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WEEKEND
Saturday, November 1, 2014
129th Year, No. 140
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
$1.50
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.DestinationSheridan.com
CHECK OUT THE NEW EDITION OF
DESTINATION SHERIDAN
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Balow, Ceballos competitive in race for superintendent office
CHEYENNE (AP) — Wyoming voters will be choosing a
new state schools chief Tuesday following years of tumult
in the K-12 public education system under Superintendent
Cindy Hill.
Republican Jillian Balow and Democrat Mike Ceballos
each say they have the right background and leadership
skills to stabilize the department and lead Wyoming’s educational system forward.
“We need to heal a pretty broken system and a broken
Department of Education, and we need to move education
forward,” Balow said.
“What we’re just lacking is that ability to step in and
really lead and help people understand and get them
involved,” Ceballos said.
It’s the most competitive of five statewide positions up
for election this year. The others are governor, secretary of
state, auditor and treasurer.
Hill’s tenure featured a bitter fight with the Republicandominated Legislature and GOP Gov. Matt Mead over her
administration of the Department of Education. The
Legislature and Mead enacted a law in 2013 removing Hill
from the agency, but the law was overturned by a divided
state Supreme Court as unconstitutional.
Hill then challenged Mead for governor, but she finished
a distant third in the primary.
Balow is a former teacher who now works as an administrator with the Department of Family Services.
“So I certainly have that experience and depth of understanding of both education, leadership and government,”
she said.
SEE SUPERINTENDENT, PAGE 2
Longtime business planning move
Webster,
Garber top
local campaign
fundraising
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Campaign contributions for the filing period
between the primary election
and the general election were
generally small and varied for
candidates in local races, with
several reporting no funds
raised.
Incumbent City Councilman
Robert Webster reported the
largest amount of campaign
finances raised in any local race
with a total of $744.24. Sheridan
County School District 1 school
board candidate Carol Garber
reported the next highest
amount at $610.44.
The filing period covered Aug.
19-Oct. 21, with reports from several candidates ranging a few
days on either side of the official
reporting dates. All election candidates are required to file campaign finance reports.
School and college districts
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Farmers Co-op manager Jim Wolfe stands outside the business currently located on the corner of Brundage and Scott streets in downtown Sheridan. The coop has purchased properties on Coffeen Avenue with plans to move and expand next summer.
Farmers Co-op
purchases property on
Coffeen Avenue
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — It’s been on the corner of
Scott Street and Brundage Street for nearly
Spacecraft for
tourists explodes
on test flight
60 years — a place to buy propane, gasoline
or cattle feed, to outfit for horseback hunting
trips, or to reference as a landmark when
giving directions to newcomers in town.
But next summer, the Farmer’s Co-op
building will stand empty.
With room becoming an issue, the co-op’s
board agreed that it was time to move. They
purchased property on Coffeen Avenue and
are preparing for new facilties that will be
able to accommodate growing demands for
the co-op’s supplies.
In his office, co-op manager Jim Wolfe
rolled out the blueprints for the new
MOJAVE, Calif. (AP) — A winged spaceship
designed to take tourists on excursions beyond
Earth’s atmosphere exploded during a test
flight Friday over the Mojave Desert, killing a
pilot in the second fiery setback for commercial
space travel in less than a week.
Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo blew apart
after being released from a carrier aircraft at
high altitude, according to Ken Brown, a photographer who witnessed the explosion.
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
Farmer’s Co-op. The cover drawing shows a
Western farm-style building that reflects the
nature of the co-op’s business.
“My architect says it will be done in July,”
Wolfe said. “But July is a busy month in
Sheridan.”
July can be a busy month for any town that
has a thriving tourism industry, but in
Sheridan, July means the Sheridan WYO
Rodeo, and for a company that caters to
farms and ranches, that means a lot of work
with little extra time.
SEE CO-OP, PAGE 2
One pilot was found dead inside the spacecraft and another parachuted out and was
flown by helicopter to a hospital, Kern County
Sheriff Donny Youngblood said.
The crash area was about 120 miles north of
downtown Los Angeles and 20 miles from the
Mojave Air and Space Port, where the flight
originated.
The race with the greatest
amount of collective campaign
funds raised was SCSD1, with a
total of $1,335.94 reported
between four candidates. Garber
reported the most at $610.44 in
personal funds, used primarily
for signs and advertising. Mary
Schilling was next at $379.48 in
personal funds, followed by
Penny Mentock-Barkan at
$346.02. Candidate Jeff Jones
reported no campaign finances
for the filing period.
Candidates running for the
SCSD2 board of trustees raised a
collective total of $662.50. Susan
Wilson reported the highest contributions at $381 primarily from
personal funds. Ami Erickson
reported $254.40, and Ann
Perkins pitched in $26.50 to her
own campaign. Erica O’Dell and
Marva Craft both reported no
campaign finances for the filing
period.
SCSD3 board candidate
Barbara Carlock reported no
campaign funds for her uncontested race.
All five candidates for the
Northern Wyoming Community
College District board of
trustees reported no in campaign funds raised for the filing
period.
SEE FLIGHT, PAGE 3
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
David Rojo
of Sheridan
SEE FUNDS, PAGE 2
OPINION
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
SPORTS
4
6
9
B1
CLASSIFIEDS
B5
HOME & GARDEN C1
SENIORS
C2
YOUTH
C3
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
CO-OP: Coffeen properties belonged to Ernsts, have been empty for several years
houses work gloves. It’s almost as if the coop has stepped back in time, and that step
While the co-op is open to any customers, was good for business.
it is owned by members who benefit from
But the demand is such that the co-op
its success. The business itself was estabcould do more with more room.
lished in 1943, but the building at 117 Scott
After some discussion, the members
St. was built in 1957. In addition to propane, voted to move. The co-op purchased properbulk fuels, work equipment and animal
ty at 1424 and 1450 Coffeen Ave.
feeds, it also featured a full-service gas staThe properties had belonged to Robert
tion and garage.
and Linda Ernst in the care of Triangle,
“As the times changed, the cars changed
Inc., since 1977 and then Robert and Linda
and we weren’t getting as many people in
Ernst since 1990, but both properties have
here for work on their cars,” Wolfe said.
been empty for several years. There is only
“Cars are becoming more sophisticated.
an old restaurant and rental center surPeople started buying tires somewhere else. rounded by fencing identifying it as the
We had to adapt with the times.”
new home of the Sheridan Farmer’s Co-op.
For the co-op, “adapting to the times” just But the blueprints in Wolfe’s office show
meant a step in a different direction. That
something more vibrant.
direction, in many other states, might look
“We’re going to tear down the restaulike it’s going backward.
rant,” Wolfe said. “We’re going to have a
The garage bays now hold bags of feed
convenience store with the gas pumps, and
for ranch animals and fertilizers for fields.
we’re going to utilize the old rental buildRefrigerated cases keep veterinary supings.”
plies. A pegged display inside the store
The new facilties will offer more room
than the corner of Scott
Street and Brundage Street
allows, with room for all of
the feed, the fertilizer, the
fencing and the fuel. There
will be more room for parkFROM 1
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Farmer’s Co-op purchased this former rental center and LBM restaurant with plans to relocate.
ing and loading and room for trailers.
After the move next summer, Wolfe said
the Scott Street building will probably be
sold.
It will then be at the mercy of new owner
who can either tear it down or let it stay on
the corner of Scott Street for another 60
years.
SUPERINTENDENT: Election to be decided Tuesday
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Press
“That’s a skill set we haven’t had in
a state superintendent, and that’s a
skill set that’s needed in a state superintendent.”
Ceballos is a former president of
Qwest Wyoming who has been
involved in developing education policy in recent years.
“I really think just the amount of
experience that I’ve had both with
educational policy the last 18 years,
that I’ve been actively involved with
governors asking me to get involved
and represent business and education
... that certainly is one of the critical
pieces of work that a superintendent
144 Grinnell
672-2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
for our children,” she said.
Ceballos has supported the Common
Core standards adopted by the State
Board of Education, saying they are
much better than the state’s previous
standards.
Balow has expressed concern about
national standards being forced on
Wyoming, but she says Common Core
should not be repealed without any
new state standards being adopted
through a public process.
Outside the governor and superintendent races, Republican businessman Ed Murray faces two minor party
candidates for secretary of state,
while state Treasurer Mark Gordon
and state Auditor Cynthia Cloud face
no opposition in their re-election bids.
FUNDS: Patton only legislator to not report PAC funding
FROM 1
T H E SH E RIDA N
does,” he said.
Both pledge to work closely with
local school districts and communities
on issues such as statewide student
performance standards.
Ceballos said he has visited all 48
school districts in the state and will
work closely with them to move students from “good to great.”
Balow said she knows the importance of working with districts and
communities through her experience
as a teacher in both small and big
school districts and a previous administrative position with the Education
Department.
“Philosophically I really believe that
families and communities need to be
making the most important decisions
City Council races
The two races for
Sheridan City Council were
the next highest in collective campaign funds raised.
Four candidates vying for
three open four-year seats
on the Council raised a collective total of $1,095.51.
Jesus Rios received $575 in
individual contributions,
Kelly Gooch reported
$420.51 in personal or immediate family contributions
and Darryl Szymanski
reported $100 in personal or
immediate family funds
donated. Alex Lee reported
no funds raised.
The two candidates competing for one open two-year
seat on Council — Webster
and challenger Thayer
Shafer — reported a collective total of $864.24.
Webster’s $744.24 was split
between a $50 individual
contribution and $694.24 in
personal funds. Shafer contributed $170 in personal
funds to his own campaign.
Town and county races
Jeremy Smith was the
only candidate for Dayton
Town Council to report any
campaign contributions. He
reported $127.20 in personal
funds. Candidates Craig
Reichert, Clifford Reed and
Eric Lofgren all reported
none. There are two open
seats on Dayton Town
Council.
Both candidates for
Dayton mayor — Norm
Anderson and Robert Alley
— reported no funds raised.
Two candidates who
accepted write-in bids for
one open two-year seat on
Ranchester Town Council
reported a collective total of
$125.94, with Jesse
Hinkhouse reporting per-
rent filing period for the
Mark Jennings for House
District 30 Committee.
Jennings’ committee
received $2,920 in individual
contributions, $750 from the
Sheridan Republican Party
Central Committee, $100
from the state Trucking
Industry PAC and $200 in
anonymous contributions.
Jennings also reported $550
worth of in-kind contributions, for a grand total of
$4,540.
Unopposed incumbent
State Legislature
Rep. Rosie Berger, R-Big
Horn, reported a carry-over
At the state level, camof $4,014.06 from the pripaign finance amounts were mary filing period and an
higher. Uncontested candiadditional $2,200 received in
dates for the Wyoming
this filing period. Individual
Legislature reported the
contributions were $100,
greatest amount of camout-of-state PACs gave $900
paign contributions, most of and Wyoming PACs gave
which came from political
$1,200. PAC contributions
action committees.
included CenturyLink, Inc.,
Rep. John Patton, REmployees PAC, the
Sheridan, reported a carryWyoming Stock Growers’ Ag
over from the last campaign PAC and the Wyoming
finance report of $448.26
Realtors PAC.
and an additional $1,000 in
Rep. Mike Madden, Rpersonal contributions for
Buffalo, is also running
this filing period. Patton is
unopposed. He reported
running for the House
$4,532.67 in carry-over funds
District 29 seat against
and $1,825 in funds this filwrite-in opponent Darryl
ing period, with $1,800 of
Szymanski, who is also on
those funds coming from
the ballot for a seat on
PACs and $25 from an indiSheridan City Council.
vidual. A few PAC contribuWrite-in candidates are
tors included the
not required to file camExxonMobile PAC and the
paign finance reports.
Union Pacific Corporation
Patton is the only incumFund for Effective
bent candidate who has not
Government.
accepted contributions from
Unopposed Senate incumstate or federal PACs.
bent Sen. Bruce Burns, RCandidate Mark Jennings, Sheridan, reported $450 in
who is running against
carry-over and $1,100 in new
write-in candidate Val
contributions, all from PACs
Burgess for House District
including the Trucking
30, reported a carry-over of
Industry PAC, the Wyoming
$405.37 and monetary contri- Stock Growers PAC and the
butions of $3,990 for the cur- Wyoming Realtors PAC.
sonal/family contributions
of $100.99 and Gayle Ogle
reporting $25 in personal
funds contributed.
All but one candidate for
county races including
county commissioners,
county treasurer, county
clerk and more reported no
campaign finances for the
filing period. Commissioner
Bob Rolston reported $92.22
in personal funds and $200
in individual donations.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
FLIGHT: Accident occurs just as it seems commercial space flight could be reality
who put $26 million into SpaceShipOne,
Branson envisioned operating flights by
British billionaire Richard Branson,
2007. In interviews last month, he talked
founder of Virgin Galactic, has been the
about the first flight being next spring with
front-runner in the fledgling race to give
his son.
large numbers of paying civilians a subor“It’s a real setback to the idea that lots of
bital ride that would let them experience
people are going to be taking joyrides into
weightlessness and see the Earth from the
the fringes of outer space any time soon,”
edge of space. Branson was expected to
said John Logsdon, retired space policy
arrive in Mojave on Saturday, as were
director at George Washington University.
investigators with the National
“There were a lot of people who believed
Transportation Safety Board.
that the technology to carry people is safely
“Space is hard, and today was a tough
at hand.”
day,” Virgin Galactic CEO President George
Friday’s flight marked the 55th for
Whitesides said. “The future rests in many SpaceShipTwo, which was intended to be
ways on hard, hard days like this.”
the first of a fleet of craft. This was only
The accident occurred just as it seemed
the fourth flight to include a brief rocket
commercial space flights were near, after a firing. During other flights, the craft either
period of development that lasted far
was not released from its mothership or
longer than hundreds of prospective pasfunctioned as a glider after release.
sengers had expected.
At 60 feet long, SpaceShipTwo featured
When Virgin Group licensed the technolo- two large windows for each of up to six
gy from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen,
passengers, one on the side and one overFROM 1
head.
The accident’s cause was not immediately known, nor was the altitude at which the
explosion occurred. The first rocket-powered test flight peaked at about 10 miles
above Earth. Commercial flights would go
62 miles or higher.
One difference on this flight was the type
of fuel.
In May, Virgin Galactic announced that
SpaceShipTwo would switch to a polymidebased fuel — a type of thermoplastic. It had
been fueled with a type of rubber called
HTPB.
Scaled Composites, the company building
the spaceship for Virgin Galactic, had
extensively tested the new fuel formulation
on the ground, President Kevin Mickey
said. He characterized the new fuel as “a
small nuance to the design.”
Now online...
www.DestinationSheridan.co m
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
307-672-2431
144 Grinnell Ave.
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Periodicals Postage Paid in
Sheridan, Wyoming.
Publication #0493-920
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Clowning around
Easter Seals employee Wendy Bruso, left, and Sam Steinfeld strike a pose during the Halloween Unity Bash
put on by Rehabilitation Enterprises of Northeast Wyoming, Eagle Ridge and Easter Seals. The adult service
organizations in Sheridan hold social events for their clients with developmental disabilities and head
injuries on a monthly basis.
Holy Name to host Remembrance
Mass for All Saints’ Day
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — In the Western secular
world, Halloween — a time for costumes
and candy — is over, but in much of the
religious world All Hallows’ Eve, or
Hallowe’en for short, is just the beginning
of the celebration.
Today is the Solemnity of All Saints or
All Saints’ Day, a holy day of obligation
and a day of feast recognized by the
Catholic Church and parts of Western
Christianity on Nov. 1 celebrating all
saints, known and unknown.
In England, saints and holy people are
called "hallowed" and the evening (e’en for
short) before All Saints Day used to serve
as a day of fast before the feast, though this
observance is no longer required.
In the Roman Catholic Church, Nov. 2 is
All Souls' Day, which specifically commemorates the departed who have not yet been
purified and reached heaven.
Catholics celebrate All Saints' Day and
All Souls' Day in the belief that there is a
spiritual communion between those who
have died and are either being purified in
purgatory or are in heaven and the living.
Other Christian traditions remember the
saints in different ways.
According to Trinity Communications, a
nonprofit organization that operates
CatholicCulture.org, the exact origins of
this celebration are uncertain, although,
after the legalization of Christianity in
A.D. 313, a common commemoration of the
saints, especially the martyrs, appeared in
various areas throughout the church.
The designation of Nov. 1 as the feast of
All Saints occurred over time.
According to some accounts, Pope
Gregory III (731-741) dedicated an oratory
in the original St. Peter's Basilica in honor
of all the saints on Nov. 1, but according to
early Church historian, John Beleth, it was
Pope Gregory IV (827-844) who officially
declared Nov. 1 the feast of All Saints.
Some may question how a religious celebration of saints could have ties to a holiday often linked with paganism,
Halloween.
In Celtic tradition, Oct. 31 was a time of
pagan sacrifice when Samhain, the Celtic
lord of death, allowed the soils of the dead
to return to earth to harm the people who
had wronged them in life.
To protect themselves from the spirits,
the Druids burned sacrifices in a large bonfire while wearing animal heads and skins.
Other groups of origin throughout time
and history have developed their own lore
with the celebration.
With the spread of Christianity and the
establishment of All Saints Day, some of
these pagan customs remained in the
English-speaking world for All Hallows
Eve, forming Halloween as we know it
today.
However, Trinity Communications states
that both the feast of All Saints and the
feast of All Souls evolved in the life of the
church independently of paganism and
Halloween, linked by Oct. 31 being recognized as the last day of summer.
All Saints’ Day, they say, was deemed necessary and appropriate after a time when
the number of martyrs became too numerous too fast for a day in honor of each one.
During the persecution of Emperor
Diocletion (284-305) many martyrs died in
groups and a common feast day for all
saints and martyrs was attested to in sermons as early as 373.
Today, many churches celebrate the day
not just by honoring all saints and martyrs,
but also remembering loved one who have
passed and praying for the direction of
their own souls.
Locally, Holy Name Catholic Church celebrates All Saints’ Day with a Remembrance
Mass intended to also honor recently
deceased parishioners and relatives.
All members of the community are invited to attend at 11 a.m. today at 260 E.
Loucks St.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to The Sheridan Press,
P.O. Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
County
Mail
$16.25
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$88.50
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Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Celebrating
each other’s
quirks
I
n my entire life, I’ve only
spent about six months living by myself. Growing
up, I had my mother,
father, brother and dog.
In college, I always had a
roommate — some good,
some bad.
After college, I moved to
Sheridan and found a roommate so that I could afford
rent. I got lucky; she was a
Sheridan native so I got to
meet a lot of people and be
involved right from the start.
Her and I had different
styles. I’m kind of a neat
freak, she’s more of a free
spirit. We both had dogs,
though, who liked to get into
trouble from time to time.
