Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013

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Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
annual report 2013
better
power
for a changing world
“2013 was a year of good progress in which our
order book, underlying revenue and underlying
profit, all grew. Our priorities remain the 4 Cs:
Customer, Concentration, Cost and Cash.”
John Rishton, Chief Executive
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
1
Change
Order book £m
71,612
60,146
+19%
Underlying revenue £m
15,505
12,209
+27%
1,759
1,434
+23%
65.59p
59.59p
+10%
Underlying profit
before tax £m
Underlying earnings per share
Full year payment to
shareholders
22.0p
19.5p
+13%
Reported revenue £m
15,513
12,161
+28%
1,759
2,766
-36%
73.26p
125.38p
-42%
1,939
1,317
Reported profit before tax £m
Reported earnings per share
Net cash £m
* 2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits
and the change in accounting policy for RRSAs.
Financial statements
Contents
74
Other information
Subsidiaries, jointly controlled
entities and associates
Independent Auditor’s report
Group five-year review
Additional financial information
Shareholder information
Glossary
127
130
136
137
139
141
Forward-looking statements
This annual report contains forward-looking
statements. Any statements that express forecasts,
expectations and projections are not guarantees of
future performance and will not be updated. By their
nature, these statements involve risk and uncertainty,
and a number of factors could cause material
differences to the actual results or developments.
This report is intended to provide information to
shareholders, is not designed to be relied upon by any
other party, or for any other purpose and the Company
and its directors accept no liability to any other person
other than that required under English law.
Other information
Restated*
2012
35
36
38
38
39
44
47
49
51
52
53
55
62
70
72
Financial statements
2013
Directors’ report
Chairman’s introduction
Board of directors
International Advisory Board
Executive Leadership Team
Corporate governance report
Audit committee report
Nomination committee report
Ethics committee report
Risk committee report
Safety committee report
Remuneration committee report
Directors’ remuneration policy
Directors’ remuneration report
Shareholders and share capital
Other statutory information
Directors’ report
Our vision is to deliver ‘better power
for a changing world’.
8
10
14
16
18
20
22
24
25
26
30
32
1
2
4
6
Strategic report
INTRODUCTION
Rolls-Royce is a global company, providing
integrated power solutions for customers
in civil and defence aerospace, marine,
energy and power markets.
Strategic report
Introduction
Group at a glance
Chairman’s review
Chief Executive’s review
Our vision, business model,
strategy and values
Chief Financial Officer’s review
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Power Systems
Engineering and technology
Operations
Sustainability
Key performance indicators
Principal risks and uncertainties
2
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
GROUP AT A GLANCE
As in previous years, our business priorities remain
the 4 Cs: Customer, Concentration, Cost and Cash.
GROUP OVERVIEW 2013
2013 revenue by business segment
ő The order book increased 19 per cent to
£71.6 billion. This included a £1.6 billion
contribution from Power Systems.
ő Underlying profit before tax increased
23 per cent to £1.8 billion, including
£257 million from Tognum.
ő Order intake was £26.9 billion in the year.
42%
17%
7%
16%
18%
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Energy
Marine
Power Systems
ő Underlying revenue increased to
£15.5 billion, with 53 per cent from
original equipment (OE) and 47 per cent
from services revenue.
CIVIL AEROSPACE
Revenue mix
£6,655m
Underlying revenue 2013
£844m
46%
54%
ő First flight of the Airbus A350 XWB powered by
Trent XWB engines
ő First flight of the Boeing 787-9 powered by
Trent 1000 engines
ő Major new orders from JAL, IAG, Lufthansa,
United, Singapore and Etihad
ő Delivered 3,000th BR700 series engine
Underlying profit 2013
The Civil aerospace segment is a major
manufacturer of aero engines for the airline and
corporate jet markets. Rolls-Royce powers more
than 30 types of commercial aircraft and has
almost 13,000 engines in service around the world.
£2,591m
ő TP400-powered A400M entered service
ő MissionCareTM contract for Saudi Arabian EJ200
engines secured
ő 1,500th AE 2100 engine delivered
ő Upgraded AE 1107 engines for V-22 Osprey
ő T56 engine enhancement kits gained first sales
ő Delivered 40th Rolls-Royce LiftFan® for
F-35B Lightning II fighter programme
ő RTM322 helicopter engine programme sold
to Turbomeca
OE revenue
Services revenue
DEFENCE AEROSPACE
Revenue mix
Underlying revenue 2013
£438m
Underlying profit 2013
50% OE revenue
46% Services revenue
4%
Development
Rolls-Royce is the second largest provider of defence
aero-engine products and services globally, with
around 16,000 engines in service with over 160
military customers in more than 100 countries.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
3
Strategic report
Directors’ report
Revenue mix
£2,527m
Underlying revenue 2013
£281m
57%
43%
OE revenue
Services revenue
The Marine segment has 4,000 customers and
equipment installed on over 25,000 vessels
worldwide, including those of 70 navies.
ENERGY
Revenue mix
£1,048m
Underlying revenue 2013
£26m
Underlying profit 2013
40% OE revenue
60% Services revenue
ő 33 RB211s ordered for oil and gas applications
ő Major service contract secured with Petrobras
ő New Santa Cruz, Brazil, assembly plant
operational
ő Signed tripartite agreement with Rosatom and
Fortum to assess nuclear reactor design for UK
new build
ő Renewed agreement with Westinghouse to
provide nuclear inspection services in US
To date, Energy has sold 4,600 gas turbines
with 180 million operating hours recorded.
Rolls-Royce has over 50 years of experience
in the nuclear industry.
POWER SYSTEMS
Revenue mix
£2,831m
Underlying revenue 2013
£294m
Underlying profit 2013
71%
29%
OE revenue
Services revenue
ő MTU Powerpacks ordered for UK Intercity
Express Programme
ő Fjord Line ordered Bergen engines for cruise
ferries
ő UK MoD selects MTU gensets alongside MT30
gas turbine
ő Polish partnership created to supply and
maintain cogeneration plants
ő Mining trucks powered by MTU delivered to
Rio Tinto in Australia
Rolls-Royce Power Systems is headquartered in
Germany and specialises in reciprocating engines,
propulsion systems and distributed energy systems.
Other information
Underlying profit 2013
ő Range of world ‘firsts’ of LNG-powered vessel
types delivered
ő MT30 selected for new UK MoD Type 26 Frigate
ő £800 million contract agreed with UK MoD
for provision of future nuclear submarine
propulsion systems
ő New UT 830 seismic survey vessel launched
ő COSCO ordered new wave-piercing design of
offshore vessels
ő Third service centre in China opened
Financial statements
MARINE
4
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW
In 2013, Rolls-Royce
delivered another year
of growth in underlying
revenues, underlying
profits and orders.
The Board is proposing
an increase in the final
payment to shareholders
of 13.4p bringing the full
year payment to 22.0p.
This is my first Chairman’s review. Before I
joined Rolls-Royce I sensed that it would be an
extraordinary privilege to serve such a great
company with such a rich history. So it has
proved to be. In the past nine months I have
travelled widely and met a broad crosssection of colleagues, customers, suppliers
and investors. All have been free with their
time and open with their perspectives.
with technologies that take years to develop.
This creates the necessity of a long-term
view and for long-term investment, together
with a commensurate attitude and mindset
for risk.
Our strategy must be directed towards
creating a sustainable business. For
Rolls-Royce that means driving profitable
growth whilst achieving a positive economic,
social and environmental impact. We will
I have two dominant initial impressions.
deliver better power to our customers, use
The first is of the pride that people across
innovation to secure a better future, and
the world have in the activities and
achievements of the Group. We have a team build on today’s achievements to develop
a better business, ready to meet the
that really does aspire to be ‘trusted to
deliver excellence’ in everything it does, yet is challenges ahead.
under no illusions about what this will take.
Research and development, and innovation
There is pride but no sense of complacency.
more broadly, are crucial. They will become
more so as we strive to improve the quality
The second impression is of opportunity.
and performance of our power systems and
Some of our business segments face strong
headwinds and there will be some inevitable services. The Trent XWB, for example, has
volatility. But, overall, Rolls-Royce competes in proved to be the most efficient large civil
markets characterised by long-term demand aero engine in the world. Design and
development of that engine started in 2006.
growth and the opportunity to add value.
In our Marine business, innovation and the
This is as true of the services we provide as
it is of our products. These opportunities are development of liquefied natural gas (LNG)
increasingly global in nature. Rolls-Royce has power systems has led to the possibility
of a 40 per cent reduction in a ship’s CO2
a great British history but its future has to
be as a great global company.
emissions and the virtual elimination of
sulphur and oxides of nitrogen emissions
In 2013, Rolls-Royce delivered another year
compared with conventional, diesel-powered
of growth in revenues, profits and order book.
craft. This presents a clear environmental
This performance was achieved against a
and commercial opportunity. These
background of significant global economic
innovations have also taken years to develop.
and political uncertainty. The 13 per cent of
increase in the payment to shareholders to
We are committed to both the short-term
22.0 pence reflects the confidence that the
performance and to the long-term health
Board has in the fundamentals of the
of the Group. It is a matter of ‘both-and’,
business as well as in its future prospects.
not ‘either-or’. In my experience the most
successful, most enduring organisations
The increase in the payment to shareholders
invest equivalent resource and imagination
also recognises the importance that many of
in the long-term health of their business
our investors place on annual cash returns.
as they do in their short to medium-term
Nevertheless a key characteristic of
performance.
Rolls-Royce is that it is a long-term business
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
5
Strategic report
I have remarked already on the need for
Rolls-Royce to establish itself as an even
more global Group. This will require us to
become more diverse in our workforce and
in our people development. To achieve our
aspirations we have to attract, retain and
develop the best talent everywhere we
operate – commercial as much as
engineering, female as much as male.
We are making real progress. Our global
apprenticeship programme enjoys worldwide renown. Our record graduate intake
in 2013 includes 32 nationalities from 97
universities around the world. Additionally
we continue to broaden internationally our
network of University Technology Centres
which are so important to our future. But
more needs to be done.
We can and need to do more to attract and,
particularly, retain exceptional women.
The engineering sector has not always been
a favoured destination for well-qualified
Fundamental to a healthy company are
strong ethical standards and behaviours,
supported by good governance. As John
Rishton has repeatedly made clear, the
Group will not tolerate improper conduct.
We are striving to ensure that every single
Rolls-Royce employee knows what is
expected of them and understands the
standards to be met. The Board and
management are united in this endeavour.
In particular, I will focus on ensuring that
we have the appropriate governance
arrangements and structures in place
to reinforce the required conduct and
behaviours, wherever we operate.
In the Queen’s Birthday Honours, Michel
Dubarry, Rolls-Royce International President
– France, Head of Europe and Northern
Africa, was awarded an OBE. In the New
Year’s Honours, Hamid Mughal, Director
of Manufacturing, received an OBE and my
fellow Board member, Warren East, a CBE.
Their recognition is well deserved and I
congratulate each of them.
I would also like, in closing, to acknowledge
Sir Simon Robertson for his inspirational
chairmanship and leadership of the Board.
I am sure that, over time, I will forgive him
for being such a hard act to follow.
I feel honoured to have the opportunity to
serve as Chairman of Rolls-Royce. We have,
and will have, challenges. However, I would
be disappointed if this review does not
convey my deep sense of opportunity to
improve both short-term performance and
to build the long-term health of the Group.
2013 was a good year for Rolls-Royce and I
would like to thank my colleagues for their
hard work and efforts in making this happen.
Over recent years, the Board and
management have been greatly assisted
by the wise counsel of our International
Advisory Board (IAB) whose membership
Ian Davis
is described on page 38. The IAB’s primary
Chairman
role is to provide context on political and
12 February 2014
economic developments around the world
and to alert the Group to possible long-term
opportunities, threats and risks. They are
also available to provide counsel and support
in specific areas of expertise. I am grateful
to the IAB members for their contributions.
I am also indebted to my fellow Board
directors for their hard work and remarkable
commitment to our Group as well as for
their patience and good humour in dealing
with the new Chairman. The Board has been
augmented in January 2014 by Lee Hsien
Yang and Warren East, both of whom bring
a wealth of experience in global technology
oriented industries. Further details of their
careers are included on pages 36 and 37. I am
delighted that they have joined the Group.
Other information
Over and above the continuing need for
investment, I would like to comment on
a couple of themes relating to long-term
health: diversity and good governance.
women and there may be cultural and
historical reasons for this. For a Group
like Rolls-Royce, this should be as much
an opportunity as a problem. Purposeful
diversity is an important part of our
long-term planning.
Financial statements
Dwelling on performance, I am totally
supportive of John Rishton and the
management team’s operational focus on
the 4 Cs – customer, concentration, cost and
cash. John describes the progress, and the
continuing opportunities, of these 4 Cs in
this report. I am particularly pleased at the
progress in improving customer service and
delivery reliability. Engineering and
technology companies can have an inbuilt
tendency to focus on product rather than
on customer. Yet it is our customers who pay
our bills and finance our investments. It is
of the highest strategic and commercial
importance that we deliver on our product
and service commitments to our customers.
Directors’ report
Ian Davis
Chairman
6
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S REVIEW
In 2013, Rolls-Royce continued to grow
its order book and expand its portfolio.
The Group increased its underlying profits,
and underlying revenues. The order book
increased to £71.6 billion.
This performance demonstrates both the
long-term demand for our products and
services, and the confidence our customers
place in us.
We strive continually to improve quality,
performance and cost. To that end we invest
in innovation, infrastructure and in the
global workforce upon whose ability and
ambition our current and future success
entirely depends. I am impressed every day
by the commitment and professionalism of
my colleagues around the world and I thank
them for their hard work.
The leaders of the Group have devoted
considerable time and energy into
articulating the vision, values, strategy and
business priorities that we share, as well
as setting out the standards of behaviours
expected from everybody at Rolls-Royce.
Providing clarity on these core beliefs,
and making sure they are understood by
everyone in the Group will enable us to
better serve our customers and secure
a profitable future for our employees and
shareholders.
Vision: better power for a changing world
Values: trusted to deliver excellence
Strategy: customer, innovation,
profitable growth
These are described in greater length on
pages 8 and 9.
Our business priorities in 2013 remained
the same as in previous years, and have been
characterised as ‘The 4 Cs’:
Customer – deliver on the promises
we have made
Concentration – decide where to grow
and where not to
Cost and Cash – improve financial
performance
In 2013, we have made progress in all of
these, although there remains much more
to do.
Customer
It is essential that we deliver on the promises
made to our customers. Across the business
we have significantly improved on-time
delivery. This foundational step will
strengthen our customer relationships and
drive more efficient use of resources, such
as inventory. In Civil aerospace, on-time
delivery to our wide-body customers was
100 per cent in 2013 for the first time.
In 2013, major milestones were achieved
in a number of important programmes.
The Airbus A350 XWB flew for the first time
powered by our Trent XWB engines. We have
now received orders for more than
1,600 Trent XWBs, making this our bestselling Trent engine. The Trent 1000 engine,
which powers the Boeing 787 Dreamliner,
has achieved the best performance of any
new wide-body engine entering service, with
a 99.9 per cent despatch reliability. In June, it
was selected by Singapore Airlines to power
50 Boeing 787 aircraft. In Marine, the first of
our innovative Environships went to sea. This
vessel combines a wave-piercing bow,
gas-powered engines and advanced
propulsion systems that together reduce CO2
emissions by 40 per cent, compared with
equivalent diesel-powered vessels. Lastly,
BAE Systems announced that the UK’s Type 26
Destroyer programme will feature four MTU
diesel gensets from Power Systems, together
with our Trent-derived MT30 gas turbines.
Concentration
Concentration means deciding where to
invest for future growth and where not.
We have two technology platforms: gas
turbines and reciprocating engines. Within
gas turbines, we have a strong Civil aerospace
business, with over £60 billion in orders.
We will continue to invest here, including in
the next generation of narrow-body aircraft
engines. We will also look for opportunities
to expand in reciprocating engines.
In 2013, we acquired Hyper-Therm HTC,
a specialist ceramics company, to increase
our capabilities in ceramic matrix materials
that will, in the future, play a critical part in
improving the performance of gas turbine
engines. We also acquired a Norwegian
company, SmartMotor AS, a leader in the
permanent magnet technology employed
in our Marine business. We integrated PKMJ
Technical Services, a US-based nuclear
engineering services business with expertise
in extending the life of nuclear plants.
Areas where we have decided not to grow
include the sale of our 50 per cent holding
in the RTM322 helicopter engine programme
to Turbomeca, a Safran company.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
7
Strategic report
Cash
The Group delivered a cash inflow of
£359 million (£312 million excluding
Tognum), after payments to shareholders,
prior to acquisitions, disposals and foreign
exchange. Inventory has been an area of
significant focus. While substantially
improving our on-time delivery to customers
and preparing for the ramp-up in volumes,
we have improved inventory turns from
3 times to 3.4 times, excluding Tognum.
This is one of the largest one-year
improvements in our stock turns.
In January 2013, we appointed Lord Gold to
lead a review of our process and procedures
regarding compliance and business ethics.
This followed our report to the Serious Fraud
Office (SFO) of concerns about bribery and
corruption involving intermediaries in
overseas markets. In December, the SFO
confirmed that it had begun a formal
investigation into these matters. We have
co-operated fully with the regulatory
authorities and will continue to do so.
During the year, we published a new Global
Code of Conduct. Under a programme
implemented in 2013, all employees are
asked to certify they have: received a copy
of the Global Code; read and understood it;
will comply with it; and have received a
management briefing. I have made it
explicit that we will not tolerate improper
business conduct of any sort. We have
updated and re-launched our confidential
reporting line for employees, now known
as the Ethics Line, available 24 hours a day,
to make sure that we can hear about and
address any matters of concern.
It is important that everyone at Rolls-Royce
recognises that they are an ambassador for
the Group. We have set out three common
behaviours that will make sure we maintain
high ethical standards, build trust with our
customers and each other and help secure
the long-term success of our business:
win right – securing business fair
and square;
focus with firm resolve – decide what
needs to be done, then focus relentlessly
on delivery – refusing to be distracted; and
communicate – simply, consistently
and often.
Every aspect of the Group’s performance
results from the endeavours of the 55,000
men and women who share a vision of
delivering ‘better power for a changing
world’. It is their ingenuity and commitment
alongside our continued investment in
technology, that allows us to seize the
opportunities that our changing world
presents and to face the future with
confidence.
John Rishton
Chief Executive
12 February 2014
Other information
We have prioritised investment that
improves operational performance, adds
to our technical capability and reduces cost.
This includes a shop floor IT modernisation
programme that will increase operational
efficiency and an Integrated Production
Systems programme that will improve
delivery to customers while reducing cost.
We continue to invest significantly to deliver
our order book. In 2013, capital expenditure
was £687 million (£590 million excluding
Tognum and £491 million in 2012). This
included two new aero-engine test facilities:
one at the NASA Stennis Space Center in
Mississippi, US, and the other at Dahlewitz,
Germany. We have extended our global
Marine services network with a new facility
in Guangzhou, China. An advanced aerofoil
machining facility at Crosspointe in Virginia,
US, will begin production in 2014. In the UK,
production has started at our new state-ofthe-art fan disc factory in Washington, Tyne
and Wear and we are also close to completing
a new turbine blade factory in Rotherham.
Financial statements
Cost
The highly regulated nature of the aerospace
industry means that it will take both time
and tenacity to drive cost out of the
business, and we are still not where we need
to be. However there are a number of areas
where progress is being made. We reduced
indirect headcount by 11 per cent, with
further savings identified for 2014. Unit cost
fell in Marine, Energy and Power Systems,
although this was more than offset by an
increase in Civil, where capacity growth has
preceded volume growth and the cost per
unit has predictably risen. We are building
newer, more efficient facilities and capacity
that will support a doubling of production
of Trent engines. We are moving production
away from high cost countries, and we are
consolidating our supply chain. These
actions will deliver benefits over time.
Directors’ report
John Rishton
Chief Executive
8
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
OUR VISION, BUSINESS MODEL, STRATEGY AND VALUES
Rolls-Royce is a global Group, providing integrated power
solutions for customers in civil and defence aerospace,
marine, energy and power markets. Our products work
in mission-critical environments where safety is paramount.
Read more on pages 14 to 23.
OUR VISION
OUR BUSINESS MODEL
Better power for a changing world
Our business model places emphasis on reducing
costs so that we can generate the funds we need
to deliver our vision of ‘better power for a
changing world’.
Since its earliest days, Rolls-Royce has been striving to
achieve ever higher standards. Our vision is delivering
‘better power for a changing world’.
Better: we will succeed only by continually raising
standards. We constantly improve quality, performance
and cost. We are inquisitive, energetic and ‘better’ every
day. Even when we may be the best, we must continue
to get better.
Power: we are a power systems company that develops,
sells and services mission-critical products. Our customers
demand innovation that improves performance and
reduces the environmental impact of our power systems.
Changing world: the world around is changing
rapidly and the pace of change is accelerating. New
markets are emerging, shifting the balance of economic
power. Regulation is, rightly, driving the requirement for
cleaner power and setting new standards for business
conduct. Our continuous investment in technology, our
ingenuity and our commitment to excellence allow us to
seize the opportunities that change presents and to face
the future with confidence.
OUR STRATEGY
We operate in competitive markets. Our
competitors are well-funded, ambitious
and full of smart people.
Our strategy will enable us to win by focusing
on three powerful themes: customer;
innovation and profitable growth.
The business model is built around our core strategic themes
of customer, innovation and profitable growth. We are a power
systems company based on two technology platforms, gas
turbines and reciprocating engines. Continuous investment
in innovation delivers better products and services on behalf
of customers. This allows us to meet their needs and grow
profitably to the benefit of our shareholders.
Around the core strategic themes of the model we:
Grow sales for original equipment and the associated aftermarket
through developing strong routes to market based on customer
relationships, understanding and knowledge. Allocate capital
in a disciplined way, choosing where to grow, and where not to.
Reduce costs and generate cash, to enable profitable growth from
our order book and the maintenance of a strong balance sheet.
Fund research, development, infrastructure and future
programmes. Our financial resilience and resources provide a
firm foundation from which to invest. Risk and Revenue Sharing
Arrangements are a particular feature of the civil aerospace
sector as a means of sharing risk due to the scale of
investment required for large gas turbines.
CUSTOMER
Customer: placing the customer
at the heart of our organisation
is key. We need to listen to our
customers, share ideas, really
understand their needs and
then relentlessly focus on
delivering our promises.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
9
Strategic report
Directors’ report
Gr
Customer
Profitable
growth
ne
e
ne
w
,g
sts
gro
e co
w th
c
Redu
Innovation
ra
t
ec
ash
A l lo c a t
e ca
a
p it
lt
o
INNOVATION
Trust: is earned by doing what we say
we will. It demands care, consistency,
courage and competence. Trust commits
us to high ethical standards – it is
central to who and what we are.
Deliver: part of being trusted. We
must deliver on our promises, meeting
our customers’ requirements for quality,
delivery, responsiveness and reliability,
always recognising that the safety of our
products and our people is paramount.
Excellence: if we are trusted, and
we deliver, then we will be regarded
as excellent.
PROFITABLE GROWTH
Innovation: is our lifeblood.
We must continually innovate
to remain competitive. To drive
innovation, we create the right
environment – curious,
challenging, unafraid of failure,
disciplined, open-minded and
able to change with pace. But
most importantly, we ensure
our innovation is relevant to
our customers’ needs.
Profitable growth: by
focusing on our customers,
and offering them a
competitive portfolio of
products and services, we
will create the opportunity
to grow our market share. Of
course we have got to make
sure that we are not just
growing, but growing
profitably. That means
ensuring our costs are
competitive. We look after
our cash and we win right.
Other information
les
sa
Fun
dR
&D
a
We say we are ‘trusted to deliver
excellence’, but simply being Rolls-Royce
does not give us the right to make that
claim. Trust takes a long time to earn
and can be lost in an instant.
ow
nd
ture
truc
s
a
r
inf
Financial statements
OUR VALUES
10
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER’S REVIEW
Summary
2013
Order book £m
Underlying revenue £m
Underlying profit before tax £m
Underlying earnings per share
Full year payment to shareholders
Reported revenue £m
Reported profit before tax £m
Reported earnings per share
Net cash £m
Average net cash/(debt) £m
71,612
15,505
1,759
65.59p
22.0p
15,513
1,759
73.26p
1,939
350
Restated*
2012
60,146
12,209
1,434
59.59p
19.5p
12,161
2,766
125.38p
1,317
(145)
Change
+19%
+27%
+23%
+10%
+13%
+28%
-36%
-42%
* 2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits and the change in accounting
policy for RRSAs.
2013 was another good year for the Group,
with significant growth in our order book,
good growth in underlying revenues and
profits, coupled with a cash inflow, but as
ever, there are some areas where progress
has been slower than I would have liked.
Our confidence in the future remains high,
reflected in our increased final payment to
shareholders but, as you would expect me
to say, we have more to do on cost and cash
across the Group to deliver the future
performance implicit in this confidence.
The results reflect the full consolidation
of Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG (formerly
Tognum AG) from 1 January 2013. Previously,
Tognum was accounted for as a joint venture.
Order intake in the year of £26.9 billion saw
the order book grow yet again to reach
record levels. This reflects £2.5 billion from
Power Systems and £18.9 billion from our
Civil business reflecting a very successful
year for the Trent XWB. This vote of
confidence from our customers gives good
visibility and underpins our confidence to
invest for the future.
Underlying revenues and profit before tax
increased by 27 per cent and 23 per cent
respectively. Prior to the impact of
consolidating Power Systems, underlying
revenue growth was six per cent and profit
advanced by 11 per cent. The 11 per cent
growth in profits reflected strong
margins in Defence, the benefit of the
IAE International Aero Engines AG (IAE)
restructuring which was executed in the
middle of 2012 and a lower research and
development charge against profits. Profits
were adversely impacted by price pressure
in our Marine business and the pace of cost
reduction in our Civil business.
Our largest business, Civil aerospace, was
the backbone of the Group’s order increase
and saw revenue grow steadily. The installed
base saw more engines flying more hours.
Profit benefited from the higher volumes,
the new IAE trading arrangements and
higher entry fees from our partners.
However, our Civil profits were held back by
higher unit costs where progress has lagged
our expectations, but the actions we have
taken in 2013 will yield savings in 2014.
Defence aerospace performed very well
in 2013, largely due to higher export
sales and lower research and development
(R&D) spend. Services held up well, albeit
with some softness on flying hours of
military transport aircraft. We expect a
15-20 per cent decline in both Defence
revenue and profit in 2014 as we complete
some major export delivery schedules. We
expect original equipment revenue to
decrease by 30-40 per cent due to fewer
deliveries of engines to power the C130Js,
V-22 Ospreys and Typhoons, as well as fewer
Adour engine kits.
As always, it is important to put this into
perspective. Our Defence business has had
two very good years of revenue and profit
growth. Which means the numbers we are
guiding for in 2014, bring us back only to
2011 revenue levels, and we expect growth
again in 2015.
Marine’s offshore and merchant markets
continue to see intense competition driven
by overcapacity and price pressure. This
affected the order intake during the year
that sees order cover for 2014 at a lower level
than we started 2013. In this challenging
environment, we made some good progress
on cost, but have more to do if we are to
compete more effectively. Our Naval
business remains stable.
Energy saw some improvement in 2013 and
we continue to work hard to improve further
its financial performance.
Power Systems delivered a very strong
second half performance, contributing
£2.6 billion to revenue in 2013 (nil in 2012)
and an underlying profit before tax of
£257 million (2012 £77 million). We are very
pleased with Power Systems and it remains a
key part of our desire to go to market via two
strong technology platforms: gas turbines
and reciprocating engines.
Our cost base can be broadly split between
85 per cent relating directly to our delivered
product, ten per cent indirect (commercial
and administration) and five per cent on
R&D. We continue to push hard on product
cost as we work with the internal and
external supply chains and although Civil
unit costs increased in 2013, we did realise
improvements in Marine and Energy.
We expect to see progress across all our
segments in 2014. In terms of indirect cost,
we achieved our objectives to reduce
headcount by 11 per cent, primarily through
voluntary severance arrangements. After
taking into account the related restructuring
costs during the year, the benefits to this
reduction will be seen in future years.
We were pleased with the cash inflow
of £359 million at Group level, prior to
acquisitions, disposals and foreign exchange,
which included an inflow of £47 million from
Power Systems. Net working capital improved
slightly, reflecting a good second half
performance on inventory and higher
deposits, mainly in Civil, flowing from the
order intake. We made good progress on
inventory, improving turns from 3 to 3.4
times (excluding Power Systems), helped by a
consistent focus in the second half of the year.
Cost and cash remain areas of intense focus
going forward.
In terms of financial reporting, please note
the following:
1. To better align our reporting structure
with our organisation, going forward
we will report as: Aerospace and Marine
& Industrial Power Systems (MIPS).
Aerospace comprises Civil aerospace
and Defence aerospace. MIPS comprises
our Marine, Power Systems, Energy
and Nuclear businesses. Our Nuclear
Submarines business will be reported
within Energy and Nuclear. We will
continue to report the same level of
financial detail for our business segments
as we normally do.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
11
Strategic report
Directors’ report
Mark Morris
Chief Financial Officer
RRSAs with key suppliers are a feature of
our Civil aerospace business. Under these
arrangements the workshare partner shares
in the risks and costs of developing an
engine and during the production phase,
supplies components and receives a share
of the programme revenues over the life
of the engine programme. The share of
development costs borne by the workshare
partner and of the revenues it receives
reflect the proportionate forecast cost of
providing their parts compared to the overall
forecast manufacturing cost of the engine.
The contribution to the development costs
is achieved by the workshare partner
performing their own development work,
providing parts in the development phase
and paying a non-refundable cash entry
fee, such that both parties bear their
proportionate share of the forecast nonrecurring development costs.
Adopted IFRS does not explicitly deal with
payments of this nature from suppliers and
so, in developing an accounting treatment
for entry fees that best reflects the
commercial objectives of the contractual
arrangement, we have analysed key features
of RRSAs in the context of relevant
accounting pronouncements and have had
to weigh the importance of each feature
in faithfully representing the overall
commercial effect. Consequently this is a
judgemental area. The judgements we have
taken in respect of this matter are set out in
detail in note 1 to the financial statements.
In summary, our view is that the
development and production phases of the
contract should be considered separately
in accounting for the RRSA, which results
in the entry fee being matched against the
non-recurring development costs as
described above.
The FRC Conduct Committee’s view is that
the RRSA contract cannot be divided into
separate development and production
phases, as the fees and development
components received by the Group during
the development phase are exchanged for
the obligation to pay the supplier a predetermined share of any sales receipts
during the production phase. On this basis
the entry fees received would be deferred in
their entirety and recognised over the period
of production.
The FRC Conduct Committee has confirmed
that, in view of the change to the policy and
the additional disclosure we have made, it
does not intend to pursue its consideration
of this accounting policy further. We will
keep the size of the difference under review,
and do not currently expect the difference
between the two approaches to become
material in the foreseeable future.
We consider that the policy we have adopted
best reflects the commercial effect of the
agreements and is in accordance with
Adopted IFRS. So far as we can tell, it is also
aligned with the approach taken by others
in our industry under both IFRS and US
accounting standards (which we believe
does not conflict with IFRS in this regard).
The impact of the different approaches on profit before tax and net assets is as follows:
2013
Reported
profit
before tax
£m
Previous policy
Difference
Adopted policy
Difference
Alternative policy 1
1
1,798
(39)
1,759
(37)
1,722
Consistent with FRC Conduct Committee’s view
Underlying
profit
before tax
£m
1,798
(39)
1,759
(37)
1,722
2012
Net assets
£m
6,511
(208)
6,303
(365)
5,938
Reported
profit
before tax
£m
2,741
25
2,766
(10)
2,756
Underlying
profit
before tax
£m
1,409
25
1,434
(10)
1,424
Net assets
£m
6,166
(170)
5,996
(323)
5,673
Other information
3. The Group has changed its accounting
policy in respect of entry fees arising from
Risk and Revenue Sharing Arrangements
(RRSAs) following discussions with the
Conduct Committee of the Financial
Reporting Council (FRC). This is covered
further in note 1 to the financial
statements.
Historically, we recognised the entry fee as
income when received, which we believed
matched it to the recognition of nonrecurring development costs incurred on
behalf of the workshare partner. However,
this did not take account of the fact that
we capitalise some of our non-recurring
development costs. Therefore, where we
capitalise those costs, we will now defer the
equivalent portion of the entry fee received
and recognise it as the related costs are
amortised in the production phase. As
required by Adopted IFRS, we have made this
change retrospectively; the impact of the
change in policy in 2012 has been to increase
profit before tax by £25 million and to reduce
net assets at 31 December 2011 and 2012 by
£184 million and £170 million respectively.
Had the policy not been amended, profit
before tax in 2013 would have been
£39 million higher and at 31 December 2013
net assets £208 million higher.
Financial statements
2. Consistent with past practice and IFRS
accounting standards, the Group provides
both reported and underlying figures.
We believe underlying figures are more
representative of the trading
performance, by excluding the impact
of year end mark-to-market adjustments,
principally the GBP/USD hedge book. In
addition, post-retirement financing and
the effects of acquisition accounting are
excluded. The adjustments between the
underlying income statement and the
reported income statement are set out
in more detail in note 2 to the financial
statements. This basis of presentation
has been applied consistently since the
transition to IFRS in 2005.
12
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER’S REVIEW
Underlying revenue increased £3.3 billion
to £15.5 billion, of which £2.6 billion was due
to the inclusion of Rolls-Royce Power Systems
AG (RRPS) from 1 January 2013. The
remaining increase (six per cent) reflects a
seven per cent growth in OE revenue and
a four per cent increase in services revenue.
Original equipment performance included
growth of 21 per cent in Energy, 13 per cent in
Defence aerospace and 12 per cent in Marine.
Underlying services revenue continues to
represent around half (47 per cent) of the
Group’s underlying revenue. In 2013, services
revenue grew in all businesses, as the
installed base of products continued to
grow and the services network expanded.
Underlying profit before financing
and taxation increased 22 per cent to
£1.8 billion, including £190 million from the
consolidation of RRPS from 1 January 2013.
Excluding RRPS, the increase was due to a
number of factors: increased revenue;
continued strong margins in Defence
aerospace and the restructured relationship
with IAE.
Further discussion of trading is included in
the business segment reports on pages 14
to 23.
Underlying financing costs increased
18 per cent to £72 million, including
£10 million from RRPS.
Underlying taxation was £434 million,
an underlying tax rate of 24.7 per cent
compared with 22.1 per cent in 2012.
The Group’s tax payments are described
on page 137.
Underlying EPS increased 10 per cent to
65.59 pence, lower than the increase in the
underlying profit after tax due to the NCI
share of RRPS.
Payments to shareholders: at the AGM on
1 May 2014, the directors will recommend
an issue of 134 C Shares with a total nominal
value of 13.4 pence for each ordinary share.
Together with the interim issue on 2 January
2014 of 86 C Shares for each ordinary share
with a total nominal value of 8.6 pence, this
is the equivalent of a total annual payment to
ordinary shareholders of 22.0 pence for each
ordinary share. Further details are on page 43.
Net underlying R&D charged to the income
statement increased by 18 per cent to
£624 million including £174 million from
RRPS, reflecting a combination of increased
spend of £33 million offset by higher net
capitalisation of £61 million (due to the
phasing of major new programmes,
in particular the certification of the
Trent XWB 84k), R&D tax credits of £28 million
and net deferral of RRSA entry fees of
£26 million. The Group continues to expect
net R&D investment to remain within four
to five per cent of Group underlying revenue.
Reported profit before tax has reduced
from £2,766 million to £1,759 million. In
addition to the changes in underlying profit
before tax described above, reported profit
before tax has been affected by (i) the
impact of mark-to-market adjustments on
derivative contracts (£497 million reduction);
(ii) the impact of consolidating RRPS
(£322 million reduction, comprising the
unrealised profit on reclassification to a
subsidiary, the additional amortisation
on recognised intangible assets and the
revaluation of the put option on NCI);
(iii) the net impact of disposals (£483 million
reduction, disposal of RTM322 in 2013 more
than offset by the restructuring of IAE
in 2012); and (iv) the cost of providing
discretionary pension increases (£64 million).
The reported tax charge is affected by the
related tax impact of these items and the
reduction of tax rates in the UK. This is set
out in more detail in note 2 to the financial
statements.
Intangible assets (note 9) represent longterm assets of the Group. These assets
increased by £121 million with additional
development, certification and software
costs being largely offset by annual
amortisation charges.
The carrying values of the intangible assets
are assessed for impairment against the
present value of forecast cash flows
generated by the intangible asset. The
principal risks remain: reductions in assumed
market share; programme timings; increases
in unit cost assumptions; and adverse
movements in discount rates. There have
been no significant impairments in 2013.
Property, plant and equipment increased
by £283 million due to the ongoing
development and refreshment of facilities
and tooling as the Group prepares for
increased production volumes.
Net post-retirement scheme deficits
(note 19) reduced by £100 million as a result
of adopting the amendments to IAS 19.
During the year, the net deficit fell by
£49 million, principally due to the
movements in the assumptions used to
Underlying income statement
£ million
Revenue
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Power Systems
Intra-segment
Profit before financing and taxation
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Power Systems
Intra-segment
Central costs
Net financing
Profit before taxation
Taxation
Profit for the year
EPS
Payments to shareholders
Other items
Gross R&D investment
Net R&D charged to the income statement
2013
15,505
6,655
2,591
2,527
1,048
2,831
(147)
1,831
844
438
281
26
294
2
(54)
(72)
1,759
(434)
1,325
65.59p
22.0p
1,118
624
Restated*
2012
12,209
6,437
2,417
2,249
962
287
(143)
1,495
743
395
294
19
109
(11)
(54)
(61)
1,434
(317)
1,117
59.59p
19.5p
919
531
Change
+27%
+3%
+7%
+12%
+9%
+886%
+22%
+14%
+11%
-4%
+37%
+170%
-18%
+23%
-37%
+19%
+10%
+13%
+22%
+18%
* 2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits and the change in accounting
policy for RRSAs.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
13
Strategic report
The Group’s funding of its defined benefit
schemes is expected to increase modestly
in 2014, largely as a result of funding the
discretionary benefits.
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Net post-retirement scheme deficits
Net working capital
Net funds
Provisions
Net financial assets and liabilities
Joint ventures and associates
Other net assets and liabilities
Net assets
Other items
USD hedge book (US$ billion)
TotalCare assets 1
TotalCare liabilities 2
Net TotalCare Assets
Gross customer finance contingent liabilities
Net customer finance contingent liabilities
24.7
1,901
(314)
1,587
356
59
4,866
3,109
(842)
(819)
1,354
(741)
(154)
523
(515)
6,781
2,901
2,564
(445)
(1,321)
1,317
(461)
(127)
1,800
(232)
5,996
22.5
1,629
(317)
1,312
569
70
* 2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits and the change in accounting
policy for RRSAs.
1
2
Included in amounts recoverable on contracts (note 13).
Included in accruals and deferred income (note 16).
Customer financing facilitates the sale of OE
and services by providing financing support
to certain customers. Where such support
is provided by the Group, it is generally to
customers of the Civil aerospace business
and takes the form of various types of credit
Provisions largely relate to warranties and
and asset value guarantees. These exposures
guarantees provided to secure the sale of
produce contingent liabilities that are
OE and services.
outlined in note 18. The contingent liabilities
Net financial assets and liabilities relate to
represent the maximum aggregate
the fair value of foreign exchange, commodity discounted gross and net exposure in respect
and interest rate contracts, financial RRSAs
of delivered aircraft, regardless of the point
and the put option on the NCI of Rolls-Royce
in time at which such exposures may arise.
Power Systems Holding GmbH, set out in
During 2013, the Group’s gross exposure
detail in note 17. The change largely reflects
reduced by £213 million to £356 million, due
the inclusion of the put option. There is also
largely to the expiry of guarantees. On a net
an impact of the change in the GBP/USD
basis, exposures reduced by £11 million.
exchange rate on the valuation of foreign
exchange contracts and the movement in
Segmental reporting
put options on NCI of £259 million.
During 2013, we have revised the internal
structure of the business to focus on
The USD hedge book increased ten per cent
(i) aerospace; and (ii) marine and industrial
to US$24.7 billion. This represents around
markets. The internal reporting structure has
four years of net exposure and has an
been developed to reflect this. Consequently,
average book rate of £1 to US$1.59.
in accordance with IFRS 8 Operating
Net TotalCare® assets relate to Long-Term
Segments, from 1 January 2014, we will
Service Agreement (LTSA) contracts in the
report the Group’s segments as follows:
Civil aerospace business, including the
Aerospace, comprising Civil aerospace and
flagship services product TotalCare. These
Defence aerospace; and
assets represent the timing difference
between the recognition of income and
Marine and Industrial Power Systems,
costs in the income statement and cash
comprising Marine, Power Systems, Energy
receipts and payments.
and Nuclear.
Investments in joint ventures and
associates increased by 15 per cent, largely
as a result of retained profits in existing
joint ventures.
4,987
3,392
(793)
(970)
1,939
(733)
(1,587)
601
(533)
6,303
Restated*
31 December
2012
The 2013 figures on the revised basis are
included in note 26 to the financial
statements.
Group 2014 guidance
For the full year 2014, we expect underlying
Group revenue and profit to be flat. This
reflects a significant decline in Defence
revenue, as we complete the delivery phase
of a number of major export programmes.
Additionally, the largest part of our Marine
business, Offshore, will generate lower
revenue in 2013. We expect growth to
resume in 2015 as Civil and Defence
deliveries increase.
We expect profitability to be much stronger
in the second half of 2014, reflecting the
timing and mix of trading and cost
reduction. To be more consistent with
market practice, our cash guidance in the
future will be based on free cash flow. We
expect our 2014 free cash flow to be similar
to 2013 (£781 million).
Additional financial information can be
found on pages 137 and 138.
Other information
Net funds increased by £0.6 billion to
£1.9 billion due in part to the £250 million
proceeds received on the sale of the Group’s
interest in the RTM322 engine. Average net
funds were £350 million.
£ million
1 January 2013
including
2013 Power Systems
Financial statements
Overall funding across the schemes has
improved in recent years as the Group has
adopted a lower risk investment strategy
that reduces volatility going forward and
enables the funding position to remain
stable: interest rate and inflation risks are
largely hedged, and the exposure to equities
is around 11 per cent of scheme assets.
Balance sheet
Directors’ report
value the underlying assets and liabilities in
accordance with IAS 19. This reduction in the
deficit was after agreeing to fund additional
pension increases in the Rolls-Royce Pension
Fund, where there is no indexation for
pre-1997 service, at a cost of £64 million.
14
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
CIVIL AEROSPACE
We remain focused on delivering
on all of our major programme
commitments.
Tony Wood
President – Aerospace
OVERVIEW
Underlying revenue (£m)
4,481
2009
4,919
2010
Revenue mix 2013
6,437
6,655
2012
2013
Revenue by sector 2013
5,572
2011
£6,655m
Underlying revenue 2013
46%
54%
OE revenue
Services revenue
57%
32%
11%
Wide-body
Corporate and regional
Narrow-body
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Key financial data
Order book £m*
Engine deliveries*
Underlying revenue £m
2010
2011
2012
2013
48,490
+3%
846
4,919
+10%
1,892
3,027
392
-20%
51,942
+7%
962
5,572
+13%
2,232
3,340
499
+27%
49,608
-4%
668
6,437
+16%
2,934
3,503
743
+49%
60,296
+22%
753
6,655
+3%
3,035
3,620
844
+14%
* all years before 2012 include IAE order book and engine deliveries include IAE V2500.
2013 financial review
The order book increased 22 per cent,
including new orders of £18.9 billion
(£10.3 billion in 2012). Trent engines and
aftermarket services now constitute
73 per cent of the Civil aerospace order book.
Revenue increased three per cent, including
three per cent growth in OE revenue. There
was a 20 per cent increase in business jet
engine deliveries and a small increase in
Trent engines. Profit increased 14 per cent,
reflecting higher volumes, the £112 million
higher benefit from the restructured
trading relationship with IAE and £26 million
higher RRSA entry fees.
In 2014, we expect modest growth in
revenue and good growth in profit.
How we are performing
The airline industry saw global passenger
traffic up around five per cent in 2013.
Airlines in developed markets benefited
from a modest economic recovery. In many
developing markets there were significant
increases in traffic supported by economic
growth and market liberalisation.
Civil Large Engines: Nearly 1,400 Trent 700
engines for the Airbus A330 have been
delivered to date and during 2013 Airbus
Important milestones were achieved in
two major Civil Large Engine programmes.
In June, the first flight of the new Airbus
A350 XWB was powered by our Trent XWB
engines. Then in September, the Boeing
787-9 version of the Dreamliner took to the
skies for the first time, powered by our
Trent 1000 engines.
Singapore Airlines Group placed a major
order with us to power 50 Boeing 787
aircraft with Trent 1000 engines.
In July, we celebrated the first delivery of
two new Rolls-Royce powered aircraft to the
British Airways fleet – the Airbus A380 and
the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.
In September, we announced that, due to the
current regulatory environment, we would
not proceed with a planned joint venture
with United Technologies Corporation to
develop an engine to power future mid-size
aircraft. Rolls-Royce remains fully committed
to this important market segment and we
continue to invest in technologies that will
enable us to take advantage of opportunities
as they arise.
The Trent XWB will enter service in 2014
with Qatar Airways. This is the best-selling
Trent engine yet, with more than 1,600
engines already on order.
Significant orders for the Trent XWB came
from airlines in Europe, North America, the
Middle East and Asia and these included a
landmark first ever engine order for
Rolls-Royce from Japanese airline JAL.
Corporate and regional: In our corporate
and regional engine business, we delivered
the 3,000th BR700 series engine. This engine
series powers the Gulfstream G500 and
G550, the Bombardier Global 5000 and
Global 6000 (BR710), the Boeing 717 (BR715)
and the Gulfstream G650 (BR725).
The first production version of the Cessna
Citation X business jet flew in August,
powered by our AE 3007C engines. Deliveries
of the new aircraft are due to begin in
early 2014.
Services: Revenue from services for civil
airliners increased by three per cent in 2013,
reflecting continued growth in the fleet of
widebodied engines. More than 1,100
aircraft in service are covered by TotalCare.
Some 1,500 business aircraft are covered
by CorporateCare® and in 2013 more than
70 per cent of customers for new Rolls-Royce
powered business jets enrolled in
CorporateCare.
Future priorities and opportunities
In 2014, particular priority will be given to
supporting the smooth entry into service
of the Airbus A350 XWB. Rolls-Royce is the
sole engine supplier for this new aircraft,
and orders for the Trent XWB represent
53 per cent of the Civil aerospace order book.
Significant management attention
will continue to be paid to financial
performance, in particular reducing costs
and improving inventory turn.
Developing new technology for future
engine programmes and enhancing existing
products remains a major priority.
Market outlook: We estimate that the
global civil engine market will be worth
approximately US$1,750 billion over the next
20 years, with US$1,050 billion being for
original equipment and US$700 billion of
aftermarket services. Over half of this value
comprises engines for twin aisle airliners
and large business jets, where Rolls-Royce is
currently the number one engine supplier
in terms of market share. Our forecasts are
based on our own internal forecasting tools,
data from Ascend Online Fleets and airline
schedules from Official Airline Guide (OAG).
Other information
What we do
The Civil aerospace segment is a major
manufacturer of aero engines for the
airliner and corporate jet markets. We have
particular strengths in the wide-body
market where Rolls-Royce has a 54 per cent
share of aircraft on order. Demand for our
products and services remains robust.
delivered the 1,000th aircraft. The milestone
aircraft and its Trent 700 engines were
accepted by Cathay Pacific, the first airline
to put the Trent 700 into service in 1995.
Financial statements
Rolls-Royce powers more
than 30 types of commercial
aircraft and has almost
13,000 engines in service
around the world.
Directors’ report
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying service revenue £m
Underlying profit before financing £m
2009
47,102
+8%
844
4,481
0%
1,855
2,626
493
-13%
Strategic report
Highlights
ő First flight of the Airbus A350 XWB
powered by Trent XWB engines
ő First flight of the Boeing 787-9 powered
by Trent 1000 engines
ő Major new Trent orders from JAL, IAG,
Lufthansa, United, Singapore and Etihad
ő Delivered the 3,000th BR700 series engine
15
16
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
DEFENCE AEROSPACE
We are focused on managing
costs to ensure we can
effectively compete and win
in today’s challenging market.
Tom Bell
President – Defence aerospace
OVERVIEW
Underlying revenue (£m)
2,010
2,123
2,235
2009
2010
2011
£2,591m
Underlying revenue 2013
Revenue mix 2013
2,417
2012
Revenue by sector 2013
2,591
2013
50% OE revenue
46% Services revenue
4%
Development
38% Combat
48% Transport
14% UAV/trainer
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
In 2014, we expect a decline in revenue and
profit of between 15-20 per cent before
growth resumes in 2015. This one year
decline is the consequence of well publicised
cuts in defence spending among major
customers, and the completion of the
delivery phase of a number of major export
programmes. After two record years, this
re-basing, supported by cost reduction
programmes, will position the business well
for future growth.
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying service revenue £m
Underlying profit before financing £m
How we are performing
2013 was a challenging year as traditional
markets continued to experience
unprecedented budgetary pressures. While
this environment creates risks for existing
business, it also presents opportunities for
us to develop innovative solutions to meet
the evolving needs of our customers.
Nowhere is this more evident than in
the area of services where we have the
opportunity to help customers manage
their budgets and costs more efficiently.
We also continue to pursue new equipment
sales opportunities in global markets such
as Asia and the Middle East where budgets
are less constrained.
MissionCare contracts worth £492 million
were secured in 2013. These included the
first MissionCare contract for the support
of EJ200 engines in Saudi Arabia.
In order to get closer to our customers, we
are expanding our presence at operational
bases. During 2013, we opened a new
support facility at RAF Marham in the UK
and announced another at Tinker Air Force
Base in the US.
2010
2011
2012
2013
6,506
+1%
710
2,123
+6%
1,020
1,103
309
+22%
6,035
-7%
814
2,235
+5%
1,102
1,133
376
+22%
5,157
-15%
864
2,417
+8%
1,231
1,186
395
+5%
4,071
-21%
893
2,591
+7%
1,385
1,206
438
+11%
The Rolls-Royce LiftSystem® continued to
perform well as the F-35B Lightning II
aircraft expanded its flight test programme
and deliveries to the US Marine Corps
accelerated. We delivered the 40th
Rolls-Royce LiftFan and the 50th 3 Bearing
Swivel Module (3BSM).
In order to concentrate our resources on
markets where we can add greatest value,
we sold our share in the RTM322 helicopter
engine programme to Turbomeca, a Safran
company, in September 2013. To further
improve efficiency, we have reconfigured
our organisation to bring us closer to our
major customers.
We expect our services business to
continue to grow as we continue to provide
customers with greater capability.
Future priorities and opportunities
We are focused on managing costs to ensure
we maximise our ability to compete and win
in an increasingly uncertain market.
Our inclusion in the Hawk Advanced Jet
Training System team to pursue the US Air
Force T-X training contract provides just one
of several paths to growth. Customers also
In-service fleets continue to benefit from
continue to invest in their transport aircraft
technology enhancements, with the
fleets, where we have a strong position.
upgraded AE 1107 now providing 17 per cent Defence applications for the Trent 700
more power for the V-22 Osprey aircraft.
should increase as the Airbus A330 tanker
The latest T56 enhancement kits achieved
aircraft is selected by more military
Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) certification customers. The UK’s fleet of tankers
and recorded their first sales in the US,
continues to expand with Rolls-Royce
where fuel savings in the US Air Force C-130
benefiting both as the engine supplier
fleet could amount to billions of dollars.
and as an AirTanker shareholder.
Our leading position in transport was
underpinned by the entry into service of
the A400M powered by TP400 engines,
broadening our portfolio in a market where
the Rolls-Royce powered C-130 is the leading
player. This year we delivered our 1,500th
AE 2100 engine for the C-130J.
Market outlook: We estimate a business
opportunity over the next 20 years of
US$155 billion in original equipment and
US$260 billion in services. Source: Forecast
International 2014.
Other information
2013 financial review
The Defence order book declined 21 per cent
(15 per cent decrease in 2012) reflecting
continued budgetary pressures on our major
customers. The net order intake of £1.6 billion
was five per cent higher than the previous
year. Revenue increased seven per cent,
reflecting a 13 per cent increase in OE and a
two per cent increase in services. Strong OE
growth was driven by higher export sales,
particularly of our EJ200 and Adour engine
programmes. Profit increased 11 per cent due
to higher volumes and lower R&D spending.
Engine deliveries
Underlying revenue £m
2009
6,451
+17%
662
2,010
+19%
964
1,046
253
+13%
Financial statements
What we do
Our engines power aircraft in every major
market sector including transport, combat,
patrol, trainers, helicopters, and unmanned
aerial vehicles.
Order book £m
Directors’ report
We are the second largest
provider of defence
aero-engine products
and services globally, with
around 16,000 engines
in service with over 160
military customers in
more than 100 countries.
Key financial data
Strategic report
Highlights
ő TP400-powered A400M entered service
ő MissionCare contract for Saudi Arabian
EJ200 engines secured
ő 1,500th AE 2100 engine delivered
ő Upgraded AE 1107 engines for V-22 Osprey
ő T56 enhancement kits gained first sales
ő Delivered 40th Rolls-Royce LiftFan for F-35B
Lightning II fighter programme
ő RTM322 helicopter engine programme
sold to Turbomeca
17
18
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
MARINE
Innovation remains an important
differentiator in the sector, as
technology will address the future
challenges related to the
environment and the cost of
owning and running vessels.
Lawrie Haynes
President – Marine and Nuclear
OVERVIEW
Underlying revenue (£m)
2,589
2009
Revenue mix 2013
2,591
2010
2,527
2,271
2,249
2011
2012
£2,527m
Underlying revenue 2013
Revenue by sector 2013
2013
57%
43%
OE revenue
Services revenue
37% Naval
15% Merchant
48% Offshore
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
19
2013
3,996
+1%
2,527
+12%
1,438
1,089
281
-4%
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG subsidiary.
Several contracts were won to supply our
largest azimuth thrusters for drill ships.
We enhanced our technology portfolio
through the acquisition of a Norwegian
company, SmartMotor AS, a leader in
permanent magnet technology.
Services: We offer customers a global
service capability through a network of 37
What we do
workshops in 28 countries. With more than
We are leaders in the provision and
1,100 service engineers, we provide roundintegration of complex, mission-critical
the-clock support wherever our customers
systems for offshore oil and gas, merchant
need it and offer not only repair and overhaul
and naval vessels. We are located in 35
but also a growing number of vessel
countries, and have a global service network
upgrades to improve efficiency. We also train
supporting our customers’ operations
our customers in the operation of our
around the clock.
equipment in our training centres in Norway,
Our advanced ship designs combine the
Singapore and Brazil. This year, we opened
Naval: Our MT30 gas turbine was
latest technologies to offer highly-efficient
successfully installed in the Royal Navy’s new our third workshop in southern China.
solutions for ship owners and operators
aircraft carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth. The
Future priorities and opportunities
including a range of engines using liquefied MT30 was also selected by BAE Systems for
The key priorities for the Marine segment
natural gas (LNG).
the UK’s new Type 26 Frigate programme and
are to increase our competitiveness in a
has now been selected by navies in the UK,
2013 financial review
challenging market and continue to develop
US and South Korea, across five types of ship.
The order book increased one per cent
innovative technologies.
