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what to do • where to go • what to see
September 12–25, 2005
The O
The
Official
fficia
ficiall Guid
Guide
e tto
o BOSTON
Boston
@
375
7 Sure Signs the
Hub is Growing Up
PLUS:
> 5 Designer Jeans Bargains
> Oyster Shucking for Charity
> The Phantom Gourmet’s
Secrets Revealed
www.panoramamagazine.com
www
ww
w.panoramamagazine.com
ALL NEW
NEIGHBORHOOD
SECTIONS…
AND MORE!
© 2005 BY ROBERTO COIN SPA –
contents
COVER STORY
THE ULTIMATE
ITALIAN ART OF CREATING
JEWELS
20 Boston at 375
As Boston celebrates the big 3-7-5,
Panorama looks at some of the big
and small ways the city has changed
DEPARTMENTS
6 around the hub
6
10
12
news & notes
kids corner
on exhibit
14
16
18
dining
nightlife
style
60
62
68
81
freedom trail
shopping
restaurants
NEIGHBORHOODS
27 the hub directory
28
37
40
46
52
current events
clubs & bars
museums & galleries
maps
sightseeing
94 5 questions with…
DAVE ANDELMAN of
“The Phantom Gourmet”
on the cover:
The I.M. Pei-designed
John Hancock Tower in
picturesque Copley Square
stands as a testament to
Boston’s modern spirit.
APPASSIONATA
COLLECTION
TOWER OF POWER:
The Custom House in downtown
Boston was the city’s first
skyscraper. Refer to feature
story, page 20.
Photo: johnsavone.com
D AV E A N D E L M A N
PH OTO B Y
___
YEHESHUA JOHNSON
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
3
The Official Guide to BOSTON
w w w. p a n o r a m a m a g a z i n e . c o m
September 12–25, 2005
Volume 55 • Number 9
Jerome Rosenfeld • CHAIRMAN
Tim Montgomery • PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER
Christine Celli • EDITOR
Scott Roberto • ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
Josh B. Wardrop • ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Sharon Hudak Miller • ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR
Christopher Wallenberg • STAFF WRITER
Marketa Hulpachova • EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Jacolyn Ann Firestone •
VICE PRESIDENT, ADVERTISING
Rita A. Fucillo •
DIRECTOR OF MARKETING
AND PUBLIC RELATIONS
Heather S. Burke, Tyler Montgomery •
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
Peter Ng •
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGER
Melissa J. O’Reilly • BUSINESS MANAGER
PANORAMA is published bi-weekly by Jerome Press
Publications Inc. Editorial and advertising offices at 332
Congress Street, Boston, MA 02210. Telephone (617) 4233400. Printed in the U.S.A. All rights reserved. No part of this
publication may be reprinted or otherwise reproduced without written permission of the publisher.
PANORAMA is a member of the Massachusetts Lodging
Association, The Back Bay Association, The Greater Boston
Chamber of Commerce, The Greater Boston Convention
and Visitors Bureau, Cambridge Chamber of Commerce, the
Greater Boston Concierge Association, the Harvard Square
Business Association, the Newbury Street League and the
Downtown Crossing Association.
PANORAMA is audited by BPA Worldwide, an
independent audit bureau recognized by the
American Association of Advertising Agencies.
a
magazine affiliate
___
4
___
PA N O R A M A
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
5
aroundthehub
news&notes
by Christine Celli & Josh B. Wardrop
Beat the Heat and
er!!!
Have Some FUN this Summ
™
The hilarious celebration of women and The Change!
™
Men
Love It
Too!!!
Happy Birthday, Dear Boston…
H
ard to believe, considering the Hub doesn’t look a day over 374, but the City of Boston
has spent Summer 2005 celebrating its 375th birthday, with a host of events boasting
the best music, dance, culture and entertainment options the city has to offer.
On September 25, the summer of revelry comes to a show-stopping close with a series of
planned events that include a parade through the streets of Boston into—we think—City
Hall Plaza. A family-oriented musical concert and an evening fireworks display at
Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park are expected to follow.
According to Tony Nunziante, a spokesman for the Mayor’s office of Arts & Tourism, final
elements of the celebration (such as performers, locations and times of events) are now
nearly finalized. He told Panorama that visitors to Boston can get up to the minute details
by visiting the Boston 375 Web site (www.cityofboston.gov/boston375) or by calling the
Boston 375 hotline at 617-635-B375.
cont. on page 8 >>
___
6
news & notes 6 • kids corner 10 • on exhibit 12 •
dining 14 • nightlife 16 • style 18
“YOU’LL
LOVE IT. IT’S
HILARIOUS.
GO SEE IT!”
- Joy Behar, The View
SIZZLIN’
SUMMER SALE!
$7.50 OFF
PE
R TICKET*
*Must mention code MMSIZZLE.
Limit 4 tix. Not valid for previous
purchased tickets, already discounly
ed seats or any other offer. Valid tall shows. Offer expires 09/04/05for
.
Now Playing!
STUART STREET PLAYHOUSE
FOR TIX 800-447-7400 OR AT BOX OFFICE WINDOW
200 Stuart Street at the Radisson Hotel Boston | www.menopausethemusical.com
PA N O R A M A
around the hub NEWS & NOTES
survived commercial development of the neighborhood
around it, changing trends
in the Boston bar scene and
the advent of modern building codes.
David Epstein, president
of the Abbey Group, told The
Boston Globe that his company would be interested in
preserving “some semblance
of The Littlest Bar,” although
no explanation as to how
they would do that was given.
Refer to listing, page 38.
SILVER LINE WORTH
ITS WEIGHT IN GOLD
<< cont.
from page 6
___
8
NEW DIGS FOR
NEW REP
After toiling for
years in a cramped, unorthodox facility in the sleepy
enclave of Newton, the Elliot
Norton Award-winning New
Repertory Theatre embarks
on a much-anticipated
chapter in its history with a
marquee move to a 380-seat
theater at the new Arsenal
Center for the Arts in
Watertown. The space will be
inaugurated with a play that
could never have been staged
in the old, church basement
space—Romeo and Juliet,
which opens September 18.
The move more than doubles
the company’s seating capacity, allowing New Rep to
PA N O R A M A
attract larger audiences, and
ultimately grow its already
acclaimed artistry. “Being in
our old space was holding us
back as a company from our
next stage of growth,” says
artistic director Rick
Lombardo (pictured above).
“Even though the Boston
media treated [us] as one of
the major players of the
Boston theater scene, there
were still a lot of people who
didn’t know about us or didn’t even know where Newton
Highlands was.”The new theater, for those still not in the
know, is a short drive from
Harvard Square and accessible by the MBTA via the 70 or
70a bus from Central Square.
Refer to listing, page 36.
BAR CLOSING NO
SMALL LOSS
They say that little things
mean a lot, and that was
certainly proven true by the
outpouring of sadness that
The Littlest Bar—a curious
38-seat pub and fixture on
Province Street near
Downtown Crossing for six
decades—will close later
this year.
According to published
reports, The Littlest Bar will
reluctantly shut its doors by
December, making way for
real estate developers The
Abbey Group to build 150
condominium units. With
the bar’s closing, the city
will lose a durable piece of
its social history—a bar that
While we at Panorama are
never in a hurry to usher visitors to Boston out of town,
we realize some of you
would love quick and easy
public transportation
options to Logan Airport.
This summer, the opening of
Silver Line service from
South Station and the waterfront has offered just that.
Beginning in June, the
MBTA introduced Silver Line
service, in which large capacity buses ferry passengers
from points near the waterfront directly to all Logan terminals. The buses depart
every 10 minutes from South
Station between 7 a.m. and 8
p.m., and every 15 minutes
after 8 p.m. and on weekends.
The MBTA hopes to eventually extend Silver Line airport service as far as downtown Boston, but have currently shelved further expansion plans while they look to
address community concerns.
calendar of events
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
Today through September 25 at the
Wang Theater, the internationally beloved
Riverdance returns to Boston. Seen by
millions around the globe, Riverdance—
now in its 10th year—remains a spectacle of color and movement that will have
audience tapping their toes en masse.
Refer to listing, page 36.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
Tonight, at Morton’s Steakhouse, children’s literacy project
ReadBoston hosts a benefit unveiling Fenway Fiction: Short Stories
from the Red Sox Nation, a compilation of fiction works by novelists,
playwrights and ardent Sox fans. Refer to listing, page 34.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
Experience the passion and tragedy of
George Bizet’s operatic masterwork,
Carmen, at Cambridge’s American
Repertory Theater through September
25, produced in collaboration with the
Theatre de la Jeune Lune of Minnesota.
Refer to listing, page 35.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
If you want your guffaws preserved for
posterity, pay a visit to The Comedy
Studio in Cambridge tonight and tomorrow for a chance to become part of legendary Boston comedian DJ Hazard’s
show, which is being recording for an
upcoming comedy CD. Refer to listing,
page 28.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
All the way from South Africa comes choreographer Vincent Mantsoe, who performs a solo recital tonight and tomorrow
at Zero Arrow Theater in Cambridge.
Acclaimed worldwide for his work fusing
African and Asian dance forms together,
Mantsoe presents the Boston debut of his
works Motswa Hole and NDAA. Refer to
listing, page 29.
SEPTEMBER 5–18, 2005
___
9
around the hub KIDS CORNER
Horsing
Around
kids
calendar
CAVALIA
Suffolk Downs
Through September 18
W
hat do
cowboys and
acrobats
have in common? Generally not much, but now they’re sharing starring roles in Cavalia: A Magical Encounter Between
Horse and Man, the new show by the co-founders of
Quebec’s famed Cirque du Soleil. After more than a year
on the west coast, Cavalia gallops into Boston at Suffolk
Downs. Given Cirque’s reputation for spectacular reality-defying feats, Cavalia promises to evoke gasps and
provide thrills as it celebrates the strong physical and
emotional ties between animal and human. With mindboggling tricks featuring horses, artists, riders, acrobats,
aerialists and dancers, Cavalia is sure to make audiences cheer until they’re (ahem) hoarse. Refer to listing,
page 23. —Micheline Frias
VIVE LA
FRANCE
BABAR’S
WORLD TOUR
French Library and
Cultural Center
September 24 from 10
a.m.–12:30 p.m.
___
10
Babar must be one
tired elephant to be
launching a world
tour at his age.
Since his character debuted in 1931, he’s been the subject
of 33 children’s books, not to mention several TV shows.
And on September 24, the French Library and Cultural
Center is welcoming the famous pachyderm’s creator
Laurent de Brunhoff for a family-friendly event, including a
photo op with Babar’s “little” lady Celeste. There will also
be a special presentation, story time and the chance to
have your books signed by the author. And better yet, it’s
all free! Call 617-912-0400 for more information.
Travel the
September 17
Curious George’s Birthday at the
Boston Public Library
The mischievious monkey hosts a
birthday bash with a book sale,
signings and celebratory bananas.
Refer to listing, page 30.
September 18
Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk
Participants follow the storied
Boston Marathon course to raise
money to fight cancer in children.
Refer to listing, page 34.
September 25
Boston by Little Feet
Explore the Freedom Trail on this
tour designed for walkers ages
6–12. Refer to listing, page 56.
Ongoing
Slither Inn at the
Franklin Park Zoo
Check out the zoo’s newest
habitat for snakes of all sizes.
Refer to listing, page 58.
TO P L E F T PH OTO B Y
PA N O R A M A
seven seas.
No nautical
experience
required.
Multiple screenings daily
Bugs! at the Museum of Science
For kids who think bugs are cool,
especially at a distance, this 3-D
journey into their creepy crawly
world packs just enough punch.
Refer to listing, page 41.
FREDERIC CHEHU
AQUARIUM - Discover 18,000 aquatic animals representing 500 species.
WHALE WATCH -Glimpse the world’s largest mammals aboard our renowned vessel.
SIMONS IMAX® THEATRE -Unravel ocean mysteries in IMAX 3D on the region’slargest screen.
It’s all on Boston’s waterfront, just steps from Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market.
www.newenglandaquarium.org • Call 617-973-5200
IMAX is a registered trademark of IMAX Corporation.
PROUDLY SPONSORED BY
around the hub
ON EXHIBIT
by Scott Roberto
art
happenings
The Camera Eye
C
onservationist, teacher, piano player—
Museum of Fine Arts
Ansel Adams (1902–1984) was all of this
Through December 31
and more. He was best known, however, as
the creator of some of the most iconic, unforgettable photographs of the American West ever captured. This is made
abundantly clear at the comprehensive retrospective of
Adams’ career on display at the Museum of Fine Arts.
From his famous scenic shots, such as the one above, to
rare portraits and cityscapes, this display of nearly 200
photographs covers the depth and breadth of the work
that revolutionized a medium. Refer to listing, page 41.
ANSEL ADAMS
WORDS &
PICTURES
ART SPIEGELMAN
Peabody Essex Museum
September 20
___
12
Those who dismiss
comics as a
disposable art
form have probably
never read the
work of cartoonist
Art Spiegelman.
Winner of the
Pulitzer Prize in
1992 for his Holocaust chronicle Maus, the former New
Yorker staff member appears at the Peabody Essex
Museum in Salem as part of its month-long remembrance of the tragedy of 9/11. Spiegelman discusses his
latest graphic novel, In the Shadow of No Towers, which
recounts his thoughts and feelings as a witness and
survivor of that horrific day in Manhattan four years ago.
Refer to listing, page 43.
T O P L E F T:
PANORAMA
ABOVE LEFT IMAGE
September 17 & 18
South End Open Studios
Local artists in this hip neighborhood open their studios to the
public for this 19th annual event.
Refer to listing, page 33.
September 18
Harvard Museums Community Day
This 3rd annual event allows visitors into all six Harvard museums
for free, as well as offering special
tours and children’s programs.
Refer to listings, page 42.
September 20
TATS CRU at MIT
The pioneering, Bronx-based
grafitti artists give a free lecture
as part of the university’s
Abramowitz Artist-in-Residence
Program. Refer to listing, page 34.
September 23
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
A new exhibit, Variations on a
Theme by Sol Le Witt and Paula
Robison, opens. Refer to listing,
page 40.
September 24
Great Glass Pumpkin Patch
The MIT Glass Lab features more
than 1,000 hand-blown glass
pumpkins (pictured above) for
sale. Refer to listing, page 34.
A N S E L A D A M S , M O O N R I S E , H E R N A N D E Z , N E W M E X I C O , 1941;
© A RT S P I E G E L M A N , C O U RT E S Y O F T H E P E A B O D Y E S S E X M U S E U M
around the hub
DINING
by Christine Celli
high fives
YOU SAY TOMATO
For some, the essence of summer
is a supple, juicy tomato. Enjoy an
end-of-summer fling for your taste
buds at these local restaurants.
Clams for a Cause
ith oyster season already in full swing, we
OYSTER SHUCKING
EVENING FOR MDA
hardly need another excuse to eat the sucMcCormick & Schmick’s culent bivalves. But local oysters are so good this
Seafood Restaurant
Faneuil Hall Marketplace time of year, and it’s for charity, so secure a free
September 27 at 6 p.m. seat at McCormick & Schmick’s Oyster Shuck-off
and watch as shells fly. Staffers from the seafood
hotspot as well as Durgin-Park, Kingfish Hall and The Salty Dog
crack them open by the dozen for the title of “Best Schucker,”
while a raffle and auction is held to raise money for the Muscular
Dystrophy Association. The public can even test their skills in
the Harpoon Beer shucking contest. Just a tip: drinking the beer
will only slow you down. For reservations, call 617-720-5230.
W
SPICE IT UP
SPICE OF THE MONTH
CLUB: FENUGREEK
Tamarind Bay, 75 Winthrop St.,
Cambridge, 617-491-4552
September 12 from 5–7 p.m.
___
14
One of the best things about
Indian cuisine is how it utilizes
a wide variety of savory seasonings that reach far beyond
the realm of salt and pepper.
Tamarind Bay, a recent addition to the Indian dining scene
that’s garnered much approval from foodies and critics alike,
is inviting diners to get up-close and personal with the flavors
that make the cuisine so delightful through its Spice of the
Month club dinners. On September 12, fenugreek seed
acts as the central ingredient for a four-course dinner that
includes a discussion with executive chef Wali Ahmad. The
meal costs $25 per person and diners take home a spice
sampler and recipes. For reservations, call 617-491-4552.
PANORAMA
1. VIA MATTA, 79 Park Plaza,
617-422-0008. Local tomatoes
cooked with garlic and basil, then
mixed with dried bread, make the
pappa al pomodoro soup a
delightful tomato-y creation.
2. TEATRO, 177 Tremont St., 617778-6841. Enjoy the sophisticated
simplicity of an heirloom caprese
salad with fresh mozzarella, basil,
aged balsamic vinaigrette and sea salt,
available only during tomato season.
3. BAMBARA, 25 Edwin H. Land
Blvd., Cambridge, 617-868-4444.
The golden tomato gazpacho lets
spicy rock shrimp ceviche mingle
with opal basil and is a cool refreshing dish for a warm summer evening.
4. EXCELSIOR, 272 Boylston St.,
617-426-7878. Wood-roasted heirloom tomatoes with garlic, thyme,
olive oil and grilled zucchini, then
rolled in ricotta cheese, fresh basil
and parmesan, make zucchini and
ricotta lasagna something special.
5. SPIRE, 90 Tremont St., 617772-0202. The heirloom tomato
tasting lets tomato lovers nibble a
tomato, basil and chevre salad, sip
tomato consomme and munch on a
tomato club sandwich.
—Katrina Scanlan
around the hub
NIGHTLIFE
by Josh B. Wardrop
Instant
Night Out
He’s Still Standing
P
residents come and go, political dictatorships rise and fall, and Sir Elton
John releases new music…it’s the
inevitability of time itself. Forty years into his musical
career, everybody’s favorite Rocket Man is touring in support of his latest effort, 2004’s Peachtree Road. While
Elton hasn’t produced a “Your Song” recently, his creativity and showmanship remain second to none when he
steps onstage. Come for “Levon” and “Crocodile Rock,” but
stay for a chance to marvel at one of the last true rock
immortals. Refer to listings, page 32.
ELTON JOHN
TD Banknorth Garden
September 16 & 17
PARTY
ANIMALS
A WILD AFFAIR
CENTENNIAL
CELEBRATION
Stone Zoo
September 24
___
16
Ever wonder how
the animals in the
zoo relax when the
zoo gates close?
Get a private
glimpse of the animals’ downtime during A Wild Affair, a special centennial benefit celebration for the Stone Zoo in nearby Stoneham. Your $35 entrance fee entitles you to food
tastings from local restaurants, a chance to bid in the silent
auction, and a nighttime tour of the Stone Zoo—including
animal encounters with certain cool critters who’ll be brought
out to meet their guests! Refer to listing, page 59.
PA N O R A M A
Boston
might be a
ways from
Mexico,
but that doesn’t mean you can’t
have a great night out in Beantown
with some south-of-the-border flair.
1. Take the MBTA Red Line to
Davis Square in Somerville, and
start your evening off with delectable Mexican fare at Picante
Mexican Grill (217 Elm St., 617628-6394). Picante serves Mexican
favorites, but with twists—like
portabello mushroom enchiladas,
zucchini quesadillas and lower fat,
oil and salt content in all dishes.
2. Next, head to the nearby
Somerville Theatre (55 Davis
Square, 617-625-5700) for a
concert by Mexican-American
vocalist Lila Downs (pictured
above) at 8 p.m. Downs is known
for combining traditional Mexican
folk music with elements of AfroCuban funk, blues and jazz.
3. Finally, end the evening at the
authentic hidden gem Tu Y Yo
(858 Broadway, 617-623-5411),
to indulge in a refreshing glass or
two of their special sangria, or
treat yourself to their decadent
family recipe flan—caramel
custard enhanced with tasty
cinnamon cream.
DAVIS SQUARE
Somerville
September 24
From historic New England
to a breathtaking world
of art and culture
experience
Peabody Essex Museum
Journey through New England’s grand and storied
past at the stunning Peabody Essex Museum in Salem,
Massachusetts. Explore the region’s legendary
connections to the art and culture of Asia, Oceania,
Africa, India, and more.
Make a day of it. Experience PEM’s unrivaled collections,
special exhibitions, interactive idea center for families,
the award-winning Museum Shop and Garden
Restaurant, plus the world-famous Yin Yu Tang, a
200-year-old Chinese merchant’s home brought here
from China.* All in the historic, uniquely captivating
seaport city of Salem.
For information, call 866-745-1876
or visit pem.org
Open daily 10 am–5 pm
East India Square | Salem, Massachusetts 01970 USA
* Timed tickets are required for the Chinese house. Advance reservations advised. Call TicketWeb at 866-468-7619 or go online to www.ticketweb.com.
around the hub
STYLE
by Marketa Hulpachova
Discount
Denim
Living the Good Life
M
ost of us never viewed the stick
figures we drew on our desks in
LIFE IS GOOD
283 Newbury St.
grade school as marketable, but Bert and
617-262-5068
John Jacobs, founders of Life is Good, have
made a whole career out of them. Characterized by
colorful, all-natural materials and a versatile stick
figure logo named Jake, this casual clothing company
has recently unveiled its first Boston store. A new line
of t-shirts, pajamas, sweats, and loungewear to curl up
in, just in time for fall? Life is good, indeed.
GIRLS JUST WANNA HAVE FUN
LADIES NIGHT
Jorge Hernandez
Cultural Center
September 22
___
18
Conformity can be
comfortable, but
sometimes a girl
needs to spice things
up a bit. To that end,
we suggest Ladies Night, a party combining art, fashion,
entertainment and, of course, shopping. Held September 22
at 7 p.m. at the Jorge Hernandez Cultural Center (85 W.
Newton St., 617-927-0061), the 18+ event features over 30
vendors selling everything from handmade jewelry to
homemade chocolate. Add in a cash bar, a fashion show
and a sensual performance by Through the Keyhole
Burlesque, and you’ve got a fun event for women of all
ages. And singletons rejoice—event coordinator Honah Lee
Milne says “A good number of men usually show up to
check out the intelligent and creative women [who attend].”
Visit www.thehonahlee.com for more info.
there’s always.
THE BASEMENT.
In anticipation of back-to-school
season, retailers have more than
doubled their jean supply, creating a
glut of denim at not-to-be-missed
prices. Take advantage of the markdowns at these local hot spots.
Filene’s Basement has an incredible
selection of women’s & men’s
fashions from world-renowned
European & American
designers, at 30%-60% off
department store prices
...everyday.
1. ANTHROPOLOGIE, 799 Boylston
St., 617-262-0545. The discount
rack at this Back Bay entity offers up
to 40% off select knits such as Joes,
Red Engine, Salt and Louie.
2. BLOOMINGDALE’S, 55
Boylston St., Chestnut Hill, 617965-1550. Bloomie’s is giving the
world yet another reason to get up
early on Saturday. September 17 is
Jean Day—all full-priced jeans are
20% off when you buy two pairs.
3. JASMINE SOLA, 344 Newbury
St., 617-867-4636; other locations.
This boutique has heaps of designer
duds like Miss Sixty, Juicy Couture
and Frankie B. (pictured above) for
half price.
4. NEIMAN MARCUS, 5 Copley
Pl., 617-536-3660. Cropped,
stretch, straight-leg, boot-cut—
this ubiquitous department store
abounds with discounted jeans, like
James Cured by Seun, now 50% off.
5. URBAN OUTFITTERS, 11 JFK
St., Cambridge, 617-864-0070;
other locations. Urban compliments
its eclectic garments with jean
brands like Lux and BDG, both
marked down by 20%.
TO P L E F T A N D R I G H T PH OTO S B Y
PA N O R A M A
Browse the boutiques,
explore the department stores,
then have lunch and relax,
because you know…
M A R K E TA H U L PA C H O VA ;
B O T T O M L E F T P H O T O C O U RT E S Y O F T H E H O N A H L E E . C O M
exclusive designer fashions
...at surprisingly low prices
BOSTON
NEW YORK
CHICAGO
ATLANTA
WASHINGTON, DC
@
Boston 375
As Boston celebrates its big
375th anniversary, Panorama
looks at seven big and small
ways the city has changed
by Josh B. Wardrop
1
NIGHT AND DAY: The
Custom House, Boston’s first
skyscraper, stands in sharp
contrast to the John Hancock
Tower, the city’s—and New
England’s—tallest skyscraper.
I’LL SEE YOUR CUSTOM HOUSE,
AND RAISE YOU A JOHN HANCOCK
When the 30-story tower of the Boston Custom House was built in 1915,
giving the city its first skyscraper, Bostonians would have scoffed at the prospect of
anything taller. And for almost 50 years, they’d be right. Then the 750-foot high
Prudential Tower came on the scene in 1964 and took over the top spot on the Boston
skyline. Today, though, they’re both trumped by the I.M. Pei-designed John
Hancock Tower, built in 1976, which stands 62 stories high. Sure, at 788
measly feet tall it’s only 71st in the world, but here in Boston, it’s #1.
2
WOMEN NO LONGER “LOCKED” OUT OF
LEGENDARY RESTAURANT
___
20
It’s served up gourmet cuisine and favored New England fare
to Boston bluebloods and foreign dignitaries for 130 years, but
there was at least one dining demographic all but ignored by
Boston’s ritzy Locke-Ober restaurant until 1971—
women. As recently as 35 years ago, the downstairs dining area
at Locke-Ober was off-limits to the fairer sex.
Today, Locke-Ober’s come a long way, baby. Not only are women welcome to break
sweetbreads with their male counterparts, but they’ve got one of their own calling
the shots at the venerable eatery. Legendary chef, culinary innovator and restauranteur Lydia Shire (Biba, Excelsior) became co-owner of Locke-Ober in 2001, and today
she determines what gets served in a dining room where, decades ago, she would not
have been allowed to set foot.
PANORAMA
3
That reputation leads
Bostonians to bring friends and
relatives from far and wide to
soak in the experience. Victoria
Raineri, 27, plans to eventually
take her friend Jessica
Manhood, 26, recently transplanted from Wisconsin, to
Game On, but said, “I wanted
her [to come here] first. If you
want to see the Sox scene, you
want to come to the Cask.”
Even a visitor from “enemy”
territory—Paul LeGoss from
A WHOLE NEW
BALLGAME
Last year something nearly
unthinkable happened: after an epic 86year drought, the Boston Red Sox
won the World Series. As life-changing as
that was for Sox fans, most would argue the
best part was that the Olde Towne Team
staged the greatest comeback in baseball history
PLAY BALL: Fans stream
against the hated New York
down Brookline Street on their
Yankees along the way. It
way to a game (top); Sox and
Yanks fans peacefully co-exist
was the beginning of a shift
outside Gate E (above inset);
in what was considered the
fans lounge at the new Game On
traditional balance of
(top right) and the old-school
Cask ’n’ Flagon (bottom right).
power, making for perhaps
the biggest change that’s
happened to Boston in 375 years. (Well, right
after the American Revolution, the rise of
modern industry and all that jazz, anyway.)
With Red Sox tickets now harder to come
by than ever, many visitors to Boston find
themselves looking for alternative venues to
check out the vaunted Sox-Yankees rivalry.
And just outside Fenway Park, a pair of
prime options present themselves: the
brand-new Game On and, across the
street, the venerable old Cask ‘n’
___
22
Flagon, a favorite of the Fenway Faithful
for more than three decades.
The upscale Game On is really two separate entities in one. The upstairs primarily
functions as a restaurant, serving a menu of
brick oven pizzas, grilled entrees, appetizers
and sandwiches. Downstairs, the space more
closely resembles a nightclub—dark and sleek,
lit by generous amounts of neon. However, the
plethora of TVs—big and small screens, highdefinition, on the wall, and all around the bar—
ensure you won’t miss a moment of the game.
The Cask ’n’ Flagon, in contrast, is a
wood-paneled, traditional sports bar that
one would imagine looks much the same as
it did when it opened in 1969, as Oliver’s.
The walls, adorned with photos of Hub hardball heroes like Carl Yastrzemski, Ted
Williams and Carlton Fisk, give the Cask a
sense of history amidst the still somewhat
incredulous joy of Sox fans following that
long-awaited World Series win.
For longtime fans, the Cask’s history as a
Sox hotspot has made it a local landmark
and a rite of passage of sorts. James White,
21, of Randolph, said that “I would walk by
when I was a kid going to a game and
always wanted to go in.”
PH OTO S B Y
PANORAMA
A Red Sox World Series victory and a recordsetting comeback against the Yankees
changed one Fenway rivalry forever. Will the
arrival of new club Game On spark another?
Brooklyn, N.Y.—seemed comfortable at the Cask during a July
Yankees-Red Sox game. While
hardcore Sox fans are known to
be extremely vocal, LeGoss
noted that “Everyone’s been chill
so far.” Still, LeGoss couldn’t
help but comment, “They really
do take the game too seriously.”
Game On has the edge as far
as peeping the celebrities that
flood the ballpark when the
Yankees come to town. One
night during that same July
series, famous faces enjoying a
pre-ballgame nosh included exSox slugger Sam Horn, PBS cooking show
star Ming Tsai and Fever Pitch and
Kingpin filmmaking siblings Bobby and
Peter Farrelly.
It remains to be seen, however, if
hardcore Sox fans will embrace Game On
the way generations have the Cask ’n’
Flagon. Andrew Lalime, 33, of Watertown
seemed let down by the newer bar’s lack of
a strong Red Sox identity. “It seems sort of
like an ESPNZone,” he said, referencing the
chain of non-partisan sports-themed restaurants which the cable network operates in
cities throughout the country.
Another patron was more blunt. “I really
wouldn’t consider it a sports bar,” said Peter
Reuell, 30, of Newton, comparing the atmosphere at Game On to more of a “meat market,” before adding, “It needs to be a little
grittier. When I go to a sports bar, I expect
sawdust on the floor and a bartender with
one eye.”
JOEL MEDINA
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
___
23
4
Blame it on our English ancestors—for centuries, Boston
cuisine operated under the motto the blander, the better,
with nothing on local menus but codfish, brown bread
and baked beans…eventually a city reaches its breaking
point. Today, Boston is known for a vibrant and diverse dining scene, and for having turned out some of the nation’s most
recognizable celebrity chefs. It started in the 1960s with our
adopted doyenne of the delectable, Julia Child, and nowadays,
internationally known chefs such as Todd English, Ming Tsai, Jackie Robert,
Gordon Hamersley, Jasper White and others still call Boston their home base.
5
BEN FRANKLIN,
MEET BEN AFFLECK
D EREK KOUYOUMJIAN
PHOTO BY
F R E E D O M T R A I L F O U N D AT I O N
PHOTO BY
THE
24
PANORAMA
The concept of “Banned in Boston” really began with
the first Bostonians, the Puritans, who—in addition to
cracking down on all the usual vices—actually made
celebrating Christmas illegal from 1659–1681, because
it reminded them of the hated Church of England.
The “Banned in Boston” movement picked up
steam in the late 19th and early 20th century when
the Watch and Ward Society and social reformer
Anthony Comstock found Bostonians unusually
receptive to their mission of stamping out “smutty”
books, films and plays—shutting down and running
out of town many a stage performer and theater
owner in the process.
Today, though, Boston's finally achieved moderation in its quest for morality, and we're thought of as
a socially progressive city yet again. Getting a tattoo, for example, was taboo from
1962 until 2000, when Massachusetts finally repealed the ordinance against inking, granting
Fat Ram’s Pumpkin Tattoo in Jamaica Plain the first of many tattooing
licenses. In 2003, liquor stores that were once only allowed to be open on Sundays around holidays were permitted Sunday operation year-round. And one can only imagine what members
of the Watch and Ward Society would have had to say about last year’s historic legalization of
same-sex marriage. Luckily for those who enjoy freedom of choice, precious little is “Banned in
Boston” anymore.
D EREK KOUYOUMJIAN
Boston’s proud of its
prominent place in our
nation’s history, and for close
to 50 years visitors have had
the opportunity to walk a red
painted line and educate
themselves by visiting some
of our most important historic sites on The
Freedom Trail.
