Django Compressor Documentation Release 1.4 Django Compressor authors October 17, 2014

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Django Compressor Documentation
Release 1.4
Django Compressor authors
October 17, 2014
Contents
1
Why another static file combiner for Django?
2
Contents
2.1 Quickstart . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2 Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3 Common Deployment Scenarios . .
2.4 Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5 Remote storages . . . . . . . . . .
2.6 Behind the scenes . . . . . . . . .
2.7 Jinja2 In-Request Support . . . . .
2.8 Jinja2 Offline Compression Support
2.9 django-sekizai Support . . . . . . .
2.10 Contributing . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.11 Changelog . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Django Compressor Documentation, Release 1.4
Compresses linked and inline JavaScript or CSS into a single cached file.
Contents
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Django Compressor Documentation, Release 1.4
2
Contents
CHAPTER 1
Why another static file combiner for Django?
Short version: None of them did exactly what I needed.
Long version:
JS/CSS belong in the templates Every static combiner for Django I’ve seen makes you configure your static files in
your settings.py. While that works, it doesn’t make sense. Static files are for display. And it’s not even
an option if your settings are in completely different repositories and use different deploy processes from the
templates that depend on them.
Flexibility Django Compressor doesn’t care if different pages use different combinations of statics. It doesn’t care if
you use inline scripts or styles. It doesn’t get in the way.
Automatic regeneration and cache-foreverable generated output Statics are never stale and browsers can be told
to cache the output forever.
Full test suite I has one.
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4
Chapter 1. Why another static file combiner for Django?
CHAPTER 2
Contents
2.1 Quickstart
2.1.1 Installation
• Install Django Compressor with your favorite Python package manager:
pip install django_compressor
• Add ’compressor’ to your INSTALLED_APPS setting:
INSTALLED_APPS = (
# other apps
"compressor",
)
• See the list of Settings to modify Django Compressor’s default behaviour and make adjustments for your website.
• In case you use Django’s staticfiles contrib app (or its standalone counterpart django-staticfiles) you
have to add Django Compressor’s file finder to the STATICFILES_FINDERS setting, for example with
django.contrib.staticfiles:
STATICFILES_FINDERS = (
’django.contrib.staticfiles.finders.FileSystemFinder’,
’django.contrib.staticfiles.finders.AppDirectoriesFinder’,
# other finders..
’compressor.finders.CompressorFinder’,
)
• Define COMPRESS_ROOT in settings if you don’t have already STATIC_ROOT or if you want it in a different
folder.
2.1.2 Dependencies
Required
In case you’re installing Django Compressor differently (e.g. from the Git repo), make sure to install the following
dependencies.
• django-appconf
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Used internally to handle Django’s settings, this is automatically installed when following the above installation
instructions.
pip install django-appconf
Optional
• BeautifulSoup
For
the
parser
compressor.parser.BeautifulSoupParser
compressor.parser.LxmlParser:
and
pip install "BeautifulSoup<4.0"
• lxml
For the parser compressor.parser.LxmlParser, also requires libxml2:
STATIC_DEPS=true pip install lxml
• html5lib
For the parser compressor.parser.Html5LibParser:
pip install html5lib
• Slim It
For the Slim It filter compressor.filters.jsmin.SlimItFilter:
pip install slimit
2.2 Usage
{% load compress %}
{% compress <js/css> [<file/inline> [block_name]] %}
<html of inline or linked JS/CSS>
{% endcompress %}
2.2.1 Examples
{% load compress %}
{% compress css %}
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/static/css/one.css" type="text/css" charset="utf-8">
<style type="text/css">p { border:5px solid green;}</style>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/static/css/two.css" type="text/css" charset="utf-8">
{% endcompress %}
Which would be rendered something like:
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/static/CACHE/css/f7c661b7a124.css" type="text/css" charset="utf-8">
or:
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{% load compress %}
{% compress js %}
<script src="/static/js/one.js" type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">obj.value = "value";</script>
{% endcompress %}
Which would be rendered something like:
<script type="text/javascript" src="/static/CACHE/js/3f33b9146e12.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
Note: Remember that django-compressor will try to group outputs by media.
Linked files must be accessible via COMPRESS_URL.
If the COMPRESS_ENABLED setting is False (defaults to the opposite of DEBUG) the compress template tag
does nothing and simply returns exactly what it was given.
Note: If you’ve configured any precompilers setting COMPRESS_ENABLED to False won’t affect the processing of those files. Only the CSS and JavaScript filters will be disabled.
If both DEBUG and COMPRESS_ENABLED are set to True, incompressible files (off-site or non existent) will throw
an exception. If DEBUG is False these files will be silently stripped.
Warning: For production sites it is strongly recommended to use a real cache backend such as memcached to
speed up the checks of compressed files. Make sure you set your Django cache backend appropriately (also see
COMPRESS_CACHE_BACKEND and Django’s caching documentation).
The compress template tag supports a second argument specifying the output mode and defaults to saving the result
in a file. Alternatively you can pass ‘inline‘ to the template tag to return the content directly to the rendered page,
e.g.:
{% load compress %}
{% compress js inline %}
<script src="/static/js/one.js" type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">obj.value = "value";</script>
{% endcompress %}
would be rendered something like:
<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
obj = {};
obj.value = "value";
</script>
The compress template tag also supports a third argument for naming the output of that particular compress tag. This
is then added to the context so you can access it in the post_compress signal <signals>.
2.2.2 Pre-compression
Django Compressor comes with an optional compress management command to run the compression outside of the
request/response loop – independent from user requests. This allows to pre-compress CSS and JavaScript files and
works just like the automatic compression with the {% compress %} tag.
2.2. Usage
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To compress the files “offline” and update the offline cache you have to use the compress management command,
ideally during deployment. Also make sure to enable the django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_OFFLINE setting. In case you don’t use the compress management command, Django Compressor will automatically fallback to
the automatic compression using the template tag.
The command parses all templates that can be found with the template loader (as specified in the TEMPLATE_LOADERS setting) and looks for {% compress %} blocks. It then will use the context as defined in
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_OFFLINE_CONTEXT to render its content. So if you use any variables
inside the {% compress %} blocks, make sure to list all values you require in COMPRESS_OFFLINE_CONTEXT.
