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E •
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September 11, 1985
Vol. XXIX. No. 34
T
.,
The weekly newspaper
servin~ the towns of
Bethlehem and ew Scotland
.<!
How close to build
on Delaware Ave.
By Theresa Bobear
Setbacks along Delaware Ave.
appeared to be a major concern as
the Bethlehem Planning Board
began discussion last week on the
"fifth generation draft" of a
zoning ordinance amendment
proposed to implement the
recommendations
of
the
Delaware Avenue Task Force.
While the board will not
formulate final recommendations
regarding the proposal until their
when
Sept. 17 meeting
neighborhood association and
business representatives will also
have a chance to comment ~
several board members seemed to
have some strong idea about the
tools they want to control
commercial development in the
town.
The chief concern appeared to
be the proposed change of the
minimum front setback for
commercial buildings from 10 to
IS feet.
.. Can we not reconsider the
front yard setback?" asked board
member John LaForte. "I'd like to
offer that this board resubmit that
recommendation to a minimum of
25 feet."
Town planning consultant
Edward Kleinke said such an
increase would make it difficult to
develop some properties along
Delaware Ave. because there
would not be enough space left for
An outdoor commuter?
There was a reason why
Stuart Beyer was strap
hanging last Saturday at the
Good Samaritan Nursing
Home's ••super Celebration." See Page 10. Jeff
Gonzalez
a building after parking and
setback requirements are met. He
said the distance from the street
line of Delaware Ave. to the
commercial district boundary line
is 192 feet.
Board
member
Warren
Kullman said he thouglit a
setback of 25 feet would be right
for Delaware Ave.
Kleinke said the proposal at this
point would be applicable to any
commercial property in the town.
The board then considered the
possibility of creating new types of
commercial zoning.
LaForte
suggested the idea of having a
minimum setback for buildings
and a minimum setback for
parking.
Board
member
William
Johnston
questioned
the
difference between the minimum
parking requirements for banks
and retail stores. The proposal
mandates more parking for retail
stores.
John Williamson, chairman of
the board, suggested that the
planning board be given the
power to d_etermine the height of a
to
buffer
fence
intended
.;:ommercial
and
residential
property under site plan approval.
Currently, a property owner must
obtain a variance from the Board
of Appeals before installing a
fence more than four feet in
height.
Prior to discussing the task
force
recommendations,
the
board heard Robert Walsh, an
engineer
with
C. T.
Male
Associates, deliver a presentation
for developing sections I A and 6
of lsak Giwerc's Skycrest Planned
Residence District.
The board scheduled a public
hearing for Nov. 19 to consider
plans for the five detached singlefamily houses proposed for
section I A.
Walsh presented plans to
construct single-family attached
town houses in groups of three or
four in section 6. Walsh said the
units would be individually
owned. The plan calls for a total of
220 dwelling units. Originally, 276
dwelling units were approved for
section 6 of the PRD.
The board decided to wait for
input from the engineering
department before acting on the
proposal.
In other business, the board:
• Held a public hearing to
consider
Susan
Favaloro's
application
for
a
one-lot
subdivision on Elsmere Avenue.
Paul Hite, a land surveyor
representing Favaloro, said a
single-family house is. proposed
for the site.
• Scheduled a public hearing
for Nov. l2 to consider Briand
· Parenteau's
proposed
5-lot
subdivision to be located in an
AA-Residential zon~ on Bender
(Turn to Page 3)
I~~~:~~~a;~: Principal Joseph Schaefer was
II
out numbers to every arriving student
last Thursday morning, so each would know
which bus to get on that afternoon. Spotlight
First day of school a real runaround
If there were some students who didn't want to go all elementary pupils. Previously those within a
to school on Thursday, the first day, there were a half-mile of their school were required to walk. It's
few more who didn't want to go Friday-at least not clear, however, that adding in walkers is what
among the elementary students on those Bethlehem created the problems on Thursday.
Central bus routes that experienced more than the
"'There are a number of things we're exploring,"
usual first-day problems at dismissal time.
district Superintendent Lawrence A. Zinn said
"I'm never getting back on that bus!" one third Monday when asked about the transportation
grader announced after a long ride home on a problems. "Clearly, more refmement needs to be
crowded bus that went past his stop twice.
done with the computer program process." Zinn
Depending on who's talking, the first-day said four of the afternoon roufs were identified as
transportation problems were (A) fewer than or (B) posing particular problems a d these were being
worse than last year, when new bus routes revised.
compounded whatever problems are inherent in the
Charles Preska, a bus drive said the first day
first day of school for some 3,600 pupils.
"went well compared to the year before," although
What is different this year is a new policy, on orientation day the bus he was driving broke
approved by voters in May, that authorizes busing
(Turn to Page 2)
BC redistricting proposal draws fire
By Caroline Terenzini
The first public reaction to a
Bethlehem Central elementary
school redistricting proposal
makes clear that more than just
numbers is involved. Last Wednesday, at the first of several
"listening" sessions the school
board has planned to hear the
public's views on the proposal,
nearly 50 district residents showed
up to let the board know how they
feel - and a number of them
weren't happy.
The proposed redistricting,
which involves four of BC's five
'elementary schools, is aimed at
easing crowding at the Glenmont
Elementary SchooL
Several of those who sopke
during the hour-long session last
week objected to the disruption
that would result from reassigning
their children to another school,
while others expressed doubt
about whether the committee's
assumptions concerning growth
were correct and whether the
proposal would, in fact, solve
Glenmont's problem.
The plan, submitted to the
board in June by a citizen-staff
committee that had been at work
since January, calls for reassigning about 100 pupils from the
Hamagrael school attendance
area to the Elsmere and
Slingerlands schools in order to
make room at Hamagrael for
nearly 100 children in the Elm
Estates development in Selkirk,
which is now in the Glenmont
attendance area. In its report, the
committee said it had sought to
devise a plan that provided
"smooth, rational boundaries,"
kept neighborhoods together and
moved as few people as possible.
The proposal alsb was intended to,.
leave each ·of the four schools
involved at approximately 94
percent of capacity and to keep
traVel time for all the children to a
minimum.
The Clarksville Elementary
School was e.xcluded from the
proposed redistricting because of
its distance from the other four
schools, the report said. But
Marie Hornick of Clarksville took
exception. ·Leaving Clarksville
out. of the plan makes it
"fragmented," she said, and
"makes it look as if Clarksville is
out in the boonies. It isn't. You
can get almost anywhere in the
district in 20 minutes" from
Clarksville, she said.
(Turn to Page 2)
·-,
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\
D BC redistricting
/
Lion settlement approved
•.
.
Glenmont was ..a ways away yet"
and that public comment would
be welcomed at the Sept. 18 and
Oct.
2 board meetings. These
(From Page I)
that the assumption that each meetings are scheduled for 8 p.m.
house would yield 1.4 children at the Educational Services
A more permanent solution,
90 Adams Place m
"may
be correct for I 0 years ago, Center,
Hornick added, might result from
I .. - .. ··' 1.-)J::J Hl>l '
redrawing the boundaries of ALL· .but- with change it_ ~ay not·be." ~ .. D:marj?,
. j_I·IJl1,
the elementary schools in the
I It .f1
('j j".JJ,
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Superintendent Lawrence A.
district.
Zinn, who served on the
Timothy Fitzgerald of committee, acknowledged that
Glenmont said he was disappoint- forecasting th!! rate of home
ed that the ·committee had not building, patterns in home buying
(From Page I)
visited the Glenmont school to see and t~e birth rate involved "a lot
the conditions there. He also of crystal ball gazing." And board down and, on opening day,
questioned whether the figures on
member Bernard Harvith backed another bus he was i:iriving overwhich the plan is based are
him up when he observed, "It's heated. Such problems are not
accurate. The capacity of 350 really hard to tell how many surprising, .Preska said, since the
pupils listed in the report is "way kindergarteners there will be six buses sit idle for the summer
over What I feel the school can years from now because they months.
handle," Fitzgerald said.
haven't been born yet."
The district owns 31 buses that
The committee projected the
John Kaplan, a . Glenmont transport high school students to
Glenmont enrollment would top parent, said he was hearing: .. Why school for a 7:40 a.m. opening,
400 next year but already,
should my child be moved if then middle schoolers for an 8:15
according to parents there, ''music
moving someone else's child will
start and elementary pupils by
is being taught in a closet" and
solve the problem?" In addition,
small groups of students must use
Kaplan said some of the 9:15 a.m. Morning kindergarcorridor space for certain statements suggested that people teners are taken home at noon and
activities. This year the' school in older sections of the district feel the afternoon kindergarteners are
foyer has been partitioned to they have .. some sort of ancestral picked up then. At dismissal time
the high schoolers go home first,
right". to that attendance area.
create a small classroom and
storage space was created f?y
followed by middle school stuSue Belemjian, president of the dent and then grade schoolers. In
partitioning off the rear of the
Glenmont Parent-Teacher addition, according to state law,
auditorium.
Figures in the report. Association, told the gathering, the district transports pupils to
concerning new home building in "No matter which school you pick and from the St. Thomas the
the Glenmont area were to put us in, somebody has to Apostle Church parish school and
questioned by several persons in move. The best thing would be to to private schools within 16 miles
the ·audience, especially with the build on to Glenmont. That would
of the district, such as to Holy
revelation that a development that make us happy and make you all
Names Academy and to St.
happy."
The
committee,
however,
is in the talking stage for some 80
Gregory's
in Loudonville.
of
adding
on
had
rejected
the
idea
acres south of the Bypass near
to
the
Glenmont
school
as
There
will
always be delays in
Bender Lane -- in the Glenmont
att~ndance area-- had not figured "unnecessarily expensive and the first few days, officials said,
. in the committee's calculations. In wastefUl" beacuse, it said, there is such as when parents pose kinderaddition, an influx -of young space in other district schools.
garteners on the steps of the bus
Board President Sheila Fuller for a first-day photograph, but
faffiilies in older sections of
Bethlehem was noted by Sher- said a decision on what should be they're hoping to keep th'e real
wood Davies of Delmar, who said done to alleviate the crowding at . snafus to a minimum.
f
Caroline .Te'renzini
'
•POTPURRI • WREATHSANDARRANGEMENTS • Gif:TBASK£:'!"5-\ . ;
A bankruptcy court judge Thursday in New York City gave his
approval to a settlement in the Lion Capital Group case that will
give the Bethlehem Central School District and other investors
back about 73 cents on the dollar. The school district had about
$394,000 placed with Lion when the, firm·werit bimkrupt in May
of 1984. Thus, the district may end up writing off about$100,000.
The new agreement replaces one the fi~m·s'creditors approved
last spring but which the court threw out. The settlement
approved Thursday calls for Bradford Trust Co. (since renamed
Fidata Trust Co.), which held the Lion securities, and all
!creditors to drop ·individual claims to securities that were sold at
the time of the bankruptcy, the proceeds of which have been held
on account pending settlement of the case.
The Bethlehem Central School District and other school
districts and municipalities had repurchase agreements with
Lion under which the· investors would buy securities from Lion
"which Lion would later repurchase at a higher price. Difficulties
arose when the securities involved were used as collateral for
loans made to Lion CapitaL
The $65.5 million to be divided proportionately among the
claimants includes $10.3 million from limited partners in Lion
(including the former secretary of state, .Gen. Alexander Haig)
and about $1 million collected from creditors who had closed out
their investments with the firm within 90 days before bankruptcy
was declared. The new settlement is subject to approval of air
creditors.
.
BAKE WHAT YOU LIKEOVEN CLEANS ITSELF
Two 8", two 6" plug-in
Calrod• surface units.
Porcelain enamel finish
drip pans. Automatic oven
timer, clock. Black glass
oven door
-
Oops, that was
Mon. - Sat. 10:00 - 5:30
243-DelaWare Ave.--;oetntiu=(518) 439-6882
~.:.··
..
A Selkirk man, age 21, is due in
Bethlehem Town Court on a
charge of driving whiJe .... intoxicated as a misdemeanor after he
was stopped Sunday on Rt. 9W,
according to a spokesman for the
state police at Selkirk. Troopers
said the motorist passed a patrol
car at a high rate of speed.
huttle Hill
Herb Shop
Dried Flowers
Statice - all colours - Statice
Larkspur • Yarrow • Safflower
You don't need
glasses to see
that advertising in
The Spotlight pays
...._._BURT,
•
•
The Bethlehem
Women's
Republican Club
•
•
•
... extends this invitation to you to become a
member of our 60-year old prestigious
organization.
"
INSURANCE
TYPE OF EVENT
&
Tuesday,
&
Tuesday,
&
Tuesday,
Sunday,
Tuesday,
Our group offers unique opportunities to
become knowledgeable about Town government and Town issues, to meet local officials
and to gather with friends and neighbors from
various communities wit~in our Town.
Tuesday,
Tuesday,
&
•
•
•
*
Wine Cheese "Open
Library
9/17/85
--Meet the Candidates-7:30p.m.
*
Card Party Fashion Show
Town Hall
10/22/85
by "Sherry's" of Delmar
7:30p.m.
*
Town Hall
"Legislation Effective
11/19/85
Rm.201
Lobbying"-Marilyn Wiles
7:30p.m .
*
Normanside
Christmas Brunch with
12/1/85
Country Club Entertainment
12:30 p.m.
*
Legion Hall
Covered Dish Supper with
12/11/86
Town Officials- Joanne
6:30p.m.
*
Gage (Consumer Reports)
Library
3/18/86
"Missing Children" with
7:30p.m.
Private Investigator
*
Marilyn Green
Normanside
Annual Spring Luncheon
4/29/86
Country Club
*
Ruth Miner Awards
12 noon
,-------------- ----------------Please Print
*
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*
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PLACE
DATE
•
•
•
-ANTHONY
. .~ ASSOCIATES
PROGRAM 1985-1986
Interested?
Call439-2744 (days)or 439-5810 (evenings)
or mail this form to: Kathleen Noonan,
412 Elm Ave., Selkirk, NY 12158
• • •
• • ., ., ., • • •
PAGE 2- September 11, 1985- Tho Spotlight
Name:
Address: - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - •
• • • • • • •
..
The lowest price on insurance
isn't always the best but we
feel a competitive price is
important Call us lor a free
comparison.
439-9958
~
208 Delaware Ave,
Delmar
Local Merit
·. S'emifinalists
The pub_lic meets itself
"We're helping Bethlehem get
to know Bethlehem even better
than before. r think thiit's What
public. access is all about," said
Karen
Finnessey,_.. rece_ntlyappoirlted .t:-program coordiriator
for the Bethlehem Channel.
Finnessey said she would like
more community awareness and
corrimunity use of the channel.
With that thought in mind, she
has contacted virtually every
organization in the community,
asking whether or not they would
be interested in using this channel
of communication.
Since being appointed in June.
Finnessey said the station has
aired a July 4 program for the
Gansevort Chapter, Daughters of
the American Revolution. And
other groups, including the
Friends of the Library, the
American
Legion
and
the
Bethlehem Elks, have expressed ·
an
interest,
according
to
Finnessey.
In addition to servmg as ..a
public relations outlet for ser:vicerelated Community groups in the
Capital District," Finnessey said
the charinel will continue to offer
many of the programs initiated by
Carol King, former director of the
station.
Finnessey said she has done one
interview for Conversations and
,,
Karen Sinnessey, the new program coordinator for the Bethleher:n
Channel, works at the program console at the Bethlehem Pubhc
Library.
>J
Theresa Bobear
has three more interviews schedbachelor's degree in broadcast
uh~d. She plans to expand on this
production and
managem~nt
concept by creating a new profrom the University of Colorado
gram to be entitled Talk of the
at Boulder. She worked at the
Town. ln this series, Finnessey uniVersity media center and
will assume more of a .. roving
completed an internship with the
reporter" role. She said the Longmont
Communication
program will introduce new Corp .• Co!Or~do. Now a resident
businesses,
and
obscure of Selkirk, Finnessey has done
.businesses or services in the town . free lance work for the Audio
that peoPle are not ·aware of.
Video Corp in.Menands.
. Originally from Port Henry,
. F-innessey is working with
N.Y.,
Finnessey
earned
a
David Bredderman and Michael
Engstrom, the studio's production
personnel, in an effort to present
programs four to five nights per
week and at least four mornings
per week. A Children's Storytime,
With children's librarian Iris
Bartkowski, and Storytelling with
Gramma Ena. featuring Edna
Salkever, are.aired three mornings
per we.ek at I 0:30 a.m.
Judith Longley, who is certified
by the American Federation of
Astrologers, volunteers her time
to produce_ a program· about
horoscopes.
On
Wedn~sday
nights at 7:30 p.m. area residents
can get some advice about the best
time to garden or plan a_dinner
party.
Karen Sinnessey operates a camera at the local station.
Spotlights delayed
Due to Postal Service
'delays many subscribers
have been receiving their
copies of The Spotlight late
during the last several
weeks. We are attempting to
work with the Postal Service
to correct the problem. If
your Spotlight dOes not
arrive on time please call
yOUr post office and please
let us know at 439-4949.
Korean Way is broadcast on
Thursdays at 7 p.m.
Finnessey said the c~annel is
also available as an outlet for area
artists. A program entitled Jazz:
Live from Bethlehem fe<,itures the
Six students from Bethlehe~
talent of area musicians.
Central, three from Voorheesville
Finnessey ha:s ~pplied tO the and one from ·Ravena-Coeymans~
New York State Council on the ·
Selkirk are among the 15,000 high
Arts for grant money to prOduce a school seniors who have been
Program about careers in art.
named
semifinalists
in
the
In spite of limited staffing,
National
Merit
Scholarship
Finnessey is eager to offer the competition .
.resources of the station to as many
The students, recognized for
community service organizations
their academic talent, will be
and area artists as possible.
competing for
5,800
Merit
Volunteers are welcome,. and
Schol~rships to be awarded ne~
college internships are available.
spring.
·
"It's a good· opportunity to learn
From Bethlehem Central High
everything," she said. "The
School, the semifinalists are Beth
opportunity is here for anyone."
K. Ammerman, who plans to
The
part-time
program major in biochemistry; Peter M ..
cool-dinator and the two part-time Blaustein, whose interest is in
production people at ~he station liberal arts; Jon E. Gibson, who
have established a training plans to major in economics and
program for persons interested in pursue a business career; Jan~t ~·
using the station's portable audio Lawrence, who plans to maJor 10
video
recorder
to
record biophysics; Betsy J. Levensohn,
community events. The recorder who plans to major in religion and
is available on a first ..come, first- become a physician; and Tania J.
served basis.
Stasiuk, who plans to major in
liberal arts and pursue a career in
While station personnel cannot journalism.
record every community event,
From Clayton A. Bouton
they are available to answer Senior High in Voorheesville, the
questions about use of the porta- students are Lawrence A. Bach,
pack and to help edit program who plans a rilusic major; Lisa K .
tapes, according to Finnessey . Baker and James F. Volkwein,
"We'd be very happy to be sure who plans to major in prelaw. ,. . .
someone is here to answ~r
Rhonda R. Newton, who plans
questions."
to major in potitical science, is the
For information call the semifinalist from · RCS Senior
High.
Bethlehem Channel at 439-8111.
For those who prefer to focus
their center of gravity here ·on
earth, a program entitled Tae
2 drivers ticketed
Both drivers were charged aftef
~a two.:car.accident Frid3.y, Sept. 6,
on Bask Rd. in Glenmont, according to a spokesman for the state
police at Selkirk. An Albany
man was ticketed for failure to
keep right, driving an uninspected
·vehicle and having unsafe tires,
troopers. said, while an Averill
Park man was charged with being
an unlicensed Operator.and failing
to use a seat-belt.
Kwon Do: Martial Arts the
o· Delaware Ave.
(From Page I)
Lane. Speaking for P3rentea~,
Hite said the lots would range 10 .
size from 22,000 square~et w l.S.
acres.
• Learned that Jean Conway
has withdrawn her application for
the proposed Woodside South,
section 2, s~bdivision of two-lots.
• Received a request from
Franz Zwi.cklbauer to begin site
-preparation work for his parcel on
Cherry
Avenue.
The
town
increased
the
frontage
requirements for developing a
parcel shortly after reviewing
Zwicklbauer's
or_iginal
development pro.posal. Lindsay
Boutelle, engineer representing
Zwicklbauer, said he was assured
this
subdivision
would
be
grandfathered;
• Entertained a quesrion from
Douglas Zeno, president of the
Central Delmar Neighborhood
Association. ~·1 just wanted to
know h.ow we're coming on that
zoning map -an updated zoning
map for the town," Zeno asked.
"It will be out shortly," repli~d
Williamson.
_...
In Glenmont The Spotlight is sold at
Van Allen Farms, CVS, Stewarts,
Three Farms Dairy and Grand Union
Pink Poppies
Iris
•
Mums
·Potted Perennials
Publu-Jrer -- Richard Ahlstrom
TitEl. ItT
SpoTIG
Editor- Thomas S. McPheeters
Now is the time to plant.
Secr'etary - Mary A. Ahbtrom
Ojjict' Manager- Susan Rodd
·Ad~·ertising
:uanager- GlennS. Vadney
Sales Representath•es- ~ora Hooper. Carol W..-igan~ ..
Editorial-Allison Bennett: Theresa Bobear, Norman Cohen. Patricia D_urilas,
;-./at Boynton, Barbara Pickup. Vincent Potenza, Mary Pratt, Lorrame C.
Smith. Lyn Stapf. Carohnc Teremini. Dan Tidd.
SpecialiZing in Perennials
P1card Road. Altamont
(near lnd1an Ladder Farms)
765-4702 Open daily 9 AMto 7 PM
. ContribUtors- Linda Anne Burtis. J.W. Campbell. R.H. Davis. Ann Treadway.
High School Correspondents~ Dave DeCecco. Bart Gottesman. C~arles
Henrihon. Kevin Hommel. Rick leach. Tim Penk. Tanya Sevcnno. lan1a
Sta~iuk
Papaver orientale
Production Manager - Vincent Poten1.a. Asst. Product~n Manager- T~rri
Lawlor. Production - Arlene Bruno, Cheryl Clary. Eh7.abcth Keays, Tma
Strauss.
/'liew~·graphics Printing -Gary Van Uer Linden.
.
J"he Spu11igh1 (US I-'.:. 396-630) i~ publish..:u each Wednesday by Ncwsgraphl~~ ot
LJclmar. Inc .. 125 Adams St.. Ddm.ar. ~.Y. 12054. Second cla~s postage pa1d at
Delmar. ~ .Y. and at i.!dtlitional mailing offices. f'o.1·mwsta: send <~ddrcss changes to
"/1w Spotlixlu. 1'.0. Uo.\ IIJO. Delmar. ,"\.Y, 12054.
, . , .
, " , , ,
Subscription rate~: Albany County, one year $15.00. tv.o ~cars S21.00. ~ lscv. hnc,
one year $17.50. two year~ S2J.50.
(518)
439-49'!_9~-_ _ _ __,
F
A
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M
The Spotlight- September 11, 1985 -·PAGE 3
Charles Bender's Golden Queen
The lane .leading to William
Taylor's house runs· through tall.fields.of corn. In fact, when you
are at the house, it seems to be an
.,.. island surrounded by waves of
tasselled corn, -covering the 135
tillable acres of the farm. Bill
cannot farm tho~e acres himself
anymore and so he rents the land
to another farmer. But corn was
not the crop that made this
'\ particular farm famous.
When Bill closed out his Glendale Dairy, a retail milk business
in Albany, he came to New
Scotland ·and purchased the farm
,- of Charles· Bender, then 80 years
of age, working with Mr. Bender
in d~veloping the produce of the
farm. This farm had been there
long before the days of the
Revolutionary War, when it was
owned by other old New Scotland
families of Bullocks; Beckers and
Coughtrys. However, it was
Charles Bender who 'decided that
the Hendricks family at Font
Grove.
·
TiMES
The colonel's friend, the Honorable John V.L. Pruyn of Albany, was sent as minister to
Allison Bennett
Japan. He often sent presents to
the colonel and one time Chanhis father's farm could be used to cellor Pruyn sent melon seeds
better advantage than it had been. from Japan, knowing the colHe was the propagator of the onel's interest in -horticulture.
famous muskmelon known in When planted and grown in the
swanky metropolitan restaurants Hendricks gardens, these melons
as the Bender Melon-its trade were found to be a beautiful
golden color inside, instead of the
name Bender's Golden Queen.
green melons that were familiar
The story of these melons dates then. Charlie Bender was given a
back many, many years ;--nd, as in. few as a treat. When he tasted
so many other srOries that we have them he asked if he might have the
recounted about that area, dep- seeds that were not saved for
ends to some extent on Col. James family use. Mr. Bender had been
Hendricks of Font Grove in employed in a fine gt.ocery store in
Slingerlands. A part of the story Albany and dt;termined to specialof the beginning of the Bender ize on his father's farm in certain
melons comes from .. Recollec- vegetables and raiSe them for the
tions," a family history written by trade.
Anne Hendricks Newhart about
For a year or two he tested the
seeds and then arranged to have
his seeds started in the Font Grove
greenhouses. Afterwards, when
they were planted in his own
fields, he. put little glass frames
over each -plant to protect it. He
had his soil analyzed by chemists
and scientifically grew his melons
for market. He used colonies of
bees to carry pollen, even in his
greenhouses. Th~ melons developed in size and flavor and Charlie
Bender took a carton of his
melons to the most exclusive
restaurants and hotel dining rooms
in New York City, asking them to
rry his melons. If they were
satisfied with them, he suggested
that they place an. order. His
merchandising methods might
seell!- unusual by our modern
standards, but soon the orders
were piling up at the sender
Melon Farm. Bender Melons
became known far and wide as a
delicious taste treat. They were
The Bender house in New Scotland, in the days when the famous
packed in barrels and shipped via
Bender melons were grown here.
the Hudson River Dayline boats
to New York and were distributed
also to 33 states at the peak of
their popularity. The Belmont
Hotel in New Yoi;"k had a standing
order for 10 baskets of Bender
mtlons a day.
REMEMbEREd
ANNUAL EVERGREEN and
FLOWERING SHRUBS
" SALE
Save 20% to 50%
Mr. Bender also raised fane);
vegetables on his farm and his
speciality was a White turnip that
was more delicate in flavor than
the purple ones. He also raised a
high quality hog that he sold to
butchers in Albany, with the meat .
- -
• Yews
• Hemlocks
• Arborvitae
• ·Junipers
• Spruce
• Pines
• Holly
• Forsythia
• Honeysuckle
• Magnolia
• Flowering Crab
• Weigelia
• Lilac
' Plus many more
All Evergreens and Shrubs must go
to make room
• FREE DELIVERY ON LARGE ORDERS •
~'"V!j
L -
""
The melons developed in size and
flavor and Charlie·Bender took a carton
to the most exclusive restaurants .and
hotel dining rooms in New York City.
to the surface, there was much
hand work involved in the weeding of the crop and it was stoop or
squatting labor. Mr. Bender was
once ·heard to say that he could
'"hire a workman for $1.00 a day
and his chewing tobaGco."
Over the years other people
entered the field of growing
spectacular melons. The seeds
could not be patented and peOple
would come and buy the best
melons,. then take the- seeds for
their own use. The famous Hand
melon· from Saratoga came out of
the use of Bender seeds. With the
advent of World War II, there was
a problem in· obtaining the necessary labor force and insecticides
also were scarce. Mr. Bender and
William Taylor felt it was time to
give up the raising of melons and
thus the land has now gone to the
growing of corn.
Although the farm was one of
the earliest in New Scotland, the
charming house that sits on the
land now was built in 1840 to
replace an older dwelling. It is
horizon in the far distance. The
main block of the house was built
to serve as a distinguished farm
home, with additions to the side
thai inco.rporated the kitchen
wing, complete with cooking
fireplace and Dutch oven. That
wing has been '·rer1ov3.ied"uro
contain two a·partmeritS~jM r.
Taylor liveS iri the· m7ti'n sti-ti'ctUre,
which has a state!); dOUble p·arlOr
divided ,by an archway~ suppo.rt€d
with heavy pillars and dentil
molded cornices. Each -parlor tias
a marble fireplace with a cast iron
insert over the fireplace opening.
The inserts are very fancifully
wrought, with birds and branches
of berries as the decoration. Thete
are floor length windows in both
parlors and in the dining room,
with panelling under the side
windows. The large verandah and
the porte-cochere over the driveway with its columns of the Doric
order were extensions added by
Mr. ·Bender in later years. However, so well do they ·match the
house decoration that it seems ali
if their sweeping grandeur could
Want20%off
on custom framing?
Get the scissors..
I
I
I
I
PAGE 4- September 11, t98S- The Spotlight
William Taylor holds a replica of the melon served all he 1909 banquet
at the Hotel Astor. The melon slice with. sails commemorates Henry
Hudson's ship, The Half Mpon.
Jeff Gonzalez
of these hogs finding its way into constructed in the ever popular
the best restaurants. Mr. Bender Greek Revival style and is very
felt that hog manure was the most similar to several houses of that
satisfactory fertilizer for his ·vintage still standing in New
melons.
Scotland and Bethlehem. From
the broad verandah there is a
·A great many people were magnificent view of the Helderemployed at the farm to work on bergs, the foothills beyond Feura
the melons in the growing season.
Bush and even the Three Sisters of
Since melon vine roots grow close the Catskills showing above the
L
Bring in this ad. and we'll cut 20% off our
custom framing. We feature over 1000
frames. from the finest hardwoods to the
latest metallics. Plus our knowledgeable,
professional staff to put it together right.
So snip this ad, and visit Posters Plus
Galleries. We'll cut your costs without
cutiing corners on quality.
Valid Sept.5-22
COOKED
HAM
USDA C
BEEF
NELESS
SIRLOIN
STEAK
• GRADE A PERDUE
POSTBRS
PLUS
Gallcric~
Stuywsant Plaza.
Albany. N.Y. 4H2-1984
CHICKEN
BREAST
Original Art • Posters
Custom Framing • Business Wall Desifln
OS
LEAN POLISH KRAKUS
~
-- ---
$14 7
LB.
.t,
PIA first customer
•
'
1"'"J
-
-
J .... ...... -'!
of.Bethlehem IDA
A banquet held at the Hotel Astor in New York
City in 1909 in celebration of the 300th anniversary
of Henry Hudson's discovery ofthe Hudson River.
have been there from the time the
house was built. Huge elm trees
once surrounded the house, but
these became the victims of Dutch
elm disease.
Beyond the house· are the
remains of the farming operation,
now standing idle and unused.
The great barns are there, with
glass-enclosed cupolas atop. ln0sjd<: Mr., Bender had installed a
20-ton r :x;ef rigeration mac.hine. for
:.~~in ~~ep,ing the:melons fresh for
¥a:lqnger period. This proved to be
~not. feasibli, since·. meions have
-their O,wn requifeffients 3.nd the
stOrage period is a short one.
There
was also a hand-made
11
el~~<:tor whicl) he used to lower
the barrels of melons into the
cellar of the barn for storage. The
large greenhouse grew geraniums
in the winter that were sold on
Decoration Day.
The melon seeds were started in
these same greenhouses in the
spring, numbering over 6,000
plants that had to be set out in the
fields. There was also a large water
tank in the complex of barns. that
caught water from the-roofs oft he
buildings. An insecticide was
mixed with water and the plants
were sprayed every 10 day~.
Charles Baker of Selkirk also
Bender melons were the first course served that
evening.
grew fancy melons and there was
great rivalry between the Bakers
and the Benders in those days.
Much of the Baker melon memorabilia is now housed in the
museum of the B~thlehem Historical Association at Cedar Hill.
We hope that the history of the
Bender Melon will not be lost for
the ages to come.
f:i.PrCl&_ession~l Insurance Agents
or'Gienmontlast week became the
first successful customer of the I lyea'.,oW5d Bbthlehemi /lnclmstriid
I.ileve1oprtuintmlt Ageno.ybt; ,:Aruli
Eastern Ingredients Inc. of
Syracuse, which has already
started building its warehouse on
Wemple Rd. near Rt. 144, may
not be far behind.
Supervisor Robert Hendrick
said Friday that he has been
informed that Eastern Ingredients
has found a bank - Marine
Midland - to finance its bonds.
and expects to close the deal
.. within the next six weeks. I was a
little worried because it was
moving so slowly," he said.The
Syracuse company had submitted
its request for $1.2 million in lowinterest financing before PIA
came in, but then had not come
back to the town to c9mplete the
transaction.
PIA, a three-state insura-nce
support company, hopes to begin·
its expansion this September,
using $750,000 in Industrial
t Revenue Bonds issued by the
Bethlehem IDA.
- Earlier this year, company
president Michael Conners told
the agency that PIA had
considered relocating its Rt. 9W
headquart~rs
downstate so it.
would be more centrally located.
'»>ilh .rrtrs. ·.\[)A,, f~r<Jirg, ___the_
Gl'Jlli\iWY-oi"iiJ ,l)lJi\9 /!: ,t'!''l<1~9.'l'J
'!5!fljfi9,ll, ,'!nd, ~.d~, .. a,\>,9.utnWAQR;
S.fl:~i' '"' fn:t, gf1 s Pf\~' ·1 fi o r.lll' fJ\f. ~ i9:
he· expects t.o .,hav.e .a.bo,~~ \9,?,
people working in the expanded
building.
IDA
met Thursday
The
morning to formally approve the
PIA bond sale, and on Friday
Hendrick signed the necessary _.
paperwork. Chase Lincoln First
Bank will sell the PIA bonds.
Bethlehem was reqUired to get a
supplemental allocation from the
state in order to finance the PIA
project, having already used up its
yearly allocation for Eastern
Ingredients. Hendrick said Friday
he expects no difficulty getting
state approval to sell more IDA
bonds if new applicants come
along.
