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Pleasanton
Weekly
Reggae is
the way for
AVHS grad
Page 12
VOL. XV, NUMBER 38 • OCTOBER 17, 2014
WWW.PLEASANTONWEEKLY.COM
Making
Pioneer a
livelier
place
PAGE 14
Cemetery
upgrades focus
on expansion,
historical past,
guided tours
5 NEWS
Vranesh berates PUSD at board meeting
5 NEWS FHS football star named All-American
16 OPINION Weekly supports Measure BB
V
O
T
E
Pleasanton City Council 2014
Because
Results
Count.
Vote for
Experience,
Vote Olson.
Our schools have long been a source of pride in Pleasanton. Arne fully supports
students, teachers, parents and homeowners who value a Pleasanton school
education. In fact, Pleasanton was recently ranked as the 4th best place in America to
live.* Arne served on Pleasantons’ Planning Commission for the last 8 years. He also
served on Pleasantons‘ Economic Vitality Committee for 2 years. Results count.
*Source: 24/7 Wall St.
w w w. O l s o n C a m p a i g n 2 0 1 4 . c o m
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Page 2 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
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AROUND
PLEASANTON
BY JEB BING
Livermore’s Bankhead
saved from bankruptcy
thanks to us
P
atrons of the Bankhead Theater in Livermore can breathe
easier these days following
the decision by Livermore officials to assume ownership of the
bankrupt facility and refinance its
$22.2 million construction bond
debt partly with fees paid by other
cities and its residents at local landfill operations.
Taxpayers in Pleasanton can
also breathe easier that our city
never got involved in the murky
financings by the redevelopment
agencies, including one that financed the construction of the
Bankhead and was about to be
used to pay for a much larger performing arts center in downtown
Livermore.
Pleasanton long ago decided
against forming a redevelopment
agency (RDA) that was proposed
to pay for downtown street improvements. Instead, the city used
general funds to upgrade its sewer
system and more recently also financed construction of its $10 million Firehouse Arts Center as a
capital improvement project paid
mostly by the city with $1 million
in private contributions.
Since its opening in 2007, the
Bankhead has played an integral role
in the redevelopment and revitalization of Livermore’s downtown, where
most of those improvements also
were financed by a redevelopment
agency before those agencies were
closed down by Gov. Jerry Brown.
In a scathing report at the time,
State Controller John Chiang cited
millions of dollars in waste, misappropriation of funds and poor management of redevelopment agencies
in California. He found that at least
18 redevelopment agencies had
no reliable means to measure job
growth, that agencies did not track
their impact and that funding was
often arbitrary.
Although Livermore’s RDA was
not implicated in any wrongdoing,
it was gutted nevertheless and the
city was left with debt already incurred and financing plans no longer viable, including construction
of a much larger performing arts
center. The Livermore Performing
Arts Center (LVPAC) organization,
which operates the Bankhead, lost
a lawsuit it brought against the
state seeking to recover more than
$120 million in redevelopment
funds for a planned 2,000-seat regional theater in downtown Livermore, meant to supplement the
Bankhead — a project that has now
been abandoned.
The Bankhead is a 500-seat theater, 200 seats larger than Pleasanton’s Firehouse. Some local performing organizations have moved
their performances to the Bankhead, including the former Pleasanton Playhouse group. The theater
now anchors a revived downtown
which the Livermore Council called
“one of the city’s most distinct cultural landmarks.”
“The city’s purchase provides a
clear path forward,” said Livermore
City Manager Marc Roberts. “It allows the Bankhead Theater to begin
a new chapter, with increased transparency, clear oversight and an enhanced connection to our community that will enable the Bankhead
to continue serving as a valued asset
to Livermore and its residents.”
Livermore, in coordination with
Alameda County, LVPAC, and the
Bank of New York Mellon, reached
an agreement to settle the Bankhead Theater’s debts. It will fund
its contribution through the allocation of future Host Community
Impact Fees the city receives as part
of a settlement agreement reached
from the expansion of the Altamont
Landfill.
Roberts said that as part of the
purchase, LVPAC will continue to
operate the Bankhead through a
sublease agreement with the city.
The sublease will last for a period
of seven years with the option to
renew after that time, providing
operating conditions are met. Programs at the Bankhead Theater
will continue uninterrupted, and
remain a focal point of activity in
the downtown.
While Pleasanton decided
against creating a redevelopment
agency that could have left the
city with huge debts to be paid
for years to come, taxpayers here
aren’t exactly off the hook. Part of
the re-financing of Bankhead’s debt
will come from $9.2 million in
certificates of participation Livermore will issue, using funds from
the Altamont Landfill and Vasco
Landfill Host Community impact
fees. Those fees come from an annual assessment on local garbage
rates, meaning that Pleasanton and
the whole region will pay for the
Bankhead for years to come.
For now, though, that won’t
be much. Livermore Mayor John
Marchand said he pays about 25
cents a year toward the subsidy. Q
About the Cover
A new $4.5 million project to upgrade and expand Pioneer Cemetery won
the approval of the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission and now goes
to the City Council Nov. 18. It would add more grave sites and turn the
1850s burial site into a park-like historical site with guided tours and veterans observances. Photo by Mike Sedlak. Cover design by Lili Cao.
Vol. XV, Number 38
t
c
KATHY
e
l
e
e
R
NARUM
City Council
Experience Matters
City Councilmember
 Former Planning Commissioner
 Past Parks and Recreation Commissioner
Preserve HIGH QUALITY of life
Support Vibrant and Unique Charm of Downtown
 Encourage Variety of Businesses & Restaurants
 Evaluate Location of Civic Center/Library
 Renovate Lions Wayside/Delucchi Parks
www.kathynarum.com
2014
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Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 3
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Have a Streetwise question? Email [email protected]
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All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.
Page 4 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
Newsfront
DIGEST
Vranesh back again at school board meeting
Claims PUSD is paying him $95,000 a year ‘to sit home and do nothing’
Assembly forum
The Pleasanton Chamber of
Commerce, in collaboration
with other local chambers, will
host a candidates’ forum this
morning featuring the two candidates competing for election
in the 16th State Assembly District: Dublin Mayor Tim Sbranti, a Democrat, and Pleasanton
attorney and Dublin resident
Catharine Baker, a Republican.
The election on Nov. 4 will
determine which candidate
will succeed current 16th District Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, who is termed out this
year.
The forum will be held from
7:45-9 a.m. at the Doubletree
by Hilton Hotel, 7050 Johnson
Drive. The cost to attend, which
includes breakfast, is $20. To
register, visit www.pleasanton.
org.
PPIE fundraiser
Pleasanton Partnerships in
Education (PPIE) Foundation
will be hosting its 11th annual
“Toasts & Tastes of Fall” culinary competition and fundraiser
this evening.
The entire community —
residents, parents, businesses,
civic and school leaders — join
together at this one event to celebrate and support education.
Proceeds benefit the foundation
and its programs that support
each student in the Pleasanton
school district.
The event, which is a cocktail party, culinary competition
and silent auction all in one,
runs from 6:30-10 p.m. at the
Castlewood Country Club, 707
Country Club Circle.
Golf under the stars
Tri-Valley Evening Rotary will
host a fundraising golf tournament tomorrow, and keeping
with the name of the club, it will
be at night.
The tournament is being held
to support the First Tee of the
Tri-Valley. It’s a “best ball” competition, so you don’t have to be
an expert golfer to enjoy a night
on the course.
The event will be held at the
Pleasanton Golf Center Executive Course at the Fairgrounds.
Featuring a “Double Shotgun
Start,” two foursomes will tee
off together, hunting down their
glowing golf balls, select the
team’s “best ball” location, and
hit again.
By having two teams playing
the course together, it accommodates groups of more than
four to stay together. To register
for golf and dinner, sign on to
Tri-Valley Evening Rotary’s website at www.trivalleyrotary.org or
call 337-0433. Q
BY AMANDA AGUILAR
F
ormer Walnut Grove Elementary principal Jon Vranesh
addressed the Pleasanton
school board during the community comment session of Tuesday
night’s board meeting about his alleged charges and the district’s lack
of honesty and accountability.
Vranesh, who was removed as
Walnut Grove principal last October amid allegations of sexual
harassment and a hostile work environment, stated that the district
assigned him to a special education
teaching position at Village High
School May 29.
“I really looked forward to the
assignment, especially after working in the isolation of the itinerant
position fabricated especially for
me by the superintendent earlier
this year,” he told the school board
during public comment on nonagendized items.
Board members were prohibited
from responding to the comments
because the issue was not listed on
the meeting’s agenda.
According to Vranesh, assistant
superintendent of human resources
Bill Faraghan put him on administrative leave on June 30 before even
starting his teaching position.
He added that Faraghan informed
him that he would receive a “statement of charges” in mid-August.
“As of tonight, the district has not
given me one piece of paper, or
shred of proof, to show that I’ve
done anything wrong or to justify
paying an employee, me, $95,000
per year to sit home and do nothing,” Vranesh said. “Even though
I’ve asked repeatedly for all such
information.”
Vranesh also contended that Faraghan was going to recommend at
the Sept. 23 school board meeting that he be terminated. Leading
up to the Sept. 23 board meeting, Vranesh said he continuously
called Faraghan’s office for information but received no response.
“That’s not fair, nor should it
be acceptable to this district,” he
added.” But ... that’s the way it
works in PUSD.”
In addition, the former Walnut
Grove principal said the district’s
Fall festival a hit at Alviso Adobe
Kids get a kick out of ‘milking’ Fiona, the park’s life-sized, fiberglass cow
BY JEB BING
Hundreds turned out for
the free Fall Festival at the Alviso Adobe Community Park last
weekend with children, especially,
having fun by joining in a number
of activities designed just for them.
The public event, by 4-H clubs
and Meadowlark Dairy, included
milking lessons with Fiona (the
park’s life-sized, fiberglass milking
cow), a live animal display, and
plenty of games and crafts. Adults
also had a chance to tour the adobe
and join in music and dance by the
California Fandango Project.
Of special interest were demonstrations such as apple cider pressing, acorn grinding, blacksmithing
and ice cream churning. Other
activities included cow and horse
roping, short birding hikes and an
introduction to the park’s new Exploration Backpacks, which can be
checked out with activities relating
to the history of the site.
Visitors to the Adobe, which is
located just off Foothill Road at
3465 Old Foothill Road, also were
treated to complimentary burritos.
For more information about
the Adobe, call 931-3439. Q
A
FHS star
named
All-American
A
dead in a ditch adjacent to Interstate 680, east of the high school.
The freshman girl usually took
the bus home from school, but had
recently started walking home to
avoid being teased by other students
riding the bus, her mother, Shirley
Orosco, said in a August 2008 interview with the Pleasanton Weekly.
At Carlson’s preliminary hearing two years ago, a pathologist
testified that Faelz died from 44
stabbing and incised wounds in her
Foothill High School senior
has been selected to join
the 2015 U.S. Army AllAmerican Bowl team to represent
the West.
Isaiah Langley, a Falcons cornerback, was given his bowl jersey
Oct. 9 in a ceremony on campus.
“Isaiah is a great young man who
has worked very hard for what he
has,” said Foothill principal Jason
Krolikowski. “He is a great source
of pride for Foothill High School
and for the Pleasanton Unified
School District.”
The U.S. Army All-American
Bowl has been the nation’s premier
high school football event for 15
years, featuring the nation’s Top 90
high school football players.
Langley will play in the annual
East vs. West match-up on Jan.
3, 2015 at the Alamodome in San
Antonio, Texas. The game will be
televised live at 10 a.m. on NBC.
“Isaiah and all of the 2015 U.S.
Army All-American Bowl players
were selected not only for their
ability on the football field, but also
because they demonstrate mental,
emotional and physical toughness
— similar strengths to those of
our Army soldiers,” said Mark S.
Davis, deputy assistant secretary of
the Army for marketing. “We are
pleased to welcome these talented
athletes to this year’s showcase of
athleticism, teamwork and excellence and we congratulate each of
them on their selection.”
Langley’s father, Patrick, said he
is proud of his son and all the hard
work he put in.
“This was one of his goals this
year, to make the All-American
See TRIAL on Page 8
See ALL-AMERICAN on Page 8
MIKE SEDLAK/[email protected]
This unidentified toddler had his first try at milking a cow, albeit with
fiberglass Fiona, at the adobe’s fall festival last weekend.
Jurors to decide if man murdered Foothill High classmate Tina Faelz
BY AMANDA AGUILAR
See SCHOOL BOARD on Page 8
Langley to represent
the West at 2015
All-American Bowl
Trial begins for 1984 Pleasanton killing
prosecutor told jurors Tuesday that belatedly uncovered
DNA evidence proves that
a then-teenage boy murdered his
14-year-old high school classmate
in Pleasanton 30 years ago.
Tina Faelz’s stabbing death on
April 5, 1984, remained unsolved
for more than 25 years, but prosecutor Stacie Pettigrew said a 2011
DNA test showed that a small
amount of blood that was found on
Faelz’s purse was Steven Carlson’s.
The chances of that blood belong-
treatment of its certificated administrators “is not pretty,” pointing
to other employees coming before
the school board to report ongoing
instances of the lack of honesty and
integrity that is “eroding and staining” the district.
“Those complaints seem to fall on
deaf ears,” Vranesh said. “It’s election time, and a time for each of us
to take measure of the integrity and
honesty of this school board and
district ... including its leadership.”
In other business Tuesday, the
school board received a report on the
school district’s student enrollment.
As of Oct. 1, there are 14,763
students enrolled in the district,
ing to someone other than Carlson,
who was 16 at the time of Faelz’s
murder and is now 46, are only 1 in
5 quadrillion, Pettigrew said.
Carlson, who has a long criminal history, including convictions
for committing lewd acts with a
child under the age of 14 and assault, was arrested and charged
with murdering Faelz in August
2011. He has pleaded not guilty.
Carlson and Faelz both attended
Foothill High School.
Faelz was killed on her way
home from school and was found
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 5
NEWSFRONT
Remembrance set for David Mertes
Served as head of state community college system, chairman of ValleyCare board
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There will be a celebration of life
Oct. 25 for David Mertes, former
chancellor of the California Community College system and at one
time chairman of the ValleyCare
Health System. Mr. Mertes, who
died Oct. 9, was 83.
Besides heading the state’s community college system from 1988
to 1996, he previously was chancellor of the Los Rios Community
College District, superintendent/
president of Santa Barbara City
College and president of the College of San Mateo.
After his retirement, Mr. Mertes
served on the board of the ValleyCare Health System and also as
its chairman. He was a founding
member and 11-year director of
the Las Positas College Foundation and had oversight of the International Service Projects of the
Livermore Rotary Club. In that
capacity, he made many service
trips to some of the neediest areas
of the world.
He received a bachelor’s degree
from San Francisco State University
and master’s and doctorate degrees
from UC Berkeley with a major in
biochemical embryology.
He is survived by his wife, Barba-
ra Mertes, who serves on the board
of trustees of the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District.
“Our entire district family
mourns the loss of a giant in the
field of higher education,” said the
district’s chancellor, Jannett Jackson. “His contributions to the community colleges in California will
not soon be matched. Our thoughts
and prayers are with trustee Mertes
and her family at this time of immeasurable loss.”
The celebration of life is set for
Oct. 25 at 11:30 a.m. at the Robert
Livermore Center, 4444 East Ave.,
Livermore. Q
Halloween events start tonight in downtown
Ghost walks, scavenger hunts, Brew Crawl set to go
Downtown Pleasanton comes alive
for Halloween with three unique
events expected to attract hundreds
of adults and children to Main Street
for a ghoulish good time.
Starting tonight, and continuing
tomorrow and next weekend, the
Museum on Main is sponsoring a
90-minute guided tour of Pleasanton’s most haunted sites along Main
Street. Tours will depart every 30
minutes between 6-8 p.m.
Ticketing information and further
details can be found at the museum’s
website at museumonmain.org.
Then the free annual Halloween
Scavenger Hunt will take place from
of adult trick-or-treating during the
fourth annual Halloween Brew Crawl
from 5-8 p.m. that evening. Participants will have the opportunity to
sample over 40 beers and tasty bites
at 32 locations on downtown streets.
To add to the festive Halloween spirit
of this event, participants are encouraged to wear costumes.
Tickets for the Brew Crawl are
now on sale both online and also at
Redcoats Pub, 336 St. Mary St. and
Studio Seven Arts, 400 Main St.
For more information, sign on to
the PDAS’s website at pleasantondowntown.net. Q
—Jeb Bing
10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Oct. 25.
Children 10 years old and younger
are invited to come in costume and
pick up instructions, a Halloween bag
and their first clue from the starting
location at Towne Center Books, 555
Main St. Children will have to solve
the clue in order to find the next
downtown location, where they will
be given a treat and their next clue.
A total of 25 downtown businesses are participating in this event.
Parents will be given the answers to
all of the clues to help children find
the treat locations.
Downtown merchants and local
breweries also are hosting a night
MEASURE BB is RIGHT
for the TRI VALLEY.
Measure BB provides funds
for improvements on the
I-580/I-680 interchange, SR-84
and other critical Tri-Valley
commute corridors.
Measure BB doubles the
funding for Tri-Valley street
and road repairs. This means
millions more for filling potholes
and reducing local traffic.
SCOTT HAGGERTY SAYS YES ON BB!
“Measure BB will reduce traffic, protect our seniors with
accessible and affordable transportation and bring
BART to Livermore! Yes on BB.”
— Scott Haggerty, Alameda County Supervisor
ALAMEDA COUNTY
COUNCIL OF THE
LEAGUES OF WOMEN VOTERS®
United Seniors of Alameda County
ALAMEDA COUNTY
TAXPAYERS’ ASSOCIATION
Measure BB will make it
possible to expand BART service
along the 580 to Livermore.
IT’S THAT IMPORTANT.
