Ancestors of Craig Stoddard Sparks

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Ancestors of Craig Stoddard Sparks
Generation No. 1
1. Craig Stoddard Sparks, born 24 Mar 1943 in Fort Riley, KS. He was the son of 2. Lloyd Lester
Sparks and 3. Cynthia Foster.
Generation No. 2
2. Lloyd Lester Sparks He married 3. Cynthia Foster 12 Jun 1943 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
3. Cynthia Foster, born 29 Sep 1920 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 22 May 1996 in Gaylord, Otsego, MI.
She was the daughter of 6. Theodore George Foster and 7. Margaret Irene Pattengill.
Notes for Cynthia Foster:
Herald Times -June 7, 1990
Spunky Sparks Gives Retirement Just One More Try
by Chris Jenkins
Gaylord -- Cynthia Sparks laughs and shakes her head at the handmade retirement card a third grader presented
her.
The youngster's card, appropriately entitled "The Retiring Machine," has captured the very essence of Sparks
and retirement, she must admit. The construction paper creation depicts a woman with a cane walking along a
graph outlining how Sparks went to school, began working, retired from one job, got a new job, retired, came out
of retirement, and now...?
"I retired May 31," the vibrant woman said almost convincingly from a wing chair in her Gaylord home. The
fact is, as the third grader so maturely pointed out, she's uttered similar phrases two other times in the past decade.
"It's my choice to retire," she said of bowing out from the CFCS/Catholic Charities where she's spent the past
three years as a drug and substance abuse prevention specialist. "At almost 70 years old, I don't have the energy
level to keep with the program," she stated. "I felt that it might be a detriment to the program and I didn't want to
put the agency in the position of having to get rid of a good friend and nice lady," she added.
And the program, said Sparks, is much too important to jeopardize. It's through that program in Otsego County
schools youngsters have a chance to learn the skills to make sound decisions, build self esteem and learn how to
say no to drugs and alcohol.
Sparks has been so successful in those efforts that members of the Michigan Association of Substance Abuse
Coordinators and Coordinating Agency Prevention Personnel cited her above others in a 23-county region for her
work.
Perhaps predictably, Sparks confesses she will still serve as a resource person and consultant in the field. "I
don't think I should just turn it off." she explained. "I have the background and I think I still have that obligation
if I can be of help to any organization or agency.
"The nice thing about retirement," she said, "is you have that luxury of choice...Anything I do is going to be
when I want to do it," she remarked, not only about consulting work, but of volunteer work or personal pursuits.
She will make time for volunteer work with the Retired Seniors Volunteer Program--RSVP--for which she
served as director. She wrote the original RSVP grant when she emerged from her brief retirement from the
YWCA where she'd been an executive director for 20 years.
Sparks retired from RSVP when she was 65, but only a few months later found herself at CFCS/Catholic
Charities.
She expects to return to the schools as an RSVP volunteer.
Beyond that, the energetic grandmother is already working with the Otsego County Historical Society. She has
outlined a list of "to-finish" projects including everything from documents, stories behind family heirlooms to her
various arts and crafts. She will enjoy working on her continuous pet project, an eight-room Victorian doll house
she's built and furnished with miniatures she's collected and created.
Her retirement lifestyle will undoubtedly involve some travel with her daughter, Pam Greve, and granddaughter.
It won't include lawm moving; not because she doesn't have the energy, but simply because she doesn't want to
do it.
1
Theodore George, her 8-year old but still very charged gray, standard poole will demand some attention, too.
"He still has the energy of a puppy," comments Sparks who displays what many might consider remarkable
energy for someone on the threshold of her eighth decade. "That's what happens when you put a couple of hyper
people together," she suggested, adding she doesn't think of herself as energetic.
"I've always had a lot of endurance. I think I pace myself. If I'm tired, I don't hesitate to take a nap and recharge
my batteries. It sounds corny, but I was brought up to eat well and maintain a fairly decent schedule.
"I'm having to rethink and readjust my lifestyle. I'm still waking up at 6 a.m., but I am learning I can roll over
and go back to sleep."
She will miss associating with professionals, although she expects she'll maintain many of those contacts,
perhaps on a different level.
In reviewing career highlights, "I think in my last career, it was exciting for me to nationally see the awareness
of the public on our problem of drug and substance abuse and acceptance that it was a problem."
Advances in materials and resources available today show commitment to the cause, and Sparks is encouraged
progress will be made.
"The real icing on the cake," she concluded, "is my experience with the kids. It's a real ego trip for me to hear
them say 'Hi, Mrs. Sparks,' and pull on my coattails."
Herald Times -- December 20, 1990
Santa has found a home on Charboneau Lane by Chris Jenkins
Gaylord's Charboneau Lane could easily be renamed Santa Claus Lane, for Santa's not just a seasonal character
around Cynthia Sparks' home. The jolly ol' elf has found a place in her heart year 'round.
It's been 10 years now since Sparks began collecting ornaments, figurines, dolls--any replica of Santa which
catches her eye.
In the move to her Charboneau Lane home a decade ago, she distributed the family ornament collection to her
son and daughter. It was time, she said, to begin something new.
So Sparks, who revels in the challenge of creating crafts, fashioned four plump little Santa dolls from fabric and
cotton batting. "The four guys," as she refers to them lovingly, "just got the ball rolling."
With a growing collection, this year's transformation of her home into Santasphere took four solid days.
It's no wonder. The metamorphosis involves trimming four trees with more than 200 handpicked Kris Kringles;
finding just the perfect spot to showcase the more than 30 St. Nick statues and dolls, and finally, a sprinkling
throughout the house of an untold number of pillows, cookie cutters, children's blocks, chocolate molds, towels
and yes, even toilet tissue--all in the bearded fella's image.
While Sparks herself has done a lot of the collecting and creating, many of the Santa faces shining on her trees
have been gifts from friends and family, and she reaps much joy from that, she said. Anyone who knows her
never wrestles with the question of what to present her on special occasions. The man with the beard is always a
hit.
It's impossible, she's decided, to pick a favortie because each is unique, each has a special memory, exquisite
needlework from her daughter, replicas of antique ornaments from a friend, beeswax figures spotted on a
vacation.
There are music boxes, wooden rubber stamps, Santa physiques of canvas and wool and painted wood. There
are beaded ornaments, ornaments of paper mache, glass, plastic and fabric, and miniature Santa lights.
There are contemporary Santas and folksy, country St. Nick's of yesteryear. Sparks created a clothespin Santa
snoozing in a miniature bed, his red suit and hat strewn around him.
Perched on her porch is another of Sparks' creations--a delightful lifesize Santa who debuted this year.
When the holiday season sets, Sparks will pack away her collection, adding new entries to her extensive catalog
which bears the name of the giver and the year it was presented.
And when Christmas 1991 rolls around, Santa Claus will come to town in a big way here once again.
Children of Lloyd Sparks and Cynthia Foster are:
1
i.
ii.
Craig Stoddard Sparks, born 24 Mar 1943 in Fort Riley, KS.
Pamela Sparks, born 07 Aug 1948 in Kalamazoo, MI.
Generation No. 3
6. Theodore George Foster, born 23 Feb 1888 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 17 Oct 1960 in Lansing,
2
Ingham, MI. He was the son of 12. Seymour Foster and 13. Mary Louisa Woodworth. He married 7.
Margaret Irene Pattengill 20 May 1912 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
7. Margaret Irene Pattengill, born 04 Aug 1889 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 11 Sep 1969 in Lansing,
Ingham, MI. She was the daughter of 14. Henry Romaine Pattengill and 15. Elizabeth Adaline Sharpsteen.
Notes for Theodore George Foster:
Historian's Rites Scheduled Thursday
Funeral services for Theodore (Ted) G. Foster, 73, prominent in Lansing real estate circles and author of the
daily historical feature, "What's in a Name" carried some time ago by The State Journal, will be held at 2:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Ester-Leadley funeral home.
Burial of Mr. Foster, who died Monday after a long illness, will be in Mt. Hope cemetery. Rev. William Hill of
St. Paul's Episcopal church, will officiate.
Mr. Foster had lived in Lansing all his life. His home was at 2426 Strathmore rd.
He was the son of Seymour Foster and Mary L. (Woodworth) Foster, Lansing pioneers.
Well known among the state's historians, Mr. Foster was an active member of the Historical Society of Greater
Lansing.
He was a graduate of old Lansing high school and attended Mercersburg academy, Mercersburg, Va., and later
attended the University of Michigan.
In 1908 he entered the employment of the Seager Engine Works, manufacturers of Olds single cylinder gasoline
engines. He worked primarily as a salesman.
He married Margaret Irene Pattengill, daughter of Henry R. Pattengill, former state superintendent of public
instruction, in 1912.
The real estate business became his work interest in 1913 when he became associated with the J.W. Bailey
company.
In 1916 he helped organize the Pattengill-Foster company with W.K. Prudden and V.R. Pattengill.
The firm developed the Greencroft subdivision.
With the United States' entry into World War I, he entered the army in 1917 and served with Co. L of the 338th
Infantry.
Upon his discharge from service in 1919 he again entered the real estate field. He was a member of the
American Legion.
He was instrumental in the development of Jessop's Home Garden, Orchard Gardens, Holmes rd. subdivision
and Burchfield subdivision.
As a hobby, Mr. Foster became interested in history and compiled an index of all Ingham county and Lansing
city histories in addition to writing many historical articles.
He was one of the original organizers of the Michigan Real Estate association.
Survivors inclue the widow, Margaret; one son, Theodore Pattengill Foster of San Francisco, Cal.; two
daughters, Mrs. Richard S. Porter of Lansing and Mrs. Lloyd L. Sparks of Owosso; a brother, Walter S. Foster,
and seven grandchildren.
Theodore G. Foster
February 23, 1888 -- October 17, 1960
Services at The Colonial Chapel, Estes-Leadley Funeral Home
Thursday, October 20, 1960--2:30 p.m.
Clergyman--Rev. William S. Hill
Miss Mildred Koonsman, Organist
Interment--Mt. Hope Cemetery
Honorary Pallbearers--Stowell Stebbins, Earl Turner, Donald Olds, E. Plummer Mifflin, Max A. Harryman,
Clifford McKibben, Bart Thoman, Hugo Lundberg, Jr. Allan R. Black, William Donovan
Active Pall Bearers--Seymour Foster, Richard Foster, Victor Porter, Joseph Foster, Richard Porter, Craig Sparks
Michigan History Magazine, Vol. 26 #4, Autumn Number 1942, Published Quarterly by The Michigan Historical
Commission, Lansing, Michigan
Place Names of Ingham County, by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing
In attempting to compile a record of the derivation of the place names of Ingham County, all available published
material bearing on the subject has been carefully searched. Cointy and city histories, postoffice guides, old scrap
books, official documents, plat books, atlases, gazetteers, surveyors' field notes and maps, both commercial and
official, have been used. Personal interviews and field trips were made to confirm explanations or theories
advanced that could not be verified by documentary proof. No references are made to lving individuals, as in no
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case was an explanation accepted unless verified by two or more persons. In making personal contacts one
outstanding fact was noticed, namely, that the present generation have little or no conception of the origin of the
place names in communities in which they reside.
Dates given in the early county histories have not been checked with official records. The early histories were
not always correct but discrepancies, if any, would doubtless be very small, and could be due to difference in the
date of the drawing of an instrument and its recording.
It has not been uncommon to find a stream designated by three different names. Dwellers near the outlet of a
creek or stream know it by one name, those living near the source know it by antoher, while those dwelling along
the central part will have a third name for it. This accounts for the change of names made by commercial map
makers. A number of creeks of yesterday are the drains of today. Lakes change names as the land surrounding
them or berdering upon them changes ownership, the community gradually acquiring the custom of referring to
the lakes by the names of the new owners.
In the early days of settlement a postofficed was a store or a dwelling on a convenient four corners, and with a
change of postmaster came a change of location of the office, accounting for the disuse of the old postoffice name
in the community and the adoption of a new name as suggested by the change of postmaster or the change of
location. The advent of the rural free delivery discontinued a great number of the smaller postoffices, and thus
there has been the gradual elimination of old place names in the community. No mention is made in this artlcle of
schoolhouses and churces except where such have given name to a whole community.
Ghost towns and paper cities are generally considered typically western products, but Ingham County has its
own blighted hopes in towns and postoffices. For example, Nova Scotia, Hamilton, Jefferson, Klink, Pear's
Shantee, and Sanford, all of which places are now non-existent. As is in most counties the animal kingdom is
well represented with Coon Creek, Bear Lake, Otter Creeks, and Wolf Creek, while for the birds only two are
named, Heron Creek and Swan Creek. That the trees were popular is indicated by the names of Cedar River,
Willow Creek, White Oak Township, Pine Lake and Plum Orchard Creeks, and it appears that the early settlers
were not color blind, for we find Red Creek and Yellow Creek. The county has its share of numerous descriptive
names such as Pearl's Shantee, White Dog Corners, Slab Oak Tavern and Shacksboro.
We might classify these place names. Approximately one-third of the names are found to be in honor of
pioneers, about one-third are descriptive, such as color, size, shape, as represented by red, round, mill, and heron.
About a quarter are borrowed names, that is, named after some place already known, as Africa, Delhi, North Holt.
Some are Indian names, or names of persons of national or historical importance.
The fact that the United States Geological Survey maps give the place names as accepted by the United States
Government, notation is made in some cases to indicate which of two commonly used names is to be considered
official.
AFRICA, the name applied to the community in Meridian Township which was north and east of Red Bridge, on
the east and west road one-half mile north of the Red Cedar River. (T.190). It was so called because of the fact
tht the anti-slavery feeling was strongest in that neighborhood and could almost be considered a term of derision
(A. 831). The term is now obsolete and very few references are to be found in the county hisptires relating to it.
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. See "Michigan State College".
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE POST OFFICE. A post-office established at the College in 1884 and continued
under that name until 1907, at which time it was changed to East Lansing.
ALAIEDON POST OFFICE, of Alaiedon Township, was established Dec. 10, 1835. William Lewis, the first
supervisor, was the first postmast (D. 216). It was discontinued August 22, 1851.
ALAIEDON TOWNSHIP. This township was originally the north one-half of Aurelius and consisted of what
are now the four northwest townships of the county which were taken from Aurelius by an Act of the legislature
approved March 15, 1838 (D. 99,216). In 1891 Delhi, Lansing, and Meridian Townships were set off, leaving
the township of Alaiedon as it now is, with the old name of Alaiedon (A. 238). The first settler was James
Phillips who established his residence there Dec. 30, 1836, on the west half of the southwest quarter of Section 30
(D. 214). The meaning or derivation of the word has not been determined.
ALCOTT'S CREEK. So called in Durant's History of Ingham and Eaton Counties. See also Olcott.
ALVERSON. A post-office originally indicated on the map of 1859 as being located in section one of Meridian
Township. The post-office was originally established in 1852, discontinued in 1867, re-opened in 1867 with
Stephen D. Alverson as postmaster and finally discontinued in 1896. The Alversons were extensive owners of
land in section one of Meridian in 1859 (G.H.S.; D. 338).
AURELIUS OR AURELIUS CENTER. A post-office located in section thirty-four of Aurelius Township.
Originally called Howe's Corners in honor of Enoch Howe, who was the first postmaster (D. 221). The postoffice was established in 1837 and discontinued in 1841, re-established in 1854 and discontinued in 1903. It was
placed on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.) as Aurelius Center Post Office. Named for the township in which it is
located.
4
AURELIUS TOWNSHIP, originally embraced the whole west one-half of the county. It is said to have been
named by Deacon John Barnes after the ancient Roman Emperor (T. 300). This statement is probably incorrect,
as one of the first settlers in the township was Elijah Woodworth who came there late in 1835 or early in 1836,
and, as he came from Aurelius Township, Cayuga Conty, N.Y., most authorities give him credit for naming the
township after his old home (A. 316).
BALDWIN LAKE (obsolete), in Section twenty-two of Onondaga Township, is represented on the map of 1859
(G.H.S.) as being two small unnamed lakes. In 1874 Beers' Atlas of Ingham County indicates only one lake and
that as yet is unnamed. It derived its name from the Baldwin family who were taxpayers there in 1844 (D. 292)
on property abutting on the lake. The Baldwin family appear in the census of 1840, Onondage Township. Now
officially called Lane's Lake.
BATEESE CREEK, of Bunkerhill Township, was un-named in 1859 but was indicated as rising in Hewe's Lake
of Ingham Township and flowing south through Bunkerhill Township where it enters Jackson Coujnty with
Bateese Lake as its outlet. It was named for John Baptiste Boreau or Boreauz, a French trader who resided on the
shores of the lake as early as 1815 (A. 66; I. 896). Bateese is evidently the English contraction of Baptiste. Blois
in his Gazetteer of the State of Michigan (1838) makes no mention of the Creek, which is first located on the map
of 1859, and is also placed on the map of 1874, but is unnamed in both cases.
BEAR LAKE, in Section thirty-four, Stockbridge Township. See Fink Lake.
BEAR LAKE, a small lake in Section thirty-five of Lansing Township, surrounded originally by a large
huckleberry marsh. The name is typical of so many early place names of Michigan, being named for the wild
animals seen in the vicinity.
BEAR LAKE OUTLET, the creek flowing from Bear Lake in Section thirty-five of Lansing Township to the
Sycamore Creek, all of which is in Lansing Township.
BEEBE LAKE (Tax.) so called for the Beebe family who were early settlers in the vicinity (U.S. Hewe's Lake).
Now Nichol's Lake (q.v.).
BELLE OAK, an unincorporated village in sections thirteen and twenty-four of Locke Township. No settlement
is indicated in 1859, but a plan of the town is to be found on page 60 of Beer's Atlas of Ingham County (1874).
Locke Post Office was established in 1861 and discontinued the same year, reestablished later and again
discontinued. The name of Locke and Belle Oak were used interchangeably for years, but now the more common
term is Belle Oak. The town was originally settled in 1842 by James L. Nichols (D. 274). The deduction can
probably be made that Belle Oak was the name given to the community to describe the wonderful forest growth of
white oak. Name purely descriptive and derived from the French (U.S. Belle Oak).
There is a second version of the naming of the settlement that has received some publicity. The story is based
on the fact that the old school house had the first bell in the community, and the school was of oak construction,
hence the name Bell Oak. The bell was purchased in 1866, according to the records of the school board, but the
community was known as Belle Oak as early as 1861. Though the story has some local color and romantic
appeal, the proof of definite dates is lacking.
BIDDLE CITY (obsolete). The name of a proposed town platted in 1836 by Jerry and William Ford at the
junction of the Grand and Cedar rivers and now in the incorporated limits of the city of Lansing (C. 113). The
plat was recorded on page one of liber six of deeds in the Register of Deeds' office in Mason, Michigan. A full
description of the platting of Biddle City may be found in the Lansing State Journal of March 27, 1926. The
"paper" city was named for Major John Biddle of Detroit (L. 1; D. 122).
BOGUS SWAMP (obsolete), a dense swamp lying in sections seven and eighteen of Lansing Township, just
west of the city of Lansing. The land originally comprising the swamp is now well drained and developed. It was
so called from the fact that when the surveyors were running the lines for the road now known as Saginaw Street,
they surprised a gang of gang of counterfeiters, who fled leaving their dies and other equipment (P.R. 32; T. 325).
BRANCH LAKE, see Nichols' Lake.
BRUTUS TOWNSHIP (obsolete). A township consisting of the present townships of Wheatfield and Leroy,
and taken from Ingham Township March 22, 1839. The name was changed to Wheatfield on March 20, 1841 (D.
100). Brutus was named by Ephriam Meech who came from Brutus, Cayuga County, N.Y. (D. 323; A. 607).
BULLET LAKE. A small round lake in Section nineteen of Locke Township. Originally called Colby's Lake
for L. Colby who owned the whole lake in 1874 (B). The present name is descriptive of the shape of the lake.
BUNKERHILL TOWNSHIP (D. 226), organized March 19, 1839 (A. 334). The first house in the township was
built by Adam Bunker. There are two versions of the naming of the town. The first is that the township was
named by Major Jonathan Shearer of Plymouth, Wayne County, Michigan, who was an early settler there and
named it in honor of his father who served as a Captain in the Battle of Bunkerhill (A. 326). The second and
more logical explanation is that it was named for the Bunker family who built the first house there. It can
probably be considered a compromise between the two versions (A. 338). Durant in his History of Ingham and
Eaton Counties states that David Fuller was the first settler there (D. 227).
5
BUNKERHILL CENTER. See Bunkerhill Post Office.
BUNKERHILL POST OFFICE, named for the township in which it was located. The small settlement
appearing on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.) and 1874 (B.) is usually called Bunkerhill Center. A plan of the village is
given in the Atlas of 1874 (B. 98). The post office was established in 1841, with Harvey Taylor as the first
postmaster, and discontinued in 1842. Reestablished in 1848 with C.J. Tuttle as postmaster, and finally
discontinued in 1903.
BURDEN LAKE, located in section twenty-six of White Oak Township. The early maps of the county
indicated these small lakes as Fulcher's Lakes, as R. Fulcher owned land there in 1874 (B.; D. 326).
CAHOOGAN CREEK, a small stream rising in the northeast part of Bunkerhill Township and draining the
marshy district of the east half of the township, flowing south into Orchard Creek in Henrietta Township of
Jackson County. Beers in his Atlas of Ingham County (1874) calls it a county ditch. The origin of the term has
not been determined, although by some it is considered a garbled Indian name that has been so spelled in an
attempt to obtain the English pronunciation.
CARTER LAKE, in Section twenty-one, Stockbridge Township, is mentioned in the Michigan Lakes and
Streams Directory of 1931.
CEDAR. See Williamston.
CEDAR RIVER. See Red Cedar River.
CHANDLER'S MARSH. A large marsh lying mostly in Clinton County, with its southern limits in Lansing
Township, Ingham County. The marsh was named for United States Senator Zachariah Chandler who at one time
owned a considerable part of the swamp and marsh land. He developed a farm there and in the early days used
the farm home for a hunting lodge to enterain his political friends.
CHAPIN'S STATION or Eden post office was named for A.M. Chapin who settled there in 1843 (D. 313). A
plat of the settlement is given in Beers' Atlas of Ingham County (1874) (B.70). The name is not now in common
usage, as the community is generally called Eden (q.v.).
CHICAGO JUNCTION. The railroad junction of the Pere Marquette and Grand Trunk Railroads, located about
three miles east of Lansing. A transfer point of travelers for Chicago. Named by the railroad officials. Now
called Trowbridge (q.v.).
COLBY'S LAKE. Now on United States official maps as Bullet Lake.
COLLEGEVILLE (obsolete). A plat recorded Nov. 15, 1887, for that development north of, and adjacent to,
Michigan State College. Now the city of East Lansing.
COLUMBIA OR COLUMBIAVILLE (obsolete). A town platted in Aurelius Township in 1836-7 by the same
owners who platted the town of Mason (D. 220). The plat was never recorded. A mill was built there at one time,
but abandoned. In 1838 there were thirteen families living in the community (T. 301). No definite information is
available to determine whether the town was named from purely patriotic motives or for Columbia County, New
York.
COLUMBIA CREEK, of Aurelius Township, is so named on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.), but in 1874 (B.) was
called Willow Creek (D. 219). It is a small stream in section thirty-three and thirty-four, flowing northwesterly
through Norton Post Office to the village of Columbia or Three Bridges, to form a junction with the Grand River.
In 1840 the stream was dammed and a mill was built there. It is sometimes called the Columbia drain. The creek
was named for the town.
COLUMBIA ROAD. The road leading west from the city of Mason to the old village site of Columbia.
COON CREEK. A small stream rising in the northeast part of Williamston Township and discharging into the
Grand River in section twenty-seven (D. 333). The name is obviously derived from the fact that the stream's
valley was a favorite locale for raccoons.
COUNTY LINE LAKE, a small lake in section five of Locke Township, is intersected by the Ingham and
Shiawassee County line. The name first appears on the maps of 1874 (B.). Name descriptive of location.
DANSVILLE, appears on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.) as a village in sections fourteen, fifteen, twenty-two and
twenty-three of Ingham Township. It was originally platted by Samuel Crossman and Ephriam Hilliard in 1856
(D. 248). A copy of the plat as recorded is found in Beers' Atlas of Ingham County (1874) (B. 81). To this plat
additions were made by Daniel L. Crossman and others. The village was incorporated March 9, 1867 (A. 402).
The name of the town was chosen by Samuel Crossman for his son Daniel L. Crossman.
DEER CREEK, rises in the marshes of section twenty-eight and twenty-nine of Ingham Township and traverses
Ingham, Wheatfield and Willamston townships to form a junction with the Red Ceder River (D. 244). Residents
in the vicinity state that the marshes along the creek originally consisted of large fields of marsh grass that
constituted deer feeding grounds. In 1839, C.C. Douglas, in his report to the State Geologist, Douglass
Houghton, mentions the stream as being one of the principal sources of the Red Cedar River (D.H. 280).
DEITZ CREEK, of White Oak Township, is a small stream placed on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.) but at that time
unnamed. It derives its name from an early settler in Leroy Township who settled in 1843 on the stream near its
6
junction with Deer Creek in Section eight. Peter Deitz was a native of Germany and was a resident taxpayer there
in the census of 1844.
DELHI. See Holt.
DELHI CENTER. A post office established in February, 1848. In February, 1860, the name was changed to
Holt (q.v.).
DELHI STATION. See Holt.
DELHI TOWNSHIP was settled in January, 1837, by Frederick Luther of Lenawee County (D. 233). Credit for
the naming of the township is given to Roswell Evertt (T. 261) by whom the name was inserted when the petition
for a new township was presented to the legislature. Either it was named for the Hindu city of Delhi or for the
village of Delhi in New York State (D. 235). The probable deduction, however, is that it was named for the New
York State village, as it is logical to believe that the pioneers would name a community after some place with
which they were familiar. The township was organized from Alaiedon in February, 1842. It was surveyed by
John Mullett, Lucius Lyon and Musgrove Evans in 1825 and 1827 (T. 232).
DELHI DRAIN. So called on the geological survey maps of 1911. A small stream in sections thirty-two and
thirty-three of Delhi and Aurelius townships. The stream was indicated on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.) but was
unnamed.
DETROIT, HOWELL AND LANSING PLANK ROAD (obsolete). The name is self-explanatory. The road
was formerly spoken of as the Military Road, Grand River Road, or The Territorial Road. (L. 115).
DOAN CREEK. A small stream rising in sections three and four of Stockbridge Township and flowing north
through Leroy Township to the Red Cedar River (D. 244). It was named for Joshua Doan who settled on the
banks of the stream in the winter of 1835-6 (D. 246). Now commonly called the Doan Drain.
DOBIE LAKE was an unnamed lake on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.) in Section ten of Alaiedon Township, but by
1874 it had been named Dobie, for Alexander Dobie who settled on the land adjacent to it in 1839 (D. 218). At
one time the Dobie family were the largest owners of land in the township. The outlet for the thirty-five acre lake
is known as Sloan Creek (D. 213).
DOUGLAS LAKE, the outlet of which is Red Creek, is located in section sixteen of Delhi Township and is now
commonly called Mud Lake. It derives its name from the Douglas family who were at one time its owners.
Alonzo Douglas heads a family in Delhi Township in the census of 1840 and 1850 and the lake was probably
named for that family. The geological survey maps give the official name as Mud Lake (U.S.).
EAST LANSING. The city adjacent to the Michigan State College, lying three miles east of the city of Lansing.
Formerly known as Collegeville. It was never incorporated as a village but was incorporated as a city in 1907 at
which time the name of the post office was changed.
EDEN, OR EDEN POST OFFICE, was so called because of the fertility of the soil in the immediate vicinity. In
1874 the railroad station became known as Chapin's Station. The post office was established in 1843, with
Judson Hopkins as the first postmaster. He is listed as a tavern keeper in the census of 1850.
EWER'S LAKE, in section thirty-four of Ingham Township, is a small lake indicated on the map of 1859
(G.H.S.) as a large swamp. It was named for J.C. Ewer's who was owner of land abutting the lake in 1874. (B.).
FELT, OR FELT POST OFFICE, was the second post office in Bunkerhill Township (A. 327), being
established in 1851 and discontinued in 1875. It was indicated on the map of 1859, and was named for Dorman
Felt who settled there in 1847 (D.221).
FELT PLAINS. A descriptive name applied to that level land surrounding the post office of Felt.
FINK LAKE, a small lake lying mostly in section thirty-four of Stockbridge Township. It is mentioned and
placed a few times in the earlier maps and then appears as Sears Lake. The United States official name, however,
is Fink Lake. J. Fink was the owner in 1874.
FITCHBURG. A village placed on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.0 and named for the Fitch family who at that time
owned three of the four corners on which the town was located at the intersection of sections twenty-five, twentysix, thirty-five and thirty-six of Bunkerhill Township. (D. 228). The first mill there was built by Selah Fitch (A.
327). In 1855 the post office was established there, with Hubbard Fitch as the first post-master. The office was
closed in 1903. A plan of the four corners settlement is to be found in Beer's Atlas of Ingham County (1874). (B.
98).
FIVE CORNERS of Delhi Township, now called North Holt, is part of the village of Holt (A. 372). The
settlement never was recorded as a plat (D. 240). The name of five corners is descriptive of the junction and
intersection of the roads there.
FULCHER'S LAKES. Now officially named Burden Lake (U.S.) (q.v.).
GERMAN SETTLEMENT, OR GERMAN, of Alaiedon Township, ws so called because of the large number of
Germans that settled in the community. The present German school, so called, derives its name from the same
fact. (A. 269).
GLENN ISLAND is a small island in the Grand River just south of the Grand Trunk Railway bridge in the city
7
of Lansing. it was named for James L. Glenn, a representative to the state legislature in 1846-7 and speaker protem of the house in 1847. He was one of a committee of three to make a plan and survey of Lansing when it was
selected as the capital, and he had charge of building the old state house (M.B.).
GRAND RIVER was first called by the early settlers the Wash-ten-ong, the Chippewa form name meaning, "faroff" or "extending far inland", i.e. the longest in the state (M.P.H. 38; 453). R.V. Williams states that it was
called Wust-e-nong or Wush-te-nung, meaning the further district or county beyond (M.P.H. 4:393). The early
French trappers used the word in their own language that came the nearest to the Indian meaning and in this
manner the river became known as the LeGrande, or as it appeared on the maps of the early English
cartographers, the Grand, or Great (K. Series of plates). Joseph Wampler, the government surveyor, in running
his survey for the baseline on the south side of Onondaga Township on January 21, 1824, mentions marking the
meander post on the east bank of the Washtenaw River. The length of the river was given by Housghton as being
216 miles (D.H. 267), but the length is now considered as approximately 300 miles, with a total fall of 520 feet,
and a drainage basin of 5,572 square miles (U.). Of this total length only a small portion lies in Ingham County.
The river enters the county from the south in Onondaga Township and flows northwesterly across the township
where it enters Eaton County, only to re-enter the county in Lansing Township where, after forming a large
horseshoe bend, it again enters Eaton County.
GRAND RIVER TURNPIKE (obsolete). Now U.S. 16 (q.v.).
GROVENBURG, OR THE GROVENBURG SETTLEMENT, as it is now usually spoken of, is a small
community lying west of Holt. So called from the Grovenburg family who were early settlers in section twenty of
Delhi Township. The family of boys had the reputation of being great hunters in the pioneer days (A. 371).
HAMILTON (obsolete). A plat laid out in 1841 and recorded in 1851 by Freeman Bray and his brother-in-law
J.H. Kilbourn. it was located in the southeast part of section twenty-one and is now part of Okemos. The name
was chosen for Alexander Hamilton and not for the town of Hamilton, Ontario (D. 284), as sometimes claimed.
HARRIS POST OFFICE (obsolete), was established July 7, 1889, with Tyrannus C. Crysler the first postmaster.
The office was discontinued April 19, 1894. George H. and J.N. Harris, for whom the post office was named,
came from New York state. T.C. Crysler was a large owner of land in section three of White Oak Township near
the north township line adjoining Leroy Township (B. 83).
HASLETT, the village in Meridian Township, was originally the post office for the present village of Haslett,
and was called Pine Lake post office, established in 1879. The railroad station was Pine Lake Station, both
names being for the lake on which they were located (D. 287). Pine Lake post office was changed to Haslett
park, Sept. 19, 1890, and then changed to Haslett on June 26, 1895. The name was changed in honor of James
Haslett, a resident there at the time, who was supposed to have been instrumental in securing better passenger
service for the Grand Trunk Railroad.
HAYNER LAKE is a small lake in White Oak Township. It was named for Abraham Hayner who came from
Troy, New York, and settled in section thirty-four of White Oak Township at an early date (H.; Tac.). He was
very active in the affairs of the community (D. 328). It is stated in Historic Michigan, Vol. 3, that Hayner's home
was on the Territorial road and that he built a tavern or hotel across from his home that was called Slab Tavern
(T. 289).
HEBE LAKE (obsolete). See Hewes Lake.
HERRON CREEK, in Alaiedon Township, was traced on the map of 1859 (G.H.S.). The stream flows north
through Alaiedon and into Meridian Township, joining the Red Cedar river near the junction of the river and the
outlet of Lake Lansing. The name is derived from the fact that at one time there was a large heronry located on its
banks.
HEWES LAKE. In Beer's Atlas of Ingham County (1874) this lake is called Hebe Lake and was located in
section thirty-two of Ingham Township. The name usually given now, however, is Hewes Lake. It was unnamed
in 1859 (G.H.S.). Named for Daniel Hewes who was the first settler on its shores. The lake and surrounding
marsh are one of the sources of Bateese Creek. Tackabury in his Atlas of the State of Michigan (1884) called it
Beebe Lake. "Hebe" is probably a mistake on the part of the cartographer.
HICKORY ISLAND is a descriptive name applied to what was at one time an island in Lake Lansing of
Meridian Township.
HOGS BACK. A term applied to a glacial formation of more than ordinary interest, consisting of a long
continuous mound or ridge between the cities of Lansing and Leslie, a distace of approzimately twenty miles, and
is now considered one of the largest eskers in the world. It is from 40 to 80 feet in height, the formation being
very distinct in Delhi Township. South of Mason in Vevey Township the formation takes an easterly course and
thence, with a few intermittent breaks, continues to the center of Bunker Hill Township. Giel, Harley and Sivard
in their map of 1859 not only have this unique formation accurately designated as on many of the more recent
maps, but they also name it the "Hog's Back", indicating that even at that early date the pioneers had given this
exceptional formation a definite name. This moraine is the only outstanding natural feature in the whoLe county
8
(D. 231; A. 131; F. 31-102).
HOLT. Durant in his History of Ingham and Eaton Counties (1880) states that Delhi was laid out originally at
the railroad station and that the post office was known as Holt post office. On the map of 1859 (G.H.S.) the
village in section twenty-three was called Delhi Center and named for the township. In 1874 (B.) the name
appears as Holt for the post office, and the village retains the name of Delhi Center and the railroad station is
called Delhi Station. The names of Delhi, Delhi Center, North Holt and Five Corners are now all considered as
obsolete and are classed under Holt, which derives its name from Joseph Holt who was Postmaker General in
1859 (A. 393).
HOWES CORNERS (obsolete). Aurelius Center (q.v.)
HUNTOON CREEK of Leslie Township is the outlet of Huntoon Lake. It was along this creek valley that the
Michigan Central Railroad and the now non-existent Michigan United Railways built their railroads./ Huntoon
Creek at one time furnished pwoer for two mills. Name derived from Huntoon Lake. (q.v.)
HUNTOON LAKE of Leslie Township in Section fourteen was named for the Huntoon family who were
indicated on the map of 1859 as being owners of the land adjoining the creek and the lake at that time. Isaac
Huntoon came from Vermont to Michigan in 1842 (A. 645).
INGHAM CENTER (obsolete). See Ingham Village.
INGHAM COUNTY was named October 29, 1829, by the Legislative Council of the Territory of Michigan for
Samuel D. Ingham, Secretary of the Treasury under Presdient Andrew Jackson (M.P.H. 38:455; D. 98). The first
settler in the county was David Rogers who located in Stockbridge Township in 1833 or 1834 (D. 297).
INGHAM TOWNSHIP wqas named for the county. The township lines and the subdivision lines were surveyed
by Joseph Wampler in 1824 and 1826 and originally included the townships of White Oak, Wheatfield and leroy
(D. 247). Marcus Beers, a native of Connecticut, was the first settler in the township and settled here in May,
1836 (D. 245).
INGHAM VILLAGE (obsolete) or INGHAM, was located in sections one and twelve of Vevay Township. For
a time it was designated as the county seat, having been selected by a committee which was appointed by
Governor Mason. The committee made their report June 15, 1836, and this selection was approved by the
Governor. The village remained the county seat until March 6, 1840, when by an Act og the legislature it was
moved to Mason (D. 99). Great rivalry existed between the towns of Mason, Ingham Center and JEFFERSON
cITY (a.36).
JACOB'S LAKE is a small lake in section ywenty-one of Stockbridge Township into and through which Orchard
Creek (Plum Orchard or Thornapple Creek as it is now called) flows. It is named for the Jacobs family who
owned land there in 1859 and is mentioned in Durant's History of Ingham and Eaton Counties (D. 296).
JEFFERSON CITY (obsolete). A village located on Mud Creek in section twenty-nine of Alaiedon Township.
A mill was built there and a few log cabins erected (A. 248-253), but the moving og the county seat ended its
growth and it now lives in tradition only
9D. 99-215). The village was supposedly platted in 1836 by Stephens T. Mason and others (A. 239) and was
named in honor of Thomas Jefferson. The plat itself was never recorded (A. 239). The street on which the court
house in Mason now faces is Jefferson Street and this street continued north from the city if Mason to the town of
Jefferson, which at the period of its greatest growth had four dwellings, a mill and a school (A. 28-29).
JOLLY CORNERS. The intersection of Jolly Road and M-9.
More About Theodore George Foster:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
Notes for Margaret Irene Pattengill:
Articles from the Lansing State Journal:
May 1912
Mrs. Frederick J. Nichols and Mrs. David Cooley will entertain at 1 o'clock luncheon Wednesday at the home
of Mrs. Nichols, West Jefferson st, in honor of Miss Margaret Pattengill. A long series of parties is planned in
Miss Pattengill's honor. Next Friday Mrs. Victor R. Pattengill will entertain at 1 o'clock luncheon; Saturday
afternoon Miss Julia Luce will entertain at an informal reception; next Tuesday afternoon Miss Sophia Dodge,
North st, will entertain at a thimble party. On Wednesday evening, May 15, Miss Margaret Church, who will be
maid of honor at Miss Pattengill's marriage to Mr. Theodore Foster, May 20, will entertain at dinner in honor of
9
Miss Pattengill and Mr. Foster, and on the following Saturday evening Mr. Stowell Stebbins, who will be best
man at the wedding, will entertain at dinner.
Mr. Stowell Stebbins, who will be best man at the wedding of Miss Margaret Pattengill and Mr. Theodore
Foster this evening, entertained 14 guests at his home on South Walnut st, in honor of Miss Pattengill and Mr.
Foster. Among the guests were Miss Marie Salles of Flint, and Miss Beatrice Haslett of Port Huron, who are
visiting Miss Pattengill. The centerpiece of the dining-table was a bouquet of red tulips and the favors were red
carnations. Between the courses of the dinner conundrums were given the answers of which were names of
Shakespeare's plays. After dinner a short time was spent dancing after which the guests went to the Phi Aloha
Delta society dancing party.
SOCIAL NEWS
Foster-Pattengill
The marriage of Miss Margaret Irene Pattengill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Pattengill, and Mr.
Theodore George Foster, son of Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Foster, was celebrated at 7:30 o'clock Monday evening at
the home of the bride's parents on Townsend st. There were about eighty guests, and among them were Miss
Mabel Rose, Mr. Sees Jonson, Mr. Robert Gillam, all of Ann Arbor; Miss Beatrice Haslett of Port Huron, and
Miss Marie Salles of Flint. The birde and groom were attended by Miss Margaret Church and Mr. Stowell
Stebbins. Dr. O.J. Price of First Baptist church performed the ceremony. The bride wore a beautiful gown of
white English crepe, with a court train, and a veil fastened with orange blossoms; she carried a bouquet of white
lilacs and lillies of the valley. The maid of honor was gowned in ink chiffon over embroidery and she carried
pink roses. The Lohengrin wedding march was played on a harp and two violins. As the bride entered the parlor
she was met by her father by whom she was given away.
The house presented a scene of green and white. The walls were covered with white and hung with vines and
other green sprays. The rooms throughout were decorated with palms, ferns and white flowers and were lighted
with candles. The ceremony was performed before an altar made of green and white, palms, ferns and flowers.
During the ceremony the harpist and violinists played. The bride's mother was gowned in voile trimmed with
heavy lace.
After the ceremony a wedding supper was served. Seated at the bride's table with the bridal couple and their
attendants were Miss Haslett of Port Huron, Mr. Gillam of Ann Arbor, Miss Salles of Flint, Mr. Johnson of Ann
Arbor, and Mr. Craig Pattengill, brother of the bride, Miss Gertrude Foster and Mr. Allen Black of this city. At
the bride's table the centerpiece was a bouquet of forget-me-nots, and tiny cupids were scattered over the table.
The favors for the guests were cupids and for the bride a pair of gold slippers and the groom a double wedding
ring on which stood a dove. Over the table hung a white wedding bell, from which were suspended tiny cupids.
The other guests were seated at small tables scattered through the rooms. Miss May Johnson presided over the
supper and ten active members of the Lambda Rho Tau society of the high school, of which the bride was a
member, served. They were Misses Marie Weston, Monell Jenison, Juliette Bartholomew, Kathleen Clark,
Martha Pratt, Marion Bronson, Doris Porter, and Marion Spencer. Miss Helen Woodworth attended the door and
Mrs. Robert Woodworth assisted with the guests.
Late in the evening the bride and groom left for the north. They will spend about ten days at Roaring Brook and
upon their return will reside at 614 Sparrow ave. They will be at home after July 1.
More About Margaret Irene Pattengill:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
Children of Theodore Foster and Margaret Pattengill are:
i.
Theodore Pattengill Foster, born 18 Oct 1913 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 29 Nov 1970 in San
Francisco, CA; married Joyce Rosalind Capper 26 Nov 1943 in Martinez, Contra Costa, CA; born 17
May 1921 in Lewistown, MT; died 21 Aug 1997 in San Francisco, CA.
Notes for Theodore Pattengill Foster:
Obituary--San Francisco Chronicle
Foster, Theodore Pattengill--In this city, Nov. 29, 1970, Theodore Pattengill Foster, Lt. Col. U.S.A.
retired, beloved husband of Joyce C. Foster; loving father of Mrs. Lille Koski, Penelope and Theodosia
Foster; brother of Mrs. Patricia Porter of Lansing, Michigan, and Mrs. Cynthia Sparks of Saginaw,
Michigan; a member of the Sierra Club and Golden Gate Chapter Univeristy of Michigan Alumni,
10
California Genealogical Society, S.F. Zoological Society and Lansing Michigan History Society.
Private funeral services were held, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 1970. McAvoy O-Hara Co.
More About Theodore Pattengill Foster:
Burial: Colma, San Mateo, CA
Notes for Joyce Rosalind Capper:
Obituary--San Francisco Chronicle
Foster, Joyce Rosalind (Capper) -- In San Francisco on August 19, 1997 at the age of 76. Beloved wife
for 27 years of the late Lt. Col. Theodore Pattengill Foster, Retired Army Officer; cherished mother of
three daughters, Lille (Paul) Koski of San Francisco, Penelope (Keith) Davey of Novato and Theodosia
(Chris) Matthews of San Francisco; devoted grandmother of Jonathan Matthews, Tedra Matthews and
Peter Koski. Also survived by many nieces, nephews and friends. Joyce was born in Lewistown,
Montana on 5/17/21. During WWII she served as an Army nurse from 1943-1945. Receiving the
Asiatic Pacific Services Medal, WWII Victory Medal, American Theater Service Medal and the
Philippine Liberation Medal. She is a charter member in the Women in Military Service for America in
Washington, D.C. She was a registered nurse at the French Hospital for 18 yrs., retiring in 1978. She
had a smile and a kind word for everyone she met.
Friends my visit Wed. from 5-8 p.m. at the Evergreen Mortuary of McAvoy O'Hara Co., Geary Blvd. at
Tenth Ave. Funeral Services Thursday at 2 p.m. at the Parlors followed by the Burial at Olivet Memorial
Park. Donation to St. Anthony's Dining Room, S.P.C.A. or your favorite charity preferred. McAvoy
O'Hara Co., Paul Arthur Domergue-Associate
More About Joyce Rosalind Capper:
Burial: Colma, San Mateo, CA
ii.
Patricia Foster, born 20 Nov 1916 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 18 Sep 1981 in Lansing, Ingham, MI;
married Richard Stanley Porter 02 Nov 1940 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; born 11 Jan 1912 in Michigan;
died 13 Dec 1959 in Hazelcrest, IL.
More About Patricia Foster:
Cremation: 1981, Ashes scattered on Little Traverse Bay
More About Richard Stanley Porter:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
3
iii.
Cynthia Foster, born 29 Sep 1920 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 22 May 1996 in Gaylord, Otsego, MI;
married Lloyd Lester Sparks 12 Jun 1943 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
Generation No. 4
12. Seymour Foster, born 01 Jul 1845 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI; died 25 Dec 1933 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
He was the son of 24. Theodore Raeejeph Foster and 25. Francis Delia Seymour. He married 13. Mary
Louisa Woodworth 25 May 1871 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
13. Mary Louisa Woodworth, born 04 Jan 1847 in Rochester NY; died 15 Dec 1935 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI. She was the daughter of 26. George Ranslow Woodworth and 27. Louisa Linsley.
Notes for Seymour Foster:
From "An Account of Ingham County From Its Organization" edited by Frank N. Turner
SEYMOUR FOSTER--Land and the state of Michigan will look in vain for a stronger or higher-minded
representative than Seymour Foster. Aside from his personal worth and accomplishments, there is much of
interest attached to his genealogy, which betokens lines of sterling worth and prominent identification with
American history for many generations. He was born at Ann Arbor, Michigan, July 1, 1845. His father,
Theodore Foster, was born at Foster, Rhode Island, in 1812. The grandfather, Theodore Foster, from who the
village took its name, was for many years closely identified with the colonial history of New England and held
many honorable and responsible positions, among which was that of United States senator from Rhode Island,
from 1791-1803. The father of Seymour Foster came to Michigan in 1829. From 1837 to 1845 he was editor of
the Signal of Liberty, an Abolition paper, at Ann Arbor, and subsequently he became one of the editors of the
Free Democrat, published in Detroit. In 1845 he removed with his family to Scio, Washtenaw county, and
engaged in general merchandising. In 1855 he was appointed by Governor Bingham to the office of building
11
commissioner for the state reform school at Lansing. Upon the completion of that institution in 1856-57 he was
made its superintendent, and in September, 1856, brought his family to Lansing. This position he finally resigned
after an effective administration. In 1864 he edited the State Republican of Lansing, but owing to gradually
failing health he was obliged to give up all active work, having been a victim of tuberculosis for the previous six
years. He was an active, earnest supporter of the Union cause throughout the Civil war. His eldest son, Charles
T., having been killed at the Battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia, in 1862 and with his son Seymour still in the army, it
was his daily prayer that his life might be prolonged to see the successful close of the war and the return of his son
Seymour. His prayer was answered and he died December 27, 1865.
Seymour Foster was eleven years old when the family came to Lansing, prior to which time his schooling
advantages had been limited to that usually given in early days, in the "Little Red Schoolhouse." Upon coming to
Lansing he entered the private school of Misses A.C. and D.C. Rogers, which was then located immediately west
of where the Downey House now stands, in a two-story frame building which had formerly been a hotel, and
known as the Ohio house. After three years of schooling he entered the drug store of I.H. & H.D. Bartholomew
as a clerk. The store was located on ground now occupied by the Prudden building. Lansing at this time had no
railroad or telegraph nearer than Jackson, and obtained its daily news when the stage arrived from that city late in
the afternoon, bringing the Detroit papers. It came to be a habit of our citizens during those stressful days of the
Civil war to assemble in front of the bookstore of Wm. M. Carr, located where the State Savings Bank now
stands, and await the arrival of the stage with the news. The gathering would then call for someone to read the
news and the lot usually fell on Seymour Foster, who would mount a dry goods box and read the news aloud to
the assembly. In 1863, having arrived at the age of eighteen years, he enlisted in Company B, Second United
States Sharpshooters, commonly known as Berdan's Sharpshooters, which was attached to the First brigade, Third
division, Second corps, Army of the Potomac. His initiation was the Battle of the Wilderness, and from that
through to Lee's surrender at Appomattox he was never off duty for a day, having participated in thirty-seven
general engagements and skirmishes. He was slightly wounded several times, never seriously, and on July 17,
1865, he, with the little remnant of his company, was mustered out and discharged at Detroit. In 1871 he married
Mary L. Woodworth, daughter of George R. Woodworth, a pioneer shoe merchant of Landing, founder of the
business now conducted by his grandson, H.P. Woodworth. Seymour Foster has always taken a lively interest in
all political and civil affairs and is one of the best-known men in Ingham county. Since 1871 his business has
been dealing in real estate. In political matters he is a Republican and has served as chairman of the city and
county committees several times. In 1873 he was elected city clerk and was re-elected in 1874. In 1876 he was
elected city treasurer and he was re-elected in 1877. In 1888 he was appointed postmaster by President Harrison.
In 1895 he was representative in the state legislature. In 1897 President McKinley appointed him postmaster,
which position he held for seventeen years. He is an active member of the Charles T. Foster Post, G.A.R., named
after his brother, who was the first man to enlist and the first to be killed in action from Lansing. Four children
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Foster: Charles W. and Walter S. are law partners; Mrs. Gertrude McEwing resides in
Chicago, and Theodore G. is manager of the T.G. Foster Company, Lansing.
*****************************************
Seymour Foster was a member of Berdan's Sharpshooters during the Civil War. In Historical New Hampshire,
Hildreth M. Allison's article "New Hampshire's Contribution to Berdan's U.S. Volunteer Sharpshooters" states:
"...Hiram Berdan, a machinist and mechanical engineer by profession, a student of ordnance, and an expert
rifleman who had conceived a plan for raising a corps of picked men to be used as sharpshooters and skirmishers
under his command. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, looked askance at Berdan's plan, but General Winfield
Scott and President Lincoln considered it with favor. On June 5, 1861, Berdan received official authorization to
raise a regiment, provided this could be accomplished within ninety days.
The type of weapon with which the Sharpshooters were to be equipped posed an immediate and sticky problem.
The standard equipment for such marksmen was a ponderous muzzle-loader with clumsy telescopic equipment
attached, the weight of the whole totalling nearly thirty cumbersome pounds. Berdan made a specific requisition
for Sharps breech-loading rifles, but General Scott, asserting the opinion that no military rifle surpassed the
Springfield, advised him that "breech-loaders would spoil his command." Cameron agreed, but the astute
Lincoln, who had personally experimented with the Sharps gun at Berdan's camp and on occasion surpassed his
top military men in martial sagacity, sided with the newly commissioned colonel. A government order went in for
Sharps breech-loaders.
To become a member of Berdan's Sharpshooters, as the organization became known popularly, a marksman had
to put ten consecutive bullets within a ten-inch circle at a two hundred yard range. Realizing that with such
restrictive qualifications he could hardly expert to raise an entire regiment from any one state, Colonel Berdan's
First Regiment was made up of representative companies from five states: New York, Michigan, Wisconsin,
12
Vermont, and New Hampshire. A few individuals reputedly could snuff out a candle at a hundred yards...
On May 3, 1864, the Sharpshooters broke camp and headed for the Rapidan. They took part in the Battle of the
Wilderness, May 5 - 6... The regiments were involved in the bloody struggle at Cold Harbor on June 3-5 and took
part in the battles around Petersburg, June 16 - 18...During the remainder of 1864, the men of Berdan's two
regiments were under constant fire, being employed in the role of skirmishers and riflemen."
More About Seymour Foster:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
Notes for Mary Louisa Woodworth:
MARY WOODWORTH FOSTER
Frequent mention has been made from time to time, in these columns, of what has seemed the significance of
certain men, as their lives have come to a close. The purpose has not been one of laudation, but, rather, that some
insight as to their lives and times and their influence on the community might be gained.
Remembrance is that few, if any, women have been so mentioned. This lack of mention of women after a
long and useful life, that tied in with the human scheme of things, has not been for lack of appreciation. The older
women, especially, exercised their worth more subtly than dealing with those affairs with which men were given
to deal, and of which newspapers take so much notice.
Something like tow years ago mention was made, at the time of his death, of the close tie-in of the life of
Seymour Foster, from the time Lansing was a little city in the mud, to the present. Mr. Foster made no claim to
greatness, but his life was part and parcel of a little, then bigger and then big Lansing.
Now, as the news section of this paper has already informed the reader, Mary Woodworth Foster, wife of the
deceased Seymour, has followed him in death. The obituary account of Mrs. Foster's life here has already been
presented with such completeness and with such attention to picturesque details that little attempt need be made to
recall the facts of eighty years of active life here.
But it does seem due to point out that Mary Woodworth Foster passed through one of the most remarkable
periods of history, and, remarkable as was her experience, she met every fact and aspect of it with ability,
capability, enthusiasm and charm.
The coming of the white race to America is one of the most amazing facts of history. Almost, if not quite, as
amazing was the rising of the second wave of impulse which carried people west of the Alleghenies and west of
the lakes and caused them to found an empire. Judged by the background of history, there is no explanation of
such migrations except that, in due time, the purposes of the Almighty required the peopling of the continent.
People of that experience did not realize their greatness and their special designation in life, but the purposes
of Providence were in them and on them, none the less.