It’s similar to a template context and should be used if a variable is used in the blocks, e.g.:
{% load compress %}
{% compress js %}
<script src="{{ path_to_files }}js/one.js" type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8"></script>
{% endcompress %}
Since this template requires a variable (path_to_files) you need to specify this in your settings before using the
compress management command:
COMPRESS_OFFLINE_CONTEXT = {
’path_to_files’: ’/static/js/’,
}
If not specified, the COMPRESS_OFFLINE_CONTEXT will by default contain the commonly used setting to refer to
saved files STATIC_URL.
The result of running the compress management command will be cached in a file called manifest.json using
the configured storage to be able to be transfered from your developement computer to the server easily.
2.2.3 Signals
compressor.signals.post_compress(sender, type, mode, context)
Django Compressor includes a post_compress signal that enables you to listen for changes to your compressed
CSS/JS. This is useful, for example, if you need the exact filenames for use in an HTML5 manifest file. The signal
sends the following arguments:
sender Either compressor.css.CssCompressor or compressor.js.JsCompressor.
Changed in version 1.2.
The sender is now one of the supported Compressor classes for easier limitation to only one of them, previously
it was a string named ’django-compressor’.
type Either “js” or “css”.
mode Either “file” or “inline”.
context The context dictionary used to render the output of the compress template tag.
If mode is “file” the dictionary named compressed in the context will contain a “url” key that maps to
the relative URL for the compressed asset.
If type is “css”, the dictionary named compressed in the context will additionally contain a “media” key
with a value of None if no media attribute is specified on the link/style tag and equal to that attribute if one is
specified.
Additionally, context[’compressed’][’name’] will be the third positional argument to the template
tag, if provided.
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Note: When compressing CSS, the post_compress signal will be called once for every different media attribute
on the tags within the {% compress %} tag in question.
2.2.4 CSS Notes
All relative url() bits specified in linked CSS files are automatically converted to absolute URLs while being processed. Any local absolute URLs (those starting with a ’/’) are left alone.
Stylesheets that are @import‘d are not compressed into the main file. They are left alone.
If the media attribute is set on <style> and <link> elements, a separate compressed file is created and linked for
each media value you specified. This allows the media attribute to remain on the generated link element, instead of
wrapping your CSS with @media blocks (which can break your own @media queries or @font-face declarations). It
also allows browsers to avoid downloading CSS for irrelevant media types.
2.2.5 Recommendations
• Use only relative or full domain absolute URLs in your CSS files.
• Avoid @import! Simply list all your CSS files in the HTML, they’ll be combined anyway.
2.3 Common Deployment Scenarios
This document presents the most typical scenarios in which Django Compressor can be configured, and should help
you decide which method you may want to use for your stack.
2.3.1 In-Request Compression
This is the default method of compression. Where-in Django Compressor will go through the steps outlined in Behind
the scenes. You will find in-request compression beneficial if:
• Using a single server setup, where the application and static files are on the same machine.
• Prefer a simple configuration. By default, there is no configuration required.
2.3.2 Caveats
• If deploying to a multi-server setup and using COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS, each binary is required to be
installed on each application server.
• Application servers may not have permissions to write to your static directories. For example, if deploying to a
CDN (e.g. Amazon S3)
2.3.3 Offline Compression
This method decouples the compression outside of the request (see Behind the scenes) and can prove beneficial in the
speed, and in many scenarios, the maintainability of your deployment. You will find offline compression beneficial if:
2.3. Common Deployment Scenarios
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• Using a multi-server setup. A common scenario for this may be multiple application servers and a single static
file server (CDN included). With offline compression, you typically run manage.py compress on a single
utility server, meaning you only maintain COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS binaries in one location.
• You store compressed files on a CDN.
2.3.4 Caveats
• If your templates have complex logic in how template inheritance is done (e.g.
{% extends
context_variable %}), then this becomes a problem, as offline compression will not have the context,
unless you set it in COMPRESS_OFFLINE_CONTEXT
• Due to the way the manifest file is used, while deploying across a multi-server setup, your application may use
old templates with a new manifest, possibly rendering your pages incoherent. The current suggested solution
for this is to change the COMPRESS_OFFLINE_MANIFEST path for each new version of your code. This will
ensure that the old code uses old compressed output, and the new one appropriately as well.
Every setup is unique, and your scenario may differ slightly. Choose what is the most sane to maintain for your
situation.
2.4 Settings
Django Compressor has a number of settings that control its behavior. They’ve been given sensible defaults.
2.4.1 Base settings
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_ENABLED
Default the opposite of DEBUG
Boolean that decides if compression will happen.
COMPRESS_ENABLED must also be set to True.
To test compression when DEBUG is True
When COMPRESS_ENABLED is False the input will be rendered without any compression except for code
with a mimetype matching one listed in the COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS setting. These matching files are
still passed to the precompiler before rendering.
An example for some javascript and coffeescript.
{% load compress %}
{% compress js %}
<script type="text/javascript" src="/static/js/site-base.js" />
<script type="text/coffeescript" charset="utf-8" src="/static/js/awesome.coffee" />
{% endcompress %}
With COMPRESS_ENABLED set to False this would give you something like this:
<script type="text/javascript" src="/static/js/site-base.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/static/CACHE/js/8dd1a2872443.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_URL
Default STATIC_URL
Controls the URL that linked files will be read from and compressed files will be written to.
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django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_ROOT
Default STATIC_ROOT
Controls the absolute file path that linked static will be read from and compressed static will be written to when
using the default COMPRESS_STORAGE compressor.storage.CompressorFileStorage.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_OUTPUT_DIR
Default ’CACHE’
Controls the directory inside COMPRESS_ROOT that compressed files will be written to.
2.4.2 Backend settings
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CSS_FILTERS
Default [’compressor.filters.css_default.CssAbsoluteFilter’]
A list of filters that will be applied to CSS.
Possible options are (including their settings):
•compressor.filters.css_default.CssAbsoluteFilter
A filter that normalizes the URLs used in url() CSS statements.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CSS_HASHING_METHOD
The method to use when calculating the suffix to append to URLs in your processed CSS files. Either
None, ’mtime’ (default) or ’content’. Use the None if you want to completely disable that
feature, and the ’content’ in case you’re using multiple servers to serve your content.
