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English
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Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes

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Brian Floca
Brian Floca

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Isaac Bashevis Singer
Isaac Bashevis Singer

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Transcript

Junior Great Books
®
!
NEW
Junior Great Books®
Series 3–5 Sample Unit
Common Core State Standards Edition
4
Junior Great Books
ooks
B
t
a
e
r
G
r
Junio
BOOK ONE
Trus T
5
Junior G
reat Boo ®
ks
Thank You, M’am
Hon e
Charles
Langston Hughes
Shirley
Crow Call
Richard
Peck
the Ped
dler’s G
Maxine
ift
Rose Sc
Philippa Pearce
Junior
Gr e a t B
ooks
ONE
Jackson
the spec
ial Power
Lois Lowry
Fresh
st y
BOOK
s of Blo
ssom Cu
lp
hur
resourCe Fuln ess
shrewd Todie and lyzer the Miser
Ukranian folktale as told by Isaac Bashevis
se
l f -R e
sPe C t
In the t
ime of th
e Drum
folktale
as told by
s
Kim L.
Siegelson
learnin
g the G
Francisco
ame
Jiménez
the Invi
sible Ch
Tove Jans
ild
son
Singer
Gullah
on sand Island
Jacqueline Briggs Martin
The Green Man
Gail E. Haley
CoMM unIC aTIon
song of Hope
f It t In
G In
the Co
ming of
the surf
lington
man
A ll sum
Ray Brad mer in a D
ay
bury
A Game
of Catch
Richard
Wilbur
Peggy Duffy
Peter Col
Jean labadie’s Big Black Dog
French-Canadian folktale as told by Natalie
Savage Carlson
Thunder, elephant, and Dorobo
African folktale as told by Humphrey Harman
_COVERS_P4.indb 1
3
ips
Relationsh
s
es
n
Kind
ce
Confiden
NE
BOOK O
4
Trust
Resourcefulness
Communication
BOOK ONE
JGB5_C
OVERS_
P2.indb
1
5
3/20/13
3/20/13
9:17 AM
BOOK
Hones
ty
Self-Re
spect
Fitting
9:19 AM
In
ONE
read.think.discuss.grow.
®
3/20/13
9:19 AM
features and benefits
Welcome to the New Junior Great Books® Series 3–5!
This sample unit contains:
• Page 2: New Junior Great Books Series 3–5 Benefits
• Page 3: Program Materials Description
• Pages 4–7: New Junior Great Books Series 3–5 Features
• Pages 8–33: Complete Unit, “Crow Call,” from Series 4, Book One
• Pages 34–35: Theme Connections
• Page 36: Critical Thinking Rubric
• Pages 37–40: Selected pages from Series 4 Reader’s Journal
• Pages 41–47: Alignment to Common Core State Standards
Junior Great Books Series 3–5 Benefits
Teachers move from a prescriptive, instructional approach to an inquiry-based,
collaborative approach. Series 3–5 makes it easy to:
•Engage all students in higher-level reading, thinking, and discussion
•Differentiate instruction to address students’ needs and learning styles
•Integrate critical thinking and social/emotional learning into their curriculum
Students come to see themselves as successful learners and thinkers, as they
learn to:
•Read for meaning
•Use reading comprehension strategies
•Go beyond initial responses to deeper thinking
•Support ideas with evidence from the story
•Develop appreciation for rich, rewarding literature
Students develop cognitive, social, and emotional intelligence by:
•Thoughtfully considering different points of view
•Listening to others and responding appropriately
•Contributing to a collaborative, respectful classroom environment
Junior Great Books® is a registered trademark and Shared Inquirytm is a trademark of the Great Books Foundation.
2
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
features and benefits
Junior Great Books Series 3–5 Materials
4
BOOK ONE
TRUST
Thank You, M’am
Langston Hughes
Crow Call
Lois Lowry
Fresh
Philippa Pearce
RESOURCEFULNESS
Junior Great Books
Student Books
Junior Great Books
Junior Great Books®
The student books are anthologies of
outstanding stories, grouped by theme, that
capture students’ imaginations and sustain
a thoughtful process of reading, writing,
and discussion. Engaging artwork provides
visual interest and strengthens students’
understanding of each story. Student-friendly
glossaries define challenging story words.
Shrewd Todie and Lyzer the Miser
Ukranian folktale as told by Isaac Bashevis Singer
Gail E. Haley
COMMUNICATION
BOOK ONE
The Green Man
4
On Sand Island
Jacqueline Briggs Martin
Song of Hope
Peggy Duffy
Jean Labadie’s Big Black Dog
French-Canadian folktale as told by Natalie Savage Carlson
Thunder, Elephant, and Dorobo
African folktale as told by Humphrey Harman
t Books®
NAL
4
Trust
Resourcefulness
Communication
BOOK ONE
Junior Great Books®
audio cd #1
4
TRUST
Thank You, M’am
Crow Call
Fresh
Junior Great Books®
audio cd #2
Book one
9:51
14:54
RESOURCEFULNESS
RESOURCEFULNESS (continued)
Shrewd Todie and
Lyzer the Miser 12:22
The Green Man
On Sand Island
25:38
4
Book one
COMMUNICATION
Song of Hope
10:26
Jean Labadie’s
Big Black Dog
11:33
15:53
15:39
Thunder, Elephant,
and Dorobo 13:41
Audio recording copyright © 2014 by The Great Books Foundation. The material contained herein cannot be
duplicated, stored, or transmitted with the intent of sharing by any electronic means, including the Internet or
any information storage or retrieval system. For classroom use only in conjunction with the Junior Great Books
program. Not for individual sale. All rights reserved. No part of this program may be reproduced in any
form without permission in writing from the publisher. Manufactured in the U.S.A.
Audio recording copyright © 2014 by The Great Books Foundation. The material contained herein cannot be
duplicated, stored, or transmitted with the intent of sharing by any electronic means, including the Internet or
any information storage or retrieval system. For classroom use only in conjunction with the Junior Great Books
program. Not for individual sale. All rights reserved. No part of this program may be reproduced in any
form without permission in writing from the publisher. Manufactured in the U.S.A.
ISBN 978-1-939014-64-1
ISBN 978-1-939014-64-1
The Great Books Foundation
The Great Books Foundation
www.greatbooks.org
www.greatbooks.org
A nonprofit educational organization
A nonprofit educational organization
Junior Great Books
TEACHER’S EDITION
Audio CDs
Professionally recorded audio versions of each
story add flexibility to your reading routine
and provide support for struggling students.
Teacher’s Editions
Teacher’s Editions include:
• A unit overview for each story that
provides important planning details and a
big-picture snapshot of the unit
4
Trust
Resourcefulness
Communication
BOOK ONE
4
BOOK ONE
Junior Great Books
READER’S JOURNAL
UST
EFULNESS
• A unit guide that walks you through each
day’s lesson
• Annotated reading selections that have
notes, icons, and highlights that correspond
to activity instructions
• A Teacher Resources section for each unit
that contains a range of additional support
materials
Reader’s Journals
zer the Miser
ac Bashevis Singer
NICATION
ack Dog
d by Natalie Savage Carlson
nd Dorobo
phrey Harman
4
Trust
Resourcefulness
Communication
Reader’s Journals allow students to record
their thinking at each stage of work on
a story, reinforcing the reading-writing
connection.
BOOK ONE
Sample Unit
3
features and benefits
Junior Great Books Series 3–5 Features
High-Quality Literature
The Junior Great Books program features outstanding literature by awardwinning authors such as Langston Hughes, Lois Lowry, Isaac Bashevis Singer,
and Jane Yolen, with illustrations by lauded artists such as Brian Pinkney,
Bagram Ibatoulline, and Caldecott winner Brian Floca. Stories are selected for
their vivid writing and for their ability to support multiple interpretations and
thought-provoking discussions, as well as for their diversity of settings, genres,
and writing styles.
In-Depth Reading, Critical Thinking, and Writing Activities
The sequence of Shared Inquiry activities encourages students to develop the
habits of effective readers and thinkers: to read closely, to think critically and
write thoughtfully about what they have read, and to listen and respond to their
classmates.
Students read along as a story is read aloud, ask questions about the story, and
then reread and respond to the story—all fundamental reading comprehension
strategies. Then through a Shared Inquiry discussion, students practice the three
essential elements of critical thinking:
• Idea—Students
develop and clarify ideas about a story’s meaning.
• Evidence—Students support these ideas with evidence found in the story.
