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Transcript

JANUARY
17,
1966
50 CENTS
35TH YEAR
THE BUSINESS
SWEEKLY OF TELEVISION AND RADIO
Second TV set splits audience, changes viewing habits. p29
Why and how the retailers have marched into television. p36
TV homes: county -by- county breakdown from Nielsen. p79
Will TV stations be forced to open books to ASCAP? p64
COMPLETE INDEX PAGE
7
Heavyweight
-
Anthony Quinn, Jackie Gleason star in a stark drama of the fight business "Requiem For a Heavyweight." One of
the sixty great Post-60's.There is more of what you're looking for with the new Screen Gems Post -60's. SCREEN GEM S
J
Never!
We're as young today as we
were 45 years ago.
And that's how it's gonna be in
two score and five.
WIL is the sound of the times.
Action Central News at 25 and 55.
Sports, weather and mobile news 24
day. Music and
personalities. Swinging. Sassy.
Exciting.
And all geared to an audience that's
vital, alert, clear -eyed and
money- spending.
It's not that we've stopped growing.
As some things never seem to stop.
Like St. Louis. And the universe.
And, if you will, WIL.
But perhaps, what's even more
important, that's how it is with
hours
a
our audience.
Still growing! Maybe you've noticed.
WIL /St.Louis
K- BOX /Dallas
-
In Tempo With The Times
John F. Box, Jr., Managing Director
Sold Nationally By Robert E. Eastman & Company, Inc.
The Balaban Stations
ieade4
co&____
Whatever your television production requirements, KRLD -TV
offers the most modern facilities available in the Dallas -Ft.Worth market.
Included are more live color cameras than any other station in the market,
4 -V color film chains, VR 2000 color tape recorders, mobile remote units,
and 3 new studios including the magnificent 60 x 80 foot studio with
revolving stage pictured above.
Channel 4 has not only the latest in equipment, but also provides
more neta talented staff, who excel) in experience and cooperation
work remote originations than any other station in the market ... the
first Dallas station to originate a network remote color pick -up
the
January 1st Cotton Bowl Parade over CBS -TV.
Combine the most modern facilities and an expert staff with top
flight programming and you get the quality in operation that produces
KRLD -TV's dominance in the market.
-
represented nationally by
Advertising Time Sales, Inc.
Na.Ì
e4 T
ne
MAXIMUM POWER
4
_F7
-
r-S
Clyde W. Rem bent. President
TV -TWIN to KRLD radio 1080, CBS outlet with 50,000 watts
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Money no object
Newspapers historically have been
anti-TV, and more so this season
than ever before, although, according
to best current estimates, they're all
getting $7 to $10 million in annual
revenues from TV network and station advertising, and there's no indication this outlay is diminishing.
It's estimated three TV networks
spend from $3 million -plus to $5 million in newspapers and that stations
spend roughly same amount. Since
many stations are newspaper-affiliated,
however, sizeable part of station total
may be in swap deals rather than
hard money. TV experts consider onair promotion far more effective than
newspapers, concentrate possibly two thirds of their newspaper spending in
first few weeks of new -season premieres.
Wait and see
For while at least National Association of Broadcasters is expected to
defer decision on whether to ante up
substantial contribution to research
project commissioned by big TV station interests that are resisting FCC
attempts to tighten multiple- ownership rules. NAB had been felt out by
Council for Television Development,
which was formed by major station
owners to fight FCC rulemaking, on
possible $50,000 contribution to project that may cost as much as $250,000- $300,000 (CLOSED CIRCUIT, Jan.
3). Word now is that NAB will wait
to see how research turns out before
deciding whether to chip in.
Eye on Washington
Although he hasn't formally declared candidacy, Democrat B. Peter
Straus, president of Straus Broadcasting Group, is making definite bid to
become representative from 19th U.S.
congressional district in Manhattan.
At small party in his honor last week
Mr. Straus held forth at length on
his political credo and qualifications,
then asked for support. One point he
made was his established record as
editorial voice of his prime property,
WMCA New York. Mr. Straus, as
chairman of New York State Democratic Campaign Committee, worked
for Johnson-Humphrey- Kennedy ticket in 1964.
Mustn't touch
Although some members of NAB
board are agitated over FCC forays
into control of broadcasting, particu-
CLOSED CIRCUIT®
larly through use of NAB -code time
standards, official agenda of NAB
joint board meeting in Florida, as of
last week, did not have this basic item
on agenda. NAB staff thinks recommendations involving code changes
should come up through respective
code boards and also that "timing" is
bad. But whether it's on agenda or
not, issue is expected to be raised at
sessions at Palm Beach Shores, Jan.
23 -29.
Capital capital gain
Norton Simon, West Coast industrialist- financier, stands to make about
$25 million on his overall investments
(through subsidiary companies as well
as individual) in ABC stock. Reputedly holder of about 450,000 shares
in all, Mr. Simon, according to Wall
Street opinion, should realize that
amount of appreciation if, as is expected, final merger of ABC into ITT
goes through.
Sears may take plunge
Entry of Sears, Roebuck in network
TV said to be imminent. Sears is
expected to place its business on CBS TV. Decision reportedly will be made
in Chicago meeting with Sears' New
York agency, Ogilvy, Benson &
Mather, before month is out. Sears
last year spent more than $80 million
in newspapers -over 70% of its advertising budget. Observers say 52week contract -should Sears commit
that far -plus encouragement of local
cut-ins by individual stores could cause
upheaval in retail merchandising patterns and attract other retail outlets
to TV on both national and local
levels.
The heat's on
Broadcaster and community antenna television system operators were
prowling Washington in large numbers
last week seeking same prey, members of Congress and FCC to support
their conflicting views on CATV regulation. CATV groups across country
are expressing considerable uneasiness
about possible commission action (see
page 50). Commission is scheduled to
meet Feb. 7 on proposals for regulating CATV's that do not use microwave as well as those that do.
On sidelines, awaiting jelling of
government policy on CA TV are all
shades of unions and societies who
hope for their cut of what they see as
profitable enterprise. Among them are
copyright societies and various unions,
including American Federation of Musicians, AFTRA, and International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
Presumably unions don't know precisely where they fit, but they're
interested. Performing rights societies
feel they're on solid ground since their
products are being used for what they
regard as performances for profit.
Big shifts
FCC Chairman E. William Henry
will come up shortly with recommendations for major staff realignments
stemming from recent retirements of
two department heads. Although
there's no assurance of outcome, speculation centers around these shifts:
transfer of Broadcast Bureau Chief
James B. Sheridan to post of executive
director of FCC replacing Curtis B.
Plummer, who would become chief
of Field Engineering; appointment of
William H. Watkins, chief, Frequency
Allocations and Treaty Division as
No. 2 man in engineering under Ralph
J. Renton, acting chief, who shortly
may retire.
If Sheridan transfer eventuates, it
would create vacancy in FCC's most
important bureau from broadcasters'
standpoint. Having substantial support
is Wallace Johnson, Broadcast Bureau's assistant chief for engineering.
Although Mr. Sheridan is staff's most
controversial figure, he has strong
backing. It's believed that executive
directorship, as lateral move, would
satisfy hint and his supporters.
How to make
a
buck
One movie producer in Hollywood,
in off -record summation, indicated if
he can bring in "decent" feature with
"good but not necessarily star names"
for $1.5 million, going economics of
network TV will assure him profits.
By his calculations he'll be able to
get at least $500,000 from network
in return for granting rights to first
crack at showing film on TV. In addition, he's confident of getting another $250,000 from domestic and
foreign TV syndication. That leaves
him with nut of only $750,000 to
overcome. "Cinch," says he, "especially if I insist on showing the picture
theatrically before giving it to TV."
in January, by BROADCASTING PUBLICATIONS Inc.
Published every Monday, 53rd issue (Yearbook Number) published
DeSales Street. N. W., Washington, D. C.. 20036. Second -class postage paid at Washington, D. C.. and additional ogees.
1735
eri
love you,
...
Daddy
when are you coming home ?"
rrWe
all miss you, Son . . ."
One GI said, "It's different when you read it in a
Voices from home
.
.'
letter than when you hear it on a recording .
Assignment Viet Nam was a "different" project. Not only did Star Stations
Bill Donella, WIFE, and Bob BenNews Directors Whitey Coker, KISN
son, KOIL, record the voices, impressions, messages and sounds of battle of
Americans at war, but they also carried with them the voices of loved ones
back home.
Everywhere they went, they searched out men from Omaha, Portland and
Indianapolis. Together they'd sit down by the side of a road near a tiny military outpost and listen to the warm messages from "home."
They're home safe now
. Coker, Donella and Benson. They suffered many
hardships and inconveniences traveling half-way around the world . . certainly a community service far beyond the call of duty.
Was it worth it?
Thousands of listeners think so. The "round -the- clock" Viet Nam Reports on
all three Star Stations provide drama, information and a "personal touch" beyond description.
ASSIGNMENT VIET NAM . . . demonstrating the News Leadership of the
Star Stations.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
THE
STAR
STATIONS
SOLD NATIONALLY
BY H -R RADIO
6
OIL
OMAHA
fe
INDIANAPOLIS
Sn
THE GREAT
OREGON TERRITORY
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
WEEK IN BRIEF
McHugh & Hoffman analysis of multi -set TV homes
reveals viewers don't watch more, but they watch differently. Study notes fewer arguments rsult over what to
watch since differing fare is available. See
...
CUT -UP AUDIENCE
...
In major reassignment of accounts, General Foods
million from
pulls
FC &B and
...
BIG WIND ON MAD
...
29
drops agency from its roster.
Also pulls some products from Y &R and B &B. Adds DDB
and Grey to agency roster. See
$11
TVB's Abrahams talks of forward movement by local TV
spanning gulf between print- oriented retailers and stations that want chance to produce. Cites Sears, Ward's
and Penney's successful campaigns. See
in
OBJECT OF AFFECTION
STATIONS TELL ALL?
...
SHIELD FOR POLICY
...
...
...
... 44
Where TV sets are: Nielsen's newest county -by- county
estimates list number of television homes and percent of
penetration. Total household pentration shows increase
from 93% to 94 %. See
...
TV PENETRATION
... 79
Broadcasters performed admirably overall in Northeast
blackout. But report to FCC says too many were unprepared and didn't know what to do. Within two hours after
power went out, 187 signals covered area. See ..
.
LESSONS LEARNED
60
NCTA summons CATV operators everywhere to ramparts
in attempt to halt FCC's move to regulate CATV. Twenty three NCTA board members hold regional meetings to
emphasize Congress has to give FCC authority. See
CALL TO ARMS
SELF -REGULATION BEST
... 64
Sale of KCTO(TV) Denver to WGN Inc. comes up for oral
argument Feb. 14, in what some see as face -saving move
by FCC. Commission staff argues against outright waiver
of top 50 policy at first test. Says it could kill plan. See...
.
For three years industry waited for report of House
hearing on ratings. In final act as committee chairman
Oren Harris released report last week and it came out
with whisper instead of yell. See
AVE.... 32
Judge Ryan says he's considering ASCAP's plea that
stations should have to tell all to music -licensing firm.
Says he's looking favorably toward pleas. CBS -TV settles
with ASCAP on flat annual fee basis. See ...
.. 36
... 52
In wake of Canadian Fowler report, CBC's boss announces plan to reduce imported U.S. programing on
French and English networks by more than 25% over next
five years. See .. .
SHARPENS AX
50
... 74
DEPARTMENTS
AT DEADLINE
BROADCAST ADVERTISING
BUSINESS BRIEFLY
CHANGING HANDS
CLOSED CIRCUIT
DATEBOOK
EDITORIAL PAGE
EQUIPMENT & ENGINEERING
FATES & FORTUNES
FINANCIAL REPORTS
FOR THE RECORD
INTERNATIONAL
LEAD STORY
THE MEDIA
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
9
32
38
46
5
MONDAY MEMO
OPEN MIKE
PROGRAMING
26
WEEK'S HEADLINERS
WEEK'S PROFILE
10
22
64
99
14
100
71
76
62
AMERICAN BUSINESS PRESS INC.
85
75
29
44
z
rUlS-
Hroa1cas1inU
Published every Monday, 59d issue
(Yearbook Number) published in
January by BROADCASTING PUBLICATIONS
INc. Second -class postage paid at
Washington, D. C., and additional
offices.
Subscription prices: Annual subscription for 52 weekly issues $850.
Annual subscription including Yearbook Number $13.50. Add $2.00 per
year for Canada and $4.00 for all
other countries. Subscriber's occupation required. Regular issues 50
cents per copy. Yearbook Number
$5.00 per copy.
Subscription orders and address
changes: Send to BROADCASTING Circulation Dept., 1735 DeSales Street.
N.W., Washington, D. C., 20035. On
changes, please include both old and
new addresses plus address label from
front cover of magazine.
7
Hey, Bunch!
How would you
describe your
audience?
Cream. No matter
how you slice it.
the
Meredith
bunch
MEREDITH BROADCASTING: KANSAS CITY KCMO AM FM TV; OMAHA WOW AM FM TV;
8
PHOENIX KPHO AM TV; SYRACUSE WHEN AM TV
BROADCASTING, January 17,
1966
Late news breaks on this page and page 10
Complete coverage of week begins on page 29
ABC's `second season'
hikes ratings, shares
First week of ABC -TV's so- called
"second season" was smash success according to 50- market Trendex report
as Batman, which was introduced last
week (Wed. and Thurs., 7:30 -8 p.m.),
scored ratings of 27.3 and 29.6 and
shares of 49.5 and 58.8.
ABC -TV's rescheduling covers 7:30
to 9 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday
and for these two blocks network hit
average 23.4 rating and 43.6 share last
week.
This represented advance of 79% in
rating over scores achieved for these
periods since September and 96% gain
in share.
Patty Duke, which remains in Wed.
8 -8:30 period, had its rating lifted 30%
over past performances, with major
credit going to Batman lead -in. Gidget
which was moved from Wednesday
night spot to Thurs. 8 -8:30, doubled
its previous average rating.
Other ABC premiere rating performances: Blue Light (Wed. 8.30 -9 p.m.),
23.2 rating and 40.2 share; Double Life
of Henry Phyfe (Thurs. 8:30 -9 p.m.),
21.0 rating and 39.2 share.
In overnight national Arbitrons, Batman led its opposition both nights
(Wed.: 24.9 rating and 39 share vs.
18.3 and 29 for NBC's Virginian and
14.5 and 23 for CBS's Lost in Space;
Thurs.: 23.9 and 40 vs. 16.7 and 28 for
NBC's Daniel Boone and 13.9 and 23
for CBS's Munsters). Phyfe with 19.5
and 31 trailed My Three Sons on CBS
(21.7 and 35) but edged Laredo on
NBC (18.6 and 30). Blue Light with
18.5 and 29 lagged CBS's Beverly Hillbillies (24.7 and 39) but was ahead of
NBC's Virginian (17.3 and 27).
Staggers hints that CATV
is next for House group
Representative Harley O. Staggers
(D -W. Va.) said Friday (Jan. 14) that
House Commerce Committee, of which
he became chairman on Thursday (see
page 44), "has some unfinished business in the second session on the broadcast industry."
Reached at his Keyser, W. Va., office,
new chairman said that unfinished business amounted to "committee intervention into those areas which the FCC has
said it will move if Congress doesn't."
He declined to identify subject, but
presumably it's community antenna television.
But, he told BROADCASTING, "We'll
have to wait and see what develops.
We have no preconceived notions about
how the matter should be handled. We
intend to give everyone his chance to
be heard, and we're not out to get any-
one."
Honolulu channel 13
sold to Richard Eton
Sale of KTRG -TV Honolulu (ch. 13)
to United Broadcasting was announced
last Friday (Jan. 14). Price was said
to be approximately $700,000 with
assumption of obligations. Transaction
was handled by La Rue Media Brokers,
New York.
Sale is subject to FCC approval.
Station is owned by David Watumull
and family of Honolulu. United Broadcasting, headed by Richard Eton, also
owns WOOK -AM -TV and WFAN -FM Washington; WSID and WTLF -TV Baltimore;
wINx Rockville, Md.; WJMO and wcuvFM Cleveland; WANT Richmond, Va.;
WMUR-TV Manchester, N. H.; WFAB
Miami; WBNX New York and WJMY
Allen Park -Detroit, Mich.
Top 50 policy review
seen in court action
Federal court in Washington has denied FCC motion to dismiss appeal by
Meredith Broadcasting Co. against commission's interim policy on station ownership in top 50 markets.
Court said FCC can reargue motion
at time of argument on merits of case.
This is second unsuccessful move in
case by commission; last fall it asked
court to hold case in abeyance pending
outcome of petitions for reconsideration before commission. Court also
turned down that request.
Meredith filed appeal last summer,
charging that FCC's policy has force
of rule since commission is following
this guide. It charged that policy is
illegal because FCC never held any
proceeding as required under Administrative Procedure Act. (BROADCASTING, Aug. 23, 1965).
Adopted last June, interim policy
states that FCC will require hearing
where group owning two VHF television stations in top 50 market attempts
to acquire another V in those communities or more than three of any kind in
top 50 markets.
AT
Cox to cable owners:
must put lid on CATV
Community antenna television operators, already concerned about tough
attitude FCC has indicated on CATV
regulations, are drawing little comfort
from remarks of Commissioner Kenneth A. Cox.
Commissioner Cox, consistently hard
liner on CATV regulation, made clear
he favors putting lid on CATV before
it overruns country.
If FCC's table of allocations is to
be abandoned, he told New York
CATV operators in Syracuse, it should
be as result of conscious decision of
Congress or commission. It should not
be as consequence of "private decisions"
of CATV operators.
He also expressed view that five -channel CATV would be adequate in most
areas, declaring, "I think that 5 channels can accommodate about all that
television has to offer."
Commissioner, who in cases before
commission has indicated he favors
limiting number of signals CATV can
carry, said that systems carrying more
than five channels not only do not
provide added value, they pose threat
to existing television system.
Contrary to views of some CATV
industry leaders, he said, TV set owners
do not have "right" to pick up any
television signal broadcast anywhere.
He also said that explosive growth
of CATV industry is result of technological advances and "self- generating demand." He said he doesn't think
it was due to "great upswelling of public demand for more television service"
or to expand program volume.
Viewers in cities with three or more
services, he said, "were quite satisfied."
There was no increase in programing.
But technological advances made
possible 12- channel systems, and CATV
operators, he said, decided they could
stimulate demand for service by bringing in independent stations' programing.
He said current expansion of CATV
depends on convincing viewers in cities
with three or more services that they
are "underprivileged."
GOP gets
rebuttal time
Three television networks, reportedly
at suggestion of Senator Everett Dirk sen (R- Ill.), will give GOP chance to
offer rebuttal tonight (Jan. 17) to
President Johnson's State of Union ad-
more AT DEADLINE page
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
10
9
WEEK'S HEADLINERS
He had been with NBC Films and
Gotham Recording Corp. as well as
with former Dumont TV network. Mr.
Granath was named to his sales managership in June 1963, also after three
years as account executive.
Larry White,
head of own
Mr. Goodman
Mr. Durgin
Julian Goodman, senior executive
VP, operations, and chief administrative officer of NBC, and Don Durgin,
president, NBC -TV network, and executive VP of NBC, elected to board
of directors. Mr. Goodman and Mr.
Durgin, along with Walter D. Scott,
now president of NBC and its chief
executive officer, were advanced to
their new posts effective Jan. 1, as was
Robert E. Kintner, president of NBC,
who was redesignated chairman of the
board (BROADCASTING, Dec. 20, 1965).
Mr. Scott has been member of board
for several years.
Bob Unger, VP, creative services,
and Phil Hornstein, executive art director, both Deutsch & Shea, New York,
join Bliss/Grunewald there a' V P's.
production firm,
Gate Way Productions, N e w
York, elected VP,
daytime television
and division VP
at NBC-TV that
city. Mr. White
was producer Mr. White
director for Dumont TV network
from 1948 to 1951, then became director of programing for Benton &
Bowles. He joined CBS-TV in 1959 as
VP daytime programing and in 1962
joined Goodson -Todman. Year later
he returned to CBS -TV as director of
program development. He reports to
William Storke, NBC-TV's VP, program administration.
given responsibility for creative product
of all M -E offices in U.S.
Mr. Gilliatt has been with M -E
since 1945. He became VP in 1952,
senior VP in 1960 and vice chairman
in 1964. Mr. Watson joined Marschalk
in 1956, climbing to VP and presidency
before being elected board chairman in
1962.
Mr. Grey
Mr. Posey
Mr. Grey, senior VP of Interpublic
since 1964, rejoins M -E where he had
been senior VP, coming to agency in
1963 from Ted Bates.
Mr. Posey started in advertising as
copy writer at Cunningham & Walsh,
then joined Kenyon & Eckhardt as copy
group supervisor and secretary to plans
board before coming to M -E in 1954
as VP and creative director of Chicago
office. He moved to M -E New York
in 1962 as head of creative division.
Harry C. Doo-
little,
VP
and
creative superMr.
Mr. Thayer
Mr.
Granath
John A. Thayer, Jr., national programing director, and Herbert Granath,
eastern sales manager, both ABC Radio,
New York, elected VP's. Mr. Thayer,
after three years with network as account executive, was named national
programing director in January 1964.
Gilliatt
Mr. Watson
Neal Gilliatt, vice chairman of McCann- Erickson, New York, and Stuart
Watson, board chairman of Marschalk
Co., same city, elected executive VP of
parent organization, Interpublic Group
of Companies. Edward A. Grey, senior
VP of Interpublic, elected vice chairman
of McCann -Erickson and Chester Posey,
VP and creative director of McCann Erickson, elected executive VP, and
Mr. Doolittle
visor
at
Ted
Bates, New York,
for nine years,
elected senior
VP, corporate
creative director
and member of
review board of
Geyer, Morey,
Ballard, that city.
Randolph T. McKelvey, senior VP
at Young & Rubicam, New York,
elected executive VP.
For other personnel changes of the week see FATES & FORTUNES
dress. But all three made clear they
didn't feel legally bound to give Republicans equal time, rather they thought
it good news judgment to balance Presiident's message with views of opposition.
Senator Dirksen and Representative
Gerald Ford (R- Mich.) are scheduled
to appear on CBS-TV 10:30 -11 p.m.
and on ABC -TV and NBC-TV at 11
p.m:
10
MGM income up
for quarter
Net income at Metro- GoldwynMayer Inc. for first quarter ended Nov.
25, 1965, climbed comfortably over
comparable period of 1964, it was reported Friday (Jan. 14). Spokesman said
that improvement stemmed from gains
in all major operations, including higher
revenue from TV film licensing.
Gross revenues from television dis-
tribution rose to $3,368,000 from
$2,941,000 in same period year
earlier. Gross revenues from television
programs and commercials were $5,921,000 compared with $5,177,000 in
November quarter of 1964.
Three months ended Nov. 25, 1965:
Earnings per share
Gross revenues
Net income before
taxes
Net income
Shares outstanding
1965
$0.83
37,280,000
1964
$0.60
36,599,000
4,379,000
2,084,000
2,506,629
3,486,000
1,566,000
2,611,829
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Warner Bros. Television Audience Magnets...
SUGARF'OOT
77
SUNSET STRIP
HAWAIIAN EYE
THE GALLANT MEN
SURFSIDE
COLT .45
MAVERICK
CHEYENNE
THE ROARING 20'S
BOURBON STREET BEAT
THE DAKOTAS
ROOM FOR ONE MORE
WARNER BROS. TELEVISION DIVISION
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
WARNER BROS. ONE- FEATURES
6
WB CARTOONS -SERIES '64
666 Fifth Avenue, New York 19, N.Y., Circle 6 -1000
il
ßR pp`
® CA
TNG
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ApN
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®RPpR
the forward look in broadcasting
"Crosley's new name more accurately reflects the active and growing part
we play in Avco Corporation, our parent enterprise. As Avco Broadcasting
Corporation, we bear the name of a company of international stature in
research and development, commercial, defense and space production, and
financial services, among others.
"Adoption of our new name comes as a fitting climax to one of the most
significant years of expansion in our four decades of broadcasting. As Avco
Broadcasting Corporation, we look to a continued future of broadcasting
leadership."
JOHN T. MURPHY, President
Avco Broadcasting Corp.
TELEVISION
RADIO
WLW -T Cincinnati /NBC Represented by B C G
WLW -C Columbus /NBC Represented by B C G
WLW -D Dayton /NBC -ABC Represented by B C G
WLW-1 Indianapolis /ABC Represented by B C G
WOAI-TV San Antonio /NBC Represented by Edward Petry 3 Co., Inc.
WLW Cincinnati /NBC Represented by B C G
WOAI San Antonio /NBC Represented by Edward Petry & Co.,
W W DC Washington, D. C. Represented by Blair
W W DC -FM Washington, D. C. Represented by Quality
Inc.
Media
DATEBOOK
calendar of important meetings and
events in the field of communications.
A
alndlcates first or revised listing.
Adam Young Speaks...
Station Option Time
It has been suggested that network
control of programs be curtailed.
From the viewpoint of what programs
are put on over the national networks, it
is obvious that they are completely responsible for this programming. It would
seem clear, therefore, that they must control totally and completely what is originated.
Let us consider the other aspect of the
problem-financial control of programming. Today the producers have a total
of three customers-ABC, CBS and NBC
-and some of them would prefer to be
in partnership with the networks rather
than to be outsiders attempting to sell
their wares. From the network standpoint, they can obtain a profit on their
programs either as producers or as
sellers and can probably do equally well
via either route.
As of now, program producers have
been most unsuccessful in selling first
run shows to advertisers or stations on a
non-network basis. Even the top re -runs
and films are offered to the networks first
because they can afford to make a major
commitment.
There is no alternative. Only a plan
for station option time during prime
hours will make it possible for program
producers to sell Grade A productions on
a first run basis to either advertisers or
individual television stations. Stations
must guarantee clearance on a long term
basis to interest the advertiser.
Today, most major stations are themselves programming a certain amount of
prime time. However, its lack of uniformity precludes developing a ready
market for the program producer or for
the advertiser who wishes to buy first run
programming during the prime hours.
Station option time seems to be the only
answer. It will afford program producers
a new market for top quality, first run
programs.
adam
young inc.
NEW
YORK CHICAGO ATLANTA BOSTON
DALLAS
DETROIT
ST. LOUIS
14
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRANCISCO
PORTLAND
SEATTLE
Jan. 17-Deadline tor comments un FCC's
proposed rulemaking to allow remote control operation of VHF stations.
Jan. 17- Deadline for comments on FCC's
further notice of proposed rulemaking
relating to fostering expanded use of
UHF television frequencies by setting aside
channels 70 through 83 inclusive for new
class of 10 -kw community TV stations with
200 -foot antenna limitation.
Jan. 17 -FCC Chairman E. William Henry
addresses luncheon of Federal Communications Bar Association. National Press Club,
Washington.
Jan. 19- Workshop on the "Creative Approval Process." Association of National
Advertisers will treat the problem of the
advertising creative process. Plaza hotel,
New York.
W an. 19- International Radio & Television
Society newsmaker luncheon. Discussion
on pro's and con's of community antenna
television by Benjamin J. Conroy Jr., president of Uvalde TV Cable Corp. and board
chairman of National Community Antenna
Television Association and Lawrence H.
(Bud) Rogers II, president of Taft Broadcasting. Waldorf- Astoria hotel, New York.
Jan. 20- Television Commercials Production Workshop presented by the International Radio & Television society. Panel
will discuss "The Production of a TV Commercial-an Overall View." Johnny Victor
theater (Rockefeller Center), New York.
Jan. 20-Illinois State Bar Association
symposium on fair trial -free press. Sherman
House, Chicago.
Jan. 20 -21- Midwinter meeting of Florida
Association of Broadcasters. Ramada Lin,
Cocoa Beach.
Jan. 21
First annual Baxter Trophy
Awards for Public Service in Maine, presented by UPI to honor the best public
service programs broadcast and telecast
in the state. Eastland hotel, Portland.
Wan. 23- 28-CBS -owned radio stations annual program meeting. General managers
and program directors, Fred Ruegg, vice
president. station administration, CBS Radio; Richard Hess, assistant, and Paul Kagan,
manager of press information, will attend.
Highlands Inn, Carmel, Calif.
Wan. 24-Seminar on the latest techniques
in radio production sponsored by the Television and Radio Advertising Club of Philadelphia. The Urban Club, Philadelphia.
Jan. 24 -28 Winter meeting of National
Associa
of Broadcasters joint boards.
Colonnades Beach hotel, Palm Beach Shores.
-
-
Fla.
-
Jan. 25 Annual meeting of the Utah Idaho AP Broadcasters. Owyhee Motor Inn,
Boise.
Wan. 25 -27 -"The Benchmark New York
Conference in the Television Arts," cosponsored by Syracuse University (TVradio -film division, Newhouse Communications Center) and the New York chapter
of the National Academy of Television Arts
and Sciences. TV producers George Schaefer and Lucy Jarvis and Roger Englander,
who also is a director, are featured in sessions. Syracuse House, 11 East 65d Street,
New York.
-
Jan. 25 -27
Annual winter meeting of
Georgia Association of Broadcasters. University of Georgia, Athens.
W an. 25 -27
21st annual Georgia Radio..
Television Institute of Georgia Association
of Broadcasters and Henry W. Grady School
of Journalism. Speakers include John Chancellor, director of Voice of America; FCC
Commissioner Kenneth A. Cox, and Marvin
Kalb. CBS News. University of Georgia.
Athens.
Jan. 25 -27- Twenty -third annual convention of National Religious Broadcasters.
Mayflower hotel, Washington.
Jan. 26-Tite Katz Agency spot television
seminar. Speaker: Edward P. Reavy Jr.,
marketing director of Hamilton Beach. Continental Plaza hotel, Chicago.
Wan. 26- "Humor in Television," forum of
New York chapter of the National Academy
of Television Arts and Sciences. Performers
Godfrey Cambridge and Selma Diamond
will be included on panel. New York Hilton,
New York.
Jan. 27-Financial seminar sponsored by
National Community Television Association.
Among speakers: E. William Henry, FCC
chairman, and Gordon Thayer, AT &T. Committee is headed by George Green, Ameco
Inc., Phoenix. Starter Hilton hotel, New
York.
Jan. 27-Television Commercials Production Workshop presented by the International Radio & Television Society. Panel
will discuss the business affairs of TV commercial production. Panel chairman is Line
Diamant of Grey Advertising. Johnny Victor theater (Rockefeller Center), New York.
Jan. 27- 29-Annual winter convention and
election of oduers of South Carolina Broadcasters Association. Speakers include Gordon Coffman of National Association of
Broadcasters legal department. Francis -Marion hotel, Charleston.
Jan. 28- Annual Tom Phillips Awards dinner of UPI Broadcasters Association of
Massachusetts. Sheraton -Boston hotel, Boston.
Jan. 28-Pacific Pioneers Broadcasters (formerly Los Angeles chapter, Broadcast Pioneers) luncheon meeting at which the new
organization will begin autonomous operation, elect officers and adopt a constitution.
Sportsmen's Club, North Hollywood, Calif.
Jan. 28 -30 -Mid- winter conference of Advertising Association of the West. Rickey's
hotel, Palo Alto, Calif.
Jan. 31- Deadline for comments on FCC's
proposed rulemaking to limit three major
television networks (ABC, CBS and NBC)
to equity holdings in no more than 50%
of all nonnews programing between 6 and
11 p.m., or to two hours of nonnews programing in same period, whichever is greater. Proposal would also prohibit three TV
networks from domestic syndication and
foreign sales of independently produced
programs. Former deadline Was Oct. 21.
alJan. 31 -Seminar on color TV sponsored
by the Television and Radio Advertising
Club of Philadelphia. The Urban Club,
Philadelphia.
Jan. 31-Deadline for nominations for annual Russell L. Cecil Awards ($500 national
award and $100 regional awards) for outstanding scripts on arthritis by the Arthritis Foundation. Submit entries to: 1212
Avenue of the Americas, New York 10036.
FEBRUARY
1-
Feb.
Entry deadline for annual Sigma
Delta Chl awards for distinguished service
in journalism. Submit entries to: 35 East
Wacker Drive, Suite 856, Chicago 60601.
Feb.
Deadline for reply comments on
FCC's proposed rulemaking to allow remote
control operation of VHF stations.
Feb. 1- Deadline for entries in the George
1-
Polk Memorial Awards competition for outstanding achievement in journalism sponsored by Long Island University. Entries
should be sent to Professor Jacob H. Jaffe,
George Polk Memorial Awards, Long Island
University, Zeckendorf Campus, Brooklyn,
N. Y. 11201.
Feb.
1
- Board
of
Broadcast Governors
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
have
business
being
on
v
z/97
New York-New Jersey
It's the fastest draw in the east! When WJRZ changed to the big sound of Country Music, listeners
We have the only unduplicated adult audience in the New York -New Jersey
changed over, too!
with an average annual income of over $8,500.00. And our new, impressive
Metropolitan area
proving country music has
Pulse, Hooper and Mediastat ratings are getting higher every day
National and local advertisers are getting fantastic results by serving up their
arrived! Have you?
Why don't
message country -style. Plus, they're getting saturation radio coverage at realistic cost.
you join the biggest country club in the east! Get the facts today from WJRZ /97 or your Adam Young
representative.
...
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
...
15
How CanTwo People Be Number One?
That's not so puzzling -not when the two people
are NBC News' Chet Huntley and David Brinkley.
Their nightly "Huntley- Brinkley Report" -which
last November became the first regular, network
news program to be televised in color -is the most
honored program of its kind in broadcasting.
Its thoroughness of coverage is matched only by
the astute character of its news analysis.
And it's a program that doesn't hesitate to do a
two, three or even four-part series on a subject
calling for coverage -in- depth.
Among such subjects it has recently explored:
campus protests against the war in Vietnam; the
decline of the U.S. Merchant Marine; the activities
of the Ku Klux Klan.
Significantly, the "Huntley- Brinkley Report" is
not merely the most honored of television's news
programs but the most watched. Each year, for six
consecutive years now, it has been ranked as the
nation's most popular television news program by
every rating service.
It's nice to know that the "Huntley- Brinkley Report" enters 1966 with so strong and lengthy a
background as television's favorite news program.
Two people can be number one... consistently.
NBC NEWSQ4
and Myer
for Hilt-4 w'._yllll
MowJk
Starring
I, . ,,,, Caws
Mickey DEEMS and Joey FAYE
IN A 7 STATION
MARKET LIKE
NEW YORK
BROADCASTING PUBLICATIONS, INC.
public hearing. Cathedral Hall, 425 Sparks
SOL TAISHOFF
PRESIDENT
Street, Ottawa.
MAURY LONG
VICE PRESIDENT
H. JAMES
EDWIN
fourth
annual
PRESIDENT
for
VICE
deadline
fFeb. 1 -Entry
LAWRENCE B. TAISHOrr
station award and fourth annual interna- SECRETARY
B.
T.
TAISHOFF
TREASURER
tional award of National Academy of Tele- COMPTROLLER
IRVmG C. Mauro
vision Arts and Sciences. Entries should be ASST. TREASURER
COWAN
JOANNE
T.
sent to NATAS at 54 West 40th Street, New
York.
EFeb. 1- Deadline for entries for U. S. Conference of Mayors- Broadcast Pioneers awards
to radio and television station making
greatest contribution to the good of the
local community. Contact: Broadcast Pioneers, 589 Fifth Avenue, New York 10017.
and publication headquarters:
.Feb. 2 -4- Western Radio and Television Executive
-TELECASTING Bldg.. 1735 DeSales
Conference. Speakers include FCC Commis- BROADCASTING
Street,
N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036. Telesioner Robert E. Lee and William Harley,
phone: 202 Metropolitan 8 -1022.
president of the National Association of
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
Educational Broadcasters. Jack Tar hotel,
Sol Taishoff
San Francisco.
Editorial
Institute of Electrical and ElecFeb. 2 -4
tronics Engineers annual winter convenVICE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Edwin H. James
tion on Aerospace & Electronic Systems,
formerly convention on Military Electronics.
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR (New York)
Rufus Crater
International hotel, Los Angeles.
MANAGING EDITOR
EFeb. 3- Meeting of the Minnesota AP Radio
Art King
and Television Association. Minnesota Press
SENIOR EDITORS: Frederick M. Fitzgerald.
Club. Minneapolis.
Earl B. Abrams. Lawrence Christopher
(Chicago), Leonard Zeidenberg, David Ber Feb. 3- Television Commercials Produclyn (New York). Rocco Famighetti (New
tion Workshop presented by the Interna- York), George W. Darlington, Morris Geltional Radio & Television Society. Panel man (Hollywood), John Gardiner (New
York), Sherm Brodey; STAFF Warms: Bill
will discuss color television. Panel chairBayne, Sonya Lee Brockstein, Joseph A.
man is Shelly Platt of Benton & Bowles.
Esser, William A. Williams, L. Christopher
Johnny Victor theatei (Rockefeller Center),
Wright; EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: Jane T. Braun,
New York.
Camille Grimes, John Jones, Tom Trewin;
SECRETARY TO THE PUBLISHER: Gladys Hall.
Feb. 4 Western States Advertising Agencies Association "Man of the Year" award
Business
luncheon. Ambassador hotel. Los Angeles.
VICE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER
Maury Long
Feb. 4- 5- Annual Radio -TV News Seminar
NATIONAL SALES MANAGER
sponsored by the Northwest Broadcast News
Warren W. Middleton (New Yerk)
Association and the School of Journalism
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
of the University of Minnesota. Speakers
Ed Sellers
include John F. Dille, board chairman of
PRODUCTION MANAGER: George L. Dant; TRarthe National Association of Broadcasters, PIC
Harry
Stevens; ADVERTISING
MANAGER:
and Robert Gamble, president of the RadioAsslsrANTS: Robert Sandor, Howard Rector,
Television News Directors Association. UniCarol Ann Cunningham; SEcsrmav To THE
versity of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
MANAGER: Doris Kelly.
COMPTROLLER: Irving C. Miller; ASSISTANT
UFeb. 7 -New deadline for reply comments
AUDITOR: Eunice Weston.
on FCC's further notice of proposed rule making relating to fostering expanded use
Publications and Circulation
of UHF television frequencies by setting
1BLICATIONS
DIRECTOR
aside channels 70 through 83 inclusive for
John T Cosgrove
new class of 10-kw community TV stations
SUBSCRIPTIOV MANAGER
with 200 -foot antenna limitation. Former
Richard B. Kinsey
deadline was Jan. 5.
William Criger, David A. Cusick. Alice
E Feb. 7- Seminar series sponsored by the
Gerwe. Dorothy Hughes, Edith Liu, Roy
Television and Radio Advertising Club of Mitchell, Ray Sauls.
Philadelphia. Topic: "Who's out there anyBureaus
way," with David Arnold, vice president of
Gray & Rogers Advertising, as moderator. New York: 444 Madison Avenue, 10022. TeleThe Urban Club, Philadelphia.
phone: 212 Plaza 5 -8354.
DIRECTOR: Rufus Crater; SENIOR
Feb. 7 -9- Eighth annual conference on ad- EDITORIAL
EDrross: David Berlyn, Rocco Famighetti,
vertising /government relations co- sponsored John Gardiner; STAFF Warrens: Phil Fitzell,
by Advertising Federation of America and Ellen R. McCormick, John O'Hara; ASSISTAdvertising Association of the West. Lunch- ANT: Frances Bonovitch; NATIONAL SALES
eon speaker on Feb. 9 is John T. Conner, MANAGER: Warren W. Middleton; lxsrrruSALES MANAGER: Eleanor R. Manning;
secretary of commerce. Senator Warren G. TIONAL
EASTERN SALES MANAGER: Robert T. FenniMagnuson (D- Wash.). Federal Trade Corn - more.
mission Chairman Paul Rand Dixon, and
Chicago: 360 North Michigan Avenue, 60601.
Donald H. McGannon, president of Westing- Telephone:
312 Central 6 -4115.
house Broadcasting Co., will take part in SENIOR Emma:
Lawrence Christopher; MmWednesday panel session. Shoreham hotel, WEST SALES MANAGER: David J. Bailey; AsWashington.
SISTANT: Rose Adragna.
Hollywood: 1680 North Vine Street, 90028.
Feb. 9- 10- Annual winter meeting of MichTelephone: 213 Hollywood 3 -3148. Samoa
igan Association of Broadcasters. Jack Tar
Emma: Morris Gelman; WESTERN SALES
hotel, Lansing.
MANAGER: Bill Merritt; ASSISTANT: Stephanie
Alexander.
Feb. 9-11- Annual meeting of the National
Toronto: Il Burton Road, Zone 10. TeleTelephone Cooperative Association. Featured
416 Hudson 9 -2694. CORRESPONDENT:
speaker will be Bill Daniels, president of phone:
James Montagnes.
Daniels & Associates, Denver CATV brokerage firm. Denver Hilton hotel, Denver.
ASSISTANT PUBLISHER
Lawrence B. Taishoff
Feb. 10- Television Commercials Production Workshop presented by the InternaBROADCASTING. Magazine was founded in 1931
tional Radio & Television Society. Panel
by Broadcasting Publications Inc., using the
will discuss video tape. Panel chairman is
title. BROADCASTING -The News Magazine of
Charles Adams of Videotape Center. Johnny
the Fifth Estate. Broadcast Advertising*
was acquired in 1932, Broadcast Reporter in
Victor theater (Rockefeller Center), New
1933 and Telecast. in 1953. BROADCASTING York.
TELECASTING was introduced in 1946.
'Reg. U. S. Patent Office
Indicates first or revised listing.
Copyright 1966: BroadcastingPublicationslnc.
DiüaiIciistillui
-
.
IS
FANTASTIC
ARB (NOV. 1965) WPIXTV
_g
2)1-7-__15,
TELEVISION CORPORATION
021
Mdlson
CHICAGO
N.Y.
HOLLYWOOD
1-3110
TranSLut Television International Coroorat,On
Zurich. Switzerland
-
e
RRISBURG
WJAC Radio
delivers broadest coverage
of the million dollar
MARKET in the MI 'DLE!
Ask Meeker Radio
for the Pulse-ating
story of WJAC's
audience make-up
RADIO
WJAC
Johnstown, Pennsylvania
.
.
.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Good taste in
commercials
is one of the
Storer Standards.
Rejecting commercials when we think our listeners would want
us to is just one of the ways Storer carries out its communications
responsibilities. The exacting standards adhered to by all 12 Storer
stations mean more worthwhile listening for the public and more
successful selling for advertisers.
LOS ANGELES
TORER
rRNUC,iSTIAC C.OUP.4NY
PHILADELPHIA
WHIG
CLEVELAND
NEW YORK
TOLEDO
DETROIT
NOBS
WIW
WHN
WSPD
Wilk
MIAMI
MILWAUKEE
CLEVELAND
DETROIT
WITITV
W1W-TV
ATLANTA
WAGATV
TOLEDO
WOIS
WSPD -TV
WMIK -TV
Storer Standards make every Storer station a great salesman.
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
19
How can a radio commercial compare with this?
We have a better question:
Why should a radio commercial
compare with this?
Radio doesn't have to compete
with television. Together they
make the most natural ... most
powerful media mix of all. Only Radio can
remind a housewife that Dash makes her
automatic clean like it's 10 feet tall as
she's pouring detergent into her washer.
Only Radio can sell a young mother baby
food as she's spooning mashed liver and
carrots into her baby's mouth. Only
Radio can sell a woman floor wax while
she's on her hands and knees waxing
her floor. When the television set has
been turned off ... when the magazines
and newspapers have been put away...
Radio is what she takes to the
supermarket with her.
Women listen to Group W Radio in their
cars when they're seconds away from a
BOSTON WBZ
NEW YORK WINS
shopping cart. They listen to Group W
because they like what they hear.
Perhaps it's time you asked yourself this
question: What's the last thing you want a
housewife to hear as she's driving her
car into a supermarket parking lot,
your sales message -or your competitor's?
GROUP
PHILADELPHIA KYW
WWESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING
PITTSBURGH KOKA
FORT WAYNE WOWO
COMPANY
CHICAGO WINO
REPRESENTED BY AM RADIO SALES COMPANY
OPEN MIKE®
an interesting
and highly informative publication, and
has helped me, during the past year,
to a better understanding of the needs
and problems, of radio and TV broadcasters.
I look forward to enjoying this weekly during the [1966] session.- Representative William L. Hungate (D -Mo.),
Washington.
in each and every lesser and smaller
TV- station city where their signals are
valuable only so long as the largest city
station's signals are not abnormally imported therein.
Switzerland could not welcome the
United Nations permission for Russia
to extend its "protective" troops into
the Swiss land though Russia would
quickly give permission.
Weber,
executive vice president, Rust Craft
Broadcasting Co., Steubenville, Ohio.
The wrangle over wire
(Messrs. Manship and Weber, and other
readers, are entitled to a clarification of
BROADCASTING's views. See editorial page
Aid to understanding
EDITOR: BROADCASTING is
WFBM TV
The logic in your community
antenna TV editorial of Dec. 27 eludes
me. You argue that broadcasters should
abandon their support for FCC regulation of CATV because CATV is growing very rapidly and many systems may
be established before the new regulations go into effect. This suggested rule
should not be adopted where there is
a serious problem which is growing
worse.
It's just not logical to argue as you
do that because the commission has
delayed so long it should defer still
further- forever, in fact.
You also suggest that the solution
is not FCC regulation but congressional
legislation that would require CATV to
obtain the consent of originating stations, but enacting such a law surely
would take longer than FCC regulation
which hopefully is imminent.
So, your proposal would permit even
more CATV's to import distant signals
before new rules could take effect.
Moreover, your proposal isn't really an
adequate solution. For example, it would
permit Los Angeles stations to decide
whether to let their programs be carried
on CATV's in Bakersfield, Amarillo, etc.
That's all right for the big stations in
Los Angeles, but how does it help the
stations in Bakersfield and Amarillo
whose audiences will be dismembered
by these imported programs ?-Douglas
L. Manship, president, WBRZ(TV) Baton
Rouge.
Indianapolis
EDITOR:
Fred
100.)
EDITOR:
The
Featas with a
REPUTATION
The
Station
with the
MGM16
REPUTATION
22
Your editorial of Dec. 27 is
most surprising. It concluded that the
CATV impact and industry issue would
be resolved if the rebroadcast rules
were applied.
You must be well aware that the
major and top- market television stations
would never look with disfavor upon
the farthest possible extension of their
signals. Thus no restraint nor denial
would exist in their granting permission
to every CATV in every community on
a nationwide basis.
The opposite condition faces stations
More on color
EDITOR: The color
(BROADCASTING, Jan.
issue looks great
3). Mary Bates,
manager, press relations, Avco Broadcasting Corp., Cincinnati.
noted in your excellent color
issue that the Katz study said some ad-
EDITOR: I
vertisers preferred a position for their
color commercial between two black and-white programs. This positioning is
done presumably to have the color commercial "stand out" in this environment.
As you point out in your issue, colorset homes prefer to view color programs
and therefore are not viewing when the
color commercial comes on in (or between) black -and -white programs. The
idea is great but it doesn't work out
in practice.
The average color program is attracting a large audience of color homes
while the average black-and -white program is attracting only a few color sets.
It you want to "stand out" to a minor
audience that's one thing but if you
want to be viewed in color by a large
color -set audience you had better be
in a color show. Again, it was a very
fine issue.
L. Klein, vice president, audience measurement, NBC, New
York.
Paul
Phone calls and letters
May I thank you for the
splendid story about Mayor [John V.]
Lindsay's interest in surveying the New
York broadcasting picture (BROADCASTING, Jan. 3)? I am always honored
when one of my projects or involvements catches the attention of BROADCASTING. That they never need to be
featured in any other publication or medium is again attested to by the fact that
so many of my colleagues called or
wrote to tell me that they had read the
story. -Richard D. Heffner, Richard
Heffner Associates Inc., New York.
EDITOR:
BROADCASTING, January 17,
1966
North Carolina's
ar eS
metropolitan market
is served best by
WSJS
TELEVISION
Winston -Salem
Greensboro
High Point
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
23
LOW- BUDGET COLOR TV TAPE SYSTEMS
e
TR -3 Player
For recording or playing.
This colorized TR -4 affords the most
economical way to record or playback
color tapes. It's complete in a 22 x 33
inch cabinet, 51 ft. tall. It includes suitable metering facilities, built-in picture
and waveform monitors, and other provisions for good quality pictures.
TR -4
Recorder:' Player
For recording and playing at the same time.
Combining the TR -4 with the TR -3 Player enables you to
record on the one while the other is on the air. The colorized
TR -3 Player performs to the same high RCA broadcast
standards and is compatible with all quadruplex recorders.
When recording and playback must be done at the same
time, the TR- 4 /TR -3 combination is the most economical.
TR-3 Player
TR-4 Recorder i Player
TR-4 Recorder 'Player
For simultaneous record and playback, with spare function.
Adding a second colorized TR -4 to the TR- 4 /TR -3 combination provides a system
that is extremely versatile. It permits you to record and playback simultaneously-and
still have a machine available for those unexpected jobs. It provides practically the
equivalent, in studio time, of a three recorder setup.
See your RCA Broadcast
Representative for complete details
on these economical systems
for color recording and playback.
Or write RCA Broadcast and
Television Equipment, Building 15 -5
Camden, N. J.
The Most Trusted Name in Television
MONDAY MEMO
from DONALD H. WALLACE, Clinton
E.
Frank Inc., Chicago
`Chicago -style' TV is born again: commercial production
When Dave Garroway and his col- ket. Sarra Studios generally is regarded Filmmakers and VPI Illinois.
leagues followed the network shows east- as the first. As a still -photography studio
Niles is a contemporary of Sarra and
ward over a decade ago, Chicago ad- under the name of Valentino Sarra, this Wilding but largely oriented to different
vertising all but resigned itself to the company dates back to the mid-twenties. markets until recent years. Niles now
role of permanent commuter -eastward In the early fifties, Sarra's staff photogra- offers complete stage and editing faciland westward to the production Meccas phers began applying the art of illus- ities plus production facilities on both
tration photography to commercial mak- coasts.
of television.
Today, however, the Second City is ing. But the experimental aura remained
The Filmmakers is a small, young
coming back into its own on the tele- through the late fifties until new man- company founded by an ex-agency provision scene. No, the network shows agement injected the professionalism for ducer. While the company has no stage
have not returned. Nor have the famous which they are now noted.
facilities of its own it offers an excepWilding Productions on Chicago's tionally creative product.
names of the earlier fifties. But new
faces and voices even more familiar to North Side predates Sarra as a filmVPI Illinois, founded a year ago by
TV viewers are living on Lake Shore making 'organization. The company was its parent company in New York. now
Drive, in Evanston or Winnetka, and founded in 1914 and claims to be the offers complete production facilities in
they are earning handsome livings in nation's first industrial film organiza- Evanston plus a large stable of name
front of the cameras of Chicago's boom- tion. In 1937 the company took over directors from both coasts.
the facilities of Chicago's Essanay Proing film studios.
Aiming for National These six are
Michigan Avenue's major agencies duction, a major studio in the days of augmented by a dozen or more indeare finding the New York-Hollywood silent movies. Today Wilding offers pendent producers. Chicago processing
commute less and less necessary for the agencies the largest complex of sound and optical facilities also are growing.
production of commercials. Today a stages between New York and HollyWhat are the Chicago prospects for
substantial percentage of the film pro- wood. In 1958 Wilding TV was formed success on a national basis? Most of us
duction of Chicago -based national agen- as a separate division of the company feel they are very good. Air transporfor the production of commercials.
cies is being completed within a cab
tation now literally enables commuting
The Big Sound The third member to anywhere in the U. S. With the rise
ride of their creative headquarters.
No longer is of Chicago's `Big Three" doesn't even of realism in commercial presentation,
Chicago Style: 1966
Chicago considered "for insert work own a camera but it probably has played convenient geography becomes highly
only" or the fast, simple, low-budget a bigger role in the growth of this in- important in efficient location work. By
job. In this past year the top six studios dustry than any single film studio. It the same token it is now just as easy to
grossed over $13 million in commercial is Universal Recording Corp.
fly New York talent to Chicago or bring
Universal draws top talent from all in a Hollywood director.
production. They now are competing
successfully with New York and Holly- parts of the country and many claim
But even more important is Chicago's
wood in the full -scale production of na- it is the best facility this side of Glen adjacency to the industrial center of the
Glenn. Today virtually every Chicago nation. As corporation headquarters
tional campaigns.
Chicago's commercial boom is the agency uses Universal for sound track move closer to manufacturing and disreflection of a new trend in creativity- even if the film work is done in Holly- tribution centers, so will the advertising
and marketing effort. The growth of
a trend that dictates agency control wood or New York.
How much has this fraternity grown Chicago commercial production relies
through writer -producers or art director producers to a greater degree than ever in six years? Estimates will vary but on the growth of advertising here. Since
before. Today a Chicago agency pro- most of Chicago's national agencies now Chicago billings have been climbing at
ducer can cast in the agency offices as add three more to this list of those in- a rate of 14% a year for the last
volved in the production of network- decade, we can't help but view our prois done in New York.
The economics of Chicago production quality commercials. They are Fred duction industry through the same rosetend to favor lower total costs for jobs Niles Communications Centers, The colored glasses.
within the scope of the comparatively
small industry here. Commercials that
rely on food photography, location work
and limited studio work are generally
the fare of Midwest commercial makers.
Don Wallace is Clinton E. Frank's vice
Hollywood remains the leading techpresident and radio -TV director. He has
nician. New York probably will always
been at the Chicago agency since 1958,
makbe the style setter of commercial
first as a writer-producer, and has become
ing. And Chicago advertising will alfamiliar with all facets of commercial proways have a need for the best of both.
duction in behalf of a number of Frank
Six Year Boom Prior to 1959 very
clients. Earlier he had been with Tatham little was completely produced in ChiLaird where his major assignment was
cago although some local commercials
General Mills. Before that he had been
were made and insert scenes shot.
with Wesley Day & Co., Des Moines, where
Editing of New York or Hollywood jobs
he was involved in radio -TV. He majored
was rather frequent.
in journalism at Iowa State University.
Most agency production people will
recall a simultaneous thrust by three
companies into this potential new mar26
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
DISTINCTIVELY DETROIT
w
Photograph by George Kawamoto
ORPHEUS FOUNTAIN, by the noted Swedish sculptor Carl
Milles, is part of the largest Milles collection in the United States.
It graces the campus of the Cranbrook Academy of Art in suburban Bloomfield Hills.
Just as Detroiters regard The Orpheus Fountain as distinctive of Detroit, so they have regarded The
WWJ Stations as distinctively Detroit for over 45 years. Why? Because of programming that reflects
Detroiters' own interest in local news, sports, entertainment, public affairs, and community service.
And because of WWJ's home -ownership by The Detroit News. When you ask a Detroiter which
radio and TV stations are distinctively Detroit, he'll instinctively tell you "WWJ."
WWJ
and
WWJ -TV
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE DETROIT NEWS. AFFILIATED WITH NBC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC.
They're over eighteen
They're able to buy
They listen to WHIO
In Dayton, the 18 year and
older audience
belongs to WHIO. From Monday through
Friday this daily audience is 34.6°/o
greater than its nearest competitor. And
this lead stretches to 79.6 °/o for those
25 years and up.'
Sell Dayton and the Miami Valley
through WHIO and you sell quality as
well as quantity. WHIO has a firm hold on
the able -to -buy audience that earns more
and spends more. WHIO maintains this
audience with solid programming
designed to entertain, educate and
inform.
Got a product to sell adults in Ohio's
fastest growing area? Choose WHIO and
make every radio minute count.
'Pulse, Inc., LQR, for Dayton and four county
metropolitan area, April 1965. These figures are
estimates and subject to errors Inherent to the survey.
OQA111AO
REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC.
liriV
Cox Broadcasting Corporation stations: WHIO AM -FM -N, Dayton; WSB AM- FM -TV, Atlanta;
WSOC AM- FM -TV, Charlotte; WIOD AM -FM, Miami; KTVU, San Francisco -Oakland; WIIC-TV, Pittsburgh.
Broadcasùrq
rxrauerarraeao
January 17, 1966, Vol. 70, No.
3
The cut -up multi -set audience
Is it eluding measurement by regular raters?
New study turns up heavy incidence of multi -set
homes -and in them fewer viewers per receiver
People don't watch television a lot
more after they get a second TV set
in their homes, but they watch a lot
differently.
That is one of the key conclusions
from a wide- ranging study being made
public today (Jan. 17) by McHugh &
Hoffman Inc., television and advertising
consultants, of Birmingham, Mich.
