Heidelberg International School International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Subject Selection Handbook 2014 – 2016

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Heidelberg International School
International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme
Subject Selection Handbook
2014 – 2016
Table of Contents
1. Subjects to be offered in 2014 – 2016 3
2. The International Baccalaureate Learner Profile 4
3. The International Baccalaureate 3.1. IB Mission Statement 5
6
4. Options for Grade 11/12 Students at H.I.S. 7
5. H.I.S. Diploma Students 5.1. IB Diploma Programme Courses Students 5.2. IB Diploma Programme Students 8
8
8
6. The Structure of the IB Diploma Programme at H.I.S. 10
7. Distinctions between Standard Level and Higher Level Classes 11
8. Components of an IB Course: Internal Assessment (IA) and IB Exams 8.1. Internal Assessment (20–30% of the Course Grade) 8.2. IB Exams (70–80% of the Course Grade) 11
11
11
9. Results for IB Diploma Students 12
10. Course Information for Subjects Offered 10.1. Group 1 – Studies in Language and Literature Literature – Higher Level and Standard Level Language and Literature – Higher Level and Standard Level 10.2. Group 2 – Language Acquisition Language B – Higher Level and Standard Level Language ab initio – Standard Level 10.3. Group 3 – Individuals and Societies History – Higher Level and Standard Level Psychology – Higher Level and Standard Level Economics – Higher Level and Standard Level Business and Management – Higher Level and Standard Level Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) – HL and SL Philosophy – Standard Level 10.4. Group 4 – Experimental Sciences Biology – Higher Level and Standard Level Chemistry – Higher Level and Standard Level Physics – Higher Level and Standard Level 10.5. Group 5 – Mathematics Mathematics – Higher Level Mathematics – Standard Level Mathematical Studies – Standard Level 10.6. Group 6 – Arts and Electives Visual Arts – Higher Level and Standard Level Film – Standard Level 13
13
13
14
16
16
17
18
18
19
21
22
23
25
27
28
29
29
31
31
31
32
33
33
34
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Page 2 of 36
1. Subjects to be offered in 2014 – 2016
Grade 11 and 12
Group 1:
Studies in
Language and Literature
English Literature*
English Language & Literature
German Language & Literature
German B
Spanish B**
Group 2:
Language Acquisition
German ab initio
Mandarin ab initio**
Spanish ab initio**
History
Psychology**
Group 3:
Individuals and Societies
Business and Management**
Economics**
ITGS**
Philosophy**
Biology
Group 4:
Experimental Science
Chemistry
Physics
Group 5:
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematical Studies
Visual Arts
Film**
Biology
Chemistry
Group 6:
The Arts and Electives
History
Psychology**
Business and Management**
Economics**
ITGS**
Philosophy**
*Some courses are dependent upon student requirement and teacher availability.
** This is a Pamoja Education online course, availability is restricted and extra costs are incurred.
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Page 3 of 36
2. The International Baccalaureate
Learner Profile
The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognising their common
humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.
IB learners are:
Inquirers They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and
research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be
sustained throughout their lives.
Knowledgeable They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so
doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of
disciplines.
Thinkers They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognise and
­approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.
Communicators They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in
more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in
­collaboration with others.
Principled They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for
the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the
­consequences that accompany them.
Open-minded They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to
the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking
and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.
Caring They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have
a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.
Risk-takers They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and
have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in
­defending their beliefs.
Balanced They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.
Reflective They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess
and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.
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Page 4 of 36
3. The International Baccalaureate
The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IB DP) is an advanced two-year course of study designed to prepare students for university and life. The IB Diploma Programme founders recognised a need to
create a university preparatory curriculum with high standards, which is recognised around the world. Since its
inception in 1968, the Diploma Programme has grown to include over 2,400 schools.
The IB Diploma Programme is more than just a curriculum, it is also a teaching and educational philosophy designed to inspire students to think beyond factual recall of information. The spectrum of IB classes is designed
to teach students to think critically, to appreciate the importance of seeing events or knowledge claims from
different perspectives, to understand strengths and weaknesses of what students or others claim to “know,” to
understand and explore ethical controversies inherently relevant to what they learn, and to be able to apply
what they learn in meaningful ways to the “real world”.
While the IB Diploma Programme is not designed exclusively for the elite or gifted academic student, the IB Diploma is most appropriate for those students who are highly motivated, open-minded, and highly responsible.
The IB Diploma Programme is much more, however, than a series of academic subjects. Its unique additional
features of Creativity, Action and Service (CAS), Extended Essay (EE) and Theory of Knowledge (TOK) ensure
that students are opened up to their community responsibilities, are encouraged to develop their research skills
and become independent analytical thinkers.
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Page 5 of 36
3.1. The IB Mission Statement
“ The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young
people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.
To this end, the IB works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging
programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students
across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people,
with their differences, can also be right. ”
The IB Diploma programme has the strengths of a traditional and broad curriculum as shown
by the graphic below:
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Page 6 of 36
4. Options for Grade 11/12 Students at H.I.S.
OPTION 1
Students officially register with
the IB to take official IB exams in
at least 6 subjects. They will be
considered
IB Diploma Programme students.
Students take IB exams in at least
6 subjects, complete TOK, an EE,
and meet all IB CAS requirements
(approx. 150 hours).
OPTION 2
Students officially register with the
IB for one or more IB exam(s) to
earn an IB Course Certificate. They
will be considered
IB Diploma Programme Courses
students.
Students take IB exams in the
subjects that they officially register in at the end of the two-year
programme.
OPTION 3
Students do not register with the
IB for any IB exam(s). They will be
considered
H.I.S. Diploma students.
Students fulfil the assessment
requirements and take H.I.S. final
exams in all their subjects at the
end of the two-year programme.
Students will not take H.I.S. final Students will take H.I.S. final exams
Students must meet all IB CAS
exams at the end of the two-year IB
in subjects other than those they
requirements
Diploma Programme – only official have chosen as IB Courses at the
(approx. 150 hours) and will be
IB exams – that are assessed by IB
end of the two-year programme. required to complete modified TOK
examiners outside of the school.
& EE components
Students must meet IB CAS
­requirements
(approx. 150 hours) and can opt
to complete full or modified TOK &
EE components
Students receive an official IB
Diploma and transcript indicating
their results in the IB Courses that
they completed.