They once chewed up an
entire
couch, an
iPod and a
door frame.
But, we
both
cleaned up
their messes.
Then I
EDITOR’S
moved in
COLUMN
with the
|
man who is
now my
Kristen Czaban
husband.
Shortly after we moved in
together, he left to spend six
months in Antarctica. (I
know what you’re thinking,
but no, I’m not that awful of
a roommate).
During those six months,
the house was virtually spotless. I cleaned every weekend, always put clothes and
dishes away. Clutter like
mail and various papers
were also kept to a minimum. Clutter and messes
tend to stress me out.
Then he got back from his
time on the ice. Never having lived with a guy before,
it took some getting used to.
Dirty boots, ash-ridden
clothes and towels — my
neat-freak alarm sometimes
sounded on high alert.
Married now for two years
(as of Monday), we’ve settled
into our routines.
For example, he’ll wash
every dish in the house, but
he never puts them away. So
each day at lunch, I unpack
our dish rack and stuff
plates, cups and silverware
back into their proper
places.
Laundry, though, is sometimes a struggle. Neither one
of us minds starting it, but
we’re not a big fan of folding
it or putting it away.
Living with people can be
interesting — no matter if
you’re married or just
friends sharing a crash pad.
The quirks of any given
person only come out when
you see them in their various forms of dress, readiness for the world and cleanliness. Nobody is perfect, but
those quirks are what makes
us who we are. Just like
Robin Williams (one of my
favorite actors) once said,
“People call these things
imperfections, but there not.
Ah, that's the good stuff.”
Here’s to many more years
of “the good stuff.”
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
SHERIDAN PRESS EDITORIAL |
Exercise your right, judgement Tuesday at the polls
I
seeking your support. The Chamber of
Commerce and ACT have worked to provide
video re-broadcasts of the candidate forums
held in October at Sheridan College.
Read the coverage, watch the videos, visit
the candidates’ websites or call them on the
phone. Get to know them. Vote.
Absentee voting has been open for a few
weeks, but Election Day polls will open at 7
a.m. and close at 7 p.m. No matter your work
or home-life schedule, take 10 minutes to
make your voice heard.
Too often, our airwaves and our daily con-
t seems, these days, election season never
really ends. Candidates announce plans to
run for office sooner, news reporting overflows with political debates and voters tend
to ignore a large part of it. Please don’t.
This Tuesday, if you haven’t done it
already, vote. Many, many people have died
to protect and uphold the freedoms we enjoy
in the U.S. One such privilege is our ability
to choose who leads us, don’t squander it.
Take the time to do your research. The
Sheridan Press has put together articles
highlighting the views of those candidates
versations are full of people who gripe about
where we are as a country and the politicians, they say, got us there. But, many of
those same individuals fail to vote.
“Nobody worth voting for,” they say.
Others vote for whoever is already there,
without much thought or consideration for
the alternative.
Apathy for the political process helps no
one.
There are few actions more patriotic than
submitting your completed ballot at the
polls.
QUOTABLE |
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“We’re not trying to push
any limits here. We’re
members of this community, too, and we want to
make people comfortable.”
— Ted Wilbur,
boyfriend of nurse Kaci
Hickox, who defied a quarantine order by the state of
Maine despite testing negative for the Ebola virus.
“He was on message. The
truck has technology and
stuff. We will use that term
and stuff.”
— Michael Albano,
spokesman for General
Motors, after zone manager Rikk Wilde bungled his
postgame presentation to
World Series MVP
Madison Bumgarner.
I
A referendum on competence
s this election really about nothing?
Democrats might like to think so, but it's
not. First, like all U.S. elections, it's about
the economy. The effect of the weakest
recovery in two generations is reflected in
President Obama's 13-point underwater ratings for his handling of the economy.
Moreover, here is a president who proclaims the reduction of
inequality to be the
great cause of his
administration. Yet it
has radically worsened
in his six years. The 1
percent are doing splendidly in the Fed-fueled
stock market, even as
median income has fallCHARLES
en.
KRAUTHAMMER
Second is the question
|
of competence. The list
of disasters is long,
highlighted by the
Obamacare rollout, the Veterans Affairs
scandal and the pratfalls of the once-lionized Secret Service. Beyond mere incompetence is government intrusiveness and corruption, as in the overreach of national
security surveillance and IRS targeting of
politically disfavored advocacy groups.
Ebola has crystallized the collapse of trust
in state authorities. The overstated assurances, the ever-changing protocols, the startling contradictions — the Army quarantines soldiers returning from West Africa
while the White House denounces governors
who did precisely the same with returning
health care workers — have undermined
government in general, this government in
particular.
Obama's clumsy attempt to restore confidence by appointing an Ebola czar has
turned farcical. When the next crisis broke
—a doctor home from West Africa develops
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
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Ebola after having traversed significant
parts of New York City between his return
and his infection — the czar essentially disappeared. Perhaps he is practicing self-quarantine.
But there's a third factor contributing to
the nation's deepening anxiety — a sense of
helplessness and confusion abroad as, in the
delicate phrase of our secretary of defense,
"the world is exploding all over."
Most voters don't care about the details of
Ukraine, the factions in Libya or the precise
battle lines of the Islamic State. But they do
have a palpable sense of American weakness.
This was brought home most profoundly
by the videotaped beheadings of James
Foley and Steven Sotloff. It wasn't just the
savagery that affected so many Americans
but the contempt shown by these savages for
America — its power, its resolve. Here is a
JV team (Obama's erstwhile phrase) defying
the world's great superpower, daring it to
engage, confident that America will fail or
flee.
Obama got a ratings bump when he finally
bestirred himself to order airstrikes and
vowed to "degrade and ultimately destroy"
the Islamic State. Yet almost two months
later, there is a realization that the disorganized, halfhearted, ad hoc U.S. reaction has
made little difference. The vaunted 60-country coalition is nowhere to be seen. The barbarians are even closer to the gate.
Moreover, U.S. flailing is not just demoralizing at home. It is energizing the very worst
people abroad. Being perceived as what
Osama bin Laden called the "strong horse"
is, for a messianic movement on the march,
the ultimate recruiting tool.
Will this affect the election? While there is
widespread dissatisfaction with the administration's handling of the Islamic State, in
most races it has not risen to the level of
major campaign issue. Its principal effect is
to reinforce an underlying, pre-existing
sense of drift and disarray.
The anemic economy, the revulsion with
governmental incompetence and the sense of
national decline are, taken together, exacting a heavy toll on Democratic candidates.
After all, they represent not just the party
now in government but the party of government.
This portends a bad night for Democrats
on Tuesday. State-by-state polls show continued Democratic control of the Senate to be
highly tenuous.
With one caveat. Democrats could make it
up with the so-called ground game (i.e., getting out the vote on Election Day) that polls
do not measure. Just a fraction of the
unprecedented success the Democrats
enjoyed in 2012 in identifying and turning
out their voters (especially young, female
and minority) could shift the results by one
or two points. That, in turn, could tilt several of the knife-edge, margin-of-error Senate
races in their favor and transform what
would otherwise be a Republican sweep into
something of a stalemate.
This could happen. More likely, however,
is that the ground-game differential is
minor, in which case the current disenchantment — with disorder and diminishment —
simply overwhelms the governing
Democrats.
The stage is set for a major Republican victory. If they cannot pull it off under conditions so politically favorable, perhaps they
might consider looking for another line of
work.
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning
syndicated columnist, political commentator, and physician. He is a
contributing editor to the Weekly Standard, a weekly panelist on the PBS news
program Inside Washington, and a nightly panelist on Fox News
IN WASHINGTON |
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Write: Letters to the Editor
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Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
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Fax: 202-224-1724
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COMMUNITY
VOICES
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVES |
LETTER |
A lesson in vocabulary for the optimistic
Y
A5
ou know how I do love Martha Beck, Life
Coach Extraordinaire. She sent out this
great blog post a few weeks ago that really
spoke to me.
In it, she described the term, pronoia. As the
opposite of paranoia, she defines it as believing that people and circumstances are secretly
conspiring to help and benefit you. I’ve looked it up in
the dictionary and turns out
Martha made pronoia up.
Who cares? I make up words
all the time to suit my needs
and use words in bizarre contexts.
Example of my made up
words: stuade. Pronounced
AMY
stwade. It can mean whatever
ALBRECHT
you want but I generally use
|
it like this, “You are totally
going against the stuade.”
Isn’t that a super fun word?
Or I’ll replace the interrogative, “seriously?”
with “cereal?” My friends say they frequently
have to consult the Amy Dictionary to translate. You can become fluent pretty quickly
though.
Ok, so back to pronoia. If you’ve spent any
time reading this column, you know that I am
a relentless optimist so suffering from (or reveling in) pronoia is pretty easy for me. It’s
those whose usual attitude is that the world
hates them who make for the best viewing
when succumbing to pronoia. Instead of heading down the spiral of negativity and gloom,
those who have a case of pronoia (even early
onset) will take a deep breath, reframe and say
out loud, “This isn’t that bad. It could be so
much worse. I am going to consider this a
growth experience.” You can’t help but do a
double take.
Associating with Pronoids (I’m thinking of
having satin jackets made for members) is
mood-altering. They don’t allow you to wallowor whine (at least not for long). They find
the bright side. Pronoids cheerlead and
Taxes and pennies;
it’s all relative
encourage. It’s why this condition is so contagious — when you’re being relentlessly
attacked by positivity, it wears down your negative defenses, causes spontaneous snickering
and results in rueful smiles.
Don’t think you could ever be a candidate for
a pronoia transplant? Think again. It’s all
about quarantining yourself with those who
share the malady you seek. Instead of being a
prepper for something that’s going to drive you
to an underground bunker of fear, be a prepper for pronoia. Load in large supplies of
jokes, fun, inspiration, hilarity and nuttiness.
Spend extra for the high quality laughter. It’s
worth it. Extend the invite to those who will
bring their own super size boxes and bags of
silly. Spread this epidemic. Because what if —
gasp! — they’re right? What if the universe
and its inhabitants really are conspiring to
make you happy? Best you be ready for it.
AMY ALBRECHT is the executive director of the Center for a Vital Community.
Re: $100 gees goes a long
way
For the fifth penny,
Optional One-Cent Sales
tax, to cost me a $1,000 per
year, I believe I would
have to spend $100,000 on
taxable items.
If I had $100,000 a year
to spend on those taxable
items, I would be more
than happy to spend
$1,000 of it on taxes!
Also, as it has been
pointed out many times,
all of the fifth penny
comes back to Sheridan
County, unlike the first
four pennies.
Dennis Wagner
Dayton
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after coin toss
6. How do you teach home-schoolers PE?
7. 2 Sheridan County athletes earn All-State
honors
8. Letter: Fluoridation decision in Nov. 4 election
9. Woodland Park student to perform in
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10. Wight bound over to district court
msnbc.com
1. Don’t judge the jury
2. The right’s misleading voter mailers
3. One dad in Virgin Galactic crash
4. The 7 biggest gaffes of 2014
5. A very White House Halloween
6. Dramatic manhunt ends in court
7. The scariest campaign headlines
8. What election? Obama talks policy
9. Seal Team 6 member under investigation
10. Celeb slams ‘sexist’ Instagram policies
QUOTABLE |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON (AP) — A collection of
quotes and remembrances of longtime
Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee from
those who knew him from the Watergate
era and beyond:
“To be honest, I was frightened. Bob and I
M
were 28 and 29 years old. Raw threats from
the former attorney general, the official
closest to Nixon, was not normal in the
course of business as we knew it. ... Ben
didn’t miss a beat. He was not just cool, but
‘hey this is a great story, get it in the paper
fast.’
— Former Washington Post journalist
Carl Bernstein remembering Bradlee’s
leadership of the newspaper’s Watergate
coverage.
“He was a journalistic warrior,
unequaled and probably never to be
matched. He had the courage of an army, a
lion in all seasons. He wanted his newspaper to be like the Navy destroyer he served
on in World War II. ... Not chronologically
but psychologically, Ben’s passing is in
some respects and in some very clear ways
marks the end of the 20th century. He is
gone, and for that we are diminished, and
the world is smaller. I will never forget the
leadership and the smile of this man we
loved so much.”
— Bob Woodward, now an associate editor at The Washington Post.
Fortify yourself for Tuesday’s election returns
ix a pitcher of martinis Tuesday evening to fortify
yourself against the torrent of election returns
painting a pointillist portrait of the nation's mind.
Before you become too mellow to care, consider some
indexes of our civic tendencies.
Voting began, and "persuasion campaigning" receded,
weeks ago. Mobilization measures became more important
than ads. Saturation spending on ads
makes for a steep decline in the utility of
the last dollars spent on them. In the
2012 presidential race, $46 million was
spent on 56,837 ads in Las Vegas; $30 million was spent on 39,259 in Columbus,
Ohio. Ads become audible wallpaper,
there but not really noticed.
Future campaign money may increasingly be spent on the expensive, because
GEORGE
labor-intensive, business of identifying
WILL
and prodding to the polls likely supporters. Tammany Hall did this 150 years
|
ago, although its infantry did not carry
smartphones with apps sending data
about voters to the campaigns.
In midterm elections, turnout usually is "frail and pale,"
meaning older and whiter than in presidential elections,
when three Democratic-leaning constituencies — minorities, young people and unmarried women — are more apt
to vote. If Democratic candidates run ahead of their endof-campaign polls, this will indicate that their party
retains its mobilization advantage.
If Republicans narrowly win Senate control, their joy
should be tempered by this fact: In 2016, they will be
defending 24 of the 34 seats at issue. These will include
three in states that are among the 18 that have voted
Democratic in at least six consecutive presidential elections. These Republican seats are Pat Toomey's in
Pennsylvania, Ron Johnson's in Wisconsin and Mark
Kirk's in Illinois.
Because Senate control is at issue, insufficient attention
has been paid to 2014's most important election, which is
in the worst-governed state. Illinois' incumbent governor
is Pat Quinn, a compliant time-server who floated up from
lieutenant governor when Rod Blagojevich became the
fourth of the previous nine governors to be imprisoned.
The state has high unemployment, low growth and more
than $100 billion in unfunded pension liabilities. If voters
ratify the state's trajectory by re-electing Quinn, he will
accelerate the downward spiral by continuing policies that
have produced it, beginning by making permanent the
"temporary" tax increases. Republicans will win if their
candidate, businessman Bruce Rauner, wins and delivers,
among other things, a campaign to term limit the state legislators who, collaborating with government employees
unions, buy job permanence using money looted from taxpayers.
Republicans also will win if Quinn wins, thereby making Illinois a scary example to the nation of the terrible
toll taken by the "blue model" of governance. Although
U.S. law allows a one-party city like Detroit to go bankrupt, there is no provision for state bankruptcies. Hence a
Quinn victory would provide, perhaps within his next
term, hair-raising excitement for Illinois' masochistic electorate as lenders recoil from America's Argentina.
Kansas' Republican governor Sam Brownback is in a
close race with a Democrat who is severely critical of
Brownback's tax cuts — but who does not say he would
repeal them. Wisconsin's Republican governor Scott
Walker is in a close race with a Democrat who is severely
critical of Walker's limitations on government workers
unions — but who does not say she would completely
repeal them. Tuesday will tell if these unheroic straddles
succeed.
We govern through parties and this autumn President
Obama's has repudiated him. Tuesday will supply evidence of not only how little pulse Obama's presidency still
has, but how much damage he has done to his party.
Before he led it to its 2010 debacle, it controlled 62 state legislative chambers to the Republicans' 36. Entering Tuesday
Republicans led Democrats, 59-39. (Subtract two chambers
because Nebraska's Legislature is unicameral and nonpartisan.) Can Democrats stop the hemorrhaging?
Earnest improvers, eager to tightly wrap the regulatory
state's tentacles around the democratic process, say the
Republic is ruined because about $1 billion has been spent
on ads in the 2014 cycle electing governors, senators and
representatives. Considering the enormous consequences
the political class has as it sloshes trillions of dollars hither and yon, it is strange that in selecting the 2015 members
of this class Americans spent less than half the $2.2 billion they spent last month on Halloween candy.
In this autumn of antic rhetoric, Hillary Clinton
achieved almost sublime silliness: "Don't let anybody tell
you ... it's corporations and businesses that create jobs."
Her subsequent clarification was that this "short-handed"
her economic thinking. We are going to need a lot more
gin and vermouth.
GEORGE F. WILL is a Pulitzer-prize winning newspaper columnist, author and television commentator
for The Washington Post Writers Group. He has authored books on baseball, politics, and American
culture.
A6
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
PAGE SIX
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
HEALTH WATCH |
TODAY IN HISTORY |
From fin
to fork
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A shopping guide
for sheridan fish
F
ish is an excellent health choice for
many reasons. It is 20-40 percent
lower in calories than most beef
and pork cuts, averages just as
much protein, and is the best healthy
animal source of conditionally essential
fats docosohexaenoic acid (DHA) and
eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). These fats
are commonly called omega-3 fats.
Omega-3 is a very difficult nutrient
to get in the typical Sheridan diet. In
fact, for the past five years teaching
nutrition at Sheridan College and
reviewing over 240 student intakes of
this nutrient, I saw very few diets that
actually met the recommendations without supplements.
The adult USDA suggested average daily
intake of omega-3 is
1.6 grams for males
and 1.1 grams a day
for females. This is
roughly the amount
GEORGIA
in 3 ounces of wild
BOLEY
Alaskan salmon (3
ounces is the size of a
|
deck of cards), or 6
ounces of wild
caught rainbow trout. Though the
standard recommendations are to have
4 ounces of fish two times a week, you
can see that this only puts a dent in
meeting your average daily needs.
Many people reach for supplements to
assure this nutrient is met. By increasing certain plant foods, you can also
greatly increase your average omega-3
intake.
Considering we are land-locked, our
grocery stores are full of an amazing
fresh, frozen and canned fish selection. All these choices can be difficult
to navigate, especially when following
all the cautionary ‘fish tails’ like mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls
(PCB) contaminate exposure, and the
need to support sustainable fishing
practices.
To help Sheridanites put the best
fish on their plate, I made a top five
fish list. The choices are based on
omega-3 content, contamination ratings, sustainable fishing practices and
affordability. Resources used include
the USDA nutrient database,
Environmental Working Group (EWG),
The Monterey Bay Aquarium's
Seafood Watch app, Wyoming Game
and Fish and Sheridan grocery store
prices.
Top five fish list
1. Anything locally caught, (except
bottom feeders like carp and Walleye
out of Big Horn Reservoir greater
than 15 inches) especially rainbow
trout: This is the freshest choice and
requires the bonus of outdoor exercise
to get it. Price: I like to think of the
$24 a year fishing license and tackle as
an investment.
