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WEEKEND
Saturday, October 18, 2014
129th Year, No. 128
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
$1.50
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEOS AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
Warm up to
radiant floorheating . C1
Hazardous materials team responds to Trails End Motel
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — A guest at Trails End Motel
made a report Friday afternoon that he was
ill and Rocky Mountain Ambulance
responded to the scene.
Upon arrival, responders were given information by the man that he had recently
returned from Africa, and was concerned
he had contracted Ebola.
RMA employees contacted Sheridan
Memorial Hospital, who directed them to
call in Sheridan Fire Rescue, as SFR is fully
equipped with the proper hazardous material suits and equipment.
“Due to some comments made by the individual, it was determined that a hazardous
materials team needed to be dispatched and
identify if there was a credible threat,”
Captain Robert Dobbs of Sheridan Fire
Rescue said.
After receiving the call from Rocky
Mountain at 5 p.m., they immediately dispatched the hazardous materials team to
Trails End.
The Sheridan Police Department reported
to the scene at 5:30 p.m. and according to
Sgt. Tom Ringley, guests in some wings of
the hotel were asked to stay out of their
rooms until it could be determined whether
or not there was a threat to the public.
SEE HAZMAT, PAGE 2
Broncs lose to Natrona 24-0
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan’s Colbey Bruney carries the ball downfield Friday at Natrona County High School.
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Through the first seven
weeks of the season, the Natrona Mustangs
only gave up 6.1 points a game, and their stifling defense was too much for the Broncs to
handle last night in Casper.
Head coach Don Julian knew that
turnovers would be the difference maker in
the ballgame, but he was hoping his team
would be on the better end of them Friday.
The Broncs dug themselves an early hole
by giving up a touchdown to the Mustangs
right away. Sheridan received the opening
kickoff and had a great possibility to move
the ball immediately, but quarterback Blake
Godwin barely overthrew a wide-open Joe
Shassetz on the opening play of the game.
The play would have gone for at least 40
yards.
Two plays later, on a third-and-6 from
their own 24-yard line, Godwin threw an
interception. To go along with the already
short field in front of them, a Sheridan
encroachment penalty on fourth-and-1 kept
the drive going and led to an eventual 6-yard
touchdown run.
The Broncs’ offense was never able to get
going after that.
It seemed as if the big “NC” logo at mid-
field was a magnet, attracted to the blue
pants and white jerseys of the Sheridan
Broncs. Anytime the Sheridan offense
gained any momentum, it hit a wall right at
the midfield logo. The Broncs were forced to
punt six times last night and turned the ball
over on downs right around midfield.
The running game was virtually nonexistent for Sheridan as well. The Broncs only
ran the ball 12 times, allowing the Natrona
defense to play the pass and come away with
three interceptions on the game.
Wedded
bliss?
Federal judge
overturns Wyoming
gay marriage ban
CHEYENNE (AP) — A federal
judge has ordered Wyoming to
allow same-sex marriage but has
stayed his decision so that the
state can appeal if it wants.
Despite the delay, advocates for
gay marriage were rejoicing
Friday.
“It’s a bit of legal maneuvering
but make no mistake the freedom
to marry is here in Wyoming,”
Jeran Artery, executive director of
Wyoming Equality, declared.
U.S. District Judge Scott
Skavdahl ruled Friday that the
state must comply with a ruling by
the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals
that permits same-sex marriage.
But he says his ruling will not
take effect until next Thursday in
order to allow time for the state to
appeal.
Skavdahl said his ruling will
take effect immediately if the state
decides before Thursday not to
appeal.
Gov. Matt Mead, who has defended the state law, said during a
debate Thursday night he would
be opposed to appealing a decision
against the state.
There was no immediate comment from Mead or the attorney
general’s office Friday afternoon.
Denver lawyer L. James Lyman,
who represents same-sex couples
who filed the federal lawsuit
against Mead, said Friday that his
side would ask the state attorneys
to “file a notice with the court so
folks can start getting married
sooner than the end of next
week.”
Wyoming is among the most conservative states politically and its
law defines marriage as between a
man and woman.
But the number of states fighting gay marriage is dwindling
thanks to a slew of court rulings
in recent weeks.
The U.S. Supreme Court recently
declined to review several federal
court rulings that upheld gay marriage as a constitutional right. The
rulings include the one from the
10th Circuit, which covers
Wyoming and five other states.
Wyoming county clerks have
been unwilling to grant marriage
licenses to same-sex couples until
the legal issues have been
resolved.
SEE BRONCS, PAGE 2
SEE MARRIAGE, PAGE 2
Dispelling the myths of Common Core
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The Common Core State
Standards continue to be an ongoing hot
topic of conversation in Sheridan County
and elsewhere, as is evident by the persisting debates and pre-election positioning on
the issue.
While it is commonly stated that there is
much discourse between supporters and
critics to the standards, there appears to
be a consensus on the idea that many people truly don’t know what the standards
are.
Earlier this week at the Sheridan County
candidate forums, school and college
board hopefuls gathered to answer questions and address topics pertinent to their
potential positions, including their
thoughts on Common Core.
Standards outline critical parts of the game
— whether they are
playing home or away.
They include the length
of the field, the rules of
the game and the roles
of offense and defense.
Curriculum is the
playbook to help
the team succeed.
Every team has a
different playbook
that draws on the
strengths of each
individual on the
team.
Assessments
include not just
the final score,
but also the
game tape used
to renew plays
and identify
areas to improve.
COURTESY GRAPHIC |
SEE CORE, PAGE 7
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Russel Cox
of Sheridan
OPINION
VOICES
ALMANAC
SPORTS
A4
A5
A9
B1
HOME & GARDEN C1
SENIOR
C2
YOUTH
C3
FAITH
C4
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
College to name street leading to AgriPark after LeDoux
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Construction on the new
AgriPark will be complete later this
month, and those heading out for a visit
will find their way there on a very special
road.
The AgriPark is Sheridan College’s new
large animal science center and future
home for the men’s and women’s rodeo
teams — in development now on the north
end of Sheridan.
During the Northern Wyoming
Community College District board of
trustees meeting Thursday night it was
decided the road through Wrench Ranch
leading to the center will be called Chris
LeDoux Way.
The unanimous vote came after a recom-
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PHOTOS IS
FRIDAY,NOV.7
AT 12 NOON
mendation by SC President Dr. Paul Young,
a motion by trustee Walt Wragge and a second by trustee Bruce Hoffman.
“We are thrilled to take the opportunity
to honor and recognize Chris LeDoux, a
truly talented man who made a difference
across the country as well as right here at
Sheridan College,” Young said.
Wragge said it was his personal honor to
make the motion as his family had connections to the LeDoux family, including
Wragge’s daughter teaching LeDoux’s children music lessons.
Hoffman added that he was at the college
when LeDoux was on the Sheridan rodeo
team and he was a remarkable man back
then, and continued to be so.
After college, LeDoux went on to compete
professionally in rodeo, claiming the bareback title at the National Finals Rodeo in
1976. Throughout his career, he moonlit as
a singer and songwriter, initially selling
records out of his truck and eventually
going on to record 36 albums.
LeDoux passed away in March 2005 after
a battle with a rare form of cancer.
That year he was posthumously named to
the ProRodeo Hall of Fame and awarded
the Academy of Country Music Pioneer
Award.
WE NEED YOUR
PHOTOS
In other business:
• Board chair Kati Sherwood appointed
trustees Wragge, Norleen Healy and Scott
Ludwig to serve as the 2015 Board Officer
Nominating Committee. The committee
will select the new NWCCD officers during
the December board meeting.
• Groathouse Construction out of Casper
was awarded the Construction Manager at
Risk contract for the upcoming science
center renovations and construction of the
new agriculture center. More information
on the contract will be released as it is
made available by the state.
• Wragge presented a Wyoming
Association of Community College
Trustees update. WACCT reports assets of
$108,167 and recently renewed their contract with Executive Director Steve
Bahmer.
• The WACCT Community College
Summit was held earlier this month in
Laramie. The theme of the summit was
“Collaboration and Completion: What
Matters Most in Strengthening Student
Success,” and a study released at the summit stated what matters most to students is
having a relationship in their education
with someone who cares about them.
The Northern Wyoming
Community College District
voted Thursday to name the
road leading to Sheridan
College’s AgriPark, the
school’s new large animal science center, after well-known
musician and rodeo cowboy
Chris LeDoux. The road will be
called Chris LeDoux Way.
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COURTESY PHOTO |
BRONCS: Julian: We’ll go back to work
30-yard pass to the Sheridan 14-yard line
put Natrona in the red zone just before the
end of the third quarter. It didn’t take long
“We just weren’t able to sustain drives on for Natrona to score again on a quarteroffense,” Julian said after the game. “They
back keeper that gave them a 21-0 lead in
took away the run game for the most part,
the final quarter of play.
so now you’ve got to put it in the air. They
The Mustangs added a 50-yard field goal
know that, and they’re coming with heat,
late in the quarter — Cody Wilkinson’s
and they did a good job with that tonight.”
sixth field goal of 50 yards or longer on the
After trailing 14-0 at the half, the
season — that sealed the deal for Natrona
Sheridan defense came out and forced
in the 24-0 victory.
Natrona to punt on the opening drive of the
Natrona clinched the top seed in 4A with
the win, and Sheridan fell to 6-2 on the seasecond half. Three big runs by Evan Coon
kept the chains moving and got the Broncs son.
“We’ll go back home, and we’ll go back to
into Natrona territory. On a crucial fourthdown play, the Broncs needed six yards but work,” Julian said.
The Broncs are back in action next
Joe Shassetz was dropped immediately a
yard short of the first-down marker.
Friday to finish the regular season at
The Mustangs took over possession, and a Cheyenne South.
FROM 1
HAZMAT: Guest claimed to have Ebola
FROM 1
The hazmat team gained entry to the
man’s room, conducted a thorough interview process and determined the individual was not a threat.
“There are certain symptoms we look for,
and also during the interview process it
was determined this individual didn’t have
any credible information that he would
have been exposed to Ebola,” Dobbs said.
“He had never left the country, been in contact with someone from Africa or with
someone with Ebola.”
The evacuation lasted approximately an
hour until it was determined there was no
public threat.
The hazmat team left the site at 6:48 p.m.
and left the man in the care of RMA.
After the threat was dispelled, the individual was transferred to Sheridan
Memorial Hospital but not for anything
biological or hazardous related.
The man’s passport showed his statement
of recently returning from Africa was false
and officials at the motel reported he had
been their guest for several weeks.
“No matter what, we always take everything serious and take all precautions necessary until we identify if it is a credible
threat or not,” Dobbs said. “We’ve received
information from the CDC detailing checklists for Ebola preparedness, the hospital is
trained for it and we have all the protective
equipment for anything like that. But there
was no threat here.”
Ringley reported that though charges
could be placed for someone attempting to
create public fear or distraction, that was
not the case here and no charges will be
filed.
“We don’t know what the intent of the
reporting party was,” Ringley said. “He
may well have been under the weather, but
it certainly wasn’t from any type of virus
or pathogen.”
Goose Valley Fire District was also onsite for the incident.
Rocky Mountain Ambulance was not
available for comment before presstime.
MARRIAGE: Suit included Carpenter pair
FROM 1
The couples include Brie Barth and
Shelly Montgomery of Carpenter, who
applied for a marriage license the day after
the Supreme Court decision not to take up
gay marriage upheld gay marriage in the
10th Circuit and elsewhere.
Barth and Montgomery are among the
couples who filed the federal lawsuit.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
12 city vehicles receive Global Positioning
Systems to improve operations
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — New Global Positioning
Systems being installed in 12 city vehicles this
week will enable more efficient operations and
improved tracking and accountability, Public
Works Director Nic Bateson said.
The systems, which will be primarily installed
in snow removal equipment, were approved in
this year’s general fund budget utilizing up to
$75,000 in supplemental funds. Supplemental
funds are state funds given to municipalities
that can’t be used for regular operations like
salaries and wages but can be used for one-time
expenses or ongoing costs like utilities.
The total cost of installing GPS in the first 12
vehicles in the snow removal fleet was approximately $12,000. City staff are considering similar systems in landfill vehicles in the future.
Bateson said GPS technology in city vehicles
is an up-and-coming trend around the country.
The system will monitor vehicle locations at all
times, driving distance and performance of each
vehicle, including idle time and running time.
Sensors on the GPS equipment will also allow
the city to identify, in the case of snow plows,
information such as when the snow plow is up
or down, when the equipment is applying ice
slicer and more.
“At the end of the day, or the end of a snow
event, we can look back and evaluate the efficiency of our operations to make sure we are
where we need to be and how efficient we are
with our equipment,” Bateson said.
GPS capabilities will allow for more efficient
dispatch of snow plows since the dispatch center will know where each vehicle is located and
where each should go based on need and location.
GPS will also allow for better tracking of
routes and services performed. This will help
city staff better address citizen questions about
whether and when a plow has been on their
street, if and when ice slicer was applied and
more.
Bateson said the city service center receives
numerous calls regarding snow plow routes and
services during each snow event, and the GPS
will allow staff to provide more accurate and
timely answers.
The systems will also provide record keeping
for “safety walk arounds” done by employees to
ensure a vehicle is safe to drive, and will provide accountability to ensure safety checks are
completed before and after a vehicle is used.
“It will be a great check and balance system,”
Bateson said. “If we do look at our system and
operations and see we’re not doing things as
efficiently as we should be, that’s when we can
try to cut costs.”
Bateson said the new systems are one way the
city uses state funds to invest in equipment that
will save the city money in the long term.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
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Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Building a bridge
Concrete workers move around the deck machine as concrete is laid down at the job site of the new bridge crossing the Big Goose Creek at Dow
and Lewis streets Friday morning. The bridge is expected to be open for traffic by early November, weather permitting. The sidewalks, pathways,
rails, landscaping and other finishing touches should be wrapped up by summer of next year.
Legislators consider combining two
proposed workplace safety bills
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Brett Collins died on the
job in 2012. The 20-year-old was hit by the
bucket of an excavator as he worked in a
trench — a violation of safety standards set
by Wyoming’s Occupational Safety and
Health Administration. Negotiations
between Occupational Safety and Health
Administration and COP Construction,
where Collins worked, reduced the proposed fine of $13,860 to less than half that
amount.
For the Collins family, that was unacceptable. They have proposed a bill that they
hope will keep companies responsible for
employee deaths from walking away with
low penalties.
The bill they have proposed is still only a
draft, but legislators on the Labor, Health
and Social Services Committee discussed it
at a meeting Thursday in conjunction with
a second bill meant to raise OSHA penalties that had passed the House, but not the
Senate, in 2010.
The original proposal by the Collins family asked that a company responsible for an
employee’s death be charged a non-negotiable $50,000 fee on top of penalties levied
against the company by OSHA.
Rep. Mary Throne, D-Laramie, said the
committee talked about combining the
Collins bill with the OSHA penalties bill in
some fashion.
“We had some good discussion,” Throne
said. “I think we can have a bill that
addresses the Collins’ concerns, and we’re
moving forward.”
Throne added that there would be one
more meeting to talk about the bills before
the legislative session starts in January.
Rep. Kathy Coleman, R-Sheridan, said
there was language in the new bill that
caused her some concern. “There is a
clause that basically makes it a criminal
act to listen to appeals,” she said.
The clause reads, “No state official or
employee who has authority to impose a
penalty under this subsection shall fail to
impose the penalty or shall negotiate a lesser penalty. Any person who willfully violates this paragraph is guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be fined
two hundred fifty dollars ($250.00) and be
removed from office or employment.”
Coleman said she believes employers
should be allowed to appeal a penalty
should new evidence arise. She also said
she is concerned that officials may not
hear those appeals if they fear they will be
criminally charged and fired.
“It just still needs a lot of discussion,”
Coleman said.
According to a report issued by the AFLCIO in May, Wyoming had the third highest
median of workplace safety penalties paid
out in 2012 at just over $20,000, and had the
second highest rate for workplace deaths at
12.2 percent per 100,000 workers. Coleman
said she believes that imposing stiffer
penalties will help lower workplace deaths.
“I think Throne’s bill has a good chance,”
Coleman said. “We need to place an emphasis on workplace safety. With grant money
for safety training and higher penalties for
safety violations, I think we can move forward.”
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Nobel awards
give voice to
the murmur
T
Prize.
here has been a lot of
talk over the last week
or so about the winners
of the Nobel Peace
The winners made quite
the stir.
Malala Yousfzai, a 17-yearold Pakistani advocate for
girls’ education, became the
youngest Nobel Peace Prize
winner in history.
The Nobel Committee also
took great
care in
choosing
the person
with
whom she
shares the
award.
Kailash
Satyarthi
EDITOR’S
is an
Indian
COLUMN
children’s
|
rights
Kristen Czaban
activist.
"The Nobel Committee
regards it as an important
point for a Hindu and a
Muslim, an Indian and a
Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education
and against extremism," the
committee said in a statement.
Not only did they join an
adult and a teenager, they
unified two cultures.
Even more important was
the focus the committee
chose to put on children.
I am an avid reader. So the
struggles of this year’s winners are not new to me. But I
was thrilled to see them honored on such a large scale.
I was saddened, though,
too.
Some hadn’t heard of
Yousfzai or Satyarthi. Why?
The troubles of children are
often drowned out by the
roar of adults clamoring for
help with their own issues.
Globally, the economy, poverty, hunger, illness and any
other number of issues often
take the forefront.
But children will be the
ones to inherit all of those
troubles we cannot solve.
They also frequently
become the victim of wars
adults continue to battle
with no resolution.
The focus put on children
by the Nobel Committee, I
hope, reminds all of us that
children’s rights and children’s voices, no matter how
murmered, deserve to be
heard.
While both Satyarthi and
Yousfzai are from outside
the U.S., our country is not
immune to issues facing
children either.
Drugs and alcohol abuse,
poverty and violence are not
unique to other nations or
cultures. We have them here
too.
I’m glad to see Yousfzai
and Satyarthi recognized,
both for their efforts to right
humanitarian wrongs and
for the light their work continues to shine on issues facing children across the
globe.
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
SHERIDAN PRESS EDITORIAL |
Part of success means showing up
W
oody Allen once said,
“Eighty percent of success is showing up.” For
candidates running for
public office, that quote seems to
fall on deaf ears.
The Sheridan County
Chamber of Commerce held two
nights of candidate forums this
week. Sheridan is one of the
largest communities in the state,
yet few statewide candidates
participated in the event.
Local candidates, even, failed
to show up.
It is understandable that not
every candidate can attend every
event to which he or she is invited. But, when you’re asking for
the votes of individuals in your
community, you sure better try.
Tuesday night’s candidate
forum featured local candidates
— those for local town councils,
school boards and the conservation district.
Of the 45 candidates seeking
office, 31 attended. Yes, some of
those individuals who chose not
to attend are running unopposed. But even those candidates, despite a likely win,
should be speaking with their
constituents about who they are
and what they have to offer.
Wednesday’s turnout proved to
be even worse. Fewer than half
(10 of 26) of the candidates
attended to speak with Sheridan
residents and ask, in person, for
their votes. Wednesday featured
candidates running for seats in
the Wyoming Legislature and for
other statewide offices like governor and superintendent of
public instruction.
Sheridan area residents have
proven to be more interested in
candidates than past years. The
Whitney Presentation Hall had
nearly 100 local residents pres-
ent to hear ideas and ask questions. While that isn’t a great
turnout if you look at the total
number of registered voters in
the county (15,132), attendance
was better than it has been in
the past.
In addition, voters will have
the opportunity to watch the
forums online and on television,
candidates will not have another
chance to address voters in this
manner before Election Day.
It’s a shame more of the candidates seeking our support didn’t
attend and share their ideas
with the voters.
QUOTABLE |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Facts and history tell us that
radical and illegal acts that got
their way only result in more
severe illegal activities, exacerbating disorder and turmoil.