We delivered a new design of water jet to the
including new orders of £2.7 billion
US Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship programme. We will continue to develop the synergies
(£3.3 billion in 2012). In 2013, we saw stable
between the Marine and Power Systems
order inflow in our Merchant and Naval
This year we opened a new facility in Derby,
segments. We are working with a number
businesses. This was offset by weaker
UK, to support our Submarine business. In
of oil majors, in developing the availability
order flow in Offshore, where the phasing
February, we agreed an £800 million
of LNG. The aftermarket offers growth
of projects has slowed growth in some of our contract with the MoD for the provision of
opportunities as we continue to utilise
key products. Revenue increased 12 per cent, nuclear propulsion systems for the UK’s
our growing global network of service
reflecting higher sales in both new
submarine flotilla. A critical design gate was
engineers and workshops. In Submarines,
equipment and in services. Growth was
successfully passed by our new nuclear plant
our focus is on maintaining customer
particularly strong in Offshore and in Naval, design, PWR 3.
confidence by achieving our savings
offset by further weakening in our Merchant
Offshore: We delivered one of our most
commitment to the MoD through
business, which declined 11 per cent. Profit
advanced
vessels
to
date,
when
a
UT 830
increased operational efficiency.
decreased four per cent as volume growth
seismic
survey
ship
was
launched.
It
features
was more than offset by pricing pressure
Market outlook: We see a business
a wealth of Rolls-Royce equipment
and a less favourable mix. In 2013,
opportunity over the next 20 years of
integrated into our own vessel design.
profitability was also offset by investments
US$270 billion for original equipment and
in Marine to better position the business for It is now at work identifying oil and gas
US$125 billion for services (not including
future growth, including higher spending on reserves around the world.
nuclear submarine business). Based on our
R&D and restructuring costs.
Our wave-piercing hull design was chosen for own forecasting tools.
the first time in Asia, when Chinese customer
In 2014, we expect a modest decline in
COSCO announced an order for two UT
revenue, with a modest increase in profit.
vessels, with options for four more. These will
The nuclear submarine business will be
reported in the Energy and Nuclear segment feature a range of Rolls-Royce equipment,
and include MTU diesel gensets from our
going forward.
Other information
Merchant: The adoption of LNG as a marine
fuel is gaining momentum: the first
LNG-powered cargo vessel of our Environship
design took to the seas in May; the world’s
first LNG-powered cruise ferry entered
service during the summer; and the world’s
first LNG-powered tug boat was delivered.
We also won our first contract to convert a
diesel-powered cargo ship to LNG. Bergen
engines using LNG fuel are all provided via
the Power Systems business segment.
2012
3,954
+44%
2,249
-1%
1,288
961
294
+2%
Financial statements
How we are performing
The global shipbuilding industry has had
a challenging year. Important factors driving
the market continue to be ship efficiency,
environmental performance and value
for money.
2011*
2,737
-8%
2,271
-12%
1,322
949
287*
-14%
Directors’ report
The Marine segment has
4,000 customers and
equipment installed on over
25,000 vessels worldwide,
including those of 70 navies.
2010
2,977
-16%
2,591
+0%
1,719
872
332
+26%
Strategic report
Key financial data
Highlights
2009
ő A range of world ‘firsts’ of LNG-powered
Order book £m
3,526
vessel types delivered
-32%
Underlying revenue £m
2,589
ő MT30 selected for the new UK MoD
+17%
Type 26 Frigate
Underlying
OE
revenue
£m
1,804
ő £800 million contract agreed with UK MoD
Underlying service revenue £m
785
for provision of future nuclear submarine
Underlying
profit
before
financing
£m
263
propulsion systems
+44%
ő New UT 830 seismic survey vessel launched
* 2011 figures restated due to transfer of Bergen to Power Systems segment.
ő COSCO ordered new wave-piercing design
of offshore vessels
ő Third service centre in China opened
20
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
ENERGY
We are capitalising on oil and
gas demand. We will also grow
our Civil Nuclear services globally
and support the UK new build
programme.
Andrew Heath
President – Energy
OVERVIEW
Underlying revenue (£m)
Revenue mix 2013
Revenue by market sector 2013
1,233
1,083
1,028
2009
2010
2011
£1,048m
Underlying revenue 2013
962
2012
1,048
2013
40% OE revenue
60% Services revenue
68% Oil and gas
21% Power generation
11% Civil Nuclear/other
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Key financial data
Order book £m
Engine deliveries
Underlying revenue £m
2010
1,180
-6%
95
1,233
+20%
691
542
27
+13%
2011*
1,420
+20%
48
1,083
-12%
527
556
16
-41%
2012
2013
1,290
-9%
49
962
-11%
344
618
19
+19%
1,469
+14%
56
1,048
+9%
415
633
26
+37%
* 2011 figures restated due to transfer of Bergen to Power Systems segment.
We continued to deliver the instrumentation
and control (I&C) upgrade for EDF’s fleet of
1,300MW nuclear reactors in France and
provided I&C systems and components for
seven new nuclear reactors currently under
construction in China.
Rolls-Royce has over
50 years of experience
in the nuclear industry.
Our new purpose-built packaging, assembly
and test facility in Santa Cruz, Brazil, became
operational and the first units were delivered
to Petrobras for use in its deepwater offshore
production activities.
What we do
Our Energy segment supplies customers
with aero-derivative gas turbines,
compressors and related services.
Power generation: Demand continued to be
subdued for new power generation capacity
in mature economies. Seven Trent 60 units
were ordered, including five for the SARB
offshore oilfield project in the UAE.
Future priorities and opportunities
Our focus is on growing our market position
in oil and gas, including opportunities in
pipelines and LNG. In power generation, we
will benefit from any recovery in industrial
demand for electricity.
In Civil Nuclear, we provide products and
services spanning the nuclear reactor
life-cycle from concept design and
installation to obsolescence management
and plant life extension. We have a strong
position in nuclear instrumentation and
control systems.
2013 financial review
The order book increased by 14 per cent
with new orders of £1.1 billion (£0.8 billion
in 2012). The business saw a strong recovery
in order intake in oil and gas. Power
generation markets remain suppressed.
In Civil Nuclear, we continue to extend the
suite of products and services that we offer
to nuclear utilities to enable them to achieve
safe, efficient and reliable lifetime reactor
operations. Revenue increased nine per cent,
driven by higher OE volumes in our oil and
gas business. Profit increased by £7 million,
reflecting higher volumes, partially offset
by strong pricing pressure and continued
investment in our Civil Nuclear business.
We continue to work to improve the
financial performance of the business.
In 2014, Energy will include nuclear
submarines to form our Energy and Nuclear
business. We expect good growth in revenue
and profit, with further improvement in the
return on sales.
We released enhanced power ratings for
the Trent 60 gas turbine, consolidating
its position as the most powerful aero
derivative available.
Services: We continue to strengthen both our
aftermarket products and services capability
as well as our penetration of the installed
fleet, resulting in a six per cent year-on-year
increase in aftermarket revenue.
Currently 24 per cent of the core engine
fleet is under long-term service agreements.
During the year we received several new major
service contracts including a US$138 million
five-year contract from Petrobras to support
15 of its RB211 industrial gas turbine power
generation units installed on four oil
platforms operating in the Campos Basin.
Civil Nuclear: We strengthened our strategic
relationships during the year with AREVA,
Westinghouse, Hitachi, EDF and Rosatom.
Our acquisition of PKMJ Technical Services
in the US means we now provide services to
every nuclear utility in the US and Canada.
In Civil Nuclear our priorities will continue
to be satisfying our customers, winning new
orders and high-quality delivery. Improving
operational efficiency will be a key feature
for the Nuclear business during 2014.
We will assess potential investments in
high-value manufacturing in order to
contribute positively to a successful new
build programme for the UK.
In international markets, we will extend the
suite of products and services that we offer
to nuclear utilities to enable them to achieve
safe, efficient and reliable lifetime nuclear
reactor operations.
Market outlook: In the oil and gas, and
power generation sectors, the Group’s
20-year forecast values demand for total
aero-derivative gas turbine and compressor
systems at more than US$60 billion and
associated services at around US$60 billion.
Sources: McCoy Power reports, LEK Consulting,
Booz & Co., IEA, Infield Systems and our own
forecasting tools. We estimate a demand for
nuclear mission-critical equipment, systems,
engineering and support services of
US$610 billion over the next 20 years.
Based on nuclear capacity forecasts from
the International Energy Agency, the World
Nuclear Association, the International
Atomic Energy Agency and the US
Department of Energy.
Other information
How we are performing
Oil and gas: In total, 33 RB211 gas turbines
were ordered for oil and gas applications,
22 of which were for pipeline compression
projects. This includes a US$175 million
contract from Asia Gas Pipeline for 12 units.
Financial statements
Energy has sold 4,600 gas
turbines with 180 million
operating hours recorded.
Directors’ report
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying service revenue £m
Underlying profit before financing £m
2009
1,262
+1%
87
1,028
+36%
558
470
24
+1300%
Strategic report
Highlights
ő 33 RB211s ordered for oil and gas
applications
ő Major service contract secured with
Petrobras
ő New Santa Cruz, Brazil, assembly plant
operational
ő Signed tripartite agreement with Rosatom
and Fortum to assess nuclear reactor
design for UK new build
ő Renewed agreement with Westinghouse
to provide nuclear inspection services
in the US
21
22
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
POWER SYSTEMS
2013 proved a challenging year.
However, in 2014 we expect
most markets to stabilise.
John Paterson
President – Marine and Industrial Power Systems
OVERVIEW
Underlying revenue (£m)
2,846
2,831
2012
2013
£2,831m
Underlying revenue 2013
Revenue mix 2013
71% OE revenue
29% Services revenue
Revenue by market sector 2013
35% Marine
26% Industrial
27% Energy
12% Defence and other
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
2013 financial review
The order book increased 6 per cent, with new
orders of £2.7 billion (£2.8 billion in 2012). The
final quarter of 2013 saw strong sales, driven
by the pre-purchase of engines for industrial,
including agricultural, applications ahead of
the introduction of tighter environmental
standards in Europe. Marine revenue is well
supported by demand from navies in Asia
and the US. In defence, major programmes to
power military tanks provide stability despite
continued pressure on government spending.
Revenue decreased 0.5 per cent with good
growth in the Marine and Industrial
divisions offset by lower revenue in oil
and gas, medium-speed engines and
lower aftermarket sales. Profit increased
0.3 per cent, reflecting a strong second half.
2013
Change
1,927
2,831
2,004
827
294
+5.7%
-0.5%
+3.4%
-8.9%
+0.3%
The table above shows a trading comparison as if both Tognum and Bergen Engines had been fully consolidated in 2012
as well as in 2013.
In 2014, we expect modest growth in revenue The Fjord Line shipping company ordered
and good growth in profit driven by growth
Bergen gas-powered engines. Its
in marine and land power systems markets.
Stavangerfjord and Bergensfjord cruise
ferries, both 170 metres long, are each to be
How we are performing
equipped with four Bergen B-gas engines.
2013 proved a challenging year. Headwinds
The engines ensure that these ships already
confronting the business included the
meet future IMO Tier III limits as well as
Eurozone crisis, US fiscal challenges and
satisfying mandatory EU regulations
slowing of growth in emerging countries.
projected for 2015, for sulphur emissions
General nervousness about the global
from ferries.
economic environment led to constrained
In addition to these contract wins, we
order activity within the market.
continue to build capacity through joint
Despite these adverse market conditions, a
ventures and partnerships. L’Orange has
number of significant orders and contracts
established a consortium with Hoerbiger, for
were achieved.
the supply of equipment for large-scale diesel
and dual-fuel engines for the Asian market.
As outlined in the Marine segment review,
Power Systems also benefited from contracts Onsite Energy and regional Polish energy
supplier Kogeneracja Zachód intend to form
awarded by Chinese customer COSCO and
a partnership for the supply and maintenance
from the UK MoD for the generator sets of
of cogeneration plants. Over the coming years,
the Royal Navy’s future Type 26 Frigate. The
both companies plan on working exclusively
Type 26 propulsion system will consist of a
combination of four MTU diesel gensets and a with each other to supply small- to mediumRolls-Royce MT30 gas turbine. These examples sized Polish cities with environmentallyfriendly energy from CHP plants.
highlight the synergies and benefits of
complementary product portfolios.
Future priorities and opportunities
MTU introduced the upgraded Series 1163
Our long-term growth relies on five pillars:
marine engines for IMO Tier II and IMO
power; propulsion; services; regional
Tier III emission standards. These are cleaner expansion and, the product portfolio.
and more fuel-efficient than the previous
In 2014, we expect most markets to stabilise.
generation and offer a better power-toalthough some segments are expected to
weight ratio.
remain difficult. This leads us to expect
For the British Intercity Express Programme, continued volatility in revenues. Overall we
MTU received orders of rail Powerpacks with expect to see a positive performance
Series 1600 engines. The Powerpacks will
primarily driven by marine applications.
drive Hitachi’s future high-speed trains
We will invest in future technologies to
which are scheduled to go into service from
maintain our technological leadership. We are
2017 on Great Western Main Line and East
configuring our different engine series to
Coast Main Line routes. Twenty locomotives
meet tougher emission standards. At the same
built by Chinese manufacturer, Dalian
time we will improve efficiency and keep a
Locomotive & Rolling Stock and powered by
focus on costs and cash in all other areas.
MTU engines went into service in Argentina.
Market outlook: We estimate the total
China-based Xiangtan Electric Manufacturing
market opportunity for high-speed engine
Corporation shipped its first ever export of
original equipment over the next ten years
mine dump trucks to the Pilbara mine site
to be €280 billion. The forecast data is taken
in Australia for Rio Tinto. Each of the 230
from a range of sources including: Global
metric-ton trucks is powered by an MTU
Insight; Oxford Economics, Diesel and Gas
mining engine.
Turbine Worldwide, Clarkson Research and
our own internal forecasting tools.
Other information
What we do
The product portfolio includes MTU-brand
high-speed engines and propulsion systems
for ships, for heavy land, rail and defence
vehicles, and for the oil and gas industry.
Under the MTU Onsite Energy brand, the
company markets diesel and gas gensets for
applications such as emergency, base load,
peak load or cogeneration. Bergen Engines
AS manufactures medium-speed engines for
marine and power generation applications.
L’Orange completes the portfolio, producing
fuel injection systems for large engines.
2012
1,823
2,846
1,938
908
293
Financial statements
Power Systems is based in Friedrichshafen
in Southern Germany and, together with its
worldwide subsidiaries, employs around
11,000 people. It specialises in reciprocating
engines, propulsion systems and distributed
energy systems. The company previously
operated under the name of Tognum AG.
In 2013, Bergen Engines AS, including its
subsidiaries, was contributed to the business.
Order book £m
Underlying revenue £m
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying services revenue £m
Underlying profit before financing £m
Directors’ report
Rolls-Royce and Daimler AG
each has a 50 per cent
shareholding in Rolls-Royce
Power Systems Holding
GmbH.
Key financial data
Strategic report
Highlights
ő MTU Powerpacks ordered for UK Intercity
Express Programme
ő Fjord Line ordered Bergen engines for
cruise ferries
ő Upgraded Series 1163 engines introduced
ő UK MoD selects MTU gensets alongside
MT30 gas turbine
ő Polish partnership to be created to supply
and maintain cogeneration plants
ő Mining trucks powered by MTU delivered
to Rio Tinto in Australia
23
24
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
We continued our commitment
to recruit and develop the very best
engineers and scientists.
Colin Smith CBE
Director – Engineering and Technology
In 2013, we invested £1,118 million in gross
research and development (R&D) of which
£746 million was funded by the Group, prior
to receipts from risk and revenue sharing
arrangements.
We continually pursue innovation that will
improve the performance of our power
systems and benefit our customers.
We have developed and actively deployed
a new innovation portal to improve the
exchange of ideas around the world as we
invest to improve the efficiency of our
global R&D footprint.
People
We have an engineering resource inside the
Group of around 16,600 engineers. Many
work as integrated teams across borders on
our major programmes and a number of our
top engineers, or Rolls-Royce Fellows, are
recognised as world-renowned experts in
their fields.
We continued our commitment to recruit
and develop the very best engineers and
scientists, and the first cohort of our
evolving internal Specialist Academy has
graduated in October 2013. The Academy
has been designed for technologists who
have the potential to join the Rolls-Royce
Fellowship at the very top of our specialist
career ladder.
Research and technology
World-class technology gives us competitive
product performance. We generate the
largest number of patents of any UK
company, 549 new patent applications were
approved for filing in 2013 (including
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG). To further
expand our capabilities, we acquired
Hyper-Therm HTC, a US-based specialist
in ceramic materials; and SmartMotor, a
world leader in permanent-magnet machines
and drives technology, headquartered in
Norway. In addition, we acquired from GKN
the 49 per cent of Composite Technology
and Applications Limited (CTAL) that we
did not already own, giving us 100 per cent
ownership. CTAL is engaged in the
development of composite fan blades and
containment cases for the next generation
of advanced turbofan engines.
In 2013, we further increased our
investment in early-stage research and
technology to about 20 per cent of the net
R&D spend. We have good visibility of stable,
long-term government match-funding for
research investments in aerospace
technologies following the creation in the
UK of the Aerospace Technology Institute,
and in the EU through the Clean Sky 2 Joint
Technology Initiative in Horizon 2020 and
continuous German support via
Luftfahrtforschungsprogramm (LuFo) V.
University Technology Centres
In addition to our significant in-house R&D
capability, we pursue advanced technologies
via a global network of 29 University
Technology Centre (UTC) partnerships.
Each centre is part-funded by the Group and
works closely with our engineering teams,
undertaking specialist work led by worldclass academics. In 2013, Nanyang
Technological University joined this network
with the launch of the [email protected]
Corporate Lab, a joint investment of
SGD$75 million (£38.5 million) between
Rolls-Royce, Nanyang University and the
National Research Foundation (NRF)
of Singapore.
Our model of developing technology
through collaboration with academia
and other partners was recognised by the
German Fraunhofer Institute for Production
Technology which benchmarked 160
European companies: Rolls-Royce was one
of five companies to receive the ‘Successful
Practices’ award in technology
management in 2013.
Research and development
Flight test results have shown the Trent XWB
to be the world’s most efficient large, civil,
aero engine.
The Trent 1000 Package C received EASA
certification in September and a few weeks
later powered the newest version of the
Dreamliner, the Boeing 787-9 on its first
flight from Seattle, USA.
The Joint Strike Fighter F-35B, with short take
-off and vertical landing (STOVL) capability
provided by the Rolls-Royce LiftSystem®,
successfully completed its second set of
carrier trials aboard the USS Wasp in August
2013. In September, the T56 engine Series 3.5
technology enhancement program received
FAA approval and has now been chosen to
power the ‘Hurricane Hunter’ aircraft of
the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
In 2013, we received the Green Ship
Technology Award for our Environship
concept – a design for cargo ships that
reduces CO2 emissions by up to 40 per cent
compared to similar diesel powered vessels.
Gross research and development (£m)
1,118
864
923
908
919
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
25
Strategic report
OPERATIONS
Directors’ report
Record levels of investment continue
to drive improvements in product
and operational performance.
Alain Michaelis
Operations Director
Developing our capacity
This year we have extended our own
capacity and capability. This included our
new turbine blade factory in Rotherham,
UK and our new 17,000 square metre,
state-of-the-art discs manufacturing facility
in Washington, UK, that has now started
production. When fully operational later this
year, it will have the capacity to manufacture
over 2,000 fan and turbine discs annually.
We are also taking steps to adjust capacity
where market segments are contracting or
demanding a lower price point. Although
our diverse portfolio helps us balance
growing and shrinking segments, we do
expect an ongoing need to adjust capacity
through plant renewal and closures.
Advanced manufacturing
We apply advanced technologies, methods
and processes to deliver ‘best in class’
manufacturing performance through our
Rolls-Royce Production System and the
Advanced Manufacturing network, which
has developed over the past five years.
The advanced centres in this network bring
together university, government and
industrial partners to provide a realistic
testing ground for new industrial techniques
that improve yield and reduce costs. These
have proved to be successful both for
Rolls-Royce and our supplier partners.
development training and is expected
to secure at least 5,000 high-value
manufacturing jobs in aerospace. We are
also supporting a £76 million Sharing in
Growth programme in the nuclear industry.
Our processes will increasingly include
powder-based manufacturing, additive layer
manufacturing technologies and ultra-high
temperature materials. ‘Knowledge-based
manufacturing’ is another developing area.
Here, we will use dynamic computer models
to design and verify processes. These
approaches will increase design flexibility,
speed of manufacture and performance.
Information technology
In 2013, we invested over £100 million in IT,
continuing with the modernisation of our
IT infrastructure and also launching our Shop
Floor IT modernisation programme. We have
launched an Integrated Production Systems
programme to address the need for
simplified, globally scalable and secure
systems. The programme will improve
delivery to the customer whilst improving
efficiency and reducing operating costs. We
are also investing in our customer systems
to improve the customer experience through
the use of portals and digital workflow.
We continue to seek new capabilities in
emerging markets across the world through
our supplier development groups. These help
Our future Advanced Remanufacturing
drive competition with our existing internal
and Technology Research Centre in Singapore plants and suppliers, and also allow us to
and High Temperature Components Centre
develop new markets – Brazil (Energy) and
of Excellence in the UK will ensure we lead
China (Marine) being good examples. We
in high-performance, low-emission turbine
expect the proportion of our supplier spend
technology.
in emerging markets to increase.
Suppliers
Strong relationships with our suppliers are
critical to our performance. We work closely
to align our strategies as well as assessing
performance through our Supplier Advanced
Business Relationship (SABRE) requirements.
Rolls-Royce has taken a leading role in the
establishment of the Aerospace Engine
Supplier Quality Committee. Through this
body, gas turbine engine makers and their
suppliers – with input from regulatory
agencies – aim to agree a set of common
industry-wide standards. These will help
remove variability and waste, enabling the
aerospace supply chain to be leaner and
more competitive.
To support UK suppliers in the global
aerospace market, Rolls-Royce is sponsoring
the UK Government-backed Sharing in
Growth programme. It is a £110 million
programme of intensive supplier
£687 million
Expenditure in 2013 on property, plant
and equipment.
We are delivering customer and business
benefits as we continue to invest at record
levels and transform our industrial
infrastructure.
Other information
Our operations employ 25,000 people in
17 countries at 85 Rolls-Royce facilities.
In addition, 33 joint venture facilities, seven
manufacturing technology partnerships
and over 70 significant suppliers help us
to meet customer demand.
The Advanced Forming Research Centre in
Glasgow, UK, the National Composites
Centre in Bristol, UK and the Manufacturing
Technology Centre in Coventry, UK, are
expanding their facilities and the new
Commonwealth Centre for Advanced
Manufacturing in Richmond, USA, is now
fully operational.
Financial statements
Our teams around the world focus on
improvement in all the classical operational
metrics – safety, quality, cost, on-time
delivery, inventory – while at the same time
ensuring that the next generation of
advanced products and processes are
successfully industrialised.
26
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
SUSTAINABILITY
Our strategy is to create a sustainable business, through our
focus on customer, innovation and profitable growth. Our
commitment is to continually improve the environmental
performance of our products and services. With our customer
at its heart, our strategy will deliver ‘Better power, a Better
future and a Better business’.
Better power
Helping our customers do
more using less.
Sustainability
Better power
Helping our customers do more
using less.
Each of our customer-facing segments
provides services and customer operation
solutions to improve the effectiveness of
our equipment. In each of our markets, we
are focused on reducing fuel consumption
and emission levels. Find out more by
visiting www.rolls-royce.com.
Better future
We are committed to innovation:
powering better, cleaner, economic
growth that creates value for customers,
employees, investors, suppliers and
wider society.
Better business
We invest in technology, people and
ideas to improve all aspects of our
performance and to drive profitable
growth. Building on today’s
achievements to meet the business
challenges of the future.
Improving the environmental performance
of our products
Rolls-Royce has a strong track record of
reducing emissions through significant
investment in technology. In 2013, we
invested £1,118 million in R&D, of which
around two-thirds is aimed at reducing
the environmental impact of our products
and services.
The Trent XWB is the world’s most efficient
turbofan aero engine flying today. The low
noise technology built into the Trent 1000
makes it the quietest engine on the Boeing
787 Dreamliner, which itself has half the
noise level of the corresponding previous
generation aircraft.
In Defence aerospace, we have worked with
the US Air Force to complete the final testing
of the Series 3.5 enhancement of the
T56 engine, providing fuel savings of up
to ten per cent in addition to improved
performance and reliability.
In Marine, our Environship design together
with our advanced propulsion systems can
reduce CO2 emissions by up to 40 per cent
compared to conventional diesel-powered
vessels. The Environship concept was
awarded the Green Ship Technology
Award this year.
Our Civil Nuclear portfolio makes a
significant contribution to future low
In Civil aerospace, The Advisory Council for
carbon electricity generation. We are
Aviation Research and Innovation in Europe
strongly positioned to support growth
(ACARE) has set challenging goals for aviation in this industry.
to meet by 2050. These include reducing
aircraft CO2 emissions by 75 per cent (per
passenger kilometre); reducing noise by
65 per cent; and reducing oxides of nitrogen
(NOx) by 90 per cent, all relative to a typical
new aircraft produced in 2000.
CO2 (Engine)
Trent family
ACARE flightpath 2050 target
Trent 800
0
Trent 500
% CO2 or fuel burn
ACARE Target:
75% overall reduction
in CO2 per passenger
kilometre 30% engine
contribution (Rolls-Royce
engine long-term goals).
-5
Trent 900
-10
Trent 1000
Trent XWB
-15
-20
-25
-30
2000
2010
2020
2030
2040
2050
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
27
Strategic report
Dow Jones Sustainability Index
Rolls-Royce has been listed for the 12th
consecutive year. We achieved an overall
score of 67 in 2013, above average in all
areas within the aviation and defence sector.
Left to right: Sarah Armstrong (Rolls-Royce),
Ella Jakubowska and Sir Trevor McDonald at
the TARGETjobs Female Undergraduate of
the Year 2013 awards.
Average number of employees
2012
2013*
22,800
20,000
42,800
24,800
30,400
55,200
21,500
7,800
8,800
3,700
1,000
42,800
23,400
7,900
9,200
4,000
10,700
55,200
* Includes Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG.
We retained our title as ‘The most popular
graduate recruiter – Engineering, Designs
and Manufacture’ in the UK TARGETjobs
Awards for the fourth year running. Our
position has also risen in the ‘Times Top 100
Graduate Employers’ rankings and in the
‘Guardian UK 300’ survey.
Employee involvement
Employee engagement is critical to our
success. We use a variety of channels to
communicate with our employees. We have
Content and figures do not include Rolls-Royce well-established frameworks for managing
employee and trade union/employee
Power Systems AG, unless indicated.
representative participation which include
In 2013, we recruited 2,530 experienced
formal information and consultation
professionals to support the growth of our
arrangements. Our incentive schemes and
business. Our graduate programme is
all-employee share plans make sure that
expanding, we recruited 379 graduates
every employee has the opportunity to share
through our global programmes, an increase
in our success. We encourage our employees
of 21 per cent from 2012. Our graduate
to improve their knowledge and enhance
population is becoming more representative
their careers by providing meaningful
of the diverse and global company we are
training and development. In 2013, we
working in, with this year’s graduates
supported 49,600 employees, customers and
representing 32 nationalities and coming
suppliers through our learning management
from 97 universities. Our apprenticeship
system. Learning investment for 2013 was
programme has been running for over 100
£39.7 million and a total of 272,000 training
years. At any one time we have over 1,000
course completions were delivered during
apprentices around the world.
the year.
Human rights
Our human rights policy sets out our
commitment to respect the human rights
of our employees through core labour
standards regarding employee involvement,
diversity and equality, pay and benefits,
working hours, forced labour and child
labour. We set equivalent standards for our
supply chain through our Supplier Code
of Conduct.
Diversity and inclusion
A diverse workforce will help ensure our
continued success as a global business and
contribute towards a better future. We
continue to face challenges in increasing
diversity across the organisation and are
working with our leadership teams to raise
awareness of the need for change. Over
recent years we have seen increased levels
of diversity in both our early career pipeline
and high potential pool, with females
making up 26 per cent of our UK graduate
intake in 2013 and 29 per cent of our
graduate intake into countries outside the
UK. Females are 24 per cent of our high
potential population as compared to
15 per cent of our general population.
This year, Rolls-Royce sponsored the UK
Female Undergraduate of the Year 2013
awards. The winner, Ella Jakubowska,
accepted a place on our Customer
Management Graduate Programme.
Headcount by gender*
Full-time equivalents
at 31 December 2013
Male
Female
Total
46,975
8,225
55,200
* Includes Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG.
Senior managers by gender*
Male
Female
188
11
* Includes Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG.
Board directors by gender
Male
Female
10
2
We give full and fair consideration to
applications for employment made by
disabled people and also support employees
who become disabled during employment,
helping them make the best use of their
skills and potential.
Other information
Our people
Our culture fosters innovation, collaboration
and continuous improvement. Developing
strong people management and leadership
skills alongside our technical expertise helps
ensure that our employees are engaged
and understand the wider role they play
in the Group’s success. We work actively
to attract young people to Science,
Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
(STEM) subjects.
By region
United Kingdom
Rest of the world
Total
By sector
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Power Systems
Total
Financial statements
Better future
We are committed to
innovation: powering
better, cleaner economic
growth that creates value
for customers, employees,
investors, suppliers and
wider society.
Directors’ report
Carbon Disclosure Project
The Rolls-Royce 2013 carbon disclosure
score of 85 is our highest score to date.
This, along with our performance
band ‘B’ rating, demonstrates our
commitment to continually improving
our environmental performance.
28
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
SUSTAINABILITY
Community investment
We are committed to conducting business to
the highest standards and building positive
relationships within the communities where
we operate. In 2013, our total contribution
was £8 million. We actively work with
schools and universities to increase interest
and encourage diversity amongst those
taking STEM subjects, and to broaden the
career aspirations of individuals from
under-represented groups.
Working with governments
National governments are often our
customers and we aim to build strategic
relationships with governments in our
key markets.
National governments and the EU also set
the legislative and policy framework for
doing business and they are a potential
source of funding and support for research
and technology (R&T), R&D, manufacturing,
education and training initiatives, as well as
for certain capital projects.
We engage in dialogue to align our own
business needs with the political, social,
economic, industrial and commercial
requirements of national governments
and the EU.
In 2013, we have worked with the UK
Government on the development and
implementation of the Aerospace Growth
Partnership; in EU Affairs, we have
focused on the Horizon 2020 EU funding
programme; and in North America we
focused on defence appropriations and
policy issues.
Globally, we are members of national
industry bodies and trade associations that
represent our sector and Group interests.
In the UK we are members of the
Confederation of British Industry (CBI) and
AeroSpace, Defence and Security (ADS); in
North America the Aerospace Industries
Association, Organisation for International
Investment and the US Chamber of
Commerce; in Brussels on EU affairs we
belong to The AeroSpace and Defence
Industries Association of Europe (ASD) and
EU Turbines, amongst others; and globally
we are members of local Chambers of
Commerce in our countries of operation.
Rolls-Royce does not make corporate
contributions or donations to political
parties or to any organisations, think-tanks,
academic institutions or charities closely
associated to a political party or cause, as
outlined in our Global Code of Conduct.
Better business
We invest in technology,
people and ideas to
improve all aspects of our
performance and to drive
profitable growth. Building
on today’s achievements to
meet the business
challenges of the future.
Ethics
We have made a strong commitment to
improving our ethical performance in line
with building a better business.
You will have read in the Chief Executive’s
review on pages 6 and 7, about Lord Gold’s
review, the SFO investigation, and the
publication of our new Global Code of
Conduct. We have also introduced a
confidential Ethics Line which is available
24 hours a day, where individuals can ask
questions or raise concerns. You can read
more on these topics in the ethics committee
report on pages 49 and 50. We are also
refreshing our Supplier Code of Conduct for
deployment in 2014. Compliance with the
code will continue to be monitored through
our regular supplier audits.
The Group continues to be an active
participant in ethical initiatives of the
European and US aerospace and defence
business sectors. We are a signatory to the
‘Common Industry Standards’ which were
drawn up by ASD and aim to promote
and enhance integrity practices among
its members.
The Group is also a member of the
International Forum on Business Ethical
Conduct’s (IFBEC) Steering Committee.
This organisation includes leading US and
European companies in the aerospace
and defence sectors and aims to promote
responsible and ethical business behaviours
through the Global Principles of
Business Ethics.
Improving operational performance
Improving the environmental performance
of our operations contributes to profitable
growth. We have set a three-year target
to reduce energy consumption by ten per cent
by the end of 2015, with 2012 as the baseline
year excluding product test and development
and normalised by revenue.
Our energy use increased slightly in 2013,
reflecting our increased levels of activity,
but we are on track to reduce our overall
emissions of greenhouse gases. We continue
to invest in improvements to our facilities.
Our total spend in 2013 amounted to almost
£3 million on projects, including upgrades
to compressed air systems, lighting systems
and controls, and additional energy
monitoring capability in our plants and
offices. We are seeking to make wider
use of more sustainable energy sources,
where cost effective and practical to do so.
Our business segments have thirdparty accredited certification to the
environmental management systems
standard ISO 14001. In addition, we have
maintained our focus on requiring key
suppliers to become certified to ISO 14001.
For further information on how we
work with suppliers please visit
www.rolls-royce.com/sustainability.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
29
Strategic report
UK Prime Minister
David Cameron meets
Colin Smith CBE,
Director – Engineering
and Technology, and
some of our apprentices
at the Apprentice
Academy, Derby, UK.
Directors’ report
Greenhouse gas emissions
In 2013, our total greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions from our facilities, processes,
product test and development was
520 kilotonnes carbon dioxide equivalent
(ktCO2e). This represents a reduction of
nine per cent compared with 572 ktCO2e
in 2009 (see table). This reduction has been
achieved, despite a growth in our global
facilities footprint. We have introduced a
longer term GHG target over ten years,
aimed at reducing emissions by 17 per cent
by the end of 2022 (baselined at 2012),
excluding product test and development.
The figures in the table do not include
emissions associated with Rolls-Royce Power
Systems AG. We expect to integrate this
subsidiary into our reporting process
during 2014. Power generation relates
to the operation of commercial gas-fired
power stations.
We have used the GHG Protocol Corporate
Accounting and Reporting Standard
(revised edition) data gathered to fulfil our
requirements under the Carbon Reduction
Commitment (CRC) Energy Efficiency
scheme, and the UK Government’s GHG
reporting guidance as the basis of our
methodology and source of emissions factors
for Company reporting for 2013. Further
details on our methodology can be found
within our ‘Basis of Reporting’, available at
www.rolls-royce.com/sustainability.
Safety
We are committed to continually improving
the standards of health and safety in the
workplace. We have steadily improved
performance over previous years. In 2013,
there were no fatalities or significant
injuries and we achieved a 17 per cent
reduction in the Total Reportable Injury (TRI)
rate from 0.54 in 2012 to 0.45 TRIs per 100
employees. Over the longer term, we have
reduced the TRI rate by 37 per cent since
2009. We have set a new target to reduce
TRIs per 100 employees by 15 per cent by
2015 (baselined at 2012).
We continue to analyse high-potential
incidents and each of them is investigated
at business segment level, with some also
included in Group level assessment. The
number of high-potential incidents has
declined slightly from previous years and
the number of ‘near misses’ reported has
significantly increased. The increased level
of near miss reporting reflects greater risk
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
215
236
229
213
218
357
365
346
337
302
572
601
575
550
520
56
3
579
0.04
awareness, overall proactive reporting,
risk based investigation and other
improvements. These contribute to both
TRI and high potential incident reductions.
Throughout the year, we continued several
global safety improvement plans. The
Electrical and Process Safety programmes
included site reviews and training and tools
for ensuring efficient implementation of
control measures. Reviews have also been
carried out on the use and control of
exposure to a number of chemicals newlyregulated under the REACH regulations.
These reviews confirmed that our controls
are suitable and that they ensure
occupational exposures and releases to the
environment are within limits set by the
new requirements.
Health
The current incidence of occupational illness
stands at 0.86 cases per 1,000 employees.
The leading causes of illness are noiseinduced hearing loss, work-related upper
limb disorders and stress. This reflects our
global health risk profile and provides the
focus for our health improvement activities.
Following a prosecution in the UK by the
Health and Safety Executive for one case
of Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS),
independent advice was sought from the
UK Health and Safety Laboratory and we are
continuing to strengthen our management
of HAVS.
Other information
Through our active participation in the
International Aerospace Environment Group
we are also helping to introduce new
standards to facilitate efficient data sharing
across the aerospace supply chain. This
focuses on the uses of hazardous substances
(in both manufacturing processes and
included in our products) and related
substitution and phase out programmes.
Total GHG emissions (ktCO2e)
Direct emissions – facilities, processes, product
test and development (Scope 1)
Indirect emissions – facilities, processes, product
test and development (Scope 2)
Total for facilities, processes, product test
and development
Direct emissions – power generation to grid (Scope 1)
Indirect emissions – power generation to grid (Scope 2)
Total for facilities, processes, product
test and development, and power generation to grid
Normalised (by revenue) emissions ratio for facilities,
processes, product test and development (ktCO2e/£m)
Financial statements
We are helping to lead the way on REACH
(Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation
of Chemicals) regulations and have submitted
the first ever REACH Authorisation
application. This is in the final stages of the
approval process with the European
Chemicals Agency and European Commission.
Additionally, we continue to work with our
suppliers to assist them in meeting their
own obligations with a focus on the
managed reduction and phase out of the use
of targeted substances that are hazardous to
health and dangerous to the environment.
30
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
The Board uses a range of financial and non-financial
indicators to monitor Group and segmental performance
in line with the strategy.
Financial indicators are shown below. The key objectives of the Board and its committees are described on pages
39 to 54 and non-financial key performance indicators are shown in the sustainability section on pages 26 to 29.
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG (RRPS), formerly Tognum AG, was fully consolidated from 1 January 2013.
To aid understanding, the impact on 2013 of consolidation has been displayed separately below.
Rolls-Royce
RRPS
CUSTOMER
ORDER BOOK
+19%
+16% before RRPS
ORDER INTAKE
+67%
+52% before RRPS
UNDERLYING REVENUE
+27%
+6% before RRPS
£m
The order book provides an indicator of future business.
It is measured at constant exchange rates and list prices and
includes both firm and announced orders. In Civil aerospace,
it is common for a customer to take options for future
orders in addition to firm orders placed. Such options are
excluded from the order book. In Defence aerospace,
long-term programmes are often ordered for only one year
at a time. In such circumstances, even though there may be
no alternative engine choice available to the customer, only
the contracted business is included in the order book. Only
the first seven years’ revenue of long-term aftermarket
contracts is included.
£bn
Order intake is a measure of new business secured during
the year and represents new firm orders, net of the
movement in the announced order book between the start
and end of the period. Any orders which were recorded in
previous periods and which are subsequently cancelled,
reducing the order book, are included as a reduction to
intake. Order intake is measured at constant exchange rates
and list prices and consistent with the order book policy of
recording the first seven years’ revenue of long-term
aftermarket contracts. Order intake for any given year
includes the seventh year of revenue.
£bn
Monitoring of revenues provides a measure of business
growth. Underlying revenue is used in order to eliminate the
effect of the decision not to adopt hedge accounting and to
provide a clearer year-on-year measure.
£m
The Group measures foreign currency revenue at the actual
exchange rate achieved as a result of settling foreign
exchange contracts from forward cover.
71.6
1.6
70.0
58.3
59.2
62.2
60.1
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
26.9
2.4
24.5
14.1
2009
16.3
16.1
2011
2012
12.3
2010
2013
15,505
2,586
10,108
10,866
11,277
2009
2010
2011
12,209
12,919
2012
2013
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
31
Strategic report
INNOVATION
+4.5% before RRPS
+40%
+20% before RRPS
To deliver on its commitments to customers, the Group
invests significant amounts in its infrastructure. All
proposed investments are subject to rigorous review to
ensure that they are consistent with forecast activity and
will provide value for money. Annual capital expenditure is
measured as the cost of property, plant and equipment
acquired during the period.
%
4.7
4.7
4.6
4.7
4.8
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
£m
687
97
590
291
491
2011
2012
361
2010
2013
PROFITABLE GROWTH
UNDERLYING PROFIT
BEFORE FINANCING
+22%
+10% before RRPS
AVERAGE CASH/DEBT
+£380m before RRPS
Underlying profit before financing is presented on a basis
that shows the economic substance of the Group’s hedging
strategies in respect of the transactional exchange rate and
commodity price movements. In particular: (a) revenues and
costs denominated in US dollars and euros are presented on
the basis of the exchange rates achieved during the year;
(b) similar adjustments are made in respect of commodity
derivatives; and (c) consequential adjustments are made to
reflect the impact of exchange rates on trading assets and
liabilities and long-term contracts on a consistent basis.
£m
The Group reports the balance of net funds/debt on a
weekly basis and average cash is therefore the average of
these weekly net balances. These balances are reported at
prevailing exchange rates and in recent periods, year-onyear movements in average cash balances reflect the
significant acquisitions and disposals which have taken
place, most notably RRPS in 2011 and IAE restructuring in
2012. The impact on average cash balances will depend on
when these transactions took place during the year.
£m
1,495
77
1,418
+£539m before RRPS
In a business requiring significant investment, the Board
monitors cash flow to ensure that profitability is converted
into cash generation, both for future investment and as a
reward for shareholders. The Group measures cash flow as
the movement in net funds/debt during the year, after
taking into account the value of derivatives held to hedge
the value of balances denominated in foreign currencies.
The figure for 2011 includes investment of £1,496 million
in RRPS.
267
1,564
1,206
983
1,010
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
960
635
350
320
(145)
2009
CASH FLOW
1,831
2010
2011
2012
2013
£m
1,094
258
(183)
2009
622
83
539
(1,310)
2010
2011
2012
2013
Other information
2009
467
Financial statements
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE
R&D is measured as the self-funded expenditure both
before amounts capitalised in the year and amortisation of
previously-capitalised balances. The Group expects to spend
approximately five per cent of revenues on R&D although
this proportion will fluctuate depending on the stage of
development of current programmes. This measure reflects
the need to generate current returns as well as to invest for
the future.
Directors’ report
NET R&D EXPENDITURE
AS A PROPORTION OF
UNDERLYING REVENUE
32
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
PRINCIPAL RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES
The Group places great importance on the identification and effective
management of risks. Our approach to enterprise risk management
helps us to deliver our objectives and maximise the returns of the Group.
The following table describes the risks that the risk committee, with endorsement from the Board, considers to have the most material
potential impact on the Group. They are specific to the nature of our business notwithstanding that there are other risks that may occur
and may impact the achievement of the Group’s objectives.
The risk committee discussions have been focused on these risks and the actions being taken to manage them.
Risk or uncertainty and potential impact
How we manage it
PRODUCT FAILURE
ő Operating a safety first culture
Product not meeting safety expectations, or causing
significant impact to customers or the environment
through failure in quality control.
ő Our engineering design and validation process is applied from initial
design, through production and into service
ő The safety committee reviews the scope and effectiveness of the Group’s
product safety policies to ensure that they operate to the highest
industry standards (see safety committee report on page 52)
ő A safety management system (SMS) has been established by a dedicated
team. This is governed by the Product Safety Review Board and is subject
to continual improvement based on experience and industry best
practice. Product safety training is an integral part of our SMS
ő Crisis management team led by the Director – Engineering and
Technology or General Counsel as appropriate
BUSINESS CONTINUITY
Breakdown of external supply chain or internal facilities
that could be caused by destruction of key facilities,
natural disaster, regional conflict, financial insolvency
of a critical supplier or scarcity of materials which would
reduce the ability to meet customer commitments,
win future business or achieve operational results.
ő Continued investment in adequate capacity and modern equipment
and facilities (see operations section on page 25)
ő Identifying and assessing points of weakness in our internal
and external supply chain, our IT systems and our people skills
ő Selection and development of stronger suppliers (see operations
section on page 25)
ő Developing dual sources or dual capability
ő Developing and testing site-level incident management and business
recovery plans
ő Crisis management team led by the Director – Engineering and
Technology or General Counsel as appropriate
ő Customer excellence centres provide improved response to supply
chain disruption
COMPETITOR ACTION
The presence of large, financially strong competitors
in the majority of our markets means that the Group
is susceptible to significant price pressure for original
equipment or services even where our markets are mature
or the competitors are few. Our main competitors have
access to significant government funding programmes
as well as the ability to invest heavily in technology
and industrial capability.
ő Accessing and developing key technologies and service offerings
which differentiate us competitively (see engineering and technology
section on page 24)
ő Focusing on being responsive to our customers and improving
the quality, delivery and reliability of our products and services
ő Partnering with others effectively
ő Driving down cost and improving margins (see Chief Executive’s review
on pages 6 and 7 and Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 10)
ő Protecting credit lines (see additional financial information on
pages 137 and 138)
ő Investing in innovation, manufacturing and production (see operations
section on page 25)
ő Understanding our competitors
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
33
Strategic report
Directors’ report
How we manage it
INTERNATIONAL TRADE FRICTION
ő Where possible, locating our domestic facilities in politically stable
countries and/or ensuring that we maintain dual capability
Geopolitical factors that lead to significant tensions
between major trading parties or blocs which could
impact the Group’s operations. For example: explicit
trade protectionism; differing tax or regulatory regimes;
potential for conflict; or broader political issues.
ő Diversifying global operations to avoid excessive concentration
of risks in particular areas
ő Network of regional directors proactively monitors local situations
ő Maintaining a balanced business portfolio in markets with high
technological barriers to entry and a diverse customer base
ő Proactively influencing regulation where it affects us (see sustainability
on page 28)
Failure to deliver a major product programme on time,
to specification or technical performance falling
significantly short of customer expectations would have
potentially significant adverse financial and reputational
consequences, including the risk of impairment of the
carrying value of the Group’s intangible assets and the
impact of potential litigation.
ő Major programmes are subject to Board approval (see additional
financial information on page 137)
ő Major programmes are reviewed at levels and frequencies appropriate
to their performance against key financial and non-financial
deliverables and potential risks throughout a programme’s life cycle
(see additional financial information on page 137)
ő Technical audits are conducted at pre-defined points performed
by a team that is independent from the programme
ő Programmes are required to address the actions arising from reviews
and audits and progress is monitored and controlled through to closure
ő Knowledge management principles are applied to provide benefit to
current and future programmes
COMPLIANCE
Non-compliance by the Group with legislation or other
regulatory requirements in the regulated environment in
which it operates (for example: export controls; offset; use
of controlled chemicals and substances; and anti-bribery
and corruption legislation) compromising our ability to
conduct business in certain jurisdictions and exposing
the Group to potential: reputational damage; financial
penalties; debarment from government contracts for
a period of time; and/or suspension of export privileges
or export credit financing, any of which could have
a material adverse effect.
ő An uncompromising approach to compliance is now, and should
always be, the only way to do business
ő The Group has an extensive compliance programme. This programme
and the Global Code of Conduct are promulgated throughout the Group
and are updated and reinforced from time-to-time, to ensure their
continued relevance, and to ensure that they are complied with both
in spirit and to the letter. The Global Code of Conduct and the Group’s
compliance programme are supported by appropriate training
(see ethics committee report on pages 49 and 50)
ő A legal and compliance team has been put in place to manage the
current specific issue (see ethics committee on pages 49 and 50)
through to a conclusion and beyond
ő Lord Gold has reviewed the Group’s current compliance procedures
and an improvement plan is being implemented
Other information
ő Understanding our supply chain risks
MAJOR PRODUCT PROGRAMME DELIVERY
Financial statements
Risk or uncertainty and potential impact
34
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Strategic report
PRINCIPAL RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES
Risk or uncertainty and potential impact
How we manage it
ő Maintaining a strong balance sheet, through healthy cash balances
MARKET SHOCK
and a continuing low level of debt
The Group is exposed to a number of market risks, some
of which are of a macro-economic nature, for example,
ő Providing financial flexibility by maintaining high levels of liquidity
foreign currency exchange rates, and some which are more
and an investment grade ‘A’ credit rating (see additional financial
specific to the Group, for example liquidity and credit risks,
information on page 138)
reduction in air travel or disruption to other customer
ő The portfolio effect from our business interests, both in terms of
operations. Significant extraneous market events could
original equipment to aftermarket split and our different segments
also materially damage the Group’s competitiveness and/
provide a natural shock absorber since the portfolios are not correlated
or credit worthiness. This would affect operational results
ő Deciding where and what currencies to source in, where and how much
or the outcomes of financial transactions.
credit risk is extended or taken and hedging residual risk through the
financial derivatives markets (foreign exchange, interest rates and
commodity price risk – see additional financial information on page 137)
IT VULNERABILITY
Breach of IT security causing controlled data to
be lost, made inaccessible, corrupted or accessed
by unauthorised users.
ő Establishing ‘defence in depth’ through deployment of multiple
layers of software and processes including web gateways, filtering,
firewalls, intrusion, advanced persistent threat detectors and
integrated reporting
ő Security and network operations centres have been established
ő Active sharing of information through industry, government and
security forums (see risk committee report on page 51)
The strategic report was approved by the Board on 12 February 2014.
By order of the Board
Nigel T Goldsworthy
Company Secretary
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
35
Strategic report
DIRECTORS’ REPORT
CHAIRMAN’S INTRODUCTION
Directors’ report
We will regularly review and develop
our governance arrangements to ensure
that the right decisions are made by the
right people.
Ian Davis
Chairman
My instinct from my discussions to date is to allow as much time
as possible at Board meetings for discussion on strategic and
operational issues. With regard to committees, I have concluded that
merging the work of the separate safety and ethics committees into
one broader-based safety and ethics committee will give greater
focus to our sustainability agenda.
I agree with the Association of British Insurers (ABI) that good
governance enhances a company’s sustainable performance and
so helps underpin long-term economic growth. Sustainability has to
be part of everything we do if our business is to endure in the long
term. Further details on sustainability are on pages 26 to 29. We
must provide excellent products which are safe, reliable, kinder to
the environment and provide the right solutions for our customers
at the right price. We can only endure if we are trusted by the world
to deliver excellence in everything we do.
Board changes
During the year, Sir Simon Robertson retired as Chairman and Peter
Byrom and Ian Strachan retired as non-executive directors at the
conclusion of the AGM on 2 May 2013. I was appointed as a nonexecutive director on 1 March 2013 and was appointed Chairman
on 2 May 2013. Lee Hsien Yang and Warren East were appointed as
non-executive directors on 1 January 2014. Having served for nine
years as a non-executive director, Iain Conn has decided to retire and
will not be standing for re-election at the AGM on 1 May 2014.
Business ethics
In January 2013, we appointed Lord Gold to lead a review of our
compliance procedures. Lord Gold presented an interim report to
the Board in July 2013, having spent time immersing himself in the
culture and systems of the Company.
Remuneration
Our remuneration report reflects the new reporting regulations.
At the 2014 AGM shareholders shall, for the first time, have the right
to vote on the policy section of the remuneration report separately
and that vote is binding. The remuneration report can be found on
pages 53 to 69.
At the 2014 AGM, we will be proposing to renew our long-term
incentive plan, the Performance Share Plan (PSP). We are also taking
the opportunity to ask shareholders to approve our Deferred Share
Bonus Plan. Further details are set out in the remuneration report.
I believe that Rolls-Royce benefits from a strong Board though we
will continue to look for opportunities to further strengthen and
diversify, as discussed in the nomination committee report on
page 47. I look forward to continuing to work with and support
my colleagues at Rolls-Royce as we face the challenges and
opportunities ahead.
Ian Davis
Chairman
Other information
Governance structure
In November, I led a discussion on governance with the nonexecutive directors. We will regularly review and develop our
governance arrangements to ensure that the right decisions are
made by the right people.
We require high standards of ethical behaviour wherever we do
business and for that behaviour to be second nature for every
employee. With over 55,000 employees operating in many business
sectors, regions and cultures across the world, we are well aware
that this is not something that can be achieved overnight but only by
relentless pursuit over time. Further details on ethics related matters
can be found in the ethics committee report on pages 49 and 50.
Financial statements
As Chairman, I am responsible for leading the Board and for
ensuring its effectiveness in all aspects of its role. Strong
governance is vital to this and I was reassured, when I joined
Rolls-Royce, to find a robust governance foundation already in place.
The challenge ahead is to build upon this foundation and ensure
that the Group’s values ‘trusted to deliver excellence’ apply not just
to our products but also to the way that we conduct and govern our
business.
36
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1. Ian Davis 2*
3. Iain Conn 1,2,4*,6
5. Lewis Booth CBE 1*,2,4
Chairman, appointed March 2013
Skills and experience: Ian spent his early career at
Bowater, moving to McKinsey & Company in 1979.
He was managing partner of McKinsey’s practice
in the UK and Ireland from 1996 to 2003. In 2003,
he was appointed as Chairman and worldwide
Managing Director of McKinsey, serving in this
capacity until 2009. During his career with
McKinsey, Ian served as a consultant to a range of
global organisations across the private, public and
not-for-profit sectors. He retired as senior partner
of McKinsey & Company on 30 July 2010.
External appointments: Ian serves as a nonexecutive director on the boards of Johnson
& Johnson Inc, BP p.l.c. and as a non-executive
member of the Cabinet Office Board. He is
also senior adviser to Apax Partners LLP.
Senior Independent Director, appointed
January 2005
Skills and experience: Iain joined the BP group
in 1986 and has held a number of executive
positions within the BP group worldwide.
External appointments: Iain is Chief Executive of
Refining and Marketing, BP p.l.c. He is a member
of The Imperial College Council and of the CBI’s
Energy and Climate Change Board. He is also a
member of the Development Advisory Board of
the RAE and of the advisory boards of the Centre
for European Reform, the Centre for China in the
World Economy at Tsinghua University and of the
Schwarzman School at Tsinghua University.
Non-executive director, appointed May 2011
Skills and experience: Lewis is the former
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial
Officer of Ford Motor Company, a position he held
for over three years until his retirement from the
company in April 2012. During his 34-year career
at Ford he held a series of senior positions in
Europe, Asia, Africa and the United States. Lewis
began his career with British Leyland, before
joining Ford in 1978. He was awarded a CBE in
June 2012 for services to the UK automotive and
manufacturing industries.
External appointments: Lewis is a director of
Mondelez International, Inc., Gentherm Inc. and
of University of Liverpool in America Inc.
2. John Rishton 5*
Chief Executive, appointed March 2011
Skills and experience: John began his career in
1979 at Ford Motor Company where he held a
variety of positions in the UK and in Europe. In
1994 he joined British Airways Plc, where he was
Chief Financial Officer from 2001 to 2005. In 2006,
he was appointed CFO at Royal Ahold and became
CEO in 2007. John was appointed as a nonexecutive director of Rolls-Royce in 2007 and
served as chairman of the audit committee
and a member of the ethics and nomination
committees until his appointment as Chief
Executive. He is a former non-executive director
of Allied Domecq.
External appointments: John was appointed
as a non-executive director of Unilever NV
and Unilever plc in May 2013.
4. Dame Helen Alexander 2,3*,4
Non-executive director, appointed
September 2007
Skills and experience: Dame Helen was Chief
Executive of the Economist Group until 2008
which she joined in 1985. She was President of the
CBI until 2011; she has also been a non-executive
director of Northern Foods plc, BT Group plc and
Centrica plc. She was awarded a DBE in 2011 for
services to business.
External appointments: Dame Helen is Chairman
of UBM plc, the Port of London Authority and
Incisive Media. She is also deputy chairman of
esure Group plc and senior adviser to Bain Capital.
Dame Helen is Chancellor of the University of
Southampton and she is involved with a number
of other not-for-profit organisations in media, the
internet, the arts and education.
6. Sir Frank Chapman 2,3,6*
Non-executive director, appointed November 2011
Skills and experience: Sir Frank has worked in
the oil and gas industry for 38 years including
appointments within Royal Dutch Shell plc and
BP p.l.c. He was Chief Executive of BG Group plc
for 12 years until December 2012. Sir Frank is a
Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the
Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the
Energy Institute.