Students receive an official IB
transcript indicating their results in
the IB Course(s) that they completed
including TOK & EE if chosen.
Students receive an official H.I.S.
transcript indicating their results
in the H.I.S. Courses that they
completed.
In addition students receive the
H.I.S. Diploma
In addition students receive the
H.I.S. Diploma
Students receive the
H.I.S. Diploma
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Page 7 of 36
5. H.I.S. Diploma Students
Students, who have decided NOT to enrol in either the full IB Diploma Programme or to undertake the IB
Courses as a certificate candidate, work towards an H.I.S. Diploma. In addition to completing the requirements of six subject areas as set by their teachers, H.I.S. Diploma candidates will be required to perform
approx.150 hours of Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) they will complete a modified Extended Essay (EE)
to a maximum of 1500 words, and will take a modified Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course. The courses at
H.I.S. are taught over a two-year period and examinations are undertaken in May in the second year of the
programme (Grade 12).
5.1. IB Diploma Programme Courses Students
Students who want to earn official recognition for the IB classes but who have decided not to enrol in the
full IB Diploma can undertake the IB courses as a Courses Student. These courses can be taken at either the
Higher or Standard Level. Courses students may, if they want, choose to take only Standard Level classes.
Courses students will be required to perform approx. 150 hours of Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) they
will choose to complete either a full or modified Extended Essay and TOK (Theory of Knowledge) course. Like
the full-diploma students, courses students can have the official grades earned in their subjects sent to universities directly from the IB. The IB courses at H.I.S. are taught over a two-year period and IB examinations are
undertaken in May in the second year of the programme (Grade 12).
5.2. IB Diploma Programme Students
Students who pursue the full IB Diploma must complete six examinations: three at Higher Level and three at
a Standard Level. The IB courses at H.I.S. are taught over a two-year period and IB examinations are undertaken in May in the second year of the programme (Grade 12).
The heart of the full IB diploma includes:
1. The CAS requirement
2. Theory of Knowledge
3. The Extended Essay
1. CAS Requirement – CAS is an acronym, which stands for “Creativity, Action and Service.” Both diploma
and certificate candidates are required to participate in appropriate activities balanced evenly between the
three components, three to four hours a week for a total of approx. 150 hours over the two years of the programme. To complete the IB Diploma, students must show evidence of their participation and personal growth
through on-going reflections and a final (short) CAS essay towards the end of the programme.
2. Theory of Knowledge – Theory of Knowledge (TOK) interweaves all the IB subject areas, distinguishes
between how knowledge is acquired in each area, and explores the difference between truth and belief. The
course emphasizes a great deal of critical thinking, personal reflection and the stresses the importance of seeing events from multiple perspectives. TOK does not have a formal IB examination, but candidates will submit
a final TOK essay and make an oral presentation that will be internally and externally moderated.
3. Extended Essay – The Extended Essay (EE) is a required analytic paper of 4000 words. The EE is
intended to promote high-level research and writing skills, intellectual discovery and creativity. It provides
students with an opportunity to engage in personal research in topics of their own choice (chosen from the list
of approved Diploma Programme subjects), under the guidance of a supervisor (a teacher in school).
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Award of Diploma points: the EE contributes to the overall IB Diploma score through the award of points
in conjunction with TOK. A maximum of three bonus points are awarded according to student’s combined performance in both the EE and TOK. Both the EE and TOK are measured against published assessment criteria.
According to the quality of the work, and based on the application of these assessment criteria, a student’s
performance in each of the EE and TOK will fall into one of the following five bands:
A
B
C
D
E
=
=
=
=
=
Work
Work
Work
Work
Work
of
of
of
of
of
an
an
an
an
an
excellent standard
good standard
satisfactory standard
mediocre standard
elementary standard
The total number of points awarded is determined by the combination of the performance levels achieved by
the student in both the EE and TOK according to the following matrix.
Extended Essay (EE)
Theory of Knowledge (TOK)
Grade
A
B
C
D
E
A
+3
+3
+2
+2
+1
B
+3
+2
+1
+1
F*
+2
+1
+1
0
F*
D
+2
+1
0
0
F*
E
+1 (F*)
F*
F*
F*
F*
C
Note: F: if a student attains an E grade in either the EE or TOK, 28 points overall will be required to be
eligible for the diploma.
A grade A in one of the requirements earns an extra point even if the other is a grade E.
Attaining a grade E in both the EE and TOK represents an automatic failure of the IB Diploma.
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6. The Structure of the IB
Diploma Programme at H.I.S.
Full-diploma candidates complete the “core” requirements of the Programme: The Extended Essay, Theory of
Knowledge, and CAS. Diploma candidates must take six courses from four, five or six subject areas, referred
to as “groups”. Three of these classes must be chosen at the Higher Level (HL) and three at Standard Level (SL).
In addition, diploma students must take the Theory of Knowledge class. The diagram below shows core components and the IB courses and the courses within the six subject groups offered at H.I.S.
Group 1
Group 2
Language Acquisition
German B – HL/SL
Spanish B - SL**
German ab initio – SL
Mandarin ab initio – SL**
Spanish ab initio – SL**
Group 4
Experimental Sciences
Biology – HL/SL
Chemistry – HL/SL
Physics – HL/SL
Studies in Language
and Literature
English Lit* – HL/SL
English Lang & Lit – HL/SL
German Lang & Lit – HL/SL
Group 3
Individuals and Societies
History – HL/SL
Psychology – HL/SL**
Economics – HL/SL**
Business & Mgmt – HL/SL**
ITGS – HL/SL**
Philosophy – SL**
Creativity, Action,
Service (CAS)
Extended Essay (EE)
Theory of Knowledge
(TOK)
Group 5
Mathematics
Mathematics – HL/SL
Math Studies – SL
Group 6
Arts and Electives
Visual Arts – HL/SL
Film – SL**
OR
an additional subject
from groups 3 or 4
IMPORTANT: Some courses may not be offered due to insufficient student enrollment. In addition, it is not
always possible to accommodate all course selections due to scheduling conflicts. Every effort will be made to
accommodate student preferences but the students must sometimes make compromise choices.
* Some courses are dependent upon student requirement and teacher availability.