Stability is bliss, and turmoil
brings havoc.”
— A front-page editorial in
Beijing’s People’s Daily, the ruling Communist Party’s mouthpiece, condemning demonstrators
seeking greater democracy in
Hong Kong.
“We knew a second case could
be a reality, and we’ve been
preparing for this possibility.”
— Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the Texas Department of
State Health Services, after a
Dallas health care worker treating
Ebola victim Thomas Eric
Duncan contracted the deadly
virus.
W
Will the FCC try to tackle ‘Redskins’?
retched excess by government can be
beneficial if it startles people into
wholesome disgust and deepened distrust and it prompts judicial rebukes
that enlarge freedom. So let’s hope the Federal
Communications Commission embraces the
formal petition inciting it to deny licenses to
broadcasters who use the
word “Redskins” when
reporting on the Washington
Redskins.
Using the FCC to break
another private institution
to the state’s saddle for the
satisfaction of a clamorous
faction illustrates how the
government’s many tentaGEORGE
cles give it many means of
WILL
intimidating people who
|
offend it. The U.S. Patent
and Trademark Office,
empowered to ban trademarks that “may” disparage persons, has
already limited trademark protection of the
Redskins’ name.
The FCC petition argues that broadcasting
the word “Redskins” during prime time has
“an adverse impact on impressionable
young Indian as well as non-Indian children.” (Today’s sensitivity arbiters say the
word “Indian” does, too, but never mind.)
Furthermore, uttering “Redskins” is “akin
to broadcasting obscenity” and pornography, is “hate speech” and an “ethnic slur”
that “keep[s] alive the spirit of inhumanity,
subjugation and genocide” and “may” cause
violence against Native Americans. Besides,
it is a “nuisance,” defined as something
“annoying.”
Is the FCC empowered to protect an entitlement to a life without annoyances? What
if the FCC is annoying? This is complicated.
Professor Eugene Volokh, who specializes
in First Amendment law at UCLA’s School of
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
Letters must be signed and include an
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will not be published – for verification
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being published.
Law and supervises an invaluable Web site,
the Volokh Conspiracy (a partner of The
Post), thinks the petition refutes itself. It
argues that “Redskins” is offensive because
of the ideas and attitudes the word conveys.
But when the Supreme Court upheld restrictions on the broadcasting of certain vulgarities (George Carlin’s “seven dirty words”), it
stressed that the mere fact that speech is
offensive is not a sufficient reason for suppressing it. And although the court focused
on the content of the words, it did not focus
on the political content or on the speaker’s
opinion. “Indeed,” Justice John Paul
Stevens wrote, “if it is the speaker’s opinion
that gives offense, that consequence is a reason for according [an utterance] constitutional protection,” because “the government
must remain neutral in the marketplace of
ideas.”
Volokh adds: “The premise of the criticism of ‘Redskins’ is precisely that it
embodies a racist, demeaning message
about American Indians (whether or not
this is intended by those who use it), and
that it offends because of this racist meaning. It thus is the speaker’s imputed opinion
and supposed ‘political content’ of the word
that gives offense.”
Some say “Redskins” is merely an offensive epithet with a negligible ideological
message. Volokh replies that the epithet is
offensive to those who are offended
“because of its allegedly racist ideology, and
the call to suppress it stems precisely from
the perception that it conveys this racist
ideology.” Anyway, the anti-”Redskins” petition is less legal reasoning than a form of
bureaucratic bullying known as regulation
by “raised eyebrow.” The petition’s author
notes that the FCC sometimes indicates disapproval of this or that, thereby compelling
broadcasters, worried about being put out of
business, to practice self-censorship. So the
petition seems designed to trigger this,
thereby succeeding even if it fails — even if
the FCC dismisses the petition.
If, however, the FCC under progressives
today but conservatives tomorrow, can, in
the petition’s words, define and ban particular words as “nuisances” because they
“annoy” a “substantial composite” of the
population, what other words will appear on
an ever-lengthening list?
Today many colleges and universities have
“free speech zones” — wee spaces to which
the First Amendment is confined. Such
institutions are run by educators whose
meager educations did not teach them that
the amendment made America a free speech
zone. Campuses are habitats for progressives, and the distilled essence of today’s
progressivism is the use of power to limit
speech. The fact that censorship is progressivism’s default position regarding so many
things is evidence of progressives’ pessimism about the ability of their agenda to
advance under a regime of robust discussion. It also indicates the delight progressives derive from bossing people around and
imposing a particular sensibility, in the
name of diversity, of course.
The petition, which uses “R*dskins” (this
typographical delicacy supposedly will help
prevent pogroms against Native
Americans), says the phrase “colored people,” too, is “now considered derogatory.” If
so, some progressive has the awkward duty
of notifying the NAACP that its name is
“akin to” a disparagement, an obscenity,
pornography, a racial slur and hate speech.
The language policeman’s lot is not a happy
one.
GEORGE WILL writes on politics, law and social character. Will began writing
for The Washington Post in 1974. He is a contributor for Fox News, a Pulitzer
Prize recipient for commentary, and is the author of 12 books.
IN WASHINGTON |
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Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
COMMUNITY
VOICES
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVES |
Street SmART: Art decorates the streets of Sheridan
I
t can challenge, delight, educate and illuminate. It is thought-provoking and often
controversial.
Public art. And it is exactly that — art in
public spaces. Art that is free and accessible to everyone.
The Sheridan Public
Arts Committee formed
in 2001 because citizens
of Sheridan aspired to
strengthen the local economy and enhance our
quality of life by establishing an on-loan art
program. The committee
raises funds to acquire
BETH
permanent sculptures
HOLSINGER
that become cherished
symbols of pride and
|
identity in our beautiful
city.
As the former part-time coordinator for
the Public Arts Committee, and now as
executive director of the Downtown
Sheridan Association, I have received innumerable compliments from tourists, locals
and artists about the splendor of our city
and our picturesque Main Street.
I cannot begin to tell you how often I see
visitors taking photos of the sculptures
around town and in front of the DSA office.
A couple traveling through Sheridan just
recently purchased “Waiting For The
Parade” by Donna Pelton, one of the onloan sculptures.
Public art matters. It weaves a diverse
and colorful tapestry throughout world
communities. Carefully conceived public
art programs, rich with connections to our
history, help make places of meaning within a community. Most of all, public art creates a sense of civic vitality in the cities,
towns and communities we inhabit and
visit.
Places with strong public art expressions
break the trend of blandness and sameness
and give communities a stronger sense of
place and identity. Art can provide an
intersection between past, present and
future, between disciplines and between
ideas.
The Public Arts Committee is able to
fund the on-loan program and maintain
acquired sculptures thanks in part to
annual funding received from the City of
Sheridan’s Optional One-Cent Sales Tax.
Yup! That’s right!
And for DSA — which in the past four
years has invested more than 10,000 volunteer hours and contributed more than
$550,000 back into the community — the
power of the penny also makes possible:
• streetscape enhancements in the
Historic Downtown area, including flowers
on Main Street and promotional banners;
• sponsorships including Third Thursday
Street Festival, Sheridan Farmers Market
and Downtown Promotional Committee
• the updating and maintaining of the
Historic Downtown Master Plan as needed
• bringing consultants and speakers to
Sheridan on an as-needed basis
• publication of the Historic Downtown
Walking Tour brochure
• coordination with other organizations
involved with Historic Downtown including the Public Arts Committee, the
Sheridan County Chamber of Commerce,
the Wyoming Department of
Transportation, Streetscape Advisory
Committee and Sheridan Travel and
Tourism.
I think we can all agree that whether you
live in the Sheridan city limits or in another part of the county, downtown Sheridan
provides a wonderful place to shop, dine
and simply enjoy. Be sure to keep our little
gem shining.
Vote “yes” on the Optional One-Cent
Sales Tax.
Enjoy the rest of Sheridan’s beautiful
autumn.
BETH HOLSINGER is the executive director of the Downtown Sheridan
Association.
QUOTABLE |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“You’re right, it needs to be solved in Africa. But
until it is, we should not be allowing these folks in,
period.”
— Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., on prohibiting
passengers from flying in from Liberia, Sierra
Leone and Guinea during the Ebola outbreak.
“It was the honor of my life to serve in the U.S.
Navy. I deeply regret and am embarrassed that my
actions led to my administrative discharge.”
— Hunter Biden, the youngest son of Vice
President Joe Biden, after he was kicked out of the
military for testing positive for cocaine, two people
familiar with the matter say.
“It’s absolutely hilarious. It will be on Saturday
Night Live for sure.”
— Alex Sink, the Democrat who lost to Florida
Gov. Rick Scott in 2010, after a portable electric fan
that former Gov. Charlie Crist insists on bringing
along to campaign appearances delayed a gubernatorial debate between Scott and Crist.
“I didn’t want to go someplace else and be married and then come home and have it be a meaningless piece of paper.”
— Kristine Hilderbrand, a native of Barrow,
Alaska, who wed Sarah Ellis on Monday in the
nation’s northernmost community in what is
believe to be the first same-sex marriage in
Alaska.
CORRECTION |
Correction: In the article titled “More than
man’s best friend” in Friday’s edition of The Press,
Jason King’s length of military service and current
occupation were incorrectly reported. King served
in the Army for 9 years and is currently employed
as a Visitor Information Specialist.
TRENDING ON THE WEB |
NY Times.com
1. Video Feature: Ambulance Work in Liberia Is a Busy
and Lonely Business
2. Staff in Texas Ebola Case Is Asked to Avoid Public
Spaces
3. Ebola Facts: When Did Ebola Arrive and Spread at a
Dallas Hospital?
4. Paul Krugman: What Markets Will
5. Lens: Same-Sex Couples, at Ease at Home
6. Obama May Name ‘Czar’ to Oversee Ebola Response
7. Movie Review | 'Dear White People': Advanced Course
in Diversity
8. Motherlode: Want to Ace That Test? Get the Right Kind
of Sleep
9. The Secret Casualties of Iraq’s Abandoned Chemical
Weapons
For Republicans, saying no to Obama may be enough on Election Day
I
t sounds like the beginning of a joke: Two libertarians and
a corporate lobbyist walk into a social hall . . .
On Wednesday, though, this very scenario happened in
Ashland, Va. Three Republican politicians shared a stage,
and one of these things was not like the others.
There was Rand Paul, ophthalmologist turned senator
and 2016 presidential hopeful, a tea party darling who
would like to strip big government right
down to its skivvies.
There, too, was David Brat, seminarian
cum economics professor who gained
national fame for defeating Eric Cantor
in a primary by portraying the House
majority leader as a Washington insider
who was too liberal on immigration. The
longtime Brat friend who introduced
him to the crowd said that “he is divineDANA
ly inspired to represent the entire 7th
District.”
MILBANK
And finally, there was Senate candidate
|
Ed Gillespie, longtime political operative
and founder of an eponymous lobbying
firm that represented, among others, Enron. He’s more the
embodiment of the Washington establishment than Cantor
ever was.
Here’s the punch line: The three got along just fine. “I
see unity,” proclaimed Paul.
Of course he did. The trio went to painful lengths to
cover over divisions.
“One thing I love about Dave is he’s for term limits, and
so am I,” Paul said of Brat.
At this, Gillespie pointed to himself.
“And Ed as well,” Paul added, caught off-guard. If
Gillespie supports term limits, he’s been awfully silent
about it. His spokesman didn’t respond to questions about
when he had taken such a position.
The men papered over their differences because of one
overriding and unifying goal: to inflict as much damage as
possible on President Obama and his agenda on Election
Day.
“People ask me what’s the worst thing Obama’s done,
and it’s a long list,” Paul said.
“Impeach Obama!” somebody in the audience shouted.
“It’s the president’s absolute disregard for the
Constitution,” Paul went on. “It’s the usurpation of
power.”
“Treason!” somebody else in the audience shouted. Brat
smiled; the others ignored the accusation.
Paul went on to accuse Obama of “a form of tyranny,”
adding, “This is everything we must rise up against.”
That antipathy toward the unpopular president more
than any single issue is what is propelling Republicans to
likely gains in November. A CBS News poll found that 31
percent of registered voters see the election as a way to
raise objection to Obama, while only 18 percent see it as a
way to affirm Obama. That’s nearly as bad as it was for
George W. Bush in 2006 before major Democratic gains.
Republicans are so confident of anti-Obama sentiments
that they aren’t making an effort to present an alternative
agenda, the way they did with 1994’s “Contract With
America” or 2010’s “Pledge to America.” The Republican
National Committee drafted only vaguely worded “principles” (“Our Constitution should be preserved, valued and
honored”).
Wednesday’s event for Brat (who is likely to win) and
Gillespie (who is not) required particular agility by the
performers to promote togetherness. Brat won his primary by claiming Cantor supported amnesty; Gillespie
had been a promoter of comprehensive immigration
reform. Paul has made it his priority to open the
Republican Party to minorities and youths, but of the few
hundred people in the hall in Ashland, only two non-white
faces were visible among the older crowd — and the event
was to promote the election of the man who had ousted
the lone Republican Jew in Congress.
Gillespie, in pinstriped suit-pants over his loafers, wore
a frozen grin as Brat promised “much less of the crony
Wall Street connection up there in D.C.” Gillespie, a political appointee in Bush’s White House, seemed to distance
himself from himself when he vowed to keep “political
appointees in Washington, D.C.,” out of health-care decisions. So eager were candidates and attendees for unity
that they even applauded Paul, dressed in blue jeans and
cowboy boots, when he spoke out for shorter drug sentences.
Their speeches included scattershot references to
Obamacare, regulations, taxes, energy, school choice, veterans, the military, China, judges and Ebola. But promises
to block the other side’s agenda inspired the most enthusiasm. Based on the crowd reaction, Brat’s best case for
Gillespie was that “we need him to be a check on all of
President Obama’s destructive policies.”
Gillespie’s best case for himself, measured by the standing ovation, was that he could “make Harry Reid the former Senate majority leader” — and stop the Democratic
incumbent, Mark Warner, from voting for Obama’s agenda.
“We just saw recently President Obama said basically
that his policies are on the ballot this year — every single
one of them,” he said.
Saying no does not an agenda make, but for Republicans
in 2014, it may be enough.
DANA MILBANK is a political reporter for The Washington Post and has authored two books on
national political campaigns and the national political parties.
A6
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
PAGE SIX
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
TODAY IN HISTORY |
HEALTH WATCH |
Breast cancer
awareness
O
ctober is Breast Cancer Awareness
Month, a time when the focus turns to
health and wellness for women. In keeping with the spirit of women’s health, all
women are invited to use this positive momentum to take stock in all aspects of their health
and wellness. Initially, this task may seem overwhelming, perhaps as overwhelming as cleaning out a closet and exchanging clothes and
accessories for each season. While there is no
real way to make the actual
closet cleaning easier, there
is a way to make it easier to
organize the accessories that
make up health and wellness.
Start with the small things,
as they are what make the
biggest difference. Start with
the BAGS AND SHOES of
WENDY
health.
WOOD
NEESON
|
B: Breast Exam —
Baseline mammogram
starting at age 40 and yearly after. Clinical breast
exam starting at age 20 and
every one to three years after. Good self
breast awareness, all ages.
A: Attitude — Emotional health and relationships.
You can check this yourself, but you can
also visit with your primary care provider
about where you are and where you want to
be. Are you happy? Do you feel safe and
respected in your relationships?
G: Gynecological Health — Starting at
age 21, a pap smear, and then every three
years. Starting at age 30, human papilloma
virus co-testing may be added. Abnormal
results have special management guidelines,
which should be discussed with your health
provider.
S: Scope — Screening for colon cancer.
Generally, screening for colon cancer
should begin no later than age 50 and repeated every 10 years. There may be some alternatives and some special circumstances such
as family history which may warrant earlier
or more frequent screenings.
A: Abnormal Appearing Skin Lesions —
Check yourself monthly.
The most important warning sign for
melanoma is a new spot on the skin or a spot
that’s changing in size, shape or color. If you
have any of these warning signs, have your
skin checked by your health provider.
N: New Relationships and Sexually
Transmitted Infection Screenings —
Annual chlamydia/gonorrhea screening for
all sexually active individuals age 25 and
under, as well as those over 25 who have new
or multiple sex partners. Anyone who shares
IV drugs should get tested for HIV at least
once a year and may need other tests.
D: Diabetes Screen — Diet and exercise
evaluation.
Starting at age 45 women should be
screened for diabetes at least every three
years. A body-mass-index is a test that can
also be done in an office and it calculates
height and weight to determine obesity,
which is a risk factor for diabetes and heart
disease. This test should be done annually.
S: Smile — Dental health.
Twice a year dental cleanings and checkups.
H: Heart Health — Heart health includes
many aspects. Blood pressure should be
check annually starting at age 18. Cholesterol
should be checked at least every five years
beginning at age 20. Waist circumference,
BMI and family history can be reviewed to
determine if other tests or screenings need
to be performed.
O: Osteoporosis Screening, Bone
Density Screening — Starting at age 65
women should be screened for osteoporosis
with a DEXA scan. This non-invasive scan
looks at the density of the bone to determine
risk for fractures and need for early treatment of osteoporosis for prevention.
E: Eyes — Starting in childhood, the
American Optometric Association recommends a comprehensive eye exam every two
years until age 60, and then annually thereafter.
S: Shots and Immunizations — There are
many immunizations needed throughout
childhood. As adults, we often forget that
there are recommended immunizations and
boosters as well. Influenza, pneumococcal,
zostavax (shingles), HPV, tetanus, hepatitis A
and B are just a few. Discuss your personal
needs with your primary care provider.
There are many factors such as personal
and family history that may change these
guidelines slightly for each individual. A
yearly discussion with a primary care
provider is important to determine which
screenings are appropriate for each individual.
There is no substitute for a medical office
visit, but by taking stock in BAGS AND
SHOES, women will be taking great strides
in screening, prevention and wellness.
WENDY WOOD NEESON is a family nurse practitioner at Reproductive
Healthcare of the Big Horns.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Blue Ribbon honor
U.S. Senator John Barrasso, R-Wyoming, congratulates the students and staff of Highland Park
Elementary for their recent National Blue Ribbon School award during a ceremony Wednesday at the
school.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Polka Club dance Sunday
SHERIDAN — The Big Horn
Mountain Polka Club will host a public
dance Sunday at the Elks Lodge, 45 W.
Brundage St.
From 1-5 p.m. there will be music by
“Just Us Two,” a band from Billings,
Montana.
For more information call Jean Arzy
at 672-3623.
Healthy Back Class
to begin Monday
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan YMCA
will offer a free “Healthy Back Class”
designed by medical professionals to
help individuals strengthen their backs.
The program is a three-week class,
and the class is limited to 15 participants. Those who attend will gradually
learn a sequence of 15 simple but effec-
tive exercises that can be done daily.
You must sign up to participate and
those interested may do so by calling
the YMCA at 674-7488.
The program starts on Monday and
will be held on Mondays and
Wednesdays from 12:15-1:15 p.m.
through Nov. 5.
Free Lectures
Starting Tuesday
SHERIDAN — Lynn Gordon plans to
focus on fear for the next Brown Bag
and After Hours lectures.
The After Hours lecture is on Tuesday
at 5:30 p.m. There will be a repeat of the
seminar on Wednesday at 12:15 p.m.
Both lectures will be held at the
Downtown Sheridan Association, located at 150 S. Main St. For more information call 674-6446 ext. 2200.
The lectures are offered by Family
and Personal Counseling Center and
Sheridan College Community
Education.
SUNDAY AND MONDAY EVENTS |
Sunday
• 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free landfill weekend, 83 E. Ridge Rd.
• 1-5 p.m. Big Horn Mountain Polka Club dance, 45 W. Brundage St.
Monday
• 12:15-1:15 p.m. Healthy Back Class begins, Sheridan YMCA, 417 N. Jefferson St.