The report finds that in multi -set
homes the families argue less about
what they're going to look at, but are
much more inclined to look at different
things. In fact, they often split up over
programs they had never disagreed on
before.
The evidence of fragmentation is
enough to cast serious doubt, in McHugh & Hoffman's opinion, on the ade-.
quacy of current rating services' measurement of audiences in multi -set
homes.
What's more, the problem is becoming bigger and more complicated. The
multi-set home is a phenomenon that is
already commonplace. In major markets, according to McHugh & Hoffman
studies, some 33% of the TV homes
have more than one set, and in some
markets the figure exceeds 40 %. And
the trend is inevitably gaining even
more impetus from the current boom
in color -set sales.
Wide Growth "I think that among
the most important findings for the
television broadcaster would be the extent of multi -set penetration" Philip L.
McHugh, president of McHugh &
Hoffman, said last week. He was radio TV vice president of Campbell -Ewald
in Detroit before resigning in 1962 to
setup the consulting firm.
"One of the top 10 markets was up
to 48% last spring and another was at
44 %. Couple this with the specific
variations of intent to buy a color set
this season and it is reasonably possible
the result could add up to another 15%
penetration in some markets.
"The real question now that can only
be speculated on from this study is how
accurately are the various rating sysBROADCASTING, January 17, 1986
tems' diaries kept on the second, third
and sometimes even fourth and fifth
sets in a home. Is the possibility already
here that television may begin to lose
track of its audience the way radio has ?"
Peter S. Hoffman, vice president of
the firm, who was assistant to Mr.
McHugh at C -E, added: "The continual
growth of multi -set homes in combination with UHF and community antenna
television will have long -range implications and present new problems in
identifying and developing audiences
for networks and individual stations.
More emphasis should be placed on research directed to keep pace with these
developments."
The multi -set home is only one of
many areas explored in the current
study, conducted for McHugh Si Hoffman in 13 markets last April by A. J.
Wood Research Corp. of Philadelphia.
(see page 30).
Pre -Fall Programs In releasing re-
sults of the study, McHugh & Hoffman
emphasized that it was conducted last
April, five months before the start of
the current TV season. Thus it cannot
reflect changes in viewer preferences and
attitudes that may have occurred since
the new season started in September.
The study's examination of multi -set
homes, however, would not be materially affected by program changes. It involved a comparison of multi -set and
single -set homes and explored patterns
of multi -set usage without regard to
specific programs.
Almost one out of four (23 %) of
the individual respondents in multi -set
homes said that both sets had been in
use simultaneously within the past
24 hours, and over half (52 %) said
both had been used at the same time
within the past week. Of the latter
group, more than half said the sets were
in use simultaneously for at least two
hours during the day, and 10% said
Turmoil at home? Here's how two TV's may help
The second TV set's role as a
peacemaker was the one most frequently mentioned when respondents were asked to name its main
advantages, the McHugh & Hoffman study revealed. Table shows
how 272 respondents in multi -set
households responded in answer to
the question (answers total more
than 100% because of multiple responses). What are the disadvantages? "Expense of repair" and "expense of electric bill" led the list,
each cited by 7% of the same 272
respondents. Two out of three
(64% ) reported "no disadvantages."
Asked how "important" it is to have
more than one set, 53% called it
"very" (24 %) or "fairly" (29 %)
important, while 36% said it's not
important and 11% didn't answer.
Prevents arguments and
disagreements
We (adults) can watch our
own programs
Children can watch their
own programs
Can watch TV in bed
Always have one set in
working order
Able to watch TV on either
floor
Choice of programs
Good for privacy
Can follow shows throughout
the day, while working in
different rooms
Other
No particular advantage
Don't know, no answer
23%
20
18
11
10
8
4
1
1
4
6
12
29
How does average viewer feel about television?
A close look at television viewer
behavior and attitudes toward a wide
range of subjects, from network
image to color, is provided
addition to a detailed study of viewing
patterns in multi -set homes (see page
29)
research being made public
today (Jan. 17).
The research was commissioned
by McHugh & Hoffman Inc., television and advertising consultants, of
Birmingham, Mich., and was conducted by the A. J. Wood Research
Corp. of Philadelphia in 13 major
markets last April. Because of the
timing, the findings obviously could
not reflect changes in attitudes and
program preferences resulting from
the introduction of new- season programing last September. Highlights
include:
The typical viewer was spending
"slightly less" than three hours a
day (20.8 hours a week) with TV.
Women tended to watch more than
men, less -educated people more than
the college- educated. Respondents in
the 35 -49 age group, although more
likely to have more than one set,
viewed somewhat less than those in
older and younger groups. Children
between 10 and 17 watched more
(19.3 hours a week) than those under 10 (16.4 hours). By a small
margin, respondents who preferred
NBC tended to watch more than
those who favored ABC or CBS.
The majority of viewers (62% )
felt they were watching TV about
the same amount of time as in previous seasons. But a larger number
thought they were watching less
(23 %) than more (15 %). The de-
-in
-in
five hours or more.
Respondents in multi-set homes tend
to watch TV "slightly" more (22.4
hours a week) than in one -set homes
(20.0 hours a week).
But "heavy" viewing was more apt to
occur in multi -set homes; 24% of the
respondents with more than one set
available reported watching over 30
hours a week, as opposed to 19% of
those in single -set homes. Viewers who
watched less than eight hours a week
were a little more likely to be found
in single -set homes.
When the family splits up to watch
different sets, the division usually finds
adults at one set, children at the other.
The addition of a second set slightly,
but not significantly, reduces the incidence of disagreement between adults
30
(LEAD STORY)
dine was most noticeable among the
college-educated; 36% of these
thought they were viewing less, as
against 13% who were viewing more,
while 17% of those with less than a
complete high-school education reported viewing more and 13% less.
Among those viewing more, the
reason most frequently given was
"more available time" (mentioned
by 53 %), while "better, more interesting" programs ranked second
(30% ) and other attitudes favorable
to programing drew another 14% of
the mentions. "More educational TV"
was mentioned by 4 %.
Those Viewing Less Among those
viewing less, "programs are not as
good" was the most frequent explanation (38 %), but other criticisms
of programing were indicated by
22 %. Second most often mentioned
explanation was "less available time"
(30 %).
Most viewers thought television
was meeting its obligations. Among
those who did not, the biggest number (12 %) cited "poor quality of
shows."
About one-third said they were
watching news, drama and situation
comedies more than in the preceding
season, but four out of ten (42% )
said they were watching westerns less.
Asked to rank the program types
they liked best, viewers put drama
on top (32 %), followed by news
(27 %), situation comedies (19 %),
variety (17 %) and westerns (14 %).
Viewers were about evenly divided
on the continuous quality of Peyton
Place, at that time the only evening
network show being presented in
and children over what is to be watched.
But adults disagree among themselves
more often after the second set comes
into the house. Among respondents with
only one set, 30% reported having
conflicting interests with other adults
in the house. In multi -set homes, the
figures rose to 41%.
"The key difference, however," according to the report, "is the way this
conflict is settled. Among single-TV
households, the conflict is usually settled by compromise or the husband's
decision. In multi -TV households, the
family will usually split up and watch
different sets."
Women vs. Men
Programs that
most often cause husbands and wives
to split up include Peyton Place, soap
operas in general and variety shows,
serial form: 44% gave favorable comments, 43% unfavorable (among
those who had seen it). After reviewing the comments in detail, the researchers concluded: "It would seem
that continuing shows would start
with a basically limited appeal."
An hour was the length that most
respondents preferred for dramatic
productions (75% ) and variety shows
(65% ), on the primary ground that
an hour is needed to develop a plot
or present enough "variety." But a
half -hour was preferred for situation
comedies (73 %), principally because
they become "monotonous after half
an hour." A half -hour was preferred
to 15 minutes for national newscasts
(64% to 29 %, with the rest having
no opinion), but eight out of ten
respondents (82% ) considered current lengths "about right."
Commercial irritation appeared to
be "at a low level," with only 9%
citing "too many commercials" as
their reason for thinking TV was not
doing a good job.
Color Boom Although the study
was made before the full impact of
the 1965 color-set boom had become
apparent, it found color penetration
"rapidly on the increase." Six percent of the sample already had a
color set and 60% of these said
they had bought it within the past
year. In addition, 14% of the black and -white set owners said they probably or definitely would buy color
during the next year (in multi -set
homes, 27% of the respondents said
that if one set broke down they
would replace it with color). Among
color owners, one-third said they
which women tend to like much more
than men do, and Combar, sports and
westerns, which often are preferred by
men but not women. Programs they
both like include Bonanza, The Fugitive, movies, situation comedies, drama
and variety shows in many cases.
When children and adults disagree
on what program is to be seen, the
children in six out of ten single -set
households get their own way, while in
six out of ten multi -set households the
children
adults -go off to watch
the second set.
Children disagree among themselves
over programing in about 54% of the
homes, whether there is one set or
snore than one. But in two- thirds of the
single -set homes (67 %) these disputes
are settled by compromise, while in
-or
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
wouldn't watch a black-and -white
program if a color show was available.
Respondents who preferred NBC.
long the leader in color, were more
apt to own a color set than those
who favored other networks, and
color -set owners definitely preferred
NBC. But "intention to buy color"
within the next year was found about
equally among fans of all three networks, indicating that NBC's color
promotion does not increase the likelihood of its black- and -white viewers
buying a color-TV set, [although
when] respondents do buy color sets
they tend to become NBC fans."
In color-set homes, individual respondents tended to watch TV slightly less (19.9 hours a week) than
those in noncolor homes (20.8
hours). Most of the color viewing
was done on sets made by RCA.
Over half (56 %) of the color sets
were by RCA, slightly more than
one -fifth (22 %) by Zenith, the rest
by a half -dozen other companies.
The three TV networks were virtually tied in viewer acceptance.
CBS-TV affiliates were preferred for
local news and comedy and, to a
lesser extent, for variety. NBC -TV
affiliates were preferred primarily for
their national (network) news. ABC TV affiliates were thought best for
sports and children's shows.
Age seemed to be the biggest factor associated with choice of favorite
network. ABC scored highest in the
under-35 group, CBS in the over -50
group and NBC in the 35 -49 group.
Among the college- educated, CBS
ranked highest and ABC lowest,
while preference for NBC increased
slightly as educational levels advanced.
44% of the multi -TV homes the youngsters watch different sets and a negotiated peace is necessary in only 28%
of the cases.
"Although having more than one set
does tend to separate the family in its
television viewing," the report continues,
"there is reason to believe that it thus
decreases the likelihood of argument
among members of the family. When
respondents with two or more sets in
working order were asked the advantage
of having more than one set, the most
frequently mentioned advantage was
'prevents argument or disagreements'
(23 %). Other reasons given [included]
'we adults can watch our own program'
(20 %), 'children can watch their own
programs' (18 %) and 'can watch TV
in bed' (11 %)."
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
The importance of having more than
one set was also measured in other ways.
Asked what they would do if one of
their sets broke down and the cost of
repairing it was "quite high," 41% said
they would replace it immediately and
another 13% said they would replace
it within three months. In all, two thirds (65% ) of the multi -set respondents said they would replace the broken
set immediately or within one year,
while 19% didn't know and only 16%
said they would not replace it at all.
The most frequently mentioned effects
of a breakdown of the primary set
were "miss entertainment value" (27% )
and "can't have choice of programs"
(26% ) Fewer than 1% thought the
breakdown would be unimportant.
What is the multi -set owner like?
"Respondents most likely to have
more than one set," according to the
report, "are those in the 35- to 49-yearsold age group, those with children between 5 and 17 years of age, and families with incomes over $10,000 a year.
Those who chose an ABC affiliate as
their 'favorite' [in the April 1965 study]
are less likely to have two or more sets
than those who chose CBS or NBC.
"Of those respondents between 35
and 49 years of age, 42% had two or
more TV sets, compared to 28% for
both younger and older respondents.
Of those respondents who chose an ABC
affiliate as their favorite station, only
28% had two or more sets, compared
with 35% for CBS and 38% for NBC.
With Children "Over 4 in 10 (41 %)
of those respondents who had children
between 5 and 17 years of age had two
or more sets, compared to only 26%
of those respondents who had no children in this age group. Among respondents earning a total family income of
$10,000 a year or more, 41% had two
or more sets; 34% of those earning between $4,000 and $9,999, and only
16% of those earning under $4,000 a
year."
A total of 82% of the multi -set
houses have console models, 62% have
portables, and 31% have table models.
Among single -set homes, 63% have consoles, 22% portables, 14% table models
(1% unclassified). The living room is
still the primary TV -set location (56%
of the homes); the bedroom has almost
20% of all sets and 37% of the portables.
What does all this growth of multi set households and split -up viewing
mean for the broadcaster and advertiser? McHugh & Hoffman, which expects
the trend to gain momentum rapidly
over the next two years, thinks that,
for one thing, it poses problems in finding out exactly who is watching what,
and what kind of people they are.
This makes it essentially a problem
for audience -measurement services. Are
the fractionated audiences being accur.
ately measured? Do the services accurately report their demographic characteristics? As viewing moves out of the
living room and becomes more of an
all-over -the-house proposition, will viewers be willing or able to keep diaries to
give rating services the information they
need?
Need of Information
McHugh &
Hoffman contends that the rating services are already lagging:
"Not only will audiences be fragmented within the households, as is the
case with radio listening, but also audience measurement systems will have
to be revised to more accurately reflect this expanding audience. It is the
opinion of McHugh & Hoffman that the
current syndicated rating systems are
not measuring this viewing segment in
its true proportion at the present time
How two sets split viewing
First
Set
Respondent
Husband
Wife
Children
(nonspecific)
Son
Daughter
Family
Father
Mother
Other relatives
Adults
Company,
friends
Grandparents
Grandchildren
Don't know,
no answer
30%
Second
Set
12%
21
19
6
13
11
11
14
9
9
5
5
19
20
5
6
4
1
3
1
1
1
I
1
1
7
10
How the TV audience splits up
after a second set comes in to the
home is suggested in this McHugh
& Hoffman table based on 158
homes reporting both sets in use
at the same time within the preceding week. "Respondent" in all
cases was husband or wife, children the secondary unit. While
the unifying effect of one-set
viewing is being dispelled in multi set homes, other findings suggest
that color may bring some reunification, "at least until there are
cheaper and lighter color TV sets."
Nine out of ten color sets (89% )
were in the living room, as cornpared to seven of ten black -andwhite sets (69 % ). More black and-white portables were in bedrooms (37% ) than living rooms
(35 % ).
31
despite the fact that they indicate they
are making some effort to do so."
The study is the latest in a continuing
series of audience-research projects commissioned by McHugh & Hoffman to
gather material on which to base recommendations for a client list that includes major broadcast group owners,
independent operators and TV networks
in the U. S. and Canada.
The current study was based on 620
personal, in -home interviews, equally
divided between men and women, in
Atlanta, Buffalo, N. Y., Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles,
Miami, Milwaukee, New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis and Toledo, Ohio.
Half of the respondents were from
multi -set homes, half from single -set
households, so that comparisons could
be made between the two. Single -set
and multi-set households were brought
Multi -set homes increasing
Multi -set television homes throughout the U. S. represented 22% of all
TV households by Jan. 1 according
to a preliminary estimate made by
NBC and released last week (also see
page 29).
A year earlier multi -set households
had been 19.4% of all television
homes and two years ago, 17.6 %.
In the 54.2 million television
homes in the U. S., as of Jan. 1,
1966, there were 67.75 million sets
according to the report. The figure
had grown by 3.45 million sets dur-
'nto their proper proportions by weight'Jig the single-set homes. On a weighted
ing the past year.
As of the first of this year the average number of sets in TV- equipped
households was 1.25 and the average
number in multi -set homes was 2.14,
according to the NBC estimates.
With total homes in the country at
58.6 million, NBC's preliminary estimate of current television saturation
is placed at 92.5%.
Non -home TV sets -those located
in hotels, commercial establishments,
schools, etc. -were estimated at .2.6
million as of Jan. 1.
basis, 33% of the sample had more
than one TV set.
BROADCAST ADVERTISING
A big wind blows
on Madison Avenue
General Foods shifts $18 million in billings;
drops FC &B, adds Doyle Dane Bernbach, Grey
An estimated $18- million or more
General Foods' billings changed
hands in a broad agency reassignment
announced last Thursday (Jan. 13).
Agency sources indicated it was likely
that the budgets involved could be much
higher than the $18 million estimate.
Detailed breakdowns were hard to come
by but the TV billing alone could be
estimated at a possible $16 million.
For General Foods the shift in
product assignments was its most farreaching advertising- account decision
in years.
The advertiser is TV's third largest
investor. In 1965 GF allocated an estimated $72 million for network and spot.
General Foods is also a radio advertiser
and is in print, as well.
High points of the agency shuffle:
General Foods will drop one agency-Foote, Cone & Belding-and add
two -Doyle Dane Bernbach and Grey
Advertising. GF now will have five
agencies. Benton & Bowles, Young &
Rubicam and Ogilvy, Benson & Mather
are the other three.
Grey and DDB each get an estimated $9 million in billings. FC&B
loses $10 -11 million, B &B an estiin
32
mated $4 -$4.5 million, and Y&R some
$2.5 million.
Benton & Bowles, New York, according to authorities, bills about $30
million in General Foods business.
Some 90% of B&B billing is in broadcast (TV for the most part). While it
will lose Yuban coffees and Gaines
Meal, it will pick up in an expansion
of budget for other products (such as
Pop -Up-Toasts) according to knowledgeable spokesmen.
Foote, Cone & Belding agency,
which will lose all of its estimated $10
million worth of GF billing, was not
stunned by the news since it had apparently been aware that the account
was considering the move. But it was
clearly hurt.
A memo to the agency's staff from
William Chambers Jr., executive vice
president and general manager of
FC&B's New York office, said performance for GF had never been better
and noted some new GF business (Jell O products) had been added by the
agency over the past year.
Stock Drops
FC &B, a publicly
owned company listed on the New
York Stock Exchange, fell to 171/4 on
the day of the announcement after
closing a day earlier at 181/4.
Grey Advertising, on the other hand,
which stands to gain about $9 million
in billing, saw its stock gain one -half
point in over-the -counter trading, closing at 20 bid, 201/2 asked on Jan. 13.
Both General Foods and FC&B indicated that their parting of the ways,
after a 10 -year relationship, was over
product conflict. FC&B said it concerned the agency's handling of clients
who are considered by GF to be competitive. GF said it was "an unavoidable
difference
.
in respect to product
conflict to which no mutually agreeable solution could be found."
The "irresolvable policy conflict,"
GF added, necessitated withdrawal of
the business from FC &B. The change,
the company said, was "accomplished
in an equitable manner through an
orderly phasing out of business."
Doyle Dane Bernbach just before the
end of 1965 resigned an estimated $3.5
million of Quaker Oats business. At
that time, the move was thought to be
a clearing of the deck for a GF assignment (BROADCASTING, Jan. 3).
The Line-Up GF's formal itemization of its product assignments under
its new agency lineup:
Benton & Bowles: Instant Maxwell
House coffee, Post cereals, Gaines
Gravy Train, Toast 'Em Pop -Ups and
Birds Eye Sodaburst (last named now
in test markets). Gives up Yuban coffees, Gaines Meal.
Doyle Dane Bernbach: Dream Whip,
S. O. S., Tuffy, La France, Gaines Meal
and Brim (last named, a food drink, is
in test stage).
Grey: Yuban coffees, D-Zerta, pectins, Baker's chocolate and coconut,
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
"San Franciscans"
catch their
favorite sports
on KTVU
Sporting blood starts young and
runs high in the San Francisco -
Oakland market. And
4,000,000
fans get plenty of live, direct
coverage exclusively on KTVU.
Giants Baseball, Warriors Basket-
ball, Seals Ice Hockey, College
Basketball to name
a
few. That's
why their first choice in sports
viewing is KTVU, the Nation's
LEADING IndependentTelevision
Station.
Zu
SAN FRANCISCO -OAKLAND
Represented by H -R Television
a
Broadcasting Corporation stations:
WSB AM- FM -TV, Atlanta; WHIO AM.
;VCox
SSSS
WI00
AM-FM, Miami; KTVU, San Francisco -Oakland;
FM -TV, Dayton; WSOC AM- FM -TV. Charlotte:
WIIC -TV, Pittsburgh
Kool-Aid, Twist, Kool-Pops, Coffee
Sweet (in test marketing).
Ogilvy, Benson & Mather: Regular
Maxwell House coffee, Maxim (freeze dried instant coffee now being tested),
Gaines Prime, Start (orange- flavored
breakfast drink in test markets), Great
Shakes (test stage), Good Seasons
salad dressings, Shake 'n' Bake, Open
Pit barbeque sauce.
Young & Rubicam: Sanka, Gaines
Burgers, Postum, Tang, Jell -O gelatin
puddings and pie fillings, instant puddings, Whip 'n' Chill, Golden Egg custard, Minute Rice, rice mixes (some in
test markets) and Pastas (now being
tested), Log Cabin syrup, Birds Eye
fruits and vegetables, Awake. Gives up
Dream Whip, Baker's chocolate and
coconut.
FC&B has been handling such accounts as S. O. S., Tuffy, La France,
D-Zerta, pectins, Kool -Aid, Twist,
Kool -Pops, all of which were reassigned
to DDB and Grey, the new agencies.
Radio -TV
flight set
for investment bank
Further evidence of the belief that
broadcast advertising is good for the
investment banking business was offered
last week by a worldwide investment
firm.
Hayden, Stone Inc., New York,
opened a $750,000 campaign with
$100,000 of it earmarked for radio-TV.
The campaign also will include use of
national magazines, newspapers and
transportation displays.
The campaign anchors on Toni Ungerer's comic illustration of the flightless
dodo bird, prepared by Albert FrankGuenther Law Inc., New York.
Langdon Littlehale, advertising and
public relations director at Hayden,
Stone, said the purpose of the dodo
bird is to attract high- income investors
"who may be regarded as being relatively sophisticated in their approach to
the investment function."
Beginning today (Jan. 17), the campaign is allotting $40,000 to a five -week
TV flight on WCBS -TV and WNBC-TV,
both New York. A 10- second color
spot will be exposed weekdays twice on
WNBC-TV's .11 o'clock News and Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, and
on WCBS-TV in a 50-spots -per-week
package. Additional TV availabilities
are being sought in Miami for $8,000
to $10,000 and on the West Coast for
$30,000 to $40,000, he said.
Radio investments by Hayden, Stone
will include over $10,000 for a permanent sponsorship on WEZE Boston five
days a week in a five -minute financial
and business report.
34
(BROADCAST ADVERTISING)
AFM rates for ads
jump 10% to 15%
Terms for a new three -year contract
covering American Federation of Musicians members employed in radio jingles
and spot TV commercials have been
agreed upon by officials of the AFM
and representatives of principal advertising agencies. Wage increases granted
ranged from 10%
to 15 %.
Herman Kenin,
president of the
AFM, announced
details of a new
three -year pact
last Friday (Jan.
14)
following
three days of negotiations (CLOSED
CIRCUIT, Jan. 10).
The contract be-
Mr. Kenin
comes effective on
Feb. 1.
The agreement provides that instrumentalists will be granted an approximate 10% raise with the rate for one hour sessions jumping to $36 for five
men or more; $39 for two to four men
and $72 for one man. The rate for
sidemen will be increased by about
15 %, rising to $41.56 per day under
the new contract. Mr. Kenin added
that rates and working conditions for
copyists and orchestrators also have
been improved, but did not provide details.
Mr. Kenin said there had been "substantial improvements" in contract provisions dealing with fringe benefits.
The AFM reportedly had sought an
All- purpose film
The Celanese Corp. of America, New York, is attempting a
tie -in of theaters, television and
television advertising for an 11minute color film it has commissioned. Called "Design For Dreaming," the film's message for Celanese nylon is communicated
through a ballet created and executed by the Robert Joffrey Ballet Co. Produced by Spectra Films.
New York, the film will be released initially to theaters in February and then offered to TV stations. Subsequently, Spectra will
edit the film footage for 30- and
60- second TV commercials for ex-
posure on TV stations throughout the country.
overall 15% pay increase plus other
benefits that would have added further
to the costs of music in commercials.
The chairman of the industry negotiating committee was Marion Preston
of J. Walter Thompson, representing
Commercial Contractors Inc., a wholly
owned subsidiary of JWT. Other members of the committee were Harold J.
Saz of Ted Bates & Co., chairman of
the American Association of Advertising Agencies Subcommittee on Union
Codes and Negotiations; Jane McNamara, McCann- Erickson; Philip L.
Tomlin, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather; Vincent J. Connelly, Dancer-FitzgeraldSample and Lewis H. Titterton, Compton Advertising. In addition, Edwin M.
Marshall, AAAA assistant vice president for broadcasting, served as an observer for the AAAA.
Long -planned agency
merger takes effect
Rumrill Co. and Charles W. Hoyt
Co. last week announced they had effected their long -pending merger into
Rumrill-Hoyt Co., New York. Annual
billings of the new agency are estimated
at $30 million. Merger terms for both
employe -owned agencies were based
on an exchange of stock.
Plans for the merger were disclosed
last summer by Charles L. Rumrill,
president of Rumrill, and Everett W.
Hoyt, president of the Hoyt agency
(BROADCASTING, Aug. 30, 1965).
Rumrill was reported to bill $22
million and Hoyt $8 million. About $7
million of the overall billing was estimated to be in radio -TV. The new
agency, employing 300 persons, has
leased additional space at Rumrill's
New York headquarters at 380 Madison
Avenue. The agency will have branch
offices in Rochester, Utica and Buffalo,
all New York.
Principals in the merged agencies include Mr. Rumrill, who becomes president and chief executive officer; Mr.
Hoyt, chairman; Donald Miller, executive vice president in charge of New
York operations; Gene Novak, executive vice president in charge of creative
services. The four make up the agency's
executive committee. Winthrop Hoyt,
chairman of the Hoyt agency, becomes
special assistant to Mr. Rumrill.
Rep. appointments
...
WJRL Rockcord, Ill.:
Time Sales, New York.
Advertising
WBIX Jacksonville, Fla.: National
Time Sales, New York.
Km, Seattle: Robert E. Eastman &
Co., New York, effective Feb. 1.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Ever heard of Top 40 7'V?
Well, we practically have it. According to the current NSI summary*
WMT-TV has 34 of the top 40 nighttime shows (ranked by homes reached).
You might not know it from the figures but we really are a three -station
market.
*Data derived from audience surveys are
estimates subject to sampling & other errors.
See complete report (NSI Cedar Rapids
Waterloo Oct/Nov '65) for details.
-
WMT -TV
Cedar Rapids-Waterloo
CBS Television for Eastern Iowa
Represented by the Katz Agency
Affiliated with WMT-AM, WMT-FM;
K-WMT, Fort Dodge.
Why retailers are moving into TV
TVB'S
ABRAHAMS TRACES A SLOW BUT ACCELERATING TREND
There are three major reasons that
retailers seem slow to move into television advertising.
They are print-oriented and business is still good.
They lack production knowledge.
In local papers stores look as good or
better than national accounts. They
want to look good in TV but don't
know how to attain this appearance.
Their problems are not understood
by local TV stations that try to reform
the stores instead of trying to adjust to
the retailers' problems.
But these shortcomings are being
overcome and there is evidence of a
changing attitude
toward media by
retailers, resulting
in increased interest in television.
Spelling this
out, Howard P.
Abrahams, vice
president for local
sales of the Television Bureau of
Advertising, last
week cited six
Mr. Abrahams
points that retailers are taking into consideration with the result that "local television is growing, slowly ... but surely."
He specified that:
Customer movement from city to
suburb is continuing and TV reaches
both at the same time.
Retailing executives are talking
about total market and total promotion
media. "Talk leads to doing something."
"Stores want the young market.
TV owns that market."
Younger people, who are taking
over important advertising posts "grew
up in a television- awareness era. They
are not print- indoctrinated."
Television can point to case histories in all categories: big stores and
small stores. "They have become pat terns."
Stores are looking at their cost to
reach customers. "Instead of comparing the price of a page vs. the price of
X commercials," stores are finding that
"TV is cheaper on a cost -per -thousand
basis."
Mr. Abrahams, who was manager of
the National Retail Merchants Association's Sales Promotion Division for nine
years, feels that the movement into
television advertising by large retail
chains is a spur to the entire industry.
Three Good Examples He cited the
Sears, Roebuck campaign, begun in
1963, of "Sears has everything." This
36
(BROADCAST ADVERTISING)
corporate move activated interest by
many Sears stores, and the "list of
Sears stores in television continues to
grow."
Montgomery Ward has a monthly
TV service to stores which is similar in
application to the home -office issued
newspaper print book. "An increased
number of Ward's stores use television."
J. C. Penney creates about 18 commercials a year tied to events and specific items. These spots become a part
of a campaign which is used by Penny
stores in about 100 markets.
He noted that "one closely knit group
of independents recently reported that
out of 15 stores surveyed, two stores
will slightly reduce their air media in
1966, one store will use the same dollars, but 12 stores will increase; some
will increase radically.
To help the retailer, and get more
advertising dollars into television at the
same time, he said TVB has been working on a three -stage concept.
The first part of the plan, begun
several years ago, was to urge stores
to run saturation tie -ins with their regular events. "This they understood.
These commercials were simple to create
because they did not require showing,
demonstrating and promoting items
just plain announcements of events."
The second stage was geared to promote stores to convert their newspaper
advertising into television. "This meant
-
The sandwich concept
RECOMMENDED BASIC
THEMED COMMERCIALS
60 seconds
Opening
intro
On
Film
Live, pre-taped or slide.
for .tore, department,
Closmg
or item
Film
Ende Joined together to make
Closing
OS
Music
Opening
Intro
Film
On
20- second Institutional
On
Film
spot
\ne
Muele
Muelc-'
20 seconde
Opening
Intro
On
Film
Music
Event or
Rem or
Slide, Live or Tape
Music "Under'
60 seconde (or 10 second.)
Opening
Cm
Flint
Music
Live, pre -taped or slides
for store, department,
Closing I. omitted.
Music "Under
t, Items.
starting with newspapers, something
they knew, and letting the camera move
on still art. R. H. Macy, New York,
still uses this method-successfully."
TVE is now in the third stage of its
TV indoctrination program. This entails
commercial creation based on the "sandwich concept," a method that Sears and
other stores have already had success in
using.
How It Works The strength of the
sandwhich concept is in its similarity
to print advertising. The three main
areas of a print ad are the headline;
merchandise, event or feature (the body
copy); and the signature. Translated
into television the headline becomes the
intro, the body remains the same and
the signature is the closing.
Since national advertisers produce results by creating good commercials and
then repeating them, TVB's sandwich
plan provides for intros, either the sanie
or similiar, to be used repeatedly;
changing the body copy as often as desired; and using a closing "with some
variations" repeatedly.
"Layout, art and copy establish a
character theme for print advertising,"
Mr. Abrahams said. "The opening and
closing do this for TV. In addition, for
television, a musical theme is important to tie each commercial together
and establish store identity.
An example of retailer use of this
concept is Knapp's of Lansing, Mich.,
which went beyond these basic steps and
created nine "sandwiches" covering
fashions, infants to teens, home furnishings, store for men, store for women,
men's furnishings, gifts and two on
corporate image.
All the commercials have a family
resemblance to each other in their visuals, they all have a musical jingle and
all have a standard closing. In addition
Knapp's made them all in color.
Even More Mr. Abrahams pointed
out that Knapp's "topped TVB's recommendations" by making the spots
full minutes. Then each was edited to
10 and 20- second lengths. As a result
the store has 27 separate color commercials "with flexibility for institutional or merchandising and for lengths
of announcements. This gives Knapp's
sufficient variations for a campaign to
be used for a year or longer."
This sandwich concept, he added, is
designed to "create a set of professional
network-caliber
commercials
which any retailer would be proud of,
which any retailer would want to repeat
and repeat. Then for his daily needs,
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
TVB offers some proof of the pudding
Illustrative of how some retailers
are successfully using television are
these examples from the Television
Bureau of Advertising.
John A. Brown, Oklahoma City.
The store's chief reason for using
TV is to open new charge accounts
in the state. John Cory, sales promotion manager, said: "We opened
more out-of -city accounts and I attribute this directly to TV, which
was the main reason I recommended
it in 1962." The store promotes
day -to-day items on TV and uses
the medium to build events like
back -to- school and anniversary sales.
The store's weekly schedule runs
from 20 one -minute spots to more
than 30 one -minute and 16 20-second spots on WKY -TV and KOCO -TV,
both Oklahoma City.
Foley's, Houston. TV is a "major factor" in the store's media budget, says Lee Dubow, publicity director. The store has been in TV
since 1950 and Mr. Dubow says the
he merely inserts the 'meat' in the
'sandwich.' "
As one store learns from another, it
joins the ranks of TV users. For TV,
it means "a definite increase in retail
television in 1966," Mr. Abrahams
said. "And we have just begun to
scratch the surface."
As the program goes,
so go commercials
New proof that audience "liking" of
a television program enhances the ef-
fectiveness of commercials on that TV
show was offered last week.
Speaking to the New York chapter
of the American Marketing Association
last Thursday (Jan. 13), Henry Brenner, president of TVQ, supported his
contention by citing a recent and previously undisclosed study by International Latex Corp. He said that this
advertiser attempted to prove the relationship "in the best possible way
by measuring brand switching."
"The International Latex study shows
those liking the program switching to
the advertised brand about 40% more
than people who feel the show is average in appeal and about 200% more
than people who do not like the show,
even if they do have it turned on," he
reported.
Mr. Brenner, whose TVQ research
-
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
"real value of being on television
every week . . . is that it is continuing."
Foley's sponsors the 10 p.m. news
three times a week on KPRC -TV and
often carries spot schedules on all
three Houston stations: KPRC -TV,
KHOU -TV and KTRK-TV.
R. H. Macy & Co., New York.
Macy's began experimenting with
TV in 1955, says John Blum, senior
vice president. In 1959 the store
went to TV on a regular basis using
flights of spots, every week, two or
more days a week, to sell large
quantities of advertised goods on the
following day. Mr. Blum feels that
"advertisers have been buying less
and less with their newspaper dollar.
The long -term spiral in rate increases
has been accompanied generally by
losses in circulation and, as a result, cost per thousand has been going up and up and up."
The initial test of TV, he adds,
showed the medium could do what
organization has been testing TV programs for eight years in terms of "liking" or "disliking" them, said he "stumbled on" the International Latex study.
He noted he had received permission to
report on the portion of the study that
dealt with the question: "How good a
measure of commercial effectiveness is
program liking?"
The study was conducted over a period of a year by International Latex
among 8,800 housewives in 13 cities.
The respondents viewed 42 commercials
for brands in four product categories
(bras, girdles, gloves and Isodettes) on
three daytime network programs. The
study was originally designed to provide
information to Latex on viewer reaction
to the commercials and the question on
"program liking" was added before the
interviews began.
The respondents were interviewed
before exposure to programs and commercials and after exposure to determine whether "program liking" had
affected their attitude toward the commercial brands.
Mr. Brenner cited statistics to show
a definite correlation between "liking a
program" and brand switching, and said
there was a variation -but not much
from one Latex product to another.
"Remember, the commercials and the
program compared are the same," Mr.
Brenner stressed. "The only difference
is the program opinion of the respondent."
-
Macy's wanted, "that each dollar
of our investment in the medium
on the average, must be capable of
returning $10 and plus over normal
sales of the advertised merchandise
the very next day."
Rich's Inc., Atlanta. Rich's first
used TV in 1949, but it has been
recently that the TV ad expenditure
has gone up. "Over the past five
years," Loring Blackstone, publicity
business manager, says, the TV ad
budget has increased "rather dramatically, adding a year-round schedule of prime -time spots and news
shows to the sporadic spot schedules
we formerly used."
On Atlanta stations Rich's sponsors a five-minute newscast on WACATv Sunday evening, and 10-minute
6 p.m. newscasts on WSB-TV Tuesday
and Thursday. In addition 10-,20-,40 and 60- second spots are carried on
WAIL -TV, WACA -TV and wsB -TV during
the week. During a week as many
as 32 commercials may be carried.
Retailers shown how
TV sells to teen -agers
TV -"it's the 0000nly way to sell,"
according to two representatives of the
May Co., Los Angeles.
Cortland Peterson, vice president of
sales promotion and publicity, and Toni
Tacoma, fashion director, used the teenage vernacular, to describe the May
Co.'s identification techniques behind a
teen-age TV special, Fashion -a- Go-Go.
The May Co., they told the National
Retail Merchants Association convention in New York last week, co -sponsored a one -hour show immediately
after Sam Riddle's Hollywood- a-Go -Go
program on a local TV station. The
show featured Mr. Riddle in the store's
own format but with different entertainment. The store's teen -age and college board members acted as audience
and models wearing May products. Instore promotion and daily TV spots
before the show helped attract attention,
they said.
This experience directed to the teenage market, they said, has helped "to
identify with them in order to attract
their buying power." They indicated
that "unless there is a radical change
in media appeal, we'll increasingly plan
promotions for TV or radio, because
these are the teen media."
37
Bristol -Myers backs ETV series
TV's second biggest advertiser grants $250,000
to WNDT(TV) to produce 12 programs on the arts
The second biggest advertiser in commercial television is going to get its feet
wet in educational TV.
Bristol-Myers Co., New York, which
spent $76.7 million in TV in 1965, according to Television magazine estimates (second only to Procter & Gamble's $160 million), has earmarked
$250,000 for the production of 12 programs on the performing and fine arts.
The series, Sunday Showcase, begins
March 6 on WNDT (Tv) Newark, N. J.New York, at 9 p.m. The Bristol -Myers
grant will also cover the costs of mak-
by slide and voice -over that the program was "made possible" by the company.
Biggest Corporate Grant
WNDT
hailed the grant last week as its biggest
from corporate sources for a special
program series.
Two other major TV advertisers
Phillip Morris and Shell Oil -have underwritten news programing on WNDT.
Their participations have run out. According to WNDT, no special corporate
financing of costs, other than B-M's, is
now associated with the station.
-
pany will use extensive TV in its
major markets beginning this month.
Pretested Promotions, New York, has
named Helitzer, Waring & Wayne, same
city, as its agency. The firm, which
will concentrate on product promotions
for regional supermarket chains, plans
to use local spot TV, newspapers and
sales promotion aids.
Anheuser -Busch Inc., St. Louis,
names D'Arcy Advertising there to
handle table syrup advertising account
that bills over $1 million. Account
moves from C. J. LaRoche, New York.
Loew's Theaters, for its New York
chain of movie houses, has appointed
Charles Schlaifer & Co., New York, as
its agency replacing West, Weir & Bartel, New York, effective Jan. 31. The
account bills approximately $1 million,
with about $200,000 of this amount
spent in radio -TV.
Case -Swayne Co., Montebello, Calif.,
names Davis, Johnson, Mogul & Col ombatto Inc., Los Angeles, to handle
its line of canned food products. Plans
for advertiser include heavy use of
broadcast media.
Business briefly
...
California Avocado Advisory
Board, through McCann- Erickson Inc.,
Los Angeles, and the Cling Peach Advisory Board, division of the Cling
Peach Industry of California, San
Francisco, through BBDO, same city,
will start a month-long coast -to-coast
joint promotion in 12 major markets
in February. There will be four-week
schedules of spot radio in Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, Atlanta, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Kansas
City, Houston, Denver, Seattle, and
Portland, Ore.
The
Mr. Frost
Mr. MacBain
ing the programs available to other noncommercial TV stations. ETV stations
on the list to receive the tapes are:
Boston, wrrw Chicago,
WGBH-TV
KCET Los Angeles, WHYY Philadelphia,
WQED Pittsburgh, KQED San Francisco,
and WETA-TV Washington. Other cities
are expected to be added.
A Responsibility
In a formal announcement, Gavin B. MacBain, president of Bristol-Myers, said the company
was convinced that "television advertisers particularly have a definite obligation in the development of educational
television programing, with its pioneering and creative influences on other,
more widely viewed television forms."
Don Frost, Bristol-Myers vice president, said the ETV allocation would be
charged against corporate public relations. He said the series was not considered a "product-selling vehicle and it
is not being charged to product advertising budgets."
Mr. Frost said the idea "originated
with our own people and
we hope
it will encourage other corporations to
do the same." He said, however, that
Bristol -Myers was not actively asking
other corporations to underwrite ETV
programs.
Bristol-Myers will receive the customary on -air credit of five seconds
before and after each program, noting
...
38
(BROADCAST ADVERTISING)
Mr.
Kiermaier
WNDT emphasized the grant was
hardly a reprieve for its long- depressed
financial status. Last year it received a
special $500,000 appropriation from the
Ford Foundation to help it stay on the
air.
John Kiermaier, president of
WNDT,
said. "Our need for support from the
public and other recurring sources has
not in any way lessened."
Each of the 12 programs will run 90
minutes to two hours. WNDT will repeat
each program once during the week
following its Sunday telecast. Sunday
Showcase will mark a return of WNDT'S
Sunday operation (it's been dark on
Sundays for the past two and one half
years and recently also on Saturdays)
with the station filling in with other
programs from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m.
Mr. Kiermaier said three of the
Showcase programs would deal with
theatrical drama, three would be produced in association with Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New
York, three would be devoted to the
fine arts and three would appraise the
status of the arts in the world.
Agency appointments
...
Laddie Boy Dog Foods Inc., Glendale, N. Y., has appointed Firestone
& Associates, Philadelphia. The corn-
The Abbey of the Genesee, Piffard,
N. Y., licensors of Monk's bread,
through Cancilla, Gore & Knapp Inc.,
San Francisco, starts a five -month spot
TV and radio campaign this week. First
advertising will be in eight major markets in central and southern Florida
where as many as 40 radio spots will
be broadcast each week in each market.
A schedule of from 6 to 10 spots weekly
will run on TV in Miami. A similar
campaign will begin about mid-February in 17 Eastern and Midwestern
markets.
Santa Barbara Savings & Loan Association through Sachs, Finley & Kaye
Inc., Beverly Hills, Calif., has started
a major campaign with the theme of
responsible financial management. Advertising expenditures primarily will be
for spot radio on six AM radio stations in three California markets. The
campaign includes 300 60- second spot
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1969
WFGA-TV won 10 major
television news awards in 1965.
Delta Chi Distinguished Service Award for Television Reporting.
2. National Headliners Medal for Consistently Outstanding Local TV Coverage of News Events.
3. Green Eyeshade Award for Outstanding Performance in News, Editorial,
and Pictorial Journalism (Southeastern Region) Presented by Atlanta Chapter,
Sigma Delta Chi (Bob Henry, recipient).
4. Florida Sportscaster of the Year (Walt Dunbar, recipient) selected by
Sportswriters and Sportscasters Association.
5. First Place in "News Specials" category, in competition sponsored by
National Press Photographers Association, World Book Encyclopedia, and
the University of Oklahoma.
6. First Place, News Category, selected by Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Association.
7. First Place, Sports Category, selected by Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Association.
8. First Place, Editorials Category, selected by Florida Associated Press
Broadcasters Association.
9. First Place, Documentaries Category, selected by Florida Associated Press
Broadcasters Association.
10. First Place, Features Category, selected by Florida Associated Press
Broadcasters Association.
1. Sigma
If there were an award for
giving away color, we'd win that, too.
We're mighty proud to have won these awards. And
we're proud of the fact that we're the Southeast's
most colorful station! Agreat combination! See your
Peters, Griffin, Woodward "Colonel" for details.
WFGA-TV /JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE'S AWARD -WINNING STATION
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
- NATIONALLY, REGIONALLY, LOCALLY.
39
AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
TO NATIONAL ADVERTISERS
from
KTLA
A
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REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY
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ATLANTA CHARLOTTE MINNEAPOLIS
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with HUGH BRUNDAGE, HAL FISHMAN, DICK ENBERG
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OLDEN WEST TELEVISION BRINGS YOU ON
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YOUR
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,
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announcements per week on Santa
Barbara radio stations KTMS, KIST and
KDB; Ventura stations KUDU and KVEN
and Port Hueneme station KACY.
Nationwide Insurance Co.'s, Columbus,
Ohio, through Ogilvy, Benson &
Mather, New York, will co-sponsor
the Our Man Godfrey segments of CBS
Radio's weekend Dimension program
service throughout this year. The fiveminute segments, featuring Arthur
Godfrey, are scheduled five times each
weekend.
Anheuser -Busch Inc., through Gardner Advertising, both St. Louis, for the
14th consecutive year will advertise
Budweiser Beer on the Ivy Radio Network. A total of 600 one-minute spots
will be broadcast nightly throughout
the academic year on campus stations
at Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Brown,
Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania.
The Cudahy Packing Co., Phoenix,
through Dancer -Fitzgerald- Sample, New
York, will sponsor its second Bar-S
Jamboree country and western special
to a lineup of 32 stations, mostly in
the West and Southwest, beginning
Jan. 21. The one -hour program, starring Roy Acuff, Minnie Pearl and other
performers will be taped live at KocoTV Oklahoma City. Cudahy's first Bar-S
Jamboree was telecast in October 1965.
NBC Radio participations announced
last week include P. Lorillard Co.,
through Lennen & Newell, both New
York, in NBC News on the Howl Coty,
through West, Weir & Bartel, both New
York, in NBC News on the Hour and
Emphasis, and Martinizing Dry Cleaning Division of McGraw Edison Co.,
Elgin, Ill., through Ralph H. Jones Co.,
Cincinnati, in Monitor. Martinizing is
using network radio for the first time.
Newly announced participations in
NBC -TV programs include Revlon Inc.,
through Grey Advertising, both New
York, in Tuesday Movies, Laredo, The
Dean Martin Show, The Sammy Davis
Show and Sunday Movies; Colgate Palmolive Co., through Norman, Craig
& Kummel, both New York, in 12
prime -time programs; Rath Packing
Co., Waterloo, Iowa, through Earle
Ludgin & Co., Chicago, in The Scherer MacNeil Report; Dow Chemical Co.,
Midland, Mich., through Norman, Craig
& Kummel, in seven prime -time shows
and The Frank McGee Report, and
Champion Spark Plug Co., Toledo,
Ohio, through J. Walter Thompson Co.,
New York, in Run for Your Life, Tuesday Movies, Dean Martin, I Spy, Saturday Movies and The Wackiest Ship
in the Army.
.
through BBDO Minneapolis, plans heavy use of radio -TV
3M Co., St. Paul,
42
(BROADCAST ADVERTISING)
spot in New York, Chicago and some
New England markets starting late this
month for new scouring pad, Rescue.
John Morrell & Co., meat packer,
through Allen, Anderson, Niefeld &
Paley, both Chicago, plans radio spot
campaign in 42 major markets next
month to promote its fifth annual "His
and Her" sweepstakes featuring a long
list of dual prizes led by his and her
airplanes.
The Chemstrand Corp., Decatur, Ala.,
through Doyle Dane Bernbach, New
York, will sponsor Color Me Barbra,
a taped color special starring Barbra
Streisand, on CBS -TV on March 30,
9 -10 p.m. EST.
Transit strike
impact slight
Many say it had no effect
on radio -TV, but reps report
traffic flow was down 40%
The impact of New York City's 12day transit strike on TV-radio business
appeared to be relatively light in terms
of financial losses. But there was some
divergence of opinion last week among
advertising agency, network, station representative and Station. ófficials.
The predominant view was that if
there was a decline in business placed
it was a modest one and affected a
small number of stations because of a
special circumstance associated with
the strike, such as the failure of a commercial to arrive on time or of a spot
schedule to reach a station.
The overriding view of agencies was
that the strike, which ended last Thursday (Jan. 13), had not slowed down
the tempo of TV -radio placements.
They claimed that with a high percentage of employes reporting for work,
particularly key personnel in the TVradio departments and with overtime
duty, they were able to conduct their
business with little or no displacement
of scheduled commercials.
A check of members of the Station
Representatives Association indicated
that traffic flow in spot activity was off
by an estimated 40% during the strike
period, compared to the last four or
five weeks of 1965. But it was also
noted that an unascertainable amount
of business was deferred and would be
made up, rather than missed. These
sources estimated that the strike might
have a 7% to 10% negative effect on
January spot billings.
Some Delay Some, but by no means
all, station reps voiced the view that
some schedules had been delayed and
may be lost in the long run because
agencies had been hit by absences at
the clerical level.
"But that's something we probably
never will know," one rep official said.
"When we look over our books later,
we may find that we're down 5% or
about even with last year. But we have
no way of determining if we would
have placed more business or less business if there had not been a strike. But
I personally have the feeling that the
strike has had at least a slightly negative
effect."
There was virtually unanimous ac-
knowledgement that doing business was
more complicated and more expensive.
Some firms rented hotel rooms for some
personnel and hired cars to carry others
to and from work. Agencies, representatives and networks agreed there was a
slow -down in paper work.
Film Picture
There were several
reports that commercial schedules were
impeded because of delays in delivery
of filmed commercials from production
houses to distribution centers. But
Harold Klein, executive director of the
Film Producers Association of New
York, tended to discount these reports.
A check of his member companies,
which produce the large majority of
filmed commercials in the New York
area; revealed there were a few delays
of minor importance, Mr. Klein said.
"In fact, January is a slow month for
commercial producers and they reported that they were well staffed and
could have used business," Mr. Klein
added.
There were reports from station
operators outside of New York that
several agencies had sent personnel to
various major markets to make sure
their campaigns started on schedule,
but these were said to be precautionary
measures to guard against any possible
delays.
TV -radio network officials reported
they had not lost any contracts though
day -to-day "mechanics" had moved
slowly.
Calif. Angels' radio -TV
bought for $1.8 million
Three companies will sponsor the
1966 broadcasts of the California Angels baseball games on KTLA(TV) Los
Angeles and a radio network of 19
Southern California stations.
Cost of the package buy is $1.8 million.
The sponsors are: United California
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
The Great New
Phoenician Series
'
NEW Solid -State, All -Band, Trunkline Amplifiers
Featuring unsurpassed serviceability and flexibility Unique design for easy "foolproof conversion
Die -cast aluminum casing, all- weather and moisture -proof
Universal -type fittings to accommodate all popular sizes and types of cable.
THE OUTSIDE STORY
The new "Phoenician"
series combines rugged
construction, unusual sereiceability, and dependable
performance under all oper-
ating conditions. The
3
sealed access ports permit
internal probe measure
t?X
°
aAl `.''
ment in any weather without
exposing the entire internal
parts. Fittings of new design
and moisture -proof seal are
backed by Kaiser -Cox war
ranty. (Patent applied for)
The new Kaiser -developed
aluminum alloy used in
fittings is impervious to
corrosion.
The Kaiser-Cox Phoenician series
ready NOW. The SOLID products
you can DEPEND on , ..!
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>
THE INSIDE STORY of the Phoenician Amplifier series. Modular construction of the "plug -in" type allows complete interchangeability from trunkline amplifier to 2 and 4- output
bridging amplifier
or combinations of trunkline and bridging
amplifier (with or without AGC and automatic tilt). Built -in
knob type controls eliminate the need for screwdrivers, plug-in
pads or accessories.
-
.
SOLID PERFORMANCE! The new Kaiser -Cox "Phoenician"
series works as well as it looks
CATV's finest all -band,
"human- engineered" amplifier. The Phoenician series is your
(from
head -end to tap -off)
assurance that your CATV system
will deliver maximum signal quality with minimum degradation at all times. Low noise figure- minimum cross -modulation
CASCADEABILITY PLUS
these are the results
products
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close tolerances, rigid specifications, quality control. An excess of 25,000 man-hours of engineering research and development, unrelenting purchasing standards and production
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KAISER-COX PRODUCES CATV EQUIPMENT
IT IS NOT IN THE FRANCHISE BUSINESS
KAISER -COX CORPORATION / P. 0.
Box 9728, Phoenix, Ariz. 85020, Phone (602) 944 -4411
DEPEND ON KAISER -COX FOR CATV LEADERSHIP TODAY AND TOMORROW
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
43
Bank, through Erwin Wasey Inc., both
Los Angeles; Busch Bavarian beer, St.
Louis, through Gardner Advertising Co.,
Los Angeles, and Standard Oil Co. of
California, through BBDO, both San
Francisco.
Radio and television rights for the
Angels first season in their new Anaheim stadium have been acquired by
Golden West Broadcasters Stations. A
total of 185 preseason and regular season games will be broadcast over Golden
West -owned KMPC Los Angeles and a
network of 18 other radio stations.
Golden West's KTLA will televise 30 Angel games live and in color. Last year
the same station televised 11 of these
games.
ARF plans to publish
Milwaukee Ad Lab study
The Advertising Research Foundation plans to publish results of experiments it is conducting with the Milwaukee Advertising Laboratory.
The plans were reported last week in
an ARF "commentary" describing
technical details of the formation and
operation of the research laboratory,
which is an experimental project for
measuring advertising effectiveness. The
project was created by the Journal Co.,
licensee of WTMJ- AM -FM -TV Milwaukee
and publisher of the Milwaukee Journal. ARF assisted in the planning and
development.
The laboratory consists of two
matched markets in the Milwaukee
area and enables advertisers, through
the use of signal -tripped muting devices
on TV sets and split runs in the newspaper, to send different advertising messages into each. Consumer panels in
the two markets keep records of their
purchases, which indicate to the participating advertisers the effectiveness
of the different messages (BROADCASTING, Dec. 16, 1963, et seq.).
The "commentary" was prepared by
ARF's Committee on Improving the
Measurements of Advertising (CIMA),
which assisted in the formation of the
laboratory.
THE MEDIA
Self -regulation held
best path on ratings
Harris sees no reason to get the government
further into policing of audience measurements
No new legislation is called for in the
long- awaited report on the ratings hearing of the House Subcommittee on Investigations. The report does ask, however, that the Broadcast Rating Council
and the audience -measurement firms
work closely with the Office of Statistical Standards of the Budget Bureau to
improve sampling techniques (CLOSED
CIRCUIT, Jan. 10).
Representative Oren Harris (D -Ark.)
issued the report last Thursday (Jan.
13) in his last official act as chairman
of the House Commerce Committee.
Chairman Harris then turned over the
gavel to Representative Harley O. Staggers (D-W. Va.), who will serve as new
chairman of the committee. (Representative Harris will resign from the Congress on Feb. 3 to become a federal
judge in Arkansas [BROADCASTING, Jan.
3].)
Mr. Harris has long been an exponent
of self- regulation as opposed to regulation by government agencies. The report says: "There is no reason at this
time to force the burden of ratings
regulation onto the shoulders of government."
On self-regulation the report says:
.. broadcasters, networks and advertisers and their trade associations prior
to the hearing did little if anything to
ascertain whether or not the rating surveys on which they placed such heavy
44
reliance in conducting their business affairs were reasonably accurate. It must
also be noted, however, that following
the hearing [they] individually and collectively, rendered an outstanding service to their respective industries and to
the public in initiating and carrying out
a program of self-regulation.
"The program of self-regulation . . .
undertaken with regard to broadcast
measurement activities is rather unusual
in this respect: It is self -regulation in
the broadest meaning of the term. Actually it is regulation by the users of
such services rather than by the services
themselves. While the services have cooperated in the regulatory effort and
have borne some of the expense, they
have by no means demonstrated any
initiative in bringing about these regulatory programs. On the contrary, it
appears that even at the present time
some of the services appear still unconvinced that the regulatory efforts
constitute a significant contribution toward achieving more reliable rating results. In considering what steps should
be taken to assure the continuing improvement of rating operations, it will
be important for the subcommittee to
be mindful of this attitude."
The report goes on to say that the
ratings industry "might conceivably"
be regulated by federal statute and a
federal agency. But the subcommittee
feels that government regulation probably would not be any more effective
than "a well-administered program of
industry self-regulation." And it concludes that there is no federal agency
now discharging functions closely related to those performed under the rating council's program and legislation
calling for such regulation would not
be in the public interest.
The report adds, however, that both
the FCC and the Federal Trade Commission should vigorously enforce their
rules governing certain aspects of the
ratings industry. Whenever violations are
uncovered, the guilty should be made to
"suffer the consequences."
The report deals at length with the
formation and the work of the Broadcast Rating Council, which it says was
formed as a direct result of the 1963
hearing.
Continuing Surveillance According
to the report, the Congress will take a
look at the ratings industry in the area
of legislative oversight "on a continuing
basis."
The report cautions broadcasters on
the "quality of the rating tool that they
use and the use they make of it." Broadcasters, the report states, "must become
more sophisticated with regard to the
rating tools which they employ."
Broadcasters are given a pat on the
back for their "increased acceptance of
this responsibility by some . . . even
to the extent of promoting formal academic seminars especially designed to
acquaint broadcasters and other users
of ratings with the basic principles and
limitations of rating procedures."