Paid for by Better Transportation for Alameda County. Yes on BB, major funding by California Alliance for Jobs - Rebuild California Committee
and Northern California Carpenters Regional Council Issues PAC, 1111 Broadway, 24th Floor, Oakland, CA 94607. FPPC ID # 1362240
Page 6 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
www.YESonBB.org
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THE PLEASANTON WEEKLY
THE PLEASANTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
BAY EAST ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS
LIVERMORE, PLEASANTON, DUBLIN BRANCH OF
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN
THE LINCOLN CLUB OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
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ANDREW McDONALD
ERIC SWALWELL, U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
ANGI QUEENAN
BILL BAKER, FORMER U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES & CALIFORNIA
ANN DAVIS
STATE ASSEMBLY
ANNE ROBY
NATE MILEY, ALAMEDA COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
ARNE OLSON
SCOTT HAGGERTY, ALAMEDA COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
ART DUNKLEY
CANDICE ANDERSON, CONTRA COSTA COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
AZI ARYANA
JOHN MCPARTLAND, BART BOARD OF DIRECTORS
BARBARA BERLOGER
JERRY PENTIN, PLEASANTON CITY VICE MAYOR
BARBARA DAGGETT
KATHY NARUM, PLEASANTON CITY COUNCILMEMBER
BARBARA KIPLINGER
ROBERT STORER, DANVILLE MAYOR
BARBARA PITL
TIM SBRANTI, DUBLIN MAYOR
BARBARA
JOHN MARCHAND, LIVERMORE MAYOR
WOLFENBERGER
BILL CLARKSON, SAN RAMON MAYOR
BEACHER PEARCE
BILL HARRISON, FREMONT MAYOR
BETTY STAGE
DON BIDDLE, DUBLIN VICE MAYOR
BEVERLY ALES
DOUG HORNER, LIVERMORE CITY COUNCILMEMBER
BILL CASSELL
SCOTT PERKINS, SAN RAMON CITY COUNCILMEMBER
BILL EASTMAN
MIKE DOYLE, DANVILLE CITY COUNCILMEMBER
BILL HIRST
ABE GUPTA, DUBLIN CITY COUNCILMEMBER
DAVE HAUBERT, DUBLIN CITY COUNCILMEMBER (CANDIDATE FOR MAYOR) BILL JORGENSEN
BOB LANE
ANNE WEISCAMP, EAST BAY REGIONAL PARK DISTRICT
BOB SILVA
JIM MCGRAIL, ZONE 7 WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS
BOB SMITH
DICK QUIGLEY, ZONE 7 WATER DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS
BRAD HIRST
BOB PHILCOX, FORMER PLEASANTON MAYOR
CHARLES HUFF
FRANK BRANDES, FORMER PLEASANTON MAYOR
CHARLOTTE SEVERIN
BOB BUTLER, FORMER PLEASANTON MAYOR
CHEREE
SHARRELL MICHELOTTI, FORMER PLEASANTON CITY COUNCILMEMBER
HETHERSHAW
GINA PIPER, PLEASANTON PLANNING COMMISSIONER
CHRIS BERATLIS
JACK BALCH, PLEASANTON PLANNING COMMISSIONER
CHRIS BUESCHER
HERB RITTER, PLEASANTON PLANNING COMMISSIONER
CHRIS MILLER
JOHN CASEY, HOUSING COMMISSIONER
CHRISTINE STEINER
JOE STRENG, PLEASANTON PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSIONER
CHUCK DECKERT
TED KINZER, PLEASANTON PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSIONER
CINDY DEPRETIS
DAVE LAMBERT, PLEASANTON PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSIONER
CINDY POWERS
DEBORAH WAHL, PLEASANTON PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSIONER
CINDY RETORT
SANDRA JELLISON, PLEASANTON CIVIC ARTS COMMISSIONER
CLAUDIA JUHL
BROCK ROBY, PLEASANTON HUMAN SERVICES COMMISSIONER
CONNIE COX
ROZ WRIGHT, PLEASANTON HUMAN SERVICES COMMISSIONER
DAVE MELANDER
DAVID NAGLER, PLEASANTON HUMAN SERVICES COMMISSIONER
DAVID CUNNINGHAM
JAY GALVIN, PLEASANTON ECONOMIC VITALITY COMMITTEE MEMBER
JANICE SANGSTER-PHALEN, PLEASANTON ECONOMIC VITALITY COMMITTEE DAVID DARBY
DAVID RHODES
MEMBER
DAVID STARK
AL LOMBARDO, PLEASANTON ECONOMIC VITALITY COMMITTEE MEMBER
BRYAN BOWERS, PLEASANTON ECONOMIC VITALITY COMMITTEE MEMBER DAVID WRIGHT
DEREK KVISTAD
SIMA YAZDANI, PLEASANTON ECONOMIC VITALITY COMMITTEE MEMBER
DICK KARN
GEORGEAN VANHEEDER-LEOPOLD, DUBLIN SAN RAMON SERVICES
D.J.SANCHEZ
DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS
DON HEWITT
JOHN SENSIBA, HOSPITAL CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
DONNA WALKER
MARTY INDERBITZEN, HOSPITAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS (FORMER
DOUG CHRISTISON
CHAIRMAN)
DOUG MILLER
BOB SHAPIRO, HOSPITAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS
ED WESTMORELAND
CATHERINE BAKER, CANDIDATE CALIFORNIA STATE ASSEMBLY
ELIZABETH MILANO
ELLEN PENSKY
ERIC HELMGREM
ERIC KRUEGER
ERIC MILLER
www.jerrythorne.com
ERIN KVISTAD
FLO BRAS
FRAN CASSELL
FRAN CUNNINGHAM
FRANCES HEWITT
FRANK AUF DER MAUR
FRANK BERLOGER
FRANK CAPILLA
FRANK GOMEZ
GAIL FAIRFIELD
GAIL FRANKLIN
GARY ALT
GARY KNOWLES
GENE FINCH
GENE PONS
GENIE FINCH
GERRY BRUNKEN
GLORIA FREDETTE
GREG YOUNT
HARVEY KAMENY
HEATHER HAUGENRIZZOLI
HELEN K. FOSTER
HOWARD SEEBACH
JACK BRAS
JACK PARKER
JACKIE SHURTLEFF
JAMES JELLISON
JAN BATCHELLER
JAN DECOITE
JAN MILLER
JAN PEGLER
JANET YARBOUGH
JANETTE ARMKNECHT
JANICE CAMILLUCCI
JAY JAMILI
JEFF ANTRIM
JENNIFER AMIEL
JENNIFER PEARCE
JENNY BUCK
JERRY HODNEFIELD
JERRY SEVERIN
JIM DIBIASE
JIM FIELDS
JIM GULSETH
JIM LYON
JIM VLAMIS
JOANIE FIELDS
JOANNE GUNSON
JOE JOHAL
JOHN FERRERI
JOHN O’NEILL
JOHN SHURTLEFF
JON HARVEY
JON PALLESON
JOSEPH CHENEY
JOYCE SHAPIRO
JUDY BURT
JUDY LLOYD
JUDY SYMCOX
JULIE ECKROAT
JULIE VILLENEUVE
KARAN HEALY
KARL SCHUNCK
KATHI VERMONT
KAY HUFF
KELLY FRENCH
KEN MANO
KEN MILLER
KEN PETERSEN
KENT PRYOR
KERI THORNE
KEVILLE PARKER
KRIS JARVIS
KURT KUMMER
LARRY LINDSAY
LAURA CAPILLA
LAURA DARROW
LAVERNE SPOTORNO
LEE KIPLINGER
LES DUMAN
LESLIE WOLF
LETICIA HYDE
LINDA REEVES
LINDA SANDIFUR
LOUIS RIVARA
LYN WALKER
MARGE JOHNSON
MARGENE GERTONRIVARA
MARIA MONTES
MARIANNE SENSIBA
MARILYN DUMAN
MARK SWEENEY
MARTY BIRK
MARTY MILLER
MARY LOMBARDO
MARY MAYER
MARY ROBERTS
MATT DEPRETIS
MEIR AMIEL
MICHAEL ROSEBERRY
MIKE CAREY
MIKE FABER
MIKE PEGLER
MIKE SEDLAK
MIKE SERPA
MOIRA UDINSKI
MOREEN NOKES
MURIEL CAPILLA
NANCY STORCH
OTIS NOSTRAND
PAM HARDY
PAT DAVIS
PAT KERNAN
PAT LANE
PAT O’BRIEN
PATTI TAKENS
PAUL ADWAR
PAUL MARTIN
PETER BAILEY
PETER MACDONALD
PHIL STAGE
PHILIP VERMONT
RALEIGH RESNICK
REBECCA BRUNER
RICHARD FREDETTE
RICHARD HANKINS
RITA GALVIN
ROBERT MUEHLHAUSER
ROBERT TUCKNOTT
ROGER MANNING
ROGER VILLENEUVE
RON CAPILLA
RON HYDE
RON MORROW
RON PETERSON
RON SUTTON
RUDY JOHNSON
RUTH PEARCE
SANDI THORNE
SANDIE DIBIASE
SARAH WARNICK
SBLEND SBLENDORIO
SCOTT REEVES
SHARON MORRIS
SHERRI HODNEFIELD
SHERRY BOYD
SHIRLEY STROMBERG
STACY FLAMING
SUMMER BOWERS
SUSAN FOX
DR. STEVE DECOITE
STEVE MORSILLI
STEVEN DUNN
SUE SHILLER
SUSAN HOUGHTON
SUZANNE CARO
TED FAIRFIELD
TIM LLOYD
TERRI HALL
TERRY A. BEATTY
TERRY BERRY
TOM DAGGETT
TOM DAVIS
TOM FOX
TOM RICHART
TOMMIE BERRY
TONY MACCHIANO
TONY MORRIS
TRACY BUESCHER
TRUDY FABIAN
TUNY DUNKLEY
V. VENKATESAN
VERA REVELLI
VERNA GARIBALDI
VIC MALATESTA
VICTORIA EMMONS
WALLY MAYER
Paid for by Jerry Thorne For Mayor 2014, FPPC #1337409
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 7
NEWSFRONT
SCHOOL BOARD
Continued from Page 5
Saturday & Sunday
October 25 & 26
10am - 5pm
Hartz Avenue in
historic downtown Danville
e!
d
a
r
a
P
e
m
stu
o
C
s
’
n
e
r
10am)
d
y
a
d
r
u
Chil
t
a
(S
Free Trick or
Treats!
200 Artisans!
Cl
Great Bands
!
w
assic Car Sho
)
(Sunday only
Food & drink
which is four students less than in
2013-14.
According to the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data
System (CalPADS), Pleasanton has
6,284 elementary students, 3,591
middle school students and 4,893
high school students. The elementary and middle schools gained
students while high schools saw an
overall reduction.
The board unanimously approved of declaring this week as
the Week of the School Administrator.
Board members recognized
Pleasanton instructional technology coach Lisa Highfill as the
Pleasanton Unified School District
Teacher of the Year. They also appointed Lynn Novak as the coordinator of Facilities and Transportation.
Also during Tuesday’s community comment session, the board
heard from:
• Chris Jacob, speaking about his
concern regarding board member
Jeff Bowser’s campaign contribu-
TRIAL
Continued from Page 5
back, torso, chin and head.
Pettigrew alleged Tuesday that
Carlson “brutally murdered Tina
and left her alive in a drainage
ditch next to I-680.”
The prosecutor said that at the
end of the trial, she will ask jurors
to conclude that, “The only reasonable interpretation of the evidence
is that Steven Carlson is guilty of
murdering Tina Faelz.”
Carlson’s lawyer, Annie Beles,
said there are many questions about
The Sungevity Glass Pumpkin P
atch
featuring over 1000 glass pum
pkins
tions.
For his re-election to the school
board, Bowser has received contributions from Alameda Central
Labor Council Unity PAC, International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers #595 and from people
outside of Pleasanton, Jacob told
the school board.
During his campaign for Alameda County Superintendent earlier
this year, Bowser received $100
from former APT president Peggy
Carpenter and $1,500 from Kimberley Bogard, the school district’s
attorney, according to the Alameda
County voters website.
• Chris Miller, addressing the need
to adjust the grading policy as the
district switches to Common Core;
and
• Rachelle Dean, talking about
providing and being open about
services for students with learning
disabilities.
At the end of each board meeting, board members can suggest
future agenda items. Trustee Jamie
Hintzke requested looking at a potential board bylaw on the censure
of individual board members for
improper conduct. Q
the DNA that was collected in the
case, such as when it was collected,
how it was collected, whether it
was contaminated and whether it
was improperly transferred.
Beles said the prosecution also
lacks other evidence that might connect Carlson to Faelz’s death, such as
a motive, fingerprints or a weapon.
“At the end of the case, after you
listen to all of the evidence, the
only verdict you will have is that
Steven Carlson is not guilty,” Beles
told jurors. Q
Information from the Bay City News
Service was used in this report.
COURTESY PUSD
From left: Foothill principal Jason Krolikowski, a U.S. Army representative,
Falcons star Isaiah Langley, Pleasanton schools superintendent Parvin Ahmadi
and football coach Matt Sweeney.
ALL-AMERICAN
glass
for complete details of all activities go to
www.danvillefallcraftsfestival.com
Page 8 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
Continued from Page 5
team, and he worked hard to make
it happen,” he added.
When asked what the selection
means to him, Langley said, “The
word ‘honor’ is what comes to
mind. It is such an honor to play
for our troops and to get out there
with other athletes who are headed to college. I’m just honored
that I get to play and support our
troops for all they do for us.”
Langley will be attending the
University of Southern Califor-
nia next year on a full-ride athletic scholarship, and he will
be studying business administration.
As a result of Langley being selected for the All-American Bowl,
his head coach Matt Sweeney is
invited to travel to San Antonio
to attend the U.S. Army Coaches
Academy, an elite three-day learning
experience, and the opportunity to
participate in Bowl Week activities.
More information about the U.S.
Army All-American Bowl can be
found at usarmyallamericanbowl.
com. Q
— Amanda Aguilar
Attend the first small business
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Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 9
BUSINESS NEWS
Sandia’s fuel cell-powered mobile
lights ready for commercial use
Pilot program sets stage for commercialization and broader deployment
BY JEB BING
Mobile lighting systems powered
by hydrogen fuel cells are cleaner,
quieter and now have a proven
track record in applications such as
nighttime construction, sports and
entertainment events and airport
operations, making them ready for
commercialization and broader use.
That’s the conclusion reached
by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and others after a
multi-year project sponsored by
the Department of Energy’s Fuel
Cell Technologies Office and the
Boeing Co. Project support also
came from Caltrans, Altergy Systems and 11 other project partners.
Developed by Sandia National
Laboratories and several industry
partners, the fuel cell mobile light
offers a cleaner, quieter alternative
to diesel-powered units.
Over the past five years, Sandia
and 14 institutional partners have
been developing the fuel cell mobile
light tower (H2LT) as a clean, efficient alternative to traditional lights
powered by diesel generators.
California-based Multiquip Inc.,
a leading manufacturer and supplier of rental construction equipment, power generation, lighting
and other industrial products, has
built six.
Airport equipment and maintenance personnel at San Francisco International Airport and
Saunders Electric crews at various
Hollywood-area entertainment and
awards shows, including the Academy Awards, have already realized
the benefits of the clean and efficient H2LT as part of their regular operations. Other systems have
been used by highway construction
COMING IN OCTOBER!
WILL DURST in
BOOMERAGING
From LSD to OMG
Friday & Saturday
October 17 & 18
8 PM
crews at Caltrans and the Connecticut Department of Transportation.
One system was even deployed
at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center
to support the final space shuttle
launch in 2011.
The goals of the pilot programs
were to perform a variety of lighting tasks, assess the operation and
reliability of the technology in a
variety of potentially corrosive environments, reduce diesel emissions at deployment locations and
help promote hydrogen fuel cell
technology in new markets.
The project has been deemed a
major success in opening up new
fuel cell markets that complement
broader hydrogen energy markets,
including the light-duty vehicle market, said Sandia project lead Lennie
Klebanoff. Toyota Motor Corp., General Motors Co., Honda and Hyun-
DINO VOURNAS
Lights powered by Sandia National Laboratories fuel cells enable workers at
San Francisco International Airport to continue nighttime paving.
dai have all announced plans for
hydrogen-powered vehicles.
“Since San Francisco International Airport and Saunders Electric are now using H2LTs as part
of their regular operations, it is
stimulating the demand for hydrogen in those regions and helping to
create markets for its production
VOTE
George Bowen
City Council
EASE SCHOOL OVERCROWDING
through slow growth policies
Work with local water agencies to ensure
SUSTAINABLE CLEAN WATER
REDUCE TRAFFIC CONGESTION by minimizing
cut-through traffic and widening Highway 84
The Senior Players
ALWAYS A
BRIDESMAID
ATTRACT DESIRABLE BUSINESS
to our city, especially downtown
October 24 thru 26
Friday & Saturday š 7:30 PM
Sunday š 2 PM
Creatures of Impulse
Teen Improv Troupe
NIGHTMARE
A Live Improvised
Horror Show!
October 30 thru
November 1
Thursday & Saturday š 7:30 PM
Friday š 9 PM *
*Special Late Night Anniversary Performance; Ages 14 and Up Only
4444 Railroad Avenue in Pleasanton
For tickets: 925.931.4848 or visit firehousearts.org
Page 10 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
As your
Council
Member
I will fight
for you!
George Bowen
BowenCouncil.com
Paid for by GEORGE BOWEN FOR CITY COUNCIL 2014 • FPPC# 1369430
I am not accepting campaign contributions from “special interest” sources
and sale,” Klebanoff said.
A key educational component
emerged during the project as well,
he added.
“Wherever the H2LT was used or
displayed, we engaged with local
fire and building safety authorities
and first responders, few of whom
had prior knowledge of the physical or safety aspects of hydrogen
and fuel cell technology,” he said.
A paper describing the project,
“Fuel cell mobile lighting: A fuel
cell market transformation project,” was published in the Aug. 13
edition of International Journal of
Hydrogen Energy.
The H2LT developed by Sandia National Laboratories and its
partners was deployed in 2011 at
the site of the final space shuttle
launch and observed by visitors,
shuttle astronauts and members of
the international media.
In addition to zero emissions,
perhaps the most attractive feature
of the fuel cell mobile light system
is how quiet it is.
The lack of noise, Klebanoff
said, is highly valued by highway
construction crews, airport maintenance personnel and stage crews
on entertainment production sets.
Users would rather not deal with
the odors and noise of diesel-based
equipment.
Another important conclusion
that was reached was that the fuel
cell power system manufactured by
project partner Altergy Systems is
compatible with the rugged world
of construction. Caltrans used one
unit in rain, wind and snow in the
Sierra Nevada range.
The price tag for a prototype
fuel cell-powered mobile lighting
system initially was roughly triple
that of a traditional diesel-powered
system.