** This is an online course, availability is restricted and extra costs are incurred.
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Page 10 of 36
7. Distinctions between Standard Level and
Higher Level Classes
Whether a student pursues the full IB Diploma or IB courses, students will usually have a certain amount of
choice whether they take each class at Higher Level (HL) or Standard Level (SL).
The exact difference in terms of content, standards, and requirements of class taken at the SL or Higher Level
varies between subjects in the IB curriculum. In some subjects, Higher Level and Standard Level vary substantially in degree of difficulty and material covered. However, for most IB subjects, the levels differ primarily in
the amount of material covered rather than degree of difficulty.
SL courses require approximately 150 class hours while Higher Level courses require approximately 240 class
hours. In practice, SL students have additional in-school study time, cover fewer units, or have fewer demands
in regard to their internal assessment. Students who pursue any course at the Higher Level should do so because they have a particular aptitude or high-level of motivation in this class.
In making the final decision about the level of coursework, students need to carefully balance their interests
and abilities with projected university entrance requirements.
8. Components of an IB Course:
Internal Assessment (IA) and IB Exams
8.1. Internal Assessment (20–30% of the Course Grade)
The IB curriculum requires that students complete a major “project” in each IB Course they take. Such projects
are formally called Internal Assessments (IA) because they are assessed “internally” by the subject teachers.
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Regardless of the type of project, students are asked to apply the knowledge and skills they are learning in the
class to this assignment. To ensure consistency, IA projects are also “moderated”. This means that while the individual teacher is responsible for grading and assessing the students work, the IB randomly requests samples
of this work to be examined by IB examiners who check to see that teachers are applying the correct grading
criteria. This step is essentially a “safeguard” to ensure that teacher-grading practices are consistent with IB
standards. The moderation process is an important part of maintaining consistency, fairness, high standards,
and accountability in the IB DP. The IA requirement also serves to lessen the relative impact of the examination at the end of the Course. Students who are not necessarily good test-takers may excel at the IA project,
thereby helping to help balance any unexpected exam results.
8.2. IB Exams (70–80% of the Course Grade)
In May of the second year of the IB Diploma/Courses Programme, students will undertake IB exams. IB exams
are comprehensive; they are usually based on two years worth of teaching materials. Therefore, they require a
great deal of revision and preparation by the student. These exams are created by the IB and sent by courier
to each IB school. The exams themselves are “externally assessed” (graded) by trained examiners, throughout
the world, based upon published grading criteria.
9. Results for IB Diploma Students
The maximum score possible for those students pursuing the full IB diploma is 45, representing up to seven
points in each of the six required courses (42 points) plus three possible bonus points for Theory of Knowledge
and the Extended Essay components. A full-diploma candidate taking examinations in six subjects must reach
a total of 24 points, or an average grade of four in each of their courses. To a certain extent, a high grade in
one subject can balance a poor grade in another (e.g., a five in English can offset a three in mathematics).
Be aware that there are several situations that can keep candidates from receiving the diploma. Full diploma
students will not receive their diploma if they receive less than 24 points, if there is a grade one awarded in
any subject and level, if there are four or more grades of three or below, if they do not complete their CAS
requirement, TOK requirements, or Extended Essay.
OTHER EXCEPTIONS WHICH WILL KEEP A CANDIDATE FROM RECEIVING AN IB
DIPLOMA INCLUDE:
Earning 24, 25, 26, or 27
points, but receiving …
» A score of 2 in any HL Course.
» A score of 2 in two or more in any SL Course.
» Fewer than 12 total points in the HL Courses.
» Fewer than 9 total points in the SL Courses.
» An E in either Theory of Knowledge or the
Extended Essay.
Earning 28 points or more,
but receiving …
» A score of 2 in more than one HL Course.
» A score of 2 in more than two SL Courses.
» Fewer than 11 total points in the HL Courses.
» Fewer than 8 points total in the SL Courses.
» A score of 3 in more than three Courses.
» An E in both Theory of Knowledge and the
­Extended Essay.
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10. Course Information for Subjects Offered
10.1. Group 1 – Studies in Language and Literature
Literature – Higher Level and Standard Level
Literature is concerned with our conceptions, interpretations and experiences of the world. The study of literature can therefore be seen as an exploration of the way it represents the complex pursuits, anxieties, joys and
fears to which human beings are exposed in the daily business of living. It enables an exploration of one of
the more enduring fields of human creativity, and provides opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical and clear thinking. It also promotes respect for the imagination and a perceptive approach to the
understanding and interpretation of literary works.
Through the study of a wide range of literature, the Language A: Literature Course encourages students to
appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are
studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by
considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to
intercultural understanding, the Language A: Literature Course does not limit the study of works to the products
of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially
important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of
literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of language.
The Course: Literature is a flexible Course that allows teachers to choose works from prescribed lists of authors
and to construct a Course that suits the particular needs and interests of their students. It is divided into four
parts, each with a particular focus.
Part 1: Works in translation
Part 2: Detailed study
Part 3: Literary genres
Part 4: Options (in which works are freely chosen)
Prerequisite: There are no formal requirements for students undertaking the Literature Course. Students who
take this Course will often have varied language profiles and may be multilingual. While it is recommended
that students have had experience of writing critical essays about texts, not having done so should not exclude
you from studying Literature.
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Languages and Levels available:
+ English – Higher Level and Standard Level,
Assessment:
Higher Level and Standard Level
External
assessment:
70%
› Written Examination 20%
– SL: Paper 1 Guided literary analysis
– HL: Paper 1 Literary commentary
› Written Examination Paper 2 essay: 25%
› Written assignment 25%:
– HL: 1000 –1500 words; assignment 1 is a comparative study of at least two
works whilst assignment 2 could be a comparative study on different works, an
imaginative or creative assignment or a detailed study.
– SL: one assignment of 1200 –1500 words.
Internal
assessment:
30%
› Individual Oral commentary 15%
– HL (20 minutes) Formal oral commentary on poetry studied in part 2 with
subsequent questions (10 minutes) followed by a discussion based on one of the
other Part 2 works (10 minutes).
– SL (10 minutes) Students present a formal oral commentary and answer subsequent questions on an extract from a work studied in Part 2.
› Individual Oral Presentation 15%
– (10 –15 minutes) The presentation is based on works studied in Part 4.
