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OREGON
LAND & WATER CONSERVATION FUND
Grant Program Manual
2014 GRANT CYCLE
OREGON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT
725 SUMMER ST NE, SUITE C
SALEM, OR 97301
(503) 986-0708
Website: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/pages/lwcf.aspx
Updated December 2013 Version 1.2
Please also refer to the National Park Service Grants Manual
effective October 1, 2008
http://www.nps.gov/ncrc/programs/lwcf/manual/lwcf.pdf
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department received Federal funds from the National Park Service,
Department of the Interior, under provisions of the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act, of 1965 (Public
Law 88-578). Accordingly, all of its publications and activities must be operated free from discrimination,
based on race, color, national origin, age or disability. Any person who believes he or she has been
discriminated against or who would like further information regarding the prohibition of discrimination
should write to:
Director, Equal Opportunity Program
U.S. Department of Interior
National Park Service
PO Box 37127
Washington D.C. 2001
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS .............................................................................................................. i
CHAPTER 1 – The Program ..................................................................................................... 1
1.1 History of the Program ............................................................................................... 1
1.2 Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan................................................... 1
1.3 Eligible Project Sponsors ............................................................................................ 1
1.4 Eligible Projects.......................................................................................................... 2
1.5 Eligible Recreation Facilities ....................................................................................... 7
1.6 Eligible Support Facilities............................................................................................ 9
1.7 Facility Location Requirements ..................................................................................10
1.8 Guidelines for Sheltered Facilities .............................................................................11
1.9 Non-Allowable Expenditures .....................................................................................11
1.10 Matching Requirements ............................................................................................12
1.11 Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act ..................................................................................12
1.12 School Park Joint Use Facilities ..................................................................................13
1.13 Sustainability ............................................................................................................14
CHAPTER 2 – PROPOSALS, ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW/FEDERAL COMPLIANCE ......................18
2.1 Proposal Development and Screening for Environmental Impacts..............................18
2.2 National Environmental Policy Act ............................................................................18
2.3 National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106 .........................................................19
2.4 Endangered Species Act, Section 7 ............................................................................19
2.5 Floodplain Management and Wetland Protection .....................................................19
2.6 Environmental Justice in Minority and Low Income Populations ................................19
CHAPTER 3 – THE APPLICATION ............................................................................................21
3.3
Application Information................................................................................................... 22
3.4
Attachments .............................................................................................................22
A.
Proposal Description and Environmental Screening Form (PD/ESF) ............................23
B.
Environmental Assessment (If Required) ...................................................................23
C.
Environmental Impact Statement (If Required)..........................................................24
D.
Vicinity Map..............................................................................................................24
E.
Project Boundary Map ..............................................................................................24
F.
Urban Growth Boundary Map ...................................................................................25
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G.
Property Deed/Lease Agreements .............................................................................25
H.
Permits (If Required) .................................................................................................25
I.
Construction Plans and Specifications .......................................................................26
J.
Land Use Compatibility Statement (LUCS)..................................................................26
K.
Appraisal (Acquisition Projects) .................................................................................26
L.
Proof of Willing Seller (Acquisition Projects) ..............................................................26
M.
Preliminary Title Report (Acquisition Projects) ..........................................................26
N.
Letters of Support .....................................................................................................26
3.5
State of Oregon Natural Resources Agency Mailing List .............................................30
3.6
Government to Government Relations ......................................................................31
3.7
Sample Resolution Authorizing Application for Grant ................................................33
CHAPTER 4 - OPEN PROJECT SELECTION PROCESS..................................................................35
4.1 Open Project Selection Process .................................................................................35
4.2 Timeline....................................................................................................................35
4.3 Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee ....................................................................35
4.4 Presentation Before the OORC ..................................................................................36
4.5 LWCF Grant Rating Criteria ........................................................................................36
4.6 LWCF Open Project Selection Process Project Review and Scoring .............................36
CHAPTER 5 – PROJECT APPROVAL AND IMPLEMENTATION ...................................................40
5.1 Inspections ...............................................................................................................42
5.2 State/Local Agreements ............................................................................................42
5.3 Amendments to Project Agreements .........................................................................46
5.4 Signing of Project Site ...............................................................................................46
CHAPTER 6 – GENERAL COST PRINCIPLES, REIMBURSEMENTS AND AUDITS ...........................48
6.1 Relationship of Project Period to Eligible Costs ..........................................................48
6.2 Retroactive Costs ......................................................................................................48
6.3 Waiver of Retroactivity .............................................................................................48
6.4 Equal Employment Opportunity Contract Compliance ...............................................49
6.5 Accounting Instructions.............................................................................................50
6.6 Force Account ...........................................................................................................52
6.7 Donations .................................................................................................................52
CHAPTER 7 – REQUESTING A REIMBURSEMENT ....................................................................54
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7.1 General .....................................................................................................................54
7.2 How to Fill Out the Reimbursement Form .................................................................54
CHAPTER 8 - POST COMPLETION AND STEWARDSHIP............................................................56
8.1 Purpose ....................................................................................................................56
8.2 Operation and Maintenance .....................................................................................56
8.3 Availability to Users ..................................................................................................56
8.4 Post Completion Inspections .....................................................................................57
8.5 Conversion, Change of Use of Property......................................................................58
8.6 Underground Utility Easements and Rights-of-Way ...................................................64
8.7 Commercial Signage in Section 6(f)(3) Areas ..............................................................64
8.8 Proposals to Construct Public Facilities ......................................................................64
8.9 Requests for Temporary Non-Conforming Uses Within Section 6(f)(3) Areas ..............65
8.10 Sheltering Facilities within Section 6(f)(3) Areas ........................................................66
8.11 Obsolete Facilities .....................................................................................................66
8.12 Significant Change of Use ..........................................................................................66
CHAPTER 9 - GLOSSARY ........................................................................................................68
APPENDIX ............................................................................................................................71
A-1 Oregon Administrative Rules .....................................................................................71
A-2 Land and Water Conservation Fund Act .....................................................................77
A-3 Civil Rights Requirements..........................................................................................82
A-4 Volunteer or Donated Labor Timesheet .....................................................................85
A-5 Donated Materials or Supplies Record.......................................................................86
A-6 Donated Equipment Record ......................................................................................87
A-7 Frequently Asked Questions – Appraisals and the LWCF State Assistance Program ....88
A-8 Recommended Format for Federal Appraisal Reports ................................................91
A-9 Appraisal Report Documentation Checklist................................................................92
A-10 Documentation Required for Final Billing of an Acquisition........................................96
A-11 Documentation Required for Final Billings of Development & Rehab Projects ............97
A.12 Reimbursement Form ...............................................................................................98
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CHAPTER 1 – The Program
1.1
History of the Program
The Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance program was established by the LWCF Act
of 1965 (Section 6, Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965, as amended; Public Law 88-578;
16 U.S.C 4601-4 et seq.) to stimulate a nationwide action program to assist in preserving,
developing, and assuring to all citizens of the United States of present and future generations such
quality and quantity of outdoor recreation resources as may be available and are necessary and
desirable for individual active participation. The LWCF State Assistance Program provides matching
grants to States, and through the States to local governments, for the acquisition and development
of public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Grant funds are also available to the States to
assist in the development of Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plans (SCORP).
The LWCF program was administered by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (BOR) from its beginning
in 1965 to 1978 when the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service (HCRS) was created. HCRS
then administered the program until 1981 when the LWCF was transferred to the Department of
Interior, National Park Service.
Source of Funds
ƒ Receipts from oil drilling leases under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act.
ƒ Federal tax on motor boat fuels
ƒ Net proceeds from the sale of surplus federal property
ƒ Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act, Public Law 109-432 (GOMESA)
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Office of the State Liaison Officer (SLO), is
responsible for the distribution of Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) monies to
state agencies and local governments. The SLO is also responsible for implementation of an ongoing
SCORP planning process; evaluation and selection of projects in accord with an Open Project
Selection Process; assuring compliance of projects; preparation and submission of applications and
amendments; financial management of apportionments and individual grant awards; inspection of
projects to insure proper completion; operations, maintenance, stewardship of Section 6(f)
parkland; and other functions necessary for proper program administration and management.
The National Park Service (Seattle Office), within the Department of the Interior, manages this
federal grant program and reviews and approves all project applications, agreements, and
amendments.
1.2
Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan
To be eligible for LWCF assistance grants, projects must be in accord with Oregon’s Statewide
Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP). Oregon’s SCORP provides a clear link between
the findings of the SCORP plan and the allocation of funding. Only project proposals in accordance
with SCORP and reviewed through the State’s Open Project Selection Process (OPSP) will be
considered by NPS.
http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/PLANS/Pages/planning_SCORP.aspx#Statewide_Comprehensive_Outdoor_Recreation_
Planning__SCORP_
1.3
Eligible Project Sponsors
Eligible local government agencies include:
ƒ Cities and towns
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Counties
Park and Recreation Districts
Port Districts
Native American Tribes
Metropolitan Service District (METRO)
Eligible state agencies include:
ƒ Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD)
ƒ Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW)
ƒ Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF)
ƒ Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL)
Ineligible agencies include schools, non-profit organizations, service clubs and non-park special
service districts, such as irrigation or fire districts. Private individuals or organizations are not
eligible for grants under this program.
1.4
Eligible Projects
ƒ Acquisition: acquisition of real property.
ƒ Development: development or renovation of public outdoor recreation facilities.
ƒ Combination: both acquisition and development in the same project.
A. Acquisition Projects
1. Acquisition of lands and waters for public outdoor recreation, including new areas or
additions to existing parks, forests, wildlife areas, beaches and other similar areas dedicated
to outdoor recreation may be eligible for assistance. Acquisition can be by fee simple title
or by whatever lesser rights will insure the desired public use without diminishing the
control and tenure of the project sponsor’s ability to enforce the Section 6(f)(3) provisions
of the LWCF Act. Areas acquired may serve a variety of outdoor recreation activities
including but not limited to: driving and walking for pleasure, sightseeing, swimming and
other water sports, fishing, picnicking, nature study, boating, hunting and shooting,
camping, horseback riding, bicycling, snowmobiling, skiing and other outdoor recreation
sports and activities.
2. Means of Acquisition
Acquisition of lands and waters, or interests therein, may be accomplished through
purchase, transfer, or by gift.
3. Eligible Acquisition Costs
The only eligible property costs include:
ƒ Direct costs for the purchase of real property and interests in real property for public
outdoor recreation and improvements. Public access to the property is required, but
may be controlled Projects may include acquisition of structures and improvements
that are to be used primarily for outdoor recreation or outdoor recreation support
activities or are a part of the outdoor recreation area to be acquired, and are to be
removed or demolished.
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The only eligible incidental costs include:
Relocation and relocation administration allowable under the Uniform Relocation
Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies, Public Law 91-646.
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Cultural resources (survey, excavation, onsite monitoring, data recovery, and other
costs.
National Environmental Policy Act compliance (e.g. hazardous substances review,
wetland delineations, biological surveys, etc.)
All other incidental and administrative costs related to the acquisition of the real
property are ineligible.
4. Acquisition of Lesser Interests
Acquisitions of interests in lands and waters of less than fee simple title, including leasehold
interests, are not eligible unless such lesser rights (e.g. permanent recreation use
easements or similar devices) will insure the desired perpetual public access and user
pursuant to Section (f)(3).
5. Acquisition involving compatible resource management practices:
Acquisition of land which the project sponsor proposes natural resource management
practices such as timber management and grazing, not including agriculture, may be
carried out concurrently within the areas if they are clearly described in the project
proposal, are compatible with and secondary to proposed outdoor recreation uses, and
are approved by the NPS.
6. Acquisition for Delayed Outdoor Recreation Development
Grants may be available to acquire property for future development of outdoor recreation
facilities. In the interim, between acquisition and development, the property should be
open for those public recreation purposes that the land is capable of supporting or that can
be achieved with minimum public investment.
If planned development for public outdoor recreation will be delayed for up to three years
from the date of acquisition, the project sponsor must include the following information in
the project application:
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Why immediate acquisition of the property is necessary.
What facilities will be developed and when such development will occur.
What, if any, non-recreation uses will continue on the property and when such nonrecreation uses will be terminated.
The type of public outdoor recreation access that will be provided during the interim
period.
Assurance that any income received by the project sponsor for the non-recreation
activities will be added to the funds committed to the project and used to further
eligible LWCF project objectives at the project site.
Assurance that the site will be available for public outdoor recreation use and any nonrecreation activity will be terminated within 3 years from the date of acquisition.
7. Uniform Relocation and Acquisition (Public Law 91-646)
All acquisitions with LWCF assistance must be in accordance with the applicable provisions
of Public Law 91-646, the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition
Policies Act of 1970, as amended.
The Uniform Act provides for the uniform and equitable treatment of persons displaced
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from their homes, businesses, or farms by federal and federally assisted programs and
establishes uniform and equitable land acquisition policies for federal and federally-assisted
programs, such as the LWCF. Refer to Chapter 4-15.D of the LWCF State Assistance Program
Manual (http://www.nps.gov/ncrc/programs/lwcf/manual/lwcf.pdf)
8. Appraisal Standards
The Uniform Appraisal Standards of Federal Land Acquisitions (UASFLA), commonly referred
to as the “Yellow Book,” must be used to prepare appraisals for acquisitions, donations if
used for a federal match, and land exchanges for conversions.
The federal standards (UASFLA) are considered “Supplemental Standards” to the Uniform
Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) and are required to bolster the
minimum level of documentation and yield compliance with the unique and applicable
appraisal methods and procedures that have evolved from federal case law. The UASFLA is
available at: http://www.justice.gov/enrd/land-ack/Uniform-Appraisal-Standards.pdf
OPRD will provide guidance to appraisers on appraisal requirements for federally-assisted
acquisitions, for ensuring appraisals are reviewed by state-certified review appraisers
pursuant to the Uniform Appraisal Standards for Federal Land Acquisitions (UASFLA), and
for approving appraisals. OPRD will certify the appraisals meet the federal appraisal
standards.
9. Appraisal value estimate under $25,000 – Waiver Valuation
The waiver valuation is not an appraisal. The Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real
Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 and the Uniform Standards of Professional
Appraisal Practice relating to appraisals do not apply. A waiver valuation approval by OPRD
is not required, but within the Project Sponsor’s organization, there must be a process to
assure that the basis for not preparing an appraisal is appropriate and that the waiver
valuation amount is used to determine what is believed to be just compensation.
An appraisal is not required if the Project Sponsor determines that the valuation problem is
uncomplicated and that the anticipated value of the proposed acquisition is less than
$25,000.
The basic concept is that the valuation will be prepared by a knowledgeable person who is
aware of the general market values in the project area. It is not intended that the person
preparing the valuation be an appraiser. The requirement for offering the owner the
opportunity to accompany the appraiser does not apply to waiver valuations. This will
further streamline the process.
There is no specific requirement for “approval” of the waiver valuation (reviewing either
the valuation itself or the decision to use a waiver valuation.)
The decision to perform a waiver valuation as opposed to an appraisal is not made merely
on the basis of the anticipated total compensation for the parcel. Other factors, such as
tenant-owned improvements, land-locking, proximity damages, familiarity of past
acquisition/condemnations trends in the project area, past acquisitions from the same
property owners, must be given serious weight and consideration in the valuation format
decision. In the event the parcel involves the acquisition of tenant-owned improvements,
the Project Sponsor shall prepare an appraisal. Tenant improvements are defined as
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buildings, structures or other improvements which would be considered to be real estate if
owned by the owner of the real property on which they are located. An appraisal shall also
be prepared when the acquisition creates a land-locked remainder or uneconomic remnant
and proximity damages to a structure.
The person performing the waiver valuation must have sufficient understanding of the local
real estate market to be qualified to make a waiver valuation.
10. Conflict of interest
No person shall attempt to unduly influence or coerce an appraiser, review appraiser, or
waiver valuation preparer regarding any valuation or other aspect of an appraisal, review or
waiver valuation. Persons functioning as negotiators may not supervise or formally
evaluate the performance of any appraiser or review appraiser performing appraisal or
appraisal review work, except that, for a program or project receiving federal financial
assistance, the federal funding agency may waive this requirement if it determines it would
create a hardship for the agency. [See 49 CFR 24.102(n) (2).]
11. Basis for LWCF matching assistance
The project sponsor must secure at least one appraisal by a qualified appraiser or document
the value using the waiver valuation method for each parcel to be acquired. Generally, the
fair market value (FMV) or waiver value will be used as the basic measure of LWCF
assistance on acquisitions. LWCF assistance shall be based upon evidence of this value.
The LWCF Act precludes using Fund assistance for incidental costs relating to acquisition.
12. Acquisition by Donation
An appraisal prepared according to the UASFLA or a waiver valuation is required for all
projects involving the donation of real property or interests for determining the federal
matching share.
ƒ Partial donations/Acquisition at less than just compensation.
Only in unusual circumstances (e.g. bargain sales, donations, etc.) will real property be
acquired at less than established just compensation as determined by an approved
appraisal. For partial donations, documentation must include evidence the owner has
been provided with a statement of just compensation. A written statement by the
owner that he is making a partial donation is also required.
ƒ To determine the amount eligible for matching a LWCF project, an approved appraisal is
necessary.
13. Acquisition of less-than-fee interests
In certain instances the purchase of less than fee title may be permissible. The acquisition
of easements, rights-of-way, etc., will be viewed in the same light as full takings.
Documentation of value by appraisals will be the same. The project proposal should
adequately explain why lesser interests are to be acquired.
14. Acquisition Projects That Will Not Be Assisted
The following are not eligible for LWCF funding:
ƒ Acquisition of historic sites and structures.
ƒ Acquisition of museums and sites to be used for museums or primarily for
archaeological excavations.
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Acquisition of land to help meet a public school’s minimum site size requirement as
established by state or local regulations.
Acquisition of areas and facilities designed to be used primarily for semi-professional
and professional arts and athletics;
Acquisition of areas and facilities to be used solely for game refuges or fish production
purposes. However, such areas and facilities may be eligible if they will be open to the
public for compatible recreation.
Acquisition of areas to be used mainly for construction of indoor facilities. Also
prohibited are areas where existing indoor recreation facilities, if left in place, will not
leave sufficient area at the site for the development of outdoor recreation facilities to
justify the cost of the acquisition.
Acquisition of railroad "hardware", trestles, stations, yards, etc.
Acquisition of sites containing luxury lodges, hotels, motels, restaurants, and similar
elaborate facilities, which are to be operated by the project sponsor or a concessionaire
to provide food and sleeping quarters.
Acquisition of agricultural land primarily for preservation in agricultural purposes.
Acquisition of federal surplus property.
B. Development Projects
Facilities needed for the use and enjoyment of outdoor recreation areas may be assisted.
Development projects may consist of basic outdoor recreation facilities to serve the general
public provided the funding of such a project is in the public interest and in accord with SCORP.
A development project may consist of one improvement or a group of related improvements
designed to provide basic facilities for outdoor recreation, including facilities for access, safety,
health, and protection of the area, as well as those required for the outdoor recreation use of
the area.
A project may consist of the complete or partial development of one area, such as a park or a
city playground, or it may consist of multiple sites such as a series of developments on a
number of geographically separated areas under the same project sponsor such as picnic
facilities in a number of parks, or the construction of fishing piers on a number of lakes in the
State. The project must be a logical unit of work to be accomplished within a specific time
frame.
Funding of development projects may cover construction, renovation, site planning, demolition,
site preparation, architectural services, and similar activities essential for the project.
1. Design Criteria
Plans for the development of land and/or facilities should be based on the needs of the
public, the expected use, and the type and character of the project area. Facilities should
be attractive for public use and generally be consistent with the environment. Plans and
specifications for the improvements and/or facilities should be in accord with established
engineering and architectural practices. Emphasis should be given to the health and safety
of users, accessibility to the general public, and the protection of the recreation and natural
values of the area.
All facilities developed must be designed in conformance with the appropriate current
design standards for the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 (ABA) (Public Law 90-480,
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, Americans with Disabilities Act,
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and State Building Codes.
Projects should incorporate the principles of sustainability in their planning and design.
2. Ownership and Control of Project Lands
Facilities may be developed on land and water owned in fee simple by the project sponsor
or where ownership of less-than-fee interests such as easements provides permanent
control of the property commensurate with the proposed development. All less-than-fee
interests must be described in the PD/ESF and indicated in the Section 6(f)(3) boundary
map.
No approval will be given for the development of facilities on leased land except for
property either:
ƒ Leased from the Federal Government with no less than 25 years remaining on the lease
and is not revocable at will; or
ƒ Leased from one public agency to another for 25 years or more, provided that
safeguards are included to adequately ensure the perpetual use requirement contained
in the LWCF Act. Such safeguards may include joint sponsorship of the proposed
project or other agreement whereby the lessor land-owning agency would provide
assurances that it would assume compliance responsibility for the Section 6(f)(3) area
in the event of default by the lessee or expiration of the lease, and these assurances are
explicitly reflected in the project agreement.
1.5
Eligible Recreation Facilities
Development projects may include but are not limited to the following facility types:
A. Sports and playfields
Fields, courts and other outdoor spaces used in competitive and individual sports. This
includes fields for baseball, softball, soccer and football, tennis courts, playgrounds and tot
lots, golf courses, rifle/pistol ranges, trap/skeet fields, archery ranges, rodeo arenas, inline
hockey rinks, skate parks, running tracks, and other similar facilities.
B. Picnic facilities
Tables, fireplaces, shelters, and other facilities related to family or group picnic sites.
C. Trails
Development and marking of overlooks, turnouts and trails for nature walks, hiking,
bicycling, horseback riding, exercising, motorized vehicles, and other trail activities.
D. Swimming facilities
Swimming beaches, outdoor pools, wave-making pools, wading pools, spray pools, lifeguard
towers, bathhouses, and other similar facilities.
E. Boating and Fishing Access Facilities
Most facilities related to motor boating, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, sculling and other boating
activities. These facilities include, but are not limited to docks, berths, floating berths secured
by buoys or similar services, launching ramps, breakwaters, mechanical launching devices, boat
lifts, boat storage, sewage pump out facilities, fuel depots, water and sewer hookups,
restrooms, showers, electricity and parking areas. Assistance will not be provided for
operational equipment such as buoys, ropes, l life jackets, or boats.
For boating and fishing access facilities and related support facilities that are eligible for LWCF
funding and the Dingell-Johnson (D-J) Act (also known as the Federal Aid in Sport Fish
Restoration Act and “Wallop-Breaux”), as amended, LWCF funding will not be provided for
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facilities also eligible under Dingell-Johnson unless the SLO has undertaken an effort to
coordinate all requests for such facilities with the state agency designated to administer the D-J
projects.
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Marinas are also eligible for assistance and are subject to the following provisions regardless of
when LWCF assistance was provided:
ƒ An equitable method of allocating berth space shall be used in all marinas.
ƒ Commercial charter fishing or sightseeing boats are permissible marina leaseholders due to
their potential for expanding public waterfront access.
ƒ Berth lease terms shall not be transferable to any other party.
ƒ Berth space for transient boaters shall be provided.
ƒ Marinas located in urban areas shall include specific design provisions for non-boater public
access.
Fishing/hunting Facilities
Trails, fishing piers and access points, initial clearing and planting of food and cover, stream
improvements, wildlife management areas, fish hatcheries and other facilities necessary for
public fishing and hunting.
Winter Sports Facilities
Facilities such as ski trails, jumps, lifts, slopes and snowmaking equipment used in downhill
skiing, cross country skiing, tobogganing, sledding, snowmobiling, and other winter sports.
Outdoor ice skating rinks and ice hockey rinks are also eligible.
Camping Facilities
Tables, fireplaces, restrooms, information stations, snack bars, utility outlets and other facilities
needed for camping by tent, trailer, or camper. Cabins, or group camps of simple basic design
and accessible to the general public in an equitable manner are eligible. Group camps designed
for specific groups or for which specific groups will be given priority access are not eligible.
Exhibitor Facilities
Outdoor exhibit or interpretive facilities that provide opportunities for the observation and
interpretation of natural resources located on the recreation site or in its immediate
surrounding areas. This includes small demonstration farms, arboretums, outdoor aquariums,
outdoor nature exhibits, nature interpretive centers and other similar facilities. Exhibit areas
will not be assisted if they function primarily for academic, historic, economic, entertainment or
other non-recreational purposes. This restriction includes convention facilities, livestock and
produce exhibits, commemorative exhibits, fairgrounds, archeological research sites, and other
non-recreational facilities. The development of nature and geological interpretive facilities that
go beyond interpreting the project site and its immediate surrounding area are not eligible for
assistance.
Spectator Facilities
Amphitheaters, bandstands, and modest seating areas related to playfields and other eligible
facilities, provided the facility is not designed primarily for professional or semiprofessional arts
or athletics, or intercollegiate or interscholastic sports. Seating provisions to accommodate
persons with disabilities should be provided. Assistance is not available solely to increase
seating capacity for a limited number of special events
Community Gardens
Land preparation, perimeter fencing, storage bins and sheds, irrigation systems, benches,
walkways, parking areas and restrooms related to a community garden.
Renovated Facilities
Assistance may be available for extensive renovation or redevelopment to bring a facility up to
standards of quality and attractiveness suitable or public use, if the facility or areas has
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deteriorated to the point where its usefulness is impaired or outmoded, or where it needs to be
upgraded to meet public health and safety laws, or requirements. Such renovation is not
eligible if the facility’s deterioration is due to inadequate maintenance during the reasonable
life of the facility.
Professional Facilities
Areas and facilities designed primarily for semi-professional or professional arts or athletics,
such as professional type outdoor theaters, professional rodeo arenas and other similar
facilities are not eligible.
Accessible Facilities
Assistance may be available for the adaption of new or existing outdoor recreation facilities and
support facilities for use by persons with disabilities. Outdoor recreation facilities to be used
exclusively by disabled persons are not eligible unless such facilities are available to the general
public or are part of an outdoor recreation area that serves the general public.
Mobile Recreation Units
Mobile recreation units including play mobiles, skate mobiles, swim mobiles, show wagons,
puppet wagons and porta-bleachers are not eligible.
Zoo Facilities
Outdoor display facilities at zoological park are eligible to receive assistance provided they
portray a natural environmental setting serving the animal’s physical, social, psychological and
environmental needs, and are compatible with the activities of the recreationists.
Eligible Support Facilities
A. Support Facilities
Support facilities needed by the public for outdoor recreation use of an area, such as roads,
parking areas, utilities, sanitation systems, restroom buildings, simple cabins or trail hostels,
warming huts, shelters, visitor information centers, kiosks, interpretive centers, bathhouses,
permanent spectator seating, walkways, pavilions, snack bar stands, and equipment rental
spaces. Support facilities may be sheltered from the elements by providing a simple roof or
cover.