2. Pacific sardines packed in water
or olive oil: For some great sardine
recipes, check out www.chow.com.
Price: 0.80 cents for 3 ounces.
3. U.S. rainbow trout (farmed): EWG
rated farmed rainbow trout as a ‘Best
Choice’ because it typically has higher
omega-3 content than wild caught and
has a low contaminate rating.
Monterey Bay’s Health Watch rates it
as a ‘Best Choice’ because it’s farmed
in an ecologically sustainable way.
Price: $1.12 for 3 ounces.
4. Canned wild Alaska salmon:
Though fresh frozen is also just as
great, it is not as affordable. Both are
rated ‘Best Choice’ by EWG and Health
Watch. Price: $1.50 for 3 ounces
canned, $1.69 for 3 ounces fresh frozen.
5. Farmed mussels (not trawled) –
EWG and Health Watch both consider
farmed mussels a ‘Best Choice.’ Price:
$0.75 cents for 3 ounces (weight
includes shell).
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan Press Halloween costume contest
Members of The Sheridan Press staff dressed in costumes Friday for Halloween and enjoyed nine homecooked soups in a staff cooking contest. Becky Martini won for best costume. Winner of the soup cooking
was Sheree Cossel (not pictured, a zombie). Those donning Halloween costumes were, from left, Stephen
Woody, (Flaming Liberal Media); Rena Appel (gypsy), Kristen Czaban (Rosie the Riveter), Lisa Marosok,
(Wenda, Waldo’s gal pal), Janea LaMeres (a Lego), Yvonne Cossel, (Cat Woman), Diannna Goodrich (mime),
Philip Ashley, (the out of town guy from corporate HR), Becky Martini (hunchback), Jon Cates (banana)
Maureen Legerski (zombie/ghoul/skeleton), Alisa Brantz (crazy cat woman), Irene Nettles (black and white
and read all over).
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Next ‘Jentel Presents’
set for Tuesday
SHERIDAN — Jentel Artist Residency
Program is pleased to present this month’s
residents in an event open to the public.
“Jentel Presents” will take place Tuesday
from 5:30 -7 p.m. at the Sagebrush
Community Art Center, on the corner of
Fifth and Broadway streets.
“Jentel Presents” is a community outreach program that features visual presentations and readings by the visual artists
and writers at the residency.
Tuesday’s presenters include New Mexico
printmaker Kristen Martincic, New York
sculptor Zachary Skinner, New York
painter Ken Buhler, Colorado poet Kathryn
T.S. Bass, Colorado mixed media artist
Ajean Ryan and Pennsylvania short-story
writer Jessamine Chan.
There is no admission charge for “Jentel
Presents” and refreshments will be available.
For more information please visit
www.jentelarts.org or call Jentel at 7372311.
Bighorn Pediatric Dentistry
offering candy buy-back
SHERIDAN — Bighorn Pediatric
Dentistry will buy back unopened, loose
candy on Monday.
Kids can bring in their leftover
Halloween candy and sell it for $1 per
pound for a maximum of 5 pounds. The
candy will then be sent to Operation
Gratitude, an organization that makes individual holiday packages for troops overseas
in war zones.
Bighorn Pediatric Dentistry is located at
531 Coffeen Ave.
For more information, call 674-5437.
SHS seeking community
members for ‘Super Choir’
SHERIDAN — Sheridan High School
Assistant Activities Director for Fine Arts
Suzie Schatz-Benson is looking for community members to participate in a “super
choir.”
According to a press release from the
school, on Jan. 18, the largest group of
singers ever assembled from Sheridan
County will perform two songs with full
orchestra as part of the Host Night Concert
for the All-State Music Conference at SHS.
Music and practice CDs or downloads
will be provided as well as a schedule of
rehearsals.
Those interested in participating should
call Schatz-Benson at 672-2495 ext. 1127 or
email her at [email protected]
Hospital to give
cash for candy
SHERIDAN — Sheridan Memorial
Hospital will give cash for candy Monday
from 3-6 p.m.
All of the candy collected will be given to
Operation Gratitude, which sends care
packages to troops stationed overseas.
The hospital will give $1 for every pound
of candy.
Those wishing to trade candy for cash
should bring their goodies to SMH’s Urgent
Care facility, entering through the emergency department doors. The Urgent Care
facility is located at 1401 W. Fifth St.
For more information, contact Cecile
Pattison at 672-1017.
SC to present concert Sunday
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan College
Music Department will present its first
band concert of the season on Sunday at 7
p.m. at the Sheridan High School auditorium.
The program, “Vibrant, Varied, and Very
Prolific,” opens with the Wind Ensemble
and concludes with the Jazz Ensemble. The
concert is free and open to the public.
“I have been so impressed with the welcome shown by the Sheridan College community and by the whole town of
Sheridan,” said Dr. Brian Casey, SC visiting
director of arts. “These talented groups of
student and community musicians are a
part of a vibrant arts network here, and
the community players have proven their
devotion to music-making through many
years. We’re happy to be able to offer this
invigorating program of great music to the
community.”
The Wind Ensemble is a full wind band
composed of community members and
Sheridan College students. For future concerts, spots are open in the trombone, clarinet and saxophone sections. Other spots
may become available.
The Jazz Ensemble is a 20-piece jazz big
band that also includes both community
members and students. Spots are open in
several sections.
For more information, contact Casey at
674-6446, ext. 3009.
Fish to avoid:
For great guides to avoiding mercury
in fish, check out:
1. wgfd.wyo.gov/web2011/fishing1001093.aspx
2. www.nrdc.org/health/effects/mercury/walletcard.pdf
Happy fishing Sheridan! May you
get the best catch of the day!
GEORGIA BOLEY is the owner of
www.TailoredNutritionLLC.com.
SUNDAY AND MONDAY EVENTS |
Sunday
• 1:30 p.m., Story Historical Society meeting, Story Woman’s Club, 28 N. Piney Road,
Story
• 7 p.m., Sheridan College band concert, Sheridan High School, 1056 Long Drive
Monday
• 5-7 p.m., Halloween candy buy-back, Bighorn Pediatric Dentistry, 531 Coffeen Ave.
• 3-6 p.m., Halloween candy buy-back, Sheridan Memorial Hospital Urgent Care, 1401 W.
Fifth St.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Nov. 1, 1950, two Puerto
Rican nationalists tried to force
their way into Blair House in
Washington, D.C. to assassinate
President Harry S. Truman. The
attempt failed, and one of the
pair was killed, along with a
White House police officer.
On this date:
In 1512, Michelangelo finished
painting the ceiling of the
Vatican’s Sistine Chapel.
In 1765, the Stamp Act went
into effect, prompting stiff resistance from American colonists.
In 1861, during the Civil War,
President Abraham Lincoln
named Maj. Gen. George B.
McClellan General-in-Chief of
the Union armies, succeeding Lt.
Gen. Winfield Scott.
In 1870, the United States
Weather Bureau made its first
meteorological observations.
In 1936, in a speech in Milan,
Italy, Benito Mussolini described
the alliance between his country
and Nazi Germany as an “axis”
running between Rome and
Berlin.
In 1944, “Harvey,” a comedy by
Mary Chase about a man and his
friend, an invisible six-foot-tall
rabbit, opened on Broadway.
In 1949, an Eastern Airlines
DC-4 collided in midair with a
Lockheed P-38 fighter plane near
Washington National Airport,
killing all 55 people aboard the
DC-4 and seriously injuring the
pilot of the P-38.
In 1952, the United States
exploded the first hydrogen
bomb, code-named “Ivy Mike,” at
Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall
Islands.
In 1968, the Motion Picture
Association of America unveiled
its new voluntary film rating system: G for general, M for mature
(later changed to GP, then PG), R
for restricted and X (later
changed to NC-17) for adults only.
In 1973, following the
“Saturday Night Massacre,”
Acting Attorney General Robert
H. Bork appointed Leon Jaworski
to be the new Watergate special
prosecutor, succeeding Archibald
Cox.
In 1979, former first lady
Mamie Eisenhower died in
Washington, D.C. at age 82.
In 1989, East Germany
reopened its border with
Czechoslovakia, prompting tens
of thousands of refugees to flee
to the West.
Ten years ago: Democratic
presidential candidate Howard
Dean stirred controversy within
his party by telling the Des
Moines Register he wanted to be
“the candidate for guys with
Confederate flags in their pickup
trucks.” (The former Vermont
governor explained that he
intended to encourage the return
of Southern voters who had
abandoned the Democrats for
decades but were disaffected with
the Republicans.)
Five years ago: Democrat
Barack Obama and Republican
John McCain plunged through
the final weekend of their
marathon race for the White
House; McCain poked fun at his
campaign’s financial shortcomings and his reputation as a political maverick in an appearance
on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.”
Machinists union members ratified a new contract with The
Boeing Co., ending an eight-week
strike.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama returned to the
campaign trail, after canceling
campaign appearances to focus
on Superstorm Sandy. Motorists
in the New York City area and in
New Jersey faced a second day of
enormous lines at gas stations;
many stations were still shut
down in the aftermath of the
storm because they didn’t have
gasoline or were without power
to run the pumps. Five days
before the election, figures were
released showing that new unemployment claims were down,
worker productivity was up, auto
sales and retail sales were rising
and consumer confidence was at
the highest level since a year
before Obama took office.
Thought for Today: “God give
me strength to face a fact though
it slay me.” — Thomas Huxley,
English biologist (1825-1895).
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
The Fall/Winter Edition
is out NOW!!
A7
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
AGENDAS |
Sheridan City Council
7 p.m. Monday
Sheridan City Hall
55 Grinnell St.
1. Weston Wineries LLC / Weston
Wineries #1
• Call to Order
• Pledge of Allegiance to the flag
• Invocation
• Roll call of members
• Approval of Consent Agenda
1. Agenda
2. Minutes of Regular Council Meeting Oct.
20, 2014
3. Claims
4. Proclamation – Prematurity Awareness
Month
5. Approval of Resolution 43-14 Authorizing
signing of JPA Loan Documents
• Approval of Ptolemy Data Systems Claims
• Communications from Junior Council
• Staff communications
• Old business
1. Remove from the table Resolution 41-14
Retail Liquor Licensing Process
2. Approval of Resolution 41-14 Retail Liquor
Licensing Process
• New business
1. Public hearing 2014 liquor license transfer
and 2015 renewal
2. Approval transfer of Retail Liquor License
SWSquared Enterprises LLC to Spencer D Willey and
Stephanie J Willey
3. Approval of Renewal Liquor Licenses:
A. Renewal of Bar and Grill Liquor Licenses:
1. Chiasson-Sheridan Inc/
Wyoming’s Rib & Chop House #1
2. Powder River Pizza Company
Inc/Powder River Pizza Company #2
3. Phoenix Restaurant Group LLC
/ Frackelton’s #3
B. Renewal of Limited Liquor Licenses:
1. Kalif Temple A.A.O.N.M.S./Kalif
Shrine Temple #1
2. Sheridan Elks Lodge #520 #2
3. American Legion Post #7 #3
4. F.O.E. #186/Fraternal Order of
Eagles #4
5. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
1560 #5
6. WYO Theater Inc/WYO Theater
#6
7. City of Sheridan/ Kendrick
Municipal Golf Course #7
8. Big Horn Mountain Eagles FOE
AERIE #4169/ Big Horn Mountain Eagles FOE #4169 #8
9. The Hidden Bridge Golf Club
LLC / The Hidden Bridge Golf Club #9
C. Renewal of a Microbrewery permit:
1. Sanford’s Grub & Pub
Inc/Sanford’s Grub, Pub & Brewery #1
2. Black Tooth Brewing Co.
LLC/Black Tooth Brewing Company #2
3. Luminous Brewhouse LLC /
Luminous Brewhouse #3
D. Renewal Winery Permit:
E. Renewal of Resort liquor licenses:
1. Cloud Peak Hospitality LLC/
Holiday Inn Sheridan #1
2. Hospitality Group, LLC/ Best
Western Sheridan Center #2
F. Renewal of Restaurant liquor licenses:
1. Pizza Hut of Sheridan, Inc/
Pizza Hut #1
2. Moyle Petroleum Company/
Country Kitchen #2
3. Golden China Restaurant, LLC/
Golden China Restaurant #3
4. Sanford’s Grub & Pub Inc/
Sanford’s Grub, Pub & Brewery #4
5. PO News & Flagstaff Cafe/PO
News & Flagstaff Cafe #5
6. Oliva’s Kitchen LLC/Oliva’s
Kitchen #6
7. New Dragon Wall Inc/ New
Dragon Wall #7
8. NWCCD- Sheridan
College/Wyoming Culinary Institute #8
9. El Tapatio Dos, LLC/ El Tapatio
Dos #10
10. Las Delicias LLC/ Las Delicias
#11
11. Robert V Murdoch III and
Severine CJ Murdoch/Cowboy Café 2 #12
G. Renewal of Retail Liquor Licenses:
1. Pony Lounge & Frontier Liquor
Inc/ Pony Grill and Bar #1
2. Rails LLC/ Rails #2
3. D & B Liquors, Inc/ Rendezvous
Liquor & Lounge #3
4. RJLK, LLC/ Coffeen Liquors #4
5. Greenland Hospitalities
LLC/Trails End #5
6. Star Liquor, LLC/ Star
Liquor/Tasting Library #6
7. Sheridan Land Co Inc/Beaver
Creek Saloon #7
8. Double Buck, Inc/ The Mint Bar
#8
9. Oles Pizza & Spaghetti House
Inc/ Oles Pizza & Spaghetti House #9
10. Cloud Peak Bowling LLC/
Cloud Peak Lanes #10
11. Young Ki Kim/ Kim’s Family
Restaurant #11
12. Spencer D Willey and
Stephanie J Willie / TBD #12
13. Rainbow Bar, Inc/ Rainbow
Bar #13
14. WJK, LLC / WiLson’s #14
15. Little Goose Liquors, LLC /
Little Goose Liquors #15
16. Estate of Scott Sutton/
Sutton’s Tavern #16
17. Noble Entertainment Group
LLC/ Noble Entertainment Group #17
18. OK Corral/City Liquor Inc /OC
Corral/ City Liquor #18
19. Sheridan Hospitality Group
LLC /Best Western Sheridan Center #19
20. T and C Liquor LLC / T & C
Liquors #20
21. GNEHM Management,
LLC/Los Agaves #22
• Comment from the Council and the public
Board of County Commissioners meeting
9 a.m. Tuesday
Second floor boardroom #220
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
• Call to order and Pledge
• Consent agenda
1. Minutes from staff meeting, Oct. 20
2. Minutes from regular session, Oct. 21
3. Minutes from staff meeting, Oct. 27
4. Sheridan County License Agreement
1426LA with Range Telephone to cross Wildcat Road, CR
84 and install a copper telecom cable, (fee waived single
family residence)
5. Sheridan County License Agreement
1427LA with Montana Dakota Utilities to cross 17th Street
(Mydland Road), CR 80 and install a gas service line, (fee
waived single family residence)
6. Sheridan County License Agreement
1428LA with Montana Dakota Utilities to cross Upper
Prairie Dog Road, CR 127 and install a primary electric
cable, (fee paid)
7. Sheridan County License Agreement
1429LA with Montana Dakota Utilities to cross Soldier
Creek Road, CR 74 and install a new electric line for residences, (fee paid)
8. Affirm 2012/13 Subaward Agreement with
Volunteers of America Northern Rockies and Sheridan
County for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention Grant from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30, 2015
9. General county vouchers for October
10. General airport vouchers for October
• Consider agenda
• Announcements
• Public comments on matters not on the agenda
• Consider Item CU-14-012: Klaahsen Cell Tower CUP
• Consider Item CU-14-013: Moore Cell Tower CUP
• Consider Receipt of Notice of Vacancy for Wild Rose
Water Improvement and Service District
• Consider Amendment 1 for the Sheridan County
Fairgrounds Water System Upgrades project
• Consider Cooperative Funding Agreement with the
City for the Sheridan Incubator Facility
• Consider Operating Agreement with the University of
Wyoming for the Sheridan Incubator Facility
• Consider rescinding lease agreement with Flying
Valley, LLC, approved Oct. 21
• Consider lease agreement with Flying Valley, LLC
• Consider amendment to lease with Cloud Peak
Aviation, LLC
• Consider contract award for Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall
Upgrades Project
SEE AGENDAS, PAGE 9
Religious talk: Salem school bars church leader
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A church
youth leader has been barred from
volunteering at a Salem public school
after a student said he was promoting
Christianity and insulted her for
being an atheist.
The principal at Straub Middle
School, Laura Perez, said that Tim
Saffeels will not be allowed back as a
volunteer for the remainder of the
school year, the Salem Statesman
Journal reported Friday.
Saffeels, director of student ministries at Salem Heights Church, said
students initiated a conversation
about religion, but he denied insulting the student who complained about
an Oct. 23 lunch conversation.
Eighth-grader Shelby Conway said
in an email that Saffeels asked students for their religious beliefs and,
when she said she is an atheist, told
her that atheism is “wrong,” ‘’bad,”
‘’stupid” and “evil.”
Perez said that violates school policy, which prohibits visitors from “promotion or inhibition of religion in
any form ...”
“I decided that I’m not going to
allow him in because to me there was
a breach of trust there,” Perez said.
Volunteers supervise students during lunch and serve as role models.
They make sure students are picking
up after themselves, Perez said.
The student said she was “very
uncomfortable and personally offended with the way he was speaking to
both me and other non-Christians
around the lunch room.”
Saffeels said he sat down at a table
with a student from the church when
students started asking about religion.
“I wasn’t in any way trying to force
any of those things,” Saffeels said.
“They actually did literally ask me
‘Who is Jesus?’ “
He denied making the comments
Conway attributed to him about atheism. Perez said she that after the current school year, she would revisit
whether to allow Saffeels back into
Straub.
Jury rules for ex-university official in lawsuit
SCRANTON, Pa. (AP) — A former state
university administrator in northeastern
Pennsylvania is not guilty of allegations
that he sexually harassed or assaulted students, a jury ruled Friday.
The verdict in the federal civil rights
trial was issued in favor of Isaac Sanders,
the former vice president of advancement
at East Stroudsburg University.
The Pocono Record said Sanders’ lawyer
reported that he was elated and considers
it the first step toward vindicating his reputation.
Sanders was not in the courtroom when
the verdict was announced.
“A lot of terrible, terrible
things have been written
about Dr. Sanders. Rumors,
gossip, whispers have been
circulated and printed, but
when the time came for
these accusers to prove
their allegations, they
failed,” said the lawyer,
Harry Coleman. “Dr.