Cost-cutting strategies Multiquip
is considering include incorporating highly efficient light-emitting
diodes (LED), which will allow a
reduction in fuel cell size; reducing
the size of the hydrogen storage
tanks; and decreasing the required
tank pressure rating. The cost of
the current LED technology used
with the system also is expected to
decline.
“Overall, end users have been
pleased with the performance of
the hydrogen fuel cell mobile lighting system,” Klebanoff said. “We’re
confident that the technology can
now be commercialized and widely
used in any application needing
large-area lighting.” Q
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 11
Tri Valley Life
What’s happening around
the Valley in music, theater,
art, movies and more
REGGAE IS THE WAY
FOR AVHS GRAD
BY
DOLORES
FOX
CIARDELLI
Harrison
Stafford
performs with
Groundation,
a reggaefusion band
he started in
college.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
H
arrison Stafford was only 7
years old when he heard the
distinctive one-drop rhythm of
Bob Marley coming from his older
brother’s room. He was hooked.
“My brother was listening to Bob
Marley’s ‘Legend’ album,” Stafford,
now 37, recalled. “From that point
on, I got all of Bob Marley’s music.
I was in my own little world.”
Harrison would do presentations
for his classmates on Rastafari, the
spiritual movement that rose in Jamaica in the 1930s and was made
famous by Marley.
“I was teased by the kids at
school,” Stafford remembered. “At
that time in Pleasanton there were
not any other Jewish families either.”
With the advent of MTV, he
looked forward to a reggae show
but none appeared. He only realized later that reggae was underground music, never promoted or
appreciated in the United States —
except Bob Marley, whose albums
sold in the millions, in this country
and globally.
“For a lot of people, it’s very
foreign, very different than what
they’re used to,” Stafford explained.
“It’s people from a Third World
country, speaking about equal
rights and justice ... it really challenges society and questions authority and what is taking place in
the world.”
Promoters were more interested
in music that could sell products,
Stafford said.
Music was an integral part of
Stafford family life when Harrison
‘Even my bar mitzvah was Jamaican.’
Harrison Stafford
Page 12 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
was growing up — his father Dick
was a jazz piano player who had
even toured with Count Basie — so
his folks accepted his devotion to
reggae.
“Even my bar mitzvah was Jamaican,” Harrison Stafford said. “If
their children had an interest, my
parents embraced it.”
The Rastafari-Hebrew connection also spoke to Stafford.
“It is so biblical and speaks about
the people of Abraham,” he said.
He considers Rastafari a way of
life more than a religion.
“Religion is like something that
divides people,” Stafford said. “Rastafari embraces the idea that all
people come from God, we are all
the human race, and we should
treat each other as one.”
“Reggae and Rastafari are intertwined,” he added. “I taught the
history of reggae, and there are
two histories. One is the Jamaican
popular music, which developed
out of street music as well as the
U.S. R&B. Reggae came out of musicians that learned instruments in
the jazz way also to please tourists.”
Ska music came in the early
1960s, with songs about love and
girls, Stafford said. Reggae came
with a social message and fused
with Rastafari, and spread into
Kingston and the poor ghetto areas.
“We started to hear a social political type of movement, lyrics meant
to address the listener, hopefully to
have them reflect on life and live
more positive,” he said.
Stafford graduated from Amador
Valley High in 1996 and went on
to Sonoma State University where
he earned a degree in jazz performance. While in college he formed
Musician
co-produces
documentary
on Rastafari
culture, works
toward DVD
release
an international reggae-fusion
group, Groundation, for which he
is the lead singer and guitar player.
He taught his reggae music class
from 1999-2002.
“It was the first ever taught in the
history of America,” Stafford said.
“It took me two years to convince
the music department that it was
worth teaching and I was the one
to teach it.”
During that time, he made several trips to Jamaica researching
the subject, and sat with Rastafari
elders to gain historical knowledge
firsthand. His class often featured
musicians and elder Rastafarians as
guest lecturers.
Meanwhile his Pleasanton childhood friend Roger Landon Hall
was studying film at the Academy
of Art in San Francisco, and he
began to go to Sonoma to film
the guest lectures. This was the
impetus for a documentary the
two have produced, “Holding on
to Jah,” a comprehensive film on
the history of roots reggae music
and the Jamaican-based Rastafarian
movement. “Jah” is the Rasta term
for “God.”
Stafford said the film took on
momentum in 2009 after Academy
Award-winning director Jonathan
Demme praised it, saying, “’Holding on’ is so very beautiful ... Every
creative aspect shines in full effect
... I watched it, fell in love with it,
and delighted to a second viewing.”
Since then, the documentary has
been screened and well received at
film festivals including in Istanbul,
Finland, Australia, Washington,
D.C., and California.
Stafford put $40,000 of his own
money into making the 97-minute
film, but now he wants to release
it on DVD, which means paying to
license the music.
“Thirty-four songs are used in
the film, and it is going to cost
about $1,000 per song,” Stafford
said.
“I’m not doing this to make
money,” he noted. “I just want to
see all this hard work about these
beautiful people come to completion. I want to go to Jamaica and
give to their children and grandchildren.”
“There’s a destiny thing,” he said.
“If you want good things to happen
to you, you have to put out good
energies to the world. This is all
part of who I am.”
Stafford lives in Tracy with his
wife, who is Jamaican, and their
21-month-old daughter and a newborn little boy. Stafford is about to
start Groundation’s 15th annual
European tour, featuring the release
of its new CD.
“I make my living touring outside of America — South America,
Australia, New Zealand,” Stafford
said. “We draw 5,000 in Paris and
10,000 in Sao Paulo. Groundation
has a unique sound, reggae and elements of jazz.”
“Europeans heard that unique
thing we were doing,” he continued. “Traditionally Europe has
been a great place for jazz. It was
the first place to embrace Bob Marley and Miles Davis. Europeans
have a larger palate in their intake
of music.”
For more information about
Groundation, the documentary and
its financing, visit www.groundation.com and www.holdingontojah.com. Q
TRI VALLEY LIFE
PAL honors Las Positas student
Scholarship, merit awards presented to local artists
BY CIERRA BAILEY
The Pleasanton Art League (PAL)
awarded a local college student
with a scholarship during its annual exhibit reception last month.
Alisha Ellard — attending Las
Positas College in Livermore —
was this year’s recipient of the
$1,000 monetary award from PAL.
Ellard’s winning pieces were
three black-and-white ink images,
including one titled “Death Stare,”
that are currently being displayed
in this year’s PAL members art show
at the Firehouse Arts Center.
After she graduates from Las Positas, Ellard said she plans to transfer into the animation program at
the California Institute of the Arts
in Southern California. She hopes
to work for Pixar in the future.
Other awards were presented
during the opening reception Sept.
29, to members of PAL who submitted work for the organization’s
month-long exhibit in the Harrington Gallery at the Firehouse.
Five artists earned merit awards,
each receiving $100. This year’s
winners were: Jennie McGregor,
FREE
Will and Estate
Planning Workshop
90 minute informational workshop
:H[\YKH`5V][O࠮!HT
Hosted by Faith Chapel,
6656 Alisal St., Pleasanton.
Registration deadline is Nov. 6th
Please call for more information
925-846-8650
COURTESY OF PAL
“Death Stare,” one of the winning ink images by student artist Alisha Ellard.
Patricia Devitt, Lisa Rigge, Norma
Webb and Grace Rankin.
The 15 artists who received honorable mention during the ceremony were: Louise Grey, Linda
Briggs, Barbara Daggett, Stephen
Rodriguez, Carol Maddox, Charlotte Severin, Courtney Jacobs,
Pat Smith, Carolyn Ramsey, Bettie Goosman, Sharon Cohune, Sue
Evens, Paul Veillux, Nancy Briemle
and Clarence Crew.
The exhibit is on display now
through Oct. 25 at the Firehouse
Arts Center located at 4444 Railroad Ave. Q
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Pleasanton Weekly’s
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coverage of
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Join today: SupportLocalJournalism.org/Pleasanton
‘Avenue Q’ comes to the Tri-Valley
TVRT opens run of Tony-winning musical this weekend
The Tri-Valley Repertory Theatre
is presenting “Avenue Q,” a modern
musical, at the Bankhead Theater
in Livermore this month.
The story is set in New York City
and focuses on the experiences of
a recent college graduate and his
friends during their journey to find
their purposes in life as they enter
into adulthood.
“Avenue Q” — first performed
on Broadway in 2003 — won the
Tony Award “Triple Crown” for Best
Musical, Best Score and Best Book.
The musical is based on a concept created by composer and
lyricist Jeff Marx and songwriter
Robert Lopez. The show addresses
adult issues using humor, satire
and puppets to illustrate the plot.
The local production, which is
R-rated, will run in Livermore from
this Saturday through Nov. 2. Tickets can be purchased at the Bankhead box office located at 2400
ROBERT SHOLTY
Jennifer Stark stars as Kate Monster in the upcoming Tri-Valley Repertory
Theatre production of “Avenue Q.”
First St. or by calling 373-6800
Tuesday through Friday 12-6 p.m.,
Saturday 3-6 p.m. Q
—Cierra Bailey
Valley Concert Chorale announces
2014-15 season
In keeping with its objective to
deliver a variety of music, Valley
Concert Chorale’s new season is
entitled “Favorite Masterworks and
New Discoveries.”
The Tri-Valley chorus is celebrating its 52nd season, and has been
under the direction of John Emory
Bush since 1998. It is an all-volunteer, nonprofit chorale and receives
financial support from grants, ticket sales, membership dues, fundraisers and donations.
The new season is as follows:
Annual Sing-It-Yourself Messiah
• 7:30 p.m., Friday, Dec. 5
Asbury Methodist Church
4743 East Ave., Livermore
Holiday Classic
& Contemporary
• 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 13
Trinity Lutheran Church
1225 Hopyard Road, Pleasanton
• 3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 14
First Presbyterian Church
4th and L Streets, Livermore
Masterworks of Yesterday
& Today
• 7:30 p.m., Saturday, March 14
Trinity Lutheran Church
in Pleasanton
• 3 p.m., Sunday, March 15
First Presbyterian Church in
Livermore
Music of the Silver Screen
• 3 p.m., Sunday, May 17
First Presbyterian Church in
Livermore
Tickets are $20 in advance and
$25 at the door; $10 for high
school and college students. Children are free. Order advance tickets
at www.valleyconcertchorale.org,
or call 866-4003. Q
—Dolores Fox Ciardelli
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 13
COVER
Making Pioneer
story by JEB BING
photos by JEB BING
AND MIKE SEDLAK
a livelier place
Cemetery upgrades focus on expansion, historical past, guided tours
T
he Pleasanton Parks and
Recreation Commission
approved a long-range
master plan last week that calls
for expanding Pleasanton’s Pioneer
Cemetery to make it a better place
to be buried and a more attractive
place to visit.
The commission accepted the
report and recommendations of a
seven-member task force appointed by the Pleasanton City Council
that was asked to determine how
the historic site can be beautified
and made more accessible — and
how much all that will cost.
The 120-year-old cemetery,
which the city purchased in 2007
from the International Order of
Odd Fellows, has seen some improvements since the city crews
and the Rotary Club of Pleasanton
invested time and money to cart
away litter, repair broken benches,
tombstones and pavement, and
spruce up the landscape.
But for many, including those
who have purchased the new grave
sites made available over the last
three years, Pioneer is still a mess.
It’s a community eyesore for those
who think of Pleasanton as a city
of well-groomed parks and trails.
On rainy days, though those have
A proposed kiosk would list names
of those buried at Pioneer and include
a map of those sites.
Kathleen Yurchak, assistant Operations Services director
been few this season, visitors come
away with muddy shoes and disappointment. These are survivors
who spent up to $10,198 for a full
double-burial grave site after the
404 new plots were added, close
to what nearby public cemeteries
charge, but they have green grass
and usually an on-site caretaker.
In many ways, Pioneer hasn’t
changed much since the days the
Odd Fellows owned it and probably
not a lot since John Kottinger was
buried there. With its recommendations, part of a $4.5 million upgrade
and expansion program that the
City Council will consider Nov. 18,
both the task force and the Parks
and Recreation Commission hope
Page 14 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
to change that, turning Pioneer into
a more visible, easily accessed cemetery that will provide more space
for burials, including cremains, as
well as become a teaching tool and
possibly even a tourist attraction.
Veterans’ organizations have already promised helping hands and
donations, offering to create a privately funded means of rebuilding
the veterans’ memorial and to help
pay future maintenance costs. The
price tag for the memorial alone is
$50,000.
Local arts contributors Nancy
and Gary Harrington want to go
even further. They’re calling for
a creative sign facing traffic on
Sunol Boulevard inviting passersby
to visit historic Pioneer Cemetery.
Once inside the gates, they would
be directed to a staging area where
the cemetery’s history, the names
of early Pleasanton settlers and
the more than 400 veterans buried
there would be listed with a locator
map to their graves. All through the
cemetery, markers would provide
more historic details.
Although a number of the pricey
new grave sites have been sold,
there’s still reluctance on the part
of survivors who would like to
have a warmer, friendlier place to
pay respects to their loved ones.
As of August, the city has sold
51 casket sites and 84 cremains
plots, with 151 casket and 269
cremains plots still available. Allowable grave markers, although
similar to what newer cemetery
locations require, are flat on the
ground with room for a name and
dates. Without a friend’s help, you
could walk some distance before
finding the deceased buried below.
The Veterans Cemetery at Los Banos
has the same ground-level ruling,
but its headstones are elevated and
slanted enough so names are visible
by motorists traveling along the
roadways.
One initial stumbling block
when the city acquired Pioneer
was a stipulation that plots could
not be re-sold if no longer needed.
That’s changed under the new plan,
giving owners the right to transfer
back their plots for a full refund of
their purchase price.
By improving the grounds and
focusing on the historic values
of Pioneer, the new master plan
could turn the cemetery into a
special place, not only for internment but also as a more pleasant
and memorable place for survivors
and visitors. After all, there are
few cemeteries so easily accessible
with grave sites dating back to the
1850s, when Pleasanton Memorial
Gardens, as it was known then, was
first established.
The oldest legible headstone is
dated 1862. Some of the city’s
founding pioneers, including John
Kottinger, Joshua Neal and Augustin Bernal, and many Pleasanton
military veterans are buried there.
Grave sites were less expensive
then, with the first recorded burial
of a Sunol Glen resident named
“Peck” for $6. Other early burials
include the Jorgensens, Augustins
and Judge William H. Gale, whose
name still adorns an old office
building on Neal Street.
The name “Pioneer” dates back
to the late 18th century when
California recognized these small
cemeteries as rustic and informal
burial grounds. The alignment of
graves, as in Pleasanton’s Pioneer
Cemetery, is more random and the
types of grave markers less uniform. Typically, these cemeteries
are not irrigated and plantings are
limited, with few shrubs and no
lawns.
Fast forward to 2012 when a
(Photo at top left) Narrow driveway off
Sunol Boulevard is the main entrance to
Pioneer Cemetery. Historic wrought iron
“I.O.O.F.” (International Order of Odd
Fellows) nameplate will be re-glazed and
preserved. (Lower left) Headstone for
Gary Phillips, a Vietnam War veteran,
one of more than 400 veterans buried
at Pioneer Cemetery. (Top photo) Grave
marker for former Mayor Ed Kinney
includes his trademark “Happy Face.”
(Above) Graves dating back to the
mid-to-late 1800s include headstone for
Pleasanton pioneer Augustin Bernal.
new and expanded citizens committee was formed to urge the
city to clean up, irrigate and landscape Pioneer to make it “the nicest
looking park in town.” A former
City Council was reluctant even
to acquire the cemetery for fear it
would become a costly operation.
This year’s council unanimously
has agreed to take that cost on and
authorized the master plan effort to
begin last January.
Members of the task force, or
oversight committee, are Brad Hottle and Deborah Wahl, of the Parks
and Recreation Commission; Stephanie Wedge and Heidi Massie, of
the Civic Arts Commission; Frank
Capilla of the Community Cemetery Group; Jayne Archer, Catholic Funeral and Cemetery Services;
STORY
(Top photo) Schween family mausoleum south of Flag Circle is one of only two
remaining structures in Pioneer Cemetery. Family plots in late 1800s and early 1900s
often were marked by large concrete slabs with multiple headstones. (Above) Pioneer
Cemetery has a number of leaning and broken headstones and sunken plots such as
this one located near the edge of the cemetery’s historic section.
Doug Miller, representing veterans’
organizations; and Carolanne Montgomery, a member at large.
Kathleen Yurchak, assistant director of Operations Services who
managed the committee, said
members met five different times
this year, holding public workshops and making drafts of their
plan available for public review.
“It’s been an aggressive project,”
she said.
Yurchak and the committee
worked with four outside paid
consultants: PGAdesign, landscape
architects; CPRA Studios, cemetery
consultants; Alexander & Associates, surveyors; and HortScience,
arborists.
She said the proposed war memorial would be built in what is
now called the Flag Circle, where
special services once were held on
Memorial and Veterans holidays but
were moved because of space limitations. The proposed kiosk would
list names of those buried at Pioneer
and include a map of those sites.
It could be a computer-generated
search screen and there are also
plans for a self-guided tour of the
cemetery to historic burial plots.
Also under consideration are adding grave sites in the historic parts of
the cemetery where unused spaces
could be available next to older
graves. It is estimated that 375 additional casket burials and 624 cremains burials could be realized in
those portions of the cemetery if all
were double plots. Given the privilege of burial next to historic figures,
those plots would cost more.
With 56% of Californians now
choosing cremation, compared to
38% nationally, Yurchak expects
future demand to intensify for cremains sites at Pioneer. That’s why
most of the proposed expansion
would add small plots for cremains, possibly part of low walls at
the cemetery’s edges but not crypts
as now seen at the adjoining St.
Augustine Catholic Cemetery.
Although burial site purchases
since the city acquired Pioneer include fees for perpetual care, most
graves at the cemetery have no
ongoing fee structure to maintain
graves and many of those buried
there have no families remaining
to handle those chores. One of the
task force recommendations is to
establish an organization such as
the Friends of the Library to adopt
graves for maintenance work.
Also, because at some point in
the future Pleasanton Pioneer Cemetery will be at capacity, the task
force is suggesting that the City
Council may want to contract with
a firm to identify new property
suitable for future burials in Pleasanton.