However, in this day and age,
the thirst for knowledge extends to subjects that move beyond the Revolutionary War and the
Bill of Rights. These days, people also want to know where “Ally McBeal” and Good Will
Hunting were filmed. Enter the Boston Movie Tour, established earlier this year,
which takes participants on a tour of movie and TV locations within the city of Boston.
History or Hollywood, past or future, Boston has inquiring minds covered.
©
___
6
THE “BANNED” PLAYED ON
COD FORBID: BOSTON’S
FOOD SCENE GROWS UP
7
THERE GOES THE
NEIGHBORHOOD
No, we don’t consider it big news that the
neighborhoods in Boston look different than
they did 375 years ago. However, some of
Boston’s boroughs have undergone significant
changes from even a couple decades ago. In
Kenmore Square in the 1970s and
1980s, a big night out meant ducking into
Cornwall’s for a brew, then pogoing next door
to “The Rat” for some quality punk rock. Now,
the Kenmore area is in the midst of a renovation focused around the new Hotel Commonwealth, its cute boutique shops, and trendy, upscale
restaurants like Great Bay and Eastern Standard. Meanwhile, most locals over the age of 30 can
remember coming to Downtown Crossing with their mom to visit Jordan Marsh and Filene’s.
Today, both Jordan Marsh and Filene’s have been swallowed by Macy’s, perhaps paving the way
for a modern chain (Target? Wal-Mart?) to take up residence in the spot where many a first doll,
interview suit or prom dress was purchased.
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
25
thehubdirectory
OUR GUIDE TO WHAT
TO DO, SEE, BUY AND
EAT IN BOSTON
index
CURRENT EVENTS
28
CLUBS & BARS
37
MUSEUMS & GALLERIES
40
MAPS
46
SIGHTSEEING
52
FREEDOM TRAIL
60
SHOPPING
62
RESTAURANTS
68
NEIGHBORHOODS
81
TOWERING ABOVE:
At 62 stories, the heralded,
I.M. Pei-designed John Hancock
Tower dominates its Copley
Square locale, not to mention
Boston’s skyline. Refer to
listing, page 55.
MEDIA SPONSOR
___
© Estate of Jacques Lowe-Woodfin Camp
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
27
CURRENT EVENTS
THE COMEDY CONNECTION, Quincy Market, Faneuil Hall
Marketplace, 617-248-9700. Cover and times may vary.
Call for full schedule. Named “The Best Comedy Club in
the Country” (USA Today), this venue has featured national
and local stand-up acts such as Wendy Liebman, Chris
Rock, Rosie O’Donnell and Dave Chappelle. Tickets:
$12–40. Sep 12 & 19 at 8 p.m.—Amateur Showcase
hosted by Kevin Knox; Sep 13 & 20 at 8 p.m.—Paul
Nardizzi; Sep 14 at 8 p.m.—Mike McDonald; Sep 15 &
22 at 8:30 p.m.—Frank Santos “The R-Rated Hypnotist”;
Sep 16 & 17 at 8 and 10:15 p.m.—3 Blonde Moms, featuring MaryEllen Hooper, Helen Keaney and Joanie Fagan;
Sep 18—Tony V. and E.J. Murphy; Sep 21—Jim Lauletta
and Harrison Stebbins; Sep 23 at 8 and 10:15 p.m., Sep
24 at 10:30 p.m.—Greg Proops; Sep 24 at 8 p.m.—Paul
Keenan and Dave Rattigan; Sep 25—Rich Ceisler and
Greg Howell.
PH OTO B Y
C AT H A R I N E M C D E R M O T T-T I N G L E
JIMMY TINGLE: The former “60 Minutes II” commentator takes the stage at his Somerville theater,
Jimmy Tingle’s Off-Broadway in Davis Square, with
his new one-man show, Jimmy Tingle’s American
Dream, Thursdays through Sundays, and as part of
the Comedy for Cambridge Forum on September 19.
Refer to listing, page 29.
CLASSICAL
BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS, Tsai
Performing Arts Center, 655 Commonwealth Ave., 617-3538724. All events are free and open to the public. Sep 21 at 8
p.m.—Piano recital by faculty member Maria Clodes, performing works by Bach, Villa-Lobos and Schumann; Sep 22 at
8 p.m.—Piano recital by Richmond Competition winner SoYoun Kim, performing works by Bach, Haydn and
Rachmaninov.
EMMANUEL MUSIC, Emmanuel Church, 15 Newbury St.,
617-536-3356. Admission: free will offering. Sep 18 at 10
a.m.—Conductor Craig Smith leads the Orchestra and Chorus
of Emmanuel Music in the Weekly Bach Cantata, BWV 69a;
Sep 25 at 10 a.m.—BWV 19.
YO-YO MA, Bank of America Celebrity Series, Symphony Hall,
301 Massachusetts Ave., 617-598-3220. Sep 25 at 5 p.m.
Tickets: $33–78. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma performs an all-Bach program, followed by the Celebrity Series Opening Night Gala,
featuring a cocktail reception, dinner and a live auction.
COMEDY
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28
BOSTON INTERNATIONAL FILM AND COMEDY FESTIVAL,
Various locations, 800-233-3123. Through Sep 17. Some of
the top comedians from the Boston area and beyond will
gather in the Hub at The Comedy Connection, Dick Doherty’s
Comedy Vault, ImprovAsylum, Nick’s Comedy Stop and other
venues for a week of workshops, stand-up performances,
theme shows and head-to-head competition as part of
PANORAMA
THE COMEDY STUDIO AT THE HONG KONG, 1236 Mass.
Ave., Harvard Square, Cambridge, 617-661-6507. Doors
open at 7:30 p.m.; nightly shows begin at 8 p.m. Call for
complete schedule. Cover: $3–7. A place where fresh talent is discovered and headliners experiment. Sep 13 &
20—Magic Lounge; Sep 14—Jeff Rosenspan, Evan
Monsky, Kevin Neales and others; Sep 15 & 22—Dan
Sally Show with guest comedians; Sep 16—The Walsh
Brothers, Tony Pike, Peter Bowers and others; Sep 17—
Jim Flaherty, E.J. Murphy, Janet Cormier and others; Sep
18 & 25—Erin Judge Presents: Tom E. Morello, Mandy
Donovan, Amy Tee, Ken Reid and others; Sep 21—Tony V
with Daniella Capolin, Marc Basch, Dan Hirsh and others;
Sep 23 & 24—D.J. Hazard CD recording with The Walsh
Brothers and others; Sep 10—Peter Dutton, Ken Reid,
Rebecca Anderson and guests.
JIMMY TINGLE’S OFF BROADWAY, 255 Elm St., Davis
Square, Somerville, 617-591-1616. Call for reservations and
complete schedule. Founded by comic, actor and writer
Jimmy Tingle, this multi-use venue features both established
and aspiring performers. Thu–Sat at 7:30 p.m.—Jimmy
Tingle’s American Dream, tickets: $15–25; seniors
$13.50–22.50; students $7.50–12.50; Sep 17 at 3 p.m.—
Cleavage, tickets: $15; seniors $13.50; students $7.50; Sep
19 at 7:30 p.m.—Comedy for Cambridge Forum: My Jimmy
Senses are Tingling, a benefit show, tickets: $25 & 50.
NICK’S COMEDY STOP, 100 Warrenton St., 617-423-2900. Fri
& Sat at 8:45 p.m. Cover: $15. Nick’s is the city’s longest-running comedy club. Sep 15—Kevin Knox; Sep 16 & 17—Paul
Gilligan;Sep 22—Mark Riley; Sep 23 & 24—Bob Seibel.
CONVENTIONS & EXPOS
SNAPPY SOUTH(END) MOVE, Snappy Dance Theater,
Wimberly Theatre, Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center
for the Arts, 527 Tremont St., 617-933-8600. Performances
Sep 14–18: Wed & Thu at 7 p.m., Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at 3 and
8 p.m., Sun at 3 p.m. Tickets: $25–40. Just back from a performance in St. Petersburg, Russia, Snappy Dance presents
the world premiere of its latest work and classic pieces
including Glory Hole, inspired by the art of glass blowing.
ZERO ARROW THEATRE, Arrow Street and Massachusetts
Avenue, 617-876-4275. Performances Sep 23–25: Fri at 7:30
p.m., Sat at 8 p.m., Sun at 3 p.m. Tickets: $30. South African
choreographer and dancer Vincent Mantsoe presents the
Boston debut of NDAA and Motswa Hole.
FILM
DANCE
BOSTON FILM FESTIVAL, Loews Copley Place and Loews
Boston Common, 617-266-2533. Through Sep 15. Call for
full schedule and festival pass prices, or visit www.bostonfilm
festival.org. Single tickets: $10. Now in its 21st year, the BFF
has become the highlight of the fall film season. This year’s
festival showcases feature films and shorts selected from
over 15 countries.
PUTTIN ON THE RITZ ON THE ROOF, Ritz-Carlton Hotel, 15
Arlington St., 617-536-5700. Sep 23 at 7 p.m. Tickets: $35. Dance
to the classics of big band and swing from the 1940s, performed
by the Ritz-Carlton Orchestra, in one of Boston’s best settings for a
night of music—the 17th-floor rooftop of the Back Bay Ritz-Carlton.
THE BRATTLE THEATRE, 40 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617-8766837. Call for showtimes and complete schedule. Tickets: $9;
students & matinees $7.50; seniors & children $6. Classic,
cutting-edge and world cinema with a different double feature
almost every day. Special event: The Complete Kubrick, a
HYNES CONVENTION CENTER, 900 Boylston St., 617-9542000. Sep 17 & 18 at noon—CollegeFest 2005; Sep 19 —
Rental Housing Conference and Expo Event.
current events
current events
Boston’s annual comedy showcase. Visit www.bostoncomedyfestival.com for a complete schedule of events.
DICK DOHERTY’S COMEDY VAULT, Remington’s Restaurant,
124 Boylston St., 617-482-0110. Call for reservations and
complete schedule. Showtimes: Thu–Sat at 9 p.m.; open mic
Sun at 9 p.m. Cover: $10–15. Located in an actual bank
vault downstairs in Remington’s Eating and Drinking
Exchange, this club features top area comics. Sep 15 &
22—Greg Howell and friends; Sep 16 & 17—TBA; Sep 18 &
25—Jim Lauletta hosts open mike night; Sep 23 & 24—
Steve Sweeney.
IMPROV ASYLUM, 216 Hanover St., 617-263-6887.
Showtimes: Wed & Thu at 8 p.m.; Fri & Sat at 8 and 10 p.m.
Tickets: $15–20, dinner packages available. Wed & Thu—
Summer in New England, featuring satirical audience-inspired
improv and sketch comedy. Every Thursday at 9:45 p.m.—
NXT Talent showcase: Sep 23—The Night Shift, with Micah
Sherman and friends; Every Sat at midnight —The Midnight
Show promises quick wit, controversy and hilarity.
IMPROVBOSTON, Back Alley Theater, 1253 Cambridge St.,
Cambridge, 617-576-1253. Showtimes: Wed at 8 p.m.; Thu
& Fri at 8 and 10 p.m.; Sat at 6, 8 and 10 p.m.; Sun at 7
p.m. Cover: $5–12. This comedy troupe features sketch
comedy, games, original music and audience participation.
Wed—The Hump; Thu—UnNatural Selection and The Great
& Secret Comedy Show; Fri— Girls’ Night Out and
TheatreSports; Sat—ImprovBoston Family Show and
ImprovBoston Mainstage; Sun—Sgt. Culpepper’s
Improvisational Jamboree.
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
29
ents the magical world of puppet theater to a broad community, enlightening audiences of all ages. Tickets: $8.50. Sep 17
& 18 at 1 and 3 p.m.—Cinderella, A Woodland Fairy Princess;
Sep 24 & 25 at 1 and 3 p.m.—Jack and the Beanstalk.
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE, 290 Harvard Ave., Brookline,
617-734-2500. Call for showtimes and complete schedule.
Tickets: $8.50; members $5.50; seniors & children $5.50.
This independent movie house screens recent indie films, as
well as the classics. Now showing: A State of Mind, The
Constant Gardener. Special events: Celebrating the ’70s Film
Series: Sep 12 at 7:30 p.m.—Deliverance; Sep 16–22—The
Manhattan Short Film Festival allows moviegoers to vote for
their favorite short film; Sep 22—The Muddy River
Environmental Film Festival.
LIVE MUSIC
AARDVARK JAZZ ORCHESTRA, Emmanuel Church, 15
Newbury St., 617-776-8778. This local jazz collaborative offers
its 33rd season of concerts, with proceeds for the shows benefiting the American friends Service Committee. Sep 18 at
7:30 p.m.—Jazz as Celebration and Challenge, featuring
works by Duke Ellington and Mark Harvey, tickets: $15.
AVALON, 15 Lansdowne St., 617-262-2424. This popular
nightclub hosts rock and pop music acts prior to evening
dance nights with DJs. Sep 25 at 7 p.m.—Paul Weller with
Ian Moore, tickets: $26.
HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE, Carpenter Center for the Visual
Arts, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge 617-495-4700. Call for showtimes, complete schedule and ticket prices. With over 300
films shown per year, HFA is one of the most active art cinemas in New England. Special event: The Films of Louis Malle,
featuring screenings of: Sep 14 at 7 p.m. and Sep 15 at 9
p.m.—Calcutta; Sep 16 at 7 p.m. and Sep 18 at 9 p.m.—A
Very Private Affair; Sep 20 at 7 p.m.—Crackers; Sep 23 at 7
p.m. and Sep 25 at 9 p.m.—Vanya on 42nd Street.
LOEWS BOSTON COMMON, corner of Tremont and Avery
streets, 617-423-3499 or 617-333-FILM. Call for showtimes,
complete schedule and ticket prices. This state-of-the-art
cineplex is the largest downtown movie theater in New
England, featuring 4,500 stadium seats and 19 oversized
screens spanning 100,000 square feet. Special event: Fan
Favorite Thursdays, free showings of favorite films.
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, 465 Huntington Ave., 617-267-9300.
Screenings Thu–Sun, call for showtimes and complete schedule. Tickets: $9; students & seniors $8. The Museum of Fine
Arts’ Film Program has grown to become one of the nation’s
finest exhibitors of contemporary international cinema, restored
classics and premieres of American independent films. Sep 15
at 6 p.m.—Au Revoir Les Enfants. Special event: The Films of
Daniel Bruhle, featuring screenings of: Sep 15 at 8 p.m., Sep
22 at 3 p.m.—No More School; Sep 16 at 8 p.m.—The White
Sound; Sep 21 at 6 p.m., Sep 24 at 10:30 a.m.—Honolulu.
MUGAR OMNI THEATER, Museum of Science, 617-723-2500
or 617-333-FILM. Call for showtimes and complete schedule.
Tickets: $7.50; seniors $5.50; children (3–11) $6.50.
Discounted admission for showtimes after 6 p.m. This
IMAX theater presents larger-than-life images on a fivestory high, domed screen. Now showing: Antarctica; Fighter
Pilot; Yellowstone.
SIMONS IMAX THEATER, New England Aquarium, Central
Wharf, 1-866-815-4629. Sun–Wed 9:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m.;
Thu–Sat: 10 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Call for showtimes and complete
schedule. Tickets: $8.95; seniors & children (3–11) $6.95. This
recent addition to the New England Aquarium is the first largeformat theater in Boston to have 3D viewing capability. Now
showing: Wild Safari; Sharks 3D; Aliens of the Deep; through
Sep 16—Batman Begins, The IMAX Experience.
AXIS, 13 Landsdowne St., 617-262-2437. Call for full schedule. This popular nightclub hosts rock, punk and alternative
music acts prior to evening dance nights with DJs. Sep 23 at
7 p.m.—Helmet, tickets: $15.
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE: The beloved
art house theater in Brookline is currently showcasing the Celebrating the ’70s Film Series, with
a screening of John Boorman’s Deliverance on
September 12. Refer to listing, left.
closed Sep 12. Daily organized activities in the Art Studio, Play
Space and KidStage, such as music and movement, finger
puppet making and kitchen science. Special events: Sep 14 &
21 from 1:30–2:30 p.m.—Pint-Sized Science; Sep 17 from
noon–2 p.m.—Critter Day, featuring a program by R.E.A.D.,
which utilizes dogs to assist children with reading difficulties.
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, 700 Boylston St., Copley Square,
617-536-5400. Refer to listing in Sightseeing section. The
first publicly supported municipal library in the world hosts
many activities and special programs for children, including
live performances, storytelling, interactive computer activities
and films. Special event: Sep 17 from 1–4 p.m.—Celebrate
Curious George’s birthday with a book sale and signing, arts
and crafts for children, as well as birthday bananas.
HARVARD COOP, Harvard Square, Cambridge, 617-499-2000.
Popular Harvard University book and gift store hosts events
for children each month. Sep 17 at 11 a.m.—Reading of If
You Give a Pig a Party, followed by a pig party; Sep 24 at 11
a.m.—Fall stories and craft activity.
KIDS CORNER
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, 465 Huntington Ave., 617-267-9300.
Refer to listing in Museums. The fine arts are not just for adults.
Special activities: Mon–Fri at 3:30 p.m.—Children’s Room, free
gallery and workshop program for children ages 6–12, offering
active exploration of the MFA’s collection through art projects,
drama, poetry and music; Tue & Wed at 3:30 p.m.—Books
Bring Art Alive explores the MFA collections using picture
books, gallery activities and adult/child art projects.
BOSTON CHILDREN’S MUSEUM, Museum Wharf, 300 Congress
St., 617-426-8855. Refer to listing in Museums. Museum
PUPPET SHOWPLACE THEATRE, 32 Station St., Brookline,
617-731-6400. The first puppetry center in New England pres-
BANK OF AMERICA PAVILION, 290 Northern Ave., 617-9312000. This open-air waterfront venue features world-class
rock, pop, blues and country performers set against the backdrop of the Boston skyline. Sep 24 at 7 p.m.—MixFest 2005,
featuring Sheryl Crow, Cyndi Lauper, Gavin DeGraw and
Howie Day, tickets: $47.50 & 67.50.
BEANTOWN JAZZ FESTIVAL, Columbus Avenue between Mass.
Ave. and Burke St., 866-442-7995. Sep 24 from noon–7 p.m.
Free and open to the public. Boston’s South End comes to life at
the 5th annual Beantown Jazz Festival, featuring performances
by some of the city’s most prominent jazz artists, as well as delicious food from area restaurants and arts and crafts activities.
BOSTON BLUES FESTIVAL, DCR Hatch Shell, Charles River
Esplanade. Sep 24 & 25 from 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Free and open
to the public. Boston’s only free two-day blues festival brings
together nationally-known blues legends. This year’s lineup
includes Louisiana Red, Sweet Willie D, Duke Robillard, Sugar
Ray Norcia, David Honeyboy Edwards and many more.
BOSTON FOLK FESTIVAL, UMass-Boston campus, 100
Morrissey Boulevard, 617-287-6911. Sep 24 & 25 from 11
a.m.–7 p.m. Tickets: two-day pass $60; Sat or Sun $35; children 6–14 for unlimited days $10, children under 6 free. Call
for tickets and full schedule. The festival brings together some
of the premier folk artists from across the country, including
Patty Griffin, Suzanne Vega, Janis Ian, Lori McKenna, Chris
Smither, Ollabelle and many more.
BOSTON OPERA HOUSE, 539 Washington St., 617-259-3400.
This recently refurbished magnificent venue for opera and
musical theater also hosts pop and rock concerts. Sep 15 at
7:30 p.m.—Sigur Ros, tickets: $27 & 32.50; Sep 20–22 at
7:30 p.m.—The White Stripes, tickets: $40 & 45.
current events
current events
Stanley Kubrick retrospective, including: Sep 12—Full Metal
Jacket; Sep 14—A Clockwork Orange; Sep 15—Eyes Wide
Shut; Sep 16–18—Cambridge Queer Film Festival, celebrating gay, bisexual, lesbian and transgender cinema.
CLUB PASSIM, 47 Palmer St., Cambridge, 617-492-7679. Call for
full schedule. This intimate coffeehouse in Harvard Square was a
North Shore Music Theatre
is coming to Boston.
New England’s most popular musical theater.
September 20 –
October 9
The Shubert Theatre
2 6 5 T R E M O N T S T R E E T, B O S T O N
Tickets on sale now Ticket prices: $32 – $65*
Telecharge.com: 800-447-7400
www.wangcenter.org
The Shubert Theatre Box Office: Mon-Sat-10am-6pm
For more information call 978-232-7200
tty # 888-889-8587 *dates, times and prices subject to change.
Sponsored by
___
30
PANORAMA
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
31
current events
HARPERS FERRY, 156 Brighton Ave., Allston, 617-254-9743.
Shows start at 8 p.m. Call for complete schedule. This club
offers live music daily and is reknown for showcasing local classic rock and rhythm’n’ blues cover bands. Sep 12—Mallochio,
tickets: $4; Sep 13 & 20—Carmen’s Condition, tickets: $4; Sep
14—The Fly-Agaris Sky, Ulysses and Caspian, tickets: $5; Sep
15—Spiritual Rez, tickets: $10–13; Sep 17—Bomb Squad featuring Jen Durkin, tickets: $8; Sep 21—Contruda with Old Silver
Band, tickets: $5; Sep 23—The Ponys, tickets: $8; Sep 24—
Playin Dead (Grateful Dead tribute band), tickets: $5.
PARADISE ROCK CLUB, 967 Commonwealth Ave., 617-5628800. Call for complete schedule. Intimate setting with a big
sound, Paradise is one of Boston’s favorite rock clubs. All shows
18+ unless otherwise noted. Sep 12 at 8 p.m.—Nouvelle
Vague, tickets: $14; Sep 13 at 8 p.m.—Mike Doughty’s Band
with Chris Glover, tickets: $20; Sep 14 at 8 p.m.—Casey
Desmond with Valerie Forgione, tickets: $8; Sep 15 at 9 p.m.—
Apocalyptica with Eyes of Fire, tickets: $15; Sep 16 at 9 p.m.—
The Proclaimers with Deadman, tickets: $17; Sep 17 at 9
p.m.—Little Brother with The Away Team, Legacy, Darien
Brockington, Joe Scudda and Chaundon, tickets: $15; Sep 18 at
8 p.m.—The Bodeans with Shannon McNally, tickets: $20; Sep
20 at 8 p.m.—Glen Phillips, Kim Richie and Griffin House with
Missy Higgins, tickets: $20; Sep 21 at 8 p.m.—Citizen Cope
with Courtney Dowe, tickets: $17; Sep 22 at 9 p.m.—Royskopp
with Annie, tickets: $18; Sep 23 at 9 p.m.—M.I.A., tickets: $20;
Sep 24 at 9 p.m.—Particle with Gabby La La, tickets: $17.
REGATTABAR, third floor of The Charles Hotel, 1 Bennett St.,
Cambridge, 617-661-5099. Sep 14 & 15 at 7:30 & 10 p.m.—
The Mike Stern Group, tickets: $22.50; Sep 16 at 7:30 and 10
p.m.—Maria Muldaur, tickets: $20; Sep 17 at 7:30 and 10
p.m.—Jimmy Scott and The Jazz Explorers 80th Birthday
Celebration, tickets: $25; Sep 21 & 22 at 7:30 and 10 p.m.—
Danilo Perez Trio, tickets: $18; Sep 23 at 7:30 and 10 p.m.—
Bruce Gertz/Jerry Bergonzi Quartet, tickets: $15.
32
WALLY’S CAFE, 427 Massachusetts Ave., 617-424-1408.
Mon–Sat from 9 a.m.–2 a.m.; Sun from noon–2 a.m.
Bands play at 9 p.m. No cover. Wally’s was established
in 1947 by Joseph L. Walcot, the first African-American to
own a nightclub in Boston. It played a large part in the
growth of jazz music in this country and continues to host
live jazz daily.
DICK’S LAST RESORT, 55 Huntington Ave., 617-267-8080,
www.dickslastresort.com. No cover. Call for full schedule. Live
music daily from classic rock acts and cover bands, 74 kinds
of beer and dining options that include buckets of ribs,
shrimp, lobster, crab cakes, chicken and crab legs.
THE MIDDLE EAST, 472 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, 617-864EAST. Doors open at 8 p.m., show starts at 9 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Call for complete schedule. Cover: $8–20.
Whether Upstairs, Downstairs or in the Corner, this entertainment club showcases the best alternative and indie rock
bands in town. Sep 13—Molotov, tickets: $30; Sep 18—
Lucero, Chris Mills and the New Miserable Bastards, tickets:
$10; Sep 21—Four Tet, Hot Chip and Koushik, tickets:
$12–15; Sep 24—Lez Zeppelin with Sirsy, The Scam and The
Vital Might, tickets: $15; Sep 25—Nashville Pussy with Zeke
and The A.K.A.s, tickets: $15.
___
TWEETER CENTER, Routes 140 and 146, Mansfield (45 minutes south of Boston), 617-931-2000. The concerts at this
outdoor amphitheater are a hallmark of summer and boast
some of pop music’s biggest acts. Sep 25 at 7 p.m.—Brooks
and Dunn with Big & Rich and The Warren Brothers, tickets:
$25 & 49.75.
SCULLERS JAZZ CLUB, DoubleTree Guest Suites Hotel, 400
Soldiers Field Road, 617-562-4111. Showtimes: Tue–Thu at 8 and
PANORAMA
WONG AUDITORIUM, MIT Tang Center, 2 Amherst St.,
Cambridge, 617-258-7971. Sep 25 at 4 p.m.—Sitar
performance by Shahid Parvez, tickets: $18.
SPECIAL EVENTS
MIXFEST 2005: The Bank of America Pavilion
hosts local radio station Mix 98.5’s annual
MixFest, which this year features Sheryl Crow
(pictured above), Cyndi Lauper, Gavin DeGraw
and Howie Day. Refer to listing, page 31.
THE BIG E, 1305 Memorial Ave., West Springfield, 413-2055115. Beginning Sep 16 from 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Gates open at
8 a.m. Tickets: $12–15; children (ages 6–12) $8–10; children
(under 6) free. This year’s Eastern States Exposition promises to
be bigger than ever, featuring a Mardi Gras parade, live entertainment from acrobats to national music acts such as
Gretchen Wilson, Collective Soul, Los Lonely Boys and Charo,
with additional activities including rides, shopping, crafts and
cuisine from around the world.
BOSTON OPEN STUDIOS, through December, more than 1,200
Boston artists open their studios to the public, providing a rare
look into the booming art scene in 12 Boston neighborhoods.
Events are free and open to the public. Sep 17 & 18 from 11
a.m.–6 p.m.—19th annual South End Open Studios, visit
www.useaboston.com or call 617-267-8862; Sep 24 & 25
from 11:30 a.m.–6 p.m.—Annual Jamaica Plain Open Studios,
visit www.jpopenstudios.com or call 617-524-3816.
BROOKLINE FESTIVAL IN THE STREET 2005, Harvard Street
between Beacon and Fuller streets., Brookline, www.brook
line300.org. Sep 18 from 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Free admission and
parking. Held in cooperation with Brookline Greenspace Alliance,
The annual Festival in the Street features a day of activities
including: more than 60 juried crafters selling jewelry, ceramics,
glass, carvings, photography and textiles; arts and community
groups providing information and demonstrations; and kids
activities such as pony rides, face-painting and balloons. Also
enjoy live music and dancing, as well as food throughout the
day. This year’s event celebrates Brookline’s 300th birthday.
CAVALIA, Suffolk Downs, Junction of Rtes. 1A & 145, 866999-8111. Performances through Sep 18: Wed–Fri at 8 p.m.,
Sat at 3 & 8 p.m., Sun at 1 & 5 p.m. Tickets: $69 & 79; $49 &
59 for children under 12. From Normand Latourelle, one of the
founders of the world-renowned Cirque du Soleil, comes
Cavalia, a multi-media performance piece uniting acrobats,
aerialists, dancers, musicians, world-class riders and 50 horses
in a dream-like theatrical experience. Watch as horses gallop
and play in front of a 200-foot wide screen projecting everchanging images.
current events
starting place for legendary folk icons such as Joan Baez and
Bob Dylan. Sep 14 at 8 p.m.—Beth Amsel and Anais Mitchell,
tickets: $12; Sep 17 at 8 p.m.—Teddy Goldstein with Jes
Hudak, tickets: $14; Sep 21 at 8 p.m.—Music for Life Cancer
Research Benefit with Teresa Storch, Patty Keough and others,
tickets: $15; Sep 22 at 8 p.m.—Rushad Eggleston and The Wild
Band of Snee, tickets: $15; Sep 23 at 7 p.m.—Ferron, tickets:
$25; Sep 24 & 25 at 7:30 p.m.—Jackopierce, tickets: $25.
10 p.m., Fri & Sat at 8 and 10:30 p.m., Sun at 7 and 9 p.m.
unless otherwise noted. Combination tickets include dinner and
show. Sep 14—Jack Donahue, tickets: $18, $58 with dinner; Sep
15 & 16—Terence Blanchard, tickets: $20, $60 with dinner; Sep
21—Ron Gill & The Manny Williams Trio, tickets: $15, $55 with
dinner; Sep 23—Tierney Sutton, tickets: $20, $60 with dinner.
SOMERVILLE THEATRE, 55 Davis Square, Somerville, 617625-4088. Sep 22 at 8 p.m.—Arkadi Duchin, tickets: $27 &
35; Sep 24 at 8 p.m.—Lila Downs, tickets: $22 & 28.
TD BANKNORTH GARDEN, 100 Legends Way (Causeway
Street), 617-624-1000. The former FleetCenter plays host not
only to Celtics and Bruins games, but is the premier indoor
concert arena for the city of Boston. Sep 16 & 17 at 8 p.m.—
Elton John, tickets: $45–125.
T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE, 10 Brookline St., Cambridge, 617492-BEAR. Shows start at 8:30 p.m. Call for complete schedule. Cover: $8–14. Sep 15—Athlete, The Working Title and
Radka; Sep 16—The National, Pela, Aberdeen City and The
Octopus Project; Sep 21—Towers of London, Gore Gore Girls
and The Strays; Sep 22—Marjorie Fair with Stand; Sep 24—
The Gravel Pit, The Downbeats, Teenage Prayers and Superlow.
TOP OF THE HUB, Prudential Tower, 52nd floor, 617-5361775. Enjoy food, drink and the best view in Boston as you
swing to live jazz and classics from ther Great American
Songbook. Sep 12, 18, 19 & 25 at 8 p.m.—Marty Ballou Trio;
Sep 13–15 at 8:30—Bob Nieske Trio; Sep 16 & 17, at 9
p.m.—Bob Nieske Group with Maggie Galloway; Sep 18 & 25
at noon—Lee Childs Group; Sep 20–22 at 8:30 p.m., Sep 23
& 24 at 9 p.m.—Tony Carelli Group.
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
33
RED SOX
GREAT GLASS PUMPKIN PATCH, Kresge Oval at MIT, 48
Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617-253-5309. Sep 24 from
10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free and open to the public. The artists of MIT’s
Glass Lab allow visitors to get a jump on the Halloween season
with an exhibition and sale of more than 1,000 handblown
glass pumpkins of all sizes, shapes and colors. Proceeds from
the sale benefit the Glass Lab.
P H O T O : J U L I E C O R D E I RO /
C O U RT E S Y O F T H E B O S T O N
current events
p.m., Fri at 7 p.m., Sat at 4, 7 and 10 p.m., Sun at 2 and 5 p.m.
Tickets: $46–56. This giddily subversive off-Broadway hit features three muted, blue-painted performers who spoof both
contemporary art and modern technology through wry commentary and bemusing antics. The show has been updated to
include new performance pieces, new music and alterations to
the sound and lighting design.
GRAFFITI ARTISTS LECTURE, Kirsch Auditorium, MIT Stata
Center, 32 Vassar St., Cambridge, 617-253-2341. Sep 20 at 7
p.m. MIT hosts a free talk by the Bronx, N.Y.-based graffiti
artists TATS CRU, who rose from being struggling inner-city
teens creating subway graffiti to become acclaimed and indemand artists who helped get graffiti recognized as a legitimate art form. TATS CRU members speak with the public as
part of their weeklong participation in the Abramowitz Artist-InResidence Program at MIT.