INSURANCE
OF ALL
KINDS
Personal
&
Commercial
Call for a FREE Quote
Frank M. Stolz Agency
135 Main St.
Ravena, N.Y. 12143
Welcome
756-2161
Erin Kathleen Clary
Dennis Northrup
Congratulations
Cheryl & Brian
t.Pi~l
~~.. "" -~··
~Schaffer"
WOMEN ...
8924
Hard to Fit Feet?
4fif'
A close-up of the first course. The Bender melon section is topped with
a metal replica of the masts and sails pf the Half Moon, Henry
Hudson's ship that sailed up the Hudson River in 1609.
J.P. JONAS, INC.
Landscape Designers & Contractors
Feura Bush Road, Glenmont
(a Garden Shoppe affiliate)
. 439-4632 • 439-4820
or He In llx different
colors. Not al colon
Mon., Wed., Thurs., 9-9
Tues. I Fri. 9-6, Slit. S...S
Planning Your
Landscape?!.
Our PERSONALIZED LANDSCAPE PLANS
r own personal lifestyle, add equity
ip·,ut:·· . to your home, and save you time
and money over and over again.
A beautiful landscape
can be designed for
low maintenance, too!
Come in today or
call and let one of our
designers plan a landscape
. development for your home.
·-.t~MK.Through professional landscaping you will enhance your
surroundings while investing in
. your future.
t4ew Red Wings Comfort ahoea anllabM
In .alzn 5 to 12, narrow to axlrll·wkl•
ChooM from allp-on
640 Central Avenue
Albany 482-8010
~alllble
In all alzea.
$ 4 95
3
.
SUPER SAV.INGS
HARDY MUMS
NURSERY SALE
Shade Trees
25 0110
• Grown In our own
nursery from proven
hardy varieties
3
Oaks: Maples
Much More
OFF
All Juniper
Upright and
low varieties
for
PATIO FURNITURE
CLEARANCE
• Still a good selection. Sorry no
special orders
2SO//0 OFF
OUR ENTIRE STOCK
Lawn Spreaders
• Scotts, Ortho
Cyclone
Precision
• Buy Now &
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off
The Spotlight- September 11, 1985- PAGE 5
Historic house tour this month
Historic house lovers are inThe Gerrit Van Zandt House,
owner's initials, yellow pine widevited to visit three eighteenth
built circa 1755 in Feura Bush, is a
board floors and original built-in
century homes featured on the
country farm house on the Ones- cupboards are treasures of this
quethaw Creek. The stone dwelcountry home.
autumn house tour sponsored by
th..e Friends of Schuyler Mansion
ling. known locally as the jordan
The Haswell-VanDerpoel Houon Saturday, Sept. 21st. Particihouse, is the home of Mr. and _ se, a late eighteenth century home,
pants will board a bus at 12:30 . Mrs. Carl Touhey. The fireplaces
was used as a tavern to serve
p.m. in the parking lot of Schuyler · feature original mantels. ~
weary tfavellers_·on the AlbanyMansion State Historic Site, 32
An example of Dutch co.lonial
Bethlehem Plank Road. The oakCatherine St., Albany.
' architecture,· the Slingerland panelled dining foom was the
Allison Bennett; Spotlight
House, constructed of brick and .former barroom of the Haswell
C,9lumnist and author of several fieldstone, was built in 1762 by tavern. The home is now owned
Albany County hi.stories, will
Teunis Slingerland. Present own- by Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Vanguide the tours of the Gerrit Van
ers are Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Derpoel, third generation of the
Zandt House, the SlingerlandParks; Mr. Parks h3vingdescend- family to reside in the house. The The Slingerland-Parks house on Rt. 32, southwest of Feura Bush, will
Parks House and the Haswell- ed ihrough the Slingerland family. second floor features cove ceil- be a stop on the Sept. 21 Schuyler· Mansion tour.
l'anDerpoel House.
Hearth tiles with the ·original mgs.
I
Make Every Room A Pretty Room.
''This Comforter
Looks Pretty Cozy. "
t\\1\ain Co'!IJII)-
Points of interest along the tour
route of Albany County's back
roads, a·long the Onesquethaw
Creek se.ttlement, will be narrated
by local historian Lois Dillon.
Tour-goers will return to Schuyler Mansion at 4:30 p.m. A
catered reception will follow.
Registration for the house tour is
$12 for members of the Friends of
Schuyler Mansion, and $17 for
non-members, which includes an
individual membership fee. For
information call 474-3953.
Mallard gets a ride
Lots And Lots Of
Other Pre/(J' Things.
And. !i!s. liJts Qf Friend(J' Serz•ice. 7/}().
B
17.99 Nothing
Tops These Pretty ~~~~~~~!riM:
Balloon Topper Curtains
A
Thev 're the ·latest. smartest look in
curiains. The jaime is Machine-wash.
,Rose on Cream hack[!,round.
, ,
·
.,•.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"r;• •
f
'1
I
Machine dry 50% Cotton/50% Polyester.
Requires litite or no ironing Blue. Clay or
•
I•
Decoration'·, . "
PILLOWS
Assorted Fabrics
The heat·iest con1forters ami/ahle frfJm
mzJ' maj(H' mmu{(actur~r. 50%
Po(vester/50% Cotton Machilli!-ll'asb.
dry·. and permanent ;n·e,,x Apricot!
Blue. Bonel/'aufJe. Cboco/ate!Hmw
c
$495
19.99 Loveliest Lace
Federal/ Col(miat Blue. Nar)'/Co/onia!.
Plum/Rose. Red/Nm'\' 1• or Rose/Hone.
You get deep. deep lace on
these I 00 % Polyester panels.
Scalloped lace section on the
mlance. Panef has scalloped
section at the bottom and
·
D
Reg. $7.00
A
Twin
Full
Queen
across the center. Machineu•ash. eu~v-care fabric. Ecru
or White.
1699 Lovely Features
K~ngt
COMFORTERS
[leg
136.00
147.00
152.00
169.00
Sale
26.99
36.99
39.99
53.99
DUST RUFFLES
Reg.
Sale
11750 t].99
120.50 /6.99
124.50 19.99
129.50 24.99'
Pillow Sham"
I /3.50 999
The curtain is white, with a slate blue
attached ruffle with eyelet embroidery.
Celanese Fortret® Polyester and Ravon
(50150). Permanent Press.
' ''
•
$26.99 Solid Color
Comforters
At A Pretty Solid Value.
Bv Wbiting.
A rescue call went out Monday
from an Elm Estates resident
concerned about a mallard duck
that had come down in the yard
and stayed, according to Bethlehem's animal control officer,
Scott Anson. The duck, which
had been 'getting bread crumbs
and raisin bran from the family,
went along quietly with Anson,
who took it to Five Rivers
Environmental Education Center.
·
1
Red/Navy at'ailable in Twin size only.
Spedal order on(v.
E
1
$3.99 Shemi-Sheer
Tiers of Elegance / ....,..,
Simple. solid color seeded
mile in 93% Polyester!
7% Cotton. Machine
wash. tumble drv.
Curtains give you 5"
hems, toppers giue you 5' · Mlli!,r;\1'
full ruffles and tiebacks.
Coffee. Dusty Rose, Eggshell. Robin ·s Egg or
White.
Sale ends Wed. 9118
l ' 24". .W ·. .16"
Shop by Phone Toll Free R00-874-7402
Topper
Albany·
Wolf Road S~oppers Park
Delmar
DelaU'are Plaza
15tH)45Y-8}53
(518)4YJ-O!J6
PAGE 6- September 11, 1985- Tho Spotlight
. 24 ..
30"
36"
Balloon Topper• .
Sale
3.99
7.99
Clifton Park
. Clifton Country Mall
f51H).)71-HN
.w·
Valance
SU'ag,
~yait
439-4979
Loo ng to
Finance that
new home?
Balloon Valance •
Reg
110.50
S/1.00
S! 1.50
118.50
I 6.00
Sale
7.99
8.99
9.99
15.99
4.99
mal' he used alone. or mserted
hetu't'en top[ler hafl·es to b!l you use a .1int;le
topper. ami _iust add mlances for addititmal
•va~t~nces
D
s 900
24"
.10"
4 Corners
Qelmar
B
Reg
E
Reg.
5.00
111.00
NOTE: Hard as we try, everv color combination in er•ef1! size is noi alwa}'S
ami/able in er1erv store, hut we lm11 be
bapp_y to obtain "tbe color of_l!OUr choice
for you
LINENS
1/0.00
111.00
s 6.75
113.00
Glens Falls
Aria/ion Mall
(518)71.J3-IIII
Sale
6.99
8.29
8.99
5.49
t0.99
uidtb
c
60"x84" Panel
60''xl7" Valance
New Hartford
SangertoUm Square Mall
(315)724-2109
Reg.
S/3.00
S 8.00
Sale
9.99
6.49
For information and
rates contact:
Ed Cheeseman
Manager-Delmar office
at
439-9988
• .,-;. {! " f .
.;r
eopened variance hearing
rings .out ~ocal
residents
-
.. t·
1
.,
,_"
"' {,"~
T
,-------------------------------------~--~·~#~. ~ ~
Dental offices proposed
for old telephone building
'
• • ,,
'
f· ,., '·
•i .
'
• ' ... "
J'l!~woY.qrk,;r~lep!wpe~s pld switching building located at 23-29
The board,adjourned a hearing
, • Forrna,lly
da~proved, 1 Dame!,
Adams Pl., .D~;!m.~r •. ~P..Paren(ly. h.as. an. ew w.,ne,r a.fter. ne.a..rl.Y.IiV~
1
·
· '
Members of the Olympian on an application from Polsinello and ;· '''Je'llPil'e' ·· · Cicifn piano's..... ,
app.(l~~t~d,n~~
r6~n-:.~
"~'s."~~e,,~.·~~~~;-J;
·.~
ye~.f:~.9t..lyin~g}(~9\?~:lld,J.+'
..
nl
~
•.
__
;
.:
f •.• ~~
·.,1~~,..
~··· ' ,
·Fuels
Inc.
for
a
special
exception·
Association got a
speak
their
minds· to permit extension of an existing vanance to permit a solar additwn' 1 A group..of de!Jtists h~v,<; apJ1\\edfor town approval to establish-,
at Krumkill Road and Marathon
their practice and develop other office space in-the building,,Th~,,,, 1
as the Bethlehem parking area at 90 Delaware Ave.,
Bethlehem Board of. Appeals last week scheduled a public
Elsmere,
a
Citgo
gas
station.
Lane,
Slingerlands.
Appeals reo.pened a
hearing for 8:30p.m. on Sept. 25 to consider the application from
on Arthur G.
Bruce Hyatt, sales manager for
• Formally approved Thomas
Myron Serling, Thomas Decker and Michael Sbutttoni for a
omogian"lls s application for a the applicant, spoke at the anO James Newell's application
variance to establish a dent?l practice in the building.
to permit two additional hearing. Members of the board for a variance to permit the
The telephone company has. had the building on the market for
ing units at 28-30 Olympian
asked about the number of taxis conversion of a two-family house
several
years, but its .size and limited parking in a residential
Slingerlands.
parked at the station.
to a three-family house at Wemple
neighborhood has apparenlty dissuaded severalinterested parties.
The
additional
Rd.,
Glenmont.
building was originally
The board agreed to adjourn
At one point, town officials looked at the building as a possible
to serve as a recreation the hearing until 8 pcm. on Sept. dwelling unit would be used by the
community
center, but gave up the idea because of the telephone
.
for the residents of 25, when the operator of the applicants' mother.
company's asking price.
>lvnnni:1n Estates, a subdivision station might be available to.
answer their questions.
• Instructed DeAngelis to draft
by
Kontogiannis.
a resolution for approving John
a lack of fi~ancial support
The board also held a public R. and Joyce Thomas's variance Mischief charged
from· a BB gun, police said.
the residents, Peter Lynch,
permitting
the
According to Bethlehem police
attorney
representing hearing to consider Sae Yqun application,
,Two 18-year-olds, both of
Chung's application for a variance conversi.en of a garage to a family
reports, each aJso was chit.rged
:onto~:ianmis. said 4 units would
.
Latham,
lace
a
felony
charge
of
from the allowed percentage of lot room and the addition of a new
with nine counts of fourth-degree
his client to retain a
third-degree
criminal
miSchief
in
occupancy to permit an addition garage at 7 Normanside Ave.,
criminal
mischief, a misdemeannable return from his initial
encompassing an existing stoqe Elsmere. The board will ask town connection with damage done last
or. The na·mes of the pair were
Currently,
two
to
16
cars
parked
at
March
3
at 145 Dumbarton Dr., planning consultant
Edward
are allowed in the patio
withheld by police because they
Bethlehem Terrace Apartments,
Delmar.
'
Kleinke
to
review
the
site
and
\-R~esi.dential two-story building.
are
eligible for youihful offender
With ihe addition ~he applicant determine whether or not trees on Blessing Rd. in Slingerlands.
treatment.
.. The clubhouse was never made . would
_The
damage
was
caused
by
pelletsexceed
the alJowed should be removed to improve
ble to us," said Bob Berry,
percentage of lot occupancy by l · traffic safety at the intersection of
>reside11t • of the Olympian
percent.
Chong
said.
the Salisbury Rd. and Normanside
Association. Sev- additional-space would serve as a Ave.
·
·
residents claimed that computer room for his children.
CorltOJliaimis used the building as
No one spoke in opposition to the
• Agreed that they had no
point
for
his
pwposal.
objection
to a change in Harold
Ruth Kirkman
kveloJ>m<mt. "lt was offered. lt'
Berben's plans for construction of
In other ~usiness, the board:
1569 New Scotland Rd.
not completed at that time,
Slingerlands
a
two-family
house
in
Glenmont.
it was· never complefed," said
• Ins tnicted board attorney The board of appeals previously
. The neighborhood leader
439-6671
Donald DeAngelis to draft a approved a variance for Berben to
.all the things that were resolution for the approval of
construct a duplex in the A- .
nrr>mise.rl .never came to fruition.
Hendrick and Irene Collen's Residential zone_.
Berr.y presented· a petition with
application for a non-conforming
signatures of 46 residents
use
change,
permitting an
• Changed the dates of the next
o;/;e~s~~~~~~t ~he _project. Several insurance agency office at 1280 meetings to Sept. 25, Oct. 9 and
0
spoke·· against the ' New Scotland Rd., Slingerlands. Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. The board
·
said they
A carved wooden sign will be · nOrmally meets on the first and
~
allowed at the premises. The third Wednesdays of the month at
board may vote on the resolution · Bethlehem Town Hall.
"'This iS O.ot~ {a personality
-~
'
.
at their Sept. 25 meeting.
contest or a populanty contest,"
• Country and Period · • China
said Lynch.
• Scheduled a public hearing
.Furniture in a
• Glass
The board decided to reopen
for 8:45 p.m. on Sept. 25 to Boosters dance set
• Collectibles
of
Woods
Variety
the July 10 hearing after receiving
consider Robert and Ester 'L.
The.
Bethlehem
Football
an affidavit from Berry, listing the
Deitz's application for a Variance· Boosters will hold their annual
narries of 19 residents within 200
from the required side yiud to dinner dance Saturday, Sept. 28.
Hours: Mon. -Sat. II Till 5:30, Sunday l-5.
feet of the site who were not
permit an addition at 69 Harrison Call Barb Jadick at 439-2463 for
notified of the hearing.
Ave., Delrytar.
information.
P.
1
Antiques at the
Tollgate
.--
.
Normally, persons applying for
a variance submit a signed
affidavit listing all residents
within 200 of their property. The
board clerk sends notice of public
hearing to those residents. Board
Chairman Charles Fritts referred
to the application as ."completely
improper."
.....................................................................................................,.
i~ ~
·
Stonewell
Plaza
~
i
tm
~\ ~ROUTES 85 AND 85A NEW SCOTLAND ROAD. SLINGERLANDS
*~
~
SAVE
20%
,Order your
Imprinted
Christmas
Cards
*~
~
:
~
:
~
:
¢
**
*
DAVIS STONEWELL MARKET
FOR FABULOUS FOOD
439-5398
I
T~e?.~~~~rsC~~~~~~in
HOME OF
1 48
I,
2 48 !
CHICKEN
BONELESS
BREASTS... •
lb. BREASTS...
•
lb.
Nabisco Premium Crackers 1 lb ................•99 ·
.
Fine Fare Apple Sauce so oz .....................99 CENTER-CUT
Harvest of Eden Grapefruit Sections 14 oz.. ...69 CHOPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
•
lb.
7 Farms Mandarin Oranges 11 oz ........... 3/.89 Pork Roasts i~~ .- .... _........ _.. _.. 1.38 lb.
Delmonte lite Freestone Peaches 16 oz .... :.. •79 Country-style Ribs ... , ......... _.... 1.38 lb.
DAIRY
WHOLE Strip Steaks .. _... -.... -. .... ~ . 3.98 lb.
Crowley Homogenized Milk gallon ........ ·.: 1.79 .
PRIME or CHOICE FREEZER BEEF
Crowley Half & Half pints, .... : ................. ~59
F~drequarters ·································· .1 .09 :~·
Crowley Cottage Cheese small & large curd
I es .. ".. .. .. .. .. . CUT & .... " " ....... " 1-29 '
88 Hinds ............... WRAPPED .. .'........ · ..... 1.49 lb.
1 lb
Every
Store
~
*
1· 68 :
8
~
~
:
;
:,
;,
*
:
2 98 lb ...
. 't
.. .
.
Citrus 'ii'i'li' Oran~~~jz~~e;~~~i':::::::::.:: '1. g ~~;UNso.. citu'ci<" ·i·o··~~~.-~ ·~ ·~·~ .. i28 lb~' a
:River Valley Wafflessoz .................. 4/1.00 GROUND ROUND o_R~o.RE,,. ••• 1.58 lb.~·
* River Valley Orange Juice 12
99
28 lb. FREEZER PACKAGE
. a
¢* c t
PRODUCE
.
g'. *
1
9
lb
.
4
**
* arro S ...... •............ " ...... :.. ........ · • •
i
OZ ..•.......•....•
FREEZERWRAPPED23%SAVCNGSOVERREG. PRICE.
JOHNSON
STATIONERS
!*
SHOP WALLACE QUALITY MEATS WHERE LOWER
PRICES AND HIGHER QUALITY ARE #1 439-9390
~
BrOCCOli .................... ~ ......................79
., 0 ·0
·
~ nl ns 3 lbs .................................... .. . ·I5 9
* Bananas........................................33 b.
3 II). Ground Chuck 2 lb. Slab Bacon
21b. London Bro;l
21b. Hoi Dogs
5 lb. Chuck Patties
6lb. Chicken
$44.
a••· Pork chops
aoo. Chuck steak 2 oo. ltalk!n Sausage
Boars Head Bologna .. . . . .. . .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . . .
American Cheese .... BACK TO SCHOOL DELl SPECIALSIII
weaver Chicken Roll ................................
:SB lb. ;
1
~
1.98 lb. :
2.1: ~~· ·*
t.......................................................
-..
-·-· ~!~r:~::~;,.~~;,.~;,.~~~~·~~~~~~~~-~·~~~~~~.~
--' ..i
.
-
~
"·-·
.
.
.......,_ .,._
·
...
-~---"""
.
Tho Spotlight- September 11, 1985-
·-
PAGE 7
Fun in merry old England
By Tania Stasiuk
What do you get when you pack
tpgether eight American high
school kids and ship !hem off to
England on the ·pretense of an,
educational exchan.ge 'trip? ·FUrl,-~
wild times, new friendships, and
sU:rprisingi:y, ~n~ugh, ~a~ g~>a_d ~'!o~~ :1
of cultural education.
.
.
That's what trip coordinator
Elfrieda Textores, Bethlehem
Central High school teacher,
learned. She managed, against all
odds, to get all eight of us - Jeff
Bielfeld, Steve Collander, Mat
Dunmore, Chris Maercklien',
Deirdre McShane, Lisa Vancans,
Chris VroOman, ahd me ·- to
· Europe and back in one piece.
I managed to keep·a pretty good
account of what went ·on during
the four weeks of our stay, ·two
and a half of which we spent at the
homes of our English ex.Change
student/ friends, and the rest spent
trave'iling with the American
group all over England. After the
diafy Nicola Legg (my exchange
partne'I-} PUt in the '!\pr·iriSSueS of
the Spotlight, I thought that an
American view of the British ways
of life might be interesting.
Enough said; here are selected
excerpts.
Wednesday, June 19
We reset our watches and·
touched down· seven hours after
taking off at 10:30 a.m. English
time, 5:30 a.m. American time.
Chris Mantz welcomed ·us all
and we were off to find the blue
rented van that was -to take us
from L·ondon to Cheslyn Hay, our
final destination. We .made it
seen for two months. Nicola and
normal (and legal!) for tw.o
her "Mum" were there; we wasted
sixteen-year-olds to be going out
no time getting into their car and
to the to~n pub, where there was a
driving three miles·to 16 School
very different mixture of people
down a series of ramps to the van, Lane:
than one might find in an Americwhere we· spent fifteen minutes or
Th
II
h
an bar. People of all ages, and in
.
h·
b
e sma namep 1ate over t e
so watc h mgt e cars go yon the d
d'd
"L
,
· 1
fact mostly "senior citizens," were
1
"wrong" side of the road. We had
oor
not say, .:;~g- ~--~Ic_o ~
enj'oying pi'nts' cif lagel'and 1bitter
b
....
·
··
.d
...
b'''
.dater.£.told
me
'thakmany;'
of
the
.
II
a expecte d '~-to:!- e ;-_surpr_J~~ ~, y.;-, :-h-~"···Nllf-"'>:-h' '-' -'. _)~_. . ,.: f :-·o\.._,-,_..,...>:, • - ,.
and iCide_i'-there'.11 A. ·g~ijfe 1 6frda'rts
0
cars on tli·e.;_:,-_.-._,,,1;·,
tefC.ihs.f&~-(hJLthe
Hg.
hr
•.
-~--~"
2.d;
-.,.eh_~,t
_
~.~-~::~~.'.t~aiy
f~-.r~h-i.
_n_~TT.
edh.
.
was,
going' dn irli the·cof-ii'ef"a-hd ~~~·-,__., __ ,:-.<"._'M..~·-:-·.·;;·an ;· ers>was-·one'o:-t em.
e
but what took, more gettmg:used:, ·h'" .',·' '< '·"·. d db· ... .
1
could
think was, "Andy Capp
to was the driver's s·eat ·being On-· ., 9,u~~- \V~,s_sur~~~n e .-Y a sma 11 ,
lives!"
the right in'stead of the Jeft.Ifthere fenced yard with a gorgeous
Friday, June 21
was no passenger in the front, it garden.
Nicola woke'me "at 7:45 with a
looked like there was no driver!
Supper, or "tea" as ihey somebowl of Rice Krispies and . a
Another couple of interesting times_ call it, began around six,
Cheerful
smile. After eating' I
things about English transporta- and I then met the rest of thC. gathered my stuff to get ready for
tion: the cars are much smaller, family: Dad, twenty-one year old
school, which lasts until the
"the trailers on semis are tipped· at Fiona, and the dog, Sally. The
middle of July in England. The
an angle instead of being parallel whole family made me feel right at
bus
(or "coach" as they say)
to the ground, and people drive home from the start - everything
picked us up at the end of the road
they
say
about
British
hospitality
much faster.
at 9 a.m.
is absolute~y trui!
abouta few of the gir.ls managed
At long last, we pulled into 'the
After tea Fiona's boyfriend
to talk to the American guys- and
parking lot pf our friends' school David came _over to take Fiona,
in Cheslyn Hay, and rushed into me, and Nicola out to a typical ·then we went around the complex
the arms of our friends. we hadn't English pub. It was perfectly' for a quick tour. One advarltage I
noticed right off to their system is
that classes are smaller and less
structured. Most of the projects
are· independent studies .
•
A brand new money saving offer
·to all investors from Norstar Bank and
Discount Brokerage Corporation of ·America
Once we got home we had to get
ready for a reception that was
being held at the school for the
~xchange' students and their
"foster families." A photographer
from the local paper was there; he
took three pictures of us as a
group and then about 15 of Nicola
spooning sUgar into a teacup held
by Ainerican Steve Callander. It
was one of those pictures that
made the paper a week later, along_
with a short caption about our
exchange program.
"
KIRSCH
.,
MINhBLINOS' ,,
Custom sizes
1
OVER
50
%
OFF
LINENS
4
Corners
Delmar
qj'Yail
lll:ia 439-497.9
"Norstar Bank and our parent company,
Norstar Bancorp, have purchased Discount
Brokerage Corporation of ~merlca, one of the
largest and oldest discount brokerage firms
in the United States."
200
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I
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NORSTAR
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Il . I •~_.. :"'.·."&]
W"]
Save m0f8 than with other
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NAME
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CITY
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STATE & ZIP
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OS
L-----------~---------------Or for further information·calltoll-free: 1·800·DBC·3939
PAGE 8 - September 11, 1985 -
The Spotlight
@
Cut quick
. and easy
with a
John Deere
Trimmer/
Edger
Cutting grass and weeds is
quick and easy with a John
Deere trimmer/edger. The
rapidly spinning line cuts fast,
without blades. You can cut
under fences, around trees or
shrUbs- in places where
conventional trimmers just
won't work. These trimmers
also mow, edge, sweep, and
weed gardens. Choose from
-·one electric and eight gas:powered models. Stop in and
check them out today.
;..._
JOHN DEERE
$20
H.C. OSTERHOUT
· & SON
Rt. 143 West of Ravena, N.Y.
Phone 756-6941
Winter Hours: Mon.-Fri 8:00·5:00
Sat. 8:00-12:00
"
on this trip - we really did learn
something about foreign life. I'd
love to do it again. If you ever get
the chanc~ ·to get first-hand
experience of life in a foreign
country, do it! It will be an
experience you'll treasure for the
rest of your life.
After we got home, I had a few
the American kids come over,
and I tried to make batch of
orowr11e; but in England they use
ms instead of cup and table-
a
con:~~~ 6 tried. to, cq~,vert o_ur
merifa!J. r~~ipes anq_ were_ s·on_:e_-.r_.
~PF~~~~_(ul._.but it ~~sn.'t,e~sy1 ~_
'.
J'•
)
!'
i
Our group then went on to
Stratford-Upon-Avon, the home
of Shakespeare. The town was
with sightseers, and the
thing seemed very touristy
to us. Weather was once again
"typically English" c already we
had learned that it's safest to bring
an umbrella with you wherever
When Nicola and I got back
home we decided to go for walk
that circled around Shareshill.
Along the way we stopped in an
old farmhouse- and don't forget
that "old" in England means 400 or
500, not !50 years old. The man
and his wife who lived there
showed us around. We saw things
you Would never 'notice on large
touristy tours, like the.meat hooks
in the living room- ceiling, the
bf:igipal-stoves an_d stairs, Old
millsfOneS ·ill thC..Jga'rden, and
photographs of the family dating
back to the early J9oo·s.
a
I~,
"-.:;1
,j \.·
Monday, June 24
This •morning we made a onehour trip to lronbridge, a town
centered around its ·namesake- an
i-ron bridge. The bridge was in fact
the first of its kind. in the world,
and is now the center of nine
different museums - we saW four
besides the bridge itself.
The first was called Blists Hill
Open Air Museum, which was
really a restored town from the
late 1800's .. Next it was on to the
Coalport China Museum, where
they displayed some ·gorgeous
handffiade pottery, china. and
glass. It was only a short walk to
the next museum, the Tar Tunnel
Mine. We had to put on fluorescent orange mining hats and
crouch down a 200-yard-long
tunnel to see a small tar-pit;
anYom: even slightly claustrophobic couldn't have made it
down.
GIANT
INDOOR
Market
Town Squire
Plaza
'• J
hem Police Department. Citizens
who wish to have such cards may
obtain them from the state De-partment of-Motor Vehicles. The
cards are available for persons 18 ....
or older who do not have a driver's
-license.
Bethlehem police said they have
issued 750 I D cards since the
service was begun in 1978.
Gym reopens
The Women's Gym, which
specializes in exercise programs
for _pregnant women,.is reopening
for
fall classes during the week of
M-1, the equivalent of the New York Thruway. A
The visiting Ameri'cans 'had a long first day in
Sept. 23.
replacement
van
got
them
to
Cheslyn
Hay.
England when their hired van broke down on the
The gym is owned and operated
by Tina Rosen of Delmar and is
Last of all was the Museum of as he had relatives in San Fran- · do. Although we only spent two under the supervision of her
and a half weeks with our foster ,husband, Dr. Jeffrey D. Rosen, a
Iron, with clear history back- cisco.
Obstetriciangrounds in front of _touchable
We made it back to the road to families, we had all grown to fit in board-certified
displays. We especially liked the Bourton-on-the-water, a small and Jove each other. The exchange Gynecologist. It offers pre-natal
post-partum
workout
huge iron cauldrons and ship town in the center of the Cots- eventually worked out well for all and
of
us;
most
wished
it
could
have
programs.
figureheit.ds that were on display. Wolds. There was a tiny miniature
· village, built to scale as the.model laste.d longer.
Pre-registration will be held at .Friday, June 28
The
rest
of
our
trip
was
very
of
the
town,
there.
The
rilodels
are
the
gym, 104 Hackett Blvd,.,
·This morning the Americans
were picked up to go to London. made of the same sandstone that different from our stay in Cheslyn Albany, Sept. 14 and 15 from 2 to
Hay. Although we saw more of 4 p.m.
·
En route we stopped to look at the Cotswo.ld houses are famous
the
country
on
the
10-daytour,
we
forsome
of
the
actual
houses
are
Blenheim Castle, Where the Duke
didn't learn as muc~ about the
of Marlboro resides for six more than 800 years old.
British people and their way of
In Feura Bt;Jsh The Spotlight is
months out of the year. Driving in
Wednesday, June 3
life.
Our
school
got
the
better
of
us
.
sold at Houghtaling's Market
Mum, Dad, and Nicola took me
London is worse than in New
York City because the streets out to see Bronte Country today
aren't set up in square blocks. (Home of the famous Bronte
While trying .to find a parking sisters, who wrote Wuthering
place we passed Hyde Park, Heights and Jane Eyre). In the
Trafalgar Square. and Buck- Brontes' home town, Nicola and I
ingham Palace; instant guided visited the authors' vicarage, and
tour of the City.
then walked down the touristy
Lisa, Deirdre, and I hit the village lane.
Thurs.day, June 4
streets looking for -fashion barThe entire class took the day off
gains. The shops are either exfrom school to go to the Univer~remely chic and expensive br
Shoe Drop Locations
cluttered and dirty and expensive, sity in Warrick.
·Adams Hardware
Guilderland Dry Cleaners
just like New Y ark.
While we were there Lisa and I
Delmar
Star
Rt. 155 & 20
watched a ga·me of cricket- British
Saturday, June 29
Mum woke me a( eight this baseball. They used .the bat to hit
morning to see the Cotswolds, a the ball backwards (in the same
4 Corners
small part of northern England. direction it is pitched at them),
Delmar
En route we found a true vi-llage and the ball bounces once before
439-1717
pub for lunch and had the Plough- the batter hits it. Different!
Delmar Bootery
wishes Kathy
a Happy 40th
Birthday!
iihe 1llrlmar
faootery
man's lunch, a farmer's traditional
lunch that usually consists of
bread, salad, cheese, and fruit.
The bartender there was friendly
and eager to talk to an American
Sunday, July 7
Tod~y we began our 10-day
tour of the country. Saying
goodbye at the school was one of
the hardest things I've ever had to
Route 9-W'
Glenmont, N.Y.
.OPEN
Every Saturday & Sunday 9~5
This is the New location of the
:::>1:.1-L U.S.
PRIME BEEF
HOURS: MON.-I;RI. 9-6
SAT. 8-5
CANNING SEASON
ARE YOU READY?
Prices effective thru 9/14/85
'
WE ARE!
SWIFTS BONELESS
BALL MASON CAPS/DOME LID
BALL MASON CANNING JAR
CHUCK
CHUCK
FILLET
ROAST
SIRLOIN
STEAK
Sl7!
Sl~!
S33!
DELl-DEPT_
J LBS- OR MORE
U.S. PRIME COOKED
ROAST BEEF
JAR OPENER
JAR WRENCH
CANNING WAX
CANNING FUNNEL
S39!
s,
SIDES
51 4!.
HINDS
&,!
COOKED TO OUR
PERFECTION
I
WHOLESALE CUTS
!K·Mart Shopping Plaza!
E~_st
·• ..
Photo identification cafds will
no longer be issued by the Bethle- ·
FLEA
·..
-~'
_I' I '
Photo IDs-,, __downtown
j;_;-_.j.. t· ' ' '
•
Sunday, June 23
,Parents and exchange students
II re~axed during a one-hour long
rip to Warwick castle .. The castle
fantastic: Huge an'd built of
tones - everything I'd ever
We investigated· the
rOIP<<J-o''' furnished rooms, where
original furniture was kept,
also the stone to~ers we had '
'
!
~
A. Phillips Hardware
292 CENTRAL AVE., ALBANY, N.Y.
235 DELAWARE AVE., DELMAR, N.Y.
OSBORNE CORNERS, ALTAMONT, N.Y.
2B1 SAND CREEK RD., COLONIE. N.Y.
RT. 9. CLIFTON PARK. N.Y.
inc.
465·8861
439·9943
861-5364
438·2484
371-9500
BOTTOM
WITH EYE
TOP
ROUND
TOP
SIRLOIN
$
1 7 ....9
COUNTRY
BACON
,s 1 59,L
ITALIAN
SAUSAGE
515!
Greenbush J:lca,Mac~et·
TheSpotlight- September 11, 1985- PAGE 9
•
Town board reviews
mining operations
Mining at the former Tall
Timber golf course - and the
extent of the town's involvement
m th~ apprOVal process dominated last week's New
Scotland Town Board meeting.
Although the board had
planned no discussion of the
controversial plan . by Voorheesville Sand and Stone to mine
27 acres of the "back nine" of the
golf course off Hilton Rd. near Rt.