• 8 p.m. “Farm to Fork” on PBS featuring SCSD1
AGENDAS |
Sheridan City Council
7 p.m. Monday
55 Grinnell Plaza
• Call to order
• Pledge of Allegiance
• Invocation
• Roll call of members
• Approval of consent agenda
1. Agenda
2. Minutes of regular council meeting Oct. 20
3. Claims
• Communications from Junior Council
1. Swearing in new Junior Councilor Maya
Gilmore
2. Junior council comments
• Staff communications
1. Snow plan update
2. Presentation on liquor license types
• Old business
• New business
• Public hearing
1. Application for new and renewal Bar and Grill
License TMT, LLC dba Open Range Bar & Grill, at 856
Broadway
2. Application for transfer of Retail Liquor
License SWSquared Enterprises LLC dba Willey’s, to Spencer
D Willey dba TBD, and renewal of Retail Liquor License,
Spencer D Willey dba TBD
3. Resolution No 42-14 budget revisions FY15
• Approval application for new and renewal Bar and Grill
License TMT, LLC dba Open Range Bar & Grill, at 856
Broadway
• Approval application for transfer of Retail Liquor
License SWSquared Enterprises LLC dba Willey’s, to Spencer
D Willey dba TBD, and renewal of retail Liquor License,
Spencer D Willey dba TBD
• Approval of Resolution 42-14 budget revisions FY15
• Approval of Cooperative Agreement with Sheridan
County for Joint Planning Area Land Use plan update
• Retail Liquor Licensing Process presentation and
Consideration of Resolution 41-14.
• Comment from the Council and the public
Sheridan County School District 1
5 p.m. Tuesday
Board room, central office
1127 Dayton St., Ranchester
• Call the meeting to order
• Pledge of Allegiance
• Reading of mission statement
• Roll call
• Approval of agenda
• Executive session
1. Personnel
• Presentations, recognitions
• Visitors
• Student ambassador report
• West Sheridan County Education Association Report
• Administrators’ reports
• Business manager’s report
• Superintendent’s report
• Policy review (CA, CB, CBA, CBC, CBG, CC, CCA)
• Consent agenda
1. Approval of Sept. 16 open and executive session meeting minutes and Oct. 13 work session minutes
2. Approval of bills and salaries
3. Approval of classified recommendation
4. Approval of extra duty recommendations
5. Policy approval – second Reading (IICAA,
IICAA-E1, GCN-R1, GCN-E1, GCNA-R1, GCNA, GCP, GDP, GCNAE1)
• Old business
• New business
1. Approval of policies – first reading (BK, BK-R1,
BFG, GCBA, GCBC/GDBC, GCBCA/GDBCA, GCBC/GDBC-R1,
GCBCA/GDBCA-R1)
2. Board evaluation discussion
3. Correspondence
• Board member reports, requests, concerns
• Board signatures
• Executive session
1. Property
2. Personnel
3. Legal
• Adjournment
Sheridan County School District 2 Legislative Roundtable
6 p.m. Monday
Board room, central office
201 N. Connor St.
• Call to order
1. Pledge of Allegiance
• New business
1. Legislative Forum presentation
• Adjournment
TIPPED OVER |
Confederate pomp amid
burial of slave’s daughter
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A funeral is
planned in North Carolina for the
daughter of a slave who had a complicated relationship with the Confederacy.
The Saturday service for 91-year-old
Mattie Clyburn Rice is being arranged
by a member of the Sons of
Confederate Veterans. A color guard of
Confederate re-enactors will attend the
service as will members of the United
Daughters of the Confederacy, to which
Rice belonged.
Rice’s father, Weary Clyburn of
Lancaster County, South Carolina, went
to the Civil War with his master, saved
the man’s life and drew a pension for
his wartime service.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Oct. 18, 1767, the MasonDixon line, the boundary between
Pennsylvania and Maryland, was
set as astronomer Charles Mason
and surveyor Jeremiah Dixon
completed their survey.
On this date:
In 1685, King Louis XIV signed
the Edict of Fontainebleau, revoking the Edict of Nantes that had
established legal toleration of
France’s Protestant population,
the Huguenots.
In 1867, the United States took
formal possession of Alaska from
Russia.
In 1892, the first long-distance
telephone line between New York
and Chicago was officially opened
(it could only handle one call at a
time).
In 1922, the British
Broadcasting Co., Ltd. (later the
British Broadcasting Corp.) was
founded.
In 1931, inventor Thomas Alva
Edison died in West Orange, New
Jersey, at age 84.
In 1944, Soviet troops invaded
Czechoslovakia during World War
II.
In 1954, Texas Instruments
unveiled the Regency TR-1, the
first commercially produced transistor radio.
In 1962, James D. Watson,
Francis Crick and Maurice
Wilkins were honored with the
Nobel Prize for Medicine and
Physiology for determining the
double-helix molecular structure
of DNA.
In 1969, the federal government
banned artificial sweeteners
known as cyclamates (SY’-kluhmaytz) because of evidence they
caused cancer in laboratory rats.
In 1972, Congress passed the
Clean Water Act, overriding
President Richard Nixon’s veto.
In 1977, West German commandos stormed a hijacked Lufthansa
jetliner on the ground in
Mogadishu, Somalia, freeing all 86
hostages and killing three of the
four hijackers.
In 1984, actor Jon-Erik Hexum,
26, was taken off life support six
days after shooting himself in the
head with a pistol loaded with a
blank cartridge on the set of his
TV show “Cover Up.”
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush and Democratic
rival John Kerry traded biting
accusations over the war in Iraq,
with Bush saying his Democratic
challenger stood for “protest and
defeatism” while Kerry accused
the president of “arrogant boasting.” An Anglican church commission urged the U.S. Episcopal
Church not to elect any more gay
bishops and called on conservative African bishops to stop meddling in the affairs of other dioceses.
Five years ago: A suicide
bomber struck a meeting between
Revolutionary Guard commanders
and Shiite and Sunni tribal leaders in the Iranian border town of
Pishin, killing 42 people, including 15 Guard members. Jessica
Watson, a 16-year-old Australian,
steered her bright pink yacht out
of Sydney Harbor to start her bid
to become the youngest person to
sail solo and unassisted around
the world. (She succeeded, returning to Sydney Harbor in May
2010.)
One year ago: People in the San
Francisco Bay area faced a frustrating Friday commute as workers for the region’s largest transit
system walked off the job for the
second time in four months.
President Barack Obama nominated the Pentagon’s former top
lawyer, Jeh (jay) C. Johnson, to be
the next Secretary of Homeland
Security. In a stunning about-face,
Saudi Arabia rejected a coveted
seat on the U.N. Security Council,
denouncing the body for failing to
resolve world conflicts such as
Syria’s civil war. The St. Louis
Cardinals advanced to their second World Series in three seasons
by roughing up the Los Angeles
Dodgers 9-0 in Game 6 of the NL
championship series. Former
House Speaker Tom Foley, 84, died
in Washington, D.C. Former NFL
coach Bum Phillips, 90, died in
Goliad, Texas.
Thought for Today: “The
strongest are those who renounce
their own times and become a living part of those yet to come. The
strongest, and the rarest.” —
Milovan Djilas (1911-1995),
Yugoslav author and politician.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A7
North Dakota well
leaking oil, gas and water
WILLISTON, N.D. (AP) — Authorities say workers
are attempting to contain an out-of-control oil well in
North Dakota.
North Dakota regulators announced Friday that a
well near Watford City in the western part of the state
has been leaking oil, gas and water since Thursday.
But they say there’s no immediate health risk.
The well is owned by XTO Energy Inc. Regulators say
a mechanical problem at the wellhead is being blamed
for the problem.
Officials say inspectors were at the site Friday. They
were working with the company to control the leak.
Authorities say about 300 barrels of oil and water
have been contained and recovered at the well location.
Regulators say an undetermined amount of mist left
the well location. Inspectors are working to determine
where it went.
Spark of creativity
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Future Farmers of America and agriculture instructor Lynne Latham holds a completed flower potholder shaped like a horse at the ag. shop
Wednesday at Arvada-Clearmont High School. The students are making a set of products to sell at the National Finals Rodeo in Vegas at the end
of November to support the FFA activities at ACHS. The products are made completely from scratch using metal working skills such as welding.
CORE: Developed by state education experts in U.S.
FROM 1
Every candidate who
spoke on the topic stated
that they support the standards and believe there are
a number of misconceptions circulating in the public about it.
During the September
Sheridan County School
District 3 board of trustees
meeting, discussion was
held among the trustees
stating they would like a
message to be sent to the
state Legislature that they
support Common Core, and
do not want to see it
repealed.
Fears were expressed that
some candidates for public
office are saying they would
repeal, if elected, and that a
repeal of the standards
which the district has
worked so hard to implement would cost them a substantial amount of money,
and time, to replace.
Sheridan Junior High
School Principal Mitch
Craft presented to the
Sheridan County School
District 2 board of trustees
earlier this month an evaluation of Common Core,
developed in partnership
with instructional facilitator and 2013-14 Wyoming
State Teacher of the Year
Mick Wiest.
He believes the majority, if
not all, of the areas of the
standards people say they
disagree with are not actually part of Common Core
at all.
"We have standards, curriculum and assessments
and I think the national
debate, in my opinion, is
really just based on misunderstanding of these terms,"
Craft said.
So, what are the Common
Core State Standards?
By definition, they are a
framework that articulates
levels of attainment in
knowledge and skills that K12 students should achieve
in English language arts
and mathematics.
What does that mean?
What Common Core is
and what it isn't
One of the common concerns expressed over
Common Core is that it is
an example of federal government overreach to an
area that should be controlled at a state level.
Much of this thinking
stems from the misconception that the standards are
part of the No Child Left
Behind Act.
On the contrary, Common
Core was a state-led initiative from the beginning,
developed by chief state
school officers and governors of 48 states in conjunction with independent
organizations such as the
National Governors
Association Center for Best
Practices, and is in no way
connected to NCLB.
As an additional measure
of state control, Common
Core allows for each state to
add to the standards up to 15
percent.
For example, Montana has
a strong emphasis on Native
American education and
has added a standard
regarding such to their
CCSS.
Another concern frequently voiced is that the standards play to the lowest
common denominator in the
nation, causing some states
to lower their standards.
On the contrary, the creators benchmarked the standards to those of the highest
performing states in the
U.S., as well as the highest
sons selected by districts,
schools and teachers to help
students learn the standards). The Common Core
standards do not dictate the
specific curriculum that is
to be used in the classroom
to reach the benchmarks of
the standards.
However, by providing
teachers nationwide with a
standard benchmark by
grade level, learning can be
consistent by concept across
an increasingly mobile society.
"We have kids moving in
and out of our schools all
the time," Craft said.
"They're moving from far
away or the district next
door, and I can tell you that
right now when they move
from far away our alignment isn't even close."
The alignment also allows
for more accurate compari-
Where was this information obtained
and where can I learn more?
• "Beyond the Rhetoric: Improving College Readiness
Through Coherent State Policy" by the National Center
for Public Policy and Higher Education, and the
Southern Regional Education Board
• The Association for Supervision and Curriculum
Development (ascd.org)
• Common Core State Standards (corestandards.org)
• Foundation for Excellence in Education
(excelined.org)
performing countries in the
world.
The standards have even
been adopted by
Massachusetts, which many
feel had the highest existing
state standards in the
nation prior to Common
Core.
Creators focused their
benchmarks on the desire to
reduce the need for remedial courses at the collegiate
level while increasing global
success.
"None of us like reading
the newspaper every year
after the PISA (Programme
for International Student
Assessment) ranks come out
and seeing that the U.S. is
ranked 30-something again,"
Craft said. "These standards
are designed to remedy that
situation over time, to make
sure we can compete on a
global scale."
Critics also bemoan the
idea of the government
telling a teacher how to
teach his or her own class.
Yet teachers from across
the nation were involved in
the drafting of the standards, and the standards do
not dictate curriculum.
Some people often confuse
the terms standards (an
agreed-upon list of concepts
and skills we expect students to learn) and curriculum (the materials and les-
son of our state's achievements to that of others.
"The PAWS does not
equate in any way, shape or
form to any of the assessments given by any of our
neighboring states in this
region or any other assessments given across the
country," Craft said. "We flat
out cannot compare how
we're doing compared to
other states with these
assessments."
When it comes specifically
to reading, some communities, including Sheridan,
have expressed concern that
the reading list contains
books they do not find
appropriate for their children to be reading.
The suggested readings in
the standards were selected
as pieces that represent the
concept being learned at
each grade level, but as the
standards do not dictate curriculum, teachers, districts
and even parents have the
ability to take their community's sensibilities into consideration when deciding
what books will be present
in class, and no one is
required to use the suggested readings.
Along those lines, many
opponents do not like the
shift in the reading focus
away from fiction and narrative.
"There is a move away
from reading and writing
stories, and a move toward
things that are more technical and appropriate for reallife applications," Craft said.
"It doesn't abandon narrative reading and writing all
together, it just places a lot
more emphasis on functional writing, such as you
would encounter in the
workforce."
The change in focus has
led to two additional fears:
that elective education will
diminish and that instructional resources will continually need to be repurchased to remain aligned.
"A lot of districts ran out
and spent tons of money on
curriculum that came out
about 10 minutes after the
Common Core State
Standards were released
that had the big stamp on it,
'Common Core aligned,' and
they weren't aligned at all,"
Craft said. "So there's been a
lot of money wasted, and
it's developed a lot of skepticism because districts have
run out and purchased
things before they really
knew that it was aligned."
He added that SCSD2 did
not do that, and also does
not intend to allow elective
programs to suffer.
Today, 43 states have voluntarily adopted the standards, which are designed to
ensure that students graduating from high school are
prepared to take credit bearing introductory courses in
two- or four-year college
programs, or enter the
workforce.
"They are more rigorous
and quite frankly they
include a lot of really
important things that were
not included in prior
Wyoming standards," Craft
said. "It's just a list of the
stuff we want them to learn.
There's really nothing scary
about it."
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A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
Judge denies Tsarnaev bid to suppress evidence
BOSTON (AP) — A federal judge on
Friday rejected a request by lawyers
for Boston Marathon bombing suspect
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to throw out evidence collected during searches of
Tsarnaev’s apartment, dorm room
and laptop computer.
Judge George O’Toole Jr. also denied
a request to dismiss the indictment
against Tsarnaev over defense concerns about an underrepresentation
of African-Americans and people over
the age of 70 on federal juries.
Tsarnaev, 21, is accused of carrying
out the April 2013 bombing, which
killed three people and injured 260.
Tsarnaev’s lawyers argued that the
warrants authorizing searches of his
family’s apartment in Cambridge and
his dorm room at the University of
Massachusetts-Dartmouth weren’t
specific enough and that some items
were improperly seized. They also
challenged the search of Tsarnaev’s
Yahoo email accounts and said
authorities improperly used the fruits
of those searches to later search his
Gmail accounts.
O’Toole rejected Tsarnaev’s arguments. Both prosecutors and the
defense declined to comment on the
judge’s ruling.
Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to
30 federal charges and could face the
death penalty if convicted.
Prosecutors say he and his older
brother, Tamerlan, planted twin pressure-cooker bombs near the
marathon’s finish line. Tamerlan was
killed in a shootout with police three
days after the bombings.
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found hiding in a boat parked in a yard in suburban Watertown. His trial is scheduled to begin in January.
Charges possible in a Minnesota priest abuse case
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A
Minnesota prosecutor said
Friday that charges may be
brought in at least one case
of alleged sexual misconduct by a Catholic priest,
and that a case involving
allegations that Archbishop
John Nienstedt improperly
touched a boy remains open
despite an earlier decision
not to charge him.
Ramsey County Attorney
John Choi said those are
two of three St. Paul cases
that remain open, while
seven other cases of alleged
sexual misconduct involving eight Catholic clergy
members will not be prosecuted for various reasons.
He also told reporters that
his office is also still investigating a fourth case, from
a St. Paul suburb.
Choi said he declined
“solely because of the
statute of limitations” to
prosecute three recently
reported cases from the
1970s and 1980s that his
staff has formally
reviewed. He said the laws
in place at the time
required that charges be
filed within three years of
an offense.
Choi said his office also
informally reviewed four
cases involving five priests
that police had closed. Two
priests suspected of abusing the same victim in one
of those cases had died,
there was not enough evidence to prove one case and
investigators could not
identify the suspects in the
other two cases, he said.
The Roman Catholic
Archdiocese of St. Paul and
Minneapolis has been
under fire for the past year
since a former church official went public with her
concerns about how local
church leaders handled
abuse cases, and the scandal generated several new
reports to police. The archdiocese announced a settlement earlier this week in a
lawsuit that claimed it created a public nuisance by
failing to warn parishioners about an abusive
priest. The settlement
includes new measures to
keep children safe and
undisclosed financial
terms.
Prosecutors are bound by
statutes of limitations
applying to criminal sexual
conduct, Choi said, but
they’ve been loosened in
recent years so victims
shouldn’t feel discouraged
from coming forward even
if they were abused long
ago.
“This does not mean that
we don’t believe the victims
and we don’t believe other
victims that are out there,”
he said. “We want them to
come forward. Sharing
their story is really going to
be helpful to our overall
investigation and also to
the public so that they can
better understand the gravity and the scope of what’s
been going on within the
archdiocese.”
Nienstedt issued a statement saying the archdiocese is cooperating with law
enforcement, victims and
their attorneys to hold
those responsible accountable and help heal those
who’ve been hurt.
“Regardless of whether
criminal charges are filed, I
believe survivors and victims have suffered tremendous damage because of the
actions of the clergy who
abused them. I am profoundly sorry for their
pain, and pray that they
and their families will find
healing,” the archbishop
said.
The prosecutor declined
to go into much detail about
the three open cases
because they remain under
investigation. He said one
involves alleged abuse that
“happened a long time ago”
in which the statute of limitations probably won’t
apply so charges remain
possible.
Choi said his decision
from last March not to
charge Nienstedt remains
in place. The archbishop
has denied an allegation
that surfaced last December
that he inappropriately
touched a boy during a public photo session after a
confirmation ceremony in
2009.
“However,” Choi said,
“there are aspects to that
case that we’re still pursing
... and so that will remain
open.”
Choi said the third open
case involves his office’s
decision in January not to
charge archdiocese officials
with failing to immediately
report allegations of abuse
committed by the Rev.
Curtis Wehmeyer, who
pleaded guilty in 2012 and
was sentenced to five years
in prison. One lawsuit
alleges the officials waited
too long between when they
confronted Wehmeyer in
2012 and when they called
police, giving him time to
destroy evidence.
“Some additional information came to light and
there are some other issues
that we’re still following up
on,” Choi said.
In one of the three cases
formally declined for prosecution, according to a
memo Choi released, a man
told police he was groped in
1984 when he was 12 by a
deacon in his neighborhood
for whom he did lawn work
and odd jobs. He said he
never told anyone until he
called to police last
November. The suspect
denied to police in April
that anything sexual had
happened between them,
the memo said, but police
saw a letter in the suspect’s
file with the archdiocese
indicating the man engaged
in mutual masturbation
with a young male prostitute in 1983.
‘Regardless of
whether criminal
charges are filed, I
believe survivors and
victims have suffered
tremendous damage
because of the actions of
the clergy who abused
them. I am profoundly
sorry for their pain, and
pray that they and their
families will find healing.”
John Nienstedt
Archbishop of St. Paul and Minneapolis
In another case, according
to a different memo, a man
called police last October
and said he had been
abused by a priest at St.
Mary’s Catholic Church in
1981, when he was 17. He
said the priest kissed him
repeatedly and ground his
body back and forth over
his pelvic area.
And in the third case,
another memo said a man
told police last October a
priest from a parish in St.