It is ­internally assessed and externally moderated through the Part 2 Internal
­Assessment Task
Language and Literature – Higher Level and Standard Level
Language and Literature comprises four parts — two relate to the study of language and two to the study of
literature. The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language
and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. A key aim of the
Language and Literature Course is to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language
and texts, which, it can be argued, is rarely straightforward and unambiguous. Helping students to focus
closely on the language of the texts they study and to become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in
­shaping its meaning is central to the course.
The Language and Literature Course aims to develop in students skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to c­ ulturally
determined reading practices. The Course is designed to be flexible — teachers have the opportunity to
construct it in a way that reflects the interests and concerns that are relevant to their students while developing in students a range of transferable skills. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used
to ­create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading
­practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception.
The Course: Language and Literature is a flexible Course that allows teachers to choose works from
­prescribed lists of authors and to construct a course that suits the particular needs and interests of their students.
It is divided into four parts, each with a particular focus.
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Part 1: Language in cultural context
Part 2: Language and mass communication
Part 3: Literature—texts and contexts
Part 4: Literature—critical study
Prerequisite: There are no formal requirements for students undertaking Language and Literature. Students who
take this course will often have varied language profiles and may be multilingual. While it is recommended
that students have had experience of writing critical essays about texts, not having done so should not exclude
you from studying Language and Literature.
Languages and Levels available:
English – Higher Level and Standard Level,
German – Higher Level and Standard Level
Assessment:
Higher Level and Standard Level
External
assessment:
70%
Internal
assessment:
30%
› Paper 1: 25%
– HL: Comparative textual analysis
The paper consists of two pairs of unseen texts. Students write a comparative
analysis of one pair of texts.
– SL: Textual analysis
The paper consists of two unseen texts. Students write an analysis of one of these
texts.
› Paper 2: Essay 25%
› Written task 20%
– HL: Students produce at least four written tasks based on material studied in
the course. Each task must be 800 –1,000 words in length plus a rationale of
200 –300 words.
– SL: Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in
the course. One task must be 800 –1,000 words in length plus a rationale of
200 –300 words.
› Individual oral commentary 15%
– Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4 of the
course. Students are given two guiding questions.
› Further oral activity 15%
– Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on Part 1 and
one based on Part 2 of the Course.
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10.2. Group 2 – Language Acquisition
Group 2 consists of modern languages, which can be studied at different levels depending on the level of
proficiency of the student in that language. Modern languages are studied through the four primary main
language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) to ensure that the student can communicate spontaneously, appropriately and effectively with an audience of the language in both familiar and unfamiliar circumstances. This level of competence is achieved through an understanding of three interrelated areas which
form the basis of the assessment criteria: using the language accurately in terms of grammar and vocabulary,
selecting language appropriate to a particular cultural and social context and understanding how ideas are
organized for appropriate communication.
Language B – Higher Level and Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: Spanish is an online course provided by Pamoja Education supervised by H.I.S. Faculty.
In this course language B students will focus mainly on language acquisition and the development of the
linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, up to a fairly sophisticated level.
The Course: Language B students will learn basic language structures and use these in a range of situations
and purposes which can include work situations, social relationships and the discussion of abstract ideas.
They will also explore the culture using a variety of texts in the language.
Prerequisite: The Language B course is designed for genuine second language learners with some previous
experience, 4 to 5 years for HL and 2 to 5 years for SL, of learning the language. As a result a language B
student should have a good knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and be fairly frequent in conversation.
Languages and Levels available:
German B – Higher Level and Standard Level
Spanish B – Standard Level
Higher Level and Standard Level
External
­assessment:
70%
Internal
­assessment:
30%
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› Paper 1 (25%)
› consists of text handling exercises and a short writing exercise.
› Paper 2 (25%)
› consists of one writing task from a number of choices
› Written Assignment (20 %) consists of one piece of writing
› Individual Oral (20%)
› Interactive Oral (10%)
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Language ab initio – Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: Mandarin and Spanish are online courses provided by Pamoja Education supervised by
H.I.S. Faculty.
If you want to learn a new language or do not have a second language you should choose an ab initio
course. The courses provide an opportunity for students to enhance their linguistic skills.
The Course: You will acquire a good basic knowledge of the language so that you can engage in everyday
conversations in a variety of situations and understand and write short pieces. The course aims to develop a
good command of the grammatical structures of the language, a variety of linguistic skills and a basic awareness of the culture associated with the language. The courses also focus on everyday situations and aspects of
the culture related to these situations.
Prerequisite: None required as this is for the beginner who has little or no previous experience of the language. However, any start you can make on the language in the summer before you start Grade 11 would
help you make a good start to these courses.
Languages and Levels available:
German ab initio – Standard Level
Spanish ab initio – Standard Level
Mandarin ab initio – Standard Level
Assessment:
External
­assessment:
75%
Internal
­assessment:
25%
› Paper 1 (30%)
› consists of text handling exercises and a short writing exercise.
› Paper 2 (25%)
› consists of two writing exercises.
› Written Assignment (20 %) consist of one piece of writing.
› Individual oral (25%) consists of a three part oral assessment.
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10.3. Group 3 – Individuals and Societies
History – Higher Level and Standard Level
History offers a unique international perspective to turning points of the 20th Century. History helps students
to understand the political and economic forces that have shaped the world as we know it and provides an
“inside look” into decision making of the world leaders. Through the study of historical sources and visits to
historical sites students can “relive” the past and become more aware of the forces that have shaped their
own identity and understanding. History is much more than learning about the past; it helps to develop critical
­thinking, debating and public speaking skills that are useful for careers in journalism, politics, international
­relations and law. In this way studying history is really about building your future.
The Course: The course comprises six units. HL students study all six units and SL students three units.
1. Peacemaking, peacekeeping – international relations 1918–36 (Higher Level and Standard Level)
2. 20th century world history: Causes, practices and effects of war (Higher Level and Standard Level)
3. 20th century world history: The Cold War (Higher Level and Standard Level)
4. European history: Imperial Russia, revolutions, emergence of Soviet State1853–1924 (HL)
5. European history: European diplomacy and the First World War 1870–1923 (HL)
6. European history: Interwar years conflict & cooperation 1919–39 (HL)
Assessment:
Higher Level
External
­assessment:
80%
Three written papers:
› Paper 1: 20%
A document-based paper set on prescribed subjects drawn from the 20th century
world history topics
› Paper 2: 25%
An essay-based paper on the 20th century world history topics.