• Response—Students listen to and consider the ideas of others.
After the discussion, students continue their exploration of the story through
written responses, creative responses, related fiction readings, and projects linking
the story to other subject areas.
Differentiated Instruction
•Student learning spectrums present the range of
student behaviors you might expect to see during
core activities.
•Support and challenge options, keyed to the
learning spectrums, help you tailor each activity to
suit the needs of all students.
•Close-reading options accompanying the second
reading activity engage different learning styles.
•Suggestions for working with ESL students and
small ability-based groups are also included.
4
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
FEATURES AND BENEFITS
Thematic Organization
Junior Great Books selections are divided into
character-education themes that are commonly
taught in elementary school and are easy to
integrate into the larger curriculum.
TheMe InTroduCTIon
Theme: Trust
This group of stories encourages students to think about trust and its role
in their lives. The stories offer students the chance to talk about and reflect on
what trust is, why it is important, and what helps it grow.
Thank You M’am
Realistic fiction by Langston Hughes
Each student book consists of three themes
(with three stories per theme). Theme-related
Crow Call
activities allow students further practice with
inquiry-based learning and allow teachers to
introduce vital character-education concepts into
Fresh
the elementary classroom:
•A Theme Introduction in the student book, with
a corresponding Reader’s Journal page, poses
Theme introduction page from Series 4, Book One.
an essential question for students to discuss and
revisit as they work through the stories.
•A Theme Connections section in the Teacher’s
Edition includes a theme wrap-up activity, a story-to-story connection
activity, and at-home thematic activities for students and parents.
A boy of about fourteen, Roger, tries to steal a woman’s purse but winds
up with more than he bargained for.
Realistic fiction by Lois Lowry
A young girl, Liz, goes crow hunting with her father, a recently returned
veteran who is just getting to know his daughter.
Realistic fiction by Philippa Pearce
When Dan and his younger cousin Laurie find a freshwater mussel in the
river, Dan is torn between wanting to let Laurie keep it for his aquarium
and wanting to let it go.
Assessment and Reflection
Trust • Theme Introduction
35
•Student learning objectives and learning spectrums provide a simple framework
for ongoing informal assessment.
•A formal assessment suite includes comprehension tests for each story, a critical
thinking rubric, activity scoring instructions, and portfolio assessment tools.
•Reflection forms for students and teachers make goal setting simple and
benchmarks for improvement more concrete.
Teacher Support
The Teacher Resources section in the Teacher’s Edition contains a range of support
materials, including:
•Reading comprehension strategies
•Vocabulary activities
•Discussion troubleshooting, tips, and handouts
In addition, links are provided to online videos showing elementary-grade
students engaged in Shared Inquiry activities, along with practical tips from a
Great Books instructor.
Sample Unit
5
Features and benefits
Research-Based Learning
Great Books programs have been recognized as effective by the U.S. Department
of Education, by Learning Forward (formerly the National Staff Development
Council), and by other studies of curricula. Independent research has shown that
regular, sustained use of Shared Inquiry and Great Books programs improves
reading comprehension and critical thinking for students from a wide range of
demographic backgrounds and achievement levels. Please contact us for more
information on research supporting Shared Inquiry practices.
Professional Learning
The Great Books Foundation offers
professional learning courses and webinars,
and on-site consultation days and planning
sessions to introduce teachers to
Shared Inquiry and to provide continuing
assistance. Learning Forward has cited
the Great Books Foundation’s courses for
teachers as effective in improving students’
learning results.
Great Books Foundation professional
learning courses give teachers the opportunity to practice using the Shared Inquiry
method. Teachers also learn how to prepare a text for inquiry-based learning,
how to conduct the classroom activities, and how to manage student responses by
asking effective follow-up questions. For more information, click on “Professional
Learning” when you visit www.greatbooks.org.
You can find free downloadable materials, videos of real classroom discussions,
research studies, and more at www.greatbooks.org.
The Shared Inquiry™ Method of Learning
The Junior Great Books program uses a method of reading and discussion known
as Shared Inquiry. This distinctive approach to learning enables teachers, parent
volunteers, and other adults who lead Great Books programs to foster a vibrant
environment in which children learn critical thinking and close reading skills used
regularly and naturally by good readers, thinkers, and learners. Through your
own curiosity and attentive questioning, you serve as a partner in inquiry with
your students, helping the group work together to discover a story’s meaning. The
process reaches its fullest expression in Shared Inquiry discussion, where you and
your students think and talk about an interpretive question—a question about the
story that has more than one good answer that can be supported with evidence
from the story.
6
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
features and benefits
Great Books Programs Meet Common Core
Each unit in Junior Great Books presents an engaging sequence of activities that
clearly and consistently develops students’ reading comprehension, critical thinking,
language, and writing skills. An appendix in each Teacher’s Edition shows how
these activities address Common Core State Standards in:
• Reading
• Speaking and Listening
• Writing
The relevant standards appear on pages 41–47.
Visit www.greatbooks.org for an overview of how our programs meet
Common Core State Standards.
Note: Even if your state has not adopted CCSS, Junior Great Books programs
align with most state English language arts standards.
New! Downloadable Common Core Correlation Booklets
To make lesson planning easier for you, we’ve carefully
matched each Great Books Teacher’s and Leader’s Edition
with the Common Core State Standards to show, story by
story, every instance in which student activities correspond to
specific standards. Every page in the Great Books Teacher’s or
Leader’s Edition that corresponds to a core standard is noted.
Junior Great Books Series 4
®
Series 3
ks
Junior Great Boo
®
Junior Great Books®
®
Junior Great Books
3
Books
Junior Great
4
Junior Great Books
Junior Great Books
Chin Yu Min
Gullah folktale
resourCeFulness
and the Ginger
Ukranian folktale as told by Isaac Bashevis Singer
L. Siegelson
the Invisible Child
Tove Jansson
on sand Island
Jacqueline Briggs Martin
Kindness
The Green Man
the Gold Coin
the Magic listening
Peter Collington
Cap
the Mushroom
All summer in
CoMMunICaTIon
Yoshiko Uchida
Ray Bradbury
song of Hope
Man
Thunder, elephant, and Dorobo
Diane Wolkstein
the Upside-down
Boy
Juan Felipe Herrera
the Ugly duckling
Andersen
5
French-Canadian folktale as told by Natalie Savage Carlson
the Banza
4
African folktale as told by Humphrey Harman
3
Trust
Resourcefulness
Communication
Relationships
Kindness
Confidence
E
BOOK ON
Honesty
Self-Respect
Fitting In
JGB5_COVERS_P2.indb
1
BOOK ONE
BOOK ONE
AM
3/20/13 9:17
JGB4_COVERS_P4.indb 1
JGB3_COVERS_P5.indb
the surfman
Richard Wilbur
Jean labadie’s Big Black Dog
ConfidenCe
a Day
A Game of Catch
Peggy Duffy
Ethel Pochocki
Hans Christian
fIttInG In
the Coming of
Gail E. Haley
Alma Flor Ada
3/20/13 9:19
AM
3/20/13 9:19 AM
1
ams:
Great Books Progr
Common Core
The Cure for the
TM
TM
Order booklets at store.greatbooks.org/ccss.
the Drums
as told by Kim
learning the Game
Francisco Jiménez
shrewd Todie and lyzer the Miser
Cat
Jennifer Armstrong
Junior Great Book
s
of Blossom Culp
self-ResPeCt
In the time of
Boundless Grace
Sid Fleischman
5
Shirley Jackson
the special Powers
Richard Peck
the Peddler’s Gift
Philippa Pearce
the scarebird
Series 5
Maxine Rose Schur
Lois Lowry
Fresh
Mary Hoffman
®
Honesty
Charles
®
Common Core
State Standa
rds
English Langua
ge Arts Correla
tions
BOOK ONE
BOOK ONE
TrusT
Thank You, M’am
Langston Hughes
Crow Call
E
BOOK ON
R elationships
Junior Great Boo
ks
Common Core State Standards
English Language Arts Correlations
rds
State Standa
Common Core
tions
ge Arts Correla
English Langua
Great Books Programs:
The Cure for the Common Core
TM
Great Books Progr
ams:
The Cure for the
Common Core
®
®
®
TM
®
®
®
About the Great Books Foundation
Founded in 1947, the Great Books Foundation is an independent, nonprofit
educational organization whose mission is to advance the critical, reflective
thinking and social and civic engagement of readers of all ages through
Shared Inquiry discussion of works and ideas of enduring value.