The taking of a continent to the purposes of humankind required families as much or more than it required
individuals. The French had tried the individual system in this very territory and it had largely failed. But when
men and women came here with devout purpose of making homes, the whole situation cleared as clears a test-tube
under the influence of a powerful reagent.
Mary Woodworth Foster, as citizen, as churchwoman, as a woman of ideas and social contacts, as wife and
as mother, played her part here through eighty years as did so many women who found America a wilderness and
left it a state.
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DECEMBER 16, 1935
RESIDENT OF CITY FOR 80 YEARS DIES
Mrs. Mary Louisa Foster, 89, Knew Lansing From Small Village Days
Mrs. Mary Louisa Foster, resident of Lansing continuously for 80 years, widow of the late Seymour Foster,
ex-postmaster, and mother of Charles W., Walter S., and Theodore G. Foster, died early Sunday morning at the
home, 315 North Chestnut street. Has Mrs. Foster lived until January 4 of the new years, she would have attained
the age of 89.
So far as known Mrs. Foster, always active in social, civic, and church affairs of Lansing, was, with one
exception, the only person in the capital city who had lived the experience of the town from the time it was a
village of 2,000 population, to the present time. The exception is Mrs. Foster's brother, Henry A. Woodworth,
13
506 North Washington avenue. Mr. Woodworth, now 97, and Mrs. Foster came to Lansing with their parents in
1855, and have lived here continuously since that year.
Mary Louisa Woodworth was born in Rochester, N.Y., January 4, 1847. Her parents, George R. and Louisa
Woodworth, were descendants of old New England pioneering stock whose names are found in the records of
military achievements when the colonies fought England for their freedom.
Remembered Trip to Lansing
In 1855 the parents decided to locate in Lansing. Their trip to this city was vividly remembered by Mrs.
Foster. The family was able to move by train as far as Lake Eire and then boarded boat for Detroit. The
Michigan Central railroad had a line operating at the time from Detroit to Jackson. The family arrived in Jackson,
then somewhat larger than Lansing. The state had voted to locate the capital and government business in this city
only eight years before the Woodworths made their migration to Michigan.
From Jackson the family was compelled to rely on horse-drawn stages in order to get to Lansing. Mrs. Foster
has sometimes related that one phase of the journey stood out most prominently. This was the overturning of the
stage and the spilling of the passengers and luggage. Michigan roads were well nigh impassable at times, deeply
rutted and mere trails through forests.
The father, upon arriving in Lansing, set up in the boot and shoe business on what is now the northwest
corner of Grand avenue and Kalamazoo street. This business was actively carried on by the son, Henry A.
Woodworth, and his sons, until a few years ago, but not in the same location.
Attended Schools Here
Mrs. Foster, eight years old upon the arrival of her parents in Lansing, attended such local schools as had
been established. The old Union school later known as the Townsend street school and now used as the board of
education's administration building, offered the higher education of the town. Mrs. Foster was a pupil in that
"high school."
After her graduation, Mrs. Foster's father and mother discussed the "finishing" of their daughter in the social
graces of the time. The daughter, therefore, was entered as a student in the Michigan Female seminary, conducted
at the time by a Mrs. Rogers in buildings, some of which are still units of the Michigan School for the Blind.
On May 25, 1871, Mrs. Foster was married to Seymour Foster, a young business man of the city, who had
but five years before returned from a long enlistment in the Union army and had returned to his home town to
make his way in civilian life. Mr. and Mrs. Foster in 1880 moved to the home at 317 North Chestnut street,
where the deaths of both occurred. Mr. Foster died two years ago. His father had built a part of this home in
1859.
When Mrs. Foster's parents left Rochester, N.Y., for Lansing, they were accompanied by the pastor of their
church and his family. This pastor came here, took over the mission which had been established here by the
Episcopal church, but later, as the town grew, organized what is now St. Paul's Episcopal church. The original
mission was on the site of the Gladmer theater. Mrs. Foster's mother was a charter member of this church and
Mrs. Foster had been a communicant of the church for nearly 80 years, making her its oldest member.
Active in Affairs Here
For years Mr. and Mrs. Foster were active in the social affairs of Lansing, the husband taking an active part
in the limited business world and also in politics. He served his home town a number of times in various
capacities. Of vast interest to the younger generation were the relation of early social and civic programs in
which Lansing was interested and which Mrs. Foster remembered so well.
Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Foster, the three sons previously mentioned and Mrs. Gertrude
McEwing, whose death occurred in 1928. The activities of Mrs. Foster are revealed in her affiliations. For years
she was active in the Lansing chapter of the Daughter of the American Revolution. Four ancestors, soldiers in the
Revolutionary war, qualified her for membership in this exclusive organization.
Mrs. Foster was also a charter member of the Woman's Historical club of Lansing and a life member of the
Michigan Pioneer and Historical association. For the last-named organization Mrs. Foster wrote, two years ago, a
most interesting article on "Pioneer Mothers." This article appeared in the association's quarterly publication and
has become a valuable matter of record for the state.
Watched City, State Develop
Since its inception, Mrs. Foster had been an affiliate of St. Mary's guild, an intra-organization of St. Paul's
Episcopal church. She was also a charter member of the Women's Relief corps of Lansing, an auxiliary to the
local G.A.R. post.
For 80 long years, Mrs. Foster as enabled to observe Michigan's development, but more especially the
changes in her own city. Each 12 months of these 80 years had brought its won change. Mrs. Foster had
witnessed them all, had participated actively in many plans for betterment and advance and development. Not
until July 1 of this year, was she compelled to withdraw from the varied activities which had held her interest in
her declining years.
14
Stricken at that time Mrs. Foster's health gradually failed. Her death Sunday removed from Lansing not only
one of its oldest residents, but one whose interest in the city in which she had lived so long, had never lagged nor
failed.
Funeral services for Mrs. Foster will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from St. Paul's Episcopal church,
the Rev. Ralph B. Putney, officiating. Besides the three sons, survivors include nine grandchildren and one greatgreat-grandchild. The three sons and three grandsons will act as pall-bearers Tuesday. Interment will be in Mt.
Hope cemetery beside the body of Mr. Foster.
******************************************
PIONEERS OF LANSING CELEBRATE GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY TODAY
Just a half century ago today Seymour Foster, former postmaster, ex-member of the legislature and active
always in Lansing's business life, married Miss Mary L. Woodworth. Today Mr. and Mrs. Foster celebrate their
golden wedding anniversary at the Foster home, 317 N. Chestnut st.
Even the home in which the celebration is to take place has a sentiment for earch since it was the parental
home of Mr. Foster, having been built in the early days by Mr. Foster's father. Married in Lansing and living
together constantly here, is the marital record of the chief celebrants and they have lived consistently to the slogan
than Lansing is the best town in which to live.
This afternoon at 3 o'clock, Mr. and Mrs. Foster receive. Besides old friends of the family, five generations
of the Woodworth family and four generations of the Foster family, all of whom have lived and participated in the
early and present life of the city, will offer congratulations.
This evening Mr. and Mrs. Foster will be hosts to 35 of the Foster-Woodworth families at dinner. The dinner
will mark the close of 50 years of married life in the same town and most of it in the same home.
Fortunately for Lansing's photographic industry all Lansingites haven't the same antipathy toward the lens art
as the Fosters. No golden wedding celebration is complete from a newspaper and editorial standpoint without
pictures of both parties to the contract. In this particular case, however, no pictures are available. It appears that
the Fosters haven't the photograph habit but give regular presents every Christmas.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Foster narrowly escaped being born in Lansing. Mr. Foster was born in Ann Arbor in
1845. His father, Theodore Foster was the first superintendent of the industrial school. He came to Lansing in
1856 to take charge of the school and later brought his family. So Mr. Foster's stay in Lansing dates from this
period.
Rochester, N.Y., is the natal city of Mrs. Foster. She was born there in 1847 but came with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. George Woodworth, to Lansing, in 1855. The trip was made mostly by stage and Mrs. Foster has a
distinct recollection of the old omnibus tipping over near Eaton Rapids while the family was enroute to Lansing.
The father established himself in the boot and shoe business in Lansing. Later his son, H.A. Woodworth
succeeded to the business and he now finds himself succeeded by his son, Harry P. Woodworth.
Mr. Foster at the early age of 18 enlisted in Company B, Second U.S. Sharpshooters. Previous to enlistment
Mr. Foster and Miss Woodworth had become more or less "chummy." Both were fond of skating and both took
several prizes for fancy glides and skillful movements on the old Grand river during the winter sports which the
early town was then very fond of.
When Mr. Foster enlisted for the Civil war in 1863 he was sent immediately to the front. The Battle of the
Wilderness was his first taste of warfare. The second U.S. sharpshooters were sent into some of the worst of the
greater battles of the Civil war. Their business was to pioneer and scout in advance of the main army.
In 1865 Mr. Foster was mustered out and returned to his home town. Immediately he became active in civic
affairs and entered business. He was one of the first of the early citizenry to make a business of insurance and
real estate. His career as a public officer was long and honorable.
In was on May 25, 1871, that he was united in marriage to Miss Woodworth. One year later he was elected
city clerk and served two terms. He also served two terms as city treasurer, being elected for the first term in
1875. From 1889 to 1893 he served as postmaster and was again appointed to the office in 1897. He retired from
the postmastership in 1914 and since then has dealt in real estate and built homes in various parts of the city
where he had vacant lots. Mr. Foster was one of the victims of the Prudden block fire and here lost his old ice
skates on which he frequently cut the figure "8" in the good old days when blood was red and cagarets and movies
were not so popular.
Mr. and Mrs. Foster's four children will help them celebrate and nine grandchildren will also be present. The
four children to offer their congratulations are Charles W. and Walter Foster, Mrs. Luther B. McEwing, Chicago,
and Theodore G. Foster. The latter son is senior member of the Foster-Fowler real estate firm and Charles W.
and Walter S., form the law partnership of C.W. and W.S. Foster, Dodge building.
15
Not only have the Fosters a long marital record as well as an extended residence record, but the family has
the unique record of having had no deaths in the 50 years.--Lansing State Journal, May 25, 1921
**************************************
LANSING COUPLE CELEBRATES WEDDING ANNIVERSARY MONDAY
The State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Monday, May 25, 1931
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Foster were receiving congratulations on their 60th wedding anniversary which they
observed quietly at their home, 317 North Chestnut street, Monday. Although a reception had not been planned,
Mr. and Mrs. Foster informally received quests during the afternoon and evening, as well as many greetings by
letter and telegram.
The three sons, Walter S., Charles W., and Theodore G., and their families, will have dinner with their
parents in the evening. Besides their sons Mr. and Mrs. Foster were the parents of one daughter, Mrs. Luther B.
McEwing, who died about two years ago. They have nine grandchildren.
Mrs. Foster, before her marriage on May 25, 1871, was Miss Mary L. Woodworth. She was born in
Rochester, N.Y., moving to Lansing at an early age with her parents. During her entire life, Mrs. Foster has been
extremely active in church and club work in the city, and holds the oldest membership in the congregation of St.
Paul's Episcopal church. She is a member of the Women's Historical club, the Lansing chapter of the Daughters
of the American Revolution, the Women's Relief corps, and the Industrial Aid society, a philanthropic
organization of women which was active a number of years ago.
Mr. Foster was born in 1845 at Ann Arbor, and at the age of 10 years, came to Lansing when his father,
Theodore Foster, became superintendent of the Michigan Vocational School for Boys, then called the house of
correction. In 1863, Mr. Foster joined Company B, 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters and saw considerable service during
the last year of the Civil war. He served as city clerk from 1873 to 1875, and then as city treasurer for two terms.
From 1888 to 1892 he served as postmaster and was elected state representative from the first district of Ingham
in 1895. For the past several years Mr. Foster has been engaged in the real estate business.
More About Mary Louisa Woodworth:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
Children of Seymour Foster and Mary Woodworth are:
i.
Charles Woodworth Foster, born 28 Mar 1873 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 1947 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI; married Martha C. Campbell 22 Jan 1908.
Notes for Charles Woodworth Foster:
From "An Account of Ingham County From Its Organization" edited by Frank N. Turner.
CHARLES WOODWORTH FOSTER, now a member of the Republican state central committee of
Michigan, was a member of the state senate in 1915-19. This epitomizes the active political career of
Charles Woodworth Foster, member of a widely known and highly esteemed family of Lansing,
Michigan. Mr. Foster, however, is not a politician by profession. He is a lawyer and his offices are at
807 American State Savings Bank building. His record of public service is unimpeachable, and as a
barrister and citizen he enjoys the confidence and esteem of the community. Mr. Foster is a true son of
Lansing, born in that city March 28, 1873, the son of Seymour Foster, of whom individual mention is
made in this publication. The mother, before her marriage, was Mary L. Woodworth. She was born in
Rochester, New York, and her folks came to Lansing in 1856 and established the first retail shoe store in
the city. Charles Woodworth Foster attended common and grade schools in Lansing and was graduated
in the literary department, University of Michigan, 1895, and law department, University of Michigan,
1896. Two years were spent in the office of Judges Cahill and Ostrander, following which Mr. Foster
opened an office of his own. In 1904 his brother, Walter S. Foster, was graduated, and that year was
admitted as a partner. Charles Woodworth Foster in 1898 and 1902 served as circuit court
commissioner; he was a member of the state senate in 1915-19 and has displayed ability and good civic
judgment as a member of the Republican state central committee, besides having served as chairman of
the Ingham county Republican committee several times. His ability as a leader and executive was
demonstrated in this political service. On January 22, 1908, Miss Martha C. Campbell, of Indianapolis,
and Mr. Foster joined hands in plighting the troth that makes for ideal companionship. Three children
are the issue of the union, Dorothy, Jeanette and Charles Campbell. Mr. Foster is an Elk, a Knight
Templar Mason, a member of the legal fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, of the Country club, the Chamber of
Commerce and the Episcopal church.
16
More About Charles Woodworth Foster:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
ii.
Walter Seymour Foster, born 23 Sep 1877 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 31 Jan 1961 in Lansing,
Ingham, MI; married Lena A. Bailey 05 Sep 1905 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; born 03 Sep 1876 in
Portland, MI; died 06 Apr 1962 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
Notes for Walter Seymour Foster:
From "An Account of Ingham County From Its Organization" edited by Frank N. Turner
WALTER S. FOSTER--A diversity of interest is strongly manifest in the life of Walter S. Foster,
prominent attorney of Lansing, Michigan, son of Seymour Foster and brother of Charles W. Foster, both
individually represented by personal sketches in this work. Mr. Foster, professionally well empanoplied,
radiates much more than the strictly professional interest in his community. He is active in the
promotion and consummation of civic and humanitarian projects and has contributed in no small degree
to the public service as the incumbent of the office of prosecuting attorney. Mr. Foster is a native of
Lansing, born September 23, 1877. He attended Lansing high school and the University of Michigan. In
1900 he became the recipient of the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and two years later he received the
degree of Doctor of Laws. In 1902 he became a law partner of his older brother, Charles W. Mr. Foster
served as county prosecutor from 1907 to 1910. During the World war his ability to co-ordinate and
develop a communal spirit of co-operation was shown in his chairmanship of the Ingham County War
Board. He was chairman also of the Liberty Loan committee and chairman of the War Chest, both
positions exacting much time and work. Mr. Foster became a second lieutenant of the state troops. His
diverse interests are further shown in the fact that he is a director of the American State Savings Bank, a
director of the East Lansing Bank, a director of the Holt Bank and secretary of the board of trustees of
the Edward W. Sparrow Hospital. He is vice-president of the Michigan Bar association. September 5,
1905, Mr. Foster was united in marriage to Miss Lena A. Bailey, of Lansing. There are three children-Richard Bailey, Seymour Bailey and Joseph Bailey Foster. Mr. Foster holds membership in the Masonic
fraternity, the Lansing Country Club and the Chamber of Commerce.
More About Walter Seymour Foster:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
More About Lena A. Bailey:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
6
iii.
iv.
Gertrude Foster, born 27 Oct 1879 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 1928; married Luther B. McEwing.
Theodore George Foster, born 23 Feb 1888 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 17 Oct 1960 in Lansing,
Ingham, MI; married Margaret Irene Pattengill 20 May 1912 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
14. Henry Romaine Pattengill, born 04 Jan 1852 in Mt. Vision, Otsego, NY; died 26 Nov 1918 in Lansing,
Ingham, MI. He was the son of 28. Lemuel Cleff Pattengill and 29. Mary Gregory. He married 15. Elizabeth
Adaline Sharpsteen 24 Jul 1877 in St. Louis, NY.
15. Elizabeth Adaline Sharpsteen, born 14 Aug 1857 in Perry, NY; died 22 May 1915 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI. She was the daughter of 30. Hiram Mortimer Sharpsteen and 31. Alvira Warren Bolton.
Notes for Henry Romaine Pattengill:
Obituary -- The State Journal -- Tuesday, November 26, 1918
DEATH CLAIMS H.R. PATTENGILL
Widely Known as an Educational Leader and for Patriotic and Civic Leadership.
Henry R. Pattengill, 66, prominent as an educator, former superintendent of public instruction of Michigan,
candidate for governor, and a man, perhaps more widely known than any man in Michigan through his association
with educational meetings, died at his home, 430 Townsend St., Tuesday morning.
Mr. Pattengill's illness was of but a few weeks' duration. He returned from Boston, where he went for medical
consultation, last Friday. Death was due to acute liver disease and came at 11:15 this morning.
In the death of Mr. Pattengill, Lansing loses the man who has done perhaps more than any man in the city to
promote civic activities. He was leader of Lansing's very successful Open Forum at one time and took a great
17
part in establishing the Forum ideas throughout the country. Mr. Pattengill presided at many of the civic meetings
in Lansing and had spoken at practically every big school meeting throughout the United States.
At the time of his death, Mr. Pattengill was proprietor and editor of Moderator-Topics, a weekly teachers'
publication of wide circulation in Michigan. He became associate editor of this publication in 1884 and in the
following year he became proprietor and editor.
In 1914, Mr. Pattengill was candidate on the National Progressive ticket for governor of Michigan. His name was
written in again in 1916. The Republican party elected him to the office of superintendent of public instruction in
1892 and again in 1894. He served for four years and was an ex-officio member of the state board of education
and the state board of geographical survey, also a member of the state board controlling state normal schools.
Previous to this, in 1885, he was assistant professor of English at the Michigan Agricultural college.
He was a member of the board of control of the Michigan Historical society and member of the Michigan Library
commission.
Mr. Pattengill came to Lansing in 1885 and had resided here continuously since that time. Mrs. Pattengill died
May 22, 1915. Four children survive. They are: Mrs. (Lille) Austin Brant of Boston; Victor R. Pattengill,
attending officers' training school at Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. Theodore G. Foster, who is with her husband, Lieut.
Foster at Camp Lewis, Wash., and Craig B. Pattengill of the Great Lakes Training station. Mrs. Brant and Craig
Pattengill were in the city at the time of their father's death.
Born in western New York state, Mr. Pattengill spent his early life in that section and in Hillsdale county,
Michigan. He was the son of a Baptist clergyman. He attended the district schools of New York and Michigan
and later entered the University of Michigan, from which he graduated in 1874. For the next 10 years he was
superintendent of schools of St. Louis and Ithaca, Gratiot county, Mich. While serving in this capacity he was a
leader in educational activities of the section and a member of the county board of school examiners.
A text book on Michigan civil government and several teachers' texts have been written by Mr. Pattengill.
He has presided at school meetings in Michigan and throughout the country for years and during that time came to
know thousands in every corner of the state. His activity in public affairs of the state has brought him in contact
with thousands more and it is probable that few in the state were more widely known than Mr. Pattengill.
He has always been a liberal contributor to the Baptist church of this city, the Y. M. C. A., and kindred
organizations.
Arrangements for the funeral are pending the arrival of two children.
___________________________________________________________________________________
From Moderator-Topics
Henry Romaine Pattengill, Editor Moderator-Topics 1884-1918
Your editor, Henry R. Pattengill, has passed away. Stilled is the voice that for more than one-third of a century
has spoken for the teachers of the boys and girls of Michigan. His life work is ended but the thousands of men
and women who have known and loved him are many times better fitted to do the world's work because he has
loved and labored among them.
No biography of this noble man can fittingly impart the story of his useful life. It remains for us at this time to
give the world some of the incidents of his career. Born in Mt. Vision, New York, Jan. 4, 1852; the son of an
able Baptist minister; his boyhood days were spent in western New York until at about the age of fourteen the
father located in Litchfield, Hillsdale county, in this state. From the village school he went to the University of
Michigan where he was graduated with honors from the literary department with the class of 1874. His roommate
during his course at Ann Arbor was Victor H. Lane, former circuit judge of the first judicial circuit, now an able
professor in the Law Department of the University. Mr. Pattengill's cousins, former Prof. A.H. Pattengill of the
University; J.G. Pattengill, late principal of the Ann Arbor high school, and Mrs. Knowlton, wife of Prof.
Knowlton of the University, were students and teachers in Ann Arbor during the same period.
From Ann Arbor Mr. Pattengill went to St. Louis, Gratiot county, where he served for two years as
superintendent of schools. At. St. Louis he married Miss Elizabeth Sharpsteen, who was a teacher and who, until
18
her death in May, 1915, was the center of a happy and well ordered home, an ideal companion and mother to the
two sons and two daughters that composed the family circle.
Leaving St. Louis Mr. Pattengill spent the next eight years as superintendent of schools at Ithaca, during which
he was president of the Gratiot County Teachers' Association, member of the county board of school examiners
and acknowledged by all as the educational leader not only of Gratiot county but of central Michigan. In 1884 he
became associate editor of the Michigan School Moderator and after a residence of one year in Grand Rapids he
acquired the sole ownership of the paper and removed with his family to Lansing where he has since resided.
From 1885 to 1889 he was assistant professor of English in the Michigan Agricultural College, having among
his pupils and intimate personal friends, Kenyon L. Butterfield, Ray Stannard Baker, Perry G. Holden and several
other prominent persons who regarded Mr. Pattengill as their staunch friend and most helpful and capable teacher.
His rapidly growing popularity as an institute worker and lecturer and the increasing influence of the Moderator
was a sufficient reason for the termination of his services at the M.A.C.
In the summer of 1892, without Mr. Pattengill's knowledge, a club was formed at the Agricultural College to
promote his candidacy for the nomination at the Republican State Convention for the office of Superintendent of
Public Instruction. Without effort or solicitation on his part, Mr. Pattengill was nominated on the first ballot and
his election and re-election in 1894 followed. It is unnecessary in this biography to enumerate the many reforms
that were inaugurated by him and successfully carried out. The future student of the educational history of
Michigan may easily trace the beginnings of great educational reforms that had their origin in the years 1893 to
1897. Retiring from office he was always loyal and earnest in his support of those who followed him and there
never was a time that "Pat" did not stand squarely behind any worthy man or movement for the good of the state
he so ably served as an official.
In 1902 he was appointed by Governor Bliss as a member of the State Board of Library Commissioners and has
served continuously since that time; for several years he has also been a member of the board of the Michigan
Historical Society; later he was honored with the presidency of the Michigan State Teachers' Association and he
was the candidate of the Progressive party for Governor of Michigan in 1914. Others in this issue will speak of
him as a promoter of civic enterprises and of his eminent service to Lansing, to Michigan and to the nation.
He never sought office for self aggrandizement; his life was unselfish and his motives pure. Public office to him
was merely an opportunity for greater usefulness; he was strong and could readily mould public opinion to the
accomplishment of great things; men of influence listened to him and followed his counsel.
His death occurred at his home in Lansing Tuesday, Nov. 26, after an illness of less than a month. His family
consists of his niece, Mary I. Johnson, who for many years was assistant editor of the Moderator; two daughters,
Mrs. Austin Brant of Boston, Mass; Mrs. Theodore G. Foster, with her husband, Lieut. Foster, stationed at Camp
Lewis, Wash.; two sons, Lieut. Victor R. Pattengill, stationed at Atlanta, Georgia, and Craig L., at Great Lakes,
Ill. On the service flag in the window of Mr. Pattengill's home, are four stars indicating that the sons and sons-inlaw possess the heroic qualities which were a pride to the valiant soul who they admired and devotedly loved.-Jason E. Hammond
MR. PATTENGILL AS A FACTOR IN EDUCATION--Walter H. French, Professor of Agricultural Education,
M.A.C.
The History of Michigan's education has its glorious pages, and the people of our state have been justly proud of
the progress that has been made under the wise constitutional and legislative provisions concerning the training of
the youth of our state. The pages of the history, written between the years of 1880 and 1918, are filled with
wonderful manifestations of progress in the thought of our people concerning education. During these years no
one individual has directed the thought of the people more forcibly than Henry R. Pattengill.
He began his career as a teacher in the rural schools and in every rural community which he served the people
still remember his vigor, energy and practical suggestions.
As a teacher in the high schools and as a superintendent of schools he manifested the same intense desire to have
the training of the child move forward rapidly, smoothly and effectively. Exceedingly quick and alert in his own
mental make-up, he was never satisfied until he had developed the same qualities in the minds of those whom he
instructed. That the school was a part of the community he never forgot and he insisted that every child and every
teacher should have a part in the development of the community life.
It is impossible to measure directly the value of any man's influence; it takes years, and the after years in
particular, to realize and comprehend the influence of the teachings of the individual. At this time, however, we
are able, as we take a backward look, to measure in some degree the ability of this remarkable man and determine
how far he was a factor in the development of educational ideals and practices. Many of the practices of our
schools today originated in his virile mind, and we desire to call attention to a few of what seem to be the most
important points or the high lights in his educational career.
First. He insisted that the rural child was entitled to as much and as good educational training as the child of the
19
city, and it was his idea that a reorganization of the rural school system was necessary, and he advocated the
township district idea. He was the first to advance this theory in this state and the plan has developed until we
have on our statute books laws providing for the organization of township districts in every township in the state.
Second. He was a firm believer in the principles of democracy and he realized that in order to develop a
democracy the individual must be educated. He was not the first but he was one of the strongest advocates of
compulsory education, and there is no question but that the articles from his pen, as published in the "Moderator"
carried much weight with the legislature and were a large factor in enacting one of the best laws of that kind
which operated in any of the states.
Third. He believed that the child should be made familiar with the events of history, not only of the past but
particularly of the present, and he has the honor of establishing the practice of teaching current events as a part of
the curriculum in every public school. The department of current events in his paper formed the basis of the
instruction of the young men and women who have become intelligent voters in recent years in this
commonwealth.
Fourth. He was a believer in trained teachers. As Superintendent of Public Instruction and member of the State
Board of Education, his influence was felt in the methods pursued in the State Normal schools and in the training
schools. While he was a believer in methods, he insisted that the teacher must be versatile, independent, original,
enthusiastic and no matter what the Normal Schools might do for the teacher, if they failed to develop these
cardinal virtues, they were subjected to criticism from his pen. His own example as an instructor and as a
conductor of institutes drove home through the consciousness of the teachers with whom he came in contact the
power of these qualities in a teacher. There are superintendents of schools in Michigan today who, consciously or
unconsciously, gained this power from him and are giving it to their teachers through teachers' meetings, personal
advice and direction. No one can measure this influence but it will require only a casual visit to certain schools in
our state to detect at once the influence of Mr. Pattengill. If the Michigan schools are better than the schools of
other states, it is due largely to what we may call the "esprit de corps" of our teaching force, and we maintain that
this condition is largely the result of the forceful direction and inspiring teachings of this man, who will in all
future history rank as one of Michigan's educators.
Fifth. As a corollary to what we have just said, we believe that it was through the teachers' institutes that Mr.
Pattengill was able to place an indelible stamp upon the educational practice of the state.
Prior to his administration of the affairs of the department of Public Instruction, the teachers' institutes had been
of the instruction type, one week or more in length, and, by his very nature, he desired to add to instruction,
enthusiasm and to this end he organized what has since been known at the "inspiration institute." These were to
be from one to three days in length and he selected the very highest type of men and women as lecturers and
instructors in these meetings. At the very beginning he impressed these instructors with this idea "inspire or
expire." The magical effect of this type of institute upon the teachers and consequently upon education was
marked. To quote another of his expressions this plan seemed "to put the grease where the squeak was" in our
system of teachers' institutes.
Sixth. In the matter of school legislation his administration stands out in clear relief. Prior to his time the
schools had run along under the then existing law known as Act No. 164 of the public acts of 1881. Mr.
Pattengill had certain definite ideas in regard to the management of our schools and he proceeded to put these into
effect through the cooperation of the legislature. Laws providing for the establishment of school district libraries;
the compulsory attendance of children at school; making it possible for school districts to furnish free text books;
for the prevention of dangerous communicable diseases; for the display of the United States flag on school
properties; for the organization of the work of the State Department of Education; and providing that institutions
of collegiate grades, upon the introduction of the proper pedagogical courses as a part of collegiate work, might
grant to their graduates licenses to teach in the public schools of the state, are some of the most important pieces
of legislation which bear the imprint of his influence.
Seventh. Mr. Pattengill was always a believer in athletics and physical training and he was largely instrumental
in educating the schools and the teachers of the state to develop a system of athletics and physical training which
would tend to produce well developed young men and women from the physical standpoint. In addition to this he
strongly advocated patriotic exercises in the public school in order to stamp the growing American with the
importance of maintaining a high standard of national life and patriotic ideas, which would later become
crystallized into public thought and law if necessary.
All through a long education career the marked characteristics of his public utterances were quickness and
alertness of thought, wholesome enjoyment of life and a desire for such efficiency as would place the young
American on a high plane of thought and living and would make of them idealistic citizens. It seems to us that his
one marked characteristic as an educator was inspiration and his one great desire seemed to be that the children of
Michigan should be so trained that they would be able to think higher thoughts and perform noble deeds.
____________________________________________________
20
MR. PATTENGILL AS SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION-- Fred L. Keeler, Superintendent of
Public Instruction
I have before me the first annual report which Mr. Pattengill issued as Superintendent of Public Instruction. It is
not only a report, it is a program. As a whole it places emphasis upon improvement in the professional
preparation of Michigan teachers. It touches furthermore upon the things which go to make good teaching
possible. A list of the main topics of the report is as follows: Teachers Examinations; Teachers Associations;
Educational Councils and Rallies; Compulsory School Law; Free Textbooks; Necessary Apparatus; More State
Normal Schools; Libraries; Old Glory; School Grounds; School Architecture; Heating and Ventilating. Each of
these topics is treated briefly and to the point. Mr. Pattengill did not stop with a write-up in his annual report, he
proceeded to carry into execution every one of his ideas.
It is perhaps correct to say that Mr. Pattengill's main contribution to Michigan education is the improvement of
the qualifications of teachers. It was during his administration that the certification law was passed under which
we now operate. Under this law a person may teach on a third grade certificate only three years. If he wishes to
remain in the profession longer he must secure a second grade certificate which requires higher qualifications.
Previous to Mr. Pattengill's day the status of teacher certification had been very unsatisfactory. The new law was
a revolution and was enacted with much opposition. However, Mr. Pattengill's all round ability as a director of
public opinion made the law stick. He inaugurated a vigorous campaign of teachers' institutes and county
association meetings. These gatherings placed emphasis upon better prepared teachers.
It would go beyond the limits of this statement to treat even partially the many constructive things accomplished
by Mr. Pattengill as Superintendent of Public Instruction. In fact many of the things proposed are still being
worked out. It is distinctly to his credit to say that not a single idea which he inaugurated has since been
repudiated. His successors have only found it necessary to enlarge and carry into more perfect execution.
I have said that Mr. Pattengill's contribution is a better prepared teacher for Michigan. Mr. Pattengill was a
teacher. When I have said that I have said it all. I could not say more. And this is how I know he was a teacher:
A few years ago they wanted a superintendent of schools at Ithaca, where nearly forty years ago Mr. Pattengill
was superintendent. The secretary of the board asked me to recommend a man for the position and this was his
comment, "Can't you get us a man of the Pattengill type?" That gentleman little knew what he was asking. There
is no Pattengill type. There was only one Pattengill. And I know he was a teacher because a man who forty years
ago had gone to school to him remembered him and as secretary of the school board felt that he would like to get
as good a superintendent for the present boys and girls as he himself had had when Mr. Pattengill presided.
In Michigan there is a multitude of men and women who are today more useful to the world because Mr.
Pattengill very personally reached them with his contagious and wholesome inspiration.
_________________
Among the thousands who knew Mr. Pattengill I felt that I was the most favored. To be given an opportunity to
serve for four years as deputy and assistant to him as Superintendent of Public Instruction was a privilege which I
always appreciated to the fullest extent. His administration was vigorous and nothing was left undone by him to
the fulfillment of his trust. He could accomplish a vast amount of work and those around him caught his
enthusiasm and delighted to be of service to him. He was happy; those around him were happy.
He was frank, sincere and fearless. No person ever remained in doubt very long as to his attitude on any
question. There was no deceit, no subterfuge in his nature. He could not tolerate duplicity nor could he have
patience with pretenders. He would do nothing to exalt himself. He knew his ability to lead and he led that he
might help and encourage his followers. To hold a public office was to him a mere incident; he was too big, too
unselfish and too kind to engage in a scramble for himself; his strife was for humanity.
His skill as a public speaker was wonderful. He knew how to attract attention and he also knew how to fix in the
minds of his audiences the plain serious thoughts which his messages always contained. His was a robust
personality but his nature was as tender and sweet as that of a pure refined woman. He had the courage to defend
his principles before a multitude or in the face of organized opposition but he was too manly and too
magnanimous to wound the feelings of the humblest person. He struck heavy blows against wrong and injustice
and yet what a joy his life has been to those who have felt the warmth of his perpetual sunshine!
Our four years of official life were years of great pleasure and satisfaction. To have known him in office; to
have lived by his side as a neighbor for twenty-five years has been an uplift and an inspiration incalculable. He
was "The richest man in Michigan"--not in bank account, bonds and stocks, but in treasures of infinite value--the
love and gratitude of tens of thousands of men and women whose lives have been inspired by him to lofty
thoughts and noble deeds.--Jason E. Hammond
______________________________________________
MR. PATTENGILL'S CIVIC IDEALS--Grant M. Hudson, Superintendent of Michigan Anti-Saloon League
A great civic idealist, a great Christian patriot, a diligent student and brilliant instructor in history and civil
21
government, it was not strange that to him should come the stirring appeal of the problems that centered around
civic affairs; a strong, passionate belief in the rule of the people; with a great faith in the soundness of the masses.
Democracy to him was the meaning of civic life.
His ardent convictions and forceful expressions of political questions early made him prominent in his party
affiliations, honoring him by election to the office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in 1892, which office
he successfully administered for four years.
It was perfectly natural with his vigorous thought and outspoken expression that he should have formed a warm
admiration and attachment for Theodore Roosevelt. So great was his belief in Roosevelt's ideals that he followed
him in 1912 in the forming of the Progressive party and became the party standard bearer in the state election of
1914, running on the Progressive ticket for Governor. Two years later, believing the principle for which the
Progressive party fought had been vindicated, he returned to the Republican party and campaigned the state as
strongly for Hughes for president as he had campaigned for the Progressive party.
Always a leader in forward civic movements he was an ardent champion of commission form of city government
and constantly advocated the same by his pen and voice.
The Open Forum was another movement which aroused his strong sympathies. Lansing's successful Open
Forum is largely the result of his untiring faith and zeal for the ideal of Democracy in action. From coast to coast
and north to south of the nation he has appeared on the Open Forum platforms, only to inspire the humblest
worker and citizen in the latent power of himself.
The battle of the moral forces of the state and nation to overthrow the slavery and curse of the liquor traffic
found in him a most eloquent advocate. He often likened it to the great conflict of the nation to rid its fair land of
the blot of slavery. No one was sought oftener to campaign for the "dry" cause than he. His logic was
unanswerable; his wit irresistible. Many a doubter was thoroughly converted to a strong advocate of temperance
by his platform appeal. In 1916 he was made the chairman of the Michigan Dry Campaign committee which
successfully carried to adoption by more than 70,000 majority the state-wide constitutional amendment. In the
campaign of that year he gave months of his time, without recompense, indeed at a personal financial loss, to the
forwarding of the campaign. The oncoming of national prohibition was to him but the natural outcome of
advancing civic ideals. His joy was boundless as he prophesied national prohibition by 1920.
Christian optimist, noble warrior, with undimmed faith and unsheathed sword for every call of humankind--your
city, your state, your nation, shall be the debtors to your visions and service through all the years to come.
____________________________________________________
HIS WORK FOR MICHIGAN HISTORY
The Michigan Pioneer Society had its birth in the Capitol at Lansing in 1874. The roster shows the names of
governors, judges and the pioneer builders of the State. As long as these lived the society flourished. The State
Librarian was its secretary. When she resigned Mrs. Judson of Lansing gave a year's hard labor trying to beget
into it new life. Mr. Pattengill was then induced by its great needs to assume the responsibilities. It was no snap
for a busy man, whose enthusiasm for his own unique and valuable work carried him all over the United States, to
take this additional load with no rewards but hard work.
He carried into it the same optimism and faith which made possible the first practical patriotism general in the
public schools by a law enacted while he was Superintendent of Public Instruction requiring each school house to
display Old Glory and pay for its upkeep. No man living in 1918 was ever a better exponent of the Spirit of '76.
Today we hear much of community singing--formerly referred to as congregational. He was the pioneer and the
greatest leader and advocate of this cause. The Knapsack and Pat's Pick are his monuments in every rural school
in Michigan.
His short, concise history of the State he so dearly loved and honored impressed more minds with the wonders
and importance of Michigan than any one thing which preceded it.
His inspiration and example led to the observance of a Pioneer day in schools, clubs and granges. In outlining
his plan his words come back to me with the ever original humor which distinguished him. "There are three ways
of communication--telephone, telegraph and tell a woman. Mrs. Ferrey, tell this to the women of the State and
persuade them to leave the study of dead Greece and Rome and give us a live Michigan." Following these
instructions as a humble disciple I have visited over 70 counties in Michigan carrying Old Glory and our own
state flag trying to beget an interest in the history of our own districts, townships and cities.
Libraries in our cities are monuments to Carnegie, but Mr. Pattengill's are the people themselves whom he had
helped, and inspired by his words and examples. His gifts to Michigan abide--not silver or gold or libraries but
human lives made better, happier and more useful.
Mr. Pattengill was not only an educator in Michigan but known the United States. He was a Billy Sunday
educational evangelist, claiming attention by his original ways and having a message and delivering it in no
uncertain manner. If ever a man had a good word for everybody it was Pat. Even his limp was triumphal and his
slang classic.
22
Would not a Pattengill day in every educational institution in Michigan keep in mind this unique, strong, helpful
character, with no malice, but charity for all and an unsurpassed uplift?
Citizens of Lansing, he has bequeathed to you the Open Forum. No one can bring to it the splendid speakers he
obtained through personal associations, but can we not, collectively and united, make this his home city memorial
and so, though he be dead, yet shall he speak to us.
To a rather discouraged and disappointed letter sent him at one time I received no rebuke but the following
poetic reply:
My dear Mrs. Ferrey--I pray thee be merry,
The world was not made in a day;
The Lord made a hit in the making of it,
But it took Him six days, so they say.
So work while you work, you never did shirk,
But quit when quit time comes round;
In your workshop leave cares, they give you gray hairs
An cause one's nerves to abound.
Do your duty each day, then rest some and play;
You will find it keeps you in trim;
A well refreshed mind comes up to the grind
With an unconquerable vim.
These sentiments old are as good as pure gold,
And often I've told them to you,
If you don't give them heed, you'll snuff out with speed,
Then what will the pioneers do?
--Mrs. Marie B. Ferrey
____________________________________
The death of Hon. Henry R. Pattengill of Lansing removes from our midst an honored citizen, a prominent
member and trustee of the Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society, and a warm personal friend.
My acquaintance with Mr. Pattengill began some twenty years ago when a teacher in the Upper Peninsula,
and the fruit of that friendship, matured with the years, is among my priceless personal treasures.
Mr. Pattengill's entire life was devoted to public service. As an educator, few men were better known
throughout the United States. As a public speaker, he was in demand for every notable gathering of civic and
educational leaders. As an editor, he was as widely known through his clean and vigorous work in the ModeratorTopics as any editor of national reputation. In civic activities he was foremost, not a "one idealist," but broad and
tolerant of all that was intellectually and morally honest.
He was a born leader. In some ways he belonged to the old school, but if he was stern he was not harsh. As
a teacher he was kind, but not soft; he did not believe in coddling. In speech he was keen, but never cruel, and he
was never too proud to acknowledge a mistake. He appreciated a joke on himself as keenly as any man, and his
sense of humor was the salt of many an otherwise poky meeting. No one went to sleep where he was. In thought
he was firm but not prejudiced; he had biases, but he was open to conviction. In action he was sometimes
impulsive, but never rash. He was quick to sense the right, and he went to his mark as straight as an arrow. In
debate he thrust with a rapier or hit with a sledge hammer, as the occasion seemed to demand. He was absolutely
without fear, yet not heedless, always open to advice and willing to make amends. In business he was shrewd, but
not selfish, standing always for the square deal. As a moral leader, he was clean, but not prudish, and enjoyed a
"spicy" joke as keenly as any man of red blood. He was wholesome and had nothing that he was ashamed of.
One of his tenets was that the first way to get right with men is to get the skeleton out of your closet. His religion
was vital.
As we sat in the gallery of Prudden Auditorium on the evening of Lansing's First Municipal Thanksgiving
and looked down upon the platform where so often we had seen him and heard him in Lansing's Open Forum and
in all the other good movements of our Capital city, there came to the mind's eye a quiet room a few doors away
where lay all that was mortal of our friend, but like a benediction came the strains of the chorus of the
International Song, and we shall believe indeed that in the Great Beyond, the soul of Henry R. Pattengill "goes
marching on!" His death will be a truly personal loss to every teacher of Michigan, and to countless others who
honored and loved him for his honest, kindly, fearless soul.
--G.N. Guller, Michigan Historical Commission
23
________________________________
HENRY R. PATTENGILL, THE MAN--Dr. Orlo J. Price, Mr. Pattengill's Pastor
Henry R. Pattengill was a great humanist. He identified himself with all human interests. He belonged to the
people. He breathed the spirit of his own time and gave out that spirit to others. His heart and his hand were
always open to every human need.
Beginning with that which is fundamental in life, he was a great home maker and home lover. No man was
ever more proud of his children. No home ever radiated more of the real happiness of life than the Pattengill
home. He was the head of the house there because he was the big brother of everyone. It seemed like the
supreme joy of his life that when the war came he could give two sons and two sons-in-law to the service and
wear his service flag with four stars upon it. He loved the simple joys that go with home life in all its phases. The
fireside, the big red apple, the vacation in the woods with the family, the good story, the singing around the family
piano, and, in his later years, the grandchildren that came to bless his advancing years. He was never too busy to
give time to the children and among the last composition of his hand are two poems, one to little Ted, a story of
"The Toad by the Roadside," and another to Patricia on "Patricia Standing Guard."
Mr. Pattengill was a great democrat. He never condescended to, nor patronized any. No country but
America could have produced him. Governors, captains of industry, little children were all the same to him. He
believed in the people and spent his life among the people, seeking to help and elevate them. He believed firmly
in the education of all the folks. He loved independence and could not be bound by party ring or organization to
anything which his conscience did not approve. Because of his democracy he hated sham and all camouflage, but
loved truth for its practical end. A great student of human nature, he detected readily sham hypocrisy in men and
saw the gold in characters where it was badly mixed with other elements.
Pattengill was a great patriot; he was one hundred percent American three hundred and sixty-five days in the
year. He knew our country's history and loved its traditions. He stood for its ideals and preached the gospel of
the "Stars and Stripes" to ten thousand school houses in Michigan. The very best of his nature came out when the
Great War came on and he said in a recent address, "I would rather the name "Pattengill" should be blotted out
for all generations to come than have one Pattengill in this world crises show the white feather." He loved his
native state and knew every stream and hill. It did not come to him to be a soldier, but no soldier ever served his
country with greater loyalty, industry or idealism than Henry R. Pattengill, and no soldier ever more greatly
deserved to be buried with the American flag draped over his casket than our friend who embodied so much of
the best of American life.
Pattengill was a great Christian. Christianity stands for great virtues, such as love of truth and hatred of
falsehood, love of right and hatred of evil, the forgiving spirit, the giving of justice, devotion in service, the belief
in fellowship and worship of a Divine Father of Love. If there is such a thing as sane philosophy of life,
Pattengill had it. He was kindly, big-hearted, not because he was soft, but because he had mastered and had under
control an intense, fiery spirit. He was a great preacher of righteousness. Every address, whether at a banquet or
before a country school, was a sermon on right living. His gospel did not repel, but was made effective by the
force of his genial and happy disposition.
There is always danger of idealizing those we love beyond the fact, but I believe that God's estimate of Henry
R. Pattengill is that here was a man worth while. No one asks "How much money did he leave behind?' for he left
great riches to all those who came into touch with his strong, fine personality. His life was one long protest
against the materialistic struggle for wealth, and an argument for clean, wholesome, righteous living. None ever
hated the saloon, or exercised greater influence to put it out of business than our former friend. As one of the
builders of Michigan, as one who gave himself, freely and joyously to their highest welfare, as one who has meted
optimism and helpfulness, his name will long be cherished among the great and the good whose lives illumine the
pathway of life.
_________________________________________
APPRECIATIONS OF HIS LIFE AND WORK
FROM HIS COLLEGE ROOMMATE
It was my good fortune to make the acquaintance of Henry Romaine Pattengill fifty years ago lacking one.
He came to Hudson to live with his aunt, Mrs. John Scott Pattengill, the mother of Albert H. and Judson G.
Pattengill, and Mrs. Jerome C. Knowlton, names prominently associated with the cause of education in Michigan.
He came to finish his preparation for college and I was a fellow student in the courses he took.
It was the acquaintance so begun which ripened into what became, as the years went on, one of the most
intimate friendships I have known. Before his year of work at the Hudson High School was finished he had
induced me to enter the State University with him. We roomed together for two years of his four in the University
24
and were only separated because of the removal of his parents to Ann Arbor and his resumption of his home
relations with them. His public service in the cause of education and in the interest of political righteousness gave
frequent occasion for our meeting after college days were over. I thus had abundant opportunity to know him as
boy and man.
He was a most congenial companion, a friend of the sort whose friendship outrides the storm, and a man who
was fundamentally right in his relations with his God, to his country, in his home and with his fellow men.
Full of life and keen in his enjoyment of it, he had a never failing sense of humor of that kindly sort which
helps the other fellow out of the shadows into the sunshine. He lacked something of patience with the
conventional, was intellectually honest, settled for himself all moral questions which would influence his own
conduct and was fearless in his advocacy of such as he thought ought to control in the lives of others.
As a boy other boys delighted in his companionship which was always wholesome. As a college student he
was popular, his abilities were recognized in many ways, notably as one of the very best expressions of University
life at Michigan, "The Chronicle"; here he leaned toward the utilitarian rather than to the more strictly scholastic
in education, an attitude which he maintained in after life without losing respect for learning in all fields; as a
citizen it were better there were more like him.
His large place in the educational life of his state, and his prominent service in the cause of good citizenship,
have been a source of great gratification to his friend of those earlier and these later years. The boy just grew
naturally into the man. He would have been recreant to his training as a boy had he been less a man.---Judge
Victor H. Lane
______________________
HIS WORK IN GRATIOT COUNTY
"I cannot express my own sorrow nor that of Mr. Pattengill's host of friends in Gratiot county on hearing of
his death. Few of us knew that he was seriously ill and we cannot yet realize that he is gone.
"In him the state has lost one of her greatest educators--great in his personality, his enthusiasm, his genial
disposition, his breadth of vision, his definite plans, his practical methods, his untiring devotion to a great cause
and above all his high ideals of a teacher's duty in the development of his own and the pupil's character.
"As one who followed him almost immediately in the Ithaca schools, it was my privilege to see and know his
work as an educator more intimately than many others knew it. It was here that he had most of his experience as a
public school teacher and so fully did he impress his convictions--himself--on this community and this county,
that for a quarter of a century his pupils, their children and grandchildren have hailed with delight the annual
Pattengill reunion with its anticipation of Pat's warm handshake, his expressive smile, his genial humor, his vivid
reminiscence of pioneer days.
"We never thought of him as old. To all who knew him, he was ever abounding in the ardor and enthusiasm
of young manhood. He seemed to have drunk of the fountain of perennial youth.
"We doubt if any other educator in the entire history of the state was so widely and intimately known, so
universally loved, or left so splendid a monument in the hearts of all who knew him. Certainly in old Gratiot his
is
'One of the few immortal names
That were not born to die.'"
J.N. McCall, Editor Gratiot County Herald
_______________________
AT ROARING BROOK
To know one's friends intimately in vacation days is one of the happiest experiences accorded us. This fact
was conspicuously shown in Mr. Pattengill's days at his summer home at Roaring Brook at the water's edge.
Five o'clock found him out every morning in his rowboat, the "Patsy," enjoying the beauties of nature and
exercising his arms and lungs. His hearty "yo-ho," which carried a half mile or more, was heard regularly every
day except Sunday.
While he enjoyed his motor boat, the "Gee Whiz," his greatest pleasure was in sailing the "Nancy Hanks."
Many were the tourists asked to "make weight" on a sail around the Bay, but he enjoyed the companionship of
none more that that of the small boys who formed the crew of the "Nancy Hanks." If any boy, after a season or
two at Roaring Brook, had not learned to sail a boat, or swim, there was not much red blood in him.
His personality was so inspiring that the boys unconsciously imbibed from him many valuable lessons not
learned from books--such as order, exactness, fairness and honor. He would not tolerate babying. This influence
was greatly appreciated by the parents.
He spend many hours in strenuous work repairing his dock and sawing wood. In this he was usually assisted
by a half dozen boys who didn't realize they were working, but thought they were playing.
Old Glory was always flying from the flag pole in front of his cottage, and many were the lessons in
25
patriotism taught by the owner.
He was foremost in planning picnics, bonfires, and social evenings and much of their great success was due
to his untiring enthusiasm. What could be more enjoyable than being one of a party breakfasting on the sand hills
of Menonaqua, or roasting marshmallows or sweet corn at an evening bonfire with Mr. Pattengill leading in the
singing or reciting poems--not always solemn ones--the favorite being "Otto and His Auto"?
He had travelled much and believed that there was no place where the sunsets were so beautiful as in the
region of Little Traverse Bay. Consequently he thought it was almost criminal to serve meals indoors at such
times.
Mr. Pattengill was unusually fond of the woods and flowers and deplored their desecration by the ruthless
tourist. He laid aside as much as possible all the artificialities of life and thoroughly enjoyed living next to Nature.
And thus the realization afforded by those delightful summer days gave him the necessary "Steam," as he
would call it, to carry on his inspiring educational work throughout the year.
The taking of Mr. Pattengill from Roaring Brook will be greatly felt and the Beach can never be the same
again, but--"No life can be pure in its purpose, strong in its strife, And all life not be purer and stronger thereby."-Mrs. A.C. Stebbins
More About Henry Romaine Pattengill:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
More About Elizabeth Adaline Sharpsteen:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
Children of Henry Pattengill and Elizabeth Sharpsteen are:
i.
Edith Lille Pattengill, born 30 Jun 1883 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; married Austin T. Brant 1909 in
Lansing, Ingham, Michigan.
Notes for Austin T. Brant:
FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR EX-LANSINGITE
State Journal -- December 16, 1933
Dr. Austin T. Brant, Who Died in East, Was Graduate of Central High
Funeral services for Dr. Austin T. Brant, a former resident of Lansing, who died Friday in Boston,
Mass., will be held at Boston Sunday afternoon. Interment will be at Newton, Mass. The Masonic
lodge, of which Doctor Brant was a past master, will conduct the service.
Doctor Brant was a graduate of Lansing Central high school and attended Ohio Wesleyan university.
He received his medical degree from the Harvard medical school.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. E. Lille Brant, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Pattengill of
Lansing; his father, the Rev. John F. Brant of Boston; four sisters, Miss Carlotta Brant of Boston, Mrs.
Fred Rust of Newtonville, Mass., and Mrs. Frederick Eaton and Miss Pauline Brant, both of New York
city.
Victor R. Pattengill, president of the Pattengill company, and Mrs. Theodore G. Foster, both of Lansing,
are brother and sister of Mrs. Brant. Another brother, Craig L. Pattengill, resides in Newtonville, Mass.
*******************************************8
HUSBAND OF FORMER LOCAL WOMAN DIES
Word has been received here of the death of Dr. Austin Brant, husband of Mrs. E. Lille Brant, formerly
Miss Pattengill of Lansing. Doctor Austin died at Boston Friday and funeral services will be held there
Sunday. Mrs. Brant is a sister of Victor R. Pattengill, West Ottawa street.
ii.
Victor Romaine Pattengill, born 20 Jun 1887 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 29 Oct 1943 in Lansing,
Ingham, MI; married Edwina Katherine Prudden 29 Feb 1912 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; born 19 Apr
1887 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died Aug 1971 in Beverly Hills, CA.
More About Victor Romaine Pattengill:
26
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
More About Edwina Katherine Prudden:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
7
iii.
iv.
Margaret Irene Pattengill, born 04 Aug 1889 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died 11 Sep 1969 in Lansing,
Ingham, MI; married Theodore George Foster 20 May 1912 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
Craig Lemuel Pattengill, born 28 Aug 1891 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; died Aug 1971 in Douglas,
Cochise, AZ; married Olivia Richardson Cooley 19 Dec 1925; born 13 May 1887 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI; died 26 Apr 1949.
Generation No. 5
24. Theodore Raeejeph Foster, born 03 Apr 1812 in Foster, RI1; died 27 Dec 1865 in Lansing, Ingham,
He was the son of 48. Theodore Foster and 49. Esther Bowen Millard. He married 25. Francis Delia
Seymour 08 Aug 1832 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI.
