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4501 Amnicola Highway, Chattanooga, TN 37406
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
Volume Number 33
2007-08
Catalog Contents
How To Use This Catalog:
Each section of this catalog is indicated by a colored tab on the
right or left edge of the page. In the Contents below you will find
out the information included within each tabbed section. Please
go to our website: chattanoogastate.edu for the most current
information about the college.
Contents
Page
Page
1
Catalog Guide and Contents
3
How To Register For Classes
Applying for admission, exploring financial aid,
scheduling new student orientation, registering, and
paying for classes.
4
Accreditations
Chattanooga State is accredited by the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools to award the
associate degree. Many programs are accredited or
approved by a national accrediting or approval body.
5
Academic Calendar for Fall 2007-Summer 2008
6
Academic Terminology:
Definitions of commonly used terms
7-30 Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degrees and
47-70
General Information
• Academic Programs (Degrees, Certificates,
and Diplomas)
• Admissions Information
First Time Freshman
Transfer Students
International Students
TTC Admissions
Early Admissions (Dual Enrollment and
Middle College High School)
Residency (In-State/Out-of-State)
Academic Fresh Start
Scholars on the River (Honors Programs)
• Academic Load/Academic Standing/Drop/Add
• Grading Policy
• Graduation Requirements
65-66
Financial Aid
• Tennessee Education Lottery (including Hope)
Scholarships
67
Financial Information (Fees/Refund Policy)
Technical Certificates (A.A.S. Degrees are not
intended to transfer to a 4-year institution)
31
Regents Online Degree Programs
32
Center for Distributed Education
33-37 General Education Requirements/University
Transfer Information
• General Education Requirements & Courses
• Associate of Arts/Associate of Science General
Transfer Programs
• Associate of Science in Teaching
38
Official EOE Statement
39-46 Tennessee Technology Center (TTC) Programs
71-108 Course Descriptions
109
Governance
110-116 Administrative/Professional Staff/Faculty
117-124 Index
Amnicola Highway Campus Map
Admission Application
Important Telephone Numbers
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
1
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
How To Use This Catalog
How To Use This Catalog
Your Official Guide To The College
Follow these helpful tips:
Youwill find information ranging from entrance requirements
to graduation requirements in the General Information section
(pages 47-70).
Youcan locate A.A.S. degrees and technical certificates (these
degree programs are not intended to transfer to a four-year
institution) on pages 7-30. With each program description is a
list of courses students must successfully complete to graduate.
You can learn how to maximize your chances to earn a fouryear, baccalaureate degree by reviewing the general education
requirements and transfer information on pages 33-37.
Youcan find brief descriptions of courses on pages 71-108.
Pages 71-72 explain how the course descriptions are arranged;
page 72 contains a guide to reading the course descriptions
and page 32 explains the Types of Course Delivery (Many
Ways To Learn).
Youcan locate information about online courses on
pages 32, and 73.
Please note: You can earn both an associateʼs degree and
a bachelorʼs degree through our Regents Online Degree
Program (RODP).
Youcan find brief biographies of faculty and staff on
pages 110-116.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu or call toll free 1-866-547-3733
E-mail: [email protected]
2
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
How To Register For Classes
5 Pay For Courses
By Mail: Use application form—
see last insert in catalog -orIn person at the Main campus Admissions Office,
Student Center • (423) 697-4401 -or-
Online
in person at any satellite campus location:
Dayton • (423) 365-5010; East • (423) 697-4797;
Kimball • (423) 837-1327; Sequatchie-Bledsoe
(SVTC) • (423) 554-4027.
By Mail
with Visa, Mastercard, Discover,
American Express or Webcheck
with check made payable to:
Chattanooga State Bursar Office
4501 Amnicola Highway
Student Center 113
Chattanooga, TN 37406
Telephone (423) 697-4732
Financial Aid:
2 Explore
Online: www.chattanoogastate.edu; -orin person at Main Campus Financial Aid Office,
Student Center. Second Floor • (423) 697-4402
Lottery Scholarship Information
(423) 697-4716 -orgo online: www.chattanoogastate.edu; -orwww.collegepaystn.com/mon_college/lottery_scholars.htm
New-Student
3 Schedule
Orientation
How to Register for Classes
for Admission
1 Apply
Online: www.chattanoogastate.edu -or-
In Person
with Cash, Check, Visa, Mastercard,
Discover or American Express
Deferred fee payment plan
may be set up at any
Chattanooga State location
(not available in summer).
You are not registered
until you have paid.
Telephone (423) 697-2654; -orschedule online: www.chattanoogastate.edu
CHECK OUT:
www.chattanoogastate.edu
• Academic Calendar
4 Register for Courses
Pick your own days and times for courses
as you register online:
www.chattanoogastate.edu.
• Academic Programs
• Campus Director
• Catalog
• Financial Aid
• Scholarships
• Student Handbook
• Student Services
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
3
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
College Program Accreditations and Approval
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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This accreditation is the highest granted to any college or university.
Accreditations
Every eligible instructional program of the College is nationally accredited.
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Fire Science Technology:
Nuclear Medicine Technology
˜˜
˜
Emergency Medical Care
P.O. Box 491, Mount Pleasant, IL 60056-0491
(800) 394-5268 FAX (800) 546-3726
Emergency Service Supervision
and Administration
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜˜˜
˜˜˜
Automotive Technology
Collision Repair
˜˜
˜˜˜
˜˜
˜˜|}
101 Blue Seal Dr., SE, Suite 101
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 669-6650 FAX (703) 669-6125
www.natef.org
˜˜˜˜˜˜
˜
1700 W. Tyler, Stillwater, OK 74078
(405) 744-8303
Health Information Management
Dental Hygiene and
Dental Assisting
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜|
}
˜˜
˜
˜˜
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˜
˜˜
˜˜˜˜
˜˜˜
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233 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 2150,
Chicago, IL 60601-5800
(312) 233-1100 FAX (312) 233-1090
(A specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on
Postsecondary Accreditation by the United States Department
of Education)
211 East Chicago Av., Chicago, IL 60641-2678
(312) 440-2500 FAX (312) 440-7494
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜˜
˜˜˜|
}
1361 Park St., Clearwater, FL 33756
(727) 210-2350 FAX (727) 210-2354
˜˜
˜
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2025 Woodlane Dr., St. Paul, MN 55125
(651) 731-7225 FAX (817) 354-8519
Emergency Medical Services
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜˜˜
˜˜
1248 Harwood Rd., Bedford, TX 76021
http://www.COAEMSP.org
(817) 283-9403 FAX (817) 354-8519
Industrial Electricity
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜˜
˜|}˜
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˜
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111 Market Pl., Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 347-7700
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Nursing (RN and LPN)
˜˜
˜˜˜˜
˜˜
Tennessee Board of Nursing, First Floor, Cordell
Hull Building, 425 Fifth Av. North
Nashville, TN 37247-1010 • (615) 532-5166
Paralegal Studies
˜˜
˜˜˜
750 North Lake Shore Dr., Chicago, IL 60611
7272 Wisconsin Av., Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 657-3000 FAX (301) 652-8278
˜˜
˜˜˜˜
˜
Physical Therapist Assistant
Pharmacy Technician
8224 Old Courthouse Rd.
Vienna, VA 22182-3808
(800) 272-6272 FAX (703) 556-6291
˜˜
˜˜˜˜
˜˜
˜˜
˜˜|}˜˜
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Medical Assistant
1111 N. Fairfax St., Alexandria, VA 22314
(800) 999-2782
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
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|
}
35 East Wacker Dr., Suite 1970
Chicago, IL 60601-2208
(312) 553-9355 FAX (312) 553-9616
˜˜˜
˜˜˜˜
˜˜˜
20 North Wacker Dr., Suite 1575
Chicago, IL 60606-2963
(800) 228-2262
Mechanical Engineering Technology
61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006
(800) 669-1656
Judicial Reporting
˜˜˜˜
Computer Systems Concentration
Nursing (RN)
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜
˜˜
˜˜˜˜
˜˜
Civil Engineering Technology
Automated Controls Concentration
716 Block Point Rd., P.O.Box 1149
Polson, MT 59860-1149
(406) 883-0003 FAX (406) 883-0022
P.O. Box 141104, Gainesville, FL 32614-1104
(888) 622-3720 FAX (352) 334-0932
www.nccer.org
Engineering Technology Programs:
Electrical/Electronic
Engineering Technology:
4
Fire Suppression
Building Construction Techonology
Heavy Equipment Operator
Masonry
Plumbing
˜˜
˜˜˜˜
˜˜˜
˜
(NCCER)
3600 NW 43rd St., Bldg. G
Gainesville, FL 32606
Radiation Therapy Technology
Radiologic Technology
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜˜˜
20 North Wacker Dr., Suite 2850
Chicago, IL 60606-3182
(312) 704-5300 FAX (312) 704-5304
www.jrcert.org
Respiratory Care
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜˜|}˜
1701 W. Euless Boulevard, Suite 300
Euless, TX 76040-6823
(817) 283-2835 (800) 874-5615
Surgical Technology
˜˜
˜˜˜˜˜
˜˜
˜˜˜|
}
35 East Wacker Dr., Suite 1970
Chicago, IL 60601-2208
(312) 553-9355 FAX (312) 553-9616
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Academic Calendar
This calendar is subject to change at any time prior to or during an academic term due to emergencies or causes beyond the reasonable
control of the institution, including severe weather, loss of utility services, or orders by federal or state agencies.
Summer 2008
August 21-22
August 23
August 27
September 3
September 4
September 9
October 13
October 13-16
October 18
October 31
November 22-25
December 7
December 7
December 7-13
December 8
December 9-15
December 12
December 16
December 17
December 24
Early Registration Begins
April 7
Registration & Fee Payment - All Sessions
May 5
Tennessee Technology Center Classes Begin
May 5
Classes Begin – 12-week/First Sessions
May 8
RODP Sessions - To Be Announced
Census-First Session
May 14
Census-12-week Session
May 21
Memorial Day Holiday (College Closed)
May 26
Classes Begin – 10-week Session
May 27
Census-10-week Session
Academic Calendar
Fall 2007
Registration
Tennessee Technology Center Classes Begin
Classes Begin – Full/First Sessions, RODP and
Late Registration Begins
Labor Day – Holiday (College Closed)
Classes Begin – Flex Session
Census
Last Day of Classes/Exams – First Session
Fall Break (No Classes)
Classes Begin – Second Session
Graduation Applications Due
Thanksgiving Holiday (College Closed)
Last Day of Classes/Exams - Second Session
Last Day of Classes - Full and Flex Sessions
RODP Exam Period
Study Day - Full and Flex Sessions
Exams - Full and Flex Sessions
Tennessee Technology Center Last Day
of Classes/Exams
RODP Grades Due
Grades Due to Records (10:00 a.m.)
Grades/Status Reports Available to Students
June 9
Last Day of Classes/Exams – First Session
June 20
Classes Begin – Second Session
June 23
Census-2nd Session
June 29
Independence Day (College Closed)
July 4
Tennessee Technology Center Last Day of Classes/Exams July 29
Last Day of Classes/Exams – 12-week, 10-week,
and Second Sessions
August 5
Grades Due to Records (10 a.m.)
August 6
Grades/Status Reports Available to Students
August 13
Spring 2008
Early Registration Begins
November 12
Registration
January 8
Tennessee Technology Center Classes Begin
January 8
Classes Begin - Full and First Session
RODP Session To Be Announced
January 14
Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday (College Closed)
January 21
Classes Begin – Flex Session
January 22
Census
January 27
Last Day of Classes/Exams – First Session
March 1
Spring Break (No Classes)
March 3-9
Classes Begin – Second Session
March 11
Good Friday/Easter Holiday (College Closed)
March 21-23
Last Day of Classes/Exams – Second Session
April 25
Last day of Classes - Full and Flex Sessions
April 25
Study Day - Full and Flex Sessions
April 26
Exams - Full and Flex Sessions
April 27 - May 1
Tennessee Technology Center
Last Day of Classes/Exams
April 25
Grades Due to Records (10:00 a.m.)
May 2
Commencement
(degree requirements completed Fall of ʻ07, Spring ʻ08, or Summer ʻ08)
May 3
Grades/Status Reports Available to Students
May 9
For more information on the
Tennessee Technology Centerʼs
start dates, please call
(423) 697-4433.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu or
call toll free 1-866-547-3733
E-mail: [email protected]
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
5
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
A Guide To Academic Terminology
Academic Terminology
The following is a list of terms commonly used in admission and registration procedures.
Academic load The total hours of credit for all courses taken during
a semester.
Honors course A version of a regular course reserved for students
who select and qualify for advanced challenge.
Add and drop deadlines The latest date in a semester when a course
may be added or dropped from a studentʼs class schedule.
Major The academic area offered by the College in which one
specializes.
Admissions The process of being admitted to the College allowing
you to register for classes. Completion of the Admissions process
does not constitute registration for classes.
Orientation A meeting (or series of meetings) designed to acquaint a
new student with the facilities, policies, sources of information and
assistance, and academic and social atmosphere of the College.
Admissions file The documents collected for admission including
the application form, official transcripts of previous work in
high school or college and any standardized test scores or other
information required by the Admissions Office.
Prerequisite A requirement to be completed or a level of skill or
knowledge to be demonstrated prior to enrollment in a course or
program.
Audit Registering for and attending class but not eligible to receive
credit.
Concentration A group of courses within a major which emphasizes
one aspect of the major.
Concurrent A course that may be taken prior to or at the same time
as another course.
Corequisite A course to be taken or a requirement to be fulfilled at
the same time another required course is being taken.
Curriculum The set of courses offered in a particular degree or
certificate program. More generally, the courses (in total) offered
in a college or university. The plural is curricula.
Drop Officially discontinuing a portion of oneʼs schedule for the
remainder of the semester.
Early Registration The period of time before official registration
day(s) for each semester when students may register for future
term(s).
Elective A course that is accepted toward fulfillment of credit for a
degree or certificate but is not specifically required for that degree
or certificate. So termed because a student “elects” or chooses to
take the course(s).
Flex Schedule These classes begin approximately one week after the
regular full-session classes.
Full load A full-time student is one taking 12 or more hours. A full
load is often referred to as 12 hours. A student taking less than 12
hours is a part-time student.
General Education For Transfer The shared common core
curriculum of 41 semester hours taken in the freshman and
sophomore years which provides critical thinking skills and
the broad knowledge to become a lifetime learner in a global
community and literate in many forms of communication.
Grade point average (GPA) An average on the four point scale
determined by dividing the total accumulated quality points by the
corresponding total hours of credit attempted. Certain grades do
not influence this computation, e.g., “W.”
6
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Probation The status of students when their cumulative GPA drops
below Chattanooga Stateʼs standards. Students may still enroll
while on probation.
Quality points Academic performance records are compiled through
use of a scale assigning four “quality points” per semester hour of
credit for an “A” grade ranging to one “quality point” per semester
hour of credit for a “D” grade.
Reapplication A form students must fill out if they do not attend
Chattanooga State for one or more semesters (summer excluded).
Registration The process of officially enrolling in one or more
courses. Students must be admitted to the College before they can
register for classes.
Semester The division of the calendar year used in academic
scheduling. A semester is roughly four months in duration.
Semester credit hour The unit of academic credit at Chattanooga
State. Generally the number of hours a course meets each week
determines the amount of credit it carries. (Laboratory and clinical
courses are notable exceptions to this guideline.)
Special Students A Special Student is one who takes credit courses
without working toward a degree.
Suspension The status of students (usually following probation)
when their cumulative GPA drops below Chattanooga Stateʼs
standards for two consecutive semesters. Students may not enroll
while on suspension.
Transcript A cumulative record of a studentʼs course work and
grades.
Transfer Program An academic program that completes two years at
the College and the student transfers to the university with junior
class standing.
Transitional Studies Foundation courses in English, math, reading,
and study skills designed for students who are not fully prepared
for college level courses. Placement in Transitional Studies
courses is determined by ACT or SAT and/or COMPASS tests
scores.
Withdraw Officially discontinuing all of oneʼs schedule for the
remainder of the semester.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu or call 1-866-547-3733
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
Contents
Page
8
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
General Information
Associate of Applied Science
Approved General Education Courses
Technical Certificate of Credit
9-16
Business & Information Technologies
Page
17-18
18
18
19
9
Accounting Technology
9-10
9
10
Applied Technology
Technology Education Concentration
Technology Management Concentration
10
Business, see Management
11
Computer Programming, see Programming
Concentration
10
11
11
Computer Science, see End User Support
Concentration, Network Management
Concentration, Programming
21
10-11
11
11
14
Information Systems Technology
End User Support Concentration
Network Management Concentration
Programming Concentration
Legal Assisting, see Paralegal Studies
22
22
22
11
12
12
12
12
13
Management
Construction Management Concentration
Entrepreneurship Concentration
General Management Concentration
Health Services Management Concentration
Office Management Concentration
Retail Management Concentration
22
13
13
13 -14
14
Media Technologies
Graphic Design Concentration
Media Technology Concentration
Web Based Design Concentration
14
Paralegal Studies
14
15
15
15
15
15
16
15
Realtime Reporting
Broadcast Captioning Concentration
CART Reporting Concentration
Judicial Reporting Concentration
Technical Certificates
Information Systems Technology
Supervisory Development (Pending TBR Approval)
Office Systems Specialist
Industrial Maintenance Technology
Engineering Technologies
16
16
16-17
17
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology
Automated Controls Concentration
Computer Systems Concentration
Networking Technology Concentration
17
17
Engineering Technology
Civil Engineering Technology Concentration
19
19-20
20
20
20
Chemical Concentration
Electromechanical Concentration
Technical Certificates
CAD Technology Certificate
Chemical Process Operations Certificate
Liberal Arts
21
Early Childhood Education
21
Human Services Specialist
22
23
23
23
21-24
24
24
24
24
25
25
26
26
26
26-27
27
28
28
28
29
29-30
29
29
30
Liberal Arts Technical Certificates
Foundations in Acting (Pending TBR Approval)
Advanced Theatre with Concentration (PendingTBR
Approval)
Math & Sciences
Veterinary Technology
Nursing/Allied Health
Admission/Retention Policies
Dental Hygiene
Fire Science Technology
Emergency Medical Care Concentration
Emergency Service Supervision &
Administration Concentration
Fire Suppression Concentration
Health Information Management
Medical Record Technology, see
Health Information Management
Nursing
LPN Transition Program
Paramedic to RN Transition Program
Physical Therapist Assistant
Radiologic Technology
Respiratory Care
Nursing and Allied Health Technical Certificates
Cardiovascular Sonography
Computed Tomography
Dental Assisting
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Nuclear Medicine
Pharmacy Technician
Radiation Therapy
X-Ray Technology, see Radiologic Technology
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
16-20
Construction Engineering Technology
Concentration
Manufacturing Engineering Technology
Concentration
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Concentration,
Motor Sports Engineering Technology
Concentration
For technical diplomas and other career programs see page 39.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu or call toll free 1-866-547-3733
E-mail: [email protected]
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
7
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
General Information
Chattanooga Stateʼs A.A.S. degrees and technical
certificates prepare students for specialized careers. These
programs are designed for the student who does not intend
to transfer to a traditional baccalaureate degree program.
(Should a student later decide to pursue a bachelorʼs degree,
four year institutions may accept some or all credits toward
a bachelorʼs degree.) Career students can pursue programs
leading to the Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree
or a Technical Certificate of Credit.
Associate of Applied Science
Associate of Applied Science degrees are designed to
prepare students for immediate employment in a specialized
area. The A.A.S. degree requires:
1. Total Credit Hours
60 semester credit hours of college level work
2. General Education
A minimum of 25% of the program must be in General Education and
must include at least 3 hours of approved courses from each of the
following:
English Composition (3 hours)
Humanities and/or Fine Arts (3 hours)
Social/Behavioral Science (3 hours)
Math or Natural Science (3 or 4 hours)
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
One additional course from any of the following categories (3 or 4 hours):
Communication
Humanities
Fine Arts
Literature
Math
Natural Science
Social/Behavioral Sciences
3. Major—A minimum of 36 hours in the technical specialty.
4. A grade of “C” or better is required in all prerequisite courses and
in specific courses listed in the program summary of required hours.
Note: The SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS for the studentʼs major may require
that a specific course be taken to satisfy a given General Education requirement.
Otherwise, the student may select any course from the list. If the requirement calls for
3 credit hours and the student selects a 4- or 5-credit course, the extra credit hour(s)
will count as unrestricted elective credit toward graduation. (If the requirement
specified in the studentʼs major is a 4-hour course, the 4th credit hour will not count
toward satisfying the unrestricted elective requirement because it is required as
opposed to being selected by the student.)
Approved General Education Courses for
All Degrees
The following courses fulfill general education
requirements at Chattanooga State.
Communication
ENGL
ENGL
SP
1010 Composition I
1020 Composition II
110 Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Humanities and/or Fine Arts
ART
ART
ART
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
HUM
HUM
HUM
MUS
PHIL
PHIL
RELS
THEA
8
1010
1020
1030
2110
2120
2140
2210
2220
2410
2420
1010
1020
2130
1030
1030
2230
2030
1030
Survey: Art History I
Survey: Art History II
Art Appreciation
American Masterpieces I
American Masterpieces II
African American Literature
English Masterpieces I
English Masterpieces II
Literature of the Western World I
Literature of the Western World II
Introduction to the Humanities I
Introduction to the Humanities II
Mythology
Music Appreciation
Introduction to Philosophy
Ethics
Religions of the World
Introduction to Theatre
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Social & Behavioral Sciences
EC
EC
GEOG
PE
PO
PO
PY
SO
SO
211
212
1025
230
110
112
101
110
216
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
World Geography
The Science of Fitness and Wellness
Introduction to American Government
Introduction to World Politics
General Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Cultural Anthropology
Natural Sciences
ASTR
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
ESC
ESC
GEOL
GEOL
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PSCI
PSCI
1030 Astronomy
1110 General Biology I
1120 General Biology II
1310 Integrated Biology
2010* Human Anatomy and Physiology I
2020* Human Anatomy and Physiology II
1010 Introduction to Chemistry I
1020 Introduction to Chemistry II
1110 General Chemistry I
1120 General Chemistry II
1310 Integrated Chemistry
1110 Environmental Science I
1120 Environmental Science II
1040 Physical Geology
1050 Historical Geology
1030 Physics Concepts
1310 Integrated Physics
2010 Non-Calculus-Based Physics I
2020 Non-Calculus-Based Physics II
2110 Calculus-Based Physics I
2120 Calculus-Based Physics II
1030 The Physical Environment
1310 Integrated Earth & Space Science
*BIOL 2010-2020 sequence must be completed to meet Natural Science requirement.
Mathematics
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
1010
1410
1530
1710
1720
1830
1910
Contemporary Mathematics
Structure of Number Systems I
Introductory Statistics
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
Calculus for Management, Life, and Social Sciences
Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
Math Placement
Students pursuing majors for which the math requirement would
normally be calculus or pre-calculus may begin their college math at a
higher level than College Algebra if they meet the criteria listed below.
Most degrees at Chattanooga State require at least one college level
math course. Meeting the criteria to place into a higher level course does
not exempt the student from this requirement, nor is any credit granted for
the course(s) the student is able to skip.
Criteria
1. Three (3) high school math
credits above the Algebra I
level and a Math subscore of
25 on the ACT or corresponding SAT score.
Advanced Placement
Course
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry-I, MATH 1910
Pre-Calculus II, MATH 1720
2. Two (2) high school math
credits above the Algebra I
level and a Math subscore of
21 on the ACT or corresponding SAT score.
Calculus for Management,
Life, and Social Sciences,
MATH-1830
or
Technical Certificate of Credit
Programs leading to Technical Certificates of Credit are
offered in response to the training needs of area business
and industry. Since the credential denotes proficiency in a
particular occupation, program standards are determined
in consultation with an advisory board of practicing
professionals. Students admitted to these programs may be
enrolled as special students.
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Business & Information
Technologies
Applied Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/Business_Information/bimain.asp
Call (423) 697-4441
or for Paralegal Studies and
Realtime Reporting
call (423) 697-4797
Admissions Criteria
Accounting Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Career Opportunities
Accountant, bookkeeper, fixed asset accountant, billing
and collections clerk, regulation compliance in banking and
other industries, accounts receivable, payable and payroll
entry level positions, paraprofessionals in accounting and tax
preparation at bookkeeping or public accounting firms, cost
accountant, and brokerage assistants.
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In order to be admitted to either of the concentrations
in the Applied Technology Degree, a student must meet
all admissions criteria for degree seeking students at
Chattanooga State and 1) hold a certificate or diploma
requiring at least 1,290 clock hours from Chattanooga Stateʼs
Tennessee Technology Center Division or other Tennessee
Technology Center OR 2) hold a certificate of completion
from an apprenticeship program approved by the U.S.
Department of Labor requiring at least 1,290 clock hours.
Regardless of the criteria used for admission,
documentation must be provided at the time of admission.
Applicants must meet all admission requirements for degree
seeking status and remove Transitional Studies deficiencies,
if any.
There are two concentrations within the Applied
Technology major:
1. Technology Education
2. Technology Management
Please see those listings as follows.
1. Technology Education Concentration
Management
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Technology Education concentration is intended for
non-credentialed teachers in technical education programs
at Tennessee Technology Centers, in high school technical
education programs, and in proprietary technology schools.
The program will provide an A.A.S. degree, which is the
minimum SACS-approved credential for faculty in such
programs. To gain admission to this program, students
must present evidence of education and/or training in a
technical area as provided in the Admissions Guidelines
for the Associate of Applied Technology Degree, shown
above, OR submit a portfolio for review and approval by the
Chattanooga State Credit for Life Experience Committee.
Such portfolio must include a letter of review from a subject
matter expert in the area of technical training evaluating
the applicantʼs technical training and abilities. The portfolio
composition, review and approval process will be governed
by the policies of the Chattanooga State Credit for Life
Experience Committee. Admitted students will be granted
30 hours of Advanced Placement credit upon completion of
all transitional studies requirements and 15 hours of college
credit with a GPA of 2.0 or above.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
The Accounting Technology Associate of Applied
Science degree includes instruction in accounting principles
and theory, business law applications, tax accounting,
payroll, computerized accounting information systems,
budgeting and cost accounting, financial statement
preparation and analysis, and financial planning. The degree
will assist those employed in both small and large business
entities to analyze business transactions, communicate
information to management, handle compliance with
governmental tax regulations, and effectively communicate
the data gained in the accounting process.
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The Applied Technology degree provides students
who have successfully completed specialized training at
a Tennessee Technology Center (previously called the
Industrial Technology Center Division at Chattanooga
State) or an apprenticeship program approved by the U.S.
Department of Labor to advance their careers by completing
concentrations in either technology management or
technology education. Students admitted to these programs
are awarded 30 semester hours of advanced placement credit
upon completion of all transitional studies requirements and
15 hours of college credit with a GPA of 2.0 or above.
9
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Career Opportunities
Computer Programming
Teacher at a Tennessee Technology Center, high school
teacher in a technology education program, teacher at a
proprietary technical school.
See “Programming Concentration”
Computer Science
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
ENGL 1010
**TELC 2008
**TELC 2011
**TELC 2013
**TELC 2015
SP 110
Course Title
Advanced Placement
Composition I
Facilitating Learning through Assessment
and Evaluation
Teaching with Technology
Adult Learners
Survey of Exceptionalities & Diversity in Adult
Learners
Public Speaking
*Directed Elective
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Math/Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Social & Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Total Hours: 60/61
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
30
3
See: “End User Support Concentration,” “Network
Management Concentration,” “Programming Concentration,”
“Information Systems Technology Certificate”
3
3
3
Graphic Design
See “Media Technologies”
3
3
3
3
3/4
____3
15/16
Information Systems Technology
__
45
*Approved Directed Electives: TELC 2014, 2016.
**TELC courses are all RODP and can be located on the following website:
http://www.rodp.org/
2. Technology Management Concentration
Associate of Applied Science Degree
There are three concentrations within the Information
Systems Technology major:
1. End User Support
2. Network Management
3. Programming
Please see those listings as follows.
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Management
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Technology Management concentration is designed
to broaden the education of students who have successfully
completed specialized training in a technology field.
Through general education classes and courses in business
and management, students develop their skills needed for
supervisory careers or to start a small business within
their area of technical training and experience. To gain
admission to this program, students must present evidence
of education and/or training in a technical area as provided
in the Admissions Guidelines for the Associate of Applied
Technology Degree, shown above. Admitted students will
be granted 30 hours of Advanced Placement credit upon
completion of all transitional studies requirements and 15
hours of college credit with a GPA of 2.0 or above.
Career Opportunities
Team leader, supervisor, foreman, entrepreneur.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
BU 114
BU 211
ENGL 1010
MG 103
MG 114
MG 165
SP 110
Course Title
Advanced Placement
Principles of Accounting I
Legal Environment of Business
Composition I
Business Today, an Introduction
Principles of Management
Business Math
Public Speaking
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Math/Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Social & Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Total Hours: 60/61
Business
See “Management”
10
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
30
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3/4
__3
_____
15
45/46
1. End User Support Concentration
Information Systems Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program trains information systems technicians for
support roles in the information technology field. Technical
and non-technical subjects address client support needs in
areas such as application software, help desk, user training,
microcomputer support and network services.
Career Opportunities
Microcomputer applications, help desk, user training and
network services support.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
Freshman
CS 104
CS 114
CS 124
CS 197
CS 176
CS 198
CS 160
CS 204
CS 205
Sophomore
BU 114
CS 296
ENGL 1010
MATH 1530
CS 240
CS 244
SP 110
Course Title
Fundamentals of Information Systems
Concepts of Programming
Visual Basic I
Spreadsheet Software Applications
*Directed Elective
Operating Systems
Database Software Applications
Java Programming I
Microcomputer Architecture
Computer Networks
Principles of Accounting I
Principles of Database Manager
Composition I
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
*Directed Elective
Introductory Statistics
Computer User Support
Systems Analysis and Design
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Total Hours: 60
*CS 215, NW 205, NW 207 or CS 140, CS 150, CS 152.
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
3
3
3
__3
15
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
3
3
3
__3
15
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
2. Network Management Concentration
Legal Assisting
Information Systems Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
See “Paralegal Studies”
This program prepares graduates for computer network
management certification.
Management
Career Opportunities
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Network manager
Course No.
Freshman
CS 104
CS 114
CS 124
NW 205
ENGL 1010
CS 185
CS 204
CS 205
1530
˜ MATH
˜
Sophomore
BU 114
CS 296
NW 207
CS 244
NW 208
Fundamentals of Information Systems
Concepts of Programming
Visual Basic I
Network Client Operating System
*Directed Elective
Composition I
C++ Programming Language I
Microcomputer Architecture
Computer Networks
Introductory
Statistics
˜
Principles of Accounting I
Principles of Database Management Systems
Managing & Maintaining a Server Environment
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Systems Analysis and Design
Management of Network Infrastructure
*Directed Elective
Network Security Fundamentals
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
¤¤˜
15
3
3
3
3
¤¤3
15
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
Management
Associate of Applied Science Degree
3
3
3
3
__3
15
3. Programming Concentration
Information Systems Technology
Associate of Applied Science
This program prepares students to work as computer programmers in business. Technical and non-technical related
subjects give students a better understanding of possible
application areas and supervisory and administrative
responsibilities.
Career Opportunities
Computer programmer, control clerk, job control
specialist, operations librarian.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Sophomore
BU 114
CS 161
CS 285
CS 296
MG 160
CS 244
CS 299
SP 110
Course Title
Fundamentals of Information Systems
Concepts of Programming
Visual Basic I
Composition I
Introductory Statistics
Java Programming I
C++ Programming Language I
Database Software Applications
Visual Basic II
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Principles of Accounting I
Java Programming II
C++ Programming Language II
Principles of Database Management Systems
Project Management
Systems Analysis and Design
Special Projects
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
*Directed Elective
Total Hours: 60
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
The Construction Management concentration provides
students already trained in the construction trades with
the opportunity to expand their career opportunities in
management and entrepreneurship. Through general
education classes and courses in business and management,
students develop the skills needed to move into supervisory
roles or to start a small business within their area of
technical training and experience.
To gain admission to this program, a student must
present: 1) a diploma in construction or a construction trade
from Chattanooga Stateʼs Tennessee Technology Center or
from another Tennessee Technology Center, OR 2) hold a
certificate of completion from an apprenticeship program
approved by the U.S. Department of Labor requiring at least
1,290 clock hours.
Regardless of the criteria used for admission,
documentation must be provided at the time of admission.
Applicants must meet all admission requirements for degree
seeking status and remove Transitional Studies deficiencies,
if any. Students accepted into this program will receive 24
hours of advanced placement upon the successful completion
of 15 hours of college level credit.*
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
3
3
3
3
__3
15
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
Please see those listings as follows.
1. Construction Management Concentration
Total Hours: 60
*Six hour of directed electives must be selected from : CS 176, NW 210, NW 215, or
NW 219.
Course No.
Freshman
CS 104
CS 114
CS 124
ENGL 1010
MATH 1530
CS 160
CS 185
CS 198
CS 225
There are six concentrations within the Management
major:
1. Construction Management
2. Entrepreneurship
3. General Management
4. Health Services Management
5. Office Management
6. Retail Management (Pending TBR Approval)
BU 114
BU 211
CI 164
CI 233
ENGL 1010
MATH 1710
MG 114
MG 160
MG 264
Course Title
*Advanced Placement
Principles of Accounting I
Legal Environment of Business
Construction Estimating
Contracts and Specifications
Composition I
Pre-Calculus I
Principles of Management
Project Management
Human Resources Management
General Education Elective
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Social & Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
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FALL
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
NW 211
SP 110
˜˜˜
Course Title
Semester Hours
SPR SUM
24
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
__
39
__3
6
3
3
3
3
__3
15
*Three hours of directed electives must be selected from : CS 150, CS 176 or CS 249.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
11
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
2. Entrepreneurship Concentration
4. Health Services Management
Concentration
Management
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Management
This program is for students interested in starting,
financing, and operating a small business. Emphasis is on
finance, marketing, accounting, personnel management, and
supervision.
Career Opportunities
˜˜˜
A.A.S. Degrees
& Technical
Certificates
Career
Programs
Sophomore
BU 250
FM 201
MATH 1530
MG 224, 225
MG 254
MG 264
Course Title
Principles of Accounting I
Legal Environment of Business
Computer Applications in Management
Principles of Economics I or II
Composition I
Business Today - An Introduction
Principles of Management
Marketing
Business Mathematics
General Education Elective
Accounting Information Systems I
Financial Management
Introductory Statistics
Entrepreneurship I, II
Principles of Selling
Human Resources Management
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
MG, BU or FP Electives
pš!d˜
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Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
Course No.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
__3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__3
15
Medical office manager, dental office manager,
supervisory or management positions in the health care field.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
3
3
3
__3
15
3. General Management Concentration
Management
Associate of Applied Science Degree
BU 114
BU 211
EC 211 or 212
ENGL 1010
MG 103
MG 114
MG 165
MG 264
SP 110
Course Title
*Advanced Placement
Principles of Accounting I
Legal Environment of Business
Macro or Microeconomics
Composition I
Business Today - An Introduction
Principles of Management
Business Mathematics
Human Resources Management
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Computer Elective
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Math/Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
FALL
24
Semester Hours
SPR SUM
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3/4
__
39/40
__
15
3
__
6
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*To qualify for admission to this program, students must present proof of Education:
1) completion of a clinically-based health program consisting of a minimum of
24 semester credit hours OR 2) a diploma from a Tennessee Technology Center
requiring at least 1,290 clock hours in a clinically-based health program AND
current registration/certification/licensure/credentials from 1) the State of Tennessee,
OR 2) the regulating authority in another state OR 3) a national credentialing
authority (if applicable). Students who are interested in careers in the health
care industry but lack this requirement should pursue the General Management
concentration.
The General Management concentration prepares
students to manage businesses and other organizations.
5. Office Management Concentration
Career Opportunities
Office manager, assistant manager, department manager,
personnel administration, supervisor.
Management
Associate of Applied Science Degree
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
The Office Management Program is designed to provide
a two-year degree with emphases in legal, professional
and medical training. This program is for those who desire
skills needed in the workforce at large. Graduates may enter
the workforce and proceed with further education or fully
dedicate their efforts toward a career as an administrative
professional.
Course No.
Freshman
BU 114,115
BU 211
CS 293
EC 211 or 212
ENGL 1010
MG 103
MG 114
MG 154
˜˜
Sophomore
FM 201
MATH 1530
MG 264
MG 281
˜˜
Course Title
Principles of Accounting I, II
Legal Environment of Business
Computer Applications in Management
Principles of Economics I or II
Composition I
Business Today - An Introduction
Principles of Management
Marketing
*Directed
Elective
˜
Financial Management
Introductory Statistics
Human Resources Management
Strategic Management Practices
*Directed Electives
General Education Elective
Humanities/Fine
Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
˜
Total Hours: 60
*Suggested Directed Electives for Areas of Emphasis:
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This concentration prepares qualified students for
supervisory and/or management positions in the health care
industry.
Career Opportunities
Entrepreneur, manager in a small business.
Course No.
Freshman
BU 114
BU 211
CS 293
EC 211 or 212
ENGL 1010
MG 103
MG 114
MG 154
MG 165
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
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15
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3
3
3
6
3
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3
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Career Opportunities
Executive Assistant, Administrative Assistant, Office
Manager, Office Supervisor, Administrative Coordinator,
Administrative Specialist, Assistant to Executive Title,
Administrative Manager, Customer Service Representative,
Administrative Associate, Executive/Secretary, Word
Processing Specialist, Clerk/Typist, Medical Office
Administrator, Legal Office, Legal/Medical Secretary.
After completion of 12 semester hours of college
level work at Chattanooga State, Certified Professional
Secretaries (CPS) or Certified Administrative Professionals
(CAP) may receive up to 15 hours of college credit,
applicable toward the A.A.S. degree in Office Management
only. This credit may not duplicate or replace previously
earned college credits. The student must present proof that
all parts of the CPS or CAP exam have been passed and
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
must be actively pursuing an Office Management major. The
courses for which credit may be awarded are:
˜
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SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
p£’F˜p˜
Freshman
ENGL 1010
OF 104, 105
OF 113, 114
OF 125, 126
OF 195
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Composition I
Business Communications I, II
Keyboarding Document Processing I, II
Word Processing I, II
General Office Procedures
Mathematics Gen. Ed. Elective*
Social and Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Sophomore
MG 114
BU 114
MG 160
MG 264
SP 110
OF 206
CS 293
Principles of Management
Principles of Accounting
Project Management
Human Resources Management
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Office Administration Internship
Computer Applications in Management
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
** Directed Electives
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*MATH 1530, Introductory Statistics is recommended.
**Directed Electives must be based on the Emphasis chosen:
Semester Hours
˜
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
_3
15
3. Web Based Design Concentration
Please see those listings as follows.
1. Graphic Design Concentration
Media Technologies
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The Graphic Design concentration focuses on print
media. Students are prepared for careers in graphic design
firms and advertising agencies, printing and graphic arts
service industries and inplant or in-house art departments.
Students will need to spend approximately $250-300 for
basic professional equipment the first semester and $100150 per semester for consumable supplies.
Career Opportunities
Graphic designer, graphic services specialist, art
director, pre-press, service bureau, printing, graphic service
sales, illustrator.
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Course No.
Freshman
AA 106
AA 107
AA 108
AA 109
AA 116
AA 245
ART 1030
CO 110
CS 190
ENGL 1010
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Management
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Sophomore
AA 209,210
AA 215,217
AA 222
AA 246
CS 140
SP 110
Career Opportunities
Store manager/assistant manager, customer service,
buyer, merchandising manager, department manager/
assistant manager, district director.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Sophomore
FM 201
MATH 1530
MG 165
MG 176
MG 214
MG 215
MG 254
MG 264
MG 281
2. Media Technology Concentration
__3
15
6. Retail Management Concentration
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BU 114, 115
BU 211
CS 293
EC 211 or 212
ENGL 1010
MG 103
MG 114
MG 154
1. Graphic Design Concentration
3
3
3
3
3
3
__3
15
Associate of Applied Science Degree
There are three concentrations within the Media
Technologies major:
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Principles of Accounting I, II
Legal Environment of Business
Computer Applications in Management
Principles of Economics I or II
Composition
Business Today - An Introduction
Principles of Management
Marketing
General Education Elective
Financial Management
Introduction to Statistics
Business Mathematics
Customer Service Skills
Supply Chain Management
Retail Operations
Principles of Selling
Human Resource Management
Strategic Management Practices
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
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3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
__3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
__3
15
3
3
3
_
15
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
Course Title
Design
Illustration I
Advertising Concepts
Production Art
Typography
Computer Applications for Graphic Design
Art Appreciation
Introduction to Mass Communications
Introduction to Macintosh
Composition I
Graphic Design I, II
Advertising Design I, II
Portfolio
Computer Illustration
Internet Foundations
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Math/Science Gen. Ed. Elective
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
3
__3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3/4
____
15/16
3
3
__
15
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
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Media Technologies
Total Hours: 60/61
2. Media Technology Concentration
Media Technologies
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The media technology concentration will give students
an opportunity to take courses in broadcasting, production,
linear editing, and other areas of mass media. This multifaceted approach will meet the identified need for students
interested in radio, television, or print journalism while
providing an overview of all aspects of media technology.
This program will also include a number of courses which
are transferable to senior institutions for students interested
in pursuing an advanced degree while working in the
industry.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
13
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Career Opportunities
Paralegal Studies
Entry level positions in radio and television operations
throughout the region.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
Freshman
AA 106
CO 110
CO 202
CO 204
CS 140
ENGL 1010
SP 110
Sophomore
CO 210
CO 221,231
CO 230
CO 232
CO 241
CO 281
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
Course Title
Design
Introduction to Mass Communications
Broadcast Announcing
TV Production
Internet Foundations
Composition I
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
*Directed Elective
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Communications Practicum
Media Writing I,II
Remote Television Production
Public Relations
Non-linear Video Editing
Media Management
*Directed Elective
Mathematics/Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
__3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
3
3 or 4
_____
15
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Total Hours: 60/61
*Select 9 hours from: Any AA or CO course, BU 211, CS 104, 150, 152, MG 154,
244, 254.
3. Web Based Design Concentration
Media Technologies
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The web based design degree trains students for careers
in advertising agencies, art services, department stores,
printing industries, television, graphic arts industries,
and in-plant or agency packaging services. The Web
Design concentration focuses on web page design and
courses specific to the internet. Students will need to spend
approximately $200–$250 for basic professional equipment
the first year.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
Course Title
Design
Illustration
Advertising Concepts
Production Art
Typography
Computer Applications for Graphic Design
Internet Foundations
Principles of Web Site Design
Introduction to Macintosh
Composition I
Portfolio
Introduction to Mass Communications
Art Appreciation
Multimedia Projects
Intermediate Web Site Design
Introduction to Scripting Languages
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Computer Illustration
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Math/Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Total Hours: 60/61
14
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*CS 101, Computer Literacy, is recommended only for students with little or no
background in using a spreadsheet program such as excel.
**PY 101, General Psychology, is strongly recommended, PE 230 is excluded.
***PE 230 is excluded; Spanish (SPAN 1010) recommended..
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Art director, production artist, graphic designer,
illustrator, printer, printing, pre-press, service bureau.
Sophomore
AA 222
CO 110
ART 1030
CS 152
CS 241
CS 242
SP 110
AA 246
The goal of the Paralegal Studies program is to provide
a general education with emphasis on substantive legal and
ethical principles and prepare them for entry-level paralegal
positions working under the supervision of an attorney in
the private or public sector. This program is also the basis
for the first two years of a baccalaureate program in Legal
Assisting through Chattanooga Stateʼs 2+2 articulation
agreement with the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.
(See the Advising Center for details.)
Realtime Reporting
Career Opportunities
Course No.
Freshman
AA 106
AA 107
AA 108
AA 109
AA 116
AA 245
CS 140
CS 150
CS 190
ENGL 1010
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Approved by the American Bar Association
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
__3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Beginning in the fall of 2006, the Realtime Reporting
Degree became a 1 + 1 program with the first year being the
Tennessee Technology Center Realtime Reporting: Scopist
diploma. After successfully completing this one year Scopist
diploma, students will receive 24 hours of advance credit
toward the Realtime Reporting Degree. (See “Realtime
Reporting: Scopist” in the Tennessee Technology Center
section of this catalog.)
Admitted students will be granted 24 hours of Advanced
Placement credit upon completion of all transitional studies
requirements and 15 hours of college credit with a GPA of
2.0 or above.
There are three concentrations within the Realtime
Reporting major:
1. Broadcast Captioning
2. CART Reporting
3. Judicial Reporting
3
__
15
3
3 or 4
_____
15
Please see those listings as follows.
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
1. Broadcast Captioning Concentration
Course No.
Realtime Reporting
Associate of Applied Science Degree
ENGL 1010
GEOG 1025
LA 130
OF 104
PO 110
REAL 122,123,124
REAL 201
The Broadcast Captioning concentration prepares
students to provide television captioning services for deaf
and hard-of-hearing people.
Career Opportunities
Live television captioning of news programs, talk shows,
sporting events, shopping networks, political debates.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
*Advanced Placement
Composition I
World Geography
Legal Research
Business Communications
Introduction to American Government
Judicial Reporting II, III, IV
Judicial Procedures
*Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Math Gen. Ed. Elective
FALL
Semester Hours
SPR SUM
24
3
3
3
3
4
3
__
16
3
4
4
3
__3
40
__
4
*Advanced Placement through the Tennessee Technology Center.
**HUM 1010, Intro to Humanities I is strongly recommended.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
CO 249
ENGL 1010
GEOG 1025
HP 132
PO 110
REAL 132,133,134
REAL 202
Course Title
*Advanced Placement
Special Topics in Mass Communications
Composition I
World Geography
Psychology of Deaf People
Introduction to American Government
Captioning II, III, IV
Captioning/CART Procedures
**Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Math Gen. Ed. Elective
Total Hours: 60
FALL
Semester Hours
SPR SUM
24
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
__
16
3
__3
37
4
3
__
7
*Advanced Placement through the Tennessee Technology Center.
**HUM 1010, Intro to Humanities I is strongly recommended.
Business and Information
Technologies Technical
Certificates
2. CART Reporting Concentration
Technical Certificate of Credit
Realtime Reporting
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation)
Reporting Concentration prepares students to provide
communication access services for deaf and hard-of-hearing
people.
Career Opportunities
CART in educational settings, conferences, conventions,
business meetings, church services, theater productions.
Course No.
ENGL 1010
GEOG 1025
HP 120
HP 132
PO 110
REAL 132,133,134
REAL 202
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
*Advanced Placement
Composition I
World Geography
American Sign Language
Psychology of Deaf People
Introduction to American Government
Captioning II, III, IV
Captioning/CART Procedures
**Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Math Gen. Ed. Elective
FALL
Semester Hours
SPR SUM
24
3
3
3
3
3
4
__3
16
4
3
3
__
40
This certificate is for persons interested in information
systems technology. Thirteen semester hours of core courses
are required of every student; the remaining coursework is
chosen from information systems, accounting, management,
or network management. A minimum grade of “C” is
required in each course.
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*Advanced Placement through the Tennessee Technology Center.
**HUM 1010, Intro to Humanities I is strongly recommended.
3. Judicial Reporting Concentration
Realtime Reporting
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Approved by the National Court Reporters Association
The Judicial Reporting concentration prepares students to
provide realtime reporting services in the legal environment.
Career Opportunities
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Information Systems
Technology Certificate
Office Systems Specialist
Technical Certificate of Credit
This two-semester certificate provides students with
entry-level word processing skills. A minimum grade of “C”
is required in each course.
˜
Course No.
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Official court reporter or freelance reporter providing
realtime reporting of court proceedings, depositions,
medical malpractice cases, arbitrations, sworn statements,
government hearings, board meetings.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
15
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Supervisory Development
1. Automated Controls Concentration
Technical Certificate
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
(Pending TBR Approval)
This two-semester certificate is designed to address the
skill set needed by new or recently promoted supervisors.
These are students who are not typically seeking a degree,
but to whose future employers formal recognition of
completion of this program is of value. These courses stress
the day-to-day functional requirements of supervisors.
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The Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology major
gives students a broad education in AC and DC circuits,
electronic circuits, logic circuits, advanced electronic
circuits, digital computer systems, and integrated circuits
through practical laboratory experiences and classroom
instruction. The Automated Controls Concentration provides
in-depth study in robotics, process control with feedback
control loops, programmable logic controllers, transducers,
and factory cell automation.
Career Opportunities
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Engineering Technologies
Chattanooga State offers two-year degrees in both
Engineering Technology and a Pre-Engineering transfer
program. Students interested in these fields need to know
the difference between Engineering and Engineering
Technology.
• Engineering uses mathematics, science, experience, and judgment
to develop ways to benefit humanity.
• Engineering Technology supports engineering through knowledge,
methods, and technical skills. It lies between the craftsman and
the engineer, closer to the engineer.
Engineering Technology courses (those with prefixes CI,
DD, EE, ET, MD), while not generally accepted at four-year
institutions offering degrees in Engineering, are accepted at
many four-year Engineering Technology programs, and are
accepted by UTCʼs Engineering Technology Management
B.S. program. The degree also offers immediate job
opportunities.
Pre-Engineering students should follow the articulation
agreement for the senior institution to which they plan to
transfer. The department is working especially close with
UTCʼs Engineering School so that transfer credit hours are
maximized.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/Engineering/enmain.asp
Electrical/Electronic Engineering
Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
There are three concentrations within the Electrical/
Electronic Engineering Technology major:
1. Automated Controls
2. Computer Systems
3. Networking Technology
Please see those listings as follows.
16
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Engineering technician, electronics technician, industrial
electronics technician, industrial-electrician, instrumentation
technician, manufacturing technician, plant technician,
robotics technician, service technician, systems-application
technician.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
Freshman
DD 116
EE 110
EE 121
EE 140
ENGL 1010
ET 115
MATH 1710
MATH 1720
Sophomore
EE 212
EE 221
EE 260
EE 261
EE 271
ENGL 2710
MATH 1910
Course Title
CAD for Electronics
Electrical Circuits I
Electronics I
Digital Circuits
Composition I
Computers in Engineering Technology
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
Physics Gen. Ed. Elective*
Electrical Circuits II
Electronics II
Programmable Logic Controllers
Automation Control Systems
Capstone Project
Technical Reports
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry I
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
4
4
4
3
3
3
__
17
4
__4
15
4
4
4
4
3
3
4
__
15
3
__3
17
Total Hours: 64
*PHYS 1030, PHYS 2010, PHYS 2110.
2. Computer Systems Concentration
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
The Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology major
gives students a broad education in AC and DC circuits,
electronic circuits, logic circuits, advanced electronic
circuits, digital computer systems, and integrated circuits
through practical laboratory experiences and classroom
instruction. The Computer Systems Concentration provides
in-depth study in microcomputer peripherals, bus standards,
communication protocols, and the latest in microprocessor
technology.
Career Opportunities
Associate engineering technician, computer technician,
communications technician, electronics technician,
industrial electronics technician, instrumentation technician,
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
networking technician, plant technician, service technician,
systems application technician.
˜˜˜
Course No.
Freshman
DD 116
EE 110
EE 121
EE 140
ENGL 1010
ET 115
MATH 1710
MATH 1720
Sophomore
EE 212
EE 221
EE 250
EE 251
EE 271
ENGL 2710
MATH 1910
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR SUM
Course Title
CAD for Electronics
Electrical Circuits I
Electronics I
Digital Circuits
Composition I
Computers in Engineering Technology
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
*PHYS 1030, PHYS 2010, or PHYS 2110.
Electrical Circuits II
Electronics II
Microcomputer Systems
Microcontrollers Applications
Capstone Project
Technical Reports
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry I
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Total Hours: 64
4
4
3
3
3
4
__
11
__4
4
4
Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
4
4
3
3
4
3
__
17
__3
15
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Career Opportunities
This program trains students to work in data/
telecommunications by providing a broad knowledge of
computer operating systems protocol as well as techniques
for establishing physical connections between various
computer platforms. Graduates will be able to work with
stand-alone local area networks, distributed workgroups
linked directly to a host computer, and interconnecting
computers with different platforms.
Career Opportunities
Management information system technician, management
information system coordinator, computer network installer,
network repair (maintenance) technician, computer
technician.
˜˜
Sophomore
CNAP 1030
EE 250
EE 251
ENGL 2710
˜˜
Course Title
CISCO CCNA I
CISCO CCNA II
Electrical Circuits I
Electronics I
Digital Circuits
Composition I
Computers in Engineering Technology
Pre-Calculus I
Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
˜
CISCO CCNA III
Microcomputer Systems
Microcontrollers Applications
Technical Reports
Approved Technical Electives
Humanities Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
˜
Total Hours: 60
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
__
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4
3
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Approved technical electives
• Data communications emphasis: CS 204 Computer Architecture and CS 205 Data
Communications or
• Security emphasis: NW 205 - Networking Client Operating Systems and NW 211
- Security or
• CISCO emphasis: CNAP 1040 + 2 hours approved by E/EET advisor from DD, EE,
MD, NW or CS courses.
Civil engineering technician, construction estimator,
construction inspector, land surveyor, hydraulics technician,
structural design technician, construction materials lab
technician.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
Freshman
CI 164
CI 174
DD 124
ENGL 1010
ENGL 2710
ET 115
MATH 1710
MATH 1720
PHYS 1030
Sophomore
CI 224
CI 231
CI 242
CI 243
CI 274
MATH 1910
MD 134,242
Course Title
Construction Estimating
Surveying I
*CAD Engineering Drawing II
Composition I
Technical Reports
Computers in Engineering Technology
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
Concepts of Physics
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Hydraulics & Hydrology
Construction Materials Testing
Structural Steel
Reinforced Concrete
Surveying II
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry I
Statics & Strength of Materials I, II
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Elective
*Prerequisite: DD 114.
**DD, MD, or CI course.
Total Hours: 65
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
__3
16
3
3
__
17
3
3
4
4
3
__
17
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
This program gives students the knowledge, methods, and
skills to work as engineering technicians in support of such
civil engineering activities such as assisting in the design of
structural steel and reinforced concrete, monitoring construction, maintaining material quality used in construction,
surveying and mapping, construction estimating, and assisting
in the design of hydraulics structures.
3. Networking Technology Concentration
Course No.
Freshman
CNAP 1010
CNAP 1020
EE 110
EE 121
EE 140
ENGL 1010
ET 115
MATH 1710
1. Civil Engineering Technology
Concentration
4
*Physics Gen. Ed. Elective.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Associate of Applied Science Degree
There are five concentrations within the Engineering
Technology major:
1. Civil Engineering Technology
2. Construction Engineering Technology
3. Manufacturing Engineering Technology
4. Mechanical Engineering Technology
5. Motor Sports Engineering Technology
Please see those listings as follows.
3
4
__
17
Engineering Technology
3
3
__3
15
2. Construction Engineering Technology
Concentration
Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The primary objective of this program is to provide
the basic technical theory, principles, and practices to
enable the graduate to work in the construction industry.
Opportunities may be available with testing firms, materials
suppliers, specialty contractors, construction safety,
subcontractors, home builders, general contractors, land
surveyors, and inspection service bureaus. The program is
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
17
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
intended for a student planning on immediate employment
as an engineering technician, but when the concentration is
accredited by TAC/ABET it will provide 2+2 transfer to a
baccalaureate program.
Career Opportunities
Construction - estimator, materials testing, inspector,
supervision, safety; contractor, surveying, project planning.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Course No.
Freshman
CI 110
CI 116
CI 164
CI 174
DD 124
ENGL 1010
ET 115
MATH 1710
MATH 1720
PHYS 1030
Sophomore
CI 231
CI 233
CI 242 or CI 243
ENGL 2710
MATH 1910
MD 134,242
Course Title
Construction Safety
Construction Planning & Scheduling
Construction Methods & Estimating
Surveying I
*CAD Engineering Drawing II
Composition I
Computers in Engineering Technology
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
Concepts of Physics
Construction Materials Testing
Contracts & Specifications
Structural Steel or Reinforced Concrete
Technical Reports
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry I
Statics & Strength of Materials I, II
Humanities Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Elective
Total Hours: 64
*Prerequisite: DD 114.
**CI, DD, or MD course.
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
__4
16
3
3
4
__
17
3
3
4
3
3
__
16
3
__3
15
3. Manufacturing Engineering Technology
Concentration
Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
The Manufacturing Engineering Technology major
provides graduates with a unique blend of theoretical
and hands-on knowledge with computer integration in a
manufacturing environment. This curriculum includes a
background in mechanical/manufacturing engineering
technologies and related theory, computer-aided design
(CAD), computer numerical control (CNC), computeraided manufacturing (CAM), statistical process control
(SPC), quality management and control, engineering
management. Computer usage for process control and
effective communication skills is emphasized along with
practical skills for programming and operating technically
sophisticated equipment.
With an A.A.S. degree in Manufacturing Engineering
Technology you will become an integral member of the
team needed by modern industrial firms. Your knowledge
of production systems, automated equipment, system
integration, process controls, quality control and managerial
skills will help you perform many different duties including
applications for computer integration, process setup and
control, quality control. You will be prepared to enter
jobs such as equipment troubleshooter, equipment builder,
equipment installation technician, manufacturing or quality
control specialist, plant supervisor and other operational
or management positions. Other areas may include product
planning, product design, or system design. Your skills will
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Course No.
Freshman
DD 124
ENGL 1010
ENGL 2710
ET 115
MATH 1710
MATH 1720
MD 184
MD 254
PHYS 1030
Sophomore
EE 284
MATH 1530
MD 134
MD 207,208
MD 226
MD 294
MD 295
QA 240
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
CAD Engineering Drawing II
Composition I
Technical Reports
Computers in Engineering Technology
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
Manufacturing Processes
Elements of Material Science
Concepts of Physics
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Electrical Technology for Mechanical
Engineering Technology
Introductory Statistics
Statics and Strength of Materials I
Numerical Control I, II
Fluid Power
Automated Manufacturing
Manufacturing Management
Statistical Process Control
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
*Technical Elective
Total Hours: 65
*DD 214, DD 222, DD 227, or DD 243.
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
4
__
16
__3
16
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
18
3
__3
15
3
Career Opportunities
18
enable you to enter your chosen field and quickly become a
member of a dynamic industry.
4. Mechanical Engineering Technology
Concentration
Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
This program gives students a broad education in
mechanical design, manufacturing processes, creation and
utilization of mechanical power, thermosciences, heating,
ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) design, metals and
special materials, and computer-aided drafting and design.
Career Opportunities
Customer support technician, draftsman/designer,
engineering assistant, HVAC technician, computer-aided
draftsman/designer, industrial mechanics technician,
metallurgical laboratory technician, mechanical engineering
technician.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
Freshman
CHEM 1010
DD 124
ENGL 1010
ENGL 2710
ET 115
MATH 1710
MATH 1720
MD 184
MD 254
PHYS 1030
Sophomore
EE 284
Course Title
Introduction to Chemistry I
CAD Engineering Drawing II
Composition I
Technical Reports
Computers in Engineering Technology
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
Manufacturing Processes
Elements of Material Science
Concepts of Physics
Electrical Technology for Mechanical
Engineering Technology
MATH 1910
Calculus w/Analytic Geometry I
MD 134,242
Statics and Strength of Materials I, II
MD 226
Fluid Power
MD 264
Thermodynamics I
MD 274
Machine Design
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
*Technical Elective
Total Hours: 64
*DD 204, DD 214, DD 222, DD 227, or DD 243.
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
4
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
__4
16
3
4
3
3
__
17
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
16
__3
15
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Industrial Maintenance
Technology
5. Motor Sports
Engineering Technology
Concentration
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Engineering Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program meets the needs of those enthusiasts
involved in motor Sports vehicle design and construction.
Motor Sports is a $475 billion a year industry and
Chattanooga is surrounded by major and minor motor
Sports tracks and each year is host to a number of racing
events and shows. Car, boat, motorcycle, and ATV race
enthusiasts are seeking training avenues for making their
vehicle the fastest and best. Chattanooga State began a
Motor Sports initiative in the fall 2005 semester, which has
generated interest and demand for motor Sports welding,
machining, and engine performance. The newly formed
Motor Sports Club, a multidisciplinary student organization,
is now the largest at Chattanooga State.
Career Opportunities
Integral member of the team needed by motor sportsrelated industries ranging from racing automobiles to
dragsters, marine craft, and motorcycles.
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Please see those listings as follows.
1. Chemical Concentration
Industrial Maintenance Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The associate degree program in industrial maintenance
technology (chemical concentration) prepares graduates
for a position as a process operator/technician in a
manufacturing facility. Students will gain an understanding
of chemistry and chemical processes as well as blueprint
reading, electrical and mechanical fundamentals, and
computer skills. Emphasis is placed upon the understanding
and troubleshooting of process systems. The program
combines classroom study and practical hands-on
experience. The courses in the program emphasize safe and
efficient work practices, teamwork, communication skills,
and real world case studies.
Career Opportunities
Process operators/technicians in the chemical, polymer,
pharmaceutical, plastics, food/beverage, water/sewage, and
pulp/paper industries.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
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Freshman
CS 101
CT 111
CT 112
CT 113
CT 121
ENGL 1010
MATH 1530
MD 104
OS 116
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*Students must present evidence of education and/or training at time of admissions in
accordance with the Tennessee Technology Center/A.A.S. Degree Articulation policy.
Admitted student will be granted 12 hours of Advance Placement upon completion
of all transitional studies requirements and 15 hours of college credit with a GPA of
2.00 or above. This program is designed for students who completed the Motor Sports
Vehicle Technology Certificate as well as Automotive Technology, Diesel Mechanic
Technology, and Motorcycle & Marine Service Technology diplomas.
Sophomore
CT 122
CT 123
CT 124
Course Title
Computer Literacy
Introduction to Process Technology
Industrial Mathematics
Industrial Chemistry
Industrial Process Equipment
Composition I
Introductory Statistics
Blueprint Reading and Analysis
Industrial Maintenance Safety
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Introduction to Quality Control
Introduction to Process Operations
Intro to Process Controls & Instrumentation
*Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Electives
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
4
4
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Because of the combination of hands-on skills in
machining, welding and engine operations, plus extensive
training in mechanical engineering technology theory and
applications, the students should also find success in jobs in
industrial maintenance and manufacturing. This is an area
in which local industry has major needs.
There are two concentrations within the Industrial
Maintenance Technology major:
1. Chemical
2. Electromechanical
3
3
3
__
15
3
__3
17
3
4
3
4
__3
14
3
__8
14
Total Hours: 60
*CHEM 1010 or PHYS 1030
**Selected from courses with the following prefixes: CI, CT, DD, EE, ET, EZ, MD,
MN, MZ, PZ or QA.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
19
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Engineering Technology
Technical Certificates
2. Electromechanical
Concentration
Industrial Maintenance Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
The associate degree program in electromechanical
technology prepares graduates for a position as a
maintenance technician in an environment where electrical
machinery and electro-pneumatic systems are prevalent.
Students will develop a wide variety of technical skills in
electrical fundamentals, fluid power, mechanical systems,
and computers. Emphasis is placed upon the understanding
and troubleshooting of electromechanical systems. A
comprehensive understanding of how these technical skills
are linked together to create automated systems is developed
so that the electromechanical technician will be able to
install, troubleshoot, and repair the complex machinery used
in business and industry.
Career Opportunities
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Course No.
Freshman
CS 101
ENGL 1010
MATH 1530
MD 104
MN 102,112
MN 103,113
OS 116
Sophomore
MN 215
MN 218
Course Title
Computer Literacy
Composition I
Introductory Statistics
Blueprint Reading and Analysis
Electrical Fundamentals I, II
Mechanical Fundamentals I, II
Industrial Maintenance Safety
*Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
Maintenance Management & Organization
Hydraulics, Pneumatics, and Fluid Systems
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Electives
3
__
15
3
3
3
__4
16
3
3
3
__8
14
Admission Information
Additional admission procedures are required for this
program. For specific information on admission.
For requirements and application procedures, contact the
Department of Engineering & Emergency Technologies.
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
This program prepares students to work as CAD
(Computer Aided Design) Drafters and Designers and provides skills enhancement for working architects, engineers,
drafters, and designers. It includes advanced CAD drafting and
design using Auto CAD and specialty software in electronics,
graphics programming, or mechanical, architectural or civil
design. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course.
Call (423) 697-4434
Maintenance technician in commercial and industrial
settings such as utilities, hospitals, schools, and
manufacturing facilities; building superintendent and
maintenance supervisory positions.
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
CAD Technology
Technical Certificate of Credit
3
__9
15
Total Hours: 60
*CHEM 1010 or PHYS 1030.
**Selected from courses with the following prefixes: CI, CT, DD, EE, ET, EZ, MD,
MN, MZ, PZ or QA.
Call (423) 697-4774 or for Human Services Specialist
call (423) 697-3127
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Technical Certificate of Credit
This certificate program trains graduates for employment
as process operators in the chemical, manufacturing, refining,
petrochemical, polymers, pharmaceuticals, plastics, food and
beverage, water/sewage, utilities and pulp/paper industries. A
minimum grade of “C” is required in each course.
Admission Information
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program. For specific information on admission requirements
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Engineering & Emergency Technologies.
˜˜˜
Engineering courses not for men only.
20
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Liberal Arts
Human Services Specialist
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Early Childhood Education
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This program trains students to work in early childhood
education (ages birth through eight). It includes theoretical
and practical elements and features supervised classroom
practice teaching. It does not lead to a teaching certificate or
qualify graduates to teach in the public schools.
Career Opportunities
Child care teacher, child care director*, family/group
child care owner, school age care teacher, assistant director,
teacherʼs assistant (Pre K-4), substitute teacher (public/
private), entry level position in designated child and family
welfare agencies.
*This job also requires some successful job experience.
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delivery worker, child care specialist, family services
advocate, psychiatric technician, drug abuse counselor,
adolescent counseling assistant, customer service
representative.
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*UTC Transfers are required to take this course.
** Directed Electives: WMST 2010 Womenʼs Studies.
CJ 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
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Call (423) 697-4774 or for Human Services Specialist
call (423)
(
) 697-3127
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
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The Human Services Specialist Program is designed to
provide students with the appropriate knowledge and skills
necessary to become competent in working with many
human service agencies in the areas of mental health, aging,
child care, homelessness, disabilities, poverty and drug abuse
counseling.
If a baccalaureate degree is desired, the student should
consult one of the Human Services faculty for information
on how this program may articulate with a baccalaureate
degree in Social Work.
Child Development Associate (CDA)
The CDA is a nationally recognized credential awarded
by the Council for Professional Recognition to child care
providers who have demonstrated their skill in working with
young children. Holders of a current CDA credential may
receive up to 9 hours of college credit, applicable toward
the A.A.S. degree in Early Childhood Education only. Such
credit may not duplicate or replace previously earned collegee
credits. The courses for which credit may be awarded are:
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Childhood Development Center.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
21
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Liberal Arts Technical
Certificates
Math & Sciences
Call (423) 697-4442
Foundations in Acting
Technical Certificate
Veterinary Technology
(Pending TBR and THEC approval)
Admission into Foundations of Acting is a prerequisite
for certificate courses. All Fall semester courses are
prerequisite to all Spring semester courses, and all courses
taught in the same semester are co-requisites.
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Course No.
Year One
THEA 1110
THEA 1230
THEA 1310
THEA 1410
THEA 1520
THEA 1120
THEA 1235
THEA 1320
THEA 1420
THEA 1525
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
Acting I
Movement I
Production I
Voice and Speech I
Improvisation I
Acting II
Movement II
Production II
Voice and Speech II
Improvisation II
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
3
3
3
__3
15
Advanced Theatre
with Concentration
Technical Certificate
(Pending TBR and THEC approval)
Course No.
Year Two
THEA 2110
THEA 2230
THEA 2310
THEA 2410
THEA 2520
THEA 2120
THEA 2235
THEA 2320
THEA 2420
THEA 2525
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
Acting III
Movement III
Production III
Voice and Speech III
Improvisation III
Acting IV
Movement IV
Production IV
Voice and Speech IV
Improvisation IV
˜
˜
˜
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Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
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15
3
3
3
3
__3
15
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
The Veterinary Technology Program is a five semester
Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree encompassing
both general education requirements and veterinary
technology knowledge and skills acquisition. The program
is designed to prepare the student to become a licensed
veterinary technician. The courses at Chattanooga State will
be taught in state-of-the-art facilities. Clinical experiences
will occur in local veterinary clinics and hospitals.
Career Opportunities
Career opportunities for licensed veterinary technicians
include, but are not limited to, traditional private practices
(small animal, large animal, and mixed), research facilities,
zoos, aquariums, educational institutions, private industry
and local, state, and federal government positions.