Paul Park touched his penis
in the sauna at a YMCA in
1976 or 1977, when he was
between 16 and 18 years old.
The suspect told police he
didn’t remember the incident or the youth. The suspect said in a deposition in
a civil case that he had
engaged in inappropriate
conduct with several
youths, though he didn’t
identify this particular person. The suspect is also on
the archdiocese’s list of
“credibly accused” priests,
the memo said.
Sept. 11 compensation
fund pays out $551 million
NEW YORK (AP) — An official at the
September 11 Victim Compensation Fund
say it has paid out $551 million over the
last year.
The fund’s special master, Sheila
Birnbaum, released a letter Friday saying
the fund had made 2,042 compensation decisions over the 12 months that ended Sept.
30.
Birnbaum says the fund had made 112
decisions totaling $27 million in the previ-
ous year.
She says the fund was able to process far
more decisions because of an increase in
staffing and better communication with
those making claims.
The fund was established in the wake of
the 2001 terrorist attacks to provide compensation for those affected.
Sunday was the deadline to apply for
compensation for those who developed cancer after working at ground zero.
Delivery as low as $108 a year!
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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A9
OBITUARIES |
Dr. Barry T. Held
November 5, 1931 - October 6, 2014
Dr. Barry T. Held died Oct. 6, 2014, at
home with his loving family around him.
He was the beloved husband of Melinda
(Sweet) Held.
Barry was born Nov. 5, 1931, in Brooklyn,
Dr. Barry T.
N.Y., the son of the late Tillie (Taylor) and
Held
Julius Held.
He graduated from Hamilton College in
Clinton, NY, and the State University of New York (Downstate)
Medical School in 1956. Dr. Held did additional fellowship training at Yale University School of Medicine, embarking on a long,
distinguished medical and academic career.
An appointment to the radiology staff at Roosevelt Hospital
in 1962 was followed by his nomination as chairman of the radiology department at Booth Memorial Hospital in Queens, NY in
1966, (now New York Hospital) a position he maintained to 1992.
He thus became the youngest appointed chairman of a major
radiology department in the United States. And as such, Barry
Held achieved senior clinical faculty rank in radiology at both
New York University Medical Center and Weill Cornell
University Medical College in New York city.
In his long professional career, Dr. Held served the American
College of Radiology as National Advisor for Accreditation and
Standards of Radiologic Care to hospitals and institutions. He
is also past president of the New York Roentgen Society and former member of the National Board of Medical Examiners and
American Board of Radiology.
In addition to serving his specialty, Dr. Held had a major educational impact training at least one generation of younger
radiologists during his long career. Mentoring young physicians by example, imparting his wisdom gently and effectively,
insisting on the highest ethical standards, Barry encouraged
best practices and humane values by his students.
Dr. Held and his wife, Melinda, are 30-year residents of
Sharon CT. And since 2000 they have enjoyed the home they
built together in Sheridan Wyoming on the Bird Farm Road.
As an amateur photographer since his late teens, his camera
was never far from hand. His travel photography included destinations such as Antarctica in 2009 with the Hotchkiss School
Expedition to Antarctica. His love of photography was greatly
enhanced when he served on the Yellowstone Foundation
Board with his wife Melinda.
In addition to his wife, he is survived by his daughter,
Patricia Grunebaum and her husband, his daughter-in-law
Sharon; stepdaughter, Elizabeth Dowling, and her husband, a
stepson, Howard Clinton Sweet and his wife, and seven grandchildren, Sebastian, Annabel and Charlotte Grunebaum, Emily
and Grace Dowling and Adam and Lila Sweet; he was predeceased by his son, James.
Contributions in his honor may be made to the Salisbury
Visiting Nurses Association, Salisbury CT.
Yvonne H. (Hauta) Prill
Ruby (Mrs. Glen) Ritterbusch
September 14, 1935 - October 11, 2014
May 10, 1919 - October 16, 2014
Yvonne H. (Hauta) Prill, died on October
11, 2014 in Denver Colorado. Yvonne was
formerly a resident of Ranchester
Wyoming, where she was an active member of The Women of the Shrine, Wyoming
Yvonne H.
Cattlewomen, PEO, The Dayton Quilters
(Hauta) Prill
and Dayton Community Church. She will
be remembered for her sweet nature, her
sense of humor, her strong faith and her exceptional kindness
to everyone she encountered.
Yvonne was born in Angora Minnesota on September 14, 1935
to Ina and Vaino Hauta. She is predeceased by her husband
LeRoy Prill, her sons Richard and David Harding, her parents,
two brothers and a sister.
She is survived by her daughters, Linda (Jim) Cluck, Kim
(Jack) Spillane, daughter-in-law Dawn (John) Kaehler, granddaughters Carly Harding and Sever Gray, two sisters-in-law, one
brother-in-law, many beloved nieces, nephews and good friends,
especially Kay Orner and Lois McCabe.
Yvonne loved “Big Wonderful Wyoming” and used to say that
she wasn’t born in Wyoming but she got there as fast as she
could! She loved nature, the Big Horn Mountains, God’s wide
open spaces, babies, small children and all animals. Her deep
faith sustained her through many difficult times and she
passed that faith along to her children.
There will be a celebration of her life and burial at a later
date in Virginia, Minnesota. The family has chosen two organizations for anyone desiring to make a donation in Yvonne’s
name. The Alzheimer’s Association and the National Parks
Conservation Association.
Ruby (Mrs. Glen) Ritterbusch, age 95, formerly of Pierre, SD, passed away on
October 16, 2014 in Sheridan, WY, where
she had lived the last two years.
Ruby Ritterbusch was born on May 10,
Ruby
1919 to John D and Hazel Nesbit Kleinjan
Ritterbusch
near Sinai, South Dakota. The family soon
moved north of Volga, SD, where she
attended the Renshaw rural school, the same school her mother
attended. Ruby graduated from Volga high school in 1937.
She attended Yankton College and earned an associate degree
and teaching certificate in 1939. She taught school for three
years at Elgin and Spencer, Nebraska. On December 26, 1941
Ruby was united in marriage to Glen Ritterbusch at the Trinity
Presbyterian Church at Volga.
After Glen’s discharge from the armed services in 1947, Ruby
and Glen made their home in Sioux Falls and then in Mitchell
until 1967. Later they lived in South Sioux City, NE, Casper, WY
and Libby, MT before moving to Pierre, SD in November 1979.
In Mitchell they were charter members of Conservative
Baptist church, now called Northridge Baptist. Glen and Ruby
celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary in 1991.
At age 53 Ruby earned a nursing degree at Casper, WY,
became a registered nurse and worked 12 years in hospitals in
Casper, Libby, MT and Pierre, SD.
Ruby was a charter member of the Community Bible Church
in Pierre, SD. She served as church pianist, organist and
Sunday school teacher. She was a 20 year member of home
extension clubs, was a 4-H leader and active in PTA while living
in Mitchell and South Sioux City, NE. She loved to plant and
tend to a garden. She was an avid reader and had a keen interest in world affairs.
DEATH NOTICE |
Ruby took an interest in sports and admired prominent
coaches and athletes who took a stand for their Christian faith,
Lola H. Hauf
an attribute that she too possessed. She valued her many
Lola H. Hauf, 85, of Sheridan, died on Thursday, October 16, friends and their support. She took special interest in the lives
and activities of her grandchildren and great grandchildren by
2014, at the Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
A Graveside Service will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, making a special effort to visit and encourage them.
Ruby is survived by three daughters and a son: Ruth (Glen)
October 21, 2014, in the Elks Memorial Cemetery with Pastor
Rosenberger, Sellersville, PA; Mary (Dick) Schmidt, Punta
Doug Goodwin officiating.
Gorda, FL; Lois (Wesley) Tschetter, Brookings, SD; and John
Online condolences may
(Penny) Ritterbusch, Sheridan, WY; eleven grandchildren:
be written at www.kanefunerDawn Rosenberger (Andy) Dant; Lisa Rosenberger (Colin)
al.com.
Tuggle; Cara Rosenberger (Fred) Krikory, Murray (Shelly)
Kane Funeral Home has
Pickard, Laura Pickard (Piper) Carter, Nicole Ritterbusch
been entrusted with arrange(Cayce) Gates, Paul (Krista) Tschetter, Jane Tschetter (Chris)
ments.
Lucas, Emily Tschetter (Ryan) Willett, Grant Ritterbusch and
Reed Ritterbusch; nine great grandchildren; and one brother
Gene (Lois) Kleinjan, Bruce, SD , one brother in law Earl Sapp,
Brookings, SD, and three sisters in-law: Adriana Kleinjan,
Volga, Lavina Mannerud and Amy Crow.
Preceding her in death was her husband Glen on December
10, 1996, her son David (1983) and his wife Barbara (1992); her
parents, brother and sister in law Lester and Sadie Kleinjan,
brother Wilbur Kleinjan and sister and brother in law Marie
and Art Anderson, sister Mildred (Earl) Sapp and brother in
law Erwin Mannerud.
The family requests memorials be directed to the Gideons.
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Here are the results
of Fridays
Big
Breakfast
Mega Millions
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
21-31-43-56-60;
Mega Ball 12
Megaplier X4
Estimated jackpot:
PENDING
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TODAY
SUNDAY
WEDNESDAY
Billings
72/44
Partly sunny and
warmer
73
36
Comfortable
with plenty of
sun
Mostly sunny
72
77
36
Almanac
38
77
The Sun
Temperature
High/low .........................................................65/29
Normal high/low ............................................60/31
Record high .............................................88 in 2003
Record low ...............................................16 in 1984
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Friday ...................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.16"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.90"
Year to date ...................................................12.86"
Normal year to date ......................................12.38"
Today
Sunday
Monday
The Moon
Today
Sunday
Monday
New
39
66
First
Rise
Set
7:27 a.m.
7:28 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
6:18 p.m.
6:17 p.m.
6:15 p.m.
Rise
Set
2:15 a.m.
3:14 a.m.
4:12 a.m.
3:50 p.m.
4:17 p.m.
4:45 p.m.
Full
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
72/39
Dayton
73/38
Lovell
70/44
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
68/42
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
71/41
Basin
71/40
73/36
Oct 30
Nov 6
Nov 14
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Clearmont
73/40
Story
68/38
Gillette
71/43
Buffalo
72/44
Worland
72/38
Wright
70/44
Kaycee
72/42
Thermopolis
72/39
Oct 23
Today
Hi/Lo/W
72/44/pc
73/35/pc
66/42/pc
68/42/pc
66/37/pc
71/43/pc
69/35/pc
64/30/pc
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
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A10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
SPORTS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Manning focused on 49ers, not passing Favre
DENVER (AP) — Peyton Manning has Justin Smith and
Aaron Lynch in his sights, not Brett Favre.
Chances are the five-time MVP will break Favre’s NFL
record for most career touchdown passes Sunday night,
however, when the Denver Broncos (4-1) host the San
Francisco 49ers (4-2).
Manning has 506, two shy of Favre’s mark, and he’s averaged an NFL-best 2.89 TD throws per game since coming to
Denver in 2012. Manning said he only wants to have more
points than the 49ers do when it’s all over.
“That’s what I’ve concentrated on, trying to do whatever
it takes to win,” he said.
Manning said he wouldn’t mind seeing Ronnie Hillman
run for four touchdowns against San Francisco. That
would be a shocker, though, because the Broncos have just
two running TDs this year to go with Manning’s 15 TD
passes.
“Always impressive,” 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh marveled. “Whenever he takes the field, he’s just great all the
time and that speaks volumes for the player that he is and
continues to be. Just keeps doing it and doing it and doing
it. Great. Great with a capital ‘G’ at the highest level.”
Last week, Jets coach Rex Ryan heaped similar praise
upon Manning, calling him “the best offensive coordinator
in the league. He just happens to be playing quarterback,
and a Hall of Fame quarterback at that.”
Favre told The Associated Press he’s thrilled Manning is
about to roar right past him and maybe approach 600 TD
tosses by the time he joins him in retirement. After all,
Manning reached 500 in his 244th game, 49 fewer than it
took Favre.
SC soccer
teams
defeated
on the road
Friday
Scores
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FOOTBALL
Big Horn 49,
Newcastle 14
Douglas 15,
Riverton 3
Dubois 74, Ten
Sleep 16
Farson-Eden 70,
St. Stephens 6
GuernseySunrise def. Rock
River, forfeit
Hanna-Elk
Mountain 72,
Normative
Services 51
Jackson Hole 30,
Powell 27
Lingle-Fort
Laramie 54,
Tongue River 33
Lovell 42,
Kemmerer 14
Lyman 32,
Greybull 14
Moorcroft 12,
Pine Bluffs 6
Mountain View
48, Big Piney 0
Rawlins 42,
Lander 20
Rocky Mountain
21, Riverside 0
Shoshoni 36,
Burlington 0
Star Valley 58,
Worland 34
Thermopolis 30,
Glenrock 14
Wind River 34,
Saratoga 6
SEE MANNING, PAGE B2
FROM STAFF REPORTS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Taking a hard hit
Jill Espeland takes a hard serve from Northwest College Friday in the Sheridan College Golden Dome. Sheridan fell to the
Lady Trappers 0-3. (13-25, 8-25, 25-27)
Weekend Sports Outlook
Saturday
High school football
Big Horn at Wright/Pinedale
Jamboree, 10 a.m.
High school volleyball
Sheridan at Cheyenne Central, 11
a.m.
Tongue River vs Riverside, 12 p.m.
Arvada-Clearmont vs Upton, 1 p.m.
Big Horn at Moorcroft, 5 p.m.
Sheridan College
Men’s basketball at Casper College
Jamboree
Men’s soccer at Trinidad State, 4 p.m.
Women’s soccer at Trinidad State, 6
p.m.
World Series: Seasoned Giants vs fresh Royals
BY BEN WALKER
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alex Gordon, Lorenzo Cain and the go-go-go Kansas City
Royals played perfect ball to zip through the playoffs. Plus,
they recently flattened Buster Posey and his Giants.
So how come this bunch that’s rapidly become a fan favorite
all across the country isn’t the favorite against San Francisco
in the World Series?
“When I look at the Royals, I see a team on a terrific run.
There was magic on their side, where everything they did
went absolutely right,” said Las Vegas oddsmaker Johnny
Avello, head of the sports book at the Wynn.
“But I don’t get into the ‘darling’ stuff,” he said Friday. “I
have to encompass everything and figure out who’s the better
team, and that’s the Giants.”
We’ll see what’s next in this tight, tense postseason starting
Tuesday night when the seasoned Giants visit the fresh Royals
at Kauffman Stadium.
A pair of teams with dominant bullpens, the talent to make
tremendous catches and a touch for grinding out key runs.
Both of them wild-card teams, too. Of course, come this late
in October, no one is really a wild card anymore.
Reigning NL Championship Series MVP Madison
Bumgarner, former World Series MVP Pablo Sandoval and
Giants manager Bruce Bochy are aiming for their third ring in
five seasons.
At 39, Tim Hudson is headed with them, going to his first
World Series. A four-time All-Star with 214 wins, he left his
longtime home in Atlanta and signed with the Giants last
November.
Hudson was swayed by an intangible that he’d seen from the
other side — San Francisco’s knack for playing especially well
at this time of year.
“They know how to win when it matters. There’s something
different whenever this team gets in the playoffs. They know
what buttons to push. They know what guys need to do in certain situations. That’s all that matters,” Hudson said.
“That’s why I’m playing, that’s why I’m here, that’s why I
decided to come to the Giants,” he said.
Already 8-0 this postseason, the Royals are back in the Series
for the first time since George Brett and Bret Saberhagen
helped them win it all in 1985.
There were a lot of lean years in the interim.
Giants reliever Jeremy Affeldt, the winning pitcher in the
NLCS clincher Thursday night against the Cardinals, played
for Kansas City from 2002-06 — the Royals lost 100 games in
three of those seasons.
“Well, I’m sure there’s a lot of excitement,” Affeldt said.
“There’s a lot of people that have been fans for a long time in
that area and been waiting to see this since 1985.”
“When I played there, I think they thought they were overdue then, and that was, I don’t know, seven, eight years ago,”
he said. “There’s going to be some energy in that stadium. And
they have remodeled it ... it’s pretty impressive to see the
amount of blue in these seats during those games.”
SEE WORLD SERIES, PAGE B2
SHERIDAN — Sheridan College men’s
and women’s soccer teams both saw defeat
on the road Friday afternoon.
The Generals took on Otero Junior
College at 1 p.m. and started the first half
strong, but in the end fell 4-1.
With only eight minutes left in the first
half the men gave up two quick goals,
including a penalty kick, and failed to capitalize on some key opportunities.
“We had a couple of opportunities — fast
breaks, counter attacks, we had one that
just missed it but the goalie got a little fingertip on it and pushed it off,” head coach
Jeff Hallenbeck said. “We had some good
opportunities in the first 20-30 minutes and
just couldn’t finish, but so did they.”
In the second half Sheridan’s goal was
scored by sophomore midfielder Sergio
Rios but in the end the team lost with the
same score they saw against Otero earlier
this season.
Hallenbeck said regardless of score,
goalie Jack Morris played very well.
“He may have given up a few goals, but he
made a lot of good saves,” he said.
Freshman Cesar Garcia and sophomore
Corbin Shriner also had their game faces
on and offered strong performances.
The Generals will play their last game of
the season tomorrow at Trinidad at 4 p.m.
“We need to play a very good game and
play smart and we’ll be OK,” Hallenbeck
said. “They beat us 2-0 at our place so we’re
looking for our final game to go out strong,
and if we play a good game I think we’ll do
well.”
The Lady General’s soccer team saw an
unprecedented shortage of starters due to
medical emergencies and struggled through
the end of their 6-1 match with Otero.
“It was kind of a frustrating game,” head
coach Stefan Skillman said. “We had a medical emergency we had to attend to just
before the game, so it was fair to say the
players were definitely affected by that.”
Five starters were missing from the lineup Friday afternoon, forcing players to play
tough and be adaptable.
“The positive of the situation was some
players who don’t always get some playing
time got to play more,” Skillman said. “One
of the girls said she learned something new
about her position, so that’s good. It’s just
one of those situations, things we can’t control happen, and we have to keep our head
up and push through.”
The goal for Sheridan was scored by
Alexis Lewis off a corner kick in the 88th
minute of the game.
Freshman Hannah Caiola, Big Horn High
School graduate, stepped up to fill multiple
different positions during the game.
Goalie Kaitlin Conley had at least 25
saves, said Skillman, and sophomore
Celena Kelly played a well fought game.
The women will play their last game of
the season tomorrow at 6 p.m. and Skillman
said he suspects it will be another uphill
battle.
“Usually you have one or two get knicked
or knacked but this was the first time we’ve
had to face something this impactful this
season,” he said. “On the plus side
Courtney Stratton was out for a bit with an
injury and it was good to see her start to
look like herself again, and for the most
part, moral-wise, I think the girls are doing
alright, keeping their heads up and trying
to enjoy the trip together as a team.”
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
MANNING: Looking to
make NFL history
FROM B1
BLAINE MCCARTNEY | WYOMING TRIBUNE EAGLE
Sheridan cross country
Sheridan's Xiomara Robinson makes her way along the trail during the Class 4A East Conference cross country meet Friday afternoon at Prairie View
Golf Course in Cheyenne. Cross country results will be printed in Monday’s edition of The Press.
WORLD SERIES: Can the Royals take the series?
FROM B1
Affeldt and the Giants got a close-up at these Royals in
August, getting swept in a three-game series at Kansas City.
Gordon homered twice in the series, outfielder Nori Aoki
threw out two runners in an inning, the Royals stole seven
bases in a game and they beat Bumgarner, Hudson and Tim
Lincecum.
“It doesn’t matter what it was,” Royals manager Ned Yost
said Friday. “This is a whole different ballgame now. This is
the World Series. This isn’t a three-game series in August.”