25. Francis Delia Seymour, born 09 Jun 1804; died 17 Mar 1876 in Lansing, Ingham, MI. She was the
daughter of 50. Ira Seymour and 51. Betsey Morehouse.
MI2.
Notes for Theodore Raeejeph Foster:
"THEODORE FOSTER (Theodore, Jedediah, Ephraim, Ephraim, Abraham, Reginald), b. Foster R. I., April 3,
1812. In 1827, when 14 years of age, he shipped as a sailor boy on a vessel bound for the East Indies. Having
received ill treatment, he deserted the ship at New Orleans and actually came back on foot from that distant point
to his home in Rhode Island. Finding that his father had died in his absence, he went to Dexter, Mich., in 1829,
where his brother, Samuel, then lived. On the formation of the Abolition party he became one of its most active
members. He edited "The Signal of Liberty" at Ann Arbor, 1841-7, which in 1847, was merged in "The National
Era," published at Washington, D.C. He advocated earnestly, the election of James G. Birney to the presidency.
He was considered by leading anti-slavery men a very able and clear-headed writer on our national duties,
interests and dangers. He edited also for some time after 1847 "The Free Democrat" of Detroit. In 1855, he was
appointed by Governor Bingham one of the Building Commissioners for The Reform School at Lansing, Mich.,
and before its completion, in 1856, was made its superintendent and held the office for 4 years (1856-60), being
afterward also on the Board of Control. He was clerk of the city of Lansing, Mich. (1861-2), deputy-collector
(1863-4) and editor (1864) of the Lansing State Republican, a position which poor health compelled him to resign
soon. He d. of consumption Dec. 27, 1865, aet. 53. He was equally modest and earnest, constitutionally
conservative; he was from deep moral conviction thoroughly radical. Naturally very sensitive to misappreciation
and opposition and obloquy, he yet delighted in defending and promoting everywhere, as opportunity offered,
whatever seemed to him to be truest and best, no matter what were the odds against him. He was a man of quick
perceptions, strong memory and philosophic habits of thought, with fine logical powers of reasoning. He was
also a close student, and much addicted to literary occupations. He had dark hair and eyes and a florid
complexion. He m. July 15, 1832, Francis Delia Seymour ; b. June 9, 1804 (dau. of Ira Seymour, of Victor, N.
Y., and Betsey Morehouse, afterward of Webster, Mich.)"--Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 307-308.
___________________________
LANSING STATE REPUBLICAN
Lansing, Mich.
Wednesday Morning, Jan. 3, 1866
Theodore Foster
In the death of Theodore Foster, Lansing loses one of its ablest men, and the State a long tried and most trustworthy citizen. Theodore Foster was born in Foster, Rhode Island, April 3d, 1812. He was the son of Theodore
Foster, who for seventeen years was United States Senator from that State. Young Foster was of a restless, roving
disposition, and at the early age of 14, shipped as a sailor boy for an East-India voyage, but having received illtreatment, deserted the vessel at New Orleans, and walked across the country from that port to his home in Rhode
Island. On his arrival he found his father had died during his absence, and his mother having died years before,
he was left an orphan, dependent upon his own exertions. Attracted by the opportunities for development in the
ten distant West, he came to Michigan in 1829, and settled at Dexter. From that time he remained a citizen of the
State, fully identified with all that tended to her political and material prosperity.
27
In his earlier political life Mr. Foster was a Whig, but upon the organization of the Abolition party, he
became one of its most active adherents, and was a supporter of James G. Birney for the Presidency. In 1841, the
Signal of Liberty was established at Ann Arbor, and by unanimous consent Mr. Foster was selected as editor,
which position he filled with great ability until 1847. Mr. Birney pronounced him the clearest-headed, and ablest
editor in the party. His paper attained a circulation of 3000 copies, at that time a large issue for even a
metropolitan paper. The establishment of the National Era at Washington, led to a discontinuance of nearly all
the other abolition papers, in order to give that an effective support, and the Signal of Liberty went out of
existence in 1847. At this time the name Abolitionist was odious, and Mr. Foster was excommunicated from a
church in Webster, because he declined to contribute to the aid of some society whose Corporate, Board was
known to consist of pro-slavery men. Mr. Foster afterwards acted as an editor of the Free Democrat, published at
Detroit, and in 1855 was appointed by Gov. Bingham, one of the Building Commissioners for the House of
Correction at Lansing, now known as the Reform School. Upon the completion of the building in 1856, he was
appointed Superintendent, which position he held four years, devoting himself with untiring earnestness to the
moral and physical development of the boys entrusted to his charge, giving the institution a high character as a
reformatory school, which it still maintains. In 1861, he was appointed by Gov. Crapo to the same position, at the
last session of the Legislature. In 1861 and 1862 he was Clerk of the City of Lansing, and in 1863 received the
appointment of Deputy Collector, which place he resigned in the spring of 1864, upon accepting the position of
editor of the Republican, eliciting the commendation of the Republican press throughout the State for his marked
ability as an editor. His increasing illness compelled him to resign in November, and his death, from
consumption, occurred Dec 27th, at the age of 53 years.
Mr. Foster was of a retiring nature, not apt to speak of himself, or of the subjects which most interested him,
except to intimate friends, and few estimated him at his true value. Not combative by nature, and hence a
conservative, he became a radical from a conscientious conviction of duty, and in obedience to the promptings of
his moral sentiments, which always controlled his sympathies and action. Sensitive by nature, he shrank from
opposition, but once committed to the cause of freedom, he never swerved or faltered. With strong perception, a
retentive memory, and great logical power of reasoning, he was an earnest and formidable opponent of slavery,
dealing telling blows for truth and humanity. For thirty years this was the thought of his life, and when the final
struggle came, he sent both of his sons to the field of battle, losing the eldest in the battle of Fair Oaks, where,
true to his fathers teachings, he had stepped from the ranks, to take the place of a fallen standard bearer of the
Michigan 3d. He lived to see the work accomplished, and slavery no more.
Could we trace effects to their legitimate causes, there would be found no man in Michigan who has done
more for the success of the Republican party than Theodore Foster. He was eminently a philosopher, possessed
of a good knowledge of the principles of common law, and satisfied only with the demonstration that removed all
doubt. He despised alike the man who loved money for its own sake, and the adherent of narrow sectarian creeds,
who could see no virtue or Christianity outside of his own church forms. A resident of Lansing for ten years he
never made a personal enemy. Filling high and responsible positions, he never asked or sought for an office. As
a writer, he always clearly defined his meaning often expressed by novel methods of reasoning, full of his own
individuality. He had strong faith in humanity, and labored against oppression in all its forms. He met death
calmly, with peace of mind, happy in the belief of rest and development hereafter. His departure will be mourned
by all who knew him.
________________________________
THEODORE RAEEJEPH FOSTER
On July 10, 1820, his father wrote him at Providence urging him to take advantage of the opportunities
offered him through the kindness of the Tillinghasts and be worthy of his name, RAEEJEPH, as this name was
made up and composed from the first letters of the names of his ancestors. In this letter his father urged him to
preserve all the correspondence that he sends him. (This letter is now, 1 March 1966, in the possession of
Theodore's great, great grandson, Theodore Pattengill Foster.]
Foster Monday July 10th 1820
Theodore Foster
My Dear Boy:
It is one week, this day, since I left you at Mr. Tillinghast's----through his goodness and that of your sister
you now have an opportunity of going to the Free School in Providence. I hope you will endeavor to learn all the
28
good you can there and that you will by all means do all, do everything in your power to recommend yourself to
Mr. Tillinghast and your sister and Mr. George Tillinghast and Mr. Charles Tillinghast who will be your friends,
if you behave well. Behave well and every body will love you...If badly nobody.
You were born in Foster, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon Friday April 3, 1812. So that you are this day eight
years three months and seven days old----old enough to learn something every day---Endeavor if possible to learn
so as to keep at the head of your class and make your school master, Mr. ___ ____ Hohayd love you, by obeying
their orders, getting your lessons well, and treating them always with respect and never quarrel with your school
Master or boys in the neighborhood and will never make any noise or disturbance in the school----Always treat
with kindness and affection your school mate Mary Carr, who lives in the family with you. Never quarrel with
her.
You are named Theodore Raeejeph to keep in remembrance your father and your grandfather of the name of
Foster from the first settlement in this country...The family came from the west of England, in the year 1638 and
settled at Ipswich eastward of Boston. You are of the seventh descent from Reginald Foster, who came from
England with five sons and two daughters----your grand father Foster was born in the following order, as in your
name for five generations (Viz)
1. Reginald, born in England, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, came to Ipswich, in Massachusetts AD 1638.
2. Abraham, born in England came with his father to Massachusetts in 1638.
3. Ephraim, born in Ipswich and settled in that town. He was Grand Father of your Grand Father Jedediah Foster.
4. Ephraim, born in Ipswich settled in Andover and was a respectable Man of Good Estates and entered your
Grand Father at Cambridge College.
5. Jedediah, this far as in your name, Jedediah was my Father. He was born in Andover 1726 Oct 10th. He was
educated at Cambridge College 15 years a member of the General Assembly. Died Judge of Supreme Court.
6. Theodore Foster born in Brookfield May 10th 1752. Educated at Rhode Island College, and was repeatedly a
member of the General Assembly of Providence and 13 years a Member of the Senate of the United States.
7. Theodore Raeejeph, now living at Providence, I hope a good boy and will in fame and goodness his ancestors
excel.
The letters E P and H were added to make out your name from the families Eames Pynchon and Hubbard
early settlers of New England, from which you are descended--all these ancestors I hope you will remember and
do Honor to by your good conduct-I was yesterday in Burrillville where I saw Wyllys and Lydia as are also Maxwell and Dwight, your
grandmother Millard with Wyllys, Dwight and Lydia, on the kind invitation of your sister Tillinghast, propose to
come to Mr. Tillinghasts at Commencement Time when you will have a opportunity of seeing them. I remain
Your Affectionate Father
Theodore Foster
*Your brother Maxwell born Providence Dec. 6th 1804
Samuel Wyllys born Foster Nov. 30th 1806
Cranston Dwight born in Foster Dec. 28th 1808
Your sister Ruth Lydia born in Foster Oct. 4, 1814
I wish you carefully preserve this and all my letters I shall ever write you.
[Not all of the letters by the father to his son were saved but enough of them remain to give an insight as to the
character of the man who wrote them, himself a great student of politics and history, he endeavored in each of his
missives to give his son some facts of importance. Some of this he wrote in Latin and most of them seem to be
too serious minded for a ten year old boy to receive, but were undoubtably part of the foundation for his serious,
studious character which gradually developed as he matured.--Theodore Pattengill Foster]
In "The Great Majority of Our Subscribers Are Farmers": The Michigan Abolitionist Constituency of the 1840s
by John W. Quist (teacher in the department of history and philosophy at Eastern Michigan University) 14
Journal of the Early Republic 328 (Fall 1994) supports his contention that most abolitionists were farmers with
data gathered from the Theodore Foster Papers. Michigan Historical Collections. Bentley Library. University of
Michigan.
29
"Because scholars utilizing individual-level data have in most cases emphasized the urban rather than the rural
components of abolitionism--and have thus failed to follow the leads established by those who have used
aggregate-level data--we presently have an incomplete understanding of the movement's constiuency. This study
will endeavor to bridge these differences through the examination of individual abolitionists who lived in both
town and countryside. The subscription list of the Signal of Liberty better identifies the anonymous yet true
believers of anti-slavery than the other source often used to ascertain individual abolitionists, petitions to the
United States Congress.
The parent organization of the Liberty party in Michigan was the Michigan State Anti-Slavery Society, which
was founded in 1836 and affiliated originally with the American Anti-Slavery Society. The Liberty party's
relatively strong showing in Michigan was probably due to its effective newspaper, the Signal of Liberty,
published in Ann Arbor from 1841 to 1848. In early 1841, the Michigan State Anti-Slavery Society endeavored
to establish a paper with the publishing record more consistent than that of the Michigan Freeman, which for the
previous two years had been issued sporadically in Jackson, Michigan. The state body assigned this task to
Theodore Foster, a farmer, tanner, and the son of a United States senator from Rhode Island of the same name,
and Guy Beckley, a merchant and sometimes Methodist preacher. The Signal of Liberty began its operations with
only 500 subscribers. This increased to 900 by February 1842, however, and may have approached 2000 by the
mid-1840s. The Signal of Liberty primarily was devoted to news and views of the antislavery movement in
Michigan, the United States, and abroad; it usually contained editorials by Foster and articles gathered from other
antislavery papers. Occasionally present were announcements and articles related to evangelicalism in Michigan.
other reform causes such as temperance also were defended avidly in the paper, although the Michigan Liberty
party refrained from taking an official stand on anything besides the issue of slavery. During its life, the Signal of
Liberty was essentially Michigan's only newspaper devoted entirely to antislavery. A change in the pecuniary
circumstances of Foster, and the death of Beckley, who financially supported the paper, caused Foster to resign
his editorship following the expiration of his publishing contract with the Michigan State Anti-Slavery Society in
early 1848, after which the paper ceased publicaltion.
The Signal of Liberty's extant subscription list was developed by Foster during the last year or two of the paper's
existence. The list contained the names of 1,267 Michigan subscribers to the Signal of Liberty. Although over a
fifth of the subscribers came from Washtenaw County, as did the majority of the Signal's advertising-undoubtedly a consequence of the paper's publicaltion at the county seat of Ann Arbor--the Signal was well
received throughout the state's lower four tiers of counties thanks to an aggressive network of agents who solicited
subscriptions. Of those subscribers who lived in Michigan, 832, or 65.7 percent, can be identified on the 1850
manuscript census, while information concerning seventy-two other subscribers has been compiled from county
histories, newspapers, church records, poll lists, and other contemporary sources. Ninety-one percent (760 of
832) of the subscribers indentified on the census were white male heads of household; only five of the Michigan
subscriptions were listed in a woman's name, while correlation with the census revealed that ten subscribers were
African-American males.
Women were recognized by Foster to be among the paer's readership and were understood by him and other
newspaper editors to be the impetus behind the decision of many households to subscribe to a newspaper. But
precisely which household found women persuading their husbands or fathers to subscribe to the Signal--or which
women subscribed tothe paper in their husband's or father's name--cannot be known.
Theodore Foster, like other newspaper editors of his day, provided less space in the Signal of Liberty to the
creation of women's voluntary associations than to men's. Though Foster usually announced the formation of
Washtenaw County's male abolitionist societies and often published the minutes of their meetings, he seldom
acknowledged the creation of female antislavery societies, and their existence can only be affirmed through
incidental references. This editorial position of Foster was consistent with his views on women's rights; during
the 1`840s, he poked fun at abolitionists who endorsed feminism. With respect to William Lloyd Garrison's
contentions that "all women are in a state of abject slavery to men" and that women deserved "an equality with
men in all respects," Foster responded: "It unfortunately happens, however, that the fair sex are very slow to
perceive or acknowledge their own wretched situation." Over the next ten years, though. Foster canged his mind.
By 1856 he concluded that women deserved the right to vote and predicted that by the middle of the twentieth
century "female suffrage will generally prevail in the United States." Concurrent with Foster's change of heart, a
small number of Garrisonians organized their own state-wide antislavery body, and women figured prominently in
that society's leadership.
After the dissolution of the Liberty party, Foster recalled that the party's members "were mostly moral and
religious men." Of course, it is not possible to determine the religious predilections of every subscriber to the
Signal of Liberty. Many church records often list only member and not the names of those who attended regularly
but had not taken the steps toward obtaining embership.
Theodore Foster recalled the importance of Protestant ministers wihtin the Liberty party, as he later wrote that
30
"clergymen of verious denominations, in considerable numbers increased its numbers and talent . . .and among the
members of their respective congregations they exerted, for the support of the party, a permanent and most
effective influence." Indeed, the fact that 3 percent of the subscribers with identifiable occupations were
members of the cleary--far in excess of the population at large--seems to bear out Foster's observation. But more
important are the large number of farmers found among Signal of Liberty subscribers. In 1843, Foster reported in
his paper that "the great majority of our subscribers are farmers, and have expected to pay their subscriptions as
soon as they could dispose of their crops." He reiterated this point during the 1850s in his history of the Liberty
party. "The Liberty votes were obtained chiefly from agricultural districts," Foster remembered, "and in the cities
and large towns it was found impossible, by any amount of efforts, to gather into the Liberty organization any
considerable numbers."
The leading trait in their system of policy (in the South), as avowed by their most prominent statemen, is, that all
laborers ought to be slaves." And it was undoubtedly this laboring constituency that Theodore Foster had in mind
when he inserted the follwoing remarks in the Signal of Liberty: "We showed, last week, that at the South, all
laborers, throughout the earth, are accounted and denominated slaves. Another principle naturally follows close
upon that, which is, that laborers ought not to have any voice in making or executing the laws . . . If thses
slaveholders could legislate for Michigan, they would deprive of the privilege of voting, and of holding office . . .
all who "depend upon their daily labor for their subsistence," viz: All the agriculturists who have not property
enough to live without work . . . The whole government of the state would then be in the hands of the members of
the lerned professions . . . and of such other individuals as might be able to live without manual labor . . . Upon
this principle, six thousand men would legislate for the whole state, while more than fifty thousand would be
deprived of all political privileges . . . . Such are the principles by which the laboring classes in the slave states
are governed, and these same principles the slave-holding statesmen would rejoice to see bringing into subjection,
and grinding down to slavery, the free working men of Michigan, and of all the free states . . . . It is not strange
that, having such feelings toward the freemen of the North, they should treat their petitions with contempt and
scorn. What right have slaves to petition? What do laboirng men know about public affairs?"
Further data demonstrate that farmers who subscribed to the Signal of Liberty also enjoyed a higher agricultural
output than did most Michigan farmers. Subscribers to the Signal of Liberty had more capital invested in farm
implements and machinery than did non-subscriber farmers. The mean value of agricultural implements and
machinery on the farms of Sigan of Liberty subcribers was $102, or 29.1 percent greater than the amount among
Michigan's farmers at large, $79. The willingness of an individual farmer to invest in these means of improving
farm output was not uniform throughout the state, a fact recognized by Foster in a Signal of Liberty editorial":
"Farmers should be vigilant to secure the early introduciton of those chemical and mechanical processes which
affact their business. They do not realize that a single invention may change materially the state of agricultural
industry. It was by invention of the steam engine that England has been able for a century to fight the battles of
Europe. By means of Whitney's cotton gin, the South have supplied the world with cotton; and are there not
similar inventions which will affect the interest of the Northwest? We think it not too much to say of the mass of
our farming population, that theyt have too little interest in improving their circumstances by keeping up too little
interest in improving their circumstances by keeping up with the spirit of the age. Many of them seem to think
that nothing chan be done more profitable than to follow the tracks of their ancestors."
The importance of education appeared frequently in Michigan's antislavery rhetoric. Indeed, Michigan
abolitionists considered "the diffusion of education among all classes" to be integral to their agenda, and
announced at the state convention of the Liberty party in 1843 that education "will most effectively promote the
interests of free-labor and thereby advance the prosperity of the country." Theordore Foster further insisted that
the advancement of common schools worked to promote well-being. "The interest of every man requrees that all
his fellow citizens should be able to read and write, keep accounts and understand geography," Foster claimed.
Additionally, he maintained that Massachusetts was prosperous because "knowledge is generally diffused there;"
South Carolina, on the other hand, was a "savage nations," and its workers "stupid, indolent creatures," because
only "the rich are well educated." Abolitionists in Oakland County agreed that the institution of slavery sttod
opposed to the spread of common schools, and caused higher illiteracy, even among the southern free
population."
_______________________________
Theodore R. Foster Writes From Lansing
Edited by Willis H. Miller (Michigan History, Vol. 35, No. 3, Sept 1951]
Conditions In The House Of Correction in Lansing in the period of the 1850's and 1860's, along with snatches of
family life, general conditions, and local politics are to be found in the group of letters written by Theodore
Ralljepgh [sic] Foster, for a time superintendent of the House of Correction. The ten letters in this collection,
dating from 1857 to 1865, were written to his sister, Mrs. Lydia Foster Seymour Comstock of Hudson, St. Croix
31
County, Wisconsin.
The writer of the letters, Theodore R. Foster, was born in Foster, Rhode Island, April 3, 1812, the next
youngest of eight children. He was the son of Theodore Foster (1752-1828), a graduate of Brown University, and
secretary of the Rhode Island Council of War during the American Revolution. His mother was Esther Bowen
Millard, the daughter of the Rev. Noah Millard and Hannah Bowen.
In 1820 his father sent him to attend the free schools in Providence, Rhode Island. While there he lived with
a half sister, Theodosia, the wife of Stephen Tillinghast, a prosperous merchant of that city.
By 1828 young Foster, then seventeen years old, had the wanderlust. He set out to join his brother, Samuel,
who had migrated a short time earlier to Dexter, where he was then operating a store, sawmill and a gristmill.
Upon his arrival in Dexter, his brother gave him employment. According to records, on April 1, 1833, we find
him serving as one of the inspectors for the first town meeting of Webster Township in Washtenaw County.
He was married July 15, 1832, to Delia Frances Seymour, the daughter of Ira Seymour and Betsey
Morehouse of Scio. It is an interesting and unusual fact that the Seymour and Foster families were closely
intertwined by marriages. Three of the Foster brothers and one Foster sister married three of the Seymour girls
and one Seymour brother.
For a time Foster was a farmer, but because of ill health he accepted a position as a schoolteacher. During
this time he was a zealous advocate of the cause of abolition and was an active member of the Underground
Railroad and while living in Scio operated the station there. In the mid 1840's he served as co-editor and later
editor of the Signal of Liberty at Ann Arbor, an antislavery publication which gained considerable reputation and
circulation.
On February 12, 1855, when Governor Kingsley S. B. Bingham signed the act to establish a "House of
Correction for Juvenile Offenders," at Lansing, Theodore Foster was appointed one of the Board of Control
members. When the first buildings were completed, he was elected superintendent, holding the post until
September 1, 1860, when he resigned because of ill health. However he did still retain his membership on the
board and remained clerk of the board until his death.
During the time he lived in Lansing--from 1856 to 1865--he served at various times as city clerk, deputy
collector of internal revenue, and for two years as editor of the Lansing State Republican. He died in Lansing on
December 27, 1865, and was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery.
It was Theodore R. Foster's sister, Mrs. Comstock (1814-99), who received and read these letters. She and
her husband, John Comstock (1812-90), had migrated west from Commerce to the frontier community of Hudson,
St. Croix County, Wisconsin, in 1856, where they lived the remainder of their lives, identifying themselves in the
development of the settlement. Mrs. Comstock, a woman of strong convictions and ideas, was a leader in
religious and social circles in Hudson for many years.
The original letters, written in a typical and attractive Spencerian penmanship, laid forgotten and unthought
of for many years in the loft of an old barn in Hudson. The owner was Miss Ruth C. Andrews, a grandniece of
Mrs. Comstock.
After the death of Miss Andrews in 1947, the letters were discovered when her personal effects were being
distributed to her heirs. A well-meaning handy man in cleaning out the barn came across the letters and not
knowing the great historical value of the manuscripts relegated them to the trash heap, thinking them just some
"old papers." The writer rescued them and subsequently presented them to the Michigan Historical Commission.
The ten letters here presented are in their original form. The spelling which is used is that of Theodore R.
Foster, though occasionally punctuation has been supplied by the editor to give clearer meaning.
House of Correction, Lansing
May 24, 1857
Dear Lydia,
It is now just four o'clock, and our church is just out, and I take the opportunity to write you a few lines,
having to stop occasionally on account of my eyes, which are worse than common. I have to be extremely careful
32
of them or I could not long have any eyes. If I did not read or write at all (the very things I delight most in) I
think they might get some better but would never be permanently well.
Yours is dated April 19, but we have seen and heard nothing of John [Comstock] yet, hence we conclude he
has not been to Lansing.
Andrew and his lady staid here Thursday night on the way home, having been out on a weeks visit to her
fathers. We have not heard of the coming of that new nephew yet, but hear he was detained in Brooklyn by
sickness. You will probably hear all the news before we shall.
We expect grandpa [Ira Seymour] and Urania out here in a few days to stay some weeks. They tell me he is
very feeble.
My Charles [Charles Tillinghast Foster] entered the Agricultural College last week as a student and digs
stumps three hours every day in addition to his studies. There are about 70 students.
Fanny [Frances Foster] attends Miss Rogers Female College regularly and Seymour [Seymour Foster] goes to
the Union School. So you see that so far as opportunity is concerned, the children all have a chance. It they do
not improve the fault will be theirs. But I do not expect very much. The old proverb says that one man may lead
a horse to water, but twenty can't make him drink. However, they all do well now.
We have 33 boys now with the prospect of many more. They work 6 hours a day, and study in school 5. We
have a meeting here every Sunday at 2 o'clock. We are just finishing our chapel room which will seat 500
persons. The boys behave quite well as could be expected, but not withstanding, in so large an establishment,
many unpleasant things annoy both Frances and myself. And were it not for the consolations of religion and its
glorious prospects both for time and eternity, I should be a wretched man. One needs to be a philanthropist to
take charge of such an establishment, and then he can feel that he gets a part of his pay in doing good, and in
being a co-operator with God in the regeneration of humanity.
Claudius and Harriet do first rate here, but they find theirs to be anything but an easy place. There is no easy
place about the institution. As this was instituted by Republicans, the Democrats are down upon us in some of the
papers of the State almost weekly assailing us in the meanest manner in order to make political capital.
I am pleased to hear that you enjoy your new home [in Hudson, St. Croix County, Wisc.] and trust you will
never have occasion to repent moving so far to the West. For my part, I like Lansing well and shall probably
settle here. It is all uncertain how long I shall keep my present place as I hold it only at the pleasure of the Board
of Control. I could get other situations as a clerk here readily enough, did not the want of eyes prevent. This cuts
me off from most kinds of business.
When shall we look for you here? For we never shall see you till you come, as I cannot leave here at all,
unless on business. Let me hear from you often, and know all about your affairs. Frances sends love to you and
John and hopes to see you both this summer.
Affectionately, your brother, Theodore
House of Correction, Lansing
Aug. 16, 1857
Dear Lydia,
Your welcome letter of July _____ was duly received and I have sat down this rainy Sunday at 4 o'clock to
write a few lines in return for you are the only regular correspondent I have in this world, Clara and Esther being
only occasional ones.
We are in usual health here except that Frances, since her last sickness, has not recovered her sight entirely,
so as to read much at a time, but I think she will become better in time.
We are filling up here from time to time, the population of our House being nearly sixty souls. We have now
36 boys committed here, and two girls, and we expect eight more boys tomorrow. Our boys, except two, are all
thieves, and our girls are both prostitutes, altho the youngest is but eleven years of age. The Board tell me that I
must consider myself a father to them all. Is not this a hard task? Especially when I am required to make them all
33
into good boys and girls. We are greatly cramped up for want of room, especially when the character of our girls
is taken into account.
The Democrats here publish in their papers and circulate through the country the most abominable lies about
the government and officers of the Institution. They call us hardhearted, cruel, unfeeling, etc, and the Institution
is denounced as a "Young State Prison," the "Boys Bastille." So that if you should come to see us, you may hear
some hard stories about your brother before you arrive. The object of the papers is to make political capital out
of it for the next election.
The things annoyed me some at first, but in this country a man cannot hold any public post if it be no more
than constable, without being maligned and lied about for political purposes. We have a full set of officers here
now, and the enterprise, according to my view, is in a favorable condition. We seem to use every means for
reformation or improvement that can possibly be devised. I give my unremitted attention to it. During 49 weeks
since my family came I have not slept out of the house one night.
We are all well pleased here, and have no desire to go back to "old Scio." Our children are entirely weaned
from their native place.
I am writing at my office table; and on the other three sides of it, writing letters, are Miss Helen Hopkins,
Miss Fanny Foster, and Miss Alma Seymour. Does it never remind you of old age to see the little ones coming on
so fast around you? I want to have you come here and examine our establishment; for I know you will be
interested in it. If you had no other post of usefulness in the world, I could find several for you here.
It is expected there will be an extra session of the Legislature here this fall. Can't you come out and stay
awhile and see the lions?
My eyes are so bad that I cannot write any more at present, and you must take this scrawl as it is.
My family all send their love to Aunt Lydia, and uncle John, as well as your affectionate brother.
Theodore
House of Correction, Lansing
Nov. 22, 1857
MY DEAR SISTER,
Yours of the Sept 30, was duly received, and would have been answered long before this, had I not delayed
on account of my eyes. But I have now resolved to acknowledg my debts, even if I cannot discharge them.
My sight has been failing gradually for some time, and I am able to write and read now only for a few
moments at a time. I am obliged to get my office writing done for me.
I have been to Detroit lately and consulted 3 oculists, but their advice does not help me much but leaves me
just where I was. So I am to stand it as best I may.
My family are in pretty good health now. So also of Claudias. But we have been out of helth some, nearly
all of us. as this is quite a place for the ague.
It is thought there will be no Extra Session here this winter, but the whole matter is uncertain.
Charles is here with me at present, but both the younger school [children] go to Miss Rogers College. I am
giving them as good advantage in schooling as I can, as the Democrats promise to rout us from this institution in
about a year.
I have not been able to see our new nephew, but have heard of him. I hear that Esther is "as happy as it is
possible for mortal to be." I am glad to hear of it; for if she lives to be 70 there will be sorrow and suffering
enough to be borne and we all of us need some sunny days. I think I should prefer to live within the bounds of
civileraton [sic], if it were possible. I presume you have seen them before this time.
If it were possible I would wrtie you long letters, and have pleasure therein; but as it is you must take the will
34
for the deed. Let me hear from you soon.
My respects to John, and will be glad to see both you and him whenever it shall please Divine Providence to
have it so. If my eyes get beter, I will write more and oftener.
Most affectionately yours,
T. Foster
State Reform School, Lansing, Mich.
June 22, 1859
MY DEAR SISTER,
Yours of the 22nd of May was received with much pleasure, and I am able to reply with some more pleasure
than usual, or rather with less pain on account of an improvement in my eyes. I can see some better than
formerly, and they pain me less. I have hopes that they will continue to gain.
Our affairs here are so systematired [sic] that the Institution has run right along for some time without any
jarring or friction. I have 87 boys and 1 girl, and boys coming, and I have less care and trouble about them than I
had at first about a tenth part of that number. They improve quite as well as could be expected, considering that
they are so expected, considering that they are so extremely degraded. Seven or eight of them go downtown to
Church several times a week, sometimes, and are regarded as hopefully pious by the brethren and sisters. You
know I am rather slow of belief on these matters, and have doubts how long their goodnes will last, but even
while it does last, the change for the better is really astonishing. No man can persuade me, with only these
examples before my eyes, that Christianity lived out by a simple and sincere mind, will not make men a great deal
better.
Our Charles came home last week, having been within 45 miles of Pikes Peak, and travelled, he says, 2500 of
which 1300 were afoot. He was gone 100 days, and we hope it will not be time, money or labor lost on him. His
health was excellent. He went into a store here yesterday with the same wages he had before he left--$200 a year
and board. No money, of course.
Fanny and Seymour are having a long holiday from school of 4 months. Their mother has a good health as
usual. Grandpa is growing feeble and old, but is well most of the time.
Andrew and wife are here. Andrew is hired out at the carpenter business. Gets 11 / a day I hear.
Selby Hutchinson and wife arrived here yesterday. They have sold out to Gus Peters. I presume some of
their children will follow.
I hear nothing very definite from Edward and Esther. I preseume you hear much sooner than I do from that
direction.
Our place is improving very fast. We are a city now, and shut up drunkards in the city jail, and pigs in the
pound. We have 4 new churches building, and expect a railroad to Owosso by January next. There is not much
excitement about anything at present though many feel sad on account of the effect of the frost.
My time never sped away so fast before, apparently. Day & night, summer & winter, follow in such rapid
succession that I could not realize it at all, did I not find my years accumulating. I find, too, my experience
accumulates, and I have a great many recollections of the past, both painful and pleasant, and some higher and
better aspirations for the future. These boys, with their vices and crimes, and hateful and violent passions, remind
me of what I might have been--yes--and for aught I know--have been forever, had not God called after me, visited
me with much affliction and sorrow, and taught me to believe and feel that he best knows how to govern the
Universe.
But as my sheet is full, I will stop my sermon right here and hope you will continue affectionately to
remember your only brother, THEODORE
Lansing, September 11, 1862
MY DEAR SISTER,
Your very kind letter of June 20 was duly received, and was very welcome to us, reaching us, as it did in the
period of the greatest affliction of our lives.
35
We found, as soon as our Charles [Charles Foster was killed in the battle of Fair Oaks, May 29, 1862. The
Grand Army of the Republic Post in Lansing was named in his memory.] was departed, that we were even more
deeply attached to him than we had supposed; and it required a continual effort of his mother and of myself, for
some time, before we could regain our usual calmness and equanimity of mind.
We have not been able to take any steps towards bringing home his remains, as the country is in possession
of the enemy, and will be till the rebellion is suppressed. It is doubtful if we shall ever bring them back, as not
more than for or five persons have ever seen his grave, and they are all soldiers, and one was lately slain in battle.
It seemed that if Charles had escaped at Fair Oakes, he might have come home; but in the late battles near
Washington more than half of the remainder of the Regiment were killed or wounded. A small chance for a
soldier's life and limbs!
Frances started out 2 weeks since for Detroit, intending to visit Eveline Owen, Aunt Mary, Aunt Hannah, on
her way back; but she was so unwell that she went no farther than Detroit, and returned. Seymour went with her
to see the world for the first time, and enjoyed the trip much.
She found the family quite comfortable situated. Edward is receiving $600 a year which is just the amount
his father received at his age. But both of them served seven years in the same place. How easy and sure is
success in life by taking the right course; and how easy and sure to miss it by taking a wrong one.
Seymour lives at home with us, and likes his place very well, but thinks he would like a clerkship in
wholesale house in Detroit better. He now gets $208 a year, boarding himself, which is about as well as a boy of
17 can do here in a store.
Fanny is at home with us, does not keep school this year; lives a very dreamy, sentimental life; reads and
thinks much, writes letters and plays on the guitar. She has an active mind, but it takes a literary direction.
We are very comfortably situated as a family--more so than we have ever before been.
Aunt Urania is with us. Her deafness is so great that she is cut off from general society entirely.
Claudius is rather poor in health. His situation as watchman in the reform School does not agree with him.
His little girl, about a year old, is very pretty and interesting.
I find, as I am going the downhill of life, that I enjoy myself better each succeeding year. I have learned to
look more within for the fountains of happiness, and less and less to external influences.
I do not now expect ever to come to see you, although I may. But I do intend to go back to old New England
once more before I die. That once will suffice. Let me hear from you soon.
Affectionately yours, Theodore
Lansing, Feb. 26, 1863
DEAR SISTER LYDIA,
Your kind letter of Jany 8 was duly received, and read with much pleasure, inasmuch as you are the only
regular correspondent I have. I have tried several other friends, at different times, old and young, but after two or
three letters, there is an utter failure. Whether it is owing to them or me, or both, is immaterial. A forced
correspondence is of little value to either party.
I think you and I will be apt always to write more or less, because we have not only the same earthly, but the
same Heavenly father: because we have both had a varied and profitable experience; because we have essentially
the same principles of action in this life, and the same common hope of another.
We are in usual health at our house--all of us--just as you have always known us, never very robust, and yet
almost always "so as to be stirring." Since I wrote you, I think in addition to my other offices, I have been
appointed a Dep. Collector of Internal Revenue. I shall not receive very much for it, but as it can be done without
much tax on eyesight, and my friends being determined to do something for me, I am trying it.
36
It seems to me, sometimes as tho I had far better friends than I deserve; and their disinterested attachment to
me is far more than I expect, or can repay. I have never had any occasion to repeat the old story about "an
ungrateful world" etc. On the contrary, all my life through, wherever my love, regard, esteem, or confidence have
gone out to man, woman or child, it has been invariably returned with abundant interest. In this respect, my life
has been a success.
As a family, we are now comfortable in our pecuniary circumstances, as Seymour provides for himself, and
Fanny has copying to do for the U.S. which supplies her wants, which, for a girl like her, I may, say, are always
reasonable. She writes a good business hand, and writes faster, and makes a better manuscript than I can. Our
children are very affectionate to each other, and we try to make home as pleasant as possible. Our children have
their faults: (what Foster has not?) but, compared with other parents, we have always been happy with our
children. The tears often start as we think of one who lies buried in his blood-soaked clothes far away, but when
we see the comrades who stood by his side come home crippled and wounded, to suffer for many years, we bless
God that he died immediately, without pain or misery.
Claudius is rather out of health this summer past. He has employ in the Reform School. Mr. Robinson,
Supt., and I are going to visit the Ohio Farm Reform School at Lancaster this Spring. He wants me to go with
him to Westboro, Mass., where you and I went, but I think I cannot go so far now. Write me what you know of
Mrs. Charles Tillinghast's death. I have only seen a newspaper marked. Also what about our R. I. friends? I
intend to go there once more (only once) before I die. Remember me kindly to John and all the other friends, and
write soon to your only brother, THEODORE
Lansing, May 13, 1863
DEAR SISTER LYDIA,
Your kind letter dated Jany 15 reminds me that I must be in debt to you; and I avail myself of a little leisure
to repay what is due.
As Rev. C. G. Clarke used to say, "My family are all well except myself." I have had a bad cough for ten
weeks, which does not seem to leave me at all, but rather increases. I have been able, however, to walk to my
office and back daily, with a few exceptions. Sometimes I feel as though I should be an inhabitant of the other
world in a few weeks; and sometimes it seems as though I would be as well as ever in a few days. The
probabilities may be that neither the one nor the other will be true.
Urania is living with us as usual. She is going on a visit to Scio soon. Fanny and Seymour are at home. F.,
as I wrote you before, sometimes makes good wages at writing for the State & U. States, which she prefers to
keeping School. Seymour left his employers after a year and a half because they were parsimonious about his
wages; and I guess politics had something to do with it, as they are the worst kind of Secesh [According to
Webster's dictionary the term "Secesh" is a slang word for secessionist.] and I need not tell you that, if Seymour is
of our family, he is a violent Republican. Our children are very affectionate to each other, and compared with
other families, Frances and I can say, most emphatically, that we are happy in our children.
I am picking up my living by odds and ends as usual. Had it not been for my eyes, I should not have been
reduced to this necessity, as I could have places in the public offices, with good salaries, at once, if I could only
fill them. but such seems to be the will of God. I was defeated this Spring for City Clerk, for want of a few votes,
which I might have had by paying money for them, giving whiskey, or importing from other towns. As I would
not adopt these means, on account of a principle I had, and my opponent would, the inevitable consequence
followed to me, viz: defeat. The Rep. party will be wiser next year, and will put up somebody "who will do
something for himself"--that is, use these means: and he will succeed, by using them. I retain my place in the
Reform School two years longer; and I also serve as Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue for Division No. 5 of
the Third Collection District of Michigan. Is not that a large title? The place, as a matter of compensation, might
not be quite as good as it would be to ring one of your church bells. But in one case I would be a collector for the
United States; and in the other sexton of the Baptist Church. What's in a name? In one case I would obtain a
hundred dollars by doing chores as a laborer; in the other I would spend just as much time, and have the privilege
of giving fifteen thousand dollars bail!
The terrible war that desolates our country still continues; but we know that every day brings it nearer to a
close; and to a close in the right manner. Night before last we had a great celebration in honor of the taking of
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Richmond; but last nights news says it is not yet taken. We must learn patience. This morning, Miss Pratt, one of
our neighbors, who lost a brother in S. Carolina, in the Mich. 8th, called on my daughter, who lost a brother in
Virginia, in the Mich. 3d., to go with her and condole with Miss Greene, whose only brother has just been killed
in Tennessee, in the Mich. 20th. The brave boys go from the same neighborhood, die in the common cause, but
fall in places wide apart.
I would like to see you and John once more, but do not know when it can be, if ever. I did go to Columbus,
Ohio, on business this Spring, but my cough was quite troublesome to me. As my eyes begin to give out I must
close. Love to all the friends, and Frances desires to be remembered to them.
Affectionately you brother
THEODORE
Lansing, Dec. 8, 1863
DEAR SISTER LYDIA,
I have been obliged to delay an answer to your kind letter of Oct. 6, until this present time, on account of the
weakness of my eyes, and the large demand made upon them by an unusual press of business, together with the
disabilities of poor health.
I seem to have been translated into the "Invalid Corps," and I fear I shall get no discharge till death. It is now
ten months since my cough began. About six weeks since I was much better, altho not near well; but I find it
hangs along, harrasing me so much, no more nor less, at all times of day and night. I do the best in a warm room,
sunk in idleness in a rocking chair. The slightest physical labor distresses me with coughing. I do not mind this
so much, if my mind is only left clear and untrammelled to pursue its travels though all time, all space, all
eternity, all changes of thought, feeling and will. The mind, after all, is the most valuable thing about us--at least I
find it so with me. I often think I am blest beyond other men, not with any greater mind, perhaps, than theirs, but
with one that brings me such an exhaustless supply of pleasures from all knowledge, all science, all worlds. And
then what emotions I have of the grand and sublime, of God, and heaven and man's progrss, and of all other things
to which I turn my attention. I know these things are worth nothing to anybody else. Most men would not give a
plug of tobacco for them all. But I would say to them with the old Methodist, "If this be delusion, let me be
deluded ever more!" I expect to have my wish, as the tobacco man will have his.
We are in usual health in our family, altho Frances does not get out much, and I see that she fails some every
year. She has a heart disease, among other things, which troubles her by spells. Fanny and Seymour live at home,
and seem to like home well enough; only Seymour declares he will see something of this world before he dies
besides Lansing! So I expect he will. I am looking for him to start out, all of a sudden, some day, after the
fashion of his Foster ancestors, into some new direction; but when or what it will be, no finite mind can foresee.
He is a very good boy, attends close to business, and is much respected.
The mind naturally wanders into the future; but on account of my health, my future in this world is very
doubtful. If my cough leaves me, I may have twenty years of activity in Lansing yet; if it does not, I may be
circuscribed to as many weeks or months. I am becoming reconciled to my lot, and have less choice every day,
which of the three periods of time might be my portion.
Claudius is employed in the Reform School as usual. It brings him a respectable living, although he cannot
make much at present high prices, on a salary--He and his family are established here in the best society, and are
much respected.
I will send you my picture, as you desire, as soon as I have any taken. I am waiting till my health improves
still more. Remember me affectionately to your better half, and the other friends in your vicinity.
Yours affectionately,
THEODORE
Lansing, Nov. 4, 1864
Dear Sister:
Your very acceptable letter of Oct. 23, was duly received, and I was glad to hear that your health had been
improved by your journey to Michigan.
As for myself, I have been better ever since you left, so that I could walk to the Reform School and back in a
day without much fatigue, and I have had some visions floating through my mind 15 or 20 years more of
usefulness, comfort, and happiness. But I am not as well this week--my cough is almost incessant; but next week
I will probably be better again. So I live not knowing what shall befall me from one day to another; and it is not
38
best I should know. As the poet says, "Heaven hides from man the Book of Fate, All but the page revealed, the
present state"--and Heaven is wise not to gratify our curiosity.
We hear from Seymour as usual--had a letter last night, stating he had been in the thickest of the fight, but
had not received a scratch, although his canteen was shot through. He says Ira writes from Nashville that he likes
soldiering much, but Seymour thinks he has not seen any yet. Seymour writes that their labors are greater than
they have been--on picket all one day, and digging all the next, and so alternating. If the war continues another
year, it will be not more than an even chance that our boy will ever return--But whether he does or not, I thank
God that our cause will finally triumph and prosper. The Republicans are very sanguine here on election, hoping
to carry every State. We shall soon see what we shall see. I have given my best abilities during this campaign, in
my little place, to do what I could against the great curse of my country, and if I should see it blotted out before I
die, it would be much more than, in former years, I could ever have hoped for.
We hear--and you have doubtless heard--of the protracted illness of Mary Foster. A late letter from Edward
represents that it is doubtfull if she ever permanently recovers.
We have a snow storm coming this morning--the first of the season. It reminds one of our soldiers south and
especially of our prisoners there where the newspapers say they die of exposure and starvation at the rate of 100 a
day. It is just as true as it was 1800 years ago, that "all these things must needs be." They grow out of the present
condition of humanity; but you and I not only believe but know that the time is coming when the whole earth shall
[be] a paradise on which God shall delight to look, and these evils shall be known no more. Each generation shall
contribute its mite to this result, and each of use are bound to contribute our millionth part towards that mite.
Considered in its results as to what we can do individually, how small--considered in its total accomplishment,
and as being fellow-workers with God in bringing it about, how grand and sublime!
Give our respects to John, and tell him that if he will come to Lansing we will all be glad to see him.
Affectionately your brother
THEODORE FOSTER
Lansing, March 22, 1865
DEAR SISTER LYDIA,
Having my other business disposed of for today, I concluded to reply to the very kind letter I have lately
received from you. My health for a few weeks has been somewhat better than usual, but better, with me, means
nothing looking much toward health. It is now two years full since my cough begun, and I do not know but I shall
be just as likely to last two years more. I am [a]round at business as usual, and have attended nearly all the
lectures and public meetings, and have been in to the Legislature almost daily. So you see I hold out yet awhile.
Perhaps you have heard that after a year's service as a soldier, of the hardest and most dangerous kind,
Seymour has got a "detached service" as clerk in the ordinance department of the second Corps. Here he has so
far had nothing to do but write, and feels quite gratified that he can "wash and be clean" and put on a white paper
collar. He is now quite comfortably situated, altho he retains his rank as a corporal. He writes that the boys are
all in good spirits and hope to come home in peace by next fall.
Albert and Fanny are enjoying themselves as fast as possible in all the balls and parties of the season. We are
to have a new election here April 3, and the prospect is that he will be re-elected City Clerk. He has thus far has
[sic] had as fair a share of law business as he could reasonable expect.
Claudius has a permanent situation now as Assistant Superintendent, with a salary of $600 a year. This is not
very high for these times, but is sure and prompty every month.
I have been reappointed again as one of the Board of Control for six years. This makes my third commission
for the same place. This, with my editorial business, is about as much as my poor health will enable me to
accomplish.
I do not know as you have heard that my neice [sic], Cornelia Nichols, from Ypsilanti, is now employed in
the Reform School as a teacher, and I believe gives very good satisfacton. Having been severely tumbled round
under the hard hand of poverty, she is not afraid to work at anything. We find this class of persons are far the
39
most reliable in the R. School. Mere philanthropy cannot be relied on in persons who are well off. Evelive has
bought her a home in Ypsilanti for $900, and Cornelia and her sister are saving their wages to pay for it. We pay
C. $250 a year and her board. We like her much; and perhaps, as love is apt to be reciprocal, you may happen to
know that all my nieces think a good deal of "Uncle Theodore." As my eyes are getting weary I must close.
When I parted with you, I felt that we should not meet again in this life; but this kind of premonitions cannot
always be depended on. We are forever safe in His hand who knows best. Remember me affectionately to your
husband, and to our other friends.
Your brother,
THEODORE
Notes for Francis Delia Seymour:
____________________________
LANSING REPUBLICAN - Official Paper of the City.
Tuesday, March 21, 1876
DEATH OF A PIONEER.--Mrs. Francis D. Foster, one of the noble pioneer women of Michigan and widow of
the late Theodore Foster (editor of the Lansing Republican in 1864-65, and a former superintendent of the reform
school), died in this city last Saturday, aged 72 years. She and her husband came from western New York to
Michigan in 1846, and settled in the town of Webster, Washtenaw county. They resided in that county until 1856,
when they removed to Lansing. Mr. Foster died in 1866. Mrs. F. was the mother of Seymour Foster and Mrs. A.
E. Cowles of this city. The funeral services were held yesterday and largely attended.
More About Francis Delia Seymour:
Burial: 20 Mar 1876, Mt. Hope Cemetery
Medical Information: Heart disease
Children of Theodore Foster and Francis Seymour are:
i.
Charles Tillinghast Foster, born 16 Jan 1834 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI3; died 31 May 1862 in Fair Oaks,
Virginia4
Notes for Charles Tillinghast Foster:
"CHARLES TILLINGHAST, b. at Scio, Mich., Jan. 16, 1834, enlisted May 11, 1861, in the Third
Mich., Regt., and joined the army of the Potomac under General McClellan. The regimental color-bear
having been killed at the battle of Williamsburgh, the colonel asked the regiment, " Who will take the
colors?" No one else offering to take such a risk, he slipped forth from the ranks, after a brief delay, and
said: "I will take them; they shall not go a begging." He bore them into the next battle at Fair Oaks, May
31, 1862, knowing that he was marching to certain death, and was shot in the left side of the neck. He
held fast to the dear flag after he had fallen, and said with his last breath: "Let some one take the colors."-Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 308.
THE NAMING OF CHARLES T. FOSTER POST, G.A.R.
(Being an address given by Seymour Foster, April 11, 1922, at Lansing, Michigan)
Thirty years ago, the Charles T. Foster G. A. R. post of Lansing would have turned out almost a
regiment of members to march in a Memorial Day parade. And these members would have resented any
arrangement made by a civilian committee to provide vehicles.
But today the "old boys" who fought to keep the Union intact, can muster scarcely a company. The
years have laid a heavy hand on the Charles T. Foster post, Time, the sharpshooter, picking the Civil War
veterans off one at a time until there are left but a few stragglers, a mere remnant of the great army that
rallied to the republic's plight in the sixties.
Apropos of Memorial Day and the coming G. A. R. encampment in this city in June, is a speech made
by Seymour Foster, former postmaster of Lansing and a past commander of the Charles T. Foster post at
the dedicatory services when the new flag was raised over the home of the local post on S. Washington
Avenue.
In this talk a few years ago Mr. Foster, upon request, explained the impelling cause which prompted the
members of the local post to select its name. This speech is to become a record of local historic fact, and
upon request of the Michigan Historical Commission, is placed in the archives of that organization.
Mr. Foster's address follows.
Comrades:
Some days ago, Commander Shipp advised me that he felt that on the occasion of the dedication of the
40
new "Post Flag Staff," it would be appropriate and desirable, that some one should be designated to give
a brief recital of the circumstances leading up to the naming of our post, the "Charles T. Foster Post," and
gave, among other reasons for so thinking, the fact that not only were there but three or four of us now
left, who were present at the organization of the post and who were familiar with the circumstances of its
naming, but on the contrary, a very large percentage of the present membership were unfamiliar with its
Early history and would be pleased to be more fully informed as to how and why it had adopted the name
of "Charles T. Foster Post."
I saw the force of his argument, and heartily concurred in his suggestion, whereupon he announced that
"As commander of the post, I will detail you to that duty."
Now, one of the lessons I learned early in my soldier life was, that a "good soldier always obeys an
order," and in view of the fact I never yet had been twitted of shirking a duty imposed upon me by my
superior, I did not feel that I would be justified in breaking that rule in my 77th year. So, if I fail to meet
your expectation in this brief sketch, as to how and why this post adopted the name of "Charles T. Foster
Post," you will have to charge it to Commander Shipp's lack of judgment in making the detail for that
duty.
As you all know in the early months of 1861 the question of "states' rights" was the all-absorbing topic,
everywhere in our country.
State after state, in the South, believing they had the right to withdraw from the Union, had passed their
ordinances of secession, and were preparing to set up a government of their own.
WAR IS DECLARED
Unfortunately for the Union cause, there was a large element in the northern states which doubted the
right of our government to coerce a state which had passed an ordinance of secession. The matter
culminated, however, on April 12, 1861, when the South opened fire on Fort Sumter.
You boys (for we were all boys then) remember how those shots on Fort Sumter electrified the loyal
element of the North. At this time my brother, Charles T. Foster, was a clerk in the dry goods store of
A. Turner and company of North Lansing, a young man about five feet, 10 inches in height, light
complexion, big blue yes, high forehead, and wore a very becoming young moustache. He was a fine
singer, a member of the Presbyterian Church and choir, and with genial disposition and agreeable
manner, he was a general favorite with all who knew him. Lansing at this time, with no railroad or
telegraph nearer than Jackson, was a town of less than 3,000 population, but with nearly 100 per cent.
loyal to the Union cause. The firing on Sumter by the secessionists was looked upon by our citizens as
an act of open rebellion against our government and served to solidify public sentiment for the Union.
Without waiting for the first call for volunteers by President Lincoln on April 15, a mass meeting of the
citizens to discuss the situation was called for the evening of April 13 (the next day after the firing on
Sumter) to meet at representative hall in the old state capitol building, which stood in the center of the
block now occupied by the Knapp store, Masonic temple and other buildings. At this mass meeting
practically the whole town turned out, excitement and patriotic spirit ran high. So dense was the crowd
that hundreds could not get within hearing distance of the speakers and we younger boys climbed up
from outside and sat in the windows.
SPEECHES ROUSE ARDOR
Vigorous, fiery, patriotic speeches were made by Daniel L. Case, Judge Tenney, Judge J. W. Longyear,
A. C. Winters, I. M. Cravath, Dr. H. B. Shank and others and at the conclusion of each the excitement
ran higher and the cheers were louder and longer, but it was when Judge Tenney finally came forward
with a series of eloquent patriotic resolutions, and asked their adoption, the closing sentence of which
was--"The Union, one and indivisible must and shall be preserved"--it was then, that the cheering, so
loud, and so long, went up, that as I sat perched in my window seat, I thought that surely the rebels of
South Carolina must have heard it.
After a short lull in the proceedings, evidently from pure exhaustion, Judge Tenney announced that a
roll had been prepared, and that an opportunity would be given anyone who desired to tender his services
in defense of the Union to come forward and sign the roll.