BOSTON RED SOX: Slugger Manny Ramirez
JIMMY FUND WALK, Starting points in Hopkinton, Wellesley, at
at Harvard Medical School in Boston, 866-JFW-HERO. Sep 18.
Join in the fight against cancer by participating in the 17th
annual Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk alongside more
than 6,000 walkers. The Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk
gives participants the opportunity to follow the route of the
26.2-mile Boston Marathon in honor or memory of friends,
family, co-workers, and patients facing all forms of the disease.
In its 16-year history the Jimmy Fund Walk has contributed
more than $35 million to support cancer research and care.
PHANTOM GOURMET FOOD FESTIVAL, Lansdowne Street
(near Fenway Park) Sep 24 from 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Tickets: $25.
Hosted by the popular local restaurant review TV show, the
Phantom Gourmet Festival unites some of Boston’s tastiest
restaurants in a day-long tasting event showing off their signature dishes. Sample barbecue, hot dogs, whoopie pies, ice
cream, oysters, crepes, candies and more from spots like
Fuddruckers, Black Cow, Panera, Kelly’s Roast Beef, Firefly’s
and more. Plus, guests can sign up for private parties at clubs
along Lansdowne Street such as The Tiki Room, Game On, Jake
Ivory’s and others.
RIVERSING 2005, at the Weeks Footbridge between Allston and
Cambridge, 617-972-8300. Sep 22 from 6:30–7:30 p.m. Free
admission. Join hundreds of singers at the Weeks Footbridge to
celebrate the passage from summer to fall. Under the artistic
leadership of the Revels, this event includes, among other
things, reciprocal singing across the Charles River, the lighting
of the Weeks Bridge, and musical performances by The Second
Line Social Aid and Pleasure Society and other local bands.
___
34
TASTE OF BOSTON, City Hall Plaza, www.tasteofboston.com.
Sep 17 from 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sep 18 from noon–6 p.m.
Tickets: $1, average tasting cost is 1–5 tickets. Bring the family
for a day of fun, food and entertainment at the 22nd annual celebration of Boston’s lively culinary world. This year’s event features food samplings from 50 area restaurants and an enormous beer and wine garden. Highlights include celebrity chef
PANORAMA
leads the charge as the home team takes on the
Oakland Athletics in a four-game series beginning September 15. Refer to listing below.
CAMELOT, North Shore Music Theatre, The Shubert Theatre,
265 Tremont St., 800-447-7400. Performances beginning Sep
20: Tue, Thu & Fri at 8 p.m., Wed & Sat at 2 and 8 p.m., Sun at
2 p.m. Tickets: $22.50–63. Long ago and far away, in a lawless
and barbaric land, there was one brief shining moment when
justice and order held sway—until passion got in the way. Join
King Arthur, Guenevere and Sir Lancelot in this epic saga of love
and betrayal, set to the soaring melodies of Lerner and Loewe.
CARMEN, American Repertory Theatre, Loeb Drama Center,
64 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617-547-8300. Performances
through Sep 25: Tue–Thu at 7:30 p.m., Fri & Sat at 8 p.m.,
Sun at 2 p.m. Tickets: $12–74. Produced in association with
Minnesota’s Theatre de la Jeune Lune, this theatrical take on
Bizet’s classic tale of two men’s love for a seductive gypsy girl
offers an intimate, potent and volatile chamber opera, accompanied by dueling grand pianos.
MENOPAUSE THE MUSICAL, Stuart Street Playhouse,
Radisson Hotel, 200 Stuart St., 800-447-7400. Performances:
Wed–Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at 4 and 8 p.m., Sun at 2 and 5 p.m.
Tickets: $42.50. This hilarious celebration of women and “the
change” starts with four ladies at a Bloomingdale’s lingerie
sale who bond over their menopausal ailments—memory loss,
brain skips, hot flashes, night sweats, not enough sex, too
much sex and more. The joyful musical parodies 28 classic
Baby Boomer songs.
ON THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, Overture Productions, Cutler
Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, 219 Tremont St., 800233-3123. Performances Sep 23–25: Fri & Sat at 8 p.m., Sun
at 2 p.m. Tickets: $20–60. This classic screwball comedy,
based on the Charles MacArthur-Ben Hecht Broadway hit play
and directed by former Broadway in Boston honcho Tony
McLean, is the story of Oscar Jaffee, an egotistical and perpetually broke theatrical producer, who plots to talk his estranged
paramour, Lily Garland, into appearing in one of his plays while
on board the luxury train the Twentieth Century.
PAL JOEY, Stoneham Theatre, 395 Main St., Stoneham, 781279-2200. Performances beginning Sep 15: Thu at 7:30 p.m.,
Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at 4 & 8 p.m., Sun at 2 p.m. Tickets: $18–36.
Set in late 1930s Chicago, this popular Rodgers and Hart musical about a first-class scoundrel and his schemes involving a
rich widow launched hits like “Bewitched, Bothered and
Bewildered” and “I Could Write a Book.”
THE REAL THING, Huntington Theatre Company, Boston
University Theatre, 264 Huntington Ave., 617-266-0800.
Performances beginning Sep 9: Wed & Thu at 7:30 p.m., Fri at
8 p.m., Sat at 2 and 8 p.m., Sun at 2 p.m. Tickets: $15–60. The
brilliant wordsmith Tom Stoppard explores the complex joy and
pain of being in love in this clever and deeply felt drama about
relationships. A successful playwright takes his marriage to the
demonstrations by Marc Orfaly of Pigalle, Michael Schlow of
Radius/Via Matta/Great Bay, Tony Ambrose of Ambrosia and
Blackfin, David Blessing of The Four Seasons Hotel and Tony
Maws of Craigie Street Bistro, among others. Concerts throughout the day feature performances by Gin Blossoms and others.
For young sports fans, the Junior Jocks area will allow kids to
test their abilities in baseball, basketball and more.
SPORTS
BOSTON BRUINS
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
Agganis Arena, Boston University, 925 Commonwealth Ave.,
617-931-2000
Sep 16 at 7 p.m.
Intersquad scrimmage
TD Banknorth Garden, 100 Legend Way, 617-624-1000
Sep 23 at 7 p.m.
Pre-season game vs. New York Islanders
BOSTON RED SOX
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Fenway Park, 4 Yawkey Way, 617-482-4SOX.
Sep 15–17 at 7:05 p.m.
vs. Oakland Athletics
Sep 18 at 2:05 p.m.
vs. Oakland Athletics
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION
Gilettte Stadium, One Patriot Place, Foxborough, 800-543-1776
or 877-GETREVS.
Sep 24 at 7:30 p.m.
vs. MetroStars
THEATER
BLUE MAN GROUP, Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton St., 617931-2787 or 617-426-6912. Performances: Wed & Thu at 8
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
current events
FENWAY FICTION, Morton’s, The Steakhouse, One Exeter
Plaza, 617-266-5858. Sep 19 from 5:30–7:30 p.m. Free and
open to the public. Morton’s and Boston literacy advocacy program ReadBoston host a special evening unveiling the new
short fiction collection Fenway Fiction: Short Stories from the
Red Sox Nation, featuring works by novelists, playwrights and
true-blue fans of the Boston Red Sox. Complimentary hors
d’oeuvres and a cash bar are featured, and donations to
ReadBoston will be accepted.
CLUBS & BARS
PUBS AND BARS
RIVERDANCE, The Wang Theatre, 270 Tremont St., 1-800-4477400. Performances Sep 16–25: Tue–Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at 2
and 8 p.m., Sun at 1 and 7 p.m. Tickets: $29.50–69.50. The
internationally acclaimed celebration of Irish music, song and
dance that has touched the hearts of millions around the world
triumphantly returns. “An explosion of sight and sound that
simply takes your breath away,” cheers the Chicago Tribune.
Discover why nothing in the world compares to the original.
SHEAR MADNESS, Charles Playhouse Stage II, 74 Warrenton
St., 617-426-5225. Performances: Tue–Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at
6:30 and 9:30 p.m., Sun at 3 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $34–50.
Boston’s hilarious whodunnit where the audience takes a stab
at catching the killer. Become an armchair sleuth in the
longest-running non-musical play in U.S. history.
THE STORY, Zeitgeist Stage Company, Black Box Theatre,
Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St., 617-933-8600.
Performances through Sep 25: Thu & Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at 4
and 8 p.m., Sun at 7 p.m. Tickets: $25 & 30. An ambitious
African-American reporter cracks a murder case involving a
white victim who is killed in a black neighborhood with a sensational scoop—but is it the truth? The fine line between a
good story and a true story in the American media is explored
in this fascinating work by Tracey Scott Wilson, described by
the New York Times as “absorbing” and “compelling.”
URINETOWN, THE MUSICAL, Lyric Stage Company, 140
Clarendon St., 617-437-7172. Performances: Wed at 2 and
7:30 p.m., Thu at 7:30 p.m., Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at 4 and 8 p.m.,
Sun at 3 p.m. Tickets: $20–47. True love blooms in the shadow
of a corrupt corporation that exploits a drastic water shortage
and charges residents a fee to pee. Winner of the 2002 Tony
Awards for Best Book and Best Music and Lyrics, this uproarious musical has been hailed by the New York Times as
“extraordinary, hilarious and entirely original! The most galvanizing theatre experience in town!”
36
THE BELL IN HAND TAVERN, 45 Union St., 617-2272098. Daily 11:30 a.m.–2 a.m. Opened in 1795, the
Bell in Hand is the oldest tavern in the U.S. This casual
pub, offering pints, food and live music, attracts locals,
students, and sightseers alike. Tues—Karaoke night.
ROMEO AND JULIET, New Repertory Theatre, Arsenal Center
for the Arts, 200 Dexter Ave., Watertown, 617-332-1646.
Performances: Wed & Thu at 7:30 p.m., Fri at 8 p.m., Sat at
3:30 and 8 p.m., Sun at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $30–48. The
company christens its new theatre with William Shakespeare’s
timeless tale of star-crossed lovers. Artistic director Rick
Lombardo directs a sprawling production that takes advantage
of the larger stage in this passionate and sexy production.
SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE, Turtle Lane Playhouse, 283 Melrose St.,
Newton, 617-244-0169. Performances beginning Sep 16:
Thu–Sat at 8 p.m., Sun at 2 p.m. Tickets: $24. This cabaretstyle verison of the hit musical revue of 1950s pop and rock
music, featuring such favorites as “Dance with Me,” “Yakety
Yak,” “Hound Dog” and “Love Potion #9,” is sure to take audiences back to the days of poodle skirts and cars with tail fins.
___
AUDOBON CIRCLE, 838 Beacon St., 617-421-1910. Daily
11:30 a.m.–11 p.m.; bar open ’til 1 a.m. This stylish but
welcoming bar and restaurant offers great drinks and food
in a hip, minimalist setting.
THE BLACK ROSE, 160 State St., next to Faneuil Hall
Marketplace, 617-742-2286. Daily 11:30 a.m.–2 a.m.
Live Irish music nightly and select afternoons in an
authentic pub setting.
BRISTOL LOUNGE, Four Seasons Hotel, 200 Boylston St.,
617-351-2052. Jazz entertainers create sounds as lush
as their setting on a Boston-made, antique Steinert piano.
Tue–Thu 8 p.m.–midnight—solo jazz pianist Joe Barbato;
Wed–Sat 5–7:30 p.m.—solo jazz pianist Bert Seager; Fri
& Sat 8:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m.—Suzanne Davis Jazz Trio;
Sun 11 a.m.–2 p.m.—Sunday Jazz Brunch with the Dan
Greenspan Jazz Duo.
BLUE MAN GROUP: The acclaimed performance trio blends music, satire and special
effects in their acclaimed, ongoing show at the
Charles Playhouse in the Theatre District.
Refer to listing, page 34.
EXPLORERS PASS, Available at 60 Rowes Wharf, 800-8879103. Pass price: $35. The pass offers free admission to 10 top
Boston attractions—including the New England Aquarium, JFK
Presidential Library and Boston Harbor Cruises—over a twoday period. Card holders are also entitled to preferred entry at
select attractions and savings of up to 20% at shops and
restaurants around the city.
GO BOSTON CARD, Available at Bostix locations at Faneuil Hall
Marketplace and Copley Square and at the Visitor Information
Center on Boston Common, 617-742-5950. Cards can be purchased in one, two, three, five and seven day increments, and
range from $45–135 for adults, $25–65 for children. The GO
Boston card offers unlimited free admission to more than 60
area atttractions, as well as savings up to 20% at local shops
and restaurants.
TRANSPORTATION
TICKETS
BOSTON BY BOAT, 617-422-0392. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.,
Sat & Sun only. All-day adult fare: $10, $5 for children.
www.savetheharbor.org. Water shuttle runs every 45
minutes between the U.S.S. Constitution in Charlestown
and the World Trade Center in South Boston, making stops
near popular waterfront-area attractions.
BOSTIX, Faneuil Hall Marketplace and Copley Square, 617723-5181. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m. (Faneuil Hall closed Mon);
Sun 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Information and tickets, including halfprice seats on day of event, for the best performing arts around
Boston. Subject to availability.
BOSTON TOWN CAR, 617-782-4000. Downtown to Logan:
$20; Back Bay to Logan: $25. Lincoln Town Car executive
sedans available at reasonable rates. Professional, courteous
drivers for tours, airport, getting around town and long distance
runs. All major credit cards accepted.
PANORAMA
BUKOWSKI’S TAVERN, 50 Dalton St., 617-437-9999.
Mon–Sat 11:30 a.m.–2 a.m.; Sun noon–2 a.m. Cash only.
Traditional pub-style food and more than 100 types of
beer characterize this cozy and unpretentious hole-in-thewall space near the Prudential Center Mall.
THE CACTUS CLUB, 939 Boylston St., 617-263-0200.
Sun-Tue 11:30 a.m.–10 p.m.; Wed-Thurs 11:30 a.m.–
11 p.m.; Fri–Sat 11:30 a.m.–midnight; bar open ’til 2 a.m.
daily. Famous for its margaritas, this always-packed restaurant and bar offers a full lunch and dinner menu. Sun 10
p.m.–midnight—Free taco bar; Tue—Build-your-own
margarita night.
CASK ’N FLAGON, 62 Brookline Ave, 617-536-4840.
Sun–Wed 11:30–1 a.m., Thu–Sat ’til 2 a.m. A hangout for
Red Sox fans since the days of Yastrzemski and Fisk, this
classic bar boasts tons of TVs for watching the Sox if you get
shut out of Fenway Park across the street, and is loaded with
photos depicting the histories of Fenway and the Sox.
Weekend nights DJs spin hits from the ’70s and ’80s, and
patrons can enjoy foosball, pinball and video games.
CHEERS, 84 Beacon St., 617-227-9605. Also: Faneuil Hall
Marketplace. Known as the model for the late sitcom, this
Back Bay pub is one of the top tourist attractions in Boston.
Live weekend entertainment.
COYOTE UGLY, 234 Friend St., 617-854-7300. Wed, Thu &
Sat 6 p.m.–2 a.m., Fri 5 p.m.–2 a.m. The Hollywood movie
was just a taste of what awaits at this bar where the ladies
behind the bar call the shots and suffer no fools. If you’re
into rocking music, raucous atmosphere and wild women
serving up cold drinks and (if necessary) verbal abuse,
Coyote Ugly is the place to go.
DAISY BUCHANAN’S, 240 Newbury St., 617-247-8516. Daily
11:30 a.m.–2 a.m. No cover. Cash only. Located on Boston’s
hopping Newbury Street, this casual singles spot attracts
college students, businessmen and women, and even the
LANSDOWNE STREET: Home to Axis, Avlaon (pictured above), Game On, Jake Ivory’s, Jillian’s and
more, Lansdowne Street behind Fenway Park’s
Green Monster is ground zero for nightlife in Boston.
Refer to listings, page 38.
clubs & bars
current events
breaking point when he falls in love with another woman. But is
it the real thing? This multiple Tony Award-winner is a masterfully written play of wit, passion, humor and intelligence.
occasional professional athlete, and remains one of the city’s
most popular bars. Full kitchen serves pub-style food seven
nights a week.
DICK’S LAST RESORT, 55 Huntington Ave., 617-267-8080.
Live music seven nights a week. No cover, no dress code and
certainly no class. Seventy-four kinds of beer for the novice
or serious sudster, or a full bar for the hardcore. This restaurant (of sorts) features buckets of messy ribs, shrimp, lobster,
chicken, catfish and crab legs.
GRAND CANAL, 57 Canal St., 617-523-1112. This Faneuil
Hall area restaurant and pub transports the authentic style of
the Victorian Irish pub scene to Boston with high ceilings,
antiques, red wallpaper, a grandfather clock rising over the
bar, photos of Dublin’s Grand Canal, a balcony, an alcove and
a working fireplace. Cover varies.
THE GREEN DRAGON TAVERN, 11 Marshall St., 617-3670055. Boston’s premier 18th-century tavern on the Freedom
Trail. Serving lunch and dinner daily with lobster specials
Mon–Thu. Home of Boston’s only Guinness/Oyster Festival.
Entertainment nightly with a traditional Irish ‘seisiun’ Sat
4–8 p.m.
JULIEN BAR, Langham Hotel, 250 Franklin St., 617-4511900. Enjoy cocktails and piano entertainment in this historic
lounge voted Boston’s “Best Fancy Bar.” Mon–Sat from
5–11:30 p.m.—Dance to the rhythm of pianist Jeffrey
Moore. Sun from 11 a.m.–3 p.m.—Sunday Jazz Brunch in
Café Fleuri. No cover.
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
___
37
KINSALE IRISH PUB AND RESTAURANT, Two Center Plaza,
Cambridge Street, 617-742-5577. The city’s only Irish pub
and restaurant built in Ireland and shipped to Boston. There
is never a cover charge. Live Irish music Mon–Wed at 7:30
p.m.; Sat at 9:30 p.m. Sun brunch features Irish musicians
from noon–3 p.m.
JILLIAN’S BOSTON, 145 Ipswich St. (behind Fenway Park),
617-437-0300. www.jilliansboston.com. Mon–Sat 11 a.m.–2
a.m, Sun noon–2 a.m. One of Boston’s largest entertainment
complexes, this fun and diverse club attracts over a million
people a year. Features 50 pool tables, 200 high-tech games,
blackjack for fun and six full bars, Lucky Strike Lanes bowling is located on the third floor, and full-service dining and
late-night dancing at Tequila Rain (“spring break 52 weeks a
year”) on the first floor. Proper dress required.
MR. DOOLEY’S BOSTON TAVERN, 77 Broad St., Financial
District, 617-338-5656. Open nightly. Fri & Sat $3 cover.
This authentic Irish pub features a charming ambiance,
13 imported drafts on tap and live music six nights a week.
Journalists, politicians and young professionals find Mr.
Dooley’s to be “a great place for a pint and a chat.”
THE PURPLE SHAMROCK, 1 Union St., 617-227-2060.
Located on the Freedom Trail, The Purple Shamrock offers
an escape from the nearby activity of Quincy Market. Menu
items include burgers, sandwiches, hearty pastas, fresh
seafood, tender steaks and more. After dark, The Purple
Shamrock has nightly entertainment, including a mix of live
music, karaoke and DJs.
NIGHTCLUBS
ARIA, 246 Tremont St., 617-338-7080. Tue–Sun 11 p.m.–
2 a.m. Cover: $5–15. Call for age restrictions. Located in the
basement of the Wilbur Theatre, this nightspot features a
chic decor with plush red couches and dance music—from
International to House. Dress to impress.
AVALON, 15 Lansdowne St., 617-262-2424. Thu–Sun 10
p.m.–2 a.m. Cover: $10–20. 19+ on Thu & Fri; 21+ on Sat &
Sun. One of Boston’s premier nightclubs featuring Euro and
Top 40 dance nights. It’s also the city’s largest club venue for
live music acts. Thu—Hip-hop night; Fri—renowned DJs
from around the world at Avaland; Sat—Tease with DJ
Adilson; Sun—Gay Night.
AXIS, 13 Lansdowne St., 617-262-2437. Mon & Thu–Sun 10
p.m.–2 a.m. Cover: $5–20. 19+. Mon—Static, gay night;
Thu—International College Night, featuring house music;
Fri—Flavor Fridays, hip-hop, Top 40, reggaeton; Sat—
Seductive Saturdays, featuring reggae, R&B.
38
SANCTUARY, 189 State St., 617-573-9333. Spread out
over three floors, Sanctuary bills itself as “Boston’s
premiere dining and lounge experience,” featuring a full
menu, outdoor seating for lunch and dinner, and resident
DJs Thu–Sat. Voted one of the sexiest bars in Boston by
Boston magazine.
THE OAK BAR, Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel, 138 St. James
Ave., Copley Square, 617-267-5300. A favorite among the
fine scotch and cigar crowd, The Oak Bar is a Boston favorite
for upscale lounging. Tue–Thu 8 p.m.–midnight and Fri & Sat
8:30 p.m.–12:20 a.m.—Diane Fischer performs. No cover.
TOP OF THE HUB, 800 Boylston St., 617-536-1775. Listen
to the sounds of live jazz seven nights a week while experiencing the breathtaking view atop Boston’s Prudential
Center. Featuring a midnight menu, Sun–Wed ’til 1 a.m.;
Thu–Sat ’til 2 a.m.
___
SAINT, 90 Exeter St., 617-236-1134. Table reservations
available. One of Boston’s hottest nightclubs, Saint offers
gourmet dining, nightly DJs, and the chance to lounge on
overstuffed couches (and even beds) in private and public
rooms. Sun—Spice Sundays; Mon—Sin Mondays; Thu—
Plush Thursdays; Fri—Pure Fridays; Sat—B&T Saturdays.
THE ALLEY, One Boylston Place, 617-351-7000. Thu–Sat
10 p.m.–2 a.m. Cover: $5–10. Located in the famous
Boylston Street alleyway, this one-stop nightspot includes the
Big Easy Bar, Sugar Shack, Sweetwater Cafe and the newest
PANORAMA
“The Original”
“The Replica”
84 Beacon Street
Beacon Hill
(617) 227-9605
Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Downtown
(617) 227-0150
Offering Visitors of Boston:
• Award-Winning Burgers & Bloody Marys
• A Selection of Draught Beers on Tap
• Great Casual Atmosphere
GAY AND LESBIAN
TOP OF THE HUB: This renowned restaurant
atop the Prudential Center in the Back Bay
features live jazz every night along with its
breathtaking views. Refer to listing, left.
addition, Liquor Store, where you can ride Boston’s only
mechanical bull. Party Mardi Gras-style on Boston’s version
of Bourbon Street
BOSTON BILLIARD CLUB, 126 Brookline Ave., 617-536POOL. Ranked Number One Billiard Club in the country by
Billiards Digest, this nightspot is perfect for pool aficionados
and novices alike. Mon—free lessons; Wed—Ladies’ Night:
each lady gets 25 percent off table time. Four ladies per
table play for free; Sun–Thu—League Night.
CLUB CAFE, 209 Columbus Ave., 617-536-0966. Thu–Sat
9 p.m.–2 a.m. No cover. In the back of the 209 restaurant,
you’ll find the Moonshine and Satellite lounges, voted “Best
of Boston” by Boston magazine and The Improper Bostonian
for best gay and lesbian nightspot.
www.cheersboston.com
© 2005 Paramount Pictures Corporation. All rights reserved.
THE EAGLE, 520 Tremont St., 617-542-4494. This popular
South End bar is an institution in the gay bar scene, with a
relaxed, dive-y atmosphere and lots of local color.
JACQUES CABARET, 79 Broadway St., 617-426-8902.
Mon–Sat 11 a.m., Sun noon–midnight. $5 Mon, $6 Tue–Thu,
$10 Fri–Sat. Cash only. Featured in Modern Bride as the
“best place for a bachelorette party,” Jacques Cabaret
allows its patrons to mingle and disco-dance with dragqueens. Live music every weekend. Mon—Cabaret drag
show; Tue—Karaoke.
BOSTON ROCKS NIGHTCLUB, 245 Quincy Market (near
Faneuil Hall), 617-726-1110. Thu–Sat 9 p.m.–2 a.m. Cover
varies. 21+. Where Boston comes to rock. Fri—6one7 presents The Loft with R & B and hip-hop music; Sat—Shotgun
Saturdays with VJ Johnnie Walker Black spinning Top 40. No
hats allowed.
MACHINE, 1254 Boylston St., 617-536-1950. Mon, Thu–Sat 10
p.m–2 a.m. Cover varies. Cash only. Featuring two dance floors,
four bars, six pool tables, pinball machines, video games and
theme nights, this club offers Boston’s gay and lesbian partygoers a plethora of nightlife options. Mon—DJ Otis, Strip-Pool
tournament; Thu at 10 p.m.—Karaoke with Eve Adams; Fri—
DJ Dovah and DJ Darrin Friedman; Sat—DJ Manuel Santiago
and International night featuring DJ J.R. Vega.
GAME ON, 82 Lansdowne St., 617–351-7001. Daily 11:30
a.m.–2 a.m. The ultimate for any sports club enthusiasts: a
bar/restaurant/nightclub built inside Fenway Park. The
newest jewel in the renovation of the Fenway area, this
nightspot offers a cool and sleek spot in which to sample a
full menu, and watch the Sox and other sporting events on
any number of big-screen TVs.
PARADISE, 180 Mass Ave., Cambridge, 617-868-3000.
Sun–Wed 7 p.m.– 1 a.m., Thu–Sat 7 p.m.–2 a.m. No cover.
Not to be confused with Allston’s popular live music club The
Paradise, here male strippers perform nightly at this rowdy
Cambridge club. Groove to Top 40 beats Thu–Sat.
JAKE IVORY’S, 9 Lansdowne St., 617-247-1222. Open
Thu–Sat. Cover: $5–8, table reservations available. Come
join the crowds who marvel at (and sing along with) the
dueling pianists at this club in the heart of nightlife central,
Lansdowne Street. Great for a casual night out, after work
parties or friendly get-togethers.
Pub • Restaurant • Gift Shop
TM &
clubs & bars
clubs & bars
THE LITTLEST BAR, 47 Province St., 617-523-9766.
Daily 8:30 a.m.–1:30 a.m. As its name suggests, this
pint-sized Irish pub holds only 38 people, but its cozy,
friendly atmosphere serves quality beer and a menu of
franks and sandwiches.
Now there are two locations
where you can enjoy all of the
fun seen on the TV series
RAMROD, 1254 Boylston St., 617-266-2986. Daily noon–
2 a.m. This is no place to bring your mom. The largest
leather bar on the East Coast, Ramrod enforces a strict dress
code (leather required for the back room on weekends).
Wed—new-wave and dance beats with DJ Mac; Thu—
trance night with DJ Jason Taylor; Fri—DJ Danae Jacovidis
in the backroom; Sun—Mandance with DJ Duo Freespace.
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
39
MUSEUMS &
GALLERIES
Archives and is ideal for fans of history or genealogy. Special
exhibits: John Adams: Atlas of American Independence;
Archaeology of the Central Artery Project: Highway to the Past.
INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART: On
September 21, the ICA debuts an exhibit by video artist
Paul Chan as part of its ongoing Momentum series,
which is dedicated to supporting the development of
new artists and fresh ideas. Refer to listing, right.
BOSTON
BOSTON CHILDREN’S MUSEUM, Museum Wharf, 300
Congress St., 617-426-8855. Open daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Fri ’til
9 p.m. Admission: $9; children (2–15) & seniors $7; children
(one-year-olds only) $2; children (under 1) free; Fri 5–9 p.m.
(Family Night) $1. Museum closed Sep 12. The museum features a variety of educational and entertaining activities for children, including interactive exhibits that allow children to learn
about science, history and culture through a hands-on experience. Special exhibits: Pattern Wizardry explores the wonderland of colors, shapes and sound; Adventures with Clifford The
Big Red Dog; Boats Afloat allows kids to explore urban water
environments; Boston Black: A City Connects celebrates
Boston’s many black cultures; Amazing Castle, an enchanting
world where people travel on horseback and dragons protect
castles. Refer to Kids Corner in Currently for special events.
BOSTON CITYPASS, www.citypass.com. Visit six of Boston’s
best attractions for one low price. Save 50 percent and avoid
ticket lines. Booklet price: $39; youth (3–11) $19.50. Ticket
booklets are available at the first attraction visited and are valid
for a year. The CityPass ticket booklet includes admission to six
major attractions: the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and
Museum, New England Aquarium, Museum of Fine Arts,
Museum of Science, Skywalk Observatory at the Prudential
Center and Harvard Museum of Natural History.
___
40
COMMONWEALTH MUSEUM, Massachusetts Archives Building,
220 Morrissey Blvd., 617-727-9268. Mon–Fri from 9 a.m.–5
p.m., second and fourth Sat of the month ’til 3 p.m. (except holiday weekends). Free admission. Across from the JFK Presidential
Library, this museum houses the collection of the Massachusetts
PA N O R A M A
INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART, 955 Boylston St.,
617-266-5152. Open Tue, Wed & Fri noon–5 p.m., Thu ’til 9
p.m.; Sat & Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $7; students &
seniors $5; children (under 12) free; Thu 5–9 p.m. free.
Installations of contemporary paintings, sculptures and photographs change regularly. Special exhibits: beginning Sep
21—Utopia, Utopia=One World, One War, One Army, One
Dress, works by Swiss artist Thomas Hirschhorn;
Momentum 5: Paul Chan, the Hong Kong-born artist displays
politically charged video works, digital animation and drawings; On view at the Charlestown Navy Yard—The Secret
Ark of Icon Park, an installation by Jerry Beck.
ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM, 280 The Fenway,
617-566-1401. Open Tue–Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission:
$10; weekends $11; seniors $7; students with I.D. $5; children
(under 18) free. Visitors named Isabella are admitted free.
Commissioned by Boston aristocrat Isabella Stewart Gardner and
modeled after a 15th-century Venetian palace, the museum
exhibits 2,500 objects, including the works of Rembrandt, Botticelli,
Raphael, Titian and Matisse. Special exhibit: beginning Sep 23—
Variations on a Theme by Sol Lewitt and Paula Robison, which
explores connections between the visual and musical arts. Special
events: Sep 18 at 1:30 p.m.—Pianist Cecile Licad; Sep 25 at
1:30 p.m.—Violinist Frank Huang and pianist Carol Wong.
Tickets: $20; seniors $14; students $10; children (5–17) $5.
JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM, off
Morrissey Boulevard, next to UMass Boston, Dorchester, 866535-1960. www.jfklibrary.org. Open daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Admission: $10; students & seniors $8; children (13–17) $7;
children (under 12) free. This museum portrays Kennedy’s life,
leadership and legacy in 21 exhibits, three theaters, 20 video
presentations and more. Special exhibits: JFK in World War II,
featuring a selection of materials from JFK’s military service in
the South Pacific; Presents for a President and a First Lady, a
display of 65 state gifts presented to the President and Mrs.
Kennedy by foreign leaders from around the world.
LARZ ANDERSON AUTO MUSEUM, Larz Anderson Park, 15
Newton St., Brookline, 617-522-6547. Open Tue–Sun 10 a.m.–
5 p.m. Admission: $5; students, seniors and children (6–18) $3;
children (5 and under) free. Admission to the Lawn events: $7;
children $5. Fee includes admission to all museum exhibits. The
oldest collection of historic automobiles in the nation is displayed in the owner’s original home. Special exhibit:
L’automobile—A Century of Innovation and Style celebrates the
French automobile industry. Lawn events: Sep 16–18—
AltWheels Festival, celebrating environmentally-friendly cars;
Sep 24—Pontiac GTO Day; Sep 25—Volkswagon Van Day.
THE MUSEUM OF AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY, African Meeting
House, 46 Joy St. (corner of Smith Court), Beacon Hill, 617-7250022. www.afroammuseum.org. Open Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Free admission; donations welcome. Explore the history of
Boston’s 19th-century African-American community at the
African Meeting House, the oldest African-American church still
standing in the United States. In addition, there are tour maps
available for the Black Heritage Trail. Special exhibit: Words of
Thunder: William Lloyd Garrison and the Ambassadors of
Abolition, celebrating the life, achievements and challenges of
famed Boston abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison.