If the City Council accepts the
master plan report and recommendations on Nov. 18, more studies
will be needed before work can
begin. Clearly, one of the first challenges for Yurchak and her staff
will be to count the graves. No one
really knows how many are buried
at Pioneer beyond the 400 that
Miller and his veterans’ organizations have identified. Q
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 15
Opinion
EDITORIAL
I
THE OPINION OF THE WEEKLY
Vote Yes on Measure BB
PUBLISHER
Gina Channell-Allen, Ext. 119
n an independent, comprehensive report called “In the Fast
Lane,” the Bay Area Economic Institute details the economic impact of Measure BB, Alameda County’s Transportation
Expenditure Plan. The measure calls for extending the halfcent sales tax for transportation purposes — now set to expire
in 2022 — to March 31, 2045, and adds another half-percent
for the same time period, in effect imposing a 1% sales tax for
the next 30 years.
The report finds that the 30-year, $8 billion plan will yield
$20 billion in economic activity in the region and create nearly
150,000 full-time equivalent local jobs in a wide variety of
occupations, including design, construction, engineering and
transit operations. It would bring millions of dollars to Pleasanton and the Tri-Valley to improve transportation. It would
include $130 million to turn Highway 84 into a four-lane
expressway from I-680, across Pigeon Pass and to connect to
the four-lane segment now being built from Airway Boulevard
near the I-580 interchange to the western end of Ruby Hill
Drive and Vallecitos Road. The measure also would provide
$400 million to help fund an extension of BART to Livermore,
another $1.26 million annually for local streets and roads, and
$340,000 annually for local bike and pedestrian projects.
The measure would provide traffic relief, including financing
to every city in the county to repave streets, fill potholes and
upgrade local transportation infrastructure. Funds would also
be available to expand BART, bus and commuter rail service,
including BART expansion and improvements within Alameda
County.
A similar measure failed by a fraction of the two-thirds favorable votes it needed two years ago, losing by just 721 votes out
of 527,403 ballots cast. At the time, those opposed to the measure, including the Pleasanton Weekly, cited its lack of a sunset
clause, making it a tax in perpetuity. Art Dao and his team at
the County Transportation Commission heard the complaints
and rewrote the measure to add a “sunset” clause that will give
voters a chance to vote on it again 30 years from now. A 30year sunset clause is probably in perpetuity for many of us, but
it’s the principle that counts.
Measure BB, with all of its benefits for Pleasanton, has our
support this time around. Vote Yes on Measure BB. Q
LETTERS
porter of downtown and the museum, he supports developing a plan
for a badly needed new library,
community and civic center.
Please vote for Jerry Thorne —
he deserves a second term.
—Christine Steiner
Support for Narum
Dear Editor,
I encourage my fellow Pleasanton voters to vote for Kathy Narum
this Nov. 4. Kathy has continued
to help Pleasanton address difficult
issues for many years — from her
days on the Parks and Recreation
Commission to her service on the
Planning Commission, and now
her continued dedication serving
on the Pleasanton City Council.
Kathy spends the time and does
the research to fully understand the
issues. She works with the public
and to find the middle ground with
respect and dignity to all parties.
Her unquestionable love for our
city, coupled with her desire to help
others through service, make her
an excellent choice for your vote
this November.
—Jack Balch
Vote No on Measure BB
Dear Editor,
We got tricked by Alameda
County at the last election on a
sales tax increase. Now they are
back again asking for another 1%
sales tax increase for 30 years while
the existing increase in tax has still
eight years to run.
They think people will not notice
and make fear mongering claims.
People in the Valley have been
paying for BART for ages, and
we should not be paying a single
penny more.
Further, California has the highest tax and sales tax in the nation.
The Department of Equalization
increased the gas tax by 3.5 cents a
gallon without reason and now we
have the highest gas tax in the nation. The governor also increased
the sales tax in the last election,
and billions of dollars are coming
into the government trough, a lot
more than budgeted.
With the highest gas tax and the
state reaping in billions of dollars
in sales tax increases, the need
for the Alameda county’s sales tax
increase to continue does not bind.
There are ample funds in the gas
tax to take care of the infrastructure needs. Alameda County gets
money from federal government
and the state also. It is time for our
politicians to live within the means
like the rest of us than continue to
tax the hard-working people. We
are now paying over 60% of our
wages in taxes. Just say No to BB.
—Rajinder Ghatoaura
Thorne the only choice
Dear Editor,
If you want a mayor who responds to all his constituents, respects and values diversity, and has
spent years serving on numerous
committees and commissions, then
Jerry Thorne is your man.
As mayor, Jerry has worked hard
to keep Pleasanton fiscally sound
and to reduce the city’s unfunded
pension liability. Jerry knows that
Pleasanton’s sound financial health
stems from our vibrant business
parks, regional shopping center
and dedicated city staff. Do not forget it is taxes from these that help
provide the outstanding parks and
community facilities we all enjoy.
Jerry has supported the redevelopment of Kottinger Gardens for
seniors, and he knows it is important to provide workforce housing
for the workers who help sustain
our fiscal health. A longtime sup-
Page 16 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
East Pleasanton
opportunity
Dear Editor,
As members of the East Pleasanton Specific Plan Task Force, we
wanted to comment on some inaccuracies and misinformation being
spread through campaign information the past few weeks.
In particular, Mr. Bowen has referenced our summary of meeting No.
17 stating that “the plan zones for
up to 2,279 new homes.” He also
has stated information regarding his
calculation for increased traffic.
For clarification, there is no approved plan yet — it is a working
draft that has just reached the stage
of environmental review (EIR) before a specific plan can be approved. Here is the information
from our most recent task force
meeting No. 17, which was held
two months ago:
• The EIR will consider 10 alternatives that range from no development up to 1,759 housing units.
• The base plan, or “preferred
plan,” was selected to be 1,300
single-family homes.
• The preferred plan increases traffic on Santa Rita Road during the
peak hour by only 42 trips, due to
this plan paying for the completion
of El Charro Road.
• If the existing zoning in the plan
area (industrial) is to remain as it
is currently, it will generate traffic
volumes that are infeasible when
built out.
Pleasanton
Weekly
• The EIR also considers parks/
open space as a plan alternative.
(Although it does not consider a
solar farm, as mentioned as an interest by Mr. Morrison during the
candidates’ forum.)
• The 1,300 single-family homes
plan proposes to add approximately 80 acres of parks, a new school,
trails, $4 million of recycled water
outside the plan area and $26 million toward affordable housing —
all funded by the developer.
We feel that it was important for
the community to understand the
full opportunity available to them
before being told “it is the wrong
plan.” We would also like to note
that the Pleasanton Gravel Co. is
listed as a land owner in the plan
area, and representatives regularly
attend task force meetings to express their safety concerns about
residential development in the plan
area. We appreciate and respect
their input, but to suggest, as Mr.
Bowen has, that they are not a “special interest” seems incorrect.
—Bob Shapiro
—Brock Roby
Mail carrier seeks relief
Dear Editor,
On the afternoon of Oct 3, my
mail carrier was seen relieving herself in the bushes of my neighbor’s
yard. When confronted, the carrier
said, “Sorry.”
Whether she was sorry for her
action or sorry that she got caught I
don’t know. Just one more example
that we are turning into a “Third
World” country.
I would report this to the postmaster “mistress?” but I know that
their union would prevent any disSee LETTERS on Page 17
EDITORIAL
Editor
Jeb Bing, Ext. 118
Tri Valley Life Editor
Dolores Fox Ciardelli
Associate Editor
Jeremy Walsh, Ext. 111
Staff Reporters
Amanda Aguilar, Ext. 121
Cierra Bailey, Ext. 229
Contributors
Jay Flachsbarth, Cathy Jetter,
Jerri Pantages Long, Mike Sedlak,
Kate Lyness, Nancy Lyness
ART & PRODUCTION
Marketing and Creative Director
Shannon Corey
Design and Production Manager
Lili Cao
Designers
Linda Atilano, Colleen Hench,
Rosanna Leung, Paul Llewellyn
ADVERTISING
Multimedia Account Manager
Mary Hantos, Ext. 222
Account Executive
Karen Klein, Ext. 122
Real Estate Sales
Carol Cano, Ext. 226
Ad Services Manager
Jennifer Lindberg, 650-223-6595
BUSINESS
Business Associate
Lisa Oefelein, Ext. 126
Circulation Director
Zachary Allen, Ext. 141
Front Office Coordinator
Sierra Rhodes, Ext. 124
HOW TO REACH THE WEEKLY
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Circulation email: cir[email protected]
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OPINION
Bowen uses incorrect
information in ad
Dear Editor,
Pleasanton is desirable because it
has been well-planned by generations of dedicated residents, council members, commissions and
committees all aimed at maintaining its character.
I am a lifelong Pleasanton resident and serve on the East Pleasanton Specific Plan (EPSP) Task Force
with 17 others (neighborhood reps,
property owners, commissioners
and at-large members). We’ve been
meeting for the past two years to
study and plan the future of this
mostly light-industrial area. After
two years of experts, reports and
public input, we submitted a draft
plan for environmental review that
includes 10 alternative scenarios.
Upon completion of the EIR and
specific plan adoption, property
owners within its boundaries desiring to develop will still have to go
through the entire planning process
(site design, density, building design).
George Bowen’s ad for City Council in the Oct. 3 Weekly claims (citing Task Force meeting notes) that
the EPSP “zones 2,279” homes,
which is incorrect (along with the
car trip numbers). No one on the
Task Force supports such numbers.
In fact, the 10 plans being studied
for the EIR include a “no project”
scenario up to 1,759 units, and that
is only being included as an outside
number for the EIR.
I plan to vote for Arne Olson
and Kathy Narum, both who have
integrity and understand the planning process having served on the
Planning Commission (Arne, 8
years; Kathy, 5 years until becoming a city council member). Arne
and Kathy both have proven records of making sound decisions
based on resident feedback and real
facts.
—Erin Kvistad
Support for Mayor
Thorne
Dear Editor,
The mayoral election in Pleasanton should be summed up in
two words: Jerry Thorne. Over the
past two years, he has been truly
a mayor all day, every day. There
is no reason to change that status,
since we all benefit from Jerry’s
productive full-time service.
We can thank Jerry for some of
the following accomplishments and
current projects in his nine years
of service as a councilman and
mayor: the long-awaited and wellused Stoneridge Drive extension,
the Bernal Sports Park emerged
with Phase 2 construction set to
begin, and the once-forgotten Pioneer Cemetery on Sunol Boulevard
is being refreshed.
Just as important, but not very
well-known, is Jerry’s support for
our returning veterans that includes being there when each and
every one of them arrives at home
from their tours of duty. Jerry also
Recommend Narum and
Bowen for council
Dear Editor,
I am voting to re-elect Kathy
Narum for council because of her
strong experience and her accessibility. Kathy consistently reaches
out to residents to gather input on
our concerns and key issues. She
truly values hearing input from all
perspectives vs. just listening to
one side. I have always respected
this about her.
Kathy personally walks more
precincts than any candidate I have
ever known, always asking residents for feedback on how we can
improve Pleasanton. As a result of
listening to all sides, she has been
able to make thoughtful, balanced
and independent decisions that
keep Pleasanton special.
I am voting for George Bowen for
the open seat as I believe he will
bring diverse thinking and fresh
ideas to the council. It is critical to
have a council team that is not only
made up of smart and experienced
individuals, but also individuals
with diverse perspectives. This ensures there will be a healthy debate
on critical issues vs. a “me too”
vote, hopefully driving the best
outcome.
Of the remaining three candidates, I believe George is the only
one who has both the experience
and the diverse perspective to create a thoughtful and well-balanced
Council team for Pleasanton.
Thank you for your consideration of Kathy and George as you
make your voting decision.
—Nancy Allen
Break up good ol’ boys
Dear Editor,
Pleasanton has been run by a
small group of good ol’ boys (and
they are mostly boys) for years. No
one voted for these folks, you probably won’t recognize their names,
yet they call the shots.
Who are these people, and how
did they achieve this power over
our community? They are led by
the Pleasanton Chamber of Commerce and include several local
well-connected business and property owners, a few large corporate
interests and developers salivating
at the chance to cash in on our
now defunct housing cap. They
have combined resources for many
years to fund local campaigns with
hundreds of thousands of dollars
in direct candidate contributions,
PAC donations and independent
expenditures to buy a City Council
majority who will do their bidding.
The Chamber even has its own
manifesto, the “2015 Community
Vision,” which reads like a shadow-
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cipline action from being taken.
—Fred Brown
Stanley B
Vineyard Ave.
tS
Continued from Page 16
is at the forefront with a city-friendly welcome to businesses wishing to do business in Pleasanton.
Not least in his mayoral routine is
thanking and honoring those who
do good in our community; Jerry
recently honored Ken Mano with
the Mayor’s Award for the many
hours he devotes to community
organizations.
Please help re-elect Jerry Thorne,
a results-oriented leader.
—Joanne Gunson
1s
LETTERS
Bernal Ave.
680
Sunol Blvd.
Vintage Hills Shopping Center
3550 Bernal Avenue
Pleasanton, CA 94566
925-621-7660
Open Daily 8am-9pm
www.newleaf.com
See LETTERS on Page 18
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 17
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OPINION
LETTERS
Continued from Page 17
government constitution for our
city and serves as a litmus test for
candidates they will bankroll. You
may think I’m a conspiracy theorist, but I know this is true because
I fought against it for eight years as
a Pleasanton City Council member
and for six as planning commissioner.
What can we do to return our
government to the people? I’m
voting for Matt Morrison for mayor
and George Bowen for council.
Neither is being supported by the
good ol’ boys or their money and
along with existing Councilmember Karla Brown will give the people of Pleasanton a council majority
that will represent our interests.
Please join me.
—Matt Sullivan
Vote for Olson,
incumbents
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Opening January 2015
Dear Editor,
I’m writing to encourage the
residents of Pleasanton to vote for
Arne Olson for the Pleasanton City
Council this election. I hope when
they are checking off the candidates, having read the candidates
ballots statements, they will realize that they should vote for Arne
Olson to fill the soon to be vacated seat of Councilmember Cheryl
Cook-Kallio.
Councilmember Cook-Kallio has
done an exemplary job representing the residents of Pleasanton, and
I think to fill her seat by electing
someone with the experience that
Arne Olson brings to the council is
the right decision.
Arne has spent eight years as
a planning commissioner for the
city and two years as a member of
the Economic Vitality Committee.
That experience, plus having lived
in Pleasanton for nearly three decades, being a community servant
Waiting list filling up fast
- reserve your spot today.
and someone that loves his community the way he does makes me
confident that Arne is the candidate
of choice. As the current vicemayor of Pleasanton, I know what
it takes to be on this council, and I
believe Arne is the most qualified
candidate.
He won’t be a councilmemberin-training for the next two or three
years; he’ll be ready to go. Please
join me in voting for Arne Olson as
well as incumbents Councilmember Narum and Mayor Thorne on
Nov. 4.
—Jerry Pentin
Misguided endorsement
of Tim Sbranti
Dear Editor,
The Pleasanton Weekly endorsement of Tim Sbranti is nothing
short of laughable. Here is a person
that used his position as head of
the California Teachers Association
(CTA) political action committee to
basically smear his opponent, Steve
Glazer, in the primaries with the
association spending millions on
campaign contributions to assure
that their lackey was the Democrats
choice.
The CTA has spent a record $211
million in the last decade to influence political outcomes. Follow
the money and it is obvious who
Sbranti is beholden to. In addition,
Sbranti opposes transparency in
public-sector collective bargaining,
supports BART workers ability to
strike, bringing the Bay Area to a
grinding halt (refresh your memory
on both the frustration and time
delays caused by the unreasonable
demands by the BART unions) and
opposes reduction of future pension benefit accruals.
His opponent for the 16th State
Assembly District, Catharine Baker,
would ban strikes by BART workers; Sbranti would not. Baker has
refused to fill out any secret questionnaires by interest groups, which
are often a condition of endorsements and contributions; Sbranti
has played that game. Baker agrees
with a Los Angeles judge’s recent
ruling that found that California’s
overly protective rules on teacher
tenure and the primacy of seniority undermine the civil rights of
low-income and minority students;
Sbranti sees no need to disrupt the
status quo on that point.
Is this the type of representation
that the 16th District wants?
—David Johnson
Re-elect Mayor Thorne
Assisted living. Memory Care. Skilled Nursing
BRAND NEW HEALTHCARE CENTER FOR SENIORS
CreekView is a perfect place to come for your short
or long-term health care needs. We offer multi-level care:
respite care, skilled nursing or assisted living.
Rehabilitation, Post-Acute and Short-Term Care
will be open to the public soon
Page 18 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
Please call or stop by for a tour!
925.201.4050
2900 Stoneridge Drive
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Located adjacent to the Stoneridge creek
retirement community
Dear Editor,
Jerry Thorne, as mayor of our
Pleasanton City Council, has
proved himself to be an effective,
responsible leader and an independent thinker. He is a man of integrity, known for his “grass roots”
efforts, who listens and works with
us. His strong and experienced
voice has helped bring more con-
sensus and cooperation to the City
Council resulting in decisions and
actions that serve well Pleasanton’s
people, businesses and government.
Jerry is a trusted businessman,
environmental engineer, family
man and community leader.
Jerry is well-recognized for
representing our Pleasanton City
Council on numerous regional,
state and national commissions and
boards. In Pleasanton he lead the
fight for lighted, multi-use sports
fields, for a teen center, for a youth
club, and for civic-arts facilities to
be built on the Bernal property.
He has recognized the fast-growing
aging population in Pleasanton and
is committed to continuing strong
services to our Senior Center, and
to promoting programs that provide assistance to seniors including
improved transportation.
Jerry Thorne will continue to be
an outstanding mayor of Pleasanton. We need his strong and
thoughtful leadership. Let’s get
Jerry elected again.
—Dave Melander
Support for Baker
Dear Editor,
The Weekly got it wrong by endorsing union-backed Tim Sbranti
over Catharine Baker. One of the
biggest problems our state faces are
the unfunded liability of public employee and teacher pension plans.
The Pleasanton Weekly endorses
Sbranti, who is a teacher and the
chair of the Political Involvement
Committee of the California Teachers Association, one of California’s
largest unions. Talk about putting
the fox in charge of the hen house!
The editorial endorsement basically chose him for being a longtime local politician, not as the best
candidate on the issues affecting
the Tri-Valley or the best voice for
us in Sacramento. We don’t need
more union-backed longtime politicians that just toe the union party
line on pensions, taxes, schools
and spending. They haven’t been
getting the job done for us in
Sacramento, and they have totally
screwed up our state.