› Paper 3: 35%
essay paper based on the regional options; answer three out of 25 questions.
Internal
­assessment:
20%
› Historical investigation
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Standard Level
External
­assessment:
75%
Internal
­assessment:
25%
Two written papers:
› Paper 1: 30%
A document-based paper set on prescribed subjects drawn from the 20th century
world history topics
› P aper 2: 45%
An essay-based paper on the 20th century world history topics.
› Historical investigation
Psychology – Higher Level and Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: This is an online course provided by Pamoja Education supervised by H.I.S. Faculty.
Psychology is the systematic study of the human condition through a variety of approaches. Such investigative approaches include the experimental method, observation, clinical interviews, and questionnaires. Seen
through three major perspectives, the study of psychology offers a field of study that brings together several
academic traditions.
Students will study psychology through the three major perspectives developed over the last one hundred
years: Biological, Cognitive and Learning. Assumptions of psychology that are addressed include motivations
underlying human behaviour, social interaction, language and thinking, memory and emotion. The students
will be engaged in a variety of practical activities including observations, experiments and interviews. There is
an emphasis on writing as a way of thinking.
Course Topics
1. Introduction to the International Baccalaureate Psychology syllabus
2. Introduction to Psychology
3. Research Methods
4. Biological Perspective
5. Learning Perspective
6. Cognitive Perspective
7. Psychology of Dysfunctional Behaviour
8. Simple Experimental Study
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Assessments
Higher Level
External
­assessment:
80%
Three written papers:
› Paper 1: 35% (2 hours)
Section A: Three compulsory questions on Part 1 of the syllabus.
Section B: Three questions on Part 1 of the syllabus. Students choose one question
to answer in essay form. [46 marks]
› Paper 2: 25% (1 hour)
Fifteen questions on Part 2 of the syllabus. Students choose two questions to answer
in essay form. [44 marks]
› Paper 3: 20% (1 hour)
Three compulsory questions based on an unseen text, covering part 3 of the
­syllabus. [30 marks]
Internal
­assessment:
20%
›A
report of a simple experimental study conducted by the student.
[28 marks]
Standard Level
External
­assessment:
75%
Two written papers:
› Paper 1: (2 hours) 50%
Section A: Three compulsory questions on Part 1 of the syllabus.
Section B: Three questions on Part 1 of the syllabus. Students choose one question
to answer in essay form. [46 marks]
› Paper 2: 25% (1 hour)
Fifteen questions on part 2 of the syllabus. Students choose one question to answer
in essay form. [22 marks]
Internal
­assessment:
25%
›A
report of a simple experimental study conducted by the student
[20 marks]
These IB assessments are in addition to the regular class assessments and assignments.
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Economics – Higher Level and Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: This is an online course provided by Pamoja Education supervised by H.I.S. faculty
Aim:To develop an awareness of the impact of economics on the global environment, students will develop
their understanding of how the impact of economics can be damaging and beneficial. Students will be expected to use newspapers and visit (international) newspaper websites on a regular basis. Economic theories
will be applied to real world examples and related to elements of politics, history and other fields of study
where appropriate.
Content: The course will include standard economics concepts and theories from 4 key areas: Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, International Economics and Development Economics. For both Higher Level and Standard Level the syllabus covers the following topics. At Higher Level certain aspects are studied in greater detail.
1. MicroEconomics – Markets, Elasticities
– Theory of the Firm
– Market Failure – Externalities, Monopoly
2. MacroEconomics – National Income
– Macroeconomic models
– Demand and Supply-side policies
– Unemployment, Inflation and the Distribution of Income
3. International Economics – Trade and Protectionism
– Economic Integration
– WTO
– Balance of Payments, Trade, Exchange Rates
4. Development Economics
– Economic Growth and Development
– Barriers to Growth
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Assessment:
Higher Level
External
­assessment:
80%
Internal
­assessment:
20%
Three written papers:
› Paper 1:
› Three data response questions
› Paper 2:
› An extended response question
› Three short essays
› Four written pieces of 650 – 750 words
Standard Level
External
­assessment:
75%
Internal
­assessment:
25%
Two written papers:
› Paper 1:
› Three data response questions
› Paper 2:
› An extended response question
› Four written pieces of 650 – 750 words
Business and Management – Higher Level and Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: This is an online course provided by Pamoja Education supervised by H.I.S. Faculty
Business and Management is a rigorous and dynamic discipline that examines business decisionmaking
processes and how these decisions impact on and are affected by internal and external environments. It is
the study of both the way in which individuals and groups interact in an organization and of the transformation of resources. It is, therefore, perfectly placed within the Group 3 subject area. The IB DP Business and
Management Course is designed to develop an understanding of business theory, as well as an ability to
apply ­business principles, practices and skills. The application of tools and techniques of analysis facilitates an
appreciation of complex business activities. The course considers the diverse range of business o
­ rganizations
and activities and the cultural and economic context in which business operates. Emphasis is placed on
­strategic decision-making and the day-to-day business functions of marketing, production, human resource
management and finance. Links between the topics are central to the course, and this integration promotes a
holistic overview of business activity.
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The Business and Management Course aims to help students understand the implications of business activity in a global market. It is designed to give students an international perspective of business and to promote
their appreciation of cultural diversity through the study of topics like international marketing, human resource
management, growth and business strategy. The ideals of international cooperation and responsible citizenship are at the heart of IB DP Business and Management. The Course encourages the appreciation of ethical
concerns and issues of social responsibility in the global business environment. Students should be able to
make sense of the forces and circumstances that drive and restrain change in an interdependent and multicultural world. The Business and Management Course will contribute to students’ development as critical and
effective participants in local and world affairs.
Assessment:
Higher Level
External
­assessment:
75%
› P aper 1 (2 hours and 15 minutes) 35%
Based on a case study issued in advance, with additional unseen material.
Students answer structured questions in sections
› Paper 2 (2 hours and 15 minutes) 40%
Students answer structured questions in sections
Internal
­assessment:
25%
› R esearch project
Students research and report on an issue facing an organization or a decision to be
made by an organization (or several organizations). Maximum 2000 words.