THE MUSEUM OF THE NATIONAL CENTER OF AFROAMERICAN ARTISTS, 300 Walnut Ave., Roxbury, 617-4428614. Open Tue–Sun 1–5 p.m.; by appointment for groups.
Admission: $4; students & seniors $3. Housed in the former Oak
Bend Mansion, a neo-Gothic structure built in the early 1870s,
this museum holds a slide archive and an extensive collection of
African artifacts, prints and drawings; it also hosts national and
international traveling exhibits.
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, 465 Huntington Ave., 617-267-9300.
Open Sat–Tue 10 a.m.–4:45 p.m., Wed–Fri 10 a.m.–9:45 p.m.
(Thu & Fri after 5 p.m., west wing only). Admission (includes two
visits in a 10-day period): $15; college students & seniors $13;
Thu & Fri after 5 p.m., $2 discount; Wed after 4 p.m., pay as you
wish; children (under 18) $6.50 on weekdays before 3 p.m., free
at all other times. Separate ticketing for Gund Gallery exhibit.
The museum houses an outstanding collection of paintings,
prints, sculptures, furnishings and other artwork from ancient
times through the present, and boasts the most comprehensive
collection of Asiatic art in the world. Special exhibits: Sounds of
the Silk Road, musical instruments of Asia; American West, Dust
and Dreams; A Much Recorded War, The Russo-Japanese War in
History and Imagery; Ansel Adams, American photographer;
Things I Love, The Many Collections of William I. Koch.
DeCordova Museum and
Sculpture Park
51 Sandy Pond Road, Lincoln, MA
decordova.org
781/259-8355
MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, Science Park, 617-723-2500. Open
daily from 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Fri ’til 9 p.m. Admission: $14; seniors
$12; children (3–11) $11; children (under 3) free. Planetarium,
laser show and Omni theater tickets: $8.50; seniors $7.50; children (3–11) $6.50. Combination ticket prices and evening discounts available. Interactive science exhibits, plus laser and
astronomy shows in the Charles Hayden Planetarium. Special
exhibits: Beyond the X-Ray; Butterfly Garden, ticketed separately: $4; Playing by the Rules: Fish, Fads and Fireflies. At the
Mugar Omni Theater: Antarctica; Fighter Pilot; Yellowstone. Refer
to Film listings in Currently for complete schedule. Showing at
the Planetarium: Countdown to Supernova; The Sky Tonight. At
the Wright 3D Theater: Mars!; Bugs!
SPORTS MUSEUM OF NEW ENGLAND, 5th and 6th floor premium seating levels, TD Banknorth Garden, Causeway Street, 617624-1234. Open daily 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission on the hour
only, until 3 p.m. Hours altered during TD Banknorth Garden
events, call ahead. Admission: $6; seniors & children (6–17) $4;
children (under 6) free. The Sports Museum showcases the rich
sports heritage of New England through an unparalleled collection of artifacts, multimedia and works of art. Exhibits include
museums & galleries
museums & galleries
GIBSON HOUSE MUSEUM, 137 Beacon St., 617-267-6338.
Open Wed–Sun for guided tours at 1, 2 & 3 p.m.
Admission: $7; students & seniors $5; children $2. A
National Historic Landmark, the Gibson House, completed in
1860, is an unspoiled, single-family Victorian row house in
the Back Bay. Now a museum offering guided tours of its
four floors, the house retains a perfectly preserved 19th
century kitchen, scullery, butler’s pantry and water closets,
as well as formal rooms and private family quarters filled
with the Gibsons’ original furniture and personal possessions. Special exhibit: Treasures from the Gibson House
Museum, drawings by Nan Freeman.
MCMULLEN MUSEUM OF ART, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, 617-552-8100. Mon–Fri 11 a.m.–4
p.m., Sat & Sun noon–5 p.m. Free admission. Gallery tours held
every Fri at 12:30 p.m. This museum is lauded for presenting interdisciplinary exhibits that spark new questions and is renowned for
its European, Asian and American collections. Special exhibit: The
Power of Conversation, Jewish Women and their Salons.
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
41
1878
the Boston Bruins Hall of Fame portraits, the Boston Garden
Penalty Box, New England’s Olympic Heroes and much more.
CAMBRIDGE
museums & galleries
Due to limited parking, it is best to take the Red Line when
traveling to Harvard, Central or Kendall squares. The
Cambridge Discovery Booth located at the Harvard Square
“T” entrance provides additional information.
BUSCH-REISINGER MUSEUM, Werner Otto Hall, 32 Quincy St.
(enter through the Fogg Art Museum), 617-495-9400. Open
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun 1–5 p.m. Tours: Mon–Fri at 1
p.m. Admission: $6.50; seniors & college students $5; children
(under 18) free; free Sat 10 a.m. A museum devoted to promoting the enjoyment and critical understanding of Central and
Northern European artists, with an emphasis on German-speaking countries. Special exhibits: Extra Ordinary Every Day: The
Bauhaus at the Busch-Reisinger; beginning Sep 17—
Stratification: An Installation of Works since 1960.
FOGG ART MUSEUM, Quincy and Broadway streets, 617495-9400. Tours: Mon–Fri at 11 a.m.; see Busch-Reisinger
Museum for hours and admission fees. The museum displays
European and American masterpieces from the Middle Ages
to the present and hosts concerts and guided tours. Special
exhibits: American Art at Harvard; 18th Century European
Ceramics Painting; A New Kind of Historical Evidence:
Photographs from the Carpenter Center Collection.
HARVARD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, 26 Oxford St.,
617-495-3045. Daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $7.50; college
students & seniors $6; children (3–18) $5; free Sun 9
a.m.–noon and Wed 3–5 p.m. Among the museum’s 17 galleries is the internationally acclaimed Ware Collection of
Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, a unique collection of over
3,000 glass flower models created between 1886 and 1936.
Special exhibits: Dodos, Trilobites & Meteorites: Treasures of
Nature and Science at Harvard; Thoreau’s Walden: A Journey
in Photographs by Scot Miller. Special event: Sep 18 from
1–5 p.m.—Third annual Harvard Museums Community Day,
featuring free admission to all six Harvard museums.
MIT LIST VISUAL ARTS CENTER, 20 Ames St., 617-253-4680.
Tue–Sun noon–6 p.m.; Fri ’til 8 p.m. Free admission. One of
Boston’s premier showcases for contemporary art, the List
Center reflects MIT’s position as a cutting-edge research institution by presenting works from the world’s leading contemporary
artists. Special exhibit: through Sep 18—Student Loan Art
Program Exhibition and Lottery.
___
42
THE MIT MUSEUM, 265 Mass. Ave., 617-253-4444. Mon–Fri
10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat & Sun noon–5 p.m. Admission: $5; students,
seniors & youth (5–18) $2. Exhibits interpret themes and ideas
related to MIT research and activities. Ongoing exhibits:
Holography, The Light Fantastic; Robots and Beyond, Exploring
Artificial Intelligence at MIT; Thinkapalooza; Gestural Engineering,
The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson. Special exhibit: 35 Innovators
PA N O R A M A
SACKLER MUSEUM: Harvard University’s
Sackler Museum presents Degas at Harvard, a
display of the French master’s works owned by
the institution. Refer to listing, below.
Under 35. Special event: Sep 25 from 2–4 p.m.—The Wonders
of Electricity and Magnetism, a free demonstration for kids and
families about the forces of electricity and magnetism.
SACKLER MUSEUM, Quincy and Broadway streets, 617-4959400. Tours: Mon–Fri at 2 p.m.; see Busch-Reisinger Museum for
hours and admission fees. Designed by James Stirling, Britain’s
famous post-modernist architect, the museum houses ancient
Oriental and Islamic collections. Special exhibits: Forging the New,
East Asian Painting in the 20th Century; Degas at Harvard, a display of Harvard University’s collection of paintings, drawings,
scuptures, and photographs by renowned artist Edgar Degas;
Silver and Shawls, India, Europe, and the Colonial Art Market.
BEYOND BOSTON
CONCORD MUSEUM, 200 Lexington Road, Concord, 978-3699763. Mon–Sun 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $8; seniors & students with I.D. $7; children (6–17) $5; family rates available.
Ample free parking on Cambridge Turnpike. Relive Concord’s
history, from Native American habitation and European settlement to the days of Emerson, Thoreau, the Alcotts and
Hawthorne. Special exhibit: David Sibley’s Birds. Special event:
Sep 18—Out Walking with David Sibley, a walk through the
Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge with the bird expert,
tickets: $65.
DECORDOVA MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE PARK, 51 Sandy Pond
Road, Lincoln, 781-259-8355. Admission: $9; seniors, students &
children (6–12) $6. Sculpture Park: open sunrise to sunset, free
admission. Tour one of the largest contemporary art museums
and the only permanent public sculpture park in New England.
NATIONAL HERITAGE MUSEUM, 33 Marrett Road, Lexington,
781-861-6559. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun noon–5 p.m.
Free admission. Devoted to presenting exhibitions on American
history and popular culture as a way of preserving our national
heritage. Special exhibits: Blue Monday, Doing Laundry in
America; Old Glory, July 1942 Magazine Covers; Teenage
Hoboes in the Great Depression, Materials from the Uys Family
Collection; September 11, Bearing Witness to History.
PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM, East India Square, Salem, 866745-1876. Daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $13; seniors $11;
students $9; children (16 and under) free. The nation’s oldest
continually operating museum boasts a brand-new wing with a
190-seat auditorium and a glass-covered atrium. The collection
showcases African, Asian, Pacific Island and American folk and
decorative art; a maritime collection dating back to the museum’s earliest days; and the first collection of Native American art
in the hemisphere. Special exhibits: All of My Life, contemporary
works by Native American artists; In Nature’s Company; Air
Lines; Yin Yu Tang, the 16-bedroom home of a prosperous
Chinese merchant of the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911), ticketed
separately: $4; The Kingdom of Siam, The Art of Central Thailand
1350–1800; Display of a Bengali Scroll, by artist Maduhusudan
Chitrakar, reounting the tragedy of 9/11; Special event: Sep 20
from 7–9 p.m.—Slideshow and discussion with Pulitzer Prizewinning cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
museums & galleries
H I L A I R E -G E R M A I N -E D G A R D E G A S , S I N G E R
WITH A
G LOV E ,
C.
U.S.S. CONSTITUTION MUSEUM, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, 617-426-1812. Open daily 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Free admission.
The museum preserves the treasures of “Old Ironsides,” the U.S.
Navy’s flagship and the world’s oldest commissioned warship.
Includes weapons, documents, journals and more. Interactive
exhibits allow visitors to load and fire a cannon, try out a sailor’s
sleeping quarters and virtually command the Constitution in battle.
Special exhibits: Killing Ground, Photographs of the Civil War and
the Changing American Landscape by John Huddleston; Zeno’s
Paradox, by Robert Arnold; Saga, The Journey of Arno Rafael
Minkkinen, Photographs 1970–2005; through Sep 26—Abstract
Elements, The Dr. Beatrice H. Barrett Collection of Art.
THE ROSE ART MUSEUM, Brandeis University, 415 South St.,
Waltham, 781-736-3434. Tue–Sun noon–5 p.m. Admission: $3;
museum members and children (under 16) free. The Rose
boasts a collection of modern and contemporary art by artists
including de Kooning, Rauschenberg and Warhol. Special
exhibits: beginning Sep 15—Monsters of Paradise, works by
Fred Tomaselli; “Post” and After, Contemporary Art from the
Brandeis University Collection.
SALEM WITCH MUSEUM, 191/2 Washington Square North,
Salem, 978-744-1692. Daily 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Admission: $6.50;
seniors $6; children (6–14) $4.50. Life-size stage settings and
historically accurate narration recreate the hysteria of the Salem
Witch Trials and executions of 1692. Translations available in
Japanese, French, German, Italian and Spanish. Special exhibit:
Witches, Evolving Perceptions.
GALLERIES
BARBARA KRAKOW GALLERY, 10 Newbury St., 617-262-4490.
Tue–Sat 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. The Barbara Krakow Gallery attracts
top contemporary artists from around the world, showcasing
work that focuses on minimalism and conceptualism. Special
exhibit: Sculptures by Donald Judd.
BERENBERG GALLERY, 4 Clarendon St., 617-536-0800.
Tue–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m. The Berenberg Gallery brings to Boston
the dynamic creations of contemporary folk and self-taught
artists. Special exhibit: New Ground, works by Jennifer Harrison.
BOSTON SCULPTORS GALLERY, 486 Harrison Ave., 617-4827781. Tue–Sat 11 a.m.–6 p.m. A sculptors’ cooperative that has
served as an alternative venue for innovative solo sculpture
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
43
Arts & Antiques
exhibitions since 1992. Special exhibits: Trans/Lucent, works by
Niho Kozuro; Late Flower Alphabet, works by Murray Dewart.
BROMFIELD ART GALLERY, 27 Thayer St., 617-451-3605.
Wed–Sat noon–5 p.m. Boston’s oldest artist-run gallery features
shows by members of the cooperative, gallery features shows
by members of the cooperative, while exhibitions by visiting
artists are selected by current members. Special exhibit:
Members’ Show, featuring works by 17 artists.
INTERNATIONAL POSTER GALLERY
CHILDS GALLERY, 169 Newbury St., 617-266-1108. Tue–Fri
9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Mon & Sat 10 a.m.–5 p.m. The longest-running
of the commercial Newbury Street galleries, Childs has one of
the largest inventories of oil paintings, drawings, watercolors,
prints and sculpture in the United States.
World Leading Collection of Original Vintage Posters
Internationally renowned collection of Art Nouveau, Art Deco and
Avant-Garde posters from Italy, Switzerland, France, Holland, the Soviet
Union and more. Dating from 1890 to the present; subjects range from
food and beverages, fashion and travel to war and propaganda. Special
exhibitions throughout the year.
museums & galleries
HOWARD YEZERSKI GALLERY, 14 Newbury St., 3rd Floor,
617-262-0550. Tue–Sat 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Features
contemporary art, including photography, sculpture and prints.
Special exhibit: Portraits by Peter Hujar.
INTERNATIONAL POSTER GALLERY, 205 Newbury St.,
617-375-0076. www.internationalposter.com. Mon–Sat 10
a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun noon–6 p.m. This internationally recognized
fine art poster gallery displays original vintage posters from the
1890s through to post-World War II modern masters. Special
exhibit: beginning Sep 15—Masterpieces of Graphic Design.
INTERNATIONAL POSTER GALLERY: On
L’ATTITUDE GALLERY, 218 Newbury St., 617-927-4400.
Tue–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun & Mon noon–5 p.m. Features
contemporary sculpture, crafts and art for the home, garden and
commercial environments. The gallery also boasts an outdoor
sculpture garden. Over 75 U.S. and international artists are represented in various mediums, including glass, ceramics, wood,
stone, mixed media and textiles. Special exhibits: Vistas
Revisited, New Work by Russ Vogt and Karen Ehart.
MILLS GALLERY, Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St., 617426-8835. Wed & Thu noon–5 p.m., Fri & Sat noon–10 p.m., Sun
noon–5 p.m. The BCA presents exciting contemporary works by
established and emerging local, regional, national, and international
visual artists, mounting approximately six large-scale exhibitions in the
2,200 square foot Mills Gallery each year. Special exhibits: Standing
On One Foot, works by Babara Grad, Heejung Kim, Jedediah Morfit
and Lauren O’Neal; Circumference, works by Steve Locke.
NEILSEN GALLERY, 179 Newbury St., 617-266-4835. Tue–Sat
10 a.m.– 5:30 p.m. Renowned for its fine collection of contemporary paintings, drawings and sculptures. Special exhbit:
beginning Sep 17—A Wolf in the Irises by Duane Slick.
NEWBURY FINE ARTS, 29 Newbury St., 617-536-0210. Mon–Sat
10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. Newbury Fine Arts deals in a
variety of media and styles, everything from painting and printmaking to sculpture and collage, and constantly builds relationships
with new artists to expose their clients to the best and brightest
artists in the business. Special exhibit: New Contemporary
Collections by Hessam Abrishami, Roderick O’Flaherty, Paul
Chester, Greg Calibey, Ted Jeremenko and Yingzhao Liu.
___
44
205 Newbury Street (between Exeter and Fairfield streets) • 617-375-0076
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun noon–6 p.m. • www.internationalposter.com
PEPPER GALLERY, 38 Newbury St., 617-236-4495. Tue–Fri
10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Sat 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Committed to presenting contemporary representational and abstract works by living
artists, the gallery rotates its exhibitions every five weeks to
represent different members of the artistic community, both
established and up-and-coming. Special exhibit: Paintings and
sculpture by Jim Zingarelli.
PA N O R A M A
September 15, this Newbury Street gallery
opens its new Masterpieces of Graphic Design
exhibit. Refer to listing, left.
PHOTOGRAPHIC RESOURCE CENTER, Boston University, 832
Commonwealth Ave., 617-353-0700. Tue, Wed, & Fri 10 a.m.–6
p.m., Thu 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sat & Sun noon–5 p.m. Admission: $3.
PRC exhibitions and educational programs are guided by a philosophical inquiry into the intersection of photography with other
aesthetic, professional and critical discourses. Special exhibit:
beginning Sep 16—2005 PRC Benefit Auction Preview Exhibition.
PUCKER GALLERY, 171 Newbury St., 617-267-9473. Mon–Sat
10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Sun 1–5 p.m. Featuring works by Israeli,
American and internationally known contemporary artists.
Named by the Boston Phoenix as one of the best art galleries in
the city: “You can make a case for the Pucker Gallery as
Boston’s best gallery—though it’s really more like a wonderful
miniature museum.” Special exhibit: How Great is Our Joy,
porcelain works by Brother Thomas.
SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS, 175 Newbury St., 617-2661810. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun noon–5 p.m. The oldest
non-profit crafts organization in the country (more than 100
years old) specializes in contemporary American crafts. The
jewelry, furniture, glass and ceramics range from cutting edge
to traditional and from functional to sculptural. Special exhibit:
Northwest Artists.
VOSE GALLERIES, 238 Newbury St., 617-536-6176. Mon–Fri
8:30 a.m.– 5:30 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Established in
1841, Vose Galleries—the oldest family-owned art gallery in the
United States—specializes in owned art gallery in the United
States—specializes in owned art gallery in the United States—
specializes in American artists from the 18th, 19th and early
20th centuries. Special exhibits: Vose Contemporary, group
exhibition; Landscapes by John F. Enser.
MASSACHUSETTS ANTIQUES
COOPERATIVE
More than 125 dealers of quality antiques and collectibles. “A don’t-miss
for lovers of antiques... everything you can think of under one roof.”
(Where magazine) “The best of the suburban lot!” (Yankee Magazine &
Newsletter) “Browsers will find everything... [Shopping here is] like
exploring a wonderful, cluttered attic...” (The Boston Globe Magazine).
Only 8 miles from Boston: Mass Pike (90) W;
128 N to Exit 26 (Rt. 20 E); right on Moody Street;
right at Felton (first light).
100 Felton Street, Waltham • 781-893-8893
10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Thu ’til 8 p.m.; closed Tue • www.massantiques.com
THE SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS
Contemporary American Craft
Ranging from functional to sculptural, SAC’s first floor gallery
represents over 250 artists working in clay, glass, metal, wood and
fiber from across the United States. The second floor exhibition
gallery features four curated shows each year.
Kimberly
Keyworth
silver, gold
and enamel
pendant
175 Newbury Street (between Dartmouth & Exeter Streets)
617-266-1810 • Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun noon–5 p.m.
www.societyofcrafts.org
S P E C I A L
A D V E R T I S I N G
S E C T I O N
A
CAMBRIDGE
& SOMERVILLE
A
CHARLESTOWN
A
•
•
•
B
B
B
•
C
15
•
•
LEGEND
•
1
Freedom Trail & Sites
W
City Water Taxi Stops
Charles River Basin
Pedestrian Bridges
Public Restrooms
Hwy. Entrances & Exits
C
R
21
•
C
T Green Line T Orange Line
D
•
Charles River Basin
Pedestrian Bridges
R
D
8
•
9
•
10
To Lowell
•
To Reading,
Haverhill
P
West Medford
P
To Newburyport,
Rockport
Malden
P
E
T Red Line
T Blue Line
T Orange Line
T Green Line
FENWAY/
KENMORE SQUARE
OAK GROVE
C
he
ls
ea
2
Public Restrooms
MBTA Subway Stops
•
11
93
MBTA SUBWAY MAP
•
LEGEND
•
MBTA Subway Stops
7
D
16
F
•
WONDERLAND
WONDERLAND
Revere Beach
P
r
te
y
le
er
en
tC
on
av
W
is
av
D
lm
Be
am
th
al
W
/
is
de rts
an be
Br Ro
To Fitchburg
Wellington
P
1
Beachmont
Sullivan
Square
ALEWIFE
Orient Heights
Porter
H
Logan
International
Airport
r th
C
ou
W
F1
SL2
90
Broadway
Mass Ave
F2
•
BOSTON MARINE
INDUSTRIAL PARK
SL3
CITY POINT
To
Hu
To
Hin ll
gh
am
J
Andrew
Melnea C
Melnea
Cass
ass B
Blvd
lvd
DUDLEY S
DUDLEY
SQ
Q
Uphams
Corner
JFK/UMass
F2
Savin Hill
P
•
Fields
Corner
ge
an
d
os
lin
da
le
Vi
lla
le
vu
e
Be
l
South
Station
Newton St
FOREST HILLS
H
ig
hl
Downtown
Crossing
Chinatown
NE Medical
Center
E. Berkeley St
Jackson Sq
B
A
y
inc
Qu
To
Shawmut
R
Parking
*B
HEATH E
To Needham
Transfer Station
Mass Ave
Ruggles
Roxbury
Crossing
LEGEND
Wheelchair
Accessible
Park St
m
Ke
n
ar
y’s
St
.M
Northeastern
Museum of Fine Arts
Longwood
Brigham Circle
Back
Bay
Stony Brook
Green St
Terminal Station
Aquarium
State*
H ore
yn
e
C s/IC
op
A
le
oy
Ar y
ls
l
i
n
to
gt
n
on
BU
BU
W
a
Sqshi
ua ng
re ton
C
o
C olid
or g
ne e
r
SI
D
E
W
oo
dl
an
P
W d
N
ab
ew
an
to
n PE
H
N
i li
ew ghl ot
to and
n
P
s
C
he Cen
st tre
nu
R tH
es ill
Be
er
vo
ac
ir
on
Br
sf
oo
ie
kl
ld
in
e
Br
H
ills
oo
kl
in
e
Vi
lla
ge
P
R
IV
ER
Fenway
Prudential
Symphony
AIRPORT
TERMINALS
SL1
C
e
Ea ntr
st al
er
W
or
ce
st
&
Fr
am
in
gh
am
To
St
P
n
to
ng
maps
hi
as
W
Longwood
CD
Si
n
ille
nv
to
CLEVELAND CIRCLE C
E
Haymarket
et
Gov't
Center
Charles/MGH
Bu
s
tr.
ew
N
e
al
to
ew
N
d
rn
bu
Au
t
es
W
Harvard Ave
hu
ttl
e
Maverick
Kendall/MIT
90
Transit Station
F4
North Station
BOWDOIN
•
Airport
S
ou
lve orl
rL d
se
in Tr
e a
W d
ay e
C
Central
P
Wood Island
Science Park
D
Morton St.
ASHMONT
Commuter Rail
Connection
G
P
P
Community College
LECHMERE
P
Harvard
95
128
BOSTON B
COLLEGE
Suffolk Downs
1A
P
N
North Quincy
Cedar Grove
Hyde Park
Fairmount
*Boylston: Accessible for Silver Line Washington
Street only.
*State: Blue line wheelchair access outbound
side only. Inbound riders transfer to outbound
train at Government Center. Exit State outbound
Readville
Readville
rP
tle
Bu
P
on
ilt
ve
M
lA
tra
en d
C
R
y
lle
Va St
N
en
ap PA
C
A
TT
A
M
Commuter
Rail Service
93
P
1
Quincy Center
P
P
•
Water Transportation Services
Quincy Adams
Endicott
F1 Hingham Shipyard to
K
Wollaston P
P
Rowes Wharf, Boston
F2 Quincy & Hull to Logan Airport &
Long Wharf, Boston
F4 Charlestown Navy Yard to
Long Wharf, Boston
For customer service & travel information
call 617-222-3200, 1-800-392-6100,
TTY 617-222-5146 or visit the MBTA
web site at http://www.mbta.com
Dedham
Corp. Center
95
128
Islington
93
To Forge Park
1
P
Route 128
L
BRAINTREE
3
95
___
46
For MBTA Police call 617-222-1212
PA N O R A M A
To Attleboro,
Stoughton, Providence
24
To Middleborough,
Lakeville
To Kingston/
Plymouth
5
•
6
•
7
•
8
•
9
•
10
•
11
•
12
•
13
•
14
•
15
CHARLESTOWN
(see page 46)
D
•
Freedom Trail & Sites
Black Heritage Trail
Pedestrian Area
W
City Water Taxi Stops
Charles River Basin
Pedestrian Bridges
Public Restrooms
R
E
D
LEGEND
1
14
•
13
E
MBTA Subway Stops
T Red Line
T Blue Line
T Orange Line
T Green Line
12
•
•
CAMBRIDGE
(see page 47)
F
F
FENWAY/KENMORE SQUARE
(see page 47)
•
•
11
2
10
4
G
9
5
6
7
G
3
8
1
•
•
H
H
•
•
J
J
•
•
K
K
•
•
L
L
MAP INDEX
GREATER BOSTON
100
115
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
117
118
119
117
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
135
136
137
100
138
139
140
141
142
Old City Hall
Old Corner Bookstore
Old North Church
Old South Meeting House
Old State House
The Opera House
Park Street Church
Park Street Station
Paul Revere House
Paul Revere Mall
Post Office Square
Prudential Center
The Public Garden (Swan Boats)
Quincy Market
Robert Gould Shaw Memorial
Rowes Wharf
Shubert Theatre
Sightseeing boats
Simmons College
South Station Information Center
State House
Suffolk University
Symphony Hall
TD Banknorth Garden
Tip O’Neill Building
Transportation Building
Trinity Church
USS Constitution (Charlestown map)
USS Constitution Museum
Wang Center for the Performing Arts
Wheelock College
Wilbur Theatre
World Trade Center
Zoo New England/Franklin Park Zoo
G10
G10
E11
G10
G11
H9
G10
G9
E11
E12
G11
H6
G8
G11
G9
H13
J9
G13
K3
J11
G9
F9
J5
E10
E9
H9
G7
D10
D10
J9
J2
J9
J14
L6
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
120
154
155
H13
1
Caffe Pompei
E11
2
Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse
H8
3
Fajitas & ’Ritas
H9
4
Florentine Café
F12
5
The Hungry i
F8
6
Jasper White’s Summer Shack
H5
7
Jimmy’s Harborside
K14
8
Lucca Restaurant
F11
9
Mamma Maria
G12
10
G6
11
33 Restaurant & Lounge
156
157
158
159
116
160
161
162
163
164
CAMBRIDGE MAP
Cambridge City Hall
CambridgeSide Galleria
Harvard Art Museums-Fogg/Sackler
Harvard Museum of Natural History
Harvard Square
Harvard University
MIT
C4
D7
B3 165
A3 166
B2
B2
E5
HEALTHCARE
Beth Israel Deaconess Med. Ctr.
Boston Medical Center
Brigham & Women’s Hosp.
Children’s Hospital
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard School of Public Health
Joslin Diabetes Center
Longwood Medical area
Mass. Eye & Ear Infirmary
Mass. General Hospital
New England Baptist Hosp.
New England Med. Ctr.
Spaulding Rehabilitation Hosp.
J2
L8
K1
K2
K1
L2
K1
K2
E8
E8
L1
J9
D9
BOSTON LODGING
Best Western Boston
K1
Best Western Roadhouse Suites
L8
Best Western Terrace Inn
G1
Boston Harbor Hotel
G12
Boston Marriot/Copley Place
J7
F12
Boston Marriot/Long Wharf
H8
Boston Park Plaza
Brookline Courtyard by Marriott
H1
The Bulfinch Clarion Hotel
E9
Charlesmark Hotel
H7
Club Quarters
G11
The Colonnade
J6
Comfort Inn & Suites Boston/Airport D16
H7
Copley Square Hotel
Days Inn Boston
B1
Doubletree Club Hotel Boston Bayside L9
Doubletree Club Hotel Boston Downtown J9
Doubletree Guests Suites
E1
ADVERTISER INDEX
The Barking Crab
180
181
182
183
184
185
184
186
187
188
189
190
Advertiser map locator
Eliot Suite Hotel
Embassy Suites Boston Logan Airport
The Fairmont Copley Plaza
Fifteen Beacon Street
Four Seasons Hotel
Hampton Inn, Crosstown Center
The Harborside Inn
Hilton Boston Back Bay
Hilton Boston Logan Airport
Holiday Inn Express
Holiday Inn/Logan Airport
Holiday Inn/Brookline
Holiday Inn Select/Government Center
Holiday Inn/Somerville
Hotel Buckminster
Hotel Commonwealth
Howard Johnson Lodge
Hyatt Harborside Hotel
Hyatt Regency Boston, Financial District
John Hancock Conference Center
Jurys Boston
Langham Hotel, Boston
Lenox Hotel
Marriott Courtyard
Marriott’s Custom House
Marriott Quincy
The Midtown Hotel
Millennium Bostonian Hotel
Milner Hotel
NINE ZERO Hotel
Omni Parker House
Onyx Hotel
Radisson Hotel
Ramada Inn Boston
Residence Inn by Marriott on Tudor Wharf
Ritz Carlton Boston Common
Ritz Carlton Hotel
Seaport Hotel
Sheraton Boston
Tage Inn Boston/Somerville
Tremont House
Westin Hotel/Copley Plaza
Wyndham Boston Hotel
Wyndham Chelsea
H4
E15
H7
G9
H8
L7
G12
H5
F16
L9
D16
H1
F9
A6
G3
G4
H3
H15
H10
H7
H8
G11
H6
H7
G12
L9
J6
F11
H9
G10
G10
E10
H8
L9
D10
H10
G8
K14
H6
A7
J9
J7
G12
A12
CAMBRIDGE LODGING
Charles Hotel
Hampton Inn/Cambridge
Harvard Square Hotel
Hotel Marlowe
Hotel at MIT
Hyatt Regency/Cambridge
Inn at Harvard
Marriott/Cambridge Center
Radisson Hotel/Cambridge
Residence Inn by Marriott/Cambridge
Royal Sonesta
Sheraton Commander
B1
C7
B1
D7
D4
E3
B2
E6
D2
D6
D7
A1
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
maps
POINTS OF INTEREST
African Meeting House
F9
Arlington Street Church
G8
Back Bay Station
J7
Bank of America Pavilion
K14
Berklee College of Music
H5
Berklee Performance Center
H5
Black Falcon Cruise Port
L15
Black Heritage Trail – – –
F9
Boston Center for the Arts
J8
Boston City Hall
F10
Boston Common
G9
Boston Convention & Exhibition Ctr.
K13
Boston Design Center
K15
Boston Massacre Site
G11
Boston Public Library
H6
Boston Tea Party Ship & Museum
J12
Boston University
G2
Bunker Hill Monument
B9
Bunker Hill Pavilion (Charlestown map) C10
Central Burying Ground
H9
Charles Playhouse
J9
Charlestown Navy Yard (Charlestown map) C11
Cheers Bar
G8
Children’s Museum
J12
Christian Science Center
J5
Christopher Columbus Park
F12
Citgo sign
G3
Colonial Theatre
H9
Conference Center at Harvard Medical J2
Copley Place
J7
Copley Square
H7
Copley Theatre
H7
Copps Hill Burial Ground
E11
Custom House Tower
G12
Cutlter Majestic Theatre
H9
Downtown Crossing
H10
Emerald Necklace
J1-J11
Emerson College
H9
Emmanuel College
J2
Exchange Conference Ctr.