•compressor.filters.csstidy.CSSTidyFilter
A filter that passes the CSS content to the CSSTidy tool.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CSSTIDY_BINARY
The CSSTidy binary filesystem path.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CSSTIDY_ARGUMENTS
The arguments passed to CSSTidy.
•compressor.filters.datauri.CssDataUriFilter
A filter for embedding media as data: URIs in the CSS.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_DATA_URI_MAX_SIZE
Only files that are smaller than this in bytes value will be embedded.
•compressor.filters.yui.YUICSSFilter
A filter that passes the CSS content to the YUI compressor.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUI_BINARY
The YUI compressor filesystem path. Make sure to also prepend this setting with java -jar if you
use that kind of distribution.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUI_CSS_ARGUMENTS
The arguments passed to the compressor.
•compressor.filters.yuglify.YUglifyCSSFilter
A filter that passes the CSS content to the yUglify compressor.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUGLIFY_BINARY
The yUglify compressor filesystem path.
2.4. Settings
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django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUGLIFY_CSS_ARGUMENTS
The arguments passed to the compressor. Defaults to –terminal.
•compressor.filters.cssmin.CSSMinFilter
A filter that uses Zachary Voase’s Python port of the YUI CSS compression algorithm cssmin.
•compressor.filters.cleancss.CleanCSSFilter
A filter that passes the CSS content to the clean-css tool.
django.conf.settings.CLEAN_CSS_BINARY
The clean-css binary filesystem path.
django.conf.settings.CLEAN_CSS_ARGUMENTS
The arguments passed to clean-css.
•compressor.filters.template.TemplateFilter
A filter that renders the CSS content with Django templating system.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_TEMPLATE_FILTER_CONTEXT
The context to render your css files with.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_JS_FILTERS
Default [’compressor.filters.jsmin.JSMinFilter’]
A list of filters that will be applied to javascript.
Possible options are:
•compressor.filters.jsmin.JSMinFilter
A filter that uses the jsmin implementation rJSmin to compress JavaScript code.
•compressor.filters.jsmin.SlimItFilter
A filter that uses the jsmin implementation Slim It to compress JavaScript code.
•compressor.filters.closure.ClosureCompilerFilter
A filter that uses Google Closure compiler.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CLOSURE_COMPILER_BINARY
The Closure compiler filesystem path. Make sure to also prepend this setting with java -jar if
you use that kind of distribution.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CLOSURE_COMPILER_ARGUMENTS
The arguments passed to the compiler.
•compressor.filters.yui.YUIJSFilter
A filter that passes the JavaScript code to the YUI compressor.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUI_BINARY
The YUI compressor filesystem path.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUI_JS_ARGUMENTS
The arguments passed to the compressor.
•compressor.filters.yuglify.YUglifyJSFilter
A filter that passes the JavaScript code to the yUglify compressor.
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django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUGLIFY_BINARY
The yUglify compressor filesystem path.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_YUGLIFY_JS_ARGUMENTS
The arguments passed to the compressor.
•compressor.filters.template.TemplateFilter
A filter that renders the JavaScript code with Django templating system.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_TEMPLATE_FILTER_CONTEXT
The context to render your JavaScript code with.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS
Default ()
An iterable of two-tuples whose first item is the mimetype of the files or hunks you want to compile with the
command or filter specified as the second item:
1.mimetype The mimetype of the file or inline code that should be compiled.
2.command_or_filter The command to call on each of the files. Modern Python string formatting will be
provided for the two placeholders {infile} and {outfile} whose existence in the command
string also triggers the actual creation of those temporary files. If not given in the command string,
Django Compressor will use stdin and stdout respectively instead.
Alternatively, you may provide the fully qualified class name of a filter you wish to use as a precompiler.
Example:
COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS = (
(’text/coffeescript’, ’coffee --compile --stdio’),
(’text/less’, ’lessc {infile} {outfile}’),
(’text/x-sass’, ’sass {infile} {outfile}’),
(’text/x-scss’, ’sass --scss {infile} {outfile}’),
(’text/stylus’, ’stylus < {infile} > {outfile}’),
(’text/foobar’, ’path.to.MyPrecompilerFilter’),
)
Note: Depending on the implementation, some precompilers might not support outputting to something else
than stdout, so you’ll need to omit the {outfile} parameter when working with those. For instance, if you
are using the Ruby version of lessc, you’ll need to set up the precompiler like this:
(’text/less’, ’lessc {infile}’),
With that setting (and CoffeeScript installed), you could add the following code to your templates:
{% load compress %}
{% compress js %}
<script type="text/coffeescript" charset="utf-8" src="/static/js/awesome.coffee" />
<script type="text/coffeescript" charset="utf-8">
# Functions:
square = (x) -> x * x
</script>
{% endcompress %}
This would give you something like this:
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<script type="text/javascript" src="/static/CACHE/js/8dd1a2872443.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
The same works for less, too:
{% load compress %}
{% compress css %}
<link type="text/less" rel="stylesheet" href="/static/css/styles.less" charset="utf-8">
<style type="text/less">
@color: #4D926F;
#header {
color: @color;
}
</style>
{% endcompress %}
Which would be rendered something like:
<link rel="stylesheet" href="/static/CACHE/css/8ccf8d877f18.css" type="text/css" charset="utf-8"
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_STORAGE
Default ’compressor.storage.CompressorFileStorage’
The dotted path to a Django Storage backend to be used to save the compressed files.
Django Compressor ships with one additional storage backend:
•’compressor.storage.GzipCompressorFileStorage’
A subclass of the default storage backend, which will additionally create *.gz files of each of the compressed files.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_PARSER
Default ’compressor.parser.AutoSelectParser’
The backend to use when parsing the JavaScript or Stylesheet files. The AutoSelectParser picks the lxml
based parser when available, and falls back to HtmlParser if lxml is not available.
LxmlParser is the fastest available parser, but HtmlParser is not much slower. AutoSelectParser
adds a slight overhead, but in most cases it won’t be necessary to change the default parser.
The other two included parsers are considerably slower and should only be used if absolutely necessary.
Warning: In some cases the compressor.parser.HtmlParser parser isn’t able to parse invalid
HTML in JavaScript or CSS content. As a workaround you should use one of the more forgiving parsers,
e.g. the BeautifulSoupParser.