Yost, by the way, grew up in the Bay Area rooting for the
Giants.
Even though they met two months ago, there’s not a lot of
history between the teams. They faced each other only
twice in spring training in Arizona, and the Royals haven’t
played in San Francisco since 2005, back when Barry Bonds
was the biggest name in town.
Closer Greg Holland, Mike Moustakas and the Royals will
be at AT&T Park for Game 3 on Friday night. It was 25
years ago that an earthquake minutes before Game 3 rattled
Candlestick Park and postponed the World Series between
the Giants and Oakland Athletics. The Series shift means
no designated hitter in the NL park, costing Royals DH
Billy Butler a spot. Yost spent most of his career in NL,
coaching in Atlanta and managing in Milwaukee.
“It’s a fun style. I’ve never really managed two styles
in one series,” Yost said.
“It’s a different type. There are a lot more things that are
involved.”
Heat win first game of preseason, beat Warriors
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Chris Bosh scored 21 points
and Luol Deng and Shawne Williams added 19 each to help
the Miami Heat win their first game in the preseason with
a 115-108 victory over the Golden State Warriors on Friday
night.
Trailing 103-102 with 5:16 left, Mario Chalmers hit a 3pointer to give the Heat (1-4) a lead. Shabaz Napier added a
3-pointer 30 seconds later to extend the lead and give the
Heat the victory.
Klay Thompson scored 27 points to lead the Warriors (41) while David Lee added 22 points. It was the first loss in
the preseason for Golden State.
Former Kansas Jayhawks star Brandon Rush, who plays
for the Warriors now, exited the game early due to spasms.
“I’m not surprised, as well as he’s been playing for
so many years,” Favre said.
Manning isn’t the only QB great Favre admires in
Denver. He said GM John Elway deserves plenty of
credit not only for luring Manning to the Broncos
but for surrounding him with a terrific supporting
cast.
Tight Julius Thomas leads the league with nine TD
catches. Demaryius Thomas had a franchise-best
226-yard game two weeks ago. Emmanuel Sanders is
averaging 95 yards and Wes Welker just became the
most productive undrafted wide receiver in NFL history.
Favre compared this group to the one Manning
had in Indy — Marvin Harrison, Reggie Wayne,
Dallas Clark and Marcus Pollard — that combined to
catch more than half (257) of Manning’s TD passes.
“I think Peyton has that type of cast there in
Denver,” Favre said. “Now, he won’t play nearly as
long there as he played with the Colts, but he does
have an excellent, young cast. Who do you doubleteam? I mean, my goodness, I have no idea.”
If Manning doesn’t get the record Sunday night,
he’ll go for it four nights later against the Chargers.
Other things to keep an eye on Sunday night:
DIFFERENT STROKES: This game features a
study in extreme contrasts at quarterback.
The Broncos have the quintessential drop-back
passer in Manning, who has minus-7 yards rushing
to go with his 1,530 yards passing. The 49ers have
multi-threat quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who
threw for 343 yards and three TDs against St. Louis
last week and has added 242 yards rushing, a 5.3yard average.
“I hope there’s a place for the drop-back quarterback,” Manning said. “At least for a couple more
years.”
TERRIFIC THOMAS: Nobody in NFL history has
more TD catches through five games than Julius
Thomas, who credits his growth this year in part to
some friendly advice from Tony Gonzalez, the NFL’s
most accomplished tight end before retiring this
year.
It’s sure paying off as Thomas is halfway to breaking Rob Gronkowski’s single-season record for touchdowns by a tight end (17 in 2011).
“He’s probably going to break that,” Gonzalez said.
“But how is he going to keep improving? I hope
that’s what he takes away. He’s just getting started
and he’s got another six to eight years to dominate
this league and he can become a legendary type player.”
LLOYD RETURNS: Brandon Lloyd, who caught
an 80-yard touchdown pass just before halftime
against the Rams last week to kick-start the 49ers’
31-17 comeback victory, is returning to the city
where he had the best year of his checkered career.
Lloyd caught 77 passes for 1,448 yards and 11 TDs
in 2010 with Kyle Orton at quarterback.
“His body control was off the charts,” Broncos
offensive coordinator Adam Gase recounted. “I’ve
never seen anybody that was able to adjust to throws
the way he does, and he made the most of his opportunities no matter who was at quarterback.”
LOSING THEIR LINEBACKERS: The Broncos
lost weakside linebacker Danny Trevathan to a broken left leg last week. It was the second time in two
months their top tackler from a year ago fractured a
bone near his left kneecap. He’s out until midDecember.
The 49ers took a hit, too, last week when Pro Bowl
linebacker Patrick Willis suffered a toe injury.
AMERICA’S TEAM: It’s not just Manning’s pursuit of Favre that will have fans tuned in Sunday
night. When Denver defensive end DeMarcus Ware
was released by the Cowboys last winter, he said
goodbye to America’s Team. Or did he?
According to The Harris Poll, which surveyed 2,543
adults, the Broncos are now the country’s most popular NFL team. The Cowboys, who had been No. 1 for
six straight years, fell to fourth.
Regional coverage of NFL games featured on networks Sunday
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
All Times EDT
Saturday, Oct. 18
AUTO RACING
1 p.m.
FOX — NASCAR, Truck
Series, Fred's 250, at Talladega,
Ala.
BOXING
9 p.m.
NBCSN — Super featherweights, Edner Cherry (32-6-2)
vs. Jerry Belmontes (19-5-0);
heavyweights, Steve
Cunningham (27-6-0) vs. Natu
Visinia (10-0-0), at Philadelphia
10 p.m.
HBO — Champion Nonito
Donaire (33-2-0) vs. Nicholas
Walters (24-0-0), for WBA Super
featherweight title; champion
Gennady Golovkin (30-0-0) vs.
Marco Antonio Rubio (59-6-1) for
WBA Super, IBO, and interim
WBC middleweight titles, at
Carson, Calif.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN — Kansas St. at
Oklahoma
ESPN2 — Iowa at Maryland
ESPNEWS — South Florida at
Tulsa
ESPNU — Tulane at UCF
FSN — Texas-San Antonio at
Louisiana Tech
FS1 — Baylor at West Virginia
3:30 p.m.
ABC — Regional coverage,
UCLA at California or Rutgers at
Ohio St.
CBS — Texas A&M at Alabama
ESPN — Michigan St. at
Indiana
ESPN2 — Regional coverage,
UCLA at California or Rutgers at
Ohio St.
ESPNU — Clemson at Boston
College
FSN — Kansas at Texas Tech
4 p.m.
FS1 — Oklahoma St. at TCU
7 p.m.
ESPN — Tennessee at
Mississippi
ESPN2 — Missouri at Florida
ESPNU — Georgia Tech at
North Carolina
8 p.m.
FS1 — Washington at Oregon
8:07 p.m.
ABC — Notre Dame at Florida
St.
10 p.m.
ESPNU — Norfolk St. at
Hampton (same-day tape)
10:15 p.m.
ESPN2 — Nevada at BYU
10:30 p.m.
ESPN — Stanford at Arizona
State
GOLF
6:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Volvo World Match Play
Championship, quarterfinal
matches, at Kent, England
11:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Hong Kong Open, third round
(same-day tape)
2:30 p.m.
TGC — Champions Tour,
Greater Hickory Classic, second
round, at Conover, N.C.
5 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Shriners
Hospitals for Children Open,
third round, at Las Vegas
11:30 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, KEB HanaBank
Championship, final round, at
Incheon, South Korea
3 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Volvo World Match Play
Championship, semifinal matches, at Kent, England
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
6 p.m.
NBCSN — Lake Superior St. at
Notre Dame
MOTORSPORTS
12 Mid.
FS1 — MotoGP World
Championship, Grand Prix of
Australia, at Phillip Island
SOCCER
7:40 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Tottenham at Manchester City
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Chelsea at Crystal Palace
3 p.m.
NBCSN — MLS, Dallas at
Colorado
Sunday, Oct. 19
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Geico 500, at Talladega, Ala.
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
LEAGUE
4 p.m.
ESPN2 — Edmonton at
Saskatchewan
GOLF
7:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Volvo World Match Play
Championship, final match, at
Ash, England
11:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Hong Kong Open, final round
(same-day tape)
2:30 p.m.
TGC — Champions Tour,
Greater Hickory Classic, final
round, at Conover, N.C.
5 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Shriners
Hospitals for Children Open,
final round, at Las Vegas
NFL
1 p.m.
CBS — Regional coverage
FOX — Regional coverage, doubleheader
4 p.m.
CBS — Regional coverage
4:25 p.m.
FOX — Regional coverage, doubleheader game
8:20 p.m.
NBC — San Francisco at
Denver
SOCCER
8:25 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Liverpool at Queens Park
Rangers
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Swansea City at Stoke City
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — MLS, Seattle at Los
Angeles
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
MLB |
Postseason Baseball Glance
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
x-if [email protected]:LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP
SERIES
(Best-of-7)
American League
Kansas City 4, Baltimore 0
Friday, Oct. 10: Kansas City 8, Baltimore 6, 10
innings
Saturday, Oct. 11: Kansas City 6, Baltimore 4
Monday, Oct. 13: Baltimore at Kansas City, ppd.,
rain
Tuesday, Oct. 14: Kansas City 2, Baltimore 1
Wednesday, Oct. 15: Kansas City 2, Baltimore 1
National League
San Francisco 4, St. Louis 1
Saturday, Oct. 11: San Francisco 3, St. Louis 0
Sunday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 5, San Francisco 4
Tuesday, Oct. 14: San Francisco 5, St. Louis 4, 10
innings
Wednesday, Oct. 15: San Francisco 6, St. Louis 4
Thursday, Oct. 16: San Francisco 6, St. Louis 3
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7)
All games televised by Fox
Tuesday, Oct. 21: San Francisco (Bumgarner 1811) at Kansas City (Shields 14-8), 8:07 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 22: San Francisco at Kansas
City, 8:07 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 24: Kansas City at San Francisco,
8:07 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 25: Kansas City at San Francisco,
8:07 p.m.
x-Sunday, Oct. 26: Kansas City at San Francisco,
8:07 p.m.
x-Tuesday, Oct. 28: San Francisco at Kansas City,
8:07 p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct. 29: San Francisco at Kansas
City, 8:07 p.m.
NFL |
National Football League
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W
L
New England
5
2
Buffalo
3
3
Miami
2
3
N.Y. Jets
1
6
South
W
L
Indianapolis
4
2
Houston
3
3
Tennessee
2
4
Jacksonville
0
6
North
W
L
Cincinnati
3
1
Baltimore
4
2
Cleveland
3
2
Pittsburgh
3
3
West
W
L
San Diego
5
1
Denver
4
1
Kansas City
2
3
0
5
Oakland
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.714
.500
.400
.143
PF
187
118
120
121
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.667
.500
.333
.000
PF
189
132
104
81
T
1
0
0
0
Pct
.700
.667
.600
.500
PF
134
164
134
124
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.833
.800
.400
.000
PF
164
147
119
79
T
Pct PF
Philadelphia
Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Washington
South
5
5
3
1
1
1
3
5
0
0
0
0
.833
.833
.500
.167
183
165
133
132
W
3
2
2
1
L
2
3
4
5
T
1
0
0
0
Pct
.583
.400
.333
.167
PF
141
132
164
120
W
4
4
3
2
L
2
2
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.667
.667
.500
.333
PF
116
161
143
104
W
L
T
Pct
Arizona
4
1
0
.800
San Francisco 4
2
0
.667
Seattle
3
2
0
.600
St. Louis
1
4
0
.200
___
Thursday’s Game
New England 27, N.Y. Jets 25
Sunday’s Games
Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Washington, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Philadelphia, Tampa Bay
Monday’s Game
Houston at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 23
San Diego at Denver, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 26
Detroit vs. Atlanta at London, 9:30 a.m.
St. Louis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Miami at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Chicago at New England, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, 4:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Open: N.Y. Giants, San Francisco
Monday, Oct. 27
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
PF
116
141
133
101
Carolina
New Orleans
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
North
Detroit
Green Bay
Chicago
Minnesota
West
GOLF |
Champions-Greater Hickory Kia Classic Scores
The Associated Press
Friday
At Rock Barn Golf and Spa, Jones Course
Conover, N.C.
Purse: $1.6 million
Yardage: 6,874; Par: 71 (35-36)
First Round
Joe Durant28-35—63
Jay Haas29-34—63
Roger Chapman32-33—65
Scott Dunlap30-35—65
Keselowski wishes Stewart
not caught up in fallout
TALLADEGA, Ala. (AP) — Brad Keselowski says
it’s “unfortunate” that Tony Stewart got caught up
in the incidents at Charlotte, but that he’s not
dwelling on “all that garbage.”
NASCAR fined both drivers for their behavior on
the track before other tempers flared outside the
cars.
Keselowksi was fined $50,000 and Stewart $25,000.
Stewart backed into Keselowski’s car after
Keselowski inadvertently ran into him from
behind while the entire field headed toward pit
road.
Keselowski also had post-race run-ins with Matt
Kenseth and Denny Hamlin.
Stewart has faced increased scrutiny since the
Aug. 9 accident that killed sprint car driver Kevin
Ward Jr. Several news outlets focused on Stewart,
but Keselowski said he felt Stewart shouldn’t have
been dragged into it.
Penguins’ Dupuis returns
to ice after incident
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pittsburgh Penguins forward Pascal Dupuis skated on Friday, barely 12
hours after being taken off the ice on a stretcher
during a loss to Dallas.
Coach Mike Johnston said the 35-year-old forward “looked fine” while going through some conditioning work for trainers. Dupuis did not participate in practice but Johnston said there’s a chance
Dupuis could return to the lineup on Saturday
night when the Penguins face the New York
Islanders.
“All signs are real positive this morning,”
Johnston said.
Dupuis was cross-checked in front of the net by
Stars defenseman Alex Goligoski in the second
period Thursday night and hit in the neck or
upper-back area by teammate Kris Letang’s shot
from the point while he was down. Dupuis got up
on one knee before clutching his arm and lying
back on the ice.
He complained of numbness in the arm but gave
a thumbs up to the crowd as he was taken to the
trainer’s room and was able to meet with his teammates afterward.
“It’s scary when you see that, you don’t know
what’s happening,” Penguins captain Sidney
Crosby said. “I saw him after the game and knew
he was good. I’m happy to hear that obviously.”
Dupuis has once goal and three assists in
Pittsburgh’s first four games. He missed the second half of the 2013-14 season after tearing the
ACL in his right knee.
“You’re thinking to yourself it’s never good to
see that but especially a guy who’s been what he’s
been through lately,” Crosby said.
Bill Glasson32-34—66
Mike Goodes32-34—66
John Riegger32-34—66
Rocco Mediate32-34—66
Kirk Triplett33-33—66
Wayne Levi34-33—67
Steve Elkington35-32—67
Gary Hallberg35-32—67
Chien Soon Lu32-35—67
Tom Pernice Jr.33-34—67
Michael Allen33-34—67
John Cook32-35—67
David Frost32-35—67
Bobby Clampett32-36—68
Paul Goydos32-36—68
Fred Funk34-34—68
Gil Morgan33-35—68
Jeff Maggert33-35—68
Corey Pavin35-33—68
Marco Dawson34-34—68
Bob Tway34-35—69
Tommy Armour III34-35—69
Rod Spittle36-33—69
Stephen Ames32-37—69
Steve Lowery34-35—69
Kevin Sutherland35-34—69
Willie Wood33-36—69
Dan Forsman34-35—69
Jeff Sluman35-34—69
Loren Roberts34-35—69
Colin Montgomerie33-36—69
Jeff Freeman36-33—69
Chip Beck35-35—70
John Inman34-36—70
Peter Senior32-38—70
Gene Sauers34-36—70
Blaine McCallister34-36—70
Steve Pate35-35—70
Larry Mize35-35—70
Mark Brooks34-36—70
Jose Coceres34-36—70
Mike Reid33-37—70
Doug Garwood36-34—70
Jeff Hart35-35—70
Tom Purtzer36-35—71
Lee Janzen34-37—71
Joey Sindelar35-36—71
Billy Andrade36-35—71
Guy Boros36-35—71
Hal Sutton36-35—71
Esteban Toledo35-36—71
Mark McNulty35-36—71
Wes Short, Jr.35-36—71
Joe Daley35-36—71
Anders Forsbrand35-36—71
Skip Kendall36-35—71
Jim Rutledge37-34—71
Barry Lane34-37—71
Scott Simpson35-37—72
Bob Gilder36-36—72
Kenny Perry35-37—72
Tom Byrum37-36—73
Bobby Wadkins35-38—73
Tom Kite35-38—73
David Eger37-36—73
Mark Calcavecchia37-36—73
Bob Niger37-36—73
Sonny Skinner36-37—73
P.H. Horgan III31-42—73
Andy Bean38-36—74
Joel Edwards35-39—74
Craig Stadler32-42—74
Scott Hoch37-37—74
Jim Thorpe37-38—75
John Harris38-38—76
Mark Mouland39-37—76
Russ CochranWD
MLS |
Major League Soccer
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
T
Pts GF
x-D.C.
16
9
7
55 49
x-New England 16
13
4
52 50
x- Kansas City 14
11
7
49 47
x-New York
12
9
11
47 52
Columbus
12
10
10
46 47
11
14
7
40 43
Toronto FC
Houston
11
16
6
39 38
Philadelphia
9
11
12
39 48
5
9
18
33 38
Chicago
Montreal
6
18
8
26 36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
L
T
Pts GF
x-Seattle
19
10
3
60 61
x-Los Angeles 17
6
9
60 67
x-Real Salt Lake14
8
10
52 52
x-FC Dallas
15
11
6
51 54
Vancouver
11
8
13
46 41
Portland
11
9
12
45 59
Colorado
8
16
8
32 43
Chivas USA
8
18
6
30 28
San Jose
6
15
11
29 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
x- clinched playoff berth
___
Thursday’s Games
New England 2, Houston 1
Friday’s Games
Real Salt Lake at Portland, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Montreal at Toronto FC, 2 p.m.
FC Dallas at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Chicago at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Columbus at New York, 3 p.m.
Seattle FC at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 22
Chivas USA at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 24
Houston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 25
Los Angeles at Seattle FC, 2:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto FC at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 26
San Jose at Chivas USA, 3 p.m.
Philadelphia at Columbus, 4 p.m.
New York at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
NHL |
National Hockey League
The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
Montreal
5
4
Ottawa
4
3
Tampa Bay
4
2
Toronto
4
2
Boston
6
2
Detroit
3
1
Buffalo
4
1
Florida
3
0
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
N.Y. Islanders 4
4
0
0
8
New Jersey
4
3
1
0
6
Washington
4
2
0
2
6
Pittsburgh
3
2
1
0
4
Columbus
3
2
1
0
4
N.Y. Rangers
5
2
3
0
4
Carolina
4
0
2
2
2
Philadelphia
4
0
2
2
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
OT Pts
3
2
0
1
5
Nashville
Chicago
3
2
0
1
5
Dallas
4
2
1
1
5
2
2
0
0
4
Minnesota
St. Louis
3
1
1
1
3
Colorado
5
1
3
1
3
Winnipeg
3
1
2
0
2
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
OT Pts
San Jose
4
3
0
1
7
Los Angeles
5
3
1
1
7
Anaheim
4
3
1
0
6
Calgary
5
3
2
0
6
Vancouver
2
2
0
0
4
Arizona
3
2
1
0
4
Edmonton
4
0
3
1
1
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Thursday’s Games
N.Y. Islanders 4, San Jose 3, SO
N.Y. Rangers 2, Carolina 1, SO
Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0, SO
Dallas 3, Pittsburgh 2
Washington 6, New Jersey 2
Montreal 6, Boston 4
Ottawa 5, Colorado 3
Friday’s Games
Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 7 p.m.
San Jose at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 3 p.m.