J15
Faneuil Hall
G11
Fenway Park
H3
Freedom Trail • • • • •
G9
Government Center
G10
Granary Burial Ground
G10
Hatch Memorial Shell
F7
Haymarket (Open-air market)
F11
Horticultural Hall
J5
Huntington Theatre Co./BU Theatre
K5
Hynes Convention Center
H5
Information Centers:
Boston Common
G9
Prudential Center
H6
National Park Service
G11
Logan Airport (Terminals A & E) F16,G16
Institute of Contemporary Art
H5
International Place
H12
Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum
K3
JFK Federal Building
F10
JFK Library
L10
John Hancock Tower
H7
Jordan Hall
K5
Jorge Hernandez Cultural Center
K7
Joseph Moakley Courthouse
J13
Kenmore Square
G3
G10
Kings Chapel & Burial Gr.
Lansdowne Street
H4
Louisburg Square
F8
Mass. College of Art
K3
Museum of Afro-American History
F9
Museum of Fine Arts
K4
Museum of Science
D8
G13
New England Aquarium
New England Conservatory of Music
K5
G6
New Old South Church
D9
North Station
Northeastern University
K4
___
51
SIGHTSEEING
Whether it’s New England’s only three-hour, high-speed
catamaran whale watch, a sunset or lunch cruise, a historic sightseeing tour or a visit to Boston’s unique Harbor
Islands, BHC’s variety of cruises and convenient scheduling make it easy to fit a harbor cruise into your plans.
CHARLES RIVER BOAT TOURS, depart from
CambridgeSide Galleria and The World Trade Center,
617-621-3001. Call for full schedule and ticket prices.
Enjoy daily 60-minute sightseeing tours of Boston and
Cambridge along the Charles River, or venture out into
Boston Harbor for a view of the city. Private charters
also available.
AIRPORT SPECIAL
DOWNTOWN TO LOGAN: $20 BACK BAY TO LOGAN: $25
“The Best Ride
in Town”
GONDOLA DI VENEZIA TOURS, Charles River Esplanade,
1-866-2-VENICE. Tours: Wed–Sun 2–11 p.m. Tickets:
Traditional Tours $69 for two; Sunset Tours (without accordion player) $99 for two, (with accordion player) $139 for
two; Bellisimo Tours $219 for two; all tours $15 each
additional person. Tours depart from beneath the Arthur
Fiedler Footbridge on the Esplanade. With authentic
Venetian gondolas and an Old World approach to
romance, these picturesque rides along the Esplanade
Lagoon feature complimentary snacks.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MASS. OFFICE OF TRAVEL & TOURISM
ADAMS NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK: Visit
sightseeing
the home of two former presidents at this hidden
gem in Quincy, just to the south of the city. Refer to
listing, below.
AMUSEMENT PARKS
5WITS, 186 Brookline Ave., 617-375-WITS. Sun & Mon 11
a.m.–8 p.m., Wed & Thu 11 a.m.–11 p.m., Fri & Sat 11 a.m.
to midnight. Tickets: $12–20. Combining the appeals of
theme parks, museums and haunted houses, 5Wits provides
visitors with action-packed interactive game-play and puzzlesolving activities. Current show: Tomb, which allows players
to journey to the center of a buried pharaoah’s final resting
place, facing challenges and obstacles along the way.
SIX FLAGS NEW ENGLAND, 1623 Main St. (Rte. 159 South),
Agawam, 413-786-9300. Open Sat & Sun; call for hours of
operation. Tickets: $41.99, seniors $26.99, kids $25.99; after
4 p.m., $24.99. Part of one of the nation’s top amusement
park chains, Six Flags New England is the region’s largest
option for thrills and chills from humongous roller coasters,
water rides and more—including the Superman: Ride of
Steel and the brand-new Mr. Six’s Pandemonium.
CRUISES
BAY STATE CRUISE COMPANY, 200 Seaport Blvd. at the
World Trade Center, 877-PT-FERRY. Visit www.provincetown
fastferry.com or call for ticket prices, reservations and departure times. Enjoy fast or traditional ferry service daily from
Boston to Provincetown aboard the new and sleek
Provincetown III.
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52
BOSTON HARBOR CRUISES, One Long Wharf, 617-2274321. Call for reservations and departure times. Boston’s oldest and largest cruise company has something for everyone.
PA N O R A M A
LIBERTY FLEET OF TALL SHIPS, departs daily from Long
Wharf, 617-742-0333. Daily sails at noon, 3 p.m. and 6
p.m. Tickets: $30, children $18. Come aboard to relive the
days of Boston Tall Ships. Take the wheel, set the sails or
just sit back and enjoy the sights and beauty of Boston
Harbor and her islands. Full cash bar available.
MASSACHUSETTS BAY LINES, depart from 60 Rowes
Wharf, 617-542-8000. Call for full schedule and ticket
prices. Take a tour of the harbor as the captain narrates a
55-minute cruise. Observe the colorful Boston skyline on a
sunset cruise, dance the night away on a music cruise
Thu–Sat, or swoon under the stars on a moonlight cruise
Fri–Sat. Private charters also available.
ODYSSEY CRUISES, departs daily from Rowes Wharf, 1-888741-0281. Brunch: Sat & Sun daily noon–2 p.m. Tickets:
$42–48. Lunch: Mon–Fri noon–2 p.m. Tickets: $37. Dinner:
Mon–Thu 7–10 p.m., Fri & Sat 8–11 p.m., Sun 6–9 p.m.
Tickets: $78–92. Boarding begins one hour prior to departure. Prices include meal. Midday and moonlight cruises also
available. Cruise historic Boston Harbor while enjoying lunch,
brunch or dinner aboard this elegant cruise ship. Three lavish
decks offer a myriad of entertainment choices, from jazz to
contemporary music, and every on-deck stroll reveals the
glorious Boston skyline.
SIGHTS OF INTEREST
ADAMS NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK, 1250 Hancock St.,
Quincy, eight miles south of Boston, 617-770-1175. Take
the “T” to the Quincy Center stop on the Red Line. Visitor
Center is open daily from 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Trolley tours:
depart every 30 minutes from 9:15 a.m.–3:15 p.m. Tickets:
$5; children (under 16) free. This oft-overlooked historical
gem offers insight into the lives of U.S. presidents John
Adams and son John Quincy Adams. Tours stop at the
birthplaces of both presidents, as well as “The Old
House,” which was home to five generations of the
Adams family. Stop by the Visitor Center to register and
purchase tickets.
Your own Private Limousine and Chauffeur
from your downtown hotel to Logan Airport...
u Luxurious Lincoln Town Car Fleet
u Courteous, Reliable Service
u Transportation to Theatres, Restaurants and
the Casinos
u Shopping and Sightseeing Tours
Tours include Cambridge, Concord and Lexington,
Salem, Plymouth, Newport,Cape Cod and Cape Ann
Equally attractive rates from hotels outside of
Boston to the Logan airport. All Major Credit Cards Accepted
Boston Town Car
For Reservations, call (617) 782-4000
[email protected]
Toll Free (888) 765-LIMO
ARNOLD ARBORETUM, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, 617524-1718. Grounds open year-round, sunrise to sunset. Free
admission. Visitor Center open Mon–Fri 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sat
10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun noon–4 p.m. This 265-acre tree
sanctuary designed by Emerald Necklace architect Frederick
Law Olmsted opened in 1872. Now a National Historic
Landmark, the arboretum and its gardens contain more than
7,000 varieties of trees, shrubs and flowers, all labeled for
your perusal.
BOSTON ATHENAEUM, 101⁄2 Beacon St., 617-227-0270.
Member hours: Tue–Fri 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Mon ’til 8 p.m.
Public tours: Tue & Thu at 3 p.m. Reservations required. One
of the oldest and most distinguished private libraries in the
United States, the Athenaeum was founded in 1807. For
nearly half a century, it was the unchallenged center of intellectual life in Boston, and by 1851 it had become one of the
five largest libraries in the country.
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, 700 Boylston St., Copley Square,
617-536-5400. Mon–Thu 9 a.m.–9 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 5 p.m.,
Sun 1–5 p.m. Free admission. Art & Architecture tours
offered Mon at 2:30 p.m., Tue & Thu at 6 p.m., Fri & Sat at
11 a.m. The first publicly supported municipal library in the
world hosts one million visitors a year, who come to view this
architectural masterpiece and its collection of more than five
million books. Film festivals, exhibits and children’s programs
run throughout the year.
BOSTON TEA PARTY SHIP AND MUSEUM, Congress Street
Bridge, 617-338-1773. Temporarily closed due to fire
damage. This replica of the famous ship, being repaired offsite, remains an indelible token of patriotism on the site of
the “single most important event leading to the American
Revolution.” On a cold evening in 1773, a group of colonists
led by the Sons of Liberty snuck aboard a British ship and
threw hundreds of chests of tea into Boston Harbor in protest
of taxation without representation.
BUNKER HILL PAVILION, Boston National Historical Park
Visitors Center, Charlestown, 617-242-5601. Located yards
from the U.S.S. Constitution. Visitor center and bookstore
open daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Monument open daily from 9
a.m.–4:30 p.m. Free admission. Check out “Whites of Their
Eyes,” a dramatic multimedia presentation of the Battle of
Bunker Hill, one of the first major battles of the Revolution.
Or climb the nearby Bunker Hill Monument, a 221-foot
granite obelisk.
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54
CHARLES RIVER ESPLANADE, 617-635-4305. This treelined park along the Charles River basin is a popular spot for
leisurely strolls and picnics as well as recreational activities.
Sports enthusiasts are drawn to the 17-mile biking, jogging
and walking path between the Museum of Science and
Watertown, while others flock to the water to sail, windsurf,
canoe or kayak. The nearby DCR Hatch Shell frequently hosts
PA N O R A M A
mementos personally collected and arranged by the
president’s mother.
FOREST HILLS CEMETERY, 95 Forest Hills Ave., 617-5240128. Open daily from dawn to dusk. Created in 1848, this
cemetery serves as the final resting place of Eugene O’Neill,
Anne Sexton, e.e. cummings, William Lloyd Garrison and former Boston Celtic Reggie Lewis. The 275 acres of twisting
paths also contain sculptural treasures, an arboretum, a
“library” of life stories and an open-air museum. Special
event: Sep 18 at 2 p.m.—Contemporary art tour, led by artists
who’ll discuss their work on the Contemporary Sculpture Path.
JOHN HANCOCK TOWER, 200 Clarendon St., 617-572-6429.
Rising 62 stories into the sky, this I.M. Pei-designed, sliverof-glass skyscraper is New England’s tallest building and is
considered by many to be one of the most beautiful skyscrapers in the world. The building houses the headquarters
of its namesake, insurance giant John Hancock Financial.
Unfortunately, the observatory on the 60th floor was closed
after September 11, 2001.
HARRISON GRAY OTIS HOUSE, 141 Cambridge St., 617227-3956. Tours: Wed–Sun 11 a.m.–4:30 p.m. every 30 minutes. Admission: $8; seniors $4; students $2.50; free for
kids, Historic New England members and Boston residents.
Built in 1796 for Harrison Gray Otis and his wife, Sally, this
grand mansion is a brilliant example of high-style Federal
elegance. Tours offer insight into the social, business and
family life of the post-Revolution American elite.
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY: The McKim
edifice of the BPL in Copley Square is a
historic and architecural landmark. Refer to
listing, left.
JOHN F. KENNEDY NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE, 83 Beals
St., Brookline, 617-566-7937. Open Wed–Sun 10 a.m.–4:30
p.m. Admission: $3; children (17 and under) free. Guided
tours every half-hour. This modest frame house is the wellpreserved 1917 birthplace and childhood home of the
35th president of the United States, and also the first
home shared by the president’s father and mother, Joseph
P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy. Includes a collection of
household furnishings, photographs and significant
THE MARY BAKER EDDY LIBRARY, 200 Mass. Ave., 617450-7000. Open Tue–Sun from 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Admission:
$6; seniors, students with ID and youth (6–17) $4; children
(under 6) and members free. Home to the world-famous
Mapparium, a three-story stained-glass globe depicting the
world as it existed in 1934, which guests can walk through.
Visitors to the library can follow Mary Baker Eddy’s quest for
insight and embark on one of their own through interactive
exhibits in the Quest Gallery, or try out a “desk job” at the
Pulitzer Prize-winning Christian Science Monitor.
MINUTE MAN NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK, Concord and
Lexington, 978-369-6993. Minute Man Visitor Center is located on Route 2A West; North Bridge Visitor Center is at 174
Liberty St. Both open daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Created in 1959 to
preserve the sites associated with the opening battles of the
American Revolution, Minute Man Park consists of over 900
acres of land along original segments of the Battles of
Lexington and Concord, including Lexington Green and
sightseeing
sightseeing
BOSTON PUBLIC GARDEN, bordered by Arlington, Charles,
Beacon and Boylston streets. Open daily dawn to dusk.
Established in 1837, the Public Garden is the nation’s first
public botanical garden. Its 24 acres are filled with scenic
and diverse greenery, as well as sculptures, including one
that commemorates the popular children’s book Make Way
for Ducklings. Other fixtures include the Lagoon, home to the
famed Swan Boats from April through Labor Day, and a suspension bridge designed as a miniature replica of the
Brooklyn Bridge.
dows illustrating Biblical events. Also see listing for the Mary
Baker Eddy Library.
concerts and films, as well as performances by the worldfamous Boston Pops.
CUSTOM HOUSE TOWER, 3 McKinley Square, 617-3106300. Free historical tours daily at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Tours
may be cancelled due to weather conditions, call ahead.
Boston’s first skyscraper, the Custom House stands high over
Boston Harbor as one of the city’s most impressive landmarks. Crowned by its distinctive clock tower and restored
with modern luxuries, the building epitomizes the preservation of Boston’s historic architecture. Today, the Marriott
Corporation operates this landmark.
EMERALD NECKLACE, parks throughout Boston, 617-6357487. Free guided tours by appointment only. This worldfamous string of parks that runs through the city was the
brainchild of renowned landscape architect Frederick Law
Olmsted, and took almost 20 years to complete. The six
green spaces—Back Bay Fens, Riverway, Olmsted Park,
Jamaica Pond, Arnold Arboretum and Franklin Park—stretch
five miles from the Charles River to Dorchester and make
up over 1,000 acres of parkland. Although not officially part
of the Emerald Necklace, Boston Common and the Public
Garden are sometimes considered the starting points, and
are connected to the Necklace by the Commonwealth
Avenue Mall.
THE FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST, 175 Huntington
Ave., 617-450-3790. Services: Sun at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.,
Wed at noon and 7:30 p.m. The original Mother Church built
in 1894 is at the heart of the Christian Science Center, situated on 14 acres in the Back Bay. The Romanesque structure
is made from New Hampshire granite with stained glass win-
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SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
55
Concord’s North Bridge. The park also preserves The
Wayside, the 19th-century home of literary greats Nathaniel
Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott and Margaret Sidney.
Civil Action, Good Will Hunting, Mystic River and others. This
90-minute walking tour takes movie buffs to 30 spots where
some of Hollywood’s biggest stars have come to film. Tour
guides also offer up behind-the-scenes stories and
Hollywood gossip.
NEW ENGLAND HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL, Congress Street
near Faneuil Hall. This haunting memorial features six luminous glass towers etched with the six million prisoner numbers of those who perished in the Holocaust. Visitors can
walk under the towers and read the dramatic stories of the
victims and heroes of this tremendous human tragedy.
TRINITY CHURCH, Copley Square, 617-536-0944. Open daily
from 8 a.m.–6 p.m.; tours available. Built in 1877, this house
of worship, a combination of Victorian, Gothic and French
Romanesque styles, is one of the great masterpieces of
American church architecture. The building is located in
Copley Square adjacent to the I.M. Pei-designed John
Hancock Tower, itself a contemporary architectural masterpiece. The church is currently in the midst of a $53 million
preservation initiative.
TOURS AND TRAILS
BEACON HILL WALKING TOURS, 617-227-3957, Ext. 256.
Guided tours highlighting the richly European section of
Boston along the Freedom Trail. Tickets: $10; reservation recommended. Magnificent & Modern: Beacon Hill Walking Tour,
including a tour of the Otis House Museum, every Sat from
11 a.m.–1 p.m.; Beacon Hill Treasures, Sep 17 from 11
a.m.–noon.
BLACK HERITAGE TRAIL, 617-742-5415. Tours: Mon–Sat at
10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. Call at least 24 hours in advance for
reservations. A guided tour through the north side of Beacon
Hill, including the homes of politicians and entrepreneurs; the
African Meeting House, built in 1806; the oldest standing
house built by an African-American (1797); and the home of
Lewis and Harriet Hayden, who harbored runaway slaves.
Maps are available at the Museum of Afro-American History.
BOSTON ART TOURS, 617-732-3920. Call for full tour schedule. Tickets: $25; teens $15; children (under 12) free. Boston
Art Tours offers various excursions to area museums and galleries that highlight different historical time periods. Families
may choose from age-appropriate tours offering lively
descriptions of works to help further the understanding of art.
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BOSTON BIKE TOUR, 617-308-5902. Tours: Sat & Sun at
11 a.m. Tickets: Sat tour $20 (w/o bike rental, $15), Sun tour
$25 (w/o bike rental, $18). Tours make stops at various sites
while your guide shares history and pokes playful fun at the
PA N O R A M A
PH OTO B Y K I N D R A C L I N E F F /
M A S S . O F F I C E O F T R AV E L & T O U R I S M
TRINITY CHURCH: The striking Victorian,
Gothic and Romanesque hybrid, built in
1877 and subject of a recent renovation, rises
above Copley Square. Refer to listing, left.
THE FREEDOM TRAIL FOUNDATION’S FREEDOM TRAIL
PLAYERS, departs from the Visitor Center on Boston
Common, 617-357-8300. Tours daily at 11 a.m., noon and 1
p.m. Tickets: $12; children (12 and under) $6. Explore the
Freedom Trail with costumed actors portraying famous patriots such as James Otis, Abigail Adams and William Dawes in
this 90-minute tour. Stops include the Park Street Church, the
Boston Massacre Site, the Old State House and Faneuil Hall.
GHOSTS AND GRAVESTONES TOUR, 617-269-3626. Tours
daily at 6, 7, 8 and 9 p.m. Reservations required. Tickets:
$30; children: $18. Step aboard the trolley of doom for a tour
of the dark side of Boston. Your host, a 17th century
gravedigger, tells the tales of the Angel of Death, the Boston
Strangler and other infamous characters from Boston’s past.
HARPOON BREWERY TOUR, 306 Northern Ave., 1-888-HARPOON ext. 522. Tours: Tue–Sat at 3 p.m., Fri & Sat at 1 and
3 p.m. Free admission. This waterfront institution was the
first brewery in 25 years to be granted a permit to brew and
package beer commercially when it opened in 1987. Visitors
gather at the Tap Room, which overlooks the brewery, for 30to 45-minute tours of the plant.
THE LITERARY TRAIL, departs from the Omni Parker House,
60 School St., 617-350-0358. Call for full tour schedule.
Tickets: $30; children (under 12) $26. Group tours also available. Tickets include entrance to all museums on the trail.
This 20-mile tour includes stops at the Boston Athenaeum;
the Omni Parker House; Cambridge’s Longfellow House; the
Concord Museum, which houses Ralph Waldo Emerson’s
study; and famed Walden Pond.
NORTH END MARKET TOUR, 64 Cross St., take the T to
Haymarket, 617-523-6032. Wed & Sat 10 a.m.–1 p.m. and
2–5 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.–1 p.m. and 3–6 p.m. Reservations
required. Custom tours for groups available. Tickets: $49.
Michele Topor, an authority on Italian cuisine and culture,
hosts award-winning culinary walking tours through one of
the nation’s oldest Italian-American communities.
NORTH END SECRET TOURS, North Square (across from The
Paul Revere House), 617-720-2283. Fri & Sat 10 a.m., 1 p.m.
sightseeing
sightseeing
THE SKYWALK OBSERVATORY AT THE PRUDENTIAL
CENTER, 617-859-0648. Open daily 10 a.m.–10 p.m.
Skywalk kiosk closes at 6 p.m. Admission (including a headset audio tour of points of interest): $9.50; seniors $7; children (under 12) $6.50. Observatory may be closed due to
weather conditions, please call ahead. Enjoy spectacular
360-degree panoramic views of Boston and beyond and
learn about the city’s 375 years of culture and history on the
new Antennae Audio Tour. Recently added displays include
“Dreams of Freedom,” featuring the Boston immigrant experience; an exhibit overlooking Fenway Park dedicated the
legendary Red Sox slugger Ted Williams; and a new theater
showing “Wings Over Boston,” a spectacular aerial tour of
the entire city.
FENWAY PARK TOURS, 4 Yawkey Way, 617-226-6666. Tours
daily each hour from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. or until three hours
before game time. Tickets: $12; seniors $11; children (under
14) $10. Tours originate at the Souvenir Store located on
Yawkey Way across from Service Gate D, rain or shine. Have
you dreamt of walking across the field where Red Sox legends spent their glory days? This tour offers a behind-thescenes look at America’s oldest active Major League ballpark, including a glimpse behind the famed “Green Monster.”
After completing your sojourn into the macabre, step off the
trolley for a walk through two of the oldest burying grounds
in the city.
city and its heritage. Tours leave from the Boston Common
Visitor Center at Park Street Station (bikes and equipment
are provided).
BOSTON BY FOOT, 617-367-2345 or 617-367-3766. Guided
90 minute tours highlighting the rich architecture and history
of the city, led by trained volunteers. Tickets: $10, children
(6–12) $8, unless noted. Call for tour locations. The Heart of
the Freedom Trail, every day at 10 a.m., tickets: $11, children
(6–12) $8; Victorian Back Bay, Fri, Sat & Sun at 10 a.m., Tue
& Thu at 5:30 p.m.; Literary Landmark Tour, Sat at 2 p.m.,
tickets: $11, children (6–12) $9; Beacon Hill, Mon–Fri at 5:30
p.m., Sat at 10 a.m., Sun at 2 p.m.; North End, Fri & Sat at 2
p.m.; Boston Underground, Sun at 2 p.m., tickets: $11, children (6–12) $9; Boston By Little Feet, Mon & Sat at 10 a.m.,
Sun at 2 p.m., tickets: $8.
BOSTON DUCK TOURS, Prudential Center and Museum of
Science. www.bostonducktours.com. Tours: seven days a
week, 9 a.m. ’til one hour before sunset. Tickets: $25; seniors, students & military $22; children (3–11) $16; (under 3)
$3; special needs $10. Group discounts available. Experience
the city in an amazing vehicle that rides on land and water.
The 80-minute tour visits most of Boston’s famous sights.
And just when you think you’ve seen it all, your Duck splashes into the Charles River for a spectacular water view.
BOSTON MOVIE TOURS, departs from the Shaw Memorial in
front of the State House on Beacon Street. 866-MOVIE-45.
www.bostonmovietours.net. Tours: daily at 11 a.m. and 1:30
p.m. Tickets: $20; seniors and students $17; children (6–12)
$10. Reservations strongly encouraged. Experience the city
of Boston the way Tinseltown has through such films as A
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SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
57
and 4 p.m. Reservations required. Tickets: $30 per person.
This two-hour guided walking tour explores some of the hidden courtyards and passageways of the North End, visits the
birthplace of Kennedy matriarch Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy,
and tells unusual tales of Boston’s oldest neighborhood.
STONE ZOO, 149 Pond St., Stoneham, 781-438-5100. Open
daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $7.50; seniors $6.50; children (2–15) $4.50; children (under 2) free. Highlights include
Snowy Owl creek, Mexican gray wolves, snow leopards,
jaguars, reindeer, river otters, llamas and miniature donkeys,
as well as educational programs at the Animal Discovery
Center. The Zoo is also home to the nation’s first “Earth Park.”
Special exhibit: Lord of the Wings: Birds of Prey, an ongoing
educational show. Special event: Sep 24 from 5:30–9:30
p.m.—A Wild Affair, an event celebrating Stone Zoo’s 100th
birthday, featuring fine food from area restaurants, live entertainment, animal encounters, a silent auction and more.
Tickets: $35; call 617-989-2015.
OLD TOWN TROLLEY TOURS OF BOSTON, 617-269-7010.
Departs every 15–20 minutes daily from 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Tickets: $29; seniors & students $26; children (under 12)
free. With 16 stops throughout the city, including the New
England Aquarium, U.S.S. Constitution Museum, the Trolley
Stop Store on the corner of South Charles and Boylston
streets, and most major hotels (see your concierge), patrons
can enjoy a 100-minute, fully narrated sightseeing tour of
more than 100 points of interest aboard the orange-andgreen, all-weather trolley.
S C O T T R O B E RT O
CAMBRIDGE
SAMUEL ADAMS BREWERY TOUR: DRINK IN A LITTLE
HISTORY, 30 Germania St., Jamaica Plain, 617-368-5080.
Tours: Wed & Thu at 2 p.m.; Fri at 2 and 5:30 p.m.; Sat at
noon, 1 and 2 p.m.; one-hour tours include samples (ID
required). Tickets: $2; donation given to a local charity. Learn
about the art of brewing beer and taste the rich malts and
spicy hops on this tour of the original Samuel Adams brewery.
SWAN BOATS, Public Garden Lagoon, 617-522-1966. Rides:
daily from 10 a.m.–5 p.m., weather permitting. Tickets:
$2.50, children (2–15) $1, seniors $2. One of Boston’s oldest
and most treasured traditions, these pedal-powered boats
glide around the Public Garden and under the smallest suspension bridge in the world.
WHALE WATCHES
BOSTON HARBOR CRUISES, One Long Wharf, 617-2224321. Through Sep 25: Mon–Fri at noon, Sat & Sun at 10:30
a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $31, seniors $28,
children $25. Cruise on high speed catamarans to Stellwagen
Bank, the East Coast’s most famous destination for whale
watching. Catch sight of humpback, finback and minke
whales from the deck or from the comfort of a full modernized cabin boasting snack and beverage services. The tour is
three hours, and free tickets on a future cruise are guaranteed if you don’t spot one of these magnificent creatures.
MASSACHUSETTS BAY LINE WHALE WATCHES, Departing
from Rowes Wharf behind The Boston Harbor Hotel, 617542-4321. Through Sep 25: Daily at 10:30 a.m. Tickets:
$29, children $23. Get out on the open water in search of the
sea’s most majestic creatures on this four-hour tour of
Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. On board, professional marine biologists will be onhand to share their
knowledge of whales and other marine wildlife.
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58
NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUM, Central Wharf, 617-973-5206.
Mon–Fri at 9:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m., Sat & Sun at 10 a.m. and 2
p.m. Tickets: $29, seniors $26, children $20. Discover the histoPA N O R A M A
BY
PH OTO
FRANKLIN PARK ZOO: Birds, zebras, lions,
kangaroos and gorillas abound at the many
displays of this oustanding menagerie. Refer
to listing, below.
Due to limited parking, it is best to take the Red Line
when traveling to Harvard, Central or Kendall squares.
The Cambridge Discovery Booth located at the Harvard
Square “T” entrance provides additional information.
CAMBRIDGE COMMON/OLD BURYING GROUND. A grazing
pasture and cemetery for Puritan Newtowne, as well as a
favorite meeting spot for public figures and a tent site for the
Continental Army. Early college presidents and town residents
were buried in “God’s Acre” across from the Common.
CHRIST CHURCH. This 1761 Tory house of worship was utilized as a Colonial barracks during the American Revolution.
FIRST CHURCH UNITARIAN/UNIVERSALIST. Harvard College
provided the pews for its students in this 1833 building
erected for the then-newly founded Unitarian Church.
ry of Stellwagen Bank aboard the Aquarium’s whale watch vessel, the 111-foot catamaran Voyager III. Search for a variety of
whales, including humpback, finback and minke. Interactive
exhibits include microscope stations, electronic navigation, computer whale programs, meteorological instruments and movies.
HARVARD AND RADCLIFFE YARDS. The centers of two institutions that have played major educational roles since
Harvard’s founding in 1636.
WILDLIFE
HARVARD SQUARE/OLD CAMBRIDGE. The center of
Cambridge activity since the 17th century, the Square is
home to Harvard University, historic buildings, bookstores,
cafes, restaurants and shops.
FRANKLIN PARK ZOO, One Franklin Park Road, Franklin
Park, 617-541-LION. Open Mon–Fri from 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat
& Sun ’til 6 p.m. Admission: $9.50; seniors $8; children
(2–15) $5.50; children (under 2) free. Home to more than
210 species, including many endangered animals. Roam the
Australian Outback Trail with wallabies and kangaroos;
explore the Tropical Forest and see the gorillas; marvel at the
lions at Kalahari Kingdom; and visit zebras, ostriches, ibex
and wildebeests at Serengeti Crossing.
NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUM, Central Wharf, 617-973-5200.
Open Mon–Fri 9 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sat & Sun 9 a.m.–6 p.m.
Admission: $15.95; seniors $13.95; children (3–11) $8.95;
children (under 3) free. Refer to Currently section under Film
for IMAX theater listings. Combination ticket prices available.
Dedicated to advancing knowledge of the world of water, this
outstanding aquatic zoo features a 187,000-gallon Giant
Ocean Tank containing a Caribbean coral reef with sharks,
sea turtles, moray eels and other aquatic life. Be sure to
check out the popular penguin habitat. Special exhibit:
Amazing Jellies. The adjacent Simons 3D IMAX Theater is the
first theater of its kind in the Boston area. Refer to Film in
Currently for complete IMAX theater listings and Kids Corner
for special events.
LONGFELLOW NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE, 105 Brattle St.,
Cambridge, 617-876-4491. Wed–Sun 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Park
ranger-guided tours: 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. and 1, 2, 3 and 4
p.m. Admission: $3, children (under 16) free. This 1759 Georgian
mansion was home to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow from 1837
to 1882 and a central gathering place for writers and artists in
the 19th century. It also served as George Washington’s headquarters during the siege of Boston in 1775–76. Original furnishings, books and art from around the world are on display.
MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY, 580 Mount Auburn St.,
Cambridge, 617-547-7105. Open daily from 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Founded in 1831 by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society,
Mount Auburn was the first landscaped cemetery in the
country. Many prominent Americans are buried here, including Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Isabella Stewart Gardner
and Winslow Homer. The cemetery is also an arboretum,
sculpture garden and wildlife sanctuary.
TORY ROW (BRATTLE STREET). One of the nation’s most
beautiful residential streets, Tory Row is the site of Loyalist
mansions and their elegant neighbors from every period of
American architecture.
A B o s t o n Tr a d i t i o n
A National Historic Landmark
sightseeing
sightseeing
PHOTO WALKS, 617-851-2273. Tours: daily at 10 a.m. and 1
p.m. Call for reservations and departure locations. Tickets:
$25; students $20; children (ages 10–17) $15. Explore
Boston on a photographic journey that reveals the scenic
treasures of the Public Garden, Beacon Hill, the Freedom Trail
and the waterfront. Each walking tour provides fascinating
historical information and simple, creative tips on composing
artistic photographs of area attractions.
America’s
Oldest
Restaurant
On The
Freedom Trail
In The
Faneuil Hall Area
Specializing In Yankee Style Seafood,
Fresh New England Lobster
And Grilled Meats
41 Union Street • 617-227-2750
Sunday-Thursday 11 am-9:30 pm
Friday & Saturday 11 am-10 pm
Union Bar til-Midnight
All Major Credit Cards Honored • Validated Parking
Visit Our Website • www.unionoysterhouse.com
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
59
FREEDOM TRAIL
building stands on land bought from John Hancock. The red brick
portion was designed by the legendary architect Charles Bulfinch.
PARK STREET CHURCH (3). Corner of
Park and Tremont streets, 617-523-3383.