B. Operation and Maintenance Facilities
Facilities that support the operation and maintenance of the recreation resource on which they
are located are eligible such as maintenance buildings, storage areas, administrative offices,
dams, erosion control works, fences, sprinkler systems and directional signs. Regional and area
wide maintenance facilities are eligible provided the project sponsor agrees to include those
park and recreation areas served by the maintenance facility in the scope of the project
agreement and under the conversion provisions.
C. Beautification
The beautification of an outdoor recreation area is eligible provided it is not part of a regular
maintenance program and the site’s condition is not due to inadequate maintenance.
D. Indoor Facilities
Assistance will not be provided for support facilities or portions thereof that contribute
primarily to public indoor activities such as meeting rooms, auditoriums, libraries, study areas,
restaurants, lodges, motels, luxury cabins, furnishings, food preparation equipment, kitchens,
and equipment sales areas. Bathhouses, public restrooms, maintenance sheds, etc., are
potentially eligible for LWCF assistance since their basic function is to provide support for
outdoor recreation facilities.
E. Pro Rata Basis
Support facilities that exclusively serve ineligible facilities are not eligible. If support facilities
9
will service both eligible and ineligible facilities, as may be the case with roads and sewers,
assistance may be provided on a pro rata basis for that portion of the support facility that will
service the eligible facilities, provided that the eligible facilities are subject to the LWCF Act
6(f)(3) conversion provisions.
F. Roads
Roads constructed outside the boundaries of the recreation area are not eligible unless:
ƒ They are, in fact access roads to a designated park and recreation area and not part of a
state, county, or local road system extending beyond or through the boundaries of the
area.
ƒ The access corridor is owned or adequately controlled by the agency sponsoring or
administering the park or recreation area and included within the projects 6(f)(3) boundary.
ƒ The principal objective is to serve the park and visitors. Any use or service to private parties
must clearly be incidental to the primary use of the access road for recreation purposes in
which case assistance may be granted on a pro rata basis. Roads designed to serve
undesignated recreation areas or federal areas are not eligible.
G. Equipment
Equipment required to make a recreation facility initially operational, and certain supplies and
materials specifically required under State Health Department regulations may be eligible.
H. Must Serve Viable Recreation Area
Development projects in new or previously undeveloped areas may not consist solely of support
facilities, unless they are required for proper and safe use of an existing viable outdoor
recreation area that does not require additional outdoor recreation facilities (such as
construction of restroom at a public nature study area), or unless necessary outdoor recreation
facilities are being developed concurrently, with the LWCF assisted support facilities, or unless
necessary outdoor recreation facilities will be developed within a reasonable period of time. In
the latter two cases, the project agreement must include a provision that the non-LWCF
assisted outdoor recreation facilities are to be completed within a certain time frame agreeable
to the NPS, and it they are not, the LWCF monies will be refunded.
I. Energy Conservation Elements
The energy conservation elements of an eligible outdoor recreation facility and its support
facilities are eligible. This includes but is not limited to solar energy system, earth berms,
window shading devices, energy lock doors, sodium vapor lights, insulation and other energy
efficient design methods and materials. Power systems that minimize or eliminate a facility’s
use of petroleum and natural gas are eligible including, but not limited to, windmills, on-site
water power systems, bioconversion systems, and facilities required for the conversion of
existing power to coal, wood, or other energy efficient fuels.
1.7
Facility Location Requirements
Development projects may be located on lands and waters owned by the project sponsor that
ensures perpetual public use. In certain situations, the following conditions also apply:
A. Public School Grounds
Public outdoor recreation areas and facilities for coordinated use by the general public and by
public schools, including colleges and universities, are eligible, provided that such facilities are
not part of the normal and usual program and responsibility of the educational institution.
Stadiums, stadium-like seating, and portable bleachers are not eligible for LWCF assistance.
Facilities needed to solely meet the physical education and athletic program requirements of a
school may not receive LWCF assistance. This policy does not preclude exclusive school use of
certain facilities such as athletic fields, tennis courts, and swimming pool, at certain times for
instruction or competition provided the public outdoor recreation use remains primary, and
10
there is adequate public access at other times.
B.
C.
D.
E.
1.8
A schedule of the time the facility will be available to the public must be included in the grant
application. Adequate signs must be installed at the site indicating when the outdoor recreation
facilities are available to the general public.
Tourist Areas
Public outdoor recreation and support facilities may be located in primary or potential tourist
market areas, provided their primary purpose is for public outdoor recreation as opposed to
entertainment or economic development, and provided they do not create unfair competition
with the private sector.
Historic Sites
Outdoor recreation and support facilities may be located on historic sites or in conjunction with
historic structures. This includes picnic areas, walkways and trails on a historic property as well
as visitor centers oriented to the outdoor facilities and environment. The restoration or
preservation of historic structures is not eligible. In all cases, the project must be in accord with
the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.
Utility Sites
Assuming project sponsor possess adequate control and tenure of land and specific agreement
from the utility company, outdoor recreation and support facilities may be located on utility
company lands such as right-of-way, reservoir lands, etc., unless the recreation management
plan of the utility’s license application filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
indicates the facilities are to be provided at the sole expense of the licensee.
Agricultural Land
Outdoor recreation and support facilities, such as demonstration farms and wildlife
management and hunting areas, maybe planned by the project sponsor in conjunction with
agricultural activities, provided that the type and extent of the agricultural activity is limited to
that necessary to support the outdoor recreation activity.
Guidelines for Sheltered Facilities
For LWCF assisted swimming pools and ice skating rinks located in areas which meet the cold
climate criteria, shelters of permanent construction may partially or completely enclose these
facilities to protect them against cold weather conditions and thereby significantly increase the
recreation opportunities provided:
OPRD may use up to 10 percent of its annual apportionment for eligible sheltered facilities.
State or local project sponsors may use their own funds to shelter existing or proposed fund assisted
swimming pools or ice skating rinks.
1.9
Non-Allowable Expenditures
ƒ Ceremonial or entertainment expenses
ƒ Expenses for publicity
ƒ Bonus payments of any kind
ƒ Charges for contingency reserves
ƒ Charges in excess of the lowest responsive bid, when competitive bidding is required
ƒ Charges for deficits or overdrafts
ƒ Taxes for which the organization involved would not have been liable to pay
ƒ Interest expenses, expenses, except those awarded by the court as part of just compensation or
acquisition in eminent domain situations
11
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
1.10
Damage judgments whether determined by judicial decision, arbitration or otherwise
Incidental costs relating to acquisition of real property and of interests in real property, unless
allowable under the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act,
P.L. 91-646
Operation and maintenance costs of outdoor recreation areas and facilities
The value of, or expenditures for, lands acquired from the United States at less than fair market
value
Cost of discounts not taken
Equipment to be used for the maintenance of outdoor recreation areas and facilities, including
automotive equipment, tractors, mowers, other machinery, and tools
Employee facilities, including residences, appliances, office equipment, furniture, and utensils
Donations or contributions made by the project sponsor, such as to a charitable organization
Salaries and expenses of the Office of the Governor, or the chief executive of a political
subdivision, or of the State legislature, or other similar local governmental bodies.
Fines and penalties
Any excess of cost over the federal contribution under one grant agreement is unallowable
under other grant agreements
Any losses arising from uncollectible accounts and other claims, and related costs
Legal and professional fees paid in connection with raising funds
Payments for lobbying ion connection with the awarding, extension, continuation, renewal,
amendment, or modification of an individual LWCF grant or the program.
Matching Requirements
LWCF provides up to 50 percent funding assistance. The eligible agency match may include local
budgeted funds, donated funds, and value of private donated property, equipment, materials, labor
or any combination thereof. The minimum federal share shall be no less than $25,000 ($50,000
total project costs).
Section 6(f)(1) of the Act prohibits the use of other Federal funds to pay the State or local matching
share of an LWCF grant. However, in those instances where the statutory provisions of a
subsequent Federal grant-in-aid program explicitly allow recipients to use such assistance to match
other Federal funds, Section 6(f)(1) of the LWCF Act is superseded and a matching arrangement is
permissible.
Existing government-owned lands cannot be used as a part of the non-federal matching share of a
project unless such land is to be acquired by the project sponsor from another agency and there is a
statutory requirement that the selling agency be reimbursed for the value of the property. Property
cannot be “donated” between a State and its political subdivisions to serve as a match.
1.11
Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act
Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act contains provisions to protect federal investments and the quality of
assisted resources. The law recognizes that changes in land use or development may make some
assisted areas obsolete over time, particularly in rapidly changing urban areas. At the same time,
the law discourages casual “discards” of park and recreation facilities by ensuring that changes or
“conversions from recreation use” will bear a cost – a cost that assures taxpayers that investments
in the “national recreation estate” will not be squandered. The LWCF Act contains a clear and
common sense provision to protect grant-assisted areas from conversions:
Section 6(f)(3): No property acquired or developed with assistance under this section shall, without
12
the approval of the Secretary, be converted to other than public outdoor recreation uses. The
Secretary shall approve such conversions only if he finds it to be in accord with the then existing
comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation plan and only upon such conditions as he deems
necessary to assure the substitution of other recreation properties of at least equal fair market value
and of reasonably equivalent usefulness and location.
This requirement applies to all parks and other sites that have received LWCF grants of any type,
whether for acquisition, development or renovation of facilities. In many cases, even a relatively
small LWCF grant (e.g. for development of a picnic shelter) in a park of hundreds or even thousands
of acres provides protection to the entire park site.
To ensure the continued effectiveness of Section 6(f)(3) protection, several management tools have
been developed to monitor and correct changes in assisted sites. The NPS requires on-site
inspections of all grant-assisted areas and facilities at least once every five years by OPRD.
1.12
School Park Joint Use Facilities
The joint use of property by schools and parks is encouraged, but there are several special
considerations that must be taken into account before a project can be funded on school property.
The proposed facilities cannot be part of the normal and usual program and responsibility of the
school district, and cannot be used to meet the physical education and athletic requirements of the
school. The land within the project boundary must be owned by or leased to the project sponsor.
Leases from one public agency to another must include provisions, which adequately safeguard the
perpetual use requirement of the LWCF Act. School Districts are not eligible project sponsors.
The lease or joint use agreement must include a Schedule of Use, which would allow the school to
use the facilities on a scheduled basis. A copy of the lease or agreement must be submitted with
the project application. This document should include a schedule of use, with provisions for
unscheduled uses by either of the agencies.
The site of a joint-use facility must be permanently signed to indicate that the primary use of the
facility is by the public, with the school having the authority to schedule classes or events at
specified times. Off-site signing is also required if such is necessary to direct the public to the
recreation facility.
13
1.13
Sustainability
The overall goal of Sustainable Parks is to promote the use of sustainable practices, maximize the useful
life of buildings and park facilities, and enhance the natural environment.
In recent years, the concept of sustainability has been emerging due to significant concerns regarding
the unintended social, environmental, and economic consequences of population and economic growth
and the consumption of our natural resources. The 1987 United Nations (U.N.) World Commission on
Environment and Development’s (WCED) report, "Our Common Future", defines sustainability as
"meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their
own needs."
More recently the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) stated that sustainability is based on a
simple principle:
Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our
natural environment. Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and
nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other
requirements of present and future generations.
Typically, any discussion of the concept of sustainability begins with more traditional ecological concerns
and issues. Any comprehensive discussion on sustainability must also include social and economic
considerations.
Planning, designing, constructing, and operating Sustainable Parks often includes the following
elements:
• Minimizing environmental impacts from the onset through sensitive siting of a park within the
landscape and careful consideration of the various uses within the park boundaries
• Protecting and enhancing habitat areas
• Educating the public about the value of natural resource stewardship
• Incorporating rain water reuse, grey water for irrigation, efficient irrigation systems, etc.
• Recycling waste products and striving to limit waste as much as possible
• Minimizing pollution impacts resulting from park features and user activities
• Utilizing Green building techniques (e.g., solar power, natural lighting) to reduce energy costs
• Promoting alternative forms of transportation (e.g., greenways, bike trails, safe routes to
schools)
• Reducing maintenance and operations costs
• Involving the public as partners, customers, volunteers, participants, stakeholders, etc.
• Encouraging partnerships with various organizations
Sustainability Considerations for OPRD-Administered Grant Programs
Project applicants are encouraged to address the following sustainability recommendations for Land
Acquisition, New Facility Development, and Major Rehabilitation grant project proposals. Since trail
projects have unique design considerations, a separate set of sustainability recommendations are
included for trail projects.
14
Land Acquisition Considerations
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Project protects and enhances floodplain functions.
Land is purchased to prevent or reduce erosion, sedimentation, and/or to improve water
quality.
Land is purchased to protect or restore damaged ecosystems.
Land is purchased to protect or enhance identified sensitive or endangered species.
Land is purchased to protect cultural and/or scenic byways.
Project will involve the removal of non-native invasive species from the site.
Project will create a diverse set of recreational experiences which are currently unavailable in
the local area—addresses an identified unmet need.
Access to the project site is easily available by foot (1/2 mile), non-motorized vehicles, or public
transportation.
Project will reduce current costs to the public and/or result in an increase in property values.
New Facility Development Considerations
Development Projects
• Project protects endangered species, restore habitat, and maximize open space.
• Careful site selection so that new park sites protect existing ecosystems and sensitive habitat
areas and utilize in-fills for new developed park locations.
• Project maintains water features, including shorelines and riparian areas to conserve water and
other resources.
• Project uses water efficient landscaping and use of native species.
• Project increases the number of native trees.
• Project increases conversion to renewable energy sources
• Project includes the use of solar energy sources for exterior lighting, parking lots, restrooms, etc.
• Project includes the use of a centrally controlled irrigation system.
• Project utilizes recycled water for landscape irrigation.
• Project provides public recycling containers at all developed park and recreation facilities.
• Project involves the control and management of invasive plants found on the site.
• Project is designed to restore damaged ecosystems.
• Project incorporates passive solar heating, daylighting, and natural cooling.
• Project includes gray water collection for landscaping irrigation.
• Project is designed for storm water retention and/or includes partnering with local flood control
entities so that the project is designed to contribute to large-scale flood protection efforts.
• Project includes the use of bioswales to handle storm run-off.
• New buildings are a minimum LEED Silver.
• Project involves an appropriate use of pervious or impervious surfaces.
Activity Based Projects
• Project will provide new access for the public to recreate in sensitive natural/preserved areas
using boardwalks, trails, fishing piers, platforms, etc.
• Project will create a diverse set of recreational experiences which are currently unavailable in
the local area—addresses an identified unmet need.
• Project will increase public awareness of the benefits of natural/preserved areas with
interpretive signs, educational brochures/posters, etc.
15
•
•
•
•
•
Project includes a Community Garden for local residents to grow edible food products and
interact with other local residents.
Project includes an edible landscape demonstration garden within site.
Project is designed to encourage physical fitness and reduce the obesity rate among Oregon
residents.
Project will increase equitable distribution of park and recreation facilities and provide for an
unmet need.
Project will provide recreational opportunities for underserved populations.
Major Rehabilitation Considerations
Development Projects
• Project increases conversion to renewable energy sources.
• Project includes the use of solar energy sources for exterior lighting, parking lots, restrooms, etc.
• Project reduces energy demand for the park site.
• Project reduces water use and increases plantings of native species.
• Project includes the use of a centrally controlled irrigation system.
• Project utilizes recycled water for landscape irrigation.
• Project provides public recycling containers at all developed park and recreation facilities.
• Project involves the control and management of invasive plants found on the site.
• Project increases the number of native trees.
• Project is designed to restore damaged ecosystems.
• Project incorporates passive solar heating, daylighting, and natural cooling.
• Project includes gray water collection for landscaping irrigation.
• Project includes the use of bioswales and is designed for storm water retention and/or includes
partnering with local flood control entities so that the project is designed to contribute to largescale flood protection efforts.
• Project includes the use of redeveloped buildings that are a minimum LEED Silver.
• Project involves an appropriate use of pervious or impervious surfaces.
Activity Based Projects
• Project will provide new access for the public to recreate in sensitive natural/preserved areas
using boardwalks, trails, fishing piers, platforms, etc.
• Project will increase public awareness of the benefits of natural/preserved areas with
interpretive signs, educational brochures/posters, etc.
• Project will increase equitable distribution of park and recreation facilities and provide for an
unmet need.
• Project provides the opportunity to enhance physical, mental, and social well-being as a result of
interaction with nature.
• Project includes development of interactive areas such as a community garden, natural play
area, or other such facility, for local residents to grow edible food products and interact with
other local residents.
• Project includes edible landscape demonstration gardens within site.
• Project is designed to encourage physical fitness and reduce the obesity rate among Oregon
residents.
• Project will create a diverse set of recreational experiences which are currently unavailable in
the local area—addresses an identified unmet need.
16
Trail Considerations
Development Projects
• Project involves an appropriate use of pervious or impervious surfaces.
• Trail will require less maintenance through sound construction techniques and using materials
designed for long term self-sustaining use and by using on-site materials as much as possible.
This may include alignment using natural topography, hydrologic techniques, and proper slope
of and around the trail.
• Trail design and alignment to reduce water runoff and water retention on the trail tread.
Activity Based Projects
• Trail is designed for alternative transportation including bicycle storage, changing rooms and
plug-in facilities for electric vehicles.
• Trail route will improve linkages to and between Federal trail systems, neighborhood,
community and regional trails, community parks and other public facilities, scenic overlooks,
historical sites, rivers/lakes, local communities and/or promote safe routes to schools.
• Project includes the development of a portion of a regionally significant trail which is part of a
larger trail system and has the benefit of increased economic activity through recreational
concessions.
• Project will provide new access for the public to recreate in sensitive natural/preserved areas
using boardwalks, trails, fishing piers, platforms, etc.
• Project will increase public awareness of the benefits of natural/preserved areas with
interpretive signs, educational brochures/posters, etc.
A trail project that includes the development of multi-use trails. The applicant must identify which of
the trail user groups included will be allowed to use the trail.
17
CHAPTER 2 – PROPOSALS, ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW/FEDERAL COMPLIANCE
(Refer to Chapter 4 of the federal LWCF Grants Manual)
2.1
Proposal Development and Screening for Environmental Impacts
States are responsible for ensuring that proposals submitted to the NPS, including new applications
and amendments for LWCF previously-approved projects such as conversions, temporary nonconforming uses, and public facility exceptions, are developed in accordance with all applicable
federal, state and local laws and regulations. This chapter presents the major federal laws and
executive orders that govern the way proposals must be developed for federal review and decision.
The federal legislation that coordinates the consideration of the potential for impacts to the human
environment as a result of a federal action is the National Environmental Policy Act. As described in
the next section, the NEPA process coordinates compliance with applicable related federal, state,
and local environmental requirements. To facilitate and document this coordination, States must
ensure that the LWCF Proposal Description and Environmental Screening Form (PD/ESF) is
completed and accompanies each LWCF proposal submitted for federal review and decision.
The PD (proposal description) portion of the PD/ESF identifies and provides descriptive information
about the proposal.
The ESF (environmental screening form) portion of the PD/ESF serves as part of the federal
administrative record required by NEPA and its implementing regulations which supports a chosen
NEPA “pathway” which must be completed. It is intended that States/project sponsors use the
PD/ESF as early as possible in the state/local project planning process. The ESF portion of the
PD/ESF will administratively document 1) a Categorical Exclusion recommendation or 2) the
necessity of further environmental review through an Environmental Assessment (EA) or
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) as necessary. The EA (or EIS) must accompany the State’s
LWCF proposal submission to the NPS if either is necessary. The ESF can also be used to document
previously conducted yet still valid environmental analysis.
2.2
National Environmental Policy Act
The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, is landmark environmental
protection legislation establishing as a goal for federal decision-making a balance between use and
preservation of natural and cultural resources.
NEPA requires all federal agencies to: 1) prepare in-depth studies of the impacts of and alternatives
to proposed “major federal actions,” and 2) use the information contained in such studies in
deciding whether to proceed with the actions; and 3) diligently attempt to involve the interested
and affected public before any decision affecting the environment is made.
Federal actions are defined as projects, activities, or programs funded in whole or in part under the
direct or indirect jurisdiction of a federal agency, including those carried out by or on behalf of a
federal agency; those carried out with federal financial assistance; those requiring a federal permit,
license, or approval; and those subject to state or local regulation administered pursuant to a
delegation or approval by a federal agency. The LWCF is a federal assistance program and thus all
NPS LWCF decisions are subject to the provisions of NEPA and associated guidance found in the:
a. Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing NEPA, 40 FR 1500-1508
18
b. NEPA’s Forty Most Asked Questions, CEQ
c. Department of Interior (DOI) policy and procedures for implementing NEPA (Departmental
Manual 516 DM 1-6)
d. National Park Service (NPS), LWCF Program Manual, Chapter 4, including the Proposal
description and Environmental Screen Form (PD/ESF)
2.3
National Historic Preservation Act, Section 106
Section 106 of NHPA requires federal agencies to consider the effects of their proposals on historic
properties, and to provide State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPO), Tribal Historic Preservation
Officers (THPO), and as necessary, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation a reasonable
opportunity to review and comment on these actions.
Section 106 review and NEPA are two separate, distinct processes. They can and should occur
simultaneously, and documents can be combined, but one is not a substitute for the other. They
should, however, be coordinated to avoid duplication of public involvement or other requirements.
The information and mitigation gathered as part of the Section 106 review must be included in the
NEPA document, and the Section 106 process must be completed by the State/project sponsor
before NPS can sign a categorical exclusion, a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of
decision (ROD).
2.4
Endangered Species Act, Section 7
Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires a federal agency consult with the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service or the National Marine Fisheries Service on any action that may affect
endangered or threatened species or candidate species, or that may result in adverse modification
of critical habitat. For LWCF purposes the State/project sponsor must carry out this consultation and
document that it has occurred. An EA or an EIS may provide sufficient information to serve as a
“biological assessment” for Section 7 purposes. If a separate “biological assessment” is prepared, it
must be part of any NEPA document.
2.5
Floodplain Management and Wetland Protection
Executive Orders 11988 and 11990 direct the federal agency to avoid, to the extent possible, the
long and short term adverse impacts associated with modifying or occupying floodplains and
wetlands. They also require the federal agency to avoid direct or indirect support of floodplain or
wetland development whenever there is a practical alternative. For LWCF purposes, the
State/project sponsor must comply with this executive order. If implementing the LWCF project
would result in an adverse impact to a federal or state regulated floodplain or wetland, a statement
of finding must be included in the EA or EIS documenting the State/local sponsors coordination
efforts with responsible state and federal authorities, a description of affected floodplain and
wetland resources, alternatives considered to developing in the floodplain and/or wetland, and
actions to avoid, minimize and/or mitigate impacts.
2.6
Environmental Justice in Minority and Low Income Populations
Executive Order 12898 directs federal agencies to assess whether their actions have
disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects on minority and lowincome populations. For LWCF purposes, States/project sponsors must specifically analyze and
evaluate the impact of the LWCF proposal on minority and low-income populations and
communities, as well as the equity of the distribution of the benefits and risks of the decision in the
NEPA document. If it does not apply, this should be noted in the "issues dismissed" section of the
19
NEPA document. See Department of Interior Environmental Compliance Memoranda (ECM) 95-3.
20
CHAPTER 3 – THE APPLICATION
3.1
Online Grant Application - In order to streamline the grant application process, the Land and
Water Conservation Fund Grant Program has moved to an online grant application. This system
has been designed to make the grant application more efficient. For more information on how
to access and navigate the online application, see the Online Grant Application Instructions
located under Manual and Forms on the Land and Water Conservation Fund website:
http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/pages/lwcf_other.aspx#materials
3.2
Pre-Application Review/Letter of Intent - Due to the large number of requests for LWCF funds,
OPRD staff will review a Pre-Application/Letter of Intent to determine if the project applicant
and proposed project meets the minimum requirements for LWCF grant funding. No scoring
points will be awarded for the pre-application review. Staff will review the PreApplication/Letter of Intent prior to granting access to the full application. If minimum
requirements are not met, the applicant will be contacted by OPRD staff with a summary of the
review. If the pre-application is approved, the full application will become available.
A Pre-Application/Letter of Intent Worksheet is provided under Manual and Forms. Using the
worksheet is a convenient way to cut and paste the pre-application questions into the Letter of
Intent in the actual online application. The following questions with the applicant’s answers
must be entered into the online Letter of Intent:
1.
Project Description and Scope: Please briefly describe the project including what work will be done, who
will perform the work, and an overview of what materials will be required to complete the project.
2. Please provide a timeline for the project including projected start and end dates as well as significant
milestones and deliverables throughout the project.
3. Is there strong public support for this project in your community? Please briefly describe the public
process used to select this project.
4. Describe your budget including the estimated grant request amount, match, and total project cost. What
is the source of match and is funding secured? Have you budgeted enough funding to complete the
project?
5. Have you ever received funding from any of the grant programs administered by Oregon Parks and
Recreation Department?
6. If applicable, are you on schedule with all active OPRD-administered grant projects? Are you in
compliance with applicable guidelines at previously assisted project sites? (e.g. no unresolved
conversions, overhead utility lines, maintenance issues or public access restrictions)
7. Does your agency have a board or city council adopted/approved ADA Transition Plan and/or Self
Certification?
8. Will you be able to provide a signed Land Use Compatibility Statement with your final grant application?
9. Are construction or concept plans completed at this time? (Development/Rehabilitation Projects)
10. With your final application will you be able to provide a completed Yellow Book Appraisal and proof of a
willing seller or donor? (Acquisition Projects)
11. Are you able to ensure that the project site will be managed for public outdoor recreation purposes in
perpetuity?
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3.3
Application Information
1. Contact Information:
• Contact Person Name, Address, E-mail, Telephone, and Fax: This is the person
responsible for the project and who should be contacted regarding application
questions. Please be sure to use information that is up-to-date and accurate.
• Federal Tax ID#: The federal ID is a requirement of OPRD financial services division
before any payments can be made to a Project Sponsor.
2. Project and Grant Request:
• Project Name: Please keep the project name brief.
• Funds Requested: Enter the dollar amount of the grant funds being requested.
• Matching Funds Requested: Enter the dollar amount of the Project Sponsor match.
• Total Cost: The total of the grant and match
• Brief Project Description: Briefly describe the project. Summarize the project in 40
words or less. Use the most concise description possible. Do not go into details of
the entire project. A more detailed description should be reserved for the Program
Narrative section of the application.
• Start Date/End Date: Approximate date you would like to start and complete work
on the project.
• Percentage of Grant: Amount of the LWCF grant being requested. No more than
50% of the total project cost.
• Percentage of Match: A minimum of 50% match is required.
3. Project Site/Location/Ownership: Enter the name of the park or site where the project
will be located and the acreage of that site. Project location should include a brief site
description, city/town, county, and owner.
4. Project Land is Controlled By: Select from the drop down menu the applicable control
and tenure documentation for the property where the project will take place. For
example, if you have a deed, select ‘Fee Simple’. Documentation is required and
described in this manual.