7. Warren East CBE
1,2
Non-executive director, appointed January 2014
Skills and experience: Warren joined ARM Holdings
in 1994 and was appointed Chief Executive in
2001. Under his leadership the company became
the world’s leading semiconductor IP licensing
company. He retired from ARM Holdings in 2013.
He is a Fellow of the Institute of Engineering and
Technology, a Fellow of the Royal Academy of
Engineering and a Distinguished Fellow of the BCS.
He was awarded a CBE in 2014 for services to the
technology industry.
External appointments: Warren is a nonexecutive director and chairman of the audit
committee of De La Rue plc, and a non-executive
director of Dyson Ltd, BT Group plc and Micron
Technology Inc.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
37
Strategic report
10
11
13
14
15
12
Directors’ report
9
10. John Neill CBE 1,2
13. Mark Morris 5
Non-executive director, appointed January 2014
Skills and experience: Hsien Yang was Chief
Executive of Singapore Telecommunications
Limited for 11 years. He served as Chairman and
non-executive director of Fraser and Neave
Limited from 2007 until February 2013.
External appointments: Hsien Yang serves as
a Special Advisor of General Atlantic LLC. He is
Chairman of the Civil Aviation Authority of
Singapore, General Atlantic Singapore Fund Pte
Ltd. and The Islamic Bank of Asia Private Limited,
The Australian and New Zealand Banking Group
Ltd. and the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.
He is also President of the INSEAD South East
Asia Council.
Non-executive director, appointed
November 2008
Skills and experience: John is a member of the
Council and Board of Business in the Community,
is Vice President of the Society of Motor
Manufacturers and Traders, BEN, the automotive
industry charity and The Institute of the Motor
Industry. He was formerly a director of the Bank
of England and a non-executive director of Royal
Mail and Charter International plc. He was
awarded a CBE in June 1994.
External appointments: John is the Chairman and
Group Chief Executive of the Unipart Group of
Companies Limited and was appointed Chairman
of Atlantis Resources Limited in December 2013.
Chief Financial Officer, appointed January 2012
Skills and experience: Mark joined Rolls-Royce
in 1986. He has held a number of senior positions
throughout the Company and before his
appointment as Chief Financial Officer was
Group Treasurer from 2001.
9. John McAdam 2,3,6
11. Jasmin Staiblin 2, 4
Non-executive director, appointed February 2008
Skills and experience: John was the Chief
Executive of ICI plc until ICI’s acquisition by
Akzo Nobel. He has held a number of positions
at Unilever, within its Birds Eye Walls and
Unichema International businesses and is a
former non-executive director of Severn Trent plc
and Sara Lee Corporation.
External appointments: John is Chairman
of United Utilities Group PLC and Rentokil
Initial plc and the Senior Independent Director
of J Sainsbury plc.
Non-executive director, appointed May 2012
Skills and experience: Jasmin is the CEO of Alpiq
Holding AG and was CEO of ABB Switzerland Ltd
until December 2012. She has lived and worked
in Switzerland, Sweden and Australia.
External appointments: Jasmin is a nonexecutive director of Georg Fischer AG and a
member of the board of the Federal Institute
of Technology, the ETH Domain.
12. James Guyette 5
President and Chief Executive Officer of
Rolls-Royce North America Inc. appointed
January 1998
Skills and experience: Before joining the
Company, Jim was Executive Vice President,
Marketing and Planning of United Airlines.
External appointments: Jim is Chairman of
PrivateBancorp Inc., of Chicago, Illinois and he is
lead independent director of priceline.com Inc
of Norwalk, Connecticut. He is also Chairman
Emeritus of the Smithsonian National Air & Space
Museum, Washington DC.
14. Colin Smith CBE 5
Director – Engineering and Technology, appointed
July 2005
Skills and experience: Colin joined Rolls-Royce in
1974. He has held a variety of key positions within
the Company, including Director – Research and
Technology and Director of Engineering and
Technology – Civil aerospace. Colin is a Fellow
of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal
Aeronautical Society and the Institution of
Mechanical Engineers. He is also a Member
of the Council for Science and Technology. In
June 2012 he was awarded a CBE for services
to UK engineering.
15. Nigel T Goldsworthy
Company Secretary & Head of Legal, appointed
December 2012
Skills and experience: A solicitor, Nigel has held
a number of senior legal and company secretary
roles within the Company and, before his
appointment as Company Secretary & Head of
Legal, was Deputy General Counsel from 2008.
Before joining Rolls-Royce in 2004, Nigel was a
partner in the banking group of Lovells (now
Hogan Lovells).
Other information
8. Lee Hsien Yang 2,4,6
Financial statements
Committee membership
1 Audit committee
2 Nomination committee
3 Remuneration committee
4 Ethics committee
5 Risk committee
6 Safety committee
* Denotes chairman of committee
38
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD (IAB)
The IAB, formed in 2006, advises the Board
on political and economic developments
around the world and alerts the Company
to possible long-term opportunities, threats
and risks. Its members are:
Lord Powell of Bayswater
(Chairman of the IAB)
Former Foreign Affairs and Defence Adviser
to Prime Ministers Baroness Thatcher and
Sir John Major
Vladimír Dlouhý
International advisor to Goldman Sachs
for Central and Eastern Europe, European
deputy chairman of the Trilateral Commission and a former member of the
Czech Government
Sir Rod Eddington
Chairman of JP Morgan (Australia & New
Zealand) and former Chief Executive of
British Airways Plc
Akio Mimura
Senior Advisor, Honorary Chairman
Nippon Steel & Sumitomo
Metal Corporation
Lubna Olayan
CEO and Deputy Chairperson of the
Olayan Financing Company
Ratan Tata
Former Chairman of Tata Sons Limited
Ambassador Robert B. Zoellick
Chairman of Goldman Sachs International
Advisors, Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center
at Harvard University, former President of
World Bank Group, US Deputy Secretary of
State and US Trade Representative
Dr Fan Gang
Professor at China’s Academy of Social
Sciences and Director of National Economic
Research Institute
Mustafa Koç
Chairman of Koç Holding, A.Ş.
THE EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP TEAM (ELT)
During 2013, John Rishton chaired
meetings of the ELT, an executive forum
at which his first line reports (the Group’s
most senior business and functional leaders)
review, communicate and agree on issues
and actions of group-wide significance.
In addition to John Rishton, its other
members are:
Miles Cowdry
Corporate Development Director
Kath Durrant
Human Resources Director
James Guyette
President and Chief Executive Officer –
Rolls-Royce North America Inc.
Lawrie Haynes
President – Marine and Nuclear
Andrew Heath
President – Energy
Alain Michaelis
Operations Director
Mark Morris
Chief Financial Officer
John Paterson
President – Marine and Industrial
Power Systems
Colin Smith
Director – Engineering and Technology
Robert Webb
General Counsel
Tony Wood
President – Aerospace
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
39
Strategic report
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE REPORT
Governance principle: leadership
Attendance in 2013
The General Counsel and the Company Secretary are also invited
to attend meetings. Jasmin Staiblin who is based in Switzerland
was unable to attend two scheduled meetings during pregnancy
and three due to unavoidable diary clashes in respect of
commitments entered into before her appointment to the Board.
Key objective:
ő create long-term success for the Group within an acceptable
risk profile and provide value for the long-term investor.
Responsibilities:
ő ensure the safety of its products and people;
ő ensure the development of strategy;
ő monitor implementation of the strategy;
ő ensure necessary resources are in place;
ő ensure controls exist to manage risk;
ő safeguard values, brand and reputation;
ő oversee performance of management;
ő ensure effective succession planning;
ő agree remuneration policy; and
ő maintain effective governance.
On 12 February 2014, the Board noted that Iain Conn intended to
retire as the Senior Independent Director and as a non-executive
director and would therefore not seek re-election at the AGM on
1 May 2014. The Board has resolved that Lewis Booth, subject to
re-election at the AGM, will succeed Iain Conn as the Senior
Independent Director at the conclusion of the AGM.
UK Corporate Governance Code (the Code)
This report explains how the Company discharges its corporate
governance responsibilities. In the year to 31 December 2013,
the revised principles and provisions of the Code (published in
September 2012 by the Financial Reporting Council (FRC) applied
to the Company.
Throughout the 2013 financial year, the Company did not fully
comply with the provisions of the Code for the following reasons:
Code provision
Explanation
C.3.5 – The audit
committee should review
arrangements by which
staff of the company may,
in confidence, raise
concerns about possible
improprieties in matters
of financial reporting or
other matters.
The Board considered it
appropriate that this provision
of the Code be the primary
responsibility of the ethics
committee. The ethics
committee is, however, required
to refer concerns about possible
improprieties in matters of
financial reporting to the
audit committee.
C.3.7 – The audit
committee should have
primary responsibility
for making a
recommendation
on the appointment,
reappointment and
removal of the external
auditors. FTSE 350
companies should put the
external audit contract
out to tender at least
every ten years.
The audit committee has
considered the requirement to
put the audit out to tender every
ten years. In line with the FRC’s
transitional arrangements, the
committee will do so during the
tenure of the current lead
partner which expires in 2017.
The committee concluded that,
in order to ensure that a
potential change in auditor is
managed effectively, it would
not be in the Company’s
interests to put the audit out to
tender in 2013. More detail can
be found in the audit committee
report on page 46.
Other information
7/7
8/9
9/9
4/4
8/9
8/9
n/a
9/9
n/a
8/9
9/9
9/9
3/4
9/9
9/9
4/9
4/4
Financial statements
Ian Davis (Chairman) (appointed 1 March 2013)
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom (retired 2 May 2013)
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Warren East CBE (appointed 1 January 2014)
James Guyette
Lee Hsien Yang (appointed 1 January 2014)
John McAdam
Mark Morris
John Neill CBE
Sir Simon Robertson (retired 2 May 2013)
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Jasmin Staiblin
Ian Strachan (retired 2 May 2013)
Board membership
The directors biographical details are on pages 36 and 37 which
demonstrate the skills and experience of the Board. The experience
and knowledge of each of the directors gives them the ability to
constructively challenge strategy and scrutinise performance.
Directors’ report
Board members and attendance
There are currently 14 directors on the Board comprising the
non-executive Chairman, the Chief Executive, three other
executive directors and nine non-executive directors.
40
Directors’ report
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE REPORT
In accordance with the Code and the Company’s Articles of
Association, all directors will retire and put themselves forward for
election or re-election at the AGM in 2014 with the exception of Iain
Conn who is not seeking re-election and will retire from the Board
at the conclusion of that meeting.
The process for succession planning is discussed in the nomination
committee report on page 47.
The work of the Board in 2013
During 2013, the Board held nine meetings, eight of which were
scheduled and a further one called at short notice. In addition, two
formal resolutions were passed by consent of all directors using
electronic means. Non-executive directors communicate directly
with executive directors and senior management between formal
Board meetings. At each scheduled meeting, executive directors
supplied reports on business and financial performance including
the usual approval of financial statements and budgets. The Board
also received regular updates on health, safety and environment
(HS&E) and employee and legal issues, including a review of its
governance arrangements. In addition, the chairman of each of the
Board committees provided reports on matters discussed by that
committee since the previous Board meeting.
Board committees
The Board has established a number of committees, the principal
ones being audit, remuneration, nomination, ethics, risk and safety.
Terms of reference for each committee are available on the Group’s
website at www.rolls-royce.com. Reports by committee chairmen
on the activities of each of the principal committees are on
pages 44 to 54. The Chairman’s introduction provides more detail
on page 35 of changes to the committee structures.
Senior management and advisers are invited to attend Board and
committee meetings where appropriate to contribute to discussions
and advise members of the Board and committees on relevant
matters. The involvement of senior management additionally
helps strengthen the relationship between the Board and senior
management and helps to provide the Board with a greater
understanding of operations and strategy.
Internal control
The directors are responsible for the Group’s system of internal
control and for maintaining and reviewing its effectiveness from
both a financial and an operational perspective. Our risk
management process is a key element of the Group’s internal control
system. This system of internal control is designed to identify and
manage, rather than eliminate, the risk of failure to achieve business
objectives and to provide reasonable but not absolute assurance
against material misstatement or loss. The processes we use to
identify and manage risk are set out in the risk committee report
on page 51. The Board’s report on the Group’s principal risks and
actions taken to mitigate them is on pages 32 to 34.
The Board holds an annual day-long strategy meeting, which
provides a forum for directors to challenge strategy and help
develop it for the future. The strategy meeting held in September
2013 included discussions on the ten-year financial plan and the
strategic context including market structure, competitor
positioning, cost challenges, technology and with a focus on the Civil
aerospace and the Marine and Industrial Power Systems businesses. Turnover from joint ventures constitutes an increasingly large part
of our reported group activity. Responsibility for internal control
In addition to its routine business, matters considered by the Board
procedures in joint ventures where we do not have a control
in 2013 included:
agreement lies with the managers of those operations. We seek to
exert influence over such ventures by board representation and
ő Marine strategy focused on markets, costs, supply chain, product
regularly review the activities of these ventures.
development and alignment with the Rolls-Royce Power Systems
and Bergen engines businesses;
The audit committee has reviewed the effectiveness of the systems of
ő the closure of the proposed joint venture with Pratt & Whitney;
internal control for the year under review. Further information can be
ő updates on the referral to the Serious Fraud Office;
found in the audit committee report on page 45. The Board confirms
ő discussion on Lord Gold’s interim findings, the adoption of a new
that the processes and systems currently in place ensure that the
Global Code of Conduct and the roll-out of a comprehensive ethics
Group continues to be compliant with the ‘Turnbull guidance’ as
training programme to all employees;
contained in ‘Internal Control: Revised Guidance for Directors on the
ő relocation to new Group headquarters;
Combined Code’ issued by the Financial Reporting Council in 2005.
ő the effect of sequestration on US defence spending;
Financial reporting
ő Civil Nuclear business strategy;
The Group has a comprehensive budgeting system with an annual
ő investors’ view on our AGM business;
budget approved by the Board. Revised forecasts for the year are
ő restructuring of the Aerospace business;
reported at least quarterly. Actual results, at both a business and
ő liquidity and additional funding;
Group level, are reported monthly against budget and variances
ő the renewal of the Euro Medium Term Note programme;
are kept under scrutiny.
ő preliminary discussions with Wärtsilä regarding a possible offer
for the company; and
Financial managers are required to acknowledge in writing that
ő cyber security.
their routine financial reporting is based on reliable data and that
results are properly stated in accordance with Group requirements.
In addition, for annual reporting, business presidents and finance
directors are required to confirm that their business has complied
with the Group’s Finance Manual.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
41
Strategic report
In addition, the Board has agreed a set of guiding principles to
govern the relationship between the Chairman and Chief Executive
which, for example, requires that the two roles are structured in a
complementary manner and demands that the relationship
between the two be based on mutual respect and trust and be
frank and open.
Each year, the Senior Independent Director leads a separate meeting
of the Board excluding the Chairman to review the Chairman’s
performance.
To achieve its long-term success the Board must:
ő ensure the safety of its products and its people;
ő oversee and approve the development of the Group’s strategy,
monitoring both its achievement and the Group’s risk appetite;
ő uphold the values of the Group, including its brand and
corporate reputation;
ő oversee the quality and performance of management and ensure
it is maintained at world-class standards, through effective
succession planning and remuneration policies; and
ő maintain an effective corporate governance framework, with
transparent reporting.
The Board has established a formal schedule of matters reserved for
its approval, generally being those items which affect the shape and
risk profile of the Group, as well as items such as the annual budget
and performance targets, the financial statements, payments to
shareholders, major capital investments, substantial changes to
balance sheet management policy and the strategic plan. This
schedule of matters reserved is reviewed annually.
John Rishton, as the Chief Executive, is responsible for the day-to-day
leadership, operational and performance management of the Group
within the confines of the strategy, business plans and budgets
agreed by the Board. The delegation of responsibilities to the
executive team is set out in a detailed schedule approved by the
Chief Executive.
Each business segment holds executive meetings to review
operational performance of its business, assisting the business
president in taking such decisions as fall within his remit and
reviewing proposals before presentation to the ELT or the Board
for approval as appropriate.
Governance principle: effectiveness
Board evaluation
The Code requires that the Board undertakes an annual evaluation
of its own performance and that of its committees and individual
directors and to do so externally at least every three years. In 2013,
the evaluation process was again conducted internally, full
external reviews having been carried out by Jan Hall Associates
in 2010 and 2011.
Initially, directors were asked to complete a confidential survey
covering the areas set out as best practice published by the Financial
Reporting Council’s ‘Guidance on Board Effectiveness’. The Company
Secretary then produced a report which consolidated the responses
following which the Chairman conducted one-to-one interviews
with each director and the Senior Independent Director interviewed
the Chairman. The findings were considered by the Board and
actions to be taken were agreed.
The evaluation concluded that the Board was proving to be effective
under the leadership of Ian Davis and John Rishton and that
relationships and Board discussions work well. The principal
recommendation was that succession planning for senior executive
positions could be improved. Other areas for improvement
identified included risk processes, mitigation plans, Board papers
and governance.
Directors’ terms of appointment
Executive directors are employees who have day-to-day
responsibilities as executives of the Group in addition to their duties
as directors. Each executive director receives a service contract on
appointment (see pages 60 and 61 for further information).
Non-executive directors are generally independent of the Company,
are not employees and do not participate in the daily business
management of the Group. On appointment, each non-executive
Information is supplied to directors in a manner which enables them director receives a letter setting out the conditions of his or her
to fulfil their responsibilities. This includes the circulation of papers appointment. Non-executive directors are appointed for an initial
term of three years, which may be extended with the agreement of
to be discussed, generally one week before meetings. Presentations
the Board, although reappointment is not automatic. Their term
are made by senior management at Board meetings on business,
of office is also subject to annual re-election by shareholders at the
financial and operating issues. Directors are expected to attend all
AGM and will terminate without compensation if they fail to be
meetings of the Board and the committees on which they sit and to
re-elected (see page 60 for further information).
devote sufficient time to the Company’s affairs to enable them to
fulfil their duties as directors. If directors are unable to attend a
Other information
Role and operation of the Board
The principal role of the Board is to ensure that the Group’s strategy
creates long-term success for the Group within an acceptable risk
profile and provides value for the long-term investor.
Executive Leadership Team (ELT)
The ELT is the senior decision-making executive committee and met
26 times during the year. Its membership is described on page 38.
It developed detailed strategic options for the Group culminating
in approval of strategy by the Board in September. It reviewed HS&E
performance, customer relations, governance, financial and
operational performance. It also reviewed acquisitions and disposals
and recommended them to the Board where required.
Financial statements
The Senior Independent Director, Iain Conn, acts as a sounding
board for the Chairman and can act as an intermediary for other
directors. He led the nomination committee in the process which
resulted in the appointment of Ian Davis as Chairman in May 2013.
meeting, their comments on the papers to be considered are
discussed in advance with the Chairman so that their contribution
can be included in the wider Board discussion.
Directors’ report
Roles and responsibilities
The Board has a written remit for the Chairman, Ian Davis, who
has responsibility for the running of the Board and ensuring its
effectiveness, and the Chief Executive, John Rishton, who has
responsibility for running the business. This division of responsibility
ensures that no one individual has unfettered powers of decision.
42
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE REPORT
Director training
Newly appointed directors participate in a structured induction
programme as detailed in the table below and receive a
comprehensive data pack providing detailed information on the
Group. An existing executive director can act as a mentor to each
newly appointed non-executive director, giving guidance and
advice as required.
Issues
Facilitated by
Operation of the Board
and governance
Group strategy development
and current issues
Financial structure
Risk strategy
Operational strategy
Technology and
engineering issues
Key site visits
Committee technical
requirements
Chairman and Company
Secretary
Chief Executive
Chief Financial Officer
General Counsel
Operations Director
Director – Engineering
and Technology
Company Secretary
Committee chairmen, internal
or external experts
Further training is available for directors, including presentations
by the executive team on particular aspects of the business. In 2013,
the Board received training in ethics conducted by our Head of
Business Ethics. In December 2013, our corporate lawyers, Slaughter
and May, held a seminar immediately following the Board meeting
to update the Board on developments in corporate law and
regulation. In addition, there is a procedure for directors to take
independent professional advice at the Company’s expense and
every director has access to the General Counsel and to the Company
Secretary who is responsible to the Board on corporate governance.
All directors are advised of changes in legislation, regulation and
changing risks with the assistance of the Company’s advisers where
necessary. In-house training is provided to directors of the
Company’s subsidiaries and joint ventures.
Independence of the non-executive directors
The Board conducts a rigorous review of the independence of
the non-executive directors every year, based on the criteria in
the Code. This review was undertaken in November 2013 and the
Board concluded that all the non-executive directors remained
independent in character and judgement. The Chairman met the
Code’s independence criteria upon his election as Chairman in May
2013. His other external commitments are described on page 36.
Non-executive directors are advised of the time required to fulfil the
role and are asked to confirm that they can make the required
commitment before the appointment is made. The Board is satisfied
that each of the non-executive directors is able to devote sufficient
time to the Company’s business.
The Board believes it can be appropriate for executive directors to
take non-executive positions in other companies and organisations,
as such appointments should broaden their experience. The
appointment to such positions is subject to the approval of the
Chairman and the Board and must not conflict with a director’s
duties and commitments to the Company.
Conflicts of interest
Directors have a duty to avoid a situation in which they have, or can
have, a direct or indirect interest which conflicts, or possibly may
conflict, with the interests of the Company unless that situational
conflict has been authorised by the Board. The nomination
committee has reviewed and authorised all directors’ situational
conflicts and has agreed that while directors are required to keep
confidential all Company information, they shall not be required to
share with the Company confidential information received by them
from a third party which is the subject of the situational conflict.
Governance principle: accountability
The directors consider the annual report and accounts, taken as
a whole, is fair, balanced and understandable and provides the
information necessary for shareholders to assess the Company’s
performance, business model and strategy.
Investor relations
Communications with shareholders regarding business strategy
and financial performance are co-ordinated by a dedicated Investor
Relations department that reports to the Chief Financial Officer.
Communications regarding the general administration of
shareholdings are co-ordinated by the Company Secretary.
The Group conducts a dedicated investor relations programme with
institutional investors which includes various formal events during
the year, as well as a regular series of one-to-one and group
meetings. The purpose of these events is to highlight a particular
issue, theme or announcement that the Group believes warrants
further explanation or clarification. The events also provide
opportunities for shareholders to meet members of the senior
management team. Examples of these events in 2013 were: the
preliminary and half-year results announcements; the AGM; the
update given at the Paris Air Show on trends in the Civil and Defence
aerospace businesses; visits to certain of the Group’s sites; and
industry conferences. The one-to-one and group meetings provide
additional context around the Group’s business strategy and
financial performance.
In 2013, over 380 meetings took place with over 340 separately
identifiable institutional investors. The majority of meetings took
place in the UK (273), 81 meetings were in the USA and Canada,
and a further 26 meetings took place in Europe. The Chairman also
meets institutional investors from time-to-time.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
43
Strategic report
The Company sends the AGM notice and relevant documentation to
all shareholders at least 20 working days before the date of the AGM.
For shareholders who have consented to receive communications
electronically, notice is given by email or by written notice of the
availability of documents on the Group’s website.
This year’s AGM will be held at 11.00am on Thursday, 1 May 2014 at
the QEII Conference Centre, Broad Sanctuary, Westminster, London
SW1P 3EE. The AGM notice and the annual report will be available to
view on the Group’s website. Shareholders unable to attend the AGM
can vote on the business of the meeting either by post or online.
Shareholders and share capital
Information on shareholders and share capital, which also forms
part of the Corporate Governance report, is detailed on pages 70
and 71.
Change of control
Contracts and joint venture agreements
There are a number of contracts and joint venture agreements
which would allow the counterparties to terminate or alter those
arrangements in the event of a change of control of the Company.
The terms of those arrangements are commercially confidential
and their disclosure could be seriously prejudicial to the Company.
Employee share plans
In the event of a change of control of the Company, the effect on
the employee share plans would be as follows:
ő PSP – awards would vest pro rata to service in the performance
period, subject to remuneration committee judgement of Group
performance;
ő APRA deferred shares – the shares would be released from trust
immediately;
ő ShareSave – options would become exercisable immediately. The
new company might offer an equivalent option in exchange for
cancellation of the existing option; and
ő Share Incentive Plan (SIP) – consideration received as shares
would be held within the SIP, if possible, otherwise the
consideration would be treated as a disposal from the SIP.
Payment to shareholders
At the AGM on 1 May 2014, the directors will recommend an issue
of 134 C Shares with a total nominal value of 13.4 pence for each
ordinary share. The final issue of C Shares will be made on 1 July
2014 to shareholders on the register on 25 April 2014 and the final
day of trading with entitlement to C Shares is 22 April 2014.
Together with the interim issue on 2 January 2014 of 86 C Shares
for each ordinary share with a total nominal value of 8.6 pence,
this is the equivalent of a total annual payment to ordinary
shareholders of 22 pence for each ordinary share.
The payment to shareholders will, as before, be made in the form
of redeemable C Shares which shareholders may either choose to
retain or redeem for a cash equivalent. The Registrar, on behalf of
the Company, operates a C Share Reinvestment Plan (CRIP) and can,
on behalf of shareholders, purchase ordinary shares from the
market rather than delivering a cash payment. Shareholders wishing
to redeem their C Shares or else redeem and participate in the CRIP
must ensure that their instructions are lodged with the Registrar,
Computershare Investor Services PLC, no later than 5.00pm on
2 June 2014. Redemption will take place on 3 July 2014.
Other information
Annual general meeting (AGM)
All holders of ordinary shares are invited to attend the Company’s
AGM. The Chief Executive gives a presentation highlighting key
business developments during the year and shareholders have an
opportunity to ask questions. All directors normally attend the AGM
and the chairmen of the audit, nomination, remuneration, ethics,
safety and risk committees are available to answer any questions
from shareholders on the work of their committees.
The Group has entered into a series of financial instruments to
hedge its currency, interest rate and commodity exposures. These
contracts provide for termination or alteration if a change of
control of the Company materially weakens the creditworthiness
of the Group.
Financial statements
Over 20,000 Rolls-Royce shareholders have registered their email
addresses with etree so that they benefit from immediate
communication of the posting of our preliminary results and of the
publication of our notice of meetings and our online annual report.
This reduces our printing and mailing costs as well as our carbon
footprint. We would encourage other shareholders to register for
this service by following the instructions on the etree website at
www.etreeuk.com/rolls-royce.
Borrowings and other financial instruments
The Group has a number of borrowing facilities provided by
various banks. These facilities generally include provisions which
may require any outstanding borrowings to be repaid or the
alteration or termination of the facility upon the occurrence of
a change of control of the Company. At 31 December 2013 these
facilities were less than 35 per cent drawn (2012 30 per cent).
Directors’ report
Shareholder communications
Information about the Group is available on the Group’s website
(www.rolls-royce.com) and in the published annual report, an online
version of which is also available on the website. The website
contains financial and other information about the Group including
current business strategy, historical financial data, and recent
presentation materials together with information on the Group’s
businesses, products and services.
44
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
AUDIT COMMITTEE REPORT
Our committee is focused on ensuring the integrity
of the Group’s financial reporting and improving
the financial controls framework.
Lewis Booth CBE
Chairman of the audit committee
Committee members and attendance
The audit committee consists exclusively of independent
non-executive directors and met four times in 2013.
Attendance in 2013
Lewis Booth CBE (Chairman)
Iain Conn
Warren East CBE (appointed 1 January 2014)
John Neill CBE
Ian Strachan (retired 2 May 2013)
4/4
4/4
n/a
4/4
2/2
The external auditors KPMG Audit Plc (KPMG), the Director of
Internal Audit, the General Counsel, the Director of Risk, the
Company Secretary, the Chairman of the Board, the Chief
Executive and the Chief Financial Officer are also invited to
attend meetings. Other Board members, including the
remuneration committee chairman and senior executives
attended meetings during the year at the invitation of the
committee chairman.
Key objective:
ő to assist the Board in ensuring the integrity of its
financial statements.
Responsibilities:
ő to review the financial results announcements and financial
statements, monitoring compliance with relevant regulations;
ő to review the appropriateness of accounting policies and the
supporting key judgements and estimates;
ő to assess the scope and effectiveness of the systems to identify,
manage and monitor financial and non-financial risks;
ő to review the procedures for detecting, monitoring and
managing the risk of fraud;
ő to oversee the relationship with the external auditor and make
recommendations to the Board regarding the external auditor’s
appointment; and
ő to review the scope, resources, results and effectiveness of
Internal Audit.
I am pleased to present the report of the audit committee for the
year. I would like to thank committee members, the executive
management team and KPMG for the open discussions that take
place at our meetings and the importance they all attach to its work.
Work of the committee in 2013
At our meetings during 2013, we focused on financial reporting,
internal control, internal audit and external audit. We received
presentations from senior executives from the Civil aerospace,
Defence aerospace and Civil Nuclear businesses. These
presentations covered key accounting judgements and estimates,
internal control and risk management.
We also reviewed the committee’s own terms of reference.
Financial reporting
In addressing our key objective, which is to assist the Board in
ensuring the integrity of its financial statements, we reviewed
financial announcements and financial statements with both
management and the external auditor, concentrating on:
ő compliance with financial reporting standards and governance
reporting requirements;
ő areas requiring significant judgements to be made in applying
accounting policies;
ő the appropriateness of accounting policies;
ő the procedures and controls around estimates that are key in
applying accounting policies;
ő whether the annual report and accounts, taken as a whole, is fair,
balanced and understandable and provides the information
necessary for shareholders to assess the Group’s business model,
strategy and performance; and
ő any relevant correspondence from regulators.
Our committee is focused on ensuring integrity of the Group’s
financial reporting and improving the financial controls framework,
including the restructuring of business audit committees which
now report directly to this committee. During the year, we
encouraged and supported the development of an enhanced
business audit committee process. Under this process, management
of each of the Group’s businesses consider the appropriateness and
related governance of accounting policies, judgements and
estimates and the control environment relating to their businesses
including internal audit findings and the robustness of the
processes used to execute their risk management responsibilities.
We receive reports on the results of these reviews.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
45
Strategic report
Internal control
The Director of Internal Audit provided a report setting out an
overview of the Group’s control environment and we reviewed the
processes by which the control environment is assessed and any
identified weaknesses resolved. We considered control weaknesses
identified by the auditors in accounting for Civil aerospace longterm aftermarket contracts, and management’s plans to address
these. We also received reports of any identified frauds that are
significant or demonstrate significant weakness in internal control.
We also reviewed a report on compliance with the Group’s policies
in respect of expenses incurred by the directors and other senior
executives, which did not identify any significant issues.
Internal Audit
The Director of Internal Audit presented two updates on audit
activities and findings covering six-month periods, the resolution
of control weaknesses, progress against the agreed plan and the
resourcing of the department. We are continuing to develop with
him a simplified metrics-driven approach to the reporting, focusing
on the closure of open items on a timely basis and the identification
of recurring themes. We were satisfied that the scope, extent and
effectiveness of Internal Audit are appropriate for the Group.
I meet the Director of Internal Audit in private before each meeting
and the committee as a whole has a private meeting with him at
least once a year.
External auditor
The external audit is a continuous process. At the start of the audit
cycle, KPMG presented their audit strategy, identifying their
assessment of the key risks for the purposes of the audit and the
scope of their work.
For 2013, these risks were: the implementation of a new
consolidation system; the business combination and Daimler’s
put option in respect of Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH;
impairment of intangible assets; long-term contractual
arrangements; warranties and guarantees; RRSAs; customer
financing arrangements; contingent liabilities; valuation of
derivatives; valuation of pension liabilities; recoverability of tax
assets and adequacy of tax provisions; the adjustments between
the reported results and the Group’s underlying performance; and
the form and content of the annual report. More detail is set out in
KPMG’s report on pages 130 to 135.
Other information
ő carrying values of the principal intangible assets in Civil aerospace
– we considered the business plans for the relevant engine
programmes, including the key assumptions on which they are
based, and which support the value in use assessments for the
intangible assets. We were satisfied that no impairments were
required;
ő long-term contractual arrangements in Civil aerospace – we
reviewed the forecasts of future contract performance on which
the accounting is based. We also considered performance to date
against these forecasts and the results of a detailed review
of certain aspects of the processes supporting these forecasts.
Where the accounting results in a contract asset, we assessed
the recoverability of the asset against agreed criteria. We were
satisfied that the forecasts have been prepared on an appropriate
and consistent basis;
ő risk and revenue sharing arrangements (RRSAs) in Civil aerospace
– (as described in the Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 11),
during the year and following discussions with the Conduct
Committee of the Financial Reporting Council (FRC), the Group
has reassessed its accounting policy for entry fees received from
workshare partners. Adopted IFRS does not contain requirements
that are specific to arrangements of this type and we assessed
possible alternative policies developed by management. We
reviewed the revised policy, considered the FRC’s and KPMG’s views
and I attended a meeting with the FRC. On balance, we agreed
with management’s view that the revised policy fairly reflects
the nature of the transaction and that it should be adopted
retrospectively;
ő we reviewed the contractual arrangements that resulted in the
Group consolidating Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG from 1 January
2013. We also reviewed the accounting for the business
combination, based on a third-party valuation of the intangible
assets acquired, and the valuation of the Daimler put option on
the non-controlling interest. We were satisfied that appropriate
judgements and estimates have been made;
ő customer financing liabilities in Civil aerospace – we considered
the adequacy of provisions for these liabilities. We considered the
likelihood of the liabilities crystallising, based on an assessment
of customers’ fleet plans and their creditworthiness. We also
considered the value of any security held, based on third-party
valuations. We were satisfied that provisions have been made
on an appropriate basis;
Since the year end, we have reviewed the form and content of the
Group’s 2013 annual report. The committee has reported to the
Board that it considers the annual report, taken as a whole, to be fair,
balanced and understandable.
Financial statements
In 2013, our work focused on:
ő contingent liabilities – we considered the adequacy of the
disclosures. In particular, we considered legal advice in respect of
the possible outcome of the SFO enquiries. We were satisfied that
the disclosures appropriately reflect the current position; and
ő segmental reporting – we considered the changes in management
structure and internal reporting described on page 10 and the
implications for reporting in accordance with IFRS 8. We were
satisfied with the appropriateness of the revised segmental
reporting from 1 January 2014.
Directors’ report
Our business is complex; in particular the development of gas
turbines for use in civil aircraft applications requires large upfront
investments, a long period of sale of original equipment, and a very
long period over which we generate profits and cash flows from the
aftermarket by the sale of spare parts and engine maintenance
work. The in-service period could be longer than 25 years for any
engine, and the total life cycle of an engine could be more than
40 years from initial concept, through production, and then through
the in-service life. Much of the aftermarket repair and overhaul is
provided through long-term service agreements. Given this long
exposure, the amount of revenue and profit recognised during any
period requires a significant number of accounting judgements and
estimates, supported by engineering and business assessments.
Consequently, one of our primary responsibilities is to ensure that
the bases for these judgements and estimates are robust.
46
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
AUDIT COMMITTEE REPORT
KPMG reports to the committee at both the half and full-year
setting out their assessment of the Group’s judgements and
estimates in respect of these risks and the adequacy of the
reporting. I meet the lead audit partner in private before each
meeting and the whole committee meets with KPMG in private
at least once a year.
Non-audit services provided by KPMG
In order to safeguard auditors’ independence and objectivity, we do
not engage KPMG for any non-audit services, except where it is work
that they must, or are clearly best suited to perform. Fees paid to
KPMG for audit, audit related and other services are set out in note 8
to the financial statements.
Excluding Rolls-Royce Power Systems (see below), the main non-audit
related services provided by KPMG during the year were in respect
of grant claims and tax compliance and were 11 per cent of the audit
fee. The nature and level of all services provided by the external
auditor is a factor taken into account by the audit committee in its
annual review of the external auditor.
All proposed services must be pre-approved in accordance with
an agreed policy. We review the non-audit fees charged by KPMG
at each meeting and annually review the approval limits.
Following the consolidation of Rolls-Royce Power Systems on
1 January 2013, we took the decision to allow the completion of
engagements already in progress. As a result, Rolls-Royce Power
Systems incurred fees on non-audit services provided by KPMG
in 2013 of £2.1 million, 210 per cent of its audit fee. This will
reduce in 2014.
Audit tendering
The Group is a complex and technologically advanced business
with a long cycle from the development of an engine to its eventual
retirement. We believe that KPMG’s knowledge of this, built up over
a number of years, enhances the effectiveness of the audit and that
the existing professional requirements, such as the rotation of audit
personnel, maintain independence. However, the UK Corporate
Governance Code now requires the external audit contract be
tendered at least every ten years. The FRC has proposed non-binding
transitional arrangements with respect to audit tendering,
including a suggestion that tendering should normally fit the
five-yearly cycle with respect to the lead partner.
We plan to recommend a tender of the audit during the tenure
of the current lead partner which, subject to KPMG’s annual
reappointment, is due to end following the 2017 audit. This will also
satisfy the requirements proposed by the Competition Commission.
However, before we make such a recommendation, we will satisfy
ourselves that, if the tender resulted in a change of auditor: (i) it
would not be unnecessarily disruptive, taking account of any other
activities; and (ii) appropriate plans are in place to ensure audit
effectiveness is maintained. During the year, we approved a tender
plan prepared by management to be used when the audit is
tendered but we do not plan to tender the audit during 2014. The EU
is also finalising requirements which would require mandatory
rotation of auditors. the draft proposals would require us to appoint
a different firm by 2020 at the latest. Once finalised, we will take
account of the EU requirements in our assessment of when to
recommend an audit tender.
Lewis Booth CBE
Reappointment of auditor
Chairman of the audit committee
Following the completion of the audit, we reviewed the effectiveness
and performance of KPMG with feedback from committee members,
senior finance personnel and Internal Audit, covering overall quality,
independence and objectivity, business understanding, technical
knowledge, quality and continuity of personnel, responsiveness and
cost effectiveness. We also considered the reports on KPMG by the
FRC’s Audit Quality Review Team. The audit of Rolls-Royce was not
subject to their review in 2013. KPMG were appointed as auditors in
1990 and this appointment has not been subject to a tender process
since that date.
The lead audit partner is required to rotate every five years and
other key audit partners are required to rotate every seven years.
Jimmy Daboo took over as lead audit partner in 2013 and has had no
previous involvement with Rolls-Royce in any capacity. No contractual
obligations restrict our choice of external auditors. We concluded
that KPMG provides an effective audit and the committee and the
Board have recommended their reappointment at the 2014 AGM.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
47
Directors’ report
We must continue to appoint the best
candidates but we will show an increasing
emphasis on recruiting candidates from
more diverse backgrounds.
Strategic report
NOMINATION COMMITTEE REPORT
Ian Davis
Chairman of the nomination committee
Attendance in 2013
4/4
6/6
5/5
2/2
4/6
5/6
n/a
n/a
6/6
6/6
2/2
2/2
4/6
2/2
The committee decided on July 2013 that the committee should only consist of
non-executive directors and John Rishton therefore ceased to be a member.
Key objective:
ő to lead the process for appointments to the Rolls-Royce Board.
Responsibilities:
ő monitor the composition and performance of the Board and
its committees;
ő evaluate the balance of skills and experience on the Board and
the diversity of its members;
ő consider and recommend the appointment and removal
of directors;
ő monitor executive development and succession planning;
ő evaluate any conflicts of interest that directors might have; and
ő evaluate the independence of the non-executive directors and
their time commitments.
During the year, the committee continued to develop its succession
plans for new non-executive directors taking into account their
respective tenures of office, analysing the skills which were either
missing or could be missing in future and how different personalities
would fit around the Board table. We are very clear that we must
continue to appoint the best candidates but we will show an
increasing emphasis on recruiting candidates from more diverse
backgrounds and with international experience.
We are pleased that Lee Hsien Yang has joined the Board as a
non-executive director. Hsien Yang was already known to the Board
as a valued member of the IAB (a role that he has relinquished upon
his appointment to the Board). The committee did not therefore
engage search consultants in connection with his appointment.
Hsien Yang will bring to our Board a wealth of business experience
in the Asian marketplace. His biography can be found on page 37.
The Board has been further bolstered by the appointment of Warren
East as a non-executive director. Warren has extensive experience in
the global technology sector and an outstanding record of business
achievement that will be of great value to Rolls-Royce. His biography
can be found on page 36. Both Warren and Hsien Yang took up their
posts from 1 January 2014. Sciteb was engaged as search consultant
for Warren’s appointment. The firm has no other connection with
the Company.
The topic of boardroom diversity has received much attention over
the past two years. In September 2011, we issued our response to
the Davies Report on women on boards stating that we expected to
make demonstrable progress in this area by 2015. Maintaining the
right balance on the Board and getting the succession policy right is
high on my agenda and the Board is clear that purposeful diversity
is a valuable goal. Gender diversity is an important part of that
although we do not consider it appropriate to fix a specific target.
We continue to participate in the FTSE 100 Cross-Company
Mentoring Programme, the objective of which is to increase the pool
of eligible senior female candidates for UK board positions and we
have comprehensive programmes in place to increase the diversity
of our internal pipeline of future leaders. We have also issued
guidance to executive search companies outlining the importance
of diverse candidate short lists. Further details of our gender
representation can be found in sustainability on page 27.
Other information
Ian Davis (Chairman) (appointed 1 March 2013)
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom (retired 2 May 2013)
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Warren East CBE (appointed 1 January 2014)
Lee Hsien Yang (appointed 1 January 2014)
John McAdam
John Neill CBE
John Rishton
Sir Simon Robertson (retired 2 May 2013)
Jasmin Staiblin
Ian Strachan (retired 2 May 2013)
I am pleased to present my first report as chairman of the
nomination committee.
Financial statements
Committee members and attendance
The nomination committee consists of all of the non-executive
directors and met six times in 2013.
48
Directors’ report
NOMINATION COMMITTEE REPORT
During the year, the committee reviewed the use of executive search
consultants and concluded that the existing agency relationships
were working well and should continue. The overarching brief is to
find candidates of international stature, with international mindsets
and relevant experience who could demonstrate sound judgement
and board skills with an emphasis towards greater diversity.
MWM Consulting was engaged in the search for the vacant
chairman’s post earlier in 2013. A detailed brief was approved by the
Board covering both the responsibilities of the role and the desired
profile which formed the blueprint against which candidates were
identified and assessed. The search was broad and global in outlook,
constrained only by the requirements of the brief. Seventy
candidates from ten different countries were actively considered.
MWM Consulting has no other connection with the Company.
In addition to the work described above, the committee also carried
out the following tasks during the year:
ő considered time commitments and potential conflicts faced by
directors who wished to take up non-executive positions on the
boards of other companies;
ő authorised John Rishton’s acceptance of a non-executive role
at Unilever;
ő reviewed its own terms of reference;
ő considered the independence of the non-executive directors;
ő considered the standing schedule of directors’ conflicts of interest
and recommended to the Board that the schedule be approved;
ő recommended the appointment of a new Chairman and two
new non-executive directors and renewed terms of office for
Dame Helen Alexander, John McAdam and Iain Conn;
ő discussed governance arrangements for the Group and the Board
evaluation process;
ő reviewed the Board’s diversity policy; and
ő since the year end, the committee has reviewed and approved the
form of this report.
Ian Davis
Chairman of the nomination committee
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
49
Strategic report
ETHICS COMMITTEE REPORT
Directors’ report
The Board has a firm belief that the only
way we can succeed as a Group is by
applying sound and ethical business
practices wherever we operate.
Iain Conn
Chairman of the ethics committee
Attendance in 2013
3/3
4/4
4/4
1/1
n/a
3/4
1/1
The Chairman of the Board, the Chief Executive, the General
Counsel, the Director of Risk and the Head of Business Ethics are
also invited to attend meetings on a regular basis.
Key objective:
ő review compliance with Rolls-Royce ethics policies.
Responsibilities:
ő review compliance with and recommend changes to the
Global Code of Conduct;
ő monitor evolving practice and requirements of regulatory bodies
and recommend how they should be applied in the Group;
ő establish bribery prevention policies and procedures;
ő review arrangements by which staff may raise concerns
and ensure such concerns are handled effectively; and
ő ensure that ethical policies and practices are subject to an
appropriate level of independent internal scrutiny.
Referral to Serious Fraud Office (SFO)
On 6 December 2012, we announced that we had passed
information to the SFO relating to concerns in overseas markets.
Since that date we have continued our investigations and are
engaging with the SFO and other authorities in the UK, the USA and
elsewhere. In December 2013, we announced that we had been
informed by the SFO that it had commenced a formal investigation.
The consequence of these disclosures will be decided by the
regulatory authorities. It remains too early to predict the outcomes,
but these could include the prosecution of individuals and of the
Group. Accordingly, the potential for fines, penalties or other
consequences (including debarment from government contracts,
suspension of export privileges and reputational damage) cannot
currently be assessed. As the investigation is ongoing, it is not yet
possible to identify the timescale in which these issues might be
resolved. We continue to demand the highest standards of behaviour
from our people. John Rishton has stated unequivocally that neither
he nor the Board will tolerate improper business conduct of any sort
and all necessary action will be taken to ensure compliance.
Lord Gold’s review
The Group has taken significant further action to strengthen and
enhance its ethics and compliance programme. In January 2013,
the Group appointed Lord Gold to review its ethical and compliance
procedures and make recommendations. Lord Gold began his work
in 2013 reporting directly to the ethics committee and attending
its meetings. In July 2013, he presented an interim report, having
interviewed over 80 senior managers across the Group. In addition
to a number of detailed recommendations, the report drew
attention to the need for further strengthening of the Group’s ethics
and compliance function in the following three areas: develop and
implement an integrity and values communication strategy;
provide integrity and values training for all employees; and
reorganise the compliance function. The ethics committee, the
Board and the ELT have all reviewed and accepted Lord Gold’s
interim report and the recommendations made in it and the Group
has started to implement those recommendations. The Group has
Other information
Iain Conn (Chairman)
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom (retired 2 May 2013)
Lee Hsien Yang (appointed 1 January 2014)
Jasmin Staiblin
Ian Strachan (retired 2 May 2013)
The ethics committee was formed in 2008 in response to the
publication of the Woolf Committee report. It is responsible, on
behalf of the Board, for reviewing compliance with the Group’s
Global Code of Conduct, for improving bribery and corruption
prevention policies and for reviewing arrangements by which
staff may raise ethical concerns in confidence. It considers
recommendations on ethical matters made by external regulatory
authorities or other bodies and makes recommendations to the
Board on how they should be applied in Rolls-Royce. I would like to
thank Ian Strachan for his chairmanship of this committee from
November 2008 to May 2013.
Financial statements
Committee members and attendance
The ethics committee consists exclusively of independent
non-executive directors and met four times in 2013.
50
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
ETHICS COMMITTEE REPORT
developed an holistic ethics and compliance improvement
programme, overseen by a newly appointed Director of Risk,
clarifying, with a new Global Code of Conduct, what is expected
from all individuals in the Group, defining processes to combat
bribery and corruption and strengthening oversight and review of
the Group’s performance in these areas. The following is a summary
of some of the Group’s major activities undertaken in 2013:
Global Code of Conduct (Global Code)
In July 2013, the Board and the ELT approved a revised version of the
Group’s Global Code of Conduct which is a condensed, updated and
more readable version of the previous Global Code of Business
Ethics. The Global Code is being used as a platform for the Group’s
enhanced ethics and compliance programme and its rollout is being
supported by manager-led face-to-face awareness briefings for all
employees and a detailed programme of training which will
continue. The Board and the ELT received the awareness briefing
and supporting ethics training in July 2013 and provided feedback
and input into the materials. The Board agreed that the training
programme would be compulsory for all employees.
The rollout programme started in September 2013 and will be
delivered to all employees and all new starters. All employees are
being asked to certify they have: received a copy of the Global Code;
read and understood it; will comply with it; and have received a
management briefing. In future years, periodic refresher training
will continue and will also be compulsory.
Ethics Line
Since 2008, employees have been able to access a confidential
reporting line to report any concerns they might have. In 2013, the
Group has reviewed, updated and re-launched its confidential
reporting line (now known as the Ethics Line). Today we have contact
numbers in 48 countries in addition to a web-based reporting tool
which enables employees to ask questions or raise concerns
24 hours a day wherever they are based in the world. The ethics
committee receives reports and questions raised through the Ethics
Line. In July 2013, it was agreed that an oversight committee would
be established to monitor the detailed operation of the Ethics Line
and ensure it remains effective and efficient.
Anti-bribery and corruption policies (ABC policies)
Much progress has been made in developing policies to govern the
use of intermediaries since the formation of the ethics committee
in 2008. The number of intermediaries used by our businesses has
continued to fall dramatically during the year. Businesses now have
greater ownership and direct responsibility for the marketing, sales
and support of the Group’s products and services. An updated
and simpler version of the Global Gifts and Hospitality Policy was
introduced in October 2012 and work has continued in the year to
capture data, develop a reporting regime and develop key metrics.
In July 2013, following the issue of Lord Gold’s interim report, the
Director of Risk undertook to carry out a further thorough review
of all ABC policies, taking account of Lord Gold’s recommendations.
This review is underway and the Group has started the process
of updating and modifying its suite of anti-bribery and corruption
policies so that they are robust, simpler, meet the current needs
of the business and are embedded as a core part of the Group’s
processes for winning new business. All revised and enhanced ABC
policies and procedures will meet the recommendations made by
Lord Gold and will be supported by a training programme.
ABC compliance team
The ABC compliance organisation’s remit is to embed the ABC
policies in the businesses, take the ABC programme into a ‘business
as usual’ mode and make compliance a central part of the Group’s
processes for winning new business. The ABC compliance team has
been reorganised during the year to ensure team members remain
independent of the businesses they are policing. The team has been
strengthened with the creation of several new roles and broader
areas of responsibility including offset compliance. A new role of
Head of Risk Training has been created to ensure that there is a
robust and effective training programme to support all risk policies
including compliance and ethics. In response to Lord Gold’s
recommendations, a protocol is being developed which will ensure
that the Group’s Legal, HR, Compliance and Ethics functions work
in a co-ordinated manner when investigating potential ethics and
compliance breaches, ensuring that any proposed disciplinary action
is reported to the Director of Risk.
Ethics team
The ethics team manages the Global Code and the reporting
Helplines. It works closely with the compliance team. The team has
been strengthened by the creation of the new role of Group Ethics
Officer responsible for establishing and co-ordinating a network of
trained ethics officers across all business sectors to act as a local
point of contact for ethical issues.
Conclusion
When I took up the post of chairman of the ethics committee in
2013, I was well aware of the huge amount of effort and resource
that this Group had already dedicated to improving the way our
employees conduct our business. The Board has a firm belief that
the only way we can succeed as a Group is by applying sound and
ethical business practices wherever we operate. We are equally
aware that there will always be more to do and we must always
seek to improve.
Iain Conn
Chairman of the ethics committee
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
51
Strategic report
RISK COMMITTEE REPORT
Directors’ report
We have benefited from the work we
did in 2012 to concentrate our focus
on a smaller number of risks.
John Rishton
Chairman of the risk committee
3/3
3/3
3/3
2/3
Other members of the Executive Leadership Team, the Director
of Risk, the Company Secretary and the Head of Enterprise Risk
Management are also invited to attend meetings.
Key objective:
ő to assist the Board in determining the nature and extent
of the principal risks it is willing to take in achieving its
strategic objectives.
Responsibilities:
ő develop and implement the Company’s Risk Management
strategy and policy;
ő review reports on key risks and monitor the total level of risk
across the Group; and
ő assess the adequacy of management plans to address the risks.
Introduction
Each of the Group’s principal risks are owned by specific members of
my executive team. We continually review and challenge ourselves
as to whether these continue to be our principal risks and whether
our management of those risks remains effective. This year, in
addition to executive directors, all members of my executive team
were invited to attend the meetings to ensure there was enhanced
visibility of the principal risks affecting the business and good
communication of the outcomes of our discussions to each of the
businesses and functions.
Work of the committee in 2013
The committee discussed all of the key risks in depth in advance of
the annual and half-year results process and produced a report on
principal risks for the Board’s approval. It also discussed the work
of the Crisis Management Team and agreed to hold more frequent
crisis management exercises. During the year, work continued on
the development of meaningful indicators to measure the principal
Risk process
The Director of Risk leads our risk team across the Group which
is responsible for implementing risk policy and processes. Line
ownership for risk management is devolved to our business units
and functions, supported by a network of risk champions and
risk managers.
Other information
Attendance in 2013
John Rishton (Chairman)
Jim Guyette
Mark Morris
Colin Smith CBE
risks. More focus was given to our key business continuity risks and
the committee considered and assessed each of the key business
continuity risks identified by the businesses and their mitigation
plans. Our discussion on IT vulnerability led us to have an in-depth
review of our IT Operations Centre and give detailed consideration
to how IT security risks, including the growing global threat of cyber
attack, are managed. We also reviewed the committee’s own terms
of reference.
Financial statements
Committee members and attendance
The risk committee consists of all of the executive directors and
met three times in 2013.
Each business maintains a risk register which comprises those risks
that it considers are material to its objectives and operations. The
businesses regularly review the effectiveness and consistency of
risk management activity via their assurance framework and the
application of the risk management process, all of which are subject
to review by the business audit committees. Each business formally
reviews their risks at least twice yearly taking account of work
carried out by the underlying business units, programmes and
functions. Business continuity plans are put in place by the
businesses to mitigate continuity risks.
Every six months, as part of the full- and half-year results process,
the risk committee reviews the key risks that the businesses and
functions report in accordance with our enterprise-wide risk
management system. The committee cross-checks the risks
identified by the business with those risks it has identified from its
own assessments and concludes a list of principal risks. During the
year, the committee discusses how the risks have changed and how
each risk is managed, identifying where further action is required.
We have benefited from the work we did in 2012 to concentrate our
focus on a smaller number of risks. I am particularly pleased with
the way the quality of discussion at these meetings has improved
as a result of this focus. The attendance of business presidents at
meetings has provided greater visibility across the Group of the
principal risks and has enabled the Group to better manage and
mitigate such risks.
John Rishton
Chairman of the risk committee
52
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
SAFETY COMMITTEE REPORT
The safety of our products and our
people will always remain a central
pillar of our business.
Sir Frank Chapman
Chairman of the safety committee
Committee members and attendance
The safety committee consists exclusively of independent
non-executive directors and met twice in 2013.
Attendance in 2013
Sir Frank Chapman (Chairman)
Iain Conn
Lee Hsien Yang (appointed 1 January 2014)
John McAdam
2/2
2/2
n/a
2/2
The Chairman of the Board, the Chief Executive, the General
Counsel, the Director – Engineering and Technology, the Company
Secretary, the Technical and Quality Director and the Head of
Product Safety Assurance are also invited to attend meetings.
Key objective:
ő review and assure the Board on all safety policies, practices and
procedures and ensure that these operate reliably and to
appropriate industry standards.
Responsibilities:
ő keep product safety, HS&E, and personnel security policies
under review;
ő make recommendations as to content and communication
of those policies;
ő measure and review safety performance; and
ő review external issues which relate to safety policies
and practices.
management system and on recent developments in safety in the
aerospace industry. It also examined the findings of the Australian
Transport Safety Bureau in respect of the Qantas QF32 event and the
actions taken by the Group.
In September, the committee was briefed by senior manufacturing
and quality managers from the supply chain units (SCUs), the
Technical and Quality Director and the Head of Product Safety
Assurance on the Rolls-Royce Management System as it applies to
safety. This was followed by an in-depth look at the compressor SCU
and the design to manufacture process for wide-chord fan blades
as well as the process for monitoring on-going blade production.
At our meeting in December, the committee reviewed how the
Director – Engineering and Technology executes his accountability
for product safety on behalf of the Chief Executive through the
Company Product Safety Review Board and the Quality System.
The committee also reviewed its own terms of reference.
Health, safety and environment
In July, the committee considered how the As Low as Reasonably
Practical (ALARP) approach is applied to HS&E risks, and received
updates on the global improvement programmes being
implemented in relation to process safety management and
electrical safety.
