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Objective
1
To review place value through ten-thousands.
materials
Teaching the Lesson
Key Activities
Children review place value and practice reading and writing numbers into the ten-thousands.
Key Concepts and Skills
• Read and write multidigit whole numbers. [Number and Numeration Goal 1]
• Identify the places in multidigit numbers and the value of the digits in those places.
[Number and Numeration Goal 1]
• Order numbers through continuation of counts. [Number and Numeration Goal 6]
ⵧ Math Journal 1, p. 102
ⵧ Teaching Master (Math Masters,
p. 119; one per 2 children)
ⵧ Transparency (Math Masters, p. 422;
optional)
ⵧ calculator
See Advance Preparation
Key Vocabulary
ten-thousands • thousands
Ongoing Assessment: Recognizing Student Achievement Use Math Masters,
page 119. [Number and Numeration Goal 1]
Ongoing Assessment: Informing Instruction See page 320.
2
Ongoing Learning & Practice
Children play Baseball Multiplication to practice automatic recall of multiplication facts.
Children practice and maintain skills through Math Boxes and Home Link activities.
3
Children use base-10 blocks to
build numbers.
ⵧ Math Journal 1, p. 103
ⵧ Student Reference Book, pp. 276 and
277
ⵧ Home Link Master (Math Masters,
p. 120)
ⵧ Game Master (Math Masters, p. 444)
materials
Differentiation Options
READINESS
materials
ENRICHMENT
Children look for patterns on a
100-number grid.
ⵧ Teaching Masters (Math Masters,
pp. 121 and 122)
ⵧ base-10 blocks
ⵧ calculator, index cards
See Advance Preparation
Additional Information
Advance Preparation For Part 1, make a transparency of Math Masters, page 422 or use
semipermanent chalk to draw a place-value chart on the board.
For each partnership, label four index cards with the terms thousands, hundreds, tens, and
ones for the optional Readiness activity in Part 3.
318
Unit 5 Place Value in Whole Numbers and Decimals
Technology
Assessment Management System
Math Masters, page 119
See the iTLG.
Getting Started
Mental Math and Reflexes
Have children use the
solve these puzzles.
Enter
3
20
7
28
9
121
X
and
Change to
6
10
21
7
81
11
.
–
.
Math Message
calculator keys to
夹
Take one of the Math Message slips. Follow the
directions.
How?
2
2
3
4
9
11
1 Teaching the Lesson
䉴 Math Message Follow-Up
WHOLE-CLASS
ACTIVITY
(Math Masters, p. 119)
Read aloud the numbers on the Math Message slip as needed.
This lesson reviews place value through ten-thousands.
Ongoing Assessment:
Recognizing Student Achievement
Math Masters
Page 119
夹
Use Math Masters, page 119 to assess children’s ability to write whole numbers
up to five digits. Children are making adequate progress if they successfully
complete Problems 1–3. Some children may be able to complete Problems
4 and 5.
[Number and Numeration Goal 1]
Name
LESSON
51
䉬
Adjusting the Activity
Date
Write the following numbers using digits:
1. two hundred fifty-six
256
Demonstrate the cycle from symbols to words and back by writing the
following on the board:
2. three thousand, four hundred eleven
27,853
4. nine thousand, seventy
夹 夹
夹
3,411
3. twenty-seven thousand, eight hundred fifty-three
5. thirty-five thousand, eight
27 thousand, 853
Time
Math Message
27,853
9,070
35,008
twenty-seven thousand, eight hundred fifty-three
27 thousand, 853
27,853
Ask children to point to the written form of the number 27,853. Have children
work through this cycle for several 3-, 4-, or 5-digit numbers. Include numbers
with 0s in different place-value positions.
A U D I T O R Y
䉬
K I N E S T H E T I C
䉬
T A C T I L E
䉬
Math Masters, page 119
V I S U A L
Lesson 5 1
䉬
319
Teaching Aid Master
Name
Date
䉴 Reviewing Place Value
Time
5-Digit Place-Value Chart
TenThousands
WHOLE-CLASS
ACTIVITY
(Math Masters, p. 422)
Thousands
Hundreds
Tens
Ones
Use a transparency of Math Masters, page 422 or semipermanent
chalk to draw a place-value chart to ten-thousands on the board.
Write several five-digit numbers in the chart, such as 37,429, and
have volunteers read them.
Adjusting the Activity
Big numbers are broken into groups of digits separated by commas.
Each group is read as though it were a separate number. For the larger groups,
the name of the group is read. Use a diagram like the one below. Continue to
write 5-digit numbers on the lines and have children practice reading them aloud.