In 1962, the Foundation extended its mission to children with the introduction of
Junior Great Books. Today, the Foundation offers programs for learners of all ages.
Great Books professional learning consultants conduct face-to-face and online
courses and provide customized on-site consultations for educators and parents
who want to use Shared Inquiry to improve students’ critical thinking, reading
comprehension, vocabulary, and writing skills.
Sample Unit
7
unit overview
Crow Call Lois Lowry
Length: 11 pages
Genre: Realistic fiction
Read-Aloud Time: About 15 minutes
Setting: U.S. (rural Pennsylvania)
About the Story
Liz, a young girl, goes on her first hunting trip with her
father, who has recently returned from war. During the
outing, Liz learns the art of crow calling, while she and her
father get to know—and understand—each other.
About the Author
Lois Lowry was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1937. The
daughter of an army dentist, she spent her early years in
New York, Pennsylvania, and Japan. Her work is often
inspired by childhood memories and by the lives of her
children. Lowry has earned numerous awards for her
writing, including Newbery Medals for Number the Stars
and The Giver. Crow Call, Lowry’s first picture book,
was published in 2009. Lois Lowry lives and works in
Massachusetts.
Author website: www.loislowry.com
CROW CALL, by Lois Lowry. Copyright © 2009 by Lois Lowry.
Reproduced by permission of Scholastic, Inc.
The story starts on page 77 of the Teacher’s Edition and on page 23 of
the student book.
8
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
unit overview
Activity Sessions
CCSS
Anchor
Standards
Reading
CCSS
Anchor
Standards
Speaking and
Listening
CCSS
Anchor
Standards
Writing
Session 1 Prereading Pages 65 – 67
5 minutes
For video clips of fourthgrade students participating
in Shared Inquiry activities,
go to www.greatbooks
.org/thankyou.
Students explore a concept relevant to the story they will
be reading.
First Reading with Sharing Questions 30–40 minutes
Students read along as the story is read aloud and share
their questions about it.
Session 2 Use these additional resources
at your discretion, depending
on your classroom schedule
and learning goals.
Pages 68 – 69
Second Reading 30–40 minutes
Students read along as the story is reread, engaging in
activities that help them explore the story more deeply.
Session 3 Pages 70 –73
Shared Inquiry Discussion 30–40 minutes
Students explore the story’s meaning by discussing an
interpretive question.
Session 4 Options Page 74
Written and Creative Response Flexible-Use
Activities
Working with Words
These vocabulary, spelling,
and reading with expression
activities can be done any
time during the unit (p. 64).
Head in the Clouds
This Reader’s Journal activity
(p. 14), which asks students to
draw or write in response to
imaginative prompts about the
story, can be done at any time
after the first session.
Times vary
Students write a brief expository essay or a piece of creative
writing based on the story, or explore the story through
another creative form.
Additional Sessions
Curriculum Connections Times vary
Students engage in suggested activities that connect “Crow
Call” to the rest of your curriculum (p. 75).
Unit Wrap-Up Times vary
Students complete the unit with a theme connection
activity (pp. 122–123), multiple-choice test (p. 320),
portfolio assessment (p. 347), or reflection on discussion
(pp. 350–352).
Sample Unit
9
Unit Overview (continued)
Working with Words
Use these activities and word lists at any time during the unit to customize the program
to your classroom learning goals. (Page numbers refer to the student book, unless
otherwise noted.)
Vocabulary in Context
Spelling
Reading with Expression
Use these suggested words
(or your own words) to
work with vocabulary in
context. See page 301 of
this Teacher’s Edition for
vocabulary activity ideas.
Use these suggested words
(or your own words) for
spelling practice.
Students look for words,
phrases and punctuation
that help them read aloud
with expression (Teacher’s
Edition, p. 23).
Suggested target words
lingered (p. 24)
imitation (p. 26)
confide (p. 28)
resolute (p. 32)
subsides (p. 32)
10
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Inflectional ending -ing,
drop final e
writing (p. 26)
driving (p. 26)
hesitating (p. 24)
memorizing (p. 27)
smiling (p. 32)
Prefix ununfold (p. 24)
unknown (p. 27)
uneasy (p. 27)
unsurprised (p. 29)
unchangeable (p. 29)
Session 1
Prereading (5 minutes)
Activity Summary
Students explore a concept
relevant to the story they will
be reading.
Student Learning Objective
To activate and build
background knowledge
related to a story
Activity Instructions
1. Choose a prereading option below.
2. Ask follow-up questions to help students further explain
their ideas.
3. Stop after about five minutes to conserve class time for
reading the story and sharing questions.
Key Shared Inquiry Concept
CCSS
RL 4.7
Thinking about what we
already know helps us
prepare to read.
CCSS
SL 4.1, 4.4,
4.6
Materials
• Student books
Prereading Options
Text Preview
Opening Question
Preview the title and story illustrations with
students. Then ask:
Ask students to think of a time when someone
they were close to was away for a long time and
then came back. Then ask: How did you feel when
the person came back? What was easy and what was
hard about being together again?
• What do you know about crows?
• What does the phrase “crow call” make you picture
in your head?
Ask students what they think the story will be
about, based on the title and illustrations. After
reading, you may want to ask students how their
inferences matched up (or didn’t match up) with
the story.
Sample Unit
11
session 1
First Reading with Sharing Questions (30–40 minutes)
Activity Instructions
Activity Summary
Students read along as the
story is read aloud and share
their questions about it.
1. Prepare students to ask questions by telling them to listen
for anything that is confusing or that they wonder about
while you read.
Student Learning Objective
2. Read the story aloud. Have students read along in their
To ask questions about a story
books and mark a ? anywhere they have a question
(on a sticky note or in the text).
Key Shared Inquiry Concepts
Reading a story once is
just the first step in
understanding it.
Asking questions about a
story helps us understand
it better.
3. Ask students to share their questions. Record them on chart
• Student books
• Sticky notes
• Chart paper
• Reader’s Journal: Sharing
4. Help students answer any questions that signal a serious
comprehension problem. Leave the rest unanswered for now.
5. Post the list of questions in the classroom and let students
RJ
questions page (p. 12)
OVERH
6. Reader’s Journal: Ask students to record something from
the story that they understand better now that they have
shared their questions, along with the question someone else
asked that most interests them.
EARD IN THE CLASSROOM
Helping Students Ask Questions
During this discussion, the teacher helps a student formulate a question before
recording it.
teacher: Joseph, did you have a question about the story?
joseph: I think Lizzie’s weird.
teacher: What part of the story makes you think Lizzie is weird?
The teacher asks a followup question to help a
student clarify his reaction.
joseph: I don’t know why she’s so worried about going on a trip with her dad.
teacher: So can you turn that into a question?
joseph: Why is she worried about a trip with her dad?
12
CCSS
RF 4.4
paper.
know that they will revisit many of the questions during
their work on the story.
Materials
CCSS
RL 4.1, 4.4
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
The teacher helps the
student turn his reaction
into a question.
CCSS
SL 4.1, 4.2,
4.6
session 1
on Evaluative and Interpretive Questions
During the sharing questions activity, your students will likely ask
different types of questions that are important to recognize.
An evaluative
question asks for
the reader’s opinion.
Evaluative questions
sometimes include
judgment words
such as fair/unfair or
wrong/right.
“Crow Call” Questions
1. Why does Liz practice saying “Daddy”?
2. Why does Liz’s father buy her the shirt?
3. Was it fair for Liz’s father to take Liz hunting and not
take Jessica?
4. What does a crow call sound like?
For more information on question types, see pages 302–303
(pp. 136–137 of the student book).
An interpretive
question asks about
the story’s meaning.
Answers come from
the text, rather
than personal
opinion. Interpretive
questions often
focus on character
motivations or
actions.
Student Learning Spectrum
Look for students to:
Have difficulty following or asking questions about the story
Approaching Objectives
Follow the story and ask a variety of questions, some of
them relevant to the story’s meaning
meeting Objectives
Follow the story and ask a variety of questions, many of
them relevant to the story’s meaning
exceeding Objectives
See SUPPORT
See CHALLENGE
Differentiated Instruction
If students are struggling to follow
or ask questions about the story, ask what
part(s) of the story confused them or what
they liked or did not like about the story. Help
students shape their reactions into questions
if necessary. If students are struggling with
comprehension, consider having students listen
to the story once more before Session 2.