San Jose at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m.
Calgary at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
BEAR LODGE BOWLING LEAGUE |
Bowling results for Bear Lodge All Star Bowling
League Week 7
L
1
1
1
2
4
1
3
2
OT Pts
0
8
0
6
1
5
0
4
0
4
1
3
0
2
1
1
L
OT Pts
1st Place
2nd Place
3rd Place
4th Place
High Game
High Series
Atlantic Roofing
102.5 - 65.5
Dick's Honey
96 - 72
Cosner Construction
92.5 - 75.5
Cloud Peak Lanes
90 - 78
Jerry Browne 279
Jerry Browne 710
High Team Game Hardesty's Hayseeds 1228
High Team Series Hardesty's Hayseeds 3481
1018_A Section Template 10/17/14 2:34 PM Page 1
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
If you've ever wondered
what your doc is scribbling
in your file or entering into a
computer during your medical appointment, you're not
alone. More than 90 percent
of us want to see our doctors'
notes. In fact, millions of
American health-care consumers now do. Seems there's
been a little revolution brewing. The big news? The revolution is making consumers
healthier.
The success of a groundbreaking new open medicalrecords program has both of
us cheering. The program
gave over 13,500 patients in
three big health systems -Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center in Boston,
Geisinger Health System in
Pennsylvania and Harbor
View Medical in Seattle -access to their doctors' notes
for one year. The patients
couldn't wait to read their
charts; up to 92 percent
checked 'em at least once.
The results were amazing:
--Up to 85 percent said they
had a better understanding of
their health and medical conditions.
--Up to 87 percent felt more
in control of their health
care.
--Up to 72 percent took better care of themselves.
--Up to 78 percent did better
with taking medications.
--Up to 42 percent shared
the notes with a close friend
or family member (a great
way to get support and
encouragement for staying
healthy).
--99 percent wanted to keep
seeing their charts after the
study ended!
The docs were enthusiastic,
too. Many said their patient
relationships were better,
with more trust, better communication and stronger
partnerships for good health.
All of the docs opted to make
their notes available to their
patients after the study
ended.
Now this breakthrough is
rolling out across North
America. The Cleveland
Clinic (where Dr. Mike is in
charge of wellness),
Milwaukee's Columbia St.
Mary's Health System, the
U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs, Penn State Hershey
Medical Group, Kaiser
Permanente Northwest and
other health systems are
making doc notes and medical records available to any
and all of their patients
through electronic media.
(The University of Texas MD
Anderson Cancer Center has
been sharing its records with
patients since 2009.) In
August, the Canadian
Medical Journal called for
open doc notes, too, urging
an end to the "hoops and
speed bumps" that leave
patients waiting nearly three
months (and footing the bill
for paper copies) for info
that's rightfully theirs.
In the U.S., health-care consumers have had the legal
right to see their doctors'
notes, along with lab test
results and other info in their
medical files, since 1996 (earlier in some states). But while
it's been easy for docs and
even insurance companies to
peek at this oh-so-personal
info, patients were stymied
by lots of red tape and copying fees. Some even had to
sue to see their files! The
story's frustratingly similar
in Canada, where a Thunder
Bay woman's discovery that
it would cost her $617 to see
copies of her records made
nationwide headlines last
summer.
So if you don't already have
access, ask your doc if you
can see YOUR notes -- and the
rest of your medical records.
Then do this:
No. 1: Look for and correct
errors! An accurate record
could save your life in the
emergency room, not to mention avoid confusion in your
regular care in the future.
No. 2: Keep track of your
meds and test results. Having
an up-to-date list of the drugs
you take is on our list of the
smart habits of highly effective health-care consumers;
so is knowing your health
metrics, like blood pressure,
blood sugar, LDL cholesterol
and results of other tests, too.
No. 3: Doc not ready to go
public with his notes? Show
him this column. And point
him to
www.myopennotes.org, the
website of the Open Notes
study, for important info
about sharing medical
records with patients. Be
patient. Docs may need to
change the way they make
notes so you don't misunderstand their shorthand
("S.O.B." means "short of
breath," not that he doesn't
like you!). Together you can
feed the revolution.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
WOMAN OBJECTS TO
ACCUSATION THAT SHE'S
A 'STATUS DIGGER'
DEAR ABBY: I have been
seeing "Tony" for a few
weeks. He is kind, caring and
will make a great boyfriend,
husband and father someday.
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
My problem with him is he
thinks I'm a "status digger."
(It's similar to a gold digger,
but he means I care only
about someone's standing in
the community.) His rationale
is based on my friendships.
I come from a privileged
background. While some
acquaintances in my circle
are spoiled and superficial,
my close friends and I are
not. Because I grew up here,
it was only natural I'd date
guys from a similar background. While I was not
opposed to dating outside my
social circle, the opportunity
never presented itself.
Abby, I have never measured a guy because of his
position in society. The
thought never occurred to
me. I admit I would probably
be more inclined to date
someone from a similar background because that's what
I'm familiar with, but I don't
think this makes me a social
climber, status digger or elitist.
How should I address this
with Tony? I'm afraid our
relationship will end if he
can't see me for who I really
am. -- JUST ME IN HOUSTON
DEAR JUST ME: Tony may
come from a blue-collar background. Because he perceives
you and your friends as having had so much given to
you, he may feel inadequate,
so he's putting you on the
defensive by accusing you of
being solely interested in
social status. Of course,
that's stereotyping, and it
isn't fair to you. Because
someone comes from inherited status/wealth there is no
guarantee that it won't disappear. That's the reason some
women prefer self-made men
to those from a privileged
background.
You and Tony should have
a frank talk. When you do,
suggest that before he
assumes any more preconceptions about you are true,
he should get to know you -because if he doesn't, he will
miss out on someone who is
not only very nice, but who
thinks HE has a lot to offer.
CLASSIFIEDS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
CRAFTSMAN 30" Scroll
UPDATED
saw. Var. Speed. $135. NEWLY
2BR/1
Ba,
W/D
307-752-9559.
hookups,
$750/mo
+
For Lease
$500
dep.
No
smoking/no pets. 307655-9753.
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Buildings
for lease, Shop
space,
Warehouse
space, Retail
space, &
office space.
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
WKLY FR $240. Am. Best
Value Inn 672-9757
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718
Office Space for Rent
1230 N. Main, 1000 SF,
$750/mo. 752-5526
2 BEAUTIFUL SUITES
for lease. (One with
kitchen area). Security,
janitorial, & utilities
included. Conference
room avail to tenants.
672-8700 or 751-3828.
COMMERCIAL
KITCHEN & bakery
w/ retail space. $800.
752-7848.
Something
for the
whole
family
Storage Space
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
INTERSTATE
STORAGE.
Multiple Sizes avail.
No deposit req'd.
752-6111.
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
NEWER 3 BR 3 BA.,
2600 sq. ft. condo.
Fplc., fam. rm.,
dishwasher, refrig.,
W/D, AC, deck,
2 car gar., maint. free,
snow remov., near
hosp. & daycare. $1500
+ dep. Call 751-4951
1 BDRM. $600. Garage.
No smk/pets. 674-4139.
VERY NICE, clean,
2BD. W/D. $750mo
w/ $750 dep. No pets.
Avail. immediately.
672-0227 & leave msg.
2 BDRM $695 463
Coffeen Ave. 1 BDRM
$600 336 W. Brundage
St. Dep req'd. Util incl.
No smoking.
752-7704.
2 BR, most util. incl., A/C,
laundry site, No Smk/cats
neg. $750mo. + Dep. &
lease 752-2327 or
752-5852
2BD $750/MO.
No smok/cat negotiable.
Dep & lease req'd.
(720) 939-7501.
1BR $575 incl. utils &
cable TV. No smk/pets.
763-2848.
AVAILABLE IN
RANCHESTER: 2
Studio apts., $400/mo.
ea. & 2 bdrm apt.
$600/mo. + dep. & heat,
util. pd., pets? Laundry
rm. incl. No smk.
751-4060
STUDIO APT. $425 +
dep. utilities not
included. Call
752-7848.
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR, 1BA townhome
w/appl, new carpet
and paint. $900mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
4 BR 2 ba., nice
neighborhood, close to
school $1800/mo.
673-5555
4 BR/2BA. Fenced yard
with deck $1200/mo.
Call 752-7848.
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
25'X80' BUILDING.
Storage/office.
Overhead door.
$400/mo. 307-256-6170
CROWN STORAGE Inc
KROE Lane 674-9819.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
Help Wanted
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
is actively recruiting
for the position of
Evidence Technician.
This
is
a
fully
benefited
position
including
health,
dental, vision, and life
insurance,
state
pension
benefits,
tuition reimbursement,
and paid time off. This
position is responsible
for the processing and
security of criminal
evidence. We are
looking
for
an
individual with proven
abilities
in
multitasking, computer
efficiency,
and
organization.
Experience
and
knowledge of effective
evidence procedures,
principles, basic crime
scene
identification
and techniques would
be helpful. The hiring
range
is
$17.17$18.97 an hour DOE.
Candidates must pass
a
comprehensive
b a c k g r o u n d
investigation.
A
complete
job
description and Police
D e p a r t m e n t
application can be
found
at
www.sheridanwy.net.
Interested applicants
must
submit
a
completed
Police
D e p a r t m e n t
Application Packet to
City Hall, 55 Grinnell
Plaza by 10/31/14.
The City of Sheridan
is a drug-free work
place.
AARON'S IS now
accepting applications
for delivery driver, must
have a valid drivers
license. Applicant
must be customer &
detail oriented. Apply in
person at 1590
Sugarland Dr.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B5
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
LPN,
WYO.
Girls
School, Sheridan; Class
Code HSNU06-01594,
Target Hiring Range:
$2966-$3708/mo. The
purpose of this job is to
gather data regarding
the health status and
attend to the healthcare
needs of each resident
admitted
to
the
Wyoming Girls School.
This will be done within
the
scope
and
standards of nursing
practice
for
the
Licensed
Practical
Nurse as outlined by
the Wyoming State
Board of Nursing and
under the direction of
an
RN,
Contract
Physicians and other
professional healthcare
providers. For more
information or to apply
online,
go
to:
http://www.
wyoming.gov/loc/06012
011_1/Pages/default.as
px or submit a State of
Wyoming Employment
Application
to
the
Human
Resource
Division,
Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Avenue, Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060,
Phone:
(307)777-7188,
Fax:
(307)777-6562, along
with transcripts of any
relevant course work.
The State of Wyoming
is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and actively
supports the ADA and
r e a s o n a b l y
accommodates
qualified applicants with
disabilities.
LOCAL BUSINESS
looking for Office
Assistant. Must have
valid DL. Background
check will be required.
Great personality,
dependability and
multi-tasking a must.
Mon-Thurs 9-4.
Please stop by to pick
up application at
5211 Coffeen Ave
during business
hours ONLY!
No
phone calls.
IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS Housekeeping, Front
Desk, Night Audit,
Breakfast
Attendant &
Maintenance. Top
wages. Apply in
person at Motel 6 &
Hampton Inn.
CLASS A CDL Driver
needed to work in oil
field in Douglas, WY.
Housing provided.
Flexible schedule. Two
wks on/two off or three
wks on/two off. $714/wk
guaranteed. Usually
$1600-$1800/wk. 307690-8253.
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL Hospital
is recruiting for a Cook
in our Nutritional
Services department.
Under the supervision
of the chef, the cook
will prepare, season
& cook food for
hospital patients, staff
& visitors. Ideal
candidates will
possess basic cooking
skills, ability to
multi-task, understand
& adjust recipes to
meet guidelines for
special diets &
maintain excellent
customer service
skills. Work with a
great team for a
growing organization.
Apply online at
(www.sheridanhospital
.org). EOE
M/F/Disabled/
Vet AAP
CERTIFIED
VETERINARY
TECHNICIAN
Small animal clinic is
seeking a CVT with
exceptional customer
service and technical
skills.Please deliver
resume and cover letter
to 241 Centennial Lane.
S H E R I D A N
MEMORIAL Hospital
is recruiting for Guest
Services Coordinators
in our Admissions
department. Full-time,
part-time,
PRN
&
weekend shifts are
available.Work with a
dynamic team and
experience our culture
of kindness! We are a
growing organization
with excellent career
opportunities.
Ideal
candidates are detailoriented,
organized,
e x c e p t i o n a l
communicators
&
provide
excellent
customer
service.
Apply
online
(www.sheridanhospital
.
o
r
g
)
.
EOE/M/F/Disabled/Vet
AAP
WE ARE currently
seeking vacuum truck
drivers to join our team
in
Wyoming. We provide
24/7 service. He or she
must have class A CDL,
with tankers
endorsement. Housing
available! We also offer
Insurance! $18-$22
starting pay! Contact
our office in Wright, WY
307-464-1146. Contact:
Gilbert Moncibaiz at
307-299-9200. Email:
g.moncibaiz10services
@gmail.com
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
Exteriors
is
immediately
hiring
experienced Siding,
gutter & window
installers/laborers,
top pay DOE. Call
751-6500.
Go online
today!
www.thesheridanpress.com
DENTAL ASSISTANT.
Progressive
office
adding an outgoing, F/T
team
member.
Emphasis on excellent
patient care, hands on
exp. in medical or
dental office helpful,
Send resume & cover
letter to: Send reply to
box 212, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan,
WY 82801
Busy Sheridan Medical Clinic has a
F/T position available for a Medical Biller/
Bookkeeper. Ideal candidates should be:
organized, flexible, ability to multi-task,
strong work ethic, detail orientated and
professional. Bookkeeping experience a
plus. Salary based on skill level. Medical
and retirement available. Send reply to
box 213, c/o The Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan, WY 82801
PERFECT 10 is
seeking independent
contractors
interested in making
extra income to
facilitate service
repairs of current
customers of Exede
High Speed Internet
in your area. We are
willing to train. Tools
and truck required.
E-mail your resume
or company
biography to
[email protected] perfect10.tv
LOST
PET?
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
Now Hiring
• Morning and
Evening Servers
• Line Cook
• Maintenance
• House Keeping
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
Hints from Heloise
Dryer Lint Is for the
Birds?
Dear Heloise: I keep a
cardboard oatmeal can near
my dryer. When I remove
the LINT FROM THE
DRYER, I place it in the can.
When the birds return in
the spring, I place some of it
in small, empty tuna cans,
and put them around the
yard or in a tree, where the
birds can get it for their
nests. -- R.E. in Nebraska
Backyard birds are our
friends, and they are just
lovely to watch! However,
this old and very common
hint is no longer safe.
All bird experts tell us
NOTto use dryer lint. Dryer
lint is made of fibers (many
man-made) from material,
and may have detergent or
softener residue, which is
not good for our feathered
friends. If you want to help
birds out, set out natural
materials, such as human
or animal hair, twigs, moss
and leaves. Now I have a
good use for Chammy's (our
silken wheaten terrier) and
my hair that collects in our
brushes. -- Heloise
P.S.: Next is a brilliant
bird hint. I'm watching my
hummingbirds right now!
HUMMINGBIRD HANGOUT
Dear Heloise: I have noticed that hummingbirds
like to sit and watch over
their food supply. I made a
hummingbird swing of my
own with a metal clothes
hanger. I bent the middle of
the clothes hanger upward,
toward the hook on top, to
make two loops, and hung it
over the feeder. They love
it! -- Shirley Davis, Lisbon,
Ohio
PET PAL
Dear Readers: Jordan
Gray sent a picture, via
email, of a friend's German
shepherd, Anya, lying in
the grass enjoying the sunshine. Jordan says that
Anya is protective and
loyal, but also as sweet as
they come. To see Anya's
photo, go to my website,
www. Heloise.com, and
click on "Pets." -- Heloise
FRUIT STAIN
Dear Heloise: I bit into a
Heloise
beautifully ripe strawberry,
and juice dripped down the
front of my favorite
sweater. Can you help? -Wilma, via email
Don't stress over a strawberry stain! Dampen the
sweater (if it's washable, of
course) with cool water, and
rub a drop or two of liquid
laundry detergent into the
spot (from the back of the
sweater), then wash. Do not
put it in the dryer. Check
the stain, and treat again if
it's still there. The next time
this happens, try to dab the
spot with cold water to help
dilute the juice. More maddening stains? Want to
know how to save that
shirt? Just send $5 and a
long, self-addressed,
stamped (70 cents) envelope
to: Heloise/Stain Guide,
P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001. Stains
are going to happen, so be
prepared! Remember, to
prevent pilling on sweaters,
wash them inside out. -Heloise
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
Casper, WY Location
We are looking for good people!!
ILCO is a family-owned business in
operation for 70+ years. We have been in
Wyoming for 35 years – started in 1980.
We are currently experiencing growth and
are seeking qualified employees for
Service Technician positions. Our
business has greatly expanded in several
industries including mining, construction,
industrial and railroads.
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Rating: GOLD
Solution to 10/17/14
ILCO offers growth opportunities along
with competitive wages and excellent
benefits including medical, dental, life,
disability, and accident insurances. We
also offer flex spending, 401k, holidays
and paid time off.
© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Hardware & Tools
www.thesheridanpress.com
If you are looking for employment with
an established company whose values
include safety, honesty, integrity, and
team work, please visit our website at
www.industriallubricant.com/jobs for
additional job information and to
apply online.
10/18/14
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted, Medical
Help Wanted,
Professional
SEEKING INDIVIDUAL
to clean and wash vans
at the UPS location in
Sheridan. Please call
Tony at 801-634-8465.
Must be able to pass
background check.
NSI ACADEMY
is seeking the
following positions:
Youth Counselor;
Clinical Therapist;
Case Manager; QA
Coordinator; Special
Ed. Teacher; Cook
(P/T). All applicants
must be 21 years of
age, meet educational
requirements, pass
background checks
and submit to drug
prescreening. Benefit
package available for
Full Time Employees.
Apply to: Human
Resources; NSI
Academy 5 Lane Ln.
Sheridan, WY 82801.
Call: (307) 674-6878
Ext. 119 Fax: (888)
400-5451.
[email protected]
vices.com or Online:
www.sequelemployme
nt.com
S H E R I D A N
MEMORIAL Hospital
is recruiting for a Full
time Certified Nursing
Assistant
for
our
Med/Surg floor. Work
with a great team and
organization dedicated
to Service Excellence
& kindness! The ideal
candidates will assists
patients with activities
of daily living; observe
and provide routine
care that meets the
psychosocial
and
physical needs of
patients. Candidates
must have a Current
Wyoming
Certified
Nursing
Assistant
certification; Current
BLS
certification;
Excellent organization,
communication
and
interpersonal
skills.
Apply
online
(www.sheridanhospital
.
o
r
g
)
.
EOE/M/F/Disabled/Vet
AAP
SENIOR NETWORK
Tech- Advanced
Communications
Technologies, Inc.
(ACT)
Sheridan, WY.
Installs, maintains,
tests, supports all types
of central office (CO),
and outside plant
facilities
as well as customer
networks lines and
equipment. Provides
guidance to Jr Network
Techs on installation
and repair. Full job
description on request.
Combination of
education and exp
equivalent to Assoc.
degree plus 7-10 yrs of
exp in
Telecom/Datacom.
Health/Vision/Dental;
LTD; Life; 401K; Send
resume with letter of
interest to: ACT/Range
HR. * PO Box 127 *
Forsyth, MT 59327; Email
[email protected]
fax: 406-347-2401.
Website:
www.actaccess.net
GREASE MONKEY is
accepting applications
for the positions of
Hood, Lube & Courtesy
Tech. We are looking
for applicants with a
friendly
attitude,
a
smile,
and
good
communication skills to
join our winning team.
Experience
is
beneficial, however all
successful
applicants
will be trained to
Grease
Monkey
standards and will be
required to complete
Grease Monkey's Hood
Tech and Lube Tech
Certification
Course.