The Responsibility
And the subcommittee gives itself credit for "the
improvements in the broadcast- rating
picture which have been made in the
last three years and which have been
due primarily, if not entirely, to the
investigations and proceedings conducted by this committee."
The report deals with the auditing of
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Most
Poll- Winning
Jazz Composers
license
their music
through BMI
BRUBECK, EVANS, LEWIS, MINGUS, MONK,
NELSON, RUSSELL and innumerablè óther
composers who make jazz an expression
of emotion and imagination have elected to
license their music through BMI.
We pay
tribute to them and to the many
other pollwinriing composers,whóse
talent brings credit to us and tö.thousands
of their fellow affiliated composers in
all fields of music.
All the worlds of music
for all of today's audience.
BMI
BROADCAST MUSIC, INC.
both radio and television market reports
and says that the rating council has
found a very close relationship in the
TV reports of the various services, primarily in the reports of the A. C. Nielsen Co. and the American Research
Bureau.
This, according to the report, speaks
well for the ratings firms. But it mentions the possible errors inherent in the
sampling techniques. Among these are
"aging, when the report is taken from
the same identical sample each time;
the nonreturn factor in the use of the
diary technique, and the failure of memory in the telephone-recall method."
The report also takes to task the size
of the sample audience but finds that
"there is very little improvement in the
accuracy of the sample over 1,000"
persons.
Ratings services for radio, according
to the report, are most in need of improvements. And the subcommittee
urges further research into this area so
that "more reliable ratings can be produced."
The subcommittee states that much
talent and money have been contributed
to the research projects to eliminate
defective procedures. It adds: "These
efforts must not be permitted to be
abandoned or reduced. On the contrary, they ought to be strengthened if
all aspects of radio and television are
to be high quality."
The report concludes that some form
of informal coordination must be
achieved by the FCC, FTC and the
rating council in the area of ratings. It
says: "As a minimum the BRC and the
two agencies should exchange information with regard to complaints received
by them concerning ratings."
Stauffer acquires
Amarillo stations
The sale of KGNC- AM -FM -TV Amarillo,
Tex., to Stauffer Publications Inc. was
approved by the FCC last week. The
Amarillo facilities were sold to Stauffer
by Roy N. and S. B. Whittenburg
(BROADCASTING, Oct. 18, 1965), whose
Plains Broadcasting Co. acquired the
original AM station in 1935. Stauffer
paid $5.6 million for the stations plus
$300,000 for a five -year agreement not
to compete. Chairman E. William
Henry abstained from voting and Commissioner Robert T. Bartley did not
participate.
Stauffer Publications, which publishes
a chain of newspapers in Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and Oklahoma as well
as several national farm publications,
Outstanding Values
in Radio -TV Properties
UPPER
Daytimer in single station market. Controlling interest can be bought for
$58,000 with as little as $10,000 cash
MIDWEST
$58,000
down.
This daytimer with fulltime FM will
pay for itself. Buy all the assets for
$135,000, or controlling interest for
$75.000. Terms available.
NEAR THE
An owner-operator who enjoys selling
and civic responsibilities will do well
with this property. Daytimer at $75,000
with terms.
IN THE
ROCKIES
$135,000
DAKOTAS
$75,000
Company, Inc.
RADIO
TV
CATV
NEWSPAPER BROKERS
NEGOTIATIONS
FINANCING
APPRAISALS
WASHINGTON, D.C.
CHICAGO
ATLANTA
James W. Blackburn
Jack V. Harvey
Joseph M. Sitrick
H. W. Cassill
William B. Ryan
Clifford
B.
John G.
Williams
Hub Jackson
Eugene Carr
Mont' Building
1655 Peachtree Rd.
873 -5626
333 N. Michigan Ave
346 -6460
46
(THE MEDIA)
WDIO to go on air Jan. 24
as ABC -TV affiliate
WDio(Tv) Duluth, Minn., will make
its on-air debut Jan. 24 with 316 kw
visual, 158 kw aural on channel 10. Affiliated with ABC -TV, the new outlet
will be equipped for network, slide and
film color.
Frank Befera, president and general
manager of the station, said WDIO will
operate from a new studio-office building designed for TV. The main portion
of the building is 68 feet by 139 feet
and contains a 40 foot by 60 foot studio
with drive -through facilities. A 27 -foot
by 41 -foot wing houses the lobby and
executive offices.
WDIO has an 838 -foot tower and is
represented by The Katz Agency.
Changing hands
ANNOUNCED
BLACKBURN &
RCA Building
333 -9270
owns W1BW- AM -FM -TV Topeka, KSEK
Pittsburgh and KSOK Arkansas City, all
Kansas, and KGFF Shawnee, Okla. Stauffer entered the broadcast field in 1957
when it acquired the wow stations by
buying Capper Publications.
In addition, Willard W. Garvey and
family, who own 4.85% of Stauffer
Publications, own KKA t Pueblo, KKFM
(FM) and KKTV(TV) Colorado Springs,
all Colorado.
The Whittenburgs, who are publishers of the Amarillo News and GlobeTimes and Lubbock (Tex.) Avalanche
and Journal, continue to own KFVO Lubbock.
KGNC, which originally went on the
air in 1922, operates fulltime on 710
kc with 10 kw. KGNC -FM, on 93.1 me
with 14.1 kw, was added in 1958. The
12- year-old KGNC -TV operates on channel 4. All the stations are NBC affiliates.
BEVERLY HILLS
Marshall
Colin M. Selph
G. Bennett Larsen
Bank of America Bldg.
9465 Wilshire Blvd.
274 -8151
The following station
sales were reported last week subject to
FCC approval.
WKFR-AM -FM Battle Creek, Mich.:
Sold by Knorr Stations to Joseph A.
Waldschmidt for $375,000. Knorr Stations also owns WKNR -AM -FM Dearborn
and WKHM -AM -FM Jackson, Mich. Mr.
Waldschmidt is president of Page Communications Engineers, Washington, and
owns Engineering Investment Corp.,
Potomac, Md. WKFR went on the air in
1925, operates on 1400 kc, with 1 kw
daytime, and 250 w nighttime. WKPRPM went on the air in June 1963 at
103.3 me with 20 kw power. Broker
was Hamilton- Landis & Associates.
WHON Centerville, Ind.: Sold by
Wayne County Broadcasting Corp. to
James R. Brewer for $150,000. Wayne
County Broadcasting is owned by Pierce
BROADCASTING. January 17, 1966
E. Lackey, F. Ernest Lackey, Thomas
Graham and W. E. Wilson. Messrs.
Lackey own WPAD -AM-FM Paducah,
WHOP, wRLx(FM) Hopkinsville, WSONAM-FM Henderson, all Kentucky, and
WRAJ -AM-FM Anna, Ill. Mr. Brewer
owns wrc.r Tell City, Ind. WHON went
on the air in February 1964, operates
daytime on 930 kc with 500 w. Broker
was Hamilton-Landis & Associates.
The following transfers
of station interests were approved by the
FCC last week (For other commission
activities see FOR THE RECORD, page
APPROVED
86).
KGNC- AM-FM -TV Amarillo, Tex.: Sold
by Roy N. and S. B. Whittenburg to
Stauffer Publications Inc. for $5.9 million (see opposite page).
Sold by Dick
Gilbert to Rene Cote for $341,250. Mr.
Cote lives in Pawtucket, R. I., and has
held interest in radio stations in Putnam
and Willimantic, both Connecticut.
Contract includes $148,250 for station
facilities and seven -year noncompetition
agreement plus $193,000 to Mr. Gilbert personally for 10-year consultation
contract. KYND operates on 1580 kc
with 50 kw day and 10 kw night. Broker was Hamilton- Landis & Associates.
waiver of the CATV rules.
IT TAKES A NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
TO GET NATIONAL SALES!
KYND Tempe, Ariz.:
"Brokered by Hamilton- Landis & Associates, Inc."
...
is a tag line you frequently see on sale announcements in the trade
press. Sometimes the credit line gets lost-therefore, we want to immodestly call your attention to three such sales made during the past
sixty days.
$1,000,000.00 -Plus
The Mining Journal
The Escanaba Daily Press
The Iron Mountain News
(All Michigan)
WFOx Milwaukee: Sold by Marine
Capital Corp. to Eugene W. Murphy
and Herbert H. Lee for $260,000. Mr.
Murphy is vice -chairman of Gateway
Transportation Co. Mr. Lee is 85%
owner of WKTY La Crosse, Wis. WFOx
was sold to Marine Capital and others
in 1962 for $385,000. In 1964 Marine
Capital became 100% owner by buying
out remaining stockholder for $25,000.
Station went on the air in August 1946
and operates daytime on 860 kc with
250 w.
new CATV rules, an oral argument
was held on whether they should be
applied to Teleprompter, in view of
the hearing.
The answer last week was no. The
majority was composed of Commissioners Rosel H. Hyde, Lee Loevinger
and James J. Wadsworth, with Commissioner Robert T. Bartley concurring
in part and dissenting in part. Commissioner Kenneth A. Cox, in a dissenting
statement in which Chairman E. William Henry and Commissioner Robert
E. Lee joined, held that Teleprompter
had failed to demonstrate a ground for
the signal of KTvc(rv) Ensign, Kan.,
some 50 miles from Liberal.
The system had already been carrying the station's signal. But it had also
been duplicating the station's CBS programing with that of KFDA -TV Amarillo,
using a microwave obtained before the
commission began attaching conditions.
Krvc had asked the commission to
require Teleprompter to provide non duplication protection as a condition
for obtaining the new microwave facilities. The review board, however, held
that the station had not demonstrated
it would suffer economic injury.
After the commission adopted its
Sold
Sold
$1,100,000.00
KSOL, San Francisco, California
$341,250.00
Sold
KYND, Tempe, Arizona
During the same sixty days we also handled:
$360,000.00
ii
WALT, Tampa, Florida
$165,000.00
WZOE, Princeton, Illinois
Teleprompter CATV
victory may be short
Teleprompter Transmission of Kansas
Inc. has won its fight for a relatively
unrestricted grant of microwave facilities to serve its community antenna
television system in Liberal, Kan.
But the victory may be short- lived,
since conditions may be attached when
all microwave licenses come up for
renewal on Feb. 1.
At issue are Teleprompter applications for renewals and modifications
of licenses for microwave facilities used
to relay signals of Amarillo, Tex., TV
stations.
The commission by a 4 to 3 vote last
week affirmed a review board decision
granting the applications subject only
to the condition that the CATV carry
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
$50,000.00
KTHS, Berryville, Arkansas
(Undisclosed Amount)
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
The Ski Safe Company of San Franci=s
"
Jii/
J
--
& ASSOCIATES, INC.
John
NEGOTIATIONS
WASHINGTON, D.C.
1737 Desales St., N.W.
EXecutive 3 -3456
F.
Hardesty- President
FINANCING OF CHOICE PROPERTIES
APPRAISALS
CHICAGO
Tribune Tower
DElavare 7 -2754
RADIO TV CATV
^4Gl//iLIGI br!irGISN
1"/
iiJ/
DALLAS
1511 Bryan St.
Riverside 8-1175
SAN FRANCISCO
111 Sutter St.
EXbrook 2.5671
NEWSPAPERS
J.P//tCP//teceiv((!'.(.hIG
%d9tfilfC(/JgQ
4%
a ARB
estimates, November'65,
subject to qualifications on request.
(Daytime: 9 am4 pm, MOn-Fri)
InStLouis,
the more things
change...
Some two billion dollars' worth
of major construction, under way
or planned, is helping to shape a
new, revitalized St. Louis.
The keynote is Eero Saarinen's
magnificent 630 -ft. stainless steel
arch now nearing completion...
a soaring tribute to St. Louis as
the Gateway to the West.
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the more things
stay the same.
The importance of KMOX-TV
to advertisers in this growing
market, for one.
Take daytime. Year after year
after year, KMOX-TV remains
the number one viewing favorite
of daytime audiences. At last
report' KMOX-TV commands
an overwhelming 48% daytime
audience share in a 4- station
market, twice that of its nearest
competitor.
Among women, KMOX-TV
enjoys the giant share in all age
brackets: 48% daytime share
of women 18-34; 53% of women
35 -49 and a 47% audience share
among women over 50.
Actually, KMOX-TV leads the
market throughout the entire
broadcast day...with a sizeable
37% total day share. Total day,
KMOX-TV now delivers 15%
more homes than a year ago!
In St. Louis, put your money
where the audience is, and has
always been... srimOX Tv
Channel 4, St. Louis /CBS Owned. Represented
by CBSTelevision Stations National Sales
Call to arms:
FCC's coming
Commission's muscle -flexing
prompts NCTA to send
23 board members on road
Alarmed community antenna operators and owners throughout the country
were scheduled to meet last Friday and
Saturday (Jan. 1415) with a single purpose: Stop the FCC.
The crisis meetings, arranged by the
National Community Television Association following a special NCTA board
meeting in Washington on Sunday, Jan.
9, were scheduled for eight major cities.
The NCTA board met to determine
strategy for the CATV industry in the
light of reports that the FCC plans to
establish its jurisdiction over all cable
companies. The commission is expected
to take up this subject on Feb. 7
(CLOSED CIRCUIT, Jan. 10).
At present, the FCC has imposed
conditions on CATV operations under
its authority to regulate the microwave
relays that feed many cable systems. It
had delayed the second phase of its
CATV consideration -what to do about
those cable systems that do not use
microwaves-until after the 89th Congress's first session. That ended Oct. 23,
1965 without any action by the Communications Subcommittee of the House
Commerce Committee. The subcommittee, which is headed by Representative
Walter Rogers (D-Tex.), held hearings
last year on a bill (HR -7715) introduced by Representative Oren Harris
(D-Ark.), chairman of the parent Commerce Committee, that would circumscribe FCC regulation of CATV
(BROADCASTING, June 7, 1965).
One of the reports that jolted community antenna owners is that the commission is considering limiting the distance from which TV signals may be
imported into a community. This would
be in addition to the imposition of conditions similar to those now applied to
CATV systems fed by microwave systems (carriage of the local station on
the CATV lines and the prevention of
CATV's from importing from distant
stations any program duplicating a
locally scheduled show for 15 days before or after local broadcast).
War Parties At each of the eight
"regional" meetings board members of
the NCTA were to deliver the official
line to CATV owners that Congress is
the only agency authorized to spell out
the FCC's jurisdiction over CATV.
Cable operators were to be asked to so
advise their own congressmen.
South Carolinians meet their representatives
Congress went back into session
last week, but even before some
legislators regained their Capitol
bearings, a group from the South
Carolina Broadcasters Association
went to Washington to meet with
members of their state's congressional delegation. Attending a luncheon
50
(THE MEDIA)
meeting in the Capitol building
Thursday (Jan. 13) were 22 SCBA
representatives, four legislators and
four members of the National Association of Broadcasters.
Standing (I to r) : Dr. Richard
Uray, SCBA executive manager; Jim
Rope, WYMB Manning; John Daven-
Here are the meetings: New York,
with board members A. J. Malin, Albert J. Ricci, Robert J. Tarlton, D. D.
Palmer, George J. Barco, Charles W.
Fribley Jr., and Irving B. Kahn; Cincinnati, Archer S. Taylor and Buford
Saville; Atlanta, Douglas B. Danser,
Robert J. Jumegan, and J. Leonard
Reinsch.
Also Dallas, Ben J. Conroy Jr. and
Jack R. Crosby; Kansas City, Mo., Robert L. Weir, John Morrissey and Robert
M. Clark; Minneapolis-St. Paul, Frank
P. Thompson; Portland, Ore., Mrs. Pat
Hughes and Bob J. Magness; Los
Angeles, Bruce Merrill and Harry C.
Butcher.
Broadcaster sells paper
The Kansas City Star has acquired
the Great Bend (Kan.) Daily Tribune,
an evening newspaper with a circulation
of 10,000 daily, 11,000 Sunday. Purchase price was not disclosed. The
Tribune also has a morning edition,
Western Kansas Press, with a circulation of 3,500.
Owners of the Tribune, Will L. and
Russell T. Townsley, own 46% of
KvoB Great Bend, Kan., and 100% of
the Russell (Kan.) News. Neither the
radio station nor the other newspaper
was involved in the Kansas City Star
purchase.
port, WESC Greenville; Clarence
Jones, WQIZ St. George; William Arrington, WMRB Greenville; Douglas
Anello, NAB general counsel; Wade
Alley, WMYB Myrtle Beach; Bill
Quinn, warw(rv) Florence; Edith
Hilton, wciu Winnsboro; Dwight
Snyder, WCKM; Joe Martin, wnsc
Dillion; Wayne Sawyer, WGCD
Chester; Paul Comstock, NAB vice
president for government relations,
and Alderman Duncan, SCBA executive secretary.
Seated (1 to r): Frank Harden,
wts Columbia; Joe Wilder, WBAW
Barnwell; Russ George, wow Columbia; Curtis Sigmon, WYCL York;
Alvin King, NAB director of state
association liaison; Cleatus O. Brazzell, WELP Easley; Vincent Wasilewski, NAB president; Hub Terry,
WJOT Lake City, SCBA president;
Senator Strom Thurmond (R); Senator Donald S. Russell (D); Representative Tom S. Gettys (D) ; Representative Albert Watson (R); Redd
Reynolds, WBLR Batesburg; John
M. Rivers, wcsc Charleston; Tom
Richards, WACA Camden, and H. S.
Bowden, WACA.
BROADCASTING, January 17,
1966
An uprising in
the Black Hills
CATV subscribers protest
FCC rule
that denies them
signals they were used to
FCC regulation of community antenna television systems is bringing in
its wake protests from cable subscribers
who suddenly find themselves looking at
pictures of substandard quality or having viewing habits disturbed.
Twice in the past two weeks the commission, acting on urgent appeals from
Black Hills Video Corp., modified orders requiring that company's CATV's
to protect local television stations. The
company, which also provides the microwave service, said the cable systems
were losing subscribers by the score.
One order affecting the Rapid City,
S. D., system came after a field engineer
from the FCC Denver office was sent
on an over-New -Year's-eve trip to
check on allegations that a protected
station was not putting out a usable
signal. The CATV, which on its own
responsibility had dropped the station
from the cable and resumed carriage of
a Denver outlet, was concerned about
viewers missing their accustomed diet
of New Year's Day football games.
The commission at the end of a bit-
terly contested hearing had granted
Black Hills microwave licenses on condition the CATV's they serve protect
the local stations (BROADCASTING, July
5, 1965). Black Hills complained this
would impose an economic hardship on
the systems, and has appealed the order
to U. S. Court of Appeals (BROADCASTING, Nov. 1, 1965). The company's
parent, Midwest Video Corp., has filed
another suit, challenging the legality of
the CATV rules (BROADCASTING, June
28, 1965).
Instant Trouble Black Hills on Dec.
31 began carrying KOTA -TV (which
broadcasts CBS and ABC programs)
and KRSD -Tv (which broadcasts NBC
programs), both Rapid City, in nearby
Ellsworth Air Force Base, and giving
them 15 -day before-and-after nonduplication protection. In Rapid City itself,
the system was required to provide the
stations simultaneous -only nonduplication and to carry only KRSD -TV.
"Within hours after the KRSD -TV
channel was put on the cable," Black
Hills counsel Max Paglin wrote the
commission, "the CATV system received 110 telephone calls from subscribers demanding restoration of the
Denver NBC signal or cancellation of
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
their service, and 15 notifications of
cancellation."
On Jan. 6, the commission, acting on
the letter and on the report of the field
engineer who made the on- the -spot investigation, deferred "until further order" the requirement that the cable
carry the KRSD -TV signal or protect it
against duplication.
Then, on Jan. 11, Mr. Paglin sent a
wire requesting relief for both the Poplar Bluff and Rapid City systems. He
said KPOB -TV Poplar Bluff, Mo., which
was being protected, was not putting out
a usable signal and that "over 300 subscriber complaints" had been received
in the four days since that station had
been on the cable. He said many subscribers threatened to cancel.
Losses Mount
In Rapid City, he
said, the loss of customers "continues
alarmingly." He said cancellations totaled 125 in the first week after KOTATV had been put on the cable. Viewers,
reportedly, were disturbed at the disruption of their viewing of CBS and
ABC programs from Denver. Four hundred complaints, principally from Ellsworth Air Force Base, were reported.
A day after getting the wire, the commission granted until Jan. 27 a stay of
the carriage and nonduplication protection previously ordered for KPOB -TV
Poplar Bluff. But it denied the same
relief requested for the system serving
the Air Force base. It also required the
system to continue giving KOTA -TV simultaneous nonduplication protection in
Rapid City.
In other areas of the country hostile
viewer reaction to commission CATV
regulation is either developing or simmering. The commission has received
scores of letters from viewers in Baker
and LaGrande, both Oregon, complaining about the regulation to which the
local CATV may be subjected when
the common carrier feeding it has its
license renewed on Feb. 1.
Taylor to address NAB
General Maxwell D. Taylor,
special consultant to the President
and former U. S. ambassador to
South Vietnam, will be the luncheon speaker on the final day of
the National Association of Broadcasters 44th annual convention in
Chicago, March 27 -30.
General Taylor, who was also
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, will address the Wednesday
management luncheon in the
Conrad Hilton hotel. He was
chairman of the joint chiefs from
1962 to 1964 and was an ambassador from 1964 to mid-1965.
NAB budget
nears approval
Finance committee calls
for $2.4 million; joint
board has final say
A 1966 -67 budget of $2,393,000
has been proposed for the National
Association of Broadcasters. It will be
put before the NAB joint board at its
meeting in Palm Beach Shores, Fla.,
Jan. 24 -28. The proposed budget, approved by the finance committee at a
two -day meeting in Washington last
week, calls for anticipated expenditures
of $2,253,000, leaving a surplus of
about $140,000.
This compares with $2,275,000 income and $2,205,000 expenses in the
current fiscal year producing a surplus
of $70,000.
A major fiscal item on the committee's agenda included approval of
the building committee's proposal to
spend $1.8 million for construction of
a new NAB headquarters building on
the present site and adjoining NAB owned parking lot (CLosED CIRCUIT,
Jan. 3). The joint board will have the
final say on the plans that call for
a seven-story edifice with two belowground levels. The building would have
about 46,000 square feet of usable
space and would have interior parking.
Included in the $2,393,000 budget
are recommended dues increases for
the radio and television codes, which
have had to dip into existing surpluses.
The increases, according to one member of the finance committee, are `very
few in dollars, although fairly big in
percentage."
The changes would also call for
slight increases in the maximum fee
for radio code members (now $216),
and the minimum ($300) and maximum ($1,200) for TV code members.
There is no radio minimum.
Surplus Dwindles Code -fee increases
have been sought for the past year
by Howard Bell, director of the code,
who brought the subject up prior to the
1965 winter board meeting.
At the end of the current fiscal year,
March 31, the radio code will have
used up its existing surplus for its
$16,008 budget. The TV code, although dipping into the surplus for
$78,778 of its $405,344 budget this
year, still has some in reserve.
The purpose of the raise is to make
the codes self- sustaining and to increase services to members. The radio
code has been a matter of some con51
tern since it is felt that increased work
will be needed there, particularly in
copy clearance. The increases for both
codes should also allow for increased
monitoring of stations.
It was understood that the requests
of the public relations and research
departments for increased funds for
new programs had been held over until the board meeting. The research
department's current budget is about
$200,000 and the PR budget is about
$57,000.
Lessons learned
from blackout
More broadcasters should
prepare themselves for
They're watching more
Daily viewing per TV home last
year reached an average of 5
hours 29 minutes, a new high. According to Norman E. (Pete)
Cash, president of the Television
Bureau of Advertising, the figure
represented an increase of four
minutes over 1964's average and
16 minutes over 1963's.
TVB said the new annual average represented 290.7 million
hours of time spent with TV per
day by all U. S. households during 1965. In pointing up the color
explosion of 1965, Mr. Cash said
TVB's figures as of Jan. 1, 1966,
showed 63% of all stations could
originate color commercials in
some form. He predicted that by
the end of this year, color capability would climb to 80 %.
emergency operations
Many radio broadcasters truly showed
their professionalism during the massive
power failure that blacked out the entire northeast section of the country the
night of Nov. 9 -10, 1965. They switched
to emergency power and kept the public
informed. But not all broadcasters were
heroes. And for the future, more of
them must shoulder the responsibility
for preparations to cope with similar
emergencies.
These are some of the conclusions
and recommendations contained in a
report on broadcasters' experience during the blackout, which a broadcasting
services committee of the National Industry Advisory Committee has submitted to the FCC. NIAC is an industry
group that advises the commission on
defense-communications matters.
The report said that within two hours
of the blackout's start, 187 signals
110 AM, 45 FM and 19 TV-were
covering the affected areas with news
and information. Of these, 55 had not
been knocked out.
But 78-48 AM, 18 FM, and 12 TV
-had been, and were able to resume
operations with emergency power within 15 minutes. Of the 174 AM's licensed
to operate at night, 64 reported they
were disabled throughout the emergency. Thirty of the area's 51 TV stations
and 96 of the FM's were off the air for
the duration.
"By and large, stations which continued operating or which returned to
the air within 15 minutes of the failure,
performed a vital service for which they
have received praise and commendation
from officials and from the public," the
committee said.
Many Unprepared
But, it continued, "too many broadcasters were un-
-
52
(THE MEDIA)
prepared for the predicament in which
they found themselves. Far too many
were at a loss as to what to do and
how to conduct themselves."
The group also recommended that at
least one station in an area have additional auxiliary power. This was said
to be particularly important in cases
where a station holds a National Defense Emergency Authorization, which
permits it to operate during a wartime
emergency.
The report formed part of a larger
report concerning all aspects of the
blackout, which affected 30 million people in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and several areas of
Maine, Pennsylvania and New Jersey
and into Canada. The commission released the report last week.
The report on broadcasting was based
on a 90% response to questionnaires
sent immediately after the blackout to
517 stations in the area -298 AM's,
168 FM's, and 51 TV's.
It concentrated on the impact on
AM's, because of the lack of time for a
wider study and because relatively few
FM and TV battery- powered receivers
are in the hands of the public.
The report also noted that radio and
TV networks and wire press services
were active in mobilizing their staffs
and gathering important information on
the power failure. Network news originations continued from New York or
were switched to cities unaffected by
the blackout. Network television operations were hardest hit.
The committee cited two examples of
what it said were "many illustrations of
exemplary operation" during the emergency. The stations were identified only
as "Station A" and "Station B."
Station A returned to the air 45 seconds after losing power through an
automatic auxiliary-power generator
which the station had maintained and
regularly tested since acquiring it 20
years ago.
The station, which normally follows
a music- and -news format, was giving
the public news within minutes of the
breakdown. In part its success was due
to the cooperation of a nearby network
affiliate, that was off the air. The affiliate made its network feeds available to
Station A, which was able to carry national news.
Station B Station B was on the air
within three minutes of the power failure and its news department was providing news of the blackout within 30
minutes. For one period of six hours
staff announcers and newsmen provided
continuous news of the blackout. In the
period, 40 separate broadcasts were
aired from key points in the area, including the governor's office.
Complete facilities were made available to state and local officials, for
broadcasting to the public. In many
instances, the reports relayed by stations
from mobile units were the first "authentic reports" officials received.
Suggestions Broadcasters supplied a
variety of suggestions for dealing with
future emergencies.
The most ambitious called for a synchronous satellite for national coverage.
Daytimers used the occasion to recommend again that they be permitted to
operate from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., instead
of from sunrise to sunset as at present.
Other broadcasters recommended permitting stations using different day and
night directional -antenna patterns to use
the daytime patterns at night to reach
a wider audience during an emergency.
Other recommendations: Install radio
links to police, fire and civil defense
headquarters. Establish state and /or
regional networks using EBS facilities
for local emergencies. Redesign EBS
monitors for battery operation. Establish a single source of reliable information to feed all stations with information
during an emergency.
The four- member committee which
prepared the report on broadcast services: Earl B. Abrams, BROADCASTING
magazine, chairman; Arthur Barriault,
radio -TV networks; George Bartlett,
National Association of Broadcasters,
and Granville Klink, WTOP Washington.
Mr. Klink was also one of three cochairmen of the MAC group responsible for the overall report which was
prepared under the supervision of Defense Commissioner Lee Loevinger. The
other co- chairmen were Elmer Pothen,
AT &T, for common carrier services,
and Joseph M. Kittner, communications
attorney, for safety and special radio
services.
BROADCASTING, January 11, 1966
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OF LAN S
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Colonel John D. Craig
54
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
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We are pleased to present this excitingly
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WLW -T in Cincinnati, WLW -I in Indianapolis,
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and secure the valuable franchise of the new
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BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
CLEVELAND, OHIO 44115
PHONE: 216 -241 -6660
55
A flurry of CATV activity in California
TWO COMPANIES ANNOUNCE EXPANSION, THIRD PLANNING
Three California community antenna
television companies were active in
three separate moves last week. Involved are local operations, out-of-state
installations and a company that's just
looking.
Malibu -Cable TV Inc., Malibu,
Calif., has started a half -million -dollar
modernization and rebuilding campaign
in Los Angeles county. It's part of an
overall $1 million program which hopes
to bring the biggest CATV system in
the world to the Los Angeles area by
next year. Projections call for as many
as 25,000 subscribers in Malibu Beach
alone.
Since last August the company has
bought four existing small CATV systems operating in Bel Air, Beverly Hills,
Malibu Beach and Hollywood. They
were TV Master Antenna, Teletenna
Corp., Community TV Reception and
Malibu -Cable TV. It's now operating
with a total of about 10,000 subscribers.
Malibu-Cable TV Inc. has interconnected ownership with both Ameco Inc.
and American Cable TV Inc., both
Phoenix. Ameco supplies equipment for
the California systems and American
Cable manages the operation. Bruce
Merrill, president of Ameco, is majority
owner of American Cable.
A short distance from Malibu Beach,
in Pacific Palisades, Community Cable casting Corp. announced a new addition
to its growing operations. Purchase was
made of a CATV system serving some
2,100 military and civilian personnel at
Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. Reportedly the price paid for the property
was less than $500,000.
Coast to Coast According to Leon
N. Papernow, president of Community
Cablecasting, the Eglin system will be
linked to a contiguous system in Fort
Walton Beach, Fla., previously acquired
by the company. This would give Community Cablecasting about 6,000 subscribers in the area and create a subscriber potential in excess of 13,000
dwellings. Common -carrier microwave
relay service bringing additional Alabama and Florida TV channels to subscribers of the systems is planned.
CCC was founded by Mr. Papernow
in July 1965 shortly after he left H &B
American Corp., where he was vice
president in charge of operations. The
company already has spent more than
$3.6 million for the acquisition and development of CATV and microwave
facilities. In Mr. Papemow's folio so
far in addition to the two Florida systems, are a CATV operation in Ohio
and a microwave system which originates south of New York City and
56
(THE MEDIA)
serves dropoff points along the eastern
seaboard. Already being served by this
latter system are points in New Jersey
and Delaware.
The California -based company has
announced intentions to invest up to
$10 million for CATV and microwave
facilities. It is now negotiating for
whole or partial interests in big -city
CATV operations.
Also hoping to buy CATV properties
is Kaufman & Broad Building Co., Los
Angeles.
Sanford Levine is in charge of Kaufman & Broad's CATV interests. The
company is publicly owned and listed
on the American Stock Exchange. It
has experienced tremendous growth in
the last seven years climbing from $4.3
million in sales in 1958 to more than
$30 million in sales in 1964.
tentative
okay in Little Rock transfer
FCC gives
The FCC by a 4 to 3 vote has given
tentative approval to the purchase of
KARK- AM-FM -TV Little Rock, Ark., by
Denver broadcaster John C. Mullins. In
the process, the commission rejected a
staff recommendation that some commissioners regarded as a "novel" approach to the overcommercialization
issue.
Mr. Mullins, owner of KBTR and
Denver, is seeking to buy
the Little Rock stations for $3.75 million. He intends to finance the purchase price with a $7.5 million loan,
some of which would be used to retire
an existing debt of $3.6 million.
Mr. Mullins says he will repay the
debt out of earnings of the Little Rock
and Denver stations, as well as from
the revenues of an outdoor advertising
business he owns.
But the staff had recommended the
commission question Mr. Mullins on
how he could pay off the debt and
still make a "fair return" without violating his commercial proposal, which
is to stay within the time standards in
the National Association of Broadcasters' codes.
Chairman E. William Henry and
Commissioners Lee Loevinger, Rosel
H. Hyde and Robert E. Lee, however,
reportedly felt that was not a desirable
way of getting at the overcommerciali zation issue. They said it would be up
to Mr. Mullins to keep his promise
and that the commission would be able
to review his performance at licenseKBTV(Tv)
-
renewal time.
Accordingly, the staff was instructed
to prepare an order dismissing a petition to set the application for hearing
and providing for the grant. The petition, filed by the Arkansas Citizens and
Advertisers Protest Committee, had opposed the sale on the ground the station would have to run a heavy schedule of commercials to pay off the debt
(BROADCASTING, Oct. 11, 1965).
Newhouse moves into
CATV cross ownership
Cross ownership of two major microwave relay systems serving community
antenna systems in New York and
portions of Pennsylvania is foreseen
in the near future.
Key to the combination, which will
run over 300 miles, is the purchase
by Eastern Microwave Inc. (owned by
Newhouse Broadcasting Corp.) of a
50% interest in New York Penn Microwave Corp. The Newhouse group, which
already serves central and northern New
York CATV's, paid in excess of
$75,000 for the half interest in the
New York Penn system, which serves
cable companies in southern and western New York state and northern and
western Pennsylvania. New York Penn
is owned by Warren L. Fribley Jr., who
will retain the other 50%. Mr. Fribley
owns the CATV system in Corning,
N. Y.
An application for FCC approval,
filed last month, is pending commission
approval.
The Newhouse microwave relay runs
from near Binghamton, N. Y., through
Syracuse (where Newhouse owns WSYRTv) to Ogdensburg, N. Y. It serves
about 15 CATV systems.
The New York Penn route serves 18
CATV systems.
Two TV's, three AM's
in new broadcast group
Formation of a new broadcasting
group was announced last week.
Southern Broadcasting Co. combines
group broadcaster Winston -Salem
Broadcasting Co. and Southern Broadcasters Inc., licensee of wom'-Tv High
Point, N. C. (channel 8).
Southern Broadcasting Co. will own
the High Point TV station and the following Winston -Salem Broadcasting
radio stations: WTOB Winston-Salem,
N. C., KTHT Houston, and wsoN Birmingham. It takes over the 331%
interest Winston -Salem Broadcasting
had in wBMG(TV) Birmingham, Ala.
Winston-Salem Broadcasting formerly
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
get
in,
before
it's
out
Broádcasdny
Perspective
'66
February
21
here's why
Every year, Broadcasting, the television and radio newsweekly, analyzes the prospects for the
industry during the coming year, and looks through fine, clear glass at the highlights of the
previous year as well.
This year, Broadcasting features Perspective 1966 in its February 21st issue
enlightened reader and advertiser.
-a must for every
Feature articles include:
A penetrating look at the
ahead. Will Vietnam
affect broadcast advertising?
What can new taxes do to advertising volume?
1 year
own esti2 Broadcasting's
mates of network, spot and
local advertising billing during
1965.
Television 1966. How long
the boom last? Will
there be a fourth network this
year? What about CATV and
3 can
the big- market audience? Does
pay -tv have a chance?
Radio 1966.
4 open
up new
lose program ownerships? Will
the FCC cut back group station ownership? Will govern-
Will research
ment tighten its grip on
horizons for
radio this year? Is a crack appearing in the solid format programming system? Can radio
justify increased advertising
rates?
programming and commercialization?
12th annual
6 Broadcasting's
look at station sales; past,
present and future.
Washington 1966. A critical
year in the making of broadcasting regulatory policy. Are
big broadcasting advertiser discounts illegal? Will networks
5
detailed look at some ad7 Avertising
campaigns, large
and small, that paid off in television and radio last year.
One would be hard put to find a broadcasting or advertising executive who's not interested in the
features of this Perspective issue.
If you have something to say or sell to this important group, February 21st is the time to do it and
the Perspective issue of Broadcasting is the place.
Roaming
Perspective
'66
February
21
in-
Get
before you're out.
Call or wire
one of our
"in" salesmen
today and
reserve your space.
owned 56.4% of WGHP -TV; an Erie,
Pa., group, headed by John W. English
and George J. Mead, owned 35.8% of
the High Point TV station, and the
remainder was owned by Greensboro,
N. C., businessmen. Last summer the
Winston -Salem group bought out the
Erie group, paying over $1.2 million
for this interest. The FCC approved
this transaction and the merger last
September, but it was consummated
Jan. 5. Mr. Mead is president of WSEE
(Tv) Erie, Pa. (channel 35).
James W. Coan was elected chairman
of the new company. He also continues
as general manager of WGHP -TV. John
G. Johnson, who was president of the
Winston -Salem Broadcasting Co., is
president of Southern Broadcasting Co.
Other officers of the new company:
Adrian E. Cox, secretary-treasurer and
controller; Bob Jones, vice president
and general manager of WTOB, assistant
secretary.
Directors are Earl F. Slick, Albert
L. Butler Jr., Joe Rice, Gordon Hanes,
Mr. Johnson, and Mrs. Katharine K.
Bahnson, all of Winston -Salem; L. P.
McLendon, Greensboro, and Eugene
B. Sydnor Jr., Richmond, Va.
Participants named for
ad- government meeting
Four high -level government officials
will participate in the eighth annual
Washington conference on advertising government relations, co-sponsored by
the Advertising Federation of America
and the Advertising Association of the
West. The conference will be held Feb.
7 -9 in the Shoreham hotel, Washington.
Secretary of Commerce John T. Connor will speak at the concluding luncheon, Wednesday (Feb. 9). House
Minority Leader Gerald R. Ford (RMich.) will take part in a Tuesday
(Feb. 8) orientation session. Senator
Warren G. Magnuson (D-Wash.) and
Federal Trade Commission Chairman
Paul Rand Dixon will be members of
a Wednesday panel.
The conference will open Monday
night (Feb. 7) with the Gold Medal
award dinner honoring Norman H.
Strouse, chairman of J. Walter Thompson Co., as advertising's 1965 man of
the year.
The Tuesday morning orientation session will have talks on "How to Communicate with Government Bureaus"
by Thomas Austern of the Washington
law firm of Covington & Burling, and
"How to Communicate with Congress"
by Representative Ford. The annual reception for members of Congress will
be held Tuesday evening.
The Wednesday agenda opens with
a Television Bureau of Advertising
breakfast and film presentation. At the
general session, Daniel Peterkin Jr.,
president of Morton International Inc.,
Chicago, will talk on "Crisis in Understanding."
The subsequent panel session will be
moderated by Frederick E. Baker, president of his own Seattle agency and
general chairman of the conference
FCC proposal could reduce
The FCC's proposed rulemaking
relating to timely and truthful responses to commission inquiries
could curtail the free flow of information between the commission and
those it regulates.
This warning was contained in
comments filed last week by CBS
and the Federal Communications
Bar Association.
The proposed rule, issued for
comment on Sept. 22, 1965, is designed to make explicit the commission's authority to levy fines on licensees and permittees that fail to
respond promptly and truthfully to
commission inquiries.
The proposed rule would impose
an absolute liability for misstatements of fact which are neither
knowing or willful, CBS said.
CBS also expressed concern about
the section which would authorize
any representative of the FCC to
specify mandatory time limits for
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
information flow
furnishing information to the commission. If mandatory time limits
are to be set, they should be set by
the FCC itself, according to CBS.
FCBA commented that the corn mission should, at the very least,
fix a minimum time which would be
allowed for response to any request.
The association said that provision should also be made for a right
to contest both the substance of requests for information and the time
limits imposed, with an automatic
stay of the effectiveness of any time
limit while a review is pending.
The FCBA said that those who
knowingly make misrepresentations
to the commission are already subject to criminal penalties under
statutes enacted by Congress. The
FCC, however, cannot change the
intent of Congress and subject to
criminal penalties those who unknowingly make misrepresentations
to the commission, it concluded.
In addition to Senator Magnuson and
FTC Chairman Dixon, panelists will be:
Donald H. McGannon, president, Westinghouse Broadcasting Co.; Dr. Richard
H. Holton, chairman, President's Consumer Advisory Council; Charles Percy,
chairman, Bell & Howell, Chicago, and
Myra Janco, president Draper Daniels,
Chicago.
Vanda recommended
for Nevada VHF
The FCC's new comparative-hearing
broadcast criteria were cited in a hearing examiner's initial decision on a TV
case last week.
Hearing Examiner H. Gifford Irion
recommended that channel 4 in Henderson, Nev., be granted to Charles
Vanda. The opposing applicant was
Boulder City Television Inc., which
planned to locate in Boulder City, Nev.,
the city of assignment for the channel.
Irion said that the only comparative areas in which an appreciable
difference had been found were those
relating to diversification of ownership,
broadcast experience coupled with integration of ownership into management and the efficient use of the channel.
The new broadcast criteria, adopted
in July, emphasize those comparative
areas. The guidelines represented an
effort to clarify and provide consistency
in the decision -making process in corn parative hearings (BROADCASTING, Aug.
2, 1965).
In relation to diversification of ownership Examiner Irion found that Mike
Gold, president of Boulder City, is already the licensee of KLUC -AM -FM Las
Vegas. Mr. Vanda, he noted, has no
other broadcast interests. He concluded
that a grant of Mr. Vanda's application
would result in greater diversification
of ownership.
Concerning integration of ownership
and management the examiner found
that both men satisfied the criteria since
both plan to assume full command of
the proposed stations. The examiner
found, however, that Mr. Vanda had
a record of experience in television
production and that this experience
coupled with his plans to manage the
station gave him an advantage. Mr.
Vanda was program chief for CBS in
Hollywood from 1935 to 1949. Since
1960 he has been president of his own
TV production firm, Vanda of TVI Inc.
The examiner said that Boulder City
Television had a slight advantage concerning the factor of efficient use of the
channel but that it was not enough to
offset the advantages in favor of Mr.
Vanda. He stressed that the decision
was "a very narrow one."
(THE MEDIA)
59
A shield for
top -50 policy?
KCTO waiver hearing
seen by many as move to
keep planned rule inviolate
The FCC will hold an oral argument
Feb. 14 in connection with the first
request it has received for a waiver of
its interim policy to limit expansion of
multiple TV- station owners in the top 50 markets.
However, the argument, which will
involve the proposed $3.5- million purchase of KcTO(TV) Denver by WGN
Inc., is generally regarded, inside the
commission and out, as a device for
enabling the agency to make the grant
without throttling the infant policy.
The vote for the argument was unanimous. But there was said to have been
a majority at the Wednesday meeting
prepared to approve the transfer on the
spot.
They reportedly were headed off by
the argument that to approve the first
application coming within the policy
would have the effect of killing that
policy. This is a point made by the staff
in urging a denial of the request for
waiver (BROADCASTING, Jan. 3).
Consequently, the procedure finally
adopted is regarded as a compromise
tactic, according to some officials. They
predicted the application would eventually be approved without a hearing.
The commissioners who favored the
grant were Rosel H. Hyde, Robert E.
Lee, James J. Wadsworth and Robert
T. Bartley. All but Commissioner Bartley had opposed adoption of the policy.
Rule Involved
The policy, which
is to remain in effect pending conclusion of a rulemaking that would set
similiar limits on TV- station ownership,
prohibits broadcasters from acquiring
more than three stations (no more than
two VHF) in the top-50 markets without a hearing. The policy provides for
exceptions only for "compelling" public
interest reasons.
There was conflicting speculation last
week as to what effect the commission's
order will have on the policy and the
rule. One official predicted the entire
concept of a limitation on top- 50 -market ownership "will fall on its face."
In any event, the entire industry is
sure to watch the proceeding closely
in an effort to divine future commission action. Two multiple owners that
have a special interest are Metromedia
Inc. and WKY Television Systems Inc.
Metromedia has an option to acquire
60
(THE MEDIA)
(ch. 32) San Francisco, and
for the purchase of
wuxa(TV) (ch. 18) Milwaukee. Both
purchases would be barred by the interim policy.
The policy applies to the proposed
KCTO purchase because WON Inc. already owns WGN-TV Chicago, in the
third market, and is under common
ownership with wrix(Tv) New York,
in the first; Denver is considered the
45th market.
The order providing for the argument
had not yet been released as of Thursday. But it's understood the commission
wants a discussion of two principal
questions-what constitutes a "compelling" reason for granting exceptions to
the policy; and what basis should be
used for determining the top -50 markets.
Request for Waiver WON Inc., in
requesting a waiver, attempted to demonstrate that it has the experience and
resources to improve KCTO'S programing
and make the station, which is not affiliated with a network, more competitive with the three network -affiliated
VHF's in Denver. For support of its
contention, WGN points to its success
in operating its independent stations in
New York and Chicago.
WoN also argued that it would not
have to ask for a waiver if the commission had chosen a different method
of determining the top 50 markets. The
commission uses net weekly circulation.
But WON said that, on the basis of
either total homes or total TV homes,
Denver is the 56th market. WON also
said that even in terms of net weekly
circulation, Denver, with 382,700
homes, exceeds the 51st market, San
Diego, by "a mere 49,000."
The commission's action in the Kcro
KSAN -TV
WKY has applied
Coffee at White House
FCC commissioners had coffee
at the White House and received
briefings from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
and the Communications Satellite
Corp. last week. The coffee was
described as a social event, the
briefings as business.
The commissioners said they
were invited to the White House
Monday for coffee only because
presidential aides M. Marvin Watson and Jake Jacobsen, both Texas hands, wanted to meet them.
The President did not appear.
The briefings by NASA and
Comsat were in accordance with
their practice of keeping the commission informed of their activities and plans.
transfer takes on added interest from
the fact that Ward Quaal, president of
WGN Inc., is also chairman of the Council for Television Development, the
group of multiple owners formed to
oppose the new multiple -ownership
rule.
Mr. Quaal, J. Elroy McCaw, president of KCTO, and other principals will
be asked to be present at the argument
to answer questions.
WGN'S interest in closing the deal has
been mounting since Dec. 1. The sale
contract calls for the addition of KCTO
losses since that date to the purchase
price.
Golden West to build
new L.A. headquarters
Gene Autry will be breaking ground
for Golden West Broadcasters' $4.5 million headquarters building in the North
Hollywood section of Los Angeles on
Wednesday (Jan. 19). Mr. Autry is
board chairman of the company.
The new building is scheduled for
completion by April 1967. It will be a
three -level structure encompassing some
100,000 square feet of space. Among
its features will be two sound stages
and a helicopter pad on the roof. The
upper level of the building will house
Golden West's executive offices. The
station group's TV outlet in Los Angeles, KTLA, will occupy the remaining
space.
The Del Webb Corp. is general constructor for the building and Welton
Becket is architect. Also scheduled to
take part in the groundbreaking ceremonies are Bob Reynolds, president
and Loyd Sigmon, executive vice president, of Golden West Broadcasters and
Arthur Mortensen, vice president and
general manager of KTLA.
Media reports
...
Colorful gift
An estimated $25,000
worth of color equipment has been
given to the Wayne State University
Mass Communications Division by
wwJ -TV Detroit. The color-film chain,
film projector and related equipment
will be used for closed- circuit work and
programing on Detroit's noncommercial
WTVS( TV)
.
Nationwide changes name
Nationwide Broadcast Services, Chicago, has
changed its name to Nationwide Radio TV Employment Agency. According to
company officials, the name was changed
to specifically identify the functions of
the firm. Nationwide Radio-TV Employment Agency has offices in Chicago
and Denver and plans to open additional offices in New York and Los Angeles.
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
you can
use your television camera
L for
both remote and studio telecasts
2. in the widest possible range of light levels
3. with zoom or turret -mounted lenses (remote iris optional)
4. with any one of a wide variety of 1.0. pickup tubes
if it's General Electric's new PE -26...
the only truly "universal" monochrome LO. camera on
the market today. It weighs only 70 pounds, requires a
mere 170 -watts of power, takes up less than 2.5 cubic
feet, is self contained except for remote control panel
and monitoring (the monitoring and control panel for a
two- camera system takes only 2' of rack space)... and is
completely transistorized (and we mean completely).
There's no other camera like it. And like it you will,
after you see it in action. You can, simply by contacting
your G -E Broadcast Equipment Representative, or: General Electric Company, Visual Communications Products, #7-315, Electronics Park, Syracuse, N.Y. 13201.
Visual Communications Products
GENERAL
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ELECTRIC
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BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
61
FINANCIAL REPORTS
RCA to extend into publishing
Plan to acquire Random House for $37.7 million
subject to boards' approval; Cerf to join RCA board
RCA, interested for months in bringing a publishing company into its electronics empire, announced last week
an "agreement in principle" to acquire
Random House Inc., New York. The
publisher would be purchased for RCA
stock worth $37.7 million.
The tentative deal provides that Random House would be a wholly owned
RCA subsidiary but retain its autonomy
of operation under present management headed by board chairman and
co-founder, Bennett Cerf.
Electronics and the printed page are
considered natural partners in the future
dissemination of educational materials.
However, past attempts of both RCA
and CBS to merge publishing houses
into their operations have failed.
An earlier plan of RCA to acquire
the text -book publishing Prentice -Hall
Co. was abandoned last April. CBS,
which is still interested in obtaining a
publisher, gave up on a plan to acquire Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff (right),
Allyn & Bacon last December, saying chairman of the board of RCA, and
Mr. Cerf conclude the agreement in
it was unable to conclude an agreement.
principle.
RCA's planned merger with Random
House was announced along with a
1966 spending program calling for a to 10% of Grosset & Dunlap, another
record outlay of $195 million by RCA publishing house.
Random House assets include its
for expansion of production facilities
with the emphasis on color -TV -tube headquarters building at 457 Madison
Avenue, New York, but no printing
and color -set plants (see page 71).
The Random House acquisition is plant facilities.
Terms of the merger plan include the
subject to the approval of both companies' boards of directors and of Ran- proposal of Mr. Cerf as a member of
dom House stockholders. According to RCA's board of directors.
the proposal, each of the publisher's
1,274,176 outstanding common shares Richmond company buys
would be exchanged for 0.62 share of
RCA common. On the day the merger Tampa operations
plan was made public, RCA shares
closed at 473/4 , making the transaction
Richmond Newspapers Inc., Richworth approximately $37.7 million.
mond, Va., acquired controlling interest
Stock Values Random House, which in the Tribune Co., Tampa, Fla., last
closed at 27 on the New York Stock week and at the same time
placed
Exchange the same day, has a market $17.5 million in notes with institutional
capitalization of about $34.4 million. investors.
The company established a sales record
Both the Richmond publishing comin its last fiscal year, when revenues pany and the Tampa newspaper own
reached $32.8 million and profits were broadcast stations; the former, WRNLup 45% to $973,189.
AM-FM Richmond, and the latter WFLARandom House divisions and sub- AM-FM-TV Tampa.
The Richmond
sidiaries include Alfred A. Knopf Inc., newspapers are the Richmond TimesPantheon Books, Beginner Books, L. Dispatch and News Leader and the
W. Singer Co. (publisher of school Tampa newspaper is the Tampa Tribune
texts), The Modern Library, The and Times.
American College Dictionary, Vintage
Although D. Tennant Bryan and fampaperbacks and Random House school ily, the principal stockholders of the
and library service. It also owns close Richmond newspaper firm, already had
62
controlling interest in the Tampa
company through trusts, the move put
Richmond Newspapers directly in 51%
control. D. Tennant Bryan is majority
stockholder of Richmond Newspapers.
The $17.5 million will be used to pay
Tribune trusts. The entire transaction
was caused by the death of J. Stewart
Bryan.
The 20 -year notes, taken principally
by the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co., Boston, carry 51% interest. Lehman Brothers negotiated the
loans.
a
to issue
additional stock
C -E -I -R
Stockholders of C- E -I -R- Inc., Washington, parent company of the American Research Bureau, have voted overwhelmingly to increase authorized class
A capital stock from 2 million shares to
2,750,000 shares.
The meeting last week also heard
Chairman Herbert W. Robinson report
that ARB will spend more than $250;
000 in the current fiscal year to improve
its TV audience measurement service.
Another $500,000 is budgeted to enter
radio measuring on a "decisive scale."
The money in the television field, it
was explained by ARB officials, is for
the establishment of its instant-spotavailabilities service (BROADCASTING,
Dec. 27, 1965) and to add further
demographic information to its monthly
television rating reports.
ARB has only begun to cover the
country with radio ratings. It started
last fall and the second report came
out last month. The radio service
covers only 15 cities at the present time.
ARB hopes to expand this soon to 30
cities then to more and more cities.
In its proxy statement to stockholders, C -E -I -R reported that George W.
Dick, president of ARB and a director
of the parent firm, owns 1,000 shares
and holds options to purchase 29,500
shares. The options were granted in
1962 and 1963 at $6.77 and $6.69 per
share and expire in 1968 and 1969.
C-E -I -R stood at 141/2 bid and 143
asked in the over- the-counter market
last Thursday (Jan. 13).
The report also shows that Mr. Dick,
whose salary as ARB president is $40;
280 received $52,606 as a bonus in the
fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 1965. ARB's
senior vice president, Rodney S. Erickson, received $17,575 as a bonus for
1965. Mr. Erickson's salary was not
disclosed.
Mr. Robinson said that C- E-I-R, on
the basis of business for 1966, would
be able to pay a stock or cash dividend
after the end of the fiscal year.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
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63
PROGRAMING
Stations to tell all to ASCAP?
That may be judge's ruling
in a new
turn
of an old case; meanwhile CBS -TV settles
for
a
new ASCAP deal on flat annual fee
U. S. District Court Judge Sylvester
J. Ryan said last week he thought, at
least tentatively, that television stations
should be required to reveal their revenues and profits, plus detailed data on
their use of music and what they pay
for it, in current litigation over musiclicense rates.
He said he was "not making that
ruling now," however, but that his current thinking was along that line. He
said he would carefully study all the
arguments pro and con before handing down a ruling, probably in a few
weeks.
This was one of two major developments last week in the complicated
chain of lawsuits over rates for broadcasters' use of the music of the American Society of Composers, Authors and
Publishers.
In the other, it was learned that the
CBS Television Network had reached
agreement with ASCAP on a new contract under which CBS-TV will pay
ASCAP fixed annual amounts over a
five -year period, rather than on the
traditional percentage-of -time-sales basis.
The amounts to be paid were not disclosed, but earlier court records show
that in 1961 CBS-TV paid ASCAP
$3,256,412.85 and in mid -1962 was
paying at an annual rate of about $3.4
million. These were the most recent
figures that observers could find last
week in the bulging files of the various
ASCAP music -license cases.
The new figures will become available
for public inspection when filed with
the court. Sources close to the negotiations said filing was being delayed until exact language of the new contract
has been worked out, a process they
hoped to complete in a few weeks.
Word Passed
CBS-TV notified its
affiliates that the new agreement had
been reached. A telegram sent by William B. Lodge, CBS-TV vice president
for affiliate relations and engineering,
noted that all three TV networks had
reached an agreement in principle with
ASCAP, covering music payments not
only for the networks but also for their
owned stations, some 14 months ago
(BROADCASTING, Nov. 2, 1964).
But it had been possible since then
64
to reach agreement with ASCAP on
what deductions would be permitted
in arriving at the revenue base on which
the ASCAP rate would be applied, he
pointed out. The new flat -fee system,
he noted, eliminates problems associated
with ASCAP auditing of network books.
This is a problem that many station
operators have protested, in their own
cases, as "harrassment by ASCAP."
Mr. Lodge also noted that the fixed amount system applies only to CBS TV's network license for ASCAP music.
would be approached with a similar arrangement. It seemed almost certain
that they would insist on payments
smaller than CBS -TV's if they consider the flat -fee basis, however.
This assumption was based on indications that CBS -TV's dollar payments
to ASCAP under the old percentage of- revenues system were higher than
those of the other networks. CBS -TV's
payments for its network and owned
stations were said to represent 41% of
ASCAP's 1961 revenues of $9,806,591
from the three TV networks and their
owned stations.
Tell All?
Judge Ryan's indication
that he may require individual stations
to disclose their revenues and profits
and music -use and music -cost data was
made Thursday during argument on an
ASCAP motion in the local TV music
case, which is separate from the network case.
The ASCAP motion asked Judge
Ryan, who is chief judge of the U. S.
Southern District Court in New York
and presides over ASCAP music cases,
to require subscribers to the All- Industry Television Station Music License
Committee-close to 370 stations in all
make available to ASCAP a wide
range of financial and other data for
the years since Jan. 1, 1959 (BROADCASTING, Dec. 20, 1965) .
