Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012 ® Ro

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Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
®
© Rolls-Royce plc 2013
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
Registered office:
65 Buckingham Gate
London
SW1E 6AT
T +44 (0)20 7222 9020
www.rolls-royce.com
Company number 7524813
®
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
annual report 2012
133
Glossary
Business review
Introduction
Group at a glance
Chairman’s statement
Chief Executive’s review
Values, vision and strategy
Future opportunity
Chief Financial Officer’s review
Key performance indicators
Principal risks and uncertainties
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Excellence in technology
Excellence in operations
Sustainability
Additional financial information
01
02
04
06
08
10
12
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
37
Governance
Chairman’s introduction
Board of directors
International Advisory Board (IAB)
The Group Leadership Team (GLT)
Corporate governance report
Audit committee report
Nomination committee report
Ethics committee report
Risk committee report
Safety committee report
Remuneration committee report
Directors’ remuneration report
Shareholders and share capital
Other statutory information
39
40
42
42
43
47
49
50
52
53
54
57
68
70
Financial statements
Contents
73
Other information
Subsidiaries, jointly controlled
entities and associates
Independent Auditor’s report
Group five-year review
Shareholder information
Glossary
126
129
130
131
133
ABC
ACARE
Anti-bribery and corruption
Advisory Council for Aviation Research and
Innovation in Europe
ADR
AEBS
AGM
ANA
APB
APRA
BIS
CAD
CBE
CDP
CGU
CO2
CO2e
CPS
CRIP
DJSI
DoD
EMIR
EPS
ESOP
EU
FAA
Frc
FRC
FSA
GBP
GDP
GHG
GLT
HS&E
I&C
IAB
IAE
IAS
IASB
IFRIC
American Depositary Receipts Programme
All-Employee Bonus Scheme
Annual general meeting
All Nippon Airways
Auditing Practices Board
Annual Performance Related Award plan
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Canadian dollar
Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
Carbon Disclosure Project
Cash-generating unit
Carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide equivalent
Cash flow per share
C Share Reinvestment Plan
Dow Jones Sustainability World and European Indexes
US Department of Defense
European Market Infrastructure Regulation
Earnings per ordinary share
Executive Share Option Plan
European Union
Federal Aviation Administration
Financial Risk Committee
Financial Reporting Council
Financial Services Authority
Great British pound or pound sterling
Gross Domestic Product
Greenhouse gas
Group Leadership Team
Health, Safety and Environment
Instrumentation and control
International Advisory Board
IAE International Aero Engines AG
International Accounting Standards
International Accounting Standards Board
International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee
IFRS
ISO
LDI
LIBOR
LLP
LTSA
LNG
MoD
MW
NCI
NOX
OCI
OE
OECD
International Financial Reporting Standards
International Standards Organisation
Liability-driven investment
London Inter-Bank Offered Rate
Limited Liability Partnership
Long-Term Service Agreement
Liquefied Natural Gas
UK Ministry of Defence
Megawatt
Non-controlling interest
Nitrogen oxides
Other comprehensive income
Original Equipment
Organisation for Economic Cooperation
and Development
OHSAS
OTC
PAC
PLC
PSP
R&D
RCF
REACH
Registrar
RRNA
RRSPs
RSUs
SCRIA
SDSR
SFO
SIP
SRN
STEM
STOVL
TRI
TSR
UAV
UK GAAP
USD
Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Services
Over-the-counter
Political Action Committee
Public Limited Company
Performance Share Plan
Research and development
Revolving credit facility
Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals
Computershare Investor Services PLC
Rolls-Royce North America
Risk and Revenue Sharing Partnerships
Restricted stock units
Supply Chain Relationships in Aerospace
Strategic Defence and Security Review
Serious Fraud Office
Share Incentive Plan
Shareholder Reference Number
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
Short take-off and vertical landing
Total reportable injuries
Total Shareholder Return
Unmanned aerial vehicle
UK Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
United States dollar
Directors’ report
The directors’ report which includes the Business review is
set out on pages 1 to 72.
Forward-looking statements
This annual report contains forward-looking statements.
Any statements that express forecasts, expectations and
projections are not guarantees of future performance and
will not be updated. By their nature, these statements
involve risk and uncertainty, and a number of factors could
cause material differences to the actual results or
developments.
This report is intended to provide information to
shareholders, is not designed to be relied upon by any other
party, or for any other purpose and the Company and its
directors accept no liability to any other person other than
under English law.
Cover: In February 2012, we celebrated the opening of our
new manufacturing and assembly facility in Singapore for
large civil aero engines.
Image courtesy of: Bob Lee Keng Siang
Designed and produced by
conran design group
The paper used in the report contains 75% recycled
content, of which 75% is de-inked post-consumer.
All of the pulp is bleached using an elemental chlorine
free process (ECF).
Printed in the UK by PurePrint using their
environmental printing technology, using
and
vegetable inks throughout. PurePrint is a CarbonNeutral®
company. Both the paper manufacturing mill and the printer
are registered to the Environmental Management System
ISO 14001 and are Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC)
chain-of-custody certified.
Introduction
“In the full year, underlying profits
increased for the tenth consecutive
year. We have established this
record of consistent delivery while
continuing to invest in people,
technology and facilities.”
John Rishton, Chief Executive
Rolls-Royce is a global company, providing integrated power solutions
for customers in civil and defence aerospace, marine and energy
markets. We support our customers through a worldwide network
of offices, manufacturing and service facilities.
2012
2011
% change
Order book – firm and announced
£60,146m
£57,630m**
+4%
Underlying revenue*
£12,209m
£11,277m
+8%
Profit before financing
£2,072m
£1,189m
+74%
Underlying profit before tax*
£1,429m
£1,157m
+24%
59.27p
48.54p
+22%
19.5p
17.50p
+11%
Underlying earnings per ordinary share*
Payments to shareholders
* See explanation in note 2 on page 86
** Restated 2011 year-end data excluding International Aero Engines (IAE) order book of £4,571 million
2
Business review
Group at a glance
The priorities of the Group remain: deliver on the promises
we have made; decide where to grow and where not to; and
improve financial performance.
Civil aerospace
£6,437m
Underlying revenue 2012
Defence aerospace
£727m
Underlying profit 2012
£2,417m
Underlying revenue 2012
£404m
Underlying profit 2012
Trent XWB achieved certification
Over US$1 billion in contracts from US DoD and UK MoD
Trent 1000-TEN introduced
BR725 enters service and IAE restructure completed
US$315 million contract for F-35B STOVL LiftSystems™
The Civil aerospace business is a major manufacturer of
aero engines for the airline and corporate jet market.
Rolls-Royce powers more than 30 types of commercial
aircraft and over 12,500 engines are in service with
customers around the world.
Rolls-Royce is the second largest provider of defence
aero-engine products and services globally with 18,000
engines in service with 160 customers in 103 countries.
Revenue mix
Revenue mix
46% OE revenue
54% Services revenue
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Adour engines ordered by Royal Saudi Air Force for Hawks
46% OE revenue
49% Services revenue
5%Development
3
Business review
Group overview 2012
2012 revenue by business segment
• T
he order book increased to £60.1 billion,
up four per cent, adjusted for the IAE disposal.
Order intake was £16.1 billion in the year.
• U
nderlying revenue increased eight per cent to
£12.2 billion, including 12 per cent growth in
original equipment (OE) revenue and five per cent
growth in underlying services revenue.
53% Civil aerospace
20% Defence aerospace
8%Energy
18%Marine
1% Engine Holding
nderlying services revenue increased in all four
• U
business segments: Civil, Defence, Marine and
Energy and, in Engine Holding.
• U
nderlying profit before tax increased 24 per cent
to £1,429 million reflecting revenue growth,
revenue mix, unit cost reduction, a contribution
from Tognum and IAE restructuring.
Marine
£2,249m
Underlying revenue 2012
Energy
£294m
Underlying profit 2012
£147 million orders from Brazil for drill ships and
offshore vessels
MT7 chosen to power US Navy future hovercraft
£1.1 billion order for UK naval nuclear reactor
core programme
£962m
Underlying revenue 2012
£21m
Underlying profit 2012
Six RB211s ordered by PetroChina for pipeline project
Services grew and investment 24/7 support
desk completed
Nuclear agreements signed with AREVA and Hitachi
Rolls-Royce has a world-leading range of capabilities in
the marine market, encompassing the design, supply and
support of power and propulsion systems. We provide
comprehensive through-life support from a global
network of service facilities.
With over 4,800 gas turbines sold, and more than
130 million hours of operating experience gained,
our Energy business plays a critical role in supporting
global infrastructure. Our technology powers offshore
platforms, transports oil and gas through pipelines and
generates dependable electricity.
Revenue mix
Revenue mix
57% OE revenue
43% Services revenue
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
36% OE revenue
64% Services revenue
Business review
4
Business review
Chairman’s statement
The Trent 1000 aero engine, which powers the Boeing 787
Dreamliner, has enabled this new composite aircraft to achieve fuel
efficiency improvements of 20 per cent compared with the aircraft
it is replacing. Looking ahead, the Trent XWB that will power the
new Airbus A350 XWB is proving itself to be the most efficient jet
engine in the world. In our Marine business, the introduction of
Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) engines and radical hull designs have
enabled our newest vessels to reduce CO2 emissions by up to 40 per
cent and practically eliminate emissions of sulphur and nitrogen
oxides. In our Energy business, the latest variant of our industrial
Trent engine offers significant efficiency improvements. We
continue to invest in our Civil Nuclear business in order to support
the development of non-fossil fuel power generation.
Sir Simon Robertson
Chairman
In 2012, Rolls-Royce continued to grow underlying profits as it has
done every year for the past decade. During that time the Group
has doubled its revenues, trebled its order book and more than
quadrupled its profits.
During 2012, the order book rose by four per cent, underlying
revenues increased by eight per cent and underlying profits grew
by 24 per cent. The Group’s performance in 2012 is a testament to
the strength of our strategy, the quality of our technology and the
ability and determination of our people. We are proposing a final
payment to shareholders of 11.9 pence per share bringing the full
year payment to 19.5 pence per share, an increase of 11 per cent.
Many of the markets in which we operate remain challenging.
European economies are stagnant or contracting. In North America,
recovery is fragile and, in the emerging economies of South America
and Asia, growth is relatively subdued. Government spending in the
developed world remains under intense pressure, whilst political
tensions in the Middle East further undermine confidence.
Nonetheless, Rolls-Royce remains well positioned. Millions of
people in developing nations continue to join the real economy,
which drives the requirement for power on land, sea and air. In
addition, all of our customers demand increasingly fuel efficient
and environmentally friendly power systems. Rolls-Royce
continues to invest for future growth throughout the business
cycle. This includes over £900 million a year in research and
development (R&D), with two thirds of this total devoted to
improving the environmental performance of our products.
The result of these investments can be seen across our portfolio.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
In order to fulfil our substantial order book and to increase our
productivity, Rolls-Royce has continued to develop new state-of-theart facilities around the world. This investment creates a demand
for highly-skilled labour and generates economic activity. In the
US, we were pleased to welcome President Obama to our new
facility at Crosspointe in Virginia where we are manufacturing discs
for our latest Trent engines. It was a particular pleasure for me to
welcome the Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Hsien Loong, to the
official opening of our new campus at Seletar in Singapore, where
later in 2012 the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge unveiled the
first Trent 900 engine to be assembled at the site. We also made
substantial investments in the UK. These include our new
apprentice academy in Derby, which was opened by the Chancellor
of the Exchequer, George Osborne. This facility enables us to double
the number of apprentices we can train, providing a supply of
highly-trained young men and women for companies in our
supply chain.
In 2012, 318 apprentices joined the Group, along with 312 graduates
from 89 universities and 36 nations. We provide these young men
and women with opportunities to gather experience across the
Group by working on different projects and in various locations
before settling on a career path within the Group.
We encourage all employees to undertake training throughout their
careers. We invested £39 million in training and development
during 2012 with major teaching facilities operating in the UK, US
and Singapore. We also have a comprehensive online resource that
this year delivered nearly 250,000 hours of training in subjects as
wide ranging as export control legislation to health and safety.
We have an outstanding community of new recruits who give
me tremendous confidence about the future of the Group.
Among the many awards accumulated by our young men and
women, Patrick Reimann came top in a national ranking of
apprentices in Germany, having completed his final exams with
a mark of 98 per cent. Neeraj Sunger, Oliver Jukes and Laura Gray all
won ‘Outstanding Achievement’ awards from the Engineering
Employers Federation in the UK. For the first time in 2012, one of
our own graduates, Philippa Davies, acted as master of ceremonies
at the Rolls-Royce Science Prize award, an annual event that
celebrates the very best science teaching in the UK. These diverse
young people show that engineering can attract the brightest and
best by offering stimulating, varied and rewarding careers.
5
Business review
Chairman’s statement
Rolls-Royce is dedicated to improving the environmental
performance of its products and to bring better power
to a changing world. The Group provides world-class training
and its people give their time and energy to support educational
projects. We donate around £8 million a year to charitable causes.
In all of these ways Rolls-Royce demonstrates its commitment
to sustainability and to investing in the communities in which
it operates.
As previously reported, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) asked us,
early in 2012, to investigate allegations of bribery and corruption
in Indonesia and China. In response to its request we asked a leading
law firm to conduct a wide review which has raised matters of
concern in these and in other markets. We have now referred
a file to the SFO.
Rolls-Royce has significantly strengthened its compliance
procedures in recent years. We established an ethics committee in
2008 and subsequently introduced a new Global Code of Business
Ethics in 2009 and an Intermediaries Policy. We have also expanded
our compliance function. In January 2013, we appointed Lord Gold
to lead a review of our current procedures and to report to the
ethics committee. Lord Gold is one of the UK’s most respected
litigators and has extensive experience working at the most senior
levels with corporations, governments and regulators around the
world. As we have made clear, the Board will not tolerate improper
business conduct of any sort and will take all necessary action to
ensure compliance.
I would like to thank my fellow directors for their great support
and hard work in the last year. In particular, I would pay tribute to
Mike Terrett, who retired from the Board and from his role as
Chief Operating Officer at the end of 2012. Mike joined Rolls-Royce
as a graduate trainee and over the course of 34 years played a
significant role in the Group’s transformation, as Chief Engineer
on the Trent 700 and the Trent 800, President of International
Aero Engines, President of Civil Aerospace and, since 2007,
as Chief Operating Officer.
We bid farewell to Peter Byrom, our longest serving non-executive
director and to Ian Strachan. Both retire at the 2013 annual general
meeting (AGM). Their wise counsel, constructive challenge and
support has been of enormous value to me and the Board. Iain Conn
will replace Ian Strachan as Chairman of the ethics committee.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
As well as thanking departing colleagues, it has been a great
pleasure to welcome onto the Board, Jasmin Staiblin, who is Chief
Executive of the Swiss energy group, Alpiq, and previously worked
for many years for ABB. Jasmin brings engineering expertise and
international experience to the Board.
Four executives at Rolls-Royce and one non-executive director were
recognised this year by Her Majesty the Queen as Commanders of
the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBEs). I congratulate
Colin Smith, Mike Terrett, Professor Ric Parker, Richard Thornley and
Lewis Booth.
I would like to thank the members of our International Advisory
Board (IAB) who continue to provide great insight into our global
markets. The IAB is led by Lord Powell of Bayswater and its members
are distinguished political and business leaders. We are fortunate to
have their support, and I am grateful for the time and energy they
devote on our behalf.
This will be the final review I write as Chairman of Rolls-Royce,
as I will be retiring at the AGM after eight years with this
great company.
It has been an honour to lead Rolls-Royce through a period of
growth and transformation. I am proud of what has been achieved
and believe strongly that the best is still to come. Rolls-Royce has
earned itself an enviable position from which it can see abundant
opportunities for profitable growth. The talent of its management
team ably led by John Rishton, the strength of its order book, the
quality and range of its technology and its access to global markets
augur well for an outstanding future.
I have met extraordinary people at every level of the Group and have
enjoyed my tenure as Chairman. I am in no doubt that my successor,
Ian Davis, who will join the Board on 1 March 2013 and who will
succeed me as Chairman at the conclusion of the AGM on 2 May,
will shepherd Rolls-Royce to even greater success. He brings to the
Group a wealth of international and Board level experience.
Lastly I wish the Board, John Rishton and the management team
every success. I am grateful to my fellow directors, Rolls-Royce
employees, customers, suppliers, partners and our long-term
shareholders for their loyal support.
Sir Simon Robertson
Chairman
13 February 2013
Business review
Rolls-Royce has a significant requirement for educated young
people to support our future growth. Therefore we invest time,
energy and financial resource in encouraging Science, Technology,
Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education. This includes our
participation in ‘Project Enthuse’, an industry and government
initiative that provides professional development of STEM teachers
in the UK; a partnership to raise the skills of science teachers in
primary schools in Germany; sponsorship of a ‘Rocket Challenge’ in
the US; and a technology laboratory in Dubai, where teachers and
pupils can learn about the practical applications of physics.
6
Business review
Chief Executive’s review
In 2012, Rolls-Royce continued to build the capacity required to
deliver our £60 billion order book. Among these investments, we
opened a new engine test and assembly facility at Seletar in
Singapore that is now producing Trent 900 engines. We announced
an expansion of our facilities at Crosspointe in Virginia, US, where
we will produce turbine blades and nozzle guide vanes. In South
America, construction of a new assembly plant to support our
Energy and Marine businesses is well advanced and will open later
this year. In the UK, as well as having opened our new apprentice
academy in Derby, we are developing a new turbine blade facility in
Rotherham and a new disc factory in Washington, Tyne and Wear.
John Rishton
Chief Executive
In the past decade, Rolls-Royce has transformed its business. Today
we are more global, with over half our order book from the Middle
East and Asia. Our portfolio has become more diversified, both
through organic growth and acquisition, and we have significantly
increased the revenues generated from servicing the power
systems we produce. During 2012, we changed the way we describe
our vision, values and strategy to reflect better the Group we have
become, to set clear direction for the future and to reinforce
standards in the way we conduct business:
Values – trusted to deliver excellence
Vision
– better power for a changing world
Strategy – understanding our customers,
innovation, profitable growth
These are described on pages 8-9.
As well as looking at the expression of our vision, values and
strategy, we have made an important structural change, bringing
together our Civil and Defence businesses to create one Aerospace
division with an integrated supply chain. This change, effective
from 1 January 2013, will improve accountability and align our
business more closely with our customers’ requirements.
The priorities for the business remain the same as last year:
1. deliver on the promises we have made
2. decide where to grow and where not to
3. improve financial performance.
In 2012, we have made progress towards these objectives.
1. Deliver on the promises we have made
The quality of the products and services we supply is measured
across the Group and has shown steady improvement. Increased
focus on delivery has led to significant improvement in widebody
engines in Civil aerospace and in our Marine products. Across the
Group, we are investing in a wide range of projects that will
improve operational performance and reduce cost. This includes
continuing investment in modernising our IT infrastructure that is
a key enabler for our business.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
7
Business review
Chief Executive’s review
These include: in Civil aerospace, the certification of the Trent XWB
engine (in February 2013) that will power the Airbus A350 XWB, the
launch of the Trent 1000-TEN that will power Boeing 787s entering
service from 2016 and, the entry into service of the BR725 engine
powering the new Gulfstream G650 corporate jet. In Defence
aerospace, the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) variant
of the F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter entered service with the
US Marine Corps and deliveries were made to the UK MoD.
In Marine, gas turbine power and propulsion equipment was
delivered for the US Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship and the UK’s Queen
Elizabeth class aircraft carriers. And, in Energy, we expanded our
fleet of gas turbine compressor units through contracts for China’s
West-East Pipeline Project (WEPP) and the Uzbekistan section of the
Asia Trans Gas (ATG) pipeline.
2. Decide where to grow and where not to
We continue to invest in capacity to fulfil our order book and in
technology to expand our portfolio.
In Civil aerospace, we are committed to investing in the widebody,
narrowbody and corporate market segments. In Defence aerospace,
we continue to see opportunities both in developing economies and
in our traditional markets, despite the pressure on government
spending. In Marine, offshore oil and gas remains a fast growing
market and, in Energy, we continue to invest in our Civil Nuclear
business where we believe Rolls-Royce can play an important part
supporting both existing and new build nuclear capacity. Our
acquisition of Tognum, in a joint venture with Daimler, expands our
Marine and Energy portfolios and brings significant opportunities
for synergies.
Areas where we have decided not to invest include the sale of our
tidal power generation business to Alstom in January 2013 and the
sale of a 51 per cent stake in our fuel cell business to LG.
3. Improve financial performance
We continue to focus on margin progression. In 2012, margins at
Group level improved to 12.2 per cent (2011 10.7 per cent).
The Tognum and the IAE restructuring, together contributed
1.1 percentage points, with 0.4 percentage point improvement
coming from the underlying business. Overall, profits grew by
24 per cent enabling us to raise our full year distribution to
shareholders to 19.5 pence, an 11 per cent increase.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Cost and cash generation remain areas of intense focus for the
Group, as we seek to improve quality, on-time delivery and working
capital while continuing to invest to meet the rising load. Around
£50 million of unit cost improvements were realised in 2012.
As noted in the Chairman’s statement, we have passed information
to the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) relating to concerns about bribery
and corruption involving intermediaries in overseas markets. This
follows a request for information from the SFO about allegations of
malpractice in Indonesia and China. We have significantly
strengthened our compliance procedures in recent years, including
new policies for Global Ethics and Intermediaries. We have also
expanded the Compliance function. As a further measure, we have
appointed Lord Gold to lead a review of current procedures and
report to the ethics committee of the Board.
In February 2013, we announced that Sir Simon Robertson will
retire as Chairman at our AGM in May. Simon has made an
exceptional contribution to Rolls-Royce over the past eight years.
He has worked tirelessly on behalf of the Group and his energy and
enthusiasm have been an example to us all. He has led the Board
with distinction and has made the time to offer guidance and
encouragement to colleagues all around the world and at every level
of the business. Simon has been a great support to me during my
first years as Chief Executive and I wish him every success in the
future. I am delighted to welcome Ian Davis as our new Chairman
and look forward to working closely with him.
During 2012, the Group has once again increased its profits,
revenues and its order book, providing a solid foundation for further
progress in the year ahead. Our cash inflow of £137 million, prior to
acquisitions and disposals, was delivered after a heavy year of
investment in technology, capability and infrastructure.
The achievements of Rolls-Royce are made possible by the more than
40,000 employees whose combined expertise and enthusiasm give
us the ability to do extraordinary things. I am constantly impressed
by their commitment and am grateful for their hard work and
customer focus.
John Rishton
Chief Executive
13 February 2013
Business review
Significant milestones have been achieved in our major programmes.
8
Business review
Values, vision and strategy
A customer-focused business
Our business model and strategy place the customer at the
heart of our business. The DNA of the organisation is built
around innovation and responding effectively to the needs of
customers. Rolls-Royce will be relentless in the pursuit of quality,
reliability and on-time delivery.
Customer
y
alit
u
Q
ery
v
i
l
De
Innovation
Rolls-Royce built its reputation
by developing and delivering
world-class engineering.
Today, we continue to invest
in innovation. Our R&D creates
the high-value intellectual
property that allows us to
compete globally.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
ess
n
e
v
nsi
o
p
Res
ility
b
a
i
Rel
Customers place great faith
in our Group. We develop
strong relationships with
them, often over long
timescales, and we are
determined to deliver on
their behalf. By doing so,
they will entrust us with
their future business.
Trusted to d
eliver e
xcel
len
ce
9
Business review
Values, vision and strategy
Business review
Values
trusted to deliver excellence
Who we are and how we behave matter to our people and the many
external groups that have an interest in our business. We have a
proud heritage, one of the world’s most powerful brands and a
responsibility to hand on to future generations a business that is
strong and successful.
Everyone at Rolls-Royce must be trusted to deliver excellence, this is a
statement of values everyone can understand, take confidence from,
be inspired by and always strive to achieve.
Vision
better power for a changing world
We are committed to innovation and a continuous pursuit of
improvement. At the forefront of science and technology, and with
a deep customer insight, we believe we are in a strong position
to meet the demands of, and create opportunities in, our
fast-changing world.
Strategy
understanding our customers,
innovation, profitable growth
Our ambition is to be world class and competition-beating in our
relationships with our customers, and in the delivery of world-class
technologies and services. To achieve this, we apply lean and cost
effective processes, simple and efficient operations, and a strong
commitment always to operate to high ethical standards.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
10
Business review
Future opportunity
A 20-year market outlook of US$3 trillion
The Group operates in four long-term global markets: Civil and
Defence aerospace; Marine; and Energy. These markets contain a total
business opportunity worth in excess of US$3 trillion over the next
20 years. The size of these markets is generally related to world Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) growth, global security and defence budgets.
Civil aerospace
We predict emerging markets such as Asia, the
Middle East and Africa will experience the fastest
rates of growth. Factors affecting demand include
GDP growth, aircraft productivity and retirements,
operating costs and environmental issues. Civil
engine demand over the next 20 years is forecast at
US$975 billion, creating a services opportunity of
US$700 billion over the same period.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
US$975bn
Civil engine market
US$700bn
Civil engine services market
11
Business review
Future opportunity
Business review
Marine
The Group forecasts a demand for marine power
and propulsion systems valued at US$215 billion
over the next 20 years. Marine aftermarket
services are expected to generate significant
opportunities with demand forecast at
US$125 billion over the same period.
US$215bn
Marine product market
US$125bn
Marine services market
Energy
The Group’s 20-year forecast values the total
aero-derivative gas turbine sales in the oil and
gas and power generation sectors at more than
US$70 billion. Over this period, demand for
associated services is expected to be around
US$50 billion.
Based on the International Energy Agency’s
latest World Energy Outlook we estimate that
demand for nuclear mission-critical equipment,
systems and engineering services could reach
US$370 billion over the next 20 years, while
demand for associated reactor support services
could amount to US$240 billion.
Defence aerospace
Despite the challenging environment, we continue
to see opportunities both in our traditional markets
and the developing economies. Demand for engines
over the next 20 years is estimated at US$155 billion.
For services and support equipment we estimate a
market of US$260 billion over the same period.
US$155bn
Defence engine market
US$260bn
Defence services market
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
US$120bn
Energy engine and services market
US$610bn
Civil nuclear market
12
Business review
Chief Financial Officer’s review
Our financial performance continues to improve and we
are increasing investment to meet future commitments.
Summary
2012
Order book £m
Underlying revenue** £m
Underlying profit before tax** £m
Underlying earnings per share
Full year payment to shareholders
Reported revenue £m
Reported profit before financing £m
Net cash £m
Average net cash £m
60,146
12,209
1,429
59.27p
19.5p
12,161
2,072
1,317
(145)
2011
57,630*
11,277
1,157
48.54p
17.5p
11,124
1,189
223
320
Change
+4%
+8%
+24%
+22%
+11%
+9%
+74%
* Restated 2011 year-end data excluding IAE order book of £4,571 million
** See explanation opposite and on page 86
Mark Morris
Chief Financial Officer
The pace of recovery of the global economy remains uncertain and
some of our customers continue to operate in challenging
budgetary environments. However, our customers operate across a
broad range of businesses and markets and our relatively young and
competitive installed portfolio of power systems and products will
generate demand for aftermarket services for many years to come.
Demand from existing customers remains strong, as it does from
the new customers included in our growing order book.
Our investments in technology, operations and people are
underpinned by the significant growth inherent in our order book.
These investments will safeguard our competitive advantage,
support our commitments to customers and improve our
operational effectiveness.
The Group’s 2012 performance was achieved after absorbing
a 27 per cent increase in the net R&D charge to £589 million and
a ten per cent increase in capital expenditure, including software,
to £610 million.
Engine Holding (EH), our collaboration with Daimler, owns over
99 per cent of Tognum. We transferred Bergen Engines to EH on
2 January 2012, which resulted in a £167 million cash inflow to the
Group. We continue to consolidate Bergen. We will consolidate
the whole of EH, including Tognum, from 1 January 2013.
EH’s contribution of £287 million to 2012 revenue came wholly
from Bergen. EH’s profit contribution of £109 million comprised
£32 million from Bergen and £77 million from the equity accounted
contribution from Tognum.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
13
Business review
Chief Financial Officer’s review
Underlying revenue increased eight per cent to £12.2 billion.
This includes a five per cent growth in services revenue to
£6.3 billion and a 12 per cent increase in OE revenue to £5.9 billion.
OE performance included strong 31 per cent growth in Civil
aerospace and 12 per cent growth in Defence aerospace offset by
reductions in each of Marine, Energy and EH. Underlying services
revenue continues to represent more than half (52 per cent) of the
Group’s underlying revenue. In 2012, services revenue grew in all
businesses as the installed base of products continued to grow
and the services network expanded.
Underlying figures are considered more representative of the
trading performance by excluding the impact of year end mark-tomarket adjustments of outstanding financial instruments on the
reported performance, principally relating to the GBP/USD hedge
book. In addition, the net post-retirement financing and the effects
of acquisition accounting are excluded. In 2011, adjustments were
made to exclude one-off past-service credits on post-retirement
schemes. The adjustments between the underlying income
statement and the reported income statement are set out in more
detail in note 2 of the financial statements. This basis of
presentation has been applied consistently since the transition to
IFRS in 2005.
Underlying profit before financing costs and taxation increased
24 per cent to £1.49 billion. This was due to a number of factors:
increased revenue; better mix; unit cost reduction; a full year’s
benefit from Tognum (compared to four months’ contribution to
Group results in 2011); and improved trading following the IAE
restructuring settlement completed during the year. These
improvements were partly offset by a significant increase
in the R&D charge and lower other operating income.
Underlying income statement
Underlying income statement extracts
£ million
Revenue
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Engine Holding
Intra-segment
Profit before financing costs
and taxation
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Engine Holding
Intra-segment
Central costs
Net financing costs
Profit before taxation
Taxation
Profit for the year
EPS
Payment to shareholders
Other items
Other operating income
Gross R&D investment
Net R&D charged to the income
statement
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2012
2011
12,209 11,277
6,437
5,572
2,417
2,235
2,249 2,271
962 1,083
287
331
(143)
(215)
Change
932
865
182
(22)
(121)
(44)
72
1,490 1,206
284
727
499
228
404
376
28
294
287
7
21
16
5
109
80
29
(11)
–
(11)
(54)
(52)
(2)
(61)
(49)
(12)
1,429
1,157
272
(318)
(261)
(57)
1,111
896
215
59.27p 48.54p 10.73p
19.5p
17.5p
2.0p
33
919
70
908
589
463
(37)
11
126
+8%
+16%
+8%
-1%
-11%
-13%
+24%
+46%
+7%
+2%
+31%
+36%
+4%
+24%
+24%
+22%
+24%
+22%
+11%
Further discussion of trading is included in the business segment
reports on pages 20 to 27.
Underlying financing costs increased 24 per cent to £61 million,
including an increase in net interest charges reflecting lower
average net funds after funding the Tognum acquisition in the
second half of 2011.
Underlying taxation was £318 million, an underlying tax rate
of 22.3 per cent compared with 22.6 per cent in 2011.
Underlying EPS increased 22 per cent to 59.27 pence, in line with
the increase in the underlying profit after tax.
Payments to shareholders: at the AGM on 2 May 2013, the directors
will recommend an issue of 119 C Shares with a total nominal value
of 11.9 pence for each ordinary share. The final issue of C shares will
be made on 1 July 2013 to shareholders on the register on 26 April
2013 and the final day of trading with entitlement to C Shares is
23 April 2013. Together with the interim issue on 2 January 2013
of 76 C Shares for each ordinary share with a total nominal value
of 7.6 pence, this is the equivalent of a total annual payment to
ordinary shareholders of 19.5 pence for each ordinary share.
The payment to shareholders will, as before, be made in the form
of redeemable C Shares which shareholders may either choose to
retain or redeem for a cash equivalent. The Registrar, on behalf of
the Company, operates a C Share Reinvestment Plan (CRIP) and can,
on behalf of shareholders, purchase ordinary shares from the market
rather than delivering a cash payment. Shareholders wishing to
redeem their C Shares or else redeem and participate in the CRIP
must ensure that their instructions are lodged with the Registrar,
Computershare Investor Services Plc, no later than 5.00pm on
3 June 2013. Redemption will take place on 3 July 2013.
Business review
The Group’s sale of its 32.5 per cent programme share and related
goodwill in IAE in 2012, generated a profit before tax of £699 million
and a cash inflow of £942 million. The profit is excluded from our
underlying results. The Group continues to play an active role as a
first tier supplier to IAE of high-pressure compressors and fan blades
and remains responsible for the final assembly of 50 per cent of the
production engines. The proposed joint venture with Pratt &
Whitney to develop an engine to power the next mid-size aircraft is
subject to regulatory approval and had no material effect on 2012’s
financial performance.
14
Business review
Chief Financial Officer’s review
Other operating income relates to programme receipts from Risk
and Revenue Sharing Partnerships (RRSPs), which reimburse past
expenditure. These receipts decreased by 53 per cent in 2012 due to
the phasing of major programmes such as the Trent XWB.
Net R&D charged to the income statement increased by 27 per cent
to £589 million reflecting a combination of increased spend of
£56 million and lower net capitalisation of £69 million due to the
phasing of major new programmes. This investment and the
ten per cent increase in capital expenditure including software to
£610 million will prepare our infrastructure and global supply chain
for significant growth in the next decade. The Group continues to
expect net R&D investment to remain within four to five per cent
of Group underlying revenue.
Balance sheet
Summary data – £ million
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Net post-retirement scheme deficits
Net working capital
Net funds
Provisions
Net financial assets and liabilities
Joint ventures and associates
Assets held for sale
Other net assets and liabilities
Net assets
Other items
USD hedge book (US$ million)
Net TotalCare assets
Gross customer finance contingent liabilities
Net customer finance contingent liabilities
2012
2011
2,901
2,564
(545)
(1,100)
1,317
(461)
(127)
1,800
4
(248)
6,105
22,500
1,312
569
70
2,882
2,338
(397)
(1,098)
223
(502)
(718)
1,680
178
(67)
4,519
22,000
956
612
124
Intangible assets relate to goodwill, certification costs,
participation fees, development expenditure, recoverable engine
costs, software and other costs that represent long-term assets of
the Group. In aggregate, these assets remained broadly unchanged
at £2.9 billion with additional development, certification and
software costs being offset by annual amortisation charges.
The carrying values of the intangible assets are assessed for
impairment against the present value of forecast cash flows
generated by the intangible asset. The principal risks remain:
reductions in assumed market share; programme timings;
increases in unit cost assumptions; and adverse movements in
discount rates. There have been no significant impairments in
2012. Further details are given in note 8 of the financial statements.
Property, plant and equipment increased by ten per cent to
£2.6 billion due to the ongoing development and refreshment
of facilities and tooling as the Group prepares for increased
production volumes.
Net post-retirement scheme deficits increased 37 per cent to
£545 million. This was principally due to the movements in the
assumptions used to value the underlying assets and liabilities in
accordance with IAS 19 – in particular the discount rate which is
derived from AA corporate bond yields. The impact of the revisions
to IAS 19 is described in note 19 of the financial statements.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Overall funding across the schemes has improved in recent years
as the Group has adopted a lower risk investment strategy that
reduces volatility going forward and enables the funding position
to remain stable: interest rate and inflation risks are largely hedged,
and the exposure to equities has reduced to around 12 per cent of
scheme asset. This has been achieved against the headwind of
increasing life expectancy assumptions.
A modest reduction in the Group’s cash contribution to the overall
funding level of the schemes is expected in 2013.
Net funds increased by £1.1 billion to £1.3 billion largely due to the
£0.9 billion proceeds received on the restructuring of IAE. Average
net funds fell by £465 million to (£145) million due to the timing of
the Tognum acquisition in the second half of 2011 and the
restructuring of IAE in June 2012.
Investment – joint ventures and associates increased by seven per
cent, largely as a result of the capitalisation of a loan to EH in
respect of the acquisition of Tognum.
Provisions largely relate to warranties and guarantees provided to
secure the sale of OE and services. These provisions reduced
modestly during the year.
Net financial assets and liabilities relate to the fair value of foreign
exchange, commodity and interest rate contracts, financial RRSPs
and the put option on Bergen Engine AS, set out in detail in note 17
to the financial statements. The change largely reflects the impact
of the change in the GBP/USD exchange rate on the valuation of
foreign exchange contracts and the inclusion of the put option
(£167 million) for the first time.
The USD hedge book increased two per cent to US$22.5 billion. This
represents around five years of net exposure and has an average
book rate of £1 to US$1.60. Current forward market exchange rates
are similar to current average book rates.
Net TotalCare® assets relate to Long-Term Service Agreement (LTSA)
contracts in the Civil aerospace business, including the flagship
services product TotalCare. These assets represent the timing
difference between the recognition of income and costs in the
income statement and cash receipts and payments.
Customer financing facilitates the sale of OE and services by
providing financing support to certain customers. Where such
support is provided by the Group, it is generally to customers of the
Civil aerospace business and takes the form of various types of
credit and asset value guarantees. These exposures produce
contingent liabilities that are outlined in note 23 to the financial
statements. The contingent liabilities represent the maximum
aggregate discounted gross and net exposure in respect of delivered
aircraft, regardless of the point in time at which such exposures
may arise.
15
Business review
Chief Financial Officer’s review
Engine Holding
EH made progress towards achieving full ownership and
management control of Tognum. At the end of 2012, EH owned
over 99 per cent of the shares in Tognum. A squeeze-out process
to acquire the remaining shares is ongoing, and is expected to
conclude in 2013. During the year, EH registered a domination and
profit and loss transfer agreement with Tognum, which provides a
greater degree of management control and flexibility to pursue
initiatives together. By bringing together Tognum and Bergen and
leveraging the skills from Rolls-Royce and Daimler, we see significant
opportunities for synergies.
In our Marine business, our design and integration skills will be
further enhanced by the additional product range that Tognum’s
high-speed diesel engines will bring. And in the aftermarket,
by combining the installed bases of equipment, we see good
opportunities to leverage our customer support networks. Recently,
we announced a contract to design and power four offshore supply
vessels where, for the first time, we were able to incorporate
Tognum’s engines into our integrated design. Similarly, Tognum’s
high-speed diesels will add additional capabilities to our Energy
portfolio, allowing us to offer both gas and diesel products as well
as options for primary and stand-by power.
Group 2013 guidance excluding Engine Holding
For the full year 2013, we expect the Group to see modest growth
in underlying revenue and good growth in underlying profit,
with cash flow around breakeven as we continue to invest for
future growth.
In Civil aerospace, we anticipate modest growth in revenue and
strong growth in profit. In Defence aerospace we expect modest
growth in revenue and a modest reduction in profit. In Marine, we
expect modest growth in revenue and profit. And in Energy, we
expect some improvement in revenue and profit.
This guidance excludes the impact of EH. The Group cannot provide
financial guidance on EH while Tognum is still listed. Further
information about Tognum’s business and future prospects can
be found on its website at www.tognum.de/investors.
Additional financial information can be found on pages 37 and 38.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Business review
During 2012, the Group’s gross exposure remained stable at
£569 million. On a net basis, exposure reduced by £54 million
to £70 million predominantly due to an indemnity from United
Technologies for all Airbus A320 commitments following the
restructuring of IAE. Whilst some banks, particularly European
institutions, continue to find circumstances challenging and offer
limited participation in financing new aircraft deliveries, the Group
expects that other providers of US dollar funding and ongoing
support from the export credit agencies will largely fill the gap
left by these banks.
16
Business review
Key performance indicators
The Board uses a range of financial and non-financial
indicators to monitor Group and segmental performance
in line with the strategy.
Financial indicators are shown below. The key objectives of board
committees are described in the governance section of the annual
report and other non-financial key performance indicators are
shown in the sustainability section.
note: prior years are not restated for the 2012 IAE restructuring
Order book
-3%
Order intake
-1%
Underlying revenue
+8%
The order book provides an indicator of future business. It is
measured at constant exchange rates and list prices and includes
both firm and announced orders. In Civil aerospace, it is common
for a customer to take options for future orders in addition to
firm orders placed. Such options are excluded from the order
book. In Defence aerospace, long-term programmes are often
ordered for only one year at a time. In such circumstances, even
though there may be no alternative engine choice available to the
customer, only the contracted business is included in the order
book. Only the first seven years’ revenue of long-term
aftermarket contracts is included.
£m
Order intake is a measure of new business secured during the
year and represents new firm orders, net of the movement in the
announced order book, between the start and end of the period.
Any orders which were recorded in previous periods and which
are subsequently cancelled, reducing the order book, are included
as a reduction to intake. Order intake is measured at constant
exchange rates and list prices and consistent with the order book
policy of recording the first seven years’ revenue of long-term
aftermarket contracts, order intake for any given year includes
the seventh year of revenue.
£bn
Monitoring of revenues provides a measure of business growth.
Underlying revenue is used in order to eliminate the effect of the
decision not to adopt hedge accounting and to provide a clearer
year-on-year measure.
£m
The Group measures foreign currency revenue at the actual
exchange rate achieved as a result of settling foreign exchange
contracts from forward cover.
55,492 58,341
08
10
11
12
16.3
16.1
11
12
20.4
14.1
08
9,147
08
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
09
59,153 62,201 60,146
09
12.3
10
11,277
10,108 10,866
09
10
11
12,209
12
17
Business review
Key performance indicators
+24%
Average cash
Underlying profit before financing is presented on a basis that
shows the economic substance of the Group’s hedging strategies
in respect of the transactional exchange rate and commodity
price movements. In particular: (a) revenues and costs
denominated in US dollars and euros are presented on the basis
of the exchange rates achieved during the year; (b) similar
adjustments are made in respect of commodity derivatives; and
(c) consequential adjustments are made to reflect the impact of
exchange rates on trading assets and liabilities and long-term
contracts on a consistent basis.
£m
The Group reports the balance of net funds/debt on a weekly
basis and average cash is therefore the average of these weekly
net balances. These balances are reported at prevailing exchange
rates and in recent periods, year-on-year movements in average
cash balances reflect the significant acquisitions and disposals
which have taken place, most notably Tognum in 2011 and IAE
restructuring in 2012. The impact on average cash balances will
depend on when these transactions took place during the year.
£m
1,490
919
983
1,010
08
09
10
The figure for 2011 includes investment of £1,496 million
in Tognum.
R&D is measured as the self-funded expenditure both before
amounts capitalised in the year and amortisation of previously
capitalised balances. The Group expects to spend approximately
five per cent of revenues on R&D although this proportion will
fluctuate depending on the stage of development of current
programmes. This measure reflects the need to generate current
returns as well as to invest for the future.
375
+5%
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
To deliver on its commitments to customers, the Group invests
significant amounts in its infrastructure. All proposed
investments are subject to rigorous review to ensure that they
are consistent with forecast activity and will provide value for
money. Annual capital expenditure is measured as the cost of
property, plant and equipment acquired during the period.
320
09
10
11
(145)
12
£m
(183)
08
1,094
258
570
(1,310)
09
10
11
12
4.7
4.7
4.6
4.7
09
10
11
12
467
491
11
12
%
5.4
08
Capital expenditure
12
635
In a business requiring significant investment, the Board
monitors cash flow to ensure that profitability is converted into
cash generation, both for future investment and as a reward for
shareholders. The Group measures cash flow as the movement in
net funds/debt during the year, after taking into account the
value of derivatives held to hedge the value of balances
denominated in foreign currencies.
Net R&D expenditure
as a proportion of
underlying revenue
11
960
08
Cash flow
1,206
£m
283
291
08
09
361
10
Business review
Underlying profit before
financing
18
Business review
Principal risks and uncertainties
Effectively managing our risks helps us to deliver our objectives and
maximise the returns of the Group while managing our reputation.
The following table describes the risks that the risk committee, with endorsement from the Board, considers would have the most material
potential impact on the Group and are specific to the nature of our business notwithstanding that there are other risks that may occur and
may impact on the achievement of the Group’s objectives.
The risk committee’s discussions have been focused on the nature of these risks and the actions that are being taken to manage them.
Risk or uncertainty and potential impact
How we manage it
Product failure
Product not meeting safety expectations, or causing significant
impact to customers or the environment through failure in
quality control.
• Operating a ‘safety first’ culture
• O
ur engineering design and validation process is applied from
initial design, through production and into service
• A
safety management system has been established by a
dedicated team, which is subject to continual improvement
based on experience and industry best practice
• P
lan to accelerate quality improvements launched, including
involvement from our suppliers
• C
risis management team chaired by the Director – Engineering
and Technology or General Counsel as appropriate
Business continuity
Complete breakdown of external supply chain or internal
facilities that could be caused by destruction of key facilities,
natural disaster, regional conflict, financial insolvency of a critical
supplier or scarcity of materials which would reduce the ability to
meet customer commitments, win future business or achieve
operational results.
ontinued investment in adequate capacity and modern
• C
equipment and facilities
• Identifying and reducing single points of failure
• S
election of stronger suppliers, developing dual sources
or dual capability
• D
eveloping and testing site level incident management and
business recovery plans
• C
ustomer excellence centres provide improved response to
supply chain disruption
Competitor action
The presence of large, financially strong competitors in the
majority of our markets means that the Group is susceptible to
significant price pressure even where our markets are mature or
the competitors are few. Our main competitors have access to
significant government funding programmes as well as the
ability to invest heavily in capability.
• A
ccessing and developing key capabilities in technology and
service offerings which differentiate us competitively
• F ocusing on our customers and partnering with
others effectively
• Driving down cost and improving margins
• Protecting credit lines
• Investing in innovation, manufacturing and production
• Understanding our competitors
International trade friction
Geopolitical factors that lead to significant tensions between
major trading parties or blocs which could impact the Group’s
operations. For example: explicit trade protectionism; differing
tax or regulatory regimes; potential for conflict; or broader
political issues.
• W
here possible, locating our domestic facilities in politically
stable countries and/or ensuring that we retain dual capability
• D
iversifying global operations to avoid excessive concentration
of risks in particular areas
• Regional director network proactively monitors local situations
• M
aintaining a balanced business portfolio with high barriers to
entry and a diverse customer base
• Understanding our supply chain risks
• Proactively influencing regulation where it affects us
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
19
Business review
Principal risks and uncertainties
How we manage it
Major product programme delivery
Failure to deliver a major product programme on time, to
specification or technical performance falling significantly short
of customer expectations would have potentially significant
adverse financial and reputational consequences, including the
risk of impairment of the carrying value of the Group’s intangible
assets and the impact of potential litigation.