Sanders, through the jury’s
verdict, has been vindicated, and a lot of people owe
Dr. Sanders an apology.”
Three former university
students claimed Sanders
offered them campus jobs
and paid some of their
tuition in order to groom
them for sexual advances.
They alleged he groped
them, and one said Sanders
forced the student to perform oral sex on several
occasions.
Sanders was never
charged with a crime, but
the school fired him in 2008.
The lawsuit followed a year
later.
The newspaper reported
that the three plaintiffs
were consoled after the verdict by friends outside the
courtroom. They had
alleged Sanders was a predator who targeted emotionally fragile young black
men.
ALMANAC
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
AGENDAS CONTINUED |
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A9
OBITUARIES |
Board of County Commissioners staff meeting
8:45 a.m. Monday
Second floor Commission Library
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
• Call to order
• Approval of agenda
1. Additions
2. Deletions
• Approve minutes of the Oct. 15 regular council meeting
• Approve minutes of the Oct. 28 special public hearing on
Verizon Tower in Dayton
• Reports
1. Utility clerk, building permits
2. Fire department
3. Law enforcement
4. Engineering
5. Employees
6. Planning committee
7. Council
8. Report from Tongue River Valley Joint Powers
Board on natural gas
• Approve warrants
• Announcements and correspondence
• Old business update
• Open bids on the Broadway Houses demolition project
• Act on second reading of Ordinance #389 adding commercial telecommunication tower to R2- Zoning
• Council comments and requests for future agenda items
• Citizen communiqué
• Call to order
• Voucher review
• Staff and elected reports
• Adjourn
Sheridan County School District 2
Board of Trustees
6 p.m. Monday
Central Office Board Room
201 N. Connor St.
• Call to order
1. Pledge of Allegiance
• Recognition
1. SJHS 2013-2014 seventh grade class
• Approval of agenda
• Welcome, audience comments
• Consent agenda items
1. Approval of minutes from Oct. 6
2. Approval of bills for payment
• Old business
1. Capital construction update
2. Graduation Matters Update
3. Approval of policies
• New business
1. Approval of bus donation to Sheridan
Recreation District
2. Award Surplus Bus Bid
3. Out-of-country travel request for France
4. 2014 Accountability Systems Results
5. FY15 quarterly financial update
6. Wellness Program improvements for 2014-2015
7. Elementary schools’ improvement plans
• Reports and communication
1. Board of Trustees
a. Committee reports
b. Related board reports
c. Other
2. PTO, parents, students and organizations
3. Site administration and staff
• District reports
1. Superintendent
• Executive session
1. Personnel matters
2. Legal matters
• Adjournment
Jane Wilson
January 12, 1937 October 26, 2014
Jane Wilson of Sheridan,
Wyoming passed away peacefully on Sunday October 26,
2014.
Jane was born on a sunny
day in Pomona, California on
January 12, 1937. She and
her sisters enjoyed the outdoors and grew up running
barefoot through the southern
California
orange
groves. Jane graduated from
Chaffey High School and attended the University of California
Los Angeles and Foothill College where she earned a degree in
dental hygiene. She also earned a bachelor’s degree from the
University of Wyoming.
A sunny disposition and fondness for the outdoors permeated
her life – bright, cheerful, optimistic, and always up for adventure. Jane moved “west” to Sheridan in 1970 where she began
her teaching career at Sheridan College. In 1972 Jane married
veterinarian Dr. John Wilson, Jr. and they resided for many
years south of Sheridan at the base of the Bighorn Mountains.
Over the years they cared for the land and raised a variety of
animals including Maynard the orphan cow elk.
Jane immensely enjoyed horseback riding, especially cattle
drives and trail rides with friends in the mountains. A prodigious seamstress, she meticulously produced intricate handstitched quilts, embroidery, and hand-crafted clothing. Her
culinary talents pleased palates.
Jane was a kind and generous person that fully lived life with
grace and dignity. Jane is preceded in death by her husband Dr.
John Wilson in 2011 and her sister Linda. She is survived by
her sister Betty Franks of Laguna Woods, California; her sons
and daughters-in-law, Stan and Gay Ellen Vick of Atkins, Iowa
and Greg and Kathy Vick of Billings, Montana; and grandchildren James (& Hillary) Vick, Sam Vick, and Alex Emick.
Cremation is complete and at Jane’s request there will be no
funeral or religious service. Thank you to the numerous
friends, acquaintances, and family of Jane and John for heartfelt support. Jane will be missed by many.
Jane was a gentle person that loved animals and nature. If
inclined, donations may be made in the name of Dr. John and
Jane Wilson to the Dog and Cat Shelter, 84 East Ridge Road,
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801. Phone (307) 674-7694.
Sheridan County Planning & Zoning Commission meeting
5:30 p.m. Tuesday
Second floor Commissioners’ Board Room
Sheridan County Courthouse addition
224 S. Main St.
• Call to order and Pledge
• Roll call
• Approval of agenda
• Approval of minutes from Oct. 2 meeting
• Matters from the public not on the agenda
• New business
1. Mobile home park license renewal requests
2. Item no. CU-14-015: THC Commercial Event
Center, application from THC, LLC for a conditional use permit
located on Lots 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, & 16 of Block 15, Town of Big
Horn. The applicants are proposing to host year round events,
including but not limited to meetings and wedding receptions. The property is located in the Commercial-2 Zoning
District, and has a physical address of 226 Johnston Street
(CR# 103).
• Matters from staff
1. Action taken at Board of County Commissioners
meeting concerning planning items (Reedy Vacation,
Klaahsen Cell Tower CUP,
and Moore Cell Tower CUP)
2. The January Planning and Zoning meeting will
fall on January 1st. This meeting needs to be rescheduled.
• Matters from commissioners
1. None at this time.
• Adjournment
Dayton Town Council meeting
5:30 p.m. Monday
Dayton Town Hall
608 Broadway St.
Child rape suspect charged in Colorado attack
DENVER (AP) — Prosecutors have
charged a man accused of attacking a
woman in Denver during a cross-country
crime spree after he cut off a GPS monitoring device.
The Denver District Attorney’s Office
charged 26-year-old Gregory Lewis on
Friday with attempted first-degree murder, three counts of sexual assault, two
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
BIG
Breakfast
Lyell M. Wilson
August 23, 1923 - October 20, 2014
counts of first-degree assault and aggravated robbery. The Southbridge,
Massachusetts, native is accused of sexually assaulting and robbing the woman at
gunpoint Oct. 5.
Lewis is a suspect in two additional
cases in Colorado and a series of attacks
in other parts of the country. He was
arrested in New York on Tuesday.
Lyell M. Wilson passed away after a short
illness on October 20, 2014, at the family
home in Maricopa, Az.
Lyell was preceded in death by her husband, Larry J. Wilson and two infant chilLyell M. Wilson dren. She was also preceded in death by
her parents and many brothers and sisters.
She is survived by daughter Loretta Wilson, Maricopa, AZ, son
Larry and Willajean Wilson of Scottsdale, AZ, sister Rose
Norris of Lakewood, Ca. She is also survived by three Grandchildren, Angela Sanchez of Maricopa, AZ, Benjamin Keller,
Dayton, WY. and Jennifer McGee of Denver, CO, several great
grand-children as well as many nieces and nephews.
Lyell was born in East Edge, ND, on August 23rd, 1923, to Bill
and Hilda Anderson. She was one of 13 brothers and sisters.
She graduated high school in Fargo, ND and then joined the US
Cadet Nurse Corp. in 1943 and graduated in 1947. She received
most of her nursing training at the Sheridan VA Hospital
where she met Larry Wilson who was also an employee of the
VA at the time. She spent 10 years at the VA hospital and
worked 23 years as RN in surgery at Sheridan County
Memorial Hospital. She retired from nursing in 1988.
Larry and Lyell were married in Hardin, MT, on January 11,
1947. As of Larry’s passing in 2009 they had been married for
63 years. They loved to Dance, Golf, Bowl and garden.
Both Lyell and Larry were long-time members of the Elks
#520 and the Does Drove #127 therefore memorials will be
accepted for the Elk’s Cemetery Fund, P O Box 624, Sheridan,
WY 82801.
Cremation has taken place and plans for a graveside service
at the Sheridan Elk’s cemetery will be made at a later date.
Here are the results
of Friday’s
Mega Millions
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
11-29-36-58-67;
Mega Ball 15
Megaplier 2X
Estimated jackpot:
PENDING
ONLINE NOW...
www.DestinationSheridan.com
TODAY
SUNDAY
TUESDAY
MONDAY
WEDNESDAY
Billings
67/39
Times of clouds
and sun
71
39
Cloudy and
cooler
Partly sunny
58
50
27
Almanac
21
Times of clouds
and sun
59
32
The Sun
Temperature
High/low .........................................................51/32
Normal high/low ............................................54/26
Record high .............................................80 in 1999
Record low ............................................... -2 in 1991
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Friday ...................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.16"
Normal month to date .................................... 1.41"
Year to date ...................................................12.86"
Normal year to date ......................................12.89"
Today
Sunday
Monday
60
Today
Sunday
Monday
Full
Rise
Set
5:57 p.m.
4:55 p.m.
4:54 p.m.
Rise
Set
3:05 p.m.
2:39 p.m.
3:12 p.m.
1:29 a.m.
1:40 a.m.
2:52 a.m.
Last
New
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
63/42
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
71/36
Basin
72/37
Nov 6
Nov 14
Nov 22
Nov 29
71/39
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Clearmont
74/42
Story
67/38
Gillette
75/45
Buffalo
73/44
Worland
73/33
Wright
70/45
Kaycee
71/43
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
51/34/c
57/28/pc
62/31/pc
52/30/c
42/25/sn
60/32/pc
49/28/c
42/24/sf
TREE SERVICES
• Tree Pruning
• Tree Removal
Regional Cities
Today
Hi/Lo/W
67/39/pc
71/41/pc
68/41/pc
63/42/r
59/32/sh
75/45/pc
63/34/sh
59/34/sn
Shown are
today's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
Ranchester
71/37
Thermopolis
72/38
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
70/38
Dayton
71/38
Lovell
68/37
First
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Friday ........................ 0.00"
Hardin
69/38
Broadus
71/38
30
7:46 a.m.
6:47 a.m.
6:48 a.m.
The Moon
Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's highs
and tonight's lows.
Times of clouds
and sun
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through 5 p.m. Fri.
National Weather for Saturday, November 1
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
51/34/c
48/24/pc
43/23/sn
46/30/c
41/25/pc
49/26/pc
47/23/pc
40/18/pc
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Today
Hi/Lo/W
63/35/pc
68/46/pc
65/35/pc
68/39/pc
61/34/sh
68/35/pc
68/48/pc
53/28/sn
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
53/26/c
61/32/pc
49/26/pc
53/29/c
45/25/c
69/35/pc
56/30/pc
35/17/sn
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
39/20/sn
48/26/pc
42/21/pc
46/27/pc
41/23/pc
50/23/r
46/30/pc
34/15/c
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
• Wood Chipping
& Clean Up
• Stump Grinding
facebook.com/LandscapingServicesInc
Call Bill Arno @ 752-6224
A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
Judge orders release
of jailed Marine
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A Mexican judge has ordered
the immediate release of a jailed U.S. Marine veteran
who spent eight months behind bars for crossing the
border with loaded guns.
Family spokesman Jonathan Franks told The
Associated Press on Friday that the judge decided to
release retired Marine Sgt. Andrew Tahmooressi.
Franks said the judge released him without making
a determination on the charge against him.
The 26-year-old Florida man said he got lost on a
California freeway ramp that sent him across the border with no way to turn back. His long detention
brought calls for his freedom from U.S. politicians,
veterans groups and social media campaigns.
Mexico says he broke the law. His lawyer argued the
judge should order his release on humanitarian
grounds because Mexico has no experience in treating post-traumatic stress.
Lake Michigan waves
slam Chicago lakeshore
CHICAGO (AP) —
Winds gusting up to 65
mph caused Lake
Michigan waves to slam
into the Chicago shoreline, sending water onto
part of Lake Shore Drive.
The waves slowed traffic
and prompted the cancellation of a Halloween
attraction.
Parts of the scenic highway were flooded Friday,
leading to some lane closures. Traffic was
backed up for miles.
The high waves
prompted Navy Pier,
one of Chicago’s top
tourist attractions, to
close its eastern end.
Navy Pier officials also
canceled a haunted
house that’s located on a
barge. Officials say the
attraction will reopen
Saturday.
The National Weather
Service issued a
lakeshore flood advisory
to remain in effect until
4 a.m. Saturday. The
warning is forecasting
winds of up to 50 mph
and 23-foot waves.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Searching for a treat
Nineteen-month-old Ever Poll inspects her loot during the “Trunk or Treat” Halloween event Thursday at Big Horn Elementary School. The students paraded through the hallways of the middle school then proceeded to the parking lot where parents and community members parked their
decorated vehicles and handed out candy.
Montana governor announces Ebola virus protocols
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana Gov. Steve Bullock said
Friday health officials will monitor people returning to
the state from areas of West Africa affected by the Ebola
virus and those who may have been in contact with an
Ebola patient.
“These new protocols will help ensure the safety of those
potentially exposed to Ebola, and the safety of Montanans
as a whole,” Bullock said in a news release.
Currently five people in Montana are being monitored
for the virus, said Tim Crowe, spokesman for the state’s
Disaster and Emergency Services. Crowe said he couldn’t
disclose where in Montana the five people live. Two others
have completed the monitoring process with no signs of
the virus, he said.
The procedures include a twice-a-day review of symptoms for 21 days. Those being monitored must disclose
their plans for work, travel or visiting public places to
determine whether those activities will be allowed. The
costs to the state for monitoring are minimal, and the
money for the effort is coming from the Department of
Public Health and Human Services’ budget, Crowe said.
No automatic quarantines will be mandated in the state,
Bullock’s spokesman, Mike Wessler, said. People infected
with Ebola are not contagious until they have symptoms.
The virus is not spread through casual contact.
If anyone is found to have Ebola, full medical treatment
would begin immediately, Crowe said. He said he couldn’t
comment on whether anyone found to have the virus
would be quarantined at that point, saying each case is
individual.
“If anyone should develop any symptoms, the health
department will focus on patient safety, medical-provider
safety and public safety throughout the course of treatment,” Crowe said.
Governors in New Jersey and New York have been criticized for ordering mandatory quarantines for people arriving from West African countries where the outbreak has
sickened more than 13,000 people and killed nearly 5,000.
Earlier this month, Bullock appointed a team to coordinate Ebola-preparedness activities. It’s headed by Major
General Matt Quinn, who oversees emergency preparedness for the state, and includes representatives from the
Department of Public Health and Human Services,
Montana Department of Environmental Quality, Montana
Department of Transportation and the Governor’s Office
of Indian Affairs.
2 arrested as people flock to Hawaii lava
PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) — Two Hawaii residents have been
arrested for trespassing to see lava, police said Friday
amid growing interest from people eager to witness the
slow-moving flow.
Hawaii County police said officers saw a man and a
woman on county property Thursday taking photos within
5 feet of the lava in the small town of Pahoa.
The 65-year-old woman and 59-year-old man had two golf
clubs that had been dipped in lava, which had hardened on
the clubs, police said. They crossed private property to get
to the spot where they
watched the lava.
Hawaii County Civil
Defense Director Darryl
Oliveira said the county is
restricting the public’s
access to the lava flow to
keep people safe.
“It’s unfortunate. We
would hope we wouldn’t
have to take steps to enforce
the rules,” Oliveira told
reporters.
He said the lava is currently in people’s backyards. The county may be
able to enable public viewing if and when it enters
public land, he said.
But authorities need to be
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able to manage the situation. In 1990, when lava poured
into Kalapana on the Big Island’s southern coast, parked
cars lined the roads and people crowded in to watch.
Tourists and Big Island residents have been streaming
into Pahoa for a glimpse of the lava since the flow edged
closer to the town’s main road. The influx of people has
been giving restaurants extra business.
Glen Bousquet, a tree trimmer from the nearby community of Nanawale, said he hiked to the flow multiple times
since the weekend and trespassed to do so. He followed the
glow through 6-foot-tall grass, he said.
“‘It’s so interesting to see nature unfolding. It’s like a
once in a lifetime chance to actually see it up close and
personal without having to wait for it to be on TV,” he
said. “You kind of get the real deal.”
Though he trespassed, he said he did so with “the utmost
respect” and didn’t break any fences or otherwise harm
anyone’s property.
But he said won’t go back because he doesn’t want to get
arrested.
Josiah Hunt, of the coastal town of Kapoho, said he
hiked to see the lava before it crossed Apaa Street, a country road on the edge of Pahoa last week. He wanted a look
because the molten rock was affecting life in the town and
the larger surrounding community of about 10,000 people.
“Somehow it helped me to come to grips . and feel a
sense of closure, to some degree,” he said. “It helps put an
image to it in your mind’s eye.”
He doesn’t think now is a good time to gather to see the
lava because it’s threatening homes.
Where will the weekend take you?
Find out at
DestinationSheridan.com
SPORTS
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Broncs advance to quarterfinals
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Friday’s
Scores
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FOOTBALL
State Playoffs
Class 4A
Quarterfinal
Campbell County
48, Laramie 3
Casper Natrona 55,
Evanston 12
Cheyenne East 57,
Casper Kelly Walsh 27
Sheridan 28,
Cheyenne Central 7
Class 3A
Quarterfinal
Cody 61, Rawlins 6
Douglas 38, Star
Valley 13
Riverton 42, Powell
26
Torrington 41,
Jackson Hole 14
Class 2A
Quarterfinal
Big Horn 23,
Lovell 12
Mountain View 60,
Thermopolis 0
Newcastle 38,
Greybull 14
Wheatland 52,
Lyman 6
Class 1A 11 Man
Quarterfinal
Cokeville 55,
Tongue River 0
Lingle-Fort Laramie
28, Shoshoni 0
Upton 48, Rocky
Mountain 14
Class 1A 6-Man
Quarterfinal
Dubois 74, Midwest
14
Guernsey-Sunrise
65, Farson-Eden 8
Little Snake River
57, Hanna-Elk
Mountain 34
Meeteetse 45,
Kaycee 20
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Broncs
were about an inch away from opening
last night’s playoff game against
Cheyenne Central the same way they
started against them in the regular season.
On the opening kickoff in the Broncs
victory on Oct. 10, Dontae Crow handed
the ball off to Joe Shassetz, who took the
ball to the house for a touchdown. Last
night, it was Shassetz handing the ball
off to Crow, and it looked like Crow was
going to mimic his teammate’s performance.
As Crow tiptoed up the sideline in
front of the Sheridan bench, he was
sprinting away from any and all Central
tacklers until a referee whistled the play
dead, signaling Crow stepped out of
bounds.