The backends included in Django Compressor:
•compressor.parser.AutoSelectParser
•compressor.parser.LxmlParser
•compressor.parser.HtmlParser
•compressor.parser.BeautifulSoupParser
•compressor.parser.Html5LibParser
See Dependencies for more info about the packages you need for each parser.
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2.4.3 Caching settings
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CACHE_BACKEND
Default CACHES["default"] or CACHE_BACKEND
The backend to use for caching, in case you want to use a different cache backend for Django Compressor.
If you have set the CACHES setting (new in Django 1.3), COMPRESS_CACHE_BACKEND defaults to
"default", which is the alias for the default cache backend. You can set it to a different alias that you
have configured in your CACHES setting.
If you have not set CACHES and are using the old CACHE_BACKEND setting, COMPRESS_CACHE_BACKEND
defaults to the CACHE_BACKEND setting.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_REBUILD_TIMEOUT
Default 2592000 (30 days in seconds)
The period of time after which the compressed files are rebuilt even if no file changes are detected.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_MINT_DELAY
Default 30 (seconds)
The upper bound on how long any compression should take to run. Prevents dog piling, should be a lot smaller
than COMPRESS_REBUILD_TIMEOUT.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_MTIME_DELAY
Default 10
The amount of time (in seconds) to cache the modification timestamp of a file. Should be smaller than
COMPRESS_REBUILD_TIMEOUT and COMPRESS_MINT_DELAY.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_DEBUG_TOGGLE
Default None
The name of the GET variable that toggles the debug mode and prevents Django Compressor from performing
the actual compression. Only useful for debugging.
Warning: Don’t use this option in production!
An easy convention is to only set it depending on the DEBUG setting:
if DEBUG:
COMPRESS_DEBUG_TOGGLE = ’whatever’
Note:
This only works for pages that are rendered using the RequestContext and the
django.core.context_processors.request context processor.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_CACHE_KEY_FUNCTION
Default ’compressor.cache.simple_cachekey’
The function to use when generating the cache key. The function must take one argument which is the partial
key based on the source’s hex digest. It must return the full key as a string.
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2.4.4 Offline settings
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_OFFLINE
Default False
Boolean that decides if compression should also be done outside of the request/response loop – independent
from user requests. This allows to pre-compress CSS and JavaScript files and works just like the automatic
compression with the {% compress %} tag.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_OFFLINE_TIMEOUT
Default 31536000 (1 year in seconds)
The period of time with which the compress management command stores the pre-compressed the contents
of {% compress %} template tags in the cache.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_OFFLINE_CONTEXT
Default {’STATIC_URL’: settings.STATIC_URL}
The context to be used by the compress management command when rendering the contents of {%
compress %} template tags and saving the result in the offline cache.
If available, the STATIC_URL setting is also added to the context.
django.conf.settings.COMPRESS_OFFLINE_MANIFEST
Default manifest.json
The name of the file to be used for saving the names of the files compressed offline.
2.5 Remote storages
In some cases it’s useful to use a CDN for serving static files such as those generated by Django Compressor. Due to
the way Django Compressor processes files, it requires the files to be processed (in the {% compress %} block) to
be available in a local file system cache.
Django Compressor provides hooks to automatically have compressed files pushed to a remote storage backend. Simply set the storage backend that saves the result to a remote service (see COMPRESS_STORAGE).
2.5.1 django-storages
So assuming your CDN is Amazon S3, you can use the boto storage backend from the 3rd party app django-storages.
Some required settings are:
AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID = ’XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX’
AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY = ’XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX’
AWS_STORAGE_BUCKET_NAME = ’compressor-test’
Next, you need to specify the new CDN base URL and update the URLs to the files in your templates which you want
to compress:
COMPRESS_URL = "http://compressor-test.s3.amazonaws.com/"
Note: For staticfiles just set STATIC_URL = COMPRESS_URL
The storage backend to save the compressed files needs to be changed, too:
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COMPRESS_STORAGE = ’storages.backends.s3boto.S3BotoStorage’
2.5.2 Using staticfiles
If you are using Django’s staticfiles contrib app or the standalone app django-staticfiles, you’ll need to use a temporary
filesystem cache for Django Compressor to know which files to compress. Since staticfiles provides a management
command to collect static files from various locations which uses a storage backend, this is where both apps can be
integrated.
1. Make sure the COMPRESS_ROOT and STATIC_ROOT settings are equal since both apps need to look at the
same directories when to do their job.
2. You need to create a subclass of the remote storage backend you want to use; below is an example of the boto
S3 storage backend from django-storages:
from django.core.files.storage import get_storage_class
from storages.backends.s3boto import S3BotoStorage
class CachedS3BotoStorage(S3BotoStorage):
"""
S3 storage backend that saves the files locally, too.
"""
def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
super(CachedS3BotoStorage, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
self.local_storage = get_storage_class(
"compressor.storage.CompressorFileStorage")()
def save(self, name, content):
name = super(CachedS3BotoStorage, self).save(name, content)
self.local_storage._save(name, content)
return name
3. Set your COMPRESS_STORAGE and STATICFILES_STORAGE settings to the dotted path of your custom
cached storage backend, e.g. ’mysite.storage.CachedS3BotoStorage’.
4. To have Django correctly render the URLs to your static files, set the STATIC_URL setting to the same value as
COMPRESS_URL (e.g. "http://compressor-test.s3.amazonaws.com/").
2.6 Behind the scenes
This document assumes you already have an up and running instance of Django Compressor, and that you understand
how to use it in your templates. The goal is to explain what the main template tag, {% compress %}, does behind the
scenes, to help you debug performance problems for instance.
2.6.1 Offline cache
If offline cache is activated, the first thing {% compress %} tries to do is retrieve the compressed version for its
nodelist from the offline manifest cache. It doesn’t parse, doesn’t check the modified times of the files, doesn’t even
know which files are concerned actually, since it doesn’t look inside the nodelist of the template block enclosed by the
compress template tag. The offline cache manifest is just a json file, stored on disk inside the directory that holds the
compressed files. The format of the manifest is simply a key <=> value dictionary, with the hash of the nodelist being
the key, and the HTML containing the element code for the combined file or piece of code being the value. Generating
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the offline manifest, using the compress management command, also generates the combined files referenced in the
manifest.