The all- industry group contended the
individual station revenue and profits
data -and most of the other information sought by ASCAP- is not relevant
in setting a "reasonable" rate for TV
stations' use of ASCAP music, which
is the purpose of the lawsuit. The suit
was filed by the committee almost four
years ago when it was unable to come
to terms with ASCAP on new rates.
ASCAP counsel indicated a willingness to "protect the anonymity" of
stations that give confidential data.
Judge Ryan indicated that much of
the information sought by ASCAP
should not be allowed, in his present
thinking. He specifically cited data relating to what ASCAP contends is a
"conspiracy" among broadcasters to
favor music licensed by Broadcast
Music Inc. and "destroy" ASCAP.
He noted that a government antitrust suit is pending, seeking to divest
BMI from its broadcast ownership, and
said he didn't want to bring that case
into the music -rate litigation, or only
"on a very limited basis," if at all.
He said it might be that ASCAP is
entitled to see memos that station managers have sent to their disc jockeys-
-to
Judge Ryan
the books
May open
CBS owned- and-operated stations will
pay according to the percentage -ofrevenues formula worked out over a
year ago (1.9% on revenues up to their
1963 levels and 1.325% on amounts
over that, as compared to a flat 2.05%
in the old contracts).
Court papers show that, in addition
to the CBS -TV network payments, the
CBS-owned television stations paid
ASCAP $786,500 in 1961 and were
paying at an annual rate of about $867,000 in 1962.
ASCAP authorities would not officially acknowledge that a flat -fee
agreement had been reached with CBS TV.
Other networks expected that they
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
an issue raised by ASCAP in its argument that broadcasters have favored
BMI music over ASCAP music. But he
said he was going to turn that question over very carefully in his mind
before deciding.
All-industry
Plea for Confidences
committee counsel contended that financial records of individual stations
are irrelevant to a proceeding to set
rates for an entire industry-that the
FCC's financial reports for TV stations
as a whole provide the necessary basis
for that phase of the case.
Judge Ryan, however, injected the
idea that a rate scale, rather than a flat
rate, might be set "to take into account the smaller station." In that case,
he said, revenue and profit figures
would be needed on a station -by- station
basis.
Committee counsel noted that this
approach would represent a departure
from past licensing, in which all stations have paid at the same rate but
allowance for size of station is built in
by having the rate apply in each case
to the station's time-sale revenues.
Judge Ryan noted that radio station
music licenses are scaled along lines
he apparently was thinking of for TV.
Without referring specifically to the
CBS -ASCAP flat -fee arrangement, he
also said the stations and ASCAP would
save themselves a lot of trouble if they
could work out some sort of system that
would "eliminate auditing and constant
friction."
All-industry committee counsel contended that if ASCAP needs to know
the revenues of specific stations it has
the right to get this information from
the stations individually under the terms
of its contracts with them. Profits, they
contended, are irrelevant: ASCAP is a
supplier of program materials, and stations want to pay a fair price for what
they use, but do not wish to go into
partnership with ASCAP.
Judge Ryan meanwhile indicated that
the long-drawn case may come to trial
soon perhaps about May. He said he
hoped ASCAP and the stations could
work out a compromise agreement and
avoid trial, but that the delays thus far
obviously had not accomplished that
result.
He said the case should be disposed
of "one way or the other" and that if
it comes to trial there will be "a minimum amount of judicial annoyance."
Giving it Thought Judge Ryan assured both sides that he would study
their arguments thoroughly before handing down a ruling on what, if anything, stations should be required to
furnish in response to ASCAP's motion.
But, he said, "I don't see how you
can get away from disclosure of [sta-
-
BROADCASTIIG, January 17, 1966
tions'] receipts, profits and [music] use."
Later he indicated a present belief that
stations should also show what they
pay BMI and SESAC, "and dealers in
similar commodities."
He also disagreed, at least for the
time being, with the stations' contention that they should have to pay only Says First Amendment
for the ASCAP music they use, not for
doesn't stretch as far
the entire ASCAP repertory.
ASCAP counsel contended that TV
station profits have been "spectacular" for radio -TV as for press
and will increase even more with the
advent of color TV. They maintained
Broadcasters who are tempted to prethat music is one of the "key elements sent sex-laced motion pictures of the
making up the value of these television type currently titillating audiences in
stations," and that most of the music
many motion-picture houses across the
comes from the ASCAP repertory.
country should think twice, check the
Counsel for the committee argued National Association of Broadcasters'
that most music used by TV stations is code-then air something else. To sucin filmed programs, that stations have cumb to temptation might "dilute" their
no control over the selection of this chance of license renewal.
music.
FCC Commissioner Robert E. Lee
"It is absurd to suggest that the selec- voiced the warning last week, as a contion [of programs] is made on the basis tribution to the "dialogue" he is atof whether the films or tapes do or do tempting to start within the broadcastnot contain ASCAP music," the com- ing industry regarding the airing of obmittee asserted in a memorandum an- scene, profane or indecent material on
swering ASCAP's motion.
radio or television-types of broadcast
A Ruse? The memorandum charged material that are banned by law.
that in seeking some of the data reIn the process, he supported the view
quested in its motion ASCAP is trying that the constitutional guarantee of
to "turn this industry -wide rate-making freedom of press means something less
proceeding into separate audit enforce- when applied to broadcasting than when
ment proceedings against individual applied to the press. He spoke before
petitioners. ASCAP has ample con- the Maryland chapter of the American
tractual rights to audit separate sta- Women in Radio and Television, in Baltions, and this rate- making proceeding timore.
cannot properly be used for such a
Commissioner Lee did not say any
purpose."
motion pictures currently on television
ASCAP's request for revenue and were in violation of the law. But the
profit data-not only for stations but commissioner, who has been expressing
also for any parent or subsidiary corn - increasing concern with the broadcast
panies associated with them-"would of what he regards as improper materequire production of financial state- rial, was looking ahead to the day when
ments of hundreds, or perhaps thou- the current stock of motion -pictures
sands, of other entities having nothing available for television is exhausted.
whatever to do with the present proAt that time, he said, the pressure will
ceeding," the committee contended.
be on TV stations to present pictures reIts memorandum also served notice cently produced in the U.S. and abroad.
that the committee will try to get a re- And, based on what he- a self -adduction in BMI rates. Answering mitted movie fan -has seen in the local
ASCAP's request for information on motion -picture theaters, he doesn't think
station payments to BMI, the memo- the new crop of films will "come even
randum contended this data has little close" to meeting the standards of the
or no bearing on ASCAP rates, and NAB code.
Code Provisions NAB code, among
added: "The local stations believe that
the BMI fees are also excessive, [and] other things, says that "violence and
intend to seek an appropriate reduction sex shall be presented without undue
emphasis," that "profanity, obscenity
in them."
The all -industry committee was smut and vulgarity are forbidden," that
represented by Donald Schapiro and As- "illicit sex relations are not treated as
sociates of the New York law firm of commendable."
Code subscribers, he said, would be
Root, Barrett, Cohen, Knapp & Smith.
ASCAP was represented by Arthur H. required to reject the new films. But a
Dean of Sullivan & Cromwell, also of noncode member might decide to carry
New York, and Herman Finkelstein, them-"at his own risk," the commissioner said, adding: "If that should hapASCAP general counsel.
Lee hits again
at off -color TV
65
pen, there is bound to be trouble."
He indicated the trouble he has in
mind when be urged TV stations to live
up to their code and not dilute or weaken their expectations of license renewals.
He also appeared surprised that not
all elements of the television industry
go along with the NAB code. He cited
published reports quoting TV writers
as referring to the code as an "anti-intellectual" straitjacket and as the product
of "Bible-belt" mentality.
The commissioner made clear he was
ready to defend his position against
charges of censorship. He said broadcasters are responsible for their programing. But, he added, legal precedents and the legislative history of the
Communications Act support the proposition that "if a broadcaster fails that
responsibility by presenting programs
that are bad legally, such as the broadcasting of obscene, indecent, or profane
then the commission has
material
the duty to concern itself with such programing."
Wants Courts to Help. He expressed
the hope the courts will soon distinguish
between freedom of the press for the
press and for broadcasting. "So far as
I am concerned," he said, "the tolerance
of sexual frankness such as would
arouse lewd and lascivious thoughts is
obviously less on the broadcast media
than that which is acceptable in books."
...
Ell
¡RADIO
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ANSING
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MID- MICHIGAN RADIO STATION
UPI to provide news
The new champion
The rags -to-riches comeback of
20th Century-Fox TV has reached
a new zenith.
Last week, the film company,
which three seasons back was
batting zero, became television's
number one producer of primetime shows and also led all other
producers in total of prime -time
air hours to its credit.
At 1965 -66 season's start, Fox
was accounting for eight series,
and seven -and -a -half program
hours.. This was a close second to
MCA-Universal TV which also
totaled seven- and -a -half program
hours but had nine series on the
air. Last week, however, two new
Fox series made their debut on
ABC-TV, Blue Light and Batman.
The latter is a twice -a -week series.
Now Fox leads the producer
pack with 10 prime -time shows on
the air totaling nine hours for
the second half of 1965 -66.
He cited as an example "Lady Chat terly's Lover." The courts have held the
book is not obscene, for purposes of
mailing, despite its four-letter words
and scenes of sexual activity. But, he
said, "the utterance of such words or
the depiction of such sexual activity
over radio or television" would raise a
question of programing contrary to the
public interest, as well as a question of
violation of the criminal code.
Commissioner Lee first attracted attention for his views on the subject
when he expressed the view that late night television was getting close to the
line of indecency (BROADCASTING, Dec.
13, 1965).
for CATV systems
United Press International plans to
provide a news channel for community
antenna television systems. The news
service last week said it has reached
an agreement with Viking Industries,
Hoboken, N. J., which will provide the
equipment and sell the service.
The Associated Press is already offering such a service in association with
Telemation, Salt Lake City.
UPI's CATV operation, to be called
Video News Service, will allow automatic camera scanning of regular news
feeds coming over a printer at 60 words
per minute and, for information transmitted and later retrieved, at 120 words
per minute.
Television screens will show several
lines of copy at a time, each line containing up to 36 characters.
Additional equipment to be made
available by Viking would enable the
same CATV news channel to carry locally originated news while using the
same UPI printer.
Viking said delivery of required
equipment is expected within three or
four months.
Friendly predicts more
effort to manage news
As the power of television grows,
the attempts of big government to
manage the news of television will grow.
Fred W. Friendly,
president of the
CBS News divi-
sion, told the
Broadcast Adver-
tising Club of
Chicago last week
that broadcast
journalists can
.ge
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Bartell Media plans
TV sports special
Bartell Media Corp., New York, has
completed negotiations with producers
Robert Aller and Robert M. Fresco for
a TV series of monthly one -hour sports
specials in color based on material appearing in Bartell's Sports Magazine. The
series, also named Sports Magazine,
will feature detailed reports on personalities in every major spectator sport.
Bartell Media will share in the series'
profits with Mr. Aller and Mr. Fresco.
Bartell Media has a publishing division, Macfadden-Bartell and a broadcast division, Bartell Broadcasters Inc.
(wAno New York, WOKY Milwaukee,
KCBQ San Diego, Calif., and TeleCuracao
and TeleAruba, both located in the
Netherlands Antilles).
Mr. Friendly
fight city hall or
the Pentagon and
win. He indicated,
however, that the
road may often
be rocky as pressures are applied by
officials involved. He cited instances
of strong Washington displeasure over
certain CBS News reports from Vietnam which although upsetting to the
U.S. image subsequently proved true.
Mr. Friendly cited the great responsibility of broadcast news executives
who must often make split-second decisions about whether to air exclusive
news breaks that could cause repercussions. He admitted decisions are not
always right but explained no one can
second guess a war.
Controversy in all fields is now acceptable on the air not only to station
management and listeners but also to
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
sponsors, Mr. Friendly noted. Ten
years ago it was virtually impossible
to find a sponsor for a hot topic, he
said, and five years ago there were
some minute participations. Today, he
noted, sponsors are literally "waiting
in the wings" to buy such soul- searching
shows.
"This is a revolution," he said, "and
I hope it spreads."
Corinthian forms
special program arm
A special production unit has been
formed by Corinthian Broadcasting
Corp. Its first project will be a series
of 16 one -hour collegiate musical
programs. Southwestern Bell Telephone Co., St.
Louis, will sponsor the series in
major markets in
Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and
Missouri.
Southwestern's
agency is Gardner Advertising,
St. Louis.
C. Wrede Petersmeyer, presiMr. Jones
dent of Corinthian
Broadcasting, announced details of
the project last week. B. Calvin
Jones has been named head of the new
activity, Corinthian Special Productions.
Mr. Jones resigned as program director
of Corinthian's KHOU -TV Houston to
become executive director of the new
unit, which will have its headquarters
in Houston.
The filmed programs will spotlight
outstanding campus talent to be found
in each state. Two one-hour black -andwhite specials will be telecast in major
markets in each state both in 1966 and
1967 in prime -time periods.
26 foreign films added
to Official's portfolio
GOP wants TV -radio in House
Resolutions introduced by 10 representatives
would allow coverage in committees and on the floor
Twenty resolutions have been introduced in Congress to permit radio and
television coverage of the House of
Representatives.
The legislation was proposed last
week by 10 Republican congressmen:
Robert P. Ellsworth (Kan.); John B.
Anderson, Donald Rumsfeld, Paul
Findlay and Robert McClory (all Illinois); Laurence J. Burton (Wash.);
James C. Cleveland (N.H.); Edward J.
Gurney (Fla.); Robert C. McEwen
(N.Y.), and Bob Wilson (Calif.)
Each congressman introduced two
resolutions. One would allow TV and
radio coverage of proceedings on a dayto -day basis in the main chamber of
the House. The other would permit TV
and radio coverage of open committee
proceedings. All 20 were referred to
the House Committee on Rules.
The proposals are supported by the
GOP task force on congressional reform.
They would overthrow the so- called
"Rayburn rule ", which was instituted
by former Speaker Sam Rayburn (DTex.). The Rayburn rule allows no
cameras or recording equipment of any
type in the House or in any of its committees while they are in session
(BROADCASTING, Nov. 1, 1965) .
Representative Ellsworth said: "There
is about a 50-50 chance of passage."
The Kansas representative earlier
told BROADCASTING: "We have been
assured by the speaker (Representative
John McCormack [D-Mass.]) that if we
can get the resolutions out of the Rules
Committee with a favorable vote, he
will not oppose the legislation once on
the floor of the House."
Speaker McCormack has reaffirmed
the Rayburn rule in his dealings with
the broadcast industry inside the House.
The GOP leaders in the struggle to
give broadcasters access to House proceedings hope for a "consensus of effort" and reiterate their position that
they do not wish to make the legislation a partisan issue.
In his introduction of the legislation
last week Representative Gurney
charged that the American public is
not aware of the deliberations in the
House. He said: "I believe if the American public see this happening with their
own eyes, they will demand that this
lick- and -promise lawmaking end at
once. They will demand that Congress
do a thorough and fair job of legislating. The searching and all- seeing eye
of the TV camera will do a good deal
in straightening out and strengthening
the legislative branch of government.
"My colleagues of the minority and
I seek to bring to the American people
the truth instead of the hodgepodge of
consensus -culled information distorted
by the bureaucracy's public relations de-
partments."
`Lena' sold to 35 TV's
Independent Television Corp's new
package of two one -hour musical specials, Lena, starring Lena Home has
been sold to 35 stations. Abe Mandell,
ITC president, last week said stations
which have bought the programs include WNEW-TV New York, KTTV(TV)
Los Angeles, WNAC -TV Boston, KTVU
(Tv) Oakland -San Francisco, wPAA -Tv
Dallas, WTTG(TV) Washington, KING-TV
Seattle and wrrv(Tv) Indianapolis.
NEGOTIATORS FOR THE SALE OF MEDIA AND ALLIED BUSINESSES
CALIFORNIA
HAWAII
Official Films has acquired television
and theatrical rights to a package of
26 foreign film features. Howard B.
Koerner, vice president -operations, said
14 of the films are in color.
Titles include "On a Beautiful Summer's Morning," with Jean Paul Bel-
mondo and Geraldine Chaplin; "The
Fabiani Affair," with Charles Aznavour;
"The 317 Section," dealing with the
French war in Vietnam; "Rouge et
Noir," with Gerard Philipe and "Monsieur Vincent," a biography of St. Vincent de Paul.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Full time. Volume
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67
A command performance at FCC
50 -50 deadline extended
Learns little it didn't already know as Schreiber
brings five -year -old MCA documents as court ordered
A five -year -old silence was broken in
Washington last week.
Taft B. Schreiber, vice president of
MCA Inc., gave testimony to the FCC
in a belated and anticlimatic postscript
to commission hearings that led last
year to a proposed rule to limit network control of programing.
Mr. Schreiber produced documents
that were five years old and gave testimony that did little to support the proposed rule.
"I am not aware of any concrete instance" in which a network used its
power to grant or withhold air time as
a lever for gaining proprietary rights in
programs of producers, such as MCA,
he said.
Command Performance Mr. Schreiber appeared before Chief Hearing
Examiner James D. Cunningham under
a court order that directed him to provide the cooperation he refused to give
five years ago unless the commission
received his information in confidence.
The commission rejected the condition,
and was upheld in that position by the
Supreme Court last May.
The documents he produced contained lists of programs in which MCA
had an interest, as a distributor or
sales agent, or for which the company
provided production facilities. The material was for the three seasons ending
in 1960. Much of the information had
been provided by staff investigators
after Mr. Schreiber refused to testify.
In obtaining the data from Mr.
Schreiber, however, the commission
made a legal point. It also, in a sense,
kept faith with other producers who
had produced similar information in
public hearings.
Proposed Rule The questioning of
Mr. Schreiber last week was by Ash brook P. Bryant, chief of the commission's network study staff and author
of the proposed rule designed to break
what has been alleged to be network
domination over programing.
The proposed rule would prevent
networks from controlling or owning
more than 50% of their nonnews prime time programing. It also would bar
them from domestic syndication and
from foreign distribution of independently produced programs.
Mr. Schreiber was aware of the growing trend to network financial participation in prime -time programing. The
networks now have proprietary rights
in 93% of such programing. But, he
said, this results from producers' desire
to "spread the risk."
Even a production company as large
as MCA, one of the largest in the business, is unwilling to assume full risk for
all the programs it develops. "We'd
rather have a part of the risk and
spread the profits than to take all of
the risk and all of the gain," he said.
Network Rights
Networks obtain
proprietary rights in syndications or
foreign distribution, for instance, in return for shouldering part of the risk
in producing and presenting new programs, he said.
In cases where a producer can bring
what is considered a sure hit to a network, such as "a new Dick Van Dyke
show," Mr. Schreiber said, "no questions will be asked. Prime time will be
available."
MCA currently has eight shows on
the networks in prime time, according
to Mr. Schreiber. Networks have a financial interest and proprietary rights
in six of them.
The FCC has extended from
Jan. 31 to March 15 the deadline for comments in the rulemaking aimed at limiting network
ownership and control of non news prime -time programing. The
new deadline for reply comments
is May 16.
The extension was requested
by the television networks to permit an independent research organization they have retained, Arthur D. Little Inc., to complete
a study on television production
and procurement and on TV program syndication.
The commission said the extension was granted on network
representations that the study will
be submitted for the record by
Feb. 15.
AM -FM duplication
gets another reprieve
The FCC has again extended the
exemption it has granted AM -FM stations seeking a waiver of its rule limiting program duplication. The exemption, scheduled to expire Jan. 31, now
runs to March 1.
The commission granted the extension to give itself time to devise liberal
criteria for granting exemptions. One
proposal under consideration would
automatically exempt daytime -only stations which some commissioners feel
need help in competing with full -time
stations in large markets.
Some 120 broadcasters have requested waivers of the rule which prohibits FM stations from duplicating
more than 50% of the programing of
commonly owned AM stations in the
same community. The rule became effective Oct. 15, 1965, but has been extended several times since then for the
stations seeking waivers.
Radio series sales
...
The Womanly Art of Self-Defense
(ACA Recording Studios Inc.): WPnc
Alexandria, Va.
Taft B. Schreiber (center), vice president of MCA Inc., makes a belated
appearance in th FCC's hearing on
network program practices. Ashbrook
BB
(PROGRAMING)
P. Bryant, chief of the commission's
network study staff, questions him before Chief Hearing Examiner James D.
Cunningham.
The Sound of Christmas Around the
World (ACA Recording Studios Inc.) :
WAPI Birmingham, Ala.; WWJB Brooksville and WJOE Port St. Joe, both Florida, and KOFL Roswell, N.M.
12 Hours of New Year's (Triangle) :
WQDC(FM) Midland, Mich., and xxoc
Prineville, Ore.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
A color
first
on Capitol Hill
Technical challenges
make LBJ address more
complex, costly
Television has scored another first.
But the price was high and the headaches were many.
The first color television coverage
of a President's State of the Union
message to Congress last Wednesday
night (Jan. 12) was not easy for the
technicians or the cameramen.
Several problems arose. Among them:
The additional lighting needed for
color; how to cut down the heat
and still get the necessary amount of
light, and how to install the additional
cables and wires necessary. All were
compounded by the short amount of
time available to the technical staff.
NBC -TV was in charge of the pool
arrangement. The network flew lighting expert Walter O'Meara to Washington to supervise the lighting so that
glare and "hot spots" could be eliminated while raising the foot -candles on
President Johnson from 125 (which
had previously been used in black -andwhite coverage from the House) to
some 260 foot -candles for the color
transmission.
Mr. O'Meara said that the lighting
Is live TV
Color TV scored another first with
its coverage of the President's State
of the Union message to a joint session of Congress and a packed gallery
Jan. 12. For the event 16 additional
fixtures had to be installed to increase the light on the podium for the
color transmission.
arrangement "more than doubled the
amount of light on the President, but
did not cause any more heat than
would be felt under the old lighting
system." He also pointed out that the
new lights
total of 16 -were concentrated so that the President was
surrounded with a nine -foot radius of
light. As long as he addressed himself directly to the microphones on the
podium, however, he would experience no hot spot and subsequently no
the three TV networks would share
the additional costs.
The main area in which the costs
were accrued was the installation of the
new lighting equipment. Mr. O'Meara
estimated that nearly 130 man-hours
were used in placing, wiring, checking
and shifting the lighting equipment.
But, he said at air time, "as far as the
lights on the podium are concerned,
the setup is perfect."
Lighting on the audience was another story.
Because of the scarcity of color TV
lighting equipment and a lack of time,
the audience for the address was very
poorly lighted. NBC -TV producer
Robert Asman, who supervised pro-
-a
glare.
The additional labor and lighting increased production costs 10 -fold, from
some $3,000 for the last black -andwhite coverage from the House to more
than $30,000 this year. He said that
coverage of news conferences losing popularity?
The Presidential news conference
with full coverage by television for
direct, live broadcast to the American people may remain as a Washington institution, but it will never
be what it was during the administration of the late Presdent Kennedy. The Johnson administration
isn't too keen about it.
This is the deduction to be made
from comments made by White
House News Secretary Bill Moyers
last week.
Mr. Moyers made his remarks on
National Educational Television's
program, The President's Men,
broadcast on NET's 100 -odd educational, noncommercial affiliates.
Asked by Paul Niven, the program's commentator, if the President did not have an obligation to
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
present himself to newsmen at full scale news conferences, including
TV and radio coverage, Mr. Moyers
replied:
"I don't know that there is an
obligation to do this in a -the circus
of a press conference, in the environment of a show, or a stage show,
which is what these generally become .
. I
think these televised
extravaganzas are a poor substitute
for these sessions [informal conversations with the President in his office],
but they're with us, they're part of
the scene, they've become almost
sacred and I'm sure that they will
.
continue...
"
The President's last prescheduled
televised news conference was Aug.
29, 1965.
Mr. Moyers said he felt that news
conferences should serve the "convenience of the President, not the
convenience of the press." A more
desirable method, Mr. Moyers said,
"is for the President to call reporters into his office and have an informal conversation with them, at which
they can present questions to him."
The White House news secretary
acknowledged that he had "planted"
some questions with newsmen at the
President's Aug. 29 news conference
to permit, he said, the President to
make comments on certain subjects.
Mr. Moyers also repeated his remarks of last fall that the President
prefers to talk directly to the people
through television or radio, rather
than to have his remarks interpreted
by newspaper or magazine reporters
(BROADCASTING, Nov. 8, 1965).
09
duction complained that it was difficult
to televise members of Congress who
were seated away from the very front
of the chamber.
Mr. Asman was pleased, however,
with the lighting on the President during the telecast.
From time to time during the speech,
the President was seen to be perspiring
profusely. This, however, was due in
part to one of the largest audiences
ever packed into the House chamber
and should not be blamed for the additional lighting equipment used in the
color coverage, it was said by both
NBC-TV and House officers.
New 7 Arts group gets head
The establishment of a new department at Seven Arts Television to acquire
already produced programs for network
sales and international syndication was
announced last week by W. Robert
Rich, executive vice president and general manager. James S. Carbery will
head the new department as director of
program acquisition. Mr. Carbery has
had extensive experience in the theatrical exhibition business. He most recently served as the executive administrator for the Grand Bahamas Development Corp.
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OVER 15 YEARS' CATV EXPERIENCE
70
Another investigation of CATV
This time it's the NCAA which views cable
football coverage with 'great concern'
An investigation of community antenna television "in all of its ramifications" was unanimously approved by
the National Collegiate Athletic Association last week. The NCAA TV committee called CATV an area of "great
concern." It got association approval to
revise the 1966 -67 TV plan to find a
solution for the problem "in the event
that there is no corrective governmental
action."
The NCAA gave the green light to
these plans at the Wednesday morning
(Jan. 12) session of its 60th annual
convention in Washington.
The 1965 TV committee report was
given by its chairman, Herbert J. Dorricott of Western State College, Gunnison, Colo. He noted that the NCAA's
long-standing procedures for granting
exceptions for TV game coverage (outside network games) based on sellouts
or the 400 -mile rule are being made
ineffective by CATV. The report noted
that CATV transmission of TV game
coverage has extended coverage areas
so much it might become impossible to
guarantee that exception telecasts will
not hurt attendance at other contests.
The committee concluded: "It may be
necessary to lessen the number of exceptions granted, or even to eliminate
them entirely, if the protective features
of the NCAA TV plan are to be maintained and its basic concepts preserved."
Without specifically mentioning the
difficulties that arose when Indiana
CATV's picked up Notre Dame games
that had been granted exemptions for
carriage on WNDU -TV South Bend, Ind.,
the report noted that a special provision,
added for the 1965 season, called CATV
pickup of excepted games "a violation
of the rights accorded." The provision
was suspended in mid-season (BROADCASTING, NOV. 1, 1965).
FCC Interest The suspension followed the FCC's show of "interest in
possible solutions to the problem."
The committee cited NBC -TV's
"highly effective" presentation of 1965
NCAA games and the negotiation with
ABC -TV for a $15.5 million 1966 -67
package as highlights of the year.
In discussing the 1965 NBC -TV coverage, the committee noted that Bud
Wilkinson's NCAA Preview, carried as
a weekly pregame show, "was probably
the best that has been presented on a
regular series for the layman."
Without spelling it out, the committee implied it felt that collegiate football had been relegated to a back seat
at NBC last season since "promotional
efforts by NBC were comprehensive
and imaginative though not as concentrated as in 1964 when collegiate football was the network's first and foremost live sports package; nor did they
cover as wide a range of activity during
both daytime and night programing."
It added that promotional support outside strictly sports shows "was not as
great as in 1964."
Among other recommendations of the
committee were:
The need for a more specific set
of guidelines to cover situations where
commercial breaks may be taken. Officials "need more specific instruction in
mechanics to prevent team action on
the field from revealing the obvious delay for commercial."
Rewriting of guidelines for announcers to emphasize "the unique aspects
of the collegiate game which set it apart,
make it more meaningful, more exciting,
more dramatic and containing more
color than the professional game...:'
Holding down promotional material
within the game "to more reasonable
limits than in the past. With the advent
of the instant replay and with the number of commercials now being granted,
game audio has reached, perhaps passed,
the saturation point."
AT &T, networks settle
press -rate dispute
Two networks and AT&T have resolved their differences on use of private
wire services at press rates.
AT&T, in a filing with the FCC, said
it agrees that NBC does meet the standard for the generally lower rate service. The company also reported that
ABC has agreed that it does not qualify.
AT&T notified the commission of the
results of discussions it held with the
networks in a motion requesting the
termination of a hearing the commission ordered on the company's new
press rates. NBC had requested the
hearing.
AT&T also said it would clarify its
press rate tariff if the hearing order
is terminated.
CBS has not taken any formal action
in seeking lower press rates. But the
network has been conducting informal
talks with AT&T and expects to be considered a press rate user.
An amendment to the AT &T tariff
specifies that press rates apply to private lines on which 50% of the use is
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
for the collection and dissemination of
general news for publication. Broadcasters are included under the term
casts in the history of the state. Sponsors were Southern Bell Telephone Co.
and Nashville's Third National Bank.
press.
Documentary films Former Congressman Donald C. Bruce, (R-Ind.), and
Fulton Lewis III have announced the
creation of a company designed to produce documentary films on current issues for television use. The company,
Newscope Inc., suite 410, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W. Washington, is to
release its first film this month. Principals in the corporation are Mr.
Bruce, chairman; Mr. Lewis, executive
vice president, and Rey Burlew Jr.,
president.
AT &T said that, following its own
study, it agrees with NBC that the network meets the 50% standard.
AT&T said that "substantially less
than 50% of the information transmitted by ABC" is general news. ABC
has withdrawn its previous request for
press rates. However, it's understood
that ABC's costs actually will be less as
a nonpress user. Press -rate users employ
their private line eight hours or less a
day. ABC preferred a 24 -hour rate.
AT &T has been charging NBC press
rates since Nov. 1, 1965. AT&T and
the network are now negotiating the
amount NBC is to be reimbursed for
overcharges from Oct. 1, 1964, when
the press rates became effective, to Oct.
31, 1965. Three months ago NBC estimated that AT&T owed it $100,000 as
of Aug. 30 (BROADCASTING, Oct. 4,
1965). CBS is seeking reimbursement
of a similar amount in its talks with
AT &T.
Program notes
...
ABC Films move
ABC Films has
moved its Los Angeles office from Beverly Hills to 1313 North Vine Street,
Hollywood 90028. Telephone: 6633311.
Big bounce
Nashville broadcast Vanderbilt University's basketball
games from the Los Angeles Classic,
Dec. 28 -30, 1965. At a total cost of
$27,000, WLAC -TV officials claimed it
was one of the most expensive broadWLAC -TV
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Playoff Bowl games
The trend to higher fees for TV football rights continued last week.
CBS-TV came to terms with the National Football League on rights for
televising the Playoff Bowl games in
1966 and 1967, putting up an estimated
$350,000 for each game.
The new price represents a $150,000
jump over the $200,000 tag currently
on the game.
The network has already presented
advertisers with an NFL package for
the next two years that contains all three
of the league's postseason contests
Playoff Bowl, championship game and
Pro Bowl (BROADCASTING, Jan. 10).
However, CBS has not reached final
agreement with the NFL on rights payments for the championship game or
Pro Bowl.
.
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nationally known tax authority
each
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approximately 60- seconds long
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RCA expands color production
Budgets $195 million in '66 for new
manufacturing facilities, product improvement
BRDADCASTIN6, January 17, 1966
NEW BUSINESS
Price jumps for NFL
EQUIPMENT & ENGINEERING
RCA is more than doubling its capital- improvement expenditures in 1966.
The company announced last week that
$195 million has been allocated for expansion of major manufacturing facilities and product improvement. The
allocation is $100 million more than
RCA spent in 1965.
Dr. Elmer W. Engstrom, executive
committee chairman, and Robert W.
Sarnoff, president, said over half of the
funds would be spent on color TV, "the
most dynamic growth industry of this
decade."
RCA has already designated $80.6
million of the 1966 program for expansion of major manufacturing facil-
Get
ities -five new construction projects,
two plant enlargements and one plant
conversion. The remaining $114.4 mil_
lion will be for overall product improvement. Additional funds will be channeled to RCA's worldwide communications network.
Messrs. Engstrom and Sarnoff said
the expenditure eventually would result in the addition of 15,000 new jobs
to RCA's work force.
Color TV's
Supply vs. Demand
"explosive" growth last year they said,
caused the supply to lag behind public
demand. "This unusual supply- demand
situation is expected to persist well into
1967, at which time current expansion
featuring Bill Vaughan, nationyou
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71
programs will start to narrow the gap."
They predicted color TV sales this
year would jump ahead to 4.5 million
sets, 2 million more than in 1965. By
1970, they said annual color sales will
be over 7 million sets.
RCA's breakdown of the $80.6 million outlay for specific expansion projects for 1966:
A $26 million
color-TV -tube
plant, with 300,000 square feet, at
Scranton, Pa. The company has already
reported a $25 million outlay for a new
color-TV -tube plant at the RCA Victor
Co. Ltd., in Midland, Ont. (BROADCAST ING, Dec. 27, 1965). It was indicated
the Canadian subsidiary would be operational after mid -1967 with a capacity
to turn out 300,000 color tubes per
year.
Dr. Engstrom and Mr. Sarnoff indicated;.the Scranton color -tube plant
would begin limited production late this
year, to supplement present work at
RCA plants in Lancaster, Pa., and
Marion, Ind. (The Lancaster and Marion facilities are part of a $50- million
expansion program begun last June,
which also affects color- receiver plants
in Indianapolis and Bloomington, Ind.)
A new $20- million color and blackand- white TV-receiver plant in Memphis, with its 800,000 square feet
devoted to receiver production, supplementing present facilities at Bloomington.
A $13.7 million factory in Indianapolis, manufacturing RCA Victor radios, Victrola phonographs and tape
recorders. After completion of this
625,000-square -foot building, RCA's
existing plant in that city will be converted at a cost of $9.6 million for
manufacture of TV components: yokes,
high-voltage transformers and solid copper circuits.
A $4.1 million investment in Lewiston, Me., for a 116,000-square -foot site
for semiconductor devices (silicon transistors) that will begin pilot production
this June.
A $3.2 million enlargement of
ABC buys radio -TV
Meyers to get NAB award
Carl J. Meyers, senior vice
president and director of engineering for
WON Inc.,
Chicago,
will be the
recipient of
the National
Associ ation of
Broadcasters' annual
Engineering
Mr. Meyers
Achievement A-
ward. Mr.
Meyers will receive the award
at the Wednesday (March 30)
concluding luncheon of the 20th
annual Broadcast Engineering
Conference -held in conjunction
with the NAB convention
Chicago, for his "pioneering and
experimental efforts in color telecasting."
A veteran of more than 40
years in broadcasting, Mr. Meyers
has experimented with high sensitivity tubes to permit color originations with low light levels.
-in
RCA's semiconductor plant at Mountaintop, Pa., to meet demands for transistors, diodes, rectifiers and other solidstate electronic components (BROADCASTING, Dec. 13, 1965).
A $3 million computer plant in
Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., for backlog
orders on RCA's Spectra 70 electronic
data processors.
A $1 million enlargement of Monticello, Ind., plant, RCA Victor cabinet
facility.
All expenditures, the corporate executives said, would be financed directly
from current RCA earnings and cash
reserves.
gear from Gates
ABC has ordered $523,000 worth of
Gates Radio Co. equipment. The Quincy, Ill. subsidiary of Harris -Intertype
Corp. reported last week that the order
is for transistorized audio consoles for
the network's mobile TV vans and audio
systems for four major ABC radio facilities.
Included is Gates custom transistorized equipment for ABC West Coast
Radio Network headquarters in Hollywood, studio equipment and a new AM
broadcast transmitter for KABC Los Angeles, standard and custom facilities for
WABC New York and for tcoO San Francisco.
The equipment for ABC's television
mobile units are compact custom audio
consoles, developed by Gates and ABC -
TV engineers.
Ampex sells four more
VTR's to WKY TV Inc.
WKY Television Systems Inc. has
ordered four VR -2000 Ampex highband color videotape recorders. Ampex
announced last week that the purchase
involves an outlay of $335,000, and
raises to 10 the number of VR- 2000's
ordered by WKY Television. Delivery
will be in mid-1966.
Three of the four tape machines are
scheduled to go to Krrrv(Tv) Houston
(channel 39), which is to resume operations this year. The fourth is ticketed
for KTVT(TV) Fort Worth, bringing to
five the number of VR-2000's there.
WKY Television, which is owned by the
Oklahoma Publishing Co. (Oklahoma
City Oklahoman and Times and FarmerStockman) also owns WKY-Tv Oklahoma City and wTvr(Tv) Tampa, Fla.
FCC ponders relays
for TV translators
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APPRAISERS
The FCC has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking that would authorize
TV translator operators to use microwave relays to bring in TV signals.
The commission said last week that
in the proceeding that authorized 100 -w
translators on assigned but unoccupied
channels, several parties had stated that
a number of unused assignments are
too far from any station to pick up
signals off -the-air. Some form of relay
system is needed if the 100-w translators are to be fully utilized, the commission said. The rule permitting 100 -w
translator stations to operate on unoccupied VHF or UHF channels went
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1999
into effect on Aug. 16, 1965.
The commission said that since the
rules governing high-power translators
provide that regular TV station licensees may operate translators beyond
the grade B contour of the originating
station, there now appears to be a
practical need for some form of relay
system for translators.
The notice invites comments on the
question of whether there is sufficient
need and demand for microwave relays for use by translators. It also asks
whether the 2,000 me band of frequencies available for TV auxiliary broadcast stations can be shared with translators without depriving regular TV
stations of sufficient channels.
In another action indicating its interest in TV translators the FCC earlier
this month authorized a 1 kw UHF
translator (BROADCASTING, Jan. 10).
Changes since '59
in coming NAB book
A sixth edition of the "NAB Engineering Handbook," encompassing technical developments and rules since
1959, is expected to be started by the
National Association of Broadcasters.
The NAB Engineering Advisory
Committee will recommend to the board
that such a project be authorized and
that work on it begin as soon as possible.
Since the fifth edition was published
in 1960, many changes have occurred
in broadcast engineering. Among the
new developments: an FCC table of
FM assignments, FCC establishment
of three classes of FM, new FCC rules
for FM stereo, new FCC rules for UHF
translators, elimination of Conelrad and
creation of the Emergency Broadcast
Service.
First published in 1935, the "Handbook" has been revised four times
1938, 1946, 1949 and 1960. That fifth
edition contains 1,616 pages plus a
35 -page index and sells for $27.50.
Overmyer signs for
Visual, RCA gear
D. H. Overmyer Communications
Co., New York, has contracted with
Visual Electronics Corp., New York,
and with RCA for equipment for the
group of UHF stations Overmyer expects to operate. The first of these,
WHDO -TV Toledo, Ohio, is slated to begin operating on April 1.
The contracts reportedly represent
roughly $1.5 million-split about evenly between the manufacturers -and include options on studio equipment
from Visual. The RCA order covers
film chains and projectors.
Ordered from Visual: Mark 10
zoom -lens image orthicon cameras; a
vidicon film camera system; a custom
preselect switcher for video, audio and
transitions; McCurdy dual-channel audio consoles and all station terminal
equipment.
From RCA: TK -27 color film camera
chain, TK-22 monochrome film camera chain, TP -66 16 -mm projectors and
TP -7 2 x 2 slide projector. All of this
gear is for each of the stations.
Several months ago, Overmyer contracted with General Electric for five
Robert W. Rader, executive vice president of D. H. Overmyer Leasing Co.
(seated -I), signs contract with James
B. Tharpe, president of Visual Electronics Corp. (seated -r). Shown watching the contract signing are Morris
A. Mayers, with Visual (r), and Arthur
M. Dorfner, vice president of the
Overmyer company.
UHF transmitters with color capability and with options to purchase up
to nine more, representing an invest-
AMCI antennas
for
and FM
Omnidirectional TV and FM
Transmitting Antennas
-
Directional TV and FM
Transmitting Antennas
Tower-mounted TV and FM
Transmitting Antennas
Logging rule amended
Standby TV and FM
The FCC's broadcast logging rules
have been amended to permit corrections after the log keeper has gone off
duty.
The official making the correction,
however, must initial the entry and
explain why the change was made. The
commission had proposed that a separate memorandum with the corrections
be attached to the logs but decided
against that idea after it received objections from the National Association
of Broadcasters and others. In the same
action the commission last week deferred consideration of the automatic
logging proposals pending further study.
Diplexers
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1956
Transmitting Antennas
Vestigial Sideband Filters
Coaxial Switches
and Transfer Panels
Power Dividers and other Fittings
Write for information and catalog.
ALFORD
Ma77ufactirri77g Company
It
299 ATLANTIC AVE., BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
73
ment in excess of $1 million (BROADCASTING, Oct. 25, 1965).
Other Overmyer stations are proposed for Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Rosenberg-Houston, San Francisco and Newport, Ky.- Cincinnati.
Technical topics
New amplifier
...
Cohu Electronics Inc.,
San Diego, has announced a solid-state
video amplifier for use in distribution
and switching systems. The amplifier
($195) plugs into a mounting frame
($200) that can accommodate up to
10 amplifiers. Cohu also has a data
sheet on 4:1 and 10:1 zoom lenses.
cable
Viking Industries, Hoboken, N. J., has introduced 1/2-mile
continuous length seamless aluminum
sheathed coaxial cables for use as 75
CATV
ohm community
transmission lines.
antenna
television
Attenuators
The Daven Division
of McGraw -Edison Co., Manchester,
N. H., has designed two new rotary
coaxial RF attenuators for use in signal
generators and transmitters and for
calibration of audio and RF equipment.
The two models are available in either
50 or 75 ohms impedance.
INTERNATIONAL
CBC sharpens ax
for U.S. TV imports
Will trim outside programing to 40% maximum over
next five years; decision follows Fowler conclusions
The Canadian Broadcasting Corp.
has announced that the importing of
U.S. television programs would be re-
TV COVERAGE
A PUZZLE?
duced more than 25% over the next
years to promote "Canadian
identity."
The move was viewed by U.S. TV
film distributors with some concern
since Canada is a lucrative market in
the estimated $80 million foreign business. But several distributors in New
York pointed out that it was reasonable to speculate that the Canadian industry might fail to achieve the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. objective within the specified time.
"A top-flight American show can be
bought by CBC for $6,000 -$7,000 per
hour," one syndicator reported. "It's
going to cost Canadians more-maybe
10 times that much
put out a program of comparable value. Our experience has been that in other countries
where similar restrictions have been
put on U.S. imports -and Australia is
a prime example-the TV industries
there simply could not meet the quota
because of economics and available
talent."
The CBC's decision was announced
in Ottawa last Wednesday (Jan. 12)
by J. Alphonse Ouimet, CBC president,
and was made in response to a report
by a special government committee
that found Canadian TV "overloaded"
with programs from the U.S., especially Hollywood films (BROADCASTING,
Sept. 13, 1965) .
The Quota The proposed reduction
would still permit U.S. programs to
fill 40% of the time on CBC. Currently, 55% of the time on CBC can be
supplied by program producers outfive
-to
EMCEE Translators extend signal range
under complete control of the station.
EMCEE Translators remove coverage
problems within framework of existing
broadcast principles
and the public
doesn't pay!
...
as
Electronics Missiles
t Communications Inc.
160 EAST THIRD STREET, MT. VERNON, NEW YORK 10550
74
side of Canada.
It could not be ascertained if a timetable has been established to phase out
the ratio of U.S. programs to 40 %, but
one U.S. syndicator said it could take
the form of a certain reduction each
year for the next five years.
Canadian taxpayers provide CBC
with approximately $888 million a
year to telecast programs, and this income is increased by approximately
$25 million from advertising.
Mr. Ouimet said last week he agreed
with the conclusions last fall of the in-
vestigating commission headed by Robert Fowler, a Montreal industrialist,
that the CBC schedule has "too high
a proportion of United States programs
and light entertainment." He also said
that the present "overdose" of Hollywood TV films shown on CBC "is not
serving the national purpose."
The so-called Fowler Commission
made other suggestions, according to
Mr. Ouimet. One was that the network could increase its advertising by
50% and use the extra money to improve its Canadian programing. Mr.
Ouimet labeled this "an impractical
suggestion based on the erroneous assumption that quality and popularity
always go together."
Canada's privately-owned CTV Network is not under the CBC.
CTV affiliates
want to buy network
CTV Television Network Ltd., Toronto, may change hands in the near
future. An offer for the purchase of
the shares of nonbroadcasting shareholders of the network has been made
by its 11 affiliated stations which now
own an estimated 25% of CTV. The
affiliates did not purchase another 24%
of shares offered to them when the
network began operations about four
years ago.
The offer, if accepted, is subject to
the approval of the Board of Broadcast
Governors, the Canadian regulatory
body. Dr. Andrew Stewart is BBG
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
chairman and its only remaining permanent full -time member. The sale
would not be subject to higher government approval, as are many BBG recommendations.
The affiliates formed the Independent
Television Organization a few years
ago. ITO buys filmed programs and
exchanges programs produced by the
individual stations. There is alleged to
have been contention between the ITO
and CTV, with the latter asking for
more time from the affiliates for network programs, and the ITO using
more filmed programs which could be
shipped to the various stations by air
express instead of being sent by the
more costly microwave network.
The recent Fowler Commission report on broadcasting (BROADCASTING,
Sept. 13, 1965), pointed out that
the station operators "admit that CTV
is a private company organized to make
money, and that most of the investment
in it is held by people not in the broadcasting industry. If there are any profits
from private broadcasting, the stations
want the profits themselves and are
unwilling to let outsiders make money
out of it."
Abroad in brief
...
Canadian billings
Billings of Canadian advertising agencies in 1964 were
up 5% from 1963, according to the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
Television was second to newspapers,
with $101,476,222, while newspaper
Spain gets GE tower
General Electric Co. (IGE export division) in its first major
European order has begun equipping a 50 -kw UHF TV transmitter
in Madrid, under a contract involving more than $250,000.
The installation is located on
top of the 7,546-foot Navacerrada
Peak in the Guadarrama Mountains north of the city. When
transmission starts early this year,
Madrid's TV capability will be
doubled, according to GE. Further construction projects are being studied by Spain's Division
of Radio and Television Communications for TV stations in Barcelona and Zaragoza. General Electric Espanola, acting as supervisor
for construction, sold the equipment for the Madrid installation.
billings totaled $154,478,714. Radio
billings amounted to $37,974,471, and
billboards and other advertising media
$5,779,044.
adds
Norman, Craig &
Kummel, New York has reported account acquisitions by two of its foreign
offices. NC&K de Puerto Rico has acquired Sealy Inc., formerly handled by
J. Walter Thompson Co. The initial
NC &K
budget has a major part devoted to TV.
Field & Crane, a division of NC&K
Ltd., London, has begun handling the
Scotch Wool Shops account in the
United Kingdom. An extensive research
program is to precede advertising plans.
New accounts
Societe Francaise de
Pneu Englebert S. A. has appointed
CPV/Kenyon & Eckhardt to handle
advertising for all its products in
France. At the same time, J. P. Lyons
has appointed CPV Ltd., London, to
handle advertising in Great Britain for
its ground coffee and Bev instant hot
beverage products.
Canadian agencies merge
Baker Advertising Ltd., Toronto, and
Collyer Advertising Ltd., Montreal,
have merged to form Baker -Collyer Advertising Ltd., with offices in both cities.
Firms are employe-owned. Baker,
formed in 1911, was one of the oldest
advertising agencies in Canada. It handles such accounts as Canadian Kodak,
Carnation Co., Yardley of Canada and
Manufacturers Life Insurance Co. Collyer has BP Canada Ltd., Chrysler Canada Ltd., Quebec Provincial Tourist Department, and a number of shipping
and airline companies.
Total billings for the merged agency
are estimated at about $10 million.
Three large accounts dropped the
merged concern because of conflicting
accounts.
FATES & FORTUNES
Charles H. Gardner, president of Clark, copy group supervisor with M -E
Remington Advertising, Springfield, since 1963 after associations in Detroit
Mass., joins Chirurg & Cairns, Hartford, with MacManus, John & Adams and
Conn., as senior VP. David H. Murray, Campbell- Ewald; Robert Forgione, TV
senior VP, and Ronald P. Nelson, VP group supervisor, who joined agency
and treasurer, both with Remington in in 1963 from BBDO and James A.
Springfield, join C &C, Hartford, as Scully, senior art director, with agency
VP's.
since 1963 coming from Bryan Houston,
Lawrence K. Grossman, VP, adver- New York.
tising, NBC, New York, will leave that
H. Richard Silver,
post in June to open his own adverVP at Bozell & Jacobs,
tising- promotion firm. Mr. Grossman
New York, appointed
joined NBC in August 1962 after six
director of radio and
years as executive in advertising and
television, east e r n
sales promotion department at CBS -TV.
operations.
Daniel Stern, associate creative diRobe rt Cagliero,
rector, McCann-Erickson, New York,
broadcast media manelected VP and deputy creative director
ager, C. J. LaRoche,
Mr. Silver
and five other members of M-E creative
New York, named
division elected VP's. Mr. Stern joined manager of ABC-TV network sales
agency in 1964 coming from position planning, that city. William E. Breda,
as copy supervisor at Ellington & Co.
Jr., formerly account executive in interOther new VP's: Bruce T. Barton, with national division, BBDO, New York,
agency since 1956 and now group head named account executive at ABC Interon Coca -Cola; Frank Broadhurst, asso- national Television there.
ciate creative director, who joined agenHal Van Tassel, account executive
cy in 1955 from Ted Bates; Raymond
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
with wrot-ry Toledo, Ohio, appointed
VP of Bridges -Sharp & Associates, that
city.
Leslie C. Bruce Jr., recently resigned
VP for advertising and marketing research at Purex Corp., Lakewood,
Calif., named VP and management
supervisor on Schick Safety Razor Co.
account at Compton Advertising, Los
Angeles.
Mr. Bonner
Miss Conefrey
James
Bonner, merchandising account supervisor, and Eileen Conefrey,
personnel manager, both at Ted Bates
& Co.. New York, elected VP's.
V.
&
Jack Spillman, VP at Foote, Cone
Belding, Los Angeles, joins Young
75
Rubicam there to serve on Hunt
Foods & Industries account.
Paul Pease, copy group supervisor
at Hoefer, Dieterich & Brown, San
Francisco, named account manager.
Don Cusenbery, radio-TV director, and
Dan Bockman, copywriter, both at
HD&B, that city, named copy group
supervisors.
Peter K. Orne, formerly account executive and sales supervisor,
at WCBS -TV
New York, named
general sales manager
of WTEN (TV ) Vail
Mills, N.Y.
Alan W. Fink, senMr. Orne
ior market research
analyst with Chesebrough- Pond's, New
York, joins Foote, Cone & Belding
there as research supervisor.
Jim Field, account executive with
BBDO, San Francisco, and John Flemer, account executive with Steedman,
Cooper and Busse, that city, join McCann-Erickson there as account execu&
tives.
John J. Hokin, formerly sales manager of WEEF -AM -FM Highland Park,
Ill., joins Edward Petry & Co., Chicago,
as account executive.
Donald H. McFarlane, account executive with KEWB Oakland, Calif.,
joins KCBS -AM -FM San Francisco, as account executive.
Jack Magan, formerly account executive for ABC -TV sports department,
New York, named account executive
at WMCA, that city.
George J. Rapp, manager, national
sales for WRC -TV Washington, appointed sales manager.
James J. Cremins, assistant sales
manager of WBT -AM -FM Charlotte,
N.C., appointed general sales manager
succeeding James G. Babb Jr., who becomes general sales manager of WBTV
(Tv) Charlotte.
Murray J. Green, VP and general
manager of WBIC Islip, N.Y., joins
WTHE Mineola, N.Y., as sales manager.
Van L. Rubenstein, account executive with CBS National Television
Sales, New York, appointed television
sales executive at RKO General Broadcasting /National Sales, that city.
Donald Hamlin, director of sales
marketing and promotion at wxvz -AMFM Detroit, named account executive.
Edward Fisher, formerly with QXR
Network in New York, named national
account executive for Long Island Network. Mr. Fisher will work from network's New York office at 230 Park
Avenue. Long Island Network is owned
and operated by woes Freeport-Hempstead, WGSM Huntington and WGSM -FM
Babylon, all New York.
John R. Boissy, account executive
with WPIK Alexandria, Va., joins WQMR
and WGAY(FM) Silver Spring, Md:
Washington, as account executive.
John McRae, national sales manager
for WCKY Cincinnati, appointed sales
manager of KRAK Sacramento, Calif.
Hal Knutson, local sales manager
of KLAC -AM -FM Los Angeles, appointed
general sales manager.
H. Scott Goings, formerly with
WEMD Easton, and WOMS Bethesda,
both Maryland, named sales manager
of WAVA -AM -FM Arlington, Va.
John J. Kelly, formerly with NBC TV sales department, New York, and
Timothy W. O'Sullivan, formerly with
Kee Lox Manufacturing Co., Rochester,
N.Y., named account executives with
WVOx-AM -FM New Rochelle, N.Y.
Mary Ellen VandeSande and Patricia
Recchia join Chicago office of Kenyon
& Eckhardt as media buyers. Charles
Bock, account executive, transfers from
San Francisco office to Chicago.
Charles M. White, formerly head of
United Press International news produces!
j
I
76
(FATES & FORTUNES)
t
H
own merchandising agency in Houston,
joins Allen, Anderson, Niefeld & Paley,
Chicago.
Thomas 'lards, formerly with
Flint, Mich., and Thomas M.
Wall Jr., formerly with Naegele Advertising there, named account executives
of WFDF, that city.
David E. Edmunds, and James N.
Miho join Needham, Harper & Steers,
Chicago, as art supervisors. Mr. Edmunds was with N. W. Ayer & Son
and Mr. Miho had own firm in Los Angeles. Sylvia Schwarz, formerly with
Tatham -Laird & Kudner, joins NH&S
as copywriter.
E. H. Rogers Jr., VP and manager of
Hollywood office of N. W. Ayer & Son
Inc., named operations consultant to
West Coast management of Geyer,
Morey, Ballard, Los Angeles.
William Watson, formerly executive
producer at Needham, Harper & Steers,
New York, joins Cunningham & Walsh
there as television producer. John
Hood, formerly copywriter at McCann Erickson, New York, joins C&W, that
city, in similar capacity.
Joseph A. Reilly, formerly program
manager at WERA Plainfield, N.J.,
named commercial manager.
Bill Nash, general manager of KFMJ
Tulsa, Okla., named head of advertising and PR department at National
Bank of Tulsa.
A.
WAMM
MEDIA
Charles Stewart, formerly general
sales manager of WCBM -AM-FM Balti-
more, appointed VP and general manager of WDMV Pocomoke City, Md.
Frank R. Travalia, business manager
of KTLA(TV) Los Angeles, appointed
corporate controller at parent Golden
West Broadcasters, that city.
James M. Patt, VP and general
manager of WALL Middletown, N. Y.,
elected VP of Straus Broadcasting
Group (WMCA New York, WGVA
Geneva, WTLB Utica, all New York, and
WALL). Mr. Patt has been general
manager of WALL since 1950.
Burt Lambert, VP and general manager of KLAS -TV Las Vegas, named
executive VP of KRAM, that city.
Jay Rayvid, program manager at
noncommercial WQED(TV) and WQEX
(TV), both Pittsburgh, named executive
director of broadcasting operations.
Stewart Corbett, with Cox Cable vision Corp., Atlanta, named assistant
secretary- treasurer. John Campbell,
with Video Service Co., subsidiary of
Cox Cablevision, named VP.
Carl Glicken, general manager of
wort Cincinnati, named general man BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
GE
Broadcasting changes
New organization structure for
General Electric Broadcasting Co.
(wGY, WOFM (FM ) and WRGB(Tv)
Schenectady, N.Y.) has been announced by Reid L. Shaw, VP
and general manager. Appointed
to newly created positions are
Merl L. Galusha, manager of public and stations relations; Richard
B. Belkin, manager of programs;
Albert G. Zink, manager of news,
and Charles B. King, manager
of operations.
Mrs. Galusha has served GE
stations as farm director, manager of wGY and waneCrV) and
since 1958 as manager of programing and production. Mr.
Belkin, formerly with wsYR Syracuse, wAST(TV) Albany, both
New York, and WTVM(TV) Columbus, Ga., joined WRGB (Tv)
in 1963 and has served as promotion specialist for both war and
wRGB(TV). Mr. Zink has been
manager of news and programing
since 1961. Mr. King has been
manager of production until his
present appointment.
WDAE -AM -FM
Tampa, Fla. Don
ager of
Clark, general manager of wvoL Berry
Hill, Tenn., appointed general manager
at WCIN. Bill Salmon, station manager
at wvoL, appointed general manager.