• Major programmes are subject to Board approval
• M
ajor programmes are reviewed at levels and frequencies
appropriate to their performance against key financial
and non-financial deliverables and potential risks
• T
echnical audits are conducted at pre-defined points
performed by a team that is independent from the programme
• F ormal independent gated reviews are conducted throughout
a programme’s lifecycle to review non-technical risks
• P
rogrammes are required to address the actions arising
from reviews and audits and progress is monitored and
controlled through to closure
• K
nowledge management principles are applied to provide
benefit to current and future programmes
Compliance
Non-compliance by the Group with legislation or other regulatory
requirements in the heavily regulated environment in which it
operates (for example: export controls; use of controlled
chemicals and substances; and anti-bribery and corruption
legislation) compromising the ability to conduct business in
certain jurisdictions and exposing the Group to potential:
reputational damage; financial penalties; debarment from
government contracts for a period of time; and/or suspension of
export privileges (including export credit financing), each of
which could have a material adverse effect.
n uncompromising approach to compliance is now,
• A
and should always be, the only way to do business
• T
he Group has an extensive compliance programme
as separately described in the ethics and risk committee
reports. These programmes and the Global Code of Business
Ethics are promulgated throughout the Group and are
updated and reinforced from time to time, to ensure
their continued relevance and, to ensure that they are
complied with both in spirit and to the letter
• A
legal and compliance team has been put in place
to manage the current specific issue through to
a conclusion
• T
he appointment of Lord Gold to lead a review of the
Group’s current compliance procedures and report to
the ethics committee
Market shock
The Group is exposed to a number of market risks: some of which
are of a macro-economic nature, for example, foreign currency
exchange rates, and some which are more specific to the Group,
for example, liquidity and credit risks or disruption to aircraft or
other operations. Significant extraneous market events could also
materially damage the Group’s competitiveness and/or credit
worthiness. This would affect operational results or the outcomes
of financial transactions.
IT vulnerability
Breach of IT security causing controlled data to be lost, made
inaccessible, corrupted or accessed by unauthorised users,
impacting the Group’s reputation.
aintaining a strong balance sheet, through healthy
• M
cash balances and a continuing low level of debt
• P
roviding financial flexibility by maintaining high levels
of liquidity and an investment grade ‘A’ credit rating
• T
he portfolio effect from our business interests, both in
terms of original equipment to aftermarket split and our
different segments provide a natural shock absorber since
the portfolios are not correlated
• D
eciding where and what currencies to source in, where
and how much credit risk is extended or taken and hedging
residual risk through the financial derivatives markets
(foreign exchange, interest rates and commodity price risk)
• E
stablishing ‘defence in depth’ through deployment of
multiple layers of software and processes including web
gateways, filtering, firewalls, intrusion and advanced
persistent threat detectors
• Establishment of security and network operations centres
• A
ctive sharing of information through industry, government
and security forums
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Business review
Risk or uncertainty and potential impact
20
Business review
Civil aerospace
The order book increased by five per cent* including new orders of
£10.3 billion (2011 £11.0 billion). We continue to grow our widebody market
share, with Trent engines making up around 75 per cent of our order book.
We remain committed to the mid-size market both as a supplier to IAE and
via our planned new joint venture with the IAE partners to develop the next
generation of engines for this market segment. Our continued success in
the corporate market is being driven primarily by our BR700 series of
engines for large cabin Gulfstream and Bombardier aircraft.
*when compared to the 2011 Civil order book of £47,370 with IAE orders of £4,571 million excluded
Revenue increased by 16 per cent. There was a 31 per cent growth in
OE revenue, primarily reflecting higher deliveries of Trent and
corporate engines. Services revenue grew by five per cent,
consistent with growth in the installed base of thrust.
Profit increased by 46 per cent, including £92 million related to the
restructured trading arrangements with IAE. Excluding these, profit
increased by 27 per cent due to increased OE volume, better OE mix,
services growth and unit cost improvements. This growth was
tempered by a higher R&D charge due to higher spend and lower
capitalisation related to major new programme activity and by
lower entry fees related to the Trent XWB.
Key financial data
Order book £m*
Mark King
President – Aerospace
Revenue mix
Engine deliveries*
Underlying revenue £m
Revenue by market sector
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying service revenue £m
Underlying profit before
financing £m
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
43,524
+21%
987
4,502
+11%
1,776
2,726
566
0%
47,102
+8%
844
4,481
0%
1,855
2,626
493
-13%
48,490
+3%
846
4,919
+10%
1,892
3,027
392
-20%
51,942
+7%
962
5,572
+13%
2,232
3,340
499
+27%
9,608
4
-4%
888
6,437
+16%
2,934
3,503
727
+46%
*all years prior to 2012 include IAE order book and engine deliveries include IAE V2500
Highlights
• Order book now stands at £49.6 billion
• Trent XWB gained certification
• Trent 1000-TEN launched
• Major new Trent XWB orders from Cathay Pacific
and Singapore Airlines
• BR725 enters service on new Gulfstream G650 business jet
46% OE revenue
54% Services revenue
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
58%Widebody
6%Narrowbody
36%Corporate and regional
• IAE restructuring completed
21
Business review
Civil aerospace
In 2012, the airline industry saw overall passenger traffic growth
at around five per cent. Airlines were careful to match capacity
to demand and the industry as a whole will record a profit on
passenger business despite the rising price of oil. The air cargo
sector faced a tougher year as shippers moved away from air freight
due to the impact of increasing fuel prices on shipment costs.
The large-cabin business aircraft market, which is characterised by
a diverse customer base of large global corporations and high net
worth individuals, remained resilient. The demand for small and
medium-sized business aircraft continued to be subdued in 2012
but our exposure to this sector is relatively small.
Widebody
The Trent XWB engine flew for the first time in February 2012,
on an Airbus A380 test aircraft in Toulouse, France. It went on
to complete a successful flight-test programme and gained
certification on 7 February 2013. This is the fastest selling Trent
engine ever, with more than 1,200 engines sold to 35 customers.
During 2012, Singapore Airlines ordered 20 Trent XWB-powered
Airbus A350-900s, while Cathay Pacific ordered ten A350-1000s
and converted previously announced orders for 16 A350-900s
to A350-1000s.
The Trent 1000 completed one year in service powering
Boeing 787 Dreamliners with Japan’s All Nippon Airways (ANA).
The engine also entered service with South American airline LAN
(the first Boeing 787s in the Americas), and with Polish flag-carrier
LOT, the first in Europe. During the year, Trent 1000 orders were
received from Avianca and Air New Zealand.
The Trent 700 continues to be popular, winning orders in 2012 to
power 54 Airbus A330 aircraft for China Eastern, Etihad, Avianca,
Synergy, Garuda Indonesia, Air Pacific and Skymark. We announced
plans to make performance improvements to the Trent 700 by
incorporating proven technologies from the Trent 1000, Trent XWB
and BR725 engines to deliver further increased efficiency.
These enhancements will complement the improvements to
the A330 aircraft that Airbus announced in 2012.
Narrowbody
In June 2012, we completed the restructuring of our participation
in IAE, which produces the V2500 engine for the Airbus A320
family of aircraft selling our equity and programme shares to
Pratt & Whitney.
We remain committed to the mid-size market through our new
joint venture with the IAE partners. We will also continue to be
responsible for the manufacture of high-pressure compressors,
fan blades and discs as well as providing engineering support
and final assembly for 50 per cent of IAE V2500 engines.
Corporate and regional
The flight-test programmes for two new Rolls-Royce powered
business jets continued through the year. The BR725-powered
Gulfstream G650 entered service in December 2012. The
AE 3007C-powered Cessna Citation TEN is due to enter service
in 2013.
Services
Revenue from services increased by five per cent in 2012, reflecting
growth in the fleet of wide-bodied engines, 92 per cent of Trent
engines are sold with TotalCare agreements.
Over 1,200 aircraft are covered by CorporateCare® and more than
70 per cent of customers for new Rolls-Royce powered business
jets enrol in CorporateCare.
In July, we launched the Trent 1000-TEN (Thrust, Efficiency and
New technology) that is due to enter service in 2016. This engine,
which incorporates proven next generation technology from
the Trent XWB, will be capable of powering all versions of the
Boeing 787.
Trent 900-powered Airbus A380s entered service with two of
Asia’s leading airlines, Malaysia Airlines in July and Thai Airways
in September. Skymark of Japan ordered the engine and Singapore
Airlines, who launched the engine in service five years ago,
ordered five more Trent 900-powered aircraft to add to the
19 A380s it already has in service.
The first Trent 900 engine to be completed at our new Seletar
campus in Singapore was delivered in September. The engine
was unveiled to an audience of VIPs and international media
by Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge
during their visit to Seletar.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
The Trent XWB successfully
completed its flight-test
programme on an A380
flying test bed.
Business review
The Civil aerospace business is a major manufacturer of
aero engines for all sectors of the airliner and corporate jet market.
Rolls-Royce powers more than 30 types of commercial aircraft
and has 12,500 engines in service with customers around the
world. Demand for our products remains robust and underpins
strong performance.
22
Business review
Defence aerospace
The order book contracted by 15 per cent reflecting the budgetary
pressures on our major customers in Europe and North America.
The net order intake of £1.6 billion (2011 £1.8 billion) includes
cancellations of £0.4 billion, principally the proposed cancellations
of a number of contracts for C-27J aircraft, including those by the
US Department of Defense. Despite the challenging environment,
we continue to see opportunities both in our traditional markets
and the developing economies.
Revenue increased by eight per cent, reflecting a 12 per cent
increase in OE revenue and a five per cent increase in services
revenue. However, adjusted for the non-recurrence of the
£60 million Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) benefit in
2011, services revenue increased by 11 per cent. This highlights how
our large installed base continues to provide services opportunities,
as customers seek to optimise the efficiency of their aircraft.
Profit increased by seven per cent. Adjusted for the SDSR benefit
in 2011, profit increased by 28 per cent due to increased OE volumes
and mix, growth in services, unit cost improvements and a
lower R&D charge.
Key financial data
Order book £m
Tom Bell
President – Defence aerospace
Revenue mix
Engine deliveries
Underlying revenue £m
Revenue by market sector
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying service revenue £m
Underlying profit before
financing £m
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
5,527
+23%
517
1,686
+1%
739
947
223
+12%
6,451
+17%
662
2,010
+19%
964
1,046
253
+13%
6,506
+1%
710
2,123
+6%
1,020
1,103
309
+22%
6,035
-7%
814
2,235
+5%
1,102
1,133
376
+22%
5,157
-15%
864
2,417
+8%
1,231
1,186
404
+7%
Highlights
• US$1 billion of contracts for OE and services for military
transport, trainer and helicopter engines for the US Army,
US Air Force, US Marine Corps and US Navy
• A US$315 million contract for LiftSystems for the F-35B STOVL
variant of the Lightning II aircraft
46% OE revenue
49% Services revenue
5%Development
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
36% Combat
54% Transport
10% UAV/trainer
• Launch of fuel-saving initiative with the Royal Australian
Air Force on C-130 operations and a £100 million contract
extension to maintain engines for C-130 and VC-10 aircraft
from the UK MoD
• An order for new Adour engines to power Hawk trainers for the
Royal Saudi Air Force
23
Business review
Defence aerospace
The first flight of the Adour-powered nEUROn, an unmanned
combat air vehicle developed by six European partners, took place.
The stealth technology demonstrator will undergo testing in France
before moving to Sweden, in 2014 for operational trials, and also to
Italy to measure stealth characteristics and undergo live-firing tests.
Transport/Patrol
We are a world leader in the military transport/patrol market with
over 8,000 engines in service. The AE 2100 engine fleet for the
Lockheed Martin C-130J, the Alenia C-27J, and other transport/patrol
aircraft, expanded in 2012.
Small engines
We delivered the first production M250 engines to Grob for its new
G120TP trainer aircraft, while in helicopters the RR300 achieved its
first 30,000 hours flight time on the Robinson R66 and the CTS800
engine surpassed 100,000 in-service flight hours. The M250, which
has now amassed over 200 million flight hours, powered the first
flight of the GippsAero GA10, while the CTS800 achieved FAA
certification for the Turkish T129 ATAK helicopter.
The TP400 engine for the Airbus A400M military transport aircraft
has amassed over 16,000 engine flying hours in its flight-test
programme. Engine deliveries for the first production aircraft
began in 2012, with entry into service planned for 2013.
Flight-tests of a technology upgrade for the T56 engine were
successfully concluded by the US Air Force. Our ‘3.5 upgrade’
kit will provide operators of legacy variants of the C-130 and
P-3 aircraft with significant fuel savings and, therefore,
reduced operating costs.
Combat
2012 was a significant year for the Rolls-Royce LiftSystem® which
provides the STOVL capability for Lockheed Martin’s F-35B Lightning
II Joint Strike Fighter. The US Marine Corps and the UK MoD received
their first deliveries of their STOVL aircraft. The F-35B exceeded the
500th short take-off milestone early in the year and the US Marine
Corps commissioned its first operational squadron of F-35Bs in
Yuma, US.
We delivered the 300th EJ200 engine built by Rolls-Royce for the
Eurofighter Typhoon programme, which has significant export
opportunities in the Middle East and Asia. The Kingdom of Saudi
Arabia is already a major export customer and at the end of 2012
Oman announced its intention to purchase 12 Typhoon aircraft.
Services
The provision of engine support through MissionCare™ continues
to generate significant revenues across a wide range of engines.
The US Armed Forces placed contracts to support engines powering
C-130, V-22, T-45 Goshawk aircraft and Kiowa Warrior helicopters
totalling over US$560 million.
The Royal Australian Air Force became the first military customer
to implement fuel usage analysis and modelling techniques, to help
improve the fuel efficiency of its C-130 transport fleet. The
techniques were first developed by Rolls-Royce for civil airline
customers.
We opened our first US Operations Centre in Indianapolis, US.
The US$2 million investment will offer technical support from
a 50-strong team of technical and engineering experts. We also
opened the first Defence Service Delivery Centre at RAF Marham
in the UK.
In the US, we initiated testing on a new, advanced technology
engine compressor, focusing on reducing fuel consumption as part
of our involvement in the Highly Energy Efficient Turbine Engine
(HEETE) programme for the US Air Force.
Together with Snecma, we signed a contract to study the
architecture and characteristics required for the next generation
of UK and French combat aircraft engines.
Unmanned vehicles
The fleet of AE 3007H engines which power the Northrop Grumman
Global Hawk high-altitude long-endurance and Triton platforms
continues to grow, with 67 engines delivered and about 50
additional engines projected.
Rolls-Royce is to power the US Navy’s Broad Area Maritime
Surveillance (BAMS) aircraft and we also see opportunities in the
US Navy’s Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and
Strike (UCLASS) aircraft programme.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
During the year we delivered
the 300th EJ200 engine built
by Rolls-Royce for the
Eurofighter programme.
Business review
Rolls-Royce remains the second largest provider of defence
aero-engine products and services globally with 18,000 engines in
the service of 160 customers in 103 countries. Our engines power
aircraft in every major sector, including: transport; combat; patrol;
trainers; helicopters; and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).
24
Business review
Marine
The order book increased 44 per cent including new orders of £3.3 billion
(2011 £2.1 billion). This includes the £1.1 billion order by the UK MoD to
deliver reactor cores for its future fleet of nuclear-powered submarines.
Offshore orders reflected improved demand in the oil and gas sector,
especially for drill ships and support vessels in Brazil. This was partially
offset by continued weak order flow in the merchant sector.
Revenue reduced by one per cent, reflecting increased pricing
pressure and adverse foreign exchange movements. Both OE
and services revenue improved in the second half, reflecting
improvement in the offshore sector and a better capture of the
services market resulting from the recent expansion of our global
network of services centres.
Profit increased by two per cent due to better revenue mix and cost
reduction, partially offset by pricing pressures and adverse foreign
exchange movement.
Key financial data
Order book £m
Underlying revenue £m
Tony Wood
President – Marine
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying service revenue £m
Underlying profit before
financing £m
2008
2009
2010
2011*
2012
5,190
+10%
2,204
+42%
1,492
712
183
+62%
3,526
-32%
2,589
+17%
1,804
785
263
+44%
2,977
-16%
2,591
+0%
1,719
872
332
+26%
2,737
-8%
2,271
-12%
1,322
949
287*
-14%
3,954
+44%
2,249
-1%
1,288
961
294
+2%
* 2011 figures restated due to transfer of Bergen to new Engine Holding segment
Revenue mix
Revenue by market sector
Highlights
• £147 million in new orders from Brazil for drill ships and highly
complex offshore vessels
• £119 million of contracts to design and equip ten offshore supply
vessels for COSCO, Farstad and Hyundai
• First contract for MT30 gas turbine outside of US and UK home
markets – chosen by Republic of Korea Navy for future frigate
• US Navy contract to power the two latest Littoral Combat Ships
• MT7 gas turbines chosen for US Navy’s future hovercraft fleet
57% OE revenue
43% Services revenue
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
33% Naval
20% Merchant
47% Offshore
• World’s first gas-powered tug commissioned and world’s first
gas-powered cargo vessel entered service
• £1.1 billion order for naval nuclear reactor core programmes
25
Business review
Marine
We are leaders in the integration of technologically complex
systems for offshore oil and gas, merchant and naval surface and
submarine vessels. Comprehensive through-life support for our
customers is provided through an expanding global network of
service facilities.
Increased price pressure had an effect on trading, there was a
reduced order flow in some merchant sectors and challenges to
naval budgets in developed economies. Despite these headwinds,
the Marine business continued to perform well in 2012.
We remain well positioned to capitalise on opportunities in the
highly specialised offshore oil and gas sector. In addition, we are
leveraging our global support network to service an increasing
proportion of the installed base of equipment.
We continue to strengthen our position in new markets, including
Brazil and Korea.
Offshore
We further consolidated our strong position in the oil and gas
sector with encouraging growth in order intake, revenues and
profitability. This was largely based on the success of our specialist
UT vessel design capabilities, which now includes highly efficient
wave-piercing vessels.
The MT7 gas turbine was selected to power the US Navy’s future
fleet of up to 73 hovercraft.
Underlining the high level of confidence that the MoD has in our
technology and our people, the Submarines business secured a
contract worth £1.1 billion for the regeneration of the reactor core
manufacturing facility at Derby and the continued delivery of
reactor cores for the UK’s nuclear powered submarine fleet.
Rolls-Royce continued to deliver against key milestones in the
programme to replace the current Vanguard class of nuclear
submarines, ensuring further long-term stability for the naval
reactor business.
The opening of the new Primary Components Operations facility
in the UK during the year, allowed the Group to rationalise its
component manufacturing capability, delivering improved
efficiencies for our customer.
Services
In 2012, we enhanced our capacity to realise better the significant
opportunity that our large installed base of equipment represents.
We expanded our service centre network through the opening of
new facilities in China, and introduced a streamlined global spare
parts distribution network and 24/7 service desks to improve
customer delivery and responsiveness. In addition, we also opened
a state-of-the-art technology and training centre to provide closer
customer support.
As the industry continues to explore deeper and more challenging
environments, like those in the South Atlantic off the coast of Brazil
and in the Arctic region, our core product and systems capabilities
enable us to be a strong partner for our offshore customers.
Merchant
We continue to invest in technology that addresses the need for
cleaner, more efficient and environmentally sustainable power and
propulsion systems. Our market leading LNG-fuelled C engine
positions us well for opportunities that arise from stricter
environmental standards from 2016. Ship design enhances our
ability to offer integrated solutions.
Naval
In our surface naval activities, we are developing greater design
capabilities for auxiliary craft. Our innovative commercial ship
design capability was extended with a new team to design ships
for navies, coastguards and other maritime agencies.
In 2012, we delivered gas turbine-based power and propulsion
equipment for the US Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship and the Royal
Navy’s Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers. The MT30 gas
turbine’s success on both of these programmes has generated
strong interest from navies in Europe, South America and in Asia
where the Republic of Korea Navy chose the MT30 to power its next
generation frigate programme.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Our new wave-piercing design
of offshore support vessel
entered service with Farstad.
Business review
Rolls-Royce has a world-leading range of capabilities in the marine
market, encompassing the design, supply and support of power
and propulsion systems.
26
Business review
Energy
The order book reduced by nine per cent, with new orders
of £0.8 billion (2011 £1.3 billion). In the oil and gas market,
high oil prices and global growth continue to sustain bid
activity, albeit with pricing pressures and order deferrals
by some customers. While the power generation market
in mature economies remains suppressed, we are seeing
growth in developing countries. We continue to invest
for future growth in Civil Nuclear.
Revenue fell by 11 per cent due to a significant reduction in OE
revenue and adverse revenue mix in oil and gas, and in power
generation. The OE reduction was partially offset by an 11 per cent
increase in services revenue. Services revenue, particularly in oil and
gas, benefited from a better penetration of the aftermarket from
the installed base across all sectors.
Key financial data
2008
Order book £m
Engine deliveries
Underlying revenue £m
Underlying OE revenue £m
Underlying service revenue £m
Underlying profit before
financing £m
Andrew Heath
President – Energy
2009
2010
2011*
2012
1,250 1,262
+45%
+1%
106
87
755 1,028
+35% +36%
385
558
370
470
(2)
24
-140% +1300%
1,180
-6%
95
1,233
+20%
691
542
27
+13%
1,420
+20%
48
1,083
-12%
527
556
16
-41%
1,290
-9%
49
962
-11%
344
618
21
+31%
* 2011 figures restated due to transfer of Bergen to new Engine Holding segment
Highlights
Revenue mix
Revenue by market sector
• Six RB211 gas turbine packages ordered by PetroChina
• Service revenue up 11 per cent, 333 engines under management
• LG acquired 51 per cent of Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.
• Tidal Generation Ltd sold to Alstom in January 2013
• RB211-Gzero launched
• £1.5 million investment 24/7 global Operational Service
Desk completed
• Enhanced agreement with AREVA for UK civil nuclear new build
• Collaboration agreement with Hitachi following its acquisition
of Horizon Nuclear Power
36% OE revenue
64% Services revenue
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
64% Oil and gas
25% Power generation
11% Civil Nuclear/other
• Expanded global footprint with acquisition of US-based nuclear
services business
27
Business review
Energy
Our technology powers offshore oil platforms around the world
and transports oil and gas through 35 pipelines in 24 countries.
Our power generation technology solutions ensure that reliable,
dependable and flexible electricity supplies are efficiently met,
without comprising emissions performance. We have also
established a strong position in the civil nuclear sector.
Oil and gas
In total, ten RB211 gas turbines were ordered for oil and gas
applications, nine of which are for pipeline compression projects.
We secured a US$75 million contract to supply PetroChina with an
additional six RB211-driven pipeline compressor units and related
services to power the flow of natural gas through Line 3 of the
West-East Pipeline Project (WEPP), the world’s longest pipeline
and a crucial element of China’s drive towards cleaner energy
consumption. When completed in 2015, the 7,000km WEPP Line 3
will link China’s western Xinjiang autonomous region to Fuijan
province in the south-east, transporting up to 30 billion cubic
metres of gas per year. The contract significantly increases our
supply to the WEPP network, bringing the total number of RB211
units sold for this huge infrastructure project to 37.
In addition, we secured a £24 million contract to supply three
RB211 units for duty on the Uzbekistan section of the Asia Trans
Gas (ATG) pipeline, and a contract to supply PTT’s Ethane Separation
Plant in Rayong, Thailand, with an additional unit to extend our
scope at the site.
Construction of our new purpose-built packaging, assembly and
test facility at Santa Cruz outside Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is on track.
The facility will open in 2013, positioning us for long-term growth
from within Brazil. The first units to be delivered from Santa Cruz
will be in fulfilment of the US$650 million contract awarded by
Petrobras in 2011 which requires 32 RB211 gas turbine units to
support its offshore production activities in the pre-salt, ultradeepwater oil fields.
Service
Our strategy to strengthen our aftermarket products and services
capability delivered solid revenue growth. Excluding the land-based
reciprocating engines that are now reported in Engine Holding,
there are a total of 333 units, or 19 per cent of the core engine fleet,
under long-term service agreements. We launched the RB211-Gzero,
a retrofit upgrade product for the RB211-G gas generator, which
provides many existing users of industrial RB211 aero-derivative
gas turbine engines with a nominal power increase of ten per cent
depending on ambient temperature and engine type.
Our new Operational Service Desk provides 24/7 technical support
to customers, considerably enhancing our global service and parts
delivery capabilities.
Civil Nuclear
During 2012, Rolls-Royce maintained its focus on the global and
strategic growth of its Nuclear business and made solid progress
in strengthening its position in this market.
We signed a strategic collaboration agreement in support of
Areva’s plans to build new nuclear reactors and continued our
collaboration with Rosatom on the development of global civil
nuclear programmes. We have an agreement to support Hitachi,
with its plans to build nuclear power stations at two sites in the UK.
The Group is modernising safety-critical instrumentation and
control (I&C) systems on EDF’s 1,300MW nuclear fleet in France and
we are delivering I&C solutions to eight new nuclear power stations
being built in China.
Our Nuclear Services business delivered a multi-million dollar
package of automated handling, transportation and storage
technology to Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd and secured a contract
to provide specialist inspection solutions to Canadian nuclear
utility, Bruce Power. At the end of 2012, we acquired PKMJ Technical
Services, a specialist US-based software and nuclear engineering
services company.
Power generation
Despite subdued demand for new power generation capacity in
mature economies, £62 million in orders were received for four
industrial Trent 60 gas turbines. Two units will support production
expansion of LUKOIL’s Stavrolen petrochemicals plant in Russia,
and single units will respectively support Empresa Nacional de
Electricidad’s El Alto power plant in Bolivia, and textile and
chemicals conglomerate CYDSA’s processing plants at Coatzacoalcos
Veracruz, México. We successfully completed several landmark
installation and commissioning projects, including eight Trents for
the Bayonne Energy Centre electric power plant in Bayonne, NJ, US,
which supplies electricity to 400,000 homes in New York City at
peak times.
Industrial Trents power New
York City from this Bayonne
Energy plant in New Jersey.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Business review
With over 4,600 industrial gas turbines sold, recording over
180 million hours of operating experience, our Energy business
plays a critical role in supporting global infrastructure.
28
Business review
Excellence in technology
In 2012, Rolls-Royce invested £919 million in gross research
and development of which £577 million was funded from the
Group’s own resources. We create intellectual property which
is then embedded in our products and services. This year,
475 patents were filed.
Rolls-Royce has a track record of innovative products and services
founded on a robust investment in technology. During 2012, we
launched an Innovation Strategy which put in place a number of
mechanisms to encourage our people to share and develop new
ideas, ensuring that the flow of future technology remains strong.
Through ‘open innovation’ we also invited other organisations to
contribute to our technical challenges.
This year we invested significantly on our high-performance
computing (HPC) capability and on several Design Key Systems
which automate much of the design and make process for
components, freeing up engineers to apply their skills to more
complex and critical tasks.
Colin Smith CBE
Director – Engineering and Technology
In addition to our in-house R&D capability, Rolls-Royce undertakes
advanced research via a global network of 28 university technology
centres. Each centre is funded by the Group and undertakes
specialist work in a particular engineering field, led by world-class
academics. In 2012, we celebrated the 21st anniversary of
this network.
Gross research and development
£m
885
864
08
09
923
908
919
10
11
12
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Research and technology
We have an engineering resource inside the Group of 14,700
engineers. Many work as integrated teams across international
borders on our major programmes and a number of our top
engineers, or Rolls-Royce Fellows, are recognised as world-renowned
experts in their fields.
In 2012, we invested £139 million in research and technology in
addition to the significant government funding. In October 2012,
together with the University of Birmingham, we announced a new
£60 million centre for research into high-temperature metallurgy.
This is the latest in a series of seven new research and advanced
manufacturing centres the Group has helped to establish in the
past four years. We believe our leading position in these centres
will deliver significant benefit for the future in technologies and
advanced manufacturing processes.
29
Business review
Excellence in technology
The new Trent 1000 engine was the first to enter service on the
Boeing 787 Dreamliner and completed its first year in service with
launch customer ANA, in October 2012.
Gulfstream’s ultra-large-cabin, ultra-long-range G650 business jet
aircraft with the BR725 engine, has received its final certification
from Federal Aviation Administration and entered into service.
We successfully completed the E3E programme in 2012 which
demonstrated core technology for our future two-shaft engine
portfolio. Offering significant improvements in fuel consumption,
unit cost, weight and emissions, it provides technologies for our
BR700-NextGen and into our wider portfolio.
Design of the PWR3 nuclear power plant for the UK Trident
Successor Programme is progressing well. The new reactor plant
design was selected by the UK MoD to provide easier operation,
longer service life and lower through-life costs. A UK Government
decision on the successor to Trident is planned for 2016.
Energy
The successful industrial version of the RB211 gas turbine is used
all over the world in oil and gas and power generation markets.
Over 700 industrial RB211s have been sold, achieving more than
30 million operating hours. In 2012, we announced the launch of
the RB211-Gzero a retrofit upgrade product that provides the
engine with a nominal power increase of ten per cent.
The distinctive power and efficiency of the industrial Trent were
strengthened in 2012, together with its capability on low emissions
and its operational flexibility for oil and gas applications.
Defence aerospace
Since the T56 entered production in 1954, over 18,000 T56/501-D
turboprops have been installed on a wide variety of propeller-driven
aircraft. We recently successfully created a technology insertion
package to significantly improve fuel efficiency on the US Air Force’s
C-130H Hercules transporter. In tests, our T56 Series 3.5
Enhancement Package demonstrated an eight per cent fuel
consumption improvement. Once certified, the T56 Series 3.5
will help extend the life of this ageing fleet.
Our T56-A427A engine, with a modern electronic engine control and
fuel pump metering unit replacing the previous hydro-mechanical
control, is now ready for full production after receiving US Navy
military qualification and successfully completing the initial
operational test and evaluation. Two of these engines power the
US Navy’s E-2D Advanced Hawkeye airborne early warning and
electronic warfare systems aircraft.
The Rolls-Royce LiftSystem for the F-35B Lightning II STOVL fighter
aircraft entered service with the US Marine Corps in late 2012.
Marine
The Far Solitaire, a Rolls-Royce designed platform supply vessel for
the offshore oil and gas industry, was named ship of the year at the
Shipbuilding, Machinery and Marine Technology exhibition, the
leading international maritime trade fair. This is the third time
in five years a Rolls-Royce designed vessel has won the award.
We have delivered our first permanent magnet tunnel thruster.
This new design reduces noise and vibration and increases power
by 25 per cent, compared to traditional models of the same size.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
The Trent XWB undergoing tests
at the Group’s outdoor facility in
Mississippi, US.
Business review
Civil aerospace
Our newest large engine programme, the Trent XWB for the Airbus
A350 XWB family was successfully certificated on 7 February 2013.
It began its flight-test programme in February 2012 on a modified
A380 and completed over 150 flying hours. The initial engine
entering service will be rated at 84,000lb thrust. The more powerful
97,000lb thrust engine for the later A350-1000 aircraft programme
is progressing into the design and definition phase.
30
Business review
Excellence in operations
We continue to invest globally in capacity and
capability that will help our customers and our
business succeed.
Manufacturing technology and infrastructure
Through the year, good progress has been made on the
introduction of a broad spectrum of technology projects that
will reduce operational costs, increase output and improve
product performance.
Manufacturing capacity
We have added significant manufacturing capacity to meet
our customers’ needs and to successfully deliver our substantial
order book.
Rolls-Royce has opened 19 new facilities in the past three years
in locations including the UK, Germany, Norway, US, Singapore,
China and Brazil.
Alain Michaelis
Operations Director
In 2012, we opened our largest facility in Asia, at Seletar Aerospace
Park in Singapore, and delivered our first Trent 900 engine from the
site. At full capacity, this facility will be capable of producing a Trent
engine every working day and 6,000 fan blades each year.
Other major projects include: construction of an advanced blade
casting facility in Rotherham, UK, and our advanced blade and vane
machining facility at our Crosspointe campus in Virginia, US.
We also made a significant extension to our engine testing facility
in Dahlewitz, Germany and developed a major facility for assembly
and test in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, that will support our Marine and
Energy businesses.
£491 million
Capital expenditure on new and
improved facilities
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Advanced centres
Five advanced manufacturing research centres are now all fully
operational in the UK with the number of research projects
doubling over the past 12 months to more than 160.
The sixth centre of the network, in Virginia, US, opened its doors in
September and building work has started in Singapore on an
advanced remanufacturing and technology centre.
31
Business review
Excellence in operations
Business review
These centres, which are the result of collaboration between
governments, universities and industrial partners, form a vital
bridge between the creation of a concept and industrial application.
This allows us to work with suppliers, university research teams and
technology providers to develop and prove manufacturing
processes before making major investment decisions.
Suppliers
As an increasingly global business, we continue to develop our
supply base in emerging markets, whilst also deepening our
relationship with existing suppliers.
In the UK, we are taking a leading role in the UK Government’s
‘Sharing in Growth’ initiative which will provide around 30 UK
suppliers with a tailored, in-depth training and development
programme. The aim is to create a competitive group of UK
suppliers to help achieve sustainable, competitive performance
as the industry continues to grow.
As we work alongside our suppliers, we also have to make sure we
strike the right balance between what we choose to do ourselves
and what we buy. We have acquired the Aero Engine Controls (AEC)
business, in order to strengthen our offering in the increasingly
important engine control systems market.
Information technology
In 2012, we invested over £100 million in IT as part of our ongoing
investment programme. This programme is addressing the need to
modernise data centres, improve networks, and upgrade personal
computers and software across more than 265 sites in 39 countries.
Continuous improvement
We continually apply technology and operational improvements
to drive productivity and the efficiency of the power systems
we produce.
We apply lean techniques to our design, manufacture and our
suppliers so that the actions of everyone involved will drive
efficiency, quality and safety in all we do.
The production flow of our LiftFan™
assembly facility in the US is mapped
on an interactive screen.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
The Chairman and employees at
Seletar celebrating delivery of
the first production engine from
the facility.
32
Business review
Sustainability – better power
for a changing world
As a leader in technology, we believe that advanced engineering
has a critical role to play in achieving a sustainable future.
We are committed to developing the most efficient power
systems in the world. This helps the environment and our
customers by enabling them to do more, using less. Focusing
on the environmental performance of our products and
operations, investing in our people and, engaging with
our communities helps grow our business.
Environment
We apply our knowledge and technology to develop the best
solutions for the environment and our customers. Our
environmental strategy has been revised in 2012 to reflect the main
focus of investment and effort applied by the Group, concentrating
on three areas:
1.support customers by further reducing the environmental
impact of our products and services;
2.develop new technology for future low-emission products; and
3.maintain our drive to reduce the environmental impact of our
business activities.
Innovative new gas-powered ferry design for Lauro Shipping.
Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP)
We continue to be one of the
leading companies in the CDP
Index. Our 2012 carbon disclosure
score was 72 and our performance
band ‘B’. We led the Global 500
industrials in governance and
strategy, emissions management
and reporting.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Dow Jones Sustainability World
and European Indexes (DJSI)
We have retained our position in
the DJSI for the eleventh consecutive
year, with an overall score of
74 per cent, well above the average
of 42 per cent in the aviation and
defence sector.
1. Support customers by further reducing the environmental
impact of our products and services
We have a strong track record of reducing the emissions of our
products through significant investment in R&D. In 2012, we
invested £919 million in R&D, of which around two thirds is aimed
at reducing the environmental impact of our products. Since the
first jet airliners of around 50 years ago, on a per passengerkilometre basis, aircraft burn 70 per cent less fuel and are 75 per
cent quieter. An Environmental Advisory Board of distinguished
academics and leading authorities in their respective fields,
provides independent expert advice to inform business strategy
and design processes.
The Advisory Council for Aviation Research and Innovation in Europe
(ACARE) has set challenging goals for aviation to meet by 2050 (base
year 2000). In 2012, we helped define the priorities for Strategic
Research and Innovation in aviation to meet the ACARE goals:
• reducing aircraft CO2 emissions by 75 per cent
per passenger kilometre;
• reducing noise by 65 per cent; and
• reducing oxides of nitrogen (NOX) by 90 per cent.
33
Business review
Sustainability
CO2 (Engine)
Trent family
ACARE flightpath 2050 target
% CO2 or fuel burn
ACARE Target:
75% overall reduction in
CO2 per passenger
kilometre 30% engine
contribution (Rolls-Royce
engine long-term goals).
2012 final target achievement
Trent 895
0
Trent 500
-5
Facility GHG emissions (absolute)
excluding product test and development
Total Group GHG emissions (normalised by
turnover) including product test and
development
Trent 1000
Trent XWB
-15
-20
1
-25
2
-30
2000
2010
2020
2030
2040
2050
We are investing in technology to provide more efficient marine
power and propulsion systems as well as ‘whole ship’ integrated
designs. In 2012, we delivered our first lean-burn gas-powered
platform supply vessel cargo ship and announced orders for our first
gas-powered tugs. We introduced new propulsor technologies,
including our first permanent magnet tunnel thruster and our first
thruster to make extensive use of composite materials.
Innovative vessel designs use the Environship concept,
incorporating wave-piercing hull features. A liquefied natural gas
engine and an integrated rudder and propeller system combination
can reduce fuel consumption, and cut CO2 emissions by up to 40 per
cent compared to conventional vessels.
In energy markets, our Trent 60 is the most advanced
aero-derivative gas turbine available today, establishing a new
benchmark for fuel economy and cost savings. Our RFA36 and
RFA24 are the most efficient pipeline compressors available today
with field-proven efficiencies of up to 91 per cent, saving energy
costs for our customers.
2. Develop new technology for future low emission products
Nuclear power can make a significant contribution to future low
carbon electricity generation.
As a key player in the industry for 50 years, we have extensive
knowledge of nuclear technology, its safety and control. Our nuclear
capabilities span the reactor life-cycle, from concept design through
to obsolescence management and plant life extension.
Our expertise including component manufacturing, licensing,
project and supply chain management as well as world-class
engineering, positions us well to support nuclear power growth.
We are also working with customers and fuel companies to ensure
that future biofuels, which will be part of the solution for aviation
towards 2050, meet our requirements, with the important caveats
that they are sustainable, do not compete with the growth of food
crops and are used in the most effective way to maximise the
reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Targeted
reduction by
end 2012 1
Target area
Trent 900
-10
3. Maintain our drive to reduce the environmental impact of our
business activities
Greenhouse gas emissions
In 2009, we set three year GHG reduction targets for our facilities
and can now report that we have exceeded these (see table below).
Actual 2
5%
6.5%
10%
16%
Based on 2009 GHG emissions
Energy/GHG data has been forecast based on data collected during January to October
2012. The ‘Basis of Reporting’ is available at www.rolls-royce.com
Our total GHG emissions (including product test and development)
was 550 ktCO2e in 2012, a reduction of four per cent compared
with 572 ktCO2e in 2009 (see table below). This reduction has
been achieved, despite a growth in our global facilities footprint,
through a sustained investment in new and more efficient
manufacturing facilities. In 2012, we invested over £3 million in
energy reduction projects such as the upgrade of compressed air
plant, furnace controls and, lighting systems and controls within
our existing facilities.
GHG emissions breakdown
Total ktCO2e
(includes emissions associated with
product development and testing)
2009
2010
2011
2012
Direct emissions
Indirect emissions
Total
215
357
572
236
365
601
229
346
575
213
337
550
We continue to recognise the need to reduce the emissions of our
operations and we are reducing our reliance on fossil fuels. We are
seeking to make wider use of more sustainable energy sources, like
renewable and other low carbon technologies, where cost effective
and practical.
New energy and GHG reduction targets aimed at sustaining our
improvement will be set for the next three years.
Certification
Our business segments have certification to the environmental
management systems standard ISO 14001.
Global supply chain
During 2012, we expanded the application of lean techniques across
the supply chain. Our suppliers increased their metal recycling and
further engaged in paperless purchasing practices. We continue to
request key suppliers are ISO 14001 certificated and support them
to meet their obligations under the European REACH (Registration,
Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) legislation.
Business review
Innovation provides increasingly efficient products worldwide
The Trent XWB – due to enter service in 2014 – is proving to be the
most efficient large civil aero engine ever produced, burning 16 per
cent less fuel per passenger kilometre than our first Trent engine
which entered service in 1995.
34
Business review
Sustainability
Our people
The Group is committed to developing a diverse workforce and
equal opportunities for all. Our policy is to provide employment
training and development opportunities for disabled people
wherever possible. We are committed to supporting employees
who become disabled during employment and helping disabled
employees make the best use of their skills and potential.
We support business growth by creating an inclusive working
environment that attracts and retains the best people.
We employ 42,800 people in more than 50 countries across our
four global market sectors:
Average number of employees
2012
By region
United Kingdom
22,800
Rest of the world
20,000
Total
42,800
By sector
Civil aerospace
21,500
Defence aerospace
7,800
Marine
8,800
Energy
3,700
Engine Holding
Total
1,000
42,800
Resourcing and development
2011 In 2012, we recruited over 2,800 experienced professionals to
support the growth of our business, nine per cent higher than
in 2011. We recruited 318 apprentices. We engage with universities
21,600
globally, and in 2012 recruited 312 graduates on to our corporate
18,800
graduate programme from 89 universities and 36 nations.
40,400
To support long-term growth objectives, we plan to further
increase our graduate programme in 2013.
19,800
7,600 In 2012, we supported 47,500 employees and sub-contract
8,600 personnel through our learning management system, MyLearning.
3,500 A total of 249,000 training courses were completed during the year.
900 Learning investment for 2012 was £39 million.
40,400
Rolls-Royce is committed to creating a working environment which
helps people to perform at their best. Great value is placed on giving
a voice to our workforce and we engage and involve people in
improving the business and welcome their feedback. Information
on business and work issues is shared with our employees and their
representatives through established communication channels.
We reward and recognise high performance and encourage our
employees to become investors in the Company.
Human rights are reflected in our policies and standards covering
Business Ethics, Health and Safety, the Environment, Employees,
and Community Investment. We oppose any form of child labour
or practices which inhibit the development of children. We believe
employment should be freely chosen and commit to refrain from
using forced or involuntary labour.
In November, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne,
opened the new apprentice academy in Derby. The £6 million
investment, supported by the Skills Funding Agency, provides
capacity for Rolls-Royce to double the number of apprentices it
trains. They will provide an additional source of skilled employees
to our supply chain. In the UK, the academy won the Gen II Macro
Employer of the Year category of the National Apprenticeship
Awards.
Our regional training centre strategy places product training close
to our customers. A new training centre in Ålesund, opened by the
Crown Prince of Norway in November, complements the existing
facilities in Derby, Bristol, Singapore and Indianapolis.
Demand for customer training continues to increase with a
35 per cent growth in 2012. On-line learning is available to all
our customers through the Group’s website at www.rolls-royce.com.
Encouraging diversity
Our Global Diversity and Inclusion Steering Group is comprised of
main board directors and senior executives. It promotes an inclusive
workplace in which individuals feel they are respected, valued and
have an equal opportunity to progress.
The Group’s global workforce is 15 per cent female with eight per
cent female senior executives. About two thirds of our workforce is
in engineering or manufacturing with historically low female
representation. We actively work with schools and universities to
increase interest and encourage diversity amongst those taking
STEM subjects, and to broaden the career aspirations of individuals
from under-represented groups.
Our female and international graduate recruitment has increased
steadily over recent years, 26 per cent of overall graduate
development programme participants are female and 38 per cent
are non-British. Around 50 per cent of participants are female in
our non-engineering and non-manufacturing programmes.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
In July, the launch at the Farnborough International Airshow of a Lego
working replica of a Trent engine fuelled ten million Tweets – including
one from The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.
35
Business review
Sustainability
Employees receive mandatory health and safety training. As a result
of this focus, health and safety performance has shown steady
improvement over many years. However, tragically, in 2012 we
suffered two employee fatalities. In the first incident, an employee
was fatally injured whilst working on electrical equipment at a
customer site. In the second, an employee drowned in a river during
a company organised event. Thorough investigations for both
incidents were carried out. These are the first fatalities since 2008.
We continued to make progress on our major global
improvement programmes. We reviewed machinery guarding
and lifting programmes at 30 sites as part of our review of process
safety management.
Business segments have global certification to OSHAS 18001,
confirming our commitment to globally consistent health and
safety standards.
Exposure monitoring confirmed that existing controls should meet
the new exposure and release standards under the EU Registration,
REACH regulations.
We further engaged our employees in improving health and safety
with focused activities during HS&E Week and over 5,000
employees taking part in a global wellness programme.
Our total reportable injury (TRI) rate continues to decline –
a 23.5 per cent drop in 2012 gives a 28 per cent reduction over the
past three years from 0.72 TRI per 100 employees to 0.52. This fell
short of our target of a 50 per cent reduction by the end of 2012.
Our primary focus has been on high potential incidents which could
lead to significant injury or harm, rather than the broader measure
of TRI which also includes minor incidents.
Engaging with governments
and communities
Working with governments
We engage in dialogue to align our business needs with the
political, social, and commercial requirements of host governments
in our key markets. Where we achieve such alignment, for example
in Singapore, the benefits for both the Group and the country can
be considerable.
In the UK, the Government has made strategic investments in the
aerospace industry through the Aerospace Growth Partnership. In
2012, they announced a £40 million investment, matched by
industry, in the Rolls-Royce led SILOET II programme (Strategic
Investment in Low-carbon Engine Technology). We expect this
programme to deliver improvements in engine fuel economy
for both widebody and narrowbody civil aircraft.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
A further Government investment of £25 million was added
to the £40 million from industry to support a series of research
and technology projects including SAMULET II (Strategic
Affordable Manufacturing in the UK through Leading
Environmental Technologies). This Rolls-Royce led collaborative
programme aims to accelerate the development of manufacturing
and product technologies.
This year the Business Secretary, Vince Cable, performed the
groundbreaking ceremonies for our new factories at Rotherham
and Washington, Tyne and Wear, UK.
In view of the importance of EU regulation and funding for
the Group’s activities, Rolls-Royce enlarged its EU Affairs team
in Brussels. Our main EU affairs activities in 2012 focused on
two areas: financial regulation and the future framework for
EU R&D funding.
We continued to monitor EU legislation on financial regulatory
reform for its impact on non-financial companies like Rolls-Royce.
Throughout the year, we provided input to the decision-making
procedure on Horizon 2020 – the EU Research and Innovation
funding framework for 2014-2020. Other policy areas have also
required our attention, such as: REACH; the future monitoring,
reporting and verification system for maritime emissions; revised
noise rules in the field of aviation; alternative fuel policies; and
international free trade agreement negotiations. We organised
high-level meetings with relevant EU Commissioners during the
year; gave evidence to the ‘Liikanen group’, the EU’s high-level group
on reforming the structure of the EU banking sector; and submitted
responses to a number of Commission consultations. Rolls-Royce
is registered in the EU’s Transparency register where more
information about our activities and involvement in associations
can be found.
In North America, our relationships with a variety of domestic
industry and government bodies provide an essential platform to
communicate on a broad array of issues from aviation emissions to
energy-related appropriations.
We engage with Congress (in both the House of Representatives
and the Senate) at the Committee, District and State level. Our
Political Action Committee (PAC) operates in accordance with all
legal and ethical requirements.
We have hosted a number of Congressional visits including
President Obama’s visit to our new Crosspointe facility, Virginia, US.
Our membership of North American major trade associations
(including the Aerospace Industries Association, Organization for
International Investment and the US Chamber of Commerce),
enables us to support broader coalition efforts. This guards against
any potential protectionist measures which may be detrimental to
Group interests.
Business review
Health and safety
Rolls-Royce is committed to continual improvement in the
standards of health and safety in the workplace. A main board
director has responsibility for this. The Board receives regular
reports on progress against targets and improvement programmes.
36
Business review
Sustainability
The Group encourages the interest of young people in Science, Technology,
Engineering and Mathematics.