In December, we received an update on 2013 HS&E activity,
including briefings on the global improvement programmes related
to process safety, electrical safety and occupational health.
Further information on our HS&E performance can be found in
sustainability on pages 28 and 29.
Product safety
In all sectors, the Group supplies high value capital products that are
strictly regulated with regard to safety. Civil aerospace products are
required to meet relevant airworthiness authority standards, whilst
defence operators define their own standards for military aerospace
and naval products. Our Marine and Energy businesses need to
meet industry specific standards with our Nuclear business being
particularly highly regulated.
Overall the committee made good progress in 2013, particularly in
relation to examining the processes that manage product safety.
Alongside this central theme, the areas of asset integrity,
occupational safety, occupational health, environmental
performance and personnel security arrangements for staff
working in difficult environments were reviewed. In 2014, we intend
to establish a framework for a structured cyclical review of all HS&E
and personnel security matters.
In June 2013, the committee reviewed a Trent case study which
demonstrated how the Company’s product safety process operates
in practice both in the design stage and during the operational life
of an engine. The committee found this product safety process to be
very thorough and of a very high standard.
This is a Company built on a brand promise of being ‘trusted to
deliver excellence’ and the safety of our products and our people
will always remain a central pillar of our business.
At its meeting in July 2013, the committee considered how the
Group applied judgements in product safety beyond the levels
defined in legislation. It received an update on the product safety
Sir Frank Chapman
Chairman of the safety committee
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
53
Directors’ report
We believe that our remuneration policy
is aligned with our strategy to enhance
long-term value for our stakeholders.
Strategic report
REMUNERATION COMMITTEE REPORT
Dame Helen Alexander
Chairman of the remuneration committee
Attendance in 2013
Dame Helen Alexander
Sir Frank Chapman
John McAdam
5/5
4/5
5/5
Key objective:
ő to develop a remuneration policy capable of attracting and
retaining individuals necessary for business success.
Responsibilities:
ő to consider and make recommendations to the Board on the
policy for the remuneration of the executive directors,
members of the Executive Leadership Team and other direct
reportees to the Chief Executive (collectively the Senior
Executives) and the Chairman;
ő to determine the whole remuneration package for Senior
Executives and recommend to the Board the whole
remuneration package for the Chairman;
ő to determine the terms and conditions of service contracts for
Senior Executives;
ő to determine the design, conditions and coverage of any annual
and long-term incentive schemes for Senior Executives and to
approve total and individual payments under these schemes;
ő to determine targets for any annual and long-term incentive
schemes;
ő to determine the issue and terms of all share-based plans
available to all employees;
ő to determine compensation (if any) in the event of termination
of service contracts of any of the Senior Executives; and
ő to approve the appointment of former executive directors by
the Company as consultants.
The report is divided into two sections. A policy report which sets
out the approach to remuneration, and a remuneration report
which details what has been paid to the directors during 2013.
Each report will be proposed as a separate resolution at the AGM.
The vote on the policy report is a binding vote.
The remuneration policy must be approved at least every three years
if it remains unchanged, or sooner in the event the policy needs
revising. The policy will become effective on 1 May 2014 subject to
shareholder approval at the AGM.
We have a clearly defined strategy to win in competitive markets
through our focus on the customer, innovation and profitable
growth. Our remuneration policy supports the delivery of this
strategy and aligns the interests of our directors with that of our
shareholders. This is achieved by short-term and long-term incentive
plans which focus on delivering business objectives, profitable
growth and strong shareholder returns. Annual incentives are also
based on personal performance which will include the progress
made on longer-term strategic objectives. An important principle
of the annual bonus plan is that no bonus can be paid unless the
entire Group has achieved a base level of business performance.
For the first time, the bonus and PSP targets we set in 2014 will
include both profit and cash contributions from Rolls-Royce Power
Systems. We believe this is appropriate now that Rolls-Royce Power
Systems is being integrated into the Rolls-Royce business.
Our overall remuneration policy remains relatively conservative
which has served us well in recent years. There will be no increase in
basic pay for most of the senior leadership team in 2014. We remain
satisfied that the existing remuneration arrangements continue to
align with the Group’s strategy and there are no plans to change the
current arrangements significantly. The committee will continue to
monitor our market competitiveness in order to ensure we are able
to attract and retain the best talent.
Annual bonus
For executive directors and all senior managers, a proportion of any
annual bonus is made in deferred shares. The committee has agreed
to allow flexibility to allot new shares to satisfy awards and this
provision will be part of the new Rolls-Royce plc Deferred Share
Bonus Plan which will be proposed at this year’s AGM.
Other information
The Chairman, the Chief Executive, the Director – Human
Resources, the HR Director – Reward & Pensions, the Company
Secretary and the Chief Financial Officer are also invited to
attend meetings. None of these executives were present during
any discussion of their own remuneration packages.
On behalf of the Board, I am pleased to present our directors’
remuneration report that has been prepared in accordance
with the new reporting regulations which became effective
on 1 October 2013.
Financial statements
Committee members and attendance
The remuneration committee consists exclusively of independent
non-executive directors and met five times in 2013.
54
Directors’ report
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
REMUNERATION COMMITTEE REPORT
Performance Share Plan
The current Performance Share Plan (PSP), approved by shareholders
ten years ago, expires in 2014. A new PSP will be put forward for
approval at the AGM. This will be broadly unchanged with the
following two exceptions which we believe increase the link to
shareholder interests:
ő the new plan will contain malus and clawback provisions to enable
the withdrawal or amendment of share grants before vesting and
the right to reclaim awards that have vested or their proceeds in
the case of serious non-compliance with the Group’s Global Code
of Conduct, reputational damage or gross misconduct; and
ő the directors will be obliged to retain half of all PSP shares released
to them until a multiple of salary is reached. The shareholding
requirement has been increased to 250 per cent of salary for the
Chief Executive and 200 per cent of salary for the other executive
directors. The share retention policy is explained on page 66.
Annual bonus outcome
This year’s bonus reflects on-target performance. Group underlying
profit was £1,500 million which met the base level performance,
and there was a net cash inflow of £312 million which resulted in an
annual bonus outcome of 60 per cent. The targets and results exclude
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG (previously named Tognum AG).
Summary of activity during 2013
During 2013, amongst other things, the committee:
ő endorsed the out-turn of the 2012 annual bonus and 2010 PSP;
ő reviewed executive directors’ base salary levels;
ő set 2013 annual bonus targets and performance targets for the
PSP 2013 – 2015;
ő recommended the approval of the 2012 remuneration report
to the Board;
ő approved PSP grants to certain senior management;
ő considered the structure of the annual bonus for 2014;
ő considered the new BIS regulations in respect of drafting the
remuneration report;
ő considered the projected out-turns for the 2013 annual bonus,
All-Employee Bonus Scheme and the 2011 PSP;
ő considered a benchmarking report for the executive salary review
in 2014; and
ő reviewed its own terms of reference.
We believe our current remuneration practices are in line with
the new reporting regulations and we welcome the structure and
transparency introduced by the new requirements. Overall, we
believe that our remuneration policy is aligned with our strategy
to enhance long-term value for our stakeholders.
Dame Helen Alexander
PSP outcome
Chairman of the remuneration committee
Over the three-year performance period for the 2011 PSP grant,
earnings per share growth was 60 per cent, which exceeded the
OECD index of consumer prices of six per cent, and cash flow per
share was 86p. This resulted in 100 per cent of the shares
conditionally granted being released. The Company’s Total
Shareholder Return (TSR) performance was ninth in the FTSE 100 over
the three-year performance period which resulted in a 50 per cent
increase in the number of shares released to executive directors.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
55
Strategic report
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION POLICY
Accordingly, the remuneration policy will continue to reflect the
following broad principles:
Policy report
The policy will start on 1 May 2014, subject to shareholder approval at the AGM.
Financial statements
ő the remuneration of executive directors and other senior
executives should reflect their responsibilities and contain
incentives to deliver the Group’s performance objectives without
encouraging excessive risk taking;
ő remuneration must be capable of attracting and retaining
the individuals necessary for business success;
ő remuneration policy must be sufficiently flexible to take
account of changes in the Group’s business environment and
market practices;
ő total remuneration should be based on Group and individual
performance, both in the short and long term;
ő the system of remuneration should establish a close identity of
interest between senior executives and shareholders through
measures such as encouraging the senior executives to acquire
shares in the Company. Therefore a significant proportion of
senior executive remuneration will comprise share-based
long-term incentives; and
ő when determining remuneration, the committee will take into
account pay and employment conditions elsewhere in the Group.
Directors’ report
Remuneration policy framework
The Group is committed to achieving sustained improvements
in performance and this depends crucially on the individual
contributions made by the executive team and by employees at all
levels. The Board believes that an effective remuneration strategy
plays an essential part in the future success of the Group.
Executive directors’ remuneration policy
Salary
Purpose and link
to strategy
It is essential that the
Company provides
competitive salaries,
suitable to attract
and retain individuals
of the right calibre to
develop and execute
the business strategy.
Operation
Maximum
opportunity
Performance
measures
Salary levels are set using careful
judgement, taking into account
the scope of the role and
responsibilities, performance,
experience, potential, retention
issues and salaries elsewhere in the
Group. Judgement will be informed,
but not led, by reference to
companies of a similar size,
complexity and internationality.
Salaries are reviewed annually and
normally fixed for 12 months from
1 March each year. However, salary
increases are not automatic.
Exceptionally, salaries may be
increased on other dates in the year.
Executive directors may be
appointed at salaries below the
target level to enable pay
progression commensurate with
growth in the new role.
Annual salary increases will not
normally exceed average increases
for employees in other appropriate
parts of the Group.
On occasion, increases may be
larger where the committee
considers this to be necessary.
Circumstances where this may apply
include: growth into a role; to
reflect a change in scope of role and
responsibilities; where market
conditions indicate a level of under
competitiveness and the committee
judges that there is a risk in relation
to attracting or retaining
executives.
Where the committee exercises its
discretion to award increases above
the average for other employees, the
resulting salary will not exceed the
competitive market range.
None, although individual
performance is the primary
consideration in setting salary
alongside overall Company
affordability and market
competitiveness.
Other information
Element
56
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION POLICY
Executive directors’ remuneration policy
Element
Purpose and link
to strategy
Operation
Maximum
opportunity
Performance
measures
Benefits
To provide marketcompetitive benefits
sufficient to recruit
and retain, and to
support the
executive to give
maximum attention
to their role.
Benefits provided include a car or
car allowance, contribution to the
cost of fuel, use of a driver, financial
planning assistance, life assurance
and medical insurance. Other
appropriate benefits may be
provided from time-to-time at the
discretion of the committee.
Certain benefits, such as
accommodation or use of a driver,
are to enable an executive to devote
maximum time and attention to
their role. Club membership fees
may also be provided. The Group
may pay any tax due on these
benefits.
The Group offers relocation for
executives to be located within
reasonable reach of their place
of work. Where relocation is not
practical or a preferred option, or
where work is mainly split between
two locations, support for
accommodation and travel may
be provided.
Relocation support may include
items such as transaction and legal
fees, removals, disturbance
allowance and temporary travel
and subsistence costs. International
relocation support may include
items such as school fees, tax
equalisation and home visits.
Benefits will be market competitive
taking into account the role and the
local market.
Benefits excluding any
accommodation, relocation and
associated tax costs will not exceed
£100,000 per annum.
The value of benefits provided for
international and domestic
relocation and any ongoing
accommodation and travel support
will be appropriate to the individual
circumstances of the executive and
only expenses that the committee
considers necessary and appropriate
will be supported.
None.
Pension
To provide marketcompetitive
pensions sufficient
to recruit and retain.
New executives to the Company are
offered membership of a defined
contribution pension plan. Pension
contributions are based on base
salary only.
There are a number of legacy
pension arrangements, including
defined benefit plans, which were in
place before 27 June 2012 and have
not changed since. Commitments
to these arrangements will be
honoured.
Executives may opt to receive a cash
allowance in lieu of pension.
The maximum employer
contribution to defined
contribution pension arrangements
is 38% of base salary. Under the
Group’s legacy defined benefit
arrangements, the pension due is
the higher of a pension based on
the executive’s final salary, with a
maximum annual accrual rate of
2.5%, or based on career average
salary with a maximum annual
accrual rate of 3.3%. The resulting
pension is limited so that the
maximum pension at normal
retirement age is two thirds of the
executive’s final remuneration. The
benefits under these arrangements
include a lump sum payable on
death in service and pensions for
surviving spouses, civil partners
and certain dependants.
None.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
57
Strategic report
Executive directors’ remuneration policy
Element
Purpose and link
to strategy
Operation
Pension
continued
Performance
measures
Executives may opt to receive a cash
allowance in lieu of pension. The
cash allowance is calculated to be
equivalent to the employer’s defined
contribution pension contributions,
reduced to allow for the additional
National Insurance cost incurred
by the employer.
James Guyette participates in
qualified and non-qualified defined
benefit and defined contribution
pension arrangements in the US.
Under these various arrangements
combined it is expected that the
benefits provided by the Company
will be equivalent in value to a
pension of two thirds of salary, with
post retirement increases similar to
those required by statute in the UK.
The current maximum annual
bonus, linked to business
performance, is 135% of salary for
the Chief Executive and 125% for
other executive directors. This is
based on achieving the highest
targets set for business performance.
However, the committee may adjust
the bonus to reflect personal
performance as described in the
previous column, giving an overall
maximum of 162% and 150%
respectively.
The committee has the discretion to
increase the overall maximum bonus
level to 200% of salary for the Chief
Executive and 175% for other
executive directors, subject to this
not being above the competitive
market range.
The bonus payout level is
determined primarily by Group
financial performance but the
committee may introduce
non-financial metrics and/or
adjust the payout level to reflect
other factors as appropriate.
The final bonus awarded to each
director is also linked to their
personal performance.
Any non-financial metrics used
in the annual bonus plan will be
linked to the Group’s strategy and
will not be weighted more than
50% of the whole bonus. A
principle applies that no bonus is
payable unless the base financial
targets are achieved and this also
applies if non-financial measures
are introduced.
Based on the current bonus
opportunity:
Chief Executive: Bonus generated
by business performance is 40%
of salary for achieving the base
level targets and 135% of salary
for achieving the highest level of
targets. Bonus may then be
adjusted for personal
performance in a range 0-120%
at committee discretion with
100% typically applying for good
performance and a 20% uplift
available for outstanding
personal performance.
Other executive directors:
Bonus generated by business
performance is 37% of salary for
achieving the base level targets
and 125% of salary for achieving
the highest level of targets.
Bonus may then be adjusted for
personal performance as above.
Other information
The committee sets Group financial
targets and agrees personal
objectives for each executive director
at the start of the financial year.
At the end of the year, business
performance determines the
Company bonus payout level and the
committee considers whether any
adjustment to the payout level is
appropriate. Each executive
director’s bonus is also dependent on
the achievement of their personal
objectives and wider contribution to
the Group. The committee may apply
an uplift of up to 20% or a reduction,
potentially to zero, as appropriate.
A portion of the bonus paid, in a
range 30% to 50%, is compulsorily
deferred into the Company’s shares
for a period of two years and is
subject to continued employment
(with early release in certain
circumstances). There are no further
performance conditions.
Deferred shares may receive a bonus
issue of C Shares or equivalent
during the deferral period.
The bonus plan is non-contractual
and may be offered on a year-by-year
basis. The committee has the right to
apply the malus provision on an
individual or group basis and amend
or withdraw the bonus before
payment. From 2014, the same right
over deferred shares will apply as will
the right to clawback bonuses paid or
vested shares on an individual basis
if it can be demonstrated that
individuals have acted in an
improper manner. Malus and/or
clawback provisions may apply in
exceptional cases such as: material
misstatement of results; a material
failure of risk management; serious
reputational damage; serious
individual wrongdoing such as
non-compliance with the Company’s
Code of Conduct; or gross
misconduct.
Financial statements
To incentivise and
reward execution of
the business strategy,
delivery of financial
performance targets
and achievement of
personal objectives.
Compulsory deferral
of part of any bonus
encourages retention
and provides
alignment with
shareholders.
Directors’ report
Annual
bonus
Maximum
opportunity
58
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION POLICY
Executive directors’ remuneration policy
Element
Purpose and link
to strategy
Operation
Maximum
opportunity
Performance
measures
Performance To incentivise and
Share Plan reward development
(PSP)
and execution of the
business strategy
Post 2014
over the longer term.
AGM
onwards
The plan provides
alignment with
shareholder interests
through the
performance
measures chosen
and a retention
element through
the plan timescale.
A shareholding
requirement is linked
to the PSP in order
to further provide
alignment with
shareholders.
The link between the
performance
measures and the
Company’s strategy
is explained in the
notes to this table on
page 59.
Executive directors are granted
awards over shares annually at the
start of a three-year performance
period. The proportion of the those
awards that vest is determined at
the end of the period according
to a set of Company performance
measures.
Vesting of awards is subject to
continued employment until
vesting date with the exception
of certain leaver circumstances,
in which case vesting is subject
to Company performance and
pro-rating for service.
The plan rules contain malus and
clawback provisions. The committee
has the right to amend and
withdraw share grants before
vesting for individuals and groups
and the right to reclaim vested
shares or their proceeds from
individuals where it has been
demonstrated that they acted in
an improper manner. Situations
where the provisions will apply are
as described in the bonus section
on page 57.
Executive directors are required to
hold a level of shareholding as
described on page 66.
The Chief Executive is granted
awards each year over shares to the
value of 120% of salary. Other
executive directors are granted
100% of salary. Subject to the
earnings per share (EPS) condition
being met, these shares vest at the
end of the performance period if
the Company has achieved the
maximum target set for cash flow
per share (CPS). The number of
shares vesting can be increased by
25% for above median TSR ranking
rising to 50% increase for upper
quartile TSR ranking.
Maximum face values of annual
awards are therefore 180% of salary
for the Chief Executive and 150% of
salary for other executive directors.
The three corporate performance
measures are:
Performance The purpose of the
Share Plan 2004 share plan is
fully consistent with
(PSP)
the purpose of the
Legacy
2014 plan described
awards –
above.
2004 plan
The operation of the 2004 plan is as
described above with the exception
of malus and clawback elements
which will apply for 2014 grants.
As above.
As above.
ShareSave
Plan
This savings-related
share option plan
provides all
employees
worldwide an
interest in the
performance of
Rolls-Royce shares.
Executive directors may participate
on the same terms as other
employees. The option price may be
discounted by up to 20%.
Accumulated savings may be used
to exercise an option to acquire
shares.
The maximum savings amount is
currently £250 per month over a
three- or five-year period. This may
be increased in accordance with
changes to UK legislation.
No performance measures are
permitted by UK legislation
applicable to this type of plan.
Share
Incentive
Plan (SIP)
UK employees may
elect to receive part
of any annual bonus
in shares.
UK employees may
elect to make regular
monthly purchases
of shares from
pre-tax income.
UK-based executive directors may
participate on the same terms as all
other UK employees. Shares held in
the SIP for five years will vest free
from income tax and National
Insurance contributions.
Currently, up to £3,000 of the
annual cash bonus can be applied
to purchase shares.
The maximum monthly amount
of £125 may be used to purchase
shares.
The above limits may be increased
in accordance with changes to UK
legislation.
The award of any bonus
will depend on performance
conditions (see page 57) but no
further conditions apply once the
employee elects to participate
in the SIP.
1. EPS – condition.
The increase in EPS over the
three-year period must exceed
an appropriate index of consumer
prices for the same period. If this
condition is not met share vesting
is zero.
2. CPS – prime measure.
The aggregate CPS over the
performance period will
determine the number of shares
which vest. Achieving a base
target of CPS will result in 30% of
the shares vesting and achieving
a maximum CPS target will cause
100% of the shares to vest. The
number of shares which may vest
is determined on a straight-line
basis between the 30% and
100% level.
3. Total Shareholder Return (TSR)
relative to FTSE 100 or other
appropriate index. The number
of shares vesting will be increased
by 25% if the Company’s TSR is
ranked above the median of the
FTSE 100, or other appropriate
index, over the same periods and
by 50% if ranked at or above the
upper quartile of the same group.
Intermediate TSR ranking will
increase the number of shares
released on a straight-line basis.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
59
Strategic report
Non-executive directors’ remuneration policy
Element
Purpose and link
to strategy
Operation
Maximum
opportunity
Performance
measures
The Articles of Association require
the Company to set a maximum
ceiling on the total remuneration
payable to non-executive directors
including the non-executive
Chairman. A resolution to increase
this to £1,400,000 will be proposed
at the 2014 AGM.
Fees are set at a level appropriate for
the role and are reviewed regularly,
taking in to account fees payable to
non-executive directors of
companies of a similar size and
complexity.
None
Benefits
To devote maximum
time and attention
to the requirements
of the role.
The Chairman has occasional
use of chauffeur services.
Travel, hotel and subsistence
expenses incurred in attending
Board meetings and committee
meetings or otherwise required to
attend the Company’s offices are
reimbursed by the Company.
The Group may pay any tax due
on such benefits.
Where a non-executive director is
based outside the UK and has to file
a UK tax return, the Company may
pay towards tax advice and filing.
The maximum value for chauffeur
services will not exceed £25,000
per annum.
The maximum contribution
towards tax advice and filing is
£5,000 per annum.
None
Performance measures and targets
The annual bonus measures are primarily based on Group financial
performance but may contain non-financial measures as detailed
in the above table.
condition is varied or replaced, the amended performance
conditions must, in the opinion of the committee, be fair, reasonable
and materially no more or less difficult than the original condition
when set.
The committee will set the Group financial targets with reference to
the prior year and to the budgets and business plans for the coming
year, ensuring the levels to achieve base, on-target and maximum
bonus payout are appropriately challenging.
Shareholders’ views
This statement of remuneration policy is largely a consolidation of
policies which have enjoyed the support of shareholders for many
years. We have considered the guidance provided by the GC 100
and shareholder advisory groups in preparing this policy and have
followed this insofar as it is appropriate in the context of our
business. Prior to finalising the policy, we have shared it with a
selection of major shareholders. Looking ahead, we welcome an open
dialogue with shareholders and intend to continue to consult with
major shareholders before implementing any significant change.
The PSP performance measures set out in the policy table support
the Group’s strategy as follows:
ő the EPS growth hurdle ensures any payout is supported by
sound profitability;
ő the aggregate CPS measure incentivises the generation of cash
flow in line with the Group’s strategy. This measure is set in line
with the principles described for the annual bonus; and
ő the TSR performance measure aligns interests with shareholders by
rewarding TSR out-performance. The TSR is measured with reference
to constituents of an appropriate index such as the FTSE 100.
In accordance with the rules of the PSP, the performance condition
may be replaced or varied if an event occurs or circumstances arise
which cause the committee to determine that the performance
conditions have ceased to be appropriate. If the performance
Group employee considerations
When setting remuneration for executive directors the committee
takes into account contextual information about pay and conditions
within the Group, including the following:
ő salary increases for the all-employee population;
ő bonus awards for the all-employee population; and
ő pay ratios between executive directors and other employees.
Other information
The committee makes
recommendations to the Board on
the remuneration of the Chairman.
The Chairman and the executive
directors determine the
remuneration for the non-executive
directors. The level of remuneration
is set within a limit approved from
time-to-time by shareholders.
The Chairman is paid a single
consolidated fee. Other nonexecutive directors are paid a base
fee covering Board and committee
membership. Committee chairmen
and the Senior Independent Director
receive an additional fee.
Financial statements
To reward
individuals for
fulfilling the relevant
role and to attract
individuals of the
skills and calibre
required.
Directors’ report
Fees
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
60
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION POLICY
Rolls-Royce employs over 55,000 people in more than 50 countries.
Inevitably remuneration arrangements differ to reflect local
markets, but some common themes apply to employees at all
levels worldwide:
ő we aim to offer competitive levels of remuneration, benefits
and incentives to attract and retain employees;
ő all employees participate in bonus arrangements where the bonus
is determined by the same financial measures as that applicable
to executive directors; and
ő all employees have the opportunity to participate in a savings
related share option plan.
At more senior levels, remuneration is increasingly long term and
larger proportions are dependent on both Group and individual
performance and paid in the form of shares.
Illustrations of remuneration policy application
The bar chart below illustrates projected executive remuneration
for 2014 at four different levels of performance showing payments
from minimum to maximum. The table below the chart explains
performance levels one to four and the associated remuneration.
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith
4,500
4,000
3,500
3,000
39%
2,500
30%
2,000
30%
11% 22%
1,500
34%
řőŚƀ
10% 21%
18% 25% 29%
13% 24%
13% 20% 25%
1,000
30%
16%
13% 20% 25%
16% 25% 29%
500
0
100% 76% 58% 45%
1
2
3
4
100% 71% 51%
1
2
3
37%
4
100% 66% 45% 32%
1
2
3
4
100% 77% 59% 45%
1
2
3
ő 12 months’ notice of termination from Rolls-Royce;
ő 6 months’ notice of termination from the executive; and
ő reimbursement of reasonable business expenses.
The committee recognises that in the case of appointments to
the Board from outside the Group, it may be necessary to offer
a longer initial notice period, which would subsequently reduce
to 12 months after that initial period.
The policy on exit payments is set out in the next section. The
following table summarises the terms of the executive directors’
service contracts:
Notice
period
Company
Notice
period
individual
29 Sep 1997
30 days
1 Jan 2012 12 months
10 Mar 2011 12 months
1 July 2005 12 months
30 days
6 months
6 months
6 months
Date of
contract
Given the scale of the employee population, the committee
considered that it would be impractical to consult all employees
when drawing up the policy.
£000*
Service contracts
UK-based executive directors’ contracts include the
following provisions:
4
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
James Guyette has a contract with Rolls-Royce North America Inc.,
drawn up under the laws of the State of Virginia, US. This provides
that, on termination without cause, he is entitled to 12 months’
severance pay without mitigation and, in addition, appropriate costs
incurred in relocating household and personal effects. The contract
also provides for the payment of club membership fees and for tax
and financial planning up to a maximum of US$15,000 per annum
and the Group will gross up any amounts to cover any applicable
taxes arising.
All contracts also include the entitlement to paid holidays, sick pay
and other standard employee terms.
The Chairman and the non-executive directors have letters of
appointment rather than service contracts. No compensation is
payable to the Chairman or to any non-executive director if the
appointment is terminated early or if they fail to be re-elected
at an AGM.
* Salary values are as at 31 December 2013
Salary, plus pension and benefits
Potential value of bonus depending on the performance scenario
Potential value of PSP depending on the performance scenario
Remuneration achieved for key levels of performance are:
1. Minimum
Fixed remuneration only. No bonus or PSP paid.
2. Base level
Bonus and PSP resulting from base level of business
performance. Bonus at 30% of maximum payment
assuming no adjustment for personal performance.
PSP vesting at 30% of maximum from achieving
base CPS target with no TSR multiplier.
3. On-target
Bonus and PSP resulting from performance in line
with Company expectations. Bonus at 60% of
maximum assuming no adjustment for personal
performance. PSP vesting mid-way between base
and maximum levels with 25% TSR multiplier.
4. Maximum
Maximum annual bonus based on achieving the
highest targets set for business performance and
outstanding individual performance: PSP vesting
from achieving maximum CPS target and with
maximum 50% TSR multiplier.
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Ian Davis
Warren East CBE
Lee Hsien Yang
John McAdam
John Neill CBE
Jasmin Staiblin
Appointment date
Current letter
of appointment
end date
1 Sep 2007
25 May 2011
10 Nov 2011
20 Jan 2005
1 Mar 2013
1 Jan 2014
1 Jan 2014
19 Jan 2008
13 Nov 2008
21 May 2012
31 Aug 2016
24 May 2014
9 Nov 2014
19 Jan 2015
29 Feb 2016
31 Dec 2016
31 Dec 2016
18 Feb 2017
12 Nov 2014
20 May 2015
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
61
Strategic report
For PSP, the rules state that unvested awards may be preserved at
the committee’s discretion according to the circumstances. In such
cases vesting will be at the normal date, subject to the established
performance conditions, and pro rata to employment in the
performance period. In cases such as death and terminal illness, the
committee also has the discretion to vest the awards immediately
using an estimate of future out-turn.
The treatment of leavers in the Company’s ShareSave and SIP plans
is governed by the plan rules. The UK rules are HMRC approved.
An executive director who has ShareSave options who retires or who
leaves the Company through ill-health, disability or redundancy will
be entitled to exercise their options, pro rata to the savings made,
within six months of leaving the Company. An executive director
who leaves in any other manner such as dismissal would only be
entitled to have their savings returned to them. Participants in
the SIP who leave the Company for the same reasons listed above
will have their shares released to them free of tax and National
Insurance contributions.
In the event of a change of control of the Company, PSP awards will
vest based on the extent to which the committee determines the
performance conditions have been or would have been met.
Pro-rating for service in the performance period will apply. Deferred
shares earned under APRA would vest in full. ShareSave options would
immediately be exercisable pro rata to savings made. Consideration
received as shares would be held in the SIP, if possible, otherwise the
consideration would be treated as a disposal from the SIP.
If awards are made on recruitment (such as buy-outs) the treatment
on leaving would be determined at the time at the committee’s
discretion.
ő if such remuneration was in the form of shares, compensation
will be in the Company’s shares;
ő if remuneration was subject to achievement of performance
conditions, compensation will be subject to Rolls-Royce
performance conditions; and
ő the timing of any compensation will, where practicable, match
the vesting schedule of the remuneration forfeited.
A newly appointed executive director may be provided with
reasonable relocation support as set out in the policy table.
Internal appointments would receive a remuneration package
that is consistent with the remuneration policy. Legacy terms and
conditions would be honoured, including pension entitlements
and any outstanding incentive awards.
If an executive director is appointed following a merger or an
acquisition of a company by Rolls-Royce, of which the executive
director was employed, legacy terms and conditions may be
honoured.
Legacy commitments
Contractual commitments made before 27 June 2012 and before the
policy comes into effect will be honoured. This will include grants
made under the old PSP arrangement which will vest, subject to the
performance criteria being achieved after the adoption of this policy,
as well as previous contractual provisions relating to the defined
benefit pension scheme.
The committee may make minor amendments to the policy set out
above (for regulatory, exchange control, tax, administrative purposes
or to take account of a change in legislation) without obtaining
shareholder approval for that amendment.
The remuneration policy report was approved by the Board on
12 February 2014 and signed on its behalf.
Dame Helen Alexander
Chairman of the remuneration committee
Other information
The committee has the discretion to preserve incentive awards
pro-rated to service and to release deferred shares. In exercising this
discretion, the committee will have regard to performance and the
circumstances of leaving. For deferred shares these are usually
released in cases such as retirement, death, injury, ill-health and
redundancy.
In addition, remuneration forfeited on resignation from a previous
employer may be compensated. The form of this compensation
would be considered on a case-by-case basis and may comprise
either cash or shares. Generally:
Financial statements
Pension benefits on early retirement should be payable in
accordance with the normal rules of the relevant pension plan.
Under legacy UK defined benefit pension arrangements, accrued
pension is reduced to reflect early receipt in accordance with factors
set by the trustees from time-to-time and is limited to a maximum
pension of two thirds of the executive’s final remuneration,
pro-rated by actual service to potential service.
Policy on new appointments
The committee will normally award newly appointed executive
directors with a remuneration package which is consistent with the
policy and principles as set out in this report. Base salary may be set
at a level higher or lower than previous incumbents and in certain
circumstances, to facilitate the recruitment of individuals of the
required calibre, the committee may use its discretion to make
individual additional incentive awards up to a maximum of
100 per cent of annual salary. Incentive levels may also be increased
by up to 30 per cent of salary per annum for incentives commencing
within two years of joining. This level of discretion is considered
appropriate given the current conservative market positioning of
Rolls-Royce and our potential need to recruit from other market
sectors or countries outside of the UK.
Directors’ report
Policy on exit payments
The notice period the Company is required to give to executive
directors under their contracts of employment is 12 months.
Payment in lieu of notice will not exceed the value of 12 months’
salary, benefits and pension contributions. Both mitigation and
the staggering of payments through the notice period will be
considered by the committee where appropriate, as will the funding
of reasonable outplacement and other professional fees. Should
additional compensation matters arise, such as a settlement or
compromise agreement, the committee will exercise judgement
and will take into account the specific commercial circumstances.
62
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION REPORT
Single figure of remuneration (subject to audit)
The total remuneration for the directors of the Company for the financial year ending 31 December 2013 is detailed below:
Salary/fees (a)
£000
2012
2013
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Ian Davis
John McAdam
John Neill CBE
Sir Simon Robertson
Jasmin Staiblin
Ian Strachan
Total
535
506
921
523
75
80
20
75
82
292
60
60
126
60
26
3,441
517
482
896
506
75
80
60
75
72
–
60
60
370
37
75
3,365
Benefits (b)
£000
2013
2012
107
159
125
128
–
10
–
3
–
2
–
2
2
2
–
540
100
189
126
23
–
4
–
–
–
–
–
2
7
–
–
451
Bonus (c)
£000
2013
2012
423
383
824
394
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2,024
663
464
1,239
596
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2,962
LTIP (d)
£000
2013
2012
1,464
445
4,055
1,329
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
7,293
1,399
333
1,998
1,194
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
4,924
Other (e)
£000
2013
2012
–
6
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
6
Sub-total
£000
2013
2012
– 2,529 2,679
– 1,499 1,468
– 5,925 4,259
– 2,374 2,319
–
75
75
–
90
84
–
20
60
–
78
75
–
82
72
–
294
–
–
60
60
–
62
62
–
128
377
–
62
37
–
26
75
– 13,304 11,702
Pension (f)
£000
2013
2012
532
162
303
531
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
1,528
Total
£000
2013
2012
472 3,061 3,151
719 1,661 2,187
318 6,228 4,577
1,034 2,905 3,353
–
75
75
–
90
84
–
20
60
–
78
75
–
82
72
–
294
–
–
60
60
–
62
62
–
128
377
–
62
37
–
26
75
2,543 14,832 14,245
Notes to the table
(a) Salary/fees – cash paid in the year. James Guyette was paid in US dollars translated at £1 = US$1.565 (2012 US$1.585).
(b) Benefits – taxable value of all benefits paid in the year. The benefits for the non-executive directors relate to travel and subsistence
associated with attending board meetings with the exception of Sir Simon Robertson which was related to the use of a chauffeur.
Benefits
Car or car allowance including fuel allowance
Chauffeur services
Financial planning
Medical insurance
Life assurance
Club membership fees
Travel and subsistence
Housing costs
Total
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
James Guyette
£000
2013
2012
11
–
19
–
38
23
–
16
107
11
–
16
–
37
20
–
16
100
Mark Morris
£000
2013
24
–
–
1
–
–
30
104
159
2012
John Rishton
£000
2013
2012
24
–
–
1
–
–
36
128
189
18
13
–
1
–
–
–
93
125
18
8
–
1
–
–
–
99
126
Colin Smith CBE
£000
2013
21
–
–
1
–
–
3
103
128
2012
22
–
–
1
–
–
–
–
23
Bonus. This is the total APRA bonus earned in 2013. The bonus, based on Group profit and cash performance, was 60 per cent of the
maximum as detailed on page 57. Personal performance is taken into account in determining individual bonuses payable. The awards
made to John Rishton and James Guyette included a modification for personal performance of 110 per cent and 105 per cent
respectively. 60 per cent of the bonus is paid as cash and 40 per cent is deferred into shares for two years subject to continuous
employment with the Group.
Long-term incentives. This is the estimated value of the PSP shares that are due to vest in March 2014 (2013 being the final year of the
performance period) and for John Rishton, as well as his PSP shares, the performance related shares he received on joining the
Company. It is based on the number of shares that will vest multiplied by the average share price of 1184.52p over the quarter ending
31 December 2013 (as the vesting price is not known at the date of approval of the remuneration report). Performance has already
been determined for these awards as detailed on page 64 and 150 per cent of the original award will vest, based on achievement of
the EPS growth hurdle, the maximum CPS target and TSR performance in the upper quartile of FTSE 100 companies. The share price at
the date of vesting for the PSP in 2013 was 1020.52p. The vesting price for John Rishton’s release of the performance related and
restricted shares in 2013 was 1048p.
Value of the gain made on the exercise of ShareSave options is the difference between the exercise price of 387p and the mid-market
price of 1062p on the date of exercise. ShareSave is not subject to performance conditions and the UK plan rules are HMRC approved.
Pensions. For defined benefit plans, this is the increase in pension benefit net of inflation for the current year and applying the HMRC
methodology multiplier of 20. Cash in lieu of pension accrual is also included.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
63
Strategic report
Implementation of remuneration policy
Information on the elements of remuneration and how the
Company intends to implement the remuneration policy in 2014
are set out below and on pages 64 to 66.
Base salary
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
$840,000
£510,000
£925,000
£525,000
Annual bonus
The annual bonus pool is delivered under APRA.
In 2013, executive directors were eligible for award levels as detailed
in the policy report on page 57.
Face
value
£000
Vesting
date
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
25,770
18,057
48,250
23,207
264
185
494
237
01/03/2015
01/03/2015
01/03/2015
01/03/2015
APRA 2014
The committee have determined that the bonus in respect of 2014
will be operated on similar terms to 2013. There will be no change
to the maximum bonus opportunities for executive directors.
As described above, bonus targets are not disclosed.
Long-term incentives – PSP
For 2013, the Group financial measures were cash-flow performance
The PSP is designed to reward and incentivise selected senior
and profit. Targets for both measures were set as follows:
executives who can influence the long-term performance of
% of maximum bonus
the Group.
Base
Target
Maximum
15%
30%
50%
The Group financial performance is the addition of the cash and
profit out-turns, provided a specified minimum level is achieved
on both, after deduction of the cost of bonus from profit, otherwise
no bonus is payable.
PSP 2013
In 2013, executive directors received PSP grants in line with the
policy report on page 58.
PSP awards made in March 2013 (subject to audit)
The targets were as follows:
Aggregate CPS over
the three-year period
% of maximum
award released
The 2013 financial performance which resulted in the APRA bonus
out-turn of 60 per cent was as follows:
Less than 56p
56p
94p
Group underlying
profit
Straight line vesting will apply between these points.
Group underlying profit* was £1,500 million
which matched the base level but fell short of
the on-target level of £1,530 million.
The profit performance resulted in achievement
of 15%.
Cash flow
Cash flow* for the year was £312 million which
exceeded both the on-target level of break-even
and the maximum target of £200 million.
The cash flow performance resulted in the
achievement of 50%.
Overall award
The minimum level of profit after the cost of
bonus, necessary to enable payment of bonus
was £1,500 million. To ensure this was achieved
the bonus earned through the separate profit
and cash elements was limited to 60% of the
maximum.
* Group underlying profit and cash flow excludes the results of Rolls-Royce Power
Systems AG (previously named Tognum AG), the impact of acquisitions and disposals
in the year and unbudgeted foreign exchange translation effects where material.
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
0%
30%
100%
Number
of shares
awarded
% of
salary
Face
value (at
maximum
vesting)
£000
51,714
49,838
108,470
51,304
100
100
120
100
794
765
1,665
788
Minimum
% vesting
(as a % of
maximum)
Performance
period
end date
20
20
20
20
31/12/2015
31/12/2015
31/12/2015
31/12/2015
All awards are made as performance shares based on a percentage
of salary and the value is divided by the average share price over a
three-day period which was 1023.33p before to the date of grant.
The face value is the maximum number of shares that would vest
(150 per cent of the award) multiplied by the share price at the date
of grant. If the base EPS or CPS targets are not achieved, no shares vest.
Other information
APRA 2013 performance measures
The APRA bonus is determined by Group financial performance
and personal performance.
Name
Number
of shares
Financial statements
Name
Deferred APRA awards in March 2013 (subject to audit)
For executive directors and other senior executives, 40 per cent
of APRA was delivered in deferred shares. As detailed on page 57,
ordinary shares held as deferred shares may receive a bonus issue
of C Shares during the deferral period.
Directors’ report
Base salary
The committee reviewed the salary levels of executive directors and
decided not to award any increases for 2014.
The extent of this disclosure reflects the Board’s view that APRA
profit and cash targets are commercially sensitive. This will be kept
under review.
64
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION REPORT
PSP awards vesting in March 2014
The following sets out details in respect of the March 2011 PSP award, for which the final year of performance was the 2013 financial year.
Targets for 2011 – 2013 period
Performance against targets
EPS growth (hurdle)
Awards may vest if EPS growth exceeds the OECD
index of consumer prices. Awards will lapse if hurdle
not met.
EPS growth of 60% over the three-year period
exceeded the hurdle which was 6%.
Aggregate CPS
(100% of award)
Aggregate CPS over three-year period
of less than 56p – zero vesting.
Aggregate CPS over three-year period of
56p – 30% vesting.
Aggregate CPS over three-year period
of 83p – 100% vesting.
Straight-line vesting between these points.
Aggregate CPS performance over three years of 86p.
100% vesting.
TSR performance
(multiplier of up to 50%)
TSR below median of FTSE 100 – no additional
vesting.
TSR above median of FTSE 100 – 25% increase.
TSR at upper quartile of FTSE 100 – 50% increase.
Straight-line basis between these points.
TSR performance was ninth best amongst the
FTSE 100.
50% increase.
Total
150% of shares will vest during March 2014.
PSP awards to be made in March 2014
Non-executive directors’ base fees
The performance targets in respect of the 2014 to 2016 performance
period under the Aggregate CPS measure will be as follows:
Chairman 2
Aggregate CPS over
the three-year period
Less than 125p
125p
155p
% of maximum
award released
0%
30%
100%
CPS is calculated as reported cash flow before the cost of business
acquisitions or proceeds of disposals, foreign exchange translation
effects, special payments into pension schemes and payments to
shareholders, divided by the weighted average number of shares
in issue.
We believe that the combination of EPS, CPS and TSR targets are
challenging and that the performance necessary to achieve awards
towards the upper end of the range is stretching. They should not,
therefore, be interpreted as providing guidance on the Group’s
performance over the relevant period.
Non-executive directors’ fees paid
The Chairman and the other non-executive directors are not
eligible to participate in any of the Group’s share schemes, incentive
arrangements or pension schemes. A facility is in place which
enables non-executive directors to use some or all of their fees, after
the appropriate statutory deductions, to make market purchases of
shares in the Company on a monthly basis.
Other non-executive directors
Chairman of audit committee
Chairman of ethics committee
Chairman of remuneration committee
Chairman of safety committee
Senior Independent Director
20141
£000
2013
£000
2012
£000
425
70
25
20
20
20
15
425
60
20
15
15
15
12
370
60
20
15
15
15
12
1
Subject to approval at the AGM, the base fees will be increased with effect from
1 May 2014.
2
Sir Simon Robertson retired as Chairman on 2 May 2013. The fee was increased on the
appointment of the new Chairman, Ian Davis.
Payments to past directors (not subject to audit)
John Cheffins retired from the Board on 30 September 2007. He
continued in his role as Chairman of Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems
Limited and provided non-executive advice to the Energy business
until 28 September 2013. He was paid £35,811 and benefits totalling
£2,051 in 2013 (paid in Canadian dollars and translated at
£1=CAD$1.612).
Dr Mike Howse retired from the Board on 30 June 2005. Following
his retirement, he has continued to be retained by the Company
for his expertise in engineering and was paid £23,310 in 2013.
Payments to past directors (subject to audit)
Mike Terrett retired from the Board on 31 December 2012. The PSP
award, granted to him on 1 March 2010, for the performance period
1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012 vested on 1 March 2013 at a
vesting price of 1020.52p. The value of the PSP released to him was
£1.4 million (2012 £2.4 million) before tax and National Insurance
contributions. PSP awards that will vest in 2014 and may vest in
2015, subject to meeting the performance criteria, will be pro-rated
to the length of service during the performance period.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
65
Strategic report
Loss of office payments (subject to audit)
There were no payments in respect of loss of office during the year.
James Guyette 1,2
John Rishton 3
1
2
3
Directorships held
Payments
received
£000
PrivateBancorp Inc. and priceline.com
Unilever PLC and Unilever N.V.
128
56
James Guyette was paid in US dollars translated at £1=US$1.565.
James Guyette received 2,548 Restricted Stock Units (RSUs) at US$19.63 per share in PrivateBank, in addition to an annual fee. He also received 359 shares of restricted stock at
US$695.62 per share in priceline.com.
John Rishton was appointed as a director of Unilever PLC and Unilever N.V. on 15 May 2013. Part of his fee was paid in Euro’s translated at £1 = EUR 1.178.
John Rishton is a member of one of the Group’s UK defined contribution pension schemes and received employer contributions restricted
to the annual allowance limits with any excess paid as a cash allowance. The cash allowance is calculated as equivalent to the cost of the
pension contributions allowing for National Insurance costs.
Colin Smith CBE opted out of future pension accrual with effect from 1 April 2006 and receives a cash allowance in lieu of future
pension accrual.
James Guyette participates in pension plans sponsored by Rolls-Royce North America Inc. He is a member of two defined benefit plans in
the US, one qualified and one non-qualified. He accrues a retirement lump sum benefit in both of these plans. In addition, James Guyette is
a member of two 401(k) Savings Plans in the US, one qualified and one non-qualified, to which both he and his employer, Rolls-Royce North
America Inc., contribute. He is also a member of an unfunded non-qualified deferred compensation plan in the US, to which his employer
makes notional contributions. Under the defined benefit plans, the earliest age at which benefits can be taken without consent and
without actuarial reduction by James Guyette is age 65.
Details of the pension benefits of the executive directors as at 31 December 2013, in the Group’s UK and US pensions schemes are
given below:
Total accrued annual pension
entitlement at
31 December 2013
£000
Mark Morris
Colin Smith
167
391
Total accrued retirement lump
sum entitlement at
31 December 2013
£000
James Guyette 1
1,181
Benefits are translated at £1 = US$1.6542.
Details of the defined contribution pension contributions paid by the Group on behalf of the following executive directors are given below:
James Guyette 1
John Rishton
1
Benefits are translated at £1=US$1.565 (2012 US$1.585).
2013
£000
2012
£000
395
50
394
123
Other information
Mark Morris opted out of future pension accrual and salary linkage with effect from 16 August 2012 and receives a cash allowance in lieu
of future pension accrual.
Financial statements
Pension entitlements (subject to audit)
The Group’s UK pension schemes are funded, registered schemes and were approved under the regime applying until 6 April 2006. They
include both defined contribution and defined benefit pension schemes. In the defined benefit pension schemes normal retirement
age is 62.
1
Directors’ report
External directorships
The directors retained the payments detailed below from serving on the boards of these companies:
66
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION REPORT
Share retention policy (subject to audit)
We believe it is important that the interests of the executive directors should be closely aligned with those of shareholders. The deferred
APRA award and the PSP provide considerable alignment. However, participants in the PSP are also required to retain at least one half of the
number of after-tax shares released from the PSP, until the value of their shareholding reaches the percentage of salary shown in the table
below. When this level is reached it must be maintained until retirement or departure from the Group. The director’s total shareholding,
for the purposes of comparing it with the minimum shareholding requirement, includes shares held: by their connected persons; in the SIP;
APRA deferred shares that have not vested; and PSP shares that have vested but does not included unvested PSP awards. The shareholding
requirement will increase in 2014 to 250 per cent of salary for the Chief Executive and 200 per cent of salary for the other executive
directors. APRA deferred shares will no longer count towards their minimum shareholding requirement.
As at 31 December 2013, the executive directors each complied with the 2013 minimum shareholding requirement as detailed in the
table below:
James Guyette 2
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
1
2
Base salary
£000
Total
shareholding
Minimum
shareholding
requirement
as % of salary
508
510
925
525
447,868
86,954
293,947
346,466
150
150
200
150
Actual
Minimum shareholding as
shareholding % of minimum
requirement
requirement1
74,462
74,756
180,782
76,954
601
116
163
450
Salary divided by the March 2013 PSP grant price of 1023.33p multiplied by percentage of salary.
Translated at £1 = US$1.6542.
Directors’ interests in shares (subject to audit)
The directors and their connected persons had the following interests in the ordinary shares and C Shares 1 of the Company at 31 December
2013, or at date of retirement if earlier, are shown in the table below:
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom (retired 2 May 2013)
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Ian Davis
Dr John McAdam
John Neill CBE
Sir Simon Robertson (retired 2 May 2013)
Jasmin Staiblin
Ian Strachan (retired 2 May 2013)
1
Non-cumulative redeemable preference shares of 0.1p each.
Ordinary
shares
C Shares
Conditional
shares not
subject to
performance
conditions
(APRA)
393,937
62,752
201,297
296,274
2,442
12,500
229,910
4,832
27,353
6,595
2,174
41,426
43,072
–
11,500
–
12,676,120
–
–
605,377
950,000
–
358,759
11,178
–
–
12,722,692
–
–
–
53,931
24,202
92,650
50,192
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Unvested awards
Vested awards
Conditional
shares
Options over
subject to shares subject Vested shares
performance
to savings
and options
conditions
contracts
exercised
(PSP)
(ShareSave)
in year
198,503
134,776
510,681
189,104
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
541
1,450
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
174,265
41,713
190,691
150,678
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
67
Strategic report
Changes in interests (subject to audit)
–
12,676,120
–
–
605,377
950,000
358,759
11,178
–
–
12,722,692
–
2,362,936
–
–
(605,377)
(950,000)
354,062
–
–
–
(12,722,692)
Market price at
date of award
(p)
Date
of grant
Date
of vesting
Market price
at vesting
(p)
544.70
601.50
809.70
1023.33
01/03/2010
09/03/2011
01/03/2012
01/03/2013
01/03/2013
09/03/2014
01/03/2015
01/03/2016
1020.52
–
–
–
601.00 11/03/2011 11/03/2013
808.80 01/03/2012 01/03/2014
1023.33 01/03/2013 01/03/2015
1048.00
–
–
Directors’ interests in unvested and vested awards
James Guyette
PSP 2010
PSP 2011
PSP 2012
PSP 2013
APRA 2010
APRA 2011
APRA 2012
31 December
2012
Granted
during year
TSR uplift
at vesting/
dividend
enhancement
91,383
82,404
64,385
–
238,172
35,595
28,161
–
63,756
–
–
–
51,714
51,714
–
–
25,770
25,770
45,692
–
–
–
45,692
1,595
–
–
1,595
31 December
2012
Granted
during year
TSR uplift
at vesting/
dividend
enhancement
Vested
awards
26,085
25,039
59,899
–
111,023
7,881
6,145
–
14,026
872
541
1,413
–
–
–
49,838
49,838
–
–
18,057
18,057
–
–
–
6,522
–
–
–
6,522
353
–
–
353
–
–
–
32,607
–
–
–
32,607
8,234
–
–
8,234
872
–
872
Mark Morris
PSP 2010
PSP 2011
PSP 2012
PSP 2013
APRA 2010
APRA 2011
APRA 2012
ShareSave (options)
ShareSave (options)
Vested
awards
31 December
2013
137,075
–
–
–
137,075
37,190
–
–
37,190
–
82,404
64,385
51,714
198,503
–
28,161
25,770
53,931
Date
of grant
Date
of vesting
Market price
at vesting/
exercise
(p)
01/03/2010
09/03/2011
01/03/2012
01/03/2013
01/03/2013
09/03/2014
01/03/2015
01/03/2016
1020.52
–
–
–
601.00 11/03/2011 11/03/2013
808.80 01/03/2012 01/03/2014
1023.33 01/03/2013 01/03/2015
1048.00
–
–
387.00* 01/02/2010 01/02/2013
525.00 01/02/2012 01/02/2015
1062.00
–
Market price at
31 December date of award
2013
(p)
–
25,039
59,899
49,838
134,776
–
6,145
18,057
24,202
–
541
541
* For ShareSave, the share price shown is the exercise price which was 85 per cent of the market price at the date of award.
544.70
601.50
809.70
1023.33
Other information
2,609
6
1,335
1,951
204
–
534
580
361
39
442
Financial statements
393,937
62,752
201,297
296,274
2,442
12,500
4,832
27,353
6,595
2,174
41,426
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Ian Davis
Dr John McAdam
John Neill CBE
C Shares
Changes from
31 December
2013 to
31 December
12 February
2013
2014
Directors’ report
Ordinary shares
Changes from
31 December
2013 to
31 December
12 February
2013
2014
68
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION REPORT
John Rishton
31 December
2012
Granted
during year
TSR uplift
at vesting/
dividend
enhancement
164,866
133,383
–
298,249
76,365
63,397
40,565
180,327
44,400
–
44,400
76,143
1,450
–
–
108,470
108,470
–
–
–
–
–
48,250
48,250
–
–
–
–
–
–
38,183
–
–
38,183
–
–
–
–
–
PSP 2011
PSP 2012
PSP 2013
Performance related shares
Performance related shares
Performance related shares
APRA 2011
APRA 2012
Restricted shares
ShareSave (options)
Vested
awards
31 December
2013
–
–
–
–
114,548
–
–
114,548
–
–
–
76,143
–
164,866
133,383
108,470
406,719
–
63,397
40,565
103,962
44,400
48,250
92,650
–
1,450
Market price
at date
of award
(p)
Date
of vesting
Market price
at vesting/
exercise
(p)
601.50 09/03/2011 09/03/2014
809.70 01/03/2012 01/03/2015
1023.33 01/03/2013 01/03/2016
–
–
–
601.50 09/03/2011 11/03/2013
601.50 09/03/2011 01/03/2014
601.50 09/03/2011 01/03/2015
1048
–
–
808.80 01/03/2012 01/03/2014
1023.33 01/03/2013 01/03/2015
–
–
601.50 09/03/2011 01/03/2013
525.00* 01/02/2012 01/02/2017
1048
–
Date
of grant
* For ShareSave, the share price shown is the exercise price which was 85 per cent of the market price at the date of award.
Colin Smith CBE
31 December
2012
Granted
during year
TSR uplift at
vesting/
dividend
enhancement
78,025
74,813
62,987
–
215,825
32,197
26,985
–
59,182
–
–
–
51,304
51,304
–
–
23,207
23,207
39,013
–
–
–
39,013
1,443
–
–
1,443
PSP 2010
PSP 2011
PSP 2012
PSP 2013
APRA 2010
APRA 2011
APRA 2012
Vested
awards
31 December
2013
117,038
–
–
–
117,038
33,640
–
–
33,640
–
74,813
62,987
51,304
189,104
–
26,985
23,207
50,192
Market price
at date
of award
(p)
Date
of grant
Date
of vesting
Market price
at vesting
(p)
544.70
601.50
809.70
1023.33
01/03/2010
09/03/2011
01/03/2012
01/03/2013
01/03/2013
09/03/2014
01/03/2015
01/03/2016
1020.52
–
–
–
601.00 11/03/2011 11/03/2013
808.80 01/03/2012 01/03/2014
1023.33 01/03/2013 01/03/2015
1048.00
–
–
Chief Executive pay, TSR and all-employee pay
This section of the report enables our remuneration arrangements to be seen in context by providing:
ő a five-year history of our Chief Executive’s remuneration;
ő our TSR performance over the same period;
ő a comparison of the year-on-year change in our Chief Executive’s remuneration with the change in average remuneration across the
Group; and
ő a year-on-year comparison of the total amount spent on pay across the Group with profit before tax and dividends paid.
Chief Executive pay
1, 2
Year
Chief Executive
2013
2012
2011
2011
2010
2009
John Rishton
John Rishton
John Rishton
Sir John Rose
Sir John Rose
Sir John Rose
1
2
Single figure
of total
remuneration
£000
Annual bonus
as a % of
maximum
PSP
as a % of
maximum
6,228
4,577
3,677
3,832
3,914
2,409
55
85
63
–
100
29
100
–
–
75
100
93
On 31 March 2011, Sir John Rose retired as Chief Executive and John Rishton was appointed.