Standard Level
External
­assessment:
75%
› P aper 1 (1 hour and 15 minutes) 35%
Based on a case study issued in advance, with additional unseen material.
Students answer structured questions in sections
› Paper 2 (1 hours and 45 minutes) 40%
Students answer structured questions in sections
Internal
­assessment:
25%
›W
ritten commentary
Students produce a written commentary based on three to five supporting documents
about a real issue or problem facing a particular organization.
Maximum 1500 words.
Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) – Higher Level and Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: This is an online course provided by Pamoja Education supervised by H.I.S. faculty
Course Description:
In general the course is the study and evaluation of the impact of information technology on individuals and
society” where information technology is defined as “the acquisition, processing, storage, manipulation and
dissemination of digital information by computing or telecommunications or a combination of both.
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Course Goals/Objectives:
This course focuses on the study and evaluation of the impact of information technology on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the use of digitised information at the local and global
level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of
information technology within social contexts. ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with
other social sciences and also considers the ethical questions found in the study of philosophy. Students come
into contact with IT on a daily basis because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This widespread
use of IT inevitably raises important questions about social and ethical issues that shape our society of today.
ITGS offers a systematic study of these issues, whose range is such that they fall outside the scope of any other
single discipline.
The course covers social and ethical issues related to the use of IT, such as security of information, authenticity
and policies and standards. It also focuses on IT systems in a social context, where students will take a closer
look at the hardware requirements of IT systems; have a look at a broad coverage of different software applications; make a study of communication systems such as the Internet and a look at integrated systems such
as robotics and artificial intelligence. All these areas under study will be linked to the impact IT has had on
business and employment, education, health, arts, entertainment and leisure, science and the environment and
politics and the government.
Higher Level
External
­assessment:
80%
Three written papers:
› Paper 1: 35%
4 structured questions
› Paper 2: 20%
One unseen article. Students are required to write a response to this article.
› Paper 3: 25%
Four questions based on a pre-seen case study.
Internal
­assessment:
20%
Project
The development of an original IT product for a specified client.
Students must produce:
› a cover page using prescribed format
› an original IT product
› documentation supporting the product (word limit 2,000 words).
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Standard Level
External
­assessment:
70%
Two written papers:
› Paper 1 (1 hour 45 minutes) 40%
Students answer three of five structured questions on any of the SL/HL core topics.
(60 marks)
› Paper 2 (1 hour 15 minutes) 30%
This paper consists of one unseen article.
Students are required to write a response to this article.
Internal
­assessment:
30%
Project
The development of an original IT product for a specified client.
Students must produce:
› a cover page using prescribed format
› an original IT product
› documentation supporting the product (word limit 2,000 words).
Philosophy – Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: This is an online course provided by Pamoja Education supervised by H.I.S. faculty
Philosophy deals with issues that are profound, usually difficult, and important for humanity. It is a systematic
critical enquiry into profound, fascinating and challenging questions that people have asked since the beginning of time, and confronts new problems arising within contemporary society.
The emphasis of the IB DP Philosophy Course is very much on doing philosophy. Students develop their skills
through the study of philosophical themes and the close reading of philosophical texts. They also learn to
apply their philosophical knowledge and skills to real-life examples or situations and how non-philosophical
material can be treated in a philosophical way. Philosophical questions are explored through an examination
of themes and texts. Students learn through tools, such as critical and systematic thinking, careful analysis and
evaluation, and construction of arguments. Students are challenged to develop their own philosophical voice
and independence of thought.
IB DP Philosophy aims to bring the subject of philosophy alive, gaining a sense of its richness and practical
value in daily life and expanding our appreciation of ourselves and the world around us. It teaches us not
what to think, but how to think. By participating in the great philosophical debates, students will develop their
skills of rigorous reasoning; by study, analysis and criticism of the great works of philosophy, ancient and
modern, students will develop their capacity to make reasoned judgments for themselves.
The Course: The IB Philosophy course is composed of three parts at SL.
Part 1: Themes – This is divided into two further parts – the core theme and the optional themes.
1.1 The Core Theme – This is the study of the core theme “What is a human being?”. The core theme offers
students the opportunity to search for a better understanding of ourselves, both as individuals and as members
of groups and wider communities. Awareness of the human condition inspires us to examine our characteristics
and notions of “person” or “identity”.
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1.2 Optional Themes – One optional theme for study from must be selected at SL from the list eight possibilities: Grounds of epistemology, Theories and problems of ethics, Philosophy of religion, Philosophy of art,
Political philosophy, Non-Western traditions and perspectives, Contemporary social issues, People, nations
and cultures.
Part 2: Prescribed Texts
This consists of the study of one text at SL from the IB Philosophy Prescribed Text List. The purpose of studying
a prescribed philosophical text is to allow students to achieve an in-depth knowledge and understanding of a
challenging work, and to extend their overall comprehension of philosophy. The detailed study of a philosophical text can be seen as another way in which students learn to do philosophy by entering into dialogue with
another philosopher. In studying the prescribed text, students should develop their ability to present a philosophical argument by testing their own position against the standpoint of the author, and using the author’s
ideas to expand their own thinking on the issue(s) under discussion. Students are expected to develop the skills
required to undertake a critical analysis of the text.
Part 3: Internal assessment
Students are required to produce a philosophical analysis of non-philosophical material, to demonstrate
their philosophical skills. The Internal Assessment exercise takes the form of a philosophical analysis of nonphilosophical material, which allows students to be rewarded for doing philosophy under ordinary conditions,
without the time constraints associated with written examinations. It reflects common activities used in teaching
and doing philosophy.
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10.4. Group 4 – Experimental Sciences
All Group 4 courses share a common structure as each one is in 3 parts: a core of material that is studied at
both Higher and Standard Level, additional material that is taken at Higher Level only and one option studied
at both Standard and Higher Levels.
Group 4 students at Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL) undertake a common core syllabus, a common
internal assessment (IA) scheme and have some overlapping elements in the option studied. They are presented with a syllabus that encourages the development of certain skills, attributes and attitudes.
While the skills and activities of group 4 science subjects are common to students at both SL and HL, students
at HL are required to study some topics in greater depth, in the Additional Higher Level (AHL) material and in
the common option. The distinction between SL and HL is one of breadth and depth.