Upon that announcement, a profound silence pervaded that great gathering, not a soul moved ; in fact, I
doubt if they even breathed, and I verily believe you could have heard a pin if dropped on the floor, so
deathly still was it--until, after a few moments there was a slight shuffling of feet, and movement of those
on the other side of the hall, and I could see that some one was trying to work his way through the crowd
and toward the front, but from my perch in the window, I could not distinguish who it was. By this time
he had reached Judge Tenney's desk, and was signing that roll. In the meantime that deathly silence still
prevailed--until Judge Tenney announced --"Charles T. Foster, tenders his services, and his life if need
be to his country and his flag." then a great cheer broke forth, and before this had died away, Allen S.
Shattuck and John T. Strong had come forward and signed, and in quick succession followed John
Broad, E. F. Siverd, Jerry TenEyck, Home Thayer, James B. TenEyck, and a score of others (to the total
of 31 as I now remember it) had signed the roll pledging their all in defense of our country.
COMPANY ORGANIZED
The organization of the company was completed rapidly, and in less than 30 days it was ordered into
camp at Grand Rapids, and designated as Company "G", 3rd Michigan Infantry, Capt. John R. Price,
commanding.
41
The regiment was immediately ordered to the defense of Washington and became a portion of the army
of the Potomac, taking a very prominent part in the varying fortunes of that army from that time on.
FOSTER CARRIES FLAG
At the battle of Willamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862, as the regiment had formed into line preparatory to
moving forward into action, the major rode to the front and center of the line, and announced that the
color sergeant of the regiment had given out, and asked, "Who of the sergeants will volunteer to carry the
colors through this fight." After a few moments, and no one seeming anxious to take the hazardous
position, Sergeant Charles T. Foster stepped to the front, saluted the major, and told him he would carry
the flag through the fight and until a regular color sergeant could be detailed. He took the old 3rd flag
and bore it through that terrific fight, in a most gallant manner, and to the satisfaction of all who
witnessed his conduct. In the course of a few days, he was relieved by a regularly detailed color
sergeant.
In writing to his mother the next day after the battle he explained to her how he came to take the colors.
he said: "When the Major called for volunteers and none of the sergeants seeming to want to take the
responsible and dangerous position, I felt it was my duty to do so, for some one must do it, and if none
would volunteer, a detail would have to be made, and the lot might fall on one who had a wife and
children at home, or a dependent father or mother, and could not be spared, whereas, I was single and
free, and would not be missed if I should be killed."
He never knew what tears his mother shed in thinking that her oldest son, even for his country, should
write that he would not be missed.
Again, at the battle of Fair Oaks, May 29, 1862, as the regiment had formed for a forward movement
against the enemy, the major came to him saying: "The color sergeant is not able to take the colors into
the fight; will you do it?"
Evidently believing his duty again called him there, he assented and once again he bore the flag into a
terrible battle, and through charge after charge and always with the flag well to the front, and until he
was stricken by a minnie ball through the neck. He went down--but not the flag--for here again we see a
manifestation of his keen sense of duty to keep the flag aloft--for as he fell, he drove the flag staff into
the ground ; still grasping the staff with both hands he called to his comrades, "Don't let the colors go
down."
FULLFILLS HIS PLEDGE
And they did not go down, for, when the color guard sprang forward to take the flag from his hands,
they found they could only release the staff from his death grip, by pulling each finger loose from the
staff--and Charles T. Foster had fulfilled the pledge he had made to the citizens of Lansing a little more
than a year before, when he had signed that roll in the old capitol, pledging his services, and his life if
need be in defense of the Union and our flag.
On the occasion of the organization of this post, the question of what name we should adopt was long
and thoroughly discussed--for be it remembered that our little city sent forth, many, very many, bright,
brave boys--all of whom had done their full duty and had given their "full measure of devotion" to our
country and to its flag.
But when comrade Allen S. Shattuck in a most earnest and eloquent plea recited the history of the
service of my brother,--practically as I have given it here--but much more fully and eloquently--and
pointed out the fact that he was the first to enlist and the first to fall, from Lansing, it was unanimously
agreed that our post should adopt the name of "The Charles T. Foster Post."--published in Michigan
History Magazine Vol. IX Number 2, April, 1925 p. 143-149.
ii.
Frances Foster, born 19 Dec 1842 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI; died 17 Dec 1889 in Lansing, Ingham, MI;
married Albert E. Cowles; born 14 May 1838; died 23 Nov 1906 in Los Angeles, California.
Notes for Frances Foster:
DEATH OF MRS. FANNIE FOSTER COWLES
On Monday evening last Mrs. Fannie Foster Cowles the wife of A. E. Cowles died of heart failure at the
family residence in this city. She had been in delicate health for several years, and a few weeks ago she
had a short attack of pneumonia which her weakened system was illy able to resist. At last her heart
failed to perform its functions and she passed peacefully away, surrounded by her husband and friends.
Mrs. Cowles was a lady of great strength of character, purity, and worth and was highly esteemed by all
who knew her. She was one of the brightest, most accomplished and most beautiful ladies of Lansing.
He life was one of much activity and great usefulness, despite her inform health. Fanny Foster was born
in Ann Arbor in 1843. Her father, Hon. Theodore Foster, was appointed the first Superintendent of the
Reform School and in 1856 brought his family to Lansing. During the first year of her residence here
she was a pupil of the writer who was then principal of the public schools. She was bright, studious,
modest and beloved by all. In 1864 she was married to Mr. Albert E. Cowles the well-known and
popular attorney of this city. During the war Miss Foster was the president of the Young Ladies' Loyal
League of this city, and was very active and efficient in working for the soldiers in the field, among
whom were her future husband and her two brothers, Mr. Charles T. Foster, who was killed at the battle
42
of Fair Oaks while carrying the flag of the Third Mich. Infty., and for whom the G. A. R. post in this city
was named, and Mr. Seymour Foster, the present postmaster of this city. She was assistant to her father
when he was editor of the Lansing Republican before the war. Mrs. Cowles was also president of the
Lansing Equal Suffrage association, and a delegate to the national convention of that body. She was
active in the organization of the Woman's club of this city and was its first secretary. Beside her
bereaved husband she leaves an adopted daughter and a very large circle of afflicted friends to mourn her
decrease.--obituary in the Lansing State Journal???
__________________________________________-
In 1871 Frances Foster Cowles took a trip to Washington, D.C. and sent the following accounts to the
Lansing Republican
From Lansing to Washington
Washington, D.C., Aug. 22, 1871
EDITOR REPUBLICAN: ----Having enjoyed so exceedingly the trip from Lansing to this city, our great
national capital, and seeing so much of beauty, grandeur, and interest by the way, it suddenly occurred to
me that a few items and facts incident to the journey might not be uninteresting to the family at home and
the readers of the REPUBLICAN. Believing that the incoherent jottings of a lady may sometimes be
interesting, as well as the staid "facts and figures" usually given us by gentlemen tourists, I presume to
give you a few items.
Our first point of interest after leaving Detroit was Put-in Bay, which is so fast gaining in favor as a
summer resort for our Western people. We took passage on the steamer "Jay Cooke," en route for the
Island, accompanied by a few friends, some of whom were formerly residents of Lansing, and arrived
about 1 o'clock, after a pleasant ride of four hours from Detroit. The island is delightfully situated in
Lake Erie, out of sight of land, save the number of beautiful little islands that surround it on all sides, all
of which seemed to be more or less inhabited. The large new hotel, the Put-in Bay House, situated on
the beach, can be seen distinctly long before reaching land. It accommodates at present about eight
hundred guests, with room for more. Besides another hotel, there are cottages, restaurants,
boardinghouses, etc.,--all in flourishing condition, I should judge. To the right of the hotels, on the
beach, are the bathing houses, and every afternoon at 4 o'clock, old and young, big and little, all troop
down to take a plunge in the clear, bright waters of Lake Erie. The children seem to enjoy it exceedingly
well, gliding in and out, up and down, over and under the water, as if it was their natural element; and
they, the little water sprites, shouting, singing, laughing, whistling, making the beach resound with their
hilarity. Indeed, it seems to be the very paradise for children ; the air so sweet and pure ; what with the
boating, bathing, fishing, dancing, they have no spare time, and are the gayest of the gay, as they are
without doubt the happiest of the throng.
In front of the large hotel stands a venerable old tree, under whose spreading branches a number of
Perry's soldiers were buried after his memorable victory on Lake Erie, and a chain drawn round serves to
keep it inviolate from the touch of profane mortal.
A cave called "Perry's Cave" also claims the attention of the visitors and of course we must see it if it is
only a hole in the ground. So we start, taking on the way the little rustic church where the visitors
assemble for service on the Sabbath. The cave reached, we descend a flight of rough stairs into what
appears to be a well, at the bottom of which we find ourselves in a large, gloomy, damp room, not high
enough to allow of our standing upright. After passing through this we come to a large room where we
can stand erect and breathe freely, and try to peer around into the dim distance, but can see nothing but
rows of flickering lamps, by means of which the cave is partially lighted. We slip and slide and stumble
along over the slimy floor until we come to a little pool, where we must drink, of course, and find
nothing remarkable in the water only its coldness and crystal clearness ; then stumble to another
apartment, where we find a bottomless well, into which we plunge all the loose rock we can find, by way
of amusement. We find evidences of there having once been plenty of stalactites, but the cave has been
sacked and pillaged by former visiting "vandals," as Mark Twain denomiates them.
Returning to the beach in front of the Put-in Bay House, we take one of the many row-boats kept
constantly ready for use, and push off from shore a little to the left, and in front of the hotel, to get a
nearer view of Gibraltar, a high, rocky island that rises abruptly out of the water, and is owned by Jay
Cooke, the famous banker. On the summit of the island, which is accessible only from one little point,
he has built a fine, large stone residence, where he comes with his family to rusticate usually during the
fishing season. The shores of the island are high, perpendicular or overhanging rocks, from every
crevice of which the little ferns and delicate little harebells creep out. The grounds are laid out as a park,
with walks, rustic bowers, flowers, etc., and in front of the house is a monument erected to Commodore
Perry. The view from here at sunset is lovely indeed.
The inside of the Patent Office is a little the most gorgeous of anything here. Nearly every color of the
rainbow is used in the frescoing and painting of the arched halls and passages, while the pillars that
43
support the arches rest on what appear to be the identical old tea-boxes of Boston Harbor renown. An
innumberable number of large cases are filled to overflowing with patent models in miniature, looking
more like children's toys than anything else ; and most of them entirely incomprehensible to any one
except those immediately interested. A large space in the hall is given to the cases of rejected patents,
equally as interesting as the others, inasmuch as they all show the immense amount of patient brain-work
and inventive genius of the American people. One case in this department is devoted to the wardrobe of
Gen. Washington and the china dinner set of Mrs. Washington, presented her by Gen. Lafayette, which is
in very dilapidated condition, showing conclusively that they had very careless servants in Martha's time,-a fashion that has not changed since. The case seemed out of place here and should of right belong to
the Mount Vernon Society and be placed in the old homestead.
The grounds around the Agricultural department are beautifully laid out and gay with flowers. The
agricultural productions are displayed in the building, very much after the fashion of a fair ; but the most
interesting thing to me is the mammoth oil painting which is placed on the wall opposite the entrance,
and represents 27 Union Generals of the late Rebellion, all mounted on horseback and looking as natural
as life, if not as large.
At the Botanical Gardens we find growing luxuriantly every variety of plants, from the delicate exotic
flower to the great date and palm of the tropics. No one interested in plants should fail to visit the
conservatory, for it will fully repay time and trouble.
Out of hundreds of queer, strange, and beautiful specimens at the Smithson Institute I have time to
speak of only one which interested us exceedingly,--a meteorite weighing 1,400 lbs., in the form of a
signet -ring, supposed to have fallen from the moon or some other place. We saw also a smaller one
weighing about 800 lbs.
At the Navy Yard we were bewildered indeed. It was all so new to me and so much to see, which was
the case at every place we visited, and one required so much time to see half the sights at Washington.
We went through long black buildings where they were melting, smelting, moulding, rolling, cutting,
boring, polishing, and every other thing to be done in making anchors, ships' cannon, and every other
horrid implement of warfare, till I wondered into whose regions I had suddenly fallen, as Vulcan, Mars,
and Pluto all seemed to have full sway by turns or all together. One huge iron clad was up on dry-dock
for repairs and two monitors lying in the water close by, one of which was badly battered and bruised
from encounters during the war, and looked like an old veteran of the seas. In the museum may be seen a
great variety of cannon, shot, shell, and warlike trophies too numerous to mention.
We go by boat to that quiet, antique city of Alexandria, where everything seems to have come to a standstill. The houses are chiefly of red brick, plain and old-fashioned. But the same may be said of
Washington ; one meets with but very few modern-looking buildings in either city. Then the old wooden
pumps with iron ladle attached, at almost every street corner, looked queer enough. We went into Grace
church, where Washington used to worship. The bricks of which it is built were brought from England ;
and the little cemetery belonging to it is one of the oldest in the country, many of the tombstones with
their odd inscriptions having stood the storms of more than a century. Some of them are badly crumbled
and broken and the names entirely obliterated.
It was on a bright, beautiful morning we set out for Mount Vernon, steaming down that river whose
waters were so disturbed and whose shores were lined with thousands of white tents during the war. But
now surely "All is quiet on the Potomac ;" the white tents and the soldiers have together vanished. Only
an occasional fort is to be seen, with some little show of military rules and warlike appearance.
The Mount Vernon estate looks almost the same as in the olden time. The view from the long piazza up
and down the river, dotted with its many white sails and steamers, is very beautiful indeed, and we could
easily picture Washington with Lafayette by his side enjoying the lively scene together ; though in
Revolutionary days steamboats as yet were not. A few articles of furniture remain,--some old chairs,
tables, etc. While in the dining-room,--which, by the way, is the pleasantest room in the house,--an old
Quaker lady who had come down with us on the boat came in and sat down in one of the old-fashioned
chairs in that antiquated room, doubtless little thinking how entirely she completed the picture, herself
and dress so much in keeping with the surroundings.
The tomb of Washington is of white marble, and is familiar to all from the great number of photographic
views taken of it. It is situated about half way up the ascent from the landing to the house.
We shall ever recur with pleasure to the day we spent at Mount Vernon. After one week's stay at the
Federal City, we take our departure toward the Quaker City and the sea-shore at Cape May. F. F. C.
More About Frances Foster:
Census: 24 Jun 1870, 2nd Ward City of Lansing, Ingham, MI. Frances is listed as living with her
husband, Albert, her mother, Frances D. Foster & her brother Seymour Foster. She is listed as 27 years
old and keeping house.
12
iii.
Seymour Foster, born 01 Jul 1845 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI; died 25 Dec 1933 in Lansing, Ingham, MI;
44
married Mary Louisa Woodworth 25 May 1871 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
26. George Ranslow Woodworth, born 22 Jan 1802 in Auburn, NY; died 05 Jul 1871 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI. He was the son of 52. William Woodworth and 53. Lovina Simson. He married 27. Louisa Linsley.
27. Louisa Linsley, born 17 Oct 1806 in Paris, NY; died 15 Jun 1886 in Lansing, Ingham, MI. She was the
daughter of 54. Ozias Linsley and 55. Lovice Ker Cadman.
Notes for George Ranslow Woodworth:
GEORGE R. WOODWORTH
The Lansing State Republican
Lansing, Michigan, Thursday, July 13, 1871
Death of an Old Citizen.--In the death of Mr. George R. Woodworth, our city loses one of its old residents,--in
fact, the oldest shoe-dealer. He came here about the year 1856, from Rochester, N.Y., where he had followed the
above business for many years. He was a native of Auburn, N.Y., and belonged to that industrious, quiet,
prudent, neighborly class of men who are the strength of a community. Mr. Woodworth had very nearly reached
three score and ten years, and his disease seemed to be old age. He leaves a widow, a son, and a daughter, all
residents of this city.
________________________________________
From "Pioneer Recollections Semi-Historic Side Lights on the Early Days of Lansing" by Daniel S. Mevis (Uncle
Dan), Lansing, Michigan, Robert Smith Printing Company, 1911
Some Old Timers--"There are many more, for as I meditate, their names and phantom faces come trooping over
memory's disk, like pleasant specters of a former life, and seem to beckon me again to converse, for with many of
them I have enjoyed many a pleasant visit in their life time. I recall just now some of the happiest hours of my
young life, spent in the boot and shoe store of that genial and kind hearted cobbler of ye olden time, George R.
Woodworth, who will undoubtedly be remembered by some of the old timers, (father of Henry A. Woodworth),
how I would sit entranced by the hour and listen to his stories of "York state" lore. His kindly words, so kindly
spoken, while he pounded the last or finished off the soles of an "honest pair of boots," or "waited on" some
hapless lad who had been sent in by some mischievous neighbor for a little good "strap oil." The kindly old
gentleman could never find it in his heart to refuse this. However, he could never accommodate them to a "three
cornered last." Of course there was competition in the boot and shoe business, for mending and tapping for
upwards of a thousand persons. Therefore, as early as this we had a shop at the north end, operated by a little
German, another up on Main street, with a small sign standing up against the front end of the shop near the little
door with a primitive boot and also a shoe represented with this motto over the device: A. Ward," and under it
was this, "Made and Repaired." On East Allegan street was another unpretending shop, owned and operated by a
Mr. Morehouse and his son Stephen, distant relatives of the gentleman from Erin. These two gentlemen were
celebrated for their "lasting" abilities and for being as honest and truthful as was consistent with the business.
However, it was well to get your order in and measurements taken at least 30 days prior to the time that you really
felt you must have the boots. You were expected to pay one dollar fifty cash, or two dollars in trade for a bang
up, good, serviceable pair of boots. There were very few shoes made in those days. A pair of pumps or oxfords
occasionally for house wear, and the boot jack was as indispensable as was the dinner pot. However, the majority
of the people could not afford the luxury of boots all year round, and consequently went bare-footed through the
summer months. Of course this meant chapped feet and stone-bruises, etc."
*********************************************
WOODWORTH SHOE STORE, 76 YEARS IN SAME LOCATION, TO BE CLOSED
Michigan's oldest shoe house will pass into mercantile history as the year closes. Robert Woodworth,
manager of the Woodworth shoe and footwear business at 115 North Washington avenue, made the
announcement Tuesday morning. Stock is now being arranged and priced for the clearing sale which open Friday
morning, October 14, at 9 o'clock.
High taxes, the times and a combination of changes radical in the retail business of today, forces into
commercial oblivion a business that has lived continuously for 76 years and which has never changed location in
that time. The Woodworth business is one of the most interesting in the mercantile history of Michigan. It has
45
adjusted itself successfully to panics, periods of adjustment, change in merchandising methods, the eccentricities
of the human taste in wearing apparel.
Three generations of the Woodworth family have managed the business. It was founded in 1856 by George
A. Woodworth and his son, Henry A. Woodworth. Father and son came to Lansing from Rochester, N.Y. after
having traded an equity in a business in their home town for a farm on the old river road north and west of
Lansing.
CAME HERE IN 1854
Father and son, both of whom were shoe makers and merchandisers of footwear, arrived in Lansing in 1854.
They hired a livery "rig" and drove out to look at their farm. The farm turned out to be 40 acres of heavily
timbered land, not a foot of which was cleared. Father and son agreed that neither was a land clearer and that a
living could not be made off 40 acres of uncleared land.
But they were here and liked what little there was at the time of the capital city of Michigan. So they leased
the lot upon which the Woodworth store now stands and built a shop. A mammoth wooden shoe was built and
mounted on the top of the building. Having completed their "plant" father and son began prospecting for
business. In these pioneer days all human footwear, including socks, was made by hand.
Boots, with high tops, were the rule with men. There were fine boots and rough boots for work days. Cloth
shoes were in vogue with the women of the town and these also were made in the Woodworth shop and some of
the hand stitching, or binding work, let out to women of the city who were glad to get the work.
In 1870 George R. Woodworth, the father, died. His son, Henry, now past his 95th year, continued the
business. Old time merchants predicted that the Woodworths would never make a success in their location as all
the business of the town was either done at the time in South Lansing or North Lansing. But both men felt that
the business district would eventually grow about the state capitol building. Their vision was a reality later, it
developed.
BUILT IN 1874
In 1874 the business of the son had become so large that he decided to build a real store building. He
acquired the site at what he considered a fancy price--$4,000--but he did not consider it good business to make
any move from the location where he and his father had started. A saloon-keeper of the time was anxious to buy
the land and Mr. Woodworth had to bid up to buy it.
There have been a number of changes in the front of the old store in the years since it was built. Mr.
Woodworth opened for business in his new building and due to the times, was compelled to accept eggs, fowl,
vegetables, meat, hides, grain and apples in payment of bills. He hired boot-makers and developed a real
manufacturing plant.
Mr. Woodworth later took his sons, the late Harry P. Woodworth and Robert Woodworth, into the business
and changed the name to the firm of H.A. Woodworth and Sons. In 1915 Harry P. Woodworth became the active
manager of the business, his brother, Robert, having bought a shoe business in Bay City.
Harry P. Woodworth died in December, 1931. The brother Robert, who had sold his business in Bay City,
returned to Lansing to manage the old store during his brother's sickness. He remained active in the management
after the brother's death.
Although relinquishing active management of the Woodworth business many years ago, the elder
Woodworth, despite his age, has kept in close touch with the local retail situation. Last April Mr. Woodworth fell
in one of the local banks and received an injury which has kept him at home. Before the fall, however, he was in
the down town district every day.
FAMED CUSTOMERS
Mr. Woodworth tells an interesting episode of the city's incorporation. H.H. Smith was its first mayor. Mr.
Woodworth, having a great respect for Lansing's first executive, made and presented Mayor Smith with a pair of
very fine boots. The mayor, however, would not accept the gift without payment. Price was $10 and the mayor
put down the money on the Woodworth counter.
Mr. Woodworth also made a pair of fine boots for James M. Turner of this city, who was then making his
race for governor of the state. For years, back in the days of tailor-made footwear, Mr. Woodworth took measure
and fitted and manufactured by hand boots for some of the state's greatest public characters as many of them were
elected to various offices and made their home in Lansing during incumbency of office.
"Changes must be expected," says Mr. Woodworth. "Time discards methods, human beings and business
houses." In discussing the closing of the ancient business house of Woodworth, the pioneer business man of
Lansing takes a stoical view softened by no sentimentality.
Mr. Woodworth was one of the city's keenest advertisers in his active managerial days. Men and women of
Lansing, now grandfathers and grandmothers, remember one advertising stunt in particular. Forty or more years
ago Mr. Woodworth caused to be built by a local carpenter a mammoth wooden shoe. This was mounted on a
sleigh, or cutter runners. With a horse as motorizing power, young "Bob" Woodworth had to spend his Saturday
46
school holiday driving this huge portable advertising sign all about the city.
It is expected that the Woodworth stock will be cleaned out completely by the proposed stock clearing sale
which opens Friday morning. The building, it is understood, has been leased to a nationally known
merchandising corporation. Robert Woodworth will personally supervise the sale and remain with the old
business established by his father and grandfather, until finis is written to its long and honorable history. We will
then return to the insurance business in which he had been engaged until called to Lansing to take charge of the
store during the illness of his brother, Harry P. Woodworth. This illness, thought to be at first of minor
importance, eventually resulted in his death. This kept the brother in the management of the business until it was
decided by father and son to close out.
More About George Ranslow Woodworth:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
Notes for Louisa Linsley:
LANSING STATE REPUBLICAN -- JUNE 16, 1886
Death of Mrs. Woodworth
She Passes Away While Sleeping in Her Chair
Mrs. Louise L. Woodworth, an old and highly-esteemed resident of the city, died suddenly at her home on
Washington avenue Tuesday, passing away while peacefully sleeping in her chair. The funeral services will be
held at the home of her son-in-law, Seymour Foster, No. 313 Chestnut street north, at 10 o'clock Thursday
forenoon.
Mrs. Woodworth was born in Paris, N.Y. on Dec. 17, 1806. She removed with her family when a child to
Rochester and was there married to Geo. Woodworth. They came to Lansing in 1855 and Mrs. Woodworth has
ever since resided here. She was the mother of five children, of whom but two, Henry A. Woodworth and Mary
L. Foster, are living. Her husband died in 1871. She was an earnest, sincere member of the Episcopal church and
her gentleness and integrity of character and the genuine nobility of her life made her universally respected by the
acquaintances she formed during her 30-years residence in the city.
More About Louisa Linsley:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
Children of George Woodworth and Louisa Linsley are:
i.
Henry A. Woodworth, born 05 May 1837 in Rochester, NY; died 06 Apr 1936 in Lansing, Ingham, MI;
married (1) Harriet L. Price 1863 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; born 05 Jun 1847; died 16 Sep 1888 in
Lansing, Ingham, MI; married (2) Lona Ostrander Strong 1889; born 20 Oct 1845; died 26 Nov 1919.
Notes for Henry A. Woodworth:
HENRY A. WOODWORTH
The State Journal
Lansing, Michigan, Tuesday, April 7, 1936
Pioneer Dies
CITY'S OLDEST RESIDENT DIES
Henry A. Woodworth, Former Merchant, Would Have Been 99 in May
Henry A. Woodworth, Lansing's oldest citizen and dean of local business men, died at the home, 506
North Washington avenue, shortly before 11 o'clock Monday night. He had been a resident of Lansing
for 82 years and would have been 99 years old had he lived until May 5. He had resided in the home in
which he died for 70 years.
Mr. Woodworth injured his hip in a fall four years ago and since that time had been confined to a wheel
chair. Despite his age and the fact that he was forced to spend his days in a wheel chair, Mr. Woodworth
continued personally to manage his various property interests in Lansing and took a great interest in any
civil enterprise. His health began failing rapidly several weeks ago and while his death came as a shock
to his many friends, it was not unexpected.
47
Born in Rochester, N.Y., May 5, 1837, he came to Lansing in 1854 when 17 years old, with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Woodworth, and his sister, Mrs. Mary L. Foster, who died December 15, 1935.
His father started a boot and shoe business on his arrival in Lansing and Mr. Woodworth entered the
business with his father in 1856 at 115 North Washington avenue and continued active in the business
until he retired in 1915.
Active in Civil Affairs
Mr. Woodworth's establishment in the old pioneering days made boots for the first mayor of Lansing and
many of the state's noted personages and did a thriving business with members of the state legislature.
Mr. Woodworth was active in city affairs from the first and was president and treasurer of the old
Lansing Industrial Aid society, one of the first charitable organizations in the city. He was also treasurer
of the George E. Palmer Shoe Fund from its inception until it was taken over by the Lansing Shrine club
several years ago.
He was probably the oldest Master Mason in the state, having been made a Master Mason January 12,
1862. He was a life member of Capitol Lodge No. 66, F. and A. M.; Capital Chapter No. 9, R.A.M.;
Lansing Council No. 29; R.S.M. Knights Templar Commandery No. 25, and the Order of the Eastern
Star and White Shrine of Jerusalem. He had also been a member of the First Universalist church since its
organization.
Married during Civil War
Mr. Woodworth was married in 1863 to Harriett L. Price, herself of pioneer stock. Five children were
born of whom three survive, Mrs. A.C. Buck of Chicago and Mrs. S.F. Ross of Lake Wales, Fla. and
Robert Woodworth of Lansing. Two sons, Dr. Seymour Woodworth and Harry P. Woodworth preceded
their father in death.
Following the death of his first wife in 1888 Mr. Woodworth was married in 1889 to Lona Ostrander
Strong who died in 1918.
He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln and since that time had been consistently a republican.
Besides the two daughters and one son he is survived by nine grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and
several nephews and nieces.
To Hold Funeral Thursday
The body was removed to the Palmer-O'Donnell funeral home where it will remain until Thursday
morning when it will be taken to the residence. Funeral services will be held at the home Thursday
afternoon at 2 o'clock, with Lansing Commandery No. 25, Knights Templar, in charge of the service,
assisted by the Rev. Henry C. Ledyard, pastor of First Universalist church. Honorary pall bearers will be
Frank Church, Thomas Gunson, A.M. Emery, O.A. Jension, J. Edward Roes, and Fred Rounsville. Sir
knights of Lansing commandery will be active pall-bearers. Interment will be in the family lot in Mt.
Hope cemetery.
****************************************
H.A. WOODWORTH TO BE HONORED ON BIRTHDAY
5/5/1933
In celebration of the 96th birthday of Henry A. Woodworth, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woodworth will
entertain the immediate family Friday evening at dinner at their home, 518 North Washington avenue,
followed by open house in the evening.
Mrs. A.C. Buck of Chicago, daughter of H.A. Woodworth, arrived Thursday to be the guest of her father
for several days at his home, 506 North Washington avenue.
Other members of the family who will be present at the dinner will be Mrs. Seymour Foster, who is 86
years old, and the only living sister of Mr. Woodworth, and Mr. Foster, Mrs. Adelta Woodworth, Mr.
and Mrs. Clarence Skinner, H.W. Woodworth and his daughter, Barbara, of Bay City and Robert and
George Woodworth, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woodworth.
****************************************
CITY'S FIRST SHOEMAKER APPROVES MODERN TREND
48
September 27, 1929
Man Who Helped Maintain Palmer Shoe Fund Is Happy in Seeing Project Absorbed by New Welfare
System by Elias H. Beam
Passing in the wake of scientific public welfare work adapted to the new system of economics as
established in the age of organization, is a quarter-century-old Lansing institution.
It was founded by a man now 92 years old and a former city truant officer, with a purpose of furnishing
every child in the city who needed them, a pair of new shoes.
That kindly old man is Harry A. Woodworth, pioneer shoemaker, who is closing nearly a century of
living in his home on N. Washington-av. The former truant officer is George Palmer, now
superintendent of buildings in the city public school system. While their institution is going the way of
many another, old time project, both men are happy.
"We have always found happiness in living in the present and our institution is just going out of
existence because it does not fit in our modern system of things," the aged shoemaker confided.
Henry Woodworth was Lansing's first shoemaker. He established his shop on N. Washington-av., 73
years ago. When individual shoe making gave way for production manufacture, the old man built a shoe
store on the site of his little shop. The store is operated today by two sons, Harry and Robert. But in all
this change, the old man has found happiness.
George Palmer was the city truant officer 25 years ago and in his work he found one of the main reasons
for children staying out of school was "that they had no shoes to wear." There is nothing in the whole
world that pleases a child more than a new pair of shoes. There is nothing that will kill a child's pride
quicker than to be compelled to wear a shabby pair of "kicks" to school, George Palmer learned this.
The truant officer went to the aged shoe dealer, and pictured the children's plight. There was not a man
in town at that time with a kinder heart than the veteran shoe maker. His entire life has been spent in
doing kind deeds, recorded only in St. Peter's ledger. He harkened to the officer's story and the Palmer
Shoe Fund was established. Palmer was president and Woodworth was the treasurer.
For 25 years, thousands of children, some of them now among the leading people of the city, were aided
by the fund. Each year at Thanksgiving time the annual contribution to the Palmer Shoe Fund was made.
Each winter season the former truant officer and the aged shoemaker doled out the bright new shoes to
the children who would have had to stay out of school because they had no shoes. The work was the
city's most appealing charity.
But times have changed. Living has become more complex. Methods of applying the work of public
welfare were forced to change with the times. The truant officer and the aged shoemaker accept the
inevitable. The Palmer Shoe Fund is no more. The custom has been abandoned.
In his study the aged man sits and views the life of the present. A smile of having done something well
lights up his face.
Then he remarks:
"I have always accepted the latest customs and methods of life without any regrets that the old system
had passed. I know spike heels for women are not sensible things but if women want to wear them, now
that's their business.
"It is the present way of doing things, and if it make them happy, all is well. At that happiness consists
of accepting things as they are, and in it all every change in a progressive life has its good purpose."
***********************************************
PIONEER MERCHANT, 95, REGISTERS; VOTED FOR LINCOLN BACK IN 1860 -- AUGUST 10,
1932 -- STATE JOURNAL
Henry A. Woodworth, pioneer Lansing merchant, Tuesday afternoon achieved the distinction of being
the oldest resident of Lansing to register to vote at the coming elections and thereby set an example in
good citizenship for many of the younger citizens of the community.
Mr. Woodworth, who is 95 years of age, wrote his name on the registration card taken to his residence
Tuesday afternoon by Miss Bertha Ray, city clerk, who has been taking a number of registration cards to
persons who for one reason or another are unable to visit the various places where voters may register.
The aged man, who founds the shoe business which for many years has borne his name, is now confined
to his home by injuries sustained in an accident.
Apparently cherishing highly the privilege of participating actively in the affairs of his government by
casting his ballot, Mr. Woodworth has not missed a presidential election since he first voted for Abraham
Lincoln in 1860. At that time the Lansing man was but slightly over the age of 21 years and had only
recently become eligible to vote.
During his 70 years of residence in Lansing Mr. Woodworth has seen many changes in the election
systems. He has witnessed the growth of the city from a small community with but a small number of
voters to a large city with nearly 40 precincts and more than 30,000 voters. He has seen voting machines
49
replace paper ballots and this year has watched the installation of a new registration system designed as
an improvement in the election machinery of the state.
Mr. Woodworth, who resides at 506 North Washington avenue, has voted for 68 years in the precinct
where he now lives. He is an advocate of temperance, favored women's suffrage long before it was
legalized, and is a republican and "proud of it."
Many more citizens of Lansing must follow Mr. Woodworth's example if the full voting strength of the
city is to be registered to vote at the September primary election and the general election in November.
While only slightly in excess of 22,000 persons have registered to date there are believed to be many
more than 30,000 citizens who are qualified to vote if they register. The last date for registering is
August 24.
**********************************************
LANSING'S OLDEST BUSINESS MAN MARKING 98TH BIRTHDAY SUNDAY
Henry A. Woodworth, Resident for 81 Years, Still Supervises Own Affairs
Henry A. Woodworth, probably Lansing's oldest citizen in point of years, celebrates his 98th birthday
Sunday, May 5. Mr. Woodworth, still personally managing his various property interests in Lansing
despite his age, has lived in the capital city continuously for 81 years. His sister, Mrs. Mary W. Foster,
315 North Chestnut street, widow of the late Seymour Foster, has a like record of continuous residence.
Mr. Woodworth will hold open house Sunday at his home, 506 North Washington avenue, for reception
of old friends. He was more May 5, 1837, in Rochester, N.Y. When 17 years old he, with his sister,
came to Lansing with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. George R. Woodworth. The father arrived in Lansing
in 1854 and started a boot and shoe business. In 1856 the son entered business with his father at 115
North Washington avenue.
The father died and Mr. Woodworth continued the business until 1915 when he retired from active
retailing. Mr. Woodworth's establishment in the old pioneering days made boots for many of the state's
noted personages and did a thriving business with members of the legislature. He still owns the store
building in which her started business with his father in 1856 and it is still occupied by a shoe business.
Voted For Lincoln
Mr. Woodworth cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln and is one of the few men living in the United
States who can boast such a distinction. Mr. Woodworth has been consistently a republican since he
cast his first vote for the Great Emancipator.
The pioneer business man of Lansing hoped to enlist with the union army during the Civil war. And he
hoped also to buy life insurance. He was denied both hopes because some of his family had at one time
or another been affected by tuberculosis. Later, however, Mr. Woodworth was able to obtain life
insurance, the company considering him a fairly good risk.
As far as known Mr. Woodworth is the oldest member of the Masonic order in Michigan. He was made
a master Mason January 12, 1862, after affiliating with Capitol Lodge No. 66. He is a life member of
this lodge and also of Chapter No. 9, Royal Arch Masons, Council No. 29, R.S.M. Lansing Commandery
No. 25 Knights Templar, Eastern Star, and the White Shrine. Each organization will pay its respects
Sunday to the venerable member.
Disabled by Fall
Three years ago Mr. Woodworth fell in the Capital National bank and injured his right hip. Since that
date he has been unable to get about as he formerly did. His son, Robert Woodworth, has lived with his
father since the father's incapacitation. Besides the son Robert, Mr. Woodworth has two daughters, Mrs.
Lutie Buck, Chicago, and Mrs. Marion Ross, Lake Wales, Fla. There are nine grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
Mr. Woodworth, except for his hip injury, is in excellent health and keenly directs his own business
affairs. He keeps apace with the times and is interested in everything pertaining to city, state, and
national affairs.
The State Journal, a consolidation of the old State Republican and the Lansing Journal, recently
celebrated its 81st birthday. Mr. Woodworth read the first issue of the old State Republican, advertised
in this pioneer publication, then a weekly, and is still a subscriber and reader.
************************************
YE OLDE PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM
The State Journal, Lansing, Michigan
Sunday, December 28, 1941
Subject of the ye olde album today is the H.A. Woodworth boot and shoe store. The original
photograph was taken in 1888 and Mr. Woodworth, who died a few years ago, had been doing business
in this store for years before the photographer took this shot.
50
The Woodworth store was known throughout this city and in all small towns. In the early days of Mr.
Woodworth's business, his shops made boots for many of Michigan's most distinguished citizens. State
officers had their footwear made in the Woodworth shop. Women wore high shoes, either laced or
buttoned. Notice the pair of heavy cow-hide boots suspended in the store's entrance and also the set of
rubber boots. Rubber boots at the time were mostly a novelty.
Standing in the front of the store are Seymour Woodworth, a clerk and son of Mr. Woodworth; Jim
Millard, shoe and boot makers; Henry A. Woodworth, store owner, and "Hi" Liebe, a shoe "drummer"
who made this territory and rode to small towns around Lansing in a livery rig.
The son, Seymour, now deceased, became a practicing physician and located in Park Ridge, Ill. Henry
A. Woodworth was a keen merchandiser and one of the earlier merchants of the town who really
believed that advertising paid. Many old timers still living remember the huge wooden shoe, mounted on
sleighs. Sides of the shoe carried the Woodworth store ad. On Saturdays this huge shoe was drawn in
winter around Lansing's streets by a horse, the driver piloting the animal from a seat within the shoe.
Picture was donated to the old album by Robert Woodworth, 581 North Washington avenue. The son
worked for the father for years but later entered business for himself in Bay City.--E.R.P.
More About Henry A. Woodworth:
Burial: 09 Apr 1936, Lansing, Ingham, MI
ii.
Nancy Aurelia Woodworth, born 15 Apr 1844 in Rochester, NY; died 28 Dec 1847 in Rochester, NY.
Notes for Nancy Aurelia Woodworth:
Obituary notice pasted on back of front cover of the Bible in possession of Mrs. Seymour Foster of
Lansing, Mich.
"On the 28th. Dec. 1847. Nancy Aurilia eldest daughter of G.R. and Lousia Woodworth. Her funeral
will be attended at the house of her father, this day, at two o'clock, P.M. north Union St. Auburn and
Worcester papers please copy."
13
iii.
iv.
Mary Louisa Woodworth, born 04 Jan 1847 in Rochester NY; died 15 Dec 1935 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI; married Seymour Foster 25 May 1871 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
Anneliza Woodworth, born Feb 1849 in Rochester, NY; died 20 Aug 1852 in Rochester, NY.
28. Lemuel Cleff Pattengill, born 03 Jun 1812 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY; died 20 Mar 1875 in Ithica,
MI. He was the son of 56. Lemuel Pattengill and 57. Sabra Fitch. He married 29. Mary Gregory 02 Apr
1837.
29. Mary Gregory, born 14 Feb 1814 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY; died 16 Feb 1902 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI. She was the daughter of 58. Seth Gregory and 59. Irene Bennett.
Notes for Lemuel Cleff Pattengill:
From "Portrait and Biographical Album of Ingham and Livingston Counties, Michigan", 1891
Rev. Lemuel C. Pattengill ...was a native of New Lisbon, Otsego County....He began his career for himself by
engaging in farming in New Lisbon, thence removing to Lawrence, where he became the owner of a fine farm.
Always of a deeply religious turn of mind, he determined to devote himself to Gospel work, and became a
preacher in the Baptist Church, in which body he became a prominent member. Later he went to Wilson, Niagara
County. In about 1863 he became Chaplain in the army under the Christian commission and he was present at the
victory of Harper's Ferry and was able to give comfort to many a poor fellow who breathed his last in the cause of
freedom and Union.
In the fall of 1865 ...Mr. Pattengill came to Litchfield, this State as pastor of the Baptist Church. He
remained there for six or seven years and then removed to Ann Arbor, where he supplied churches. Thence he
moved to Ithaca and there he died in 1875 at the age of sixty-five years. He was a Republican in politics, voting,
however, for the man that he believed to be best fitted for the position and one that he felt that had integrity and
principle rather than a man who could be made the tool of unscrupulous politicians.
From MISSIONARY WORK : A RECORD OF THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH IN THE TUSCARORA
RESERVATION
The church in the Tuscarora Reservation was organized in the year 1805, embracing six members only, under
51
the care of the New York Missionary Society.
...In the year 1860 Rev. James Cusick began his labors again among the Tuscaroras, in the town of Lewiston,
having been invited here by James Johnson, with the view of reorganizing the form Baptist Church.....A council
of delegates from Wilson and Ransomville was invited by the reorganized Baptist church to meet on the 26th day
of April, 1860, for recognition which duly met, rev. William Sawyer, Chairman: James Bullock, Clerk.
Introductory prayer by Rev. L.C. Pattengill: hand of fellowship by Rev. Wm. Sawyer; address by Rev. L.C.
Pattengill, including prayer and benediction by Rev. Wm. Sawyer. The following delegates were present, to-wit:
From Wilson Rev. L.C. Pattengill, Dea. R. Robinson, Dea. A. Chapin.
From Fransomville Rev. Wm. Sawyer, Dea. G. Hopkins, Dea. J. Bullock.
They were received into fellowship of the Niagara Baptist Association June 14, 1860, held at Akron, Erie
county, N.Y. Hames Johnson, the first deacon, was chosen April 13, 1860.
The finished an edifice of 30 x 40 feet, a convenient chapel, which was dedicated February 5, 1862. A
sermon by Rev. L.C. Pattengill, prayer of dedication by Rev. Wm. Sawyer, report of building by J.C. Hopkins.
************************************
REV. LEMUEL C. PATTENGILL.
Bro. Pattengill was born at New Lisbon, Otsego county, N.Y., June 3rd, 1812, and died at Ithaca, Gratiot
county, Michigan, March 20th, 1875. Of the sixty-two years and nine months which he lived, he spent thirtythree years and five months in the he ministry. During this time he has hardly failed to preach a single Sabbath.
His first settlement, which was made a little over a year after he commenced preaching, was with the church in
Jacksonville, Otsego county, of which he was the first pastor. he was pastor of this church for nearly nine years;
at Akron, Eire county, for six years; at Wilson, Niagara county, eight years; and at Litchfield, Hillsdale county,
Michigan, for seven years. Leaving Litchfield with the intention of resting for a time, he moved to Ann Arbor.
After resting for one Sabbath, he began preaching for the church in Chelsea, where he preached for over a year,
still residing in Ann Arbor.
In January, 1874 he began his work in Ithaca, removing there in the summer. Here he found a great amount
of work to be done, and he prayed that his life might be spared for five years longer. During the cold weeks of
this terrible winter, even when he had begun to feel the pains which warned him that death was near, he has been
going from house to house through the day and preaching every evening. Two weeks before his death he was
obliged to give up this incessant work. But he preached twice on the last Sabbath before his death. Both of these
services were at an outstation, eleven miles from his house, at which he has conducted a successful work this
winter, and where on this last Sabbath, many new converts were gathered to hear him.
At two a.m. on Thursday, the 18th, he was taken with a severe pain in the chest, which this time did not leave
him after a few minutes, as it had done before, but continued for twelve hours. His recovery appeared doubtful
and friends were hastily summoned, who arrived in time to see him pass peacefully away. He went down into the
valley with unshrinking step, leaning on the arm of the Savior whom he had loved and served so long, and whose
promise: "Lo, I am with you," was verified even at the last. His death, possibly hastened by his incessant work,
was caused by ossification of the coronary arteries and could not have been long delayed. The funeral was on
Monday the 22nd. Rev. T. Nelson, of East Saginaw preached from the text: "I know that my Redeemer liveth."
Brother Pattengill has been an eminently successful pastor. God's blessing has been given to his work, and
the churches have prospered under his care. His sermons were rich in Biblical illustrations, and his
straightforward, simple presentations of truth, seemed to those who heard him, but a part of the one grand sermon
which was being preached in all his life. He was disinterested and self-forgetful. He followed a master who came
not to be ministered unto, but to minister. To know him was to love him. To visit him in his home, was to
receive from him a thousand thoughtful attentions. He was everybody's friend. The old sought his brotherly
counsel. The young, his fatherly care. His death leaves a home desolate and a church bereaved. When we
remember that we shall see his face no more, our hearts are bowed with sorrow. But when we think of the great
and good work which through the grace of God he has accomplished, of the triumphant manner of his going home
and of the "well done" that awaited him, our sorrow is mingled with joy and with devout thanksgiving. W.
Condolence
On Wednesday March 24th, during the session of the Shiawassee Baptist Sunday school Institute, held at
Maple river, sadness came upon us at the unexpected news of the sudden death of one much loved and highly
esteemed: Brother Rev. L.C. Pattengill, the honored pastor of the First Baptist church of Ithaca, Gratiot county,
Michigan. When the sad news was broken to us, the usual services of the institute were suspended, while, by
suggestion of others, Brother O.F.A. Spinning addressed the assembly in brief, on the character and valuable
52
services of the deceased, and then led in prayer. A committee was also raised to express in writing the sorrows
we so deeply feel, as well as our tenderest heart felt sympathies for the greatly afflicted family, and the bereaved
church.
The Institute ordered the committee to send the above the the Hearld for publication, and also a copy to the
family and church.
Joel Lyon
T.H. Cary Committee.
Owosso. March 26th, '75.
*********************************************
DEATH OF REV. L.C. PATTENGILL.
Died at his residence, in this village, on the 20th inst., Rev. L.C. Pattengill, pastor of the Baptist Church at
Ithaca, aged 62 years, 9 months and 17 days, of heart disease, after an illness of only about one week.
Mr. Pattengill was born in New Lisbon, Otsego county, N.Y., June 3, 1812. He was converted and unted
with the Baptist Church at New Lisbon when 18 years of age, studied for the ministry, and preached his first
sermon October 1, 1841. His pastoral labors were commenced at Jacksonville, N.Y., January 1843, from which
place he removed to Akron, Erie county, N.Y., in October, 1851; and from thence to Wilson, Niagara county,
N.Y., October, 1857. From the latter place he removed to Litchfield, Hillsdale county, Mich., to October, 1865.
he left Litchfield in September, 1872, and while a resident of Ann Arbor, preached over a year at Chelsea, Mich.
A year ago last January he came to Ithaca and became pastor of the Baptist Church here.
During his pastorate at Wilson, N.Y., he was employed for some time at Harper's Ferry, Va., in the employ of
the Christian Commission, and while at Akron and Wilson labored occasionally among the Tuscarora and
Tonawanda Indians at Tonawanda. His labors in every charge were attended with revival influences. Many have
been converted and the churches to which he preached have been built up and strengthened. During his pastorate
he preached something over 5,000 sermons. During his entire ministry of over 33 years, there were but few
sabbaths he was not found in the pulpit.
He was a devout christian, an affectionate husband and father, a good citizen, and a valuable member of
society in every sense of the term. Although but a short resident of this place, he had already gained a wide circle
of friends, who deeply regret his death. He leaves a wife and an only son, Professor Pattengill, principal of the St.
Louis union school, to mourn his loss.
His funeral, which was largely attended, took place on Monday, and the sermon was preached by Rev. Theo.
Nelson of East Saginaw, which was, by the way, one of the finest we have ever heard.
Cause of His Death
In a few hours after his death, Dr. Scott, the physician who attended him during his illness, assisted by Dr.
Marvin of this village and Dr. Caldwell of Byron, Shiawassee county, who chanced to be visiting friends here at
the time, made a post mortem examination of the remains, for the purpose of ascertaining the true cause of his
death, there being considerable curiosity in regard to the matter, not only on the part of the physicians, but the
friends also, the case having developed some unusual symptoms, or rather it was apparent that it was more than an
ordinary affection of the heart. The result revealed the fact, therefore, that his death was caused by angina
pectoris, the disease arising from the coronary arteries becoming ossified. The heart was also found in a very bad
condition, having become softened and almost entirely devoid of elasticity. The wonder is, therefore, how the
deceased really survived as long as he did. Indeed, his disease was entirely beyond the reach of human skill, and
nothing could have afforded him permanent relief.
*********************************************
DEATH OF REV. L.C. PATTENGILL.
Rev. L.C. Pattengill, Pastor of the Baptist Church in Ithaca, died last Saturday after a short illness of three
days. for about four weeks previous, Mr. Pattengill had suffered from occasional pains in the region of his heart;
these, though painful for a few moments, would pass off, leaving him so well that nothing permanent or serious
was anticipated, at least nothing sufficient to persuade him to rest from his labors. He preached two sermons the
Sunday preceeding his death. Thursday morning he was seized with one of these pangs, which proved to be more
painful and lasting than any before, continuing some twelve hours. From this time he gradually failed till one
o'clock Saturday, when he breathed his last. He was conscious all through his sickness, and calmly waited for the
summons which he had all along felt was close at hand. When the glazing eye and pallid cheek told the weeping
53
friends that the last sands were fast running out, efforts were made to recall the dying man, but all in vain, until
the voice of his beloved wife seemed to rouse the fast decaying features. He opened his eyes and looking at her
said: "Oh, its Mary! Good bye--meet me in Heaven." He settled back, and in a few more minutes ceased to
breathe. (The disease which carried him off was angina pectoris. A post mortem examination showed the
immediate cause of the disease to be the ossification of the coronary arteries.)
The funeral services were held Monday, the 22d inst. Rev. Theo. Nelson, of East Saginaw, preached a
touching and powerful sermon, from the text, "I know that my Redeemer liveth." The attendance was very large,
but the earnest delivery and stirring words of the speaker seemed to completely sway the entire congregation.
The musical selections were very appropriate, and rendered by the singers in a manner worth of especial praise.
The deceased was 63 years of age, had been in the minister over 33 years, during which time he had been the
settled pastor of four different churches before coming to Ithaca. During his entire ministry he has preached over
5,000 sermons, but full statistics of his work cannot be found.
Notes for Mary Gregory:
From Portrait and Biographical Album of Ingham and Livingston Counties, Michigan, 1891
...was before her marriage Miss Mary Gregory. She ...was born in Otsego County. She was a daughter of the
Rev. Seth Gregory, a native of Rhode Island, who located near Lisbon. Mrs. Pattengill is still living, making her
home with her son. She has reached the good old age of seventy-eight years and has been the mother of three
children, only one of whom, the youngest, is now living.
*******************************************
Mrs. Mary Pattengill
1902
Lansing, Mich., Feb. 17--Mary C. Pattengill, the aged mother of Hon. H.R. Pattengill, ex-superintendent of
public instruction and the widow of Rev. Lemuel C. Pattengill, once a prominent member of the Baptist clergy in
Michigan, died at the home of her son in this city Sunday night at the age of 88 years. The funeral will take place
at Ithaca Wednesday.
********************************************
Pattengill, Mrs. Mary G., was born in New Lisbon, Otsego Co., N.Y., Feb. 14th, 1814. She consecrated her
life to the service of Christ at the age of sixteen; and was baptized by her father the Rev. Seth Gregory of New
Lisbon, and from that time till she was called home was a devoted Christian. She did what she could to lighten
the burdens, and brighten the lives of others. Her beautiful and life and example has been an inspiration to many.
Mary 2d, 1837, she was married to Lemuel C. Pattengill, a Baptist clergyman, and thus her field of usefulness was
enlarged. Her husband was pastor of the following churches in N.Y. state, Mt. Vision, Akron and Wilson.
In 1865, Rev. and Mrs. Pattengill, moved to Litchfield, Mich., where Mr. Pattengill became the pastor of the
Baptist church, remaining for seven years. He was also pastor of the Baptist churches at Chelsea and Ithaca,
Mich. In all of these pastorates his devoted wife Mary G. proved herself to be a wise counsellor, and an efficient
helpmate. Three children were born into this home, only one of whom is now living. In 1875, while living at
Ithaca, the husband passed to his reward.
In 1865, Mrs. Pattengill came to Lansing with her only surviving son, Hon. H.R. Pattengill, with whom, she
has made her home since her widowhood. In Lansing, her life has been such, that all who knew her loved her,
and she will be greatly missed by the church, the First Baptist, of which she was a spiritual pillar. She was an
ardent worker in the Missionary organizations, always present with zeal and contributions. Here surely will she
be missed, because her seat will be empty.
She was a member of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, always allying herself with the good in
order to help crush the bad.
Sunday afternoon Feb. 16th, 1902, this beloved personage, after an illness of a few weeks passed peacefully
to her rest, at the advanced age of 88 years and two days. The evening hours of her life were filled with the
presence of the Master, and on her lips were quotations from his word. As the sun of her earthly life was settling;
she beheld the dawn of another and more glorious existence.
Her sun was rising on "the everlasting hills." Surely, "Blessed are the dead, which die in the Lord from
henceforth; Yea saith the Spirit; that they may rest from their labors and their works do follow them.
Children of Lemuel Pattengill and Mary Gregory are:
i.
Henry Livingston Pattengill, born 19 Dec 1839; died 30 Dec 1842.
54
14
ii.
iii.
Henry Romaine Pattengill, born 04 Jan 1852 in Mt. Vision, Otsego, NY; died 26 Nov 1918 in Lansing,
Ingham, MI; married Elizabeth Adaline Sharpsteen 24 Jul 1877 in St. Louis, NY.
Helen Josephine Pattengill, born 02 Apr 1853; died 14 Feb 1870 in Wilson, N.Y; married Albert
Johnson.