5. Supplemental:
• Program Narrative: The program narrative describes all elements of the project
and the need for assistance. The program narrative should be clear, concise,
and should clearly articulate what is being proposed and why it is needed.
• SCORP CRITERIA: See the LWCF Open Project Selection Process Project Review
and Scoring section in this manual and in SCORP for guidance on the remaining
questions in the supplemental section of the application.
3.4
Attachments
Attachments should be in an electronic format and uploaded with the online grant application.
Instructions on how to upload documents are included in the Online Grant Application
Instructions manual.
It is preferred that attachments are uploaded with the online grant application. If you are unable
to digitize files, you may choose to send required attachments in the mail. If documents are
mailed they must meet the following guidelines:
•
Attachments must be RECEIVED by OPRD no later than 5:00 pm on the application due date.
•
Faxed copies will not be accepted.
22
•
Label attachments.
•
Maximum size attachment is 11 x 17. Larger attachments will not be accepted.
•
Submit attachment packet with your contact information and project name to:
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
LWCF Grant Coordinator
725 Summer Street, NE, Suite C
Salem, OR 97301
Attachments:
A. Proposal Description and Environmental Screening Form (PD/ESF)
The PD/ESF must be used by all potential project sponsors for any proposal requiring federal action.
The PD/ESF is designed for use a tool during project scoping, planning, and proposal development to
document environmental information and to consider the proposal’s possible environmental
impacts at the time it is discussed, presented, or discovered in the field rather than as a “compliance
exercise” after a decision is made and the application for federal assistance is being prepared.
The PD (proposals description) portion of the PD/ESF identifies and provides descriptive information
about the proposal.
The ESF (environmental screening form) portion of the PD/ESF serves as part of the federal
administrative record required by NEPA and its implementing regulations which supports a chosen
NEPA “pathway” which must be completed before NPS approval. It is intended that you use the
PD/ESF as early as possible in the local planning process. The ESF portion of the PD/ESF will
administratively document 1) a Categorical Exclusion recommendation or 2) the necessity of further
environmental review through an Environmental Assessment (EA) or Environmental Impact
Statement (EIS). The ESF can also be used to document previously conducted yet still valid
environmental analysis.
B. Environmental Assessment (If Required)
(Refer to Chapter 4-6.b of the federal LWCF State Assistance Program Manual)
An Environmental Assessment (EA) is required when 1) the significance of impacts on any resource
is unknown, or 2) the proposed action does not meet the criteria for Categorical Exclusion (CE) and
is not included in the list of actions that normally require and EIS, or 3) the proposed action needs
several CE categories to fully describe the action, would involve one or more CE criteria exceptions,
or would involve unresolved conflicts concerning the use of resources.
Public Review - Opportunity for public review and comment. At a minimum, States are required to
ensure the interested and affected public has had an opportunity to review and provide written
comments on completed environmental assessments for LWCF proposals. This public comment
period shall be no less than 30 days. The notice an EA is available for review shall be published in
the local newspapers and community notices, posted on the sponsoring agency’s web site, and
made broadly known to the public in such a way that the interested and affected public has ample
notice of the public comment period. The State/project sponsor is responsible for reviewing the
public comments. These comments and the responses that address all substantive comments are to
be included in the proposal’s submission to NPS.
If the proposal is revised in response to substantive public comments or for any other reason, States
should consult with NPS to determine if the public needs another opportunity to review the revised
23
EA.
C. Environmental Impact Statement (If Required)
An Environmental Impact State (EIS) is required when the potential for significant impact to the
human environment exists is indicated by an EA or through the PD/ESF.
D. Vicinity Map
An area map that shows the location of the park within the town/city or county, used to assist staff
in locating the park for inspections. Provide enough information so that the park can be easily
found by someone unfamiliar with the area. Include a north arrow, street names, names of water
bodies, etc. Include the project title and use a highlighter to mark the park location.
E. Project Boundary Map and Site Plan
You may have one map that covers all of the requirements however, you may submit the
boundary map and site plan as two different documents. One of the most important
attachments to the project application is the 6(f)(3) project boundary map. This map shows the
relationship of past, present and future work, and the boundary of the property. This map must
clearly delineate the area to be included under the conversion provisions of Section 6(f)(3) of
the LWCF Act.
A boundary map is required for all acquisition and development projects and should accurately
reflect the proposed project and the existing facilities and uses on the park site. No changes may be
made to the 6(f) boundary after final reimbursement unless the project is amended as a result of an
NPS approved conversion. All land within the project boundary must be dedicated in perpetuity for
public outdoor recreation.
At a minimum, the Section 6(f) boundary must encompass a viable public outdoor recreation area
that is capable of being self-sustaining without reliance on an adjoining or additional areas not
identified in the scope of the project. Where it can be shown that a lesser unit is clearly a selfsustaining outdoor recreation resource, the area subject to Section 6(f) protection will be the park,
open space, or recreation area being developed or expanded. Exceptions will be made only in the
case of larger parks where logical management units exist therein resulting in smaller viable public
outdoor recreation areas.
The requirements for this map are:
ƒ Official park name/site name, location and LWCF project number
ƒ Sufficient detail to legally identify the lands to be protected under Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF
Act.
ƒ All known outstanding rights and interests in the area held by others. Known easements,
deed/lease restrictions, reversionary interests, etc. are to be documented, including any area(s)
under lease, name(s) of lessor and lessee, and term remaining on the lease(s).
ƒ When at the time of project application it is known that outstanding property rights held by
others are or will be exercised in the foreseeable future and impact only a portion of the area to
be protected under Section 6(f), the impacted area must be clearly excluded from the Section
6(f) map and accompanied by an explanation of why it is not intended to be under the Section
6(f) provision. The remaining project area must meet all LWCF program criteria for eligibility
and be a viable public outdoor recreation area.
ƒ Approximate total acreage of the 6(f) area.
ƒ North arrow.
24
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Signature and date of Authorized Local Official and date map was created.
Scan and upload up to 11 inch x 17 inch format to allow for filing, copying, and/or scanning.
Avoid use of color as the only means to delineate areas.
The map must be to scale. If metes and bounds are not provided, include actual distances or a
bar scale.
All existing facilities, including utilities, known easements must be shown. The map should be
sufficient to identify significant natural features of the park, such as tree lines, water bodies,
tributaries, geographic features, floodways and floodplains and wetlands.
If there has been a previous LWCF project within the park boundary, that project number and
the area should be shown on the map.
All proposed future facilities to be constructed should be shown. Futures facilities should also
be shown to scale by notes indicating general use area such as “future picnic area” or “future
ballfield.”
Indicate all of the facilities to be included in the project application, either by appropriate notes
or by color-coding.
F. Urban Growth Boundary Map
Required to identify priority projects for the distribution of funds for both close-to-home areas (located within
an urban growth boundary (UGB) or unincorporated community boundary and dispersed areas (located
outside of these boundaries). A map clearly identifying the project location and UGB or unincorporated
community boundary drawn on it must be submitted in order to receive points. The map should also include
the following:
1.
Project Sponsor and Project Name
2.
Clearly label project area either in the UGB or outside the UGB.
3.
Map must be current and dated.
G. Property Deed/Lease Agreements
Facilities may be developed on land and water owned in fee simple by the project sponsor or where
ownership of less-than-fee interests such as easements provides permanent control of the property
commensurate with the proposed development. Copies of the property deed, easement or lease
agreement must be submitted.
Approval will not be given for the development of facilities on leased land except for property
either:
ƒ Leased from the federal government with no less than 25 years remaining on the lease and
is not revocable at will; or
ƒ Leased from one public agency to another for 25 years or more, provided that safeguards are
included to adequately ensure the perpetual use requirement contained in the LWCF Act. Such
safeguards may include joint sponsorship of the proposed project or other agreement whereby
the lessor land-owning agency would provide assurances that it would assume compliance
responsibilities for the Section 6(f)(3) area in the event of default by the lessee or expiration of
the lease, and these assurances are explicitly reflected in the project agreement.
H. Permits (If Required)
Upload copies of any required permits (i.e. Division of State Lands, Corps of Engineers, etc.).
Proposals involving dredge and fill operations must be reviewed and evaluated by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service for the effects on marine and wildlife habitat. A permit from the appropriate
Federal agency (Corps of Engineers, Coast Guard, etc.) is required for development proposals
25
involving any of the above activities in navigable waters prior to NPS approval.
I. Construction Plans and Specifications
All development and rehabilitation projects must include construction plans and specifications that
show sufficient details of the project. The cost of the preparation of these plans may be included in
the total project cost. The general rule is to provide OPRD with the same documents used by the
construction crew building the project. When a building is to be constructed or remodeled as part
of the project, a floor plan and either an elevation or perspective view of the structure must be
submitted. The primary purpose of these drawings is to insure that the building are accessible, and
that to allow committee members and grants staff sufficient detail to review what is being
constructed prior to the funding meeting. Plans and specifications must be approved by OPRD prior
to project approval.
J. Land Use Compatibility Statement (LUCS)
All project applications must include a completed Land Use Compatibility Statement to ensure that
proposed grant funded projects are consistent with local land use requirements.
K. Appraisal (Acquisition Projects)
Appraisals must be submitted with application. Appraisals must meet the Uniform Appraisals
Standards for Federal Land Acquisitions (“Yellow Book”. These federal standards are considered
“Supplemental Standards” to the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP).
(Refer to Frequently Asked Questions – Appraisals and the LWCF State Assistance Program
located in the Appendix).
L. Proof of Willing Seller (Acquisition Projects)
Documentation that there is a willing seller or donor of the property for acquisition projects.
M. Preliminary Title Report (Acquisition Projects)
All acquisition projects must include a preliminary title report or lot book report.
N. Letters of Support
Letters of support from volunteer organizations, neighborhood associations, community members,
business partners, or other resources to demonstrate community support and the need for the
project. Submit no more than 3-5 letters. Include only those letters that strongly support your
project. Do not use multiple form letters signed by different organizations.
O.
Resolution to Apply
Attach Resolution from City Council, Board of Commissioners, Metro Council, or Board of
Directors to apply for grant funding assistance. Resolution should address match funding and
commitment to maintenance. (See Appendix for sample resolution)
P.
Maintenance Documentation
Documentation to support partnerships with other agencies or volunteer maintenance. Where
appropriate documentation such as letters of support from volunteer organizations, cooperative
agreements, donations, private sponsorship support letters, or signed memoranda of
understanding to demonstrate commitment to maintenance should be provided. Your
Resolution to Apply should address long term commitment to maintenance.
Q.
Additional Attachments
Documents not covered in any other category of attachments, such as photos. If you choose not
26
to submit ‘Additional Attachments’, you will need to upload a place-holder document which
simply states N/A or Not Applicable. This will allow you to continue with the submission
process.
R.
State Natural Resource Agency Review Procedures, Transmittal & Form
Submit the required forms and attachments to the list of State Natural Resource Agencies to assure
compliance with state and federal laws and that project proposals do not have a significant impact
on the environment. Upload copies of any comments from State Natural Resource Agencies.
ƒ Use the Sample Transmittal Memo as a cover sheet when contacting the Natural Resource
Agencies.
ƒ Provide the Natural Resource Agencies a copy of the State Agency Review form. Fill out the
form with your project information and a brief description of the project. Have the form
returned to you, then provide the forms to OPRD. Allow at least 30 days for the review
comment period. Keep copies of the requests made and note the date they were sent and
when you expect to receive the forms back.
ƒ When the forms are returned, you will need to contact the agency if additional information is
needed or if there are any adverse effects or if the agency requires additional information to
evaluate your proposal.
ƒ Attach the Preliminary Proposal Description and Environmental Screening Form (Preliminary
PD/ESF) The Preliminary PD/ESF has some of the information from the full PD/ESF. The
preliminary form is only used to solicit Natural Resource Agency comments. The full PD/ESF will
be required to be submitted with your grant application.
ƒ Attach Park Boundary Map (include project elements).
The State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) will be contacted by OPRD after you have submitted
your application and before you may receive grant funding to assure that the project proposal
complies with state laws regarding archaeology on lands or historic properties.
ƒ SHPO reviews are required to ensure that the project proposal complies with state laws
regarding archaeology and historic properties.
ƒ Any project element calling for alteration, rehabilitation, renovation, or demolition of a
historically, culturally, or architecturally significant property or property contributing to the
integrity of a cohesive older neighborhood or historic district needs to be cleared by SHPO.
ƒ Include photographs of properties 45 years or older.
ƒ With limited exception, it is illegal to disturb an historical, cultural, or archaeological site or to
remove an archaeological object from public or private lands unless that activity is authorized
under a permit issued by OPRD.
ƒ If human remains are found during an excavation, the local State Police office must be
contacted to determine if they are Indian or are evidence of a crime scene. If the remains are
Indian, contact the Legislative Commission on Indian Affairs (503) 986-1067 for a list of
appropriate tribal contacts.
ƒ If other archaeological materials are found during a ground disturbing activity, contact SHPO.
The SHPO can check to see if your project area has been surveyed and can give you a list of
archaeological consultants. Only professional archaeologists may apply for an archaeological
permit. ORS 97.740, 358.905 and OAR 736-51-000
27
SAMPLE TRANSMITTAL MEMO
TRANSMITTAL MEMO
______________________________________________________________________
DATE:
TO:
(State/Federal Natural Resource Agencies)
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Intergovernmental Review of Proposed Project for which Federal Assistance is being
requested (Local Government Grant Program).
______________________________________________________________________
Attached is a copy of:
1) a Preliminary Project Description and Environmental Screening Form (Preliminary PD/ESF),
2) a project location map, and
3) a blank State / Federal Agency Review form for the
(Project Name)
project,
in (City or County)
.
Brief Narrative:
We would appreciate your review of the project and the accompanying documents, as well as completion
and return of the enclosed State / Federal Agency Review form to our agency. If concerns about this
project are noted on the form, we will be in contact with the person signing the form to address those
concerns.
Thank you!
28
Intergovernmental Review of Proposed Outdoor Recreation Projects
For Which Federal Assistance Has Been Requested
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
725 Summer St. NE, Suite C, Salem, OR 97301-1266
STATE AGENCY REVIEW
Project Name:
Project Sponsor:
To Agency Addressed: If you intend to comment, but cannot respond by the return date, please notify us
immediately. If no response is received by the due date, it will be assumed that you have no comment and
the file will be closed.
PROGRAM REVIEW AND COMMENT
We have reviewed the subject notice and have reached the following conclusions on its relationship to
our plans and programs:
[ ]
It has no effect.
[ ]
We have no comment.
[ ]
Effects, although measurable, would be acceptable.
[ ]
It has adverse effects. (Explain in Remarks Section.)
[ ]
We are interested, but require more information to evaluate the proposal. (Explain in
Remarks Section.)
[ ]
Additional comments for project improvement. (Attach if necessary).
REMARKS
Agency:
Reviewed By:
Telephone No:
Return to:
Grant Applicant
(Insert your address here)
29
3.5
State of Oregon Natural Resources Agency Mailing List
For Review of Proposed Federal Actions
Mandatory Contact List: Submission required to these five agencies.
Oregon Dept of Fish & Wildlife
(ODF&W)
Joy Vaughan
Land Use & Waterway Alterations
Coordinator
3406 Cherry Ave SE
Salem, OR 97303
503-947-6089
[email protected]
Oregon Dept of Land
Conservation & Development
Jon Jinings
Community Dev. Spec.
888 NW Hill ST STE 2
Bend, OR 97701
(541) 318-2890
[email protected]
y Submit by email
y Submit by email
y Jon will forward your packet to the
appropriate Regional Rep
State Historic Preservation Office
Dennis Griffin
725 Summer St. NE, Suite C
Salem, OR 97301
(503) 986-0674
[email protected]
OPRD WILL SUBMIT YOUR APPLICATION
TO SHPO. If you need to consult them
prior to submitting your grant application,
you may do so.
If you are in Northwest Region:
Dept of Environmental Quality
Audrey O’Brien
th
2020 SW 4 Ave STE 400
Portland, OR 97201
503-229-5072
[email protected]
y Submit by email
If you are in Western Region:
Dept of Environmental Quality
Mary Camarata
th
165 E 7 Ave STE 100
Eugene, OR 97401
541-687-7435
[email protected]
y Submit by email
Oregon Division of State Lands
Caroline Stimson, Wetland Specialist
775 Summer Street NE
Salem, OR 97301
(503) 986-5231
[email protected]
y Submit by mail or email
Please include the following project
info:
y County y Latitude
y Township y Longitude
y Range
y Tax Lot(s)
y Section y Accurate Site Map
If you are in Eastern Region:
Cheryll Hutchens-Woods
700 SE Emigrant, #330
Pendleton, OR 97801
541-278-4619
[email protected]
y Submit by email
Potential Contacts: Submission to these agencies is not required, but may be prudent for certain projects.
Oregon Department of Forestry
Paul Ries
2600 State Street
Salem, OR 97310
(503) 945-7391
Oregon State Dept. of Energy
George Thompson, Grants Officer
625 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97310
(503) 378-3767
[email protected]
Oregon Dept. of Agriculture
James Johnson, Land Use & Water
Planning Coordinator
Natural Resources Division
635 Capitol Street NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
(503) 986-4706
Oregon State Marine Board
Wayne Shuyler, Assistant Director
435 Commercial St. NE #400
Salem, OR 97301-2453
(503) 378-2605
[email protected]
Oregon State Dept. of Transportation
Ask ODOT
355 Capitol Street NE MS 11
Salem OR 97301
1-888-275-6368
[email protected]
Oregon Water Resources Dept.
Bill Fujii, Intergovernmental Liaison
725 Summer St NE, Suite A
Salem, OR 97301
(503) 986-0887
[email protected]
30
[email protected]
3.6
Government to Government Relations
Governor’s Executive Order 96-30 – State/Tribal Government to Government Relations
http://www.leg.state.or.us/cis/statetribal_govrelations.htm
LEGISLATIVE COMMISSION ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
167 State Capitol, Salem, OR 97301-1347
(503) 986-1067; (503) 986-1071 Fax
Exec. Director: Karen Quigley; [email protected] Commission Assistant: Jeana Harrington;
[email protected]
Oregon’s Nine Federally Recognized Tribes
PHONE: (503) 879-5211
BURNS PAIUTE TRIBE
HC-71 100 Pasigo Street
Burns, OR 97720
PHONE: (541) 573-2088
FAX: (541) 573-2323
Website: http://www.burnspaiute-nsn.gov/
Tribal Chair: Dean Adams
General Manager: Carolyn St. James
FAX: (503) 879-5964
Website: http://www.grandronde.org
Tribal Chair: Cheryle Kennedy
General Manager: Cliff Adams
KLAMATH TRIBES
P.O. BOX 436
Chiloquin, OR 97624
PHONE: (541) 783-2219 1-800-524-9787
FAX: (541) 783-2029
Website: http://www.klamathtribes.org
Tribal Chair: Allen Foreman ext. 100
Tribal Manager: Kathleen Mitchell ext. 183
CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF COOS, LOWER
UMPQUA & SIUSLAW
1245 Fulton Avenue
Coos Bay, OR 97420
PHONE: (541) 888-9577
FAX: (541) 888-2853
Website: http://www.ctclusi.org
Tribal Chair: Ron Brainard
Tribal Administrator: Francis Somday
CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF SILETZ
P.O. BOX 549
Siletz, OR 97380
PHONE: (541) 444-2532
FAX: (541) 444-2307
Website: http://ctsi.nsn.us
Tribal Chair: Delores Pigsley
General Manager: Brenda Bremner
COQUILLE INDIAN TRIBE
3050 Tremont Street
P.O. Box 783
North Bend, OR 97459
PHONE: (541) 756-0904
FAX: (541) 756-0847
Website: http://www.coquilletribe.org
Tribal Chair: Ed Metcalf
Executive Director: Dave Tovey
CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF UMATILLA
P.O. BOX 638
Pendleton, OR 97801
PHONE: (541) 276-3165
FAX: (541) 276-3095
Website: http://www.umatilla.nsn.us
Chair, Board of Trustees: Antone Minthorn
Executive Director: Don Sampson
COW CREEK BAND OF UMPQUA INDIANS
2371 NE Stephens Street Suite 100
Roseburg, OR 97470
PHONE: (541) 672-9405
FAX: (541) 673-0432
Website: http://www.cowcreek.com
Tribal Chair: Sue Shaffer
Chief Executive Officer: Sherri Shaffer
CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS
P.O. BOX C
Warm Springs, OR 97761
PHONE: (541) 553-1161
FAX: (541) 553-1924, (541) 553-1268 Myrtle
Adams fax
Web Page: http://www.warmsprings.com
Tribal Chair: Ron Suppah
CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF GRAND RONDE
9615 Grand Ronde Road
Grand Ronde, OR 97347
31
Chief Operating Officer: Laurain Hintsala
32
3.7
Sample Resolution Authorizing Application for Grant
IN THE (Board of Commissioners, City Council, Board of Directors, etc.) (County Name) COUNTY, OREGON
) IN THE MATTER OF AUTHORIZING THE
) (Project Sponsor Name/Department) TO
) APPLY FOR LAND AND WATER
) CONSERVATION FUND ASSISTANCE FROM
) THE OREGON PARKS AND RECREATION
ORDER NO. xxxxx
) DEPARTMENT FOR (acquisition of, development
) of, rehabilitation of, etc) AT (Park Name)
) AND DELEGATING AUTHORITY TO THE
) TO THE (Authorized Official) TO SIGN
)THE APPLICATION.
WHEREAS, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is accepting applications for the federal Land and Water Conservation
Fund Grant Program; and
WHEREAS, the (Project Sponsor Name) desires to participate in this grant program to the greatest extent possible as a means of
providing needed park and recreation acquisition, improvements and enhancements; and
WHEREAS, (Parks Advisory Committee, Budget Committee, City Council, Board of Commissioners, Board of Directors and staff) have
identified _______________________ improvements at (Park Name) as a high priority need in (County, City, Park District, METRO, or
Port District Name); and
WHEREAS, (Brief Description of What Project Includes); and
WHEREAS, the (Project Sponsor Name) has available local matching funds to fulfill its share of obligation related to this grant
application should the grant funds be awarded; and
WHEREAS, the (Project Sponsor Name) it has been estimated that annual maintenance costs will be______and we will dedicate
adequate funding for on-going operations and maintenance of this park and recreation facility should the grant funds be awarded;
and
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE (BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS, CITY COUNCIL, BOARD OF DIRECTORS, ETC.) OF THE
(PROJECT SPONSOR NAME) AS FOLLOWS:
Section 1:
The (Board of Commissioners, City Council, Board of Directors, etc.) demonstrates its support for the
submittal of a grant application to the Oregon Park and Recreation Department for (acquisition of,
development of, rehabilitation of, etc.) at (Park Name).
Section 2:
This Resolution shall be effective following its adoption by the (Board of Commissioners, City Council,
Board of Directors, etc.).
Passed by the (Board of Commissioners, City Council, Board of Directors, etc.) this (Date) of (Month), (Year).
(Authorized Official’s Name and Title)
ATTEST:
(Staff Member’s Name and Title)
Note: Use this as a sample only. Resolution formats will vary from one agency to another. Use the required format
for the Project Sponsor
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
34
CHAPTER 4 - OPEN PROJECT SELECTION PROCESS
4.1
Open Project Selection Process
OPRD has develop an Open Project Selection Process (OPSP) that provides objective criteria and
standards for grant selection that are explicitly based on Oregon’s priority needs for the acquisition
and development of outdoor recreation resources as identified in the SCORP. The OPSP is the
connection between SCORP and the use of LWCF grants to assist in meeting high priority outdoor
recreation resource needs. The OPSP assures equal opportunity for all eligible sponsors and all
sectors of the general public to participate in the benefits of the LWCF State Assistance Program and
to affirmatively address and meet priority recreation needs. Oregon has developed a priority rating
system for selecting projects that ensures the fair and equitable evaluation of all projects and a
project selection process, which evaluates and selects projects on the basis of quality and
conformance with its priority rating system.
4.2
Timeline
The Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee evaluates and prioritizes grant application on an annual
basis. The timeline may change due to special circumstances. For the latest information check our
website at: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/pages/lwcf.aspx or call the LWCF Grants
Coordinator.
4.3
Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee
The Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC) is a nine-member committee appointed by the
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director. The committee meets annually and at other
times upon the call of the Director. The committee will establish the priority list of eligible projects
for LWCF assistance or provide other assistance as requested by the Director. The meeting will
assure full and open project selection processes that will include an outreach to all citizens of the
state.
The committee members serve non-concurrent four-year terms and represent the following
interests:
ƒ Counties east of the Cascade Mountains;
ƒ Counties west of the Cascade Mountains;
ƒ Cities under 15,000 populations;
ƒ Cities over 15,000 populations;
ƒ Park and Recreation Districts, Metropolitan Service District or Port Districts
ƒ Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
ƒ People with Disabilities
ƒ Minorities; or Representatives from Tribal Governments
ƒ Public-at-Large
Selection of committee members shall be from lists supplied by the Oregon Parks Association,
Association of Oregon Counties, League of Oregon Cities, Oregon Recreation and Park Association,
Special Districts Association of Oregon, and recommendations from the Director.
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
4.4
Presentation Before the OORC
All project sponsors must make a presentation before the committee in order to be placed on the
priority list for funding. The committee will score and will recommend grant requests for funding
assistance to the Director for submission to the Oregon Parks Commission for approval. Project
applications on the priority list are submitted to the National Park Service for qualification and
obligation of funds. Grants agreements are not executed until approved by the Commission.
Project sponsors who wish to make a “PowerPoint” presentation will be required to send a copy of
their presentation to the Grant Coordinator one week prior to the committee meeting.
Presentations will be pre-loaded onto a computer to be used during the presentation. We will try
to check that the presentation is working property. Project sponsors should request from OPRD a
return email indicating the receipt of your “PowerPoint” presentation and that it is working
property. Project sponsors should also bring a back-up flash drive to the meeting.
4.5
LWCF Grant Rating Criteria
LWCF GRANT RATING
CRITERIA POINT SUMMARY
CRITERIA TYPE
4.6
Possible
Points
1. Pre-Application
2. SCORP Criteria
A. Consistency With Statewide Priorities
B. Local Needs And Benefits
C. Long-Term Commitment To Maintenance
3. Overall Site Suitability Criteria
4. Community Support and Financial Commitment Criteria
A. Community Support
B. Financial Commitment
5. Discretionary Committee Criteria
0
0-5
0-10
0-10
Total Points Possible
100
0-20
0-30
0-15
0-10
LWCF Open Project Selection Process Project Review and Scoring
Technical Review
As part of the Land and Water Conservation Fund grant evaluation process, OPRD and National Park Service
(NPS) grant personnel conduct a technical review of all grant applications. Each submitted grant application
packet will need to include all of the materials requested in Section 2 (The Application) of the current Land
and Water Conservation Fund Oregon Grants Manual. Ineligible or incomplete applications will be returned
to the project applicant with an explanation of why their application was returned.