If offline cache is activated and the nodelist hash can not be found inside the manifest, {% compress %} will raise an
OfflineGenerationError.
If offline cache is de-activated, the following happens:
2.6.2 First step: parsing and file list
A compressor instance is created, which in turns instantiates the HTML parser. The parser is used to determine a file
or code hunk list. Each file mtime is checked, first in cache and then on disk/storage, and this is used to determine an
unique cache key.
2.6.3 Second step: Checking the “main” cache
Compressor checks if it can get some info about the combined file/hunks corresponding to its instance, using the cache
key obtained in the previous step. The cache content here will actually be the HTML containing the final element code,
just like in the offline step before.
Everything stops here if the cache entry exists.
2.6.4 Third step: Generating the combined file if needed
The file is generated if necessary. All precompilers are called and all filters are executed, and a hash is determined
from the contents. This in turns helps determine the file name, which is only saved if it didn’t exist already. Then the
HTML output is returned (and also saved in the cache). And that’s it!
2.7 Jinja2 In-Request Support
Django Compressor comes with support for Jinja2 via an extension.
2.7.1 Plain Jinja2
In
order
to
use
Django
Compressor’s
Jinja2
extension
we
would
compressor.contrib.jinja2ext.CompressorExtension into environment:
need
to
pass
import jinja2
from compressor.contrib.jinja2ext import CompressorExtension
env = jinja2.Environment(extensions=[CompressorExtension])
From now on, you can use same code you’d normally use within Django templates:
from django.conf import settings
template = env.from_string(’\n’.join([
’{% compress css %}’,
’<link rel="stylesheet" href="{{ STATIC_URL }}css/one.css" type="text/css" charset="utf-8">’,
’{% endcompress %}’,
]))
template.render({’STATIC_URL’: settings.STATIC_URL})
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2.7.2 For coffin users
Coffin makes it very easy to include additional Jinja2 extensions as it only requires to add extension to
JINJA2_EXTENSIONS at main settings module:
JINJA2_EXTENSIONS = [
’compressor.contrib.jinja2ext.CompressorExtension’,
]
And that’s it - our extension is loaded and ready to be used.
2.8 Jinja2 Offline Compression Support
You’d need to configure COMPRESS_JINJA2_GET_ENVIRONMENT so that Compressor can retrieve the Jinja2
environment for rendering. This can be a lamda or function that returns a Jinja2 environment.
2.8.1 Usage
Run the following compress command along with an --engine parameter. The parameter can be either jinja2 or
django (default). For example, ”./manage.py compress –engine jinja2”.
2.8.2 Using both Django and Jinja2 templates
There may be a chance that the Jinja2 parser is used to parse Django templates if you have a mixture of Django
and Jinja2 templates in the same location(s). This should not be a problem since the Jinja2 parser will likely raise a
template syntax error, causing Compressor to skip the errorneous template safely. (Vice versa for Django parser).
A typical usage could be :
• ”./manage.py compress” for processing Django templates first, skipping Jinja2 templates.
• ”./manage.py compress –engine jinja2” for processing Jinja2 templates, skipping Django templates.
However, it is still recommended that you do not mix Django and Jinja2 templates in the same project.
2.8.3 Limitations
• Does not support {% import %} and similar blocks within {% compress %} blocks.
• Does not support {{super()}}.
• All other filters, globals and language constructs such as {% if %}, {% with %} and {% for %} are
tested and should run fine.
2.8.4 Jinja2 templates location
IMPORTANT: For Compressor to discover the templates for offline compression, there must be a template loader that
implements the get_template_sources method, and is in the TEMPLATE_LOADERS setting.
If you’re using Jinja2, you’re likely to have a Jinja2 template loader in the TEMPLATE_LOADERS setting, otherwise
Django won’t know how to load Jinja2 templates. You could use Jingo or your own custom loader. Coffin works
differently by providing a custom rendering method instead of a custom loader.
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Unfortunately, Jingo does not implement such a method in its loader; Coffin does not seem to have a template loader
in the first place. Read on to understand how to make Compressor work nicely with Jingo and Coffin.
By default, if you don’t override the TEMPLATE_LOADERS setting, it will include the app directories loader that
searches for templates under the templates directory in each app. If the app directories loader is in use and your
Jinja2 templates are in the <app>/templates directories, Compressor will be able to find the Jinja2 templates.
However, if you have Jinja2 templates in other location(s), you could include the filesystem loader
(django.template.loaders.filesystem.Loader) in the TEMPLATE_LOADERS setting and specify the
custom location in the TEMPLATE_DIRS setting.
2.8.5 For Jingo users
You should configure TEMPLATE_LOADERS as such:
TEMPLATE_LOADERS = (
’jingo.Loader’,
’django.template.loaders.filesystem.Loader’,
’django.template.loaders.app_directories.Loader’,
)
def COMPRESS_JINJA2_GET_ENVIRONMENT():
# TODO: ensure the CompressorExtension is installed with Jingo via
# Jingo’s JINJA_CONFIG setting.
# Additional globals, filters, tests,
# and extensions used within {%compress%} blocks must be configured
# with Jingo.
from jingo import env
return env
This will enable the Jingo loader to load Jinja2 templates and the other loaders to report the templates location(s).
2.8.6 For Coffin users
You might want to configure TEMPLATE_LOADERS as such:
TEMPLATE_LOADERS = (
’django.template.loaders.filesystem.Loader’,
’django.template.loaders.app_directories.Loader’,
)
def COMPRESS_JINJA2_GET_ENVIRONMENT():
# TODO: ensure the CompressorExtension is installed with Coffin
# as described in the "In-Request Support" section above.
# Additional globals, filters, tests,
# and extensions used within {%compress%} blocks must be configured
# with Coffin.
from coffin.common import env
return env
Again, if you have the Jinja2 templates in the app template directories, you’re done here. Otherwise, specify the
location in TEMPLATE_DIRS.
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2.8.7 Using your custom loader
You should configure TEMPLATE_LOADERS as such:
TEMPLATE_LOADERS = (
’your_app.Loader’,
... other loaders (optional) ...
)
You could implement the get_template_sources method in your loader or make use of the Django’s builtin loaders to
report the Jinja2 template location(s).