“It was right in front of us,” head
coach Don Julian said of the out-ofbounds call. “We didn’t think he stepped
out of bounds.”
It was the big plays that separated the
Broncs from the Indians in their earlier
matchup, but Crow’s almost-big play
wasn’t enough to get Sheridan going
early in Friday’s contest that ended in a
28-7 Bronc victory.
Both teams started out slow. After the
out-of-bounds call, the Broncs marched
into Central territory, but an offensive
facemask penalty forced them to punt.
The punt was a sign of things to come,
at least for the first half.
SEE BRONCS, PAGE B2
Kyle Bott (55) and Dalton Legerski sandwich
Central quarterback Rhett Muchmore during
Sheridan's 28-7 victory Friday at Scott Field.
The Broncs travel to face top-ranked Natrona
next Saturday.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Lady Broncs move to No. 4 seed
with win over Cheyenne South
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan High School volleyball team got off to a slow start in their opening round matchup in the 4A East regional tournament Friday, but still only needed three sets
to take down fifth-seeded Laramie.
The Lady Broncs had trouble stretching their
lead to open the match until a timeout by head
coach Maureen McEwen sparked a big scoring
run to win the first set. Hanging onto a 16-13
lead, the Lady Broncs came out of the timeout
and went on a 9-1 run to closeout the set. Senior
Megan Myers carried Sheridan through the
scoring spectacle with a handful of kills to help
her team win the set 25-14.
Sheridan was unable to string together any
long runs in the next two games, but they were
able to pull it out in the end to escape with two
close victories.
The score was tied at 22 in the second set
before a Dylan Wright spike gave the Lady
Broncs the lead and forced a Laramie timeout.
Sheridan came out of the timeout and was able
to hold of the Plainsmen to win 25-23.
The final set was similar to the second, with
neither team extending their lead more than a
few points until Sheridan ran away with the
final three points of the match. Leading 22-21,
Sheridan won the next two points before Robbi
Ryan and Myers teamed up for a match winning
block to advance the Lady Broncs to the second
round of the tournament.
SEE REGIONALS, PAGE B2
Robbi Ryan tosses the ball in the air for a serve Friday
at Sheridan High School.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Big Horn Rams earn
win against Lovell
FROM STAFF REPORTS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Big Horn Ram Seth Kite is tackled during the game Friday night at Big Horn. The Rams defeated Lovell 23-12.
SHERIDAN — It was closer than
most people expected, but the Big
Horn Rams squeaked out a win
against Lovell to advance in the 2A
playoffs.
In the Rams first-ever home playoff night game, it was a back-andforth battle for the 24 minutes of
play before Big Horn was able to
pull ahead in the second half.
Lovell was only one of two teams
to hold Big Horn under 30 points
in the regular season, a 25-0 weekone Rams victory. The team’s
defense proved to be even tougher
last night, holding Big Horn to 16
first-half points.
The Rams led 10-6 before a 51yard score put the Bulldogs on top
12-10. The Rams responded with a
Kerry Powers touchdown with less
than a minute left in the half to
put the Rams on top again, this
time for good.
It took another 18 and a half
minutes for either team to score,
but it was a Christian Mayer
touchdown that helped Big Horn
secure the 23-12 victory and
advance to a semifinal rematch
with 7-2 Wheatland, the other team
to hold Big Horn under 30 points
this season.
The Big Horn versus Wheatland
matchup will be played at Big
Horn High School next week, but
the date and time has yet to be
determined. Be on the lookout for
updated tournament schedules in
The Press.
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
Tongue River ends season with tough loss to Cokeville
FROM STAFF REPORTS
DAYTON — The Tongue River Eagles football team suffered a tough, season-ending loss to Cokeville Friday night
in the first round of the 1A playoffs.
The No.-1 ranked team in the 1A West, topped the team
from Dayton 55-0.
“They were everything I thought they would be,” Eagles
coach John Scott said about Cokeville Friday night. “We
try to convey that to the kids throughout the week that it
will take a giant effort to offset that, but Cokeville is physical, fast and really dominated us in every aspect of the
game.”
Scott added, though, that the game wasn’t all bad news
for his young squad.
Players at all levels hung in there, he said.
“We didn’t concede anything,” Scott said. “What they
got, they got by going over top of us.”
Dayton will graduate five seniors this year, but Scott said
that his young players got to see first-hand what a championship team looks like.
He noted that his team got better preparing for the game.
“The next step is to continue to build on what we’ve done
and develop physically and mentally,” Scott said. “If we
can have a commitment to that, we’ll find ourselves getting better each year and going deeper into the playoffs.”
The Eagles finish the season 5-4.
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Lady Rams head
to regional championship game
BIG HORN — The Lady Rams volleyball team won
two matches Friday night to move into the 2A East
regional championship game, set for 4 p.m. today.
The Lady Rams will face Wright, a team that also
earned two wins Friday.
Big Horn topped Pine Bluffs in their first matchup of
the evening, winning in three sets (25-12, 25-12, 25-16).
“Our goal was to go in and take control right away,
and the girls did a great job of doing that,”
McLaughlin said Friday night. “We were ahead the
whole game, and really dominated them at the end.”
The coach noted that her team has been working on
maintaining focus and intensity throughout the
match, something that paid off in the team’s matchups
Friday.
In the second matchup of the evening, the Lady
Rams faced a little better competition against
Southeast. But, it wasn’t enough to keep Big Horn
from winning in three sets (25-17, 25-19, 25-23).
McLaughlin noted that Southeast is a scrappy team
that hung with the Lady Rams the entire time. She
said her team maintained its intensity in the first two
sets, but lost a little focus in the third.
“We made some critical errors and didn’t play our
best defense, so they caught up,” McLaughlin said.
“But we got our heads in the right place and we were
able to put them away.”
The Lady Rams will face Wright in the regional
championship today at 4 p.m. in Torrington. Big Horn
has lost to Wright three times this season, but each
match has gotten closer. Just last week it took Wright
five sets to put the Lady Rams away.
Lady Eagles to battle in consolation
bracket today
DAYTON — The Tongue River Lady Eagles volleyball
team opened the 2A East regional tournament with a
four-set loss to Burns Friday night (25-11, 25-22, 25-22).
Coach Michelle Nielsen said her team struggled to
get started Friday, which resulted in the loss.
“We had some good things happen, we just weren’t
finishing our rallies,” Nielsen said.
She noted that the Lady Eagles had a tough time getting started against Saratoga too, losing the first set
before gaining some momentum through the next
three.
The scores of that match were 21-25, 25-17, 25-19, 2513.
“They finally turned the coner and it was go time,”
Nielsen said of her team’s ability to get going against
Saratoga. “They knew it was now or never and defensively they really picked up.”
She added that everyone contributed in the last three
sets and it was a nice way to end the day.
Top contributors for the day included Amanda
Buller, who had 14 kills and went 22-22 in serving
against Saratoga. Neci Sundquist contributed to the
team’s success with 22 kills, while teammate LeeAnna
Mitchell added 11 kills and two stuff blocks. Eryn
Aksamit went 20-21 in serving against Saratoga and
had six kills. Sarah Bacon helped out on defense with
10 digs for the day, and Maddie Boll chipped in with 34
assists.
In the next round, the Lady Eagles will face
Southeast today at 11 a.m. in Torrington. This will be
the first time the teams have met this season.
“We had a great talk tonight and they know what
they have to do,” Nielsen said of her girls’ preparation
for Saturday.
Saratoga covers the net well, so Nielsen said the
Lady Eagles will have to move and be strategic in placing the ball.
“They are beatable, though,” Nielsen added.
Lady Generals top Eastern in three sets
Sheridan’s Courtney Smith, right, taps the ball over the net against Eastern Wyoming College during the game Friday in the Sheridan College
Bruce Hoffman Golden Dome. The Lady Generals won in three sets. Smith contributed seven kills for the night.
SHS swimming finishes fifth at state meet
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — While the Sheridan
High School girls swimming and diving team left the 4A state meet without earning any championships, the
team did turn out several good performances in Gillette Friday.
Overall, the team finished in fifth
place with 131 points, behind
Campbell County, La ramie,
Cheyenne Central and Cheyenne
East.
The following are SHS highlights
from the meet.
SC women’s
basketball
dominates
Great Falls
• The team’s 200 medley relay team
comprised of Sol Montero, Raien
Emery, Mackenzie Dougherty and
Pippin Robison finished fourth.
• Robison also finished sixth in the
200 freestyle and fourth in the 500
freestyle, ahead of teammate Teal
Scheuber’s 10th-place finish in the
same event.
• Dougherty added a seventh-place
finish in the 200 IM and a fourthplace finish in the 100 butterfly ahead
of teammate Ava Johannesmeyer’s
12th-place finish in the same event.
• Katie Beardslee took 12th in the 50
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan College
Lady Generals basketball team dominated
in the opening performance at the Holiday
Inn tournament Friday night, topping
Great Falls 101-41.
While the score was just 55-24 going into
the halftime break, the Lady Generals ran
away with the game in the second half.
Tamara Brine led the team in scoring
ARVADA-CLEARMONT — The Arvada-Clearmont
girls volleyball team dropped two games Friday night
at the 1A East regional tournament held in Buffalo.
The girls started off facing HEM, losing in three sets
(25-18, 25-19, 25-21).
The Lady Panthers then moved into the consolation
bracket, where they faced Rock River. The Clearmont
team again lost in three sets (25-12, 25-18, 25-14).
The losses end the team’s season.
2014 Adult Basketball League
and 100 freestyle.
• Montero also earned a third-place
finish in 100 yard backstroke.
• In diving, Brielle Smiley earned a
ninth-place finish in the 1-meter competition.
• In the 200 freestyle relay, the team
comprised of Johannesmeyer, Emery,
Shyana Hunt and Avery Otto finished
in seventh place.
• Emery also took home a 12th-place
finish in the 100 breaststroke.
• The 400-yard freestyle relay team
of Dougherty, Montero, Beardslee and
Robison earned a fourth-place finish.
with 22, followed by Sierra Toms with 20.
Tiana Hanson also contributed 13, Peyton
Hinn added 12 and Shae Bruursema
chipped in 10.
The Lady Generals shot 54 percent from
field-goal range for the game and held
Great Falls to just 18 percent from fieldgoal range in the second half.
The Lady Generals will face North Idaho
today at 5 p.m. at the Bruce Hoffman
Golden Dome.
BRONCS: Head to Natrona for next round of playoffs
FROM B1
Arvada-Clearmont drops two at
1A East regional tourney
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
The Sheridan defense forced a three-and-out and a
Central punt on their first possession, and Central
returned the favor. After the Sheridan punt, the two
teams combined for seven more punts in the half, and the
Broncs threw in an interception for good measure.
Luckily for Sheridan, two big runs, the second a Riley
Sessions 25-yarder, put the Broncs on the scoreboard first.
Sheridan took a 7-0 lead into the locker room at halftime.
“That’s more punts than we’ve punted for the year,”
Julian joked of the first-half stat line.
The big play that was missing in the first half finally
came in the second half, and it put the game away for
good.
After Sessions added a 35-yard touchdown run, Central
answered with a 46-yard pass to bring them within one
score of the Broncs in the third quarter. Sheridan missed
a 28-yard field goal but forced a punt on the next possession before their game-changing play.
It was a short pass that Crow took 89 yards to the house
to put the Broncs up two scores late in the game.
Shassetz, who had an interception slip through his fingertips on the earlier Central touchdown, put the icing on
the cake with a pick immediately following Crow’s score.
The Broncs went on to win the game, 28-7. The win
advances Sheridan to the quarterfinals, where they will
face off in a rematch of top-seeded Natrona. The
Mustangs beat Sheridan 24-0 in the regular season.
“Here’s the deal, everybody in this whole community, in
this whole school, in this whole town needs to believe that
we can go do this,” Julian said of the rematch with
Natrona. “If anybody doubts, it won’t happen. Our team’s
not going to doubt; we’re going to go battle.”
The Broncs will travel to Natrona for a Saturday
matchup next week. The time has not yet been set.
Basketball season is right around the corner. Compete and have fun with a
reenergized league this year. Some new features this year include: stat keeping,
an established website for league leaders, individual and team awards, and more.
Registrations: October 20th - November 7th
How: Sign up online at www.sheridanrecreation.com or sign up in person
at 1579 Thorne Rider Park
Cost: $540 Where: Games will be played at Sheridan Jr. High Old Gym
Games: Games will begin November 18th
Manager’s Meeting: Thursday October 30th, 6 PM at Sheridan Jr. High School
If you attend the manager’s meeting your team will be rewarded a
$20 discount towards your team’s fees this year. Individuals wishing to
play this year but might not have a team is also encouraged to come so
that we can place you with a team.
Contact Robbie Spencer at the Sheridan Recreation District
office at 674-6421 for more information.
REGIONALS: Face No. 1 Cheyenne East at 10 a.m. today
FROM B1
In the Lady Broncs second matchup of the night, they
faced Campbell County, losing in three sets (25-19, 25-15, 2518). Details of that matchup were unavailable at press
time, but the loss meant a third round of play Friday
night.
The Lady Broncs won in three sets over Cheyenne South,
25-13, 25-14, 25-19. The win puts Sheridan in the No. 4 seed
for Saturday’s games. The Lady Broncs will face No.1ranked Cheyenne East at 10 a.m. today. If the Lady Broncs
win, they’ll face the winner of the Campbell
County/Cheyenne Central game in the regional championship.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD|
NBA |
National Basketball Association
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Boston
1
0 1.000
—
Toronto
1
0 1.000
—
New York
1
1
.500
½
Brooklyn
0
1
.000
1
Philadelphia
0
2
.000
1½
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Miami
1
0 1.000
—
Charlotte
1
0 1.000
—
Washington
1
1
.500
½
Atlanta
0
1
.000
1
Orlando
0
2
.000
1½
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
1
1
.500
—
Cleveland
Indiana
1
1
.500
—
Milwaukee
1
1
.500
—
1
1
.500
—
Chicago
Detroit
0
2
.000
1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Houston
2
0 1.000
—
Memphis
2
0 1.000
—
San Antonio
1
0 1.000
½
New Orleans
1
0 1.000
½
Dallas
1
1
.500
1
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Portland
1
0 1.000
—
Denver
1
0 1.000
—
Minnesota
1
1
.500
½
Utah
0
2
.000
1½
Oklahoma City 0
2
.000
1½
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Golden State
1
0 1.000
—
Phoenix
1
0 1.000
—
L.A. Clippers
1
0 1.000
—
Sacramento
0
1
.000
1
L.A. Lakers
0
2
.000
1½
___
Thursday’s Games
Washington 105, Orlando 98
Minnesota 97, Detroit 91
New York 95, Cleveland 90
Dallas 120, Utah 102
L.A. Clippers 93, Oklahoma City 90
Friday’s Games
Memphis 97, Indiana 89
Cleveland 114, Chicago 108, OT
Milwaukee 93, Philadelphia 81
San Antonio at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Dallas at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Toronto at Miami, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m.
AHL |
American Hockey League
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
Providence
7
4
Worcester
7
4
St. John’s
10
3
Portland
9
4
Manchester
6
3
East Division
GP
W
Hershey
8
6
Wilkes-Barre/Sc10
5
Lehigh Valley
7
4
Binghamton
9
3
Norfolk
8
3
L
2
2
4
5
3
OL SL
1
0
1
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
L
2
4
2
4
5
OL SL
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
Northeast Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Albany
7
6
0
0
1
Bridgeport
7
4
2
0
1
Hartford
7
4
2
1
0
Springfield
8
3
4
1
0
Syracuse
8
3
4
1
0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Rockford
9
6
2
0
1
Milwaukee
7
6
1
0
0
Chicago
7
4
1
2
0
Grand Rapids 7
3
3
1
0
Lake Erie
8
3
4
0
1
North Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
Utica
9
6
1
2
0
Rochester
8
6
2
0
0
Hamilton
8
3
3
2
0
Adirondack
9
3
5
1
0
Toronto
7
3
4
0
0
West Division
GP
W
L
OL SL
San Antonio
9
5
4
0
0
Texas
7
4
2
1
0
2
2
2
0
Oklahoma City 6
7
2
5
0
0
Iowa
Charlotte
8
2
6
0
0
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Friday’s Games
Hamilton 3, Charlotte 1
Chicago 6, Grand Rapids 5, OT
Hershey 4, Manchester 0
Portland 7, St. John’s 3
Rochester 3, Syracuse 0
Binghamton 4, Utica 3, OT
Lake Erie 5, Texas 2
Norfolk 3, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 2, OT
Rockford 6, San Antonio 3
Saturday’s Games
Rochester at Toronto, 5 p.m.
Bridgeport at Albany, 5 p.m.
Texas at Lake Erie, 6 p.m.
Utica at Adirondack, 7 p.m.
St. John’s at Manchester, 7 p.m.
Providence at Springfield, 7 p.m.
Hershey at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Hartford at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Rockford at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Iowa at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Hamilton at Charlotte, 1 p.m.
Hershey at Manchester, 3 p.m.
Springfield at Bridgeport, 3 p.m.
Portland at Albany, 3 p.m.
Worcester at Hartford, 3 p.m.
St. John’s at Providence, 3:05 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 4 p.m.
Iowa at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
MLS PLAYOFF |
Major League Soccer Playoff Glance
The Associated Press
KNOCKOUT ROUND
Times EDT
Eastern Conference
Thursday, Oct. 30: New York 2, Sporting Kansas
City 1
Western Conference
Wednesday, Oct 29: FC Dallas 2, Vancouver 1.
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
New England vs. Columbus
Leg 1 — Saturday, Nov. 1: New England at
Columbus, 4 p.m.
Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 9: Columbus at New
England, 5 p.m.
D.C. United vs. New York-Sporting Kansas City winner
Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 2: D.C. United at New York,
4 p.m.
Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 8: New York at D.C. United,
2:30 p.m.
Western Conference
LA Galaxy vs. Real Salt Lake
Leg 1 — Saturday, Nov. 1: LA Galaxy at Real Salt
Lake, 8 p.m.
Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 9: Real Salt Lake at LA
Galaxy, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle vs. FC Dallas-Vancouver winner
Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 2: Seattle at FC Dallas, 9
p.m.
Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 8: FC Dallas at Seattle,
10:30 p.m.
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPLeg 1 —
Sunday, Nov. 23: teams TBD, 1:30 p.m.
Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 23: teams TBD, 5 p.m.
Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 29: teams TBD, 3 p.m.
Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 30: teams TBD, 5 or 9 p.m.
MLS CUP
Sunday, Dec. 7: Conference champions, 3 p.m.