Project Priority Scoring System
Projects presented to OPRD for grant funding and that satisfy the requirements of the pre-application
and technical reviews will be scored by Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC) members
36
according to the criteria, rating factors, and points shown in the following “Project Priority Scoring
System.” A project's final score will be calculated as an average of the sum of all individual committee
member scores. The highest possible score for a project will be 100 points. Sixty five of the 100 possible
points are tied to specific priorities identified in the 2013-2017 Oregon SCORP. The priority rank of a
project will depend on its score relative to other projects and in relation to the amount of LWCF grant
funds available each year.
1. Pre-Application Review
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will support high-quality outdoor recreation grant
projects that have a reasonable likelihood of being funded. Project applicants are encouraged to contact
OPRD grant staff with questions regarding the LWCF grant application process. New applicants who have
not received prior LWCF funding are encouraged to participate in the program. Due to the large number
of requests for LWCF funds, OPRD staff will review submitted pre-applications to determine if the
project applicant and proposed project meets minimum requirements for LWCF grant funding. No
scoring points will be awarded for the pre-application review. The following are factors that will be
considered in the pre-application review.
A. Grant Performance and Compliance. The successful completion of projects in a timely and
efficient manner is an important goal of the LWCF grant program. A project applicant’s past
performance in effectively meeting the administrative guidelines of the program is also an
important factor in evaluating performance and compliance.
a.
The project applicant is on schedule with all active OPRD-administered grant projects.
(See Compliance Schedule in Section 2 of the LWCF Manual)
b. The project applicant is in compliance with applicable guidelines at previously assisted
project sites (e.g., no unresolved conversions, overhead utility lines, maintenance issues or
public access restrictions).
OR
c.
The project applicant has never received an OPRD-administered grant.
B. General Project Suitability/Minimum Program Requirements. Since LWCF grant funding is limited,
OPRD wants to ensure that all proposed projects are a good fit with the intent of the program
and meet minimum program requirements.
a.
Is the project a good fit for this particular grant program? If not, is there another grant
program that would provide a better fit?
b. Is the project’s budget well researched and complete? Does it anticipate the time needed to
navigate the application process and complete the project?
c. Is the scope of work appropriate and complete? Does it follow “best practices” and
incorporate the use of proven materials and products?
d. Has the applicant demonstrated that they are capable of completing a project of this size
and scope?
e. Has the applicant demonstrated that this project is a priority in their community, that it has
strong public support, and that an adequate public process has been followed in selecting
it?
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C. Accessibility Compliance. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a law ensuring equal access
to park and recreational facilities and services. In Oregon, there is a need for the retrofitting of
existing facilities constructed before current ADA accessibility requirements were in place.
a. The project applicant has provided evidence of a board or city council adopted/approved
ADA Transition Plan and/or Self Certification.
D. Readiness To Proceed. OPRD intends to ensure that available LWCF grant funds are used in a
timely manner and appropriate local land use and consistent zoning is applied to the property
once funding is awarded to a project applicant.
a. Planning / Design Status. The project applicant has demonstrated, through sufficient
documentation:
•
Land use compatibility (by providing a land use compatibility statement).
•
Construction or concept plan completed.
b. Acquisition Status*. The project applicant has demonstrated, through sufficient
documentation:
•
Completed appraisal.
•
Proof of willing seller or donor.
•
Land use compatibility by providing a land use compatibility statement.
•
Can the sponsor demonstrate adequate legal ability to ensure the site is
managed for public outdoor recreation purposes in perpetuity?
*Note: Acquisition Status does not apply to rehab/development projects.
2. SCORP Criteria (0-65 Points)
OORC members will determine a value from 0 to 65 points based on the information provided by the
applicant for addressing one or more of the four SCORP priorities, demonstrating that the project
satisfies high priority needs identified within their jurisdiction through the SCORP needs assessment or
local planning efforts, and demonstrating a commitment to long-term maintenance for the recreation
area/facility.
A. Consistency With Statewide Priorities (0-20 points). To what extend does the project address one
or more LWCF priorities identified in SCORP? The 2013-2017 SCORP identifies four priorities for
LWCF grant support:
a. Major rehabilitation of existing outdoor recreation facilities at the end of their useful life.
Major rehabilitation projects involve the restoration or partial reconstruction of eligible
recreation areas and facilities, which is necessitated by one or more of the following:
•
the recreation area or facility is beyond its normal life expectancy,
•
the recreation area or facility is destroyed by fire, natural disaster or vandalism,
•
the recreation area or facility does not meet health and safety
codes/requirements,
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•
the recreation area or facility requires rehabilitation to ensure critical natural
resource protection,
•
the recreation area or facility does not meet access requirements of the
Americans with Disabilities Act, and
•
changing recreation needs (e.g., changes in demographics within the service
area) dictate a change in the type of recreation area or facility provided.
b. Non-motorized trail projects satisfying priority needs identified through a local trails or park
planning process and trail projects making significant contributions to local and regional trail
systems providing trail connectivity. Trail connectivity involves linking urban trails to
outlying Federal trail systems; linking neighborhood, community and regional trails;
connecting community parks and other recreational and public facilities; connecting parks to
supporting services and facilities; connecting neighboring communities (e.g., Ashland to
Medford); and providing alternative transportation routes.
c. Projects supporting or providing a base for individual active participation. “Active” means
those forms of recreation that rely predominantly on human muscles, and includes walking,
sports of all kinds, bicycling, running, and other activities that help people achieve currently
accepted recommendations for physical activity levels. If the project does not include
specific active recreation facilities, please explain how the project will promote physical
activity by improving access to such facilities.
d. Projects addressing sustainability recommendations for OPRD-administered grant programs
included in SCORP Chapter Seven (pages 115-117). Recommendations are included for land
acquisition, new facility development, major rehabilitation, and trail projects.
B. Local Needs and Benefits (0-30 points). Project applicants are strongly encouraged to develop
project applications that meet high priority needs of their jurisdiction. Need can be demonstrated
through results of the SCORP needs assessments (item a below), coordinated, long-range
planning with a minimum of a 5-year planning horizon (item b below), or through a substantive
public involvement process (item c below). If the project isn’t identified as a county-level need by
the SCORP needs assessment, local need should be demonstrated through the project’s inclusion
in a current local planning document, or by describing the project’s public involvement process.
a. The 2013-2017 Oregon SCORP effort included a county-level analysis to identify priority
projects using the following two methods. Please identify if the project satisfies county-level
needs identified by one or both of these methods.
• Public recreation provider identified need. The first method involved a survey of Oregon
public recreation providers to identify priority projects for the distribution of LWCF
funds for both close-to-home areas (located within an urban growth boundary (UGB),
unincorporated community boundary, or a Tribal Community) and for dispersed areas
(located outside of these boundaries). Data were collected and analyzed to identify
need for each of Oregon’s 36 counties. Results are included in SCORP Chapter Five. If
the project is located within a UGB, unincorporated community boundary, or a Tribal
community use the close-to-home area priorities. Projects outside of these areas will
use the dispersed-area priorities. A map clearly identifying the project location and
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UGB or unincorporated community boundary or Tribal community boundary drawn on
it must be submitted.
• Oregon resident identified need. The second method was a component of the statewide
survey of Oregon residents. Residents were asked to rate several items for investment
by park and forest agencies using a 5-point Likert scale (1=Lowest priority need to
5=Highest priority need). Top priority needs are identified for each of Oregon’s 36
counties in SCORP Chapter Five.
b. The extent to which the project will satisfy priority needs, as identified in a current local
planning document (park and recreation master plan, city or county comprehensive plan,
trails master plan, transportation system plan or a bicycle and pedestrian plan).
c. If the project is not included in a current local planning document, describe the public
involvement effort that led to the selection of the project including citizen involvement
through public workshops, public meetings, surveys, and local citizen advisory committees
during the project’s planning process.
C. Long-Term Commitment to Maintenance. (0-15 points). According to recreation providers,
continued heavy use and inadequate maintenance are taking a toll on our outdoor recreation
facilities and infrastructure across the state. Many jurisdictions are reporting reductions in
department budgets and park maintenance levels. As a result, it is critical that once a recreation
area/facility is built or rehabilitated, the provider puts a priority on maintaining the area/facility
at a level that will ensure it does not slip into needing major rehabilitation and that the state is
properly investing limited resources in providing long term, high quality recreation opportunities.
a. The applicant should carefully explain how they plan to continue area/facility operation and
maintenance after the project is complete by providing the following information:
•
How will the project’s future maintenance be funded? A Resolution to Apply
submitted with your application should address funding for on-going operation and
maintenance for this project. Please include specific maintenance funding sources
such as tax levies, fee increases, and other funding sources which will be used.
•
How much do you expect to spend annually or number of hours needed to
maintain?
•
What degree of commitment do you have?
•
Do you have partnerships with other agencies or volunteer maintenance?
Where appropriate provide documentation such as letters of support from
volunteer organizations, cooperative agreements, donations, private project
applicant support letters, or signed memoranda of understanding to demonstrate
commitment to maintenance should be provided.
•
Will this project reduce maintenance needs and costs?
3. Overall Site Suitability Criteria (0-10 Points)
OORC committee members will determine a value from 0 to 10 points based on the information
provided by the applicant related to site and design suitability.
40
A. Site and Design Suitability Evaluation (0-10 points). To what extent is the site suitable for the
proposed development? Also, describe the extent to which the site or project design minimizes
negative impacts on the environment and surrounding neighborhood and integrates sustainable
elements.
4. Community Support and Financial Commitment Criteria (0-15 Points)
OORC committee members will determine a value from 0 to 15 points based on information provided by
the applicant related to the degree to which the project demonstrates broad community support and
that financing for the project is in place for successful completion.
A. Community Support (0-5 points). Project applicants should demonstrate community support for
the project by providing information such as letters of support and/or survey analysis.
B. Financial Commitment (0-10 points). Project applicants should demonstrate that finances are
available for the project by showing agency budget information or other documents
demonstrating financial commitment to the project. What is the source of local matching funds?
Project applicants are encouraged to develop project applications involving partnerships
between the project applicant, other agencies, or non-profit organizations. Project applicants are
also encouraged to demonstrate solid financial commitment to providing necessary project
maintenance and upkeep. To what extent does the project involve partnerships with other
agencies or groups? Is the funding from other agencies or groups guaranteed? To what extent
are local matching funds available? What is the local commitment to the project from the local
community through donations? To what extent has enough money been budgeted to successfully
complete the work?
Note: Donations of land, cash, labor, equipment or materials cannot occur until written
authorization to proceed has been received from OPRD.
5. Discretionary Committee Member Criteria (0-10 Points)
The OORC membership is representative of state geographic regions, agencies and communities. This
assessment allows committee members to bring their knowledge of statewide and local recreation
patterns, resources, and needs into consideration. The determination of points awarded is an individual
decision, based on informed judgment. OORC committee members will determine a value from 0 to 10
points. Applicants do not need to provide any additional material for this committee member review.
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CHAPTER 5 - PROJECT APPROVAL AND IMPLEMENTATION
5.1
Inspections
A. Pre-award Inspections
An on-site pre-award inspection will be performed by the State prior to the award of any
acquisition, development, major rehabilitation or combination acquisition/development
project. This inspection will summarize the utility of the site for its intended use. Photos will be
taken to record the site conditions before an acquisition and prior to the start of development.
B. Annual Progress Inspections
Progress inspections for all active development projects that extend one construction season
may be completed in conjunction with the annual performance report, due by March 31 of each
year. Annual progress inspections will summarize the accomplishments, evaluate the rate of
progress and method of execution, assure that the project is being carried out in accordance
with the project agreement and discuss any corrective action or amendments to the project
agreement. The State, may, at its discretion, inspect projects on a random basis.
C. Final Inspections
Final inspections will be performed by the State on all projects. Final inspections will access the
completeness and acceptability of the finished work, assure that the work was in accord with
the scope of the project agreement and any subsequent amendments, and determine the
actual location of the facilities.
5.2
State/Local Agreements
The State/Local Agreement is a document between the State and project sponsor that documents
project elements to be completed and limits of reimbursement payment. No work may begin
without approval from the Department. After NPS approval, the project sponsor will be notified to
proceed with the project. A signed State/Local Agreement by the Department constitutes project
authorization and approval. CONSTRUCTION WORK COMPLETED OR LAND ACQUIRED PRIOR TO
STATE APPROVAL AND NATIONAL PARK SERVICE APPROVAL OF THE PROJECT ARE INELIGIBLE FOR
REIMBURSEMENT. No project may begin without a signed agreement from OPRD.
Project sponsors have 12 months from the date of authorization to begin substantial work (i.e. the
award of contracts, or completion of at least 25 percent of the work, if done by force account.
Projects not conforming to this schedule will be cancelled.
Projects must complete and billed within two years of project authorization. Requests for time
extensions for extenuating circumstances must be requested in writing and approved prior to
expiration of the State/Local Agreement. Projects will be inspected and audited by the Department
or its designate prior to final grant reimbursement.
Project sponsors may be assessed an administrative fee for services.
42
STATE-LOCAL AGREEMENT
LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND
Project Title: XXXXXXXXXXX
Project Number: OP XXXX; NPS XX-XXXXX
This Agreement is entered into between the STATE OF OREGON, by and through its Parks and Recreation
Department, hereinafter called "OPRD," and XXXXXXXXX, a municipal corporation of the State of Oregon, by and
through its designated representative, hereinafter called "Project Sponsor;"
RECITALS
WHEREAS, federal matching funds for acquisition and development of outdoor recreation areas are available
under the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965, 78 Stat. 897 (1964), as administered by the
Department of the Interior; and
WHEREAS, it is the intent of the parties hereto that the Project Sponsor perform the Project, as defined
herein, in accordance with the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965, other applicable federal
and state statutes, and the requirements of the Department of the Interior; and for OPRD to reimburse
Project Sponsor for up to 50 percent (50%) of Project Sponsor's costs in performing the Project.
NOW THEREFORE, the parties agree to the following:
1.
Effective Date and Duration: This Agreement shall become effective on the date it is fully executed
and approved as required by applicable law. Unless otherwise terminated or extended the Project
shall be completed and this Agreement shall expire on MM/DD/YYYY.
2.
Notice to Proceed: Project Sponsor may begin work upon receipt of a Notice to Proceed from the
State. The Project Sponsor shall have one year from the date of the Notice to Proceed to commence
substantial work (i.e., for Project Sponsor to award contracts for work or show at least 25% of work
is complete if the work is performed by force account). Failure to comply with this schedule may
result in cancellation of the Project and termination of this Agreement unless substantial justification
for an extension is warranted. Any expenses incurred prior to the Effective Date will not be eligible
for reimbursement.
3.
Project: The Project consists of (scope of work and project elements) and as described in Project
Sponsor’s Grant Project Application (attached hereto as Exhibit A and incorporated herein).
4.
Project Funding: The estimated total cost of the project is $XXX,XXX.XX. The maximum amount of the
grant by the OPRD to Project Sponsor is fifty percent of $XXX,XXX.XX. The Project Sponsor shall in pay
the costs of the Project and then may request reimbursement from the OPRD. The Project Sponsor may
submit partial payment requests for work completed. Payment requests may be submitted no more
than once per calendar quarter. Final payment will be made upon satisfactory completion of the Project.
OPRD shall pay Project Sponsor no more than $XXX,XXX.XX or XX% of the cost of the project for
reimbursement, whichever is less. OPRD shall bill the Project Sponsor no more than $XXX,XXX.XX for
OPRD administration expenses. In no event shall the sum of the payment to Project Sponsor and the
OPRD administration retention exceed fifty percent (50%) of the total actual cost of the Project. OPRD
will bill Project Sponsor for all OPRD administrative expense on each reimbursement request submitted
by Project Sponsor.
5.
Reimbursements: Reimbursements by the OPRD will be made only for those items identified in the
Grant Application and approved by the OPRD to be reimbursable. Substitutions of the elements of the
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
Project or deletion of elements will not be eligible for and will not receive reimbursement.
6.
Continued Operation: Upon completion of the Project, Project Sponsor shall be responsible for the
operation and maintenance of said facility for public outdoor recreation in the manner and according to
the standards set forth in the Department of the Interior Manual.
7.
Funds Allocated: It is understood by the parties hereto that no OPRD funds other than the Grant Funds
are committed to payment of any costs of the Project, and that obligations imposed upon OPRD to apply
for federal funds as well as the right of Project Sponsor to receive any reimbursement for any costs of
the Project shall extend only to those portions of the Project, including the estimated costs thereof,
approved by the Department of the Interior. Furthermore, if Project Sponsor fails to perform any of the
work of the project and such failure, because of commitments made by OPRD to the Department of the
Interior, causes OPRD to perform any work necessary to bring the Project to a useful state of completion
(as determined by OPRD and the Department of the Interior), Project Sponsor shall reimburse OPRD for
all OPRD's costs in performing such necessary completion work, less any federal funds received by OPRD
for such work.
8.
Match: The Project Sponsor shall contribute matching funds or the equivalent in labor, materials, or
services, which are shown as eligible match in the rules, policies, and guidelines for the Land & Water
Conservation Fund Grant Program.
9.
Final Report: Project Sponsor must submit a final report and request for final reimbursement within 60
days of the date the project is completed or the Expiration Date, whichever is earlier. The final report
shall include full and final accounting of all expenditures and description of the work accomplished.
10.
Project Sponsor Obligations: Project Sponsor hereby agrees to comply at all times with all applicable
federal and state laws. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, Project Sponsor shall comply
with the LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROJECT AGREEMENT (the Federal Project
Agreement), General Provisions attached hereto marked "Exhibit B" and by this reference made a part
hereof, in accordance with paragraph E of part I (Definitions) of Exhibit B. Project Sponsor hereby
undertakes separately to perform its obligations set forth in said Federal Project Agreement. The benefit
to be derived from full compliance by the Project Sponsor with the terms of this Agreement is the
preservation, protection, and the net increase in the quantity and quality of public outdoor recreation
facilities and resources which are available to the people of the OPRD and of the United States, and
because such benefit exceeds to an immeasurable and unascertainable extent the amount of money and
other assistance furnished under the terms of this Agreement, the Project Sponsor agrees that payment
by the Project Sponsor to the OPRD of an amount equal to the value of any assistance extended under
this Agreement would be inadequate compensation to OPRD for any breach by the Project Sponsor of
this Agreement. The Project Sponsor further agrees, therefore, that the appropriate remedy for OPRD in
the event of a breach by the Project Sponsor of this Agreement shall be the specific performance of the
Agreement.
11.
Termination:
a.) The OPRD reserves the right to cancel this Agreement if substantial work has not
commenced on the Project within one year of issuance by the OPRD of the Notice to Proceed.
b.) The OPRD, upon thirty (30) days written notice to the Project Sponsor, may terminate this
Agreement if the OPRD fails to receive funding or appropriations, limitations, or other expenditure
authority at levels that, in OPRD’s reasonable administrative discretion, are sufficient to pay the
allowable costs of the Project to be funded hereunder, or if state law, regulation or guidelines be
modified, changed or interpreted in such a way that the Project, or any portion of the Project is no
longer eligible for Local Government Grant Program funding.
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c.) The OPRD, upon thirty (30) days written notice to the Project Sponsor, may terminate this
Agreement if Project Sponsor fails to perform, observe, or discharge any of its agreements or
obligations set forth herein and such failure remains uncured at the end of the 30 day period or such
longer period, if any, as OPRD may specify in the notice.
12.
Amendments: This Agreement may only be amended by a written instrument signed by both parties.
13.
Publicity: Project Sponsor shall make every effort to acknowledge and publicize the OPRD’s
participation and assistance with the project. Prior to the completion of the project, the Project
Sponsor agrees to place signage acknowledging the OPRD’s grant program support. The Project
Sponsor also agrees to maintain the signage throughout the life of the project. OPRD may withhold
final reimbursement payment until signage has been placed.
14.
Public Access to the Project: The Project Sponsor shall allow open and unencumbered public access
to the Project to all persons without regard to race, color, religious or political beliefs, sex, national
origin or place of primary residence.
15.
Compliance with Workers Compensation Law: All employers, including the Project Sponsor that
employ subject workers who provide services in the State of Oregon shall comply with ORS
656.017, which requires subject employers to provide compensation coverage for all subject
workers, unless such employers are exempt under ORS 656.126.
16.
Record Maintenance, Audits: The Project Sponsor acknowledges and agrees that OPRD and the
Oregon Secretary of State's Office and the federal government and their duly authorized
representatives shall have access to such financial records and other books, documents, papers,
plans, records of shipments and ________ payments and writings of the Project Sponsor that are pertinent
to this Agreement, whether in paper, _____ electronic or other form, to perform examinations and audits
and make excerpts and transcripts. The Project Sponsor shall retain and keep accessible all such
financial records, books, documents, papers, plans, records of shipments and payments and writings
for a minimum of three (3) fiscal years after the completion of the Project, or such longer period as
may be required by applicable law, following final payment and termination of this Agreement, or
until the conclusion of any audit, controversy or litigation arising out of or related to this Agreement,
whichever date is later.
17.
Governing Law, Consent to Jurisdiction. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in
accordance with the laws of the State of Oregon without regard to principles of conflicts of law. Any
claim, action, suit or proceeding (collectively, “Claim”) between OPRD (and/or any other agency or
department of the State of Oregon) and Project
Sponsor that arises from or relates to this
agreement shall be brought and conducted solely and exclusively within the Circuit Court of Marion
County in the State of Oregon. In no event shall this section be construed as a waiver by the State of
Oregon of any form of defense or immunity, whether sovereign immunity, governmental immunity,
immunity based on the eleventh amendment to the Constitution of the United States or otherwise, from
any Claim or from the jurisdiction of any court. PROJECT SPONSOR, BY EXECUTION OF THIS
AGREEMENT, HEREBY CONSENTS TO THE IN PERSONAM JURISDICTION OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
MARION COUNTY.
18.
Remedies: The OPRD shall have any and all rights and remedies available by law or in equity and
provisions of state law applicable to this Agreement are hereby incorporated.
19.
Project Sponsor shall comply with and is subject to the requirements of the Office of
Management and Budget Circular A-133, which implement the Single Audit Act of 1984
(P.L. 98-502). Title 49 CFR Part 90.
45
20.
Hold Harmless; Indemnity. The Project Sponsor shall perform the work under this agreement as an
independent contractor and shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless the State of Oregon and
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and its officer, employees, and agents from all claims,
suits, actions, loses, damages, liabilities, costs and expenses of any nature, resulting from, arising
out of or relating to the activities of the Project Sponsor or the Project Sponsor’s officers, employees,
sub-contractors, or agents under this Agreement.
21.
Participation in Similar Activities: This Agreement in no way restricts the Project Sponsor or the
OPRD from participating in similar activities with other public or private agencies, organizations or
individuals.
22.
Duplicate Payment: The Project Sponsor shall not be compensated for or receive any form of
duplicate, overlapping or multiple payments for the same work performed under this Agreement
from any agency of the State of Oregon or the United States of America or any other party,
organization or individual. All Project Sponsor matching contributions to this Agreement must be
used and expended for this project only and within the project period.
23.
No Third Party Beneficiaries: The OPRD and the Project Sponsor are the only parties to this
Agreement and are the only parties entitled to enforce its terms. Nothing in this Agreement gives, is
intended to give, or shall be construed to give or provide any benefit or right, whether directly or
indirectly, to a third person unless such a third person is individually identified by name herein and
expressly described as intended beneficiary of the terms of this Agreement.
24.
Public Records: Any information furnished under this Agreement is subject to the Public Records
Law, ORS 192.410 to 192.505.
25.
Non-Discrimination: The parties agree not to discriminate on the basis of race, religion, sex, color,
national origin, family status, marital status, sexual orientation, age, and source of income or mental
or physical disability in the performance of this Agreement.
26.
Notices: All written communications, which are to be given to the OPRD under this Agreement, will
be mailed and addressed as follows:
OPRD
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
LWCF Grants Program Coordinator
725 Summer Street NE, Suite C
Salem, Oregon 97301
PROJECT SPONSOR
(Project Sponsor)
(Attention)
(Address)
(City, State, Zip)
(Telephone #)
27.
THIS AGREEMENT CONSTITUTES THE ENTIRE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE OPRD AND THE PROJECT
SPONSOR. NO WAIVER, CONSENT, MODIFICATION OR CHANGE OF THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT
SHALL BIND EITHER PARTY UNLESS IN WRITING AND SIGNED BY BOTH PARTIES. SUCH A WAIVER,
CONSENT, MODIFICATION, OR CHANGE IF MADE SHALL BE EFFECTIVE ONLY IN THE SPECIFIC INSTANCE
AND FOR THE SPECIFIC PURPOSE GIVEN. THERE ARE NO UNDERSTANDINGS, AGREEMENTS OR
REPRESENTATIVES, ORAL OR WRITTEN, NOT SPECIFIED HEREIN REGARDING THE AGREEMENT. THE
DELAY OR FAILURE OF THE OPRD TO ENFORCE ANY PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT SHALL NOT
46
CONSTITUTE A WAIVER BY THE OPRD OF THAT PROVISION OR ANY OTHER PROVISION. THE RECIPIENT,
BY THE SIGNATURE BELOW OR ITS AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE, HEREBY ACKNOWLEDGES THAT IT
HAS READ THIS AGREEMENT, UNDERSTANDS IT, AND AGREES TO BE BOUND BY IT’S TERMS AND
CONDITIONS.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have set their hands and affixed their seals as of the day and
year first above mentioned.
STATE OF OREGON, BY AND THROUGH ITS PARKS AND
RECREATION DEPARTMENT
PROJECT SPONSOR
Authorized Representative Signature
Tim Wood, Director
Print Name and Title
Date
Date
Grants Division Manager
Date
LWCF Grant Program Coordinator
Date
Assistant Attorney General – Legal Sufficiency
(for grant allocations over $150,000)
Date
47
5.3
Amendments to Project Agreements
Amendments may be made to the project agreement to delete work items, add time to the
project period or to decrease funds allocated to the project. Amendments that increase the
local project cost will not be allowed. Changes that significantly alter the scope of the
project from what was reviewed and approved by the OORC will not be allowed and may
jeopardize grant funds. Deletion of scope items will reduce federal participation of the
project and must be amended prior to final billing. Requests for time extensions must be
approved prior to the expiration of the approved project period on the agreement. All
requests must be submitted in writing to the state.
5.4
Signing of Project Site
Permanent Signs – Federal guidelines require that permanent signs acknowledging LWCF
participation be installed at all grant assisted project sites. Project sponsors may design or
may use signs furnished by OPRD. The use of the LWCF logo on permanent and temporary
signs is required.
The sign may be placed at entrances to outdoor recreation sites, at other appropriate onsite locations, and park literature. The acknowledgement of LWCF assistance will be
checked during compliance inspections.