2.8.8 Python 3 Support
Jingo with Jinja2 are tested and work on Python 2.6, 2.7, and 3.3. Coffin with Jinja2 are tested and work on Python
2.6 and 2.7 only. Jinja2 alone (with custom loader) are tested and work on Python 2.6, 2.7 and 3.3 only.
2.9 django-sekizai Support
Django Compressor comes with support for django-sekizai via an extension. django-sekizai provides the ability to
include template code, from within any block, to a parent block. It is primarily used to include js/css from included
templates to the master template.
It requires django-sekizai to be installed. Refer to the django-sekizai docs for how to use render_block
2.9.1 Usage
{% load sekizai_tags %}
{% render_block "<js/css>" postprocessor "compressor.contrib.sekizai.compress" %}
2.10 Contributing
Like every open-source project, Django Compressor is always looking for motivated individuals to contribute to it’s
source code. However, to ensure the highest code quality and keep the repository nice and tidy, everybody has to
follow a few rules (nothing major, I promise :) )
2.10.1 Community
People interested in developing for the Django Compressor should head over to #django-compressor on the freenode
IRC network for help and to discuss the development.
You may also be interested in following @jezdez on Twitter.
2.10.2 In a nutshell
Here’s what the contribution process looks like, in a bullet-points fashion, and only for the stuff we host on github:
1. Django Compressor is hosted on github, at https://github.com/django-compressor/django-compressor
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2. The best method to contribute back is to create a github account, then fork the project. You can use this fork as
if it was your own project, and should push your changes to it.
3. When you feel your code is good enough for inclusion, “send us a pull request”, by using the nice github web
interface.
2.10.3 Contributing Code
Getting the source code
If you’re interested in developing a new feature for Compressor, it is recommended that you first discuss it on IRC not
to do any work that will not get merged in anyway.
• Code will be reviewed and tested by at least one core developer, preferably by several. Other community
members are welcome to give feedback.
• Code must be tested. Your pull request should include unit-tests (that cover the piece of code you’re submitting,
obviously)
• Documentation should reflect your changes if relevant. There is nothing worse than invalid documentation.
• Usually, if unit tests are written, pass, and your change is relevant, then it’ll be merged.
Since it’s hosted on github, Django Compressor uses git as a version control system.
The github help is very well written and will get you started on using git and github in a jiffy. It is an invaluable
resource for newbies and old timers alike.
Syntax and conventions
We try to conform to PEP8 as much as possible. A few highlights:
• Indentation should be exactly 4 spaces. Not 2, not 6, not 8. 4. Also, tabs are evil.
• We try (loosely) to keep the line length at 79 characters. Generally the rule is “it should look good in a terminalbase editor” (eg vim), but we try not be [Godwin’s law] about it.
Process
This is how you fix a bug or add a feature:
1. Fork us on github.
2. Checkout your fork.
3. Hack hack hack, test test test, commit commit commit, test again.
4. Push to your fork.
5. Open a pull request.
Tests
Having a wide and comprehensive library of unit-tests and integration tests is of exceeding importance. Contributing
tests is widely regarded as a very prestigious contribution (you’re making everybody’s future work much easier by
doing so). Good karma for you. Cookie points. Maybe even a beer if we meet in person :)
Generally tests should be:
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• Unitary (as much as possible). I.E. should test as much as possible only one function/method/class. That’s the
very definition of unit tests.
• Integration tests are interesting too obviously, but require more time to maintain since they have a higher probability of breaking.
• Short running. No hard numbers here, but if your one test doubles the time it takes for everybody to run them,
it’s probably an indication that you’re doing it wrong.
In a similar way to code, pull requests will be reviewed before pulling (obviously), and we encourage discussion via
code review (everybody learns something this way) or IRC discussions.
Running the tests
To run the tests simply fork django_compressor, make the changes and open a pull request. The Travis bot will
automatically run the tests of your branch/fork (see the pull request announcment for more info) and add a comment
about the test results to the pull requests. Alternatively you can also login at Travis and enable your fork to run there,
too. See the Travis documentation to read about how to do that.
Alternatively, create a virtualenv and activate it, then install the requirements in the virtualenv:
$ virtualenv compressor_test
$ source compressor_test/bin/activate
(compressor_test) $ make testenv
Then run make test to run the tests. Please note that this only tests django_compressor in the Python version
you’ve created the virtualenv with not all the versions that are required to be supported.
2.10.4 Contributing Documentation
Perhaps considered “boring” by hard-core coders, documentation is sometimes even more important than code! This
is what brings fresh blood to a project, and serves as a reference for old timers. On top of this, documentation is the
one area where less technical people can help most - you just need to write a semi-decent English. People need to
understand you.
Documentation should be:
• We use Sphinx/restructuredText. So obviously this is the format you should use :) File extensions should be
.txt.
• Written in English. We can discuss how it would bring more people to the project to have a Klingon translation
or anything, but that’s a problem we will ask ourselves when we already have a good documentation in English.
• Accessible. You should assume the reader to be moderately familiar with Python and Django, but not anything
else. Link to documentation of libraries you use, for example, even if they are “obvious” to you. A brief
description of what it does is also welcome.
Pulling of documentation is pretty fast and painless. Usually somebody goes over your text and merges it, since there
are no “breaks” and that github parses rst files automagically it’s really convenient to work with.
Also, contributing to the documentation will earn you great respect from the core developers. You get good karma just
like a test contributor, but you get double cookie points. Seriously. You rock.
Note: This very document is based on the contributing docs of the django CMS project. Many thanks for allowing us
to steal it!
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2.11 Changelog
2.11.1 v1.4 (06/20/2014)
• Added Python 3 compatibility.
• Added compatibility with Django 1.6.x and dropped support for Django 1.3.X.
• Fixed compatibility with html5lib 1.0.
• Added offline compression for Jinja2 with Jingo and Coffin integration.
• Improved support for template inheritance in offline compression.
• Made offline compression avoid compressing the same block multiple times.
• Added a testenv target in the Makefile to make it easier to set up the test environment.
• Allowed data-uri filter to handle external/protocol-relative references.
• Made CssCompressor class easier to extend.
• Added support for explictly stating the block being ended.
• Added rcssmin and updated rjsmin.
• Removed implicit requirement on BeautifulSoup.