We need someone like Catharine Baker, a longtime resident of
the area who has the experience
we need: experience as a leader
in our local schools, experience
working with Tri-Valley small businesses and nonprofits to help them
become successful, and experience
with political courage to take on
powerful interests, even in her own
party.
I am voting for Catharine Baker,
and I urge my fellow voters to
do the same because I don’t want
another longtime union puppet
representing us. I want someone
that’s going to change the culture in
Sacramento. I want a leader to represent us — that leader is Catharine
Baker.
—Frank Capilla
Code of ethics
The Pleasanton Weekly seeks to adhere to the highest level of ethical standards in journalism, including the Code of Ethics adopted Sept. 21, 1996,
by the Society of Professional Journalists. To review the text of the Code,
please visit our website at www.PleasantonWeekly.com.
Community Pulse
WEEKLY MEETING NOTICES
POLICE BULLETINOBITUARIES
Citrus Heights man arrested for
suspected drug violation
A man from Citrus Heights was arrested Oct. 8 after
Pleasanton police officers received a call about suspected drug activity at an automobile shop on California
Avenue.
When the officer arrived, many people were inside
the business, and one of them was on probation for
evading law enforcement, according to police.
The officer conducted a probation search on the
man, identified as 45-year-old Christopher Sean Gorman.
Police allege Gorman had methamphetamine in his
pockets. The officer also searched Gorman’s car and
allegedly found ammunition — a prohibited item for
someone on probation.
Gorman was arrested on suspicion of possession of
methamphetamine, probation violation and possession of ammunition.
In other police reports:
• The Safeway on Bernal Avenue was able to recover
City Council
over $200 worth of cosmetic items after a man and
woman tried to leave the store without paying for the
items, police said.
An unknown black male and white female entered
the store, and store employees reported seeing the
people filling four reusable grocery bags with items
such as facial creams, expensive shampoos and razors.
According to police, the items stolen are worth approximately $900.
Police said an employee attempted to stop the man
and woman as they left the store without paying, but
they were able to run away from the employee — after
the employee tore one of the four grocery bags and was
able to recover several stolen items.
No arrests have been made.
• A house on Tapestry Way was reported burglarized
after the female resident returned home and found various pieces of jewelry missing on Oct. 6.
According to police reports, the upstairs master
bedroom was ransacked. Police say the point of entry
was the backyard glass door.
—Amanda Aguilar
Tuesday, October 216, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.
Council Chamber, 200 Old Bernal Avenue
࠮ Public Hearing: Adopt a resolution Levying the Pleasanton
Downtown Business Improvement District Assessment for 2015
and approve agreement renewal between the City of Pleasanton
and the Pleasanton Downtown Association to administer the
Downtown Pleasanton Business Improvement District
࠮ Public Hearing: Adopt a resolution approving the Citizens’
Options for Public Safety Program (COPS) Year 18 Appropriation
࠮ Update on the Stage 3 Water Shortages and Local Emergency
Declaration
࠮ Consider a resolution accepting the 2013/14FY Unaudited
Financial Report for the Operating Budget and amending the
2013/14FY Operating Budget
࠮ Concurrent Item of City Council and Housing Authority
Board of Directors – Consider approval of an application to the
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the
Demolition and Disposition of Kottinger Place located at 240
Kottinger Drive as part of the Kottinger Place / Pleasanton Gardens
development project
࠮ Review and consider the City of Pleasanton’s 2014 Cultural Plan
Planning Commission
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.
Council Chamber, 200 Old Bernal Avenue
POLICE REPORT
The Pleasanton Police Department made
the following information available.
Oct. 5
Vandalism
Q 9:24 a.m. Street information not
disclosed.
Theft from structure
Q 2:54 p.m. in the 1500 block of East
Gate Way
Battery
Q 9:16 p.m. in the 800 block of Bricco
Court
Oct. 6
Theft
Q 3:20 a.m. in the 4300 block of
Rosewood Drive; auto theft
Q 5:15 p.m. in the 5800 block of Valley
Avenue; theft from auto
Q 6:34 p.m. in the 11900 block of
Dublin Canyon Road; auto theft
Burglary
Q 5:51 a.m. in the 5600 block of
Owens Drive
Q 10:29 a.m. in the 800 block of Main
Street; commercial burglary
Q 6:13 p.m. in the 2400 block of
Tapestry Way; residential burglary
Vandalism
Q 7:37 a.m. in the 7300 block of
Johnson Drive
Q 11:03 a.m. at the intersection of
Bernal and Vineyard avenues
Child abuse
Q 4:13 p.m. Street information not
disclosed.
Sex crimes
Q 5:48 p.m. Street information not
disclosed.
Oct. 7
Theft
Q 8:38 a.m. in the 1200 block of
Concord Street; theft from auto
Q 11:51 a.m. in the 5300 block of Case
Avenue; bicycle theft
Q 1:52 p.m. in the 400 block of Boulder
Court; theft from auto
Q 7:15 p.m. in the 6100 block of W. Las
Positas Boulevard; bicycle theft
Q 10:23 p.m. in the 1100 block of
Santa Rita Road; theft from structure
Drug violation
Q 10:55 p.m. in the 5100 block of
Hopyard Road
Gary Dean Logan
December 9, 1938-August 20, 2014
Gary Dean Logan passed away on
Wednesday, August 20th after a short yet
valiant battle with liver cancer; he was 75
years old. He touched so many lives with
his gentle spirit and lively sense of humor.
Gary’s remarkable life included extraordinary achievements in spite of his humble beginnings. His resilience and goodwill were
clearly demonstrated through his effortless
charitable endeavors and love for children.
Gary was born in San Francisco, Ca, raised
in Santa Barbara, Ca and later moved to Independence, MO. He
was introduced to The Andrew Drumm Farm for under-privileged
children at the age of 13. Soon after, it was determined that Drumm
Farm would become Gary’s new home. During his residency, Gary
attended East High School, graduating in 1956. After serving in the
Navy for four years, Gary returned to California where he enjoyed
a 54 year career in the electronics industry. Gary was a resident of
Pleasanton for more than 17 years. He worked for companies such
as Mel Labs, Zeta Labs, Shugart Associates and FlexStar.
It was through Shugart Associates that he would meet his match,
the love of his life and future wife, Pamela Young. This dynamic
pair seized the opportunity and as a result of an acquisition of
FlexStar’s disk drive repair facility, he started his own company.
As Founder/CEO of BigByte Corporation for 25 years, Gary leaves
behind a legacy of great influence and tangible accomplishments.
Gary is survived by his loving wife of almost 28 years, Pamela
Young Logan; children Keely Lozano (Tino) of Prunedale, CA,
Michael Logan of Merced, CA and Cari Brockett of Sonora, CA.
Grandchildren Chris Raymond (Cinthia) of Rocklin, CA, Sean
Raymond of Prunedale, CA, Stevi Torres (Mario) of Sonora, CA
and Kennedy Brockett of Sonora, CA. Great-Grandchildren
Isabella and Camille Raymond of Rocklin, CA and Cali Torres of Sonora, CA, his faithful canines Winston Bentley Logan and Burr Jack
Logan and a host of cousins and relatives.
Gary was predeceased by his mother Phyllis Lyon Logan, brother
Donald Logan, father Kenneth Walter Logan and his sister Joyce
Elaine Herrington. He would also want to recognize his beloved
canine sons which passed before him: Prescott Miles Logan, Bentley Ross Logan and Jack Prescott Logan.
A Celebration of Life was held on Sunday, October 12, 2014 at
Barone’s Restaurant in Pleasanton. This was an invitation only
event.
Family requests that a donation be made to:
Drumm Farm Center for Children:
www.drummforkids.org
Select “Give Today” check Tribute and fill in:
Gary Dean Logan
PA I D
O B I T U A RY
࠮ P14-0970/P14-1173, Young Ivy Academy
Applications at 5460 Sunol Boulevard, Suites 3 and 4 (Oak Hills
Shopping Center) to: (1) modify an existing Conditional Use Permit
to convert a previously approved tutoring facility with a maximum
of 30 students into a Heritage School with a maximum of 30
students and an outdoor playground area; and (2) Design Review
approval to remove eight existing parking spaces at the rear of the
existing shopping center and construct a new 1,984 square-foot
outdoor playground area enclosed with a new 6-foot tall wrought
iron fence
࠮ P14-1164, Ravi Cherukuri and Greg Kawahara
Application for Design Review approval to construct a two-story
custom home at 2523 Yolanda Court.
࠮ P14-1022/P14-1097, Genius Kids
Applications for a Conditional Use Permit to operate a licensed
daycare for children ages 2-6 years and a tutoring center for
grades K-6 and for Design Review approval for an outdoor play
area at 5698 Stoneridge Drive.
࠮ 77HJPÄJ7LHYS)YHK)SHRLVUILOHSMVM)/=
CenterStreet Properties, LLC
Work Session to review and receive comments on a
Preliminary Review application to construct an approximately
120,000-square-foot shopping center with emergency vehicle
access from El Charro Road and related site improvements on the
Retail/Commercial Site at Staples Ranch.
࠮ 77<+HUK7<+ 4*OPJRÄS(
Applications for: (1) General Plan Amendments to change the
Land Use Designation of an approximately 0.59-acre vacant
parcel located at the southwest corner of Hopyard Road and
[OL0U[LYZ[H[LLHZ[IV\UK/VW`HYK9VHKVɈYHTWMYVT
“Open Space – Public Health and Safety” to “Business Park”
and to change the Land Use Designation of an approximately
0.18-acre portion of 6111 Johnson Court from “Retail/Highway/
:LY]PJL*VTTLYJPHS)\ZPULZZHUK7YVMLZZPVUHS6ɉJLZ¹[V
“Business Park”; (2) Rezoning of 6111 Johnson Court from the O
6ɉJL+PZ[YPJ[[V[OL7<+0*67SHUULK<UP[+L]LSVWTLU[¶
0UK\Z[YPHS*VTTLYJPHS6ɉJL+PZ[YPJ[HUK7<+67SHUULK<UP[
+L]LSVWTLU[¶6ɉJL+PZ[YPJ[HUKLZ[HISPZOTLU[VMHaVUPUN
designation of the PUD-I/C-O (Planned Unit Development –
0UK\Z[YPHS*VTTLYJPHS6ɉJL+PZ[YPJ[MVY[OL HJYL]HJHU[
parcel; (3) PUD Development Plan approval to construct an
HWWYV_PTH[LS` ZX\HYLMVV[*OPJRÄS(YLZ[H\YHU[^P[O
two drive-through lanes and related site improvements; and (4)
7<+4HQVY4VKPÄJH[PVU[V[OL7<+NV]LYUPUN[OL7SLHZHU[VU
Square II development (PUD-96-13; 5225-6015 Johnson Drive) to
HJJVTTVKH[L[OLWYVWVZLK*OPJRÄS(KL]LSVWTLU[
*****************************************************************************************
The City Council is currently accepting applications for a vacancy on
the Tri Valley Conservancy. The Tri-Valley Conservancy is a community
organization whose mission is “to permanently protect the fertile soils,
rangelands, open space and biological resources, and to support a viable
agricultural economy in the Tri-Valley area.” For more information visit
http://www.trivalleyconservancy.org/
If you are interested in applying, please visit our website at www.
cityofpleasantonca.gov
The above represents a sampling of upcoming meeting items.
For complete information, please visit
www.ci.pleasanton.ca.us/community/calendar
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 19
Calendar
Author Visits
‘AFTER HOURS AUTHORS’ PROGRAM
HOSTS TWO GRAPHIC NOVELISTS
The Pleasanton Library and Towne
Center Books will host a visit by the
popular, award-winning graphic
novelists Raina Telgemeier and
Kazu Kibuishi at 7 p.m. on Friday,
Oct. 24 at the Pleasanton Library.
Raina Telgemeier is the author and
illustrator of the graphic novels
“Smile” and “Drama,” both #1
New York Times bestsellers, as
well as other works. Kazu Kibuishi
is the creator of the #1 New York
Times bestselling “Amulet” series,
as well as other works. Co-sponsor
Towne Center Books will have copies of both authors’ books available for purchase and autographs.
No registration required. Ages 8
and older. For more information,
call 931-3400 or go to http://
www.ci.pleasanton.ca.us/services/
library/.
NEUROTIC PARENT’S GUIDE TO
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS Join Emmywinning writer and author J.D.
Rothman for a lively, laugh-filled
reading and conversation about
the insanity of modern college
admissions, from 7-8:30 p.m.
on Wednesday, Oct. 22 at the
Pleasanton Library. Towne Center
Books will sell copies of the book.
Call 931-3400.
Civic Meetings
CITY COUNCIL The Pleasanton City
Council meets at 7 p.m. on the first
and third Tuesdays of the month
at City Council Chamber, 200 Old
Bernal Ave.
Clubs
TRI-VALLEY WRITERS MEETING The
Tri-Valley Writers Meeting will be
from 2-4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18
at Four Points by Sheraton. Guest
Speakers D. Patrick Miller, a collaborator, ghostwriter, and principal
editor, and Sari Friedman, poet, fiction and creative non-fiction writer,
will present “The Golden Age of
Self-Publishing is Now.” Writers of
all genres and experience levels are
welcome. Cost is $12 for members,
$17 for non-members. Contact
828-7687 or [email protected]
Concerts
PLEASANTON COMMUNITY CONCERT
BAND The Pleasanton Community
Concert Band will perform a program for all ages featuring music by
famous composers whose names
begin with an “S” at 2 p.m. on
Sunday, Oct. 19 at the Firehouse
Arts Center. Free! Call 846-5897 or
go to pleasantonband.org.
Events
AN EVENING WITH ALBERT EINSTEIN
Broadway and film actor Duffy
Hudson returns in a highly anticipated performance as Albert
Einstein, the great scientific thinker
WHAT’S HAPPENING IN OUR COMMUNIT Y
who revolutionized physics, at 7
p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 21 at the
Firehouse Arts Center. Tickets are
$10, $7 for seniors, $5 for members, $3 for students. Call 4622766 or go to www.museumonmain.org.
GHOST WALK Meet the ghosts
of Pleasanton’s past during the
Museum on Main’s popular Ghost
Walk. This family-friendly tour will
take you to some of Pleasanton’s
most haunted sites along Main St.
Tours depart the museum every
30 minutes between 6-8 p.m. on
Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17-18,
24-25. Costumes encouraged. For
tickets and more information, go to
museumonmain.org.
GRAND REOPENING AT BON DIA
CAFE Come and join Bon Dia Café
at their grand reopening event
from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 21
at 1987 Santa Rita Road, in the
Mission Plaza Shopping Center.
Appetizers, drinks and special
raffles will be held throughout the
evening. Call (510) 390-2342. Bon
Dia Cafe, 1987 Santa Rita Road,
Pleasanton.
HALLOWEEN BREW CRAWL
Downtown merchants and local
breweries will come together for a
night of adult trick-or-treating at
the Halloween Brew Crawl from
5-8 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 25.
Participants will sample over 40
beers and tasty bites at 32 locations on and around Main St.
Guests are encouraged to come
in costume. Tickets are $35 and
available at Red Coats Pub, Studio
7, and at https://pleasantondowntownassociation.instagift.com/
halloween-brew-crawl-2014.
HARVEST CELEBRATION Celebrate
the Harvest Season from 6-9 p.m.
on Friday, Oct. 24 at Harvest Valley
Church, 3200 Hopyard Road.
Music, games, prizes, inflatables,
puppet shows, petting zoo, face
painting, chili cook off, and pie
contest. Hamburger or hotdog,
chips and drink available for $5.
Nachos, cotton candy, popcorn,
caramel apples, chili and pie available for purchase. Call 484-2482.
INTERNATIONAL DANCE FESTIVAL
Come learn a variety of simple
dances from around the world from
3-5 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 26 at
the Veteran’s Hall in Livermore. No
partner or experience needed. Wear
smooth soled shoes and lightweight
clothing. Enjoy folk music, refreshments, and new friends. Children
welcome. Call (415) 246-7697 or
go to www.folkdance.com.
MIXER FOR TRI-VALLEY RENTAL
PROPERTY OWNERS The City of
Pleasanton and Abode Services
will host a resource mixer for TriValley rental property owners from
11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct.
24 at the City of Pleasanton’s
Operations Service Center, 3333
Busch Road. Light lunch and door
prizes. Clifford Fried, a Partner at
Fried and Williams Attorneys at
Law, will speak on how to deal
effectively with difficult tenant situations. Information will also be
available regarding strategies for
Page 20 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
good tenant selection, programs
for tenants that are also beneficial
to landlords, and more. Space is
limited. To reserve a spot, contact
Flora Garcia at 373-5313 or [email protected] by Oct. 21.
WIDOWED MEN AND WOMEN OF
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH The Widowed Men and
Women of Northern California
invite you to join for a champagne
brunch at 11 a.m. on Sunday, Oct.
26 at Castlewood Country Club.
RSVP to Jill at (510) 881-4758 or
[email protected] by Oct. 18.
Fundraisers
‘WE CAN’ ART EXHIBIT AT LAS
POSITAS COLLEGE The “We Can”
art exhibit will benefit the Alameda
County Community Food Bank by
sale of the paintings and the donation of canned foods. The exhibit
will run from Oct. 1-30 at the
Barbara Fracisco Mertes Center for
the Arts at Las Positas College in
Livermore. Paintings can be viewed
and bid on in $60 increments at
www.biddingforgood.com/lpcfoundation; cash donations can also be
made at this website. Food donations can be made at the college.
A closing reception will be held
6-8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 30.
For more information contact Bill
Paskewitz at 424-1265.
ASSISTANCE LEAGUE SPONSORS
BOOK DRIVE Assistance League of
Amador Valley will hold a children’s
book drive for Make a Difference
Day on Oct. 25. New books for
children in grades K-5 can be
donated now through October at
Towne Center Books, 555 Main
St. Presented in conjunction with
Operation School Bell which provides students in need in the TriValley with clothes and shoes. Go
to www.amadorvalley.assistanceleague.org.
GOLF UNDER THE STARS Tri Valley
Evening Rotary will host a golf
event to support their community
service efforts and First Tee program Tri-Valley from 4:30-9 p.m.
on Saturday, Oct. 18 at Pleasanton
Golf Center Executive Course.
Tickets are $75. Contact Mark at
(510) 410-7703 or [email protected] Go to trivalleyrotary.
org.