. . , 85A, the matter came up w~en a
neighbor urged that the town
refuse to issue the necessary
zoning approval fof the mining to
take place. That led. to further
comments by several Democratic
candidates on the town's role in
dealing with future ffiining
applicatiOns.
Voorheesville Sand and Stone
, has already received its mining
permit from the state Department
of Environmental Conservation,
but must still obtain a variance
from the tOwn before starting
work. The Planning Board has
already
held two informal
hearings on the matter, but has
not yet set a public hearing that
would be necessary before final
approval.
James Eberhardt of Hilton Rd.
.,; presented the board with a
statement arguing that the low
_· ~ensity· reside~tial zoning at Tall
Timber. was neVer intended to
·permit the sort of large:...scale
. mining planned by the applicant.
"As the applied-for use does not
exist,
the
application
was
. accepted in· error," Eberhardt
wrote. He urged the town to
return the applicatiOn and take
another look at the zoning code.
[
NEW SCOTLAND
Robert Mudge, .the Democratic
candidate for town supervisor,
suggested that the town set up art
environmental council. similar to
the vOorheesville council that he
helped establish. It Is clear, he
said, that New Scotland nee'ds to
beconie
familiar
with
the
of
the
· State
workings
Environmental Quality Review
Act (SEQRA), which gives
localities certain controls over
new projects but also imposes
limits on what can be done to stop
them.
In this case, Mudge said later,
the town faces a deadline fpr
making a decision ... They're going
to get bombed by time," he said.
The board, with Supervisor
Steve Wallace abseni due to
minot
surgery,
referred
Eberhardt's
statement
and
Mudge's comments
to the
planning board.
,In other action, the town board:
Among the attractions at the
Good Samaritan Nursing Home'S
"Super Celebration" Saturday
were tethered balloon rides
conducted by pilot Cyrithia
Wilson of Delmar. Stuart Beyer
was in charge of making sur.e that
things stayed iri control. At left, a ·
few of the booths and games at the
celebration of the Delmar nursing
Jeff
home's tenth anniversary.
Gonzr;/ez
··
• Received a petition with
signatures from 10 families asking
for a reduction of th~ speed limit
on Pangburn Rd. from 50 lo 35
m.p.h.
·'
Dance fun night
The Silver Bullets Square
Dance Club will host a •. free
Western square dance fun night at
Bethlehem Town Hall, Wednesday,·Sept. IS,'·fro\n·7:30•io:9:30
p.rri:f) •1i'{.t.h .J!U;d :Jrfj rfJJ'I/
o Opened 38 bids for the sale
of two used trucks and a backhoe .
High bidders were $725 and
$3,276 forthe trucks and $2,757
for the backhoe. The board may
hold a special meeting later this
month to award the bids.
OLD FASHIONED SERVICE
c::::;;c--WITH
:~
Jl'1'1inbTm ' _,, 0
TRI-VILLAGE AREA
DIRECTORY- '
--~
uJ•"
~-
.
OLD FASHIONED VALUE
Delivery since June missed
many vacationers .
AND QUALITY
.
, i
Instr-uctor Duane 1::. Silver of
·
··
. _I,··. - .,) '·'u'l '''
Delmar,
.wlll,
call the
dance:
··
'--'
' ' • - ' .JU.I~ · .._l)d(".
'
If you have not received your
1985-86 issue, call 439-9976 for
delivery within our Tri-Vill(lge.
CALL BETWEEN 9:00 & 4:30p.m. WEEKDAYS
;
IDEO TAPES
/
Sales & Rentals
HEATH'S
DAIRY
DELIVERS:
NO CLUB TO JOIN
-.$2.00 RENTAL
*****
·----------Milk, butter, eggs, cheese and bread directly to your home.
Convenient, Time~saving and Reasonable
465-2253
******
For information about delivery call
Open 7 Days A Week
463-1721
or visit the store on 9W and Wemple Rd. 6 a.m.-9 p.m.
LINCOLN
PHARMACY
300 MORTON AVE., ALBANY
HEATH'S DAIRY
SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1920
PAGE 10- September 11, 1985- The Spotlight
(plus deposit)
.......... ..,~·~ , .... _ . ...... ,.:;.,,.,..,; ' * ' .
... -..... ~~-···"'"·--··
·~
(Corner of Delaware) 6 min. from the 4 Corners
.
. ... _ .... •··
-· .... -. . -----.......
.............
'
,•
.
~
.
' , .
• _,
•
~
,_ .. ;
I.'·
. . . . _._ ...... 't-4-11-11••--- ....... ~..
.-
•
Chicken barbecue Saturday
The New Scotland
Kiwanis
Club invites the pUblic to come on
down to their annual chicken
barbecue to be held this Saturday
from 4 to 7:30 p.m. at the New
Scotland Presbyterian Church on
VooRitEEsvillE ,
NEws Nons
Lyn Stapf 765-2451
New Scotland· Rd. Dinner will include garden fresh salad, potato,
the TenEyck family, located
across from the Indian Ladder
Farm, will be provided, while
guests partake of the open bar and
appetizers. New Scotland Democratic Chairman Thomas Dolin
will also be on hand.
Those wishing to obtain tickets,
which cost $10 per person and $16
per couPle, may contact either
Tom Dolin at 765-4085, Dick
Decker at 439-520 lor Mike Burns
at 765-4390.
to do the same neXt week as the
grade school holds its annual
Corn on-the-cob, rolls, ~orne­ Parents' Night programs.
made pies and cakes, beverages
This year the open house
and one-half chicken. Tickets are
evenings
will feature two over$5.50 for adults and $3.50 for
lapping
grade
level meetings each
children and may be purchased at
the door or from any Kiwanis night instead of only one as in the
past. The format for each evening
member.
. Register for co.ntinuing ed
will begin at 7:15 p.m. with 45
Those who missed the in-person
Those who would prefer takeminutes for the first grade level,
out may order their meal by divided between the- student's registration for the continuing
calling 439-6454. Proceeds from homeroom, reading and math education program sponsored by
the event will go towards main- classes. From 8 p.m. until 8;30 the Voorheesville Central School
district may still register by mail
taini· .g the many community
p.m. a general session will be held
this week. Registnltion forms,
sen: ...:es provided by the Kiwanis,
in the auditorium for both grade
including the monthly blood levels, followed at 8:30p.m. by the accOmpanied by registration fees
pressure clinic, summer band, second grade level meeting" in the should be sent to Jim Hladun,
director; Continuing Education
youth soccer, grasshopper baseclassrooms.
Program, Voorheesville Central
ball and softball, pee wee wrestThe ;chedule: Wednesday, School, Voorheesville, NY 12186.
ling, Memorial Day races, holiday
baskets for those in need, as well Sept. 18, grade l, 7:15 to 8:30
Classes begin the week of Sept.
as a host of other local programs p.m., grade 2, 8 to 9:15 p.m:,
16 and include such interesting
such as those for handicapped Thursday, Sept. 19, grade 3, 7:15 offerings as microwave cooking,
youth and substanc~ abuse educa- to 8:30 p.m., grade 4, 8 to 9:15 creative writing, iniroduction to
tion supported by the men. All are p.m.; Monday, Sept. 23, grade 5, computers, and resume developeinvited to support this major 7:15 to 8:30p.m., grade 6, 8 to9: 15 ment and interview strategies.
p.m.; Thursday, Sept. 26, Kinderfund raiser of the group.
Those who would like a brochure
garten, chapter l, ECI A and gifted
or more information should call
and talented programs, 7:30 to
And Southbound too
the high school at 765-3314.
Those interested in entertain- .8:30p.m.
Next to new clothing
ment Saturday night are welcome
Those parents who would like
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
to attend the Southbound concert
to become more involved in the
New Scotland Elks will be holding
to benefit the Voorheesville Fire
general programs at the "elemena
next-to-new clothing sale this
Dept. Doors at the Fire House on
tary school are invited to join the
Saturday, Sept. 14, from 9 a.m. to
, School Rd. will open at 8 p.m.
Elementary School Advisory 4 p.m. on the lodge premises on
. with the band playing from 9 p.m.
Committee. Those interested may
Main St. Proceeds of this event
until midnight. The $10 per
contact principal Donna Grant at
will go towards the building fund
person donation includes beer,
765-2382
of
the lodge now located in the
soda and snacks as well as a
former
post office building.
performance by the area's rising
Homecoming's next
All
are
invited to stop by.
new stars. Advance sale of tickets
With the very successful Com- Anyone wishing to may donate
will take place on one night onlyThursday, Sept. 12, from 7 p.m.
munity Day behind them, the clothing and crafts to the ladies:
until 10 p.m. at the fire house. coordinators of the Thomas Donations may be left off at the
After that time tickets will only be Buckley Fund are beginning to lodge.
available at the door-providing; plan for the upcoming home,
pf course, that any are remaining~ coming weekend to be held Oct.
Booths available
Tickets will be available on a first11 and 12. Besides the dedication
Crafttrs and vendois: are still
come-first-serve basis, sO interest- of· the field on Oct. 12, the needed · for the First Beautiful
ed parties are urged to get there weekend will include a barnfire Downtown Voorheesville Benefit
early. Only 300 tickets are avail- and possibly a dance. Those Day, according to co.chairmen
interested in assisting with this Anne Cossac and Sue Williams.
able.
project are invited to attend a Everyone is welcome to sign up
The proceeds will be used
towards the convention to be meeting on Monday, Sept. 16, at 7 for a booth to help benefit the
March of Dimes on Sept. 21.
hosted by the fire department in p.m. at the high schooL
Those interested in taking part in
the fall of 1987.
the block party at the Prospect St.
Democrats hold party
The ladies auxiliary would also
end
of Main St. should call Cossac
to
meet
Those
who
would
like
like to thank the public for
at
765-2975
or 765-2603 or Wilcandidates
for
the
upcoming
supporting their pancake breakfast held on Labor Day weekend. election in the Town of New liams at 765-4099.
Chairman Barbara Stone an- .Scotland are invited to attend a
Auxiliary dinner
nounces that the gas grill was won cocktail party sponsored by the
Democratic Committee to be held
The Voorheesville American
by Donna Welker.
on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 5 p.m. Legion Ladies Auxiliary will hold
until 7 p.m. at the Biscone home their first meeting of the year this
Parents night
Thursday, Sept. 12 at the ItalianNow that students at the el- on Altamont Rd. During the
American Community Center on
ementary school have 'met their evening, tours of the historic
teachers their parents are invited ·home, formerly the main house of Washington Ave. Extension. The
Science coordinator Don Otterness sports an umbrella as he and
Assistant Principal Betty Singer welcome children outside the
Voorheesville Elementary School for the first day of classes
Lyn Stapf
Thursday.
meeting to honor the auxiliary
chapter members will begin with
dinner at 7 p.m. and will celebrate
the 40th birthday of the group.
call the Human Concerns Committee at 765-2373.
lmerial®
Cheese day Thursday
A cheese day will be held this
Thursday, Sept. 12, at St. Matthew's in Voorheesville from ·10
a.m. until 2 p.m. Only cheese will
be distributed this month, with a
few staples of limited supply
provided by St. Matthew's Human Concerns Group.
All those eligible-on unemployment, WICS, social security, HEAP or other such programs~are welcome to come.
Those having any question should
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Consistent Quality
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Custom Framing
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439-7913
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12054
Open T-F 10-5 Sat. 10-12
INDIAN ·LADDER FARMS
It's that time again!
Pick your own Macs
Starting September 14th
• Fresh Baked Goods
• Cider
@capital~$
"'"""'""CARS
-
Aulllorozld-
765-2956
• Pears
• U-Pick-Haspberries
Market Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9-6
Sun. 10-6
(2 miles west of Voorheesville Rt. 156)
S•le• • Service • Ln1lng • Part•
ile. 9W, Glenmont, (51&) 463-3141
The Spotlight- September11,19BS- PAGE 11
Town of -Bethlehem, Town Board
second and fourth Wednesdays at 7:30
p.m. Board of Appeals, first and third
Wednesdays at 8 p.m. Planning Board,
first and third Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m.,
Town Hall, 445 Delaware Ave. Town
offices are open 8:30a.m. to 4:30p.m.
T?wn of New Scotland, Town Board
meets first Wednesday at 8 p.m.,
Planning Board second and fourth
Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m., Board of
Appeals meets when necessary, usually Fridays 8t 7 p.m. Town Hall, At.
85.
.
Village of Voorheesville, Board of
Trustees, fourth Tuesday at 8 p.m.,
Planning Commission, third Tuesday
at 7 p.m., Zoning Board, second and
fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m. when agenda
warrants, Village Hall, 29 Voorheesville
Ave.
/
Bethlehem Board of Education meets
first and third Wednesdays of each
month at 8 p.m. at the Educational
Services Center, 90Adams Pl., Delmar.
Ravena-Coeymans-Selkirk Board of
Education meets the first and third
Mondays of each month at 8 p.m. at the
board offices, Thatcher St., Selkirk.
Voorheesville Board of Education
meets second Monday of each month,
7:30 p.m. at the district offices in the
high school, Rt. 85A, Voorheesville.
Bethlehem Landfill open at 8 p.m. to 4
p.m. Monday-Saturday, closed Sundays .and holidays. resident permit
required; permits av~ilable at at town
hall, Elm Ave. Park office and town
garage, Elm Ave. East.
New Scotland Landfill open 9 a.m.-4
p.m. Saturdays only. Resident permit
required, permits available at town
hall:
Bethlehem. Recycling, town garage,
119 Adams St. Papers should be tied,
cans flattened, bottles cleaned with
metal and plastic foam removed.
l!.JeSday and Wednesday 8 a.m.-noon;
Thursday and Friday noon-4 p.m.,
·Saturday 8 a.m.-noon.
Food Pantry, Selkirk and South Bethlehem area. Bethlehem Reformed
Church, At. 9W, Selkirk, call 767-2243,
436-1!289 or 767-2977.
Project Hope, preventive program for
adolescents and their families, satellite
offices for Bethlehem-Coeymans, 7672445.
Project Equinox, Delmar Satellite
office, professional counseling for
substance abuse problems, all contact confidential. By appointment, call
434-1!135.
American Legion, meets first Mondays
at Blanchard Post 1040, Poplar Dr.,
Elsmere, 8 p.m.
League of Women Voters, Bethlehem
unit, meets monthly at the Bethlehem
Public Library, 9:15 a.m. Babysitting
\I
.
'
/,
ILl
r~I .
I
lL
---
Half Moon Button Club, meeting with
Marilyn Abraham presenting program
about "Clowns and the Circus," all
welcome, Bethlehem Public Library,
Delmar, noon.
TitEl. · .
SpoYIG11T
Tr1-Village Welcome Wagon,coffee for
women newcomers and new mothers,
at home of Laurie Hawley, Delmar, 7:30
p.m. Reservations, 439-5058."
Events in Bethlehem and New Scotland
":r
Village Stage,'.moi1thly mem~erShip.
meeting, ·· with
Judy
Spevack
presenting lesson on basic acting
techniqueS,- Bethlehem Central High
School auditorium, 7:3~ p.m.
available. For information, call Kay
Valentino at 439-9686.
FISH, Tri-Village 24-hour-a-day voluntary service year 'round, offered by
residents Of Delmc;~r, Elsmere and
Slingerlands to help their neighbors in
any emergency, 439-35'18.
Bethlehem Senior Citizens, dinner at
Three Brothers Restaurant, Glenmont.
Reservations, 439-4955.
Bethlehem Youth Employment Service, Bethlehem Town Hall, Monday
through Friday, 1:00-4:30 p.m. Call
439-2238.
Farmers' Market,. at First United
Methodist Church, 421 Kenwood Ave.,
Delmar, 3-6:30 p.m. information, 4391450.
Assemblyman Larry Lane's district
office, 1 Becker Terr., Delmar, open
Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
THURSDAY
Laleche League of Delmar, meets one
Thursday each month to share
breast-feeding experiences, 8 p.m. For
meeting schedule and breast-feeding .
information call 439-1774.
SEPTEMBER
Bethleh.em Channel Cablecast, Tae
Kwon Do: martial Arts the Korean Way,
part 10, 7 p.m.; Cooperative Extension:
Handivan Plumbing; 7:30p.m.
Voter Registration: You may vote in
New York State if you are a U.S. citizen,
a resident of the county, city o.rvillage
for 30 days preceding the election, and
registered with county Board of
Elections. Mail registration forms can
be obtained at town and village halls,
from political parties, from the League
of Women Voters and from boards of
election. The completed form must I"
received by your Board of Electiom
the first Monday in October. lnfot
mation, Albany County Board of
Elections, 445-7591.
Auxiliary, Voorheesville American
Legion dinner meeting at ItalianAmerican Community Center, 7 p.m.
For reservations by Sept. 6, call Esther
Schultz, 765-2520.
"New York: A Wonderful Town,"
presented by Mary Lou Bartalotta,
regional tourism director, state Dept.
of Commerce, sponsored by Friends of
the Library, Bethlehem Public Library,
Delmar, 7:30 p.m. Information, 4393339.
New ScoH11,nd Kiwanis Club; Thursdays, New Scotland Presbyterian
Church, At. 85, 7 p.m.
Bethlehem Senior Citizens, meet every
Thursday at Bethlehem Town Hall, 445
Delaware Ave., Delmar, 12:30 p.m.
Welcome Wagon, newcomers and mothers of infants, call 785-9640 for a
Welcome Wagon visit. Mon.-Sat. 8:30
a.m.-6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
11
Bethlehem Archaeology Group, provides regular volunteers with excava:.. "
tion and laboratory experience ·at v1
Tuesday, Thursday and Satu~day:3
meetings. Call 439-4258 fo'r.c.niore.r
information..
·i~·..;,.,..,O
bnuQdt;.h:o~oa
New· scotland Dtimocratlc SOcial Cii.Jb, '·I
secOnd Thursday, 8 p.m.. o~:; ;;. r:lOQ>/
SEPTEMBER'
Bethlehem Garden Club, meeting at
Bethlehem Public Library, 1 p.m.
information, 439-1386.
Channel
Cablecast,
Bethlehem
Storytelling with Dorothy Lovelock,
10:30 a.m.; Readings for the visually
impaired, 4-7 p.m.; Astrology with
Judith Longley, 7:30p.m.
St. Thomas Altar Rosary Society,
membership tea, .with Christine Deyss
speaking about parenting, all parish
women welcome, St. Thomas School
auditorium, Delmar, following 7 p.m.
Mass.
12
Writer Mark GerzoD will discuss
· current heroes and the meaning of
heroism in a nuclear age at a
public forum Sept. 18 at 8 p.m. in
the Foy Campus Center at Siena
r~r
area arts
\II
I
A capsule listing of cultural events easily accessible to Bethlehem·
New Scotland residents, provided as a commmunity service by the
General Electric Co. plastics plant Selkirk.
I
College. This is the first of three
public forums dealing with gender
and violence scheduled by the
college for this fall.
Soccer Clinic, sponsored by BCHS
Soccer Booster Club·, all welcome,
Bethlehem Central High School,·room
46, 7:30p.m.
Second Mllers Association, of TriVillage area retirees, meeting with
Mark Gardner speaking about fixed
income investing, Fellowship Hall,
First United
Methodist Church,
Kenwood Ave., Delmar, noon.
Alcoholism Talk, view of alcoholism as
disease will be Presented by Susan
Faulkner, C.A.C., Bethlehem Public
Library, 7:30p.m. Free.
Delmar .Fire Oep"t:' lad·l;a·· AU'xnlarY~1 ~
regular meeting second Thursday of J
every month except August, at the fire
house, 8 p.m ..
Bethlehem Memorial V.F.W. Post3185,
meets second Thursday of each
month, post rooms, 404 Delaware Ave.,
Delmar. Information, 439-9836.
Elsmere Fire Company, meets second
Tuesday of each month at the fire
house, Poplar Dr., Elsmere, 8 p.m. '
Overeaters
Anonymous,
meeting
every Thursday at First .United
Methodist Church, Kenwood Ave.,
Delmar, 7 p.m.
Govemment Cheese Distribution, St.
Matthew's Church, Mountain View St.,
Voorheesville, 10 a.m.; Bethlehem
Food Pantry, 445 Delaware Ave.,
Delmar, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Onesquethaw Reformed Church, TerryTown Rd.,
Feura Bust), 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
I
T"'!EATER
ART
"Cyrano De Bergerac," Edmund Rostand's tragic epic of
unrequited love, Proctor's Theatre, Schenectady, Sept. 17,8 p.m.
Tickets, 346-6204.
·
"Contemporary Sculpture at Chesterwood, exhibit displayed at
summer estate of Daniel Chester French, sculptor of Lincoln
Memorial, Chesterwood Museum, Stockbridge, Mass., through
Oct. 31. Open daily 10 a.m.:5 p.m.
"li'lner light: The Shaker Legacy," black-and-white photographs
-by Linda Butler. documenting Shaker vision, Albany Institute of
History and Art, 125 Washington Ave., Albany, through Nov. 3.
Alumni art show, College of Saint Rose, PicotteGallery,324 State
St., Albany, through Oct. 11.
"The First Hundred Years of Forever: A Forest Preserve
Centennial," State Museum, Empire State Plaza, Albany, through
Nov. 3.
!
Historical exhibits of the Mohawks, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga,
Seneca and Tuscarora tribes, Schoharie Museum of the Iroquois
indian. off At. 30, north of Schoharie, through Oct. 31.
Information, 295-6553.
_
"Let Paper Speak," works by Eileen Verno and lnge Panko,
Hudson Valley Community College, through Sept. 30.
"Saratoga Horse Racing Exhibition," Soave Gallery, 449
Broadway, Saratoga Springs, through Sept. 29..
"Maine-ly Tin," exhibit of painted tinware produced during early
1600's in Stevens Plains, Maine, Museum of Historical Society of
Early American Decoration, 19 Dove St., Albany, through
December.
"Electric City Eclectic," exhibit by members of Visual Artists
Critique Alliance, Schenectady Museum. through Sept. 29.
Exhibit of paintings by Tony Reinemann, The Albany Academy,
through Oct. 4.
"Funny Girl," The Mac-Haydn Theatre, Chatham, Sept. 11-15.
Tickets, 392-9292.
MUSIC
Adirondack Percussion Ensemble, Recital Hall, State University
at Albany, Sept. 14,8 p.m. Tickets. 442-3997. Capitol Chamber
Artists, present concert ofTelemann, Viv'aldi, Kastle, Brahms and
Barber, Page Hall, State University at Albany, Sept 12, 8 p.m.
Tickets. 469-0507.
Vladimir Ussachevsky joins Catskill Conservatory Brass Quintet,
Rensselaerville Institute, Rensselaerville, Sept. 15,4 p.m. Tickets,
797-3763.
DANCE
"Dancin'," Proctor's Theatre, Schene.:::tady, Sept. 10 th;ough
15 (Tues.-Fri. 6 p.m.; Sat. 2and 6p.m.; Sun. 2and 7 p.m.). Tickets,
346-6204.
GENERAL
e
ELECTRIC
•
I I I
~. CHANNEl
Spec1al On LWJ 1111 lS
• The Bounder : A Tale of the ·unexpected
Thursdav. 10 p.m.
• Great Performances: The Four Seasons (a
WMHT simulcast)
Friday, 10 p.m.
• The Nature of Things
Saturday, 8 p.m.
• Innovation: Get the Plcturel
Sunday, 10 p.m.
• America at Risk: A History of Consumer Protest
Monday, 10 p.m.
Nova: Bab'/ Talk
Tuesday, p.m.
Owens·Corning Fiberglas supports
public television for a better community.
SELKIRK, NEW YORK 12158
An Equal Opportunity Employer
PAGE 12.:.. September 11, 1985- The Spotlight
17
OWENS/CORNING
Owens-Corning is Fiberglas
FIBERGLAS
......... ®
·I
I
Glenmont Homemakers, third WedParents
Night,
Voorheesville
Women's Retreat, with "Building
nesday, Selkirk Fire House No. 2,
Elementary School, grade 3, 7:15-8:30
Biblical Relationships" as theme,
p.m.; grade 4, 8-9:15 p.m.
Camp pinnacle, Voorheesville, Sept.
Glenmont Ad .. 8 p.m.
SEPTEMBER
SEPTEMBER
Bethlehe_m Lions Club, meets first and
"Nursing and Health Care," slide show
20.:.21. Reservations, 399-5700.
third ·wednesday of month, Starlite
and
discussion,
led
by
June
Bethlehem Channel Cablecast, A
Bethlehem Channel Cablecast, A Restaurant Ill, At. 9W, Glenmont, 7
Champney of Visiting_ Nurse Assn.,
Children's Storytime, 10:30 a.m.; Real
Recovery, Inc., self-help for former
men~_?!tmm~~~.eyg.~<!.t.~osewithchronic
Puppet' Workshop,
10:30
a.m.; p.m.
_
Bethlehe_m Public- Library,_ 7:30 p.m.
George's Backroom, 7:30p.m.; Jazz:
n.e~vg,!;J_s;~;~):fl:\Se(!f,~~-b'n.U~d~~~O.i ,pol~rsations, with_KristyR.eynoldsof Bethl.o.hem Elks. Lodge 2233 meets at
Information, 439-9.314.
Live from Bethlehem II, 8 p.m.
od1st, 428 [email protected]~o.gp~ :')Ylt:itsPeJH2~-f·. .-n Fol nmages, 7:30p.m.
h
~Hn l~ge, [lt~..~44... Ce~ar Hill, 8 p.m. first
55 .Alive ~lure Driving Course,
Weekly at 12:30 p.m.
Bo
Discussion Group, wm·~nslder Oa•d tht(a <Weci>i~l!dayslt\at\slr\t~8Pr¢'s'\lri!l>)j;'b&:'Jl~hlehem AARP and
...
. ·•
S.Al:t,JRDA'( ,,
October, St. Thomas the Apostle .•-,.,.PubliC Library, 7:30p.m. Reglstratl9n.. Eastern Star, first and third WedneBetHlehem t<:>wn ~all, sept. 19-20, 1-4
.
~
. . 'I' . .
') ·.
I
..... ·A
Church, Delmar, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
439-9314.
sdays at Masonic Temple, Kenwood
p.m.._ ~~0 r!f%1str.~}.l;~~~·1 4~'t3~1~. ~.!"->
s.EP.TEMaER . .
·.. : ~ lli ~;'
Chicken Barbecue, put on by _John
Bethlehem AARP, meeting with Anne Ave., Delmar, 8 p.m. • ·
20th Anniversary Celebration,., for'
2-~
Trt-VIIIage Squares, square •dancen'./
Geurtze at Glenmont. Community
Rogan speaking about nutrition, First Delmar Fire District, regular meetings. Bethlehem
Historical
Assn.,
lessons for beginners, with club
United Methodist Church, Kenwood third
Wednesdays, Delmar Fire
Normanside Couritry Club, 5:30p.m.
Church, Weiser St. and Chapel La.,
members demonstrating basic steps,
Ave., Delm-ar, 12:30 p.m.Station, 7:30p.m.
Bethlehem Channel Cablecaat, Tae
Glenmont, $6 and $3 admission, 5-7
First United Methodist Church, 428
p.m. Reservations by Sept. 9, 439-3870
Tri-VIIIage Welcome Wagon, luncheon Capital Dlstrlc·t Fannerl' Market,
Kwon Do: Martial Arts the Korean Way,
Kenwood Ave., Delmar, 7-9 p.m.
or 434-0818.
at
Normanside
Country
Club, Wednesdays through summer, First
part 10, 7 p.m.; Cooperative Extension
Meet-the-Candidates
Night,
QUILT, Ouilters United In Learning
Salisbury
Rd.,
Delmar,
noon. United
Methodist
Church,
421
Handivan Plumbing, 7:30p.m.
Scotland
sponsored
by
New
Together, meeting at First United
Reservations, 439-e;>154.
Kenwood Ave., Delmar, 3-6:30 p.m.
Democratic
Committee,
Viscone 11 ~
Methodist Church, 428 Kenwood Ave.,
Delmar Rotary, meets Tuesdays at Information, 439-1450.
residence,
-Altamont
Rd.,
$10
Delmar, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m:
Starlite Inn, Rt. 9W, Glenmont, 6 p.m. ~o~puter Or1entaUon, Bethlehem
FRIDAY
admission, 5-7 p.m. Reservations, 765Bethlehem Charinel Cablecast, A
Covered Dish Supper,, American Public Library, 7:30 p.m. Information,
4085.
Children's Storytime, 10:30 a.m.; R9al
Legion Auxiliary·, ~athaniel Adams 439·9314.
SEPTEMBER
Bethlehem SGnlor Cltlzena, trip to
Blanchard Post 1040, Poplar Dr.,
George's Backroom, 7:30 p.m.; Jazz:
Introduction to· Square Dancing,
Empire State Plaza to see "The
Elsmere, 7 p.m.
Live From Bethlehem, with Ray Rettig,
presented by members of Silver Bullets
Bluebird Ballet," van leaving from
Norman Cohen, Larry Vernon, Hal
Recovery, Inc., self-help for former
Medicare Form Aid, sponsored by Square Dancing Club, all welcome,
Glenmont, 1:15 p.m.; Delmar, 12:30
Miller and John Hines, 8 p.m.
mental patients and those with chronic
AARP, first and third Tuesdays, Bethlehem Town Hall, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
p.m. Information, 439-4955.
nervous symptoms. First United MethHarry the Dirty Dog Day, for children in
B8thlehem Town Hall, Delmar, .10a.m.- Information, 439-3689.
odist, 428 Kenwood Ave., Delmar.
kindergarten
and
first
grade,
Garage Sale,·"organized by Bethlehem
2 p.m. Appointments required, 439- Parents
Night,
Voorheesville
Weekly at 12:30 p.m.
Bethlehem Public Library, 4 p.m.
Volunteer Ambulance Service, grove
2160.
School,
grade
1,
7:15-8:30
Elementary
of Selkirk Fire Company No. 2
Registration, 439-9314.
Be,hlehem Lodge 1098 F&AM first and p.m.; grade 2, 8-9:15 p.m.
Farmers' Market, every Friday through
Bethlehem Tennis A11n. Tournament,
Book
Fair, sponsored by Delmar
third Tuesdays, · Delmar Masonic
October, St. Thomas the Apostle
A-level events, Bethlehem Central
Rotary Club, Delaware Plaza, Delmar,
Temple.
Church, Delmar, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Middle School, Sept. 13-15.
9 a.m.-4 o.m.
Sign Language Course, 12-week
Northwlnd, contemporary Christian
course in elementary sign language,
THURSDAY
arts association, meeting at Albany
presented by Bethlehem Lions Club,
Christian Community, Retreat House Bethlehem Public Library, 7 p.m.
Searching ... ?
Rd., Glenmont, 7:30 p.m. information,
Register by Sept. 13, 43!)-9314.
Join
us...
462·3436 or 89!!-6850.
Delmar Peace Breakfast, FellowNew
Scotland
Kiwanis
Club,
ThursSt. Thomaa Farmers' Market, every ship Hall of First United Methodist
Journey with us ...
days, New Scotland . Presbyterian
Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Church, 428 Kenwood Ave., Delto
God, se(f and church
Rt.
85,7
p.m.
Church,
mar, 7 a.m.
Bethlehem Senior CIUzens, meet every
SATURDAY
Thursday at Bethlehem Town Halt, 445
Oe_laware A,ve.,- Delmar, 12:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER
Bethlehem Archaeology Group, provides regular volunteers with excavaSEPTEMBER
tion and laboratory experience at
Community Garage Sale, Unionvill~
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
'Reformed Church, Delaware Turnpike,
Bethlehem
Channel
Cablecast,
meetings. Call 43~4258 for more
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Spaces available;
Storytelling with Dorothy Lovelock,
information.
information, 767-2797.
10:30 a.m.; Readings for the VisuallyAmerican Legion Luncheons, for
c·lothlng and Craft Sale, organized by
Impaired, 4-7 p.m.; Astrology with
members, guests and applicants for
New Scotland Elks Ladies Auxiliary,
Judith Longley, 7:30p.m.
The Roman Catholic Community
membership. Post Rooms, Poplar Dr.,
Elks [email protected] Main St., Voorheesville, 9
CelebraUon, to show appreciation fOr
Elsmere; third Thursday, noon.
a.m.-4 p.m.
of St. Thomas the Apostle
Bethlehem ·senior van drivers, van
Food Stamp Form Aid, third Thursday
phone volunteers and senior service
Southbound Concert, to benefit
Delmar, New York
office volunteers, sponsored by of odd-numbered months, Bethlehem
Voorheesville Fire Dept., SGhool Rd.,
Voorheesville, $10 admission, 9 p.m.
Bethlehem Chamber of Commerce. Town Hall, Delmar, 9i15 a.m.-noon.
Appointments required, 43~4955.
Tickets available Sept. 12, 7-10 p.m.
Information, 439-4955.
Anonymoua, · meeting
Toddler Tr1ethelon, for children under Overeatera
Chicken Barbecue, sponsored by New
3 years and their parents, Bethlehem every Thursday at First United
Scotland Kiwanis, New Scotland
Presbyterian Church, $5.50 and $3.50
Public Library, 10 a.m. Registration, Methodist Church, Kenwood Ave.,
Delmar, 7 p.m.
admission, 4-7:30 p.m. Take-out
439-4955.
orders, 439-6454.
13
FRIDAY
TUESDAY
17
Farrn~~M\1,1~'11. e.very,fr,id!!)'Jt~wu~(j, 111 ~ayibr•by~6dwardJ<.och,.Betnlollem-oneoquethaw,Chapter,.Ordar.oJ.tho._ll.ethl~h.e,m _,seni~r
2· 1 ·'"' ,. '
Servi~es._j
20
19
~S~E~P~T~EM~B~ER~-·=-~---·
14
OPEN HOUSE
18
for Inquirers of the Faith
Saturday, September 14- 11:00 a.m.
at St .. Thomas Parish House (rectory)
35 Adams Place, Delmar; phone 439-4951
r-------------------------·---·-------·--------1
I First United Methodist Church 1
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER
15
. . ,.__. . ____________""'"'!!