The group 4 Project is a compulsory interdisciplinary activity in which all Diploma Programme science students
must participate. The intention is that students from the different group 4 subjects analyze a common topic or
problem. The exercise is a collaborative experience where the emphasis is on the processes involved in, rather
than the products of, such an activity.
Assessment:
Higher Level
External
­assessment:
80%
Three written papers
› Paper 1: (20%) 40 multiple-choice questions
› Paper 2: (36%) short answer and extended answer-response questions
› Paper 3: (24%) short answer and extended answer-response questions on practical
skills and the option
Internal
­assessment:
20%
› One extended scientific investigation
Standard Level
External
­assessment:
80%
Three written papers
› Paper 1: (20%) 30 multiple-choice questions
› Paper 2: (40%) short answer and extended answer-response questions
› Paper 3: (20%) short answer and extended answer-response questions on practical
skills and the option
Internal
­assessment:
20%
› One extended scientific investigation
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Biology – Higher Level and Standard Level
Biology is the study of life. The first organisms appeared on the planet over 3 billion years ago and, through
reproduction and natural selection, have given rise to the 8 million or so different species alive today. Estimates vary, but over the course of evolution 4 billion species could have been produced. Most of these
flourished for a period of time and then became extinct as new, betteradapted species took their place.
There have been at least five periods when very large numbers of species became extinct and biologists are
concerned that another mass extinction is under way, caused this time by human activity. Nonetheless, there
are more species alive on Earth today than ever before. This diversity makes biology both an endless source
of fascination and a considerable challenge.
The IB Diploma Programme biology course covers the relationship of structure and function at all levels of
complexity. Students learn about cell theory, the chemistry of living things, plant structure and growth, and the
difference between genes and alleles, among many other topics, to further their understanding of and learning
about biology. Throughout this challenging course, students become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. Further, students enjoy multiple opportunities for scientific study and creative inquiry
within a global context.
The course includes the essential principles of the subject but also, through selection of an option, flexibility
to tailor the course to meet the needs of the students. The course is available at both standard level (SL) and
higher level (HL), and therefore accommodates students who wish to study biology as their major subject in
higher education and those who do not.
All students undertake both theory and practical study. These should complement one another naturally, as they
do in the wider scientific community. The Diploma Programme biology course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language
of science. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and digital technology skills, which are essential in 21st century scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.
Core Topics
›
›
›
›
›
›
ell biology
C
Molecular biology
Genetics
Ecology
Evolution and biodiversity
Human physiology
Additional higher level (AHL) Topics
›
›
›
›
›
ucleic acids
N
Metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis
Plant biology
Genetics and evolution
Animal physiology
Options
›
›
›
›
eurobiology and behaviour
N
Biotechnology and bioinformatics
Ecology and conservation
Human physiology
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Chemistry – Higher Level and Standard Level
Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and
investigational skills. It is often called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical
environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own
right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful preparation for employment.
The Diploma Programme chemistry course includes the essential principles of the subject but also, through
selection of an option, flexibility to tailor the course to meet the needs of the students. The course is available
at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL), and therefore accommodates students who wish to study
chemistry as their major subject in higher education and those who do not.
All students undertake both theory and experiments. They should complement one another naturally, as they do
in the wider scientific community. The Diploma Programme chemistry course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language
of science. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and digital technology skills, which are essential in 21st century scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.
Core Topics
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
Stoichiometric relationships
Atomic structure
Periodicity
Chemical bonding and structure
Energetics/thermochemistry
Chemical kinetics
Equilibrium
Acids and bases
Redox reactions
Organic chemistry
Measurements and data processing.
Additional Higher Level (AHL) Topics
› All core topics are studied in more breadth and depth in AHL.
Options
›
›
›
›
Materials
Biochemistry
Energy
Medicinal Chemistry
Physics – Higher Level and Standard Level
Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself, from the
very smallest particles—quarks, which may be truly fundamental—to the vast distances between galaxies.
All students should cover theory and undertake experiments. They should complement one another naturally,
as they do in the wider scientific community. The IB DP Physics Course allows students to develop traditional
practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of
physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology
skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in
their own right.
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Alongside the growth in our understanding of the natural world, perhaps the more obvious and relevant result
of physics to most of our students is our ability to change the world. This is the technological side of physics,
in which physical principles have been applied to construct and alter the material world to suit our needs, and
have had a profound influence on the daily lives of all human beings—for good or bad. This raises the issue
of the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. These concerns have become more prominent as our power over
the environment has grown, particularly among young people, for whom the importance of the responsibility
of physicists for their own actions is self-evident.
The syllabus for the IB DP Physics Course is divided into three Parts: the core, the Additional Higher Level (AHL)
material and the options.
Core Topics
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
easurements and uncertainties
M
Mechanics
Thermal physics
Waves
Electricity and magnetism
Circular motion and gravitation
Atomic, nuclear and particle physics
Energy production
Additional Higher Level (AHL) Topics
›
›
›
›
ave phenomena
W
Fields
Electromagnetic induction
Quantum and nuclear physics
Option
›
›
›
›
Relativity
Engineering physics
Imaging
Astrophysics
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10.5. Group 5 – Mathematics
All students take Mathematics at an appropriate level.
Mathematics – Higher Level
The Course: A challenging programme designed for students with a strong background and ability in
­Mathematics. You may choose this level because you need it to support further study at university, for example
Physics, Engineering or Technology, or simply because you enjoy Mathematics. The HL Course extends each
topic in the SL Course (see below), expecting students to have not only wider knowledge, but also greater
insight and ability to apply that knowledge. Additionally students will study one option in depth, chosen by the
teachers. The course is assessed by an exploration and three examination papers: non-calculator, calculator
and options.
Prerequisite: It is essential HL students have an excellent background in Mathematics; in general
they will have gained an excellent grade in Grade 10. A high degree of competence in algebra is
required.
Assessment:
External
­assessment:
80%
Internal
­assessment:
20%
Three written papers (total 5 hours)
› Paper 1: (30%) Extended and Short-response questions
› Paper 2: (30%) Extended and Short-response questions
› Paper 3: (20%) Extended-response on the syllabus option
› T he exploration is a short report based on a mathematical topic chosen by the
student. The emphasis is on mathematical communication (including formulae,
diagrams, graphs and so on), with accompanying commentary, good mathematical
writing and thoughtful reflection.