SUPPORT
If students follow the story and
readily ask questions, you might:
• Have students mark other reactions to the
story, such as ! where they are surprised
or smiling/frowning faces where they have
positive/negative reactions.
• After students share questions, review the
question types on pages 302–303 (pp. 136–
137 of the student book). Ask groups or pairs
to identify different types of questions on the
class list and explain their thinking.
CHALLENGE
Sample Unit
13
session 2
Second Reading (30–40 minutes)
Activity Instructions
Activity Summary
Students read along as the
story is reread, engaging
in activities that help them
explore the story more
deeply.
1. Choose one or more of the Move! Note! Share! activities (see
box below) to conduct during the second reading.
2. Prepare students to reread with a purpose by telling them
that this time they will be doing activities that help them
think more deeply about the story.
Student Learning Objective
To reread a story purposefully
in order to gain a deeper
understanding of it
3. Read the story aloud or play the audio CD as students read
Key Shared Inquiry Concept
Rereading helps us discover
new things about a story.
along. During the reading have students do one of the
following:
• Note! Take notes throughout the entire story.
• Move! or Share! Pause at the appropriate passage to
engage in the activity.
Then ask students the follow-up question corresponding to
that activity.
4. Review with the class the list of questions you posted from
Materials
• Student books
• Audio CD
• Sticky notes
• Class question list
• Reader’s Journal: Second
the sharing questions activity. See if any have been answered
while rereading and add any new questions.
RJ
reading page (p. 13)
5. Reader’s Journal: Ask students to record something new
they learned from rereading as well as a question they would
like to talk about more.
6. Collect the Reader’s Journals and note which questions
students have recorded. This will help you choose a focus
question for Shared Inquiry discussion.
Second Reading Activity Options
14
CCSS
RL 4.1–4.4
move! Students act out
the crows becoming noisier
and more active as another
student (or teacher) calls them
(p. 86).
note! Students mark
an N where Liz feels
nervous and a C where she
feels comfortable (see p. 79 for
sample student responses).
share! Pairs of students
share their visualizations
of the forest when Liz and her
father get out of the car (p. 80).
Follow-up question:
Follow-up question:
Why does Liz say to her father,
“Do you hear them? They think
I’m their friend! Maybe their baby,
all grown up!”?
Why did you mark that Liz feels
nervous (or comfortable) there?
How does the stillness make Liz
feel?
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Follow-up question:
CCSS
RF 4.3, 4.4
CCSS
SL 4.1, 4.2,
4.6
CCSS
W 4.9, 4.10
session 2
on Second Reading Follow-Up Questions
The questions following the Move! Note! Share!
activities are interpretive (they have more
than one good answer). These questions help
prepare students for the thinking they will do in
Shared Inquiry discussion and require them to
make inferences about characters and events—
an essential reading strategy.
Student Learning Spectrum
Look for students to:
•Have difficulty engaging in second reading or related activities
•Misunderstand or have trouble answering second reading
Approaching Objectives
See SUPPORT
questions
•Reread and participate in the related activities
•Offer simple answers to second reading questions
meeting Objectives
•Reread and participate in the related activities, purposefully
pursuing a deeper understanding of the story
•Offer more insightful answers to second reading questions
exceeding Objectives
See CHALLENGE
Differentiated Instruction
If students struggle to reread or
complete the related activities, you might:
• Pause for comprehension checks as you
reread, modeling reading strategies (p. 300).
• Return to a Move! Note! Share! activity and
read the corresponding passage aloud. Model
the activity, then have students complete it
themselves. Ask the follow-up question and
give students time to think or write before
sharing answers aloud.
SUPPORT
If students readily reread and
participate in the related activities, ask them
to consider different answers: For Note!, have
students return to a passage they marked and
look for evidence that supports the opposite
note. For Move! or Share!, have them generate
alternative answers to the follow-up question.
Have students share their thinking with a
partner, a small group, or the whole class.
CHALLENGE
Sample Unit
15
session 3
Shared Inquiry Discussion (30–40 minutes)
Activity Instructions
Activity Summary
Students explore the story’s
meaning by discussing an
interpretive question.
NOTE: If your class is large, you may wish to divide it for
discussion. For instructions on the fishbowl technique,
where half your class observes the other half in discussion,
see page 307.
Student Learning Objective
To engage in a discussion by
sharing ideas about a story,
supporting those ideas with
evidence, and listening and
responding to other students’
ideas
1. Review students’ Reader’s Journal pages and the class
question list and compare them to the questions in the box
on the facing page.
that best align with your students’ areas of interest. Write
those questions on your Discussion Planner (reproducible
master on p. 310).
Discussing a story helps us
form our own ideas about its
meaning while thoughtfully
considering the ideas of
others.
3. Seat everyone in a circle. If needed, review the dos and
don’ts of discussion and the five discussion guidelines on
pages 6–9 of the student book.
RJ
Materials
• Student books
• Class question list and
4. Reader’s Journal: Post the focus question and have
students copy it on the Shared Inquiry discussion page of
the Reader’s Journal. Give students time to think, look back
at the story, and write their answers.
5. Begin the discussion by asking students to share their
answers to the focus question.
6. Ask follow-up questions such as those on the facing page or
on your Discussion Planner. Aim for the discussion to last at
least 25 minutes.
RJ
7. Reader’s Journal: As the discussion winds down, have
students complete the Shared Inquiry discussion page of the
Reader’s Journal. If time allows, have volunteers share what
they wrote.
For more tips on conducting a successful Shared Inquiry discussion,
see pages 306–310 of the Teacher Resources section.
16
CCSS
SL 4.1–4.4,
4.6
2. Choose the interpretive focus question and cluster questions
Key Shared Inquiry Concept
completed Reader’s
Journal pages (for teacher
review)
• Reader’s Journal: Shared
Inquiry discussion page
(p. 15)
• Discussion Planner
(p. 310)
• Seating chart (optional)
CCSS
RL 4.1–4.4,
4.7
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
CCSS
W 4.4, 4.9
session 3
Suggested Focus and Cluster Questions
Choose one of the options below for your discussion. Start with the focus question.
Ask the related cluster questions when they fit naturally into the conversation—they will
help students develop their ideas by looking closely at specific parts of the story.
(Page numbers refer to the student book.)
Option 1
Focus QuestionWhy does Liz go crow hunting with her father, even though the
word hunter makes her uneasy?
Cluster Questions
• Why does Liz hope her pigtails will stay hidden, after she is mistaken for a
• Why does Liz feel “uneasy” about walking in front of her father in the
boy at the diner?
woods? (p. 27)
• After Liz asks her father whether he was scared in the war, why does she
confide in him that she is “scared sometimes”? (p. 28)
• Why does Liz enjoy using the crow call so much?
Option 2
Focus QuestionWhy doesn’t Liz’s father shoot any crows?
Cluster Questions
• Why does Liz’s father put her in charge of the crow call?
• After Liz confides in her father that she is scared sometimes, why does he ask
• As Liz runs among the circling crows, why does her father remain seated and
smile?
• Why does Liz feel there is no need to thank her father for not using his gun?
her, “Are you scared now”? (p. 29)
Asking Follow-Up Questions During the Discussion
The follow-up questions you ask during the discussion will help advance students’ critical thinking
skills. Try using these questions when you want students to:
Clarify Ideas
• What do you mean when you
say that?
• Can you say a little more
about that?
• Is there another way you can
explain that to us?
Find Evidence
• Where does that happen in
the story?
• What part of the story makes
you think that?
• Can you find that part and read it
aloud to us?
Respond to Others
• Have you heard an answer you
agree with?
• Do you agree or disagree
with Jason?
• Will you tell Marisol what you
think of her idea?
Activity continues on next page
Sample Unit
17
session 3
Shared Inquiry Discussion (continued)
OVERH
EARD IN THE CLASSROOM
Exploring Different Answers
During this discussion, students have been largely agreeing with a single answer
to the focus question and the conversation has flagged. To help the class explore
other ideas, the teacher actively solicits divergent answers and uses the cluster
questions to get at new issues. For more strategies for troubleshooting discussion,
see pages 308–309.
teacher: I’ve been hearing a lot of you say that Liz goes crow hunting because
she wants to get to know her dad better. There might be some other
answers we haven’t thought of yet. Can anyone think of a different
reason Liz goes crow hunting with her father even though the word
“hunter” makes her uneasy?