Bethlehem Central Class of '66... 1
Where are YOU?
!
Bethlehem Senior CIUzena Picnic, in
. the Helderbergs. Information and van
reservations, 439-4955.
Bethlehem Hlatorlcal ~sn., exhibit of
antique gowns and accessories,
museum at Rt. 144 and Clapper Rd.,
Selkirk, every Sunday, through Sept.,
2·5 p.m.
It's 20th Reunion time
We need your current address and your help
in finding missing classmates.
Call or write:
Rick &Anita Dunn
23 Wedgewood Drive
Saratoga Springs, NY
(518) 587-9476
SEPTEMBER
PI
.
Delmar Klwanll, meet Mondays at the
9
Rt. w. Glenmont, .
~t~~~i~emLounge,
AI-Anon GroUp, support for relatives of
alcoholics; meets rv,ondays at Bethtehem Lutheran Church, 85 Elm Ave.,
Delmar, 8:30-9:30 p.m .. Information,
439-4581.
.
Temple Chapter 5 RAM, first and third·
Mondays, Delmar Masonic Temple.
Bethlehem Memorial Auxiliary Post
3185, VFW, third Monday, Post rooms,
404 Delaware Ave., Delmar.
Delmar Community Orchestra, Betblehem Town Hall, weekly at 7:30p.m.
Mothers Time Out, Christian support
group for mothers of pre-schoolers,
meets Mondays at Delmar Reformed
Church, Delaware Ave., Delmar, 1011:30 a.m. Information, 439-9929.
Bethlehem Public Library, board of
·trustees, meeting at library, 7:30p.m.
489-5461
Stuyve~;~ az~.i;;Jo~ ~.~~':: Cards
Long Stem
Roses
16
Bethlehem Channel Cablecast, A
Children's Storytime, 10:30 a.m.; Five
Rivers: ~ird Nests, 7:30 p.m.
NutriUon Clall, Gail Bromley will
teach, about identifying fats and
cholesterol in diet and modifying
recipes to reduce fat content, Albany
County
Resource
Development
Center, Martin Rd., Voorheesville, $1
fee, 7-8:30 p.m. Registration, 765-2874.
!
1
1
1!
!
~--------------------.,.!
______________,.. !
Corner of Allen & Central -
MONDAY
I
I
3
Cash & Carry
,
Look for our flower cart at your
favorite shopping locations.
A ba!loon for
every OCCOSIO/J
WE DELIVER
We can he/P with
your wedding plans
...........................................
Selkirk Fire Department. No. l .
ANNUAL ROAST
·
with shrimp
Sept. 14th at 1:00 • Roast at' 5:00 p.m.
Roast by Geurtze
$18 per person ·
For tickets call:
767-2006
(must be 19)
................................
I
!
!
I
428 Kenwood Ave.
Delmar, N.Y.
Sunday Morning Schedule
1
!
1
1
1
!
Worship .... · · · · ·. · · · · · · · · .10:00 a.m.
Church School ............. I 0:15 a.m.
Sermon Talkback ........... 11:15 a.m.
!
l!
Pastor
!
Associate Pastor
Director of Education
!
!
\
Arthur F. Hagg, Jr.
Richard Neal
Patty Meyers
J
~.
Come join us for worship and fellowship
1
1
j_____~__________.________J
Writers Support Group, Bethlehem
Public Library, 7 p.m.
Square
Dancing
Lesson,
for
SEPTEMBER
_beginners, presented by Tri-Village
Squares,
First Urlited Methodist
Hudson·Mohawk Bonsai Association,
Church, 429 KenwOod Ave., Delmar, 7meets fourth Sundays at Albany - 9 p.m. Information, 439-3289.
County Cooperative Extension, Martin
Rd., Voorheesville.
"Immigrants: Dreamers of American . ._ _ _ _ _ _1""...--------------~----------------~~-:.:!.~·~·• l•l
.
. .. -.--.- __ 1 . , . '"1!', __ •• _1,._
81II.J.-.1A ~lt•P 1r~r ,312!U bns, h ~
Dreams,"
program
offered
at
_
.
Garage Sale, organized by Bethlehem
. _.~, _f;:.oncerned ·Frlendst'Of-' Hope· House,---<-~F~eedpmtfram Smoktna, r~g!_strat1on
0, ., self-help support group .for parents of ·.dea~llfl~ for s~ve!l :SEJ:!?..SiOflrPJ;qgr~m :19
Volunteer Ambulance-Service,, Selkirk
Bethlehem. Public .Lib.rary, 7:30'P'm.. ·.,;c;o,>. WE;:DNESI?A¥>
~egistration py ~pt,~8 ..4~9-931~ ... ~ .,.,-·.-,.:....
·
.•t.~ r-,l' 1" ,
Fire Company No.2: ~-! 1
· substance ~abuser,; meets1 rever.y•o:begln
Sept. 26, sPonsored cbY
11
,,
.
,
.'"",
.
c.
SEPTEMBER
Bethlehem Historical Assn., exhibit of
"Thursday· · ah ~--Capital.,. "-Qistrict · A~merican Lung Assn., 8 Mountain
antique_· Qowns and-· accessories,
1
,-,,, ..-Psychiatric_, center, 75 New Scotland
View Ave., Colonie. Information, 459TUESDAY
museum, At. ·144 and Clapper Rd.,
Retall Crime· Prevention, seminar Ave., Albany, 7:30. p.m. Information, 4197.
Selkirk, Sundays through Sepk 2-5
presented
by
Albany-Colonie 465-2441.
P.-m.
.
SEPTEMBER
Chamber of Commerce, Quality Inn, 1- Farmers' Market, sponsored by Capital Volunteer Training Program, for
90 and Everett Rd., 8:30 a.m. District
Farmers'
Market Assn., participation in Hospice Program, St.
Bethlehem Senior Citizens, Sunday
Reservations, 434-1214.
downtown Pine Street, Albany, 11:30 Peter's Hospital, 315 So. Manning
brunch at Tool's Restaurant, noOn.
Sept.
13-15.
Blvd.,
Albany,
Reservations, 439-4955.
D81mar Rotary, meets Tuesdays at
Restoration Seminar, "Graining and a.m.-1:30 p.m. Information, 732-2991.
Appointments, 454-1689.
Starlite Inn, At. 9W, Glenmont, 6 p.m.
Marbleizing," Museum of the Historical
Shaker Design, slide lecture presented
Society of Early American Decoration, by June Sprigg, former curator of
Sign Language Class, presented by
Bethlehem lions Club, Bethlehem
19 Dove St., Albany, Sept. 11-13, 9 Hancock Shaker Museum, Pittsfield, Forest Preserve Centennial Festival,
MONDAY
golden
anniversCJ.ry of
Mass.: Albany Institute of History and marking
a.m.-4 p.m. Information, 462-1676.
Public Library, 7 p.m. Information, 439Whiteface
Mountain
Veteran's
SEPTEMBER
.
9314.
Doc Scanlon's Rhythm Boys, will Art, 125 Washington Ave., Albany,
Memorial highway, Lake Placid area,
present outdoor concert at Schuyler noon. Free; information, 463-4478.
Sept. 13-15. Information, 474-6784.
Delmar Kiwanis, meet Mondays at the
Mansion State Historic Site, 32
Mothers Without Custody, Capital
Starlite Lounge, At. 9W, Glenmont,
District Chapter, monthly meeting at
Catherine St., Albany, 7 p.m. Free;
WEDNESDAY
6:15. p.m.
information, 474-3953.
home of Ellen Eck, Albany, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY
Job Search Semlnar,Human Resource
Information, 477-4183.
AJ-Anon Group, support for relatives of
SEPTEMBER
alcoholics, meets Mondays at BethleCenter, North Lake and Central Aves,
Awards Dinner, Nelson A. Rockefeller _
hem Lutheran Church, 85 Elm Ave.,
SEPTEMBER
Award for public service· will be
Albany. Information, 434-0656.
Delmar, 8:30-9:30 p.m. Information,
Child Care Discussion Group, hosted
presented to state Health Dept.
439-45.81.
Commissioner David Axelrod, all
by Albany County Health Dept., West
Lord's Acre Auction, Fair and Chicken
Sllnger1~nds Fire Co. Auxiliary, fourth
welcome, State University at Albany.
Shore Dr., Ravena, 2 p.m. Free.
Delmar Community Orchestra, BethBarbecue, Trinity United Mt;!thodist
Wednesday, Slingerlands Fire Hall, 8
Reservations, -47 4-1377.
lehem Town Hall, weekly at 7:30 p.m.
Chui-ch, Rt. 143, Coeymans, 10 a.m.
p.m.
Club
Rehearsal,.
Mendelssohn
·
Information, 756-2255.
Mothers Time Out, Christian support
interested tenors and basses Invited to · ---==-:=-::-:-:---;.--;;;;;:--group for mothers of pr&-schoolers,
New Scotland Elks Lodge, meets
Reunion,
for
alumni
of
Protestant
attend first rehearsal of male chorus,
FRIDAY
meeting with Pauline Kamen-Miller .second and fourth Wednesdays, VoOrUnited Fourth P,resbyterian Church,
Young _Adult Group of Albany, G_olden
speaking about "Getting Back Into the
Fox Restaurai'lt. Reservations, 463heesville Post Office, 8 p.m.
Western Ave. at. At. 85., Albany, 7:30
SEPTEMBER
p.m.
395.2.
'
Job Market," Delmar Reformed
Church, Delaware Ave., Delmar, ·10caPital DistriCt Fanners' Market, Young Society Band, young Capital
Children's ·Auditions,_ all levels, for
11 :30 a.m. Information, 439-9929.
"Malpractice: Its Impact on the Public's
Wednesdays through summer, First
District musicians will present big
Berkshire Ballet October production of
conference
sponsored
by
Health,"
United
Methodist
Church,
421
Storyhour Registration, Bethlehem
band sounds of 1940's, Empire State
Cinderella,
full
length
ballet,
New York State Public Health Assn.,
Public Library, 9a.m.lnformation,439Kenwood ·Ave., Delmar, 3-6:30 p.m.
Plaza, Albany,. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free.
Cantaiclla School of Dance, Fuller Rd.,
Inn,
1228
Western
Ave.,
Ramada
9314.
Information, 439-1450.
Albany, 4 p.m. Information, 482-5224:American Assn._ of University Women,
Albany, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Registration,
meeting of· Albany branch, with
Lark Fest '85, presented by Lark Street
472-85.45..
Geraldine Bryant, assistant attorney·
Area Merchant Group Inc., featuring
Altamont
Station
Squares,
mainstream
general, as guest speaker, ·Marriott~
music, two beer gardens, flea market
level black cat dance, with· AI Cappetti
Wolf
Rc;L,
Colonie,
5:30
p.m.
and craft fair, between Washington
calling, all western square dancers
Reservations, 482-5815.
and Madison Aves., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
welcome, Guilderland Elementary Information, 436-1425.
·
RegistratiOn, for fitness and dance
School, Rt. 20, 8-11 p.m. Information,
classes at eba Center for Dance and
Government Cheese Distribution, .
872-1646.
"A musical education with the guitar"
Movement, 351 Hudson Ave., Sept. 11,
Ravena Bible Training Center, 10 Edna
Benefit. Performance, of Annie, Ave.,
Ravena,
10
a.m.-noon.
5~ p.m.; Sept. 14, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
presented by Chatham Theatre Co., Information, 447-7000.
·
· ·: ·
lnf_ormation, 465-9916.
proceeds will be donated to Chatham
, .· - .r .FY!JArt""~ol:--J
Elementary
School
PTA
for Assertiveness; '!-tlTra_lnln_g,
two-part
construction of creative community worksHop c6iidiJt;,ted·8y'J~IeS:f-r.ltriS~rba
THURSDAY
structure, Chatham High School, $3 Alba~y~uqiiqLi_~_f,'fY;1~1~v.iji~6L~~i\)fV.~,~~
I
admission, Sept. 13 and 14, 8 p.m.; A_ve., Albany, ~ept. 14 and-21;'9 a:m.-1.\0~\
SEPTEMBER
.
Sept. 15,·2:30 p.m. Tickets, 39-2..245&.•··.P-m. Reservatcons, 449-3380, ext. 223.
Portfolio Workshop; open to students
Red Cross Blood Services Training
.Carnival, featuring craft fair, food, and professional artists, presented by
Course, enabling volunteers. to work . · games, prizes and·-- entertainlnent, "··_College -of·-Saint- Rose-and -GraQh-_~-:..;;_
••
on bloodmobiles, Albany Area Chapter
Kenwood Child Development Genter, Artists Guild,. College of sii;!lfRQse~
Red Cross, Hackett Blvd., Albany, 9:30
Doane- Stuart Campus, Rt. 9W, Albany, activities center, Albany, $5 and $8 ·
a.m.-2:30p.m. Registration, 462-7461,
Sept.13,5p.m.-dusk;Sept.14, 10a.m.- admission, noon-6 p.m. Reservation!;~,:?
ext. 321.
dusk. Information, 465-0404.
454-5144.
SUNDAY
22
AREA EvENTs & OccAsioNs
Events in Nearby ·Areas
.
11
24
23·
25
14
13
JOAN MULLEN STUDIO
Instruction In Classical
& Folk Guitar At All Levels
~·
439-3701
..
12
<9la.ssi.que Dance SchooL
1541\ DeLaware 1\>Je,
DeLmar, New York 12054
Charmaine Tocci, Director
NORMAN G. COHEN, CSW, ACSW
- Pyschotherapist
NOW FORMING
Friday and Saturday Jazz
dance classes
439-0199
Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club, will view
migrating hawks in Helderbergs, all
welcome,. meet at Star Plaza Shoppfng
Center parking lot, Ats. 20 and 155,
8:30a.m.
439-6100
•
1004 Western Avenue
Albany, N.Y.
438-4860
Specializing in:
0 child and family problems
0 stress related disorders
0 anxiety and depression
· Call for free telephone consultation
Son;tething
new
and
exciting
is coming
this
fall!
The Spotlight
Restaurant Guide
Acomplete, easy-to-use:
magazine style guide inserted in
the issue of October 30, 1985.
Capture the right
advertising market
Call Spcitlight Advertising
TODAY!
Glenn Vadney, Nora Hooper or
Carol weigand
439-4949 .
,_;.
----
.
_._
Kids' Fare of Washington Park Theatre
Inc., Robin and Linda Williams will
present program of country folk music,
Page Hall, State University at Albany,
downtown campus, $3 and $6
_admission, 7 p.m. Tickets, 482-2826.
Club, Helderberg Reformed Church,
At. 146, Guilderland Center, 8 p.m.
Information 895-2073.
Hawk
Street
Farmers
Market,
sponsored by Capital District Farmers'
Market Assn., located across from
State Capitol, Albany, open Mondays,
11 30 a.l]1.- 1 30 p.m ,lnformfltiOfl. 732 _
~.)
2991 .
Railroad Festival, sponsored by
Delaware and Ulster. Raii.Ride,
AfkV!IIe
1
11
1
Depot, At.· ·28;· ArkVille,' '$1 and_ $2'1
r' ' " '
· - r • .,
'"l
admission, 10"3.'.m.-4 p.m. !.nformat1on;
338-2955. J: ~·) ., ~
r ·~
"' r Information session, for Empire State
1
'
t · )' M
J.
College,: ·SUNY,· at :Gunther Hall,.
Hudson \latley ·C6rrimunity College,
Troy, noon. Information, 447-6746.
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER
15
Comic Book Convention, Polish
Community center, Washington Ave.
Ext., Albany, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Saratoga Spa State Park Tour,
Saturdays through Oct. 12, 11 a.m.
I-nformation, 584-2000.
Bass Tournament, sponsored by North
American Bass Assn., Catskill launch
lower Main
St.,
Catskill.
site,
Information, 943-6559.
U.S. Navy Northeaatern Show Band,
appearing at Empire State Plaza,
Albany,
8:30-8:30
p.m.
Free;
information, 474·5986.
Benefit Concert, 12-hour concert of
country music· to r~lse funds tor
national Farm Aid fund, featuring
music of Southbound, Whitewater,
Bovine, Shilo, A9ed in the Hills, and
others, Altamont Fairgrounds, $5
admission, nooh~ p.m.
''Experiencing Albany: Paat, Present,
Future," Lee and Richard WilkiS will
present program entitled "The Hudson
River and Scenes of Albany in Art and
Song," State University at Albany art
gallery, 3 p.m. Free.
Nature Talk, discussion of ecological
importance of Constitution Marsh,
Boscobel Restoration, Garrison~on­
Hudson, $2 and $4 admiSsion, 2:304:30 p.m. Information, 1-914-265-3638.
Scottish Country Dancing, beginners
welcome, Unitarian Church, 405
Washington Ave., Albany, 7:30 p.m.
lnform~tion, 377-8792.
Schen~tady Antique Radio Club,
meetiriQ at SChenectady Museum, Nott
Terr. Heights, 2 p.m. Information, 459.
.
.
7407. .
,,
MONDAY
SEPTEMBER
Lamaze
_Ch_lldblrth
Preparation,
classesbegmmngSept.16and17atSt.
,
H
.
I
Alb
R
. t ra t.1on,
Peters osplt<i\,
any. eg1s
456-0303.
Gansevoort Chapter NSDAR, meeting
featuring "A Tribute to the Statue of
Liberty," all welcome, Ten Broeck
Mansion, Albany, 12:30 p.m.
Fitness and Dance Classes begin at
eba Center for Dance and Movement,
Chapter House Theater, Hudson and
Lark Aves., Albany. Information, 4659916.
"Exploring the Hidden Job Market,''
Fonner Smokers, support group
workshop
career
development
sponsored by American Lung Assn.,
conducted by Jack Crawford of Sage
meet first and third Tuesdays at
Associates, Albany Public Library, 161
American Lung Assn., 8 Mountain
SEPTEMBER
Washington
Ave.,
12:15
p.m.
View
Ave.,
Albany
7-8
p.m.
Information, 449-3380.
Information, 459-4197.
ComP"sslonate Friends, self-help Time
Management
Workshop,
"Coinprehenslve Financial Planning,"
group for parents whose children have presented at Albany campus of Russell
presentation by David Vigoda, certifi~d
died monthly meeting at Westm1mster Sage College, 140 New Scotland Ave,
financial planner, Albany Public
' f Presbytenan Church, 85 Chestnut St.,. Albany 5 p.m. Reglstratlon,445-1717.
Library, 161 Washington Ave., 12:15-1
Albany 7·30 p.m. InformatiOn, 438',
,.. -. , .
f St
~ ··
' ·, f
.... -:.--. ~~ Farmers Market, m parkmg area o
· ' p.m. Information 449-3380.
1
.73 6• .
P.~U~~·-. 'l-.t...- Vmcent DePaul Church, Albany, n
.
. ........
Jt'•
+ h
~
~·Putting Your Garden to Bed," lecture
a.m.
"America as an; Emerging , Nation,"
presented by Mike Bartholomew. of • .()
YAC';3UT reading discussto_n series funded by
County
Cooperattve
Albany
National
Endowment ·. fo~-·- .;.. the
Extension, Albany Public Library, 161
Humanities, Albany Public Library, _161
W h' 1 A e Albany noon Free·
mgt' on v9 .,3380
,
.
,
. WEDNESDAY
Washington Ave .. 2 p.m. lnformatton,
. as
f
.m orma 10n, 44 .
449-3380.
SEPTEMBER
El Norte, presented as part of Hispanic
.
William Kennedy talk about growing
Film Week, in Spanish with English
L!P in Albany, tape will be shown at 7:30
captions, Albany Public Library, 161
AIDS Program, luncheon to provide
p.m., Albany Public Library, 161
Washington Ave., 2 and 7:30p.m. Free.
social interaction for persons with
Washington Ave.
AIDS and AIDS Related Complex,
Corning!
Panel ~Discussion, · "0
sponsored by AIDS Council of
Changing City and State Political
Public Forum, with focus on gender
Northeastern New York, Wednesdays
Scenes," tape of discussion will be
and violence, Fay Campus Center,
at 3:,32 Hudson Ave., Albany, noon.
Siena College, Loudonville 8 p.m. 783shown at Albany Public Library, 161
2421.
Reservations, 434-4686.
Washington Ave., 7:30p.m.
TUESDAY
17
. ...
18
•••••••••••••••••••••couPON'''''''''-'''"'"'"''''"'"':
PIZZA EXPRESS· i•
•
"Serving The Finesi Pizza, Hot or Cold Submarine Sandwiches
Tossed Green and Antipasto Salads"
DELAWARE PLAZA
z
DELIVERY AVAILABLE UNTIL MIDNIGHT
~$1°
Trout Unlimited, Clearwater Chapter
meeting, -with Fran Verdoliva as guest
speaker, Americana Inn, Albany
Shaker Rd., Colonie, 7:30 p.m.
Information, 399-9000.
Plus Level Square Dance Lessons, for
dancer wishing to learn level above
mainstream, sponsored by A.C.
Sparkplug Western Square Dance
869~3408
1811 W6stern Ave.
Between Northway & Rt. 155
EARLY DINNER
SPECIALS
Mon.-Sat. 4:30·6:oo·, Sun. 4-5:30
Mussels Fra Dlavalo
over linguini ........
Broiled Boston Scrod ..
Chicken Milanese .....
Chicken Parmesan
with linguini ........
Fried Scallops .........
Tenderlol.n Kabob .....
Scallops & Crab Legs
Couquille ..........
Regular Cut
Prime Rib . , ........
$5.95
$6.95
$6.95
$6.95
$7.95
$7.95
$8.95
·
$9.95
Comes with House Salad,
Vegetable & Potato
Ribs while they last Thurs. & Sat.
SPECIAL PRIVATE ROOM
AVAILABLE FOR PARTIES
Open for Lunch
Mon.- Fri. 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
•••
g
Starting with our daily entree feature of Fresh
Baked Meatloaf and a Fresh Catch of the Day,
Fresh Fish Special.
You can choose from a variety of Italian entrees:
Baked Manicotti or Stuffed Shells ....... 4.50
Lasagna ........ : ...................... 4.50
Eggplant Parmigiana .................... 4.50
Veal Parmigiana ........................ 6.95
Chicken Parmigiana .................... 4.50
Baked Ziti ............... : ............ .4.50
Chicken Cacciatore ................... .4.50
Linguene with Marinara Sauce .......... 4.50
OFF~•
0
•
:
ANY LARGE OR SICILIAN PIZZA
:
:
Open 11 a.m.-midnight/7 days a week
:
•,
•'
Cannot be combined with any other offer. _Expires 9/18/85
We deliver until midnight
•
•,
111
~••••·~··••••••••••••~OUPON.,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,}
.16
Scottllh Country Dancing, social
dancing to traditional Scottish music,
beginners welcome, Salvation Army,
Lafayette
and
Albany
Sts.,
Scheriectady, 7:30 p.m. Information,
457..()849.
:
••
439-2244
Tool's Restaurant
invites you to dine Italian
with us every Wednesday
Ill
,
·FRENCH
RESTAURANT
·
238 Delaware Ave.
RESTAURANT
Home-style cooking at
attractiue family prices
~~;'t{l
7 a.m.-9 p.m.
Everyday
Seruing Dinner 5 to 10 p.m.
Closed Sun. and Mon.
Rt. 9W, Glenmont, 3 miles south of '171ruwoy Exit 23
Lou Alter;· s
~\~!Nr?l
Now Open Every Day!
·
~~~439-=2023
155 Delaware Ave., Delmar
Senior Citizens & Early Bird
SPECIALS
Directly Across /rom Delaware Plaza
This
Sunday
and every Sunday
4:00p.m. -10:00 p.m.
ALL YOU CAN EA
Your Choice of . . .
FRIED CLAMS
FRIED SHRIMP
FRIED FISH
.JUST
$6.95
Monday-Saturday 11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m.
Sunday 12 noon-9:30 p.m.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
(4 p.m.-6 p.m. Mon. thru Fri.)
(12-5 p.m. Sundays)
Chicken Parmigiana
Fried Clams
only
Broiled Scrod
Eggplant Parmigiana
Chopped Steak, with
mushrooms
Ravioli, w/meat sauce
Stuffed Shells w/meat sauce
$595
Includes: Soup and Salad- Choice of
or Potato or Spaghetti, coffee or tea
55 Delaware Ave.
439-2447
"NOT AFFILATED IN ANY WAY WITH
ALTER/'S REST.o'JURANT OF GLENMONT. IfV.C."
The Spotlight- Seotember11. 1985- PAGE 15
Church festival on the way
The date of the South Bethlehem United Methodist Church's
Fall Festival is still several weeks
away but it isn't too early to make,
reservations for the barbeC'ife1'cr
CitiCke-n dinner that'will chnclu'dC
... ,,•..
"'
4J,~},iials lestlv:ities..:A ·c9mplete: l, ' ' .' •
_,, • ' .
:
,
will
be
refreshments,
games and
chicken dinner will be served at 5
horseback rides for the children,
·in the" dining roOm- of the
and beginning at I p.m. an auction
church, at Willowbrook Ave. in
will provide lots of bargains for
South Bethlehem. The cost is
bidders.
$5.75 for adults and $3.25 for
children, with those under 3 free
Historical group to celebrate
of charge. Takeout orders also·
The Town of Bethlehem H istorwill be filled. Reservations are
ical Association plans to celebrate
requested by Thursday, Sept. 26,
an anniversary. Members and
and may be made by contacting ·friends will gather at the NormanJessie Leigh at 767-9087.
side Country Club in Elsmere on
Thursday evening, Sept. 19, for a
The public is invited to arrive
social hour and cash bar from 5:30
early Saturday, Sept. 28, and
to 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner.
spend the entire day enjoying the
many activities plarined for the_
Allison Bennett, a charter
whole family. Fair booths will member of the association and
open at 9 a.m-., with a large former historian for the town, will
assortment of crafts and other speak on ''Provocative Pastmerchandise to select from. There Future Excitement." She will give
p:m'.
-
a brief review of the association
and how it started and offer some
ideas for the future. Peter Christoph,.afouner.president~who;hasa
, talent !fan rcl~tingJAistori:cal fcJcts;:
wiH teH:rof .the~_DtitCh assauttron·
Man~a t taJLin rJ 6 73. ;Clh.~isto ph "is:
ah,associ:ite librarian at the state
library in Albany, and is editor for
the New York colonial records
project.
Students in culinary arts at the
Glenmont Job Corps will furnish
a special anniversary cake and a
group picture of charter members
will be taken.
Ribbons go to Grange
Using the theme "Keep the
Torch Lit-She Belongs to Alf of
Us," the Bethlehem Grange of
Selkirk earned several awards at
the recent Altamont Fair. The
group received ''best of fair" and
first pla~e awards for its main
exhibit. Their mannequi·ri of
"Lady Liberty" was complete with
785-0552
439-0339
Mon. • Fri. 9-8
Sat. 8-6
Sun. 10-2
29 years of quality & experience
Rt. 85 Slingerlands (just off of 1·90
STOREWIDE END OF SEASON SALE!!
; Winter Pool Closings:
Complete $139.95
Partial $94.95
·· All winter covers on sale (any size pool)
PRICES SLASHED ON
lnground & Above Ground Pools
20% off all White Cedar
Post & Rail Style
25% off all Mailboxes
15% oil all Lanterns
Also available
Picnic tables- Doghouses- Mailbox posts
& all types of fencing
Fall installations still available · Liner renovations
,, 25% off all podt games & loungers
·
..10% off all Winter chemicals & accessories
HURRY! QUANTITIES LIMITED!
All prior sales excluded/In-stock items only/Cash & Carry
FREE ESTIMATES • ALL TYPES OF FENCES & POOLS
~YS
TO SAVE
r----- COUPON·-----, r----- COUPON·-----,
115DONUTSI ! . $}.89
FOR 6 MUFFINS
a
RCS continues sean;h ·
for new superintendent·-·h.
The school district will continue
to use consultants to search for a
new superintendent, the RavenaCoeymans-Selkirk
Board
of
Education decided last week.
At last week's meeting, a group
of residents questioned the
legality of using a consultant for
the search. After hearing from
Simeo Gallo, attorney for ..the
district, that the actio_n was. legal,.J
board member Frank. Filipp.one
made a, .woiio_~ )9-. .-d!(HL_ ~h~_)
consultant. Filippon~·~. mq!!o!l,
was seconded by bo~rd mem.ber..
Ronald Selkirk and defeated 7 to
2.
The district will pay· a total of
approximately $8,000 for the
search, according to figures·
submitted by consultant Clyde
~iden at_ an earlier meeting.
Superintendent
Milton
Chodack has announced his plans
to retire at the end of the 1985-86
school year.
The board learned that contract
negotiations and mediation have
not yielded an agreement between
the board of education and ,the
RCS Teachers Association. The
district and teachers have gone to·
fact finding for a solution to the
problem.
In other business, the board:,
o Learned that three students'
from the portion. of. Elm' Ayenu~·;
Estates :that.is .in&he. ROS-d istrld0
wi-ll' r1 attend ·~,rB~:ttileheniioGen tia4! i
schools.;r,An :agreemehtdineachecl>J
Ja:st"monthrlbyAthe :twd1 boar.dS..l
allows:.- .par~nU~.~rirD the; J,an;a;./trirl
choose the·distiict theit diild•willoJ
attend: ·Chodack said, the restJ!of>J
the students have elected to stay'
with the RCS ~chool District. ow
• Accepted
an
aditi'iionaP
$5,000 scholarship from J.
Leonard Douglas of Florida.
Douglas is a 1960 graduate of the
Ravena Training School.
• Approved $126,000 in serial
bonds and bond anticipation ,
notes for the purchase of school
buses. District residents approved
a special proposition for the
purchase last May.
Bethlehem dogs need tags:~
DOUBLE OFFER·
$2.29
crown, star, lighted torch, and a ... pre-licensing course, a low ·chOlesbackdrop depicting the harbor. terol diet class and a diabetic.
The display included pictures and
nutfition class also are available.:
stories relating to the history of Information may be obtained by
the Statue of Liberty and the calling Joanne Nunan at 756-2155
changes that have taken place in or 439-7170.
its interior and on the exterior.
.. ,,,,, "'''-' 6•1.111'H \.l\\\::1 )l._.I\1\J\l'!)\
..... A"»I't)fflt,\1 fhe'CitS'Jiil\~ U\ \\ ~
The
Sub?rd~<W'
'Gr"fgrN!'~
1
The South Bethlehem-Selkirk
sp;~n~ pface '"·rn"e~!!~1:dJ:dse
rcompetition,
and ,J,lje,:fkth!ohem '1SU nshine !'< iSeni ~.IiJ Gitizens-~rn"dxt
JuniO~_Grarlge alsO.~ere winners: majior IOUtirig- Will be· t'riP to the
They received second place for a Catskills scheduled for Oct. II.
display on fire safety. A large Reservations· are being made now
replica of Smoky the Bear drew for this year's fall foliage trip.
attention to tips on fire pre- Included in the day's activities will
venti.on.
be a ride through the mountains
on the Arkville Railroad and a
Adults back to school too
Regular school sessions have drive to Oneonta for dinner at the
Brooks Restaurant.
resumed for the fall, but there is
still time for adults who wish to
The seniors will leave by bus
enroll in the RCS continuing from the First Reformed Church
education -program: Courses will
of Bethlehem parking lot at 7 a.m.
begin the week of Sept. 16. They
Friday, Oct. 1-1. They expect to
include: dog obedience training, · return to the church which is on
basic photography, beginning and
Rt. 9W in Selkirk, about 6 p.m.
advanced sewing, cardiopulmon- The total cost of the trip, includary
resuscitation,
stenciling, ing bus fare, the train ride· and
.. bear" obics for infants and
dinner, is $24. Reservations
preschoolers, stress management,
should be made as soon as
basketball and beginning quilting,
possible by contacting Elizabeth
among other subjects. A driver's
Huller at 767-2340.
!I
Town of Bethlehem animal
control officer Scott Anson reminds dog owners that: under
state law, all dogs over the age of 6
months must have a license, which
must be renewed annually. Licenses may be obtained from the
town clerk's office, 445 Delaware
Ave., Delmar. The staturory fee is
$2.50 for a neutered or spayed pet
or $7.50 for- an unneutered or
unspayed clog plus a $2 local fee.
Licensed dogs should have the
f~_l! <1ttached to their collars.
When the pet dies or is transferred
to another owner, the tag should
be turned in, Anson said.
While it is advised that pets be
vaccinated against rabies, vaccination is not required for
licensing in Albany County.
In addition. the town's leash
law requires that any dog at large
be on a leash that is no longer than
eight feet or be otherwise under
the full control of the owner or
another responsible person.
Christian arts group meets
Cannot b~ Combmed with any otht:'r
ofh:r. Good at any participating Dunkin·
Donuts shop. Orwcoupon pt:!rcustomer.
OFFER GOOD: thru 9117/85
Limit: 1 dozen
LIMIT: 2 offers per coupon
Offer Good: thru 9/17/85
DUNKIN"®. 440 Mad;son
Ave.
Albany
232 Delaware Ave.
DONUTS
It!. u·orth the trip.
· Delmar
L----------------PAGE 16- September 11, 1985- Tho Spotlight
..:...;...
-~
Cannot be combined with any other offer.
Good at participating Dunkin· Donuts
shops. One coupon per customer.
I
.II
DUNKIN"® 440 Mad;son
Ave.
Albany
232 Delaware Ave.
DONUTS
ItS worth the trip.
Delmar
.I
L------~----------
Northwind, the contemporary
Christian arts association, will
present WHAZ disc jockey Tony
Zappola as its guest speaker at its
monthly meeting on Friday at
7:30 p.m. at the Albany Christian
Community on Retreat House
Rd. in Glenmont.