Paul E. Cowley, formerly sales manager of WFIA Louisville, Ky., promoted
to general manager of KFLS Santa Rosa,
Calif.
Feb. 1. Future plans will be announced
following short vacation.
Willard V. James, news director at
WOKY Milwaukee, named program director. Bob Betts, editorial director, replaces Mr. James.
Carol Reed, elected 1966 president of
New York local, American Federation
of Television and Radio Artists. Miss
Reed's daily Talk of New York is on
WCBS New York.
Bob Finnegan, sports broadcaster for
two decades, signed to do play-by -play
of White Sox baseball on WCFL Chicago
with Bob Elson. White Sox network
covers more than 80 stations.
Rudy Bukich, quarterback of Chicago Bears professional football team,
named sports director of WBKB -TV
Chicago.
Gordon Baker, with WGLI Babylon,
N. Y., appointed program director.
Kenneth A. Swanson, formerly with
WTCN -TV Minneapolis -St. Paul, named
production supervisor at wolo(Tv)
Duluth, Minn.
Wallace M. Theodore, continuity director at WLTH Gary, Ind., appointed
operations manager.
Larry Busse, with WLUK-TV Green
Bay, Wis., named farm director.
Grahame Richards, formerly national director of programing for Storz sta-
Miami, appointed director of
programing for WFUN South Miami,
and WDAE -AM -FM Tampa, both Florida.
Dick Starr, with WFUN, named program
director.
David Quaid, free-lance cameraman director in New York, joins Video Pictures there as VP and chief cinematographer.
Martin Rubenstein, general attorney
for ABC News, also named director of
business affairs for ABC News, Special
Events and Public Affairs, New York.
Jordan P. Davis, attorney at ABC, promoted to assistant director of business
affairs, and Martin Remnitz, also attorney at ABC, named assistant director
of sales contracts.
with
Wall
Street investment
banking firm of Carl
M. Loeb, Rhoades
Co., elected VP of
Filmways Inc., New
York and Los Angeles. Mr. Brown will
direct his efforts toMr. Brown
wards company diversification.
Harry R. Shriver, sports director at
wFBR Baltimore, appointed program director.
Rusty Reynolds, formerly with WAKY
Louisville, Ky., named director of program operations at KxoL Fort Worth.
Milton Hall, program director of
KRLA Pasadena, Calif., resigns effective
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
Thomas S. Murphy, president of
Capital Cities Broadcasting Corp.,
named chairman of 1966 broadcasters
campaign for Radio Free Europe. Donald H. McGannon, president of Westinghouse Broadcasting Co., was chairman of last year's broadcasters drive
for RFE. Organization's national fundraising campaign began Jan. 11 in Boston.
Michael B. Levine,
with public information office of U. S.
Navy, Little Creek,
Va., named account
executive with Richards Associates, Washington PR firm.
Arlene J. Strangio,
with noncommercial
KviE(TV) Sacramento, Calif., appointed
publicity director.
James R. Stevenson, program manager at WIIN Atlanta, joins wsB there
as promotion manager.
Harm Gardner, formerly VP at
Cherry Hill Records, Cherry Hill, N.J.,
Mr. Levine
SPOTMASTER
Sam C. Gale Jr., sales executive with
Capital Film Laboratories, Washington,
named sales manager at Capital, Miami.
NEWS
formerly
FANFARE
tions,
PROGRAMING
Richard Brown,
Television News Directors Association.
Eric Rohde, free -lance news correspondent in Los Angeles, joins KRML
Carmel, Calif., as news director.
Bruce Dennis, VP
and manager of news
for WON-AM -TV Chicago, promoted to
manager of news for
WON group stations
now under expansion.
Gene Filip, assistant
news director, named
Mr. Dennis
director of news for
WON. Robert E. Henley, administrative
assistant for WGN news, becomes news
director for WGN -TV. Mr. Dennis joined
Chicago Tribune in 1930 and moved to
wow in 1940. He is first VP of Radio-
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BROADCAST ELECTRONICS, INC.
8800 Brookville Road
Silver Spring, Maryland
77
appointed advertising-promotion director Of WPEN -AM -FM Philadelphia.
Arlo D. Woolery, formerly general
manager of xsuN Bisbee, Ariz., named
PR director at Ameco Inc., Phoenix.
William Piecuch, formerly with Detroit News, appointed sales -promotion
director of WDTM(FM), that city.
EQUIPMENT & ENGINEERING
Leonard W. Tuft, general attorney
for RCA Communications, New York,
elected VP and general attorney. Mr.
Tuft joined RCA Communications in
1948 and was named assistant general
'attorney in 1960. He will serve as chief
legal counsel with responsibility for
company's regulatory relations with
government agencies and departments.
Richard Kellerman, formerly manager, news planning, NBC News, New
York, appointed manager, special projects, at RCA, that city.
Matthew Dorenbosch, and Russell
G. Pelton, both VP's at North American Philips Co., New York, elected
senior VP's.
Robert P. Johnson, chief engineer
at WBEC Pittsfield, Mass., appointed
chief engineer of WISN -AM -FM Milwaukee.
Filipe Cervantes, formerly with
United Data Control, El Monte, Calif.,
named chief engineer of Magnasync
Corp., North Hollywood, Calif.
Francis C. Healey, general manager
of Revere -Mincom division of 3M Company, Camarillo, Calif., named director
of advance projects for 3M's electrical
products group.
Don Lincoln, engineering technical
supervisor at KPIx(TV) San Francisco,
named assistant chief engineer.
John C. Lory, with Memorex Corp.,
Orlando, Fla., named sales engineer.
Fred Hoffman, assistant purchasing
agent at ABC, western division, Hollywood, named purchasing agent.
ALLIED FIELDS
Jerry Jackson, manager of Nationwide Broadcast Services, Denver, named
manager at Chicago office. Dave Martin, formerly with WNUS -AM-FM Chicago, named director of placements at
Nationwide, that city.
Jack C. Mazzei, American Telephone
and Telegraph Co. sales supervisor at
Chicago, retires early this year after 32
years service. He has been given silver
plaque by Illinois Broadcasters Association, for his service to stations through
years.
Prof. Donald E. Brown, author of
Careers in Radio and Television and
member of Council on Radio and Television Journalism, appointed chairman
of department of mass communications
at Arizona State University, Tempe,
Ariz.
A. Harry Becker and Nathan L. Silberberg announce formation of Becker
& Silberberg, Washington law firm. Mr.
Becker was chief of FCC's litigation and
administration law branch before he
entered private practice in 1951. Mr.
Silberberg has practiced administrative
and general law in Washington for more
than 25 years. Associated with firm is
Howard B. Silberberg, 1963 Georgetown Law School graduate.
INTERNATIONAL
Ross McCreath, VP of television
division of All-Canada Radio and Television Ltd., Toronto, named VP and
general manager,
succeeding Reo
Thompson who died last month. Bob
Tait, VP of organization, appointed assistant general manager. Don Smith,
Represented by The Katz Agency, Inc.
WE CAN GET
°I
(FATES
&
FORTUNES)
Kenneth A. Hamilton, 47, VP and
treasurer of Hicks & Greist, New York,
died Jan. 7 of heart attack in Greenwich hospital, Greenwich, Conn. He
was formerly copywriter at J. M.
Mathes agency, advertising manager of
Fellows Gear Shaper Co., and publisher's representative for American Girl
and Boy's Life magazines. He joined
Hicks & Greist in 1945. Surviving
are his wife, Beverly, and three daughters.
Karl Warren, 64, retired New York
and Chicago newsman, died at his
home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Mr. Warren was Washington correspondent for
Chicago Tribune and political science
writer for New York Daily News. He
had organized news and special events
department at WPIX-FM New York.
Thomas A. Doyle, 58, senior media
buyer at Dancer -Fitzgerald-Sample,
New York, died Jan. 6 of heart attack
while at work. He is survived by his
wife, Veronica, and three children.
George D. Coleman, 65, director of
regional sales for Triangle Publications,
Philadelphia, died Jan. 7 in Scranton,
Pa. Mr. Coleman had been general
manager of WGBI and wGBI -Tv (now
WDAU -TV Scranton -Wilkes-Barre) for 25
years.
Edward J. Jansen, 59, founder of
KBun Sparks, Nev., died Dec. 17, 1965,
in hospital in Reno. He started career
with KVI Seattle and had been owner of
WRCB /TV ®3
78
DEATHS
Roy F. Thompson, 74, mayor of Altoona, Pa., from 1960 to 1964 and
former owner and manager of WRTA
Altoona, died Jan. 4 in Altoona hospital after long illness. He entered
broadcasting in 1924 and was chief announcer and managing director of
WFBG Altoona for 25 years. Surviving
are his wife and four children.
J
A RUST CRAFT STATION
TV sales director of All- Canada's major
market stations, named to new post
of Toronto television manager.
Jack Brooks, formerly of CFCF -AM-FM
Montreal, appointed sales manager of
CFMB, that city.
Fernand Girard, formerly in public
relations with Quebec Hydro Power
Commission, Montreal, appointed manager of newly opened Montreal office
of Canadian Association of Broadcasters.
Anthony Gruner, former director of
Commonwealth Film Festival in Britain, has joined Talbot Television, London, European representative of Fremantle International.
CHATTANOOGA'S KEY STATION
Boulder City, Nev., station which
moved to Las Vegas and was later
known as KRAM. Surviving are his wife,
Edith, four daughters and son.
KBNE
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
SPECIAL REPORT: TV HOMES
-
TV penetration: now 94%
Nielsen's county -by- county estimates
show increase of
1.1
million television
homes in one -year period, gain of 1%
Television households in the United
States (excluding Alaska) increased
1,166,850 during the period between
September 1964 and September 1965,
according to the latest county -by -county
estimates of A. C. Nielsen Co.
The rise, from 52,755,990 to 53,922,840 also reflects a gain in TV penetration of 1 %, from 93% to 94% of the
total households. This increase of 1%
is identical to the one reported by Nielsen a year ago when the TV penetration
rose from 92% to 93% (BROADCASTCounty
TV
Homes
%
TV
Homes
%
ARIZONA
ALABAMA
Autauga
Baldwin
Barbour
Bibb
Blount
Bullock
Butler
Calhoun
Chambers
Cherokee
Chilton
Choctaw
Clarke
Clay
Cleburne
Coffee
Colbert
Conecuh
Coosa
Covington
Crenshaw
Cullman
Dale
Dallas
De Kalb
Elmore
Escambia
Etowah
Fayette
Franklin
Geneva
Greene
Hale
Henry
Houston
Jackson
Jefferson
Lamar
Lauderdale
Lawrence
Lee
Limestone
Lowndes
Macon
Madison
Marengo
Marion
Marshall
Mobile
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan
Perry
Pickens
Pike
Randolph
Russell
St. Clair
Shelby
Sumter
Talladega
Tallapoosa
Tuscaloosa
Walker
Washington
Wilcox
Winston
State total
County
Dec. 7, 1964).
Nielsen used the total household estimates of Sales Management magazine
for its base of estimates. The latter figures are based on growth rates applied
by that publication for its own Jan. 1,
1965, counts.
The television ownership percentages
are based on U.S. Census percent levels
as of April 1960, revised to reflect conversion of nontelevision households to
TV owners as shown by TV penetration
growth rates from successive AdvertisING,
3,890
12,900
4,470
2,780
5,770
2,340
4,750
25,410
8,830
3,620
5,730
2,920
4.910
2,760
2,420
7,250
11,730
3,110
2,120
8,230
2,850
11,370
8,280
11,860
10,150
6,790
7,610
28,130
3,740
4,780
4,800
1,900
3,090
2,940
13,840
8,240
181,620
3,250
15,310
4,920
11,330
9,000
2,020
4,610
40,310
4,640
4,800
88,200
3,640
46,030
16,470
2,600
4,020
5,290
4,180
10,920
5,740
7,890
3,140
15,370
8,390
26,310
13,090
2,790
2,450
3.290
820,420
86
91
75
82
87
71
80
91
86
86
82
71
74
84
84
85
88
76
81
85
82
92
88
81
87
85
84
93
83
82
84
61
69
82
90
86
93
83
84
81
88
84
65
80
88
71
86
89
93
71
90
89
67
76
80
80
87
87
91
71
88
88
89
92
77
64
87
Apache
Cochise
Coconino
Gila
Graham
Greenlee
Maricopa
Mohave
Navajo
Pima
Pinal
Santa Cruz
Yavapai
Yuma
State total
3,280
16,400
9,120
6,120
3,030
2,510
239,370
2,210
6,030
90.700
16,360
2,540
8,140
13,370
419,180
52
86
68
82
78
87
93
79
62
93
88
79
77
86
ARKANSAS
Arkansas
Ashley
Baxter
Benton
Boone
Bradley
Calhoun
Carroll
Chicot
Clark
Clay
Cleburne
Cleveland
Columbia
Conway
Craighead
Crawford
Crittenden
Cross
Dallas
Desha
Drew
Faulkner
Franklin
Fulton
Garland
Grant
Greene
Hempstead
Hot Spring
Howard
Independence
Izard
Jackson
Jefferson
Johnson
Lafayette
Lawrence
Lee
Lincoln
Little River
Logan
Lonoke
Madison
Marion
Miller
Mississippi
Monroe
Montgomery
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
8,270
5,430
2,550
11,180
4,460
3,200
1,240
3,420
3.730
4,990
5.210
2,250
1,390
6.320
3,750
13,470
5,420
11,030
3.960
2,340
4,350
3.360
7,090
2,630
1.180
15,150
2.050
6.380
4,620
5,400
2,750
5,360
1,350
5,210
22,090
3,050
2,470
4,130
3.870
2,690
1.970
3,820
5,860
1,950
1.500
8,730
17,500
3,530
1,190
éá
BO
63
82
83
83
73
85
84
83
77
82
85
92
82
86
84
84
81
78
86
66
89
85
87
82
86
86
84
68
84
88
80
85
81
74
79
79
83
90
70
84
90
89
75
80
County
Nevada
Newton
Ouachita
Perry
Phillips
Pike
Poinsett
Polk
Pope
Prairie
Pulaski
Randolph
St. Francis
Saline
Scott
Searcy
Sebastian
Sevier
Sharp
Stone
Union
Van Buren
Washington
White
Woodruff
Yell
State total
TV
Homes
TV
%
2,370 79
1,000
7,720
1,230
9,610
67
85
88
80
82
1,810
7,020 90
2,670 78
5,740 86
2,360 84
76,430 93
2,760 79
6,950 83
7,540 92
1,590 80
1,660 75
24,480 93
2,850 86
1,140
1,270
13.170
1,840
16,830
9,090
2,860
3,110
467,940
67
75
88
84
85
88
79
84
CALIFORNIA
Alameda
313,450
Alpine
80
Amador
2,920
Butte
29,400
Calaveras
3,300
Colusa
3,460
Contra Costa 135.060
Del Norte
4,900
Eldorado
11,810
Fresno
114,280
Glenn
5,390
Humboldt
31,720
Imperial
18,380
Inyo
3,130
Kern
90,970
Kings
15,110
Lake
5,370
Lassen
3,800
Los Angeles 2,191,350
Madera
11,260
Marin
53,650
Mariposa
1.640
Mendocino
13,040
Merced
27,000
Modoc
Mono
2,020
610
Monterey
55,460
Napa
20.440
Nevada
7,400
Orange
308,720
Placer
19,440
Plumas
3,260
Riverside
120.930
Sacramento 180,060
San Benito
4,580
San Bernardino
119,600
San Diego
344,370
ing Research Foundation -Census sampling studies.
The television households have been
derived by applying percent ownership
estimates to the Sales Management estimates of total households.
Estimates for Alaska were last provided in Nielsen's 1962 report (BRoADCASTING, Dec. 17, 1962).
The county -by- county figures, with
Sales Management's total household
estimates, are available from Nielsen in
booklet form.
94
75
89
91
89
89
96
85
93
93
91
92
85
74
93
91
83
88
95
92
94
82
84
93
84
68
93
93
89
97
93
86
93
95
90
94
95
Homes
County
San Francisco
256,610
74,380
San Joaquin
San Luis Obispo
28,830
157,600
San Mateo
Santa Barbara 69,100
Santa Clara 245,660
Santa Cruz
34,630
21,360
Shasta
Sierra
740
Siskiyou
9,970
Solano
43,990
Sonoma
52,200
48,960
Stanislaus
Sutter
10,460
Tehama
8,640
Trinity
2,760
Tulare
48,410
4,810
Tuolumne
73,840
Ventura
22,460
Yolo
Yuba
11.400
State total 5,563,970
%
92
92
97
93
95
92
94
82
86
96
92
91
93
94
84
92
88
96
92
93
COLORADO
Adams
Alamosa
Arapahoe
Archuleta
Baca
Bent
Boulder
Chaffee
Cheyenne
Clear Creek
Conejos
Costilla
Crowley
Custer
Delta
Denver
Dolores
Douglas
Eagle
Elbert
El Paso
Fremont
Garfield
Gilpin
Grand
Gunnison
Hinsdale
Huerfano
Jackson
Jefferson
Kiowa
Kit Carson
Lake
Plata
Larimer
Las Animas
Lincoln
Logan
Mesa
Mineral
Moffat
Montezuma
Montrose
98
84
County
Morgan
Otero
Ouray
Park
Phillips
Pitkin
Prowers
Pueblo
Rio Blanco
Rio Grande
Routt
Saguache
San Juan
San Miguel
Sedgwick
Summit
Teller
Washington
Weld
Yuma
State total
65
93
83
88
93
70
97
81
88
96
87
84
92
80
78
100
81
90
98
80
80
85
87
94
78
89
90
93
140
71
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
1,870
3,830
5,250
78
87
Source: A.
76
87
88
94
86
80
89
81
89
%
5,990
6,380
490
520
1,410
710
3,130
34,080
1,310
2,590
1,360
850
180
720
1,170
520
830
1.700
22,240
2,400
572,780
95
90
210,900
220,050
38,240
27,290
210,380
53,510
20,280
20,980
801,630
97
96
81
86
94
71
78
96
87
81
76
77
91
81
90
86
92
85
95
86
CONNECTICUT
Fairfield
Hartford
Litchfield
Middlesex
New Haven
New London
Tolland
Windham
State total
39,650
2,420
38,140
530
1,330
1,680
26.040
2.310
640
890
1,620
590
1,020
330
4,480
170,890
350
1,550
1,060
1,050
53,340
5,600
3,350
370
880
1,250
200
1,860
450
53,080
560
1,680
1,790
5,280
19.370
4,470
1,510
5,580
16,120
97
TV
Homes
95
95
97
95
95
95
DELAWARE
Kent
New Castle
Sussex
State total
20,350 94
97,450 97
21,460 91
139,260
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Dist. of Columbia
State total
244,840
244,840
92
20,080
1,500
18,970
3,140
43,430
135,450
1,560
6,670
3,210
5,090
5,960
5.240
352,260
3,020
84
88
92
87
92
95
74
88
82
89
83
83
93
84
FLORIDA
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Collier
Co.
C.
Nielson
79
TV
County
Homes
Dixie
950
Duval
139,210
Escambia
51,920
Flagler
1,280
Franklin
1,750
Gadsden
7,940
Gilchrist
660
Glades
600
Gulf
2,270
Hamilton
1,550
Hardee
3,610
Hendry
2,540
Hernando
3,510
Highlands
7,220
Hillsborough 133,640
Holmes
2,350
Indian River
9,270
Jackson
7,980
Jefferson
2,020
Lafayette
840
Lake
19,800
Lee
21,090
Leon
20,260
Levy
2,460
Liberty
690
Madison
2,790
Manatee
27,500
Marion
15,460
Martin
7,030
Monroe
13,850
Nassau
4,780
Okaloosa
17,560
Okeechobee
2,190
Orange
91,430
Osceola
7,020
Palm Beach 88,560
Pasco
12,710
Pinellas
163,090
Polk
51,390
Putnam
9,030
St. Johns
8,910
St. Lucie
13,490
Santa Rosa
8,440
Sarasota
31,680
Seminole
18,780
Sumter
3,330
Suwannee
3,690
Taylor
3,150
Union
1,080
Volusia
50,740
Wakulla
1.280
Walton
3,760
Washington
2,600
State total 1,726,110
%
68
94
94
85
76
81
83
75
81
74
88
77
85
85
93
73
85
79
75
71
92
90
88
72
77
70
93
84
88
80
90
92
88
93
87
91
89
93
92
89
89
87
92
90
92
83
75
77
83
91
85
82
79
GEORGIA
Appling
Atkinson
Bacon
Baker
Baldwin
Banks
Barrow
Bartow
Ben Hill
Berrien
Bibb
Bleckley
Brantley
Brooks
Bryan
Bulloch
Burke
Butts
Calhoun
Camden
Candler
Carroll
Catoosa
Charlton
Chatham
Chattahoochee
Chattooga
Cherokee
Clarke
Clay
Clayton
Clinch
Cobb
Coffee
Colquitt
Columbia
Cook
Coweta
Crawford
Crisp
Dade
Dawson
Decatur
De Kalb
Dodge
Dooly
Dougherty
Douglas
Early
Echols
Effingham
:6O
2,470
900
1,710
730
4,960
1,410
3,950
7,860
3,010
2,310
42,350
2,070
1,250
77
64
82
73
81
83
90
91
77
77
3,000
81
92
80
83
1,270 85
5,520 85
3,680 75
2,020
1,100 65
2,420 90
1,270 80
10,250 92
6,040 94
8
1,090
84
52,700
1,230
4,910
6,060
12,630
750
15,620
1,400
37.060
4,420
7,890
3,440
2,580
8,920
1,000
92
4,050
79
2,170
90
83
84
96
82
80
5,130
89,620
3,430
2,250
21,450
4,520
2,350
360
2,200
95
89
92
90
75
95
78
96
79
88
88
81
87
71
80
90
92
78
72
85
TV
County
Elbert
Emanuel
Evans
Fannin
Fayette
Floyd
Forsyth
Franklin
Fulton
Gilmer
Glascock
Glynn
Gordon
Grady
Greene
Gwinnett
Habersham
Hall
Hancock
Haralson
Harris
Hart
Heard
Henry
Houston
Irwin
Jackson
Jasper
Jeff Davis
Jefferson
Jenkins
Johnson
Jones
Lamar
Lanier
Laurens
Lee
Liberty
Lincoln
Long
Lowndes
LUmpkin
McDufñe
McIntosh
Macon
Madison
Marion
Paulding
Peach
Pickens
Pierce
Pike
Polk
Pulaski
Putnam
Quitman
Rabun
Randolph
Richmond
Rockdale
Schley
Screven
Seminole
Spaldingg
Stephens
Stewart
Sumter
Talbot
Taliaferro
Tattnall
Taylor
Telfair
Terrell
Thomas
Taft
Toombs
Treutlen
Troup
rou p
Turner
Twiggs
Union
Upson
Walker
Walton
Ware
Warren
Washington
Wayne
Webster
Wheeler
White
Whitefield
Wilcox
Wilkes
Wilkinson
Worth
State total
(SPECIAL REPORT: TV HOMES)
%
County
4,480
3,740
1,640
2,890
1,880
18,850
3,260
3,250
166,700
1,820
500
12,720
5,080
4.070
2,140
12,910
4,410
13,790
1,530
3,740
2,360
3,860
1,020
4,100
11,420
1.770
4,520
1,110
1,750
3,500
1,800
1,670
1,820
90
80
86
82
89
92
93
90
94
83
84
90
HAWAII
91
85
79
94
86
92
69
89
84
90
85
87
93
80
89
79
80
81
82
83
83
2430 87
1,000
7,510
1,120
3,100
1,180
790
Meriwether
Miller
Mitchell
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan
Murray
Muscogee
Newton
Oconee
Oglethorpe
Homes
11,700
1,600
3,100
1,340
2,450
2,590
890
4,100
1,310
3,830
2,230
1,040
2,060
2,400
45.090
5,270
1,500
1,460
3,500
3,260
2.210
1,850
1,380
7,380
1,730
1.660
950
1,670
2,040
35,450
2,600
720
2,730
1,400
10,020
4,600
1,240
5,320
1,330
540
3,000
1,600
2,130
2,500
8,950
5,250
3,400
77
83
80
84
84
79
85
89
86
79
78
86
69
84
77
80
86
70
82
86
93
89
94
81
92
86
89
80
81
90
79
83
75
84
76
93
90
80
78
82
91
87
69
77
'78
77
83
80
71
78
87
82
75
1,130 86
11,470 88
1,710 82
1,390 77
1,350 85
5,930 89
13,160 93
4,970 89
8,650 87
1,340
3,380
4,340
520
940
1,58
12,590
1,550
2,220
1,860
3,240
1,034,980
79
72
85
66
72
8
93
82
77
81
83
Hawaii
Honolulu
Kauai
Maui
State total
TV
TV
Homes
%
12,950
135,290
4,370
10,620
163,230
83
94
56
89
31.050
740
13.880
1,760
1,730
7,440
100
1 440
4,360
13,770
1,410
940
280
16,450
1,390
4,290
280
2.280
700
4,850
1,800
2,180
2,540
2,390
3,410
2,930
3,090
9.540
5,420
1,260
1,280
900
2,200
3.860
8,440
830
1,750
3,550
1,010
5,410
680
12,450
740
2,250
189,050
94
83
93
88
91
95
85
88
89
96
83
94
94
IDAHO
Ada
Adams
Bannock
Bear Lake
Benewah
Bingham
BlaMe
Boise
Bonner
Bonneville
Boundary
Butte
Camas
Canyon
Caribou
Cassia
Clark
Clearwater
Custer
Elmore
Franklin
Fremont
Gem
Gooding
Idaho
Jefferson
Jerome
Kootenai
Latah
Lemhi
Lewis
Lincoln
Madison
Minidoka
Nez Perce
Oneida
Owyhee
Payette
Power
Shoshone
Teton
Twin Falls
Valley
Washington
State total
91
87
93
92
88
78
93
90
95
91
92
81
98
94
94
87
70
91
90
96
90
92
92
92
91
84
90
98
94
83
Alexander
Bond
Boone
Brown
Bureau
Calhoun
Carroll
Cass
Champaign
Christian
Clark
Clay
Clinton
Coles
Cook
Crawford
Cumberland
De Kalb
De Witt
Douglas
Du Page
Edgar
Edwards
96
9,080
91
6,270
1,840
11,330
1,670
5,910
4,370
38,040
11,130
5,000
4,340
6,640
13,400
95
92
95
93
95
93
95
95
93
87
95
95
89
96
Iroquois
6,610
2,840
17,500
5,390
6,250
101,150
7,070
2,180
6,270
5,860
5,030
11,640
12,920
1,890
5,210
7,040
2,510
7,320
1,560
2.420
15,850
10,140
Jackson
94
92
96
95
95
98
94
87
90
92
95
92
95
86
95
96
84
95
92
93
97
95
12,420
93
91
Kane
3,100
9.240
4,860
5,960
1,890
64,180
25,450
5,630
19,570
89.000
33,900
Effingham
Fayette
Ford
Franklin
Fulton
Gallatin
Greene
Grundy
Hamilton
Hancock
Hardin
Henderson
Henry
Jasper
Jefferson
Jersey
Jo Daviess
Johnson
Kankakee
Kendall'
Knox
Lake
La Salle
Randolph
Richland
Rock Island
St. Clair
Saline
Sangamon
Schuyler
Scott
Shelby
Stark
Stephenson
Tazewell
Union
Vermilion
Wabash
Warren
Washington
Wayne
White
Whiteside
111
Williamson
Winnebago
Woodford
State total
5.430
4,640
6,230
1,030
2,460
1,360
7,880
4.480
47.640
81,230
7,640
48,740
2,640
1,820
6.650
2,290
14,500
32,010
4,470
30,240
3,940
6,500
3,910
5,210
5,200
18,710
60,100
14,630
66,740
7,260
3,129,510
92
97
93
86
88
91
95
90
97
96
93
95
94
96
91
95
95
96
93
95
92
96
91
85
85
96
97
94
97
93
INDIANA
21,550
4,080
1.612,630
Perry
Piatt
Pike
Pope
Pulaski
Putnam
87
ILLINOIS
Adams
County
Homes %
Lawrence
5,390 93
Lee
10,370 96
Livingston
11,460 94
Logan
9,130 95
McDonough
8,710 95
McHenry
28,420 98
McLean
26,050 95
Macon
38,390 96
Macoupin
13.430 95
Madison
71,110 96
Marion
12,080 94
Marshall
3,930 94
Mason
4,750 95
Massac
4.370 91
Menard
2,780 93
Mercer
5.200 96
Monroe
4.620 94
Montgomery
9,620 94
Morgan
10,080 93
Moultrie
3,850 92
Ogle
12,060 96
Peoria
58,000 96
92
94
92
90
97
96
97
97
98
95
Adams
Allen
Bartholomew
Benton
Blackford
Boone
Brown
Carroll
Cass
Clark
Clay
Clinton
Crawford
Daviess
Dearborn
Decatur
De Kalb
Delaware
DuBois
Elkhart
Fayette
Floyd
Fountain
Franklin
Fulton
Gibson
Grant
Greene
Hamilton
Hancock
Harrison
Hendricks
Henry
Howard
Huntington
Jackson
Jasper
Jay
Jefferson
Jennings
Johnson
Knox
Kosciusko
Lagrange
Lake
La Porte
Lawrence
Madison
Marion
Marshall
Martin
Miami
Monroe
7,200
75,340
15,440
3,140
4,590
8.490
2,010
5,280
12,120
18,520
7,660
9.730
2,150
7,380
8,740
6,070
8,510
34,520
7,290
33,250
6,990
15.820
5,730
4,170
5,240
8,860
22,910
8,390
12,980
9.090
5.180
12,980
14,710
22,380
10,570
8,990
5.020
6,920
6,510
4,430
14,260
13,020
13,210
4,340
151,690
28,850
10,940
39,630
222,950
9,320
2,710
11.790
17,400
95
97
96
95
96
97
96
96
95
96
96
96
89
92
96
95
97
97
92
95
96
97
95
93
95
95
96
94
97
97
94
97
97
97
97
96
96
94
94
94
98
96
96
89
97
97
96
97
97
95
94
95
94
TV
Homes
County
Montgomery 10,120
Morgan
10,570
Newton
3,330
Noble
8,440
Ohio
1.260
Orange
4,830
Owen
3.510
Parke
4,710
Perry
4,690
Pike
3,770
Porter
19,700
Posey
5,400
Pulaski
3,300
Putnam
6,780
Randolph
8,660
Ripley
5,910
Rush
5,910
St. Joseph
71,890
Scott
3,960
Shelby
10,920
Spencer
4,290
Starke
4,920
Steuben
5,280
Sullivan
6,730
Switzerland
2,020
Tippecande
25,580
Tipton
4,840
Union
1,870
Vanderburgh 48,620
Vermillion
5,170
Vigo
32,940
Wabash
10,090
Warren
2,340
Warrick
6,580
Washington
5,160
Wayne
22,450
Wells
6,360
White
6,070
Whitley
6,260
State Total 1,420,640
%
96
96
95
95
97
93
95
96
92
92
97
92
92
96
95
94
97
97
92
97
93
95
96
95
92
95
97
93
96
96
96
93
94
94
92
96
95
95
96
IOWA
Adair
Adams
Allamakee
Appanoose
Audubon
Benton
Black Hawk
Boone
Bremer
Buchanan
Buena Vista
Butler
Calhoun
Carroll
Cass
Cedar
Cerro Gordo
Cherokee
Chickasaw
Clarke
Clay
Clayton
Clinton
Crawford
Dallas
Davis
Decatur
Delaware
Des Moines
Dickinson
Dubuque
Emmet
Fayette
Floyd
Franklin
Fremont
Greene
Grundy
Guthrie
Hamilton
Hancock
Hardin
Harrison
Henry
Howard
Humboldt
Ida
Iowa
Jackson
Jasper
Jefferson
Johnson
Jones
Keokuk
Kossuth
Lee
Linn
Louisa
Lucas
Lyon
Madison
Mahaska
Marlon
_
3,240
2,000
4.220
4,970
3,150
6,920
37.170
8,050
5,850
5,670
6.260
4,940
4,720
6,540
5,670
5,260
15,190
5,110
4,050
2,500
5,370
6,050
16.870
5,340
7,350
2,530
2,740
5,010
13,880
3,580
21,100
3,920
8.090
6.140
4.500
3,180
4,430
4,330
4,150
6,190
4,160
7,140
5,020
4,900
3,400
3,740
3,050
4.700
5,890
11,180
4,550
15,010
5,740
4.410
6,880
12,920
44,840
3,000
3,130
3,890
3,660
6,910
7,270
95
91
94
92
96
96
97
96
94
94
95
93
94
96
95
96
96
95
94
93
93
92
97
95
95
94
88
94
96
92
94
87
95
94
96
96
96
96
94
95
95
95
95
91
89
94
95
94
93
96
93
93
96
92
98
96
97
94
89
93
96
93
94
Source: A. C. Nielson
Co.
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
TV
Homes %
County
11.800 97
Marshall
3,240 95
Mills
3,980 95
Mitchell
4.050 94
Monona
2,910 94
Monroe
4,530 94
Montgomery
10,690 96
Muscatine
5,560 96
O'Brien
2,800 93
Osceola
6,160 93
Page
3,640 89
Palo Alto
6,700 96
Plymouth
3,850 94
Pocahontas
88,410 97
Polk
Pottawattamie 25.930 96
5.410 95
Poweshiek
2,270 94
Ringgold
4,970 94
Sac
97
37,610
Scott
4,400 96
Shelby
91
6,890
Sioux
14,310 95
Story
6,240 95
Tama
2,970 90
Taylor
4,210 93
Union
2,750 92
Van Buren
14,160 96
Wapello
6,140 96
Warren
5,410 92
Washington
2,900 91
Wayne
14,720 96
Webster
3,700 95
Winnebago
5,450 92
Winneshlek
32,790 96
Woodbury
2,740 95
Worth
5,820 95
Wright
821,620
State total
Chautauqua
Cherokee
Cheyenne
Clark
Clay
Cloud
Coffey
Comanche
Cowley
Crawford
Decatur
Dickinson
Doniphan
Douglas
Edwards
Elk
Ellis
Ellsworth
Finney
Ford
Franklin
Geary
Gove
Graham
Grant
Gray
Greeley
Greenwood
Hamilton
Harper
Harvey
Haskell
Hodgeman
Jackson
Jefferson
Jewell
Johnson
Kearny
Kingman
Kiowa
Labette
Lane
Leavenworth
Lincoln
Linn
Logan
Lyon
McPherson
Marion
Marshall
Meade
Miami
Mitchell
Montgomery
Morris
Morton
Nemaha
Neosho
Ness
Norton
Osage
%
86
86
93
85
91
94
90
96
89
95
91
93
93
92
95
92
96
92
96
90
92
90
93
85
83
94
86
88
88
87
87
86
89
86
96
KENTUCKY
KANSAS
Allen
Anderson
Atchison
Barber
Barton
Bourbon
Brown
Butler
Chase
TV
TV
Homes
County
2,060
Osborne
2,060
Ottawa
2,790
Pawnee
2,710
Phillips
Pottawatomie 3,360
3,850
Pratt
1,440
Rawlins
Reno
Republic
12,930
4,180
Rice
10,420
Riley
2,590
Rooks
1,770
Rush
3.490
Russell
16,030
Saline
1,560
Scott
101,290
Sedgwick
5,080
Seward
45,350
Shawnee
1,080
Sheridan
2,020
Sherman
2,440
Smith
2,320
Stafford
510
Stanton
1,080
Stevens
7,780
Sumner
1,990
Thomas
1,410
Trego
1.930
Wabaunsee
610
Wallace
3,220
Washington.
690
Wichita
4,340
Wilson
1,460
Woodson
58,200
Wyandotte
660,900
State total
5,400
2,630
5,920
2,440
10.490
5.350
4.710
11,330
1,160
1,930
7,190
1,360
1,220
3,070
4,060
2,390
860
11,440
12,400
1,820
7,020
2,870
12,340
1,580
1,480
5,680
2,330
4,960
6,320
6,500
7,930
1,110
1,480
1.390
1,210
540
3,330
860
3.060
7,460
840
800
3,110
3,230
2,060
50,550
840
3.150
1,290
8,230
830
12,360
1,720
2,660
1,120
7,440
6,860
4,220
4.690
1,760
5.850
2.530
14,090
2,150
970
3,620
5,950
1,730
2,530
3,970
BROADCASTING, January
90
91
95
91
96
92
92
95
89
92
95
91
94
85
86
86
86
94
95
91
91
93
92
93
87
95
89
94
94
93
93
86
93
92
93
90
90
86
93
92
93
89
92
92
82
98
94
95
86
92
92
96
86
92
88
89
89
90
88
98
96
87
93
89
88
93
91
91
92
17,
Adair
Allen
Anderson
Ballard
Barren
Bath
Bell
Boone
Bourbon
Boyd
Boyle
Bracken
Breathitt
Breckinridge
Bullitt
Butler
Caldwell
Calloway
Campbell
Carlisle
Carroll
Carter
Casey
Christian
Clark
Clay
Clinton
Crittenden
Cumberland
Daviess
Edmonson
Elliott
Estill
Fayette
Fleming
Floyd
Franklin
Fulton
Gallatin
Garrard
Grant
Graves
Grayson
Green
Greenup
Hancock
Hardin
Harlan
Harrison
Hart
Henderson
Henry
Hickman
Hopkins
Jackson
Jefferson
Jessamine
Johnson
Kenton
Knott
Knox
Larue
Laurel
Lawrence
Lee
Leslie
Letcher
Lewis
Lincoln
Livingston
Logan
1966
3,090
3,170
2.510
2.520
7,620
2,010
7,060
6,780
4,920
14,710
5,420
1,950
1,980
3.740
4,620
2,150
3,530
6,340
26,130
1.700
2.200
4,790
2,790
15,320
6,000
3,360
1,920
2.160
1.580
20,100
1,700
1,450
2,480
40,020
2,660
8,070
9,300
2,770
1,020
2,560
2,650
9,040
3,620
2,870
7,500
1,490
14,170
9,120
3,940
3,470
9.740
3,090
1,740
10,730
1,630
188,600
3,190
4,040
36,860
2,610
5,000
2,790
5,270
2.800
1,220
1,320
5,330
2,940
3.620
2,170
5,650
77
88
93
93
90
80
87
97
91
97
89
93
66
89
94
86
84
91
98
95
92
89
78
92
88
73
80
86
79
94
81
91
71
94
86
90
93
89
92
85
91
93
84
84
94
88
95
87
92
89
94
91
92
90
65
97
84
88
98
73
82
90
80
90
68
63
82
84
82
91
91
Homes %
County
Lyon
1,300 86
McCracken
18,160 95
2,060 76
McCreary
2,520 90
McLean
Madison
8,850 86
Magoffìn
1,820 79
Marion
3,890 93
Marshall
5,360 94
Martin
1,730 82
5.100 91
Mason
Meade
5,350 95
Menifee
870 79
Mercer
4.140 88
Metcalfe
1.970 86
Monroe
2,760 89
Montgomery
3.230 81
Morgan
2,170 80
Muhlenberg
6.850 91
Nelson
5.010 93
Nicholas
1,640 86
Ohio
4,290 88
Oldham
2.930 95
Owen
2,120 88
Owsley
720 60
Pendleton
2.850 95
Perry
5.710 80
Pike
13.360 88
Powell
1,160 68
Pulaski
7.710 81
730 91
Robertson
Rockcastle
2,200 71
Rowan
2.880 85
Russell
2,280 81
4,230 90
Scott
5.610 94
Shelby
Simpson
3.380 91
Spencer
1.490 93
4,180 85
Taylor
Todd
2.990 91
Trigg
2.240 90
Trimble
1.300 93
Union
3,760 89
Warren
13,300 92
Washington
2.660 92
Wayne
2,580 68
Webster
3,840 85
Whitley
5.750 85
1.080 72
Wolfe
Woodford
3.140 90
State total
797,660
LOUISIANA
Acadia
Allen
Ascension
Assumption
Avoyelles
12,420
4,690
6,690
3,690
9.020
4,510
3.620
16,130
66,950
43.380
1,880
1,740
2.290
4,060
4,840
5,500
Beauregard
Bienville
Bossier
Caddo
Calcasieu
Caldwell
Cameron
Catahoula
Claiborne
Concordia
De Soto
East Baton Rouge
66,280
2,550
East Carroll
East Feliciana 2,830
7,130
Evangeline
5,230
Franklin
3,130
Grant
13.700
Iberia
6,900
Iberville
4,020
Jackson
65,090
Jefferson
Jefferson Davis 7,590
23,060
Lafayette
14,900
Lafourche
3,220
La Salle
6,870
Lincoln
6,780
Livingston
Madison
Morehouse
3,280
8,000
Natchitoches
6,980
187,810
Orleans
Ouachita
30,830
Plaquemines
6.110
Pointe Coupee 4,600
Rapides
30,410
1,970
Red River
4,920
Richland
3,600
Sabine
9,920
St. Bernard
5,790
Charles
St.
1,660
St. Helena
St. James
3,860
St. John the Sept.
Landry
Martin
Mary
Tammany
Tangipahoa
Tensas
Terrebonne
St.
St.
St.
St.
89
84
84
82
86
81
82
93
93
93
82
87
74
81
77
82
94
75
76
81
86
82
91
85
85
95
87
92
93
83
90
85
76
87
78
93
93
91
82
92
79
85
74
97
92
76
88
4,290 87
17,320 84
6.520 88
13,230 91
11,010 91
14,820 88
2,140 74
15,780 92
TV
Homes
County
Union
4,220
Vermilion
10,520
Vernon
4.240
Washington
11,480
Webster
10,960
West Baton Rouge
3,530
West Carroll
2,950
West Feliciana 1,810
Winn
3,780
State total
879,030
TV
%
88
91
80
87
89
86
84
79
80
MAINE
Androscoggin
Aroostook
Cumberland
Franklin
Hancock
Kennebec
Knox
Lincoln
Oxford
Penobscot
Piscataquis
Sagadahoc
Somerset
Waldo
Washington
York
State total
25,880
24,690
54,820
5,040
9.730
24,840
8,430
5,440
12,240
35,150
4,710
6,640
10,880
6,300
8,970
29,770
273,530
96
Allegany
24,680
Anne Arundel 60,510
Baltimore
415,370
Calvert
4,140
Caroline
5,270
Carroll
15,110
13,630
Cecil
8,130
Charles
Dorchester
8,470
21,100
Frederick
5,150
Garrett
Harford
23,180
Howard
11,690
Kent
5,090
Montgomery 111,210
Prince Georges
124,580
Queen Annes
4,720
9,620
St. Marys
Somerset
4,850
Talbot
7,710
Washington
28,680
Wicomico
15,140
Worcester
6,290
State total
934,320
93
96
98
90
89
96
96
91
89
95
84
96
96
93
97
92
96
90
95
95
92
94
96
96
94
93
94
93
92
97
MARYLAND
97
91
93
84
93
94
93
84
Homes %
County
2,920 94
Gladwin
Gogebic
6,680 93
Grand Traverse 9,340 94
Gratiot
10,400 96
Hillsdale
9,630 95
Houghton
9,630 92
Huron
9,250 95
Ingham
64,110 97
Ionia
11,810 98
Iosco
6,660 96
Iron
4,910 94
Isabella
8.530 95
Jackson
38,130 98
Kalamazoo
50,000 97
Kalkaska
1,210 93
Kent
110,780 97
Keweenaw
750 93
Lake
1,650 92
Lapeer
11,110 97
Leelanau
2,730 94
Lenawee
21,520 97
Livingston
11,290 97
Luce
1,440 90
Mackinac
2,770 92
Macomb
134,380 99
Manistee
5,790 95
Marquette
16,620 97
Mason
6,220 91
Mecosta
5,590 95
Menominee
6,810 96
Midland
14,780 98
Missaukee
1,650 92
Monroe
29,730 98
Montcalm
11,310 97
Montmorency 1,140 88
Muskegon
44,470 97
Newaygo
7,110 95
Oakland
207,390 98
Oceana
4,430 92
Ogemaw
2,650 95
Ontonagon
2,810 88
Osceola
3,790 95
Oscoda
1,050 88
Otsego
2,280 95
Ottawa
28,860 97
Presque Isle
3,130 87
Roscommon
2,420 97
Saginaw
54,440 98
St. Clair
31,760 97
St. Joseph
13,020 97
Sanilac
9.370 96
Schoolcraft
2,240 90
Shiawasee
15,730 97
Tuscola
11,800 97
Van Buren
15,540 97
Washtenaw
50,420 95
Wayne
'773,050 97
Wexford
5,270 96
State total 2,304,690
MINNESOTA
MASSACHUSETTS
Barnstable
Berkshire
Bristol
Dukes
Essex
Franklin
Hampden
Hampshire
Middlesex
Nantucket
Norfolk
Plymouth
Suffolk
Worcester
State total
24,820
42,530
124,690
1,770
178,570
15,870
133,500
27,680
365,590
1,090
157,460
80,500
221,440
172,750
1,548,260
95
96
97
88
97
92
96
94
97
91
98
97
94
97
1,640
2,320
16,130
7,350
3,030
2,650
1,960
8,490
30,620
2,330
46,030
9,670
42,830
10,860
3.950
3,600
9,630
3,570
11,720
1,380
9,420
7,410
15,010
4,400
114,390
91
93
97
89
95
95
93
97
98
93
96
97
98
96
94
90
93
94
98
92
94
96
97
92
98
MICHIGAN
Alcova
Alger
Allegan
Alpena
Antrim
Arenac
Baraga
Barry
Bay
Benzie
Berrien
Branch
Calhoun
Cass
Charlevoix
Cheboygan
Chippewa
Clare
Clinton
Crawford
Delta
Dickinson
Eaton
Emmet
Genesee
Aitkln
Anoka
Becker
Beltrami
Benton
Big Stone
Blue Earth
Brown
Carlton
Carver
Cass
Chippewa
Chisago
Clay
Clearwater
Cook
Cottonwood
Crow Wing
Dakota
Dodge
Douglas
Faribault
Fillmore
Freeborn
Goodhue
3,520
27,750
6,070
5,120
4,480
2,410
12.340
7,780
7,550
6,280
3,860
4,360
3,940
11,130
1,960
880
3,910
9,040
26,100
3,590
5,870
6,660
6,480
11,180
9,630
2,450
262,940
4,410
2,210
3,440
9,900
4,020
2,470
7,870
1,980
4,090
3,650
4,280
Grant
Hennepin
Houston
Hubbard
Isanti
Itasca
Jackson
Kanabec
Kandiyohi
Kittson
Koochiching
Lac Qui Parle
Lake
Lake of the Wood
800
Le Sueur
5,730
Lincoln
2,570
Lyon
5,770
93
98
89
76
93
93
94
92
96
97
77
89
94
97
79
88
83
90
97
92
90
94
94
96
95
94
96
94
76
93
93
91
91
90
83
82
91
95
62
94
92
89
Source: A. C. Nielson
Co.
81
County
TV
Homes
McLeod
7,220
1,510
3,550
7,560
5,190
4,030
6,430
13,690
3,670
5,350
6,390
2,930
19,320
13,020
3,190
4,930
3,850
10,020
3,030
126,390
1,360
5,430
6,220
9,690
3,180
2.380
70,050
6,800
3,990
4,330
19,540
7,820
2,960
3.820
5,840
2.040
4,710
2,910
4,720
17,290
3,830
2,860
11,570
8,530
Mahnoman
Marshall
Martin
Meeker
Mille Lacs
Morrison
Mower
Murray
Nicollet
Nobles
Norman
Olmsted
Otter Tail
Pennington
Pine
Pipestone
Polk
Pope
Ramsey
Red Lake
Redwood
Renville
Rice
Rock
Roseau
St. Louis
Scott
Sherburne
Sibley
Stearns
Steele
Stevens
Swift
Todd
Traverse
Wabasha
Waders
Waseca
Washington
Watonwan
Wilkin
Winona
Wright
Yellow Medicine
State total
3,840
986,250
%
95
89
89
93
93
92
88
96
94
94
95
89
96
90
86
90
94
93
87
96
91
88
90
95
96
70
95
97
94
94
94
95
92
91
86
93
94
81
94
97
91
95
93
94
83
MISSISSIPPI
Adams
Alcorn
Amite
Attala
Benton
Bolivar
Calhoun
Carroll
Chickasaw
Choctaw
Claiborne
Clarke
Clay
Coahoma
Copiah
Covington
De Soto
Forrest
Franklin
George
Greene
Grenada
Hancock
Harrison
Hinds
Holmes
Humphreys
Issaquena
Itawamba
Jackson
Jasper
Jefferson
Jefferson Davis
Jones
Kemper
Lafayette
Lamar
Lauderdale
Lawrence
Leake
Lee
Leflore
Lincoln
Lowndes
Madison
Marion
Marshall
Monroe
Montgomery
Neshoba
Newton
Noxubee
Oktibbeha
Panola
Pearl River
Perry
Pike
Pontotoc
Prentiss
82
8.450
6.280
2,700
4,090
1,430
8,950
3,370
1,500
3,490
1,430
1,660
3,460
4,290
8,800
5.590
2,710
4,470
14,300
1,720
2.500
1,460
3,820
3.860
33.250
53.140
4,600
3,050
390
3,420
17,120
3,350
1,490
2.230
14,440
1,870
4,030
3,280
18,390
1,810
3,500
10,470
9.150
5,700
11,740
5.930
4,300
3,980
7,820
2,480
4.270
4,130
2,680
5,030
5,900
5,710
1.860
7,840
4,060
4.290
81
83
73
74
79
69
80
63
79
71
69
80
81
74
82
80
78
89
72
89
73
75
86
92
92
74
73
66
83
91
82
62
72
90
'72
81
84
91
75
81
86
76
80
88
79
77
77
85
71
82
83
69
76
84
85
81
81
83
84
TV
Homes
County
Quitman
3,380
Rankin
7,010
Scott
4,600
Sharkey
1.710
Simpson
4,260
Smith
2,760
Stone
1,510
Sunflower
8,700
Tallahatchie
3,600
Tate
3,630
Tippah
3,420
Tishomingo
3.220
Tunica
2.660
Union
4,850
Walthall
2.380
Warren
10,880
Washington
16,270
Wayne
3,060
Webster
2,080
Wilkinson
2.050
Winston
3.750
Yalobusha
2.240
Yazoo
State total
6.400
479.440
%
73
84
82
71
84
'79
84
'70
71
81
88
79
72
90
'74
84
79
76
'77
86
78
72
80
MISSOURI
Adair
6.290
Andrew
3,290
Atchison
2.620
Audrain
8,290
Barry
5.170
Barton
3.350
Bates
4.930
Benton
2.070
Bollinger
2,270
Boone
16.750
27,540
Buchanan
Butler
9,390
Caldwell
2,920
Callaway
6,060
Camden
2,930
Cape Girardeau
12,990
Carroll
4.040
Carter
840
Cass
10,060
Cedar
2,710
Chariton
3.380
Christian
3.690
2,570
Clark
Clay
30,830
Clinton
3.710
Cole
11,850
Cooper
4,440
Crawford
3,540
Dade
2,190
Dallas
2.740
Daviess
2,960
De Kalb
2,180
Dent
2,830
Douglas
2,100
Dunklin
10,101
Franklin
Gasconade
Gentry
Greene
Grundy
Harrison
Henry
Hickory
Holt
Howard
Howell
Iron
Jackson
Jasper
Jefferson
Johnson
Knox
Laclede
Lafayette
Lawrence
Lewis
Lincoln
Linn
Livingston
McDonald
Macon
Madison
Maries
Marion
Mercer
Miller
Mississippi
Moniteau
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan
New Madrid
Newton
Nodaway
Oregon
Osage
Ozark
Pemiscot
Perry
Pettis
Phelps
(SPECIAL REPORT: TV HOMES)
14,250
3,540
2,440
42,890
3,780
3,290
6,020
1,330
2,290
3.040
5,370
1.870
212,240
26,130
21,640
9.070
1,950
5.520
7.700
6,880
3,210
4,710
5,010
4,810
3.300
5,180
2,490
1,960
9,340
1,590
4,040
4,890
3.230
3,290
3.480
2,830
6,540
9,220
6,350
2,030
2,700
1,500
8,450
3,780
12.170
7.090
92
94
93
94
89
91
TV
Homes %
County
Pike
5.100 91
Platte
7,750 96
Polk
3,850 89
Pulaski
8,880 91
Putnam
2,080 95
Balls
2.370 95
Randolph
7.230 93
Ray
5.080 94
Reynolds
1.090 78
Ripley
1,900 73
St. Charles
18,230 96
St. Clair
2.260 87
St. Francois
10.540 94
St. Louis
458,370 97
Ste. Genevieve 3,170 93
Saline
7,470 92
Schuyler
1.380 86
Scotland
1,960 93
Scott
9,050 94
Shannon
1,380 69
Shelby
2,750 92
Stoddard
7,630 93
Stone
2,060 86
Sullivan
2,360 91
Taney
3,120 92
Texas
4,390 81
Vernon
5,750 90
Warren
2,630 91
Washington
3.550 09
Wayne
2,230 86
Webster
3,750 89
Worth
1,140 95
Wright
3.670 83
State total 1,332,760
90
BR
87
94
95
88
94
93
89
94
92
70
95
88
87
92
92
97
93
96
92
82
91
91
92
91
81
88
91
96
89
90
96
90
92
91
89
88
92
78
85
95
94
97
94
93
90
94
89
92
92
89
91
92
93
89
89
94
88
92
91
92
94
92
91
90
94
92
70
87
84
90
90
93
88
MONTANA
Beaverhead
Bib Horn
Blaine
Broadwater
Carbon
Carter
Cascade
Chouteau
Custer
Daniels
Dawson
Deer Lodge
Fallon
Fergus
Flathead
Gallatin
Garfield
Glacier
Golden Valley
Granite
1,890 79
2,110 81
1,740 76
660 83
2,210 89
600 75
24,400 95
2,000 91
3,540 80
940 86
3,430 88
4,830 93
1,090 84
3,610 82
9,510 91
7,320 87
360 60
2,970 85
320 BO
900 90
Hill
5,290 90
Jefferson
940 86
Judith Basin
740 83
Lake
3,610 90
Lewis and Clark 8,500 88
Liberty
630 90
Lincoln
3,680 88
McCone
760 84
Madison
1,480 92
Meagher
710 79
Mineral
990 90
Missoula
13,550 90
Musselshell
1,240 83
Park
3,950 88
Petroleum
230 78
Phillips
1,350 75
Pondera
2,100 91
Powder River
480 69
Powell
1,800 86
Prairie
530 76
Ravalli
3,520 88
Richland
2,790 90
Roosevelt
3,090 91
Rosebud
1,330 78
Sanders
1,780 77
Sheridan
1,840 92
Silver Bow
14,310 94
Stillwater
1,600 94
Sweet Grass
850 '78
Teton
1,930 92
Toole
2,170 90
Treasure
330 82
Valley
5.150 82
Wheatland
670 83
Wibaux
450 89
Yellowstone
25,160 96
State total
193,960
NEBRASKA
Adams
Antelope
Arthur
Banner
Blaine
Boone
Box Butte
Boyd
Brown
Buffalo
Burt
8,840
2,610
180
95
87
90
380 96
220 75
2,300 92
3,330 93
1,220 87
1,160 83
7,770 95
2,970 9R
County
Butler
Cass
Cedar
Chase
Cherry
Cheyenne
Clay
Colfax
Cuming
Custer
Dakota
Dawes
Dawson
Deuel
Dixon
Dodge
Douglas
Dundy
Fillmore
Franklin
Frontier
Furnas
Gage
Garden
Garfield
Gosper
Grant
Greeley
Hall
Hamilton
Harlan
Hayes
Hitchcock
Holt
Hooker
Howard
Jefferson
Johnson
Kearney
Keith
Keya Paha
Kimball
Knox
Lancaster
Lincoln
Logan
Loup
McPherson
Madison
Merrick
Morrill
Nance
Nemaha
Nuckolls
Otoe
Pawnee
Perkins
Phelps
Pierce
Platte
Polk
Redwillow
Richardson
Rock
Saline
Sarpy
Saunders
Scotts Bluff
Seward
Sheridan
Sherman
Sioux
Stanton
Thayer
Thomas
Thurston
Valley
Washington
Wayne
Webster
Wheeler
York
State total
TV
Homes
2,830
5,450
3,410
1,220
2,270
4,390
2,840
2,920
3,350
4,230
3,590
2,570
5,650
920
2,110
11,180
113,380
820
2,930
1,600
1,220
2,160
7,700
840
700
770
240
940
11,500
2,570
1,310
550
1,420
3,130
400
1,830
3,250
1,760
2,050
2,480
460
2,720
3,220
51,450
8,640
250
270
160
7.280
2,480
1,680
1,440
2,490
2,280
5,120
1,420
1,170
3,190
2,320
7,120
2,130
4,140
3,810
700
3,850
9,520
5,140
9,440
3,740
2,470
1,350
720
1,450
2,610
230
1,660
1,640
3,600
2,810
1,800
340
4,110
427,880
%
91
96
95
94
91
91
98
91
93
88
97
86
94
92
96
96
96
91
94
94
94
90
94
84
88
96
81
86
96
95
94
92
95
60
100
92
93
93
98
95
92
97
85
96
94
83
92
80
91
92
89
90
92
91
95
88
98
97
93
95
97
94
93
88
94
96
95
93
91
91
90
90
91
93
76
92
86
97
97
95
86
91
NEVADA
Churchill
Clark
Douglas
Elko
Esmeralda
Eureka
Humboldt
Lander
Lincoln
Lyon
Mineral
Nye
Ormsby
Pershing
Storey
Washoe
White Pine
State total
2,680
67,190
1,430
2,870
100
170
1,870
340
550
2,050
1,730
1,170
2,800
850
160
32,760
2,640
121,360
92
94
84
70
50
58
85
68
79
82
86
65
90
85
79
92
8,350
4,630
%
93
96
92
97
95
97
96
91
NEW JERSEY
Atlantic
Bergen
Burlington
Camden
Cape May
Cumberland
Essex
Gloucester
Hudson
Hunterdon
Mercer
Middlesex
Monmouth
Morris
Ocean
Passaic
Salem
Somerset
Sussex
Union
Warren
State total
53,170
263,260
65,720
124,560
17,470
34,300
288,510
41,120
186,380
71,460
78,840
140,910
108,710
83,550
39,900
134,960
18,060
46,190
16,150
163,970
20,020
1,943,210
95
82,190
430
18,070
3,050
9,780
800
15,740
14,010
4,140
990
270
1,080
14,080
1,990
4,110
2,560
6,150
630
8,190
3,250
4,500
4,710
2,710
9,130
3,710
11,440
2,060
2,400
2,900
1,320
1,240
8,400
246,030
95
62
94
78
98
98
98
96
97
97
98
97
96
97
98
98
98
98
97
97
98
96
96
96
NEW MEXICO
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Dona Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
State total
91
89
89
92
80
76
67
77
92
83
93
85
71
53
91
83
74
89
'77
77
71
89
76
89
67
82
73
88
NEW YORK
Albany
Allegany
Bronx
Broome
Cattaraugus
Cayuga
Chautauqua
Chemung
Chenango
Clinton
Columbia
Cortland
Delaware
Dutchess
Erie
Essex
Franklin
Fulton
Genesee
Greene
Hamilton
Herkimer
Jefferson
Kings
Lewis
Livingston
85
Madison
Monroe
Montgomery
Nassau
96
94
Source: A.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Belknap
Carroll
TV
County
Homes
Cheshire
12,730
Coos
10,260
Grafton
13,170
Hillsborough 56,360
Merrimack
19,620
Rockingham
31,220
Strafford
17,190
Sullivan
7,720
State total
181,250
Co.