Community investment
We have a long-standing commitment to the communities we
operate in around the world and during 2012 the Group’s total
contribution (including money, employee time and gifts in kind)
was £8 million.
Our community investment activities support the Group’s strategy
and future success, particularly in the areas of: recruitment and
retention; employee engagement and development; and the
Group’s reputation in the wider community.
The main areas of support defined in our global charitable
contributions and social sponsorships policy are:
• education and skills, particularly Science, Technology, Engineering
and Mathematics (STEM) which are key to our future success;
• environment activities linking into our environment strategy;
• social investment, making a positive difference to the
communities in which we operate; and
• arts, culture and heritage, contributing to the cultural vibrancy
in the areas we operate.
A clear governance structure ensures a consistent approach and
visibility of our contributions globally.
2012 charitable contributions, sponsorship and payroll giving
£ million
Charitable contributions and social sponsorships:
UK
Asia and Middle East £0.1m, Americas £0.8m,
Europe £0.3m
Total
Commercial sponsorship – global total, including:
UK £0.3m, Asia and Middle East £0.3m, Americas £1.3m,
Europe 0.2m
Employee time
Gifts in kind
Total
Payroll giving UK £0.5m, North America £0.2m
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2.3
1.2
3.5
2.1
2.2
0.2
8.0
0.7
37
Business review
Additional financial information
USD per GBP
EUR per GBP
2012
2011
Change
Year end spot rate
1.63
1.55
+5%
Average spot rate
Year end spot rate
Average spot rate
1.59
1.23
1.23
1.60
1.20
1.15
-1%
+3%
+7%
Taxation
The Group believes that it has a duty to shareholders to seek to
minimise its tax burden but to do so in a manner which is consistent
with its commercial objectives and meets its legal obligations and
ethical standards. Every effort is made to maximise the tax
efficiency of business transactions and this includes taking
advantage of available tax incentives and exemptions. However,
the Group has regard for the intention of the legislation concerned
rather than just the wording itself.
The Group is committed to building open relationships with tax
authorities and to following a policy of full disclosure in order to
effect the timely settlement of its tax affairs and to remove
uncertainty in its business transactions. Where appropriate,
the Group enters into consultation with tax authorities to help
shape proposed legislation and future tax policy.
Transactions between Rolls-Royce subsidiaries and associates in
different jurisdictions are conducted on an arms-length basis
and priced as if the transactions were between unrelated entities,
in compliance with the OECD Model Tax Convention and the laws
of the relevant jurisdictions.
Investments and capital expenditure
The Group subjects all major investments and capital expenditure
to a rigorous examination of risks and future cash flows to ensure
that they create shareholder value. All major investments require
Board approval.
The Group has a portfolio of projects at different stages of their
life cycles. Discounted cash flow analysis of the remaining life of
projects is performed on a regular basis.
Sales of engines in production are assessed against criteria in
the original development programme to ensure that overall
value is enhanced.
Financial risk management
The Board has an established and structured approach to financial
risk management. The Financial risk committee (Frc) is accountable
for managing, reporting and mitigating the Group’s financial risks
and exposures. These risks include the Group’s principal
counterparty, currency, interest rate, commodity price, liquidity and
credit rating risks outlined in more depth in note 17 to the financial
statements. The Frc is chaired by the Chief Financial Officer.
The Group has a comprehensive financial risk policy that advocates
the use of financial instruments to manage and hedge business
operations risks that arise from movements in financial,
commodities, credit or money markets. The Group’s policy is not
to engage in speculative financial transactions. The Frc sits
quarterly to review and assess the key risks and agree any
mitigating actions required.
Capital structure
£ million
Total equity
Cash flow hedges
Group capital
Net funds
2012
2011
6,105
63
6,168
1,317
4,519
52
4,571
223
Operations are funded through various shareholders’ funds, bank
debt, bonds and notes. The capital structure of the Group reflects
the judgement of the Board as to the appropriate balance of
funding required.
Funding is secured by the Group’s continued access to the global
debt markets. Borrowings are funded in various currencies using
derivatives where appropriate to achieve a required currency and
interest rate profile. The Board’s objective is to retain sufficient
financial investments and undrawn facilities to ensure that the
Group can both meet its medium-term operational commitments
and cope with unforeseen obligations and opportunities.
The Group holds cash and short-term investments which, together
with the undrawn committed facilities, enable it to manage its
liquidity risk.
During the year, the Group drew down a further £200 million loan
from the European Investment Bank. Following the acquisition of
the 50 per cent of AEC that we did not already own (see note 25
of the financial statements), the Group repaid AEC’s external bank
funding of £78 million.
At year end, the Group retained aggregate liquidity of
£3.6 billion. This liquidity comprised net funds of £1.3 billion
and aggregate borrowing facilities of £2.3 billion, of which
£1.0 billion remained undrawn.
The maturity profile of the borrowing facilities is regularly reviewed
to ensure that refinancing levels are manageable in the context of
the business and market conditions. The only facility to mature in
2013 is the US$230 million private placement. There are no rating
triggers in any borrowing facility that would require the facility to
be accelerated or repaid due to an adverse movement in the Group’s
credit rating.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Business review
Foreign exchange
Foreign exchange rate movements influence the reported income
statement, the cash flow and closing net cash balance. The average
and spot rates for the principal trading currencies of the Group are
shown in the table below:
38
Business review
Additional financial information
During 2012, the maturity date on the £1.0 billion revolving credit
facility was extended from 2016 to 2017.
The Group conducts some of its business through a number of
joint ventures. A major proportion of the debt of these joint
ventures is secured on the assets of the respective companies
and is non-recourse to the Group. This debt is further outlined in
note 10 to the financial statements.
Credit rating
Moody’s Investor Service
Standard & Poor’s
Rating
Outlook
Grade
A3
A
Stable
Stable
Investment
Investment
The Group subscribes to both Moody’s Investors Service and
Standard & Poor’s for independent long-term credit ratings.
At 31 December 2012, the Group maintained investment grade
ratings from both agencies.
As a capital-intensive business making long-term commitments
to our customers, the Group attaches significant importance
to maintaining or improving the current investment grade
credit ratings.
Accounting and regulatory
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS),
as adopted by the EU.
In 2012, the Group has adopted revisions to IAS 1 Presentation of
Financial Statements that require items of other comprehensive
income to be classified depending on whether they may be
potentially reclassified to the income statement. There is no net
impact. There were no other revisions to IFRS that became
applicable in 2012 which had a significant impact on the Group’s
financial statements.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
A summary of changes which have not been adopted in 2012
is included within the accounting policies in note 1 to the
financial statements.
Governments and regulators around the world continue to
implement reforms to the financial markets with the aim of
improving transparency and reducing systemic risk. Although the
reforms are predominantly directed at financial institutions, they
will also affect non-financial institutions such as the Group.
The primary concern has been the reform of the over-the-counter
(OTC) derivatives market, and in particular a proposal in the EU
European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) that parties to
future OTC derivative transactions would be required to use an
exchange to clear the transactions and post cash collateral to reduce
counterparty risk. The proposal could adversely affect the Group’s
future funding requirements and make cash flow more volatile.
The final EMIR rules have now been released, which exempt
non-financial institutions engaged in hedging activity from
this requirement.
Share price
During the year, the share price increased by 17 per cent from
746.5 pence to 873.5 pence, in line with a 17 per cent increase in the
FTSE aerospace and defence sector and compared to a six per cent
increase in the FTSE 100. The Company’s share price ranged from
733 pence in January to 913.5 pence in December.
39
Governance
Governance
Chairman’s introduction
The actions we have taken in 2012
should leave no doubt that the Board
of Rolls-Royce will pursue the Code’s
principles in the spirit in which they
are intended.
In this report on governance, we will review the framework of rules
and practices by which the Board of Rolls-Royce directed and
controlled its business during 2012.
In 2012, the Association of British Insurers whose members account
for a significant proportion of our shareholder base, issued a report
on board effectiveness, which pinpointed three areas that it
believed were essential to improving board effectiveness namely:
board diversity; succession planning; and board evaluation.
The issues of diversity and the related topic of succession planning
are high on our agenda and are covered in more detail in the
nomination committee report on page 49.
With regard to board evaluation, we undertook an extensive
external process in 2011 which provoked a good deal of debate and
ushered in significant change. In 2012, I personally led a formal
internal evaluation of the effectiveness of the Board. The general
consensus from the confidential survey was that the Board
continued to work well together and that Board interaction was
effective. Further details of the process used and the outcome can
be found on page 44.
Business ethics
The ethics committee spent a good deal of its time in 2012 dealing
with concerns about bribery and corruption involving
intermediaries in overseas markets which resulted in the Group
handing over information to the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) in
December 2012. This action, together with our appointment of Lord
Gold to lead an independent review of our current compliance
procedures, should make it clear to all who do business with us, or
on our behalf, that the Board is united in its resolve not to accept
any behaviour that undermines this Group’s future success. More
information on the work of the ethics committee can be found on
pages 50 to 51.
Principal risks
In 2012, the risk committee reconsidered and redefined the
principal risks which we face in our business. The resulting list on
pages 18 to 19 has therefore been condensed to fit under just eight
broad headings. We believe this should provide a much clearer
picture of the major areas of risk which our business faces. A report
from the chairman of the risk committee can be found on page 52.
Remuneration
In June 2012, the Government published a consultation on what
companies must disclose in pay reports. The directors’
remuneration report on pages 57 to 67 must necessarily address
existing legislation. However, we have anticipated some of the new
requirements as described in the remuneration committee report
on page 54.
UK Corporate Governance Code
The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) recently issued a revised UK
Corporate Governance Code (the 2012 Code) and revised Guidance
to Audit Committees. The audit committee has scheduled time in
2013 to discuss how the Company can best comply with these. This
year’s audit committee report can be found on pages 47 to 48.
Safety committee
The new safety committee met for the first time in 2012.
The committee has made a good start in gaining an understanding
of the Group’s safety governance and disciplines and in developing
a suitable reporting regime to enable the committee to provide
the Board with an appropriate level of assurance. We hope this
additional Board level scrutiny will tighten further the already
stringent controls in place in this most critical area. The report
of the safety committee is on page 53.
This is my final governance report as Chairman of Rolls-Royce.
I firmly believe that the Company’s values, its reputation and its
ability to achieve its objectives depend to a large extent on the
effectiveness of its approach to corporate governance. However,
rules alone are not enough. The Code is based on principles and not
just rules and the actions we have taken in the past and in 2012
should leave no doubt that the Board of Rolls-Royce will pursue
those principles in the spirit in which they are intended.
Sir Simon Robertson
Chairman
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Governance
Sir Simon Robertson
Chairman
The International Advisory Board (IAB)
Rolls-Royce is a global company and whilst that brings with it many
exciting opportunities it also presents significant challenges. We
have an International Advisory Board, which has been in place for
some six years. Its membership, which is listed on page 42,
comprises senior business and political leaders from all the areas in
which we are building and developing our business and where we
have a substantial presence, such as the US, China, India and
Australia. The IAB meets once a year and in 2012, it was held in
Derby. Its remit is to discuss the high-level issues and their potential
impact on the Group. This type of big picture discussion is vital for a
company such as ours where our continued success depends on
making very long-term investments.
40
Governance
Board of directors
Sir Simon Robertson
John Rishton
Iain Conn
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom
Sir Frank Chapman
John McAdam
Sir Simon Robertson (71) 2*
Non-executive Chairman,
appointed January 2005
Skills and experience: Sir Simon
brings to the Board an international
corporate advisory background with
a wealth of experience in mergers
and acquisitions, merchant banking,
investment banking and financial
markets. During his career he has
worked in France, Germany, the UK
and the US. He is the former
Managing Director of Goldman
Sachs International and former
Chairman of Dresdner Kleinwort
Benson. In June 2010, he was
honoured with a knighthood
in recognition of his services
to business.
External appointments: Sir Simon is
the founder member of Robertson
Robey Associates LLP and Deputy
Chairman and Senior Independent
Director of HSBC Holdings plc. He is
a non-executive director of Berry
Bros & Rudd Limited, The Economist
Newspaper Limited and Troy Asset
Management. He is a Trustee of
The Eden Project and of the Royal
Opera House Endowment Fund.
John Rishton (54) 2,5*
Chief Executive,
appointed March 2011
Skills and experience: John began
his career in 1979 at Ford Motor
Company and held a variety of
positions in the UK and in Europe.
In 1994 he joined British Airways
Plc, where he was Chief Financial
Officer from 2001 to 2005. In 2006,
he was appointed CFO at Royal
Ahold and became CEO in 2007.
John was appointed as a
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
non-executive director of
Rolls-Royce in 2007 and served as
chairman of the audit committee
and a member of the ethics and
nomination committees. He is a
former non-executive director of
Allied Domecq.
External appointments: Unilever
have announced that John will
be proposed to join the boards of
Unilever NV and Unilever plc at
the AGMs of those companies in
May 2013.
Iain Conn (50) 1,2,6
Senior Independent Director,
appointed January 2005
Skills and experience: Iain joined
the BP group in 1986 and has held a
number of executive positions
within the BP group worldwide.
External appointments: Iain is
Group Managing Director and
Chief Executive of Refining and
Marketing, BP p.l.c. He is Chairman
of the Advisory Board of The
Imperial College Business School
and a member of the Imperial
College Council. Iain is also a
member of the Energy and Climate
Change Board, CBI and a member of
the advisory boards of the Centre
for European Reform and of the
Centre for China in the World
Economy at Tsinghua University.
Dame Helen Alexander (56) 2,3*,4
Non-executive director, appointed
September 2007
Skills and experience:
Dame Helen was Chief Executive of
the Economist Group until 2008,
having joined the company in 1985.
She was President of the CBI until
2011 and Deputy President until
June 2012; she has also been a nonexecutive director of Northern
Foods plc, BT plc and Centrica plc.
Dame Helen was awarded a CBE
for services to publishing in 2004
and was made a Dame Commander
of the Order of the British Empire for
her services to business in
June 2011.
External appointments: Dame
Helen is Chairman of UBM plc, the
Port of London Authority (PLA) and
Incisive Media. She is also deputy
chairman of esure Group Holdings,
senior adviser to Bain Capital and
a Director of the CBI. Dame Helen
is Chancellor of the University of
Southampton and she is currently
involved with a number of other
not-for-profit organisations in
media, the internet, the arts
and education.
Lewis Booth CBE (64) 1*,2,4
Non-executive director,
appointed May 2011
Skills and experience: Lewis is the
former Executive Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of Ford
Motor Company, a position he held
for over three years until his
retirement from the company in
April 2012. During his 34-year career
at Ford he held a series of senior
positions in Europe, Asia, Africa and
the United States. Lewis began his
career with British Leyland, before
joining Ford in 1978. He was
awarded a CBE in June 2012 for
services to the UK automotive and
manufacturing industries.
External appointments: Lewis is a
director of Mondelez International,
Inc., Gentherm Inc. and of University
of Liverpool in America Inc.
Peter Byrom (68) 2,4
Non-executive director,
appointed January 1997
Skills and experience: Peter was
a director of AMEC plc from 2005
to 2011 and of NM Rothschild &
Sons Limited from 1977 to 1996.
He is a Fellow of the Royal
Aeronautical Society.
External appointments: Peter is
Chairman of Domino Printing
Sciences plc.
Sir Frank Chapman (59) 2,3,6*
Non-executive director,
appointed November 2011
Skills and experience: Sir Frank has
worked in the oil and gas industry
for 38 years including appointments
within Royal Dutch Shell plc and
BP p.l.c. He was Chief Executive of
BG Group plc for 12 years until
December 2012. Sir Frank graduated
with first class honours in
Mechanical Engineering from
Queen Mary College, London
University and is a Fellow of the
Royal Academy of Engineering, the
Institution of Mechanical Engineers
and the Energy Institute.
John McAdam (64) 2,3,6
Non-executive director,
appointed February 2008
Skills and experience: John was the
Chief Executive of ICI plc until ICI’s
acquisition by Akzo Nobel. He has
held a number of positions at
Unilever, within its Birds Eye Walls,
41
Governance
Board of directors
Jasmin Staiblin
Ian Strachan
Mark Morris
Colin Smith CBE
Nigel Goldsworthy
Quest International and
Unichema International businesses
and is a former non-executive
director of Severn Trent plc and
Sara Lee Corporation.
External appointments: Jasmin is a
non-executive director of Georg
Fischer AG, ETH Domain and Neue
Aarguer Bank (a member of the
Credit Suisse Group).
External appointments: John is
Chairman of United Utilities Group
PLC and Rentokil Initial plc and the
Senior Independent Director of
J Sainsbury plc.
Ian Strachan (69) 1,2,4*
Non-executive director,
appointed September 2003
John Neill CBE (65) 1,2
Non-executive director,
appointed November 2008
Skills and experience: John is a
member of the Council and Board of
Business in the Community, is Vice
President of the Society of Motor
Manufacturers and Traders, BEN,
the automotive industry charity and
The Institute of the Motor Industry.
He was formerly a Director of the
Bank of England and a nonexecutive Director of the Royal Mail
and Charter International plc. He
was awarded a CBE in June 1994.
External appointments: John is
the Chairman and Group Chief
Executive of the Unipart Group
of Companies.
Jasmin Staiblin (42) 2,4
Non-executive director,
appointed May 2012
Skills and experience: Jasmin is the
CEO of Alpiq Holding AG and was
CEO of ABB Switzerland Ltd until
December 2012. She has lived and
worked in Switzerland, Sweden
and Australia.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Skills and experience: Ian is the
former Chief Executive of BTR plc,
former Deputy Chief Executive and
Chief Financial Officer of Rio Tinto
plc, former non-executive Chairman
of Instinet Group Inc and a former
non-executive director of Johnson
Matthey plc, Commercial Union and
Reuters Group plc.
External appointments: Ian is a
non-executive director of Xstrata
plc, Transocean Inc and Caithness
Petroleum Limited.
James Guyette (67) 5
President and Chief Executive
Officer of Rolls-Royce North America
Inc. appointed January 1998
Skills and experience: Before
joining the Company, Jim was
Executive Vice President, Marketing
and Planning of United Airlines.
External appointments: Jim is
Chairman of PrivateBancorp Inc.,
of Chicago, Illinois and he is lead
independent director of priceline.
com Inc of Norwalk, Connecticut. He
is also Chairman of the Smithsonian
National Air & Space Museum,
Washington DC.
Mark Morris Age (49) 5
Chief Financial Officer,
appointed January 2012
Mark joined Rolls-Royce in 1986.
He has held a number of senior
positions throughout the Company
and prior to his appointment as
Chief Financial Officer was Group
Treasurer from 2001.
Colin Smith CBE (57) 5
Director – Engineering and
Technology, appointed July 2005
Skills and experience: Colin joined
Rolls-Royce in 1974. He has held a
variety of key positions within the
Company, including Director –
Research and Technology and
Director of Engineering and
Technology – Civil Aerospace. Colin
is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of
Engineering, the Royal Aeronautical
Society and the Institution of
Mechanical Engineers. He is also a
Member of the Council for Science
and Technology. In June 2012 he
was awarded a CBE for services to
UK engineering.
Nigel Goldsworthy (47)
Company Secretary & Head of Legal
appointed December 2012
Skills and experience: A solicitor,
Nigel has held a number of senior
legal and company secretary roles
within the Company and, before his
appointment as Company Secretary
& Head of Legal, was Deputy
General Counsel from 2008. Before
joining Rolls-Royce in 2004, Nigel
was a partner in the banking group
of Lovells (now Hogan Lovells).
James Guyette
Governance
John Neill CBE
Committee membership
1
Audit committee
2
Nomination committee
3
Remuneration committee
4
Ethics committee
5
Risk committee
6
Safety committee
* Denotes chairman of committee
Non-executive directors
Executive directors
Company Secretary
42
Governance
International Advisory Board (IAB)
The IAB, formed in 2006,
advises the Board on emerging
worldwide trends. Membership
is as follows:
Lord Powell of Bayswater
(Chairman of the IAB)
Former Foreign Affairs and
Defence Adviser to Prime
Ministers Baroness Margaret
Thatcher and Sir John Major
Sir Rod Eddington
Chairman JP Morgan
(Australia & New Zealand)
and former Chief Executive,
British Airways Plc
Dr Fan Gang
Professor at China’s Academy
of Social Sciences and
Director of National Economic
Research Institute
Carla Hills
Chair and CEO, Hills & Company,
International Consultants,
former US Trade Representative,
former US Secretary of Housing
and Urban Development, former
US Assistant Attorney General
General Sir Mike Jackson
Former Chief of the General
Staff, UK Ministry of Defence
Mustafa Koç
Chairman of Koç Holding, A.Ş.
Dr Henrique Meirelles
Chairman of J&F, the holding
company of JBS, Flora, Eldorado,
non-executive Chairman of
Brazil’s Olympic Public
Committee (the 2016 Olympic
Games – Rio de Janeiro) and
former President of Brazil’s
Central Bank from 2003 to 2010
Akio Mimura
Director, Board member and
Senior Advisor Nippon Steel &
Sumitomo Metal Corporation
WilmerHale, former Federal
Minister of Research and
Technology and of Transport
of Germany
Lubna Olayan
CEO and Deputy Chairperson of
the Olayan Financing Company
Lee Hsien Yang
Chairman, Fraser and Neave
Limited, Chairman Civil Aviation
Authority Singapore,
Chairman Islamic Bank of
Asia Private Limited
Rair Simonyan
Advisor to the President OAO NK
Rosneft, former Chairman,
Morgan Stanley, Russia, former
first vice president of Russian
State oil company, Rosneft
Ratan Tata
Former Chairman of Tata
Sons Limited
Matthias Wissmann
President of the German
Association of the Automotive
Industry, Vice-Chairman of the
Federation of German
Industries and Senior
International Counsel at
Ernesto Zedillo
Former President of Mexico,
Director, Yale Center for the
Study of Globalization
Ambassador Robert B Zoellick
Senior Fellow at the Belfer
Center for Science and
International Affairs at Harvard
University’s Kennedy School of
Government, former President
of World Bank Group, former US
Deputy Secretary of State and
former US Trade Representative
The Group Leadership Team (GLT)
During 2012, John Rishton
chaired meetings of the GLT
which acted as an important
communications channel
between the senior
management team and the
Group’s executive directors. In
addition to John Rishton, its
other members were:
Andrew Heath
President – Energy
Lawrie Haynes
President – Nuclear
Mark King
President – Aerospace
Peter Morgan
Director – Corporate Affairs
Alain Michaelis
Operations Director
John Paterson
President – Marine and
Industrial Power Systems
Mark Morris
Chief Financial Officer
Miles Cowdry
Corporate Development
Director
Kath Durrant
Human Resources Director
James Guyette
President – Rolls-Royce North
America Inc.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Colin Smith
Director – Engineering
and Technology
Robert Webb
General Counsel & Head of Risk
Tony Wood
President – Marine
Other members who served
were: Mike Terrett, former
Chief Operating Officer, who
retired on 31 December 2012;
Harry Holt who took up a post
as Director, Business
Development in our Civil
aerospace business on 1 July
2012; Michael Haidinger who
joined the board of Tognum as
Chief Sales Officer on 1 July
2012; and Dan Korte, President
– Defence aerospace who
resigned in September 2012.
43
Governance
Corporate governance report
This report, which includes the directors’ remuneration report on
pages 57 to 67, explains how the Company discharges its corporate
governance responsibilities.
In the year to 31 December 2012, the revised principles and
provisions of the Code (published in May 2010 by the Financial
Reporting Council (FRC)) applied to the Company. A printed copy of
the Code can be obtained free of charge from FRC Publications, 145
London Road, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT2 6SR – telephone:
+44 (0)20 8247 1264 and online at: www.frcpublications.com.
The Board confirms that throughout 2012, the Company complied
with the provisions of the Code, with the following exception:
Explanation
C.3.4 – The audit committee should
review arrangements by which staff
of the company may, in confidence,
raise concerns about possible
improprieties in matters of financial
reporting or other matters.
The Board considered it appropriate
that this provision of the Code be
the primary responsibility of the
ethics committee although that
committee is required to refer
concerns about possible
improprieties in matters of
financial reporting to the
audit committee.
Board membership
There are currently 14 directors on the Board comprising the
non-executive Chairman, the Chief Executive, three other executive
directors and nine non-executive directors. During the year,
Mark Morris took up the post of Chief Financial Officer on
1 January 2012 and Jasmin Staiblin was appointed as an additional
non-executive director on 21 May 2012. Two directors retired in the
year, Sir Peter Gregson did not seek re-election at the annual
general meeting (AGM) on 4 May 2012 and Mike Terrett retired
on 31 December 2012.
On 14 February 2013, the Board announced Sir Simon Robertson’s
intention to retire as Chairman and as a non-executive director at
the conclusion of the AGM on 2 May 2013. In addition, Ian Strachan
and Peter Byrom will not be seeking re-election as non-executive
directors at that meeting. Under Article 112 of the Company’s
Articles of Association, all directors (with the exception of Sir Simon
Robertson, Peter Byrom and Ian Strachan) will offer themselves for
re-election at the 2013 AGM. Ian Davis will be appointed as an
additional non-executive director on 1 March 2013 and will take
over as Chairman at the conclusion of the 2013 AGM.
The process for Board succession is discussed in the nomination
committee report on page 49.
Roles and responsibilities
The Board has a written remit for the Chairman, Sir Simon
Robertson, who has responsibility for the running of the Board
and ensuring its effectiveness. The Chief Executive, John Rishton,
has responsibility for running the business. This division of
responsibility ensures that no one individual has unfettered
powers of decision. In addition, the Board has agreed a set of
guiding principles to govern the relationship between the
Chairman and Chief Executive which, for example, requires that
the two roles are structured in a complementary manner and
demands that the relationship between the two be based on
mutual respect and trust and be frank and open.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Role and operation of the Board
The principal role of the Board is to ensure that the Group’s strategy
creates long-term success for the Group within an acceptable risk
profile and providing value for the long-term investor.
To achieve its long-term success, the Board must:
nsure the safety of its products and its people;
• e
• oversee and approve the development of the Group’s strategy,
monitoring both its achievement and the Group’s risk appetite;
• uphold the values of the Group, including its brand and corporate
reputation;
• oversee the quality and performance of management and ensure
it is maintained at world-class standards, through effective
succession planning and remuneration policies; and
• maintain an effective corporate governance framework, with
transparent reporting.
The Board has established a formal schedule of matters reserved for
its approval, generally being those items which affect the shape and
risk profile of the Group, as well as items such as the annual budget
and performance targets, the financial statements, payments to
shareholders, major capital investments, substantial changes to
balance sheet management policy and the strategic plan.
John Rishton, as the Chief Executive, is responsible for the day-today leadership, operational and performance management of the
Group within the confines of the strategic and business plans and
budgets agreed by the Board. The delegation of responsibilities to
the executive team is set out in a detailed schedule approved by the
Chief Executive.
The work of the Board in 2012
During 2012, the Board held 11 meetings, seven of which were
scheduled and a further four called at short notice. At each
scheduled meeting, executive directors supplied reports on
business and financial performance including the usual approval of
financial statements and budgets. The Board also received regular
updates on HS&E issues, employee issues and legal issues including
a review of its governance arrangements. In addition, the chairman
of each of the board committees provided verbal reports on matters
discussed by that committee since the previous Board meeting.
Governance
Code provision
The Senior Independent Director, Iain Conn, acts as a sounding
board for the Chairman and can act as an intermediary for other
directors. Each year, he leads a separate meeting of the Board
excluding the Chairman to review the Chairman’s performance. In
2012, the meeting expressed its unanimous support for Sir Simon
Robertson, noting the enormous amount of time, effort and energy
he contributed outside of the boardroom. During the year, Iain Conn
also led the process to seek a replacement for Sir Simon, taking the
chair when appropriate at meetings of the nomination committee.
44
Governance
Corporate governance report
On 18 September 2012, the Board held its annual day-long strategy
meeting, which included discussions on each of the business
segments and presentations on the ten-year financial plan and the
development of the Group’s overall strategy, vision, brand promise
and values. The September meeting was held in the Group’s offices
in Reston, US, and was followed by a visit to its Crosspointe facility,
which included a tour of the newly established Commonwealth
Centre for Advanced Manufacturing nearby.
In addition to its routine business, matters considered by the Board
in 2012 included:
• the Eurozone crisis;
• defence strategy;
• concerns about bribery and corruption involving intermediaries
in overseas markets;
• potential new and re-core engine developments;
• potential new facilities such as the new indoor test bed for
Dahlewitz and a facility in Brazil;
• the acquisition of the remaining shares in the Aero Engine
Controls joint venture from the Goodrich Corporation;
• the future of the tidal engineering and fuel cells businesses;
• potential acquisitions particularly in the nuclear sector;
• a presentation from Dr Hamid Mughal describing the global
network of Advanced Manufacturing Research Centres;
• a review of the Group’s tax affairs which included the renewal of
taxation policy a statement of which can be found on page 37;
• IT infrastructure update; and
• an investor relations presentation which included the results of
the 2012 investor audit.
Board and committee attendance
The attendance by individual directors at meetings of the Board and its committees in 2012 is shown in the table below:
Board
Sir Simon Robertson (Chairman)
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom
Sir Frank Chapman 1
Iain Conn
Sir Peter Gregson 2
James Guyette
John McAdam
Mark Morris
John Neill CBE
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Jasmin Staiblin 3
Ian Strachan
Mike Terrett CBE 4
11(11)
10(11)
11(11)
11(11)
8(11)
10(11)
2 (3)
11(11)
10(11)
11(11)
11(11)
11(11)
11(11)
8(8)
11(11)
11(11)
Audit
Remuneration
Nomination
1(1)
4(4)
3(4)
4(4)
4(4)
3(4)
4(4)
0(1)
3(3)
4(4)
3(3)
4(4)
2(3)
4(4)
Ethics
Risk
Safety
5(5)
5(5)
5(5)
1(2)
2(2)
2(2)
2(2)
2(2)
4(4)
4(4)
4(4)
3(4)
3(3)
4(4)
2(2)
2(2)
2(2)
5(5)
2(2)
Figures in brackets denote the maximum numbers of meetings that could have been attended (seven Board meetings were scheduled and four called at short notice).
1
Sir Frank Chapman was unable to attend two Board meetings and three committee meetings held in December 2012 due to illness.
2
Sir Peter Gregson retired as a non-executive director at the AGM on 4 May 2012.
3
Jasmin Staiblin was appointed as a non-executive director on 21 May 2012.
4
Mike Terrett, Chief Operating Officer, retired on 31 December 2012.
Board evaluation
The UK Corporate Governance Code requires that the Board
undertakes an annual evaluation of its own performance and that
of its committees and individual directors and to do so externally at
least every three years. In 2012, the evaluation process was
conducted internally, a full external review having been carried out
by Jan Hall Associates in 2011.
The general consensus from the process was that the Board was
working well under the leadership of Sir Simon Robertson and John
Rishton. It was considered appropriate that succession planning and
the provision of information to the Board should be areas of focus
for 2013. Also some directors expressed the view that the Board
should maintain a continual watch on principal risks to avoid being
solely reliant on the work of the audit and risk committees.
Initially, directors were asked to complete a confidential survey
covering the areas set out as best practice in the Financial Reporting
Council’s ‘Guidance on Board Effectiveness – March 2011’. The
Company Secretary then produced a report which consolidated the
responses in such a way that individual contributions were not
attributable. Following the circulation of the report to the Board,
the Chairman conducted one-to-one interviews with each of them
and reported to the next board meeting on the findings and agreed
actions to be taken.
Directors’ terms of appointment
Executive directors are employees who have day-to-day
responsibilities as executives of the Group in addition to their
duties as directors. Each executive director receives a service
contract on appointment (see page 60 for further information).
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
45
Governance
Corporate governance report
Non-executive directors are generally independent of the Company,
are not employees and do not participate in the daily business
management of the Group. On appointment, each non-executive
director receives a letter setting out the conditions of his or her
appointment. Non-executive directors are appointed for an initial
term of three years, which may be extended with the agreement of
the Board, although reappointment is not automatic. Their term of
office is also subject to annual re-election by shareholders at the
AGM and will terminate without compensation if they fail to be
re-elected (see page 67 for further information).
Issues
Facilitated by
Operation of the Board and
governance
Group strategy development and
current issues
Financial structure
Risk strategy
Operational strategy
Technology and
engineering issues
Key site visits
Chairman and Company Secretary
Committee technical
requirements
Committee chairmen, internal
or external experts
Chief Executive
Chief Financial Officer
General Counsel & Head of Risk
Operations Director
Director – Engineering
and Technology
Company Secretary
Further training is available for all the directors, including
presentations by the executive team on particular aspects of the
business. In 2012, our lawyers, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, held
a seminar immediately following the November Board meeting
updating the Board on developments in corporate law and
regulation. In addition, there is a procedure for directors to take
independent professional advice at the Company’s expense and
every director has access to the General Counsel & Head of Risk and
the Company Secretary. In-house training is also provided to
directors of the Company’s subsidiaries and joint ventures.
Shareholder relations
Communications with shareholders regarding business strategy
and financial performance are coordinated by a dedicated
Investor Relations department that reports to the Chief Financial
Officer. Communications regarding the general administration of
shareholdings are coordinated by Company Secretariat, reporting
to the Company Secretary.
The two primary written sources of information about the
Group for shareholders are the website (www.rolls-royce.com)
and the published annual report, an online version of which is
also available on the website. The website also carries a wealth
of financial and other information about the Group that includes
current business strategy, historical financial data, recent
presentation materials as well as factual data about the Group’s
businesses, products and services.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
In 2012, around 340 meetings took place with over 320 separately
identifiable institutional investors. Of those meetings, the Chief
Executive attended 25 meetings and the Chief Financial Officer
50 meetings. From a regional perspective, the majority of meetings
took place in the UK (approximately 200). Sixty meetings occurred
in the US and Canada, and a further 35 meetings took place in
Europe. The Chairman also meets institutional investors from
time to time when requested.
AGM
Holders of ordinary shares may attend the Company’s AGM. The
Chief Executive gives a presentation highlighting key business
developments during the year and shareholders have an
opportunity to ask questions. The chairmen of the audit,
nomination, remuneration, ethics, safety and risk committees are
available to answer any questions from shareholders on the work of
their committees.
The Company confirms that it sends the AGM notice and relevant
documentation to all shareholders at least 20 working days before
the date of the AGM. For those shareholders who have consented
to receive communications electronically, notice is given by email
or by written notice of the availability of documents on the
Group’s website.
This year’s AGM will be held at 11.00am on Thursday, 2 May 2013
at the QEII Conference Centre, Broad Sanctuary, Westminster,
London SW1P 3EE. The AGM notice and the annual report will be
available to view on the Group’s website. Shareholders unable to
attend the AGM can vote on the business of the meeting either by
post or online.
Independence of the non-executive directors
The Board conducts a rigorous review of the independence of the
non-executive directors every year, based on the criteria in the Code.
This review was undertaken in November 2012 and the Board
concluded that all the non-executive directors remained
independent in character and judgement.
The Code does not consider the test of independence to be
appropriate to the chairman of a company. However, Sir Simon
Robertson did meet the Code’s independence criteria upon his
appointment as Chairman in January 2005. His other external
commitments are described on page 40.
Governance
Director training
Newly appointed directors participate in a structured induction
programme and receive a comprehensive data pack providing
detailed information on the Group. An existing executive director
acts as a mentor to each newly appointed non-executive director,
giving guidance and advice as required.
The Group conducts a dedicated investor relations programme with
institutional investors which includes various formal events during
the year, as well as a regular series of one-to-one and group
meetings. The purpose of these events is to highlight a particular
issue, theme or announcement that the Group believes warrants
further explanation or clarification. The events also provide
opportunities for shareholders to meet members of the senior
management team to discuss topics of interest. Examples of these
events in 2012 were: the preliminary and half-yearly results
announcements; the AGM; the update given at the Farnborough
International Airshow on trends in the Civil and Defence aerospace
businesses; visits to the Group’s sites; and industry conferences.
The one-to-one and group meetings provide additional context
around the Group’s business strategy and financial performance
such that shareholders are able to consistently and fairly value the
Group’s businesses.
46
Governance
Corporate governance report
Conflicts of interest
Directors have a duty to avoid a situation in which they have, or can
have, a direct or indirect interest which conflicts, or possibly may
conflict, with the interests of the Company unless that situational
conflict has been authorised by the Board. The nomination
committee has reviewed and authorised all directors’ situational
conflicts and has agreed that while directors are required to keep
confidential all Company information, they shall not be required to
share with the Company confidential information received by them
from a third party which is the subject of the situational conflict.
Indemnity
The Company has entered into separate Deeds of Indemnity in
favour of its directors which were in force during the financial year
and remained in force at the date of this report. The deeds provide
substantially the same protection as that already provided to
directors under the indemnity in Article 216 of the Company’s
Articles of Association. The Company has also reviewed, arranged
and maintains appropriate insurance cover for any legal action
taken against its directors and officers.
Board committees
The Board has established a number of committees, the principal
ones being audit, remuneration, nomination, ethics and risk.
A safety committee was established in 2012. Terms of reference
for each committee are available on the Group’s website at
www.rolls-royce.com. The membership, responsibilities and
activities of these committees are described on pages 47 to 56.
Executive committees
In 2012, the Executive Board, the senior decision-making committee,
was made up of the executive directors. It worked with the Board to
develop Group strategy and policy, established corporate priorities,
decided on senior succession. It made recommendations to the
nominations committee in relation to membership of the Executive
Board and the Group Leadership Team (GLT). The membership of the
GLT is described on page 42.
The Executive Board reviewed HS&E performance, customer
relations, governance, financial and operational performance as
well as receiving regular updates on potential acquisitions and
disposals.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
The GLT’s responsibilities were:
• to provide input and advice to the Executive Board on policy
and strategy;
• to agree priorities and objectives in management of the Group;
and
• to drive performance.
The GLT regularly considered HS&E, customer relations, financial
and operational performance. In addition the committee discussed
a range of topics of business relevance. This included employee
engagement, sustainability and the Global Code of Business Ethics.
In January 2013, the Executive Board and GLT were combined into
the Executive Leadership Team (ELT). This new body simplifies the
senior management structure, it will establish clear accountability
and improve decision making.
47
Governance
Audit committee report
I would like to thank committee
members, the executive management
team and our auditor for the open
discussions that take place at
our meetings
The audit committee, which consists exclusively of independent non-executive
directors, met four times in 2012 and attendance by the members is shown in the table
on page 44. During the year, the external auditors (KPMG Audit Plc), the Head of Internal
Audit, the General Counsel & Head of Risk and the Acting Company Secretary attended
the meetings, together with the Chairman of the Board, the Chief Executive and the
Chief Financial Officer. Other Board members and/or senior executives may also attend
meetings at the invitation of the committee chairman. The General Counsel & Head of
Risk and the Head of Internal Audit have direct access to the committee.
I am pleased to present the report of the audit committee for the
year. I would like to thank committee members, the executive
management team and our auditor for the open discussions that
take place at our meetings and the importance they all attach to its
work. During 2012, the committee sought to enhance the clarity and
focus of all the reports it receives.
A key task for 2013 will be to consider the implications of the revised
UK Corporate Governance Code. In particular, we will assess the
implications of the requirement for regular audit tendering and
the procedures supporting the directors’ responsibility report
statement that: “the report and accounts, taken as a whole, is fair,
balanced and understandable and provides the information
necessary for shareholders to assess the Company’s performance,
business model and strategy”.
Responsibilities
In summary, the committee recommends the financial statements
to the Board and reviews the Group’s financial reporting and
accounting policies, including formal announcements and trading
statements relating to the Company’s financial performance.
It oversees the relationship with KPMG, and the role and
effectiveness of the internal audit function (previously termed
Business Assurance). The committee reviews the Group’s procedures
for detecting, monitoring and managing the risk of fraud
and the Group’s internal controls and systems for assessing and
mitigating risk.
The Board’s review of the risk management process and its
statement on internal control as required by ‘Internal Control:
Guidance for Directors’ published by the FRC is on pages 70 to 71.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Since the year end, the committee has reviewed the form and
content of the Group’s 2012 annual report and financial statements.
In conducting its review, the committee considered reports
prepared by management and the external auditors. These reports
covered analyses of the judgements and sources of estimation
uncertainty involved in applying the accounting policies as
described in note 1 to the financial statements. The committee also
considered the going concern statement on page 72. The committee
recommended the 2012 annual report to the Board.
Internal Audit
In May and November, the Head of Internal Audit presented a
summary of the reviews performed in the previous six months.
The committee reviewed the effectiveness of the internal control
environment and the structure in place to resolve identified
weaknesses. It also agreed an improved structure for internal audit
reports to the committee, with an increased focus on significant
issues and trends evident in the reports and the speed of their
resolution. During the year, the committee approved a revised
charter for the internal audit function, reviewed and agreed the
work plan for 2013 and reviewed compliance with the Group’s
policies in respect of expenses incurred by the directors and other
senior executives.
Auditors
During the year, the committee considered the independence and
objectivity of KPMG and agreed the audit strategy and the audit fee.
Non-audit services provided by KPMG
In order to safeguard auditors’ independence and objectivity, the
following policy is applied in relation to services provided by
the auditors:
• audit related services – the auditors undertake these services as
it is work that they must, or are best suited to, perform. It
includes formalities relating to borrowings, grants, shareholder
and other circulars, risk management services, various regulatory
reports and work in respect of acquisitions and disposals;
• tax, accounting and mergers and acquisitions – the auditors are
used for this work where they are best suited to undertake it.
All other significant consulting work in these areas is put out to
tender; and
• other advisory or consultancy services – the auditors are
generally prohibited from providing these services.
Pre-approval of non-audit fees is required for non-audit fees
exceeding pre-determined thresholds which vary according to the
nature of the service being proposed.
Governance
Lewis Booth CBE
Chairman of the audit committee
Work of the committee in 2012
The focus at the meetings in February and July 2012 was the 2011
annual report and financial statements and 2012 half-yearly results
announcement respectively, including an evaluation of the going
concern statements therein. The May and November meetings
reviewed the interim management statements, considered matters
which were expected to require consideration at the following half
year and full year and forthcoming changes to reporting and
accounting requirements.
48
Governance
Audit committee report
The committee reviews non-audit fees charged by KPMG at each
meeting and annually reviews the limits for pre-approval of
non-audit fees. In particular the committee pre-approved: an
engagement for KPMG to provide specialist support to internal
audit during the Group’s IT modernisation project while the
department recruited its own personnel; and the continuation of
specialist support to the IT modernisation programme that was
being performed by a consultancy which was acquired by KPMG
after the engagement had commenced. Expenditure on audit and
non-audit services is set out in note 7 to the financial statements.
Reappointment of auditor
Each year, the committee reviews the effectiveness and
performance of the external auditors with feedback from
committee members, senior finance personnel and internal audit.
KPMG were appointed as auditors in 1990 and this appointment
has not been subject to a tender process since that date. The lead
audit partner is required to rotate every five years and other key
audit partners are required to rotate every seven years. The current
lead audit partner completed his term in 2012. His replacement
as lead audit partner has had no previous involvement with
Rolls-Royce in any capacity. No contractual obligations restrict the
committee’s choice of external auditors. The committee concluded
that KPMG provides an effective audit and the committee and the
Board have recommended their reappointment.
Resolutions to reappoint the external auditor, KPMG Audit Plc, and
to authorise the directors to determine the auditor’s remuneration,
will be proposed at the AGM on 2 May 2013.
I hope that you will vote in favour of the resolutions as the directors
intend to do in respect of their own shareholdings.
Other matters
During the year, the committee reviewed risk management in the
Marine and Civil businesses. The committee reviewed its own terms
of reference.
Private meetings
During the year, the committee met privately with the Chief
Financial Officer, KPMG and the Head of Internal Audit. I also met
the lead audit partner in private in advance of each meeting.
Lewis Booth CBE
Chairman of the audit committee
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
49
Governance
Nomination committee report
I have absolutely no doubt that Ian Davis
has all the required attributes to lead
the Company to even greater success in
the future
However, diversity means much more than gender and we recognise
that appointments should reflect the increasing range and
geographical spread of activities carried out by the Group. In May
2012, we were pleased to announce the appointment of Jasmin
Staiblin, a German national and currently Chief Executive of Alpiq,
one of Europe’s leading energy companies. Jasmin’s appointment
brings to the Board an exceptionally talented individual with broad
and relevant international engineering experience.
In addition to the work described above, the committee also carried
out the following tasks during the year:
The nomination committee, which comprises the Chairman, the Chief Executive and the
independent non-executive directors met four times in 2012. Attendance by the
members is shown in the table on page 44.
The principal role of the nomination committee is to consider, and
recommend for approval to the Board, the appointment of suitable
persons as directors of the Company and to lead the process for
such appointments. The committee is also responsible for reviewing
and overseeing senior management development to ensure orderly
succession planning at and immediately below Board level.
During the year, the committee continued to develop its succession
plans for new non-executive directors taking into account their
respective tenures of office as far forward as 2020, analysing the
skills which were either missing or could be missing in future and
how different personalities would fit around the board table.
The committee continues to be mindful of the diversity agenda
in its candidate selection process. In September 2011, we issued
our response to the Davies Report on women on boards stating that
we expected to make demonstrable progress in this area by 2015.
We are committed to improving diversity at all levels of leadership
in Rolls-Royce and to making appointments based on merit at
the most senior levels of our organisation. We recognise the
importance of gender diversity in the boardroom and the valuable
contribution that women make in achieving the right mix of skills,
knowledge and experience that enables us to maximise our
corporate potential.
We continue to participate in the FTSE 100 Cross Company
Mentoring Programme, the objective of which is to increase the
pool of eligible senior female candidates for UK Board positions and
have comprehensive programmes in place to increase the diversity
of our internal pipeline of future leaders. We have also issued
guidance to executive search companies outlining the importance
of diverse candidate short lists. Further details of our gender
representation can be found on page 34.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
During the latter part of the year, Iain Conn ably led the committee
in its search for a suitable replacement for myself as Chairman of
the Board. An independent consultant, MWM Boardroom
Consulting LLP, was again appointed to conduct the search having
assisted in the process which led to Jasmin’s appointment earlier in
the year. I am pleased to report that this process has resulted in the
announcement on 14 February 2013 of the appointment of Ian
Davis to the Board, effective 1 March 2013. He will succeed me as
Chairman at the conclusion of the AGM. I have absolutely no doubt
that Ian Davis has all the required attributes to lead the Group to
even greater success in the future.
Sir Simon Robertson
Chairman of the nomination committee
Governance
Sir Simon Robertson
Chairman of the nomination committee
• received papers on senior executive development and leadership
team success and a detailed assessment of current diversity
across the Group;
• considered time commitments and potential conflicts faced by
directors who wished to take up non-executive positions on the
boards of other companies;
• reviewed its own terms of reference;
• considered the independence of the non-executive directors;
• considered the standing schedule of directors’ conflicts of
interest and recommended to the Board that such conflicts be
duly re-authorised; and
• recommended the appointment of a new company secretary.