Include numbers with several 0s.
th
ou
sa
nd
3 7 ,4 2 9
A U D I T O R Y
䉬
K I N E S T H E T I C
䉬
T A C T I L E
䉬
V I S U A L
Math Masters, p. 422
TenThousands
Thousands
Hundreds
Tens
Ones
3
7
4
2
9
NOTE Children may have trouble with
algorithms because they do not understand
what the digits in a number represent.
Children should get into the habit of thinking
and talking about the values of digits in
multidigit numbers.
Ask questions about the numbers written in the place-value chart.
For 37,429 ask:
●
Which digit is in the thousands place? 7
●
What is the value of the digit 4? 400
●
How many ten-thousands are there? 3
Repeat using other numbers including those with 0s, such as
5,072. Review the role of zero as a placeholder. Ask: What would
happen if the zero were left out of 5,072? The value of the number
would not be the same. Encourage children to think in terms of
money: $5,072 is not the same as $572.
Student Page
Date
Time
LESSON
Ongoing Assessment: Informing Instruction
Place-Value Review
5 1
䉬
Ten-Thousands
Thousands
Hundreds
Tens
Ones
Follow the steps to find each number in Problems 1 and 2.
1.
Write
Write
Write
Write
Write
1
3.
6
4
9
0
1
in
in
in
in
in
the
the
the
the
the
ones place.
thousands place.
hundreds place.
tens place.
ten-thousands place.
4 , 9
6
Write
Write
Write
Write
Write
4
6
4
9
0
1
in
in
in
in
in
the
the
the
the
the
tens place.
ten-thousands place.
ones place.
hundreds place.
thousands place.
1 , 0
6
䉴 Solving Problems Involving
41,069
Complete.
The 9 in 4,965 stands for 9
The 7 in 87,629 stands for 7
The 4 in 48,215 stands for 4
The 0 in 72,601 stands for 0
hundreds
thousands
ten-thousands
tens
or
or
or
or
900 .
7,000 .
40,000 .
0
.
Continue the counts.
4,710 ; 4,711 ; 4,712
7,700 ; 7,701 ; 7,702
900 ; 899 ; 898
903; 902; 901;
6,004; 6,003; 6,002; 6,001 ; 6,000 ; 5,999
47,265; 47,266; 47,267; 47,268 ; 47,269 ; 47,270
5.
4,707; 4,708; 4,709;
6.
7,697; 7,698; 7,699;
7.
8.
9.
9
Compare the two numbers you wrote in Problems 1 and 2.
Which is greater?
4.
0
2.
Watch for children who insert the word and after thousand when reading a whole
number. A number like 4,009 should be read as “four thousand nine,” not “four
thousand and nine.” Proper use of and is especially important when reading
decimals. See Lesson 5-9.
Place Value
(Math Journal 1, p. 102)
Children use the place values of digits in 3-, 4-, and 5-digit
numbers to solve problems.
Math Journal 1, p. 102
320
INDEPENDENT
ACTIVITY
Unit 5 Place Value in Whole Numbers and Decimals
Student Page
Games
2 Ongoing Learning & Practice
䉴 Playing Baseball Multiplication
SMALL-GROUP
ACTIVITY
(Student Reference Book, pp. 276 and 277; Math Masters, p. 444)
Baseball Multiplication (Advanced Version)
Materials 䊐 1 Baseball Multiplication (Advanced)
game mat (Math Masters, p. 444)
䊐 1 twelve-sided die
䊐 4 counters
Players
2 teams of one or more players each
Skill
Multiplication facts through 12s
Object of the game To score more runs in a 3-inning game.
Directions
Children play Baseball Multiplication (Advanced Version). See
pages 276 and 277 of the Student Reference Book or Lesson 4-7
for game directions.
Members of one team take turns “pitching.” They roll the
die twice to get 2 factors. Players on the “batting” team
take turns multiplying the 2 factors and giving the
product. When a correct product is given, the batter checks
the Scoring Chart on the game mat.
The rest of the game is the same as a regular game of
Baseball Multiplication.
䉴 Math Boxes 5 1
INDEPENDENT
ACTIVITY
䉬
(Math Journal 1, p. 103)
Mixed Practice Math Boxes in this lesson are paired with
Math Boxes in Lesson 5-3. The skill in Problem 6
previews Unit 6 content.
䉴 Home Link 5 1
You can make the Advanced Version of this game a bit
easier with this rule:
If the die comes up as “11” or “12” on a roll,
pretend that the die came up as “10.”
Student Reference Book, p. 276
INDEPENDENT
ACTIVITY
䉬
(Math Masters, p. 120)
Home Connection Children solve Frames-and-Arrows
problems involving place value.
Student Page
Date
LESSON
5 1
䉬
1.
Home Link Master
Time
Name
HOME LINK
Math Boxes
51
䉬
If a map scale shows that 1 inch
represents 200 miles, then
2.
400 miles
3 inches represent 600 miles
5 inches represent 1,000 miles
2 inches represent
Put these numbers in order from
smallest to largest.