87,330
11,710
446,600
65,460
22,960
20,890
45,810
29,180
12,370
19,700
14,390
12,070
11,720
50,020
331,690
9,670
11,960
16,120
16,110
9,840
1,300
20,250
25,730
810,600
6.050
12,060
15,890
185,990
17,150
396,530
C.
96
94
96
97
95
95
96
95
95
97
95
96
92
95
97
96
94
96
97
95
93
96
96
96
95
96
96
97
95
99
Nielson
BROADCASTING, January 11, 196e
Television ownership by geographic area
TeleTele- vision
vision penehouse- traholds tion
Total
households
Total U.S..
Continental U.S.
Northeast
New England
Conn.
Me.
Mass.
N. H.
R. I.
Vt.
57,433,300 53,922,840
57,254,300 53,759,810
94
14,288,500
3,303,200
833,100
288,200
1,607,300
190,200
271,400
113,000
13,736,540
3,173,780
801,630
273,530
1,548,260
181,250
263,250
105,860
96
96
98
10,562,760
1,943,210
5,283,530
3,336,020
15,634,800
96
97
96
96
Del.
96
N. C.
S. C.
V a.
W. Va.
10,985,300
1,995,200
5,525,200
3,464,900
16,322,400
Pa.
North Central
East North Central
11,458,000
3,267,500
1,478,400
2,374,800
3,102,800
Ill.
Ind.
Mich.
Ohio
All figures are
County
TV
Homes
562,540
73,610
79,690
132,280
19,920
56,670
10,180
Oswego
24,760
Otsego
14,720
Putnam
12,280
Queens
623,250
Rensselaer
43,100
Richmond
67,290
Rockland
43,000
St. Lawrence 29,950
Saratoga
27,750
Schenectady
49,130
Schoharle
6,180
Schuyler
4,280
Seneca
8,650
Steuben
27,930
Suffolk
221,400
Sullivan
13,840
Tioga
11,520
Tompkins
17,830
Ulster
37,730
Warren
13,570
Washington
13.430
Wayne
20,550
Westchester 264,450
Wyoming
9,650
Yates
5,430
State total 5,283,530
Niagara
Oneida
Onondaga
Ontario
Orange
Orleans
%
88
97
97
97
97
96
95
97
94
96
98
96
98
97
96
97
97
94
93
97
95
98
93
96
89
94
95
96
96
97
97
94
NORTH CAROLINA
29,170
3,950
1,820
4,940
3,970
2,280
8,550
4,520
5,080
4,290
36,770
13,680
19,430
12,730
1,360
7,610
3,820
21,450
6,340
3,260
2,508
1,140
16,330
11,051,910
3,129,510
1,420,640
2,304,690
3,010,520
Iowa
Kan.
Minn.
Mo.
Neb.
95
96
95
97
94
N. D.
S. D.
1,234,500
1,186,550
D. C.
Fla.
Ga.
Md.
96
96
97
94
90
83
84
81
81
90
81
77
84
91
92
94
92
90
87
87
94
88
79
86
76
92
Haywood
Henderson
Hertford
Hoke
Hyde
Iredell
Jackson
Johnston
Jones
Lee
Lenoir
Lincoln
McDowell
Macon
Madison
Martin
Mecklenburg
Mitchell
Montgomery
Moore
Nash
New Hanover
Northampton
Onslow
Orange
Pamlico
Pasquotank
Pender
Perquimans
Person
Pitt
Polk
Randolph
Richmond
Robeson
Rockingham
Rowan
Rutherford
Sampson
Scotland
Stanly
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
497,
3,454,800
932,500
Ala.
97
Currituck
Dare
Davidson
Davie
Duplin
Durham
Edgecombe
Forsyth
Franklin
Gaston
Gates
Graham
Granville
Greene
Guilford
Halifax
Harnett
8,043,700
146,000
266,100
1,886,000
1,156,000
968,200
1,281,400
652,300
1,189,800
East South Central
96
County
Columbus
Craven
Cumberland
4,864,400
863,400
705,100
1,047,700
1,413,400
453,700
178.600
204,500
16,858,400
South
South Atlantic
estimates only.
New York Co
Alamance
Alexander
Alleghany
Anson
Ashe
Avery
Beaufort
Bartle
Bladen
Brunswick
Buncombe
Burke
Cabarrus
Caldwell
Camden
Carteret
Caswell
Catawba
Chatham
Cherokee
Chowan
Clay
Cleveland
TeleTele- vision
vision penehouse- traholds tion
West North Central
Middle Atlantic
N. J.
N. Y.
Wis.
94%
Total
households
Ky.
Miss.
96%
4,582,890 94
821,620 95
660,900 94
986,250 94
1,332,760 94
427,880 94
164,660 93
188,820 92
15,274,040 91
7,360,020
139,260
244,840
1,726,110
1,034,980
934,320
1,153,420
578,790
1,084,360
463,940
92
95
92
92
90
97
90
89
3,058,300
820,420
88
88
TeleTele- vision
vision penehouse- traholds tion
Total
households
876,300
581,800
797,660
479.440
958,780
91
5,359,900
542,400
974,100
763,700
3,079,700
4,857,720
467,940
879,030
701,700
2,809,050
91
88
90
9,785,000
2,296,900
466,900
614,800
205,800
217,300
133,500
278,900
273,500
106,200
7,488,100
5,911,400
612,900
963,800
179,000
9,114,230 93
2,092,730 91
419,180 90
572,780 93
189,050 92
193,960 89
121,360 91
246,030 88
255,760 94
94,610 89
7,021,500 94
5,563,970 94
559,730 91
897,800 93
163,230 91
Tenn.
1,064,200
West South Central
Ark.
La.
Okla.
Tex.
West
Mountain
Ariz.
Colo.
Idaho
Mont.
Nev.
N. M.
Utah
91
93
Wyo.
Pacific
Calif.
Ore.
Wash.
Hawaii
82
90
92
91
Excluding Alaska
TV
Homes %
9,850
15,210
36,980
1,550
1,560
22,820
4,110
8,540
30,560
12,150
56,960
5,550
84
93
90
35.030
1,860
1,270
6,630
3,140
72,730
11,440
11,140
10,120
10,250
4,800
2,810
1,010
17,050
3,610
14,330
2,170
6,970
13,510
6,930
6,640
2,940
2,940
5,660
84,190
2,910
4,580
9,020
13,760
20,160
4,820
19,160
10,510
2,220
6,090
3,600
2,130
6,040
16,540
2,860
17,760
9,270
17,120
18,640
23,360
11,590
10.180
4,990
11,240
93
82
78
92
86
85
91
90
93
82
81
79
86
87
94
82
88
87
88
87
80
72
92
84
88
87
89
91
88
89
74
75
88
94
83
90
86
88
92
82
88
88
89
88
78
89
89
90
84
92
90
84
93
93
93
86
85
92
County
Stokes
Surry
Swain
Transylvania
Tyrrell
Union
Vance
Wake
Warren
Washington
Watauga
Wayne
Wilkes
Wilson
Yadkin
Yancey
State total
TV
Homes
%
5,390
12,570
1,350
3,830
950
10,840
7,460
45,570
3,140
2,810
3,730
20,090
10,210
13,760
5,660
2,510
1,153,420
90
90
67
85
79
90
90
92
85
85
90
87
89
88
74
County
Sargent
Sheridan
Sioux
Slope
Stark
Steele
Stutsman
Towner
Traill
Walsh
Ward
Wells
Williams
State total
TV
Homes
1,700
900
640
470
4,640
1,240
6,350
1,340
2,690
4,280
14,290
2.300
6,990
164,660
%
95
90
81
94
93
96
96
89
96
93
95
92
93
OHIO
NORTH DAKOTA
Adams
Barnes
Benson
Billings
Bottineau
Bowman
Burke
Burleigh
Cass
Cavalier
Dickey
Divide
Dunn
Eddy
Emmons
Foster
Golden Valley
Grand Forks
Grant
Griggs
Hettinger
Kidder
La Moure
Logan
McHenry
McIntosh
McKenzie
McLean
Mercer
Morton
Mountrail
Nelson
Oliver
Pembina
Pierce
Ramsey
Ransom
Renville
Richland
Rolette
1,180
91
4,590
2,020
96
88
94
91
90
380
2,730
1,080
1,370
10,410
19,950
1,990
2,050
1,240
1,350
1,310
1,770
1,390
840
14,020
1,360
1,330
1,380
1,150
91
95
96
80
89
89
90
94
93
93
94
96
91
95
92
96
2,030 92
1,070 89
2,670 95
1,540 85
1,860 93
3,080 93
1,510 89
5,440 94
2,660 92
1,910 96
560 93
2.770 84
1,530 90
3,290 91
2,080 94
1.150 96
4,880 94
1,910 79
Adams
Allen
Ashland
Ashtabula
Athens
Auglaize
Belmont
Brown
Butler
Carroll
Champaign
Clark
Clermont
Clinton
Columbiana
Coshocton
Crawford
Cuyahoga
Darke
Defiance
Delaware
Erie
Fairfield
Fayette
Franklin
Fulton
Gallia
Geauga
Greene
Guernsey
Hamilton
Hancock
Hardin
Harrison
Henry
Highland
Hocking
Holmes
Huron
Jackson
Jefferson
Knox
Lake
5,330 89
31,380 96
12,570 97
28,510 97
12,950 94
10,980 96
24,480 97
7,330 93
60,860 97
5,780 96
9,060 96
40,570 98
25,880 97
9,330 96
32,160 97
9.760 94
15,270 97
506,810 97
14,010 97
9,310 96
10,850 98
21,520 97
20,020 98
7,710 95
227,780 98
8,640 95
6,580 93
14,830 96
29,730 97
10,910 95
277,530 97
17,890 97
8,620 95
5,040 95
7,780 97
8,990 94
5,770 95
4,970 86
14,510 97
8,270 94
29,010 97
12,010 97
46,530 98
TV
County
Homes %
Lawrence
16,130 96
Licking
29,710 97
Logan
11,110 97
Lorain
68,650 98
Lucas
146,110 98
Madison
7,370 95
Mahoning
89,200 98
Marion
18,890 97
Medina
20,170 97
Meigs
5,970 93
Mercer
9,010 96
Miami
23,790 97
Monroe
4,260 93
Montgomery 170,200 98
Morgan
3,490 92
Morrow
5,680 96
Muskingum
24,010 96
Noble
2,870 90
Ottawa
11,070 97
Paulding
4.870 95
Perry
7,720 95
Pickaway
9,820 97
Pike
5,460 93
Portage
27,940 98
Preble
9.910 97
Putnam
7,610 95
Richland
36,320 97
Ross
Sandusky
Scioto
Seneca
Shelby
Stark
Summit
Trumbull
Tuscarawas
Union
Van Wert
Vinton
Warren
Washington
Wayne
Williams
Wood
Wyandot
State total
16,920
17,600
24,740
17,170
9,960
104,070
161,860
64,970
23,520
6,800
8,880
2,710
21,130
15,640
21,880
9,320
21,920
8,270
3,010,520
96
98
96
97
97
97
98
98
96
96
97
93
97
94
2,770
2,200
2,180
1,950
4,600
77
88
87
89
84
95
95
97
95
OKLAHOMA
Adair
Alfalfa
Atoka
Beaver
Beckham
Source: A.
Co.
C.
Nielson
83
County
Blaine
Bryan
Caddo
Canadian
Carter
Cherokee
Choctaw
Cimarron
Cleveland
Coal
Comanche
Cotton
Craig
Creek
Custer
Delaware
Dewey
Ellis
Garfield
Garvin
Grady
Grant
Greer
Harmon
Harper
Haskell
Hughes
Jackson
Jefferson
Johnston
Kay
Kingfisher
Kiowa
Latimer
Le Flore
Lincoln
Logan
Love
McClain
McCurtain
McIntosh
Major
Marshall
Mayes
Murray
Muskogee
Noble
Nowata
Okfuskee
Oklahoma
Okmulgee
Osage
Ottawa
Pawnee
Payne
Pittsburgh
Pontotoc
Pottawatomie
Pushmataha
Roger Mills
Rogers
Seminole
Sequoyah
Stephens
Texas
Tillman
Tulsa
Wagoner
Washington
Washita
Woods
Woodward
State total
TV
Homes
3,170
6,150
7,430
6,950
12,200
4,250
3,150
1,110
12,770
1,330
25,960
2,030
3,860
11,490
6,110
3,200
1,350
1,280
16,980
8,060
8,360
2,190
1,980
1,380
1,700
1,960
3,550
9,420
2,170
2,050
16,140
2,900
3,980
1,640
7,100
5,210
4,970
1.490
3,490
5,660
2,590
1,770
1,980
5,650
3,180
17,690
3,080
2,950
2,530
158,610
10,550
9,630
8,220
2,930
12,180
8,620
8,990
12,300
1,800
1,050
6,150
6,760
4,030
12,270
3,850
3,910
117,840
4,170
14,730
4,900
3,400
3,520
701,700
%
91
84
92
94
90
87
72
79
93
89
94
92
90
91
89
82
84
75
94
93
92
91
83
86
90
85
85
92
90
86
93
94
91
75
86
93
90
87
94
82
86
80
86
90
88
91
93
92
84
95
93
94
93
91
92
89
92
92
72
81
90
90
82
94
88
91
95
91
96
92
87
82
OREGON
Baker
Benton
Clackamas
Clatsop
Columbia
Coos
Crook
Curry
Deschutes
Douglas
4,770
11,460
36,650
7,490
6,460
14,690
2,520
3,910
7,010
19,670
87
86
94
88
91
84
87
83
87
90
County
Gilliam
Grant
Harney
Hood River
Jackson
Jefferson
Josephine
Klamath
Lake
Lane
Lincoln
Linn
Malheur
Marion
Morrow
Multnomah
Polk
Sherman
Tillamook
Umatilla
Union
Wallowa
Wasco
Washington
Wheeler
Yamhill
State total
TV
TV
Homes
%
850
1,560
1,690
85
68
80
85
94
89
87
93
85
93
82
92
90
92
82
93
92
93
83
87
84
83
86
96
86
90
3,640
26,070
2,920
9,620
14,110
2,040
52,640
6,760
17,950
6,220
38,470
1,240
178,490
8,520
1,110
4,390
11,460
4,860
1,820
6,050
32,630
690
9,300
559,730
PENNSYLVANIA
Adams
Allegheny
15,150
481,260
22,770
59,660
11,680
86,470
39,590
15,570
96,980
34,100
54,480
2,320
14,860
21,440
61,570
10,290
22,420
10,710
15,650
21,800
40,000
67,740
168,130
10,520
76,260
45,130
1,360
26,390
2,630
10,360
10,570
20,430
13,430
4,170
64,770
80,490
33,100
26,290
71,830
94,880
32,540
15,670
37,230
12,470
12,370
164.430
4,050
61,200
Armstrong
Beaver
Bedford
Berks
Blair
Bradford
Bucks
Butler
Cambria
Cameron
Carbon
Centre
Chester
Clarion
Clearfield
Clinton
Columbia
Crawford
Cumberland
Dauphin
Delaware
Elk
Erie
Fayette
Forest
Franklin
Fulton
Greene
Huntingdon
Indiana
Jefferson
Juniata
Lackawanna
Lancaster
Lawrence
Lebanon
Lehigh
Luzerne
Lycoming
McKean
Mercer
Mifflin
Monroe
Montgomery
Montour
Northampton
Northumberland
28,530
Perry
7.390
Philadelphia 602,650
Pike
2,920
Potter
4,610
Schuylkill
47,360
Snyder
6,580
Somerset
20,470
95
97
97
98
93
96
96
95
98
98
97
97
96
94
97
98
96
96
95
96
96
98
98
96
98
96
97
93
88
96
94
96
97
89
97
92
97
95
97
97
93
94
97
92
96
97
92
96
94
94
96
91
92
95
89
95
Homes %
County
1,580 93
Sullivan
9,160 95
Susquehanna
Tioga
9,920 93
Union
6,030 89
17,930 95
Venango
Warren
12,780 95
60,930 97
Washington
7,350 91
Wayne
Westmoreland
102,230 98
4,600 94
Wyoming
75,790 96
York
State total 3,336,020
RHODE ISLAND
Bristol
Kent
Newport
Providence
Washington
State total
11,760 98
36,490 98
22,630 97
175,500 97
16,870 96
263,250
Abbeville
4,840
Aiken
23,990
Allendale
2,120
Anderson
26,690
Bamberg
2,990
Barnwell
3,670
Beaufort
9,680
Berkeley
10,180
Calhoun
1,960
Charleston
60,550
Cherokee
8,600
Chester
7,010
Chesterfield
6,740
Clarendon
4,360
Colleton
5,490
Darlington
11,780
Dillon
5,860
Dorchester
6,740
Edgefleld
3.100
Fairfield
3,850
Florence
20,150
Georgetown
6,740
Greenville
60,700
Greenwood
11,890
Hampton
3,320
Horry
16,630
Jasper
2,740
Kershaw
7,400
Lancaster
10,040
Laurens
11,170
Lee
3,590
Lexington
16,620
McCormick
1,560
Marion
6,120
Marlboro
5.430
Newberry
7,010
Oconee
9,660
Orangeburg
13,120
Pickens
12,200
Richland
47,820
Saluda
2,930
Spartanburg
41,260
Sumter
17,960
Union
6,940
Williamsburg 6,710
York
18,880
State total
578,790
1,200
6,580
670
2,500
5,510
9,710
1,750
300
2,340
830
2,240
1,880
UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY
(SPECIAL REPORT: TV HOMES)
85
93
73
92
79
81
87
86
75
91
91
90
84
73
78
87
86
88
84
80
90
84
93
91
'79
85
78
87
92
89
78
89
82
82
84
88
91
81
88
90
84
93
86
90
80
91
SOUTH DAKOTA
IticlppineSS is I-ielpitic
84
Cla
Codington
Corson
Custer
Davison
Day
Deuel
Dewey
Douglas
Edmunds
Fall River
Faulk
Grant
Gregory
Haakon
Hamlin
Hand
Hanson
Harding
Hughes
Hutchinson
Hyde
SOUTH CAROLINA
Aurora
Beadle
Bennett
Bon Homme
Brookings
Brown
Brute
Buffalo
Butte
Campbell
Charles Mix
Clark
County
86
91
84
89
93
96
92
75
90
83
86
94
Jackson
Jerauld
Jones
Kingsbury
Lake
Lawrence
Lincoln
Lyman
McCook
McPherson
Marshall
Meade
Mellette
Miner
Minnehaha
Moody
Pennington
Perkins
Potter
Roberts
Sanborn
Shannon
Spink
Stanley
Sully
Todd
Tripp
Turner
Union
Walworth
Washabaugh
Yankton
Ziebach
State total
TV
TV
Homes
2830
%
94
6,020
1,050
1,220
4,440
2,720
1,750
1,070
1,290
1,310
2,780
1,170
2,570
1,820
800
1,670
1,760
1,190
600
4,050
2,970
760
500
1,090
540
2,440
3,240
4,500
3,610
1,140
2,300
1,290
1,580
3,040
580
1,300
28,520
2,260
20,560
1,150
1,260
3,150
1,240
840
3,030
1,150
650
840
2,310
3,110
2,920
2,020
240
4,660
410
188,820
96
75
87
89
16,780
6,530
2,690
1,450
14,820
11,830
5,320
2,080
5,490
10,100
2,440
2,120
3,180
1,400
5,020
8,220
3,470
3,860
121,120
1,910
2,630
5,020
7,500
3.910
2,270
6,010
11.640
4,870
2,490
11,210
2,200
10,370
71,450
1,390
3,850
3,760
6,940
4,290
3,710
5,770
2,810
1,160
3,170
1,660
5,340
93
90
84
81
92
92
82
87
82
90
90
85
76
78
81
91
87
79
95
80
85
91
89
77
76
87
88
81
78
88
79
86
94
77
80
77
85
81
82
82
88
83
94
92
76
86
87
90
90
92
91
89
93
93
91
85
94
90
95
83
91
90
94
95
90
95
95
96
86
88
89
83
93
97
94
95
82
90
90
88
70
95
89
93
77
92
94
97
84
80
93
68
TENNESSEE
Anderson
Bedford
Benton
Bledsoe
Blount
Bradley
Campbell
Cannon
Carroll
Carter
Cheatham
Chester
Claiborne
Clay
Cocke
Coffee
Crockett
Cumberland
Davidson
Decatur
De Kalb
Dickson
Dyer
Fayette
Fentress
Franklin
Gibson
Giles
Grainger
Greene
Grundy
Hamblen
Hamilton
Hancock
Hardeman
Hardin
Hawkins
Haywood
Henderson
Henry
Hickman
Houston
Humphreys
Jackson
Jefferson
Homes
County
2,270
Johnson
73,630
Knox
1,960
Lake
4,680
Lauderdale
Lawrence
6,700
Lewis
1,530
Lincoln
5,660
Loudon
6,250
8,640
McMinn
McNairy
3,890
2,960
Macon
17,090
Madison
Marion
5,080
Marshall
4,320
11,100
Maury
970
Meigs
Monroe
4,940
Montgomery 14,540
Moore
820
2,720
Morgan
7,290
Obion
2,840
Overton
Perry
Pickett
Polk
Putnam
Rhea
Roane
Robertson
Rutherford
Scott
Sequatchie
Sevier
Shelby
Smith
Stewart
Sullivan
Sumner
Tipton
Trousdale
Unicoi
Union
Van Buren
Warren
Washington
Wayne
Weakley
White
Williamson
Wilson
State total
1,190
850
2,500
7,300
3,580
10,670
7,080
14,200
2,620
1,300
5,510
186,280
3,010
1,760
33,330
10,190
8,060
1,140
3,400
1,710
700
6,240
17,190
2,190
5,980
3,870
6,240
7,760
958,780
%
84
93
82
87
86
85
83
92
88
81
87
88
91
90
91
88
85
93
82
82
88
79
85
78
86
85
83
90
91
93
75
87
82
93
89
88
93
92
85
88
85
78
77
83
93
76
84
83
89
90
TEXAS
Anderson
Andrews
Angelina
Aransas
Archer
Armstrong
Atascosa
Austin
Bailey
Bandera
Bastrop
Baylor
Bee
Bell
Bexar
Blanco
Borden
Bosque
Bowie
Brazoria
Brazos
7,710
3,520
11,720
2,280
1,700
640
87
90
89
91
95
91
4,010 85
3,380 79
2,550 91
1,260 90
3,990 81
1,700 94
5,490 83
29,060 93
191,510 92
1,040 87
270 89
3,140 87
17,920 92
23,460 94
11,840
1,220
1,000
1,750
7,270
Brewster
Briscoe
Brooks
Brown
Burleson
Burnet
Caldwell
Calhoun
Callahan
Cameron
Camp
Carson
Cass
Castro
Chambers
Cherokee
Childress
Clay
Cochran
Coke
Coleman
Collin
Collingsworth
Colorado
Comal
Comanche
Concho
2,570
2,560
4,080
4,330
2,820
31,830
1,910
2,210
5,640
2,570
3,150
7,540
2,000
2,430
2,020
1,000
3,840
12,870
1,200
4,690
5,650
3,550
1,150
89
72
91
83
85
78
92
86
85
90
86
80
96
88
89
93
84
87
93
92
91
89
92
75
81
90
79
89
91
'79
88
Source: A.
Co.
C.
Nielson
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
County
Cooke
Coryell
Cottle
Crane
Crockett
Crosby
Culberson
Dallam
Dallas
Dawson
Smith
Delta
Denton
De Witt
Dickens
Dimmit
Donley
Duval
Eastland
Ector
Edwards
Ellis
El Paso
Erath
Falls
Fannin
Fayette
Fisher
Floyd
Foard
Fort Bend
Franklin
Freestone
Frio
Gaines
Galveston
Garza
Gillespie
Glasscock
Goliad
Gonzales
Gray
Grayson
Gregg
Grimes
Guadalupe
Hale
Hall
Hamilton
Hansford
Hardeman
Hardin
Harris
Harrison
Hartley
Haskell
Ha
Hemphill
Henderson
Hidalgo
Hill
Hockley
Hood
Hopkins
Houston
Howard
Hudspeth
Hunt
Hutchinson
Irion
Jack
Jackson
Jasper
Jeff Davis
Jefferson
Jim Hoeg
Jim Wells
Johnson
Jones
Karnes
Kaufman
Kendall
Kenedy
Kent
Kerr
Kimble
King
Kinney
Kleberg
Knox
Lamar
Lamb
Lampasas
La Salle
Lavaca
Lee
Leon
Liberty
Limestone
Lipscomb
Live Oak
Llano
Loving
Lubbock
Lynn
McCulloch
McLennan
McMullen
Madison
Marion
Martin
Mason
Matagorda
Maverick
TV
Homes %
6,920
8,280
990
1,230
880
2,890
820
1,680
345,450
5,460
1
91
92
83
95
80
93
82
88
95
88
232300
16,010
4,850
1,160
1,450
1,180
2,320
5.350
25,740
480
12,670
84.900
4,990
5,150
6,060
4,620
1,950
3,840
820
10,590
1,310
2,840
1,980
3,510
45,010
1,740
2,460
380
1,180
4,180
10,270
22.410
21,830
2.900
7,650
11,530
1,410
2,190
1,970
2.190
7,250
410,550
11,480
670
2,750
4,770
700
6.420
38,210
6,220
6,460
1,730
5.310
3,730
12,030
500
11,580
10,060
330
2,400
3,390
5,590
280
75,940
940
8,150
11.530
5.330
2,970
7,410
1,570
180
590
5.220
830
160
430
8.860
1,800
8,460
8.870
2,810
960
4,240
2,120
2,190
8,720
4,540
870
1,610
1,800
200
99.240
3,390
1.940
45,290
340
1,510
1.730
1.300
780
8,910
2,420
82
94
79
89
66
85
75
85
94
69
92
94
91
84
85
74
89
94
91
90
82
81
79
92
93
91
74
95
79
85
94
92
92
80
87
92
78
84
94
84
87
94
88
95
89
88
84
85
90
95
91
86
76
95
72
90
96
82
92
83
85
69
TV
Homes %
County
Medina
4,370 86
Menard
470 59
Midland
19,350 94
Milam
5.450 84
Mills
1,150 82
2,570 89
Mitchell
4,360 91
Montague
8,210 86
Montgomery
Moore
3,500 94
Morris
3,130 89
Motley
520 '74
Nacogdoches
7,050 83
Navarro
9,950 88
2,160 77
Newton
Nolan
5,470 93
Nueces
58,050 92
Ochiltree
3,080 91
Oldham
450 90
Orange
16,630 94
Palo Pinto
6,180 88
Panola
3,880 84
Parker
Parmer
Potter
Presidio
Terrell
Terry
Throckmorton
Titus
Tom Green
Travis
Trinity
Tyler
Upshur
Upton
Uvalde
Val Verde
Van Zandt
Victoria
Walker
89
83
89
99
82
89
78
62
88
88
78
93
Yoakum
Young
Zapata
Zavala
91
74
69
81
76
87
83
79
85
84
100
94
92
74
93
85
79
83
93
71
85
62
840
92
91
87
79
95
64
87
97
95
62
Rains
700
Randall
14,450
Reagan
860
Real
430
Red River
3,340 '76
Reeves
4,130 88
Refugio
2,790 90
Roberts
380 95
Robertson
3,740 85
Rockwall
1,600 89
Runnels
3,930 89
Rusk
9,310 89
Sabine
1,460 73
San Augustine 1,570 75
San Jacinto
1,110 69
San Patricio
9,400 89
San Saba
2,250 83
Schleicher
760 84
Scurry
4,710 91
Shackelford
1,040 87
Shelby
4,710 80
Sherman
730 91
Smith
25,650 91
Somervell
810 90
Starr
2,760 67
Stephens
2,560 85
Sterling
340 85
Stonewall
850 95
Sutton
760 69
Swisher
3,320 95
Tarrant
174,950 95
Taylor
32,170 94
Waller
Ward
Washington
Webb
Wharton
Wheeler
Wichita
Wilbarger
Willacy
Williamson
Wilson
Winkler
95
73
84
94
92
83
6,870
2,990
3,140
3,240
38,300
Pecos
Polk
Wise
Wood
State total
560
4,670
770
4,880
19,540
62,910
1,530
2,390
5,100
1,500
3,850
5,310
5,080
13,250
4,010
2,850
3,280
4,530
13,610
9,720
1,790
38,780
5,040
3,470
9,620
2,790
3,440
5,260
4.500
2,360
5,100
600
1,940
2,809,050
89
92
86
85
93
93
73
80
86
88
80
75
86
87
79
84
91
76
87
88
78
96
95
81
90
82
91
92
87
95
91
60
67
UTAH
Beaver
Box Elder
Cache
Carbon
Daggett
Davis
Duchesne
Garfield
rfield
Grand
Iron
Juab
Kane
Millard
Morgan
Piute
Rich
Salt Lake
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
1,070
9,080
10.530
4,750
200
19,600
1,320
1,270
590
1,670
2,360
1,090
400
1,700
660
340
430
118,670
89
96
92
90
67
97
82
91
66
70
76
90
57
90
83
85
86
95
County
San Juan
Sanpete
Sevier
Summit
Tooele
Uintah
Utah
Wasatch
Washington
Wayne
Weber
State total
TV
Homes
%
1,870
2,710
2,600
1,300
4,910
2,520
27,540
1,330
2,140
32,650
460
255,760
69
90
93
93
96
4,890
7,060
8,200
20,910
1,620
7,740
92
93
94
96
95
97
98
95
92
95
94
95
85
92
84
94
88
76
96
92
VERMONT
Addison
Bennington
Caledonia
Chittenden
Essex
Franklin
Grand Isle
Lamoille
Orange
Orleans
Rutland
Washington
Windham
Windsor
State total
790
2,940
3,960
5,250
13,010
11,730
7,810
11,950
105,860
VIRGINIA
Accomac
7,390
Albemarle
16,380
Alleghany
7,330
Amelia
1,470
Amherst
4,900
Appomattox
2,390
Arlington
90,460
Augusta
19,900
Bath
1,200
Bedford
7,330
Bland
1,260
Rotetourt
4,250
Brunswick
3,450
Buchanan
6,680
Buckingham
1,940
Campbell
25,050
Caroline
2,740
Carroll
6,760
Charlotte
3.050
Charles City
880
Chesterfield
23,810
Clarke
2,220
Craig
830
Culpeper
3,930
Cumberland
1,140
Dickenson
3,630
Dinwiddie
14,000
Essex
1.390
Fairfax
87,720
Fauquier
5,960
Floyd
2,290
Fluvanna
1,470
Franklin
6,190
Frederick
10,730
Giles
3,900
Gloucester
3,330
Goochland
2,030
Grayson
3.950
Greene
740
Greensville
3.480
Halifax
8.650
Hanover
7,680
Henrico
101,260
Henry
15.740
Highland
680
Isle Of Wight 4,030
James City
4,820
King and Queen 1,210
King George
1,980
King William
1,780
Lancaster
2.250
Lee
5,300
Loudoun
6,990
Louisa
2,740
Lunenburg
3,120
Madison
1,810
Mathews
1,900
Mecklenburg
6,840
Middlesex
1,630
Montgomery
10,980
Nansemond
11,070
Nelson
2,670
New Kent
960
Newport News 59,030
Norfolk
133,830
Northampton
4,060
Northumberland
2,540
Nottoway
3,590
2,950
Orange
Page
3.940
Patrick
3,350
26,430
Pittsylvania
Powhatan
1,390
Prince Edward 2,960
Prince George 13,660
Princess Anne 32,010
Prince William 16,200
Pulaski
6,730
Rappahannock 1,000
Richmond
1,550
82
84
91
77
86
88
96
90
85
86
84
90
80
81
78
92
86
83
85
80
95
92
83
89
76
86
89
82
97
89
85
82
86
91
91
90
85
84
68
85
86
87
93
92
85
88
89
80
90
89
86
80
90
81
84
79
86
84
86
91
88
81
88
94
93
83
88
88
82
88
82
90
87
85
92
95
94
90
83
86
TV
County
Homes %
49,810 94
Roanoke
7,050 86
Rockbridge
Rockingham
14,180 89
Russell
5,680 84
Scott
5,130 80
Shenandoah
6,000 91
Smyth
7,040 89
Southampton
4,270 84
Spotsylvania
7,500 89
Stafford
4,720 91
Surry
1,350 84
Sussex
2,290 79
Tazewell
9,990 90
Warren
3,710 86
Washington
14,170 90
Westmoreland 2,530 82
Wise
8,290 85
Wythe
4,730 83
York
7,060 92
State total 1,084,360
WASHINGTON
Adams
3,280 94
Asotin
4,130 94
Benton
18.160 94
Chelan
12,400 91
Clallam
8,990 91
Clark
30,630 95
Columbia
1,260 84
Cowlitz
17,640 93
Douglas
4,000 93
Ferry
930 84
Franklin
6,730 93
Garfield
800 88
Grant
12,740 92
Grays Harbor 15,630 87
Island
5,920 96
Jefferson
2,650 91
King
314,360 93
Kitsap
23,980 96
Kittitas
6,100 87
Klickitat
3,670 83
Lewis
12,510 91
Lincoln
3,320 95
Mason
5,180 94
Okanogan
6,770 86
Pacific
4,020 85
Pend Oreille
1,990 90
Pierce
98,740 95
San Juan
1,000 91
Skagit
15,420 93
Skamania
1,410 88
Snohomish
60,050 95
Spokane
87,440 94
Stevens
4,570 88
Thurston
18,130 95
Wahkiakum
970 88
Walla Walla
11,580 87
Whatcom
20,840 91
Whitman
8,770 91
Yakima
41,090 92
State total
897,800
WEST VIRGINIA
Barbour
Berkeley
Boone
Braxton
Brooke
Cabell
Calhoun
Clay
Doddridge
Fayette
Gilmer
Grant
Greenbrier
Hampshire
Hancock
Hardy
Harrison
Jackson
Jefferson
Kanawha
Lewis
Lincoln
Logan
McDowell
Marion
Marshall
Mason
Mercer
Mineral
Mingo
Monongalia
Monroe
Morgan
Nicholas
Ohio
Pendleton
Pleasants
Pocahontas
Preston
Putnam
Raleigh
Randolph
Ritchie
Roane
Summers
Taylor
Tucker
Tyler
3,290
9.830
5,820
3,010
8,190
31,470
1,620
2,220
2.030
13,460
2,150
1.850
8,240
2,330
10,640
1,960
20,890
5,250
5,040
69.500
4.890
4,550
11.700
13.180
17,630
10,500
6.380
17,280
5,790
7,920
14,720
2,460
2,240
5,090
19,590
1,600
2,040
2,090
5,970
6,430
16,890
6,590
2,620
3,390
3,160
3,490
1,830
2,690
89
95
94
81
98
96
85
85
88
94
90
84
93
83
89
81
96
94
93
96
91
91
94
93
95
96
95
95
89
91
93
85
89
89
97
84
93
80
89
95
93
89
84
87
85
90
86
90
County
Upshur
Wayne
Webster
Wetzel
Wirt
Wood
Wyoming
State total
TV
Homes
%
4,400 90
9,860 94
2,420 83
5,500 93
1,050 88
22,080 94
7,330 92
463,940
WISCONSIN
Adams
Ashland
Barron
Hayfield
Brown
Buffalo
Burnett
Calumet
Chippewa
Clark
Columbia
Crawford
Dane
Dodge
Door
Douglas
Dunn
Eau Claire
Florence
Fond Du Lac
Forest
Grant
Green
Green Lake
Iowa
Iron
Jackson
Jefferson
Juneau
Kenosha
Kewaunee
La Crosse
Lafayette
Langlade
Lincoln
Manitowoc
Marathon
Marinette
Marquette
Milwaukee
Monroe
Oconto
Oneida
Outaggamie
Ozaukee
Pepin
Pierce
Polk
Portage
Price
Racine
Richland
Rock
Rusk
St. Croix
Sauk
Sawyer
Shawano
Sheboygan
Taylor
Trempealeu
Vernon
Vílas
Walworth
Washburn
Washington
Waukesha
Waupaca
Waushara
Winnebago
Wood
State total
2,150
5,000
9,250
3,100
36,600
3,830
2,450
6,230
11,830
7,880
10,840
4,010
72,460
17,840
5,890
12,840
6,740
17,530
930
20,350
89
94
93
98
98
93
91
96
96
92
95
93
95
95
97
97
94
96
93
96
1,750
87
11,880
7,660
4,660
4,980
2,290
3,970
15,830
4,500
32,310
5,010
21,190
4,690
5,190
6,330
21,810
24,890
9,750
2,420
321,570
7,830
6,540
6,150
29,320
12,160
1,850
6,190
7,180
10,070
3,620
44,760
4,490
36,230
3,550
8,400
9,790
2,390
9,090
26,550
4,330
6,210
6,630
2,740
16,060
2,900
14,000
52,740
10,240
3,980
32,980
17,100
1,186,550
93
95
93
6,030
2,730
1,630
3,970
1,760
1.090
7,300
3,230
1.880
1,520
19,920
2,090
16,840
940
4,390
1,810
4,840
1,040
4,410
860
1,760
2,440
2,060
95
92
95
92
97
88
97
96
97
94
94
96
98
97
97
89
97
94
95
92
98
97
93
95
96
96
88
98
92
97
91
97
94
89
96
97
92
91
92
91
96
93
97
97
97
92
98
97
WYOMING
Albany
Big Horn
Campbell
Carbon
Converse
Crook
Fremont
Goshen
Hot Springs
Johnson
Laramie
Lincoln
Natrona
Niobrara
Park
Sheridan
Sublette
Sweetwater
Teton
Uinta
85
82
86
88
78
91
92
85
84
95
84
94
86
84
82
82
80
88
86
88
Washakie
90
Weston
82
Yellowstone
National Park
70 67
State total
94,810
Source: A. C. Nielsen
Co.
85
FOR THE RECORD
STATION AUTHORIZATIONS, APPLICATIONS
As compiled by BROADCASTING, Jan.
6 through Jan. 12 and based on filings,
authorizations and other actions of the
FCC during that period.
Abbreviations: Ann.- announced. ant.-antenna. aur.- aural. CATV- community antenna television. CH- critical hours. CPconstruction permit. D-day. DA- directional antenna. ERP -effective radiated power.
kw- kilowatts. LS -local sunkc-kilocycles.
set. me-megacycles. mod. -modification. N
-night. SCA- subsidiary communications
authorization. SH-specified hours. SSA
special service authorization. STA-special
temporary authorization. trans.-transmitter.
UHF-ultra high frequency. U-unlimited
hours. VHF-very high frequency. vis:
visual. w-watts.
educational.
-
New TV
stations
ACTIONS BY FCC
*Honolulu- University of Hawaii. Granted
CP for new educational TV on VHF channel 11 (198 -204 mc); uni.; ERP 149 kw vis.,
kw aur. Ant. height above average terrain 82.75 ft., above ground 436 ft. P.O. address c/o Thomas H. Hamilton, president,
1801 University Ave., Honolulu. Estimated
construction cost $233,060; first year operating cost $183,208; revenue $251,457. Studio
and trans. locations both Honolulu. Geographic coordinates 21. 17' 45.7^ north lat.,
157' 50' 35.7" west long. Type trans. RCA
TT-25DH, type ant. RCA TF -6AH. Legal
counsel Cohn & Marks, Washington; consulting engineer, W. J. Keesler, Gainesville,
Fla. Principals: Board of Regents, University of Hawaii. University is licensee of
KUGH(FM) Honolulu. Action Jan. 11.
Fort Worth Trinity Broadcasting Co.
Granted CP for new TV on UHF channel
40 (626-634 mc); ERP 483 kw vis., 242 kw
aur. Ant. height above average terrain 1,119
ft.. above ground 1,064 ft. P.O. address c/o
W. C. Windsor Jr., 2212 E. 4th St., Ft.
Worth. Estimated construction cost $834,100;
first year operating cost $318,500; revenue
$325,000. Studio and trans. locations both
Ft. Worth. Geographic coordinates 32. 45' 47"
north lat., 97. 13' 07" west long. Type trans.
RCA TTU -25B, type ant. RCA TFU -25G.
Legal counsel Scharfeld, Bechhoefer, Baron
& Stambler, consulting engineer Jules Cohen
& Assoc., both Washington. W. C. Windsor Jr. is sole owner. Trinity is licensee
of KJIM -AM -FM Ft. Worth. Action Jan. 6.
29.8
-
APPLICATIONS
Sarasota, Fla.-Sarasota- Bradenton Florida Television Co. UHF channel 47 668 -674
mc); ERP 221 kw vis., 42.1 kw aur. Ant.
height above average terrain 510.5 ft., above
ground 518 ft. P.O. address c/o Robert S.
Nelson, Box 940, Sarasota. Estimated construction cost $178,000; first year operating cost $120,000; revenue $150,000. Studio
and trans. locations both SE of Sarasota.
Geographic coordinates 27. 16' 15^ north lat.,
82. 28' 30" west long. Type trans. GE TT25A, type ant. GE TY-25D. Consulting engineer W. J. Kessler, Gainesville. Fla.; legal
counsel Daly and Joyce, Washington. Principals: Robert R. Nelson (51 %), William P.
Croom Jr., Rudolph C. Schonek, Wilbur E.
Schonek, Theodore A. Zalles (each 12;¡ %).
Mr. Nelson is majority stockholder of
WBRD -AM -FM Bradenton, Fla. Mr. Croom
is Sarasota mortgage broker, real estate
and construction investor. Messrs. Schonek
are automobile salesmen and Mr. Salles 1s
director of advertising and sales for Food
Fair Stores Inc., Miami. Ann. Jan. 10.
Reno Washoe Empire. VHF channel
2 (54 -60 mc); ERP 200 kw vis., 50.4 kw
aur. Ant. height above average terrain 489
ft., above ground 145 ft. Estimated construction cost $443,820; first year operating cost
$236,400; revenue $338,400. P.O. address c/o
Lee D. Hirshland, 300 South Virginia St.
Reno. Studio located in Reno, trans. located
4 miles to north in Washoe. Geographic
coordinates 39 35' 00.5" north lat.,
119' 47.52" west long. Type trans. RCA TT6AL, type ant. RCA TF 8AL. Legal counsel Cohn & Marks, consulting engineer Kear
and Kennedyy, both Washington. Principals:
Lee D. Hirshland (24 %), H. G. Wells, Robert A. Paisley, David McKay (each 16%).
Robert L. Stoker, Robert L. Stoddard (each
8 %), Frank N. Bender Link Piazzo Pediatric Clinic partnership (each 4 %I. Mr.
Hirshland has been director, but holds no
stock interest, in KORK Las Vegas and
KOLO -TV Reno and has been involved in
Reno real estate investment. Mr. Wells is
33!s% owner of KUTI Yakima, Wash. Mr.
McKay also holds 33M,% interest in KUTI
and has interest in CATV systems in Santa
Cruz, Calif., and Fallon, Nev. Mr. Stoker is
Reno real estate developer. Mr. Stoddard
is owner of KBET Reno. Mr. Bender is
Reno warehouse owner. Mr. Piazzo is Reno
real estate investor and part owner of
sporting goods store. Ann. Jan. 6.
Canton, Ohio -Midway Television Inc.
UHF channel 23 (524 -530 mc); ERP 200 kw
vis., 50.4 kw aur. Ant. height above average terrain 540 ft., above ground 456 ft.
P.O. address c/o Harold Froelich, 2016
Birchwood Drive, Rockford, Ill. Estimated
construction cost $354,337; first year operating cost $125,000; revenue $125,000. Studio
and trans. locations both Louisville, Ohio.
Geographic coordinates 40 51' 44^ north
lat., 81. 12. 38" west long. Type trans. RCA
TTU -10A; type ant. RCA TFU-30J. Legal
counsel Robb, Porter, Kistler & Parkinson.
Washington; consulting engineer Alfred J.
Petzke, Rockford, Ill. Principals: Irwin
Dubinsky H. W. Dubinsky Harold Froelich
(each 33',
Messrs. Dubinsky have widespread theater holdings over Middle West,
have ownership in WTVO Rockford, Ill., and
WFLD Chicago. Mr. Froelich is stockholder
in WTVO and WFLD. Ann. Jan. 6,
Lead, S. D.- Duhamel Broadcasting Enterprises. VHF channel 11 (198 -204 mc); ERP
50 kw vis., 7.5 kw aur. Ant. height above
-
%).
average terrain 1,946 ft., above ground 576
ft. P.O address c/o Helen S. Duhamel, Box
1752, Rapid City, S. D. 57701. Estimated
construction cost $200,410; first year operating cost $24,500; revenue not listed. Trans.
location Lead; station to be satellite of
KOTA -TV Rapid City, S. D. Geographic
coordinates 44. 19. 40" north lat., 103. 50' 07^
west long. Type trans. RCA TT-5BH, type
ant. RCA TF -12AH. Legal counsel Fisher,
Wayland, Duvall & Southmayd, Washington.
Duhamel Broadcasting is owned 66.7% by
Helen S. Duhamel and is licensee of KOTAAM-TV Rapid City, S. D., and KDUH -TV
Hay Springs, Neb. Ann. Jan. 3.
Galveston, Tex. -TVUE Associates Inc.
UHF channel 18 (494 -500 mc); ERP 32.4 kw
aur. Ant. height above average terrain 604
ft., above ground 630 ft. P.O. address c/o
Charles E. Macy, 1217 Prairie St., Houston
77002. Estimated construction cost $573,300;
first year operating cost $380,000; revenue
$360,000. Trans. location near Dickinson,
Tex., studio location not determined. Geographic coordinates 29 26' 42" north lat.,
95 00' 47^ west long. Type trans. RCA
TTU -12A, type ant. RCA TFU -30J. Legal
counsel Welch & Morgan, Washington; consulting engineers Serge Bergen, Fairfax,
Va. Principals: Roy O. Beach Jr. (156%).
Charles F. Macy, John K. Bremyer, Elmer
C. Gardner, Elmer C. Moore, Tom Salter,
Frank Kessler, Clare Miller (each 10.5 %).
Roy O. Beach Sr., Garret D. "Sonny" Look
(each 5.3 %). Mr. Beach Jr. is owner of
World Markets Corp., Houston export-import
firm. Mr. Macy is director of UHF applicant in Houston. Mr. Bremyer is law partner
in McPherson, Kan. Mr. Gardner is Houston construction and banking investor, 10%
owner of KRYS Corpus Christi, Tex. Mr.
Moore is investor in small car promotion
firms, Wichita Television Corp. (less than
5 %) and is director of Cessna Aircraft Co.
Mr. Kessler is Wichita, Kan., land developer
and rental firm investor. Mr. Miller is one third owner of McPherson, Kan., general
contracting company. Mr. Look is Houston
restauranteur. Ann. Jan. 10.
Rawlins, Wyo.- Frontier Broadcasting Co.
VHF channel 11 (198 -204 mc): ERP 12.58 kw
vis., 2.51 kw aur. Ant. height above average terrain 4 ft., above ground 60 ft. P.O.
address c/o William C. Grove, 2923 East
Lincolnway, Cheyenne, Wyo. Estimated construction cost $34,750; first year operating
cost $40,000: revenue $20,000. Studio and
trans. location both Rawlins. Geographic
coordinates 41. 47' 51^ north lat., 107. 14' 34"
west long. Type trans. RCA TT -2 AH, type
ant. RCA TF -6AH. Legal counsel Koteen
and Burt, Washington; consulting engineer Robert C. Pfannenschmld, Pueblo.
Colo. Applicant station will be operated
as a satellite of KFBC-TV Cheyenne.
Frontier Broadcasting Co. is licensee of
KFBC -AM-TV Cheyenne,
Wyo.;
KSTF
Scottsbluff, Neb., and KTVS Sterling, Colo.
Ann. Jan. 6.
Existing TV stations
APPLICATION
WBTM -TV Danville, Va. -Seeks mod. of
CP authorizing new TV to change from
channel 24 (530 -536 mc) to channel 14 (470-
EDWIN TORNBERG
& COMPANY, INC.
476 mc); ERP from 22.4 kw vis., 12 kw aur.
to P09.3 kw vis., 41.86 kw aur.; type trans.
to GE TT-25 -A; type of ant. to GE TY -25A: change trans. location to 710 Grove
Street, Danville, Va. (same as studio); make
changes in ant. structure and ant. height
above average terrain to 339.5 ft.
New AM stations
Negotiators For The Purchase And Sale Of
Radio And TV Stations CATV
Appraisers Financial Advisors
New York -60 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y.
West Coast -1357 Jewell Ave., Pacific Grove, Calif.
Washington -711 14th St., N.W., Washington, D.C.
86
MU
FR
7.4242
5.3164
DI 7 -8531
APPLICATIONS
Sylacauga, Ala.-Heart of Dixie Broadcasting Co. 1090 kc, 10 kw, D. P.O. address
c/o F. H. Craddock Jr., 106 Hillside Dr.,
Sylacuaga 35150. Estimated construction
cost $60,351; first year operating cost $48.324; revenue $73,000.
Principals: French
Hood Craddock Jr. (25 %), Charles H. Russell. Robert Creswell Rea, Myron N. Craddock, Walton E. Williams Jr., James Calhoun Rutledge, John D. Little Jr. (each
12 % %), Dr. Craddock is surgeon and partner
in clinic in Sylacauga. Dr. Rea is pediatrician and partner with Dr. Craddock in
clinic, part owner with Messrs. Russell, Lit BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
tie and others of electronic parts firm.
Myron N. Craddock is announcer for WFEB
Sylacauga; Mr. Rutledge is chief engineer
for WHBB Selma, Ala.; Mr. Williams announcer and salesman for WSGN Birmingham, Ala. Ann. Jan. 7.
Slidell, La.- Faulkner Radio Inc. 1190 kc.
5 kw, D. P.O. address c/o M. Thorburn, Box
569, Carrollton, Ga. 30117. Estimated construction cost $59,683; first year operating
cost $35,000; revenue $70,000. Principals:
James H. Faulkner Sr. (73.33 %), James H.
Faulkner Jr. (5 %), Robert M. Thorburn
(16.67 %). Faulkner Radio owns WBCA-AMFM Bay Minette, Ala.; WLBB-AM -FM Carrollton, Ga.. and is applicant for AM in
Auburn -Opelika, Ala. Ann. Jan. 10.
Pittsfield, Mass. -Blue Ribbon Broadcasting Inc. 1110 kc, 1 kw, D. P.O. address: 417
Angel St., Providence, R. I. 02903. Estimated
construction cost $30,531; first year operating cost $35,184; revenue $42,000. Principals:
Herbert M. Levin (53 %), Marion Levin
(15 %), Debra Levin (11 %), William E. Marco
(10 %), Norman T. Simpson, David C. Katz
(each 4 %), Ronald H. Glantz (3 %). Herbert
Levin is sales manager of WICE Providence;
Debra Levin is school teacher; Mr. Glantz
is Providence attorney and director of
mortgage firm; Mr. Simpson is owner of
Lee, Mass., advertising agency; Mr. Katz is
Pittsfield, Mass., attorney. Ann. Jan. 7.
Jamestown, Tenn. -R. Gene Cravens and
Denton E. Burden db /as Fentress County
Broadcasting Co. 1500 kc, 1 kw, (500 w CH),
D. P.O. address c/o Gene Cravens, 311 S.
Main St., Crossville, Tenn. 38555. Estimated
construction cost $16,068; first year operating cost $35,000; revenue $38,500. Dr. Cravens
is physician in Crossville, Tenn.; Mr. Burden
is pharmacist in Jamestown, Tenn. Dr.
Cravens is 50% owner of WLET -AM -FM
Toccoa, Ga., and 50% owner with Mr.
Burden of WDEB -FM Jamestown, Tenn.
Ann. Jan. 7.
SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL BROADCASTING
Compiled by BROADCASTING, Jan. 13
ON AIR
tic.
FM
TOTAL APPLICATIONS
CP's
for new stations
20
38
472'
92'
TV-VHF
TV-UHF
NOT ON AIR
199
20
79
21
17
ACTIONS BY FCC
Little Rock, Ark.-Victor Management Inc.
Granted CP for new FM on 93.1 mc, channel 226, 26.5 kw. Ant. height above average
terrain 297.5 ft. P.O. address 4015 West Capitol. Little Rock. Estimated construction cost
$24,319; first year operating cost $18,000;
revenue $24,000. Principals: Victor Muscat
(33.11 %), United American Metals Corp.
(47.27 %) and Victor Industries Corp. (19.62 %).
Applicant is licensee of KYMO Little Rock.
Action Dec. 30, 1965.
Louisville, Ky. -WHAS Inc. Granted CP
for new FM on 97.5 mc, channel 248, ERP
100 kw, U. Ant. height above average terrain 505 ft. P.O. address 525 West Broadway,
Louisville. Estimated construction cost $79,550; first year operating cost $139,000; revenue $35,000. Principal: WHAS Inc. (100 %),
WHAS Inc. is licensee of WHAS -AM -TV
Louisville. Action Dec. 30, 1965.
Aiken, S. C.- Soundcasting Inc. Granted
CP for new FM on 95.9 mc, channel 240,
1.45 kw. Ant. height above average terrain
185 ft. P.O. address Box 2206, Aiken. Principals: Robert S. Taylor (52 %), Klein B.
Beach Jr., W. R. Davidson (each 22 %), William M. Walton, Thomas B. Taylor (each
2 %). Mr. Taylor owns 90% of WALD Walter boro, S. C.: 66 %% of WLOW Aiken, S. C.
Mr. Beach owns 5% of WALD and 33!á% of
WLOW. Messrs. Davidson and Walton are
co- managers of WLOW. Action Jan. 7.