Tony Zappola is the Saturday
morning disc jockey on WHAZ
Troy. He and his wife, Rose,
minister as "Under His Wing"
ministries. Their topic is "No
Compromise." An outline of the
schedule for the group's firsi
annual festival, "ManiFest," will
be presented at the meeting.
Northwind is an organization
devoted to helping Christians in
the arts fulfill their ministries by
publishing information, sponso~­
ing seminars and festivals and
providing a forum for the exchange of revelant ideas at its
monthly meetings. For information, contact Northwind at
462-3436 or 899-6850.
-- --
-----------------c------,---------------~~-----------------,
Those happy school days?
"School.da~·s. school days,
for me at the end of every TV
program and movie I would
watch, saying "Good night, see
A II to ,!flflfl!.'I!JOf.ll!hifi<Y!IIJ'itick ... ..
yDttrttomornow~tJ .~t .the -..~end. of
;hdb2-m~rl5frlJ58 rlwo2 '.lrn
ever,jll tla.Aieol ~Mi(i!lti liDh~, andt tev,ef,l,
i i-tl"oW. rC§)tild)a nyOne: i fi ·.hi~/ot:hef.
competing; with <itself, lmalh' !Jig•·
right mirid sin.g·siiCh a hi:fppy·di;ttyr
ai"ns.t1<1Ei1:gliShJ_ \ E:ngltstu.;t agR'ioSf
about a period in our history of
history,· itnd So· o·n·. · 'Fhe·,·work
discipline that was imposed by the world of 9 to 5 looked very
formal education when the classold-fashioned hickory stick has appealing to my nOt-so-studious
room resembled a prison cell and
been replaced hy an internal, t::yes.
the teacher conducted the class
individual
discipline of stick-to-itwith tyrannical power enforced by
Another aspect of the academic
iveness, a discipline that doesn't
the menacing wave of a baton
world I and my colleagues especior
that
doesn't
always
work
well
fashioned from the hard, tough
produce results as consistent as ally loathed was the boredom of a
wood of a hickory tree?.
dull class, be it due to irrelevant
dictatorial control produces.
Yet, in a very real sense, school
subject matter or a lackluster
However, despite changing teacher, or "both. Stuck in such .
has always reflected the times of
history and has attempted to times, changing styles, changing classes day after day made the '
prepare its recipients for life in values and changing changes, hickory stick seem preferable, for
those times. To a somewhat lesser some things remain the same. 1 at least there would be some The Delmar Car Wash, with the help of a fel" clown-friends, held a
hated the tedium of math home- excitement in the atmoSphere.
extent education has addressed
grand opening for its newly remodeled facility Saturday. From left,
itself to changing times and has work where You had to show all
monager
Ken Ringler and his daughter Amy share the limelight with
One of the most fearsome
attempted to contribute to the the work, not just the answer. I beasts wandering the halls· of M<D Jnalds Hamburgular, accompanied b: Joyce McCann of
direCtion of that change, a nearly heard people from my parents' learning was the beast of social M<DJnalds. At the right is operator Jack Donnely,
generation say the same thing .with
impossible world.
ridicule and peer rejection. One
undone button or zipPer, a single
facial blemish, the threat of
The external discipline that was imposed by attracting a "No, thank you" at
The Village Stage, Delmar's ·Jerome Kass's musical ''Ba.lschool dance or "I'll be waiting
the old-fashioned hickory stick. has been replaced the
room", will be held Oct. 22and 23,;
one-~ear-old theater troupe, holds
for you after school" upon bumpmJnthly
membership
meeting
its
For more information, send"
by an internal, individual discipline ... that doesn't ing a tough guy in 'the cOrrider, or tonipt (Wed~esday) at 7:30p.m. inquiries
to The Village Stage,'
appearing too slow in the classP.O. B·JX 208, Slingerlanc s1
always work well...
room or, for that matter, too at the Bethl<hem Central High
12159.
smart, any one of these faux pas Scho:>l auditorium.
Judy Spevack will give a mini
had the potential for ruining a
lesson in bas·c acting techniques
those "golden rule days," the same feeling, and now I am school career, or so it seemed.
children were being prepared for a hearing my children repeat the
I suspect that certain aspects of and lead a dis<:ussion on plans for
$20,000 theft probed
life charac_terized by sweatshops, scenario as though they were the school will be hated by every a new one-act re:Jertory group.
dominee·ring industrial giants, first generation to hate certain generation. I don't know if those n.e oepertory group, with play$
State police at Selkirk a ·e
political bosses, rigid social aspects of school.
aspects must be r~garded as still 10 be seleoted, plans its first
investiga1ing a break-in at a home.
pr:>d-Jction fer Nov. II to be
mores, limited persOnal economic
necessary evils qf the system, but I
on Swift Rd. in Voorheesvil.e .n
prosenled
to the Delmar Progress
When
I
was
a
boy,
I
recall
reso\.ln:;es and _even more limited
believe that since they have
which an estimated $20,000 wor·.h
ciyjJ:r,ights. A majority of children · dreading the first morning of the surviVed for so long, they must Club's drama ·group, and will be
of jewelry was taken, according ·.o
d.idi n<'i~JO~<en>fiilish· their schooling school year. It aroused a nuniber reflect aspects of life in general to of:er ng its services to other
a spokesman at the substatio:1.
community groups.
Troopers. said a side window at the
i OrJ:aMo()ofreotetiflg;t:he~w.otkforCe 1 of •distasteful images, and still which we must adjust and, perAuditions for the Village house was forced open sometime
t6J~c:Ontnibu~rrton~e famiiYcpoi.•;> does'whertever I think of it. One of haps, learn to overcome through
S'age 's March 7 and 8 production, . during the day Thursday, Sept. 5.
Lifeu;irrl those 'tiine~-ihaanaehard-ol tnern-;wa:S feiinqUishing the luXury change.
hiCikur;;w;tick dangling::O)Ienthec oh.la<iiiglwhenever I was finished
h~ads'ofinoS!:people·and•tbey had.
tcklearn -tdtJiv·e with-. it sOinehow. · the windowshades up to iet in the
sll:'epilig,
n'oi bHiire;·and
flicking
bright mid-morning
sunlight.
A
School helped prepare them for it
and, .in some instances, to over- lovely welcome to a new day. But
1
CO.JTle,.~~ ·through change._
on the first day of school, and in
·,
·
.
.
Indeed, times have changed and ,spite of Daylight Savings Time,
with them, so have schools, as a -sleep was always interrupted, and
a·
consequence as well as a cause of raising the windowshade only
those changing times. Today's added more darkness to an alstudents are being prepared to ready dark moment.
Another burdening memory of
enter a-world characterized by the
dilemmas of overwhelming free- the onset of school is the perpetual
doms of choice regarding career, feeling of study and preparation
place of residence,. lifestyle, mate for tests and exams ·and term
selection Or no ·mate at all, papers and oral presentations.
parenting or not, and so many· Schoolwork seemed ne":'er to be
other issues that have opened up completed, always lurking around
\\,
as a result of the opening up of the corner I would hang around
\,,,
with my friends, always waiting
soc~ty_ in general. The external
\\
Dear ol' ·g~lden rule days;
Reading and writing and 'rirhmeric,
Village Stage meets tonight
In
l~~~~~!:::;~~!--~~:~~~::~:j;:
s
\1
1'
'UF'Ft\C
,,
SAVE
On Hallagan Living Room Sets
In Stock or Special Orders
~c~ccc=~
l,
i\.,,
\\
\,
SAVE
On Recliners by
1985 Winners at Saratoga fair, semi-finalists at New York State Fair.
Enroll Now
.,,
"
--Eleanor's
School of the Dance
Classes for all ages
t TAP • BALLET • JAZZ • GYMNASTICS • DANCERClSE
154B Delaware Ave.
Delmar
Colonie
East Greenbush
Clifton Park
* BARCALOUNGER.
*
* ~KROEH LER'
Discounted Name Brand Early American And
I
Traditional Furniture
Where low overhead means $avings to you
•
1·
BURRICK FURNITURE
_,560 Delaware A·te,, Albany 465-5112
..'ust over tae ·.thruway bridge
.
Tho Spotlight- September 11. 1985- PAGE
tt
Service academy openings
Young men and women in-
District will have at teast one
terested in entering the nation's
three service academies, as well as
the U.S. Merchant Marine Acad-
vacancy to fill at West Point, the
emy at Kings Point, should get in
touch with his office without
delay, says U.S. Rep. Samuel S.
Stratton.
For classes entering in July,
1986, the 23rd Congressional
U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis and the U.S. Air Force
Academy at Colorado Springs. In
·addition, each congressman can
nominate 10 young people to
compete' for vacancies at· the·
Merchant Marine Academy allocated to New York State.
·
All nominations are based on ·small salary as cadets and midmerit, without regard to political shipmen. After graduation they
affiliation, and the recommenda- become regular officers in their
tions of a non-partisan citizens respective services.
advisory committee which perThose interested in applying are
sonally interviews each of the
urged
to write directly to Co·n·grescandiC Jes, Stratton said.
sman Samuel S. ·Stratton. Rm.
Successful appointees will enter 827, Leo O'Brien Federal Buildthe academies in JUrv~··l986, for a ing, Albany. NY 12207. Deadline
four-year period. T-h~ir education for filing an application is Oct. 15.
will be paid for by the govern- 1985.
ment. and they will also receive a
PUBLIC NOTICE
NEW YO
LOTTERY
9th AN
The mission of New York's Lottery is to raise money
for education, to provide funds that will help the State
provide financial assistance to the local elementary and
secondary schools.
. In the nine years since New York's Lottery tickets went on
sale on September 8, 1976, the Lottery has turned over more
than $2 Billion to help fund the State's aid to local schools.
. For the fifth straight year, New York's Lottery in Fiscal
1984-85 set new sales and revenue earnings for education records.
New York's Lottery sales in FY 1984-85 passed the billion dollar mark for the first time in New York Lottery history. ·
In Fiscal1984-85: Sales totaled $1.271 billion.
Revenues transferred to the State for education reached
$615 million.
This was six times greater than the Lottery's first year,
FY 1976-77.
Over its nine years of operations, the Lottery has:
-Sold $4.7 billion in tickets.
-Raised more than $2.1 billion for New York State.
REPORT
MORE THAN $2.5 BILLION IN PRIZES
Millions of New York's Lottery players are winning millions of prizes and many of New York's Lottery players are
winning millions of dollars.
The number of men and women who have won individual prizes of a million· dollars or more continues to soar,
putting New York State in first place in the nation in awarding
such prizes.
In its nine years, New York's Lottery has paid prizes
valued at a million or more dollars to more than 380 persons-the largest such total in the United States.
Millions more have won other Lottery prizes-ranging
from a free ticket to the $20 million won by Venero Pagano
on July 25, 1984.
All told, .in nine years, more than 230 million persons
have won pnzes valued at more than $2.6 billion.
The $20 million won by Mr. Pagano, a retired carpenter
from The Bronx, continues to be the richest Lottery prize
won by a single person in the New York's Lottery.
THANKS, NEW 10RK STATE
Sales and revenue for the last nine years are shown below:
(IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS)
REVENUES EARNED FOR
FISCAL YEAR
SALES
NEW YORK STATE
1976-77
$ 196.5
$ 94.8
1977-78
195.8
91.2
1978-79
188.1
90.9
1979-80
184.6
85.6
1980-81
236.2
103.0
1981-82
424.9
179.8
1982-83
645.0
275.2
1983-84
890.3
390.5
1984-85'··
1 271.1
615.0
Subtotal
$4,232.5
$1,926.0
1985-86 (to 08/24/85)'
526.1
217.5
TOTALS
$4,758.6
$2,143.5
On its ninth anniversary, New York's Lottery is able to
look back at many successful and productive years. In these .
nine years we have sold more than $4.7 billion in tickets and
have raised more than $2.1 billion for New York. This could
not have been done without your support, confidence and,
above all, participation.
On this ninth anniversary, we pledge anew our determination and efforts to merit your continued support and confidence by offering the Lottery games you enjoy playing, and
winning.
Thanks, New York State.
Sincerely,
·unaudited.
~fu·c·~
-------ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS-----OREN ASKED ABOUT NEW'YORK'S LGnERY
a. Why the changes In the LOTTO games?
A. The Lottery is constantly looking to provide its players with the games and
prize levels they like best. Sales data, information from our customers and
agents tell us that the two most preferred LOTIO features are bigger jackpots
and more money allocated to the lower level prizes. LOTTO 48 is the best able
to offer big jackpots along with the potential for even bigger jackpots; LOTIO
40 responds to those players who want a greater share of the prize money
pool allocated to second and third prizes.
a. Where does the Lottery money go?
A. By law, Lottery proceeds must go to education. Since 1976 there have been
two· exceptions to this: The first was in 1976/77 when legislation directed that
the Lottery proceeds ($90.7 million) be used to help balance the State budget.
And, from 1978·1980, legislation directed that about $4 million of the proceeds
from the Olympic Lottery be distributed to the Winter Olympic Trust Fund for
the benefit of winter sports education in New York. All the rest of revenue
earned to date has gone, or will go, to local school districts in New York.
a. How much goes to the State from each game?
A. Not lesS than 45% of the revenues from the Lotto and Instant games must
go to the State for education. From the Daily Numbers and Win-4 games, not
less than 35%.
a. How much goes to prizes?
A. Prizes in Instant games and Lotto are limited to not more than 40%; and not
more than 50% in Daily Numbers and Win-4.
Q. Why are big prizes paid over 20 years?
A. The law gives the Lottery Director the authority to determine how prizes are
paid. We have chosen to pay them over several years (usually 20) because:
Most winners of large Lottery prizes have not handled sums of money
like one million dollars or more. By paying over time, they have an
opportunity to pian and use the money effectively.
tottery prizes are taxed as normal income (we believe taxing Lottery
prizes is unfair; see related question) and if paid out in a lump sum,
e
e
more than half of the money available (under current federal and slate
law) would immediately be lost in taxes.
• It enables the Lottery to pay larger prizes. Part of the money received
over a 20-year period by a winner represents interest earned on that
investment as well as the original principal available for the prize. For
example, on June 8, a New Yorker won $5 million. The winner
received an iriitial payment of $238,000 and will receive 20 annual
annuity 'payments of $238,100 over the next 20 years. Without the
interest earnings, the prize would have been $2,203,048.
Q. If I win big, can I collect a lump sum?
A. No.
Q. If I die before the 20 years are up, who gets the money?
A.ln such cases, payment is made to the estate of the winner. The State does
not get the unpaid balance.
a. Does Lottery Prize money earn interest pending payment of the prizes
to the winners?
A. Yes. There are several categories of accounts for prize funds (Numbers
Reserve Fund. Lotto Reserve Fund, Annuity Guarantee Reserve Fund, Special Prize Fund) and all are in interest-bearing accounts. Interest received on
prize payment funds are ultimately used by the Lottery for payment of addi·
tiona! prizes.
a. What about unclaimed prizes?
A. By law, winners have one year to claim their prizes. After one year any
unclaimed prize money reverts to the State. From September 1976 to March
1985 that has amounted to over $27.6 million. The Lottery has supported and
will continue to support legislation to return unclaimed prize money to players
in the form of more prizes. So far we have not been successful.
a. Why are Lottery prizes taxed?
A. Because federal and state laws require it. The Lottery has· tried to have the
state and federal taxation on prizes removed, but thus far we have been
unsuccessful.
Francis W. Nye
Pvt. Frimcis W. Nye, son of
Annette Dragon of Selkirk, has
completed basic training at Fort
Sill, Okla.
Cadet Peter E. Zeh, son of Jan
and Katy Zeh of Voorheesville,
has completed an Air Force
Reserve Officer Training Corps
(ROTC) field training encamp-·
ment at Wright-Patterson Air
Force Base, Ohio. The curriculum includes orientations on jet aircraft, and physical fitness and survival training.
Zeh is a student at Clarkson
College, Potsdam.
Marine Pfc. John E. MacMillen, son of Wilkins and Joan
Mac Millen of Voorheesville,
recently reported for duty with the
3rd Marine Division, on Okinawa. A 1983 graduate of Berlin
Central High School,· Berlin, he
joined the M:lrihe Corps
Cadet Randal J. Shorr, son of
Myron H. Shorr of 21 Olympian
Drive, Bethlehem, and Marcia S.
Shorr of 3 Kevan Circle, Manlius,
N.Y., received practical work in
military leadership this summer at
the U.S. Army ROTC advanced
camp, Fort Bragg, N.C.
The six-week camp, attended
by cadets normally between their
third and fourth year of college,
includes instruction in communications, management and survival
training.
Successful completion of the
advanced camp and graduation
from college results in a commission as a second lieutenant in
either the U:S. ·Army, Army
Reserve or National Guard for the
cadet.
Time Out meetings
Mothers Time Out, a Christian
support group for mothers of preschoolers, meets each Monday
from 10 to II :30 a.m. at the
Delmar Reformed Church on
Delaware Ave.
The finest French
Tergal Voil
DRAPERIES
• Custom widths & lengths
• SeamleSs • Extra fullness
OVER
a. If I win $1 million, how much will I have to pay in taxes?
A. A lot. Lottery winnings are treated as "earned income;· which is added to
whatever other income you may have. Liability depends on total income as
well as number and type of exemptions authorized, current local, state and
federal lax laws, city and county of residence, number of dependents, how
returns are filed, etc. Because of these variables, it is not possible to give a
precise percentage.
tn
August, 1983.
50
%
OFF
LINENS
4
Corners
Delmar
~yaif
~:sss,;439-4979>ss~
PAGE 18- September 11, 1985- Tho Spotlight
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where there iS an allergic or' asthmatic pre-ccndition. ·' •. ., · o ·
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U.S.D.A. Choice - Boneless Beef
Bottom Round Roast
S"oo'dococ
Chuck fillet
138
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8
lb.
Californta - Orange fleshed
Sweet Cantaloupes
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Boneless
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Eye Round
Roast of Beef
•
lb.218 s
189. Shoulder '"'
L<lndon 8n>il
Where Req.
U.S.D.A. Choice • Banele" B1>ef
Pork Roast ~~·;:~.~~~·'·"298e
TopRounda:~·~·;·~~;;.,169e
Fresh- Hol.es ... lb.$3.18
U.S.OA Choice- Banele.. Beel
LambChops~.::;;'
Pkg.
aa~
Lb.
~ao"
lb.
Quarters
Scottowel·
Big Roll
s~;:, [email protected]
Fresh
Mushrooms
12-oz.
199.
Colors or Arts & Flowers
AU Natural
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6-Pack
GROCERIES
~
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Roll
. Imperial
Margarine
\-lb.
Pkg.
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59~-
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78Ce FrmtCocktail
178e Oranges
~05;-:0c.:.A~C>.:;o":'-'·-='"::::"'='"'::,:'':::'''c.'--:--==:'':::'c-=lb.
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PRODUCE
Westein Grain Fed Pork
ll"u"'nRnund
Steak fnrS"i"-•inH
16-oz. ·
lb.
THE BUTCHER BLOCK
. lb.
Pepsi~Cola
Seedless Grapes
~:118
'i'o~~~~0'188
Mt. Dew. Pepsi-free or
California.- Thompson White
8,0, 119e SodaAdirondack
78Ce
Tomatoes Slicing 59c e English Muffins 49c e Tomato Paste 3 '" 100e
Calofornia Valencia . I I 3 Slle
.Red. Ripe· 5•6 Size
.
Lb
Reg. ar O,et ·Aut. Fla•o" :?-Ltr. BtL Plu> Oep Where Req.
Del Monte
17-oz. Con
l"Ovenbe"- 6-Pock
Hunt's
6-oz. Cons
12-az Pkg
189e ChickenThighs 169e ClappPears 3,0,99ce WisellomeFries129e Ragu:::~:""
149e
159e Chicken:::;.::7•.~!::. 219e Pascal Celery 49ce Bath Tissue
116e Pork&Beans3,,. 100e
Fresh American· Shoulder Blade Bane
Chuck Fillet
U.S.D.A_ Chooce ·Boneless Bael Steak
lb.
Country Pride· Bonelu» Grade "A' Fresh
tb:.
Hud>on Volley· U.S No. I
Lb
Grade "A" fresh- Bonela»
Lb
Grown in N_Y_ Stole·
Cr~sp
lb.
B<Jnch
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Cattonelle- Who!" or Colo"
7.5-oz. Pkg.
Four 400-Sheet Roll>
Chunky Garden Sryle- or Homesryle Var.
'IM Camp's. In Sauce
32-oz: Jar
16-oz. Cans
Flounder Fillets 498e Turkey Breast~;::;;.~;:198e Fresh Eggplant 39c e Dynamo Detergent 199e Rice tJ~:~;~~~::~r:::~:;;~ 119e
fre~h
Grode "A' · A•oiL lues -Sot
lb
Grode "A" frozen · 3 ta 5 lbs.
Smoked Ham~;;;: 148e Select Slices
Olcle Virginia· Semi-Banele»
Lb.
lb.
for Slicong & Frymg - Royol Purple
•
lb.
Country Pride. Parry Pod Frozen
laundry "qUod
64-oz. Con!
159e Romaine Lettuce 39' e Ivory for Dishes 88 ce
Oscor Moyer· New A»orted \lor~eties 6-oz. Pkg.
fre>h Tender
VealforSclillopini699e C}!icken Wings 299e Prune Plums
Prov1m1 · Thonly SliCed Banele» Leg
lb.
5-lb. Bog
Hud>on Volley - ltolion
Lb
Liquid Detergent
22-az. Cant.
49ce Grape Jelly
lb.
32-oz. Jar
~.~~"'s~~~;.~.. 26,!e I i i IJ,~,;Jf;;.l;J,U} j , I
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P,.rdue- Grode "A" fre>h
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Deli Sliced
U.S.DA Choice - Bonele>s Beef
Eo. Lb.
Hotfoeld. Deli Sli~ed Woter Added
Cliiick'Ctibed
U.S.D.A. Ch'=!ite. Bonele.. Beef Steak
Half lb
lb.
Hall Lb-
Grand Un1<in • Said Below Co>!
I ·Go I. Cont
Birds Ey" · Regular or htro Cteamy
Donnan Regular- A"orted flo•or>
B-oz. Con!>
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Assorted flo•or>
6-oz. Cant..
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Fla~or>
5-oz. Pkg
Bea.nS~!:~\;,;:.:::···
4 7 ce
Del Monte Regular Vegetables
16-oz. Con
149e Wesson Corn Oil179e
Welch"s
Roast Beef
199e 1%I.ow Fat Milk 158e Cool Whip
2,"'99ce Jell-0 Pops
Chicken Wings 78Ce Bologna Granada 149e Yogurt
169e Yog,urt;::.., 4,0, 100e Niblets~:; :
Chuck for,.Stew 169e Smoked Ham
Uncle Sen'>
low In Saturated Fats
32-az. Btl.
~,~~~?~.~?acks
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79ce HEALTH & BEAUTY
198e St. Ives~::::::::.!,
329e
8-az. Cant
21.6-oz. Pkg
Combo Pak ·Alae or Jajobo
36-az. Pkg.
99ce Sudafed Tablets 219e
16-az. Pkg.
Decongestant
Pkg. al 24
189e
Eo. lb
Chicken Thighs 79ce
·Country Pride. Grode "A" fresll
Eo. lb.
ELSMERE - Delaware Plaza
OPEN - 24 hrs. - 7 days a week
GLENMONT- Town Squire Ctr.
OPEN- 24 hrs. Mon. -·Sat
Sun. 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.
The Spotlight-'- September 11.. 1985- PAGE 19
-.--. .......... (
~o~,
trl!.llti-' ~k~
.,.,.
·~ ~
Ill _...,...
New blood brings
Eagles fresh hope
Bethlehem Central-· opens . . lil.·n-·;·:J\vith the pre-season. performances
SaturdAy J. 1of John Lindsay, a junior from t.
with·· a iyoung team thinJin ;man"t•nDelmar who has returned to the;.-;
powet· bUt with high hOpes to shed: 4:fold ·after a scholastic detour to ·
the stigma of being the Suburban CBA in Albany, and Brian MeCouncil doormat fqr the past six Garrahan, a home-grown proseasons.
duct. After Saturday's four-way
Coach John Sodergren has scrimmage at Raveria, BC's thirdseveral positive factors going-for year coach pronounced that "we
him when the Eagles launch the should get a coqsistent, workman
1985 campaign in Latham against job" from Lindsay, and that
Shaker. (Kickoff 2 p.m.) One is McGarrahan "looked good run·the momentum that carries over ning the ball."
On a team with a critical need to
from last year.. BC's best since the
1978 championship season. The develop depth across the board,
other is a good-looking crop of Sodergren further solidified his
running backs that has inspired running back situation by bringSodergren to promise Eagle ing up a sophomore, Jim HoffI'
boosters that ••we're . going to man, from the JV squad just two
· Two next-door neighbors who never meet during
with Bethlehem's offense paired with Ravena's ·]
days before the Ravena exercise.
:nove the football on people."
the
regular
season
mixed
it
up
in
a
pre-campaign
defense,
BC's Adam Acquario (27) was caught
Ordinarily you wouldn't think Hoffman is the kid brother of scrimmage Saturday and nobody kept score. Just
behind the line by Bob Baranska of the Indians,
Mark
Hoffman,
who
started
both
that a 2-7 team like the 1984
as well, because they fared about even. On this play,
foreground.
R. H. Davis
Eagles would generate any mo- ways at tackle during the past two
mentum, but a closer ~ook reveals seasons before he Was lost to under a searing sun on a humid were getting a lot of people to the "there are still some positions. up
day last Saturday. As usual in pte- football pretty quick, and that's for grabs, and probably will be
that those Eagles were in every graduation in June.
Hoffman is one of five sopho- season skirmishes, there were always a good sign, even if we until Friday." Meanwhile, apart
game but two until the closing
minutes, and last year's freshman mores on BC's small but exuber- good things and bad, but overall didn't make the tackles we should from the usual bumps and bruises,
the team survived the scrimmage
team had the first winning record ant-squad, and therein lies a clue Sodergren said he was pleased . have."
he
saw.
·
Sodergren
~egged
off
naming
a
without incurring any significant
with
what
among all BC teams at any level to just how thin the ranks are in
..
I
was
certainly
impressed
with
starting
lineup,
declaring
that'
medical
casualties.
since that dream season seven Bethlehem. The other four have
years ago.
all but nailed down starting berths the effort the boys put out on a
As for those running backs, 'in Saturday's lid-lifter, and several day that was not suited for
Sodergren has been impressed could be starters on both offense. football," he said. "I think we're
going to be able to move the
and defense. ·
football
on the ground in normal
One is Eric Heathwaite, who
played center and defensive end in down-and-distance situations. I
the long workout on a steamy day was disappointed in the passing
in Ravena last weekend. "He held game. We didn't do what I had
up real well,"said Sodergren. ""He expected, so we11 be working on
pass patterns this week. We
got the job jone."
A Light Bethlehem Committee, lines will receive a "deed •: to their~ 1
looked at several receivers, and headed by Thomas Dobert of property.
Two of the others have well- everybody on the team got a
Anyone 'interested in purchas- ~
known Bethlehem names. Mike chance to play a lot. Because our Delmar, has been formed to raise
Hodge, ·son of assistant coach numbers are not what they should money to purchase lights for the ing a light, half a light or .a yard
Bethlehem Central High School line should send a check to the ·
Ken Hodge, will start on defense,
be, our biggest' concern is to
and Gary Mendel, . younger develop some depth, not only to footb,!'ll field. Organizers said Light Bethlehem Committee,
brother of last year's southpaw compensate for injuries, but to addition of the lights will mean a P.O. Box 32, Delmar 12054:
quarterback Steve Mendel, will give some kind of relief to people variety of athletic and other Other contributions, in any amactivities can take place there ount, also will be gratefully
start at tight end and in the who have to play both ways."
during
evening hours.
accepted, the committee noted.
defensive backfield. Then there's
On
defense
the
tackling
was
on
The committee hopes to have
Brian Cerneck, a linebacker who
Contributors' names will be
is also being groomed as a guard the shoddy side a little too·often to the lights installed by early announced periodically.
please the coaches, but that can be October.
irl the offensive line.
The total cost of the lights has
fixed whe.n the emphasis switches
Benjamin McFerran of Slinger- been estimated at $25,000 to
Bethlehem coaches ran 60 plays to fundamentals. In the Ravena
on offense and defended against scrimma"ge, Sodergren said, ••we lands is chairing the fund-raising $30,000.
60 plays from Mechanicville, swarmed to the ball very well. We part of the project, in which the
first activity is- to "sell" the 48 Coaches have class
Taconic Hills and host ~avena
lights that will be installed. Each Eleven Bethlehem Soccer Club
light will be "sold" for $400, or coaches recently completed a
half a light for $200, organizers course in soccer fundamentals
For Complete
Oewggraphics
said. Individuals, organizations or offered by the Capital District
businesses that purchase lights . Youth Soccer League.
Printers
The beat power tools money can ·
Composition
125 Adams St., Delmar, N.Y.
~uy cost leu when yo~ rent them
will have their names inscribed on
The nine-hour course. the fir.St
Call Gery VanDer Linden
from Shaker Rentals. Here's why:
and Printing
a brass plaque to be displayed at in a series covering different skill
(518) 439-5363
• You only pay a fraction of the
the high school.
levels, was coordinated by Roy
cost of. buying the new tool.
The committee also is selling Pfeil, state Select Team coach.
· • We offer professional quality
••ownership" of the yard lines on
tools .... perhaps better quality
Local coaches who took the
Because We Like to Make Life Easier
the football field. The goal lines course were Steven Bylsma, Jack
than you could buy.
for Advertisers and Advertising Agencies
and the 50-yard line will be "spld" Follis, AI Geis, Liz Hemstead,
• We maintain the power tool for
the
for $100 each. The 1-yard through Michael Heider, George Kawas, .
you. Our mechanics keep the
highest standards for
20-yard lines are $25 each and the Paul Kietzman, Jim·Roche, Mich- ;
NEW YORK PRESS SERVICE
maintaining the working
21-through 49-yard lines are $50 ael Smith, Fran Teeter and Jim '
condition of rental tools.
offers
each. Those who purchase yard Turner.
• We can give you complete
other·:f~otba'llrs:eason:orl
Drive to buy lights
on for BC's gridiron
,,
The Advertising Plan
For New York State
Instructions for using the tool so
you can get the Job done right
the first time.
• When you're done you don't
have to store the tool, you
bring the tool back to us.
• Next time you want the· best
tool money you can buy, rent
Next time you want the best
tool money can buy, rent
' It from us . . . And remember,
renting makes the_ best affordable.
We rent only the very best.
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SHAKER EQUIPMENT
RENTAL
869-0983
Rt. 155
Colonie, N.Y.
1/2 mile west of K-Marl, Rt. 155
PAGE 20 -September 11, 1985- Tho Spotlight
The New York Press Servrce is an affiliate of the New York Press Assocratron
....
%
NEW YORK PRESS SERVICE
Carriage House
QUIK KLEEN
Ravena
Don Carroll
Executrve Director
or
768-2096
eves
• Free estimates •-'Fullv.lnsured
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1/2 Bushel
7 a.m.-8 p.m.
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lackbirds' backfield
a brotherly mood
treated to a genuine 14-karat
act-and a backfield one.
that-when new head coach
Douglas unveils his 1985
uction on Saturday.
Blackbird boosters know what
expect from Bill Kelly, their
• 1
senior fullback and. coa in, the bread-and-butter
n of Tom Buckley's final
n who rushed for more than
yards in nine games as a
and added another 125 in
84 playoff. Now they will see
Kelly, a 5-foot-9, 148junior lining up alongside
im in one of the halfback slots.
Douglas.
lot from
the starting
another Celt,
the strong-armed
who started all 10
a year ago, and Jamie
hen, a scrappy runner who was
defensive standout. last season
getting a chance to put his
on the ball.
Douglas and his assistants
to be pretty well set on
starting lineup for the.
Conference opener at
with Chatham (kickoff I :30
m.) Dave Symula will be over
ball, Glenn Zautner and Mike
[)c,elc" at the guards, and Mike
ILJ<eL•Or<:nz.o and Mark Chyrywaty
John Graziano, Jim
and Mike Caimano·will be
ing on the flanks. All but
rK~Us ta~e· -seniors who
Y,arSity .~QotbalHast season. ·
Eight or nine of this cast will
also stay on the field on defense, at
least for starters. Two prime
defensive operatives are on the
medical list and are questionable
for Saturday. Chuck Gianatasio,
the bulkiest Blackbird of them all,
was wheeled off the field last
Saturday at Littham with a knee
injury suffered in the four-way
scrimmage with ·large schools
Shaker, Troy High and Johnstown, and Mark Gillenwalters is
hobbled by a mysterious knee
ailment.
Both were scheduled t.o see
doctors this week. Douglas said
early reports on Gianatasio indicated the injury was not serious.
If neither is ready for Chatham,
DeLorenzo will replace Gianatasio at DT with Rich Kane, a 215pounder, at the other tackle, and
Symula will impersonate Gillenwalters at noseguard. Zautner and
Chyrywaty will complete the front
wall.
Douglas, retaining the Buckley
format of two linebackers and
four in the secondary, will rotate
Brian De De,· Jeff Mazaferro and
Deeley up close. Bill Kelly will
play safe!y, Graziano and either
Caimano or Kevin Kelly in the
corners, and Cohen as strong
safety, or "monster back," as the·
terminology goes in Voorheesville.