The remuneration for Sir John Rose does not include any pension accrual or contribution
as he was receiving his pension from 1 February 2008. John Rishton received a special grant
of shares on joining the Company on 1 March 2011 to mirror the shares he forfeited on
resigning from his previous employer. The share price has increased from 483.50p at the
time this grant was made to 1275p at the end of 2013. These are the main reasons why
John Rishton’s remuneration exceeds that of his predecessor.
Five-year TSR performance
The Company’s TSR performance over the previous five years
compared to a broad equity market index is shown in the graph
opposite. The FTSE 100 has been chosen as the comparator because
it contains a broad range of other UK listed companies.
The graph shows the growth in value of a hypothetical £100 holding
in the Company’s ordinary shares over five years, relative to the
FTSE 100 index. The values of the hypothetical £100 holdings at the
end of the five-year period were £432.40 and £183.10 respectively.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
69
Strategic report
Rolls-Royce – five year TSR data
450
400
350
300
250
Rolls-Royce (rebased to 100)
Deloitte is a founding member of the Remuneration Consultants
Group and adheres to its code in relation to executive remuneration
consulting. The committee requests Deloitte to attend meetings
periodically during the year. The committee is satisfied that the
advice it has received has been objective and independent.
FTSE 100 (rebased to 100)
200
150
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Chief Executive
UK employees average
Salary
Benefits
Annual
bonus
2.8%
3.2%
-0.8%
0.6%
-33%
-12%
UK employees were chosen as a comparator group in order to avoid
the impact of exchange rate movements over the year. UK
employees make up approximately 45 per cent of the total
employee population.
Relative spend on pay
The following table sets out the percentage change in payments
to shareholders and overall expenditure on pay across the Group.
Payments to shareholders
(note 17 – financial statements)
Group employment costs
(note 7 – financial statements)
Statement of shareholder voting
2013
£m
2012
£m
Change
%
366
328
11.6
3,675
2,762
34.7
For
Against Votes withheld
Approval of 2012 remuneration report
Percentage of votes (%)
98.41
1.59
Number of votes cast
1,297,319,180 20,981,975
0.58
7,611,187
We monitor carefully shareholder voting on our remuneration
policy and implementation. We recognise the importance of
ensuring that our shareholders continue to support our
remuneration arrangements.
We adopt the principles of good governance as set out in the UK
Corporate Governance Code and comply with the regulations
contained in the Schedule 8 of the Large and Medium-sized
Companies and Groups (Accounts and Reports) (Amendment)
Regulations 2013, the Listing Rules of the Financial Conduct
Authority and the relevant schedules of the Companies Act 2006.
The Companies Act 2006 and the Listing Rules require the
Company’s auditor to report on the audited information in their
report on page 135 and to state that this section has been properly
prepared in accordance with these regulations. The remuneration
policy report and the annual remuneration report are subject to
shareholder approval at the AGM on 1 May 2014.
The directors’ remuneration report was approved by the Board on
12 February 2014 and signed on its behalf.
Dame Helen Alexander
Chairman of the remuneration committee
Other information
Percentage change in Chief Executive remuneration
The following table compares the percentage change in the Chief
Executive’s remuneration to the average percentage change in
remuneration for all UK employees from 2012 to 2013.
Statutory requirements
The remuneration report has been prepared on behalf of the Board
by the remuneration committee.
Financial statements
100
Directors’ report
Advisers to the committee
During the year, the committee had access to advice from Deloitte
LLP’s executive compensation advisory practice. Total fees for advice
provided to the committee during the year by Deloitte were
£120,850. Deloitte also advised the Company on tax, assurance,
pensions and corporate finance and Deloitte MCS Limited provides
consulting services.
70
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Directors’ report
SHAREHOLDERS AND SHARE CAPITAL
Share capital and voting rights
On 31 December 2013, there were 1,880,301,654 ordinary shares
of 20 pence each, 16,286,039,565 redeemable C Shares of 0.1 pence
each and one Special Share of £1 in issue. The ordinary shares are
listed on the London Stock Exchange.
Payments to shareholders
Payments to shareholders will, as before, be made in the form of
redeemable C Shares and at the AGM on 1 May 2014, the directors
will recommend an issue of 134 C Shares with a total nominal value
of 13.4 pence for each ordinary share. The C Shares will be issued on
1 July 2014. Together with the interim issue on 2 January 2014 of
86 C Shares for each ordinary share with a total nominal value of
8.6 pence, this is the equivalent of a total annual payment to
ordinary shareholders of 22 pence for each ordinary share.
You can find out more about payments to shareholders by going to
the ‘Shareholder information’ section of this report on page 139 or
by visiting the Group’s website www.rolls-royce.com/investors/
share_information.
Share class rights
The rights and obligations attaching to the different classes of
shares are summarised below. The full rights are set out in the
Company’s Articles of Association, the latest copy of which can be
found on the Group’s website at www.rolls-royce.com.
Ordinary shares
Holders of ordinary shares are entitled to receive the Company’s
annual report. They are also entitled: to attend and speak at general
meetings of the Company; to appoint one or more proxies or, if they
are corporations, corporate representatives; and to exercise voting
rights. They have the right to ask questions at the AGM relating to
the business of the meeting and for these to be answered, unless
such answer would interfere unduly with the business of the
meeting, involve the disclosure of confidential information, if the
answer has already been published on the Group’s website or if it is
not in the interests of the Group or the good order of the meeting
that the question be answered. Holders of ordinary shares may
receive a bonus issue of C Shares or a dividend and on liquidation
may share in the assets of the Company.
C Shares
The Company issues non-cumulative redeemable preference shares
(C Shares) as an alternative to paying a cash dividend.
Shareholders can choose to:
ő redeem all C Shares for cash;
ő redeem all C Shares for cash and reinvest the proceeds in
additional ordinary shares using the CRIP operated by the
Registrar; or
ő keep the C Shares. Any C Shares retained have limited voting rights and attract a
dividend of 75 per cent of LIBOR on the 0.1p nominal value of each
share, paid on a twice-yearly basis. The Company has the option to
redeem the C Shares compulsorily, at any time, if the aggregate
number of C Shares in issue is less than ten per cent of the aggregate
number of all C Shares issued, or on the acquisition or capital
restructuring of the Company.
On a return of capital on a winding-up, the holders of C Shares are
entitled, in priority to any payment to the holders of ordinary shares,
to the repayment of the nominal capital paid-up or credited as
paid-up on the C Shares held by them, together with a sum equal to
the outstanding preferential dividend which has been accrued but
not paid until the date of return of capital.
The holders of C Shares are entitled to attend, speak and vote at a
general meeting only if a resolution to wind up the Company is to
be considered, in which case they may vote only on such resolution.
Special Share
Certain rights attach to the special rights non-voting share (Special
Share) issued to HM Government (Special Shareholder). Subject to
the provisions of the Companies Act 2006, the Treasury Solicitor may
redeem the Special Share at par at any time. The Special Share
confers no rights to dividends but in the event of a winding-up it
must be repaid at its nominal value in priority to any other shares.
Certain Articles that relate to the rights attached to the Special Share
may only be altered with the consent of the Special Shareholder.
Such Articles include: (i) the foreign shareholding limit provisions
whereby a foreign person cannot hold more than a 15 per cent
voting interest in the Company; and (ii) the nationality of directors
provisions whereby at least the Chairman or the Chief Executive
must be a British citizen and at least half of the number of directors
must be British citizens. The Special Shareholder is not entitled to
vote at any general meeting or any other meeting of any class of
shareholders.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
71
Strategic report
Voting rights for employee share plan shares
Shares are held in various employee benefit trusts for the purpose
of satisfying awards made under the various employee share plans.
For shares held in a nominee capacity or if plan/trust rules provide
the participant with the right to vote in respect of specifically
allocated shares, the trustee votes in line with the participants’
instructions. For shares that are not held absolutely on behalf of
specific individuals, the general policy of the trustees, in accordance
with investor protection guidelines, is to abstain from voting in
respect of those shares.
Authority to issue shares
At the AGM in 2013, authority was given to the directors to allot new
ordinary shares up to a nominal value of £124,821,118, equivalent to
one-third of the issued share capital of the Company.
Major shareholdings
At 31 December 2013, the following companies had notified an
interest in the issued ordinary share capital of the Company in
accordance with the Financial Conduct Authority’s Disclosure
and Transparency Rules:
This is called the first section 551 amount. In addition, a special
resolution was passed to effect a disapplication of pre-emption
rights for a maximum of five per cent of the issued share capital of
the Company. These authorities are valid until the AGM in 2014, and
the directors propose to renew these authorities at that AGM. It is
proposed to seek a further authority, at the AGM in 2014 to allot up
to two thirds of the total issued share capital, but only in the case
of a rights issue. This is called the second section 551 amount.
The Board believes that this additional authority will allow the
Company to retain the maximum possible flexibility to respond
to circumstances and opportunities as they arise; and to allot new
C Shares up to a nominal value of £500 million as an alternative
to a cash dividend. Such authority expires at the conclusion of the
AGM. The directors propose to renew the authority to allot new
C Shares at the AGM.
Voting rights
Deadlines for exercising voting rights
Electronic and paper proxy appointments, and voting instructions,
must be received by the Company’s Registrar not less than 48 hours
before a general meeting.
Company
BlackRock Inc.
Invesco Limited
Capital Research and Management Company
Date
notified
% of issued
ordinary share
capital
03 Sep 2010
04 Feb 2008
16 May 2013
5.02
6.91
3.03
The Company had not received any further notifications from
31 December 2013 to 12 February 2014.
Other information
Shareholder agreements and consent requirements
There are no known arrangements under which financial rights
carried by any of the shares in the Company are held by a person
other than the holder of the shares and no known agreements
between the holders of shares with restrictions on the transfer of
shares or exercise of voting rights. No disposal may be made to a
non-Group member which, alone or when aggregated with the
same or a connected transaction, constitutes a disposal of the whole
or a material part of either the nuclear business or the assets of the
Group as a whole, without consent of the Special Shareholder.
The Company did not make use of this authority during 2013. The
authority for the Company to purchase its own shares expires at the
conclusion of the AGM or 18 months from 2 May 2013, whichever
is the earlier. A resolution to renew it will be proposed at the AGM.
Financial statements
Authority to purchase own shares
At the 2013 AGM, the Company was authorised by shareholders to
purchase up to 187,231,677 of its own ordinary shares representing
ten per cent of its issued ordinary share capital.
Directors’ report
Restrictions on transfer of shares and limitations on holdings
There are no restrictions on transfer or limitations on the holding
of the ordinary shares or C Shares other than under the Articles of
Association (as described here), under restrictions imposed by law
or regulation (for example, insider trading laws) or pursuant to the
Company’s share dealing code. The Articles of Association provide
that the Company should be and remain under United Kingdom
control. As such, an individual foreign shareholding limit is set at
15 per cent of the aggregate votes attaching to the share capital of
all classes (taken as a whole) and capable of being cast on a poll and
to all other shares that the directors determine are to be included
in the calculation of such holding. The Special Share may only be
issued to, held by and transferred to the Special Shareholder or his
successor or nominee.
72
Directors’ report
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
OTHER STATUTORY INFORMATION
Political donations
In line with its established policy, the Group made no political
donations pursuant to the authority granted at the 2013 AGM.
Although the Company does not make, and does not intend to make,
donations to political parties within the normal meaning of that
expression, the definition of political donations under the
Companies Act 2006 is very broad and includes expenses
legitimately incurred as part of the process of talking to members
of parliament and opinion formers to ensure that the issues and
concerns of the Group are considered and addressed. These
activities are not intended to support any political party.
A resolution will therefore be proposed at the AGM seeking
shareholder approval for the directors to be given authority to make
donations and incur expenditure which might otherwise fall within
the terms of the Companies Act 2006. The authority sought will be
limited to a maximum amount of £25,000 per Group company but
so as not to exceed £50,000 for the entire Group in aggregate.
In addition, notes 1, 14, 15 and 17 to the consolidated financial
statements include the Group’s objectives, policies and processes for
financial risk management, details of its cash and cash equivalents,
indebtedness and borrowing facilities and its financial instruments,
hedging activities and its exposure to counterparty credit risk,
liquidity risk, currency risk, interest rate risk and commodity
pricing risk.
Going concern
As described on page 138, the Group meets its funding
requirements through a mixture of shareholders’ funds, bank
borrowings, bonds and notes. The Group has facilities of £3.6 billion
of which £2.4 billion was drawn at the year end. £200 million of
these facilities mature in 2014.
The Group’s forecasts and projections, taking into account reasonably
possible changes in trading performance, show that the Group has
sufficient financial resources. If the put option on Rolls-Royce Power
Systems Holding GmbH (formerly named Engine Holding GmbH) is
During the year, the business expenses incurred by Rolls-Royce North
exercised by Daimler AG, (estimated cost £1.9 billion), the directors
America Inc. towards the operation of the Rolls-Royce North America
consider that the Group would be able to raise additional resources
Political Action Committee (RRNAPAC) in the US was US$69,430
in the necessary timeframe to meet this commitment. As a
(2012 US$44,161). PACs are a common feature of the US political
consequence, the directors have a reasonable expectation that the
system and are governed by the Federal Election Campaign Act.
Company and the Group are well placed to manage their business
The RRNAPAC is independent of the Group and independent of any
risks and to continue in operational existence for the foreseeable
political party. The RRNAPAC funds are contributed voluntarily by
future, despite the current uncertain global economic outlook.
employees and the Company cannot affect how they are applied,
Accordingly, the directors continue to adopt the going concern basis
although under US Law, the business expenses are paid by the
(in accordance with the guidance ‘Going Concern and Liquidity Risk:
Company. Such contributions do not require authorisation by
Guidance for Directors of UK Companies 2009’ issued by the FRC) in
shareholders under the Companies Act 2006 and therefore do not
preparing the consolidated financial statements.
count towards the £25,000 and £50,000 limits for political donations
and expenditure for which shareholder approval will be sought at
Responsibility statements
the AGM.
Statement of directors’ responsibilities in respect of the annual
report and the financial statements
Indemnity
The directors as listed on pages 36 to 37 are responsible for
The Company has entered into separate Deeds of Indemnity in
preparing the annual report and the Group and parent company
favour of its directors, which were in force during the financial year
financial statements in accordance with applicable law and
and remain in force at the date of this report. The deeds provide
regulations.
substantially the same protection as that already provided to
Company law requires the directors to prepare Group and parent
directors under the indemnity in Article 216 of the Company’s
company financial statements for each financial year. Under that
Articles of Association. The Company has also reviewed, arranged
law they are required to prepare the Group financial statements in
and maintains appropriate insurance cover for any legal action
accordance with IFRS as adopted by the EU and applicable law and
taken against its directors and officers.
have elected to prepare the parent company financial statements in
Disclosures in the strategic report
accordance with UK Accounting Standards and applicable law (UK
The Board has taken advantage of section 414C(11) of the
Generally Accepted Accounting Practice).
Companies Act 2006 to include disclosures in the strategic report on:
Under company law the directors must not approve the financial
ő greenhouse gas emissions on page 29;
statements unless they are satisfied that they give a true and fair
ő disabled people and employee involvement on page 27;
view of the state of affairs of the Group and parent company and
ő the future development, performance and position of the Group
of their profit or loss for that period.
throughout pages 1 to 34;
ő the financial position of the Group on pages 10 to 13;
ő the R&D and net R&D expenditure as a proportion of underlying
revenue on pages 24 and 31; and
ő the summary of principal risks on pages 32 to 34.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
73
Strategic report
In preparing each of the Group and parent company financial
statements, the directors are required to:
The directors are responsible for the maintenance and integrity of
the corporate and financial information included on the Group’s
website. Legislation in the UK governing the preparation and
dissemination of financial statements may differ from legislation
in other jurisdictions.
Disclosure of information to auditors
Each of the persons who is a director at the date of approval of this
report confirms that:
i) so far as the director is aware, there is no relevant information
of which the Company’s auditor is unaware; and
ii) the director has taken all steps that he or she ought to have taken
as a director in order to make himself or herself aware of any
relevant audit information and to establish that the Company’s
auditor is aware of that information.
This confirmation is given, and should be interpreted, in accordance
with the provisions of section 418 of the Companies Act 2006.
iii) the annual report, taken as a whole, is fair, balanced and
understandable and provides the information necessary for
shareholders to assess the Company’s performance, business
model and strategy.
By order of the Board
Nigel T Goldsworthy
Company Secretary
12 February 2014
Other information
Under applicable law and regulations, the directors are also
responsible for preparing a strategic report and a directors’ report
(including the directors’ remuneration report and corporate
governance statement) that comply with that law and those
regulations.
ii) the strategic report on pages 1 to 34 and pages 137 to 138 of the
directors’ report include a fair review of the development and
performance of the business and the position of the Company
and the undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a
whole, together with a description of the principal risks and
uncertainties that they face; and
Financial statements
The directors are responsible for keeping adequate accounting
records that are sufficient to show and explain the parent and
Group’s transactions and disclose with reasonable accuracy at any
time the financial position of the parent company and enable them
to ensure that its financial statements comply with the Companies
Act 2006. They have general responsibility for taking such steps as
are reasonably open to them to safeguard the assets of the Group
and to prevent and detect fraud and other irregularities.
i) each of the Group and parent company financial statements,
prepared in accordance with IFRS and UK Accounting Standards
respectively, gives a true and fair view of the assets, liabilities,
financial position and profit or loss of the issuer and the
undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole;
Directors’ report
ő select suitable accounting policies and then apply them
consistently;
ő make judgements and estimates that are reasonable and prudent;
ő for the Group financial statements, state whether they have been
prepared in accordance with IFRS as adopted by the EU;
ő for the parent company financial statements, state whether
applicable UK Accounting Standards have been followed, subject
to any material departures disclosed and explained in the parent
company financial statements; and
ő prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis
unless it is inappropriate to presume that the Group and the
parent company will continue in business.
Responsibility statements under the Disclosure and
Transparency Rules and the UK Corporate Governance Code
Each of the persons who is a director at the date of approval of this
report confirms that to the best of his or her knowledge:
74
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Financial statements
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
75
75
76
77
79
CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOW STATEMENT
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
80
80
89
93
93
94
96
97
97
98
100
101
102
102
102
103
103
104
112
113
118
118
119
120
120
121
123
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1
Accounting policies
2
Segmental analysis
3
Other income and expenses
4
Net financing
5
Taxation
6
Earnings per ordinary share
7
Employee information
8
Auditors’ remuneration
9
Intangible assets
10 Property, plant and equipment
11 Investments
12 Inventories
13 Trade and other receivables
14 Cash and cash equivalents
15 Borrowings
16 Trade and other payables
17 Financial instruments
18 Provisions for liabilities and charges
19 Post-retirement benefits
20 Share capital
21 Share-based payments
22 Operating leases
23 Contingent liabilities
24 Related party transactions
25 Acquisitions and disposals
26 Segmental analysis from 1 January 2014
125
125
125
125
126
126
126
126
NOTES TO THE COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1
Accounting policies
2
Investments – subsidiary undertakings
3
Financial liabilities
4
Share capital
5
Movements in capital and reserves
6
Contingent liabilities
7
Other information
COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
124 COMPANY BALANCE SHEET
124 RECONCILIATION OF MOVEMENTS IN SHAREHOLDERS’ FUNDS
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
75
Strategic report
CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT
For the year ended 31 December 2013
2013
£m
Notes
3
11
25
2
12,161
(9,432)
2,729
–
(993)
(531)
173
1,378
–
699
2,077
327
(438)
(111)
797
(108)
689
1,759
(380)
1,379
2,766
(431)
2,335
1,367
12
1,379
2,321
14
2,335
73.26p
72.44p
125.38p
123.73p
22.0p
414
19.5p
365
1,759
1,434
2013
£m
Restated*
2012
£m
1,379
2,335
4
4
5
Attributable to:
Ordinary shareholders
Non-controlling interests (NCI)
Profit for the year
Earnings per ordinary share attributable to ordinary shareholders:
Basic
Diluted
Payments to ordinary shareholders in respect of the year:
Per share
Total
1
Underlying profit before taxation
6
17
2
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
For the year ended 31 December 2013
Notes
Profit for the year
Other comprehensive income (OCI)
Items that will not be reclassified to profit or loss
Movements in post-retirement schemes
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates
Related tax movements
Items that may be reclassified to profit or loss
Foreign exchange translation differences on foreign operations
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates
Related tax movements
19
11
5
48
–
10
58
(305)
(46)
105
(246)
Total comprehensive income for the year
(64)
(6)
1
(69)
1,368
(118)
(12)
(1)
(131)
1,958
Attributable to:
Ordinary shareholders
Non-controlling interests
Total comprehensive income for the year
1,356
12
1,368
1,945
13
1,958
11
5
* 2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits – see note 19, and the change in the accounting policy for RRSAs – see note 1.
Other information
Profit before taxation 1
Taxation
Profit for the year
3
15,513
(12,197)
3,316
65
(1,323)
(683)
160
1,535
119
216
1,870
Financial statements
Financing income
Financing costs
Net financing
2
Directors’ report
Revenue
Cost of sales
Gross profit
Other operating income
Commercial and administrative costs
Research and development costs
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Operating profit
Profit on transfer of joint ventures to subsidiaries
Profit on disposal of businesses (2012 IAE International Aero Engines AG restructuring £699 million)
Profit before financing and taxation
Restated*
2012
£m
76
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Financial statements
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
At 31 December 2013
Notes
ASSETS
Non-current assets
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investments – joint ventures and associates
Investments – other
Other financial assets
Deferred tax assets
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
Current assets
Inventories
Trade and other receivables
Taxation recoverable
Other financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Assets held for sale
4,987
3,392
601
27
674
316
248
10,245
2,901
2,564
1,800
6
592
342
348
8,553
2,882
2,338
1,680
10
327
387
520
8,144
12
13
3,319
5,092
16
74
321
3,990
6
12,818
23,063
2,726
4,119
33
115
11
2,585
4
9,593
18,146
2,561
4,009
20
91
11
1,310
313
8,315
16,459
(207)
(1,976)
(7,045)
(204)
(348)
–
(9,780)
(149)
(312)
(6,401)
(126)
(220)
–
(7,208)
(20)
(111)
(6,263)
(138)
(276)
(135)
(6,943)
(2,164)
(360)
(2,138)
(10)
(882)
(385)
(1,041)
(6,980)
(16,760)
(1,234)
(418)
(1,672)
–
(584)
(241)
(793)
(4,942)
(12,150)
(1,184)
(919)
(1,533)
–
(445)
(226)
(807)
(5,114)
(12,057)
6,303
5,996
4,402
376
80
163
(68)
250
4,804
5,605
698
6,303
374
–
169
(63)
314
5,185
5,979
17
5,996
374
–
173
(52)
433
3,473
4,401
1
4,402
14
Total assets
Non-current liabilities
Borrowings
Other financial liabilities
Trade and other payables
Tax liabilities
Deferred tax liabilities
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Post-retirement scheme deficits
15
17
16
18
15
17
16
5
18
19
Total liabilities
Net assets
EQUITY
Equity attributable to ordinary shareholders
Called-up share capital
Share premium account
Capital redemption reserve
Cash flow hedging reserve
Other reserves
Retained earnings
Non-controlling interests
Total equity
1 January
2012
£m
9
10
11
11
17
5
19
17
LIABILITIES
Current liabilities
Borrowings
Other financial liabilities
Trade and other payables
Tax liabilities
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Liabilities associated with assets held for sale
2013
£m
Restated*
31 December
2012
£m
20
* 2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits – see note 19, and the change in the accounting policy for RRSAs – see note 1.
The financial statements on pages 75 to 123 were approved by the Board on 12 February 2014 and signed on its behalf by:
Ian Davis Chairman
Mark Morris Chief Financial Officer
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
77
Strategic report
CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOW STATEMENT
For the year ended 31 December 2013
Notes
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at 1 January
Exchange losses on cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at 31 December
11
11
9
9
25
25
25
25
20
1,378
(9)
(173)
129
231
256
2
(40)
(158)
(284)
242
(29)
173
(299)
55
1,474
(219)
1,255
(1)
1
(503)
–
(669)
21
7
(37)
245
(34)
–
273
(43)
–
–
(740)
–
4
(250)
1
(435)
10
30
(20)
–
–
942
–
(24)
167
(1)
424
(133)
1,013
880
15
(58)
(313)
32
(3)
(60)
(357)
136
(99)
221
122
11
(52)
–
–
(94)
–
(318)
(331)
1,436
2,585
(34)
3,987
1,348
1,291
(54)
2,585
* 2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits – see note 19, and the change in the accounting policy for RRSAs – see note 1.
Other information
Cash flows from financing activities
Repayment of loans
Proceeds from increase in loans
Net cash flow from increase in borrowings
Interest received
Interest paid
Increase in short-term investments
Issue of ordinary shares and cash received on share-based payments vesting
Purchase of ordinary shares
Dividend to NCI
Redemption of C Shares
Net cash inflow/(outflow) from financing activities
21
1,535
7
(160)
99
428
372
–
(17)
119
(533)
376
9
279
(315)
79
2,278
(238)
2,040
Financial statements
Cash flows from investing activities
Additions of unlisted investments
Disposals of unlisted investments
Additions of intangible assets
Disposals of intangible assets
Purchases of property, plant and equipment
Government grants received
Disposals of property, plant and equipment
Acquisitions of businesses
Reclassifications of joint ventures to subsidiaries
Acquisitions of preference shares in subsidiary
Restructuring of IAE International Aero Engines AG
Disposals of businesses
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Repayment of loan to Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH
Transfer of subsidiary to associate
Net cash (outflow)/inflow from investing activities
11
11
9
10
11
Restated*
2012
£m
Directors’ report
Reconciliation of cash flows from operating activities
Operating profit
Loss/(profit) on disposal of property, plant and equipment
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Dividends received from joint ventures and associates
Amortisation and impairment of intangible assets
Depreciation and impairment of property, plant and equipment
Impairment of investments
Decrease in provisions
Decrease/(increase) in inventories
Increase in trade and other receivables
Increase in trade and other payables
Cash flows on other financial assets and liabilities held for operating purposes
Net defined benefit post-retirement cost recognised in profit before financing
Cash funding of defined benefit post-retirement schemes
Share-based payments
Net cash inflow from operating activities before taxation
Taxation paid
Net cash inflow from operating activities
2013
£m
78
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Financial statements
CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOW STATEMENT
Reconciliation of movements in cash and cash equivalents to movements in net funds
Increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash flow from increase in borrowings
Cash flow from increase in short-term investments
Change in net funds resulting from cash flows
Net funds (excluding cash and cash equivalents) of businesses acquired
Exchange losses on net funds
Fair value adjustments
Movement in net funds
Net funds at 1 January excluding the fair value of swaps
Net funds at 31 December excluding the fair value of swaps
Fair value of swaps hedging fixed rate borrowings
Net funds at 31 December
2013
£m
2012
£m
1,436
(880)
313
869
(204)
(43)
105
727
1,213
1,940
(1)
1,939
1,348
(122)
–
1,226
(78)
(54)
2
1,096
117
1,213
104
1,317
The movement in net funds (defined by the Group as including the items shown below) is as follows:
At
1 January
2013
£m
Cash at bank and in hand
Money market funds
Short-term deposits
Overdrafts
Cash and cash equivalents
Short-term investments
Current borrowings excluding overdrafts
Non-current borrowings
Finance leases
Net funds excluding fair value of swaps
Fair value of swaps hedging fixed rate borrowings
Net funds
674
408
1,503
–
2,585
11
(149)
(1,233)
(1)
1,213
104
1,317
Funds
flow
£m
333
754
352
(3)
1,436
313
133
(1,013)
–
869
869
Net funds
of businesses
acquired
£m
Exchange
differences
£m
–
(4)
(200)
–
(204)
(25)
(5)
(4)
–
(34)
(3)
–
(6)
–
(43)
(204)
(43)
Fair value
adjustments
£m
–
–
–
–
–
–
17
88
–
105
(105)
–
Reclassifications
£m
–
–
–
–
–
–
(201)
201
–
–
–
At
31 December
2013
£m
982
1,157
1,851
(3)
3,987
321
(204)
(2,163)
(1)
1,940
(1)
1,939
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
79
Strategic report
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
For the year ended 31 December 2013
Notes
3
4
5
6
7
17
17
5
19
11
5
20
17
17
25
17, 25
5
Total
equity
£m
374
–
–
374
–
–
–
–
–
–
173
–
–
173
–
(52)
–
–
(52)
–
433
–
–
433
–
3,590
67
(184)
3,473
2,321
4,518
67
(184)
4,401
2,321
1
–
–
1
14
4,519
67
(184)
4,402
2,335
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
374
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(328)
324
–
–
–
–
–
(4)
169
–
–
–
(11)
–
(11)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(63)
–
(117)
–
(1)
(1)
(119)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
314
–
–
(305)
(46)
105
2,075
4
(324)
(94)
47
116
(121)
9
(363)
5,185
1,367
(117)
(305)
(58)
104
1,945
(324)
–
(94)
47
116
(121)
9
(367)
5,979
1,367
(1)
–
–
–
13
–
–
–
–
48
(45)
–
3
17
12
(118)
(305)
(58)
104
1,958
(324)
–
(94)
47
164
(166)
9
(364)
5,996
1,379
–
–
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2
376
–
–
–
–
–
80
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
80
80
–
–
–
–
–
–
(366)
360
–
–
–
–
–
–
(6)
163
–
–
(5)
–
(5)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(68)
(64)
–
(1)
1
(64)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
250
–
48
–
10
1,425
(81)
3
(360)
(3)
99
–
–
(1,477)
13
(1,806)
4,804
(64)
48
(6)
11
1,356
1
(363)
–
(3)
99
–
–
(1,477)
13
(1,730)
5,605
–
–
–
–
12
–
–
–
–
–
669
(45)
45
–
669
698
(64)
48
(6)
11
1,368
1
(363)
–
(3)
99
669
(45)
(1,432)
13
(1,061)
6,303
See accounting policies note 1.
Other reserves include a merger reserve of £3m (2012 £3m, 2011 £3m) and a translation reserve of £247m (2012 £311m, 2011 £430m).
At 31 December 2013, 11,960,535 ordinary shares with a net book value of £91m (2012 20,365,787, 2011 22,541,187 ordinary shares with net book values of £125m and £116m
respectively) were held for the purpose of share-based payment plans and included in retained earnings. During the year, 16,603,840 ordinary shares with a net book value of £118m
(2012 13,533,646 shares with a net book value of £85m) vested in share-based payment plans. During the year, the Company acquired 298,588 of its ordinary shares via reinvestment of
dividends received on its own shares. In addition, the Company issued 7,900,000 new ordinary shares to the Group’s share trust for its employees share-based payment plans with a net
book value of £81m.
Share-based payments direct to equity is the net of the credit to equity in respect of the share-based payment charge to the income statement and the actual cost of shares vesting,
excluding those vesting from own shares.
On 2 January 2012, the Group contributed its interest in Bergen Engines AS to Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH (RRPSH – previously Engine Holding GmbH), a company jointly
held by Rolls-Royce and Daimler AG. Under the terms of agreement with Daimler, Rolls-Royce retained certain rights such that Bergen Engines continued to be classified as a subsidiary
and consolidated.
As part of the RRPSH shareholders’ agreement, Daimler has the option to sell its shares in RRPSH to Rolls-Royce for a period of six years from 1 January 2013. The initial fair value of the
exercise price of this option in respect of Bergen Engines AS (£166m) was recognised in 2012 and that amount in respect of RRPS (£1,432m) has been recognised in 2013 and charged to
retained earnings. In addition, £45m of the initial recognition of the put option on NCI relating to Bergen Engine AS, recognised in 2012, has been reclassified from NCI to retained
earnings. Subsequent movements in the value of this liability are included in the income statement, but excluded from the underlying results.
On 1 January 2013, the Group exercised rights in RRPSH that resulted in Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG (RRPS – formerly Tognum AG) being classified as a subsidiary and
consolidated – see note 25.
Other information
2
19
11
5
Noncontrolling
Total
interests
£m
£m
Financial statements
1
19
1
Retained
earnings 3
£m
Directors’ report
At 1 January 2012, as previously reported
Effect of amendments to IAS 19
Effect of change in accounting policy for RRSAs
At 1 January 2012, as restated
Profit for the year
Foreign exchange translation differences on
foreign operations
Movement on post-retirement schemes
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates
Related tax movements
Total comprehensive income for the year
Issue of C Shares
Redemption of C Shares
Ordinary shares purchased
Share-based payments – direct to equity 4
Transactions with NCI 5
Initial recognition of put option on NCI 6
Related tax movements
Other changes in equity in the year
At 1 January 2013
Profit for the year
Foreign exchange translation differences on
foreign operations
Movement on post-retirement schemes
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates
Related tax movements
Total comprehensive income for the year
Arising on issues of ordinary shares
Issue of C Shares
Redemption of C Shares
Ordinary shares purchased
Share-based payments – direct to equity 4
Reclassification of Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG
Transactions with NCI 7
Initial recognition of put option on NCI 6
Related tax movements
Other changes in equity in the year
At 31 December 2013
Share
capital
£m
Attributable to ordinary shareholders
Capital Cash flow
Other
Share redemption
hedging
premium
reserve
reserve 1 reserves 2
£m
£m
£m
£m
80
Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1 Accounting policies
The Company
The consolidated financial statements of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc (the ‘Company’) for the year ended 31 December 2013 consist of the
consolidation of the financial statements of the Company and its subsidiaries (together referred to as the ‘Group’) and include the Group’s
interest in jointly controlled and associated entities.
Basis of preparation and statement of compliance
In accordance with European Union (EU) regulations, these financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), as adopted for use in the EU effective
at 31 December 2013 (Adopted IFRS).
The Company has elected to prepare its parent company financial statements under UK Generally Accepted Accounting Practices (GAAP).
These are set out on pages 124 to 126 and the accounting policies in respect of Company financial statements are set out on page 125.
These consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except where Adopted IFRS requires the
revaluation of financial instruments to fair value and certain other assets and liabilities on an alternative basis – most significantly
post-retirement scheme liabilities are valued on the basis required by IAS 19 Employee Benefits – and on a going concern basis as described
on page 72.
The consolidated financial statements are presented in pound sterling which is the Company’s functional currency.
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Adopted IFRS requires management to make estimates and judgements that
affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and
expenses during the reporting period; the key areas of judgement and key sources of estimation uncertainty are described below. Actual
results could differ from those estimates.
The Group’s significant accounting policies are set out on the following pages. These accounting policies have been applied consistently
to all periods presented in these consolidated financial statements and by all Group entities.
Amendment to accounting policy
As explained in the Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 11, following discussions with the Conduct Committee of the FRC, the Group
has reassessed its policy for the recognition of entry fees received under Risk and Revenue Sharing Arrangements (RRSAs). Whilst the impact
on our historical results is not significant, the directors believe that the change represents an improvement in the policy.
In prior years, entry fees were recognised as other operating income when they were received, on the basis that this matched it to the
recognition of non-recurring development costs incurred on behalf of the workshare partner. This policy has been revised, to reflect better
the fact that some of these non-recurring development costs are capitalised. Under the amended policy, where the relevant costs in the
development programme are capitalised (ie development costs incurred between engine certification and entry into service and
certification costs and participation fees paid to airframers), an equivalent portion of the entry fee received is deferred and recognised as
the related costs are amortised after entry into service. In addition, the amount of entry fees recognised in the year will be presented as a
contribution to research and development expenses, rather than other operating income.
As required by IAS 8 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors, this change has been made retrospectively; the impact
of the change in policy in 2012 was to increase profit before tax by £25 million and to reduce net assets at 31 December 2011 and 2012 by
£184 million and £170 million respectively. Had the policy not been amended, profit before tax in 2013 would have been £39 million higher
and at 31 December 2013 net assets £208 million higher.
The FRC Conduct Committee’s view is that the RRSA contract cannot be divided into separate development and production phases, as the
fees and development components received by the Group during the development phase are exchanged for the obligation to pay the
supplier a pre-determined share of any sales receipts during the production phase. On this basis, the entry fees received would be deferred
in their entirety and recognised over the period of production.
As explained in the Chief Financial Officer’s review, on page 11, the FRC Conduct Committee has confirmed that, in view of the change to
the policy and the additional disclosure the Group has made, it does not intend to pursue its consideration of this accounting policy further.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
81
Strategic report
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Key areas of judgement
The directors consider the potential key areas of judgements required to be made in applying the Group’s accounting policies to be:
ő RRSAs with key suppliers (workshare partners) are a feature of our Civil aerospace business. Under these contractual arrangements the
key commercial objectives are that: (i) during the development phase the workshare partner shares in the risks of developing an engine
by performing its own development work, providing development parts and paying a non-refundable cash entry fee; and (ii) during the
production phase it supplies components in return for a share of the programme revenues as a ‘life of type’ supplier. The share of
development costs borne by the workshare partner and of the revenues it receives reflect a jointly agreed forecast of the proportionate
cost of providing its production parts compared to the overall forecast manufacturing cost of the engine.
These arrangements are complex and have features that could be indicative of: a collaboration agreement, including sharing of risk
and cost in a development programme; a long-term supply agreement; sharing of intellectual property; or a combination of these.
There is no directly applicable IFRS to determine an accounting policy for the recognition of entry fees of this nature in the income
statement. Consequently, in developing an accounting treatment for such entry fees that best reflects the commercial objectives of the
contractual arrangement, the directors have analysed these features in the context of relevant accounting pronouncements (including
those of other standard setters where these do not conflict with IFRS) and have weighed the importance of each feature in faithfully
representing the overall commercial effect. The most important considerations that need to be balanced are: the transfer of development
risk; the workshare partner receiving little standalone value from the payment of the entry fee; and the overall effect being collaboration
between the parties which falls short of being a joint venture as the Group control the programme. Also important in the analysis is the
fact that, whilst the Group and the workshare partner share risks and rewards through the life of the contract, these risks and rewards are
very different during the development and production phases.
In this context, the entry fee might be considered to represent: an amount paid as an equalisation of development costs; a payment to
secure a long-term supply arrangement; a purchase of intellectual property; or some combination thereof. The accounting under these
different scenarios could include: recognition of the entry fee to match the associated costs in the income statement; being spread over
the life of the programme as a reduction in the cost of supply during production; or being spread over the time period of the access to the
intellectual property by the workshare partner.
Other information
ő The Group has significant intangible assets. In deciding whether certain intangible assets should be recognised, judgement is required:
ő i) IAS 38 Intangible Assets requires that internally-generated development costs should only be recognised if strict criteria are met, in
particular relating to technical feasibility and generation of future economic benefits. The directors consider that, due to the complex
nature of new equipment programmes, these criteria are not met until relatively late in the programme – Civil aerospace programmes
represent 54 per cent of development costs; for these, the criteria are generally satisfied at the time of the initial engine certification;
ő ii) on delivery of engines without a linked long-term aftermarket contract, the Group has contractual rights to supply aftermarket parts
to the customers and its intellectual rights, warranty arrangements and, where relevant, statutory airworthiness or other regulatory
requirements provide reasonable control over this supply. Accordingly the directors consider that these rights meet the definition of an
intangible asset in IAS 38. However, the directors do not consider that it is possible to determine a reliable fair value for this intangible
asset. Accordingly, an intangible asset (recoverable engine cost or REC) is only recognised on the occasions where the contractual price
of the engine is below the cost of manufacture and then only to the extent of this deficit, as this amount is a reliable value.
Financial statements
ő A large proportion of the Group’s activities relate to long-term aftermarket contracts. The determination of appropriate accounting
policies for recognising revenue and costs in respect of these contracts requires judgement:
ő i) whether a long-term aftermarket contract is linked, for accounting purposes, to the related sale of original equipment – where the
long-term aftermarket contract is agreed (or agreed in principle) at the same time as the original equipment contract, these are
considered to be linked for accounting purposes and treated as a single contract – or whether it should be treated separately; and
ő ii) the appropriate measure of stage of completion of the contract – this will vary depending on the precise nature of the arrangements.
Where the service provided is assessed to be continuous, the stage of completion is measured by reference to the flying hours, or
equivalent, under the contract. Other aftermarket contracts are overhaul event based and the stage of completion is measured
accordingly.
Directors’ report
ő Assessing whether or not the Group controls Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH (RRPSH) requires judgement. The shares of RRPSH
are held equally by the Group and Daimler AG and the rights of each shareholder are encapsulated in shareholder agreements which set
out, amongst other things, key matters on which the Group has the casting vote at the Shareholders’ Committee of RRPSH. These most
important matters subject to casting vote which are relevant to assessing whether RRPSH is controlled include (a) setting the annual
budget and operating and financial plan, (b) appointing, removing and setting the remuneration of key management personnel (though
removal of the CEO or the CFO requires joint agreement), (c) entering into contracts in the ordinary course of business and (d) establishing
management procedures and responsibilities. The Group considers that these provisions are sufficient to give it control over RRPSH.
Daimler AG has protective rights covering matters such as: (i) significant changes to the scale, scope and financing of RRPSH’s business;
(ii) certain significant supplier relationships; and (iii) changes to contractual arrangements between RRPSH and Rolls-Royce. These are not
considered sufficient to prevent the Group from directing the activities of RRPSH.
82
Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1 Accounting policies (continued)
The directors consider that the most important features of the arrangement are the risk sharing and that the entry fee represents a
contribution to the development costs that the Group incurs in excess of its proportionate programme share. The key judgements taken in
reaching this view are: the entry fee is determined by the parties on that basis and the contract specifies that, in the event that a derivative
engine is to be developed further, entry fees will also be calculated on this basis; the workshare partners describe the entry fee in this way;
although the workshare partner receives little stand-alone value from paying the entry fee, the entry fee together with its own
development activities represent its aggregate investment in the collaboration; the amount of the entry fee does not include any amount in
excess of that necessary to equalise forecast development costs; the Group is not ‘on risk’ for the full development costs it incurs but for that
amount less the entry fees received; and, as far as can be determined, this appears to be common industry accounting for arrangements of
this type, under both Adopted IFRS and US accounting standards (which we believe do not conflict with IFRS in this regard).
The resulting accounting policy (described below) represents the commercial effect of the contractual arrangements in that the Group
recognises only those development costs to which it is exposed (and thus reflects the significant transfer of development risk to the
workshare partner) and the costs of supply of parts during the production phase is measured at the workshare partner’s share of
programme revenues (which we consider to be a commercial fair value). The directors do not consider that accounting which would result
in entry fees only being recognised in the production phase would appropriately reflect the sharing of development risk. Accordingly, the
directors believe that the policy adopted best reflects the commercial objectives of the arrangements, the nature of the relationship with
the workshare partner and is in accordance with Adopted IFRS.
ő The Group has contingent liabilities in respect of financing support provided to customers. In order to assess whether a provision
should be recognised, judgement as to the likelihood of these crystallising is required. This judgement is based on an assessment on
the knowledge of the customers’ fleet plans, the underlying value of the security provided and, where appropriate, the customers’
creditworthiness.
Key sources of estimation uncertainty
In applying the accounting policies, estimates are made in many areas; the actual outcome may differ from that calculated. The key sources
of estimation uncertainty at the balance sheet date that have a significant risk of causing material adjustment to the carrying amounts of
assets and liabilities within the next financial year are set out below. The estimation of the relevant assets and liabilities involves the
combination of a number of assumptions. Sensitivities are disclosed in the relevant notes where this is appropriate and practicable.
Intangible assets arising on consolidation of Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG and put option on Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH
The fair value of intangible assets of RRPS at 1 January 2013 involved the use of valuation techniques and the estimation of future cash
flows to be generated by RRPS over a considerable period of time. The Group engaged a specialist valuer to assist with these.
For a period of six years from 1 January 2013, the Group is obliged to acquire, at Daimler AG’s option, the latter’s 50 per cent interest in
RRPSH. The estimated exercise price of this option has been recognised as a liability. The exercise price of the option is based on averaging
three valuations at the date the option is exercised, which are based on both internal metrics, requiring estimation of future performance
of the business, and external metrics.
Forecasts and discount rates
The carrying values of a number of items on the balance sheet are dependent on the estimates of future cash flows arising from the
Group’s operations, in particular:
ő The assessment of whether the goodwill and other intangible assets (carrying value at 31 December 2013 £1,864 million) arising on the
consolidation of RRPSH is impaired is dependent of the present value of the future cash flows expected to be generated by the business.
These cash flows are based on the business plan jointly agreed by the shareholders.
ő The assessment as to whether there are any indications of impairment of development, participation, certification, recoverable engine
costs and customer relationships recognised as intangible assets (carrying values at 31 December 2013 £2,499 million, 31 December 2012
£1,457 million) is dependent on estimates of cash flows generated by the relevant assets and the discount rate used to calculate a present
value. These estimates include the performance of long-term contractual arrangements as described below, as well as estimates for
future market share, pricing and unit cost for uncontracted business. The risk of impairment is generally higher for newer programmes
and, for customer specific intangible assets (RECs), for launch customers.
Assessment of long-term contractual arrangements
The Group has long-term contracts that fall into different accounting periods and which can extend over significant periods – the most
significant of these are long-term service arrangements in the Civil aerospace business. The estimated revenues and costs are inherently
imprecise and significant estimates are required to assess: engine flying hours, time on wing and other operating parameters; the pattern
of future maintenance activity and the costs to be incurred; and life cycle cost improvements over the term of the contracts. The estimates
take account of the inherent uncertainties and the risk of non-recovery of any resulting contract balances.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
83
Strategic report
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Taxation
The tax payable on profits is determined based on tax laws and regulations that apply in each of the numerous jurisdictions in which the
Group operates. Where the precise impact of these laws and regulations is unclear then reasonable estimates may be used to determine
the tax charge included in the financial statements.
Basis of consolidation
The Group consolidated financial statements include the financial statements of the Company and all of its subsidiary undertakings
together with the Group’s share of the results of joint ventures and associates made up to 31 December.
A joint venture is an entity in which the Group holds a long-term interest and which is jointly controlled by the Group and one or more other
venturers under a contractual arrangement. An associate is an entity, being neither a subsidiary nor a joint venture, in which the Group
holds a long-term interest and where the Group has a significant influence. The results of joint ventures and associates are accounted for
using the equity method of accounting.
Any subsidiary undertakings, joint ventures or associates sold or acquired during the year are included up to, or from, the dates of change
of control. Transactions with non-controlling interests are recorded directly in equity.
Where the Group has issued a put option over shares held by a non-controlling interest, the Group recognises a liability for the estimated
exercise value of that option. Movements in the estimated liability after initial recognition are recognised in the income statement.
All intra-group transactions, balances, income and expenses are eliminated on consolidation. Adjustments are made to eliminate the profit
or loss arising on transactions with joint ventures and associates to the extent of the Group’s interest in the entity.
Significant accounting policies
Revenue recognition
Revenues comprise sales to outside customers after discounts, excluding value added taxes.
Sales of products (both original equipment and spare parts) are recognised when the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the
goods are transferred to the customer, the sales price agreed and the receipt of payment can be assured – this is generally on delivery. On
occasion, the Group may participate in the financing of OE, most commonly by the provision of guarantees as described in note 18. In such
circumstances, the contingent obligations arising under these arrangements are taken into account in assessing when the significant risks
and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the customer. As described on page 81, a sale of OE at a contractual price below its cost
of manufacture is considered to give rise to an intangible asset, a recoverable engine cost. In these circumstances, revenue is recognised to
the same value as the recoverable engine cost.
Sales of services are recognised by reference to the stage of completion based on services performed to date. As described on page 81, the
assessment of the stage of completion is dependent on the nature of the contract, but will generally be based on: flying hours or equivalent
for long-term aftermarket arrangements where the service is provided on a continuous basis; costs incurred to the extent these relate to
services performed up to the reporting date; or achievement of contractual milestones where relevant.
Other information
A subsidiary is an entity controlled by the Company. Control exists when the Company has the power, directly or indirectly, to govern the
financial and operating policies of the entity so as to derive benefits from its activities.
Financial statements
Provisions
As described in the accounting policy on page 87, the Group measures provisions (carrying value at 31 December 2013 £733 million,
31 December 2012 £461 million) at the directors’ best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the obligation at the balance sheet
date. These estimates take account of information available and different possible outcomes.
Directors’ report
Post-retirement benefits
The Group’s defined benefit pension schemes and similar arrangements are assessed annually in accordance with IAS 19. The accounting
valuation, which was based on assumptions determined with independent actuarial advice, resulted in a net deficit of £793 million before
deferred taxation being recognised on the balance sheet at 31 December 2013 (31 December 2012 £445 million). The size of the net deficit
is sensitive to the market value of the assets held by the schemes and to actuarial assumptions, which include price inflation, pension and
salary increases, the discount rate used in assessing actuarial liabilities, mortality and other demographic assumptions and the levels of
contributions. Further details are included in note 19.
84
Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1 Accounting policies (continued)
As described on page 81, sales of products and services are treated as though they are a single contract where these components have been
negotiated as a single commercial package and are so closely interrelated that they do not operate independently of each other and are
considered to form a single transaction with an overall profit margin. The total revenue is allocated between the two components such that
the total agreed discount to list prices is allocated to revenue for each of the two components pro rata, based on the list prices. This revenue
is then recognised for each component on this basis as the products are delivered and services provided, as described above. Where the
contractual price of the OE component is below the revenue allocated from the combined arrangement, this will give rise to an asset
included in ‘amounts recoverable on contracts’. This asset reduces as services are provided, increases as costs are incurred, and reduces
to zero by the end of the contract. Where the overall balance is a liability, it is recognised in ‘accruals and deferred income’.
Full provision is made for any estimated losses to completion of contracts, having regard to the overall substance of the arrangements.
Progress payments received, when greater than recorded revenue, are deducted from the value of work in progress except to the extent
that payments on account exceed the value of work in progress on any contract where the excess is included in accruals and deferred
income within trade and other payables. The amount by which recorded revenue of long-term contracts is in excess of payments on
account is classified as amounts recoverable on contracts and is separately disclosed within trade and other receivables.
Risk and revenue sharing arrangements (RRSAs)
As described on page 81, the Group enters into arrangements with certain workshare partners under which these suppliers: (i) contribute
to the forecast costs of developing an engine by performing their own development work, providing development parts and paying a
non-refundable cash entry fee; and (ii) supply components for the production phase for which they receive consideration, which is an agreed
proportion of the total programme revenues. Both the suppliers’ contributions to the forecast non-recurring development costs and their
consideration are determined by reference to their proportionate forecast scopes of supply relative to that of the engine overall. Once the
forecast costs and the scopes of supply have been agreed at the inception of the contract, each party is then accountable for its own
incurred costs. No accounting entries are recorded when the suppliers undertake development work or when development components are
supplied. Cash sums received are recognised in the income statement, as a reduction in research and development costs incurred, to match
the expensing of the Group’s related costs – where the cash sums are received in advance of the related costs being expensed or where the
related costs are capitalised as intangible assets, the recognition of the cash received is deferred (in accruals and deferred income) to match
the recognition of the related expense or the amortisation of the related intangible asset respectively. The payments to suppliers of their
shares of the programme revenues for their production components are charged to cost of sales as programme revenues arise.
The Group has arrangements with partners who do not undertake development work or supply parts. Such arrangements are considered
to be financial instruments as defined by IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation and are accounted for using the amortised cost method.
Government investment
Where a government or similar body has previously invested in a development programme, the Group treats payments to that body as
royalty payments, which are matched to related sales.
Government grants
Government grants are recognised in the income statement so as to match them with the related expenses that they are intended to
compensate. Where grants are received in advance of the related expenses, they are included in the balance sheet as deferred income.
Non-monetary grants are recognised at fair value.
Interest
Interest receivable/payable is credited/charged to the income statement using the effective interest method. Where borrowing costs are
attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset, such costs are capitalised as part of the specific asset.
Taxation
The tax charge/credit on the profit or loss for the year comprises current and deferred tax:
ő Current tax is the expected tax payable for the year, using tax rates enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet date, and any
adjustment to tax payable in respect of previous years.
ő Deferred tax is provided using the balance sheet liability method, providing for temporary differences between the carrying amounts
of the assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for taxation purposes and is calculated using the
enacted or substantively enacted rates that are expected to apply when the asset or liability is settled.
Tax is charged or credited in the income statement or other comprehensive income (OCI) as appropriate, except when it relates to items
credited or charged directly to equity in which case the deferred tax is also dealt with in equity.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
85
Strategic report
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Deferred tax assets are recognised only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profits will be available against which the assets
can be utilised.
Foreign currency translation
Transactions denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the transacting Group undertaking (foreign currencies)
are translated into the functional currency at the exchange rates ruling on the date of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities
denominated in foreign currencies are translated into the relevant functional currency at the rate ruling at the year end. Exchange
differences arising on foreign exchange transactions and the retranslation of assets and liabilities into functional currencies at the rate
ruling at the year end are taken into account in determining profit before taxation.
Financial instruments
IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement requires the classification of financial instruments into separate categories
for which the accounting requirement is different. The Group has classified its financial instruments as follows:
ő short-term investments are generally classified as available for sale;
ő short-term deposits (principally comprising funds held with banks and other financial institutions), trade receivables and short-term
investments not designated as available for sale are classified as loans and receivables;
ő borrowings, trade payables, financial RRSAs, put options on NCI and C Shares are classified as other liabilities; and
ő derivatives, comprising foreign exchange contracts, interest rate swaps, and commodity swaps are classified as fair value through
profit or loss.
Financial instruments are recognised at the contract date and initially measured at fair value. Their subsequent measurement depends
on their classification.
ő Available for sale assets are held at fair value. Changes in fair value arising from changes in exchange rates are included in the income
statement. All other changes in fair value are taken to equity. On disposal, the accumulated changes in value recorded in equity are
included in the gain or loss recorded in the income statement.
ő Loans and receivables and other liabilities are held at amortised cost and not revalued (except for changes in exchange rates and forecast
contractual cash flows, which are included in the income statement) unless they are included in a fair value hedge accounting
relationship. Where such a hedging relationship exists, the instruments are revalued in respect of the risk being hedged, with the change
in value included in the income statement.
ő Fair value through profit or loss items are held at fair value. Changes in fair value are included in the income statement unless the
instrument is included in a cash flow hedge. If the instruments are included in an effective cash flow hedging relationship, changes
in value are taken to equity. When the hedged forecast transaction occurs, amounts previously recorded in equity are recognised in
the income statement.
Financial instruments are derecognised on expiry or when all contractual rights and obligations are transferred.
Hedge accounting
The Group does not generally apply hedge accounting in respect of forward foreign exchange contracts or commodity swaps held to
manage the cash flow exposures of forecast transactions denominated in foreign currencies or in commodities respectively.
The Group applies hedge accounting in respect of transactions entered into to manage the fair value and cash flow exposures of its
borrowings. Forward foreign exchange contracts are held to manage the fair value exposures of borrowings denominated in foreign
currencies and are designated as fair value hedges. Interest rate swaps are held to manage the interest rate exposures and are designated
as fair value or cash flow hedges of fixed and floating rate borrowings respectively.
Other information
The trading results of Group undertakings are translated into sterling at the average exchange rates for the year. The assets and liabilities
of overseas undertakings, including goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on acquisition, are translated at the exchange rates ruling
at the year end. Exchange adjustments arising from the retranslation of the opening net investments, and from the translation of the
profits or losses at average rates, are recognised in OCI. The cumulative amount of exchange adjustments was, on transition to IFRS in
2004, deemed to be nil.
Financial statements
Accruals for tax contingencies require management to make judgements and estimates of exposures in relation to tax audit issues. Tax
benefits are not recognised unless the tax positions will probably be sustained. Once considered to be probable, management reviews each
material tax benefit to assess whether a provision should be taken against full recognition of that benefit on the basis of potential
settlement through negotiation and/or litigation. All provisions are included in current liabilities.