LHS PTSA GRAD NIGHT DROP
AND SHOP Support Livermore High
School PTSA Safe and Sober Grad
Night at the Drop and Shop meat
and plant sale, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
on Saturday and Sunday, Oct.
25-26 at Livermore High School.
Drop off your old TVs, Laptops,
monitors and DVD players and
shop a selection of great plants and
meats. Contact [email protected]
PLEASANTON WALK4WELLS 7K RUN
Join this 7k run to raise awareness
about women and kids who walk
great distances to access clean
water, from 9:30 a.m.-noon on
Sunday, Oct. 19 at Pleasanton
Sports and Recreation Park.
Includes a mile Fun Run, activities
for kids, and raffle prizes. Guest
O
POST CALENDAR ITEMS AT PLEASANTONWEEKLY.COM
PET OF THE WEEK
Hi, I’m
Francis!
He’s a gentle guy
who is mature, wellmannered and loves
to cuddle — some
people call him a
“lap cat.” He gets
along really well
with other cats, but
would be just fine
as a solo pet also.
Francis available for
adoption through
Maddie’s Adoption Program. All
of the pets live in
foster homes while
awaiting a permanent home. Contact
[email protected]
com or 487-7279.
of honor will be Congressman Eric
Swalwell. Contact kalavacherla.
[email protected] or go to walk4wells.org.
TOUR DE CURE WOMEN’S SERIES
Grab your bikes, ladies! Whether
an avid cyclist or just a beginner, the American Diabetes
Association’s Tour de Cure
Women’s Series is a chance to
ride in sisterhood to celebrate all
women living with diabetes and all
those affected by the disease. The
event will be from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. on
Sunday, Oct. 26 at Shadow Cliffs
Regional Park. Register today!
Contact Lee Barona at (510) 6544499 ext. 7461 or [email protected] Go to www.diabetes.org/
womenstournorcal.
TRI-VALLEY BASKET BRIGADE The
Basket Brigade is a special kind of
Thanksgiving food drive and community effort that offers participants the opportunity to donate
food and much needed items to
families in need. The participants
may choose to deliver wrapped
baskets to families in need located
throughout the Bay Area. This
special donation event will run
now through Nov. 22 at Valley
Montessori School in Livermore.
Go to trivalleybasketbrigade.com.
WINE FOR A CURE Join the 5th
Annual Wine for a Cure, a benefit
for Cystic Fibrosis Research, Inc.,
from 3-7 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 19
at The Purple Orchid Resort and
Spa in Livermore. Meet actor Todd
Giebenhain, who lives with CF; Bill
Ring, former San Francisco 49er
great; and recording artists Adam
Topol and Tess Dunn, who lives
with CF. Tickets are $100, $125 for
VIP. Call (650) 404-9979 or go to
http://www.cfri.org/wineforacure.
shtml.
Health
COVERED CALIFORNIA INFORMATION
SESSION Learn about Covered
California, the new online “marketplace” that makes it simple and
MADDIE’S FUND
affordable to purchase quality
health insurance, at 6:30 p.m. on
Monday, Oct. 20 at the Rincon
Library in Livermore. Find out how
you may be eligible to receive assistance to pay for health insurance
plans, or for free coverage through
Medi-Cal. Go to www.CoveredCA.
com.
COVERED CALIFORNIA INFORMATION
SESSION Learn about Covered
California, the new online “marketplace” that makes it simple
and affordable to purchase quality health insurance, at 7 p.m.
on Thursday, Oct. 23 at the
Pleasanton Library. Find out how
you may be eligible to receive assistance to pay for health insurance
plans, or for free coverage through
Medi-Cal. Go to www.CoveredCA.
com. Pleasanton Library, 400 Old
Bernal Ave., Pleasanton.
DIABETES SELF MANAGEMENT
CLASSES This 7-week series will
teach you how to manage your
diabetes with exercise, healthy eating, and medications, and answer
all your questions about living with
diabetes. Classes are 9:30-11:30
a.m. Fridays, Oct. 17-Dec. 5 at the
Dublin Senior Center. Open to all
adults with Pre Diabetes and Type
2 Diabetes. Call (408) 768-3763
or go to http://www.acphd.org/
diabetes.aspx.
Holiday
CRAFTERS WANTED FOR HOLIDAY
BOUTIQUE Crafters wanted for the
Holiday Boutique; the boutique will
be from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday,
Nov. 15 at Harvest Valley Church.
For more information contact
Valerie at 484-2482 ext. 121 or
[email protected]
Kids & Teens
HALLOWEEN SCAVENGER HUNT Kids
10 and younger are invited to come
in costume and pick up instructions, a Halloween bag and their
first clue from the starting location,
CALENDAR
Towne Center Books, 555 Main St.,
starting at 10 a.m. on Saturday,
Oct. 25. Solve the clue to find the
next downtown location, where
they will be given a treat and their
next clue. Parents will be given the
answers to the clues to help children find the treat locations. Call
484-2199 or go to www.pleasantondowntown.net.
LIFETIME TENNIS 9TH ANNUAL
HALLOWEEN FUN NIGHT Join in costume for an annual trick-or-treat
evening, from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on
Friday, Oct. 24 at the Pleasanton
Tennis and Community Park. This
free event features the Haunted
Hallway of Horror, games and
activities for kids and adults, and
yummy treats for all. Call 931-3449
or go to www.lifetimetennis.com.
Miscellaneous
‘LAWYERS IN THE LIBRARY’ Members
of the Alameda County Bar
Association visit the Pleasanton
Public Library on the third
Tuesday of each month to give
free 15 to 20 minute consulta-
DINING
On Stage
‘BOOMERAGING: FROM LSD TO
OMG’ Bay Area’s one and only
Will Durst will present his rollicking
celebration of “the Maturation of
the Boomer Nation” at 8 p.m. on
Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17-18
now open!
YOUR
SUCCESS
STARTS
HERE
STUDENT SUCCESS
CENTER
• Credits can be transferred
• Students can transfer at any time
• Transfer scholarships are available
• On-campus and online courses
Eddie Papa’s
American Hangout
4889 Hopyard Road, Pleasanton,
469-6266. Winner of The
Pleasanton Weekly’s Reader
Choice Awards for “Best American
Food,” “Best Meal under $20”
and “Best Kid Friendly Restaurant,”
Eddie Papa’s American Hangout
celebrates the regional food and
beverage cultures of America.
Bring the whole family to enjoy
iconic dishes from across the United
States, Old World Hospitality, and
hand crafted artisan cocktails.
‘THE FABULOUS FABLE FACTORY’ AT
LAS POSITAS Las Positas College will
present its children’s theater show,
“The Fabulous Fable Factory” at 7
p.m. on Friday, Oct. 24; and at 2
p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 25 at the
Black Box Theater at Las Positas
College. The play centers around
the retelling of four of Aesop’s most
famous fables: “The Tortoise and the
Hare,” The Lion and the Mouse,”
“The Ant and the Grasshopper,”
^dKEZ/'ZK/^
• Flexible one-course-per-month class schedule
ON THE
TOWN
at the Firehouse Arts Center. Ably
assisted by his genial wit and trusty
overhead projector, Durst presents
his newest one-man show. Tickets
are $20-$30. Call 931-4848 or go
to www.firehousearts.org.
© 2014 National University NU14_905
MAD SCIENCE FOR KIDS AT
PLEASANTON LIBRARY The
Pleasanton Library will feature Mad
Science of Mt. Diablo at 1:30 p.m.
on Saturday, Oct. 25. The company
brings its traveling science lab for
a presentation of Fire and Ice! This
fast-paced, interactive presentation
is meant for grades 1-5. 200 free
tickets will be given out at 1 p.m.
prior to the event. Call 931-3400
ext. 3 or go to www.ci.pleasanton.
ca.us/services/library.
tions. Appointments are by lottery.
Register from 5:30-5:45 p.m.;
names will be selected at 5:50 p.m.
and people must be present when
names are drawn. Appointments
begin at 6 p.m. and end at 8 p.m.
Call 931-3400, ext. 7.
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3300 STONERIDGE CREEK WAY
PLEASANTON, CA 94588
™
STONERIDGECREEK.COM
VISIT US AT
STONERIDGE SHOPPING CENTER IN PLEASANTON
NU.EDU/TRANSFER
(925) 467-6000
www.eddiepapas.com.
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Continuing Life LLC does not own, nor is it financially responsible for, Stoneridge Creek
Pleasanton CCRC LLC, but allows the use of the Continuing Life® mark under a services and
license agreement. State of California License #019200474. Certificate of Authority #262.
PLEASANTON LACROSSE NEW PLAYER FESTIVAL
Sunday, October 26, 2014 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm at HART MS
Are you thinking about playing lacrosse? Not sure… Would you like to give it a try?
GIRLS
www.pleasantongirlslacrosseclub.com
Pleasanton Lacrosse is holding
a New Player Festival MVYÄYZ[
time players and anyone interested
in learning more about this great
game! The New Player Festival is
for boys and girls currently enrolled
in 1st through 10th grade.
Come and enjoy an afternoon
of fun! The Fall Festival is a great
opportunity to try out one of the
areas fastest growing sports. PLC
and High School coaches, from
Amador and Foothill, as well as
local players will be on hand to
teach new players the fundamentals
of lacrosse: passing, catching,
cradling, shooting, ground balls and
MHJLVɈZ-VY$45 registration, all
participants will receive a Lacrosse
stick and a ball to take home and
a discount code for 2015 Spring
Registration.
BOYS
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 21
CALENDAR
and “The Farmer and His Donkeys.”
Free. The show will also be touring
to elementary schools in the TriValley area. Contact Ken Ross at
(510) 763-7087 or [email protected]
CREATURES OF IMPULSE PRESENTS
‘NIGHTMARE’ The Bay Area’s awardwinning teen improv troupe will
present their live, improvised horror
show at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday,
Oct. 30 and Saturday, Nov. 1. A
free preview show will be at 7:30
p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 28. A special
late-night show (costumes encouraged) for ages 14 and up only will
be at 9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 31. All
shows at the Firehouse Arts Center.
Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for
students. Call 931-4848 or go to
www.firehousearts.org.
PLEASANTON SENIOR PLAYERS:
‘ALWAYS A BRIDESMAID’ Pleasanton
Senior Players return with a hilarious comedic romp about four
friends who made a promise at
Senior Prom to be in each others’
weddings. “Always a Bridesmaid”
will run at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and
Saturday, Oct. 24-25; and at 2 p.m.
on Sunday, Oct. 26 at the Firehouse
Arts Center. Tickets are $10, $5 for
children. Call 931-4848.
Seniors
FREE MEMORY SCREENING FOR
SENIORS Caring Solutions is spon-
soring free memory assessment on
the fourth Thursday of the month
at the Dublin Senior Center, 7600
Amador Valley Blvd. Call 5564511 for a 30-minute appointment. Preregister by the Monday
prior to reserve an appointment.
Informational materials are available at the Senior Center.
HEALTHY SENIOR NUTRITION
AND FITNESS LifeStyleRx and the
Livermore-Pleasanton-Dublin
Branch of AAUW will present
“Healthy Senior Living: Nutrition
and Fitness” at 2 p.m. on Thursday,
Oct. 23 at the Livermore Civic
Center. Featuring Valley Care
Health wellness center, LifeStyleRx
and a nutritional eating seminar
7+(1(:&$/,)251,$
GOLD
NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL
ILLNESS (NAMI) TRI-VALLEY NAMI
Tri-Valley Parent Resource and
Support Group meets twice a
month for parents with children
to age 17 diagnosed or suspected
of having bipolar or other mood
disorders. It meets from 7-9 p.m.
the third Tuesday of each month
at Pathways To Wellness, 5674
Stoneridge Drive, Suite 114. The
group is drop-in, no registration
required and is free. For more information contact Marsha McInnis
at 980-5331 or [email protected]
with a registered dietitian. Call 2482444 or go to www.aauw-lpd.org.
Support
Groups
CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP
This is a safe place to speak openly
about your experience of pain and
to learn ways of coping with it.
Meetings are 12:30-1:30 p.m. the
first and third Mondays monthly
at Asbury Methodist Church, 4743
East Ave., Livermore. Call 4471950.
Volunteering
EAST BAY ESSENTIAL TREMOR
SUPPORT GROUP If you have
recently been diagnosed with ET
or would like to learn more about
this common movement disorder
in a safe and supportive environment, please join us from 10 a.m.noon on the third Saturday of each
month, in the Blackhawk A and B
conference rooms at San Ramon
Regional Medical Center, 6001
Norris Canyon Road, San Ramon.
For more information, view their
blog at www.eastbayet.com or call
487-5706 or email [email protected]
ASSISTANCE LEAGUE OF AMADOR
VALLEY All ladies are invited to join
this dedicated group of volunteers,
reaching out to those in need in
the Tri-Valley and having fun doing
it. Meetings are at 7 p.m. on the
third Thursday of the month at The
Parkview, 100 Valley Ave. Contact
461-6401 or [email protected] Go to www.
amadorvalley.assistanceleague.org.
LIFETIME TENNIS 9TH ANNUAL
HALLOWEEN FUN NIGHT Volunteer
at Lifetime Tennis’s 9th annual
Halloween Fun Night from 5-9 p.m.
on Friday, Oct. 24 at Pleasanton
Tennis and Community Park. This
is a free community event needing
volunteer actors for the haunted
house and costumed volunteers to
help with carnival games. Contact
Aaron at [email protected]
com.
MOTHERS WITH A PURPOSE
Mothers With a Purpose meets
at 7 p.m. on the second and
fourth Thursday of the month at
the Foothill High School Library.
Mothers with a Purpose was
formed by local moms to offer
support to families affected by
addiction. Visit www.motherswithapurpose.org.
One. Two. Three. They’re back!
With more than 385 breathtaking itineraries to choose from, departing February 2015 through
April 2016, you’re sure to find the perfect vacation with the perfect offer to go with it.
Choose one of the offers below – for Europe sailings choose TWO!
Classic
FREE
FREE
Beverage Packages*  Gratuities*
Receive a Classic Beverage Packages for two, including spirits,
valued at $98* per day—with
beverage gratuities covered by
us, a 12-night sailing has a total
value of $1,350 per stateroom.
Compost food soiled paper in your green bin.
Help create rich soil for our farms.
Receive pre-paid gratuities
for two, a value of up to
$360* per stateroom.
Credit*
‘ Onboard
Up to $300
Receive $100* for 3- to 5-night sailings
Receive $200* for 6- to 9-night sailings
Receive $300* for 10-night or more sailings
NEW! Added benefit for Suite Class guests
Book Suite Class accommodations in Europe or Alaska,
and the second guest in your party flies free
FREE Companion Air with
Celebrity’s ChoiceAir®
Benefits for each additional guest, beyond the first two, in your stateroom
FREE Beverage Package
Receive a Classic Non-Alcoholic Beverage Package* For each
additional guest in your stateroom, valued at $16* per day/per
person, with beverage gratuities covered by us —a 12-night
sailing has a total value of more than $220 per person
FREE Internet Package
Receive a 40-Minute Internet Package
for each additional guest in your stateroom
FREE Air to Alaska from SFO and SJC. Cannot be combined with 123Go offer.
Book by November 4, 2014.
For reservations or information please contact:
Celebrity Cruises supports
The Breast Cancer Research Foundation®
Test your recycling knowledge.
Win prizes! ReadySetRecycle.org.
www.pleasantontravel.com | 925.462.8484
Certain terms and restrictions apply and are subject to change.
Celebrity Cruises Inc. ships registry Malta and Ecuador.
Page 22 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
fogster.com THE TRI-VALLEY’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE
Fogster.com offers FREE • postings online and the opportunity for your ad to appear in print to more than 80,000 readers.
You can log on to fogster.com 24/7, and your online ad starts immediately. Some ads require payment.
Bulletin
Board
115 Announcements
Pregnant?
Considering adoption? Call us first.
Living expenses, housing, medical, and
continued support afterwards. Choose
adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7.
1-877-879-4709 (CalSCAN)
Pregnant?
Thinking of adoption? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching
Birthmothers with Families Nationwide.
LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s
One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293.
Void in Illinois/ New Mexico/Indiana
(AAN CAN)
Suffered a Stroke?
If you or a loved one suffered a stroke,
heart attack or died after using testosterone supplements you may be
entitled to monetary damages. Call 877884-5213. (CalSCAN)
Livermore Quakers
New unprogrammed worship group
2nd & 4th Mondays each month
7pm, UU Church
1893 N. Vasco Rd., Livermore
[email protected]
(925) 315-7170
130 Classes &
Instruction
Airbrush Makeup Artist
Course for Ads . TV . Film . Fashion. 35%
OFF TUITION - SPECIAL $1990 - Train
& Build Portfolio . One Week Course
Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com
818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)
Airline Careers
begin here — Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid
for qualified students. Job placement
assistance. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)
152 Research Study
Volunteers
Did You Know
that not only does newspaper media
reach a HUGE Audience, they also reach
an ENGAGED AUDIENCE. Discover the
Power of
Newspaper Advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011 or email
[email protected] (Cal-SCAN)
For Sale
201 Autos/Trucks/
Parts
- 1993 Jeep Wrangler
In beautiful condition. Price: $2500,
Email me at: [email protected]
210 Garage/Estate
Sales
Livermore, 573 Bernal Avenue , Oct
24 & 25, 7-4
Huge Garage Sale!
Everything must go.
- Tools
- Truck
- Trailer
- Furniture
- Household Goods
- Much More!
Pleasanton: 7658 Olive Dr.,
10/18-19, 8am
2 Hudson Bay Point 100% wool blankets, Halloween and sewing stuff, backpacks, gym bags, more
245 Miscellaneous
DirecTV
starting at $24.95/mo. Free 3-Months of
HBO, starz, SHOWTIME and CINEMAX.
FREE RECEIVER Upgrade! 2014 NFL
Sunday Ticket
Included with Select Packages. Some
exclusions apply - Call for details 1-800385-9017. (Cal-SCAN)
DISH TV Retailer
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/
month (where available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME
DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-3570810. (Cal-SCAN)
Kill Roaches!
Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Eliminate
Roaches-Guaranteed. No Mess,
Odorless, Long Lasting. Available at ACE
Hardware, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN)
Kid’s
Stuff
350 Preschools/
Schools/Camps
Did You Know
Newspaper-generated content is
so valuable it’s taken and repeated,
condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited, and
emailed countless times throughout
the day by others? Discover the Power
of Newspaper Advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-2886011 or email [email protected] (CalSCAN)
Mind
& Body
425 Health Services
Safe Step Walk-in Tub
Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be
fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation.
Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch StepIn. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American
Made. Installation Included. Call 800799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN)
Jobs
202 Vehicles Wanted
500 Help Wanted
Cash for Cars
Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top
Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For
Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.
cash4car.com (AAN CAN)
Administrative Clerk
Clerical person is needed from 11am to
3pm, Mon-Fri $400 weekly.Computer
skills are a must.Need to be detail
oriented, possess good customer skills
must be able to do small errands.Email
[email protected]
Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat
to Heritage for the Blind. FREE 3 Day
Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing,
All Paperwork Taken Care of. 800-7315042 (Cal-SCAN)
Visit today:
ShopPleasanton.com
Sign up today at
PleasantonWeekly.com
Energy Conservation Analyst
(San Ramon, CA). Desin of graphical
user interface for IBS s/ware. Create
animations using Flash technologies.
Monitor data and analysis. Maintain
and support customer deployments.
Prgmg of controllers, sensors, meters
and controller n/work configuration
for automated operation and data
monitoring from HVAC, lighting, gas
and water systems. Reqd: Bach’s in
Comp Sci or closely rltd + 12 mos exp
as Energy Conservation Analyst +
knowl of prgmg languages. Resume
to: Integrated Building Solutions,
Inc., Attn: Eugene Gutkin, C.E.O. 2000
Crow Canyon Pl., Ste 440, San Ramon,
CA 94583
550 Business
Opportunities
Avon
Earn extra income with a new career!
Sell from home, work, online. $15
startup. For information, call: 877-8302916. (CalSCAN)
560 Employment
Information
$1,000 Weekly!!
Mailing brochures from home. Helping
home workers since 2001. Genuine
Opportunity. No Experience required.
Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)
Africa, Brazil Work/Study!
Change the lives of others
and create a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9,
18 month programs available.
Apply now!
www.OneWorldCenter.org 269.591.0518
[email protected] (AAN CAN)
Drivers: Attn: Drivers
Be a Name, Not a Number. $$$ Up to
50 cpm + Bonuses $$$. 401k + Family
Friendly. CDL-A Required. (877) 2588782
meltontruck.com/drivers (Cal-SCAN)
Drivers: Start With Our
training or continue your solid career.
You Have Options! Company Drivers,
Lease Purchase or Owner Operators
Needed. 888-891-2195 www.
CentralTruckDrivingjobs.com (CalSCAN)
Drivers: Truck Drivers
Obtain Class A CDL in 2 ½ weeks.
Company Sponsored Training. Also
Hiring Recent Truck School Graduates,
Experienced
Drivers. Must be 21 or Older. Call: (866)
275-2349. (Cal-SCAN
Business
Services
605 Antiques & Art
Restoration
“A Labor of Love”
ANTIQUE RESTORATION
Preserve special memories...
Recycle the past into the future
Impeccable Quality
Integrity of Workmanship
Conveniently located in Pleasanton
For 14 Years
925-216-7976 License #042392
Real Estate Loans
Get cash loan! Buy property; Buy low
down; Buy no down; Buy rentals to live
free; buy below value; Pay bills & taxes;
Stop foreclosure; Using our cash loan;
Ask us how. Free quote - No obligation.
CA-BRE#00707520. www.Equity1Loans.
com. Call 661 330 2222. Hablo Espanol.
(Cal-SCAN)
Reduce Your Past Tax Bill
by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies,
Liens and Wage Garnishments. Call The
Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify 1-800498-1067. (Cal-SCAN)
648 HorsesBoarding/Training
Did You Know
7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S.
Adults read content from newspaper
media each week? Discover the Power
of Newspaper
Advertising. For a free brochure call 916288-6011 or email [email protected]
(Cal-SCAN)
Health and Dental Insurance
Lowest Prices. We have the best rates
from top companies! Call Now! 888-9894807. (CalSCAN)
Home
Services
704 Audio/Visual
Did You Know
144 million U.S. Adults read a
Newspaper print copy each week?
Discover the Power of Newspaper
Advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011 or email
[email protected] (Cal-SCAN)
715 Cleaning
Services
Convenient Cleaning
Over 15 years exp. Will bring supplies.
3 hour min., $60. Lic. 060612. Natalie,
925/922-3920
Do You Owe $10,000
to the IRS or State in back taxes? Get tax
relief now! Call BlueTax, the nation’s full
service tax solution firm. 800-393-6403.
(Cal-SCAN)
Identity Protected?
Is Your Identity Protected? It is our
promise to provide the most comprehensive identity theft prevention and
response products available! Call Today
for 30-Day FREE TRIAL 1-800-908-5194.
(Cal-SCAN)
Public
Notices
Case No. RG12640691
995 Fictitious Name
Statement
MD SPA OF PLEASANTON FICTITIOUS
BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.:
496507 The following person(s) doing
business as: MD SPA OF PLEASANTON,
531 MAIN STREET, PLEASANTON, CA
94566, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): Robert F. Gray MD
Inc., 531 Main Street, Pleasanton, CA
94566. This business is conducted by a
Corporation. Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein 11/12/2004.
Signature of Registrant: Robert F. Gray,
MD, FACS, Owner and President. This
statement was filed with the County
Clerk of Alameda on 09/25/2014.
(Pleasanton Weekly, Oct. 17, 24, 31, Nov.
7; 2014)
MCT DEVELOPMENT & CONSTRUCTION;
INVESTIGATIVE BUSINESS CONSULTANTS
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No.: 496650-1 The following
person(s) doing business as: MCT
DEVELOPMENT & CONSTRUCTION;
INVESTIGATIVE BUSINESS
CONSULTANTS, 125 W. NEAL STREET,
PLEASANTON, CA 94566, is hereby registered by the following owner(s): Michael
M. O’Callaghan, 3425 Arbor Drive,
Pleasanton, CA 94566. This business is
conducted by an Individual. Registrant
began transacting business under the
fictitious business name(s) listed herein
01/02/2002. Signature of Registrant:
Michael M. O’Callaghan. This statement
was filed with the County Clerk of
Alameda on 09/30/2014. (Pleasanton
Weekly, Oct. 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7; 2014)
Visit today:
ShopPleasanton.com
NOTICE OF DAMAGES SOUGHT BY
DEFAULT C.C.P. §§425.10, 425.11, 580;
CIVIL CODE §3295 ASSIGNED FOR ALL
PURPOSES TO THE HON. KIMBERLY
E. COLWELL, DEPT. 18 NOTICE TO
Defendant O.F. Lending Group, Inc., an
unknown business entity,; Defendant
James Rivera, an individual; Defendant
Tiffany Carr, an individual; Defendant
Gregory Lomba, an individual (collectively “Defendants”); Plaintiffs Mary Kate
Cunniff, Mitchell Eason, Katie Eason,
Bryan Evans, Gregory Henry, Tobian
Henry, David Lim, Janice Yee, Webster
D. Loudd, Katherine Loudd, Deborah
McLarty, Rickie McLarty, Darlene
McLarty, Janice Nelson, Tommy Ness,
Deborah Ness, Benjamin Ostroff, Mary
Ostroff, Ernesto Sayo, Joji Sayo, Kazuo
Semitsu, and Karen Thumm (“Plaintiffs”)
and each of them reserves the right to
seek $120,005.20 (one hundred and
twenty thousand and five dollars and
twenty cents) in restitutional damages,
$43,737.22 (forty three thousand seven
hundred and thirty seven dollars and
twenty two cents) in compensatory
damages (and/or emotional distress)
and $690,000.00 (six hundred and
ninety thousand dollars) in punitive
and/or statutory damages against each
Defendant listed above jointly and severally in Alameda County Superior Court
Case number RG12640691 entitled
Cunniff et al., v. O.F. Lending Group, Inc.
This notice is being served pursuant
to California Code of Civil Procedure
§§Sections 425.10, 425.11, and 580; Civil
Code §3295. The name, address, and
telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: John S. Richards, Esq., Richards
Law, 4695 Chabot Drive, Suite 200,
Pleasanton, CA 94588; (925) 231-8104.
/s/ John S. Richards. Dated 09/22/2014.
(Pleasanton Weekly, Oct. 10, 17, 24, 31;
2014)
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Contracting
A NOTICE TO READERS:
It is illegal for an unlicensed person
to perform contracting work on any
project valued at $500.00 or more in
labor and materials. State law also
requires that contractors include
their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status
at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB
(2752). Unlicensed persons taking
jobs that total less than $500.00
must state in their advertisements
that they are not licensed by the
Contractors State License Board.
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Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 23
Real Estate
OPEN HOME
GUIDE AND REAL
ESTATE LISTINGS
SALES AT A GLANCE
Highest sale reported: $1,625,000
Average sales reported: $647,476
Dublin (Sept. 10-18)
Total sales reported: 9
Lowest sale reported: $653,000
Highest sale reported: $1,150,000
Average sales reported: $833,944
San Ramon (Sept. 22-24)
Total sales reported: 7
Lowest sale reported: $725,000
Highest sale reported: $1,189,000
Average sales reported: $934,429
Livermore (Sept. 10-18)
Total sales reported: 21
Lowest sale reported: $228,000
Source: California REsource
OPEN HOMES THIS WEEKEND
Danville
6 BEDROOMS
325 Harper Lane
Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
$1,719,000
837-4100
Dublin
3 BEDROOMS
3369 Monaghan St.
Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
$565,000
847-2200
4 BEDROOMS
3700 Silvera Ranch Drive
Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
$979,900
847-2200
Livermore
OPEN SATURDAY 12-3
4543 and 4545 Second St., Pleasanton
A unique opportunity to own a home in
downtown Pleasanton! Live in one side,
lease the other or lease both. Plans for a
single family conversion on hand.
Each
Ea unit has 2 beds and 1.5
baths.
ba
Total sq. ft. 2,582.
2σHUHGDW
2
3378 W. Las Positas Blvd, Pleasanton
3 bedrooms + retreat and 2.5 baths, approx
2,144 sq feet. Exceptional place to call home.
The details won’t go unnoticed. Stainless
steel appliances, crown molding, ceiling
fans, newer furnace, a/c, roof, beautiful we
bar and more. Fabulous rear yard with koi
pond, raised garden, play house & large side
\DUG2σHUHGDW
925.577.6113 CalBRE#01232520
[email protected] • jenniferbranchini.com
2 BEDROOMS
1226 Elm St.
Sat/Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
$365,000
847-2200
3 BEDROOMS
3873 Inverness Common
Sat/Sun 1-4
Alain Pinel Realtors
665 Buckeye Drive
Sat/Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
$575,000
251-1111
$499,000
847-2200
4 BEDROOMS
675 Jefferson Ave.
Sat/Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
$699,950
847-2200
5 BEDROOMS
3205 E. Ruby Hill Drive
Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
711 Swallow Drive
Sat/Sun 1-4
Leslie Faught
$2,150,000
847-2200
$689,000
784-7979
Pleasanton
4 BEDROOMS
5428 Pleasant Hill Road
$899,000
Sat/Sun 1-4DeAnna Armario and Liz Venema260-2220
8053 Horizons Court
$2,195,000
Sat/Sun 1-6
Javier Bahamonde
639-3651
4121 Grant Court
$1,695,000
Sat/Sun 1-4
Laura Handlery
285-4634
1046 Harvest Circle
$895,000
Sun 12-3
Louise Davis
200-2457
1279 Lozano Court
$2,425,000
Sun 1-4 Donna Garrison and Susan Schall 980-0273
1125 Autumn Court
$1,099,000
Sun 1-4
Julia Murtagh
997-2411
5 BEDROOMS
3205 Ruby Hill Drive
Sun 1-4
Coldwell Banker
2001 Ruby Hill Drive
Sat/Sun 1-5 Keller Williams Tri-Valley
7919 Paragon Circle
Sat/Sun 1-4
Cindy Gee
1976 Via di Salerno
Sun 1-4
Melissa Pederson
$2,150,000
847-2200
$5,449,000
397-4200
$1,788,000
963-1984
$1,889,000
858-1984
6 BEDROOMS
1712 Zenato Place
$2,300,000
Sun 1-4
Debby Johnson-Abarta
989-6844
7 BEDROOMS
862 Gray Fox Circle
$2,750,000
Sun 1-4
Dave and Sue Flashberger
463-0436
San Ramon
5 BEDROOMS
3027 Hastings Way
Sat/Sun 1-4
Joan Sakyo
Call for price
989-4123
Sunol
3 BEDROOMS
3378 W. Las Positas Boulevard
Sat 12-3
Jennifer Branchini
$854,900
577-6113
5 BEDROOMS
23 Carver Lane
$2,190,000
Sat 1-3
Dave and Sue Flashberger
463-0436
Helping
H
elping Sellers
Sellers and
and Buyers
Buyers in
in the
the Tri-Valley
Tri Valley
Providing leadership, knowledge and support every step of the way.
JUST LISTED AT $1,099,000
PENDING
E
TIPL
MULFERS
OF
N
OPE Y 1-4
A
D
N
SU
Julia Murtagh
925.997.2411
Email: [email protected]
DRE #01751854
“Bringing Integrity
to Your Front Door”
1125 Autumn Court, Pleasanton
673 Palomino Dr, #D
Fabulous downtown location in one of Pleasanton’s favorite neighborhoods.
Enjoy this great family home on a nice quiet cul-de-sac. This 4-bedroom/2bath home has 2150 sq. ft. of living space, with a very functional floor plan.
Beautiful hardwood floors installed throughout the entire home. The
backyard features a “resort like” pool with spa. Enjoy entertaining with the
built-in barbeque, a fire pit with seating, and a nice sized patio. Walk to
downtown Pleasanton, Stores and Amador High School in minutes.
Great Townhome in Oak Tree Villas in
one of the most private locations.
This home has 2 beds & 2 baths, with
1198 Sq. Ft of Living space. One Bed
and Bath On each floor ~ Call Julia for
more details.
JUST SOLD
Please see
reviews of
Julia on
Page 24 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
7122 W. Woodbury Ct,
Pleasanton
5 bed, 4.5 bath in 4792
sq ft. of upgraded
luxurious living
space on .31 acres.
Spectacular garden.
SOLD FOR
$1,800,000
7263 Cronin Cicle,
Dublin
Charming 2 bed,
2 bath condo in
Kildara. 1,137 sq ft.
REPRESENTED
BUYERS
SOLD FOR
$445,000
8199 Tamarack Drive,
Dublin
Updated single story,
3 bed, 2 bath, 1,424
sq ft.
REPRESENTED
BUYERS
SOLD FOR
$655,000
7919 PARAGON CIRCLE. JUST LISTED
ED -4
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The East Bay’s premier real estate company.
Real Estate Is an Art
Leave it to the Masters...J. Rockcliff Realtors
Serving
LAGUNA OAKS RESORT STYLE LIVING…WESTSIDE PLEASANTON
Gorgeous Executive home! Gourmet Kitchen Granite, 5 bed, 3.5 bath, approx 4330 sq
ft. On approx 20000 sq. ft. lot. Huge Park-like yard with Sparkling pool and spa. Tennis,
parks, community pool! Much More.
Contra
Costa
9459 BLESSING DR. THE PRESERVE!
6216 GUYSON CT., PLEASANTON
and
D!
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LIS N 1
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OP
Alameda
Counties
®
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Gorgeous Updated 3 bed 2 bath,
approx 1555 sq ft. on approx 7985 lot. Granite, remodeled kitchen and Master bath.
Call Cindy for details. Offered at $720,000
www.rockcliff.com
Cindy Gee
Multiple offers. Gorgeous Updated to perfection
Executive home with Pool/Waterfall
Views!
Offered at $1,848,000
Realtor, Notary, GRI, CDPE, Top Producer,
Pinnacle Award, Grand Masters
925.963.1984
925.218.1210 • [email protected]
BRE# 1307919
J. Rockcliff has been named the #1 Real Estate Company
in the East Bay for the third consecutive year!*
Caring Professional Hardworking
*By the San Francisco Business Times based on total sales volume
Call Cindy for all your Real Estate needs... She will make it happen for you!
DUBLIN
SUN 1 - 4
3700 SILVERA RANCH DR
GREAT LOCATION!
$979,900
4 BR 3.5 BA Jr Mstr Ste, 3 car tandem grg, kitch with
granite, SS, island. No rear nghbrs. Near top schls.
Azita Mowlavi, CalBRE #01074630 925.847.2200
DUBLIN
SUN 1 - 4
3369 MONAGHAN ST
JUST LISTED!
$565,000
3 BR 2.5 BA 2 car tandem grg. Bright & Open. Kitch
[KVERMXI
YTKGEFMRIXW4SSPWTEGPYFLWI
½XRIWW
Tae Terry Kim, CalBRE #01363454 925.847.2200
LIVERMORE
SAT/SUN 1 - 4
675 JEFFERSON AVE
JUST LISTED!
$699,950
&6&%OMXGL[KVERMXI
77ETTP[SSH¾VWGVS[R
molding, outdoor kitch, veg gardens, side access!
Mary Anne Rozsa, CalBRE #00783003 925.847.2200
LIVERMORE
SUN 1 - 4
3205 E RUBY HILL DR
GOLF COURSE VIEWS!
$2,150,000
5 BR 4.5 BA Expert craftsmanship. Library & 2 BD on
1st level. Pool, spa, outdoor kitch & Rose Arbor.
Kathleen Waelde, CalBRE #00885285 925.847.2200
B R E N T WO O D
LIVERMORE
SAN R AMON
828 HOLLOWBROOK DR
LARGE HOME W/POOL!
$539,950
4 BR 3 BA Granite in kitchen, new carpet & fresh
TEMRX1WXV[WMXXMRKEVIE
½VITPEGI4SSPPEVKIPSX
8LSQEW-ZEVWSR'EP&6)
5450 BETTY CIR
BEAUTIFUL TRI-LEVEL!
$629,000
4 BR 2.5 BA Located in quiet neighborhood.
Cathedral ceilings, master suite with sitting area, side
yard access.
Drew Holscher/ Tommy Sinclair,
CalBRE #01936944/ 01928160 925.847.2200
SAT/SUN 1 - 4
1226 ELM ST
JUST LISTED!
$365,000
&6&%'%00-2+%00-2:)78367-HIEPEWVIRXEP
SV¾MT2IEVWGLPWTSSPTVOPFV]WLSTH[RX[RJV[]W
Lucy Lizarraga, CalBRE #01393413 925.984.1518
FREMONT
126 PEONY CT
NEWLY REMODELED HOME!