Please apply in person
E
G
A
L
at
1360
Coffeen L
Avenue, across from A S S T / S E C R E T A R Y
needed for Attorney w/
Perkins in Sheridan.
active
Business
&
Estate planning/Admin
RODEWAY INN &
practice.
Experience
Suites is looking for
preferred. Send resume
front desk/
housekeepers. Apply in to Office Mgr. PO Box
person at 1704 N. Main, 6288, Sheridan, WY
82801.
Sheridan.
Bridge
START AT TRICK ONE
TO REACH TRICK 13
Bill Bryson writes humorous books on travel and science. He said, "I always tell
people there's only one trick
to writing: You have to
write something that people
are willing to pay money to
read. It doesn't have to be
very good, necessarily, but
somebody, somewhere, has
got to be willing to pay
money for it."
In bridge, there is only
one trick to winning: You
have to find a line of declarer play or defense that
works. It does not have to be
mathematically very good,
but something that succeeds. However, if you constantly make second-best
plays, you will lose in the
long run. So try to play accurately.
In this deal, South pushes
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
Phillip Alder
himself into seven notrump. What should he do
after West leads the heart
jack?
North might have rebid
two no-trump, but support
with support is a reliable
policy. And South's last bid
was a slight gamble, but
North rated to have decent
diamonds for his opening
bid when he had only one
ace and one king.
South has 13 top tricks:
one spade, two hearts, four
diamonds and six clubs. But
since the diamond suit is
blocked, that is true only if
he has an entry to reach the
diamond ace-queen. Declarer must win the first
trick in his hand with the
heart ace, cash the diamond
king-jack, play a heart to
dummy's king, and discard
his spade losers on the diamond ace-queen.
If South wins trick one on
the board, he had better
hope that West discards a
diamond while the clubs are
run.
THE VETERANS’
Home of Wyoming is
currently taking
applications for a parttime Nurse (RN). Job
Title: HSNU08-01820Registered Nurse.
Provides nursing
services to the
residents of the facility
and assesses health
problems and needs
amd develops and
implements nursing
care plans. Hiring
Range: $24.19 - $30.24
per hour. For
application
information or to apply
online go to
http://agency.governme
ntjobs.com/wyoming/def
ault.cfm or submit an
official application to
A&I Human Resources
Division, Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Avenue, Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060, (307) 7777188, Fax (307) 7776562 along with any
relevant coursework.
Open until filled.
EEO/ADA Employer.
Delivery
problems?
Call
The Press
at 672-2431
Antiques
CLOCK REPAIR.
All types, cuckoo,
mantle, grandfather,
etc. Pick up & delivery
avail. Call American
Radio. Located at the
Powder Basin Shopping
Center, 260 S. Douglas
Hwy. in Gillette.
Ask for Jerry
307-685-1408.
Real Estate
OPEN HOUSES
1129 Cross Creek Ct.
SATURDAY
or retirement planning
when you have some personal time on your hands in
the week ahead.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You can check out, but you
can't leave. Daydreams
might take up much of your
time in the week ahead.
Some of your ideas may be
applicable to financial success in practical ways, but
some are simply farfetched.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Something good can come
from a simple act of kindness. Go ahead and grant
someone a favor even if you
feel they don't deserve it.
You could be asked to make
an important commitment
of time and energy this
week.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Turn the ordinary into the
extraordinary in the week
ahead. You may be amazed
at what you can accomplish
if you set out without preconceived notions. With
Venus in your sign, romantic relationships can take
top priority.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Turn wounds into wisdom. You can move past
hurts and humiliations if
you put them behind you
and use them as inspiration
to do better. In the week to
come several people will
offer you flattering and positive feedback.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Benefit from good
advice. In the upcoming
week, you can gather wisdom from traditional
sources and use it to your
advantage in financial and
business planning. You may
be inspired to look for more
opportunities.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You may be more disappointed by the things you
didn't do than by those you
did. The fact is, you don't
have to do them all right
now. Hold off launching
crucial plans until the end
of the week.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Winners compare their
achievements using the
measuring stick of their
goals, while losers compare
their achievements to those
of other people. You can
stash away money like a
squirrel this week to reach
financial goals.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): If you don't know where
you stand with someone,
perhaps you should quit
standing and start walking.
By the end of the week, you
should receive clear signals
about whether a romantic
prospect is worth your time
and effort.
IF OCTOBER 19 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Work hard to
find ways to use your energy and initiative in constructive ways during the
next 4-6 weeks. Consider
running your personal life
in the same efficient manner in which you handle
your career or business responsibilities. Don't begin
anything crucial until after
the end of November when
you can put your business
savvy and street smarts to
good use. Your best month
to initiate plans or start
something of great importance is next May, when
Lady Luck smiles on everything you do and you have
your best chance to achieve
security.
$899,000 MLS 14 - 698
Saturday 11-1 PM
October 18th
10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
1511 Mydland Rd. #77
Cyndee Jacobson
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
2569 Big Horn Ave.
Matt Westkott
NEW LISTING
2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
11 Spur Lane – Parkman
Matt Westkott
NEW LISTING
15 Deer Haven Dr.
$795,000 MLS 14 - 646
Saturday 2-4 PM
Kristin McFaul
752-9577
Broker/Owner
45 E. Loucks • Sheridan, WY
Land/Property Sale
306 N. Main St.
Sheridan, WY
(307) 672-8911
Office Hours
Sat 9am-2pm
10 ACRES. Prime; Ag
Land. Location, View
and Creek. $335,000.
Sheridan. Carlton Real
Estate. Call Bill 307461-4473.
Autos-Accessories
FOR SALE 2000 Dodge
Ram. Accepting bids
until
October
27.
Sunlight Federal Credit
Union.
www.eracrc.com
Business Opportunities
GREAT BUSINESS
Opportunity!!
If you are a licensed
Wyoming
Cosmetologist looking
to work independently
in one of Sheridan’s
Premier Salons.
Contact Stacey Bassett
at Mae Carter Salon
307-672-5021.
Independent Booth
Rent $375.00 per
month.
Garage Sales
3 FAMILY GARAGE
SALE! 316 E. 4th St
Sat. Oct. 18. 7-2. Kids
clothing, wood stove,
glass top stove, lots of
misc.
GARAGE SALE - 1408
Easy St. Sat 8-?.
OPEN HOUSE
11-3 SAT OCT. 18
1363 MARTIN AVE.
2BR/1 BATH
MOVE IN COND.
Great Neighborhood
Come See This!! 7525556 or 672-8641
REDUCED PRICE!
CUTE BRIGHT AIRY
2Br/1Ba Home. Lots of
Storage/Central Air
New Roof/
Move in cond
$172,450.
Call 752-5556
or 672-8641
VERY NICE 4 plex in
Dayton, WY. Great
investment. FSBO.
Serious inquiries only.
$425K. 307-674-7718.
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Joy Bryant was born in
New York City on this date
in 1974. This birthday gal
has portrayed Jasmine
Trussell on "Parenthood"
since 2010. She's also appeared on episodes of "Love
Bites," "Entourage" and
"ER." On the big screen,
Bryant has had roles in
films such as "About Last
Night," "Hit And Run" and
"Bobby." Bryant has also
worked as a model for several major brands.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Focus is on finding your
way to a fine future. Be concerned about achieving
long-term goals and set
aside money to make your
future secure. Don't be extravagant about spending
on personal items in the
week to come.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Think big. Big thinking
precedes great achievement. You don't need to
limit your ideas even if putting them into motion may
take time and energy. A
partner might not be willing to give you the go ahead
in the upcoming week.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Ask for forgiveness and you
will be forgiven. Get a disagreement straightened out
before it undermines your
future prospects. In the
week ahead, concentrate on
making dreams a reality
and on improving your
most cherished commitments.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Every hour that passes
takes you an hour closer to
what is yet to come. You
might be smart to investigate your options for college
Real Estate
Jeraldine Saunders
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Katie Featherston was born
in Texas on this day in 1982.
This birthday gal has
played the role of Katie in
four "Paranormal Activity"
films and will reprise the
role for a fifth time in 2016.
Her other film work includes "Psychic Experiment" and "Mutation."
Featherston also co-starred
in the short-lived 2012 horror series "The River" and
appeared in the web series
"Act-Anon."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Know when to speak
and when to maintain silence. Romantic partners
are easily influenced by
your words. You must fight
against a tendency to take
drastic measures where
your home life or career is
concerned.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Relax and let go of a
know-it-all attitude. There's
no need to waste your time
in a debate over personal
opinions that can never be
proven by facts and figures.
You can dazzle higher ups
in the career or job arena.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
The information highway
might not have all the answers. This might be a good
day to rely on your own resources and intuitions. You
and a special someone
might be on different wavelengths for a few hours.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Hum along in harmony
with others if you don't
know the words. Be tactful
when you aren't sure of the
facts. Examine the fine
print before you sign anything of importance. Work
can be tackled with a cre-
ative flair.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If
you think the sky's the
limit, you must have limited imagination. You can't
build anything without an
idea and you should not let
your ideas be limited by
what you see others do.
Focus on being the best.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Pay attention to those "in
the know." Use someone in
your family as a sounding
board for financial decisions. There's much to be
learned from anyone who's
well versed in a subject and
has a lot of experience.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
The simplest solutions may
solve the most difficult
problems. You could be fretting over hardships when
you could easily resolve the
situation by using simple,
sound principles. Sidestep
unnecessary expenses.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Remember that it's your
attitude, not your aptitude,
that will determine your altitude. You may be ambitious and want to make key
changes so you rule your
own world. Tackle your
goals with a positive outlook.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Remain hooked
into a solid core of optimism. Reach into your
inner being to make wise
choices now so that you'll
be set on automatic whenever you're tempted to indulge in unwise
investments or romances.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Iron out misunderstandings on the home front
immediately. Someone who
thinks you're exerting too
much control could be
downright rebellious. Keep
a close watch on your pennies so you have something
extra for the weekend.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Remember the tale of
the blind men who came
upon an elephant. Each one
found a separate part and
thought it dictated the
whole. If you change the
way you look at things, the
things you look at change.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Set your sights on beneficial and worthy goals. If
you're focused on making
all your dreams come true
you won't be distracted by
passing fancies. Apply yourself diligently to tasks, then
unwind with a loved one
tonight.
IF OCTOBER 20 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: During the
next 6-8 weeks, you have energy and vitality that can be
put to good use in any business or financial venture. In
December, keep a low profile, start nothing of crucial
significance, and pay close
attention to your obligations. By January, the cosmic weather is more
favorable for making headway with career and romantic aspirations. The answer
to your prayers might drop
right in your lap in late
May or June, so use that
time wisely and launch crucial plans or ask for favors
while the cosmos smiles on
your efforts. You'll shine
brightest in social situations during May and June,
when groups, clubs, teams,
or community organizations might value your
input and participation.
101814Legals_Layout 1 10/17/14 4:07 PM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note dated July 18, 2005 executed and delivered by
Craig L. Sanders to Lender, Mann Financial Inc., d/b/a
Mann Mortgage, and a real estate mortgage of the
same date securing the Note, which Mortgage was
recorded in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., (“MERS”), as Mortgagee acting solely as
nominee for Lender and Lender’s successors and
assigns, recorded on July 22, 2005 as Rec. No. 514574,
Book 606, Page 0092 in the public records in the office
of the County Clerk of Sheridan County, Wyoming; as
assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger
to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, f/k/a Countrywide
Home Loans Servicing LP, recorded June 8, 2012 as Rec.
No. 2012-696914 in the public records in the office of the
County Clerk of Sheridan, County, Wyoming; as assigned
to Federal National Mortgage Association, recorded on
November 1, 2012 as Rec. No. 2012-700482, Book 845,
Page 446, in the public records of the office of the
county clerk of Sheridan County, Wyoming. The
premises that are described in the Mortgage are as
follows:
A tract of land situated in the SW ¼ SW ¼
of Section 8, T53N, R83W of the Sixth Principal
Meridian, of Sheridan County, Wyoming, described as
follows: Beginning at a point located 512 Feet East and
295 Feet North from the Southwest corner of Section 8,
T53N, R83W; thence North 365 Feet to a point; thence
West 182 Feet to a point; thence South 265 Feet to a
point; thence East 50 Feet to a point; thence South 100
Feet to a point; thence East 132 Feet to the point of
beginning;
with an address of 93 Fish Hatchery Road, Story,
Wyoming 82842.
Seterus Inc., as servicer for Federal National Mortgage
Association, has served a written Notice of Intent to
Foreclose the Mortgage by Advertisement and Sale
pursuant to the terms of the Mortgage to the record
owner or party in possession in accordance with the
statute ten (10) days prior to the first publication of the
sale.
The amount due and owing on the date of the first
publication is $215,540.23 which includes the unpaid
principal and accrued but unpaid interest. Interest
continues to accrue on the unpaid balance at the rate of
$11.63 per day.
The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to
other liens and encumbrances that will not be
extinguished at the sale and any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to W.S.§ 34-3-101 et
seq., (1977 Republished Edition) that the above
described property will be at public venue sold by the
Sheriff of Sheridan County, to the highest bidder at the
hour of 10:00 o’clock A.M. on the 7th of November, 2014,
at the courthouse steps of Sheridan County.
DATED this 22nd day of September, 2014.
BY: Greg B. Asay
Associated Legal Group, LLC
1807 Capitol Ave Suite 203
Cheyenne, WY 82001
(307) 632-2888
Attorney for Seterus Inc., as servicer for Federal
National Mortgage Association
Publish: September 27, October 4, 11, 18, 2014.
CITY OF SHERIDAN, WYOMING, “DRAFT” MINUTES OF
REGULAR COUNCIL MEETING, COUNCIL CHAMBERS,
7:00 P.M., October 6, 2014
The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag was led by Mayor
Heath. Invocation was given by Doc Nelson, from the
Calvary Chapel. The meeting was called to order with a
quorum as follows: Mayor Heath presiding with
Councilors Kelley, Lee, Rios and Smith with Councilor
Webster absent. Also present were Fire and Emergency
Services Director Lenhart, Interim Chief of Staff
Adriaens, Human Resources Director Doke, City
Clerk/Interim Treasurer Badley, and various other City
staff. Mayor Heath asked for a motion to remove the
retail liquor licensing items and replace them with a
discussion on process of issuing the retail license.
Councilor Smith moved, seconded by Councilor Kelly, to
modify the agenda as requested. Mayor Heath then
read aloud the consent items: a) Modified Agenda; b)
Minutes of Regular Council Meeting 09/15/2014; c)
Minutes of Special Council Meeting 09/24/2014; d)
Claims; e) Final Acceptance of Poplar Grove Phase III
PUD; f) Approval Ordinance 2149: an ordinance
amending Appendix A (Zoning) of Sheridan City Code,
particularly pertaining to parking requirements for
development (Third Reading). Councilor Lee moved,
seconded by Councilor Rios, approval of the modified
agenda and the consent agenda. Council approved the
motion: roll call vote; unanimous. REGULAR PAYROLL
09/19/14 & 10/03/14: 497-874-NCPERS Wyoming,
$624; Aflac, $1,153.02; Blue Cross Blue Shield of
Wyoming, $135,820.70; CITCO FCU, $14,787.26; Colonial
Supplemental Insurance, $43.56; First Federal Savings
Bank, $13,401.10; First Interstate Bank, $7,727.22; ICMA
Retirement Trust 300698, $15,911.74; IRS 941,
$134,480.36; LegalShield, $87.70; LOCAL 276, IAFF,
$1,600; Orchard Trust, $2,298.74; Police Protective
Assoc, $95; Security State Bank, $1,136.68; Sunlight
Federal Credit Union, $1,244.16; US Bank, $124.16; VSP,
$1,699.44; Wells Fargo Bank-CC, $2,878.42; Workers'
Safety, $14,407.85; WYO EDUCATOR'S BENEFIT,
$1,063.30; Wyoming Child Support Enforcement, $750;
Wyoming Retirement System, $107,511.45; TOTAL
REGULAR PAYROLL 09/19/14 & 10/03/14: $458,845.86.