Sunday services at 8:30 & 11 a.m. and 4
& 6 p.m. Morning services are traditional,
evening services are contemporary. Built
in 1809, this church was described by
Henry James as “the most interesting
mass of brick and mortar in America.”
this seat of colonial government was the center of activity for
such patriots as John Hancock and Samuel and John Adams. It
was from the east balcony that the Declaration of Independence
was first read in Boston.
BOSTON MASSACRE SITE (10). State
Street in front of the Old State House. At
the next intersection below the State
House, a ring of cobblestones marks the
site of the clash between a jeering Boston
crowd and a British guard of nine soldiers
OLD GRANARY BURYING GROUND (4).
Tremont Street next to Park Street
Church, 617-635-7389. Open daily 9
a.m.–5 p.m. This historic cemetery, formerly the town granary, is the final resting place of John Hancock, Paul Revere,
Robert Treat Paine, Samuel Adams, Peter
Faneuil, and the victims of the Boston
Massacre. A stone inscribed “Mary Goose” (a.k.a. Elizabeth
Goose) allegedly marks the grave of Mother Goose.
THE FREEDOM TRAIL FOUNDATION’S FREEDOM
TRAIL PLAYERS: Step back in time and explore the
Freedom Trail with costumed actors portraying famous
patriots such as James Otis, Abigail Adams and William
Dawes in this 90-minute tour covering the sites listed
below. Refer to listing in Sightseeing, page 57.
The Freedom Trail begins at the Boston Common
Information Kiosk, where you can obtain a free
guide or rent a handheld self-guided audio tour
complete with sound effects and anecdotes for $15,
$12 for each additional adult and $10 for children.
Free 90-minute, park ranger-guided tours depart
from the Boston National Historical Park Visitors
Center at the corner of State and Devonshire
streets, Mon–Fri at 2 p.m., Sat & Sun at 10 & 11 a.m.
and 2 p.m. First come, first serve. Arrive 30 minutes
prior to tour. Call 617-242-5642 for more information.
The number accompanying each site listed below
refers to the site’s location as shown on Panorama’s
map. Refer to center spread.
BOSTON COMMON (1). Set aside in 1634
as a military training field and grazing pasture, the Common is the oldest public park in
America. The park served as quarters for
British as well as Colonial troops, and later
housed Civil War regiments. The British Army
set out for the start of the Revolutionary War
from what is now Park Square.
THE STATE HOUSE (2). Beacon Street, top of
Beacon Hill facing Boston Common, 617-7273676. Open Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–4 p.m., except
holidays. Guided tours Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–3:30
p.m. The famous golden dome of the State
House marks the government seat of the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The cornerstone was laid by Samuel Adams, and the
___
60
PA N O R A M A
KING’S CHAPEL AND BURYING GROUND
(5). Tremont and School streets, 617-2272155. Services: Sun at 11 a.m., Wed at
12:15 p.m. Burying Ground open daily 9
a.m.–5 p.m. Tours: Mon and Thu–Sat 9:30
a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Tue and Wed 1:30–4:30
p.m. Visitors are reminded that King’s
Chapel is a house of worship. The chapel
was established in 1687 as the first Anglican congregation in
Boston. The second chapel, built in 1754, became the first
Unitarian church in America after the Revolution.
FANEUIL HALL (11). Merchants Row and
Faneuil Hall Square, 617-523-1300. Open
daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Historical talks given
daily every half hour 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Military museum open Mon–Fri 9
a.m.–3:30 p.m. “The Cradle of Liberty”
combines in one building a free enterprise
market on the first floor with a free marketplace for the exchange of ideas upstairs.
PAUL REVERE HOUSE (12). 19 North
Square, Hanover Street, 617-523-2338.
Open daily 9:30 a.m.–5:15 p.m. Admission:
$3; students & seniors with I.D. $2.50;
children (5–17) $1; (under 5) free. The
oldest home in Boston, built about 1680,
was occupied by Paul Revere from 1770
to 1800.
COPP’S HILL BURIAL GROUND (14). Open
daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Hull Street. Set out in 1660,
Copp’s Hill was Boston’s second cemetery.
Many remarkable people are interred here,
including Increase Mather, his son Cotton,
Cotton’s son Samuel Mather and Edmund
Hartt, builder of the U.S.S. Constitution.
BUNKER HILL MONUMENT (15). Breed’s
Hill, Charlestown, 617-242-5641. Climb the
monument from 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Lodge
and museum open daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. The
site of the historic battle of June 17, 1775.
U.S.S. CONSTITUTION (16). Charlestown
Navy Yard, Charlestown, 617-242-5670.
Free guided tours Tue–Sun from 10
a.m.–3:50 p.m. This 44-gun frigate is the
oldest commissioned warship in the world.
The U.S.S. Constitution Museum, located
adjacent to the ship, is open daily from 9
a.m.–5 p.m. Call 617-426-1812.
freedom trail
freedom trail
on March 5, 1770.
OLD NORTH CHURCH (13). 193 Salem St.,
617-523-6676. Open daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Sun services at 9 and 11 a.m. Known as
Christ Church and erected in 1723, this is
Boston’s oldest standing church, where two
lanterns were hung on April 18, 1775, signaling the Redcoats’ departure by sea for
Lexington and Concord.
SITE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOL AND
BEN FRANKLIN’S STATUE (6). On School
Street, marked by a column and commemorative plaque. On April 13, 1635, the town
voted to establish the first public school in
the country (the forerunner of the Boston
Latin School). Nearby is Benjamin Franklin’s
statue, built in 1856, the first portrait-statue
erected in the United States.
SITE OF THE OLD CORNER BOOKSTORE
(7). School and Washington streets, 617367-4000. Constructed as an apothecary in
1718, the ground floor was later used as a
bookstore that became the center of literary
Boston and the meeting place of such notables as Emerson, Hawthorne, and Thoreau.
OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE (8). 310
Washington St., 617-482-6439. Open daily
9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: $5; students &
seniors $4; children (6–18) $1; children
(under 6) free. This building housed many
town meetings, the most famous of which
triggered the Boston Tea Party. Permanent
exhibit: Voices of Protest.
OLD STATE HOUSE (9). Corner of
Washington and State streets, 617-7203292. Open daily 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission:
$5; students & seniors $4; children (6–18)
$1; children (under 6) free. Built in 1713,
SEE BOSTON LIKE YOU’VE NEVER SEEN IT, AT THE SKYWALK OBSERVATORY.
VISIT OUR NEW DISPLAYS INCLUDING “DREAMS OF FREEDOM,” FEATURING THE BOSTON IMMIGRANT
EXPERIENCE, A NEW ANTENNA AUDIO TOUR AND OUR NEW THEATER
FEATURING “WINGS OVER BOSTON,” AN AERIAL TOUR OF OUR CITY
AT THE PRUDENTIAL CENTER, 800 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON. CALL 617-859-0648.
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
___
61
SHOPPING
THE SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS, 175 Newbury St., 617266-1810. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. The
oldest nonprofit craft organization in the country, established
in 1897. The Society specializes in contemporary American
crafts, jewelry, furniture, glass and ceramics ranging from
cutting edge to traditional, and from functional to sculptural.
BOOKS
BARNES & NOBLE, 395 Washington St., 617-426-5184;
800 Boylston St. (Prudential Center), 617-247-6959.
Washington Street: Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11
a.m.–6 p.m. Prudential: Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun 10
a.m.–9 p.m. One of America’s largest booksellers boasts
all the bestsellers, plus an extensive selection of back
titles, audiobooks, magazines, CDs and more.
BORDERS, 10–24 School St., 617-557-7188;
CambridgeSide Galleria, Cambridge, 617-679-0887.
School Street: Mon–Fri 7 a.m.–9 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.–9 p.m.,
Sun 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Galleria: Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–9:30 p.m.,
Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m. This major retailer provides readers
with seemingly limitless options regarding books and periodicals, as well as an extensive music section.
___
62
clothing is adored by countless trendy young
celebrities. His Newbury Street boutique specializes
in his collection’s ready-to-wear offerings and todie-for accessories, as well as his men’s line. Refer
to listing, page 63.
THE COOP AT HARVARD SQUARE, 1400 Mass. Ave.,
Cambridge, 617-499-2000. Harvard Book Building:
Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.–9 p.m.
Brattle/Palmer Building: Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun
noon–7 p.m. Founded by Harvard students a century ago,
this behemoth landmark offers a massive selection of
books, reference materials and Harvard merchandise.
ANTIQUES/ART/
COLLECTIBLES
CLOTHING/ACCESSORIES
BLACK INK, 101 Charles St., 617-723-3883; 5 Brattle St.,
Cambridge, 617-497-1221. Mon–Sat 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun
noon–6 p.m. Trendy knick-knacks, from silk change purses to
sensual candles to sushi-eating accessories, and nostalgic
memorabilia such as tin lunch boxes can be found at this
quirky, fun gift shop.
AKRIS, 16 Newbury St., 617-536-6225. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–
6 p.m. Founded in Switzerland in 1922, this design house is
the only true couture house outside of Paris and Milan that
has distinguished itself for its creative, elegant and modern
fashions. Its designer collection for women is comprised of
elegant, understated suits, coats, dresses and evening wear.
DEVONIA ANTIQUES, 43 Charles St., 2nd floor, 617-523-8313.
Mon–Sat 11 a.m.–5 p.m., closed Wed & Sun. Perched on
“Antiques Row,” this unique 1,200-foot showroom specializes
in antiques for the dining room, including an array of English
porcelain, European stemware circa 1880 and hand-painted
cabinet plates.
CHANEL BOUTIQUE, 5 Newbury St., on the ground floor of the
Ritz-Carlton Hotel, 617-859-0055. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
Modeled after the famed Chanel Boutique in Paris, the Boston
outpost of this storied franchise offers a range of Chanel products, including a line of clothing designed by Karl Lagerfeld, as
well as shoes, accessories, handbags and fragrances.
PUCKER GALLERY, 171 Newbury St., 617-267-9473. Mon–Sat
10 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Sun 1–5 p.m. Founded in 1967 as a
showcase for the talents of Israeli artists, the gallery has displayed and sold a wide range of art by international artists,
including works by Chagall, Picasso and Hundertwasser.
EDDIE BAUER, 500 Washington St., 617-423-4722. Mon–Sat
10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. This local outlet of the
renowned Seattle-based chain offers seasonal collections of
fine-quality, casual apparel, footwear, travel gear and accessories for men and women, all at steep discounts from the
regular retail prices.
ARTS & CRAFTS
ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, 39 Newbury St., 617-424-9300.
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. A small, family-run
textile business which evolved into a world leader in elegant
men’s clothing, this Italian design house has focused on quality
since its founding in 1910. Today, Zegna boasts the finest in
menswear and is known for a vast, first-rate necktie selection.
A KNIT AND NEEDLEPOINT STORE BY MARY J. COLE,
11 Newbury St., 617-536-9338. Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–5 p.m.,
Sun by chance. The fine art of handprinted needlepoint
and gorgeous knitting yarns are showcased here. Instruction
is available from the knowledgeable staff and lessons
are free when the project is purchased here. Visit
www.needlepoint-boston.com.
THE GARMENT DISTRICT, 200 Broadway, Cambridge, 617876-5230. Sun–Tue 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Wed–Fri ’til 8 p.m., Sat
A B OV E PH OTO B Y
PA N O R A M A
KIM’S FASHION DESIGN, 12 Kneeland St., Chinatown, 617426-5740. Copley: Daily 10 a.m.–9 p.m.; Chinatown: Daily
noon–6 p.m. Kim Pham has been a driving force in the Asian
fashion industry for over 20 years. Kim’s couture, Asianinspired apparel for both genders uses only the finest silks,
with painstaking attention to detail and fit.
LOUIS BOSTON, 234 Berkeley St., 617-262-6100. Mon 11
a.m.–6 p.m., Tue & Wed 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Thu–Sat ’til 7 p.m.
Housed in a historic former Back Bay museum building, this
Boston institution maintains its cutting-edge allure by offering
upscale men’s fashions by up-and-coming designers, as well as
women’s fashions, bed and bath items, and home accessories.
MARC JACOBS, 81 Newbury St., 617-425-0707. Mon–Sat
11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. One of the country’s hottest
designers has finally opened one of his outlets right here in the
Hub. This store specializes in Jacobs’ hip, retro-inspired readyto-wear line as well as his fabulous accessories, shoes and
men’s line.
MAXMARA, 69 Newbury St., 617-267-9775. Mon–Sat 10
a.m.–7 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. Founded in 1951 and with more
than 1,000 stores worldwide, MaxMara is Italy’s largest women’s
ready-to-wear manufacturer. Known for luxurious fabrics, stylish
silhouettes and hand detailing. MaxMara embodies the principles
of truly great Italian fashion—classic design and top quality.
RUGBY, 342 Newbury St., 617-247-2801. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–
8 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. This casual clothing store from Ralph
Lauren and features the latest in preppy couture, with edgy
fashions aimed at the college-aged set at prices lower than
Lauren’s traditional Polo gear.
. . . Just a
Heartbeat
away!
shopping
shopping
MARC JACOBS: Jacobs’ line of retro-inspired
9 a.m.–7 p.m. A vintage lover’s paradise, this two-level thrift
warehouse sells everything from vintage Levi’s to knock-off
designer dresses and ’70s go-go boots. The ambitious (or
desperate) can sift through the heaping piles of the downstairs Dollar-A-Pound.
SIMON’S MEN’S CLOTHING, 220 Clarendon St., between
Newbury and Boylston, 617-266-2345. Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–6
p.m., Wed & Thu ’til 7 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. The oldest familyrun men’s clothing store in Boston, Simon’s sells business and
casual wear in classic and updated styles and offers quick,
expert alterations and even complete same-day tailoring.
STONESTREETS, 1276 Mass. Ave., Harvard Square,
Cambridge, 617-547-3245. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sat 10
a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. This sophisticated men’s clothier offers a casual-yet-refined collection of Italian and American
designers. The knowledgeable staff will make sure that you find
the proper garment, superbly tailored to your specifications.
TALL GIRL SHOP, 211 Berkeley St. at Boylston St., 617-4247164. Mon, Tue and Fri 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Wed and Thu 10
a.m.–8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. At Tall Girl,
you’ll find an incredible selection of fashions for taller women
of all ages. Tall Girl fashions have been expertly proportioned
to fit long-limbed women of sizes 6–22.
URBAN OUTFITTERS, 361 Newbury St., 617-236-0088.
Mon–Thu 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 11 p.m., Sun noon–
8 p.m. Also: 11 JFK St., Harvard Square, Cambridge, 617-8640070. Where urban hipsters turn for funky men’s and women’s
fashions. The store also features a wide array of housewares,
shoes, accessories, gifts, books, cards and other bric-a-brac.
At The Corner Mall you have the
best of Boston with boutiques and
an international food court offering
something for every palate!
At the Corner of Winter & Washington Streets
A L B E RT V E C E R K A
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
___
63
GIFTS/SOUVENIRS
WISH, 49 Charles St., 617-227-4441. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–7
p.m., Thu ’til 8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m.
Proving hip couture exists outside Newbury Street, this boutique is home to designers like Nanette Lapore, Rebecca
Taylor and Jean Yu. The chic yet welcoming shop sells cashmere sweaters, pink chiffon dresses, and beaded purses for
your big night out.
FANEUIL HALL HERITAGE SHOP, Zero Faneuil Hall Square,
Stall #13, basement of historic Faneuil Hall, 617-723-1776.
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Opened in
1973, the shop continues to offer quality Colonial reproductions in pewter as well as scrimshaw, blown glass, Dedham
pottery, hand-hammered copper weathervanes, prints, and
sterling and gold charms of historic Boston locales.
DEPARTMENT STORES
OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE MUSEUM SHOP, 310
Washington St., 617-482-6439. Open daily from 9:30 a.m.–5
p.m. The Museum Shop offers historical books, maps, jewelry,
handcrafted ceramics and pottery. The children’s section of the
store has a variety of whimsical and educational toys and
books, which includes “hurdy-gurdys,” wooden tops, historical
paper dolls and much more.
FILENE’S, 426 Washington St., 617-357-2100. Mon–Sat 9:30
a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m. New England’s premier
department store since 1851 offers six floors of the latest apparel from renowned designers such as Ralph Lauren and Tommy
Hilfiger; cosmetics and fragrances from Chanel and Lancôme;
and bed and bath products by Laura Ashley and Croscill.
H & M, 350 Washington St., 617-482-7081. Mon–Sat 10
a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m. This youthful, cutting-edge
department store opened its Boston shop in 2001. Its mantra of
“fashion and quality at the best price” translates to inexpensive,
trendy clothes for men and women, as H & M boasts the freshest, most up-to-date fashion trends in color, material and style.
MACY’S, 450 Washington St., 617-357-3195. Mon–Sat 9:30
a.m.– 8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m. This famous New Yorkbased department giant features floor after floor of the latest
culinary tools, bed and bath items, incredible gifts and hot fashions. Choose from your favorite designers—Polo, Liz Claiborne,
Jones New York and DKNY—or Macy’s exclusive labels.
MARSHALLS, 500 Boylston St., 617-262-6066. Mon–Sat 9
a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; 350 Washington St.,
Downtown Crossing, 617-338-6205. Mon–Sat 9 a.m.–7:30
p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Its mantra “Brand name clothing for
less” has made this discount retailer a bargain-hunter’s dream
come true. From Ralph Lauren to Calvin Klein, Marshalls features designer clothing for men, women and children.
NEIMAN MARCUS, 5 Copley Place, 100 Huntington Ave., 617536-3660. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. Nearly a
century of dedication to gathering the most enviable products
the world has to offer has helped make this Dallas-based retailer a world-class fashion authority. Neiman’s has stayed in step
with the times, while stepping ahead to deliver the unexpected.
___
64
HOME GOODS
CRATE & BARREL, 777 Boylston St., 617-262-8700. Mon–Sat
10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Also: Faneuil Hall
Marketplace, 617-742-6025; 48 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617876-6300. Call for other location hours. This fun yet sophisticated
home fashions store features everything from kitchenware and
furniture to flatware, glassware and bath and body accessories.
SIMON’S MEN’S CLOTHING: This Back Bay
haberdasher has been outfitting Boston men
for more than four generations. Refer to
listing, page 63.
FARMERS’ MARKETS
COPLEY SQUARE FARMERS’ MARKET, Copley Square, along
St. James Avenue (in front of Trinity Church), 781-893-8222.
Tue & Fri 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Vendors from farms across the state
of Massachusetts sell homegrown fruits, vegetables, breads,
flowers and more from their farms.
FURNITURE
CARTIER, 40 Newbury St., 617-262-3300. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–
6 p.m. If diamonds are forever, the House of Cartier is timeless.
With more than 150 years of experience, Cartier is a symbol of
prestige, glamour, and quality. The jeweler offers a dazzling display of diamonds, jewelry and accessories, including timepieces, silver, crystal, designer pens and leather accessories.
T.J. MAXX, 350 Washington St., 617-695-2424. Mon–Sat 9
a.m.–7:30 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. This discount retailer
offers brand name and designer fashions for men, women and
kids, as well as accessories, fine jewelry and items for the
home. Prices are slashed 20 to 60% off most department store
rates. T.J. Maxx offers current trends of the highest quality.
RESIDE, 266 Concord Ave., Huron Village, Cambridge, 617547-2929. Thu–Fri 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun
noon–6 p.m. Specializing in vintage, mid-20th century furniture and accessories, this eclectic store has quickly gained a
following for its unique inventory of the best in European and
American modern design.
PA N O R A M A
u
Belts
u
Buckles
u
Bolo Ties
HELEN’S LEATHER
110 Charles St., Boston, MA
617.742.2077
RESTORATION HARDWARE, 711 Boylston St., 617-578-0088.
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m. This hardware
retailer features distinctive, high-quality items for the home—
from home furnishings and lighting to kitchen accessories and
garden supplies. Each product is imbued with the store’s classic
design, affordable pricing and whimsical product information.
JEWELERY/ACCESSORIES
ADESSO, 200 Boylston St., 617-451-2212. Mon–Sat 10
a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. One of America’s leading
resources for beautiful furniture, lighting and accessories.
Adesso imports a vast range of Europe’s finest designer products—such as Ligne Roset, renowned for its beds, sofas and
comfortable seating, and Alessi, known for stainless-steel
teakettles and serving pieces.
MEN u WOMEN u CHILDREN
Boots u Lucchese u Justin u Nocona
Tony Lama u Dan Post u Frye u Liberty
STETSON HATS
Shirts
KOO DE KIR, 65 Chestnut St., 617-723-8111. Mon–Fri 10
a.m.–7 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–5 p.m. This sleek home goods store
exudes warmth and irreverence with its selection of unique,
fashionable home essentials, from serving trays and lamps to
teapots and coffee mugs.
HAYMARKET, near Quincy Market/Faneuil Hall. Open Fri and
Sat from dawn to dusk. A local institution, this open-air market
harkens back to the old days when Bostonians bought their
fruits, vegetables, meat and seafood from roadside stalls.
Those used to the modern supermarket experience may be
shocked by the chaotic atmosphere, but the bargains are hard
to beat.
SAKS FIFTH AVENUE, The Shops at Prudential Center, 800
Boylston St., 617-262-8500. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun
noon–6 p.m. One of the country’s premier upscale retail
giants, Saks proffers a wide selection of high-end fashion
apparel, accessories, cosmetics and home decor pieces from
an assortment of unique and name-brand designers.
COWBOY BOOTS
shopping
shopping
FILENE’S BASEMENT, 426 Washington St., 617-542-2011.
Mon–Fri 9:30 a.m.–8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–
7 p.m. For decades, the Basement has provided shoppers with
huge deals, thanks to its automatic markdown system which
guarantees greater discounts the longer an item remains on
the selling floor. A “must-visit” for bargain hunters.
ALPHA OMEGA, 1380 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, 617-864-1227.
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Thu ’til 7 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. Also:
The Shops at Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617-494-9030.
Devoted to the art of timekeeping, Alpha Omega is an authorized
agent for more than 20 prestigious watch brands such as Akteo,
Breitling, Movado, Omega, Seiko, TAG Heuer and Raymond Weil.
JOHN LEWIS, INC., 97 Newbury St., 617-266-6665. Tue–Sat
11 a.m.–6 p.m. John Lewis has been creating jewelry of imaginative design in Boston for more than 30 years. Using only solid
precious metals and natural stones, Lewis’s aim is “to make
jewelry at a reasonable price, of excellent workmanship and
uncommon beauty.”
LUX BOND & GREEN, 416 Boylston St., 617-266-4747.
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Thu ’til 7 p.m. Since 1898, Lux Bond
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
65
SHOES
& Green has provided its customers with diamonds, gold jewelry, watches and giftware from around the world. The store
offers a corporate gift division, bridal and gift registry, a fullservice repair department, gift certificates and elegant giftwrapping.
SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 330 Boylston St., 617-267-9100.
Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Serving Bostonians since 1796,
this Boston institution boasts of being the oldest continuously
operating luxury business in the U.S. Its landmark Art Deco
store is filled with glittering diamonds, fine jewelry and watches. The galleries also offer silver, china, porcelain, stationery,
antiques and more.
shopping
SMALL PLEASURES, 142 Newbury St., 617-267-7371; 92
State St., 617-722-9932. Newbury St.: Mon–Sat 11 a.m.–6
p.m.; State St.: Mon–Fri 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Specializing in antique
jewelry and vintage watches, this unique store features watch
brands like Rolex, Cartier and Tiffany and engagement rings
from the 1920s, as well as custom design and repair services,
all in an intimate Art Deco setting.
HELEN’S LEATHER, 110 Charles St., 617-742-2077. Mon–
Wed, Fri & Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m. For more than 35 years, Helen’s
Leather has supplied New Englanders with quality Western
boots by makers like Lucchese, Tony Lama, Justin, Nocona
and Frye. In addition, Helen’s sells Western belts, buckles,
shirts and Stetson hats, as well as leather jackets and bags.
BILL RODGERS RUNNING CENTER, 353 North Market Place,
Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 617-723-5612. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–
8:45 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. Owned by the four-time Boston
Marathon winner, the Center helps runners of all levels choose
the most suitable shoes, not the most expensive. Boasts a vast
selection of shoes and accessories and a knowledgeable staff.
JOHN FLUEVOG, 302 Newbury St., 617-266-1079. Mon–Sat
noon–8 p.m., Sun 1–6 p.m. This funky footwear retailer features shoes created by the maverick designer, ranging from
mind-bending platforms to the classic black boot and his triedand-true “Angels.” The Newbury Street locale is the only place
in Boston to find a wide range of his cutting-edge styles.
CITY SPORTS, 1035 Commonwealth Ave., 617-782-5121; 480
Boylston St., 617-267-3900; 44 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617492-6000; other locations. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–9:30 p.m., Sat 10
a.m.–9 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–7 p.m. City Sports sells athletic
apparel by top brands like Nike, Adidas and Puma, as well as
sporting equipment for all interests, and footwear from
Saucony, Reebok and others.
HELEN’S LEATHER: This leather goods shop
MALLS/SHOPPING CENTERS
on Beacon Hill offers boots, belts, jackets,
bags and other fine accessories. Refer to
listing, page 67.
THE TANNERY, 402 Boylston St., 617-267-0899. Mon–Sat 9
a.m.–9 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Also: 11A
THE CORNER MALL, corner of Winter and Washington streets.
Open daily. One-stop shopping in Downtown Crossing. You’ll
find the latest styles at shops like Discovery Imports, Bath &
Body Works and Aldo Shoe. In addition, the Corner Mall features
an international food court to please every palate, including
Cafe La Brioche, Sakkio Japan and India Express.
THE HERITAGE ON THE GARDEN, 300 Boylston St., 617-4269500. Call for individual store hours. This residential/
office/retail complex located alongside the Public Garden features a handful of upscale retailers, including St. John Boutique,
Sonia Rykiel, Escada, Hermes, Candela Spa and Anne Fontaine.
66
SPORTING GOODS
MOXIE, 51 Charles St., Suite 1A, 617-557-9991. Mon–Fri 11
a.m.–7 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. This cozy
women’s footwear boutique features shoes from such fashionable designers as Nicole Miller, L’Autre Chose, Cynthia Rowley,
Rafe and Isaac, as well as purses and handbags.
COPLEY PLACE, Copley Square, 617-369-5000. The magnificent Copley Place features more than 100 upscale stores,
including Neiman Marcus, Tiffany & Co., Gucci and WilliamsSonoma. A variety of restaurants, including Legal Sea Foods,
offer shoppers numerous dining options. To receive a free
Ultimate Shopping Excursions card, stop by one of the customer service kiosks.
___
ALLEN-EDMONDS, 36 Newbury St., 617-247-3363. Mon–Sat
9:30 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun noon–5 p.m. Step out in luxurious style
with Allen-Edmonds’ collections of wing tips, capped toes and
slip-on kilties and tassles. This world-class men’s footwear
retailer, famous for its 212-step construction process, features
shoes made of top-quality leather and all-natural materials.
TIFFANY & CO., Copley Place, 100 Huntington Ave., 617-3530222. Mon, Tue & Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Wed–Fri ’til 7 p.m., Sun
11 a.m.–5 p.m. This world-renowned jeweler has been synonymous with quality, integrity and tradition for more than 150
years. The Copley Place store features an exquisite array of
diamonds, rings, timepieces and accessories.
CAMBRIDGESIDE GALLERIA, 100 CambridgeSide Place,
Cambridge, 617-621-8666. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–9:30 p.m., Sun
11 a.m.–7 p.m. This three-level mall features department
stores such as Filene’s, Sears and Best Buy, as well as more
than 100 other stores and specialty shops including the largest
Gap in Boston, Abercrombie & Fitch, J. Crew, Old Navy, Borders,
Victoria’s Secret and more.
MARKETPLACE CENTER, located between Faneuil Hall and the
Waterfront. Twenty-four distinctive shops surround an open
court known as the Exedra, where you will always find a wide
range of unusual pushcarts and entertainment events unique to
this wonderful area. Within walking distance are literally hundreds of other shops, restaurants, pubs and nightspots.
PA N O R A M A
THE SHOPS AT PRUDENTIAL CENTER, 800 Boylston St., 1800-SHOP-PRU. Mon–Sat 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m.
The Shops at Prudential Center features over 75 shops and
restaurants including The Cheesecake Factory, Saks Fifth
Avenue, Ann Taylor, J. Jill and Alpha Omega. It is also the
launch spot for the city’s renowned tourist resource, the Boston
Duck Tours.
FENWAY SPORTSWORLD, INC.
Boston’s Largest Sports Memorabilia Shop
Conveniently located near Fenway Park at the corner of Yawkey Way and
Boylston Street, Fenway Sportsworld, Inc. offers the best prices on all your
ballgame and collectible card needs. It boasts Boston’s largest selection of
autographed items in addition to dozens of specialty/novelty items, the
most balls in Boston and unique items for the discerning collector. .
NEWBURY COMICS, 332 Newbury St., 617-236-4930.
Mon–Thu 10 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 11 p.m.; Sun 11
a.m.–8 p.m. Also: Government Center, 1 Washington Mall,
617-248-9992; 36 JFK St. (Garage Mall), Cambridge, 617491-0337; 211 Alewife Brook Parkway, Cambridge, 617-4917711. You’ll have a “wicked good time” at this upstart local
chain, which boasts the cheapest CD prices in town, including
import, indie and major label releases, as well as T-shirts,
comics, and other pop culture kitsch items.
VIRGIN MEGASTORE, 360 Newbury St., 617-896-0950. Daily
10 a.m.–midnight. The British music retailer chose Boston for
its 22nd North American location. Three levels and more than
40,000 square feet of space house thousands of books, CDs,
videos and DVDs, as well as interactive listening kiosks.
NIKETOWN, 200 Newbury St., 617-267-3400. Mon–Sat 10
a.m.–8 p.m., Sun noon–6 p.m. An enormous temple to the
Nike franchise, this sporting goods retailer proffers all things
Nike, including footwear, apparel, equipment and accessories.
The store features an homage to the Boston Marathon, seats
from the old Boston Garden and autographed shoes from
Marathon champ Uta Pippig.
Window Shopping
MUSIC/VIDEO
TOWER RECORDS, 95 Mt. Auburn St., Harvard Square,
Cambridge, 617-876-3377. Sun–Thu 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri &
Sat ’til midnight. This music superstore features everything
from CDs, tapes and records to videos, books and periodicals.
Its music selection runs the gamut from classical to country to
current pop, rock and soul sounds.
Brattle St., Harvard Square, Cambridge, 617-491-0810. Since
1973, The Tannery has been recognized as one of the world’s
best footwear stores. The Tannery offers customers 200 of the
top name brands to choose from, including Birkenstocks,
Dansko, Ecco and Clarks.
1312 Boylston Street • 617-437-1010 • Mon–Fri 11–6 p.m.; extended
hours during all Red Sox home games • www.fenwaysportsworld.org
ADVERTISE IN WINDOW SHOPPING!
Special discount rates are available for advertisers in Panorama’s
Window Shopping section off our regular display advertising prices.
Call 617-423-3400 for more details.
S P E C I A L
A D V E R T I S I N G
S E C T I O N
RESTAURANTS
Five Diamond Award. Enjoy exquisite modern French cuisine,
accompanied by a selection from an 1,800-bottle wine library.
Reservations recommended. D Mon–Sat 5:30–10:30 p.m.,
Sun 6–10 p.m.; SB 11:30 a.m.–2 p.m. $$$$
AZURE, The Lenox Hotel, 61 Exeter St., 617-933-4800.