Directors’ report
Deferred tax liabilities are recognised for taxable temporary differences arising on investments in subsidiaries and joint ventures, except
where the Group is able to control the reversal of the temporary difference and it is probable that the temporary difference will not reverse
in the foreseeable future. Deferred tax is not recognised on taxable temporary differences arising on the initial recognition of goodwill or
for temporary differences arising from the initial recognition of assets and liabilities in a transaction that is not a business combination
and that affects neither accounting nor taxable profit.
86
Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Changes in the fair values of derivatives designated as fair value hedges and changes in the fair value of the related hedged item are
recognised directly in the income statement.
Changes in the fair values of derivatives that are designated as cash flow hedges and are effective are recognised directly in equity. Any
ineffectiveness in the hedging relationships is included in the income statement. The amounts deferred in equity are recognised in the
income statement to match the recognition of the hedged item.
Hedge accounting is discontinued when the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated, exercised, or no longer qualifies for hedge
accounting. At that time, for cash flow hedges and if the forecast transaction remains probable, any cumulative gain or loss on the hedging
instrument recognised in equity is retained in equity until the forecast transaction occurs. If a hedged transaction is no longer expected to
occur, the net cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in equity is transferred to the income statement.
The portion of a gain or loss on an instrument used to hedge a net investment in a foreign operation that is determined to be an effective
hedge is recognised directly in equity. The ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the income statement. Gains and losses
accumulated in the translation reserve will be recycled to profit when the foreign operation is sold.
Business combinations and goodwill
On the acquisition of a business, fair values are attributed to the identifiable assets and liabilities and contingent liabilities unless the fair
value cannot be measured reliably, in which case the value is subsumed into goodwill. Where fair values of acquired contingent liabilities
cannot be measured reliably, the assumed contingent liability is not recognised but is disclosed in the same manner as other contingent
liabilities.
Goodwill recognised represents the excess of the fair value of the purchase consideration over the fair value to the Group of the net of
the identifiable assets acquired and the liabilities assumed. On transition to IFRS on 1 January 2004, business combinations were not
retrospectively adjusted to comply with Adopted IFRS and goodwill was recognised based on the carrying value under the previous
accounting policies. Goodwill in respect of the acquisition of a subsidiary is recognised as an intangible asset. Goodwill arising on the
acquisition of joint ventures and associates is included in the carrying value of the investment.
Certification costs and participation fees
Costs incurred in respect of meeting regulatory certification requirements for new civil aero-engine/aircraft combinations including
payments made to airframe manufacturers for this and participation fees are carried forward in intangible assets to the extent that they
can be recovered out of future sales and are charged to the income statement over the programme life, up to a maximum of 15 years from
the entry into service of the product.
Research and development
In accordance with IAS 38 Intangible Assets, expenditure incurred on research and development is distinguished as relating either to a
research phase or to a development phase.
All research phase expenditure is charged to the income statement. Development expenditure is capitalised as an internally generated
intangible asset only if it meets strict criteria, relating in particular to technical feasibility and generation of future economic benefits. As
described on page 81, the Group considers that it is not possible to distinguish reliably between research and development activities until
relatively late in the programme.
Expenditure capitalised is amortised on a straight-line basis over its useful economic life, up to a maximum of 15 years from the entry into
service of the product.
The fair value of research and development recognised during a business combination relate to the acquired company’s technology.
Amortisation occurs on a straight-line basis over its useful economic life, up to a maximum of 15 years.
Recoverable engine costs
The Group may sell OE to customers at a price below its cost, on the basis that this deficit will be recovered from the profits of highly
probable future aftermarket sales. As described on page 81, this sale is considered to give rise to an intangible asset, which, subject to
an impairment review, is recognised at the time of delivery and amortised on a straight-line basis over the period that highly probable
aftermarket sales are expected to be earned.
Customer relationships
The fair value of customer relationships recognised during a business combination relate to the acquired company’s established
relationships with its existing customers that result in repeat purchases and customer loyalty. Amortisation occurs on a straight-line basis
over its useful economic life, up to a maximum of 15 years.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
87
Strategic report
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Property, plant and equipment
Property, plant and equipment assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and any provision for impairment in value.
Depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis to write off the cost, less the estimated residual value, of property, plant and equipment
over their estimated useful lives. No depreciation is provided on assets in the course of construction. Estimated useful lives are as follows:
Operating leases
Payments made and rentals received under operating lease arrangements are charged/credited to the income statement on a straightline basis.
If the recoverable amount of an asset (or cash-generating unit) is estimated to be below the carrying value, the carrying value is reduced
to the recoverable amount and the impairment loss recognised as an expense. The recoverable amount is the higher of value in use or fair
value less costs to sell, if this is readily available. The value in use is the present value of future cash flows using a pre-tax discount rate that
reflects the time value of money and the risk specific to the asset.
Inventories
Inventories and work in progress are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value on a first-in, first-out basis. Cost comprises direct
materials and, where applicable, direct labour costs and those overheads, including depreciation of property, plant and equipment, that
have been incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition. Net realisable value represents the estimated selling
prices less all estimated costs of completion and costs to be incurred in marketing, selling and distribution.
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents include cash at bank and in hand, investments in money-market funds and short-term deposits with a maturity
of three months or less on inception. The Group considers overdrafts (repayable on demand) to be an integral part of its cash management
activities and these are included in cash and cash equivalents for the purposes of the cash flow statement.
Provisions
Provisions are recognised when the Group has a present obligation as a result of a past event, and it is probable that the Group will be
required to settle that obligation. Provisions are measured at the directors’ best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the
obligation at the balance sheet date, and are discounted to present value where the effect is material.
Post-retirement benefits
Pensions and similar benefits (principally healthcare) are accounted for under IAS 19 Employee Benefits.
For defined benefit plans, obligations are measured at discounted present value whilst plan assets are recorded at fair value. Surpluses
in schemes are recognised as assets only if they represent economic benefits available to the Group in the future. A liability is recognised
to the extent that the minimum funding requirements in respect of past service will give rise to an unrecognisable surplus.
The service and financing costs of such plans are recognised separately in the income statement:
ő current service costs are spread systematically over the lives of employees;
ő past service costs are recognised immediately; and
ő financing costs are recognised in the periods in which they arise.
Other information
Impairment of non-current assets
Impairment of non-current assets is considered in accordance with IAS 36 Impairment of Assets. Where the asset does not generate cash
flows that are independent of other assets, impairment is considered for the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs. Goodwill and
intangible assets not yet available for use are tested for impairment annually. Other intangible assets, property, plant and equipment and
investments are assessed for any indications of impairment annually. If any indication of impairment is identified, an impairment test is
performed to estimate the recoverable amount.
Financial statements
i) land and buildings, as advised by the Group’s professional advisers:
a) freehold buildings – five to 45 years (average 24 years)
b) leasehold buildings – lower of adviser’s estimates or period of lease
c) no depreciation is provided on freehold land
ii) plant and equipment – five to 25 years (average 13 years)
iii) aircraft and engines – five to 20 years (average 15 years).
Directors’ report
Software
The cost of acquiring software that is not specific to an item of property, plant and equipment is classified as an intangible asset and
amortised over its useful economic life, up to a maximum of five years.
88
Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Actuarial gains and losses and movements in unrecognised surpluses and minimum funding liabilities are recognised immediately in OCI.
Payments to defined contribution schemes are charged as an expense as they fall due.
Share-based payments
The Group provides share-based payment arrangements to certain employees. These are principally equity-settled arrangements and are
measured at fair value (excluding the effect of non-market based vesting conditions) at the date of grant. The fair value is expensed on a
straight-line basis over the vesting period. The amount recognised as an expense is adjusted to reflect the actual number of shares or
options that will vest, except where additional shares vest as a result of the Total Shareholder Return (TSR) performance condition in the
Performance Share Plan (PSP).
Cash-settled share options (grants in the International ShareSave plan) are measured at fair value at the balance sheet date. The Group
recognises a liability at the balance sheet date based on these fair values, taking into account the estimated number of options that will
actually vest and the relative completion of the vesting period. Changes in the value of this liability are recognised in the income statement
for the year.
The cost of shares of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc held by the Group for the purpose of fulfilling obligations in respect of employee share plans
is deducted from equity in the consolidated balance sheet. See note 21 for a further description of the share-based payment plans.
Sales financing support
In connection with the sale of its products, the Group will, on occasion, provide financing support for its customers. These arrangements
fall into two categories: credit-based guarantees; and asset-value guarantees. In accordance with the requirements of IAS 39 and IFRS 4
Insurance Contracts, credit-based guarantees are treated as insurance contracts. The Group considers asset-value guarantees to be nonfinancial liabilities and accordingly these are also treated as insurance contracts. As described on page 82, the directors consider the
likelihood of crystallisation is assessing whether provision is required for any contingent liabilities.
The Group’s contingent liabilities relating to financing arrangements are spread over many years and relate to a number of customers
and a broad product portfolio, and are reported on a discounted basis.
Revisions to Adopted IFRS in 2013
With effect from 1 January 2013, the Group has adopted the amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits issued by the IASB in June 2011.
A description of these amendments and their effect is set out in note 19. In summary, the amendments require:
ő recognition of certain administrative costs as operating costs rather than being included in net financing;
ő net financing to be calculated on the net asset or liability recognised on the balance sheet using an AA corporate bond rate rather than
using an expected rate of return for scheme assets; and
ő immediate recognition of previously unrecognised past-service credits.
Had these amendments not been adopted, the results would have been affected as follows:
ő profit before financing £15 million higher (2012 £22 million higher);
ő net post-retirement financing £107 million higher (2012 £56 million higher); and
ő net assets £73 million lower (2012 £100 million lower).
Revisions to IFRS not applicable in 2013
Standards and interpretations issued by the IASB are only applicable if endorsed by the EU.
Under Adopted IFRS, IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements, IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements, IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities
and amendments to IAS 17 Separate Financial Statements are effective for 2014. The principal potential effect is that certain entities
previously classified as joint ventures might be classified as joint operations, requiring the Group’s share of the individual assets and
liabilities of these entities to be included in the financial statements rather than the equity accounting method previously applied. The
Group has reviewed its material joint ventures and has concluded that none are to be classified as joint operations under the requirements
of IFRS 11. If endorsed, IFRS 9 Financial Instruments will simplify the classification of financial assets for measurement purposes, but is not
anticipated to have a significant impact on the financial statements.
The Group does not consider that any other standards, amendments or interpretations issued by the IASB, but not yet applicable, will have a
significant impact on the financial statements.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
89
Strategic report
2 Segmental analysis
The analysis by business segment is presented in accordance with IFRS 8 Operating Segments, on the basis of those segments whose
operating results are regularly reviewed by the Board (the Chief Operating Decision Maker as defined by IFRS 8), as follows:
Power Systems
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of commercial aero engines and aftermarket services.
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of military aero engines and aftermarket services.
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of marine-power propulsion systems and aftermarket services.
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of power systems for the offshore oil and gas industry and
electrical power generation and aftermarket services.
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of diesel engines.
Directors’ report
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Engineering and technology and Operations, discussed in the strategic report, operate on a Group-wide basis across all the above segments.
Underlying revenues – Where revenues are denominated in a currency other than the functional currency of the Group undertaking, these
reflect the achieved exchange rates arising on settled derivative contracts.
Underlying profit before financing – Where transactions are denominated in a currency other than the functional currency of the Group
undertaking, this reflects the transactions at the achieved exchange rates on settled derivative contracts. In addition, adjustments have
been made to exclude one-off past-service costs and credits on post-retirement schemes and the effect of acquisition accounting.
ő includes amounts realised from settled derivative contracts and revaluation of relevant assets and liabilities to exchange rates forecast
ő to be achieved from future settlement of derivative contracts; and
ő excludes unrealised amounts arising from revaluations required by IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement, changes
in value of financial RRSA contracts arising from changes in forecast payments, changes in the value of put options on NCI and the net
impact of financing costs related to post-retirement scheme benefits.
This analysis also includes a reconciliation of the underlying results to those reported in the consolidated income statement.
Year ended 31 December 2013
Underlying revenue from sale of original equipment
Underlying revenue from aftermarket services
Total underlying revenue
Underlying operating profit excluding share of results
of joint ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Underlying profit before financing and taxation
Segment assets
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Segment liabilities
Net assets/(liabilities)
Investment in intangible assets, property, plant and
equipment and joint ventures and associates
Depreciation, amortisation and impairment
Civil
aerospace
£m
Defence
aerospace
£m
Marine
£m
Energy
£m
Power
Systems
£m
3,035
3,620
6,655
1,385
1,206
2,591
1,438
1,089
2,527
415
633
1,048
2,004
827
2,831
708
136
844
424
14
438
281
–
281
15
11
26
9,587
495
(6,243)
3,839
891
349
1,437
17
(1,660)
(206)
103
53
1,910
6
(1,312)
604
37
75
1,407
54
(688)
773
66
51
296
(2)
294
3,927
29
(3,034)
922
142
272
Intersegment
£m
(72)
(75)
(147)
2
–
2
(744)
–
733
(11)
–
–
Total
reportable
segments
£m
8,205
7,300
15,505
1,726
159
1,885
17,524
601
(12,204)
5,921
1,239
800
Other information
Underlying profit before taxation – In addition to those adjustments in underlying profit before financing:
Financial statements
The operating results reviewed by the Board are prepared on an underlying basis, which the Board considers reflects better the economic
substance of the Group’s trading during the year. The principles adopted to determine underlying results are:
90
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
2 Segmental analysis (continued)
Year ended 31 December 2012 (restated – see note 1)
Underlying revenue from sale of original equipment
Underlying revenue from aftermarket services
Total underlying revenue
Underlying operating profit excluding share of results of
joint ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Underlying profit before financing and taxation
Segment assets
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Segment liabilities
Net assets/(liabilities)
Investment in intangible assets, property, plant and
equipment and joint ventures and associates
Depreciation, amortisation and impairment
Reconciliation to reported results
Year ended 31 December 2013
Revenue from sale of original equipment
Revenue from aftermarket services
Total revenue
Operating profit excluding share of results of joint
ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Profit on transfer of joint ventures to subsidiaries
Profit on disposal of businesses
Profit before financing and taxation
Net financing
Profit before taxation
Taxation
Profit for the year
Ordinary shareholders
Non-controlling interests
Profit for the year
Year ended 31 December 2012 (restated – see note 1)
Revenue from sale of original equipment
Revenue from aftermarket services
Total revenue
Operating profit excluding share of results of joint
ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Profit on disposal of businesses
Profit before financing and taxation
Net financing
Profit before taxation
Taxation
Profit for the year
Ordinary shareholders
Non-controlling interests
Profit for the year
1
Central corporate costs.
Total
reportable
segments
£m
Civil
aerospace
£m
Defence
aerospace
£m
Marine
£m
Energy
£m
Power
Systems
£m
2,934
3,503
6,437
1,231
1,186
2,417
1,288
961
2,249
344
618
962
118
169
287
(22)
(121)
(143)
5,893
6,316
12,209
613
130
743
382
13
395
295
(1)
294
7
12
19
32
77
109
(11)
–
(11)
1,318
231
1,549
8,683
440
(5,819)
3,304
1,434
(22)
(1,797)
(385)
2,059
4
(1,467)
596
1,279
50
(570)
759
150
1,328
(282)
1,196
(682)
–
671
(11)
12,923
1,800
(9,264)
5,459
101
55
94
42
581
322
126
46
11
4
–
–
913
469
Underlying
adjustments
£m
Group
£m
Total
reportable
segments
£m
Underlying
central items
£m
Total
underlying
£m
8,205
7,300
15,505
–
–
–
8,205
7,300
15,505
1,726
159
–
–
1,885
(54) 1
–
–
–
(54)
(72)
(126)
(434)
(560)
1,672
159
–
–
1,831
(72)
1,759
(434)
1,325
1,224
101
1,325
Total
reportable
segments
£m
Underlying
central items
£m
Total
underlying
£m
5,893
6,316
12,209
–
–
–
5,893
6,316
12,209
1,318
231
–
1,549
(54)1
–
–
(54)
(61)
(115)
(317)
(432)
Intersegment
£m
1,264
231
–
1,495
(61)
1,434
(317)
1,117
1,103
14
1,117
70
(62)
8
(297)
1
119
216
39
(39)
–
54
54
143
(89)
54
Underlying
adjustments
£m
8,275
7,238
15,513
1,375
160
119
216
1,870
(111)
1,759
(380)
1,379
1,367
12
1,379
Group
£m
41
(89)
(48)
5,934
6,227
12,161
(59)
(58)
699
582
750
1,332
(114)
1,218
1,218
–
1,218
1,205
173
699
2,077
689
2,766
(431)
2,335
2,321
14
2,335
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
91
Strategic report
2 Segmental analysis (continued)
Underlying adjustments
2
3
4
5
(434)
Revenue
£m
Net
financing
£m
Taxation
£m
15,505
1,831
8
–
–
–
(48)
–
–
–
–
(10)
(5)
–
–
(25)
–
–
–
–
–
(18)
250
–
–
–
–
–
–
(23)
747
–
–
–
–
–
–
(265)
(251)
–
–
–
–
–
–
(69)
11
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
8
15,513
119
(64)
–
216
61
–
–
39
1,870
–
–
(26)
–
(7)
–
–
(39)
(111)
–
–
–
–
–
54
–
54
(380)
12,209
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(48)
12,161
1,495
–
–
–
–
–
–
699
582
2,077
(61)
–
–
(8)
–
–
–
–
750
689
(317)
–
–
–
–
–
(151)
37
(114)
(431)
Realised gains on settled derivative contracts include adjustments to reflect (gains)/losses in the same period as the related trading cash flows.
Unrealised fair value changes to derivative contracts: (i) include those included in equity accounted joint ventures; and (ii) exclude those for which the related trading contracts have
been cancelled when the fair value changes are recognised immediately in underlying profit.
The adjustment eliminates charges recognised as a result of recognising assets in acquired businesses at fair value.
Discretionary increase of £64m on unindexed pensions – see Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 12.
Other includes the exclusion of other operating income of £63m and the revaluation of preference shares in RRPS, which have now been acquired.
The reconciliation of underlying earnings per ordinary share is shown in note 6.
2013
£m
Reportable segment assets
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments
Fair value of swaps hedging fixed rate borrowings
Income tax assets
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
Total assets
Reportable segment liabilities
Borrowings
Fair value of swaps hedging fixed rate borrowings
Income tax liabilities
Post-retirement scheme deficits
Total liabilities
Net assets
* Restated – see note 1.
17,524
601
4,311
47
332
248
23,063
(12,204)
(2,371)
(48)
(1,096)
(1,041)
(16,760)
6,303
Restated*
31 December
1 January
2012
2012
£m
£m
12,923
1,800
2,596
104
375
348
18,146
(9,264)
(1,383)
–
(710)
(793)
(12,150)
5,996
12,425
1,680
1,321
106
407
520
16,459
(9,463)
(1,204)
–
(583)
(807)
(12,057)
4,402
Other information
1
(72)
Taxation
£m
2012*
Profit before
financing
£m
Financial statements
Underlying performance
Revenue recognised at exchange rate
on date of transaction
Realised gains on settled
derivative contracts 1
Net unrealised fair value changes to
derivative contracts 2
Effect of currency on contract accounting
Put option on NCI and financial RRSAs –
foreign exchange differences and other
unrealised changes in value
Effect of acquisition accounting 3
Profit on reclassification of joint ventures
to subsidiaries
Pensions discretionary increase 4
Net post-retirement scheme financing
Profit on disposal of businesses
Other 5
Related tax effect
IAE restructuring
Total underlying adjustments
Reported per consolidated income statement
Net
financing
£m
Directors’ report
Revenue
£m
2013
Profit before
financing
£m
92
Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
2 Segmental analysis (continued)
Geographical segments
The Group’s revenue by destination is shown below:
United Kingdom
Norway
Germany
Switzerland
Spain
Italy
France
Russia
Rest of Europe
USA
Canada
South America
Saudi Arabia
Rest of Middle East
India
China
South Korea
Japan
Malaysia
Singapore
Rest of Asia
Africa
Australasia
Other 1
1
2013
£m
2012
£m
1,803
520
977
871
178
236
259
114
670
3,972
507
393
547
426
244
1,087
452
244
292
558
772
139
174
78
15,513
1,641
446
319
63
177
151
182
165
613
3,999
351
303
308
389
148
1,117
194
158
322
333
376
123
240
43
12,161
Other revenue mainly originates from Central America.
In 2012, revenue (included in all reportable segments other than Power Systems) of £1,203 million was received from a single customer.
In 2013, no single customer represented ten per cent or more of the Group’s revenue.
The carrying amounts of the Group’s non-current assets, excluding financial instruments, deferred tax assets and post-retirement benefit
surpluses, by the geographical area in which the assets are located, are as follows:
United Kingdom
North America
Nordic countries
Germany
Other
2013
£m
2012
£m
3,649
872
823
2,739
924
9,007
3,139
723
889
2,023
497
7,271
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
93
Strategic report
3 Other income and expenses
Research and development costs
2012*
£m
(750)
110
(130)
(770)
126
(50)
11
(683)
59
(624)
(572)
38
(55)
(589)
33
(5)
30
(531)
–
(531)
* Restated – see note 1.
Financial statements
Expenditure in the year
Capitalised as intangible assets
Amortisation of capitalised costs
Net research and development cost
Entry fees received
Entry fees deferred in respect of charges in future years
Recognition of previously deferred entry fees
Net cost recognised in the income statement
Underlying adjustments relating to effects of acquisition accounting and foreign exchange
Net underlying cost recognised in the income statement
2013
£m
Directors’ report
In October 2011, Rolls-Royce and United Technologies Corp. (UTC) announced their intention to form a new joint venture to develop an
engine to power future mid-size (120–230 passenger) aircraft. In September 2013, the parties agreed not to proceed with the partnership.
Other operating income includes £63 million received by the Group as a result of this.
4 Net financing
Financing costs
Interest payable
Fair value losses on foreign currency contracts 2
Put options on NCI and financial RRSAs – foreign exchange
differences and other unrealised changes in value
Financial charge relating to financial RRSAs
Fair value losses on commodity derivatives 2
Financing costs on post-retirement scheme deficits
Net foreign exchange losses
Other financing charges
Net financing
Analysed as:
Net interest payable
Net post-retirement scheme financing
Net other financing
Net financing
1
See note 2
2
Net gain on fair value items through profit or loss
17
17
19
17
17
17
17
19
2012
Per
consolidated
income
Underlying
statement
financing 1
£m
£m
15
287
15
–
10
750
10
–
8
17
327
–
–
15
11
26
797
–
–
10
(58)
(3)
(58)
–
(51)
–
(51)
–
(259)
(9)
(34)
(43)
(5)
(27)
(438)
(111)
–
(9)
–
–
–
(20)
(87)
(72)
–
(10)
(3)
(34)
–
(10)
(108)
689
–
(10)
–
–
–
(10)
(71)
(61)
(43)
(26)
(42)
(111)
(43)
–
(29)
(72)
(41)
(8)
738
689
(41)
–
(20)
(61)
250
–
747
–
Other information
Note
Financing income
Interest receivable
Fair value gains on foreign currency contracts 2
Put options on NCI and financial RRSAs – foreign exchange
differences and other unrealised changes in value
Financing income on post-retirement scheme surpluses
2013
Per
consolidated
income
Underlying
statement
financing 1
£m
£m
94
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
5 Taxation
UK
2013
£m
Current tax
Current tax charge/(credit) for the year
Less double tax relief
Adjustments in respect of prior years
Deferred tax
Charge/(credit) for the year
Adjustments in respect of prior years
Credit resulting from reduction in tax rates
Recognised in the income statement
Other tax (charges)/credits
Current tax:
Share-based payments – direct to equity
Deferred tax:
Net investment hedge
Movement in post-retirement schemes
Share-based payments – direct to equity
2012*
£m
Overseas
2013
£m
2012*
£m
Total
2013
£m
2012*
£m
7
(1)
6
2
8
(3)
(1)
(4)
(7)
(11)
290
–
290
29
319
218
–
218
(18)
200
297
(1)
296
31
327
215
(1)
214
(25)
189
224
(8)
(59)
157
165
216
1
(19)
198
187
(66)
(37)
(1)
(104)
215
38
6
–
44
244
158
(45)
(60)
53
380
254
7
(19)
242
431
OCI
Items that will not
be reclassified
2012*
2013
£m
£m
10
105
10
105
Equity
Items that may
be reclassified
2013
2012
£m
£m
1
(1)
1
(1)
Tax reconciliation
Profit before taxation
Less share of results of joint ventures and associates (note 11)
Profit before taxation excluding joint ventures and associates
Nominal tax charge at UK corporation tax rate 23.25% (2012 24.5%)
UK R&D credit
Rate differences
Profit on reclassification of joint ventures to subsidiaries
Changes in value of put option on NCI
Restructuring of IAE 1
Other permanent differences
Benefit to deferred tax from previously unrecognised tax losses and temporary differences
Tax losses in year not recognised in deferred tax
Adjustments in respect of prior years
Reduction in closing deferred taxes resulting from decrease in tax rates
Underlying items (note 2)
Non-underlying items
* Restated – see note 1.
1
Pursuant to the Substantial Shareholdings Exemption, the majority of the upfront proceeds received on the IAE restructuring were not subject to tax.
2013
£m
2012
£m
5
3
8
13
6
9
2013
£m
1,759
(160)
1,599
372
(13)
51
(27)
60
–
12
(7)
6
(14)
(60)
380
434
(54)
380
2012*
£m
2,766
(173)
2,593
635
(26)
59
–
–
(209)
9
–
–
(18)
(19)
431
317
114
431
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
95
Strategic report
5 Taxation (continued)
Deferred taxation assets and liabilities
(242)
(53)
11
8
(282)
–
(8)
(566)
316
(882)
(566)
(77)
(43)
62
(58)
(242)
104
6
(1)
(46)
(5)
(242)
342
(584)
(242)
Financial statements
2012
£m
Directors’ report
At 1 January, as previously reported
Effect of amendments to IAS 19 – see note 19
Effect of amendment to RRSAs – see note 1
At 1 January as restated
Amount charged to income statement
Amount credited to other comprehensive income
Amount credited to equity
Acquisition of businesses
Transferred to assets held for sale
Exchange differences
At 31 December
Deferred tax assets
Deferred tax liabilities
2013
£m
The analysis of the deferred tax position is as follows:
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Other temporary differences
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Pensions and other post-retirement
scheme benefits
Foreign exchange and commodity financial
assets and liabilities
Losses
R&D expenditure credit
Advance corporation tax
Recognised
in OCI
£m
Recognised
in equity
£m
Acquisition
of businesses
£m
Transferred
from assets
held for sale
£m
Exchange
differences
£m
At
31 December
2013
£m
(232)
(158)
12
(351)
34
17
9
(29)
–
–
1
–
–
–
3
–
(311)
(70)
60
–
–
–
–
–
(2)
1
(5)
–
(511)
(210)
80
(380)
110
–
10
–
36
–
(3)
153
(56)
369
–
64
(242)
(36)
(55)
7
–
(53)
–
–
–
–
11
–
5
–
–
8
–
3
–
–
(282)
–
–
–
–
–
–
1
–
–
(8)
(92)
323
7
64
(566)
Restated*
Recognised
in income
statement
£m
Recognised
in OCI
£m
Recognised
in equity
£m
Acquisition
of businesses
£m
At
1 January
2012
£m
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Other temporary differences
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Pensions and other post-retirement
scheme benefits
Foreign exchange and commodity financial
assets and liabilities
Losses
Advance corporation tax
Recognised
in income
statement
£m
Transferred
to assets
held for sale
£m
Exchange
movements
£m
At
31 December
2012
£m
(243)
(135)
1
(250)
58
(25)
10
(101)
–
–
(1)
–
–
–
–
–
–
1
–
–
(46)
–
–
–
(1)
1
2
–
(232)
(158)
12
(351)
56
(41)
105
–
(2)
–
(8)
110
121
328
64
(58)
(177)
34
–
(242)
–
–
–
104
–
6
–
6
–
–
–
(1)
–
–
–
(46)
–
1
–
(5)
(56)
369
64
(242)
* Restated – see note 1.
Advance corporation tax
Losses and other unrecognised deferred tax assets
Deferred tax not recognised on unused tax losses and other items on the basis that future economic benefit is uncertain
2013
£m
2012
£m
118
39
157
118
39
157
Other information
At
1 January
2013
£m
96
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
5 Taxation (continued)
Deferred taxation assets and liabilities
The 2013 Budget announced that the UK corporation tax rate will reduce to 21 per cent from 1 April 2014 and to 20 per cent from
1 April 2015. These reductions were substantively enacted on 2 July 2013. As the reduction to 20 per cent was substantively enacted
prior to the year end, the closing deferred tax assets and liabilities have been calculated at this rate. The resulting charges or credits have
been recognised in the income statement except to the extent that they relate to items previously charged or credited to OCI or equity.
Accordingly, in 2013, £59 million has been credited to the income statement, £1 million has been charged to the OCI and £9 million has
been charged directly to equity.
The temporary differences associated with investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates, for which a deferred tax liability
has not been recognised, aggregate to £573 million (2012 £144 million). No deferred tax liability has been recognised on the potential
withholding tax due on the remittance of undistributed profits as the Group is able to control the timing of such remittances and it is
probable that consent will not be given in the foreseeable future.
6 Earnings per ordinary share
Basic earnings per ordinary share (EPS) are calculated by dividing the profit attributable to ordinary shareholders by the weighted average
number of ordinary shares in issue during the year, excluding ordinary shares held under trust, which have been treated as if they had
been cancelled.
Diluted EPS are calculated by adjusting the weighted average number of ordinary shares in issue during the year for the bonus element
of share options.
2012 figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits – see note 19, and the change in the
accounting policy for RRSAs – see note 1. The impact of the restatement on the previously reported EPS of 123.23p was an increase of 1.40p
relating to the IAS 19 amendments and an increase of 0.75p relating to the change in the accounting policy for RRSAs.
Basic
Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders (£m)
Weighted average number of ordinary shares (millions)
EPS (pence)
1,367
1,866
73.26
2013
Potentially
dilutive share
options
21
(0.82)
Diluted
Basic
1,367
1,887
72.44
2,321
1,851
125.38
2012
Potentially
dilutive share
options
25
(1.65)
Diluted
2,321
1,876
123.73
The reconciliation between underlying EPS and basic EPS is as follows:
2013
Underlying EPS/Underlying profit attributable to ordinary shareholders
Total underlying adjustments to profit before tax (note 2)
Related tax effects
Related NCI effects
EPS/Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders
Excluding IAE restructuring
IAE restructuring
Diluted underlying EPS
2012*
Pence
£m
65.59
–
2.89
4.78
73.26
73.26
–
64.86
1,224
–
54
89
1,367
1,367
–
Pence
59.59
71.96
(6.17)
–
125.38
85.62
39.76
58.80
£m
1,103
1,332
(114)
–
2,321
1,585
736
* The impact of the restatement on the previously reported underlying EPS of 59.27p was a decrease of 0.71p relating to the IAS 19 amendments and an increase of 1.03p relating to the
change in the accounting policy for RRSAs.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
97
Strategic report
7 Employee information
1
22,800
7,200
1,700
2,800
8,300
42,800
21,500
7,800
8,800
3,700
1,000
42,800
£m
£m
2,843
374
79
379
3,675
2,163
265
55
245
2,728
2013
£m
2012
£m
0.2
5.6
5.8
0.2
4.5
4.7
0.8
0.8
0.1
0.2
–
1.0
8.7
0.6
0.3
0.2
0.6
0.4
0.1
6.9
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1
Remuneration of key management personnel is shown in note 24.
8 Auditors’ remuneration
Fees payable to the Company’s auditors and its associates were as follows:
Fees payable to the Company’s auditors for the audit of the Company’s annual financial statements 1
Fees payable to the Company’s auditors and its associates for the audit of the Company’s subsidiaries pursuant to legislation
Total fees payable for audit services
Fees payable to the Company’s auditors and its associates for other services 2:
Audit related assurance services 3
Taxation compliance services
Taxation advisory services
Internal audit services 4
Information technology services 4
All other services
Fees payable in respect of the Group’s pension schemes:
Audit
Taxation compliance services
1
2
3
4
The level of fees payable to the Company’s auditors for the audit of the Company’s annual financial statements reflects the fact that limited incremental work is required in respect of
the audit of these financial statements. Rolls-Royce plc, a subsidiary of the Company, is also required to prepare consolidated financial statements and the fees payable to the Company’s
auditors for the audit of those financial statements, including the audit of the sub-consolidation, is included in the audit of the Company’s subsidiaries pursuant to legislation.
As described on page 46, in 2013, fees for other services to KPMG in respect of Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG (RRPS) were £2.1m. Following the consolidation of RRPS on 1 January 2013,
the audit committee approved the continuation of engagements already in progress at that date.
This includes £0.3m (2012 £0.3m) for the review of the half-year report.
In 2012, as part of the Group’s IT modernisation programme, KPMG provided specialist internal audit support while the Group recruited its own personnel. In addition, consulting
services were provided by a firm which was acquired by KPMG after being engaged by the Group.
Other information
Group employment costs 1
Wages and salaries
Social security costs
Share-based payments (note 21)
Pensions and other post-retirement scheme benefits (note 19)
24,800
8,500
1,600
10,500
9,800
55,200
23,400
7,900
9,200
4,000
10,700
55,200
Financial statements
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Power Systems
2012
Number
Directors’ report
Average number of employees
United Kingdom
United States
Canada
Germany
Rest of world
2013
Number
98
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
9 Intangible assets
Goodwill
£m
Cost:
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Transferred from subsidiary to associate
Disposals
At 1 January 2013
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Disposals of businesses
At 31 December 2013
Accumulated amortisation:
At 1 January 2012
Charge for the year 2
Impairment
Disposals
At 1 January 2013
Exchange differences
Charge for the year 2
Impairment
Disposal of businesses
At 31 December 2013
Net book value:
At 31 December 2013
At 31 December 2012
At 1 January 2012
1
2
Certification
costs and
participation
fees
£m
Development
expenditure1
£m
Recoverable
engine
costs
£m
Customer
relationships1
£m
Software1
£m
Other1
£m
Total
£m
1,106
(4)
–
10
–
(1)
1,111
(18)
–
773
(5)
1,861
720
(2)
28
–
–
(6)
740
3
185
–
–
928
998
(1)
38
–
(1)
(6)
1,028
5
110
508
(5)
1,646
464
–
35
–
–
–
499
–
52
–
–
551
45
–
–
–
–
–
45
(3)
–
433
–
475
267
(1)
119
2
–
(2)
385
(1)
69
–
–
453
134
(3)
5
7
–
(1)
142
17
87
286
–
532
3,734
(11)
225
19
(1)
(16)
3,950
3
503
2,000
(10)
6,446
7
–
3
(1)
9
(1)
–
17
(2)
23
197
34
–
(6)
225
–
40
–
–
265
274
55
–
(6)
323
(7)
130
3
(5)
444
231
64
–
–
295
–
28
–
–
323
7
5
–
–
12
(8)
61
4
–
69
104
41
–
(1)
144
–
54
–
–
198
32
10
–
(1)
41
5
91
–
–
137
852
209
3
(15)
1,049
(11)
404
24
(7)
1,459
255
241
163
395
101
102
4,987
2,901
2,882
1,838
1,102
1,099
663
515
523
1,202
705
724
228
204
233
406
33
38
Following the acquisition of RRPS on 1 January 2013, intangible assets relating to R&D, customers relationships and software have been reclassified from ‘other’ into their respective
categories from 1 January 2012 onwards.
Charged to cost of sales except development costs, which are charged to research and development costs.
Goodwill
In accordance with the requirements of IAS 36 Impairment of Assets, goodwill is allocated to the Group’s cash-generating units, or
groups of cash-generating units, that are expected to benefit from the synergies of the business combination that gave rise to the
goodwill as follows:
Cash-generating unit (CGU) or group of CGUs
Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG
Commercial marine – arising from the acquisitions of Vinters Limited and
Scandinavian Electric Holding AS
Commercial marine – arising from the acquisition of ODIM ASA
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG
Other
Primary
reporting
segment
2013
£m
2012
£m
Civil aerospace
230
223
Marine
Marine
Power Systems
Various
620
88
785
115
1,838
649
115
–
115
1,102
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
99
9 Intangible assets (continued)
Goodwill has been tested for impairment during 2013 on the following basis:
ő The carrying value of goodwill has been assessed by reference to value in use. These have been estimated using cash flows from the most
recent forecasts prepared by management, which are consistent with past experience and external sources of information on market
conditions. Given the long-term and established nature of many of the Group’s products (product lives are often measured in decades),
these forecast the next ten years. Growth rates for the period not covered by the forecasts are based on a range of growth rates
(2.0 – 2.75 per cent) that reflect the products, industries and countries in which the relevant CGU or group of CGUs operate.
ő The key assumptions for the impairment tests are the discount rate and, in the cash flow projections, the programme assumptions,
the growth rates and the impact of foreign exchange rates on the relationship between selling prices and costs. Impairment tests are
performed using prevailing exchange rates.
ő The pre-tax cash flow projections have been discounted at 13 per cent (2012 13 per cent), based on the Group’s weighted average cost
of capital, adjusted for specific risk where appropriate.
The principal value in use assumptions for goodwill balances considered to be individually significant are:
ő Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG – Volume of equipment deliveries, pricing achieved and cost escalation. These are based on current and
known future programmes, estimates of capture of market share and long-term economic forecasts. The principal foreign exchange
exposures are on translating income in a variety of non-functional currencies into euros. For the purposes of the impairment only, cash
flows beyond the ten-year forecasts are assumed to grow at two per cent. Following the recognition of RRPS at fair value on 1 January
2013, reasonably possible changes in the key assumptions could cause the value of goodwill to fall below its carrying value, such as a
reduction in the level of cash generation of nine per cent, a reduction in the assumed long-term growth rate to 0.8 per cent or an increase
in the assumed discount rate of 0.7 per cent.
ő Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG – Volume of engine deliveries, flying hours of installed fleet and cost escalation. These are based on
current and known future programmes, estimates of customers’ fleet requirements and long-term economic forecasts. The principal
foreign exchange exposure is on translating US dollar income into euros. For the purposes of the impairment test only, cash flows beyond
the ten-year forecasts are assumed to grow at 2.5 per cent (2012 2.5 per cent). The directors do not consider that any reasonably possible
change in the key assumptions would cause the value in use of the goodwill to fall below its carrying value. The overall level of business
would need to reduce by more than 85 per cent to cause an impairment of this balance.
ő Vinters Limited – Volume of equipment deliveries, capture of aftermarket and cost escalation. These are based on current and known
future programmes, estimates of customers’ fleet requirements and long-term economic forecasts. The principal foreign exchange
exposures are on translating income in a variety of non-functional currencies into Norwegian kroner. For the purposes of the impairment
test only, cash flows beyond the ten-year forecasts are assumed to grow at 2.5 per cent (2012 2.5 per cent). The directors do not consider
that any reasonably possible change in the key assumptions would cause the value in use of the goodwill to fall below its carrying value.
The overall level of business would need to reduce by more than 75 per cent to cause an impairment of this balance.
Other intangible assets
Certification costs and participation fees, customer relationships, technology, patents and licences, order backlog, trademark, development
costs and recoverable engine costs have been reviewed for impairment in accordance with the requirements of IAS 36 Impairment of Assets.
Where an impairment test was considered necessary, it has been performed on the following basis:
ő The carrying values have been assessed by reference to value in use. These have been estimated using cash flows from the most recent
forecasts prepared by management, which are consistent with past experience and external sources of information on market conditions
over the lives of the respective programmes.
ő The key assumptions underlying cash flow projections are assumed market share, programme timings, unit cost assumptions, discount
rates, and foreign exchange rates.
ő The pre-tax cash flow projections have been discounted at 11 per cent (2012 11 per cent), based on the Group’s weighted average cost
of capital.
ő No impairment is required on this basis. However, a combination of changes in assumptions and adverse movements in variables that
are outside the Group’s control (discount rate, exchange rate and airframe delays), could result in impairment in future years.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
100 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
10 Property, plant and equipment
Land and
buildings
£m
Cost:
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Disposals of businesses
Reclassifications
Disposals/write-offs
At 1 January 2013
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Disposals of businesses
Reclassifications
Disposals/write-offs
At 31 December 2013
Plant and
equipment
£m
Aircraft and
engines
£m
In course of
construction
£m
Total
£m
981
(14)
50
–
–
60
(5)
1,072
(11)
17
202
–
19
(2)
1,297
2,646
(25)
124
45
(4)
168
(65)
2,889
(28)
150
300
(1)
242
(62)
3,490
216
(1)
18
–
–
4
(14)
223
(2)
83
–
–
21
(1)
324
454
(9)
299
–
–
(232)
(1)
511
(8)
437
44
–
(282)
(2)
700
4,297
(49)
491
45
(4)
–
(85)
4,695
(49)
687
546
(1)
–
(67)
5,811
Accumulated depreciation:
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Charge for the year 1
Reclassifications
Disposals of businesses
Disposals/write-offs
At 1 January 2013
Exchange differences
Charge for the year 1
Reclassifications
Disposals of businesses
Disposals/write-offs
At 31 December 2013
315
(3)
39
7
–
(3)
355
(9)
48
(8)
–
–
386
1,598
(13)
196
(7)
(2)
(58)
1,714
(22)
301
8
(1)
(51)
1,949
44
–
20
–
–
(2)
62
(1)
23
2
–
–
–
–
(2)
–
–
–
–
–
84
–
–
–
1,959
(16)
255
–
(2)
(65)
2,131
(32)
372
–
(1)
(51)
2,419
Net book value:
At 31 December 2013
At 31 December 2012
At 1 January 2012
911
717
666
1,541
1,175
1,048
240
161
172
700
511
452
3,392
2,564
2,338
2013
£m
2012
£m
7
4
7
4
1
Depreciation charged during the year is presented in the income statement or included in the cost of inventory as appropriate.
Property, plant and equipment includes:
Net book value of finance leased assets:
Land and buildings
Plant and equipment
Assets held for use in operating leases:
Cost
Depreciation
Net book value
Capital expenditure commitments
Cost of fully depreciated assets
The Group’s share of equity accounted entities’ capital commitments is £150 million (2012 £31 million).
320
(79)
241
317
899
242
(65)
177
258
721
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
101
11 Investments
Joint ventures
£m
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Additions
Taxation paid by the Group
Transfer to subsidiary
Impairment
Share of retained profit
Transferred from subsidiary to associate
Disposals
Share of OCI – will not be reclassified to profit and loss
Share of OCI – may be reclassified to profit or loss
At 1 January 2013
Exchange differences
Additions
Taxation paid by the Group
Transfers to subsidiaries1
Acquisition of businesses
Share of retained profit
Disposals
Share of OCI – will not be reclassified to profit and loss
Share of OCI – may be reclassified to profit or loss
At 31 December 2013
1
Equity accounted
Associates
£m
1,680
(58)
191
6
(5)
(2)
44
–
–
(46)
(12)
1,798
(4)
43
6
(1,327)
30
61
(2)
–
(6)
599
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2
Total
£m
Other
Unlisted
£m
1,680
(58)
191
6
(5)
(2)
44
2
–
(46)
(12)
1,800
(4)
43
6
(1,327)
30
61
(2)
–
(6)
601
10
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(4)
–
–
6
1
1
–
–
20
–
(1)
–
–
27
At 31 December 2012, Rolls-Royce Power Systems GmbH (a 50:50 joint holding company with Daimler AG) held 99 per cent of the RRPS AG shares. As part of the shareholders’
agreement, certain conditions allowed the Group to classify RRPS AG as a subsidiary and consolidate it. These conditions were fulfilled and the rights exercised on 1 January 2013,
resulting in £1,328m being transferred to subsidiaries.
The summarised aggregated financial information of the Group’s share of equity accounted investments is as follows:
2013
Other
£m
Assets:
Non-current assets
Current assets
Liabilities:
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Liabilities include borrowings of:
Revenue
Profit before financing and taxation
Net financing
Taxation
Results recognised in the consolidated
income statement
Dividends received
Retained profit
Joint ventures
2012
Power
Systems
£m
Associates
Total
2012
Other
£m
2012
£m
2013
£m
2012
£m
2013
£m
2012
£m
1,839
852
1,590
718
1,717
818
3,307
1,536
1
2
1
2
1,840
854
3,308
1,538
(623)
(1,469)
599
(1,291)
(421)
(559)
1,328
(103)
(655)
(1,410)
470
(1,271)
(1,076)
(1,969)
1,798
(1,374)
(1)
–
2
–
(1)
–
2
–
(624)
(1,469)
601
(1,291)
(1,077)
(1,969)
1,800
(1,374)
2,343
188
(16)
(12)
1,223
33
(10)
(1)
2,827
189
(22)
(16)
4,050
222
(32)
(17)
1
–
–
–
3
–
–
–
2,344
188
(16)
(12)
4,053
222
(32)
(17)
160
(99)
61
22
(28)
(6)
151
(101)
50
173
(129)
44
–
–
–
–
–
–
160
(99)
61
173
(129)
44
The principal joint ventures at 31 December 2013 are listed on pages 128 and 129.
102 Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
12 Inventories
2013
£m
2012
£m
593
1,177
15
1,426
108
3,319
336
1,056
10
1,282
42
2,726
447
89
5
136
64
1
2013
£m
2012
£m
1,601
2,239
380
637
235
5,092
1,182
1,902
351
479
205
4,119
2,118
527
2,447
5,092
1,662
364
2,093
4,119
51
1,751
–
41
84
1,927
40
1,473
3
63
32
1,611
2013
£m
2012
£m
Cash at bank and in hand
Money-market funds
Short-term deposits
982
1,157
1,851
3,990
674
408
1,503
2,585
Overdrafts (note 15)
Cash and cash equivalents per cash flow statement (page 77)
Cash held as collateral against third-party obligations (note 18)
(3)
3,987
50
–
2,585
64
Raw materials
Work in progress
Long-term contracts work in progress
Finished goods
Payments on account
Inventories stated at net realisable value
Amount of inventory write-down
Reversal of inventory write-down
13 Trade and other receivables
Trade receivables
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Amounts owed by joint ventures and associates
Other receivables
Prepayments and accrued income
Analysed as:
Financial instruments (note 17):
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Non-financial instruments
Trade and other receivables expected to be recovered in more than one year:
Trade receivables
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Amounts owed by joint ventures and associates
Other receivables
Prepayments and accrued income
14 Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at 31 December 2013 includes £286 million (2012 £78 million) that is not available for general use by the Group.
This balance relates to cash held in non-wholly owned subsidiaries and the Group’s captive insurance company.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
103
15 Borrowings
Unsecured
Overdrafts
Bank loans
73/8% Notes 2016 £200m
6.38% Notes 2013 US$230m 1
6.55% Notes 2015 US$83m 1
6.75% Notes 2019 £500m 2
2.125% Notes 2021 €750m 1
3.375% Notes 2026 £375m 2
Secured
Obligations under finance leases 3
1
2
3
Current
2013
£m
2012
£m
Non-current
2013
£m
2012
£m
Total
2013
£m
2012
£m
3
204
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2
–
147
–
–
–
–
–
412
200
–
55
535
611
350
–
404
200
–
58
571
–
–
3
616
200
–
55
535
611
350
–
406
200
147
58
571
–
–
–
207
–
149
1
2,164
1
1,234
1
2,371
1
1,383
These notes are the subject of interest rate swap agreements under which the Group has undertaken to pay floating rates of interest, and currency swaps which form a fair
value hedge.
These notes are the subject of interest rate swap agreements under which the Group has undertaken to pay floating rates of interest which form a fair value hedge.
Obligations under finance leases are secured by related leased assets.
16 Trade and other payables
Current
2013
£m
Payments received on account 1
Trade payables
Amounts owed to joint ventures and associates
Other taxation and social security
Other payables
Accruals and deferred income
1
Includes payments received on account from joint
ventures and associates
2012*
£m
Non-current
2013
£m
2012*
£m
Total
2013
£m
2012*
£m
1,594
1,370
191
101
1,820
1,969
7,045
1,361
1,109
202
107
1,574
2,048
6,401
750
16
–
–
143
1,229
2,138
609
–
1
–
95
967
1,672
2,344
1,386
191
101
1,963
3,198
9,183
1,970
1,109
203
107
1,669
3,015
8,073
180
262
151
162
331
424
Included within trade and other payables are government grants of £100 million (2012 £89 million). During the year, £26 million
(2012 £16 million) of government grants were released to the income statement.
Included in accruals and deferred income are deferred receipts from RRSA workshare partners of £260 million (2012 £221 million).
Trade and other payables are analysed as follows:
2013
£m
Financial instruments (note 17):
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
Non-financial instruments
* Restated – see note 1.
2,989
806
5,388
9,183
2012*
£m
2,571
704
4,798
8,073
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
104 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
17 Financial instruments
Carrying values and fair values of financial instruments
Basis for
determining
Notes
fair value
At 31 December 2013
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Exercise prices of put options on NCI
Financial RRSAs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
At 31 December 2012
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Exercise price of put option on NCI
Financial RRSAs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
11
13
13
14
15
16
16
11
13
13
14
15
16
16
Assets
Fair value
through
Loans
profit or
and
Available
loss receivables
for sale
£m
£m
£m
Cash
£m
Liabilities
Fair value
through
profit
or loss
Other
£m
£m
Total
£m
A
B
B
C
B
B
D
C
E
F
B
B
B
–
–
–
748
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
748
27
2,118
527
–
321
1,851
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
4,844
–
–
–
–
–
1,157
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
1,157
–
–
–
–
–
982
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
982
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(295)
–
–
–
–
–
(295)
–
–
–
–
–
–
(2,371)
–
(1,858)
(167)
(16)
(2,989)
(806)
(8,207)
27
2,118
527
748
321
3,990
(2,371)
(295)
(1,858)
(167)
(16)
(2,989)
(806)
(771)
A
B
B
C
B
B
D
C
E
F
B
B
B
–
–
–
707
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
707
6
1,662
364
–
11
1,503
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
3,546
–
–
–
–
–
408
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
408
–
–
–
–
–
674
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
674
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(360)
–
–
–
–
–
(360)
–
–
–
–
–
–
(1,383)
–
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(5,028)
6
1,662
364
707
11
2,585
(1,383)
(360)
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(53)
Fair values equate to book values for both 2013 and 2012, with the following exceptions:
2013
2012
Book value Fair value Book value Fair value
£m
£m
£m
£m
Borrowings
Financial RRSAs
(2,371)
(167)
(2,495)
(184)
(1,383)
(193)
(1,542)
(215)
The fair value of a financial instrument is the price at which an asset could be exchanged, or a liability settled, between knowledgeable,
willing parties in an arms-length transaction. Fair values have been determined with reference to available market information at the
balance sheet date, using the methodologies described below.
A These primarily comprise unconsolidated companies where fair value approximates to the book value.
B Fair values are assumed to approximate to cost either due to the short-term maturity of the instruments or because the interest rate of the investments is reset after periods not
exceeding six months.
C Fair values of derivative financial assets and liabilities are estimated by discounting expected future contractual cash flows using prevailing interest rate curves. Amounts
denominated in foreign currencies are valued at the exchange rate prevailing at the balance sheet date. These financial instruments are included on the balance sheet at fair value,
derived from observable market prices (Level 2 as defined by IFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement).
D Borrowings are carried at amortised cost. Amounts denominated in foreign currencies are valued at the exchange rate prevailing at the balance sheet date (Level 2 as defined by IFRS 13).
E The value of the put option on NCI is determined in accordance with the contractual terms, which requires averaging three valuations, covering forecasts of the business performance
and external metrics of comparable business and transactions.
F The fair value of RRSAs is estimated by discounting expected future cash flows. The contractual cash flows are based on future trading activity, which is estimated based on latest
forecasts (Level 3 as defined by IFRS 13).
IFRS 13 defines a three-level valuation hierarchy:
Level 1 – quoted prices for similar instruments;
Level 2 – directly observable market inputs other than Level 1 inputs; and
Level 3 – inputs not based on observable market data.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
105
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Carrying values of other financial assets and liabilities
Derivatives
Foreign
exchange
contracts
£m
At 31 December 2013
Non-current assets
Current assets
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
At 31 December 2012
Non-current assets
Current assets
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Commodity
contracts
£m
Interest rate
contracts
£m
Total
derivatives
£m
Exercise price
of put options
on NCI
£m
Financial
RRSAs
£m
C Shares
£m
Total
£m
631
72
703
(63)
(142)
(205)
498
–
2
2
(16)
(25)
(41)
(39)
43
–
43
(1)
(48)
(49)
(6)
674
74
748
(80)
(215)
(295)
453
–
–
–
(1,858)
–
(1,858)
(1,858)
–
–
–
(22)
(145)
(167)
(167)
–
–
–
(16)
–
(16)
(16)
674
74
748
(1,976)
(360)
(2,336)
(1,588)
498
104
602
(97)
(233)
(330)
272
4
6
10
(8)
(15)
(23)
(13)
90
5
95
–
(7)
(7)
88
592
115
707
(105)
(255)
(360)
347
–
–
–
(167)
–
(167)
(167)
–
–
–
(30)
(163)
(193)
(193)
–
–
–
(10)
–
(10)
(10)
592
115
707
(312)
(418)
(730)
(23)
Derivative financial instruments
The Group uses various financial instruments to manage its exposure to movements in foreign exchange rates. Where the effectiveness
of a hedging relationship in a cash flow hedge is demonstrated, changes in the fair value that are deemed effective are included in the cash
flow hedge reserve and released to match actual payments on the hedged item. The Group uses commodity swaps to manage its exposure
to movements in the price of commodities (jet fuel and base metals). To hedge the currency risk associated with a borrowing denominated
in US dollars, the Group has currency derivatives designated as part of fair value hedges. The Group uses interest rate swaps, forward rate
agreements and interest rate caps to manage its exposure to movements in interest rates.
Movements in the fair values of derivative financial assets and liabilities were as follows:
Foreign
exchange
instruments
£m
At 1 January 2012
Movements in fair value hedges 1
Movements in cash flow hedges
Movements in other derivative contracts 2
Contracts settled 3
At 1 January 2013
Business acquisitions
Movements in fair value hedges 1
Movements in other derivative contracts 2
Contracts settled 3
At 31 December 2013
1
2
3
(447)
(8)
(4)
750
(19)
272
4
3
284
(65)
498
Commodity
instruments
£m
(12)
–
–
(3)
2
(13)
(1)
–
(34)
9
(39)
Interest rate
instruments
£m
81
6
–
1
–
88
–
(91)
–
(3)
(6)
Total
£m
(378)
(2)
(4)
748
(17)
347
3
(88)
250
(59)
453
Gain on related hedged items £88m (2012 £2m net gain).
Included in financing.
Includes contracts settled in fair value hedges £17m (2012 nil) and cash flow hedges £nil (2012: £4m loss).
Exercise price of put option on non-controlling interests and financial RRSAs
The Group has agreed a put option with Daimler AG, such that Daimler can sell its interest in Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH
(RRPSH) to the Group. The exercise price of this option is included as a financial liability.
The Group has financial liabilities arising from financial RRSAs. These financial liabilities are valued at each reporting date using the
amortised cost method. This involves calculating the present value of the forecast cash flows of the arrangements using the internal rate
of return at the inception of the arrangements as the discount rate.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
106 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Movements in the carrying values were as follows:
At 1 January
Cash paid to partners
Business acquisitions
Additions
Exchange adjustments included in OCI
Financing charge 1
Excluded from underlying profit:
Changes in put options exercise prices 1
Exchange adjustments 1
Changes in forecast payments 1
At 31 December
1
Put options on NCI
2013
2012
£m
£m
(167)
–
(2)
(1,432)
–
–
–
–
–
(167)
–
–
(212)
(45)
(5)
5
(1,858)
(167)
Financial RRSAs
2013
£m
2012
£m
(193)
33
–
–
(4)
(9)
(230)
35
–
–
1
(10)
4
2
(167)
9
2
(193)
Included in financing.