CLAIMS: A Plus Plumbers, City Hall maintenance,
$174.20; A&M Service & Supply, Toner, $64.75; ABC
Signs & Specialties, Signs, $840; Ace HardwareNewkirk, Supplies, $339.16; ACT Communications,
Telephone, $171.50; Advance Fence, Fence repair,
$235.71; Ambiente H2O, WWTP Was pump project,
$4,060.40; American Welding & Gas, Parts & supplies,
$692.17; AmeriMark Direct, Recycling button & stickers Ag Expo event, $220.44; Andree J Biot, Contractual
services, $192; Andrew Palmer, Water deposit refund,
$44.36; B&B Leasing, B&B leasing, $216.35; Babcock
Laboratories, UCMR Lab samples, $1,831; Bently
Systems, Quarterly software renewal, $1,084.50; Big
Horn Design, Uniform shirts (D.Hauf), $93; Big Horn
Sanitation, Portable toilets, $403.30; Black Bear
Construction, Concrete repair (Burton leak), $1,050;
Bloedorn Lumber, Supplies, $340.82; Bockman Group,
Dog Park Fencing & misc work @ BGWTP, $16,605.86;
Border States Electric Supply, Electrical switch handle,
$222.87; Brian James, 4th Quarter 2014 Operating,
$55,680.74; Brian's Boot & Shoe, Steel toe work boots,
$409.90; Britnee Geringer, Water deposit refund,
$18.29; Burn Cleuch Ditch Company, 2014 Assessment,
$15.86; Burns & Mc Donnell, Professional services,
$68,541.84; C & K Equipment, Bristles, $753.72;
California Contractors, Gloves, $79.60; Captain Clean,
Contract carpet cleaning-Sept, $552.40; Carquest Auto
Parts, Parts & supplies, $1,116.10; Carter-Isakson
Appraisals, Canby St. property appraisal, $2,000; CED,
Parts, $443.55; Cedars Health, Drug screens-Aug, $467;
CenturyLink Communications, Telephone, $48.72;
Certified Folder Display Service, Publications,
Advertising, $8,620.34; CH Diagnostics & Consulting,
Giardia & Crypto analysis-July-Sept, $1,560; Charter
Media - Mtn States, Back to School TV advertising,
$901.50; Chemtrade Chemicals US, Alum Sulfare Liq
Sid, $13,371.14; Collection Professionals, CollectionsAug, $812.69; Colonial Research, Asphalt desolver
(cleanser), $287.60; Communication Technologies,
Replacement radio & batteries, $813; Comtronix,
Camera system, alarm monitoring & batteries,
www.thesheridanpress.com
$2,518.98; Connie's Glass, Dispatch pass through
window fixed, $114.40; Country Bounty, Display ads,
$948.50; Cowboys & Indians Magazine, Publications,
Advertising, $600; Craftco Metals Services, Materials &
labor-modify DSA art pedestals, $422.70; Crescent
Electric, Parts, $207; Dale Buckingham Architects,
Professional services, $21,190; Dixon Land Mgmt &
Consulting, Lawn care, $1,502.50; Doggone Rodent
Control, Rodent control Kendrick pasture, $932.50;
Dowl HKM, Professional services, $37,533.75; Downtown
Sheridan Assoc, Printing letters & envelopes (500 ea.),
$96; DXP Enterprises, Calibration gas, $240.66; Ed
Hammer, Handle, $55; Empco, Police Corporal written
exam development, $2,288; Energy Laboratories, TOC
sample analysis-Sept, $160; Entech, Professional
services, $34,196.50; Farmers Co-op Oil, Fuel (NL, diesel
& propane) & animal suppl, $25,527.71; Fastenal
Industrial Supplies, Safety glasses & lazer, $133.70;
Fedex Freight West, Mailing fees-Police Officer
Promotional, $55.21; Ferguson Waterworks #1701,
Handheld programmer repair, $91; Fiberpipe Internet
Services, Virtual domain, $46.50; FirePrograms, Annual
support & upgrade service, $1,860; Fletcher
Construction, WTP conventional upgrades Pay App #14,
$203,867.67; Fremont Motor Sheridan, Replace worn
bushings, $340.51; Galls/Quartermaster/Roy Tailors,
Patrol uniform shirts, $179.96; Geoffrey Buisch, Water
deposit refund, $42.71; Grainger, Replacement motor,
$513.38; Green Carpet Sod, Burial sod, $46.75; Hach,
Lab supplies, $1,047.12; Harris Publishing, Pubs,
advertise, promotional-Fall Nation, $3,315; Hawkins,
Chemical & freight chg, $4,663.20; HDR Engineering,
Professional services, $24,999.11; Health Education
Design Solutions, FA/HCP/CPR Classes-Sept, $161;
Helen Kearney, Water deposit refund, $29.19; I/O
Solutions, Pre-Employment Integrity tests, $342;
Industrial Communications, Motorola radio batteries &
microphones, $1,056; InfoSend, Data process, print,
mail
service-Aug,
$4,435.68;
Inter-Mountain
Laboratories, Sample testing & volatile compounds,
$4,074; Jack's Truck & Equipment, Parts, $3,069.62;
Janet Kyle Liston, Water deposit refund, $53.89; Jeff
Jones, Water deposit refund, $57.15; Jerry & Angela
Logan, Water deposit refund, $18.05; Jill & Tyler Kerns,
Water deposit refund, $90; Jim Norton, Water deposit
refund, $81.33; Jim's Tree Service, Tree care, $800; Joel
Wardell, Water deposit refund, $55.52; John Deere
Financial, Glove, $15.99; John Heath, Mileage-NEWY in
Gillette, $112; Josh Law, IT support services-Aug & Sept,
$2,400; Kate Harrington, Contractual services,
$1,999.67; KBJ Economic Development, Ady/voltage
travel expenses, $452.07; Kennon Sign Shop, QR code
labels for sculptures, $108.52; Kilpatrick Creations,
Clothing for firemen, $1,530.25; Klay Condos, Running
shoes, $109.99; Knecht Home Center, Supplies, $107.95;
Kois Brothers Equipment, Micron element filter, $121.53;
L J Wright Ironworks & Design, Rebuild latches on dump
truck, $475.40; Lannan's Supply, Supplies, $145.40;
Laurie L Schwabauer, Cleaning services CSC (Sept),
$400; Lieuallen Tree Service, Cemetery Largent tree
care, $2,290; Linda Jafek, Water deposit refund, $31.01;
Little Goose Multimedia, One Cent video, $1,380;
Lonabaugh & Riggs, Municipal Court Judge feesKlepperich, $400; Luke A Goddard, Medical Doctor
coverage-October, $500; Madden Media, Publications,
Advertising, $625; Marc Cantrell, Water deposit refund,
$20.25; Maria Burke, Water deposit refund, $82.69;
Maric Sales, Hyd filter elements, $382.73; Marjorie
Odekoven, Water deposit refund, $52.50; Martini's
Detailing, Detailing of CSO truck interior GMC, $129.95;
Master Clean / J.A.S. Const, Cleaning services, $300;
Megan Jane Ahrens, Contractual services, $1,916.67;
Memorial Hospital, Wellness screening & supplies,
$9,138.74; Mike's Electric, Work on recirculating pump,
$79.95; MDU, WY/Park Phase II - Street light repair,
$1,306.10; Moore Iacofano Goltsman, Parks planning,
$6,316.92; Mountain View Building, Sheridan
Commercial Park Pay App #14, $13,200; Mullinax
Concrete Svc & Irrigation, Cement & gravel, $2,187.20;
Municipal Emergency Services, Tools, $305.30; Napa
Auto Parts, Parts & supplies, $821.44;Neve's Uniforms,
Patrol ballistic vest alteration, $120;Nicholas Haller,
Water deposit refund, $17.78; Norco, Clothing & supplies,
$985.64; North Main Association, Economic
Development, $2,000; North Star Energy &
Construction, WY-Park Phase III Construction Pay App
#2, $244,875.59; Northern Lights Electric, Uptown
electric upgrades, $10,000; Northwest Pipe Fittings,
Parts & service, $2,238.14; One-Call of Wyoming, Tickets
for August, $212.25; P. Lynne Meyers, Water deposit
refund, $13.82; Pat Burke Trucking, Haul glass to
Colorado for recycling, $1,200; Pavement Markings,
Paint yellow curb @ Montana/S. Sheridan Ave, $125; PB
Communications & Strategic, eNewsletter Email
Marketing subscription, $108; PC House Call, September
services, $8,000; Pence & Macmillan, Legal servicesJuly 24 - Aug. 31, 2014, $9,000.50; Plains Tire & Battery,
Tires, service & disposal fee, $3,116.23; Porter, Muirhead,
Cornia, Interim Audit services-FY2014 Audit, $20,000;
Post and Associates, Pre-employment Examination
Patrol Officer, $300; Powder River Power, Parts &
supplies, $234.75; Process Solutions, Thermal
dispersion flowline & sensor temp, $760.28; Public
Surplus, Equipment auction costs, $436.71; Randall
Engineering, Professional services, $3,894; Rayanne
Collins, Water deposit refund, $37.99; Renew, Parks
upkeep-Aug, $1,649; Resource Staffing, Temporary
labor - Roof Inspector, $1,806.70; Ricoh USA, Monthly
service-copier/printer/scanner, $582.37; Ridgepoint
Consulting, Professional services, $23,295.52; RoadSafe
Traffic Systems, Traffic paint & glass beads, $1,377.31;
RPM Professional Cleaning Services, Cleaning of City
Hall, $2,875; Servall Uniform & Linen, Cleaned rugs,
$41.40; Shawn Buckley, Contractual services, $2,875;
Sheridan Brake, Parts & service, $770.95; Sheridan
Commercial, Supplies, $685.41; Sheridan Econ-O-Wash,
Laundry services, $8.91; Sheridan Electronics, Supplies,
$174.96; Sheridan Ice, Sponsorship, $1,500; Sheridan
Iron Works, Sign supports, $32.20; Sheridan Lock & Key,
Keys & service, $99.80; Sheridan Media, AdvertisingAug, $1,270; Sheridan Motor, Parts & service, $2,784.26;
Sheridan Newspapers, Display & legal ads-Aug, $6,655;
Sheridan Printing, Printing services, $325; Sheridan
Recreation, Qtr payment July-Sept & pool heater repair,
$46,956.74; Sheridan Saw Service, Turf equipment
repairs, $165.26; Sheridan Seed, Pasture supplement,
$327.48; Sheridan Winnelson, Parts & supplies,
$4,077.15; Sherwin Williams, Cable kit & hose, $161.08;
Source Office Products, Supplies, $1,933.78; SSR
Construction, Professional services, $219,861.24; Steve's
Truck Service, Major vehicle repairs, $7,055.07; SWCA,
Professional services, $2,445; Ted's Towing, Move
vehicle(s) - Illinois St. Reconstruction, $200; Tekleen
Automatic Filters, Non-potable water filter, $4,105;
Teledyne ISCO, Flow meter, $673.09; Thomas H Barrett,
Water deposit refund, $64.44; Tire Rama, Tire repairs,
tires & tube, $3,638.58; Top Office Products, Supplies &
copy chgs, $1,083.22; Transaction Warehouse, Web
pymt transaction fee-Aug, $1,688.40; Travis Koltiska,
Clothing allowance-Detectives, $192.86; UPS Store,
Shipping charges-Rabies Bat, $17.70; Uriah Rohrer,
Water deposit refund, $34.88; Verizon Wireless, Aircards
& router – Sept, $649.83; Vidacare, Medical supplies for
ambulances #KJ, $931.28; Visionary Communications,
Internet services, $737.54; VisitUs, Publications,
Advertising, $300; Vista West Engineering, Professional
services, $20,006.25;WAM, Handbook & committee
lunch (S Smith), $65; Wamco Lab, Wet testing, $1,600;
Warehouse Market, Meeting supplies-Term # 4, $98.69;
Water Products, 5 gallon water bottles, $105; Wenck
Associates, Professional services, $726.69; Wood Group
PSN, Professional services, $32,677.59; WWC
Engineering, WY-Park Phase III CA Pay App #54,
$10,997.31; WY DOT, Professional services, $334,394.52;
Wyoming Assoc Rural Water, Conference registration,
$975; Wyoming Audiology, Annual hearing exams for
firefighters, $512; Wyoming First Aid & Safety Supply,
Restock first aid cabinet, $50.26; Wyoming Law,
Firearms instructor recertification-Patrol Ofc, $185;
Xerox, Contractual services, $208.78; Zowada Recycling
& Steel, Materials, $306.76; TOTAL CLAIMS:
$1,675,574.99. PREPAID CLAIMS: Caterpillar Financial,
Caterpillar 627G pay #6-scraper-property tax,
$101,961.57; CenturyLink Communications, Scada lines
& extensions, $794.12; Chris Amicucci, Reissue check
lost-105568, $8.78; MDU, Electric bills, $34,946.56;
Northern WY Community College, Support Tech
Teaching Resolution 16-13, $125,000; State of Wyoming,
Loan #CWSRF-109 & #DWSRF-101/110, $194,848.45;
Katie Kennedy, Reissue check 111140-lost in mail,
$207.28; Kim C Ostermyer, Contract Cemetery Data
Work-August, $864; Michael Dykhorst, Contract
Cemetery Data Work-August, $490; Rocky Mountain
Ambulance Service, Ambulance service-October,
$10,000; TOTAL PREPAID CLAIMS: $469,120.76.
Councilor Lee administered the oath of office to new
Junior Councilors Adam Berry, Cameron Craft, Jacob
Jahiel and Ann Lynam. Council welcomed the Junior
Councilors to their positions and encouraged
participation as topics arise. City Clerk/Interim Treasurer
Badley informed the council of the change by Charter
Cable to digital from analog signals which resulted in
the change of the two local government access
channels 12 and 22 being moved to channels 190 and
191 respectively. Interim Chief of Staff Adriaens provided
a brief discussion on the uses of the optional one cent
funds approved by voters in 2010 and the tax up for
renewal this November. Mr. Adriaens then played a brief
video that will be run on the government access cable
channels along with other short informational videos.
Council commented that the optional sales tax was
instrumental in helping the community through
construction projects, assisting worthy community
groups, a substantial portion of the tax is paid by
tourism and the voters decide if the tax shall be
renewed. Mayor Heath explained the need for a motion
to discuss the retail license issuance. Councilor Lee
moved, seconded by Councilor Rios, to open discussion
of how to address issuing the retail liquor license #20.
Mayor Heath expressed the need to establish city policy
and criteria before issuing the last retail liquor license.
The delay in issuing the license, to the October 20 city
council meeting, would be utilized to draft a resolution
establishing the method to be used by the council on
how the applications will be reviewed, answer a series
of legal questions on how the licenses can be utilized
and provide a fair opportunity for all applications to be
submitted before any decision is made to issue the
license. Mr. James Yates, Mr. Stephen Kuzara, Mr. Shawn
Boyle all rose in favor of their applications to be
approved by the council. Sheridan County Liquor
Dealers representatives Connie Deutsch and Carol Davis
urged the council on behalf of their organization for an
opportunity to provide input on the selection process
before the council makes any decision. Council
approved the motion; voice vote, unanimous. Mr.
Demchok addressed council on his concern about the
city accepting volunteer help. Mr. George Neeson,
representing Local IAFF 276, urged the council to
approve a continuing contract for FY 2015. Mr. Neeson
asked to revisit prior proposals, offered no additional
proposals or new language, did not elaborate on any
differences between the City and the Union and urged
the council to prevent a costly arbitration scheduled for
the later part of October. Councilor Smith reported on
the recent Wyoming Association of Municipalities
(WAM) Board meeting she attended where she was
approved as a board member. Councilor Rios noted that
Bethany Hamilton, the surfer that survived the shark
attack in Hawaii, was speaking in town to the K-Life
group and also welcomed the new Junior Councilors.
There being no further business Council adjourned at
7:47 P.M.
Publish: October 18, 2014.
Sheridan County School District No.2.
Pursuant to the provisions of Wyoming Statute 21-3-11
the following list of warrants over $500 is published
herewith. The following warrants were approved for
payment 10/09/14. Signed: Marva Craft, Clerk.
Ck No Vendor Amount
103123 A & M SERVICE AND 964.50
103128 ALSCO 940.49
103131 AMERICAS BEST VALU 605.80
103132 APPLE INC 6,848.00
103135 BAILEY POTTERY 1,704.29
103143 BINOS WHOLESALE 721.67
103145 BLOEDORN LUMBER 705.02
103152 BULLSEYE GLASS 579.29
103155 C B MUSIC REPAIR G 900.55
103158 C P S ELECTRONICS 596.00
103160 CARQUEST AUTO PART 3,274.24
103162 CENTRAL TRUCK & DI 4,289.63
103168 CLASSROOM DIRECT 1,782.70
103171 COMPANION CORPORAT 1,000.00
103173 CONSOLIDATED 2,524.30
103174 COWBOY SUPPLY HOUS 572.90
103176 CREATIVE LEARNING 5,000.00
103180 DELL MARKETING L.P 13,630.30
103182 DICK BLICK COMPANY 998.31
103183 DIVISION OF CRIMIN 936.00
103184 DOMINOS/SHERIDAN 611.26
103187 E M C PUBLISHING 5,193.27
103190 ANDY EDMUNDSON 2,472.00
103194 EVERYDAY 1,618.36
103196 FOLLETT SCHOOL 6,746.30
103197 FOOD SERVICES OF 3,298.91
103203 GLOBAL INDUSTRIAL 13,478.00
103209 HANDWRITING WITHOU 970.19
103211 STUDENT RECEIVABLE 500.00
103215 HEINEMANN / 1,815.00
103220 HOUGHTON MIFFLIN 16,847.88
103222 I S C INC 40,521.85
103223 INFINITE CAMPUS IN 6,952.00
103224 J B D INC 3,957.00
103230 JOHNSON CONTROLS, 3,572.00
103233 K B COMMERCIAL 1,647.04
103236 KENNON SIGN SHOP 1,184.35
103237 KILPATRICK CREATIO 2,402.50
103247 LAWN PRO/SNOW PRO 8,989.94
103249 LIKE NEW AUTO BODY 961.10
103250 LONG BUILDING 535.58
103252 M P S/MACMILLIAN P 4,138.43
103253 MALLERY MARSHALL 1,298.74
103256 JERI J MATHES 875.00
103258 MONTANA DAKOTA 11,090.18
103263 N C S PEARSON, INC 848.72
103264 NAVIANCE INC 1,495.00
103265 REBECCA M NEWTON 2,380.00
103266 NORCO 3,352.96
103267 NORTHEAST WYOMING 17,683.09
103268 O & M TRAINING LLC 540.00
103269 O K WRECKING 1,350.00
103270 OFFICE MAX 10,504.00
103271 OFFICE SHOP INC 545.02
103272 THE OFFICE 2,290.18
103274 PARKERS GLASS SHOP 515.66
103275 PEARSON EDUCATION 31,017.71
103276 JEANNIE R PETERSON 1,192.33
103277 PLUSOPTIX INC 7,420.00
103279 THE POWDER HORN 1,290.12
103280 POWDER RIVER HEATI 837.77
103283 QUICK PRINTING COM 1,645.31
103284 QUILL CORPORATION 5,482.41
103286 REALLY GOOD STUFF 1,259.76
103292 RIDDELL / ALL AMER 5,956.42
103297 SARK MUSIC 5,308.00
103300 SCHOOL DIST #2/GEN 6,604.13
103301 SCHOOL HEALTH 686.03
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
103306 SHERIDAN COMMERCIA 2,466.21
103307 SHERIDAN COMMERCIA 794.08
103310 SHERIDAN COUNTY YM 820.00
103312 SHERIDAN SPORTS 1,620.00
103313 SHERIDAN SPORTS 4,360.00
103316 SHERIDAN WINNELSON 1,628.17
103317 SHERWIN WILLIAMS 1,019.32
103318 SOAR LEARNING INC 897.00
103322 AMY R J STEEL 2,835.00
103326 TEACHER DIRECT 698.67
103328 TIME MANAGEMENT 562.50
103329 TIRE RAMA 2,904.55
103330 TOP OFFICE PRODUCT 4,688.68
103334 THE TROPHY CASE 521.90
103338 UNIVERSAL ATHLETIC 2,166.37
103343 WALSWORTH PUBLISHI 12,012.59
103344 WAREHOUSE MARKET 2,222.38
103346 WE VIDEO INC 6,192.00
103347 WEBSITES MADE EZ 2,188.00
103348 WEED WARRIORS 550.00
103350 JERRY WEITZ 520.00
103354 WESTERN EXTINGUISH 3,506.10
103355 WHITNEY PLAZA OWNE 3,138.28
103356 WILLIAM V. MACGILL 1,420.96
103359 WOODEN PERCUSSION 12,950.00
103360 THE WOODS 1,275.35
103366 WYTEL COMMUNICATIO 5,154.40
103370 YELLOWSTONE BOYS & 2,209.35
103371 YONKEE & TONER LLP 4,710.00
103374 HEINEMANN 1,815.00
103376 VISA 19,757.32
103378 MONTANA DAKOTA 9,586.81
103379 SCHOOL DIST #2/GEN 5,898.88
103380 SCHOOL DIST #2/GEN 705.25
103382 UNIV OF 500.00
103384 WY EDUCATORS BENEF 6,946.70
103385 WY SCHOOL SUPPORT 3,638.56
103386 SHOUT POINT 3,795.00
103395 BIG HORN DESIGN 603.00
103396 BILLINGS OFFICIALS 1,226.40
103401 BUSH WELLS SPORTIN 1,305.11
103404 C D W- GOVERNMENT, 4,800.00
103405 C P S ELECTRONICS 596.00
103408 DON CHERNI 610.00
103412 COWBOY SUPPLY HOUS 6,551.60
103416 DECKER EQUIPMENT I 501.41
103422 EAGLE RIDGE 2,980.86
103423 E-BIZSOFT INC 4,548.00
103424 ELCO DRILLING INC 2,240.00
103427 FLEXSHARE BENEFITS 608.00
103428 FLINN SCIENTIFIC I 3,259.40
103429 FOOD SERVICES OF 37,382.12
103431 FREESTYLE PHOTOGRA 543.58
103432 G H PHIPPS CONSTRU 22,772.00
21561 SUE BELISH 1,000.00
21562 CHELSEA BESTRAM ( 523.00
21564 C P S ELECTRONICS 38,160.00
21569 DELL MARKETING L.P 5,424.20
21570 DELTA EDUCATION 2,000.00
21572 FATHER FLANAGAN'S 20,786.35
21574 TRACY HED (ADM) 749.00
21576 I X L LEARNING 7,440.00
21577 IDESIGN SOLUTIONS 10,689.70
21579 JILL LANGER 650.00
21581 JERI J MATHES 875.00
21584 PROJECT ADVENTURE 4,836.40
21585 RUBICON INTERNATIO 2,595.00
21590 WAL MART COMMUNITY 573.53
21591 VISA 17,100.33
21593 PUBLIC EDUCATION & 5,085.00
21594 VISA 4,970.14
21595 VISA 5,390.00
21597 DELL MARKETING L.P 5,424.20
21603 HEINEMANN 10,260.00
21604 I X L LEARNING 975.00
21605 N C S PEARSON, INC 780.00
21606 SCHOLASTIC INC (3 2,895.00
21609 U A L R CENTER FOR 600.00
21613 BLUE CROSS/BLUE SH 28,957.48
Publish October 18, 2014.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
legal notices must be paid in full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
OF
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at
672-2431 if you have questions.
B8 FULL PAGE AD 1018.qxp_A Section Template 10/17/14 10:47 PM Page 1
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014

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