30. Hiram Mortimer Sharpsteen, born 03 Mar 1821 in Springport, Cayuga, NY; died 22 Feb 1897 in St.
Louis, MI. He was the son of 60. Samuel Sharpsteen and 61. Margaret Sleight. He married 31. Alvira
Warren Bolton 20 May 1855 in Perry, NY.
31. Alvira Warren Bolton, born 25 Dec 1832 in Leicester, New York; died 17 Feb 1923 in Battle Creek,
MI. She was the daughter of 62. James Henry Bolton and 63. Alvira Warren.
Notes for Hiram Mortimer Sharpsteen:
ST. LOUIS, MICHIGAN
Mortimer Sharpsteen, a prominent resident of Bethany township, died at his home Monday afternoon at 2
o'clock, of heart trouble, aged 76 years. He had been sick for some time. Two of his daughters, Mrs. H.R.
Pattengill and Miss Nora Sharpsteen, of Lansing, were with him when he died, the other daughter, Mrs. F.C.
Norris, of Port Huron, did not arrive until Monday night. Short funeral services were held at the home Tuesday
afternoon and the remains were taken on this afternoon train to Perry, New York, accompanied by H.R. Pattengill
and wife and Miss Sharpsteen. Owing to her extreme poor health Mrs. Sharpsteen remained at home. Mr.
Sharpsteen was a gentleman highly respected and leaves a host of friends.
*************************************************
Mortimer N. Sharpsteen.
The subject of this notice was born in Springport, Cayuga County, N.Y. March 3d, 1821, and died at St.
Louis Mich., February 22d, 1897, of heart trouble, after an illness of about three weeks.
When four years of age his parents removed from Springport to Leicester, where they purchased a farm,
situated between Perry and Mt. Morris. The deceased was one of a family of 10 children. When a young man, in
company with his brother Daniel he went to Michigan and took up a tract of land near Battle Creek. As the
climate did not agree with him, he returned to Perry a short time afterward. In 1854, in partnership with his
father, Mr. Samuel Sharpsteen, he purchased what is now known as the Needham farm, and in 1855 he was united
in marriage to Miss Alvira Bolton, by whom he had five children, three of whom with their mother survive him.
In 1869, on account of his suffering from asthma, Mr. Sharpsteen sold the farm in Perry and in 1870 he
removed to Clinton, Iowa, where in company with B. Duryea and N.B. Fern, he purchased a stock of dry goods.
The great fire of Chicago, in 1871, opening up what seemed a better location, they moved their stock of goods to
that city in November of that year. In 1873 they lost their stock of goods by fire.
After the loss of his property in Chicago, Mr. Sharpsteen and his family went to Michigan, and in a short time
settled near St. Louis, Ratio County, on 40 acres of heavily timbered land. Here at the age of 54, with
characteristic pluck and indomitable energy, he began to hew out a home in the forest. His never-failing kindness
and unselfishness, his excellent judgment, and his uniform courtesy, won him many friends in the new country.
A beautiful farm resulted at length from his labors. Asthma, which had troubled him so much in former
years, was not a frequent visitor in the northern Michigan home. The township in which Mr. Sharpsteen lived was
swept completely by the Greenback craze of 1877-8, and was held by them with great majorities until the
Republicans put up Mr. Sharpsteen one spring, for supervisor, who by his popularity defeated the most
distinguished Greenbacker of the county, the editor of their official organ. Mr. Sharpsteen was several times
elected to this office and performed its manifold duties with great satisfaction to his constituents.
But years of toil, and the inroads of disease at last told upon the sturdy frame; but not until a few weeks ago
did failing health compel the cessation of active toil. Even as late as last fall Mr. Sharpsteen labored with a zeal
and effectiveness that would put to shame many a younger man. But however great his labor, he never neglected
his reading. His memory was remarkable, and his grasp on the history and politics of the country was truly
wonderful. A few weeks since it was apparent that a serious disease of the heart would ere long close the labors
of this active man, and soon after noon, February 22d, he peacefully passed away. The day before he had been
heard to say, as he sat in his chair, "Well, let it come; I am ready."
Mr. Sharpsteen leaves a widow and three daughters; Mrs. F.C. Norris of Pt. Huron, Mich.; Mrs. H.R.
Pattengill, Lansing, Mich.; and Miss Nora Sharpsteen, who is statistical clerk in the State Department of Public
Instruction at Lansing.
55
The body of the deceased was brought to Perry for interment in the family lot in Hope Cemetery. The funeral
services took place Thursday forenoon of last week, at the Universalist Church; Rev. Charles Palmatier
officiating. A large number of relatives and friends paid their respects to the memory of this much loved man.
The following named relatives from out of town were present at the funeral: Mr. and Mrs. H.R. Pattengill
and Miss Nora Sharpsteen, of Lansing, Mich.; Mr. Frank Adams of Buffalo; Mr. and Mrs. Will Clapp, Mr. and
Mrs. Leslie Bottsford, Mrs. Henry Curtis, Mr. Allen King, Mrs. Arthur Wheelock, and Miss Edith Bottsford, of
Moscow.
More About Hiram Mortimer Sharpsteen:
Burial: Perry, NY
Notes for Alvira Warren Bolton:
FEBRUARY 17, 1923
WOMAN, 90, WHOSE HUSBAND CAME YEAR STATE
WAS ADMITTED IS DEAD
Mrs. Alvira Sharpsteen, in her ninety-first year, having been 90 on Christmas day last, and whose husband,
Mortimer Sharpsteen first came to Battle Creek in 1838, the year that Michigan was admitted into the union, died
on Saturday night at 8:30, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C.A. Cummings 21 Clay street.
She had been failing since the fall and had recently been confined to her bed.
Mrs. Cummings is the only survivor of Mrs. Sharpsteen's six children. Thus of the large family of
Sharpsteens, who have so long lived in Battle Creek and its surroundings, only one of the name in the generation
succeeding those who first came here is now living. This is A.L. Sharpsteen, nephew of the deceased. The late
Alphonzo, so long prominent in the local G.A.R. post, was a nephew. She also leaves a niece living here, Mrs.
Florence Hicks. There are seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.
The late Mortimer and Daniel Sharpsteen came to Battle Creek together in 1838, the brothers buying 400
acres of government land a little northeast of the present limits of the city. This property, later left by Daniel
Sharpsteen to his children, remained intact and in their possession until a few years ago.
Though Daniel remained here, his brother Mortimer, on account of ill health at the time, was obliged to give
up the hardships of pioneering and return to the home at Perry, N.Y. There, in 1855, he married Alvira Bolton,
who has survived him many years.
Since the death of her husband Mrs. Sharpsteen has been living with her children. She was at the home of
her oldest child, Mrs. H.R. Pattengill, in Lansing, when the latter died, nine years ago. And it was then that Mrs.
Sharpsteen came to live with her Battle Creek daughter, Mrs. Cummings, remaining here till her death.
Funeral services, which will be private, will be held at the Cummings home tomorrow afternoon at 2:30,
conducted by the Rev. F.H. Bodman.
Temporary interment will be at Oak Hill, and the body will be taken later, about May 1, to Perry, New York,
the old home of the family.
More About Alvira Warren Bolton:
Burial: Perry, NY
Children of Hiram Sharpsteen and Alvira Bolton are:
15
i.
ii.
Elizabeth Adaline Sharpsteen, born 14 Aug 1857 in Perry, NY; died 22 May 1915 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI; married Henry Romaine Pattengill 24 Jul 1877 in St. Louis, NY.
Mary Bolton Sharpsteen, born 29 Jun 1859; died 05 Apr 1904 in Port Huron, MI; married Frederick
Clifton Norris; born 19 May 1859 in Bradley, Maine; died 22 Nov 1916 in Cleveland, Ohio.
Notes for Mary Bolton Sharpsteen:
MRS. NORRIS DEAD
Well Known Military Street Lady Passes Away
She was ill for thirteen weeks with typhoid fever.
After an illness of three months with typhoid fever, Mrs. Fred C. Norris died at five o'clock this morning
at her home at 1306 Military street. During her illness Mrs. Norris has been very low several times, but
she rallied each time and until a few days ago it was thought she was improving. Then a change for the
worse came and yesterday it was known that she could live but a short while.
Mr. and Mrs. Norris moved to this city from Lansing nine years ago, and during this time they have
become well known in the city. Mrs. Norris was a charming woman and with her sweet disposition
56
ingratiated herself with all whom she met.
Mrs. Norris leaves a husband and three children. Miss Nonna Norris, Miss Vera Norris and Clifford
Norris. She also has a mother, Mrs. Alvira Sharpsteen, in Lansing, and two sisters, Mrs. H.R. Pattengill
and Miss Sharpsteen, both of Lansing.
The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon. Rev. John Munday will conduct the service.--April 5,
1904
***************************************
DIED OF TYPHOID FEVER
MRS. F.C. NORRIS OF PORT HURON HAS MANY FRIENDS HERE.
Mrs. F.C. Norris died this morning of typhoid fever at her home in Port Huron. She was the daughter of
Mrs. Alvira Sharpsteen and sister of Mrs. H.R. Pattengill and Miss Nora Sharpsteen of this city, who
went to Port Huron Sunday in view of her critical condition. Mr. and Mrs. F.C. Norris lived in Lansing
upwards of eight years, and both have many friends. Mr. Norris was one of the organizers of the
Lansing, St. Johns & St. Louis Railway Co.
The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon.
Lansing--4/5/1904
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Fred Sharpsteen
Wilbur Sharpsteen, born 29 Jan 1860; died 17 Dec 1862.
Nora Belle Sharpsteen, born 12 Sep 1866; died 06 May 1957.
Infant Sharpsteen
Generation No. 6
48. Theodore Foster, born 29 Apr 1752 in Brookfield MA5; died 13 Jan 1828 in Providence RI6. He was
the son of 96. Jedediah Foster and 97. Dorothy Dwight. He married 49. Esther Bowen Millard 30 Jul 1803.
49. Esther Bowen Millard, born 15 Jun 1785 in Foster, RI; died 29 Dec 1815 in Foster, RI. She was the
daughter of 98. Rev. Noah Millard and 99. Hannah Bowen.
Notes for Theodore Foster:
HON. THEODORE FOSTER (Jedediah, Ephraim, Ephraim, Abraham, Reginald), b. Brookfield, Mass., April 29
1752 ; m., Oct. 27, 1771, Lydia Fenner, dau. of Gov. Arthur Fenner of Rhode Island who gr. at Brown ; b. March
1, 1748 ; d. June 1, 1801 ; m., 2d June 18, 1803, Esther Bowen Millard of Foster, R. I. ; b. June 15, 1785 ; d. Dec.
29, 1815. He entered Rhode Island college (now Brown university), in 1767, being graduated in the class of
1770, and in 1773, on receiving the degree of A. M., delivering an oration on "The Future Greatness of the
American Colonies." He received the same degree from Dartmouth college in 1786. In 1794 he was chosen one
of the trustees of Brown university, which position he held until 1822. After his graduation, he began the practice
of law in Providence county. He served as deputy from Providence in the general assembly, in six sessions, the
first being that of October, 1776. From 1776 to 1781 he served as secretary of the Rhode Island council of war.
In 1781 occasion arose for dividing the town of Scituate, in the western part of the state. The newly created town
was named Foster, in compliment to him. As early probably as 1789 he was acting as naval officer of
Providence, resigning in 1790. On the adoption by Rhode Island in May, 1790, of the Constitution of the United
States, he was one of the two senators chosen to represent the State in Congress. His term of service as senator
was one of the longest on record, namely, thirteen years, 1790 to 1803, and has been surpassed by only three
others from that State. During this public service his wife died at Providence, in June, 1801. The next twelve
years of his life were passed chiefly on his estate at Foster. After the death of his second wife, Dec. 29, 1815, he
returned to Providence making his home with his oldest daughter, Mrs. Stephen Tillinghast, whose husband was a
grand-son of Governor Stephen Hopkins. At her house he died Jan. 13, 1828.
At two periods of his life, namely, from 1776 to 1785, and from 1803 to 1828, his time was largely devoted
to the collection of historical materials. The papers left by him (many of which were placed in his hands by
Governor Hopkins), amount to about one thousand and are preserved in sixteen bound volumes now in the
possession of the Rhode Island Historical Society. He was one of the earliest members and first officers of that
society, organized in 1822. In 1800 he was chosen a corresponding member of the Massachusetts Historical
Society. A sketch of his "Life and Services" by William E. Foster, is printed, pages 11-134 of. vii. of the
Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society (1885), his "Materials for a History of Rhode Island" being
57
printed pages 67-94 of the same volume. He was educated at the public school and by private instructors, fitted
for college and was graduated at Brown university (then called R. I. college) ; m. Lydia Fenner of Providence, R.
I., dau. of Rev. Noah Millard of R. I., and Hannah Bowen). He was a lawyer at Providence. He was elected a
justice of the peace for the town and county of Providence at the general State election in 1773, and was town
clerk for twelve years (1775-87), and was in 1776 a member of the State Legislature. In 1787 he was elected a
member of the Governor's council and was for thirteen years U. S. Senator (1790-1803). "He was a thoroughly
unselfish man, and had literary tastes, personal friendships, and a love of nature which were far dearer to him than
pecuniary gain." In personal appearance he was dignified and prepossessing and in stature above the average
height. His face which was full and round, beamed with benignity and intelligence. He had a light complexion
and blue eyes. His wife Esther Millard d. Dec. 29, 1815, aet. 30. riv. Noah Millard, b. at Rehoboth, Mass., Oct.
10, 1758, was the son of Noah Millard and Jane Maxwell. He was a "Six Principle Baptist." He preached
without ordination at Foster R. I. (a town incorporated in 1781 and named in honor of the Hon. Theodore Foster)
for some 10 years (1795-1805). In April, 1805, he removed to Burrillville, R. I. where he was ordained, Oct. 15,
1806, and preached until his death, Oct. 25, 1834. He had 5 children: Hannah, Samuel, Esther Bowen, Theodore
Foster and Arthur Lemuel.
Mr. Foster was a lover of the study of antiquities, particularly American and made considerable collection
toward a history of Rhode Island, which he planned, but from habits of procrastination never executed. In the
preface of his life of Roger Williams, Knowles used what he found advantageous to his purpose among Mr.
Foster's papers. He died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Stephen Tillinghast. He d. Jan. 13, 1828. Res.,
Providence, R. I.--Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 212-213.
_________________________
FOSTER, Theodore (brother of Dwight Foster), a Senator from Rhode Island; born in Brookfield, Worcester
County, Mass., April 29, 1752; pursued classical studies and was graduated from Rhode Island College (now
Brown University), Providence, R.I., in 1770; studied law; was admitted to the bar about 1771 and commenced
practice in Providence, R.I.; town clerk of Providence 1775-1787; member of the State house of representatives
1776-1782; appointed judge of the court of admiralty in May 1785; elected as a Law and Order candidate to the
United States Senate in 1790; reelected in 1791 and again in 1797 and served from June 7, 1790, to March 3,
1803; was not a candidate for reelection in 1802; retired from public life and engaged in writing and historical
research; again a member of the State house of representatives 1812-1816; trustee of Brown University 17941822; died in Providence, r. I., January 13, 1828; interment in Swan Point Cemetery. -- Biographical Directory of
the American Congress 1774-1949. U.S. GPO, 1950.
______________________________________________________
From HISTORY OF THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND, 1878.
FOSTER is a considerable post township, and situated on the extreme western border of the State, some
fifteen miles from the city of Providence. Foster was incorporated with Scituate in 1730, from the western section
of that township, and remained up to 1781, when it was set off as a distinct and separate township. It derived its
name, Foster, from the Hon. Theodore Foster, for many years a United States senator; and for this mark of esteem
upon the part of the citizens of the town, Mr. Foster presented the town with a library. Some of the books are still
preserved, and especially one in which was written the early records of the town, and is now in the possession of
the town clerk.
MOUNT HYGEIA--The settlement of this celebrated spot was begun by two of the most learned and
distinguished men in the history of the town of Foster, if not in the State. Theodore Foster and Solomon Drowne
are names that are intimately connected with the history of Foster, and occupy a prominent and honorable place in
the historical record of their native State. The following interesting sketch of the early life and settlement of these
distinguished personages, at what is familiarly known as "Mount Hygeia," was kindly furnished by the Hon.
Amos Perry of Providence.
Among the prominent men whose names are enrolled on the records of the town, Senator Theodore Foster,
after whom the town was named, and Dr. Solomon Drowne, the eminent botanist, unquestionably hold a first
place. Therefore, without disparagement to other worthy residents of that rural distict, we shall offer a brief
paragraph, to recall the images and preserve the memory of these two men, "par nobile fratrum," who represent
types of character that well-nigh belong to the lost arts. The friendship of these men was formed and cemented in
boyhood's days.
Foster came from Brookfield, Mass., while yet in his teens; graduated at Rhode Island College in 1770; and
Drowne graduated three years later. The boys roomed, studied, and took their meals together, in the old Drowne
mansion, on Cehapside, Providence; worshipped together in the old First Baptist Church; had each other's
company in visiting favorite sylvan retreats and exploring the forests for miles around, and had longer and more
58
intimate relations than ordinarily fall to the lot of college classmates. Writings and traditions are still preserved
that give an idea of the visions and romantic schemes of these youthful students. Science, philosophy, and belleslettres were their delight, and in order to indulge their taste for these pursuits, they agreed to withdraw, as soon as
circumstances would permit, from places frequented by the multitude, and take up their abode on adjoining farms,
where they could have each other's society and pass their days in rural retirement. This cherished plan was,
however, for a long time frustrated by the force of circumstances, and seemed to be forgotten. Indeed, nearly
aquarter of a century elapsed with only occasional and hurried meetings.
Foster, besides contracting a matrimonial alliance with a sister of the late Governor James Fenner, studied
and practiced law in Providence; was town clerk twelve years; was drawn into the exciting life of a politician, and
in 1790 was made a United States senator, which office he held till 1803. Drowne studied and practiced
medicine; married the lady of his choice, Miss Elizabeth Russell of Boston; served as a surgeon in the
Revolutionary war; spent considerable time in foreign travel and study, and, like General Varnum and Admiral
Whipple, acted as a pioneer in the settlement of the West.
In the summer of 1800, while Mr. Foster was still a member of the Senate, these quondam room-mates and
cherished friends met in Providence. They were somewhat changed by the discipline of life, yet in heart and soul
seemed to each other as in boyhood's days. Amid their hard encounters with the outward world, they had
maintained their loyalty to truth and duty, and sustained their interest in the pursuits which were the delight of
their youth. Shortly before this meeting, Mr. Foster, who had been bereft of the companion of his joys and
sorrows, wrote Dr. Drowne several letters, in some of which he referred in touching terms to his affliction and to
his future prospects. The latter, acting the part of a good physician, sought to amuse and sooth his friend, and
recommended in the most felicitous terms, religion, philosophy, science, literture, and finally, a second
matrimonial alliance.
In the following extract from a letter dated May 2, 1800, the doctor shows a keen appreciation of the
senator's needs, and indicates in no ambiguous terms the step that should be taken: "Who, at your time of life,"
says the doctor, "could think of passing the remainder of his years without a partner of his joys and cares, when
qualified so peculiarly to reciprocate domestic felicity?" The doctor then proceeds to discuss the matrimonial
question, and in his remaks brings in a case where there is a great disparity of years. A week later, the doctor
made the following manifest effort to divert his friend and draw him into the filed of philosophy:
DR. DROWNE TO SENATOR FOSTER
"Your very agreeable letter of the 2d instant was received by me this beautiful morning, and I could not but
consider it a confirmation of the congeniality of our minds; for while I lay awake last night, my imagination was
roving amid the wonders of creation. Among the wild fancies in which I indulged, one was, how this wonderful
structure, the terraqueous globe, would appear to a person entirely detached from it, and contemplating it
unsupported by any visible power, wheeling majestically through the vast expanse of heaven. I was next led to
admire the surprising faculties and capacities of the human mind, so fitted to embrace sublime ideas, and to range,
I had almost said, beyond creation's bourne. Of what an astonishingly projecting genius is man possessed! He
has not hesitated as at Panama. Thus, if he could not create, he has dared to think of altering and improving the
formation of a globe. Surely, thought I, that principle in man which can contemplate and project such mighty
things must participate of immortality. But perhaps, at best, I must come to your conclusion--Guesswork, all!"
Children of Theodore Foster and Esther Millard are:
i.
ii.
Maxwell Stewart Foster, born 06 Dec 1804 in Providence, RI; married Mary Howard 27 Aug 1823; born
12 Nov 1795; died 24 May 1835.
Samuel Willis Foster, born 30 Nov 1806 in Foster, RI; died 11 Oct 1850 in San Francisco, CA; married
Ruth Belden Seymour 23 Feb 1829; born 06 Nov 1808 in Webster, MI.
Notes for Samuel Willis Foster:
SAMUEL WILLIS FOSTER - Village Founder
Washtenaw County's most significant history (Chapman 1881) describes Samuel W. Foster as a miller
who worked for Judge Dexter during the late 1820s. It also mentions Foster as the founder of Scio
Village and Foster's Station--both former Washtenaw county villages located on the banks the Huron
River. While the titles miller and village founder give us some clues about a man who left a permanent
mark on the area, they fail to do him justice.
Few realize that Samuel W. Foster was an inventor, financier, prospector, surveyor as well as a miller,
land speculator and underground railroad operative. Had the dynamic man stayed in Washtenaw County
to live out his life, he would be recognized as one of the most prominent early pioneers in the state.
There is some confusion in local historical records about Foster hailed from Rhode Island. That premise
was undoubtedly formed from statements made by Judge Crane, who was, at one time, Foster's neighbor
59
when they both lived in Dexter.
Crane's statement contradicts information recorded on early land deeds. Foster indicated to land official
that he came from Worchester, Massachusetts. The U.S. Census of 1850 also lists Foster's home state as
Massachusetts. However, on the same census, Theodore R. Foster, Samuel's brother, told the enumerator
that he was from Rhode Island.
The apparent contradiction is answered by tracing Foster family history. His family moved frequently
back and forth between states. Samuel did come to Washtenaw County from Massachusetts around
1827. A few years after his departure to Michigan, Samuel's parents and siblings moved from
Massachusetts to Providence, Rhode Island. Young Theodore then moved in Scio Village from Rhode
Island to be close to older brother Samuel.
Samuel W. Foster, born in 1806, was the son of Esther Bowen Millard and Theodore Foster,
schoolmaster, lawyer and United States Senator from 1790 to 1802. The elder Foster helped found an
agricultural town (Foster, Rhode Island) in 1781. Forty years later, young Samuel would do the same in
Washtenaw County.
From the level of accomplishments, it seemed likely that young Samuel received, what appeared to be,
his considerable education at Brown University where his father was a trustee for twenty-eight years
(1794 to 1822). But that is not the case. The University does not claim him as a graduate. Records
indicate that he probably attended the public schools in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and perhaps
was tutored by Mr. Foster's associates at Brown.
Foster didn't happen into Dexter Village and Judge Dexter's employ by simple good fortune. His family
knew Dexter before the Judge came to Michigan. In fact, it is possible that Foster was named after
Dexter. In a letter dated December 17, 1819, Samuel's father states, the Honorable Samuel Dexter of
Dedham, Massachusetts, an intimate friend of my Father, at whose house I had been in the last preceding
Thanksgiving day...
Although the exact date of 21 year-old Samuel W. Foster's arrival in Michigan is not known, we can
reasonably assume that he had a job waiting for him in Dexter. He first purchased land in Washtenaw
County on May 21, 1827, and he was an original grantee of 80 acres in section 32 in Webster Township.
That same year he married 19 year-old Ruth Seymour, of Webster Township. It is highly probable that
Ruth and Samuel know each other in Massachusetts and that Samuel followed Ruth to Michigan. Ruth
was the daughter of Ira Seymour and Betsey Morehouse and reportedly had several attractive sisters.
Folklore contends that Foster and Seymour were the first couple married in the township (1827).
Samuel and Ruth became members of the Webster Congregation Church. They apparently were not
involved in the founding (1834), but were involved in building the church. Records recounting
construction of the famous country church states:
Whitewood logs were brought and drawn from the timbered land of Plymouth for Foster's Mill at Scio
and manufactured into lumber sufficient to enclose and floor the structure.
Church records show that by 1840 Samuel and Ruth, like other prominent, church-going families in the
community, bought a pew (#36) in support of the church for $25.
Foster was socially aware and politically active. In 1830 he attended an Anti-Masonic convention.
Records show he attended Whigs of Washtenaw meetings from 1830 to 1835, and later signed a Whig
petition aimed at making the Michigan Territory a state. Samuel ran for office several times on the Free
soil ticket in 1840s. He also attended a Young Men's Temperance Convention in 1835. His temperance
convictions makes it ironic that decades later, Scio village would be infamous for its illegal alcohol
production and consumption.
As mentioned earlier, in 1831 he purchased 66 acres in Scio Township and later purchased river
frontage for the development of another village in Washtenaw County--Foster's Station. These purchases
reflect a high level of speculative activity, but appear to only scratch the surface real estate wheeling and
dealing.
Other local historians have said that Foster's name frequently appears when conducting land record
searches in their communities. Evidently he wanted property in Lenawee county and had an interest in a
mill on Walker Lake in Livingston County, all while operating primarily in Washtenaw. One can only
guess at the level of his involvement around the state.
While Foster's speculative land deals like Scio Village were initially successful, one of his projects was
a bust of state-wide magnitude. You recall from Chapter 1 that Foster started his Scio village venture
just a short time before an economic depression rippled across the country. Any depression inhibits
economic growth and perhaps Foster had concerns about selling his village property during a slowdown.
Chapman (1881) states that Foster and John Holden of Scio approached the state lawmakers with a plan
(and a petition) that was designed to help lift Michigan out of the financial depression. that plan later
became known as the infamous wildcat banking law.
The bill, officially known an An Act to Organize an Regulate Banking Associations, was passed by the
Michigan Legislature on March 15, 1837. To oversimplify, it allowed Michigan banks to be chartered
...upon any persons desirous of forming an association for transacting banking business. It also allowed
banks to print their own money and back this money with only a small percentage of capital.
The freedom from regulation and traditional sound banking practices attracted many unscrupulous
individuals. Fuller (1924), famous state historian and educator states, ...While some bona fide banks
60
were established, it was soon found that the law was taken advantage of by dishonest men to practice the
grossest frauds and swindles.
When the law was enacted there were fifteen banks chartered in the state. After the act was repealed on
April 3, 1838, forty-nine banks were in operation. Fuller (1924) writes,
...When all the banks had been swept out of existence there were bills afloat representing millions of
dollars. Many of these were in the hands of bona fide holders, who lost heavily thereby. ...Children used
them to play with, and in the rural districts, where paper-hangings were scarce, people used them to
paper their rooms.
It is doubtful that Foster benefited much from the bill he helped become law. Perhaps he even accepted
some of the worthless paper money for some of his village lots. We do know that he didn't open a
wildcat bank in Scio Village and, again, much like the modern banking scandal, money was made by the
bankers.
It does appear that neighbors may have held some resentment toward him for participating in the
banking disaster. In 1842, 1844 and again in 1845, he ran for public office (county surveyor) and lost.
As we mentioned, Foster was a man of many talents. In addition to being a surveyor (Scio Village,
Foster's Station) and a master mill builder (Scio Flouring Mill, and the first mill at Foster's Station), he
was also an inventor. As an inventor, he succeeded where other failed--he was granted a patent on one
of his inventions!
Sometime in the late 1830s or early 1840s, he started manufacturing and selling his agricultural
machinery. One of his first inventions was a Smut Machine. Smut is an old term for a fungi that forms
on grain. If left untreated the contaminated grain turns into a powdery mass. Foster's machine removed
the fungi.
U.S. patent, number 1,436 was granted to Foster on December 21, 1839. The specification letter began:
Be it known that I, Samuel W. Foster, of Scio, in the county of Washtenaw, State of Michigan, have
invented a new and useful Improvement in Machines for Cleaning Grain, called "Foster's Improved SmutMachine."
The letter continued with a description and a drawing. The drawing can be found in Appen. C.
Foster ran advertisements in Ann Arbor's Democratic Herald newspaper promoting his Smut Machine
and his own threshing machine with recommendations from satisfied customers.
Records show that Ruth and Samuel Foster had their first child, Andrew, on August 5, 1832. Two year
later, in 1834, Ruth gave birth to a girl, Esther. On October 4, 1842, the couple lost an infant son,
Joseph. Four years later, their last child was born. Ira was named after Ruth's father, Ira Seymour.
Perhaps it was the death of his son Joseph that soured Foster on regular church attendance. Whatever
the reason, his frequent absences were noticed by church elders early in 1850. Church records show
elder met in Session on February 19, 1850, to hear charges against him. While the actions of the elders
tell us more about the influence of church than about Foster, it does give us insight into his later
decisions. The minutes from the meeting follow:
Session was held by church elders. Topic: Bro. Foster not appearing: Bro. Reeves was appointed by the
Session to act as defense.
The Witness: Bro. Dwight & Bro. Boyden took the oath. The charges and specifications having been
read Bro. Dwight testified that he had no recollection of Bro. Foster having been present on the Sabbath
more than once in two or three years. That in January 1850 he visited Bro. Foster as a committee of the
Church and belabored with him in respect to the charge and specifications in the citation. That Bro.
Foster replied that he found it more convenient to attend meeting elsewhere. That he occasionally
attended at Scio and sometimes at Dexter.
The Session then voted that Bro. Foster be suspended from the communion of the church until he shall
give satisfactory evidence of true repentance, and that his decision of the Session be publicly read next
Sabbath.
Members of the Session: D.B. Davidson; P.H. Reeve; Strom Kimberly; Norman Dwight; N.C. Goodale
Foster's unfavorable standing in the church may account for the negative comments about him found in
an informal area history. A neighbor and church member, who may or may not have known Foster
personally, mentions him in a history of Webster Township prepared for some church related activity
around 1874. He [Foster] was a man of good ability, great energy, quite an inventive genius, but lacking
in concentration and thoroughness.
There is room for speculation that Samuel W. Foster was singled out for suspension for political
reasons. Members probably knew that he and his brother Theodore were operatives on the underground
railroad. Harboring or transporting slaves was, after all, a federal offense.
Within months of his suspension from the church, Foster caught gold rush fever. Like many other
Washtenaw Countians, he was probably influenced by the letters Ann Arbor's founder, John Allen, was
writing to the Ann Arbor Argus detailing his trip and life in the gold fields of California.
Although the route Foster and his friends took to the Golden State is unknown, we do know he didn't
accompany Allen as Morrison (1957) implies. Allen's letters from California (at the Bentley Historical
Library) make that point clear. Perhaps Foster traveled with business associate and Ann Arbor Township
miller Harvey Cornwell, who left for California in the same year.
Chapman (1881) recounts, ...when the first great stream of emigrants passed over the plains to
61
California, he [Foster] was called to his final reward.
Notice of his death in October was contained in one short paragraph in the November 27, 1850, edition
of the Michigan Argus (shown in this chapter). A search of subsequent editions surprisingly revealed no
tribute, no eulogy, no other mention of the man who founded two communities in the county.
Ruth, Samuel W. Foster's widow, stayed in Scio Village for a number of years and was appointed
village postmaster in 1854. She left the post in 1860 and moved to Lansing with her children. (Andrew
became a carpenter and Ira served in the Civil War.) On October 7, 1869, she married Freeman Havens
of Ingham County.---Chapter 10, Scio Village : Ghost Town with a Past by Nicholas A. Marsh
iii.
24
iv.
v.
Dwight Cranston Foster, born 28 Dec 1808 in Foster, RI; died 16 Aug 1852; married (1) Alma Jeanette
Seymour; born 19 Mar 1816; died 11 Jan 1843 in Scio, MI; married (2) Cornelia Seymour 01 Nov 1843;
born 17 Apr 1806.
Theodore Raeejeph Foster, born 03 Apr 1812 in Foster, RI; died 27 Dec 1865 in Lansing, Ingham, MI;
married Francis Delia Seymour 08 Aug 1832 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI.
Ruth Lydia Foster, born 04 Oct 1814 in Foster, RI; married Joseph Willard Seymour 03 Jan 1834; born
01 Mar 1811.
50. Ira Seymour, born 25 Dec 1778 in Norwalk, CT; died 11 Feb 1861 in Lansing, Ingham, MI. He was
the son of 100. Ira Seymour and 101. Ruth Smith. He married 51. Betsey Morehouse 25 Dec 1800.
51. Betsey Morehouse, born 08 Jun 1784; died 17 Feb 1844 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI. She was the daughter
of 102. Jabez Morehouse and 103. Elizabeth Bouton.
More About Ira Seymour:
Burial: Lansing, Ingham, MI
More About Betsey Morehouse:
Burial: Scio, Washtenaw, MI
Children of Ira Seymour and Betsey Morehouse are:
25
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Evilina Seymour, born 22 Sep 1801.
Francis Delia Seymour, born 09 Jun 1804; died 17 Mar 1876 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; married Theodore
Raeejeph Foster 08 Aug 1832 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI.
Cornelia Seymour, born 17 Apr 1806; married Dwight Cranston Foster 01 Nov 1843; born 28 Dec 1808
in Foster, RI; died 16 Aug 1852.
Ruth Belden Seymour, born 06 Nov 1808 in Webster, MI; married Samuel Willis Foster 23 Feb 1829;
born 30 Nov 1806 in Foster, RI; died 11 Oct 1850 in San Francisco, CA.
Notes for Samuel Willis Foster:
SAMUEL WILLIS FOSTER - Village Founder
Washtenaw County's most significant history (Chapman 1881) describes Samuel W. Foster as a miller
who worked for Judge Dexter during the late 1820s. It also mentions Foster as the founder of Scio
Village and Foster's Station--both former Washtenaw county villages located on the banks the Huron
River. While the titles miller and village founder give us some clues about a man who left a permanent
mark on the area, they fail to do him justice.
Few realize that Samuel W. Foster was an inventor, financier, prospector, surveyor as well as a miller,
land speculator and underground railroad operative. Had the dynamic man stayed in Washtenaw County
to live out his life, he would be recognized as one of the most prominent early pioneers in the state.
There is some confusion in local historical records about Foster hailed from Rhode Island. That premise
was undoubtedly formed from statements made by Judge Crane, who was, at one time, Foster's neighbor
when they both lived in Dexter.
Crane's statement contradicts information recorded on early land deeds. Foster indicated to land official
that he came from Worchester, Massachusetts. The U.S. Census of 1850 also lists Foster's home state as
Massachusetts. However, on the same census, Theodore R. Foster, Samuel's brother, told the enumerator
that he was from Rhode Island.
The apparent contradiction is answered by tracing Foster family history. His family moved frequently
back and forth between states. Samuel did come to Washtenaw County from Massachusetts around
1827. A few years after his departure to Michigan, Samuel's parents and siblings moved from
Massachusetts to Providence, Rhode Island. Young Theodore then moved in Scio Village from Rhode
Island to be close to older brother Samuel.
Samuel W. Foster, born in 1806, was the son of Esther Bowen Millard and Theodore Foster,
schoolmaster, lawyer and United States Senator from 1790 to 1802. The elder Foster helped found an
agricultural town (Foster, Rhode Island) in 1781. Forty years later, young Samuel would do the same in
62
Washtenaw County.
From the level of accomplishments, it seemed likely that young Samuel received, what appeared to be,
his considerable education at Brown University where his father was a trustee for twenty-eight years
(1794 to 1822). But that is not the case. The University does not claim him as a graduate. Records
indicate that he probably attended the public schools in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and perhaps
was tutored by Mr. Foster's associates at Brown.
Foster didn't happen into Dexter Village and Judge Dexter's employ by simple good fortune. His family
knew Dexter before the Judge came to Michigan. In fact, it is possible that Foster was named after
Dexter. In a letter dated December 17, 1819, Samuel's father states, the Honorable Samuel Dexter of
Dedham, Massachusetts, an intimate friend of my Father, at whose house I had been in the last preceding
Thanksgiving day...
Although the exact date of 21 year-old Samuel W. Foster's arrival in Michigan is not known, we can
reasonably assume that he had a job waiting for him in Dexter. He first purchased land in Washtenaw
County on May 21, 1827, and he was an original grantee of 80 acres in section 32 in Webster Township.
That same year he married 19 year-old Ruth Seymour, of Webster Township. It is highly probable that
Ruth and Samuel know each other in Massachusetts and that Samuel followed Ruth to Michigan. Ruth
was the daughter of Ira Seymour and Betsey Morehouse and reportedly had several attractive sisters.
Folklore contends that Foster and Seymour were the first couple married in the township (1827).
Samuel and Ruth became members of the Webster Congregation Church. They apparently were not
involved in the founding (1834), but were involved in building the church. Records recounting
construction of the famous country church states:
Whitewood logs were brought and drawn from the timbered land of Plymouth for Foster's Mill at Scio
and manufactured into lumber sufficient to enclose and floor the structure.
Church records show that by 1840 Samuel and Ruth, like other prominent, church-going families in the
community, bought a pew (#36) in support of the church for $25.
Foster was socially aware and politically active. In 1830 he attended an Anti-Masonic convention.
Records show he attended Whigs of Washtenaw meetings from 1830 to 1835, and later signed a Whig
petition aimed at making the Michigan Territory a state. Samuel ran for office several times on the Free
soil ticket in 1840s. He also attended a Young Men's Temperance Convention in 1835. His temperance
convictions makes it ironic that decades later, Scio village would be infamous for its illegal alcohol
production and consumption.
As mentioned earlier, in 1831 he purchased 66 acres in Scio Township and later purchased river
frontage for the development of another village in Washtenaw County--Foster's Station. These purchases
reflect a high level of speculative activity, but appear to only scratch the surface real estate wheeling and
dealing.
Other local historians have said that Foster's name frequently appears when conducting land record
searches in their communities. Evidently he wanted property in Lenawee county and had an interest in a
mill on Walker Lake in Livingston County, all while operating primarily in Washtenaw. One can only
guess at the level of his involvement around the state.
While Foster's speculative land deals like Scio Village were initially successful, one of his projects was
a bust of state-wide magnitude. You recall from Chapter 1 that Foster started his Scio village venture
just a short time before an economic depression rippled across the country. Any depression inhibits
economic growth and perhaps Foster had concerns about selling his village property during a slowdown.
Chapman (1881) states that Foster and John Holden of Scio approached the state lawmakers with a plan
(and a petition) that was designed to help lift Michigan out of the financial depression. that plan later
became known as the infamous wildcat banking law.
The bill, officially known an An Act to Organize an Regulate Banking Associations, was passed by the
Michigan Legislature on March 15, 1837. To oversimplify, it allowed Michigan banks to be chartered
...upon any persons desirous of forming an association for transacting banking business. It also allowed
banks to print their own money and back this money with only a small percentage of capital.
The freedom from regulation and traditional sound banking practices attracted many unscrupulous
individuals. Fuller (1924), famous state historian and educator states, ...While some bona fide banks
were established, it was soon found that the law was taken advantage of by dishonest men to practice the
grossest frauds and swindles.
When the law was enacted there were fifteen banks chartered in the state. After the act was repealed on
April 3, 1838, forty-nine banks were in operation. Fuller (1924) writes,
...When all the banks had been swept out of existence there were bills afloat representing millions of
dollars. Many of these were in the hands of bona fide holders, who lost heavily thereby. ...Children used
them to play with, and in the rural districts, where paper-hangings were scarce, people used them to
paper their rooms.
It is doubtful that Foster benefited much from the bill he helped become law. Perhaps he even accepted
some of the worthless paper money for some of his village lots. We do know that he didn't open a
wildcat bank in Scio Village and, again, much like the modern banking scandal, money was made by the
bankers.
It does appear that neighbors may have held some resentment toward him for participating in the
63
banking disaster. In 1842, 1844 and again in 1845, he ran for public office (county surveyor) and lost.
As we mentioned, Foster was a man of many talents. In addition to being a surveyor (Scio Village,
Foster's Station) and a master mill builder (Scio Flouring Mill, and the first mill at Foster's Station), he
was also an inventor. As an inventor, he succeeded where other failed--he was granted a patent on one
of his inventions!
Sometime in the late 1830s or early 1840s, he started manufacturing and selling his agricultural
machinery. One of his first inventions was a Smut Machine. Smut is an old term for a fungi that forms
on grain. If left untreated the contaminated grain turns into a powdery mass. Foster's machine removed
the fungi.
U.S. patent, number 1,436 was granted to Foster on December 21, 1839. The specification letter began:
Be it known that I, Samuel W. Foster, of Scio, in the county of Washtenaw, State of Michigan, have
invented a new and useful Improvement in Machines for Cleaning Grain, called "Foster's Improved SmutMachine."
The letter continued with a description and a drawing. The drawing can be found in Appen. C.
Foster ran advertisements in Ann Arbor's Democratic Herald newspaper promoting his Smut Machine
and his own threshing machine with recommendations from satisfied customers.
Records show that Ruth and Samuel Foster had their first child, Andrew, on August 5, 1832. Two year
later, in 1834, Ruth gave birth to a girl, Esther. On October 4, 1842, the couple lost an infant son,
Joseph. Four years later, their last child was born. Ira was named after Ruth's father, Ira Seymour.
Perhaps it was the death of his son Joseph that soured Foster on regular church attendance. Whatever
the reason, his frequent absences were noticed by church elders early in 1850. Church records show
elder met in Session on February 19, 1850, to hear charges against him. While the actions of the elders
tell us more about the influence of church than about Foster, it does give us insight into his later
decisions. The minutes from the meeting follow:
Session was held by church elders. Topic: Bro. Foster not appearing: Bro. Reeves was appointed by the
Session to act as defense.
The Witness: Bro. Dwight & Bro. Boyden took the oath. The charges and specifications having been
read Bro. Dwight testified that he had no recollection of Bro. Foster having been present on the Sabbath
more than once in two or three years. That in January 1850 he visited Bro. Foster as a committee of the
Church and belabored with him in respect to the charge and specifications in the citation. That Bro.
Foster replied that he found it more convenient to attend meeting elsewhere. That he occasionally
attended at Scio and sometimes at Dexter.
The Session then voted that Bro. Foster be suspended from the communion of the church until he shall
give satisfactory evidence of true repentance, and that his decision of the Session be publicly read next
Sabbath.
Members of the Session: D.B. Davidson; P.H. Reeve; Strom Kimberly; Norman Dwight; N.C. Goodale
Foster's unfavorable standing in the church may account for the negative comments about him found in
an informal area history. A neighbor and church member, who may or may not have known Foster
personally, mentions him in a history of Webster Township prepared for some church related activity
around 1874. He [Foster] was a man of good ability, great energy, quite an inventive genius, but lacking
in concentration and thoroughness.
There is room for speculation that Samuel W. Foster was singled out for suspension for political
reasons. Members probably knew that he and his brother Theodore were operatives on the underground
railroad. Harboring or transporting slaves was, after all, a federal offense.
Within months of his suspension from the church, Foster caught gold rush fever. Like many other
Washtenaw Countians, he was probably influenced by the letters Ann Arbor's founder, John Allen, was
writing to the Ann Arbor Argus detailing his trip and life in the gold fields of California.
Although the route Foster and his friends took to the Golden State is unknown, we do know he didn't
accompany Allen as Morrison (1957) implies. Allen's letters from California (at the Bentley Historical
Library) make that point clear. Perhaps Foster traveled with business associate and Ann Arbor Township
miller Harvey Cornwell, who left for California in the same year.
Chapman (1881) recounts, ...when the first great stream of emigrants passed over the plains to
California, he [Foster] was called to his final reward.
Notice of his death in October was contained in one short paragraph in the November 27, 1850, edition
of the Michigan Argus (shown in this chapter). A search of subsequent editions surprisingly revealed no
tribute, no eulogy, no other mention of the man who founded two communities in the county.
Ruth, Samuel W. Foster's widow, stayed in Scio Village for a number of years and was appointed
village postmaster in 1854. She left the post in 1860 and moved to Lansing with her children. (Andrew
became a carpenter and Ira served in the Civil War.) On October 7, 1869, she married Freeman Havens
of Ingham County.---Chapter 10, Scio Village : Ghost Town with a Past by Nicholas A. Marsh
v.
vi.
Joseph Willard Seymour, born 01 Mar 1811; married Ruth Lydia Foster 03 Jan 1834; born 04 Oct 1814
in Foster, RI.
Urania Smith Seymour, born 01 Aug 1813; died 1898 in Lansing, Ingham, MI.
64
More About Urania Smith Seymour:
Burial: 1898, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Lansing, Ingham, MI
vii.
viii.
Alma Janett Seymour, born 09 Mar 1816.
Claudius Seymour, born 13 Nov 1821.
52. William Woodworth, born 06 Apr 1774 in Mayfield, Fulton, NY; died 26 Apr 1813 in Mayfield,
Fulton, NY. He was the son of 104. Selah Woodworth and 105. Rebecca Dunham. He married 53. Lovina
Simson.
53. Lovina Simson
Child of William Woodworth and Lovina Simson is:
26
i.
George Ranslow Woodworth, born 22 Jan 1802 in Auburn, NY; died 05 Jul 1871 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI; married Louisa Linsley.
54. Ozias Linsley, born 09 Nov 1772 in North Branford, CT. He was the son of 108. Abraham Linsley
and 109. Elizabeth Barker. He married 55. Lovice Ker Cadman.
55. Lovice Ker Cadman, born 18 Apr 1779 in Paris, Oneida, NY. She was the daughter of 110. John
Cadman and 111. Phoebe DeWolf.
Notes for Lovice Ker Cadman:
Lovice born April 18, 1779. She married Ozius Linsley and to Ozius and Lovice (Cadman) Linsley were born
three children (i) Phebe Linsley born March 13, 1802, married her cousin William Christopher Cadman. He died
in Leroy N.Y. in 1836 and is buried there. (ii) Louisa Linsley, born Oct. 17, 1806. She married George R.
Woodworth who was born Jan. 22, 1802 and died July 5, 1871 at Lansing, Michigan. George R. Woodworth was
the son of William Woodworth and his wife Lavina Simson. Lousia Linsley Woodworth died June 15, 1886 at
Lansing, Mich. (iii) Lovice Linsley married three times (i) Waldron (2) French (3) Dewey. She was born Oct. 2,
1808 and died Oct. 11, 1886 at Lansing, Mich.
VERSES OF VALENTINE GIVEN TO LOVICE KER CADMAN IN 1798 BY EZRA CASTEREN
Center Verse
Round is the ring that hath no end and so is my love to you my friend and not a foe where this valentine is to
go
Verses between Hearts
We first cast lots and I knew and fortune said it must be you
I drew you out from all the rest the reason was I loved you best
Roses red viltes blew carnations sweet and so are you
Dear Valentine don't take this amiss your humble servant sent you this
But if these lines you do refuse pray burn the prayer and me excuse
But if you take it in good pray pray lay this paper next to your heart
A heart I gave a friend of mine I choose you for my valentine
Verses in Hearts
A heart I have
A heart I crave
A heart I hope to find
And with a heart
I hope to part
And leave a heart
Behind
Verse around Outside
There is but one
And only one
And I am only he
65
That love but one
And only one
And you are only she
Children of Ozias Linsley and Lovice Cadman are:
i.
Phebe Linsley, born 13 Mar 1802; married William Christopher Cadman; died 17 Aug 1836 in Leroy,
NY.
Notes for Phebe Linsley:
Letter to Lousia Linsley and her sister Lovice:
Leroy, Nov 27
Dear Sisters
I presume that you are very anxious to hear from the east if not from us. Brother John has this day
received an answer to his letter from Mr. Calkins he writes that he waited to see Uncle Wm J Cadman he
saw him the day before he rote he does not say where he lives but I think not very near by his waiting so
long he went and talked with mr Chamberlain and he says that his lawyer says he can keep it al long as
Father lives but I shall find out if he can they think the land is worth 600 dollars and what he has ingend
it he will have to pay he say that he will try to by it of the heirs if he can he noes that he will have to give
it up when Father is dead I herd from him last week he was well as usial but Calvins Brother says that he
has a very hard time of it the children come home and stay so much. Louisa I want to hear from you very
much and now how you are a getting along with all of your troubles do write as soon as you can Hellen
is very sick she has been agrowing worse about a week if she is not better in a few days i shant think she
can live she is a poor little (undeciferable) I hope I shall be recconsiled to the will of god Louisa put
your whole trust in him I may be down soon if the going will admit dont say any thing about your
property for I think it might not have a good affect they might not do as well by you in your lawsuit as
they would if they thought you destitute if you want to enjine (?) them think it is for some friend I think
that is best tell Lovice she must write if you cant for she knows how I must want to hear from you how
you get a long I am in a great hurry and must stop and bid you aduie may god bless you both farewell
Phebe Cadman
Lousia Linsley
Lovice
I shall find out what the law is about that property and wich is the best course to pursue
and let you know
Leroy
Aug 30 1836
Dear Lousia
I now have an opportunity of sending a line to you and now I cant put off the painfull task of informing
you of our misfortune if you have not herd O Louisa how can I describe it it is imposible but I can give
you a faint idea of it William died the 17 morning of this month in a fit of appoplexey he died instantly I
dont think he had the least warning of his deth or how it becomes us to be also very (?) he was unwell
abut 48 hours but we did not think dangerous I hope you will come and see me for I feel as if I need all
the consolation that my friends could give me and I have great many things to attend to and a great care
on my mind and little Hellen is sick we have no expected her lif for several weeks but I hope the lord
will spare her to me I have her in my armes while i write give my love to all Friends if any Creditors
should enquire tell them the Buisnys shall be settled as soon as possible & that you think there is
property to settle all dets I shall come down there as soon as possible in great hase yours
Phebe Cadman
More About William Christopher Cadman:
Burial: Leroy, NY
27
ii.
iii.
Louisa Linsley, born 17 Oct 1806 in Paris, NY; died 15 Jun 1886 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; married
George Ranslow Woodworth.
Lovice Linsley, born 02 Oct 1808 in According to TGF; died 11 Oct 1886 in Lansing, Ingham, MI;
married (1) Waldron Dewey; married (2) French; married (3) Dewey.
56. Lemuel Pattengill, born 15 Sep 1775 in Canterbury, Windham, CT; died 07 Jan 1857 in New Lisbon,
Otsego, NY. He was the son of 112. Lemuel Pettengill and 113. Zerviah Smith. He married 57. Sabra Fitch
03 Nov 1803 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY.
66
57. Sabra Fitch, born 1784 in Pawlet, Vermont; died 17 Sep 1852 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY. She was
the daughter of 114. Daniel Fitch and 115. Lucy Giddings.
Notes for Lemuel Pattengill:
"Member of the Baptist church and leading citizen of his town and county. A Democrat; was captain in the New
York militia; served on the Niagara frontier in the War of 1812; was taken prisoner at the battle of Queenstown;
served as presidential elector in 1836." *Pettingell, John Mason, Pettingell Genealogy. Boston: Fort Hill Press,
c1906 p. 117.
_______________________________________________________
From Portrait and Biographical Album of Ingham and Livingston Counties, Michigan, 1891
...Lemuel Pattengill, was a native of Connecticut, where he engaged in farming, removing, however, to New York
where he was an early settler in Otsego county. Lemuel Pattengill, Sr. was a Captain in the War of 1812 and was
wounded at Queenstown Heights, and taken prisoner by the British soldiers and held for two or three months in
Canada. His decease occurred in New York at the age of eighty-five years.
Children of Lemuel Pattengill and Sabra Fitch are:
28
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Fitch Pattengill, born 10 Aug 1804.
Esther Pattengill, born 29 Dec 1805.
Alonson Pattengill, born 20 May 1808.
Lemuel Cleff Pattengill, born 03 Jun 1812 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY; died 20 Mar 1875 in Ithica, MI;
married Mary Gregory 02 Apr 1837.
John Scott Pattengill, born 26 Feb 1816.
Charles Nelson Pattengill, born 11 Dec 1820.
58. Seth Gregory, born 25 Aug 1787 in Danbury, CT; died 19 Dec 1869 in New Lisbon, New York. He
was the son of 116. Hezekiah Gregory and 117. Abigail Benedict. He married 59. Irene Bennett 14 Oct 1809.
59. Irene Bennett, born 21 Oct 1788; died 10 Mar 1826. She was the daughter of 118. Benjamin Bennett
and 119. Mary.
Notes for Seth Gregory:
From Portrait and Biographical Album of Ingham and Livingston Counties, Michigan, 1891
Rev. Seth Gregory, a native of Rhode Island...located near Lisbon. He....was a Baptist minister and for forty
years had a charge in one place.
*********************************************
REV. S. GREGORY
There are many in the Western States who will recognize the name of this eminent servant of God, and grieve
to learn that another good man in Israel has fallen in death. Rev. Seth Gregory, of blessed memory, died Dec. 19,
1869, in the 83rd year of his age. Thus on the Sabbath, as he desired, he passed up to the Sabbath of eternal rest.
Long, however, did he live to bless a world, and to shed upon it the light and influence of a consistent Christian
life. And many noticed its beautiful simplicity and confessed its power, and were constrained to seek the good
man's portion and journey with him to the heavenly land; some even passing over the river before him, while
many others were left this side to weep their loss and bear him away to the sepulchre of their fathers.
Father Gregory was converted in his youth, and though inclined by his early culture to the Presbyterian faith,
yet now his convictions led him in another direction, and he was soon baptized into the fellowship of the First
Baptist church of New Lisbon, Otsego county, N.Y.,--a church that became as dear to him as life itself--serving it
sometimes as a deacon, and afterward years as its honored and beloved pastor; never resigning this position until
age and infirmities imperiously demanded the sacrifice. Then, with much prayer and deliberation, he
submissively yielded to what he saw to be the will of the Master, and offered his resignation, which the church,
after many entreaties, reluctantly accepted. Becoming again a private member, he filled the position with great
propriety, serving the church as diligently and as faithfully as health would permit; and it may be said of him, he
never became an annoyance to any of his successors to the pastorate. His good judgment, warm heart and
Christian spirit, made them perfectly at home in his society. They found in him a genial companion and a fellowhelper in every good word and work.