The teacher actively solicits
different answers from the
class.
hannah: I wrote that she wanted to go hunting with her dad.
teacher: Why do you think Liz wanted to go hunting?
hannah: Because he’s her dad. She feels like she should do things with him.
teacher: What part of the story makes you think that, Hannah?
hannah: The part where they’re in the car.
teacher: Sonja, can you read that part for us? (Sonja reads.) Hannah, why does
The teacher asks a
student to explain how
the evidence she chose
supports her answer.
that part make you think that Liz goes hunting because she feels like
she should do things with her dad?
hannah: She says his name to herself because he seems like a stranger. But he’s
still her dad. That’s why she says “Daddy” under her breath.
teacher: Thank you, Hannah. Can anyone think of a different reason why she
might say his name under her breath like that?
sonja: Maybe she’s afraid of him and she only goes hunting because he
The teacher solicits other
interpretations of a
passage.
asked her to.
teacher: Can you say more about that, Sonja? What do you mean when you
say she’s afraid of him?
sonja: She’s shy about talking to him.
teacher: What Sonja is saying reminds me of another question I want to ask
you. Maybe it will help us think of more answers to our focus
question. Why does Liz feel “uneasy” about walking in front of her
father in the woods?
18
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
The teacher introduces
a cluster question to ask
about a different aspect of
the story.
session 3
Student Learning Spectrum
This student learning spectrum reflects student behavior in three key areas of critical thinking:
idea, evidence, and response.
Look for students to:
Idea
Evidence
Response
Offer no answers or
repeat others’ answers
to the focus question
Have difficulty supporting
ideas with evidence from
the story
Have difficulty listening
to other students’ ideas
Offer simple answers to
the focus question
Refer in general to the
story to support ideas
Agree or disagree with
other students’ ideas
Offer developed answers
to the focus question
Recall or locate relevant
parts of the story to
support ideas
Explain agreement or
disagreement with other
students’ ideas
Approaching Objectives
See SUPPORT
meeting Objectives
exceeding Objectives
See CHALLENGE
Differentiated Instruction
SUPPORT If the class as a whole is
struggling, use the student learning spectrum
(above) or the student and teacher reflection
forms (pp. 350–354) to determine which area
of critical thinking students need the most
practice with (idea, evidence, or response).
Then concentrate your follow-up questions in
that area.
If some students are struggling, use
the student learning spectrum (above) or
the student and teacher reflection forms to
determine which area of critical thinking they
need to practice. Jot students’ names next
to the corresponding follow-up questions on
your Discussion Planner (p. 310) as a reminder
to ask them those questions during the
discussion.
CHALLENGE If your students show proficiency
in one or more of the key critical thinking
areas, try asking some of the advanced
questions below to encourage them to:
Explain ideas in more detail
• Can you explain what you mean by [word or
phrase]?
• How does that idea help answer our focus question?
Explain how evidence supports an idea
• How does this part of the story support your answer?
• What does the character do or say in this part of the
story to make you think that?
Consider other responses
• Why do you agree with Jasmine’s answer?
• How is your idea different from Salvador’s idea?
Sample Unit
19
session 4
Written and Creative Response (times vary)
Choose from among the following suggested activities to help students deepen their
understanding of the story while honing other language arts skills and concepts.
Written Response
Essay Practice
RJ
Use your students’ questions and areas of interest as topics for essays.
Alternatively, try one of the questions below. Students can use the essay
organizer in the Reader’s Journal (pp. 16–17) to plan the structure of their
essays.
Interpretive question: Have students turn their answer to the focus question
into an essay, using the completed Shared Inquiry page of the Reader’s
Journal as a starting point.
Skills or
concepts covered
CCSS
RL 4.1–4.3,
4.7
CCSS
SL 4.4
CCSS
W 4.1– 4.5,
4.9, 4.10
Evaluative question: Did Liz’s father make a good decision or a bad
decision when he spared the crows?
Creative Writing
RJ
Skills or
concepts covered
Have students turn their speculative questions into short stories, using
the story organizer in the Reader’s Journal (p. 18) as a starting point.
Alternatively, try the activity below.
Dear Diary Ask students: What do you think Liz learned about her father
from going crow hunting with him? Have the class brainstorm a list of
story events and the things Liz learns about her father during each event.
Then have each student choose a few events from the list and write a
diary entry as Liz, describing the events in detail and explaining what
she learned about her father.
Creative Response
Skills or
concepts covered
20
Crow Call Mementos Brainstorm with students what Liz will remember
about the day spent with her father, and the kind of objects she might
keep to help her remember it (photos, feathers, etc.). Give students small
boxes and have each student draw or make 3–5 items to put in a memory
box for Liz. Ask students to write a tag for each memento detailing the
specific event or feeling it reminds Liz of. Display the boxes and invite
volunteers to explain why they chose each item in their boxes.
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
CCSS
RL 4.1–4.3,
4.7
CCSS
SL 4.1, 4.2,
4.4, 4.6
CCSS
W 4.2– 4.4,
4.9, 4.10
additional sessions
Curriculum Connections (times vary)
CCSS
SL 4.1, 4.2,
4.4–4.6
CCSS
RL 4.1, 4.9
CCSS
W 4.4–4.7,
4.9, 4.10
Choose from among the following suggested activities to connect
“Crow Call” to the rest of your curriculum.
Related Projects
Use students’ background questions as topics for extension projects. Alternatively,
try one of the projects below.
Junior Ornithologists Help the class use print or online resources to compile a list
of birds common to the area. Then have students work in groups to do simple
research on a bird from the list, focusing on information such as appearance, call
or song, diet, nesting patterns, habitat, and migratory patterns.
Veterans’ Stories Have students listen to one or more of the stories recorded by
servicemen and servicewomen for the Library of Congress’s Veterans History
Project. Go to “Experiencing War” and view all stories by theme. The themes of
courage and family may have the strongest connection to this story.
Related Readings
S
O
C
Yolen, Jane. Owl Moon. 1987.
On a winter’s night, a father and daughter trek into the woods
to see a great horned owl.
Say, Allen. The Lost Lake. 1989.
A boy and his father become closer during a camping trip in the
mountains.
Lowry, Lois. Gossamer. 2006.
A “dream giver” tries to save a boy from the effects of his past
and the nightmares inflicted upon him by fearsome creatures.
Related Readings Key
S Appropriate for
struggling readers
who need support
O Appropriate for
on-level readers
C Appropriate for
readers who are
ready for a challenge
or for classroom readalouds
Theme Connections
Assessment and Reflection
See the Theme Connections section (pp. 122–123)
for a theme wrap-up activity, a story-to-story
connection activity, and at-home projects.
See the Assessment and Reflection section (pp.
316–354) for resources to track student learning
and for teacher and student reflection forms.
Sample Unit
21
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
Tentatively I call again, more loudly.
22
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Notation Key
Crow Call
Yellow-highlighted words can
be used with the suggested
vocabulary activities (p. 301).
A purple-highlighted passage
is suggested for reading with
expression.
Lois Lowry
Underlined words may need to
be briefly defined as you read
aloud. (Definitions appear at the
bottom of the page.)
I
t’s morning, early, barely light, cold for November.
at home, in the bed next to mine, Jessica, my older
sister, still sleeps. But my bed is empty.
I sit shyly in the front seat of the car next to the
stranger who is my father, my legs pulled up under
the too-large wool shirt I am wearing.
I practice his name to myself, whispering it under
my breath. Daddy. Daddy. Saying it feels new. The
war has lasted so long. He has been gone so long.
Finally I look over at him timidly and speak aloud.
“Daddy,” I say, “I’ve never gone hunting before.
what if I don’t know what to do?”
“well, liz,” he says, “I’ve been thinking about
that, and I’ve decided to put you in charge of the
crow call. Have you ever operated a crow call?”
I shake my head. “No.”
23
Second Reading Activity
Options
MOVE! Kinesthetic
learning option
NOTE! Linguistic
learning/note-taking
option
Share! Interpersonal
learning/comprehension
strategy option
Working with Words
Reading with Expression
Ask students to look at
this passage and point
out words, phrases, or
punctuation that help them
figure out how Liz is feeling.
Then have a few volunteers
read Liz’s dialogue with the
pacing, tone, and inflection
that they think best
expresses her feelings.
Sample Unit
23
◆
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
l oIS l ow rY
◆
“It’s an art,” he says. “No doubt about that. But
I’m pretty sure you can handle it. Some people will
blow and blow on a crow call and not a single crow
will even wake up or bother to listen, much less
answer. But I really think you can do it. of course,”
he adds, chuckling, “having that shirt will help.”