50
Governance
Ethics committee report
The Board will not tolerate
improper business conduct of any
sort and will take all necessary action
to ensure compliance
Global Code of Business Ethics (Global Code)
In 2007, the Board supported the issue of a Global Code of Business
Ethics which sets out the principles to be followed by employees
when conducting business and makes it clear that the Board
pursues a zero tolerance approach to bribery and corruption. The
Global Code was revised in 2009 and was assessed as ‘best in class’
in 2011 by Radley Yeldar, a corporate communications company that
reviewed 142 FTSE 350 Codes of Conduct against a set of 28 criteria.
Work is currently underway to simplify the Global Code which we
expect to roll-out with training and engagement activities in the
first half of 2013. The revised Global Code will:
• provide increased clarity around the Company’s principles and
the responsibility of individuals;
• focus on the guidance and support available to employees to help
them apply the Global Code; and
• be more concise while focusing content on key topics.
Ian Strachan
Chairman of the ethics committee
The ethics committee consists exclusively of independent non-executive directors. In
2012, the committee met five times and details of its membership and attendance can
be found on page 44. During the year, the General Counsel & Head of Risk, Robert Webb,
took executive responsibility for ethics and attended the meetings. The Chairman of the
Board, the Chief Executive, the Head of Business Ethics and the Chief Compliance Officer
were also invited to attend meetings on a regular basis.
The ethics committee was formed in 2008. It is responsible for
reviewing compliance with the Group’s Global Code of Business
Ethics, for establishing bribery prevention policies and for
reviewing arrangements by which staff may raise concerns
about improprieties in confidence. It considers recommendations
on ethical matters made by external regulatory authorities or
other bodies and makes recommendations to the Board on how
they should be applied in Rolls-Royce. The committee’s full
terms of reference are available on the Group’s website
at www.rolls-royce.com.
Referral to Serious Fraud Office (SFO)
During the last year, much of the discussion at the ethics
committee has centred on specific concerns about bribery and
corruption involving intermediaries in overseas markets.
This followed a request for information from the SFO about
allegations of malpractice in Indonesia and China. The review by
our compliance team identified matters of sufficient concern to
cause the committee to recommend to the Board that the law
firm Debevoise & Plimpton LLP be instructed to conduct an
independent investigation.
As a result of that investigation, on 6 December 2012 we announced
that we were passing information to the SFO addressing their
concerns in Indonesia and China and identifying further matters
of concern in other overseas markets. The consequence of these
disclosures will be decided by the regulatory authorities. It is too
early to predict the outcomes but these could include the
prosecution of individuals and of the Company. We are cooperating
fully. John Rishton has stated unequivocally that neither he nor the
Board will tolerate improper conduct of any sort and all necessary
action will be taken to ensure compliance. The Board is committed
to anti-bribery and corruption (ABC) compliance. Our Board Charter
includes a commitment to ensure the Group meets ‘the highest
legal and ethical standards’.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
ABC work programme
After the publication of the Woolf Committee report in 2008, the
Board undertook a systematic review of its ethics and compliance
procedures that led to the creation of the ethics committee which
first met under my chairmanship in November 2008. In 2009, with
the assistance of an independent firm of auditors and at a cost of
over £6 million, the Company conducted a thorough review to
measure its ABC policies and procedures against the Woolf
Committee report, the Aerospace & Defence Industries Association
of Europe Common Industry Standards, the US Federal Sentencing
Guidelines, the UK Bribery Bill then in draft and the OECD
Guidelines. The first policies to be implemented arising from the
work programme were the Global Gifts and Hospitality Policy and a
new Global Intermediaries Policy both of which went into effect on
1 December 2010.
Policies, procedures and guidance notes on the remaining topic
areas followed in the period from December 2010 to the
implementation of the UK Bribery Act on 1 July 2011. These covered
a number of topics including: sponsorships and donations;
facilitation payments; raising concerns; conflicts of interest;
competitive intelligence; sales and business evaluation;
collaborative ventures; joint ventures; offset; human resources;
financial monitoring and reporting; supply chain and purchasing;
government interactions; and political lobbying. The ABC
Programme team came to a close in July 2011, having delivered
all of the necessary policies identified in the review.
Global Intermediaries Policy
In 2009, the newly formed ethics committee enhanced and updated
the Group’s Global Intermediaries Policy to require more exacting
contractual warranties and safeguards in agreements with
intermediaries. The current policy introduced in December 2010
represents a significant enhancement over the prior regime. A
risk-based approach has been adopted, whereby the Company
assigns a risk rating to each intermediary (lower, moderate, or
higher) on the basis of a standardised risk assessment.
Proportionate levels of review and due diligence are conducted on
each intermediary depending on this risk rating. This has resulted in
much more intense scrutiny of activities in high risk countries,
covering matters such as the level of payments to intermediaries,
their qualifications and the business case for their use.
51
Governance
Ethics committee report
Further work is underway to improve the process for appointment
or renewal of intermediary advisers and consultants. The Company
plans to introduce further enhanced controls targeting: the nature
of the services the intermediary will provide; the value for money
that represents; proposed and historical payment information;
and disclosure of all relevant historical information about
the intermediary.
Global Gifts and Hospitality Policy
This policy ensures that gifts and hospitality offered or accepted by
the Group’s employees do not appear to give or actually give a
business advantage and are properly approved and documented.
An updated and simpler version of the Global Gifts and Hospitality
Policy was introduced in October 2012 along with a global internetbased reporting tool, ‘Rolls-Royce Compliance Online’.
Training and engagement
Following the launch of the revised Global Code in 2009, a training
and engagement programme was undertaken to ensure full
awareness of the Global Code and the Group’s values and ethics
across the organisation. This training programme ultimately
reached more than 37,000 employees, starting with face-to-face
workshops delivered to 4,600 managers across the Group.
The ABC work programme introduced a further comprehensive
training programme to ensure that the new ABC policies and
procedures were fully understood. Two training modules were
created for gifts and hospitality – an e-learning module was
completed by 23,000 employees and a facilitated online training
module designed for employees was completed by the 4,000
employees responsible for approving gifts and hospitality. Two
training modules also support the intermediaries process, both of
which must be taken by any employees who interact with the
Group’s intermediaries. By the time the UK Bribery Act came into
effect on 1 July 2011, the Group had delivered more than 12,000
hours of training with an additional 9,000 hours planned.
Further training is always on our agenda. In 2012, the Group
launched an online training module for employees in how to deal
with conflicts of interest and also developed training for employees
who are actively involved in the acquisition and use of competitive
intelligence. Additional training on ABC policies will also be rolled
out on a global basis in 2013.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Conclusion
As our actions in 2012 demonstrate, we aim to live up to the high
ethical standards we have set ourselves. Despite the progress we
have undoubtedly made, we constantly strive to improve our
controls as indicated by our recent appointment of Lord Gold to
lead an independent review of our current procedures.
We believe that everyone in our Group has a role to play in
maintaining and building upon our reputation. This is at the heart
of the way we do business and how we deliver our brand promise
of ‘Trusted to deliver excellence’.
Ian Strachan
Chairman of the ethics committee
Governance
Confidential reporting lines
In 2008, the Company established telephone contact numbers in
31 countries along with web-based reporting to enable employees,
wherever they were based in the world, to report confidentially any
concerns they might have with regard to business conduct.
The committee receives reports on concerns raised through the
confidential reporting line. Early this year, an improved service will
be introduced combining both the internal ethics helpline and the
confidential reporting line to provide a single route for individuals
to ask questions or raise concerns 24 hours a day.
Central ethics and compliance team
In 2011, the Board vested authority to administer and enforce our
ABC policies in a newly-created compliance organisation, separate
from but working closely with the business ethics team that
remains in place to manage the Global Code and the reporting
hotlines. The compliance organisation’s remit is to embed the ABC
policies in the businesses and take the ABC programme into a
‘business as usual’ mode. The compliance organisation, with a total
staff of 19, is headed by the Group’s first Chief Compliance Officer,
who joined in May 2011.
52
Governance
Risk committee report
Focusing our attention on a smaller
number of risks has led to more
comprehensive discussions about the
nature of the risks that really matter
to our business
These reviews take place at least twice a year. Following
discussion, the committee decided that this bottom up process
could be sense checked by a top down process; asking each member
of the committee to identify the risks they considered would have
a significant impact on the Group. The resulting list did overlap
with the bottom up approach but helped stimulate debate which
led us to redefine some of the risks and produce a new list of
principal risks.
At the November meeting, we refined this new list of principal risks
further, making changes to remove duplication and to define the
risks more clearly. We discussed how the risks had changed and also
reviewed how each risk was managed, identifying where further
action was required.
John Rishton
Chairman of the risk committee
The risk committee, which consists of the executive directors, met twice in 2012.
Attendance by the members is shown in the table on page 44. During the year, the
General Counsel & Head of Risk and the Head of Enterprise Risk Management also
attended the meetings.
Summary
During the course of our meetings this year, the committee
has spent time discussing and agreeing the most significant risks
that the Group faces. We have condensed the 17 risks listed in our
last annual report to the eight that can be found on pages 18 to 19.
Each of these risks is owned by specific members of my executive
team. We reviewed and challenged ourselves as to how these risks
were managed.
Development of principal risks
At the June 2012 committee meeting, we performed our usual task
of considering any potential changes to the full corporate risk
register. The risk register comprises those risks that are escalated to
the committee following reviews carried out by the underlying
business units, programmes and functions.
Risk committee
Businesses / Functions
Business units
Programmes
Work packages
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
In January 2013, the committee concluded this major review of the
number and the nature of our risks and we believe that the list we
have reported on pages 18 to 19 represents the most significant
risks that would have an acute and traumatic impact on the Group
were they to occur.
We also resolved to develop key risk indicators to measure each of
the principal risks and use them to inform us where future action
may be required. These will complement the key performance
indicators shown on pages 16 to 17.
Group risk process
The risk process is part of our quality management system that all
parts of the business must follow and it is shown below.
1. Plan
2. Identify
3. Assess
4. Treat
5. Review,
control and
communicate
6. Close out
The General Counsel & Head of Risk now leads our enterprise
wide risk team which is responsible for the risk policy and processes.
Line ownership for risk management is devolved into our business
units and functions, supported by a network of risk champions
and risk managers.
I am pleased with the level of active debate that we have had about
risk this year. Focusing our attention on a smaller number of risks
has helped us to have more comprehensive discussions about the
nature of the risks that really matter to our business and to
communicate these throughout the Group.
Our attention next year will be on developing further measures by
which the status of these risks can be assessed.
John Rishton
Chairman of the risk committee
53
Governance
Safety committee report
The safety of our products
is paramount
The safety committee consists exclusively of independent non-executive directors. In
2012, the committee met twice and details of its membership and attendance can be
found on page 44. During the year, the Chairman of the Board, the Chief Executive, the
Director – Engineering and Technology and the General Counsel & Head of Risk were
also invited to attend meetings.
I am pleased to present my first report as chairman of the newly
formed Rolls-Royce safety committee. The committee held its first
meeting in June 2012 having been tasked by the Board to keep
under review the scope and effectiveness of the Group’s Product
Safety Policies and its Health, Safety and Environment (HS&E)
Policies. The Group’s performance in HS&E is described in more
detail in the sustainability report on page 35.
The safety of our products is, of course, paramount. We supply high
value capital products to customers that are strictly regulated with
regard to safety. Civil aerospace products are required to meet
relevant airworthiness authority standards, whilst defence
operators define their own standards for military aerospace and
naval products. Marine classification societies prescribe standards
for product designs, working within the comprehensive regulatory
framework for shipping developed by the International Maritime
Organisation. Energy products, including those for the civil nuclear
programme need to meet relevant standards and regulations.
The committee’s first priority has been to familiarise the nonexecutive committee members with the Group’s detailed safety
protocols and procedures. At our first meeting, we received a
presentation on product safety from the Technical and Quality
Director which covered: the background to the Rolls-Royce Safety
Management Process; the stringent risk levels the Group works to;
the status of some key issues being managed across the Group’s
businesses; and safety assurance and safety in design.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
At our meeting in December, we had a presentation from the
Director – Engineering and Technology supported by the Head
of Product Safety Assurance who took us through the Group’s
product safety processes in more detail and how the engineering
function asserts control over critical safety issues throughout the
manufacturing process. The meeting discussed risk management
in HS&E and the Group’s risk profile. We also considered personal
security arrangements for employees travelling to difficult
territories or else working in high risk environments.
In November 2012, I spent a day at the Group’s facilities in Derby,
UK and met the engineering teams. I was impressed by the depth
of knowledge and diligence demonstrated by the team members.
During the tour, the team showed me how the Trent 1000 design
process had proactively addressed safety issues at the design stage.
I also looked at the management of in-service safety issues and how
safety was managed for the Royal Navy’s submarine reactors
currently in service and the design-for-safety approach adopted for
the next generation successor submarine. My colleagues on the
committee are planning similar induction visits in the near future.
The safety committee has been in existence just eight months at
the date of this report. I feel the committee has made a good start
but clearly there is more to do and I expect to be able to report much
more progress in 2013, as the committee’s understanding and
reporting processes mature.
Sir Frank Chapman
Chairman of the safety committee
Governance
Sir Frank Chapman
Chairman of the safety committee
This was followed by a presentation from the Director – Engineering
and Technology on the governance of HS&E issues in the Group.
The committee considered assurance, key metrics, performance,
global improvement plans in course of delivery and the mechanism
by which the Group learned from incidents. The meeting also
considered the Group’s environmental performance including
emissions levels and targets and actions to improve the in-house
energy footprint.
54
Governance
Remuneration committee report
This year’s remuneration again
reflects a strong performance
Dame Helen Alexander
Chairman of the remuneration committee
Rolls-Royce has followed a consistent strategy towards executive
remuneration over many years. We believe that a significant
proportion of senior executives’ remuneration should be made
up of performance-related incentives so that overall reward is
closely aligned to the creation of long-term stakeholder value.
These principles are well-established in Rolls-Royce. This year’s
remuneration again reflects a strong performance. Rolls-Royce has
achieved record underlying revenues, underlying profits, and has a
£60 billion order book which should ensure that the business will
remain strong for many years to come.
In June 2012, the Department for Business Innovation & Skills
(BIS) issued remuneration reporting regulations. Although these
will not become mandatory until next year’s report and some of
the details have still to be finalised, we have gone some way to
anticipating these new regulations. On page 58 we have presented
a total figure for remuneration table which includes an estimate of
the value of the long-term incentive plan that is due to vest in March
2013. On page 62 we have illustrated the value of executive director
packages for 2013 under different performance scenarios.
In the commentary, we show how the annual bonus paid in 2013
aligned to performance achieved in the 2012 financial year and
how the Performance Share Plan (PSP) 2010-2012 out-turn was
aligned to performance achieved and shareholder value generated
over the three-year performance period; from 1 January 2010 to
31 December 2012.
Annual bonus outcome
It is an important principle of the Rolls-Royce executive bonus
arrangements that no bonus can be paid to anyone unless the
entire Group has achieved the financial targets set by the
committee. During 2012, the Group delivered 24 per cent growth
in underlying profit before tax and, before the cost of acquisitions
and foreign exchange translation effects, a net cash inflow of
£137 million. This strong performance was achieved in challenging
economic circumstances whilst maintaining the long-term
investment programmes needed to deliver our existing order
book and future growth.
The committee is satisfied that the annual bonus financial outcome
of 85 per cent for the executive directors for 2012 appropriately
reflects these results and the significant value delivered to all
stakeholders. Individual bonuses for executive directors reflect
personal performance against clear objectives and can therefore
vary in the range zero per cent to 120 per cent of the 85 per cent
bonus determined by the Group financial outcome. The aggregate
of individual bonuses cannot exceed the 85 per cent financial
outcome. For executive directors, 40 per cent of the bonus is
delivered in deferred shares which must be held for a period of two
years, to align further with shareholder interests.
Underlying profit
before tax (£m)
1,429
1,157
+24%
11
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
12
55
Governance
Remuneration committee report
Long-term remuneration for 2012 (£000)
462
451
385
107
747
178
637
765
James
Guyette
Mark
Morris
Colin
Smith
Mike
Terrett
PSP (appreciation in share price)
PSP (value at grant in 2010)
Over the three-year performance period for the 2010 PSP grant,
our performance in terms of cash flow and earnings per share was
sufficient to release 100 per cent of the conditional shares originally
granted. The Company’s TSR was 11th in the FTSE 100 over the
three-year performance period. This TSR performance triggers
an increase of 50 per cent in the shares released to executive
directors and other members of the Group Leadership Team and
an increase of 25 per cent for other executives. Executives must
retain 50 per cent of the shares they receive under the scheme
until they retire from the Company or achieve a minimum
shareholding requirement which is 200 per cent of salary for the
Chief Executive or 150 per cent for other executive directors.
This ensures the directors have a personal financial interest in
the long-term success of the business.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
The following chart tracks the value of £100 invested in Rolls-Royce
shares (to be clear, without taking account of dividends) compared
to the FTSE 100 index from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012, to
match with the performance period for the March 2010 PSP award.
Rolls-Royce – three year TSR data
200
175
150
Rolls-Royce (rebased to 100)
FTSE 100 (rebased to 100)
125
100
75
50
2010
2011
2012
2013
Rolls-Royce TSR of 818 per cent over the ten-year period to
31 December 2012 was better than any other FTSE 100 company.
Only 71 of the companies which made up the FTSE 100 at the
beginning of that period are still trading independently and the
median TSR amongst these 71 companies over the same ten-year
period is 92 per cent.
Total returns over the period to 31 December 2012
Last year
Last 3 years
Last 5 years
Last 7 years
Last 10 years
FTSE 100
Rolls-Royce
17%
35%
11%
43%
92%
37%
106%
90%
187%
818%
Rolls-Royce versus FTSE 100 TSR growth in each performance year
2010
2011
2012
FTSE 100
Rolls-Royce
23%
5%
17%
+37%
+13%
+37%
All TSR numbers on this page, for both Rolls-Royce and FTSE 100, are
calculated based on start and end values averaged over the
previous six months. This is consistent with the rules of the PSP.
Governance
Performance Share Plan outcome
The long-term incentive plans at Rolls-Royce are designed to reward
long-term value creation. They are measured over three years
against Total Shareholder Return (TSR), earnings per share and cash
generation. Against all these metrics Rolls-Royce has performed
well. The share price, for example, increased by 60 per cent
between 1 March 2010 (date of grant for the 2010 PSP award) and
31 December 2012, compared to an increase in the FTSE 100 index
over the same period of nine per cent. The March 2010 PSP award
was made on the basis of a share price of 544.70 pence. The graph
below demonstrates that a large part of the performance share plan
reward is due to the substantial increase in the Company’s share
price from 544.70 pence per share at award date to 873.50 pence
per share at the end of the three-year performance period – a strong
alignment of executive reward to shareholder reward. The actual
value released will depend on the share price when the award
vests on 1 March 2013.
56
Governance
Remuneration committee report
Remuneration and opportunities for our employees
All employees worldwide have the opportunity to benefit from our
success through participation in our global bonus and share plans.
All employees who were with us throughout 2012 will be receiving
a bonus of at least two weeks’ pay as a result of our 2012
performance. Around a half of our employees currently participate
in our global save-as-you-earn ShareSave plan which gives all
employees the opportunity to benefit from share price growth. In
February 2013, two of our ShareSave plans matured – a three-year
plan granted in 2009 at an option price of 387 pence and a five-year
plan granted in 2007 at an option price of 416.1 pence against a
closing price on 1 February 2013 of 971 pence. In addition, more
than 6,000 employees participate in our SharePurchase and
ShareBonus plans which allow employees to purchase shares on
a regular basis and to convert bonus payments into shares.
The work of the committee during 2012
In February 2012, the committee endorsed the out-turn for bonus
and long-term incentive plans. It also considered a benchmarking
report by Deloitte LLP and assessments of personal performance
before approving salary increases for senior executives.
The committee set bonus targets for 2012 and targets for the
Performance Share Plan 2012-2014 and agreed the participation
of senior executives in those plans. It also considered a draft of the
directors’ remuneration report which it agreed to recommend
to the Board for approval.
In November, the committee considered the way the bonus pool
would be determined for 2013. The committee agreed revised terms
of reference and considered the BIS consultation on remuneration
reporting. It agreed that consideration would be given to early
adoption of some of the disclosure requirements within the draft
regulations in the 2012 annual report.
In December, the committee considered the potential out-turns for
the 2012 bonus, the all-employee bonus scheme and the vesting of
PSP 2010 – 2012.
In summary
We support the clear message on executive remuneration sent by
BIS that: ‘generous rewards for leading executives are not an issue
where executive remuneration is well-structured, clearly linked to
the strategic objectives of a company, and which rewards executives
that contribute to the long-term success of that company’.
The committee is very pleased that once again we are disclosing
and explaining the compensation arrangements for Rolls-Royce
executives against a background of excellent business performance.
Dame Helen Alexander
Chairman of the remuneration committee
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
57
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
During 2012, the committee had access to advice from:
• Deloitte LLP 1; and
• Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP, the Company’s lawyers.
Deloitte LLP advised the Group on tax, assurance, pensions and corporate finance and
Deloitte MCS Limited provided consulting services.
1
The remuneration policy framework
The Group operates in a highly competitive, international market.
Its business is complex, technologically advanced and has long time
horizons. The Group is committed to achieving sustained
improvements in performance and this depends crucially on the
individual contributions made by the executive team and by
employees at all levels. The Board therefore believes that an
effective remuneration strategy plays an essential part in the
future success of the Group.
Accordingly, we remain committed to a remuneration policy which,
whilst sufficiently flexible to take account of future changes in the
Group’s business environment and in remuneration practice, will
continue to reflect the following broad principles:
• the remuneration of executive directors and other senior
executives should reflect their responsibilities and contain
incentives to deliver the Group’s performance objectives without
encouraging excessive risk taking;
• remuneration must be capable of attracting and retaining the
individuals necessary for business success;
• total remuneration should be based on Group and individual
performance, both in the short and long term;
• the system of remuneration should establish a close identity of
interest between senior executives and shareholders through
measures such as encouraging the senior executives to acquire
shares in the Company. Therefore, a significant proportion of
senior executive remuneration will comprise share-based
long-term incentives; and
• when determining remuneration, the remuneration committee
should take into account pay and employment conditions
elsewhere in the Group.
The committee reviews regularly both the competitiveness
of the Group’s remuneration structure and its role in
incentivising executives to enhance value for all stakeholders
over the longer term.
The main components of remuneration
The main components of remuneration for all executives worldwide comprise base salary, annual incentive arrangements, long-term
share-based incentives and benefits. Executives are also entitled to participate in all-employee share plans.
Base salaries • S
et by the committee at levels required to recruit and retain high
quality senior executives with reference to the marketplace for
companies of similar size, internationality and complexity and
taking account of pay elsewhere in the Group.
• Set with reference to market practice.
• N
ormally reviewed annually on 1 March. Increases must be
justified on the basis of performance and are not automatic.
• Annual incentive.
Annual
easures set by the committee, to align with Group Strategy,
Performance • M
based on underlying profit, cash flow and individual objectives
Related
and performance.
Award plan
• Strong link between performance and remuneration.
(APRA)
• Promotes share ownership and encourages decisions in the
long-term interest of shareholders.
• Bonuses can be increased by up to 20 per cent to reflect
exceptional personal performance.
• Shares vest after two years subject to continued employment.
• C
ompulsory deferral of 40 per cent of bonus into shares.
• Bonus potential:
– for on target performance, 75 per cent of salary for executive
directors, and 81 per cent for Chief Executive.
– for maximum performance, 125 per cent of salary for executive
directors, and 135 per cent for Chief Executive.
• For UK participants, APRA awards do not form part of pensionable
earnings.
Performance • Share-based long-term incentive.
• Conditional on corporate performance.
Share Plan
• Measures based on Cash Flow Per Share (CPS), Total Shareholder
(PSP)
Return (TSR) and an underlying earnings per ordinary share (EPS)
hurdle to ensure alignment with Group strategy and with the
interests of shareholders.
• Shares vest after three years provided performance criteria are met.
• 5
0 per cent must be held until retirement or the minimum
shareholding requirement is met.
• Potential:
– for maximum CPS performance, 100 per cent of salary for
executive directors, and 120 per cent for Chief Executive.
– for maximum CPS and TSR performance, 150 per cent of salary
for executive directors, and 180 per cent for Chief Executive.
All-employee • ShareSave Plan – a savings-related share option plan available to all • ShareSave options may be exercised in three or five years from the
date of grant.
share plans
employees allowing purchase of shares at a discount to the share
• Shares under the SIP vest after five years free from income tax and
price at date of grant.
national insurance.
• Free share element of the Share Incentive Plan (SIP) where UK
employees receive shares as part of any bonus paid.
• Partnership share element of the SIP under which UK employees
may make regular purchases of shares from pre-tax income.
In addition to the above, pension and other benefits, which are competitive in local markets, are provided.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Governance
Remuneration committee
The committee is responsible for making recommendations to the
Board on the Group’s policy regarding executive remuneration and
determines, on the Board’s behalf, the specific remuneration
packages of the Chairman, the executive directors and a number
of senior executives. A copy of the committee’s terms of reference
is available at www.rolls-royce.com/about/management/
corporate_governance. The remuneration committee consists
exclusively of independent non-executive directors. In 2012, the
committee met three times and details of its membership and
attendance can be found on page 44. Peter Byrom retired as a
member of the remuneration committee in February 2011. He
continued to attend meetings by invitation. During the year, the
Chairman of the Board, the Chief Executive, the Group HR Director
and the HR Director – Performance, Reward and Recognition also
attended the meetings.
58
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
Total remuneration
We have gone some way to applying the new BIS regulations by
providing the following table which shows a total figure for salary,
benefits, annual bonus and long-term incentives. Pension
valuations are provided on page 63 using the methodology
under the existing regulations.
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Mike Terrett CBE
Salary
£000
Benefits
£000
Bonus
£000
PSP
£000
Total
£000
517
482
896
506
567
100
189
126
23
125
663
464
1,239
596
303
1,198
285
1,666
1,022
1,227
2,478
1,420
3,927
2,147
2,222
• Salary is total base salary paid during 2012.
• Benefits include car or car allowance, use of a driver, housing costs, private medical
insurance and financial counselling.
• Bonus is the total bonus award paid in cash and deferred shares for 2012 performance.
Forty per cent of the bonus is in deferred shares which are released after two years.
• PSP is an estimate of the value of the PSP award, including the TSR multiplier, which is
due to vest on 1 March 2013. The PSP award was originally granted on 1 March 2010 at
544.70 pence. The share price as at 31 December 2012 was 873.50 pence. For John
Rishton, the table shows the value of the shares that are due to vest on 1 March 2013
that were granted to him on joining the Company.
Annual incentives – APRA bonus opportunity
The committee considers that there should be a continuing
emphasis on those at-risk elements of remuneration, such as annual
and long-term incentives, which directly influence the performance
of senior executives. For the Chief Executive, a 162 per cent
maximum bonus opportunity means that 62 per cent of combined
basic pay and bonus opportunity is directly related to annual
financial and personal performance.
Under APRA, as operated in 2012, executive directors were eligible
for awards in accordance with the table below:
Target bonus
(as a % of salary)1
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Mike Terrett CBE
75
75
81
75
75
Maximum bonus
(as a % of salary)1
125
125
135
125
125
It is possible for a bonus award to be increased by a further 20 per cent to reflect
exceptional personal performance. Therefore the overall maximum was 162 per cent
for the Chief Executive and 150 per cent for the other executive directors.
1
The committee has determined that the bonus in respect of
2013 will be operated on substantially similar terms to 2012.
However, in 2013 separate bonus pools will be earned for profit and
cash performance. Anything earned through one measure will be
subject to a minimum level of acceptable performance against the
other measure. The committee is mindful of corporate,
environmental, social and governance risks when setting personal
objectives. There will be no change to the maximum bonus
opportunities for executive directors.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
APRA performance measures
For 2012, the performance targets operated so that three
Group underlying profit targets were set in respect of bonus
levels as follows:
(% of maximum)
Base
Stretch (1)
Stretch (2)
30
60
100
The bonus pool earned through profit performance was multiplied
by a factor between zero per cent and 100 per cent as determined
by cash flow performance.
For 2012, the performance out-turns which resulted in the APRA
bonus out-turns were as follows:
Group underlying
profit
Cash flow hurdle
Group underlying profit* was £1,292 million
which exceeded the Base and the Stretch (1)
target but was less than the Stretch (2) target.
The performance resulted in achievement of
86 per cent of the maximum.
Cash flow* for the year was £92 million which
resulted in the bonus pool earned through profit
performance being reduced from 86 per cent to a
final bonus pool of 85 per cent.
*Group underlying profit and cash flow exclude Tognum, the impact of acquisitions and
disposals in the year and unbudgeted foreign exchange translation effects where material.
Individual bonuses for executive directors reflect personal
performance against clear objectives and can therefore vary
in the range zero per cent to 120 per cent of the 85 per cent
bonus determined by the Group financial outcome.
The aggregate of individual bonuses cannot exceed the
85 per cent financial outcome.
Deferred APRA
For executive directors and other senior executives, 40 per cent of
APRA is delivered in the form of a deferred share award in the
Company’s shares. For other participants in APRA, 33 per cent is
delivered in the form of deferred shares. Details of deferred shares
held under the plan are shown in the table on page 65.
A participant who is granted a deferred share award under APRA
must normally continue to remain an employee of the Group for
two years from the date of the award in order for the shares to vest,
although shares will be released early in certain circumstances
including retirement or redundancy.
The value of any deferred share awards is derived from the annual
bonus criteria and is therefore dependent on personal and business
financial performance. This arrangement provides a strong link
between performance and remuneration, promotes a culture of
share ownership amongst the Group’s senior management and
encourages decisions in the long-term interest of shareholders.
59
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
APRA timeline – 2013 performance year
Start of
performance
period
End of
performance
period
31 Dec 13
After tax shares released
subject to performance
criteria
End of two year
retention period
Deferred shares
released
31 Dec 14
31 Dec 15
Long-term incentives – PSP
The PSP is designed to reward and incentivise selected senior
executives who can influence the long-term performance of the
Group. The size of awards under the PSP take into account
competitive levels within the marketplace for UK companies of a
similar size and complexity to the Group. In 2012, John Rishton
received a conditional award of shares with a market value at the
time of grant of 120 per cent of his annual salary.
The 2012 grant for other executive directors was 100 per cent
of their annual salary and 80 per cent for other members of the
Group Leadership Team.
Under the rules of the PSP, selected senior executives are granted
conditional share awards entitling them to a number of shares
determined by reference to corporate performance over a threeyear performance period. The measures of corporate performance
are CPS, EPS and TSR. These measures are considered particularly
important in generating shareholder value and are explained in
more detail in the table opposite. There is no retesting of the
performance criteria and no automatic vesting in the event of a
takeover. In the three-year period to 31 December 2012, the
Company’s profit and cash flow performance generated 100 per
cent of the number of shares conditionally granted in 2010. This was
increased to 150 per cent for executive directors and other senior
executives and to 125 per cent for other participants because the
Company’s TSR was ranked 11th in the FTSE 100 and therefore in the
upper quartile, over the three-year performance period 2010-2012.
50% of after tax shares
continue to be held under
retention policy
1 Jan 13
31 Dec 13
31 Dec 14
31 Dec 15
PSP performance measures
Vesting criteria
Purpose of
the measure
Performance condition over
three-year period
Hurdle to ensure any • If EPS growth exceeds the hurdle,
the number of shares vesting will
payouts are
be determined in accordance
supported by sound
with the CPS targets.
profitability
• If EPS growth does not exceed
the hurdle – zero vesting.
• Below threshold cash flow
Aggregate CPS Incentivise
target – zero vesting.
generation of cash
flow in line with the • Threshold cash flow
target – 30 per cent vesting.
Group’s strategy
• Vesting will increase on a
straight-line basis between
30 per cent and 100 per cent.
TSR performance Align interests with • 50th percentile (median) and
below – no additional vesting.
against FTSE 100 shareholders by
• Above 50th percentile (median)
rewarding outindex
– vesting will be enhanced by
performance of
25 per cent. For executive
FTSE 100 returns
directors and selected senior
executives, a straight-line basis
will operate from 25 per cent to
50 per cent enhancement for
upper quartile TSR performance.
EPS growth
The profit hurdle for the 2013 grant will require EPS to show real
growth by exceeding the OECD index of consumer prices.
The following CPS targets will apply to the grants to be made
in 2013:
Aggregate CPS over
three-year performance period
Percentage of maximum
award released
56p
94p
30
100
The committee believes that these CPS targets are challenging and
that the performance necessary to achieve awards towards the
upper end of the range is stretching. They should not, therefore, be
interpreted as providing guidance on the Group’s performance over
the relevant period.
Governance
Other annual incentives
The same financial targets as set for APRA are used for the
Managers’ Bonus and the All-Employee Bonus Scheme (AEBS). The
Managers’ Bonus typically enables managers worldwide to receive
a bonus of up to ten per cent of pay and the AEBS up to two weeks’
pay, based on corporate and business performance. Participants in
APRA or the Managers’ Bonus do not participate in the AEBS.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
End of performance period
Start of performance period
Deferred share
awards allocated
and cash
awards paid
1 Jan 13
PSP timeline – 2013-2015 performance period
60
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
PSP awards granted in 2013
For 2013, the size of awards under the PSP will be unchanged from
2012 and will be as follows:
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
PSP award
(as a % of salary)
PSP award
overall maximum
(as a % of salary)
100
100
120
100
150
150
180
150
Share retention policy
The committee believes it is important that the interests of the
executive directors should be closely aligned with those of
shareholders. The deferred APRA award and the PSP provide
considerable alignment. However, participants in the PSP are also
required to retain at least one half of the number of after tax shares
released from the PSP, until the value of their shareholding reaches
200 per cent of salary for the Chief Executive and 150 per cent for
other executive directors. When this level is reached, it must be
retained until retirement or departure from the Group. Details
of the executive directors’ share interests are set out on pages
64 to 67. The current executive directors have each complied with
the minimum shareholding requirement.
Service contracts
The committee’s policy is that executive directors appointed to the
Board are offered notice periods of 12 months. The committee
recognises that in the case of appointments to the Board from
outside the Group, it may be necessary to offer a longer initial notice
period, which would subsequently reduce to 12 months after that
initial period.
The committee has a defined policy on compensation and
mitigation to be applied in the event of a UK director’s contract
being terminated prematurely. In these circumstances, steps are
taken to ensure that poor performance is not rewarded. When
calculating termination payments, the committee takes into
account a range of factors including the director’s obligation to
mitigate their own loss.
The following table summarises the terms of the executive
directors’ service contracts:
Date of
contract
Unexpired Notice period
term
Company
James Guyette 29 September 1997 Indefinite
30 days 1
Mark Morris
1 January 2012 12 months 12 months
John Rishton
10 March 2011 12 months 12 months
Colin Smith CBE
1 July 2005 12 months 12 months
Notice period
individual
30 days
6 months
6 months
6 months
James Guyette has a contract with Rolls-Royce North America Inc., drawn up under the
laws of the State of Virginia, US. It provides that, on termination without cause, he is
entitled to 12 months’ severance pay without mitigation and, in addition, appropriate
relocation costs.
1
All-employee share plans
The committee believes that share-based plans make a significant
contribution to the close involvement and interest of all employees
in the Group’s performance. Executive directors are eligible to
participate in the Group’s all-employee share plans on the same
terms as other employees:
i)the ShareSave Plan – a savings-related share option plan available
to all employees. In the UK, this plan operates within UK tax
legislation (including a requirement to finance the exercise of the
option using the proceeds of a monthly savings contract) but the
key principles are applied globally. The exercise of the option is
not subject to the achievement of a performance target;
ii)the free share element of the Share Incentive Plan (SIP) under
which UK employees may receive shares as part of the Company
component of any bonus paid. The SIP attracts tax benefits for
UK employees; and
iii)the partnership share element of the SIP under which UK
employees may make regular purchases of shares from
pre-tax income.
Benefits
Executive directors and senior executives are entitled to a company
car or car allowance, private medical insurance and financial
counselling. James Guyette is entitled to a housing allowance and
the costs of additional housing are met for John Rishton, Mark
Morris and Mike Terrett.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
External directorships of executive directors
During 2012, James Guyette was chairman of PrivateBancorp Inc.,
and a director of priceline.com Inc. In each case he retained the
relevant fees from serving on the boards of these companies, as
shown in the table below:
Payment received
£000
James Guyette 1
110
James Guyette was paid in US dollars translated at £1=US$1.585.
In addition to an annual fee, James Guyette received 3,345 Restricted Stock Units (RSUs)
at US$14.95 per share in PrivateBancorp. During 2012, 3,460 RSUs vested. He was
granted 263 shares of restricted stock at US$645.86 per share in priceline.com.
During 2012, 1,031 shares of restricted stock vested at US$645.86 per share.
1
61
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
Directors’ aggregate emoluments (audited)
The individual directors’ emoluments are analysed as follows:
2012
Annual Performance Related Award plan (APRA)
Non-executive directors
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Sir Peter Gregson 9
John McAdam
John Neill CBE
Sir Simon Robertson
Jasmin Staiblin 10
Ian Strachan
Total
APRA
£000
Aggregate
emoluments
excluding
pensions
contributions 4
£000
Salary/fees
£000
Cash
bonus
£000
517
482
896
506
567
398
278
743
358
182
265
186
496
238
121
663
464
1,239
596
303
–
58
195
127
–
100
189
126
23
125
1,280
1,193
2,456
1,252
995
1,124
–
1,910
1,135
1,277
–
2,968
–
1,959
–
1,306
–
3,265
–
380
–
563
–
7,176
1,481
6,927
75
80
60
75
72
21
60
60
370
37
75
3,953
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
1,959
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
1,306
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
3,265
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
380
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
7
–
–
570
75
80
60
75
72
21
60
60
377
37
75
8,168
74
44
60
11
72
60
60
60
385
–
86
7,839
Cash
allowance 2
£000
Taxable
benefits 3
£000
For executive directors, 60 per cent of APRA is delivered in cash and 40 per cent is delivered in the form of a deferred share award. Shares forming part of the bonus under APRA will be
valued at the date of award which is likely to be 1 March 2013. The Trustee will acquire the required number of shares at the prevailing market price by 31 March 2013.
Colin Smith CBE received a cash allowance in lieu of future pension accrual. Mark Morris received a cash allowance in lieu of future pension accrual. John Rishton received employer
contributions into the executive defined contribution pension arrangement restricted to the annual allowance limits with any excess paid as a cash allowance.
3
Taxable benefits may include the following: a car or car allowance; the use of a driver; private medical insurance and financial counselling; in the case of James Guyette, a housing
allowance and club membership fees; and in the case of John Rishton, Mark Morris and Mike Terrett CBE, the figure in the above table includes additional housing costs paid on their
behalf and the tax charge on that benefit paid by the Group.
4
Aggregate emoluments exclude pensions contributions. Details of the directors’ pensions are set out on pages 63 and 64.
5
James Guyette was paid in US dollars translated at £1 = US$1.585.
6
Mark Morris was appointed as an executive director on 1 January 2012.
7
Mike Terrett CBE retired as an executive director on 31 December 2012.
8
Sir John Rose retired as an executive director on 31 March 2011 and Andrew Shilston retired as an executive director on 31 December 2011.
9
Sir Peter Gregson retired as a non-executive director on 4 May 2012.
10
Jasmin Staiblin was appointed as a non-executive director on 21 May 2012.
1
2
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Governance
Executive directors
James Guyette 5
Mark Morris 6
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Mike Terrett CBE 7
Former directors who served during 2011
but did not serve during 2012 8
Deferred
shares 1
£000
Aggregate
emoluments
excluding
pensions
contributions 4
£000
2011
62
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
TSR over five years
The Company’s TSR performance over the previous five years
compared to a broad equity market index is shown in the
graph below. The FTSE 100 has been chosen as the comparator
index because it contains a broad range of other leading UK
listed companies.
Looking ahead to 2013
The following chart illustrates the value of executive directors’
packages in various scenarios.
The graph shows the growth in value of a hypothetical £100
holding in Rolls-Royce Holdings plc ordinary shares over five years,
relative to the FTSE 100 index. The values of the hypothetical
£100 holdings at the end of the five-year period were £186.40
and £110.60 respectively.
There is no bonus Threshold bonus
and threshold
and no vesting
vesting under
under the PSP
the PSP
Performance scenarios for annual bonus and PSP
Below
threshold
Threshold
Exceptional
maximum
Maximum
Rolls-Royce – five year TSR data
Maximum bonus
(based on
financial
performance)
and maximum
CPS vesting
under the PSP
200
Maximum bonus
(based on
financial and
exceptional
individual
performance) and
maximum vesting
under the PSP
with maximum
TSR multiplier
180
160
140
Rolls-Royce (rebased to 100)
£000
FTSE 100 (rebased to 100)
4,500
4,000
120
100
80
60
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
The TSR calculations in the chart above are based on spot start and end values for both
Rolls-Royce and the FTSE 100. The TSR data on page 55 is based on start and end values
averaged over six months to be consistent with the rules of the PSP and does not therefore
align to the values on which this chart is based. However, both spot and average
methodologies confirm that Rolls-Royce TSR has outperformed the FTSE 100.
Payments made to former directors of the Company (audited)
John Cheffins retired from the Board on 30 September 2007. He has
continued in his role as Chairman of Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems
Limited and provided non-executive advice to the Energy business.
He was paid £47,890 and benefits totalling £3,642 in 2012 (paid in
Canadian dollars translated at £1= CAD$1.5837).
Dr Mike Howse retired from the Board on 30 June 2005. Following
his retirement, he has continued to be retained by the Company for
his expertise in engineering. He was paid £23,940 in 2012.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
3,500
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
John
Rishton
1 2 3
4
Mark
Morris
1 2 3
4
Colin
Smith
1 2 3
4
James
Guyette
1 2 3
1. Below threshold
2. Threshold
3. Maximum
4. Exceptional maximum
Salary for the year
The taxable value of benefits
The potential value of the APRA award depending on the performance scenario
The potential value of the PSP awards, depending on the performance scenario
4
63
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
Colin Smith CBE opted out of future pension accrual with effect
from 1 April 2006. He receives a cash allowance in lieu of future
pension accrual. Had he elected to continue to accrue pension the
estimated cost of that accrual would be higher than the cash
allowance being paid in lieu.
John Rishton is a member of one of the Group’s UK defined
contribution pension schemes and received employer contributions
restricted to the annual allowance limits with any excess paid as a
cash allowance. The cash allowance is calculated as equivalent to
the cost of the pension contributions allowing for national
insurance costs.
James Guyette participates in pension plans sponsored by
Rolls-Royce North America Inc. He is a member of two defined
benefit plans in the US, one qualified and one non-qualified.
He accrues a retirement lump sum benefit in both of these plans.
The aggregate value of the retirement lump sums accrued in these
two plans, and the transfer values of these benefits, are shown
in the second table below. In addition, James Guyette is a member
of two 401(k) Savings Plans in the US, one qualified and one
non-qualified, to which both he and his employer, Rolls-Royce
North America Inc., contribute. He is also a member of an
unfunded non-qualified deferred compensation plan in the US,
to which his employer makes notional contributions. Employer
contributions to these three plans during 2012 have been added
to the increase in transfer value over 2012 for the defined benefit
plans, and are therefore included in the figures shown in the final
two columns of the second table below. The transfer values in the
tables below have been calculated on the basis of actuarial advice.
Mark Morris opted out of future pension accrual and salary linkage
with effect from 16 August 2012 and receives a cash allowance. Had
he elected to continue to remain in the pension plan the estimated
cost of accrual would be higher than the cash allowance being paid
in lieu.
Mike Terrett CBE opted out of future pension accrual with
effect from 1 April 2006 and started to receive his pension from
1 November 2009. Since starting to receive his pension, he does not
accrue any further pension benefit or allowance in lieu of pension
benefit from his ongoing employment with the Group.
Details of the pension benefits, which accrued over the year in the Group’s registered UK defined benefit pension scheme 1, are given below:
Increase in accrued
pension during the
year ended
31 Dec 2012
£000 pa
Increase/decrease
in accrued pension
during the
year ended
31 Dec 2012 2
£000 pa
40
61
3
34
46
(10)
Mark Morris 6
Colin Smith CBE
Mike Terrett CBE 7
Increase in
accrued retirement Increase in accrued
lump sum during
retirement lump
the year ended sum during the year
31 Dec 2012 ended 31 Dec 2012 2
£000 pa
£000 pa
James Guyette 9
125
87
Transfer value of
Total accrued
Increase in
increase/decrease
pension
Transfer value as at transfer value over
in accrued
entitlement at
Transfer value of
31 Dec 2011 of
2012 net of the
pension over 2012
the year ended accrued pension as accrued pension at
member’s own net of the member’s
31 Dec 2012 3
at 31 Dec 2012 4
that date 4
contributions
own contributions 5 £000 pa
£000
£000
£000
£000
164
363
244
Total accrued
retirement lump
sum entitlement
at the year ended
31 Dec 2012 8
£000 pa
1,047
3,778
6,977
5,773
2,354
6,002
5,666
1,406
975
107
1,325
732
(202)
Transfer value
of accrued
retirement
lump sum as at
31 Dec 2012
£000
Transfer value as at
31 Dec 2011 of
accrued retirement
lump sum
at that date
£000
Increase in
transfer value over
2012 net of the
member’s own
contributions
£000
Transfer value of
increase in accrued
retirement lump
sum over 2012 net
of the member’s
own contributions 5
£000
1,047
922
508
471
Members of the schemes have the option to pay Additional Voluntary Contributions. Neither the contributions nor the resulting benefits are included in the above table.
This column shows the increase/decrease in pension/retirement lump sum during the year ended 31 December 2012 but in this case excluding the effect of inflation.
The pension entitlement shown is that which would be paid annually on retirement at normal retirement age or to 1 April 2006 for Colin Smith CBE and to 16 August 2012
for Mark Morris. For Mike Terrett CBE, the pension shown is the annual pension in payment at 31 December 2012.
4
The transfer values stated represent liabilities of the Rolls-Royce sponsored pension schemes and are not sums paid to the individuals. The transfer values of the accrued pensions
as at 31 December 2011 and 31 December 2012 have been calculated on the bases adopted by the trustees on 6 October 2008 and 16 October 2012 respectively, following receipt of
actuarial advice.
5
This column shows the transfer value of the increase/decrease in pension/retirement lump sum during the year ended 31 December 2012 excluding the effect of inflation,
and net of the member’s own contributions.
6
Mark Morris was appointed as an executive director on 1 January 2012.
7
Mike Terrett CBE retired as an executive director on 31 December 2012.
8
The lump sum entitlement shown is that which would be paid on immediate retirement based on service to the end of the year.
9
Benefits are translated at £1 = US$1.6255.
1
2
3
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Governance
Pensions (audited)
The Group’s UK pension schemes are funded, registered schemes
and were approved under the regime applying until 6 April 2006.
They include both defined contribution and defined benefit
pension schemes.
64
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
Details of payments made by the Group to defined contribution pension plans on behalf of the following executive directors are
given below:
James Guyette 1, 2
John Rishton
2012
£000
2011
£000
394
123
381
115
Employer contributions for the defined contribution plans during 2012, have been included in the increase in transfer value over 2012 for the defined benefit plans and shown in the
final two columns of the table above for James Guyette.