Admission Information
Admission into Advanced Theatre with Concentration
is by completion of Foundations in Acting or audition
demonstrating advanced skills. All Fall semester courses are
prerequisite to all Spring semester courses, and all courses
taught in the same semester are co-requisites.
Choose one concentration
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22
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Additional admission procedures are required for
this program. Contact the Life Sciences Department for
application materials and other pertinent information. The
application deadline is April 1 of the year in which fall
admission is sought. Applications would be accepted after
this deadline date only if there were not enough qualified
applicants to fill the class.
NOTE: The program is not designed to meet educational requirements for those
students desiring to transfer to a pre-veterinary program.
Course No.
Freshman
BIOL 1110
CHEM 1110
ENGL 1010
HE 103
PHIL 2230
SP 110
VETT 1010
VETT 1015
VETT 1020
VETT 2010
VETT 2015
Sophomore
BIOL 2230
VETT 2000
VETT 2016
VETT 2020
VETT 2030
VETT 2040
VETT 2050
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
*General Biology I
**General Chemistry
Composition I
Medical Terminology
Ethics
Speech
Introduction to Veterinary Technology
Pharmacology & Calculations
Animal Anatomy & Physiology
Clinical Practicum I
Animal Nursing
Microbiology
Clinical Pathology
Topics in Veterinary Technology
Clinical Practicum II
Clinical Practicum III
Anesthesia & Surgical Nursing
Imaging
Social/Behavioral Sciences Gen. Ed. Elective
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Prerequisites:
*Remedial/Developmental courses, if applicable.
**CHEM 1010 or equivalent and Math 1710.
FALL
Semester Hours
SPR SUM
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
__
13
4
4
4
__
15
3
4
5
4
4
__
16
__3
15
__
11
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Nursing/Allied Health
Admission/Retention Policies
A student must be admitted to the specific Nursing/Allied
Health program beyond general admission to Chattanooga
State Technical Community College. Selection into health
programs is based on a comparative evaluation of all
applicantsʼ test scores, transcripts and other application
information. Composition of a class will reflect diversity
based on age, gender and race. Students must have
successfully completed (or be scheduled to complete during
the summer) all Transitional Studies courses and other
required prerequisite courses.
The goal of all Chattanooga Stateʼs health programs
is to prepare practitioners who can function in the health
care arena to ensure the safety of patients. Program
standards are in place to assure that students have the
potential to perform as entry level practitioners. These
program standards are available in the Nursing/Allied
Health Division office. Acceptance into a health program
is contingent upon the studentʼs demonstrated ability to
meet these standards. Following acceptance and prior to
entering the first career course in designated healthcare
programs, each student must undergo a criminal background
check in order to comply with policies of affiliating clinical
practice agencies. It shall be the studentʼs responsibility
to comply with instructions provided upon acceptance and
provide the results by a designated date. The check will be
at the expense of the student. Students who do not meet this
requirement in a timely manner or whose background does
not meet agency standards will not be able to successfully
complete the program. Additionally, a criminal background
may preclude licensure or employment. Individuals with a
question concerning this should schedule an appointment
with the Program Director. All Nursing and Allied Health
Programs and Certificates require a grade of “C” or higher
in all courses used to fulfill curriculum requirements.
For specific information on admission requirements
and application procedures, contact the Division of
Nursing/Allied Health.
Call (423) 697-4450,
for Nursing call (423) 493-8720
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of
the American Dental Association
The Dental Hygiene program provides a background in
basic studies as well as directed dental hygiene experience,
acquired in an on-campus dental facility as well as in
community facilities. The student will develop judgment
and skills needed for providing oral health care to the public
under the supervision of a dentist and within the limits
of the Code of Ethics of the American Dental Hygienists
Association and the laws of the state in which he/she
practices. A minimum grade of “C” (or “S”) is required in
all DH, science, and all non-elective courses. Graduates
are prepared to take the National Dental Hygiene board
examination and the state or regional clinical examination.
Career Opportunities
Private practice—general, group, specialty; health
departments or associated institutions; teaching—dental
hygiene or dental assisting schools; pediatric, geriatric or
special needs centers; health maintenance organizations,
hospitals, nursing homes; dental claims departments of
insurance companies; sales representative of preventive
dental products.
Admission Information
Additional admission procedures are required for this
program. Contact the Allied Health Division office for
application materials and other pertinent information. The
application deadline is the first Monday in March. However,
applications will be processed until the class is full. CHEM
1010 is a prerequisite (or 1 year of high school chemistry
with a “B” or better).
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Students are encouraged to take additional science and
general education courses, however, students are cautioned
that science courses taken prior to program acceptance must
have been completed no sooner than five years before the
student is admitted to the program. HOWEVER, completion
of the application process and any/all science and general
education courses does not guarantee acceptance into a
health program.
Dental Hygiene
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Fire Science Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
There are three concentrations within the Fire Science
Technology major:
1. Emergency Medical Care
2. Emergency Service Supervision and Administration
3. Fire Suppression
Please see those listings as follows.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/Allied_Health/ahmain.asp
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
23
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
1. Emergency Medical Care Concentration
Fire Science Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This concentration gives students a broad education in
stress, legal issues, community relations, research, safety,
fire protection, and paramedic training. Students who are
currently licensed as paramedics will receive 32 hours of
advanced placement credit. Students may work toward their
paramedic training while completing the general education
and emergency medical services technical core.
Career Opportunities
Private and municipal ambulance services, industrial
fire and medical response teams, fire departments which
employ combination fire fighters/paramedics, and hospital
emergency rooms
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course No.
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
ENGL 1010
FI 113
FI 114
FI 215
SP 110
Course Title
*Advanced Placement
Composition I
Fire Protection Systems
Building Construction for Fire Science
Fire Behavior and Combustion
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Mathematics Gen. Ed. Elective
Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Social/Behavioral Sciences Gen. Ed. Elective
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
32
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
__
__3
15
13
Total Hours: 60
*Completion of CSTCCʼs Paramedic Training Program or current state or national
paramedic certification/licensure.
**Must choose from: PY 101, PO 110, or SO 110.
MATH 1410 not acceptable for Nursing/Allied Health programs.
For information on Chattanooga Stateʼs Paramedic
Training Program, contact the Division of Nursing and
Allied Health.
This program is designed for experienced emergency
services personnel who desire additional education for
improved job performance and/or advancement. The
program covers legal issues, safety, research, and emergency
services, as well as supervision, leadership, planning,
prevention, systems, and fire behavior.
Career Opportunities
Company officer/chief officer positions with fire
departments, emergency medical supervision, and fire
brigade leaders.
24
Composition I
Introduction to Emergency Services
Fire Protection Systems
Building Construction for Fire Science
Fire Administration I
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Mathematics Gen. Ed. Elective
*Social/Behavioral Sciences Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Electives
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
3
__
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
__4
13
4
__2
15
Total Hours: 60
*Must choose from: PY 101, PO 110, or SO 110.
**Technical Electives totaling fourteen (14) hours must be selected from courses with
the following prefixes: EA, FI, HZ, MG, OS. Alternatively, students who plan to
transfer to a four year program may, with adviser approval, use their Technical
Elective hours to take additional General Education courses needed to satisfy
requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Students with current state or national
licensure as Emergency Medical Technicians may be eligible for Advanced Standing
credit toward the Technical Elective requirement. See program adviser for details.
MATH 1410 not acceptable for Nursing/Allied Health programs.
3. Fire Suppression Concentration
Fire Science Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
This concentration allows career emergency service
personnel to enhance their emergency services education,
and gives the student who wishes to enter emergency
services an introduction to the basics of fire suppression.
Topics include legal issues, safety, fire protection, tactics/
strategy, fire equipment, and building construction, fire
systems, prevention, and fire cause.
Career Opportunities
Course No.
Freshman
ENGL 1010
FI 111
FI 113
FI 114
FI 116
SP 110
Fire Science Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
Legal Aspects of the Fire Service
Fire Behavior and Combustion
Fire Administration II
Fire Prevention and Inspection
Emergency Services Practicum
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Electives
Fire suppression, rescue, hazardous materials
organizations, fire prevention, industrial fire protection, and
private fire protection companies.
2. Emergency Service Supervision and
Administration Concentration
Course No.
Freshman
ENGL 1010
FI 111
FI 113
FI 114
FI 221
SP 110
Sophomore
FI 140
FI 215
FI 222
FI 260
FI 280
3
3
__8
17
Sophomore
FI 124
FI 140
FI 215
FI 260
FI 262
SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS
Course Title
Composition I
Introduction to Emergency Services
Fire Protection Systems
Building Construction for Fire Science
Firefighting Strategy and Tactics I
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Mathematics Gen. Ed. Elective
*Social/Behavioral Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Electives
Fire Fighting Tactics and Strategy II
Legal Aspects of the Fire Service
Fire Behavior and Combustion
Fire Prevention and Inspection
Fire Cause and Investigation
Humanities/Fine Arts Gen. Ed. Elective
Natural Science Gen. Ed. Elective
**Technical Electives
Total Hours: 60
Semester Hours
FALL
SPR
3
3
3
3
3
__3
15
3
3
3
__5
17
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
__4
14
__2
14
*Must choose from: PY 101, PO 110, or SO 110.
**Technical Electives totaling fourteen (14) hours must be selected from courses with
the following prefixes: EA, FI, HZ, MG, OS. Alternatively, students who plan to
transfer to a four year program may, with adviser approval, use their Technical
Elective hours to take additional General Education courses needed to satisfy
requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Students with current state or national
licensure as Emergency Medical Technicians may be eligible for Advanced Standing
credit toward the Technical Elective requirement. See program adviser for details.
MATH 1410 not acceptable for Nursing/Allied Health programs.
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Health Information Management
Nursing (RN)
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation
for Health Informatics and
Information Management Education (CAHIIM)
Accredited by the National League for
Nursing Accrediting Commission
61 Broadway, New York, New York 10006
1-800-669-1656
The Health Information Management program prepares
students to become Health Information Technicians (HIT).
The curriculum consists of a combination of classroom,
laboratory, and clinical practice. A minimum grade of
“C” is required in all courses. Graduates are eligible to
take the national exam administered by the American
Health Information Management Association and receive
recognition as a Registered Health Information Technician
(RHIT) upon passing the examination.
The Health Information Management program is an
evening program; however, clinical practice is during
the day.
Admission Information
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The Nursing Program prepares individuals to be
providers and managers of nursing care and members of the
nursing discipline. Graduates use a clinical decision making
process to provide care to diverse individuals across the
life-span.
Following acceptance into a nursing class, the day
program includes a sequence of four clinical courses that
can be completed in two academic years. A new day class is
accepted each fall. The night program includes five clinical
courses and takes two and one-half years to complete. New
night classes are accepted every other year. The next class
is fall 2009. A minimum grade of “C” must be earned in
all courses included in the summary of required hours.
Contact the Nursing Program office or nursing web site for
detailed information on program policies (Nursing Program
Handbook) or for information about admission, readmission,
transfer from an accredited nursing program, and articulation
with baccalaureate programs.
Career Opportunities
Hospitals, physicianʼs offices, home health care agencies,
nursing homes.
Admission Information
Admission into the Nursing Program is a competitive
process. Application deadline is March 15. All required
prerequisites must be completed prior to enrollment in the
first nursing course. Contact the Nursing Program office
or nursing web site for detailed information on admission,
selection, policies, etc. Attendance at a Nursing Program
Information Session is strongly encouraged.
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Additional admission procedures are required for this
program. Contact the Allied Health Division office for
application materials and other pertinent information.
Applicants must have a minimum 55% reading and 59%
composite scores on the NET/HOBET for acceptance into
the program along with other requirements. The application
deadline for priority consideration is the first Monday in
April. Applications for qualified applicants may be accepted
after this deadline if the class is not full.
Approved by the Tennessee Board of Nursing
Day Program
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Medical Record Technology
See “Health Information Management”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
25
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Night Program
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*Recommended: MATH 1010, MATH 1530 or MATH 1710.
MATH 1410 not acceptable for Nursing/Allied Health Programs.
and special treatment procedures. Program content is based
on recommended guidelines as established by the American
Physical Therapy Association and the Commission on
Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. The program
prepares students to take the board examination for Physical
Therapist Assistants administered by the state. A minimum
grade of “C” is required in all degree courses.
Career Opportunities
Hospital, rehabilitation center, extended care facility,
home health agency, private practice, school system,
outpatient.
Admission Information
Additional admission procedures are required for this
program. Contact the Allied Health Division office for
application materials and other pertinent information. The
application deadline is the first Monday in March of the
year in which fall admission is sought. (Applications would
be accepted after this deadline only if there were not enough
qualified applicants to fill the 20 spaces in the class.)
˜˜˜
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Nursing (RN)
LPN Transition Program
Paramedic to RN Transition Program
The LPN and Paramedic to RN Transition Programs offer
accelerated curriculum tracks for the licensed practical nurses
and licensed Paramedic to pursue the Associate of Applied
Science Degree in nursing and RN licensure. The associate
degree curriculum is adapted to recognize the knowledge
and skills of the LPN and Paramedic. Following completion
of a transition course (NS 024 for LPNʼs or NS 027 for
Paramedics), in the summer semester students receive
equated credit for first year nursing courses and are eligible
to enter the second year of the nursing program, NS 238
(day) or NS 210 (night program).
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Admission Information
Admission into the LPN and Paramedic to RN Transition
Programs is a competitive process. Application deadline is
January 15. All required prerequisites must be completed
prior to enrollment in the transition course. Contact the
Nursing Program office or nursing web site for detailed
information on admission, selection, policies, etc. Attendance
at a Nursing Program Information Session is strongly
encouraged.
Physical Therapist Assistant
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in
Physical Therapy Education
Physical Therapist Assistants (PTAʼs) work under the
direction and supervision of a Physical Therapist (PT). PTAʼs
perform physical therapy treatment interventions delegated
by the supervising Physical Therapist. The PTA Program is
a combination of classroom, laboratory and clinical practice
designed to prepare the student in the use of exercise,
physical therapy modalities, clinical communication skills,
26
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Radiologic Technology
Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Joint Review Committee on
Education in Radiologic Technology
The Radiologic Technology Program begins fall semester
and is a 24-month program. Full-time student status is
required. A minimum grade of “C” is required for all courses
in the major. Clinical assignments totaling approximately
1,400 clock hours are required and may include semester
breaks. Graduates may apply as candidates for certification
by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
Clinical Affiliates
Skyridge Medical Center, Chattanooga Imaging Inc.,
Chattanooga Outpatient Center, Erlanger Medical Center,
Hutcheson Medical Center, Memorial Hospital, Memorial
Atrium (outpatient), Memorial North Park Hospital,
Parkridge Medical Center, Parkridge East Hospital, Rhea
Medical Center, Erlanger East Imaging, Erlanger North
Medical Center
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Admission Information
Respiratory Care
Additional admission procedures and progression criteria
are required for this program. Contact the Allied Health
Division office, 697-4450, for application materials and other
pertinent information. The deadline for priority consideration
is April 15. After this date, applications will be processed as
they are received.
Prerequisites
High School Chemistry, “C” grade or above or Principles
of Chemistry CHEM 1010 “C” grade or above.
High School Algebra I, II, Geometry and Advanced
Mathematics, “C” grade or above or Pre-Calculus I MATH
1710 “C” grade or above.
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The Respiratory Care Program is six semesters
and-qualifies graduates to take the Entry Level Examination
to become a Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) and the
written and simulation portions of the Registry Examination
to become a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT).
Through a combination of classroom and laboratory
instruction and clinical practice, students gain knowledge
and skills in cardiopulmonary testing and therapy. A
minimum grade of “C” is required in all courses used to
meet graduation requirements. One year of high school
chemistry with a grade of “B” or better is a prerequisite.
College level in mathematics is required. Graduates will
meet the requirements to practice as a respiratory therapist as
defined in the Tennessee Respiratory Care Practitionerʼs Act.
Admission Information
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experience. Students who qualify for “advanced standing”
need only complete the core curriculum outlined below.
Additional admission procedures are required for this
program. Contact the Allied Health Division office for
application materials and other pertinent information. The
deadline for priority consideration is May 15.
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1. Certified transcript from approved school of Radiologic
Technology. (School must have JRCERT/CAHEA approval
at the time the student graduated.)
2. Proof of registration by ARRT.
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A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
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Associate of Applied Science Degree
Accredited by the Committee on Accreditation for
Respiratory Care
Ultrasound
See “Diagnostic Medical Sonography” or
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“Cardiovascular Sonography”
X-Ray Technology
See “Radiologic Technology”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
27
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Nursing/Allied Health
Technical Certificates
Cardiovascular Sonography Certificate
Technical Certificate of Credit
Dental Assisting Certificate
Technical Certificate of Credit
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Accredited by the American Dental Association,
Commission on Dental Accreditation
This 3-semester program prepares the student to become a
valuable member of the dental health team. The dental assistant
may serve a dental practice or health center as an office manager/
business assistant, chair side assistant, laboratory assistant, or as
the person responsible for dental health education. The Dental
Assisting curriculum provides a foundation in the health sciences
along with extensive training in the technology necessary to
perform those tasks delegated to dental assistants by the State
Dental Practice Act. Clinical training experiences working with
dentists and patients are provided in the facilities of the Dental
Center on the Chattanooga State campus, in private offices of
practicing dentists, at community health centers, and at schools
within the area.
Students who successfully complete this program are eligible
to sit for the State Registry Examination (RDA) and the Dental
Assisting National Board Examination (CDA).
Career Opportunities
Private Practice—General, Group, or Specialty; Health
Departments; Dental Supply House; Manufacturerʼs Representative;
Dental Insurance Claims; Dental Office Receptionist/Manager.
Admission Procedures
In addition to submitting proof of high school graduation or
GED and completing the application process for admission to
Chattanooga State, a students seeking admission to the Dental
Assisting program must also:
1. Attend a Dental Assisting info session.
2. Take the appropriate entrance exam (ACT, SAT or COMPASS)
to determine placement. All recommended transitional studies
classes must be completed prior to enrolling in the dental
assisting program, except DSPM 0850, which may be taken
concurrently with DAST classes.
3. Complete the Nursing and Allied Health Application form.
4. Complete a 16-hour pre-clinical observation in a dental
practice.
5. Participate in a personal academic planning session with a
program faculty member
Applicants who complete these steps will be offered admission
into the next class in which space is available. One class of 36
students is admitted each fall semester.More information, printable
forms and information session schedules are available at
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/Allied_Health/ahmain.asp
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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The Cardiovascular Sonography program is a 12-month
advanced certificate program providing specialty education
for post-associate healthcare professionals and preparation
for certification by the American Registry of Diagnostic
Medical Sonographers (ARDMS) in the specialty categories of
Echocardiography, Vascular Technology, and Physics. Classes
are conducted two or three days every other week, with clinical
experience obtained at approved clinic affiliates within the region.
A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course. Full-time
status is required for those who have no previous experience in
sonography. Applicants who have worked as diagnostic medical
sonographers may qualify for part-time status, or those who
have been working for a minimum of one year in the field may
potentially qualify for non-traditional working status.
A class will be accepted each year for fall admission.
Diagnostic Medical Sonography is also offered as a 12-month
Technical Certificate located in the A.A.S. degrees and technical
certificates section of this catalog.
Admission Information
Additional admission procedures are required for this
program. Contact the Allied Health Division office for application
materials and other pertinent information. The deadline for priority
consideration is March 15.
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Computed Tomography
Technical Certificate of Credit
The Computed Tomography (CT) program is a one-semester,
three-course set designed to meet the professional needs of
radiologic technologists for formal specialized education in
Computed Tomography. The curriculum includes the following
topics: patient care and management; whole body cross-sectional
anatomy; pathology; imaging procedures with protocols; special
procedures in computed tomography; history of computed
tomography; fundamentals of computers; scanning methods; digital
imaging; quality control; and radiation protection.
The required clinical education component is conducted
at an approved clinical education center over a fifteen week
period providing at least 225 contact hours on site. Supervised
performance of computed tomography of the head, neck, spine,
chest, abdomen, pelvis and musculoskeletal system is required.
Arrangements for clinical education are made by the students to
obtain clinical experience with a Chattanooga State approved
CT facility in their geographic area. Students must purchase
liability insurance or show evidence of self coverage of $1,000,000
or more.
The CT courses are taught Fall semester on alternate weekends
(Friday night and Saturday), based on demand and offer 15semester credit hours [240 CEUʼs for purpose of American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) continuing
education]. Radiologic Technologists certified and registered by
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
ARRT may receive advanced standing for the clinical education
component if they have independently performed whole-body
computed tomography an equivalent of one year full-time within
the past three years. In addition, competence in the performance of
computed tomography of the head, neck, spine, chest, abdomen,
pelvis, and musculoskeletal system must be demonstrated.
Admission Procedures
In addition to completing the application process for admission
to Chattanooga State, students seeking admission to the Computed
Tomography program must also submit a Computed Tomography
Application Form to the Division of Nursing/Allied Health.
Applicants must be graduates of a CAHEA/JRCERT accredited
Radiologic Technology Program and eligible for certification or
certified and registered by the ARRT. Selection into the program is
on a first applied most qualified basis.
Deadline
Applications for Fall semester must be submitted by August 15
for priority consideration.
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Technical Certificate of Credit
Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied
Health Education Programs in cooperation with the Joint
Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical
Sonography
The Diagnostic Medical Sonography program is a 12-month
advanced certificate program providing specialty education
for post-associate healthcare professionals and preparation for
certification by the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical
Sonographers (ARDMS) in the specialty categories of Abdomen
& Small Parts, Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Physics. Classes
are conducted two or three days every other week, with clinical
experience obtained at approved clinic affiliates within the region.
A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course. Full-time
status is required for those who have no previous work experience
in sonography. Applicants who have worked as diagnostic medical
sonographers for a minimum of one (1) year may potentially
qualify for the program in a non-traditional working status.
A class will be accepted each year for fall admission.
Technical Certificate of Credit
The Magnetic Resonance Imaging program, designed to meet
the professional needs of radiologic technologists for formal
specialized education in MRI, is a one-semester course offered in
two course-credit formats. The curriculum includes the following
topics: MRI physics, cross-sectional anatomy, patient safety,
site development, MR imaging techniques applicable to all MR
imaging systems, patient care and management, pathology, and
quality control.
MRI 200 is taught Fall semester only, in six Saturday instructional settings and twenty-four observational hours in clinic. The
optional clinical component, MRI 230, is offered Fall and Spring
and involves 225 hours of clinical education at a Chattanooga
State approved MRI facility in the studentʼs geographic area.
Arrangements for the required clinical component are made by
the student. Students must purchase liability insurance or show
evidence of self-coverage of $1,000,000 or more. Insurance is
available through Chattanooga State and is payable at the time of
registration.
Admission Procedures
In addition to completing the application process for admission
to Chattanooga State, students seeking admission to the Magnetic
Resonance Imaging program must also submit a MRI Application
Form to the Division of Nursing/Allied Health. Applicants must be
graduates of a CAHEA/JRCERT accredited Radiologic Technology
program and eligible for certification or certified and registered by
the ARRT.
Selection into the program is on a first-applied, most-qualified
basis. Qualified applications received after the class is full will be
accepted for the following class and placed on a reserve list to fill
the space of any withdrawals.
Radiologic technologists certified and registered by the
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists may receive
advanced standing for the clinical component if they have
independently performed whole-body magnetic resonance imaging
an equivalent of one year, full time within the past 3 years. In
addition, competence in the performance of magnetic resonance
imaging of the head, neck, spine, chest, abdomen, pelvis and
musculoskeletal system must be demonstrated.
Deadline
Applications for Fall semester must be submitted by June 15
for priority consideration.
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A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Certificate
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Admission Information
Additional admission procedures are required for this program.
Contact the Allied Health Division office for application materials
and other pertinent information. The application deadline for
priority consideration is March 15.
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Nuclear Medicine Technology
Certificate
Technical Certificate of Credit
Accredited by the Joint Review Committee on
Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology
The Nuclear Medicine Technology program provides specialty
education for registered radiologic technologists, registered medical
technologists, registered cardiovascular technologists, registered
diagnostic medical sonographers, registered nurses, registered
respiratory therapists, or suitably prepared persons with bachelorʼs
degrees and patient care experience. The program also provides
preparation for the ARRT and/or NMTCB certification exams in
nuclear medicine technology. This 12 month program begins each
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
29
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
fall semester. Classes are conducted every other week on Monday
and Tuesday with clinical experience obtained at affiliated clinical
sites. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course. Full-time
status is required.
Applicants who have worked as nuclear medicine technologists
for a minimum of two years may qualify for the Non-Traditional
program. Contact the program for more information.
Admission Information
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates
Additional admission procedures for all applicants are required
for this program.
Admission is based on college grade point averages, personal
interviews, references, and evaluation of motivation and individual
qualities needed to successfully complete the nuclear medicine
technology program. Non-RT students must take the Hobet test.
All applicants must present postsecondary education credits
for human anatomy and physiology, college algebra, written
communications, general chemistry with lab, and physics (radiation
physics preferred). Basic computer knowledge is also strongly
recommended. Junior colleges, universities and postsecondary
technical institutes may be used to earn these course prerequisites
to study in nuclear medicine.
Contact the Allied Health Division office for application
materials and other pertinent information. The application deadline
for priority consideration is April 15. Applications received after
the deadline will be accepted if space permits.
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Pharmacy Technician Certificate
Technical Certificate of Credit
Accredited by the American Society of Health System
Pharmacists
This program prepares students for certification by the
Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB). Pharmacy
technicians assist licensed pharmacists to provide health care
and medications to patients. Pharmacy Technicians must perform
precise work where details can be a matter of life or death. They
must have a broad knowledge of pharmacy practice and the
techniques required to fill prescriptions, constitute IV solutions,
and prepare medications. Good communication and interpersonal
skills are essential to interact with patients and other health care
professionals on a daily basis.
The Pharmacy Technician courses are designed in accordance
with American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)
guidelines. They are not designed for college transfer credit. A
minimum grade of “C” is required in each course.
For specific information on admission requirements and
application procedures, contact the program director.
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*Prerequisites: DSPM 0800, DSPR 0800, DSPW 0800.
**May substitute BIOL 1050 and 1051; or BIOL 2020.
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Radiation Therapy Technology Certificate
Technical Certificate of Credit
Accredited by the Joint Review Committee on
Education in Radiologic Technology
The Radiation Therapy Technology certificate is a 12 month
program of specialty education for registered radiographers and
prepares them to take the ARRT certification exam in radiation
therapy technology. Classes are conducted every other week on
Thursday and Friday with clinical experience obtained at affiliated
clinical sites throughout the Southeast. A grade of 75% or better is
required in each course. Full-time status is required for those who
have no previous work experience in radiation therapy.
Applicants who have worked as radiation therapy technologists
for a minimum of two (2) years may qualify for the advanced
standing program. Contact the division for further information.
A class will be accepted each fall semester.
Admission Information
Additional admission procedures are required for this program.
Contact the Allied Health Division office for application materials
and other pertinent information.
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A class will be accepted each fall semester.
Career Opportunities
Community pharmacies, drug manufacturing companies, drug
wholesale companies, home-health care, hospital pharmacies,
nuclear-medicine pharmacies, nursing homes
Admission Information
Additional admission procedures are required for this program.
Students are encouraged to apply early, as the program is filled on a
Rolling Admission basis. This means that applications are reviewed
upon receipt, interviews are scheduled, and notification letters are
mailed to applicants untill the class has been filled.
30
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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Regents Online Degree Programs
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
Contents
Page
31-32 Regents Online Degree Programs (RODP)
What is “RODP”?
“RODP” stands for “Regents Online Degree Programs.” The
universities, colleges, and technology centers of the Board of Regents
System of Tennessee public education have combined resources to
enable students to get certain degrees completely online. For more
information, go here: www.rodp.org.
What are “RODP classes”?
RODP classes are courses offered by all of the TBR institutions
state-wide. These classes are delivered completely online.
Find a list of all classes here:
http://www.rodp.org/degrees/course_listings.htm. Click on the
course title to see the syllabus.
How do I recognize RODP classes?
RODP classes are designated as “R50” sections.
If I want to take an RODP class, do all of my classes have
to be RODP?
No. You can mix and match CSTCC traditional classes, hybrid
classes, video classes, online classes, and RODP online classes
interchangeably. Courses delivered in all of these methods will
show up on your transcript simply as CSTCC courses.
Do RODP classes count the same as CSTCC classes?
Yes. RODP classes have the same number, title, and content as
CSTCC courses. They count the same as CSTCC classes.
Do RODP classes transfer?
Yes. They transfer just as any other CSTCC courses would.
How do my RODP grades show on my transcript?
They show up as your grades for having taken CSTCC classes.
(If you were to take RODP classes through another institution,
then the grades would show up as grades from that institution.)
Do RODP online classes cost more than CSTCC online
classes?
Yes. You must pay a per-credit-hour fee of $39. Also, you must
pay for all credit hours, even after the first 12 hours. www.
rodp.org/enrolltoday/fees.htm
When can I log in to my RODP classes?
You will be able to log in to your RODP classes on the day
classes begin. Your username and password will not work until
then.
How do I log in to my RODP class?
On the first day of class, go to http://webct.rodp.org and follow
the directions for log in.
Who will be my instructor?
Your instructor will be a full-time or adjunct instructor for one
of the TBR institutions.
Who is my advisor?
Your advisor should be an expert in your major field who can
guide you through your degree program. If you want to take
a class online, you can check the CSTCC list for 971 section
classes. If CSTCC does not list the course, look for an RODP
R50 section. Your advisor can help you select the RODP course
you need. If you have declared one of the programs listed on
the RODP web site for a major, then you may be assigned to
the RODP Campus Contact for advising.
Regents Online Degrees
How do I enroll in RODP classes?
You enroll in RODP classes the same way you enroll in regular
CSTCC classes. You must (1) be admitted to the college, (2)
see an advisor, (3) register for RODP online classes along with
any other CSTCC classes that you would like to take.
How do I get books?
To find out what books you need for RODP classes, go to
http://rodp.bkstr.com. You may buy the books there, new or
used. CAUTION: Oftentimes the books for RODP classes are
not the same as the books listed for the same class at CSTCC.
You should not go to the CSTCC Bookstore to get RODP
books.
What are “RODP programs of study”?
These are programs that can be (but do not have to be)
completed totally online. You can follow one of these programs
and still mix and match CSTCC and RODP online classes, as
you wish. The “RODP program” is simply a listing of classes leading to a degree: www.rodp.org/degrees. If CSTCC is
your home institution when you receive your RODP program
degree, then you receive a CSTCC degree in that field.
Do I have to follow an RODP program of study to take
RODP classes?
No. You can take RODP classes anytime for any reason. They
are interchangeable with CSTCC classes (but are a bit more
expensive).
Will my financial aid apply to RODP classes? Yes.
To enroll for these courses, please follow directions at http://www.rodp.org/campus/ or call toll free 1-866-547-3733
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
31
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Many Ways To Learn
Center for Distributed Education (IMC 206)
Many of our courses are offered via hybrid classes, independent study, video, online or through the Regents
Online Degree Program (RODP) program. These courses require students to be very self-motivated and well
organized. Once registered for these courses, it is the studentʼs responsibility to take the necessary steps to
begin the course. Listed below, you will find some important information for these types of courses.
Many Ways To Learn
Hybrid Classes:
Hybrid classes are a combination of
traditional delivery and online delivery. That
is, a hybrid course has a fixed meeting time
and place for 50% (or more) of the hours
required for the course each week. However,
the remainder of the course materials and
activities are delivered through the online
format. For example, a traditional 3 credit
hour class might meet on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
in H-107. The hybrid class would meet
ONLY on Tuesday from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45
a.m. in H-107. The “Thursday” portion
would be covered online through materials,
assignments, and activities directed by the
instructor and performed by the student
anytime during the ensuing week.
Directed Studies:
(Noted in the schedule as 99 section)
Independent Study:
(Noted in the schedule as 95 section)
In this type of course the student
completes the coursework on their own with
the instructorʼs assistance. Instructor approval
is required to register. Once registered, the
student MUST contact the course instructor
for the syllabus and to make arrangements for
completion of course assignments. There are
no assigned class meeting times. If required,
students take proctored tests either in the
Chattanooga State Testing Center or an agreed
upon off-site location. Textbooks usually
accompany the course and can be purchased
in the bookstore.
Online:
(Noted in the schedule as 97 section)
In this type of course, material is
presented via the Internet. Once registered,
the student must access their course online
using eLearn. This can be done after the
first day of classes by clicking on the ʻLog
On eLearn Coursesʼ button in the bottom
right hand corner of the Chattanooga State
home page - www.chattanoogastate.edu.
Information is given on the logon page
regarding eLearn ID and password as well
as assistance with common problems, etc.
32
(near bottom of the page). Typically, there
are no assigned class meeting times, but this
can vary by course. The class meetings, if
required, would be conducted online. All
course work is submitted via the Internet.
Testing for the course is either online or
proctored in the Testing Center or at an
agreed upon off-site location. Textbooks
usually accompany the course and can be
purchased in the bookstore. There is an
additional per course fee. Students MUST
be computer literate, have a minimum 56K
Internet access and an e-mail address. For
courses involving streaming media, a cable,
DSL or broadband connection is highly
recommended.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
In this type of course, the material is
presented and/or enhanced by printed material
and/or video/DVD content. The student,
once registered, must go to the Center for
Distributed Education (CDE) to pick up
the syllabus and any other course materials
provided by the college (IMC 206). There
are no assigned class meeting times. The
student should contact the instructor within
the first week of classes by phone, e-mail or
in-person. All course work must be submitted
to the Center for Distributed Education and
picked up from CDE once graded by the
instructor. Testing for the course is proctored
in the Testing Center or at an agreed upon offsite location. Textbooks usually accompany
the course and can be purchased in the
bookstore. There is an additional per course
fee. Students can view videos with their
own VCR or by using VCRs available in the
Reading & Writing Center and Math Center,
all located in the IMC
classes, (2) each semesterʼs calendar, and
(3) instructions on how to be admitted and
registered. Students should be aware that
the RODP cut-off for class registration
is usually a few days EARLIER than
Chattanooga Stateʼs. Once registered,
students are responsible for going to the
RODP eLearn login page on the first day of
classes to begin their studies: http://eLearn.
rodp.org. Students should get their books
at http://direct/mbsbooks.com (the RODP
information site also has a link for the RODP
bookstore). The Chattanooga State Bookstore
does not carry RODP books. Students do
not have to declare an RODP major to take
RODP classes. RODP classes fulfill general
education requirements the same way regular
classes do. When students take RODP classes,
they declare Chattanooga State as their “home
institution.” This means that any courses
they take through RODP are counted as
Chattanooga State classes. If students follow
an RODP program of study (for example,
to get an associateʼs degree in information
technology), the degree they earn is awarded
by Chattanooga State. For RODP classes,
students must pay per hour tuition plus the
RODP per hour fee. Students must pay for
every “credit hour” regardless if they exceed
the twelve credit hours of “full-time” status.
Students are charged for credit hours over
twelve due to the additional cost for online
delivery, virtual bookstore, virtual library,
online student services, and 24/7 technical
help. For more information on fees, visit the
website http://www.rodp.org/fees.htm. No
enrollment overrides are allowed. For help
with RODP classes, see your RODP Campus
Contact.
Please also note the following course designs:
Mixed Courses
Online with Video
RODP:
(Noted on schedule as 96 section)
(Noted in the schedule as R50 section)
Similar to classes offered “online”
as noted above, these classes are offered
via the Internet. Students should go to the
RODP website http://www.rodp.org for
(1) information on degree programs and
Video (Distance Ed)
with lab
(Noted on schedule as 98 section)
General Education Requirements/University Transfer
Information
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
General Education Requirements/
University Transfer Information
Page
Contents
34
Associate of Arts/Associate of Science
34-37
General Education Information and Courses
37
Removal of Entrance Deficiencies
34-37
Tennessee Board of Regents/University of Tennessee Transfer Track
Associate of Science (A.S.) University Transfer
Music
A.S. Transfer
Nutrition
(Non-Specified)
Physics
Accounting
Political Science
American Sign
Pre-Cytotechnology
Language Studies
Pre-Dentistry
Art
Pre-Engineering
Art Education
Pre-Law
Biology
Pre-Medical Technology
Broadcasting
Pre-Medicine
Business Administration
Pre-Occupational Therapy
Chemistry
Pre-Optometry
Early Childhood Education
Pre-Pharmacy
Economics
Pre-Physical Therapy
Elementary Education
Pre-Veterinary
Environmental Science
Psychology
Forestry, Fisheries and
Secondary Education
Wildlife
Social Work
Geography
Sociology
Graphic Design
Health & Physical Education Surveying
Theatre Arts
Information Systems
Wellness/Fitness Leadership
Management
TBR-UT Transfer
Marketing
Mathematics
Associate of Science (A.S.T.) University Transfer
Teaching
Associate of Science (A.A.) University Transfer
A.A. Transfer
(Non-Specified)
Accounting
Art
Broadcasting
Business Administration
Chemistry
Economics
English
French
German
Graphic Design
History
Humanities
Journalism
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre Arts
TBR-UT Transfer
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
33
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
General Education Requirements/
Transfer Information
General Education Requirements/Transfer Information
Associate of Arts and Associate of
Science General Transfer Degrees
Students who complete an associate degree are eligible
to transfer to a senior level institution as a junior to complete
a baccalaureate degree. Students transferring to a Tennessee
Board of Regents university will have satisfied all the
general education requirements by completing the associate
degree at Chattanooga State. Students transferring to any
other system (including the University of Tennessee system
universities) should consult with the campus where they
intend to go for general education requirements for specific
majors. Students should be aware that a minimum grade of
“C” is required in all prerequisite courses and some other
program specific courses. Courses in which a “D” grade is
made may not transfer.
The following table presents an example of course work
leading to an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science
degree.
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*Prerequisite: ECED 2060 - ECED 2020, 2040 or departmental consent.
Additional Degree Requirements:
• “C” or better required for all courses and a 2.75 cumulative grade point average
(GPA) for all college level work
• Successful completion of Praxis I
• Satisfactory rating on an index of suitability for the teaching profession (procedure
will be developed through collaboration between university and community college
representatives)
The purpose of the Tennessee Board of Regents general
education core is to ensure that college graduates have the
broad knowledge and skills to become lifelong learners in
a global community that will continue to change. Because
course requirements in general education emphasize breadth,
they are not reduced to the skills, techniques, or procedures
associated with a specific occupation or profession. As a
fundamental element of the baccalaureate degree, essential
for full completion of all majors and minors, the general
education core is fulfilled through lower division (freshman
and sophomore) courses, but universities may add general
education courses at the upper division as well.
General education provides critical thinking skills
enabling students to discover authoritative answers to
questions, and to solve challenging problems. Specifically,
educated people practice and are literate in many forms of
communication. They recognize their place in the history,
culture, and diverse heritage of Tennessee, the United States,
and the world. They appreciate the web of commonality of
all humans in a multicultural world and are prepared for
the responsibilities of engaged citizenship. They recognize
the ethical demands of modern life. They demonstrate the
skills and knowledge of the social and behavioral sciences
to analyze contemporary society. They are familiar with the
history and aesthetics of the fine arts. They understand and
practice the scientific and mathematical view of the world.
Finally, Tennesseeʼs general education core provides for
its citizens the means to make a better living. It also, perhaps
above all, enables its citizens to have a better life.
œ
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The Associate of Science Teaching Degree (AST)
assists students to complete some of the professional teacher
licensing standards at the community college level. Students
who complete the degree requirements and graduate can
transfer into a teacher education program in any TBR
university.
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34
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Tennessee Board of Regents Philosophy of
General Education
Associate of Science in Teaching
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General Education
Effective Fall Semester 2004, each institution in the State
University and Community College System of Tennessee
(The Tennessee Board of Regents System) shares a common
lower-division general education core curriculum of fortyone (41) semester hours for baccalaureate degrees and the
Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degrees.
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Lower-division means freshman and sophomore courses.
The courses comprising the general education curriculum are
contained within the following subject categories:
Baccalaureate Degrees and Associate of Arts* and
Associate of Science Degrees
9 hours**
6 hours
3 hours
6 hours
6 hours***
8 hours
3 hours
_______
41 hours
Foreign language courses are an additional requirement for the Associate of Arts
(A.A.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees. Six hours of foreign language are required
for the A.A. degree and twelve hours are required for the B.A.
**Six hours of English Composition and three hours in English oral presentational
communication are required.
***Students who plan to transfer to Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) universities
should take six hours of United States History (three hours of Tennessee History
may substitute). Students who plan to transfer to University of Tennessee System
universities or to out-of-state or private universities should check requirements and
take the appropriate courses.
Although the courses designated by Tennessee Board
of Regents (TBR) institutions to fulfill the requirements of
the general education subject categories vary, transfer of the
courses is assured through the following means:
• Upon completion of an A.A. or A.S. degree,
the requirements of the lower-division
general education core will be complete
and accepted by a TBR university in the
transfer process.
• If an A.A. or A.S. is not obtained, transfer
of general education courses will be based
upon fulfillment of complete subject
categories. (Example: If all eight hours
in the category of Natural Sciences are
complete, then this “block” of the general
education core is complete.) When a subject
category is incomplete, course-by-course
evaluation will be conducted. The provision
of block fulfillment pertains also to students
who transfer among TBR universities.
• Institutional/departmental requirements
of the grade “C” will be honored. Even if
credit is granted for a course, any specific
requirements for the grade of “C” by the
receiving institution will be enforced.
• In certain majors, specific courses must
be taken also in general education. It is
important that students and advisors be
aware of any major requirements that must
be fulfilled under lower-division general
education.
A complete listing of the courses fulfilling general
education requirements for all system institutions is available
on the TBR website (www.tbr.state.tn.us) under Transfer
and Articulation Information. Specific courses offered at
Chattanooga State that meet general education requirements
are listed below:
ENGL 1010
ENGL 1020
SP 110
Composition I
Composition II
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Humanities and/or Fine Arts (6 hours)
ART 1010
ART 1020
ART 1030
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2120
ENGL 2140
ENGL 2210
ENGL 2220
ENGL 2410
ENGL 2420
HUM 1010
HUM 1020
HUM 2130
MUS 1030
PHIL 1030
PHIL 2230
RELS 2030
THEA 1030
Survey: Art History I
Survey: Art History II
Art Appreciation
American Masterpieces I
American Masterpieces II
African American Literature
English Masterpieces I
English Masterpieces II
Literature of the Western World I
Literature of the Western World II
Introduction to the Humanities I
Introduction to the Humanities II
Mythology
Music Appreciation
Introduction to Philosophy
Ethics
Religions of the World
Introduction to Theatre
General Education Requirements/
Transfer Information
Communication
Humanities and/or Fine Arts
Literature
Social/Behavioral Sciences
History Sequence
Natural Sciences
Mathematics
Total
Communication (9 hours)
Literature (3 hours)
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2120
ENGL 2140
ENGL 2210
ENGL 2220
ENGL 2410
ENGL 2420
American Masterpieces I
American Masterpieces II
African American Literature
English Masterpieces I
English Masterpieces II
Literature of the Western World I
Literature of the Western World II
Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 hours)
EC 211
EC 212
GEOG 1025
PE 230
PO 110
PO 112
PY 101
SO 110
SO 216
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
World Geography
The Science of Fitness and Wellness
Introduction to American Government
Introduction to World Politics
General Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Cultural Anthropology
History Sequence (6 hours)
Transfer students must complete a history sequence. HIST
2030 may be substituted for either HIST 2010 or 2020. This
is the only substitution that is allowed in any of the History
Sequences.
HIST 1010, 1020 Western Civilization I & II
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
35
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
General Education Requirements/
Transfer Information
HIST 1110, 1120 History of World Civilizations I & II
HIST 2010, 2020 United States History I & II
HIST 2030
Tennessee History (for 2010 or
2020)
American History Requirement
General Education Requirements/
University
Parallel
Transfer
Information
Students who plan to transfer to one of Tennesseeʼs statesupported institutions should be aware of the following:
• Effective July 1, 1978 and afterwards, all students receiving
bachelorʼs degrees from any of Tennesseeʼs state-supported
colleges or universities must have completed one unit of
American History on the high school level or 6 semester hours (9
quarter hours) of college-level American history as required by
TCA Statute 49-3253.
• The law allows one course in Tennessee History to be substituted
for one of the required American history courses.
• Students who hold a GED Certificate are not considered to have
satisfied this requirement automatically. Unless American History
was completed in high school prior to receiving the GED, the
student has a deficiency which must be removed in order to
receive a baccalaureate degree from a Tennessee state-supported
college or university.
• Although college-level American History may be used to remove
a high school History deficiency, the reverse is not true. High
school American History cannot substitute for college-level
history required as part of an associate or baccalaureate degree
program. A student who has taken American History in high
school may be required to take American History in college as
well.
Students who have not completed a full year of
American History in high school are strongly encouraged
to remove this deficiency before transferring to a senior
institution. For students not subject to the 1989 Admission
Requirements, completion of 6 hours from HIST 2010, HIST
2020, HIST 2030 (in any combination) will remove this
deficiency and also count as the approved History sequence
required for the AA or AS degree or, if the student prefers to
take a non–U.S. history for the History sequence, as elective
credit toward graduation. For students subject to the 1989
Admission Requirements, all 3 courses (9 hours) must be
completed in order to satisfy the AA/AS requirement for a
History sequence because one of the U.S. History courses
must be used to remove the high school unit deficiency and
can only count as an elective toward graduation.
Natural Sciences (8 hours)
ASTR 1030
BIOL 1110
BIOL 1120
BIOL 1310
BIOL 2010*
BIOL 2020*
CHEM 1010
CHEM 1020
CHEM 1110
CHEM 1120
CHEM 1310
36
Astronomy
General Biology I
General Biology I
Integrated Biology
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Introduction to Chemistry I
Introduction to Chemistry II
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Integrated Chemistry
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
ESC 1110
ESC 1120
GEOL 1040
GEOL 1050
PHYS 1030
PHYS 1310
PHYS 2010
PHYS 2020
PHYS 2110
PHYS 2120
PSCI 1030
PSCI 1310
Environmental Science I
Environmental Science II
Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Physics Concepts
Integrated Physics
Non-Calculus-Based Physics I
Non-Calculus-Based Physics II
Calculus-Based Physics I
Calculus-Based Physics II
The Physical Environment
Integrated Earth & Space Science
*BIOL 2010-2020 sequence must be completed to meet Natural Science requirement.
Mathematics (3 hours)
MATH 1010
MATH 1410
MATH 1530
MATH 1710
MATH 1720
MATH 1830
Contemporary Mathematics
Structure of Number Systems I
Introductory Statistics
Pre-Calculus I
Pre-Calculus II
Calculus for Management, Life, and
Social Sciences
MATH 1910 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
Math Placement
Students pursuing majors for which the math requirement
would normally be calculus or pre-calculus may begin their
college math at a higher level than College Algebra if they
meet the criteria listed below. Most degrees at Chattanooga
State require at least one college level math course. Meeting
the criteria to place into a higher level course does not
exempt the student from this requirement, nor is any credit
granted for the course(s) the student is able to skip.
Criteria
1. Three (3) high school
math credits above the
Algebra I level and a
Math subscore of 25 on
the ACT or corresponding SAT score.
2. Two (2) high school
math credits above the
Algebra I level and a
Math subscore of 21 on
the ACT or corresponding SAT score.
Advanced Placement
Course
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry-I, MATH 1910
Pre-Calculus II, MATH
1720
or
Calculus for Management,
Life, and Social Sciences,
MATH-1830
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Foreign Language
The Associate of Arts degree requires proficiency in a foreign
language equivalent to one year of college-level work. Students
FREN 1010, 1020 Elementary French I, II
FREN 2010, 2020 Intermediate French I, II
GERM 1010, 1020 Elementary German I, II
GERM 2010, 2020 Intermediate German I, II
SPAN 1010, 1020 Elementary Spanish I, II
SPAN 2010, 2020 Intermediate Spanish I, II
Updated information may be available at the collegeʼs
web site: http://www.chattanoogastate.edu.
Students who wish to fulfill core curriculum
requirements for institutions in both the Tennessee Board
of Regents (TBR) System and the University of Tennessee
(UT) System may do so by completing the TBR-UT
University Track Module. The Module consists of a sixty
(60) semester hour block of courses in eight categories
of subjects. The University Track Module incorporates
the minimum degree requirements of all TBR and
UT institutions and requires the completion of courses
within the following subject categories:
Category 1:
Category 2:
Category 3:
Two English Composition Courses (normally 6
credit hours)
Two Mathematics Courses (normally 6 credit
hours)
Two Science Courses (normally 6-8 credit
hours)
Five History and Humanities Courses
(normally 15 credit hours)*
Removal of Entrance Deficiencies
Category 4:
Students who do not meet the entrance requirements
for regular admission listed under “Admission” in the
“General Information” section must remove the deficiencies
before receiving an associate degree. Credit hours earned in
college-level courses taken to remove entrance deficiencies
may count as electives toward the 60 hours required for
graduation, but may not be used to satisfy general education
or major requirements. A registration hold will be placed on
students who have earned 30 hours and have not removed
their deficiencies.
*Six credit hours of history are required. The type of history required varies among
public universities in Tennessee. Check university catalogs to determine the proper
history courses to take.
Requirement
English
Algebra I and II
Geometry
Natural/Physical
Science I
Course
*
*
MATH 0990
BIOL 1110, CHEM 1010,
CHEM 1110, ESC 1110,
PHYS 1030, PHYS 2010, or
PSCI 1030
Natural/Physical BIOL 1120, CHEM 1120,
ESC 1120, or PHYS 2020
Science II
Social Studies** HIST 1010, HIST 1020,
HIST 1110, HIST 1120, or
GEOG 1025
HIST 2010 or HIST 2020
U.S. History
Foreign Language FREN 1010, GERM 1010, or
SPAN 1010
I
Foreign Language FREN 1020, GERM 1020, or
SPAN 1020
II
Visual/Performing ART 1110, MUS 1130, THEA
1030, or THEA 1110
Arts †
Exam
*
*
No
CLEP
CLEP
CLEP
General Education Requirements/
Transfer Information
who have completed 2 or more years of the same foreign
language in high school may be able to skip one or both of
the elementary level courses. No credit is granted for the
course(s) the student is able to skip.
Tennessee Board of Regents/
University of Tennessee Transfer Track
Category 5:
Two Social/Behavioral Science Courses
(normally 6 credit hours)
Category 6: Two Multicultural or Interdisciplinary Courses
or Two Foreign Language Courses (normally
6 credit hours)
Category 7: Two Physical Education Courses (normally 2
credit hours)
Category 8: Pre-major/Major Elective Courses (normally
12-15 credit hours)
The choice of courses depends upon the intended major
at the university to which transfer is planned. Students
planning to transfer to a senior institution are expected
to contact the senior institution in order to ensure that
courses taken at Chattanooga State will transfer into the
chosen major program. Courses to be transferred under the
stipulations of the University Track Module must have been
completed with the grade of C or better.
CLEP
CLEP
CLEP
No
*Entrance deficiencies in these areas may be removed by scoring 26 or above on
the ACT composite; scoring at college level on placement tests other than ACT; or
completing Transitional Studies requirements.
**The following courses are acceptable for removal of a Social Studies deficiency
only if the student graduated from high school prior to Spring 1993: EC 211, PY 101,
SO 110, SO 216.
†Not required for students who graduated from high school prior to Spring 1993.
Chattanooga Stateʼs Center for Business, Industry, and Health.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
37
Official EOE Statement
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Chattanooga State has an Outdoor Museum of Art
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
1-866-547-3733
E-mail: [email protected]
Chattanooga State Technical Community College Official Bulletin, Volume XXXIII
It is a Class A misdemeanor to misrepresent
academic credentials. A person commits the offense
of misrepresentation of academic credentials who,
knowing that the statement is false and with the
intent to secure employment at or admission to an
institution of higher education in Tennessee, represents, orally or in writing that such person:
1. Has successfully completed the required
course work for and has been awarded one
(1) or more degrees or diplomas from an
accredited institution of higher education;
2. Has successfully completed the required
course work for and has been awarded one
(1) or more degrees for diplomas from a
particular institution of higher education; or
3. Has successfully completed the required
course work for and has been awarded
one (1) or more degrees or diplomas in
a particular field or specialty from an
accredited institution of higher education.
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College does not discriminate on the basis of race,
sex, color, religion, national origin, age, disability
or veteran status in provision of educational programs and services of employment opportunities
and benefits. This policy extends to both employment by and admission to Chattanooga State
Technical Community College.
38
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College does not discriminate on the basis of race,
sex, or disability in its education programs and
activities pursuant to the requirements of Title VI
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the
Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990.
Inquiries and charges of violation concerning
Title VI, Title IX, Section 504, ADA or the Age
Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) or any
of the other above referenced policies should be
directed to the College's Affirmative Action Officer.
Requests for accommodation of a disability should
be directed to the ADA Coordinator at Chattanooga
State Technical Community College.
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College is one of 45 institutions in the Tennessee
Board of Regents system, the sixth largest system
of higher education in the nation. The Tennessee
Board of Regents is the governing board for this
system which is comprised of six universities,
thirteen community colleges, and twenty-six area
technology centers. The TBR system enrolls more
than 80 percent of all Tennessee students attending public institutions of higher education. Crime
statistics, rate, and institutional security policies and
procedures are available upon request.
The Title IX Coordinator for your campus is:
Jerome Gober
Room 232D, CBIH Building, 697-4457
This catalog is intended for information
purposes only. Requirements, rules, procedures,
courses and informational statements set forth
herein are subject to change. Notice of changes
will be conveyed to duly enrolled students and
other appropriate persons at the time such changes
are effected. The period during which the degree
requirements set forth in this catalog shall remain
in effect, subject to changes provided herein, shall
not exceed five (5) years from the beginning of
the Fall 2006 academic term, two (2) years for
technical certificates.
Publication Number 11-67-404002-1-7/2007/print version/mktg/jdd
Tennessee Technology Center Career Programs
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
Page
40
41
41
42
42
43
44
46
Lottery Scholarship Information—
The Wilder-Naifeh Technical Skills Grant
Academic Retention Standards
Tennessee Technology Center/A.A.S. Degree Articulation
Aesthetics
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Automotive Technology
Building Construction Technology
Business Systems Technology
Collision Repair
Commercial Truck Driving
Computer Operations Technology
Computer Repair, see Computer Operations Technology
Cosmetology
Cosmetology Instructor
Diesel Equipment Mechanics
Electrician, see Industrial Electricity
Greenhouse, see Landscaping and Turf Management
Heavy Equipment Operator
Horticulture, see Landscaping and Turf Management
HVAC, see Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Industrial Electricity
Industrial Electronics
Industrial Maintenance Mechanics
IV Therapy
Landscaping and Turf Management
Machine Tool Technology
Manicurist
Marine Engine Repair, see Motorcycle & Marine Service
Technology
Masonry
Massage Therapy
Mechanic, see
Automotive Technology
Diesel Equipment Mechanics
Motorcycle & Marine Service Technology
Medical Assistant
Motor Sports Vehicle Technology
Motorcycle & Marine Service Technology
Ornamental Horticulture, see Landscaping and Turf Management
Practical Nursing (LPN)
Plumbing
Realtime Reporting: Scopist
Security + Certificate
Surgical Technology
Truck Driving, see Commercial Truck Driving
Welding
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu or call toll free 1-866-547-3733
Tennessee Technology Center
45
Contents
E-mail: [email protected]
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
39
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Lottery Scholarship Information
The Wilder-Naifeh Technical Skills Grant
Itʼs $2,000
per year to earn valuable job skills
at Chattanooga Stateʼs Tennessee
Technology Center
Adults of any age and recent high school grads can qualify!
any of the many technical career programs offered at
• Study
Chattanooga Stateʼs Tennessee Technology Center
• Enroll full- or part-time (Some evening programs available.)
• No high school diploma or GED required for most programs
• No minimum GPA or GED score required
• Be a TN resident for one year prior to May 1st
Tennessee Technology Center
These excellent programs will have you career-ready in as little as one year!
40
Air Conditioning/Refrigeration*
Heavy Equipment Operator
Aesthetics (Pending TBR Approval)
Industrial Electricity
Medical Assistant (HS Diploma or
GED required)
Automotive Technology
Industrial Electronics
Motor Sports Vehicle Technology
Building Construction Technology §
Industrial Maintenance Mechanics
Business Systems Technology
Collision Repair
IV Therapy (not eligible for
financial aid)
Motorcycle & Marine Service
Technology
Commercial Truck Driving *** †
Landscape & Turf Management
Computer Operations Technology
Machine Tool Technology
Cosmetology *
Manicurist (Pending TBR Approval)
Cosmetology Instructor *
Masonry
Diesel Equipment Mechanics
Massage Therapy (Pending TBR
Approval)
Plumbing
Practical Nursing (HS Diploma or
GED required)
Realtime Reporting: Scopist (HS
Diploma or GED required)
Surgical Technology (HS Diploma
or GED required)
Welding
All of the Wilder-Naifeh Grant programs –
except the Realtime Reporting: Scopist Program (CSTCC East campus), Construction Technology
Program, Masonry, and Plumbing
are available at Chattanooga Stateʼs Tennessee Technology Center at the Amnicola Campus.
In addition select programs are offered at these locations:
*Kimball Campus, **Sequatchie Valley Campus, ***Dayton Campus, †Cleveland, §Sequoyah High School
Telephone today to learn about the simple application process.
(423) 697-4781
Fees to attend the Tennessee Technology Center Division are among the lowest charged by any
college in the state, and out-of-state students do not pay additional fees.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Tennessee Technology Center Career Programs
Tennessee Technology Center programs are designed to
be completed in one year (usually 1290 clock hours except as
noted). However, some students may need more or less than
the usual number of clock hours to achieve the level of
competency required.
Academic Retention Standards
A minimum grade of “C” is required each semester
except for those programs having higher retention/
progression standards due to accreditation or licensing
requirements. Students failing to achieve the minimum
semester grade for the program will be suspended for one
enrollment period.
The semester grade will reflect each studentʼs progress in
the following categories:
Skill Proficiency (written tests, lab work)
Related Information (daily journals, math)
Worker Characteristics (attendance*, participation, working
with others)
*Regular and punctual class attendance is required.
Excessive absences and tardies will have an adverse effect
on student progress. For each 1% of the assigned clock
hours that a student is absent from class, 3.2 points will be
deducted from the attendance grade. A student who has been
absent for 11% or more of a semester will receive a failing
grade for attendance. One point will be deducted from the
final attendance grade for each tardy. A student is considered
tardy if not in the classroom at the designated time for class
to start. The attendance grade will be averaged in with the
other course-related grades for the studentʼs final semester
grade.
In individual cases of extenuating circumstances, the
dean may make exceptions to suspension. Requests for
exceptions must be made in writing and be accompanied by
full documentation.
Readmission by the
Dean from Suspension
Tennessee Technology Center/A.A.S.
Degree Articulation
Tennessee Technology Center students who hold a
certificate of completion or diploma from a Tennessee
Technology Center in an approved program, may be eligible
to receive undergraduate semester hours of advanced
standing toward an Associate of Applied Science degree
in Applied Technology. For more information, see the
appropriate major.
The aesthetics program specializes in preventative skin care
and offers instruction to keep skin healthy and attractive. The
aesthetics course consists of 750 hours of instruction in both
theoretical and practical skill development required for licensure by
the Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology. Theory and practical
precede laboratory activities and students must complete basic
aesthetics curriculum which demonstrates competence in both
theory and practical skills before being allowed to participate in
laboratory activities. For further information, please call 697-2634.
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technical Diploma
Accredited by HVAC Excellence, an organization that establishes national standards
for HVAC/R Programs
This program covers the theory, application, operation, and
maintenance of basic and advanced air conditioning/
refrigeration systems.
Career Opportunities
Air conditioning/refrigeration technician, air-conditioning/
refrigeration installation/maintenance/service, sales—retail and
wholesale
(423) 697-3173
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Note: Students register for AC 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
Automotive Technology
Technical Diploma
Accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF)
This ASE certified training program covers automotive
electronics, engine performance, steering and suspension, manual
transmissions and drive trains, automatic transmissions and
transaxles, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, brakes, and
engine repair and rebuilding. Specialized electronics are taught
throughout as well as the proper use of tools and equipment.
Career Opportunities
Technician, shop foreman, service adviser, service manager
(423) 697-4479 or 697-2439
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Note: Students register for AM 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
Auto Body Repair
See “Collision Repair”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Tennessee Technology Center
Criteria considered in evaluating readmission requests
are 1) the candidateʼs willingness to address those
deficiencies that contributed to the suspension and 2) the
likelihood that the student may succeed in pursuing his or
her training objective.
Aesthetics
Technical Certificate of Proficiency
41
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Building Construction Technology
Technical Diploma
This program trains students in four areas of the construction
trade - carpentry, electricity, masonry and plumbing.
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Truck driver, dispatcher, operations manager, safety supervisor,
terminal
(423) 875-8448
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Career Opportunities
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Computer Operations Technology
Technical Diploma
This program will teach students a wide variety of office
functions including clerical and keyboarding skills, and the use of
applications software and technology.
Technical Diploma
This program is designed to provide students with first hand
knowledge of the software, hardware, and operations of personal
computers used in business and industry today; students will explore
how the personal computer works, how data is processed, and
how to apply the functions to solutions on the job. The program
consists of studies in the major operating systems, diagnostics, and
configuration of computers and their related peripheral devices.
Career Opportunities
Career Opportunities
Data entry, payroll clerk, receptionist/customer service
representative, accounting clerk, information processor, bookkeeper,
and administrative assistant
Information processing technician, personal computer hardware
technician, microcomputer specialist, networking specialist
Business Systems Technology
(423) 697-4729
(423) 697-4451
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Note: Students register for BST 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
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Security+ Certificate
Technical Diploma
This course prepares students to work in automotive body repair
and refinishing. The program focuses on automobile construction
and repair and emphasizes hands-on activities. The course provides
instruction on diagnosing damages and estimating repair costs,
while covering the subjects included in the National Institute for
Automotive Service Excellence (NIASE) certification tests “Body
Repair” and “Painting and Refinishing.”
Career Opportunities
Auto body metal straightener, insurance adjuster, painter, repair
cost estimator
Tennessee Technology Center
(423) 697-4780
42
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Commercial Truck Driving
Technical Certificate of Proficiency
This 7 1/2 week program trains students to drive commercial
trucks, focusing on driving skills, safe operating practices, and
proper record keeping.
Applicants must be at least 21 years of age.
This certificate program is designed to add foundation-level
skills in the security area for students that have completed the
Computer Operations Technology program. Students will study
general security concepts, communication security, infrastructure
security, and the basics of Cryptography to protect data integrity.
Career Opportunities
Computer Repair Technician, Help Desk Technician,
Microcomputer Specialist, Information Processing Technician
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Note: Students register for AB 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
Additional Admission Requirements
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Note: Students register for COT 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
Collision Repair
˜˜˜
˜˜˜
Computer Repair
See “Computer Operations Technology”
Cosmetology
Technical Diploma
This four-semester program prepares students to take the State
Board of Cosmetologyʼs practical and written examinations.
Additional Admission Requirements
Applicants must have completed at least two years of high
school (8 credits) or score 38 or higher on the GED.
Career Opportunities
Color technician, esthetician, hair stylist, manicurist, make-up
artist, shop manager
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
(423) 697-4477 or Kimball (423) 837-9105
Grundy County High School (931) 692-5400
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*1500 clock hours required for State Board licensure
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be competency based in accordance with the National Center for
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will consist of a specified common core and required competencies
for each piece of unique equipment.
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Cosmetology Instructor Training
Horticulture
Technical Certificate of Proficiency
This 300 hour course is a presentation of concepts of instruction
in cosmetology. Topics include history of teaching, educator
characteristics, curriculum development-evaluation, and teaching
assessment in techniques.
See “Landscaping and Turf Management”
HVAC
Additional Admission Requirements
See “Air Conditioning and Refrigeration”
Applicants must have completed 1500 hours in the course of
cosmetology and have a valid cosmetologist license.
(423) 697-4477 or Kimball (423) 837-9105
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Industrial Electricity
Technical Diploma
This program prepares students to install, maintain, and repair
electrical systems and equipment.
Career Opportunities
Diesel Equipment Mechanics
Technical Diploma
This program trains students in diesel engine mechanics.
Career Opportunities
Diesel mechanic, heavy diesel equipment repair, mechanic
helper, truck mechanic
(423) 697-4778
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Apprentice electrician, cable TV installer, electricianʼs helper,
electric motor repairer, electrical technician, journeyman electrician,
satellite antenna installer
(423) 697-3106
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Note: Students register for IE 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
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Note: Students register for DM 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
See “Industrial Electricity”
˜˜˜
Industrial Electronics
Technical Diploma
This program prepares students to repair and maintain “state of
technology” electronic equipment.
Career Opportunities
Greenhouse
See “Landscaping and Turf Management”
(423) 697-3238 or 697-3174
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Note: Students register for ER 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
Heavy Equipment Operator
Certificate
This 8 week program will provide the students with the
necessary knowledge, skills and abilities required in the safe
and efficient operation of specific pieces of heavy construction
equipment and in preventative maintenance. Training will be
available in Crawler Tractors, Excavators (Track-hoe) and Motorized
Road Graders. The program is accredited and recognized by the
respective industry as a regional training resource. Training will
Industrial Maintenance Mechanics
Technical Diploma
This program prepares maintenance personnel for industry.
Students learn skills in electricity, welding, machine shop,
hydraulics, pneumatics, air conditioning, general building
maintenance, and robotics.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Tennessee Technology Center
Computer maintenance, industrial controls system specialist,
radio and television repair, industrial instrumentation specialist,
telecommunications technician
43
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Career Opportunities
Manicurist
Electrical equipment maintenance technician, repair welder,
robotics maintenance technician, maintenance foreman assistant,
maintenance machinist, maintenance technician
(423) 697-3175
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Note: Students register for ID 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
Technical Certificate of Proficiency
The manicurist program is designed to train students in basic
manipulative skills, safety, judgments, proper work habits and
desirable attitudes necessary for entry level positions as a Nail
Technician or a related career avenue. The nail technology course
consists of 600 hours of instruction in both theoretical and practical
skill development required for licensure by the Tennessee State
Board of Cosmetology. Theory and practical precede laboratory
activities and students must complete basic manicuring curriculum
which demonstrates competence in both theory and practical skills
before being allowed to participate in laboratory activities. For
further information, please call 697-2634.
IV Therapy
This course will present the concepts necessary to safely
maintain peripheral IV therapy and to administer drugs. Topics to
be covered include the following: related anatomy and physiology,
IV fluids, delivery methods, pharmacology and administration
techniques related to selected drugs, preventing and monitoring for
complications in IV therapy, legal and ethical issues, documentation
standards, and the role of the RN supervisor. prereq: current PN or
RN licensure.
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Landscaping and Turf Management
Technical Diploma
This program trains students for work with greenhouses, golf
courses, public grounds, and residential landscaping.
(423) 697-2580
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Marine Engine Repair
See “Motorcycle & Marine Service Technology
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Note: Students register for LM 000 each term until all competencies are mastered.
Building and Construction Institute of Southeast
Technical Diploma
This program is designed to provide students with the necessary
knowledge, skills and abilities in the safe and efficient performance
of the residential masonry and concrete profession. Training will
be competency based in accordance with the national center for
Construction Education and Research (NCCER) curriculum and
local Masonry/Concrete code(s). Training will consist of a specified
common core and required competencies according to curricula.
Training will include hands-on instruction and will require students
to demonstrate learning outcomes through performance orientated
evaluations.
(423) 697-3174
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Tennessee Technology Center
Machine Tool Technology
44
Technical Diploma
This program gives students experience in machine tools, such
as engine lathes, vertical and horizontal milling machines, pedestal
and surface grinders, shapers, CNC Machining Centers, and Turning
Centers.
Career Opportunities
CNC operator, CNC programmer, machine tool operator,
maintenance machinist, manufacturing machinist, tool and die maker
apprentice
Massage Therapy
Technical Diploma
This program is designed to train students in the techniques and
skills of massage therpay in preparation for becoming a licensed
massage therapist. In addition, students will develop skills and
techniques in medical massage. 1290 clock hours.
(423) 697-4447
(423) 697-3176
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Mechanic
See “Automotive Technology”
See “Diesel Equipment Mechanics”
See “Motorcycle & Marine Service Technology”
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Medical Assistant
Ornamental Horticulture
Technical Diploma
See “Landscaping and Turf Management”
Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
(www.caahep.org), on recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the
American Association of Medical Assistantsʼ Endowment (AAMAE).
This program develops the administrative knowledge and
clinical skills needed to work in a physicianʼs office. Graduates are
eligible to write the National Certification Examination for Medical
Assistants. Individuals convicted of a felony are not eligible to take
the certification examination.