NFL |
National Football League
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
Pct PF
New England
6
2
0
.750 238
Buffalo
5
3
0
.625 178
Miami
4
3
0
.571 174
N.Y. Jets
1
7
0
.125 144
South
W
L
T
Pct PF
Indianapolis
5
3
0
.625 250
Houston
4
4
0
.500 185
Tennessee
2
6
0
.250 137
Jacksonville
1
7
0
.125 118
North
W
L
T
Pct PF
Cincinnati
4
2
1
.643 161
Baltimore
5
3
0
.625 217
Pittsburgh
5
3
0
.625 205
Cleveland
4
3
0
.571 163
West
W
L
T
Pct PF
Denver
6
1
0
.857 224
San Diego
5
3
0
.625 205
Kansas City
4
3
0
.571 176
Oakland
0
7
0
.000 105
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
Pct PF
Dallas
6
2
0
.750 213
Philadelphia
5
2
0
.714 203
N.Y. Giants
3
4
0
.429 154
Washington
3
5
0
.375 171
South
W
L
T
Pct PF
New Orleans
4
4
0
.500 227
Carolina
3
5
1
.389 177
Atlanta
2
6
0
.250 192
Tampa Bay
1
6
0
.143 133
North
W
L
T
Pct PF
Detroit
6
2
0
.750 162
5
3
0
.625 222
Green Bay
Chicago
3
5
0
.375 180
Minnesota
3
5
0
.375 139
West
W
L
T
Pct PF
Arizona
6
1
0
.857 164
San Francisco 4
3
0
.571 158
Seattle
4
3
0
.571 172
St. Louis
2
5
0
.286 136
___
Thursday’s Game
New Orleans 28, Carolina 10
Sunday’s Games
Arizona at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Washington at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Miami, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Buffalo, Chicago, Detroit, Green
Bay, Tennessee
Monday’s Game
Indianapolis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 6
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 9
San Francisco at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Dallas vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis, Minnesota, New
England, San Diego, Washington
Monday, Nov. 10
Carolina at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
TRANSACTIONS |
Friday’s Sports Transactions
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Reinstated LHP Johan
Santana from the 60-day DL. Claimed LHP Patrick
McCoy off waivers from Detroit. Declined 2015
options on OF Nick Markakis and C Nick Hundley.
BOSTON RED SOX — Reinstated RHP Ryan
Dempster from the restricted list and OF Shane
Victorino from the 60-day DL. Declined 2015 option
on LHP Craig Breslow.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Declined 2015 option on
RHP Felipe Paulino.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Exercised 2015 option
on INF Mike Aviles. Promoted Ross Atkins to vice
president-player personnel, Carter Hawkins to
director of player development and Paul Gillispie to
director of pro scouting.
DETROIT TIGERS — Reinstated RHP Joel
Hanrahan from the 60-day DL. Exercised 2015
option on RHP Joakim Soria. Assigned RHP Evan
Reed and INF/OF Don Kelly outright to Toledo (IL).
Selected the contract of OF Wynton Bernard from
West Michigan (MWL).
HOUSTON ASTROS — Reinstated RHPs Matt
Albers and Jesse Crain from the 60-day DL.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Reinstated RHPs Luke
Hochevar and Michael Mariot from the 60-day DL.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Reinstated RHP Mike
Pelfrey from the 60-day DL.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Reinstated 1B Kyle
Blanks and RHPs Jarrod Parker and A.J. Griffin
from the 60-day DL. Claimed OF Andrew Brown off
waivers from the N.Y. Mets. Selected the contract of
2B Tyler Ladendorf from Nashville (PCL).
SEATTLE MARINERS — Reinstated OF Franklin
Gutierrez from the restricted list.
TAMPA BAY RAYS — Exercised 2015 option on
INF/OF Ben Zobrist.
TEXAS RANGERS — Named Steve Buechele
bench coach, Hector Ortiz first base coach/catching instructor and Jayce Tingler major league field
coordinator. Assigned RHPs and Alfredo Figaro
and INF Ed Lucas outright to Round Rock (PCL).
Announced Adcock refused assignment and chose
free agency.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Reinstated OF Melky
Cabrera from the 60-day DL. Claimed OF Andy
Dirks off waivers from Detroit. Agreed to terms with
LHP Jeff Francis on a minor league contract.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Reinstated RHPs
David Hernandez and Bronson Arroyo and LHPs
Patrick Corbin and Matt Reynolds from the 60-day
DL.
ATLANTA BRAVES — Reinstated RHP Gavin
Floyd from the 60-day DL.
CHICAGO CUBS — Fired manager Rick Renteria.
Named Joe Maddon manager. Assigned 1B Chris
Valaika and OF Josh Vitters outright to Iowa (PCL).
CINCINNATI REDS — Reinstated RHP Homer
Bailey, LHP Sean Marshall and 1B Joey Votto from
the 60-day DL.
COLORADO ROCKIES — Exercised 2015 option
on RHP LaTroy Hawkins. Assigned INF/OF Matt
McBride outright to Colorado Springs (PCL).
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Reinstated LHP
Paul Maholm and RHP Josh Beckett from the 60day DL. Declined 2015 option on RHP Chad
Billingsley. Announced RHP Brian Wilson exercised
his 2015 option.
MIAMI MARLINS — Reinstated RHP Kevin Gregg
and 2B Rafael Furcal from the 60-day DL.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Exercised 2015 option
on RHP Yovani Gallardo and their half of 2015
mutual option on 3B Aramis Ramirez. Declined
2015 option on 2B Rickie Weeks.
NEW YORK METS — Reinstated RHP Bobby
Parnell and RHP Matt Harvey from the 60-day DL.
Sent LHP Scott Rice, RHP Dana Eveland RHP
Buddy Carlyle and INF Josh Satin to Las Vegas
(PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Announced RHP
A.J. Burnett and the team have declined their mutual option.
American Association
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Exercised
the 2015 option on LHP Joe Harris and OF Sawyer
Carroll.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Released INF Chris
Escobar.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Traded LHP Anthony
Ferrara to Joplin (AA) for a player to be named.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS — Signed C Anderson
Varejao to a contract extension.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Exercised third-year
options on G Michael Carter-Williams and F
Nerlens Noel and the fourth-year option on G Tony
Wroten.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Fined Oakland S Brandian Ross $22,050
for his actions during last week’s game.
ATLANTA FALCONS — Released DB Kimario
McFadden from the practice squad. Signed DB
Sean Baker to the practice squad.
CAROLINA PANTHERS — Signed RB Darrin
Reaves to the practice squad.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Released TE Konrad
Reuland from the practice squad. Signed LB Carlos
Fields to the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released DE Ben
Bass and WR Jonathan Krause from the practice
squad. Signed G Chris Barker and LB Deontae
Skinner to the practice squad.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Signed LB Todd Davis
from the practice squad.
NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed LB Justin
Anderson to the practice squad.
ST. LOUIS RAMS — Signed QB Case Keenum to
the practice squad.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS — Released DBs Aaron
Hester and Marcus Cromartie from the practice
squad. Signed CB Kendall James to the practice
squad.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released TE Rashaun
Allen from the practice squad. Signed TE Brett
Brackett and WR Chris Matthews to the practice
squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL — Suspended Vancouver F Alexandre
Burrows three games for a late, illegal check during
Thursday’s game.
BUFFALO SABRES — Reassigned F Sam
Reinhart to Kootenay (WHL).
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Reassigned G Scott
Darling to Rockford (AHL).
DALLAS STARS — Assigned F Branden Troock
from Texas (AHL) to Idaho (ECHL).
EDMONTON OILERS — Assigned G Tyler Bunz
from Oklahoma City (AHL) to Wichita (ECHL).
FLORIDA PANTHERS — Recalled Fs Vincent
Trocheck and Rocco Grimaldi from San Antonio
(AHL) and C Wade Megan from Cincinnati (ECHL)
to San Antonio.
LOS ANGELES KINGS — Activated F Trevor Lewis
from injured reserve. Assigned F David Van der
Gulik to Manchester (AHL).
NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Assigned D Andrey
Pedan from Bridgeport (AHL) to Stockton (ECHL).
ST. LOUIS BLUES — Assigned D Jani Hakanpaa
from Chicago (AHL) to Quad City (ECHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Reassigned F Cedric
Paquette to Syracuse (AHL) and F Danick Gauthier
from Syracuse (AHL) to Wichita (ECHL).
WINNIPEG JETS — Reassigned F Patrice Cormier
to St. John’s (AHL).
American Hockey League
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS — Recalled F
Peter Sivak from Stockton (ECHL).
LEHIGH VALLEY PHANTOMS — Recalled D Brett
Flemming from Reading (ECHL).
MANCHESTER MONARCHS — Signed D Jamie
McBain to a professional tryout agreement.
MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS — Assigned F Zach
Budish to Cincinnati (ECHL).
SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE — Recalled F Wade
Megan from Cincinnati (ECHL).
ECHL
BAKERSFIELD CONDORS — Signed D Brendon
Nash.
INDY FUEL — Added G Jordan Tibbett as emergency backup.
ORLANDO SOLAR BEARS — Added G Kris
Kavanagh as emergency backup.
SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS — Loaned D
Drew MacKenzie to Providence (AHL).
TULSA OILERS — Signed F Matthew Larke.
WICHITA THUNDER — Released G Kevin St.
Pierre as emergency backup and F Michael Budd.
LACROSSE
National Lacrosse League
MINNESOTA SWARM — Signed F Miles
Thompson to a two-year contract.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS — Suspended FC Dallas M Mauro Diaz one
game and fined him an undisclosed amount for violating the league’s policy on entering the field/leaving the bench area during Wednesday’s game.
National Women’s Soccer League
SKY BLUE FC — Re-signed D Lindsi Cutshall.
COLLEGE
KANSAS — Announced men’s basketball G
Conner Frankamp will transfer at the end of the
semester.
LEHMAN — Named James Cisco baseball coach.
MICHIGAN — Announced the resignation of athletic director Dave Brandon.
UW, Fresno State game to broadcast on ESPN2
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Times EDT
Saturday, Nov. 1
AUTO RACING
11 a.m.
FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for AAA Texas 500, at
Fort Worth
1 p.m.
NBC — Formula One, qualifying for United States Grand
Prix, at Austin, Texas
3:30 p.m.
ESPN — NASCAR,
Nationwide Series, O’Reilly
Auto Parts Challenge, at Fort
Worth, Texas
3 a.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying
for Toyota Nationals, at Las
Vegas (delayed tape)
BOXING
9 p.m.
SHO — Super featherweights,
Javier Fortuna (25-0-1) vs.
Abner Cotto (18-2-0); champion
Tomoki Kameda (30-0-0) vs.
Alejandro Hernandez (28-10-2),
for WBO bantamweight title;
light heavyweights, Andrzej
Fonfara (25-3-0) vs. Doudou
Ngumbu (33-5-0), at Chicago
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
11:30 a.m.
CBS — Air Force at Army
Noon
ESPN — Wisconsin at
Rutgers
ESPN2 — Maryland at Penn
St.
ESPNEWS — East Carolina
at Temple
ESPNU — Duke at Pittsburgh
FS1 — Oklahoma at Iowa
State
3 p.m.
FSN — W. Kentucky at
Louisiana Tech
3:30 p.m.
ABC — Split national coverage, TCU at West Virginia or
Purdue at Nebraska
CBS — Florida vs. Georgia, at
Jacksonville, Fla.
ESPN2 — TCU at West
Virginia or Purdue at
Nebraska
ESPNU — Virginia at
Georgia Tech
4 p.m.
ESPNEWS — Houston at
South Florida
FS1 — Kansas at Baylor
7 p.m.
ESPN — Auburn at
Mississippi
ESPNU — Old Dominion at
Vanderbilt
7:15 p.m.
ESPN2 — Arkansas at
Mississippi St.
7:30 p.m.
FOX — Stanford at Oregon
FS1 — Texas at Texas Tech
8 p.m.
CBS — Notre Dame vs. Navy,
at Landover, Md.
8:07 p.m.
ABC — Split national coverage, Illinois at Ohio St. or
Oklahoma St. at Kansas St.
10:30 p.m.
ESPN — Arizona at UCLA
10:45 p.m.
ESPN2 — Wyoming at Fresno
St.
11 p.m.
FS1 — Utah at Arizona St.
GOLF
6 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
BMW Masters, third round, at
Shanghai (same-day tape)
4:30 p.m.
TGC — Champions Tour,
Charles Schwab Cup
Championship, third round, at
Scottsdale, Ariz.
11 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, CIMB
Classic, final round, at Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia
2 a.m.
TGC — LPGA, Taiwan
Championship, final round, at
Taipei (delayed tape)
HORSE RACING
3:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Thoroughbreds,
Breeders’ Cup World
Championships undercard, at
Arcadia, Calif.
8 p.m.
NBC — Thoroughbreds,
Breeders’ Cup Classic, at
Arcadia, Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
WGN — Chicago at
Minnesota
NHL HOCKEY
10:30 p.m.
NBCSN — N.Y. Islanders at
San Jose
RUGBY
3:30 p.m.
NBC — U.S. Eagles vs. New
Zealand All Blacks, at Chicago
SOCCER
8:45 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Liverpool at Newcastle
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Queens Park at Chelsea
8 p.m.
NBCSN — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinals, first leg, LA
Galaxy at Real Salt Lake
Times EST
Sunday, Nov. 2
AUTO RACING
3 p.m.
ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint
Cup, AAA Texas 500, at Fort
Worth
NBC — Formula One, United
States Grand Prix, at Austin,
Texas
6 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, Toyota
Nationals, at Las Vegas (sameday tape)
GOLF
6 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
BMW Masters, final round, at
Shanghai (same-day tape)
3:30 p.m.
TGC — Champions Tour,
Charles Schwab Cup
Championship, final round, at
Scottsdale, Ariz.
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
CBS — Regional coverage,
doubleheader
FOX — Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX — Regional coverage
4:25 p.m.
CBS — Regional coverage,
doubleheader game
8:20 p.m.
NBC — Baltimore at
Pittsburgh
RUNNING
9 a.m.
ESPN2 — New York City
Marathon
4 p.m.
ABC — New York City
Marathon (same-day tape)
SOCCER
8:25 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Manchester United at
Manchester City
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Tottenham at Aston Villa
9 p.m.
ESPN2 — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinals, first leg,
Seattle at FC Dallas
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
Until recently, only 10 percent to 20 percent of people
diagnosed with advanced
melanoma -- the deadliest of
skin cancers -- could expect
to be alive in five years. Now,
cutting-edge cancer drugs are
unleashing the power of the
human immune system
against this and other toughto-treat cancers. In other
words, these new drugs are
allowing the immune system
to do the job it was designed
to do: protect us from harmful disease.
These exciting, life-saving
medicines are called checkpoint inhibitors (CIs). They
outsmart cancer cells in a
brand-new way. They take the
blinders off the immune system so that it can recognize,
attack and destroy cancer
cells. One big reason that
cancer gains a foothold in the
body is that it's really good at
hiding from the immune system. In fact, scientists recently reported that lung cancer
has NINE ways of dodging
attack! That happens because
cancer cells often disguise
their surfaces with proteins
designed to show the immune
system that the cell is healthy
-- something your body's real
healthy cells actually do to
keep the immune system
from attacking the wrong
ones. Checkpoint inhibitors
unmask the cancer cells so
they can be KO'd.
Just two CIs, ipilimumab
(Yervoy) and pembrolizumab
(Keytruda), are FDAapproved. In September,
Health Canada approved its
first CI, Yervoy, for skin cancer. In addition to treating
melanoma, these cutting-edge
drugs are producing exciting
results in clinical trials
against cancers of the lung,
kidney, blood, colon, stomach,
breast, bladder, head, neck
and brain. Based on some
early evidence, scientists are
even speculating that CIs can
help the immune system
"remember" cancer cells, so it
can fight them off in the
future if they reappear.
Cancer docs and
researchers, usually cautious
when talking about the potential of new treatments, are
calling CIs "remarkable" and
"a breakthrough." We're even
more thrilled by what cancer
survivors themselves have to
say: "I did not expect to celebrate another birthday,
Christmas or even experience
another summer," says one
melanoma survivor from
Canada who received ipilimumab in a clinical trial.
"This treatment didn't just
save my life, it gave me my
life back."
In fact, CIs are so promising that this week the
Cleveland Clinic put them
into its list of the Top 10
Medical Innovations for 2015.
(Dr. Mike helps lead the panel
of experts that reviewed over
100 up-and-coming health
technologies to find those
that will have the biggest
impact on health care -- and
our lives -- in 2015.)
These drugs don't work for
everyone, and they can cause
serious (though controllable)
side effects, but they are
effective for a large percentage of the population and are
conveying astounding benefits.
For skin cancer: CIs help
some people with advanced
melanoma, who typically live
6-18 months after diagnosis,
live longer. When Dana
Farber Cancer Institute
researchers tracked 4,868 people with this cancer who
received the CI ipilimumab,
they found that 21 percent
were still alive after three
years, and 17 percent were
still alive after seven years.
In a study of the CI pembrolizumab, also used for
treating melanoma, 69 percent of those receiving it
were alive after one year.
For kidney cancer: Still an
experimental treatment,
these drugs helped 65 percent
of people with renal cell carcinomas live without any
cancer progression for at
least 24 weeks in one study.
One in five responded to the
drug, as did nearly one in two
when it was combined with
another checkpoint inhibitor.
For lung cancer: Still in
clinical trials, a number of
CIs show promise against
this killer cancer. So far,
tumors in up to 25 percent of
people with lung cancer
respond to these drugs, but
up to 71 percent get benefits
when the CI is combined with
conventional chemotherapy.
Learn more: Checkpoint
inhibitors are currently
approved only for melanoma,
but in clinical trials they are
being tested against several
other cancers. To find clinical trials for your cancer type
or location, go to www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/search
or search for clinical trials by
drug type at www.clinicaltrials.gov.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
DEAR ABBY: For the past
year and a half, I have
worked a full-time and a parttime job while attending
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
school. I recently graduated
from college and now have a
career that has put me into a
better financial position.
My problem is, I'm still
working my part-time job. My
boyfriend, "Jared," and I get
into arguments over whether
or not I should keep it.
I enjoy the extra cash, but
I'm starting to feel like life is
passing me by because I'm
working seven days a week,
usually 10 hours a day. I am
exhausted, but Jared doesn't
want me to quit.
Jared doesn't seem to
understand that I feel left out
when I work this much. I
don't have time to see my
family or visit friends, something I feel he takes for
granted. Should I keep this
job and keep Jared happy, or
stand my ground and live life
my way? -- EXHAUSTED IN
IOWA
DEAR EXHAUSTED: At the
rate you're going, Jared will
work you into a state of collapse. I could understand his
not wanting you to quit your
part-time job if the two of
you were saving for something special, but because
you didn't mention that, I am
assuming it isn't the case.