All school-park sites must be signed to designate the times when the public is allowed to
use the facility. Also, if necessary, off-site signing should be provided to direct the public to
public recreation sites located on school grounds.
Temporary Signs – Acquisition and/or development projects totaling $500,000 or more the
project sponsor is required to place temporary signage on or near the affected site, so as to
indicate the action taken is a product of funding made available through the federal LWCF.
The sign should include the source, percent and dollar amount of all federal, state, and/or
local funds.
Signing of acquisitions should be delayed until the acquisition of all parcels is completed
and all relocations have occurred. The display of dollar amounts for acquisition projects is
optional where such display may be detrimental to the project for future acquisitions.
For development and combination projects, temporary signs shall be placed at the initiation
of construction and remain until the project is completed.
Unless precluded by local sign ordinances, temporary signs shall be no less than 2 feet by 3
feet. The size of lettering should be based on the amount of information placed on the sign.
The selection of colors will be at the discretion of the project sponsor, however, there
should be sufficient contrast between the background and the lettering to make the sign
readily visible without being intrusive. The sign should include the source, percent and the
dollar amount of all Federal, State and/or local funds. The second line on the temporary
sign will indicate whether the project is acquisition, development, or both. In addition to
the National Park Service, the administrative acknowledgement may include the State
agency responsible for the LWCF program. Although optional, symbols for the LWCF and/or
the project sponsor may be used. Here is a suggested format:
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
The CITY OF XXXXXXXXXX
Public Outdoor Recreation Site Development
Aided by the Federal
Land and Water Conservation Fund
Administered by the National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
LWCF
City of XXXXX
Total Project
Funding
50%
50%
$250,000.00
$250,000.00
$500,000.00
Source of funding includes monies derived
from Outer Continental Shelf Federal Receipts
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CHAPTER 6 – GENERAL COST PRINCIPLES, REIMBURSEMENTS AND AUDITS
6.1
Relationship of Project Period to Eligible Costs
To be eligible for matching assistances, costs must have been incurred within the project
period except for pre-award project planning costs. The project period is the span of time
stipulated on the agreement during which all work to be accomplished under the terms of
the agreement must be completed.
A. Development costs are first incurred at the start of actual physical work on the project
site (such as the clearing of ground, the beginning of construction of a building, or the
delivery of material to the site), and continue through the period the work is being
done. Costs are not incurred at some earlier time when contracts are signed, funds
obligated, or purchase orders issued, or at a later time when the ensuing bills are paid.
Physical work on the project site shall commence within one year of project approval.
B. Acquisition projects – Since the transfer of ownership in real property can be a
protracted process which differs under various State laws and procedures, the
relationship of acquisition costs to project period is separated into two elements: the
date when the acquisition cost is incurred and the date when the cost is eligible for
reimbursement.
(1) Acquisition costs are incurred on the date with the earliest of any of the following
transactions takes place:
a. The project sponsor accepts deed, lease or other appropriate conveyance;
b. The project sponsor makes full payment for the property;
c. The project sponsor makes first payment in a series of spaced or time
payments.
d. The project sponsor makes the first or full payment as stipulated in an option
agreement; (The cost of the option, if included as part of the purchase price is
allowed as a retroactive cost.)
e. The project sponsor makes first partial or full payment to an escrow agent.
(2) The transactions will be used to determine whether an acquisition cost is incurred
within the project period. Eligible acquisition costs (and retroactive option costs)
will be reimbursed only after the project sponsor has made payment and received
satisfactory title to the property.
6.2
Retroactive Costs
Costs incurred prior to NPS or State approval of a project, are not eligible for matching
funds. LWCF assistance shall only be awarded to assist work not yet undertaken, rather
than to help pay for work already begun or completed.
6.3
Waiver of Retroactivity
Retroactive costs will not be matched under ordinary circumstances. Waivers will be made
only when immediate action is necessary and the time needed to process and application
would result in a loss of a significant opportunity.
(1) Acquisition – The State will notify NPS in writing of the necessity to immediately acquire
land prior to taking such action, including a description of the resources to be acquired,
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
the public outdoor recreation uses proposed for the site, and justification for the
proposed action. At the time the formal acquisition project is submitted, the State shall
include all the necessary documentation required for a new acquisition.
(2) Development – The State will notify NPS in writing of the necessity to immediately
develop an area prior to taking such action, including a description of the planned
development, the public outdoor recreation uses proposed for the site, and a
justification for the proposed action. Waivers for development will not be approved
unless accompanied by a PD/ESF and the proposal qualifies for a categorical exclusion
under NEPA.
If NPS grants a waiver, the retroactive costs will be eligible for assistance if the agreement is
later approved. Granting a waiver is only an acknowledgement of the need for immediate
action; it does not imply nor assure NPS approval of the project. The retroactive costs are
incurred at the applicant’s risk.
Project proposals should be submitted for funding as soon as possible after the granting of
a waiver of retroactivity. Projects for which a waiver is granted will be submitted within
one fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the waiver was granted.
6.4
Equal Employment Opportunity Contract Compliance
For all LWCF grants involving federally assisted construction contracts and subcontracts in
excess of $10,000, the recipient must comply with Executive Order 11246, as amended, and
with the regulations of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) of the
Department of Labor at 41 CFR 60-4. In determining whether Fund-assisted construction
contracts exceed this dollar limit, the total amount of the contract awarded rather than the
amount of federal assistance shall apply.
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6.5
Accounting Instructions
ACCOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENTS PARTICIPATING IN THE NATIONAL
PARK SERVICE'S LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM
In any program where reimbursement is requested for a portion of project costs, adequate
records are essential. There should be definite supporting evidence for each item of cost
claimed -- estimates are not sufficient.
In order to promote a better understanding of the records required and to avoid the
possibility of having costs disallowed at the time of audit, the following accounting
procedures are suggested for all NPS (LWCF) projects.
A separate account should be established for each approved project. The ledger sheet, IBM
card or tape should include the project number and name. It should be maintained in such
a manner (e.g., separate columns on a ledger sheet) that payment for salaries, contracts,
equipment rental, supplies and other items listed on the Agency Billing Form can be
accumulated separately.
Each entry in the account must be cross-referenced to a voucher, payroll invoice or other
supporting document. Each payment must be supported by a cancelled check or warrant.
Salaries and Wages
An authorized official should sign Payrolls and time and attendance records should support
wages paid for each employee. Special care should be taken to distinguish between
difference phases of development (i.e., separate projects in the same area, and between
different locations developed at the same time and/or with similar construction.
Any fringe benefit rates used should be developed using actual historical costs, and
individual components should be identified.
Cash and In-Kind Contributions
The value of in-kind contributions may be used as all or part of the project sponsor's share
of the project costs.
Contract Payments
Payments made by the project sponsor should be supported by a statement or invoice from
the contractor or the project architect or engineer. The document must identify the project
and the service performed. NPS construction contracts that exceed $10,000.00 must be
advertised for bid. Documentation for the bidding procedure will be required at the time of
audits (i.e., advertisement for bid, bid tabulation, original bid proposal, change orders, and
a copy of the final contract.)
Consultant Services
Payments made by a project sponsor should be supported by a statement or invoice from
the consultant. The project sponsor should enter into a contract and/or include the
estimated costs in the original application for assistance. Payments made by the project
sponsor may be for per diem, salary, fee for service and may include payment for the travel
or other services. A cost-plus-a-percentage of costs payment is not allowable under federal
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
regulations. Proper consultant selection procedures must be followed and proper
documentation maintained for audit.
Equipment Rental (Owned)
Equipment rental cost (for owned equipment) should be supported by time records and by
a schedule of hourly rates developed from actual historical costs, or in the event no
previous cost data exists, from reasonable estimates of such factors as useful life, annual
hours of use, tire replacement schedule, insurance premiums, etc. These estimated rates
must be adjusted each year based on the previous year's actual costs.
Equipment Rental (Outside)
Payments made by the project sponsor for equipment rented for specific project are
generally allowed under federal regulations. A statement must support payments made by
the project sponsor or invoice from the vendor that indicates the time period the
equipment was rented.
Materials and Supplies
Supplies and materials charged to the project should be supported by purchase orders and
supplier's invoices, if purchased for a specific project, or by approved requisitions or similar
documents, if issued from stock; unit prices for stock issues should be traceable to actual
invoices and/or other historical cost data.
Approved Pre-Agreement Cost
For development projects the costs of site investigation and selection, site planning,
feasibility studies, preliminary design, environmental review, preparation of cost estimates,
construction drawings and specifications and similar items necessary for project
preparation may be eligible for assistance, for up to three years in advance of the approved
project. These costs must be included and described in the project application.
Value of Approved Donations (Non-Cash)
The method and evaluation and charges for volunteer services, material, and equipment
must be documented and approved by the State prior to donations being applied to
reimbursement requests in order for such contributions to be considered as part of the
sponsor's matching share. Donations must be included in the project application and
approved in advance by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.
Allowable Costs
The principles and standards for determine costs applicable to this grants program are
found in OMB Circular A-87. Allowable costs include personal services, fringe benefits,
consultant services, equipment, supplies and materials, information and interpretation
costs, construction, administrative and supporting expenses, costs of purchase of real
property and of interests in real property, cost of real property purchased from other public
agencies, costs of real property acquired through exchanges, real property acquired by
donation, master planning (actual development costs must be of at least equal cost to the
master plan), and other miscellaneous costs.
Unallowable Costs
Unallowable costs include, but are not limited to: Ceremonial or entertainment expenses,
51
publicity, bonus payments, contingency reserves, charges in excess of lowest bid, deficits or
overdrafts, interest expense, operation and maintenance costs of outdoor recreation areas
and facilities, maintenance equipment, employee facilities, donations to charitable
organizations, fines and penalties, lobbying and legal and professional fees paid in
connection with fund raising activities.
An audit will be made after completion of the project to verify your billing. Please attach all
documentation to support your billing request. A State Auditor will contact you several
days in advance to arrange a convenient time for an on-site audit or will complete a desk
review of the documentation submitted. To expedite the on-site audit, please have all
supporting documents available.
6.6
Force Account
Force account refers to the use of Project Sponsor’s staff, equipment, and/or materials. All
or part of the Project Sponsor’s share may be provided through force account.
Documentation must be verifiable from Project Sponsors record, and must be reasonable
and necessary for proper and efficient completion of the project.
6.7
Donations
Donations of land, labor, equipment rental or materials may be used as all or a portion of
the sponsor's matching share of an LWCF project. The method of valuation and charges for
volunteer services, material, equipment must be documented and approved by the State
prior to the donations being applied to reimbursement requests in order for such
contributions to be considered as part of the sponsor's matching share. The value of
eligible donations cannot exceed the actual expenditures of the project.
Donated Real Property
A donation of land may be partial or total; a partial donation is known as a "bargain sale"
and must be handled the same as a total donation. The value of donated real property shall
be established by an independent appraiser in accord with commonly accepted appraisal
standards (Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of
1970, Public Law 91-646). The appraisal will be reviewed by the Parks Department and
then forwarded to NPS for their review and approval. After NPS approval, the sponsor can
accept or acquire land involved in a total or partial donation.
In-kind donation of real property donations are eligible in a project only to the extent there
are additional acquisition and/or development costs to be met by the federal assistance
requested for that project that must be fully described and explained in the proposal.
Example: Land valued at $10,000 is donated to the project sponsor who proceeds to
develop the property for recreational use. Development costs total $6,000. The actual
total project cost is $16,000. But because only $6,000 was actually spent, and since a grant
in excess of that would constitute a profit to the sponsor, the federal share is reduced
accordingly.
Sponsor’s share (amount of the $10,000 donation applied to the project)
LWCF Assistance
Total
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$6,000.00
$6,000.00
$12,000.00
The amount of donation that is matchable is the value of the donation or the amount of
cast spent by the sponsor for additional acquisition of development, whichever is less.
Labor, Materials and Equipment:
Labor: Project sponsors should consider the source of the donation, the estimated hours,
the rate or rates at which the labor will be credited to the project and the source of the
rates (i.e. federal minimum wage rate, prevailing wage rate). Volunteer services may be
furnished by professional and technical personnel, consultants, and other skilled and
unskilled labor. Each hour of volunteered service may be counted as matching share if the
service is an integral and necessary part of an approved project. Records of in-kind
contributions of personnel shall include time sheets containing the signature of the person
whose time is contributed and of the supervisor verifying that the record is accurate.
Rates for volunteers should be consistent with those regular rates paid for similar work in
other activities of the State. In cases where the kinds of skills required for the project are
not found in the other activities of the grantee, rates used should be consistent with those
paid for similar work in the labor market in which the grantee competes for the kind of
services involved. The time of a person donating services will be valued at the rate paid as
a general laborer unless the person is professionally skilled in the work being performed on
the project (i.e., plumber doing work on pipes, mason doing work on a brick building).
When this is the case, the wage rate this individual is normally paid for performing this
service may be charged to the project. A general laborer's wages may be charged in the
amount of that which the city or cities in the immediate area pay their city employees for
performing similar duties. The rates for labor are the "bare" rates -- no payroll additives or
overhead costs may be included, since the sponsor is paying none.
Materials - Prices assessed to donated materials included in the matching share should be
reasonable and should not exceed current market prices at the time they are charged to the
project. Records of in-kind contributions of material shall indicate the fair market value by
listing the comparable prices and vendors.
Equipment - The hourly rate for donated equipment used on a project shall not exceed its
fair-rental value. Hourly rates in the annual edition of Rental Compilation or Rental Rate
Guide or similar publications, which provide the national or regional average rates for
construction equipment, may be used. Such publications are usually available from
contractor associations. Records of in-kind contributions of equipment shall include
schedules showing the hours and dates of use and the signature of the operator of the
equipment. The rental rates must be without operator; the operator must be shown
separately as donated labor.
Documentation
The basis for determining the charges for donated personal services, material, equipment
and land must be documented and must be approved by OPRD prior to the request for
reimbursement that includes the value of the donation.
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CHAPTER 7 – REQUESTING A REIMBURSEMENT
7.1
General
These guidelines are for local government agencies participating in the federal Land and
Water Conservation Fund grant program. In any program where reimbursement is
requested for a portion of the project costs, adequate documentation and records are
essential. Financial records, supporting documents, statistical records, and all other records
pertinent to a grant program shall be retained for a period of three years after final
payment on a project.
It is extremely important that reimbursement requests clearly define the work, their costs,
and are supported by relevant documentation. They document must be included with the
reimbursement request.
Note: Project costs initiated or completed prior to project authorization (signed grant
agreement) will not be reimbursed. For acquisition projects, do not take title to proposed
acquisition until project has been approved by NPS and the State.
A. Partial Billings
A partial reimbursement request may be submitted at any time after a significant
portion of the work has been completed on the project along with supporting
documentation. Submit a copy of the “Request for Grant Reimbursement Form” and
“Progress Report” that includes the status of the work completed. The State will
reimburse up to 90% of the grant amount and the remaining 10% after the project has
been completed.
B. Final Billings
Submit a final “Request for Reimbursement Form” and final “Progress Report”, digital
photos, supporting documentation and a transmittal letter describing the work
completed. For acquisitions, a copy of the deed must be submitted. A final inspection
of the project will be completed by OPRD grants staff to assure that the project has been
completed successfully.
7.2
How to Fill Out the Reimbursement Form
http://egov.oregon.gov/OPRD/GRANTS/docs/LWCF/Reimbursement_Form.xls
A separate accounting record should be established for each approved project in such a
manner that all project costs can be tracked according to the categories on the
reimbursement form.
A. Salaries and Wages
Show on the form any salaries or wages incurred during the project period and project
costs to date. For audit purposes you must submit payroll records. Include under
salaries and wages, labor costs for the use of any equipment, except for donated labor,
that should be included in donations.
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
B. Contract Payments
Show on the form any costs incurred by contracts. For audit purposes, payments made
by your agency should be supported by a statement or invoice from the contractor or
the project architect or engineer. You should retain documentation of the bidding
procedure and a copy of the final contract.
C. Equipment, Materials and Supplies
Equipment rental costs for owned equipment should be supported by your agency’s
schedule of hourly rates. Rented equipment payments must be supported by a
statement or invoice showing costs and the time period equipment was rented.
D. Program Administration, Design and Engineering
Costs for program administration, design and engineering, plans and specifications,
land use and building permits from another agency, should not exceed 15% of the total
project costs.
E. Value of Donations
See Chapter 6.7
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CHAPTER 8 - POST COMPLETION AND STEWARDSHIP
8.1
Purpose
Pursuant to Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act and 36 CFR 59.3, the following requirements are
for maintaining LWCF assisted sites and facilities in public outdoor recreation use following
project completion and to assure that LWCF assisted areas remain accessible to the general
public including non-residents of assisted jurisdictions. These post completion
responsibilities apply to each area or facility for which LWCF assistance is obtained,
regardless of the extent of participation of the program in the assisted area or facility and
consistent with the contractual agreement between NPS and the State of Oregon.
Responsibility for compliance and enforcement of these requirements rests with the State
for both state and locally sponsored projects. The responsibilities are applicable to the area
depicted or otherwise described o the 6(f)(3) boundary map and/or as described in other
project documentation approved by the NPS.
8.2
Operation and Maintenance
Property acquired or developed with LWCF assistance shall be operated and maintained as
follows:
1. The property shall be maintained so as to appear attractive and inviting to the public.
2. Sanitation and sanitary facilities shall be maintained in accordance with applicable
health standards.
3. Properties shall be kept reasonably open, accessible, and safe for public use. Fire
prevention, lifeguard, and similar activities shall be maintained for property public
safety.
4. Buildings, roads, trails, and other structures and improvements shall be kept in
reasonable repair throughout their estimated lifetime to prevent undue deterioration
and to encourage public use.
5. The facility shall be kept open for public use at reasonable hours and times of the year,
according to the type of area or facility.
6. A posted LWCF acknowledgement sign shall remain displayed at the project site.
.
8.3
Availability to Users
1. Discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, or sex. Under Title VI
of the 1964 Civil Rights Act property acquired or developed with LWCF assistance shall
be open to entry and use by all persons regardless of race, color, or national origin, who
are otherwise eligible. Title 43, Part 17 (43 CFR 17), effectuates the provisions of Title
VI.
The prohibitions imposed by Title VI apply to park or recreation areas benefiting from
federal assistance and to any other recreation areas administered by the state agency
or local agency receiving the assistance. Discrimination is also prohibited on the basis of
religion or sex.
2. Discrimination on the basis of residence. Section 6(f)(8) of the LWCF Act provides, with
respect to property acquired and/or developed with LWCF assistance, discrimination on
the basis of residence, including preferential reservation, membership or annual permit
systems is prohibited except to the extent reasonable differences in admission and
other fees may be maintained on the basis of residence.
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
Fees charged to nonresidents cannot exceed twice the amount charged to residents.
Where there is no charge for residents, but a fee is charged to nonresidents,
nonresident fees cannot exceed fees charged for residents at comparable state or local
public facilities. Reservation, membership or annual permit systems available to
residents must also be available to nonresidents and the period of availability must be
the same for both residents and nonresidents.
These provisions apply only to the recreation areas described in the project agreement.
Nonresident fishing and hunting license fees are excluded from these requirements.
3. Discrimination on the basis of disability. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
requires no qualified person shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from
participation in, be denied benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination
under any program or activity that receives or benefits from federal financial
assistance. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (P.L. 100-336) simply references
and reinforces these requirements for federally-assisted programs.
4. Reasonable use limitations. Project sponsors may impose reasonable limits on the type
and extent of use of areas and facilities acquired and/or developed with Fund
assistance when such a limitation is necessary for maintenance or preservation. Thus,
limitations may be imposed on the numbers of person using an area or facility or the
type of users, such as "hunters only" or "hikers only." All limitations shall be in accord
with the applicable grant agreement and amendments.
8.4
Post Completion Inspections
Post-completion inspections are required on all projects to determine whether properties
acquired or developed are being retained and used for outdoor recreation purposes in
accordance with the project agreement and other program requirements. A state post –
completion inspection is to be made within five (5) years after final payment is made and
then at five-year intervals afterward.
On site post completion inspections should include the following points:
Retention and Use. Is the Section 6(f)(3) boundary in tack and the property being used for
outdoor recreation purposes including those intended through the projects funded with
LWCF assistance?
Appearance. Is the property attractive and inviting to the public?
Maintenance. Is upkeep and repair of structures and improvements adequate? Is there
evidence of poor workmanship or use of inferior quality materials or construction? Is
vandalism a problem? Is the area being maintained?
Management. Does staffing and servicing of facilities appear adequate?
Availability. Is there evidence of discrimination? Is the property readily accessible and
open to the public during reasonable hours and times of the year?
Signing. Is the area properly signed to allow for user information and safety, and proper
acknowledgement of the Land and Water Conservation Fund?
Interim Use. Where lands have been acquired but not yet developed, the inspection should
determine whether the interim uses of the property are in accordance with agreement with
the State and NPS.
Accessibility. Is the area or facility accessible by handicapped or disabled persons?
57
8.5
Conversion, Change of Use of Property
Property acquired or developed with LWCF assistance shall be retained and used for public
outdoor recreation. Any property so acquired and/or developed shall not be wholly or
partly converted to other than public outdoor recreation uses without the approval of NPS
pursuant to Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act. The conversion provisions of Section 6(f)(3), 36
CFR Part 59, apply to each area or facility for which LWCF assistance is obtained, regardless
of the extent of participation of the program in the assisted area or facility.
Responsibility for compliance and enforcement of these provisions rests with the State for
both state and locally sponsored projects. The responsibilities are applicable to the area
depicted or otherwise described on the 6(f)(3) boundary map and/or described in other
project documentation approved by NPS. This mutually agreed to area normally exceed
that actually receiving LWCF assistance so as to assure the protection of a viable recreation
area.
Project sponsors should consult early with the State when a conversion is under
consideration or has been discovered. State must consult with NPS as early as possible in
the conversion process for guidance and to sort out and discuss the details of the
conversion proposal to avoid mid-course corrections and unnecessary delays. A critical first
step is for the State and NPS to agree on the size of the Section (f) park land impacted by
any non-public use, especially prior to any appraisal activity.
If the NPS is alerted or otherwise becomes aware of an ongoing conversion activity that has
not been approved, NPS shall request the State Liaison Officer (SLO) to advise the project
sponsor of the necessary prerequisites for approval of a conversion and to discontinue the
unauthorized conversion activities. If the conversion activity continues, NPS shall formally
notify the State it must take appropriate action to preclude the project sponsor from
proceeding further with the conversion, use, and occupancy of the area pending NPS
independent review and decision of a formal conversion proposal
The NPS Regional Director has the authority to disapprove conversion requests and/or to
reject proposed property substitutions. This approval is a discretionary action and should
not be considered a right of the project sponsor.
1. Situations that trigger a conversion include:
a. Property interests are conveyed for private use or non-public outdoor recreation
uses.
b. Non-outdoor recreation uses (public or private) are made of the project area, or a
portion thereof, including those occurring on pre-existing rights-of-way and
easements, or by a lessor.
c. Unallowable indoor facilities are developed within the project area without NPS
approval, such as unauthorized public facilities and sheltering of an outdoor facility.
d. Public outdoor recreation use of property acquired or developed with LWCF
assistance is terminated.
2. Situations that may not trigger a conversion if NPS determines that certain criteria
are met include:
a. Underground utility easements that do not impact the recreational use of the park
and is restored to its original surface condition (see Section F below).
58
b. Proposals to construct public facilities, such as recreation centers and indoor pool
buildings, within a Section 6(f)(3) protected area where it can be shown there is a
gain or increased benefit to the public outdoor recreational opportunity. These
proposals must be reviewed by the NPS as a “public facility request”. The State
should consult with the NPS early in the formative stages of developing proposals
to construct indoor facilities on Section 6(f)(3) protected land (see Section H
below).
c. Proposals for "temporary non-conforming uses," that is temporary non-recreation
activities of less than a six-month duration within a Section 6(f)(3) protected area,
must be reviewed by the NPS.
d. Proposals to build sheltered facilities or to shelter existing facilities within a Section
6(f)(3) protected area provided they do not change the overall public outdoor
recreation characteristics and otherwise meet the sheltering criteria in Chapter 3.
The NPS review and approval of such proposals will not trigger a conversion (see
Section J below).
e. Proposals for changing the overall outdoor recreation use of a Section 6(f)(3) area
from that intended in the original LWCF project agreement. These proposals must
be reviewed by the NPS.
3. Prerequisites to the NPS consideration of conversions. Formal requests from the project
sponsor for permission to convert LWCF assisted properties in whole or in part to other
than public outdoor recreation uses must be submitted by the State Liaison Officer to
NPS in writing and conform to the prerequisites set forth in 36 CFR 59. OPRD will
consult with NPS when conversions are proposed or discovered and prior to making the
formal request to NPS. OPRD and project sponsor shall use the Proposal Description
and Environmental Screening Form (PD/ESF) to prepare its conversion proposal.
The PD/ESF guides the development of the conversion proposal, including the
incorporation of the following prerequisites that must be met before NPS will consider
the formal conversion request:
a. All practical alternatives to the conversion have been evaluated and rejected on
a sound basis.
b. The fair market value of the property to be converted has been established and the
property proposed for substitution is of at least equal fair market value as
established by a state approved appraisal (see Chapter 4 for appraisal guidance)
excluding the value of structures or facilities that will not directly enhance its
outdoor recreation utility.
c. The property proposed for replacement is of reasonably equivalent usefulness and
location as that being converted. Depending on the situation, and at the discretion
of the NPS, the replacement property need not provide identical recreation
experiences or be located at the same site, provided it is in a reasonably equivalent
location. Generally, the replacement property should be administered by the same
political jurisdiction as the converted property. NPS will consider OPRD requests to
change the project sponsor for any replacement property when it is determined a
different political jurisdiction can meet the criteria for replacement properties.
Equivalent usefulness and location will be determined based on the following
criteria:
(1) Property to be converted must be evaluated in order to determine what
recreation needs are being fulfilled by the facilities which exist and the types of
59
outdoor recreation resources and opportunities available. The property being
proposed for substitution must then be evaluated in a similar manner to
determine if it will meet recreation needs that are at least like in magnitude
and impact to the user community as the converted site. This criterion is
applicable in the consideration of all conversion requests with the exception of
those where wetlands are proposed as replacement property. Wetland areas
and interests therein shall be considered to be of reasonably equivalent
usefulness as compared to the recreational usefulness of the property
proposed for conversion if they have been identified in the wetlands provisions
of the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) in
accordance with Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act as amended (36 CFR 59.3) by
Section 303 of the Emergency Wetlands Resources Act of 1986.
(2) Replacement property need not necessarily be directly adjacent to or close by
the converted site. This policy provides the administrative flexibility to
determine location recognizing that the property should meet existing public
outdoor recreation needs. While generally this will involve the selection of a
site serving the same community(ies) or area as the converted site, there may
be exceptions. For example, if property being converted is in an area
undergoing major demographic change and the area has no existing or
anticipated future need for outdoor recreation, then the project sponsor
should seek to locate the substitute area at another location within the
jurisdiction.