Career Opportunities
Hospital clinics, private physician offices, private medical
clinics
Additional Admission Procedures
Additional admission procedures are required for this program.
Please contact the program office.
(423) 697-4438
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Plumbing
Building and Construction Institute of Southeast
Technical Diploma
This program will provide the necessary knowledge, skills and
abilities in the safe and efficient performance of the residential
plumbing profession. Training will be competency based in
accordance with the National Center for Construction Education
& Research (NCCER) curriculum and local plumbing code(s).
Training will consist of a specified common core and required
competencies according to curricula. Training will include handson instruction and will require students to demonstrate learning
outcomes through performance oriented evaluations. 1290 clock
hours.
(423) 697-3174
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Motor Sports Vehicle Technology
Technical Certificate of Proficiency
This program provides training for students who have an
interest in learning about engine performance and basic chassis
construction techniques related to all types of motor sport industry
vehicles. To earn this 450-hour certificate, students attend parttime (112.5 hours) for four semesters or one semester of full-time
attendance (450 hours) and concentrate in the following areas:
engine machining, chassis welding, basic engine performance and
advanced engine performance.
Career Opportunities
Chassis fabrication, engine machinist and performance engine
technician
(423) 697-3178
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Practical Nursing (LPN)
Technical Diploma
This three-semester program provides theoretical knowledge
and clinical experiences needed for practical nursing. The graduate
is eligible to write the National Council Licensure Examination
for Practical Nursing (NCLEX-PN). Individuals who have been
convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation could be
ineligible for licensure in the State of Tennessee, even though they
have successfully completed a nursing program.
A class of 40 students is admitted in the fall and spring
semesters.
Additional Admission Procedures
Additional admission procedures are required for this program.
Applications are available all year on a first-requested basis. Please
contact the program office.
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(423) 697-4447
Expenses
Motorcycle & Marine Service
Technology
Technical Diploma
This program prepares students for employment in the field of
marine engine repair.
Career Opportunities
Marine mechanic, parts salesman, service manager, shop
foreman
(423) 697-3178
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Progression
A minimum grade of “B” is required for retention and
progression in the program. Students failing to meet this standard
will not earn clock hours toward graduation and will be suspended
from the program.
Career Opportunities
Doctorʼs office, home health care agencies, hospital, long-term
care facility, nursing homes
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Tennessee Technology Center
Additional expenses include nursing textbooks, liability
insurance, student uniform, achievement tests, school pin, state
board examination and other supplies.
45
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Surgical Technology
Realtime Reporting: Scopist
Technical Diploma
Scopists are hired by court reporters to edit and proofread
transcripts while the reporters work in court or depositions.
According to the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA),
there are an estimated 50,000 court reporters in the United States.
The Scopist Diploma will serve as the first year of the A.A.S.
degree program in Realtime Reporting. (See “Realtime Reporting,
A.A.S.” in the A.A.S. degrees and technical certificates section of
this catalog.)
Technical Diploma
Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of
Allied Health Education Programs
The Surgical Technologist maintains a sterile environment
and makes instruments and equipment available to the surgeon
during surgery. Graduates of this three-semester training program
are eligible to write the National Certification Examination for
Surgical Technologists.
Career Opportunities
Additional admission procedures are required for this program.
Applications are available all year long. Please contact the program
office.
Scoping is an ideal career for someone who needs or prefers
to work from home. A scopist uses a computer and software to
edit transcripts, and all of the data is transferred via the Internet.
Therefore, the job opportunities are not limited to Chattanooga and
the surrounding counties. Thanks to online accessibility, scopists in
Chattanooga can work for reporters anywhere in the United States
or the world.
(423) 697-4451
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Additional Admission Procedures
(423) 697-4447
Expenses
Additional expenses include textbooks, certification exam and
other supplies.
Progression
A minimum grade of “B” is required for retention and
progression in the program. Students failing to meet this standard
will not earn clock hours toward graduation and will be suspended
from the program.
Career Opportunities
Doctorʼs office, hospital
˜
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p£’F˜ašdF˜
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Truck Driving
See “Commercial Truck Driving”
Tennessee Technology Center
Welding
46
Technical Diploma
This program teaches combination welding, basic oxyacetylene cutting and welding, shielded metal arc welding, metal inert
gas welding, tungsten inert gas welding, and blueprint reading for
welding.
Career Opportunities
Combination welder, maintenance welder, mig welder, pipe
welder, structural steel welder, tig welder
(423) 697-3179
˜
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
General Information
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
Contents
Page
Page
47
Notice To Students
48
History
69
Disabilities Support Services
Mission Statement
Educational Planning and
Advisement
49-50
Academic Programs
Library Services
51-56
Admissions
Media Services
57-64
Academic Regulations
Scholars on the River
65-66
Financial Aid
67
Financial Information
68
Adult Education/GED
70
Athletics
Business and Community
Development Center
Student Life
Tennessee Small Business
Development and Resource Center
Testing Center
Transitional Studies
WAWL Radio
Career Planning and Counseling
Center
Child Development Center
Notice To Students
The Collegeʼs course offerings and requirements are analyzed, scrutinized and revised for currency
and quality. This catalog shows the offerings and requirements in effect at the time of publication.
They may be changed or revoked. Adequate and reasonable notice will be given to students affected
by any substantive changes.
Contents
General
Information
Center for Distributed Education
This catalog is not intended to state contractual terms and does not constitute a contract between
the student and the institution.
The institution reserves the right to make changes as required in course offerings, curricula,
academic policies and other rules and regulations affecting students to be effective whenever
determined by the institution. These changes will govern current and formerly enrolled students.
Enrollment of all students is subject to these conditions.
Current information may be obtained from the following sources:
Admission Requirements
– Admissions Office
Course Offerings
– Department or Division Offering Course
Degree Requirements
– Academic Affairs
Fees and Tuition
– Bursarʼs Office
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu or call toll free 1-866-547-3733
E-mail: [email protected]
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
47
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
History
Chattanooga State Technical Community Collegeʼs history
shows its commitment to the community and its ability to adapt.
When it opened in September 1965 on Fourth and Chestnut
Streets, the College was known as Chattanooga State Technical
Institute, a two-year, coeducational, college level institution. It
was the stateʼs first technical college, and Southeast Tennesseeʼs
first public institution of higher education. In 1967, the College
moved to its present location; since then, it has grown into a
multi-million dollar complex.
Chattanooga State Technical Instituteʼs goal was to prepare
students with marketable technical skills that would bridge
the gap between the engineer and the craftsman. The technical
programs offered AS and AE degrees and certificate programs,
while remaining flexible to students and industry needs.
In 1973, Chattanooga State Technical Institute turned into
Chattanooga State Technical Community College. Senate Bill
1010 assured the College would:
• provide comprehensive one and two-year occupational,
college parallel, continuing education, and community service
programs;
• provide quality technical and scientific occupational programs;
• serve as a regional technical school to train engineering
technicians or technical workers in the fields of production,
distribution, or service.
Chattanooga Stateʼs mission expanded to include vocational
education on July 1, 1981, when the State Area VocationalTechnical School merged with the College. That merger was
made permanent by the Tennessee legislature effective July 1,
1983.
Today, Chattanooga State Technical Community College
continues to emphasize two-year technical programs and
the expanded dimension of the comprehensive community
college. Thus, the College is committed to meeting the needs of
Chattanooga and Hamilton, Rhea, Sequatchie, Marion, Bledsoe,
and Grundy counties.
HistoryHistory/Mission
& Mission Statement
Mission Statement
Purpose:
Transform the lives of individuals and develop the
capacities of business, industry and the communities within the
Chattanooga State service area and beyond through the power
of technical and postsecondary education.
Standing:
Chattanooga State is nationally recognized for
entrepreneurial initiatives, excellence in student support,
curricular innovation, use of technology, and responsiveness to
its community. The College is a leader in community, economic
and workforce development, the use of advanced technologies
in instruction, life-transforming support services based on a
culture of care for all students and employees, and maintaining
an environment of open access to learning where high academic
standards and personal integrity are prized. Chattanooga State
affords equal opportunity to all persons.
Commitments:
Chattanooga State is committed to these objectives:
• Selecting and supporting faculty and staff members
known for superior teaching, applied research and
professional service.
• Encouraging all employees to grow personally and
professionally and create community awareness of
their capabilities.
• Providing educational programs and services that
are of high quality, timely, created through scholarly
program design and are responsive to community
needs.
• Instilling a desire for lifelong learning and a love of
knowledge in all members of the College family.
• Fostering a climate of success for all students through
counseling, support groups, financial aid, career
planning, advisement, library facilities, laboratories,
tutoring, co-curricular activities, sports and recreation.
48
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
• Ensuring that all of these mission commitments are
publicly accountable and accomplished through the careful
utilization of resources, strategic planning, financial
controls, employee professional development, publicprivate partnerships, and alternative funding, where
possible.
Description:
Chattanooga State is a comprehensive, regionally
accredited community college in the Tennessee Board of
Regents College System. Founded in 1965, Chattanooga State
offers a wide array of programs and services including:
• Degree and certificate study for career preparation
and Advancement
• University parallel (transfer) studies leading to
associate degrees
• Partnerships with secondary schools, state and
community agencies, and the private sector
• Non-credit coursework (including CEU study)
• Transitional Studies (reading, writing and basic math)
• Adult Education/GED preparation/English as Second
Language
• Technological and occupational training
• Cultural diversity and environmental health initiatives
Chattanooga State serves a six-county area of Southeast
Tennessee and bordering counties of north Georgia and
Alabama as an open-entry postsecondary institution offering
over 50 majors of study toward these degrees and certificates:
• Associate of Arts
• Associate of Science
• Associate of Applied Science
• Technical Certificates
• Institutional Certificates
• Tennessee Technology Center Diplomas and
Certificates
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Academic Programs
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Several classrooms
now are equipped with
“clicker technology.”
Students are assigned a clicker and
log on at the beginning of each class
session. When prompted by the
instructor, students answer test questions using the clicker. Instructors use
the results from the device to receive
immediate feedback via computer.
This technology allows the instructor
determine how well the information
being presented is understood.
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
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on next page
Chattanooga State Technical Community College Catalog
49
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Academic Programs continued
General
Academic
Information
Programs
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50
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Admissions
General Admissions Requirements
Chattanooga State has an open door admission policy.
The College is open to all persons, regardless of race, color,
religion, sex, age, national origin, veteran status, or physical,
mental or educational disability.
Admissions requirements and procedures vary, depending
on the studentʼs goals and classification. Each category has
its own requirements and procedures. However, the following
apply to all applicants:
• Applicants should meet physical standards appropriate to their
occupational choices.
• An admission application is not complete until the Admissions
Office has received all required documents. An applicant may be
denied admission until all are received.
• Males between 18 and 26 must certify registration with Selective
Service before they can register for classes.
• The State of Tennessee requires all students who plan to enroll
full-time to provide proof of two immunizations with the measles,
mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccines. Contact Admissions for
detailed information. (Exempt if born before 1957 or graduated
from a Tennessee Public High School 1999 or after.)
• All first-time students must submit a completed Hepatitis B Health
History Form prior to enrollment.
Admissions Procedures - How To Apply
Regular Admission
A regularly admitted student is one who is pursuing an
associate degree or Tennessee Technology Center program
from Chattanooga State.
Associate Degree Programs
First Time Freshmen
• Submit an application to the Admissions Office and pay the nonrefundable application fee.
• Submit an official high school transcript or General Education
Development (GED) transcript.
An official transcript has the granting institutionʼs seal and is
either mailed directly to the Admissions Office or hand delivered
in a sealed school envelope.
– High School graduates must hold a regular high school diploma.
The high school transcript must show the studentʼs graduation date
and, for Tennessee high school graduates, must include a transcript
entry that indicates the student passed the required proficiency
test battery. Note: Certificate of attendance or Special Education
diplomas are not equivalent to a regular high school diploma.
– Minimum scores for GED Certificate holders are based upon when
the GED test was taken and are as follows:
JANUARY 1, 2002 OR LATER
Minimum score: 2,250
Minimum sub-score: 410
Minimum sub-score average: 450
JANUARY 1, 1997 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2001
Minimum score: 45
Minimum subscore: 40
PRIOR TO 1997
Minimum score: 45
Minimum subscore: 35
Note: Students without the ACT (or SAT) may take the ACT residual test available
in the Testing Center (valid for admission only at Chattanooga State); fee required.
Residual test scores cannot be used for Tennessee Lottery eligibility.
For applicants 21 or older: Submit valid ACT or SAT scores or
take assessment tests in reading, writing, and-math.
Transfer Students
• Submit an application to the Admissions Office and pay the nonrefundable application fee.
• Submit official transcript(s) from all colleges previously attended.
An official transcript has the granting institutionʼs seal and
is either mailed directly to the Admissions Office or is hand
delivered in a sealed school envelope.
Transcripts are evaluated and credit may be given for equivalent
courses completed at regionally accredited institutions. Transfer
credits will not be used in computing the studentʼs GPA at
Chattanooga State.
Students transferring from non–regionally accredited institutions
follow the same procedures as first time freshmen. Credits
from non–regionally accredited institutions may be evaluated
on an individual basis or may be validated by examination. See
“Alternative Sources of Credit” for information on procedures
and-fees.
• Testing and Placement
Transfer students who have not earned credits in college-level
English composition or college-level, algebra-based math will be
assessed in writing and math based on a valid ACT score or other
appropriate assessment test. Chattanooga State accepts assessment
and placement, as well as equivalent Transitional Studies courses,
from all TBR schools. Assessment and placement from other non–
TBR institutions, as well as Transitional Studies course credits,
may be approved by Chattanooga Stateʼs Transitional Studies
director.
Testing is not required for students who have any of the following
from a regionally accredited college:
– successful completion of 60 hours of college level courses
– associate degree
– baccalaureate degree
General
Admissions
Information
In addition to the admission requirements/procedures
listed below, some programs have extra requirements, procedures, and deadlines. See the specific program in the “A.A.S.
Degrees & Technical Certificates” section of this catalog for
more information.
• Test Requirements
For applicants under 21: Submit ACT (American College Testing
Program) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) scores. Scores are
valid if taken within three years of the first semester of attendance
and are used for advising and placement purposes. Additional
assessment may be required.
Transfer students are held to the same standards as other
Chattanooga State students. Transfer students deficient in a
Basic Academic Competency cannot continue in a related
college-level course until they have satisfactorily met the exit
criteria of the appropriate Transitional Studies course(s).
• Transfer students pursuing an AA or AS must also submit official
high school transcripts or GED scores. This is waived for students
who:
– graduated from high school (or GED) before 1989, or
– transferred 60+ hours of college level work, or
– have a baccalaureate or associate degree
• Grade Point Average
Transfer students must be eligible to return to the institution they
transferred from and meet the academic retention standards of
Chattanooga State. Students not meeting these criteria may be
admitted to Chattanooga State after not attending any college
for at least one term (not including summer). Such students are
admitted on probation their first term and can be suspended at the
end of the term if they do not meet Chattanooga Stateʼs academic
retention standards. (See “Academic Retention Standards” in the
“Academic Regulations” section.)
Graduates of a non-regionally accredited or non-state approved high school
will be required to take the test.
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
International Students
Admissions
The Records Office handles international student admissions, including U.S. BICE (Bureau of Immigration and
Customs Enforcement) requirements.
International Students Requirements
• meet all requirements for admission as a degree-seeking student
• provide minimum TOEFL score of 500
• provide English translation of high school and/or post-secondary
school transcripts
• take English and Reading components of placement exam if
no transfer courses from institution using English as primary
language
• furnish evidence of financial capability
• provide medical certification verifying freedom from tuberculosis
• have medical and hospitalization insurance
Language Proficiency
Applicants whose native language is not English must satisfy one of
the following requirements.
• submit a TOEFL score (minimum = 500/paper based, 173/
computer-based, or 61/internet-based) and take English
components of Compass. Students with valid ACT or SAT scores
less than 3 years old may elect to submit scores for placement
• provide an official transcript documenting graduation from an
American high school
• provide an official transcript documenting satisfactory completion
(grade C or better) in college-level English Composition I from a U.S.
college or university
Mandatory Placement
• Students under 21 will be assessed for Transitional Studies
placement according to ACT (or corresponding SAT) scores.
Students over 21, GED students, and international students
have the option of using ACT/SAT scores (taken within 3 years
prior to the first day of the studentʼs entering term) OR taking
assessment tests in reading, writing, and math. Students with
an ACT composite score of 26 or higher are placed at college
level in all areas. An ACT score less than 19 in the subject areas
of reading, writing, or math requires placement in Transitional
Studies or further assessment.
• Students not required to take an assessment may request to be
tested.
• Instructors may recommend testing for students who were
not assessed, but later show deficiencies. If a student is then
determined to be deficient in a Basic Academic Competency at
the Transitional Studies level, he/she shall be withdrawn from the
class(es) with a grade of “W.” As a result, the student may not reenroll until the exit criteria of the appropriate Transitional Studies
course(s) has been satisfactorily met.
• A studentʼs placement may be adjusted based on further holistic
assessment.
• Re-testing for assessment may be available for an additional fee.
See Director of Transitional Studies for options and approval to
retest.
High School Unit Requirements
Beginning fall semester 1989, students entering a
Chattanooga State program designed for transfer to a fouryear institution must have the following high school credits:
4 units English
3 units Algebra I or Math for Technology II; Algebra II;
and Geometry/Advanced Math
OR Integrated Mathematics I, II, and III
2 units Natural/Physical Science (1 unit must have a lab)
1 unit Social Studies
52
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
1 unit United States History
2 units A single Foreign Language
1 unit Visual/Performing Art (effective Fall 1993)
Students without the entrance requirements listed above
will be admitted, but cannot receive an Associate of Arts or
Associate of Science until all deficiencies are removed.
High school deficiencies in English or Algebra I or
Algebra II may be removed by scoring 19 or higher on
the ACT sub score; scoring at college level on placement
tests other than ACT; or completing Transitional Studies
requirements. Other deficiencies may be removed with specified college courses, taken as electives. See “Removal of
Entrance Deficiencies” in “Transfer Programs.”
Notes:
• Applicants who graduated from high school or received a GED
before 1989 are not subject to the 1989 Admission Requirements.
• Applicants who graduated from high school and have an ACT
composite score of 26 or higher will have met all high school unit
requirements except for foreign language and visual/performing
arts.
• Applicants who received a General Education Development
(GED) Certificate or an American Council on Education (ACE)
External Diploma in 1989 or thereafter are considered to have
met all high school unit requirements except those in foreign
language and visual/performing arts. (However, such students are
not exempt from the “American History Requirement” mandated
by the Tennessee General Assembly as a condition of receiving a
bachelorʼs degree from one of Tennesseeʼs state-supported colleges
or universities.)
• For applicants holding a baccalaureate degree or an associate
degree designed for transfer, all high school deficiencies will be
waived upon presentation of a transcript verifying completion of
the degree.
• The qualifications and needs of applicants who volunteer
information about a handicapping condition will be assessed on
an individual basis. Assessment will include an evaluation of the
applicantʼs potential for success in college and the determination
of any exceptions which may be warranted.
• Applicants who are non-Tennessee residents are subject to the
same admission requirements as Tennessee applicants.
• The High School Unit Requirements do not apply to students
enrolled in Associate of Applied Science degrees or Technical
Certificates of Credit.
Tennessee Technology Center Programs
• Submit an application to the Admissions Office (with nonrefundable fee).
• Be 18; or (if under 18) have a high school diploma, GED, or be a
designated Tech Prep program participant (see “Tech Prep” section
under “Early Admission”).
• Testing
– Practical Nursing, Medical Assistant, and Surgical Technology
applicants must take the Nursing Entrance Test (NET).
– Other applicants must take the Tennessee Technology Centerʼs
standard entrance exam or COMPASS. (This is waived for
applicants with a baccalaureate or associate degree.)
• If applying for financial aid, submit:
– Official high school transcript or GED transcript, or
– Official transcript(s) from each college or university attended,
or
– A passing score on the Ability to Benefit Test (given by the
Testing Center by appointment only).
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Technical Certificate of Credit Programs
• Submit an application to the Admissions Office (with nonrefundable fee).
• Be admitted as a Special Student (see below).
• Testing requirements, if any, are determined by the programʼs
content.
If a student enrolled in a Technical Certificate of Credit
program later changes to degree-seeking status, all regular
admission requirements, including assessment, must be met.
Likewise, a regularly admitted student pursuing an associate
degree may concurrently pursue a Technical Certificate of
Credit, but this provision does not alter any requirements for
regular admission.
• Additional Admission Requirements
Some Technical Certificate of Credit programs have additional requirements, procedures, and deadlines which must
be met. See the specific program in the “A.A.S. Degrees &
Technical Certificates” section of this catalog for information.
Special Students
A Special Student is one who takes credit courses without
working toward a degree. Special Students must:
• Submit an application to the Admissions Office (with nonrefundable fee).
• Be 21, or (if under 21) have a regular high school diploma or
GED.
• Testing
• Meet course prerequisites. (Transcripts may be required for
advisement.)
Limitations:
• Special Students cannot enroll in a college level English or math
course or in a course with an English or math prerequisite until
they (1) satisfy the courseʼs Mandatory Assessment Requirements,
or (2) show successful completion of an appropriate college level
English and/or algebra-based math course.
• Special Students are not eligible for financial aid unless enrolled
in an approved Technical Certificate of Credit program.
• There is no limit on the number of credits Special Students may
carry per term other than those stated in the Academic Load
policy.
• Special Students are not restricted in how many credits they can
earn. But, if the student changes to degree-seeking status, credit
hours accumulated as a Special Student do not apply to the final
twenty-four (24) semester hours required for the associate degree
(exclusive of R/D requirements).
When special students change to degree seeking status,
ALL regular admissions requirements must be met prior to
registration regardless of the number of credit hours earned
as a Special Student.
Transient Students
Students who are regularly enrolled in another college
may attend Chattanooga State as transient students. Transient
students-must:
• Submit an application to the Admissions Office (non-refundable
fee).
• For each semester attending, submit a letter of good standing from
their regular college, dated after the end of the last term attended.
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Note: Transient students cannot enroll until the first day of regular registration
for a semester, nor are they eligible to receive financial aid through Chattanooga
State. If a transient student changes to Chattanooga State degree seeking status,
ALL admissions requirements must be met prior to registration.
Early Admission—Submit an application to the Admissions
Office with nonrefundable application fee.
1. Early admission is available to high school students
who-have:
• completed the 9th, 10th, and 11th grades with a 3.2+ GPA on
a 4.0 scale or the equivalent.
• ACT composite score of at least 22.
• written statement from their high school principal or
counselor specifying the college courses that will be
substituted for the remaining high school courses needed for
high school graduation.
• written endorsements from their high school counselors and
from their parents or guardians.
The student will leave the high school at the end of the
junior year and matriculate into Chattanooga State. The
Chattanooga State courses will substitute for courses
needed for graduation from high school. The high school
principal or counselor, or designee, will determine
appropriateness of the courses before the studentʼs
matriculation.
The student is awarded senior credit after successfully
completing the college freshman year. Since 4 units of
English is required for high school graduation, each
student will enroll in freshman English, plus American
History and Economics if not already completed in
high-school.
2. Dual Enrollment—The Dual Enrollment Program
provides college courses for qualified high school honor
students. Students receive college and high school credit
simultaneously. These courses are offered during the
school day on the high school campus, or students may
attend one of Chattanooga Stateʼs sites with the parentʼs
and principalʼs or counselorʼs permission. All courses
are taught by properly credentialed Chattanooga State
instructors.
Prospective dual enrollment students: sophomore (by
exception), junior, or senior high school students with a
minimum of 3.0 GPA and an ACT composite score of 19
or above. Additionally:
Admissions
Some Technical Certificate of Credit programs require
testing before admission. Testing may also be required in
order to take certain courses (see below). Though Special
Students are not required to complete normal assessment
procedures, they are responsible for having the requisite
knowledge and skills to succeed in their course(s).
• Meet course prerequisites. (Transcript may be required for
advisement.)
• If taking English or math, show successful completion of
appropriate college level English and/or algebra-based math
course(s), or satisfy the courseʼs Mandatory Assessment
Requirements.
• For English—ACT English score of 19 required; open to
seniors only
• For Math—ACT math scores required: 21 for Pre-Calculus II
(MATH 1720); 25 for Calculus (MATH 1910)
3. Middle College High School—Courses are offered
during the day at the Chattanooga State main campus
located on Amnicola Highway. Students will matriculate
into Chattanooga State with parent and principalʼs or
counselorʼs permission. SACS qualified instructors teach
all courses. Since 4 units of English are required for high
school graduation, each student will enroll in an English
course developed and taught by a Hamilton County
teacher, housed on the Chattanooga State campus for this
purpose.
Continued on next page
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
53
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Each Middle College student will enroll in other courses
defined as necessary to complete the Carnegie units
that are required for high school graduation. These
courses are included with the standard curriculum
offered at Chattanooga State and are taught by fulltime Chattanooga State professors. Middle College
High School students may take any scheduled course
that is appropriate for the completion of high school
requirements other than English. Students receive both
college and high school credit simultaneously for these
college courses.
Middle College High School students meet the following
criteria:
• Have completed the 9th, 10th, or 11th grade.
• Have an ACT composite score of at least 19 or a
demonstration of ability by exception.
• Provide a written statement of recommendation from principal
or counselor and parent.
• Have completed all necessary paperwork for college entrance.
• Have been selected for participation by the Middle College
High School screening committee.
• Will be dual enrolled with the college.
General
Admissions
Information
Middle College High School graduates may also earn
Chattanooga Stateʼs associate degree.
MCHS graduates can use their college courses plus an
additional 12 credit hours (minimum) to meet associate
degree requirements. After Middle College students have
completed their high school requirements, they can:
54
• Apply for re-admission as an associate degree major.
• Provide a letter of intent to graduate (MCHS) from the
Middle College principal.
• Enroll in at least 12 credit hours more than required for high
school completion.
• Submit an application for graduation.
4. Technical Preparation Education (Tech Prep)—
Chattanooga State may grant credits to high school
students through the national Technical Preparation
Education (Tech Prep) program. Depending upon their
type, Tech Prep credits may be used in placement in the
Collegeʼs Tennessee Technology Center programs or
as academic credit for selected technical courses. High
school students interested in earning Tech Prep credits
should contact either the high school guidance counselor
or the Tech Prep Coordinator at Chattanooga State.
5. Academically talented/gifted students enrolled in grades
9–12 in Tennessee may, with the high school principal
and appropriate personnelʼs approval, take college courses
from a Tennessee college if the student presents an official
high school transcript showing a 3.2 GPA on a 4.0 scale,
if such placement is a part of the studentʼs Individual
Education Program (IEP) as established by the multidisciplinary team process.
6. Alternative Educational Opportunities for High School
Students - (For High School Juniors and Seniors)
College Access Program
The College Access Program is a dual credit transitional
studies program that allows high school students to
take courses that meet college requirements while at the
same time obtaining credit necessary for high school
graduation. CAP courses are numbered below the 100
level. The CAP program is designed for students whose
ACT scores indicate a need for transitional courses.
Course offerings include Math and Writing. To enroll in
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
the College Access Program, high school students must
complete a college admission application and obtain a
signed permission form from the Parent and the Principal.
Students are allowed up to $300 per semester or a total
of $600 per year from the Tennessee Dual Enrollment
Lottery Grant.
Tennessee Technology Center Program
The Tennessee Technology Center (TTC) offers dual
credit programs that allow high school students to take
courses that meet post-secondary career education
requirements while at the same time obtaining credit
necessary for high school graduation. The TTC program
is designed for students who wish to get started on an
industrial/technical career. TTC credits are based on
clock-hours completed. To enroll in a TTC Program, high
school students must complete an admission application
for Chattanooga State, pass the TTC Admissions test, and
obtain a signed permission form from the Parent and high
school Principal. Participating high schools must have
a signed agreement with the TTC at Chattanooga State.
Students are allowed up to $300 per semester or a total
of $600 per year from the Tennessee Dual Enrollment
Lottery Grant. Once high school graduation is complete,
students can continue TTC enrollment with a lottery
sponsored Wilder-Naifeh Technical Skills Grant.
Audit
A student may audit college-level or Tennessee Technology
Center courses. Auditing may be denied based on available
space or if restricted by program of study.
Students may enroll in any combination of audit and credit
courses.
Students cannot audit Transitional Studies courses.
Payment of the regular course fee is required. The student
participates in class, but is not required to do assignments or
take tests.
Audit hours may not be converted to credit later or used to
replace an earlier grade.
Senior Citizens and Persons With Disabilities
Tennessee residents who are totally and permanently disabled or who are senior citizens (age requirement defined
below) may take courses at Chattanooga State for a reduced
rate. A “Maintenance Fee Reduction Request,” available
from the Admissions Office, must be completed at the time
of registration each semester in order to receive the discount
or waiver. Normal admission (or readmission) requirements
apply.
Audit—To receive a maintenance fee waiver for auditing,
a person must:
• be 60+ or permanently disabled
• meet Tennessee residency requirements
• provide proof of age or disability before registering
• register for AUDIT on first day of class if space is available in
course(s)
• pay all other applicable fees
Credit—To receive discounted maintenance fees on credit
courses, a person must:
• be 65+ or permanently disabled
• register for credit on first day of class if space is available in
course(s)
• meet Tennessee residency requirements
• provide proof of age or disability before registering
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
• have satisfied all prerequisites or other criteria required for the
course(s)
• pay all other applicable fees
Readmission
A student who did not attend the preceding term (summer excluded) must:
• Reapply for admission (no fee)
• Submit official transcripts from any college attended since leaving
Chattanooga State (if applying for regular admission status)
• Complete any remaining admission requirements
Alternative Sources of Credit
College credit for prior learning may be given to students-who demonstrate satisfactory achievement and
proficiency-by:
Credit by National Examination
Chattanooga State awards credit for successful completion of the following nationally recognized college-level
examinations offered by the College Entrance Examination
Board (CEEB):
Advanced Placement (AP)
AP tests are given to 11th and 12th grade students.
Scores must be three or higher to receive credit.
Credit By Departmental Examination
With the approval of an instructor, dean, and the Vice
President for Academic Affairs, a student can earn credit for
some college-level courses by passing a special departmental
examination(s). Contact division offices for details.
Conditions and Restrictions:
• The student must be currently enrolled in credit work at
Chattanooga State and have 2.5 cumulative GPA.
• The student must show the academic department he/she has
the knowledge, skills, and/or competencies covered by the
course. Permission to take a proficiency exam may be denied
if the department decides the studentʼs request is invalid. The
departmentʼs decision is final.
• Proficiency examinations may validate credits taken at
unaccredited institutions. Students must show by official
transcript that the credits were previously earned.
• The regular course fee is charged for each test, in addition to
maintenance fees paid for courses in which the student is actually
registered (even if the student is full-time).
• Credits earned by testing appear on the studentʼs transcript with a
grade of “CE,” which carries no quality points and is not used in
computing the studentʼs GPA.
• Proficiency tests may not be used to repeat coursework or to
remove a grade of “I” or “F.”
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Students planning to transfer should talk to their intended
college or university about accepting proficiency test credit.
Credit for Life Experience
Individuals who have not earned an associate or baccalaureate degree may be eligible to petition to receive credit
for work experience and/or certified professional programs.
A student who has previously taken the petitioned course
may not request Credit for Life Experience. Credit hours
earned by Life Experience are not considered part of the
Collegeʼs Graduation Residency Requirement.
Credit for Life Experience may be granted by:
• Verification of College Credit Recommendation in the Directory
of the National Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction
(published by the University of the State of New York and the
State Education Department of New York).
-OR• Up to nine (9) semester hours may be granted upon submission
of a portfolio documenting professional experience that directly
relates to the content of specific courses offered by Chattanooga
State AND approval of this portfolio by a Faculty Committee.
The portfolio process must be initiated at least two semesters
before graduating. A non-refundable assessment fee, equivalent
to the per-credit-hour maintenance/tuition fee, must be paid prior
to faculty assessment of the studentʼs portfolio. Step-by-step
procedures are listed in the Student Handbook. Assessment by
portfolio is allowed only if credit by exam (including CLEP) is
not available.
Military Service Credit
Credit may be granted for appropriate educational experience in the armed services in accordance with evaluation in
the American Council on Education Guide to the Evaluation
of Education Experience in the Armed Services. Veterans
should submit documentation of previous training to the
Veterans Affairs Office.
Students who have completed Basic Training with any
military branch of the United States to include Reserves,
National Guard or a Police or Fire Academy, may receive
two credits for physical education activity courses. One
credit is allowed for each six months of continuous active
duty to a maximum of two credits.
General
Information
Admissions
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
CLEP scores must be at the 50th percentile to get credit.
Chattanooga Stateʼs Testing Center arranges the tests.
Students who have taken CLEP exams elsewhere should
have official scores sent to the Records Office.
Credits earned by testing appear on the studentʼs transcript with a grade of “CE,” which carries no quality points
and is not included in the studentʼs GPA.
No limit is set on the number of hours that can be earned
by AP or CLEP other than the restrictions imposed by the
Graduation Residency Requirement.
Transfer program students should talk to their intended
college or university about accepting AP and/or CLEP credit.
• A student may take the proficiency test for a specific course only
once.
• Credits earned by testing do not satisfy the Graduation Residency
Requirement.
• No limit is set on the total number of credits that can be earned by
examination other than the restrictions imposed by the Graduation
Residency Requirement.
• Proficiency examinations are not available for all courses.
American Council on Education (ACE)
Chattanooga State may give credit for appropriate
educational experience listed in The National Guide to
Educational Credit for Training Programs sponsored by the
American Council on Education. The program is national in
scope, and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission is a
participating agency. Each request will be considered on its
own merit and must have the approval from the appropriate
division.
Orientation
Orientation is required for all first-time degree-seeking
students.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
55
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Residency Classification
General
Admissions
Information
The following determines in-state and out-of-state status
for fees and tuition purposes for college credit courses.
The fee policies are defined by the State University and
Community College System of Tennessee:
• Everyone domiciled* in Tennessee is classified in-state for fee,
tuition, and admission purposes.
• Everyone not domiciled in Tennessee is classified out-of-state for
said purposes.
• The domicile of an “unemancipated person”** is that of his or
her parent (i.e., father or mother, or non-parental guardian or
legal custodian provided the guardianship or custodianship was
not created primarily to create in-state status).
• Tennessee Technology Center students who are out-of-state
residents do not pay additional fees because of residency.
• Unemancipated students of divorced parents are in-state when
one parent, regardless of custodial status, is domiciled in
Tennessee.
• A graduate of any out-of-state high school must show Tennessee
residency before receiving in-state tuition status.
• The spouse of a student classified as in-state shall also be
classified as in-state.
• International students will pay out-of-state tuition.
• Students classified by Immigration as a Permanent Resident,
Resident Alien, Refugee, or Immigrant may be charged in-state
fees if domiciled in Tennessee.
• Part-time students who are not domiciled in Tennessee but who
are employed full-time in Tennessee, are classified out-of-state
but are not required to pay out-of-state tuition. The student must
provide proper documentation each semester.
• Chattanooga Sate is able to award out-of-state fee waivers to a
limited number of out-of-state students residing in border counties.
*Domicile—a personʼs true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation; it is
the place where he or she intends to remain, and to which he or she expects to return
when he or she leaves without intending to establish a new domicile elsewhere.
**Emancipated person—a person who is eighteen years old, and whose parents have
entirely surrendered the right to his/her care, custody, and earnings and are no
longer under any legal obligation to support or maintain him/her.
Contact the Admissions Office for more information.
14 days after the beginning of the term, and the amount of
the deferment shall not exceed the total monetary benefits
to be received for the term. Students who have been granted
deferments are expected to make timely payments on their
outstanding tuition and fees balance once education benefits
are being delivered, and eligibility for such deferment shall
terminate if the student fails to abide by any applicable rule
or regulation, or to act in good faith in making timely payments. This notice is published pursuant to Public Chapter
279, Acts of 2003, effective July 1, 2003.
Qualifying Courses
A student receiving veteran benefits can only be paid for
courses listed in the catalog as required for his/her designated major.
Tennessee Technology Center Programs
Students receiving veteran benefits who are enrolled in
Tennessee Technology Center programs are certified for
clock-hour certificates. Credit may be given for previous
education or training as determined by the instructor and
approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs at initial enrollment.
Full-time Status
The Department of Veterans Affairs accepts, as full-time,
students who meet either of the following criteria:
• degree-seeking students taking 12 or more credit hours
per-semester.
• Tennessee Technology Center students enrolled in clock hour
programs meeting at least 22 hours per week.
Academic Fresh Start
Veterans are not eligible for Academic Fresh Start.
Veterans Brochure
Brochures with more information are available in
Veterans Affairs.
Veterans
The Veterans Affairs Office is located in Student
Aid-Office.
To receive benefits, eligible students must:
• Apply to the Department of Veterans Affairs for educational
benefits.
• Be enrolled in an associate degree program or in an Tennessee
Technology Center program.
• Submit a copy of DD 214 and DD-2384, if applicable.
• Register for classes.
Eligibility for Deferment of Payment of Tuition and Fees by
Certain Eligible Students Receiving
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or
Other Governmentally Funded Educational Assistance Benefits
Service members, veterans, and dependents of veterans who are eligible beneficiaries of U.S. Department of
Veterans Affairs education benefits or other governmentally
funded educational assistance, subject to the conditions and
guidelines set forth in Tennessee Code Annotated 49-7-104
as amended, may elect, upon formal application, to defer
payment of required tuition and fees until the final day
of the term for which the deferment has been requested.
Application for the deferment must be made no later than
56
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Students participate in campus activities.
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Academic Regulations
Any exceptions to the following Academic Regulations
must have the Vice President for Academic Affairsʼ recommendation and the Presidentʼs approval.
General Expectations
The College can change the calendars, curricula, degree
requirements, course offerings, and all academic regulations
any time the faculty, the President, or the Tennessee Board of
Regents believes such changes are in the best interests of the
students and the College.
By registering, a student accepts all published academic
regulations, including those here and in any other official
announcement.
Academic Fresh Start
“Academic Fresh Start” is a plan of academic forgiveness
provided for undergraduate students who have demonstrated
academic responsibility following their return. The Academic
Fresh Start allows the calculation of the quality point average
and credit hours toward graduation to be based only on work
after returning to college.
Eligibility
Terms of the Academic Fresh Start
• Academic Fresh Start is granted only once and is irrevocable.
• The studentʼs permanent record will remain a record of all work;
however, the student will forfeit the use for degree or certification
purposes all college or university degree credit earned prior to the
4 year separation upon granting of the Fresh Start.
• Previously satisfied Transitional Studies requirements are not
forfeited. Students who did not complete their Transitional Studies
requirements during their previous enrollment must meet current
requirements and these courses do not count toward the 15 hours
of coursework required to be eligible for Academic Fresh Start.
• The studentʼs transcript will note the Academic Fresh Start and
state that the grade point average and credit totals are based only
on the work beginning with the Academic Fresh Start.
• A student transferring to another institution should contact that
institution to see what impact an Academic Fresh Start will have
prior to implementing the program at Chattanooga State.
For more information, contact the Records Office.
Note: Veterans are not eligible for benefits as Academic Fresh Start participants.
Academic Honors
All honors recognition at commencement is based on the
college-level GPA and work completed at the end of the fall
term before graduation.
Commencement Honors
Chattanooga State recognizes exceptional degree-seeking
students by granting honors at graduation as follows:
Summa cum laude
4.0 GPA
Magna cum laude
3.75–3.99 GPA
Cum laude
3.50–3.74 GPA
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Dean’s List
Students completing 12 or more hours of college level
work with a GPA of 3.5 or higher will make the Deanʼs List
for that semester. (Deanʼs list recognition is based on calculations at the end of the semester and cannot be updated later to
reflect grade changes, such as removal of Incompletes.)
Scholars on the River
Honors Program
The Chattanooga State Honors Program provides an
enriched curriculum and educational experiences for motivated
students. The program is designed for students who desire to
maximize their learning experience. Students admitted to
the Honors Program are eligible for in-state tuition rates.
Honors Program students who have completed at least 12
hours of honors courses and maintain a cumulative 3.5 GPA or
higher in college level courses receive special recognition at
graduation. All successful Honors students will be eligible for
presidential letters of recommendation.
Members of the Honors Program work with Alpha Beta
Mu, the college chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, as a part of
Chattanooga Stateʼs Scholars on the River. Together the students participate in enrichment activities as well as college and
community service.
The Honors Program is open to students who meet at least
one of the following criteria:
• ACT composite score of 25 or higher
• SAT score of 1130-1160
• High school GPA of 3.5 or higher
• GPA of 3.5 or higher based on a minimum of 12 hours
of college level courses
Upon the recommendation of a faculty member, exceptional
students who do not meet the above criteria may be admitted into the program after approval by the Honors Program
Director.
Students must maintain a cumulative college level GPA
of 3.25 or higher to maintain good standing in the Honors
Program.
Phi Theta Kappa
Phi Theta Kappa is the international two-year college honor
society to recognize outstanding academic achievement and
provide opportunities for developing leadership, service, fellowship and continued academic excellence.
All full-time and part-time students who have completed
12 college-level credit hours with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 are
eligible for membership. Invitations are sent to eligible students
each fall and spring semester. Members pay a one-time fee and
must maintain a college level GPA of 3.25 or higher to remain
in good standing. Graduating members may purchase a Phi
Theta Kappa stole to wear at graduation.
Members of Alpha Beta Mu, the college chapter of Phi
Theta Kappa, work with members of the Honors Program as a
part of Chattanooga Stateʼs Scholars on the River. Together the
students participate in enrichment activities as well as college
and community service.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Academic Regulations
• Separation from all institutions of higher education for a minimum
of 4 years.
• Readmit or apply as degree-seeking student to Chattanooga State.
• Prior to completion of 15 hours of degree coursework, obtain an
Academic Fresh Start application and an Academic Plan form from
the Records Office and return to Records Office upon completion.
• Completion of 15 semester hours of earned degree coursework
with a minimum GPA of 2.50 for all work attempted.
Honors recognition at commencement is based on the college-level GPA at the end of the fall term before graduation.
If grades in courses completed during the final term(s) cause
the student to qualify for a higher honors designation, it will
be noted on the diploma.
57
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Who’s Who Among Students In American Junior Colleges
Full-time students with 30 completed hours and a GPA
of 3.3 or higher may apply for Whoʼs Who. Applicants are
screened by a committee and reviewed by faculty members
before the final selection is made.
Academic Load
Definition: The total semester hours of credit for all
courses taken during the semester. Also referred to as “credit
load,” “course load,” or “class load.”
Full-time Students
Recommended credit load: 15–18 hours.
Minimum credit load: 12 hours.
Maximum credit load: 19 hours.
Overload: 20–22 hours. Enrollment in more than 19 credit
hours must be approved in advance by the Vice President for
Academic Affairs. A student requesting an overload should
have a cumulative 3.0 GPA. The maximum number of hours
permitted is 22.
General Information
Academic
Regulations
Part-time Students
A student who carries an academic load of less than 12
hours is considered part-time.
Tennessee Technology Center Students
A full-time load for a Tennessee Technology Center
student is 30 or more clock hours per week
Tennessee Technology Center enrollments are limited to
enrollment in one program per term.
Tennessee Technology Center students who wish to take
credit courses while enrolled in an Tennessee Technology
Center program may do so subject to the following restrictions:
• Requests for concurrent registration must be submitted before
registration in either division takes place.
• All course prerequisites, including any mandatory testing, must be
met and appropriate course fees paid.
• When concurrent registration has been approved, schedule
changes cannot be made without TTC and Academic Affairs
approval and cannot be made via self-service.
Note: The following grades are shown under Attempted Hours (AHRS) but not
used in calculating GPA for probation/suspension purposes: W(withdrawal),
S(satisfactory), N(no credit), and AU(audit).
Academic Probation
Any student who fails to attain the progression standards
listed will be placed on academic probation for the next
enrolled semester.
Academic Suspension
Any student on academic probation who fails to attain either
the cumulative standard or a 2.0 GPA for the current semester
will be suspended for the next semester. The summer semester
cannot be counted as the semester of suspension, nor can a suspended student enroll in summer-school.
A student who re-enrolls at Chattanooga State after an
academic suspension will be placed on post-suspension probation. If the student earns:
1. the cumulative standard, he/she will be in good standing.
2. a 2.0 GPA for that semester but is still below the cumulative
standard, he/she will remain on probation.
3. less than a 2.0 GPA for that semester and is still below the
cumulative standard, he/she will be placed on a twelve month
suspension.
Appeal of Academic Suspension
A student may appeal his/her academic suspension.
Suspension appeal forms, which include the procedures
for an appeal, are available in the Career Planning and
Counseling Center. Appeals hearings are usually held the
first day of registration each semester. Students should ask
about suspension appeals as early as possible.
If an appeal is granted, the student will be eligible to
enroll that semester in post-suspension probation status and
must meet the conditions set by the appeals committee. If
the conditions are not met, the student will be suspended for
twelve months. Students may not appeal during this twelvemonth suspension.
Tennessee Technology Center
The Tennessee Technology Center academic retention
policy can be found in the “Tennessee Technology Center
Programs” section of this catalog.
Academic Retention Standards
Academic standing is based on the studentʼs grade point
average and is posted at the end of each term. The standing
designation becomes part of the permanent record and does
not change even if the GPA changes due to repeated courses.
Good Standing
The minimum college-level GPA required to receive a
degree is 2.0. To be enrolled in good standing, a student
must earn the minimum cumulative combined GPA below
for the total number of semester credit hours attempted.
*Semester Quality Hours Attempted
0.0 – 14.0
14.1 – 26.0
26.1 – 40.0
40.1 – 48.0
48.1 – 56.0
above 56
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
A “Registration and Drop/Add” form is used to add or
drop a course, change from one course section to another, or
change course registration from credit to audit or from audit
to credit. (This form cannot be used to completely withdraw from school. See “Withdrawal From College.”) Forms
must be submitted to the Admissions office for processing.
Students may not drop Transitional Studies courses except
for extraordinary reasons and with special permission from
the Director or his/her representative.
Required Cumulative GPA
No Minimum
1.0
1.4
1.7
1.9
2.0
*Quality hours attempted are shown on the transcript under QHRS.
58
Change of Registration (Drop/Add)
Deadlines
The academic calendar published by the Records Office
each semester indicates the deadlines for making various
registration changes. The following policies apply:
• Courses dropped during the first two weeks of the term will not appear on
the studentʼs transcript.
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
• With advisor approval, student can drop/add online according to the term
calendar..
• A grade of W shall be recorded for course(s) dropped prior to the Drop
Deadline, which is not later than two-thirds into the semester.
• Exceptions to Drop Deadline are approved by the Vice President for
Academic Affairs under extenuating circumstances only.
• A grade of W shall be recorded for Tennessee Technology Center courses
dropped at any point in the semester.
• If a student stops attending class and does not officially withdraw, he/she
will receive a failing grade (F) for that-course.
• For consideration of full refund, drop must be prior to first day of the
term.
Note: If a student withdraws on or after the first day of class, but never attends
the class, that class will not count when calculating financial aid eligibility and the
studentʼs financial aid will be adjusted accordingly.
Change of Status
Classification
It is the studentʼs obligation to notify the Records Office
of any change in name, social security number, address, or
major. Name and/or social security number changes require
documentation. Failure to do so can cause serious delay in
handling student records and in notification of emergencies at
home. Any major change requires that all admissions requirements be completed before future registration. Change of
Status forms are in the Records Office and on the Web.
A change of major must be received during the first two
weeks of the academic term. Any changes after that time will
be effective with the next academic term.
A student is a freshman until he/she completes 33
semester hours in college level courses. Transfer credits are
included in determining classification.
Class Attendance
Students obligated for all the work that may be assigned
and for regular class attendance. The student is responsible
for all assigned work in the course; absences, excused or
unexcused, do not absolve him/her of this responsibility.
The instructor sets the attendance requirements for a
class. At the beginning of the term, the instructor will distribute the class attendance policy, including an explanation
of any grade penalties that result from failure to comply
with the policy. An unsatisfactory attendance record may
negatively affect the final grade. It is each studentʼs responsibility to know the attendance policy in each of his/her
classes. Please note: non-attendance will not result in an
automatic drop/withdrawal from course(s) and can result
in grades which negatively affect the studentʼs academic
record.
Students who are members of school sanctioned organizations will not incur grade penalties for classes not attended
or class assignments/exams missed while representing
Chattanooga State at scheduled events. At the beginning of
each semester, the student must present a letter of organizational membership and a tentative activity schedule that
has been developed and signed by the organization sponsor.
It is also the studentʼs responsibility to notify the teacher
in advance of any class he/she will miss. The student must
complete missed assigned work/exams. Scheduled completion time will be at the discretion of the instructor.
Unsatisfactory attendance may result in a repayment
of any financial aid received. Financial Aid students must
attend all classes for which they register.
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Class Cancellation
The College can cancel any class with fewer than the
minimum number of students enrolled as set by the institutional guidelines; however, all courses are given the
opportunity to make.
Co-op Credit
College credit may be earned through Chattanooga
Stateʼs Cooperative Education program and applied toward
graduation, with the following restrictions:
1. Co-op courses may be used as Unrestricted Elective
credit in career programs (Associate of Applied
Science-degree).
2. A course substitution approved by the appropriate dean
is required for co-op credit to be used to satisfy degree
requirements other than Unrestricted Elective.
3. Co-op credit may not be used to satisfy General
Education requirements.
4. Co-op credit may not be used as elective credit in
transfer programs (Associate of Arts or Associate of
Science degrees).
Course Substitutions
A substitution for a general education course will be considered only if course requested is on the approved general
education list (one general education course for another)
and meets the requirements/goals of the major. Only under
unavoidable and exceptional circumstances will the College
permit deviation from the prescribed curricula. In cases
where this is necessary, the student must have advisor
clearly state in writing the desired substitution and reason
for the request. Course substitutions must be approved by
the studentʼs adviser, the appropriate department head and
dean, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. A substitution is not allowed for courses for which a grade of D or F
has been earned.
Academic
General Information
Regulations
Note: If mail is returned indicating insufficient address, a registration hold
is placed on the studentʼs records until the address is corrected with the
Records-Office.
All veterans will be reported to Veterans Affairs when
they have been excessively absent.
Diplomas
Unclaimed diplomas will be held in the Records Office
for one (1) academic year after each graduation.
Dropping a Class
See “Change of Registration.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
59
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Grading Policy
Chattanooga State uses a grading system designed to
show the level of mastery the student has achieved in a
course. Minimum acceptable achievement is what is deemed
necessary to enter the next level course or, at the program
level, to enter a four-year college, or to be qualified to work
in a specific career. The letter grades below are based on
documented mastery of a set of specific instructional competencies. The competencies and objectives for each course are
listed in the course syllabus.
Letter
Grade
Quality
Points (Per Semester Hour)
A
4.0
B
3.0
C
2.0
D
1.0
Indicates consistently superior performance.
Mastery level should be a minimum average of
90.
Indicates consistently above-average performance.
Mastery level should be a minimum average of 80.
Indicates satisfactory performance. Mastery level
should be a minimum average of 70.
Indicates less than mastery level performance
with a minimum average of 65. A course in which
a D grade has been earned cannot be used as a
prerequisite for another course.
Note: A grade of “C” or better is required in all prerequisite courses and
in specific courses listed in the program summary of required hours.
0.0
0.0
General Information
Academic
Regulations
F
I
Indicates failure to achieve minimum standards.
Incomplete. Given at the instructorʼs discretion
to students who have not fulfilled all course
requirements at the end of the grading period.
Counts as an F, both in computing the GPA and
for purposes of satisfying course prerequisites.
The deadline for removing an Incomplete is
determined by the instructor, but must be no
later than two weeks before the end of the
next semester. An exception to rule is anyone
who has applied for graduation. If incomplete
grades in courses satisfying degree or certificate
requirements are not removed within two
weeks of the end of the term, the studentʼs
degree or certificate will not be posted until the
following-term.
Note: If course requirements are not satisfied by the deadline, the “I”
grade is changed to “IF” on the studentʼs transcript.
IF
W
AU
CE
CL
S/N
0.0
Incomplete/Failure. Indicates student failed to
complete the requirements of a course in which
he/she had received an Incomplete.
Withdrawal. Indicates the student has withdrawn
from the course. Does not count in the GPA.
Audit. Indicates that the student elected to enroll
in the course for no grade or credit. Audits do not
replace previous grades.
Credit by Examination. This designation is used
for both institutional and national exams (AP
and-CLEP).
Credit for Life Experience. The CL is not counted
in the GPA.
Satisfactory/No Credit. Selected courses may be
offered on a competency based grading system.
If the student satisfactorily meets the minimum
competencies, credit (S) will be awarded.
Students not meeting minimum competencies will
not receive credit (N).
Calculation of Grade Point Average (GPA)
Chattanooga State transcripts indicate two grade point
averages—a “college only” average and a “combined” aver-
60
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
age. The college only GPA consists of hours taken in college
level courses. The combined GPA includes hours taken in
both college level and Transitional Studies courses. The
college only GPA is used to calculate the GPA required for
graduation and to determine honors. The combined GPA
is used to determine suspension, probation, eligibility for
financial aid, and athletic eligibility.
The GPA for the Tennessee Education Lottery
Scholarship is calculated to determine potential scholarship
eligibility. All grades including transfers, repeats, and withdrawals are used to determine eligibility.
Note: Grades of W are shown on the transcript under the heading of Attempted
Hours (AHRS) but are not used in calculating GPA. But, they may affect a
studentʼs financial aid eligibility.
Repeating a Course
For increasing mastery or GPA (and only for these purposes), students may repeat courses in which their final
grades are C or lower.
Students may only repeat a course with a B or higher
with the approval of the Vice President for Academic
Affairs.
When a course is repeated, only the last grade received
is calculated in the cumulative GPA. However, if a course is
repeated more than twice, the third and all later grades are
included in computing the cumulative GPA.
Appeal of a Grade
Prior to requesting the appeal of a final course grade, the
student should read the following statement.
Course grades assigned by faculty members are final
unless there is evidence that the grade was influenced by
consideration of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, disability or national origin, arbitrary or capricious action or
other reasons not related to the academic performance of the
student. In all cases, the student shall assume the burden of
proof with respect to the allegations.
In the event the student elects to file an appeal, the
student is required to refer to and abide by the guidelines
provided below. All information provided for this appeal
must be legible. Pending resolution of the appeal request,
the final course grade stands. If the student fails to present the Final Course Grade Appeal Request within the time
frames specified within these guidelines, the studentʼs final
course grade stands. To ensure fair and equable treatment for
all students, the steps provided below are to be followed in
sequential order beginning with Step 1. Fair and appropriate
resolution may occur at any of the six steps provided below.
Steps For Appeal of a Grade:
1. The student must review his/her grade with the course
instructor if the student believes the final course grade
is incorrect. The student has thirty (30) calendar days
from the day grades are due in the Records Office of
the term in which the grade was earned to consult with
the instructor in an effort to review the final grade
assigned. If, for any reason, the instructor is unavailable,
the student should contact the instructorʼs supervisor
to review the course grade. If thirty (30) calendar
days have passed from the day grades were due in the
Records Office of the term in which the grade was
earned prior to the student completing STEP 1, the final
course grade stands. Possible outcomes of the Final
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Course Grade Appeal are:
A) The final course grade remains as assigned by the course
instructor.
B) The final course grade is changed by the course instructor
to a new grade, which may be higher or lower than the
initial grade assigned by the course instructor.
C) If the Final Course Grade Appeal Request warrants
further review, the matter must be referred to the
Instructorʼs Immediate Supervisor.
A) The final course grade remains as assigned by the course
instructor.
B) The final course grade is administratively changed to a
new grade, which may be higher or lower than the initial
grade assigned by the course instructor.
C) If it is determined that the Final Course Grade Appeal
Request warrants further review, the matter must be
referred to the Student Academic Appeals Committee
chairperson.
4. Should further review be warranted, the Division Dean
has ten (10) calendar days to send a copy of his/her
written decision, the Student Final Grade Appeal
Request, the evidence and any other supporting data,
correspondence and/or records from both parties to the
Student Academic Appeals Committee (SAAC). The
written request for a hearing shall state the facts of the
appeal. The Student Academic Appeals Committee
(SAAC) shall notify the student, the instructor (and/
or supervisor), Department Head/Program Director,
Division Dean and the Vice President for Academic
Affairs of the time and location of the hearing. This
hearing shall be held within fifteen (15) calendar days
of the receipt of the Student Final Course Grade Appeal
Request and supporting documentation. The Student
Academic Appeals Committee shall function as a review
board. After thorough review of the case, the committee
shall prepare and submit a written recommendation
regarding the final course grade appeal request to the
Vice President for Academic Affairs. The committee
shall also provide all materials received for the case
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
A) The final course grade remains as assigned by the course
instructor.
B) The final course grade is administratively changed to a
new grade, which may be higher or lower than the initial
grade assigned by the course instructor.
6. Upon receipt of the recommendation and materials, the
President of Chattanooga State Technical Community
College shall review all documents received from the
Vice President for Academic Affairs and shall prepare
his/her written final decision regarding the grade
appeal within ten (10) calendar days. The President
of Chattanooga State Technical Community College
retains full responsibility for the final decision rendered.
A copy of the written decision shall be provided to all
parties involved. Possible outcomes of the Final Course
Grade Appeal are:
A) The final course grade remains as assigned by the course
instructor.
B) The final course grade is administratively changed to a
new grade, which may be higher or lower than the initial
grade assigned by the course instructor.
Graduation Requirements
General Information
Academic
Regulations
2. Should further review be requested, the student has
ten (10) calendar days from the date provided by
the instructor (supervisor) at Step 1 to present this
form with the appropriate signatures and supporting
documentation to the instructorʼs Department Head/
Program Director. The Department Head/Program
Director shall discuss the appeal with the instructor and
the student.
3. Should further review be requested, the student has
five (5) calendar days from the date listed in Step 2 to
present this form with the appropriate signatures and
supporting documentation to the instructorʼs Division
Dean. The Division Dean shall discuss the appeal
with the instructor and the student within fifteen (15)
calendar days of the receipt of the Student Final Course
Grade Appeal Request and supporting documentation.
The Division Dean, in collaboration with the
Department Head/Program Director, shall prepare a
written decision regarding this grade appeal. A copy of
the Division Deanʼs written decision shall be provided
to the student, course instructor (and/or supervisor),
Department Head/Program Director, and the Vice
President for Academic Affairs. Possible outcomes of
the Final Course Grade Appeal are:
including but not limited to the Student Final Grade
Appeal Request, all evidence and other supporting data,
correspondence and/or records from both parties to the
Vice President for Academic Affairs.
5. Upon receipt of the recommendation and materials
from the Student Academic Appeals Committee, the
Vice President for Academic Affairs shall review
all documents received from the Student Academic
Appeals Committee and shall prepare his/her written
final decision regarding the grade appeal within ten
(10) calendar days. A copy of the written decision
shall be provided to the student, course instructor
and/or supervisor, Department Head/Program Director,
Division Dean and President of Chattanooga State
Technical Community College. Possible outcomes of
the Final Course Grade Appeal are:
All requirements for degrees and/or certificates must
be completed before the credential can be posted to the
studentʼs transcript or a diploma awarded. This includes
removal of any incomplete grades in courses needed to
satisfy degree or certificate requirements. Incompletes not
removed within two weeks of the end of the term will delay
posting the credential until the following term.
All candidates for graduation for a given academic year
(Fall, Spring, or Summer) may participate in Chattanooga
Stateʼs annual commencement exercises even though
all requirements for graduation may not have been met.
However, such participation in no way confirms completion of requirements or official graduation. Students not
completing all requirements by the end of the summer term
following commencement must reapply.
Application and Fee
A student must submit an application and pay the nonrefundable application fee by the end of October in order
to be considered a candidate for graduation. This deadline
applies to all candidates for a given academic year, including
summer completers.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
61
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Applicable Catalog
A student may obtain a degree or certificate based on the
requirements in the catalog in force when he/she entered the
College or under a later catalog in effect for any term he/she
is enrolled. However, a student can only use one catalog.
Time Limitation. Counting from the first term covered by the catalog, requirements for associate degrees and
Technical Certificates of Credit remain in effect for a period
of five years and Tennessee Technology Center programs for
two-years.
General Information
Academic
Regulations
Double Degree
A student may earn, simultaneously or consecutively,
multiple degrees only when the majors completed lead to
different degrees, e.g., one leads to the A.A.S. and the other
to the AS. All requirements for both degrees must be met,
and the student must complete at least 20 semester hours
not included for the first degree. The cumulative grade point
average (GPA) for all college-level work must be 2.0 or
higher.
Double Major
A double major is the completion of two or more majors
leading to the same degree. (At Chattanooga State, double
majors are available only in A.A.S. degree programs.) All
requirements for each major must be met. The second major
must include at least 20 hours not applied to the first major.
The cumulative grade point average (GPA) for all college
level work must be 2.0 or higher.
Note: Graduation with two or more concentrations in the same major is not
considered a double major (see below).
Double Concentration
Students may complete more than one concentration in
the same major; however, both concentrations must be completed at the same time.
Degree/Technical Certificate of Credit
Students may receive both a degree and a Technical
Certificate of Credit by completing all requirements listed in
the SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS for each.
Double Certificate
All requirements for both Technical Certificates of
Credit must have been met and at least one-third of the
hours required for the second certificate must not have been
required for the first certificate.
Grade Point Average
Associate Degree—The cumulative grade point average
(GPA) for all college level work must be 2.0 or higher.
Technical Certificate of Credit—All courses required
for the Technical Certificate of Credit must be completed
with a grade of C or better.
Graduation Residency Requirements
Associate Degree—The final twenty (20) semester credit
hours before graduation must be completed at Chattanooga
State. (Only credits earned in college level courses apply
toward satisfying this requirement.)
Note: Credit hours accumulated as a Special Student are not applicable to the
final twenty-four (24) semester hours required for an associate degree.
Technical Certificate of Credit—A minimum of sev-
62
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
enty-five percent (75%) of the required hours for a Technical
Certificate of Credit must be completed at Chattanooga
State. A maximum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the
required hours for a Technical Certificate of Credit may be
completed through approved alternative sources such as
transfer or tech prep credit, credit for life experiences or by
exam.
Tennessee Technology Center Programs—Credit may
be given for previous education or training as determined
by the instructor and approved by the Vice President for
Academic Affairs at the time of the studentʼs initial enrollment.
Exit Testing
All degree candidates are required to test for general
achievement. Major testing may also be required in selected
fields. These tests are used to evaluate Chattanooga Stateʼs
academic programs. Exit testing must be completed before
the Records Office can post the degree or issue a diploma.
Until the degree is posted, a student is not considered to
have graduated.
Indebtedness
Students should pay off any debts to the College as soon
as possible. No diploma, certificate, or academic transcript
will be issued to a student who has not settled outstanding College debts with the Vice President for Business and
Finance. A student may be prohibited from attending classes
or taking final examinations after the due date of any unpaid
obligation.
Privacy Rights of Students
A. Definitions
Educational Records. Those records, files, documents, and
other materials which (1) contain information directly related
to a student, and (2) are maintained by Chattanooga State or
by a person acting for the College. Educational records do not
include (1) personal notes, (2) records available only to law
enforcement personnel, (3) employment records.
Student. Any person who is or has been enrolled at
Chattanooga State. Wherever “student” is used in reference to
personal rights, an eligible parent of a dependent student has
similar rights. This “eligible” parent is one who has satisfied
Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, and who
presents proof of such to the Records Office. Normally, this will
be a written affirmation by the student and the parent declaring
that the student is a dependent for Federal Income Tax purposes.
Directory Information. The studentʼs name, address,
telephone listing, photograph, date and place of birth, major
field of study, participation in officially recognized activities
and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams,
dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most
recent previous educational agency or institution attended
by the student. At the time the student registers for courses,
the student may notify the Records Office, in writing, that
directory information for that student may not be released.
This notification must be received within ten (10) days of
registration.
Access. To have access to an educational record is to be
allowed to see the original record.
B. Release of personally identifiable student educational
records
Chattanooga State shall not permit access to, or the release of
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Note: With the exception of Chattanooga State officials and staff who have been
determined by the College to have legitimate educational interests, all individuals
and agencies who have requested or obtained access to a studentʼs record will
be noted in a record which is kept with each studentʼs educational record. A
request must be in writing stating the purpose of the request. This record will
also indicate specifically the legitimate interest that the person or agency had in
obtaining the information.
C. Procedure for Accessing Educational Records
The student requests the custodian to allow him/her to pursue
the educational record. The student may ask for an explanation
and/or a copy of the given educational record. After consultation
with the custodian, errors may be corrected at that time by
that custodian. Thereafter, if the student believes the record
to be accurate in content, he/she should acknowledge with
his signature and the date; if the student believes the record
content to be inaccurate, he/she then may submit a request for
an informal hearing before the Appeals Committee. The request,
and the challenge, must be presented in writing to the Records
Office which will request a meeting of the Appeals Committee.
The Appeals Committee Chairperson will acknowledge receipt
of the challenge and notify the student of time and place for the
first meeting convenient to the student. The Appeals Committee
will convene with the student within forty-five (45) days from
the date of the request allowing the student to present relevant
evidence, and allowing the student to be represented by an
individual of his/her choice at his/her own expense, including
an attorney if so desired. The student will be afforded all of
his/her rights under Due Process as delineated in the Student
Handbook. The decision rendered by the Appeals Committee
shall be based solely upon the evidence presented at the hearing.
The decision must include a summary of the evidence and the
reasons for the decision.
Note: This procedure does not provide for a hearing to contest an academic
grade.
Telephone: (423) 697-4401 or 1-800-207-8202
D. Right of Access Does Not Include:
1. Financial records of parents or any information therein.
2. Confidential letters and statements of recommendation
which were placed in the educational records prior to
January 1, 1975.
3. Records to which access has been waived by the
student. (This applies only if a student, upon request, is
notified of the names of all persons making confidential
recommendations and, if such recommendations are used
solely for the purpose they were intended.)
E. Educational Records may be destroyed except that a student
shall be granted access prior to destruction if such is requested.
F. Complaints
Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S.
Department of Education concerning alleged failures by
Chattanooga State to comply with the requirements of FERPA.
The Office that administers FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605
Probation/Suspension
See “Academic Retention Standards” in this section.
Retention of Records
The Records Office is required to maintain certain
student records permanently. However, Registration and
Drop/Add forms and Transcript requests will be maintained
for only one year.
Transcripts
An official Chattanooga State transcript will be sent to
another institution or organization upon a studentʼs written
request. Unofficial transcripts are available online for current
students. There is no fee for this-service.
Note: Transcripts are not released if the student has an outstanding obligation to
the college.
Academic Regulations
any information in the educational records of any student that is
personally identifiable, other than directory information, without
the written consent of the student, to any party other than the
following:
1. Chattanooga State officials and staff who have legitimate
educational interests, including the support of honor
societies and academic excellence.
2. Officials of schools in which the student seeks admission.
3. Appropriate persons in connection with a studentʼs
application for, or receipt of, financial aid.
4. Federal or State officials as defined in paragraph 99.31 of
the regulations concerning this law.
5. State and local officials authorized by state statutes.
6. Organizations or persons conducting studies for, or on
behalf of Chattanooga State for the purpose of assisting
in accomplishing the Collegeʼs stated goals, when such
information will be used by such organizations or persons
and subsequently destroyed when no longer needed for the
intended purpose.
7. Accrediting organizations, to carry out their functions.
8. Parents of a student as defined in section 152 of the
Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (written consent may be
allowed from either of these separated or divorced parents
subject to any agreement between the parents or court
order). In the case of a student whose legal guardian is an
institution, a party representing that institution may have
access to the records.
9. In compliance with judicial order or subpoena, providing
that the student is notified in advance of the compliance.
10. Appropriate persons in connection with an emergency
if such knowledge is necessary to protect the health and
safety of a student or other persons.
Transcript Evaluations
The College accepts transfer credits from other colleges.
Official transcripts from each institution a student attended
are evaluated upon receipt in Admissions. A grade of “D” or
higher is required for transfer. However, a course in which
a “D” grade has been earned may/may not be used to satisfy degree requirements or prerequisites. Any “C or better”
requirements must be met. Transfer credits are not used in
computing a studentʼs GPA at Chattanooga State, but are
counted in Earned Hours.
Credits from non–regionally accredited institutions may
be evaluated on an individual basis (contact the Records
Office for a “Petition of Transfer Credit” form) or may
be validated by examination (See “Alternative Sources of
Credit” for information on credit by exam).