Risk management policies and hedging activities
The principal financial risks to which the Group is exposed are: foreign currency exchange rate risk; liquidity risk; credit risk; interest rate
risk; and commodity price risk. The Board has approved policies for the management of these risks.
Foreign currency exchange rate risk – The Group has significant cash flows (most significantly US dollars, followed by the euro)
denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the relevant trading entity. To manage its exposures to changes in values
of future foreign currency cash flows, so as to maintain relatively stable long-term foreign exchange rates on settled transactions, the
Group enters into derivative forward foreign currency transactions. For accounting purposes, these derivative contracts are not designated
as hedging instruments.
The Group also has exposures to the fair values of non-derivative financial instruments denominated in foreign currencies. To manage the
risk of changes in these fair values, the Group enters into derivative forward foreign exchange contracts, which are designated as fair value
hedges for accounting purposes.
The Group regards its interests in overseas subsidiary companies as long-term investments. The Group aims to match its translational
exposures by matching the currencies of assets and liabilities. Where appropriate, foreign currency financial liabilities may be designated
as hedges of the net investment.
Liquidity risk – The Group’s policy is to hold financial investments and maintain undrawn committed facilities at a level sufficient to ensure
that the Group has available funds to meet its medium-term capital and funding obligations and to meet any unforeseen obligations and
opportunities. The Group holds cash and short-term investments, which together with the undrawn committed facilities, enable the Group
to manage its liquidity risk.
Credit risk – The Group is exposed to credit risk to the extent of non-payment by either its customers or the counterparties of its financial
instruments. The effective monitoring and controlling of credit risk is a key component of the Group’s risk management activities. The
Group has credit policies covering both trading and financial exposures. Credit risks arising from treasury activities are managed by a
central treasury function in accordance with the Group credit policy. The objective of the policy is to diversify and minimise the Group’s
exposure to credit risk from its treasury activities by ensuring the Group transacts strictly with ‘BBB+’ or higher rated financial institutions
based on pre-established limits per financial institution. At the balance sheet date, there were no significant concentrations of credit risk to
individual customers or counterparties. The maximum exposure to credit risk at the balance sheet date is represented by the carrying
value of each financial asset, including derivative financial instruments.
Interest rate risk – The Group’s interest rate risk is primarily in relation to its fixed rate borrowings (fair value risk), floating rate borrowings
and cash and cash equivalents (cash flow risk). Interest rate derivatives are used to manage the overall interest rate profile within the Group
policy, which is to maintain a higher proportion of net debt at floating rates of interest as a natural hedge to the net cash position. These
are designated as either fair value or cash flow hedges as appropriate.
Commodity risk – The Group has exposures to the price of jet fuel and base metals arising from business operations. To minimise its cash
flow exposures to changes in commodity prices, the Group enters into derivative commodity transactions. For accounting purposes, these
derivative contracts are not designated as hedging instruments.
Other price risk – The Group’s cash equivalent balances represent investments in money market instruments, with a term of up to three
months. The Group does not consider that these are subject to significant price risk.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
107
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Derivative financial instruments
The nominal amounts, analysed by year of expected maturity, and fair values of derivative financial instruments are as follows:
Nominal
amount
£m
At 31 December 2013
Foreign exchange contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Interest rate contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Commodity contracts:
Non-hedge accounted
At 31 December 2012
Foreign exchange contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Interest rate contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Commodity contracts:
Non-hedge accounted
Expected maturity
Between
Within
one and
one year
two years
£m
£m
Fair value
Between
two and
five years
£m
After
five years
£m
Assets
£m
Liabilities
£m
46
19,654
–
4,759
46
4,530
–
9,493
–
872
3
700
–
(205)
1,550
5
–
–
50
5
–
–
1,500
–
43
–
(48)
(1)
262
21,517
79
4,838
62
4,693
80
9,573
41
2,413
2
748
(41)
(295)
175
17,701
129
4,585
–
3,542
46
9,029
–
545
15
587
–
(330)
692
7
141
–
51
–
–
7
500
–
89
6
–
(7)
286
18,861
76
4,931
68
3,661
99
9,181
43
1,088
10
707
(23)
(360)
As described above, all derivative financial instruments are entered into for risk management purposes, although these may not be
designated into hedging relationships for accounting purposes.
Currency analysis
Derivative financial instruments related to foreign exchange risks are denominated in the following currencies:
Sterling
£m
At 31 December 2013
Currencies sold forward:
Sterling
US dollar
Euro
Other
At 31 December 2012
Currencies sold forward:
Sterling
US dollar
Euro
Other
Currencies purchased forward
US dollar
Euro
£m
£m
Other
£m
Total
£m
–
15,936
4
22
429
–
–
23
–
2,036
–
75
10
913
249
3
439
18,885
253
123
–
14,407
–
21
495
–
–
11
–
1,817
–
70
23
840
177
15
518
17,064
177
117
2013
£m
2012
£m
880
300
637
–
506
479
–
–
Other derivative financial instruments are denominated in the following currencies:
Sterling
US dollar
Euro
Other
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
108 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Non-derivative financial instruments are denominated in the following currencies:
At 31 December 2013
Assets
Unlisted non-current investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Liabilities
Borrowings
Exercise prices of put options on NCI
Financial RRSAs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
At 31 December 2012
Assets
Unlisted non-current investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Liabilities
Borrowings
Exercise price of put option on NCI
Financial RRSAs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
Sterling
£m
US dollar
£m
Euro
£m
Other
£m
Total
£m
–
199
289
282
1,619
2,389
–
995
48
–
1,080
2,123
26
829
89
4
980
1,928
1
95
101
35
311
543
27
2,118
527
321
3,990
6,983
(1,490)
–
–
(16)
(1,501)
(208)
(3,215)
(826)
(55)
–
(114)
–
(641)
(328)
(1,138)
985
(826)
(1,858)
(53)
–
(653)
(158)
(3,548)
(1,620)
–
–
–
–
(194)
(112)
(306)
237
(2,371)
(1,858)
(167)
(16)
(2,989)
(806)
(8,207)
(1,224)
1
234
121
5
495
856
(1,173)
–
–
(10)
(1,254)
(250)
(2,687)
(1,831)
–
1,176
75
–
1,038
2,289
4
169
40
–
606
819
1
83
128
6
446
664
6
1,662
364
11
2,585
4,628
(205)
–
(139)
–
(825)
(320)
(1,489)
800
(5)
(167)
(54)
–
(289)
(17)
(532)
287
–
–
–
–
(203)
(117)
(320)
344
(1,383)
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(5,028)
(400)
Currency exposures
The Group’s actual currency exposures after taking account of derivative foreign currency contracts, which are not designated as hedging
instruments for accounting purposes are as follows:
Functional currency of Group operation
At 31 December 2013
Sterling 1
US dollar
Euro
Other
At 31 December 2012
Sterling 1
US dollar
Euro
Other
1
Sterling
£m
US dollar
£m
Euro
£m
–
8
(1)
(5)
13
–
(2)
41
(1,855)
–
–
(11)
–
4
(1)
6
22
–
(2)
1
(166)
(6)
–
(5)
Other
£m
12
7
–
(4)
4
5
–
1
Included in the £1,855m liability (2012 £166m liability) euro currency exposure is a £1,858m liability (2012 £167m liability) relating to the put option on Daimler’s interest in
RRPSH – see page 105.
Total
£m
(1,830)
15
(3)
21
(140)
3
(3)
3
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
109
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Ageing beyond contractual due date of financial assets
At 31 December 2013
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
At 31 December 2012
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Contractual maturity analysis of financial liabilities
Within
one year
£m
At 31 December 2013
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Exercise prices of put options on NCI
Financial RRSAs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
At 31 December 2012
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Exercise price of put option on NCI
Financial RRSAs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
Within
terms
£m
Up to
three
months
overdue
£m
Between
three
months and
one year
overdue
£m
More than
one year
overdue
£m
Total
£m
27
1,769
523
748
321
3,990
7,378
–
240
1
–
–
–
241
–
90
1
–
–
–
91
–
19
2
–
–
–
21
27
2,118
527
748
321
3,990
7,731
6
1,470
343
707
11
2,585
5,122
–
132
18
–
–
–
150
–
43
1
–
–
–
44
–
17
2
–
–
–
19
6
1,662
364
707
11
2,585
5,335
Gross values
Between
Between
one and
two and
two years
five years
£m
£m
After
five years
£m
Discounting
£m
Carrying
value
£m
(290)
(87)
(1,858)
(33)
(16)
(2,972)
(751)
(6,007)
(140)
(76)
–
(34)
–
(17)
(28)
(295)
(609)
(146)
–
(65)
–
–
(16)
(836)
(1,894)
(90)
–
(75)
–
–
(11)
(2,070)
562
104
–
40
–
–
–
706
(2,371)
(295)
(1,858)
(167)
(16)
(2,989)
(806)
(8,502)
(210)
(108)
(167)
(35)
(10)
(2,568)
(694)
(3,792)
(257)
(103)
–
(32)
–
(1)
(10)
(403)
(403)
(138)
–
(75)
–
(1)
–
(617)
(778)
(14)
–
(100)
–
(1)
–
(893)
265
3
–
49
–
–
–
317
(1,383)
(360)
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(5,388)
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
110 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Interest rate risk
In respect of income-earning financial assets and interest-bearing financial liabilities, the following table indicates their effective interest
rates and the periods in which they reprice. The value shown is the carrying amount.
2013
Short-term investments 1
Cash and cash equivalents 2
Unsecured bank loans
Other borrowings
Interest rate swaps
£200m floating rate loan
£200m floating rate loan
€125m fixed rate loan
€75m fixed rate loan
€50m fixed rate loan
Unsecured bond issues
73/8% Notes 2016 £200m
6.55% Notes 2015 US$83m
Effect of interest rate swaps
6.75% Notes 2019 £500m
Effect of interest rate swaps
2.125% Notes 2021 €750m
Effect of interest rate swaps
3.375% Notes 2026 £375m
Effect of interest rate swaps
Other secured
Obligations under finance leases
2012
Short-term investments 1
Cash and cash equivalents 2
Unsecured bank loans
Other borrowings
Interest rate swaps
£200m floating rate loan
£200m floating rate loan
Unsecured bond issues
73/8% Notes 2016 £200m
6.38% Notes 2013 US$230m
Effect of interest rate swaps
6.55% Notes 2015 US$83m
Effect of interest rate swaps
6.75% Notes 2019 £500m
Effect of interest rate swaps
Other secured
Obligations under finance leases
1
2
Effective
interest rate
%
Total
£m
321
3,990
Period in which interest
rate reprices
6 months
or less
6–12 months
£m
£m
318
3,990
3
–
5.3225%
GBP LIBOR + 0.267
GBP LIBOR + 1.26
2.6000%
2.0600%
2.3500%
(10)
–
(200)
(200)
(104)
(63)
(42)
(5)
5
(200)
(200)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
7.3750%
6.5500%
USD LIBOR + 1.24
6.7500%
GBP LIBOR + 2.9824
2.1250%
GBP LIBOR + 0.7005
3.3750%
GBP LIBOR + 0.8330
(200)
(55)
–
(535)
–
(611)
–
(350)
–
–
–
(55)
–
(535)
–
(611)
–
(350)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
5.0000%
(1)
1,940
(1)
–
Effective
interest rate
%
Total
£m
Period in which interest
rate reprices
6 months
or less
6–12 months
£m
£m
11
2,585
9
2,585
2
–
5.3225%
GBP LIBOR + 0.267
GBP LIBOR + 1.26
(6)
–
(200)
(200)
(4)
7
(200)
(200)
–
–
–
7.3750%
6.3800%
USD LIBOR + 1.26
6.5500%
USD LIBOR + 1.24
6.7500%
GBP LIBOR + 2.9824
(200)
(147)
–
(58)
–
(571)
–
–
–
(147)
–
(58)
–
(571)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
5.0000%
(1)
1,213
–
–
Interest on the short-term investments are at fixed rates.
Cash and cash equivalents comprise bank balances and demand deposits and earn interest at rates based on daily deposit rates.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
111
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Some of the Group’s borrowings are subject to the Group meeting certain obligations, including customary financial covenants. If the
Group fails to meet its obligations these arrangements give rights to the lenders, upon agreement, to accelerate repayment of the facilities.
There are no rating triggers contained in any of the Group’s facilities that could require the Group to accelerate or repay any facility for a
given movement in the Group’s credit rating.
In addition, the Group has undrawn committed borrowing facilities available as follows:
Expiring in one to two years
Expiring after two years
2013
£m
2012
£m
–
1,250
1,250
–
1,000
1,000
2013
£m
2012
£m
Sensitivity analysis
Sensitivities at 31 December (all other variables held constant) – impact on profit after tax and equity
Sterling 10% weaker against the US dollar
Sterling 10% stronger against the US dollar
Euro 10% weaker against the US dollar
Euro 10% stronger against the US dollar
Sterling 10% weaker against the Euro
Sterling 10% stronger against the Euro
Commodity prices 10% lower
Commodity prices 10% higher
(1,177)
963
(128)
100
(95)
78
(16)
16
(1,073)
878
(146)
118
–
–
(20)
20
At 31 December 2013 the Group had no material sensitivity to changes in interest rates on that date. The main interest rate sensitivity for
the Group arises as a result of the gross up of net cash and this is mitigated as described under the interest rate risk management policies
on page 106.
C Shares and payments to shareholders
The Company issues non-cumulative redeemable preference shares (C Shares) as an alternative to paying a cash dividend. C Shares in
respect of a year are issued in the following year. Shareholders are able to redeem any number of their C Shares for cash. Any C Shares
retained attract a dividend of 75 per cent of LIBOR on the 0.1 pence nominal value of each share, paid on a twice-yearly basis, and have
limited voting rights. The Company has the option to compulsorily redeem the C Shares, at any time, if the aggregate number of C Shares
in issue is less than ten per cent of the aggregate number of C Shares issued, or on the acquisition or capital restructuring of the Company.
Movements in the C Shares during the year were as follows:
2013
Nominal value
Millions
£m
Issued and fully paid
At 1 January
Issued
Redeemed
At 31 December
10,418
366,041
(360,173)
16,286
10
366
(360)
16
2012
Nominal value
Millions
£m
6,371
327,643
(323,596)
10,418
6
328
(324)
10
Payments to shareholders in respect of the year represent the value of C Shares to be issued in respect of the results for the year.
Issues of C Shares were declared as follows:
Interim
Final
2013
Pence
per share
8.6
13.4
22.0
£m
2012
Pence
per share
£m
162
252
414
7.6
11.9
19.5
142
223
365
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
112 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
18 Provisions for liabilities and charges
At
1 January
2013
£m
Warranty and guarantees
Contract loss
Restructuring
Customer financing
Insurance
Other
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
1
247
54
4
82
47
27
461
220
241
Exchange
differences
£m
Acquisitions
of
businesses
£m
1
–
–
–
–
1
2
201
27
4
–
–
48
280
Disposals
of
businesses
£m
(2)
–
9
–
–
–
7
Unused
amounts
reversed
£m
(39)
(13)
(6)
(11)
(7)
(11)
(87)
Charged to
income
statement
£m
1501
24
17
23
31
48
293
Utilised
£m
(139)1
(25)
(3)
(21)
(9)
(26)
(223)
At
31 December
2013
£m
419
67
25
73
62
87
733
348
385
The amount of warranty and guarantee provision charged to the income statement and utilised by RRPS was £86m and £78m respectively.
Provisions for warranties and guarantees primarily relate to products sold and generally cover a period of up to three years.
Provisions for contract loss and restructuring are generally expected to be utilised within two years.
In connection with the sale of its products the Group will, on some occasions, provide financing support for its customers – generally in
respect of civil aircraft. The Group’s commitments relating to these financing arrangements are spread over many years, relate to a number
of customers and a broad product portfolio and are generally secured on the asset subject to the financing. Customer financing provisions
cover guarantees provided for asset value and/or financing. These guarantees, the risks arising and the process used to assess the extent
of the risk are described under the heading ‘Customer financing’ in the Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 13. It is estimated that the
provision will be utilised as follows:
Potential claims with specific claim dates:
In one year or less
In more than one year but less than five years
In more than five years
Potential claims that may arise at any time up to the date of expiry of the guarantee:
Up to one year
Up to five years
2013
£m
2012
£m
29
38
5
30
43
8
1
–
73
–
1
82
Commitments on delivered aircraft in excess of the amounts provided are shown in the table below. These are reported on a discounted
basis at the Group’s borrowing rate to reflect better the time span over which these exposures could arise. These amounts do not represent
values that are expected to crystallise. The commitments are denominated in US dollars. As the Group does not generally adopt cash flow
hedge accounting for future foreign exchange transactions, this amount is reported, together with the sterling equivalent at the reporting
date spot rate. The estimated values of aircraft providing security are based on advice from a specialist aircraft appraiser.
Gross commitments
Value of security 1
Indemnities
Net commitments
Net commitments with security reduced by 20% 2
1
Security includes unrestricted cash collateral of:
2
£m
2013
$m
£m
2012
$m
356
(217)
(80)
59
78
50
589
(360)
(132)
97
129
83
569
(381)
(118)
70
133
64
925
(620)
(191)
114
216
104
Although sensitivity calculations are complex, the reduction of relevant security by 20 per cent illustrates the sensitivity to changes in this assumption.
There are also commitments in respect of undelivered aircraft, but it is not considered practicable to estimate these, as deliveries can be
many years in the future, and the relevant financing will only be put in place at the appropriate time.
The Group’s captive insurance company retains a portion of the exposures it insures on behalf of the remainder of the Group. Significant
delays occur in the notification and settlement of claims and judgement is involved in assessing outstanding liabilities, the ultimate cost
and timing of which cannot be known with certainty at the balance sheet date. The insurance provisions are based on information
currently available, however it is inherent in the nature of the business that ultimate liabilities may vary. Provisions for outstanding claims
are established to cover the outstanding expected liability as well as claims incurred but not yet reported.
Other provisions comprise a number of liabilities with varying expected utilisation rates.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
113
Strategic report
19 Post-retirement benefits
The Group operates a number of defined benefit and defined contribution schemes:
Directors’ report
ő UK defined benefit schemes are funded, with the assets held in separate trustee administered funds. Employees are entitled to
retirement benefits based on either their final or career average salaries and length of service; and
ő overseas defined benefit schemes are a mixture of funded and unfunded plans and provide benefits in line with local practice.
Additionally in the US, and to a lesser extent in some other countries, the Group’s employment practices include the provision of
healthcare and life insurance benefits for retired employees. These schemes are unfunded.
The valuations of the defined benefit schemes are based on the most recent funding valuations, where relevant, updated by the scheme
actuaries to 31 December 2013.
The Group has adopted amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits with effect from 1 January 2013. The impact is described further below.
2012 figures have been restated to put them on a comparable basis.
Amounts recognised in the income statement
Defined benefit schemes:
Current service cost and administrative expenses
Past-service cost
Defined contribution schemes
Operating cost
Net financing (income)/charge in respect of defined benefit schemes
Total income statement charge
The operating cost is charged as follows:
Cost of sales – included in underlying profit
Commercial and administrative costs
Research and development
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
55
5
60
44
104
38
142
208
71
279
74
353
26
379
153
66
219
30
249
(12)
237
Defined benefit
2013
£m
144
106
29
279
2012
£m
124
38
11
173
UK
schemes
£m
129
2
131
23
154
(17)
137
Defined contribution
2013
2012
£m
£m
49
15
10
74
46
14
4
64
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
42
–
42
41
83
25
108
171
2
173
64
237
8
245
Total
2013
£m
2012
£m
193
121
39
353
170
52
15
237
The Group operates a PaySave scheme in the UK. This is a salary sacrifice scheme under which employees elect to stop making employee
contributions and the Group makes additional contributions in return for a reduction in gross contractual pay. As a result, there is a
decrease in wages and salaries and a corresponding increase in pension costs of £37 million (2012 £36 million) in the year.
Net financing comprises:
UK
schemes
£m
Financing on scheme obligations
Financing on scheme assets
Financing on unrecognised surpluses and minimum
funding liability
Net financing (income)/charge in respect of defined
benefit schemes
Financing income on scheme surpluses
Financing costs on scheme deficits
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
UK
schemes
£m
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
371
(431)
59
(21)
430
(452)
354
(444)
47
(22)
401
(466)
48
–
48
73
–
73
(12)
(16)
4
38
(1)
39
26
(17)
43
(17)
(26)
9
25
–
25
8
(26)
34
Other information
UK
schemes
£m
Financial statements
The defined benefit schemes expose the Group to actuarial risks such as longevity, interest rate, inflation and investment risks. In the UK,
and in the principal US pension schemes, the Group has adopted an investment policy to mitigate some of these risks. This involves
investing a significant proportion of the scheme assets in liability driven investment (LDI) portfolios, which hold investments designed to
offset interest rate and inflation rate risks. In addition, in the UK, the Rolls-Royce Pension Fund has invested in a longevity swap, which is
designed to offset longevity risks in respect of existing pensioners.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
114 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
Amounts recognised in OCI in respect of defined benefit schemes
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
UK
schemes
£m
Actuarial gains and losses arising from demographic assumptions
Actuarial gains and losses arising from financial assumptions
Actuarial gains and losses arising from experience adjustments
Return on scheme assets excluding financing income
Movement in unrecognised surplus and related finance cost
Movement in minimum funding liability and related finance cost
(87)
(200)
65
(363)
407
133
(45)
(12)
116
31
(42)
–
–
93
Amounts recognised in the balance sheet in respect of defined benefit schemes
UK
schemes
£m
Present value of funded obligations
Fair value of scheme assets
Net asset/(liability) on funded schemes
Present value of unfunded obligations
Unrecognised surplus 1
Minimum funding liability 2
Net asset/(liability) recognised in the balance sheet
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
Post-retirement scheme deficits
1
2
(9,046)
9,776
730
–
(488)
(46)
196
242
(46)
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
(558)
504
(54)
(935)
–
–
(989)
6
(995)
Total
£m
(99)
(84)
96
(405)
407
133
48
Total
£m
(9,604)
10,280
676
(935)
(488)
(46)
(793)
248
(1,041)
UK
schemes
£m
(27)
(639)
7
(155)
529
72
(213)
UK
schemes
£m
(8,569)
9,794
1,225
–
(853)
(173)
199
336
(137)
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
(1)
(104)
(13)
26
–
–
(92)
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
(609)
534
(75)
(569)
–
–
(644)
12
(656)
Total
£m
(28)
(743)
(6)
(129)
529
72
(305)
Total
£m
(9,178)
10,328
1,150
(569)
(853)
(173)
(445)
348
(793)
Where a surplus has arisen on a scheme, in accordance with IAS 19 and IFRIC 14, the surplus is recognised as an asset only if it represents an unconditional economic benefit available
to the Group in the future. Any surplus in excess of this benefit is not recognised in the balance sheet.
A minimum funding liability arises where the statutory funding requirements require future contributions in respect of past service that will result in a future unrecognisable surplus.
Overseas schemes are located in the following countries:
Assets
£m
Canada
Germany
US pension schemes
US healthcare schemes
Other
Net asset/(liability) recognised in the balance sheet
135
–
347
–
22
504
2013
Obligations
£m
(181)
(500)
(420)
(352)
(40)
(1,493)
Net
£m
(46)
(500)
(73)
(352)
(18)
(989)
Assets
£m
139
–
369
–
26
534
2012
Obligations
£m
(200)
(86)
(449)
(399)
(44)
(1,178)
Net
£m
(61)
(86)
(80)
(399)
(18)
(644)
Defined benefit schemes
Assumptions
Significant actuarial assumptions for UK schemes (weighted average by size of the obligation) used at the balance sheet date were
as follows:
Discount rate
Inflation assumption 1
Rate of increase in salaries
Male life expectancy – current pensioner
– future pensioner currently aged 45
1
2013
2012
4.4%
3.5%
4.5%
22.5
24.2
4.4%
3.0%
4.1%
22.6
24.4
For the UK schemes, this is the assumption for the Retail Price Index. The Consumer Price Index is assumed to be one per cent lower.
Discount rates are determined by reference to the market yields on AA rated corporate bonds. The rate is determined by using the profile
of forecast benefit payments to derive a weighted average discount rate from the yield curve.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
115
Strategic report
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
The inflation assumption is determined by the market implied assumption based on the yields on long-term indexed linked government
securities and increases in salaries are based on actual experience, allowing for promotion, of the real increase above inflation.
Other assumptions have been set on advice from the relevant actuary, having regard to the latest trends in scheme experience and the
assumptions used in the most recent funding valuation. The rate of increase of pensions in payment is based on the rules of the relevant
scheme, combined with the inflation assumption where the increase is capped.
Changes in present value of defined benefit obligations
UK
schemes
£m
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
(8,569)
–
(147)
(66)
(371)
(4)
334
(1)
(222)
–
–
(9,046)
(9,046)
–
(1,178)
16
(53)
(4)
(59)
(4)
63
(402)
134
–
(6)
(1,493)
(558)
(935)
(9,747)
16
(200)
(70)
(430)
(8)
397
(403)
(88)
–
(6)
(10,539)
(9,604)
(935)
The defined benefit obligations are in respect of:
Active plan participants
Deferred plan participants
Pensioners
Weighted average duration of obligations
(3,492)
(1,647)
(3,907)
16
(849)
(74)
(570)
13
(4,341)
(1,721)
(4,477)
16
Changes in fair value of scheme assets
UK
schemes
£m
At 1 January
Exchange differences
Administrative expenses
Financing
Return on plan assets excluding financing
Contributions by employer
Contributions by employees
Benefits paid out
Acquisition of businesses
Settlements/curtailment
At 31 December
Total return on scheme assets
9,794
–
(6)
431
(363)
249
4
(334)
1
–
9,776
68
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
534
(19)
(2)
21
(42)
66
4
(63)
5
–
504
(21)
Total
£m
10,328
(19)
(8)
452
(405)
315
8
(397)
6
–
10,280
47
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
(7,713)
17
(7,696)
–
(122)
(2)
(354)
(4)
322
(54)
(659)
–
(1,052)
(1)
(1,053)
42
(40)
–
(47)
(2)
38
–
(118)
2
(8,765)
16
(8,749)
42
(162)
(2)
(401)
(6)
360
(54)
(777)
2
(8,569)
(8,569)
–
(1,178)
(609)
(569)
(9,747)
(9,178)
(569)
(3,129)
(1,583)
(3,857)
(915)
(15)
(248)
(4,044)
(1,598)
(4,105)
UK
schemes
£m
9,519
–
(7)
444
(155)
252
4
(322)
59
–
9,794
289
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
497
(18)
(2)
22
26
47
2
(38)
–
(2)
534
48
Total
£m
10,016
(18)
(9)
466
(129)
299
6
(360)
59
(2)
10,328
337
Other information
At 1 January, as previously reported
Effect of amendments to IAS 19
At 1 January, as restated
Exchange differences
Current service cost
Past-service cost
Finance cost
Contributions by employees
Benefits paid out
Acquisition of businesses
Actuarial (losses)/gains
Settlement/curtailment
Other movements
At 31 December
Funded schemes
Unfunded schemes
UK
schemes
£m
Financial statements
Assumptions for overseas schemes are less significant and are based on advice from local actuaries. The principal assumptions are the
discount rate, 4.5 per cent (2012 3.9 per cent) and inflation, 2.3 per cent (2012 2.4 per cent).
Directors’ report
The mortality assumptions adopted for the UK pension schemes are derived from the SAP actuarial tables, with future improvements
in line with the CMI 2013 core projections and long-term improvements of 1.25 per cent. Where appropriate, these are adjusted to take
account of the relevant scheme’s actual experience.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
116 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
Fair value of scheme assets at 31 December
UK
schemes
£m
Sovereign debt
Derivatives on sovereign debt
Corporate debt instruments
Interest rate swaps
Inflation swaps
Cash and similar instruments
Liability driven investment (LDI) portfolios 1
Longevity swap 2
Listed equities
Unlisted equities
Sovereign debt
Corporate debt instruments
Cash
Other
1
2
5,929
(987)
1,045
1,361
(13)
257
7,592
3
994
172
215
540
253
7
9,776
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
231
2
190
–
–
44
467
–
3
–
4
4
4
22
504
Total
£m
6,160
(985)
1,235
1,361
(13)
301
8,059
3
997
172
219
544
257
29
10,280
UK
schemes
£m
6,088
(1,225)
969
1,922
(289)
429
7,894
(126)
1,126
–
245
334
–
321
9,794
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
119
–
313
74
–
28
534
Total
£m
6,088
(1,225)
969
1,922
(289)
429
7,894
(126)
1,245
–
558
408
–
349
10,328
A portfolio of gilt and swap contracts, backed by LIBOR generating assets, that is designed to hedge the majority of the interest rate and inflation risks associated with the
schemes’ obligations.
Under the longevity swap, the Rolls-Royce Pension Fund (RRPF) has agreed an average life expectancy of pensioners with a counterparty. If pensioners live longer than expected the
counterparty will make payments to the RRPF to offset the additional cost of paying pensioners. If the reverse applies the cost of paying pensioners will be reduced but the scheme
will be required to make payments to the counterparty. Following the adoption of the amendments to IAS 19 and the interaction with IFRS 13 from 2013 the longevity swap has been
valued on an external fair market basis, rather than using the same assumptions as used for the valuation of the scheme’s liabilities. As the surplus on the RRPF is restricted, this has
had no impact on the net surplus/deficit recognised in the balance sheet. Had the longevity swap been valued on the same basis as 2012, its value would have been a liability of £156m,
the movement since 2012 largely reflecting the changes in mortality and discount rate assumptions. The valuation is based on an estimate of the assumptions that a hypothetical third
party would use for the future mortality and premium.
The scheme assets do not include any of the Group’s own financial instruments, nor any property occupied by, or other assets used by,
the Group. The longevity swap is valued by the scheme actuaries based on the difference between the agreed longevity assumptions at
inception and actual longevity experience. All other fair values are provided by the fund managers. Where available, the fair values are quoted
prices (eg listed equity, sovereign debt and corporate bonds). Unlisted investments (private equity) are included at values provided by the fund
manager in accordance with relevant guidance. Other significant assets are valued based on observable inputs such as yield curves.
Movements in unrecognised surplus and minimum liability
UK
schemes
£m
At 1 January, as previously reported
Effect of amendments to IAS 19
At 1 January, as restated
Movements in unrecognised surplus through OCI
Movements in minimum funding liability through OCI
Related finance costs
At 31 December
(1,026)
407
133
(48)
(534)
2013
Overseas
schemes
£m
–
–
–
–
–
Total
£m
(1,026)
407
133
(48)
(534)
UK
schemes
£m
(1,554)
–
(1,554)
529
72
(73)
(1,026)
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
(94)
94
–
–
–
–
–
Total
£m
(1,648)
94
(1,554)
529
72
(73)
(1,026)
Future contributions
The Group expects to contribute approximately £325 million to its defined benefit schemes in 2014.
In the UK, the funding is set on the basis of a triennial funding valuation by the actuaries for which the assumptions may differ from those
above. In particular, the discount rate used to value the obligations takes account of the investment strategy, rather than being based on
market yields of AA corporate bonds. As a result of these valuations, the Group and the scheme trustees agree a Schedule of Contributions
(SoC), which sets out the required contributions from the employer and employees for current service. Where the scheme is in deficit, the
SoC also includes required contributions from the employer to eliminate the deficit. The most recent agreed triennial valuations for the
principal schemes are:
Rolls-Royce Pension Fund
Rolls-Royce Group Pension Scheme
Vickers Group Pension Scheme
Obligations at
31 December
2013
£m
Valuation
date
6,543
1,540
637
31 March 2012
5 April 2013
31 March 2013
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
117
Strategic report
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
For the most significant funded schemes, the investment strategies are designed to hedge the risks from interest rates, inflation on an
economic basis and in the Rolls-Royce Pension Fund in the UK, the longevity of pensioners. Where appropriate, the table also includes the
corresponding movement in the value of the plan assets.
Directors’ report
Sensitivities
The calculations of the defined benefit obligations are sensitive to the assumptions set out on page 114. The following table summarises
the estimated impact of a change in the assumption on the UK defined benefit obligation at 31 December 2013, while holding all other
assumptions constant. This sensitivity analysis may not be representative of the actual change in the defined benefit obligation as it is
unlikely that the change in assumptions would occur in isolation of one another as some of the assumptions may be correlated.
£m
Reduction in the discount rate of 0.25% 1
Increase in real increase in salaries of 0.25%
One year increase in life expectancy
1
Financial statements
Increase in inflation of 0.25%
(412)
465
(201)
185
(88)
(212)
86
Obligations
Plan assets (LDI portfolio)
Obligations
Plan assets (LDI portfolio)
Obligations
Obligations
Plan assets (longevity swap)
The difference arises largely due to differences in the methods used to value the obligations for accounting and economic purposes. On an economic basis the correlation is
approximately 97 per cent.
Notes
At 1 January 2012
Exchange adjustments
Current service cost and administrative expenses
Past-service cost
Net financing
Contributions by employer
Acquisition of business
Actuarial losses
Return on plan assets excluding financing
Movement in unrecognised surplus
Movement on minimum funding liability
At 31 December 2012
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
Post-retirement scheme deficits
A
B
A
C
C
C
C
C
As previously reported
UK Overseas
£m
£m
252
–
(123)
(2)
(41)
250
5
(659)
(30)
465
63
180
317
(137)
(649)
24
(38)
12
(23)
47
–
(118)
20
–
–
(725)
12
(737)
Total
£m
UK
£m
(397)
24
(161)
10
(64)
297
5
(777)
(10)
465
63
(545)
329
(874)
17
–
(6)
–
58
2
–
–
(125)
64
9
19
Amendments
Overseas
£m
93
–
(4)
(12)
(2)
–
–
–
6
–
–
81
Total
£m
UK
£m
110
–
(10)
(12)
56
2
–
–
(119)
64
9
100
269
–
(129)
(2)
17
252
5
(659)
(155)
529
72
199
336
(137)
As restated
Overseas
£m
(556)
24
(42)
–
(25)
47
–
(118)
26
–
–
(644)
12
(656)
Total
£m
(287)
24
(171)
(2)
(8)
299
5
(777)
(129)
529
72
(445)
348
(793)
A An unrecognised past-service credit related to the restructuring of certain overseas healthcare schemes in 2011. This has now been recognised in full at 1 January 2012. As a
consequence, the amortisation of this past-service credit in 2012 is eliminated. In addition, an adjustment has been made in the calculation of the defined benefit obligation on one
of the UK schemes to put it on a consistent basis with the other schemes.
B Previously all administrative costs were offset against the expected return on scheme assets. The amendments only allow this in respect of the costs of managing scheme assets; other
administrative expenses are now included in the current service cost.
C Previously net financing comprised the actual expected return on scheme assets based on the underlying assets and a financing charge on scheme liabilities calculated using a ‘AA’
corporate bond rate. The amendments require net financing to be calculated on the net asset or liability recognised on the balance sheet using an AA corporate bond rate. This has a
consequential impact on amounts recognised in OCI: (i) the change in assumed return on scheme assets affects the related actuarial gains or losses; and (ii) implicit financing on
movements in the unrecognised surplus and the minimum funding liability is not included in the income statement.
Other information
Amendments to IAS 19
Prior period figures have been restated to reflect the adoption of the amendments to IAS 19. Consequential tax effects have been reflected
in deferred tax.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
118 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
20 Share capital
Non-equity
Issued and fully paid
At 1 January 2012
Proceeds from shares issued for share option schemes
At 31 December 2012
Proceeds from shares issued for share option schemes
At 31 December 2013
Equity
Special
Share
of £1
Nominal
value
£m
1
–
1
–
1
–
Ordinary
shares of
20p each
Millions
Nominal
value
£m
1,872
–
1,872
8
1,880
374
–
374
2
376
The rights attaching to each class of share are set out on page 70.
During 2013, the Group also received £30 million from participants in ShareSave schemes. Shares to satisfy these options were issued from
those already held by the Group for this purpose, as described on page 79.
In accordance with IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation, the Company’s non-cumulative redeemable preference shares (C Shares) are
classified as financial liabilities. Accordingly, movements in C Shares are included in note 17.
21 Share-based payments
Effect of share-based payment transactions on the Group’s results and financial position
Total expense recognised for equity-settled share-based payments transactions
Total expense recognised for cash-settled share-based payments transactions
Share-based payments recognised in the consolidated income statement
Liability for cash-settled share-based payment transactions
2013
£m
2012
£m
61
18
79
19
49
6
55
18
A description of the share-based payment plans is included in the remuneration report on pages 57 to 58.
Movements in the Group’s share-based payment plans during the year
ShareSave
Number
Millions
Outstanding at 1 January 2012
Granted
Additional entitlements arising from TSR performance
Forfeited
Exercised
Outstanding at 1 January 2013
Granted
Additional entitlements arising from TSR performance
Additional shares accrued from reinvestment of C Shares
Forfeited
Exercised
Outstanding at 31 December 2013
Exercisable at 31 December 2013
Exercisable at 31 December 2012
27.5
–
–
(0.6)
(0.1)
26.8
10.0
–
–
(0.6)
(10.2)
16.0
–
–
ESOP
Weighted
average
exercise price
Pence
447
–
–
446
409
447
961
–
–
483
404
660
–
–
Number
Millions
0.5
–
–
–
(0.4)
0.1
–
–
–
–
(0.1)
–
–
0.1
PSP
Weighted
average
exercise price
Pence
100
–
–
–
103
77
–
–
–
–
77
–
–
77
Number
Millions
APRA
Number
Millions
19.5
4.3
2.8
(0.8)
(11.8)
14.0
2.8
0.6
–
(0.6)
(4.8)
12.0
–
–
As share options are exercised throughout the year, the weighted average share price during the year of 1123 pence (2012 836 pence) is
representative of the weighted average share price at the date of exercise. The closing price at 31 December 2013 was 1275 pence
(2012 873.5 pence).
There were no exercisable options as at 31 December 2013. The average remaining contractual life of the exercisable options as at
31 December 2012 was 0.2 years.
3.3
2.0
–
(0.1)
(1.2)
4.0
1.6
–
0.1
(0.1)
(2.5)
3.1
–
–
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
119
Strategic report
21 Share-based payments (continued)
PSP – 25% TSR uplift
PSP – 50% TSR uplift
ShareSave – three year grant
ShareSave – five year grant
APRA
2013
2012
1128p
1254p
287p
349p
1027p
885p
985p
n/a
n/a
809p
APRA
The fair value of shares awarded under APRA is calculated as the share price on the date of the award, excluding expected dividends.
22 Operating leases
Leases as lessee
Rentals paid – hire of plant and machinery
– hire of other assets
Non-cancellable operating lease rentals are payable as follows:
Within one year
Between one and five years
After five years
2013
£m
2012
£m
134
55
94
34
179
545
507
1,231
147
490
526
1,163
2013
£m
2012
£m
56
30
19
48
23
90
2
7
1
10
Leases as lessor
Rentals received – credited within revenue from aftermarket services
Non-cancellable operating lease rentals are receivable as follows:
Within one year
Between one and five years
After five years
The Group acts as lessee and lessor for both land and buildings and gas turbine engines, and acts as lessee for some plant and equipment.
ő Sublease payments of £1 million (2012 £4 million) and sublease receipts of £27 million (2012 £17 million) were recognised in the income
statement in the year.
ő Purchase options exist on aero engines, land and buildings and plant and equipment with the period to the purchase option date varying
from one to eight years.
ő Renewal options exist on aero engines, land and buildings and plant and equipment with the period to the renewal option varying
between one to 28 years at terms to be negotiated upon renewal.
ő Escalation clauses exist on some leases and are linked to LIBOR.
ő The total future minimum sublease payments expected to be made is £8 million (2012 £10 million) and sublease receipts expected to be
received is £42 million (2012 £9 million).
Other information
ShareSave
The fair value of the options granted under the ShareSave plan is calculated using a binomial pricing model that assumes that participants
will exercise their options at the beginning of the six-month window if the share price is greater than the exercise price. Otherwise it
assumes that options are held until the expiration of their contractual term. This results in an expected life that falls somewhere between
the start and end of the exercise window.
Financial statements
PSP
The fair value of shares awarded under the PSP is calculated using a pricing model that takes account of the non-entitlement to dividends
(or equivalent) during the vesting period and the market-based performance condition based on expectations about volatility and the
correlation of share price returns in the group of FTSE 100 companies and which incorporates into the valuation the interdependency
between share price performance and TSR vesting. This adjustment increases the fair value of the award relative to the share price at the
date of grant.
Directors’ report
Fair values of share-based payment plans
The weighted average fair value per share of equity-settled share-based payment plans granted during the year, estimated at the date of
grant, are as follows:
120 Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
23 Contingent liabilities
On 6 December 2012, the Company announced that it had passed information to the SFO relating to concerns in overseas markets.
Since that date the Company has continued its investigations and is engaging with the SFO and other authorities in the UK, the USA
and elsewhere.
In December 2013, the Company announced that it had been informed by the SFO that it had commenced a formal investigation. The
consequence of these disclosures will be decided by the regulatory authorities. It remains too early to predict the outcomes, but these could
include the prosecution of individuals and of the Group. Accordingly, the potential for fines, penalties or other consequences (including
debarment from government contracts, suspension of export privileges and reputational damage) cannot currently be assessed. As the
investigation is ongoing, it is not yet possible to identify the timescale in which these issues might be resolved.
Contingent liabilities exist in respect of guarantees provided by the Group in the ordinary course of business for product delivery,
performance and reliability. The Group has, in the normal course of business, entered into arrangements in respect of export finance,
performance bonds, countertrade obligations and minor miscellaneous items. Various Group undertakings are parties to legal actions
and claims which arise in the ordinary course of business, some of which are for substantial amounts. As a consequence of the insolvency
of an insurer as previously reported, the Group is no longer fully insured against known and potential claims from employees who worked
for certain of the Group’s UK-based businesses for a period prior to the acquisition of those businesses by the Group. While the outcome of
some of these matters cannot precisely be foreseen, the directors do not expect any of these arrangements, legal actions or claims, after
allowing for provisions already made, to result in significant loss to the Group. The Group’s share of equity-accounted entities’ contingent
liabilities is £13 million (2012 £48 million).
Contingent liabilities in respect of customer financing commitments are described in note 18.
24 Related party transactions
2013
£m
Sales of goods and services to joint ventures and associates
Purchases of goods and services from joint ventures and associates
Operating lease payments to joint ventures and associates
Guarantees of joint ventures’ and associates’ borrowings
Dividends received from joint ventures and associates
RRSA receipts from joint ventures and associates
Other income received from joint ventures and associates
3,149
(3,269)
(69)
7
99
4
1
2012
£m
2,937
(3,082)
(57)
12
129
13
2
The aggregated balances with joint ventures are shown in notes 13 and 16. Transactions with Group pension schemes are shown in
note 19.
In the course of normal operations, related party transactions entered into by the Group have been contracted on an arms-length basis.
Key management personnel are deemed to be the directors and the members of the ELT as set out on page 38. Remuneration for key
management personnel is shown below:
Salaries and short-term benefits
Post-retirement schemes
Share-based payments
2013
£m
2012
£m
11
1
7
19
15
1
8
24
More detailed information regarding the directors’ remuneration, shareholdings, pension entitlements, share options and other long-term
incentive plans is shown in the remuneration report on pages 53 to 69.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
121
Strategic report
25 Acquisitions and disposals
Financial statements
Other
On 30 April 2013, the Group acquired 100 per cent of the issued share capital of Hyper-Therm High-Temperature Composites, Inc., a
producer of state-of-the-art composite materials, including ceramic matrix composites, engineered coatings and thermal-structural
components. On 15 August 2013, the Group acquired 100 per cent of SmartMotor AS, a leading specialist in the development of permanent
magnet technology.
For each of the other acquisitions noted, the acquisition cost (net of cash and borrowings acquired) has been allocated to identifiable assets
and liabilities – principally technology, patents and licences, customer relationships, trademark, order backlog and other intangible assets.
Recognised amounts of identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investments in joint ventures, associates and other unlisted investments
Inventory
Trade and other receivables
Taxation recoverable
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other payables
Current tax payables
Borrowings
Other financial assets and liabilities
Deferred tax
Provisions
Post-retirement schemes
Total identifiable assets and liabilities
Goodwill arising
Total consideration
Exercise price of put option on NCI
Consideration satisfied by:
Cash consideration
Existing shareholding
NCI
Other
£m
Total
£m
1,192
545
50
737
487
48
240
(693)
(77)
(203)
(27)
(283)
(280)
(397)
1,339
773
2,112
(1,432)
680
35
1
–
–
2
–
5
(3)
–
(1)
–
1
–
–
40
–
40
–
40
1,227
546
50
737
489
48
245
(696)
(77)
(204)
(27)
(282)
(280)
(397)
1,379
773
2,152
(1,432)
720
–
1,443
669
2,112
37
3
–
40
37
1,446
669
2,152
Other information
On 24 December 2013, the Group acquired the remaining 49 per cent of shares not held in Composite Technology and Applications Limited,
a business engaged in the development of composite fan blades and containment cases for the next generation of advanced turbofan
engines.
RRPS
£m
Directors’ report
Acquisitions
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG (RRPS – formerly Tognum AG)
From 25 August 2011 to 31 December 2012 the Group’s interest in RRPS was classified as a joint venture and equity accounted. On
1 January 2013, conditions were fulfilled which gave the Group certain rights that result in RRPS being classified as a subsidiary and
consolidated. Accordingly, the Group’s joint venture interest in Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH (RRPSH) has been reclassified
as a subsidiary. The fair values of the identifiable assets and liabilities assumed are £1,339 million, giving rise to goodwill of £773 million, as
set out in the table below. Rolls-Royce and Daimler AG (Daimler) each hold 50 per cent of the shares of RRPSH, which itself held over
99 per cent of the shares of RRPS. During 2013, RRPSH acquired the remaining 1 per cent of shares of RRPS. RRPS is a premium supplier
of engines, propulsion systems and components for marine, energy, defence, and other industrial applications (often described as ‘offhighway’ applications).
122 Financial statements
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
25 Acquisitions and disposals (continued)
RRPS
£m
Net cash outflow arising on acquisition:
Cash consideration
Less: cash and cash equivalents acquired
Cash (inflow)/outflow per cash flow statement
Identifiable intangible assets comprise:
Technology, patents and licences
Customer relationships
Trademark
Order backlog
In-process development
Other
–
(240)
(240)
420
433
105
94
53
87
1,192
Other
£m
Total
£m
37
(245)
(208)
37
(5)
32
35
–
–
–
–
–
35
455
433
105
94
53
87
1,227
In accordance with the provisions of IFRS 3 Business Combinations, the Group has opted not to recognise goodwill in respect of the noncontrolling interest in RRPS. The previous joint venture investment holding in RRPSH of £1,328 million was revalued, giving rise to a gain
of £115 million.
As part of the RRPSH shareholders’ agreement, Daimler AG has the option to sell its shares in RRPSH to Rolls-Royce for a period of six years
from 1 January 2013. The initial fair value of the exercise price of this option in respect of RRPS has been recognised as a liability
(£1,432 million), which has been charged to NCI and retained earnings.
The goodwill arising on the acquisition of RRPS amounting to £773 million (which is not tax deductible) consists of anticipated synergies
and the assembled workforce. The anticipated synergies principally arise from:
ő increases in revenue from the combination of the routes to market; and
ő cost savings from the combination of the supply chain and central functions.
The gross contractual value of trade receivables acquired is £446 million. At the acquisition date, it was estimated that contractual cash
flows of £24 million would not be collected.
The acquisition of the controlling interest in RRPS contributed £2,593 million of revenue and profit before tax of £10 million (including
amortisation of intangible assets arising on acquisition) to the Group’s results for the year.
Disposals
On 29 January 2013, Alstom acquired Tidal Generation Limited.
On 2 September 2013, Turbomeca (a Safran company) acquired the Group’s 50 per cent shareholding and interest in the RTM322 helicopter
engine programme for which it has received a cash consideration of €293 million. Rolls-Royce will progressively transfer its operational
responsibilities in the engine programme to Turbomeca over a multi-year period.
Assets and liabilities disposed
RTM322
£m
Intangible assets – goodwill
Investment in joint venture
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other payables
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Net assets
Profit on disposal of businesses
Disposal costs
Proceeds deferred in respect of transitional services and retained obligations
Disposal proceeds
Cash and cash equivalents disposed
Cash inflow per cash flow statement
–
2
–
–
(2)
–
194
3
53
250
–
250
Tidal
Generation
£m
3
–
2
(2)
–
3
22
–
–
25
(2)
23
Total
£m
3
2
2
(2)
(2)
3
216
3
53
275
(2)
273
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
123
Strategic report
25 Acquisitions and disposals (continued)
During 2012, the Group acquired:
Directors’ report
ő on 19 June 2012, Superstructure Capital Limited, a business engaged in marketing and sale of safety and risk management software
to the aerospace industry;
ő on 13 July 2012, PFW Aerospace UK, a business engaged in the manufacture of precision components for the aerospace industry;
ő on 13 December 2012, Rolls-Royce Goodrich Engine Control Systems Limited (acquisition of 50 per cent not already held), a business
engaged in the development and manufacture of aero-engine controls; and
ő 27 December 2012, PKMJ Technical Services, Inc., a nuclear engineering services business in the US.
and disposed of:
26 Segmental analysis from 1 January 2014
As described in the Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 13, the management structure of the business has been revised and the
internal reporting structure has been developed to reflect this. These changes will be reflected in the segmental analysis with effect from
1 January 2014. Had they been in place during 2013, the segmental analysis shown in note 2 would be as follows:
Aerospace
Segment assets
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Segment liabilities
Net assets
Investment in intangible assets, property, plant
and equipment and joint ventures and associates
Depreciation, amortisation and impairment
MIPS
Civil
£m
Defence
£m
Total
£m
Marine
£m
Power
Systems
£m
3,035
3,620
6,655
1,385
1,206
2,591
4,420
4,826
9,246
1,236
801
2,037
2,004
827
2,831
708
136
844
424
14
438
1,132
150
1,282
233
–
233
296
(2)
294
63
11
74
1,437 11,024
17
512
(1,660) (7,903)
(206)
3,633
1,701
5
(985)
721
3,927
29
(3,034)
922
1,616
55
(1,015)
656
9,587
495
(6,243)
3,839
891
349
103
53
994
402
23
63
142
272
Nuclear
& Energy
£m
617
921
1,538
80
63
Intrasegment
£m
(72)
(75)
(147)
2
–
2
(10)
–
–
(10)
–
–
Total
£m
Total
Inter- reportable
segment segments
£m
£m
3,785
2,474
6,259
–
–
–
8,205
7,300
15,505
594
9
603
–
–
–
1,726
159
1,885
7,234
89
(5,034)
2,289
(734) 17,524
–
601
733 (12,204)
(1)
5,921
245
398
1,239
800
Other information
Year ended 31 December 2013
Underlying revenue from sale of original equipment
Underlying revenue from aftermarket services
Total underlying revenue
Underlying operating profit excluding share of results
of joint ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Underlying profit before financing and taxation
Financial statements
ő on 27 June 2012, Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (dilution of existing shareholding to 49 per cent); and
ő on 29 June 2012, for US$1.5 billion, the equity, programme share and related goodwill of IAE International Aero Engines AG, which gave
rise to a profit before tax of £699 million.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
124 Financial statements
COMPANY BALANCE SHEET
At 31 December 2013
Fixed assets
Investments – subsidiary undertakings
Creditors – amounts falling due within one year
Financial liabilities
Amounts owed to subsidiary undertakings due within one year
Net current liabilities
Total assets less current liabilities
Capital and reserves
Called-up share capital
Share premium account
Merger reserve
Capital redemption reserve
Other reserve
Profit and loss account
Equity shareholders’ funds
Notes
2013
£m
2012
£m
2
12,000
11,954
3
(16)
(995)
(1,011)
10,989
(10)
(595)
(605)
11,349
4
5
5
5
5
5
376
80
8,203
857
109
1,364
10,989
374
–
8,569
497
63
1,846
11,349
The financial statements on pages 124 to 126 were approved by the Board on 12 February 2014 and signed on its behalf by:
Ian Davis Chairman
Mark Morris Chief Financial Officer
Company’s registered number: 7524813
RECONCILIATION OF MOVEMENTS IN SHAREHOLDERS’ FUNDS
For the year ended 31 December 2013
£m
At 1 January 2013
Profit for the year
Arising on issue of ordinary shares
Issue of C Shares
Share-based payments – direct to equity
At 31 December 2013
11,349
(1)
82
(366)
(75)
10,989
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
125
Strategic report
NOTES TO THE COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1 Accounting policies
Basis of accounting
The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with applicable UK Accounting Standards on the historical cost basis.
Directors’ report
As permitted by section 408 of the Companies Act 2006, a separate profit and loss account for the Company has not been included in
these financial statements. As permitted by the audit fee disclosure regulations, disclosure of non-audit fees information is not included
in respect of the Company. As permitted by FRS 1 Cash flow statements, no cash flow statement for the Company has been included. As
permitted by FRS 8 Related party disclosures, no related party disclosures in respect of transactions between the Company and its wholly
owned subsidiaries have been included.
Investments in subsidiary undertakings
Investments in subsidiary undertakings are reported at cost less any amounts written off.
2 Investments – subsidiary undertakings
£m
Cost:
At 1 January 2013
Cost of share-based payments in respect of employees of subsidiary undertakings
less receipts from subsidiaries in respect of those payments
At 31 December 2013
11,954
46
12,000
3 Financial liabilities
C Shares
Movements in C Shares during the year were as follows:
Issued and fully paid
At 1 January 2013
Shares issued
Shares redeemed
At 31 December 2013
The rights attaching to C Shares are set out on page 70.
C Shares
of 0.1p
Millions
10,418
366,041
(360,173)
16,286
Nominal
value
£m
10
366
(360)
16
Other information
Financial instruments
In accordance with FRS 25 Financial instruments: Presentation, the Company’s C Shares are classified as financial liabilities and held at
amortised cost from the date of issue until redeemed.
Financial statements
Share-based payments
As described in the remuneration report on pages 53 to 69, the Company grants awards of its own shares to employees of its subsidiary
undertakings, (see note 21 of the consolidated financial statements). The costs of share-based payments in respect of these awards are
accounted for, by the Company, as an additional investment in its subsidiary undertakings. The costs are determined in accordance with
FRS 20 Share-based payment. Any payments made by the subsidiary undertakings in respect of these arrangements are treated as a return
of this investment.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
126 Financial statements
NOTES TO THE COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
4 Share capital
Non-equity
Issued and fully paid
At 1 January 2013
Proceeds from shares issued for share options schemes
At 31 December 2013
Special
Share
of £1
Preference
shares of
£1 each
Nominal
value
£m
1
–
1
–
–
–
–
–
–
Equity
Ordinary
shares of
20p each
Millions
1,872
8
1,880
Nominal
value
£m
374
2
376
The rights attaching to each class of share are set out on page 70.
In accordance with FRS 25 Financial instruments: Presentation, the Company’s non-cumulative redeemable preference shares (C Shares) are
classified as financial liabilities. Accordingly, movements in C Shares are included in note 3.
5 Movements in capital and reserves
Non-distributable reserves
At 1 January 2013
Profit for the year
Proceeds from shares issued for share option schemes
Shares issued to share trust
Issue of C Shares
Redemption of C Shares
Share-based payments – direct to equity
At 31 December 2013
1
Share
capital
£m
Share
premium
374
–
–
2
–
–
–
376
–
–
–
80
–
–
–
80
Merger
reserve
£m
8,569
–
–
–
(366)
–
–
8,203
Capital
redemption
reserve
£m
497
–
–
–
–
360
–
857
Other
reserve1
£m
63
–
–
–
–
–
46
109
Profit
and loss
account
£m
1,846
(1)
–
–
–
(360)
(121)
1,364
Total
£m
11,349
(1)
–
82
(366)
–
(75)
10,989
The ‘Other reserve’ represents the value of share-based payments in respect of employees of subsidiary undertakings for which payment has not been received.