(3) Should a local project sponsor be unable to replace converted property, the
OPRD would be responsible, as the primary recipient of federal assistance, for
assuring compliance with these requirements and for the substitution of
replacement property.
(4) The acquisition of one parcel of land may be used in satisfaction of several
approved conversions and vice versa.
d. The property proposed for replacement meets the eligibility requirements for
LWCF assisted acquisition (see Chapter 3). The replacement property must
constitute or be part of a viable recreation area. Viability and recreational
usefulness is dependent upon the proposed outdoor recreation development plan
and timetable for the development of the replacement parks. If full development
of the replacement site(s) will be delayed beyond three years from the date of
conversion approval, the conversion proposal shall explain why this is necessary.
For proposed replacement property with a history of contamination, proposals
must address the nature of the contamination, how the contaminated area has
been or will be remediated, how the area will be developed into a safe, public
outdoor recreation area, and how provisions will be put in place to monitor the
new replacement parkland to ensure public health and safety in perpetuity. Certain
contaminated areas may not meet the equal or greater recreational usefulness
prerequisite for replacement land. Early coordination with NPS for conversion
proposals involving contaminated replacement land, even if remediated, is
required.
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Unless each of the following additional conditions (also see Chapter 3) is met, land
currently owned by another public agency may not be used as replacement land for
land acquired as part of an LWCF project:
(1) The replacement land was not originally acquired by the sponsor or selling
agency for recreation.
(2) The replacement land has not been previously dedicated or managed for
recreational purposes while in public ownership.
(3) No federal assistance was provided in the replacement land’s original
acquisition unless the assistance was provided under a program expressly
authorized to match or supplement LWCF assistance.
(4) Where the project sponsor acquires replacement land from another public
agency, the selling agency must be required by law to receive payment for the
land so acquired An exception may be made to this condition only in the case
of development projects for which the project sponsor’s match was not
derived from the cost of the purchase or value of a donation of the land to be
converted, but from the value of the development itself. In this case, public
land that has not been previously dedicated or managed for
recreation/conservation use may be used as replacement land even if this land
is currently owned by the project sponsor or is transferred from one public
agency to another without cost.
e. In the case of Section 6(f)3) protected areas that are partially rather than wholly
converted, the impact of the converted portion on the remaining area shall be
considered. If such a conversion is approved, the unconverted area must remain
recreationally viable or be replaced as well.
f. All necessary coordination with other federal agencies has been satisfactorily
accomplished including, for example, compliance with Section 4(f) of the
Department of Transportation Act of 1966.
g. The guidelines for environmental review under NEPA have been satisfactorily
completed and considered by NPS during its review of the proposed Section 6(f)(3)
action. In cases where the proposed conversion arises from another federal action,
NPS final review of the proposal shall not occur until the NPS is assured all
environmental review requirements for the other federal action have been met,
e.g., Army Corps of Engineers permits.
The environmental review process must analyze not only the Section 6(f)(3) area
proposed for conversion, but also the development of the replacement parkland.
The purpose and scope of the environmental review must focus on the impacts on
the “human environment” resulting from the loss of the Section 6(f)(3) parkland,
impacts on any remaining Section 6(f)(3) parkland for partial conversions, and the
development of new Section 6(f)(3) replacement park(s). The scope of the
environmental review should not include impacts of the action precipitating the
conversion on resources beyond the Section 6(f)(3) boundary, such as impacts of a
new housing development or a school on a neighborhood.
The environmental analysis must be conducted in a neutral and factual manner and
result in statements that reflect this same neutrality so the interested and affected
public can focus on and understand the details of the proposed federal action of
converting parkland including the replacement of new parkland according to 36
61
CFR 59. The environmental analysis documents should not include statements that
promote or justify the action precipitating the conversion, such as proclaiming that
the subject parkland is the best location for a new fire station.
h. Adherence to state intergovernmental review procedures as appropriate.
i. The proposed conversion and substitution are in accord with the SCORP.
4.
State preparation of conversion proposal for NPS review: To avoid any unnecessary
delays, duplication of effort, and mid-course corrections, the States shall consult
with NPS early when conversions are proposed or discovered to ensure:
a. the extent of impact from the conversion activity on Section 6(f)(3) protected
area is mutually agreed upon; and
b. the acceptability of proposed replacement parkland has been explored prior to
State/local sponsor expenditure of resources on appraisals and the required
environmental review process to be undertaken in accordance with NEPA.
The State shall coordinate the development of the conversion proposal including
ensuring the project sponsor complies with applicable federal, state and local laws,
regulations and permit requirements. As the proposal is developed, the State may
enlist the assistance of NPS to provide technical guidance as needed, especially for
complex and controversial conversions. A State’s submission of a formal conversion
request to NPS is a State’s endorsement of the conversion. If a State does not concur or
endorse the conversion, then the proposal should not be forwarded to NPS for formal
review and decision.
5. NPS review of the State conversion proposal. NPS will conduct an independent review
of the proposal using the conversion prerequisites and any other critical factors that
may have arisen during proposal development. If the State has adequately addressed
the prerequisites, and NPS finds no other reason to deny the request, the NPS
administrative record will be documented as such and an amendment will be signed
approving the conversion.
6. Banking excess fair market value of replacement land for future conversions. The
acquisition of one parcel of replacement land may be used in satisfaction of several
approved conversions.
Excess fair market value (FMV) of a replacement property can be “banked” for a period
not to exceed five years from the date of the initial conversion amendment. During this
time period, the same project sponsor may use the remaining value to make up the
FMV difference in cases where the subsequent proposed replacement property
satisfies the equal usefulness criterion but its appraised FMV falls short of the equal fair
market value requirement.
The initial replacement property with the excess fair market value may not be used to
satisfy the equal usefulness criterion for subsequent conversions unless additional
conversions are anticipated by the sponsor at the time of the original conversion
request and the accompanying documentation clearly addresses how the replacement
property would satisfy the equal usefulness criteria for the original conversion as well
as those that are anticipated.
7. Conversions on leased land. Should a conversion occur on leased land during the term
of the lease, the State must comply with the conversion requirements of Section 6(f)(3)
including the provision of replacement land. In this instance, the conversion of the
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original lease can be replaced with a leasehold interest for a period of time that is not
less than the time remaining on the original lease, and, which fulfills the recreation
commitment agreed to in the original lease agreement.
For existing projects that involve leases, the responsibility for retaining the property in
recreation terminates at the end of the lease period unless the grant agreement calls
for some other arrangement. Lease agreements containing a renewal clause that can
be exercised by the lessee must be reviewed to ensure that Section 6(f)(3) compliance
will continue throughout the duration of the next lease period.
8. Conversion proposal documentation. A conversion requires an amendment to the
original project agreement. The amendment should be submitted concurrently with
the formal conversion request or at such time as all details of the conversion have been
worked out with NPS.
Once the conversion has been approved by NPS, replacement property should be
immediately acquired and developed according to the replacement proposal timetable.
If development will be delayed beyond three years from the date of NPS conversion
approval, then a request for delayed development beyond three years with a
justification for the delay must be made to NPS.
9. Small conversions. Small conversions are composed of small portions of Section 6(f)(3)
protected areas that amount to no more than 10 percent of the 6(f) protected area or
five acres, whichever is less. States should consult with NPS prior to developing the
small conversion proposal.
Because small conversion proposals are less complex, NPS review and decision can be
facilitated when:
a. Minor or no environmental impacts would occur on resources being removed from
Section 6(f)(3) protection, on the remaining Section 6(f)(3) area, and on the
contiguous new replacement parkland by placing it under Section 6(f)(3) protection
per the environmental screening form. This includes consideration of impacts to
historic resources per the Section 106 process of the National Historic Preservation
Act. The entire conversion proposal is categorically excluded from further
environmental review under NEPA.
b. The proposed conversion is not controversial.
c. The replacement property is contiguous to the original Section 6(f)(3) area.
10. Discovering unauthorized conversions. When it is discovered that a Section 6(f)(3) area
has been converted without NPS approval, a conversion proposal must be submitted
and reviewed by NPS for retroactive action. .The NPS shall notify the State it is in
violation of the grant contract, program regulations, and law, and an immediate
resolution of the unapproved conversion must be expedited.
If it is discovered that an unauthorized conversion is in progress, the State must notify
the project sponsor to cease immediately until the conversion process pursuant to 36
CFR 59.3 has been satisfactorily completed.
Resolution of the conversion will require State and NPS review of the conversion
proposal including the provision of suitable replacement property.
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If the sponsor has already provided replacement property without NPS approval, the
eligibility of the replacement land must meet the same Section 6(f)(3) requirements as
if it had not yet been acquired. It is incumbent upon the State to make the case that the
replacement land fully meets these requirements.
11. Conversions with delayed parkland replacement. Exceptions to the immediate
replacement requirement will be allowed only when it is not possible for replacement
property to be identified prior to the State's request for the conversion. An express
commitment must be received from the State to satisfy Section 6(f)(3) substitution
requirements within a specified period normally not to exceed one year following
conversion approval.
8.6
Underground Utility Easements and Rights-of-Way
The State may allow underground utility easements within Section 6(f)(3) area as long as
the easement site is restored to its pre-existing condition to ensure the continuance of
public outdoor recreation use of the easement area within 12 months after the ground
within the easement area is disturbed. If restoration exceeds the 12 month period, or the
easement activities result in permanent above ground changes, NPS shall be consulted to
determine if the changes will trigger a conversion. If present or future outdoor recreation
opportunities will be impacted in the easement area or in the remainder of the Section
6(f)(3) area, a conversion will be triggered.
8.7
Commercial Signage in Section 6(f)(3) Areas
Commercial signs are only allowable within Section 6(f)(3) boundaries when the advertising
is attached to allowable park structures such as benches, fencing, walls, and buildings and
are not inconsistent with the park setting and/or the built environment in which it is
located (e.g., athletic fields). Signs may face either outside or inside the park. Commercial
advertising in the form of a stand-alone structure such as a billboard that creates a
footprint in the park, or commercial signage permanently affixed to a natural feature within
the 6(f) area, is a conversion regardless of which direction it faces.
8.8
Proposals to Construct Public Facilities
Public facility requests will only be approved if the public facility clearly results in a net gain
in outdoor recreation benefits or enhances the outdoor recreation use of the entire park,
and the facility is compatible with and significantly supportive of the outdoor recreation
resources and opportunities of the Section 6(f)(3) protected area. The State shall use the
PD/ESF to document its public facility proposal using the following criteria and submit it
along with a project amendment and a recommendation for federal approval for NPS
review and decision. The NPS will consider requests to construct sponsor-funded public
facilities when the following criteria have been met:
1. Uses of the facility will be compatible with and significantly supportive of outdoor
recreation resources and uses at the rest of the site and recreation use remains the
overall primary function of the site. The proposed public facility will includes a
recreation component and will encourage outdoor recreation use of the remaining
Section 6(f) area.
2. All design and location alternatives have been adequately considered, documented and
rejected on a sound basis.
3. The proposed structure is compatible and significantly supportive of the outdoor
recreation resources of the site, whether existing or planned. The park's outdoor
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recreation use must continue to be greater than that expected for any indoor uses,
unless the site is a single use facility, such as a swimming pool building, which virtually
occupies the entire site.
Examples of uses which would not ordinarily be approved include, but are not limited
to, a community recreation center which takes up all or most of a small park site,
clinics, police stations, restaurants catering primarily to the general public, fire stations,
professional sports facilities or commercial resort or other facilities which: (1) are not
accessible to the general public; or, (2) require memberships; or, (3) which, because of
high user fees, have the effect of excluding elements of the public; or, (4) which include
office, residential or elaborate lodging facilities. Restaurant-type establishments with
indoor dining/seating that cater primarily to the outdoor recreating public must be
reviewed under this public facility policy. Other park food service operations such as
snack bars, carry-out food service, and concession stands with outdoor dining including
pavilions and protected patios are allowable without further NPS if the primary purpose
is to serve the outdoor recreating public.
4. Potential and future benefits to the total park's outdoor recreation utility must be
identified in the proposal. Any costs or detriments should be documented and a net
recreation benefit must result.
5. The proposed facility must be under the control and tenure of the public agency that
sponsors and administers the original park area.
6. The proposal has been analyzed pursuant to NEPA, including providing the public an
opportunity to review and comment on the proposal if required as part of the NEPA
review.
7. All applicable federal requirements for approval are met.
8. The proposal has been adequately reviewed at the state level and has been
recommended by the SLO.
8.9
Requests for Temporary Non-Conforming Uses Within Section 6(f)(3) Areas
All requests for temporary uses for purposes that do not conform to the public outdoor
recreation requirement must be submitted to and reviewed by the State. The State, in turn,
will submit a formal request to NPS describing the temporary non-conforming use proposal.
Continued use beyond six-months will not be considered temporary, but will result in a
conversion of use and will require the State/project sponsor to provide replacement
property pursuant to Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act.
1. Criteria. NPS will use the following criteria to evaluate each request:
a. The size of the parkland area affected by any temporary non-recreation use shall
not result in a significant impact on public outdoor recreation use. This means that
the site of the temporary activity should be sufficiently small to restrict its impacts
on other areas of a Fund-assisted park.
b. A temporary use shall not result in permanent damage to the park site, and
appropriate mitigating measures will be taken to ensure no residual impacts on the
site once the temporary use is concluded.
c. No practical alternatives to the proposed temporary use exist.
d. All applicable federal requirements for approval are met.
65
e. The proposal has been adequately reviewed at the state level and has been
recommended by the SLO.
8.10
Sheltering Facilities within Section 6(f)(3) Areas
NPS approval is required to shelter an existing facility located within a Section 6(f)(3)
protected area.
8.11
Obsolete Facilities
Project sponsors are not required to continue operation of a particular recreation area or
facility beyond its useful life. However, Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act requires project
sponsors maintain the entire area within the Section 6(f)(3) boundary in some form of
public outdoor recreation use.
Notwithstanding neglect or inadequate maintenance on the part of the project sponsor, a
recreation area or facility may be determined to be obsolete if:
A.. reasonable maintenance and repairs are not sufficient to keep the recreation area or
facility operating;
B. changing recreation needs dictate a change in the type of facilities provided;
C. ark operating practices dictate a change in the type of facilities required; or,
D. the recreation area or facility is destroyed by fire, natural disaster, or vandalism.
States may determine a facility is obsolete and permit its use to be discontinued or allow a
particular type of recreation use of the LWCF assisted area to be changed provided that the
project record maintained by the State is documented by the sponsor with a justification
statement for determining obsolescence and the State concurs in the change. However,
NPS approval must be obtained prior to any change from one LWCF allowable use to
another when the proposed use would significantly contravene the original plans for the
area.
If, in the judgment of the State, the facility is needed and was lost through neglect or
inadequate maintenance, then replacement facilities must be provided at the current value
of the original investment.
LWCF assistance may be provided to renovate outdoor recreation facilities that have
previously received LWCF assistance if the State determines the renovation is not required
as a result of neglect or inadequate maintenance and the State documents the project
record to that effect.
8.12
Significant Change of Use
Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act requires project sponsors maintain the entire area defined
in the project agreement in some form of public outdoor recreation use. NPS approval must
be obtained prior to any change from one eligible use to another when the proposed use
would significantly contravene the original plans or intent for the area as described in the
original LWCF project(s).
NPS approval is not required, however, for each and every facility use change. Uses within a
Section 6(f)(3) protected area should be viewed in the context of overall use and should be
66
monitored in this context. A change from a swimming pool with substantial recreational
development to a less intense area of limited development such as a passive park, or vice
versa, would, for example, require NPS approval.
States shall notify NPS in writing of proposals to significantly change the use of Section
6(f)(3) areas in advance of their occurrence. NPS will expedite a determination of whether a
formal review and approval process will be required. A primary NPS consideration in the
review will be the consistency of the proposal with the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor
Recreation Plan.
If the change in use proposal requires a formal review and decision by NPS, the State shall
complete the Proposal Description and Environmental Screening Form (PD/ESF).
Changes to other than public outdoor recreation use constitute a conversion and will
require NPS approval and the substitution of replacement land in accordance with Section
6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act.
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CHAPTER 9 - GLOSSARY
ACQUISITION - The gaining of property rights, including but not limited to fee title, or easements for
public use by donation, or purchase.
ACT - The Act of Congress, approved September 3, 1964, entitled "Land and Water Conservation
Fund Act of 1965" (78 Stat. 897), as amended.
ADA - Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 prohibits discrimination based on disability--both in
the private and public sector.
ADAAG - Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines.
AGREEMENT (STATE/LOCAL) - The written document under which the project sponsor does certain
stipulated work and the state makes payment to the sponsor.
AGREEMENT (STATE/NP) - The written document signed by the State and the National Park Service
under which certain stipulated work is done and payment is made by NPS to the State.
APPORTIONMENT- The amount annually reserved for a State by the Secretary of the Interior from
Congressional appropriations for financially assisting projects under provisions of the Act.
AMENDMENT - A change in the cost, project period, or work items included in an agreement.
ANSI - American National Standards Institute, Inc.
APPLICANT - The ultimate recipient of the grant funds and the agency responsible for implementation
of the project and the operation and maintenance of the site.
APPLICATION - A complete document with all of the forms and attachments required for project
approval.
APPROPRIATION - The amount of funds which the Congress makes available yearly from the Land and
Water Conservation Fund for purposes of the Act.
APPROVAL - The signing by the National Park Service Director or designated official of a project
agreement resulting in the obligation of a specified amount of Federal funds for a specific
purpose.
ASSISTANT STATE LIAISON OFFICER (ASLO) – Designated by the Governor to represent and act for the
State as the Assistant State Liaison Officer in dealing with the National Park Service for
purposes of the LWCF program.
COMMITTED FUNDS - Funds that are assigned by the State for use on a specific project not yet
approved by NPS.
CONVERSION - Property acquired and/or developed with LWCF assistance that has been converted to
other than public outdoor recreation uses.
CURRENT PARK MASTER PLAN - A site-specific resource based plan guiding park acquisition,
development, protection, and management of park areas and facilities.
DEPARTMENT - The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD).
DESK AUDIT - An audit of project records made by a state auditor of records sent to the state by the
project sponsor.
DEVELOPMENT - The construction or rehabilitation of facilities necessary for the use and enjoyment of
public outdoor recreation resources.
DIRECTOR - The Director of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.
DONATION - Receipt of land, labor, materials, or use of equipment without payment for same by the
project sponsor.
ELIGIBLE PROJECT - An acquisition, development or major rehabilitation undertaking, which satisfies
the requirements of the federal Land &Water Conservation Fund Program.
Updated December 2013 Version 1.1
ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - A document written from the point of view of what effect the project
will have on the environment, both inside and outside the park boundary.
FIELD AUDIT - An audit of project records made in the office of the project sponsor by a state auditor.
FISCAL YEAR - A period of time which begins October 1 and ends on the following September 30.
FLOODPLAIN - The lowland and relatively flat areas of adjoining inland and coastal waters, including
flood-prone areas of offshore islands, subject to a 1% or greater chance of flooding in any
given year (a 100-year flood).
FORCE ACCOUNT - The performance of work on a development project with the forces and resources
of the project sponsor, including personal services, equipment, and materials, as opposed to
development by contract with an outside organization or individual.
IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM - A requirement of SCORP which identifies salient recreation issues to be
addressed over a two year period.
IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS - Represents the value of noncash contributions provided by (1) the grantee;
(2) other public agencies and institutions; and (3) private organizations and individuals. Inkind contributions may consist of the value of services directly benefiting and specifically
identifiable to the project.
LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND (LWCF) - Funds made available to the states through the Land
and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (Public Law 88-578).
LOCAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN - The comprehensive land use plan prepared by each local jurisdiction
within the state, as required by OAR Chapter 197.
MAJOR REHABILITATION - The repair, restoration, or construction of eligible facilities, which is
necessitated by obsolescence, building code changes or normal wear and tear, not
attributed to the lack of maintenance.
MFG - Marine Facilities Grant; a program operated by the Oregon State Marine Board.
NPS - The National Park Service, Department of Interior. (Formerly HCRS-Heritage Conservation and
Recreation Service.) (Prior to HCRS, formerly BOR-Bureau of Outdoor Recreation).
OBLIGATED FUNDS - Funds assigned to a project which has been approved by NPS.
OREGON APPLICATION PROCEDURES MANUAL - A manual prepared by the Department containing state
and federal policies, procedures and instructions to assist local government agencies
wishing to participate in LWCF assistance program.
OREGON OUTDOOR RECREATION COMMITTEE (OORC) - A committee appointed by the OPRD Director to
prioritize LWCF project applications.
PROJECT AUTHORIZATION - State/Local agreements, which authorize the project, as signed by both the
Department and project sponsor.
PROJECT BOUNDARY - The boundary of the land subject to the conversion restrictions in Section 6(f)(3)
of the LWCF Act. May or may not be the same as the park property lines.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCREENING FORM (PD/ESF)– The project description portion
of the PD/ESF identifies and provides descriptive information about the proposal. The
environmental screening form portion of the PD/ESF serves as part of the federal
administrative record required by NEPA and its implementing regulations which supports a
chosen NEPA “pathway”.
PROJECT SCOPE - A list of the work items to be accomplished on the project such as: "Acquire two
parcels of land" or "construct parking lot, restrooms, and two tennis courts."
PROJECT SPONSOR - The recipient of the grant funds and the agency responsible for implementation
of the project and the maintenance and operation of the site.
PD/ESF – PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCREENING FORM – The purpose of the PD/ESF is
to provide descriptive and environmental information about LWCF proposals for National
Park Service review and decision. The PD/ESF becomes part of the federal administrative
69
record in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and its
implementing regulations. The PD portion of the form captures administrative and
descriptive details to enable NPS understanding of the proposal. The ESF portion is
designed for use as a tool by State/project sponsors to draft out as early as possible in
project planning to assist in the identification of potential environmental impacts and
related issues.
REAPPORTIONMENT ACCOUNT - Those monies derived from project underruns, cancellations and
reduction in project scope. Separate accounts will be kept for both state and local sponsors.
STATEWIDE COMPREHENSIVE OUTDOOR RECREATION PLAN (SCORP) - Otherwise known as SCORP, the
document used to identify and access Oregon outdoor recreation needs.
SECTION 504 - Refers to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 which prohibits discrimination
based on disability in federally assisted and federally conducted programs.
SECTION 6(f)(3) - The section in the LWCF Act which requires replacement of any recreation land
converted to non-recreation uses.
STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE (SHPO) - The office responsible for operation and management of
the Historic Preservation Act in Oregon. Located within the Oregon Parks and Recreation
Department.
STATE/FEDERAL AGREEMENT - A contract between the state and Department of Interior, National Park
Service, setting forth mutual obligations with regard to all or part of a specific project.
STATE LIAISON OFFICER (SLO) - Designated by the Governor, the OPRD Director has the authority to
accept and administer funds for purposes of the LWCF Program and the authority to
represent and act for the State as the State Liaison Officer in dealing with the National Park
Service for purposes of the LWCF program in Oregon.
STATE/LOCAL AGREEMENT - Agreement between the state and project sponsor, which authorizes the
project to begin.
UFAS - Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards.
VICINITY MAP - An area map showing the location of the park within the town or county, used to
assist the state project officer in locating the park for inspections.
WETLANDS - Those areas that are inundated by surface or ground water with a frequency sufficient
to support, and under normal circumstances does or would support, a prevalence of
vegetative or aquatic life that requires saturated or seasonally saturated soil conditions for
growth and reproduction. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar
areas such as sloughs, potholes, wet meadows, river overflows, mud flats and natural
ponds.
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APPENDIX
A-1
Oregon Administrative Rules
Oregon Administrative Rules
Chapter 6, Division 8
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
DIVISION 8
DISTRIBUTION OF LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUNDING ASSISTANCE TO UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT FOR
PUBLIC OUTDOOR RECREATION
Purpose of Rule 736-08-005
This rule establishes the procedures and requirements used by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, State
Liaison Officer, when distributing federal Land and Water Conservation Fund monies to state agencies and eligible local
governments, and the process for establishing the priority order in which projects shall be funded.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Statutory Authority and Procedure 736-08-010
ORS 390.180 requires the Director of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department to adopt rules establishing
procedures the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department shall use when the Department allocates money to local
governments or other state agencies.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
Federal Requirements 736-08-015
The Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965, as amended, provides matching grants to states and local units of
government for acquisition and development of public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Funds for the program
are derived from entrance or admission fees to federal recreation areas, Outer Continental Shelf revenues from leasing
oil and gas sites in coastal waters, federal surplus real property sales and a small portion of federal motorboat fuel
taxes. All applicants for federal funding assistance must also satisfy the requirements delineated in the National Park
Service's Land and Water Conservation Fund Grants Manual, parts 600 through 685.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
Definitions 736-08-020
For purposes of OAR 736-08-005 through 736-08-055 the following definitions shall apply:
(1)
"Acquisition" - The gaining of property rights, including but not limited to fee title or easements, for public use
by donation or purchase.
(2)
"Conversion" - Property acquired and/or developed with LWCF assistance that has been converted to other than
public outdoor recreation uses.
(3)
"Current Park Master Plan" - A site-specific resource based plan guiding park acquisition, development,
protection and management of park areas and facilities.
(4)
"Department" - The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.
(5)
"Development" - The construction or rehabilitation of facilities necessary for the use and enjoyment of public
outdoor recreation resources.
(6)
"Director" - The Director of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
(7)
"Eligible Project" - An acquisition, development, or major rehabilitation undertaking which satisfies the
requirements of the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund Program.
71
(8)
"Implementation Program" - A requirement of SCORP, which identifies salient recreation, issues to be addressed
over a two-year period.
(9)
"Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF)" - Those funds made available to the state through the Land and
Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (Public Law 88-578).
(10) "Local Comprehensive Plan" - The comprehensive land use plan prepared by each local jurisdiction within the
state, as required by Chapter 197.
(11) "Major Rehabilitation" - The repair, restoration, or reconstruction of eligible facilities, which is necessitated by
obsolescence, building code changes, or normal wear and tear, not attributed to lack of maintenance.
(12) "Oregon Application Procedures Manual" - A manual prepared by the Department containing state and federal
policies, procedures and instructions to assist local government agencies wishing to participate in LWCF
assistance.
(13) "Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC)" - The committee appointed by the Director to prioritize LWCF
project applications.
(14) "Project Authorization" -State/local agreement, which authorizes the project, as, signed by both the Department
and project sponsor.
(15) "Project Sponsor" - The recipient of the grant funds and the agency responsible for implementation of the
project and the maintenance and operation of the site.
(16) "Reapportionment Account" - Those monies derived from project underruns, cancellations and reduction in
project scope. Separate accounts will be kept for both state and local sponsors.