The GPA for the Tennessee Education Lottery
Scholarship includes all courses to determine eligibility.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
63
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Withdrawal from College
Chattanooga Stateʼs “undecided” or “undeclared” major
is the Associate of Science, general transfer degree. To learn
about Chattanooga Stateʼs degree programs and majors visit
the Career Planning and Counseling Center (Student Center
– 423-697-4421), the Educational Planning and Advising
Center (Student Center – 423-697-4483), or one of our academic divisions. A change of major must be received during
the first two weeks of the academic term and submitted
to the Records Office. Any changes after that time will be
effective with the next academic term. The Change of Status
form is available in the Admissions and Records Office or
on the web.
A release from enrollment from all classes becomes official only after completion of the withdrawal process, which
is initiated in the Career Planning and Counseling Center.
Failure to attend class or discontinued attendance is not
official withdrawal. Not withdrawing officially will cause a
student to fail and could jeopardize later reenrollment.
The consequences of completely withdrawing from
school depend on when the student withdraws. For more
information, see “Change of Registration (Drop/Add).”
For specific deadlines, see the Records Officeʼs academic
calendar.
Academic Regulations
Undecided Majors
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64
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Financial Aid
The Financial Aid Office helps students pay for college.
Eligibility for financial aid is based on financial need, merit,
availability of funds and the ability to maintain satisfactory
academic progress. To qualify a student must:
• Have a high school diploma, a GED, a certificate of completion
of a home study program recognized by the state of Tennessee,
or, for Tennessee Technology Center students, pass the Ability to
Benefit Test;
• Be a U.S. Citizen or permanent resident;
• Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to
determine financial need;
• Be accepted for admission or currently attending Chattanooga State;
• Be enrolled in an approved degree or certificate program;
• Submit all verification documents as requested by the Financial
Aid Office;
• Meet Chattanooga Stateʼs satisfactory academic progress
standards for financial aid recipients;
• Not be in default on a Federal Student Loan or owe a repayment
on a Federal Pell Grant;
• If male and born after 1959, be registered with Selective Service;
• Have a valid Social Security Number.
Students may be eligible for financial aid through any or
all of the following sources:
Telephone: (423) 697-4401 or 1-800-207-8202
Refund
Class withdrawal refunds will be calculated using the
TBR refund policy published in Chattanooga Stateʼs Class
Schedule. Any refund due for class(es) dropped before the
14th day will be returned to the student; after the 14th day,
refunds will be returned to the Department of Education.
Withdrawal and Repayment
Students who withdraw from all classes prior to completing more than 60% of the term will have their eligibility for
aid recalculated based on the percent of the term they completed. E.g., a student who withdraws completing only 30%
of the term will have “earned” only 30% of any Title IV aid
received. The remaining 70% is considered “unearned” and
must be returned.
When the total amount of unearned aid is greater than
the amount returned by Chattanooga State from the studentʼs
account, the student is responsible for repaying the difference. Loan amounts are returned by the student to the lender
according to the terms of the promissory note.
The Financial Aid Office will notify the student of the
amount of repayment due. The student has 20 calendar days
after notification to repay in full or make satisfactory repayment arrangements with the Financial Aid Office. Students
owing repayment are ineligible for additional Title IV aid
unless arrangements can be made for deducting balances
from future awards.
For more detailed information on these policies and procedures for withdrawal, contact the Financial Aid Office.
Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards For Federal
Financial Aid Eligibility (Credit Hour Programs) Effective
July 1, 2004
Chattanooga State has established policies to monitor
the academic progress of all financial aid applicants and
recipients (full-time and part-time) in accordance with federal regulations. All financial aid recipients must be enrolled
in a program (associate degree, certificate or Tennessee
Technology Center certificate diploma) that has been
approved by the Department of Education. Students must
make reasonable progress toward completing their stated
educational goal in order to receive funds. Chattanooga State
complies with federal regulation by using both qualitative
(grade point average) and quantitative (number of credit
hours) measures to monitor a studentʼs progress.
Associate Degrees and Technical Certificates
I. Completion Rate
A. Students must earn a minimum of 67% of all credit
hours attempted at Chattanooga State by the end of each
spring term. Grades of A, B, C or D count as earned credit.
B. Grade values of “W”, “I”, “F” and “AU” are not passing grades and will count against the student.
Academic
Regulations
Financial
Aid
• Chattanooga State Academic Performance Scholarships cover
in-state tuition and fees and provide an allowance for books and
supplies. Entering freshman must have a cumulative 2.9 high
school GPA. Some continuing students are also eligible.
• Tennessee Education Lottery awards are for Tennessee
Residents who meet specific guidelines for scholarship and grant
programs. Contact the Financial Aid Office for more information.
• MinorityGrants are for first-time African American and Native
American freshmen with at least a 2.0 high school GPA. Currently
enrolled, continuing, and transfer students may also be eligible.
• FederalPell Grants are for students with financial need who are
enrolled in an eligible program and who do not have a bachelorʼs
degree.
• Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
(FSEOG) are for students with exceptional financial need who are
enrolled in an eligible program and who do not have a bachelorʼs
degree.
• TennesseeStudent Assistance Awards (TSAA) are for Tennessee
students with demonstrated need who are enrolled or accepted as a
student at an eligible Tennessee institution.
• FederalWork Study Programs are for at least half-time students
who are eligible to work on campus.
• FederalSubsidized Stafford Loans are for at least half-time
students who are maintaining satisfactory progress.
• FederalUnsubsidized Stafford Loans are for middle-income
borrowers who do not qualify for federal interest subsidies under
the Federal Stafford Loan program.
• FederalPlus Loans are for the parents of at least half-time
students.
• InstitutionalWork Programs are for students who work on
campus, but not through the Federal Work Study Program.
• VeteransBenefits are for students who have served on active
duty and for the children and/or spouses of disabled or deceased
veterans whose disability or death was service-connected.
• MilitaryAssistance is for students serving in the Armed Forces.
• VocationalRehabilitation is for eligible students with
occupational handicaps.
• EmploymentBenefits are for students who get financial
assistance or tuition reimbursement from their employers.
Financial Aid Refund, Withdrawal, and
Repayment Policies
II. Cumulative Grade Point Average
A. Financial aid recipients must meet the collegeʼs
good standing requirements in order to maintain eligibility. To be enrolled in good standing, a student must earn
the minimum cumulative combined grade point average
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
65
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
(GPA) below for the total number of semester credit hours
attempted, as shown below.
Attempted Hours
0.0 - 14.0
14.1 - 26.0
26.1 - 40.0
40.1 - 48.0
48.1 - 56.0
above 56
Required Cumulative GPA
No Minimum
1.0
1.4
1.7
1.9
2.0
(The hours attempted include developmental and collegiate hours)
Financial
Aid
Academic
Regulations
B. GPA is calculated when grades are processed at the
end of each semester.
66
III. Time Limitations
A. A student will be allowed to receive financial assistance until he/she has attempted a maximum of 150% of
the hours required to complete their program of study.
Most associate degree programs require 60 hours; therefore the maximum attempted hours is 90. The maximum
attempted hours limit for technical and associate degrees
that differ from the standard 60 will be calculated according
to the length of each program. Technical Certificates will be
evaluated individually because required hours for programs
differ.
B. The calculation of attempted hours will include all
hours transferred to Chattanooga State as well as all hours
attempted at Chattanooga State.
C. R/D (transitional studies) such as DSPM (developmental math) or DSPW (developmental writing) credits
above 30 hours will be counted in the calculation of
attempted hours for each student.
D. The Student Aid Office reviews the maximum time
limitation at the end of each semester.
IV. Notification
A. All student aid recipients are provided a copy of
satisfactory academic progress guidelines at the time
they are awarded student aid. Standards are also published
in the catalog and can be found on the student aid web site.
B. When it is determined that a student is ineligible for
student aid, they will be notified promptly in writing.
V. Reinstatement of Student Aid (There are two ways in
which a student may reestablish student aid eligibility.)
A. A student may re-establish student aid eligibility by completing a minimum of 6 hours at his/her
own expense. The classes taken must satisfy requirements
needed for the completion of the studentʼs degree. The student must pass all classes attempted with a minimum 2.0
grade point average (GPA). Students who choose to enroll
for more than the minimum hours required for reinstatement
must pass all classes attempted with at least a 2.0 GPA.
B. The appeal must be in writing and must be accompanied by appropriate supporting documentation.
C. If not satisfied with the decision of the Student Aid
Academic Standards Committee, the student may request a
meeting to make a personal appeal.
D. Personal appeals can be made to the Student Aid
Appeals Committee, a subcommittee of the Student Aid
Academic Standards Committee.
E. Committee members assigned to hear personal
appeals will be different from those who made the decision
to deny the studentʼs original request.
F. A student whose financial assistance is reinstated as
the result of an appeal must meet all conditions established in order to continue student aid eligibility.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
G. All decisions of the Student Aid Appeals Committee
are final.
H. Students will not be granted more than 3 appeals during their matriculation at Chattanooga State.
VII. Returning & Transfer Students Who Are New Aid
Applicants
A. Transfer students must meet all satisfactory progress
standards.
B. Students who do not meet satisfactory progress guidelines, but have never received student aid at any institution
will be given one semester of probation in order to establish
eligibility. Students failing to meet satisfactory academic
progress during this period will become ineligible for financial assistance the following semester.
VIII. Exceptions
A. Chattanooga State reserves the right to deny or cancel
a studentʼs financial assistance in the event of extraordinary circumstances that may not be covered in this policy.
However, the college guarantees prompt notification of
ineligibility and explanation of the appeal process.
Tennessee Technology Center Students
In order to get financial aid, Tennessee Technology
Center Division students must (1) have a high school
diploma, a GED, or pass the Ability to Benefit Test, AND (2)
be enrolled for at least 30 clock hours per week if full time.
Students enrolled for less than 30 hours per week are not
considered full time, and their awards will be prorated based
on part-time enrollment. Part-time Tennessee Technology
Center students are ineligible for student loans.
Qualitative Standards
A grade of C or better is required.
Quantitative Standards
Chattanooga State Tennessee Technology Center
programs count as one academic year in length (except
Cosmetology).
Tennessee Technology Center students must complete
91% of the enrolled hours to remain eligible for later financial
aid payments. Unexcused absences exceeding 9% must be
made up before the student can receive future financial aid.
Time Frame
The maximum time frame for an Tennessee Technology
Center student to receive financial aid is 1.5 times the number of clock hours needed to complete a certificate.
Appeals
Financial aid termination can be appealed in writing to
the Financial Aid Appeals Committee, which meets before
classes begin and throughout the semester as needed.
Students are encouraged to submit, in writing, any significant circumstances that would affect their ability to make
satisfactory academic progress. Consideration will be given
for extenuating circumstances, such as a studentʼs illness or
hospitalization, or death in family.
Prorating of Funds
Registration in non-standard term classes (Examples:
Flex, RODP, Urban League and classes that do not run the
full semester) will result in prorating (reducing) financial
aid, including loans. Financial aid is awarded based on the
number of weeks of class instruction.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Financial Information
Fee Policy
All fees are due when the student registers or pre-registers. Registration is not complete until fees are paid or when
the initial minimum payment under the deferred payment
plan has been paid. The fees are subject to change at any
time by the Tennessee Board of Regents. Please view current
fees at: www.chattanoogastate.edu.
Fee Schedule
The fee schedule is available on the Collegeʼs web site,
and at campus locations.
Out-of-state residents who work full-time in Tennessee
may attend classes part-time at in-state fee rates, upon completion of an out-of-state employment form. This form must
be completed for each term.
Maintenance fees for Summer are not capped at 12 credit
hours. Students will be charged the per hour fee for every
hour enrolled.
Note: The regular maintenance fee and tuition, not to exceed the maximum, will
be charged for repeating a course for which a grade of “E” has been received in a
previous term.
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Eligibility for Deferment of Payment of Tuition and Fees by Certain
Eligible Students Receiving U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or
Other Governmentally Funded Educational Assistance Benefits
Service members, veterans, and dependents of veterans who are eligible
beneficiaries of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs education benefits
or other governmentally funded educational assistance, subject to the
conditions and guidelines set forth in Tennessee Code Annotated 49-7104 as amended, may elect, upon formal application, to defer payment
of required tuition and fees until the final day of the term for which
the deferment has been requested. Application for the deferment must
be made no later than 14 days after the beginning of the term, and the
amount of the deferment shall not exceed the total monetary benefits to
be received for the term. Students who have been granted deferments
are expected to make timely payments on their outstanding tuition and
fees balance once education benefits are being delivered, and eligibility
for such deferment shall terminate if the student fails to abide by any
applicable rule or regulation, or to act in good faith in making timely
payments. This notice is published pursuant to Public Chapter 279,
Acts of 2003, effective July 1, 2003.
Refund Policies
Refund percentages are based on billable hours, not
amounts paid. Students who officially withdraw from school
entirely, full-time students who drop to part-time, or part-time
students who drop one or more classes may get a refund.
100% of fees are refunded for (1) drops or withdrawals
before the first day of the term, (2) cancelled classes, and (3)
the death of a student during the term.
College Credit Courses
75% of fees are refunded for drops or withdrawals during
the first 14 calendar days of a term or within an equivalent
period for a short term course.
25% of fees are refunded for 25% of a term following
the 75% period. No refunds will be made beyond the 25%
period.
Tennessee Technology Center Courses
75% of fees are refunded for drops or withdrawals during
the first 10% of the class hours.
50% of fees are refunded for drops or withdrawals during the first 20% of the class hours. No refunds will be made
after 20% of the class hours have been completed.
The Vice President for Business and Finance may make
an exception to these policies. Requests for exceptions should
be submitted in writing, along with supporting documentation, directly to the Vice President or his/her designee.
STOPPING PAYMENT ON A CHECK DOES NOT
CONSTITUTE PROPER WITHDRAWAL. Refund policies
subject to change fall 2007.
General Information
Financial
Information
Regents Online Degree Program (RODP)—The fees
for RODP students will be the current part-time per hour
charge of the home institution for the maintenance fee and
for the out-of-state fee, as applicable, plus an online course
fee. (Since the RODP Online Course Fee is considered a
“special course fee,” TBR, UT and other state employees
who are entitled to a fee waiver are still required to pay this
fee.) RODP students are not required to pay the General
Access Fee. This fee is included in the RODP Online Course
Fee. Regents degree courses are all charged per hour and
viewed separately from on-campus courses so as not to mix
with the full-time cap applicable to on-campus courses and
other online courses that are not part of the Regents Degree
Program, and distance education courses. For more information, visit: http://www.TN.regentsdegrees.org.
Senior Citizens and Persons with Disabilities—Senior
citizens and persons with disabilities may qualify for discounted maintenance fees.
Fees Charged in Addition to Maintenance and Tuition:
Application Fee—Paid one-time. Non-refundable.
CDE Fee—Per Distributed Education class (non-refundable).
Credit by Examination Fee—The regular course fee is
charged for each special examination before the test.
Credit for Life Experience Fee—A non-refundable assessment fee, equivalent to the per-credit-hour maintenance/tuition
fee, must be paid prior to faculty assessment of the studentʼs
portfolio.
General Access Fee
Graduation Fee
Handicapped Parking Violation
ID Card Replacement Fee
Late Registration Fee
Parking Violations
Private Music Fee
Special Course Fees—If the College must pay for special
facilities, those costs will be assessed as a laboratory fee.
Technology Access Fee:
• For credit courses per credit hour.
• For Tennessee Technology Center courses.
Dishonored Checks
Checks tendered in payment of fees are normally deposited immediately by the College and should be drawn only
against accounts with sufficient balances. Every effort will be
made to collect on checks dishonored for any reason. A fee
will be charged for dishonored checks.
A STUDENT IS NOT REGISTERED UNTIL ALL FEES
ARE PAID.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
67
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Adult Education/GED
Chattanooga State conducts day and evening Adult
Education/GED classes on the main campus and throughout
the community for anyone 17 or older. All classes have
individualized instruction.
The program includes:
• Registration and orientation session.
• Computerized instructional lab.
• Reading program.
• English as a Second Language (ESL) classes.
• GED practice tests.
(423) 697-2529
Athletics
Chattanooga State provides National Junior College
Athletic Association (NJCAA) Division I competition in
women's fast-pitch softball, women's and men's basketball,
and baseball. Chattanooga State's teams are often nationally
ranked, and student athlete scholarships are plentiful. Team
members are recruited locally and regionally. Students
interested in tryouts are welcome.
(423) 697-3370
Business and Community Development Center
General Information
The Business and Community Development Center
offers a wide range of services, including personal interest
continuing education classes, short-courses, teleconferences,
certification classes, and customized skills training delivered
on-site to business and industry. It also provides job
profiling and analysis, skill assessment, and WorkKeys
skill development training for area employers. WorkKeys
helps employers match employee skills to those required
for satisfactory performance in specific jobs. Once skills
gaps are identified, Chattanooga State can deliver training
programs to help bridge them.
(423) 697-3100
Career Planning and Counseling Center
Confidential personal, career, and academic counseling
is available to help students define and achieve their goals
and succeed in college. Services include individual and
group counseling, crisis intervention, tutoring, issue-related
workshops, support groups, “How to Learn” workshops,
Transitional Studies advising, drug awareness activities
and information about self-help groups. Career counseling
resources include group and individual career counseling,
career inventories and interpretations, a career library,
workshops for people returning to college or enrolling
for the first time; and support groups for various types of
students.
(423) 697-4421
Center for Distributed Education
Chattanooga State offers “anytime, anywhere” education
through its Center for Distributed Education. Both credit
and non-credit courses are delivered remotely via a variety
of methods—Regents Online Degree Program (RODP)
and other online courses, video, CD-ROM, and traditional
correspondence. All credit courses have the same content
and transferability as on-campus courses.
For additional information, visit the Center for
Distributed Education web site at
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/cde or e-mail
[email protected]
(423) 697-4408, 2592 or 1-800-207-8202
Child Development Center
The Child Development Center serves Chattanooga State
employees and students on a space-available basis. The
Center also serves as a demonstration/observation area for
Early Childhood Education, Psychology, Nursing, and Allied
Health programs. Monthly fees are charged for participation.
(423) 697-4412
Disabilities Support Services
Disabilities Support Services arranges for
accommodations for students with documented disabilities so
that they have equal access to programs and activities offered
by the College. Accommodations may include readers,
scribes, interpreters, notetakers, assistive listening systems,
and adaptive computer equipment. Students with disabilities
must provide current documentation of their disability
68
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
prior to receiving accommodations. Disabilities Support
Services also assists students in linking to appropriate
campus and community services, such as counseling,
tutoring, registration assistance, financial aid, and Vocational
Rehabilitation.
(423) 697-4452
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Educational Planning and Advising
The Educational Planning and Advising (EPA) office
assists students in the realization of their educational goals.
Professional advisers are available to advise students in
developing and following an appropriate educational plan.
(423) 697-4483
Internationalizing Initiative
Chattanooga State offers a wide array of opportunities
for gaining knowledge, perspective and appreciation of the
increasing diversity of America and the dynamics of participating in the global economy. These opportunities include:
courses in world cultures and religions, an international
students club, focused studies on the business climates and
structures of other countries, art and music of other nations,
Plaza Communtaria for Hispanic students, and many more
activities.
(423) 697-4475
Library Services
biography information, as well as complete books. The
libraryʼs catalog and these other resources can be searched
through the Internet site at http://library.chattanoogastate.edu.
The library staff provides individualized and classroom
instruction on research for students, faculty, and staff.
Reference librarians are available during all hours the library
is open.
The library is open to everyone. Students can use their
Chattanooga State picture I.D. cards to check out books.
Residents of Tennessee, North Georgia, or Northeast
Alabama with a current driverʼs license may apply for a
Chattanooga State library card.
(423) 697-4448
Media Services
Media Services is located in the IMC building on the
first floor. The staff offers a variety of services in the audio/
visual field. They offer a library of 5,000 tapes with over
150 monitors across the campus which are wired to a master
control room in the media services center. Via a closed
circuit phone in each classroom, videos can be viewed by
selecting the number of the video, which is obtained from
the instructor, and can be viewed in the classroom.
General Information
The Augusta R. Kolwyck Library is located on the
Instructional Materials Centerʼs first floor, with a branch at
Chattanooga State East. The Kimball Site students use Jasper
Public Library, while the Dayton Site students use Bryan
College Library or Dayton Public Library. Sequatchie Valley
students may use the Pikeville Public Library. Students
located elsewhere may contact the Dean of Library Services
who will make arrangements for those students to have
access to library services.
Holdings (as of December 2006) include 66,677
print books; 46,172 online books; 284 print magazine
subscriptions; 20,000+ online magazine subscriptions;
3,574 videotapes; 75 DVDs; 779 CDs; and 905 audiotapes.
Students can search more than a dozen online databases
containing journal articles, news stories, literary and
(423) 697-4405
Middle College High School
This cooperative program between Hamilton County
Board of Education and Chattanooga State allows high
school students to enter the College and take college credit
courses at the same time as high school requirements are
completed. As students graduate from Middle College High
School, they will have already earned a number of college
credits—occasionally with enough credits to earn the
Associate degree.
See page 53 for more admission information
(423) 697-3226.
Scholars on the River
Scholars on the River consists of the Honors Program
and Phi Theta Kappa which provides an enriched curriculum
and related informal educational experience for able and
highly motivated students.
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Test and GPA requirements are located in the General
Information/Academic Regulations/Academic Honors section of this course catalog.
(423) 697-2463
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
69
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Student Life
The Student Life Office offers many opportunities and
experiences to students that compliments and expands the
classroom experience. Student representatives work with
programming and are active in every phase delivering a first
class student life program. This office also distributes the
Student Handbook, which contains descriptions of campus
clubs and organizations, a monthly calendar of major campus
events, and the Student Code of Conduct.
(423) 697-4475
Tennessee Small Business Development and Resource Center
Chattanooga State, with area partners, operates the
Tennessee Small Business Development and Resource Center
at 100 Cherokee Blvd. The Center promotes entrepreneurial
education, supports small business start-ups, and provides
access to capital. It enhances small businesses through
counseling, planning assistance, the First Tennessee Small
Business Computing Center, a comprehensive resource library,
the TVA Small Business Video Center, seminars, and courses.
(423) 756-8668
Testing Center
The Testing Center offers regularly scheduled tests, tests
by special appointment, and unscheduled tests.
General Information
Regularly Scheduled Tests
• ACT Residual Test
• ACT ASSET
• Career Abilities Placement
Survey (CAPS)
• Computerized Placement
Testing (COMPASS)
(423) 697-4461
Tests by Special Appointment
• General Educational
• Certified Electronic
Development (GED)
Technician (CET)
• Nursing Entrance Test
• Regents Online Degree
Program (RODP)
(NET)
• Health Occupations Basic • Special Proctored Exams
for other colleges/
Entrance Test (HOBET)
businesses
• Ability to Benefit (ATB)
Unscheduled Exams
• Make-up Exams
• Exams for Distance
Education
Courses
• COPS Career Inventory
• Myers Briggs
• 16 PF Personality Profile
• Strong Interest Inventory
Transitional Studies
The Transitional Studies Program offers foundation courses
in English, mathematics, reading and Psychology of Learning
for students who need additional preparation for college
level-courses.
Transitional Studies Policies and Procedures:
• Valid ACT/SAT scores, COMPASS or other assessment is needed
to determine Transitional Studies course placement. Students who
have taken the COMPASS/ASSET exam at another institution must
have their transcript and test scores sent to the College.
• Transitional Studies requirements must be completed during the
studentʼs initial terms of enrollment. A grade of “C” or higher is
required for progression to the next course. Auditing is not allowed.
• Students may not withdraw from a Transitional Studies course
except for extraordinary reasons and with special permission from
the Transitional Studies Director.
• Instructional labs provide tutoring and supplementary materials.
• Placement in Learning Strategies (DSPS 0800) is required for
students who place into two or more subject areas of DSP courses.
This course is no longer offered at Chattanooga State. To complete
requirements for this course, register for RI 100, College and
Personal Success, and complete the course with a grade of at least
a “C.”
• Credit hours earned for Transitional Studies do not satisfy degree
requirements for an associate degree; however, may be corequisites
or prerequisites for credit courses and must be completed prior to
graduation.
(423) 697-3221
WAWL Radio 91.5 FM
The purpose of the WAWL is twofold. It serves as a
vehicle for academic instruction as a learning lab for students
enrolled in the broadcasting degree program where they are
able to receive valuable hands-on experience in the art of radio
broadcasting. The station is staffed entirely by students and
70
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
also provides a unique marketing service for the college.
www.chattanoogastate.edu/media_services/mewawl.html
Office (423) 697-4470, Request Line—(423) 697-4406
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
Course Descriptions
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
71-72
Course Listing By Subject Abbreviation
72
How To Read Course Description/Example
73
Types of Course Delivery
Subject Abbreviations
Contents
Page
74-108 Course Descriptions By Subject Abbreviation
Course Listing By Subject Abbreviation
The following is a list in alphabetical order of Chattanooga State courses by subject abbreviation code.
For example, ENGL=English, FI=Fire Science and WD=Welding.
Courses numbered 000 or 0000 are Tennessee Technology Center (vocational) courses and carry clock-hour credit.
Course numbers beginning with 0 (e.g. 0700) are Transitional Studies or other remedial-type courses.
Course numbers beginning with 1 (e.g. 101, 1010) are freshman level.
Course numbers beginning with 2 (e.g. 201, 2010) are sophomore level.
ID
AA
AB
AC
AM
ART
ASTR
BIOL
BL
BST
BU
CD
CHEM
CI
CJ
CNAP
CO
COT
CP
CS
CT
CY
DAST
DD
DH
DM
Course Title
Page
Graphic Design (formerly Advertising
Arts) ................................................74
Collision Repair .................................74
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration...74
Automotive Technology ....................74
Art ................................................ 74-75
Astronomy .........................................75
Biology ........................................ 75-76
Building Construction Technology ....76
Business Systems Technology ...........76
Accounting .........................................76
Commercial Truck Driving................76
Chemistry ..................................... 76-77
Civil Engineering Technology ...........77
Criminal Justice .................................77
Cisco Network Academy
Program..................................... 77-78
Mass Communications ......................78
Computer Operations Technology .....78
Cooperative Education.......................78
Information Systems .................... 78-80
Chemical Technology ........................80
Cosmetology ......................................80
Dental Assisting .................................80
Computer-Aided Design
Technology ............................... 80-81
Dental Hygiene ..................................81
Diesel Equipment Mechanics ............81
ID
DSPM
DSPR
DSPS
DSPW
EA
EC
ECED
ED
EDPY
EE
EG
ENGL
EO
ER
ESC
ET
EZ
FI
FM
FP
FREN
GEOG
GEOL
GERM
HE
Course Title
Page
See Mathematics ................................81
Reading ........................................ 81-82
See Psychology ..................................82
See English ........................................82
Emergency Medical Services ............82
Economics..........................................82
Early Childhood Education ......... 82-83
Education ...........................................83
Education Psychology .......................83
Electrical/Electronic Engineering
Technology .....................................83
Engineering Transfer
(Pre-Engineering) ...........................84
English ......................................... 84-85
Heavy Equipment Operators .............85
Industrial Electronics .........................85
Environmental Science ......................85
Engineering Technology ....................85
Electrical/Electronic Engineering
Technology (DuPont) ............... 85-86
Fire Science .......................................86
Financial Management.......................87
Financial Planning .............................87
French ................................................87
Geography..........................................87
Geology..............................................87
German ..............................................87
Health Information Management 87-88
ID
Course Title
HIST
HMSC
HP
HR
HS
HUM
HZ
ID
IE
IS
IY
IV
JS
LA
LM
LP
MATH
MB
MD
MG
MN
MO
MOTR
MRI
MT
MUS
MY
History ...............................................88
Homeland Security ............................88
American Sign Language ............ 88-89
Human Services .................................89
Health Science ...................................89
Humanities ................................... 89-90
Hazardous Materials ..........................90
Industrial Maintenance Mechanics ....90
Industrial Electricity ..........................90
Insurance ............................................90
Interdisciplinary Studies ....................90
IV Therapy .........................................90
Job Skills Development .....................90
Paralegal Studies.......................... 90-91
Landscaping and Turf Management ..91
Practical Nursing (LPN) ....................91
Mathematics ................................. 91-92
Masonry .............................................92
Mechanical Engineering Technology 92
Management ............................... 92-94
Maintenance Technology ...................94
Medical Assistant ...............................94
Motor Sports Technology .................94
Magnetic Resonance Imaging ...........94
Machine Tool Technology .................94
Music ........................................... 94-95
Mammography ...................................95
Page
continued on next page
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
71
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Course Listing By Subject Abbreviation continued
ID
Course Title
How to Read
Course Descriptions
MZ
Page
Mechanical Engineering Technology
(DuPont) ................................... 95-96
ND
Dietary Manager ................................96
NM
Nuclear Medicine Technology..... 96-97
NS
Nursing (RN) .....................................97
NW
Network Management .......................98
OF
Office Administration ........................98
OR
Surgical Technology ..........................98
OS
Occupational Safety ...........................98
PC
Pharmacy Technician ................... 98-99
PE
Physical Education
(General Courses) ...........................99
PET Position Emission Tomography .........99
PHED Physical Education
(Activity Courses)................... 99-100
PHIL Philosophy .......................................100
PHYS Physics .............................................100
ID
PM
PO
PSCI
PT
PY
PZ
QA
RC
REAL
RELS
RI
RR
RS
RT
SE
Course Title
Page
Plumbing ..........................................100
Political Science....................... 100-101
Physical Science ..............................101
Physical Therapist Assistant ............101
Psychology .......................................101
Powerhouse Operations ........... 101-102
Quality Technology..........................102
Respiratory Care ..............................102
Realtime Reporting .................. 102-103
Religious Studies .............................103
Renaissance Institute .......................103
Realtime Reporting: Scopist ............103
Real Estate .......................................103
Radiologic Technology ........... 103-104
Motorcycle & Marine Service
Technology ...................................104
ID
Course Title
Page
SO
SP
SPAN
ST
TFAP
Sociology .........................................104
Speech ..............................................104
Spanish ..................................... 104-105
Security + .........................................105
Technology Foundations in Basic
Anatomy & Physiology ................105
TFMA Technology Foundations in
Mathematics..................................105
THEA Theatre ..................................... 105-106
TM
Computed Tomography ...................106
US
Diagnostic Medical Sonography106-107
VETT Veterinary Technology ............. 106-107
VC
Motor Sports Vehicle Technology ...107
WD
Welding ............................................108
WMST Womenʼs Studies .............................108
YT
Cosmetology Instructor Training .....108
How To Read Course Descriptions
injuries; preventive measures and developing,
molecular structure; element and compound
initiating, and evaluating safety training programs;
reactions and equations, stoichiometry, kinetics,
[F,S]
and measurement techniques and calculation; 1120
Course analysis; for students in the
lab includes qualitative
CI 111 Construction Blueprint Reading (2)
medicine, or engineering; class
Prefix or subject field of science,number
Basics of proposal writing in construction industry
3 hours, lab 3 hours. Must be taken Course
in sequence.
abbreviation,
based on sound estimates and takeoffs from
Coreq
title
GEOL-= GeologyPrereq for 1110: CHEM-1010 or equivalent.
budget-grade project prints; numbering sequence
for 1110: MATH-1710 or 1740. [E]
Example:
Number
of of
thesemester
Construction Specifications Institute Master
credit hours
Format System. Prereq: CI-101 or instructorʼs
◆ CHEM 1310 Chemistry (3)
consent. [on demand]
This course is an integrated approach to basic
principles of chemistry. Integration will be
CI 116 Construction Planning and
between lab and lecture activities as well as
Scheduling (3)
between this and other areas of science. Major
Brief
Provides a working knowledge for planning
topics of study include physical and chemical
description
and scheduling of construction projects; C.P.M.,
properties of matter, atomic structure, kineticof course
Precedence Method, PERT, Bar Charts, arrow
molecular theory and phase changes, chemical
content
bonding, chemical reactions, types of properties
diagrams, and computer applications. [on demand]
of chemical reactions, water and aqueous
solution chemistry, acid-base chemistry and pH,
CI 164 Construction Estimating (3)
nomeclature and formula writing, naming and
Construction estimating techniques/applications
structure recognition of simple covalent, simple
related to technical aspects required for quantity
organic and biological molecules. Class 2 hours,
takeoffs in construction estimate preparation; the
lab 3 hours. Prereq: PHYS 1310 [E]
Construction Specifications Institute Master Format
Systemʼs numbering sequence; computer applications
If the course has a lab component,
CHEM 2010,2020 Organic Chemistry I,II Term(s)
may
be covered. Concurrent: DSPM-0850. [S]
offered:
a breakdown of the amount of time
Prerequisite, corequisite and/or
(4,4)
E=Every,
per week spent in class and lab
concurrent.
A prerequisite
is a
Aliphatic
and aromatic
hydrocarbons,
F=Fall,
CI 174,274 Surveying I,II (4,4)
will be shown here. Some clinical
course which
should be completed
stereochemistry,
monofunctional
and some
S=Spring,
Fundamental concepts and practices of surveying;
courses may show the total amount
prior
to
enrolling
in
the
selected
polyfunctional compounds; basic separation,
Su=Summer.
class 2 hours, lab 4 hours. 174–Theory of measureof time spent in clinic for the entire
course.
A
corequisite
is
a
course
purification, synthesis and identification techniques ments and field notes; methods of obtaining horsemester.
which in
must
at the
same
emphasized
lab;befortaken
science
and
preprofessional
izontal and vertical distances, angles and directions;
time
as 3thehours,
selected
majors;
class
lab course.
3 hours. Must be taken
use of levels, transits, theodolites, and total stations;
Concurrent
means
the
course
may
in sequence. Prereq for CHEM 2010: CHEM-1120. construction surveying, curves and volumes. 274–
be
taken
before
or
at
the
same
time
[2010–F, 2020–S]
E.D.M. use and theory, traversing practice, adjusting
as the selected course.
methods, plotting a plat, computing the area and
making topographic maps; State Plane coordinates,
CHEM 2990 Special Topics in Chemistry
Public Land surveys; Photogrammetry and satellite
(1-5)
surveying. Concurrent for 174: MATH-1720. Prereq
Detailed study of a specific chemistry topic;
for 274: CI-174, MATH-1720; or instructorʼs
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
consent. [174–S, 274–F]
Department head and instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
CI 202 Construction Financial and Cost
72
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Regents Online Degree Programs — Associate’s and Bachelor’s
Regents Online Degree Programs offered
by Chattanooga State
Associate of Applied Science
Professional Studies
Information Technology
Degree:
Major:
Associate of Applied Science
Nursing (pending TBR approval)
Degree:
Major:
Associate of Arts
General Studies
Degree:
Major:
Associate of Science
General Studies
Degree:
Major:
Concentration:
Bachelor of Professional Studies
Degree:
Major:
Concentration:
Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies
InformationTechnology
or Organizational Leadership
General Studies/Liberal Studies/
University Studies
Teacher Education Online
Each of the six Tennessee Board of Regents universities will be
addressing online programs for teacher education. Details at
website.
Information about these programs can be found at: www.rodp.org/campus/cstcc
RODP Degrees & Equivalency
Degree:
Major:
Concentration:
Additional Regents Degrees
RODP Equivalency Chart
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
73
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Course Descriptions
Descriptions of courses offered by the College are listed alphabetically by the subject abbreviation code.
Course Descriptions
LEGEND
◆Fulfills a General Education requirement
*Transitional Studies course (not generally
transferable; not applicable to credit hours
required for a degree or certificate)
AA - Graphic Design (formerly Advertising Arts)
AA 106 Design (3)
Intro to the basic visual elements and principles of
2-dimensional design; surface, depth, perspective,
scale, size, shape, line, movement, balance,
texture, value, contrast, emphasis, hythm, light,
unity, variety; components, structure and use of
color. The student will be introduced to problem
identification, analysis, brainstorming, and idea
refinement, as they relate to the above principles.
Required of all students in Media Technologies
program concentrations. [F]
AA 107 Illustration (3)
A studio course with an emphasis on illustration
techniques using traditional media. Creative
interpretation and disciplined draftsmanship for
the visual communication of ideas will be stressed.
Projects will include study of linear perspective,
isometric and human figure indication drawing
systems for advertising. Line art, black and white,
and color media used. [S]
AA 108 Advertising Concepts (3)
Intro to creative problem solving; study of using
textual and graphic communication; methods
of idea/concept and content generation; focus
is on strong visuals, typographic elements and
presentation skills. [F]
AA 109 Production Art (3)
Intro to the electronic preparation of simple
and complex designs, and industry standard
terminology and methods (both traditional and
digital). Typesetting, image reproduction, color
models, and bindery and finishing methods will be
explored. [F]
AA 116 Typography (3)
Intro to the terminology, technology and design
aspects of typography and visual communication;
topics include typographical anatomy, type
characteristics, basic digital text composition and
layout utilizing type as a primary visual. Emphasis
will be on understanding the foundations of
typography and its effective use in graphic design.
Prereq: AA 106. [S]
A grade of “C” or better is required in all
prerequisite courses!
Students should be prepared for the use of computer
technology in ALL classes!
AA 209,210 Graphic Design I,II (3,3)
( )
Intermediate to advanced creative problem
solving. 209-Application of design principles and
techniques to logo/trademarks and basic identity
design using type as a major design element.
210-Advanced identity design including application
of identity elements to collateral elements and
working in a team environment. Prereq for 209:
AA 08, AA 116, concurrent AA 245; Prereq for
210: AA 209, concurrent AA 246, [209-F, 210-S]
AA 215,217 Advertising Design I,II (3,3)
215—Study of basic tools, terms, and kinds of print
advertising; design process from conception to prepress
production; incorporation of conceptual exercises to
meet clientsʼ specific needs. 217— Advanced problems
in ad design: creation of ad campaigns incorporating the
mass media; individual projects for portfolios to include
computer and layout techniques. Prereq for 215: AA
108, AA 116, concurrent AA 245; Prereq for 217: AA
215 [215-F, 217-S]]
Intro to basic techniques, processes and
terminology of digital still photography as applied
to imagery for print media; emphasis is placed
on the workflow processes for preparing and
correcting images to be used in print. Prereq:
Concurrent AA 246 or instructorʼs consent. [S]
74
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Intro to selected issues and/or problems in graphic
design; repeatable for credit on different
topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
AB - Collision Repair
AB 000 Collision Repair Technology
Current collision repair procedures; collision
repair and refinishing of each part; auto welding,
sheet metal repair, body and frame straightening;
painting car body and interior/exterior parts;
preparing written damage estimates; running
successful body shop; hands-on activities
emphasized; 30 clock hours/week. [E]
AA 221 Design Internship (3)
On the job training in graphic design, advertising,
illustration or related commercial art with area
design firms, advertising agencies or other
businesses directly engaged with graphic design
or the graphic arts; lab, minimum of 10 hours per
week. Prereq: Faculty Advisorʼs approval. [E]
AA 222 Portfolio (3)
Visual presentation techniques, design of basic
personal identity system and preparation of
portfolio; editing of work, organizing, formatting,
presenting the design portfolio; preparation for
entry into job market; participation in group
portfolio presentation to area professionals
required. To be taken final Spring semester prior to
graduation. [S]
AA 245 Computer Applications for Graphic
Design (3)
Introduction to digital document generation;
digital page layout and production in a page layout
application, preparing electronic “mechanicals”
for output; basic draw program techniques. Prereq:
AA 106, CS 190 [S]
AA 246 Computer Illustration (3)
AA 190 Photography for Designers (3)
AA 249 SSpecial Topics in G
Graphic Design
(1-3)
Intro to digital imagery; creation and editing
of pixel based imagery; design and illustration
projects created for personal portfolio. Prereq:
AA 245 or instructorʼs consent. [F]
AC - Air Conditioning/Refrigeration
AC 000 Air Conditioning/Refrigeration
Technology
Theory, application, operation and maintenance
of air conditioning and refrigeration systems; 30
clock hours/week. [E]
AM - Automotive Technology
AM 000 Automotive Technology
ASE certified training in Automotive Electronics;
Engine Performance; Steering and Suspension;
Manual Transmission & Drive Train; Automatic
Transmission & Transaxles; Heating, Ventilation
& Air Conditioning; Brakes; Engine Repair &
Rebuilding; 30 clock hours/week. [E]
ART - Art
ART 1001 Artist in Residence (1-3)
Visiting artists interact with students in lectures
and workshops: 2 workshops for 1 credit; 3
workshops for 2 credits; 4 workshops for 3 credits;
repeatable; maximum of 3 hours applicable toward
a degree. [F,S]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
◆ART 1010,1020 Survey: Art History I,II (3,3)
Visual arts within western civilization. 1010–Near
East, Aegean, Greece, Rome, early Christian,
Byzantium, early medieval, Romanesque,
Gothic eras. 1020–Renaissance, baroque, rococo,
neoclassic, romantic, moderns and postmoderns.
[1010–F, 1020–S]
◆ART 1030 Art Appreciation (3)
handbuilding, glazing and wheel-throwing.
2610–Beginning techniques. 2620–Intermediate
techniques. Must be taken in sequence. [F,S]
ART 2030 Art Structure (4)
ART 2770 Field Studies of American Art
(1-3)
Broad spectrum course using various techniques to
develop art appreciation across a range of cultures
and periods; emphasis on the contemporary; intro
to a variety of materials, methods, and concepts
employed by artists. [on demand]
A class which includes travel within the United
States, specifically to study art in American
museums and galleries outside of the local area;
repeatable; maximum of 1 hour applicable toward
a degree. Extra fee payable to department. [F,S]
ART 2100 Metal Casting (3)
Metal casting, using the lost wax method;
various mold making techniques utilized. Prereq:
ART 1210. [on demand]
ART 2780 Art Internship Studies (4)
ART 2160 Art Education (4)
ART 2790 Intermediate Studio (3)
A course of work experience in the arts
community. Prereq: Permission of instructor. [F,S]
ART 1060 Making Art Safely (1)
Survey of health and safety concerns in the field of
visual arts; overview of chemicals used in diverse
media; tips on studio design, safe use of materials
and tools, and on how to stay informed; for artists
and hobbyists. [on demand]
ART 1110 Life Drawing I: Fine Arts Studies
(4)
Beginning to advanced studies from figure
and still-life objects. Line and value studies
emphasizing observation and accurate spatial and
proportionate rendering; intro to composition.
1120– [F,S]
ART 1120 Life Drawing II (4)
Focus on sustained studies, composition, value
modeling, and detail rendering; practice with live
models and still life; in-depth study of drawing
media; intro to personal imagery and contemporary
concepts. Must be taken in sequence.
ART 1210 Three Dimensional Design: Fine
Arts Studies (4)
Design elements as they operate in 3-D; projects
deal with real space and 3-D materials, may
involve both relief and free-standing forms. [on
demand]
ART 1250 Stone Carving (3)
Study of the direct method of carving alabaster
and soapstone; use of hand, electric and pneumatic
tools. [on demand]
ART 1260 Outdoor Sculpture Fabrication (2)
A class in metal sculpture based on the
fundamental of public art. Course includes
designing art for public areas and the metal
fabricating of the art work. Must have some
experience in metal fabricating, joining and
finishing; repeatable; maximum of 4 hours
applicable toward a degree. Prereq: Permission of
Department. [F,S]
ART 1310 Color: Fine Arts Studies (4)
An introduction to color perception, theory
and application as applied to fine arts, on a
two dimensional plane. Areas studied include;
theoretical and harmonic systems, color interaction
and pigment/color mixing and historical,
psychological and symbolic implications of color.
[S]
ART 1400 Beginning Photography (1)
Beginning photography course; intro to the
darkroom, photography as art, and significant
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Emphasizes understanding of child art as basic to
good teaching and parenting; range of materials
and procedures appropriate to preschoolers and
1st–6th graders; teaching art appreciation at
elementary level. [on demand]
ART 2200 Clay Portraiture and Torso (3)
Life study of the human head and torso in
clay; proportions and anatomy stressed. Prereq:
ART-2610. [on demand]
ART 2310,2320 Painting and Composition
I,II (4,4)
Painting techniques in oil and/or acrylics.
2310–Focus on developing color relationships and
spatial and composition skills; studies may include
abstract, still life, landscape, and/or figurative
subject matters. 2320–Stresses technical skills
in sustained personal image composition; some
assigned problems but focus on studentʼs choice
of non-objective, abstract, surreal, pop, or realistic
direction. Must be taken in sequence. Prereq for
2310: ART-1110. (ART-1120 recommended.) [F,S]
ART 2410,2420 Photography and Darkroom
I,II (4,4)
Fine art approach to photography; darkroom
work and oral critiques; must provide own 35mm
camera. 2410–Black and white photography
and printing; image, personal symbolism, avant
garde composition, content, and photographs as
art statements. 2420–Photography as expressive
communication and art; creative approach to
lighting methods, camera and paper use, film type,
developing, enlarging, and mounting; focus on
personal imagery and content. Must be taken in
sequence. [F,S]
ART 2430 Color Photography (4)
Intro to techniques and theory of color
photographic process; processing slides, negative
film, and color printing; design, composition and
perceptual aspects of color; focus on creative
expression. Prereq: ART-2410. [on demand]
ART 2450 Digital Photography I (3)
Fine art approach to digital imaging. Basic
techniques, equipment, trends and processes used
in creating imagery as personal expression. Basic
computer experience and digital camera required.
[on demand]
ART 2610,2620 Ceramics I,II (4,4)
Studio in ceramics; focus on design and creative
Continued practice in technical expertise
while expanding compositional and expressive
components in chosen studio area; repeatable.
Prereq: advanced standing in emphasized media
and instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
Course Descriptions
Study of significant works of art throughout
history to heighten perception and enjoyment of
the visual arts; consideration of formal elements in
representative works of various styles, forms, and
periods. [E]
historical and contemporary photographs;
emphasizes camera work and aesthetics of an
image; must provide own 35mm camera. [F,S]
ART 2990 Special Topics in Art History or
Theory (1-3)
Art history/theory; topics change each term and
include African-American art, photographic media
history, experimental art surveys, art criticism or
aesthetics, museum site learning via art travel in
U.S. or abroad; repeatable for credit on different
topics. [on demand]
ART 2991 Special Topics in Studio Art (1-4)
Media processes/studio techniques; topics change
each term and include assemblage, stone-carving,
watercolor, conceptual art, or workshops in clay,
photography, drawing, wood-working, painting,
matting, framing, or slide making; repeatable. [on
demand]
ASTR - Astronomy
◆ASTR 1030 Astronomy (4)
Intro to astronomy; history and methods of
astronomy, formation of the solar system, and
physical characteristics of the sun, planets, moons,
and minor members of the solar system (asteroids,
meteoroids, and comets); class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. [S]
Auto Body Repair, See “AB-Collison Repair”
BIOL - Biology
BIOL 1060 Introduction to Human Biology
(4)
Human anatomy and physiology related to body
systems; relationship between structural and
functional roles of system components; special
focus on disease and homeostasis; basic histology
and terminology; not intended for transfer; class 3
hours, lab 3 hours [F,S] (Note: credit will not be
allowed for both BIOL 1060 and PC 115.) [F,S]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
75
Course Descriptions
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
◆BIOL 1110,1120 General Biology I,II (4,4)
Broadcasting, See CO-Mass Communications”
Class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. 1110–Chemical
concepts related to biology: cell structure and
function, photosynthesis, respiration, cellular
control, cell division, Mendelian and molecular
genetics, ecological concepts. 1120–Evolutionary
principles, survey of the Kingdoms: Archebacteria,
Eubacteria, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, Animalia;
study of plant and animal biological systems. Must
be taken in sequence. [E]
BST - Business Systems Technology
◆BIOL 1310 Integrated Biology (3)
An integrated approach to biological lecture
topics and lab activities concerning cell structure
and function; interaction between living things
and environment; energy for life; heredity and
reproduction; diversity of living organisms;
evolution for life. Class 2 hours, lab 3 hours.
Prereq: PHYS 1310 and CHEM 1310 [E]
BIOL 1430 Nutrition (3)
Nutrients and their relation to human growth,
development and maintenance; role of foods and
their nutrients on sociological, physiological, and
psychological well-being; food records analysis
and nutritional knowledge application. [E]
◆BIOL 2010,2020 Human Anatomy and
Physiology I,II (4,4)
Structure, function, interrelationships and
homeostasis of body organ systems; biochemical,
cytological and histological studies integrate
dissection, experimentation, 3-D visualization, and
computer applications; focus on critical thinking
and clinical application; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
2010–Integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and
nervous systems. 2020–Endocrine, cardiovascular,
lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and
reproductive systems; includes immunity,
metabolism, fluid-electrolyte dynamics, and
genetics. Must be taken in sequence. [E]
BIOL 2050 Plant Morphology (4)
Analysis of the structure, reproductive processes,
and evolutionary relationships of the main
nonvascular and vascular plant groups; class
3 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: BIOL-1110 or
equivalent. [F]
BIOL 2230 Microbiology (4)
Microbial morphology and physiology; focus on
energy relationships, genetics, microbial control,
immune responses and human pathogens using
portal of entry approach; class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. Prereq: BIOL-1110 or 2010. [E]
BIOL 2990 Special Topics in Biology (1-4)
Detailed study of a specific topic in biological
sciences; repeatable for credit on different topics.
Prereq: Department head and instructorʼs consent.
[on demand]
BL - Building Construction Technology
BL 000 Building Construction Technology
A 1,290 hour program that trains students in four
areas of the construction trade - carpentry, electricity,
masonry, and plumbing.
76
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
cash misappropriations, corruption, accounting
principles and fraud, fraudulent financial
statements, and interviewing witnesses. Prereq:
BU 114 or 1 year relevant experience and
instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
BU 250,251 Accounting Information
Systems I,II (3,3)
BST 000 Business Systems Technology
BU - Accounting
Core concepts in using commercial application
software in accounting information systems;
integrates software application projects with course
topics; experience with computer applications
required. 251 includes internal controls as they
relate to EDP and systems for managerial decision
making. Must be taken in sequence. Prereq:
BU-114. [250–F, 251–S]
BU 114,115 Principles of Accounting I,II
(3,3)
BU 255 Professional Review in Accounting
and Taxation (3)
Principles, practices and techniques of accounting.
114–Emphasis on basic functions for proprietorship
and partnership. 115–Emphasis on partnership,
corporation and managerial accounting; analysis
of financial statements. Must be taken in sequence.
[E]
BU 299 Special Topics in Accounting (1-3)
Communication, data records management,
business math and English, office computer
applications and procedures, personal/professional
development; 30 clock hours/week. [E]
BU 185 Federal Taxes (3)
Study of individual income tax; includes issues
in form preparation such as tax credits, tax rates,
capital gains and losses, and personal deductions.
[F]
BU 201 Accounting Internship (3)
Work experience in career specialties related to
accounting technology; 9 hours/week at approved
local business without compensation. [S]
BU 204,205 Intermediate Accounting I,II
(3,3)
Theory and structure of financial statements;
emphasizes generally accepted accounting
principles. Must be taken in sequence. Prereq: BU
115. [204–F, 205–S]
BU 210 Business Tax Reporting (3)
Surveys local, state, and federal tax regulations
for proprietorships, partnerships, corporations and
nonprofit organizations; includes payroll, business,
excise, and sales taxes. Prereq: BU 115, 185; or
instructorʼs consent. [S]
BU 211 Legal Environment of Business (3)
Principles of law governing business transactions:
contracts, sales and agency. [E]
Condensed professional review of financial/
managerial accounting and income taxation
topics. Prereq: BU-115, 185, 204, 224. Concurrent
BU-205. [S]
Study of selected accounting and related topics of
current and special interest. Prereq: BU-115 and/or
faculty consent. [on demand]
Business Accounting, See “BU-Accounting”
Business Law, See “BU-Accounting”
Business Management, See “MG-Management”
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), See
“PHED-Physical Education—General Courses”
CD - Commercial Truck Driving
CD 000 Commercial Truck Driving
Basic commercial truck operation principles and
skills; safe operation, vehicle documentation,
and proper load; all federal, state and local law
compliance; minimum age of 21 required for
program admission; 7.5-week course; 30-clock
hours/week. [E]
BU 212 Business Law (3)
Principles of law governing business transactions:
business organizations, property laws, commercial
paper, secured transactions, and business legal
environment. Prereq: BU 211 [S]
CHEM - Chemistry
BU 224 Cost & Budgeting (3)
Principles of chemistry; not for chemistry majors;
class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. 1010–Atomic and
molecular structure, bonding, equation writing
and stoichiometry, compound classification, gas,
liquid and solid states, solutions, acids/bases.
1020–Basics of organic and analytical chemistry;
organic compound families, their preparation and
reactions; qualitative and quantitative analytical
methods. Must be taken in sequence. Concurrent
1010: DSPM-0850. [1010–E, 1020–S]
Study of cost accounting principles and procedures
using accounting as managerial tool; emphasis on
cost determination methods. Prereq: BU 115. [F]
BU 235 Fraud Examination (3)
Covers the principles and methodology of
fraud detection and deterrence. Topics include
skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register
disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll
and expense reimbursement schemes, non-
◆CHEM 1010,1020 Introduction to
Chemistry I,II (4,4)
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
CHEM 1060 Survey of Organic and
Analytical Chemistry (3)
Second semester of principles of chemistry
without lab; credit not given for both CHEM-1020
and CHEM-1060; CHEM-1020 substitutes
for CHEM-1060, but not vice versa. Prereq:
CHEM-1010 or equivalent. [on demand]
◆CHEM 1110,1120 General Chemistry I,II
(4,4)
◆ CHEM 1310 Integrated Chemistry (3)
This course is an integrated approach to basic
principles of chemistry. Integration will be
between lab and lecture activities as well as
between this and other areas of science. Major
topics of study include physical and chemical
properties of matter, atomic structure, kineticmolecular theory and phase changes, chemical
bonding, chemical reactions, types of properties
of chemical reactions, water and aqueous
solution chemistry, acid-base chemistry and pH,
nomeclature and formula writing, naming and
structure recognition of simple covalent, simple
organic and biological molecules. Class 2 hours,
lab 3 hours. Prereq: PHYS 1310 [E]
CHEM 2010,2020 Organic Chemistry I,II
(4,4)
Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons,
stereochemistry, monofunctional and some
polyfunctional compounds; basic separation,
purification, synthesis and identification techniques
emphasized in lab; for science and preprofessional
majors; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. Must be taken
in sequence. Prereq for CHEM 2010: CHEM-1120.
[2010–F, 2020–S]
CHEM 2990 Special Topics in Chemistry
(1-5)
Detailed study of a specific chemistry topic;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Department head and instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
CI - Civil Engineering Technology
CI 101 Construction Licensing (2)
Basic concepts and practices in construction; emphasis on project contracts, elementary blueprint
reading, scheduling, field operations, construction
law, purchasing and cost control; Satisfactory/No
Credit grading. [on demand]
CI 102 Construction Calculations (3)
Applied mathematics for the construction industry;
covers basic math, applied algebra, applied trigonometry, and intro to construction estimating. [on
demand]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
CI 233 Contracts and Specifications (3)
Establishing and controlling the flow of documentation on a construction project; focus on communication between owners, developers, architects,
construction managers, facilities managers, general
contractors, subcontractors, and vendors. [on
demand]
Study of engineering contracts and specifications;
business and legal issues, engineering ethics,
competitive bidding, contracting procedures,
general and technical specifications, and inspection
procedures for contract enforcement. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
CI 110 Construction Safety (3)
CI 242 Structural Steel (3)
Knowledge for efficiency in the workplace; safety
professionals and typical workplace accidents and
injuries; preventive measures and developing,
initiating, and evaluating safety training programs;
[F,S]
CI 111 Construction Blueprint Reading (2)
Basics of proposal writing in construction industry
based on sound estimates and takeoffs from
budget-grade project prints; numbering sequence
of the Construction Specifications Institute Master
Format System. Prereq: CI-101 or instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
CI 116 Construction Planning and
Scheduling (3)
Provides a working knowledge for planning
and scheduling of construction projects; C.P.M.,
Precedence Method, PERT, Bar Charts, arrow
diagrams, and computer applications. [on demand]
CI 164 Construction Estimating (3)
Construction estimating techniques/applications
related to technical aspects required for quantity
takeoffs in construction estimate preparation; the
Construction Specifications Institute Master Format
Systemʼs numbering sequence; computer applications
may be covered. Concurrent: DSPM-0850. [S]
CI 174,274 Surveying I,II (4,4)
Fundamental concepts and practices of surveying;
class 2 hours, lab 4 hours. 174–Theory of measurements and field notes; methods of obtaining horizontal and vertical distances, angles and directions;
use of levels, transits, theodolites, and total stations;
construction surveying, curves and volumes. 274–
E.D.M. use and theory, traversing practice, adjusting
methods, plotting a plat, computing the area and
making topographic maps; State Plane coordinates,
Public Land surveys; Photogrammetry and satellite
surveying. Concurrent for 174: MATH-1720. Prereq
for 274: CI-174, MATH-1720; or instructorʼs
consent. [174–S, 274–F]
CI 202 Construction Financial and Cost
Analysis (2)
In-depth study of financial and cost accounting
means and methods related to small and medium
sized construction companies, general contractors,
and subcontractors. Prereq: CI-101 or instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
Analysis, design, and detailing of elementary
structural steel; emphasis on structural components
rather than entire structure. Prereq: MATH-1720.
Concurrent: MD 134. [S]
CI 243 Reinforced Concrete (3)
Analysis, design, and detailing of elementary
reinforced concrete structures; emphasis on
structural components rather than entire structure.
Prereq: MATH-1720. Concurrent: MD-242. [S]
CI 298 Special Topics in Civil Engineering
Technology (1-4)
Specialized topics and/or problems in civil
engineering technology; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
Course Descriptions
Properties of matter related to atomic and
molecular structure; element and compound
reactions and equations, stoichiometry, kinetics,
and measurement techniques and calculation; 1120
lab includes qualitative analysis; for students in the
field of science, medicine, or engineering; class
3 hours, lab 3 hours. Must be taken in sequence.
Prereq for 1110: CHEM-1010 or equivalent. Coreq
for 1110: MATH-1710 or 1740. [E]
CI 103 Construction Project Administration (3)
CI 299 Special Topics in Civil Engineering
Technology with Lab (1-4)
Specialized topics and/or problems in civil
engineering technology; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
Criminal Justice
CJ 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
This course is an overview of the criminal justice
system. It is a broad-based interdisciplinary
analysis of the philosophy, history, and processes
of criminal justiceʼs major components: police;
courts; and corrections. It also addresses special
issues including juvenile justice, drugs and crime,
and terrorism. [F,S]
CJ 1070 Introduction to Criminal Law (3)
This course is an overview of both substantive
and procedural law related to the definitions,
investigations, processing, and punishment of
crimes. It provides an overall understanding of the
articulation between law and the criminal justice
system. Areas of study emphasize the nature
and history of criminal law; criminal defenses;
legal and social dimensions of crime; victims;
punishment; and sentencing. [F,S]
CI 224 Hydraulics & Hydrology (3)
Intro to fluid mechanics, hydrostatics,
hydrodynamics, and hydrology; hydraulic devices,
open channels, culverts, storm sewer, culvert and
detention pond design; lab work parallels class
work; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. Concurrent:
MD-134. [F]
CI 231 Construction Materials Testing (3)
Intro to lab practices in measuring construction
material properties like soil, concrete, steel, wood,
timber, asphalt; tests based on ASTM standards;
class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. Concurrent: MD-134.
[F]
CNAP - Cisco Network Academy
Program
CNAP 1010,1020,1030,1040 CISCO Network
Academy Program I,II,III,IV (4,4,4,4)
Preparation for CISCO Network Academy
Program Exam; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
1010–Introduction to how computers communicate
with one or more computers. Includes the basic
theories of electricity and electro-magnetism,
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
77
Course Descriptions
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
data collision and collision detection. Topics
include the OSI model and the peer to peer
relationship that exists between similar OSI
layers as computers connect, exchange data, and
disconnect. TCP/IP, structured cabling project,
and design and documentation. 1020–Wide area
networks are discussed. CISCO routers are studied
in operational detail. The student learns how to
use the Command Line Interface and how to
configure CISCO routers. The OSI and TCP/IP
models are compared and the student learns how
these models interact. Various routing protocols
are studied. IP addressing and sub-netting are
thoroughly discussed and practiced. The student
is introduced to network troubleshooting methods.
1030–The student continues learning new theories
and applications including Virtual Local Area
Networks, Access Control Lists, Virtual Private
Networks, Wide Area Networks, Point to Point
Protocol, Frame Relay, ISDN and Novell IPX.
Application of gained knowledge is applied in the
threaded case study throughout the semester. At
the end of the semester, the student presents the
solution to a complex network design scenario.
1040–Multiprotocol networks using LAN and
WAN interfaces, NAT and PAT configurations
on specific routers, Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP), comparisons and contrasts
between various WAN technologies. Must be
taken in sequence. [1010–F, 1020–S, 1030-F,
1040-S]
CO - Mass Communications
CO 110 Introduction to Mass
Communications (3)
Survey of mass communications field; overview
of mass media (TV, radio, newspapers, and
magazines), their role and effect in society, and
how they work together. [F,S]
CO 202 Broadcast Announcing (3)
Examination of broadcast communication
principles and effective announcing techniques;
lab and broadcast experiences cultivate on-air
personality and announcing skills. [F,S]
CO 204 TV Production (3)
Practice and study in basic elements of television
production; focus on studio facilities, equipment,
and techniques. [F,S]
CO 205 Radio and Television News Writing
and Editing (3)
Practice and study of preparing news for radio
and television broadcasting. Prereq: CO-110,
ENGL-1010, keyboarding skills. [F,S]
Construction, See “CI-Civil Engineering
Technology”
CO 221,231 Media Writing I,II (3,3)
221–Introduction to language skills and factual
writing style for the mass media. News writing,
information gathering and interviewing. 231–
Researching, structuring, writing, and evaluating
new stories, and practice in writing for public
relations and advertising. Theoretical perspectives
of news and other media information, comparisons
among the media. Prereq for 221: CO 110, ENGL
1010. Prereq for 231: CO 221. [F,S]
COT - Computer Operations Technology
COT 000 Computer Operations Technology
Computer components and functions; data;
software applications; hardware assembly
and repair; system diagnostics; networking;
programming; 30 clock hours/week. [E]
Security+ Certificate
CO 230 Remote Television Production (3)
Intensive practical experience in multi-camera
remote television broadcasting; focus on
production, direction, camera and audio operation,
electronic graphics use, satellite news gathering
and uplinking; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. [F,S]
Court Reporting, See “REAL-Realtime Reporting”
CO 232 Public Relations (3)
Introduces strategic issues and effective practices
of communication between organizations and their
constituencies. Includes the study of public opinion
research, media relations, public communication
campaigns, consumer identity, and representational
ethics. Students gain practical experience in
writing news releases, conducting surveys, and
designing integrated campaigns. Prereq: ENGL
1010. [S]
CO 240 News and Sports Broadcasting (3)
Techniques and methods used by Radio-TV
news and sports broadcasters; focus on reporting,
writing, management of resources and on-camera
presentation. Prereq: CO-202-or-204 or instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
CP - Cooperative Education
CP 101,102,103,104,105,106 Cooperative
Education Work Experience I,II,III,IV,V,VI
(1-3 each)
Combines off-campus work with on-campus
study, allows students to gain marketable job skills
and develop self-confidence and interpersonal
skills; credit based on hours worked; approved
for unrestricted elective credit in career programs
(A.A.S.).
Creative Writing, See “ENGL-English”
CO 241 Non-linear Video Editing (3)
Master and employ advanced electronic video
editing skills by completing various editing
assignments utilizing a variety of linear and nonlinear editing technologies and techniques. Prereq:
CO 110. [F]
CS - Information Systems
CS 101 Computer Literacy (3)
Information about the nature of a computer applied
to the roles that computers play in society; intro
to the use and operation of microcomputers and
commercial applications software packages; basic
components of a computer, computer applications,
data processing careers, electronic spreadsheets,
databases, intro to word processing, and issues in
computing. [E]
CO 249 Special Topics in Mass
Communications (3)
Specialized topics in the field of mass
communications; repeatable for credit on different
topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
CO 281 Media Management (3)
This course deals with various media management
functions, models, and operations. Topics will
include advertising planning, media, strategy,
creative execution, consumer behavior, campaign
management, and the role of advertising agencies
and governmental regulations. Prereq: CO 110,
ENGL 1010. [S]
CS 104 Fundamentals of Information
Systems (3)
Overview of the information systems discipline;
base number systems, computer, data, and file
organization, career opportunities, and current
technology concepts. [E]
CS 105 Intro to Microsoft Office 2007 (1)
CO 210 Communications Practicum (3)
Classroom and supervised lab work in broadcast
communications; FCC rules and regulations,
operating procedures, radio station format, and
program development; class 1 hour, lab 6 hours.
Prereq: CO-110, 202. [F,S]
This course will introduce the Office 2007 user
interface and the new or updated features of
Microsoft Word, Excel and Powerpoint. It is
intended for students who already know and are
familiar with Office 2003. The course will not
cover the basics of how to use Office Applications.
Prereq: CS 101 or permission of instructor. [E]
Computer Programming, See “CS-Information
Systems”
Computer Repair, See “ER-Industrial Electronics”
CO 219 Internship in Television
Communications (3)
Field experience in television with supervision by
College faculty and cooperating broadcast stations;
written reports relating to the field experience; lab
9 hours. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
78
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
CS 108 Internet Applications for Educators (3)
Computer Science, See “CS-Information Systems”
History of the Internet and classroom application;
focus on accessing Internet resources. [Su]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
CS 109 Maintaining Classroom Technology (3)
Covers basic skills needed to set up and maintain
technology in the classroom. [Su]
CS 114 Concepts of Programming (3)
Basic concepts of traditional computer program
design, design tools, and an intro to object
technology. [E]
CS 124 Visual BASIC I (3)
CS 140 Internet Foundations (3)
Fundamentals of Web Site Design - domains,
Web hosting, evolution of browsers and HTML/
XHTML, current standards in Web design, basic
techniques for creating and maintaining Web pages
using software tools, basic understanding of issues
related to use of scripting, Web page interactivity,
accessibility and multimedia. Prereq: CS 101 or
equivalent, or proof of computer competency. [F,S]
CS 150 Principles of Web Site Design (3)
Concepts and principles for designing Web sites;
basics of creating Web pages using XHTML and
Cascading Style Sheets; enhancing a Web site with
color, images, tables and other page elements;
and publishing a Web site to a Web server. [on
demand]
CS 151 Building Web Sites (3)
Use of current web authoring tools to create web
sites; focus on web page construction and use of
themes, templates, and forms. Prereq: CS-150. [on
demand]
CS 152 Multimedia Projects (3)
Use of latest web design tools for web publishing.
Prereq: CS-150 [on demand]
CS 241 Intermediate Web Site Design (3)
Advanced concepts in Web site design using XHTML
and Cascading Style Sheets to create forms and
advanced page layouts. Provides an introduction to
shopping carts and other advanced page features. Prereq:
CS 150. [F]
CS 190 Introduction to Macintosh (3)
Intro to Macintosh computers; basic operation,
maintenance and terminology; intro to use of
mainstream advertising and graphic design
software; projects include use of conceptual skills
to produce basic design projects incorporating page
layout and production techniques. [F,S]
CS 197 Spreadsheet Software
Applications (3)
CS 242 Introduction to Scripting Languages
(3)
Introduction to Javascript for non-programming majors.
Students use Javascript to incorporate Dynamic HTML
(DHTML) into pages with Cascading Style Sheets.
Prereq: CS 241 [S]
CS 244 Systems Analysis and Design (3)
Designed for students who have been introduced
to microcomputer use and operation, have basic
knowledge of Windows environment, and wish
to learn to use electronic spreadsheet software
package. Prereq: CS 101, or equivalent, or proof
of computer competency. [F,S]
Integration of manual and data processing techniques
applied to business and science; complex application
areas studied with view toward development and
analysis of systems and procedural improvements; focus
on case study approach. Prereq: CS 185 or CS 160. [S]
CS 198 Database Software Applications (3)
CS 248 Survey of Computer Topics (1-4)
Designed for students who have been introduced
to microcomputer use and operation, have basic
knowledge of Windows environment, and wish
to learn to use commercial database software
package. Prereq: CS 101, or equivalent, or proof
of computer competency. [F,S]
Specialized topics and/or problems in information
data processing studied at an introductory level;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Course Descriptions
Intro to the concepts of computer program design
through the Visual BASIC language. Use of
controls, forms, code modules, functions and
procedures to create Windows applications.