In order to have a happy,
successful life, people need to
achieve a balance between
work and time to themselves.
If Jared wants the extra
income, then my view is that
Jared should earn it.
DEAR READERS: It's time
for my "timely" reminder
that daylight saving time
ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, so
don't forget to turn your
clocks back one hour before
going to bed. (That's what I'll
be doing.) -- ABBY
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
What teens need to know
about sex, drugs, AIDS and
getting along with peers and
parents is in "What Every
Teen Should Know." Send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $7 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby, Teen Booklet, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
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made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Adoption
ADOPT:
A loving, devoted
married couple longs to
adopt your newborn
into a home filled with
love, warmth & financial
security. Expenses
paid. Stephanie
& Jason
@ 1-800-672-8514.
For Lease
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
ROCKTRIM $500. WiFi/ Cable incl. 752-8783
WKLY FR $210. Mnthly
fr $630 Americas Best
Value Inn 672-9757
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
1 BDRM. $600. Garage.
No smk/pets. 674-4139.
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
LOVELY COTTAGE in
Big Horn, 2BD 1BA, XLg
garage,
W/D,
includes all util & lawn
care. $1250/mo, no
smok/pets, 674-7718
LOG CABIN in Story.
3 acres. 1 BR/sleeping
loft/1 ba. W/D. No
Smoking. Pets ?.
$975/mo + util. 307751-7794.
UNIQUE VICTORIAN,
west of Sheridan. 3-4
BR. 2 ba. $1400 + utils.
& deposit. 655-9225.
HOUSE ON Ranch.
3 BR 2 ba. Mtn. View.
Deck. $1200 + utils.
& deposit. 655-9225
2BR. 1BA $800 mo. +
util. Close to
downtown. No
Smk/Pets Dep. +
lease. 752-2090
SHERIDAN COZY 1BR
house. screened in
porch, nice location,
new carpet, paint &
windows, W/D, A/C. no
smk/pets. $600 + dep.
& util. 655-9350 leave
msg.
Mobile Homes for Rent
3BR. $650 mo + dep &
references. Call before
5pm. 672-3077
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718
Office Space for Rent
NEWER 3 BR 3 BA.,
2600 sq. ft. condo.
Fplc., fam. rm.,
dishwasher, refrig.,
W/D, AC, deck,
2 car gar., maint. free,
snow remov., near
hosp. & daycare. $1500
+ dep. Call 751-4951
STADIUM PLACE
TOWNHOMES
3 Bedroom $695/month
Available NOW
• Attached Garage
• Washer & Dryer
• Dishwasher
For showing call 307.763.2682
Income restrictions apply
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR, 1BA townhome
w/appl, new carpet
and paint. $900mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
2BR, 2BA townhome
w/garage, appl, new
carpet and paint.
$900mo + util. Lease
& dep. No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
2 BEAUTIFUL SUITES
for lease. (One with
kitchen area). Security,
janitorial, & utilities
included. Conference
room avail to tenants.
672-8700 or 751-3828.
25'X80' BUILDING.
Office/Storage.
Overhead door.
$400/mo. 307-256-6170
Child Care
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
SMART START
CHILDCARE now
enrolling. Infant-5 yrs
Mon-Fri. Well rounded
preschool curriculum,
breakfast, lunch
& snacks. Call
307-660-2502
GREAT
TALENT
makes good business!
Kmart
is
seeking
talented
associates
wanting to build a
career in retail. Flexible
scheduling, employee
discount
and
opportunity
for advancement!
Currently recruiting for:
Cashiers
Pricing Specialist
Service Desk
Associates
Little Caesars
Associates
Data Integrity
Specialists
Reset Specialists
Merchandisers
Join our team of
dedicated,
talented
associates and build an
exciting career with
Kmart! Apply on line at
kmart.jobs.com Kmart is
a drug free work place
and
an
equal
opportunity employer.
BIG BROTHERS BIG
SISTERS is growing.
Now accepting resumes
for a part-time case
manager. Responsible
for intake of youth and
volunteers, coordinating
and providing ongoing
support of mentoring
relationships. Flexible
hours, Bachelor's
degree required. Send
over cover letter and
resume to
[email protected]
SHERIDAN ICE has the
following
open
positions: Adult Figure
Skating Instructor! Must
have figure skating
experience.
$15/hour
on
Tuesdays,
Thursdays
and
Saturdays.
Adult Skating Guards!
Skating experience a
must! Mainly weekend
shifts. $9/hour. Pick up
applications at the rink
located
at
475
Brundage or online at
www.sheridanice.org.
Help Wanted
NWCCD JOB
Openings
Sheridan College
• Information Systems
Developer
• Enterprise Systems
Administrator
• Computer Specialist
• Athletic Trainer (PT)
• Math Tutor (PT)
Gillette College
• Records Specialist
• Coordinator,
Academic Success
Center
• Diesel Technology
Instructor
• Facilities Specialist
• OSHA Instructor (PT)
Full-time positions
include outstanding
benefits.
On-line postings and
application at:
https://jobs.sheridan.edu
EOE.
FULL-TIME POSITION
available for
Farm/Ranch hand.
Some equipment
experience preferred,
benefits including
housing and more.
Call 406-679-1796,
Position currently open.
SEEKING INDIVIDUAL
to wash vans at the
UPS
location
in
Sheridan. Please call
Tony at 801-634-8465.
Must be able to pass
background check.
COUNSELOR AT
Tongue River High
School needed.
Applicant must hold a
WY license. Willing to
consider both part-time
and full-time applicants.
To apply please call
Brandi Miller at 307655-9541 or
[email protected]
y.us or visit
www.sheridan.k12.wy.u
s Position open until
filled. E.O.E.
LOOKING FOR
Full Time
Farm Mechanic
responsibility include
equipment
maintenance and
repair, some other
farm duties included,
open immediately.
Benefits include
housing. Call
406-679-1796
Busy restauranti
n searchof
M AN AGERS.
M u s tha ve experience in f o o d
s ervice m a na gem ent& a ble to
w o rk nights & w eekend s .
Interested appli
cants send resum es to:
Sheridan County
Administration
Job Title: Human Resource Coordinator/Full-time Grade 20
Salary Range: $49,100 to $60,000 annual DOE
Benefits: Medical insurance and prescription drug coverage, dental insurance,
term life insurance, Wyoming Retirement Program, vacation and sick leave, paid
holidays.
Hours of work are from 8:00AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday.
Minimum Job Requirements: Knowledge and level of competency commonly
associated with the completion of a baccalaureate degree in a Human Resource
course of study or similar study related to the occupational field. Sufficient
experience to understand the basic principles relevant to the major duties of the
position usually associated with the completion of an apprenticeship/internship or
having had a similar position for one to two years. PHR certification preferred,
but not required. Possession of a valid driver’s license issued by the State of
Wyoming.
Blind Bo x 214,
C/ O The S herid a n Pres s
P.O . Bo x 2006
S herid a n, W Y 82801
Application deadline is November 24, 2014. To apply submit a letter of interest, a
current resume, and three work related references, to Renee’ Obermueller,
Administrative Director, 224 S Main, Suite B-1, Sheridan, WY 82801. Job
description is available at www.sheridancounty.com/current job openings.
PICKLES
Storage Space
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CROWN STORAGE Inc
KROE Lane 674-9819.
NON SEQUITUR
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
Vacutech is hiring for the following positions:
Work Wanted
PRIVATE NANNY
available. FT or PT.
Any day, any time.
Great references.
763-2163.
Can You Say
I’m Lovin’ It
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
At Your Job?
Rating: GOLD
Solution to 10/31/14
© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
McDonald’s
Employees Can.
Now hiring:
Night Shift
Team Members
4p.m. - Midnight
Apply online at
mcwyoming.com/4206
or in person.
11/1/14
Welder – Contact Scott
• MIG process for
stainless steel
• Perform detailed welding techniques
• Position, clamp or assemble work piece prior
to welding
• Read technical drawings
• Set up welding equipment
• Use acetylene welding/cutting torch
• Use arc welding equipment
• Knowledge of welding filler rod types
• Thermal-cutting equipment
• Weld in flat, horizontal, vertical or
overhead positions
Shipping Coordinator – Contact Denise
Schedules pick up and arrival of inbound and
outboard shipments. Schedules and executes loading
activities. Coordinates quality control on outgoing
orders. One year experienced required.
Palleting – Contact Scott
Individual will be responsible for building
multiple sized pallets for shipping of large product.
Knowledge of hand tools and carpentry a plus.
CAD – Contact Scott
AutoCAD experience, computer literacy, ability
to learn quickly, work under pressure, ability to
complete tasks in a timely manner, time
management skills.
Painter/Bondo/Powder Coat – Contact Scott
Painter wanted - looking for a painter/bondo/
powder coater.
Please email resume to Scott at [email protected]
or Denise at [email protected]
or fax to 307-675-1972
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Bridge
HOW
WOULD YOU
REACH THE
RIGHT CONTRACT?
Saki, a Scottish shortstory author
who died in 1916, said, "I
think she must have been
very strictly brought up,
she's so desperately anxious
to do the wrong thing correctly."
This week we have had a
series of deals in which the
bidding has not been either
clear-cut or accurate. And
on some, the opening lead
has been weird. Here is one
more in which the right
final contract was not
reached. How should the
auction have gone?
North might have rebid
three clubs with such a
strong suit and seven playing tricks. South's sensible
two-diamond rebid was
forcing for one round. Note
Help Wanted
Phillip Alder
also that this guaranteed at
least five spades and denied
four hearts; with 5-4-4-0 distribution, he would have
rebid two hearts -- we love
majors and dislike minors.
Then maybe North should
have continued with two
hearts (hoping partner
could bid no-trump) or
two no-trump (hoping it
would not wrongside the
contract).
However, when North
bid two spades, South
should not have jumped
to four spades. He
should have bid three
no-trump to offer a
choice of games. Here,
North would have
passed, but if he had
held three spades, he
would have corrected
back to four spades.
As you will have seen,
there are 10 top tricks in
no-trump: one spade,
two hearts, one diamond
and six clubs. But four
spades had no chance.
And even if spades had been
3-3, careful defense could
have defeated that game.
Always try to keep your
options open. And remember that partner will not forget your earlier bids and
their meanings.
Hints from Heloise
Poster
Painting
Dear
Heloise:
When trying to decide what
color we
wanted to
PAINT our
walls, the small paint chips
didn't help much. They are
so small, and we didn't want
to paint large swatches on
the wall. Here is our hint:
We bought large, white
poster boards and painted
each color we were thinking
about. We pushpinned them
on the walls and looked at
them for a few days. -- K.J.
in New Orleans
Better to live with a few
painted posters than paint a
whole room and hate it! -Heloise
MELTED PLASTIC
Dear Heloise: I accidentally melted some plastic on
the top of my toaster. Do
you have any hints on how I
can get the plastic off? -- Hal-
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
lie, via email
Hallie, don't worry -- this
happens. Get an old washcloth or towel and some rubbing alcohol or
acetone-based nail-polish
remover. Be sure the
toaster is UNPLUGGED!
Pour a little of the liquid
onto the washcloth. Rub it
over the area. You should
start to see the plastic peel
away. You may need to repeat to get it all off. When
done, wipe the area with a
clean, damp cloth. -- Heloise
PET PAL
Dear Readers: Claudia
Parks of Texas sent in a
photo, via email, of her 8year-old standard poodle,
Sammy, posing for a photo
in a hat. Claudia said that
Sammy loves posing for
photos. To see Sammy's
photo, go to my website,
www.Heloise.com, and click
on "Pets." -- Heloise
AFTER-SUMMER SALES
Dear Heloise: I love endof-summer sales. You usually can find great deals on
Heloise
summer products right
after school starts. I got an
inflatable pool for the backyard for 70 percent off! I live
in South Texas, so it is still
warm enough to use it well
into fall. You also can get
great deals on barbecues
and school supplies. I often
go and buy crayons, etc.,
when they are on sale after
school starts. -- Lisa M.,
Lubbock, Texas
PESKY PIGEONS
Dear Heloise: I live in
New York City, where pigeons always are a problem.
Recently, a neighbor put a
bird feeder on her terrace,
and we were "bombarded"
with pigeons. I found a rubber snake and put it on the
edge of the terrace barrier.
Result: no more pigeons. -Fred Jacobs in New York
Pigeons can be a problem,
and many readers use fake
snakes to keep the pigeons
away. Since owls hunt
birds, locate a few fake owls
and use them to ward off the
pigeons. -- Heloise
WE ARE currently
seeking vacuum truck
drivers to join our team
in
Wyoming. We provide
24/7 service. He or she
must have class A CDL,
with tankers
endorsement. Housing
available! We also offer
Insurance! $18-$22
starting pay! Contact
our office in Wright, WY
307-464-1146. Contact:
Gilbert Moncibaiz at
307-299-9200. Email:
g.moncibaiz10services
@gmail.com
PT SPEECH
Language Pathology
Position in Northeast
WY Children’s Clinic
Speech Language
Pathology job in
Sheridan WY. This is
a part-time job with
flexible hours &
competitive pay.
Wyoming SLP
license required. For
more information call
Matt at
(307) 217-0681.
LOCAL BUSINESS
looking for Office
Assistant. Must have
valid DL. Background
check
will be required.
Great personality,
dependability and multitasking a must. MonThurs 9-4.
Please stop by to pick
up application at
5211 Coffeen Ave
during business hours
ONLY!
No phone calls.
Help Wanted
THE CITY of Sheridan
Utility Maintenance
Division team is
currently seeking a
highly motivated,
customer service
focused and reliable
person to fill their
position of Utility
Maintenance
Operator. This
position is responsible
for performing
technical duties in the
maintenance, repair,
and operation of the
water and wastewater
systems as well as
regular interaction with
the public and other
City divisions.
Experience in heavy
equipment operation,
construction &
maintenance of utility
systems including
distribution collection
and storm water
collection preferred.
Ability to perform
moderate/
heavy physical work
required. Interested,
qualified applicants
with ability to obtain a
CDL with air brake
endorsement and
level II DEQ
certifications should
submit a completed
City of Sheridan
application to 55
Grinnell Plaza,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
This is a fully
benefited position
including health,
dental, vision and life
insurance, retirement
pension, tuition
reimbursement, and
paid time off. Hiring
range for this position
is $17.17 hr $18.97/hr DOE. Full
job description and
application can be
found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The deadline for
applications is
11/7/14. The City of
Sheridan is a drug
free workplace.
TACO JOHN'S/GOOD
TIMES is looking for F/T
& P/T employees for all
shifts.
Clean
cut
appearances & pleasing
personality
are
essential. Stop by our
store for application and
your
interview.
References.
$10.00+
per hr DOE.
Help Wanted,
Professional
SEEKING QUALIFIED
tax preparer for long
standing CPA firm.
Experience a must.
Salary DOE. Retirement
plan and flex scheduling
available. Send reply to
box 215, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan,
WY 82801
SEEKING
KNOWLEDGEABLE
bookkeeper with
experience and
understanding of
Quickbooks and
payroll reporting a must.
Retirement plan & flex
scheduling available.
Send reply to box 216,
c/o The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
the money that circulates
will irrigate virtual fields so
you can nurture future
prosperity and success.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Foster the spirit of give and
take. Unresolved issues can
be resolved in a blink of an
eye this week by offering an
apology in a timely manner.
Changing someone's mind
will take no more effort
than changing a light bulb.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
A few minutes of feeling
"down" may act as the
springboard for you to pursue "upward" mobility. Get
an education in areas where
you've displayed a lack of
knowledge and overcome a
handicap in the week
ahead.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Get a new lease on life.
Start taking brisk walks
over your lunch hour, get a
makeover, or join a gym.
Find ways to improve your
wellbeing and appearance
so you'll be more productive
in the week ahead.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Your decisiveness and
your charm are your best
qualities during the week
ahead. Go after your goals
fearlessly. Friends will admire your boldness, and a
significant other is likely to
take pride in your tenacity.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): What goes around
comes around. You may
make sound decisions during the week ahead, possibly because you're wiser
than usual. But you'll also
receive better advice and
guidance than usual from
your supporters.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Wrap up deals and tie
them with a bow. You're
passionate about being successful and not afraid to get
your hands dirty. Since you
are willing to cooperate,
you can make your dreams
come true in the week
ahead.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Learn to play many
roles and bend with the
wind during the upcoming
week. Keep an open mind
when dealing with liberals
and honor the traditional
when hobnobbing with conservatives. Adjust your
views to keep the peace.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): An aura of popularity
surrounds you in the week
to come. Focus on ways to
circulate and network to
make your business and career flourish. New friendships might prove
beneficial and can act as
stepping-stones.
IF NOVEMBER 2 IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY: You
can't wallow in disillusionment when you're feeling on
top of the world during the
next 4-6 weeks. Joining up
with a group of like-minded
individuals could introduce
you to fresh fields of endeavor and plant new ambitions in December. You
could lose your way if you
dwell on fantasies or waste
your time on unrealistic
pursuits in January, but if
you focus on being inspired
by new surroundings, perhaps by taking a vacation,
you'll discover a new purpose. March is the best time
to make financial and business decisions. The fine example of someone close to
LGE HOME near
Highland Park School.
4 br/ 3 ba. Office,
finish basement, 2 car
garage, large private
yard, beautiful finishes,
abundant storage
& much more.
752-3452.
OPEN HOUSE
11-3 SAT NOV. 1
1363 MARTIN AVE.
2BR/1 BATH
MOVE IN COND.
Great Neighborhood
Come See This!! 7525556 or 672-8641
Lost & Found
FOUND
PLASTIC Toolbox &
Tools. Decker Hwy. &
3 Poles Rd. Call to
identify. 307-752-1492.
Antiques
CLOCK REPAIR.
All types, cuckoo,
mantle, grandfather,
etc.
Pick up & delivery avail.
Call American Radio.
Located at the Powder
Basin Shopping Center,
260 S. Douglas Hwy. in
Gillette. Ask for Jerry
307-685-1408.
SHORT SALE! Newer
4 BR, 2 Ba, beautiful
kitchen, huge Daylight
Fam Rm, Fenced
Yard. REDUCED for
fast sale to $170,000.
Call Jackie Warnke,
RE/MAX Bighorn
Prop. 751-5838.
Autos-Accessories
2003 AUDI A6 Quattro.
2.7 Turbo Excellent
condition. 120K miles.
Land/Property Sale
Asking $5500.
10 ACRES. Prime; Ag 673-5271
Land. Location, View
and Creek. $335,000.