In his long and successful ministry in his own native town, he came to be the leader of the people, and proved
himself worthy of the position both as a good pastor and an able minister. But few men were more at home in the
67
truths of God's work. The Bible was his study, his delight, and very seldom has that precious book found a more
eloquent and able expounder. It may truthfully be said of him, that he was mighty in the Scriptures. Hence the
character of the revivals under his ministry, some of them extending over a space of more than two years, wherein
the deepest conviction of sin was felt, and salvation by grace the joyful experience. He had the unspeakable
satisfaction of baptizing all his children, six in number, into the fellowship of the same church. But he has passed
away, leaving his children to mourn the loss of an affectionate and praying father, and his wife a kind and faithful
husband. He had a long and painful illness, suffering much--but grace was given--the triumph came--and he was
enabled, with patience and calm resignation, to peacefully and sweetly fall asleep in Jesus. And write, Happy are
the dead who die in the Lord henceforth; yea, says the Spirit, that they shall rest from their labors, for their works
follow with them.--Lemuel Cleft Pattengill, Litchfield, Mich.
Children of Seth Gregory and Irene Bennett are:
29
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Eliza Gregory, born 09 Jul 1810.
Lyman Gregory, born 20 Jan 1812.
Mary Gregory, born 14 Feb 1814 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY; died 16 Feb 1902 in Lansing, Ingham,
MI; married Lemuel Cleff Pattengill 02 Apr 1837.
Abigail Gregory, born 23 Mar 1817.
Cyrenus Gregory, born 13 Feb 1819.
William Gregory, born 15 Jun 1821.
60. Samuel Sharpsteen, born 08 Apr 1796; died 12 Nov 1865 in Perry , New York. He was the son of 120.
John Henry Sharpsteen and 121. Jane Simpson. He married 61. Margaret Sleight.
61. Margaret Sleight, born 12 Jan 1796; died 22 Mar 1871. She was the daughter of 122. Daniel H.
Sleight and 123. Deborah Humphrey.
Children of Samuel Sharpsteen and Margaret Sleight are:
i.
Anson Sharpsteen, born 08 Aug 1814; died 27 Oct 1876; married Caroline Parker 1835; born 23 Feb
1820 in Vermont; died 30 May 1899 in Pennfield, Mich..
Notes for Caroline Parker:
IN MEMORIAM
Mrs. Anson Sharpsteen
Caroline Parker was born in Vermont, Feb. 23, 1820. She was married to Anson Sharpsteen in 1835
and died at her home in Pennfield, May 30, 1899.
When Mrs. Sharpsteen was but seventeen years old, this child wife and mother started from New York
with her six months old baby for Michigan which in 1836 was "the west."
30
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Arminda Sharpsteen, born 12 Oct 1816; died 18 Feb 1843.
Daniel Sharpsteen, born 03 Feb 1819; died 09 Apr 1886.
Hiram Mortimer Sharpsteen, born 03 Mar 1821 in Springport, Cayuga, NY; died 22 Feb 1897 in St.
Louis, MI; married Alvira Warren Bolton 20 May 1855 in Perry, NY.
Miles Sharpsteen, born 25 Mar 1823 in Cayuga County, New York; died 31 Dec 1871.
Albert Sharpsteen, born 20 Oct 1825; died 06 Dec 1895.
Henry Sharpsteen, born 06 Dec 1827; died 16 Jan 1916.
Oscar Sharpsteen, born 09 Apr 1830; died 10 Sep 1852.
Adaline Marie Sharpsteen, born 21 Jun 1832; died 15 Jan 1902.
Notes for Adaline Marie Sharpsteen:
NEW YORK STATE
Death of Mrs. Adeline M. Bolton
Mrs. Adeline Sharpsteen Bolton, widow of the late J. N. Bolton, died at her home on Watrous street in
this village, about 9:30 o'clock last night, aged 69 years. Mrs. Bolton has been in failing health for more
than eight years, and has been confined to her bed totally helpless, since April, 1900.
On November 10th, 1893, she fell down stairs and sustained injuries that seriously affected her health.
While no bones were broken, the shock was severe and she failed steadily from that time. During the
past three years or more she has been a great sufferer and has required almost constant care and attention,
which her children have faithfully bestowed with tenderest devotion. Nothing that could be done by
them was left undone that would tend to her comfort. Although an intense sufferer, she bore her illness
68
with patience until exhaustion of body and mind caused pain beyond endurance.
Last Sunday she was taken with vomiting spells, which continued at more frequent intervals until death
mercifully relieved her suffering and her spirit was taken to the Father.
Mrs. Bolton was a daughter of Samuel and Margaret Sharpsteen, pioneer settlers of the town of
Leicester, where she was born on June 20th, 1832. She was one of a family of 10 children, eight sons
and two daughters, only two of whom are now living, viz: Henry and Seward Sharpsteen of Marshall,
Mich.
Mrs.. Bolton was a woman of many lovable qualities and was held in high regard by all who knew her,
being one who possessed and exemplified in her daily life the characteristics of a true Christian. She was
the mother of whom are living, viz: Platt S. Cora A. and Oscar N. Bolton, all of Perry.
Funeral services will be held at the late residence of the deceased, on Watrous street, Saturday afternoon
at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. C. Palmatier officiating.
x.
Seward Sharpsteen, born 20 Jun 1838; died 30 Mar 1909.
62. James Henry Bolton, born 30 Nov 1801 in Scipio, NY; died 09 Jul 1890 in Leicester, NY. He married
63. Alvira Warren 20 Feb 1823.
63. Alvira Warren, born 16 May 1805; died 21 Aug 1849.
Notes for James Henry Bolton:
Obituary -- 1890
James H. Bolton died at his late home in Leicester, Wednesday, July 9th, at the advanced age of 87 years.
Mr. Bolton was one of the earliest pioneers of this section, coming here from Scipio soon after his marriage
with Miss Alvira Warren, following Indian trails and disputing with bears and wolves for possession. His life
since has been spent in the vicinity of his first settlement, where he accumulated a comfortable fortune and reared
his large family, to whom he was most devotedly attached. The family reunions on Thanksgiving and Christmas
were the most important occasions of the year to the children, grandchildren and great grandchildren, who
gathered around the bountiful board and merry Christmas trees, where he was the center of attraction and the
chief promoter of the good times.
About five years ago he was stricken with paralysis and since then has been confined to his bed, where he has
received the tenderest of care from his daughter, Mrs. C. A. Chapin, and her husband, who have lived with him
since their marriage. He was a member and one of the founders of the Universalist church in Perry, and his faith
in an all-loving, all-wise Providence has sustained him in the utmost cheerfulness and patience during these years
of confinement and suffering and made the long-delayed summons, "Come home," most welcome.
The last services were rendered at the house Saturday afternoon, July 12, conducted by Rev. J. F. Gates,
assisted by Rev. S. A. Whitcomb. The interment was made in the family lot at Moscow.
James H. Bolton
1890
Another pioneer has gone from the scenes of time to join the innumerable company on the other side. He
died on the afternoon of July 9th, in his 88th year, and was buried Saturday at 3 o'clock p.m., the editor of the
NEWS, under a promise made several years ago, delivering the funeral address. Prof. S. A. Whitcomb conducted
the preliminary services. The funeral was held at the residence of Charles A. Chapin, near the old homestead,
where Mr. Bolton spent many years of his life in the peaceful pursuits of agriculture, and where his large family
was reared to manhood and womanhood. While father James Bolton has left a large number of descendents there
are few among the number to transmit his name as he was the father of but on son, J. N. Bolton. That son and
nine daughters constituted the household when all were together. Of children, grandchildren and great
grandchildren there are many living. At a family reunion on the Christmas of 1883, there were between fifty and
sixty of his descendants to enjoy the festivities of that memorable night. Since the organization of the Wyoming
Pioneer Association, while in active life and health he found great pleasure in the annual gatherings. The
hospitality of his tent was always open to his friends. Mr. Bolton was well-known to the citizens of Perry and
Leicester and adjoining towns, many of whom were present Saturday afternoon to pay the tribute of respect to his
memory. All his children who are living and many of his grandchildren gathered about his bier to gaze upon the
aged form. The remains were interred in the Moscow cemetery to repose beside the dust of the wife, who died
many years ago.
Bryant's lines upon the "Old Man's Funeral" appear particularly fitting at this time:
69
"Why weep ye ten for him, who, having won
the bound of man's appointed years, at last,
Life's blessing all enjoyed, life's labors done,
Serenely to his final rest has passed;
While the soft memory of his virtues, yet,
Lingers like twilight when the bright sun is set?
"And I am glad that he has lived thus long,
And glad that he has gone to his reward;
Nor can I deem that nature did him wrong,
Softly to disengage the vital cord
For when his hand grew palsied, and his eye
Dark with the mists of age, it was his time to die."
Child of James Bolton and Alvira Warren is:
31
i.
Alvira Warren Bolton, born 25 Dec 1832 in Leicester, New York; died 17 Feb 1923 in Battle Creek, MI;
married Hiram Mortimer Sharpsteen 20 May 1855 in Perry, NY.
Generation No. 7
96. Jedediah Foster, born 10 Oct 1726 in Andover, Essex, MA7; died 17 Oct 1779 in Brookfield MA8. He
was the son of 192. Ephraim Foster and 193. Abigail Poore. He married 97. Dorothy Dwight 18 May 17499.
97. Dorothy Dwight, born 13 Nov 1729 in Springfield MA; died 12 Jan 1818 in Brookfield MA. She was
the daughter of 194. Brig. Gen Joseph Dwight and 195. Mary Pynchon.
Notes for Jedediah Foster:
"HON. JEDEDIAH FOSTER (Ephraim, Abraham, Reginald), b. Andover, Mass., Oct. 10, 1726; m. May 18,
1749, Dorothy Dwight, dau. of Brig. Gen. Joseph Dwight; b. Nov. 13, 1729; d. Jan. 12, 1818.
Mr. Foster was graduated at Harvard college in 1744, and soon after went to Brookfield and engaged in
business with Brig.-Gen. Joseph Dwight. He was a man very much trusted and respected. He retained various
offices; was deacon of the church in the First Parish; was judge of the Probate Court; judge of the Supreme
Judicial Court of Massachusetts. Rev. Nathan Fisher, D.D., preached his funeral sermon, in which he gave him a
very high character. In 1753 he headed a petition to the selectmen to lay out the First parish into two parishes. In
1774 he was elected delegate to the Provincial Congress at Cambridge. He was often moderator of the town
meetings, and often served on important committees. During the Revolutionary war he was a colonel. In 1775
there was a prevalent prejudice against inoculation as a guard against violent disease, especially smallpox. Col.
Foster went to Esopus, N.Y., and was there inoculated, had the disease and returned to health. He was
representative in the legislature 1761-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-'70-1-2-3-4-5-9. He was a deacon in the church. He held
various military offices, from captain of a company to major of a regiment, under Major-General Winslow, by
commission from Gov. Shirley. In 1754 he was commissioned justice of the peace and of the quorum for
Worcester county. He was also judge of probate, and afterward one of the judges of the Superior court of
Massachusetts. He was a representative of the town in the General Council for 15 years (1761-76), and a member
of all the Provincial Congresses of Massachusetts. In 1779 he was a member of the convention for forming a
State constitution and of the committee itself appointed to draft it; during the session of which committee he died.
He was a man of thorough integrity and honor and of large benevolence, an active Christian and a zealous patriot.
"Blessed with a happy steadiness and presence of mind" he always studied to be useful, "being of the fixed
opinion that no one should desire to outlive his usefulness." He was especially hopeful, determined and active in
that part of the Revolutionary war in which he had an opportunity to take any share of duty or service. He d. Oct.
17, 1779. Res., Brookfield, Mass."--Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 160-161.
Notes for Dorothy Dwight:
"Mrs. F.'s personal appearance was thus described by her grandson, Alfred Dwight Foster Esq., in a letter
addressed by him to Fredic A. Foster Esq., of Lancaster, O. : "She had always, within my memory, a head of
perfectly white hair and very black eyes, although the Dwights almost without exception have light complexion
and blue eyes, as my father and uncles Theodore and Theodphilus had."--Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 160-161.
Children of Jedediah Foster and Dorothy Dwight are:
i.
Pamela Foster, born 12 Aug 1750.
70
48
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Theodore Foster, born 29 Apr 1752 in Brookfield MA; died 13 Jan 1828 in Providence RI; married (1)
Lydia Fenner 27 Oct 1771; married (2) Esther Bowen Millard 30 Jul 1803.
Theophilus Foster, born 16 Mar 1754.
Abigail Foster, born 10 Jan 1756.
Dwight Foster, born 07 Dec 1757.
Notes for Dwight Foster:
FOSTER, Dwight (brother of Theodore Foster), a Representative and a Senator from Massachusetts;
born in Brookfield, Worcester County, Mass., December 7, 1757; completed preparatory studies, and
was graduated from Brown University, Providence, R. I., in 1774; studied law; was admitted to the bar in
1778 and commenced practice in Providence, R. I., justice of the peace for Worcester County 17811823; special justice of the court of common pleas in 1792; sheriff of Worcester County in 1792;
member of the State house of representatives in 1791 and 1792; elected as a Federalist to the Third and
to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1793, to June 6, 1800, when he resigned;
delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1799; elected to the United States Senate to fill the
vacancy caused by the resignation of Samuel Dexter and served from June 6, 1800, to March 2, 1803,
when he resigned; served as chief justice of the court of common pleas in 1808 ad 1809; member of the
Governor's council and held other State and local offices; died in Brookfield, Mass., April 29, 1823;
interment in Brookfield Cemetery. --Biographical Directory of the American Congress 1774-1949. U.S.
GPO, 1950. p. 1175.
vi.
vii.
Pergrine Foster, born 28 Dec 1757.
Ruth Foster, born 11 Sep 1766.
98. Rev. Noah Millard, born 10 Oct 1758 in Rehobath, Bristol, MA10; died 25 Oct 1834 in Burrillville,
He was the son of 196. Noah Millard and 197. Jane Maxwell. He married 99. Hannah Bowen.
99. Hannah Bowen, born 25 Sep 1762 in Rehoboth, Bristol, MA; died 04 Jul 1794 in Foster, RI.
RI11.
Children of Noah Millard and Hannah Bowen are:
49
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Hannah Millard, born 08 Sep 1780.
Esther Bowen Millard, born 15 Jun 1785 in Foster, RI; died 29 Dec 1815 in Foster, RI; married
Theodore Foster 30 Jul 1803.
Theodore Foster Millard, born 11 Apr 1788.
Samuel Arthur Millard, born 14 May 1790.
100. Ira Seymour, born 31 Aug 1748 in Norwalk, CT; died 04 Oct 1837 in Victor, NY. He was the son of
200. John Seymour and 201. Ruth Belden. He married 101. Ruth Smith 14 Nov 1772.
101. Ruth Smith, born 1742; died 26 Aug 1792 in Stockbridge, MA. She was the daughter of 202. Dr.
Elisha Smith and 203. Ruth Seymour.
Notes for Ira Seymour:
Ira SEYMOUR (John, John, Thomas, Richard), born at Norwalk, Conn., 31 Aug. 1748, died 4 Oct. 1837 aged
89; married first, 14 Nov. 1772, RUTH SMITH, born 1742, died at Stockbridge, Mass., 26 Aug. 1792 aged 50 (in
50th year by gravestone), daughter of Dr. Elisha (Simon, Joseph) and Ruth (Seymour) ; married second, 24 Dec.
1795, JERUSHA PARSONS, born 1 May 1766, died 7 Jan. 1861 aged 96, daughter of Elihu (Edenezer, Joseph,
Joseph) and Sarah (Edwards), and granddaughter of Rev. Jonathan Edwards, the noted theologian. He resided in
Stockbridge, Mass, and Victor, N.Y. -- History of the Seymour Family : Descendants of Richard Seymour of
Harford, Connecticut for Six Generations, 1939 p. 117.
---------------------------------------------The Duke of Stockbridge, a romance of Shay's Rebellion, was written by Edward Bellamy in 1879. Several
characters in the romance were "real personages who played their parts in this singular revolt." Deputy Sheriff Ira
Seymour was one of them.
Passages from the book mentioning Ira Seymour:
p. 16
"'Twas only yes'day Iry Seymour sold out Zadkiel Poor, ez lives 'long side o' me, an' took Zadkiel daown to
Barrington jail fer the rest that the sale didn't fetch," said Israel Goodrich.
71
p. 128
"No one will be so cruel. Father is so sick. If you could see him, you would not say so. They shall not take
him to jail again. If Mr. Seymour coms after him, I'll tear his eyes out. I'll kill him!'
p. 142
"No,--that is, I don't know," said Perez, his face flushing a little with the difficulty of thinking at once of any
plausible reason. "You see," he finally found words to say, "the store is so near Squire Woodbridge's, that the
noise might disturb Madam Woodbridge."
"She must hev dum sharp ears, ef she kin hear much at that distance," observed Abner, "but it shell be as yew
say, cap'n. I s'pose ye've ag'in our givin' Sheriff Seymour a little mewsick."
"As much as you please, Abner."
p. 148-149
"Iry Seymour wuz a-goin' ter sell aout Elnathan Hamlin this week, but somehow he hain't got tew it," said
Abner, dryly. "I kind o' think he heard some news from Barrington 'baout Tuesday."
"Iry might's well give up his commission ez depity sheriff, an' try ter git inter some honet trade," remarked
Israel.
p. 184
"Now, boys, le's go an' see Iry Seymour," said Abner, and with a yell, the crowd rushed off in the direction of
the deputy sheriff's house.
Their blood was up, and it was perhaps well for that official that he did not wait to be interviewed. As the
crowd surged up before the house, a man's figure was seen dimly flitting across the field behind, having
apparently emerged from the back door. There was a yell, "There goes Iry," and half the mob ran after him, but,
thanks to the darkness, the nimble-footed sheriff made good his escape, and his pursuers presently returned,
breathless, but in high good humor over the novel sport, protesting that they laughed so hard they could not run.
p. 186
The dismay which the news of the extent and apparent irresistibleness of the rebellion produced among those
attached to the court party in Stockbridge corresponded to the exultation to which the people gave themselves up.
Nor did the populace lose any time in giving expression to their bolder temper by overt act. About nin o'clock in
the morning, Deputy Sheriff Seymour, who had not ventured to return to his house, was found concealed in the
corn-bin of a barn near the burying-ground. A crowd instantly collected and dragged the terrified man from his
concealment. Some one yelled:
"Ride him on a rail," and the suggestion finding an echo in the popular breast, a three-cornered fence rail was
thrust between his legs, and lifted on men's shoulders. Astride of this sharp-backed steed, holding on with his
hands for dear life, lest he should fall offf and break his neck, he was carried through the main streets of the
village, followed by a howling crowd, and pelted with apples by the boys, while the windows of the houses along
the way were full of laughing women. Having graced the popular holiday by this involuntary exhibition of
himself, Seymour was allowed to escape without suffering any further violence, the crowd appearing boisterously
jocose rather than embittered in temper.
p. 188
"Good morning, Abner," replied Edwards, propitiatingly.
"It's a good mornin' and it's good news ez is come to taown. I s'pose ye hearn it a'ready? I thought so. Ye
look ez ef ye hed. But we didn't come ter talk 'baout that. There wuz a little misunderstandin' yis'day 'baout
sellin' aout David. He ain't nothin' but a skunk of a Baptist, an' ef Iry hed put him in the stocks or licked him
'twould ha' sarved him right. But ye see some of the boys hev got a notion ag'in hevin' any more fellers sold aout
fer debt, an' we been explainin' our idee to Iry this mornin'. I guess he's got it through his head naow, Iry hez. Ye
see ef neighbors be goin' ter live together peaceable they've jest got ter understand each other. What do ye s'pose
Iry said? He said Squire there told him to sell David aout. In course we didn't b'lieve that. Squire ain't no
goldarned fool, ez that would make him aout ter be. He know'd the men ez stopped the courts last week wouldn't
be afeard o' stoppin' a sheriff. He knows the folks be in arnest 'baout hevin' an end on suein', an' sellin', an' sendin'
ter jail. Squire knows, an' ye all know, that there'll be fightin' fore there's any more sellin'."
"But Iry didn't save his hide by tryin' ter lay it off onter Squire, an' I guess he won't try no more sellin' aout
right away, not ef Goramity told him tew."
p. 205
72
After the funeral service Squire Woodbridge managed to whisper a few words in the ears of a dozen or so of
the gentlemen present, the tenor of which, to the great surprise of those addressed, was a request that they would
call on him that eveing after dark, taking care to come alone and to attract as little attention as possible. Each one
supposed himself alone to have been invited, and on being met at the door by Squire Woodbridge and ushered
into the study, was surprised to find the room full of gentlemen. Doctors Partridge and Sergeant, and Squire
Edward were there, Captain Stoddard, Sheriff Seymour, Tax Collector Williams, Solomon Gleason, John Bacon,
Esquire, General {epoon and numerous other lawyers, County Treasurer Dwight, Deacon Nash, Ephraim
Williams, Esquire, Sedgwick's law-partner, Captain Jones, the militia commissary of Stockbridge, at whose house
the town stock of arms and ammunition was stored and several others.
p. 207
"They have no leaders, though," said Bacon. "Such fellows are dangerous only when they have leaders.
They could not stand before us, for methinks we are by this time become desperate men."
"You forget that this Hamlin fellow will stop at nothing, and they will follow him," remarked Seymour.
p. 308
One day, three days before the end of January, as Perez, returning from a walk, approached the guard-house,
he saw that it was in possession of Deputy Sheriff Seymour and a posse. The rebel garrison of three or four men
only, having made no resistance, had been disarmed and allowed to go. Perez turned on his heel and went home.
That same afternoon, about three o'clock, as he was sitting in the house, his brother Reuben, who had been on the
watch, came in and said that a party of militia were approaching.
p. 343
Tax Collector Williams once more went his rounds, Deputy Sheriff Seymour's red flag floated again from the
gable ends of the houses whence the mob had torn it last September, foreclosure sales were made, processes were
served, debtors were taken to jail, and the almost forgotten sound of the lash was once more heard on the green of
Saturday afternoons as the constable executed Squire Woodbridge's sentences at the re-erected whipping-post and
stocks.
Children of Ira Seymour and Ruth Smith are:
50
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Ruth Seymour, born 10 Aug 1773.
Ruth Seymour, born 17 Jan 1775.
Cynthia Seymour, born 17 Oct 1776.
Ira Seymour, born 25 Dec 1778 in Norwalk, CT; died 11 Feb 1861 in Lansing, Ingham, MI; married
Betsey Morehouse 25 Dec 1800.
Joseph Seymour, born 29 Mar 1781.
Sophia Seymour, born 27 Mar 1784.
Charles Seymour, born 15 Jun 1786.
102. Jabez Morehouse, born 1742. He was the son of 204. Jabez Morehouse and 205. Mary DeHart.
He married 103. Elizabeth Bouton.
103. Elizabeth Bouton She was the daughter of 206. Ezra Bouton and 207. Mary Bouton.
Child of Jabez Morehouse and Elizabeth Bouton is:
51
i.
Betsey Morehouse, born 08 Jun 1784; died 17 Feb 1844 in Scio, Washtenaw, MI; married Ira Seymour
25 Dec 1800.
104. Selah Woodworth, born 11 Aug 1750 in Salisbury, Litchfield, CT; died 25 Oct 1823 in Mayfield,
Fulton, NY. He was the son of 208. Caleb Woodworth and 209. Jane Munger. He married 105. Rebecca
Dunham 30 Dec 1773 in Salisbury, Litchfield, CT.
105. Rebecca Dunham, born 12 Jan 1755 in Sharon, CT; died 03 Jun 1836 in Mayfield, Fulton, NY. She
was the daughter of 210. Jacob Dunham and 211. Elizabeth Pettee.
Child of Selah Woodworth and Rebecca Dunham is:
52
i.
William Woodworth, born 06 Apr 1774 in Mayfield, Fulton, NY; died 26 Apr 1813 in Mayfield, Fulton,
NY; married Lovina Simson.
73
108. Abraham Linsley, born 17 Feb 1744/45 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 01 Mar 1817. He was the
son of 216. Israel (Jacob) Linsley and 217. Priscilla Wheadon. He married 109. Elizabeth Barker 18 Nov
1766 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
109. Elizabeth Barker, born 07 Mar 1745/46. She was the daughter of 218. Capt. Timothy Barker and
219. Hannah Baker.
Child of Abraham Linsley and Elizabeth Barker is:
54
i.
Ozias Linsley, born 09 Nov 1772 in North Branford, CT; married Lovice Ker Cadman.
110. John Cadman, born 1755; died 12 Apr 1803. He was the son of 220. Edward Cadman and 221.
Sarah Seabury. He married 111. Phoebe DeWolf.
111. Phoebe DeWolf, born 05 Nov 1750 in Lyme Twp, New London, CT; died Aft. 1803. She was the
daughter of 222. Simon DeWolf and 223. Lucy Calkins.
Notes for John Cadman:
"John (5) Edward (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman was born in 1755 and died April 12,
1803. The entry in the family Bible stating that he was 48 years old at the time of his death. (B. P.) The date of
his marriage is not of record but he married Phoebe DeWolf (D. G.) who was born in 1750, the daughter of
Simon DeWolf (D. G.) and Lucy (Calkins) DeWolf (New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 49: 17).
Lucy Calkins was the daughter of Stephen (4) Hugh (3) John (2) Hugh (1) Calkins, born Sept. 5, 1701.
Stephen (4) Calkins married Jan. 22, 1722 Sarah Calkins who was born at Lyme, Conn. July 7, 1703. He was the
son of Lt. Jonathan (3) David (2) Hugh (1) Calkins. Her mother was Sarah Turner the grand daughter of Mary
Brewster who was the grand daughter of Elder Brewster of the Mayflower. (New York Genealogical and
Biographical Record)
In 1790 John Cadman's name appears among others as a signer of a petition to Governor Clinton. Among the
other signatures is that of his brother George (G. C. 5: 930). John's name in the petition is Cadmon and that of
George is Cadmond. His name appears among the levies under command of Colonel Morris Grahm (New York
in the Revolution p. 79), and again appears under the muster rolls of the Line or the Levies under the Land
Bounty Rights (New York in the Revolution, p. 94). Certificate #7377 for 22 pounds 9 s. 9 d. was issued to John
Cadmon for services as a drummer in Captain Joseph Harrison's Co., Lt. Col. Willitts Regiment, of the Levies
(New York State Library. Manuscript and History Section) He drew pay for eight months service in this
company. (War Department, Adjutant Gen'l Office or Veteran's Bureau, Washington, D.C.)
John Cadman, private in Van Ness' Regiment, 9th Albany New York Albany Militia served nine days from
October 8 to October 16, 1776, hunting and apprehending Tories in Kinderhook and Kings Districts in Albany
County (New York State Library. Manuscript and History Section).
The census of 1790 lists John (5) Cadman of Hillsdale, Columbia County, New York, the family consisting
of two males over 16, one male under 16 and six females. Edward (4) his father was alive at that time and is not
listed in the census of 1790. As John (5) has only one son at that date and he was under 16, at that time, it is
probable that Edward (4) was living with John (5) thus accounting for the two males over 16 as listed in the
census.
John Cadman (5) died April 12, 1803 aged 48 (B. P.)
Phebe (DeWolf) Cadman's death did not occur until after Nov. 1803 as at that time she was granted Letters of
Administration in the matter of the estate of her husband John Cadman of Hillsdale Columbia County N.Y.
(Surrogate Court Records Columbia County, N. Y.--not published)"--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH
AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theordore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
Children of John Cadman and Phoebe DeWolf are:
i.
John Cadman, born Nov 1793; died 26 Apr 1803.
Notes for John Cadman:
The family Bible record calls him John Jr. and the entry is that he died April 26, 1803
ii.
Joseph Cadman, died 16 Mar 1803.
Notes for Joseph Cadman:
Date of birth not of record. Died unmarried March 16, 1803. (B. P.) he was probably named for his
uncle Joseph who tradition claims was killed in the war.
iii.
Phebe Cadman
74
55
iv.
v.
Lovice Ker Cadman, born 18 Apr 1779 in Paris, Oneida, NY; married Ozias Linsley.
William John Cadman, born 26 Apr 1796.
112. Lemuel Pettengill, born 16 Nov 1729 in Stoughton, Norfolk, MA; died 27 Oct 1798 in Westminster,
CT. He was the son of 224. Daniel Pettingill and 225. Abigail Leonard. He married 113. Zerviah Smith 04
May 1762 in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
113. Zerviah Smith, born 07 Nov 1741 in Canterbury, Windham, CT. She was the daughter of 226. John
Smith and 227. Mehitable Adams.
Children of Lemuel Pettengill and Zerviah Smith are:
56
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
William Ripley Pattengill, born May 1766.
Lemuel Pattengill, born 15 Sep 1775 in Canterbury, Windham, CT; died 07 Jan 1857 in New Lisbon,
Otsego, NY; married Sabra Fitch 03 Nov 1803 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY.
Horatio Pattengill, born 27 Oct 1777.
Daughter Pattengill
Hannah Pattengill, born 22 Nov 1753.
Benjamin Pattengill, born 10 Jan 1770.
Lydia Pattengill, born 1762.
Abigail Pattengill, born 1755.
John Pattengill, born 1757.
Eunice Pattengill, born 1764.
Elihu Pattengill, born 1769.
114. Daniel Fitch, born 28 May 1744 in Norwich, New London, CT. He was the son of 228. Benjamin
Fitch and 229. Zipporah Haskell. He married 115. Lucy Giddings.
115. Lucy Giddings, born 10 Aug 1749 in Preston, Connecticut; died 12 May 1814 in Pawlet, Vermont.
She was the daughter of 230. James Giddings and 231. Lucy Rockwell.
More About Daniel Fitch:
Burial: 12 Dec 1801, Pawlet, Rutland, VT
Children of Daniel Fitch and Lucy Giddings are:
57
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
xiii.
xiv.
xv.
xvi.
xvii.
xviii.
xix.
Daniel Fitch
Issac Fitch
Philene Fitch
Salina Fitch
Henry Fitch, born 20 Apr 1772.
Return Fitch, born 1774.
Erastus Fitch, born 09 Mar 1774.
Daniel Fitch, born Aug 1776.
Stephen Fitch, born 19 Jan 1778.
Isaac Fitch, born 1779.
Anna Fitch, born 1781.
Benjamin Fitch, born 1781.
Lucy Fitch, born 1782.
Sabra Fitch, born 1784 in Pawlet, Vermont; died 17 Sep 1852 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY; married
Lemuel Pattengill 03 Nov 1803 in New Lisbon, Otsego, NY.
John Turner Fitch, born 1785.
Prosper Fitch, born 07 Nov 1789.
Nancy Fitch, born 1790.
Phylinda Fitch, born 31 Oct 1791.
Jared Fitch, born 1792.
116. Hezekiah Gregory, born 13 May 1752 in Cranberry, Norwalk, CT; died 06 Nov 1834 in New Lisbon,
Otsego, New York. He was the son of 232. John Gregory and 233. Mary Smith. He married 117. Abigail
Benedict 19 Nov 1776 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
117. Abigail Benedict, born 1752 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 12 Jul 1836 in New Lisbon, Otsego, New
York. She was the daughter of 234. Thomas Benedict and 235. Abigail Scrivner.
75
Children of Hezekiah Gregory and Abigail Benedict are:
58
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Hezekiah Gregory, born 03 Oct 1777.
Ruth Gregory, born 25 Jul 1779.
John Gregory, born 29 Jul 1781.
Polly Mary Gregory, born 29 May 1783.
Chloe Gregory, born 07 May 1785.
Seth Gregory, born 25 Aug 1787 in Danbury, CT; died 19 Dec 1869 in New Lisbon, New York; married
(1) Irene Bennett 14 Oct 1809; married (2) Nancy Fuller; married (3) Ninetta Fuller 1857.
Uriah Gregory, born 17 Oct 1789.
Ekias Gregory, born 06 Dec 1791.
Ebenezer Gregory, born 26 May 1794.
118. Benjamin Bennett He married 119. Mary.
119. Mary
Child of Benjamin Bennett and Mary is:
59
i.
Irene Bennett, born 21 Oct 1788; died 10 Mar 1826; married Seth Gregory 14 Oct 1809.
120. John Henry Sharpsteen, born 08 Oct 1766 in Town of Washington, Duchess, New York; died 25 Apr
1848 in Leicester, Livingston, New York. He was the son of 240. Henry Sharpsteen and 241. Phebe Losee. He
married 121. Jane Simpson.
121. Jane Simpson, born 15 Oct 1761; died 07 Jan 1840.
Children of John Sharpsteen and Jane Simpson are:
60
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Mary Sharpsteen, born 30 Nov 1787; died 11 May 1853.
Phebe Sharpsteen, born 22 Aug 1789; died 11 Feb 1838.
Betsey Sharpsteen, born 31 May 1791; died May 1863.
Sarah Sharpsteen, born 15 Nov 1792; died 08 Jan 1863.
John Sharpsteen, born 17 Feb 1794; died 20 Feb 1863 in Chatham Corners.
Samuel Sharpsteen, born 08 Apr 1796; died 12 Nov 1865 in Perry , New York; married Margaret
Sleight.
Rebecca Sharpsteen, born 13 Jun 1798; died 27 Feb.
Ann Eliza Sharpsteen, born 16 Aug 1800.
Margaret Sharpsteen, born 22 Feb 1803.
Jane Sharpsteen, born 20 Apr 1808.
122. Daniel H. Sleight, born 10 Mar; died 29 Oct 1807. He married 123. Deborah Humphrey.
123. Deborah Humphrey, born 27 Jul 1768.
Notes for Daniel H. Sleight:
The following is an excerpt from a deed found at Dutchess Co. Courthouse. It is genealogically intereting in that
it lists all the children of Daniel H. Sleight and his wife Deborah Humphrey. --Ken Rood--Sharpsteen Gen Forum
"This indenture made this fourth day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand eight huyndred and twenty
four between Deborah Sleight widow of Daniel H. Sleight late of the town of Clinto in Dutchess County, Henry
Sleight Jurnior as Guardian under the act entitled an act in addition to the act concerning infants passed the twenty
fourth of March one thousand eight hundred fifteen of Juliana Sleight and Mary Sleight, survivors of Hiram
Sleight, Juliana Sleight and Mary Sleight infant children and heirs at Law of the said Daniel H. Sleight deceased,
and Henry D. Sleight and Freelove his wife, John S. Sleight and Elizabeth his wife, Jacob Mosher and Hane his
wife, Samuel Sharpsteen and Margaret his wife, Elias Sleight and Rebecca his wife, John Henion and Huldah his
wife which said Henry Henry D. Sleight, John S. Sleight, Jane Mosher wife of Jacob Mosher, Margaret
Sharpsteen wife of Samuel Sharpsteen, Elias Sleight and Huldah Henion wife of John Henion are the remaining
children and heirs at law of the said Daniel H. Sleight deceased parties of the first part and Tilley Crouse and
Robert Morey of Clinton aforesaid of the second part. Whereas the aforesaid Daniel H. Sleight, deceased, in his
life time and at the time of his death was seized in fee of all that certain farm situate in the town of Clinton
aforesaid in a Patent known and distinguished at the Great and lower Nine Partners and is part of Lot No. 3 in the
second general division of said Patent known by Lot A, and is part of a lot distinguished by No. 2 in a Map made
by Charles De Witt Esquired in the year 1767 and is distinguished in a Map made 4th November 1790 by Jacob
76
Smith as lot No. 1, lying on east and adjoining the little Wappingers Creek. Comprehended? in the following
bounds. Beginning at a crotched elm tree marked on four sides, standing on the west bank of the aforesiad Creek
and run from thence south eighty-six degrees forty-five minutes west forty three chains and fifty links to a stake
and stones, then south twenty five chains..."
Children of Daniel Sleight and Deborah Humphrey are:
61
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Margaret Sleight, born 12 Jan 1796; died 22 Mar 1871; married Samuel Sharpsteen.
Henry Sleight, born 24 Apr 1786.
John S. Sleight, born 18 May 1788; died 22 Apr 1824.
William Sleight, born 24 Dec 1790.
Generation No. 8
192. Ephraim Foster, born 12 Mar 1687/88 in Andover, Essex, MA12; died 08 Apr 1738 in Andover,
Essex, MA13. He was the son of 384. Ephraim Foster and 385. Hannah Eames. He married 193. Abigail
Poore 11 Jan 1715/16 in Newburyport, Essex, MA14.
193. Abigail Poore, born 01 Aug 1695 in Newbury, Essex, MA; died 28 Aug 1747 in Brookfield, Mass.15.
She was the daughter of 386. Joseph Poore and 387. Mary Wallington.
Notes for Ephraim Foster:
"EPHRAIM FOSTER (Ephraim, Abraham, Reginald), b. Andover, Mass. Nov. 12, 1687; m. Jan. 17, 1716,
Abigail Poor of Newbury, dau. of Joseph Poor of Newbury. She m. 2d, 1739, Capt Nathaniel Frynd. He was a
blacksmith. She d. Aug. 28, 1747 in Brookfield, Mass. while on a visit to her son. He d. Apr. 8, 1738. Res.
Andover, Mass."--Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 138.
More About Ephraim Foster:
Burial: Apr 1738, Ancient Burying Ground, West Boxford, MA
Children of Ephraim Foster and Abigail Poore are:
96
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Jedediah Foster, born 16 Oct 1717.
Sally Foster
Hannah Foster, born 02 Aug 1725.
Jedediah Foster, born 10 Oct 1726 in Andover, Essex, MA; died 17 Oct 1779 in Brookfield MA; married
Dorothy Dwight 18 May 1749.
Naomi Foster
Hannah Foster, born 23 Mar 1728/29.
194. Brig. Gen Joseph Dwight, born 16 Oct 1703; died 19 Jun 1765. He was the son of 388. Capt. Henry
Dwight and 389. Lydia Hawley. He married 195. Mary Pynchon.
195. Mary Pynchon, born 10 Oct 1706; died 29 Mar 1751. She was the daughter of 390. Col.. John
Pynchon and 391. Bathshua Taylor.
Notes for Brig. Gen Joseph Dwight:
Brig. Genl. Joseph Dwight (son of Capt. Henry Dwight of Hatfield, Mass., and Lydia Hawley), b. Oct. 16, 1703,
grad. at Harvard in 1722, m. Aug. 11, 1726, Mary Pynchon of Springfield, Mass., b. Oct. 10, 1706 (dau. of Col.
John Pynchon and Bathshua Taylor). He spent some years at Springfield, where he was engaged in trade (172331), but afterwards removed to Brookfield, Mass., where he practised law for 20 years and more (1731-53), and
went 11 different times as a representative of the town to the council of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay (in
1731, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and '41, 8, 9, and '51). He was Speaker of the Council in 1748-9. In 1752 he removed to
Stockbridge, to act as Trustee of "the Indian Schools," which relation he held to them nearly or quite all the time
that Jonathan Edwards was also at work there as a missionary (1751-8) to that settlement of whites and
Christianized Indians. He was one of the few white hearers that sat regularly under his preaching. They were
both born in Oct. 1703, and being of similar cultivated and religious tastes, must have been greatly addicted to
each other's company. In 1758 we find that he had removed to Gr. Barrington, then called "Upper Sheffield," or
"the north parish of Sheffield." On March 14th of that year he is recorded in the town records as having been
made selectman in the town. On Nov. 9, 1759, he is spoken of as having been chosen moderator of a parishmeeting. By the act incorporating the twon he was empowered to issue a warrant calling the first town-meeting.
The house which he erected at Gr. Barrington is still standing and is in good repair.
77
From 1753 to 1761 he was Chief-Justice of the Court of Common Pleas for Hampshire Co., Mass., and when
(1761) the county was divided he was made judge of the new county of Berkshire, then formed, holding the office
(1761-5) until his death. Gr. Barrington was made the shire town of the county, and Genl. Dwight, beside being
judge of the county court, was made also judge of proabte, and held this office likewise, during the same term
(1761-5) until his death. He had been previously (in 1739) appointed judge of the Court of Common pleas of
Worcester Co.
He was Coloinel of Militia, but was made Brigadier General by Gov. Shirley, Feb. 20, 1745, when on the
expedition against Cape Breton. In the attack upon Louisburgh, in 1745, he was second in general command,
leading in person the Mass. artillery, called then as now, "The Ancient and Honorable Company of Artillery of
Boston." His courage and skill on that occasion gained for him the approbation of the army and of its chief
officer.
In 1756 he led a brigade of Mass. militia to Lake Champlain to reduce Ticonderoga.
His personal appearnace was very fine. He was dignified in his gait and bearing, and had great urbanity in his
manners. He was an upright judge and an exemplary professor of the religion of his fathers. "No man in civil life
was more esteemed in the county." "He was a man of singular veracity; and all who knew him spoke of his
virtues with enthusiam."
Mrs. Mary (Pynchon) Dwight, d. March 29, 1751, and he m. Aug. 1752, for a 2d wife, Mrs. Abigail Sergeant,
widow of Rev. John Sergeant (missionary to the Housatonnoc Indians at Stockbridge, where he died July 27,
1749, aet. 38.--The History of the Descendants of John Dwight, of Dedham, Mass. by Benjamin W. Dwight, Vol.
II, 1874, pages 625-626.
Children of Joseph Dwight and Mary Pynchon are:
97
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Mary Dwight, born 22 Jun 1727; died 10 Jul 1734.
Dorothy Dwight, born 13 Nov 1729 in Springfield MA; died 12 Jan 1818 in Brookfield MA; married
Jedediah Foster 18 May 1749.
Lydia Dwight, born 03 Jan 1731/32; died 23 Jan 1798.
Henry Dwight, born 22 Dec 1733; died 28 Feb 1756.
Mary Dwight, born 26 Jan 1735/36; died 07 Feb 1812.
Bathsheba Dwight, born 12 Mar 1736/37; died 11 Jan 1761.
Elijah Dwight, born 23 Apr 1740; died 12 Jun 1794.
Moses Dwight, born 29 Oct 1742; died 22 May 1764.
Joseph Dwight, born 23 Jan 1744/45; died Jul 1826.
196. Noah Millard, born 19 Feb 1729/30 in Rehoboth, Bristol, MA. He married 197. Jane Maxwell.
197. Jane Maxwell, born 22 Sep 1731 in Rehoboth, Bristol, MA. She was the daughter of 394. Samuel
Maxwell and 395. Hannah Squire.
Children of Noah Millard and Jane Maxwell are:
98
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Dorcas Millard, born 22 Mar 1748/49.
Sarah Millard, born 02 Aug 1751.
Rev. Noah Millard, born 10 Oct 1758 in Rehobath, Bristol, MA; died 25 Oct 1834 in Burrillville, RI;
married Hannah Bowen.
Samuel Millard, born 1761.
200. John Seymour, born 1710 in Norwalk, CT; died 08 Sep 1796 in Norwalk, CT. He was the son of 400.
John Seymour and 401. Sarah Gregory. He married 201. Ruth Belden.
201. Ruth Belden, born 18 Jan 1712/13 in Norwalk, CT; died 29 May 1782 in Norwalk, CT. She was the
daughter of 402. William Belding and 403. Margaret Arms.
Notes for John Seymour:
JOHN SEYMOUR (John, Thomas, Richard), of Norwalk, Conn., born at Norwalk about 1710, died there 8
Sept. 1796, aged 85 (gravestone record). He married first RUTH BELDEN, born at Norwalk 18 Jan. 1712/13,
died there 29 May 1782, in her 70th year (gravestone record), daughter of William (Daniel, William, Richard)
and Margaret (Arms) ; and secondly, at New Canaan, Conn., 4 Feb 1784, ELIZABETH WOOD of Huntington,
Long Island, N.Y.--A History of the Seymour Family by Donald Lines Jacobus, 1939, page 65.
"John Seymour lived and died in his native town. In his will, dated 28 Dec. 1791 and proved 12 Sept. 1796,
he names his wife Elizabeth, to whom he gives "all those articles contained in two written agreements between
us," bequeaths to his grandchildren, heirs of his son John deceased, viz., Jonathan, Samuel, and John Seymour,
78
Ruth Sammons, and Rebecca, Sarah, Betsey, and Martha Seymour, certain pieces of land, the boys to have twice
as much as the girls, gives to his son William, besides other property, the use of nine acres of land, which is later
to go to his grandsons, William, Josiah, Belden and Benjamin Seymour, sons of his said son William, and gives to
his grandchildren, heirs of his son Seth deceased, viz., Seth, John, Nathaniel, Levi, Anne, and Almy Seymour,
pieces of land, as also to his sons David, Ira, and James Seymour, and his daughters Sarah and Martha.."*
*Genealogies of Connecticut Families, Vol. III, Richard Seymour of Hartford and Norwalk, Conn., and Some of
His Descendants, Page 314.
Children of John Seymour and Ruth Belden are:
100
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
John Seymour, born 1734.
William Seymour, born 10 Oct 1735.
Seth Seymour
Sarah Seymour, born 1739.
Martha Seymour, married Levi Taylor.
David Seymour, born 24 Dec 1744.
Ira Seymour, born 31 Aug 1748 in Norwalk, CT; died 04 Oct 1837 in Victor, NY; married (1) Ruth
Smith 14 Nov 1772; married (2) Jerusha Parsons 24 Dec 1795.
James Seymour, born 26 May 1752.
202. Dr. Elisha Smith, born 30 Jun 1706 in Hartford, CT. He was the son of 404. Simon Smith and 405.
Hannah Bliss. He married 203. Ruth Seymour.
203. Ruth Seymour, born 10 Nov 1707. She was the daughter of 406. Thomas Seymour and 407. Ruth
Norton.
Child of Elisha Smith and Ruth Seymour is:
101
i.
Ruth Smith, born 1742; died 26 Aug 1792 in Stockbridge, MA; married Ira Seymour 14 Nov 1772.
204. Jabez Morehouse, born Jun 1714; died 1753 in Ridgefield, Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 408.
Jonathan Morehouse and 409. Rebecca Hull. He married 205. Mary DeHart 09 Nov 1738 in Ridgefield,
Fairfield, CT.
205. Mary DeHart
Children of Jabez Morehouse and Mary DeHart are:
102
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Jabez Morehouse, born 1742; married Elizabeth Bouton.
Mary Morehouse
Rebecca Morehouse
Josiah Morehouse
Jonathan Morehouse
Benjamin Morehouse, born 1753.
206. Ezra Bouton, born 18 Nov 1723. He was the son of 412. Eleazer Bouton and 413. Elizabeth
Seymour. He married 207. Mary Bouton 28 Jun 1749.
207. Mary Bouton, born 1732.
Child of Ezra Bouton and Mary Bouton is:
103
i.
Elizabeth Bouton, married Jabez Morehouse.
208. Caleb Woodworth, born 22 May 1704 in Lebanon, Connecticut; died 30 May 1780 in Salisbury,
Litchfield, CT. He was the son of 416. Benjamin Woodworth and 417. Hannah Damon. He married 209.
Jane Munger.
209. Jane Munger, born 27 Feb 1704/05 in Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 04 Apr 1774 in Salisbury,
Litchfield, CT. She was the daughter of 418. Samuel Munger and 419. Sarah Hand.
Child of Caleb Woodworth and Jane Munger is:
104
i.
Selah Woodworth, born 11 Aug 1750 in Salisbury, Litchfield, CT; died 25 Oct 1823 in Mayfield, Fulton,
NY; married Rebecca Dunham 30 Dec 1773 in Salisbury, Litchfield, CT.
79
210. Jacob Dunham, born 08 Apr 1727. He was the son of 420. Daniel Dunham and 421. Rebecca
Norton. He married 211. Elizabeth Pettee.
211. Elizabeth Pettee, born 18 Apr 1735. She was the daughter of 422. Jonathan Pettit and 423. Hannah.
Child of Jacob Dunham and Elizabeth Pettee is:
105
i.
Rebecca Dunham, born 12 Jan 1755 in Sharon, CT; died 03 Jun 1836 in Mayfield, Fulton, NY; married
Selah Woodworth 30 Dec 1773 in Salisbury, Litchfield, CT.
216. Israel (Jacob) Linsley, born 08 Mar 1711/12 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 04 Jun 1778 in
Branford, New Haven, CT. He was the son of 432. Jonathan Linsley and 433. Dorcas Phippen. He married
217. Priscilla Wheadon 06 Jul 1739 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
217. Priscilla Wheadon, born 12 Aug 1718 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 05 Nov 1775. She was the
daughter of 434. John Wheadon and 435. Mary Crowfoot.
Child of Israel Linsley and Priscilla Wheadon is:
108
i.
Abraham Linsley, born 17 Feb 1744/45 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 01 Mar 1817; married
Elizabeth Barker 18 Nov 1766 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
218. Capt. Timothy Barker, born 23 May 1723. He was the son of 436. Lt. Daniel Barker and 437.
Keziah Moulthrop. He married 219. Hannah Baker 09 Aug 1744.
219. Hannah Baker, born 08 Apr 1723. She was the daughter of 438. Samuel Baker and 439. Mercy
Schellinx.
Children of Timothy Barker and Hannah Baker are:
109
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Elizabeth Barker, born 07 Mar 1745/46; married Abraham Linsley 18 Nov 1766 in Branford, New
Haven, CT.
Hannah Barker, born 12 Apr 1748.
Timothy Barker, born 05 Apr 1750.
Philemon Barker, born 16 Feb 1754.
Joseph Barker, born 08 Apr 1755.
Notes for Joseph Barker:
CAPTURED BY THE INDIANS BY JOSEPH BARKER
Mr. Barker in his life states that he was born of poor, but respectable Parents, in the town of Branford,
twelve miles East of New Haven, Connecticut, on the Sea-board and after having arrived at the age of
maturity, he emigrated to Brandon, Rutland County, Vermont; where he married the daughter of Capt.
Solomon Tuttle, and after having settled there on a farm, he states that his father, who was advanced in
years, having no family, and being in reduced circustances, also emigrated to Brandon and took up his
residence with him prefering rather to spend the few remainder of his days, under the roof of his son,
than with strangers--and having resided there about ten years, there was a general dread of there being an
attack by the British and Indians. The country was new, but the inhabitants were on the continual look
out, that they should not be taken by surprise, but it being late in the autumn, and a body of snow upon
the earth, they flattered themselves they were safe, at any rate until spring. But Oh! Man, boast not of
thyself tomorrow, for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth, for Providence in his wisdom, had
seen fit to ordain it otherwise. For it was in the latter part of November, in the yer 1777 or 78, a body of
Indians, reached the house of Mr. Noah Strong, residing in the North East corner of the town of
Brandon, distant about seven miles from my farm, but finding that Mr. Strong was confined by a very
severe wound, occasioned by an axe, having nearly separated his foot from his leg, and as they could not
manage for to take him along as a prisoner, on account of the wound, at that inclement season of the yer,
they did not confine him, only taking what they wanted to refresh themselves with, and proceed on their
march, taking all prisoners that came within their grasp. They then reached the farm of Mr. Robbins,
where there were only four brothers, and two of the brothers, endeavored to make their escape, in
crossing a tree that lay across a stream of water near their house, and the log being very slippery, they fell
in and before they could reach the opposite side, the Indians shot them, and having taken their scalps, the
other two submitted and were made prisoners. It now came my turn to suffer, and should I be spared a
thousand years in this world, I could not tell my feelings at that moment. I think that it was about noon,
as I went to the east door of my house, to throw out some shaving water (as I was getting ready to go to
the town of Rutland, which was distant from where I resided almost twelve miles, to obtain some articles
for my wife, as in those days the country was but thinly populated, and it was a considerable distance
80
before you could reach a store, as she was in a very delicate state of health and expected every hour to be
confined) and there being a rise of ground, I could see nearly one hundred rods from my door, and what
was my amazement when casting my eye in that direction, I beheld a solitary Indian, leaping over a
knoll, and giving a war-whoop, as soon as he discovered my residence. I closed the door as speedily as
possible, and having a first rate hunting gun, I seized it with the intention of blowing his brains out, and
although, much alarmed I did not cummunicate the sad tidings to my wife, until I opened the door the
second time, with the purpose of giving him the contents of my gun, when horrid to relate I perceived a
body of Indians and British coming like Demons, from the lower regions, sweeping destruction every
step they took. As soon as I cast my eye on such a body of savages I hastened back and replaced my gun,
before they had time to see that I had it or knew what my intentions were--for had they seen me with a
waspon of defence, my life would have been the forfeiture immediately. I then being most frantic for the
safety of my dear wife, and little daughter aged fourteen months (I recommended them to the care of that
being who will not suffer a hair of our head to fall to the ground, without His notice) I exclaimed, my
dear Martha, we are lost, the bloodhounds are close upon us. I then went out, and ran towards the
Indians, who had raised their muskets to shoot me, when I made a humble sign with my hand that I
surrendered. They then took me prisoner, and proceeded to the house, and began their deeds of cruelty
by killing my horse, cows, sheep, and all the livestock that I possessed. After they had killed the cows,
they cut them up, and cooked what they wanted, and refreshed themselves, all the time desplaying a
demoniac character, and showing their savage propensities. After they had satisfied their appetite with
what they could find, they commence their plunder, and took everything they could put their hands on
and destroyed and amonst the rest they took a feather bed, and having ripped open the tick, they took the
bed out of doors, and scattered the feathers to the four winds of heaven, setting up a most hideous yell,
and dancing with joy at seeing the feathers taking their flight to the regions above. They even took the
little articles that my dear wife had prepared for a particular occasion (already alluded to) and seemed to
be delighted to think they had plundered her of them. But what could we do, we were in the power of
mosters in human shape, and therefore put our trust in Him who sees and knows all things. After some
time, my wife, finding that the Savages would not return them, she went to a British officer, and
supplicated him with tears in her eyes, to consider the state she was in, and to make the Indians give
those few articles, she stood so much in need of--after many entreaties, wherein she portrayed in the most
delicate traits of the female character, to the Officer, her situation, and supposing that he had, for
instance, a mother, sister, or wife, in the hands and at the mercy of unfeeling barbarians, what would be
his feelings, did he know that they were treated in such a manner? Therefore she hoped, at any rate, he
would fulfil the golden maxim, of "doing unto others, as he would they should do unto him"--this at last
awakened him to a sense of his duty. He relented, and made the Indians restore those things to her that
would not have been the least benefit to them, and were to her precious. They then set fire to my
dwelling, and began to make preparations to take up their line of march--and the British officer informed
my dear companion, that she could go to the lame man's house, (alluding to Strong's, seven miles distant,
and for me, I was to be taken with the rest of the prisoners to Canada--therefore two of the most robust
Indians were chosen to guard me, and two also to take charge of my poor old father, who was with us,
when the Indians made the attack. The officer then allowed me and my dear companion to take farewell
of each other. Oh! My God, what were our feelings at that moment, I am certain I cannot express, and
language is too feeble to state; there we were separated by a merciless band of robbers, murderers, and I
cannot express any appellation too cruel to call them--our property all destroyed, and probably never to
meet again, this side of eternity--and my poor companion left to travel and but thinly clad with our little
daughter in her arms, seven miles, snow on the ground, and within an hour or two of the setting sun-without a friend or protector. It almost drove me to madness, but I had reason sufficient to know that I
must command my temper, or be forever lost; I therefore committed my dear companion to the care of
our heavenly Father, and beseeched of her to keep up courage, and not to sink under her trials and he
would support us through all our troubles, and I had no doubt but we should be spared to meet again, as
His hand, and His are, were powerful and able to save to the uttermost.