Concurrent: CS-114. [F,S]
language; orientation towards syntax, usage,
modularity of program design, and development
of program libraries; credit not allowed for both
CS-185 and EG-225. Prereq for 185: CS 124 or CS
160 or instructorʼs consent. [S]
CS 249 Topics in Computer Applications (3)
CS 204 Microcomputer Architecture (3)
Provides background for using the microcomputer
as a business tool; microcomputer basics with
focus on hardware components and configurations,
security, and networking. Prereq: CS-104 [S]
CS 205 Computer Networks (3)
Basic data communications and networks; data
communication concepts, standards, local area
networks OSI model, and network hardware and
software. Prereq: CS-176. [S]
Specialized topics and/or problems in computer
data processing studied in detail; repeatable for
credit on different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
CS 250 Advanced Web Page and Site
Design (3)
Development of web sites driven by underlying
databases; Active Server Page (ASP) technology;
client-side and server-side scripting. Prereq:
CS-124, 151, 296. [S]
CS 215 Local Area Network Management (3)
CS 160 Java Programming I (3)
160–Intro to the Java programming language;
includes object-oriented techniques and
development of simple application and applets.
Prereq: CS-124 [S]
CS 161 Java Programming II (3)
Covers advanced features. Must be taken in
sequence or have instructorʼs consent. Prereq: CS
160. [F]
CS 176 Operating Systems (3)
Microcomputers, operating systems, system
commands, and machine codes; data representation
and elementary machine instructions studied
in detail; survey of communication codes and
terminology. Prereq: CS-124 [S]
CS 178 Fundamentals of UNIX (3)
Overview UNIX system administration; booting
and shutting down, root account, controlling
processes, file system organization, drivers and the
kernel, networking, security, daemons, and other
UNIX concepts. Prereq: CS-176 [on demand]
CS 185, C++ Programming Language I (3)
Intro to computer program design concepts
and development using the C++ programming
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Management of computer local area networks;
server and workstation installation, network
performance management, managing client
services, print services, and security. Prereq:
CS-205. [S]
CS 225 Visual BASIC II (3)
Advanced features: file processing, data access,
and communicating with other Windows
applications, including object linking and
embedding. Prereq: CS 124 [S]
CS 231 Numerical Methods (3)
Foundation for basic numerical methods; higher
order equations, systems of equations, interpolation
and curve fitting, numerical integration, and
differential equations; problem solution using
the computer and elementary discussion of error
control. Prereq: CS-185. Coreq: MATH-1920. [on
demand]
CS 240 Computer User Support (3)
Overview of computer user support; includes
troubleshooting, problem-solving, personal
communications, needs assessment, product
documentation, user training, and help-desk operation.
Prereq: CS 205. [S]
CS 251 Scripting Languages (3)
Intro to JavaScript and VBScript programming
languages; covers both client-side and server-side
programming. Prereq: CS-250. [on demand]
CS 285 C++ Programming II (3)
Covers object-oriented design, design and
implementation of C++ classes, inheritance, C++
pointers and dynamic memory, recursion, linked
lists, and data structures - stacks and queues.
Prereq: CS 185; or instructorʼs consent. [F]
CS 293 Computer Applications in
Management (3)
Designed for those who will use a suite of
commercial software applications in the office
setting; must have working knowledge of word
processing software applications and excellent
keyboarding/document formatting skills. Prereq:
CS 101 or equivalent, proof of computer
competence. [F,S]
CS 296 Principles of Database Management
Systems (3)
Basic concepts of database management systems
(DBMS); terminology, types of systems, large and
small system implementation, report generators,
and user interface. Prereq: CS 124. [F]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
79
Course Descriptions
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
CS 299 Special Projects (3)
CT 122 Introduction to Quality Control (3)
DAST 1120, 1121 Basic Sciences I, II (3, 2)
Integrates concepts and skills learned in previous
programming courses; focus on solutions to typical
problems encountered in business; case studies in
systems and programming; repeatable for credit
with different programming languages. Prereq:
CS 285. [S]
Intro to quality concepts and applications used
in process industries; includes a study of the
statistical methods of quality control, quality tools,
control charts, team skills and communication
skills. Prereq: CT-111, 112. [S]
Basic sciences for dental assistants. 1120 – Anatomy
and physiology, microbiology, oral anatomy, tooth
morphology, histology and embryology. 1121 – Oral
pathology, nutrition, pain control and pharmacology.
[1120 - F, 1121 - S]
CT 123 Introduction to Process
Operations-(4)
DAST 1130, 1131 Clinical Skills I, II (4, 3)
CT - Chemical Technology
CT 101 Foundational Studies for Chemical
Process Operator (4)
Intro to terms and basic concepts used in food and
chemical process industries; helpful to prospective
and existing employees in the industry and
provides base for follow-up studies in chemical
and food processing; class 3 hours, lab 3.5 hours.
[on demand]
CT 102 Fundamentals of Process Operations
(4)
Intro to chemical process operation basics;
overview of basic process equipment
characteristics involved in chemical
manufacturing—heat exchangers, steam traps,
pumps, valves, piping, and sensors; class 3 hours,
lab 3.5 hours. [on demand]
CT 107 Plant Statistics (1)
Intro to statistical thinking and its industrial
applications; includes statistical process control,
Excel use, and plant-specific control charts and
graphs. Prereq: CT-112. [on demand]
CT 111 Introduction to Process
Technology (3)
Overview of process technology ranging from
safety to process utilities; includes a plant visit.
Prereq: DSPM-0800, DSPR-0800, DSPW-0800.
[F]
CT 112 Industrial Mathematics (3)
Basic mathematical operations, systems of
measure, problem solving, geometry, right angle
trigonometry, and their industrial applications.
Prereq: DSPM 0800, DSPR-0800,
DSPW-0800. [F]
CT 113 Industrial Chemistry (4)
Intro of inorganic and organic chemical theories
and their industrial applications; includes case
studies, safety, and communication skills; class
3 hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq: DSPM-0800,
DSPR-0800, DSPW-0800. [F]
CT 115 Process Chemistry (3)
Intro to organic chemistry and industrial
applications of organic and inorganic theories;
focus on plant-specific process chemistry; includes
case studies, safety, and communication skills.
Prereq: CT 111, 113. [on demand]
CT 121 Industrial Process Equipment (4)
Intro to operation and utilization of industrial
process equipment; includes preventative
maintenance, safety, troubleshooting; and
communication skills; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
Prereq: CT-111. [S]
80
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Intro to theory, equipment, and application of
common industrial processes such as distillation
and evaporation; includes case studies, safety,
troubleshooting, and communication skills; class 3
hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: CT-111, 113. [S]
Skills development in the clinical setting. 1130 emphasis on chairside assisting in general dentistry and
on infection control; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. 1131
- A continuation of Clinical Skills I with emphasis on
advanced intraoral skills and assisting with specialties as
they relate to general dentistry; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours.
[1130 – F, 1131 – S]
CT 124 Introduction to Process Control and
Instrumentation (3)
DAST 1140 Dental Radiology (4)
A study of the theory and practice of dental radiology;
emphasis on patient and operator safety, technical aspects
of x-ray production, image quality, and preliminary
interpretation; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. [F]
Intro to the principles of process control and
the functions of instruments used to monitor
and control chemical processes; includes the
use of process control diagrams, case studies,
troubleshooting and communication skills. Prereq:
CT-111. [S]
DAST 1150 Dental Materials (4)
CT 150,220 Unit Operations I,II (4,4)
Processes and equipment used to convert raw
materials into chemical products; class 3 hours,
lab 3 hours. 150–Characteristics and operations of
materials handling and storage systems; checks
and maintenance requirements; mixing operations,
tanks, pumps, conveyors, and piping. 220–Focus on
types of reactors, energy input/output, and reactor
control methods. Must be taken in sequence. [on
demand]
Dental laboratory skills to include the proper
manipulation and storage of restorative materials,
impression materials, gypsum, resins, abrasives,
and waxes; emphasis on laboratory and material
safety; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. [F]
DAST 1160 Dental Office Management (3)
Preparation to serve as a dental receptionist or
dental office manager; includes insurance claims,
appointment control, records management,
payment plans, collections, disbursements, and
inventory control. [S]
CT 210 Basic Laboratory Techniques (4)
Intro to basic laboratory techniques; filtration
and extraction; use of laboratory equipment and
glassware; focus on industrial applications, safety,
and plant-specific techniques; class 3 hours, lab 2
hours. Prereq: CT 115. [on demand]
DAST 1170, 1171 Clinical Practice (7, 6)
Supervised clinical experience with emphasis on
professional, ethical and legal aspects of dentistry.
Students must provide own transportation to and
from off-campus clinical sites; valid CPR card
required for participation in clinical practice. 1170
– assisting in general dentistry to master basic
dental assisting skills; class 2 hours, clinical 15
hours. 1171 – a continuation of Clinical Practice
I to master more advanced dental assisting and
specialty skills; class 2 hours, clinical 12 hours.
[1170 - S, 1171 - U]
CT 211 Instrumental Analysis (4)
Spectroscopy applications and basic theory;
standard lab experiments and chemical analysis
methods using UV-Visible, fluorescence, atomic
absorbance and emission, total organic carbon, and
fourier transform infrared spectrometers; class 2
hours, lab 6 hours. [on demand]
CY - Cosmetology
DD - Computer-Aided Design Technology
CY 000 Cosmetology
DD 100 Introduction to CAD (1)
Personal and shop safety, sanitation/sterilization;
salon equipment/implements, scalp and hair care,
hair styling, permanent/thermal waves, relaxers,
color, straightening, manicures, facials; electricity
and electrical safety practices; intro to anatomy/
physiology and organic/inorganic chemistry;
salesmanship; 30 clock hours/week. Note: 1500
clock hours required for State Board licensure. [E]
Intro to a PC-based Computer-Aided Design
(CAD) system; Satisfactory/No Credit grading. [on
demand]
DD 101 Microcomputer Drafting (3)
Intense overview of AutoCADʼs microcomputerbased drafting software; geometric construction
and editing concepts; focus on AutoCAD language
and syntax; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq:
Drafting experience or instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
.
DAST - Dental Assisting
Admission to the program and CPR certification is a
prerequisite for all DAST courses. All Fall Semester
DAST courses are prerequisites to all Spring Semester
courses and all Spring Semester courses are prerequisites
to the Summer Semester courses. All courses taught in
the same semester are corequisites. Exceptions are by
permission of the Program Director.
DD 114,124,204 CAD Engineering Drawing
I,II,III (3,3,3)
CAD engineering drawing using AutoCAD
software; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. 114–
Introductory level; includes scales, sketching of
multi-view and pictorial drawings, AutoCAD
geometry construction and editing techniques,
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
DD 298 Special Topics in CAD (1-4)
Selected specialized topics and/or problems in
Computer-Aided Design (CAD); repeatable for
credit on different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
DD 299 Special Topics in CAD with Lab
(1-4)
Selected specialized topics and/or problems in
Computer-Aided Design (CAD); repeatable for
credit on different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
DD 116 CAD for Electronics (3)
Intro to mechanical and electrical/electronic
drafting practices and procedures; focus on
pictorial and electronic drawings using CAD;
class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq: EE-110,
ET-115; or instructorʼs consent. Concurrent
EE-121. [S]
DD 118 Introduction to Intergraph
Microstation (3)
Intense intro to Intergraph Microstation
drafting and design software; concepts of
geometric construction and editing; focus on
the Microstation language and syntax; class 2
hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq: Drafting experience or
instructorʼs consent. Concurrent DD 124. [S]
DD 214 Mechanical Desktop (3)
Intro to Mechanical Desktop software; includes
surface modeling, parametric design, assembly
modeling, and part modeling; class 2 hours, lab 3
hours. Prereq: DD-124 or instructorʼs consent. [S]
DD 216 Architectural Desktop (3)
Intro to Architectural Desktop software; class 2
hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: DD-114, MATH-1710.
[on demand]
DD 218 Civil 3D (3)
Intro to Civil 3D software. Includes working with
points, surfaces, projects, horizontal alignment,
profiles, parcels, grading, corridors and pipe
networks; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Concurrent:
DD 124. [on demand]
DD 222 Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER (3)
Fundamentals of the Pro/ENGINEER software;
concepts of solid modeling, including the
fundamentals of part, assembly, and drawing
creation; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq:
DD-114 or instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
DD 227 Inventor (3)
Use of feature based, dimension driven, 3-D
solid modeling design software; Model building,
assemblies, and production drawings; class 2
hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq: DD 124 [on demand]
DD 243,253 SolidWorks I,II (3,3)
Use of parametric, solid modeling design
software; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. 243Prototyping, assemblies, and production drawings.
253-Advanced features; sheetmetal parts, advance
sweeps and lofts, importing and exporting
files, and assembly modeling. Must be taken in
sequence. [on demand]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
DH - Dental Hygiene
Admission to the Dental Hygiene Program is a
prerequisite for all DH courses unless otherwise
noted. Please consult the SUMMARY OF
REQUIRED HOURS. All DH courses shown
in the same term are corequisites and all DH
courses shown in the preceding term(s) are
DH prerequisites.
DH 132,135,238,239 Dental Hygiene
I,II,III,IV (9,9,5,3)
Diagnostic Medical Sonography, See “USDiagnostic Medical Sonography
DM - Diesel Equipment Mechanics
DM 000 Diesel Mechanics
Diesel engine mechanics; diesel assembly
and disassembly, safety regulations, and shop
equipment operation; cylinder block, camshaft,
crankcase and oil pan; cylinder head/valves;
timing and valve mechanism, air intake, starting
and fuel systems; trouble shooting and tune-ups;
30 clock hours/week. [E]
Drama, See “Theatre”
DSPM - Developmental Mathematics
*DSPM 0700 Basic Mathematics (3)
Integers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratio
and proportions, basic statistics, measurement
conversions, exponents, numerical and algebraic
expressions; appropriate use of graphing
calculator and applications. Prereq: ACT or
COMPASS Placement. [E]
Course series integrates didactic knowledge with
affective behavior and psychomotor skills. 132–
Tooth morphology; head, neck and oral anatomy;
oral embryology, histology and pathology;
radiology; periodontology; pain management;
dental materials; oral health education; patient
management, including special needs; clinical
dental hygiene; medical and dental emergencies;
legal and ethical issues; infection and hazard
control management, including blood borne
infectious diseases; focus on clinical safety,
critical thinking and decision making. 135–Focus
on recognition of conditions requiring treatment
modification (e.g., developmental abnormalities,
drug therapies, medical conditions) evident during
medical and dental history review, radiographic
interpretation, and clinical examination; role of
research in the profession. 238–Focus on treatment
modifications necessitated by clinical findings.
239–Focus on lifelong learning strategies,
e.g., literature review; outreach projects with
community agencies. Prereq for 239: Program
directorʼs consent. [132, 238–F; 135, 239–S]
Polynomials, factoring, quadratic functions,
rational expressions, radicals, rational and radical
equations, integer exponents, Pythagorean
Theorem; appropriate use of graphing calculator
and applications. Prereq: DSPM-0800; or ACT or
COMPASS Placement. [E]
DH 142,145,248,249 Dental Hygiene
Applications I,II,III,IV (4,4,4,4)
DSPR - Developmental Reading
Application of dental hygiene theory; supervised
provision of services on partner, lab manikin or
client; lab hours: 11 in 142, 12 in 145, 14 in 248
& 249; Satisfactory/No Credit grading. 142–
Determination of services through accurate
decision making stressed. 145–Integration of
preventive, educational and therapeutic concepts
when treating clients. 248 & 249–Preventive,
educational and therapeutic concepts for treating
increasingly severe gingivitis and periodontal
conditions. [142, 248–F; 145, 249–S]
DH 255 Dental Hygiene Clinical
Enhancement (2)
Refines clinical skills for practicing dental
hygienists or students; individual attention given
to participants; focus on scaling and curettage
techniques; lab 7 hours; Satisfactory/No Credit
grading. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Course Descriptions
dimensioning, and plotting. 124–Intermediate
level; includes electrical, piping, fasteners,
welding, power transmission, property plats,
elevations, and structural steel designing; design
project required. 204–Advanced level; includes
developments, intersections, limits, tolerances,
GD&T, detail and assembly drawings, cams,
scripts and slides, menu customization, intro to
3-D wireframe, surfaces, and solids modeling
drawings. Must be taken in sequence. DD 124
Prereq: DD 114. Concurrent MATH 1710 or
instructorʼs consent. DD 204 Prereq. DD 124
Concurrent MATH 1720; or instructorʼs consent.
*DSPM 0800 Elementary Algebra (3)
Real number system, linear equations and
inequalities, graphing equations and inequalities,
systems of linear equations; appropriate use of
graphing calculator and applications. Prereq:
DSPM 0700; or ACT or COMPASS Placement.
[E]
*DSPM 0850 Intermediate Algebra (3)
*DSPR 0690 Individualized Instruction in
Reading Skills (2)
Individualized course for students with significant
weakness in general or specific reading skills and
in need of individualized instruction and guided
practice; may be taken before or after DSPR-0700
and/or DSPR-0800; lab 4 hours; repeatable.
Prereq: Assessment test recommendation or
Department Headʼs consent. [E]
*DSPR 0700 Basic/Developmental Reading
(3)
Lecture/lab course to improve ability to
comprehend written materials, identify main and
subordinate ideas, make inferences, separate fact
from opinion, develop flexibility and efficiency
in reading rate, and improve vocabulary and
reasoning skill. Prereq: ACT or COMPASS
Placement. [F,S]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
81
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
*DSPR 0709 Basic Reading and College
Success (6)
EA 106,116 Emergency Medical Technician
I,II (8,8)
College success strategies with focus on basic
reading skills necessary to master college
textbooks, critical thinking, career and goal setting,
study skills and diversity in the college community.
Prereq: ACT or COMPASS placement. [E]
Two semester sequence provides minimum training
required to staff a licensed ambulance and prepares
students for licensing exams; taught in accordance
with the 1994 National Dept. of Transportation
EMT–B curriculum and Tennessee regulatory
requirements. [106–F, 116–S]
Course Descriptions
*DSPR 0800 Developmental Reading:
Reading Analysis and Reasoning (3)
Designed to improve studentʼs overall reading
skills to college level; focus on reasoning skills,
analysis of materials for bias and point of view,
and increasing flexibility and efficiency in reading
rate. Prereq: DSPR-0700; or ACT or COMPASS
Placement. [E]
*DSPR 0870 Topics in Reading (1)
For students who cannot demonstrate mastery of
objectives in a particular area of competency in
language arts even though he/she has competency
in other language arts areas; students may work
on spelling, vocabulary, rate and flexibility, or
reasoning skills; lab 2 hours. Prereq: Assessment
test or instructorʼs recommendation. [on demand]
EA 226,227,228 Paramedic Theories I,II,III
(14,14,7)
Based on 1998 Department of Transportation
EMT–Paramedic curriculum. 226–Covers
preparatory subjects, airway management &
ventilation, and patient assessment. 227–Medical
emergencies and traumatic injuries. 228–
Special patient populations, assessment-based
management; ambulance operations. [226–F,
227–S, 228–Su]
*DSPS 0800 Learning Strategies (3)
Designed to develop effective study habits,
attitudes and skills in the classroom setting; focus
on application of study skills, critical thinking,
and the processes of learning how to learn in
college.[E]
DSPW - Developmental Writing
*DSPW 0700 Basic/Developmental Writing
(3)
Basic writing skills and grammar review; stresses
applying basic mechanical skills to writing
paragraphs and sentences; primary emphasis
on writing coherent, well-developed, unified
paragraphs; advancement to DSPW-0800
upon completion. Prereq: ACT or COMPASS
Placement. [E]
*DSPW 0800 Developmental Writing (3)
Continued study and application to achieve writing
skills needed for college; student will write unified,
coherent paragraphs and essays in acceptable,
standard form; will also produce a research essay.
Prereq: DSPW-0700; or ACT or COMPASS
placement. [E]
A prerequisite to all EA courses is admission
into the program in which the course is required.
Please consult the brochure for the specific
program. All courses shown in the same term
are corequisites and all courses shown in the
preceding term(s) are prerequisites.
82
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Pragmatic intro to Early Childhood Education;
preparation for student teaching; focus on physical,
emotional, cognitive, creative and social aspects of
young children; includes field component. Prereq:
ECED 1010, 2010. [S]
Physical, cognitive, social and emotional
development of young children; application to
child care, guidance and development; includes
field component. Prereq: ECED 1010, 2010. [F,S]
ECED 2030 Infant & Toddler Care (3)
240–Ambulance observation, EMS communication,
aeromedical services, rescue, labor and delivery,
burn unit, operating room, forensic center. 241–
Emergency and Pediatric Emergency departments.
242–Precepted prehospital paramedic field
internship. [240–F, 241–S, 242–Su]
Procedures for stimulating intellectual and physical
development of infants and toddlers as well as
basic caregiving skills; includes field component.
[on-demand]
ECED 2040 Family Dynamics & Community
Involvement (3)
Role of family and community in the physical,
cognitive, social, and emotional growth of
the child in a diverse society; includes field
component. Prereq: ECED-2015 or departmental
consent. [F]
EC - Economics
ECED 2050 Psychomotor Development (3)
EC 113 Consumer Economics (3)
Provides knowledge to make rational decisions
when purchasing clothing, food, housing,
consumer durables and insurance, using credit,
saving and investing, and preparing for retirement
and property distribution. [on demand]
◆EC 211,212 Principles of Economics I,II
(3,3)
211–Macro economics; study of national income
and its determination, fiscal and monetary policy,
money and banking, economic growth, and
international economics. 212–Micro economics;
study of the market system; covers the price
system, labor and the distribution of income,
government and business, and forms of business
organization. [F,S]
Theories and application of psychomotor
development; focus on motor skills; includes field
component. Prereq: ECED-2020. [on demand]
ECED 2060 Development of Exceptional
Children (3)
Physical, intellectual, and sensory impairments;
community resources for diagnosis and
treatment services; includes field component.
Prereq: ECED-2020, 2040; or departmental
consent. [F]
ECED 2070 Developmental Assessment (3)
Developing competency in screening children
for developmental problems; community support
programs and referral procedures; includes field
component. Prereq: ECED 2020; or departmental
consent. [S]
EC 235 Special Topics in Economics (1-3)
Specific topics of current economic interest;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
ECED 2080 Language and Literacy
Development in Early Childhood (3)
Research-based principles and practices for
providing children, birth to age nine, a strong
foundation in language and literacy; field
experiences required. Prereq: ECED-2015, 2020;
or departmental consent. [F]
ECED - Early Childhood Education
ECED 1010 Introduction to Early Childhood
Education (2)
EA - Emergency Medical Services
ECED 2015 Early Childhood Curriculum (3)
ECED 2020 Infant, Toddler, Child
Development (3)
EA 240,241,242 Paramedic Clinical Practice
I,II,III (2,3,4)
DSPS - Developmental Learning
Strategies
hygiene, growth, disease and accident prevention
in a family or child care program and the
community. [F]
ECED 2085 Math and Science in Early
Childhood (3)
Orientation to the profession; family relationships,
diversity, child development, age-appropriate
practices, observation and assessment, learning
environments, health and safety, and guidance. [F]
Standards, principles, and practices in teaching
mathematics and science to children, birth to age
nine; focus on developing and integrated math and
science curriculum; field experiences required.
Prereq: ECED-2015, 2020; or departmental
consent. [F]
ECED 2010 Safe, Healthy Learning
Environments (3)
ECED 2090 Creative Development (3)
Basic principles of childrenʼs health, nutrition,
Theories, teaching techniques, and basic program
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
components of early childhood art instruction;
use of art media and creative play activities. [on
demand]
ECED 2100 The Mentoring Teacher (3)
Philosophy, principles, and methods of mentoring;
focus on role of mentors as facilitators of adult
learning. [on demand]
Organization and administration practices; staffmanagement relations, state and local licensing
standards, national accreditation, CDA standards,
tax laws, legal liabilities; laboratory observation
and interaction. Prereq: ECED-1010, 2015, 2020,
2030. [on-demand]
ECED 2130,2140,2150 Clinical Practicum
I,II,III (2,2,2)
Practicum caring for children, birth to age
nine; 60 hours per semester. 2130–Physical and
human qualities needed to create safe, healthy
environments for learning. 2140–Reflective
practices to examine quality, and set goals;
experience in accredited site. 2150–Demonstration of competencies that produce positive
developmental outcomes. Must be taken
in sequence. Coreq for 2130: ECED 2010
or departmental consent. Prereq for 2140:
ECED-1010, 2015, 2040; or departmental consent.
Prereq for 2150: departmental consent. [2130-F,
2140–F, 2150–S]
ECED 2510 Educating the Culturally
Different (3)
A course providing insight into the special
problems and needs of children whose ethnic,
religious, or cultural heritage is different from
the majority culture group. The effects of poverty
and prejudices on classroom performance are
examined, as well as classroom practices to help
overcome these handicaps. [F]
EDPY 207 Educational Psychology (3)
Applies the principles of psychology to the
classroom. Topics include principles of human
development, learning, effective instructional
strategies, motivation, evaluative techniques and
challenges facing teachers in the increasingly
diverse classrooms in todayʼs schools. Fieldwork
required. [F,S]
EE - Electrical/Electronic Engineering
Technology
EE 110,212 Electrical Circuits I,II (4,4)
Study of DC and AC circuits, including series,
parallel and series-parallel; class 3 hours, lab
3 hours. 110–Current, voltage, resistance, and
power for DC circuits; capacitance, magnetism,
inductance and DC transients; sinusoidal
alternating waveforms. 212–Sinusoidal current,
voltage, phasors and impedance; resistance
and impedance networks and circuit theorems;
resonance, transformers and 3-phase circuits;
advanced practices with lab instruments. Must
be taken in sequence. Concurrent for 110:
MATH-1710. Prereq for 212: MATH-1720. [110–
F,S; 212–F]
EE 121,221 Electronics I,II (4,4)
Characteristics, parameters and basic physics
of semiconductors; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
121–Includes diodes, bipolar and field effect
transistors, optoelectronic devices, and small signal
and power amplifiers; covers biasing methods and
application of diodes in elementary rectifier/filter
circuits. 221–Focus on linear integrated circuit
technology; covers decibels and frequency effects,
voltage regulators, and amplifiers. Must be taken
in sequence. Prereq for 121: EE-110. [121–S,Su;
221–S]
EE 140 Digital Circuits (4)
ED - Education
ED 201 Foundations of Education (3)
Intro to the history, philosophies, and present
practices of elementary and secondary education in
America; includes field component. [F,S]
Intro to digital circuitry basics; systems, codes,
Boolean algebra, logic circuit design, types and
analysis, logic storage devices, counters, registers,
arithmetic and MSI (medium-scale integration)
logic circuits; lab experiments enforce logic
circuits design and analysis; class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. Concurrent: DSPM-0850. [F,S]
EE 200,201 Networking Technology I,II (4,4)
An overview of strategies for teaching reading
and critical thinking skills in kindergarten through
third grade. Emphasis on assessment instruments,
connections between reading and writing
development and allowing for cultural diversity.
[on demand]
Local area networks; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
200–Wiring, cables, telephone networks, modems,
cable modems, protocol and 1-server LANs. 201–
Larger LANs, connections and operations; network
architectures and standards, TCP/IP, Ethernet,
10 Base T, Novell, Macintosh servers, ISDN and
multimedia technology. Must be taken in sequence
or have instructorʼs consent. [200–F, 201–S]
ED 235 Special Topics in Education (1-3)
EE 203 Telecommunications (4)
ED 202 Teaching Reading and Critical
Thinking (3)
Specific topics of traditional and current interest,
including social developments and issues;
repeatable for credit on different topics. [on
demand]
EE 251 Microcontrollers Applications (4)
Microcontroller interfacing and applications; single
chip microcontrollers and single board computers
in stand-alone applications; assembly level
programming, program downloading, debugging;
interfaces to various I/O devices and appropriate
control software development; timing waveforms
generated by microcontroller using programmable
interrupts to control servos, stepper motors, and
DC motors; on-chip analog-to-digital convertor
and multiplexer to acquire, store, and process
analog signals; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq:
EE-110, and ET-115 or EE-250. [S]
EE 260 Programmable Logic Controllers (4)
PLC system and components description; program
functions including sequential on-off operations,
timers, counters and data comparisons; PLC
instructions use to perform numerical, logic and
move functions on single element and multielement files, forcing input/output instructions;
program control, sequencer, and block transfer
instructions application; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
Prereq: EE-110, 140. [F]
EE 261 Automation Control Systems (4)
Discrete and continuous automation control
systems; principle motors used as actuators in
these systems; motor control devices and circuits
studied; proportional, integral, and derivative
control of 3-control loop model factory analyzed
with theoretical discussion and lab investigation;
mechanical/thermal transducers analyzed; PLC
used for automatic control of factory cell; class
3 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: EE-121, 212, 260.
Concurrent: EE-221 or instructorʼs consent. [S]
EE 271 Capstone Project (3)
Capstone course for Automated Controls and
Computer Systems majors in Electrical/Electronic
Engineering Technology. Applies skills learned
in previous courses in the development of team
projects. Prereq: EE 221, 250 or 260, MATH 1720.
Concurrent: EE 212, 251 or 261, or instructorʼs
consent. [S]
EE 284 Electrical Technology for
Mechanical Engineering Technology (3)
Basic electrical/electronics theory/practice for
mechanical engineering technology; intro to
electric and electronic devices; AC/DC circuits
reviewed; emphasis on electrical power;
transformers, generators, motors studied for single
and 3-phase operations; electrical machinery
controls studied; lectures enforced by lab
experiments, videos, and tours of local companies;
class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: ET-115,
MATH-1720. [F]
EE 298 Special Topics in Electronics (1-4)
Introduction to telecommunications with emphasis
on wiring, cables, telephone networks, modems,
protocols and local area networks; class 3 hours,
lab 3 hours. [S]
EE 250 Microcomputer Systems (4)
Thorough study of DOS, DOS EDIT, DOSSHELL,
DOSKEY, RAMDRIVEs and Batch files;
advanced Turbo Basic methods including data/
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
objects graphical display, basic object motion, and
interrupts use; parallel data input/output; serial
communication (RS-232) to terminals and other
computers. Prereq: EE-110, ET-115. [F]
Course Descriptions
ECED 2120 Administration of Child Care
Centers (3)
EDPY - Educational Psychology
Special topics and/or problems in electronics;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
EE 299 Special Topics in Electronics with
Lab (1-5)
Special topics and/or problems in electronics;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
83
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
EG - Engineering Transfer
EG 104 Vector Statics (3)
Course Descriptions
Forces and their effect on rigid bodies at rest; free
body diagrams, equilibrium in 2 and 3 dimensions,
moments of inertia, and truss analysis. Concurrent:
MATH-1920. [S, day/every year; F, night/odd
years]
EG 185 Introduction to Engineering Design
(3)
Introduction to the design process in engineering
and computer aided design including: historical
perspective, problem definition, idea generation,
project planning and management, simple
decision-making, development of visualization
skill, interpretation and construction of 3-D
objects through the use of sketching and basic
computer-aided design software. Design exercises
culminating in a conceptual group design project,
with application of basic engineering science.
Written and oral reports included. Concurrent:
MATH 1720. [on demand]
EG 222 Probability and Statistics for
Engineering (3)
Descriptive, inferential, and relational statistics
including discrete and continuous distributions,
bivariate and multivariate data and distribution,
elementary sampling, interval estimation,
hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and
experimental design. Concurrent: MATH 1720. [F]
EG 224 Introduction to Engineering
Computations (3)
Engineering computations using Excel, Visual
Basic.Net, and macros created in Visual Basic.Net
accessed through the Excel platform. Programming
topics include flowcharts, algorithms, input/
output, data types, decisions, loops, functions, sub
procedures, files, and arrays. All programs are
related to engineering applications and analysis
including problem solving techniques, applicable
engineering fundamentals, and mathematical
solution procedures. Prereq: MATH 1720. [F,S]
EG 225 Engineering Programming (3)
Study of the structure, design, and implementation
of computer programming for engineering
applications; flow diagram representation of
efficient algorithms and proper syntax of the C++
computer language; credit not allowed for both
EG 225 and CS 185. Prereq: MATH 1720. [F, day/
every year; Su, night/odd years]
EG 246 Mechanics of Materials (3)
Stress-strain relationships under plane and 3-D
deformations; Hookeʼs Law, extension, bending,
shear, torsion, and beam deflections; Castiglianoʼs
theorem, column design and buckling, combined
stresses, stress concentrations, and failure theories.
Prereq: EG 104. [F, day/every year; S, night/even
years]
EG 247 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory
(1)
Experiments demonstrating material mechanics
theory and engineering materials characteristics;
labs include measurement and accuracy, hardness,
impact strength, elasticity modulus, torsion, beam
bending, and column buckling; individualized
design project involving analysis, design and test
84
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
of a structure required; class 1 hour, lab 3 hours.
Concurrent: EG-246. [F, day/every year; S, night/
even years]
EG 248 Dynamics (3)
Rectilinear, curvilinear, and rotary motion; work
and energy, impulse and momentum principles;
emphasis on machine motions; 3-D problems.
Prereq: EG-104. [S, day/every year; F, night/even
years]
EG 270 Electrical Circuits (3)
Direct current and sinusoidal steady-state analysis;
resistance, capacitance, inductance, first and
second order step response; Kirchhoffʼs laws,
circuit theorems, and operational amplifiers.
Concurrent: MATH-1920. [S, day/every year; F,
night/odd years]
EG 271 Electrical Circuits Laboratory (1)
Lab for EG 270; use of circuit simulation software
and basic electrical instrumentation; lab 3 hours.
Concurrent: EG 270, MATH 1920. [S, day/every
year; F, night/odd years]
EG 298 Special Topics in Engineering (1-4)
Specialized topics and/or problems in engineering;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
EG 299 Special Topics in Engineering with
Lab (1-4)
Specialized topics and/or problems in engineering;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Electrician, See “IE-Industrial Electricity”
Electronics, Industrial, See “ER-Industrial
Electronics”
◆ENGL 1010,1020 Composition I,II (3,3)
Research projects required. 1010–Focus on
exposition and argument; process and development
using various rhetorical patterns. 1020–Focus on
reading and responding to short fiction, poetry,
drama and/or non-fiction prose. Must be taken in
sequence. Prereq for 1010: Placement per TBR
specifications or DSPW-0800. [E]
ENGL 1035 Literary Studies in America (3)
Study of the literary and cultural legacy of selected
regions in America through reading, discussion,
research, online interaction, writing, and personal
travel to the destination. Prereq: ENGL 1010,
enrollment and registration in the designated
educational tour. [S]
◆ENGL 2110,2120 American Masterpieces
I,II (3,3)
Framework and major movements, writers, and
works of American literature; research project
required. 2110–To 1865; focus on tracing the
development of a national literature and literatureʼs
role in recording American cultural heritage. 2120–
From 1865; focus on various attempts to portray
the American response to the complexity of life in
the 20th century. Prereq: ENGL-1020. [2110–F,
2120–S]
◆ENGL 2140 African-American Literature (3)
Literature by African-American writers from
the Colonial Period to the Modern Era; readings
include written versions of traditional oral forms.
Prereq: ENGL-1020. [F]
◆ENGL 2210,2220 English Masterpieces I,II
(3,3)
Literary, cultural, and historical aspects of British
literature; focus on works that illustrate important
literary trends; research project required. 2210–To
1798. 2220–From 1798. Prereq: ENGL-1020.
[2210–F, 2220–S]
ENGL 2240 Shakespeare: An Introduction (3)
ENGL - English
ENGL 0610 English as a Second Language
(3)
Designed for the non-native speaker of English;
includes practice in writing, listening, reading and
speaking; not intended for transfer; not accepted
toward any degree program at Chattanooga State.
[on demand]
ENGL 0620 English as a Second Language
III (3)
Designed for the non-native speaker of English
who possesses a mid-to-intermediate level of
competency in spoken and written English. The
course includes practice in writing, listening,
reading and speaking. Not applicable to credit
hours required for a degree or certificate. Prereq:
ENGL 0610 or equivalent. [on demand]
ENGL 1000 Tutoring Writing (1)
In-depth view of writing and tutoring process,
and current writing center theory; focus on
professionalism, interpersonal skills, and
collaborative learning; repeatable for credit.
Prereq: ENGL-1010 and departmental consent. [on
demand]
Study of representative plays by William
Shakespeare selected from among the comedies,
tragedies, and histories; research project required.
Prereq: ENGL-1020. [on demand]
◆ENGL 2410,2420 Literature of the Western
World I,II (3,3)
Survey of western literature; research project
required. 2410–Literary, cultural, and historical
contributions of classical, medieval, and
Renaissance periods to the value systems and
world view of contemporary society; focus
on development of aesthetic awareness and
appreciation of literary art. 2420–Selected readings
from the 17th–20th centuries; focus on cultural
and aesthetic values presented by the writers, their
relationship to earlier literature, and their influence
on contemporary literature. Prereq: ENGL-1020.
[2410–F,S; 2420–S]
ENGL 2540 Literature by Women (3)
Historical overview of womenʼs literary
accomplishments in English; from the Middle
Ages to the contemporary period; genres surveyed
include the novel, autobiography, short story,
feminist expository prose, drama, and poetry.
Prereq: ENGL-1020. [on demand]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
ENGL 2630 Literature for Children (3)
ER - Industrial Electronics
Survey of childrenʼs literature with special
attention to preschool and elementary; genres
include folk tales, myth, fantasy, fiction, poetry,
biography, and non-fiction. Prereq: ENGL-1010.
[F,S]
ET 299 Special Topics in Engineering
Technology with Lab (1-4)
ER 000 Industrial Electronics
Specialized topics and/or problems in engineering
technology; repeatable for credit on different
topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
ENGL 2640 Children’s Literature:
Contemporary Issues (3)
ENGL 2650 Literature for the Adolescent (3)
Literature for the young adult with emphasis on
stages of development and their relationship to
the reading experience. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on
demand]
ESC - Environmental Science
◆ESC 1110,1120 Environmental Science I,II
(4,4)
Logical organization, formatting, and stylistic
conventions applied to communication in business/
industry; focus on collaborative planning and
presentation of research-based data and reader/
listener-oriented communication; word processing
assignments. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [E]
Study of environmental problems at global,
national, and local levels; class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. 1110–Ecological principles, geophysical
processes, and human population dynamics;
scientific approach applied to understanding
environmental concepts using hands-on laboratory
and field experiences. 1120–Soil, water, and
mineral resources, food resources and pesticides,
hazardous wastes and air pollution, energy, land,
and species resources; laboratory emphasis on
local field experiences. [E]
ENGL 2830 Creative Writing: Introduction (3)
ESC 2430 Introduction to Soil Resources (4)
Instruction and practice in writing poetry and/or
short fiction; students read and discuss their
own works as well as representative works by
contemporary writers. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on
demand]
Soil genesis and formation, composition and
classification, physical and chemical properties and
how they relate to soil capabilities and limitations,
and soil planning and management; field lab
excursions and exercises reinforce lecture topics;
class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. [on demand]
ENGL 2710 Technical Reports (3)
ENGL 2840 Creative Writing: Poetry (3)
Instruction and practice in writing poetry. Prereq:
ENGL-1010. [on demand]
ENGL 2850 Creative Writing: Fiction (3)
Instruction and practice in writing fiction. Prereq:
ENGL-1010. [on demand]
ENGL 2990 Special Studies in English (3)
Topics of contemporary interest in language and
literature; repeatable for credit on different topics.
Prereq: ENGL-1010. [F,S]
ESC 2650 Gardening with Native Plants (3)
Intro to using native vegetation in the landscape;
appropriate for the home gardener or commercial
designer; advantages of native plants, general
plant ecology, plant identification, soils, landscape
design, species selection, and plant propagation
techniques. [F]
ESC 2990 Special Topics in Environmental
Science (1-4)
Detailed study of specific topic in environmental
science; repeatable for credit on different topics.
Prereq: Instructor and department headʼs consent.
[on demand]
EO - Heavy Equipment Operator
EO - Heavy Equipment Operator
This 8 week program will provide the students
with the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities
required in the safe and efficient operation of
specific pieces of heavy construction equipment
and in preventative maintenance. Training will
be available in the Crawler Tractors, Excavators
(Track-hoe) and Motorized Road Graders. The
program is accredited and recognized by the
respective industry as a regional training resource.
Training will be competency based in accordance
with the National Center of Construction Education
& Research (NCCER) curriculum. Training will
consist of a specified common core and required
competencies for each piece of unique equipment.
This program is 275 clock hours.
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
ET - Engineering Technology
ET 115 Computers in Engineering
Technology (3)
Intro to computers for engineering technology
students; Visual BASIC programming, word
processing, and spreadsheets; use of computer
as a tool for subsequent courses in engineering
technology. Concurrent: MATH-1710. [F,S]
ET 298 Special Topics in Engineering
Technology (1-4)
Specialized topics and/or problems in engineering
technology; repeatable for credit on different
topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
EZ - Electrical/Electronic Engineering
Technology (DuPont)
EZ 110 DC Circuits (4) (DuPont)
Direct current electronics basics; analysis of
current flow and conductors physics; study of
voltage, resistance, Ohmʼs Law, Kirchhoffʼs Laws,
theory and use of meters, power, magnetism,
inductance and capacitance; series, parallel, and
series-parallel DC circuits analyzed using Ohmʼs
and Kirchhoffʼs Laws; complex DC circuits
analyzed using loop equations and Theveninʼs and
Nortonʼs theorems; class 3 hours, lab 2 hours.
EZ 111 AC Circuits (3) (DuPont)
Course Descriptions
Explores changes in childrenʼs literature of the last
25 years; current literature that addresses real-life
issues confronting todayʼs child and considered
both helpful and controversial; includes novels,
picture books, poetry, and non-fiction for children
from preschool age to junior high; how to deal
with sensitive issues and censorship. Prereq:
ENGL-1010. [on demand]
The student will be trained in construction
materials and methods, conduit bending, electrical
safety, electrical test equipment, electrical
blueprints, voice and data systems, codes and
standards, and computer applications. The student
will be trained in proper buses and networks, fiber
optics, video systems, wireless communication,
fire alarm systems, intrusion detection systems,
and media management systems; 30 clock hours/
week. [E]
Alternating current electronic basics; sine waves
and alternating current values analysis; waveform
measurement with AC meters and oscilloscopes,
inductance theory and circuits, transformer theory
and applications, capacitance theory and circuits,
series and parallel resonance theory and circuits,
bandwidth, and -C filters; class 2 hours, lab 2
hours.
EZ 115 Active Devices (3) (DuPont)
Semiconductor devices theory and application;
description of semiconductor materials, doping
methods, and conduction; conventional/special
purpose diodes, bipolar junction transistor
characteristics and circuits, unipolar junction field
effect transistors, and FET and MOSFET circuits,
thyristors, integrated circuits, and optoelectronic
devices; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours.
EZ 120 Electrical Theory (3) (DuPont)
Basic concepts and skills needed for technically
competent Control Equipment Craftsman in
electrical plant maintenance areas; National
Electrical Code, AC/DC basics and motors,
3-phase systems, transformers, over-current
protection, fuses, circuit breakers, electrical test
equipment, grounding, and wiring techniques; class
2 hours, lab 2 hours.
EZ 122 Applied Electricity (3) (DuPont)
Electrical components common to industrial power
distribution and motor control systems; electrical
symbols, drawings, diagrams, and ladder logic
diagrams instruction, focus on 2- and 3-wire motor
control circuits and motor control devices; class 2
hours, lab 2 hours.
EZ 124 Motor Control (3) (DuPont)
Motor control centers circuit construction,
operation, and troubleshooting applied by GE-7700
Motor Control Venter and a Rowan controller
system trainer use; GE-7700 and Rowan controller
analysis and troubleshooting by system level
drawings, schematic diagrams, and electrical test
equipment use; GE-7700 represents a manual
motor control center and Rowan trainer simulates
a plant installed nylon yarn wind-up system that
simultaneously employs several motors; class 2
hours, lab 2 hours.
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
85
Course Descriptions
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
EZ 131 Digital Electronics (3) (DuPont)
FI 113 Fire Protection Systems (3)
Theory and application of digital electronics
techniques and devices; uses and physical/
electronic characteristics of a wide range of
integrated circuits; working knowledge of number
systems, Boolean algebra, binary codes, logic
circuits, memory devices, data conversion, and
digital troubleshooting also gained; class 2 hours,
lab 2 hours.
Design and operation of fire detection and alarm
construction, heat and smoke control systems,
special protection and sprinkler systems, water
supply for fire protection and portable fire
extinguishers. [F]
EZ 134 Basic Programmable Controls (3)
(DuPont)
Entry level programmable logic controllers (PLC)
theory, operation and maintenance; generic PLC
basics; PLC system component identification,
ladder logic diagrams, and programming basics;
lab training situations on Allen Bradley SLC100/150, PLC-5 and T-50 programming terminals
operation; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours.
EZ 201 Instrumentation Theory (3) (DuPont)
Intro to process control systems equipment and
basic physics used in their operation; includes
equipment instrumentation demonstrations and
instruction on skills used in performing basic
instrumentation practices and procedures for
calibration certification; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours.
EZ 210 Plant Safety (3) (DuPont)
Prepares Control Equipment Craftsmen to
recognize electrical safety hazards, plan and
execute electrical jobs from a safety perspective,
and follow general safety practices and
protective measures as stated in EZ DuPont
Engineering Standards, the Chattanooga Plant
Works Engineering Safety Handbook, and the
Chattanooga Plant Lock-Tag-Clear-Try-Release
Procedures; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours.
EZ 220 Advanced Instrumentation (3)
(DuPont)
Manual and automatic process controls; control
loop installation, calibration, and tuning with
emphasis on single loop controllers; calibration,
installation and removal, disassembly, reassembly,
and maintenance of valves; class 2 hours, lab 3
hours.
EZ 230 Automated Control Systems (3)
(DuPont)
Practical application of process installation,
calibration, operation and troubleshooting using
batch process simulator; use of process instrument
drawings, schematic diagrams and input/output
(I/O) drawings in installing, analyzing and
troubleshooting a process on a system level; class
2 hours, lab 3 hours.
FI 111 Introduction to Emergency
Services (3)
Emergency/non-emergency operations typically
provided by municipal, volunteer and industrial
emergency service organizations; historical
perspectives, relevant statistics, current and future
challenges, services and operations, and external
agencies that regulate or impact the emergency
response field. [F]
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
FI 240 Emergency Service Instructor (3)
FI 114 Building Construction for Fire
Science (3)
Credit given for national or state certification to
NFPA-1041 Instructor Level-I. [F,S]
Intro to fire problems relating to building
construction; analysis of building construction,
materials, and constructional design methods;
focus on needs and requirements of institutional,
mercantile, and industrial structures before, during,
and after construction periods. [S]
FI 251 Fire Officer I (3)
Credit given for national or state certification
to NFPA-1021 Fire Officer Professional
Qualifications. May be substituted for FI 221.
Prereq: FI 230 or instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
FI 116,124 Fire Fighting Tactics and
Strategy I,II (3,3)
FI 260 Fire Prevention and Inspection (3)
Fire control techniques and attack strategies.
116–Focus on residential fires; fire apparatus and
equipment, forcible entry, ladder use, hose and
hose stream application, extinguishing agents,
ventilation, overhaul and salvage. 124–Focus on
commercial, industrial, and nonresidential fires;
personnel and equipment distribution and use;
hazard control. Must be taken in sequence. Prereq
for 116: Instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
Provides fundamental information regarding
the history and philosophy of fire prevention;
organization, and operation of a fire prevention
bureau; use of fire codes; identification and
correction of fire hazards, and the relationship
of fire prevention with built-in fire protection
systems, fire investigation, and fire and life safety
education. [S]
FI 140 Legal Aspects of the Fire Service (3)
FI 262 Fire Causes and Investigation (3)
Federal, state, and local laws that regulate
emergency services; national standards influencing
emergency services; standard of care, tort liability,
and review of relevant court cases. Prereq: FI-111
or instructorʼs consent. [S]
Analysis of fire causes; relationship of fire
characteristics and causes; recognition of
equipment failure responsible for fires, incendiary
fires; collection, preservation, and documentation
of evidence substantiating fire causes. [S]
FI 146 Emergency Service Stress (1)
FI 270 Emergency Service Strategic
Planning & Innovation (3)
Stress and its impact on emergency service
personnel; unique emergency service field stresses,
excessive stress identification, survival skills, and
management; critical incident stress debriefing
(CISD). [F]
FI 148, 230 Firefighter I, II (3,3)
148–Credit for course given for state or national
certification to NFPA-1001 Firefighter-I. 230–
Credit given for completion of standards set for
state or national advanced Certified Fire Fighter-II.
[F,S]
FI 215 Fire Behavior and Combustion (3)
Theories and fundamentals of how and why fires
start, spread, and how they are controlled. [F]
FI 217 Fire Hydraulics (3)
Basic math and hydraulic formulas for fluid flow,
friction loss and forces; internal and external fire
protection water distribution and supply; fluid
flow in hoses; nozzle discharge and fire streams;
and application of principles to fire department
operations. [S]
FI 221,222 Fire Administration I,II (3,3)
FI - Fire Science
understanding to emergency and non-emergency
operations; emergency operations, emergency
medical, equipment and vehicle, facility, hazardous
materials, wildland, and general safety, protective
clothing and safety equipment. [F]
Organization and management of fire department.
221–Focus on fire service leadership from
perspective of the company officer; relationship
with government agencies. 222–Budget
administration, organization of divisions;
relationship with outside agencies. Prereq for 222:
FI 221 or 251. [F,S]
Basic concepts strategic planning and innovation
for emergency services; community emergency
service planning issues, budget/cost containment,
and evaluation review; alternative delivery
systems, innovation management and emergency
service future. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [S]
FI 275 Emergency Response to Hazardous
Materials (4)
Basic principles and techniques regarding
emergency response to hazardous materials
incidents; recognition information, analysis
and mitigation of hazardous materials incidents
by emergency response personnel; regulatory
considerations, detection and personal protective
equipment, decontamination, and facility and
transportation containers; class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. [on demand]
FI 280 Emergency Services Practicum (3)
Research paper on contemporary issues or
problems within emergency services field; written
report required; findings may be applied in work
environment. Prereq: instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
FI 299 Special Topics in Emergency
Services (1-3)
Topics of traditional and current interest in
emergency service field; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
FI 235 Fundamentals of Emergency Service
Safety (3)
Application of safety during emergency and nonemergency operations; basic understanding of
causes of injuries and death and how to apply that
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
FM - Financial Management
FREN 2990 Special Topics in French (1-3)
FM 201 Financial Management (3)
Specific topics in French language and culture;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
FREN-1010 and instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Designed to improve decision skills related to
financial resources of the firm; financial analysis
techniques, time value of money, valuation, and
risk; nature and scope of financial markets and
investment opportunities. Prereq: BU 115 or
BU 250 and MG 103.
GEOG - Geography
GEOG 1010 Physical Geography (3)
The Earthʼs physical environment; processes that
determine Earthʼs climate, water, soil, landforms,
vegetation, and distribution patterns of each. [S]
◆GEOG 1025 World Geography (3)
FP - Financial Planning
FP 101 Fundamentals of Financial Planning
(3)
Study of selected world regions; focus on each
regionʼs characteristics, problems and global
interrelationships. [E]
Intro to financial planning principles; focus on
communication with the client; basic areas of
financial planning surveyed, i.e., tax planning, risk
and insurance, investments, retirement benefit, and
estate planning. [F]
GEOL - Geology
FP 219 Computerized Financial Planning (3)
Intro to geology; Earthʼs age and origin; Earth
materials, processes, and resultant structures; class
3 hours, lab 3 hours. [F]
Applications course teaching simple household
budgeting and money management software and
more extensive programs which track investments;
students use spreadsheet software to develop
their own applications; experience with computer
applications required. Prereq: BU-185. [on
demand]
FREN - French
FREN 1010,1020 Elementary French I,II
(4,4)
Elementary grammar, vocabulary, reading,
idiomatic conversation, and French culture. Must
be taken in sequence. [1010–F, 1020–S]
FREN 2010,2020 Intermediate French I,II
(3,3)
Intermediate French conversation and reading.
Must be taken in sequence. Prereq: FREN-1020 or
2 years of high school French. [on demand]
◆GEOL 1040 Physical Geology (4)
◆GEOL 1050 Historical Geology (4)
Earthʼs origin and geologic history; concept of
geologic time and the fossil record; class 3 hours,
lab 3 hours. [S]
GERM - German
GERM 1010,1020 Elementary German I,II
(4,4)
Elementary grammar, vocabulary, reading,
translation, conversation, and cultural studies.
Must be taken in sequence. [1010–F, 1020–S]
GERM 2010,2020 Intermediate German I,II
(3,3)
Intermediate German grammar, reading, oral drills
and conversation. Must be taken in sequence.
Prereq: GERM-1020 or 2 years of high school
German. [on demand]
SPECIAL INTEREST COURSES
SPECIAL INTEREST COURSES
The following courses are offered as a community
service and are not intended to be used to satisfy
the foreign language requirement or remove
high school deficiencies for any degree program
at Chattanooga State or any other college or
university.
FREN 1000 Conversational French (2)
Contemporary French language and culture;
focus on spoken language, basic vocabulary and
idiomatic expressions needed in real-life situations.
[on demand]
FREN 1990 French Field Work (3)
Basics of teaching French; includes observation/
participation; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq:
FREN-1010. [on demand]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Greenhouse, See “Landscaping and Turf
Management”
The following courses are offered as a community
service and are not intended to be used to satisfy
the foreign language requirement or remove
high school deficiencies for any degree program
at Chattanooga State or any other college or
university.
HE - Health Information
HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
HE 103 Medical Terminology (3)
Prefixes, suffixes, root words, combining
forms, Latin and Greek forms, spelling, and
pronunciation; focus on building working medical
vocabulary based on all body systems; commonly
used terms related to body disorders, medical
and surgical procedures, abbreviations, charting
symbols, and diagnostic terms; class 3 hours. [E]
Course Descriptions
Foreign Language, see “FREN-French,” “GERMGerman,” “SPAN-Spanish”
Graphic Design, See “AA Graphic Design”
HE 115 Health Information Management
Foundations (4)
This course introduces the healthcare environment,
healthcare settings, medical staff organization,
records management and the role of health
information management (HIM) in healthcare.
Topics include the history of HIM, organization of
various healthcare facilities; the impact managed
care has had on healthcare providers, healthcare
record format, deficiency analysis, records control,
storage, document imaging, forms management
and numbering, filing and indexing systems.
Emphasis is placed on the ethical conduct of the
HIM professionals, understanding the patient
record, and using electronic charting software to
create electronic health records; class 3 hour, lab
3 hours. Prereq: Acceptance into HIM Program or
instructorʼs consent. [F]
HE 118 Pharmacology (3)
Principles and classifications of commonly used
drugs by body system. Drug actions, sources,
administration, indications, adverse reactions;
forms and reference material. Prereq: Acceptance
into HIM Program or instructorʼs consent. [F]
HE 127 Medicolegal, Ethical and
Professional Concepts (3)
This course explores the professional standards
of conduct, privacy and confidentiality of patient
information; in depth review of HIPAA with a
focus on the legislative process and the court
system. Release of information, informed consent,
patient rights, risk and ergonomic management, job
procurement, and record retention. Prereq: HE 115
or instructorʼs consent. [S]
HE 211 Pathophysiology (4)
GERM 1000 Conversational German (2)
Contemporary German language and culture;
focus on spoken language; basic vocabulary and
idiomatic expressions needed in real-life situations.
[on demand]
A comprehensive study of disease and disease
processes. A focus on causes, symptoms and
treatments. Prereq: BIOL 2020, HE 103, 118, 115,
or instructorʼs consent. [F]
GERM 2990 Special Topics in German (1-3)
HE 225 Health Data Content and the
Computer Based Record (3)
Specific topics in German language and culture;
repeatable for credit on different topics. [on
demand]
This course emphasizes JCAHO, NCQA,
Medicare, and state licensure requirements
including medical staff credentialing; the course
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
87
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Course Descriptions
stresses documentation issues. Data sets utilized
to measure healthcare such as UHDDS, UACDS,
MDS, HEDIS, and NPDB are covered. Cancer
and Trauma registries, primary versus secondary
records, data dictionaries, forms design, and screen
design are reviewed. The CPR (computer-based
patient record) is introduced; class 3 hours. Prereq:
HE-115 or instructorʼs consent. [S]
HE 226,256 Health Information Management
Clinical Practice I,II (3,3)
Supervised learning is experienced in the
basic functions of an HIM (health information
management) department in hospitals accredited
by the JCAHO and in select non-hospital
settings. Emphasis is placed on student learning
of HIM procedures, computer applications
including registration and master patient index,
data collection, analysis and presentation, data
integrity and productivity assessment, protection
of patient confidentiality, professional conduct,
and ethical behavior. Prereq for 226: HE-103, 115;
or instructorʼs consent. Coreq for 256: HE 255.
Prereq for 256: HE 127, 226, 297; or instructorʼs
consent. [F]
patient accounting overview, anti-fraud measures,
chargemaster, EOBs, check and balance
procedures, comprehensive claims tracking and
reporting, financial statements, management
reporting and managed care contracts; class
2 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: HE-225, 245 or
instructorʼs consent. [S]
HIST 2130 Afro-American History (3)
HE 297 Organization and Supervision for
Healthcare Professionals (2)
HIST 2530 The Holocaust and Jewish
Civilization (3)
Basic principles of management; the strategic
management process; operational management
on the microlevel, midlevel, and organizationwide level; space design and management; human
resource management; and financial management,
including business plans and budgets, healthcare
accounting and finance, and capital expense and
investment. Prereq: HE-115, 225; or instructorʼs
consent. [F]
Chronicles the origins, progression, and
culmination of the Holocaust and grapples with
questions and issues surrounding this human
catastrophe; endeavors to understand the rich
European Jewish heritage and civilization virtually
destroyed and to analyze the continuing impact of
modern racial nationalism in the world today. [on
demand]
Study of black people in America from their
African origins to the present; highlights and
unique nature of the Black Experience in America;
the structure, problems, and potential of the Black
Community; intro to thoughts and contributions of
Black leaders. [on demand]
HIST 2990 Special Topics in History (1-3)
Specific topics of traditional and current historical
interest; includes relevant political and social
developments and issues; repeatable for credit on
different topics. [on demand]
Health and Physical Education, See “PHEDPhysical Education”
HE 244 Health Statistics (2)
Covers common health statistics; includes
converting data into information. Prereq: CS-101,
HE 115; or instructorʼs consent. [F]
HE 245,255 Clinical Coding and
Classification I,II (4,4)
Classification and coding systems for most
health care settings; focus on accurate coding as
major anti-fraud measure by substantiation of
diagnoses and service through documentation
and as a legitimate reimbursement optimizer.;
class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. 245–ICD-9-CM
conventions, quality control, principal diagnosis
identification, coding reference, DRGs, severity,
sequencing and methodology. 255–CPT-4 coding
and documentation, relationship of coding to
managed care, compliance, and chargemasters;
APCs, groupers, encoders, and coding references.
Although ICD-9-CM is utilized in case studies,
emphasis is placed on accurate CPT-4 (including
E&M and HCPCS) coding as an antifraud
measure along with substantiation of services
by documentation. The relationship of coding to
managed care, compliance and chargemaster is
explored. Thorough coding with documentation
substantiation as a legitimate reimbursement
optimizer is stressed. Prereq for 245: HE 115,
BIOL 2010, 2020; or instructorʼs consent. Coreq
for 245: HE 211. Prereq for 255: HE-211, 245; or
instructorʼs consent. [245–F, 255–S]
HE 247 Healthcare Quality, Utilization, and
Risk Management (2)
This course addresses the use and collection of
aggregate data in the evaluation of healthcare
services. The exploration of quality improvement,
committee functions, critical pathways, risk
management, utilization review, and peer review
organizations. Admission and level of care criteria
are emphasized along with risk management
indicators and data quality; class 1 hour, lab 3
hours. Prereq: HE-225 or instructorʼs consent. [S]
HE 248 Reimbursement Methodologies (3)
This course explores prospective payment
systems, DRG assignments, groupers, APCs,
RBRVS, PPS, capitalitation, third party payers,
practice management including personnel issues,
scheduling and referrals, billing and insurance,
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
HIST - History
HMSC - Homeland Security
HIST 1010,1020 Western Civilization I,II
(3,3)
HMSC 230 Terrorism and the Law (3)
Survey of political, economic, social, cultural,
religious, and intellectual history of mankind that
has influenced Western Civilization. 1010–To 1715.
1020–From 1715. [1010–F, 1020–S]
HIST 1110,1120 History of World
Civilizations I,II (3,3)
Survey of political, economic, social, cultural,
religious, and intellectual history of world
civilizations. 1110–To 1500. 1120–From 1500. [E]
This course is an in-depth analysis of federal and
state law as they pertain to the study of terrorism.
Topics include search and seizure issues, privacy
laws, the Patriot Act, Constitutional issues with
reference to terrorism investigation/prevention, and
criminal procedure. [F]
HMSC 240 Terrorism Prevention (3)
HIST 2010,2020 United States History I,II
(3,3)
This course provides an overview of the various
methods of monitoring for and detection of
chemical, biological, and radiological hazards.
Related topics include target identification, target
protection techniques, and information assimilation
and analysis. [F]
Survey of United States history; focus on political,
diplomatic, economic, social, cultural and
intellectual phases of American life in its regional,
national, and international aspects. 2010–Through
1865. 2020–After 1865. [E]
HP - American Sign Language
HIST 2030 Tennessee History (3)
Survey of the stateʼs history from its beginnings
to the present; consideration of its social
development, population, economy, political life,
and geography. [on demand]
HIST 2040 The Scopes Trial (3)
Historical, scientific, theological, educational,
and artistic ramifications of the Scopes Trial. [on
demand]
HIST 2050 Appalachian History: Colonial
Times to Present (3)
Examines the theme of continuity and change
in the Southern and Central Appalachian region
from colonial times to present. States included in
this study are western Virginia, eastern Kentucky,
western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee,
northern Georgia, northern Alabama, and southern
West Virginia. [F,S]
HP 120,121,220,221 American Sign
Language I,II,III,IV (3,3,3,3)
Study of the manual alphabet and language of
“signs.” 120–Basic level skill development;
sentence structure, question forms, verb usage,
classifiers, negatives, locational relationships,
plurals, and time measurements stressing ASL and
Deaf Community. 121–Intense study of manual
communication; vocabulary, language concepts,
sign language idioms, and expressive/receptive
skills; intro to ASL conversational regulators.
220–Focus on communication of day-to-day
experiences and activities, spatial agreement,
storytelling, and general conversational regulators.
221–Emphasis on language concepts and syntax,
vocabulary review, conversational patterns,
numbers, fingerspelling, songs, poetry, and
storytelling techniques. Must be taken in sequence.
[120, 220–F; 121, 221–S]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
HP 132 Psychology of Deaf People and
Their Culture (3)
HR 210 Methods of Human Service
Practice (3)
Study of the bilingual education for Deaf children,
socio-linguistics and Deaf culture, family
structure, socialization in groups and in the Deaf
Community, and economic status of Deaf persons,
civil rights of the Deaf, telecommunication
devices, cochlear implants and deafness as a
disability. [S]
Multi-disciplinary approach to development of
understanding of the roles, treatment modalities,
and practice settings in which human services
specialists may be involved. Prereq: HR-101. [F,S]
Special topics in American Sign Language; focuses
on use of ASL in the workplace; repeatable for
credit on different topics. [on demand]
Examination of interpersonal interaction patterns
in functional and dysfunctional families and their
problems in contemporary American society; focus
on examining emotional and physical abuse, drug
addiction, alternative life styles, and changing sex
roles. [F,S]
HR 220 Human Services Practicum (6)
HP 222 Fingerspelling (2)
Comprehensive study of fingerspelling, using drills
to enable reading of full-speed fingerspelling and
fluent expression in fingerspelling. Coreq: HP-221
or instructorʼs consent. [S]
Horticulture, See “LM-Landscaping and Turf
Management”
HR - Human Services
HR 101 Introduction to the Field of Social
Welfare (4)
Intro and orientation to social welfare; focus on
professional values/ethics and the diversity of
groups served; historical development and present
structure; minimum of 45 observation hours and
supervised volunteer service in appropriate settings
required. [F,S]
HR 125 Community Social Services (3)
Survey of community social services to consider as
resources in making effective referrals for human
services in the Chattanooga Metropolitan area. [on
demand]
Minimum of 200 hours supervised field instruction
in social agencies dealing directly with human
problems; student applies and demonstrates
appropriate mastery of necessary knowledge/skills
required for beginning practice; in-class activities
include on-campus seminars. Prereq: HR-101.
Concurrent HR 210. [F,S]
HR 235 Methods of Substance Abuse
Treatment (3)
Theory and practice of alcohol and/or drug
addiction treatment approaches; focus on
understanding of wellness and the whole person,
stages of recovery, discharge assessment, and
community resources. [on demand]
HS 200 Clinical Education Methodology (3)
Aids instructors or future instructors in allied
health and nursing programs to develop
knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for effective
teaching, supervision, and evaluation of students
in clinical settings; focus on presenting real-world
experience by providing students the opportunity
to design, develop, implement and evaluate
instruments and strategies transferable to clinical
settings. [on demand]
HS 214,224 Radiation Physics I,II (4,4)
Basic classical and modern physics concepts
needed for physics involved in radiation therapy;
includes math concepts needed for physics
principles. [214–F, 224–S]
HS 220,230,240 Clinic I,II,II (8,4,6)
Course Descriptions
HP 135 Special Topics in American Sign
Language (1-3)
HR 219 Family Systems (3)
of computerized tomography, magnetic resonance,
ultrasonography and nuclear medicine images
in the localization and follow-up of tumors after
radiation treatment. [F]
Radiation therapy clinical methodology; develops
skills and knowledge in radiation protection
and quality assurance, simulation and treatment
planning, treatment procedures using multiple
megavoltage machines, and patient care and
management; clinic hours: 520 in 220 & 230, 450
in 240. [220–F, 230–S, 240–Su]
HS 223,233 Radiation Oncology I,II (3,3)
HR 240 Group Dynamics (3)
Intro to interpersonal concepts and problems of
communication in interpersonal transactions; focus
on understanding group processes, developing
ability to facilitate communication between others
in group settings and specific group process
competencies. [on demand]
HR 245 Introduction to Counseling (3)
Comparative analysis of major theoretical
approaches to counseling and psychotherapy
practice; psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive
behavioral, gestalt, transactional analysis, rationalemotive therapy and systems theory. [F,S]
Concepts of disease, types of growths, causative
factors and biologic behavior of neoplastic disease;
intro to specific malignant disease entities by site
of occurrence; disease processes, staging, and
treatment planning philosophy; inter-relating of
treatment planning with clinical radiation therapy.
[223–S, 233–Su]
HS 243 Radiation Biology and Hyperthermia
(3)
Intro to medical aspects of radiobiology, including
cellular, systemic, and total body responses;
somatic and genetic effects of radiation; use of
radiobiology in the clinical practice of Radiation
Therapy; concept of hyperthermia. [Su]
HR 130 Substance Abuse Theories (3)
Social, political, physiological, and behavioral
implications of alcohol/drug abuse; theories of
drug-alcohol addiction stages, dynamics and nature
of psychoactive substances, and theories/methods
of substance abuse prevention; focus on family
dynamic models, co-dependency, and disease
concept. [F,S]
HR 135 Special Topics in Human
Services (1-3)
Specific topics of interest in human services and
social welfare; repeatable for credit on different
topics. [on demand]
HR 205 Interviewing and Interpersonal
Skills (4)
Intro to social and psychological concepts
and techniques of therapeutic communication,
including individual and group process dynamics.
Practice in interviewing skills, active listening,
reflective techniques, and establishing therapeutic
relationships in both individual and group settings
through the use of humanistic psychology.
Concurrent HR 101. [F,S]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
HS 299 Special Topics in Allied Health (1-3)
HS - Health Science
A prerequisite to all HS courses numbered above
111 is admission into the Radiation Therapy
Technology program in which the course is
required. Please consult the SUMMARY OF
REQUIRED HOURS or the specific program
brochure. All HS courses shown in the same term
are corequisites and all HS courses shown in the
preceding term are HS prerequisites.
HS 111 Health Care Overview (1)
Overview of current health care milieu; broad
topics include health care environment, careers,
and dynamics. [on demand]
HS 123 Introduction to Radiation Oncology (3)
Overview of radiation therapy; medical
terminology, ethics and the law, patient care,
cancer management, radiation therapy rationale,
usage, and physics, and basic machine usage. [F]
HS 172 Anatomy and Imaging (2)
In-depth study of transverse, longitudinal, sagittal
and coronal cross sections of the total body; use
Selected topics of interest in allied health;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
HUM - Humanities
◆HUM 1010,1020 Introduction to the
Humanities I,II (3,3)
Historical approach to pivotal ideas, systems of
thought, and creations of the Western world (e.g.,
music, drama, painting, sculpture, architecture,
and literature) as reflections of the culture that
produced them. 1010–From antiquity to 1600 A.D.