APPLICATIONS
Galesburg, Ill. -Galesburg Broadcasting
Co. 94.9 mc, channel 235, 26.8 kw. Ant.
height above average terrain 353 ft. P.O.
address c/o Roger Coleman, 60 S. Kellogg
St., Galesburg 61401. Estimated construction cost $25,046; first year operating cost
$18,000; revenue $18,000. Galesburg Broadcasting is licensee of WGIL Galesburg.
Ann. Jan. 7.
Burlington, Iowa -RB Inc. 107.3 mc, channel 297, 75.85 kw. Ant. height above average
terrain 362 ft. P.O. address c/o David H.
163'
AUTHORIZED TELEVISION STATIONS
Compiled by BROADCASTING, Jan. 13
Total
701'
UHF
VHF
188
63
513g
68
Commercial
Noncommercial
131
COMMERCIAL STATION BOXSCORE
Compiled by FCC, Nov. 30, 1965
'Includes two licensed
'
°
TV
FM
AM
Licensed (all on air)
CP's on air (new stations)
CP's not on air (new stations)
Total authorized stations
Applications for new stations (not in hearing)
Applications for new stations (in hearing)
Total applications for new stations
Applications for major changes (not in hearing)
Applications for major changes (in hearing)
Total applications for major changes
Licenses deleted
17
New FM stations
388
231
77
4,018
24
1,391
81
208
1,631
562'
40
32.
4,123
284
96
698
132
63
195
34
185.
45
230
70
354
201
38
239
CP's deleted
initial decision which looked toward granting application of KUNO Radio Inc. to Increase daytime power of KUNO Corpus
Christi, Tex., on 1400 kc from 250 w to 1 kw,
continued nighttime operation with 250 w;
remote control permitted; conditions, and,
in accordance with commission's hearing
designation order, final decision in favor
of applicant not to be made prior to determination by commission that problem of
interference between applicant's proposal
and station XEZD Ciudad Tamaulipas,
Mexico, has been resolved, became effective
Jan, 6 pursuant to Sec. 1.276 of the rules.
Action Jan. 11.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
4,031
1,408
AM
Existing AM stations
ACTION BY FCC
Commission gives notice that Nov.
CP's
51.
1
8
42
0
52
0
0
2
0
1
stations and one licensed UHF station off the air.
Breakdown on UHF and VHF applications not available.
Includes three noncommercial stations operating on commercial channels.
VHF
Steinle, Box 70, Burlington 52602. Estimated
construction cost $45,500; first year operating cost $12,000; revenue $12,000. Principals:
John P. Harris (56 %), Virginia Harris Rayl
(16 %), Peter M. Macdonald (10 %), Robert
Wells (8 %), William W. Hansen (7 %), David
H. Steinle (3 %). RB Inc. is licensee of
KBUR Burlington. Ann. Jan. 7.
Princeton, Ky.-Leslie Goodaker tr /as
Princeton Broadcasting Co. 97.7 mc, channel
249, 3 kw. Ant. height above average ten rain 173 ft. P.O. address Box 478, Princeton
42445. Estimated construction cost $11,513;
first year operating cost $3,000; revenue
$4,000. Mr. Goodaker is licensee of WPKY
Princeton. Ann. Jan. 7.
Corpus Christi
Corpus Christi, Tex.
Broadcasting Co. 93.9 mc, channel 230, 100
kw. Ant. height above average terrain 730
ft. P.O. address c/o Vann M. Kennedy, 533
N. Broadway, Corpus Christi 78401. Estimated construction cost $40,596; first year
operating cost $8,000; revenue $10,000. Principals: Vann M. Kennedy (51.66 %), Cecil
E. Burney (25.00 %), Charles R. Manning
-
r
(11.66 %), James H. Burney estate (8.33 %),
Mary L. Kennedy (3.33 %). Mr. Kennedy is
10.39% stockholder of K -SIX Television
Inc., licensee of KZTV(TV) Corpus Christi
and 40% partner in state house reporting
agency. Mr. Burney is 4.03% stockholder
of KZTV(TV); oil, land, banking and land
development investor. Burney estate has
electronic equipment company holdings,
0.67% interest of KZTV(TV). Mrs. Kennedy
holds 0.67% ownership in KZTV(TV). Corpus
Christi Broadcasting Co. to licensee of KSIX
Corpus Christi and holds majority interest
in K -SIX Television Inc., licensee of KZTV
(TV) Corpus Christi and applicant for CP
for KVER -TV Laredo, Tex. Ann. Jan. 7.
Corpus Christi, Tex.-Broadcasting Corp.
of Southwest. 93.9 mc, channel 230, 50.4 kw.
Ant. height above average terrain 327 ft.
P.O. address c/o Robert C. Kent, Box 898,
Corpus Christi 78403. Estimated construction
cost $33,321; first year operating cost $11,000; revenue $20,000. Principals: W. D. York
(47 %), Robert C. Kent (26 %), Agnes Bryant
(9 %), Beaulah Kent (6 %), Elton Brombergy
Droiiilcastíiig
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and others. Mr. York is Houston investor. Mr. Kent is % owner of Corpus
Christi men's store. Mrs. Bryant and Mrs.
Kent are housewives. Mr. Brombergy is
Houston builder. Ann. Jan. 7.
(5 %),
Ownership changes
ACTIONS BY FCC
KSUN Bisbee, Ariz.- Granted assignment
of license from Esther Morris, executrix of
estate of Carleton W. Morris deceased, to
Bisbee Broadcasters Inc., owned by Arlo
Woolery (50 %) John Hogg (25 %) and Jack
Williams (25%). Mr. Woolery is general
manager of KSUN; Mr. Hogg is general
manager and Mr. Williams is program director of KOY Phoenix. Each owns 25% of
KOY and 20% of KVOY Yuma, Ariz. Consideration $55,000. Action Jan. 7.
KHFH Sierra Vista, Ariz.- Granted assignment of license from Esther Morris,
executrix of estate of Carleton W. Morris
deceased, to Huachuca Broadcasting Co.,
owned by Kenneth Ferguson (50 %) and
Earl Hickman (50 %). Mr. Ferguson is general manager of KHFK and mmority stockholder of KMOP Tucson, Anis. Mr. Hickman is general manager for Kaiser Aerospace and Electronics, Phoenix. Consideration $55,000. Action Jan. 5.
KTHS Berryville, Ark.-Granted assignment of license from Ozark Radio and Equipment Co. to KTHS Inc., owned by Maurice
F. Dunne Jr. (30% %), Charles C. Earles
(20 %), Norris Love (22% %). Eleanor L Dunne
(20 %), John W. Hough (6% %). Mr. Dunne
is director of WBEJ Inc., UHF applicant
for Beloit -Janesville, Wis.; WLOP -AM -FM
La Salle, Ill.; KAWA Waco, Tex.; Daily
News-Tribune Inc., La Salle, Ill., and is
51% owner of three ice skating schools. Mr.
Hough is law partner, director of two alloy
casting companies, less than 5% stockholder
of WCIU Chicago. Mr. Earles is professional
radio announcer. Mr. Love Is assistant to
radio and TV director, market research,
D'Arcy Advertising Co. Consideration $50000. Action Jan. 5.
KOSY -AM -FM Texarkana, Ark. -Granted
assignment of license from W. Decker Smith
tr /as Gateway Broadcasting Co. to Gateway
Broadcasting Co., owned by W. Decker
Smith (51 %), James K. Smith and W. Decker
Smith Jr. (each 24 % %). Consideration book
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Weston Once
310 Quincy Street
Reno, Nevada
Phone 702.322 -9300
Eastern Office
509 Webster Street
Marshfield, Moss.
Phone 617.834 -9521
Southern Office
Boa 877, Richardson
Texas
Phone 214- AD1.3481
factory
P. O.
Illinois, U.S.A.
88
(FOR THE RECORD)
Box 2000, Peoria
Phone 309 -637.8416
value of stock to be transferred. Action
Jan. 7.
KIQS Willows, Calif.-(Due to accidental
omission following. FCC action was not
reported at time of occurrence.) Granted
assignment of license from Glenn County
Broadcasters Inc., owned by Walter D. Stewart, Vernon C. Hatfield and William F.
Ward (each 33 % %), to KIQS Inc., owned by
Robert C. Rose and Jo Ann Rose (each
50 %). Consideration $65,000. Mr. Rose is
news director at KRDO -TV Colorado
Springs. Colo. Action Oct. 12, 1965.
KLST(FM) Colorado Springs, Colo.
Granted assignment of license from Little
London Broadcasting Co., to David P. Pinks ton d/b Western Broadcasting Co., owned
by David P. Pinkston (100 %). Consideration
$50,000. Mr. Pinkston is sole owner of
KDAV Lubbock, KPEP San Angelo, KZIP
Amarillo, all Texas, and KPIK Colorado
Springs. Action Jan. 6.
WORT New Smyrna Beach, Fla.-Granted
transfer of control of licensee corporation,
Radio New Smyrna Inc., from John C.
Dent, Robert E. Wasdon, Leon C. Hall, and
Edward I. Cutler (each 25% before. none
after) to William P. Swartz III (100 %). Mr.
Swartz is photographic equipment and service dealer, has application pending for purchase of WSFC -AM -FM Somerset, Ky.,
through Swartz Media Inc. Consideration
$7,500 plus endorsement of mortgage debt
of $27,500. Action Jan. 7.
WIBW- AM -FM -TV Topeka, Kan.-Granted
transfer of control of license corporation,
Topeka Broadcasting Association Inc., from
Capper Publications Inc. (100% subsidiary
of Stauffer Publications Inc.) to Stauffer
Publications Inc. Transfer is to facilitate
dissolution of Capper Publications Inc. Consideration assumption and redemption of
corporate stock. Action Jan. 7.
KATC Lafayette, La.- Granted voluntary
acquisition of positive control of licensee
corporation, Acadian Television Corp., by
Voting Trustees: Mrs. Paul H. Kurzweg Jr.,
Shirley Kurzweg Gonaux, William A. Patton, D. Roy Domingue, Barton W. Freeland,
A. B. Dore, Ivan Bourque, Frank A. Godchaux III and C. Lambert Duhe, through
transfer of stock from Charles R. Godchaux
and Lawrence P. Godchaux to Voting
Trustees. Transfer represents changes in
minority ownership of corporation which
necessitated renewed filing of ownership.
No financial consideration. Action Jan. 11.
WEBC Duluth, Minn. -Granted assignment
of license from WMT -TV Inc. to Radio
Suburbia Inc. Radio Suburbia is solely
owned by Red Owl Stores and is licensee
of KRSI St. Louis Park, Mich. In addition
Red Owl owns, through Areawide Communications Inc., WNAX Yankton, S. C. Consideration $325,000. Action Jan. 5.
KLFD Litchfield, Minn. -Granted assignment of license from C. W. Doebler & Associates Inc. to Litchfield Broadcasting Corp.
Both corporations will remain under same
ownership, being Alver Leighton and Herb
Gross (each 50%). Assignment is for legal
convenience only; no financial consideration. Action Jan. 5.
WDVL Vineland, N. J.- Granted assignment of license from Mortimer Hendrickson,
Vivian Eliza Hendrickson and John Thomas
Jones Jr. db/as Delsea Broadcasters to Mortimer Hendrickson and Vivian Eliza Hendrickson db /as Delsea Broadcasters. Consideration $9,200 to Mr. Jones for 33% interest. Action Jan. 7.
KAMY McCamey, Tex.-Granted assignment of license from Don Renault (66% %)
and Jack Bundrant (33 ;, %) db /as Upton Radio to Don Renault (100 %). No financial
consideration stated. Action Jan. 11.
WHAW Weston, W. Va.-Granted involuntary transfer of control license corporation, Central W. Va. Service Corp., from
Francis E. Andrew (49.6 %) to Ruth McKinnon Andrew (0.4 %), executrix of estate of
Francis E. Andrew deceased. Action Jan. 7.
WFOX Milwaukee- Granted assignment of
license from Fox Broadcasting Corp., wholly
owned by Marine Capital Corp. of Milwaukee, to Fox Broadcasting Corp., a new corporation owned by principals named below.
Former Fox Broadcasting is to become
known as F. B. C. Corp. Principals: Eugene
W. Murphy (50 %), Herbert H. Lee (45 %),
Philip A. Dyer (5 %). Mr. Murphy is VP
of Gateway Transportation Co.; Mr. Lee is
85.5% owner of WKTY La Crosse, Wis.; Mr.
Johns is law partner. Consideration
$260,000. Action Jan. 7.
APPLICATIONS
KBLU -AM -TV Yuma, Ariz.-Seeks voluntary relinquishment of negative control of
licensee corporation, Desert Telecasting Co.,
by Robert W. Crites (50% before, 33 %%
after), John and Helen Noga (each 25% before. 16%% after) to Paul E. Morgan and
-
Herman Newhouse, a partnership (none before. 33!x% after). Consideraiton $140,000.
Ann. Jan. 8,
WYNX Smyrna, Ga. -Seeks transfer of
control of licensee corporation, Jonquil
Broadcasting Co., from Mrs. Jane E. Grant,
Victor W. Aderhold and Walter E. Baker
(total of 100% before. none after) to
Laurence N. Polk Jr. (none before, 100%
after). Mr. Polk is laundry investor in
Chattanooga, Tenn., and is sales manager of
WYNX. Consideration not to exceed total
of $151,000. Ann. Jan. 6.
WPHN Liberty, Ky. -Seeks voluntary relinquishment of negative control of licensee
corporation, Patrick Henry Broadcasting
Co., by each, J. B. Crawley and W. B. Kelley
(each 50% before, 28% after), through sale
of stock to Malcolm Wolford and George
Wolford (each none before, 24% after).
Woolford brothers own building location of
WPHN and have acted as contract engineers. Consideration $12,000. Ann. Jan. 6.
WORL Boston-Seeks transfer of control
of licensee corporation, Pilgrim Broadcasting Co., from Edward M. Gallagher Jr.
(38.8% before, none after), Francis P.
Mutrie, James E. Mutrie, Sidney Dunn
(each 19.4% before, none after), George
Gray (3% before, none after) to Ralph
Guild (100 %). Mr. Guild is executive VP
of McGavern -Guild, New York. Consideration $220,000. Ann. Dec. 23.
WKAQ -AM -FM San Juan-Seeks transfer
of control of licensee corporation, El Mundo
Broadcasting Corp., from Mrs. Argentina S.
Ramos, Jose Oviedo and Pablo Vargas
Badillo, executors of estate of Angel Ramos
deceased, to Mrs. Argentina S. Hills, voting
trustee of Fundacion Angel Ramos Inc. Stock
is beneficially held. No financial consideration. Ann. Jan. 6.
WKAQ -TV San Juan-Seeks assignment
of license from El Mundo Inc. to Telemundo
Inc., beneficially controlled 99.82% by Mrs.
A. S. Hills, voting trustee of Fundacion
Angel Ramos Inc. Transfer is to fulfill provisions of will of Angel Ramos. No financial consideration. Ann. Jan. 8.
WLSD Big Stone Gap, Va. -Seeks assignment of license from W. H. Wren Jr. and
Jean B. Wren db/as Gap Broadcasting Co.
to W. H. Wren Jr. tr /as Gap Broadcasting
Co. Assignment is result of court directed
division of properties. Ann. Jan. 6.
Hearing cases
INITIAL DECISIONS
Commission gives notice that Nov. 17
initial decision which looked toward granting application of Trinity Broadcasting Co.
for new TV to operate on channel 40 in
Fort Worth became effective Jan. 6 pursuant
to Sec. 1.276 of rules. Action Jan. 11.
Hearing examiner H. Gifford Irian issued initial decision looking toward grant ing application of Charles Vanda for new
TV to operate on channel 4 in Henderson.
Nev., and denying competing application of
Boulder City Television Inc. for new station
on that channel in Boulder City, Nev. Action Jan. 7.
OTHER ACTIONS
By letter, commission returned as unacceptable for filing for noncompliance with
Sec. 1.569 of "clear channel" rule application of Greencastle Broadcasting Co. for
new daytime AM to operate on 1130 kc.
1 kw, DA, in Greencastle, Pa. Commissioner
Lee abstained from voting. Action Jan. 12.
Twin -State Radio Inc., Natchez, Miss.
and Richland Broadcasting Co., Delhi, La.Designated for consolidated hearing applications for new daytime AM's to operate on
1390 kc-Twin -State with 5 kw. and Richland with 1 kw. Action Jan. 12.
Kentuckian Television Inc., Louisville,
Ky.- Designated application for new FM to
operate on channel 295 (106.9 mc), ERP
50 kw, ant. height 500 ft., in consolidated
hearing with applications of Keith L. Reising and Kentucky Central Broadcasting Inc.
for new stations on same channel in Louisville; specified issues superseding previous
ones. Action Jan. 12.
Review board granted petition by
Broadcast Bureau to extend time to Jan. 21
to file responsive pleadings to Joint petition
for approval of agreement, dismissal of application, and waiver of five -day requirement by Charlottesville Broadcasting Corp.
(WINA), Charlottesville, and WBXM Broadcasting Co., Springfield. Va., in proceeding
on their AM applications. Member Nelson
not participating. Action Jan. 10.
Review board granted petition by Community Telecasters of Cleveland Inc. to extend time to Jan. 14 to file affidavits of
financial showing to its petition for leave
to amend in proceeding on its application
and that of Cleveland Broadcasting Inc. for
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
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Wash. 4. D. C.
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D.
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C. 296 -6400
Engineering
1710 H St., N. W. 298 -6850
WASHINGTON 6, D. C.
A. EARL CULLUM, JR.
KEAR & KENNEDY
1302 18th St., N.W.
WASHINGTON
Hudson
6,
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INWOOD POST OFFICE
DALLAS 9, TEXAS
MElrose
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JULES COHEN
& ASSOCIATES
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
George M. Skions
Quincy St.
Hickory 7 -2401
Riverside, III.
IA Chicago suburb)
19
E.
CARL
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729 15th St., N.W., 393 -4616
E.
PETE JOHNSON
MERL SAXON
Consulting am -tm -tv Engineers
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEER
Applications-Field Engineering
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Charleston, West Virginia
E.
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CONSULTANT
Bon
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Phone: 517 -278 -6733
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342 -6281
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is suburb of Washington)
Phone: 301 427 -4666
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COMMERCIAL RADIO
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PRECISION EREQUENCY
MEASUREMENTS
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103 5.
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BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
G St., N.W.
Republic 7 -6646
Washington 5, D. C.
1405
TEXAS
Member AFOCE
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CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
Box 68,
San
International Airport
Francisco 28, California
Diamond 2 -5208
9208 Wyoming PI.
Hiland
4
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KANSAS CITY 14, MISSOURI
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
Applications and Field Engineering
345 Colorado Blvd.-80206
Phone: (Area Code 303) 333 -5562
WILLIAM B. CARR
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
P. O. Box 13287
Fort Worth, Texas
BUtler -1551
A.
Towne Assocs., Inc.
E.
TELEVISION and RADIO
ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS
420 Taylor St.
San Francisco 2, Calif.
PR 5 -3100
RAYMOND
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& Associates
Consulting Radio Engineers
436
E.
BENHAM
5, D.
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Phone: 347 -9061
Member AFCCE
Member AFCCE
E.
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Washington
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and ASSOCIATES
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& KOWALSKI
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DENVER, COLORADO
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4318
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Cleveland 41, Ohio
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C.
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HAMMETT & EDISON
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5, D.
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ARLINGTON,
KEAN
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1100 W. Abram
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
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District
Washington 5, D. C.
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Lohnes & Culver
Munsey Building
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P.O.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
Radio -Television
Communications -Electronics
901 20th St., N.W.
Washington, D. C.
Federal 3 -1116
Washington
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1
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Member AFCCE
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
930 Warner Bldg. National 8 -7757
Washington 4, D. C.
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Munsey Bldg.
STerling 3 -0111
Washington 4, D. C.
Member AFCCE
Years' Experience in Radio
42
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Montclair, N.J. 07043
Phone: (2011 746 -3000
A. D. Ring & Associates
Everett L. Dillard, Gen. Mgr.
Edward F. Lorentz, Chief Engr.
PRUDENTIAL BLDG.
DI 7 -1319
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20005
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
RADIO Cr TELEVISION
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Box 798, Upper
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EQUIPMENT CO.
GEORGE C. DAVIS
PAUL GODLEY CO.
Consulting Engineer
2411 - 2419 M St., N.W.
Washington 37,
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JANSKY & BAILEY
JAMES
F.
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& ASSOCIATES
FM and TV Engineering Consultant
Consulting Engineers
Precision Frequency Measurements.
3141 Cahuenga
Los Angeles 28,
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California
HO 6 -3227
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SPECIALISTS FOR AM -FM -TV
445 Concord Ave..
Cambridge 36, Mans.
Phone TRowbridge 6 -2810
Applications and Construction.
TELETRONIX ENGR. CO.
308 Monterey Rd., S. Pasadena, Cal.
Phone 213 -682 -2792
T. W. KIRKSEY
Years TV Engineering
TV CATV and Microwave
Phone 612 -935 -7131
Box 8068
55416
17
Minneapolis, Minnesota
89
new TV's to operate on channel 19 to Cleveland. Action Jan. 10.
Review board granted petition by
Broadcast Bureau to extend time to Feb. 1
to file exceptions to supplemental initial
decision in proceeding on application of
Connecticut Coast Broadcasting Co. for new
AM in Bridgeport, Conn. Action Jan. 10.
Review board scheduled oral argument
for Feb. 3 in proceeding on application of
Verne M. Miller for new AM in Crystal Bay,
Nev. Action Jan. 7.
By memorandum opinion and order in
proceeding on AM applications of Emerald
Broadcasting Corp. (KPIR), Eugene, Pendleton Broadcasting Co. (KUMA), Pendleton, both Oregon, and Hi- Desert Broad(KDHI), Twenty - Nine
casting Corp.
Palms, Calif., review board held in
abeyance further consideration of
request
for approval
agreement
nth pending reeccelipt of affidavit by
latter that it has complied with Sec. 1.525(b)
of publication rules in order to afford other
persons opportunity to apply for its proposed facilities. Member Nelson absent. Action Jan. 7.
By memorandum opinion and order in
proceeding on applications of United Broadcasting Co. for renewal of license of WOOK
Washington, and Bowie Broadcasting Corp.,
for new AM station in Bowle, Md., review
board held in abeyance further consideration of their joint request for approval of
agreement pending compilance by Bowie
with Sec. 1.525(b) of publication rules in
order to afford other persons opportunity
to apply for its proposed facilities. Member
Nelson absent. Action Jan. 7.
By memorandum opinion and order in
Lebanon, Pa. -Catonsville,
Catonsville, Md., AM proceeding in Doc. 15835 et. al., review board
granted petition by Lebanon Valley Radio
for review of examiner's action and denied
Cedar Broadcasters petition for leave to
amend its application. Member Nelson absent. Action Jan. 7.
Routine roundup
ACTIONS ON MOTIONS
By Office of Opinions and Review
Granted motion by North Central Video
Inc. (KWEB), Rochester, Minn., to extend
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BROADCASTING
1735 DeSales St., Washington, D. C. 20036
90
(FOR
THE RECORD)
time from Jan. 8 to Jan. 13 to file reply to
opposition by Broadcast Bureau to its application for review of review board's action
of Nov. 5, 1965. Action Jan. 7.
Granted petition by Ottawa Broadcasting Corp to extend time to Jan. 17 to file
application for review of decision of review
board which denied its application to change
operation of WJBL Holland, Mich. Action
Jan. 6.
By Chief Hearing Examiner
James D. Cunningham
Designated examiner Sol Schildhause to
preside at hearings in proceeding on applications of J. C. Stallings and Texan Broadcasting Co. for new FM's in Nacogdoches,
Tex.; scheduled prehearing conference for
Jan. 26 and hearing for Feb. 17. Action
Jan. 5.
Continued further hearing from Jan. 6
to Jan. 20 in matter of liability for forfeiture of McLendon Pacific Corp. for station
KARL Oakland, Calif. Action Jan. 5.
By Hearing Examiner Basil P. Cooper
Granted petition by Ultravision Broadcasting Co. for leave to amend its application to reflect up -to -date terms on which
technical equipment is to be supplied, but
denied its petition for leave to amend to
reflect new loan agreements from individuals not parties in proceeding on its application and that of WEBR Inc. for new TV's
to operate on channel 29 in Buffalo. Action
Jan. 7.
Granted motion by Fine Music Broadcasts Inc. and Belk Broadcasting Co. of
Florida Inc. to continue further prehearing
conference from Jan. 10 to Feb. 21 in pro ceeding on their applications for new FM's
in Jacksonville, Fla. Action Jan. 7.
By Hearing Examiner James D. Cunningham
In proceeding on application of West
Central Ohio Broadcasters Inc. for new AM
in Xenia, Ohio, granted motion by parties
and on own motion corrected in various
respects transcript of record; dismissed as
moot motion by Greene Information Center
to correct transcript; and extended time
from Jan. 17 to Jan. 20 to file proposed
findings. Action Jan. 10.
By Hearing Examiner Thomas H. Donahue
is Pursuant to agreement reached at Jan.
4 prehearing conference, scheduled hearing
for March 7. in proceeding on applications
of Clay County Broadcasting Co. and Wilderness Road Broadcasting Co. for new
FM's in Manchester, Ky. Action Jan. 5.
Quashed notice by Wilderness Road
Broadcasting Co. to take depositions in proceeding on its application and that of Clay
County Broadcasting Co. for new FM's In
Manchester, Ky. Action Jan. 5.
Granted motion by Campbell and Sheftall to extend time from Dec. 27 to Jan. 5
to file proposed findings and from Jan. 10
to Jan. 24 for replies in proceeding on its
application and that of Fort Campbell
Broadcasting Co. for new FM's in Clarke ville and Fort Campbell, both Kentucky,
respectively. Action Jan. 4.
Granted motion by Television San Francisco and Jail Broadcasting Co. to extend
time from Dec. 26 to Jan. 10 to file replies
to proposed findings in proceeding on their
applications for new TV's to operate on
channel 26 in San Francisco. Action Jan. 4.
By Hearing Examiner Charles J. Frederick
Pursuant to commission's action of Dec.
27 which remanded to examiner proceeding
on AM applications of Monroeville Broadcasting Co., Monroeville. and Miners Broadcasting Service Inc. (WMBA), Ambridge Aliquippa, both Pennsylvania, reopened record and scheduled prehearing conference
for Jan. 14. Action Jan. 6.
Upon request of Triple C Broadcasting
Corp. (WLOR), Thomasville, Ga., continued
hearing from Jan. 12 to Jan. 13 in proceeding on its AM application. Action Jan. 6.
In proceeding on AM applications of
Charlottesville Broadcasting Corp. (WINA),
Charlottesville, and WBXM Broadcasting
Co., Springfield, both Virginia, identified for
record and received in evidence WINA's
Exhibits 3 and 4. Action Jan. 4.
By Hearing Examiner Walther W. Guenther
On own motion, certified to review
board for such action, if any, it may deem
appropriate, certain questions raised by
commission's policy on Sec. 307(b) in proceeding on AM applications of Abacoa Radio
Corp. (WRAI), Rio Piedras (San Juan), and
Mid -Ocean Broadcasting Corp., San Juan,
P. R. Action Jan. 10,
By Hearing Examiner Isadore A. Honig
Scheduled hearing conference for Jan.
in proceeding on application of Continental Broadcasting Inc. for renewal of license of WNJR Newark, N. J. Action Jan. 7.
Pursuant to agreements reached at Jan.
13
prehearing conference, scheduled certain
procedural dates in proceeding on application of New South Broadcasting Corp. for
new FM's in Meridian, Miss., and continued
Jan. 19 hearing to Feb. 24. Action Jan. 5.
Granted motion by Continental Broadcasting Inc. to quash in part subpoena duces
tecum directed to O. Wayne Rollins or his
representative in proceeding on renewal of
license of Continental's AM station WNJR
Newark, N. J. Action Jan. 4.
By Hearing Examiner H. Gifford Irion
In proceeding on applications of TriCity Broadcasting Co. and Henryetta Radio
Co. for new FM's in Eufaula and Henryetta,
Okla., respectively, cancelled Jan. 12 hearing, scheduled further prehearing conference for Feb. 4, and hearing for March 14.
Action Jan. 6.
Continued further prehearing conference from Jan. 7 to Jan. 28 in proceeding
on applications of Keith L. Reising and
Kentucky Central Broadcasting Inc. for new
FM's in Louisville, Ky. Action Jan. 4.
By Hearing Examiner David I, Kraushaar
Granted motion by Radio Marshall Inc.
to dismiss without prejudice its application
for new FM in Marshall, Tex.; and terminated proceeding in Doc. 16299. Action Jan. 7.
Issued order following Jan. 6 prehearing
conference formalizing certaippnpp procedural
a)
Edgefield Saluda Radio Co. (WJES
Johnston, and WQIZ Inc. (WQIZ), Saint George,
both South Carolina, and continued hearing
to March 8 (Doc. 16340 -1). By separate action, granted petition by WJES for leave to
amend its application to supplement data
contained in section I of FCC Form 301,
correcting showings in section II, and setting forth its current financial proposals in
section III. Action Jan. 6.
By Hearing Examiner Jay A. Kyle
Pursuant to commission's action of Dec.
27 which remanded to examiner proceeding
on applications of Jupiter Associates Inc.,
Somerset County Broadcasting Co. and Radio Elizabeth Inc. for new AM's in Matawan,
Somerville, and Elizabeth, N. J., respectively, scheduled hearing conference for Jan.
18. Action Jan. 10.
By Hearing Examiner Forest L. McClenning
Granted request by Broadcast Bureau
to extend time from Jan. 11 to Jan. 24 to
file proposed findings in proceeding on AM
application of Oklahoma Press Publishing
Co. (KBIX), Muskogee, Okla. Action Jan. 7.
In Costa -Mesa -Newport Beach, Calif.,
AM proceedings in Doc. 15752 et al. cancelled Jan. 24 date for exchange of exhibits,
Jan. 31 hearing and scheduled further hearing conference for Jan. 31. Action Jan. 6.
By Hearing Examiner
Chester F. Naumowicz Jr.
Granted request by Broadcast Bureau
to continue prehearing conference from
Jan. 7 to Jan. 25 in proceeding on applications of Seven League Productions Inc.
for renewal of license of WIII Homestead,
Fla., and applications of South Dade Broadcasting Co. and Redlands Broadcasting Co.
for new stations in Homestead. Action
Jan. 5.
By Hearing Examiner Sol Schildhause
In proceeding on applications of United
Broadcasting Co. for renewal of license of
WOOK Washington and Bowle Broadcasting
Corp. for new AM in Bowie Md., granted
motion by WOOK to extend time to Feb. 25
to file proposed findings and replies to
March 18. Action Jan. 10.
On motion by United Broadcasting Co.
to extend dates for submitting proposed
findings in proceeding on its application for
renewal of license of WOOK Washington.
and Bowie Broadcasting Corp. for new AM
in Bowie Md., cancelled Jan. 7 and 31 dates
to submit findings and reply findings, reopened record for purpose of considering
fixing of new dates, and scheduled hearing
conference for Jan. 10 to consider justification for more delay. Action Jan. 4.
In Lebanon, Pa.-Catonsville, Md., AM
consolidated proceeding, denied motion by
Cedar Broadcasters to dismiss application
of Lebanon Valley' Radio. By separate action, granted petition by Lebanon Valley
Radio for leave to amend its application as
to its financial showing and redistribution
of partnership interests. Action Jan. 4.
(Continued on page 97)
5
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17,
1966
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SITUATIONS WANTED 250 per word-$2.0t' minimum
DISPLAY ads $25.00 per inch -STATIONS FOR SALE, WANTED TO BUY STATIONS and EMPLOYMENT AGEN.
CIES advertising require display space. (26 X rate -$2250, 52 X rate(20.00 Display only). 5" or over Billed R.O.B. rase.
All other classifications, 350 Der word-$4.00 minimum.
No charge for blind box number. Send replies: c/o BROADCASTING, 1735 DeSales St, N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036.
please) All tranacrlp.
APPLICANTS: If tapes, films or packages submitted, $1.00 charge for handling (Forward remittance separately
ttons, photos, etc., sent to box numbers are sent at owner's risk. BROADCASTING expressly repudiates any liability or responsibility for
their custody or return.
RADIO
Help Wanted -Management
Manager- strong on sales, liberal commission. New station in small midwest market, some announcing, 1st desirable, stock
option possible. Send resume, photo and
tape. Box A -40, BROADCASTING.
Station manager work under general manager. Rapidly expanding South Florida gold
coast area major network affiliate. Essential previous experience heavy sales and
collections. State previous earnings, resume.
Prefer above 35. Box A -115. BROADCASTING.
Young manager, under 35, with sales conscious mind -willing to work, preferably
married -upper New York state market of
100,000. Grow with a young, progressive organization that is ready to expand -The
right man can take hunk of profits as well
as good salary open for negotiation. Station plays top 40 music in a market just
waiting to be sold. If you like professional
radio, security and $$$-this is it. Box A148, BROADCASTING.
Ohio small market daytimer needs working
manager now! Salary plus percentage of
net profit. Box A -207, BROADCASTING.
Selling manager-50 kw, St. Louis religious
-country western daytimer. $10,000 to start
plus bonus on increase. Station in black.
Assume complete control. Harold Schwartz,
1227 Loyala Ave., Chicago 26.
Sales
Leading good -music AM -FM station in
major southwest market seeks top -notch
salesman with sales management experience.
Right man can earn up to $30.000. Box M-29.
BROADCASTING.
Salesman- newsman to manage branch studio, midwest. Creative, aggressive worker
will earn big commission checks. Box A153, BROADCASTING.
Needed immediately -qualified sales manager; excellent base plus strong incentive.
Northeast within two hundred miles New
York City. Box A -183, BROADCASTING.
East coast near NYC local sales division non
competitive market, well established, prestige station, group owned. Outstanding opportunity for reliable man to make his
"last" move. Age 25 to 35. Guarantee plus
commission arrangement plus many company benefits. Send complete resume and
recent photo to Sales Manager, Box A -175,
BROADCASTING.
New Fla. Gold Coast (south of W. Palm).
Need salesman- announcer. Emphasis on
sales. 1000 watt daytimer; one station market, pop. 15,000. $80 wk, plus 10 %. Tape,
resume, current billing, photo. Box A -178,
BROADCASTING.
Fine opportunity in sales in midwest small
market station. Call Manager, KLEX, 818259 -3232.
Experienced salesman $400 month plus commission, good account list, management
opportunity. Mr. Waters
KLTR. Black-
...
well, Okla.
Need stable radio salesman interested in
permanent employment in good community.
Send full details, salary and snapshot to
Manager, KSWS, Roswell, New Mexico.
Sales -announcer for Magnolia, Arkansas,
daytime. Ideal training on established accounts. Send tape to KVMA.
Experienced married salesman, immediately.
$100 plus commission. WJOE, Port St. Joe,
Florida.
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
Sales-(Cont'd)
market-member of 7 staToledo -Top
tion group -top 40 needs aggressive salesman
to match aggressive programing of staff and
management. Great future. Must be experienced. Write WTOD Radio, 3225 Arlington,
Toledo, Ohio. Phone Evergreen 5 -2507.
Need four salesmen to travel (already have
one making $800 week) to sell prestige promotion (proven) to Radio and Banks. Call
on inquiries only. Write Randall, P.O. Box
50
Tuscaloosa. Ala. Will call you long
distance for interview.
2029,
Announcers
Announcer with experience for progressive
group operated western Pennsylvania station. Forward tape, resume and photo. Box
M -205. BROADCASTING.
Announcers-(Cont'd)
New Jersey-if you are an experienced announcer, able to deliver news and commercials in a friendly relaxed manner, send
tape and resume. Interview required. Box
A -191, BROADCASTING.
Announcer for C &W station. Mid -Atlantic
state. Mature, friendly voice. Must handle
all phases well, especially news. Good salary,
excellent staff equipment. Only sober, responsible people need apply. Two years
experience minimum requirement. Tape,
photo, resume 1st letter. All material will
be returned. Box A -192, BROADCASTING.
Opportunity married staff announcer. Tape.
resume. KFRO, Longview, Tex.
Alaska-Experienced, mature voice. Affection free delivery. High professional standards for news, production and short board
shift. Excellent wage. Good music. Air mail
tape, application references to: KHARPouch 7 -016. Anchorage.
Immediate opening for announcer who
would also like sales. Good small midwest
market. Near large city. Call manager,
Aggressive northern Virginia radio station
looking for 2 experienced announcers. One
should be a combo man with 1st phone. No
maintenance required. Plenty of chance for
advancement: this is a multiple ownership
operation. If you bring enthusiasm to radio
we're interested. Are you? These are immediate openings. Rush tape and resume to
Box M -234. BROADCASTING.
KLEX, 816- 259 -3232.
must have Immediate opening for experienced announGirls wanted for air work
good voice
in top 50 market area. Send
cers and creative production man. Must be
photograph, resume
able to turn out top copy. Ideal spot to
Box A-5, BROADCASTING.
settle down in, a beautiful city, mild dry
Park.
Announcer- Midwest radio -TV group looking climate, near Kings Canyon NationalproducBest of schools, submit air check,
for top talent. Announcers and newsmen.
resume, referFine opportunity and location. Inquire today. tion commercials. completeVisalia,
Calif.
ence to KONG AM & FM.
write Box A -11, BROADCASTING.
with
first
for
new
50,engineer
announcer
announcerNeed
1
more
staff
Experienced
000 watt good music radio station. Send
phone needed for Maryland AM -FM onerain
an
people
airdependable
&
full
details
by
Join
other
salary
tion.
tape, snapshot,
excellent staff. Box A -53. BROADCASTmail to Manager, KSWS, Roswell, New
ING.
Mexico.
Announcer with pleasant, authoritative deExperienced announcer for Magnolia, Ark.
livery for middle -music Texas station. Box
daytimer. Write copy and service established
A -90, BROADCASTING.
accounts. KVMA. Send tape.
. must have first phone
Morning man
Immediate opening-young. single announ. . . part time deejay, full time salesman
. outcer with 3rd phone. with broadcast endorsemust be exceptional at both
Radio station,
standing opportunity in major midwest mar- ment. Housing available.
KVWN, AM /FM, Show Low. Arizona.
. $150.00 week plus
ket for right man
commissions. Box A -93, BROADCASTING.
Immediate opening for Negro DJ R&B,
need first class ticket but will accept other.
Announcer to train in time sales, some announcing. Top pay, good working condi- .fiend tape, picture and details to KZEY,
tions. Fine small market station in S. C. P.O. Box 1331, Tyler, Texas.
Send complete resume. Box A -142. BROADCASTING.
Opening for staff announcer. Send resume
tape to Leo Jylha, WBCM, Bay City.
Straight announcer, tight board; good music and
station. Big Connecticut market; $120.00. Michigan.
A
-145,
BROADSend tape and resume. Box
C &W jock -format country in station on the
CASTING.
way up. Prefer first phone. Send tape and
Immediate opening for adult announcer with resume to Gary Woods, WEEE, Box 1300.
endorsed third. Grown-up central Florida
Albany, N. Y.
established station has permanent position
for mature man who wants to practice good
. a lively self need a morning man
radio and believes in top notch production. We
starting personality who is aware of the
Send tape. snapshot, resume all in first
importance of communicating with his auletter to Box A -149, BROADCASTING.
dience on that important first shift. Good,
popular music, no rock. 200,000 listeners in
N. E. top ten market has immediate opening
our primary need stimulating from 6 to
minimum
5
years
for staff announcer
.
10 am. Start at $100 weekly. WFIN,Findlay,
Middle
.
station
experience
. Union
Ohio. Send tape and resume or contact
send tape
network affiliate
of road
Program Director, Rick Rawlins.
and resume to Box A -158. BROADCASTING.
...
...
...
Personality deejay with sports background
and 3rd endorsed for N'eastern Penna. Medium market. Send tape, resume, salary requirements to Box A -178, BROADCASTING.
Will pay up to $150.00 weekly for an announcer. Send resume and tape to Box A -181.
BROADCASTING.
Top flight afternoon top 40 jock, mature,
personable, must be production whiz. Medium market, New York state. No beginners.
Send non-returnable tape, resume and
photo. Box A -187, BROADCASTING,
Immediate opening for morning man with
interest in production and sales. Good opportunity for bright personality, using middle of road format. Good starting salary.
Must have third phone. Send photo. resume
and tape. Material returned. No calls please.
Write Preston Young, WHLF AM -FM, South
Boston, Virginia.
Washington, D. C. metropolitan area is first
ranked. WHMC, serves expanding region.
Immediate opening for first phone. bright
announcer. Quick, call 301 -948 -9400.
91
Announcer-- (Cont'd)
Techdcal---(cont'd)
Management- (cont'd)
WISM, Madison Is looking for an air pro.
First phone engineer needed immediately,
at 24 hour 5 kw operation, 4 tower directional day & nite. Car required. Studios &
transmitter at one location. Recent graduates
of tech schools are acceptable. An equal
opportunity employer. Contact Tom Kite
WLEE Radio, Richmond, Virginia, 6200 W.
Broad Street.
First class engineer for FM station in Ohio
vacationland. Announcing ability desirable
but not necessary. Call Mr. Lane 419 -734-
Experienced manager, sales, engineer, sober.
dependable, references. 774 -5414, Chillicothe,
personality with imagination and ambition. A first class ticket is desirable but not
required. We are number one in ratings,
pay and working conditions. If you want
action by us send tape and resume to Program Director WISM, Box 2058, Madison.
Wisconsin.
Announcer with first phone. Some experience required. No maintenance. NBC affiliate, newspaper owned. Solid and well
equipped. Send tape, resume, salary requirements and photo. WJPG, P.O. Box
520, Green Bay, Wisconsin 54305.
Immediate opening for experienced announcer top 100 format, award -winning
news, all new equipment. Send tape, R. M.
McKay, Jr., WKRM, P.O. Box 71, Columbia,
Tennessee.
A
Announcer, for 5,000 watt, 580 kw station,
require 1st phone. Good pay, many extra
benefits. Write H. Lee, WKTY, LaCrosse,
Wisconsin.
One top 40-One C &W announcer with top
40 delivery. 1st tickets. Send photo, tape, re..
sume to Ted Hite, WKYX, Paducah, Ky.
Announcer, engineer with 1st phone for
Albany, Georgia. No maintenance. Jim
Rivers, WMJM, Cordele, Ga.
Middle of road Massachusetts station needs
quality announcer. Experienced only! Contact WSRO, Marlboro, Massachusetts.
Opening available immediately for nite announcer. WTAP Parkersburg, W. Va. Phone
Joe Rada, 304 -485 -4588.
Going FM and increasing power. Need announcer with minimum 1 year experience.
$90 start. Send 7!4ips tape. WVSC, Somerset, Pa.
Young, bright, modern sounding disc Jockey..
Production man. Good pay, you will be
heard in Washington, Baltimore area. Send
tape & resume to Program Director WYRE
Radio, Annapolis, Maryland.
Announcer -morning man for balanced programed station, relaxed but alert. Ideal location in fast -growing community, many
cultural and recreational advantages; home
of Indiana University. Contact: E. M. Sears,
Box 62. Bloomington, Indiana. We are an
equal employment opportunities employer.
Technical
First class technical men wanted for Eastern
AM expanding into CATV. Growth opportunity with a solid future. Liberal fringe
benefits. Box A-4, BROADCASTING.
Excellent opportunity for Chief engineer:
western Mass. Finest resort living. Experience with directional array necessary. Interview required. Box A -116, BROADCASTING.
3146.
News
Aggressive, young newsman wanted in 150,000 population midwest market. Capital city.
Good training for the big ones. Send complete resume & tape to Dick Benedict,
KLIN Radio, 400 S. 13th, Lincoln, Neb.
Wanted: Assistant news director for mid west station with established, award winning news department. Prefer journalism
degree and experience. Salary open. Call
Bert Freedman, News Director, WASK, La-
fayette, Indiana 447 -2186.
Experienced radio newsman ready for fast
company as part of 11 -man radio -TV news
department. Must have good voice plus
delivery to match pace format. To replace
man with us five years leaving for Group
"W ". Rush news tape, newscopy samples,
resume to Ron Russell, WHYN, Springfield,
Mass.
Newsman for number one station. Action
oriented news department with emphasis on
actualities, must have rewrite ability and be
a digger. Send tape and resume to News
Director, WISM, Madison, Wisconsin. Box
2058.
Newsman, experienced, dig and write local
news. Must be strong on air work. Good
nay and fringe benefits. Near Philadelphia.
Call 215- 896-3690.
Prodoction- Programing. Others
Opportunity for talented assistant program
director in radio station on Texas gulf
coast. Box A -91, BROADCASTING.
Accountant-Major Washington, D. C. network radio -TV station. Send resume indicating salary level required to Box A -172,
BROADCASTING.
Opening for copywriter. Experienced. Send
resume to Leo Jylha, WBCM, Bay City,
Michigan.
Professional broadcaster for Program director and personality air work. Station has
bright middle of road music, creative corn mercial production, local news and special
events emphasis. Dominant station in growing city of 50,000. Job opens Jan. 30th. Applicant will be checked closely. Send tape
and resume to Andy Huger, WJON, St.
Cloud, Minnesota.
New Fla. Gold Coast (south of W. Palm.)
RADIO
Situations Wanted-Management
Tape, resume, photo. Box A -177, BROADCASTING.
General manager -Crack broadcaster, 17
years experience, seeks solid operation opportunity, stock. interest options. medium
to large market. Family man, first rate
reputation, all around creative sales, programing. operation success. Box A -120,
watt daytimer, non -directional. Need
chief engineer- announcer. Must be able to
maintain transmitter and studio equipment
and handle good music show. $80 wk start.
1000
Alaska-Need chief to layout, install, maintain color TV. Studios -Xmtr of TV -AM -FM
on site. Practical experience in color necessary. Excellent wage. Airmail application,
references to KHAR-Pouch 7 -016, Anchorage.
Ist class engineer. No announcing. Contact:
Leo Jylha, WBCM, Bay City, Michigan.
Chief engineer for non -directional modern
music station -desire man strong on audio
and tape equipment. Present chief promoted
to TV. Excellent opportunity with growing
group. Contact, Myron Jones -WJET, Erie.
Pennsylvania.
Engineer wanted: stable, 1st phone with
some experience, for transmitter shift, to
take over transmitter maintenance when
we go remote. Send references and back ground to Phil Graham, WJPS, Evansville,
India?á.
92
BROADCASTING.
Young, aggressive manager of one of nation's
most respected stations desires change. Excellent background. references. Experience
in an phases of radio. Box A -125, BROADCASTING.
Experienced broadcaster with highly successful management and sales record seeks
position as manager of radio station in top
50 market. Family man, 42 years old. Box
A -147, BROADCASTING.
California, here I come. Looking
for an op-
portunity in management, sales management
or sales .
experience in all three on
the small ad medium market level. Selling est salesman you ever saw. Box A -157,
.
.
BROADCASTING.
FM program director, medium market, experienced, looking for advancement. Presently employed. This is not a panic ad.
Box A -167, BROADCASTING.
Ohio.
Sales
Sales manager-eight years industrial ex-
perience, eight years N. Y. C. broadcast
technician desires opportunity combine experience for broadcasting sales marketing.
Box A -119, BROADCASTING.
Money hungry, aggressive, creative salesman
who can sell is available. I believe the
name of the game is sales, and sales mean
dollars to both of us. Now working in com-
petitive radio market with very promotion
minded top 40 station within the top 70
markets. Want to move to major market.
If you have the ratings, but not the sales.
let's get together and "turn on" your market. Have interesting background and good
track record. Box A -168, BROADCASTING.
Announcers
Personality -any format, 23, family, third.
sells, production. Box A -70, BROADCASTING.
Beginner, married, 3rd end. broadcast school
grad., prefer southwest. Box A -140, BROADCASTING.
First phone-10 years all formats -relaxed
style. Available immediately. Box A -144,
BROADCASTING.
Married country music personality, six years
experience, looking for opportunity with
modern country station. Currently employed,
top ratings in major market. Looking for
security, chance for advancement. In return, and air personality well versed in
growing field of country music. Box A -150,
BROADCASTING.
Negro lady di /announcer; graduate of top
New York announcing school. Seeks position in R &B, Jazz or Gospel. Third class
endorsement. Will relocate. Box A -151,
BROADCASTING.
Hold it: Bright morning man, program director, radio personality in top ten markets.
Excellent ratings in middle of the road and
top forty programing. Highly creative, professional production, authoritative newscast
and top rate play by play. 15 years experience, for details phone 212 -526 -5989, New
York City or write Box A -154, BROADCASTING.
Well trained newscaster /dj. Tight board,
endorsed third phone. Family man will relocate. Box A -15$. BROADCASTING.
Staff announcer, family man, third phone.
One year middle of the road experience.
Will try anything. Prefer south. Box A-156,
BROADCASTING.
Announcer 17 yrs network. "Old School"
but can swing. Box A -161, BROADCASTING.
Announcer-1st phone- excellent references,
experienced, will relocate. Box A -169,
BROADCASTING.
Young sportscaster with college degree and
5 years experience interested in play -byplay job in small or medium market, Box
A-171, BROADCASTING.
Sports director. Top play by play. Third
phone. Eager to please. Steady, reliable,
friendly. Basketball, football, auto racing a
specialty. Box A -182, BROADCASTING.
Are you a top 40 station In a top 50 market? Do you plan to stick with your current format? Are you looking for a "personality" dj that's willing to start at the
bottom and work to the top? If you can
answer yes to these, this could be the bepinning of a beautiful relationship!! Box
A -188, BROADCASTING.
Announcer: Seven years experience. 25,
Married. $95 week. Box A -190, BROADCASTING.
Attention: top talk show star of radio and
TV is available. Major markets only. Highest references. Call 212 -KI -3 -3498 or write
Box A -194, BROADCASTING.
First phone-experience: sports. news, dj.
Prefer southwest or midwest. Box A -195,
BROADCASTING.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Announcers-(Cont'd)
Production- Programing, Others
Technical-(Confd)
First phone-di /news-interviews-telephone
show -mopic cameraman -service completed
Sportscaster, married, looking for a sports
minded station . . . experienced play by
.
play in any spor & news coverage .
would consider a share of TV work also
Engineer of good character, best technical
qualifications for South Texas VHF. Box
A -92, BROADCASTING.
Studio technician operations /maintenance.
Contact Bob Latham, KNTV, 645 Park Ave.,
San Jose, California.
-family-west coast. Box
A -196, BROADCASTING.
Disc -jockey announcer, adapt to any format.
Married, 3rd phone endorsed, newscaster.
Box A -I97, BROADCASTING.
Announcer -newsman -first phone: currently
news director metro station -good pay gets
you good hardworking man. Box A-198,
BROADCASTING.
3aseball announcing position wanted. Experi-
enced sportscaster. Tape available. Box A201,
BROADCASTING.
Experienced sportscaster- teacher wants New
York state part -time sportscasting, including baseball. Tape available. Box A -202.
BROADCASTING.
Bright- alert -happy sound morning man
excellent references -first phone-no maintenance.
Iowa or Minnesota. Box A -204,
BROADCASTING.
Are you ready? Me, too! Personality top 40
six years. 3rd endorsed. Box A -206, BROADCASTING.
DJ, tight board, prefer N. Y., N. J. good
music. Box A -208, BROADCASTING.
Go go go with the go success story that can
go with you! Young. lively, pop personality
wants to join a swinger that's not a swingin'
door. Pulse rated 9 to 22 in six months,
including 154% rise in teens in major market. Presently employed, family, stable, 6
years experience, (air, promotion & sales
work). Can we go -go -go together? Box
A -210, BROADCASTING.
Top "40" only-experienced, first phone,
married, college graduate wants permanent position with progressive production
minded station. Call 615- 877 -4992. Rick
Sharpe, 3614 Pickering Avenue, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
Now booking relief announcer, newsman,
copywriter? Available Feb. 1, 1966 through
Dec. 15, 1966. Call Ron 803 -833 -1625 or 803833 -2501. Will consider relief with possible
-
.. Box A-168, BROADCASTING.
Traffic manager. Can write copy. Do production -and hold 1st class ticket. Left
.
previous station because of ownership
change. P.S. Don't faint-I'm Female! Box
A -170, BROADCASTING.
Hark!! Fair- haired, mild-mannered production genius with experience in metropolitan
markets, including Philadelphia and suburbs, desires stable position where talents
are needed. College grad's specialty- humorous, adult -oriented morning show; also TV
and sales experience. Box A -173, BROAD-
CASTING.
Rally your ratings and revenue!! First class
P.D. /DJ with first ticket can make your
outlet #1 with contemporary- personality
format. Full responsibility for all interior
operations from announcing to traffic. Box
A-185, BROADCASTING.
Award winning documentary writer- director- producer available for temporary assignment. Box A -186, BROADCASTING.
6 years announcing experience. Ready for
Program director position. Thorough knowledge music. Good overall radio know-how.
Box A -193, BROADCASTING.
Professional sportscaster seeking heavy play by-play schedule, excellent references. Box
A-205, BROADCASTING.
Creative writer- producer-director. Six years
international radio abroad. Strong on documentation, European politics, commentary
and narration. Authoritative presentation.
Married, BA journalism. Box A -213, BROADCASTING.
Automated stations! "Biff Collie's Corner,"
taped country personality show with 25
cycle tone ins. Can be two, three, four
hours. Seven days $35.00. Tape, brochure
write, 1041 Pine Avenue, Long Beach, Calif.
TELEVISION -Help Wanted
permanent future.
jock, have beard, will travel. 4 years
experience. Hit with young and old. Personality that swings, is different, 3rd class.
Call 707 -462 -3635 or write 164 Eastwood
Drive, San Francisco.
Top jock, good ratings. McLendon, first
phone, ideas. Take P.D. or jock. Texas
area. Jay Lindsay, OL 5 -4749, San Antonio.
I'm looking for a station that is hotter than
a two dollar pistol loaded for bear. Let's
go
Have worked
together
22
market
250 to 0,000 wattsgo
rock, midroad, C &W. Tight airwork, production . . award winning newsman. Dave
Eberle, Vernon. Florida.
Combo -top 40 currently music director &
rated #1 by Hooper 7 -12 midnight in million market area-would like to move to
East or Gulf Coast- Available in February.
A.C. 512 -MI 8 -0780.
Top
40
Announcer, family, six months experience.
Sales, copy. $75.00. Don Morton, 788 -6136,
Macon, Georgia.
-
available
knowledgeable, modern
country jock, 1st phone, excellent referPD or MD position.
prefer
ences. Would
Contact Box 34, Chester Heights, Pa., 215 Now
GL9 -4870.
Technical
First phone Christian, broadcast inexperienced but with three years electronics exoerience and technical school. Eager to
learn. Box A -143, BROADCASTING.
Chief engineer. Twenty five years experience in construction, installation and maintenance, AM, FM, remote control directional. No announcing, prefer mid -west.
Now employed as CE. Box A -152, BROADCASTING.
First phone engineer. Network experienced.
Radio -Television production. College graduate. Reliable. N.Y.C. area. Box A -211,
BROADCASTING.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Management
Strong number 2 man for group- operated
VHF station to backstop and supplement
general manager. Must have solid experience in all phases of operations, sales and
administration. Good opportunity to move
up for savvy general sales manager, or
small market station manager. Submit full
resume, references, recent snapshot and
salary requirement first letter. Box A -139,
BROADCASTING.
Five -radio, two-TV southern base chain
looking for ambitious, sales oriented assistant managers to move up. Send full
particulars to Harry Lades, Exec. Vice Pres. & General Manager, Wagenvoord
Broadcasting Company, 614 North Rampart,
New Orleans, La.
Announcers
Excellent opportunity for versatile announcer- director. Permanent job for cooperative
staff announcer who is willing to work.
Send audio tape, snapshot, salary, and full
details by air mail to Manager, KSWS TV,
Roswell, New Mexico.
Sportsman. Middle- sized, mid -west television station needs aggressive commercial
announcer with sports background. Must be
capable of handling sports desk as well as
being strong on commercials. Must be able
to shoot own 16mm. Contact Program Manager, WICS, Springfield, Illinois, 217 -5280465.
Technical
1st phone for small
but expanding eastern market. Outstanding
opportunity to gain TV experience in
scenic vacation area. Box M -125, BROADCASTING.
Assistant chief engineer for midwestern
VHF. EE degree and field experience with
TV transmitters, proofs, VTR, color, strong
on maintenance and supervision. Salary
commensurate with background. Pension
plan, excellent schools, residential areas.