Benefits are translated at £1 = US$1.585.
1
2
Directors’ share interests (audited)
The directors who held office at 31 December 2012 and their connected persons, had the following interests in the ordinary shares and
C Shares 1 of the Company in respect of which transactions are notifiable to the Company under DTR 3.1.2R of the Disclosure Rules and
Transparency Rules:
Ordinary shares
James Guyette
Mark Morris 2
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Mike Terrett CBE 3
Dame Helen Alexander
Peter Byrom
Lewis Booth CBE
Iain Conn
Sir Peter Gregson 4
Dr John McAdam
John Neill CBE
Sir Simon Robertson
Jasmin Staiblin 5
Ian Strachan
C Shares
1 January
2012#
Changes in
2012
31 December
2012§
274,797
39,618
9,686
218,554
507,166
1,071
223,321
5,000
20,210
4,218
1,571
36,464
41,839
–
11,500
211,646
32,254
97,179
64,308
10,659
407
4,692
7,500
4,000
137
341
2,101
878
–
–
486,443
71,872
106,865
282,862
517,825
1,478
228,013
12,500
24,210
4,355
1,912
38,565
42,717
–
11,500
1 January 2012#
–
–
–
–
–
102,816
–
–
–
–
226,080
1,858,752
–
–
–
Changes in
2012
51,562,968
4,314,497
–
–
–
187,425
–
–
11,178
–
(226,080)
5,138,350
–
–
–
31 December
2012§
51,562,968
4,314,497
–
–
–
290,241
–
–
11,178
–
–
6,997,102
–
–
–
# Or date of appointment if later
§ Or date of retirement if earlier
1
Non-cumulative redeemable preference shares of 0.1p each.
2
Mark Morris was appointed as an executive director on 1 January 2012.
3
Mike Terrett CBE retired as an executive director on 31 December 2012.
4
Sir Peter Gregson retired as a non-executive director on 4 May 2012.
5
Jasmin Staiblin was appointed as a non-executive director on 21 May 2012.
Directors’ interests in the Company’s share plans are shown separately on pages 65, 66 and 67. No director had any other interests,
beneficial or otherwise, in the share capital of the Company or any of its subsidiaries as at 31 December 2012.
Changes in the interests of the executive directors and non-executive directors between 31 December 2012 and 13 February 2013
are listed below.
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom
Iain Conn
James Guyette
John McAdam
Mark Morris
John Neill CBE
John Rishton
Sir Simon Robertson
Colin Smith CBE
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Ordinary shares
C Shares
189
–
1,897
724
9,693
51
–
528
890
355
2,380
97,128
950,000
–
–
–
–
2,953,208
2,231,512
–
–
–
65
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
Partnership shares held in trust under the SIP 1
1 January
2012
Colin Smith CBE 2
Mike Terrett CBE
1,610
1,609
Free shares held in trust under the SIP 1
1 January
2012
Colin Smith CBE
3,179
Unrestricted shares held under the SIP 1
1 January
2012
Colin Smith CBE 2
Mike Terrett CBE
2
(125)
(124)
Ordinary shares
Changes in
2012
(249)
Ordinary shares
Changes in
2012
(4,946)
303
31 December
2012
1 January
2012
C Shares
Changes in
2012
31 December
2012
1,485
1,485
–
–
224,965
224,965
224,965
224,965
31 December
2012
1 January
2012
C Shares
Changes in
2012
31 December
2012
2,930
–
487,427
487,427
31 December
2012
1 January
2012
C Shares
Changes in
2012
31 December
2012
72
4,848
–
–
40,423
40,354
40,423
40,354
Governance
1
5,018
4,545
Ordinary shares
Changes in
2012
Under the SIP, free shares and partnership shares held in trust for more than five years are classified as unrestricted and are no longer subject to income tax or national insurance
contributions on withdrawal. Unrestricted shares can be held in Trust under the SIP for as long as the participant remains an employee of the Group.
On 15 January 2013 and 8 February 2013, 25 and 31 ordinary shares respectively, which were held as partnership shares, were classified as unrestricted shares.
Share options (audited)
The directors held the following options under the Rolls-Royce ShareSave plan.
Mark Morris
Mark Morris
John Rishton
1 January
2012
Granted
in 2012
Lapsed
in 2012
Exercised
in 2012
31 December
2012
872
541
1,450
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
872
541
1,450
Exercise
price
Market price
at date
exercised
Aggregate
gains 2012
£000
Aggregate
gains 2011
£000
Exercisable
dates
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2013
2015
2017
387p
525p
525p
The market price of the Company’s ordinary shares ranged between 733.00 pence and 913.50 pence during 2012. The closing price on
31 December 2012 was 873.50 pence.
Long-term incentive awards (audited)
The directors as at 31 December 2012 had the following share awards arising out of the operation of APRA1:
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Mike Terrett CBE
Total value of shares vested
1
1 January
2012
Dividend
enhancement
during 2012
51,867
10,794
–
44,677
59,682
826
145
–
631
789
Vested
during 2012
(17,098)
(3,058)
–
(13,111)
(16,344)
Granted
during 2012
31 December
2012
28,161
6,145
44,400
26,985
30,601
63,756
14,026
44,400
59,182
74,728
Value of shares
vested in 2012
£000
140
25
–
107
133
405
Under APRA, shares vest after two years. Shares went into trust in 2010, 2011 and 2012 at prices of 537.20 pence, 601.00 pence and 808.80 pence respectively. At 31 December 2012, the
amounts stated in the emoluments table representing the 2012 APRA deferred shares had not yet been applied by the Trustee to purchase shares. An investment is expected to be
made by 31 March 2013 when the Trustee will acquire the required number of shares at the prevailing market price. The market value per share which vested under APRA during 2012
was 816 pence.
Conditional awards, granted under the PSP to executive directors are shown on page 66. The number of shares released will be dependent
upon the achievement of the EPS and CPS targets over the three-year performance period. If the Company’s TSR is above the median of
the FTSE 100 index, the number of shares due to be released to an executive will be increased by between 25 per cent and 50 per cent.
This increase is on a straight-line basis between the median and upper-quartile TSR performance in the performance period.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
66
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
PSP (audited)
James Guyette
Mark Morris
John Rishton
Colin Smith CBE
Mike Terrett CBE
31 December
2012
Value of shares
vested in 2012
£000
–
2,551
–
91,383
–
–
–
82,404
–
64,385
64,385
–
103,923
–
(311,768)
64,385
238,172
–
2,551
44,506
–
11,127
(55,633)
–
455
26,085
–
–
–
26,085
–
25,039
–
–
–
25,039
–
–
95,630
59,899
59,899
–
11,127
59,899
111,023
–
455
164,866
–
–
–
164,866
–
–
164,866
133,383
133,383
–
–
–
–
133,383
298,249
–
–
148,319
–
74,160
(222,479)
–
1,820
78,025
–
–
–
78,025
–
74,813
–
–
–
74,813
–
–
301,157
62,987
62,987
–
74,160
–
(222,479)
62,987
215,825
–
1,820
191,998
–
95,999
(287,997)
–
2,357
93,630
–
—
—
93,630
–
91,438
–
–
—
91,438
–
–
377,066
70,397
70,397
–
95,999
70,397
255,465
–
2,357
1 January
2012
Granted during
2012
207,845
–
103,923
91,383
–
–
82,404
–
–
381,632
Total value of
shares vested
TSR uplift at
vesting 1
Total vested
during 2012
(311,768)
–
(55,633)
—
(287,997)
Performance
period
Date of grant
1 Jan 2009 to
31 Dec 2011
1 Jan 2010 to
31 Dec 2012
1 Jan 2011 to
31 Dec 2013
1 Jan 2012 to
31 Dec 2014
10 Mar
2009
1 Mar
2010
9 Mar
2011
1 Mar
2012
1 Jan 2009 to
31 Dec 2011
1 Jan 2010 to
31 Dec 2012
1 Jan 2011 to
31 Dec 2013
1 Jan 2012 to
31 Dec 2014
10 Mar
2009
1 Mar
2010
9 Mar
2011
1 Mar
2012
1 Jan 2011 to
31 Dec 2013
1 Jan 2012 to
31 Dec 2014
9 Mar
2011
1 Mar
2012
1 Jan 2009 to
31 Dec 2011
1 Jan 2010 to
31 Dec 2012
1 Jan 2011 to
31 Dec 2013
1 Jan 2012 to
31 Dec 2014
10 Mar
2009
1 Mar
2010
9 Mar
2011
1 Mar
2012
1 Jan 2009 to
31 Dec 2011
1 Jan 2010 to
31 Dec 2012
1 Jan 2011 to
31 Dec 2013
1 Jan 2012 to
31 Dec 2014
10 Mar
2009
1 Mar
2010
9 Mar
2011
1 Mar
2012
Market price at
date of grant
260.42p
544.70p
601.50p
809.70p
260.42p
544.70p
601.50p
809.70p
601.50p
809.70p
260.42p
544.70p
601.50p
809.70p
260.42p
544.70p
601.50p
809.70p
7,183
Under the rules of the PSP, the number of shares vesting in 2012 was increased by between 25 per cent and 50 per cent as the TSR exceeded the median of the FTSE 100 index during the
three-year performance period to 31 December 2012. The market value per share, which vested under the PSP during 2012, was 818.25 pence.
1
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
67
Governance
Directors’ remuneration report
Grant of shares (audited)
John Rishton received a special grant of shares on joining the Company intended to mirror the fair value and vesting profile of the
incentives he forfeited on resigning from his previous employer as detailed below:
1 January
2012
TSR uplift
Total vested
during 2012
49,099
126,019
24,550
–
Performance related
Restricted shares
76,365
76,143
–
–
–
–
76,365
76,143
Performance related
63,397
–
–
63,397
Performance related
40,565
431,588
–
24,550
–
(199,668)
–
–
40,565
256,470
Performance
period
1 Jan 2009 to
31 Dec 2011
n/a
1 Jan 2010 to
31 Dec 2012
n/a
1 Jan 2011 to
31 Dec 2013
1 Jan 2012 to
31 Dec 2014
Vesting date
Value of shares
vested in 2012 1
£000
Market price
at date
of grant
1 Mar 2012
1 Mar 2012
609
1,043
601.50p
601.50p
1 Mar 2013
1 Mar 2013
–
–
601.50p
601.50p
1 Mar 2014
–
601.50p
1 Mar 2015
–
1,652
601.50p
The market value per share for the performance related and restricted shares that vested was 827.50 pence.
Non-executive directors’ remuneration
policy
The committee determines, on the Board’s behalf, the remuneration
package of the Chairman. The Board determines the remuneration
of the other non-executive directors.
The Chairman and the non-executive directors have letters of
appointment rather than service contracts. No compensation is
payable to the Chairman or to any non-executive director if the
appointment is terminated early.
Appointment
date
Dame Helen Alexander
Lewis Booth CBE
Peter Byrom
Sir Frank Chapman
Iain Conn
Dr John McAdam
John Neill CBE
Sir Simon Robertson
Jasmin Staiblin
Ian Strachan
1 Sep 2007
25 May 2011
1 Jan 1997
10 Nov 2011
20 Jan 2005
19 Feb 2008
13 Nov 2008
1 Jan 2005
21 May 2012
19 Sep 2003
Current letter of
appointment
start date
Current letter of
appointment
end date
23 May 2011 31 Aug 2013
25 May 2011 25 May 2014
1 Jan 2013 31 Dec 2013
10 Nov 2011
9 Nov 2014
23 May 2011 19 Jan 2014
23 May 2011 18 Feb 2014
13 Nov 2011 12 Nov 2014
23 May 2011 31 Dec 2013
21 May 2012 21 May 2015
19 Sep 2012 18 Sep 2013
Non-executive directors’ fees
The Board takes account of independent market surveys in
determining the fees payable to the Chairman and the nonexecutive directors.
The committee adopts the principles of good governance as set out
in the Code and complies with the Listing Rules of the Financial
Services Authority and the relevant schedules of the Companies Act
2006 and the Directors’ Report Regulations in Schedule 8 of the
Large and Medium-sized Companies and Groups (Accounts and
Reports) Regulations 2008.
The report is divided into audited and unaudited information.
The Companies Act 2006 and the Listing Rules require the
Company’s auditor to report on the audited information in their
report on page 129 and to state that this section has been properly
prepared in accordance with these regulations. The report is subject
to shareholder approval at the AGM on 2 May 2013.
Dame Helen Alexander
Chairman of the remuneration committee
£000
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Statutory requirements
The remuneration report has been prepared on behalf of the Board
by the remuneration committee.
The directors’ remuneration report was approved by the Board on
13 February 2013 and signed on its behalf.
The fees payable to the non-executive directors are reviewed
annually by the Board and are shown below:
Chairman
Other non-executive directors
Chairman of audit committee
Chairman of ethics committee
Chairman of remuneration committee
Chairman of safety committee
Senior Independent Director
The Chairman and the non-executive directors are not eligible to
participate in any of the Group’s share schemes, incentive
arrangements or pension schemes. A facility is in place which
enables non-executive directors to use some or all of their fees, after
the appropriate statutory deductions, to make market purchases of
shares in the Company on a monthly basis.
370
60
20
15
15
15
12
Governance
Performance related
Restricted shares
1
(73,649)
(126,019)
31 December
2012
68
Governance
Shareholders and share capital
Share capital and voting rights
On 31 December 2012, there were 1,872,303,563 ordinary shares of
20 pence each, 10,417,658,475 C Shares of 0.1 pence each and one
Special Share of £1 in issue. The ordinary shares are listed on the
London Stock Exchange.
Payments to shareholders
At the AGM on 2 May 2013, the directors will recommend an issue
of 119 C Shares with a total nominal value of 11.6 pence for each
ordinary share. The C Shares will be issued on 1 July 2013. Together
with the interim issue on 2 January 2013 of 76 C Shares for each
ordinary share with a total nominal value of 7.6 pence, this is the
equivalent of a total annual payment to ordinary shareholders of
19.5 pence for each ordinary share.
The payment to shareholders will, as before, be made in the form of
redeemable C Shares which shareholders may either choose to
retain or redeem for a cash equivalent. The Registrar, on behalf of
the Company, operates a C Share Reinvestment Plan (CRIP) and can,
on behalf of shareholders, purchase ordinary shares from the market
rather than delivering a cash payment. Shareholders wishing to
redeem their C Shares or else redeem and participate in the CRIP
must ensure that their instructions are lodged with the Registrar no
later than 5pm on 3 June 2013.
Share class rights
The rights and obligations attaching to the different classes of
shares are summarised below. The full rights are set out in the
Company’s Articles of Association, the latest copy of which can be
found on the Group’s website at www.rolls-royce.com.
Ordinary shares
Holders of ordinary shares are entitled to receive the Company’s
annual report. They are also entitled: to attend and speak at general
meetings of the Company; to appoint one or more proxies or, if they
are corporations, corporate representatives; and to exercise voting
rights. They have the right to ask questions at the AGM relating to
the business of the meeting and for these to be answered, unless
such answer would interfere unduly with the business of the
meeting, involve the disclosure of confidential information, if the
answer has already been published on the Group’s website or if it is
not in the interests of the Group or the good order of the meeting
that the question be answered. Holders of ordinary shares may
receive a bonus issue of C Shares or a dividend and on liquidation
may share in the assets of the Company.
C Shares
The Company issues non-cumulative redeemable preference shares
(C Shares) as an alternative to paying a cash dividend.
Shareholders can choose to:
• redeem all C Shares for cash;
• redeem all C Shares for cash and reinvest the proceeds in
additional ordinary shares using the CRIP operated by the
Registrar; or
• keep the C Shares.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Any C Shares retained have limited voting rights and attract a
dividend of 75 per cent of LIBOR on the 0.1p nominal value of each
share, paid on a twice-yearly basis. The Company has the option to
redeem the C Shares compulsorily, at any time, if the aggregate
number of C Shares in issue is less than ten per cent of the
aggregate number of all C Shares issued, or on the acquisition or
capital restructuring of the Company.
n a return of capital on a winding-up, the holders of C Shares shall
O
be entitled, in priority to any payment to the holders of ordinary
shares, to the repayment of the nominal capital paid-up or credited
as paid-up on the C Shares held by them, together with a sum equal
to the outstanding preferential dividend which will have been
accrued but not been paid until the date of return of capital.
The
holders of C Shares are entitled to attend, speak and vote at a
general meeting only if a resolution to wind up the Company is to
be considered, in which case they may vote only on such resolution.
Special Share
Certain rights attach to the special rights non-voting share (Special
Share) issued to HM Government (Special Shareholder). Subject to
the provisions of the Companies Act 2006, the Treasury Solicitor may
redeem the Special Share at par at any time. The Special Share
confers no rights to dividends but in the event of a winding-up it
shall be repaid at its nominal value in priority to any other shares.
Certain Articles (in particular those relating to the foreign
shareholding limit, disposals and the nationality of directors) that
relate to the rights attached to the Special Share may only be altered
with the consent of the Special Shareholder. The Special Shareholder
is not entitled to vote at any general meeting or any other meeting
of any class of shareholders.
Restrictions on transfer of shares and limitations on holdings
There are no restrictions on transfer or limitations on the holding
of the ordinary shares or C Shares other than under the Articles of
Association (as described here), under restrictions imposed by law
or regulation (for example, insider trading laws) or pursuant to the
Company’s share dealing code. The Articles of Association provide
that the Company should be and remain under United Kingdom
control. As such, an individual foreign shareholding limit is set at
15 per cent of the aggregate votes attaching to the share capital of
all classes (taken as a whole) and capable of being cast on a poll and
to all other shares that the directors determine are to be included in
the calculation of such holding. The Special Share may only be
issued to, held by and transferred to the Special Shareholder or his
successor or nominee.
69
Governance
Shareholders and share capital
Shareholder agreements and consent requirements
There are no known arrangements under which financial rights
carried by any of the shares in the Company are held by a person
other than the holder of the shares and no known agreements
between the holders of shares with restrictions on the transfer of
shares or exercise of voting rights. No disposal may be made to a
non-Group member which, alone or when aggregated with the
same or a connected transaction, constitutes a disposal of the
whole or a material part of either the nuclear business or the assets
of the Group as a whole, without consent of the Special Shareholder.
Authority to purchase own shares
Also at the AGM in 2012, the Company was authorised by
shareholders to purchase up to 187,224,369 of its own ordinary
shares representing ten per cent of its issued ordinary share capital.
The Company did not make use of this authority during 2012. The
authority for the Company to purchase its own shares expires at the
conclusion of the AGM in 2013 or 18 months from 2 May 2012,
whichever is the earlier. A resolution to renew it will be proposed at
that meeting.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Voting rights for employee share plan shares
Shares are held in various employee benefit trusts for the purpose
of satisfying awards made under the various employee share plans.
For shares held in a nominee capacity or if plan/trust rules provide
the participant with the right to vote in respect of specifically
allocated shares, the trustee votes in line with the participants’
instructions. For shares that are not held absolutely on behalf of
specific individuals, the general policy of the trustees, in accordance
with investor protection guidelines, is to abstain from voting in
respect of those shares.
Major shareholdings
At 8 February 2013, the following companies had notified an
interest in the issued ordinary share capital of the Company in
accordance with the Financial Services Authority’s Disclosure and
Transparency Rules:
Company
AXA S.A.
BlackRock Inc.
Invesco Limited
Legal & General Group plc
Date notified
% of issued
ordinary share
capital
11 January 2010
3 September 2010
4 February 2008
14 October 2009
4.90
5.02
6.91
3.96
Governance
Authority to issue shares
At the AGM in 2012, authority was given to the directors to allot
new ordinary shares up to a nominal value of £124,816,246,
equivalent to one-third of the issued share capital of the Company.
This is called the first section 551 amount. In addition, a special
resolution was passed to effect a disapplication of pre-emption
rights for a maximum of five per cent of the issued share capital of
the Company. These authorities are valid until the AGM in 2013, and
the directors propose to renew these authorities at that AGM. It is
proposed to seek a further authority, at the AGM in 2013 to allot up
to two thirds of the total issued share capital, but only in the case of
a rights issue. This is called the second section 551 amount.
The Board believes that this additional authority will allow the
Company to retain the maximum possible flexibility to respond
to circumstances and opportunities as they arise; and to allot new
C Shares up to a nominal value of £500 million as an alternative to
a cash dividend. Such authority expires at the conclusion of the
AGM in 2013. The directors propose to renew the authority to allot
new C Shares at the AGM in 2013.
Voting rights
Deadlines for exercising voting rights
Electronic and paper proxy appointments, and voting instructions,
must be received by the Company’s Registrar not less than 48 hours
before a general meeting.
70
Governance
Other statutory information
Political donations
In line with its established policy, the Group made no political
donations pursuant to the authority granted at the 2012 AGM.
Although the Company does not make, and does not intend to make,
donations to political parties, within the normal meaning of that
expression, the definition of political donations under the
Companies Act 2006 is very broad and includes expenses
legitimately incurred as part of the process of talking to members
of parliament and opinion formers to ensure that the issues and
concerns of the Group are considered and addressed. These
activities are not intended to support any political party and the
Group’s policy is not to make any donations for political purposes
in the normally accepted sense.
A resolution will therefore be proposed at the 2013 AGM seeking
shareholder approval for the directors to be given authority to make
donations and incur expenditure which might otherwise be caught
by the terms of the Companies Act 2006. The authority sought will
be limited to a maximum amount of £25,000 per Group company
but so as not to exceed £50,000 for the entire Group in aggregate.
During the year, the business expenses incurred by Rolls-Royce
North America Inc. towards the operation of the Rolls-Royce
North America Political Action Committee (RRNAPAC) in the US
was US$44,161 (2011: US$44,436). PACs are a common feature
of the US political system and are governed by the Federal Election
Campaign Act.
The Group has entered into a series of financial instruments
to hedge its currency, interest rate and commodity exposures.
These contracts provide for termination or alteration in the event
that a change of control of the Company materially weakens the
creditworthiness of the Group.
Employee share plans
In the event of a change of control of the Company, the effect on the
employee share plans would be as follows:
• PSP – awards would vest pro rata to service in the performance
period, subject to remuneration committee judgement of Group
performance;
• APRA deferred shares – the shares would be released from trust
immediately;
• ShareSave – options would become exercisable immediately.
The new company might offer an equivalent option in exchange
for cancellation of the existing option; and
• Share Incentive Plan (SIP) – consideration received as shares
would be held within the SIP, if possible, otherwise the
consideration would be treated as a disposal from the SIP.
The PAC is independent of the Group and independent of
any political party. The PAC funds are contributed voluntarily
by employees and the Company cannot affect how they are
applied, although under US Law, the business expenses are
paid by the Company.
Essential commercial relationships
Supply chain
Certain suppliers to the Group contribute key components or
services, the loss of which could cause disruption to the Group’s
deliveries. However, none are so vital that their loss would affect the
viability of the business as a whole. When dealing with suppliers,
the Group is guided by the Supply Chain Relationships in Aerospace
(SCRIA) initiative. It seeks the best possible terms from suppliers and
when entering into binding purchasing contracts, gives
consideration to quality, delivery, price and the terms of payment.
In the event of disputes, efforts are made to resolve them quickly.
Such contributions do not require authorisation by shareholders
under the Companies Act 2006 and therefore do not count
towards the £25,000 and £50,000 limits for political donations
and expenditure for which shareholder approval will be sought
at the AGM.
Customers
The increasingly global nature of the business, balanced across
the Civil aerospace, Defence aerospace, Marine and Energy
segments, ensures that the Group is not overly dependent on
any individual customer.
Change of control
Contracts and joint venture agreements
There are a number of contracts and joint venture agreements
which would allow the counterparties to terminate or alter those
arrangements in the event of a change of control of the Company.
These arrangements are commercially confidential and their
disclosure could be seriously prejudicial to the Company.
Creditor days
As the Company is a holding company and does not itself trade,
it owed no amounts to trade creditors at 31 December 2012
and therefore the number of creditor days required to be shown
in this report to comply with the provisions of the Companies
Act 2006 is nil.
Borrowings and other financial instruments
The Group has a number of borrowing facilities provided by various
banks. These facilities generally include provisions which may
require any outstanding borrowings to be repaid or the alteration
or termination of the facility upon the occurrence of a change of
control of the Company. At 31 December 2012 these facilities were
less than 30 per cent drawn (2011 20 per cent).
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Internal control and risk management
The Board’s responsibility for internal control and
risk management
The directors are responsible for the Group’s system of internal
control and for maintaining and reviewing its effectiveness from
both a financial and an operational perspective. The system of
internal control is designed to manage, rather than eliminate, the
risk of failure to achieve business objectives and to provide
reasonable but not absolute assurance against material
misstatement or loss.
71
Governance
Other statutory information
The Group’s approach to internal control is based on the underlying
principle of line management’s accountability for control and risk
management. In reviewing the effectiveness of the system of
internal control, the Board has taken account of the results of the
work carried out to audit and review the activities of the Group.
The risk management process is a key element of the Group’s
internal control system and there is an ongoing process to identify,
assess and manage risk, including those risks affecting the Group’s
reputation. This process is subject to continuous improvement and
has been in place throughout the financial year to which these
statements apply and up to the date of their approval. The
businesses regularly review the effectiveness and consistency of risk
management via their assurance framework and the application of
the risk management process is subject to review by internal audit.
The Board has established a risk committee. Every six months the
risk committee reviews the key operational risks that the businesses
and functions report in accordance with our enterprise-wide risk
management policy. The risk committee also determines material
external and strategic risks that exist at Group level. The principal
risks are reported annually to the Board and are included on pages
18 and 19. In addition, reports and presentations are made to the
Board on certain types of specialist risks eg treasury, insurable risks,
pensions, health and safety as the risks evolve.
Following the closure of the 2012 financial year, the audit
committee reported to the Board the results of a review of the risk
management process at all levels of the organisation prepared by
internal audit. The Board confirms that ongoing processes and
systems ensure that the Group continues to be compliant with the
‘Turnbull guidance’ as contained in ‘Internal Control: Guidance for
Directors on the Combined Code’.
Financial reporting
The Group has a comprehensive budgeting system with an
annual budget approved by the Board. Revised forecasts for the
year are reported at least quarterly. Actual results, at both a
business and Group level, are reported monthly against budget
and variances reviewed.
Financial managers are required to acknowledge in writing that
their routine financial reporting is based on reliable data and that
results are properly stated in accordance with Group requirements.
In addition, for annual reporting, business presidents and finance
directors are required to acknowledge that their business has
complied with the Group’s Finance Manual.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Company law requires the directors to prepare Group and parent
company financial statements for each financial year. Under that
law they are required to prepare the Group financial statements in
accordance with IFRS as adopted by the EU and applicable law and
have elected to prepare the parent company financial statements in
accordance with UK Accounting Standards and applicable law (UK
Generally Accepted Accounting Practice).
Under company law the directors must not approve the financial
statements unless they are satisfied that they give a true and fair
view of the state of affairs of the Group and parent company and
of their profit or loss for that period.
In preparing each of the Group and parent company financial
statements, the directors are required to:
• s elect suitable accounting policies and then apply
them consistently;
• make judgements and estimates that are reasonable
and prudent;
• for the Group financial statements, state whether they have been
prepared in accordance with IFRSs as adopted by the EU;
• for the parent company financial statements, state whether
applicable UK Accounting Standards have been followed, subject
to any material departures disclosed and explained in the parent
company financial statements; and
• prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis
unless it is inappropriate to presume that the Group and the
parent company will continue in business.
The directors are responsible for keeping adequate accounting
records that are sufficient to show and explain the parent and
Group’s transactions and disclose with reasonable accuracy at any
time the financial position of the parent company and enable them
to ensure that its financial statements comply with the Companies
Act 2006. They have general responsibility for taking such steps as
are reasonably open to them to safeguard the assets of the Group
and to prevent and detect fraud and other irregularities.
Under applicable law and regulations, the directors are also
responsible for preparing a directors’ report, directors’
remuneration report and corporate governance statement that
complies with that law and those regulations.
The directors are responsible for the maintenance and integrity
of the corporate and financial information included on the Group’s
website. Legislation in the UK governing the preparation and
dissemination of financial statements may differ from legislation
in other jurisdictions.
Governance
Responsibility for internal control procedures in joint ventures
where we do not have a control agreement lies with the managers
of those operations. We seek to exert influence over such ventures
by board representation and regularly review the activities of
these ventures.
Annual report and financial statements
Statement of directors’ responsibilities in respect of the annual
report and the financial statements
The directors are responsible for preparing the annual report and
the Group and parent company financial statements in accordance
with applicable law and regulations.
72
Governance
Other statutory information
Going concern
The Group’s business activities, together with the factors likely to
affect its future development, performance and position are set out
on pages 1 to 38 of the business review and a summary of the
principal risks affecting the business are shown on pages 18 to 19.
The financial position of the Group, its cash flows, liquidity position,
borrowing facilities and financial risks are described on pages 12 to
15 and pages 37 to 38 of the business review.
In addition, notes 1, 13, 15 and 17 of the consolidated financial
statements include the Group’s objectives, policies and processes
for financial risk management, details of its cash and cash
equivalents, indebtedness and borrowing facilities and its financial
instruments, hedging activities and its exposure to counterparty
credit risk, liquidity risk, currency risk, interest rate risk and
commodity pricing risk.
As described on page 37, the Group meets its funding requirements
through a mixture of shareholders’ funds, bank borrowings, bonds,
notes and finance leases. The Group has facilities of £2.3 billion
of which £1.3 billion was drawn at the year end. US$230 million of
these facilities mature in 2013.
The Group’s forecasts and projections, taking into account
reasonably possible changes in trading performance, show that
the Group has sufficient financial resources. In the event that the
put option on Engine Holding GmbH is exercised, (estimated cost
£1.6 billion), the directors consider that the Group would be able
to raise additional resources in the necessary timeframe to meet
this commitment. As a consequence, the directors have reasonable
expectation that the Company and the Group are well placed
to manage their business risks and to continue in operational
existence for the foreseeable future, despite the current
uncertain global economic outlook.
Accordingly, the directors continue to adopt the going concern basis
(in accordance with the guidance ‘Going Concern and Liquidity Risk:
Guidance for Directors of UK Companies 2009’ issued by the FRC) in
preparing the consolidated financial statements.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Disclosure of information to auditors
Each of the persons who is a director at the date of approval of this
report confirms that:
i)so far as the director is aware, there is no relevant information of
which the Company’s auditor is unaware; and
ii)the director has taken all steps that he or she ought to have taken
as a director in order to make himself or herself aware of any
relevant audit information and to establish that the Company’s
auditor is aware of that information.
This confirmation is given, and should be interpreted, in accordance
with the provisions of Section 418 of the Companies Act 2006.
Responsibility statements
Each of the persons who is a director at the date of approval of this
report confirms that to the best of his or her knowledge:
i)each of the Group and parent company financial statements,
prepared in accordance with IFRS and UK Accounting Standards
respectively, gives a true and fair view of the assets, liabilities,
financial position and profit or loss of the issuer and the
undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole; and
ii)the directors’ report on pages 1 to 72 includes a fair review of the
development and performance of the business and the position
of the Company and the undertakings included in the
consolidation taken as a whole, together with a description of the
principal risks and uncertainties that they face.
By order of the Board
Nigel Goldsworthy
Company Secretary
13 February 2013
73
Financial statements
Financial statements
Consolidated financial statements
74
74
75
76
78
CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOW STATEMENT
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
Company financial statements
123 COMPANY BALANCE SHEET
123 RECONCILIATION OF MOVEMENTS IN SHAREHOLDERS’ FUNDS
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
124 NOTES TO THE COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1241Accounting policies
124 2 Investments – subsidiary undertakings
1243Financial liabilities
1254Share capital
125 5 Movements in capital and reserves
1256Other information
Financial statements
79 NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
791Accounting policies
862Segmental analysis
903Net financing
904Taxation
93 5 Earnings per ordinary share
936Employee information
947Auditors’ remuneration
958Intangible assets
97 9 Property, plant and equipment
9810Investments
9911Inventories
99 12 Trade and other receivables
99 13 Cash and cash equivalents
100 14 Assets held for sale
10015Borrowings
101 16 Trade and other payables
10217Financial instruments
110 18 Provisions for liabilities and charges
11019Post-retirement benefits
11520Share capital
11521Share-based payments
11822Operating leases
11823Contingent liabilities
119 24 Related party transactions
120 25 Acquisitions and disposals
122 26Events after the reporting period –
Consolidation of Tognum AG
74
Financial statements
Consolidated income statement
For the year ended 31 December 2012
2012
Notes
Revenue
Cost of sales
Gross profit
Other operating income
Commercial and administrative costs
Research and development costs
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Operating profit
Profit on disposal of businesses
Profit before financing and taxation
Financing income
Financing costs
Net financing
Profit before taxation 1
Taxation
Profit for the year
1
Underlying profit before taxation
2011
IAE
restructuring
£m
Total
£m
£m
12,161
(9,416)
2,745
33
(989)
(589)
173
1,373
–
1,373
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
699
699
12,161
(9,416)
2,745
33
(989)
(589)
173
1,373
699
2,072
11,124
(8,676)
2,448
69
(984)
(463)
116
1,186
3
1,189
3
1,112
(479)
633
–
–
–
1,112
(479)
633
456
(540)
(84)
4
2,006
(447)
1,559
699
37
736
2,705
(410)
2,295
1,105
(257)
848
1,545
14
1,559
736
–
736
2,281
14
2,295
850
(2)
848
83.47p
39.76p
123.23p
121.59p
45.95p
45.33p
19.5p
365
17.5p
328
–
1,429
1,157
Notes
2012
£m
2011
£m
2,295
848
2
10
25
2
3
Attributable to:
Ordinary shareholders
Non-controlling interests (NCI)
Profit for the year
Earnings per ordinary share attributable to ordinary shareholders:
Basic
Diluted
Payments to ordinary shareholders in respect of the year:
Per share
Total
Excluding IAE
restructuring
£m
5
17
2
1,429
Consolidated statement of comprehensive income
For the year ended 31 December 2012
Profit for the year
Other comprehensive income (OCI)
Items that will not be reclassified to profit or loss
Movements in post-retirement schemes
Share of other comprehensive income of joint ventures and associates
Related tax movements
(259)
(46)
91
(214)
123
(3)
(53)
67
Total comprehensive income for the year
(118)
(12)
(1)
(131)
1,950
(102)
(7)
(1)
(110)
805
Attributable to:
Ordinary shareholders
Non-controlling interests
Total comprehensive income for the year
1,937
13
1,950
808
(3)
805
Items that may be reclassified to profit or loss
Foreign exchange translation differences on foreign operations
Share of other comprehensive income of joint ventures and associates
Related tax movements
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
19
10
4
10
4
75
Financial statements
Consolidated balance sheet
At 31 December 2012
Notes
ASSETS
Non-current assets
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investments – joint ventures and associates
Investments – other
Other financial assets
Deferred tax assets
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
8
9
10
10
17
4
19
Current assets
Inventories
Trade and other receivables
Taxation recoverable
Other financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Assets held for sale
11
12
17
13
14
Total assets
LIABILITIES
Current liabilities
Borrowings
Other financial liabilities
Trade and other payables
Current tax liabilities
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Liabilities associated with assets held for sale
15
17
16
18
14
15
17
16
4
18
19
Total liabilities
Net assets
EQUITY
Equity attributable to ordinary shareholders
Called-up share capital
Share premium account
Capital redemption reserve
Cash flow hedging reserve
Other reserves
Retained earnings
20
Non-controlling interests
Total equity
2011
£m
2,901
2,564
1,800
6
592
330
329
8,522
2,882
2,338
1,680
10
327
368
503
8,108
2,726
4,119
33
115
11
2,585
4
9,593
18,115
2,561
4,009
20
91
11
1,310
313
8,315
16,423
(149)
(312)
(6,387)
(126)
(220)
–
(7,194)
(20)
(111)
(6,236)
(138)
(276)
(135)
(6,916)
(1,234)
(418)
(1,465)
(584)
(241)
(874)
(4,816)
(12,010)
(1,184)
(919)
(1,314)
(445)
(226)
(900)
(4,988)
(11,904)
6,105
4,519
374
–
169
(63)
314
5,294
6,088
17
6,105
374
–
173
(52)
433
3,590
4,518
1
4,519
The financial statements on pages 74 to 122 were approved by the Board on 13 February 2013 and signed on its behalf by:
Sir Simon Robertson Chairman R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Mark Morris Chief Financial Officer
Financial statements
Non-current liabilities
Borrowings
Other financial liabilities
Trade and other payables
Deferred tax liabilities
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Post-retirement scheme deficits
2012
£m
76
Financial statements
Consolidated cash flow statement
For the year ended 31 December 2012
2012
£m
2011
£m
1,373
(9)
(173)
129
231
256
2
(40)
(158)
(284)
267
(29)
151
(297)
55
1,474
(219)
1,255
1,186
(8)
(116)
76
169
241
–
(28)
(140)
(62)
416
68
(43)
(304)
59
1,514
(208)
1,306
4
(250)
1
(435)
10
30
(20)
942
–
(24)
167
(1)
424
1
(363)
6
(412)
38
31
(19)
–
7
(1,329)
(167)
–
(2,207)
Cash flows from financing activities
Repayment of loans
Proceeds from increase in loans
Net cash flow from increase/(decrease) in borrowings
Interest received
Interest paid
Decrease in short-term investments
Issue of ordinary shares (net of expenses)
Purchase of ordinary shares
Redemption of C Shares
Net cash outflow from financing activities
(78)
200
122
11
(52)
–
–
(94)
(318)
(331)
(567)
–
(567)
19
(50)
316
(1)
(57)
(315)
(655)
Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at 1 January
Exchange losses on cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at 31 December
1,348
1,291
(54)
2,585
(1,556)
2,851
(4)
1,291
Notes
Reconciliation of cash flows from operating activities
Operating profit
Profit on disposal of property, plant and equipment
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Dividends received from joint ventures and associates
Amortisation and impairment of intangible assets
Depreciation and impairment of property, plant and equipment
Impairment of investments
Decrease in provisions
Increase in inventories
Increase in trade and other receivables
Increase in trade and other payables
Movement in other financial assets and liabilities
Net defined benefit post-retirement cost/(credit) recognised in profit before financing
Cash funding of defined benefit post-retirement schemes
Share-based payments
Net cash inflow from operating activities before taxation
Taxation paid
Net cash inflow from operating activities
Cash flows from investing activities
Disposals of unlisted investments
Additions of intangible assets
Disposals of intangible assets
Purchases of property, plant and equipment
Government grants received
Disposals of property, plant and equipment
Acquisitions of businesses (net of cash acquired)
Proceeds from restructuring of IAE
Disposals of businesses
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Cash flows from loan to Engine Holding GmbH
Transfer of subsidiary to associate
Net cash inflow/(outflow) from investing activities
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
10
10
10
21
25
25
77
Financial statements
Consolidated cash flow statement
2012
£m
Reconciliation of movements in cash and cash equivalents to movements in net funds
Increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
Cash flow from (increase)/decrease in borrowings
Cash flow from decrease in short-term investments
Change in net funds resulting from cash flows
Net funds (excluding cash and cash equivalents) of businesses acquired
Exchange losses on net funds
Fair value adjustments
Movement in net funds
Net funds at 1 January excluding the fair value of swaps
Net funds at 31 December excluding the fair value of swaps
Fair value of swaps hedging fixed rate borrowings
Net funds at 31 December
1,348
(122)
–
1,226
(78)
(54)
2
1,096
117
1,213
104
1,317
2011
£m
(1,556)
567
(316)
(1,305)
–
(5)
92
(1,218)
1,335
117
106
223
The movement in net funds (defined by the Group as including the items shown below) is as follows:
At
1 January
2012
£m
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
1,285
11
14
(19)
1,291
11
(1)
(1,183)
(1)
117
106
223
(578)
397
1,510
19
1,348
–
78
(200)
–
1,226
1,226
Net funds
of businesses
acquired
£m
Exchange
differences
£m
Fair value
adjustments
£m
–
(78)
–
–
(78)
(33)
–
(21)
–
(54)
–
–
–
–
(54)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2
–
2
(78)
(54)
(2)
–
Reclassifications
£m
–
–
–
–
–
–
(148)
148
–
–
–
At
31 December
2012
£m
674
408
1,503
–
2,585
11
(149)
(1,233)
(1)
1,213
104
1,317
Financial statements
Cash at bank and in hand
Money market funds
Short-term deposits
Overdrafts
Cash and cash equivalents
Short-term investments
Other current borrowings
Non-current borrowings
Finance leases
Net funds excluding fair value of swaps
Fair value of swaps hedging fixed rate
borrowings
Net funds
Funds
flow
£m
78
Financial statements
Consolidated statement of changes in equity
For the year ended 31 December 2012
Attributable to ordinary shareholders
Notes
At 1 January 2011
Profit for the year
Foreign exchange translation differences
on foreign operations
Movement on post-retirement schemes
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates
Related tax movements
Total comprehensive income for the year
Arising on issues of ordinary shares
Issue of C Shares
Redemption of C Shares
Ordinary shares purchased
Share-based payments – direct to equity 4
Effect of scheme of arrangement 5
Effect of capital reduction 5
Related tax movements
Other changes in equity in the year
At 1 January 2012
Profit for the year
Foreign exchange translation differences on
foreign operations
Movement on post-retirement schemes
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates 5
Related tax movements
Total comprehensive income for the year
Issue of C Shares
Redemption of C Shares
Ordinary shares purchased
Share-based payments – direct to equity 4
Transactions with NCI 6
Initial recognition of put option on NCI 6
Related tax movements
Other changes in equity in the year
At 31 December 2012
Share
capital
£m
374
–
19
10
4
20
17
17
4
19
10
4
17
17
4
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2,434
(2,434)
–
–
374
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
374
Capital Cash flow
Share redemption hedging
premium
reserve
reserve 1
£m
£m
£m
Other
reserves 2
£m
Retained
earnings 3
£m
Noncontrolling
Total
interests
£m
£m
Total
equity
£m
133
–
209
–
(37)
–
527
–
2,769
850
3,975
850
4
(2)
3,979
848
–
–
–
–
–
1
(120)
–
–
–
(14)
–
–
(133)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
317
–
–
(353)
–
–
(36)
173
–
–
–
(15)
–
(15)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(52)
–
(101)
–
8
(1)
(94)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
433
–
–
123
(3)
(53)
917
–
(176)
(317)
(57)
77
(2,069)
2,434
12
(96)
3,590
2,281
(101)
123
(10)
(54)
808
1
(296)
–
(57)
77
(2)
–
12
(265)
4,518
2,281
(1)
–
–
–
(3)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
1
14
(102)
123
(10)
(54)
805
1
(296)
–
(57)
77
(2)
–
12
(265)
4,519
2,295
–
–
–
–
–
(328)
324
–
–
–
–
–
(4)
169
–
–
(11)
–
(11)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(63)
(117)
–
(1)
(1)
(119)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
314
–
(259)
(46)
91
2,067
4
(324)
(94)
47
116
(121)
9
(363)
5,294
(117)
(259)
(58)
90
1,937
(324)
–
(94)
47
116
(121)
9
(367)
6,088
(1)
–
–
–
13
–
–
–
–
48
(45)
–
3
17
(118)
(259)
(58)
90
1,950
(324)
–
(94)
47
164
(166)
9
(364)
6,105
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
See accounting policies note 1.
Other reserves include a merger reserve of £3m (2011 £3m, 2010 £3m) and a translation reserve of £311m (2011 £430m, 2010 £524m).
At 31 December 2012, 20,365,787 ordinary shares with a net book value of £125m (2011 22,541,187, 2010 28,320,962 ordinary shares with net book values of £116m and £125m
respectively) were held for the purpose of share-based payment plans and included in retained earnings. During the year, 13,533,646 ordinary shares with a net book value of £85m
(2011 14,822,563 shares with a net book value of £66m) vested in share-based payment plans. During the year, the Group acquired 11,485,790 of its ordinary shares through purchases
on the London Stock Exchange.
4
Share-based payments – direct to equity is the net of the credit to equity in respect of the share-based payment charge to the income statement and the actual cost of shares vesting,
excluding those vesting from own shares.
5
On 23 May 2011, under a scheme of arrangement between Rolls-Royce Group plc, the former holding company of the Group, and its shareholders under Part 26 of the Companies Act
2006, and as sanctioned by the High Court, all the issued ordinary shares in that company were cancelled and the same number of new ordinary shares were issued to Rolls-Royce
Holdings plc in consideration for the allotment to shareholders of one ordinary share in Rolls-Royce Holdings plc for each ordinary share in Rolls-Royce Group plc held on the record date
(20 May 2011). Pursuant to the scheme of arrangement, 1,872,188,709 ordinary shares of 150 pence were issued. As required by Section 612 of the Companies Act 2006, no share
premium was recognised.
On 24 May 2011, the share capital of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc was reduced by reducing the nominal value of the ordinary shares from 150 pence to 20 pence as sanctioned by the
High Court.
6
On 2 January 2012, the Group transferred its interest in Bergen Engines AS (Bergen) to Engine Holding GmbH, its joint vehicle with Daimler AG. As it retained rights to control Bergen,
the transaction has been treated as a disposal of 50 per cent of Bergen to a non-controlling interest for €200m. Daimler AG has a put option to sell its interest in Bergen (see note 17).
1
2
3
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
79
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies
The Company
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc (the ‘Company’) is a company domiciled in the United Kingdom. The consolidated financial statements of the
Company for the year ended 31 December 2012 comprise the Company and its subsidiaries (together referred to as the ‘Group’) and
the Group’s interest in jointly controlled and associated entities. The financial statements were authorised for issue by the directors on
13 February 2013.
Basis of preparation and statement of compliance
In accordance with European Union (EU) regulations, these financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), as adopted for use in the EU effective
at 31 December 2012 (Adopted IFRS). The Company has elected to prepare its parent company accounts under UK Generally Accepted
Accounting Practices (GAAP).
The financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except where Adopted IFRS requires the revaluation of financial
instruments to fair value and certain other assets and liabilities on an alternative basis – most significantly post-retirement scheme
liabilities are valued on the basis required by IAS 19 Employee Benefits – and on a going concern basis as described on page 72.
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Adopted IFRS requires the use of certain critical accounting judgements and
estimates, which are set out below.
The Group’s significant accounting policies are set out on the following pages. These accounting policies have been applied consistently to
all periods presented in these consolidated financial statements and by all Group entities.
Key areas of judgement
The directors consider the potential key areas of judgements required to be made in applying the Group’s accounting policies to be:
Key sources of estimation uncertainty
In applying the accounting policies, management has made appropriate estimates in many areas, and the actual outcome may differ from
those calculated. The key sources of estimation uncertainty at the balance sheet date, that have a significant risk of causing material
adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year are set out below. The estimation of the relevant
assets and liabilities involves the combination of a number of assumptions. Where appropriate and practicable, sensitivities are disclosed
in the relevant notes.