1020–From 1600 to present. [1010–E; 1020–F,S]
HUM 1040 The Human Experience through
Song (3)
Study of culture and the human experience through
analysis of song lyrics; emphasis on messages in
American lyrics including blues, country, folk,
pop, rap, reggae, rock and spirituals. [on demand]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
89
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
HUM 1230 Philosophy of Science and
Technology (3)
IE - Industrial Electricity
LA - Paralegal Studies
History of major scientific and technological
achievements in the modern age and their
relevance to the world view of Western
civilization. [on demand]
IE 000 Industrial Electricity
LA 110 Fundamentals of Law (3)
Basic electricity, National Electric Code, AC/DC
motors, generators, alternators, programmable
logic controllers, hydraulics, symbols, pneumatics,
line diagrams, manual contactors and manual
motor starters; installation and repair of TVRO
satellite systems; hands-on experience in
residential wiring and conduit bending; 30 clock
hours/week. [E]
Intro to the legal field; includes survey of Torts,
family law, legal ethics, Contracts, Civil Procedure,
and Criminal Law; focus on the attorney, paralegal,
and legal tribunalʼs role in administration of
justice. [F,S]
IS - Insurance
LA 135 Legal Writing/Case Analysis (3)
Course Descriptions
◆HUM 2130 Mythology (3)
Cross-cultural survey of the creation, hero, and
fertility myths of diverse cultures including Middle
Eastern, European, African, Oriental, and North
and South American; study of Classical Greek
Mythology. [F,S]
HUM 2140 Folklore and Native Culture (3)
Basic theory and working vocabulary of folklore
related to the studentʼs geographical origin and
personal experience; focus on family, community,
and regional cultures. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on
demand]
HUM 2550 Leadership Development (3)
Leadership philosophy, practices and skills;
decision making, empowerment, trust, goalsetting and conflict resolution; readings in the
humanities and critical analysis of media that
explore leadership styles. (Same as PY-250; credit
not allowed for both courses.) Prereq: ENGL-1010.
[on demand]
HUM 2990 Special Topics in Humanities (3)
Specific topics of traditional and current relevance
in Humanities disciplines; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on demand]
IS 107 Principles of Life and Health
Insurance (3)
Intro to the principles, practices, and techniques of
life and health insurance. [on demand]
HZ 200 Hazardous Materials Technician
Certification (2)
Critical competencies required by hazardous
materials, environmental and safety technicians;
4 certificates of training upon completion: OSHA
8-hour annual update training for hazardous waste
operations and emergency response; basic first aid
and CPR; Department of Transportation hazardous
materials employee general awareness and safety
training certification; OSHA confined space
operations certification; repeatable for credit and
certification; Satisfactory/No Credit grading; class
1 hour, lab 2 hours. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent.
[on demand]
ID - Industrial Maintenance Mechanics
ID 000 Industrial Maintenance Technology
Theory and practical applications in industrial
maintenance; blueprint reading, welding, machine
shop, HVAC, and general building maintenance;
30 clock hours/week. [E]
90
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Primary and secondary sources of law found in the
legal library; focus on legal research methods, case
briefing, and citation of legal authorities. [F]
Systematized approach to how legal results
and doctrines are reached through case
analysis; writing techniques, case analysis, and
briefing skills; focus on format, documentation
development, application of judicial opinions, and
uniform citations. Prereq: ENGL-1010, LA-110,
130 and keyboarding at 30 wpm. [S]
LA 210 Contracts (3)
IV- IV Therapy
IV 0000 Intravenous Therapy Course for
Practical Nurse
This course is designed to offer LPNʼs the basic
knowledge necessary to safely assist the registered
nurse in administering and monitoring selected
peripheral IV medications under the supervision
of the registered nurse. 40 clock hours. Prereq:
current LPN license.
HVAC, See “AC-Air Conditioning/Refrigeration”
HZ - Hazardous Materials
LA 130 Legal Research (3)
IY - Interdisciplinary Studies
IY 100 Student Government Leadership (2)
Promotes development of appropriate leadership
skills; focus on identifying, nurturing and
mentoring students as they grow to become
effective leaders; parliamentary process and
the basic principles of arbitration, compromise,
conflict resolution, effective communication,
motivation and team building. [F,S]
JS - Job Skills Development
JS 100 Job Search Skills (1)
Production of a job search portfolio: application,
resume, cover letter, and attachments; ability
to identify current skills and strengths to find
employment related to studentʼs area of study.
Development of professional interview skills and
job search strategies; opportunities to network
with local professionals; prepares students for
Chattanooga Stateʼs co-op opportunities. [F,S]
JS 101 Career and Life Planning (3)
Assists students to develop awareness of personal
choice in making career and life decisions; focus
on developing realistic short and long term career
goals through personality, abilities and skills
assessments; job market trends explored in relation
to need for continual training and retraining. [F,S]
Contracts from a paralegalʼs perspective; elements
to formation, defenses, breach, remedies, ethical
considerations, and drafting. Prereq: LA-110. [S]
LA 220 Torts (3)
Intentional torts, negligence, strict liability,
workerʼs compensation, malpractice, and products
liability; rules of civil procedure and evidence. [S]
LA 225 Constitutional Law (3)
Search and seizure; internet and cell phone privacy,
exclusionary rule, right to trial, sentencing, free
speech, and ethical considerations; components
of research and presentation. Prereq: LA-110 or
instructorʼs consent. [Su]
LA 230 Criminal Law/Procedure (3)
Criminal law and rules of procedure; Tennessee
law; specific crimes, their elements, ethical
considerations, and drafting. [S]
LA 235 Administrative Law (3)
Authority of government agencies to create,
interpret and apply administrative laws; judicial
review of administrative rulings, freedom
of information issues, access to government
information, and governmental liability/immunity.
Prereq: LA-110, 130. [on demand]
LA 240 Trial Practice and Civil Procedure (3)
Techniques and documentation utilized in the civil
trial; investigation, drafting, jurisdiction, discovery,
procedure, multi-party litigation, interviewing/
presentation component. Prereq: LA-110, 130 [F]
LA 245 Legal Ethics for Paralegals (3)
Legal ethics and professional responsibility; rules
and guidelines affecting paralegals, certification,
licensing, unauthorized practice of law,
confidentiality, conflicts, advertising, client fees
and funds. Prereq: LA-110, 130. [on demand]
LA 250 Wills, Trusts and Estate Planning (3)
Legal requirements of wills and trusts; estate
planning; administration of estates; advance
directives; ethical considerations. [S]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
LA 260 Domestic Relations (3)
LP - Practical Nursing (LPN)
Family law; divorce, legal separation, annulment,
child custody, adoption, support; pleading and
drafting documentation. [F]
LP 000 Practical Nursing
LA 270 Insurance Law (3)
Policy analysis, coverage, insurable interest,
automobile, property and life insurance, and
regulation. Prereq: LA-110 or instructorʼs consent.
[on demand]
Federal bankruptcy laws and guidelines; statutory
provisions and judicial interpretations of Federal
Bankruptcy Code, and use of forms. Prereq:
LA-110. [S]
LA 280 Property Law (3)
Property law; landlord/tenant law in real estate;
transference of ownership interest; closings and
zoning. Prereq: LA-110, 130. [F]
LA 298 Special Topics in Legal Assisting
Technology (1-3)
Topics of current and special interest; repeatable
for credit on different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
MATH 1510,1520 Statistics I,II (3,3)
LPN, See “LP-Practical Nursing”
1510–Sampling, data organization, variability
and central tendency; probability distributions,
hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals;
credit not allowed for both MATH 1510 and 1530.
1520–Hypothesis testing, confidence intervals,
independence of two variables, simple analysis of
variance, analysis of regression, and intro to nonparametric statistics. Must be taken in sequence.
Prereq for 1510: 2 years of high school algebra
and acceptable test scores; or DSPM-0850. Prereq
for 1520: MATH 1510 or approval of department
head. [E]
Marketing, See “MG-Management”
◆MATH 1530 Introductory Statistics (3)
LA 290 Law Practice Management (3)
Law office management techniques and practices;
business aspects, record keeping, billing
procedures. Includes interviewing/presentation
component. [F]
systems, logic, sets, relations, functions, problem
solving, whole numbers, integers, elementary
number theory, and rational numbers. 1420–
Euclidean geometry, metric system, probability and
statistics. Prereq for 1410: 2 years of high school
algebra and acceptable test scores; or DSPM-0850.
Prereq for 1420: MATH 1410. [F,S]
Marine Engine Technology, See “SE-Motorcycle
& Marine Service Technology”
Course Descriptions
LA 275 Bankruptcy (3)
32.5 clock hours/week. Must be taken in sequence.
First Semester
Intro to the nursing profession; normal anatomy
and physiology, nutrition, aging, basic math;
nursing procedures to assist in maintaining normal
function; clinical experiences in long term care
facilities. [F,S]
Second Semester
Study of alterations in normal function; focus on
nursing care of adults with medical and/or surgical
problems; includes disease process, diet therapy,
and pharmacology; clinical experiences in acute
care setting. [S,Su]
Third Semester
Specialty areas of obstetric, gynecologic and
pediatric nursing; intensive review for state
licensing examination; concentrated clinical
practice experience. [Su,F]
MATH 1410, 1420 Structure of Number
Systems I,II (3)
◆1410–Origin of numerals and numeration
Sampling, data organization, variability and
central tendency, probability, distributions and
confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, inference
and regression; credit not allowed for both
MATH-1510 and 1530. Prereq: 2 years of high
school algebra and acceptable test scores; or
DSPM-0850. [E]
LA 299 Internship (3)
On-campus study combined with supervised
work experience directly related to paralegalʼs
role in legal community. Includes interviewing/
presentation component. Prereq: CS-101, LA-135,
and instructorʼs consent. [S]
Leadership, see “HUM-Humanities,” “IYInterdisciplinary Studies,” “MG-Management,”
“PY-Psychology”
◆MATH 1710, 1720 Pre-Calculus I,II (3,4)
MATH - Mathematics
MATH 0990 Geometry (3)
Minimum preparation for students who did not
have high school geometry for trigonometry
and calculus; lines, angles, planes, triangles,
circles, polygons, and their properties; includes
applications, direct and indirect proofs; not
intended for transfer; not accepted toward any
degree program at Chattanooga State. Prereq:
DSPM-0850. [E]
Legal Assisting, See “LA-Paralegal Studies”
1710–Equations and inequalities, functions and
graphs, linear and quadratic functions, equation
systems, polynomial and rational functions, and
exponential and logarithmic functions. 1720–
Trigonometric functions, identities, equations and
graphs, inverse trigonometric functions, triangle
applications, vectors, polar coordinates, complex
numbers, conic sections, sequences and series, and
the Binomial Theorem. Prereq for 1710: 2 years of
high school algebra and acceptable test scores; or
DSPM-0850. Prereq for 1720: 2 high school math
credits above the Algebra I level and acceptable
test scores; or MATH-1710.[E]
MATH 1000 Tutoring Mathematics (1)
Literature, see “ENGL-English”
LM - Landscaping and Turf
Management
LM 000 Landscaping and Turf Management
Landscape management; plant and soil science;
pest and insect identification and management;
selection and safe application of pesticides and
fertilizer; landscape design and residential turf
management; cost calculation and bid preparation;
greenhouse and nursery production and
management; interiorscaping; computer assisted
landscape drafting and design; 30 clock hours/
week. [E]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Online course offering in-depth view of the
tutoring process; Chattanooga State textbook
familiarization, and intro to and discussion of
Math Center mission and procedures; focus
on professionalism, study, tutoring techniques,
listening, communication, and critical thinking
skills; specific attention paid to math concepts
giving students the most difficulty; tutor training
program certified by College Reading and
Learning Association (CRLA). Prereq: Department
headʼs and instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
◆MATH 1010 Contemporary Mathematics
(3)
Nature and techniques of mathematics; topics such
as set theory, consumer mathematics, statistics,
probability, methods of apportionment, and voting
schemes. Prereq: 2 years of high school algebra
and acceptable test scores; or DSPM-0850. [E]
◆MATH 1830 Calculus for Management,
Life, and Social Sciences (3)
Intro to calculus; limits, differentiation of
functions, optimization, marginal analysis,
integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus,
applications of integration. Prereq: 2 high school
math credits above the Algebra I level and
acceptable test scores; or MATH-1710. [E]
◆MATH 1910 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry I (4)
Limits, derivatives and integrals of algebraic,
trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic
functions, their graphs and applications. Prereq: 3
high school math credits above the Algebra I level
and acceptable test scores; or MATH-1720. [E]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
91
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
MATH 1920,2110 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry II,III (4,4)
Course Descriptions
1920–Differentiation and integration involving
inverse trigonometric functions, integration
techniques, integral applications, infinite sequences
and series. 2110–Vectors, parametric equations,
polar coordinates, space coordinates, vector-valued
functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrals,
and vector analysis. Must be taken in sequence.
Prereq: MATH 1910 [1920–E; 2110–F,S]
MATH 2000 Mathematical Problem
Solving (1)
Explores a variety of mathematical problem
solving techniques; focus on applying
mathematical concepts and communicating
effectively. Prereq: MATH-1720 and instructorʼs
consent. [on demand]
MATH 2010 Linear Algebra (3)
Intro to linear algebra; linear systems, matrix algebra
and matrices, determinants, vectors and vector spaces,
inner product spaces, linear transformations, and
eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Prereq: MATH 1910.
[F,S]
MATH 2120 Differential Equations (3)
Intro to basic concepts, theory, methods, and
applications of ordinary differential equations
including systems of equations and transform
methods. Prereq: MATH-1920. Coreq:
MATH-2010. [F,S]
MATH 2990 Special Topics in
Mathematics (1-4)
Detailed study of specific topics in math;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Department headʼs and instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
mathematical analysis; topics include orthographic
projection, dimensioning, sectioning, line
conventions, visualization of the object and basic
shop math. [on demand]
MD 294 Automated Manufacturing (3)
Various manufacturing concepts applied to
manufacturing automation; manufacturing
organization, flexible manufacturing systems,
plant layout and design, quality control, computer
integrated manufacturing, jig and fixture design,
geometric tolerancing and dimensioning, plastics,
and tool design. Prereq: DD-124, MATH-1530,
MD-184. [F]
MD 134,242 Statics and Strength of
Materials I,II (3,3)
134–Statics: vectors, moments, equilibrium of
structures, centroids and moment of inertia;
strength of materials: basic stresses and
deformations; beam diagrams, flexure and
shear. 242–Further study of vector operations
and forces in structures in 2 and 3 dimensions;
stresses for welds, 2 material members, eccentric
loads and those caused by temperature changes;
interrelationship of beam diagrams; wood and steel
beams designed; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq
for 134: ET-115, MATH-1720. Concurrent for 242:
MATH 1910. [F,S]
MD 295 Manufacturing Management (3)
Production, organization, and operation
management; relationships between manufacturing
lead-time, cycle time and inventory level; quality
management, production planning and control,
plant layout, motion and time studies. Prereq: MD
294. [S]
MD 298 Special Topics in Mechanical
Engineering Technology (1-4)
MD 184 Manufacturing Processes (3)
Primary and secondary manufacturing processes;
covers formation of material into shapes through
the testing of the finished product; basic C.I.M.
concepts, usage of lathes, mills, drills, saws and
other machine shop tools; lab exercises, videos,
and tours of manufacturing facilities; class 2 hours,
lab 3 hours. [F,S]
MD 207,208 Numerical Control I,II (3,3)
Principles of numerical control systems; class
2 hours, lab 3 hours. 207–Focus on hands-on
equipment usage, program debugging, and error
diagnosis; NC tooling, 2- and 3-axis machining
and G-codes. 208–DNC links, CAM software,
NC programming languages, 3-axis contouring,
sculptured surfaces, interfacing CAD systems with
NC systems. Must be taken in sequence. Prereq for
207: ET-115, MATH-1720, MD-184. Concurrent
for 207: MD-294. [207–F, 208–S]
Specialized topics and/or problems in mechanical
engineering technology; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
MD 299 Special Topics in Mechanical
Engineering Technology with Lab (1-4)
Specialized topics and/or problems in mechanical
engineering technology; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
Mechanics, Automotive, see “AM-Automotive
Technology”
Mechanics, Diesel, See “DM-Diesel Equipment
Mechanics”
MD 226 Fluid Power (3)
MB - Masonry
MB 000 Masonry
This program is designed to provide
students with the necessary knowledge,
skills and abilities in the safe and efficient
performance of the residential masonry
and concrete profession. Training will be
competency based in accordance with the
national center for Construction Education
and Research (NCCER) curriculum and
local Masonry/Concrete code(s). Training
will consist of a specified common core and
required competencies according to curricula.
Training will include hands-on instruction and
will require students to demonstrate learning
outcomes through performance orientated
evaluations. 1290 clock hours.
MD - Mechanical Engineering
Technology
MD 104 Blueprint Reading and
Analysis (1-4)
Principles of pneumatics and hydraulics; air
compressors and power boosters, hydraulic fluids
and power devices, accumulators, and controls;
class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: ET-115,
MATH-1720. [S]
MD 254 Elements of Material Science (3)
Study of the physical structure of engineering
materials and how their properties are dependent
upon their internal structure; crystal structures,
phase relationships, mechanical behavior of solids,
and polymer and composite characteristics; class 2
hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: MATH-1710. [S]
MD 264,265 Thermodynamics I,II (3,3)
Applied thermodynamics; study of heat and
energy transfer and refrigeration; class 2 hours,
lab 3 hours. 264–Labs include study of heating
and cooling equipment in operation. 265–Internal
combustion engines, gas and steam turbines,
properties of steam. Must be taken in sequence.
Prereq for 264: ET-115, MATH-1720. [264–F,
265–S]
MD 274 Machine Design (3)
Principles of dynamics; kinetics and kinematics
of rectilinear motion and rotation of bodies,
curvilinear motion, work, energy and power; gear
design basics. Prereq: MD-134, PHYS-1030.
Concurrent: MATH 1910. [S]
Mechanics, Marine, See “SE-Motorcycle &
Marine Engine Technology”
Medical Records, See “HE-Health Information
Management”
MG - Management
MG 101 Professional Ethics in the
Workplace: Business and Commerce (1)
Prepares students to cope with difficult choices in
the business-commerce arena by the study of moral
principles governing conduct of persons at work.
[F,S]
MG 103 Business Today, An Introduction (3)
Explores the principles and practices of todayʼs
businesses. Focuses on the foundations of business
structure, business ethics, management, marketing,
quality, human resources, accounting, and finance.
Identifies and gives insights into contemporary
challenges that will affect businesses. [E]
Intro to the basics of blueprint interpretation and
92
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
MG 105 Introduction to Quality
Management (3)
Acquaints students with concepts and tools
associated with continuous improvement of
products and services offered by the firm;
explores basic tenets of quality from several of the
outstanding writers in the Quality Management
field. [F]
MG 110 Leadership Skills (1)
customer needs with business features, dealing
effectively with dissatisfied customers through
listening and communication skills. [F]
MG 185 Basic Investing (3)
Presents alternative means of investing for the
purpose of receiving benefits such as profits,
interest payments or income tax reduction; elective
for both business and non-business majors. [on
demand]
Survey of legal issues shaping e-commerce
including taxation, licensing, and contract
principles. [on demand]
MG 114 Principles of Management (3)
MG 198 E-commerce Success Factors (1)
MG 115 E-commerce Operations (3)
Overview of operating an online business; focus
on how the Internet is used in businesses and the
fundamentals of Internet technology; replaces
MG 196 and 197; duplicate credit not allowed. [on
demand]
MG 116 E-commerce Marketing (3)
Study of how the Internet is used as a marketing
tool both by e-businesses and traditional
businesses. Prereq: MG-115. [on demand]
MG 160 Project Management (3)
Basic project management concepts; project
organization, quotations and negotiations;
planning, beginning operations, budgeting
and funding; quality assurance and control,
procurement, management style, team building
and phasing-out methods; tracking a project
with management computer software package;
experience with computer applications required.
[F]
MG 165 Business Mathematics (3)
Application of math to solve problems related to
routine business operations and to personal finances; topics include insurance, taxes, consumer
credit, retail applications, investments and
introductory statistics. [E]
MG 170 Labor Relations (3)
Intro to labor relations; overview of labor relations
beginning with the history and progressing through
developments in the field, federal laws and recent
trends; presents a labor relations definition and a
working knowledge of basic negotiations concepts.
[on demand]
MG 176 Customer Service Skills (3)
Intro to customer service; analysis of personal and
group service skills, components of good customer
service, focus on customer retention and matching
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Examines principles of modern advertising related
to customer psychology; includes means and media
of creative communication with customers; focus
on group interaction via a selected advertising
campaign. Prereq: MG-154. [F]
MG 195 E-commerce Legal Issues (1)
Survey of the marketing, financial, and operational
characteristics of successful e-commerce sites. [on
demand]
MG 201 Management Internship (1-6)
Provides students with the opportunity to work for
a business that is specifically related to their career
objectives. Provides on-th-job experience while earning
credit. Prereq: Department Head or Dean approval. [on
demand]
MG 245 Internship in Broadcast Media
Account Executive (3)
Designed to help the student gain work experience
in the position of account executive in a broadcast
media organization. The opportunity will be
provided at one of several approved local media
organizations where the student will work nine (9)
hours per week for one semester. Prereq: MG 244,
254. [F]
MG 246 Broadcast Media Practices (3)
An overview of the skills and techniques utilized
by account executives and the unique challenges
they encounter in selling radio and television
advertising. Prereq: MG-224, 254. [S]
MG 254 Principles of Selling (3)
MG 202 International Business (3)
Provides an overview of the international environment in
which business operates today. Demonstrates the global
relationships between business activities and how events
in one part of the world can influence business decisions
and activities in other parts of the world. Prereq: MG 103
or consent of instructor. [S]
MG 154 Marketing (3)
Study of the field of marketing; covers marketing
channels, functions, methods and institutions;
interpersonal skills developed through
collaborative projects; may include case studies
and/or computer simulations. [E]
MG 244 Advertising (3)
Course Descriptions
Comprehensive approach to the subject of
leadership; successful leadership styles and ways
to manage conflict, formulating a plan from initial
concept through execution, positive productivity
techniques, and presentation and speaking skills
improvement. [S]
Concise, comprehensive review of the management
processes of planning, organizing, leading and
controlling; students develop decision making
and communication skills through case studies,
research reports and simulations. [E]
to the entrepreneurʼs success and the development
of a bank ready business plan. Prereq for 224:
BU-114, MG-103, MG-165. Prereq for 225: MG224. [224-F,225-S]
MG 204 Logistics (3)
A theoretical and applied study of effective logistics
management within a supply chain perspective. [on
demand]
MG 214 Supply Chain Management (3)
An overview of effective and efficient management
of the supply chain with a focus on the purchasing
area; emphasizes supply chains in both operations
and services industries. Methods, processes, and
systems used in the operation and improvement of
supply chain relationships and outcomes will be
studied. Prereq: MG 103, 114. [F]
MG 215 Retail Operations (3)
Study of the field of retailing; store location and
lay-out, merchandising, advertising, salesmanship,
customer service standards, staffing, and security;
focus on policy differences according to retail
establishment type. Prereq: MG 154. [S]
MG 217 Operations Management (3)
An overview of operations management inclusive
of operations strategy, process analysis, materials
requirements planning, production scheduling,
enterprise wide resource planning, quantitative
methods, and lean manufacturing. Prereq: MG 103,
MG 114. [S]
MG 224, 225 Entrepreneurship I, II (3,3)
Capstone course that applies skills learned
throughout the previous courses in the
Entrepreneurship Program. 224-Emphasis on
the development of creative skills to allow
identification of opportunities; starting, managing,
and financing a small business. 225-Issues relevant
Basic personal salesmanship principles linking customer
needs to selling activities; focus on salesmanʼs duties
and methods, common problems, competitor and product
knowledge, and handling objections; includes oral
presentations in which each student serves as both buyer
and seller. [S]
MG 264 Human Resources Management (3)
Intro to principles and practices of effective
resources management; focus on procurement,
development, compensation, integration, and
management of personnel through case studies.
Prereq: MG 114 or instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
MG 281 Strategic Management Practices
(3)
A capstone course which requires students to
apply critical thinking, problem solving, and
communication skills to a variety of business
scenarios in order to develop relevant strategies.
Utilizes case studies, presentations, team processes,
research methods, and written analyses as tools for
study and assessment. Prereq: MG 103, 114, 154,
264, BU 211. [S]
MG 285 Organizational Behavior (3)
Study of strategic variables and relationships of
structure and process involving groups of people
and how they may be motivated to work together
more productively. [S]
MG 286 Health Services Management
Practicum (3)
Preparation for employment in Health Services
Management; provides practical work experience;
2 required areas of emphasis are Accounting and
Management/Supervision making and controlling
processes to increase individual productivity within
the workplace. [S]
MG 288,289 Applied Management I,II
(3,3)
Results oriented management development course
to refine skills in leadership, team building,
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
decision making and controlling processes to
increase individual productivity in the workplace.
Must be taken in sequence. [288–F, 289–S]
MG 295 Students in Free Enterprise (1-3)
Course Descriptions
Explores real life business situations through
participation in community project. [F,S]
MG 299 Special Topics in Management (119)
Selected management and related topics of
current and special interest; repeatable for credit
on different topics. Prereq: Department headʼs
consent. [on demand]
MT - Machine Tool Technology
Intro to fluid handling, management and quality
control activity basics; focus on the parameters
that sustain selection, installation, operation,
service and maintenance of fluid handling and
management systems; activity based labs aid in
perfecting skill and proficiency with regard to
industrial/commercial systems; class 2 hours, lab 3
hours. Prereq: MN-113. [on demand]
MT 000 Machine Tool Technology
Machine shop safety; basic hand tools and
precision instruments; lathes, milling machines,
and grinders; basic stamping die components
principles and construction; focus on precision
grinding; CNC technology; blueprint reading
focusing on skills needed to interpret shop
drawings; 30 clock hours/week. [E]
MO - Medical Assistant
MUS - Music
MO 000 Medical Assistant
MN - Maintenance Technology
MN 102,112 Electrical Fundamentals I,II
(3,3)
Electrical fundamentals for industrial/
commercial electrical and electronic systems
maintenance; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. 102–Basic
AC/DC theory and concepts including circuits,
batteries, transformers, and magnetism; generation,
transmission, regulation and distribution of power
systems with focus on in-plant customs, practices
and application. 112–Measuring and monitoring
electrical/electronic systems variables; switching,
modifying, and regulating electrical devices;
electrical transmission (conductors); AC/DC
circuits; intro to electronics. Must be taken in
sequence. [on demand]
MN 103,113 Mechanical Fundamentals I,II
(3,3)
Mechanical practices, applications, and concepts;
class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. 103–Drive components,
mechanical forces, and machine motion; focus on
operating, servicing and maintaining machines and
equipment using a systems approach. 113–Basics
of integrated drive systems that propel and control
motion; focus on management of processes and
application of force/motion patterns in propulsion,
positioning, and articulated movement of
machines, materials and tooling systems. Must be
taken in sequence. Concurrent for 103: MD-104.
[on demand]
MN 210 Building and Structural
Maintenance (3)
Intro to necessary skills for servicing and
maintenance of buildings and facilities used
to house and support production machinery,
processes, and storage; lock and key systems,
carpentry, finishing for floors, walls, and ceilings,
painting, roof maintenance, plumbing, and
landscape maintenance activities; class 2 hours, lab
3 hours. Prereq: OS-116. [on demand]
MN 215 Maintenance Management and
Organization (3)
Intro to the supervisorʼs role in a contemporary
maintenance department/organization; human
relations and organizational duties, control
of maintenance resources, improvement of
maintenance performance, and need to promote
maintenance productivity through life long
learning; lab and project activities include research
on current maintenance management practices;
class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: MN-102, 103,
OS-116. [on demand]
94
MN 218 Hydraulics, Pneumatics, and Fluid
Systems (3)
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
MUSIC—GENERAL COURSES
30 clock hours/week. Must be taken in sequence.
First Semester
Administrative and clinical procedures; anatomy
and physiology, medical terminology, basic
medical typing, business communication,
professional orientation and exam room
procedures. [F]
Second Semester
Pharmacology and administration of medication,
administrative practices (insurance, billing, filing,
scheduling, and banking), lab procedures, medical
transcription, first aid and CPR. [S]
Third Semester
Review of clinical and lab procedures; internship
in physicianʼs office. [Su]
MUS 1000 Music Seminar (0)
Opportunities to perform and attend concerts and
seminars on various musical topics; required each
semester of attendance for every music major;
repeatable. Coreq: Private instruction in music. [F,S]
MUS 1001 Artist in Residence (1-3)
Visiting artists interact with students in lectures
and workshops; 2 workshops for 1 credit; 3
workshops for 2 credits; 4 workshops for 3 credits;
repeatable; maximum of 3 hours applicable toward
a degree. [F,S]
◆MUS 1030 Music Appreciation (3)
MOTR - Motor Sports Technology
Development of music from Middle Ages to the
present; designed to give better understanding and
appreciation of traditional art music as well as
music of our present culture. [E]
MOTR 101 Introduction to Motor Sports (1)
MUS 1040 History of Rock and Roll (3)
Introduction to the motor Sports industry;
emphasis on history, types of sanctioning
bodies and their rules and regulations, and job
opportunities. Discusses the interdisciplinary roles
of technology, management, marketing, graphics,
safety, and public relations. [on demand]
Study of the development of rock and roll by
musical analysis, style comparison and coverage
of the performers and their musicʼs impact. [on
demand]
MUS 1130 Fundamentals of Music (3)
Study of basic music elements: scales, intervals,
triads, meter, note values, rhythm, notation, and
simple keyboard harmony. [F,S]
MRI - Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MUS 1210,1220,2210,2220 Music Theory
I,II,III,IV (3,3,3,3)
Prereq for all MRI courses: Graduate of CAHEA/
JRCERT accredited Radiologic Technology
Program and certified or eligible for certification
by American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
MRI 200 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (4)
Intro to basic essentials of magnetic resonance
imaging methods, system operation, cross-sectional
anatomy and clinical imaging interpretation; focus
on requirements to operate magnetic resonance
equipment. [F]
MRI 230 Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Clinical (7)
This is a one-semester course designed to prepare
the Radiologic Technologist clinically for a
professional career in MRI. Emphasis is placed
on the foundations, concepts and procedures of
Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This class
is a recommended co-requisite with MRI 200
Magnetic Resonance Imaging or post-requisite for
MRI 200. Advanced standing is also available for
qualified candidates.) Prereq: Active Certification
(or eligible) as a Registered Technologist by the
American Registry of Radiologic Technologist.
1210–Building scales, major and minor key
signatures, triads, intervals, rhythmic notation,
4-part vocal writing, and primary and secondary
triads. 1220–Harmonization of melodies, non-chord
tones, writing for the piano, secondary dominants,
and secondary diminished 7th chords. 2210–Modal
changes, Neapolitan chords, pedal points,
modulations; modal, non-functional, extended
tertian and non-tertian harmony. 2220–Harmony
and form; binary and ternary principles, imitative,
variation, sonata-allegro, rondo and atypical formal
organization. Must be taken in sequence. Prereq
for 1210: MUS 1130. Coreq: MUS-1310 sequence;
MUS-1401. [1210, 2210–F; 1220, 2220–S]
MUS 1310,1320,2310,2320 Aural Skills
I,II,III,IV (1,1,1,1)
Development of sightreading skills through drills
in aural and visual recognition, intervals, melodies,
harmonies, and rhythmic impulsations; lab 3 hours.
2310 & 2320–Added focus on sight singing, ear
training, and dictation. Must be taken in sequence.
Coreq: MUS-1210 sequence. [1310, 2310–F; 1320,
2320–S]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
MUS 2530 Electronic Music I (3)
Hands-on course with focus on MIDI and how it
is used in conjunction with computers and sound
devices; electronic keyboards, software programs,
and basic recording techniques. [on demand]
MUS 2990 Special Topics in Music (1-3)
Study of specific topics relating to the historical
and cultural significance of music; repeatable for
credit on different topics. [on demand]
AND
PERFORMANCE
Music majors must take at least one course from
Applied Instruction and one from Performing
Ensemble each semester. Designated courses are
repeatable for credit, but no more than 12 hours of
Applied Instruction and/or Performing Ensemble,
in any combination, may be applied toward a
degree.
APPLIED INSTRUCTION COURSES:
MUS 1400 Piano Instruction for
Non-Majors (1)
Individual piano instruction for non-majors;
repeatable; maximum of 4 hours applicable toward
a degree; extra fee required. [F,S]
MUS 1401, 1402, 1403, 1404 Piano Class I,
II, III, IV (2,2,2,2)
Group instruction in basic keyboard techniques.
1401-Basic note-reading, elementary harmony,
simple exercises and pieces 1402-Major scales and
arpeggios, simple harmonization, sight-reading and
transposition, simple pieces. 1403-Minor scales
and arpeggios, harmonization with augmented and
diminished chords, four-part reading, pieces from
standard keyboard literature. 1404-Harmonization
using traditional and pop chord notation, advanced
sight-reading, improvisation, pieces from standard
keyboard literature. Must be taken in sequence or
have instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
MUS 1410 Piano Instruction (1-2)
Private instruction in piano; daily practice
required; 1 half-hour lesson each week per credit
hour; repeatable; maximum of 6 hours applicable
toward a degree; extra fee required. [F,S]
MUS 1500 Voice Instruction for
Non-Majors (1)
Individual voice instruction for non-music majors;
repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable toward
a degree; extra fee required. [F,S]
MUS 1501 Voice Class (2)
Group instruction in basic techniques of breath
control, tone production, diction, phrasing and
interpretation using simple song repertoire; daily
practice required. [F,S]
MUS 1620 Guitar Class (2)
Group instruction in guitar; must provide own
instrument; repeatable; maximum of 6 hours
applicable toward a degree. [on demand]
MY 210 Mammography Patient Management
(3)
(Online)
MUS 1650 Percussion Instruction (1-2)
Patient care (psychological, sociological and
physical), breast anatomy and physiology,
pathology, compression and positions, and special
procedures. [F]
Private instruction in percussion instruments; daily
practice required; 1 half-hour lesson each week per
credit hour; focus on only 1 percussion instrument;
repeatable; maximum of 6 hours applicable toward
a degree; extra fee required. [on demand]
MUS 1660 String Instruction (1-2)
Private instruction in string instruments; daily
practice required; 1 half-hour lesson each week
per credit hour; focus on only 1 string instrument;
repeatable; maximum of 6 hours applicable toward
a degree. Extra fee required. [on demand]
MUS 1670 Bass Guitar Instruction (1-2)
Private instruction in bass guitar; daily practice
required; 1 half-hour lesson each week per credit
hour; repeatable; maximum of 6 hours applicable
toward a degree; extra fee required. [on demand]
MUS 1610 Guitar Instruction (1-2)
Private instruction in guitar; daily practice
required; 1 half-hour lesson each week per credit
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
MY 220 Mammography Instrumentation/
Physics (3)
(Online)
Characteristics of dedicated film screen
mammography units and digital unit, image
receptors and required quality control tests. [F]
MY 230 Mammography Clinic (4)
Supervised performance of a minimum of 100
mammography exams and film-reporting sessions
with radiologists interpreting mammograms;
observation and assistance in quality assurance
tests and localization procedures; clinic 140 hours
in an FDA approved mammography facility in
studentʼs geographic area. [F]
MUS 2430 Conducting (2)
Intro to conducting techniques; repeatable;
maximum of 6 hours applicable toward a degree.
Prereq: MUS-1210, 1310. [on demand]
PERFORMING ENSEMBLE COURSES:
MUS 1720 Jazz Band (1-2)
Performance of big band, jazz-rock and dixieland
styles; members required to play at scheduled
performances; repeatable; maximum of 6 hours
applicable toward a degree; lab 3 hours. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent, knowledge/skill in an
instrument. [F,S]
MZ - Mechanical Engineering
Technology (DuPont)
MZ 110 Mechanical Principles (4) (DuPont)
Intro to concepts of mechanical principles of
motion, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and
mathematical solution techniques; class 3 hours,
lab 2 hours.
MZ 111 Mechanical Tool Applications (3)
(DuPont)
MUS 1810 Concert Choir (1-2)
Intro to the safe use and care of tools, precision
measuring instruments, mechanical drawing, and
everyday shop operations; class 2 hours, lab 2
hours.
Performance of choral literature; open to all
students; performance at scheduled concerts
required; repeatable; maximum of 6 hours
applicable toward a degree. [F,S]
MZ 112 Mechanical Piping Systems (3)
(DuPont)
MUS 1840 Chorale (1-2)
Auditioned choral group; performs wide variety
of choral music; admission by audition only;
repeatable; maximum of 6 hours applicable toward
a degree. [F,S]
MUS 1850 Jazz Vocal Ensemble (1-2)
Auditioned vocal ensemble; performs standard and
contemporary jazz music; repeatable; maximum of
6 hours applicable toward a degree. [F,S]
MUS 1510 Voice Instruction (1-2)
Private instruction in voice; daily practice required;
1 half-hour lesson each week per credit hour;
repeatable; maximum of 6 hours applicable toward
a degree; extra fee required. [F,S]
together. Prereq: Graduate of CAHEA/JRCERT
accredited Radiologic Technology Program and
certified or eligible for certification by American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
Course Descriptions
MUSIC—INSTRUCTION
hour; repeatable; maximum of 6 hours applicable
toward a degree; extra fee required. [F,S]
MY - Mammography
A 3-course set in specialized imaging of the
breast; complete set fulfills federal regulations
for formal specialized training in mammography prior to independent mammography
performance. All 3 courses must be taken
Intro to equipment and practices of pipe fitting
procedures; pipe and pipe fitting properties
identified by material, dimensions, schedule
number, joining method, and function; basic piping
system layout concepts taught using orthographic
and isometric sketches; measurement, fabrication,
assembly, and installation techniques; techniques
and practices related to testing and breaking into a
piping system explained with focus on safety; class
2 hours, lab 2 hours.
MZ 120 Mechanical Maintenance Principles
(3) (DuPont)
Overview of the principles required to maintain
and repair mechanical systems found in typical
production facilities; bolt grade marking, hardware
fasteners and identification, torque values, rigging
techniques to move loads and equipment, lubricant
characteristics and principles, bearings, seals,
packing, pump applications and selection, and
alignment techniques using dual dial indicators;
class 2 hours, lab 2 hours.
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
MZ 122 Fluid Mechanics (3) (DuPont)
Course Descriptions
Intro to the principles of pneumatics and
components found in a typical pneumatic circuit;
force and energy transmission, compressors,
pressure and directional control, diagrams,
maintenance programs, and troubleshooting in
a pneumatic circuit; covers safety, use of each
component, and troubleshooting procedures; class
2 hours, lab 2 hours.
MZ 124 Principles of Thermodynamics (3)
(DuPont)
Saturated, superheated, and wet steam; latent
heat of steam, pressure/temperature relationship
of saturated and superheated steam, condensing
steam, and major components of steam generating
equipment; how steam and condensate are formed,
importance and need of steam traps; steam piping;
installation, testing, troubleshooting, and repair of
typical steam trap assemblies; class 2 hours, lab 2
hours.
MZ 130 Principles of Machine Operation
and Maintenance (3) (DuPont)
Advanced maintenance principles for production
equipment; chem, ansi, canned, nonmetallic, and sealless
pumps; pump bearings and motors, mechanical seals, fans
and blowers, power transmission related to chain drives,
V belts, industrial flat belts, sheaves, shaft couplings,
bearing mounting and dismounting, bearing failure
analysis, gear types and usage, maintaining spur, helical,
herringbone bevel work gears, and gear reducers; class 2
hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq: Instructorʼs consent.
MZ 131 Introduction to Welding Principles
and Techniques (1-4) (DuPont)
Welding safety, processes, and techniques;
personal protective equipment, equipment setup; oxy-acetylene process used to demonstrate
proper equipment set-up, lighting, adjusting,
and extinguishing the flame, bevel cutting pipe
in position, and equipment disassembly; SHAW
process used to make fillet welds on carbon steel
plate in position; class 1 hour, lab 3 hours. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent.
MZ 200,201 Machine Shop Principles I,II
(3,3) (DuPont)
Machine tool principles and operation; class
2 hours, lab 2 hours. 200–Physical properties
of metals, their manipulation in mining and
refinement; alloying and heat treatment processes;
natural and manufactured abrasives and bonding
processes that determine their molecular structures;
various types of grinding machines studied and
used. 201–Operation and safe use of lathes, milling
machines (including NC and CNC types), drill
presses, etc.; focus on engine type bench lathe.
MZ 210 Planned Maintenance/PPM (3)
(DuPont)
Intro to the basic information needed to establish
or improve Predictive/Preventive Maintenance
and equipment reliability programs; covers the
latest predictive/preventive technology and how
its implementation helps plants compete within the
world market place; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours.
MZ 260 Mechanical Drawings and
Standards (3) (DuPont)
Intro to P&IDʼs as well as the Dupont Industrial
Engineering Standards; specific symbology,
96
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
application and interconnection of prints and
drawings studied until the student is fully
competent to analyze given process control system
from its prints; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours.
ND 140 Food Service Administration (3)
Principles of food service administration/
personnel management; focus on human relations,
institutional development and operations
management; problem solving, systems analysis,
dietary policies and procedures, interpersonal
skills, departmental budgeting, marketing and
computer applications. Prereq: BIOL-1430.
Coreq: ND-141. [F]
ND - Dietary Manager
ND 141 Food Service Administration
Practicum (1)
ND 110 Practical Diet Therapy (3)
Normal nutrition and therapy principles related
to health and disease; role of food and its
nutrients regarding diet modifications; practical
diet planning, identifying dietary needs patients,
development of nutritional care plans and clinical
services quality assurance. Prereq: BIOL-1430.
Coreq: ND-111. [S]
Series of area non-commercial food service agency
visits and/or study of diet therapy in studentʼs work
facility; principles of food service administration
applied; extension of topics studied in ND-140;
clinic 4 hours. Prereq: BIOL-1430. Coreq:
ND-140. [F]
ND 111 Practical Diet Therapy Practicum (1)
Series of area non-commercial food service agency
visits and/or study of diet therapy in studentʼs work
facility; diet therapy principles applied in work
settings; extension of topics in ND-110; clinic 4
hours. Prereq: BIOL-1430. Coreq: ND-110. [S]
ND 120 Food Service Sanitation (2)
Food service and equipment sanitation/safety
principles; Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point
(HACCP) food safety systems, foodborne illness
emerging pathogens, Hazard Communication
Standard (HCS) required by Occupational Safety
and Health Administration (OSHA); Natural
Restaurant Associationʼs SERVSAFE Certification
Examination given at course end. Prereq:
BIOL-1430. Coreq: ND-121. [F,S]
NM - Nuclear Medicine Technology
Admission to the Nuclear Medicine Technology
Program is a prerequisite for all NM courses.
Please consult the SUMMARY OF REQUIRED
HOURS. All courses shown in the same term
are corequisites and all courses shown in the
preceding term(s) are prerequisites.
NM 200 Introduction to Nuclear
Medicine (2)
Intro to basic terminology in nuclear medicine
technology; special emphasis on guidelines for
radiation protection, regulatory requirements,
ethics, patient care and participation in the Nuclear
Medicine Technology Program and its clinical
affiliates. [F]
ND 121 Food Service Sanitation Practicum
(1)
NM 201 Instrumentation and Statistics (3)
Series of area non-commercial food service agency
visits and/or study of food service sanitation
and safety principles in studentʼs work facility;
principles of food service sanitation applied,
extension of topics studied in ND-120; lab 3 hours.
Prereq: BIOL-1430. Coreq: ND-120. [F,S]
ND 125 HACCP Training & Certification (1)
Recipes, flowcharts and written Hazard Analysis
Critical Control Point (HACCP) system; develop
and implement an HACCP food safety system for
food service operation. Coreq: ND-120, 121; or
proof of current SERVESAFE certification. [F]
Principles of instrumentation and nuclear statistics
as used in the nuclear medicine laboratory with
emphasis on use, maintenance, and quality
control of personal monitoring devices, gas and
scintillation detectors; intro to statistical analysis
and computer applications associated with
radiation detection and
imaging. [F]
NM 205,215,225 Clinical Procedures I,II,III
(2,4,6)
Food procurement, production and service
principles; methods for organization/department
planning, menu planning with computer
applications, food production/productivity, work
simplification, inventory control, equipment procurement, and continuous quality improvement
methods. Prereq: BIOL-1430. Coreq: ND-131. [Su]
Biological, physiological and anatomical aspects of
nuclear medicine clinical procedures. 205–Skeletal,
cardiovascular and respiratory organ systems;
relationship between physiology, pathophysiology,
radiochemistry, radiobiology, instrumentation and
patient care techniques. 215–Gastrointestinal,
genitourinary and endocrine systems; radionuclide
therapy and department management. 225–Central
nervous system, tumor and inflammatory
processes; intro to in-vivo non-imaging procedures,
in-vitro procedures; preparation for national
registries. [205–F, 215–S, 225–Su]
ND 131 Food Service Management
Practicum (1)
NM 207,217,227 Practicum in Nuclear
Medicine I,II,III (9,2,6)
ND 130 Food Service Management (2)
Series of area non-commercial food service agency
visits and/or study of diet therapy in studentʼs work
facility; principles of food service management
applied, extension of topics studied in ND-130;
clinic 4 hours. Prereq: BIOL-1430. Coreq:
ND-130. [Su]
Clinical experience allowing students to assimilate
methods, theory, and techniques into clinical
practice; must demonstrate acceptable level of
progression in clinical competency culminating
in mastery of all required clinical competencies
defined by the Joint Review Committee on
Education Programs in Nuclear Medicine as
Essential; Satisfactory/No Credit grading. [207–F,
217–S, 227–Su]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
NM 208 Radiopharmacology (2)
Basic principles of radiopharmacy as practiced
in the nuclear medicine laboratory; special
emphasis on radionuclide and radiopharmaceutical
preparations, radiation safety, quality control
procedures and operation of equipment. [F]
NM 212 Physics and Radiation Biology of
Nuclear Medicine (4)
Expands the development of psychomotor, cognitive
and affective competencies needed to assume the
roles of the associate degree nurse, with continued
emphasis on assessment, students plan, implement and
evaluate interventions to promote, maintain and restore
health of diverse individuals across the life span who
are experiencing alteration in health; emphasis is on
teaching/learning, intro to acute care, perioperative
care and altered cell function and alterations in
comfort/rest, fluid/gas transport, nutrition/metabolism
and psychosocial/cultural; students apply nursing
process in caring for pediatric and adult clients in acute
care, ambulatory care and community based settings.
Prerequisite: NS 110; with concurrency PY 101.
NS - Nursing (RN)
Admission to the Nursing Program is a
prerequisite for all NS courses unless otherwise
noted. Please consult the SUMMARY OF
REQUIRED HOURS; all BIOL and PY courses
are pre/corequisite to the NS courses as shown. All
Nursing courses must be completed in sequence.
NS 024 Nursing Transitions (class 3 hours,
clinical 1 hour)
Prepares LPN, reentering and transfer students to
enter second year nursing courses. Assists LPNʼS with
transition from the role of LPN to associate degree
RN; content derived from first year nursing courses
provides a background on which remaining educational
program will be based; successful completion required
for entry into NS 238 or NS 210. Prerequisites: BIOL
2010, BIOL 2020, BIOL 1430, PY 101, PY 217. Note:
This is a course for which institutional credit is given.
It is not accepted towards any degree program at
Chattanooga State.
NS 027 Paramedic Transition
Prepares the licensed paramedic to enter second
year nursing courses. Building on emergency and
acute care knowledge, assists the paramedic with
the transition to the role of the associate degree
RN; content derived from the first year nursing
courses provides a background of theory and skills
on which the remaining educational program
will be based; successful completion required
for entry into NS 238 (day program) or NS 210
(night program). Note: This is a course for which
institutional credit is given. It is not accepted
towards any degree program at Chattanooga State.
(class 4 hours; clinical 9 hours). Nursing lab
fee, achievement test fee and liability insurance
required. Prereq: Acceptance into the program,
BIOL 2010, BIOL 2020, BIOL 1430, BIOL 2230,
PY 101, PY 217. [Su]
NS 110, Night Nursing I (class 4 hours,
clinical 9 hours)
Begins the development of psychomotor, cognitive and
affective competencies needed to assume the roles of
the associate degree nurse; intro to the nursing process
focusing on assessment of diverse individuals across
the life span; with emphasis on communication and
teaching, students plan and implement interventions
to promote and maintain wellness and provide care to
individuals experiencing variation in function; clinical
experiences provided in a variety of community based
settings. Prerequisites: BIOL 1430, BIOL 2010, BIOL
2020, BIOL 2230; with concurrency PY 217.
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
NS 210 Night Nursing III (class 5 hours,
clinical 6 hours)
Enhances development of psychomotor, cognitive and
affective competencies needed to assume roles of the
associate degree nurse; with continued emphasis on the
nursing process, students plan, implement and evaluate
interventions to promote, maintain and restore health of
diverse individuals across the life span who experience
alteration in fluid/gas transport, activity/mobility,
and nutrition/metabolism, students apply the nursing
process in caring for pediatric and adult clients in acute
care and community based settings. Prerequisite: NS
024 or NS 120.
NS 220 Night Nursing IV (class 5 hours,
clinical 6 hours)
Enhances development of psychomotor, cognitive and
affective competencies needed to assume roles of the
associate degree nurse; with continued emphasis on the
nursing process, students plan, implement and evaluate
interventions to promote, maintain and restore health of
diverse individuals across the life span who experience
alteration in fluid/gas transport, psychosocial/cultural,
elimination, nutrition/metabolism and growth and
development functions; students apply the nursing
process in caring for adult clients in acute care and
community based settings with concentrated experience
in womenʼs health and care of the client with altered
psychosocial function. Prerequisite: NS 210
NS 230 - Night Nursing V (class 4 hours,
clinical 12 hours)
Operationalizes the performance of psychomotor,
cognitive and affective competencies needed to assume
the roles of the associate degree nurse, continued focus
on assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating
interventions to promote, maintain and restore health of
diverse individuals across the life span who experience
alteration in growth and fluid/gas transport, nutrition/
metabolism, sensory/perceptual, elimination, and
protective functions; students apply nursing process in
caring for clients in acute care and community based
settings with a concentrated experience in care of
clients in the critical care settings; course culminates
with a clinical experience in the management of groups
of clients in the acute care setting. Prerequisite:
NS 220.
NS 119 Nursing I (class 5 hours, clinical
12 hours)
Begins the development of psychomotor, cognitive and
affective competencies needed to assume the roles of
the associate degree nurse; intro to the nursing process
focusing on assessment of diverse individuals across
the life span; with emphasis on communication and
teaching, students plan and implement interventions
to promote and maintain wellness and provide care to
individuals experiencing variation in function; clinical
experiences provided in a variety of community based
settings. Prerequisite with concurrency BIOL 2010,
BIOL 1430, PY 217.
NS 128 Nursing II (class 6 hours, clinical 9
hours)
Expands the development of psychomotor, cognitive
and affective competencies needed to assume the
roles of the associate degree nurse, with continued
emphasis on assessment, students plan, implement and
evaluate interventions to promote, maintain and restore
health of diverse individuals across the life span who
are experiencing alteration in health, emphasis is on
teaching/learning, intro the acute care, perioperative
care and altered cell function and alterations in comfort/
rest, fluid and gas transport, nutrition/metabolism,
activity/mobility, psychosocial/cultural, and growth
and development functions; students apply nursing
process in caring for pediatric and adult clients in acute
care, ambulatory care and community based settings.
Prerequisite: NS 119; with concurrency BIOL 2020,
PY 101.
Course Descriptions
Principles of physics and radiation biology as
related to nuclear medicine. [S]
NS 120 Night Nursing II (class 4 hours,
clinical 9 hours)
NS 238 Nursing III (class 6 hours, clinical
9 hours)
Enhances development of psychomotor, cognitive and
affective competencies needed to assume the roles of
the associate degree nurse; with continued emphasis
on assessment, students plan, implement and evaluate
interventions to promote, maintain and restore health of
diverse individuals across the life span who experience
alteration in fluid and gas transport, nutrition/
metabolism, psychosocial/cultural, elimination, and
growth and development functions; students apply
nursing process in caring for pediatric and adult
clients in acute care and community based settings
with concentrated experience in care of the client with
altered psychosocial function. Prerequisite: NS 024 or
NS 128; with concurrency BIOL 2230
NS 249 Nursing IV (class 5 hours, clinical
12 hours)
Operationalizes the performance of psychomotor,
cognitive and affective competencies needed to assume
the roles of the associate degree nurse, continued focus
on assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating
interventions to promote, maintain and restore health of
diverse individuals across the life span who experience
alteration in growth and development, sensory/
perceptual, elimination, protective and psychosocial/
cultural functions; students apply nursing process in
caring for clients in acute care and community based
settings with a concentrated experience in womenʼs
health; course culminates with a clinical experience
in the management of groups of clients in the acute or
extended care setting. Prerequisite: NS 238.
NS 299 Special Topics in Nursing (1-3)
Study of selected topics of interest in nursing;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Nutrition, See “BIOL-Biology” and “ND-Dietary
Manager”
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
97
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
NW - Network Management
NW 205 Network Client Operating Systems
(3)
Course Descriptions
Provides knowledge and skills needed to install
and configure a network client operating system
and to perform day-to-day administration tasks.
[on demand]
NW 207 Managing & Maintaining a Server
Environment (3)
Provides knowledge and skills needed to install
and configure a network server and to perform
day-to-day administration tasks in a network
environment; class 3 hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq:
NW-205. [F]
memos, e-mail, and short reports; focus on oral
communication skills through reports and team
activities. Prereq: Must be taken in sequence.
Prereq for 105: OF-113 or instructorʼs consent (25
wpm). [104–F, 105–S]
OF 107 Keyboarding for Information
Systems (1)
Basic keyboarding; develops touch mastery for
input; speed and accuracy; for non–Office majors
only; not allowed as an elective for Office majors.
[E]
OF 113,114 Keyboarding/Document
Processing I,II (3,3)
NW 208 Management of Network
Infrastructure (3)
Keyboarding and formatting of business
documents (letters, memos, reports, tables) with
speed and accuracy. Prereq for OF-114, OF 113 or
instructorʼs consent. [F,S]
Provides knowledge and skills needed to implement, manage and maintain a network server
infrastructure. Prereq: NW 207. [S]
OF 115 Speedbuilding (1)
NW 210 Web Services (3)
Provide knowledge and skills needed to install, configure
and support the Internet Information Server (IIS) and
Apache Web Server in Microsoft and Linux environments.
Concurrent: NW 205 [F]
NW 211 Network Security Fundamentals (3)
Basic computer network security concepts and
techniques. Prereq: NW 207 [S]
NW 219 Operating Systems Security
This course provides an in depth look at operating
system security concepts and techniques.
Theoretical concepts that make the operating
system security unique are examined. Also, this
course adopts a practical hands-on approach in
examining operating system security techniques.
Prereq: NW 211. [S]
OF 103 Records Management (3)
A study of modern filing systems and equipment
with practice in applying ARMA indexing rules.
Additionally various issues related to record
management will be studied: compliance and
legal exposure, privacy, security, disaster recovery,
access to information, space limitation and cost
control. [S]
OF 104,105 Business Communications I,II
(3,3)
104–Study of English skills; focus on proofreading
and using reference sources efficiently. 105–
Prepare result-producing communications: letters,
98
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
32.5 clock hours/week. Must be taken in sequence.
First Semester
Intro to basic operative procedures and techniques,
principles of asepsis; human anatomy and
physiology, microbiology, medical terminology;
clinical experience in campus practice lab. [F]
Second Semester
Continued study of surgical operative procedures
and techniques; clinical experience in surgical
areas of affiliated hospitals. [S]
Third Semester
Intensive clinical practice experience in a
variety of surgical settings; review for national
certification examination. [Su]
Ornamental Horticulture, See “LM-Landscaping
and Turf Management”
OS - Occupational Safety
OF 125,126 Word Processing I,II (3,3)
Applications in word processing. 125–Basic
editing techniques through document merge.
126–Advanced functions and formatting; focus on
speed, decision making, and accuracy. Must be
taken in sequence. Prereq for 125: Keyboarding at
25 wpm. [F,S]
OF 127 Desktop Publishing (3)
OS 116 Industrial Maintenance Safety (3)
Review of basic requirements and application
of industrial safety and general housekeeping
practices related to manufacturing and service
environments; intro to potential maintenance
activity hazards, employer/employee responsibility
for job safety, and Occupational Safety and Health
Act. [on demand]
Mechanics of desktop publishing, creation of a
variety of publications. Prereq: OF 113. [F,S]
Paralegal, See “LA-Paralegal Studies”
OF 130 Law Office Procedures (3)
A study of the office procedures directly related to
the operation of a law office. Includes a study of
procedures to prepare court documentation such as
filings, briefs, contracts, real estate settlements and
other legal documents. [S]
OF 195 General Office Procedures (3)
Assists students in meeting the challenges
presented in todayʼs offices with emphasis on
critical thinking skills. Major topics: telephone
mastery, travel arrangements; time, human
resources, and organizational management. [F]
OF 205 Administrative Office Management
(3)
OF - Office Management
OR 000 Surgical Technology
Students will concentrate on building keyboarding
speeds; Satisfactory/No Credit Grading. Prereq:
OF 114 or equivalent or instructorʼs consent. [on
demand]
NW 215 Firewalls & Network Security
This course provides a comprehensive overview
of building and maintaining firewalls in a
business environment. Specific topics covered
include: planning/design, security, configuration,
packet filtering, proxy servers, authentication,
encryption, and VPNs. In addition, the textbook
used in the course maps to the CheckPoint CCSA
Certification. Concurrent: NW 205 [F]
OR - Surgical Technology
Developing teamwork, motivation, conflict
resolution, and problem solving skills relating to
an office environment utilizing a suite of software
applications. Prereq: OF 114, 126; Coreq: CS 197,
Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. [F]
OF 206 Office Administration Internship (3)
A capstone experience to prepare for employment
in the professional, industrial, and legal job
markets; simulated office experience and on-thejob training in chosen emphasis; class 3 hours, lab
6 hours. Prereq: OF 205. [S]
Paramedic Training, See “EA-Emergency Medical
Services”
PC - Pharmacy Technician
PC 101 Introduction to Pharmacy
Practice (3)
Intro to pharmacy practice and the health care
system; focus on pharmacy techniciansʼ role and
relationship with pharmacists; written and oral
communication skills to deal with other health
care professionals and patients; automation,
computer use, and technology used in pharmacy
practice; managed care medicine and health care
organizations; generic and brand names of top 200
drugs; class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. [F]
PC 104 Chemistry for Pharmacy
Technicians (4)
Intro to the study of chemistry; atomic and
molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry and
equation writing, compound classification and
naming, gas laws, liquid and solid states, solutions,
acids and bases, kinetics and equilibria, oxidation
and reduction; emphasis on organic compounds
and applications to pharmacy; credit may not be
applied toward a chemistry major; class 3 hours,
lab 3 hours. Prereq: DSPM-0800, DSPR-0800,
DSPW-0800. [F]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
PC 105 Pharmacy Law and Ethics (3)
PE 209 Individual and Team Sports (3)
Intro to pharmacy law history and application
of laws governing duties delegated to pharmacy
technicians; state and federal laws pertaining to
pharmacy practice and drug distribution discussed.
[F]
Teaching techniques of individual and team sports.
[F]
PC 110 Pharmaceutical Calculations (4)
PC 115 Introduction to Human Biology (4)
Structure and function of the human body; focus
on cells, tissues, and circulatory, respiratory,
digestive, nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, and
reproductive systems; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
(Note: credit will not be allowed for both PC 115
and BIOL 1060.) [F]
PC 201 Pharmacology and Therapeutics (4)
Provides practical knowledge of general
therapeutic classes of drugs and their
interactions with the human body; focus on
drug classifications, dosages and routes of
administration and some major side effects of
medications. Prereq: PC-101, 115. [S]
PC 205 Pharmacy Practice (5)
Review of prescriptions for accuracy; gathering
patient information; entering information into data
processing; preparing labels; counting, measuring,
or admixing of drug products; pricing and third
party billing, and maintaining records; ordering,
stocking, returning drug products, medication
distribution and control, and compounding with a
heavy focus on sterile products and IV admixture;
class 3 hours, lab 5 hours. Coreq: PC-110. [S]
PC 220 Pharmacy Practice Clinical
Rotations (5)
Clinical experience in local institutional and
community pharmacies to observe and practice
basic pharmacy practice skills learned in class
and through lab participation; students under
supervision of a registered pharmacist; seminar
2 hours, clinical experience 24 hours. Prereq:
PC-110, 201, 205. [Su]
Role of physical activity in American education;
historical, political, economic, and social forces
affecting physical education and society. [S]
PE 211 Personal and Community
Health (3)
Significant information useful in making intelligent
decisions about personal health; focus on personal,
family, social living, and community health. [F]
PE 220 Care and Prevention of Athletic
Injuries (3)
Prevention, analysis, prompt diagnosis, treatment
and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries;
focus on practical aspects of athletic training
within a theoretical framework; lab experiences
significant part of course. [F]
◆PE 230 The Science of Fitness and
Wellness (3)
Developing personal responsibility for optimal
well being; encompassing health concerns and risk
factors, lifestyle behaviors and preventive health
measures. This course may not be substituted for a
physical education activity class. [F,S].
PE 235 Special Topics in Wellness and
Health Promotion (1-3)
Specific topics of interest in wellness and health
promotion fields; repeatable for credit on different
topics.
PHED 1010 Aerobics (1)
Repeatable; maximum of 4 hours applicable
toward a degree. [E]
PHED 1020 Step Aerobics (2)
Repeatable; maximum of 4 hours applicable
toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1030 Aerobic Kickboxing (1)
Repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable
toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1040 Indoor Cycling (1)
Course Descriptions
Basic math computations with Roman numerals;
addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
of whole numbers and fractions; pharmacy
measurement systems (metric, apothecary, and
avoirdupois); interpretation of numeric symbols
and Latin abbreviations; medical terms, symbols,
and abbreviations used in pharmacy practice. [S]
PE 210 Introduction to Physical
Education (3)
Physical Education activity classes. These classes
routinely begin with evaluation of each studentʼs
physical profile and establish a personalized
training or conditioning program based on the
individualʼs needs. A wide range of adaptations
may be implemented, limited by considerations
of the studentʼs personal safety and abilities and
reasonable and appropriate use of the Collegeʼs
equipment and facilities.
Basic instruction and practice of indoor cycling on
a stationary bike; repeatable, maximum of 2 hours
applicable toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1080 Introduction to Pilates (1)
A class emphasizing mat exercise that increases
muscular strength, tone and flexibility. Repeatable;
maximum of 2 hours applicable toward a degree.
[F,S]
PHED 1090 Introduction to Yoga (1)
Repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable
toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1095 Power Yoga (1)
PET - Positron Emission Tomography
PET 200 Positron Emission Tomography
This course is designed to provide students with
a cognitive foundation in positron emission
tomography (PET). The relationships between
physiology, pathophysiology, radiochemistry,
radiobiology, instrumentation, and patient care
techniques in order to perform PET Imaging
procedures in neurology, cardiology, and oncology
are discussed. Radiation protection and physics,
with focus on the positron, is discussed in detail.
Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [F, S, SU]
Practice in an intense form of yoga; repeatable;
maximum of 2 hours applicable toward a degree.
[F,S]
PHED 1100 Weight Loss Management (1)
Class will cover the major components of weight
loss management through nutrition and physical
well being. Repeatable; maximum of 4 hours
applicable toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1110 Concepts of Wellness (1)
Concepts, understandings, and values of activity as
applied to optimal living through wellness; lab in
motor activity. [E]
PHED 1120 Strength and Conditioning (1)
PE - Physical Education - General
Courses
PE 154 First Aid and Safety Education (3)
Basic accident prevention principles applied to
the home, school, and community; administering
immediate and temporary care in the event
of injury or sudden illness, focus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation; may lead to CPR
certification. [E]
PHED - Physical Education - Activity
Courses
Physical Education Activity courses meet 2 hours
per week for each semester hour of credit.
To encourage students to develop and maintain
an active, healthy lifestyle, designated Physical
Education Activity Courses are repeatable
for credit, but no more than 6 hours (in any
combination) may be applied toward a degree.
Each course has a maximum limit as well (see
course description).
PE 201 Group Fitness Instruction (3)
Concepts and techniques for designing and practice
in teaching all components of a safe and effective
group exercise class. [F]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Adaptive Physical Education
Students with Adaptive Physical Education
needs may enroll in any of a number of regular
Intro to weight training and conditioning;
repeatable; maximum of 4 hours applicable toward
a degree. [E]
PHED 1130 Fitness for Living (2)
Encompasses strength training, body contouring
and toning, aerobic conditioning, and flexability.
Each studentʼs current status will be assessed and
progress monitored. Repeatable; maximum of 4
hours applicable toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1140 Walking for Fitness (2)
Repeatable; maximum of 4 hours applicable
toward a degree. [E]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
99
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
PHED 1150 Body Sculpting (1)
PHIL - Philosophy
Basic instruction and practice in the fundamentals
of weight training using light hand weights;
repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable toward
a degree. [F,S]
◆PHIL 1030 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
Course Descriptions
PHED 1450 Beginning Self-Defense (1) [F,S]
PHED 1460 Self-Defense for Women (1) [F,S]
PHED 1470 Advanced Self-Defense for
Women (1)
◆PHYS 2110,2120 Calculus-Based Physics
I,II (4,4)
PHIL 1130 Critical Thinking (3)
An introduction to practical reasoning and how to
think critically. [S]
Calculus-based physics; for engineering and
science majors; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
2110–Mechanics: statics, kinematics, work,
energy, power, momentum, conservation
laws, heat, rotation and harmonic motion, and
thermodynamics. 2120–Electrostatics, fields and
potentials, electromotive force, AC/DC circuits,
electromagnetism, capacitance and inductance, and
electromagnetic waves. Must be taken in sequence.
Prereq for 2110: MATH 1910, PHYS-2010;
or departmental consent. Coreq for 2110:
MATH-1920. [2110–F, 2120–S]
PHIL 2130 Formal Logic (3)
Prereq: PHED-1460 or instructorʼs consent. [S]
PHED 1560 Skin and Scuba Diving (1)
◆PHIL 2230 Ethics (3)
Scuba equipment rental not included in course
cost; swimming proficiency needed; repeatable;
maximum of 2 hours applicable toward a degree.
[F,S]
A study of the challenges faced by traditional
morality, the major ethical theories, and moral
dimensions of specific issues. Prereq: ENGL-1010.
[F,S]
PHED 1570 Backpacking and Hiking (1)
PHIL 2430 Philosophy of Religion (3)
Repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable
toward a degree; equipment, campsite rental fees,
food, and transportation not included in course
cost. [F,S]
Philosophical examination of religion; issues
include the existence and nature of God,
relationship between faith and reason, and
challenges to religious belief. Prereq: ENGL-1010.
[on demand]
Covers the fundamental steps, styling and
variations of different social dances selected from
the Fox Trot, Waltz, Swing, Polka, Cha-Cha,
Tango, Rumba, Samba, Schottischeand Country
Western. Repeatable; maximum of 4 hours
applicable toward a degree. [F,S]
PHIL 2990 Special Topics in Philosophy (3)
PHED 1750 Elementary Ballet Technique (1)
PHYS - Physics
Repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable
toward a degree. [F,S]
PM - Plumbing
PM 000 Plumbing
This program will provide the necessary
knowledge, skills and abilities in the safe and
efficient performance of the residential plumbing
profession. Training will be competency based
in accordance with the National Center for
Construction Education & Research (NCCER)
curriculum and local plumbing code(s). Training
will consist of a specified common core and
required competencies according to curricula.
Training will include hands-on instruction and will
require students to demonstrate learning outcomes
through performance oriented evaluations. 1290
clock hours.