My father had bought the shirt for me. In town to
buy groceries, he had noticed my hesitating in front of
Kronenberg’s window. The plaid hunting shirts had
been in the store window for a month—the popular
red-and-black and green-and-black ones toward the
front, clothing mannequins holding duck decoys;
but my shirt, the rainbow plaid, hung separately on
a wooden hanger toward the back of the display. I
had lingered in front of Kronenberg’s window every
chance I had since the hunting shirts had appeared.
My sister had rolled her eyes in disdain. “Daddy,”
she pointed out to him as we entered Kronenberg’s,
“that’s a man’s shirt.”
The salesman had smiled and said dubiously, “I
don’t quite think . . .”
“You know, lizzie,” my father had said to me as
the salesman wrapped the shirt, “buying this shirt is
probably a very practical thing to do. You will never
ever outgrow this shirt.”
Now, as we go into a diner for breakfast, the
shirt unfolds itself downward until the bottom of
24
lingered: stayed around or was slow to leave
24
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
◆
C row C a l l
◆
it reaches my knees; from the bulky thickness of
rolled-back cuffs, my hands are exposed. I feel totally
surrounded by shirt.
My father orders coffee for himself. The waitress
asks, “what about your boy? what does he want?”
My father winks at me, and I hope that my
pigtails will stay hidden inside the plaid wool collar.
Holding my head very still, I look at the menu. at
home my usual breakfast is cereal with honey and
milk. My mother keeps honey in a covered silver
pitcher. There’s no honey on the diner’s menu.
“what’s your favorite thing to eat in the whole
world?” asks my father.
I smile at him.
“Cherry pie,” I
admit. If he hadn’t
been away for so
long, he would
have known.
My mother had
even put birthday
candles on a cherry
pie on my last
birthday. It was a
family joke in a
family that hadn’t
included Daddy.
second reading
NOTE!
As students reread the story,
have them make the following
notes throughout:
N = Liz feels nervous.
C = Liz feels comfortable.
Afterward, ask a few volunteers:
Why did you mark that Liz feels
nervous (or comfortable) there?
Sample student responses for
this page:
N = Liz feels nervous because
her regular breakfast isn’t on the
menu.
C = Liz feels comfortable
because she is hiding inside her
big shirt.
25
Sample Unit
25
◆
second reading
SHARE!
Have students pair up and share
visualizations of the forest
when Liz and her dad get out of
the car. Afterward, ask the class:
How does the stillness make Liz
feel?
Sample student responses to this
question:
• The stillness makes Liz feel
excited because the air is
sharp and clear.
• The stillness makes Liz feel
l oIS l ow rY
My father hands back both menus to the waitress.
“Three pieces of cherry pie,” he tells her.
“Three?” She looks at him sleepily, not writing the
order down. “You mean two?”
“No,” he said, “I mean three. one for me, with
black coffee, and two for my hunting companion,
with a large glass of milk.”
She shrugs.
we eat quickly, watching the sun rise across the
Pennsylvania farmlands. Back in the car, I flip my
pigtails out from under my shirt collar and giggle.
“Hey, boy,” my father says to me in an imitation of
the groggy waitress’s voice, “you sure you can eat all
that cherry pie, boy?”
“Just you watch me, lady,” I answer in a deep
voice, pulling my face into stern, serious lines. we
laugh again, driving out into the gray-green hills of
the early morning.
It’s not far to the place he has chosen, not long
until he pulls the car to the side of the empty road
and stops.
Grass, frozen after its summer softness, crunches
under our feet; the air is sharp and supremely clear,
free from the floating pollens of summer, and our
words seem etched and breakable on the brittle
stillness. I feel the smooth wood of the crow call in
my pocket, moving my fingers against it for warmth,
26
nervous because she says her
words feel “breakable.”
imitation: copying actions or sounds
26
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
◆
memorizing its ridges and shape. I stamp my feet
hard against the ground now and then as my father
does. I want to scamper ahead of him like a puppy,
kicking the dead leaves and reaching the unknown
places first, but there is an uneasy feeling along the
edge of my back at the thought of walking in front
of someone who is a hunter. The word makes me
uneasy. Carefully I stay by his side.
It is quieter than summer. There are no animal
sounds, no bird-waking noises; even the occasional
leaf that falls within our vision does so in silence,
spiraling slowly down to blend in with the others.
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
27
Sample Unit
27
◆
l oIS l ow rY
◆
But most leaves are already gone from the trees; those
that remain catch there by accident, waiting for the
wind that will free them. our breath is steam.
“Daddy,” I ask shyly, “were you scared in the war?”
He looks ahead, up the hill, and after a moment
he says, “Yes. I was scared.”
“of what?”
“lots of things. of being alone. of being hurt.
of hurting someone else.”
“are you still?”
He glances down. “I don’t think so. Those kinds
of scares go away.”
“I’m scared sometimes,” I confide.
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
28
confide: to share something secret or private
28
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
◆
C row C a l l
◆
He nods, unsurprised. “I know,” he said. “are you
scared now?”
I start to say no. Then I remember the word that
scares me. Hunter.
I answer, “Maybe a little.”
I look at his gun, his polished, waxed prize, and
then at him. He nods, not saying anything. we
walk on.
“Daddy?”
“Mmmmmm?” He is watching the sky, the trees.
“I wish the crows didn’t eat the crops.”
“They don’t know any better,” he says. “Even
people do bad things without meaning to.”
“Yes, but . . .” I pause and then say what I’d been
thinking. “They might have babies to take care of.
Baby crows.”
“Not now, liz, not this time of year,” he says.
“By now their babies are grown. It’s a strange thing,
but by now they don’t even know who their babies
are.” He puts his free arm over my shoulders for a
moment.
“and their babies grow up and eat the crops,
too,” I say, and sigh, knowing it to be true and
unchangeable.
“It’s too bad,” he says. we begin to climb the hill.
“Can you call anything else, Daddy? or just
crows?”
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
29
Sample Unit
29
◆
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
l oIS l ow rY
“Sure,” he says. “listen. Mooooooooo. That’s a cow
call.”
“Guess the cows didn’t hear it,” I tease.
“well, of course, sometimes they choose not to
answer. I can do tigers, too. Rrrrrrrrrrr.”
“Ha. So can I. and bears. Better watch out, now.
Bears might come out of the woods on this one.
Grrrrrrrrrr.”
“You think you’re so smart, doing bears. listen to
this. Giraffe call.” He stands with his neck stretched
out, soundless.
I try not to laugh, wanting to do rabbits next,
but I can’t keep from it. He looks so funny, with
his neck pulled away from his shirt collar and a
condescending, poised, giraffe look on his face.
I giggle at him and we keep walking to the top of
the hill.
From where we stand, we can see almost back to
town. we can look down on our car and follow the
ribbon of road through the farmlands until it is lost
in trees. Dark roofs of houses lay scattered, separated
by pastures.
“okay, lizzie,” says my father, “this is a good
place. You can do the crow call now.”
I see no crows. For a moment, the fear of
disappointing him struggles with my desire to blow
into the smooth, polished tip of the crow call. But I
30
30
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
◆
◆
C row C a l l
◆
see that he’s waiting, and I take it from my pocket,
hold it against my lips, and blow softly.
The harsh, muted sound of a sleepy crow comes
as a surprise to me, and I smile at it, at the delight of
having made that sound myself. I do it again, softly.
From a grove of trees on another hill comes an
answer from a waking bird. Just one, and then
silence.
Tentatively I call again, more loudly. The branches
of a nearby tree rustle, and crows answer, fluttering
and calling crossly. They fly briefly into the air and
then settle on a branch—three of them.
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
Sample Unit
31
◆
second reading
move!
Have several students take turns
acting out the crows becoming
noisier and more active as
another student (or teacher) calls
them. Afterward, ask the class:
Why does Liz say to her father,
“Do you hear them? They think
I’m their friend! Maybe their baby,
all grown up!”?
Sample student responses to this
question:
• Liz wants her father to say her
call sounded just like a crow.
• Liz doesn’t want her father to
shoot the crows.
l oIS l ow rY
◆
“look, Daddy,” I whisper. “Do you see them?
They think I’m a crow!”
He nods, watching them.