The Blackbirds, always hungry
for physical combat, were scheduled fo'r another scrimmage yesterday (Tuesday) at Cobleskill
only .three days after a 2 1/2-hour
head-knocking with larger sch-
When Chatham High comes to Voorheesville to open the Capital
Conference football season Saturday, the visitors will see a lot of Rick
Kane, left, and Mike DeLorenzo.in the Blackbird forward wall, only
this time they will look even more .ominous in helmets and shoulder
~L
RHfu~
eorge W. rueh Sons
Fuel Oil • Kerosene
Fuel Oil. 89¢agat.
Due to the market conditions call for today's prices
i
•
.
Mobir
Cash Only
050
We'll make
Slow start
for booters
By Tanya Severino
In the pre-season of the Voor-·
heesville varsity soccer program,
the Blackbirds have proven that
they are a competitive team. Last
Saturday, in-the first half of the
Cobleskill Invitational Tournament, the Blackbirds fell to the
host team, 2-0.
"Cobleskill came out strong
and our defense played well, but
we couldn't contain the short
passing." observed Bob Crandall,
head coach at Voorheesville. "'We
need to be more aggressive and
more intense."
In the second half,. the 'Birds
tried to regain control of their
passing and had four legitimate
shots on goal, but had to give up a
penalty kick to Cobleskill.
Crandall hopes to find a successfid offensive combination and
create a quicker pace. The Blackbirds host Mechanicville Friday in
· their first league game. The team
is also looking forward to fadng
Schalrnont in their first of three
It was only a pre-season scrimmage so this pass thrown by Vince Foley, mee'tings on Saturday to finish up
Voorheesville quarterback, over the head of an unidentified teammate the Cobleskill tournament.
didn't count. The intended receiver (20),however, had a full step on the
R H. Davis
defender from Troy High in the dark jersey.
Teachers appointed
ools at Shaker. "We had some
good . sequences and some bad
ones," Douglas said after the
Latham exertion. "We moved
some on the ground, we threw
pretty well and I thought the
defense was further along than
usual." ·
As might he expected, there
we:e the usual missed assignments
and foul-ups in the season's first
test of coin bat. That means a lot of
work on timing this week.
In Voorhee~·vil/e The Spotlight is
!old at Voorheesville Pharmacy
and Stewarts
Appointments made recently
by the Bethlehem Central school
board include JoAnn McCarthy,
at the Clarksville Elementary
School; Mary Capobianco, Glenmont Elementary School, and
Monica Bush, part-time in home
economics at the high school.
s
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The Spotlight- September 1.1, 1985- PAGE 2t
)
.
}
Lady Eagles
young,~ strong
By Davd DeCecco
The halfback positions will be
held by Cathy Futia, Andrea Post
This year's Bethlehem girls and Regina Wahlen, all juniors,
soccer team can best be deScribed ' 3Joilg with sophs Caroline Jaczko
in just one word: young. Head and Heather Smith. Senior Katie
coach Kelly Kelle\, who led last Menzie, juniors Margot Downs,
year's BC boys frosh hooters to an Colleen Smith, Wendy Vogel and
outstanding 9-2 season, points out sophomores Shelly Miller and cothat on an IS-girl roster, just four capt.ain Lynette Stracke should be
are seniors.
seeing action as fullbacks this fall.
Three of these veterans play ·on
the front line, Jennifer Fritts, Given probation
Timothy J. Relyea, 21, of
Maureen Montanus and cocaptain Amy Zick join sopho- Albany, who was arrested June 27
ffiores Cindy Riegal and Liz in woods off Rockefeller Rd. with a
Keens in front. This combination stolen handgun in his possession,
proved very successful in the Lady according to police, Was sentenced
Eagles' 6-0 romp over Holy Sept. 3 in Bethlehem Town Court·
Names in a scrimmage last Friday. to three years on probation.
Fritts, Montanus, Zick and Keens Relyea, originally charged with a
each scored one goal while Riegal felony, had pleaded guilty to a
reduced charge of criminal possesnetted two.
sion of stolen property, third
Keller awaits the return of
sophomore goalie Allison Dor- degree, a misdemeanor, court
man from a family vacation. officials said.
Relyea was given credit for the
Though Dorman may be the firststringer, Kris Cooke, also a 41 days he spent in the Albany
sophomore, proved to be a skilled County Jail. A midnight curfew is
keeper by posting the Holy Names a condition of the probation,
a~thorities said.
shutout.
Lynette Stracke gets set to clear. the ball during a workout of the Bethlehem Central girls soccer
varsity.
J~ff Gonzales
'
In Elsmere The Spotlight is sold at
Paper Mill, Grand Union, C VS,
Johnson's and Brooks, Drugs.
Nine Mile !wo operators
will spend 20% of their careers
just in training. There are very few pro-
fessions that demand this level of expertise. This
assures you that the people in charge of providing you with a safe
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It takes a great deal of training to operate a nuclear
generating station. Reactor operators must be licensed by the
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Yet, even after obtaining a license, each operator still will
spend one out of every five weeks in training. During tbis time, all
technological and procedural information tliey have learned will
be completely reviewed. Operators will be required to stay
updated on significant industry events, plant systems, and
procedure modifications. Then, every year, each operator will
take a requalification examination, closely monitored by the NRC.
Nine Mile Two will be one of the most modern nuclear
generating stations in the world, and it soon will begin providing
electricity to millions of New Yorkers throughout the state to well
into the 21st Century.
It is the talented, knowledgeable people of Nine Mile Two
who will assure you of tbis commitment to a high standard of
performance.
Surprising turnout
for BC sticker squ~d~
Several sophomores are join in~
·the ranks, up from last year':
freshman team. Andrea Arm!
strong, Holly Mendelson an~
Wendy Sims have all proven to b(
more aggressive than Rice expect
ed, and they too have blended we
with the varsity. Emily Webe
should carry on the family trad·
tion of field hockey talent, as sh
has shown agility and a fliir f()'
Of the 18 girls on the team, eight the difficult reverse-stick man
are returning seniors from last euver.
One major setback the tea
year's team. Cindy Ferrari, a
three-year varsity player, Liz faces this year is the lack of a
Gray, Janet Lawrence, Michele· experienced goalie. Althoug
Maeder and Tricia Weber are all only three of last year's player
back with scores to settle, along graduated from the team, 1984';
with the three top scorers from the only goalie, Emily Holsinger, i1
'84 season: Roxanne Chin, Peg spending the first half of thi
Jeram and Cindy Lovelace. These school year as an exchang(
seniors will be playing together for student. Sims will be the ne~
the second year in a row, and Rice goalie.
One area that appears to bj
expects good things from them.
improved over last year is scorin~
A scrimmage against the J V Rice admits that '84 was a terribl~
team last Saturday proved that year for goals, despite superio
the ne.w additions, including field play, but hopes that her drill
seniors Kelly Fitzpatrick and Erin this season have put the girls bacl
Morrissey, and juniors Janet
into a sCoring pattern.
The girls have a scrimmag
Joachim,· Stephanie La Maitre,
Megan McGinn and Jackie Men- against the Albany Academy fo
Girls today (Wednesday) on th
zie, are blending well with the
high school fields at 3:45. Thei
more experienced varsity athletes.
first game incheduled for Frida
Of the six, the two seniors will
probably hold positions on the at Shen(mdehowa, a tradition
starting team.
ally tough team.
By Tania Stasiuk
The 1984 season wasn't a good
one for Bethlehem Central's field
hockey team, but varsity coach
Jeannette Rice feels that '85
should be one of BC's best, .. We
have the largest, most competitive
turnout ever. The girls are all
working harder than last year, and
we're anticipating a good season."
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PAGE 22- September 11, 1985- Tho Spotlight
YOUR COMFORT IS OUR CONCERN
a tiring Hethl~hem team. But the
defense :was alert and parried
numerous scoring threats. Bethlehem finally advanced the ball
into the Newton penalty area, but
For additional information,
Government surplus cheese wili
Adam Perry was tripped as he
be distributed in Albany County . call the Albany, County lnfoline at
attempted a shot on goal. _Perry's ·
Thursday. Local residents may 447-7000.
·penalty shoi was stopped by the
. obtain chees~ ~_at_ t?e followir:g
Newton goalie, wh9 punted the
CB'!!r calls police ,
sites:
t
.o;_
ball out of danger. The pressing
SOCCER
A motorist with a citizen band
In Bethlehem, Bethlehem Town
Ne\.\'ton offense scored a goal
radio in his-vehicle alerted -BethleHall,
445
Delaware
Ave.,
will
be
wnen they put ,;ght players in the
hem police early Sunday when he ·
Bethlehem· end of the field. The distributing between 10 a.m. and 3 spotted an erratic driver on Elm
climbed_ wearily into their cars for
p.m.
For Voorheesville residents,
the trip to NewtOn to ·meet the game was tied, 2-2, with 10
the distribution -site is St. Ave. As a result, a Delmar
minutes
left
to
play.
Newton parents who would feed
Matthew's Church on Mountain woman, 37, faces a misdemeanor
and house .the players for the
Bethli:hem Snarks had not
View St., starting at 10 a.m. New charge of driving "Yhile intoxinight. Members of the Bethlehem come all that way to go home
Scotland residents may obtain cated, police said. The CB radio
team were: paired with New~on without a victory. Although the
surplus
cheese
at
the at headquarters operates on
team members and taken to their team was tired due to a limited
Onesquethaw Reformed ·church, Channel 9, the emergency channeL
homes to stay overnigh~. Since number of su:bstitutions, ihey
Terry Town Rd. between 10 a.m.
Four other motorists_ face
there were n,o girls on the Newton mustered their remaining- energy
and 2 p.m. And in Ravena cheese misdemeanor DWl charges as a
club, the- two Bethlehem young for the final moments. The opporwill be distributed Friday from 10 result of Bethlehem police action
ladies elected to stay at Howard ttmity. came when -Adam Perry ·a.m.' to noon at the Ravena Bible
this week. A New York City man
Johnson's along with their tea~ received a pass on a give-and-go
Training Center, 10 Edna Ave.
was stopped about 3:30 a.m.
parents.
from his right wing and dribbled
The surplus che·ese is free to Sunday on· Delaware Ave. at
The sun came out the next day into the right side of the Newton
those
families
on
public Evelyri Dr.; ~n Altamont woman
and as an additional omen of good penalty area. He kicked the ball
assistance, persons·· eligible for waS pulled ·aver at 10:40 p.m.
fortune, an orange soccer ball "Yas towards the left corner of the goaL
Supplemental Security Income~ Friday on JDelaware Ave. at
seen on the roof of the restaur(!nt The ball ricocheted off a defender· those eligible fqr HEAP (Home Howard PL;:a Slingerlands man
right below the Motel window. and crossed the goal lin.e for a
Energy Assistance Program) and was nabbed on Rt. 851ast 1uesday
Since our team's jerseys were Bethlehem score. The game erided
those receiving unemployment and_ a Feufa Bush man was
orange, ~e considered . this a with a 3-2 victory for Bethlehem
benefits from pr'ivate industry or stopped· about 12:20 a.m. last
positive sign. However, when we and a special celebration for_ the government.
·
Monday on ~L 32, police said.
'·
arrived' at the field of play, we Adam Perry who turned II this
were greeted by the Newton Tigers day, Sept. 7.
with their orange shirts and black
• All New Modern Equfpment
Cardio-Vascular H9alth, 6 Computer Cycles
short-s. So much for omens.
The Bethlehem team, in alpha• Aid To Weight Cqntrol
The Bethlehem players were betical order: Gabrielle and Jon- ·
Individualized Program & Instruction
• Area's Best EQuipped Nautilus Facility
-.much sharper and more relax~d .athan Belfort, Aaron Col_man,
• Saunas, Steam And Showers
Richard Downey, Brent Dzekciothan they were the day before, and
• A Complete Circuit Of Women's
\Mth o One Year Membershrp
played tenaciously, Bethlehem rius, Sean Hawley, Charles Kawautilus
• Nursery
scored first but Newton got it right · as, Kirsten Matarrese, Kyle Mc• Tanning Booth
Carthy,
Brian
McGrath,
Adam
Wrth
o
3
Month
Membershrp
back 'when they scored on a
• Co-ed Facilities
Ofter
Good
Thru
9/15/85
breakaway. This game was shap- Perry, Joseph Weber, and Jessica
• Gift Certificates
Call 439-1200 for a free trio! workout
• One low Price
inl! uo to be an exciting contest. Williams. Coach is Georges Bel• Open 7 Days ~
Two successive Bethlehem goals fort, and team pa-rents on the trip
154-B DELAWARE AVE.
. DELMAR
AM - 9 PM IS:X2
. DELMAR
were nullified when the referee were ·Donald Dzekciorius, Fred.,BPhond Grand Un1on)
NAUTILUS, INC.
whistled the team offside each erick Downey, George Kawasand
Dick
Matarrese.
time. On the third posseSsion, a
Bethlehem corner kick was head(This article was wrillen by
ed into the Newton goal by the George Kawas).
SIDING~
right halfback' on a picture-perfect
~'play. The first half ended with the
score Snarks 2, Tigers I.
READ THE LA,TEST
Cheese Day Thursday
Snark·attack
in Boston -area
with.:
It was
keen anticipation
that 13 members of the Bethlehem
under-12- ( B)"sOccer-team traveled
to the Boston area for a weekend
doubleheader with· the Needham
and Newton under-12 s.occer
clubs. The four-car convoy c.arrying the team- had to proceed
gingerly to arrive before Boston
traffic became too heavy and
make a 6 p.m. schedllled game.
If you have ever read Lewis
Carroll (Alice In Wonderland) or
have seen this team play, you can.
understand why the coach has
nicknamed them the Snarks.
After delays due to rain, heavy
traffic and the late arrival of one
car, the game did not begin until
6:30. The combination of overcast
sky, the huge field and black-andwhite uniforms of the Needham
Atoms was foreboding for the
Bethlehem team.
With no time
io
warm up,
Betftlel1em -. was.on defense continually for the first part of the
game. Excellent defense broke
many Needham scoring opportunities. However, constailt pressure by their forwards and halfbacks netted a goal when a kicked
ball sailed high over the outstretched arms of the· Bethlehem
goalie. Bethlehem did have one
scoring oppo-rtunity off a corner
ick; but the ball was cleared by
Atoms' defense. The first half
h-"··" with the Needham· team
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ham g'oali~ blocked. After a
more minUtes elapsed, the
referee called the game over
beca'uSc. of dirkncss with 10
' .
left to play. A cranky,
'tii-ed Bethlehem team, which had
_inisscd two scoring chances,
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The second half b~gan at a
faster pace as the Newton team
tried to gain the equalizer against
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FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
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Name--------------------------------7Address-----------------------------Phone-------------------------------MAIL TO: Spotlight, P.O. Box 100, Delmar, N.Y. ,1205'4
_OR BRING TO: Spotlight, 125 Adams St., Delmar, N.Y.
',.
The Spotlight- September 11,1985- PAGE 23.
fhis season will be a challenge
to the team to keep its winning
streak intact. The team is led by
seniors Tania Stasiuk and Jen ·
Hammer and junior tricia Shultes: The other varsity runners are
BC harriers still
chasing the ladies
. ~ ~- "___ .
By,~h~~~•• Henrikson ; ,
{
_ "
1
!
.' ·~-··running ;ja)'vee-, but csho.w. the
Mrt~:r·J_~- ~tririg of disaPPOiflti~g: ·j pcitep1iab1:6 ·mov.e up-- to -varsity j
sealcinst~·thf: Bethlehem Cenh.-al :~.,.withfaJittle-hard work.·
b·o:y~/'cf~~~=C'ountry ~earn_ loo~s to
Coach John Nyilis believes that
break .500 for the first time m 15 this is the best team he has had in
years
·
several years. Last year the boys
The .team
is
led
by
Pete
Winwent 4-7, but they appearto have
.
kler, a JUmor who played football improved substantially. With just
last year, sophomore Tommy one senior on the varsity squad,
Nyilis and senior Mark LeBeau, a Nyilis-sees this season as a year of
transfer from Shaker. The re- success and building in orderto be
mainder of the varsity squad a contend~r for the Suburban
consists of junior Dave DeCecco Council championship next year.
and three sophomores, Craig
Isenberg, Brendan Kearse and
The BC girls crosS-country
'Brendan Mitchell, who is showing team is coming off several excelstrong potential in his first season lent seasons. They have won- 26
on the team despite an injured calf dual meets irt a row over the last
muscle. Senior Greg Dobert, iwoandahalfyears. Last year the
along with freshmen Ian Berry girls were 11-0and ranked seventh
and Pat Leamy are currently in the state.
Voorheesville looking
to further X-C dynasty
By Rick Leach
When people think of Voorheesville sports they think of their
26-1 basketball team or their
many excellent football teamS.
These teams all deserve recognition, but one sport in Voorheesville that never seems to get the
recognition it deserves is croSs.;
country.
'To put it simply, like the Boston
Celtics in the N BA or the New
York Yankees of baseball, the
Blackbird cross-country team is a
dynasty. In their 19 years of
existence, all coached by Ken
Kirik, they have had only one
losing season, and have won·ll
out of the last 12 Colonial Council
championships. With returnees
like Chuck Rogers, Len Mertens,
'
Jim Volkwein, Ed Donohue and
Pat Lentlie this season should pe
no different.· Rogers, second in-the
league, and Mertens, second in the
sectionals a year- ago, are two of
the area's top runners.
Kirik expects Cohoes to be the
main-roadblock in the Blackbirds'
quest for another league title. The
veteran coach is also looking
towards Schuylerville and Hoosic
Valley to contend with the Birds
for sectional honOrs. Voorheesville came in second in the
Sectionals last year and were
champs the previous year.
Voorheesville starts off their
·season on ·sept. 17 against JohnStown. They have their first- big
meet, with 15 to 20 other schools,
at
State on
KILL
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Junior
Tennis
Ages 4-21
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-
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Sept. 20 - Dec. 20
Heather .Wolfe, a junior who·'ri:m
1
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For More Information
Call Phil Ackerman
Michelle Kahn 436-0838
By Bart Gottesman
•i
r?·< . ol}~rt_e;sb_ur'S-' !~~t _se~s:o~ 1 ~~-
oO
r:-::-:-c---:--'-'-~----.
Ft~os§
After a long. disappoint'iJi:f
COUNTRY
season last year, the RCS croSs-., '.·-;·?
coU.nti-Y team is looking forwafd
to a promis.ing 1985.
the team, and Tracy just joined the
This year's team is twice the si7.e team so we will have to wait and
of last year's. One of the many new see what she can do."
additions to the team is first-year
Since the Indians we~t without
c9ach Ron Racey, Ravena's third
a
victory last year one Would
crOss country coach in as many
expect this tq be a rebuilding year,
·years.
Unlike·
past
coaches,
Racey
Nyilis1 sees this .team as very
is experienced in 'the sport~he but Racey does not feel this is the
strong in the first three runners,
was the assistant coach at Shaker case and he expects his team to
but the fourth at).d fifth run hers
and
also ran on the. RCS cross place well in.the Colonial Council
will decide the oUtcome of close
standings. The season starts on
meets. This team does not have a country team during his foul- years
Satui-day when the Indians comof high school.
single outstanding· runner, as tit
pete. in the Gloversville Invitahas had in ·years past -such as
Leading this year's team will be tional, the first of six invitationals
Carey and Christine Ainsworth, the three co-captains, senior Brian
that Ravena will attend this year.
who graduated last year. Still, · Perry and juniors Lance Tucker
Nyilis foresees a good season, with and Paul Curley. Perry, the only The Indians' first dual match wili ~
a chance to go undefeated once bright spot on last year's team be at home on Sept. 24 ar4 p.m._:
-agaip.
"has the potential to run with
The first meet of the year is the anybody in the Council," accordFor young gymnasts
Gloversville Invitational on Sat- ing to Racey. Tucker sh_owed a lot
The Town of Bethlehem Parks'
urday. The first of two home of improvement last season and in
and Recreation Department is:
meets is next Wednesday against his second· year should be. among
offering a gymnastics program for
Burnt Hills. This should be a good the top finishers aloilg with Perry.
children in grades 2 through 12
good measure of how the season Curley, who ran his freshman year
beginning'Tuesday, Sept. 17, and
will turn out for both the boys and but sat out last year, also appears
continuing through Nov. 19.
the iirls. The freshmen sta~t at to have the potential to be among
3:45, with the girls' varsity at the top finishers.
·
The program will be conducted
about 4:30 and· the boys varsity at
in the Bethlehem Central Middle
The only other runner with
approximately 5 p.m.
School boys' gym with beginners
experience is junior Mark Alfrom 6:30 to 8 p.m. and interbright, who will fill the fourth
Most of a bike found. · varsity position. According to ~ediates and advanced partie~·!
!pants from 8 to 9:30 p.m.
'I
Racey, Albright h~s shown much
A: yellow bicycle frame, without progress and will be a big factor.
Pre-registration is required and
wheels, was found Saturday in the The major problem facing· the·
can be made by telephone or in
woods off Pine St. in Delmar, Indians this season is the lack of
person at the Elm Ave. Park
according to Bethlehem police overall experience. Reflecting on
office, Elm Ave. Delmar, tele·reports.
this lack of experience, Racey
phone 439-4131. Office hours are:
In addition, a boy's bicycle said, "we need seven runners to
8:30a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays.'
valued· at $325 was reported field. a varsity team, an-d after the
Fee is $13 per participant. The
missing from the Normanside top four (Perry, Tucker, ·curlev
program is open t<;> residents of th
Country Club on Thursday and a and Albright) the rest of the lineup
town and the Bethlehem Central
27-inch boy's bike that had been has to be filled with fi.rst-year
School District.
locked in the basement of a iunners." Those include juniors
Village Dr. apartment building Matt Tice, Ed Smith, Heath Moss
$500 and jail
was reported missing last Wed- and Darryl Boehlke, and freshColleen A. Gabriels of Slingernesday. The latter bike is register- men David Cary, Jason Tucker,
lands, who was arrested June 23
Tony Johnston, Josh-Curley and
ed with the town.
on a charge of driving while
Phillip Goodrich.
intoxicated as a felony, was fined
Since only three girls· came out
$500 Sept. 3 in Bethlehem Town
OLOF H. LUNDBERG
for cross country lj.ist .Year, they
Court and sentenced to 21 days in
were unable to qualify as a team
.
and
the
Albany County Jail, accordand no score was kept when they
TUCKER SMITH
ing to a court official. The wo~man,'
ran. The three girls, Theresa
INSURANCE AGENCY
whose license to drive was revokDarlington and Tammy and
ed for the three-year term of a
'~
Sherri Stalker, are back this
probation sentence ·that also was
'
season as eighth graders. The girls
handed down, pleaded guilty to a
~ need five members to qualify as a
reduced charge of misdemeanor
,
t team and with the addition of
OWl, officials said.
.
senior Stephanie Wheeler and
The felony charge had been!
sophomore Tracy·Carrol the girls'
filed because of a previous OWl
~ ~i~t'~~~aelp~cores and team record conviction, authorities said.
·I
·
Gabriels
was
stopped
by
BethleJoAnn Pacyna & Alex Snow.
"Theresa is an outstanding
hem police about 4 a.m. June 231
159 Delaware Avenue
• runner and the Stalker twins have
on Delaware Ave. near Plymouth'
:LDelmar, New Yor~, developed much faster than antiAve., in Elsmere, according to!
439 7646
cipated," Racey stated. "Step1
police reports.
•
·
.hanic should be a nice addition to
e1ghth-grader Cathy ·salla',' who'.
w~~- ~~t~a~~-i-~·g _13~t' ')'du .a·s~:i ·
seventh-grader, and freshmen
Amy Peterson and Laura Klcinke.
Unfortunately, Anne Carey, who
was th_e No. I runner last year as a
sophomore, is not_coming out for
the team this year.
1
~·:
I
!
9'
~
FOR ALL
·yoUR
~INSURANCE~
~
NEEDS
1
:::(N:e:x:t:t:o:F:":.":n:d~~:s:J::::~.:::~
Sign-Up Today
For Best Times
New coach, large squad
make RCS future brighter
Ever wonder
,i£ you'r~ paying
too much for
car insurance?
Ask one of your neighbors about State Farm's low rates
and fast, dependable service. Then give me a call.
MARK T. RAYMOND INSURANCE
155 DELAWARE AVENUE
(Opposite Delaware Plaza)
Delmar, New York
439-6222
70 Palmer /We.
Delmar, N.Y. 12054
INSUU•NC!,_
Stale Farm Mutual
Automobile Insurance Company
Home Office: Bloomington, Illinois
~~------------~------'
PAGE 24 -September 11, 1985- The Spotlight
LAWN &GARDEN
POWER
EQUIPMENT
SERVICE
• Authorized dealer for
LAWN-BOY and JACOBSEN
Lawn mowers
HOMELITE CHAINSAWS
BRIGGS and STRATTON
TECUMSEH and KOHLER engines.
• FREE pickup and delivery
• Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-6:00p.m .
Sat. 8:30 a.m.-5:00p.m.
/
i
'
I, { ./
·- ~!Jj
WEISHEIT
. ENGINE WORKS, INC.
WEISHEIT ROAD,
GLENMONT, N.Y. 12077
767-2380
BT A fall tournament
goes into second week
The .~ecqpd. )"eekend of the Johnson against Tad and Lyn
Beihleheffi
T·e·~rii~
ASSO_ci~fiOri'S
_._ Phelps.
. · , ;
•
, ;.~
• I '
· · , . t_ '
r
J
fail ;t,?urr).arpe~~~ gets .unJd:er. ~~Y,,
-Men's' 'singles semifinals: and -~
Friday afternoon when the "A"..
flighi goeS ·in·t0 adtlo'r-J. ·w~ciihe~·;. meri's doubles semis will be played
permitting, both A and B finals duri_ng the week~ again; weather,
are scheduled for Sunday.
permitting.
Men's and women's A singles
After Last weekend's B flight
action, Sue Nye and ~am Pollard get underway at 5:30p.m. Friday
emerged as the women's singles cit the Bethlehem Central Middle
finalists, the team of Arlene- School courts, with some matches
Nygern and Molly• Kirkwood will to be played at the high school and
face Julie and Marvmell Hart in Elm Ave. Park. Men's and
the women's double~ finals, and in women's doubles start at noon
mixed doubles the finalists will be Saturday, with mixed doubles set
·Jesse Holloway and .Juanita ·to get underway at 2 p.m.
Warner action was fast arid furious On-the first weekend of the
eat and Hail-Mary
,-··ercome Bethlehem
Sunday was highlighted by the
llse:asc>n opener of Bethlehem Pop
with both teams playing
against Albany.
The Midget Eagles battled to a
llcliff-!1anger finish. The game was
6-6 until the last I0 seconds
a Hail-Mary pass by Albany
llre:sullted . .in a disappointing 12-6
Food for thought
The heat and· humidity was a
deciding factor for the undermanned PeeWee. Falcon squad.
The team played extremely well
throughout the game and never let
up in the disappointing 19-13
contest. A fumble recovery· by
Mike Pratt put the Falcons into
scoring position. The touchdowns were scored by Tim Mooney and Brent Kosoc. The sole
extra-point ~as rammed in by
Mik Gambelunghe. Quarterback
Tim
M coney's
interception
provided additional excitement.
Mi?lissa Kleit~
'
Cat dance
Best of the crop
The Super Seven 4-H Club of
The Altamont Station Squares Delmar received a total of67 blue
open its Western square dance ribbons and 14 red ribbons for
n Friday with a mainstream exhibits at the AltamOnt Fair.
Black Cat dance at the
Members exhibiting were Billy
ilderland Elementary School,
Greer,
Deanna Greer, Gwen
20, from 8 to II p.m. AI
Jones, Laura Kleinke, Wendy
l~:;~:~ti will be calling the Kleinke and Traci Layman.
lk
including a plus tip, and .
the rounds.
Billy Greer also won a ribbon
11~~., .. driving course
Alive Mature D'riving"
conducted
by
the
IIArner·ica.n Association of Retired
will be held at the
~Bethl<ohem Town Hall Sept. 19
20 from I
4 p.m.
course,
offered
in
~cooperaLticm with the Bethlehem
O<;em;'" Services, entitles graduates
a discount on auto insurance
most insurance companies.
fee is $10.
For information and regisllmLuon, call Jack Pellettier at 43913: ClaSs size is limited.
to
POCONO
POOL
COMPANY
28 so. Main St. Voorheesville
WINTERIZING
CHEMICALS
and
WINTER
COVERS
• custom made
• All sizes
765-2221
Running the BT A Open this year are Mary Ann Harper and Jamie
Greenburg, shown here keeping scores at the Bethlehem Central
Middle School courts.
Jeff Gonzalez
SAUNA • NAUTILUS • AEROBICS • RAQUETBALL o KARATE • MASSAGE
·Scholarship- won
David Kaczynski of Delmar, a
junior at Clarkson University, was
recently aWarded a National
Electronic Distributors Association scholarship.
You weren't le€Uing
!I
enough to do anything. But
when someone put an arm '
around you and held your
·hand, you just knew you were
going to feel better. Today,
North America's largest full
service provider of nurses and
other health care pro/essDrnls
helps keep traditions like that
alive. We remember what core
is all about. We're available
24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
'f11.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.11
IScharffs~
TruQ}Jo., Inc.
I~
m
~
~(Next to Friendly's)
o~
~
:t
ol
_:.
g
c
:l
~
:t
ii
!;i
0
439-2778 o
•
r
NURSERY• TANNING HUT • WALLYBALL • 4 STAFF PROFESSIONALS• .
OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK
t allan
and inital assessment
of your home health care ·
needs.
Rt. 85
New Salem
463-2171
Medical
Personnel Pool.
INC.
765-2702
765-2435
GOOD SELECTION OF PRE-OWNED
SAAB'S AND USED TRUCKS
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM
D.L. MOVERS INC.
''Moving With PRIDE for·
over a quarter of a century"
M 0 V E RS
MANY NEW MODELS IN STOCK
USED CARS & TRUCKS
Honda Accord .. $4400
1982 Honda Accord ... $5500
1980 Mazda 626 .. ; ... $3995
1981 Datsun 4 dr. Maxima$5995
1981 Mazda RX7., .... $5500
1981
Long
Distance
ICC-87112
Agent lor
WOHD-WIO'e MOVING
412 KENWOOD AVE.
DELMAR, N.Y.
!5
o • MORE LEGITIMATE Nautilus Stations
ffi • MORE WOMEN'S Circuits!
~ • MORE Cardiovascular Equipment!
:l: • MORE Fitness-Recreation OPTIONS!
z • MORE LOWER-PRICED SPECIALS than any other
Nautilus Club in the area!
~CALL NOW ... to set your appointment to find out about both
~our SEPTEMBER DISCOUNT PRICES and our TIME-ADD
« ONS! WIN EITHER WAY! AT THE
;:)
.
'
~ DELMAR ATHLETIC CLUB -THE RIGHT CHOICE!
Cail us todily for a free consul-
&
FOR-HEATING FUELS
~
Glenmont
~
~
465-3861
~
So. B~lhlehem
~
~
Iii:
767·9056
~
llillo-.1.1.1.1.1.1.11.1.1.1..:
(D~~~~270 )
•
~
; GET FA.R MORE FOR YOUR
g
FITNE$$ DOLLAR at the
~
DELMAR ATHLETIC CLUB!
5
for his vegetable entry at the
Syracuse State Fair.
I~
Members of the Bethlehem
Chapter, American Association
of Retired Persons·, will hear a talk
from Anne Rogan, director of
nutrition programs at Russell
Sage College, at the group's Sept.
17 meeting.
Her topic is "Latest Do's and
Don't's About the Food We Eat."
The AARP meets at I p.m. at the
First United Methodist Church,
Kenwood Ave., Delmar, with a
social hour at 12:30 p.m.·
439-5210
-~-
The Spotlight- September 11, 1985- PAGE 25 _
.: J"
T
\"1
•
4
~
H , • :
•
t• ., a:s.... ,,:.w
l • '
I
.
'
.'
"
1"·'
·~"E===:==
AUTOMOTIVE
r..- - - - - - - - '76 PACER auto, ale, snow tires,
good condition. After 5, 439-9447.
CLASSIFIEDS
_
.
-.
· - - - - - - - - - - ,.PRICE
flashing WAR!
arroW Super
sign, deluxe
$259
complete. Lighted, no arrow, $237.
Non-lighted
$189.
Warranty.
Minimum $3.00 for 10 words, 25 cents each additional word, payable in
Guaranteed never undersold! Can
79 JAG XJGL 56K, blue, $10,500,
advance before 1 pm Monday "for publication Wednesday. Submit in
see locally_. Factory: 1{800.) 423person or by mail with check or money order to
:,·p
.,.,_{1vt..im,,e_. {nys~a._c,·)
u ... nll
439-1913.
163 r :.·
125AdamsStreet, Delmar, New York 12054
j
-! ~<=>- 1 ~·-·
_
,
,., ... 11 r·
1978
FORD
FAIRMONT
BALDWtN ACR6SONIC ·'
stationwagon.
66,000
miles.:, . _ ..... •
._ .... .,_,_
II\._ i
........
... ..,
_,_., ,;:,,... ,. '·'!!,
...
,.,Red __ mabog(:lny
..
1
Automatic, 6 cylinders, air, snow
t
,..,
·i
_
fT·
r
,.
l
....
,.
._. .... "' ..... p sond.itioo.,_
1$J
\.1ft
•
_) .
1
1
1
11
1
1
tires.
$1.400.
439-4523 -,
"1 - L., !l: • , • "''t. teievlsrons,
,teleph\>nes,' .. flENTAt. ASSIST. ANl';'wn( train -.firm. 439_-4479 after 5 p.m.
weekElnQS
~~10:Call
ev~~bing:s,;~
H ;lSUSINEs"s a.·p'p'oRTUiiniV' -··~~I
_._,._,.,..
and help customers. Great after Mon. & Tues., 8-4:30.463-3462.