Azure's menu and concept are designed to be as clear and
understated as the color palette itself. Nationally-recognized
Executive Chef Robert Fathman, known for his innovation
and playful risk-taking in the kitchen, creates contemporary
American cuisine with a sophisticated edge and an emphasis on fresh seafood. B, D. $$$
BAR 10, The Westin Hotel, Copley Place, 10 Huntington Ave.,
617-424-7446. This sleek, contemporary bistro serves creative Mediterranean cuisine and offers an exceptional wine
list. Enjoy grilled Greek salad flatbread pizza or tagliarini
provencale in a cosmopolitan atmosphere. L, D, C, LS. $$
TASTE OF BOSTON: The 22nd annual event takes
ALLSTON/BRIGHTON
*BOATHOUSE GRILL, DoubleTree Guest Suites, 400 Soldiers
Field Road, 617-783-0090. Boathouse Grill offers elegant yet
casual dining overlooking the Charles River. Featuring grilled
items and fresh seafood in abundant portions. Boathouse diners
can also enjoy a meal and a performance by a top national jazz
acts at Scullers Jazz Club as part of a package. B, L, D, SB. $
THE SUNSET GRILL & TAP, 130 Brighton Ave. (corner of Harvard
and Brighton avenues), Allston, 617-254-1331. This popular
Allston hangout features Boston’s best beer selection, with more
than 112 beers on tap and over 400 microbrews. Its food
entices too, with award-winning steam beer burgers, famous
curly fries, buffalo wings and giant nachos. L, D, C, LS, SB. $
BACK BAY
___
68
BRASSERIE JO, The Colonnade Hotel, 120 Huntington Ave.,
617-425-3240. The “sister” of chef Jean Joho’s award-winning Chicago restaurant combines traditional favorites (coq
au vin and steak frites) with unique specialties (Uncle
Hansi’s onion tart). Home-brewed beer, a wine list and
desserts in the French tradition complete this Gallic experience. Seasonal outdoor patio. B, L, D. $$
CIAO BELLA, 240A Newbury St., 617-536-2626. Modern Italian
decor accented with marble and woodwork forms a graceful
backdrop for the house specialty—chops. Fresh Alaskan king
crab, tender lamb chops and veal chops head up the menu,
accompanied by moderately priced wines. L, D, LS, SB. $$
CLIO, The Eliot Hotel, 370-A Commonwealth Ave., 617-536-7200.
James Beard Award-winning chef Ken Oringer serves up FrenchAmerican fare with some striking Asian influences in a sleek,
sophisticated atmosphere that’s styled after a Parisian supper club.
Bacon-wrapped foie gras, caramelized swordfish au poivre and ginger-glazed oxtail keep customers coming back for more. D. $$$$
COTTONWOOD CAFE, 222 Berkeley St., 617-247-2225.
Specialties include open-grill steaks, poultry, pasta and vegetarian dishes. Voted “Boston’s Best Southwestern Restaurant”
and “Boston’s Best Margarita.” Reservations recommended.
Two hours free validated parking. L Mon–Fri 11:30 a.m.–2:30
p.m.; D daily ’til 11 p.m.; Sat & SB 11 a.m.–3 p.m. C, LS, VP.
www.cottonwoodboston.com. $$
APROPOS, Sheraton Boston, 39 Dalton St., 617-375-6500.
Drawing its influences from American
regional cuisine with a strong New England
KEY
flair, the menu at Apropos offers hearty, satB ....................................Breakfast
isfying dishes ranging from pan-roasted
L ..........................................Lunch
Chilean sea bass to grilled New York sirloin
D..........................................Dinner
and herbed roasted chicken. The menu, creBR ......................................Brunch
ated by executive chef Joseph Nartowicz,
SB ..........................Sunday Brunch
exudes the flavors of Boston. B, L, D, SB. $$$
C ......................................Cocktails
AUJOURD’HUI, Four Seasons Hotel Boston,
LS ..Late Supper (serving after 10 p.m.)
VP..............................Valet Parking
200 Boylston St., 617-351-2037. An elegant
NC ........Credit Cards Not Accepted
eatery with the Public Garden as a back* ..............................Entertainment
drop, and a perennial recipient of the AAA
PA N O R A M A
AVERAGE PRICE OF
DINNER ENTREES
$ .................... Most less than $12
$$ ......................................$12–18
$$$ ....................................$19–25
$$$$ ..............Most more than $25
Many restaurants offer a wide
range of entrees and prices;
therefore, the classifications are
only approximations.
American
Apropos, p. 68
Aura, p. 76
Avenue One, p. 73
Boathouse Grill, p. 68
Boodles, p. 68
Cheers, p. 72
Cuvee, p. 70
Daisy Buchanan’s, p. 70
Dick’s Last Resort, p. 70
Finale, p. 74
The Federalist, p. 72
The Foggy Goggle, p. 70
Hard Rock Cafe, p. 70
Jer-Ne Restaurant & Bar,
p. 74
Meritage, p. 74
Parker’s Restaurant, p. 74
Speeder & Earl’s, p. 71
The Spinnaker, p. 73
Stephanie’s on Newbury,
p. 71
The Sunset Grill & Tap,
p. 68
33 Restaurant & Lounge,
p. 71
Theatre Cafe, p. 76
Top of the Hub, p. 71
Italian
Antonio’s, p. 71
Caffe Pompei, p. 75
Caffe Vittoria, p. 76
Caliterra, p. 73
Ciao Bella, p. 68
Davide, p. 76
Davio’s Northern Italian
Steakhouse, p. 73
Florentine Cafe, p. 76
Lucca Restaurant & Bar,
p. 76
Mamma Maria, p. 76
Massimino’s Cucina
Italiana, p. 76
Teatro, p. 75
Chinese
P.F. Chang’s, p. 76
Seafood
Anthony’s Pier 4, p. 76
Azure, p. 68
The Barking Crab, p. 76
B&G Oysters, p. 76
Chart House, p. 73
Dolphin Seafood, p. 72
Gourmeli’s Seafood, p. 70
Great Bay, p. 75
Harborside Grill, p. 75
Jasper White’s Summer
Shack, p. 70
Jimmy’s Harborside, p. 76
Legal Sea Foods, p. 76
McCormick & Schmick’s
Seafood, p. 74
Oceana, p. 74
Skipjack’s, p. 70
Turner Fisheries, p. 71
Wisteria, p. 76
Ye Old Union Oyster
House, p. 75
Eastern Mediterranean
Lala Rokh, p. 72
French/French-American
Aujourd’hui, p. 68
Brasserie Jo, p. 68
Cafe Fleuri, p. 73
Clio, p. 68
Hamersley’s Bistro, p. 76
Julien, p. 74
No. 9 Park, p. 72
Radius, p. 75
Spire, p. 75
French Country
Hungry i, p. 72
Indian
Gandhi, p. 72
International
Intrigue, p. 74
Rialto, p. 72
The Ritz-Carlton Hotel,
p. 70
Sonsie, p. 71
Zephyr on the Charles,
p. 73
Mediterranean
Bar 10, p. 68
Museum Dining
Bravo, p. 75
Museum of Science, p. 74
New England
Henrietta’s Table, p. 72
Sheraton Commander
Restaurant, p. 73
restaurants
restaurants
place September 17 & 18 at City Hall Plaza and features cuisine from dozens of local restaurants, celebrity chef demonstrations from the likes of Michael
Schlow of Radius and Gabriel Frasca (pictured above)
of Spire, and music by the Gin Blossoms. All proceeds
benefit the Greater Boston Food Bank. Refer to listing
in Current Events, page 34.
BOODLES, Back Bay Hilton Hotel, Dalton St. near Prudential
Center, 617-236-1100. Boodles serves tasty wood-fired
entrees, salads, and sandwiches in a casual and cozy setting and features a lively bar with over 60 micro-brewed
beers to choose from. Breakfast buffet available Mon–Sat. B,
L, D, SB. $$$$
CUISINE INDEX
Southwestern
Cottonwood Cafe, p. 68
Fajitas & ’Ritas, p. 73
Steakhouses
Davio’s Northern Italian
Steakhouse, p. 73
The Oak Room, p. 70
Irish
The Green Dragon Tavern,
p. 74
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
69
RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
CUVÉE, 254 Newbury St., 617-536-7077. Intimately elegant,
Cuvée offers the utmost in hospitality and unmatched contemporary American cuisine paired with its passionately crafted, Wine
Spectator Award-winning wine list. Enjoy a sampling of delectable small plates, an entree specialty, or come for a regularly
scheduled wine dinner. Patio dining is available. www.cuveeboston.com. Open daily 11:30 a.m.–10 p.m. L, D, Sat & SB. $$$
DAISY BUCHANAN’S, 240A Newbury St. (corner of Fairfield
St.), 617-247-8516. For more than 30 years, this popular
get-together spot in the heart of the Back Bay has provided
a comfortable place to mingle and meet new and old friends
and enjoy a menu of pub specials. L, D, LS, C daily 11 a.m.–
2 a.m. $
Contemporary American Cuisine
With daily offerings that include a decadent
4-Course Chef’s Tasting, sumptuous 3-Course Prix
Fixe and an unforgettable a la carte menu.
Experience dining excellence, 33 style.
33 Stanhope Street, Boston
C H A N G ’S L E T T U C E W R A P S
Giving salad an
inferiority complex
since 1993.
THE FOGGY GOGGLE, 911 Boylston St. (across from the Hynes),
617-266-3399. “If you don’t know how to have fun, stay home,”
is the motto of this Back Bay hot spot. The crazy decor, the
enthusiastic staff and the “Foggy Fish Bowl” emphasize fun
above all. Late night pizza and pub food available. D, LS, C
Tue–Sat 4 p.m.–2 a.m. $
GOURMELI’S SEAFOOD, Marriott Copley Place, 110 Huntington
Ave., 617-236-5800 ext. 6741. Enjoy the sushi bar or indulge in
fresh lobster, swordfish and more at this eatery in the heart of
the Back Bay. Gourmeli’s offers an array of fresh New England
seafood and entrees. B, L, D. $$$
*HARD ROCK CAFE, 131 Clarendon St., two blocks from
Boylston St., 617-424-ROCK (7625). HRC Boston serves up
down-home American food, seasoned with a healthy dose of
rock ’n’ roll. Try the infamous “Pig” sandwich, and check out
memorabilia including “The Aerosmithsonian,”the “Boston Wall of
Fame,” Phish’s vacuum, Jim Morrison’s leather pants and
Madonna’s bustier. L, D, C, LS. $
SPEEDER & EARL’S, Copley Square Hotel, 47 Huntington Ave.,
617-536-9000. Boston’s “quirkiest” breakfast and coffee bar,
serving traditional and innovative favorites such as eggs Benedict
and malted waffles. Boston’s best pastries and premium blends
of gourmet coffee from Speeder & Earl’s of Vermont are also featured. B, L, Sat & SB, D. $
STEPHANIE’S ON NEWBURY, 190 Newbury St., 617-236-0990.
Lauded by The New York Times, chef/owner Stephanie Sidell’s
eatery showcases sophisticated cooking and classic comfort
food. Casual elegance at its best with sidewalk cafe, club-like
bar and skylit dining space. Mon–Sat 11:30 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun
10 a.m.–10 p.m. L, D, SB 10 a.m.–3 p.m., C, VP Tue–Sat
evenings. $$$
33 RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE, 33 Stanhope St., 617-5723311. This stylish establishment offers a unique fusion of
*TOP OF THE HUB, 800 Boylston St., Prudential Center, 617536-1775. There is nothing like sitting 52 stories above Boston
for dining and a spectacular view of the city. The magnificent
cuisine complements the breathtaking views. L, D, LS, C. Live
jazz seven nights a week. $$$$
TURNER FISHERIES, Westin Hotel Copley Place, Stuart and
Dartmouth streets, 617-424-7425. Known for its fresh seafood
and winner of several regional awards, Turner’s features sevenfoot-high French windows, swooping Hollywood banquettes,
mahogany paneling and cobalt blue tile. Private dining rooms
accommodate 10–140 guests. Discounted VP at The Westin
Hotel Copley Place. L, D, C, LS. $$$
BEACON HILL
ANTONIO’S, 288 Cambridge St., 617-367-3310. One of Boston’s
finest Italian restaurants (across from Massachusetts General
Hospital on historic Beacon Hill). Traditional Italian food with
nightly specials and complementing wine list. Specials include
homemade fusilli, shrimp margarita and chicken/sausage vinegar
peppers and potatoes. L, D Mon–Thu 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri & Sat
11 a.m.–10:30 p.m. $
Harborside Restaurant
The restaurant with an ocean of window dressing.
JASPER WHITE’S SUMMER SHACK, 50 Dalton St., 617-8679955; 149 Alewife Brook Parkway, Cambridge, 617-520-9500.
Top-notch fare such as pan-roasted lobster, award-winning fried
chicken and impressive raw bar in a casual setting. Boston: Daily
11:30 a.m.–11 p.m., raw bar Thu–Sat ’til 1 a.m. Cambridge:
Mon–Thu 11:30 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 11 p.m., Sun 3–9
p.m. $$$. SEE LOCATOR #7 ON CENTER MAP.
Reservations Accepted
In the Theatre District
8 Park Plaza • 617-573-0821
*THE OAK ROOM, 138 St. James Ave., Fairmont Copley Plaza
Hotel, 617-267-5300. This sophisticated spot offers a traditional
steakhouse menu of prime steaks and chops and fresh seafood.
Replete with stately wood paneling, rich draperies and wall ornaments for a comfortable yet elegant feel. B, L, D daily. Adjoining
Oak Bar offers martinis, raw bar and full Oak Room menu. $$$$
*THE RITZ-CARLTON HOTEL, 15 Arlington St., 617-536-5700.
This 1927 culinary landmark offers award-winning contemporary
French cuisine. The historic Dining Room is available for special
events only. The Cafe: B, L, D, Sat & SB. The Lounge: L, D, C, LS.
The Bar: L, D, C, LS. $$$$
(at the Transportation Building)
pfchangs.com
___
70
SONSIE, 327 Newbury St., 617-351-2500. Recommended by
Boston magazine as the place to “see and be seen.” The lively
restaurant features a streetside cafe, 50-foot mahogany bar,
brick oven and colorful dining room. The menu by award-winning chef Bill Poirier includes tempura tuna roll with avocado,
mizuna and tobiko caviar and herb pappardelle with asparagus.
L, D, C, LS, VP. $$$
traditional New England cuisine with hints of the exotic.
Executive chef Anthony E. Dawodu’s flavorful menu has gained
popularity for its vegetarian options and ability to cater to dietary
needs. D Mon–Sat 5–11 p.m. Bar: Mon–Sat 5 p.m.–2 a.m.
Lounge: Tue–Sat 8 p.m.–2 a.m. $$$. SEE LOCATOR #11 ON
CENTER MAP.
PA N O R A M A
restaurants
restaurants
617.572.3311 • www.33restaurant.com
*DICK’S LAST RESORT, Prudential Center, 55 Huntington Ave.,
617-267-8080. Dick’s serves ribs and chicken by the bucket,
74 kinds of beer and more. SB 10 a.m.–3 p.m. includes Belgian
waffles and a make-your-own Bloody Mary bar. Live music, no
cover, no dress code and definitely no class. L 11:30 a.m.–
4 p.m.; D Sun–Thu 4 p.m.–midnight, Fri & Sat ’til 1 a.m.
www.dickslastresort.com. $$
comfortable atmosphere and specialties such as blackened
tuna sashimi, moonfish, Maryland crabcakes and lobster.
Winner of Best of Boston 2003 award for seafood. Jazz Brunch
Sun 11 a.m.–3 p.m. L & D Sun–Thu 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri & Sat
’til 11 p.m. $$
SKIPJACK’S SEAFOOD EMPORIUM, 199 Clarendon St., Copley
Square, 617-536-3500; other locations outside Boston. Enjoy a
Boston Historic Fish Pier • 617.423.1000
Functions for any occasion
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
___
71
*CHEERS, 84 Beacon St., 617-227-9605. Also: Faneuil Hall
Marketplace, 617-227-0150. Both the original Beacon Hill pub
and its spinoff offer a tasty selection of traditional fare and an
abundant beverage selection, including their award-winning
Bloody Mary and a variety of draft beers. Live entertainment
Thu–Sat nights, and officially licensed Cheers merchandise sold
on site. L, D, C, LS. $
THE FEDERALIST, Fifteen Beacon Hotel, 15 Beacon St., 617-6702515. The menu at this elite spot brings artistic flair to dishes like
Colorado rack of lamb and skillet-roasted French Dover sole, in an
atmosphere evoking the stately class of the world’s most private
clubs. A rooftop herb garden and in-kitchen fish tanks help to
ensure culinary perfection. B, D, Sat & SB, C, LS. $$$$
1
HUNGRY I, 71 / Charles St., 617-227-3524. In a two-story townhouse with three working fireplaces and an outdoor patio, Chef
Peter Ballarin delights patrons with French country cuisine and
creative desserts. Signature dishes include venison au poivre and
braised rabbit a la moutard. L Thu and Fri only, noon–2 p.m.; D
5:30–9:30 p.m.; SB 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Private dining rooms available. $$$$. SEE LOCATOR #6 ON CENTER MAP.
2
barking
crab
restaurant
ZEPHYR ON THE CHARLES, Hyatt Regency Cambridge, 575
Memorial Drive, Cambridge, 617-441-6510. This restaurant
serves small-portioned, tapas-like dishes, featuring eclectic fare
like sushi-grade tuna tartare and wood-grilled tiger prawns. The
setting features spectacular views of the Boston skyline. B, L,
D, C. $$
DOWNTOWN
*AVENUE ONE, Hyatt Regency, Financial District, 1 Ave. de
Lafayette, 617-422-5579. Enjoy Boston’s most extensive fondue
menu in a relaxed atmosphere. Live jazz every Thu. B, L, D, C. $$
*CAFÉ FLEURI, Langham Hotel Boston, 250 Franklin St., 617451-1900. Enjoy what Boston magazine calls “the best Sunday
brunch in Boston” or sample a la carte Mediterranean and
American fare, and French desserts—all within a sunlit garden
CALITERRA, Wyndham Boston Hotel, 89 Broad St., 617-3481234. Located in the heart of the Financial District, this casual,
upscale restaurant features Cal-Ital cuisine with seasonal New
England flavors. B, L, D. $$
CHART HOUSE, 60 Long Wharf, 617-227-1576. The Chart House
boasts an impressive menu of fresh seafood, including specialties
like the crab, avocado and mango stack appetizer; shrimp fresca;
macadamia crusted mahi-mahi; slow roasted prime rib; and its
signature dessert—hot chocolate lava cake. Private parties for
30 or more by reservation only. L, D, C. $$$
DAVIO’S NORTHERN ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE, 75 Arlington St.,
617-357-4810; Royal Sonesta Hotel, 5 Cambridge Parkway,
Cambridge, 617-661-4810. Enjoy fine steaks, pasta and seafood,
or lighter fare in the spacious bar. The Cambridge Davio’s boasts
an outdoor patio and skyline view. L Mon–Fri 11:30 a.m.–3 p.m.;
D Sun–Tue 5–10 p.m., Wed–Sat ’til 11 p.m.; C, VP.
www.davios.com. $$$. SEE LOCATOR #3 ON CENTER MAP.
FAJITAS & ’RITAS, 25 West St., 617-426-1222. Established in
1989, Fajitas & ’Ritas features fresh, healthy Tex-Mex and barbecue cuisine. The restaurants stress generous portions, affordable
prices, open casual space and prompt, friendly service. Boston:
Mon–Tue 11:30 a.m.–9 p.m., Wed, Thu & Sat ’til 10 p.m. Fri ’til
11 p.m., Sun noon–8 p.m. C, LS. www.fajitasandritas.com. $.
SEE LOCATOR #4 ON CENTER MAP.
617•426•2722
casual harborside
dining in the heart
of boston
open daily for
lunch and dinner
live music!
sun & wed 5–9 pm
88 sleeper street
H E
reservations accepted
for parties of 6 or more
T
on ft. point channel
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72
NO. 9 PARK, 9 Park St., 617-742-9991. Nationally acclaimed
chef Barbara Lynch serves up French and Italian style dishes in a
sophisticated bistro atmosphere atop Beacon Hill. Chef Lynch has
a subtle hand in the kitchen, turning out inventive renditions of
classic Italian and French fare such as fresh pasta and foie gras.
L, D, LS. $$$$
THE SPINNAKER, Hyatt Regency, 575 Memorial Dr.,
Cambridge, 617-492-1234. Enjoy a view of the Boston skyline
and Charles River while dining in Boston’s only revolving
rooftop restaurant and lounge. Spinnaker features American
cuisine for dinner and Sunday Brunch. Savor a cocktail or
dance under the stars on Fri & Sat evenings. D, LS, SB.
Reservations recommended. $$$
atrium. B Mon–Fri 6:30–11:30 a.m., Sat 7:30–11 a.m.; L daily
11:30 a.m.–3 p.m.; D Mon–Sat 6–10 p.m., Sun 4–10 p.m.; SB
11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. $$
restaurants
restaurants
LALA ROKH, 97 Mt. Vernon St., 617-720-5511. Named for a legendary Persian princess, this elegant restaurant is owned by siblings Babak and Azita Bina. Using their mother’s recipes, they’ve
created a unique dining experience in the only restaurant of its
kind in New England. L Mon–Fri noon–3 p.m.; D nightly 5:30–10
p.m. Reservations recommended. VP. www.lalarokh.com. $$
SHERATON COMMANDER RESTAURANT, 16 Garden St.,
Harvard Square, Cambridge, 617-234-1365. New England-style
cuisine in a relaxed, elegant setting with a casual atmosphere.
B, L, D, SB. $$
PA N O R A M A
CAMBRIDGE
DOLPHIN SEAFOOD, 1105 Mass Ave., Cambridge, 617-6612937; 12 Washington St., Natick, 508-655-0669. These familyowned restaurants offer seafood hand-picked every morning from
the Boston piers. Complement your dish with the famous
“Dolphintini” cocktail. L & D Mon–Fri 11:30 a.m.–10 p.m.
www.dolphinseafood.com. $$
GANDHI, 704 Mass. Ave., Central Square, Cambridge, 617-4911104. Savor the scents and flavors of India and enjoy exceptional
Indian cuisine in the heart of Central Square. Only the freshest produce, herbs and delicate spices are used to prepare the healthy
fare. L daily noon–3 p.m.; D noon–11 p.m.; SB noon–3 p.m. L
buffet daily noon–3 p.m., “All you can eat” $5.95. Beer & wine. $
HENRIETTA’S TABLE, The Charles Hotel, One Bennett St.,
Cambridge, 617-661-5005. Nothing but locally grown and organic
produce are used to create a lively, textured menu of reinterpreted
New England classics. Private dining room available. B Mon–Fri
6:30–11 a.m., Sat 7–11 a.m., Sun 7–10:30 a.m.; Sat and SB
noon–3 p.m.; L Mon–Sat noon–3 p.m.; D daily 5:30–10 p.m. $
RIALTO, The Charles Hotel, One Bennett St., Cambridge, 617661-5050. One of Greater Boston’s top restaurants features fine
wines and cuisine from France, Italy and Spain. Chef Jody Adams
lends her creative talents to seasonal dinner menu items such as
grilled pork tenderloin with Ligurian potato-cheese pie, pine nuts
and basil. D only. Reservations recommended. $$$$
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
73
FINALE, One Columbus Ave., 617-423-3184; 30 Dunster St.,
Harvard Sq., Cambridge, 617-441-9797. One of the only dessert
restaurants in America, Finale features items like the caramel
carnivale and the “molten chocolate cake.” Chef Nicole Coady’s
menu is complemented by a drink menu of ports, champagnes,
cordials and “Finale Favorites.” A light dinner menu is available.
L & D. $$
RADIUS, 8 High St., 617-426-1234. James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Schlow churns out impeccably prepared nouveau French fare such as foie gras-suffused Vermont pheasant
and New Zealand loin of venison in an ultra-modern, minimalist
setting. Pastry chef Paul Connors creates rapturously delectable
desserts. The ambiance is powerbroker chic, and the service is
top-notch. L, D, C, LS. $$$$
*THE GREEN DRAGON TAVERN, 11 Marshall St., 617-3670055. Boston’s premier 18th-century tavern, located on the
Freedom Trail, is home to Boston’s only Guinness/Oyster
Festival. Microbrews and a large selection of imported beers
flow from its taps. Live entertainment nightly, with a traditional
Irish seisiun (session) Sat 4–8 p.m. L, D, C, Sat & SB. $
SPIRE, Nine Zero Hotel, 90 Tremont St., 617-772-0202.
Alluringly ensconced in Boston’s most fashionable luxury boutique hotel, Spire features a striking interior and chef Gabriel
Frasca’s cuisine, which combines flavors from France, Italy,
Spain and Portugal with seasonal New England ingredients.
Named one of “America's 50 Best Hotel Restaurants” by Food
and Wine. B, L, D LS, VP. $$$$
INTRIGUE, Boston Harbor Hotel at Rowes Wharf, 617-856-7744.
Casual elegance surrounds this unique cafe. Beautiful decor and
breathtaking harbor views are perfect for those who desire a
cosmopolitan, relaxed atmosphere. Enjoy a global menu created
by renowned chef Daniel Bruce. B, L, D, LS. $
74
FENWAY/KENMORE SQUARE
BRAVO, Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., 617-3693474. Chef Benjamin Cevelo brings his creative touch to an eclectic
and contemporary menu. The restaurant’s bold decor, created by
famed restaurant designer Peter Niemitz, meshes with a rotating
selection of the MFA’s modern masterpieces. L daily 11:30 a.m.–3
p.m.; D Wed–Fri 5:30–8:30 p.m.; SB 11:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $$$
GREAT BAY, Hotel Commonwealth, 500 Commonwealth Ave.,
617-532-5300. Christopher Myers and chef Michael Schlow
(Radius, Via Matta) present their unique take on the seafood and
raw bar concepts. This eclectic space in Kenmore Square serves
delectable fare such as fish tacos and the acclaimed baked
stuffed lobster. L, D, SB, C, LS. $$$
NORTH END
CAFFE POMPEI, 280 Hanover St., 617-227-1562. Pompei features a wide variety of coffee, 160 wines by the glass, Italian
MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT, Park
Plaza Hotel, 34 Columbus Ave., 617-482-3999; Faneuil Hall
Marketplace, North Market, 617-720-5522. Renowned for fresh
seafood and lively atmosphere, M & S also offers steak, chicken
and pasta dishes. Daily 11 a.m.–11:30 p.m., Fri & Sat ‘til midnight. Bar menu Mon–Fri 3:30–6:30 p.m., Sat & Sun 10
p.m.–midnight. $$$
MERITAGE, Boston Harbor Hotel at Rowes Wharf, 617-4393995. Fresh, seasonal cuisine is carefully matched to an appropriate vintage from the 12,000-bottle wine collection. The restaurant’s interior combines slate, marble, exotic wood and leather,
creating a luxurious atmosphere to accompany a hearty meal. All
menu items come in appetizer and entree sizes. D, LS. $$$$
Prices range from $45.00 to $56.00
Children under 12, $17.50.
Sunday seatings: 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
___
*JULIEN, Langham Hotel Boston, 250 Franklin St., 617-4511900. The award-winning Julien offers creative contemporary
French cuisine in a formal dining room of unparalleled elegance
and intimacy. An ideal setting for pre-theatre dining, a private
business dinner or a romantic celebration. D Mon–Sat 6–10
p.m. Tapas menu available at bar Mon–Fri 4–7 p.m. $$$$
YE OLDE UNION OYSTER HOUSE, 41 Union St., 617-227-2750.
Steps from Quincy Market stands America’s oldest restaurant,
serving Yankee-style seafood, beef and chicken. Famed for its
oyster bar where Daniel Webster dined daily. Specialties include
clam chowder, swordfish, and fresh lobster. L, D Sun–Thu 11
a.m.–9:30 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 10 p.m. VP. www.unionoysterhouse.com. $$$
HARBORSIDE GRILL, Hyatt Harborside, 101 Harborside Drive,
617-568-6060. The Harborside Grill offers panoramic views of the
Boston skyline from every seat in the dining room. During the day,
the Grill is a welcoming casual location for a bowl of chowder, and
in the evening is transformed into a sophisticated seafood restaurant. Open daily 6 a.m.–10 p.m. B, L, D, SB, C, VP. $$$
restaurants
restaurants
Langham Hotel, Boston (formerly Le Meridien)
250 Franklin Street, Boston
617.956.8752
www.langhamhotels.com
JER-NE RESTAURANT & BAR, The Ritz-Carlton Boston Common,
12 Avery St., 617-574-7176. Chef Jason Adams sets an uncharted
course of adventure in contemporary cuisine, featuring American
favorites, seafood and steaks, all artistically presented. The artful
menu is created from a palette of lush local flavors. The restaurant
also boasts an exhibition kitchen. B, L, D, SB, C, LS. $$$$
TEATRO, 177 Tremont St., 617-778-6841. Teatro boasts a reasonably priced Italian-influenced menu by executive chef Robert
Jean and owner/chef Jamie Mammano. The restaurant was
named “Best Pre-Theatre Dining 2003” (Improper Bostonian)
and “Best Italian Restaurant 2003” (Boston magazine). D
Mon–Sat 5 p.m.–midnight; Sun 4–11 p.m. Reservations accepted. www.teatroboston.com. C, VP. $$$
EAST BOSTON/AIRPORT
Langham Hotel, Boston (formerly Le Meridien)
250 Franklin Street, Boston
617.451.1900, ext. 7125
www.langhamhotels.com
PA N O R A M A
MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, Science Park, 617-723-2500. Forget
dinner and a movie—now it’s brunch and a movie at the noontime Skyline Sunday Brunch. The package includes tickets to
Museum’s newest IMAX film, admission to the exhibit halls and
free parking. Tickets: $32; seniors $31; children $30.
Reservations recommended. $
OCEANA, Marriott Long Wharf Hotel, 296 State St., 617-2273838. One of Boston’s premier seafood spots. Boasting a
breathtaking view of the Harbor, Oceana offers uniquely prepared fresh seafood. B, L, D, SB. $$
PARKER’S RESTAURANT, Omni Parker House, 60 School St.,
617-725-1600. Executive chef Jerry Tice celebrates nostalgic
cuisine with a contemporary flair. The stately dining room
reflects the rich culinary heritage that lives on at the birthplace
of Boston cream pie and the Parker House roll. B, L, D. $$$$
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
75
cordials, pizza, Italian sandwiches, homemade cannoli and ice
cream imported from Italy. Open daily 4 p.m.–12:30 a.m.; B 8
a.m.–11:30 p.m.; L 11:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; LS ’til 3:30 a.m. SEE
LOCATOR #2 ON CENTER MAP. $
CAFFE VITTORIA, 296 Hanover St., 617-227-7606. This popular European-style cafe in the North End offers a variety of
desserts, cappuccino and espresso. Sun–Thu 8 a.m.–midnight,
Fri & Sat ’til 12:30 a.m. NC. $
DAVIDE, 326 Commercial St., 617-227-5745. Boasts an
upscale yet casual atmosphere with Northern Italian-inspired
dishes. Accolades include the Zagat Award, The Five-Star
Diamond Award and plaudits from Wine Spectator. All pastas
and desserts made fresh on premises. Reservations recommended. L Mon–Fri 11:30 a.m.–3 p.m.; D daily 5–10 p.m. C,
VP. $$$
FLORENTINE CAFE, 333 Hanover St., 617-227-1777. Revered
by visitors and residents for decades, this historic cafe is one of
Boston’s culinary landmarks. Lobster ravioli with tomatoes and
lobster cream sauce and seared veal with grilled shrimp in
Frangelico mushroom sauce are just two of the Italian wonders
awaiting you in this charming bistro setting. Daily noon–1 a.m.
L, D, C. $$$. SEE LOCATOR #5 ON CENTER MAP.
restaurants
LUCCA RESTAURANT & BAR, 226 Hanover St., 617-742-9200.
Winner of the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence 2002, Zagat
Survey’s “Top New Restaurant 2002” and winner of Best of
Boston 2001, this eatery is racking up raves for its regional
Italian cuisine, superb wine list, lively bar and elegant
ambiance. D nightly 5–11 p.m.; Sat & Sun ’til 11:30 p.m.; bar
menu ’til 12:15 a.m.; C ’til 1 a.m. VP. $$$. SEE LOCATOR #9
ON CENTER MAP.
MAMMA MARIA, 3 North Square, 617-523-0077. “Mamma
Maria stands for what Italian food is. Simplicity, quality ingredients and fun…the food of love.” (Emeril Lagasse, 2004).