Special topics of traditional and current relevance
in Philosophy; repeatable for credit on different
topics. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on demand]
PHYS 1000 Basic Technical Physics (3)
PHED 1840 Volleyball (1) [F,S]
Preparation for college physics for students with
no previous physics and/or weak math background;
algebraic equations, trigonometry and vectors;
intro to physical mechanics; not intended for
transfer; not accepted toward any degree program
at Chattanooga State. Recommended coreq:
MATH-1710 [F]
PHED 1850 Basketball (1) [F]
◆PHYS 1030 Concepts of Physics (4)
PHED 1820 Beginning Table Tennis (1) [F,S]
PHED 1830 Racquetball (1) [F,S]
PHED 1860 Golf (1) [F]
PHED 1870 Beginning Tennis (1) [E]
PHED 1880 Intermediate Tennis (1)
[on demand]
PHED 1890 Wallyball (1)
Repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable
toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1895 Bowling (1)
Repeatable; maximum of 2 hours applicable
toward a degree. [F,S]
PHED 1990 Special Topics: Physical
Education Activity (1-2)
Repeatable for credit on different topics; maximum
of 6 hours applicable toward a degree. [on
demand]
100
An introduction to lifeʼs fundamental questions.
Addresses issues pertaining to rationality, value,
knowledge, and reality. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [E]
An introduction to formal deductive logic:
syllogistic, modal, propositional, and predicate
arguments. [F]
PHED 1740 Popular Social Dance (1)
and preprofessional majors; class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. 2010–Mechanics, heat and thermodynamics.
2020–Electricity and magnetism, ray and wave
optics. Must be taken in sequence. Prereq for
2010: PHYS-1000 or equivalent. Coreq for 2010:
MATH-1720 [2010–E; 2020–S,Su]
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
PO - Political Science
◆PO 110 Introduction to American
Government (3)
Basics of democratic government; constitutional
principles, functions, operations, and processes of
governmental change; attention given to the role
of political institutions and parties, public opinion,
interest groups and the media. [F,S]
One semester intro physics course for non-science
and non-engineering majors; focus on the nature
of physics and applying basic physics concepts
in everyday life experience and work; math
limited to basic algebra required to understand
and apply physics concepts; mechanical motion,
energy, temperature and heat, fluids, electricity,
magnetism, wave motion and optics; class 3 hours,
lab 3 hours. [E]
World politics with emphasis on international
competition, cooperation, war, and peace. Theories
explain political and economic events, military
conflicts, and how domestic politics are linked
to foreign policy. The behavior of states and
non-state actors are linked to the evolution of the
contemporary world order. [F,S]
◆PHYS 1310 Integrated Physics (3)
PO 217 Introduction to Urban Politics (3)
An integrated approach to the physics concepts
associated with force and motion, energy,
heat and temperature, sound, light, electricity
and magnetism using guided student inquiry.
Connections of these physics concepts to other
fields of science like chemistry, biology, geology,
and earth science will be made; lab 3 hours, class
2 hours. [E]
◆PHYS 2010,2020 Non–Calculus-Based
Physics I,II (4,4)
Algebra-based physics for engineering technology
◆PO 112 Introduction to World Politics (3)
Historical and policy investigation of urban politics
in American government and the evolutionary
place of cities in American politics and society.
Prereq: ENGL 1010, PO 110. [F,S]
PO 218 The American Presidency (3)
This course examines the growth and development
of the Presidency and its place in the American
political system. Topics covered include policy,
image, campaigning, domestic and foreign policies,
and the economy. Prereq: ENGL 1010, PO 110.
[F,S]
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
PO 219 State and Local Government (3)
Intro to state and local government; focus on
the interrelationships between state and local, state
and federal, and local and federal governments. [F]
PO 220 Comparative Governments (3)
A comparison of the basic principles of the
presidential, parliamentary, presidentialparliamentary, and totalitarian systems of
government. Prereq: PO 110,112. [on demand]
An examination of the external factors affecting
the American political system. Emphasis is given
to the role of the United States as a nation-state by
examining behavior and the nature of interaction
with international powers. Prereq: PO 110,112. [on
demand]
PO 260 American Foreign Policy (3)
Selected themes in American foreign policy.
Emphasis on the trends of American foreign policy
from the beginning of the nationʼs history up to the
present. Prereq: PO 110,112. [on demand]
Clinical experience in local health care facilities;
students observe and apply skills and interventions
learned in class and lab under direct supervision
of PTs or PTAs; clinic hours: 6 in 111, 12 in 210,
30 in 221; Satisfactory/No Credit grading; liability
insurance required. [111–S, 210–F, 221–S]
PT 112 Pathological Conditions (3)
Survey of diseases and injuries treated by physical
therapy; associated medical or surgical treatment
of these conditions; physical therapy treatment for
specific conditions. [S]
PT 115,125 Physical Therapy Procedures
I,II (5,4)
Physical therapy principles; class 3 hours, lab
hours: 6 in 115, 3 in 125; liability insurance
required. 115–Basic principles, interventions and
modality techniques. 125–Focus on spinal traction,
electrical stimulation, biofeedback, pain control,
protocol exercise routines, iontophoresis, CPM,
manual muscle testing. [115–F, 125–S]
PT 123 Functional Anatomy (4)
PSCI - Physical Science
◆PSCI 1030 The Physical Environment (4)
Explores physical science in its historical and
sociological significance, the process of science,
and the present content of scientific fact and
theory; includes physics, chemistry, geology and
astronomy; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. [F,S]
◆PSCI 1310 Integrated Earth and Space
Science (3)
This course is an integrated approach to
basic principles from the fields of geology,
oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy.
Topics include: map interpretation, minerals and
rocks, processes acting at the Earthʼs surface and
within the Earth, plate tectonics, geologic time and
dating, water movements, ocean floor, weather and
climate, composition and motions of the Earth,
solar system, phases of the moon, origin and life
cycles of stars, and galaxies; class 2 hours, lab 3
hours. Prereq: PHYS 1310 and CHEM 1310 [E]
PSCI 2990 Special Topics in Science (1-4)
Study of a specific topic in science; repeatable for
credit on different topics. Prereq: Department head
and instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
PT - Physical Therapist Assistant
Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant
Program is a prerequisite for all PT courses.
Please consult the SUMMARY OF REQUIRED
HOURS; all PT courses shown in the same term
are corequisites, all PT courses shown in the
preceding term(s) are PT prerequisites, and all
BIOL and PHYS courses are pre/corequisites to
PT courses as shown.
PT 104 Introduction to Physical Therapy (2)
History, function, purpose of physical therapy;
PTAʼs role in ethics, medical-legal issues, medical
terminology, administration and communication
skills with all clients/patients/and other care
providers. [F]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Integrates muscle innervation, position, and function
of the musculoskeletal system for specific joints and
their muscular components; palpation skills, joint range
of motion, goniometry, and manual muscle testing;
biomechanical concepts related to simple movement
analysis and kinesiology; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. [F]
PT 201 Physical Therapy Seminar (2)
Critique sessions concerning physical therapy
interventions and clinic participation; student
presentations on PT interventions for specific
pathologies, specific process for licensure. [S]
given to “pitfalls” that become obstacles to
successful marriages; general communications
skills, interactive listening, conflict resolution, and
CONSTRAT (conscious strategizing). [on demand]
PY 151 Psychology of Personal Adjustment
(3)
Major theories of adjustment and maladjustment,
including psychoanalysis, neo-Freudian, behavioral
theory and humanistic psychology; role of religion,
work behavior and other cultural influences. [E]
PY 201 Introduction to Behavioral Statistics
(4)
Fundamental statistics for the behavioral sciences;
descriptive and inferential statistics, research
design, and interpretation of psychological data;
computer analysis emphasized; class 3 hours, lab
2 hours. Prereq: 2 years of high school algebra
and acceptable test scores; or DSPM-0850. [on
demand]
PY 213 Abnormal Psychology (3)
Course Descriptions
PO 240 International Relations (3)
PT 111,210,221 Clinical Practice I,II,III
(2,4,10)
Abnormal and psychopathological behavior
patterns, mental deficiencies, neuroses, psychoses,
personality disorders; prevention and processing;
contains service-learning component. Prereq:
ENGL-1010, PY-101. [F,S]
PY 215 Child Growth and Development (3)
Physical, emotional, social and intellectual child
development from conception through adolescence;
concepts of development and function derived from
theoretical approaches, research and clinical observation
emphasized; child rearing applications included. Prereq:
PY-101. [F,S]
PY 217 Human Growth and Development (3)
PT 205 Therapeutic Exercise (5)
Principles and uses of therapeutic exercises
and exercise equipment options; special
assessment procedures, exercise techniques,
neurodevelopmental exercises, and techniques
utilized in specific conditions; intro to orthotics,
prosthetics, splinting and gait analysis; class 3
hours, lab 6 hours. [F]
Public Speaking, See “SP-Speech”
PY - Psychology
◆PY 101 General Psychology (3)
Intro survey course; study of mental processes and
human behavior to better understand ourselves
and anticipate and predict the behavior of others;
history and methods of psychology, principles of
human development (infancy through adulthood),
motivation, emotion, stress, learning and
remembering, and abnormal psychology. [E]
PY 103 Stress Management (1)
Relationship of stress to physical and mental
well-being; focus on developing a lifestyle that
promotes wellness through exercise, proper
nutrition, and understanding the basic physiology
of stress. [on demand]
PY 109 Healthy Marriages Aren’t Accidents (1)
Basic “maintenance skills” for creating a marriage
with long-range, positive potential; attention
Overview of human developmental changes from
conception to death focusing on multidisciplinary
perspectives (biological, cognitive, behavioral,
social); analysis and application of these
perspectives in various environmental contexts.
Prereq: PY-101. [E]
PY 235 Special Topics in Psychology (1-3)
Specific topics of traditional and current social
and psychological interest; repeatable for credit on
different topics. [on demand]
PY 250 Leadership Development (3)
Leadership philosophy, practices, and skills;
decision making, empowerment, trust, goal-setting
and conflict resolution; readings in the humanities
and critical analysis of media that explore
leadership styles. (Same as HUM-2550; credit not
allowed for both courses.) Prereq: ENGL 1010.
[F,S]
PZ - Powerhouse Operations
PZ 110,111,210,211 Powerhouse Operations
I,II,III,IV (4,4,4,4) (DuPont)
Theory of steam generation; class 3 hours, lab 2
hours. 110-Boilers, auxiliaries and superheaters;
instruments and controls; fuels. 111-Turbines,
auxiliaries, coal handling, emission control
systems, river water pumping stations, water
treatment and cooling tower use, application
and maintenance. 210-Use of well water for
steam generation, manufacturing processes;
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
101
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Course Descriptions
electrical generation and distribution, compressed
air production, and equipment maintenance.
211-Compression refrigeration systems, heat
transference, refrigerant types, compressors, lowtemperature systems, air conditioning applications,
delivery and handling; intro to waster water
treatment and sludge disposal. Prereq for 210:
PZ 110, 111. Prereq for 211: PZ 110, 111. [on
demand]
QA - Quality Technology
QA 142 Quality Engineering (4)
Basic concepts and body of knowledge involved
in Certified Quality Engineer Examination; basic
concepts and principles of probability, discrete
and continuous probability functions, sampling
distributions, statistical inference, regression,
and correlation analysis; statistical quality
control, acceptance sampling using attributes and
variables, experimental design, quality planning,
quality management, product liability, metrology,
inspection, testing, quality cost analysis, quality
auditing, reliability, maintainability, product safety,
quality information systems, motivation, and
human factors. Recommended prereq: MATH-1510
or 1530. [on demand]
QA 146 Quality Auditing (1-2)
Basic concepts and body of knowledge required
for Certified Quality Auditor (CQA) Examination;
review of steps required for planning and
conducting an audit: initiation, preparation,
performing, reporting, and follow-up; sample
questions from previous CQA examinations. [on
demand]
QA 240 Statistical Process Control (3)
Concepts and body of knowledge required in basic
statistical process control and improvement; study
and applications of basic probability concepts and
principles, discrete and continuous probability
functions, sampling distributions, limited statistical
inference, linear regression, and correlation
analysis; also covers flow charts, check sheets,
stem and leaf plots, histograms, cause and effect
diagrams, and run and pareto chart; measurement
process evaluation methods. Recommended prereq:
MATH-1510 or 1530. [on demand]
QA 298 Special Topics in Quality (1-4)
Specialized topics and/or problems in quality;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
QA 299 Special Topics in Quality with Lab
(1-4)
111–An introduction to the development of the
respiratory care profession, including the basic
legal and ethical components of the practice.
Topics also include review of math, computer
skills and terminology related to the field along
with the study of medical gas therapy. 112–In depth
studies in respiratory care procedures to include
humidity and aerosol therapy, airway management,
pulmonary hygiene and hyper inflation therapy.
A 3-hour lab supplements course material. 113–In
depth study of noninvasive ventilation, patient
monitoring and assessment, safety issues and
charting. A 3-hour lab supplements the course
material. Prereq for 111: Current standing in
respiratory care program. Prereq for 112: RC
111,142. Prereq for 113: RC 112,142,241. [111–F,
112–S, 113–Su]
RC 142 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and
Physiology (3)
General concepts of disease, human pathology,
arterial blood gases, and acid-base concepts.
Prereq: RC 111,142. [F]
RC 242 Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology
(3)
RC 143 Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology (2)
Introduction to the drugs used in the care of patients
with respiratory conditions. Includes dose calculations,
methods of administration, and recognition of adverse
effects. Prereq: RC 111,142 [S]
Etiology, pathology, pathophysiology, symptoms,
diagnosis, course, treatment, and prognosis of
selected diseases that affect the cardiopulmonary
system. Prereq: RC 112,143,241. [S]
RC 210 Mechanical Ventilation (4)
In-depth study of mechanical ventilation through
didactic and guided lab experiences; critical
care medicine principles as applied to rationale,
institution and discontinuance of mechanical
ventilation; basic ventilator operation and
modification; class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq:
RC113,242. [F]
RC 243 Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory
Care (3)
Intro to common pediatric and neonatal
cardiopulmonary disorders; intro to therapeutic
modalities used in the treatment of infants and
children, including critical care procedures. Prereq:
RC 113,242. [S]
RC 212 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostic Testing
(3)
Cardiopulmonary diagnostic testing and
monitoring, major cardiovascular monitoring and
supportive therapy concepts; EKG and pulmonary
testing and interpretation, transcutaneous O2
monitoring, oximetry, end tidal CO2 monitoring;
class 2 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: RC 210,221,243.
[S]
RC 213 Advanced Respiratory Therapy
Topics (3)
Radiation Therapy Technology, See “HS-Health
Science”
RC 214 Advanced Practice (3)
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Respiratory care procedures in hospital settings;
clinical rotations may be scheduled during
evening or night hours; clinical fee and liability
insurance required; 24 lab hours; Satisfactory/No
Credit grading. 221–Oxygen therapy, medical
gas cylinder use, humidity and aerosol therapy,
IPPB, incentive spriometry, bronchial hygiene,
chest physiotherapy, isolation techniques, cleaning
and sterilization, CPR, physical assessment
and arterial puncture. 222–Emphasis on patient
evaluation and clinical judgment; pediatric therapy,
blood gas instrumentation and quality control
procedures, EKG testing and interpretation,
endotracheal intubation, pulmonary function
testing, chest radiographs interpretation and home
care. 223–Emphasis on critical care procedures;
initiation, monitoring and discontinuation of
mechanical ventilation; neonatal-pediatric
intensive care; hemodynamic monitoring and lab
test interpretation. Prereq for 221: RC 113,242.
Prereq for 222: RC 210,243. Prereq for 223: RC
212,213,222. [221–F, 222–S, 223–Su]
RC 241 Arterial Blood Gas Analysis (2)
Consists of a study of the structure and function of
the respiratory, cardiac and renal systems. Prereq:
Current standing in the respiratory care program.
[F]
Specialized topics and/or problems in quality;
repeatable for credit on different topics. Prereq:
Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Admission to the Respiratory Care Program is
a prerequisite to all RC courses. Please consult
the SUMMARY OF REQUIRED HOURS. All RC
RC 221,222,223 Clinical Practicum I,II,III
(5,5,4)
RC 111,112,113 Principles of Respiratory
Care Procedures I,II,III (3,4,4)
Advanced topics including fluid and electrolyte
balance, pulmonary rehabilitation, hemodynamics,
and new techniques in respiratory care; practice
exams to prepare for NBRC entry level and
advanced practitioner exams.
Prereq: RC 210,222,243. [Su]
RC - Respiratory Care
102
courses shown in the same term are corequisites
and all RC courses shown in the preceding term(s)
are RC prerequisites.
A comprehensive look into the advanced level
practices expected of a therapist to include
advanced life support, intra hospital transportation,
assisting the physician, patient monitoring,
education and rehabilitation, along with evaluating
results from testing. [Su]
REAL - Realtime Reporting
REAL 122,123,124 Judicial Reporting
I,II,III,IV (4,4,4)
122–170 wpm required for course completion.
123–Continuation of REAL 122; focus on
speedbuilding, dictation of various legal
proceedings and accuracy; 200 wpm machine
shorthand speed required for course completion.
124–Continuation of REAL 123; focus on
speedbuilding and all court reporting areas using
machine shorthand; must pass one 5-minute test
at 96% accuracy and two 5-minute tests at 95%
accuracy at each of the following speeds: 225
wpm two-voice testimony; 200 wpm jury charge;
and 180 wpm literary. Prereq for 122: Scopist
Diploma or equivalent. Prereq for 123: REAL 122
Prereq for 124: REAL 123[121–Su; 122–F; 123–S;
124–Su]
REAL 132,133,134 Captioning/CART I,II,III,IV
(4,4,4)
Development of captioning/CART skills, including
speedbuilding. 132–Development of captioning/
CART skills, including speedbuilding. Emphasis
on numbers, time, speaker ID, brackets, and
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
RI 120 Chattanooga’s African-American
Experience—Contemporary Issues (2)
RT 1130 Introduction to Radiologic
Technology (3)
Study of the African-American experience in
Chattanooga; focus on issues of identity, diversity,
conflict, and community. [on demand]
Organization, function, supervision and financial
arrangements of radiology departments; rules
and regulations of the program and the clinical
affiliates, brief history of medicine and radiology,
doʼs and donʼts regarding radiation and electrical
protection and general safety, and ethical and legal
responsibilities entailed by becoming a member of
a paramedical profession. [F]
REAL 201 Judicial Procedures (3)
RR 000 Realtime Reporting: Scopist
Methods and procedures for transcript production
of legal proceedings; freelance field procedures;
taking and transcribing depositions, arbitrations,
sworn statements, and official procedures. [S]
A 1,290 hour program that trains the students to
transcribe and edit realtime reporterʼs transcripts.
Scoping is an ideal career for someone who needs
or prefers to work from home.
RI 135 Special Topics—Renaissance
Institute (1-3)
Study of contemporary, social, political, and/or
cultural issues; repeatable for credit on different
topics. [on demand]
RR - Realtime Reporting: Scopist
REAL 202 Captioning/CART Procedures (3)
Online translation, basic care of hardware data
input device, setup of computer hardware,
application of CAT functions, broadcast production
preparation, FCC regulations, and Internet
research; hands-on practicum in simulated
broadcast studio. [S]
RELS - Religious Studies
RS - Real Estate
RS 101 Basic Principles of Real Estate (4)
Basics of real estate; prepares applicants for the
State of Tennessee Real Estate License Exam
(course not applicable for licensure in Georgia or
other states); topics include ethics, contracts, trust
deeds, closing statements, leases, mortgages, and
real estate math. [on demand]
◆RELS 2030 Religions of the World (3)
Main tenets of the worldʼs great religions,
including Christianity, Judaism, Confucianism,
Shintoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam; focus
on their influence on thought and action. Prereq:
ENGL-1010. [E]
RELS 2230 Religion in America (3)
Survey of religionʼs historical development in the
American experience; major movements, divisions,
theological issues, and personalities woven
into the mosaic of religion in America from the
Puritan heritage to modern secularism and cultural
pluralism. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on demand]
RELS 2610,2620 Biblical Studies I,II (3,3)
Philosophical, religious, socio-political, and
literary aspects of the Bible and its impact on
Western Culture. 2610–Old Testament. 2620–New
Testament. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [F,S]
RELS 2990 Special Topics in Religious
Studies (3)
Special topics of traditional and current relevance
in Religious Studies; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on demand]
RI - Renaissance Institute
RI 100 Personal and College Success (3)
Analysis of personal and academic strengths;
career and life planning; building new skills and
values; learning college and community culture and
resources. A grade of “Cʼ or better is required. [E]
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
RS 103 Real Estate Course for New
Affiliates (2)
A course designed to establish performance
capabilities, knowledge, and skills for performing
in real estate: for real estate affiliates (salespersons)
already engaged in real estate as a career. Prereq:
RS 101 or consent of instructor. [on demand]
RS 104 Real Estate Brokerage (3)
A study of the rapidly changing operation of real
estate brokerage firms. Emphasis is placed on how
companies operate, how managers function and
how people become effective leaders. The course
covers brokerage services, recruiting requirements,
personnel selection, hiring procedures, policies and
procedures, marketing and advertising, professional
development, and the risks of doing business.
Prereq: RS 101. [on demand]
RT - Radiologic Technology
A prerequisite to all RT courses is admission
into the program in which the course is required.
Please consult the SUMMARY OF REQUIRED
HOURS for the specific program. All RT courses
shown in the same term are corequisites and all
RT courses shown in the preceding term(s) are RT
prerequisites. BIOL, CHEM, and MATH courses
required in the Radiologic Technology A.A.S.
degree program are pre/corequisite to RT courses
as shown, and all Freshman year courses are
prerequisite to second year RT courses. Course
descriptions may be abbreviations of the syllabi
course descriptions.
RT 1220,1330,2420,2520,2630 Clinic
I,II,III,IV,V (2,3,2,2,3)
Simulation, practice and competent performance
of radiologic exams in the following categories:
1)-upper extremities, 2)-lower extremities, 3)-bony
thorax, chest and abdomen, 4)-contrast studies,
5)-spines, 6)-cranium; progressive development
of knowledge and skills in correct positioning
to demonstrate specific anatomy, radiographic
film evaluation process, reasons for radiographic
exams, and proper methods of patient care;
assignments in advanced imaging procedures and
radiation therapy; lab/clinic hours: 20 in 1220,
2420 & 2520, 30 in 1330, 2630. 1220–Intro to
radiographic imaging and equipment care, basic
positioning and exposure selection, and body
mechanics of handling patients; must demonstrate
competent performance of 3 radiologic exams
from 3 different categories (except cranium).
1330–Must demonstrate competent performance
of three radiographic exams. Preparation for final
category competency evaluation. 2420, 2520 &
2630–Final category instruction and evaluation of
4 exams from 2 categories; assignments in nuclear
medicine, radiation therapy, computed tomography,
special procedures, and pararadiologic areas.
[1220, 2520–S; 1330, 2630–Su, 2420–F]
Course Descriptions
musical notes. 133–Development of captioning/
CART skills including speedbuilding. Emphasis
on dictionary development, environmental sound
descriptors, phonetic translation, prefixes and
suffixes. 134–Development of captioning/CART
skills. Minimum speed of 180 wpm writing a
30-minute program with a TER goal of 98% or
higher. Write a simulated CBC/CCP skills test
at 180 wpm literary for five minutes with a goal
of 96%. Emphasis on writing web site/Internet
addresses, stroke placement, and slang. Prereq for
132: Scopist Diploma or equivalent. Prereq for
133 DSPW 0800, DSPR 0800, REAL 132. Prereq
for 134 DSPW 0800, DSPR 0800, REAL 133 [131,
134–Su; 132–F; 133–S]
RT 1143,1243 Radiographic Exposure/
Physics I,II (4,4)
A two-course sequence in the fundamentals
of radiologic science and x-ray physics. 1143–
Nature and production of x-rays, x-ray film
and intensifying screens, invisible and manifest
image, film processing equipment and quality
control, prime factors of radiography and x-ray
interaction with matter. 1243–Factors that govern
and influence radiographic image production using
radiographic film; proper operation and care of
radiographic equipment; tomography; and radiation
protection and health physics. Class 4 hours, lab 3
hours. [1143–F, 1243–S]
RT 1145,1244,2430 Radiographic
Positioning—Film Critique and Medical
TerminologyI,II,III (4,4,3)
Radiographic positioning and image critique;
medical terminology, exam instruction simulation
and practice prior to working with patients.
1145–Intro to positioning and terminology; upper
and lower extremities, bony thorax, chest, and
abdomen, cervical, thoracic and lumbar - lumbosacral vertebrae; intro to common contrast
procedures; class 4 hours, lab 5 hours. 1244–
Anatomy, topography, morphology and routine
projections of contrast studies and the cranium and
face; class 4 hours, lab 4 hours. 2430–Radiography
of the soft-tissue structures of the neck, thorax, and
abdomen; contrast media characteristics relative
to their proper use in the body, side effects, and
administration and opacification methods; normal
radiographs of each body system reviewed with
focus on preprocedure prep, patient care and
management, contraindications and complications,
and proper positioning and exposure; class 3 hours.
[1145-F, 1244-S, 2430-F]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
103
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Course Descriptions
RT 2433 Special Procedures Radiography—
Nursing (4)
Special procedures discussed in reference
to: anatomy, procedures, indications and
contraindications, contrast media, equipment, and
patient positioning; basic medical techniques and
patient care, medical and surgical asepsis, vital
signs, medical emergencies, drug administration,
venipuncture, anatomy and radiography of the
central nervous system, and the visceral and
peripheral circulatory system, general tomography,
and foreign body localization. Class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. [F]
RT 2440 Introduction to Digital Imaging and
Radiation Therapy (4)
Intro to subspecialties of diagnostic radiology
and basic radiation therapy principles; focus on
the following digital imaging modalities: digital
fluoroscopy and radiography, bone densitometry,
computed tomography, nuclear medicine, positron
emission tomography, diagnostic ultrasound,
magnetic resonance; radiation therapy and digital
imaging modalities discussed in reference to
comparison to conventional radiology physical
principles, equipment and methodology, historical
development, selected clinical applications, and
biological effects. This course presents a survey
of the subspecialties. Detailed coverage requires
additional course work and clinical experiences.
[F]
RT 2442,2542 Radiology Seminar I,II (4,4)
Advanced radiographic science; integrated
coverage of radiation protection, equipment
operation and maintenance, image production
and evaluation, radiographic positioning and
procedures, patient care and management, and
quality assurance; focus on development of skills
and knowledge needed to exercise independent
judgement and discretion in the technical
performance of medical imaging procedures.
Focus on non-routine procedures in each exam
category and modification of standard projections
to better demonstrate pathology and accommodate
patientʼs condition; evaluation of the performance
of radiologic systems to effect the best diagnostic
results with the least cost and radiation exposure
to the patient. 2442–- Includes film processing
analysis and quality assurance using sensitometry.
2542–Includes x-ray equipment analysis and
quality control and the development of exposure
guides (fixed kV, optimal kV, variable kV,
automatic exposure control). Class 4 hours, lab 2
hours. [2442–F, 2542–S]
culture. Global issues of race and ethnicity provide
parameters for understanding issues within the
United States. Prereq: ENGL 1010. [S]
SE 000 Motorcycle & Marine Service
Technology
SO 219 Violence and Society (3)
Historical investigation into violence in American
society and the evolutionary response of criminal
justice agencies. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [F,S]
Motorcycle & Marine Service Technology
Program is the study of shop safety, tools and
equipment, routine maintenance, diagnostics and
troubleshooting of 2&4 stroke internal combustion
engines; electrical systems, fuel systems,
mechanical, lubrication, cooling, power transfer,
and exhaust systems. The students will diagnose
symptoms, disassemble, inspect, and reassemble
components for repair relative to the motorcycle
and marine services industries; 30 clock hours/
week. [E]
SO 235 Special Topics in Sociology (1-3)
Specific topics of traditional and current
sociological interest; repeatable for credit on
different topics. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [on demand]
Sonography, See “US-Diagnostic Medical
Sonography”
Secretarial Science, See “MG-Management/Office
Management Concentration”
◆SP 110 Fundamentals of Public Speaking
(3)
SO - Sociology
◆SO 110 Introduction to Sociology (3)
Intro to field of sociology; focus on basic concepts,
principles, and processes used to study the
structure and function of society. [E]
SO 202 Social Problems (3)
Study of social problems in the U.S.; provides
sociological perspective for making sense of future
developments in our society. Prereq: ENGL 1010,
SO 110. [F,S]
SO 214 Criminology (3)
This course employs a broad-based
interdisciplinary approach to theories of crime
and criminal justice. More specifically, the course
examines explanations about crime, the criminal,
and societal responses. Prereq: ENGL 1010. [F]
SO 215 Marriage and Family (3)
Emphasizes values and family dynamics of
contemporary American life; helps students make
knowledgeable choices in their interpersonal lives
by providing sound facts and using a problemsolving approach. Prereq: ENGL-1010. [F,S]
SP - Speech
Introductory public speaking course
stressing organization and presentation of the
extemporaneous speech in a variety of formats.
Prereq. ENGL 1010. [E]
SP-120 Interpersonal Communication Skills
(3)
Covers basic interpersonal communication
skills including listening, nonverbal awareness,
interviewing and conflict management; focuses on
strategies for college, personal and professional
success. [on demand]
SP 235 Special Topics in Speech (1-3)
Specific topics in speech communication and
forensics; repeatable for credit on different topics.
Prereq: ENGL-1010 with grade of C or better. [on
demand]
SPAN - Spanish
SPAN 1010,1020 Elementary Spanish I,II
(4,4)
RT 2540 Radiologic Pathology (4)
◆SO 216 Cultural Anthropology (3)
Elementary grammar, vocabulary, reading,
idiomatic conversation, and Spanish culture. Must
be taken in sequence. [F,S]
Survey of disease as related to Radiologic
Technology and is prepared for the advanced
student radiographer. Material based on systems
and related organs of the body, emphasizing
studies that make use of radiology; each system
discussed according to the categories of disease
demonstrated by radiography or by another
imaging modality. Focus on specific pathologic
conditions encountered in the major organ systems
that require adjustments in exposure factors,
patient care and management and positioning. [S]
Comparative study of culture, social organization,
economics, government, education, religion,
language, and arts in various primitive and present
societies. [E]
SPAN 2010,2020 Intermediate Spanish I,II
(3,3)
RT 2543 Radiobiology and Radiation
Protection (4)
Sociological analysis of racial and ethnic relations
in the United States. Historical and sociology
overview of race and ethnicity focusing primarily
on four ethnic groups: Native Americans, African
Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans. Brief
analysis of white ethnic Americans of Irish,
Italian, and Jewish ethnicities. Emphasis on group
interrelations and their relations with the dominant
A study of the effects of ionizing radiation in
biological systems; radiation units; radiation
protection standards for patients, occupationally
exposed, general public and special groups; design
of x-ray diagnostic imaging laboratories; and
radiation monitoring devices; class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. [S]
104
SE - Motorcycle & Marine Service
Technology
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
SO 217 Sociology of Aging (3)
Basic course in social gerontology; focus on the
aging process and the problems of the aged. [on
demand]
SO 218 American Ethnic Relations (3)
Intermediate grammar, reading and conversation.
Must be taken in sequence. 2010–Focus on oral
skills and Spanish culture. 2020–Focus on reading
and translation. Prereq: SPAN-1020 or 2 years of
high school Spanish. [2010–F, 2020–S]
SPECIAL INTEREST COURSES
The following courses are offered as a community
service and are not intended to be used to satisfy
the foreign language requirement or remove
high school deficiencies for any degree program
at Chattanooga State or any other college or
university.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
SPAN 1000,2000 Conversational Spanish I,II
(1-2,1-2)
Everyday Spanish language and culture; focus
on spoken language. 1000–Basic vocabulary and
idiomatic expressions in real-life situations. 2000–
Sophisticated vocabulary and complex grammar
structures: discussion and debate of politics,
environment and current events. [1000–F,S;
2000–S]
SPAN 1002 Medical Spanish (2)
SPAN 1990 Spanish Field Work (3)
Basics of teaching Spanish: includes observation/
participation; class 2 hours, lab 2 hours. Prereq:
SPAN-1020. [on demand]
SPAN 2811,2812,2813,2814 Spanish for
Healthcare Professionals I,II,III,IV
(1,1,1,1)
Spanish language development for medical
professionalsʼ interaction with patients and
staff including basic conversation, medical
questions, medical terms, and cultural elements.
2811–Introduction to language, conversation,
culture; 2812–Focus on more complex dialogues,
introduce medical terms; 2813–Expand dialogue
skills, study culture, build medical term knowledge;
2814–Focus on medical interviews, explaining
diagnoses, building cultural bridges. Must be taken
in sequence. [on demand]
SPAN 2821 Spanish for Human Resources
Professionals I (1)
THEA 2810 Actor’s Workshop (3)
ST 000 Security +
Ongoing study in the foundational skills of acting
and improvisation for students interested in a career
in the theatre arts, television and film. Repeatable
for credit; maximum of 3 hours applicable toward a
degree. [F,S]
This certificate program is designed to add
foundation-level skills in the security area for
students that have completed the Computer
Operations Technology program. Students will
study general security concepts, communication
security, infrastructure security, and the basics of
Cryptography to protect data integrity. 450 clock
hours. Prereq: VCOT Diploma or permission.
TFAP - Technology Foundations in
Basic Anatomy & Physiology
*TFAP 0000 Technology Foundations in
Basic Anatomy & Physiology
Human anatomy and physiology related to body
systems; relationship between structural and
functional roles of system components; basic
histology and terminology. The class is an 8-week,
160 clock hour course. [Su]
*TFMA - Technical Foundations in
Mathematics
TFMA 0000 Technology Foundations in
Mathematics
Course of study includes whole numbers,
fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion;
5-clock hours/week.
Spanish language development for human resources
professionalsʼ interaction with employees and
applicants including basic conversation, interview
questions, human resources related terms, and
cultural elements. [on demand]
THEA - Theatre
SPAN 2831 Spanish for Business
Professionals I (1)
THEA 1001 Artist in Residence (1-3)
Spanish language development for business
professionalsʼ interaction with employees and
applicants including basic conversation, sales
presentations, business related terms, and cultural
elements. [on demand]
SPAN 2841 Spanish for Education
Professionals (1)
Spanish language development for educational
professionalsʼ interaction with employees, parents
and students including basic conversation,
education related terms, and cultural elements. [on
demand]
THEATRE—GENERAL COURSES
Visiting artists interact with students in lectures
and workshops; 2 workshops for 1 credit; 3
workshops for 2 credits; 4 workshops for 3 credits;
repeatable; maximum of 3 hours applicable toward
a degree. [F,S]
◆THEA 1030 Introduction to the Theatre (3)
Representative survey of drama and stagecraft
from its beginning to the present; analysis of
significant plays from outstanding periods of
theatre history; enhances understanding and
appreciation of the theatre. [E]
THEA 1990 Performance and Production (3)
SPAN 2990 Special Topics in Spanish (1-3)
Specific topics pertaining to Spanish language and
culture; repeatable for credit on different topics.
Prereq: Instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Basic principles of performance and play
production for non-majors; includes developing
and presenting a public performance. [on demand]
THEA 2430,2440 Musical Theatre
Performance I,II (2,2)
Sustainability, See “ESC-Environmental Science”
2430–Performance techniques used in modern
musical theatre productions/auditions; voice,
acting, and movement for the stage developed
through scene studies from musical theatre
repertory. 2440–Advanced rehearsal and
performance techniques and performance of a
Musical Theatre Play. Prereq for 2440: THEA
2430 or instructorʼs consent. [on demand]
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
THEA 2990 Special Topics in Drama (3)
Study of topics relating to the historical and cultural
significance of theatre; repeatable for credit on
different topics. [on demand]
PROFESSIONAL ACTOR TRAINING Courses
Admission to participate in the Professional Actor
Training is a prerequisite for Professional Actor
Training courses. All Fall Semester courses are
prerequisite to all Spring Semester courses, and all
courses taught in the same term are corequisites.
Designated courses are repeatable for credit, but
no more than 12 hours of Applied Instruction and/
or Performing Ensemble, in any combination, may
be applied toward a degree.
Course Descriptions
Basic vocabulary to communicate at the elementary
level in everyday situations in the medical field.
[F,S]
ST - Security +
APPLIED INSTRUCTION COURSES:
THEA 1110,1120,2110,2120 Acting I,II,III,IV
(3,3,3,3)
1110–Introduces foundational skills of acting
to students interested in a career in theatre arts.
1120–Explores the use of senses, response, and
imagination to develop and enhance actorʼs
performance skills. 2110–Develops and integrates
voice, body, and face to enhance actorʼs
performance skills in classical and contemporary
dramas. 2120–Applies collective knowledge and
skills gained in the professional theatre program in
context of a full-scale performance. Must be taken
in sequence. [1110, 2110-F; 1120, 2120-S]
THEA 1230,1235,2230,2235 Movement
I,II,III,IV (3,3,3,3)
1230–Principles and techniques of improvisational
dance and movement; exploration of movement as
an integral part of the actorʼs performance skills.
1235–Advances the skills of THEA 1230. 2230–
Advances the skills of THEA 1235 so that students
are more fully prepared for dramatic performance
situations. 2235–Advances the skills of THEA
2230 so that students are more fully prepared for
contemporary and musical theatre performance
situations. Must be taken in sequence. [1230, 2230F; 1235, 2235-S]
THEA 1310,1320,2310,2320 Production
I,II,III,IV (3,3,3,3)
1310–Fundamental knowledge of vocabulary,
principles and techniques employed in major
theatrical production; basic principles and
techniques of stagecraft, lighting, costuming and
sound; hands on application in actual theatrical
productions. 1320–Review of the vocabulary,
tools and techniques of theatre craft; introduction
of process, principles, and techniques of scenic,
lighting, and costume design; practical projects
in each design area. 2310–Introduction to
publicity, tickets, programs, ushering, and house
management in the theatre; includes overview of
process and internship in production of a play or
performance. 2320–Introduction to the business of
acting; includes photos and resumes, auditioning
techniques, scenes and monologues for auditions,
and how to market oneself as an actor. Must be
taken in sequence. [1310, 2310-F; 1320, 2320-S]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
105
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Course Descriptions
THEA 1410,1420,2410,2420 Voice and
Speech I,II,III,IV (3,3,3,3)
1410–Introduces concepts and practices to develop
a voice suitable for theatrical performance.
1420–Provides opportunity to train the voice for a
wide range of situations in theatrical performance.
2410–Extends studentʼs ability to employ his/her
voice to express emotion, develop character, and
enhance performances. 2420–Prepares student to
apply voice and speech skills to a professional
performance. Must be taken in sequence. [1410,
2410-F; 1420, 2420-S]
THEA 1520,1525,2520,2525 Improvisation
I,II,III,IV (3,3,3,3)
1520–Introduces foundational skills of
improvisational acting to students interested in a
career in the theatre arts. 1525–Advances skills
of students to prepare them for performance
situations. 2520–Advances skills of students;
engages them in performance situations.
2525–Advances skills of students; engages them
in professional performances. Must be taken in
sequence. [1520, 2520-F; 1525, 2525-S]
THEA 2130 Acting Seminar (2)
Explores personal philosophy and reflection in
making artistic choices in theatre. Prereq: THEA
2110, THEA 2230, THEA 2310, THEA 2410,
THEA 2520; Coreq: THEA 2120, THEA 2235,
THEA 2320, THEA 2420, THEA 2525. [F,S]
THEA 2330 Production Seminar (2)
Exploration of the Stage Manager as the
coordinator of all the technical aspects of theatre.
Prereq: THEA 2110, THEA 2230, THEA 2310,
THEA 2410, THEA 2520; Coreq: THEA 2120,
THEA 2235, THEA 2320, THEA 2420, THEA
2525. [F,S]
TM 230 Computed Tomography Clinic (4)
US 203,213,223 Abdominal and Small Parts
I,II,III (4,2,3)
This course is one of a three-course set in whole
body Computed Tomography (CT) imaging.
The complete set provides formal specialized
training in CT whole body imaging prior to
independent performance. The clinical component
is conducted at an approved clinical education
center and requires supervised performance of
computed tomography of the head, neck, spine,
chest, abdomen, pelvis and musculoskeletal
system. Requires several experience requirements.
Arrangements for clinical education are made by
the students to obtain clinical experience with a
Chattanooga State approved CT facility in their
geographic area. [S] Coreq: TM-210, TM 220.
203–Abdominal organs, their relation and normal
sonographic presentation; physiologic process;
metabolic functions; importance of lab data. 213–
Pathologic patterns of abdominal organs; relation
to sonographic appearance, physiologic changes,
and lab findings; anatomic variations; Doppler
and color-flow technique in vascular anatomy
evaluation. 223–Neonatal encephalography and
demonstration of anatomy and pathology of
superficial structures (small parts). [203–F, 213–S,
223–Su]
US 204 Cardiovascular Anatomy &
Physiology (3)
To demonstrate the role of sonography in
the evaluation of the cardiovascular system.
The student will map the arterial and venous
systems from the heart through the abdomen
and throughout the periphery. Emphasis will be
placed on abdominal vasculature, and cardiac
anatomy and physiology, with an introduction to
echocardiography protocol. The student will also
become familiar with basic ECG interpretation,
learning the relationship between ECG timing and
cardiac events, as seen in the echocardiogram. [F]
Truck Driving, See “CD-Commercial Truck
Driving”
US - Diagnostic Medical Sonography
NEW: Admission to the Diagnostic Medical
Sonography or Cardiovascular Sonography
Program (or part-time Breast Sonography course
sequence) is a prerequisite for all US courses.
Please consult SUMMARY OF REQUIRED
HOURS. All courses shown in the same term
are corequisites and all courses in the preceding
term(s) are prerequisites.
US 205,215,225 Clinic I,II,III (7,2,2)
Increasing development of sonographic knowledge
and skills in the clinical setting; performance of
sonographic exams under clinical supervision;
weekly case studies and imaging critiques;
clinic hours: 540 in 205, 520 in 215, 420 in 225.
205–Intro to the sonographic imaging process and
the clinical setting; exam protocol; operation of
ultrasound instrumentation. 215–Normal anatomy;
pathology and abnormal physiological processes.
225–Focus on completion of all clinical objectives.
[205–F, 215–S, 225–Su]
US 200 Introduction to Diagnostic Medical
Sonography (2)
Basic ultrasound instrumentation and clinical
terms; cross-sectional/sagittal anatomy review;
rules, regulations, clinical affiliates, diagnostic
ultrasound history and student-instructor
responsibilities in clinical settings; liability
insurance fee required. [F]
TM - Computed Tomography
The following 3-course set provides formal
specialized training in CT whole-body imaging
prior to independent performance. All 3 courses
must be taken together. Prereq: Graduate
of CAHEA/JRCERT accredited Radiologic
Technology Program and certified or eligible for
certification by American Registry of Radiologic
Technologists.
TM 210 Computed Tomography Patient Care
and Management (4)
This is one of a three-course set in whole body
Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. The
complete set provides formal specialized training
in CT whole body imaging prior to independent
performance. Topics included in this course are
patient care and management, whole body crosssectional anatomy, pathology, imaging procedures
with protocols, and special procedures in CT. [F]
Coreq: TM-220, TM-230
TM 220 Computed Tomography Physics (4)
This course is one of a three course set in whole
body Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. The
complete set provides formal specialized training
in CT whole body imaging prior to independent
performance. Topics included in this course are
history of computed tomography, fundamentals
of computers, scanning methods, digital imaging,
quality control, and radiation protection. [F] Coreq:
TM-210, TM-230
106
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
US 206 Cardiovascular Hemodynamics (3)
Assessment of vascular hemodynamics for the
cardiovascular sonography student through
a topic-based analysis of various abdominal
vascular structures, as well as an introduction to
lower venous examinations and indirect pulse
recognition of potential arterial disease of the lower
extremities. [F]
US 201,211,221 Ultrasound Physics I,II,III
(2,2,2)
Physics of diagnostic medical sonography;
correlation with instrumentation procedures;
class 2 hours, lab 1 hour. 201–Sound wave
characteristics, matter-ultrasound interaction;
basic algebraic review. 211–Real-time ultrasound
transducer characteristics, the ultrasound beam,
and the imaging process; application of theoretical
concepts in lab. 221–Focus on instrumentation
and clinical environment; artifactual image
analysis and corrective factors, quality control
measurements and observations, and ultrasoundʼs
biologic effects; advanced scanning techniques,
including Doppler and color flow principles.
[201–F, 211–S, 221–Su]
US 207 Breast Sonography (4)
US 202,212,222 Obstetrics and Gynecology
I,II,III (4,2,3)
A 3-course sequence in female pelvic & obstetrical
ultrasound. 202–Physiological processes affecting
imaging; pathological processes and sonographic
appearance. 212–Fetal anatomy; gestational
age estimation; fetal anomaly detection and
intrauterine growth retardation; transabdominal
and transvaginal techniques for assessing early
intrauterine and ectopic pregnancies. 222–
Advanced fetal and pelvic sonography techniques;
multiple gestations, antenatal syndromes, placental,
umbilical cord and membrane evaluation; fetal
and maternal disorders; intro to infertility studies;
uncommon pathological processes in nongravid
pelvis. [202–F, 212–S, 222–Su]
Specialty course for development of a breast
imaging specialist, providing a comprehensive
review of sonographyʼs targeted role in the
diagnosis and treatment of breast disease,
while comparing mammography and other
imaging techniques, to apply to an appropriate
understanding of scanning principles for optimal
diagnostic results. Achievement of course
competencies will assist in preparation of the breast
sonography certification examination. Course
participant must either be ARDMS or ARRT(M)
certified. [S]
US 208,218,228 Vascular Clinic I,II,III
(3,2,2)
Progressive development of vascular sonographic
skills. Case group studies and imaging critiques
will be performed, and the studentʼs performance
will be evaluated through clinical competencies
in each related category through sonographer and
instructor evaluations. 208-An introduction to
the vascular sonographic imaging process. The
student will become familiar with the clinical
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
US 209,219,229 Echocardiography Clinic
I,II,III (3,2,2)
Progressive development of echocardiography
imaging skills. Case group studies and imaging
critiques will be performed, and the studentʼs
performance will be evaluated through clinical
competencies in each related category through
sonographer and instructor evaluations.
209-An introduction to the adult cardiographic
imaging process. The student will become familiar
with the clinical setting, the operation ultrasound
instrumentation, exam indications, and the required
protocol for adult echocardiography sonographic
exams. Case group studies and imaging critiques
will be performed, and the studentʼs performance
will be evaluated through clinical competencies
in each related category through sonographer and
instructor evaluations. 219-The student will have
the opportunity to develop increased knowledge
and skills in performing echocardiographic
examinations and demonstrating normal anatomy
and pathology. Pathologic processes shall be
further described to build on the studentʼs
present understanding of abnormal physiological
processes. The student will be allowed to continue
the practice and performance of echocardiographic
exams under clinical supervision. Weekly case
studies and imaging critiques will continue with
the clinical instructor. The studentʼs performance
shall be further assessed through continued
sonographers and instructor evaluations and
higher-level clinical competencies. 229-A
continuation of Echocardiography Clinic II;
the student will have the opportunity to further
increase echocardiography knowledge and
skills. The student will continue performance
of adult echocardiography exams under clinical
supervision. Weekly case studies and imaging
critiques will continue with the clinical instructor.
Special emphasis will be given to final category
evaluations and completion of all clinical
objectives in specified adult echocardiography
categories. Sonographer and instructor evaluations
wil be used for final assessment of student
performance.
US 210 Ultrasound Administration (1)
Research, quality control, and accreditation
practices and procedures of a general sonography
department; research paper, oral presentation, and
group accreditation project. [S]
US 214,224 Vascular Testing I,II (3,3)
214-A topic-based analysis of clinical exams of
the upper and lower extremity vascular studies,
along with pertinent physiologic and hemodynamic
diagnostic factors. Also includes student and
instructor case study presentations and evaluations
by topic, and instructs on pre- and post-operative
patient assessments; class 3 hours, lab 1 hour.
[S] 224-A topic-based analysis of sonographic
clinical exams of the cerebrovascular system
and other miscellaneous studies, along with
pertinent physiologic and hemodynamic diagnostic
factors. Also includes student and instructor case
study presentations and evaluations by topic,
and instructs on pre- and post-operative patient
assessments.[Su]
US 216,226 Adult Echocardiography Testing
I,II (3,3)
216-To further demonstrate the role of sonography
in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. The
student will demonstrate knowledge of cardiac
development in the embryonic period, and the
expected changes in cardiac structures at birth.
The student will become familiar with congenital
cardiac abnormalities which may be followed
into or manifest into adulthood. The student will
recognize various cardiac disease processes and
their effects on the heart sonographically, and will
demonstrate proficiency in performing 2-D, MMode and Doppler examinations of the heart, also
sonographically evaluating cardiac structures in a
diseased state.; class 3 hours, lab 1 hour. [S] 226To further demonstrate the role of sonography in
the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. The
student will demonstrate knowledge of additional
cardiac testing procedures used in the clinical
setting. The student will become familiar with
stress echo, echocardiography contrast agents, and
the clinical indications of each. The student will
recognize various cardiac disease processes and
their effects on the heart, and will also demonstrate
knowledge of other cardiac imaging modalities
and their roles in evaluating cardiac structures
(e.g., cardiac nuclear medicine testing and cardiac
catheterization). Class 3 hours, lab 1 hour. [Su]
US 220 Ultrasound Seminar (2)
Integrated coverage of ultrasound topics related
to image production/evaluation, ultrasound
procedures, and patient care and management;
focus on needed skills, attitudes and knowledge
for judgment and discretion in ultrasound imaging.
[Su]
US 245,255,265 Breast Sonography Clinic
I,II,III (4,4,4)
245–An introduction to basic scanning and
patient care skills and physical principles for
the sonographer, as related to breast sonography
for the clinical breast specialist. Appropriate
protocols will be introduced, along with
operation of ultrasound instrumentation. Course
participant must either be ARDMS or ARRT(M)
certified. 255–Builds upon scanning, patient
care skills and physical principles introduced
in US 245. Competency in breast protocols and
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
instrumentation will be demonstrated; differential
diagnoses and utilization of specialized procedures
will be introduced. Course participant must
either be ARDMS or ARRT (M) certified. 265–
Progression from skills developed in the US 255
course, with final assessment of scanning, patient
care skills and physical principles for the breast
sonographer imaging specialist. The formulation
of differential diagnoses and the utilization of
specialized procedures will be introduced. Course
participant must either be ARDMS or ARRT(M)
certified. In all courses, case studies, competency
objectives, and image critiques will serve as
assessment mechanisms during the mentoring
process. Malpractice insurance is required for all
clinics. [On Demand]
VC - Motor Sports Vehicle Technology
VC 000 Motor Sports Vehicle Technology
To provide training to those with an interest in
constructing vehicles in racing industries by
focusing their skills and knowledge development
in four areas: Machining, Welding, Basic Engine
Performance, and Advanced Engine Performance.
Course Descriptions
setting, the operation ultrasound instrumentation,
exam indications, and the required protocol for
vascular sonography exams. 218-A continuation
of Vascular Clinic I; The student will have the
opportunity to develop increased knowledge
and skills in performing vascular examinations
and demonstrating normal anatomy, physiology
and pathology. Pathologic processes shall be
further described to build on the studentʼs
present understanding of abnormal physiological
processes. The student will be allowed to continue
the practice and performance of vascular exams
under clinical supervision. Weekly case studies
and imaging critiques will continue with the
clinical instructor. The studentʼs performance
shall be further assessed through continued
sonographers and instructor evaluations and
higher-level clinical competencies. 228-A
continuation of Vascular Clinic II; the student will
have the opportunity to further increase vascular
imaging/testing knowledge and skills. The student
will continue performance of vascular exams under
clinical supervision. Weekly case studies and
imaging critiques will continue with the clinical
instructor. special empahsis will be given to
final category evaluations and completion of all
clinical objectives in specifed vascular categories.
Sonographer and instructor evaluations will be
used for final assessment of student performance.
VETT - Veterinary Technology
VETT 1010 Introduction to Veterinary
Technology (3)
Introduction to the animal health care profession.
Topics will include career choices, animal welfare,
breed identification, basic concepts of husbandry,
nutrition and occupational safety. Overview
of clinic/hospital management techniques and
skills, concepts of human animal bonds, pet
loss, euthanasia communication strategies and
an introduction to the agencies, ethics, and laws
pertaining to the animal health care industry. [F]
VETT 1015 Pharmacology & Pharmaceutical
Calculations (4)
Introduction to major drug classifications and
federal regulatory guidelines. Proper techniques in
use, administration, and control of pharmaceutical
agents. Recognize actions and interactions in
various animal breeds and species. Develop skills
in pharmaceutical computations, measurements,
mixtures and conversion factors. Class 3 hours, lab
3 hours. [Su]
VETT 1020 Animal Anatomy & Physiology
(4)
This class focuses on the detailed anatomy and
related basic physiology of selected animal species.
Topics include the interrelationships between
major body systems as well as the study of special
sense organs. Labs will include skeletons, live
animals and cadavers. Class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
Prereq: VETT 1010. [S]
VETT 2000 Clinical Pathology (4)
Prepare the student for specimen management
including techniques of proper preparation,
handling and analysis; relationships to fields of
dermatology, mycology, virology, microbiology,
histology, parasitology, pathology and toxicology;
to use and maintenance of lab equipment and
ability to perform a variety of commonly used
laboratory evaluations. Class 3 hours, lab 3 hours.
Prereq: CHEM 1110, VETT 1010. [S]
◆ and *, see “Legend page 74.”
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
107
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
VETT 2010, 2020, 2030 Clinical Practicum
I,II,III (4,4,4)
Course Descriptions
Students are required to participate in a handson work experience at an assigned off-campus
facility; private practice, business, industry, or
government. The student will be involved in all
aspects of the day-to-day operation of the facility.
Prereq for 2010: BIOL 1110, VETT 1020, 2000.
Prereq for 2020: VETT 2010. Prereq for 2030:
VETT 2020 [Su,F,S]
procedures. Topics include calculations and
administration of drugs, monitoring and
management of patient status, operation and
maintenance of anesthetic equipment. Surgical
nursing emphasis placed on pre-op assessment and
prep of the patient, post-op assessment and care of
the patient as well as surgical set up and assistance.
Class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq: VETT 1015. [S]
VETT 2050 Imaging (4)
Pending Curriculum Committee Approval
VETT 2015 Animal Nursing (4)
Introduction and application of patient assessment
techniques, including history taking, basic physical
examination, therapeutic bathing, grooming, nail
trims, and restraint. Additional topics include
basic patient care including wound management
and bandaging, fluid therapy, special nutritional
requirements and therapeutics. Class 3 hours, lab 3
hours. Prereq: VETT 1020. [F]
VETT 2016 Topics in Veterinary Technology
(3)
Pending Curriculum Committee Approval
Study of select current topics pertaining to the
field of veterinary technology. Exotic, laboratory
and wildlife animal issues, care and handling
will be addressed as well as refinement of skills,
techniques and review of other pertinent materials.
Field trips will be used to facilitate course
materials when possible. Prereq: VETT 1020. [S]
VETT 2040 Anesthesia & Surgical Nursing
(4)
Pending Curriculum Committee Approval
Coverage of the safe and effective management
of patients undergoing anesthesia and surgical
Overview of the theory and safe application
of radiological techniques in order to produce
diagnostic films. Topics addressed will include
patient handling, restraint and positioning, correct
use and maintenance of radiographic films and
equipment and introduction to special contrast
techniques. Class 3 hours, lab 3 hours. Prereq:
VETT 2000. [F]
WD - Welding
Women’s Studies
WMST 2010 Introduction to Women’s
Studies (3)
The course is an interdisciplinary approach to the
study of womenʼs social identity and placement
throughout history and the world. Theoretical
perspectives and research from sociology,
psychology, biology, and anthropology are used
to understand how gender shapes our lives on
individual, cultural, and societal levels. Areas
of study emphasize the role of gender in social
institutions including family, workplace, education,
religion, media, and politics. Prereq: ENGL 1010.
[E]
Wellness, See “PHED-Physical Education”
X-Ray Technology, See “RT-Radiologic
Technology”
WD 000 Welding Technology
Theory and practice in welding; oxyacetylene
flame cutting, welding and brazing; MIG welding
procedures; gas metal arc welding on aluminum;
TIG welding on mild steel plate and aluminum;
gas tungsten arc pipe welding; flux cored arc
welding, covering self shielding and shielded flux
cored electrode wire; welding instruction and
practice in all positions on thin and thick gauge
aluminum and 11-gauge plate; math and blueprint
reading for welding; 30 clock hours/week. [E]
YT - Cosmetology Instructor Training
YT 000 Cosmetology Instructor Training
This course is a presentation of concepts of
instruction in cosmetology. Topics include history
of teaching, educator characteristics, curriculum
development-evaluation, and teaching assessment
in techniques. This course is a combination of
lecture and lab (300 contact hours). [on demand]
Chattanooga Stateʼs C.C. Bond Humanities building contains an auditorium, class rooms, labs and offices.
108
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
Governance
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
Contents
Page
109-114
Governance
109
Tennessee Higher Education Commission
109
Tennessee Board of Regents
109
Chattanooga State Foundation
110-112
Administrative/Professional Staff*
112-114
Faculty*
Tennessee Board of Regents
The Honorable Phil Bredesen
Governor of the State of Tennessee
Dr. Charles Manning, Chancellor
Dr. Richard Rhoda, Executive Director
Dr. Richard Rhoda, Executive
Director, THEC (Ex-Officio)
Katie Winchester, Chair, Dyersburg
Jack Murrah, Vice-Chair, Hixson
General Wendell Gilbert, Vice-Chair, Clarksville
A. C. Wharton, Jr., Secretary, Memphis
Debby Patterson Koch, Nashville
Dale Sims, State Treasurer, Nashville
The Honorable Phil Bredesen,
Governor of the State of
Tennessee (Ex-Officio)
The Honorable Lana Seivers,
Commissioner of Education
(Ex-Officio)
The Honorable Ken Givens,
Commissioner of Agriculture
(Ex-Officio)
Frank Barnett
Agenia Clark
Gregory Duckett
Judy T. Gooch
Jonas Kisber
Fran Marcum
Millard Oakley
Leslie Parks Pope
Howard Roddy
J. Stanley Rogers
Robert P. Thomas
William H. Watkins, Jr.
Governance
Tennessee
Higher Education
Commission
Riley Darnell, Secretary of State, Nashville
John Morgan, State Comptroller, Nashville
Wm. Ransom Jones, Murfreesboro
Eleanor E. Yoakum, Knoxville
Charles Mann, Columbia
Robert White, Johnson City
Sondra Wilson, Non-voting Ex-Officio, TTU
Adam Green, Voting Ex-Officio, UT Chattanooga
Gary Nixon, Non-voting Ex-Officio, Executive
Director,
State Board of Education
Chattanooga State Foundation
Board Directors
Archie Meyers, Jr., Chair
Joseph Donnovin, Jr.
W. Leonard Fant
Harry L. Fields, III
John F. Germ, P.E.
Vicky B. Gregg
R.H. Maclellan
John E. Marek
The Reverend Paul A. McDaniel, Sr.
Robert L. McDowell
Roberta T. Miles
Harshad C. Shah
Alfred E. Smith, Jr., Esquire
Kenny Smith
Edna E. Varner
Grady P. Williams, CPA
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu or call toll free 1-866-547-3733
E-mail: [email protected]
*The offense of misrepresentation of academic credentials constitutes a Class A misdemeanor.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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Administrative and
Professional Staff
Julie C. Bennett, (1984) Director, Kimball
Site—Extended Services. B.S., Covenant
College, 1991.
James L. Catanzaro, (1990) President;
Professor, Philosophy, Western Civilization,
Humanities. Ph.D., Claremont Graduate
University, California.
Raymond M. Bertani, (1984) Coordinator,
Center for Distributed Education. B.A.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1984.
James L. Barrott, (1985) Vice President,
Technology; Dean, Industrial Technology.
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville,
2000.
Thomas F. Crum, (1991) Director, Human
Resources. M.S., University of Illinois, 1970.
Fannie D. Hewlett, (1979) Vice President,
Academic Affairs; Professor, Psychology—
Liberal Arts. Ed.D., University of Tennessee,
1990.
Jeffrey F. Olingy, (2006) Special Assistant to
the President. B.A., Rutgers University, 1971.
Administrative/Professional Staff
Consuelo B. OʼNeal, (1978) Vice President,
Student Affairs. M.Ed., Memphis State
University, 1977.
Holly S. Reeve, (2006) Associate Vice
President, Leadership and Fund Development.
M.B.A., University of North Florida, 1988.
Tammy L. Swenson, (1987) Vice President,
Business and Finance. M.B.A., University
of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1991; C.P.A.;
Certified Government Financial Manager.
Dan W. Throgmorton, (2004) Vice President,
Economic and Community Development. Ed.D.,
University of Southern California, 1999.
________________________________________
Lulu L. Copeland, (1996) Manager, Computer
and Technical Training—Business and
Community Development Center. B.S.E.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1982.
Rajammah Bhandari, (2006) Technician,
Biology—Math and Sciences. B.S., University
of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 2001.
John W. Crawley, (2003) Manager,
Employment and Job Analysis—Human
Resources. B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University,
1994.
Vickie M. Boles, (1999) Specialist, Web
Services—Computer Services. M.S., Capella
University, 2005.
Mark A. Cunningham, (1983) Manager,
Systems Support—Computer Services. A.S.,
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College, 1982.
Larry L. Bray, (1992) Counselor, Career
Planning and Counseling. M.Ed., Wright State
University, 1981.
Ramona S. Daugherty, (2007) Coordinator,
Tech Prep Program, M.B.A., Cameron
University 2003.
Hannah V. Brewer (2007) Coordinator, Adult
Education Off-Campus Site -- Adult Education.
M.A., Tennessee Technological University,
2004.
Julie David, (2006) Counselor, Outreach—
Recruiting. A.A., Chattanooga State Technical
Community College, 1998.
Joyce A. Brinkmeyer, (2000) Manager,
Workforce Assessment and Development—
Business and Community Development Center.
B.S., Illinois State University, 1971.
J. Dianne Dennison, (1988) Designer,
Marketing. A.S., William Carter College, 1968.
Patricia K. Brown, (1979) Director, Marketing,
Design, and Communications—Marketing. B.S.,
Covenant College, 1998.
Corey Buchanan, (2003) Programmer Analyst
2—Computer Services. B.S., University of
Cincinnati, 2000.
Nora C. Burke, (1993) Supervisor, PC
Support—Computer Services. B.S., University
of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1987.
Jules T. Doux, Jr. (2001), Counselor, Small
Business Development Center. B.S., Middle
Tennessee State University, 1988.
Richard E. Burke, (2002) Director, Continuing
Education. B.S., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1987.
Andrew J. Duncan, (2007) Computer
Programmer Analyst—Library Services. B.S.
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 2003.
Jane Bustabad, (2004) Technician,
Chemistry—Math and Sciences. M.A.C.T.,
Auburn University, 1974.
Annette Ballew Alsobrooks, (2000) Designer,
Marketing. B.S., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1995.
Douglas E. Byrd, (1988) Counselor, Career
Planning and Counseling. M.A., University
of Alabama, 1988; M.S., Jacksonville State
University, 1981.
Bruce T. Alston, (1993) Producer, Media
Services. B.F.A., New York Institute of
Technology, 1990.
Amy L. Campbell, (1998) Technician, Physics—
Math and Sciences. B.S., Centre College, 1977.
Martha K. Bates, (1991) Technician, Biology—
Math and Sciences. B.S., Mississippi College,
1967.
Kyleen Y. Beechum, (2004) Accountant
1, Business Office. B.S., Tennessee State
University, 2001.
Timothy R. Belcher, (1990) Network Analyst—
Computer Services. B.S., Bryan College, 2006
Amanda P. Bennett, (2006) Advisor,
Educational Planning and Advising. M.Ed.,
University of Georgia, 2005.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Bruce A. Carlisle, (1997) Systems Analyst
1, Computer Services. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1997.
Heidi G. Cawood, (1994) Designer, Marketing.
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1993.
Charles E. Chamberlin, (1998) Manager,
Network Services—Computer Services. B.S.,
University of Chattanooga, 1967.
Christine A. Chardos, (1997) Adviser,
Educational Planning and Advising. B.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1993.
N. Elaine Cioni, (2006) Coordinator, Benefits
and Information Research—Human Resources.
M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
1985.
Timothy S. Dills, (1999) Assistant Coordinator,
Educational TV—Center for Distributed
Education. B.A., Freed-Hardeman University,
1988.
Scott W. Dismuke, (2005) Director, New
Economy Institute—Economic and Community
Development. B.S., Southeast Missouri State
University, 2000.
Deborah A. Adams, (1981-86, 1988) Associate
Vice President, Continuing Education and
Community Development. M.S., Central
Michigan University, 2004.
Donna Appleget, (1993) Systems Analysis
1--Computer Services. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1986.
110
Sandra Cooke, (2006) Counselor, Financial
Aid. B.S., Covenant College, 2003.
James C. Durm, (1997) Director,
Administrative Systems—Computer Services.
M.B.A., Troy State University, 1980.
Suzanne P. Elston, (2005) Director, Adult
Education. M.A., University of North Texas,
1988.
Paul J. Ennis, (2000) Technician, Chemistry—
Math and Sciences. B.S., University of
California, 1979.
Juanita B. Finnell, (1992) Adviser, Educational
Planning and Advising. M.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1992.
Gary L. Fisher, (1993) Director, Media
Services. B.A., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1989.
Darlene A. Florence, (2005) Specialist,
Educational Programs—Academic Affairs.
M.B.A., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1991.
Barbara A. French, (1985) Coordinator,
Business and Community Development Center.
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
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Elizabeth L. Fronk, (2000) Assistant Librarian
1, Library Services. M.L.S.., University of
Michigan, 1993.
Joan W. Howell, (2006) Director, Educational
Planning and Advising—Advising. M.S.,
University of Tennessee, 1989.
Terrence E. Lee, (1981) Programmer/Analyst
2, Computer Services. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1980.
Patricia A. Gardner, (1988) Manager, Personal
Interest, Continuing Education—Business
and Community Development Center. B.A.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1970.
Don Hunt, (1990) Coordinator, Commercial
Truck Driving—TN Technology Center.
Certified Commercial Truck Driving Instructor,
1976.
Aleta F. Lenyard, (2001) Manager, Math Center.
B.S., Tulane University, 1970.
Mosunmola A. George-Taylor, (2005) Dean/
Associate Professor, Mathematics and Sciences,
Ph.D., Clark Atlanta University, 1994.
Steve C. Huskins, (1993) Assistant Vice
President, Plant Operations and Facilities
Planning. B.S., University of Tennessee, 1978.
Jerome A. Gober, (2002) Director, Affirmative
Action/EEO—Human Resources. B.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1988.
J. Gregory Jackson, (2006) Director, Academic
Systems and Instructional Support—Computer
Services. M.B.A., University of TennesseeMartin, 2004.
Eva W. Lewis, (2006) Director, Institutional
Effectiveness—Institutional Effectiveness.
M.B.A., Vanderbilt University-Owen Graduate
School of Management, 1988.
Judy K. Lowe, (2002) Assistant Vice President,
Center for Distributed Education and Multi
Media. Graduate Diploma in Higher Education,
University of New South Wales, 1992.
Wanda Gocher-Johnson, (2003) Specialist,
Leaning Disabilities—Disabilities Support.
M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
2001.
Vicki M. Jackson, (1976) Coordinator, Testing
Center—Basic Skills. B.S., Covenant College,
1992.
Ju-Hsin W. Lusk, (2006) Manager, Online
Training and Development Projects—Build
Your Own Business. M.B.A., Georgia State
University, 1991.
Marsha L. Goolesby-Barker, (1999) Advisor,
Educational Planning and Advising. M.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1993.
Steve Jaecks, (2001) Director, Athletics and
Wellness. M.S., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1982.
Kathryn L. Lutes, (1998) Director, Disabilities
Support Services. M.Ed., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1992.
E. Clark Graham, (1998) Coordinator, Student
Services (Evening)—TN Technology Center.
M.A., Tennessee Technological University,
1980.
Susan G. Joseph, (1990) Associate Vice
President—Business and Finance. B.S.,
University of Tennessee, 1982.
Deborah J. Mailen, (1994) Associate Vice
President, Grants, Contracts and Student
Accounts—Business Office. B.S., University of
Tennessee, 1975.
Edward R. Kelly, (1987) Assistant Director,
Plant Operations. M.S., University of Tennessee,
1961.
Beth Keylon-Randolph, (2005) Counselor,
Recruiting. B.S., Tennessee Technological
University, 1996.
Larry E. Mangrum, (2004) Manager,
Business and Industry Training—Business
and Community Development Center. M.Ed.,
Mississippi State University, 1983.
Brenda R. Maples, (1987) Assistant
Coordinator, Testing Center. Certificate,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1979.
Lisa G. Hancock, (1993) Bursar--Business
Office. A.A.S., Chattanooga State Technical
Community College.