SOLID PINE BUNK BEDS, good
'76 AMC PACER - 6 cyl., auto.,
START YOUR OWN BUSINESS school JOb. PreciSion Electromcs.
condition new mattresses. Call
A/C, good tires, radio, one owner,
439-8011
RELIAB.LE LOCAL COLLEGE
•
Pressure Wash Systems. Call439,·
STUDENT
to
do
yard
after 6. 43 9-020 6.
57,000 miles, some rust, $950.4393471 eVes. and ask for John.
FULL OR PART~TIME for Hoogy's maintenance 2 to 4 hours weekly.
6029.
USED B/W TV's, 17 inch, 12 inch.
team, apply in person Hoagy's 439-+769.
OWN YOUR OWNjean-sportwear;
1980 PONTIAC SUNBIRD P.S.,
Electric guitar amp/microphone.
Corner,
1562
New
ladies apparel, childrens, larg-e Village
439-0222 eves.
AM/FM, sunroof, 50,000 miles.
RAKING
&
MOWING
size, combination store, petites, Scotland Rd., Slingerlands. 439Must sell. $1,650. 439-2047.
4420
WEEKENDS.
Saturday
and/or
maternity, accessories. Jordache,
BIKES. 20" BOYS DIRT, Royce
Sunday, start immediately. RePly
'77 OLDSMOBILE Delta 88 Chic, Lee, Levi, E Z street, lzod, . MANAGEMENT TRAINEE need
Union, $25. 26" ladies and 26"
to Box "M" The Spotlight,· 125
Royale, 2 door, clean, $1500, call Esprit, Tomboy, Calvin Klein, car, high potential positions. Call
men's, $15 each. 439-1845.
Street,
Delmar,
NY
12054.
Adams
Sergio Valen'te, Evan Picone, Liz 439-0115.
439-9572.
KIRBY VACUUM; all attachments,
Claiborne,
Members
only,
PART-TIME TELLER POSLTION
·1975 CHEVY. MALIBU; good Gasoline, Healttitex, ove~ 1000 CHILD CARE for 6 yr. old. After
3 yrs. old, used 6 mos. 439-7391. ~
available at Albany Savings Bank.
condition, runs well, asking $700. others. $13,300 to $24,900 inven- school and vacatiOns, my Delmar
.SALE:, Battery-powered
. . ---r~·;
Every Wednesday aod Friday 3:30FOR
Tony at 237-9311 or 768-2332.
tory, Training, Fixtures, Grand home.
Mon-Fri.
References 7:30, Every Saturday 9:30-2:30.
three-wheeled vehicle {Lark),. like
opening, etc. Can open. 15 days required. 439-4942 mprnings.
Contact Mr. Geyer 445-2185.
'82 TIOGA M.H. 22,000 miles Mr. Bing (404) 252-4489.
new .. For · handicapped people.· A
sleeps 5-6, excellent. 439-4991.
Origimil price $2,145. Will sell for ,
PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPER EXPERIENCED, LOVING CHILD
$1,200. Call 439-5430. :
Pro-CLEAN CARPET CLEANING. Slingerlands. Some cooking, 20- CARE provider for part-time work
BABYSITTING------ Expert residential and commercial 25 hrs week. $100. Afternoons thru
in my Voorheesville home, starting
$10 __ . ZENITH TABLE RADIO.
carpet and upholstery cleaning. dinner, older person acceptable- after Labor Day. Must have own
Push button, AM/FM, nice tone.
BABYSITTING
MY
DELMAR
Call 382-8240.
Call
weekdays,
7-8
p.m.,
transp_ortation.
References
Excellent condition.- 767-2726.
HOME
on
Delaware
Ave.
weekends 2-4 p.m. 439-6641.
required. Call Holly 765-4213.
Experienced mother. Tc;>ddlers
PING-PONG TABLE, full size, 'J
preferred. References. 439-5920. • CLEANING SERVICE _ _ __
EXPERIENCED
AUTO
ME- TEACHER
AND
TEACHER'S . hinged in center, excellent, $45. !
CHANIC-with own tools, full tim'e,
Also old-fashioned cast iron push -·i
RESPONSIBLE PERSON to sit for
HOUSE CLEANING reasonable. benefits. Reply to Box A, The AIDE positions part-time, after
lawn mower $20. 768-2695. ·
infant. Fulltime, references requir- reliable, references. Call after 5 Spotlight, PO Box 100, Delmar,NY school child care program. Send
resume to: School's Out, Inc., 428
ed. Excellent corripensation. Call p.m. 756-3677.
12054.
PIANO upright, tuned. new keys, !i
Kenwood Avenue, Delmar, . NY
765-3680.
$325. 439-0786.
OFFICE CLEANING ~ General AFrER SCHOOL, WEEKENDS, 12054.
cleaning -done. floors buffed and Kennel help, clean up. High school
LAND FOR $100 CAN BE FOUND . ·'
PART-TIME'- D.l. Movers. 439waxed. By job or contract. Call Bill Jr. or Sr. preferred. Delmar Animal
DAY CARE ..;.,Licensed family Day
by suoscribing to NEW' YORK. •
5210.
439-2792.
Care in Delmar. Only six children;
Hospital. 439-9361, 9-5.
PUBLIC AUCTION BULLETIN. '
excellent pre-school program;
HAIRDRESSER: 2 years recent
Lists
of
county
auctions,
CHILD CARE Responsible person
experienced, certified teacher.
experience.
Leonardo
Hair
equipment and sheriff sale's. P.O.
DOG GROOMING _ _ _...;c__
to care for our 4 and 6 year olds,
Ages 3 and up; full/part-time. 439Designers. 439-6066 ..
Box 512, Owego, NY 13827. . ,
1844.
DOG GROOMING & BOARDING Monday thru Thursday 3pm-6pm,
(nyscan)
BABYSITTER- Delmar, SlingPet supplies, dog food. Marjem convenient Slingerlands location.
erlands, Voorheesvill_e area. Ex439-6906.
CLARINET . Bundy, ·-excellent •II
Kennels. 767-9718.
SITTER weekdays 2:15 to 5 for boy
perienced mother to care for 31/2
condition, fair price, 4398-4796 . ,
11. Mature, love kids. $2.00
CASHIER PART-TIME. Mostly and 9 month old boys, weekday
morning or evening. 1' --~p- 1
-- •
hr., eves. 439-5046
FURNITURE REPAIR/REFIN._ afternoons or evenings. No afternoons. References 439-5712.
SOFA $175, 19" color T:v. $175, ·"j
FURNITURE
REFINISHING experience necessary. Respond
FT/PT,
BABYSITTING
Bearcat scanner $75.·,797"3020<:H1t''
reasonable,
free
estimates, Box "J" c/o The Spotlight, 125
references. 439-1494.
references available. 434-3796 Adams Street, Delmar, NY 12054.
WHITE PINE TREES ·all sizes, $5' '
HOME IMPROVEMENT ______
leave ll"!essage.
PART-TIME, M-F 5 p.m.-9 p.m.,
and up, your pick. 439'7911._ ~
~I.. · -·S · \ . hl
LANDSCAPING~
DRIVEWAY
Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Furniture
BATHROOMS----~­
OFFICE EQUIPMENT.. Old,b~~~
SEALING, till September autumn
knowledge helpful. Call482-1394.
HELP WANTED - - - - good. cash register, -'Sharpfax " ..
leaf raking·. Call Tim, 439-6056 or
BATHROOMS NEED WORK?
SF726 copier, toner, new roller,,.....
PART -TIME HELP 4-6 p.m. WORKING COUPLE Needs sitter 434-1434 after 5 p.m.
Dirty joints? Loose tile? Leaks
and 13 masters. 439-4949, Mary.'
Monday-Friday. Additional hours in Delmar for two elementary
when showering? Calo Fred, 482school
children
on
sick
days
and
available. Must be able tO carry
NEARLY NEW GE Electric "stove,
1256.
some holidays. Call Mr. Phelts· HORSES .BOARDED _ _ __
self-cleaning oven, Corning ware
482-8903
top, Harvest gold. 439-5655.
5 MILES FROM DELMAR, miles of
.c
SECRETARY for Delmar law scenic terrain. Stall space. Dryden
WARDS 8 HP riding mower office. Call 439-9927 to arrange Farm, 768-2126.
structure good shape. Motor ·
interview.
works but needs some attention.
Will sell for $50. Call in the
JEWELRY~-----------­
RESTAURANT
WORK
all
evening. 439-5079.
positions available serving quality
EXPERT. WATCH, CLOCK AND
products
in
pleasant
JEWELRY REPAIRS. Jewelry
SOFA "HARDEN" gold -velvet.
sUrroundings,
above
average
Excellent, reversible cushions.
design, appraisals, engraving.
income, merit raises, uniforms and
LeWANDA
JEWELERS, . INC.
$375. 439-3579.
discounts
generous
-food
Delaware Plaza, 439-9665. 25
provided. For details call between
G.-E.
15
CUBIC
FOOT.
years of service.
2-5 daily. 439-3242.
REFRIGERATOR
avocado,·
I
manual defrost, $195 or best offer.
RECEPTIONIST - Part-time in MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE- · 439-4757.
Delmar. Call Michael Buenau, 4342 NIGHT STANDS 28 by 17, twin
4149.
bed frame, clothes rack. 439-8263.
NEW POT. A TOES dug to order.
PART-TIME
MORNING
help
1/2 to 1 bushel. Free delivery-TriWILL
CUSTOM
CUT.
Your
beef,
needed. Pleasant Delmar office.
Village. Dick Everleth 439-1450 ..
pork, veal, lamb and deer {sausage
Call 439-0115.
extra!) 439-2792
GENTLE, KIND WOMAN TO LIVE
BICYCLE, girls 20-inch Columbia,
IN and be a companion for 96 year 14'
FACTORY
FINISHED
extremely good condition, $45.
old, lonely woman in a beautiful SHUTTERS. Dark brown, $10 pair.
439-6147.
home. Call after 1, 434-6755.
439-7753 after 6 p.m ..
.439.-.4.949
~
- -. ~
9r
,'~. . . . . _~e-____ ---·.- ~----~-·.~J' . ·~ "·'4'3' 9- ~"4" '91)19'"..~PIANO~
YT
an§w~r:
~· 1 "
_~,..,on ~ ~
·~
'~
ca~.§'---~x_c_~llent_
~e.ll .D19t{ltq.jJ:~~<lt. ~SPO
•I
I
·I
i;:!
·:•b..
'--
HORSE LOVER
If you can supply a good home and training
I'm yours for theasking.
·
I'm a two-year-old REGISTERED
ARABIAN gelding, turning grey, 13.4 hands
high. I'm a beautiful, healthy horse but my
owner has outgrown me. For more
information call Linda Davis at ·622-3789.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON PROPOSED
AMENDMENT TO THE
TRAFFIC ORDINANCE OF
THE TOWN OF BETHLEHEM
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
public hearing will be held by the
Town Boord of the Town of Sethle·
hem at the Town Hall, 445 Delaware
Avenoe, Delma,, New Yo'k on the
25th day of September, 1985 at 7:30
p.m. to consider amending the
Traffic Ordinance of the Town of
Bethlehem in the following respect:
1. By Amending ARTICLE II, Section
1, Maximum Speed Limits, para·
graph (C) Thirty (30) miles per hour is
hereby established as the maximum
speed at which vehicles may proceed
on or along the following highway in
the Town of Bethlehem, Albany
County, New. York by adding the
following new section as follows:
71. Elm Avenue East from Jericho
Road west to Elm Avenue
All interested persons and citizens
will have an opportunity to be heard
at the said hearing.
By ORDER OF THE TOWN BOARD
LEGAL NOTICE - - TOWN OF BETHLEHEM
Carolyn M. Lyons
Town Clerk
Dated: August 14, 1985
(Sept. 11 )
"NOTICE OF PROPOSED
FONT GROVE ROAD
WATER EXTENSION
WHEREAS, a mol? plan and report
hove been prepared by J. Kenneth
Fraser and· ·Associates, P.C., en·
gineers, duly licensed by the State of
New York, and filed in the Office of
the Town Clerk of the Town of
Bethlehem in such manner and detail
as is hereby approved by the Town
Boord, relating to a proposed
extension of Water District No. 1 of
said Town, and showing the boundaries of the proposed extension, with
a general plan of the proposed
water system and a report of the
proposed method of operation; and
WHEREAS, the boundaries of the
proposed extension to the district ore
as follows:
Beginning at a point in the
PAGE 26- September 11, 1985- The Spotlight
LEGAL NOTICE
northeasterly boundary line of Font
Grove Road, said point being the
intersection of the northeasterly
d
boundary line of Font Grove Roo
with the southerly. boundary line of
the Delaware and Hudson Railroad
Company right·of·way, said point
also being in the northeasterly
boundary line of Water District No.
J;,fhence running from said point· of
beg;nning N35°·16'·08" W and
along the northeasterly boundary
. line of Font Grove Rood a distance of
63.4 feet, more or less, to the point of
intersection of the division line
between lands now or formerly of W.
Von Kirk Brownell and Clara Brownell, his wife~ on the northwest and the
Lyndhurst Extension to Bethlehem
Water District No. 1 on the southeast
with the northeasterly boundory line
of Font Grove Rood; thence in o
northeasterly direction and along
the aforementioned division line a
distance of 999..42 feet, more orless,
to a point; thence along the north·
westerly boundary of the Lyndhurst
extension to Bethlehem Water
District No. 1 th~ following courses
and distances:
.I
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
N 33°-38'00" W a
212.6.4 feet to a point;
N 75°-52'-00" E a
729.30 feet to a Point;
N 19°·22'-28" W a
273.24 feet to a point;
N 50°-22'·28" W a
126.72 feet to a point;
N 30°·22'-28" W a
225:06 feet to a point;
distance
thence
distance
thence
distance
thence
distance
thence
distance
of
o.f
of
of
of
said point being on the division line
between lands now or. formerly of
Sandford Sager on the northwest
and the Lyndhurst e~tension to
Bethlehem Water District No .. 1 on
the southeast; thence in a north·
westerly di~ection 1,005 feet, more
or less, alOng a line, said line being
perpendicular to the northwesterly
boundary line of the Town of
Bethlehem, to a point on the
northwesterly boundary line of the
Town of Bethlehem; thence in a
southwesterly direction· 2,505 feet,
more or less, along the aforemen.'
tioned boundary line of the Town of
Bethlehem, said boundary line also
being the division line between the
TOwn of New Scotland on the
LEGAL NOTICE
Northwest and the Town of Bethle.
and seconded by Mrs. Bickel, it is
hereby
hem on the southeast, to a point on its
intersection with the soughwesterly
ORDERED, that the Town Bored of
boundary of the Delaware and
the Town of Bethlehem shall meet
Hudson Railroad Cof!lpany right-ofand hold a public hearing at the
way, said point also being the
Town Hall, 445 Dekiware Avenue,
northwest corner of the Corsteod
Delmar, New York, on the 25th day
Drive Extension to Bethlehem Water
of September, 1985 at 8:00p.m. on
District No. 1; thence in a southeastthot day to consider said map, plan
erly direction 2,125 feet, more or
and report and to hear all persons
less, along the southerly boundary
interested
in 'the subject thereof
line of the Delaware and Hudson
concerning the same, and to take
Railroad right-of-way, said bound.
such action thereon as is required or
ary line also being the northeasterly
boundary of the Carstead Drive · authorized by law, and it is further
Extension to Bethlehem Water
ORDERED, that the Town Clerk be
District No. 1 and a portion of the
and she hereby is directed to publish
northeasterly boundary line of
and post certified copies of this order
Bethlehem Water District No. 1, to
at the time and in the manner
the point and place of beginning,
provided by low.
containing .76.5 acres, more or less.
Bearings from a map prepored by
The adoption of the foregoing
Paul E. Hite, Licensed land Surveyor,,
order was put to a vote and upon
Delmar, -New York.
roll, the vote was as follows:
AYES: Mr. Hendrick, Mrs. Bickel.
WHEREAS, said mop, plan and
Mr. Geurtze, Mrs. Ritchko.
report describing said improvements
NOES: None.
ore on file in the Bethlehem Town
ABSENT: Mr. Prothero.
Clerk's Office for public inspection.
{Sept. 11)
Now, on motion of Mrs. Ritchko
CUSHION SOFA $89.00;
electric broom, $6.00; 6ft
th binding, $10.00. Call439-
Free estimates. After 6 p.m. call
767-2541, 439-1515, 463-7912.
Supreme
Building
and
For specific information, call:
Tony at 237-9311 or 768-2332.
ping pong table, games, tools,
furniture, hardware, new items
never offered.
WANTED
20 AXBRIDGE LANE, Delmar.
PEDESTAL TABLE and 4
I"
chairs.
Excellent
dition: 765-4863.
Remodeling.
VAN CANS ROOFING- all types
Ot roofing, free estimates, insured,
guaranteed. 439_3541 .
~UI·U:IKA
THOMAS
CALl- VANGUARD ROOFING CO. Excellent SpecialiZing In roofing. Fully
ilion. $l,.200. 439,5150.·
"' ' msured, re f erences CaII J ames S
· ......... _,
' Staats·767-2712:' .. l,4J'''
'250
~Nroorm~~jjN~===~"
rl
HANG-
'
25 years experience, please
Thomas Curit, 465-6421.
A MATE For all ages and
lnaltacohed.
Thousands
of
anxious to meet you.
lre:sticle Acquaintances. Call, Toll
(800) 263-6673 noon to 8
(nyscan)
YOU INTERESTED IN
IOFIMI'NG A. STAMP CLUB? Call
ho.. A1'>o after 6 p.m.
r C·"R
"" AGE S... LE' _,
H
3
•'
1.
LINCOLN OFF DELAWARE.-.
HAMAGRAE.:·-- PRE-SCHOOL-'9/14, 10-4, ;,ulti-iamlly. Furniture,
HAS AN OPENING In the 3 year. clothes, bikes, etc. '
''
old class - Tues. and Thurs.
afternoons 12:30 to 2:30p.m. Call DELAWARE TURNPIKE Unionregistrar 439-9791.
ville Church. Saturday, September
14, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Refreshments
available. 797-2797.
·
SITUATIONS WANTED--5 DELMAR PLACE. 9/14, 10 a.m.
light
house Furniture, stereo, toys, games,
EXPERIENCED
cleaning service. Free estimates. tables, chairs, etc. Rain date9/21.
Call evenings 767-2180.
1 FURMAN, Delmar. Garage Sale
WILL DO CLEAN UPS of yards, September 13 and 14, 9-4.
attics, basements, help with
moving and other trucking needs. MOSHER RD Sat. Sept. 14th, 9 to
4, Frames, wooden and tin ware,
452-1163
antiques and some furniture
SPECIAL SERVICES _ _ __
YOU EVER NOT PAID a
ld support payment? Contact
THEA'S
RIGHTS
ASS01
FOR STUDY. 674-3253.
HO TRAINS, collector will pay
cash, any condition. 768-2695.
RUSTPROOFING - New car lifetime guarantee. $200. T.A.C.S.
462-3977.
28 CAROLANNE DR., Delmar, Sat
9/14, rain date 9/15, 9-4 p.m, All
good items, lg. & small. Priced
right.
Saturday, September 14, 9 a.m.-4
p.m. Furniture, couch, crib, etc.,
household, books, toys, children's
b1kes. Ram date September 15,
Sunday.
TUNING------
PIANO WORKSHOP tuning,
i , reconditioning, rebuilding.
bought and sold. Key tops
!covered. 4.47-5885.
lANDS' TUNED & REPAIRED,
T. Lamkin, Registered,
htt<'"'"" ~Piano~ Technicians
i ' 272-7902.
.TUNING AND REPAIR'' Thompson,
qualified
ician, reasonable rates. 459-
'SIMONIZING. Auto or . truck.
$29.95. T.A.C.S. 462-3977.
DELMAR SANITARY CLEANERS
serving the Tri-Village. area for
more than 20 years. 768-2904.
COD -Dennis West Motor
, At. 28 West Dennis. AAA
pool, air conditioned,
rant. Low off-season rates.
7) 394-7 434.
A PURE AND SIMPLE SOLUTION
to improving water quality is the
Amway Water Treatment System.
Effectively removes: Pesticides,
Herbicides, Industrial Chemicals,
Chlorine and THM's (suspected
cancer -causing agents at high
concentrations). Giardia Lamblia
and a host of other contaminants.
& SIDING - - - -
RESIDENTIAL.
les. Quality work.
la,;on:ahiA rates. Fully insured -
Friends, Fun & Flexible Hours
McDonald's·~··
ol Delmar & Ravena
has the following shills available
s,~, REALTY WANTED _ _ _ __,:.
-
_
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT__
2
BEDROOM
completely
furnished, subleased October 1 to
May 1, 1986. $300 per month plus
security, Feura Bush. Call 439·
2937 or 439-4055.
PROFESPRIME
DELMAR
SIONAL OFFICE SPACE, 660 sq.
ft. for $450. Call Bill or Fred Weber.
439-9921.
GARAGE FOR RENT at 568
Delaware Ave, Delmar. Call 4392964.
o
E•cellenl
·~
Local
ERA
John .1. Healy Realtors
125 Adams Street
439·7p15
NANCY KUIVILA
Real Estate, Inc.
276 DelaWare Ave.
439·7654
PICOTTE REALTY INC.
205 Delaware Ave.
439·4953
BETTY LENT REALTY
241 Delaware Ave.
439·2494
New Construction, Klersy
B.uilt, 4 Bedrooms, Magnificent
Master Bath, Executive Delmar
Location, Great Detail, Energy
Efficency.
'
For further Information
call 783-5350
&BLACKMAN
DESTEFANO
Real Estate
MAGAZINE PICTURE HOME
·•
Possoblitly ol ~ Managamenr CMeer and BEING PART OF ql
_ ' ,.,._ .t
"BENEFITS"
min.
max.
$3 40 hr
$4 00 h1
others
S4 50 hr.
$7.0(.1 hr
Raoses lwiCe a year-on performance
Ouartetly Award Wonners
lOC Increase
$10 cash
own plaque
Free Unolorms
....
50% emp!oyee _Meal
)nsurance avaolable at cost
o "Genetal holp
o
0
o
•
o
,.,.---
~ Phone • .
i
: Namo
,Over 18 yro.
l::::rl.lf 1· 1· 1· I.
------
~~
$25 cash
or a .25¢ hourly incraaS(!.
0
RECOGNITION:
Rece1ve exira dollars when you
break varrous sales records. Have onstore
contests and w1n money lor the crew fun~
• CHRISTMAS PARTY:
Annual wilh SAND, FOOD & FUN
FREE
-----------,
--========
--.--~,------
o Rarer a Friend program
RavQna
Delmar
McDonald,. ot Delma!
132 Delaware Ave
Delmar. NY 12054
756-9890
Gina Vuto
439-22!)!1
Jo. M~tley
MoDonald·s· ot Aa•ena
AI gw
Aa;er·•
owner operators
NY 12143
*
*
*
Featured in "House Beautiful"
Spacious five bedroom home in "Colonial Acres"
Community.Pool and Golf Course available
'
Call Ann Conley
439-9921
-~-------------~
fV\
fMC~
WANTED TO RENT, garage or
comparable work space fUrniture
refinishing. 452-1163
WANTED TO RENT
3 Bedroom House
or Apartment
Jan. 1 - July 1986
439-6406
WE
DELIVER
MORE
THAN
THE
NEWS
We match buyer_ and
seller. , . employer and
job seeker.
There is something
for everyone In
the classilieds.
WE CAN
CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
DIRECTORY
• Wago & Perlmmance Reldews
o Tra1nong
Cr~w Rap Se~smns
o Ongomg commumcai100S
exper~ence
-· ...
_. _
FOR CHURCH SITE, 1·5 acres.
Voorheesville, Slingerlands area.
Must be reasonably priced. Would
consider a building to rent. 765·
4184.
REAL ESTATE
What's In it for you???
o Meet•ng & Makong new lnends
o Elemonts of Teamwmk
CAPE COD RENTALS off-season
rates.
West
Dennis
and
Dennisport. Beaut•ful 2 and 3
b d
h
I
371
e room ames near wa er
4051
1'" -·
1
Day Shilts (Mcnday. Fr~day) 7 a.m .• 3 l).m. 18 yrs. or older
Noght Sh1fts (Monday· Sunday) 7 p.m.· midnight 18 yrs. or older
Altet schoot & weekends 16 yrs. o.r older
o Flexoble Hours
CAPE COD: Homes, condos and
lots for sale while they last! Local
owner. 371-4051.
REALESTATE'
.. _.. • , ,
r~
CL ASSI.F.IEd
-----''-'·.,.-------~~
95 ELSMERE AVENUE, Delmar.
DELMAR DUPLEX $450 plus
QUALITY CARPENTRY WORK. September 14, 8:30-3, September
utilities, 2 bedroom, 1% bath, deck,
Compare estimates. Call 439- 15, 10-3. Toys, bike, books,
no pets. 377-3895 after 6 p.m.
1534.
clothing, household.
STENCILING
INSTRUCTION, 21 HERBER AVE Sat. Sept. 14th,
SLINGERLANDS APARTMENT.
learn to custom stencil fabric Bam to 12, collectibles and small
Bus l.ine, one bedroom, heated,
paper goods, wooden objects and siuff.
appliances, no pets, lease. $360.
walls. Linda Mannella 439-1098.
439-9824.
354,348,346 KENWOOD AVE AND
GOLDEN TOUCH - For tree 34 & 44 DELMAR PLACE Sept. 14,
./
pruning, shrub trimming. All work 9-1pm, 5 families. Baby things,
guaranteed. Call Harley Alderson, couch, furniture, office furniture,
$425-$485 NEW 1 AND 2
767-3361.
BEDROOM APARTMENTS, all
snow blower, oil burner and many
applianced and fully serviced.
GENERAL
TYPING
DONE. goodies.
Glenmont.
439-5696. 439-9081.
Reasonable rates. Call between 10 61 MAPLE AVE, Selkirk, Barn Sale
a.m. and 8 p.m. 439-7807.
9/14,
· 9-5,
Country
Sat
SEWING, quality alterations - Collectables
APARTMENT
FOR
RENT,
mending, bridal parties, Mary 439- FILTRATION PLANT ROAD, 1 Elsmere Arms in the heart of
9418. Barb, 439-3709.
Delmar-Elsmere area on major
mile on County At. 102, Feura
bus
lines. Two Bedroom currently
Bush.
9/14-15,
9-5,
several
SHARPENING -hand and rotary
available. Call 465-4814 between
lawnmowers, lawn and garden families.
10-2.
STREEr,
South
tools, saws, chain saws, scissors, SOUTH
knives, pinkers, etc. 439-5156; Bethlehem, first house on right, off
FOR LEASE DELMAR
residence 439-3893.
Route 396. September 15 & 16, 9
soupsalad-sandwich
luncheon,
mini4
3
NORMANSKILL SEPTIC TANK a.m.- : 0p.m.
. restaurant; evenings full bar setCLEANERS. Sewer and drain • 14 HARTWOOD ROAD off Dumup; either or both by choice. Call
cleaning. Systems installed. 767- barton-Sat. Sept, 14th 9 to 2 pm,
439-3073.
9287.
.
AND TRAINING
Certified Reality
counseling
wc,.,mcoos. Arthur Copeland
Clyde Eastman 456-
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - -
People
Our M05t Important lngrediPnl 4
We're on the grow
again and if you're
bright, ambitious and
want a real career
opportunity we want
to talk to you.
If you qualify to
become a Realty
USA professional
you'll be backed
every step of the
way with professional training and
sales te·chniques developed by the area's
top Real Estate
Company.
Classes begin soon
to learn the sophisticated marketing skills
that can make you a
success.
Call us today for
more information.
11
205 Delaware Ave. Delmar
264 Delaware Ave., Delmar
439-4943
The Spotlight- September 11,1985- PAGE
:!i''
0
•
· b•IT UAR •I ES
0
I
'
Church,
585
of the service organization Leo Presbyterian
Delaware
Ave.,
Delmar.
Club, Jhe Windham Ensemble, a
select group of the most advanced
musicians, the concert band, the
Ski Club, a former member of the
Village Volunteers Fife and Drum
·- Corps, ~.ld a volun-teer with the~
Jennifer• Grierson~;"JOri.t.tha.rSt<ltte. i Good Saflt.i}i\a'rr~crrfie:h5 :!'-a 5t:i
Thruway in Rockland County,
lllCHS"oNPrincip~L,ndi'harJcs
Born in '11§/gJIM'6bc?,(!,i'lljl.:3 Q4fii!Ier r~'lfl<llrdith~t,~h.e wa;SJ<mfl
Lg.urm:.q ffiriersojttJvwas .Ji:aJ !19i1.9 of ·the. top\ fi-ve irt her· class, "An
gratluate of Bethlehem Central outstanding young lady in every
High School, a 1983 graduate of· respect."
Duke University, Durham, N.C.,
Survivors inchide her mother
and was studying for her master's Lynne Perry and stepfather,
degree at the University of David Perry, a brother, Douglas
Southern
California,
Los Grierson and a Sister, Noel Perry,
Angeles.
all
of
Delmar,
maternal
She was a member of the Duke grandparents, John and Gladys
Alumni club, Phi Mu Sorority, Gallagher of Woodcliff Lake.
the Science Fraternity at USC,
N.J., and her fiance, Palmer
. and ALSO, an oceanographic
Whisenant.
association.
Jennifer Grierson
A memorial service will be held
While at BCHS, she was
National
Merit
Commended .today (Wednesday) at 10:30 a.m.
Student, representing the top two in the Delmar Presbyterian Jennifer Grierson
per cent of the nation's scholars, Church. Burial will be in George
Jennifer Grierson, 18, a top
president of the National Honor Washington Memorial Park, athlete and scholar in Bethlehem
Paramus, N.J.
Society, editor of the Oriole year
Central High School's Class of
book, and manager for the
Memorial gifts may be sent to 1985, died Sept. 6 as a result of an
volleyball and softball teams.
Laura
Grierson
Memorial automobile accident that also
She was also a charter member Scholarship
Fund,
Delmar caused the death of her sister,
..~---...,. . -----..1,
ll.J!....,---..----!!!""""'!!~-
Laura Grierson
Laura Grierson
Laura Grierson, 23, remembered as an "outstanding young
·Jady" at Bethlehem Central High
School, died Sept. 6 as a result of
an automobile accident that also
caused the death of her sister,
ACCOUNTING
Laura Grierson, on the state
Thruway in Rockland County.
Born In Westwood, N.J.,
Jennifer Grierson graduated from
Bethlehem Central High School
last ~pring and· was• t0 l··be'·--a 1;
fres't!inari''ltt I'1arllhllil!h Q\~11\;ge)
th1:s1fan~oi.tr;
"'" e f '1\noi
fiVe tudl!ilt~ ~I'
uR'i.;.>,?,Yi.
orPP r11 tJo<rnv r """
BCH:s.
Unerson was a r~auonal
Merit
Commended
Student,
representing the to'p two per cent
of the nation's scholars.
She was recipient oft he Scholar.
Athlete Award as participant in,
two varsity sports for two
consecutive years and having the
highest sCholastic average. She_
was captain of the Girls Soccer
Team and had lettered in soccer,
volleyball and track. In her junior
year, she won the Coach's Award
as outstanding team player.
According to Ray Sliter, BCHS
athletic director,' she was .. a great·
team member, well-liked, and a
terrific all-around student."
She had also been selected for
the Capital District Select Soccer
Team. As a member of the
Bethlehem
Soccer
Club,
according to co-founder Connie
A~,~~~-~~~~~;~:;;;;:·;e
Support your local advertisers·
{._ 235 Delaware Ave.
'·!"
439-0761
BLACKTOPPING _ __;, CONSTRUCTION
,.· iiliiiuium_umiiiiiiiiiiiiiiD.IDI, _.... ••••••••••••••••• 4
BARKMAN
:
BLACKTOP -§ :• CONSTRUCTION
:
• Computer;zed Account;ng,
Bookkeeping, Income Tax,
& Estate Planning Functions
Corporation Income Tax
Return Preparation
• Small & Medium Size
Business Accounting
• Payroll/Sales Tax Return
& Functions
• Journals, Ledgers. Work
Papers Maintained
Other Offices:
Clif~on Park 371-3311
ll
i§
i
=
paving by
=
=
=
.1=
C. M,_crl & Sons § ~
1,
Driveways
§_ :
1
Patios
'
,
Complete
Tennis Courts
Also Seal Coating
e
'!,'""=:=========~~
- --
§
Parking Lots
.
Colonie 869-8428
ANTIQUES
-~- ~
e
~
GENERAL CONSTRUCTION
1111
At. 9W, Glenmont N.Y. 12077
·:
=
!_.
U~"··-...
439-0002
~
,~
FURNITURE
WAYS, INC.
APPLIANCE~
"I
I
1..._...._.._..._...
439-0199
FULLY
INSURED
Delmar, N.Y.
439·6416
439-4858
Delawa--;;Ave.,
Delmar
FRED'S MASONRY
All types masonry.
FREE ESTIMATES
'
*SHRUB
PRUNING*
I
Home
~~Repair Service _, ':tJ--p-.
Interior & Exterior·
Carpentry • Painting
Plumbing • Electrical
Commercial • Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
• RESTORATION
• STAIRS
• WOOD FLOORS • NEW & OlD
• Wood Floors Installed
767-2000
439-4059
189A Unionville Rd.
I
[
Commercial & Residential
Service
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
Jim Haslam - Owner
439-9702
., ~
Dick's
Professional Ser~ice for O~er
3 Generations
M&P FLOOR
SANDING, INC.
1
Fertil1zat1on
(518) 477-5045
No ;ob
too smo/1
Please call after
6:00 p.m .
'
INTERIOR DECORATING
Feura Bush
•
Wm.P.
McKeough Inc.
Established 1960.