Current economic environment
The current economic environment could impact a number of estimates necessary to prepare the financial statements, in particular, the
recoverable amount of assets and contingent liabilities. The Group has taken these factors into account in assessing the estimates set
out overleaf.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
• A large proportion of the Group’s activities relate to long-term aftermarket contracts. The determination of appropriate accounting
policies for recognising revenue and costs in respect of these contracts requires judgement, in particular (i) whether an aftermarket
contract is linked, for accounting purposes, to the related sale of original equipment and (ii) the appropriate measure of stage of
completion of the contract.
• As set out in note 8, the Group has significant intangible assets. The decision as to when to commence capitalisation of development
costs and whether sales of original equipment give rise to recognisable recoverable engine costs is a key judgement.
• As noted in the risk and revenue sharing partnerships accounting policy on page 81, the Group enters into arrangements with partners
who make non-refundable payments, which the directors consider represent a reimbursement to the Group for its past expenditure,
including that in establishing the market to which the partners gain access, on the basis that the Group has satisfied the relevant
performance obligations and the payments are not linked to the future supply arrangements between the partners and the Group.
Under the arrangements, the partners share the programme costs and receive a share in future programme revenues or profits.
• As set out in note 23, the Group has contingent liabilities in respect of financing support provided to customers. Judgement is required
to assess the likelihood of these crystallising, in order to assess whether a provision should be recognised.
80
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Forecasts and discount rates
The carrying values of a number of items on the balance sheet are dependent on the estimates of future cash flows arising from the
Group’s operations, in particular:
• The assessment as to whether there are any indications of impairment of development, participation, certification and recoverable
engine costs recognised as intangible assets is dependent on forecasts of cash flows generated by the relevant assets (carrying values
at 31 December 2012 £1,388m, 31 December 2011 £1,442m).
• The financial liabilities arising from financial risk and revenue sharing partnerships are valued at each reporting date using
the amortised cost method (carrying values at 31 December 2012 £193m, 31 December 2011 £230m). This involves calculating the
present value of the forecast cash flows of the arrangement using the internal rate of return at the inception of the arrangement as
the discount rate.
• The realisation of the deferred tax assets (carrying values at 31 December 2012 £330m, 31 December 2011 £368m) recognised is
dependent on the generation of sufficient future taxable profits. The Group recognises deferred tax assets where it is more likely than
not that the benefit will be realised.
Assessment of long-term contractual arrangements
The Group has long-term contracts that fall into different accounting periods. In assessing the allocation of revenues and costs to
individual accounting periods, and the consequential assets and liabilities, the Group estimates the total revenues and costs forecast
to arise in respect of the contract and the stage of completion based on an appropriate measure of performance as described in the
revenue recognition accounting policy below.
Post-retirement benefits
The Group’s defined benefit pension schemes and similar arrangements are assessed annually in accordance with IAS 19. The accounting
valuation, which was based on assumptions determined with independent actuarial advice, resulted in a net deficit of £545m before
deferred taxation being recognised on the balance sheet at 31 December 2012 (31 December 2011 £397m). The size of the net deficit is
sensitive to the market value of the assets held by the schemes and to actuarial assumptions, which include price inflation, pension and
salary increases, the discount rate used in assessing actuarial liabilities, mortality and other demographic assumptions and the levels of
contributions. Further details are included in note 19.
Provisions
As described in the accounting policy on page 84, the Group measures provisions (carrying value at 31 December 2012 £461m,
31 December 2011 £502m) at the directors’ best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the obligation at the balance sheet date.
These estimates take account of information available and different possible outcomes.
Taxation
The tax payable on profits is determined based on tax laws and regulations that apply in each of the numerous jurisdictions in which the
Group operates. Where the precise impact of these laws and regulations is unclear then reasonable estimates may be used to determine
the tax charge included in the financial statements.
Basis of consolidation
The Group financial statements include the financial statements of the Company and all of its subsidiary undertakings together with the
Group’s share of the results of joint ventures and associates made up to 31 December.
A subsidiary is an entity controlled by the Company. Control exists when the Company has the power, directly or indirectly, to govern the
financial and operating policies of the entity so as to derive benefits from its activities.
The Group has an indirect interest of 50 per cent in
Bergen Engines AS. Under the terms of the shareholders’ agreement with Daimler AG, the Group controls this company.
A joint venture is an entity in which the Group holds a long-term interest and which is jointly controlled by the Group and one or more other
venturers under a contractual arrangement. An associate is an entity, being neither a subsidiary nor a joint venture, in which the Group
holds a long-term interest and where the Group has a significant influence. The results of joint ventures and associates are accounted for
using the equity method of accounting.
Any subsidiary undertakings, joint ventures or associates sold or acquired during the year are included up to, or from, the dates of change of
control. Transactions with non-controlling interests are recorded directly in equity.
Where the Group has issued a put option over shares held by a non-controlling interest, the Group recognises a liability for the estimated
exercise value of that option. Movements in the estimated liability after initial recognition are recognised in the income statement.
All intra-group transactions, balances, income and expenses are eliminated on consolidation. Adjustments are made to eliminate the profit
or loss arising on transactions with joint ventures and associates to the extent of the Group’s interest in the entity.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
81
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Significant accounting policies
Revenue recognition
Revenues comprise sales to outside customers after discounts, excluding value added tax.
Sales of products are recognised when the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the goods are transferred to the customer, the
sales price agreed and the receipt of payment can be assured. On occasion, the Group may participate in the financing of engines in
conjunction with airframe manufacturers, most commonly by the provision of guarantees as described in note 23. In such circumstances,
the contingent obligations arising under these arrangements are taken into account in assessing whether significant risks and rewards of
ownership have been transferred to the customer.
Sales of services are recognised by reference to the stage of completion based on services performed to date. The assessment of the stage of
completion is dependent on the nature of the contract, but will generally be based on: costs incurred to the extent these relate to services
performed up to the reporting date; achievement of contractual milestones where appropriate; or flying hours or equivalent for long-term
aftermarket arrangements.
Linked sales of products and services are treated as a single contract where these components have been negotiated as a single commercial
package and are so closely interrelated that they do not operate independently of each other and are considered to form a single project
with an overall profit margin. Revenue is recognised on the same basis as for other sales of products and services as described above.
Provided that the outcome of construction contracts can be assessed with reasonable certainty, the revenues and costs on such contracts
are recognised based on stage of completion and the overall contract profitability.
Full provision is made for any estimated losses to completion of contracts, having regard to the overall substance of the arrangements.
Progress payments received, when greater than recorded revenue, are deducted from the value of work in progress except to the extent
that payments on account exceed the value of work in progress on any contract where the excess is included in trade and other payables.
The amount by which recorded revenue of long-term contracts is in excess of payments on account is classified as amounts recoverable on
contracts and is separately disclosed within trade and other receivables.
The Group has arrangements with partners who do not undertake development work or supply parts. Such arrangements are
considered to be financial instruments as defined by IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation and are accounted for using the
amortised cost method.
Government investment
Where a government or similar body has previously invested in a development programme, the Group treats payments to that body as
royalty payments, which are matched to related sales.
Government grants
Government grants are recognised in the income statement so as to match them with the related expenses that they are intended to
compensate. Where grants are received in advance of the related expenses, they are included in the balance sheet as deferred income.
Non-monetary grants are recognised at fair value.
Interest
Interest receivable/payable is credited/charged to the income statement using the effective interest method. Where borrowing costs are
attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset, such costs are capitalised as part of the specific asset.
Taxation
The tax charge/credit on the profit or loss for the year comprises current and deferred tax. Current tax is the expected tax payable for the year,
using tax rates enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet date, and any adjustment to tax payable in respect of previous years.
Deferred tax is provided using the balance sheet liability method, providing for temporary differences between the carrying amounts of
the assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for taxation purposes.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
Risk and revenue sharing partnerships (RRSPs)
From time to time, the Group enters into arrangements with partners who make cash payments that are not refundable. Cash sums
received, which reimburse the Group for past expenditure, including that in establishing the market to which the partners gain access,
are credited to other operating income. The arrangements also require partners to undertake development work and/or supply
components for use in the programme at their own expense. No accounting entries are recorded where partners undertake such
development work or where programme components are supplied by partners because no obligation arises unless and until programme
sales are made. Instead, partners receive a share of the programme revenues or profits, which are charged to cost of sales as programme
revenues arise.
82
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Deferred tax liabilities are recognised for taxable temporary differences arising on investments in subsidiaries and joint ventures, except
where the Group is able to control the reversal of the temporary difference and it is probable that the temporary difference will not reverse
in the foreseeable future. Deferred tax is not recognised on taxable temporary differences arising on the initial recognition of goodwill or
for temporary differences arising from the initial recognition of assets and liabilities in a transaction that is not a business combination
and that affects neither accounting nor taxable profit.
Deferred tax is calculated using the enacted or substantively enacted rates that are expected to apply when the asset or liability is settled.
Deferred tax is charged or credited in the income statement or statement of comprehensive income as appropriate, except when it relates
to items credited or charged directly to equity in which case the deferred tax is also dealt with in equity.
Deferred tax assets are recognised only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profits will be available against which the assets
can be utilised.
Foreign currency translation
Transactions in overseas currencies are translated into local currency at the exchange rates ruling on the date of the transaction. Monetary
assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into local currency at the rate ruling at the year end. Exchange
differences arising on foreign exchange transactions and the retranslation of assets and liabilities into sterling at the rate ruling at the
year-end are taken into account in determining profit before taxation.
The trading results of overseas undertakings are translated at the average exchange rates for the year. The assets and liabilities of overseas
undertakings, including goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on acquisition, are translated at the exchange rates ruling at the year
end. Exchange adjustments arising from the retranslation of the opening net investments, and from the translation of the profits or losses
at average rates, are taken to equity.
Financial instruments
IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement requires the classification of financial instruments into separate categories for
which the accounting requirement is different. The Group has classified its financial instruments as follows:
• Short-term investments are generally classified as available for sale.
• Short-term deposits (principally comprising funds held with banks and other financial institutions), trade receivables and short-term
investments not designated as available for sale are classified as loans and receivables.
• Borrowings, trade payables, financial RRSPs and C Shares are classified as other liabilities.
• Derivatives, comprising foreign exchange contracts, interest rate swaps and commodity swaps are classified as held for trading.
Financial instruments are recognised at the contract date and initially measured at fair value. Their subsequent measurement depends on
their classification:
vailable for sale assets are held at fair value. Changes in fair value arising from changes in exchange rates are included in the income
• A
statement. All other changes in fair value are taken to equity. On disposal, the accumulated changes in value recorded in equity are
included in the gain or loss recorded in the income statement.
• Loans and receivables and other liabilities are held at amortised cost and not revalued (except for changes in exchange rates which are
included in the income statement) unless they are included in a fair value hedge accounting relationship. Where such a relationship
exists, the instruments are revalued in respect of the risk being hedged, with the change in value included in the income statement.
• Held for trading instruments are held at fair value. Changes in fair value are included in the income statement unless the instrument
is included in a cash flow hedge. If the instruments are included in a cash flow hedging relationship, which is effective, changes
in value are taken to equity. When the hedged forecast transaction occurs, amounts previously recorded in equity are recognised in
the income statement.
Financial instruments are derecognised on expiry or when all contractual rights and obligations are transferred.
Hedge accounting
The Group does not generally apply hedge accounting in respect of forward foreign exchange contracts held to manage the cash flow
exposures of forecast transactions denominated in foreign currencies. In 2011, the Group applied cash flow hedge accounting in respect of
foreign exchange contracts entered into to hedge the cost of its investment in Engine Holding GmbH.
The Group does not apply hedge accounting in respect of commodity swaps held to manage the cash flow exposures of forecast
transactions in those commodities.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
83
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies (continued)
The Group applies hedge accounting in respect of transactions entered into to manage the fair value and cash flow exposures of its
borrowings. Forward foreign exchange contracts are held to manage the fair value exposures of borrowings denominated in foreign
currencies and are designated as fair value hedges. Interest rate swaps are held to manage the interest rate exposures and are designated
as fair value or cash flow hedges of fixed and floating rate borrowings respectively.
Changes in the fair values of derivatives designated as fair value hedges and changes in fair value of the related hedged item are recognised
directly in the income statement.
Changes in the fair values of derivatives that are designated as cash flow hedges and are effective are recognised directly in equity. Any
ineffectiveness in the hedging relationships is included in the income statement. The amounts deferred in equity are recognised in the
income statement to match the recognition of the hedged item or, in the case of the cash flow hedges of the investment in Engine Holding
GmbH, included in the initial carrying value of the joint venture.
Hedge accounting is discontinued when the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated, exercised, or no longer qualifies for hedge
accounting. At that time, for cash flow hedges and if the forecast transaction remains probable, any cumulative gain or loss on the hedging
instrument recognised in equity is retained in equity until the forecast transaction occurs. If a hedged transaction is no longer expected to
occur, the net cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in equity is transferred to the income statement.
The portion of a gain or loss on an instrument used to hedge a net investment in a foreign operation that is determined to be an effective
hedge is recognised directly in equity. The ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the income statement.
Purchased goodwill
Goodwill recognised represents the excess of the fair value of the purchase consideration over the fair value to the Group of the net of
the identifiable assets acquired and the liabilities assumed. On transition to IFRS on 1 January 2004, goodwill was recognised based the
carrying value under the previous accounting policies. Goodwill in respect of the acquisition of a subsidiary is recognised as an intangible
asset. Goodwill arising on the acquisition of joint ventures and associates is included in the carrying value of the investment.
Research and development
In accordance with IAS 38 Intangible Assets, expenditure incurred on research and development, excluding known recoverable amounts
on contracts, and contributions to shared engineering programmes, is distinguished as relating either to a research phase or to a
development phase.
All research phase expenditure is charged to the income statement. For development expenditure, this is capitalised as an
internally generated intangible asset only if it meets strict criteria, relating in particular to technical feasibility and generation of
future economic benefits.
Expenditure that cannot be classified into these two categories is treated as being incurred in the research phase. The Group considers that,
due to the complex nature of new equipment programmes, it is not possible to distinguish reliably between research and development
activities until relatively late in the programme.
Expenditure capitalised is amortised over its useful economic life, up to a maximum of 15 years from the entry into service of the product.
Recoverable engine costs
On occasion, the Group may sell original equipment to customers at a price below its cost, on the basis that this deficit will be
recovered from future aftermarket sales to the original customer. Where the Group has a contractual right to supply aftermarket parts
to the customer and its intellectual rights, warranty arrangements and, where relevant, statutory airworthiness requirements provide
reasonable control over this supply, these arrangements are considered to meet the definition of an intangible asset. Such intangible
assets are recognised to the extent of the deficit and amortised on a straight-line basis over the expected period of utilisation by the
original customer.
Software
The cost of acquiring software that is not specific to an item of property, plant and equipment is classified as an intangible asset and
amortised over its useful economic life, up to a maximum of five years.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
Certification costs and participation fees
Costs incurred in respect of meeting regulatory certification requirements for new civil aero-engine/aircraft combinations and payments
made to airframe manufacturers for this, and participation fees, are carried forward in intangible assets to the extent that they can be
recovered out of future sales and are charged to the income statement over the programme life, up to a maximum of 15 years from the
entry into service of the product.
84
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Property, plant and equipment
Property, plant and equipment assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and any provision for impairment in value.
Depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis to write off the cost, less the estimated residual value, of property, plant and equipment
over their estimated useful lives. No depreciation is provided on assets in the course of construction. Estimated useful lives are as follows:
i) land and buildings, as advised by the Group’s professional advisors:
a)freehold buildings – five to 45 years (average 24 years)
b)leasehold buildings – lower of advisor’s estimates or period of lease
c) no depreciation is provided on freehold land
ii) plant and equipment – five to 25 years (average 13 years)
iii)aircraft and engines – five to 20 years (average 16 years).
Operating leases
Payments made and rentals received under operating lease arrangements are charged/credited to the income statement on a straightline basis.
Impairment of non-current assets
Impairment of non-current assets is considered in accordance with IAS 36 Impairment of Assets. Where the asset does not generate cash
flows that are independent of other assets, impairment is considered for the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs.
Goodwill and intangible assets not yet available for use are tested for impairment annually. Other intangible assets, property, plant and
equipment and investments are assessed for any indications of impairment annually. If any indication of impairment is identified, an
impairment test is performed to estimate the recoverable amount.
Recoverable amount is the higher of value in use or fair value less costs to sell, if this is readily available. The value in use is the present value
of future cash flows using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects the time value of money and the risk specific to the asset.
If the recoverable amount of an asset (or cash-generating unit) is estimated to be below the carrying value, the carrying value is reduced to
the recoverable amount and the impairment loss recognised as an expense.
Inventories
Inventories and work in progress are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value on a first-in, first-out basis. Cost comprises direct
materials and, where applicable, direct labour costs and those overheads, including depreciation of property, plant and equipment, that
have been incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition. Net realisable value represents the estimated selling
prices less all estimated costs of completion and costs to be incurred in marketing, selling and distribution.
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents include cash at bank and in hand, investments in money-market funds and short-term deposits with a maturity
of three months or less on inception. The Group considers overdrafts (repayable on demand) to be an integral part of its cash management
activities and these are included in cash and cash equivalents for the purposes of the cash flow statement.
Provisions
Provisions are recognised when the Group has a present obligation as a result of a past event, and it is probable that the Group will be
required to settle that obligation. Provisions are measured at the directors’ best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the
obligation at the balance sheet date, and are discounted to present value where the effect is material.
Post-retirement benefits
Pensions and similar benefits (principally healthcare) are accounted for under IAS 19 Employee Benefits.
For defined benefit plans, obligations are measured at discounted present value whilst plan assets are recorded at fair value. Surpluses in
schemes are recognised as assets only if they represent economic benefits available to the Group in the future. A liability is recognised to
the extent that the minimum funding requirements in respect of past service will give rise to an unrecognisable surplus. Movements in
unrecognised surpluses and minimum funding liabilities are included in the statement of comprehensive income.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
85
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies (continued)
The service and financing costs of such plans are recognised separately in the income statement:
• current service costs are spread systematically over the lives of employees;
• past service costs are recognised immediately to the extent the benefits are already vested, or otherwise recognised on a straight-line
basis over the average period until the benefits become vested; and
• financing costs are recognised in the periods in which they arise.
Actuarial gains and losses are recognised immediately in the statement of comprehensive income.
Payments to defined contribution schemes are charged as an expense as they fall due.
Share-based payments
The Group provides share-based payment arrangements to certain employees. These are principally equity-settled arrangements and are
measured at fair value (excluding the effect of non-market based vesting conditions) at the date of grant. The fair value is expensed on a
straight-line basis over the vesting period. The amount recognised as an expense is adjusted to reflect the actual number of shares or
options that will vest, except where additional shares vest as a result of the Total Shareholder Return (TSR) performance condition in the
Performance Share Plan (PSP).
Cash-settled share options (grants in the International ShareSave plan) are measured at fair value at the balance sheet date. The Group
recognises a liability at the balance sheet date based on these fair values, taking into account the estimated number of options that will
actually vest and the relative completion of the vesting period. Changes in the value of this liability are recognised in the income statement
for the year.
The fair values of the share-based payment arrangements are measured as follows:
The cost of shares of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc held by the Group for the purpose of fulfilling obligations in respect of employee share plans is
deducted from equity in the consolidated balance sheet. See note 21 for a further description of the share-based payment plans.
Contingent liabilities
In connection with the sale of its products, the Group will, on occasion, provide financing support for its customers. These arrangements
fall into two categories: credit-based guarantees and asset-value guarantees. In accordance with the requirements of IAS 39 and IFRS 4
Insurance Contracts, credit-based guarantees are treated as insurance contracts. The Group considers asset-value guarantees to be nonfinancial liabilities and accordingly these are also treated as insurance contracts. Provision is made as described on page 118.
The Group’s contingent liabilities relating to financing arrangements are spread over many years and relate to a number of customers and
a broad product portfolio, and are reported on a discounted basis.
Revisions to Adopted IFRS in 2012
The Group has adopted revisions to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements that require items of other comprehensive income to be
classified depending on whether they may be potentially reclassified to the income statement. There is no net impact.
There were no other revisions to Adopted IFRS that became applicable in 2012 which had a significant impact on the Group’s
financial statements.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
i) ShareSave plans – using the binomial pricing model;
ii)PSP – using a pricing model adjusted to reflect non-entitlement to dividends (or equivalent) and the TSR market-based performance
condition; and
iii)Annual Performance Related Award plan deferred shares – share price on the date of the award.
86
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
1 Accounting policies (continued)
Revisions to IFRS not applicable in 2012
Standards and interpretations issued by the IASB are only applicable if endorsed by the EU. The following will or may be applicable in the
future:
• Amendments to IAS 19 Employee Benefits: the principal change is that the financing on post-retirement benefits is calculated on the
net surplus or deficit using an ‘AA’ corporate bond rate. This will be effective for 2013. If it had been effective in 2012, it would have
increased the current service cost of defined benefit post-retirement schemes by £9 million, the past service cost by £5 million and
reduced the net post-retirement scheme financing cost by £55 million. The net deficit at 31 December 2012 would have reduced by
£100 million.
• IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements: the principal potential effect is certain entities currently classified as joint ventures may be classified as joint
operations. This would result in the Group’s share of the individual assets and liabilities of these entities being included in the financial
statements rather than the equity method accounting adopted under the requirements of IAS 31. This would not affect the Group’s net
assets or profit after tax for the period. This will be effective for 2013. The Group has reviewed its joint ventures and has concluded that
none of its material joint ventures fall to be classified as joint operations under the requirements of IFRS 11.
• IFRS 9 Financial Instruments will simplify the classification of financial assets for measurement purposes, but is not anticipated to have a
significant impact on the financial statements. If endorsed, this will be effective for 2015.
The Group does not consider that any other standards, amendments or interpretations issued by the IASB, but not yet applicable, will have a
significant impact on the financial statements.
2 Segmental analysis
The analysis by business segment is presented in accordance with IFRS 8 Operating Segments, on the basis of those segments whose
operating results are regularly reviewed by the Board (the Chief Operating Decision Maker as defined by IFRS 8), as follows:
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Engine Holding
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of commercial aero engines and aftermarket services.
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of military aero engines and aftermarket services.
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of marine-power propulsion systems and aftermarket services.
– development, manufacture, marketing and sales of power systems for the offshore oil and gas industry and
electrical power generation and aftermarket services.
–d
evelopment, manufacture, marketing and sales of diesel engines, aftermarket services and the equity accounted
share of Tognum AG.
Technology and Operations discussed in the business review operate on a Group-wide basis across all the above segments. Following the
transfer of Bergen Engines AS to Engine Holding on 2 January 2012, the comparative figures for 2011 have been restated to put them on a
consistent basis.
The operating results reviewed by the Board are prepared on an underlying basis, which the Board consider reflects better the economic
substance of the Group’s trading during the year. The principles adopted to determine underlying results are:
Underlying revenues – Where revenues are denominated in a currency other than the functional currency of the Group undertaking, these
reflect the achieved exchange rates arising on settled derivative contracts.
Underlying profit before financing – Where transactions are denominated in a currency other than the functional currency of the Group
undertaking, this reflects the transactions at the achieved exchange rates on settled derivative contracts. In addition, adjustments have
been made to exclude one-off past-service credits on post-retirement schemes and the effect of acquisition accounting.
Underlying profit before taxation – In addition to those adjustments in underlying profit before financing:
• Includes amounts realised from settled derivative contracts and revaluation of relevant assets and liabilities to exchange rates forecast
to be achieved from future settlement of derivative contracts.
• Excludes unrealised amounts arising from revaluations required by IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement, changes
in value of financial RRSP contracts arising from changes in forecast payments, changes in the value of put options on NCI and the net
impact of financing costs related to post-retirement scheme benefits.
This analysis also includes a reconciliation of the underlying results to those reported in the consolidated income statement.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
87
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
2 Segmental analysis (continued)
Year ended 31 December 2012
Underlying revenue from sale of original equipment
Underlying revenue from aftermarket services
Total underlying revenue
Underlying operating profit excluding share of results of joint
ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Underlying profit before financing and taxation
Segment assets
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Segment liabilities
Net assets
Investment in intangible assets, property, plant and equipment
and joint ventures and associates
Depreciation, amortisation and impairment
Year ended 31 December 2011
Underlying revenue from sale of original equipment
Underlying revenue from aftermarket services
Total underlying revenue
Underlying operating profit excluding share of results of joint
ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Profit on disposal of businesses
Underlying profit before financing and taxation
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Marine
£m
Energy
£m
Engine
Holding
£m
2,934
3,503
6,437
1,231
1,186
2,417
1,288
961
2,249
344
618
962
118
169
287
(22)
(121)
(143)
5,893
6,316
12,209
597
130
727
391
13
404
9
12
21
32
77
109
(11)
–
(11)
1,313
231
1,544
150
1,328
(282)
1,196
(682)
–
671
(11)
12,923
1,800
(9,043)
5,680
8,683
440
(5,598)
3,525
1,434
(22)
(1,797)
(385)
2,059
4
(1,467)
596
1,279
50
(570)
759
581
322
126
46
101
55
94
42
11
4
2,232
3,340
5,572
1,102
1,133
2,235
1,322
949
2,271
527
556
1,083
185
146
331
384
115
–
499
367
9
–
376
282
2
3
287
6
10
–
16
44
36
–
80
8,218
403
(5,982)
2,639
620
267
1,333
(22)
(1,831)
(520)
70
48
2,023
8
(1,440)
591
75
56
1,192
42
(546)
688
83
38
405
1,249
(164)
1,490
1,318
1
–
–
(110)
(105)
(215)
–
–
–
–
(746)
–
746
–
–
–
913
469
5,258
6,019
11,277
1,083
172
3
1,258
12,425
1,680
(9,217)
4,888
2,166
410
Financial statements
Segment assets
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Segment liabilities
Net assets
Investment in intangible assets, property, plant and equipment and
joint ventures and associates
Depreciation and amortisation
Defence
aerospace
£m
295
(1)
294
Intrasegment
£m
Total
reportable
segments
£m
Civil
aerospace
£m
88
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
2 Segmental analysis (continued)
Reconciliation to reported results
Total
reportable
segments
£m
Year ended 31 December 2012
Revenue from sale of original equipment
Revenue from aftermarket services
Total revenue
Operating profit excluding share of results of joint ventures and associates
5,893
6,316
12,209
1,313
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Profit on disposal of businesses
Profit before financing and taxation
Net financing
Profit before taxation
Taxation
Profit for the year
Year ended 31 December 2011
Revenue from sale of original equipment
Revenue from aftermarket services
Total revenue
Operating profit excluding share of results of joint ventures and associates
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Profit on disposal of businesses
Profit before financing and taxation
Net financing
Profit before taxation
Taxation
Profit for the year
Underlying
central
items
£m
–
–
–
(54) 1
Total
underlying
£m
Underlying
adjustments
£m
Group
£m
5,893
6,316
12,209
1,259
41
(89)
(48)
(59)
5,934
6,227
12,161
1,200
231
–
1,544
–
–
(54)
(61)
(115)
(318)
(433)
231
–
1,490
(61)
1,429
(318)
1,111
(58)
699
582
694
1,276
(92)
1,184
173
699
2,072
633
2,705
(410)
2,295
5,258
6,019
11,277
1,083
172
3
1,258
–
–
–
(52) 1
–
–
(52)
(49)
(101)
(261)
(362)
5,258
6,019
11,277
1,031
172
3
1,206
(49)
1,157
(261)
896
(19)
(134)
(153)
39
(56)
–
(17)
(35)
(52)
4
(48)
5,239
5,885
11,124
1,070
116
3
1,189
(84)
1,105
(257)
848
Central corporate costs
1
Underlying adjustments
Underlying performance
Revenue recognised at exchange rate on date of
transaction
Realised (gains)/losses on settled derivative contracts 1
Net unrealised fair value changes to derivative contracts 2
Effect of currency on contract accounting
Put option on NCI and financial RRSPs – foreign exchange
differences and other unrealised changes in value
Effect of acquisition accounting 3
Post-retirement scheme past-service credits 4, 5
Net post-retirement scheme financing
Related tax effect
IAE restructuring
Total underlying adjustments
Reported per consolidated income statement
2012
Profit before
Net
Revenue
financing
financing
£m
£m
£m
12,209
1,490
(48)
–
–
–
–
(25)
–
(23)
–
–
–
–
–
–
(48)
12,161
–
(69)
–
–
–
699
582
2,072
(61)
–
–
747
–
11
–
–
(64)
–
–
694
633
Taxation
£m
(318)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(129)
37
(92)
(410)
Revenue
£m
11,277
2011
Profit before
Net
financing
financing
£m
£m
1,206
(49)
(153)
–
–
–
–
(116)
(5)
4
–
24
(49)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(153)
11,124
–
(64)
164
–
–
–
(17)
1,189
2
–
–
(12)
–
–
(35)
(84)
Taxation
£m
(261)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
4
–
4
(257)
Realised (gains)/losses on settled derivative contracts include adjustments to reflect the (gains)/losses in the same period as the related trading cash flows.
Unrealised fair value changes to derivative contracts: (i) include those included in equity accounted joint ventures; and (ii) exclude those for which the related trading contracts have
been cancelled when the fair value changes are recognised immediately in underlying profit.
3
The adjustment eliminates charges recognised as a result of recognising assets in acquired businesses at fair value.
4
In 2010, the UK Government announced changes to the basis of the statutory indexation for pension increases. As a result, the relevant arrangements have been amended, resulting in
a gain in the income statement of £130m in 2011, which was excluded from underlying profit.
5
In 2011, the Group agreed revised post-retirement healthcare arrangements on certain of its overseas schemes. This resulted in a net gain in the income statement of £34m which was
excluded from underlying profit.
1
2
The reconciliation of underlying earnings per ordinary share is shown in note 5.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
89
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
2 Segmental analysis (continued)
2012
£m
Reportable segment assets
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments
Fair value of swaps hedging fixed rate borrowings
Income tax assets
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
Total assets
Reportable segment liabilities
Borrowings
Income tax liabilities
Post-retirement scheme deficits
Total liabilities
Net assets
12,923
1,800
2,596
104
363
329
18,115
(9,043)
(1,383)
(710)
(874)
(12,010)
6,105
2011
£m
12,425
1,680
1,321
106
388
503
16,423
(9,217)
(1,204)
(583)
(900)
(11,904)
4,519
Geographical segments
The Group’s revenue by destination is shown below:
2011
£m
1,641
446
319
177
151
182
165
676
3,999
351
1,117
194
1,729
306
123
240
345
12,161
1,361
374
409
189
183
143
143
547
3,578
301
934
210
1,778
290
261
228
195
11,124
In 2012, revenue (included in all reportable segments, other than Engine Holding) of £1,203m (2011 £1,143m) was received from a single
customer.
The carrying amounts of the Group’s non-current assets, excluding financial instruments, deferred tax assets and post-employment
benefit surpluses, by the geographical area in which the assets are located, are as follows:
United Kingdom
North America
Nordic countries
Germany
Other
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2012
£m
2011
£m
3,139
723
883
2,023
497
7,265
2,980
670
902
1,907
441
6,900
Financial statements
United Kingdom
Norway
Germany
Spain
Italy
France
Russia
Rest of Europe
USA
Canada
China
South Korea
Middle East and South East Asia
Rest of Asia
Africa
Australasia
Other
2012
£m
90
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
3 Net financing
2012
Per consolidated
income statement
Notes
£m
Financing income
Interest receivable
Fair value gains on foreign currency contracts 2
Put option on NCI and financial RRSPs – foreign exchange differences and other
unrealised changes in value
Expected return on post-retirement scheme assets
Net foreign exchange gains
Financing costs
Interest payable
Fair value losses on foreign currency contracts 2
Financial charge relating to financial RRSPs
Fair value losses on commodity derivatives 2
Interest on post-retirement scheme liabilities
Other financing charges
17
17
19
17
17
17
19
Net financing
Analysed as:
Net interest payable
Net post-retirement scheme financing
Net other financing
Net financing
1
See note 2
2
Net gain/(loss) on items held for trading
4 Taxation
Current tax
Current tax (credit)/charge for the year
Less double tax relief
Adjustments in respect of prior years
Deferred tax
Charge for the year
Adjustments in respect of prior years
Credit resulting from reduction in UK tax rate
Recognised in the income statement
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
UK
2012
£m
2011
£m
2011
Underlying Per consolidated
financing 1 income statement
£m
£m
Underlying
financing 1
£m
10
750
10
–
20
–
20
–
11
341
–
1,112
–
–
–
10
2
410
24
456
–
–
–
20
(51)
–
(10)
(3)
(405)
(10)
(479)
633
(51)
–
(10)
–
–
(10)
(71)
(61)
(51)
(21)
(11)
(28)
(422)
(7)
(540)
(84)
(51)
–
(11)
–
–
(7)
(69)
(49)
(41)
(64)
738
633
(41)
–
(20)
(61)
(31)
(12)
(41)
(84)
(31)
–
(18)
(49)
747
–
(49)
–
Overseas
2012
£m
2011
£m
Total
2012
£m
2011
£m
(3)
(1)
(4)
(7)
(11)
(1)
(2)
(3)
1
(2)
218
–
218
(18)
200
177
–
177
(8)
169
215
(1)
214
(25)
189
176
(2)
174
(7)
167
193
1
(24)
170
159
69
2
(11)
60
58
45
6
–
51
251
37
(7)
–
30
199
238
7
(24)
221
410
106
(5)
(11)
90
257
91
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
4 Taxation (continued)
Other tax (charges)/credits
OCI
Items that will not be reclassified
2012
2011
£m
£m
Current tax:
Share-based payments – direct to equity
Deferred tax:
Net investment hedge
Movement in post-retirement schemes
Share-based payments – direct to equity
Equity
Items that may be reclassified
2012
2011
£m
£m
–
91
–
(53)
(1)
–
(1)
–
91
(53)
(1)
(1)
2012
£m
2011
£m
3
6
6
9
6
12
2012
£m
2011
£m
2,705
(173)
2,532
1,105
(116)
989
620
(26)
58
(209)
9
–
(18)
(24)
410
318
92
410
262
(29)
40
–
8
(1)
(12)
(11)
257
261
(4)
257
Tax reconciliation
Profit before taxation
Less share of results of joint ventures and associates (note 10)
Profit before taxation excluding joint ventures and associates
Nominal tax charge at UK corporation tax rate 24.5% (2011 26.5%)
UK R&D credit
Rate differences
Effect of restructuring of IAE 1
Other permanent differences
Benefit to deferred tax from previously unrecognised tax losses and temporary differences
Adjustments in respect of prior years
Reduction in closing deferred taxes resulting from decrease in UK tax rate
1
Pursuant to the Substantial Shareholding Exemption, the majority of the upfront proceeds received on the IAE restructuring (see note 25) are not subject to tax.
Deferred taxation assets and liabilities
At 1 January
Amount charged to income statement
Amount credited/(charged) to other comprehensive income
Amount credited to equity
Acquisition of businesses
Transferred (from)/to assets held for sale
Exchange differences
At 31 December
Deferred tax assets
Deferred tax liabilities
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2012
£m
2011
£m
(77)
(221)
90
6
(1)
(46)
(5)
(254)
330
(584)
(254)
13
(90)
(54)
6
(3)
46
5
(77)
368
(445)
(77)
Financial statements
Underlying items (note 2)
Non-underlying items
92
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
4 Taxation (continued)
The analysis of the deferred tax position is as follows:
At 1 January
2012
£m
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Other temporary differences
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Pensions and other post-retirement
scheme benefits
Foreign exchange and commodity financial
assets and liabilities
Losses
Advance corporation tax
Recognised
in OCI
£m
Recognised
in equity
£m
Acquisition
of businesses
£m
Transferred
from
assets held
for sale
£m
Exchange
differences
£m
At
31 December
2012
£m
(243)
(135)
(61)
(250)
58
(25)
21
(101)
–
–
(1)
–
–
–
–
–
–
1
–
–
(46)
–
–
–
(1)
1
2
–
(232)
(158)
(39)
(351)
99
(31)
91
–
(2)
–
(8)
149
121
328
64
(77)
(177)
34
–
(221)
–
–
–
90
–
6
–
6
–
–
–
(1)
–
–
–
(46)
–
1
–
(5)
(56)
369
64
(254)
Recognised
in OCI
£m
Recognised
in equity
£m
At 1 January
2011
£m
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Other temporary differences
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Pensions and other post-retirement
scheme benefits
Foreign exchange and commodity financial
assets and liabilities
Losses
Advance corporation tax
Recognised
in income
statement
£m
Recognised
in income
statement
£m
Acquisition
of businesses
£m
Transferred to
assets held
for sale
£m
Exchange
differences
£m
At
31 December
2011
£m
(282)
(150)
(64)
(229)
(9)
16
(3)
(21)
–
–
(1)
–
–
–
6
–
–
–
(3)
–
46
–
–
–
2
(1)
4
–
(243)
(135)
(61)
(250)
263
(111)
(53)
–
–
–
–
99
94
317
64
13
27
11
–
(90)
–
–
–
(54)
–
–
–
6
–
–
–
(3)
–
–
–
46
–
–
–
5
121
328
64
(77)
Advance corporation tax
Losses and other unrecognised deferred tax assets
Deferred tax not recognised on unused tax losses and other items on the basis that future economic benefit is uncertain
2012
£m
2011
£m
118
39
157
118
41
159
The Autumn Statement 2012 announced that the UK corporation tax rate will reduce to 21 per cent by 2014. The reductions to 24 per cent
effective from 1 April 2012 and 23 per cent effective from 1 April 2013 were substantively enacted on 26 March 2012 and 3 July 2012
respectively. As the rate change to 23 per cent was substantively enacted prior to the year end, the closing deferred tax assets and liabilities
have been calculated at this rate. The resulting charges or credits have been recognised in the income statement except to the extent that
they relate to items previously charged or credited to OCI or equity. Accordingly, in 2012, £24m has been credited to the income statement,
£3m has been charged to the OCI and £3m has been charged directly to equity.
Had the further tax rate changes been substantively enacted on or before the balance sheet date it would have had the effect of reducing
the deferred tax asset by £15m and reducing the deferred tax liability by £33m.
The temporary differences associated with investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates, for which a deferred tax liability has
not been recognised, aggregate to £144m (2011 £178m). No deferred tax liability has been recognised on the potential withholding tax due
on the remittance of undistributed profits as the Group is able to control the timing of such remittances and it is probable that consent will
not be given in the foreseeable future.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
93
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
5 Earnings per ordinary share
Basic earnings per ordinary share (EPS) are calculated by dividing the profit attributable to ordinary shareholders by the weighted average
number of ordinary shares in issue during the year, excluding ordinary shares held under trust, which have been treated as if they had
been cancelled.
Diluted EPS are calculated by adjusting the weighted average number of ordinary shares in issue during the year for the bonus element of
share options.
2012
Potentially
dilutive
Basic share options
Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders (£m)
Weighted average number of ordinary shares (millions)
EPS (pence)
The reconciliation between underlying EPS and basic EPS is as follows:
Underlying EPS/Underlying profit attributable to ordinary shareholders
Total underlying adjustments to profit before tax (note 2)
Related tax effects
EPS/Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders
Excluding IAE restructuring
IAE restructuring
Diluted underlying EPS
6 Employee information
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Engine Holding
Group employment costs 1
Wages and salaries
Social security costs
Share-based payments (note 21)
Pensions and other post-retirement scheme benefits (note 19)
Remuneration of key management personnel is shown in note 24.
1
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
25
(1.64)
Diluted
2,281
1,876
121.59
2012
Pence
59.27
68.93
(4.97)
123.23
83.47
39.76
58.48
850
1,850
45.95
£m
1,097
1,276
(92)
2,281
1,545
736
25
(0.62)
2011
Pence
48.54
(2.81)
0.22
45.95
45.95
–
47.89
Diluted
850
1,875
45.33
£m
898
(52)
4
850
850
–
2012
Number
2011
Number
22,800
20,000
42,800
21,500
7,800
8,800
3,700
1,000
42,800
21,600
18,800
40,400
19,800
7,600
8,600
3,500
900
40,400
£m
£m
2,163
265
55
279
2,762
2,037
245
59
23
2,364
Financial statements
Average number of employees
United Kingdom
Rest of world
2,281
1,851
123.23
2011
Potentially
dilutive
Basic share options
94
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
7 Auditors’ remuneration
Fees payable to the Company’s auditor and its associates were as follows:
Fees payable to the Company’s auditor for the audit of the Company’s annual financial statements 1
Fees payable to the Company’s auditor and its associates for the audit of the Company’s subsidiaries pursuant to legislation
Total fees payable for audit services
Fees payable to the Company’s auditor and its associates for other services:
Audit related assurance services 2
Taxation compliance services
Taxation advisory services
Internal audit services 3
Information technology 4
All other services
Fees payable in respect of the Group’s pension schemes:
Audit
Taxation compliance services
2012
£m
2011
£m
0.2
4.5
4.7
0.2
4.3
4.5
0.6
0.3
0.2
0.6
0.4
0.1
6.9
1.0
0.3
0.2
–
–
0.2
6.2
0.2
0.1
0.2
–
The level of fees payable to the Company’s auditor for the audit of the Company’s annual financial statements reflects the fact that limited incremental work is required in
respect of the audit of these financial statements. Rolls-Royce plc, a subsidiary of the Company, is also required to prepare consolidated financial statements and the fees
payable to the Company’s auditor for the audit of those financial statements, including the audit of the sub-consolidation, is included in the audit of the Company’s subsidiaries
pursuant to legislation.
2
This includes £0.3m (2011 £0.3m) for the review of the half-year report.
3
During the Group’s IT modernisation programme, KPMG provided specialist internal audit support while the Group recruited its own personnel.
4
This relates to consulting services on the Group’s IT modernisation programme. After being engaged by the Group, the consultancy was acquired by KPMG.
1
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
95
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
8 Intangible assets
Goodwill
£m
Cost:
At 1 January 2011
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Transferred to assets held for sale
Disposals
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Transferred from subsidiary to associate
Disposals
At 31 December 2012
Development
expenditure
£m
Recoverable
engine
costs
£m
Software
and other
£m
Total
£m
686
(2)
44
–
–
(8)
720
(2)
28
–
–
(6)
740
862
(1)
93
–
–
–
954
(4)
38
–
(1)
(6)
981
697
–
135
–
(368)
–
464
–
35
–
–
–
499
413
(2)
95
8
–
(24)
490
(1)
124
9
–
(3)
619
3,773
(25)
367
19
(368)
(32)
3,734
(11)
225
19
(1)
(16)
3,950
7
–
–
–
7
–
3
(1)
9
190
15
–
(8)
197
34
–
(6)
225
232
36
–
–
268
50
–
(6)
312
351
62
(182)
–
231
64
–
–
295
109
56
–
(16)
149
61
–
(2)
208
889
169
(182)
(24)
852
209
3
(15)
1,049
515
523
496
669
686
630
204
233
346
411
341
304
2,901
2,882
2,884
1,102
1,099
1,108
Charged to cost of sales except development costs, which are charged to research and development costs.
1
Goodwill
In accordance with the requirements of IAS 36 Impairment of Assets, goodwill is allocated to the Group’s cash-generating units, or
groups of cash-generating units, that are expected to benefit from the synergies of the business combination that gave rise to the
goodwill as follows:
Cash-generating unit (CGU) or groups of CGUs
Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG
Offshore marine – arising from the acquisitions of Vinters Limited and
Scandinavian Electric Holdings AS
Offshore marine – arising from the acquisition of ODIM ASA
Other
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Primary
reporting
segment
2012
£m
2011
£m
Civil aerospace
223
230
Marine
Marine
Various
649
115
115
1,102
645
112
112
1,099
Financial statements
1,115
(20)
–
11
–
–
1,106
(4)
–
10
–
(1)
1,111
Accumulated amortisation:
At 1 January 2011
Charge for the year 1
Transferred to assets held for sale
Disposals
At 1 January 2012
Charge for the year 1
Impairment
Disposals
At 31 December 2012
Net book value:
At 31 December 2012
At 31 December 2011
At 1 January 2011
Certification
costs and
participation
fees
£m
96
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
8 Intangible assets (continued)
Goodwill has been tested for impairment during 2012 on the following basis:
• T
he carrying values of goodwill have been assessed by reference to value in use. These have been estimated using cash flows from the
most recent forecasts prepared by management, which are consistent with past experience and external sources of information on
market conditions. Given the long-term and established nature of many of the Group’s products (product lives are often measured in
decades), these forecast the next ten years. Growth rates for the period not covered by the forecasts are based on a range of growth rates
(2.0 – 2.5 per cent) that reflect the products, industries and countries in which the relevant CGU or group of CGUs operate.
• The key assumptions for the impairment tests are the discount rate and, in the cash flow projections, the programme assumptions, the
growth rates and the impact of foreign exchange rates on the relationship between selling prices and costs. Impairment tests are
performed using prevailing exchange rates.
• The pre-tax cash flow projections have been discounted at 13 per cent (2011 13 per cent), based on the Group’s weighted average
cost of capital, adjusted for specific risks.
The principal value in use assumptions for goodwill balances considered to be individually significant are:
• R
olls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG – Volume of engine deliveries, flying hours of installed fleet and cost escalation. These are based on
current and known future programmes, estimates of customers’ fleet requirements and long-term economic forecasts. The principal
foreign exchange exposure is on translating US dollar income into euros. For the purposes of the impairment test only, cash flows
beyond the ten-year forecasts are assumed to grow at 2.5 per cent (2011 2.5 per cent). The directors do not consider that any reasonably
possible change in the key assumptions would cause the value in use of the goodwill to fall below its carrying value. The overall level of
business would need to reduce by more than 75 per cent to cause an impairment of this balance.
• Vinters Limited – Volume of equipment deliveries, capture of aftermarket and cost escalation. These are based on current and known
future programmes, estimates of customers’ fleet requirements and long-term economic forecasts. The principal foreign exchange
exposures are on translating income in a variety of non-functional currencies into Norwegian kroner. For the purposes of the
impairment test only, cash flows beyond the ten-year forecasts are assumed to grow at 2.5 per cent (2011 2.5 per cent). The directors do
not consider that any reasonably possible change in the key assumptions would cause the value in use of the goodwill to fall below its
carrying value. The overall level of business would need to reduce by more than 80 per cent to cause an impairment of this balance.
Other intangible assets
Certification costs and participation fees, development costs and recoverable engine costs have been reviewed for impairment in
accordance with the requirements of IAS 36 Impairment of Assets. Where an impairment test was considered necessary, it has been
performed on the following basis:
he carrying values have been assessed by reference to value in use. These have been estimated using cash flows from the most recent
• T
forecasts prepared by management, which are consistent with past experience and external sources of information on market
conditions over the lives of the respective programmes.
• The key assumptions underlying cash flow projections are assumed market share, programme timings, unit cost assumptions, discount
rates, and foreign exchange rates.
• The pre-tax cash flow projections have been discounted at 11 per cent (2011 11 per cent), based on the Group’s weighted average cost
of capital, adjusted for specific risks.