I shall now proceed to give an account of the sufferings and trials that my dear companion had to endure
after we were separated, previous to stating my critical situation, and in what manner through the
goodness of a kind and allseeing Providence, I made my escape the second night after I had been taken
into captivity. It was as I stated before within an hour or two of the setting sun, that I was torn away by
these savage monsters, from my dear wife and child, they had to go in one direction, and I in another.
They told my wife that she might go to the lame man's house, which was Strong's, seven miles distrant,
(as I have stated before). She started with her dear babe closely embraced in her arms, fourteen months
old; and in her trying situation to find the house of Strong. As she had never been there before, and the
country being very new, she had no guide but marked trees, and footpaths; (and her mind being that
disturbed state that few women could hardly have been expected to have borne their trouble with so
much fortitude but she placed her confidence beyond this world) she proceeded on until the shades of
night began to prevail, and all the world was clothed in darkenss, except what reflection the snow made,
and becoming bewildered and worn out with fatigue, sad to relate, she lost her way:
"The cold winds swept the mountain's height,
And pathless was the dreary wild,
81
And mid the cheerless gloom of night,
A mother wandered with her child,
As through the drifted snows she pressed,
The babe was sleeping on her breast.
And colder still the winds did blow,
And darker hours of night came on,
And deeper grew the drifts of snow,
Her limbs were chill'd, her strength was gone,
O God! she cried in accents wild,
If I must perish save my child!"
But a kind Providence protected her, for during her distress, and thinking very moment she must perish,
and could not get on further, she accidently (or may I more properly say providentially) reached a place
where the Indians had been that day, and destroyed a house previous to reaching ours; and finding a few
branches, my dear companion got into the cellar, and building a fire took up her quarters and before
morning without the aid or assistance of a living soul, she was delivered of a daughter; and to show how
mysterious the ways of Providence are to us poor mortals, and although thinly clad, and at the inclement
season of the year, and situated as she was yet they were all preserved; and remarkable to relate that child
is still living, and afterwards married Mr. Artemas W. White, in Paris, Oneida County, New York,
upwards of thirty years ago; and now resides in the town of Byron, Genessee County, --and is the mother
of a numberous family and when a small girl, and went to school, if any person would ask her where she
was born, she would look at them, and say with a smile, "why in the woods to be sure". My dear wife
remained in that situation, until the next day at noon, when Capt. Daniels, her brother-in-law, came to
her rescue, and taking her, although very feeble with the child behind him, and carried them to Strong's,
which was about four miles; as she got out of the path, the evening previous when we parted. The
manner in which Capt. Daniels discovered her was as follows: he resided in the south-west corner of the
town, and being a remote corner of the said town, the Indians did not surround that section; but he,
together with the few neighbors that lived in that section, finding what devastation the Indians had
committed, went to look after their friends and relatives; when distressing to relate, Capt. Daniels found
that we had been amonst the sufferers, and immediately went to the house of Mr. Strong, as he
understood all the women had been sent there, (whilst the men had been taken prisoners) and not finding
my dear companion, he went in pursuit and found her as I have before stated in the cellar where she was
delivered of her child. My companion remained at the house of Mr. Strong, until I reached there, which
was within a few days after my capture. I shall now proceed to relate how I made my escape. After
having bid farewell to my dear companion and embraced my child, finding that I had to go with the
Indians, I concluded within my oun mind that I would pretend to be very submissive and do every thing
that I could to ingratiate myself in the good graces of the two savages who had me in their custody; but I
would never go to Canada, and before I would I'd suffer death. I therefore layed many plans, to see in
what manner I could make my escape as I was determined to get my freedom, and at last fell upon this
expedient in which I proved successful. We traveled the first evening about four miles, and camped at a
place, known in those days by the name of Brown's Camp on Otter Creek, in the same township where I
resided. I was at this time in the prime of life, and was considered very active, and therefore I suppose
that was the reason that two athletic Indians were my guards. After having encamped and we came to lay
down to rest, I was placed between these two Indians, and a cord put over my breast, and one over my
thighs, and then, covered with a blanket, on which the Indians layed, so that if I attempted to stir, it
would awaken them; but I intended to do everything with discretion. I now therefore, commenced the
first part of my operations, so as to take my flight, as soon as circumstances would allow. The Indians
being weary, shortly after we had stretched out, fell asleep, I then began to make the most hideous noise I
could; I grunted, growned, twisted, turned in every shape and attitude, as if I was in a great deal of
distress, and I pretended to be sick, I did not allow them to shut their eyes again during the night, and
they seeing my distress, and that they could not rest, they seemed to take a little compassion and made
me a kind of herb tea, thinking that would ease me, and they could rest, but it was entirely uselesss; and
the more they did for me, the worse I went on, as I was determined they should not sleep, as by keeping
them awake, I was satisfied they would be sleepy the next night and then I would endeavor to escape;
and by this mean I did succeed.
When day dawned and they came to me, and enquired how I felt, and if I would eat something, I replied
I felt much better, and eat a little, and made myself as attentive to do every thing that was wanted to be
done, as I possibly could, they to try me, would send me to draw water, and do other menial offices,
finding me so submissive, but at the same time to try if I would not endeavour to run away; but they kept
a good watch over me, and my not showing the least dispostion, it would put them a little off their guard.
We now took up our march, and nothing of any consequnce worth relating took place during the day,
except we kept pretty much all together, traveling through the dreary woods, and occasionally we
travelled along the banks of Otter Creek, and we encamped on this ever memorable night (to me) near
Middlebury Falls, between twenty and thirty miles, (as the woods were in those days if they might be
called by that name) from my former residence. I was very particular to do every thing, that was in my
power to please them during the day, and after we had made camp fires, and had taken some refreshment,
82
they prepared to lie down. But Oh! what were my thoughts, I cannot state for my own sufferings I
considered them as mere ciphers when I thought of my poor wife, in her situation, and my little daughter,
and not knowing to what extremity she might be driven after we parted but I put my trust in Him who is
willing and ready to save all that call upon His name in sincerity, and being well satisfied that my guard
would sleep sound that night, I was determined to make my escape, or forfeit my life in the attempt,
another thing that distressed me much was my poor aged father. I did not dare to communicate to him
my prospect, as I well knew that I could not rescue him, and therefore I kept my plans, sunk deep within
my own breast none but the One above knowing my most secret thoughts and after taking off my shoes,
and taking sight of a large Elm tree, that was within a rod of where we were to lay, I laid down between
the two Indians with the cords around me, the same as the night previous, only that instead of laying in a
straight position, I raised up both of my legs, so as to give me room, and to keep them as far off from me
as possible. As I expected they were soon wrapped in sound sleep, and after I was perfectly satisfied that
their sleep was reality, by their tremendous snoring, I began in a very careful manner to straighten myself
from under the blanket, and clear of them; then taking my shoes I gave one leap and got to the large Elm
tree, that I spoke of, between me and the Indians; where stopping a moment and finding they did not stir,
I put on my shoes, but I was in dread, as they were up at the other two camps, each side of up, and when
I sprang I was fearful that I might be discovered from those Camps, and they would fire on me; but to my
utter astonsihment, and overwhelming joy, I found that I had not been perceived; this was about nine
o'clock, of a clear, cold, star-light night, when I once more found myself clear of those hell-hounds, but
knew there was no time to be lost, for if I should be retaken, my doom was inevitable. I therefore,
commended to retrace my steps, towards my family, as I did not dare to take the path we came, for fear of
being pursued. I traveled this way until the day dawned, and then in the most careful manner, made for
the path, that I trod the day before; but in quite a different situation to what I was then in. After some
time I struck the path, and having nothing to molest me, I proceeded on until I reached where but a day
before had stood my domicile, but now was nothing but a heap of ruins. I then continued making my
way on to the dwelling of my brother-in-law, Capt. Daniel's, as I knew they had not been molested by the
Indians, and by the protecting hand of a kind Providence, although faint and weary, having eaten but
little during my captivity, and nothing since I made my escape, I reached there towards evening, and Oh!
with what demonstration of joy did they receive me. I was there informed by my brother-in-law,
concerning my dear companion, and the manner in which he found her after our sad calamities, and how
he took her to the house of Mr. Strong, as I have given the particulars before. I was to proceed
immediately to my dear wife, but being so exhusted they turned a deaf ear to my petition, (as they knew
my wife was as comfortable as could be expected) and therefore I consented to tarry until the next
morning, when I arose somewhat refreshed from my night's rest, having had no sleep nor appetite for the
last three days, and two nights, and nature was nearly exhausted, and proceed on to the house of Mr.
Strong. I had to walk, as in those days horses were scarce in that part of the country; and although it was
ony a few miles, time hung heavy, and the distance seemed to be much further than what it really was;
and Oh! could I have had the wings of a dove, how much sooner should I have embraced the dear
companion and sufferer with me in my misfortunes, to my bosom; but I had to submit, and have patience,
until I could reach the house, which was not very long after I got under way. When I arrived at Mr.
Strong's, I found my dear companion as comfortable as could be expected, after she had undergone what
she had, and when she first cast her eyes upon me, she screamed out, not knowing whether to believe her
senses, or whether it was my apparition standing before her-but when I enfolded her in my arms, she
rested her head upon my bosom and it was many minutes, before we could speak to each other, and she
then bursting into a flood of tears, exclaimed my dear husband, how did you excape? I was fearful I
should be left with two poor helpless orphans, a widow but thanks be to God, He has been merciful to
me a sinner, having heard and answered my supplications for your welfare and safe return. I then my
dear reader, related to her, what I have already stated to you. Concerning my poor old father, I never
beheld him again, he reached Canada, but soon went "to that bourne from whence no traveler returns".
Torn away from us by a ruthless bank, to close his eyes in a strange land, and among the enemies of his
country. My little daughter who was about fourteen month old when my property was destroyed, and
was with her mother on that awful night that she took shelter in the ruins of the house that she found
when she lost her way in going to Strong's, grew up and married a Mr. Timothy Putman, in the town of
Paris, Oneida county, New York, and had four children by her husband who is now deceased, and she
remains a widow, and resides at this time in the town of Aurora, Erie County, near Buffalo. My wife had
at this time two brothers, Jesse and Soloman Tuttle, in the army, and who were at the ever memorable
battle of Bunker-Hill. The few settlers that were in this part of the Country, after I returned, determined
to evacuate their homes, for fear of the Indians, and go into that part of the state that was more thickly
populated, and for that purpose we emigrated to the South-East section of Vermont, within the vicinity of
Shaftsbury, and Benington; where we remained until after the war, and then returned once more to our
habitations. I then commenced work, rebuilt me a new log-house (and as the country was new we had a
great many trials and difficulties to encounter). I remained for about twelve years, and improved my
farm, and as the country became more thickly populated, I at last concluded I would sell my property as
it would pay me well, and once more emigrate into the town of Paris, Oneida County, New York, where I
resided about twenty-five years--and where my two daughters were married as I have already stated. I
83
then sold my farm, in the town of Paris and removed to Westmoreland, Oneida county, within a few
miles of Rome, where I again purchased a farm, and remained a few years, and having a good offer for
the same, and getting to be advanced in years, and having children married and settled in the town of
Byron, Genessee County, my companion and self thought we would prefer to settle, and spend the few
remaining days that we might yet have here on earth, near them. I therefore sold out, and once more
purchased another farm, in Byron, where I improved my property and resided about twelve years.
This closes the life of the Narrator, and Mr. Solomon Barker, continues the narrative by saying that his
father, after residing in the town of Byron, for upwards of twelve years, departed this life, in the month of
August eighteen hundred and twenty-four or five, aged abut seventy-seven and that his mother had
fifteen children having lost the first born previous to the depredations committed by the Indians upon
them- and after the birth of his sister in the woods, his father returned and his mother had twelve more, of
which he is one--and that to the best of his knowledge there are eleven now surviving, being seven
brothers, and four sisters. His mother he says, was always a pious woman, and a member of the Baptist
church, ( and there is no doubt but that her firm reliance in the atoning blood of the Lamb, supported her
through many trials and afflictions, in transitory world, and prepared her for a blessed immortality) and
having survived the companion of her early choice, and sufferings, about eight years, was suddenly
called from time to eternity, but she could in her last moments say "death has no sting, nor the grave no
victory over me", my trials and afflictions which have been many, are ended, and I shall soon be at restand having taken farewell of those around her, she resigned her breath to Him who gave it, in the month
of May or June, in the year 1831 or 1832, aged about sixty-seven, and was followed to the grave by a
numberous circle of relatives and friends, who lamented their loss-but what was loss to them, was, it is to
be trusted, much glory to her. Her body was deposited by the side of my father, in a burying ground, that
was situated on my father's farm, as he previous to his death, granted an acre of land to the town of
Byron for that purpose.
Joseph Barker the author of the above was a son of Capt. Timothy Barker and a brother of Eliabeth
Barker who married Abraham Linsley.
The above was copied from a manuscript in the possession of Miss Etta Wilbur of Lansing Mich. Her
mother was a Barker but as when or how the manuscript came possession of the family she did not know.
Copied in 1931 by T.G. Foster.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Jonathan Barker, born 26 Jan 1757.
David Barker, born 15 Jun 1759.
Rhoda Barker, born 20 Nov 1763.
220. Edward Cadman, born 26 May 1725 in Dartmouth; died 1816. He was the son of 440. William
Cadman and 441. Amy. He married 221. Sarah Seabury 03 Jun 1753 in Little Compton,.
221. Sarah Seabury, born 04 Dec 1732 in Tivertown; died 18 Sep 1797 in Austerlitz, NY.
Notes for Edward Cadman:
"Edward (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) the sixth child of William (3) and Amy Cadman was born
in Dartmouth May 28, 1725 (D. 54), and was married to Sarah Seabury of Little Compton by the Rev. Nathaniel
Searl, Justice of the Peace, June 3, 1753 (Vital Records of Rhode Island by Arnold 4: Little Compton 17). The
intentions of the marriage were published March 24, 1753. (Vital Records of Rhode Island by Arnold 8 Little
Compton 52) but under the name of Codman. Putnam in vol. 9 page 228 states that "family records state that she
married Edward Cadman and that family tradition and records are wrong for there are no records of the
marriage." Obviously the compiler of the article considered only the one entry wherein the name is spelled
Codman and made no other search to discover the entry of the intention of Edward Cadman and Sarah Seabury.
This definite contradictory statement has caused considerable difficulty among the descendants and this is
probably the origin of the often repeated and erroneous statement that Edward Cadman married "Salley Sebra" a
combination of the common name for Sarah and a contradiction of her family name. Sarah Seabury was the
daughter of Joseph (3) Seabury, Martha (2) Pabodie, Elizabeth (1) Alden, born in Tivertown Dec. 4. 1732. (P. 8:
11). She died at the home of her son John Cadman Sept. 18, 1797 in Austerlitz, N.Y.
Edward Cadman was in Austerlitz a few years before the Revolution (C. 380) and in 1778 his name appears
among the signers of a petition of the Association of Exempts of Claverack who have held civil or military
commissions or are over fifty years of age and agree to form a company to be under command of men chosen by
and from their own organization (G.C. 3: 625; G. C. 4: 240). He was a shoemaker and a farmer and died in 1816.
(C. 345) To Edward Cadman and his wife Sarah (Seabury) Cadman were born ten children."--WILLIAM
CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing,
Michigan, 1935
Children of Edward Cadman and Sarah Seabury are:
84
i.
Phebe Cadman, born 10 Oct 1753; married Turner Calkins 05 Jan 1775; born 05 Nov 1736.
Notes for Phebe Cadman:
"Phebe (5) Edward (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman was born Oct. 10, 1753 (M. Dsc. 4:
19). She was the second wife of Turner Calkins and was married Jan. 5, 1775. (M. Dsc. 19). Turner
Calkins had eight children by his first wife and thirteen by his second wife Phebe (Cadman) Calkins.
(New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 49: 19) Turner Calkins was born Nov. 5, 1736 (M.
Dsc. 4: 19), the seventh child of Stephen and Sarah (Calkins). Calkins whoe mother, Sarah Turner, was
a grand daughter of Mary Brewester, the grand daughter of Elder Brewster of the Mayflower. He died
Jan 27, 1797 in his sixty first year. (New York Genealogical and Biograhical Record) Phebe Cadman
Calkins lived to be over 100 years of age. (M M. 33)--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND
HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
ii.
Joseph Cadman, born 1754; died 13 Mar 1781.
Notes for Joseph Cadman:
"Joseph (5) b. 1754. He was born in the city Eight, Rhode Island, the exact date not of record (War
Department, Adjutant Gen'l office or Veteran's Bureau, Washington, D.C.) His age is given as 16 on an
undated muster roll of men raised out of a regiment commanded by Peter Van ness in Albany County
N.Y. for reenforcing the army of the United States, in persuance to an act of the legislature of the State of
New York passed the 24th of June, 1780. Joseph Cadman is again listed as a private on the rolls of
Capt. Peter Muller's Company, 3rd regiment, New York Levies, commanded by Colonel Morris Graham.
He enlisted for three months and was discharged Sept. 29, 1780. (War Department...) His last residence
was Green River Albany County, New York. (War Department...) No further record of Joseph (5) is
found except the date of his death, March 13, 1781 (B.P.) There is a family tradition that he was killed
in the war, but this has not been verified. Joseph never married."WILLIAM CADMAN OF
PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan,
1935
110
iii.
iv.
John Cadman, born 1755; died 12 Apr 1803; married Phoebe DeWolf.
Edward Cadman, died 03 Mar 1781.
Notes for Edward Cadman:
"Edward (5) The date of his birth has not been determined but he died March 3, 1781 (b.P.). Family
traditions state that he and his brother Joseph (5) were both killed in the war. No verification of this
statement is obtainable from recognized authorities. He never married."--WILLIAM CADMAN OF
PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan,
1935
v.
Lydia Cadman, born 23 Sep 1758; died 09 Jul 1802; married Benoni Ford.
More About Lydia Cadman:
Burial: Middleville, Herkimer, NY
More About Benoni Ford:
Burial: Middleville, Herkimer, NY
vi.
George Cadman, born 07 Oct 1760; died 10 Jan 1839 in Mayfield, Montgomery, NY; married Desire
Beebe 03 Jan 1785; born 19 Nov 1765 in New London, CT; died 10 Mar 1863 in Barkersville, Saratoga,
N.Y..
Notes for George Cadman:
"George (5) Edward (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman was born Oct. 7, 1760 in
Dartmouth, Mass. (War Department). While residing in Spencertown, a part of which was called
Hillsdale County (later Austerlitz, Columbia County) New York, with his father, whose name does not
appear on the pension records he enlisted and served as a private with the New York troops as follows:
from December 1, 1777 five months in Captain McConnagil's company, Colonel Alden's (probably
meant for Van Alen) Regiment. From May 1779 he served two months in Captain Mallory's Company
and from September 1779 three months in Captain Barrett's Company, under Major McKinstry. (War
Department)
After the Revolution, he moved from Spencertown, New York to the adjoining town of Canaan N.Y.
where he resided for several years thence to Milton, Saratoga County, New York and resided there about
six years; thence to Providence, Saratoga County, where he lived for seven years; thence he moved to
Mayfield, Montgomery County, N.Y. (War Department)
George Cadman was allowed a pension on his application executed Sept. 20, 1832, while residing in
85
Mayfield, Montgomery Co., where he had then lived for six years.
He died January 10, 1839, in Mayfied, Montgomery County and was buried there. (War Department)
He married on January 3, 1785, Desire Beebe who was born Nov. 19, 1765, New London, Conn. She
was allowed a pension on her application which was executed January 21, 1840, while residing in
Mayfield, N.Y. where she lived until 1855 (War Department). She was born in New London, Conn. and
died March 10, 1863 at Barkersville Saratoga N.Y. and is buried there.
The census of 1790 lists him as of Claverack, Columbia County New York, his household consisting of
one male over 16, one male under 16 and two females.
In 1780, George Cadman with his brother John, both of Claverack are signers of a petition to Gov.
Clinton. In his petition the signature appears George Cadmon and the signature of John is Dadmond. (G.
C. 5: 930)--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by
Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
More About George Cadman:
Burial: Mayfield, Montgomery, NY
More About Desire Beebe:
Burial: Barkersville, Saratoga, N.Y.
vii.
viii.
Rebecca Cadman
Sarah Cadman, born 29 Oct 1767; died 21 Feb 1835; married Peter Havens 23 Sep 1784; born 14 Apr
1762; died 29 Jul 1841 in Somerset Twp, Hillsdale, MI.
Notes for Sarah Cadman:
Sarah (5) Edward (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman was born October 29, 1767.
((Revolutionary Soldier of Hillsdale County, Michigan) and died Feb. 21, 1835, aged 67. She married
on Sept. 23, 1784 Peter Havens who was born April 14, 1762. He died in Somerset Township Hilldale
County, Michigan and is buried on the Curtis farm in Wheatland Township, Hillsdale County Michigan
on July 29, 1841 (Revolutinary Soldiers of Hillsdale County, Michigan)
Peter Havens enlisted near Otsego Lake New York in June 1779 and served as a private under
Lieutenant Henry Dodge in Colonel Lewis Dubois New York Regiment, and was transferred to Captain
Henry Vanderburgh's company Colonel Philip Van Cortland's Second New York Regiment; he was in
the battle of Newton and was at the seige of Yorktown, and was discharged June 7, 1783 (War
Department) He was allowed a pension on his application executed May 1, 1818 then aged fifty and
living in Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York. 1820 he referred to his wife as fifty four years of age
and his daughter (Sintha) was fifteen years of age and his son Peter was born March 23, 1809 (War
Department)
In 1839 he was a widower and moved to Michigan with his son Peter, and in 1840 he gave his address
as Gambleville Hillsdale county Michigan (War Department) His son Daniel served in the war of 1812
and died at Fort George (Revolutionary soldiers of Hillsdale County Michigan)--Theodore G. Foster
More About Peter Havens:
Burial: Wheatland Twp, Hillsdale, MI
ix.
x.
Hannah Cadman
Christopher Cadman, born 16 Feb 1770.
222. Simon DeWolf, born 22 Jan 1718/19 in Lyme, New London, CT. He was the son of 444. Josiah
DeWolf and 445. Anna Waterman. He married 223. Lucy Calkins.
223. Lucy Calkins, born 05 Aug 1723. She was the daughter of 446. Stephen Calkins and 447. Sarah
Calkins.
Child of Simon DeWolf and Lucy Calkins is:
111
i.
Phoebe DeWolf, born 05 Nov 1750 in Lyme Twp, New London, CT; died Aft. 1803; married John
Cadman.
224. Daniel Pettingill, born 05 Jan 1704/05 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA. He was the son of 448. Daniel
Pettingell and 449. Mary Stickney. He married 225. Abigail Leonard.
225. Abigail Leonard, born 29 Jan 1705/06. She was the daughter of 450. Uriah Leonard and 451.
Abigail Stone.
86
Children of Daniel Pettingill and Abigail Leonard are:
112
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Lemuel Pettengill, born 16 Nov 1729 in Stoughton, Norfolk, MA; died 27 Oct 1798 in Westminster, CT;
married Zerviah Smith 04 May 1762 in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
Solomon Pettengill, born 31 May 1735.
Abigail Pettengill, born 26 Jul 1737.
Nathaniel Pettengill, born 1740.
Elkanah Pettengill
John Pettengill
Hannah Pettengill
226. John Smith, born 20 May 1719 in Canterbury, Windham, CT; died 03 Nov 1762 in Canterbury,
Windham, CT. He was the son of 452. Richard Smith and 453. Mary Cleveland. He married 227. Mehitable
Adams 26 Feb 1740/41 in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
227. Mehitable Adams, born 1719 in Medfied, MA; died 16 Mar 1749/50 in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
She was the daughter of 454. Samuel Adams and 455. Mary Plimpton.
Child of John Smith and Mehitable Adams is:
113
i.
Zerviah Smith, born 07 Nov 1741 in Canterbury, Windham, CT; married Lemuel Pettengill 04 May 1762
in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
228. Benjamin Fitch, born 22 Aug 1719 in Long Society, New London, CT; died 12 Jul 1780 in Franklin,
New London, CT. He was the son of 456. Benjamin Fitch and 457. Hannah Reade. He married 229.
Zipporah Haskell 24 Mar 1742/43 in Norwich, New London, CT.
229. Zipporah Haskell, born 11 Apr 1723 in Norwich, New London, CT; died 08 Dec 1795 in Pawlet,
Vermont. She was the daughter of 458. Roger Haskell and 459. Sarah Safford.
Children of Benjamin Fitch and Zipporah Haskell are:
114
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Daniel Fitch, born 28 May 1744 in Norwich, New London, CT; married Lucy Giddings.
Joseph Fitch, born 05 Aug 1746.
Benjamin Fitch, born 19 Feb 1748/49.
Desire Fitch, born 10 Oct 1751.
Sarah Fitch, born 27 Jul 1754.
Lemuel Fitch, born Dec 1757.
Roger Fitch, born 1759.
Elisha Fitch, born 21 Jul 1765.
230. James Giddings, born Apr 1725. He was the son of 460. Nathaniel Giddings and 461. Sarah Lee.
He married 231. Lucy Rockwell.
231. Lucy Rockwell, born Jun 1718.
Children of James Giddings and Lucy Rockwell are:
115
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Lucy Giddings, born 10 Aug 1749 in Preston, Connecticut; died 12 May 1814 in Pawlet, Vermont;
married Daniel Fitch.
Abigail Giddings, born 1744.
John Giddings, born 1740.
Anna Giddings, born 1746.
Abiah Giddings, born 03 Sep 1748.
Sarah Giddings, born 1754.
James Giddings, born 1756.
Susannah Giddings, born 1758.
Joseph Giddings, born 05 Apr 1759.
232. John Gregory, born 1705 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 1786 in Cranberry, Norwalk, CT. He was
the son of 464. John Gregory and 465. Sarah Seeley. He married 233. Mary Smith 30 Apr 1726.
233. Mary Smith, born 1707 in Jamaica, Long Island, NY; died in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT. She was the
daughter of 466. Ebenezer Smith and 467. Clement Denton.
Children of John Gregory and Mary Smith are:
87
116
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
Seth Gregory
John Gregory, born 25 Jan 1726/27.
Ebenezer Gregory, born 19 Mar 1728/29.
Mary Gregory, born 08 Mar 1731/32.
Sarah Gregory, born 20 Oct 1734.
Abraham Gregory, born 15 Sep 1736.
Seelev Gregory, born 09 Dec 1739.
Phebe Gregory, born 01 Mar 1740/41.
Elizabeth Gregory, born 21 Nov 1743.
Hannah Gregory, born 02 Dec 1745.
Charity Gregory, born 11 Apr 1749.
Hezekiah Gregory, born 13 May 1752 in Cranberry, Norwalk, CT; died 06 Nov 1834 in New Lisbon,
Otsego, New York; married Abigail Benedict 19 Nov 1776 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
234. Thomas Benedict He was the son of 468. Thomas Benedict and 469. Millison Hyatt. He married
235. Abigail Scrivner.
235. Abigail Scrivner
Child of Thomas Benedict and Abigail Scrivner is:
117
i.
Abigail Benedict, born 1752 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 12 Jul 1836 in New Lisbon, Otsego, New
York; married Hezekiah Gregory 19 Nov 1776 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
240. Henry Sharpsteen, born 03 Jan 1741/42 in Dutchess County, New York; died 1818 in New York. He
was the son of 480. Johan Jacob Sharpsteen and 481. Maria (Marjye) Busch. He married 241. Phebe Losee
22 Mar 1764 in New York.
241. Phebe Losee, born 1746 in Oyster Bay, New York. She was the daughter of 482. Peter Losee and
483. Abigetje Lewis.
Notes for Henry Sharpsteen:
Henery Sharpstein the oldest child of Jacob and Mary Bush Sharpstein was probably born about 1742 or 43,
as his marriage to Phebe Lose is recorded as March 22, 1764. He lived in the town of Washington, Dutchess
County, New York, and during the Revolution he served in the 4th Regiment of Dutchess County Militia.
The census of 1790 lists the household of Henery Sharpstone of the town of Washington, Dutchess Co., N.Y.
as consisting of four males over sixteen, one male under sixteen, and eight females and one slave. It is probable
that his oldest son and his family were residing with him at the time of the census, for John Henery was married
and had two and possibly three children. He is not listed elsewhere.
Authorities:
Early N.Y. Marriages, p. 347.
N.Y. in the Revolution, p. 244
Records of Dr. H. Sharpsteen
From the notes of Theodore G. Foster
Children of Henry Sharpsteen and Phebe Losee are:
120
i.
ii.
iii.
John Henry Sharpsteen, born 08 Oct 1766 in Town of Washington, Duchess, New York; died 25 Apr
1848 in Leicester, Livingston, New York; married Jane Simpson.
Peter Sharpsteen, born 09 Sep 1771; died 14 Sep 1845.
Sarah Sharpsteen, born 1781.
Generation No. 9
384. Ephraim Foster, born 09 Oct 1657 in Ipswich, MA16; died 21 Sep 1746 in Andover, MA17. He was
the son of 768. Abraham Foster and 769. Lydiah Burbank. He married 385. Hannah Eames.
385. Hannah Eames18, born 18 Dec 166119; died 08 Jul 173120. She was the daughter of 770. Robert
Eames and 771. Rebecca Blake.
Notes for Ephraim Foster:
EPHRAIM FOSTER (Abraham, Reginald), b. Ipswich, Mass., October 9, 1657; m. _____, 1677, Hannah Eames,
88
dau. of Robert, b. 1661, d. July 8, 1731 ; m. 2d, Jan. 8, 1732, Mary West, of Bradford, wid. of John West. He
was a blacksmith.
"One of the prominent names in the early town history [of Andover, Mass.,] was Ephraim Foster. He was a
grandson of Reginald Foster, a citizen of Ipswich of some consideration, and who is said by genealogists to have
been descended from an ancient family of Forsters, mentioned by Walter Scott in his tales and ballads of Scottish
border warfare. Ephraim Foster was a man conspicuous in the town matters of Andover, although not connected
prominently with the military or the civil history. He seems, judging from the numerous documents in his
handwriting, to have excelled as a scribe, and to have been versed in the art of punctuation, then little known to
the majority of town officials. His favorite point was the colon, with which his papers are plentifully besprinkled,
without regard to grammatical or rhetorical construction. This characteristic appears in the 'Proprietor's Records,'
where his handwriting occurs. Some of the family estates were in the east part of North Andover, one of the
ancient homesteads (that afterward occupied by J. M. Hubbard, Esq., and noted for the large and beautiful elm
tree, still vigorous) was Ephraim's residence. He d. September 21, 1746. Res., Andover, Mass., in that part now
North Andover."--Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 130.
Children of Ephraim Foster and Hannah Eames are:
192
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
Hannah Foster, born 28 May 1681.
Hannah Foster, born 15 May 1684.
Jemima Foster, born 25 Feb 1685/86.
Ephraim Foster, born 12 Mar 1687/88 in Andover, Essex, MA; died 08 Apr 1738 in Andover, Essex,
MA; married Abigail Poore 11 Jan 1715/16 in Newburyport, Essex, MA.
John Foster, born 26 Mar 1690.
Gideon Foster, born 13 May 1692.
David Foster, born 18 Apr 1694.
Moses Foster, born 27 Sep 1696.
Aaron Foster, born 21 Apr 1698.
Joshua Foster, born 13 Mar 1701/02.
Ruth Foster, born 09 Mar 1703/04.
386. Joseph Poore, born 04 Oct 1653 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; died 1732 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA.
He was the son of 772. John Poore, Sr. and 773. Sarah ?. He married 387. Mary Wallington 06 Aug 1680 in
Newbury, Essex, MA.
387. Mary Wallington, born 22 Apr 1663 in Newbury, Essex, MA; died in Newbury, Essex, MA. She was
the daughter of 774. Nicholas Wallington and 775. Sara Travers.
Notes for Joseph Poore:
Will probated 6/4/1735
Joseph, b. Oct. 4, 1653, who had ten children; but none of his sons, as we have discovered, had any children. He
resided in Newbury, excepting a short time in Rowley, about 1700; was a weaver; also bought and sold lands, and
owned lands in Newbury, Salisbury and Rowley at times. His son-in-law, Ephraim Foster, was appointed admr of
his estate, Nov. 18, 1732, who rendered acct. June 4, 1735, and the estate was divided among his widow (Mary
Poor) , and 5 children that survived, the husbands of whom were all living. He m. Aug. 6, 1680, Mary, dau. of
Nicholas Wallingford, b. Aug. 29, 1663. Her father was a seaman, residing in Newbury, when taken captive at
sea, and never returned. His wife's mother was Sarah, dau. of Henry and Bridget Travers, of Newbury.
On November 1709 Joseph was a signatory to a petition of the children of the late Nicholas Wallington to the
Massachusetts governemnt. This petition is described in more detail under Nicholas' record.
Joseph was a weaver. They resided in Newbury, Mass. except for a short time in Rowley about 1700. Their first
child was unnamed and was born and died in 1683. He was called Joseph Sr. in the Newbury town records to
distinguish him from another Joseph who was having children around the same time.
Notes for Mary Wallington:
Mary Wallington was born in either Newbury or Rowley, Mass. 15 or 22 August 1663. Newbury records give the
22nd, and Rowley records the 15th. Mary died after 18 November 1732, at approximately 69 years of age. (She
was alive when her husband wrote his will on that date.)
She married Joseph Poore, 6 August 1680, in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.
89
When Mary was sixteen she appeared as a wtiness in a trial against William Fanning of Newbury. On 28 August
1679 Caleb Moody made a complaint against said Fanning and his wife of several misdemeanors. He clamed that
Fanning was "overgone with excessive drinking" and was quarrelling with his wife and threatening her and calling
her "whore, devill, etc." Sarah Moody and Mary Wallington gave statements that "as they were going by the
house to fetch the Cowes, in the moring, Goodwife ffaning coming forth & beginning to complaine of he husband
to them: he swore God damme my soule, if you speake a work I will knock out your braines."
A Mary Poor married William Pisbury on 15 November 1737 in Newbury. This may be our Mary or it could be
another Mary Poore entirely. It is only the fact that the marriage took place two years after her husband's death
that makes it seem at all likely. More research is necessary into the local Pilsbury family.
Children of Joseph Poore and Mary Wallington are:
193
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Unknown Child Poore, born 1683.
Joseph Poore, born 25 Sep 1685.
Benjamin Poore, born 07 Nov 1687.
Sarah Poore, born 12 May 1690.
Mary Poore, born 12 Aug 1692.
Abigail Poore, born 01 Aug 1695 in Newbury, Essex, MA; died 28 Aug 1747 in Brookfield, Mass;
married Ephraim Foster 11 Jan 1715/16 in Newburyport, Essex, MA.
Hannah Poore, born 03 Apr 1698.
John Poore, born 01 Aug 1701.
Lydia Poore, born 14 Mar 1703/04.
Judith Poore, born 08 Jul 1708.
388. Capt. Henry Dwight, born 19 Dec 1676; died 26 Mar 1732 in Hatfield, MA. He was the son of 776.
Timothy Dwight and 777. Hannah Flynt. He married 389. Lydia Hawley 27 Aug 1702.
389. Lydia Hawley, born 07 Jul 1680; died 27 Apr 1748. She was the daughter of 778. Capt. Joseph
Hawley and 779. Lydia Marhsall.
Notes for Capt. Henry Dwight:
Capt. Henry Dwight (son of Capt. Timothy Dwight of Dedham, Mass., and Anna Flint, dau. of Rev. Henry Flint
of Braintree, Mass.), b. Dec. 19, 1676, was a farmer and trader at Hatfield, Mass., and a man of wealth and
standing. He was also, for several years, a judge of the County Court. He m. Aug. 27, 1702, Lydia Hawley, b.
July 7, 1680 (dau. of Capt. Joseph Hawley of Northampton, Mass., and Lydia Marshall). She d. April 27, 1748,
aet. 68. He d. March 26, 1732, aet. 55.
In copies of wills and deeds found in "The Sutton Papers" he is at different times in the earlier part of his history
designated as "a clothier" and "shopkeeper." He was always a farmer. At all times, even when honored as a
judge, he was known best int he community by his military title.
The Dwights of that day figured largely in Western Massachusetts as jurists. Five of them, all closely related to
each other, sat at different times as justices upon the bench of the same court, that of common pleas, of
Hampshire Co., Mass. These were Capt. Henry Dwight of Hatfield, Col. Timothy Dwight of Northampton, his
nephew, two sons of Capt. Henry Dwight, namely, Col. Josiah Dwight of Springfield and Genl. Joseph Dwight of
Gr. Barrington and Major Timothy Dwight of Northampton, son of Col. Timothy Dwight and father of Prest.
Dwight of Yale. They held the judicial office successively in the order in which they are here named. See
"Washburn's Judicial History of Massachusetts." Washburn makes the mistake of supposing the 2d term (174857) of Col. Timothy Dwight to indicate still another Timothy (No. 3) in a grand succession, and enumerates,
accordingly, six judges of the name instead of five, the true number. Capt. Henry Dwight was judge for five years
(1727-31. Compare the date of his death). Col. Timothy Dwight held the office twice (1737-41 and 1748-57).
Col. Josiah Dwight sat on the bench for 18 years (1750-68, the date of his death). Genl. Joseph Dwight was judge
in Hampshire County from 1753 to 1761, when the county was divided, at which time he was made judge of the
new county of Berkshire (Washburn wrongly calls it Worcester Co.), which office he held until his death in 1765.
He was also judge of probate of Berkshire co. for 16 years (1758-74). In two different instances two Dwights sat
as associate judges on the smae bench, as: first, from 1750 to 1757, Col. Timothy Dwight and Col. Josiah Dwight,
his cousin; and secondly, from 1758 to 1761, Major Timothy Dwight and Genl. Joseph Dwight, second cousins to
each other. In one instance a son, Major Timothy Dwight, immediately succeeded (1758) his father, Col.
Timothy Dwight, in the judeship, whose second term of office expired by his resignation of it in 1757. In two
other instances two sons of the same father succeeded him in the office, the younger one, Col. Josiah Dwight,
following him first. But, strangest of all, three Dwights sat for four years together as judges upon the same bench
90
(1753-7), as by comparing the agreement of their separate official terms will at once appear: Col. Timothy
Dwight (1748-57); Col. Josiah Dwight (1750-68); and Brig. Genl. Joseph Dwight (1753-61). One of these
judges, Genl. Joseph Dwight, was judge at different times in three different courts, those in the counties of
Worcester, Hampshire, and Berkshire. Such a judicial history cannot, it is believed, be paralleled in any other
family of the land.
It is a strong proof of the higher estimate in which military rank was held in the times preceeding the revolution,
that each of these judges was commonly degisnated by his military instead of his judicial title, in which way,
therefore, each of them is uniformly spoken of in this book. Two of this family of judges were Chief Justices:
Col. Timothy Dwight and Brig. Genl. Joseph Dwight.
It was in the following way that Nathaniel Dwight of Northampton and Henry Dwight of Hatfield, brothers, were
induced to remove from their paternal home at Dedham to Western Massachusetts: "The General Court had given
to the town of Dedham eight thousand acres of land, to be located anywhere within the jurisdiction of the court, in
exchange for 2,000 acres granted by that town to the Natick Indians, converted under John Eliot. Lieut. Fisher
and John Fairbanks were appointed commissioners to examine the country and locate the claim. This they did,
and selected Deerfield as the spot, and employed Major John Pynchon of Springield to purchase their lands of the
Petumtuck tribe of Indians, taking him in, with some others also, as joint proprietors with them in the purchase.
He paid the Indians some L94 and a half as purchase-money, which had been raised for the purpose by the people
of Dedham." Thus was it that the lowlands of the Connecticut in Western Massachusetts became early known at
Dedham, and thus that the course of the two chief progenitors of the Dwight Family in the third generation
became determined thitherward.
Capt. Henry Dwight was active in the subsequent purchase of the territory, comprising now the towns of Gt.
Barrington, Sheffield, Egremont, Aldord, etc., in what is now Berkshire Co., Mass. A copy of the original deed
of purchase and sale may be found in vol. 8 N.E. Geneal. Register, p. 215, as given by Conkepot, Poneyote,
Partarwake, Naurnanquin, and other Indians, "all of Ousatonack, for four hundred and sixty pounds, three barrels
of cider and thirty quarts of rum," to Col. John Stoddard, Capt. Henry Dwight and Capt. Luke Hitchcock,
"committee appointed by the General Court to purchase a certain tract of land lying upon Housatonack river."
That land was cheap at Hatfield at that time, and that he was disposed to purchase it largely, appears from the
fact that in June 1722, he purchased 1,200 acres for L180 (or three English shillings per acre).
In 1726 he and Jamor John Pynchon of Springfield, and John Ashley of Westfield, Mass., were appointed, by
the General Court, commissioners under "the Act prepared for issuing L100,000 in bills of credit" for government
purposes.
From records at Northampton it appears that he had a negro slave, Humphrey, for whom he paid L60, and a
slave woman, Rose, of like cost to him.
None but men of means and enterprise could be traders in those dyas; and none but the best men in the
community, "gentlemen", in the technical sense that the word then had, and deacons, were icensed then "to be
innholders, taverners and common victualler, and to retail strong krink." Capt Henry Dwight was thus licensed in
1728, as was Col. Samuel Partidge before him, who was one of the great men of Western Massachusetts and
Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas for Hampshire Co. for 30 years (1706-36). Dea. Aaron Lyman of
Belchertown (who m. Eunice Dwight, dau. of Rev. Josiah Dwight of Woodstock, see page 541), was licensed
likewise in 1728, as was also, in the same year, Genl. Joseph Dwight (son of Capt. Henry Dwight), then living in
Springfield, Mass. How greatly has American society generally moved forward since that day to better things.
Who would wish now to go back in any respect to the pioneer days of our still new but already great republic?
The communion-service now used by the Congregational Church at Hatfield is said to have been given to it by
Capt. Henry Dwight 150 years ago, or more.
Notes for Lydia Hawley:
It will interest the descendants of Capt. Henry Dwight to read an account of his wife's marriage-outfit, which the
author found at Northampton.
"An account of goods Lydia Hawley had at her marriage and since." They were had of David Wilton, and the
account was made out after his decease by her father. The prices given are the cost prices of the articles to him.
By adding 100% to them, the pay-price given by Mr. Hawley to Mr. Wilton will be made manifest. Behold then
the account:
Five suits of good aparel not valued.
L s d
L s d
Bible.........................0 8 0
Skillet..........................0 6 0
Kettle........................2 0 0
Frying-pan.................0 5 0
do. ..........................0 15 0
Iron Pot.......................0 6 0
91
Warming-pan...........0 13 0
7 pillow cases............0 16 0
6 plates.....................0 8 0
3 bath-cloths...............0 8 0
Basin ........................0 4 0
20 napkins..................1 13 4
6 platters ..................1 8 0
2 chests...................... 2 4 8
6 porringers...............0 8 0
2 wheels (spinning?) 0 8 0
1 do. ......................0 1 0
6 chairs ...................... 0 10 8
6 spoons ...................0 3 0
Trammel slice--tongs 0 14 0
1 funnel ......................0 1 0
2 heaters .................... 0 1 4
1 quart pot .................0 4 0
1 pail ............................ 0 0 0
1 candlestick & earth
Wooden-ware..............0 2 8
enware......................0 3 0
Bread tub ......................0 2 0
Sieve bottom..............0 1 0
Brass skimmer and
Pillion and cloth..........0 16 0
trencher........................0 2 8
Bed, bolster & pillows 3 0 0
A pair pot-hooks .........0 2 0
Coverlid & 2 blankets 2 0 0
Jackspit........................ 0 1 8
Curtains and valance.. 2 0 0
2 cows (40s & 46s).... 4 6 0
6 pair sheets.................5 0 0
The whole amounting when doubled, as all but two or three articles were, to L48 12s., or $242.--The Hostory of
the Descendants of John Dwight, of Dedham, Mass. by Benjamin W. Dwight, Vol. II, 1874, pages 624-625.
Children of Henry Dwight and Lydia Hawley are:
194
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Brig. Gen Joseph Dwight, born 16 Oct 1703; died 19 Jun 1765; married Mary Pynchon.
Seth Dwight, born 18 Aug 1707; died 09 Jun 1774.
Dorothy Dwight, born 17 Sep 1709; died 12 Jan 1744/45.
Lydia Dwight, born 25 Apr 1712; died 25 Jan 1748/49.
390. Col.. John Pynchon, born 15 Oct 1674; died 12 Jul 1742. He was the son of 780. John Pynchon and
781. Margaret Hubbard. He married 391. Bathshua Taylor 18 Feb 1701/02.
391. Bathshua Taylor, born 11 Jan 1682/83; died 20 Jun 1710. She was the daughter of 782. Edward
Taylor and 783. Elizabeth Fitch.
Notes for Col.. John Pynchon:
Col. John Pynchon, Jr. b. in 1674, m. Feb 18, 1702, Bathshua Taylor, b. in 1683 (dau. of Rev. Edward Taylor of
Westfield, Mass., and Elizabeth Fitch his first, dau. of Rev. James Fitch of Norwich, Ct.). She d. June 20, 1710,
aet. 27, and he m. for 2d wife, Nov. 3, 1711, Phebe Sexton of Enfield, Ct., b. Jan. 7, 1686. She d. Oct. 17, 1722,
aet. 36.
He is called in the records of him "a man of great improvements in Springfield and the neighboring towns, and
in laying out the lands in Springfield and Suffield, Enfield and Longmeadow." He was also one of the
commissioners of the united colonies. He was a trader. He. d. July 12, 1742, aet. 68.--The History of the
Descendants of John Dwight of Dedham, Mass. by Benjamin W. Dwight, Vol. II, 1874, page 631.
Child of John Pynchon and Bathshua Taylor is:
195
i.
Mary Pynchon, born 10 Oct 1706; died 29 Mar 1751; married Brig. Gen Joseph Dwight.
394. Samuel Maxwell He married 395. Hannah Squire.
395. Hannah Squire
Child of Samuel Maxwell and Hannah Squire is:
197
i.
Jane Maxwell, born 22 Sep 1731 in Rehoboth, Bristol, MA; married Noah Millard.
400. John Seymour, born 1679 in Norwalk, CT; died 1746 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT. He was the son of
800. Thomas Seymour and 801. Hannah Marvin. He married 401. Sarah Gregory.
401. Sarah Gregory, born 15 Sep 1678 in Norwalk, CT. She was the daughter of 802. Jachin Gregory
and 803. Mary.
92
Notes for John Seymour:
JOHN SEYMOUR (Thomas, Richard), of Norwalk, Conn., born at Norwalk, died there in the summer of
1746. He married first SARAH GREGORY, born at Norwalk 15 Sept. 1678, daughter of Jacin (John) ; and
secondly, abut 1723/24, HANNAH (HIGGINBOTHAM) GOLD widow of John Gold, Jr., and daughter of
Richard and Elizabeth (Munson) (Cooper) Higginbothom.
In his will, dated 28 Apr. 1746, with two codicils dated 5 May and 26 May 1746, and proved 5 Aug. 1746,
he names wife Hannah and son John Seymour of Norwalk (who are apppointed executors), daughter Mary
Hanford and her husband Thomas, to whom is given land bordering on land formerly belonging to the testator's
brother Matthew, "other four" daughters, viz., Sarah Trowbridge, Abigail Selleck, Rebecca Bouton, and Martha
Jarvis, and grandsons John Seymour (under twenty-one) and Munson Jarvis, son of Samuel and Martha Jarvis.
The amount of the inventory, 4797 pounds 10s., shows an unusually large estate.--A History of the Seymour
Family, by Donald Lines Jacobus, 1939, p.47-48.
Children of John Seymour and Sarah Gregory are:
200
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
John Seymour, born 1710 in Norwalk, CT; died 08 Sep 1796 in Norwalk, CT; married (1) Ruth Belden;
married (2) Elizabeth Wood.
Mary Seymour
Sarah Seymour
Abigail Seymour
Rebecca Seymour
Martha Seymour, born 1726.
402. William Belding, born 26 Dec 1671. He was the son of 804. Daniel Belding and 805. Elizabeth
Foote. He married 403. Margaret Arms.
403. Margaret Arms, born 06 Oct 1683. She was the daughter of 806. William Arms and 807. Joanna
Hawks.
Child of William Belding and Margaret Arms is:
201
i.
Ruth Belden, born 18 Jan 1712/13 in Norwalk, CT; died 29 May 1782 in Norwalk, CT; married John
Seymour.
404. Simon Smith, born 02 Aug 1662 in Hartford, CT. He was the son of 808. Joseph Smith and 809.
Lydia Hewett. He married 405. Hannah Bliss 01 May 1689 in Hartford, CT.
405. Hannah Bliss, born 26 Dec 1666 in Hartford, CT. She was the daughter of 810. Samuel Bliss and
811. Mary Leonard.
Children of Simon Smith and Hannah Bliss are:
202
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Hannah Smith, born 31 Jan 1689/90 in Hartford, CT; died 14 Nov 1719 in Bloomfield, Hartford, CT.
Lydia Smith, born 07 Aug 1691 in Hartford, CT.
Simon Smith, born 1693 in Hartford, CT.
Elizabeth Smith, born 1697 in Hartford, CT.
Margaret Smith, born 1699 in Hartford, CT.
Ebenezer Smith, born 08 Feb 1701/02 in Hartford, CT.
Margaret Smith, born 15 Sep 1704 in Hartford, CT.
Dr. Elisha Smith, born 30 Jun 1706 in Hartford, CT; married Ruth Seymour.
Jemima Smith, born 11 Dec 1708 in Hartford, CT.
Martha Smith, born 20 Feb 1709/10 in Hartford, CT.
406. Thomas Seymour, born 12 Mar 1667/68. He was the son of 812. John Seymour and 813. Mary
Watson. He married 407. Ruth Norton.
407. Ruth Norton, born 1675. She was the daughter of 814. John Norton and 815. Ruth Moore.
Child of Thomas Seymour and Ruth Norton is:
203
i.
Ruth Seymour, born 10 Nov 1707; married Dr. Elisha Smith.
408. Jonathan Morehouse, born 01 Jan 1677/78 in Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 816. Jonathan
Morehouse and 817. Mary Wilson. He married 409. Rebecca Hull 08 Aug 1706 in Stratfield, CT.
93
409. Rebecca Hull, born 1688. She was the daughter of 818. Samuel Hull and 819. Deborah Beers.
Children of Jonathan Morehouse and Rebecca Hull are:
204
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Jonathan Morehouse, born 09 Mar 1707/08.
Rebecca Morehouse, born 02 Feb 1709/10.
Martha Morehouse, born 26 Jan 1711/12.
Jabez Morehouse, born Jun 1714; died 1753 in Ridgefield, Fairfield, CT; married Mary DeHart 09 Nov
1738 in Ridgefield, Fairfield, CT.
412. Eleazer Bouton, born Jun 1701 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 824. John Bouton and
825. Sarah Gregory. He married 413. Elizabeth Seymour 1721.
413. Elizabeth Seymour, born Abt. 1696. She was the daughter of 800. Thomas Seymour and 801.
Hannah Marvin.
Children of Eleazer Bouton and Elizabeth Seymour are:
206
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Ezra Bouton, born 18 Nov 1723; married Mary Bouton 28 Jun 1749.
Hezekiah Bouton, born 02 Nov 1725.
Eleazer Bouton, born 02 Feb 1727/28.
Elizabeth Bouton, born 08 Feb 1729/30.
416. Benjamin Woodworth, born Aug 1649 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA; died 22 Apr 1728 in Lebanon,
Connecticut. He was the son of 832. Walter Woodworth and 833. Elizabeth Rogers. He married 417. Hannah
Damon.
417. Hannah Damon, born 02 Dec 1672 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA. She was the daughter of 834. John
Damon and 835. Martha Howland.