Mathematics – Standard Level
The Course: Like HL this is a challenging programme requiring good background knowledge and ability in
Mathematics. It is a good programme for those who wish to pursue further studies in fields such as Chemistry, Geography and Business. During the Course students study six topics: algebra, functions and equations,
circular functions and trigonometry, vectors, probability and statistics, and calculus. The Course is assessed by
an exploration and two examination papers: non-calculator and calculator.
Prerequisite: SL students will have a good background in Mathematics; normally they will have gained a high
grade in Grade 10 Mathematics.
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Assessment:
External
­assessment:
80%
Two written papers (total 3 hours)
› Paper 1: (40%) Extended and Short-response questions
› Paper 2: (40%) Extended and Short-response questions
Internal
­assessment:
20%
› T he exploration is a short report based on a mathematical topic chosen by the
student. The emphasis is on mathematical communication (including formulae,
diagrams, graphs and so on), with accompanying commentary, good mathematical
writing and thoughtful reflection.
Mathematical Studies – Standard Level
The Course: This programme is designed to develop the skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society for the non-specialist. Emphasis is placed on the development of mathematical models and their application to real-life situations. You should usually choose this Course if you do not
need advanced mathematics for your future studies. The course includes number and algebra, sets, logic and
probability, functions, geometry and trigonometry, statistics, introduction to differential calculus and financial
mathematics.
Assessment:
External
­assessment:
80%
Two written papers (total 3 hours)
› Paper 1: (40%) Short-response questions
› Paper 2: (40%) Extended-response questions
Internal
­assessment:
20%
› Project. This involves the collection of information or measurements and the analysis
and evaluation of this information or measurements.
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10.6. Group 6 – Arts and Electives
In this Group you can choose to study Visual Arts Higher Level and Standard Level, Film SL or a subject from
another Subject Group.
IB DP Visual Arts is a rigorous programme, which allows students to explore the possibilities if visual art
through their own practical work and research. The IB DP Visual Arts Course provides students with opportunities to explore art on a number of levels including: Aesthetic, Cultural, Social and Personal.
Visual Arts – Higher Level and Standard Level
The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural
expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in
problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as artmakers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts,
students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary
practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher
education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.
Supporting the International Baccalaureate mission statement and learner profile, the course encourages
students to actively explore the visual arts within and across a variety of local, regional, national, international
and intercultural contexts. Through inquiry, investigation, reflection and creative application, visual arts students
develop an appreciation for the expressive and aesthetic diversity in the world around them, becoming critically informed makers and consumers of visual culture.
Distinction between Visual Arts HL and SL
The visual arts syllabus demonstrates a clear distinction between the course at SL and at HL, with additional
assessment requirements at HL that allow for breadth and greater depth in the teaching and learning. The assessment tasks require HL students to reflect on how their own work has been influenced by exposure to other
artists and for them to experiment in greater depth with additional art-making media, techniques and forms. HL
students are encouraged to produce a larger body of resolved works and to demonstrate a deeper consideration of how their resolved works communicate with a potential viewer.
Assessment:
Higher Level and Standard Level
External
assessment
Studio:
60%
› P art 1: Comparative study 20%
Students analyse and compare different artworks by different artists.
› Part 2: Process portfolio 40%
Students submit carefully selected materials which evidence their experimentation,
exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of visual arts activities during
the two-year course.
Internal
› Part 3: Exhibition
assessment
Students submit for assessment a selection of resolved artworks from their exhibition.
Investigation:
40%
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Film – Standard Level
PLEASE NOTE: This is an online course provided by Pamoja Education supervised by H.I.S. faculty
Film is both a powerful communication medium and an art form. The film course aims to develop students’
skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts.
Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making, the film course explores film history,
theory and socio-economic background. The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film. To achieve an international understanding
within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of
different individuals, nations and cultures.
The film course emphasizes the importance of working individually and as a member of a group. Students are
encouraged to develop the professional and technical skills (including organizational skills) needed to express
themselves creatively in film. A challenge for students following this course is to become aware of their own
perspectives and biases and to learn to respect those of others. This requires willingness to attempt to understand alternative views, to respect and appreciate cultural diversity, and to have an open and critical mind.
Thus, the film course can become a way for the student to celebrate the international and intercultural dynamic
that inspires and sustains a type of contemporary film, while appreciating specifically local origins that have
given rise to cinematic production in many parts of the world.
For any student to create, to present and to study film requires courage, passion and curiosity: courage to
create individually and as part of a team, to explore ideas through action and harness the imagination, and to
experiment; passion to communicate and to act communally, and to research and formulate ideas eloquently;
curiosity about self and others and the world around them, about different traditions, techniques and knowledge, about the past and the future, and about the limitless possibilities of human expression through film.
At the core of the film course lies a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis,
effective involvement and imaginative synthesis that is achieved through practical engagement in the art and
craft of film.
The Course:
Textual analysis
Study one extract, of approximately 5 minutes, from a prescribed film and offer a detailed textual analysis of
the extract within the context of the film as a whole.
Film theory and history
Study of at least two films from more than one country
Creative process (Film production)
Create and produce an original film as part of a team or as an individual.
www.hischool.de
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Assessment:
Option A
External
assessment
50%
Independent study: 25%
› Rationale, script and annotated list of sources for a documentary production of
8–10 pages
Presentation: 25%
› An oral presentation of a detailed textual analysis of an extract from a prescribed
film of up to a maximum of 10 minutes
Internal
assessment
50%
Film production:
› One completed film project of 4–5 minutes including titles
Documentation in relation to the film production
› Rationale of no more than 100 words
› Written commentary of no more than 1,200 words
www.hischool.de
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Please look for more information about:
DP Info events at H.I.S.:
›› At the end of January or start of Febuary each year there is a parent information meeting held to
­provide more details.
›› H.I.S. Newsletter
Weekly information about events, important dates
Information and feedback about past events
›› H.I.S. Information Boards
General information about the IB Programmes:
›› www.ibo.org
Please contact the H.I.S. DP Coordinator for questions about the Diploma Programme at H.I.S.

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