54,752
54,329
54,999
54,832
1 inch
Family
Note
54,329
54,752
54,832
54,999
Date
Time
Frames and Arrows
Have your child read and solve the three Frames-and-Arrows problems. Review the rule that
is being used in each puzzle. Ask your child to look for patterns in the frames. For example,
which digit changes when adding or subtracting 10? (tens digit and hundreds digit change
when moving from the 8,800s to the 8,900s) 100? (hundreds digit and thousands digit change
when moving from the 8,000s to the 9,000s) 1,000? (thousands digit and ten-thousands digit
change when moving from the 9,000s to the 10,000s)
Please return this Home Link to school tomorrow.
Solve each Frames-and-Arrows problem.
1.
0
3.
182
200 miles
Number of cookies in packages:
18
4.
19
Rule
Solve.
Unit
Add 10
20, 24, 28, 30, 28, 26, 19, 24, 27
Put the data in order. Then find
the median. Fill in the circle for
the best answer.
A 26 cookies
B
C 30 cookies
D 1 cookie
40,000
400,000
25 cookies
800,000 400,000
30,000 40,000 70,000
300,000 400,000 6.
JANUARY
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
8,889
8,899
8,909
8,919
8,929
8,789
8,889
8,989
9,089
9,189
9,289
7,889
8,889
9,889 10,889 11,889 12,889
80,000 40,000
700,000
2.
Rule
Add 100
80
5.
8,879
Use your template. Trace two
different polygons.
3.
Sample answer:
Rule
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
Add 1,000
31
January 17th is a Tuesday. What is
the date on the following Tuesday?
January 24th
176 177
Math Journal 1, p. 103
102–105
Math Masters, p. 120
Lesson 5 1
䉬
321
Teaching Master
Name
LESSON
51
䉬
Date
Time
3 Differentiation Options
Place Value with Base-10 Blocks
Record each number. Then record how many of each block you used
and how much those blocks are worth.
My number is
.
READINESS
I used
big cube(s)
, which is worth
I used
flat(s)
I used
long(s) , which is worth
I used
cube(s) , which is worth
.
, which is worth
.
䉴 Reviewing Place-Value Concepts
SMALL-GROUP
ACTIVITY
5–15 Min
(Math Masters, p. 122)
My number is
.
.
.
I used
big cube(s)
, which is worth
I used
flat(s)
I used
long(s) , which is worth
.
, which is worth
.
To provide experience with place value, have children build
numbers with base-10 blocks, placing them under index cards
labeled thousands, hundreds, tens, and ones. (See Advance
Preparation) Children will record the number of each block they
used on Math Masters, page 122. Suggestions: 357; 604; 1,251;
1,507.
.
ENRICHMENT
I used
cube(s) , which is worth
䉴 Exploring Patterns on a
.
PARTNER
ACTIVITY
15–30 Min
100-Number Grid
Math Masters, p. 122
(Math Masters, p. 121)
To further explore patterns on a number grid, have children use a
calculator and Math Masters, page 121. Have children report the
strategies they used to find the digit counts without necessarily
having to count each.
NOTE Remind children to continue to record the sunrise, sunset, and length
of day for your location on journal page 27 and the national high and low
temperatures on journal page 44.
Teaching Master
Name
LESSON
51
䉬
Date
Time
Patterns on a 100-Number Grid
1
11
21
31
41
51
61
71
81
91
2
12
22
32
42
52
62
72
82
92
3
13
23
33
43
53
63
73
83
93
4
14
24
34
44
54
64
74
84
94
5
15
25
35
45
55
65
75
85
95
6
16
26
36
46
56
66
76
86
96
7
17
27
37
47
57
67
77
87
97
8
18
28
38
48
58
68
78
88
98
0
9 10
19 20
29 30
39 40
49 50
59 60
69 70
79 80
89 90
99 100
1. Which digit is used the greatest number of times on the
100-number grid?
1 is used 21 times.
2. Which digit is used the least number of times on the
100-number grid?
0 is used 12 times.
3. Is the digit 6 used more times in the ones place or in the
tens place?
It is used 10 times in each place.
4. Use a calculator. Find the sum of two or three rows of the
100-number grid. How much more is the sum of the numbers in
a row than the sum of the numbers in the row above it? Why?
100 more. Each number below is 10 more
than the number above and there are
10 numbers in each row; 10 10 100.
5. On the back of this sheet, describe the strategies you used to answer
Questions 1, 2, and 3. Try to find ways to answer the questions so that you
do not need to count each digit.
Sample answer:
Each digit 1–9 is used ten times in the tens
place and ten times in the ones place. 0 is
used only in the ones place (except in 100).
Math Masters, p. 121
322
Unit 5 Place Value in Whole Numbers and Decimals

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