Box A-50, BROADCASTING.
Experienced chief engineer needed immediately for full color, southwestern station.
Send full file, graphical information to /or
call A. Cowan, KTAL -TV, Shreveport,
Louisiana.
Studio technician with 1st class license for
studio and microwave maintenance. Also
some routine switching. Station installing
color film, slide and video tape equipment.
Write Director of Engineering, KSOO -TV &
AM, 205 N. Phillips Ave., Sioux Falls, S.
Dak. or call collect 605- 336 -1300.
Chief engineer wanted for WFEA, Manchester to maintain 2 tower stable directional
array and handle station maintenance. Good
salary. Stable and responsible position for
right man. Please call or send resume to
Charles Shoe, WFEA, Box 149, Manchester.
Wanted: Experienced TV studio engineer
immediately to fill permanent position in
progressive full color operation. Studio
color experience highly desirable. Liberal
benefits and salary commensurate with
ability. Contact Chief Engineer, WJBF -TV,
Augusta, Ga.
Ground floor opportunity for first phone
technicians interested in operating. New
ABC network station, new modern equipment, now assembling best staff in television. Contact Dick Zahnizer, Chief Engineer, WJET -TV, Erie, Pennsylvania.
Florida television station, going full color,
has immediate opening for first class licensed studio engineer. Only those experienced in VTR maintenance need apply.
Interested applicants submit complete resume, including salary and availability to
Lew Evenden, Chief Engineer, WPTV, P.O.
Box 510, Palm Beach, Florida.
Immediate: need Chief engineer, Television
station WPTZ, NBC. Channel 5, Plattsburgh, N. Y. Group owned, company benefits, salary open. Contact David Milligan,
Gen. Mgr., or Harry Bowen, present C. E.,
phone Plattsburgh, 518 -JO 1 -5555.
WTOC -AM, FM & TV, Savannah. Georgia,
has opening for first class engineer. Write
for our application form.
Sparkes Tarzian broadcasting stations need
television technicians with 1st phone-experience desirable. Locations are Indianapolis or Fort Wayne. Contact Elmer C.
Snow, Director of Engineering, Broadcast
station WTTV, 3490 Bluff Road, Indianapolis, Indiana.
Engineers, experienced. For new multimillion dollar transmitter/studio installation
operating maximum power VHF and UHF.
Salary to $10,000. Excellent benefits, superb
working conditions and location. Contact
Director of Engineering WTTW/WXXW,
5400 North St. Louis Avenue, Chicago, Minois 60625.
1st class engineer -technician for university
closed circuit TV and radio. Two or three
years experience with cable, VTR, and
latest audio and video broadcast equipment
desirable. 40 hour week; paid vacation.
New installation in new building. Send
resume to and or contact Thomas J. Aylward, Director of Radio /TV Division, Department of Speech and Dramatic Art, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Phone: WA 7 -3800, ext. 7555.
News
TV Technician with
Newsman wanted immediately to join staff
at midwestern combined radio & television
operation. Prefer midwest applicants. Will
provide advanced training in news work.
Send full resume to Box A -129, BROADCASTING.
News director needed immediately by Virginia VHF. Experienced only apply. Harry
Abbott, Operations Manager, WXEX -TV,
Petersburg, Va.
93
Production- Programing, Others
- directormegacycle
- Large beginning, private school,
E.T.V.- Producer
2500
Production- Programing, Others
MISCELLANEOUS
photographer -heavy photo background processing. Director of photography
capabilities. Box A -28, BROADCASTING.
Have communications Master's degree (emphasis on production). Seek fob bottom of
production ladder. N.Y. or vicinity; working on communications PHD at NYU. Have
experience writing for trade press. Box
Professional Comedy Lines! Topical
laugh service featuring deejay comment
introductions. Free catalog. Orben Comedy
Books. Atlantic Beach, N. Y.
News
E.T.V.
system in New York City. Position requires
creative experienced director, preferably
with filming background and willing to grow
with a challenging program. Resume to Box
A -118. BROADCASTING.
Production manager- experienced college,
some announcing. Need imaginative, creative. self -starter. VTR's. Rocky Mountain
NBC, VHF. Salary open. Box A -160.
A -189, BROADCASTING.
Production assistant: Experienced/educated,
for TV /film: Call -write; Harold Weismann,
1257 Unruh Street, Phila. 11, Pa. 215 -FI
BROADCASTING.
2 -2198.
WANTED: Creative TV producer-director
with at least five (5) years experience.
Major group station located in northeast.
Excellent opportunity for directing with
ability plus experience. Box A -162, BROAD-
WANTED TO BUY
Equipment
CASTING.
Experienced television director. Immediate
opening. Please contact Cecil Ruffin, Operations Manager, WIRL -TV, Peoria, M.
Producer /director- Immediate opening for a
young person with at least two years experience directing a variety of live entertainment programing. Good starting salary,
fringe benefits and opportunity for advance..
ment. Send confidential resume of experience. education, etc. to Personnel Department, WLW -T, Crosley Broadcasting Corporation. 140 West Ninth Street, Cincinnati,
Ohio 45202. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
Promotion /publicity writer: Immediate opening in Cincinnati for a recent college graduate. Position involves copywriting for onair, newspaper and trades, and a variety
of related publicity activities at the station
level. Good starting salary with excellent
opportunity for advancement with our expanding organization. Send confidential resume to Personnel Department, WLW -T
140 West Ninth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio
45202. An equal opportunity
employer.
(M /F)
Administrative assistant. Secretarial skills,
radio -TV -film experience, writing ability.
Apply: Daniel Rose, University Relations,
State University of New York, Buffalo.
Commercial copywriter needed for AM -FMTV facility. Send resume to David Hoyle,
Time -Life Broadcast, Inc., 120 College, S.E.,
Grand Rapids, Michigan 49502.
Graduate fellowships in communication
available. Persons with communications experience and outstanding undergraduate
records. Details before January 20 to Chairman, Mass communications, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.
Situations Wanted
Management
Somewhere, a television operator needs experienced station manager who believes a
modest staff of capable, imaginative people,
treated like human beings, can earn money
and prestige for station. If so, I'm not
priced out of reason. Confidential only. Box
A -174. BROADCASTING.
Technical
ETV assistant chief engineer desires position
as chief engineer in new ETV station. For
complete resume reply Box A -77, BROADCASTING.
New station or going color? I am chief engineer- supervisor material. Experienced in
operation and maintenance of live, film
and tape color equipment, including color
remotes. Some college, RCA equipment
school and management training. Employed
at full time color operation. Box A -200,
BROADCASTING.
NEWS
news- emphasis on -air and writing.
Many years of experience in news including
filming and editing-General reporting. $15,TV
Box A -87, BROADCASTING.
Really want a professional journalist? Good
news director is looking. Box A-180,
BROADCASTING.
Unique situation makes available a talen000.
ted on the air news director, Extensive administrative experience, strong delivery and
solid reportorial ability. Box A -184, BROADCASTING.
94
We need used 250, 500 1 kw & 10 kw AM
transmitters, no junk. Broadcast Electronics Corp.. 1314 Iturbide St.. Laredo.
Texas 78040.
Auricon or other 16mm professional magnetic sound on film camera with 400 to 1200
foot capacity. KOLN -TV, 40th & W Sts.,
Lincoln, Nebraska. Phone 434 -8251.
Wanted, used microphones. State make
model, age, condition, price. Box A -159.
BROADCASTING.
Wanted 2 GE RPX -046 cartridges. New or
goo condition. Box A -203, BROADCASTIN
FOR SALE
Equipment
Add 30% to your billing
. with weekly
ideas from the Brainstorm. Each issue contains 13 saleable ideas. $2.00 per week. Exclusive. Tie up your market now. Write
Brainstorm Box 875, Lubbock, Texas.
"DEEJAY MANUAL "-A collection of di
comedy lines, bits, breaks, adlibs, thoughts.
$5.00. Write for free "Broadcast Comedy"
Catalog, Show -Biz Comedy Service, 1735 E.
26th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 11229.
DEEJAYS! 4.000 classified gag-lines,
Comedy catalogue free. Ed Orrin,
Gentry, No. Hollywood, Calif. 91605.
$4.001
8034
Anyone knowing whereabouts of a Jack
Payne, formerly in Army-P.I., '60-61' reply Box A-146, BROADCASTING.
INSTRUCTIONS
FCC license and A.S.E.E. degree programs,
by home study and resident instruction.
Resident FCC courses available in Washington. D. C.; Seattle, Wash., and Hollywood,
Calif. Home study conducted from Hollywood. Write for free catalog. Dept. 5 -K,
Grantham Schools, 1505 N. Western Ave..
Hollywood, Calif. 90027.
Be prepared. First class FCC license in
six weeks Top quality theory and laboratory training. Elkins Radio License School
of Atlanta. 1139 Spring St., N.W., Atlanta.
leorgia.
Television radio transmitters, monitors.
tubes, microwave, cameras. audio. Electrofind, 440 Columbus Ave. N.Y.C.
Parabolic antennas 6' aluminum complete
with dipole and 4" pole mounting bracket.
1750 me $125.00 complete. Tuned to 950 me
$175.00 complete. S. W. Electric Co., Phone
415- 832 -3527, 24th & Willow Streets, Oakland, Calif.
For sale, RCA type TTU 113 UHF television
transmitter. Immediate delivery "as is"
basis. Presently tuned to Channel 20. 6
weeks delivery if tuned to your channel
and reconditioned. Box M-98, BROADCASTING.
Need equipment? Get our listings. Broadcast Equipment and Supply Co., Box 3141,
Bristol, Tennessee.
Write, Call or wire about information covering trade -in used tape cartridge equipment
of all makes. Sparta Electronic Corpora
Lion, Box 8723, Sacramento, California.
95822, 916 -421 -2070.
Almost all models ATC and ATC /Collins
available re-conditioned and guaranteed.
Play backs priced from $225 to $450. Cartridge tape delay units at $550. Used Equipment Dep't., ATC, Bloomington, Illinois.
309-829 -7006.
For sale: 30.000 ft. new SD #10 Copper wire. Contact WGTN-Georgetown, S.C.
Copper strap -two inch, in
200 pound mill
Swager Tower Corporation, Fremont, Indiana.
coils. $1.00 /pound, F.O.B. Telephone 219495 -5165;
Ampex PR -30. Two available. Will sell individually or as a package. Contact Mr.
Richard Euben, WALI. Adelphi University,
Garden City, N.Y.
Ampex 350-2 portable. Perfect condition.
Used in office to check tapes, $1,250.00 Write
or call J. D. Cloughessy, 301 Belmont Place,
Munster, Indiana, 219 -386 -8298.
-
Gates dualux M5236Á console-still in use
years old. Best offer. Write Box A -179,
BROADCASTING.
5
30,000
For sale: By owner; 5 kw radio transmitter
RCA model BTA5H. Excellent condition.
Some spare parts available. Price-$5,000.
Ready for shipment, F.O.B. Maryland. Box
A -212. BROADCASTING.
The nationally known 6 weeks Elkins training for an FCC First Class License. Outstanding theory and laboratory instructions
Elkins Radio License School of New Orleans.
333 Saint Charles. New Orleans, Louisiana.
FCC first phone license in six weeks.
Guaranteed instruction in theory and
laboratory methods by master teachers,
G.I. approved. Request free brochure.
Elkins Radio License School, 2603 Inwood
Road, Dallas. Texas.
Elkins Radio License School
Six weeks quality instruction
methods and theory leading
First Class License. 14 East
Chicago 4. Illinois.
-
of Chicago
in laboratory
to the Ere
Jackson St..
Announcing programing. console operation.
Twelve weeks intensive, practical train Ing. Finest, most modern equipment available. G.I. apnroved. Elkins School of
Broadcasting. 2603 Inwood Road. Dallas 35.
Texas.
The masters. Elkins Radio License School
of Minneapolis offers the unmatched success of the Famous Elkins Laboratory and
Theory Classes in preparation for the First
Class FCC license. Elkins Radio License
School, 4119 East Lake Street, Minneapolis,
Minnesota.
Since 1946. Original course for FCC first
phone operator license in six weeks. Over
420
hours instruction and over
200
hours
guided discussion at school. Reservations
required. Enrolling now for class starting
March 16. For information, references and
reservation, write William B. Ogden Radio
Operational Engineering School 1150 West
Olive Ave., Burbank, California.
America's pioneer. 1st in announcing since
1934. National Academy of Broadcasting,
814 H St. NW, Washington 1, D. C.
"It's REI and Here's Whyl" First phone
license in (5) weeks -and we guarantee it.
Tuition only $295. Rooms $6 -$12 per week.
Classes .begin every 5 weeks in beautiful
Sarasota by the sea, on Feb. 7 -Mar, 14Apr. 18-May 23 -June 27. Call or write
Radio Engineering Institute,
Sarasota, Fla.
1336
Main St.,
Announcing, programing, first phone. all
phases electronics. Thorough, intensive
practical training. Methods and results
proved many times. Free placement service, Allied Technical Schools, 207 Madison. Memphis. Tennessee.
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
Production- Programing, Others
INSTRUCTIONS-(Cont'd)
Train now in N.Y.C. for FCC first phone
License. Proven methods, proven resulta
day and evening classes. Placement assistance. Announcer Training Studios. 25 W.
.
83rd, N. Y. OX
5 -9245.
F.C.C. First Phone -plus-250 hours theory
practical application. 6 weeks $345.
Rooms $10.00 a week, on campus. License
guaranteed. Orlando Technical College, 535
N. Magnolia, 415, Orlando, Florida.
F.C.C. First Phone in 6 weeks plus 300 hours
theory and practical application. License
guaranteed. Free placement service. Florida Institute of Electronics, 3101 Main St.,
&
Weirton, W. Va.
New England's only 10 week, First Phone
course. Classes offered eves, so if you can
commute to Boston, no need to quit your
job and relocate. Classes limited to 20 students! Starting dates: Feb. 7, May 2, Sept.
6. Write to: Northeast Broadcasting School,
883 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 02116.
RADIO
Help Wanted
Sales
PROGRAM DIRECTOR
Needed for midwest metropolitan
market no. 1 top 40 station, Move
up to fine operation where your
goals are only limit. Salary open.
Send resume and tape to
Box A -73, BROADCASTING
New FM Station in large midwestern
city to begin FM service as part of
complete TV and AM service needs
experienced FM Program Director.
Substantial capital available to make
FM successful with right man directing. Give evidence of experience by
writing complete facts to
lect 612- 645 -2724.
BROADCASTING
A -128,
SENIOR TELEVISION ENGINEER
State Education Department, Albany, New
York. To provide advice and consultation
to the local schools in New York State on
problems of construction and design of facilities for educational television. Bachelor's
-
degree
and specialization
in electronics,
television or electrical engineering; five
years of broadcasting or closed -circuit TV
operations experience or two years of professional experience designing TV stations or
closed -circuit installations; and FCC first class license. Salary range $10,090 to $12,110
in five annual increments with salary increase anticipated later in 1966. Non -contributory pension plan, health insurance, and
other excellent fringe benefits. Send resume to Bureau of Personnel, State Education Department, Albany, New York.
TELEVISION
STATION
MANAGER
Communications company
nationally seeks a fully
Station Manager for one
operating
qualified
of
six
stations
Television
their mid -western
stations.
Candidates must have complete station operation & management exp.
Operating experience in this geographic ana
is desirable but not required.
No contact will be made with current or previous employers until a personal Interview Is
arranged at your convenience. Please send re
sume of experience and earnings in complete
confidence to:
Box
A -136,
BROADCASTING
Our Employees Know of
advertieemenl.
Help Wanted-Announcers
.-..-..e
DOMINENT STATION in growth market is
looking for the beet radio personality
around. Good five figure salary for the
right man. Television work available. Top
professional performers only. Send tapes,
TELEVISION-Help Wanted
Production -Programing, Others
STATION MANAGER
Must be
Prestige, Southeastern market.
strong on sales production and administration. Prefer experienced in sales, forecasting
and financial control. Great opportunity for
second man ready to move up. Replies completely confidential.
to:
Box A -108, Broadcasting
+
Contact the Chief Engineer,
KSTP -TV, 3415 University Avenue, St. Paul, Minn, or call col-
TELEVISION
Help Wanted Management
Profitable, growth -minded company,
leader in broadcast equipment field,
located in the Midwest has immediate
opening for sales engineer to travel
and sell technical equipment primarily to AM, FM and TV stations in exgood
clusive territory. Requires
knowledge of broadcast equipment.
Must be sales minded. Self starter.
BSEE or equivalent and minimum
three years in field of radio broadcasting. Excellent salary plus commission. Travel expenses paid. Complete company benefits. An equal -op.
portunity employer. Send resume to
Box A -52, BROADCASTING.
resumes
Want to get into color? We've
been full color for 41/2 years! We
need technicians who are interested in working at a modern allcolor station. There are no state
licenses, fee requirements or payments to be made to a third party
in connection with this position.
FM Program Director
Box
SALES ENGINEER
BROADCAST EQUIPMENT
Technical
Broadcasting
Box A -209,
* * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * ** ** * * * * *
*
it
*
*
*
*
PROGRAM -PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
4
*
-1(
Sales
News
#
.c
*
NEWS-SPORTS
Independent radio station in major
TELEVISION
it
SALES DIRECTOR
*
40
*
eastern market considering adding
Director fully qualified for
national
sales
effort Is sought by malin
broadcsting company operating stations in the
man to do news and sports commen-
southwest, midwest
tary (No play -by- play). If you have
experience
in
both, send resume,
Applicants
experience
A -135,
Sales
must
and
have
Including
westaoast
a
direct
full
range
supervision
in
complete
confidence
et
detailing
perlente & earnings to:
Box A -137, BROADCASTING
BROADCASTING
of
*
*-jl
sales
*-1
na-
-k
tional, regional and local files programs.
Reply
tape and salary requirements to:
Box
Television
ex-
*
*
*
key management position in established
expanding Midwest TV station. Necessary
qualifications include practical program and
a
production experience
in
commercial
or
*
edu-
cations!
(or both) TV stations; advanced
degree; capability of organizing
and if necessary personally producing live
documentary programs. Position offers creative opportunities, relative job permanency
and chance to grow plus very pleasant living
environment, Acting on behalf of client, we
will screen applicants. Send full biographical
*
*
academic
*
*
*
*
**
and vocational resume, picture and list of
references.
Richard P. Doherty, TV -Radio Management Corp., 1735 DeSales Street, N.W.,
Washington, D. C. 20036
*
*
-It
-Kìs-Kìtìs*oflf*lfìs*-K***-K** K-K4--)PFì4
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
î
95
FOR SALE-Equipment
Production-Programing, Others
X911
! Ili!
III
WANTED TO BUY
Stations
Continued
II!I 9!! 1;!
^,!'
II'I !'II 'Il'
PO
1111 11111_
USED TOWERS FOR SALE
==
ft. Blaw -Knox microwave with two
ft.). Two parabolic antennas (eight ft.)
We have a large stock of CATV cable
towers.
U. S. Towers
249 Bartow Lane
One 300
PROGRAM
DIRECTOR
AM Station in South or Southeast.
reflectors lten by fifteen
All inquiries
answered promptly on
confidential basis. Send complete details.
Box A -71, BROADCASTING
Petersburg, Va.
National
television broadcasting company seeks
Program Director for it's Corporate staff
capable of heldiog complete respenoibillty ter
national and local programing.
a
WANTED TO BUY
CATV
replies will be treated confidentially
and should include complete details of
experience.
AU
Box A-138,
EXPERIENCED BROADCASTER
wishes to buy AM or FM Station in $100,000
to $300,000 class. Cash or terms. All areas,
size markets and propositions seriously considered in the strictest confidence.
BROADCASTING
CATV
TELEVISION
Situations Wanted
Management
P
A -I83, Broadcasting
Box
C
otitIlli IIII 1111 1111 1111IIII 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111\
CASH or TRADE
LISTED COMPANY (ASE)
N. CALIFORNIA CATV
have 11 years of Radio -TV & CATV Manage
ment experience. I can build or operate your
system quickly and smoothly to its best sumen
& profit, from franchise talks thru head -end and
home hook -ups. Now CATV Manager, fine record,
but wish better climate. B.B. degree. Photo and
resume on request.
I
Major outdoor advertising company will
pay cash or trade commercial and industrial real estate for nradio or television
station. Real estate leased to national
tenants. Good ental income and growth
potential. Will r also consider part cash
and part real estate trade for broadcast
property.
WANTS INVESTMENT
OPPORTUNITIES IN CATV
WILL PURCHASE JOINT
VENTURE OR FINANCE
EXISTING SYSTEMS OR
UNDEVELOPED FRANCHISE
Write Donald J. Hewitt, Stone System,
1900 Delaware Avenue, Des Moines,
Iowa.
Box A -165, Broadcasting
Box A-67, BROADCASTING
FOR SALE
Stations
AVAILABLE
HAVE YOUR 7 AM's YET?
KW, Northwest, top 100 cities, priced
to show fine return. Airmail simple
evidence of ability to meet FCC financial requirements. We'll rush full in-
5
V.P. -General Manager of top 50 VHF TV station. In -depth experience at all levels of operation, particularly Sales and Administration. Impeccable references from top industry figures. Reason
for seeking change: Family health and climate don't agree. Employer not aware of situation. Availability depends upon job op-
formation.
Box A -164, Broadcasting
portunities.
SAN JUAN
Box A -141, Broadcasting
KW Fulltime Station
5
Ro,
reaark,
INSTRUCTIONS
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
nq San
15:51
h under
the U.
S
111('
Of
Stlaq.
the very
best radin
wills FCC reported
earning, in
of SI,000.000. We offer
a
ne modern fncil11, with spectacular studios.
iG id,liü with favorable terns. This station has
,.nrly ncreasecl power and i ready for good
crabs. Wrrtr Box i,F, RFD s2, Rio Piedras.,
d n,
ti
LEARN MORE
EARN MORE
Radio & TV
Announcing & Production
PLACEMENTS
Stations and Applicants use our service
with confidence
1615 California St., (303) 292 -3730
Denver, Colorado 80202
WRITE!
rf R.
',32
GUNZENDORFER
HO 2-3218
Cherokee
Hollywood, Calif. 90028
1653 N.
WIRE!
CALIFORNIA FULLTIMER $15,000 down. Owns
real estate asking $65,000. Exclusive.
CALIFORNIA NORTH Powerful daytimer asking
$250,000. 29% down easy payout. Exclusive.
CALIFORNIA SOUTH daytimer 29% down. 10
year payout. Growing mkt. Asking $125,000.
$80,000, $200,000 and $340,000.
PHONE!
WILT GUNZENDORFER
AND ASSOCIATES
ANNOUNCER NEWSMAN, ENGINEER OR COPYWRITER, WE CAN PLACE
YOU IN A BETTER POSITION WITH AN INCREASE
IN SALARY! NO FEE TILL PLACED.
NATIONWIDE RADIO-TV EMPLOYMENT AGENCY
call San Juan 721 -0666 (days) or 766-
evur,lq,1.
DON MARTIN SCHOOL
OF RADIO & TV
IF YOU ARE A DISC JOCKEY,
APPRAISALS
sea So.
ROBERTSON
PHONE OL
Loa ANGELES 35. CALIF.
Station For Sale
I
645 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill.
Phone area code 312 337 -7075
i
96
55
Fulltime facility in famous old southern
city. High growth area,
size market, growing fast! Making money! Real
estate Included, valued at near $150,000
. Priced $300,000. Send proof financial
ability.
Box A -199, Broadcasting
t
!
i
1
f
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
(Continued from page 90)
By Hearing Examiner Herbert Sharfman
Granted motion by applicants in Boston
5 proceeding in doc. 8739 et al.,
to reopen record to receive in evidence
stipulation relating to interest of Boston
Herald- Traveler Corp. in Entron Inc. and
again closed record. By separate action,
granted petition by Charles River Civic
Television Inc. for leave to amend its application to reflect issuance of additional
authorized class A common stock and revision of employment agreement between it
and Theodore Jones. Action Jan. 7.
On own motion, continued hearing from
Jan. 17 to March 21 in proceeding on applications of Capital Broadcasting Corp. and
Capital News Inc. for new FM's in FrankTV channel
fort, Ky. Action Jan. 6.
Granted request by Southern Radio and
Television Co. to continue hearing from Jan.
10 to Jan. 24 in proceeding on its application for new AM in Lehigh Acres, Fla.
Action Jan. 6.
BROADCAST ACTIONS
by Broadcast Bureau
Actions of Jan. 11
WNWC(FM) Arlington Heights, III.
Granted CP to change ant.-trans. and studio
location; install new trans. and ant.; increase ERP to 3 kw; and ant. height to
300 ft
WKBS(TV) Burlington, N. J.- Granted
CP to replace expired permit for new TV.
Granted renewal of licenses for following main stations and co- pending auxiliaries: KAMY McCamey, Tex.; KRDG Redding, Calif.; and WTIF Tifton, Ga.
Actions of Jan. 10
KGKO Benton, Ark.-Granted CP to
change frequency from 1600 kc to 850 kc;
and make changes in ant. and ground system; remote control permitted; condition.
sWGBX(TV) Boston -Granted mod. of CP
to change ERP to 324 kw vis. and 32.4 kw
aur.; change trans. location to Needham;
change studio location; type trans. and ant.;
make changes in ant. system; and change
ant. height to 1,080 ft.
Granted renewal of licenses for following main stations and copending auxiliaries: KAGO Klamath Falls, Ore.; KAIM
Honolulu; KAJO Grants Pass, Ore.;
KARY Prosser. Wash.; KATR Eugene, Ore.:
KBCH Lincoln City, Ore.; KBRO -AM -FM
Bremerton, Wash.; KCLX Colfax, Wash.;
KEDO Longview, Wash.; KEX Portland,
Ore.; KFLW Klamath Falls, Ore.; KGY
Olympia, Wash.; KIRR Hood River. Ore.;
KIRO Seattle; KITI Chehalis -Centralia.
Wash.; KITN Olympia, Wash.; KJDY John
Day, Ore.; KLAR Klamath Falls, Ore.;
-
KLAM Cordova, Alaska; KMAS Shelton,
Wash.; KMCM McMinnville, Ore.; KMVI
Wailuku, Hawaii; KNUI Makawao, Hawaii;
KOAC Corvallis, Ore.; KODL The Dalles,
Ore.; KOHO Honolulu; KOMO Seattle;
KOMW Omak, Wash.; KOOS Coos Bay,
Ore.; KOZI Chelan, Wash.; KPIR Eugene,
Ore.; KRAF Reedaport, Ore.; KREM Spokane, Wash.; KREW Sunnyside, Wash.
KRNS Burns, Ore.; KROW Dallas, Ore.
KSRV Ontario, Ore.; KTAC Tacoma, Wash.
KTKN Ketchikan, Alaska; KTRG Honolulu
KUJ Walla Walla, Wash.; KULA Honolulu
KULE Ephrata. Wash.; KUMA Pendleton
Ore.; KWH. Albany, Ore.; KWVR Enter-
FOR SALE-Stations
Continued
Xtqîlte
AT.ebitt
limiters jftlr.
654 MADISON AVENUE
NEW YORK, N. Y.
TE
2-9362
daytime
Ala.
Small
Ca.
Medium
fulltime
metro
South
M. W VHF -TV
daytime
major
Fla
2
FM
CHAPMAN
$65M
82.5M
250M
3MM
60M
Terms
SOLD
terms
terms
29
AOCIATt
1
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
prise, Ore.; KYES Roseburg, Ore.; NAMFM and SCA Honolulu; KYJC Medford,
Ore.; KIRO -FM Seattle; KOIN -FM Portland, Ore.; KREM-FM Spokane, Wash.;
KTAC -FM Tacoma, Wash.; KOAP -FM
Portland, Ore.; KAH -TV Wailuku, Hawaii;
XATU(TV) Portland, Ore.; KCBY-TV Coos
Bay, Ore.; KENI -TV Anchorage; KEPR-TV
Pasco, Wash.; KFAR -TV Fairbanks, Alaska;
KHAW -TV Hilo Hawaii; KHON -TV Honolulu; KMED -Tif Medford. Ore.; KMVI -TV
Hawaii; KNDU(TV.) Richland
Wailuku,
Wash.; KOIN-TV Portland, Ore.; KOTI
(TV) K)amath Falls, Ore.; KPIC(TV) Roseburg. Ore.; KREM -TV Spokane, Wash.;
KTNT-TV Tacoma, Wash.; KTVM (TV) Medford, Ore.; KVAL -TV Eugene, Ore.; KCTSKOAC -TV Corvallis Ore.;
T V Seattle;
KOAP -TV Portland. Ore.; KPEC -T(7 Lakewood Center. Wash.; KWSC -TV Pullman.
Wash.; KTVW(TV) Tacoma, Wash.
Granted extension of completion dates
for following stations: KHCD(TV) Santa
Rosa Calif.. to July 10; and WO9AG, SparRosa,
Co.. Franklin, N. C., to
tan
July 10.
Actions of Jan. 7
KBIF Fresno, Calif.- Rescinded Dec. 13,
1965, grant of renewal of license for main
station and co- pending auxiliaries.
WMDD -FM Fajardo, P. R.- Granted CP to
replace expired permit for new FM.
KDBM Dillon, Mont.- Granted license covering change in frequency and hours of
operation; condition.
KLIZ -FM Brainerd Minn. -Granted mod.
of CP to change studio location; type ant.;
and increase ERP to 36 kw; remote control
permitted.
WDBJ -TV Roanoke, Va.- Granted mod. of
CP to change ERP to 309 kw DA vis., and
61.7 kw DA aur.; and make changes in ant.
structure.
KFMB San Diego- Remote control permitted (main trans.).
KTHO Tahoe Valley, Calif.-Waived Sec.
73.30(a) of rules to permit relocation of
main studio at Bijou; conditioned upon
notification by licensee to commission that
operation has commenced from new studio;
and Tahoe Valley station identification to
be continued.
WDUN -FM Gainsville, Ga.- Granted license covering installation of new ant. and
trans.; increase in ERP to 50 kw; specify
type ant. and trans.; remote control permitted.
KGCL East Prairie, Mo.- Granted license
for AM and specify type trans.; condition.
WQIZ St. George, S. C.- Granted license
covering change in ground and ant. system
(top -load ant.).
KMBC -TV Kansas City, Mo.- Granted CP
to install alternate main drivers.
KOAL Price, Utah-Granted license covering increased daytime power, installation
of new trans., and specify type trans.
WBMD Baltimore -Granted license cover ing installation of alternate main trans.
with remote control.
WFUR Grand Rapids, Mich.-Granted license covering changes in ant. system.
WILK Wilkes- Barre, Pa.- Granted license
covering installation of new auxiliary trans.
KGIW Alamosa, Colo.-Granted license
covering increased daytime power.
WPNF Brevard N. C.- Granted license
covering increased daytime power, installation of new trans., and specify type trans.;
condition.
KFJZ -FM Fort Worth-Granted CP to
install new ant.; increase ERP to 59 kw;
and decrease ant. height to 670 ft.
WRAL-FM Raleigh, N. C.- Granted CP to
install new ant.
WISZ -FM Glen Burnie, Md.- Granted CP
to install new ant.; increase ERP to 2.65 kw;
and reduce ant. height to 120 ft.
WDHA-FM Dover, N. J.- Granted request
for SCA on subcarr)er frequency of 68 kc.
Granted extension of completion dates for
following stations: KALB -TV Alexandria,
La., to July 7; and WTIU(TV) Bloomington, Ind., to July 7.
WHTC Holland, Mich. -Granted license
covering changes in ant. system; without
prejudice to such further action as commission may deem warranted in connection
with review, by U. S. Supreme Court, of
judgement order entered Jan. 27, 1965 by
U. S. Court of Appeals (7th Circuit) and
prior cease and desist orders of Federal
Trade Commission involving Paul T. Cheff,
director and stockholder in Holland Broadcasting Co.
Actions of Jan. 6
WHPL-FM Winchester, Va.- Granted license for FM and specify type trans.
KTFC(FM) Sioux City, Iowa-Granted license for FM and specify type trans.
*WEMU(FM) Ypsilanti, Mich.- Granted license for noncommercial educational FM
and specify type trans.
WBAT Marion, Ind.- Granted license covering changes in ant. -trans. and studio location and ant. system.
KGNC Amarillo, Tex.-Granted license
covering installation of auxiliary trans. with
remote control.
WALM Albion Mich.- Granted license
covering installation of auxiliary trans.
KBIM -FM Roswell, N. M.- Granted license
covering change in frequency.
KTTS -FM Springfield, Mo.- Granted license covering installation of new ant., and
increase in ERP.
*KSDS(FM) San Diego-Granted license
covering change in trans. location, installation of new ant., and increase in ERP and
ant. height.
*WSUP(FM) Platteville, Wis.- Granted license covering change in frequency and
name of noncommercial educational FM.
Granted extension of completion dates for
following stations: WCMR Elkhart, Ind.. to
Feb. 17; KBLA Burbank, Calif. (auxiliary
and main) to June 19; WIBC Indianapolis,
Ind., to April 1; KWJJ Portland, Ore., to
Feb. 15; and WJBK Detroit, to June 24.
Granted renewal of licenses for following
main stations and co-pending auxiliaries:
KLST(FM) Colorado Springs; ICJLM(FM)
and SCA San Diego; and KVCR(FM) San
Bernardino, Calif.
Granted mod. of licenses of following
licensee
stations and adjuncts to change Corp.
to
name from Crosley Broadcasting
Avco Broadcasting Corp.; WLWI(TV) Indianapolis, Ind.; WLW and WLWT(TV) Cincinnati, WLWD(TV) Dayton, and WLWC
(TV) Columbus, all Ohio; WOAI and WOAITV San Antonio, Tex.; and WWDC and
WWDC-FM Washington.
Eagle Valley TV Corp., Radium and Sheep UHF TV
horn, Colo.- Granted CP for new
translator station on channel 70 to rebroadcast programs of KOA -TV, channel 4,
Denver.
Remote control permitted KHJ -FM Los
Angeles.
Action of Jan. 5
Remote control permitted KGHO Hoqu)am, Wash.
Action of Jan. 3
Granted application of J. B. Karban for
new UHF TV translator station on channel
78 to serve Rhinelander, Wis., by rebroad-TV
casting programs of station WAOW
(channel 9) Wausau, conditioned that if
translator operates in area within predicted
grade A contour or any existing or subsesimulquent TV, translator
taneously, or 15 ays prioruoorl subsequent
and
TV,
by
such
thereto, program broadcast
subject to outcome of proceeding in Doc.
15971.
Action of Dec. 28
Granted extension of completion date for
WPGH(FM) Pittsburgh, to July 2.
Rulemakings
DENIED
By letter, commission denied request by
Seashore Broadcasting Co. for waiver of
Sec. 1.569 of "clear channel" rule and returned its application for new daytime AM
to operate on 1170 kc, 1 kw, in Orleans,
Mass. Commissioner Lee abstained from
voting. Action Jan. 12.
By report and order, commission denied
proposal by Jim Gordon Inc. licensee of
KCLE -FM on channel 235 in Cleburne, Tex.,
to delete channel 236 from Wichita Falls
(now
and require Radio Wichita Falls toInc.operate
Steve Gose Enterprises Inc.),
KTNO(FM) on one of unused assigments in
Wichita Falls in lieu of channel 236 so as to
eliminate short spacing between stations.
FM
Since institution of proceeding,
has been authorized to increase power to
50 kw and ant. height to 450 ft., pursuant
to Doc. 14185 which provided for increases
in facilities in existing short spaced stations
in accordance with new formula in rules
Sec. 73.213. Action Jan. 12.
AMENDED
report and order, commission
amended part 73 of its rules to revise requirements for changes and corrections in
broadcast station logs. They are largely
same as those proposed May 5, 1985, except
that action on automatic logging proposals
is deferred for further study. (This is separate proceeding from Doc. 14187 relating
to amending logging rules to conform with
revised programing sections of application
form.) Action Jan, 12.
By
PROPOSED
Commission invited comments to proposed rulemaking looking toward substituting FM channel 258 for 272A at Henry87
atta, Okla., and assigning latter channel to
Eufaula. Change was requested by Henryetta Radio Co. to eliminate need for comparative hearing for present channel assigned Henryetta -Eufaula area and to provide Henryetta with wide -coverage assignment. Commissioner Cox dissented. Action
Jan. 12.
Commission invited
comments on
amending part 74 of its auxiliary broadcast
rules to permit repeater microwave relay
equipment to be used in TV translator operations. Proponents contend that form of
microwave relay, such as now used for
auxiliary purposes by regular TV broadcast
stations, should also be available for translators, especially when community served
is far from TV broadcast stations whose
signals are picked up. Notice asks for corn-
ments on translator use of heterodyne repeater microwave equipment of type employed for auxiliary TV broadcast services
(intercity relay, studio -transmitter link and
remote pickup). Such translator use would
be on secondary basis to present TV auxiliary operations. Action Jan. 12.
PETITIONS FOR RULEMAKING FILED
Lexington, Ky.-Kentucky Authority for
Educational Television. Requests amendment of rules so as to assign and reserve
channel for noncommercial educational use
in Owenton, Ky. Ann. Jan. 7.
New call letters requested
Vernon, Ala.
Through a typographical
-
error Broadcasting Jan.
3
incorrectly re-
ported Lamar County Broadcasting Co. as
requesting call letters WSVA, which are
owned by Gilmore Broadcasting Corp. of
Virginia, Harrisonburg, Va. The correct call
letters requested by Lamar Broadcasting are
WVSA.
KSWB (TV) Elk City, Okla.-Bass Broad casting Co. Requests KFDO-TV.
WMBM -FM Miami Beach
Community
Service Broadcasters Inc. Requests WGOS.
Mason, Mich.
M. H. Wirth. Requests
WMSN.
WAEO -TV Rhinelander, Wis.-Northland
Television Inc. Requests %VFCS.
Rochester, N. Y.-U. of R. Broadcasting
Corp. Requests WRUR-FM.
Edmond, Okla. -Central State College. Requests
Tazewell,
Garland A. Hess, William
H. Bowen, Fred Cox. Request WTZE.
-
-
Va.-
COMMUNITY ANTENNA FACILITIES ACTIVITIES
The following are activities in community antenna television reported to
BROADCASTING through Jan. 12. Reports
include applications for permission to
install and operate CATV's and for
expansion of existing CATV's into new
areas as well as grants of CATV franchises and sales of existing installations.
Indicates
a franchise has been granted.
Savannah, Ga.- Savannah TV Cable Co.
has been sold to Bruce Merrill and associates (principal owner of American Cable
Television Inc.). The system, which now
has about 350 subscribers, brings in nine TV
signals from Savannah, Augusta and Pembroke, all Georgia; Charleston, S. C., and
Jacksonville, Fla., as well as FM and a time
Human
Engineered
Li
Kaiser -Cox brings
a
new degree
of sophistication in "human
engineering" to CAN equipment design. The "plug -in"
modular construction of the
new Phoenician series amplifiers assures ease of installation, efficient field-testing, low
maintenance cost and maxi
mum convertibility. More reasons to depend on Kaiser -Cox
for CATV leadership today and
tomorrow.
Depend on..,
KAISER-COX
KAISER -COX CORPORATION
P.O. Box 9728, Phoenix,
98
(FOR THE
Ara. 85020 Phone (602) 944.4411
RECORD)
and weather channel. The system, now
managed by John V. Burke, will be operated by American Cable Television Inc.,
which plans to add about 200 miles of facilities to the existing 50 miles, to serve the
entire city of Savannah.
Centralia, 111.-James K. Donahue and associates, Boston, have applied for a franchise, bringing the total number of applicants to seven. The others are Top Vision
Cable TV Co., L. R. Young Construction
Co., Egyptian Cable TV, Mt. Vernon Cable
TV, Tele -Cable Inc., and former Centraba
Councilman Charles Gross.
Huntington, Ind. -A franchise has been
granted to Community Teleception Inc., Indianapolis (Bruce R. Storm, president). The
company, a group owner, will provide
subscribers with 12 channels, FM channels and a weather channel. Installation
fee will be $14.90 with a $4.90 monthly
service charge. The city will receive 3% of
the gross revenue for the first five years and
41/2% annually thereafter. There were three
other applicants-Telesis Corp., Citcom Inc.
and Tele Trend Inc.
Elizabethtown, Ky.- Cable -Vista Inc., serving 650 subscribers, has been purchased by
American Cable Television Inc. (group
CATV owner). Purchase price not given.
Mary Elizabeth Kinder will be in charge of
the Elizabethtown CATV. ACT plans to
build an office, replace sections of the cable
systems and expand facilities to serve a
potential 2,500 homes. Elizabethtown CATV
brings in TV signals from Louisville and
Bowling Green. both Kentucky; Nashville
and Evansville, Ind. The system also carries
a time- weather signal.
Owensboro, Ky. -Top Vision Cable Co.,
Portsmouth, Ohio, has been granted a franchise. Under the agreement the firm will
pay the city 26% of gross annual income.
Multi- Channel Cable Co., Portsmouth, also
was an applicant.
Mackinaw City, Mich.-Tahquamenon
Cable Vision Inc. has been granted a franchise. The firm also has applied In Cheboygan, Mich.
Ringwood, N.
Ringwood TV Cable
Corp., that city, has been granted a 25 -year
franchise. The firm will charge a $15 instal-
J.-
lation fee and a $5 monthly service rate.
Tele -Mark Communications Co. was also an
applicant.
Camden, N. Y. -A six -month conditional franchise has been granted Lewneida
Cable TV Inc., represented by Robert Helmer, Whitesboro, and Frank Gruenwald,
Utica, both New York. If within six months
the board is not satisfied with progress, the
franchise can be revoked.
Morris, N. Y. -Nell Leonard, Mt. Upton,
and Edward Miller, Otego, both New York,
jointly have applied for a franchise. Morris
Video, represented by John Olmstead and
Gordon Ripley, also applied at the same
time. The Leonard -Miller proposal set the
installation fee at $30 with a $3.75 monthly
service fee; while Morris Video proposed a
$29.50 installation fee with a $4.50 monthly
rental charge.
Bucyrus, Ohio -The James K. Donahue
Co., Boston, and Crawford County Cable vision Co. (Thomas Moore, president) have
both applied for franchises. For details of
the Crawford County Cablevision Co.'s offer
see Galion, Ohio.
Conneaut, Ohio-Conneaut Associates
Television Inc. has been granted a franchise.
The installation fee will not exceed $10 with
a monthly service charge of no more than
$5 residential and $7 commercial. Video-
sonics Inc., Cleveland, also had an applica-
tion pending.
Crestiine, Ohio- Crawford County Cable vision Co. (Thomas P. Moore, president),
has applied for a franchise. The company
also has applications pending in Bucyrus
and Galion, both Ohio. (For details see
Galion. Ohio).
Eastlake, Ohio-James K. Donahue Co.,
Boston, has applied for a franchise. The
company is also applying for franchises in
Bucyrus, Ohio, and Aliquippa, Pennsylvania.
Gallon, Ohio -A newly formed company,
Crawford County Cablevision Co. (Thomas
P. Moore, president), has applied for a
franchise. The company will offer 12 American and Canadian television stations. Multi Channel Cable Co., Portsmouth, Ohio has
also applied for a franchise. Crawford
County has two other franchise applications
pending in Bucyrus and Crestllne, both
Ohio.
Solon, Ohio -An application for a franchise has been received from Telerama
Inc., Cleveland, a group owner. Installation
fee would be between $10 -$15 with a $4 -$5
monthly service fee. Telerama Inc. already
has franchises in Warrensville Heights and
Shaker Heights, both Ohio.
Aliquippa borough, Pa, -James
Donahue Co., Boston, and Daniel M.K.Rooney,
Pittsburgh, have both applied for franchises.
Other applicants are Gateway Broadcasting
Enterprises Inc., New Kensington and West inghouse Broadcasting Co., Pittsburgh.
Allegheny Area CATV already has a nonexclusive franchise.
Clairton, Pa.-Steel Valley Cablevision
Inc., a subsidiary of Centre Video,
State
College, Pa. (Robert E. Tudek, VP) has been
granted a 15 -year nonexclusive franchise.
The company agreed to pay the city $3,400
for the franchise rights. First outlet
connec_
tions will be free with a $4.50 monthly
service charge. The company also
franchises in Liberty, Port Vue, Lincolnholds
and
Glassport, all Pennsylvania,
East Deer township, Pa-Westmoreland
Cable Co., New Kensington, Pennsylvania,
has been granted a franchise. Installation
fee will be $10 with a monthly rental charge
of $4.50. However, during the first 90 days
there will be no installation fee. The township will receive 2% of the gross revenue.
East Pennsboro township, PaTV, Harrisburg, has been granted Perfect
nonexclusive franchise. Connections to apublic
buildings and schools will be free and the
township will receive a percentage of the
collected fees.
Nashville-Gregg Cablevision Inc., Nashville has applied for a franchise.
firm holds franchises in Huntingdon, The
McKenzie and Martin, all Tennessee. Other
firms seeking franchises are Nashville Community TV Inc., WLAC -TV Inc. and WSMTV Inc., all Nashville.
New Braunfels, Tex. -Tames K. Donahue
Co., Boston, has applied for a franchise.
Columbus Wis. Columbus
Television Co. has applied for aCommunity
franchise,
Principals in the firm are Charles
hoH, owner of WEAQ Eau Claire, Dick
Faile, president and general managerTom
of
WBEV Beaver Dam and Tom Wells, attorney, Beaver Dam, all Wisconsin.
Menasha, Wis.- Marcus Theatres CATV
Systems Inc., Milwaukee, has applied
for
a franchise.
Two Rivers, Wis. -Two Rivers All- Channel
Cablevision Inc. has applied for a franchise.
-
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
THERE HAS always been plenty of
work in broadcasting for Gordon
Keeble ever since he started in freelance acting and singing roles as a teenager. Today he is busier than ever
getting the CTV Television Network of
II Canadian stations and their satellites
across the country ready for color telecasting in October.
Tall, debonaire and calm, Mr. Keeble
has come through all phases of broadcasting to head Canada's second national
television network. He was elected to
the post early in October 1965, succeeding Spencer W. Caldwell. He and Mr.
Caldwell started the network four and
a half years ago. They have worked together since 1950 in a variety of enterprises related to broadcasting, from
selling equipment to producing corn mercials.
Mr. Keeble's goal is to have the
network's 25 hours of weekly programing entirely in color by Jan. 1, 1967.
That's when color television officially
begins in Canada. It will be only one
facet of the country's centennial celebration as a continentwide nation. To
get the bugs out of production, stations
will be allowed to start color programing
in October.
U. S. Could Grab Lead Canadian
stations must make themselves ready
to satisfy the growing demand for
color programing or lose viewers to
U. S. border stations. Mr. Keeble feels
that Canadian stations cannot afford
to fall behind the U. S. stations. So
his network plans to take the lead in
developing network color programs in
Canada. This, he feels, is the most
economical method for bringing tint
programs to the country.
From the broadcasters' and advertisers' viewpoint, he explains, it is obvious
that a central color-origination facility,
plus a simultaneous national microwave
distribution system, will cut conversion
and operation costs of color television
to the minimum.
The network's stations either already
have color equipment installed or will
have it ready by summer. The 11 stations now own an estimated 25% of
the CTV network. They made an offer
earlier this month to purchase the
shares owned by nonbroadcasters.
All programs from the U. S. next
season will be in color. And all CTV
stations producing shows for the network will have color production facilities. National network news, originating
at CJOH -TV Ottawa, will be in full color.
And so will daytime programs from
CFCF -TV Montreal.
CTV plans to charge the same rates
for color as for black and white, at
least in the first full year of color telecasting.
These and other problems are occupying Gordon Keeble at present. But
BROADCASTING,
January 17, 1966
He's planning
color TV's
start in Canada
he is used to many problems.
He recalls that he
Busy Beginning
probably worked harder on his first full time job in radio at CFCH North Bay,
Ont. He answered an advertisement for
an announcer's job at that station in
1940. He not only announced for 10
hours a day, but wrote all continuity
and conducted classes in broadcasting
technique for the sons and daughters of
local sponsors for the big salary of
$75 a month.
He then moved to CKGB Timmons,
Ont., a gold- mining town. His first task
there was to write 13 half -hour spook
dramas, which had already been sold,
script unseen, to an enthusiastic sponsor. He also produced, directed and
starred in the series with other staff
members forming the cast. He next
WEEK'S PROFILE
Gordon Frederic Keeble -pres. of CTV
Television Network Ltd., Toronto; b. July
23, 1917, at Toronto; announcer CFCH
North Bay, Ont., 1940; chief announcer
CJBC Toronto, 1942; radio director, F. H.
Hayhurst Co. Ltd., Toronto, 1946; man ager CFCF Montreal, Que., 1948; exec. VP
of S. W. Caldwell Ltd., Toronto, 1950;
exec. VP of CTV Television Network Ltd.,
Toronto,
1961; pres. Central Canada
Broadcasters Association 1964; m. Marjorie (Midge) Ellis, three children; hobbies
-golf, tennis, stamps, woodworking.
went for a short time to CHEX Peters borough, Ont., a station which was operated by the same management as that
Of CFCH and CKGB.
Familiar Script At the suggestion of
Canadian Broadcasting Corp. announcer
Midge Ellis (whom he later married)
he auditioned for the CBC in 1942.
Given a script for the audition, he
found it to be the same one he had
used at CFCH to teach announcing. He
was spectacularly successful on the
audition and became a CBC staff announcer. He soon moved as chief announcer to the key station of CBC's
Dominion Network, CJBC Toronto.
Mr. Keeble switched to a new field
in 1946, when he joined F. H. Hayhurst
Ltd., Toronto and Montreal advertising
agency, as radio director.
Two years later, he took over as
station manager of CFCF Montreal,
which claims to be Canada's oldest
radio station. One of his major accomplishments at CFCF was the beginning
of separate programing for its FM
affiliate, the first separate FM broadcast service in Canada.
In 1950, Mr. Keeble joined Spence
Caldwell as executive vice president of
the Caldwell operations. They had both
devoted their business careers to the
broadcasting field. While Mr. Caldwell
started on the engineering side, he held
many posts similar to those Mr. Keeble
used on his climb up the industry's
ladder.
TV's Start TV hadn't started yet in
Canada, but Mr. Keeble was soon working in every phase of the new medium
as the country began preparing for the
1952 licensing of TV stations.
Mr. Caldwell fought for several years
to set up a second Canadian TV network. When he was successful in 1961,
Mr. Keeble became executive vice president of CTV.
He has long been interested in radio television industry problems in Canada.
He is director of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters and immediate
past president of the Central Canada
Broadcasters Association. Mr. Keeble is
one of the original members of the
Association of Canadian Radio and Television Artists, the Canadian union.
As a youth, Mr. Keeble had planned
on a career as an accountant. But his
high school English teacher interested
him in acting and stagecraft. After
leaving school, he was soon in freelance acting on several Toronto radio
stations.
His wife, Majorie, is a public -school
teacher in Toronto's North York section. When he has time to relax from
planning for color TV, he plays the
piano, reads, plays some tennis and golf,
occasionally fences and collects Canadian stamps.
99
EDITORIALS
The best way out
SEVERAL broadcasters, including two of prominence
whose letters are published in this week's "Open Mike"
beginning on page 22, have questioned a Dec. 27, 1965, editorial that restated this publication's views on the regulation of
community antenna television. Evidently we failed to make
our position clear on Dec. 27. This is another attempt.
As we have been saying for years, CATV constitutes
unfair competition to broadcasting as long as it is permitted
to use any broadcast programing it desires without obtaining
the consent of the originating station and as long as broadcasters have no means of preserving the exclusivity of their
shows in markets where they have a legitimate claim to
exclusively. There is, we have also said repeatedly, a way to
correct this fundamental injustice without invocation of a
federal policy of protectionism that would lead to undesirable
restraints on both CATV and broadcasting.
A minor amendment to an existing law, Section 325(a)
of the Communications Act, would provide the legal basis
for the elimination of the unfair competition that CATV
now represents. Section 325(a) now prohibits one station
from rebroadcasting the programs of another without the
originating station's consent. It should be amplified to apply
the same conditions to retransmission by wire.
The argument is advanced by our "Open Mike" contributors and others that an amendment of Section 325(a)
would grant no protection to local stations against the importation of distant signals by CATV. We suggest that
protection of considerable measure would ensue from the
business arrangements that would logically flow from an
amendment of the section.
Under an amplified Section 325 stations would be in a
position to say whether any program they had produced for
themselves or had acquired from a network or other supplier could be carried on a CATV within their coverage area.
Their title to their programing would be clear. They would
need only to make sure that their contracts with networks
and other program sources guaranteed territorial exclusivity,
a condition that is implied if not specified in many contracts now in force.
Any station could deny a CATV permission to import
from distant stations any program or program schedule that
duplicated programing to which the local station held exhibition rights. The combination of an amended Section
325 and of territorial exclusivity in program contracts
would establish fair conditions for negotiations between
broadcasters and CATV operators. The natural forces of a
free market would be brought into play.
Can Congress be persuaded to amend Section 325?
Easily
broadcasters will unite in a campaign of persuasion, and especially if influential owners of CATV systems can be made to see that this is a better approach to
regulation than others that have been advanced.
By one means or another CATV will eventually be subjected to restraints. For CATV there are many threats
of federal, state and local regulation that could add up to
obstacles of fatal consequence. Wise CATV owners must
certainly be aware that their days of carefree signal poaching
are numbered.
Circumstances may be ripe for a rapprochement between broadcasting and CATV. If significant elements in
both camps will begin considering the realities of the times,
they will also see the need for a sensible accommodation
in which each element can prosper according to the merits
of the service each provides.
For starters we suggest an amendment of Section 325(a)
to put wire transmissions under the same conditions that
apply now to rebroadcasts and to install the FCC as a
court of arbitration in case either broadcaster or CATV
feels aggrieved in an application of the amended section.
That kind of amendment can be brought in, and fast, if
significant support emerges from both sides of the existing
controversy.
The alternatives that are now under consideration would
in the end be certain to debilitate both broadcaster and
cable operator.
The Fly years
IN
nearly four decades of communications regulation 17
chairmen have served the Federal Radio Commission and
its successor FCC. The toughest was James Lawrence Fly,
who practically controlled the FCC from 1939 until 1944.
Larry Fly died Jan. 6, four years after he had retired from
active law practice.
Larry Fly was appointed to the FCC by President Franklin
D. Roosevelt. Mr. Roosevelt was in his second term and
had established the radio fireside chat as an FDR trademark. Although there is no clear record, it was understood
that Mr. Fly was instructed to prevent radio from being
swallowed up by newspapers which FDR regarded as shot
through with "half- truths and innuendoes" against his New
Deal. He had no love for the then networks-NBC's Red
and Blue (the latter now ABC) and CBS.
Whether Chairman Fly personally held the views of his
chief was never revealed. He had his orders. While he
failed in the effort to force divorcement of newspaper
ownership of stations, he did arrest the trend. And he
did spearhead regulation of networks and the forced sale
of NBC's Blue.
Mr. Fly was the first of the hard -line chairmen. Many
of the FCC's existing procedures had their origin during
his tenure. He was radio's hair shirt. Broadcasters were
able to stave off his most violent thrusts, but in the process
they did much soul -searching and self -disciplining that probably prevented more serious consequences.
-if
100
Drawn for BROADCASTING by Sid Rix
"When you promised nie a career in television, Mr. Worley, I assumed
..."
BROADCASTING, January 17, 1966
get our man. We
Wegetalways
him with a television set
and a few brief words. Maybe, a
little music. We let him do the
listening. We lull him with great
entertainment. We give him
sporting events, award -winning
news coverage, fine NBC programming interspersed with topCourtesy
of
Sussex Clothes Ltd.
notch local shows.
Then, we throw in a sales pitch.
We point it right at him. He surrenders everytime.
We could go into a long song and
dance about our hand -basted
commercials, hand -basted availabilities, and hand -basted prices,
but he wouldn't even listen.
Anyway, it's all written down in
a little booklet carried by every
Edward Petry man. Better still,
we can capture the Houston Market for you, every man in it. For
the Petry man nearest you, please
write to KPRC -TV, P. 0. Box
2222,
Houston, Texas
77001.
"Science
is organized
knowledge."
Edmund Spenser
1552 -1599
English Poet
The efficient organization
and utilization of knowledgeboth operational and
motivational -is a basic
management concept at
G -L stations. Griffin -Leake
makes television a SCIENCE,
and yet an ART ... with sales
results a primary goal.
GRIFFIN
LEA R E
TV, INC.
-
KATV -7, LITTLE ROCK
KTUL-TV -8, TULSA
KWTV -9, OKLAHOMA CITY
L
CTV,
INC)

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