I move away from him and stand on a rock at the
top of the hill and blow loudly several times. Crows
rise from all the trees. They scream with harsh voices
and I respond, blowing again and again as they fly
from the hillside in circles, dipping and soaring,
landing speculatively, lurching from the limbs in
afterthought and then settling again with resolute
and disgruntled shrieks.
“listen, Daddy! Do you hear them? They think
I’m their friend! Maybe their baby, all grown up!”
I run about the top of the hill and then down,
through the frozen grass, blowing the crow call over
and over. The crows call back at me, and from all
the trees they rise, from all the hills. They circle and
circle, and the morning is filled with the patterns of
calling crows as I look back, still running. I can see
my father sitting on a rock, and I can see he is smiling.
My crow calling comes in shorter and shorter
spurts as I become breathless; finally I stop and stand
laughing at the foot of the hill, and the noise from
the crows subsides as they circle and settle back in the
trees. They are waiting for me.
My father comes down the hill to meet me coming
up. He carries his gun carefully; and though I am
32
resolute: firm and steady in purpose
subsides: to come down to a normal or less active level
32
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
◆
C row C a l l
◆
grateful to him for not using it, I feel that there is no
need to say thank you—Daddy knows this already.
The crows will always be there and they will always
eat the crops; and some other morning, on some
other hill, a hunter, maybe not my daddy, will take
aim.
I blow the crow call once more, to say good
morning and goodbye and everything that goes in
between. Then I put it into the pocket of my shirt
and reach over, out of my enormous cuff, and take
my father’s hand.
Teacher’s Notes
and Questions
33
Sample Unit
33
theme connections
Activity Summary
Students explore the theme
of trust across stories they
have read and in real-world
situations.
CCSS
RL 4.4, 4.6
CCSS
SL 4.1–4.2,
4.4–4.6
CCSS
W 4.4,
4.6–4.10
Student Learning Objective
Key Shared Inquiry Concept
To synthesize ideas from a
variety of sources to extend
understanding of a concept
Making connections between
the story, the world, and
ourselves deepens our
understanding of all three.
Theme Wrap-Up: Trust Walks (25–35 minutes)
1. Review with the class the responses to the theme question: How do you earn
someone’s trust? Solicit new responses that students have generated as a result of
completing all three stories.
2. Tell students that they will be doing a simple trust activity with a partner, and
that they should keep the theme question in mind as they do it.
3. Pair students up and have one partner in
each pair put on a blindfold. Ask the nonblindfolded partner to guide the blindfolded
one slowly and safely through a designated
path in the classroom. How partners
communicate in order to walk the path safely
and successfully is up to them. If you wish,
introduce simple obstacles such as chairs or
desks.
4. Ask partners to switch roles so that everyone
gets a chance to lead and be led.
5. Follow up by asking partners to share their experiences, explaining whether or
not they trusted their partner when they were being led, and describing what they
did to establish trust when they were asked to lead.
Story-to-Story Connection (30–40 minutes)
1. Post the titles of stories your students have read in the Trust theme, along with
the names of the characters from each story.
2. Brainstorm with students some traits that a trustworthy person might have.
Then have them offer examples of story characters that have these traits, finding
evidence to support their answers. (For example: If students identify “honesty” as
a trait, someone might say that Roger, from “Thank You M’am,” is honest because
he does not steal Mrs. Jones’s purse when he gets a second chance to do so.)
RJ
34
3. Divide students into small groups and have them turn to page 27 of the Reader’s
Journal. Tell groups that they will be creating the “perfect trustworthy person”
made up of the traits that each character possesses.
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
theme connections
RJ
4. Ask students to decide on four traits a trustworthy person should have and
decide which characters embody those traits. (If they struggle to find a character
who has a certain trait, they can pick a new trait.) Have them write the traits,
character names, and supporting evidence in the Reader’s Journal. Have groups
present and explain their choices to the class.
At-Home Theme Connections (times vary)
These activities can be completed at home with a parent’s or guardian’s help.
A Promise Contract
1. Tell students that they will be creating promise contracts to carry out at home.
Have students brainstorm some “I promise . . .” statements, encouraging them to
come up with promises they can reasonably keep for a set amount of time
(Examples: “For the month of May, I promise to clean my room without being
asked”; “I promise to read three picture books to my brother in the next two
weeks.”)
2. Have students choose their promises and then design promise contracts,
including a deadline by which the promise must be fulfilled and signature lines
for themselves and their parent(s) or guardian(s). You may wish to show students
examples of contracts or certificates for inspiration.
3. Send the contracts home and remind students to bring them back to class once
they have made good on their promises. Display completed contracts in the
classroom.
4. Follow up by asking students to discuss what they learned about trust as a result
of creating and fulfilling the contracts, and how the experience affected the trust
in their households.
Borrow and Return
1. Ask each student to bring in a personal item (something that is important to
them but not too valuable or breakable). Explain that they will be loaning their
items to one another for a few days. It is up to the borrower to behave in a
trustworthy manner and keep the items safe from harm.
2. Pair students together (or have them choose their own pairs) and have them
explain to one another why the items are important. Then have students promise
to their partners that they will take good care of the items, explaining how they
will do so.
3. Follow up once the items are returned to their owners by asking pairs to talk
about how they felt about lending and borrowing the items, and to explain what
the experience helped them learn about trust.
Sample Unit
35
assessment: critical thinking rubric
Critical Thinking Rubric
The critical thinking rubric, which expands on the student learning spectrum for
Shared Inquiry discussion, details the critical thinking skills developed through the
use of Junior Great Books Series 4. The rubric shows three major critical thinking
areas—idea, evidence, and response—at four performance levels.
Idea
Coming up with an
interpretation
Performance Level
4
3
2
36
Response
Listening and responding
to other students
OFFERS A WELL-DEVELOPED
ANSWER TO THE FOCUS QUESTION
Explains how evidence
supports ideas
• Makes inferences about
• Habitually looks back at
CONSIDERS OTHER STUDENTS’
IDEAS WHEN DEVELOPING OWN
ANSWER
motives and causes
• To clarify, specifies meaning of
words or phrases
• Explores implications of an
idea
whole story for evidence
• Explains how specific words or
• Understands that classmates’
ideas are valuable
phrases support an idea
• Sees when evidence works
against own idea
• Responds directly to other
OFFERS A DETAILED ANSWER TO
THE FOCUS QUESTION
LOCATES EVIDENCE FROM THE
STORY TO SUPPORT IDEAS
• Thinks carefully before
• Often looks back at the story
explains agreement or
disagreement with other
students’ ideas
answering
• To clarify, tells more about
answer
• Recalls or locates relevant
Offers a simple answer to the
focus question
Refers to the story in general
to support ideas
Agrees or disagrees simply
with other students’ ideas
• Does not elaborate on answer,
• Looks back at the story when
or offers a snap judgment
• To clarify, repeats or
paraphrases answer
asked to do so
• Recalls major story facts
• Allows classmates to speak
• Reacts to other students’ ideas
Struggles to answer
the focus question
has difficulty supporting
answer with evidence
from the story
• Does not answer when
1
Evidence
Using support
from the story
called on
• Repeats other students’
answers
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
without prompting
parts of the story
• Talks about things other than
the story
• Struggles to recall key
story facts
• Considers answer
self-explanatory
students without prompting
• Agrees or disagrees with
specific parts of other
students’ ideas
• Acknowledges
differing ideas
• Builds on or offers
counterarguments to other
students’ ideas
• Responds directly to
classmates with prompting
but does not give reasons for
reactions
• Speaks only to teacher and
not directly to classmates
Has difficulty listening to
other students’ ideas
• Ignores or interrupts other
students
• Struggles to understand that
classmates have differing ideas
• Distracts other students or
does not follow the discussion
reader’s journal
CCSS
RL
4.1–4.3, 4.6,
4.7, 4.9
Sharing
Questions
Write about a part of the story that you
understand better after the sharing
questions activity.
CCSS
W 4.1–4.5,
4.9, 4.10
Write the question someone else asked that interests you the most.
The Sharing Questions and
Second Reading activities
from the Reader’s Journal
CCSS
RL
4.1–4.3, 4.6,
4.7, 4.9
CCSS
W 4.1–4.5,
4.9, 4.10
Sample Unit
37
reader’s journal
Head in the
Clouds
Choose one of the topics in the clouds and write or
draw a picture about it.