Complete
Landscaping
Service and
Nursery Stock
439-4665
HORTICULTURE
UNLIMITED
FLORIST
• Flowers
• Foliage
plants
-ELECTRICAL REPAIRS
• Balloons
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Commercial
:j
GINSBURG ELECTRIC
All Residential Work
Large or Small
FREE ESTIMATES
Fully Insured • Guaranteed
"My Prices Won't Shock You"
459-4702
By Barbara
Draperies
Drapery Alterations
Bedspreads
Your fabric or mine
872-0897
JEWELRY
Ginger Herrington
Jeweler
Repair • Manufacturing
*439-8693 *
4 Normansklll Blvd.
(next to Del Lanes)
439-7690
Herilage Woodwork
Specializing in Antiques
and fine woodworking
FURNITURE
Restored • Repaired • Refinished
Custom Furniture • Designed, Suitt
BOB PULFER - 439-5742
439-6165
HENRIKSON
LANDSCAPING
• Maintenance
• Installation
• Construction
Fully inSured-Free estimates
768-2842
John Fritze, Jr.
1548 Delaware Ave·
FURN . .REPAIR/REFIN. _ _
PAGE 28 -September 11, 1985- Tho Spotlight
\. -"·.J
• Planting of nursery
stock
• New Lawns
• Spot Seeding
FLOOR SANDING - -
439-7374
61Drrps l.tb
• Shrub & }re~ )o ~
HOME IMPROVEMENT_
439-6249
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR
PAYMENT TERMS AVAILABLE
It elbr C:bimntp
Roger\.mith
FLORIST - - - - -
ELECTRICAL - - - -
Residential
• Genera! LandSc3piii-g ,.J·
439-a1oo_.
_..._..._.._..
NEW INSTALLATIONS
Expert Collision
&
Rust Repair
FREE ESTIMATES
325 Delaware Aue.
Delmar
(Rear of Gochee 's)
_
Bethlehem
Electric
Inc.
AUTO IK>DY REPAIR - -
Let Us Fix-Emf
340
FLOOR SANDING
&
REFINISHING
I
I'
I
I
I
HASLAM TREE
SERVICE. _ ,j
SCREEN?
No Job Too Small
HH##<
- - - - - - - · ~ 154 A Delaware
SCHOOLAvenue
FREE
CHILDREN AND ADULTS
INSPECPRIVATE OR GROUPS
Charmaine Tocci, Director
TIONS
756-9232
DELMAR
AUTO BODY
439-5986
l
Sales - Service
planning.
investments
insurance
taxes
JIM 885-8164
CHIMNEY CLEANING- ....._...._..._.._.._..._...._..,_._,
DANCE
.
CLASS/QUE DANCE
Most Major Brands
Whirlpool Tech-Care
Franchised Service
439-7670
BOB
LANDSCAPING
---·TORN
16 Fernbank Ave.
Shop At Home
"Call Us First"
For the best workmanship in
bathrooms, kitchens, porches,
additions, painting, or papering
at reasonable prices call A.B.
Miller & Sons-25 yrs. exp.
439-2990
flEE Eltlrnatea
'
Charles C. Noll, CFP
JIM'S
CARPETING SALES
& INSTALLATION
General Contractors, Inc.
Bonded and Insured
APPLIANCE REPAIR -
BROKEN
WINDOW
FINANCIAL COUNSELING
•
•
•
.•
439-9943
GLASS
Robert B. Miller & Sons -
Commerckll • Relldenfial
Tues.-Fri. 12-4, Sat. 11-4:30
Sunday 12-4:30
..
Estimates Given.
-
Carpot Cleaning ~lallll
ROO< SHpplng
.
Re-waxing • Rood Work
COmplete ·.Janitorial
OF YESTERYEAR
._.
439-9385
QUALITY WORK AT
REASONABLE PRICES
Delmar Janitorial
439-ll157
Buy • Sell
FINANCE
FLOOR COVERING ___:::
• Exterior & Interior
Renovation
• Additions & Remodeling
• Carpentry/Repairs
• Bathrooms & Kitchens
• Drywall & Metal Studs
• Design & Layout
For AU Your
Cleaning Needs lfa
Antiques
~
'·
>C..I"u
CARPETCARE
2100 New Scotland Rd.
Route 85, New Scotland
518-767-9738
GANLEY ~
BUILDING
& REMODELING
§
Call Delmar
Carl Barkman Jr.
W•••~•••••••••••••)
:
Free Estimates
439-7801
1111
:
;~i .e0 rn(/ 1~llliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;IIIIIIHI'ii
'
!
LAWNL:::E:OWERS
New & Used
208 Delaware Ave
Delmar, N.Y. 12054
• Jnd;,;ou•l, P"tnersh;p &
:.·i,wfl! ·r.(,fl:l~
0
r---BUSINESS DIRECTORY----i'
PRATT VAIL
ASSOCIATES
Tax & Business
Consultants
'J·V.. (/,
LAMP REPAIR
LAMP REPAIR
· Rewired - Switch & Socket
replacement
A. Phillips Hardware
~ 235 Delaware Ave.
439-9943
HORTICULTURE
UNLIMITED
LANDSCAPING
..:,,,
...... :-
~~!:=
. ,-, ,.-,,
·--
~~-
Design
.
Mamtenance
Construction
"A Complete Professional
Service"
BRIAN HERRINGTON
767-2004
~----·
--------
Tilroe, she .. was the ideal team
player, playing all positions hard
and well, whatever was needed,
she was always there . foi- the
team."
Also
an
accomplished
musictan,, in her senior year
Grierson ·P.lfl~ed in ,th~. St~te_
School Music Association Are.a
All-State
Sectionals.
'She
participit!bct in the Windh3fn
Ensemble, a selected group o.f the
most advanced musi.cians, as well
~s the newly established marching
band. She had been an active
member of band programs on the
middle school and the elementary
school level as well.
Music Department' Supervisor
Samuel Bozzella described her as
"dedicated
musician,
an
a
accomplished piano player as well
as a ba~s clarinet player. She was
5teady, responsibl"e, congenial and
showed a lot of talent."
In addition, Grierson was a
member of the Key Club, chorus,
had done volunteer work with the
retarded, and had previously been
active with the V-illage Volunteers
Fife and Drum Corps. "The girl
was outstanding," said BCHS
Principal Charles Gunner.
lANDSCAPING
D.W. MACK
LANDSCAPING
439-6557
l
Commercial, residential &
automotive
~A. Phillips Hardware
465-8861
h
Olive Wright
Olive T. McNary Wright, 95, a
resident of Delmar since 1910,
died Sept. 2 at Childs Nursing
HOme.
Born in Watervliet, she was a
member of the First United
Methodist Church of Delmar, a
past member of the Delmar Fire
Department Auxiliary and a life
member of the Bethlehem Senior
Citizens.
JOSEPH GUIDARA
He started work at the West
Albany Car Repair Shops in 1947
and was employed a total of 38
years as a machinist for the New
York Central Railroad, later
Conrail.
PAINTING, _ _ _.:___
VOGEL
Painting
Contractor
The Delmar Rotary Club wiil
hold its annual book fair
Saturday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. at Delaware Plaza.
~·
,.~//·.
C
Cat '
./3oarJin/1
•
•
•
•
RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST
COMMERCIAL SPRAYING
WALLPAPER APPLIED
DAY WALL rAPING
Interior - Exterior'
INSURED
439-7922
'
767-9095
JACK DALTON
PAINTING
439-3458
PANTAGES
HOMES, INC.
U.S. Rt. 9W, Selkirk, N.Y.
767·9685
767·9562
UNDERGROUND PLUMBING
562 Central Ave.
Albany, N.Y .
Septic Tanks C1eaned & Installed
SEWERS- WATER SERVICES
Drain Fields Installed & Repaired
'-SEWER ROOTER SERVICEAll Types Backhoe Work
OPEN: Tues- Sat
. 439-2645
GUY A. SMITH
SHARPENING
·Lawn mowers~ Chain saws
Hand tools
A. Phillips Hardware
D.L. CHASE
Painting
Contractor
768-2069
{/!IE IIAII~Y
H-4/
Jt:;f
Home Repairs
Remodeling ·
Interior-Exterior
Painting
439-9026
235 Delaware Ave.
439-9943
A. Phillips Hardware
f..
'I"'
439-9943
CONCORD
TREE
SERVICE
...-sPRAYING
• REMOVAL
• PRUNING
439 - 7134
Days
1-868-2502
Anytime
• CABLING
• EMERGENCY SERVICE
Printers
125 Adams St., Delmar, NY
Call Gary Van Der Linden
{518) 439·5363
i DELIVER i
:
:
Tri-Village Area
HASLAM TREE
SERVICE
••
BRIAN HERRINGTON
Complete Tree and Stump Removal
Pruning ol Shade and
767-2004
Ornamental Tree•
Free Estimates- Fully Insured
Exclusively Serving The
Feadln_g
·. PIIINT.ING _ _~--
~ Oew§graphics
land Clearing
Planting
Storm Damage Repair
Wood splitting
Give the gift
of love.
·
24 hr. Emergency Service
-li -·
. a·_aAmerican Heart
vAssociation .
WE'RE
FIGHTI~G FOR YOU
1
r····;;~···r
439-7365
Residential
Commercial
PLUMBING -HEATING
1
TREE SERVICE
HORTICULTURE
UNLIMITED
5NOWPLOWING
L.S. FERGUSON
In plumbing since 1956
· The Shade Shop
439-4130
235 Delaware Ave.
SNQWPLOWING _ __
Schedule Now
~
Lawn, garden; carpet,
plumbing, wood working,
firewood, etc.
438-6320"
• interior &exterior
• Fully insured
~ Free esti m!)tes
Cloth & Wood Shades ·
Mini & Vertical Blinds
Shutters-5olar Shades
Porch Shades
Shoji Screens
TOOL RENTAL
!!
;;_
/J';-1.
WINDOW SHADES _ _ .
~TO~O~L~R~E~N~TM~=======-
SEWER HOOKUPS
Gas & Electric Water Heaters
356-4053
s: HOTALING
439-9943
,__ _ _ 434.,8550 ---'"--"
Chuck Noland
482-5940
235 Delaware Ave.
J. Wiggand &
Sons
Resurrection
Painting
(Answered 24 Hours)
A. Phillips Hardware
'T
GLENMONT
Small jobs welcome
PAINTING & PAPERiNG -
1
Finest Quality Loam
Plumbing & Heating·
872-0100
Glass- Screen or Acrylic
TOPSOIL
_,....
Interior & Exterior Painting
By Someone Who Enjoys His Work
Fully Insured with FREE Estimates
Using BENJAMIN MOORE and
other fine paints.
WINDOW REPAIR - - - -
TOP S O I L - - - - -
Bethlehem Are.a
!
Call JIM lor all you-;plumblng problems
REASONABLE RATES -FREE ESTIMATES
15 Years Experience
DELMAR-GUILDERLAND
"HAVE BRUSH, WILL lilAVEL ..."
439-0114
WINDOW REPAIRS
tk
FREE ESTIMATES
R.D. 1 B6x 396
Voorheesville, N.Y.
12186
Kirby of
Delmar
439-4130
InteriOr & Exterior
INTERIOR- EXTERIOR
TUNE-UP
SPECIAL
I
The Shade Shop
PLUMBING & HEATING_
Wallp&perlng ..:.._ Painting
872-2025
•-
Protect your table top
Call for FREE estimate
S & M. PAINTING ~~-''.".".".'ma:;;.~;a~;mtb/e Rates
INSURED • WORK 'GUARANTEED
482-4427
Made to· Order
Eleanor Cornell
Home P]umbing
Repair Work
Bags - Belts
ALL MAJOR BRANDS
TABLE PADS
Route 9W, Glenmont
RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
Satel -- Service - Pitrts
-
Purveyors of the finest
in Factori-Bilt .l:l.Dmes
{Across from Marjem Kennels)
INC.
John M. Vadney, ;
Beautiful homes always
on display. Single and
multi-section. Affordable
and lovely manufactured
homes.
Heated • Air Conditioned
Your choice ol food
439-5736
BOB'S QUALITY PAINTING
768-2893
VAC~~~:ERS
SPECIAL SERVICES
Contractor.
Bill Stannard
-Bethlehem police were called
Sunday morning when spray
paint was discovered On a number
of windows at the Bethlehem
Middle School. Police are looking
for the vandals, who also spray
painted picnic tables near the
school.
Book fair at plaza
REAL ESTATE
PETS
Free Estimates
439·1763 Evenings
CARPENTRY /MASONRY
ALL TYPES
Vandals hit school
St..(ppqrt. xour local advertisers i
MASON WORK
NEW - REPAIRS
over 30 years with Qualily
Professional Work
SATISFACTION GUAIIANTEED
Born in Jersey Shore, Pa., he
was a longtime resident of the
Capital District.
A truck towing· road-paving
equipment tried to drive under the
Delaware arid Hudson Railroad
bridge over New Scot)and Road
in Slingerlands last Tuesday
afternoon and couldn't, according
to Bethlehem police reports.-The
equipment was too high for the
bridge, and both it and the
overpass were damaged, pOlice
said .. A Greenville man, age 23,
was driving the truck, which is
owned by an Albany company,
authorities said. No citations were
issued.
LEXINGTON
EXTERIOR/INTERIOR
FREE ESTIMATE· REFERENCES
INSURED
S~rving this community
Delmar~
The Mendelssohn Club male
chorus of Albany opens its 77th
season with the first rehearsal
scheduled today (Wednesday) at
7:30 p.m. at the United. Fourth
Presbyterian Church, Western
Ave. at Rt. 85, Albany.
Interested tenors and basses are
invited to attend rehearsals each
Wednesday in September, sing
along with the group, beco·me
acquainted with the members,
then participate in auditions at the
end of the month.
Music will include classic,
baroque, romantic periods as well
as glee club favorites, popular and
show music.
-·VACUUM
FORMERLY R.E.O. PAINTING
•
Brl~ge too low
William T. Getgen, 55, of
Delmar, died Sept. 7 at Albany
Medical Center Hospital.
LOCKSMITH
Locks repaired -safes
opened- combinations
changed
.
· Arrangements r· were t by
Applebee Funeral Home. Burial •
was in the Bethlehem Cemetery,
Singers invited
r---BUSINESS DIRECTORY-··
Anytime
LOCKSMITH - - - - . . , .
He is survived by a sister,
Constance Guettler of Colonie, a
brother, Jack Getgen of Colonie,
two uncles and several nieces and
nephews.
Arrangements were by Philip J.
Frederick Funeral Home in
Albany. Burial was at St. John's
Lutheran Cemetery, Colony.
William T. Getgen
Guaranteed to
under price
anyone!!
• Quality work
• Complete lawn.
service
She was the wife of the late
Walter S. Wright Sr. and the
mother of Mrs. Henry (Dorothy)
Kleinke of Delmar, Walter S.
Wright Jr. of Texas and the late
Esther Wright. She is also
survived by six grandchildren, 17
great-grandchildren and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Survivors include her mother
Lynne Perry and stepfather,
David Perry, a brother, Douglas
Grierson and a sister, Noel Perry
all of Delmar, and maternal
grandparents, John and Gladys
Gallagher of Woodcliff Lake, N.J.
A memorial service will be held
today (Wednesday) at 10:30 a.m:
in the Delmar Presbyterian
Church. Burial will be in George
Washington Memorial Park,
Paramus, N.J.
Memorial gifts may be sent to
Jennifer
Grierson
Memorial
Scholarship
Fund,
Delmar
Presbyterian
Church;
585
Delaware Ave., Delrriar.
. FE
~et
f>F(~
FREE ESTIMA}E:4GM
HASLAM
.FULLY
INSUR'EC
-OWNER
~·.
;t
t
:.
•
•
•
t
:
MORE
THAN
THE
N Ews
•
f
••.
•.'I
t!
We match buyer and +l.
II
t
18 er • • • employer and
jOb Seeker~
•
. There is something
:
lor everyone in
the classllieds.
·•
tl
+!
.·~·
····~·······'
-
439-9702
Tho Spotlight- September11,1985- PAGE 29
'
Vox
D
op
'
third school if redistricting takes
place. Be thankful your child will
only have to adjust once! ·
is open to all readers for
letterS m good taste on
. -1
matters ot public mteres. t
Letters longer than 300
words are subject to editing and all letters should be typed and
double-spaced it possible. Le!ters must
include phone numbers: names will be
withheld on request. Deadline is the Fridaybefore publicatiOn.
Redistricting view
..
Regarding redistricting: This is
not just a problem to be solved for
next year at Glenriwnt. This is a
nightmare we have been living
with for the past three years.
In 1983, 20 kindergartners
didn't fit. In 1984, the whole
Kindergarten didn't fit. Now this
year, all a·vailable space in the
building has been filled, forcing
the teachers to curtail curriculum.
Not only is the Kinderga'rten
being bused elsewhere but so too
is any new child enrolling in third
grade.
I understand the apprehension.
of those who fear they may be
asked to move to one of the other
Bethlehem schoo.ls, but let ·me
point ~ut to you that there are
children from Glenmont who
have attended Kindergarten at
Elsmere, first grade at Glenmont
and will attend second grade at a
Albany County
Cooperative Extens1on
As for the many who claim they
have bought their. homes in a
specific area because-of a specific
elemenJ<;lry school-the_ peopic ·at
~GletlmOnt ''feel the s-~ffie about
heing ·uprooted from their neigh-
.
Fall fj~ :·an, ideal time
norttiCast tO s'ced a new lawn· or
aftc'"r·those·pcsky weedS in la\vns~
N~urm H ufn'~el, an assist an~
professor of turfgrass science iri
the New York State College o
Agriculture and Life Sciences a
Cornell University, says that th
purchase of grass seed is one goo
example of getting what you pa
for.
-
bOrhOOd school. There is not a
schoOl in Bethlehem which has
more school spirit than Glenmont. Ov.er the years it has always
had the highest number of"volunteers and by far the greatest
nUI;nber of volunteer h.ours.
"It's no bargain· if you hu
inexpensive seed that contain
manY weed seeds and othe
impurities. Also iJ_Tiportant is t
buy the kind of seed that is righ
for the location of your lawn."
But we recognize we are Bethlehem and the school lines need to
be redrawn in order to restore
consistency and quality for all the
children. Randomly busing neighborhoods to fill empty spaces will
only lead us to greater chaos in 10
years.
The children will pay the price if
we don't do it right the first time
and totally redistrict using all five
schools.
Beverly McGrath
Glenmont
Members of the Freihofer Cross Country Dancers are, center front,
Mirinda, a South Bethlehem resident who is also a country singer;
second row from left, Tracey Daniels"Bnd Tracy Strait; and back row,
Alicia Rootes, Beth Stevens; Freddie Freihofer, Vicki Shoup and
Tricia Brooks.
In E-lsmere The Spotlight is
sold at Paper Afi/1, Grand
, Union, C VS, Johnson's and
Brooks Drugs.
Group seeks new dancers
The Freihofer Cross Country
Dancers is 'looking for new
dancers to begin fall training.
Under the sponsorship of the
Freihofer. Baking Co., which
adopted the girls within the past
year, the active troupe performs at
· fairs, festivals, fun parks and
benefits with the backing of the
five-piece American Country
Band.
.
•
..,.,
.watch this
The group, whos average age is
16, does precision clogging, country, tap, jazz and ballet dancing in
their produ~rions, as well as acting
s~;>ot
skits and singing with the 6-foot
Freddie Freihofer.
The group's manager, Jim
Staats from South Bethlehem,
started· the troupe four years ago as
the Cros_s Country Dancers. "'We
are not attached to any dance
studiO" explained Staats. "We
have several choreographers to
work with the girls and some
routines have been choreograph-·
ed by the girls themselves_"Any
girls interested in auditioning for
the group should contact Staats,
767-2744, Box 387, South Bethlehem, NY 12161.
Continuing ed signup
•
RENEW .YOUR SUBSCRIPTION
OR SUBSCRIBE TO
Registration for Bethlehem
Central's fall continuing educa-·
tion program will be held from 9
a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept.
14, in the main lobby of the high
school, 700 Delaware Ave. Registrations also can be mailed or
Happy
30th
Birthday.
Joey& Frank
Love, Terri
s15 a year - s21 two years
(within Albany County)
elsewhere '17.50 a year- '23.50 two years
·~
SHAPE UP!
AEROBIC PROGRAM
Starting Sept. 9th!
Please enter my o renewal o subscription' to THE
SPOTLIGHT, 125 Adams Street, Delmar, New York.
Name
made in person at the high school
from 3 to 4 p.m. weekdays until
classes begin. No telephone registrations will be accepted.
Quilting, wOrd processing,
watercolor painting, typing, computer use, photography, bridge
and woodworking are some of the
varied course offerings.
Classes will begin the week of
Sept. 23. Most courses are offered
for 10 weeks and meet evenings at
either the middle school or the
high schooL
Though Bethlehem Central
residents ar~ given preference,
courses also are open to· nonresidents at an additional $4 fee
per course. Resident fees are $22
for each course, and the minimum
age for registration is 16_ Those
with a Bethlehem senior citizen
pass will be admitted free to all
evening courses.
For information, ca11439-4921,
extension 248, from 3 to 4 p.m.
weekdays through SepL 27. -
Zip
Gift From:
Send or bring to The Spotlight, 125 Adams St.,
Delmar, N.Y. 12054
If there is a lot of wear and tea
on the grass, such as in a play area
consider a ·mixture of 50-5
perennial ryCgrass and· Kentuck
bluegrass.
Reading the label is important
The label will give a seed analysi
in percentage as well as germina
tion information.
''Selecting the right grass an
purchasing quality s~ed are th
first steps ·toward establishing
lawn successfully. A sound pro
gram of fertilization, weed con
trol, and other maintenanc
practices arc necessary to keep th
lawn healthy."
-
Beth Bergera
Extension Agen
Kenwood carnival
The Kenwood , Child Devel
opment Center, on the grounds o
the Doane Stuart School off Rt
9W, will_hold its second annua
Kenwood Karnival this Frida
from 5 p.m. to dusk and Saturda
from 10 a.m_ to dusk.
This year's carnival will featur
a craft fair, food, gamis, prize
and entertainment for the family
Proceeds will benefit the center
whic.h is a non-profit cOmmunit
service agency servmg handi
capped
pre-schoolers
and
toddlers_
Auxiliary meets
The
Nathaniel
Adams
Blanchard
American
Legion
Auxiliary's first meeting of the
year, a covered dish supper, will
feature a report from Bethlehem's
representatives at Girls State and
Boys State.
'
The
auxiliary
will
meetl
Tuesday, Sept. 17. The coveredj
dish supper is planned for 7 p.m.,
followed by reports from Jennifer
Hammer and Sean Sheehan_
--
......
GARY L. NELSON, D.M.D.
AEROBICS/CALESTHENICS
Fall Program
Starting Sept. 16
I
takes pleasure in announcing that
JOHN V. BUCHER, D.D.S.
On our exclusive
AEROBAFLOOR!
No membership fees!
will be associated with him in the
practice of General Dentistry
Pla!ll_!i~e_wJ!Lb~ !!m.it~<l!o_15!
CALL NOW- or stop by.
274 Delaware Avenue, Delmar, NY
439-2778 (next to Friendlys)
DELMAR ATHLETIC
CLUB- The RIGHT Choice!
PAGE 30- September 11, 1985-. The Spotlight
For heavy shade, a mixture o
seed with a high percentage of on.
of thC fine leaf fescues, such a
creeping red fescue, hitrd fesCue
or chewing fescue, should be used
,--·-----·~-----------·-·-----
ALL AGES-ALL LEVELS!
Address
If you are selecting grass for
sunny location, the first choic
should be a blend of improve
Kentucky bluegrass varieties. But
if there is shade or heavy traffic, i
may be. necessary to select anothe
kind of grass.
'j
Office Hours
By Appointment Only
L-----------·~·-
Telephone
439-9994
______,___
~-J
I~ '
>
~ FU
'1
i
f i
i.
-/'~!
I:
'
'
Claudia Ann DeFrate
DeFrate-Tiberia
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore L. Higgins
Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Koochagian
Maria Tilaro married
•
Delmar
'Robin Lynk wed m
Robin Brewster Lynk, daughter
of Nancy and Robert E. Lynk of
Delmar, and Robert Vahe
Koochagian, son of Adrienne and
. Armen V. Koochagian of Sparta,
N.J., were married Aug. 17 at the
Delmar Presbyterian Church.
. Tamara S. Lynk, sister of the
·bride, was maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Leslie G.
_'Koochagian, sister of the groom,
Tamara Beaver, Marian Fetter,
Heather Leslie and
Maria
Milham. Richard L. Koochagian,
· brother of the groom, was best
·man, and ushers were Charles M.
' Lynk, brother of the bride, James
··Kalfalan, cousin of the groom,
·Nicholas
Palczuk,
Richard
-~_yracuse and Charles Y~iser.
•' ' '"'
-
Lizbeth Burke wed
··· ,. Lizbeih ·Ann Burke, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Burke Jr.
of Delmar, and Stephen Louis
Nickel, son of Helen Nickel of
Delmar and Ardie Nickel of
Sparta, N.J., were married July 27
at Our Lady of Lourdes Grotto in
Albany:
Mary Rosinski was matron of
honor - for her sister. Douglas
Nickel served as best man for his
brother.
The bride, a graduate of
Bethlehem Central High School
~nd the Junior College of Albany,
ts employed as a data entry
operator with Key Bank. The
bridegroom, a graduate of
Bethlehem Central High School
and Hudson Valley Community
College, is a lab technician at
Bender Laboratory in Albany.
The couple will reside in
Albany.
The bride is a graduate of
Cornell University and the
University of Pennsylvania. She is
a. case manager and victim
advocate
for
the
Women
Organized
Against
Rape,
Philadelphia, Pa. The bridegroom, a graduate of Franklin
and Marshall College and the
University of Pennsylvania, is
employed as a civil engi~eer.
After a wedding trip to Nova
Scotia, Canada, the couple will
reside in Philadelphia, Pa.
.,
Sheila Butcher wed
Sheila Sue Butcher and Ted
Bruce West were married July 27
at the Grand River Baptist
Church, Freeman, Mo. The bride
is the daughter of Mrs. Audrey J.
Garcia of Delmar and James C.
Butcher of Columbia, Mo. The
groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Clyde West of Lee's Summit, Mo.
Sandra J. Kendall, sister of the
bride, was matron of honor.
Bridesmaids were Janice Butcher,
cousin of the bride, and Debbie
Laurent. Best man for the groom
was W. Curtis Kendall. Ushers
were Tom Springer and Ed Hill.
The bride, a graduate of
Bethlehem Central High School,
attended
Columbia
College,
Columbia, Mo. She is employed
as a property manager for Darron
Properties, Lee's Summit, Mo.
The bridegroom, a graduate of
Lee's Summit High School, is
employed by Lady Baltimore of
Kansas City, Kan.
The couple resides in Lee's
Summit, Mo.
Bridal Registry
VIllage Shop, Delaware
Pla.la.439-1823
FREE GIFT lor
registering.
Maria
Margaret
Tilaro,
The bride, a graduate of St.
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence University, is attending
Salvatore A. Tilaro of Delmar, the Boston University School of
and Theodore Linne! Higgins, son Law. The bridegroom is a
of Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. graduate of Bowdoin College and
Higgins of Atkinson, N.H., were Northeastern Graduate School of
married Aug. 24 at the Bavarian Business. He is employed as a
Chalet, Guilderland.
product manager for the Forum
Laura Tilaro, sister of the bride, Corp., Boston, Ma.
was maid of honor. Bridesmaids
were Dale Talhouk, sister of the
After a wedding trip to
groom, Margaret Stutts, Mary
Vineyard
and
Popovich and Eve Barakos. Martha's
Nantucket,
the
couple
will
reside
Michael Casale was best man and
ushers were Michael Hickey, Ken in Stoneham, Mass.
Clark, Andy Johnson and Steven
Rote.
Claudia
Ann
DeFrate,
daughter of Mrs. Mary-June
De Frate of Glenmont and the late
F.
William
DeFrate,
has
announced her engagement to
Joseph R. Tiberia Jr., son of Mrs.
Florence Tiberia of Ravena and
the late Joseph R. Tiberia Sr.
The bride-to-be is a graduate of
the dental program at Hudson
Valley Community College, Troy.
She is employed by Drs. Evans,
Bacon and Miller, D.D.S. Her
fiance, also a graduate of Hudson
Valley Community College, is
employed
by
the
state
Department of Correctional
Services at Coxsackie.
A May 23 wedding is planned.
Norman Cohen's book
Family Matters now
available at The Spotlight
-=-- -----==---=----- - - - ~
-=- --
,,.
~ -
Ruth Leighton wed
Ruth Linda Leighton, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Eric A. Leighton
of Delmar, and Steven Andrew
Graff; son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton
Graff of Waban, Ma., were
married Aug. 4 at Temple Israel,
Albany.
Judy Leighton was maid of
honor. Bridesmaids were Lisa
Goldslager, Marina Logrillo, Zoe
Karp, Sefi Richer, Sue Steinberg
and Robin Cohen. Jim LaJoie
was best man, and ushers were
Stephen Toross, Jim Dowburg,
Rich Hartman, Jerry Heilbronner Larry Heilbronner and Kevin
Heilbronner.
The bride is employed as a
special education teacher in
Windsor, Ct. The bridegroom is
employed as a financial analyst
for United Technologies in
Hartford, Ct.
After a wedding trip to
Bermuda, the couple will reside in
South Windsor, Ct.
Florist
Flowers Forever Save ·
30%-60%1 Personali.led Service! Fresh & Silk. Call lor
appointment 482-5088.
Photography
Comlnunity
Comer
Support Your Teams
The fall high school sports season gets under
way this weekend - it's fun for the players but
also represents dedication and hard work on
the part of many people. Players on all sports
teams, from football to cross country and from
varsity to freshman level, appreciate your
support and encouragement.
Let them know you care!
-Richard L. Baldwin
Photography, Glenmont
Weddings, Portraits, Children. Grouos. 439-1144.
Invitations
Florist
Flower Girl Florist When
It Has To Be Special'
239 Delaware Ave.
439-0971.
For that special day
and the preparations
which are so
necessary to make it a
memorable one,
please, consult the
following advertisers.
Danker Florist. Two great
locations. Cor. of Allen &
Central. 489·5461 M-Sat.
8:30-5:30. Stuyvesart Plaza
438-2202. M-Sa\.9-9. Sun
12-5. All New S1lk and
Traditional Fresh Flower
Bouquets
Yalinda's Delmar Florist
439-7n6~ Wedding Gazebos
available. Specializir~g in
~ Bridal Dolls.
Johnson's Sial. 439-8166
Wedding Invitations
Announcements
Personalized Accessories
Paper Mill Delaware Plaza
439--8123. Wedding lnvJtations-Wnting PaperAnnouncements Your
Custom Order
Jewelers
Harry L Brown Jewelers
& Thistle Gilt Shop. 4392718. Quality Rings. Fun
Bridal Registry
Harold Finkle, "'Your
Jeweler'" 217 Central Ave
Albany 463·8220 - Diamonds
- Handr.rafted Wedding Rings
Receptions
Normanslde Country
Club, 439-5362. Wedding
and Engagement Parties
Weddings up to 325. New
Wedding Package. Discount
room rates. Quality Inn
Hotel, Albany. 438--8431.
Rental Equipment
A to Z Rental. Everett Rd .•
Albany. 489-7418. Canopies,
Tables, Chairs. Glasses,
Chma. Silverware
Empire
Blue Cross
Blue Shield
Albany Division
The Spotlight- September 1
i. 1985- PAGE 31
r::! t' ~~J""'""
1!»3~~ ~,}.Ed
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uu Gll 1
n
·ro
September 11. 1985 l @
NOT CIRCULATE .
The weekly newspaper
seNing the towns of
Bethlehem and New Scotland
,o+--rroo
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w
3
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DELAWARE AVE.
ll
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PROP. 1
0
. I
(f1
_,.
How much room
for businesses?
;4;
*
·u
0
(JJ
Mining issue debated
at New Scotland board
Page 10
Medicare Plus CHP
makes Medicare everything
it should be.
The ideal Medicare program would
provide quality health care at a low
cost.
The ideal Medicare program would
include preventive care, like routine
check·ups, laboratory tests and x-rays.
The ideal Medicare program would
have no deductibles, no claim forms and
other complicated paperwork to fill out
And the ideal Medicare program
would offer the benefits that you would
often need, like prescription drugs, eye
exams and hearing tests.
That program is here today.
Medicare will now pay the majority
of the cost of Medicare Plus CHP so you
can get all of the above, and more, for a
low, fixed monthly fee.
Your personal doctor
You'll receive medical care from
the doctor you've chosen at one of
CHP's convenient locations. Your complete medical record will be in one location. And when necessary you'll see
specialists who work closely with your
personal CHP doctor. You get truly personal care at no extra cost.
l
Cable channel seeks
more local users
Page 3
Send me more information about
Medicare Plus CHP.
Name
Affordable health care.
Your cost for Medicare Plus CHP is
only $33.93 a month.
With it, all costs while in hospital,
including doctor's services, are paid in
full.
Preventive care, such as routine
check-ups, is covered as well.
.
To learn about Medicare Plus CHP,
fill out and return the coupon below.
Or, if you like what you've read,
plan to attend one of our upcoming
o~en houses where any questions you
m1ght have can be answered in person.
Call (518) 439-5358.
PAGE 32- September 11, 1965- The Spotlight
An American girl in England
Address
Page 8
City
State
Z1p
--JY
~" "··:!if
I Phone
IMailto· Medicare
Plus CHP
1201Troy-Schenectady Road
1
I
Latham, NY 12110
im-Co-m-m-un-ity..
!
• Health Plan
·->;!:: '
A
ALLISON BENNETT
Charles Bender's melons
Page 4
The first day of school for
Bethlehem Central students
seemed like the end of summer.
There were a few more reasons
why some students didn't want to
go back.
Story,_ Page 1.

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