2007 SAAB 93 Aero.
Sheridan. Carlton Real
2.8 Turbo Fully Loaded.
Estate. Call Bill 30778K miles. $9500 OBO.
461-4473.
970-371-5361
Real Estate
FSBO, 1368 Yonkee
Ave., 7380 SF lot,
942 SF house, 2 BR
1 ba., excel. cond.,
w/lots
of
extras.
Ready to Move in.
call for more info.
Amy or Tim at 6725293.
Motorcycles
2006 YAMAHA R6. All
new plastic. 10K miles.
$4500 OBO.
970-371-5361
Garage Sales
1526 COFFEEN Ave.
Fri & Sat. 8-?
Are you
having delivery
problems?
Call circulation at The Sheridan
Press and we’ll take care of it!!
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Kendall Schmidt was born
in Wichita, Ka., on this date
in 1990. This birthday guy is
best known for his portrayal of the character
Kendall Knight on the TV
series, "Big Time Rush" that
aired 2009-2013, as well as in
the 2012 feature "Big Time
Movie." He's also appeared
on episodes of "Without a
Trace," "Ghost Whisperer"
and "CSI: Miami." Schmidt
performs with the band Heffron Drive.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Put the needs of others
first. A situation that seems
fraught with tension can be
healed and might create a
golden opportunity for you
to succeed through teamwork in the week ahead.
You can strengthen beneficial relationships.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): It's time to mend fences
so you can fulfill your
dreams. Pay attention to
how others see you. Intimacy issues will be resolved if you agree to do
better and abide by this decision during the coming
week.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Make a resolution as firm
as your handshake. In the
upcoming week, you can
join forces to accomplish
worthy goals. You may discover that other people are
willing to share the knowledge and experience that
you need.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Enjoy the good life this
week. Money, like water,
must be spread around in
order to perform its function. Spend generously and
Real Estate
672-2431
Jeraldine Saunders
you will be a spur to accomplishment in the spring.
IRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Shayna Rose was born in
Denver, Colo., on this day
in 1983. This birthday gal,
born Shayna Rose Mordue,
co-starred as Marina on the
series "The Fresh Beat
Band" from 2009-2011, as
well as playing Stephanie
Johnson on "Days of Our
Lives" (2006-2007). She's also
appeared on episodes of
"Mad Men," "Ugly Betty"
and "Gilmore Girls."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Wear your heart on
your sleeve. It's possible
that someone else shares
your feelings or ideas and
has been waiting for a signal from you to make a
move. Your love life could
change for the better.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Mend fences. A misunderstanding could be keeping you and a special
someone apart. If you ask
for forgiveness, it will be
granted. This is an excellent
time to seek professional
advice from experts.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Be a realist in your own reality show. Although you
might fall prey to wishful
thinking, you'll find your
interests are best served by
going along with the crowd.
This is a good time to ask
for favors or a loan extension.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Wear your true colors.
You can be kind to your
loved ones, but treat the
world well, too. Feed a stray
kitten, recycle grocery bags,
or make a charitable dona-
tion. Act on your ideals and
do some good for Mother
Earth.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A
warm and friendly attitude
will open doors. Press forward to achieve your career
objectives and put your passions to work in moneymaking activities. Steer
clear of controversial issues
when in public.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
If you've been expecting the
worst, you may be in for a
pleasant surprise. A thorny
situation may play out
much differently than anticipated. This could be a good
time to turn over a new leaf
or launch a project.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
The advice you receive
might be golden. Even a casual encounter could prove
beneficial. You might read
an article that answers a
key question, or hear about
a money making opportunity while waiting at the
checkout counter.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Dress for success; the
spotlight might be on you
today. Other people will be
drawn to your charm,
friendliness and outgoing
personality. Think hard
and thoroughly about improving your finances or acquiring new possessions.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Radiate a positive
attitude and you'll attract
good people, things and opportunities. Know exactly
what your goals are and
who your friends are. A
good friend could provide
sound advice or encouragement.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Put plenty of purpose
into your pleasures. You
have the right instincts to
succeed at anything that
tickles your fancy. Investments and hard work could
pay off and a romantic partner is yours for the asking.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Romance and socializing could be at the top of
your personal agenda.
You're more attractive than
usual, but don't let your
guard down or get caught
up in inappropriate situations. Keep your career and
love life separate.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A change of tactics can
change outcomes. Share
what you know and let
yourself be known. Join a
group, sign up for a class, or
take an interest in community affairs. You can make
new friends in the blink of
an eye.
IF NOVEMBER 3 IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY: You
may be riding on a wave of
inspiration during the upcoming 3-4 weeks. Since you
might feel like the apple of
someone's eye, or because
you've gained the trust of
someone powerful, it may
be tempting to make a commitment when an offer or
proposal is made. You can
be fooled by appearances
but have a knack for seeing
the advantages and disadvantages. You might be
wiser than usual now, as
well as in December, so
aren't likely to get in over
your head. April is when
you have the best chance of
making the shrewdest financial and business decisions.
110114Legals_Layout 1 10/31/14 10:17 PM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE
AND FINAL PAYMENT AND SETTLEMENT
Notice is hereby given that on the 25th day of
November, 2014 final settlement will be made by the
City of Sheridan, for and on account of a contract with
Intermountain Construction & Materials for the City of
Sheridan 2014 Rotomill & Overlay Project.
The above work having been completed and accepted
according to the plans and specifications of Ridgepoint
Consulting and the above date being the 41st day after
the first publication of this notice, the said Contractor
will be entitled to final settlement and payment
therefore.
Any person, partnership, association, agency or
corporation who shall have any unpaid claims against
said Contractor for or on account of the furnishing of
labor, materials, equipment, sustenance, provisions, or
other supplies used or consumed by such contractor
and/or subcontractor in or about the performance of
said work may at any time, up to and including the date
of final settlement and payment, file a verified
statement of any and all amounts due on account of
such claim with:
Ridgepoint Consulting
Attn: Chad Lynn, PE
312 Whitney Lane, Ste. 3
Sheridan, WY 82801
Failure on the part of the claimant to file such
statement prior to final settlement and payment will
relieve absolutely the City of Sheridan, for all or any
liability for such claim.
/s/ John Heath, Mayor City of Sheridan
Publish: October 15, 24, November 1, 2014
Notice of Publication
You are hereby notified that a Petition has
been filed on behalf of Judy Ann Sathre in the District
Court in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming, Civil Action
No. CV2014-356, the object and prayer of which is to
change the name of the above-named person from
Judy Ann Sathre to Judy Ann Smith.
Any objection must be filed in the District
Court, 224 S. Main, Suite B-11, Sheridan Wyoming 82801
in writing, on or before December 15, 2014 or the prayer
of the Petioner shall be granted.
Dated this 22nd day of October 2014.
By:/s/ Nickie Arney, Deputy Clerk
Publish: October 25, 2014 and November 1, 8, 15, 2014.
NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL SETTLEMENT AND
PAYMENT
Notice is given that Sheridan County School District No.
2 has accepted the work as completed according to
plans, specifications and requirements set forth in the
contract between Sheridan County School District No. 2
and Delta Construction bda GH Phipps Construction of
Wyoming, 3840 Ft. Misner Lane, Laramie, WY 82070 for
the construction of Henry A Coffeen ES, 1053 Sheridan
Avenue, Sheridan, WY 82801 and is entitled to final
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
settlement for the above described work as deemed
complete by Owner.
On November 28th, 2014 being the 41st day after the
first publication of this notice, Sheridan County School
District No. 2 will pay Delta Construction the amount
due under the contract.
Craig Dougherty, Superintendent
Sheridan County School District No. 2
Publish: October 17, 22 and November 1, 2014.
NNOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL SETTLEMENT
AND PAYMENT
Notice is given that Sheridan County School District No.
2 has accepted the work as completed according to
plans, specifications and requirements set forth in the
contract between Sheridan County School District No. 2
and Delta Construction bda GH Phipps Construction of
Wyoming, 3840 Ft. Misner Lane, Laramie, WY 82070 for
the Early Building Roof Replacement, 500 Lewis Street,
Sheridan, WY 82801 and is entitled to final settlement
for the above described work as deemed complete by
Owner.
On November 28th, 2014 being the 41st day after the
first publication of this notice, Sheridan County School
District No. 2 will pay Delta Construction the amount
due under the contract.
Craig Dougherty, Superintendent
Sheridan County School District No. 2
Publish: October 17, 22, and November 1, 2014.
TO: ALL KNOWN CLAIMANTS OF AND INTERESTED IN A
1988 Sunline travel trailer VIN#1LC2S1F19JD151443. You
are hereby notified that under Wy. Statute 31-13-109 a
lien has arisen on said vehicle in favor of Cielo Storage
LLC in the amount of $3430.00. Notices have been
mailed by certified mail to all persons known to claim
an interest in said vehicle. The proposed sale is to be
held at 1318 Skeels St., Sheridan, WY on November 17,
2014 at 10:00AM.
Publish: November 1, 8, 2014.
NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL SETTLEMENT AND
PAYMENT
Notice is given that Sheridan County School District No.
2 has accepted the work as completed according to
plans, specifications and requirements set forth in the
contract between Sheridan County School District No. 2
and O’Dell Construction, Inc., 1448 O’Dell Court,
Sheridan, WY 82801 for the renovation of Sheridan High
School Entrance, 1056 Long Drive, Sheridan, WY 82801
and is entitled to final settlement for the above
described work as deemed complete by Owner.
On November 28th, 2014 being the 41st day after the
first publication of this notice, Sheridan County School
District No. 2 will pay O’Dell Construction, Inc. the
amount due under the contract.
Craig Dougherty, Superintendent
Sheridan County School District No. 2
Publish: October 17, 22 and November 1, 2014
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
Your Right
To Know
and be informed
of government
legal
proceedings is
embodied in
public notices.
This newspaper
urges every
citizen to read and
study these
notices.
We strongly
advise those
seeking
further
information to
exercise their right
of access to public
records and
public meetings.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
before
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at
672-2431 if you have questions.
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
This photo depicts loading planes for grasshopper spraying in 1949. George
Ostrom Sr. is pictured at right. The photo is in the Ostrom Collection in the
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Sheridan County Museum's Memory Book project.
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
B7
P U B LI C N O T I C ES
I
ti
s the publi
c’
s ri
ght to know .
I
ndependent new spapers,li
ke The S herid a n P res s ,publi
sh governm ental
proceedi
ngs to foster a greater trust betw een governm ent and i
t’
s ci
ti
zens.
New spapers have long had the experi
ence,experti
se,and credi
bi
li
ty i
n publi
shi
ng
publi
c noti
ces and have done so si
nce the R evoluti
on.Today,they are an establi
shed
li
nk enabli
ng the publi
c to understand how thei
r resources are bei
ng used i
n the m ost
effi
ci
ent and effecti
ve w ays possi
ble.
I
t’
s m ore than foreclosures,requests for bi
d and m i
nutes ofm eeti
ngs.I
t’
si
nteresti
ng
readi
ng.W hen w e launched a redesi
gned S heri
dan P ress i
n July,w e i
ntended to gi
ve
publi
c noti
ce adverti
si
ng i
t’
s due by m ovi
ng the pages from the back ofthe
new spaper to the front secti
on.The pages
i
nclude the nam es and contact
i
nform ati
on ofour publi
c offi
ci
als.
O ur publi
c noti
ces page(s)also i
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valuable,i
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the S heri
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Content matters.
144 G ri
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B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014
Johnson: New title format
‘has seemed bizarre’
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Jimmie Johnson says
NASCAR’s new championship format has “seemed
bizarre,” but the eliminated six-time champion knows
he has to think about the big picture for racing.
Johnson was among 16 drivers who initially made
the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. He’s
already out of contention for his seventh season title
even with three wins and 1,119 laps led this year. Fourtime race winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. also can’t win the
title after the first two championship rounds cut the
field to eight drivers.
“It has seemed bizarre since the onset. I, though, feel
that I need to take a different approach and think of it
differently and think of what is good for the sport,”
Johnson said Friday. “This is really being put back in
the fans’ hands. At the end of the day, if there are
more people tuning in and watching, we are creating
the drama, sponsorship is in the sport, then it is what
we need to do. I made that conscious decision when
Brian France called me and told me where things
were going for this year.”
Among the eight drivers still in contention are Ryan
Newman and Matt Kenseth, neither of whom has won
a race this season. Newman, who has led only 41 laps
all season, was in 16th place when the chase started —
two spots ahead of Kenseth.
After Texas and then Phoenix next week, only the
top four drivers in the standings will be eligible to win
the season title in the finale at Homestead.
“I understand that from an economic standpoint
(that) tracks, NASCAR, the race teams for sure, are in
a bind and we are in a tough situation,” Johnson said.
“So we need to make some change.
“This is the decision they made and we have certainly seen the drama. It seems like attendance is going in
the right way, ad buys are going the right way and TV
viewership is up,” he said. “Is it what we all as racers
think should happen and is it the best way to go about,
falling back on the history of our sport in determining a champion? No, but we have to pay attention to
who is sitting out in the stands, in my opinion.”
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Lady Broncs still in running at regional tournament
Malia Smiley pushes the ball over the net Friday at Sheridan High School in the Lady Broncs’ win over Laramie. The SHS volleyball team went on
Friday to lose against Campbell County before earning a win over Cheyenne South and earning the No. 4 seed. The Lady Broncs will face No. 1ranked Cheyenne East at 10 a.m. today.
Randolph leads Grizzlies over Pacers 97-89
Fall Savings....
33% OFF
Clip this ad, bring it in at time of drop off and
receive 33% off any dry cleaning or laundry
order. Offer valid until November 30, 2014.
Martinizing Dry Cleaning
1360 Sugarland Drive
(behind Perkins)
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Zach
Randolph scored 11 of his 22 points in
the third quarter and added 13
rebounds to lead the Memphis
Grizzlies to a 97-89 victory over the
Indiana Pacers on Friday night.
Marc Gasol had 20 points and six
rebounds and Mike Conley added 17
points for the Grizzlies, who are 2-0
for just the third time in franchise
history. They have a shot to open the
season with three straight wins for
the first time.
Chris Copeland came off the bench
with 16 points and six rebounds and
C.J. Miles finished with 13 for the
short-handed Pacers.
Conley and Randolph combined for
13 points in a 26-2 run by Memphis to
take a 74-63 lead with 2:23 remaining
in the third quarter.
Courtney Lee, who finished with 12
points, was diagnosed with a mild
concussion after he left the game at
GO
ONLINE!
t hesherid anpres s.com
the 2:03 mark in the second quarter.
He fell to the ground after a missed
lay-up and suffered a blow to the back
of the head after hitting Roy Hibbert’s
knee.
He lay on the floor with
his hands on his head for
several minutes before he
was helped to the locker
room.
The Pacers look its first
lead early in the second
quarter and led at the
break 53-45.
Randolph
The Grizzlies shot just 9
of 20 in the second quarter and
Indiana took advantage with a 13-2
run. But Memphis’ big third quarter
was too much for the Pacers to overcome.
TIP-INS
Grizzlies: Had just nine turnovers
and converted Indiana’s 18 turnovers
into 14 points. . Despite poor shooting
in the second quarter, Memphis still
shot 44.3 percent. . The Grizzlies
brought three natives for an Indiana
homecoming. Conley and Lee are
from Indianapolis, and Randolph
grew up nearly 70 miles away in
Marion, Indiana.
Pacers: Hibbert was taken out of
the mix early when he picked up his
second foul at the 7:19 mark of the
first quarter and didn’t return until
midway through the second quarter. .
Beno Udrih was 3 of 3 from 3-point
range and Rodney Stuckey added six
points in the second quarter, including a turnaround jumper to give
Indiana its first lead. . Hibbert
blocked a hook-shot by Randolph
early in the third quarter before Luis
Scola scored to put the Pacers ahead
57-46 before the Grizzlies pulled away.
UP NEXT
Memphis visits Charlotte on
Saturday.
49ers LB Willis to be game time decision
SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP) — Patrick
Willis will be a game-time decision Sunday
when the San Francisco 49ers host the St.
Louis Rams.
The playmaking linebacker missed the
49ers’ loss in Denver two weeks ago with a
big toe injury. Willis, third on the team
with 49 tackles, said he still feels pain but
is getting better every day.
“It’s all about being able to know how
much pain you can endure and still perform,” Willis said Friday. “I won’t go out
unless I know I can help the defense.”
Willis does not suffer from turf toe, a
severe injury that sidelined cornerback
Tramaine Brock for five games and who
remains questionable this week, but the
injury does affect Willis every time he
takes a step.
“Over time, you understand the big toe is
important for the body,” Willis said. “It’s
not like a broken middle finger, which you
can put a cast on and still go. My feet are
everything.”
The seven-time Pro Bowl linebacker is
one of the reasons the 49ers remain in the
upper echelon of the NFL in defensive
rankings despite missing two key linebackers in the injured NaVarro Bowman and
the suspended Aldon Smith.
Rookie linebacker Chris Borland started
in place of Willis against the Broncos and
will fill the void again should Willis be
unable to go. Rookie Aaron Lynch has also
seen his playing time increase the past few
weeks.
“I can handle the pain, but this is a little
more,” Willis said. “It’s taking a little time.
I want to be at my peak any time I step on
the field.”
Willis spent the bye week receiving treatment for the injury at the 49ers’ headquar-
ters.
“At this point, the bye week is a chance to
relax and get my mind back focused,”
Willis said. “For me, that meant being here
and getting better. We have great trainers
here who are working to help me.”
Rookie center Marcus Martin gets his
opportunity to start against the Rams due
to a season-ending injury to Daniel Kilgore.
Martin will be making his NFL debut.
“He’s sure of himself naturally, so he’s
just being himself,” 49ers veteran left tackle Joe Staley said. “He’s been sharp and on
top of it all year. He takes notes like an old
veteran. His notebook is filled with details.
He’s ready to get on the field.”
The 49ers will be using their fifth starting
combination along the offensive line after
two years of relative stability.
“Our guys have looked good,” 49ers coach
Jim Harbaugh said. “In terms of practice,
they have improved noticeably.”
Staley said it’s all part of doing business.
“We have been very fortunate the past
couple of years,” Staley said. “Injuries are
part of the game and we adjust. I feel confident with the guys we play. We can always
do better. We’ve done a lot of things well,
but the whole thing is a process and we
continue to improve.”
NOTES: Harbaugh gave a visual in
response to what makes WR Stevie
Johnson elusive to defensive backs. “He’s
got a shake, a wiggle. It’s different,”
Harbaugh said while looking like he was
poking his head around the corner while
running in place. “If you see it enough and
watch it, you can read the body language.
That’s probably a good description: His
body language being tough to read is an
asset for him.” ... Willis and Brock are the
only two listed as questionable for Sunday.

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