(17) "State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan" - Otherwise known as SCORP, the document used to identify
and assess Oregon outdoor recreation needs.
(18) "State Liaison Officer (SLO)" - Designated by the Governor, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Director and his designees who have the responsibility to administer the stateside LWCF.
(19) "State/Local Agreement" - Agreement between the state and project sponsor which authorizes the project to
begin.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
APPORTIONMENT OF MONIES BETWEEN STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES 736-08-025
(1)
Monies apportioned annually by the Department of Interior to the state from the federal Land and Water
Conservation Fund shall be divided into three shares:
(a)
An amount equal to one-half of the annual anticipated administrative costs of the office of the State
Liaison Officer to operate the program;
(b)
Not less than 60 percent of the remainder to units of local government; and
(c)
Up to 40 percent of the remainder to eligible state agencies.
(2)
Monies derived from project underruns, project cancellations, reduction in project scope will be made available
to the account from which it originally came, i.e. state or local.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
Assessment for Services 736-08-030
Each local government project sponsor shall be assessed a percentage of the total final project cost for services
provided by the Department. This percentage assessment shall be established in the state/local agreement. The
assessment shall be reviewed by the Department annually to insure that income does not exceed 50 percent of the
administrative costs for grant distribution to units of local government. This assessment shall be made at the time of
any project billing with the fee being withheld from the amount paid to the sponsor.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
Application Procedure 736-08-045
The purpose of this section is to set forth requirements that must be met by local government applicants in submitting
an application for Land and Water Conservation Fund assistance.
(1)
Eligibility for Funding Assistance. Public agencies eligible for LWCF funding assistance are:
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(a)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
Local Governments:
(A) City Park and Recreation Departments;
(B) County Park and Recreation Departments;
(C) Park and Recreation Districts;
(D) Port Districts;
(E) Indian Tribes;
(F) Metropolitan Service District.
(b)
State Agencies:
(A) Oregon Parks and Recreation Department;
(B) Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife;
(C) Oregon Department of Forestry;
(D) Oregon Division of State Lands.
Matching Requirements. The Land and Water Conservation Fund provides for up to 50 percent funding
assistance. The eligible agency match may include local budgeted funds, donated funds, and value of private
donated property, equipment, materials, labor or any combination thereof. The minimum federal share shall be
no less than $12,500 ($25,000 total project costs).
Section 6f of the LWCF Act prohibits the use of other federal funds as matching share of an LWCF grant.
Projects Eligible for Funding:
(a)
Projects eligible are acquisition, development and rehabilitation projects that are consistent with the
outdoor recreation goals and objectives contained in the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation
Plan (SCORP) and the Implementation Program, and recreation elements of local comprehensive plans.
(b)
Marine facility development requests are eligible for funding. Projects, which use federal Dingle-Johnson
funds, may not be used as match with LWCF.
Local Agency Requirements. Local agencies participating in the funding assistance program must show that
there is a current park master plan in effect and that the project is consistent with the local comprehensive land
use plan.
State Agency Requirements. State agencies participating in the fund assistance program must show that the
project is in their legislatively approved biennial budgets or is mandated by legislation.
Application Form. All applications for funding assistance for outdoor recreation projects must be submitted on
forms supplied by the Department. All applications must be consistent with the Oregon Application Procedures
Manual and contain the following information:
(a)
Program narrative;
(b)
Environmental assessment;
(c)
Vicinity map;
(d)
Project boundary map;
(e)
Park master plan;
(f)
Civil Rights compliance;
(g)
Local Council of Governments review;
(h)
State agency review;
(i)
Property deed or lease;
(j)
Estimate of development costs and schedule;
(k)
Preliminary title report (acquisitions only);
(l)
Documented Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance Plan specific to project;
(m) Other documentation that may be required by the Department.
Local Project Time Line:
(a)
All applications for funding must be submitted to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department in a
completed form consistent with section (6) of this rule, no later than January 1 for funding in the next
federal fiscal year, which begins October 1. Incomplete applications will not be considered for funding
assistance. The Department Grants Program staff shall perform a technical review of all applications and
forward eligible applications to the Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC). Project sponsors will
be contacted about missing documentation, which must be submitted to the Department within 10 days.
On or about April 1, OORC will meet to recommend funding priorities to the Director for all eligible
projects submitted.
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(b)
By October 1 of each year, sponsors whose projects have been prioritized and are scheduled for funding
assistance must submit to the Department the following project information
(A) Certification by project sponsor of availability of local match;
(B) All required permits and certifications as identified in the Department Procedural Manual;
(C) Preliminary plans and specifications (for construction projects);
(D) Appraisal for acquisition projects. Appraisals must conform to the Uniform Appraisal Standards for
Federal Land Acquisitions.
(c)
The Department will remove those project applications from the priority list (as outlined in subsection (b)
of this section) that are unable to provide the required documentation.
(d)
The amount of federal funding assistance available within the federal fiscal year (October 1 to September
30), will determine the projects to be funded.
(e)
If additional federal monies become available throughout the current funding year, projects on the
priority list will be funded in priority order.
(f)
Reapportionment account will be requested on or about March 31 of each year to assure that the State
does not lose the availability of those funds. All reapportionment monies received will be allocated to the
current funding cycle.
(8)
Project Administration
(a)
A signed state/local agreement shall constitute project authorization. It shall be executed 30 days after
federal approval. Projects not authorized within this time frame will be cancelled. Funds recovered from
cancellations will be reassigned to other projects on the priority list. No project may begin without a
signed state/local agreement from the Department.
(b)
Final documentation (permits, plans and specifications) must be submitted to the Department prior to
project authorization.
(c)
In the event that the funding assistance available cannot fully fund the last priority project, the sponsor
will be given the option of reducing the scope of the project or the Department will pass the available
funds to the next priority project;
(d)
The sponsor shall have one year from the date of authorization to begin substantial work (i.e., the award
of contracts or to complete at least 25 percent of the work, if done by force account. Force account work
is work on a development project with the forces and resources of the project sponsor. Projects not
conforming to this schedule will be cancelled, unless substantial justification warrants an extension.
Extensions in such cases will be made for a six month period only. In no situation will further extensions
be granted;
(e)
Projects that do not receive funding assistance for the federal fiscal year submitted will be returned to
the applicant without prejudice.
(f)
All projects shall be completed and billed within two years from the authorization date. Projects will be
inspected and audited by the Department, or its designee prior to final grant payment. Partial payments
up to 90 percent of the grant amount may be billed during the project for work completed.
(g)
Project amendments that increase the federal share will generally not be allowed. Project amendment
requests based on extraordinary circumstances will, however, be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.
Requests for time extensions must be approved prior to expiration of the approved project period as set
forth in the state/local agreement.
(h)
Time Line Summary:
(A)
January 1 - Complete application due;
(B)
April 1 - Priority selection by OORC;
(C)
September 30 - Project certification;
(D) October 10 - Revise list;
(E)
October 10 - Formal application submitted for federal obligation.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
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Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee 736-08-050
(1)
The Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC) shall be composed of nine members appointed by the
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director. The Committee membership, to serve non-concurrent fouryear terms, shall represent the following interests:
(a)
Counties east of the Cascade Mountains;
(b)
Counties west of the Cascade Mountains;
(c)
Cities under 15,000 people;
(d)
Cities over 15,000 people;
(e)
Park and Recreation Districts, Metropolitan Service District or Port Districts.
(f)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department;
(g)
People with Disabilities;
(h)
Minorities; or Representatives from Tribal Governments; and
(i)
The public at large.
(j)
The chair shall be appointed by the Director from the committee membership, considering the
recommendations of the committee.
(2)
Selection of committee members shall be from a list of not less than two candidates for each position to be
supplied by:
(a)
County representation shall be from lists supplied by the Oregon Parks Association and the Association of
Oregon Counties.
(b)
City representation shall be from lists supplied by the Oregon Recreation and Park Association and the
League of Oregon Cities.
(c)
Park and Recreation District, Port District or Metropolitan Service District representation shall be from list
supplied by the Special Districts Association of Oregon.
(d)
Representatives for People with Disabilities, Tribal Governments, Minorities, Public at Large, and Parks
Department shall be selected by the Director.
(3)
The travel, meals and lodging expenses of all members of the Committee will be reimbursed by the Department
according to the rates established by the Department of Administrative Services and approved by the Director.
(4)
Function of OORC:
a)
The Committee shall meet in April of every even year, starting in 1996, and at other times upon the call
of the Director. The committee will establish a priority order of eligible local government projects for
Land and Water Conservation Funding assistance or provide other assistance as requested by the
Department. The meeting will assure full and open project selection processes that will include an
outreach to all citizens of the state.
(b)
In order to assure full citizen participation in the selection of local projects to be prioritized for funding,
all projects submitted must be consistent with the recreation element of the local comprehensive land
use plan. The prioritization process will provide the opportunity for the citizens of the state to address
the degree to which each project meets the outdoor recreation needs of the state and local community.
The Department will provide public notice of all projects to be presented to the OORC at least 30 days
prior to their meeting.
(c)
Each sponsor shall be allowed to make a presentation under a procedure established by the Department.
(5)
Priority Selection Criteria. Projects shall be prioritized by OORC based on at least the following:
(a)
Department review and recommendations, including a technical scoring of each project that will include
the extent to which projects satisfy basic outdoor recreation needs and/or urgent needs identified in
SCORP, the extent the project meets the recreation needs identified in the local comprehensive land use
plan, and sponsor's past performance in their ability to complete and bill projects, maintain existing
facilities, and whether there are any outstanding conversions.
(b)
The committee shall review all applications using project selection criteria, including but not limited to
the following:
(A)
Extent the project demonstrates user benefits, public interest and support
(B)
Extent the project demonstrates conformance with local and state planning guidelines, the
Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) and local Park Master Plans; all
projects must be identified in local comprehensive plans and current master plans
(C)
Financial considerations, including cost/benefit ratio
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(D) Environmental assessment as defined in Oregon Application Procedures Manual.
(E)
Extent the project increases outdoor recreation opportunity in the service area.
(F)
How well the project's design accommodates people with disabilities.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
Emergency Procedure 736-08-055
(1)
Under extreme conditions, such as severe cut backs of federal funds or complete elimination of these funds, an
emergency procedure may be initiated at the discretion of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Director.
(2)
The emergency procedure will establish new time lines and funding strategies to coincide with the time delay
created at the federal level. The Director may delay or abolish time lines, and fund projects on the existing
priority list with underruns and cancellations until either projects or money is exhausted.
(3)
Under the emergency procedure the Director will notify prospective sponsors of any anticipated time changes
and assure sponsors of adequate lead time in developing new time lines.
Stat. Auth.: 390.180
Stat. Implemented: 390.180
76
A-2
Land and Water Conservation Fund Act
Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965, Public Law 88-578
Title 16, United States Code
Selected Relevant Parts – State Assistance Program
for full code section:
http://www.access.gpo.gov/uscode/title16/chapter1_subchapterlxix_partb_.html
§ 460l–4. Land and water conservation provisions; statement of purposes
The purposes of this part are to assist in preserving, developing, and assuring accessibility to all citizens of the United
States of America of present and future generations and visitors who are lawfully present within the boundaries of the
United States of America such quality and quantity of outdoor recreation resources as may be available and are
necessary and desirable for individual active participation in such recreation and to strengthen the health and vitality of
the citizens of the United States by
(1) providing funds for and authorizing Federal assistance to the States in planning, acquisition, and development of
needed land and water areas and facilities and
(2) providing funds for the Federal acquisition and development of certain lands and other areas.
§ 460l–5. Land and water conservation fund; establishment; covering certain revenues and collections into fund
During the period ending September 30, 2015, there shall be covered into the land and water conservation fund in the
Treasury of the United States, which fund is hereby established and is hereinafter referred to as the “fund”, the
following revenues and collections:
(a) Surplus property sales
All proceeds (except so much thereof as may be otherwise obligated, credited, or paid under authority of those
provisions of law set forth in section 572 (a) or 574 (a)–(c) of title 40 or the Independent Offices Appropriation Act,
1963 (76 Stat. 725) or in any later appropriation Act) hereafter received from any disposal of surplus real property and
related personal property under the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended,
notwithstanding and provision of law that such proceeds shall be credited to miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury.
Nothing in this part shall affect existing laws or regulations concerning disposal of real or personal surplus property to
schools, hospitals, and States and their political subdivisions.
(b) Motorboat fuels tax
The amounts provided for in section 460l–11 of this title.
(c) Other revenues
(1) In addition to the sum of the revenues and collections estimated by the Secretary of the Interior to be covered into
the fund pursuant to this section, as amended, there are authorized to be appropriated annually to the fund out of any
money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated such amounts as are necessary to make the income of the fund not
less than $300,000,000 for fiscal year 1977, and $900,000,000 for fiscal year 1978 and for each fiscal year thereafter
through September 30, 2015.
(2) To the extent that any such sums so appropriated are not sufficient to make the total annual income of the fund
equivalent to the amounts provided in clause (1), an amount sufficient to cover the remainder thereof shall be credited
to the fund from revenues due and payable to the United States for deposit in the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts
under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, as amended (43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq.): Provided, That notwithstanding the
provisions of section 460l–6 of this title, moneys covered into the fund under this paragraph shall remain in the fund
until appropriated by the Congress to carry out the purpose of this part.
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§ 460l–7. Allocation of land and water conservation fund for State and Federal purposes
There shall be submitted with the annual budget of the United States a comprehensive statement of estimated
requirements during the ensuing fiscal year for appropriations from the fund. Not less than 40 per centum of such
appropriations shall be available for Federal purposes. Those appropriations from the fund up to and including
$600,000,000 in fiscal year 1978 and up to and including $750,000,000 in fiscal year 1979 shall continue to be allocated
in accordance with this section. There shall be credited to a special account within the fund $300,000,000 in fiscal year
1978 and $150,000,000 in fiscal year 1979 from the amounts authorized by section 460l–5 of this title. Amounts
credited to this account shall remain in the account until appropriated. Appropriations from the special account shall
be available only with respect to areas existing and authorizations enacted prior to the convening of the Ninety-fifth
Congress, for acquisition of lands, waters, or interests in lands or waters within the exterior boundaries, as aforesaid,
of—
(1) the national park system;
(2) national scenic trails;
(3) the national wilderness preservation system;
(4) federally administered components of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System; and
(5) national recreation areas administered by the Secretary of Agriculture.
§ 460l–8 [Sec 6]. Financial assistance to States
(a) Authority of Secretary of the Interior; payments to carry out purposes of land and water conservation
provisions
The Secretary of the Interior (hereinafter referred to as the “Secretary”) is authorized to provide financial assistance to
the States from moneys available for State purposes. Payments may be made to the States by the Secretary as
hereafter provided, subject to such terms and conditions as he considers appropriate and in the public interest to carry
out the purposes of this part, for outdoor recreation:
(1) planning,
(2) acquisition of land, waters, or interests in land or waters, or
(3) development.
(b) Apportionment among States; finality of administrative determination; formula; notification;
reapportionment of unobligated amounts; definition of State
Sums appropriated and available for State purposes for each fiscal year shall be apportioned among the several States
by the Secretary, whose determination shall be final, in accordance with the following formula:
(1) Forty per centum of the first $225,000,000; thirty per centum of the next $275,000,000; and twenty per centum of
all additional appropriations shall be apportioned equally among the several States; and
(2) At any time, the remaining appropriation shall be apportioned on the basis of need to individual States by the
Secretary in such amounts as in his judgment will best accomplish the purposes of this part. The determination of need
shall include among other things a consideration of the proportion which the population of each State bears to the
total population of the United States and of the use of outdoor recreation resources of individual States by persons
from outside the State as well as a consideration of the Federal resources and programs in the particular States.
(3) The total allocation to an individual State under paragraphs (1) and (2) of this subsection shall not exceed 10 per
centum of the total amount allocated to the several States in any one year.
(4) The Secretary shall notify each State of its apportionments; and the amounts thereof shall be available thereafter
for payment to such State for planning, acquisition, or development projects as hereafter prescribed. Any amount of
any apportionment that has not been paid or obligated by the Secretary during the fiscal year in which such notification
is given and for two fiscal years thereafter shall be reapportioned by the Secretary in accordance with paragraph (2) of
this subsection, without regard to the 10 per centum limitation to an individual State specified in this subsection.
(5) For the purposes of paragraph (1) of this subsection, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (when such islands achieve Commonwealth
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status) shall be treated collectively as one State, and shall receive shares of such apportionment in proportion to their
populations. The above listed areas shall be treated as States for all other purposes of this title.
(c) Matching requirements
Payments to any State shall cover not more than 50 per centum of the cost of planning, acquisition, or development
projects that are undertaken by the State. The remaining share of the cost shall be borne by the State in a manner and
with such funds or services as shall be satisfactory to the Secretary. No payment may be made to any State for or on
account of any cost or obligation incurred or any service rendered prior to September 3, 1964.
(d) Comprehensive State plan; necessity; adequacy; contents; correlation with other plans; factors for formulation of
Housing and Home Finance Agency financed plans; planning projects; wetlands consideration; wetlands priority plan
A comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation plan shall be required prior to the consideration by the Secretary of
financial assistance for acquisition or development projects. The plan shall be adequate if, in the judgment of the
Secretary, it encompasses and will promote the purposes of this part: Provided, That no plan shall be approved unless
the Governor of the respective State certifies that ample opportunity for public participation in plan development and
revision has been accorded. The Secretary shall develop, in consultation with others, criteria for public participation,
which criteria shall constitute the basis for the certification by the Governor. The plan shall contain—
(1) the name of the State agency that will have authority to represent and act for the State in dealing with the
Secretary for purposes of this part;
(2) an evaluation of the demand for and supply of outdoor recreation resources and facilities in the State;
(3) a program for the implementation of the plan; and
(4) other necessary information, as may be determined by the Secretary.
The plan shall take into account relevant Federal resources and programs and shall be correlated so far as practicable
with other State, regional, and local plans. Where there exists or is in preparation for any particular State a
comprehensive plan financed in part with funds supplied by the Housing and Home Finance Agency, any statewide
outdoor recreation plan prepared for purposes of this part shall be based upon the same population, growth, and other
pertinent factors as are used in formulating the Housing and Home Finance Agency financed plans.
The Secretary may provide financial assistance to any State for projects for the preparation of a comprehensive
statewide outdoor recreation plan when such plan is not otherwise available or for the maintenance of such plan. For
fiscal year 1988 and thereafter each comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation plan shall specifically address
wetlands within that State as an important outdoor recreation resource as a prerequisite to approval, except that a
revised comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation plan shall not be required by the Secretary, if a State submits, and
the Secretary, acting through the Director of the National Park Service, approves, as a part of and as an addendum to
the existing comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation plan, a wetlands priority plan developed in consultation with
the State agency with responsibility for fish and wildlife resources and consistent with the national wetlands priority
conservation plan developed under section 3921 of this title or, if such national plan has not been completed,
consistent with the provisions of that section.
(e) Projects for land and water acquisition; development
In addition to assistance for planning projects, the Secretary may provide financial assistance to any State for the
following types of projects or combinations thereof if they are in accordance with the State comprehensive plan:
(1) For the acquisition of land, waters, or interests in land or waters, or wetland areas and interests therein as identified
in the wetlands provisions of the comprehensive plan (other than land, waters, or interests in land or waters acquired
from the United States for less than fair market value), but not including incidental costs relating to acquisition.
Whenever a State provides that the owner of a single-family residence may, at his option, elect to retain a right of use
and occupancy for not less than six months from the date of acquisition of such residence and such owner elects to
retain such a right, such owner shall be deemed to have waived any benefits under sections 4623, 4624, 4625, and
79
4626 of title 42 and for the purposes of those sections such owner shall not be considered a displaced person as
defined in section 4601 (6) of title 42.
(2) For development of basic outdoor recreation facilities to serve the general public, including the development of
Federal lands under lease to States for terms of twenty-five years or more: Provided, That no assistance shall be
available under this part to enclose or shelter facilities normally used for outdoor recreation activities, but the
Secretary may permit local funding, and after September 28, 1976, not to exceed 10 per centum of the total amount
allocated to a State in any one year to be used for sheltered facilities for swimming pools and ice skating rinks in areas
where the Secretary determines that the severity of climatic conditions and the increased public use thereby made
possible justifies the construction of such facilities.
(f) Requirements for project approval; conditions; progress payments; payments to Governors or State officials or
agencies; State transfer of funds to public agencies; conversion of property to other uses; reports to Secretary;
accounting; records; audit; discrimination prohibited
(1) Payments may be made to States by the Secretary only for those planning, acquisition, or development projects
that are approved by him. No payment may be made by the Secretary for or on account of any project with respect to
which financial assistance has been given or promised under any other Federal program or activity, and no financial
assistance may be given under any other Federal program or activity for or on account of any project with respect to
which such assistance has been given or promised under this part. The Secretary may make payments from time to
time in keeping with the rate of progress toward the satisfactory completion of individual projects: Provided, That the
approval of all projects and all payments, or any commitments relating thereto, shall be withheld until the Secretary
receives appropriate written assurance from the State that the State has the ability and intention to finance its share of
the cost of the particular project, and to operate and maintain by acceptable standards, at State expense, the particular
properties or facilities acquired or developed for public outdoor recreation use.
(2) Payments for all projects shall be made by the Secretary to the Governor of the State or to a State official or agency
designated by the Governor or by State law having authority and responsibility to accept and to administer funds paid
hereunder for approved projects. If consistent with an approved project, funds may be transferred by the State to a
political subdivision or other appropriate public agency.
(3) No property acquired or developed with assistance under this section shall, without the approval of the Secretary,
be converted to other than public outdoor recreation uses. The Secretary shall approve such conversion only if he finds
it to be in accord with the then existing comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation plan and only upon such
conditions as he deems necessary to assure the substitution of other recreation properties of at least equal fair market
value and of reasonably equivalent usefulness and location.: Provided, That wetland areas and interests therein as
identified in the wetlands provisions of the comprehensive plan and proposed to be acquired as suitable replacement
property within that same State that is otherwise acceptable to the Secretary, acting through the Director of the
National Park Service, shall be considered to be of reasonably equivalent usefulness with the property proposed for
conversion.
(4) No payment shall be made to any State until the State has agreed to (1) provide such reports to the Secretary, in
such form and containing such information, as may be reasonably necessary to enable the Secretary to perform his
duties under this part, and (2) provide such fiscal control and fund accounting procedures as may be necessary to
assure proper disbursement and accounting for Federal funds paid to the State under this part.
(5) Each recipient of assistance under this part shall keep such records as the Secretary shall prescribe, including
records which fully disclose the amount and the disposition by such recipient of the proceeds of such assistance, the
total cost of the project or undertaking in connection with which such assistance is given or used, and the amount and
nature of that portion of the cost of the project or undertaking supplied by other sources, and such other records as
will facilitate an effective audit.
(6) The Secretary, and the Comptroller General of the United States, or any of their duly authorized representatives,
shall have access for the purpose of audit and examination to any books, documents, papers, and records of the
recipient that are pertinent to assistance received under this part.
(7) Repealed. Pub. L. 104–333, div. I, title VIII, § 814(d)(1)(H), Nov. 12, 1996, 110 Stat. 4196.
(8) With respect to property acquired or developed with assistance from the fund, discrimination on the basis of
residence, including preferential reservation or membership systems, is prohibited except to the extent that reasonable
differences in admission and other fees may be maintained on the basis of residence.
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(g) Coordination with Federal agencies
In order to assure consistency in policies and actions under this part with other related Federal programs and activities
(including those conducted pursuant to title VII of the Housing Act of 1961 [42 U.S.C. 1500 et seq.] and section 701 of
the Housing Act of 1954) and to assure coordination of the planning, acquisition, and development assistance to States
under this section with other related Federal programs and activities, the President may issue such regulations with
respect thereto as he deems desirable and such assistance may be provided only in accordance with such regulations.
(h) Capital improvement and other projects to reduce crime
(1) Availability of funds
In addition to assistance for planning projects, and in addition to the projects identified in subsection (e) of this section,
and from amounts appropriated out of the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund, the Secretary may provide financial
assistance to States, not to exceed $15,000,000 for projects or combinations thereof for the purpose of making capital
improvements and other measures to increase safety in urban parks and recreation area, including funds to(A) increase lighting within or adjacent to public parks and recreation areas;
(B) provide emergency phone lines to contact law enforcement or security personnel in areas within or adjacent to
public parks and recreation areas;
(C) increase security personnel within or adjacent to public parks and recreation areas; and
(D) fund any other project intended to increase the security and safety of public parks and recreation areas.
(2) Eligibility
In addition to the requirements for project approval imposed by this section, eligibility for assistance under this
subsection shall be dependent upon a showing of need. In providing funds under this subsection, the Secretary shall
give priority to projects proposed for urban parks and recreation areas with the highest rates of crime and, in
particular, to urban parks and recreation areas with the highest rates of sexual assault.
(3) Federal Share
Notwithstanding subsection (c) of this section, the Secretary may provide 70 percent improvement grants for projects
undertaken by any State for the purposes described in this subsection, and the remaining share of the cost shall be
borne by the State.
§ 460l–10. Availability of land and water conservation fund for publicity purposes; standardized temporary signing;
standards and guidelines
Moneys derived from the sources listed in section 460l-5 of this title shall not be available for publicity purposes:
Provided, however, That in each case where significant acquisition or development is initiated, appropriate
standardized temporary signing shall be located on or near the affected site, to the extent feasible, so as to indicated
the action taken is a product of funding made available through the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Such signing
may indicate the per centum and dollar amounts financed by Federal and non-Federal funds, and that the source of the
funding includes moneys derived from Outer Continental Shelf receipts. The Secretary shall prescribe standards and
guidelines for the usage of such signing to assure consistency of design and application.
81
A-3
Civil Rights Requirements
1. Age Discrimination Act of 1975 prohibits discrimination based on age in program participation and
excludes from coverage most employment practices except for programs funded under the public
services employment title of the Job Partnership Training Act.
2. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 provides for a clear and comprehensive prohibition of
discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local services – including
transportation, public accommodations and services – including transportation and
telecommunications. All projects must comply with the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards and
the ADA Accessibility Guidelines.
3. Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 (P.L. 90-480) All facilities constructed within the project boundary
of any NPS funded project must be accessible to the physically handicapped and must comply with
the UFAS and the ADA accessibility guidelines. Projects that do not conform to these specifications will
be returned for modifications.
Includes structural accessibility of buildings and facilities, newly constructed, added to, or altered.
Provides for standards in effect at design stage.
4. Section 504, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (P.L. 93-112, as amended in 1978.
Prohibits discrimination on the basis of handicap in program participation, services and activities
provided by federal financial assistance or by any federal agency. The law requires that programs
and facilities be, to the highest degree feasible, readily accessible to and usable by all persons who
have a disability, including mobility, visual, hearing, or mental impairments.