• No impairment is required on this basis. However, a combination of changes in assumptions and adverse movements in variables that
are outside the Group’s control (discount rate, exchange rate and airframe delays), could result in impairment in future years.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
97
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
9 Property, plant and equipment
Land and
buildings
£m
Plant and
equipment
£m
Aircraft and
engines
£m
In course of
construction
£m
Total
£m
877
(4)
17
–
78
15
(2)
981
(14)
50
–
–
60
(5)
1,072
2,538
(13)
80
2
123
–
(84)
2,646
(25)
124
45
(4)
168
(65)
2,889
189
–
52
–
5
(13)
(17)
216
(1)
18
–
–
4
(14)
223
342
1
318
–
(206)
–
(1)
454
(9)
299
–
–
(232)
(1)
511
3,946
(16)
467
2
–
2
(104)
4,297
(49)
491
45
(4)
–
(85)
4,695
Accumulated depreciation:
At 1 January 2011
Exchange differences
Charge for the year 1
Impairment
Reclassifications
Transferred to assets held for sale
Disposals
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Charge for the year 1
Reclassifications
Disposals of businesses
Disposals
At 31 December 2012
271
(2)
39
–
3
6
(2)
315
(3)
39
7
–
(3)
355
1,497
(7)
185
–
(3)
–
(74)
1,598
(13)
196
(7)
(2)
(58)
1,714
42
–
15
–
–
(7)
(6)
44
–
20
–
–
(2)
62
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
–
(2)
–
1,810
(9)
239
2
–
(1)
(82)
1,959
(16)
255
–
(2)
(65)
2,131
Net book value:
At 31 December 2012
At 31 December 2011
At 1 January 2011
717
666
606
1,175
1,048
1,041
161
172
147
511
452
342
2,564
2,338
2,136
2012
£m
2011
£m
7
4
7
5
Depreciation charged during the year is presented in the income statement or included in the cost of inventory as appropriate.
1
Property, plant and equipment includes:
Net book value of finance leased assets:
Land and buildings
Plant and equipment
Assets held for use in operating leases:
Cost
Depreciation
Net book value
242
(65)
177
235
(60)
175
Capital expenditure commitments
Cost of fully depreciated assets
258
721
196
655
The Group’s share of equity accounted entities’ capital commitments is £31m (2011 £25m).
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
Cost:
At 1 January 2011
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Reclassifications
Transferred to assets held for sale
Disposals
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Additions
Acquisitions of businesses
Disposals of businesses
Reclassifications
Disposals
At 31 December 2012
98
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
10Investments
Equity accounted
Joint
ventures
Associates
£m
£m
At 1 January 2011
Exchange differences
Additions
Taxation paid by the Group
Share of retained profit
Transferred to assets held for sale
Disposals
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates – will not be reclassified to profit or loss
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates – may be reclassified to profit or loss
At 1 January 2012
Exchange differences
Additions
Taxation paid by the Group
Transfer to subsidiary
Impairment
Share of retained profit
Transferred from subsidiary to associate
Disposals
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates – will not be reclassified to profit or loss
Share of OCI of joint ventures and associates – may be reclassified to profit or loss
At 31 December 2012
Assets:
Non-current assets
Current assets
Liabilities: 2
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
2
Liabilities include borrowings of:
Revenue
Profit before financing
and taxation
Net financing
Taxation
Results recognised in the
consolidated income statement
Dividends received
Retained profit
Joint ventures
Engine
2012
Holding 1
£m
£m
Engine
Holding 1
£m
Other
£m
1,590
718
1,717
818
3,307
1,536
(421)
(559)
1,328
(103)
(655)
(1,410)
470
(1,271)
1,223
2,827
393
(62)
1,329
3
40
(13)
–
(3)
(7)
1,680
(58)
191
6
(5)
(2)
44
–
–
(46)
(12)
1,798
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
2
Associates
Other
Total
£m
393
(62)
1,329
3
40
(13)
–
(3)
(7)
1,680
(58)
191
6
(5)
(2)
44
2
–
(46)
(12)
1,800
Unlisted
£m
11
–
–
–
–
–
(1)
–
–
10
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(4)
–
–
6
Total
Other
£m
2011
£m
2012
£m
2011
£m
2012
£m
2011
£m
1,687
818
1,529
891
3,216
1,709
1
2
–
–
3,308
1,538
3,216
1,709
(1,076)
(1,969)
1,798
(1,374)
(477)
(779)
1,249
(176)
(793)
(1,196)
431
(1,176)
(1,270)
(1,975)
1,680
(1,352)
(1)
–
2
–
–
–
–
–
(1,077)
(1,969)
1,800
(1,374)
(1,270)
(1,975)
1,680
(1,352)
4,050
491
3,055
3,546
3
–
4,053
3,546
33
(10)
(1)
189
(22)
(16)
222
(32)
(17)
(13)
(12)
10
165
(19)
(15)
152
(31)
(5)
–
–
–
–
–
–
222
(32)
(17)
152
(31)
(5)
22
(28)
(6)
151
(101)
50
173
(129)
44
(15)
–
(15)
131
(76)
55
116
(76)
40
–
–
–
–
–
–
173
(129)
44
116
(76)
40
At 31 December 2012, Engine Holding (the 50:50 collaboration with Daimler AG) held 99 per cent of the Tognum shares. As part of the Engine Holding shareholders’ agreement,
certain conditions allow the Group to exercise rights and classify Tognum as a subsidiary and consolidate it. These conditions were fulfilled and the rights exercised on 1 January 2013.
Daimler AG has the option to sell, for a period of six years, from 1 January 2013, at a specified price, its shares in Engine Holding to Rolls-Royce. The fair value of this option was not
significant at 31 December 2012. Further detail is shown in note 26.
1
The principal joint ventures at 31 December 2012 are listed on pages 127 and 128.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
99
Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
11 Inventories
Raw materials
Work in progress
Long-term contracts work in progress
Finished goods
Payments on account
Inventories stated at net realisable value
Amount of inventory write-down
Reversal of inventory write-down
12 Trade and other receivables
Trade receivables
Amounts recoverable on contracts 1
Amounts owed by joint ventures and associates
Loan to Engine Holding GmbH
Other receivables
Prepayments and accrued income
Trade and other receivables expected to be recovered in more than one year:
Trade receivables
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Amounts owed by joint ventures and associates
Other receivables
Prepayments and accrued income
2011
£m
336
1,056
10
1,282
42
2,726
319
921
12
1,267
42
2,561
136
64
1
169
114
3
2012
£m
2011
£m
1,182
1,902
351
–
479
205
4,119
1,123
1,665
421
169
475
156
4,009
1,662
364
2,093
4,119
1,655
550
1,804
4,009
40
1,473
3
63
32
1,611
4
1,314
20
60
28
1,426
The balance at 31 December 2012 includes an allowance of £80m (2011 £63m), being the directors’ best estimate of the loss that will occur from the Group’s contract with EPI Europrop
International GmbH to participate in the development of the TP400 engine for the A400M military transport aircraft.
1
13 Cash and cash equivalents
2012
£m
2011
£m
Cash at bank and in hand
Money-market funds
Short-term deposits
674
408
1,503
2,585
1,285
11
14
1,310
Overdrafts (note 15)
Cash and cash equivalents per cash flow statement (page 76 )
Cash held as collateral against third party obligations (note 23)
–
2,585
64
(19)
1,291
67
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
Analysed as:
Financial instruments (note 17):
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Non-financial instruments
2012
£m
100 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
14Assets held for sale
2012
£m
2011
£m
Intangible assets – recoverable engine costs
Property, plant and equipment
Investment in joint venture
Amounts recoverable on contracts
Amounts owed by joint ventures
Assets held for sale
–
4
–
–
–
4
186
6
13
59
49
313
Accruals and deferred income
Other payables
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Deferred tax liabilities
Liabilities associated with assets held for sale
–
–
–
–
–
(54)
(26)
(9)
(46)
(135)
On 12 October 2011, the Group announced an agreement to form a new partnership with Pratt & Whitney, a United Technologies
Corporation company, to develop new engines for the next generation of mid-size aircraft (120-230 seats). As part of this agreement,
on 29 June 2012, the Group and Pratt & Whitney restructured their participation in IAE, which produces the V2500 engine for the
Airbus A320 family of aircraft. Rolls-Royce sold its equity, programme share and related goodwill in IAE to Pratt & Whitney for US$1.5 billion.
As Rolls-Royce continues to be responsible for the manufacture of high-pressure compressors, fan blades as well as the provision of engine
support and final assembly of 50 per cent of V2500 engines, the transaction was not considered to give rise to a discontinued operation.
15 Borrowings
Unsecured
Overdrafts
Bank loans
73/8% Notes 2016 £200m
6.38% Notes 2013 US$230m 1
6.55% Notes 2015 US$83m 1
6.75% Notes 2019 £500m 2
Secured
Obligations under finance leases 3:
Current
2012
£m
2011
£m
Non-current
2012
£m
2011
£m
Total
2012
£m
2011
£m
–
2
–
147
–
–
19
1
–
–
–
–
–
404
200
–
58
571
–
204
200
160
62
557
–
406
200
147
58
571
19
205
200
160
62
557
–
149
–
20
1
1,234
1
1,184
1
1,383
1
1,204
These notes are the subject of interest rate swap agreements under which the Group has undertaken to pay floating rates of interest, and currency swaps which form a fair value hedge.
These notes are the subject of interest rate swap agreements under which the Group has undertaken to pay floating rates of interest which form a fair value hedge.
Obligations under finance leases are secured by related leased assets.
1
2
3
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
101 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
16 Trade and other payables
Current
2012
£m
Payments received on account 1
Trade payables
Amounts owed to joint ventures and associates
Other taxation and social security
Other payables
Accruals and deferred income
1
Includes payments received on account from joint
ventures and associates
2011
£m
Non-current
2012
£m
2011
£m
Total
2012
£m
2011
£m
1,361
1,109
202
107
1,574
2,034
6,387
1,396
1,028
215
88
1,623
1,886
6,236
609
–
1
–
95
760
1,465
487
–
1
–
58
768
1,314
1,970
1,109
203
107
1,669
2,794
7,852
1,883
1,028
216
88
1,681
2,654
7,550
262
358
162
147
424
505
Included within accruals and deferred income are government grants of £89m (2011 £104m). During the year, £16m (2011 £2m) of
government grants were released to the income statement.
Trade and other payables are analysed as follows:
Financial instruments (note 17):
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
Non-financial instruments
2012
£m
2011
£m
2,571
704
4,577
7,852
2,356
718
4,476
7,550
Financial statements
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
102 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments
Carrying values and fair values of financial instruments
At 31 December 2012
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Put option on non-controlling interests
Financial RRSPs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
At 31 December 2011
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Financial RRSPs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
Assets
Loans and
Available
receivables
for sale
£m
£m
Liabilities
Held for
trading
£m
Total
Basis for
determining
Notes
fair value
Held for
trading
£m
A
B
B
C
B
B
D
C
E
D
B
B
B
–
–
–
707
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
707
6
1,662
364
–
11
1,503
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
3,546
–
–
–
–
–
408
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
408
–
–
–
–
–
674
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
674
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(360)
–
–
–
–
–
(360)
–
–
–
–
–
–
(1,383)
–
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(5,028)
6
1,662
364
707
11
2,585
(1,383)
(360)
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(53)
A
B
B
C
B
B
D
C
D
B
B
B
–
–
–
418
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
418
10
1,655
550
–
11
14
–
–
–
–
–
–
2,240
–
–
–
–
–
11
–
–
–
–
–
–
11
–
–
–
–
–
1,285
–
–
–
–
–
–
1,285
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(796)
–
–
–
–
(796)
–
–
–
–
–
–
(1,204)
–
(230)
(4)
(2,356)
(718)
(4,512)
10
1,655
550
418
11
1,310
(1,204)
(796)
(230)
(4)
(2,356)
(718)
(1,354)
10
12
12
13
15
16
16
10
12
12
13
15
16
16
Cash
£m
Other
£m
£m
Fair values equate to book values for both 2012 and 2011, with the following exceptions:
2012
Book value
Fair value
£m
£m
Borrowings
Financial RRSPs
(1,383)
(193)
(1,542)
(215)
2011
Book value
Fair value
£m
£m
(1,204)
(230)
(1,371)
(254)
The fair value of a financial instrument is the price at which an asset could be exchanged, or a liability settled, between knowledgeable,
willing parties in an arms-length transaction. Fair values have been determined with reference to available market information at the
balance sheet date, using the methodologies described below.
AThese primarily comprise bank deposits where the fair value approximates to the book value.
BFair values are assumed to approximate to cost either due to the short-term maturity of the instruments or because the interest rate of the investments is reset after periods not
exceeding six months.
CFair values of derivative financial assets and liabilities are estimated by discounting expected future contractual cash flows using prevailing interest rate curves. Amounts
denominated in foreign currencies are valued at the exchange rate prevailing at the balance sheet date. These financial instruments are included on the balance sheet at fair value,
derived from observable market prices (Level 2 as defined by IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures).
DBorrowing and financial RRSPs are carried at amortised cost. Fair values are estimated by discounting expected future contractual cash flows using prevailing interest rate curves.
Amounts denominated in foreign currencies are valued at the exchange rate prevailing at the balance sheet date. For financial RRSPs, the contractual cash flows are based on future
trading activity, which is estimated based on latest forecasts.
EThe fair value of the put option on NCI is determined in accordance with the contractual terms (Level 3 as defined by IFRS 7).
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
103 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Carrying values of other financial assets and liabilities
Foreign
exchange
contracts
£m
At 31 December 2012
Non-current assets
Current assets
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
At 31 December 2011
Non-current assets
Current assets
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Commodity
contracts
£m
Interest rate
contracts
£m
Total
derivatives
£m
498
104
602
(97)
(233)
(330)
272
4
6
10
(8)
(15)
(23)
(13)
90
5
95
–
(7)
(7)
88
592
115
707
(105)
(255)
(360)
347
237
84
321
(85)
(683)
(768)
(447)
7
7
14
(7)
(19)
(26)
(12)
83
–
83
–
(2)
(2)
81
327
91
418
(92)
(704)
(796)
(378)
Put option
on noncontrolling
interests
£m
–
–
–
(167)
–
(167)
(167)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Financial
RRSPs
£m
C Shares
£m
Total
£m
–
–
–
(30)
(163)
(193)
(193)
–
–
–
(10)
–
(10)
(10)
592
115
707
(312)
(418)
(730)
(23)
–
–
–
(15)
(215)
(230)
(230)
–
–
–
(4)
–
(4)
(4)
327
91
418
(111)
(919)
(1,030)
(612)
Derivative financial instruments
The Group uses various financial instruments to manage its exposure to movements in foreign exchange rates. Where the effectiveness of
a hedging relationship in a cash flow hedge is demonstrated, changes in the fair value that are deemed effective are included in the cash
flow hedge reserve and released to match actual payments on the hedged item. The Group uses commodity swaps to manage its exposure
to movements in the price of commodities (jet fuel and base metals). To hedge the currency risk associated with a borrowing denominated
in US dollars, the Group has currency derivatives designated as part of fair value hedges. The Group uses interest rate swaps, forward rate
agreements and interest rate caps to manage its exposure to movements in interest rates.
Foreign
exchange
instruments
£m
At 1 January 2011
Movements in fair value hedges 1
Movements in cash flow hedges
Movements in other derivative contracts 2
Contracts settled 3
At 1 January 2012
Movements in fair value hedges 1
Movements in cash flow hedges
Movements in other derivative contracts 2
Contracts settled 3
At 31 December 2012
(336)
2
(1)
(21)
(91)
(447)
(8)
(4)
750
(19)
272
Commodity
instruments
£m
21
–
–
(28)
(5)
(12)
–
–
(3)
2
(13)
Interest rate
instruments
£m
175
83
–
1
(178)
81
6
–
1
–
88
Total
£m
(140)
85
(1)
(48)
(274)
(378)
(2)
(4)
748
(17)
347
Net gain on related hedged items £2m (2011 £85m net loss).
Included in financing.
Includes contracts settled in fair value hedges £nil (2011 £1m loss) and cash flow hedges £4m loss (2011: nil).
1
2
3
Put option on NCI and financial risk and revenue sharing partnerships (RRSPs)
The Group has agreed a put option with Daimler AG, such that Daimler can sell its interest in Engine Holding GmbH to the Group. The fair
value of the exercise value of this option that relates to Bergen Engines AS is included as a financial liability (see also note 26). The Group has
financial liabilities arising from financial RRSPs. These financial liabilities are valued at each reporting date using the amortised cost
method. This involves calculating the present value of the forecast cash flows of the arrangements using the internal rate of return at the
inception of the arrangements as the discount rate.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
Movements in the fair values of derivative financial assets and liabilities were as follows:
104 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Movements in the carrying values were as follows:
Put option on NCI
2012
£m
At 1 January
Cash paid to partners
Additions
Exchange adjustments included in OCI
Financing charge 1
Excluded from underlying profit:
Change in put option exercise price 1
Exchange adjustments 1
Changes in forecast payments 1
At 31 December
–
–
(167)
–
(5)
5
(167)
Financial RRSPs
2012
£m
(230)
35
2011
£m
1
(10)
(266)
46
–
(1)
(11)
9
2
(193)
1
1
(230)
Included in financing.
1
Risk management policies and hedging activities
The principal financial risks to which the Group is exposed are: foreign currency exchange rate risk; liquidity risk; credit risk; interest rate
risk; and commodity price risk. The Board has approved policies for the management of these risks.
Foreign currency exchange rate risk – The Group has significant cash flows (most significantly US dollars, followed by the euro)
denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the relevant trading entity. To manage its exposures to changes in values
of future foreign currency cash flows, so as to maintain relatively stable long-term foreign exchange rates on settled transactions, the
Group enters into derivative forward foreign currency transactions. For accounting purposes, these derivative contracts are not designated
as hedging instruments.
The Group also has exposures to the fair values of non-derivative financial instruments denominated in foreign currencies. To manage the
risk of changes in these fair values, the Group enters into derivative forward foreign exchange contracts, which are designated as fair value
hedges for accounting purposes.
The Group regards its interests in overseas subsidiary companies as long-term investments. The Group aims to match its translational
exposures by matching the currencies of assets and liabilities. Where appropriate, foreign currency financial liabilities may be designated
as hedges of the net investment.
Liquidity risk – The Group’s policy is to hold financial investments and maintain undrawn committed facilities at a level sufficient to ensure
that the Group has available funds to meet its medium-term capital and funding obligations and to meet any unforeseen obligations and
opportunities. The Group holds cash and short-term investments, which together with the undrawn committed facilities, enable the Group
to manage its liquidity risk. The profile of the maturity of the Group’s committed facilities is discussed on page 37.
Credit risk – The Group is exposed to credit risk to the extent of non-payment by either its customers or the counterparties of its financial
instruments. The effective monitoring and controlling of credit risk is a key component of the Group’s risk management activities. The
Group has credit policies covering both trading and financial exposures. Credit risks arising from treasury activities are managed by a
central treasury function in accordance with the Group credit policy. The objective of the policy is to diversify and minimise the Group’s
exposure to credit risk from its treasury activities by ensuring the Group transacts strictly with ‘BBB+’ or higher rated financial institutions
based on pre-established limits per financial institution. At the balance sheet date, there were no significant concentrations of credit risk to
individual customers or counterparties. The maximum exposure to credit risk at the balance sheet date is represented by the carrying
value of each financial asset, including derivative financial instruments.
Interest rate risk – The Group’s interest rate risk is primarily in relation to its fixed rate borrowings (fair value risk), floating rate borrowings
and cash and cash equivalents (cash flow risk). Interest rate derivatives are used to manage the overall interest rate profile within the
Group policy, which is to maintain a higher proportion of net debt at floating rates of interest as a natural hedge to the net cash position.
These are designated as either fair value or cash flow hedges as appropriate.
Commodity risk – The Group has exposures to the price of jet fuel and base metals arising from business operations. To minimise its cash
flow exposures to changes in commodity prices, the Group enters into derivative commodity transactions. For accounting purposes, these
derivative contracts are not designated as hedging instruments.
Other price risk – The Group’s cash equivalent balances represent investments in money market instruments, with a term of up to three
months. The Group does not consider that these are subject to significant price risk.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
105 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Derivative financial instruments
The nominal amounts, analysed by year of expected maturity, and fair values of derivative financial instruments are as follows:
Nominal
amount
£m
At 31 December 2012
Foreign exchange contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Interest rate contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Commodity contracts:
Non-hedge accounted
At 31 December 2011
Foreign exchange contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Interest rate contracts:
Fair value hedges
Non-hedge accounted
Commodity contracts:
Non-hedge accounted
Expected maturity
Between
Within
one and
one year
two years
£m
£m
Fair value
Between
two and
five years
£m
After
five years
£m
Assets
£m
Liabilities
£m
175
17,701
129
4,585
–
3,542
46
9,029
–
545
15
587
–
(330)
692
7
141
–
51
–
–
7
500
–
89
6
–
(7)
286
18,861
76
4,931
68
3,661
99
9,181
43
1,088
10
707
(23)
(360)
175
17,563
–
5,438
129
3,625
46
7,568
–
932
23
298
–
(768)
701
43
–
–
148
–
53
43
500
–
83
–
–
(2)
220
18,702
68
5,506
59
3,961
93
7,803
–
1,432
14
418
(26)
(796)
Currency analysis
Derivative financial instruments related to foreign exchange risks are denominated in the following currencies:
Sterling
£m
At 31 December 2012
Currencies sold forward:
Sterling
US dollar
Euro
Other
At 31 December 2011
Currencies sold forward:
Sterling
US dollar
Euro
Other
Currencies purchased forward
US dollar
Euro
£m
£m
Other
£m
Total
£m
–
14,407
–
21
495
–
–
11
–
1,817
–
70
23
840
177
15
518
17,064
177
117
–
14,401
–
36
814
–
–
26
–
1,193
–
67
147
834
197
23
961
16,428
197
152
2012
£m
2011
£m
506
479
–
510
421
33
Other derivative financial instruments are denominated in the following currencies:
Sterling
US dollar
Other
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
As described above, all derivative financial instruments are entered into for risk management purposes, although these may not be
designated into hedging relationships for accounting purposes.
106 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Non-derivative financial instruments are denominated in the following currencies:
Sterling
£m
US dollar
£m
Euro
£m
Other
£m
Total
£m
1
234
121
5
495
856
–
1,176
75
–
1,038
2,289
4
169
40
–
606
819
1
83
128
6
446
664
6
1,662
364
11
2,585
4,628
(205)
–
(139)
–
(825)
(320)
(1,489)
800
(5)
(167)
(54)
–
(289)
(17)
(532)
287
–
–
–
–
(203)
(117)
(320)
344
(1,383)
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(5,028)
(400)
–
1,201
87
–
657
1,945
4
133
217
–
367
721
5
117
134
6
236
498
10
1,655
550
11
1,310
3,536
(222)
(173)
–
(812)
(308)
(1,515)
430
(5)
(57)
–
(275)
(18)
(355)
366
–
–
–
(174)
(140)
(314)
184
(1,204)
(230)
(4)
(2,356)
(718)
(4,512)
(976)
At 31 December 2012
Assets
Unlisted non-current investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Liabilities
Borrowings
Put option on non-controlling interests
Financial RRSPs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
(1,173)
–
–
(10)
(1,254)
(250)
(2,687)
(1,831)
At 31 December 2011
Assets
Unlisted non-current investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Liabilities
Borrowings
Financial RRSPs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
1
204
112
5
50
372
(977)
–
(4)
(1,095)
(252)
(2,328)
(1,956)
Currency exposures
The Group’s actual currency exposures after taking account of derivative foreign currency contracts, which are not designated as hedging
instruments for accounting purposes are as follows:
Functional currency of Group operation
At 31 December 2012
Sterling
US dollar
Euro
Other
At 31 December 2011
Sterling
US dollar
Euro
Other
1
Sterling
£m
Includes £167m relating to the put option on Daimler’s interest in Bergen Engines AS — see note 10.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
US dollar
£m
–
4
(1)
6
22
–
(2)
1
–
3
(1)
1
1
–
(1)
4
Euro
£m
(166)1
(6)
–
(5)
–
(2)
–
1
Other
£m
Total
£m
4
5
–
1
(140)
3
(3)
3
3
10
–
3
4
11
(2)
9
107 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Ageing beyond contractual due date of financial assets
At 31 December 2012
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
At 31 December 2011
Unlisted non-current asset investments
Trade receivables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial assets
Derivative financial assets
Short-term investments
Cash and cash equivalents
Within
terms
£m
Up to
three
months
overdue
£m
Between
three
months and
one year
overdue
£m
More than
one year
overdue
£m
Total
£m
6
1,470
343
707
11
2,585
5,122
–
132
18
–
–
–
150
–
43
1
–
–
–
44
–
17
2
–
–
–
19
6
1,662
364
707
11
2,585
5,335
10
1,377
532
418
11
1,310
3,658
–
184
15
–
–
–
199
–
68
–
–
–
–
68
–
26
3
–
–
–
29
10
1,655
550
418
11
1,310
3,954
Between
two and
five years
£m
After
five years
£m
Discounting
£m
Carrying value
£m
Contractual maturity analysis of financial liabilities
Within
one year
£m
At 31 December 2011
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Financial RRSPs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
(210)
(108)
(167)
(35)
(10)
(2,568)
(694)
(3,792)
(257)
(103)
–
(32)
–
(1)
(10)
(403)
(403)
(138)
–
(75)
–
(1)
–
(617)
(778)
(14)
–
(100)
–
(1)
–
(893)
265
3
–
49
–
–
–
317
(1,383)
(360)
(167)
(193)
(10)
(2,571)
(704)
(5,388)
(85)
(92)
(37)
(4)
(2,353)
(715)
(3,286)
(213)
(199)
(37)
–
(1)
(2)
(452)
(608)
(419)
(91)
–
(1)
–
(1,119)
(603)
(48)
(127)
–
(1)
(1)
(780)
305
(38)
62
–
–
–
329
(1,204)
(796)
(230)
(4)
(2,356)
(718)
(5,308)
Financial statements
At 31 December 2012
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Put option on non-controlling interests
Financial RRSPs
C Shares
Trade payables and similar items
Other non-derivative financial liabilities
Gross values
Between
one and
two years
£m
108 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments (continued)
Interest rate risk
In respect of income earning financial assets and interest bearing financial liabilities, the following table indicates their effective interest
rates and the periods in which they reprice. The value shown is the carrying amount.
2012
Period in which interest rate reprices
Effective
interest rate
%
Short-term investments 1
Cash and cash equivalents 2
Unsecured bank loans
€2m floating rate loan
€5m floating rate loan
Overdrafts 3
Interest rate swaps
£200m floating rate loan
£200m floating rate loan
Unsecured bond issues
73/8% Notes 2016 £200m
6.38% Notes 2013 US$230m
Effect of interest rate swaps
6.55% Notes 2015 US$83m
Effect of interest rate swaps
6.75% Notes 2019 £500m
Effect of interest rate swaps
Other secured
Obligations under finance leases
4.1927%
0.5000%
EURIBOR + 0.75
Total
£m
6 months
or less
£m
6-12 months
£m
1-2 years
£m
2-5 years
£m
More than
5 years
£m
11
2,585
9
2,585
2
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
5.3225%
GBP LIBOR + 0.267
GBP LIBOR + 1.26
(2)
(4)
–
–
(200)
(200)
–
(4)
–
7
(200)
(200)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(7)
–
–
(2)
–
–
–
–
–
7.3750%
6.3800%
USD LIBOR + 1.26
6.5500%
USD LIBOR + 1.24
6.7500%
GBP LIBOR + 2.9824
(200)
(147)
–
(58)
–
(571)
–
–
–
(147)
–
(58)
–
(571)
–
(147)
147
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(200)
–
–
(58)
58
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(571)
571
5.0000%
(1)
1,213
–
2
–
–
–
(207)
(1)
(3)
–
1,421
2011
Period in which interest rate reprices
Effective
interest rate
%
Short-term investments 1
Cash and cash equivalents 2
Unsecured bank loans
€2m floating rate loan
€5m floating rate loan
Overdrafts 3
Interest rate swaps
£200m floating rate loan
Unsecured bond issues
73/8% Notes 2016 £200m
6.38% Notes 2013 US$230m
Effect of interest rate swaps
6.55% Notes 2015 US$83m
Effect of interest rate swaps
6.75% Notes 2019 £500m
Effect of interest rate swaps
Other secured
Obligations under finance leases
1
2
3
4.3782%
0.5000%
EURIBOR + 0.75
Total
£m
6 months
or less
£m
6-12 months
£m
1-2 years
£m
2-5 years
£m
More than
5 years
£m
11
1,310
9
1,310
2
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
10.8775%
GBP LIBOR + 0.267
(2)
(3)
(19)
–
(200)
–
(3)
(19)
10
(200)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(10)
–
(2)
–
–
–
–
7.3750%
6.3800%
USD LIBOR + 1.26
6.5500%
USD LIBOR + 1.24
6.7500%
GBP LIBOR + 2.9824
(200)
(160)
–
(62)
–
(557)
–
–
–
(160)
–
(62)
–
(557)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(160)
160
–
–
–
–
(200)
–
–
(62)
62
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(557)
557
5.0000%
(1)
117
–
328
–
2
–
–
–
(210)
(1)
(3)
Interest on the short-term investments is at fixed rates.
Cash and cash equivalents comprise bank balances and demand deposits and earns interest at rates based on daily deposit rates.
Overdrafts bear interest at rates linked to applicable LIBOR rates that fluctuate in accordance with local practice.
Some of the Group’s borrowings are subject to the Group meeting certain obligations, including customary financial covenants. If the
Group fails to meet its obligations these arrangements give rights to the lenders, upon agreement, to accelerate repayment of the facilities.
There are no rating triggers contained in any of the Group’s facilities that could require the Group to accelerate or repay any facility for a
given movement in the Group’s credit rating. R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
109 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
17 Financial instruments (continued)
In addition, the Group has undrawn committed borrowing facilities available as follows:
Expiring after two years
2012
£m
2011
£m
1,000
1,200
2012
£m
2011
£m
Sensitivity analysis
Sensitivities at 31 December (all other variables held constant) – impact on profit after tax and equity
Sterling 10% weaker against the US dollar
Sterling 10% stronger against the US dollar
Euro 10% weaker against the US dollar
Euro 10% stronger against the US dollar
Commodity prices 10% lower
Commodity prices 10% higher
(1,073)
878
(146)
118
(20)
20
(1,083)
886
(93)
78
(15)
15
At 31 December 2012 the Group had no material sensitivity to changes in interest rates on that date. The main interest rate sensitivity for
the Group arises as a result of the gross up of net funds and this is mitigated as described under the interest rate risk management policies
on page 104. C Shares and payments to shareholders
The Company (and previously Rolls-Royce Group plc, the former holding company) issues non-cumulative redeemable preference shares
(C Shares) as an alternative to paying a cash dividend. C Shares in respect of a year are issued in the following year. Shareholders are able to
redeem any number of their C Shares for cash. Any C Shares retained attract a dividend of 75 per cent of LIBOR on the 0.1p nominal value of
each share, paid on a twice-yearly basis in arrears, and have limited voting rights. In certain circumstances the Company has the option to
compulsorily redeem the C Shares, at any time, if the aggregate number of C Shares in issue is less than ten per cent of the aggregate
number of C Shares issued, or on the acquisition or capital restructuring of the Company. As part of the scheme of arrangement described
on page 78, all outstanding C Shares issued by Rolls-Royce Group plc were redeemed on 6 April 2011.
2012
Nominal value
Millions
£m
Issued and fully paid
At 1 January
Issued
Redeemed
C Shares in issue
Held in employee share trust
At 31 December
6,371
327,643
(323,596)
10,418
–
10,418
6
328
(324)
10
–
10
2011
Nominal value
Millions
£m
23,380
299,522
(316,531)
6,371
(1,999)
4,372
23
300
(317)
6
(2)
4
Payments to shareholders in respect of the year represent the value of C Shares to be issued in respect of the results for the year. Issues of
C Shares were declared as follows:
2012
Pence per
share
Interim
Final
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
7.6
11.9
19.5
£m
142
223
365
2011
Pence per
share
6.9
10.6
17.5
£m
129
199
328
Financial statements
Movements in the C Shares during the year were as follows:
110 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
18 Provisions for liabilities and charges
At
1 January
2012
£m
Warranty and guarantees
Contract loss
Restructuring
Customer financing
Insurance
Other
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
285
52
6
81
51
27
502
276
226
Exchange
differences
£m
(3)
(1)
–
(1)
–
–
(5)
Acquisitions
of
businesses
£m
Disposals
of
businesses
£m
7
–
–
–
–
–
7
–
–
–
–
–
(3)
(3)
Unused
amounts
reversed
£m
(18)
(8)
(1)
–
(21)
(4)
(52)
Charged to
income
statement
£m
42
29
–
2
31
10
114
Utilised
£m
(66)
(18)
(1)
–
(14)
(3)
(102)
At
31 December
2012
£m
247
54
4
82
47
27
461
220
241
Provisions for warranties and guarantees primarily relate to products sold and generally cover a period of up to three years.
Provisions for contract loss and restructuring are generally expected to be utilised within two years.
Customer financing provisions cover guarantees provided for asset value and/or financing. These guarantees are considered to be
insurance contracts in nature and provision is made in accordance with IFRS 4 Insurance Contracts and IAS 37 Provisions, Contingent
Liabilities and Contingent Assets. These guarantees, the risks arising and the process used to assess the extent of the risk are described
under the heading ‘Customer financing’ in the Chief Financial Officer’s review on page 14. The related contingent liabilities arising from
these guarantees and the sensitivity to movements in the value of the underlying security are discussed in note 23. It is estimated that
the provision will be utilised as follows:
Potential claims with specific claim dates:
In one year or less
In more than one year but less than five years
In more than five years
Potential claims that may arise at any time up to the date of expiry of the guarantee:
Up to one year
Up to five years
Thereafter
2012
£m
2011
£m
30
43
8
12
62
6
–
1
–
82
–
1
–
81
The Group’s captive insurance company retains a portion of the exposures it insures on behalf of the remainder of the Group. Significant
delays occur in the notification and settlement of claims and judgement is involved in assessing outstanding liabilities, the ultimate cost
and timing of which cannot be known with certainty at the balance sheet date. The insurance provisions are based on information
currently available, however it is inherent in the nature of the business that ultimate liabilities may vary. Provisions for outstanding claims
are established to cover the outstanding expected liability as well as claims incurred but not yet reported.
Other provisions comprise a number of liabilities with varying expected utilisation rates.
19 Post-retirement benefits
The Group operates a number of defined benefit and defined contribution schemes.
For the UK defined benefit schemes, the assets are held in separate trustee administered funds and employees are entitled to retirement
benefits based on either their final or career average salaries and length of service.
Overseas defined benefit schemes are a mixture of funded and unfunded plans. Additionally in the US, and to a lesser extent in some other
countries, the Group’s employment practices include the provision of healthcare and life insurance benefits for retired employees. These
schemes are unfunded.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
111 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
The valuations of the defined benefit schemes are based on the most recent funding valuations, updated by the scheme actuaries to
31 December 2012. The most recent funding valuations of the main UK schemes were:
Scheme
Rolls-Royce Pension Fund
Rolls-Royce Group Pension Scheme
Vickers Group Pension Scheme
Amounts recognised in the income statement
UK
schemes
£m
Defined benefit schemes:
Current service cost
Past-service cost/(credit)
Curtailment
Defined contribution schemes
Operating cost
Financing in respect of defined benefit schemes:
Expected return on assets
Interest on liabilities
Total income statement charge
Valuation date
31 March 2009
5 April 2010
31 March 2010
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
UK
schemes
£m
2011
Overseas
schemes
£m
Total
£m
123
2
–
125
23
148
38
(12)
–
26
41
67
161
(10)
–
151
64
215
119
(126)
–
(7)
16
9
34
(68)
(2)
(36)
38
2
153
(194)
(2)
(43)
54
11
(315)
356
41
189
(26)
49
23
90
(341)
405
64
279
(381)
372
(9)
–
(29)
50
21
23
(410)
422
12
23
The operating cost is charged as follows:
Cost of sales – included in underlying profit
Cost of sales – excluded from underlying profit
Commercial and administrative costs
Research and development
108
–
33
10
151
2011
£m
114
(204)
36
11
(43)
Defined contribution
2012
2011
£m
£m
46
–
14
4
64
38
–
12
4
54
Total
2012
£m
2011
£m
154
–
47
14
215
152
(204)
48
15
11
The Group operates a PaySave scheme in the UK. This is a salary sacrifice scheme under which employees elect to stop making employee
contributions and the Group makes additional contributions in return for a reduction in gross contractual pay. As a result, there is a
decrease in wages and salaries and a corresponding increase in pension costs of £36m (2011 £35m) in the year.
Amounts recognised in other comprehensive income
Actuarial (loss)/gain on scheme assets
Experience losses on scheme liabilities
Movement in unrecognised surplus
Movement in minimum funding liability
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2012
£m
2011
£m
(10)
(777)
465
63
(259)
1,426
(720)
(683)
100
123
Financial statements
Defined benefit
2012
£m
112 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
Defined benefit schemes
Assumptions
The principal actuarial assumptions used at the balance sheet date were as follows:
2012
UK
schemes
%
Rate of increase in salaries
Rate of increase of pensions in payment
Discount rate
Expected rate of return on scheme assets
Inflation assumption *
4.1
2.5
4.4
3.1
3.0
Overseas
schemes
%
3.9
2.6
3.9
5.6
2.4
2011
UK
schemes
%
4.2
1.7
4.7
3.4
3.1
Overseas
schemes
%
4.0
1.7
4.5
5.6
2.5
* For the UK schemes, this is the assumption for the Retail Price Index. The Consumer Price Index is assumed to be 0.6 per cent lower.
The discount rates are determined by reference to the market yields on AA rated corporate bonds. For the main schemes, the rate is
determined by using the profile of forecast benefit payments to derive a weighted average discount rate from the yield curve. For other
schemes, the rate is determined as the market yield at the average duration of the forecast benefit payments. The discount rates above are
the weighted average of those for each scheme, based on the value of their respective liabilities.
The overall expected rate of return is calculated by weighting the individual returns expected from each asset class (see below) in
accordance with the actual asset balance in the schemes’ investment portfolios.
The mortality assumptions adopted for the UK pension schemes are derived from the SAP actuarial tables, with future improvements in
line with the CMI 2011 core projections and long-term improvements of 1.25 per cent. Where appropriate, these are adjusted to take
account of the relevant scheme’s actual experience. The resulting range of life expectancies in the principal UK schemes are as follows:
Life expectancy from age 65
Current pensioner
Future pensioner currently aged 45
20.8 years
22.4 years
Other demographic assumptions have been set on advice from the relevant actuary, having regard to the latest trends in scheme
experience and other relevant data. The assumptions are reviewed and updated as necessary as part of the periodic actuarial valuation of
the schemes.
Assumptions in respect of overseas schemes are also set in accordance with advice from local actuaries.
The future costs of healthcare benefits are based on an assumed healthcare costs trend rate of 7.9 per cent grading down to 5.0 per cent
over 6.7 years.
Amounts recognised in the balance sheet
UK
schemes
£m
Present value of funded obligations
Fair value of scheme assets
Present value of unfunded obligations
Unrecognised past-service credit 1
Unrecognised surplus 2
Minimum funding liability 3
Net asset/(liability) recognised in the balance sheet
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
Post-retirement scheme deficits
(8,588)
9,794
1,206
–
–
(853)
(173)
180
317
(137)
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
(609)
534
(75)
(568)
(82)
–
–
(725)
12
(737)
Total
£m
(9,197)
10,328
1,131
(568)
(82)
(853)
(173)
(545)
329
(874)
UK
schemes
£m
(7,713)
9,519
1,806
–
–
(1,318)
(236)
252
495
(243)
2011
Overseas
schemes
£m
(557)
497
(60)
(495)
(94)
–
–
(649)
8
(657)
Total
£m
(8,270)
10,016
1,746
(495)
(94)
(1,318)
(236)
(397)
503
(900)
The unrecognised past-service credit arose as a result of revisions to post-retirement healthcare schemes in 2011. It will be amortised over the remaining service lives of the
participants (11.3 years).
2
Where a surplus has arisen on a scheme, in accordance with IAS 19 and IFRIC 14, the surplus is recognised as an asset only if it represents an unconditional economic benefit available
to the Group in the future. Any surplus in excess of this benefit is not recognised in the balance sheet.
3
A minimum funding liability arises where the statutory funding requirements require future contributions in respect of past service that will result in a future unrecognisable surplus.
1
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
113 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
Changes in present value of defined benefit obligations
UK
schemes
£m
At 1 January
Exchange differences
Current service cost
Past-service (cost)/credit
Finance cost
Contributions by employees
Benefits paid out
Acquisition of businesses
Actuarial losses
Settlement
At 31 December
Funded schemes
Unfunded schemes
(7,713)
–
(123)
(2)
(356)
(4)
323
(54)
(659)
–
(8,588)
(8,588)
–
Changes in fair value of scheme assets
UK
schemes
£m
Total
£m
(1,052)
42
(38)
–
(49)
(2)
38
–
(118)
2
(1,177)
(609)
(568)
(8,765)
42
(161)
(2)
(405)
(6)
361
(54)
(777)
2
(9,765)
(9,197)
(568)
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
9,519
–
315
250
4
(323)
59
(30)
–
9,794
285
(7,039)
–
(119)
126
(372)
(4)
312
–
(617)
–
(7,713)
(7,713)
–
(1,063)
–
(34)
162
(50)
(3)
37
–
(103)
2
(1,052)
(557)
(495)
2011
Overseas
schemes
£m
UK
schemes
£m
Total
£m
497
(18)
26
47
2
(38)
–
20
(2)
534
46
2011
Overseas
schemes
£m
UK
schemes
£m
10,016
(18)
341
297
6
(361)
59
(10)
(2)
10,328
331
7,783
–
381
256
4
(312)
–
1,407
–
9,519
1,788
434
1
29
48
3
(37)
–
19
–
497
48
Total
£m
(8,102)
–
(153)
288
(422)
(7)
349
–
(720)
2
(8,765)
(8,270)
(495)
Total
£m
8,217
1
410
304
7
(349)
–
1,426
–
10,016
1,836
The fair value of the scheme assets in the schemes and the expected rates of return at 31 December, were as follows:
2012
UK
Expected
rate of
return
%
UK schemes:
Liability driven investment (LDI) portfolios 1
Longevity swap 2
Equities
Sovereign debt
Corporate bonds
Other
2.8
4.4
5.9
2.3
3.5
2.7
3.1
2011
Market
value
£m
Overseas
Expected
rate of
return
%
Market
value
£m
7,925
(126)
1,095
245
334
321
9,794
5.4
–
7.5
–
3.6
4.3
5.6
313
–
119
–
74
28
534
UK
Expected
rate of
return
%
3.1
4.7
6.0
2.8
4.0
2.8
3.4
Market
value
£m
Overseas
Expected
rate of
return
%
Market
value
£m
8,330
(79)
1,004
159
13
92
9,519
5.3
–
7.9
–
4.0
2.5
5.6
291
–
118
–
83
5
497
A portfolio of gilt and swap contracts, backed by LIBOR generating assets, that is designed to hedge the majority of the interest rate and inflation risks associated with the schemes’
obligations.
Under the longevity swap, the Rolls-Royce Pension Fund has agreed an average life expectancy of pensioners with a counterparty. If pensioners live longer than expected the
counterparty will make payments to the Fund to offset the additional cost of paying pensioners. If the reverse applies, the cost of paying pensioners will be reduced but the scheme will
be required to make payments to the counterparty.
1
2
The scheme assets do not include any of the Group’s own financial instruments, nor any property occupied by, or other assets used by, the Group.
The expected rates of return for LDI portfolios are determined by the implicit yields on the portfolios at the balance sheet date and that for
the longevity swap by the discount rate.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
At 1 January
Exchange differences
Expected return on assets
Contributions by employer
Contributions by employees
Benefits paid out
Acquisition of businesses
Actuarial (losses)/gains
Settlement
At 31 December
Actual return on scheme assets
2012
Overseas
schemes
£m
114 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
19 Post-retirement benefits (continued)
The expected rates of return on other individual categories of scheme assets are determined by reference to gilt yields. In the UK,
equities and corporate bonds are assumed to generate returns that exceed the return from gilts by 3.25 per cent and 0.9 per cent
per annum respectively.
The expected rates of return above are the weighted average of the rates for each scheme.
Future contributions
The Group expects to contribute approximately £290m to its defined benefit schemes in 2013.
Sensitivities
For the most significant schemes, the investment strategies are designed to hedge the risks from interest rates and inflation on an
economic basis. The impacts of principal sensitivities are:
UK defined benefit obligations – 0.25% reduction in the discount rate 1
UK defined benefit assets – 0.25% reduction in interest rates 1
UK defined benefit obligations – Age ratings increase by one year
UK defined benefit longevity swap – Age ratings increase by one year
UK defined benefit obligations – 0.5% increase in rate of increase in salaries
Post-retirement medical benefit obligations – 1% increase in healthcare trend rates
Post-retirement medical benefit obligations – 1% decrease in healthcare trend rates
Post-retirement medical benefit expense – 1% increase in healthcare trend rates
Post-retirement medical benefit expense – 1% decrease in healthcare trend rates
2012
£m
2011
£m
(319)
458
(199)
68
(197)
(49)
41
4
(3)
(298)
463
(163)
62
(127)
(45)
56
4
(5)
The difference arises largely due to differences in the methods used to value the obligations for accounting and economic purposes. On an economic basis the correlation is
approximately 97 per cent.
1
History of defined benefit schemes
The history of the schemes for the current and prior years is as follows:
2012
£m
Balance sheet
Present value of defined benefit obligations
Fair value of scheme assets
Unrecognised past-service credit
Unrecognised surpluses
Minimum funding liabilities
Deficit
Experience (losses)/gains
Actuarial (losses)/gains on scheme assets
Experience (losses)/gains on scheme liabilities
Movement in unrecognised surpluses
Recognition of minimum funding liability on 1 January 2008
Movement in minimum funding liabilities
Total amount recognised in OCI
Cumulative amounts recognised in OCI since 1 January 2004
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2011
£m
2010
£m
2009
£m
2008
£m
(9,765)
10,328
(82)
(853)
(173)
(545)
(8,765)
10,016
(94)
(1,318)
(236)
(397)
(8,102)
8,217
–
(635)
(336)
(856)
(7,537)
7,402
–
(335)
(385)
(855)
(6,546)
7,446
–
(1,042)
(425)
(567)
(10)
(777)
465
–
63
(259)
(328)
1,426
(720)
(683)
–
100
123
(69)
460
(303)
(300)
–
49
(94)
(192)
(270)
(878)
707
–
40
(401)
(98)
178
766
(928)
(491)
66
(409)
303
115 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
20Share capital
Non-equity
Special
Share
of £1
Preference
shares of
£1 each
Nominal
value
£m
1
–
–
1
–
–
–
1
50,000
–
–
–
–
1
(50,000)
–
–
–
1
–
–
Issued and fully paid
Rolls-Royce Group plc
At 1 January 2011
Proceeds from shares issued for share option schemes
At 23 May 2011
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
On formation of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
Scheme of arrangement – issue of ordinary shares of 150p each 2
Capital reduction to ordinary shares of 20p each 2
Proceeds from shares issued for share option schemes
Redemption of shares
At 1 January 2012
Proceeds from shares issued for share option schemes
At 31 December 2012
Equity
Ordinary
Nominal
shares of
value
20p each 1
Millions
£m
1,872
–
1,872
374
–
374
–
1,872
–
–
–
2,808
(2,434)
–
1,872
–
1,872
374
–
374
Unless otherwise stated.