$638,888
3 BR 2 BA Central Fremont. Contemp kitchen with
SS appliances, qrtz counter & storage. Huge lot, pool,
pond, fountain.
Elaine Arnt, CalBRE #01046497 925.847.2200
LIVERMORE
3103 BELMONT CT
WELCOME HOME!
$1,599,950
&6&%'YPHIWEGPSGEXMSR-RPE[YRMXEFSZI
garage huge kitchen perfect home for entertaining.
David Beville Jr., CalBRE #01954597 925.847.2200
812 VIA GRANADA
SUNSET WEST SINGLE STORY!
$500,000
3 BR 2 BA Converted garage with laundry room and
an enclosed porch. Near schools, shopping, downtown
and freeway.
Sean Leggat, CalBRE #01280186 925.847.2200
665 BUCKEYE DR
JUST LISTED!
$499,000
3 BR 2 BA Bonus room, vaulted ceilings, brick
½VITPEGIQEWXIVFIHVSSQ[MXL[EPOMRGPSWIXTSSP
side access!
Mary Anne Rozsa, CalBRE #00783003 925.847.2200
M O U N TA I N H O U S E
SUN 1 - 4
3557 ASHBOURNE CIR
NORRIS CANYON BEAUTY!
$1,895,000
5 BR 4.5 BA Custom home! Gourmet kitch w/granite,
SS appl. Huge mstr, loft, library, professional landscape.
Sharon He, CalBRE #01810593 925.847.2200
761 ANTIGUA TER
GORGEOUS SHEA HOME!
$615,000
&6&%4PYWPVKSJ½GI
FSRYWVSSQ+SYVQIX
kitch w/granite & built-ins. 1 BD & full BA down.
Suzan Gladieux, CalBRE #01245705 925.847.2200
1215 NANCY LN
BEAUTIFUL CONDO!
$525,000
&6&%3TIR¾V&PXMRQIHME
WYVVSYRH1WXV[
wlk-in clst. Upgraded kitch. Large 2car attched garage.
Karen T, CalBRE #009628800 925.847.2200
OA K L A N D
10963 MOONLIGHT CT
BEAUTIFUL NEWER HOME!
$384,000
3 BR 2.5 BA Soaring ceiling Liv Rm. Mstr ste w/walk-in
GPSWIXRH¾VPEYRHV]VSSQGEVKEVEKI
Laurie Pfohl, CalBRE #00866660 925.847.2200
541 VAN BUREN PL
JUST LISTED!
$625,000
3 bd 2 BA Kitchen with granite and cherry cabinents.
'VS[RQSPHMRK&VE^MPMERGLIVV][SSH¾SSVW
Upgraded Master bathroom.
Nancy Sutorius CalBRE#00628232, 925.847.2200
Œ'SPH[IPP&EROIV6IEP)WXEXI00'%PP6MKLXW6IWIVZIH'SPH[IPP&EROIV‹MWEVIKMWXIVIHXVEHIQEVOPMGIRWIHXS'SPH[IPP&EROIV6IEP)WXEXI00'%R)UYEP3TTSVXYRMX]'SQTER])UYEP,SYWMRK3TTSVXYRMX])EGL'SPH[IPP&EROIV6IWMHIRXMEP&VSOIVEKI3J½GI-W3[RIH%RH3TIVEXIHF]26800'(6)0MGIRWI
PLEASANTON
925.847.2200 |
5980 Stoneridge Drive, Ste. 122
CaliforniaMoves.com
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 25
ed!
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Tri-Valley
Real Estate Directory
Dennis Gerlt
Darlene Crane,
OPE S A DV IS O R S
925-699–4377
[email protected]
www.darlenecrane.com
2929 Amoroso Court Pleasanton
NMLS 30878 License 00907071
Vintage Hills II
CA LIC# 01317997
349 Main Street #203, Pleasanton
This Custom Home is beautifully appointed with top of the line upgrades.
It features 4 bedrooms 3 baths, Approx. 3217 sqft, on a 10,000+ sqft lot.
Gorgeous Custom Kitchen, w/ cherry cabinetry, granite counters, Gas cookXSTWXEMRPIWWWXIIPETTPMERGIWERHFYMPXMRVIJVMKIVEXSV,EVH[SSH¾SSVWERH
custom built cabinets in Family room and Master bedroom. Large backyard,
w/sunroom, putting green and built-in BBQ w frig.
Susan Kuramoto
Janice Habluetzel
®
REALTOR
Re/Max Accord
phone: (925) 699-3122
www.JaniceTheRealtor.com
REALTOR
®
Serving the greater Bay Area
for over 20 years with integrity
cell: (408) 316-0278
BRE# 1385523
BRE# 01199727
Delores
Gragg
®
REALTOR
Broker/Owner
Gerlt Real Estate Services
direct: (925) 426-5010
email: [email protected]
www.dennisgerlt.com
Real Estate Mortgage Advisor
Read client testimonials
at apr.com/skuramoto
To advertise in the Tri-Valley Real Estate
Directory call (925) 600-0840. Ask about online
and email advertising.
925-989-6500
www.deloresgragg.com
DRE# 1206964
weinermcdowell
PENDING • SOLD
weinermcdowell.com / (925) 251.2585
Top 1% of Realtors Nationwide*
Luxury Real Estate and Lifestyle in the East Bay
NEW LISTING - OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4
SOLD WITH MULTIPLE
OFFERS OVER LIST PRICE!
3531 Rosincress Dr,
The Bridges, San Ramon
Exceptional home in the desirable
Bridges golf course community!
Five bedroom floor plan with
beautiful interior courtyard and
huge lot.
PENDING Call for Price
3210 Westbridge Lane, Callippe
Golf Course, Pleasanton
Stunning, custom built Mediterranean home overlooking the
beautiful Callippe Golf Course
in Pleasanton. Four spacious
Bedrooms, five and a half baths,
3670 sq.ft. on a private .63 acre
view lot.
Phyllis Weiner
REALTOR®
(925) 251.2585
[email protected]
Peter McDowell
REALTOR®
(925) 251.2550
[email protected]
Information provided by © 2013 - 2014 Terradatum and its suppliers & licensors
(www.terradatum.com/metrics/licensors). BrokerMetrics®
Page 26 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly
8131 Moller Ranch Dr., Moller Ranch, Pleasanton Enjoy the privacy and incredible views from this beautifully updated home in
desirable Moller Ranch. Featuring 3 spacious bedrooms, 2 ½ baths, 1887 sq.ft. Offered At $848,000
REAL PEOPLE... REAL REVIEWS...
®
“Phyllis and Peter made our dream a reality! They assisted us both in our sale and our purchase and both
transactions were smooth and pleasant from beginning to end. They went above and beyond our
expectations.” -Bill and Judy Sherry, Seller’s 910 Sherman Way.
weinermcdowell.com • (925) 251.2585 [email protected] • (925) 251.2550 [email protected] • CalBRE #00673849 / 01361481
Open Saturday & Sunday 1-4
3027 Hastings Way, San Ramon
Views of the Hills
5 Bd, 4.5 Ba 3,716 Sq. Ft.
Highly upgraded Windemere home includes solid hardZRRGÀRRUVSODQWDWLRQVKXWWHUVPDUEOHJUDQLWH¿QLVKHG
DWWLFZLWKDPSOHVWRUDJHFXVWRPSDLQWHGWR\URRPDQG
JDUDJHSOXPEHGIRUHOHFWULFFDUPlease call for pricing
Joan Sakyo | Coming Soon
630 Selby Lane #3, Livermore at Montage
Open Sunday 1-4
Open Sunday 1-4
1976 Via di Salerno, Pleasanton
1712 Zenato Place, Pleasanton
0DJQL¿FHQW&XVWRP0HGLWHUUDQHDQLQ5XE\+LOO
5 Bd, 4 Ba 4,552 Sq. Ft.
DFUHORW2SHQOLJKWEULJKWÀRRUSODQ)UHQFKGRRUV
RSHQWRWKHORYHO\IURQWFRXUW\DUG0DVWHUVXLWHGRZQVWDLUV
ZLWKOX[XULRXVEDWKPlease call for pricing
&ODVVLF)UHQFK&RXQWU\+RPH2YHU/RRNLQJWKH
%HDXWLIXO9LQH\DUGV
6 Bd, 5.5 Ba 5,050 Sq. Ft.
+XJHERQXVURRPDQGPDVWHUVXLWHRQ¿UVWOHYHO$2,300,000
Melissa Pederson | For Sale
Debby Johnson-Abarta | Open Sunday 1-4
7795 Cedar Mountain Road, Livermore
1279 Lozano Court, Ruby Hill, Pleasanton
0DMRUXSJUDGHVLQEHVWORFDWLRQLQ0RQWDJH8QH[SHFWHG
VSDFHDQGYLHZVPlease call for pricing
Tuscan Vineyard Estate
7 Bd, 7 Ba, 6,671 Sq. Ft.
([FHSWLRQDOFXVWRPKRPHZLWKSURGXFLQJYLQH\DUGVRQ
DFUHVLQWKH/LYHUPRUH:LQH&RXQWU\Offered at $4,200,000
Glorious Georgian Estate
4 Bd, 4.5 Ba 5,560 Sq. Ft. on .74 acre
&KHUU\ÀRRUVH[WHQVLYHPLOOZRUNJRXUPHWNLWFKHQDQGWUDGLWLRQDOVW\OLQJ5HVRUWVW\OHG\DUGOffered at $2,425,000
Donna Garrison & Susan Schall
__)DEXORXV3URSHUWLHVQHW
Donna Garrison & Susan Schall
__)DEXORXV3URSHUWLHVQHW
Donna Garrison & Susan Schall
__)DEXORXV3URSHUWLHVQHW
7UDQTXLO7RZQKRPHZLWK9LQH\DUG9LHZV
3 Bd, 3.5 Ba, Bonus, 2196 sq. ft.
For Lease
For Lease
Sale Pending
2740 Chocolate Street, Pleasanton
3360 Maguire Way, Dublin
1168 Paladin Way, Pleasanton
'HVLUDEOH6WRQHULGJH6TXDUH
4 Bd, 2.5 Ba 2,014 Sq. Ft.
7ZRVWRU\KRPH%XLOWLQ/LYLQJ'LQLQJ5RRP
RSHQNLWFKHQZJUDQLWHFRXQWHUWRSV&KHUU\ZRRGÀRRUV
EDFN\DUGSDWLRDUHD&RPPXQLW\SRRODQGVSD
$3400 Per Month
/X[XU\DW7KH7HUUDFHV
2 Bd, 2.5 Ba 1,298 Sq. Ft.
6SDFLRXVWZRVWRU\FRQGREHDXWLIXOJUDQLWHNLWFKHQRSHQ
OLYLQJDUHDZRRGÀRRUV¿UHSODFHJUHDWYLHZVZLWK
EDOFRQLHV&RPPXQLW\DPHQLWLHV$2500 Per Month
&DOLIRUQLD:LQH&RXQWU\/LYLQJ
5 Bd, 5.5 Ba 6,260 Sq. Ft.
7KLV5XE\+LOOPDVWHUSLHFHLVFRQWHPSRUDU\LQGHVLJQZLWK
ULFKH[TXLVLWHLQWHULRUGHWDLOV$JUDQGHQWU\ZHOFRPHV\RX
WRWKLVVRXWKHUQH[SRVXUHKRPH6HSDUHDWHFDEDQDZLWKIXOO
EDWKLQFOXGHGLQVTIW$2,588,888
Kevin Wess | 5880 W. Las Positas Blvd., Suite 34
Pleasanton, CA 94588
925.359.9600
VentureSIR.com
Kevin Wess | Joan Sakyo | CA Lic. #0194566
$OORI¿FHVDUHLQGHSHQGHQWO\RZQHGDQGRSHUDWHG
Pleasanton Weekly • October 17, 2014 • Page 27
OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
The Market is Still Strong!
JUST SOLD!
Now is the time to sell your home!
Thinking of moving? Need a larger home
or smaller home? Moving out of the area?
This may be your time to make a move!
5428 Pleasant Hill Road, Pleasanton
Please call me for information
on the market and a no obligation
market analysis of your home!
Beautiful single story next to neighborhood park. 4 BR, 2 BA
HTVUNZXM[6WLUÅVVYWSHU^P[OZWHJPV\ZRP[JOLU
family room. Formal Living and dining rooms. Large Master Suite
^P[OYLTVKLSLKIH[OYVVT5L^JHYWL[NHZÄYLWSHJL/\NL ZXM[SV[MLH[\YLZWYP]H[LIHJR`HYKZ[HTWLKJVUJYL[LWH[PV
Offered at $899,000
DeAnna Armario & Liz Venema
REALTORS® LIC # 01363180 and 01922957
925.260.2220
Gail Boal
REALTOR® LIC # 01276455
925.577.5787
www.gailboal.com
925.413.6544
[email protected] [email protected]
ArmarioVenemaHomes.com
Pending
SALE PENDING!
Open House 12-3 pm
Your Keller Williams Connection for
The Birdland and Pleasanton Valley Area!
5196 Hummingbird Road
6 bedrooms, 3 baths,
Heritage Model
5143 Hummingbird Road:
4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths,
Monterey Model
David Darby
Mike Chandler
The “Darby Group”
BRE#01842223
925.858.4910 Cell
925.421.1289 3J½GI
REALTOR®
LIC #01039712
925.426.3858
[email protected]
1ST TIME OPEN SAT 1 TO 3 PM
OPEN SUN 1 TO 3 PM
4561 Sutter Gate, Pleasanton 1046 Harvest Circle, Pleasanton
Great one in the Gates!
Stylishly Remodeled in last 3
months - New kitchen, Granite,
7XEMRPIWW%TTPMERGIW¾SSVMRK
'IMPMRK&EXLWLIEXMRKERHEMVHIGO
WMHMRK2I[TEMRXMRWMHIERHSYX
0EVKI4VMZEXIFEGO]EVHFIHVSSQ
FEXLWGEVKEVEKI
$920,000
Fabulous Downtown Location!
5YMIXWXVIIXEGVSWWJVSQ%VVS]S
[EPOMRKXVEMPWTIEGIJYPWIXXMRK
;EPOMRKHMWXERGIXSWGLSSPW
%UYEXMG'IRXIV7LSTTMRK)RNS]
EPPXLEX4PIEWERXSRLEWXSSJJIVMR
XLMWFIHVSSQWFEXLW2I[
GEVTIX2I[MRXIVMSVTEMRX+VERMXI
GSYRXIVWMRWMHIPEYRHV] $895,000
Louise Davis
23 Carver Lane, Sunol
Nestled in the quiet hills of Sunol on
over 5 acres of land. 5 bdrms, 3.5
baths, 2 car garage plus a detached 3
car garage. Zoned for an in law unit.
862 Gray Fox Circle, Pleasanton
Fabulous Foxbrough Estates ~
Private custom estate on 1 acre with
over 7,100 sq ft! Extensive upgrades!
Stunning pool, waterslide and
Offered at $2,190,000 waterfall covered grotto!
Offered at $2,750,000
Tom Fox
REALTOR®
&63/)6%773'-%8)
Lic. # 00551850
Lic. # 00630556
[[[0SYMWI(EZMWGSQ
REALTORS®, GRI, CRS, SRES
[[[8SQ*S\GSQ
925.463.0436 | www.SoldInAFlash.com
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 10/26!
Live in complete Luxury! 'YWXSQWMRKPIWXSV]1IHMXIVVERIER-XEPMERWX]PIZMPPEFYMPXSJXLI½RIWXGVEJXWQERWLMT(VEQEXMGTSVXMGSWXYRRMRKZMI[WSJZMRI]EVHW
ERHWYRWIXWPSSOMRKEX1X(MEFPS*MZIFIHVSSQW[LMGLMRGPYHIWEREQE^MRKQEWXIVWYMXI[MXLKSVKISYWZMI[TPYWERI\IGYXMZISJ½GI7M\JYPPERHX[STEVXMEPFEXLVSSQW
)\UYMWMXIEQIRMXMIWXLVSYKLSYXXLILSQIERIRXIVXEMRIV´WHVIEQ[MXLWIEXXLIEXIVE[MRIGIPPEVEGLIJ´WKSYVQIXOMXGLIR[MXLEJSSXMWPERHERHMQTSVXIHWXSZI
JVSQ*VERGI%TIVJIGX[IHHMRKTVSTIVX]ERHWUJXGSZIVIHTEXMSWTERRMRKXLIIRXMVIFEGOSJLSYWIERHPSZIP]GSYVX]EVH%TTVS\MQEXIP]WUJXSJPMZMRKWTEGI
SREGVIW[MXLMRGSQITVSHYGMRKZMRI]EVHW4VMZEXIPY\YV]EYXSGSYVX[MXLGEVKEVEKIWTEGI°SRIEXXEGLIHERHSRIHIXEGLIHQSXSVLSQIKEVEKI8LI(SYFPI
0SKKMEMWXLITIVJIGXQERGEZI7SXLIVI]SYKS©=SY´ZIKSXMXEPP2I[SRXLIQEVOIX
Offered at $4,975,000
ˆ&YMPXMR
• Powder bath and patio bath
• 5 bedrooms each with their
own bathroom
ˆWUYEVIJIIX
ˆEGVIWSJKVETIWSREEGVIPSX
ˆ½VITPEGIW
47 Raccolio Way
Most sought-after singlestory home in South
Livermore! Wonderful Prima
Neighborhood! 3,023 sq ft
of living space, 4 Bedrooms,
3 full baths, 3 Car Garage.
3TIRERHPMKLX¾SSVTPER
with a private backyard &
lots of fruit trees. Call for a
private showing.
Offered at $1,050,000
SOLD IN 3 DAYS
Cindy and Gene Williams
Cindy and Gene Williams
REALTORS® BRE LIC # 01370076 and 00607511
REALTORS® BRE LIC # 01370076 and 00607511
925.243.0900
www.WilliamsReGroup.com
925.243.0900 | www.WilliamsReGroup.com
kw
AT
®
WE HELP YOU
BLAZE YOUR OWN TRAIL!
Debbie Burness
[email protected]
925-357-3210
Team Leader/Manager
5994 W. Las Positas, Suite 101, Pleasanton | 459 Main Street, Pleasanton | 2300 First Street, Suite 316, Livermore | Broker License #01395362
Page 28 • October 17, 2014 • Pleasanton Weekly

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