Program accessibility, both structural and non-structural, is required for qualified handicapped
participants and employees.
Programs must be offered in the most integrated setting possible and provide opportunities for
equal achievement and not otherwise limit qualified handicapped persons in any right, privilege,
advantage, or opportunity enjoyed by able bodied.
A Section 504 Self Evaluation is the process that is required, whereby each sponsor, in consultation
with handicapped individuals and organizations within their community, examine policies, practices,
programs, services, activities and facilities to determine whether they are in compliance to Section
504 of the Rehabilitation Act and that they are accessible to all individuals.
The transition plan is the document detailing plans for achieving compliance with Section 504 when
structural changes to existing facilities are required and identified through the self-evaluation
process. The plan identifies physical obstacles; describes the methodology for providing
accessibility; specifies the schedule for achieving program accessibility and indicates the person
responsible for implementing the plan on a scheduled basis.
Establishes a set of structural standards to use.
Exception if such participation alters the fundamental nature of the program, and/or reasonable
accommodation cannot be made for the participant or employee without doing so or creating a
financial burden.
82
Provides for viewing programs in their entirety, which allows for offering non-accessible and
accessible programs within the same service area. However, all "unique" structural and nonstructural programs must be accessible without regard to location.
5. Executive Order 11246, Equal Employment Opportunity and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
(P.L. 88-352, 42 U.S.C. Sects. 2000d to 2000d-4) Title VI prohibits discrimination based on race,
color or national origin in program participation and employment, where (1) the primary purpose of
the grant is to provide employment, or (2) discriminatory employment practices will result in
unequal treatment of person, who are or should be benefiting from the grant. The provisions of
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Executive Order 11246 implementing the Act must be
followed.
a. An assurance of compliance (Form DI-1350) must accompany each application for both
acquisition and development projects. This form must be signed by the head of the governing
body of the sponsoring agency or by the individual designated by the governing body.
b. All construction contracts exceeding $10,000 total cost must be awarded through a process of
competitive bidding involving formal advertising, with adequate purchase description, sealed
bids, and public openings. Copies of all advertisements, bids, and a copy of the contract shall be
retained for inspection. In determining whether fund-assisted construction contracts exceed
this dollar limit, the total amount of the contract awarded rather than the amount of federal
assistance shall apply.
c. All advertisements for bids for projects expected to cost more than $10,000 total cost must
include in the notice to prospective bidders that federal funds are being used on the project. A
typical notice would be:
"All prospective bidders are hereby notified that federal funds provided under the Land and
Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 will be used to finance a portion of the project.
Affirmative action to conform to the provisions of Executive Order 11246 which implements Civil
Rights Act of 1964 will be required of the successful bidder".
d. All contracts let in hometown or imposed plan areas must be in conformance with the
requirements of the area plan. In Oregon, only Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington
counties are in a plan area. Certification of compliance with the plan will be required from all
contractors of these counties. The EEO rules are available through the Oregon State Parks and
Recreation Department office.
e. All proposed contracts exceeding $1,000,000 in total cost must receive approval from the State
prior to the awarding of the contract.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
For technical assistance on the design requirements of the ADA as they apply in new construction and alterations,
contact:
United States Access Board
1331 F Street NW, Suite 1000
Washington, DC 20004-1111
(202) 272-0080 (v) (202) 272-0082 (TTY) (202) 272-0081 (fax)
(800) 872-2253 (v) (800) 993-2822 (TTY)
Website: http://www.access-board.gov/ada/
e-mail: [email protected]
83
For assistance on other topics related to the ADA standards or regulations, including effective dates and
requirements for existing facilities, contact:
U.S. Department of Justice
www.ada.gov
(800) 514-0301 (voice)
(800) 514-0383 (TTY)
http://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
1801 L Street NW, Washington DC 20507
1-800-669-3362 (voice) 1-800-800-3302 (TDD)
Federal Communications Commission
1919 M Street NW, Washington DC 20554
(202) 632-7260 (voice), (202) 632-6999 (TDD)
U.S. Department of Justice
Civil Rights Division, Office of the Americans with Disabilities Act
PO Box 66738, Washington DC 20035-6738
(202) 514-0301 (voice) (202) 514-0383 (TDD)
U.S. Department of Transportation
400 Seventh Street SW, Washington D.C. 20590
(202) 366-1656 (voice), (202) 366-2979 (TDD)
84
A-4
Volunteer or Donated Labor Timesheet
Project Title:
Project #:
Volunteer Name:
Phone #
Address:
Professional and technical personnel, consultants, and other skilled and unskilled labor may furnish volunteer services.
Each hour of volunteered service may be counted as matching share if the service is an integral and necessary part of
an approved project.
Records of in-kind contributions of personnel shall include time sheets containing the signature of the person whose
time is contributed and of the supervisor verifying that the record is accurate.
Rates for volunteer should be consistent with those regular rates paid for similar work in other activities of the
State. In cases where the kinds of skills required for the project are not found in other activities by the grantee,
rates used should be consistent with those paid for similar work in the labor market in which the grantee
competes for the kind of services involved. The time of a person donating services will be valued at the rate of pay
as a general laborer unless the person is professionally skilled in the work being performed on the project (mason
doing work on a retaining wall). When this is the case, the wage rate this individual is normally paid for performing
this service may be charged to the project. The rate cannot exceed prevailing wage charges determined by the
Department of Labor. A list can be found at http://www.access.gpo.gov/davisbacon/or.html
Date
Hourly Rate
Hours Worked
(From – To)
Description of Work
Signature of Person Volunteering or Donating Time
Date
Project Supervisor Signature
Total Hours Worked
Date
X
=
Rate of Pay
85
Total Value of Hours This Sheet
Initials
A-5
Donated Materials or Supplies Record
Project Title:
Project #:
Donor:
Phone #
Address:
Prices assessed to donated materials included in the matching share should be reasonable and should not exceed
current market prices at the time they are charged to the project. Records of in-kind contributions of in-kind
contributions of material shall indicate the fair market value by listing the comparable prices and vendors.
Date
Description of Donated Materials or Supplies
Signature of Person Donating Materials or Supplies
Fair Value of
Donation
Date
Project Supervisor Signature
Date
Total Value of Donation This Sheet $
86
Is this full retail
value?
A-6
Donated Equipment Record
Project Title:
Project #:
Donor:
Phone #
Address:
The hourly rate for donated equipment used on a project shall not exceed its fair-rental value. Records of in-kind
contributions of equipment shall include schedules showing the hours and dates of use and the signature of the
operator of the equipment.
Date
Description of Equipment Used
Signature of Person Donating Equipment
Hourly Rate of
Donated
Equipment
Date
Project Supervisor Signature
Date
Total Value of Donation This Sheet $
87
Number of
Hours Used
A-7
Frequently Asked Questions – Appraisals and the LWCF State Assistance Program
1. Why do I need an appraisal?
An appraisal determines the basis for LWCF federal grant assistance involving the acquisition of real
property, establishes fair compensation for the land owner as required by law, and establishes the
equivalent fair market value requirement for both converted and replacement property pursuant to
Section 6(f)(3) of the LWCF Act as amended.
2. When must an appraisal be conducted?
Before the initiation of negotiations with the property owner, an appraisal must be conducted unless
the State determines that an appraisal is unnecessary pursuant to Title 49 Part 24.102 of the Code of
Federal Regulations and a waiver valuation is prepared (see Question #23 regarding waiver valuations).
3. Where do I go to find information about appraisals and appraisal requirements?
Because the LWCF is a federal assistance program, the first stop for information about appraisals should
be the Uniform Appraisal Standards for Federal Land Acquisitions (UASFLA) which has been prepared for
use by appraisers to promote uniformity in the appraisal of real property with federal involvement.
These federal standards are considered “Supplemental Standards” to the Uniform Standards of
Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP).
The UASFLA can be found at http://www.usdoj.gov/enrd/land-ack/yb2001.pdf
Also, Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 24, specifically addresses the applicability of
acquisition requirements to federal acquisitions or federal assistance programs. Realty and land
acquisition offices within state and local offices of the Federal Highway Administration may be able to
provide additional information with respect to land acquisitions and associated appraisal requirements.
4. What is the “Yellow Book”?
Because of its yellow cover, the UASFLA publication is commonly referred to as the “Yellow Book.”
5. What is USPAP?
USPAP (the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice) are the generally accepted standards
(ASB) of The Appraisal Foundation, a nonprofit educational organization.
6. Must each appraisal be reviewed for every LWCF acquisition and every conversion and what type
of review is required?
Yes. Except for “waiver valuations,” a appraisals conducted for LWCF purposes must be reviewed by a
qualified review appraiser pursuant to the UASFLA, Section C, “Standards for the Review of Appraisals.”
The UASFLA and 49 CFR Part 24.104 require that a “technical review” must be conducted by a review
appraiser of each appraisal prepared for LWCF purposes. See UASFLA Section C-1 for further guidance
on technical reviews.
7. Who is responsible for the appraisal?
The State, as the LWCF grant recipient, is ultimately responsible for ensuring that appraisals for this
program are obtained. This responsibility and associated costs are often passed on to local sub
recipients.
88
8. Is the cost of an appraisal eligible for reimbursement under my LWCF grant?
Because “incidental costs” such as for appraisals are precluded by law, such costs cannot be recouped
through a LWCF grant as either a direct or indirect cost.
9. Who is responsible for the appraisal review?
The responsibility for ensuring that the resulting appraisal meets federal standards rests solely with
the agency responsible for administering the LWCF grant program at the State level (State Liaison
Officer). The State must 1) have an appraisal review process in place to provide guidance to
appraisers, 2) ensure that the appraisals are reviewed by State-certified review appraisers, and 3)
certify that the appraisal meets federal standards.
10. Can the State delegate its responsibility for obtaining the appraisal review for a locally sponsored
project?
If the State opts, as part of its appraisal review process, to allow its LWCF sub recipients to contract
for appraisal reviews, it is the State’s responsibility to ensure that the sub recipient’s review process
is in conformance with the UASFLA standards for appraisal review.
11. Who pays for the appraisal review?
As with appraisals, the cost of an appraisal review is the responsibility of the State or sub recipient
and is not an eligible direct or indirect cost under the LWCF program.
12. Does the National Park Service approve the appraisal?
NPS does not normally review and approve individual appraisals. It will conduct spot checks of
appraisals as needed and will review the State’s LWCF appraisal review process. The NPS may request
appraisal review assistance from the Department of Interior’s Appraisal Services Directorate (ASD) as
needed.
13. What kinds of qualifications are acceptable for appraisers? Do we require specific certifications?
Some of the other federal agencies have a list of appraisers they accept. Does LWCF have anything
similar?
LWCF-related appraisals may be prepared by only “certified general” appraisers in the state where the
property is located. No list of acceptable appraisers or appraisal firms is maintained by the LWCF
program.
14. How many appraisals must I obtain for each property?
At least one appraisal is required for each property to be acquired with LWCF assistance and for each of
the converted and replacement parcel(s) involved in a conversion.
15. What does “highest and best use” mean?
“Highest and best use” is the determinant of market value, i.e., the highest and most profitable use for
which the property is adaptable and needed or likely to be needed in the reasonably near future. See
Section B-3 of the UASFLA for a more thorough explanation.
16. Can the highest and best use be the use for which the government entity is acquiring the property?
Since the government entity is using federal assistance to acquire property for a public park (a noneconomic use) or is acquiring property to satisfy the replacement requirement for public park land (a
similar non-economic consideration), future public park use is not a valid use upon which to estimate
market value. See Section B-3 of the UASFLA for additional guidance.
89
17. How should highest and best use be determined when the zoning for the parcel in question is
different than the surrounding area (this comes up with conversions)?
In order to determine the highest and best use of 6(f)-protected land to be converted, the appraiser is to
ignore the actual zoning of the property if the zoning is a non-economic zoning established to recognize
or preserve the open space characteristic of a LWCF-assisted site. In this case, the appraiser shall
determine the likely zoning that would have been established under the hypothetical condition that the
park, or preserve, was never created. In so doing, the appraiser will evaluate local economic
characteristics, factors, and trends as well as the physical characteristics of the property.
18. What is the definition of market value?
“Market value is the amount in cash, or on terms reasonably equivalent to cash, for which in all
probability the property would have sold on the effective date of the appraisal, after a reasonable
exposure time on the open competitive market, from a willing and reasonably knowledgeable seller to a
willing and reasonably knowledgeable buyer, with neither acting under any compulsion to buy or sell,
giving due consideration to all available economic uses of the property at the time of the appraisal”
(UASFLA).
19. Are the existing improvements to the property factored into the appraisal?
Yes, when the value of the improvements contributes to the highest and best use of the real property.
20. Must I pay the landowner the full fair market value?
Yes, in most cases. However, a landowner may find it advantageous to make a full or partial donation of
the property. An approved appraisal is still necessary to determine the amount eligible for matching a
LWCF grant, as is documentation from the property seller documenting their willingness to donate a
portion of the property’s value. Alternatively, negotiations might result in an administrative settlement
higher than the appraised value. If the NPS agrees that the administrative settlement is reasonable, the
higher amount is eligible for assistance.
21. Does a court settlement in a condemnation acquisition supersede the appraisal?
When lands are acquired through judicial proceedings the price determined by the court will be
accepted by NPS in lieu of any previously approved appraised value. However, if a court settlement
postdates project approval, there is no obligation for NPS to match an amount higher than what was
originally approved.
22. How long before an appraisal is outdated, i.e., how old can an appraisal be and still be considered
useful for LWCF situations?
For acquisitions, any appraisal older than one year should be updated by the original appraiser to reflect
any changes in the market. For conversions, the lapse of time between the effective date of the
appraisals for the converted and replacement properties is critical since the fair market values are being
compared. To facilitate this, the converted and replacement properties should be appraised with the
same effective date. First, the property to be converted should be appraised and then the replacement
property(s) should be appraised with the same effective date as the appraisal for the converted parcel.
23. What is a waiver valuation?
When the estimated value of real property is less than $10,000 (up to $25,000 with the owner’s
concurrence), a waiver valuation may be prepared in lieu of an appraisal (see
www.fhwa.dot.gov/realestate/appwaiv1.htm
90
A-8
Recommended Format for Federal Appraisal Reports
Part I—Introduction
A-1. Title page
A-2. Letter of transmittal
A-3. Table of contents
A-4. Appraiser’s certification
A-5. Summary of salient facts and conclusions
A-6. Photographs of subject property
A-7. Statement of assumptions and limiting
conditions
A-8. Scope of the appraisal
A-9. Purpose of the appraisal
A-10. Summary of appraisal problems
c. Fixtures
d. History
e. Assessed value and annual tax load
f. Zoning and other land use regulations
Part V—Data Analysis and
Conclusions—After Acquisition
A-23. Analysis of highest and best use
A-24. Land valuation
A-25. Value estimate by cost approach
A-26. Value estimate by sales comparison
approach
A-27. Value estimate by income
capitalization approach
A-28. Correlation and final value estimate
Part II—Factual Data—
Before Acquisition
A-11. Legal description
A-12. Area, city and neighborhood data
A-13. Property data:
a. Site
b. Improvements
c. Fixtures
d. Use history
e. Sales history
f. Rental history
g. Assessed value and annual tax load
h. Zoning and other land use regulations
Part VI—Acquisition
Analysis
A-29. Recapitulation
A-30. Allocation and explanation of damages
A-31. Explanation of special benefits
Part VII—Exhibits and
Addenda
A-32. Location map
A-33. Comparable data maps
A-34. Detail of comparative data
A-35. Plot plan
A-36. Floor plan
A-37. Title evidence report
A-38. Other pertinent exhibits
A-39. Qualifications of appraiser
Part III—Data Analysis and
Conclusions—Before
Acquisition
A-14. Analysis of highest and best use
A-15. Land valuation
A-16. Value estimate by cost approach
A-17. Value estimate by sales comparison
approach
A-18. Value estimate by income capitalization
approach
A-19. Correlation and final value estimate
Part IV—Factual Data—
After Acquisition
A-20. Legal description
A-21. Neighborhood factors
A-22. Property data
a. Site
b. Improvements
91
A-9
Appraisal Report Documentation Checklist
Title Page
❏Agency Name
❏Agency Tract No.
❏Appraiser’s Address
Site Data—Before
❏Property Address
❏Appraiser’s Name(s)
❏Effective Date of Value
(Overall)
Adequate
Present use
Topog.
Vegetation
Land Shape
Minerals
Hazards
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
Letter of Transmittal
❏Date of Letter
❏Identification of Property
❏Prop. Rights Appraised Effective Date of Value
❏Special Assumptions ❏Special Instructions
❏Estimate of Before Value
❏Estimate of After Value
❏Appraiser Signature
Table of Contents
❏Omitted
❏Adequate
Appraiser’s Certification
❏Facts True &Correct
❏No Interest in Property
❏Conforms to USPAP
❏Property Inspection
❏Professional Assistance
❏After Value
Improvement Data—Before
(Overall)
Adequate
Type
Actual Age
Condition
Occupancy
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Limited Only by Assump.
❏No Contingent Fee
❏Conforms to Fed Standards
❏Offered Owner Accomp.
❏Before Value
❏Effective Date of Value
Fixtures—Before
❏Omitted
Use
Omitted
Sales
Omitted
Rental
Omitted
❏
❏
❏
❏Effective Date of Value
❏H & B Use—After
❏Description After
Value After:
❏Cost
❏Market
❏Income
❏Final Est.
Photographs of Subject
❏Omitted
❏Adequate
Assessed Value
Omitted
Tax Load
Omitted
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Adequate
Description
Omitted
Rezone Probability
Omitted
Land Use Regs.
Omitted
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Legal Desc.—Before
❏Inadequate
Area Data—Before
❏Inadequate
❏Omitted
❏Omitted
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
Vacant
Omitted
Adequate
Improved
Omitted
Adequate
L.P. Considered
Omitted
Adequate
Reasonable Conclusion
Yes
No
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Defin. of Market Value ❏Defin. of Property Rights
❏Omitted
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Highest and Best Use—Before
Purpose of Appraisal
Sum. of Appraisal Prob.
❏Inadequate
Zoning & Land Use Regulations—Before
❏Appropriate
❏Suitable for Trial
❏Extraneous Assumptions ❏Limited Appraisal
❏Omitted
❏Adequate
Assessed Value & Tax Load—Before
Assumptions & Limiting Conditions
Scope of Appraisal
❏Inadequate
❏Size
❏Effective Age
❏Quality
❏On-site Imp.
History—Before
Summary of Salient Facts and Conclusions
❏Ident. of Property
❏H & B Use—Before
❏Description Before
Value Before:
❏Cost
❏Market
❏Income
❏Final Est.
❏Inadequate
❏Access
❏Soils
❏Land Area
❏Utilities
❏Easements
92
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Land Valuation—Before
Final Value Estimate—Before
Comparables:
Description
Adequate
Photos
Omitted
Analysis
Omitted
Suitable for Trial
Yes
Final Value Analysis
Adequate
Reasoned Analysis
Omitted
Adequate
Avoided Summation Appraisal
Yes
No
Suitable for Trial
Yes
No
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏No
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏No
❏Inadequate
❏No
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Omitted
❏Adequate
Project Desc.
Omitted
Project Impact
Omitted
❏
❏N/A
❏
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Shape
❏Utilities
❏Size
❏Access
❏Easements
Relationship to Project
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Comparables:
Description
Adequate
Photos
Omitted
Analysis
Omitted
Suitable for Trial
Yes
Final Value Analysis
Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Description
Omitted
❏
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
Fixtures—After
Omitted
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏
History—After
Use/Rental Since Take
Omitted
Adequate
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
Assessed Value—Tax Load—After
Estimated A.V.
Omitted
Estimated Tax Load
Omitted
❏
❏
Income Capitalization Approach—Before
Justified Omission
Yes
No N/A
Gross Income Estimate
Adequate
Inadequate
Vacancy
Omitted
Adequate
Expenses:
Fixed
Omitted
Adequate
Operating
Omitted
Adequate
Reserves
Omitted
Adequate
Capitalization Rate:
Market Supported
Yes
No
Selection Method
Adequate
Inadequate
Suitable for Trial
Yes
No
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Site Data
Improvements—After
❏Inadequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏No
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Neighborhood Factors—After
Sales Comparison Approach—Before
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
Legal Description—After (or Description of
Acquisition)
Cost Approach—Before
Justified Omission
Yes
Reproduction Cost
Adequate
Depreciation:
Market Supported
Yes
Analysis
Omitted
Final Estimate
Adequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏ ❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Zoning & Land Use Regulations—After
Rezone Considered
Omitted
Appendix A
❏
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
Highest & Best Use—After
Change Considered
Omitted
Adequate
Intensity Considered
Omitted
Adequate
Restoration Considered
Yes
No
Effects of TCEs
Yes
No
❏
❏
❏
❏
93
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏N/A
❏N/A
Reasonable Conclusion
Yes
No
Non-conformity
Omitted
Adequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
Omitted
Analysis
Omitted
Suitable for Trial
Yes
Final Value Analysis
Adequate
❏Inadequate
Land Valuation—After
Comparables:
Same Comparables as Before
Yes
No
Description
Adequate
Inadequate
Photos
Adequate
Inadequate
Depreciation:
Market Supported
Yes
No
Analysis
Omitted
Adequate
Final Value Analysis
Adequate
Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
Cost Approach—After
Justified Omission
Yes
No
Reproduction Cost
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏N/A
Final Value Estimate—After
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
Acquisition Analysis
Avoided Valuing Take
Yes
No
Shown in Proper Form
Yes
No
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
Value of Take/Damages Properly Allocated
Yes
No
Damage Explanation
Omitted
Adequate
Inadequate
Noted Accounting Tabulation
Yes
No
Cost to Cure Damage Estimated
Yes
No
Cost Justified
Omitted
Adequate
Inadequate
Profit
Omitted
Adequate
Inadequate
Cost v. Diminution in Market Value Considered
Omitted
Adequate
Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏N/A
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
Allocation & Explanation of Damages
Income Capitalization Approach—After
Justified Omission
Yes
No
Gross Income Estimate
Adequate
Inadequate
Vacancy
Omitted
Adequate
Expenses:
Fixed
Omitted
Adequate
Operating
Omitted
Adequate
Reserves
Omitted
Adequate
Capitalization Rate:
Market Supported
Omitted
Adequate
Selection Method
Adequate
Inadequate
Suitable for Trial
Yes
No
❏
Reasoned Analysis
Omitted
Adequate
Avoided Summation Appraisal
Yes
No
Suitable for Trial
Yes
No
Sales Comparison Approach—After
Comparables:
Same Comparables as Before
Yes
No
Description
Adequate
Inadequate
Photos
Omitted
Adequate
Analysis
Omitted
Adequate
Suitable for Trial
Yes
No
Final Value Analysis
Adequate
Inadequate
❏Adequate
❏Adequate
❏No
❏Inadequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
Special Benefits
Adequately Explained
Yes
No
❏
❏
❏N/A
Location Map
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Omitted
Comparable Data Maps
All Comps on Map
Yes
No
Subject Shown on Map
Yes
No
❏
❏
94
❏
❏
Comparable Data Sheets
Confirmed
Yes
Terms Reported
Yes
Buyer/Seller
Yes
Date of Sale
Yes
Recording Info
Yes
Location
Yes
Present Use
Yes
H&B Use
Yes
Zoning
Yes
Legal
Yes
Physical Description
Adequate
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏No
❏Inadequate
Plot Plan
Property Boundaries Shown
Yes
No
Dimensions Before
Yes
No
Dimensions After
Yes
No
Street Frontage Before
Yes
No
Street Frontage After
Yes
No
Photo Locations
Yes
No
Improvement Locations
Yes
No
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
Floor Plan
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏N/A
Title Report
❏Omitted
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
Other Exhibits
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏N/A
Qualifications
❏Adequate
❏Inadequate
❏Omitted
95
A-10
Documentation Required for Final Billing of an Acquisition
One copy of each of the following documents (if applicable) must be submitted with the
billing for each parcel of land acquired.
1. First contact with owner. If verbal, not date and subjects, owner’s reaction to sponsor’s
interest in the acquisition.
2. Ten year history of conveyance. This is frequently included in the appraisal report.
3. Invitation to the owner from the appraiser or sponsor to accompany the appraiser
while he is viewing the property for the purpose of making the appraisal.
4. Written offer of purchase at not less than the review appraisal amount.
5. Properly documented waiver of just compensation, if required.
6. If purchase price exceeded the fair market value, is there adequate justification.
7. A copy of the deed to the purchasing agency.
8. A copy of the check or voucher (both sides) used to make the payment
9. A copy of the title insurance policy.
10. A copy of the vesting deed. This is the deed or deeds under which the seller acquired
the property.
11. One copy each of any easements that affect the property, and a statement as to the
effect of each easement on the proposed recreation use of the property.
12. One copy each of any deeds referred to in the deed to the purchaser, the vesting deed
or in the easements. These are called reference deeds.
13. A statement of unrecorded interests is required for each parcel. Unrecorded interests
include such items as unrecorded sales contracts, leases, or easements, which are not
part of the public record. The title insurance policy includes all of the recorded
instruments, and therefore, is not necessary to repeat. Also, a statement of the effect
on recreation utility of any unrecorded interests discovered must be made.
14. A statement on any liens by public agencies that is not included in the title reports.
15. One copy each (if applicable) of an assessor's map of the property, any official plats,
county or private land surveys or documents pertaining to the vacation of platted
streets or roadways.
16. A statement of payments made to the seller for relocation and other allowable costs in
conformance with P.L. 91-646.
If any of these documents have been previously submitted, they need not be resubmitted,
but such prior submittal should be mentioned in the letter of transmittal.
96
A-11
Documentation Required for Final Billings of Development & Rehab Projects
Note: Depending on the project, some items may not be required. For example: Items 2,
3, 4 and 6 would not apply to a project completed entirely by your own employees.
Please attach copies of required documentation to final billings.
1. Project ledger sheet or other detailed listing of expenditures.
2. Affidavit of publication. Supplied by the newspaper when you advertise for bids.
3. Minutes of any meeting at which action is taken on bids received. Should be dated and
signed by responsible official.
4. Contractor invoices (or final progress payment, if countersigned by contractor
acknowledging payment of all prior charges, and if the costs of each major work item is
shown).
5. All other invoices. Not monthly statements.
6. Cancelled checks to contractor. (Copy both sides).
7. All other cancelled checks. (Copy both sides).
8. Employee time records.
9. Individual earnings records for the calendar year or payroll journals. Should show gross
wages, withholdings and net pay for each pay period.
10. Equipment rental time records.
11. Detailed schedule showing how you computed owned-equipment rental rates. For
donated equipment time, you may use hourly rates published in rental compilation or
rental rate guide, or other publications which provide national or regional average
rates.
12. Detailed schedule showing how you computed rates for payroll additives (fringe
benefits)
97
A.12
Reimbursement Form
98

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