Mamma Maria offers charming views of the neighborhood and
city skyline, as well as a Wine Spectator Award-winning wine
list. D Sun–Thu 5–10 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til 11 p.m. VP. www.mammamaria.com. $$$. SEE LOCATOR #10 ON CENTER MAP.
MASSIMINO’S CUCINA ITALIANA, 207 Endicott St., 617-5235959. Owner/chef Massimino was formerly head chef of
Naples’ Hotel Astoria and Switzerland’s Metropolitan Hotel. His
eatery’s specialties include veal chop stuffed with arugula, prosciutto, smoked mozzarella and black olives, amongst other
delights. L, D, LS, C. Mon–Thu 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Fri & Sat ’til
11 p.m.; Sun noon–9 p.m. $
SOUTH BOSTON WATERFRONT
ANTHONY’S PIER 4, 140 Northern Ave., 617-482-6262. For 37
years, this Boston institution has tempted diners with Maine
lobster, fresh New England seafood, imported Dover sole, prime
steaks and a huge wine list. The dining room offers a view of
Boston Harbor and the city skyline. L & D Mon–Fri 11:30
a.m.–10 p.m., Sat noon–11 p.m., Sun noon–10 p.m. $$
___
76
AURA, Seaport Hotel, One Seaport Lane, 617-385-4300. Aura’s
seasonal menus showcase a passion for using fresh, local
ingredients in his recipes. Chef John Merrill partners with local
farmers and fishermen to select freshly harvested vegetables,
seafood that is just off the boat and specially aged meats and
cheeses to create his award-winning meals. B, L, D, SB. $$$
PA N O R A M A
THE BARKING CRAB, 88 Sleeper St., 617-426-CRAB. No frills
at this ramshackle little clam shack that’s a Boston dining institution. Pluck mussels and steamers from plastic buckets and
drink wine out of styrofoam cups under an outdoor tent brimming with communal-style picnic tables. L & D Sun–Wed 11:30
a.m.–11 p.m., Thu–Sat ’til 1 a.m. SEE LOCATOR #1 ON
CENTER MAP. $$
Boston’s Tables
JIMMY’S HARBORSIDE, 242 Northern Ave., 617-423-1000.
Since 1924, visitors and natives alike have enjoyed Jimmy’s
Harborside. The waterfront location offers views of historic
Boston Harbor and the menu features award-winning chowders, Maine lobster, traditional Boston haddock and jumbo
baked stuffed shrimp. Mon–Thu noon–9:30 p.m., Fri & Sat
’til 10 p.m., Sun 4–9 p.m. VP. $$$. SEE LOCATOR #8 ON
CENTER MAP.
SOUTH END
B&G OYSTERS, 550 Tremont St., 617-423-0550. This sophisticated South End raw bar from James Beard Award-winning
chef Barbara Lynch (No. 9 Park) and partner Garrett Harker features bivalves from Wellfleet to the West Coast, as well as signature dishes like the lobster BLT and the Maine lobster roll. L,
D, LS, VP. $$
HAMERSLEY’S BISTRO, 533 Tremont St., 617-423-2700. This
pioneering French-American classic, helmed by the husband
and wife team of Gordon and Fiona Hamersley, first put the
South End dining scene on the map. Try the duck confit or the
roast chicken with garlic, lemon and parsley. Long regarded as
one of the city’s top tables. D. $$$$
THEATRE DISTRICT
LEGAL SEA FOODS RESTAURANT, 26 Park Plaza, Park Square
Motor Mart, 617-426-4444; 255 State St., Long Wharf, 617227-3115; Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617-266-6800;
other locations. For more than 50 years, Legal Sea Foods has
served the freshest seafood possible, including oysters, succulent New England lobsters and its famous clam “chowda.”
Extensive wine list. L & D. $$$
P.F. CHANG’S, 8 Park Plaza, Theatre District, 617-573-0821.
Traditional Chinese cuisine and American hospitality combine in
this upbeat bistro. Specialties include Chang’s chicken in soothing lettuce wraps, Dan Dan noodles and orange peel shrimp.
Enjoy an impressive list of over 50 wines. Reservations accepted. L & D Sun–Wed 11:30 a.m.–11 p.m., Thu–Sat ’til midnight.
C, LS. $$
THEATRE CAFE, Radisson Hotel, 200 Stuart St., 617-574-2752.
Located in the heart of the theater district, this restaurant features traditional American fare in a comfortable atmosphere
and is a great location for pre- and post-theater dining.
Seasonal outdoor dining and discounted parking at on-site
garage is available. B, L, D. $$
WISTERIA, Doubletree Hotel Boston, 821 Washington St., 617956-7900. This restaurant and bar with a nouveau Asian twist
offers an innovative menu that synthesizes New England
seafood and Asian cuisine. Impeccable service and attention to
detail are apparent, from the unique presentation of entrees on
signature china to the welcoming hotel towel offered upon
being seated. L & D. $$$
Your guide to dining out in the Hub
S P E C I A L
A D V E R T I S I N G
S E C T I O N
ON THE MENU
ANTIPASTI
Fagottini ai Funghi di Bosco:
Puff pastry stuffed with wild
mushrooms and fontina cheese in a
marsala sauce © Capesante a Forno:
Roasted scallops in a red pepper
sauce with basil oil
PRIMI
Fusilli alla Boscaiola: Hand-rolled
pasta with wild mushroom, prosciutto
in a parmigiano cream sauce
D AV I D E
PESCE
Tonno e Capesante Balsamico: Pan-seared
tuna and scallop in a balsamic reduction
with fresh diced tomato and basil
CARNI
ON THE MENU
CHART HOUSE
60 Long Wharf
617-227-1576
chart-house.com
RAW BAR
Crab, Avocado and Mango Stack
Seared Peppered Ahi Tuna
Shrimp Cocktail
APPETIZERS
Coconut Crunchy Shrimp
Lobster Spring Rolls
Jumbo Lump Crab Cake
SEAFOOD
Steamed Maine Lobster © Dynamite
Mahi Mahi © Herb Crusted Salmon
© Spiced Yellowfin Ahi © Pan Seared
Sea Scallops © Baked Stuffed Shrimp
© Alaskan King Crab Legs ©
Dungeness Crab Clusters
PRIME RIB & STEAKS
Prime Rib © Filet Mignon © New
York Strip © Tenderloin Medallions
DESSERT
Open for dinner Mon–Fri 5–10 p.m.,
Sat 4–10:30 p.m., Sun 4–10 p.m.
et Chart House take you to a place where time stands still,
the historic Hancock Counting House. This Boston landmark once housed the offices of John Hancock, an
American Patriot. And Chart House celebrates this legacy with
an interior design boasting original artwork, artifacts and personal belongings such as a silver teapot displaying the Hancock
family crest and portraits of John Hancock himself and the
Hancock House at 30 Beacon Street.
Experience their million-dollar renovations firsthand while
savoring a seamless blend of high quality seafood and steaks—
including whole, steamed lobster, cracked for you right at your
table, and prime rib rubbed with aromatic herbs and spices and
slow roasted to succulent perfection.
Chart House's location near the New England Aquarium, right
on Boston Harbor, allows this casual dining spot to further draw
on the region's best features, with its heralded service and atmosphere providing patrons with a relaxed, casual atmosphere.
L
Hot Chocolate Lava Cake
Raspberry Crème Brulée
S P E C I A L
A D V E R T I S I N G
S E C T I O N
Carre D’Angello all’Aglio e
Rosmarino: Roasted rack of lamb
with a roasted garlic and rosemary
crust in Barolo wine
326 Commercial St., North End • 617-227-5745
www.daviderestaurant.com
n integral part of the North End’s dining scene for over
20 years, Davide first opened in 1982. While reflecting
the rich traditions of Northern Italy, the dishes amaze
diners with their originality. Davide has earned numerous
accolades over the years, including recognition as one of the
nation’s top 50 Italian restaurants, and boasts one of the finest
wine lists in the city.
A
ON THE MENU
SMALL PLATES
Szechwan Lobster over
vegetable beurre blanc © Roasted
Duck Pot-stickers © Wild Mushroom
Ravioli in a herbed truffle broth ©
Smoked Salmon-wrapped Sea
Scallops over béarnaise
ENTRÉE SPECIALTIES
“The Filet”—poached filet mignon
with roasted new potatoes,
asparagus spears and béarnaise
sauce © Pan-seared Tuna Steak—
roasted peppers, ginger shiitake
mushrooms & bok choy ©
“The Veal”—sautéed cutlet topped
with Alaskan king crab, chives,
shallots, asparagus and
hollandaise © Roast Chicken
Pasta Ravioli in a farmers
vegetable broth
S P E C I A L
CUVÉE
254 Newbury St. • 617-536-7077
www.cuveeboston.com
ntimately elegant, Cuvée offers the utmost in hospitality and
unmatched contemporary American cuisine paired with its
passionately crafted, Wine Spectator Award-winning wine
list. Enjoy a sampling of delectable small plates or an entrée
specialty, or come for a regularly scheduled wine dinner. Lunch
and dinner are served daily, with brunch on Saturday and
Sunday, and patio dining is available.
I
A D V E R T I S I N G
S E C T I O N
Theatre District Dining
neighborhoods
Best Italian Restaurant 2003
—Boston Magazine
177 Tremont St., Boston
617.778.6841
www.teatroboston.com
reservations accepted
1
2
3
4
1
1237 Hancock St.
25 West Sreet
Quincy Center
Boston Common
617-774-1200
617-426-1222
www.fajitasandritas.com
index
4
2
ONE IF BY LAND:
The oldest standing church in
Boston, the Old North Church,
was adorned with two lanterns,
signalling the arrival of British
soldiers in 1775. It continues to
attract visitors to Boston’s historic North End. Refer to page 82.
3
S P E C I A L
A D V E R T I S I N G
S E C T I O N
PH OTO B Y
NORTH END
82
BACK BAY
86
BEACON HILL
88
SOUTH END
90
CAMBRIDGE
92
___
DELLA HUFF
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
81
NORTH END
WINE SPECTATOR AWARD OF EXCELLENCE 2002
TOP 5 NORTH END
EXPERIENCES:
1. Mike’s Pastry, 300 Hanover St., 617-742-3050.
This renowned purveyor of cannoli, biscotti, torrone
and other delicious baked goods has been satisfying
sweet tooths for decades.
2. Paul Revere House, 19 North Square,
617-523-2338. Built in 1680, the home of the
legendary Revolutionary figure is the oldest building
in downtown Boston.
“ZAGAT SURVEY, TOP NEWCOMER 2002”
3. Polcari’s Coffee, 105 Salem St., 617-227-0786.
Perhaps the best smelling-store you’ll ever enter,
Polcari’s has been a fixture of the North End for
generations, selling coffee, loose tea, grains and
spices from all around the world.
Old World
Charm
___
82
“Little Italy,” the North End
is constantly brimming
with the aroma of garlic
and freshly cooked cuisine.
But its storied history is
also part of its charm. The
oldest neighborhood in the
city, it gave birth to the
American Revolution on its
narrow cobblestone streets
and has been home to wave
after wave of new immigrants. Today, the North
End remains one of the
most European neighborhoods in America.
The North End is widely
known for its abundance of
Italian restaurants. The cuisine is authentic and consistently delicious, whether
TIME TRAVELING: North Square’s
cobblestoned streets play host to not only
fine Italian eateries, but also to the historic
Paul Revere House on the Freedom Trail.
smith/patriot/midnight
rider and his family
(including 16 children!)
cont. on page 84 >>
5. North End Market Tour, 64 Cross St., 617-5236032. Longtime North End resident Michele Topor
leads award-winning culinary tours of the neighborhood three days a week, clueing visitors into the best
places for pastry, produce and more.
Nouvelle Italian Cuisine
featuring a variety of
meats and fresh fish...
Specials prepared daily;
Pan seared veal with
grilled shrimp, housemade
lobster ravioli and Certified
Black Angus beef. Full bar
and private function
room available.
333 HANOVER ST., BOSTON
617.227.1777
THE OLD NEIGHBORHOOD: Dozens
of local shops offering authentic Italian goods
from coffee to cold cuts and pastry to pasta
line the streets of the North End.
www.florentinecafeboston.com
PH OTO S B Y
PA N O R A M A
Dinner Nightly from 5
Late night menu until 12:15 a.m.
Drinks until 1 a.m.
226 Hanover St., North End, Boston
(617) 742-9200 • www.luccaboston.com
Valet Parking — Private Function Room
neighborhoods
neighborhoods
Renowned as Boston’s
Old World Sicilian, traditional Northern Italian or
Mediterranean fusion. And
though the ambience can be
boisterous, romantic or
somewhere in between, the
setting is usually intimate,
with patrons rubbing
elbows with one another
in crowded dining rooms—
it’s all part of the
European feel.
One of Boston’s most
well-known attractions is,
of course, the Freedom
Trail. Three of its sites are
located in the North End.
The Paul Revere House,
Boston’s oldest home
built circa 1680, was occupied by the famed silver-
4. Old North Church, 195 Salem St., 617-5236676. Also known as Christ Church, Boston’s oldest
standing church was built 230 years ago. It’s from
the upstairs window that colonists hung lanterns
to warn of the Redcoats’ departure for Lexington
and Concord.
REGIONAL ITALIAN CUISINE
___
DELLA HUFF
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
83
NORTH END
617.720.0422
WWW.DOLCEVITARISTORANTE.COM
221 HANOVER STREET | BOSTON | MA
THE BEST VIEW
OF BOSTON IS
RIGHT HERE
The Official Guide to BOSTON
Advertise in our new
Neighborhoods section
“BEST ITALIAN CUISINE.
By far the best restaurant in the North End,
Mamma Maria might be the best in town.”
Frommer’s Boston 2005
For information, call 617-423-3400
Caffé
Pompei
Restaurant open daily
from 4 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
Serving Breakfast from 8 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. and Lunch from
11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Late night menu available
’til 3:30 a.m.
SPECIALIZING IN
ITALIAN CUISINE
280 HANOVER ST.
NORTH END
BOSTON, MA 02113
TEL: 617-227-1562
FAX: 617-227-1562
___
84
PA N O R A M A
<< cont. from page 82
from 1770–1800. Christ Church, a.k.a. the
Old North Church, Boston’s oldest standing church (built in 1723) served as the
signal tower that spurred Revere on his
jaunt through the countryside. And Copp’s
Hill Burying Ground, founded in 1660 as
the Hub’s second cemetery, provided the
final resting place of many famous colonials, such as the Puritan preachers of the
Mather family, including Salem Witch
Trial-era firebrand Cotton Mather, and
Edmund Hartt, whose shipyard constructed the U.S. Navy’s flagship U.S.S.
Constitution.
In keeping with its Old World character, the North End observes many traditions imported from the shores of Europe.
One such annual rite is the weekly Italian
feasts and processions, kept alive by immigrants and their descendents, that take
place throughout the summer and enliven
this already spirited locale. These spectacles usually celebrate the patron saints of
Italian villages and center CELEBRATE
GOOD TIMES:
around jubilant parades of Processions and
the saints’ statues through festivals celebrating
the feast days of
the North End’s winding
various saints take
roadways. Food vendors,
over the streets of the
North End throughout
hawking everything from
the summer.
sausage to calamari,
add their own flavor to
the scene.
If you’re looking for belly laughs
instead of a full belly, have a seat at the
Improv Asylum on Hanover Street to take
in the wild antics of this innovative
comedy troupe. The Asylum offers off-thecuff fun and hilarity at its original North
End venue.
And if you haven’t had enough of good
old Paul Revere, check out Paul Revere
Tonight, which runs at the Old North
Church during the summer and fall.
Award-winning actor David Conner recreates this legendary figure and tells the
oft-untold stories of Revere’s upbringing
and his midnight ride.
A B O V E P H O T O C O U RT E S Y O F T H E G R E AT E R
B O S TO N C O N V E N T I O N & V I S I TO R S BU R E AU
Offering a Creative Menu
Specializing in Fresh
Seafood and Homemade
Pasta. Visit the Hyatt
Harborside and Relax in
Our Unique Atmosphere,
Enjoy the Spectacular View
of the Boston Skyline and
Taste What Boston Is
Talking About.
neighborhoods
neighborhoods
three north square, boston (617) 523-0077
www.mammamaria.com
Hyatt Harborside
101 Harborside Drive
Boston, MA 02128
(617) 568-6060
www.boston.hyatt.com
[email protected]
___
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
85
BACK BAY
cafe e
ristorante
lunch • dinner
• sunday
brunch
patio dining
featuring a
new menu with
updated
classics
at the corner of newbury
& fairfield streets, boston
617-536-2626
www.ciaobella.com
In Style
___
86
success story: rising from
the humblest of beginnings
to achieve prestige and
greatness. As such,
Boston’s chic Back Bay may
well be the ultimate
American neighborhood—
classically beautiful
brownstone residences,
paired with block after
block of high-end, glamorous retail space, on a
stretch of land that was
once a fetid marsh.
Between 1857 and 1882,
what we know as today’s
Back Bay was a tidewater
flat for the Charles River.
Gradually it was filled in,
the largest part of a project
that would more than
double the size of the city.
RIVER VIEW: The picturesque Back
Bay skyline, appointed by the Hancock and
Prudential towers, overlooks the Charles
River Esplanade.
prominent feature is the
alphabetical cross streets,
which intersect main
residential thouroughfares
of Beacon Street,
Marlborough Street and
Commonwealth Avenue, as
well as the commercial
boulevards of Newbury and
Boylston streets.
The Back Bay draws a
high number of visitors
because of Newbury Street,
which has been referred to
as “the East Coast’s own
Rodeo Drive.” If you’re itching to rev up the charge
cards, and names like
Gucci, Cartier, Chanel and
DKNY get your heart racing,
then this is the place for
ABOVE
PANORAMA
PH OTO B Y
PH OTO B Y
you. Once your shopping is
complete (or you just need
to rest and reload), the
street also boasts ice
cream shops like JP Licks
and Ben and Jerry’s, and
fashionable restaurants
and bars like Sonsie,
Stephanie’s on Newbury
and Ciao Bella, great for outdoor dining.
The Back Bay is also home to some of
Boston’s architectural standouts—from the
classic beauty of Trinity Church (built in
1877) and the Boston Public Library, to
Boston’s largest and most impressive modern skyscrapers, the 62-story John Hancock
Tower and the Prudential Center, which
houses offices, restaurants and shops.
OLD AND NEW:
Trinity Church and the
Hancock Tower, two
of the city’s most
prominent architectural landmarks, stand
side by side in Copley
Square.
creative southwestern cuisine
S C O T T R O B E RT O
222 Berkeley Street
Copley Square, Boston
617.247.2225
snakebites
angus ranch strip steak
fire and spice pasta
mango margaritas
fresh grilled salmon fillet
20% food discount for parties of six to
twenty guests with this ad
neighborhoods
neighborhoods
It’s the great American
Once the swamp was gone,
architect Arthur Gilman
drew up the plans to build
a largely uniform series of
three- and four-story
brownstones.
Real estate is pricey in
this highly desired neighborhood—bordered on the
north by the Charles River,
Arlington Street to Park
Square on the east,
Columbus Avenue to
Huntington Avenue,
Dalton Street and the
Massachusetts Turnpike on
the south, and Charlesgate
East on the west—and it’s
easy to understand why
when one strolls past the
gorgeous old brick buildings, amply shaded by
trees, and within short
walking distance of picturesque Boston Common and
the Public Garden. Another
Just a few reasons to come visit us.
www.cottonwoodboston.com
*two hours free parking back bay garage after 5 p.m.
DELLA HUFF
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
___
87
BEACON HILL
B O S T O N ’ S
PH OTO B Y
S C O T T R O B E RT O
H I D D E N
J E W E L
RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
71 1/2 Charles Street, Beacon Hill
Heart
of the City
___
88
Bostonians struggled to
define themselves as members of a separate nation,
and not English citizens,
remnants of the Old World’s
culture, morality and, particularly, its physical architecture were bound to live
on in Boston. Today, there’s
nowhere in Boston that this
still holds true more than
the historically upper-class
environs of the Beacon
Hill neighborhood.
Beacon Hill has traditionally been the home of
leaders—Boston’s first
mayor, John Phillips, lived
here, as well as instrumental figures in the formation
of Boston, such as Harrison
ROAD TO THE PAST: One of the most
photographed streets in the city, Acorn
Street and its cobblestoned surface are a
throwback to a bygone era.
luminaries), King’s Chapel
and, on School Street, the
site of America’s first public
school (in 1856, a statue of
Benjamin Franklin was
erected near the site). One
spot on the Trail not to be
missed is the Old State
House, at the corner of
Washington and State
streets. In 1776, the
Declaration of
Independence was first
publicly read in Boston
from the building’s east
balcony, and the building
overlooks the site of the
Boston Massacre in 1770.
Physically, the neighborhood still bears resemABOVE
PANORAMA
PH OTO B Y
617.227.3524
blance to its European
roots—narrow cobblestone
p a n o r a m a
1 / 4
p a g e
j a n u a r y
streets and gas-lit streetlamps still abound. While
other areas of Boston are
loaded with trendy restaurants and designer boutiques, visitors to Beacon Hill are more
likely to find quaint antique shops along
Charles Street and “local” restaurants, off
the beaten path but beloved for generations. One exception is the original place
Tucked away in Boston’s historic Beacon Hill is
“where everybody knows your name”—the
Lala Rokh, featuring the culinary delights of Persia.
Since its opening in 1995, the restaurant has received
Bull & Finch Pub, used as the inspiration
ecstatic reviews by some of the country’s toughest
for the classic sitcom “Cheers” can be found
critics including Zagat, Gourmet and Food & Wine
on Beacon Street and still draws in throngs
magazines. For a memorable evening of distinctive
of tourists annually.
cuisine, beautiful surroundings and gracious hospitality,
And for those who cherish the outdoors,
visit the Mediterranean world of Lala Rokh.
Beacon Hill shares the Boston Common
with Downtown, offering visitors the
opportunity to take advantage of a natural
oasis upon which to throw a Frisbee, soak
up some sun, ride a foot-pedaled Swan
Boat through the Public Garden, or simply
sit on a bench and watch the world go by,
the way generations of Bostonians have
done before.
SEAT OF POWER:
The golden-domed
State House atop
Beacon Hill is the
legislative heart of
Massachusetts.
A True Taste
of Eastern
Mediterranean
in Historic Boston
97 Mt. Vernon Street, Beacon Hill
720-5511
DELLA HUFF
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
2 0 0 3
neighborhoods
neighborhoods
As much as early
Gray Otis, William Scollay
and Charles Bulfinch, who
were all property owners
here. Beyond that, Beacon
Hill has remained the seat
of political power in
Boston. The Massachusetts
State House was completed
at the top of Beacon Hill in
1798, and in 1874 it
received the gold leaf finish
on its massive dome, which,
thanks to diligent maintenance and renovations over
the years, still shines brilliantly today.
It’s here that visitors to
the Freedom Trail begin
their travels—passing by
historical landmarks such
as Park Street Church, the
Old Granary Burying
Ground (final resting place
of John Hancock, Paul
Revere, Samuel Adams and
other Revolution-era
___
89
SOUTH END
Hip in
the City
___
90
new SoHo. And it’s not
stereotypical, eggheaded
Boston. Nestled beneath
the afterglow of the John
Hancock Tower, just beyond
the roar of the Mass.
Turnpike, a thriving community is hard at work
building a utopia of Old
World architectural
preservation and a
progressive cultural charisma all its own.
The South End—encompassing an area bordered
by South Bay on the east
and running south along
Massachusetts Avenue,
with another side on the
north outlined by the
Turnpike and a small pro-
ances and residencies; and
develops outreach programs to promote the arts.
The results have been dramatic. Two BCA regulars
are bringing critical
acclaim to the South End’s
performing arts scene—
the avant-garde SpeakEasy
Stage Company and the
Irish troupe of the Sugan
Theatre Company. The
two performance spaces at
the BCA’s new Calderwood
Theatre Pavilion have
provided a larger home
for these acclaimed
troupes, as well as a
second stage for the
widely hailed Huntington
Theatre Company.
PH OTO B Y
PANORAMA
PH OTO B Y
VICTORIAN SPLENDOR: The
bow-fronted Victorian row houses of
the South End remain and indelible part
of the neighborhood’s character.
K AT R I N A S C A N L A N
If you’re not having a good time,
check your pulse.
40
neighborhoods
neighborhoods
It’s not Southie. It’s not the
jection near Arlington
Street containing Bay
Village—is as old as
Boston, but it has seen
more change during the
past 300 years than perhaps any other neighborhood in the city. Today, the
South End is regarded not
only for its beautiful, narrow streets and Victorian
bow-front row houses, but
also for its presence in the
arts, its vibrant gay community, its fine restaurants
and its racial diversity.
The Hub of the South
End, however, remains the
opulent dome of the Boston
Center for the Arts’
Cyclorama Building. From
this focal point, the nonprofit BCA provides artists
with affordable work
space; sponsors exhibitions, theatrical perform-
But it’s the aroma of the culinary arts
that most notably attracts visitors to the
South End. It was Gordon Hamersley, awardwinning chef/owner of Hamersley’s Bistro,
who first lit the flames on this hot dining
scene when he opened up shop in a quaint
storefront on Tremont Street in 1983, triggering a now-thriving scene that includes cuisine from Southern barbecue to Ethiopian.
The very essence of the South End
resists stereotypes. Its only predictable
elements are the breathtaking architectural detail and the community’s open-minded, colorful character. Beloved Bostonian
John F. Kennedy might have envisioned a
place such as this when
he said: “I look forward
to an America that will
EASY BEING GREEN:
reward achievement in
Picturesque green spaces
dot the South End, such
the arts as we reward
as this park in Blackstone
achievement in business
Square.
or statecraft.”
fabulous years
LATE NIGHT BISTRO MENU, LIVE JAZZ NIGHTLY
617.536.1775
800 Boylston Street, Prudential Center, Boston
S C O T T R O B E RT O
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
___
91
CAMBRIDGE
Inman Square
Just north of Central Square, the more residential, quieter Inman Square prides
itself on hometown sensibility, with a
diverse working-class population, many of
whom speak Portuguese. No elitism here:
the area’s only monument is the
Cambridge Fireman’s Mural. It is a place
where food brings people together,
whether at a range of local ethnic markets
or at restaurants known for their bold flavors, like Chris Schlesinger’s East Coast
Grill. It does get rowdy over at the
ImprovBoston, where an acclaimed comedy troupe spoofs on sports, mystery and
pop-culture with jamboree music and general “joyful chaos.” Local and up-and-coming national jazz acts entertain music
lovers at Ryles Jazz Club.
Kendall Square
Square
Deal
would like to inform the
world that their fine city is
not a neighborhood of
Boston. Although it often
gets lumped together with
Beantown, Cambridge stands
alone with all the sustaining
qualities of an international
city center. Throughout
Kendall, Central, Inman,
Harvard and Porter Squares,
nearly 100,000 residents
share a spirited range of
cultural influences.
Central Square
___
92
Central Square sets a swift
pace as the social center for
Cambridge professionals
and is home to the annual
Harvard Square
The grand cultural and
geographical nucleus of
Cambridge houses six performing arts theaters, three
movie theaters, nine museums, over 100 restaurants
and more than 400 retail
stores. History is everywhere, including storied
Harvard Yard, home of the
DOME, SWEET DOME: The legendary
dome at MIT has served as the site of many
infamous student pranks, or “hacks,” over
the years.
homonymous Harvard
University, which makes its
quaint presence on the north
side of the square. With all
this intellectual energy flowing, it’s no surprise that
Harvard Square has been
dubbed “the book mecca of
the world.” Not everyone
here is a student, though. A
walk along Massachusetts
Avenue or JFK Street
reveals musicians, magicians and street performers,
who add color to the
already bustling square.
Diners flock to Harvard
Square for the food as well,
at favorites like Henrietta’s
Table, UpStairs on the
Square and Dolphin Seafood.
ABOVE
PANORAMA
PH OTO B Y
Kendall Square, home to MIT—with its
conspicuous concrete dome, the scene of
many famous pranks—looks more like a
high-brow business park than a neighborhood. Among the modern, sleek bio-tech
firms and research labs, there are more
than a few secret hiding places for fun. At
the Kendall Square Cinema, movie buffs
can check out foreign and independent
films along with ice cream and espresso.
And for shoppers, the CambridgeSide
Galleria houses over 100 stores, including
Banana Republic, J. Crew and Best Buy.
Porter Square
The young, artistic crowd influences the
stretch of Cambridge just beyond Harvard
Square. Porter Square, on the outskirts of
Mass. Ave., is full of eclectic second-hand
shops and home to restaurants like the
Cambodian-French favorite Elephant Walk
and the Temple Bar. For a feel of the
avant-garde arts scene, head to the
provocative Lizard Lounge for a poetry
jam or live music.
&
G R I L L E
A LOCAL FAVORITE SINCE 1974
U DAILY HAND PICKED SEAFOOD
U EXOTIC COCKTAILS
U UNBEATABLE PRICES
1105 MASS AVE., HARVARD SQUARE,
CAMBRIDGE, (617) 6 61-2937
f r esh & h o n est
serving breakfast, lunch,
supper and brunch
neighborhoods
neighborhoods
The people of Cambridge
Central Square World’s Fair.
It’s lined with coffee shops,
burrito joints, down-home
music stores, and its own
share of great restaurants
like La Groceria, Gandhi
and Centro. Every night of
the week, fans of rock, jazz,
hip-hop and the blues line
up at the doors of venues
such as the Middle East
Cafe, T.T. the Bear’s Place
and Green Street Grill.
GET HOOKED ON US!
BA R
617.661.5005
at the charles hotel
harvard square
www.charleshotel.com
___
DELLA HUFF
SEPTEMBER 12–25, 2005
93
5
questions with…
Dave Andelman
FOR YOUR
PAST,
by Josh B. Wardrop
ince 1993, Bostonians have been getting
restaurant advice from “The Phantom
Gourmet.” The mysterious “Phantom” (a food
critic whose true identity is unknown to restaurants and the public) dishes on everything from
ritzy restaurants to the best burgers each week on
Boston’s UPN38 TV. Phantom CEO Dave Andelman
talks about the hit program, which has inspired this
month’s Phantom Gourmet Food Festival. Refer to
listing, page 34.
S
Q: What was the impetus for
“Phantom Gourmet?”
A: Our philosophy was to rate
Boston-area restaurants using a
formula of food and fun. People
don’t just want cooking tips, but
practical restaurant recommendations because eating out is so
popular.
Q: Are you asked for restaurant
suggestions a lot?
A: It’s funny, for years people wanted to talk sports with me because
of my dad (local sports radio personality Eddie Andelman). Now, if
I’m recognized, I’m holding court
on food.
Q: How hard is it to keep The
Phantom’s identity secret?
A: Very. We don’t even let ourselves
be in the same room. It’s actually in
his contract that I have to fire him if
people find out who he is.
Q: What can we expect from the
Food Festival on September 24?
___
94
PRESENT,
AND
FUTURE
A: It costs $25 at the door to
sample signature items from
the best restaurants in
Boston. [Plus} we’ve taken
over Lansdowne Street for
private parties in the clubs
[like] a celebrity poker game
at Avalon and a Phantom
viewing party at Game On.
Q: What are the “can’t
miss” restaurants in town?
A: Definitely go to Jasper
White’s Summer Shack. It’s
so unique to have a fine
dining chef open basically a
clam shack on steroids. You
gotta have at least one meal
in the North End. Probably
Strega for fine dining, or a
slice of pepperoni at Pizzeria
Regina.
actually
“It’s
in [The
Phantom
Gourmet’s]
contract
that I have
to fire him
if people
find out
who he
is.
”
PH OTO B Y
PANORAMA
YEHESHUA JOHNSON
THE THREE-STONE D IAMOND RING
Joseph Gann
Jewelers
LLC
SINCE 1933
387 Washington Street, 4th Floor • Boston
617-426-4932 • Fax 617-426-9028
www.josephgann.com
1-800-44-DIAMOND (443-4266)
1400 Worcester Rd (Rte 9)
Natick 508 628
628-- 9900

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