See page 78.
1
2
The rights attaching to each class of share are set out on page 68.
In accordance with IAS 32 Financial Instruments: Presentation, the Company’s non-cumulative redeemable preference shares (C Shares) are
classified as financial liabilities. Accordingly, movements in C Shares are included in note 17.
21 Share-based payments
Effect of share-based payment transactions on the Group’s results and financial position
2011
£m
49
6
55
18
52
7
59
9
Share-based payment plans in operation during the year
Performance Share Plan (PSP)
This plan involves the award of shares to participants subject to performance conditions. Vesting of the performance shares is based on the
achievement of both non-market based conditions (EPS and cash flow per share) and a market based performance condition (Total
Shareholder Return – TSR) over a three-year period.
ShareSave share option plan (ShareSave)
Based on a three or five-year monthly savings contract, eligible employees are granted share options with an exercise price of up to 20 per
cent below the share price when the contract is entered into. Vesting of the options is not subject to the achievement of a performance
target. In the UK, the plan is HM Revenue & Customs approved. Overseas, employees in 33 countries participate in cash-settled ShareSave
plans through arrangements which provide broadly comparable benefits to the UK plan.
Executive Share Option Plan (ESOP)
This plan involved the grant of market value share options to participants. It terminated in 2009 and no further grants may be made.
Remaining options under the plan are subject to a non-market based performance condition (growth in EPS) and have a maximum
contractual life of ten years.
Annual Performance Related Award (APRA) plan deferred shares
A proportion of the APRA annual incentive scheme is delivered in the form of a deferred share award. The release of deferred share awards
is not dependent on the achievement of any further performance conditions other than that participants remain employed by the Group
for two years from the date of the award in order to retain the full number of shares. During the two-year deferral period, participants are
entitled to receive dividends, or equivalent, on the deferred shares.
Further information regarding the operation of the plans can be found on pages 57 to 60 of the directors’ remuneration report.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
Total expense recognised for equity-settled share-based payments transactions
Total expense recognised for cash-settled share-based payments transactions
Share-based payments recognised in the consolidated income statement
Liability for cash-settled share-based payment transactions
2012
£m
116 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
21 Share-based payments (continued)
Movements in the Group’s share-based payment plans during the year
ShareSave
Number
Millions
ESOP
Weighted
average
exercise price
Pence
Number
Millions
PSP
Weighted
average
exercise price
Pence
APRA
Number
Millions
Number
Millions
Outstanding at 1 January 2012
Granted
Additional entitlements arising from TSR performance
Forfeited
Exercised
Outstanding at 31 December 2012
Exercisable at 31 December 2012
27.5
–
–
(0.6)
(0.1)
26.8
–
447
–
–
446
409
447
–
0.5
–
–
–
(0.4)
0.1
0.1
100
–
–
–
103
77
77
19.5
4.3
2.8
(0.8)
(11.8)
14.0
–
3.3
2.0
–
(0.1)
(1.2)
4.0
–
Outstanding at 1 January 2011
Granted
Additional entitlements arising from TSR performance
Additional shares accrued from reinvestment of C Shares
Forfeited
Exercised
Outstanding at 31 December 2011
Exercisable at 31 December 2011
26.5
10.6
–
–
(0.9)
(8.7)
27.5
–
384
525
–
–
387
357
447
–
0.7
–
–
–
–
(0.2)
0.5
0.5
125
–
–
–
–
207
100
100
19.5
5.3
1.1
–
(0.7)
(5.7)
19.5
–
3.1
2.6
–
0.1
(0.1)
(2.4)
3.3
–
As share options are exercised throughout the year, the weighted average share price during the year of 836 pence (2011 642 pence)
is representative of the weighted average share price at the date of exercise. The closing price at 31 December 2012 was 873.5 pence
(2011 746.5 pence).
The average remaining contractual life of exercisable options is 0.2 years (2011 1.0 years).
Share options outstanding
ShareSave
Exercise prices (pence)
At 31 December 2012
0 – 99
300 – 399
400 – 499
500 – 599
At 31 December 2011
0 – 99
100 – 199
300 – 399
400 – 499
500 – 599
ESOP
Number
Millions
Weighted
average
remaining
contractual life
Years
–
10.5
5.9
10.4
26.8
–
–
10.8
6.0
10.7
27.5
Total
Number
Millions
Weighted
average
remaining
contractual life
Years
Number
Millions
Weighted
average
remaining
contractual life
Years
–
1.3
0.1
3.2
1.8
0.1
–
–
–
0.1
0.2
–
–
–
0.2
0.1
10.5
5.9
10.4
26.9
0.2
1.3
0.1
3.2
1.8
–
–
2.3
1.1
4.2
2.7
0.4
0.1
–
–
–
0.5
1.2
0.2
–
–
–
1.0
0.4
0.1
10.8
6.0
10.7
28.0
1.2
0.2
2.3
1.1
4.2
2.7
The range of exercise prices of options outstanding at 31 December 2012 was: for ShareSave between 387 pence and 525 pence
(2011 387 pence and 525 pence); and for ESOP it was 77 pence (2011 77 pence and 188 pence).
Under the terms of the Rolls-Royce 1999 Executive Share Option Plan, options granted to three senior executives were outstanding at
31 December 2012.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
117 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
21 Share-based payments (continued)
Fair values of share-based payments
The weighted average fair value per share of equity-settled share-based payment plans granted during the year, estimated at the date of
grant, are as follows:
PSP – 25% TSR uplift
PSP – 50% TSR uplift
ShareSave – 3 year grant
ShareSave – 5 year grant
APRA
2012
2011
885p
985p
n/a
n/a
809p
662p
737p
210p
238p
612p
2011
ShareSave
2011
612p
n/a
15.4p
32%
36%
3 years
n/a
n/a
1.9%
691p
525p
16.0p
30%
n/a
n/a
3.3 – 3.8 years
5.3 – 5.8 years
1.9%
In estimating these fair values, the following assumptions were used:
PSP
2012
Weighted average share price
Exercise price
Expected dividends
Expected volatility
Correlation
Expected life – PSP
Expected life – 3 year ShareSave
Expected life – 5 year ShareSave
Risk free interest rate
809p
n/a
16.5p
31%
39%
3 years
n/a
n/a
0.6%
Expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of the Company’s share price over the seven years prior to the grant or award date.
Expected dividends are based on the Company’s payments to shareholders in respect of the previous year.
ShareSave
The fair value of the options granted under the ShareSave plan is calculated using a binomial pricing model that assumes that participants
will exercise their options at the beginning of the six-month window if the share price is greater than the exercise price. Otherwise it
assumes that options are held until the expiration of their contractual term. This results in an expected life that falls somewhere between
the start and end of the exercise window.
APRA
The fair value of shares awarded under APRA is calculated as the share price on the date of the award, excluding expected dividends.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
PSP
The fair value of shares awarded under the PSP is calculated using a pricing model that takes account of the non-entitlement to dividends
(or equivalent) during the vesting period and the market-based performance condition based on expectations about volatility and the
correlation of share price returns in the group of FTSE 100 companies and which incorporates into the valuation the interdependency
between share price performance and TSR vesting. This adjustment increases the fair value of the award relative to the share price at the
date of grant.
118 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
22 Operating leases
Leases as lessee
Rentals paid – hire of plant and machinery
– hire of other assets
Non-cancellable operating lease rentals are payable as follows:
Within one year
Between one and five years
After five years
Leases as lessor
Rentals received – credited within revenue from aftermarket services
Non-cancellable operating lease rentals are receivable as follows:
Within one year
Between one and five years
After five years
2012
£m
2011
£m
94
34
104
29
147
490
526
1,163
117
401
479
997
2012
£m
2011
£m
30
36
2
7
1
10
3
8
2
13
The Group acts as lessee and lessor for both land and buildings and gas turbine engines, and acts as lessee for some plant and equipment.
• Sublease payments of £4m (2011 £3m) and sublease receipts of £17m (2011 £23m) were recognised in the income statement in the year.
• Purchase options exist on aero engines, land and buildings and plant and equipment with the period to the purchase option date
varying between one to eight years.
• Renewal options exist on aero engines, land and buildings and plant and equipment with the period to the renewal option varying
between one to 29 years at terms to be negotiated upon renewal.
• Escalation clauses exist on some leases and are linked to LIBOR.
• The total future minimum sublease payments expected to be made is £10m (2011 £5m) and sublease receipts expected to be received
is £9m (2011 £4m).
23 Contingent liabilities
In connection with the sale of its products the Group will, on some occasions, provide financing support for its customers. The Group’s
contingent liabilities relating to financing arrangements are spread over many years and relate to a number of customers and a broad
product portfolio.
Contingent liabilities are disclosed on a discounted basis. As the directors consider the likelihood of these contingent liabilities crystallising
to be remote, this amount does not represent a value that is expected to crystallise. However, the amounts are discounted at the Group’s
borrowing rate to reflect better the time span over which these exposures could arise. The contingent liabilities are denominated in
US dollars. As the Group does not generally adopt cash flow hedge accounting for forecast foreign exchange transactions, this amount
is reported, together with the sterling equivalent at the reporting date spot rate.
The discounted values of contingent liabilities relating to delivered aircraft and other arrangements where financing is in place, less
insurance arrangements and relevant provisions, were:
2012
£m
Gross contingent liabilities
Contingent liabilities net of relevant security 1
Contingent liabilities net of relevant security reduced by 20% 2
1
Security includes unrestricted cash collateral of:
569
70
133
64
$m
925
114
216
104
2011
£m
612
124
201
67
$m
951
192
312
104
Although sensitivity calculations are complex, the reduction of relevant security by 20 per cent illustrates the sensitivity of the contingent liability to changes in this assumption.
2
There are also net contingent liabilities in respect of undelivered aircraft, but it is not considered practicable to estimate these as deliveries
can be many years in the future, and the relevant financing will only be put in place at the appropriate time.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
119 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
23 Contingent liabilities (continued)
Following a request for information from the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) about allegations of malpractice in Indonesia and China,
investigations by Rolls-Royce have identified matters of concern in these, and in other overseas markets. The Group has passed information
to the SFO relating to these concerns and is cooperating fully.
The consequence of these disclosures will be decided by the regulatory authorities. It is too early to predict the outcomes, but these could
include the prosecution of individuals and of the Company. Accordingly, the potential for fines or other penalties cannot currently be
assessed. As the investigation is ongoing it is not possible to identify the timescale in which these issues might be resolved.
Contingent liabilities exist in respect of guarantees provided by the Group in the ordinary course of business for product delivery,
performance and reliability. The Group has, in the normal course of business, entered into arrangements in respect of export finance,
performance bonds, countertrade obligations and minor miscellaneous items. Various Group undertakings are parties to legal actions and
claims which arise in the ordinary course of business, some of which are for substantial amounts. As a consequence of the insolvency of an
insurer as previously reported, the Group is no longer fully insured against known and potential claims from employees who worked for
certain of the Group’s UK-based businesses for a period prior to the acquisition of those businesses by the Group. While the outcome of
some of these matters cannot precisely be foreseen, the directors do not expect any of these arrangements, legal actions or claims, after
allowing for provisions already made, to result in significant loss to the Group. The Group’s share of equity accounted entities’ contingent
liabilities is £48m (2011 £68m).
24 Related party transactions
2012
£m
Sales of goods and services to joint ventures and associates
Purchases of goods and services from joint ventures and associates
Operating lease payments to joint ventures and associates
Guarantees of joint ventures’ and associates’ borrowings
Dividends received from joint ventures and associates
RRSP receipts from joint ventures and associates
Other income received from joint ventures and associates
2,937
(3,082)
(57)
12
129
13
2
2011
£m
2,864
(2,380)
(77)
124
76
13
56
In the course of normal operations, related party transactions entered into by the Group have been contracted on an arms-length basis.
Key management personnel are deemed to be the directors and the members of the GLT as set out on pages 40 to 42. Remuneration for key
management personnel is shown below:
Salaries and short-term benefits
Post-retirement schemes
Share-based payments
2012
£m
2011
£m
15
1
8
24
18
1
14
33
More detailed information regarding the directors’ remuneration, shareholdings, pension entitlements, share options and other long-term
incentive plans is shown in the directors’ remuneration report on pages 57 to 67.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
The aggregated balances with joint ventures are shown in notes 12 and 16. Transactions with Group pension schemes are shown in note 19.
120 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
25 Acquisitions and disposals
During the year, the Group made a number of acquisitions:
• on 19 June 2012, Superstructure Capital Limited, a business engaged in marketing and sale of safety and risk management software
to the aerospace industry;
• on 13 July 2012, PFW Aerospace UK, a business engaged in the manufacture of precision components for the aerospace industry;
• on 13 December 2012, Rolls-Royce Goodrich Engine Controls Limited (AEC, acquisition of 50 per cent not already held), a business
engaged in the development and manufacture of aero-engine controls; and
• on 27 December 2012, PKMJ Technical Services, Inc., a nuclear engineering services business in the US.
Recognised amounts of identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed
£m
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Post-retirement scheme surpluses
Inventory
Trade and other receivables
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other payables
Borrowings
Deferred tax liabilities
Provisions
Total identifiable assets and liabilities
Goodwill arising
Bargain purchase 1
Total consideration
Satisfied by:
Cash consideration
Existing shareholding
Net cash outflow arising on acquisition:
Cash consideration
Less: cash and cash equivalents acquired
Cash outflow per cash flow statement
Identifiable intangible assets comprise:
Technology, patents and licenses
Customer relationships
Other
1
argain purchase of £4m arising on the acquisition of AEC has been recognised as a gain within commercial and administrative costs, offset by a charge of £2m on revaluing the
B
previous joint venture investment.
These acquisitions did not have a significant impact on the results for the year, and would not have done had they been acquired
on 1 January 2012.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
9
45
5
37
61
7
(52)
(78)
(1)
(7)
26
10
(4)
32
27
5
32
27
(7)
20
2
5
2
9
121 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
25 Acquisitions and disposals (continued)
During the year, the Group disposed of:
• on 27 June 2012, Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (dilution of existing shareholding to 49 per cent); and
• on 29 June 2012 for US$1.5 billion, the equity, programme share and related goodwill of International Aero Engines AG, which produces
the V2500 engine for the Airbus A320 family of aircraft.
Assets and liabilities disposed
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investment in joint venture
Trade and other receivables
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other payables
Provisions for liabilities and charges
Net assets
Profit on disposal of businesses
Transfer of subsidiary to associate
Disposal proceeds
Cash and cash equivalents disposed
Cash inflow/(outflow) per cash flow statement
1
IAE 1
£m
193
–
13
76
–
(31)
(8)
243
699
–
942
–
942
Other
£m
1
2
–
1
1
–
(3)
2
–
(2)
–
(1)
(1)
Total
£m
194
2
13
77
1
(31)
(11)
245
699
(2)
942
(1)
941
At 31 December 2011, the assets and liabilities associated with the IAE business were classified as ‘Assets held for sale’, as described in note 14.
Financial statements
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
122 Financial statements
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
26Events after the reporting period – Consolidation of Tognum AG
On 1 January 2013, conditions were fulfilled which gave the Group certain rights that result in Tognum AG being classified as a subsidiary
and consolidated. Rolls-Royce and Daimler AG each hold 50 per cent of the shares of Engine Holding GmbH, which itself holds approximately
99 per cent of the shares of Tognum AG. From 25 August 2011 to 31 December 2013 the Group’s interest in Tognum was classified as a joint
venture and equity accounted. Tognum is a premium supplier of engines, propulsion systems and components for marine, energy, defence,
and other industrial applications (often described as ‘off-highway’ applications).
The table below sets out the illustrative effects of this business combination. These are based on: (i) a price of €26 per share (the offer
price of the acquisition of Tognum by Engine Holding in 2011) and (ii) adjustments to reflect the fair values of Tognum’s assets and
liabilities on the acquisition of Tognum by Engine Holding on 25 August 2011, updated where appropriate. Both these bases will be
updated during 2013.
As part of the Engine Holding shareholders’ agreement, Daimler has the option to sell its shares in Engine Holding to Rolls-Royce for a period
of six years from 1 January 2013. The fair value of the exercise price of this option will be recognised as a liability.
Provisional identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed
£m
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investments in joint ventures and associates
Inventory
Trade and other receivables
Taxation recoverable
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other payables
Current tax liabilities
Borrowings and other financial liabilities
Deferred tax
Provisions
Post-retirement schemes
Total identifiable assets and liabilities
Goodwill arising
Total consideration
Put option on NCI
Consideration satisfied by:
Existing shareholding
NCI
The carrying value of the Group’s interest in Tognum before the change in classification was £1,328m. On the basis of the illustrative
valuation, the Group will recognise a gain of £81m in 2013 as a result of re-measuring this interest.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
1,134
572
30
764
479
46
29
240
(520)
(26)
(306)
(263)
(435)
(397)
1,347
735
2,082
(1,433)
649
1,409
673
2,082
123 Financial statements
Company balance sheet
At 31 December 2012
Fixed assets
Investments – subsidiary undertakings
Creditors – amounts falling due within one year
Financial liabilities
Amounts owed to subsidiary undertakings due within one year
Notes
2012
£m
2011
£m
2
11,954
11,921
3
(10)
(595)
(605)
(605)
11,349
(6)
(175)
(181)
(181)
11,740
4
374
–
8,893
173
63
1,846
11,349
374
–
8,897
173
31
2,265
11,740
Net current assets
Total assets less current liabilities
Capital and reserves
Called-up share capital
Share premium account
Merger reserve
Capital redemption reserve
Other reserve
Profit and loss account
Equity shareholders' funds
5
5
5
5
The financial statements on pages 123 to 125 were approved by the Board on 13 February 2013 and signed on its behalf by:
Sir Simon Robertson Chairman
Mark Morris Chief Financial Officer
Company’s registered number: 7524813
Reconciliation of movements in shareholders’ funds
For the period ended 31 December 2012
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
11,740
–
–
(328)
(63)
11,349
Financial statements
£m
At 1 January 2012
Profit for the year
Arising on issue of ordinary shares
Issue of C Shares
Share-based payments – direct to equity
At 31 December 2012
124 Financial statements
Notes to the Company financial statements
1 Accounting policies
Basis of accounting
The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with applicable UK Accounting Standards on the historical cost basis and on a
going concern basis.
As permitted by Section 408 of the Companies Act 2006, a separate profit and loss account for the Company has not been included in these
financial statements. As permitted by the audit fee disclosure regulations, disclosure of non-audit fees information is not included in
respect of the Company. As permitted by FRS 1 Cash flow statements, no cash flow statement for the Company has been included. As
permitted by FRS 8 Related party disclosures, no related party disclosures in respect of transactions between the Company and its whollyowned subsidiaries have been included.
Investments in subsidiary undertakings
Investments in subsidiary undertakings are reported at cost less any amounts written off.
Share-based payments
As described in the directors’ remuneration report on pages 57 to 67, the Company grants awards of its own shares to employees of its
subsidiary undertakings, (see note 21 of the consolidated financial statements). The costs of share-based payments in respect of these
awards are accounted for, by the Company, as an additional investment in its subsidiary undertakings. The costs are determined in
accordance with FRS 20 Share-based payment. Any payments made by the subsidiary undertakings in respect of these arrangements are
treated as a return of this investment.
Financial instruments
In accordance with FRS 25 Financial instruments: Presentation, the Company’s C Shares are classified as financial liabilities and held at
amortised cost from the date of issue until redeemed.
Taxation
Provision for taxation is made at the current rate and, in accordance with FRS 19 Deferred tax, for deferred taxation at the projected rate on
timing differences that have originated, but not reversed at the balance sheet date.
2 Investments – subsidiary undertakings
£m
Cost:
At 1 January 2012
Cost of share-based payments in respect of employees of subsidiary undertakings less receipts from
subsidiaries in respect of those payments
At 31 December 2012
11,921
33
11,954
3 Financial liabilities
C Shares
Movements in C Shares during the year were as follows:
Issued and fully paid
At 1 January 2012
Shares issued
Shares redeemed
At 31 December 2012
The rights attaching to C Shares are set out on page 68.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
C Shares
of 0.1p
Millions
6,371
327,643
(323,596)
10,418
Nominal
value
£m
6
328
(324)
10
125 Financial statements
Notes to the Company financial statements
4 Share capital
Non-equity
Issued and fully paid
At 1 January 2012
Proceeds from shares issued for share options schemes
At 31 December 2012
Equity
Ordinary
shares of
20p each
Millions
Special
Share
of £1
Preference
shares of
£1 each
Nominal
value
£m
1
–
–
1,872
–
–
–
–
–
1
–
–
1,872
374
Nominal
value
£m
374
The rights attaching to each class of share are set out on page 68.
In accordance with FRS 25 Financial instruments: Presentation, the Company’s non-cumulative redeemable preference shares (C Shares) are
classified as financial liabilities. Accordingly, movements in C Shares are included in note 3.
5 Movements in capital and reserves
Share
capital
£m
At 1 January 2012
Profit for the year
Proceeds from shares issued for share options schemes
Issue of C Shares
Redemption of C Shares
Share-based payments – direct to equity
At 31 December 2012
Non-distributable reserves
Capital
Merger
redemption
reserve
reserve
£m
£m
Other
reserve 1
£m
Profit
and loss
account
£m
Total
£m
374
8,897
173
31
2,265
11,740
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(328)
324
–
–
–
–
–
374
8,893
173
32
63
(324)
(95)
1,846
–
(328)
–
(63)
11,349
The ‘Other reserve’ represents the value of share-based payments in respect of employees of subsidiary undertakings for which payment has not been received.
1
Emoluments of directors
The remuneration of the directors of the Company is shown in the directors’ remuneration report on pages 57 to 67.
Employees
The Company had no employees in 2012.
Share-based payments
Shares in the Company have been granted to employees of the Group as part of share-based payment plans, and are charged in the
employing company.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Financial statements
6 Other information
126 Other information
Subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates
At 31 December 2012
Subsidiaries incorporated within the UK – directly held
Rolls-Royce Group plc
Holding company
Subsidiaries incorporated within the UK – indirectly held
Optimized Systems and Solutions Limited
Rolls-Royce Engine Control Systems Limited
Rolls-Royce International Limited
Rolls-Royce Leasing Limited
Rolls-Royce Marine Electrical Systems Limited
Rolls-Royce Marine Power Operations Limited
Rolls-Royce plc
Rolls-Royce Power Development Limited
Rolls-Royce Power Engineering plc
Rolls-Royce Total Care Services Limited
Vinters Engineering Limited
Equipment health management and advanced data management services
Development and manufacture of aero engine controls
International support and commercial information services
Engine leasing
Marine electrical systems
Nuclear submarine propulsion systems
Principal trading company
Generation of electricity from independent power projects
Energy and marine systems
Aero engine aftermarket support services
Production, repair and overhaul of power generation, transmission and conversion
equipment for military and commercial activities
The above companies operate principally in the UK and the effective Group interest is 100 per cent.
Subsidiaries incorporated overseas – indirectly held
Brazil
Rolls-Royce Brasil Limitada
Canada
China
Finland
France
France
Germany
Guernsey
India
India
Italy
Norway
Norway
Singapore
Rolls-Royce Canada Limited
Rolls-Royce Marine Manufacturing
(Shanghai) Limited
Rolls-Royce OY AB
Rolls-Royce Civil Nuclear SAS
Rolls-Royce Technical Support SARL
Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG
Nightingale Insurance Limited
Rolls-Royce India Private Limited
Rolls-Royce Operations (India) Private Limited
Europea Microfusioni Aerospaziali S.p.A.
Rolls-Royce Marine AS
Bergen Engines AS
Rolls-Royce Singapore Pte Limited
Sweden
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
US
Rolls-Royce AB
Data Systems & Solutions LLC
Optimized Systems and Solutions Inc.
PKMJ Technical Services, Inc.
R. Brooks Associates Inc.
Rolls-Royce Corporation
Rolls-Royce Crosspointe LLC
Rolls-Royce Energy Systems Inc.
Rolls-Royce Engine Services – Oakland Inc.
Rolls-Royce Defense Services Inc.
Rolls-Royce Marine North America Inc.
Industrial gas turbines and aero engine repair and overhaul, energy and marine aftermarket
support services
Industrial gas turbines and aero engine sales, service and overhaul
Manufacture and supply of marine equipment and marine aftermarket
support services
Manufacture of marine winches and propeller systems
Instrumentation and control systems and life-cycle management for nuclear power plants
Aero engine project support
Aero engine design, development and manufacture
Insurance services
Diesel engine project management and customer support
Engineering support services
Manufacture of gas turbine engine castings
Design and manufacture of ship equipment
Design and manufacture of medium-speed diesel engines (50%)
Aero engine parts manufacturing and engine assembly, energy and marine aftermarket
support services
Manufacture of marine propeller systems
Instrumentation and control systems and life-cycle management for nuclear power plants
Equipment health management and advanced data management services
Nuclear engineering services and software solutions
Specialist civil nuclear reactor services
Design, development and manufacture of gas turbine engines
Manufacturing facility for aero engine parts
Energy turbine generator packages
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Design and manufacture of marine equipment and marine aftermarket support services
The above companies operate principally in the country of their incorporation and the effective Group interest is 100 per cent unless
otherwise stated.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
127 Other information
Subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates
At 31 December 2012
Jointly controlled entities and associates incorporated within the UK – indirectly held
Airtanker Holdings Limited
Strategic tanker aircraft PFI project
Airtanker Services Limited
Provision of aftermarket services for strategic tanker aircraft
Alpha Partners Leasing Limited
Aero engine leasing
Composite Technology and Applications Limited
Development of aero engine fan blades and fan cases
Genistics Holdings Limited
Trailer-mounted field mobile generator sets
Rolls-Royce Snecma Limited (UK & France)
Aero engine collaboration
Rolls-Royce Turbomeca Limited (UK & France)
Adour and RTM322 aero engine collaboration
Rolls Wood Group (Repair and Overhauls) Limited
Industrial gas turbine repair and overhaul
TRT Limited
Aero engine turbine blade repair services
Turbine Surface Technologies Limited
Aero engine turbine surface coatings
Turbo-Union Limited (UK, Germany & Italy)
RB199 engine collaboration
Class
% of
class held
% of
equity held
Ordinary
20
20
Ordinary
22
22
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Shares
B Shares
A Shares
B Shares
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
A Ordinary
B Ordinary
Ordinary
A Shares
100
–
100
–
100
–
–
100
–
100
100
–
–
100
–
100
40
37.5
50
51
50
50
50
50
49.5
50
40
The above companies operate principally in the country of their incorporation. The countries of principal operations are stated in brackets
after the name of the company, if not the country of their incorporation.
Other information
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
128 Other information
Subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates
At 31 December 2012
Jointly controlled entities and associates incorporated overseas – indirectly held
Class
China
Germany
Germany
Germany
Germany
Germany
Hong Kong
India
Israel
Malaysia
Singapore
Singapore
Spain
US
US
US
US
Xian XR Aero Components Co Limited
Ordinary
Manufacturing facility for aero engine parts
EPI Europrop International GmbH (effective interest 35.5%)
Ordinary
A400M engine collaboration
EUROJET Turbo GmbH (UK, Germany, Italy & Spain) (effective interest 39%)
Ordinary
EJ200 engine collaboration
MTU, Turbomeca, Rolls-Royce GmbH (UK, France & Germany)
Ordinary
MTR390 engine collaboration
N3 Engine Overhaul Services GmbH & Co KG
Ordinary
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Ordinary
Tognum AG
Supplier of engines and power trains for marine propulsion, distributed power
generation and industrial ‘off highway’ sectors
Hong Kong Aero Engine Services Limited
Ordinary
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Ordinary
International Aerospace Manufacturing Private Limited
Manufacture of compressor shrouds, compressor rings, turbine blades and nozzle
guide vanes
Techjet Aerofoils Limited
A Ordinary
Manufacture of compressor aerofoils for gas turbines
B Ordinary
Advanced Gas Turbine Solutions Sdn Bhd
Ordinary
Industrial gas turbine aftermarket services
International Engine Component Overhaul Pte Limited
Ordinary
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Singapore Aero Engine Services Private Limited (effective interest 39%)
Ordinary
Aero engine repair and overhaul
Industria de Turbo Propulsores SA
Ordinary
Aero engine component manufacture and maintenance
Alpha Leasing (US) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.2) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.4) LLC, Partnerships
Alpha Leasing (US) (No.5) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.6) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US)
(No.7) LLC, Alpha Leasing (US) (No.8) LLC, Rolls-Royce & Partners Finance (US) LLC,
Rolls-Royce & Partners Finance (US) (No.2) LLC
Aero engine leasing
Exostar LLC
Partnership
Business to business internet exchange
LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc.
Common Stock
Development of fuel cells
Texas Aero Engine Services, LLC
Partnership
Aero engine repair and overhaul
% of
class held
% of
equity held
49
49
28
28
33
33
33.3
33.3
50
50
49.5
49.5
45
45
50
50
50
50
49
50
49
50
50
30
30
46.9
46.9
50
–
18.5
–
49
49
50
–
Unincorporated overseas – indirectly held
US
Light Helicopter Turbine Engine Company (LHTEC)
Rolls-Royce Corporation has a 50 per cent interest in this unincorporated partnership which was formed to develop and market
jointly the T800 engine
The above companies operate principally in the country of their incorporation. The countries of principal operations are stated in brackets
after the name of the company, if not the country of their incorporation.
In accordance with Section 410 of the Companies Act 2006, the subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates listed on pages 126 to
128 is of those whose results or financial position, in the opinion of the directors, principally affect the financial statements. A list of all
related undertakings will be included in the Company’s annual return to Companies House.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
129 Other information
Independent Auditor’s report
to the Members of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
We have audited the financial statements of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc for the year ended 31 December 2012, set out on pages 74 to 128.
The financial reporting framework that has been applied in the preparation of the Group financial statements is applicable law and
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the EU. The financial reporting framework that has been applied in
the preparation of the parent company financial statements is applicable law and UK Accounting Standards (UK Generally Accepted
Accounting Practice).
This report is made solely to the Company’s members, as a body, in accordance with Chapter 3 of Part 16 of the Companies Act 2006. Our
audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the Company’s members those matters we are required to state to them in an
auditor’s report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other
than the Company and the Company’s members, as a body, for our audit work, for this report, or for the opinions we have formed.
Respective responsibilities of directors and auditor
As explained more fully in the directors’ responsibilities statement set out on pages 71 and 72, the directors are responsible for the
preparation of the financial statements and for being satisfied that they give a true and fair view. Our responsibility is to audit, and express
an opinion on, the financial statements in accordance with applicable law and International Standards on Auditing (UK and Ireland). Those
standards require us to comply with the Auditing Practices Board’s Ethical Standards for Auditors.
Scope of the audit of the financial statements
A description of the scope of an audit of financial statements is provided on the Financial Reporting Council’s website at
www.frc.org.uk/auditscopeukprivate.
Opinion on financial statements
In our opinion:
• the financial statements give a true and fair view of the state of the Group’s and of the parent company’s affairs as at 31 December 2012
and of the Group’s profit for the year then ended;
• the Group financial statements have been properly prepared in accordance with IFRS as adopted by the EU;
• the parent company financial statements have been properly prepared in accordance with UK Generally Accepted Accounting Practice;
and
• the financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Companies Act 2006; and, as regards the Group
financial statements, Article 4 of the IAS Regulation.
Opinion on other matters prescribed by the Companies Act 2006
In our opinion:
• the part of the directors’ remuneration report to be audited has been properly prepared in accordance with the Companies Act 2006; and
• the information given in the directors’ report for the financial year for which the financial statements are prepared is consistent with the
financial statements.
Matters on which we are required to report by exception
We have nothing to report in respect of the following:
Under the Companies Act 2006 we are required to report to you if, in our opinion:
Under the Listing Rules we are required to review:
• the directors’ statement, set out on page 72 in relation to going concern;
• the part of the corporate governance statement on page 43 relating to the Company’s compliance with the nine provisions of the UK
Corporate Governance Code specified for our review; and
• certain elements of the report to shareholders by the Board on directors’ remuneration.
A J Sykes (Senior Statutory Auditor)
for and on behalf of KPMG Audit Plc, Statutory Auditor
Chartered Accountants
15 Canada Square
London, E14 5GL
13 February 2013
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Other information
dequate accounting records have not been kept by the parent company, or returns adequate for our audit have not been received from
• a
branches not visited by us; or
• the parent company financial statements and the part of the directors’ remuneration report to be audited are not in agreement with the
accounting records and returns; or
• certain disclosures of directors’ remuneration specified by law are not made; or
• we have not received all the information and explanations we require for our audit.
130 Other information
Group five-year review
For the years ended 31 December
Income statement
Revenue
Profit before net research and development and share of results of joint ventures
and associates
Research and development (net) 1
Share of results of joint ventures and associates
Profit before financing
Net financing
Profit/(loss) before taxation 2
Taxation
Profit/(loss) for the year
Attributable to:
Equity shareholders of the parent
Non-controlling interests
Profit/(loss) for the year
1
2
Research and development (gross)
Underlying profit before taxation
Earnings per ordinary share:
Underlying
Basic
Payments to shareholders per ordinary share
Balance sheet
Assets
Liabilities
Called-up share capital
Reserves
Equity attributable to equity holders of the parent
Non-controlling interests
Cash flow
Cash inflow from operating activities
Cash inflow/(outflow) from investing activities
Cash (outflow)/inflow from financing activities
Increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
Net funds
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2012
£m
2011
£m
2010
£m
2009
£m
2008
£m
12,161
11,124
11,085
10,414
9,082
2,488
(589)
173
2,072
633
2,705
(410)
2,295
2,281
14
2,295
(919)
1,429
1,536
(463)
116
1,189
(84)
1,105
(257)
848
850
(2)
848
(908)
1,157
1,463
(422)
93
1,134
(432)
702
(159)
543
1,458
(379)
93
1,172
1,785
2,957
(740)
2,217
1,191
(403)
74
862
(2,754)
(1,892)
547
(1,345)
539
4
543
2,221
(4)
2,217
(1,340)
(5)
(1,345)
(923)
955
(864)
915
(885)
880
59.27p
123.23p
48.54p
45.95p
38.73p
29.20p
39.67p
120.38p
36.70p
(73.63p)
19.50p
17.50p
16.00p
15.00p
14.30p
2012
£m
2011
£m
2010
£m
2009
£m
2008
£m
18,115
(12,010)
6,105
16,423
(11,904)
4,519
16,234
(12,255)
3,979
15,422
(11,640)
3,782
15,348
(13,123)
2,225
374
5,714
6,088
17
6,105
374
4,144
4,518
1
4,519
374
3,601
3,975
4
3,979
371
3,411
3,782
–
3,782
369
1,847
2,216
9
2,225
2012
£m
2011
£m
2010
£m
2009
£m
2008
£m
1,378
(759)
(743)
(124)
1,533
859
(606)
384
637
1,275
1,015
(645)
(221)
149
1,458
1,255
424
(331)
1,348
1,317
1,306
(2,207)
(655)
(1,556)
223
131 Other information
Shareholder information
Financial calendar 2013-2014
2 May 11:00am
AGM
QEII Conference
Centre London
Apr
2013
24 April
Ex-entitlement
to C Shares
26 April
Record date for
entitlement to
C Shares
May
2013
Jun
2013
1 July Payment of C Share dividend
1 July Allotment of C Shares
3 July Payment of C Share redemption monies
11 July Purchase of ordinary shares for CRIP
participants (at the latest)
26 July Announcement of interim results
Jul
2013
Aug
2013
Sep
2013
3 June 5:00pm
Deadline for
receipt of C Share
elections
3 June
Record date for
C Share dividend
Managing your shareholding
Your shareholding is managed by Computershare Investor
Services PLC (the Registrar). When making contact with the
Registrar please quote your Shareholder Reference Number (SRN),
an 11-digit number that can be found on the right-hand side of
your share certificate or in any other shareholder correspondence.
It is very important that you keep your shareholding account
details up to date by notifying the Registrar of any changes in
your circumstances.
You can manage your shareholding at www.investorcentre.co.uk,
speak to the Registrar on +44 (0)870 703 0162 (8.30am to 5.30pm
Monday to Friday) or you can write to them at Computershare
Investor Services PLC, The Pavilions, Bridgwater Road,
Bristol BS13 8AE.
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
2 January Payment of
C Share dividend
2 January Allotment of
C Shares
6 January Payment of
C Share redemption monies
Oct
2013
Nov
2013
Dec
2013
Jan
2014
23 October
Ex-entitlement to
C Shares
2 December
Deadline for receipt
of C Share elections
25 October
Record date for
entitlement to
C Shares
31 December
Financial year end
Feb
2014
February
Preliminary
announcement
– 2013 full year
results
February
Annual report
published
Share dealing
The Registrar offers existing shareholders an internet dealing
service at www-uk.computershare.com/investor/sharedealing.asp
and a telephone dealing service (+44 (0)870 703 0084). The service is
available during market hours, 8.00am to 4.30pm, Monday to Friday
excluding Bank holidays. The fee for internet dealing is 1 per cent of
the transaction value subject to a minimum fee of £30. The fee for
telephone dealing is 1 per cent of the transaction plus £35. Please
note that, in addition to dealing fees, stamp duty of 0.5 per cent is
payable on all purchases. Other share dealing facilities are available
but we recommend that you only use a firm regulated by the
Financial Services Authority (FSA). You can check the FSA register at
www.fsa.gov.uk.
Your share certificate
If you sell or transfer your shares you must ensure that you have a
valid share certificate in the name of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc.
If you place an instruction to sell your shares and cannot provide a
valid share certificate the transaction cannot be completed and you
will be liable for any costs incurred by the broker. Share certificates
previously issued by either Rolls-Royce Group plc or Rolls-Royce plc
are invalid and should be destroyed. If you are unable to locate your
share certificates please inform the Registrar immediately.
American Depositary Receipts (ADR)
ADR holders should contact the depositary, The Bank of New York
Mellon by calling +1 888 269 2377 (toll free within the US) or
emailing [email protected]
Other information
Payments to shareholders
The Company makes payments to shareholders by issuing
redeemable C Shares of 0.1 pence each. You can still receive cash or
additional ordinary shares from the Company providing you
complete a payment instruction form, which is available from the
Registrar. Once you have submitted your payment instruction form,
you will receive cash or additional ordinary shares each time the
Company issues C Shares. If you choose to receive cash we
recommend that you include your bank details on the payment
instruction form and have payments credited directly to your bank
account. This removes the risk of a cheque going astray in the post
and means that cleared payments will be credited to your bank
account on the payment date.
15 November Record date
for C Share dividend
132 Other information
Shareholder information
Warning to shareholders – boiler room fraud
We are aware that some shareholders might have received
unsolicited phone calls or correspondence concerning investment
matters. These are typically from overseas based ‘brokers’ who offer
to sell them what often turn out to be worthless or high risk shares
in US or UK investments. Such operations are known as ‘boiler
rooms’ and these ‘brokers’ can be very persistent and extremely
persuasive. You should always check that any firm calling you about
investment opportunities is properly authorised by the FSA using
the following web link www.fsa.gov.uk/fsaregister or by calling
their Consumer Helpline on 0845 606 1234 (overseas callers dial
+44 20 7066 1000). If you deal with an unauthorised firm, you
will not be eligible to receive payment under the Financial Services
Compensation Scheme. You will find lots of advice and information
about protecting yourself from investment scams on the FSA
website www.fsa.gov.uk.
Remember the golden rule – IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE IT
PROBABLY IS.
Available as a free
download from
the app store for
iPad users
Visit Rolls-Royce online
Visit www.rolls-royce.com/investors to find out more about the
latest financial results, the share price, payments to shareholders,
the financial calendar and shareholder services.
Keeping up to date
You can sign up to receive the latest news to your phone or inbox.
You can also download the Rolls-Royce Investor Relations iPad app
which provides the latest media and financial information.
Dividends paid on C Shares held
C Share calculation period
1 July 2012 – 31 December 2012
1 January 2012 – 30 June 2012
Record date for
C Share dividend
Payment date
16 November 2012
27 April 2012
2 January 2013
3 July 2012
C Share dividend rate (%)
0.441
0.516 Previous C Share issues
Apportionment values
Issue date
2 January
2013
2 July
2012
No of
C Shares issued
per ordinary
share
Record date
for
entitlement
to C Shares
Latest date
for receipt of
Payment
Instruction
Forms by
Registrar
CGT apportionment
Price of
ordinary
Value of
shares on first C Share issues
day of trading
per ordinary
(p)
shares (p)
26 November 3 December
76
2012
2012
27 April
1 June
106
2012
2012
Ordinary
shares (%)
C Shares (%)
903.288
7.6
99.17
0.83
863.25
10.6
98.79
1.21
Date of
redemption
of C Shares
CRIP
purchase
date
4 January
2013
4 July
2012
7 January
2013
5 July
2012
CRIP
purchase
price (p)
906.210
888.027
For earlier C Share issues, please refer to the Group’s website.
Analysis of ordinary shareholders at 31 December 2012
Type of holder:
Individuals
Institutional and other investors
Total
Size of holding:
1 – 150
151 – 500
501 – 10,000
10,001 – 100,000
100,001 – 1,000,000
1,000,001 and over
Total
R olls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
Number of
shareholders
% of total
shareholders
Number
of shares
% of total
shares
208,973
6,322
215,295
97.06
2.94
100.00
109,156,755
1,763,146,808
1,872,303,563
5.83
94.17
100.00
67,604
109,625
36,046
1,354
460
206
215,295
31.40
50.92
16.74
0.63
0.21
0.10
100.00
6,501,027
29,132,208
58,447,201
36,087,499
161,984,671
1,580,150,957
1,872,303,563
0.35
1.55
3.12
1.93
8.65
84.40
100.00
133
Glossary
Business review
Introduction
Group at a glance
Chairman’s statement
Chief Executive’s review
Values, vision and strategy
Future opportunity
Chief Financial Officer’s review
Key performance indicators
Principal risks and uncertainties
Civil aerospace
Defence aerospace
Marine
Energy
Excellence in technology
Excellence in operations
Sustainability
Additional financial information
01
02
04
06
08
10
12
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
37
Governance
Chairman’s introduction
Board of directors
International Advisory Board (IAB)
The Group Leadership Team (GLT)
Corporate governance report
Audit committee report
Nomination committee report
Ethics committee report
Risk committee report
Safety committee report
Remuneration committee report
Directors’ remuneration report
Shareholders and share capital
Other statutory information
39
40
42
42
43
47
49
50
52
53
54
57
68
70
Financial statements
Contents
73
Other information
Subsidiaries, jointly controlled
entities and associates
Independent Auditor’s report
Group five-year review
Shareholder information
Glossary
126
129
130
131
133
ABC
ACARE
Anti-bribery and corruption
Advisory Council for Aviation Research and
Innovation in Europe
ADR
AEBS
AGM
ANA
APB
APRA
BIS
CAD
CBE
CDP
CGU
CO2
CO2e
CPS
CRIP
DJSI
DoD
EMIR
EPS
ESOP
EU
FAA
Frc
FRC
FSA
GBP
GDP
GHG
GLT
HS&E
I&C
IAB
IAE
IAS
IASB
IFRIC
American Depositary Receipts Programme
All-Employee Bonus Scheme
Annual general meeting
All Nippon Airways
Auditing Practices Board
Annual Performance Related Award plan
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Canadian dollar
Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
Carbon Disclosure Project
Cash-generating unit
Carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide equivalent
Cash flow per share
C Share Reinvestment Plan
Dow Jones Sustainability World and European Indexes
US Department of Defense
European Market Infrastructure Regulation
Earnings per ordinary share
Executive Share Option Plan
European Union
Federal Aviation Administration
Financial Risk Committee
Financial Reporting Council
Financial Services Authority
Great British pound or pound sterling
Gross Domestic Product
Greenhouse gas
Group Leadership Team
Health, Safety and Environment
Instrumentation and control
International Advisory Board
IAE International Aero Engines AG
International Accounting Standards
International Accounting Standards Board
International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee
IFRS
ISO
LDI
LIBOR
LLP
LTSA
LNG
MoD
MW
NCI
NOX
OCI
OE
OECD
International Financial Reporting Standards
International Standards Organisation
Liability-driven investment
London Inter-Bank Offered Rate
Limited Liability Partnership
Long-Term Service Agreement
Liquefied Natural Gas
UK Ministry of Defence
Megawatt
Non-controlling interest
Nitrogen oxides
Other comprehensive income
Original Equipment
Organisation for Economic Cooperation
and Development
OHSAS
OTC
PAC
PLC
PSP
R&D
RCF
REACH
Registrar
RRNA
RRSPs
RSUs
SCRIA
SDSR
SFO
SIP
SRN
STEM
STOVL
TRI
TSR
UAV
UK GAAP
USD
Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Services
Over-the-counter
Political Action Committee
Public Limited Company
Performance Share Plan
Research and development
Revolving credit facility
Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals
Computershare Investor Services PLC
Rolls-Royce North America
Risk and Revenue Sharing Partnerships
Restricted stock units
Supply Chain Relationships in Aerospace
Strategic Defence and Security Review
Serious Fraud Office
Share Incentive Plan
Shareholder Reference Number
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
Short take-off and vertical landing
Total reportable injuries
Total Shareholder Return
Unmanned aerial vehicle
UK Generally Accepted Accounting Practices
United States dollar
Directors’ report
The directors’ report which includes the Business review is
set out on pages 1 to 72.
Forward-looking statements
This annual report contains forward-looking statements.
Any statements that express forecasts, expectations and
projections are not guarantees of future performance and
will not be updated. By their nature, these statements
involve risk and uncertainty, and a number of factors could
cause material differences to the actual results or
developments.
This report is intended to provide information to
shareholders, is not designed to be relied upon by any other
party, or for any other purpose and the Company and its
directors accept no liability to any other person other than
under English law.
Cover: In February 2012, we celebrated the opening of our
new manufacturing and assembly facility in Singapore for
large civil aero engines.
Image courtesy of: Bob Lee Keng Siang
Designed and produced by
conran design group
The paper used in the report contains 75% recycled
content, of which 75% is de-inked post-consumer.
All of the pulp is bleached using an elemental chlorine
free process (ECF).
Printed in the UK by PurePrint using their
environmental printing technology, using
and
vegetable inks throughout. PurePrint is a CarbonNeutral®
company. Both the paper manufacturing mill and the printer
are registered to the Environmental Management System
ISO 14001 and are Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC)
chain-of-custody certified.
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc annual report 2012
®
© Rolls-Royce plc 2013
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
Registered office:
65 Buckingham Gate
London
SW1E 6AT
T +44 (0)20 7222 9020
www.rolls-royce.com
Company number 7524813
®
Rolls-Royce Holdings plc
annual report 2012

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