• Made GzipCompressorFileStorage set access and modified times to the same time as the corresponding base
file.
• Defaulted to using django’s simplejson, if present.
• Fixed CompilerFilter to always output Unicode strings.
• Fixed windows line endings in offline compression.
2.11.2 v1.3 (03/18/2013)
• Backward incompatible changes
– Dropped support for Python 2.5.
compressor.utils.
Removed any and walk compatibility functions in
– Removed compatibility with some old django setttings:
* COMPRESS_ROOT no longer uses MEDIA_ROOT if STATIC_ROOT is not defined. It expects
STATIC_ROOT to be defined instead.
* COMPRESS_URL no longer uses MEDIA_URL if STATIC_URL is not defined.
STATIC_URL to be defined instead.
It expects
* COMPRESS_CACHE_BACKEND no longer uses CACHE_BACKEND and simply defaults to
default.
• Added precompiler class support. This enables you to write custom precompilers with Python logic in them
instead of just relying on executables.
• Made CssAbsoluteFilter smarter: it now handles URLs with hash fragments or querystring correctly. In addition,
it now leaves alone fragment-only URLs.
• Removed a fsync() call in CompilerFilter to improve performance.
self.infile.flush() so that call was not necessary.
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• Added an extension to provide django-sekizai support. See django-sekizai Support for more information.
• Fixed a DeprecationWarning regarding the use of django.utils.hashcompat
• Updated bundled rjsmin.py to fix some JavaScript compression errors.
2.11.3 v1.2
• Added compatibility with Django 1.4 and dropped support for Django 1.2.X.
• Added contributing docs. Be sure to check them out and start contributing!
• Moved CI to Travis: http://travis-ci.org/django-compressor/django-compressor
• Introduced a new compressed context dictionary that is passed to the templates that are responsible for
rendering the compressed snippets.
This is a backwards-incompatible change if you’ve overridden any of the included templates:
– compressor/css_file.html
– compressor/css_inline.html
– compressor/js_file.html
– compressor/js_inline.html
The variables passed to those templates have been namespaced in a dictionary, so it’s easy to fix your own
templates.
For example, the old compressor/js_file.html:
<script type="text/javascript" src="{{ url }}"></script>
The new compressor/js_file.html:
<script type="text/javascript" src="{{ compressed.url }}"></script>
• Removed old templates named compressor/css.html and compressor/js.html that were
originally left for backwards compatibility.
If you’ve overridden them, just rename them to
compressor/css_file.html or compressor/js_file.html and make sure you’ve accounted for
the backwards incompatible change of the template context mentioned above.
• Reverted an unfortunate change to the YUI filter that prepended ’java -jar’ to the binary name, which
doesn’t alway work, e.g. if the YUI compressor is shipped as a script like /usr/bin/yui-compressor.
• Changed
the
sender
parameter
of
the
post_compress()
signal
to
be
either
compressor.css.CssCompressor or compressor.js.JsCompressor for easier customization.
• Correctly handle offline compressing files that are found in {% if %} template blocks.
• Renamed the second option for the COMPRESS_CSS_HASHING_METHOD setting from ’hash’ to
’content’ to better describe what it does. The old name is also supported, as well as the default being
’mtime’.
• Fixed CssAbsoluteFilter, src attributes in includes now get transformed.
• Added a new hook to allow developers to completely bypass offline compression in CompressorNode subclasses: is_offline_compression_enabled.
• Dropped versiontools from required dependencies again.
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2.11.4 v1.1.2
• Fixed an installation issue related to versiontools.
2.11.5 v1.1.1
• Fixed a stupid ImportError bug introduced in 1.1.
• Fixed Jinja2 docs of since JINJA2_EXTENSIONS expects a class, not a module.
• Fixed a Windows bug with regard to file resolving with staticfiles finders.
• Stopped a potential memory leak when memoizing the rendered output.
• Fixed the integration between staticfiles (e.g. in Django <= 1.3.1) and compressor which prevents the collectstatic management command to work.
Warning: Make sure to remove the path method of your custom remote storage class!
2.11.6 v1.1
• Made offline compression completely independent from cache (by writing a manifest.json file).
You can now easily run the compress management command locally and transfer the COMPRESS_ROOT dir to
your server.
• Updated installation instructions to properly mention all dependencies, even those internally used.
• Fixed a bug introduced in 1.0 which would prevent the proper deactivation of the compression in production.
• Added a Jinja2 contrib extension.
• Made sure the rel attribute of link tags can be mixed case.
• Avoid overwriting context variables needed for compressor to work.
• Stopped the compress management command to require model validation.
• Added missing imports and fixed a few PEP 8 issues.
2.11.7 v1.0.1
• Fixed regression in compressor.utils.staticfiles compatibility module.
2.11.8 v1.0
• BACKWARDS-INCOMPATIBLE Stopped swallowing exceptions raised by rendering the template tag in
production (DEBUG = False). This has the potential to breaking lots of apps but on the other hand will help
find bugs.
• BACKWARDS-INCOMPATIBLE The default function to create the cache key stopped containing the server
hostname. Instead the cache key now only has the form ’django_compressor.<KEY>’.
To revert to the previous way simply set
’compressor.cache.socket_cachekey’.
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• BACKWARDS-INCOMPATIBLE Renamed ambigously named COMPRESS_DATA_URI_MAX_SIZE
setting
to
COMPRESS_DATA_URI_MAX_SIZE.
It’s
the
maximum
size
the
compressor.filters.datauri.DataUriFilter filter will embed files as data: URIs.
• Added COMPRESS_CSS_HASHING_METHOD setting with the options ’mtime’ (default) and ’hash’ for
the CssAbsoluteFilter filter. The latter uses the content of the file to calculate the cache-busting hash.
• Added support for {{ block.super }} to compress management command.
• Dropped Django 1.1.X support.
• Fixed compiler filters on Windows.
• Handle new-style cached template loaders in the compress management command.
• Documented included filters.
• Added Slim It filter.
• Added new CallbackOutputFilter to ease the implementation of Python-based callback filters that only need to
pass the content to a callable.
• Make use of django-appconf for settings handling and versiontools for versions.
• Uses the current context when rendering the render templates.
• Added post_compress signal.
2.11.9 v0.9.2
• Fixed stdin handling of precompiler filter.