6 Contingent liabilities
Where the Company enters into financial guarantee contracts to guarantee the indebtedness of other companies within its group, the
Company considers these to be insurance arrangements, and accounts for them as such. In this respect, the Company treats the guarantee
contract as a contingent liability until such time as it becomes probable that the Company will be required to make a payment under
the guarantee.
At 31 December 2013, these guarantees amounted to £1 billion (2012 £nil).
7 Other information
Emoluments of directors
The remuneration of the directors of the Company is shown in the directors’ remuneration report on pages 62 to 69.
Employees
The Company had no employees in 2013.
Share-based payments
Shares in the Company have been granted to employees of the Group as part of share-based payment plans, and are charged in the
employing company.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
127
Strategic report
SUBSIDIARIES, JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES AND ASSOCIATES
At 31 December 2013
Subsidiaries incorporated within the UK – directly held
Rolls-Royce Group plc
Holding company
Development of aero engine fan blades and fan cases
Sales and service of off-highway diesel engines (50%)
Equipment health management and advanced data management services
Development and manufacture of aero engine controls
International support and commercial information services
Engine leasing
Marine electrical systems
Nuclear submarine propulsion systems
Principal trading company
Generation of electricity from independent power projects
Energy and marine systems
Aero engine aftermarket support services
Production, repair and overhaul of power generation, transmission and conversion
equipment for military and commercial activities
Subsidiaries incorporated overseas – indirectly held
Brazil
Rolls-Royce Brasil Limitada
Industrial gas turbines and aero engine repair and overhaul, energy and marine aftermarket
support services
Canada
Rolls-Royce Canada Limited
Industrial gas turbines and aero engine sales, service and overhaul
China
MTU Engineering (Suzhou) Company Limited Service centre and spare parts (50%)
China
Rolls-Royce Marine Manufacturing
Manufacture and supply of marine equipment and marine aftermarket
(Shanghai) Limited
support services
Finland
Rolls-Royce OY AB
Manufacture of marine winches and propeller systems
France
Rolls-Royce Civil Nuclear SAS
Instrumentation and control systems and life-cycle management for nuclear power plants
France
Rolls-Royce Technical Support SARL
Aero engine project support
Germany
L’Orange GmbH
Development and production of high-pressure injection systems for diesel engines (50%)
Germany
MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH
Development, production and distribution of gas turbines and engines (50%)
Germany
MTU Onsite Energy GmbH
Sales and service of gas engines (50%)
Germany
Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG
Aero engine design, development and manufacture
Germany
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG
Supplier of engines and power trains for marine propulsion, distributed power generation
and industrial off-highway sectors (50%)
Guernsey
Nightingale Insurance Limited
Insurance services
Hong Kong
MTU Hong Kong Limited
Distributor for off-highway products and after-sales service (50%)
India
Rolls-Royce India Private Limited
Diesel engine project management and customer support
India
Rolls-Royce Marine India Private Limited
Provision of marine support services
India
Rolls-Royce Operations (India) Private Limited Engineering support services
Italy
Europea Microfusioni Aerospaziali S.p.A.
Manufacture of gas turbine engine castings
Italy
MTU Italia S.r.l
Distributor for all off-highway applications and after-sales service (50%)
Netherlands MTU Benelux B.V.
Sales and after-sales support for diesel engines (50%)
Norway
Rolls-Royce Marine AS
Design and manufacture of ship equipment
Norway
Bergen Engines AS
Design and manufacture of medium-speed diesel engines (50%)
Singapore
Rolls-Royce Singapore Pte. Limited
Aero engine parts manufacturing and engine assembly, energy and marine aftermarket
support services
Singapore
Tognum Asia Pte. Limited
Distributor of diesel engines and spare parts (50%)
Spain
MTU Ibérica Propulsión y Energía S.L.
Sales and service of transmission equipment with diesel and gas engines (50%)
Sweden
Rolls-Royce AB
Manufacture of marine propeller systems
Turkey
MTU Motor Türbin Sanayi ve Tic. A.S.
Production of diesel engines and manufacturer of control systems (50%)
Other information
The above companies operate principally in the UK and the effective Group interest is 100 per cent unless otherwise stated.
Financial statements
Composite Technology and Applications Limited
MTU UK Limited
Optimized Systems and Solutions Limited
Rolls-Royce Controls and Data Services Limited
Rolls-Royce International Limited
Rolls-Royce Leasing Limited
Rolls-Royce Marine Electrical Systems Limited
Rolls-Royce Marine Power Operations Limited
Rolls-Royce plc
Rolls-Royce Power Development Limited
Rolls-Royce Power Engineering plc
Rolls-Royce Total Care Services Limited
Vinters Engineering Limited
Directors’ report
Subsidiaries incorporated within the UK – indirectly held
128 Other information
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
SUBSIDIARIES, JOINTLY CONTROLLED ENTITIES AND ASSOCIATES
Subsidiaries incorporated overseas – indirectly held (continued)
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
Data Systems & Solutions LLC
Instrumentation and control systems and life-cycle management for nuclear power plants
Optimized Systems and Solutions Inc.
Equipment health management and advanced data management services
PKMJ Technical Services, Inc.
Nuclear engineering services and software solutions
R. Brooks Associates Inc.
Specialist civil nuclear reactor services
Rolls-Royce Corporation
Design, development and manufacture of gas turbine engines
Rolls-Royce Crosspointe LLC
Manufacturing facility for aero engine parts
Rolls-Royce Energy Systems Inc.
Energy turbine generator packages
Rolls-Royce Engine Services – Oakland Inc.
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Rolls-Royce Defense Services Inc.
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Rolls-Royce High Temperature Composites Inc. Production of state-of-the-art composite materials
Rolls-Royce Marine North America Inc.
Design and manufacture of marine equipment and marine aftermarket support services
MTU America Inc.
Sales and service of engines and systems (50%)
The companies above and on page 127 operate principally in the country of their incorporation and the effective Group interest
is 100 per cent unless otherwise stated.
Jointly controlled entities and associates incorporated within the UK – indirectly held
Airtanker Holdings Limited
Strategic tanker aircraft PFI project
Airtanker Services Limited
Provision of aftermarket services for strategic tanker aircraft
Alpha Partners Leasing Limited
Aero engine leasing
Genistics Holdings Limited
Trailer-mounted field mobile generator sets
Rolls-Royce Snecma Limited (UK & France)
Aero engine collaboration
Rolls Wood Group (Repair and Overhauls) Limited
Industrial gas turbine repair and overhaul
TRT Limited
Aero engine turbine blade repair services
Turbine Surface Technologies Limited
Aero engine turbine surface coatings
Turbo-Union Limited (UK, Germany and Italy)
RB199 engine collaboration
The above companies are incorporated and operate in the UK unless otherwise stated.
Class
% of
class held
% of
equity held
Ordinary
20
20
Ordinary
22
22
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Shares
B Shares
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
Ordinary
A Shares
100
–
100
–
–
100
100
–
–
100
–
100
40
37.5
50
50
50
50
49.5
50
40
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
129
Strategic report
Jointly controlled entities and associates incorporated overseas – indirectly held
China
China
Germany
Germany
Germany
Germany
Hong Kong
India
Malaysia
Singapore
Singapore
Spain
US
US
US
US
Ordinary
50
50
Ordinary
49
49
Ordinary
49
49
Ordinary
28
28
Ordinary
33
33
Ordinary
33.3
33.3
Ordinary
75.1
75.1
Ordinary
50
50
Ordinary
45
45
Ordinary
50
50
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
Ordinary
50
50
49
Ordinary
50
50
Ordinary
30
30
Ordinary
46.9
46.9
Partnerships
50
–
Partnership
18.5
–
Common Stock
39.9
39.9
Partnership
50
–
50
49
Unincorporated overseas – indirectly held
US
Light Helicopter Turbine Engine Company (LHTEC)
Rolls-Royce Corporation has a 50% interest in this unincorporated partnership which was formed to develop and market jointly
the T800 engine
The above companies operate principally in the country of their incorporation. The countries of principal operations are stated in brackets
after the name of the company, if not the country of their incorporation.
In accordance with section 410 of the Companies Act 2006, the subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates listed on pages 127
to 129 is of those whose results or financial position, in the opinion of the directors, principally affect the financial statements. A list of all
related undertakings will be included in the Company’s annual return to Companies House.
Other information
Israel
% of
equity held
Financial statements
Germany
MTU Detroit Diesel Australia Pty. Limited (effective interest 25%)
Sales and servicing of diesel engines
Xian XR Aero Components Co Limited
Manufacturing facility for aero engine parts
Shanxi North MTU Diesel Co. Ltd (effective interest 24.5%)
Manufacture and sale of MTU engines
EPI Europrop International GmbH (effective interest 35.5%)
A400M engine collaboration
EUROJET Turbo GmbH (UK, Germany, Italy & Spain) (effective interest 39%)
EJ200 engine collaboration
MTU, Turbomeca, Rolls-Royce GmbH (UK, France & Germany)
MTR390 engine collaboration
MTU Onsite Energy Systems GmbH (effective interest 37.5%)
Manufacturing and distribution of diesel-powered generating sets
N3 Engine Overhaul Services GmbH & Co KG
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Hong Kong Aero Engine Services Limited
Aero engine repair and overhaul
International Aerospace Manufacturing Private Limited
Manufacture of compressor shrouds, compressor rings, turbine blades and nozzle
guide vanes
Techjet Aerofoils Limited
Manufacture of compressor aerofoils for gas turbines
Advanced Gas Turbine Solutions Sdn Bhd
Industrial gas turbine aftermarket services
International Engine Component Overhaul Pte Limited
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Singapore Aero Engine Services Private Limited (effective interest 39%)
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Industria de Turbo Propulsores SA
Aero engine component manufacture and maintenance
Alpha Leasing (US) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.2) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.4) LLC,
Alpha Leasing (US) (No.5) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.6) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.7)
LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.8) LLC, Rolls-Royce & Partners Finance (US) LLC,
Rolls-Royce & Partners Finance (US) (No.2) LLC
Aero engine leasing
Exostar LLC
Business to business internet exchange
LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc.
Development of fuel cells
Texas Aero Engine Services, LLC
Aero engine repair and overhaul
% of
class held
Directors’ report
Australia
Class
130 Other information
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT
to the members of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc only
The measurement of revenue and profit in the Civil
aerospace business
1 Our opinion on the financial statements is unmodified
Refer to page 81 (Key areas of judgement – Long-term aftermarket
We have audited the financial statements of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc contracts), page 83 (Significant accounting policies – Revenue
for the year ended 31 December 2013 set out on pages 75 to 129.
recognition) and page 44 (Audit committee report – Financial
In our opinion:
reporting)
ő the financial statements give a true and fair view of the state of
ő The risk The amount of revenue and profit recognised in a year
the Group’s and of the parent company’s affairs as at 31 December
on the sale of engines and aftermarket services is dependent,
2013 and of the Group’s profit for the year then ended;
inter alia, on the assessment of the percentage of completion
ő the Group financial statements have been properly prepared in
of long-term aftermarket contracts and the forecast cost profile
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as
of each arrangement. As long-term aftermarket contracts can
adopted by the European Union (Adopted IFRS);
extend over significant periods and the profitability of these
ő the parent company financial statements have been properly
arrangements typically assumes significant life-cycle cost
prepared in accordance with UK Accounting Standards; and
improvement over the term of the contracts, the estimated
ő the financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
outturn requires significant judgement to be applied in assessing
the requirements of the Companies Act 2006 and, as regards the
engine flying hours, time on wing and other operating parameters,
Group financial statements, Article 4 of the IAS Regulation.
the pattern of future maintenance activity and the costs to be
Opinions and conclusions arising from our audit
2 Our assessment of risks
In arriving at our opinions set out in this report, the risks that had
the greatest effect on our audit and the key procedures we applied
to address them are set out below. Those procedures were designed
in the context of the financial statements as a whole and,
consequently, where we set out findings we do not express any
opinion on these individual risks.
The basis of accounting for revenue and profit in the Civil
aerospace business
Refer to page 81 (Key areas of judgement – Long-term aftermarket
contracts), page 83 (Significant accounting policies – Revenue
recognition) and page 44 (Audit committee report – Financial reporting)
ő The risk The amount of revenue and profit recognised in a year
on the sale of engines and aftermarket services is dependent,
inter alia, on the appropriate assessment of whether or not each
long-term aftermarket contract for services is linked to or separate
from the contract for sale of the related engines. As the
commercial arrangements can be complex, significant judgement
is applied in selecting the accounting basis in each case. The most
significant risk is that the Group might inappropriately account for
sales of engines and long term service agreements as a single
arrangement for accounting purposes as this would usually lead
to revenue and profit being recognised too early because the
margin in the long term service agreement is usually higher than
the margin in the engine sale agreement.
ő Our response We made our own independent assessment, with
reference to the relevant accounting standards, of the accounting
basis that should be applied to each long-term aftermarket
contract entered into during the year and compared this to the
accounting basis applied by the Group.
ő Our findings We found that the Group has developed a framework
for selecting the accounting basis to be used which is consistent
with accounting standards and has applied this consistently.
For almost all the agreements entered into during this year, it
was clear which accounting basis should apply. Where there was
room for interpretation, we found the Group’s judgement to have
been balanced.
incurred. The inherent nature of these estimates means that their
continual refinement can have an impact on the profits of the Civil
aerospace business that can be significant in an individual
financial year. The assessment of the estimated outturn for each
arrangement involves detailed calculations using large and
complex databases with a significant level of manual intervention.
ő Our response We tested the controls designed and applied by the
Group to provide assurance that the estimates used in assessing
revenue and cost profiles are appropriate and that the resulting
estimated cumulative profit on such contracts is accurately
reflected in the financial statements; these controls operated over
both the inputs and the outputs of the calculations. We challenged
the appropriateness of these estimates for each programme and
assessed whether or not the estimates showed any evidence
of management bias. Our challenge was based on our assessment
of the historical accuracy of the Group’s estimates in previous
periods, identification and analysis of changes in assumptions
from prior periods and an assessment of the consistency of
assumptions across programmes, detailed discussions and
assessments of the achievability of the Group’s plans to reduce
life-cycle costs and an analysis of the impact of these plans on
forecast cost profiles taking account of contingencies and analysis
of the impact of known technical issues on cost forecasts. Our
analysis considered each significant airframe that is powered
by the Group’s engines and was based on our own experience
supplemented by discussions with an aircraft valuation specialist
engaged by the Group. We assessed whether the valuer was
objective and suitably qualified. We also checked
the mathematical accuracy of the revenue and profit for each
arrangement and considered the implications of identified errors
and changes in estimates.
ő Our findings Our testing identified weaknesses in the design and
operation of controls. In response to this we assessed the
effectiveness of the Group’s plans for addressing these weaknesses
and we increased the scope and depth of our detailed testing and
analysis from that originally planned. We found no significant
errors in calculation. Overall, our assessment is that the
assumptions and resulting estimates (including appropriate
contingencies) resulted in mildly cautious profit recognition.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
131
Strategic report
Accounting for the consolidation of Rolls-Royce Power Systems
Holding GmbH and valuation of Daimler AG’s put option
Refer to page 81 (Key areas of judgement – Rolls-Royce Power Systems
Holding GmbH), page 82 (Key sources of estimation uncertainty –
Intangible assets arising on consolidation of Rolls-Royce Power Systems
AG and put option on Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH),
page 83 (Accounting policies – Basis of consolidation) and page 44
(Audit committee report – Financial reporting)
Financial statements
Other information
Control of Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH
ő The risk Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH (a special
purpose vehicle owned equally by the Group and Daimler AG
ő The risk The recovery of these assets depends on a combination of
(RRPSH)) acquired a controlling interest in Rolls-Royce Power
achieving sufficiently profitable business in the future as well as
Systems AG (RRPS) on 25 August 2011. From that date, the Group
the ability of customers to pay amounts due under contracts often
equity accounted for its joint venture interest in RRPSH as control
over a long period of time. Assets relating to a particular engine
was shared with Daimler AG. On 1 January 2013, conditions were
programme are more prone to the risk of impairment in the early
fulfilled which the Group considered gave it control over RRPSH
years of a programme as the engine’s market position is
and from that date the Group’s 50 per cent interest has been
established. In addition, the pricing of business with launch
classified as a subsidiary and RRPSH has been consolidated in the
customers makes assets relating to these engines more prone
Group financial statements. Assessing whether or not the Group
to the risk of impairment.
controls RRPSH is a critical accounting judgement. The rights of
ő Our response We tested the controls designed and applied by the
the Group and Daimler AG are encapsulated in shareholder
Group to provide assurance that the assumptions are regularly
agreements and assessing whether the Group’s rights are
updated, that changes are monitored, scrutinised and approved
sufficient to give it control over RRPSH requires detailed
by appropriate personnel and that the final assumptions used in
consideration of the relevant provisions and a commercial
impairment testing have been appropriately approved. We
assessment as to which rights are most important.
challenged the appropriateness of the key assumptions in the
impairment test (including market size, market share, pricing,
ő Our response We analysed the shareholder agreements with
engine and aftermarket unit costs, individual programme
particular reference to rights relating to key matters including the
assumptions, price and cost escalation, discount rate and
existence of a casting vote in respect of key matters described on
exchange rates ) focusing particularly on those assets with
page 81 at the shareholders meeting and Shareholders’ Committee
a higher risk of impairment (those relating to the Trent 900
of RRPSH.
programme and launch customers on the Trent 900 and 1000
ő Our findings We found that the terms of the agreements provide
programmes). Our challenge was based on our assessment of the
the Group with the power to establish key operating and capital
historical accuracy of the Group’s estimates in previous periods,
decisions of RRPSH and to appoint, remove and set the
our understanding of the commercial prospects of key engine
remuneration of key management personnel. The agreements
programmes, identification and analysis of changes in
also provide Daimler AG with rights (in particular over matters
assumptions from prior periods and an assessment of the
that would significantly change the scale, scope and financing
consistency of assumptions across programmes and customers
of RRPSH’s business, certain significant supplier relationships
and comparison of assumptions with publicly available data
and changes to contractual arrangements between RRPSH with
where this was available. We considered the appropriateness
Rolls-Royce) which we have determined provide protection to
of the related disclosures in note 9 to the financial statements.
Daimler AG over its interest in RRPSH but are not sufficient
to prevent the Group from controlling RRPSH. On that basis,
ő Our findings Our testing did not identify any deviation in the
we consider that it is appropriate that RRPSH (and hence RRPS)
operation of controls which would have required us to amend the
has been consolidated from 1 January 2013.
nature or scope of our planned detailed test work. We found that
the assumptions and resulting estimates were balanced and that
the disclosures in note 9 appropriately describe the inherent
degree of subjectivity in the estimates and the potential impact
on future periods of revisions to these estimates. We found no
errors in calculations.
Directors’ report
Recoverability of intangible assets (certification costs and
participation fees, development expenditure and recoverable
engine costs) and amounts recoverable on contracts primarily
in the Civil aerospace business
Refer to page 82 (Key sources of estimation uncertainty – Forecasts
and discount rates), pages 86 and 87 (Significant accounting policies –
Certification costs and participation fees, Research and development,
Recoverable engine costs and Impairment of non-current assets),
page 99 (Note 9 to the financial statements – Intangible assets) and
page 44 (Audit committee report – Financial reporting)
132 Other information
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT
Consolidation of Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH
ő The risk Estimating the fair value of intangible assets of RRPS
at the date of consolidation involved the use of complex valuation
techniques and the estimation of future cash flows over a
considerable period of time. To the extent that greater or
lesser value is attributed to intangibles (which are subject to
amortisation), lesser or greater value is attributed to goodwill
(which is not).
ő Our response We evaluated the basis upon which the Directors
identified and assessed the fair value of each significant asset,
liability and contingent liability of RRPS and its subsidiaries having
regard to the relevant accounting standards. For the intangible
assets, we assessed whether the measurement basis and
assumptions underlying the estimate of the fair values were
reasonable, taking account of our experience of similar assets in
other comparable situations and of the work performed by a
valuer engaged by the Group. We assessed whether the valuer
was objective and suitably qualified, had been appropriately
instructed and had been provided with complete, accurate data
on which to base its evaluation. We also assessed whether or not
the estimates showed any evidence of management bias with
a focus on whether there was any indication of value being
inappropriately attributed to goodwill rather than
depreciable assets.
Liabilities arising from sales financing arrangements
Refer to page 82 (Key areas of judgement – financing support), page
88 (Significant accounting policies – Sales financing support, page 112
(Note 18 to the financial statements – Provisions for liabilities and
charges) and page 44 (Audit committee report – Financial reporting)
ő The risk The Group has contingent liabilities in respect of
financing and asset value support provided to customers. This
support typically takes the form of either a guarantee with respect
to the value of an aircraft at a future date or a guarantee of a
customer’s future payments under an aircraft financing
arrangement. Judgement is required to assess the likelihood of
these liabilities crystallising, in order to assess whether a provision
should be recognised and if so the amount of that provision. The
total potential liability is significant and can be affected by the
assessment of the residual value of the aircraft and the
creditworthiness of the customers.
ő Our response We analysed the terms of guarantees on aircraft
delivered during the year in detail and obtained aircraft values
from and held discussions with aircraft valuation specialists
engaged by the Group. We assessed whether the valuer was
objective and suitably qualified, had been appropriately
instructed and had been provided with complete, accurate data
on which to base its evaluation. For all contracts on delivered
aircraft, we assessed the commercial factors relevant to the
likelihood of the guarantees being called, including the credit
ő Our findings We found that the intangible assets identified were
ratings and recent financial performance of the relevant
typical for acquisitions of similar businesses and that the valuation
customers and their fleet plans, and critically assessed the Group’s
bases used were in accordance with accounting standards. We
estimate of the required provisions for those liabilities. We
have no concerns with the basis on which the valuer had been
considered movements in aircraft values and potential changes
instructed by the Group and found that (i) the valuer was objective
in the assessed probability of a liability crystallising since the
and competent, (ii) the estimates used in the valuations were
previous year end and considered whether the evidence supported
balanced and did not result in either too much or too little
the Group’s assessment as to whether or not a liability needs to be
goodwill being recognised and (iii) the valuations arrived at by
recognised and the amount of the liability recognised or
the valuer had been adopted by the Group without adjustment.
contingent liability disclosed. We considered the appropriateness
Valuation of Daimler AG’s put option
of the related disclosure in note 18 to the financial statements.
ő The risk As part of the shareholder agreements, for a period of six
years from 1 January 2013 Daimler AG has the option to require
ő Our findings We found that the assumptions and estimates were
the Group to purchase its 50 per cent interest in RRPSH. The
balanced and that note 18 appropriately discloses the potential
estimated amount of the purchase price of this option has been
liability in excess of the amount provided for in the financial
recognised as a financial liability on the Group balance sheet. The
statements for delivered aircraft and highlights the significant
purchase price is based on averaging three valuations, which are
but unquantifiable contingent liability in respect of aircraft
based on both internal and external metrics, at the date the
which will be delivered in the future.
option is exercised. The external metrics include price/earnings
ratios for comparable companies and those implicit in comparable
transactions. There is judgement involved in choosing appropriate
comparable companies and transactions and in predicting what
these might be at a future date.
ő Our response We analysed the shareholder agreements and tested
the reasonableness of the estimate of the purchase price of the
option, including assessing whether the Group’s judgement as to
which external metrics should be used was appropriate, and the
accuracy of its calculation. We also assessed whether or not the
estimates showed any evidence of management bias with a
particular focus on the risk that the liability might be understated
given its visibility.
ő Our findings We found that the resulting estimate was acceptable
but mildly optimistic resulting in a somewhat lower liability being
recorded than might otherwise have been the case.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
133
Strategic report
ő Our findings Our analysis indicated that in substance, from the
point of view of both the Group and the risk and revenue sharing
workshare partners, the entry fees represent the reimbursement
of expenditure incurred by the Group as part of an engine
development programme and that this represented a significant
transfer of development risk from the Group to the partners that
should be reflected in the income statement at the time the
reimbursed expenditure is recognised. On that basis, we found
that the revised accounting policy most appropriately reflects the
commercial substance of the entry fees. So far as it was possible to
ő The risk A large part of the Group’s business is characterised by
competition for individually significant contracts with customers
which are often directly or indirectly associated with governments
and the award of individually significant contracts to suppliers.
The procurement processes associated with these activities are
highly susceptible to the risk of corruption. In addition the Group
operates in a number of territories where the use of commercial
intermediaries is either required by the government or is normal
practice. The Group is currently under investigation by law
enforcement agencies, primarily the Serious Fraud Office in the UK
and the US Department of Justice. Breaches of laws and regulations
in this area can lead to fines, penalties, criminal prosecution,
commercial litigation and restrictions on future business.
ő Our response We evaluated and tested the Group’s policies,
procedures and controls over the selection and renewal of
intermediaries, contracting arrangements, ongoing management,
payments and responses to suspected breaches of policy. We
sought to identify and tested payments made to intermediaries
during the year, made enquiries of appropriate personnel and
evaluated the tone set by the Board and the Executive Leadership
Team and the Group’s approach to managing this risk. Having
enquired of management, the audit committee and the Board as
to whether the Group is in compliance with laws and regulations
relating to bribery and corruption, we made written enquiries
of the Group’s legal advisers to corroborate the results of those
enquiries and maintained a high level of vigilance to possible
indications of significant non-compliance with laws and
regulations relating to bribery and corruption whilst carrying out
our other audit procedures. We discussed the areas of potential or
suspected breaches of law, including the ongoing investigation,
with the audit committee and the Board of directors as well as the
Group’s legal advisers and assessed related documentation. We
assessed whether the financial effects of potential or suspected
breaches of law or regulation have been properly disclosed in
note 23 to the financial statements.
ő Our findings We found that the disclosures in note 23 to the
financial statements reflect appropriately the matters required
to be disclosed by accounting standards and highlighted that, as
the investigation is at too early a stage to assess the consequences
(if any), including in particular the size of any possible fines, no
provision can be made at year end.
Other information
ő Our response We independently analysed the agreements under
which significant entry fees have been received to establish the
range of possible accounting treatments that could be adopted
and to assess which of these would in our view most appropriately
reflect the requirements of accounting standards. The most
significant accounting standards considered were
IAS 8 Accounting policies, changes in accounting estimates and
errors, IAS 18 Revenue, IFRS 11 Joint arrangements in terms of the
timing of recognition of the entry fees and IAS 1 Presentation of
financial statements in respect of their presentation as an offset
against the expenditure to which they relate. We also had regard
to the definitions of assets, liabilities, income and expenses in the
IFRS Framework and, to the extent they did not conflict with
Adopted IFRS, to pronouncements of other standard-setting
bodies that more explicitly address accounting for payments from
suppliers and collaborative arrangements. We examined
correspondence between the Group and the Financial Reporting
Council and attended meetings between them. We sought to
identify the accounting applied in similar circumstances by other
companies including the Group’s direct competitors and compare
these to the approach adopted by the Group and the requirements
of Adopted IFRS. We assessed whether the change to the
accounting policy made in the year was appropriate and
recalculated the resulting amounts in the financial statements.
We considered the appropriateness of the related disclosures.
Bribery and corruption
Refer to page 120 (Note 23 to the financial statements – Contingent
liabilities) and page 44 (Audit committee report – Financial reporting)
Financial statements
ő The risk The Group receives non-refundable cash payments under
risk and revenue sharing arrangements (which are referred to as
entry fees). The assessment of when these entry fees should be
recognised in the income statement involves analysis of their
commercial substance in the context of the agreement as a whole.
As there is no single accounting standard that directly addresses
these types of agreements, management has to apply very
significant judgement in deciding how to apply the various
provisions of accounting standards that are relevant to different
aspects of the agreements. These arrangements are complex and
have features that could be indicative of: a collaboration
agreement, including sharing of risk and cost in a development
programme; a long-term supply agreement; sharing of
intellectual property; or a combination of these.
tell, we found that the accounting applied by the Group was
similar to the approach taken by others. We found that the change
to the accounting policy made by the Group was appropriate given
the incidence of entry fees in the year and the costs capitalised on
the programmes to which these entry fees relate. We found that
the disclosures in the financial statements properly describe the
accounting treatment adopted by the Group and the directors’
basis for applying that treatment.
Directors’ report
Accounting for risk and revenue sharing arrangements
Refer to page 81 (Key areas of judgement – Risk and revenue sharing
arrangements), page 84 (Significant accounting policies – Risk and
revenue sharing arrangements), page 11 (Chief Financial Officer’s
review) and page 44 (Audit committee report – Financial reporting)
134 Other information
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT
The presentation of ‘underlying’ profit
Refer to page 10 (Chief Financial Officer’s review), page 89 (Note 2 to
the financial statements – Segmental analysis) and page 44 (Audit
committee report – Financial reporting)
ő The risk In addition to its Adopted IFRS financial statements, the
Group presents an alternative income statement on an
‘underlying’ basis. The directors believe the ‘underlying’ income
statement reflects better the Group’s trading performance during
the year. The basis of adjusting between the Adopted IFRS and
‘underlying’ income statements and a full reconciliation between
them is set out in note 2 to the financial statements on pages 89
and 91. A significant recurring adjustment between the Adopted
IFRS income statement and the ‘underlying’ income statement
relates to the foreign exchange rate used to translate foreign
currency transactions. The Group uses forward foreign exchange
contracts to manage the cash flow exposures of forecast
transactions denominated in foreign currencies but does not
generally apply hedge accounting in its Adopted IFRS income
statement. The ‘underlying’ income statement translates these
amounts at the achieved foreign exchange rate on forward foreign
exchange contracts settled in the period, retranslates assets and
liabilities at exchange rates forecast to be achieved from future
settlement of such contracts and excludes unrealised gains and
losses on such contracts which are included in the Adopted IFRS
income statement. In addition, adjustments are made to exclude
one-off past-service credits on post-retirement schemes and the
effect of acquisition accounting and a number of other items.
Alternative performance measures can provide investors with
appropriate additional information if properly used and presented.
In such cases, measures such as these can assist investors in gaining
a better understanding of a company’s financial performance and
strategy. However, when improperly used and presented, these
kinds of measures might mislead investors by hiding the real
financial position and results or by making the profitability of the
reporting entity seem more attractive.
ő Our response We assessed the appropriateness of the basis for
the adjustments between the Adopted IFRS income statement
and the ‘underlying’ income statement and recalculated the
adjustments with a particular focus on the impact of the foreign
exchange rate used to translate foreign currency amounts in the
‘underlying’ income statement. As the Group has discretion over
which forward foreign exchange contracts are settled in each
financial year, which could impact the achieved rate both for the
period and in the future, we assessed whether or not this showed
any evidence of management bias. We also assessed: (i) the extent
to which the prominence given to the ‘underlying’ financial
information and related commentary in the annual report
compared to the Adopted IFRS financial information and related
commentary could be misleading; (ii) whether the Adopted IFRS
and ‘underlying’ financial information are reconciled with
sufficient prominence given to that reconciliation; (iii) whether
the basis of the ‘underlying’ financial information is clearly and
accurately described and consistently applied; and (iv) whether
the ‘underlying’ financial information is not otherwise misleading
in the form and context in which it appears in the annual report.
ő Our findings We have no concerns regarding the basis of the
‘underlying’ financial information or its calculation and found
no indication of management bias in the way the Group managed
forward foreign exchange contracts during the year. We consider
that there is sufficient appropriate disclosure of the nature and
amounts of the adjustments to allow shareholders to understand
the implications of the two bases on the financial measures being
presented. We consider that the ‘underlying’ financial information
is useful to shareholders as an adjunct to the Adopted IFRS
financial information particularly in the context of isolating
trends resulting from trading performance from trends that
result from other factors. We found the presentation of the
‘underlying’ financial information to be balanced.
In addition to these key audit risks, we also focused on the
recognition of revenue and profit on other long-term contracts;
the implementation of a new consolidation system; warranties
and guarantees; valuation of derivative contracts; valuation of
post-retirement scheme liabilities; and the recoverability of tax
assets and the adequacy of provisions for tax contingencies.
3 Our application of materiality and an overview of the scope
of our audit
The materiality for the Group financial statements as a whole was
set at £86 million. This has been calculated with reference to a
benchmark of profit before taxation (representing 4.9% of reported
and ‘underlying’ profit before taxation) which we consider to be one
of the principal considerations for members of the company in
assessing the financial performance of the Group.
We agreed with the audit committee to report to it the following
misstatements that we identified through our audit: (i) all material
corrected misstatements; (ii) uncorrected misstatements with
a value in excess of £4 million for income statement items
(or £8 million for balance sheet reclassifications); and (iii) other
misstatements below that threshold that we believe warranted
reporting on qualitative grounds.
In order to gain appropriate audit coverage of the risks described
above and of each individually significant reporting component:
(a) audits for Group reporting purposes were carried out at 13 key
reporting components located in the following countries: United
Kingdom (9 key reporting components), USA (1), Germany (2) and
Norway (1). In addition, audits for Group reporting purposes were
performed at a further 20 reporting components. Together these
covered 90 per cent of revenue, 87 per cent of underlying profit
before taxation and 85 per cent of total assets; and
(b) specified reporting procedures were carried out over key risk
areas at a further 12 reporting components, none of which are
considered to be key.
In total our procedures covered 98 per cent of revenue, 99 per cent
of underlying profit before taxation and 94 per cent of total assets.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
135
Strategic report
The audits undertaken for Group reporting purposes at the
reporting components were all performed to materiality levels set
by, or agreed with, the group audit team. These materiality levels
were set individually for each such component and ranged from
£0.5 million to £50 million.
As explained more fully in the Directors’ responsibilities statement
set out on pages 72 and 73, the directors are responsible for the
preparation of the financial statements and for being satisfied that
they give a true and fair view. A description of the scope of an audit
of accounts is provided on the Financial Reporting Council’s website
at www.frc.org.uk/auditscopeukprivate. This report is made solely
to the Company’s members as a body and is subject to important
explanations and disclaimers regarding our responsibilities, published
on our website at www.kpmg.com/uk/auditscopeukco2013a, which
are incorporated into this report as if set out in full and should be
read to provide an understanding of the purpose of this report,
the work we have undertaken and the basis of our opinions.
5 We have nothing to report in respect of the matters on which
we are required to report by exception
Under ISA (UK and Ireland) we are required to report to you if, based
on the knowledge we acquired during our audit, we have identified
other information in the annual report that contains a material
inconsistency with either that knowledge or the financial
statements, a material misstatement of fact, or that is otherwise
misleading. In particular, we are required to report to you if:
ő we have identified material inconsistencies between the
knowledge we acquired during our audit and the directors’
statement that they consider that the annual report and financial
statements taken as a whole is fair, balanced and understandable
and provides the information necessary for shareholders to assess
the Group’s performance, business model and strategy; or
ő the audit committee report does not appropriately address
matters communicated by us to the audit committee.
Under the Companies Act 2006 we are required to report to you if,
in our opinion:
ő adequate accounting records have not been kept by the parent
company, or returns adequate for our audit have not been
received from branches not visited by us; or
ő the parent company financial statements and the part of the
directors’ remuneration report to be audited are not in agreement
with the accounting records and returns; or
ő certain disclosures of directors’ remuneration specified by law
are not made; or
ő we have not received all the information and explanations we
require for our audit.
Jimmy Daboo (Senior Statutory Auditor)
for and on behalf of KPMG Audit Plc, Statutory Auditor
Chartered Accountants
15 Canada Square
London
E14 5GL
12 February 2014
Other information
4 Our opinion on other matters prescribed by the Companies
Act 2006 is unmodified
In our opinion:
ő the part of the directors’ remuneration report to be audited has
been properly prepared in accordance with the Companies Act
2006; and
ő the information given in the Strategic report and Directors’
report for the financial year for which the financial statements
are prepared is consistent with the financial statements.
Scope of report and responsibilities
Financial statements
Under the Listing Rules we are required to review:
ő the directors’ statement, set out on page 72, in relation to going
concern; and
ő the part of the corporate governance report on page 39 relating
to the Company’s compliance with the nine provisions of the UK
Corporate Governance Code (2010) specified for our review.
We have nothing to report in respect of the above responsibilities.
Directors’ report
Detailed audit instructions were sent to the auditors of all these
reporting components. These instructions covered the significant
audit areas that should be covered by these audits (which included
the relevant risks of material misstatement detailed above) and set
out the information required to be reported back to the group audit
team. The group audit team visited the following locations: United
Kingdom, USA, Germany, Norway and Singapore. Telephone
meetings were also held with the auditors at these locations and
the majority of the other locations that were not physically visited.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
136 Other information
GROUP FIVE-YEAR REVIEW
For the years ended 31 December
Income statement
Revenue
Profit before net research and development and share of results of joint ventures
and associates
Research and development (net) 1
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Profit before financing
Net financing
Profit before taxation 2
Taxation
Profit for the year
Attributable to:
Equity shareholders of the parent
Non-controlling interests
Profit for the year
1
2
Research and development (gross)
Underlying profit before taxation
2013
£m
15,513
Restated*
2012
£m
12,161
2,393
(683)
160
1,870
(111)
1,759
(380)
1,379
2,435
(531)
173
2,077
689
2,766
(431)
2,335
1,367
12
1,379
2,321
14
2,335
(1,118)
1,759
(919)
1,434
2011
£m
2010
£m
2009
£m
11,124
11,085
10,414
1,536
(463)
116
1,189
(84)
1,105
(257)
848
1,463
(422)
93
1,134
(432)
702
(159)
543
1,458
(379)
93
1,172
1,785
2,957
(740)
2,217
850
(2)
848
539
4
543
2,221
(4)
2,217
(908)
1,157
(923)
955
(864)
915
Earnings per ordinary share:
Underlying
Basic
65.59p
73.26p
59.59p
125.38p
48.54p
45.95p
38.73p
29.20p
39.67p
120.38p
Payments to shareholders per ordinary share
22.00p
19.50p
17.50p
16.00p
15.00p
2013
£m
Restated*
2012
£m
2011
£m
2010
£m
2009
£m
Balance sheet
Assets
Liabilities
Called-up share capital
Reserves
Equity attributable to equity holders of the parent
Non-controlling interests
Cash flow
Cash inflow from operating activities
Cash (outflow)/inflow from investing activities
Cash inflow/(outflow) from financing activities
Increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
Net funds
23,063
(16,760)
6,303
18,146
(12,150)
5,996
16,423
(11,904)
4,519
16,234
(12,255)
3,979
15,422
(11,640)
3,782
376
5,229
5,605
698
6,303
374
5,605
5,979
17
5,996
374
4,144
4,518
1
4,519
374
3,601
3,975
4
3,979
371
3,411
3,782
–
3,782
2013
£m
2012
£m
2011
£m
2010
£m
2009
£m
2,040
(740)
136
1,436
1,939
1,255
424
(331)
1,348
1,317
1,378
(759)
(743)
(124)
1,533
859
(606)
384
637
1,275
1,306
(2,207)
(655)
(1,556)
223
* Restated for the adoption of the amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits on 1 January 2013 and the change to the accounting policy for RRSAs – see note 1. It is not practicable to
restate prior years on a comparable basis.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
137
2013
2012
Change
USD per GBP
Year end spot rate
Average spot rate
1.65
1.56
1.63
1.59
+1%
-2%
EUR per GBP
Year end spot rate
Average spot rate
1.20
1.18
1.23
1.23
-2%
-4%
i)
ii)
iv)
v)
vi)
Investments and capital expenditure
The Group subjects all major investments and capital expenditure
to a rigorous examination of risks and future cash flows to ensure
that they create shareholder value. All major investments require
Board approval.
The Group has a portfolio of projects at different stages of their
life cycles. Discounted cash flow analysis of the remaining life of
projects is performed on a regular basis.
Sales of engines in production are assessed against criteria in
the original development programme to ensure that overall value
is enhanced.
Financial risk management
The Board has established a structured approach to financial risk
management. The Financial risk committee (Frc) is accountable for
managing, reporting and mitigating the Group’s financial risks and
exposures. These risks include the Group’s principal counterparty,
The Group’s global corporate income tax contribution
currency, interest rate, commodity price, liquidity and credit rating
Over 95 per cent of the Group’s underlying profit before tax
(excluding joint ventures) is generated in the United Kingdom, United risks outlined in more depth in note 17. The Frc is chaired by the
Chief Financial Officer. The Group has a comprehensive financial risk
States of America, Germany, Norway, Finland and Singapore. The
remaining profits are generated across more than 40 other countries. policy that advocates the use of financial instruments to manage
and hedge business operations risks that arise from movements
This reflects the fact that the majority of the Group’s business is
in financial, commodities, credit or money markets. The Group’s
undertaken, and employees are based, in the above countries.
policy is not to engage in speculative financial transactions. The
In common with most multinational groups, the total of all profits
Frc sits quarterly to review and assess the key risks and agree any
in respect of which corporate tax is paid is not the same as the
mitigating actions required.
consolidated profit before tax reported on page 75. The main
reasons for this are:
i)
the consolidated income statement is prepared under IFRS
whereas tax is paid on the profits of each Group company, which
are determined by local accounting rules;
Other information
iii)
the Group manages its tax costs through maximising the tax
efficiency of business transactions. This includes taking
advantage of available tax incentives and exemptions;
this must be done in a way which is aligned with the Group’s
commercial objectives and meets its legal obligations and
ethical standards;
the Group also has regard for the intention of the legislation
concerned rather than just the wording itself;
the Group is committed to building constructive working
relationships with tax authorities based on a policy of full
disclosure in order to remove uncertainty in its business
transactions and to allow the authorities to review possible risks;
where appropriate and possible, the Group enters into
consultation with tax authorities to help shape proposed
legislation and future tax policy; and
the Group seeks to price transactions between Group companies
as if they were between unrelated parties, in compliance with
the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines and the laws of the
relevant jurisdictions.
The Group’s total corporation tax payments in 2013 were
£238 million. The level of tax paid in each country is impacted by
the above. In most cases, (i) and (ii) are only a matter of timing and
therefore tax will be paid in an earlier or later year. As a result they
only have a negligible impact on the Group’s underlying tax rate
which, excluding joint ventures, would be 27.1 per cent (the
underlying tax rate including joint ventures can be found on
page 12). This is due to deferred tax accounting, details of which can
be found in note 5 to the financial statements. The impact of (iii) will
often be permanent depending on the relevant tax law.
Financial statements
The Group’s approach to managing its tax affairs
The Board is involved in setting the Group’s tax policies which
govern the way its tax affairs are managed. In summary, this means:
ii) accounting rules require certain income and costs relating to
our commercial activities to be eliminated from, or added to,
the aggregate of all the profits of the Group companies when
preparing the consolidated income statement (‘consolidation
adjustments’); and
iii) specific tax rules including exemptions or incentives as
determined by the tax laws in each country.
Directors’ report
Foreign exchange
Foreign exchange rate movements influence the reported income
statement, the cash flow and closing net cash balance. The average
and spot rates for the principal trading currencies of the Group are
shown in the table below:
Strategic report
ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
138 Other information
ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Capital structure
£ million
Total equity
Cash flow hedges
Group capital
Net funds
2013
Restated
2012
6,303
68
6,371
1,939
5996
63
6,059
1,317
Operations are funded through various shareholders’ funds, bank
borrowings, bonds and notes. The capital structure of the Group
reflects the judgement of the Board as to the appropriate balance
of funding required.
Funding is secured by the Group’s continued access to the global
debt markets. Borrowings are funded in various currencies using
derivatives where appropriate to achieve a required currency and
interest rate profile. The Board’s objective is to retain sufficient
financial investments and undrawn facilities to ensure that the
Group can both meet its medium-term operational commitments
and cope with unforeseen obligations and opportunities.
The Group holds cash and short-term investments which, together
with the undrawn committed facilities, enable it to manage its
liquidity risk.
During the year, the Group issued €750 million 2.125% Notes
maturing in 2021 and £375 million 3.375% Notes maturing in 2026.
Credit rating
Moody’s Investors Service
Standard & Poor’s
Rating
Outlook
Grade
A3
Stable
Investment
A
Stable
Investment
The Group subscribes to both Moody’s Investors Service and
Standard & Poor’s for independent long-term credit ratings.
At 31 December 2013, the Group maintained investment grade
ratings from both agencies.
As a capital-intensive business making long-term commitments
to our customers, the Group attaches significant importance
to maintaining or improving the current investment grade
credit ratings.
Accounting and regulatory
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRS), as adopted by the EU.
In 2013, the Group has adopted Amendments to IAS 19 Employee
Benefits. There were no other revisions to IFRS that became
applicable in 2013 which had a significant impact on the Group’s
financial statements.
A summary of changes which have not been adopted in 2013
is included within the accounting policies in note 1.
At year end, the Group retained aggregate liquidity of £5.6 billion. This
As explained in the Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 11,
liquidity comprised net funds of £1.9 billion and aggregate borrowing
following discussions with the Conduct Committee of the FRC,
facilities of £3.6 billion, of which £1.2 billion remained undrawn.
the Group has reassessed its policy for the recognition of entry
The maturity profile of the borrowing facilities is regularly reviewed fees received under RRSAs.
to ensure that refinancing levels are manageable in the context
Governments and regulators around the world continue to
of the business and market conditions. The only facility to mature
implement reforms to the financial markets with the aim of
in 2014 is a £200 million EIB loan. There are no rating triggers in any
improving transparency and reducing systemic risk. Although the
borrowing facility that would require the facility to be accelerated
reforms are predominantly directed at financial institutions, they
or repaid due to an adverse movement in the Group’s credit rating.
will also affect non-financial institutions such as the Group.
The Group conducts some of its business through a number of joint
The primary concern was the reform of the over-the-counter (OTC)
ventures. A major proportion of the debt of these joint ventures is
derivatives market, and in particular a proposal in the EU European
secured on the assets of the respective companies and is nonMarket Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) that parties to future OTC
recourse to the Group. This debt is further outlined in note 11.
derivative transactions would be required to use an exchange to
clear the transactions and post cash collateral to reduce counterparty
risk. The proposal could have adversely affected the Group’s future
funding requirements and made cash flow more volatile.
The final EMIR rules have now been released, which exempt
non-financial institutions engaged in hedging activity from
this requirement.
Share price
During the year, the share price increased by 46 per cent from
873.5 pence to 1275 pence, compared to a 38 per cent increase in
the FTSE aerospace and defence sector and 14 per cent increase
in the FTSE 100. The Company’s share price ranged from 873.5 pence
in January to 1275 pence in December.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
139
Strategic report
SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
Financial calendar 2014-2015
1 May 11.00am
25 April
Record date for
entitlement to
C Shares
Jun
2014
Jul
2014
Aug
2014
Sep
2014
2 June 5.00pm
Deadline for
receipt of C Share
elections
2 June
Record date for
C Share dividend
Managing your shareholding
Your shareholding is managed by Computershare Investor
Services PLC (the Registrar). When making contact with the
Registrar please quote your Shareholder Reference Number (SRN),
an 11-digit number that can be found on the right-hand side of
your share certificate or in any other shareholder correspondence.
It is very important that you keep your shareholding account
details up to date by notifying the Registrar of any changes in
your circumstances.
You can manage your shareholding at www.investorcentre.co.uk,
speak to the Registrar on +44 (0)870 703 0162 (8.30am to 5.30pm
Monday to Friday) or you can write to them at Computershare
Investor Services PLC, The Pavilions, Bridgwater Road,
Bristol BS13 8AE.
Payments to shareholders
The Company makes payments to shareholders by issuing
redeemable C Shares of 0.1 pence each. You can still receive cash
or additional ordinary shares from the Company providing you
complete a payment instruction form, which is available from the
Registrar. Once you have submitted your payment instruction form,
you will receive cash or additional ordinary shares each time the
Company issues C Shares. If you choose to receive cash we
recommend that you include your bank details on the payment
instruction form and have payments credited directly to your bank
account. This removes the risk of a cheque going astray in the post
and means that cleared payments will be credited to your bank
account on the payment date.
Oct
2014
Nov
2014
Jan
2015
Dec
2014
23 October
Ex-entitlement to
C Shares
1 December 5.00pm
Deadline for receipt
of C Share elections
24 October
Record date for
entitlement to
C Shares
31 December
Financial year end
Feb
2015
February
Preliminary
announcement –
2014 full year results
March
Annual report
published
Share dealing
The Registrar offers existing shareholders an internet dealing
service at www-uk.computershare.com/investor/sharedealing.asp
and a telephone dealing service (+44 (0)870 703 0084). The service is
available during market hours, 8.00am to 4.30pm, Monday to Friday
excluding Bank holidays. The fee for internet dealing is 1 per cent of
the transaction value subject to a minimum fee of £30. The fee for
telephone dealing is 1 per cent of the transaction plus £35. Please
note that, in addition to dealing fees, stamp duty of 0.5 per cent is
payable on all purchases. Other share dealing facilities are available
but we recommend that you only use a firm regulated by the
Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). You can check the FCA register at
www.fca.org.uk/register.
Your share certificate
If you sell or transfer your shares you must ensure that you have a
valid share certificate in the name of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc.
If you place an instruction to sell your shares and cannot provide a
valid share certificate the transaction cannot be completed and you
will be liable for any costs incurred by the broker. Share certificates
previously issued by either Rolls-Royce Group plc or Rolls-Royce plc
are invalid and should be destroyed. If you are unable to locate your
share certificates please inform the Registrar immediately.
American Depositary Receipts (ADR)
ADR holders should contact the depositary, The Bank of New York
Mellon by calling +1 888 269 2377 (toll free within the US) or
emailing [email protected]
Other information
23 April
Ex-entitlement
to C Shares
May
2014
2 January Payment of
C Share dividend
2 January Allotment of
C Shares
6 January Payment of
C Share redemption monies
13 January Purchase of ordinary
shares for CRIP participants
(at the latest)
Financial statements
Apr
2014
14 November Record date
for C Share dividend
Directors’ report
AGM
QEII Conference
Centre London
1 July Payment of C Share dividend
1 July Allotment of C Shares
3 July Payment of C Share redemption monies
11 July Purchase of ordinary shares for CRIP
participants (at the latest)
31 July Announcement of interim results
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
140 Other information
SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
Warning to shareholders – boiler room fraud
We are aware that some shareholders might have received
unsolicited phone calls or correspondence concerning investment
matters. These are typically from overseas based ‘brokers’ who offer
to sell them what often turn out to be worthless or high risk shares
in US or UK investments. Such operations are known as ‘boiler
rooms’ and these ‘brokers’ can be very persistent and extremely
persuasive. You should always check that any firm calling you about
investment opportunities is properly authorised by the FCA using
the following web link www.fca.org.uk/register or by calling their
Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768 (overseas callers dial
+44 20 7066 1000). If you deal with an unauthorised firm, you will
not be eligible to receive payment under the Financial Services
Compensation Scheme. You will find lots of useful advice and
information about protecting yourself from investment scams
on the FCA website www.fca.org.uk/consumers.
Remember the golden rule – IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE
IT PROBABLY IS.
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Visit www.rolls-royce.com/investors to find out more about the
latest financial results, the share price, payments to shareholders,
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Keeping up to date
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You can also download the Rolls-Royce Investor Relations iPad app
which provides the latest media and financial information.
Dividends paid on C Shares held
C Share calculation period
1 July 2013 – 31 December 2013
1 January 2013 – 30 June 2013
Previous C Share issues
Issue date
2 January
2014
2 July
2013
C Share dividend rate (%)
Record date for
C Share dividend
Payment date
0.225
0.25
15 November 2013
3 June 2013
2 January 2014
3 July 2013
Apportionment values
No of
C Shares issued
per ordinary
share
86
119
Record date
for
entitlement
to C Shares
Latest date
for receipt of
Payment
Instruction
Forms by
Registrar
CGT apportionment
Price of
ordinary
shares on first
day of trading
(p)
Value of
C Share issues
per ordinary
shares (p)
Ordinary
shares (%)
C Shares (%)
1265.50
8.6
99.33
0.67
1151.50
11.9
98.98
1.02
25 October 2 December
2013
2013
24 April
3 June
2013
2013
Date of
redemption
of C Shares
CRIP
purchase
date
6 January
2014
3 July
2013
7 January
2014
9 July
2013
CRIP
purchase
price (p)
1287.3621
1192.7275
For earlier C Share issues, please refer to the Group’s website.
Analysis of ordinary shareholders at 31 December 2013
Type of holder:
Individuals
Institutional and other investors
Total
Size of holding:
1 – 150
151 – 500
501 – 10,000
10,001 – 100,000
100,001 – 1,000,000
1,000,001 and over
Total
Number of
shareholders
% of total
shareholders
Number
of shares
% of total
shares
197,937
7,101
205,038
96.54
3.46
100.00
101,503,370
1,778,798,284
1,880,301,654
5.40
94.60
100.00
64,735
103,476
34,806
1,344
464
213
205,038
31.57
50.47
16.98
0.65
0.23
0.10
100.00
6,216,673
27,720,381
56,638,725
36,159,598
158,602,026
1,594,964,251
1,880,301,654
0.33
1.47
3.01
1.92
8.44
84.83
100.00
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2013
141
Strategic report
GLOSSARY
annual general meeting
Annual Performance Related Award plan
non-cumulative redeemable preference shares
carbon dioxide
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
cash flow per share
C Share Reinvestment Plan
European Aviation Safety Agency
Executive Leadership Team
earnings per ordinary share
European Union
Federal Aviation Administration
Financial Conduct Authority
Financial Reporting Council
Great British pound or pound sterling
Association of general counsel and company secretaries
of FTSE 100 companies
GHG
Global Code
Group
HMRC
HS&E
I&C
IAB
IAE
IAG
greenhouse gas
Global Code of Conduct
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc and its subsidiaries
HM Revenue & Customs
health, safety and environment
instrumentation and control
International Advisory Board
IAE International Aero Engines AG
International Airlines Group (parent company of
British Airways)
IAS
International Accounting Standards
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CONRAN DESIGN GROUP
The paper used in the report contains 75% recycled
content, of which 75% is de-inked post-consumer.
All of the pulp is bleached using an elemental chlorine
free process (ECF).
International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee
International Financial Reporting Standards
Japan Airlines
key performance indicator
London Inter-Bank Offered Rate
Long-Term Service Agreement
liquefied natural gas
UK Ministry of Defence
non-controlling interest
other comprehensive income
original equipment
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
Performance Share Plan
research and development
Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals
recoverable engine cost
Computershare Investor Services PLC
Rolls-Royce Power Systems Holding GmbH
Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG (previously named Tognum AG)
Risk and Revenue Sharing Arrangements
restricted stock units
Serious Fraud Office
Share Incentive Plan
Shareholder Reference Number
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
short take-off and vertical landing
total reportable injuries
Total Shareholder Return
unmanned aerial vehicle
UK Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
United States dollar
Printed in the UK by PurePrint using their
environmental printing technology, using
and
vegetable inks throughout. PurePrint is a CarbonNeutral®
company. Both the paper manufacturing mill and the printer
are registered to the Environmental Management System
ISO 14001 and are Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC)
chain-of-custody certified.
Other information
AGM
APRA
C Shares
CO2
Company
CPS
CRIP
EASA
ELT
EPS
EU
FAA
FCA
FRC
GBP
GC 100
IFRIC
IFRS
JAL
KPI
LIBOR
LTSA
LNG
MoD
NCI
OCI
OE
OECD
PSP
R&D
REACH
REC
Registrar
RRPSH
RRPS
RRSAs
RSUs
SFO
SIP
SRN
STEM
STOVL
TRI
TSR
UAV
UK GAAP
USD
Financial statements
anti-bribery and corruption
Advisory Council for Aviation Research and
Innovation in Europe
Directors’ report
ABC
ACARE
© Rolls-Royce plc 2014
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
Registered office:
65 Buckingham Gate
London
SW1E 6AT
T +44 (0)20 7222 9020
www.rolls-royce.com
Company number 7524813

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