Lucas Kilburn, (2002) Accountant 2, Business
Office. B.A., Michigan State University, 1994.
Emily A. Harbold, (2005) Dean, Liberal Arts.
Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1988.
Saundra K. King, (2001) Director, Transitional
Studies. M.S., University of Tennessee, 1988.
Ronald L. Martin, (2002) Purchasing Agent,
Business Office. B.S., University of Tennessee,
1977.
Craig T. Harston, (2000) Counselor, Small
Business Development Center. Ph.D., Tulane
University, 1977.
Sandra J. Kluttz, (1991) Dean, Student Life
and Judicial Affairs—Student Affairs. M.S.,
University of Tennessee, 1978.
Gayle A. Maul, (2005) Specialist, Leaning
Disabilities—Disabilities Support. M.S., New
York State University, 1988.
Kelly M. Hayton, (2006) Manager, College
Reading and Writing Center—Academic Affairs.
M.A., Eastern Michigan University, 2001.
Mary E. Knaff, (1990) Director, Multicultral
Services. M .S., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1993.
L. Ann Mawhinney, (1987) Director, Internal
Audit—Presidentʼs Office. M.S., University of
Wisconsin at Milwaukee, 1979.
Vicki J. Headrick (1982) Assistant Director,
Child Development Center. A.S., Chattanooga
State Technical Community College, 1982.
Rex H. Knowles, Jr., (2002) Director, Theater
Arts. M.A. Union Theological Seminary, 2002.
Kevin L. Maxfield, (2005) Director, Small
Business Development Center—Economic
and Community Development. B.S., Middle
Tennessee State University, 1993.
Jerry L. Hendrix, (1997) Director, Dayton
Site—Extended Services. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1975.
John Henry, (2001) Artist-in-Residence—
Liberal Arts, D.A., University of Kentucky,
1965.
Sherry Landrum Knowles, (2002) Director,
Theater Arts. M.A., Antioch University, 1992.
Georgiana C. Kotarski, (2000) Director,
Sequatchie/Bledsoe Site. M.P.A., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1994.
Jeanne Hinchee, (2007) Director, Financial
Aid. B.S., Austin Peay State University , 1982.
Mark Lander, (2005) Specialist, Web
Development—Center for Distributed
Education. B.S., Jacksonville State University,
1971.
Robert E. Hobgood, (1996) Manager,
Auditorium—Media Services. B.A., University
of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1985.
Brenda Langston, (2002) Director—TECTA
Program. M.S., Nova Southeastern University,
2006.
Tisa M. Houck, (1983) Librarian 1—Library
Services. M.S., University of Tennessee, 2000.
Victoria P. Leather, (1981) Dean, Library
Services. M.S.L.S., University of Tennessee,
1978.
Deborah S. Howe, (1989) Programmer/Analyst
2, Computer Services. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1999.
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Norma L. Lee, (1981) Registrar, Records—
Admissions/Registration and Records. B.S.,
Covenant College, 1994.
Professional Staff
M. David Haddock, Jr., (1979) Associate
Vice President, Academic Affairs/Professor,
Accounting—Business and Information
Technologies. Ed.D., Auburn University, 1976.
C.P.A.
Elaine D. McCalla, (1999) Programmer Analyst
2, Computer Services. B.S., Florida A & M
University, 1988.
Summer McClarty, (2006) Coordinator, Lottery
Scholorship Program--Financial Aid. M.A.,
Austin Peay State University, 2006.
Janelle T. McDonald, (2006) Accompanist-Liveral Arts. B.M., University of Cincinnati,
1973.
Sarah F. McDowell, (1993) Coordinator,
College Reading and Writing Center. M.A.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1996.
Tim J. McGhee, (2005) Director, Business
and Construction Institute of the Southeast
-- Academic Affairs. B.S., University of
Louisville, 2003.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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Phyllis P. Mescon, (2007) Director, Center
for Applied Legal Studies/East Campus B.A.,
University of Kentucky, 1980.
Rosemary C. Milburn, (1988) Library
Associate, Library Services. B.A., Smith
College, 1973.
Carol A. Moore, (2006) Director, Institutional
Research--Institutional Effectiveness. Ph.D.,
University of Tennessee, 1991.
Barbara S. Morgan, (1968) Administrative
Assistant to the President. A.S., Chattanooga
State Technical Institute, 1967.
Jack B. Sample, (2006) Director, Economic and
Community Development Projects—Continuing
Education. M.A., University of Tennessee,
1969.
Sonja A. Sanders, (2005) Coordinator, Payroll
and Personnel Budget—Business Office. M.A.,
Tennessee Technological University, 2003.
Diane C. Norris, (1982) Interim Director,
Admissions/Registration and Records.
Tamberly S. Sawyers (2007) Coordinator,
Fundraising/Special Gifts--Leadership and
Fund Development. A.S., Chattanooga State
Technical Community College, 1988.
Michelle R. Olson, (2002) Coordinator,
AHEAD Program. B.S., Berry College, 1990.
Gregory C. Schuck, (2001) Director, Food
Services.
Charles M. Owen, (2002) Systems Programmer
1, Computer Services. B.A., University of
Tennessee, 1986.
T. Elijah Scott, (2002) Librarian 1, Library
Services. M.S., University of Tennessee, 1997.
Rebecca A. Owens, (2003) Specialist, TECTA—
Liberal Arts. B.S., University of Alabama, 1998.
Tiffany C. Scruggs, (2001) Advisor,
Educational Planning and Advising. M.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1997.
Percy K. Parakh, (1995)Coordinator,
Training—Computer Services. B.S., Mysore
University, 1975.
Charles H. Parks, (2006) Producer—Media
Services. A.A., Art Institute of Atlanta, 1980.
Robert P. Sefcik, (2002) Designer, Computer
Services. B.S., Bryan College, 2005.
Nancy W. Shiles, (2006) Coordinator, Nursing
Skills—Allied Health. M.S.N., Vanderbilt
University, 1989.
Harold M. Terrell, (2004) Network Analyst,
Computer Services. B.S., Tennessee Temple
University, 1987.
Sheila A. Thompson, (1997) Director,
Community Outreach—Community Outreach.
B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
1987.
Lynda Timmons, (1989) Systems Analyst
1, Computer Services. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1993.
Sandra D. Townley, (1997)Assistant Vice
President, Counseling and Academic Support.
M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
1982.
Christy L. Vandergriff, (2006) Specialist,
Orientation --TECTA Program. M.A.,
Tennessee Technological University, 2006.
Bart M. Walker, (2004) Counselor, Recruiting.
M.Ed., Lincoln Memorial University, 2000.
Nancy V. Watts, (1997) Director, Pharmacy
Technician Program—Math and Sciences.
Pharm.D., Mercer University, 1990.
Katharine A. White, (2006) Technician,
Veterinary Technician Program--Math and
Sciences. Licensed Veterinary Medical
Technician, 2005.
Kathrandra D. Smith, (1994) Coordinator,
Marketing. M.A., University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, 1994.
Napoleon Williams, (1993) Assistant Director,
Safety/Security—Plant Operations. B.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1996.
Robin J. Smith, Coordinator, Recruiting—
Community Outreach. B.S., Tennessee
Technological University, 1992.
Sandra B. Williford, (1993) Assistant Librarian
1, Library Services. M.L.I.S., Louisiana State
University, 1988.
Kasandra J. Sneed, (2005) Counselor, AHEAD
Program. A.A.S., Chattanooga State Technical
Community College, 1995
Joshua J. Wilson, (2006) Coordinator, Student
Activities and Orientation--Student Affairs.
M.S., Georgia Southern University, 2006.
Joyce G. Stakely, (1984) Director, Institutional
Development—Institutional Advancement. B.S.,
Covenant College, 2000.
Howard L. Yarbrough, (1973) Dean, Nursing/
Allied Health; Professor, Biology. Ed.D.,
University of Tennessee, 1986.
Benney N. Standifer, (1998) Manager,
Computer Lab—Computer Services. B.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1991.
Laura Young, (1994) Assistant Librarian 1,
Library Services. M.S.L.S., University of North
Carolina, 1971.
Michael E. Ricketts, (1983) Assistant Dean—
TN Technology Center; Ed.D., University of
Tennessee, 1996.
James L. Steele, Jr., (1998) Dean/Associate
Professor, Management-- Business and
Information Technologies. M.B.A, Vanderbilt
University, 1982.
Faculty
Bonnie H. Riggs, (1988) Assistant Director,
Institutional Research—Academic Affairs.
M.B.A., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1996.
Robert R. Steinmetz, (2002) Director,
Recruitment, Enrollment and Retention
Services—Student Affairs. M.P.A., University
of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 2006.
Carolann Roberts, (2000) Counselor, Career
Planning and Counseling. M.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1984.
Cynthia W. Swafford, (1987) Director,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. Ed.D.,
University of Tennessee, 1992.
George W. Abbott, (1981) Vocational Senior
Instructor, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration,
and Heating—TN Technology Center. A.G.E.,
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College, 1988.
Michael L. Rogers, (2000) Programmer/Analyst
2, Computer Services. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1980.
Carol Swayze, (2001) Director, Dual
Enrollment—Academic Affairs. M.A.,
Tusculum College, 1992.
Marcia E. Abernathy, (1997) Associate
Professor, Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health.
M.S.N., University of Alabama, 1985.
Peter Y. Peter, (2004) Coordinator, Math
Center—Math and Sciences. B. S., Austin Peay
University, 1994.
Eric H. Petersen, (2002) Assistant Librarian
1, Library Services. Ph.D., Oxford University,
1991.
Darryl J. Pirtle, (1994) Programmer/Analyst
2, Computer Services. B.S, Freed-Hardeman
University, 1983.
Jay I. Price, (2005) Counselor, Recruiting.
Rolynda S. Price, (2004) Assistant Director,
New Economy Institute—Economic and
Community Development. B.S., University of
Tennessee, 1997.
Betty A. Proctor, (1991) Designer, Marketing.
B.A., Governors State University, 2004.
112
Pamela P. Temple, (1980) Librarian 3, Library
Services. M.L.S., George Peabody College,
1968.
Belinda S. Smith, (1998) Counselor, Career
Planning and Counseling. M.S., Alabama A &
M University, 1982.
Erica D. Patton, (2004) Coordinator, Financial
Aid. B.A., Spellman College, 2003.
Faculty
Keith A. Russell, (2000) Senior
Telecommunications Analyst, Computer
Services. Professional Telecommunications
Technician Licensure, BICSI, 2005.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Gabriele M. Aborn, (2005) Assistant Professor,
Biology—Math and Sciences. M.S., University
of Southern Mississippi, 1992.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
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Cinda J. Adams, (1992) Associate Professor,
Economics— Liberal Arts. M.S., University of
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1976.
Karen W. Castleberry, (1976) Associate
Professor, Dental Assisting—Nursing/Allied
Health. B.S., Covenant College, 1996.
Michelle L. Ehmling, (2005) Instructor, Dental
Assisting—Nursing/Allied Health. B.S., Bryan
College, 2006.
Rodney L. Adams, (2003) Vocational Associate
Instructor, Cosmetology—TN Technology
Center. Cosmetologist Instructor License,
Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology, 2001.
Rhonda S. Castleberry, (2004) Vocational
Senior Instructor, Cosmetology—TN
Technology Center. Cosmetologist Instructor
License, Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology,
1973.
Angela Jordan Everett, (1997) Associate
Professor, Mathematics—Math and Sciences.
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville,
2001.
S. Paulette Amsler, (2002) Instructor, Real
Time Reporting—Business and Information
Technologies. A.S., Kelsey-Jenney College,
1994.
Donald F. Andrews, (1980) Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. Ph.D., University of
Tennessee, 1977.
Curtis E. Aukerman, (2001) Assistant
Professor/Director, Emergency Medical Services
Program—Allied Health. B.S., Lee University,
1996.
Sherri L. Barnes, (1993) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.S.,
University of Tennessee, 1992.
K. Shay Bean, (2006) Associate Professor,
Chemistry—Math and Sciences. Ph.D.,
University of New Orleans, 1993.
Paula Benford, (1987) Instructor, Adult
Education—Basic Skills. B.A., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1975.
Leslie S. Brabham, (2004) Instructor, English—
Liberal Arts. M.A., Tennessee Technological
University, 2003.
Marilyn B. Brown, (1979) Associate Professor/
Department Head, Mathematics—Math and
Sciences. M.Ed., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1975.
Pamela M. Brune, (2001) Associate Professor,
Office Administration— Business and
Information Technologies. M.S., University of
Tennessee, 1989.
William M. Clem, (2005) Vocational Associate
Instructor, Commercial Truck Driving—TN
Technology Center. B.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1989.
Richard K. Clements, (1994) Professor,
Biology—Math and Sciences. Ph.D., University
of Kentucky, 1995.
Charles L. Cofer, (1988) Master Instructor,
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology—
TN Technology Center. B.S.E., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1986, P.E.
Gay D. Cohen, (1991) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.N.,
University of Tennessee, 1981.
John E. Cousino, (1991) Associate Professor,
Respiratory Care—Nursing/Allied Health. M.A.,
University of South Florida, 1986.
Sarah E. DʼAngelo-Woody, (2005) Assistant
Professor, Voice/Speech—Liberal Arts. M.F.A.,
University of Montana, 2003.
Emitt L. Daniel, (2005) Instructor, Information
Systems—Business and Information Systems.
M.C.S., Texas A & M University, 1973.
Gregory F. Dennis, (2003) Assistant Professor,
Physical Education— Liberal Arts. M.S., Baylor
University, 1989.
Carolyn F. Dodson, (1990) Associate Professor,
Biology—Math and Sciences. M.S., Arizona
State University, 1970.
T. Scott Douglass, (1991) Professor, English;—
Liberal Arts. Ph.D., Florida State University,
1982.
Joyce B. Campbell, (1988) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.N.,
University of Tennessee, 1982.
Robert N. Dreyer, (2005) Associate Professor/
Department Head—Engineering Technologies.
M.S.E., University of Michigan, 1968.
Tina R. Cannon, (1993) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. Ed.D.,
University of Tennessee, 2005.
Linda D. Duke, (2004) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.N.,
Andrews University, 1988.
Rebecca A. Cantrell, (1988) Associate
Professor, Writing— Liberal Arts. M.A.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1990.
Jennifer M. Duncan, (2001) Assistant
Professor, English— Liberal Arts. M.A.,
University of South Carolina, 1999.
Kenneth F. Cardillo, (1999) Associate
Professor/Coordinator, Music— Liberal Arts.
D.Phil., Oxford Graduate School, 1992.
Linda S. Edwards, (1985) Associate Professor,
Reading— Liberal Arts. M.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1982.
Anne A. Carroll, (2006) Assistant Professor/
Department Head—Liberal Arts. M.A.,
University of Tennessee, 2002.
Ann R. Ehmling, (1988) Associate Professor,
Emergency Medical Services—Nursing/Allied
Health. B.S., Covenant College, 1993.
Telephone: 1-866-547-3733
Lisa L. Evers, (1998) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.,
Southern Illinois University, 1994.
Libby W. Farrelly, (2005) Instructor, Biology—
Math and Sciences. M.S., University of
Charleston, 1999.
Jerry L. Faulkner, (1994) Professor/
Department Head, Natural Sciences—Math and
Sciences. Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1994.
Arlene Flerchinger, (2000) Assistant
Professor, Information Systems— Business and
Information Technologies. M.A., University of
Denver, 1974.
Toni W. Fountain, (1992) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.Ed.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1991.
Jean H. Gammon, (1981) Associate Professor,
Reading— Liberal Arts. M.Ed., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1977.
James E. Garner, (1983) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.A.,
University of Mississippi, 1964.
Max D. Gartman, (2005) Assistant Professor,
Spanish— Liberal Arts. Ph.D., University of
Alabama Tuscaloosa, 1965.
Gary Gilreath, (2002) Assistant Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.S.,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1972.
Faculty
Cindy D. Birchell, (1993) Instructor, Physical
Therapist Assistant—Nursing/Allied Health.
A.S., Chattanooga State Technical Community
College, 1981; Licensed Physical Therapist
Assistant in Tennessee.
Richard D. Claburn, (2004) Vocational
Associate Instructor, Industrial Electricity—
Industrial Technology. Electrical License, State
of Tennessee, 2004.
Hisel H. Gobble, (1978) Associate Professor,
Accounting— Business and Information
Technologies. M.B.A., East Tennessee State
University, 1974.
R. Clifford Goodlet, (1998) Assistant Professor,
Information Systems—Business and Information
Systems. B.S., Tennessee Wesleyan College,
1972.
Glenda R. Goodwin, (2006) Instructor, Business
Systems Technology--Business and Information
Technologies. M.Ed., University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga, 1985.
E. Frank Gordy, Jr., (2002) Assistant Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.Ed.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1991.
Donald W. Green, (1986) Vocational Senior
Instructor, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and
Heating—TN Technology Center. Certificate,
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College, 1984; A.B.S., McKenzie College, 1977.
Flavius L. Green (Wilkie), (1999). Associate
Professor/Coordinator, Physical Education—
Liberal Arts. M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State
University, 1970.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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Yolanda J. Green, (1988) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.N.,
University of Alabama in Birmingham, 1983.
David E. Guinn, (1998) Vocational Associate
Instructor, Heating, Air Conditioning, and
Refrigeration—TN Technology Center.
Certificate, Chattanooga State Technical
Community College, 1993.
Hennie Gunter, (1988) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.N.,
University of Tennessee, 1981.
Faculty
Brian P. Hale, (2003) Associate Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. Ph.D., University of
South Carolina, 1993.
Wayne C. Jones, (1981) Professor, Electrical/
Electronic Engineering Technology—
Engineering Technologies. Ed.D, University of
Tennessee, 1977.
Marian A. Higginbotham, (1999) Associate
Professor, Mathematics—Math and Sciences.
M.Ed., Alabama State University, 1990.
Patricia W. Kato, (1980) Associate Professor,
Writing— Liberal Arts. M.A., East Tennessee
State University, 1980.
C. Bruce Hilbert, (2000) Assistant Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.Ed.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 2001.
Denis O. Kiely, (2000) Assistant Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. M.A., Western Kentucky
University, 1983.
Sara J. Hill (Jackie), (1990) Associate
Professor, Early Childhood Education— Liberal
Arts. M.Ed., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1987.
Shirley A. Kilgore, (1985) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.N.,
University of Tennessee, 1986.
Sharon E. Hall, (1988) Associate Professor,
Respiratory Therapy—Nursing/Allied Health.
Mount Marty College, 1978.
Stuart R. Hilton, (1989) Associate Professor,
Manufacturing Engineering Technology—
Engineering Technologies. M.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1994.
Lucy W. Hampton, (1995) Vocational Master
Instructor, Surgical Technology/Director,
Medical Programs—TN Technology Center.
B.S.N., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
1983.
Constance C. Hitchcock, (1999) Associate
Professor, Management— Business and
Information Technologies. M.B.A., Vanderbilt
University, 1987.
Jody Arnold Hancock, (1993) Associate
Professor/Program Director, Diagnostic Medical
Sonography—Nursing/Allied Health. M.A.,
University of Phoenix, 2004; R.D.M.S.; R.T.(R).
Breanna S. Hodges, (2005) Vocational
Associate Instructor, Computer Operations
Technology—TN Technology Center. A.A.S.,
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College, 2002.
Michael R. Harris, (2005) Vocational Senior
Instructor, Diesel—TN Technology Center.
Diesel Mechanics Certificate, Sequoyah
Technology Center, 1977.
Mary Lee Hopson, (2002) Vocational Instructor,
Licensed Practical Nursing—TN Technology
Center. RN, Baroness Erlanger Hospital, 1980.
Darrin J. Hassevoort, (2000) Assistant
Professor/Department Head, Music— Liberal
Arts. M.A., Bob Jones University, 1996.
Robert C. Hawfield, (1986) Vocational
Senior Instructor, Industrial Technology—TN
Technology Center. M.A., University of
Tennessee, 1994.
John M. Haworth, (2006) Assistant Professor,
Psychology—Liberal Arts. M.S., Augusta State
University, 1994.
Travis L. Hayes, (2005) Instructor,
Management—Business and Information
Technologies. M.B.A., University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga, 1993.
Betsy K. Headrick, (1983) Associate Professor,
Information Systems— Business and
Information Technologies. M.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1992.
Denise I. Frank Heinly, (1979) Associate
Professor, Art— Liberal Arts. M.A., University
of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1991; M.Ed.,
University of Florida, 1977.
William J. Helseth, (1980-83, 1992) Associate
Professor/Coordinator, Art— Liberal Arts.
M.S., Florida State University, 1976; M.F.A.,
Pennsylvania State University, 1973.
Joel B. Henderson, (1998) Associate Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. M.S., Harding
University, 1993.
114
Alan D. Herweyer, (1989) Associate Professor,
Mathematics--Math and Sciences. M.A.T.,
Calvin College, 1985; M.S., Purdue University,
1973.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Linda Jarrett, (2005) Instructor, Early
Childhood Education— Liberal Arts. M.Ed.,
Middle Tennessee State University, 1975.
Alexis D. Jenkins, (1988) Vocational Master
Instructor, Medical Office Assisting—TN
Technology Center. M. A., Tennessee
Technological University, 1992.
Diane P. Johnson, (2000) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S., College
of St. Francis, 1996.
William A. Johnson, (1990) Professor/Program
Director, Dental Assisting & Hygiene—Nursing/
Allied Health. D.M.D., University of Oregon
Dental School, 1969.
Donna M. Johnston, (2002) Instructor, Health
Information Technologies—Nursing/Allied
Health. A.S., Chattanooga State Technical
Community College, 1983.
Debra S. Jones, (1998) Associate Professor/
Coordinator, Speech— Liberal Arts. M.S., Texas
Christian University, 1978.
James L. Jones, (2004) Vocational Associate
Instructor, Commercial Truck Driving—TN
Technology Center. Certified Commercial Truck
Driving License, State of Tennessee, 1990.
Jimmy E. Jones, (1996) Vocational Senior
Instructor, Marine Engine Technology/
Department Head, Transportation—TN
Technology Center. A.A.S., Chattanooga State
Technical Community College, 1995.
Virginia M. Kilgore, (1995) Vocational
Associate Instructor, Cosmetology—TN
Technology Center. Cosmetologist Instructor
License, Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology,
1993.
Paula R. Kinchen, (2000) Assistant Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. M.A., Ohio University,
1996.
Janet L. King, (2006) Instructor, Psychology—
Liberal Arts. M.S., Mississippi State University,
1986.
Michael D. Krogman, (1999) Associate
Professor, Philosophy— Liberal Arts. Ph.D.,
University of Tennessee, 1998.
Sara E. Kuhn, (1980) Professor, English—
Liberal Arts. Ed.D., University of Georgia,
1979.
Richard K. Lamerand, (1980-87, 1992)
Associate Professor, Pre-Engineering—
Engineering Technologies. M.S., University of
Houston, 1977.
Lori Lammert, (2003) Assistant Professor,
Spanish— Liberal Arts. M.A., Vanderbilt
University, 2002.
K. Labron Lawson, (1989) Vocational Master
Instructor, Collision Repair Technology—TN
Technology Center. B.S, Tennessee Wesleyan
College, 1997; ASE Certified; ICAR Certified,
Unibody.
Douglas M. Ledford, (1997) Vocational
Senior Instructor, Surgical Technology—TN
Technology Center. Certified Surgical
Technologist, 1984; B.S., Tennessee Temple
University, 1981.
Lisa Legg, (1993) Associate Professor/Program
Director, Radiation Therapy—Nursing/Allied
Health. B.S., Covenant College, 1994.
Zoila G. Leon, (2006) Associate Instructor,
L.P.N.--TN Technology Center. A.S., Southern
Adventist University, 1980; R.N.
Dorothy L. Lochridge, (2005) Instructor,
English—Liberal Arts. M.A., University of
North Carolina at Greensboro, 1971.
Marie P. Loisy, (1999) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S,
Michigan State University, 1997.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
For more information see the “Chattanooga State Digital Directory” online at http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/facultypages/default.asp
Kathy L. Long, (1988) Associate Professor,
Social Sciences— Liberal Arts. M.S., M.A.,
Florida State University, 1973, 1974.
Sandra K. Lowery, (1996) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S., Indiana
University, 1978.
Judy L. Mabe, (2000) Assistant Professor,
Dental Hygiene—Nursing/Allied Health. M.Ed.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1974.
Warren C. Mackey, (1976) Professor, History—
Liberal Arts. D.A., Middle Tennessee State
University, 1980.
Angie P. Maida, (2002) Assistant Professor,
Dental Hygiene—Nursing/Allied Health. M.Ed.,
University of Louisville, 1998.
Teresa T. Marcus, (1998) Associate Professor,
Biology—Math and Sciences. M.S., University
of Tennessee, 1974; TN Licensed Dietitian/
Nutritionist; GA Licensed Dietitian.
Susie Jo Matthews, (2005) Assistant Professor,
Biology—Math and Sciences. D.V.M.,
University of Tennessee, 1985.
Will E. McDonald, (2004) Instructor, Mass
Communications— Business and Information
Technologies. M.A., Communications, Western
Kentucky University, 1989.
Jeffrey McEwen, (1995) Associate Professor,
Social Sciences—Arts and Sciences. M.A.,
University of Tennessee, 1995.
Jeffery S. Mendenhall, (2003) Instructor,
Speech— Liberal Arts. M.A., Ball State
University, 2001.
Carolyn S. Miller, (1989) Associate Professor,
Reading— Liberal Arts. M.Ed., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1976.
Cheryl L. Miller, (1988) Professor, Nursing—
Nursing/Allied Health. Ed.D., University of
Tennessee, 2001.
Linda P. Miller, (1981) Associate Professor,
English—Liberal Arts. M.A., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1990.
Stuart B. Miller, (1982) Vocational Master
Instructor, Landscaping and Turf Management/
Department Head, Occupational Technologies—
TN Technology Center. Vocational Education,
UCF, 1981; M.A.T., Rollins College, 1976.
Christopher B. Mobley, (2005) Assistant
Professor, Political Science— Liberal Arts.
Ph.D., Purdue University, 1992.
Christine Moniyung, (1999) Associate
Professor, Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health.
M.S., Andrews University, 1997.
Gay M. Moore, (2000) Assistant Professor,
Human Services— Liberal Arts. M.Ed.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1990.
Roy H. Morris, (1992) Vocational Associate
Instructor, Automotive Technology—TN
Technology Center. Master ASE Certified in
eight automotive fields, GM Master Technician.
Michelle R. Mould, (2005) Instructor, Dental
Hygiene—Nursing/Allied Health. B.S.,
University of Missouri, 1991.
Samuel J. Nalley, (1971) Professor, Physics—
Math and Sciences. Ph.D., University of
Tennessee, 1971.
Lucilla A. Nash, (2006) Instructor/Program
Director, Human Services--Liberal Arts.
M.S.W., Atlanta University, 1989.
Shirley F. Nelson, (1990) Associate Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. M.A., Middle Tennessee
State University, 1978.
Dean Alan Nichols, (2001) Associate Professor,
Music— Liberal Arts. D.M.A., University of
Kentucky, 2000.
Edward C. Nichols, (1993) Professor/
Coordinator, Mathematics—Math and Sciences.
Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1986.
R. Duane Nickols, (1979) Associate Professor,
Civil Engineering Technology—Engineering
Technologies. B.S.C.E., University of Kentucky,
1971; P.E.; A.S.; C.E.T .
Patricia Ochoa, (1998) Associate Professor,
Physical Education— Liberal Arts. Ph.D.,
University of Alabama, 1999.
Merrill B. Parker, (1976) Professor, Information
Systems— Business and Information
Technologies. Ph.D., Peabody College of
Vanderbilt University, 1979.
Barbara Y. Partridge, (2003) Assistant
Professor, Radiologic Technology—Nursing/
Allied Health. B.S., Covenant College, 1997.
Karen M. Payne, (2004) Assistant Professor,
Biology—Math and Sciences. D. C., Life
University, 1997.
Claire M. Peacock, (1988) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.Ed.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1995
Michiba L. Pendgergrass, (2007) Associate
Professor, Surgical Technology--TN Technology
Center, Certificate, Surgical Technology,
Chattanooga State Technical Community
College, 2000..
Janet E. Pickard, (2002) Associate Professor,
Information Systems— Business and
Information Technologies. M.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1988.
Anita Polk-Conley, (1989) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. Ph.D.,
University of Texas at Austin, 2006.
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Larry Ponder, (1979) Vocational Instructor,
Welding Technology—TN Technology Center.
Certified Combination Welder, 1976; Diploma,
Chattanooga Area Vocational Technical School,
1976.
Robin L. Popp, (2005) Instructor, Psychology—
Liberal Arts. M.A., Lewis and Clark College,
1996.
Robert E. Prytula, (2005) Assistant Professor/
Program Coordinator, Fire Science—Engineering
Technologies. B.S., Eastern Kentucky University,
1995.
Kathleen M. Puri, (1992) Associate Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.N.,
University of Connecticut, 1987.
Azar D. Raiszadeh, (1993) Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. Ed.D.,
University of Tennessee, 1997.
Margaret S. Ramsey, (1988) Associate
Professor, Mathematics—Math and Sciences.
M.M., University of Tennessee, 1991.
Paul A. Ray, (1995) Associate Professor,
Paralegal Studies— Business and Information
Technologies. J.D., University of Arkansas
School of Law, 1988.
Ronald W. Reese, (1983) Assistant Professor,
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology—
Engineering Technologies. B.S.E.E., University
of Tennessee, 1969.
Mitchell A. Rhea, (2002) Associate Professor,
Chemistry—Math and Sciences. Ph.D.,
University of Tennessee, 1990.
Joyce C. Rhoton, (1977) Associate Professor,
Biology—Math and Sciences. M.S., East
Tennessee State University, 1969.
Faculty
Stacie L. McPherson, (2004) Instructor,
Radiologic Technology—Allied Health. B.S.,
East Tennessee State University, 2002
M. Jeffrey Morris, (1996) Associate Professor,
Advertising Arts— Business and Information
Technologies. M.F.A., University of Memphis,
2005.
Jeffrey L. Rinkel, (1995) Associate Professor,
Speech— Liberal Arts. M.A., University of
Northern Iowa, 1982.
Paul A. Robertson, (1983, 1999) Associate
Professor, Mathematics—Math and Sciences.
M.M., University of Tennessee, 1994.
Cynthia L. Robinette, (2007) Instructor, LPN
Program--TN Technology Center. M.S.,
University of St. Francis, 2006; R.N.
Lori A. Robinson, (2006) Instructor/Program
Coordinator, Cardiovascular Program—Nursing/
Allied Health. A.A.S., Chattanooga State
Technical Community College, 1985. —
Kathleen S. Rose, (1996) Assistant Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1996.
Leesa A. Ross, (1996) Assistant Professor,
Nuclear Medicine Technology—Nursing/Allied
Health. B.S., Covenant College, 1997; C.N.M.T.
Timmy L. Ross, (2006) Instructor, Physics-Math and Sciences. M.A., University of North
Alabama, 1985.
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
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McIver Rountree, Jr., (1987) Assistant
Professor/Program Director, Respiratory Care—
Nursing/Allied Health. B.S., Medical College of
Georgia, 1977.
April C. Royer, (2005) Assistant Professor,
Chemistry—. Ph.D., University of Alabama,
1999.
Deborah J. Rudd, (1987) Associate Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. M.A., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1990.
Susan E. Ruta (Beth), (1987) Assistant
Professor, Chemical Technology—Engineering
Technologies. M.S., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1986.
George R. Ryan, (1996) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.S.,
California State University, 1986.
Andrea Sanders, (2003) Associate Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. Ph.D., University of
Chicago, 1996.
Margery K. Sanders, (1997) Associate Professor,
Radiologic Technology—Nursing/Allied Health.
M.B.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
1985.
Rose N. Scalise, (1997) Assistant Professor,
Office Administration— Business and
Information Technologies. B.S., University of
Pittsburgh, 1974.
Faculty
Ann D. H. Schide, (2000) Assistant Professor,
Nursing—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 2004.
Marsha M. Schoonover, (1983) Associate
Professor, Mathematics—Math and Sciences.
M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
1981.
Randolph C. Schulte, (1995) Associate
Professor/Department Head, Humanities—
Liberal Arts. Ed.D., University of Tennessee,
2005.
Donna L. Seagle, (1998) Associate Professor,
Psychology— Liberal Arts. M.A., Middle
Tennessee State University, 1994.
William W. Shifflett, (1984) Associate Professor,
Accounting— Business and Information
Technologies. M.B.A., University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga, 1983; Certified Financial
Planner; C.P.A.
Wade C. Silvey, (2005) Vocational Senior
Instructor, Machine Tool Technology—TN
Technology Center. Machine Tool Certificate,
Northwestern Technical College, 1989.
Stephen K. Simmerman, (2006) Assistant
Professor, Graphic Design—Business and
Information Technologies. M.F.A., Savannah
College of Art and Design, 2002.
Joyce Smith, (1987) Professor, Mathematics—
Math and Sciences. Ed.D., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1997.
Kimberly W. Smith, (1997) Associate Professor,
Physical Education— Liberal Arts. M.S.,
University of Tennessee, 1988.
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Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Roy K. Sofield, (1998) Associate Professor/
Coordinator, Biology—Math and Sciences.
Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1983.
Hugh W. Vines, (1983) Vocational Senior
Instructor, Industrial Electricity/Department
Head, Industrial Technologies—TN Technology
Center. A.G.E., Chattanooga State Technical
Community College, 1991; Journeyman
electrician, 1972.
Laqueta A. Soule, (1991) Associate Professor,
Court Reporting— Business and Information
Technologies. B.S., University of Alabama,
1998.
Vicki L. Vonschaaf, (1989) Vocational Master
Instructor, Practical Nursing—TN Technology
Center. B.S., University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga, 1981.
K. Edward Southeard, (2006) Instructor,
Management—Business and Information
Technologies. M.B.A., Alabama A and M
University, 1990.
Duane J. Walker, (1999) Vocational Associate
Instructor, Automotive Technology—TN
Technology Center. Auto Mechanics Certificate,
Athens Area Vocational School, 1967; ASE
Certified Master Automotive Technician.
Clifford L. Stalter, 2004) Instructor/Department
Head, Management— Business and Information
Technologies. M.A., Virginia Commonwealth
University, 1981.
James H. Walker, (2005) Assistant Professor,
Legal Assisting— Business and Information
Technologies. J.D., University of Virginia School
of Law, 1990.
David Stanislawski, (1994) Professor,
Chemistry—Math and Sciences. Ph.D.,
University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1978.
DeʼLara Khalili Stephens, (1997) Associate
Professor, English— Liberal Arts. M.A.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1997.
James V. Ware, (2001) Assistant Professor,
Mechanical Engineering Technology—
Engineering Technologies. B.S.E., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1993.
William L. Stifler, Jr., (1992) Associate
Professor, Writing— Liberal Arts. M.A.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1991.
Laura P. Warren, (1984) Associate Professor/
Program Director, Physical Therapist Assistant
Program—Nursing/Allied Health. M.S.,
University of Tennessee, Memphis, 1996;
Licensed Physical Therapist.
Ken Storrs, (1976) Associate Professor,
History— Liberal Arts. M.S., University of
Tennessee, 1980.
Dorothy T. Weathersby, (1981) Professor/
Coordinator, English— Liberal Arts. Ed.D.,
University of Tennessee, 1975.
Erik G. Stubsten, (1996) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.Ed.,
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 2000.
Jill H. Wentworth, (2003) Vocational Instructor,
Computer Operations—TN Technology Center.
B.S., University of Tennessee Knoxville, 1981.
Lisa P. Swift, (2001) Assistant Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. M.A., East Tennessee
State University, 1983.
William M. Teem, IV, (2005) Assistant Professor,
English— Liberal Arts. M.A., University of
Virginia, 1990.
Lori A. Tilley, (2006) Instructor/Program
Director, Health Information Management-Nursing/Allied Health. B.S., Medical University
of South Carolina, 1996.
Casey Turner, (2003) Vocational Associate
Instructor, Auto Body—TN Technology Center.
A.A.S., Chattanooga State Technical Community
College, 1992.
Theresa A. Underwood-Lemons, (1995)
Professor/Coordinator, Physical Sciences—Math
and Sciences. Ph.D., University of Tennessee,
1990.
Sam T. Valcaniant, (2005) Instructor,
Information Systems Technology—Business
and Information Technologies. M.A., Nova
University, 1991.
Kathy Veal, (1995) Vocational Instructor,
Practical Nursing—TN Technology Center.
B.S.N., East Tennessee State University, 2006.
Margaret B. Venable, (1981) Assistant
Professor, Biology—Math and Sciences. M.S.,
Auburn University, 1976.
Mary E. White (Libby), (1996) Associate
Professor, Mathematics—Math and Sciences.
M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
1999.
Anne M. Wilkins, (2005) Instructor,
Accounting—Business and Information
Technologies. MACC, University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga, 2004.
Mark W. Wood, (1992) Associate Professor,
Art— Liberal Arts. M.F.A., Yale University,
1987.
James Wright, (2004) Assistant Professor,
Sociology— Liberal Arts. M.S., University of
Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1999.
Jane M. Yantis, (1984-86, 1988) Associate
Professor, Biology—Math and Sciences. M.S.,
Cornell University, 1984.
Dusty M. York, (2003) Instructor, Nuclear
Medicine—Nursing/Allied Health. B.S., Medical
College of Georgia, 2000.
James R. Zimmer, (1999) Associate Professor,
Mathematics—Math and Sciences. M.S., Bob
Jones University, 1977.
Betty R. Zmaj, (2004) Instructor, Nursing—
Nursing/Allied Health. B.S.N., University of
Wisconsin, 1974.
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu
Index
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
Volume Number 33
2007-08
AA, Advertising Arts, see “Graphic Design”
Grade .......................................................................................................................58-59
Tennessee Technology Center Suspension.................................................................... 41
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates ............................................................................7-30
AB, see “Collision Repair”
ABE, see “Adult Education”
Applicable Catalog, see “Graduation”
Application for Admission .........................................................................................Last Insert
AC, see “Air Conditioning and Refrigeration”
Application for Graduation, see “Graduation”
Academic Calendar for 2007-08................................................................................................ 5
Applied Technology Major ..............................................................................................9-10,49
Technology Education Concentration ........................................................................ 9,10
Technology Management Concentration ...................................................................... 10
Academic Fresh Start ............................................................................................................... 57
Academic Honors, see “Scholars on the River”
Academic Inventory, see “Academic Programs”
Academic Load ........................................................................................................................ 58
Academic Performance Scholarship, see “Financial Aid”
Academic Probation/Suspension ............................................................................................. 58
Academic Programs ............................................................................................................49-50
Academic Regulations ........................................................................................................57-64
Art (ART)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................74-75
See also “Graphic Design”
Articulation Agreements
Tennessee Technology Center ....................................................................................... 41
Transfer Information ................................................................................................33-37
Associate Degree (Minimum Requirements)
Associate of Applied Science Degree ..............................................................8,32,49-50
Academic Retention Standards
for College programs .................................................................................................... 58
for Financial Aid ......................................................................................................65-67
for Tennessee Technology Center ............................................................................ 41,58
Associate of Arts Degree .............................................................................. 33-37,49-50
Academic Suspension .............................................................................................................. 58
Astronomy (ASTR)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 75
Academic Terminology .............................................................................................................. 6
Accounting (BU)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 76
Associate of Science Degree ......................................................................... 33-37,49-50
Associate of Science in Teaching.................................................................................. 34
Athletics ................................................................................................................................... 68
Attendance .......................................................................................................................... 41,59
Audit ....................................................................................................................................... 54
Accounting Technology Major .................................................................................................. 9
Accreditations ............................................................................................................................ 4
ACT ....................................................................................................................................... 52
Adaptive Physical Education ................................................................................................... 99
Automated Controls
Concentration in Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology.................................. 16
Automotive Technology (AM)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 74
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 41
Adding a Course ...................................................................................................................... 58
Administrative/Professional Staff ................................................................................... 110-112
Admission Application ...............................................................................................Last Insert
Admissions Information .....................................................................................................51-56
Bachelor Degrees, see “Regents Online Degree Programs”
Adult Education/GED ............................................................................................................. 68
Biology (BIOL)
Advanced Placement (AP) Credit............................................................................................ 55
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................75-76
Advanced Theatre with Concentration (Pending TBR approval)
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 22
Board of Regents ................................................................................................................... 109
Advertising Arts, see “Graphic Design”
Broadcast Captioning
Concentration in Realtime Reporting ........................................................................... 15
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................102-103
Advisement, see “Educational Planning and Advisement”
African American Grant, see “Financial Aid”
Allied Health, see “Nursing/Allied Health”
BST, see “Business Systems Technology
BU, see “Accounting”
AM, see “Automotive Technology”
Building Construction Technology (BL)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 76
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 42
American Council on Education (ACE) .................................................................................. 55
Business and Community Development Center ...................................................................... 68
Index
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration (AC)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 74
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 41
Broadcasting
Course Descriptions, see “Mass Communications”
American History Requirement ............................................................................................... 35
American Sign Language
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................88-89
Appeals
Academic Suspension ................................................................................................... 58
Financial Aid ............................................................................................................65-67
Business and Information Technologies Division
Degree Programs ........................................................................................................9-15
Technical Certificates of Credit ............................................................................... 15,16
Business Law Courses, see “Accounting”
Business Management Courses, see “Management”
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Business Systems Technology (BST)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 76
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 42
Commercial Truck Driving
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 76
Technical Certificate of Proficiency ............................................................................. 42
CAD
Communication
Course Descriptions, see “Mass Communications”
Certificates, see “CAD Technology Technical Certificate of Credit”
Course Descriptions, see “Computer-Aided Design”
Major, see “CAD Technology”
CAD Technology
COMPASS .......................................................................................................................... 52,70
Computed Tomography (Pending TBR approval)
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 28
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 106
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 20
Calendar ..................................................................................................................................... 5
Computer-Aided Design (CAD)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 84
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 20
CAM, “Computer Aided Manufacturing”
Computer-Aided Drafting/Design, see “Computer-Aided Design”
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Courses (CPR), see “Physical Education Course
Computer Courses, see “Information Systems” and “Network Management”
Calculation of Grade Point Average (GPA) ............................................................................. 60
Cardiovascular Sonography (Pending THEC approval)
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 28
Computer Operations Technology (COT)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 78
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 42
Career Planning & Counseling ................................................................................................ 68
Computer Programming, see “Information Systems”
CART Reporting (REAL) Concentration in Realtime Reporting .......................................... 14
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................102-103
Realtime Reporting: Scopist Technical Diploma .......................................................... 46
Computer Repair, see “Computer Operations Technology”
Descriptions”
Computer Science, see “Information Systems”
Catalog, Applicable for Graduation, see “Graduation”
CD, see “Commercial Truck Driving”
Center for Distributed Education ............................................................................................. 32
Change of Name or Address, see “Change of Status”
Change of Registration (Drop/Add) ....................................................................................... 58
Change of Status ..................................................................................................................... 59
Computer Systems
Concentration in Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology.............................16-17
Construction Engineering Technology
Concentration in Engineering Technology.................................................................... 17
Course Descriptions (CI, Civil Engineering) ................................................................ 77
Construction Management
Concentration in Management ...................................................................................... 11
Chattanooga State Foundation Board Members .................................................................... 109
Continuing Education, see “Business and Community Development Center”
Chattanooga State Scholarships, see “Financial Aid”
Chattanooga Stateʼs Web Site .................................................................................................... 3
CHEM, see “Chemistry”
Chemical Process Operations
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 20
Chemical Technology
Concentration in Industrial Maintenance Technology .................................................. 19
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 80
Chemistry (CHEM)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................76-77
Cooperative Education (CP)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 78
Credit ............................................................................................................................ 59
See also, “Placement and Cooperative Education”
Cosmetology (CY)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 80
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 42
Cosmetology Instructor Training (YT)
Course Description ...................................................................................................... 108
Technical Certificate of Proficiency ............................................................................. 43
Cost, see “Financial Information”
Child Development Center ..................................................................................................... 68
COT, see “Computer Operations Technology”
CI, see “Civil Engineering Technology”
Counseling Center.................................................................................................................... 68
Cisco Network Academy Program Course Descriptions....................................................77-78
Course Abbreviations Index ...............................................................................................71-72
Civil Engineering Technology (CI)
Concentration in Engineering Technology...............................................................17-19
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 77
Course Delivery Types............................................................................................................. 73
Class Attendance ................................................................................................................. 41,59
Course Drop Deadline ............................................................................................................. 58
Index
Class Cancellation .................................................................................................................. 59
Course Descriptions ..........................................................................................................74-108
Course Load, see “Academic Load”
Class Load, see “Academic Load”
Course Repeat .......................................................................................................................... 60
Classification for Fee Payment ................................................................................................ 56
Course Substitutions ............................................................................................................... 59
Classification of Students ....................................................................................................... 59
CP, see “Cooperative Education”
CLEP Credit ............................................................................................................................. 55
CPR, see “Physical Education Course Descriptions”
CNAP, see “Cisco Network Academy Program”
Creative Writing Courses, see “English”
CO, see “Mass Communications”
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) ......................................................................... 55
Collision Repair (AB)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 74
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 42
Commencement Honors ......................................................................................................... 57
Credit by Examination ............................................................................................................ 55
Credit for Life Experience ....................................................................................................... 55
Credit Load, see “Academic Load”
Credit, Military Service ........................................................................................................... 55
Criminal Justice (CJ)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 77
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CS, see “Information Systems”
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................82-83
Major ............................................................................................................................ 21
CT, see “Chemical Technology”
EC, see “Economics”
CY, see “Cosmetology”
ECED, see “Early Childhood Education”
DAST, see “Dental Assisting”
Economics (EC)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 82
DD, see “Computer-Aided Design”
Deadlines (Drop/Add).........................................................................................................58-59
Deanʼs List ............................................................................................................................... 57
Degree Requirements (Minimum)
A.A.S. Degrees & Technical Certificates ....................................................................... 8
ED, see “Education”
Education (ED)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 83
Educational Planning and Advisement .................................................................................... 69
Degrees Offered .................................................................................................................49-50
Dental Assisting (DAST)
Technical Certificate ................................................................................................27-28
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 80
EE, see “Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology”
Dental Hygiene (DH)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 81
Major ............................................................................................................................ 23
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology (EE)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................83-84
Major, see
Automated Controls Concentration .................................................................... 16
Computer Systems Concentration .................................................................16-17
Networking Technology Concentration.............................................................. 17
Developmental Studies, see “Transitional Studies”
EG, see “Engineering University Parallel (Pre-Engineering)”
DH, see “Dental Hygiene”
Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology (DuPont) Course Descriptions .................83-84
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 106
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 29
Electrician, see “Industrial Electricity”
Electromechanical Technology
Concentration in Industrial Maintenance Technology .................................................. 19
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 94
Diesel Equipment Mechanics (DM)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 81
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 43
Electronics, Industrial, see “Industrial Electronics”
Dietary Manager
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 96
Emergency Medical Care Concentration in Fire Science Technology.................................... 24
EMT, see “Emergency Medical Services”
Diplomas .................................................................................................................................. 59
Disabilities Support Services ................................................................................................... 69
Emergency Medical Services
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 86
Dishonored Checks .................................................................................................................. 67
Emergency Service Supervision and Administration Concentration in Fire Science
Technology .................................................................................................................... 24
Distance Education, see “Center for Distributed Education”
End User Support Concentration in Information Systems Technology .................................. 10
DM, see “Diesel Equipment Mechanics”
Engineering Technology (ET)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 85
Major, see
Civil Engineering Concentration ........................................................................ 17
Construction Engineering Concentration ......................................................17-18
Manufacturing Engineering Concentration ........................................................ 18
Mechanical Engineering Concentration ............................................................. 18
Motor Sports Engineering Concentration .......................................................... 19
Double Certificate .................................................................................................................... 62
Double Concentration .............................................................................................................. 62
Double Degree ......................................................................................................................... 62
Double Major ........................................................................................................................... 62
Drafting, see “Computer-Aided Design”
Drama, see “Theatre”
Drop/Add ................................................................................................................................. 58
Drop Deadline .......................................................................................................................... 58
Engineering Technologies Division
Degree Programs ......................................................................................................16-20
Technical Certificates of Credit .................................................................................... 20
Engineering (Transfer)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 85
DSPM, see “Mathematics”
ENGL, see “English”
DSPR, see “Reading”
English as a Second Language, see “Adult Education”, see also “English”
DSPW, see “English”
Dual Enrollment....................................................................................................................... 53
English (ENGL)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................84-85
English Education, see “General Education Requirements/Transfer Information”
Entrance Deficiencies, Removal of ......................................................................................... 37
DuPont
Course Descriptions, see “Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology (DuPont)” and
“Mechanical Engineering Technology (DuPont)”
EA, see “Emergency Medical Services”
Index
DSPS, see “Psychology”
Entrepreneurship Concentration in Management .................................................................... 12
Environmental Science (ESC)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 85
Equal Opportunity Employment (EOE) Statement ................................................................. 38
Early Admission....................................................................................................................... 53
ER, see “Industrial Electronics”
Early Childhood Education (EDED)
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
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ESC, see “Environmental Science”
GED ............................................................................................................ 40,51-52,65-66,70
ESL Courses, see “Adult Education”, see also “English”
GED Test .................................................................................................................................. 70
General Education ..........................................................................................................8,33-37
ET, see “Engineering Technology”
General Information ...........................................................................................................47-70
Exit Testing .............................................................................................................................. 62
Expenses and Fees .................................................................................................................. 65
General Management Concentration in Management ............................................................. 12
EZ, see “Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology (DuPont)”
Geography (GEOG)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 87
Faculty ........................................................................................................................... 112-114
GEOL, see “Geology”
Federal Financial Aid, see “Financial Aid”
Geology (GEOL)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 87
Federal Pell Grant, see “Financial Aid”
Federal Plus Loans, see “Financial Aid”
Federal Stafford Loans, see “Financial Aid”
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), see “Financial Aid”
Federal Work Study, see “Financial Aid”
Fees ....................................................................................................................................... 67
Discounts.................................................................................................................................. 67
FI, see “Fire Science”
Financial Aid .......................................................................................................................65-67
Financial Information ............................................................................................................. 67
Financial Management Course Descriptions ........................................................................... 87
Financial Planning
Course Descriptions ................................................................................................................. 87
Fine Arts Electives
Electives (General Education) ..............................................................................8,35-36
Fire Science Technology Major, see
Emergency Medical Care Concentration ...................................................................... 24
Emergency Service Supervision and Administration Concentration ............................ 24
Fire Suppression Concentration .................................................................................... 24
Fire Science (FI)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 86
Major, see “Fire Science Technology”
Fire Suppression Concentration in Emergency Services Technology ..................................... 24
First Time Freshmen ................................................................................................................ 51
FM, see “Financial Management”
Foreign Language
Course Descriptions, see “French,” “German,” “Japanese, see ʻHumanities,ʼ ”
“Spanish”
Electives (General Education) ..............................................................................8,35-36
Foreign Student, see “International Students”
Forestry, see “General Education Requirements/Transfer Information”
Index
Foundation Board Members, Chattanooga State ................................................................... 109
Foundations in Acting (Pending TBR approval)
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 22
FP, see “Financial Planning”
FREN, see “French”
French (FREN)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 87
Freshman Admission................................................................................................................ 51
Full-Time Student Credit Load ................................................................................................ 58
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GERM, see “German”
German (GERM)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 87
GO, see “Geography”
Governance ............................................................................................................................ 109
GPA, see “Grade Point Average”
Grade Appeal ......................................................................................................................60-61
Grade Point Average (GPA)
Calculation of ................................................................................................................ 60
for Degree................................................................................................................. 58,62
for Technical Certificate of Credit ................................................................................ 62
Grading Policy ................................................................................................................... 41,60
Graduation
Application and Fee ...................................................................................................... 61
Honors ........................................................................................................................... 57
Requirements (General) ................................................................................................ 61
Residency Requirements ............................................................................................... 61
Testing ........................................................................................................................... 61
See also Specific Program Requirements
Graphic Design Concentration ................................................................................................ 13
Grants, see “Financial Aid”
Greenhouse, see “Landscaping and Turf Management”
H
azardous Materials Course Descriptions............................................................................ 90
HE, see “Health Information Management”
Health and Physical Education
Course Descriptions, see “Physical Education”
Health Information Management (HE)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................87-88
Major .......................................................................................................................24-25
Health Science Course Descriptions...................................................................................87-88
Health Services Management Concentration in Management ................................................ 12
Hearing Impaired, see “American Sign Language”
Heavy Equipment Operators (EO)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 85
High School Unit Requirements .............................................................................................. 52
HIST, see “History”
History of Chattanooga State ................................................................................................... 48
History (HIST)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 88
Homeland Security
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 88
Honors Program ....................................................................................................................... 57
Horticulture, see “Landscaping and Turf Management”
How to Apply...................................................................................................................3,51-52
How to Read Course Descriptions........................................................................................... 72
How to Use This Catalog........................................................................................................... 2
HP, see “American Sign Language”
HR, see “Human Services”
HS, see “Health Science”
HUM, see “Humanities”
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2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Human Services (HR)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 89
Major ............................................................................................................................ 21
Humanities (HUM)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................89-90
Electives (General Education) ..............................................................................8,33-37
Humanities Department
See “General Education Requirements/Transfer Information”
HZ, see “Hazardous Materials”
LA, see “Legal Assisting” and “Paralegal Studies”
Landscaping and Turf Management (LM)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 91
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 44
Late Registration Fee ............................................................................................................... 67
Leadership Courses, see “Humanities,” “Interdisciplinary Studies,” “Management,”
“Psychology”
Legal Assisting, see “Paralegal Studies”
ID, see “Industrial Maintenance Mechanics”
Liberal Arts Division
Degree Programs ......................................................................................................20-22
IE, see “Industrial Electricity”
Library Services ....................................................................................................................... 69
Indebtedness ............................................................................................................................ 62
Industrial Electricity (IE)
Course Description .................................................................................................................. 90
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 43
Industrial Electronics (IE)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 90
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 43
Industrial Maintenance Mechanics (ID)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 90
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 43
Industrial Maintenance Technology
Concentrations
Chemical Concentration ..................................................................................... 19
Electromechanical Concentration ..................................................................19-20
Information Systems Technology
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................78-80
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 15
Concentrations
End User Support Concentration........................................................................ 10
Network Management Concentration ................................................................ 11
Programming Concentration .............................................................................. 11
Information Technology Concentration in Professional Studies, see “Regents Online Degree
Programs”
Institutional Work Program, see “Financial Aid”
Insurance Course Descriptions ................................................................................................ 90
Interdisciplinary Studies Course Descriptions ........................................................................ 90
International Students .............................................................................................................. 52
Interpreter Training, see “American Sign Language”
Interpreters, see “Disabilities Support Services”
IV Therapy (IV)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 91
IS, see “Insurance”
Literature
Course Descriptions, see “English”
Electives (General Education) ......................................................................................... 8,35,36
LM, see “Landscaping and Turf Management”
Load, Student Academic, see “Academic Load”
Loans, see “Financial Aid”
LP, see “Practical Nursing”
LPN, see “Practical Nursing”
LPN Transition Program .......................................................................................................... 26
Machine Tool Technology (MT)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 94
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 44
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (Pending TBR approval)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 94
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 29
Maintenance Technology Course Descriptions ....................................................................... 94
Mammography
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 95
Management
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................92-94
Concentrations
Construction Management Concentration ......................................................... 11
Entrepreneurship Concentration ......................................................................... 12
General Management Concentration .................................................................. 12
Health Services Management Concentration ..................................................... 12
Office Management Concentration ...............................................................12-13
Retail Management Concentration ..................................................................... 13
Mandatory Placement Requirements ...................................................................................... 52
Manufacturing Engineering Technology
Concentration in Engineering Technology.................................................................... 18
IY, see “Interdisciplinary Studies”
Marine Engine Technology, see “Motorcycle and Marine Service Technology”
Job Skills Development Course Descriptions ......................................................................... 90
Joint Enrollment, see “Dual Enrollment”
Judicial Reporting
Concentration in Realtime Reporting ........................................................................... 15
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................102-103
Realtime Reporting: Scopist Technical Diploma .......................................................... 46
JS, see “Job Skills Development”
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Marketing
Course Descriptions, see “Management”
Masonry (MB)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 92
Index
Japanese, see “Humanities”
Mass Communications
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 78
MATH, see “Mathematics”
Math Placement............................................................................................................. 36
Math and Sciences Division
Degree Programs ........................................................................................................... 22
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Mathematics (MATH)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................91-92
Electives (General Education) ................................................................................... 8,36
Placement ................................................................................................................... 8,36
MD, see “Mechanical Engineering Technology”
Mechanical Engineering Technology ( MD)
Concentration in Engineering Technology.................................................................... 18
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 92
Mechanical Engineering Technology (DuPont) Course Descriptions................................95-96
Mechanics Courses, see “Automotive Technology,” “Diesel Equipment Mechanics,”
“Motorcycle and Marine Service Technology”
Media Services......................................................................................................................... 69
Media Technologies
Course Descriptions ............................................................................................ 74,78,79
Graphic Design Concentration ...................................................................................... 13
Media Technologies Concentration .........................................................................13-14
Web Based Design Concentration................................................................................. 14
Medical Assistant (MO)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 94
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 45
Network Management
Concentration in Information Systems Technology...................................................... 11
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 98
Networking Technology Concentration in Electrical/Electronic
Engineering Technology ............................................................................................... 17
NM, see “Nuclear Medicine Technology”
Non-Profit Management, see “Certificates of Advancement”
Non-Residents (Admission)..................................................................................................... 56
NS, see “Nursing”
NU, see “Health Physics”
Nuclear Medicine Technology (NM)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................96-97
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 29
Nursing (NS)
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 97
LPN Transition Program .............................................................................................. 26
Major (A.A.S.) ............................................................................................................. 25
Paramedic Transition Program ...................................................................................... 26
Medical Terminology Courses, see “Health Science”
Nursing/Allied Health Division
Admission/Retention Policies ....................................................................................... 23
Degree Programs ......................................................................................................23-27
Technical Certificates of Credit ...............................................................................27-30
Course Descriptions, see “Biology” and “Dietary Manager”
MG, see “Management”
NW, see “Network Management”
Medical Records, see “Health Information Management”
Microcomputer, see “End User Support”
Middle College High School ..............................................................................................53-54
Military Service Credit ............................................................................................................ 55
Minority Grant, see “Financial Aid”
Mission Statement.................................................................................................................... 48
MN, see “Maintenance Technology”
MO, see “Medical Office Assisting”
Motor Sports Engineering Concentration in Engineering Technology ................................... 19
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 94
Motor Sports Vehicle Technology (MOTR)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 94
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 45
Occupational Safety Course Descriptions ............................................................................ 98
OF, see “Office Management”
Office Management (OF)
Concentration in Management .................................................................................12-13
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................... 98
Office Systems Specialist
Course Descriptions, see “Office Administration”
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 15
Oral Communication Electives (General Education) ........................................................... 8,36
Orientation .............................................................................................................................. 56
Ornamental Horticulture, see “Landscaping and Turf Management”
Out-of-State.............................................................................................................................. 56
Motorcycle and Marine Service Technology
Course Description ...................................................................................................... 104
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 45
OS, see “Occupational Safety”
MRI, see “Magnetic Resonance Imaging”
Paralegal Studie (LA)s
MT, see “Machine Tool Technology”
MUS, see “Music”
Paramedic Training
Course Descriptions, see “Emergency Medical Services”
Music (MUS)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................94-95
Part-time Students .................................................................................................................... 58
MY, see “Mammography”
Index
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................90-91
Degree Program ............................................................................................................ 14
MZ, see “Mechanical Engineering Technology (DuPont)”
PC, see “Pharmacy Technician”
PE, see “Physical Education”
Pell Grant, see “Financial Aid”
Name Change, see “Change of Status”
Persons Over Sixty .................................................................................................................. 54
Persons Over Sixty-five ........................................................................................................... 54
Native American Grant, see “Financial Aid”
Persons With Disabilities ......................................................................................................... 54
Natural Science
Course Descriptions, see “Astronomy,” “Biology,” “Chemistry,” “Environmental
Science,” “Geology,” “Physical Science,” “Physics”
Electives (General Education) ................................................................................... 8,36
PHED, see “Physical Education”
ND, see “Dietary Manager”
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Pharmacy Technician (PC)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................98-99
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 30
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PHIL, see “Philosophy”
Philosophy (PHIL)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 100
Phi Theta Kappa....................................................................................................................... 57
PHYS, see “Physics”
Physical Education (PE)
Course Descriptions ...............................................................................................99-100
Physical Science (PSCI)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 101
Physical Therapist Assistant (PT)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 101
Major ............................................................................................................................ 26
Physics (PHYS)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 100
Placement Tests .............................................................................................................51-55, 68
Plumbing (PM)
Course Description ...................................................................................................... 100
PO, see “Political Science”
Political Science (PO)
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................100-101
Polymer Operator, see “Certificates of Advancement”
Positron Emission Tomography (PET)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 99
REAL, see “Realtime Reporting”
Real Estate (RS)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 103
Realtime Reporting
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................102-103
Concentrations
Broadcast Captioning Concentration ............................................................................ 15
CART Reporting Concentration.................................................................................... 15
Judicial Concentration................................................................................................... 15
Realtime Reporting: Scopist
Course Description ...................................................................................................... 103
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 46
Records, Retention of .............................................................................................................. 63
Refrigeration, see “Air Conditioning and Refrigeration”
Refund Policies ....................................................................................................................... 65
Registration, Change of ........................................................................................................... 58
Registration Steps ...................................................................................................................... 3
Regents Online Degree Programs........................................................................31-32,50,67,73
Regulations, Academic .......................................................................................................57-64
Religious Studies (RELS)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 103
RELS, see “Religious Studies”
Removal of Entrance Deficiencies .......................................................................................... 37
Renaissance Institute Course Descriptions ............................................................................ 103
Powerhouse Operations Course Descriptions.................................................................101-102
Repeating a Course ................................................................................................................. 60
Practical Nursing (LPN)
Course Description ........................................................................................................ 91
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 45
Requirements for Graduation .................................................................................................. 61
Residency ................................................................................................................................. 61
`Privacy Rights of Students ................................................................................................62-63
Respiratory Care (RC)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 102
Major ............................................................................................................................ 27
Probation/Suspension, see “Academic Retention Standards”
Retention of Records ............................................................................................................... 63
Professional Staff ............................................................................................................ 110-112
Retention Standards, Academic
for Credit, see “Academic Retention Standards”
for Financial Aid ......................................................................................................65-66
for Tennessee Technology Center ................................................................................. 41
Professional Studies Major, see “Regents Online Degree Programs”
Programming Concentration in Information Systems Technology ......................................... 11
PSCI, see “Physical Science”
Psychology (PY)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 101
PT, see “Physical Therapist Assistant”
Public Speaking Courses, see “Speech”
PY, see “Psychology”
PZ, see “Powerhouse Operations”
QA, see “Quality Technology”
Quality Point Average .......................................................................................................... 6,60
Quality Technology
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 102
Course Descriptions, see “Health Science”
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 30
Radiologic Technology (RT)
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................103-104
Major .......................................................................................................................26-27
RS, see “Real Estate”
RT, see “Radiologic Technology”
Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards
for Credit, see “Academic Retention Standards”
for Financial Aid ......................................................................................................65-66
for Tennessee Technology Center ................................................................................. 41
Scholars on the River .......................................................................................................... 51,69
Scholarships ............................................................................................................................. 65
SE, see “Marine Engine Technology”
Secondary Education, see “General Education Requirements/Transfer Information”
Secretarial Science, see “Office Administration”
Security + (ST)
Course Description ...................................................................................................... 105
Senior Citizens ....................................................................................................................54-67
Services for Students with Disabilities .................................................................................... 69
Index
Radiation Therapy Technology
RI, see “Renaissance Institute”
Sign Language (American), see “American Sign Language”
Small Business Development and Resource Center, see “Tennessee Small Business
Development and Resource Center”
SO, see “Sociology”
RC, see “Respiratory Care”
Social and Behavioral Science Electives (General Education) ............................................ 8,37
Reading
Course Descriptions ................................................................................................. 81,82
Sociology (SO)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 104
Readmission ............................................................................................................................. 55
Telephone: Toll Free 1-866-547-3733
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
123
2007-08 Course Catalog Volume Number 33
Sonography, see “Diagnostic Medical Sonography”
SP, see “Speech”
Tomography, see “Computed Tomography”
Transcript Evaluations ............................................................................................................. 63
Transcripts .....................................................................................................................51-52,63
SPAN, see “Spanish”
Transfer Programs (University Parallel) .............................................................................33-37
Spanish (SPAN)
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................104-105
Transfer Students .................................................................................................................... 51
Transient Students ................................................................................................................... 53
Special Students ....................................................................................................................... 53
Staff, Administrative/Professional and Faculty ..............................................................109-114
Transitional Studies
Courses, see “DSPM,” “DSPR,” “DSPS,” and “DSPW”
Program ......................................................................................................................... 70
Stafford Loans, see “Financial Aid”
Transportation Management, see “Certificates of Advancement”
Speech Course Descriptions .................................................................................................. 104
Financial Aid, see “Financial Aid”
Truck Driving, Commercial, see “Commercial Truck Driving”
Student Course Load, see “Academic Load”
Tuition Costs ........................................................................................................................... 67
Student Life.............................................................................................................................. 70
Student Records, Retention of ................................................................................................. 63
Subject Abbreviations .........................................................................................................71-72
Substitutions, see “Course Substitutions”
University of Tennessee Transfer Track .............................................................................36-37
Supervisory Development
Technical Certificate of Credit ...................................................................................... 16
US, see “Diagnostic Medical Sonography”
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, see “Financial Aid”
Surgical Technology
Course Description ...................................................................................................... 101
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 50
Surveying, see “General Education Requirements/Transfer Information”
Suspension, Academic ........................................................................................................ 41,58
Veterans ................................................................................................................................. 56
VC, see “Motor Sports Vehicle Technology”
Veterinary Technology (VETT)
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................106-107
Degree Program ............................................................................................................ 22
Video Independent Study Courses, see “Center for Distributed Education”
Teacher Education Online ................................................................................................. 31,32
Vocational Programs, see “Tennessee Technology Center”
Tennessee Technology Center Division
A.A.S. Degree Articulation Agreement ........................................................................ 41
Academic Retention Policy ........................................................................................... 41
Admission...................................................................................................................... 41
Attendance Policy ......................................................................................................... 41
Credit for Previous Training ......................................................................................... 56
Programs...................................................................................................................41-46
Tennessee Technology Center Student Credit Load ..................................................... 58
Vocational Rehabilitation, see “Financial Aid”
Technical Certificates
of Credit ................................................................................................... 15-16,20,27-30
Technology Education Concentration in Applied Technology .............................................9-10
Technology Foundations in Basic Anatomy & Physiology Course Description .................. 105
Technology Management Concentration in Applied Technology ........................................... 10
Index
Ultrasound, see “Diagnostic Medical Sonography”
Undecided Majors ...............................................................................................................63-64
WAWL Radio....................................................................................................................... 70
Web Based Design Concentration in Media Technologies ..................................................... 14
Web Site, Chattanooga Statesʼ ................................................................................................... 3
WD, see “Welding”
Welding (WD)
Course Description ...................................................................................................... 108
Technical Diploma ........................................................................................................ 46
Wellness
Course Descriptions, see “Physical Education”
Telephone Numbers ...................................................................................... Inside Back Cover
Whoʼs Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges ................................................... 58
Tennessee Board of Regents .................................................................................................. 109
Wilder-Naifeh Technical Skills Grant .................................................................................... 40
Tennessee Board of Regents Philosophy of General Education ............................................. 34
Withdrawal from College ........................................................................................................ 64
Tennessee Board of Regents/University of Tennessee University Transfer............................ 37
Tennessee Higher Education Commission ............................................................................ 109
Womenʼs Studies (WMST)
Course Descriptions .................................................................................................... 108
Tennessee Small Business Development and Resource Center .............................................. 70
Work Study, see “Financial Aid”
Tennessee Student Assistance Award (TSAA), see “Financial Aid”
WorkKeys, see “Business and Community Development Center”
Written and Oral Communication Electives (General Education) ..........................36-37
Tennessee Technology Center, see “Tennessee Technology Center Division”
Terminology, Academic ............................................................................................................. 6
Testing as Degree Requirement ..........................................................................................61-62
X-Ray Technology
See, “Radiologic Technology”
Testing Center ......................................................................................................................... 70
THEA, see “Theatre”
Theatre (THEA)
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................105-106
TM, see “Computed Tomography”
TOEFL, see “International Students”
124
Chattanooga State Technical Community College
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu

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