2.11.10 v0.9.1
• Fixed encoding related issue.
• Minor cleanups.
2.11.11 v0.9
• Fixed the precompiler support to also use the full file path instead of a temporarily created file.
• Enabled test coverage.
• Refactored caching and other utility code.
• Switched from SHA1 to MD5 for hash generation to lower the computational impact.
2.11.12 v0.8
• Replace naive jsmin.py with rJSmin (http://opensource.perlig.de/rjsmin/) and fixed a few problems with
JavaScript comments.
• Fixed converting relative URLs in CSS files when running in debug mode.
Note: If you relied on the split_contents method of Compressor classes, please make sure a fourth item is
returned in the iterable that denotes the base name of the file that is compressed.
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2.11.13 v0.7.1
• Fixed import error when using the standalone django-staticfiles app.
2.11.14 v0.7
• Created new parser, HtmlParser, based on the stdlib HTMLParser module.
• Added a new default AutoSelectParser, which picks the LxmlParser if lxml is available and falls back to HtmlParser.
• Use unittest2 for testing goodness.
• Fixed YUI JavaScript filter argument handling.
• Updated bundled jsmin to use version by Dave St.Germain that was refactored for speed.
2.11.15 v0.6.4
• Fixed Closure filter argument handling.
2.11.16 v0.6.3
• Fixed options mangling in CompilerFilter initialization.
• Fixed tox configuration.
• Extended documentation and README.
• In the compress command ignore hidden files when looking for templates.
• Restructured utilities and added staticfiles compat layer.
• Restructered parsers and added a html5lib based parser.
2.11.17 v0.6.2
• Minor bugfixes that caused the compression not working reliably in development mode (e.g. updated files didn’t
trigger a new compression).
2.11.18 v0.6.1
• Fixed staticfiles support to also use its finder API to find files during developement – when the static files haven’t
been collected in STATIC_ROOT.
• Fixed regression with the COMPRESS setting, pre-compilation and staticfiles.
2.11.19 v0.6
Major improvements and a lot of bugfixes, some of which are:
• New precompilation support, which allows compilation of files and hunks with easily configurable compilers
before calling the actual output filters. See the COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS for more details.
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• New staticfiles support. With the introduction of the staticfiles app to Django 1.3, compressor officially supports
finding the files to compress using the app’s finder API. Have a look at the documentation about remote storages
in case you want to use those together with compressor.
• New compress management command which allows pre-running of what the compress template tag does.
See the pre-compression docs for more information.
• Various perfomance improvements by better caching and mtime cheking.
• Deprecated COMPRESS_LESSC_BINARY setting because it’s now superseded by the
COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS setting. Just make sure to use the correct mimetype when linking to less
files or adding inline code and add the following to your settings:
COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS = (
(’text/less’, ’lessc {infile} {outfile}’),
)
• Added cssmin filter (compressor.filters.CSSMinFilter) based on Zachary Voase’s Python port of
the YUI CSS compression algorithm.
• Reimplemented the dog-piling prevention.
• Make sure the CssAbsoluteFilter works for relative paths.
• Added inline render mode. See usage docs.
• Added mtime_cache management command to add and/or remove all mtimes from the cache.
• Moved docs to Read The Docs: http://django-compressor.readthedocs.org/en/latest/
• Added optional compressor.storage.GzipCompressorFileStorage storage backend that gzips of
the saved files automatically for easier deployment.
• Reimplemented a few filters on top of the new compressor.filters.base.CompilerFilter to be a
bit more DRY.
• Added tox based test configuration, testing on Django 1.1-1.3 and Python 2.5-2.7.
2.11. Changelog
29
Django Compressor Documentation, Release 1.4
30
Chapter 2. Contents
Index
C
COMPRESS_OFFLINE_TIMEOUT
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 16
COMPRESS_OUTPUT_DIR
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 11
COMPRESS_PARSER (in module django.conf.settings),
14
COMPRESS_PRECOMPILERS
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 13
COMPRESS_REBUILD_TIMEOUT
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 15
COMPRESS_ROOT (in module django.conf.settings), 10
COMPRESS_STORAGE
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 14
COMPRESS_TEMPLATE_FILTER_CONTEXT
(in
module django.conf.settings), 12, 13
COMPRESS_URL (in module django.conf.settings), 10
COMPRESS_YUGLIFY_BINARY
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 11, 12
COMPRESS_YUGLIFY_CSS_ARGUMENTS (in module django.conf.settings), 12
COMPRESS_YUGLIFY_JS_ARGUMENTS (in module
django.conf.settings), 13
COMPRESS_YUI_BINARY
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 11, 12
COMPRESS_YUI_CSS_ARGUMENTS (in module
django.conf.settings), 11
COMPRESS_YUI_JS_ARGUMENTS
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 12
compressor.signals.post_compress() (built-in function), 8
CLEAN_CSS_ARGUMENTS
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 12
CLEAN_CSS_BINARY
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 12
COMPRESS_CACHE_BACKEND
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 15
COMPRESS_CACHE_KEY_FUNCTION (in module
django.conf.settings), 15
COMPRESS_CLOSURE_COMPILER_ARGUMENTS
(in module django.conf.settings), 12
COMPRESS_CLOSURE_COMPILER_BINARY
(in
module django.conf.settings), 12
COMPRESS_CSS_FILTERS
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 11
COMPRESS_CSS_HASHING_METHOD (in module
django.conf.settings), 11
COMPRESS_CSSTIDY_ARGUMENTS (in module
django.conf.settings), 11
COMPRESS_CSSTIDY_BINARY
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 11
COMPRESS_DATA_URI_MAX_SIZE (in module
django.conf.settings), 11
COMPRESS_DEBUG_TOGGLE
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 15
COMPRESS_ENABLED
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 10
COMPRESS_JS_FILTERS
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 12
COMPRESS_MINT_DELAY
(in
module
P
django.conf.settings), 15
COMPRESS_MTIME_DELAY
(in
module Python Enhancement Proposals
PEP 8, 26
django.conf.settings), 15
COMPRESS_OFFLINE
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 16
COMPRESS_OFFLINE_CONTEXT
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 16
COMPRESS_OFFLINE_MANIFEST
(in
module
django.conf.settings), 16
31

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