CCSS
RL
4.1–4.3, 4.6,
4.7, 4.9
CCSS
W 4.1–4.5,
4.9, 4.10
A time you were afraid
of something new
What Kronenberg’s
window display looks like
The character in the
story you would choose
to be, and why
A picture of a crow
taking care of its babies
38
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Reader’s Journal
Shared Inquiry
Discussion
CCSS
RL
4.1–4.3, 4.6,
4.7, 4.9
The focus question:
CCSS
W 4.1–4.5,
4.9, 4.10
Your answer before discussion:
A piece of evidence from the story that supports your answer:
Page:
Your answer after discussion (explain how you changed or added to your original answer):
Sample Unit
39
reader’s journal
Story
Organizer
Write a question you had about the story that still hasn’t been
answered. Use this page to take notes for a short story that
answers your question.
The Story and Essay Organizers
from the Reader’s Journal
CCSS
RL
4.1–4.3, 4.6,
4.7, 4.9
Notes
BEGINNING:
Where and when
does this story
happen? Who
are the
characters?
CCSS
W 4.1–4.5,
4.9, 4.10
CROW CALL
Essay
Organizer
Write your answer to the assigned essay question, and write three
pieces of evidence from the story that support your answer.
MIDDLE: What
problems or
important events
happen?
END: Are the
problems
solved? What
happens to the
characters?
Your evidence can
be a quote from the
story or a summary
of what happens in
your own words.
Explain how this
piece of evidence
supports your
answer to the essay
question.
16
40
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Series 4 • Book One
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
Junior Great Books activities develop students’ reading, critical thinking, writing, and
listening and speaking skills. This appendix details the alignment of Junior Great Books
Series 4 activities with the Common Core State Standards. The complete Common Core
State Standards can be found at www.corestandards.org.
Prereading
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific
descriptions and directions in the text.
Speaking and Listening Standards
SL.4.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL.4.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main
ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
SL.4.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas)
and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group
discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
First Reading with Sharing Questions
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL.4.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
Reading Standards: Foundational Skills
RF.4.4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
Sample Unit
41
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
Speaking and Listening Standards
SL.4.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL.4.2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
SL.4.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas)
and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group
discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Second Reading
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text;
summarize the text.
RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.)
RL.4.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
Reading Standards: Foundational Skills
RF.4.3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
RF.4.4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
Writing Standards
W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
W.4.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reasearch, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening Standards
SL.4.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
42
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
SL.4.2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
SL.4.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas)
and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group
discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Shared Inquiry Discussion
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text;
summarize the text.
RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
RL.4.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
RL.4.7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific
descriptions and directions in the text.
Writing Standards
W.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to tasks, purpose, and audience.
W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
Speaking and Listening Standards
SL.4.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL.4.2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
SL.4.3. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.
SL.4.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main
ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
Sample Unit
43
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
SL.4.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas)
and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group
discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Written Response
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text;
summarize the text.
RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.)
RL.4.7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific
descriptions and directions in the text.
Writing Standards
W.4.1.Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons
and information.
W.4.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and
information clearly.
W.4.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
W.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to tasks, purpose, and audience.
W.4.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing
as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
W.4.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening Standards
SL.4.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main
ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
44
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
Creative Response
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text;
summarize the text.
RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
RL.4.7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific
descriptions and directions in the text.
Writing Standards
W.4.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and
information clearly.
W.4.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
W.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to tasks, purpose, and audience.
W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
W.4.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening Standards
SL.4.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL.4.2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
SL.4.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main
ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
SL.4.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas)
and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group
discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Sample Unit
45
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
Curriculum Connections and Theme Connections
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL.4.9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition
of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and
traditional literature from different cultures.
Writing Standards
W.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
W.4.6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the
Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate
with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a
minimum of one page in a single sitting.
W.4.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of
different aspects of a topic.
W.4.8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from
print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list
of sources.
W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
W.4.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening Standards
SL.4.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,
and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on
others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL.4.2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
SL.4.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main
ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
SL.4.5. Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to
enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
SL.4.6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas)
and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group
discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
46
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Alignment to Common Core State Standards
Reader’s Journal
Reading Standards for Literature
RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text;
summarize the text.
RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.)
RL.4.6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated,
including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.
RL.4.7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific
descriptions and directions in the text.
RL.4.9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition
of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and
traditional literature from different cultures.
Writing Standards
W.4.1.Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons
and information.
W.4.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and
information clearly.
W.4.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
W.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to tasks, purpose, and audience.
W.4.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing
as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
W.4.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Sample Unit
47
Junior Great Books Series 3–5
Series 3
Series 4
Series 5
Book One
Book One
Book One
Theme: Relationships
Boundless Grace Mary Hoffman
The Scarebird Sid Fleischman
Chin Yu Min and the Ginger Cat
Jennifer Armstrong
Theme: Trust
Thank You, M’am Langston Hughes
Crow Call Lois Lowry
Fresh Philippa Pearce
Theme: Honesty
Charles Shirley Jackson
The Special Powers of Blossom Culp
Richard Peck
The Peddler’s Gift Maxine Rose Schur
Theme: Kindness
The Gold Coin Alma Flor Ada
The Magic Listening Cap
Japanese folktale as told by
Yoshiko Uchida
The Mushroom Man Ethel Pochocki
Theme: Resourcefulness
Shrewd Todie and Lyzer the Miser
Ukrainian folktale as told by
Isaac Bashevis Singer
On Sand Island Jacqueline Briggs Martin
The Green Man Gail E. Haley
Theme: Confidence
The Banza Haitian folktale as told by
Diane Wolkstein
The Upside-Down Boy
Juan Felipe Herrera
The Ugly Duckling
Hans Christian Andersen
Theme: Communication
Song of Hope Peggy Duffy
Jean Labadie’s Big Black Dog
French-Canadian folktale as told by
Natalie Savage Carlson
Thunder, Elephant, and Dorobo
African folktale as told by
Humphrey Harman
Book Two
Book Two
Theme: Gratitude
White Wave Chinese folktale
as told by Diane Wolkstein
Luba and the Wren Ukrainian folktale
as told by Patricia Polacco
Basho and the River Stones Tim Myers
Theme: Strength
Tuesday of the Other June
Norma Fox Mazer
Doesn’t Fall Off His Horse
Virginia A. Stroud
The Cello of Mr. O Jane Cutler
Theme: Courage
The Monster Who Grew Small
Joan Grant
The Buffalo Storm Katherine Applegate
Pierre’s Dream Jennifer Armstrong
Theme: Integrity
The No-Guitar Blues Gary Soto
The Fire on the Mountain
Ethiopian folktale as told by
Harold Courlander and Wolf Leslau
Ooka and the Honest Thief Japanese
folktale as told by I. G. Edmonds
Theme: Cleverness
The Dream Weaver Concha Castroviejo
The Man Whose Trade Was Tricks
Georgian folktale as told by George and
Helen Papashvily
The Emperor’s New Clothes
Hans Christian Andersen
Theme: Perspective
The Old Woman and the Wave
Shelley Jackson
Letting Swift River Go Jane Yolen
The Apple and the Envelope
Herbert Montgomery
Theme: Self-Respect
In the Time of the Drums
Gullah folktale as told by Kim L. Siegelson
Learning the Game Francisco Jiménez
The Invisible Child Tove Jansson
Theme: Fitting In
The Coming of the Surfman
Peter Collington
All Summer in a Day Ray Bradbury
A Game of Catch Richard Wilbur
ooks
ior Great B
n
Ju
Book Two
®
3
NE
BOOK O
Theme: Family tionships
Re la
Kamau’sunFinish
GraceMuthoni Muchemi
Bo dless
an
Mary Hoffm
Ghost Cat
Donna Hill
ebird
ar
sc
the
n
The Hemulen
Sid Fleischma Who Loved Silence
Ginger Cat
in and the
Tove Jansson
Chin Yu M
mstrong
Jennifer Ar
Theme: HumilityK indn ess
oin
The Enchanted
Sticks
Steven J. Myers
the GoldaC
Ad
Alma Flor
ap folktale as told
Kaddo’s Wall agWest
African
ng
listeni C
the M ica
Uchid
by Harold
Courlander
and George Herzog
Yoshiko
oom Man
Mushr
The PrincetEthheand
the
Goose Girl
el Pochocki
Elinor Mordaunt
en Ce
Con fi d
Theme: Compassion
the Banzan
e Wolkstei
Cynthia
Rylant
A Bad RoadDianfor Cats
y
e-down Bo
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Valiska Gregory
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JGB3_COV
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