Notes for Benjamin Woodworth:
On the 23rd day of June 1692, Benjamin sold his land at Scituate, his second wife Hannah signing the deed with
him, and he removed to little Compton, Bristol County, Massachusetts Bay, where his brother Isaac had preceded
him.--Wall Family Tree ([email protected])
Child of Benjamin Woodworth and Hannah Damon is:
208
i.
Caleb Woodworth, born 22 May 1704 in Lebanon, Connecticut; died 30 May 1780 in Salisbury,
Litchfield, CT; married Jane Munger.
418. Samuel Munger, born 1662 in East Parrish, Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 05 Mar 1716/17 in
Guilford, New Haven, CT. He was the son of 836. Nicholas Munger and 837. SarahHall/Hull. He married
419. Sarah Hand 11 Oct 1688.
419. Sarah Hand, born 02 Mar 1663/64 in East Parrish, Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 01 Aug 1751. She
was the daughter of 838. Joseph Hand and 839. Jane Wright.
Notes for Samuel Munger:
Samuel Munger was a farmer. Member of the Congregational Church. "In 1696, was permitted to build a
"Sabbath day house" on the rock back of Lieut. Bradley's house. -- The Munger Book by J.B. Munger. Savages
Gen Dict.
Children of Samuel Munger and Sarah Hand are:
209
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Samuel Munger, born 07 Feb 1689/90.
Joseph Munger, born 19 Jan 1692/93.
Sarah Munger, born 16 Mar 1694/95.
Delieverence Munger, born 12 Mar 1696/97.
Nathaniel Munger, born 26 Feb 1698/99.
James Munger, born 01 May 1701.
Ann Munger, born 01 Feb 1702/03.
Jane Munger, born 27 Feb 1704/05 in Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 04 Apr 1774 in Salisbury,
Litchfield, CT; married Caleb Woodworth.
94
420. Daniel Dunham, born 1677. He married 421. Rebecca Norton.
421. Rebecca Norton, born 03 Feb 1682/83.
Child of Daniel Dunham and Rebecca Norton is:
210
i.
Jacob Dunham, born 08 Apr 1727; married Elizabeth Pettee.
422. Jonathan Pettit, born Oct 1693. He married 423. Hannah.
423. Hannah
Child of Jonathan Pettit and Hannah is:
211
i.
Elizabeth Pettee, born 18 Apr 1735; married Jacob Dunham.
432. Jonathan Linsley, born 1676 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 03 May 1725 in Branford, New
Haven, CT. He was the son of 864. John Linley and 865. Hannah Griffin. He married 433. Dorcas Phippen
24 Sep 1706 in Milford, New Haven, CT.
433. Dorcas Phippen, born 22 Dec 1678 in Salem, Essex, MA; died 05 May 1760 in Wallingford, New
Haven, CT. She was the daughter of 866. Joseph Phippen and 867. Mary Stanford.
Child of Jonathan Linsley and Dorcas Phippen is:
216
i.
Israel (Jacob) Linsley, born 08 Mar 1711/12 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 04 Jun 1778 in
Branford, New Haven, CT; married Priscilla Wheadon 06 Jul 1739 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
434. John Wheadon, born Sep 1694 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut. He was the son of 868.
Thomas Wheadon and 869. Hannah Sutcliffe. He married 435. Mary Crowfoot 10 Jan 1716/17 in Branford,
New Haven, Connecticut.
435. Mary Crowfoot, born 11 Jan 1694/95 in Weathersfield, Hartford, CT. She was the daughter of 870.
Joseph Crowfoot and 871. Mary Hillyer Hilliard.
Children of John Wheadon and Mary Crowfoot are:
217
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Mary Wheadon, born 18 Nov 1717 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
Priscilla Wheadon, born 12 Aug 1718 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 05 Nov 1775; married Israel
(Jacob) Linsley 06 Jul 1739 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
Jonathan Wheadon, born 15 Jul 1721 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
Elizabeth Wheadon, born 27 Jul 1725 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
436. Lt. Daniel Barker, born 27 Jan 1675/76 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 25 Jan 1751/52. He was
the son of 872. Edward Barker and 873. Elizabeth Fowler. He married 437. Keziah Moulthrop 24 Aug 1701
in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
437. Keziah Moulthrop, born 16 Apr 1682 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 31 Dec 1767 in Branford,
New Haven, CT. She was the daughter of 874. Matthew Moulthrop and 875. Hannah Thompson.
Children of Daniel Barker and Keziah Moulthrop are:
218
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Joesph Barker, born 30 Nov 1702.
Daniel Barker, born 07 Jun 1705.
Hannah Barker, born 15 Nov 1707.
Keziah Barker, born 30 Apr 1710.
Lydia Barker, born 22 Dec 1712.
Samuel Barker, born 09 Feb 1714/15.
Thankful Barker, born 19 Apr 1719.
Capt. Timothy Barker, born 23 May 1723; married Hannah Baker 09 Aug 1744.
438. Samuel Baker, born 05 Apr 1702. He was the son of 876. Thomas Baker and 877. Ann Topping.
He married 439. Mercy Schellinx.
439. Mercy Schellinx, born 04 Nov 1699. She was the daughter of 878. Jacob Schellinx and 879. Hannah
Conkling.
95
Child of Samuel Baker and Mercy Schellinx is:
219
i.
Hannah Baker, born 08 Apr 1723; married Capt. Timothy Barker 09 Aug 1744.
440. William Cadman, died Aft. 06 May 1760. He was the son of 880. Richard Cadman and 881. Sarah
Almy. He married 441. Amy.
441. Amy
Notes for William Cadman:
"William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman's date of birth and of marriage are not of record. The meager
information concerning him is derived from his will which was proven May 6, 1760 (A. 269). In this will he
appointed his son George (4) as executer, mentioned his wife Amy and all of his six children. He is called of
Dartmouth.
In September, 1711, he had surveyed a parcel of land consisting of 90 acres which at that early date was
called by the surveyor, "Cadman's Neck" (N.B. 33.), an inheritance from his father. This is the parcel of land
afterwards used by the Christian Baptists as a camp meeting ground and is located in that part of the town of
Westport, Mass. now called South Westport."--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS
DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
Children of William Cadman and Amy are:
i.
Sarah Cadman, born 21 Feb 1706/07; married Jonathan Davol Abt. 1727; born 01 May 1702 in
Dartmouth.
Notes for Sarah Cadman:
"Sarah (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman was born Feb. 21, 1707. (D. 54) She married
on or before 1727, Jonathan Davol, son of Jonathan (3) Jonathan (2) William (1) and Marah (?) Davol of
Dartmouth, Mass. Jonathan (4) Davol was born in Dartmouth May 1, 1702 (A. 287). He was a weaver
and resided in Rochester, Mass. in 1739, in Dartmouth, 1741, and Tivertown, 1759. Sarah, his wife was
living in 1761."--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by
Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
ii.
Richard Cadman, born 03 Jun 1712.
Notes for Richard Cadman:
Richard b. June 3, 1712 (D. 54) There is no farther record of him. There is, however, a Richard
Cadman whose name appears in the census of 1790 as of Claverack Columbia Co. New York. His
household consisting of one male over 16 and one female. The fact that Edward Cadman, his brother,
located in Columbia Co. is very good evidence that the Richard who appears in the census of 1790 is
Richard (4) the second child of William (3). The Soule Family History published by Rev. G. T. Ridlan
Sr. gives a list of miscellaneous marriage records and among them on page 176 is the marriage of
Deborah Soule & Richard Cadman on May 16, 1738. No place or reference given. Having her born in
1712 she would have been 26 at the time of this marriage.--Theodore G. Foster
iii.
iv.
William Cadman, born 26 Oct 1715.
Christopher Cadman, born 04 Sep 1717 in Tivertown; married Hannah Seabury; born 07 Feb 1724/25 in
Tivertown; died 09 Feb 1805.
Notes for Christopher Cadman:
"Christopher (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman was born Sept. 4, 1717 (D. 54), in
Tivertown (A. 268) the fourth child of William (3) and Amy Cadman. He was a resident of Dartmouth.
The intentions of his marriage to Hannah (4) Seabury, Joseph (3) Martha (2) Pabodies; Elizabeth (1)
Alden; were on Jan 16, 1745/6 (Putnams Historical Magazine 29: 227) but no marriage date is of record.
Hannah Seabury was the second child of Joseph (3) Seabury by his second wife Mary Ladd, daughter of
William and Elizabeth (Tompkins) Ladd. (Putnams Historical Magazine 8: 10). She was born in
Tivertown Feb. 7, 1724/5. (Putnams Historical Magazine 9: 227).
Christopher (4) Cadman's will, proved Oct. 30, 1765, (Portsmouth Town Council Book 6: pat 2: 35)
was executed Feb. 16, 1764 (H. S. 130). In it he mentions his honored mother, Amy, who is to be
maintained by his wife Hannah. He also mentions all of his children. In this will he bequeaths certain
lands to his son William when he becomes twenty two years of age and mentions that Mary, Amy,
Deborah and Ruth are all unmarried at that time. (Portsmouth Town Council Book 6: 35) Christopher
(4) was the administrator of the estate of his brother George (4) who died April 20, 1765 (Portsmouth
Town Council Book 2: 22, 26). Christopher was Justice of Peace in Portsmouth in Sept. 1765. (C & M.
1: 252).
96
Hannah Cadman, wife of Christopher (4) appears in the census of 1790 as of Taunton, Mass. The
household consisting of three females. To Christopher (4) and Hannah Cadman were born seven
children all of whom were born in Dartmouth (Putnams Historical Magazine 227) except Ruth who was
born in Tivertown (Vital Records of Rhode Island 7: 62). Hannah (Seabury) Cadman died Feb. 9, 1805
in her 77th year. (Westport Vital Records 267) Her will being filed in the Bristol County Probate
Court."--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore
G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
v.
George Cadman, died 20 Apr 1765 in Portsmouth, MA.
Notes for George Cadman:
His date of birth is not of record (D. 54). On April 20, 1765 George Cadman died at Portsmouth. The
administration of his estate being given to his brother Christopher. (H. S. 21: 130) At the time of his
death he was a schoolmaster (A. 269) His estate was advertised in the Mercury of June 10, 1765. He
never married.--Theodore G. Foster
220
vi.
Edward Cadman, born 26 May 1725 in Dartmouth; died 1816; married Sarah Seabury 03 Jun 1753 in
Little Compton,.
444. Josiah DeWolf, born 15 Nov 1689 in Lyme, New London, CT; died 1767 in Lyme, New London, CT.
He was the son of 888. Simon DeWolf and 889. Sarah Lay. He married 445. Anna Waterman 14 Nov 1713 in
Lyme, New London, CT.
445. Anna Waterman, born Apr 1689 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut; died 21 Dec 1752 in
Norwich, New London, Connecticut. She was the daughter of 890. Thomas Waterman and 891. Miriam
Tracy.
Child of Josiah DeWolf and Anna Waterman is:
222
i.
Simon DeWolf, born 22 Jan 1718/19 in Lyme, New London, CT; married Lucy Calkins.
446. Stephen Calkins, born 05 Sep 1700 in Norwich, New London, CT; died 02 Feb 1734/35. He was the
son of 892. Hugh Calkins and 893. Sarah Sluman. He married 447. Sarah Calkins Abt. 1722 in Norwich,
New London, CT.
447. Sarah Calkins, born 11 Jul 1703 in New London, CT; died 03 Dec 1774. She was the daughter of
894. Jonathan Calkins and 895. Sarah Turner.
Children of Stephen Calkins and Sarah Calkins are:
223
i.
ii.
Lucy Calkins, born 05 Aug 1723; married Simon DeWolf.
Turner Calkins, born 05 Nov 1736; married Phebe Cadman 05 Jan 1775; born 10 Oct 1753.
Notes for Phebe Cadman:
"Phebe (5) Edward (4) William (3) Richard (2) William (1) Cadman was born Oct. 10, 1753 (M. Dsc. 4:
19). She was the second wife of Turner Calkins and was married Jan. 5, 1775. (M. Dsc. 19). Turner
Calkins had eight children by his first wife and thirteen by his second wife Phebe (Cadman) Calkins.
(New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 49: 19) Turner Calkins was born Nov. 5, 1736 (M.
Dsc. 4: 19), the seventh child of Stephen and Sarah (Calkins). Calkins whoe mother, Sarah Turner, was
a grand daughter of Mary Brewester, the grand daughter of Elder Brewster of the Mayflower. He died
Jan 27, 1797 in his sixty first year. (New York Genealogical and Biograhical Record) Phebe Cadman
Calkins lived to be over 100 years of age. (M M. 33)--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND
HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
448. Daniel Pettingell, born 16 Feb 1678/79 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; died 12 May 1726 in Abington,
Plymouth, MA. He was the son of 896. Samuel Pettingell and 897. Sarah Poore. He married 449. Mary
Stickney 13 Nov 1699 in Newbury, Essex, MA.
449. Mary Stickney, born 10 Jan 1679/80 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA. She was the daughter of 898. John
Atkinson and 899. Sarah Morse.
Notes for Daniel Pettingell:
"DANIEL, (Samuel, Richard) born in Newbury 16 Feb., 1679-80; died at Abington, May 12, 1726 ; married first,
Nov. 13, 1699, Mary Stickney, who died March 7, 1706-7. He married second, March 26, 1707-8, Esther
97
(Hester), daughter of Samuel and Esther French, of Salisbury, born Sept. 22, 1688 ; they were admitted to the
church May 9, 1712. They sold, March 21, 1707, land in Salisbury which she had inherited from her grandfather,
Edward French. As his widow, Esther sold land March 15, 1755. Daniel applied for a sword in October, 1700.
Daniel Pettingell of Newbury bought, Nov. 3, 1715, 60 acres of land in Abington and Bridgewater, adjoining
that of his brother John, of Jacob Nash, for 60 lbs. He removed thither; chosen constable in 1723; was a cooper
by trade.
In the name of God Amen --- I Dan Pettingale of Abington In the County of Plymouth In New England Cowper
being weak & Infirm in Body but of perfect mind & memory for wch I bless God Doe make this my last Will &
Testament Reccommending my Soul into the hands of God yt Gave it & my body to the Dust to be Decently
buryed according to the Descretion of my Executriz hereafter herein mentioned --- and as to my Worldly estate I
Dispose of In manner & forme following viz--Imprimis --- I doe give unto my beloved wife Ester the sole Improvement of my homestead till my Two sons viz
Obediah & Sam. shall arrive unto Twenty & one years of age & after that but one Third of ye Improvement
thereof, I Doe also Give unto my Wife Aforsd all my Moveable wth-in Doors & wth-out door, I Doe also order
that Right of Land wch I bought of Micah Pratt wch-lyes wth-land of Lieut. --- Reed to be sold by my Executrix
hereafter named to help pay my lawfull Debts
Item --- I Doe Give my son Akerman Pettingale fifteen pounds to be paid him by my two sons viz Obadiah &
Samuel att such time or Within a year after they shall arrive unto Twenty & one years of age to him his heirs or
assigns.
Item 3 --- I Doe Give unto my son Danl Pettingale Twenty pounds to be paid him or his heirs wth-in Two years
after my Two sons viz Obadiah & Samuel shall arrive unto Twenty & one years of age, by my two sons last
mentioned.
Item 4 --- I Doe Give unto my son Obadiah Pettingale one Third part of my homestead wn he shall arrive unto
Twenty & one years of age & also one halfe of that third part wch his mother is to have the improvement of
During her life after her decease to him his heirs & assigns forever.
Item 5 --- I Doe give unto my son Samuel Pettingale one Third part of my homestead wn he shall arrive unto
Twenty & one years of age & also one halfe of that third part wch his mother is to have the improvement of
During her life after her Decease to him his heirs & assigns forever.
Item 6 --- I Doe Give unto my son John Pettigale Twenty pounds to be paid to him his heirs or assigns wth-in
Six years after my Two sons viz Obadiah & Saml---shall arrive unto Twenty & one years of age
by my Two sons last mentioned.
Item 7---I Doe Give unto my son Joseph Pettingale to his heirs or assigns Twenty pounds to be paid by my two
sons viz Obadiah & Sam wth-in Seven years after they shall arrive unto Twenty & one years of age
Item 8---I Doe Give unto my Daughter Mahetabell Pettingale to her her heirs & assigns Twenty pounds to be
paid by my Two sons Obadiah & Sam Pettingale wth-in Three years after they shall arrive unto Twenty & one
years of age--Item 9---I Doe Give unto my daughter Mary Pettingale Twenty pounds to be paid unto her her heirs or assigns
by my two sons viz Obadiah & sam Pettingale wth-in four years after they shall arrive unto Twenty & one years
of age
Item 10---I Doe Give unto my daughter Ester pettingale Twenty pounds to be paid to her or her heirs or assigns
by my two sons viz obadiah & Sam Pettingale wth-in five yers after they shall arrive unto Twenty & one yers of
age
Item 11---I Doe Give unto my daughter Joanna Pettingale to her her heirs or assigns Twenty pounds to be paid
by my two sons viz Obadiah & Sam Pettingale wthin eight years after they shall arrive unto Twenty & one years
of age
Item 12---I Doe Give unto my daughter Sarah Pettingale Twenty pounds to be paid unto her her heirs or assigns
by my two sons viz obadiah & Sam Pettingale wth-in nine yers after they shall arrive unto Twenty & one years of
age---And I Doe hereby oblige my sd two sons & their heirs to pay out the Severall Legacys before mentioned
according to ye times before herein specified therefor, as also the Legacy next mentioned.
Item 13--I Doe Give unto my son Benjamin Pettingale (wch should have been before mentioned) Twenty pounds
to be paid to him his heris or assigns wth-in Seven years after my Two sons viz Obadiah & Sam Pettingale shall
arrive unto Twenty & one years of age by my sd Two sons Last mentioned.
And I doe hereby ordain and appoint my beloved wife Ester aforesd to be the sole executrix of this my Last Will
& Testament and I Doe hereby make void all other former wills made by me & Declare this to be my Last Will &
Testament on this Twelfth day of May Anno Dom. 1726 & in the twelfth year of our Sovereigne Lord George
King of England &c.,
Note yt---before signing & sealing hereof there in Interlined In page 1 between lines 17 & 18 the follwing
98
words viz Obadiah & Sam Shall--DANIEL PETTINGALE (Seal)
Signed sealed Published & Declared In the presence of
Samll Noyes
Thomas Tirrell
John Noyes
Notes for Mary Stickney:
"Amos Stickney married Sarah Morse in 1663 and eight children were born to them. Amos Stickney died in
August 1678 in Newbury. Mary (who became Daniel Pettingale's wife) was born Jan 10 1680--about two years
and five months after Sarah's husband's death!! This info comes from "The Records and Files of the Quarterly
Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts" which includes the record of a three year court battle waged by Sarah
Morse Stickney against one John Atkinson in an attempt to have him deemed the father of Mary. However
testimony in the case seems to indicate that the father could have been any one of three men! (John Atkinson's
wife called her "an impudent baud" in open court!)...John Atkinson was judged by the court to be Mary's father
and ordered to pay Sarah maintenance. But three years later the record was ordered expunged from the court
record and he was relieved of the payments."--Martha Pettengill ([email protected])
Children of Daniel Pettingell and Mary Stickney are:
224
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Akerman Pettingill, born 30 Jun 1700.
Daniel Pettingill, born 05 Jan 1704/05 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; married Abigail Leonard.
Mehitable Stickney Pettingill, born 07 Mar 1705/06.
Mary Pettingill, born 05 Mar 1706/07.
450. Uriah Leonard, born 10 Apr 1686. He was the son of 900. Uriah Leonard and 901. Elizabeth
Caswell. He married 451. Abigail Stone.
451. Abigail Stone, born 09 Jul 1689. She was the daughter of 902. William Stone and 903. Hannah
Walley.
Child of Uriah Leonard and Abigail Stone is:
225
i.
Abigail Leonard, born 29 Jan 1705/06; married Daniel Pettingill.
452. Richard Smith, died 12 Sep 1742 in Canterbury, Windham, CT. He married 453. Mary Cleveland 30
Jan 1715/16 in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
453. Mary Cleveland, born 17 Mar 1691/92. She was the daughter of 906. Josiah Cleveland and 907.
Mary Bates.
Child of Richard Smith and Mary Cleveland is:
226
i.
John Smith, born 20 May 1719 in Canterbury, Windham, CT; died 03 Nov 1762 in Canterbury,
Windham, CT; married Mehitable Adams 26 Feb 1740/41 in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
454. Samuel Adams, born 25 Feb 1684/85 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 24 Apr 1742 in Canterbury,
Windham, CT. He was the son of 908. John Adams and 909. Michal Bloice. He married 455. Mary Plimpton
02 Nov 1709.
455. Mary Plimpton, born Jul 1692. She was the daughter of 910. Joseph Plimpton and 911. Mary
Morse.
Children of Samuel Adams and Mary Plimpton are:
227
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Joshua Adams, born 1710.
Abigail Adams, born 12 Nov 1712.
Amy Adams, born 24 Jul 1717.
Mehitable Adams, born 1719 in Medfied, MA; died 16 Mar 1749/50 in Canterbury, Windham, CT;
99
v.
married John Smith 26 Feb 1740/41 in Canterbury, Windham, CT.
Sanuel Adams, born 05 Oct 1719.
456. Benjamin Fitch, born 29 Mar 1691 in Mohegin, New London, CT; died 10 Oct 1727 in Long Society,
New London, CT. He was the son of 912. Samuel A. Fitch and 913. Mary Brewster. He married 457. Hannah
Reade 18 Nov 1713 in Norwich, New London, CT.
457. Hannah Reade, born Jul 1688 in New London, CT; died 19 May 1761 in Norwich, CT. She was the
daughter of 914. Josiah Reed and 915. Grace Holloway.
Children of Benjamin Fitch and Hannah Reade are:
228
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Mary Fitch, born 26 Sep 1714.
John Fitch, born 13 Jan 1715/16.
Abijah Habbijah Fitch, born 28 Dec 1717.
Benjamin Fitch, born 22 Aug 1719 in Long Society, New London, CT; died 12 Jul 1780 in Franklin,
New London, CT; married Zipporah Haskell 24 Mar 1742/43 in Norwich, New London, CT.
Benajah Fitch, born 30 Jul 1721.
Josiah Fitch, born 23 Oct 1723.
Ebenezer Fitch, born 01 Feb 1724/25.
458. Roger Haskell, born 16 Oct 1697 in Beverly, Essex, MA. He was the son of 916. Roger Haskell and
917. Hannah Woodbury. He married 459. Sarah Safford 01 Dec 1720 in Preston, New London, CT.
459. Sarah Safford, born 25 Dec 1694 in Preston, New London, CT; died 04 Apr 1729 in Preston, New
London, CT. She was the daughter of 918. John Safford and 919. Hannah Newman.
Child of Roger Haskell and Sarah Safford is:
229
i.
Zipporah Haskell, born 11 Apr 1723 in Norwich, New London, CT; died 08 Dec 1795 in Pawlet,
Vermont; married Benjamin Fitch 24 Mar 1742/43 in Norwich, New London, CT.
460. Nathaniel Giddings, born 1673. He was the son of 920. James Giddings and 921. Elizabeth
Andrews. He married 461. Sarah Lee.
461. Sarah Lee, born 1675.
Children of Nathaniel Giddings and Sarah Lee are:
230
i.
ii.
iii.
Nathaniel Giddings, born 1705.
Elizabeth Giddings, born 1715.
James Giddings, born Apr 1725; married Lucy Rockwell.
464. John Gregory, born 1677 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 18 Jan 1751/52 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
He was the son of 928. John Gregory and 929. Elizabeth Moulthroup. He married 465. Sarah Seeley.
465. Sarah Seeley, born 1680 in Jamaica, Long Island, NY. She was the daughter of 930. Robert Seeley.
More About John Gregory:
Burial: East Norwalk
Children of John Gregory and Sarah Seeley are:
232
i.
ii.
iii.
John Gregory, born 1705 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 1786 in Cranberry, Norwalk, CT; married Mary
Smith 30 Apr 1726.
Nehemiah Gregory
Sarah Gregory
466. Ebenezer Smith He married 467. Clement Denton.
467. Clement Denton, born in Jamaica, Long Island, NY.
Child of Ebenezer Smith and Clement Denton is:
233
i.
Mary Smith, born 1707 in Jamaica, Long Island, NY; died in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; married John
Gregory 30 Apr 1726.
100
468. Thomas Benedict He was the son of 936. John Benedict and 937. Phebe Gregory. He married 469.
Millison Hyatt.
469. Millison Hyatt
Child of Thomas Benedict and Millison Hyatt is:
234
i.
Thomas Benedict, married Abigail Scrivner.
480. Johan Jacob Sharpsteen, born 22 Nov 1716 in Niederbieber, Germany; died 1802 in Fiskill,
Dutchess, New York. He was the son of 960. Johan Peter Scharffenstein and 961. Maria Margaretha Bauer.
He married 481. Maria (Marjye) Busch 06 Dec 1741.
481. Maria (Marjye) Busch, born 1724 in Peoughkeepsie, Dutchess, New York. She was the daughter of
962. Johann Henrich Busch and 963. Maria Catharina Schawer.
Notes for Johan Jacob Sharpsteen:
THE SHARPSTIENS AND SHARPSTEENS OF DUTCHESS COUNTY
The name Sharpsteen has been spelled in various ways by the descendants of Jacob Sharpstone. Today it is
to be doubted if any one of his descendants spell it as he did. We find them at various times in different
generations, spelling the name: Sharpstorn, Sharpstarn, Sharpsteen, Sharpstien, Sharp, Sharpe, and Scharpe.
Sharpsteen being the prevalent way of spelling the name at the present time. No distinction is made herein, and
all are treated as Sharpsteens, regardless of the spelling of the different generations.
The family is not a large one nor can it be considered a prominent one. Very few of the earlier generations
appearing in business or public life in such a way as to obtain recognition by the compilers of town or county
histories, in the communities in which they lived. Most of them having been farmers.
No attempt has been made to connect the New Jersey Sharpenstyn family with Jacob Sharpstone of Dutchess
County N.Y., nor is the Jacob Sharpenstyn listed in the census of 1790 of Mohawk town, Montgomery County,
tied into the family in any manner. The Jacob Sharenstien of Florida, Montgomery Co., N.Y., whose will was
dated 1821 cannot be placed among the descendants of Jacob Sharpstone. It is probable that he was of the New
Jersey Sharpenstyns and those of the children of Jacob of Florida.
From the correspondence, of the descendants of Jacob Sharpstone, there has been a consistent tradition that
the immigrant ancestor settled in Dutchess County, N.Y. and in no instance, if any location has been given, has it
been otherwise.
It might be of interest here to quote from the letter written by George Gourmand Sharpsteen of Poughkeepsie,
N.Y., written February 4, 1884, to Dr. Henry Sharpsteen of Marshall, Michigan.
"As I am the only one of the name left in this County, where the first Sharpsteen settled in 1743, and have the
deed of that date now in my possession, in which the name is spelt Scharpenstien and also the chest he brought
with him from Holland, I am inclined to think all of the name must go back to him, and consequently be of one
family. So I thought I would like to know something of your ancestors. My grandfather, Peter, was born on and
owned the farm bought by Jacob Sharpenstien in 1743, with additions in 1753."
George Gourmand Sharpsteen was the son of the venerable William Sharpsteen, mentioned by Smith in his
History of Poughkeepsie. William married Sarah Lawrence, and was the first child of Peter Sharpsteen and
Deborah Gourmand.
In the early 80's and 90's Dr. Henry Sharpsteen of Marshall, Michigan, was an itinerant Doctor selling patent
medicines throughout the eastern United States, and in his travels never failed to obtain such information on the
Family as he could. After his death these records were left in his office safe for years and at the time the safe was
finally disposed of most of these records were destroyed. The few remaining were in the possession of his son,
Dr. Verne Sharpsteen, now living (1931) in Marshall, Michigan.--from the notes of Theodore G. Foster
*****************************************
Jacob Sharpenstine or Sharpstone, settled about the time of his marriage, on a farm on what is now, the town
of Washington, in the vicinity called Washington Hollow, in Dutchess County, N.Y. He was a prosperous farmer
with his home the third one above Washington Hollow, on the main road to Stanford. It adjoined the Nicholas
Bush farm. He was born about 1720.
The first mention of him is the record of the proclamation of the first of the three banns of his marriage to
Mary Bush, registered in the record of the Fishkill Reformed Church, on December 6, 1741-2. The marriage was
101
undoubtedly performed early in January. The date is not recorded.
In the Revolution he was not a loyalist though his adherence to the patriot cause may have been lukewarm.
However, he was on the rolls of the New York Militia, as were his two sons, Henry and John, but not his son
Peter. Nevertheless, in 1780, when the New York State Legislature passed an act taxing each person whose son
or sons had gone to the enemy, nine pence in the pound of the valuation of his estate, for each son, Jacob
Sharpstone paid for two such sons. His tax was 82 pounds, 10 shillings, on an assessed valuation of 2,200
pounds. One of the larger assessments, Peter was doubtless one of the Tories. Which was the other son has not
been determined. It was probably John, as Henry paid taxes in Dutchess County, N.Y., in 1779.
In 1780, Jacob Sharpsteen was named as one of the executors of the will of Henry Bush, of Charlotte,
Precent, Dutchess County, N.Y., who mentioned his daughter, Mary Sharpsteen.
The census of 1790 lists four Sharpstone families in Dutchess County, N.Y., and one Sharpstone family in
Montgomery county. The four Sharpstone families are listed as follows: Jacob Sharpstone is listed with two
males over 16, one female and two slaves. Henry Sharpstone family listed with four males over 16, one male
under 16, eight females, and one slave. Peter Sharpstone family listed with one male over 16, two males under 16
and one female. John Sharpstone family listed with one male over 16, one under 16 and four females.
the will of Jacob Sharpstone is recorded in the Dutchess County Surrogates Office, Volume B, page 346. he
is named as of Washington. The will was made December 16, 1799, and probated October 25, 1802. (The date
of his death was probably 1802).--from the notes of Theodore G. Foster.
***********************************************
Copy of the Will of Jacob Sharpstone;-IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN.
I, JACOB SHARPSTONE of the Town of Washington and County of Dutchess and State of New York,
farmer, being in perfect health and memory thanks be given to God for the same, calling unto mind the mortality
of my body and knowing that it is appointed men once to die do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament,
that is to say:
FIRST of all I give and commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it to me and my body to
the earth to be buried in a decent christianlike manner at the decreson of my executors nothing doubting but at the
general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the might power of Almighty God and as tuching such
worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life I give and demise and dispose of the same in
the following manner and form following to wit,
I give and bequeth unto my true and loving wife Mary, in case she outlives me the house wherein I now live
and the whole of my form with two cows and and all my sheep belonging to me at my death and three hundred
wate of good fat pork yearly that is to say one hundred wate by my son Henery, one hundred by my son Peter and
one hundred by my son John Sharpstone and her firewood cut and drawed to her dore and lier made by my
aforesaid three sons and to find her all other things to make her comfortable in her old age and if my aforesaid
sons doth provide for their mother as is above directed and ordered then then they are to have the full benefit of
the aforesaid farm and after my and my wife death then I give and bequeath unto my son Henery Sharpstone and
the the one equal third part of all my lands where he now lives to him and his hares and assigns forever.
ITEM: I give and bequeth unto my son Peter Sharpstone the one equal third part of all my lands and to to
have his part whare he now lives to him his hares and assigns forever and I give and bequeth untio my son John
Sharpstone the one queal third part of all my lands where he now lives to him his hears and assigns forever and I
further give unto my above named three sons all my goods and chattels and personal estate except my household
furniture to be equel divided among my aforesaid three sons to to them and there hears and assigns and in the
devishun between my son Peter and John Sharpstone the aforesaid John Sharpstone is to have the one half of my
great meadow lying south-west of my dwelling house and to be considered in the said devishun.
And I do order and it is my will that my three sons namely Henery Sharpstone, Peter Sharpstone & John
Sharpstone shall pay unto my daughter Marget wife of John Conkhite the sum of Fifty Pounds and to my daughter
Molly wife of George Cusuick the sum of Fifty Pounds and to my daughter Cathrine the wife of George Barnhart
the sum of Fifty Pounds and unto my three grandchildren sons of my daughter Hannah Dursed namely John
Harris, Daniel Bush Jacob Bush the sum of Fifty Pounds to be equel devided and my wareing aperel to be equel
102
devided among my sons and my wifes among my daughters and my daughters to have all my household furnityre
and I give unto my black woman Chat her freedom after my wifes death and to my black boy Calop his freedom at
the age of twenty-four years. My daughter Elizabeth wife of Henery German has had her fifty pounds and is to
have her equel part of my household furniture with the rest of my daughters and furder I do ordain constitute and
appoint my sons Henery Sharpstone, Peter Sharpstone and John Sharpstone and my friend John W. Allen my true
and lawful executors to see that this my last Will and Testament is done and performed according to the true
interest and meaning.
As witness Whereof I, Jacob Sharpstone have hereunto set my hand and fixed my seal and acknowledge the
same to be my last Will and Testament in the presents of us who have subscribed our names as witnesses this 16th
day of December 1799.
Jacob Sharpstone
Jacob Ostrom
Benjamin Herington his mark X
John W. Allen
(LS)
Children of Johan Sharpsteen and Maria Busch are:
240
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Henry Sharpsteen, born 03 Jan 1741/42 in Dutchess County, New York; died 1818 in New York;
married Phebe Losee 22 Mar 1764 in New York.
Margaret Sharpstone, born 1750.
Mary Sharpstone, born 09 Jan 1750/51.
Catherine Sharpstone
Hanna Sharpstone, born 1753.
Elizabeth Sharpstone, born 26 Apr 1755.
Peter Sharpstone, born 11 Jan 1757; died 01 Dec 1841.
John Sharpstone, born 06 Sep 1762; died 13 May 1822.
482. Peter Losee He married 483. Abigetje Lewis.
483. Abigetje Lewis
Child of Peter Losee and Abigetje Lewis is:
241
i.
Phebe Losee, born 1746 in Oyster Bay, New York; married Henry Sharpsteen 22 Mar 1764 in New
York.
Generation No. 10
768. Abraham Foster, born 1622 in Exeter, Devonshire, England21; died 25 Jan 1710/11 in Ipswich, MA22.
He was the son of 1536. Reginald Foster and 1537. Judith. He married 769. Lydiah Burbank 165523.
769. Lydiah Burbank24, born 07 Feb 1643/44.
Notes for Abraham Foster:
ABRAHAM FOSTER (Reginald), b. Exeter, Devonshire, England, 1622; m. 1655, Lydia Burbank, dau. of Caleb
and Martha of Rowley. He came from England with his father when sixteen years of age and located in Ipswich.
He d. Jan. 25, 1711. Res. Ipswich, Mass. Caleb Burbank was of Rowley, in 1691, and had children, John and
Lydia, and perhaps others; he is supposed to have been the son of John Burbank, who was made freeman in
Rowley, 13 May, 1640, and who in his will 5 April, 1681, mentions wife Jimima, and children, John, Caleb and
Lydia. Foster joined the church in full communion 12 April, 1674; and was seventy-six years of age, 26
September, 1698, when he gave his deposition concerning Rev. John Norton's land. He was a yeoman. There is
no will or administration of his estate, as he distributed it among his family by deed, 21 Dec., 1698 (Essex Deeds,
lib. 13, p. 206).--Pierce, Foster Genealogy, p. 124.
Children of Abraham Foster and Lydiah Burbank are:
384
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Ephraim Foster, born 09 Oct 1657 in Ipswich, MA; died 21 Sep 1746 in Andover, MA; married Hannah
Eames.
Abraham Foster, born 16 Oct 1659.
James Foster, born 12 Jan 1661/62.
Benjamin Foster, born 1670.
Ebenezer Foster, born 15 Jul 1672.
103
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Mehitable Foster, born 12 Oct 1675.
Caleb Foster, born 09 Nov 1677.
Isaac Foster, born 1668.
Child Foster
Ruth Foster
770. Robert Eames, born 1630. He married 771. Rebecca Blake 1661 in Andover, Essex, MA.
771. Rebecca Blake, born Feb 1640/41 in Gloucester, Essex, MA; died 08 May 1721 in Boxford, Essex,
MA. She was the daughter of 1542. George Blake and 1543. Dorothy.
Notes for Rebecca Blake:
Tried and convicted of witchcraft at the Andover Witch Trials on September 17, 1692; later reprieved.
The Salem witchcraft papers : verbatim transcripts of the legal documents of the Salem witchcraft outbreak of
1692 / compiled and transcribed in 1938 by the Works Progress Administration, under the supervision of Archie
N. Frost; edited and with an introduction and index by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum.
Rebecca Eames
(Mary Walcott, Mary Warren, and Ann Putnam, Jr. v. Rebecca Eames)
Mary Walcott affirmed to the grand Inquest: that Rebecca Eames hath afflicted her at the time of her
examination.
this she ownd: Sept 15: 1692
Mary Warren: & Ann Putnam: affirmed that Rebecca Eames: did afflict Mary Walcott at the time of her
examination: this they owned Sept 15. 1692.
(On Reverse)
Sept 15 1692
Affirmation agt. Rebecca Eames of }
Mary Walcott
Mary Warren
Ann Putnam {
(Boston Public Library -- Dept. of Rare Books and Manuscripts [1939 acquistion])
(Examination of Rebecca Eames and Mary Lacey Sr.)
Rebecca: Eames: examined. before Salem Majestrats: Aug'st 19: 1692 She owned she had bin in the snare a
monthe: or 2: and had bin perswqded to it: 3 monthes: & that the devil: apeared to her like a colt. very ugly: the
first: time: but she would not own: that she had bin baptized by him. She did not know but that the devil did
perswade her: to renounce god & christ & folow his wicked wayes & that she did take his Counsell: and that she
did afflict Timo: Swan: she did not know but that the devil might ask: her body & soul: & she knows not but that
she did give him soul & body: after ward she s'd she did do itt & that she would for sake god & his works: and the
devil promised her: to give her powr: to avenge her selfe on them that offended her afterward she s'd the devil
apeared to her 7 year agoe: & that he had tempted her to ly and had made her to afflict persons but she could not
tell their names that she first afflicted: Q who came w'th the devil when he made you a wittch A: a ragged girl:
they came to gether and they perswaded me to afflict: & I afflicte mary warin & an other fayr face: it is abo't a
quarter of a year agoe: I did it by sticking of pins. but did you afflict Swan: yes but I am sorry for it: Q where had
you your spear A I had nothing but an all but was it with yo'r body or spirit you came to hurt these mayds: A with
my spirit: Q but can you ask them forgivnes: A I wil fall down on my knees: to ask it: of them: She would not
own: that she signd the devils book when he askd her body & soul: but he would have had her done it not. to a
burch Rign: nor nothing: she s'd the devil was in the Shape of a hors when: he caried her to afflict: but would not
own any body went with her to afflict but the afflicted s'd her son Dan'll went with her: to afflict:
Q did you not say: the Devil babtized yo'r son Daniell. A he told me so: but: did you not touch the book nor lay
yo'r hand on book nor paper: A I layd my hand on nothing without it was a peice of board: and did you lay yo'r
hand on the board when he bid you. A yes: mary Lascy: s'd she had given her son Dan'll to the devil; at 2 years
old: & that her aperition told her so: but: she could not remember it: she was bid to take warin & lasy by the hand
& beg forgivnes & did so: & they forgave her. she s'd if she had given her son Dan'll to the devil it was in an
104
Angry fitt she did not know but she might do it nor I do not know he is a wich but I am afrayed he is: mary lascy
saw her son Dan'll stand before her & s'd Dan'll bid his mother not confess he was a Wich: his mother: did not
know she s'd but: she might se him for she saw a burlling: thing before her: Mary lascy s'd she had babtized her:
son Dan'll & that she had bin babtized in five mile Pond: she s'd the reason she feared Dan'll was a witch: was
because he used dredfull bad words when he was Angry: and bad wishes being asked: the #[s'd her] age of Dan'll:
s'd he was 28 years old: she was told she had bin long a witch: then if she gave her son to the devil at 2 years old
she woned she had bin discontented since she had bin in league: with the devil: she knew not but the devil migfht
come once a day: lik a mous: or ratt: she s'd she knew Sarah parker but did not know her to be a wich: but she
heard she had bin crosd in love & the devil had come to her & kisd her who was with you when you afflicted
Swan: A no body but my son Dan'll he was there when I came: theether: she would have Dan'll perswaded to
confes: but was told she were: best to perwade him becaus she knew him to be a wich: she was askt if she was at
the execution: she was at the hous below: the hill: she saw a few folk: the woman of the hous had a pin stuck into
her foot: but: she s'd she did not doe it: but how do you afflict: A I Consent to it: but have you bin a wich 26
years: A no I can remember but 7: years & have afflicted: about a quarter of a year: but: if you have bin a wich so
long: why did you not afflict before seing you promised to serv the devil A: others: did not Afflict before: and the
devil: did not require it: but: doth not the devil threaten: #[to tare] you #[in peices:] if you not do what he ses: A
yes he thretens to tere me in peices but did you use: to goe to meeting on sabath dayes: yes: but not so often as I
should have done: what shape did the devil Com in when you layd yo'r hand on the board: A. I cannot tell except
it was a mous #[or rat] (Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 2, Page 25)
(SECOND EXAMINATION OF REBECCA EAMES)
August 31't: 1692 present Jn'o Hathorne Jona't Corwin Esq'r
Rebeca Eames further acknowledgeth & declareth that she was baptized aboute three years agoe in five Mile
pond and that her son Daniell was also then baptized by the Divell, and that her son Daniell hath benne a Wizard
aboute thurteene Yeares and that [] Toothaker Widow, and Abigail faulkner are both Witches and that her son
and both them have benne in Company with her in Andover affliteing of Timothy Swan and further Confirmes
what she formerly acknowledged (viz) that she hath benne a wicth this 26 years and that the Divell then appeared
to her in the likeness of a black man and she then gave herselfe she sayth soul and body to the Divell and
promised to sarve & obey him and Keepe his ways and further declares that she did Then at the tyme signe to a
paper the Divell then had that she would soe doe and sayth she made a Mark upon said paper with her finger, and
the spott or Mark she made was black, and that she was then in such horror of Conscienc that she tooke a Rope to
hang herselfe and a Razer to cutt her throate by Reason of her great sin in Committing adultery & by that the
Divell Gained her he promiseing she should not be brought out or ever discovered.
the abovesaid Confession is the truth as wittnese my hand
Rebecka Emes
(The mark of Rebecka Emes]
Rebecka. Emes. signed & owned the abovesaid Conffesion to be the truth before me *John Higginson Justice of
peace. 15 Sep't 1692
(Essex Institute -- Fowler Papers)
(INDICTMENT V. REBECCA EAMES, NO. 1)
The Juriors for our Sov'r. Lord and Lady the King and Queen doe. present. That. Rebeckah Eames Wife of
Robert Eames of Boxford in the County of Essex. aforesaid In the Yeare afores'd. and divers other dayes and
times as well before as After Certaine detestable Arts Called witchcraft & Sorceries Wickedly Mallitiously and
felloniously hath used practised and Exercised at and. in the Towne of Andivor in the County of Essex afores'd. in
upon and against one. Timothy Swan afores'd. by which said wicked acts the Said Timothy Swan the day and
yeare -- afores'd. and divers other dayes and times both before and after was and Is Tortured aflicted Consumed
Wasted Pined and Tormented and also for Sundry Acts of Witchcraft by the said Rebeckah Eames Comitted and
done. Before and Since that time against the peace of our Sov'r. Lord and Lady the King and Queen theire
Crowne and dignity and the forme in the Stattute In that Case made and provided.
(Endorsement)
{Reverse} She acknowledged that she aflicted Timo. Swann. Indictm't agst Rebecka Eames for bewitching Timo
Swan
Billa Vera
(Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 2 Page 25)
(INDICTMENT V. REBECCA EAMES, NO. 2)
The Juriors for o'r Sov'r Lord and Lady the King & Queen doe present That Rebeckah Eames Wife of Robert
105
Eames of Boxford in the County afores'd About Twenty six years past in the Towne of Boxford in the County
aforesaid Wickedly & felloniously A Covenant with the evill Speritt the Devill did make in & by which Wicked
Covenant Shee the said Rebeckah Eames hir Soule & body to the Devill did give & promised to serve & obey
him & Keep his Wayes, Contrary to the Stattute Of the first yeare of the Reigne of King James the First in that
Case made & provided And Against the peace of o'r Soveraigne Lord & Lasdy the King & Queen their Crowne &
dignity Cogn.
{Reverse} Indictm't ag'st Rebecka Eames for Covenanting with the Devil Billa vera Cogn.
(Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 2. Page 26)
(PETITION OF REBECCA EAMES)
The humble Petition of Rebecka Eames unto his Excellencye S'r. W'm: Phipps knight & Govern'r of their
Majestyes Domionions in America humbly sheweth
That wheras your Poor and humble petitioner having been here closely confined in Salem prison neare four
monthes and likewise Condemned to die for the cirme of witchcraft w'ch the Lord above he knowes I am
altogether innocent and ignorant off as will appeare att the great day of Judgment having had no Evidences
against me but the Sprectre Evidences and my owne confession w'ch the Lord above knowes was altogether false
and untrue I being hrried out of my Senses by the Afflicted persons. Abigaill Hobbs and Mary Lacye who both of
them cryed out against me charging me with witchcraft the space of four dayes mocking of me and spitting in my
face saying they knew me to be an old witch and If I would not confesse it I should very Spedily be hanged for
there was some such as my selfe gone before and it would not be long before I should follow them w'ch was the
Occasion with my owne wicked heart of my saying what I did say: and the reason of my standing to my
confession att my tryall was: That I know not one word w't I said upon my Tryall att what the honourd Majestr'ts
said to me but only the Name of Queen Mary: But may it please yo'r Excellencye: when mr Matthew and mr
Brattle were here in Salem they disowned w't they before had said against me and doe still owne and say w't they
had sayd against me was Nothing but the Divellls delusions and they know nothing in the least measure of any
witchcraft by me: your poor and humble petition'r doe begg and Implore of yo'r Excellencye to Take it into yo'r
Pious and Judicious consideration To Graunt me A Pardon of my life Not deserving death by man for wichcraft or
any other Sin That my Innocent blood may not be shed and your poor and humble petitioner shall for ever pray as
she is bound in duty for yo'r health & happinesse in this life and eternall felicity in the world to come So prayes
Your poor and humble petition'r
*Rebecka: Eames
From Salem prison
Decem the 5th: 1692
(New York Public Library -- Manuscripts and Arcives Division)
REVERSAL OF ATTAINDER OCTOBER 17TH 1711.
Province of the Massachusetts Bay: Anno regni anna Regin' Decimo.
An Act to reverse the attainders of George Burroughs and others for Witchcraft
Forasmuch as in the year of our Lord one Thousand six hundred ninety two several Towns within this Province
were Infested with a horrible Witchcraft or posession of devils: And at a Special Court of Oyer and Termina
holden at Salem in the County of Essex in the same year 1692. George Burroughs of Wells. John Procter, George
Jacobs, John Willard, Giles Core, and Martha his wife, Rebecca Nurse and Sarah Good all of Salem aforesaid,
Elizabeth How of Ipswich, Mary Eastey, Sarah Wild and Abigail Hobbs all of Topsfield, Samuel Wardell, Mary
Parker, Martha Carrier, Abigail Falkner, Anne Foster, Rebecca Eames, Mary Post and Mary Lacey all of
Andover, Mary Bradbury of Salisbury, and Dorcas Hoar of Beverley Were severally Indicted covnicted and
attainted of Witchcraft, and some of them put to death. others lying still under the like sentance of the said Court
and liable to have the same Executed upon them.
The Influence and Energy of the Evil Spirits so great at that time acting in and upon those who were the principal
accusers and Witnesses proceeding so far as to cause a Prosecution to be had of persons of known and good
reputation, which caused a great disatisfaction and a stop to be put thereunto until theire Majesty's pleasure should
be known therein: And upon a Representation thereof accordingly made her late Majesty Queen Mary the second
of blessed memory by Her Royal Letter given at her Court of Whitehall the fifteenth of April 1693. Was
Graciosly pleased to approve the care and Circumspection therein; and to Will and require that in all proceedings
agt persons accused for Witchcraft, or being possessed by the devil, the greatest Moderation and all due
Circumspection be used, so far as the same may be without Impediment to the Ordinary course of Justice.
106
And some of the principal Accusers and Witnesses in those dark and severe prosecutions have since discovered
themselves to be persons of profligate and vicious conversation.
Upon the humble Petition and suit of several of the sd persons and of the children of others of them whose Parents
were Executed. Be it Declared and Enacted by his Excelency the Governor Councill and Representatives in
General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same That the several convictions Judgments and Attainders
against the said George Burroughs, John Procter, George Jacobs, John Willard, Giles Core and Martha Core,
Rebecca Nurse, Sarah Good, Elizabeth How, Mary Easty, Sarah Wild, Abigail Hobbs, Samuel Wardell, Mary
Parker, Martha Carrier, Abigail Falkner, Anne Foster, Rebecca Eames, Mary Post, Mary Lacey, Mary Bradbury,
and Dorcas Hoar, and every of them Be and hereby are reversed made and declared to be null and void to all
Intents, Constructions and purposes whatsoever, as if no such convictions Judgements, or Attainders had ever
been had or given. And that no penalties or fforfeitures of Goods or Chattels be by the said Judgments and
attainders or either of them had or Incurred. Any Law Usage or Custom to the contrary notwithstanding. And
that no Sheriffe, Constable Goaler or other officer shall be Liable to any prosecution in the Law for anything they
then Legally did in the Execution of their respective offices.
Made and Pass'd by the Great and General Court or Assembly of Her majestys Province of the Massachusetts Bay
in New England held at Boston the 17th day of October, 1711.
Whereas we the subscribers are Informed that His Excellency the Governour Honourable Council, and Generall
assembly of this province have been pleased to hear our Supplication and answer our Prayer in passing an act in
favour of us respecting our Reputations and Estates: Which we humbly and gratefully acknowledge.
And inasmuch as it would be Chargeble and Troublesome for all or many of us to goe to Boston on this affair:
Wherefore we have and do Authorize and Request our Trusty Friend the Worshipfull Stephen Sewall Esq. To
procure us a Coppy of the said act and to doe what my be further proper and necessary for the reception of what is
allowed us and to take and receive the same for us and to Transact any other thing referring to the Premises on
our Behalfe that may be requisite or Convenient. Essex. December 1771.
John Eames in behalfe of his mother Rebecca Eames; Abig'l Falkner; Samuel Preston on behalf of his wife Sarah
Preston; Samuel Osgood on behalfe of his mother Mary Osgood; Nathaniel Dane; Joseph Wilson; Samuel
Wardwell; John Wright; Ebenezer Barker; Francis Johnson on behalf of his mother Brother & sister Elizabeth;
Joseph Emerson on behalf of his wife Martha Emerson of Hauerhill; Ephraim Willds; John Moulton on behalfe
of his wife Elizabeth, the daughter of Giles Coree who suferd; Robert pease on behalfe of his wife; Annies King
on behalf of her mother; Charles Burrough eldest son; John Barker; Lawrence Lacy; Abraham Foster; John
Parker, Joseph Parker {ye sons of Mary Parker deceased]; John Marston; Thomas Carrier; John Frie; Mary Post;
John Johnson in behalf of his mother Rebecca Johnson & his sister; William Barker senr; Gorge Jacob on behalfe
of his father who suffered; Thorndik Procter on behalfe of his father John Procter who suffered; Beniamin Procter
son of the abouesd; Doarcas hoare; willem town; Samuel nurs; Jacob estei
Edward Bishop By his Excellency the Gouernor
Whereas ye Generall Assembly in their last session accepted ye report of their committe appointed to consider of
ye Damages sustained by Sundry persons prosecuted for witchcraft in ye year 1692 vizt
To Elizabeth How...12 lbs; George Jacobs...79 lbs.; Mary Eastey...20 lbs.; Mary Parker...8 lbs.; George
Burroughs...50 lbs.; Giles Cory & wife...21 lbs.; Rebeccah Nurse...25 lbs.; John Willard...20 lbs.; Sarah
Good...30 lbs.; Martha Carrier...7 lbs. 6 s.; Samuel Wardwell & wife...36 lbs. 15 s.; John procter and wife...150
lbs. 1s.; Sarah Wild...14 lbs.; Mary Bradbury...20 lbs.; Abigail Faulkner...20 lbs.; Abigail Hobbs...6lbs. 10s.;
Rebeccah Eames...10 lbs.; Dorcas Hoar...8 lbs. 14s.; Mary Lacey...8 lbs. 10s.
The whole amounting vnto Five hundred seventy eight poundes and Twelve shillings.
J doe by & with the advice and consent of her Majtys council hereby order you to pay ye above sum of fiue
hundred seventy eight poundes & twelve shillings to Stephen Sewall Esqr who together with ye gentlemen of ye
Comitte that Estimated and Reported ye said damages are desired & directed to distribute ye same in proportion
as aboue to such of ye said persons as are Liuing and to those that legally represent them that are dead according
as ye law directs and for which this shall be your Warrant.
Given under my hand at Boston the 17 Day of December 1711
J. Dudley
107
To Mr Treasurer Taylor By order of ye Gouernor & Council Jsa Addington Secrty.
Whereas His Excellency the Governor and Generall court haue been pleased to grant to ye persons who were
sufferers in ye year 1692 some considerable alowance towards restitution with respect to what they suffered in
their Estates at that Sorrowfull time and jaue alsoe appointed a Comitte viz. John Appleton Esqr Thomas Noyes
Esqr John Burrel Esqr Nehemiah Jewet Esq. & Stephen Sewall to distribute ye Same to and amongst ye parties
concern'd as in & by ye records and Court orders May apear. Now Know yee that wee Subscribers herevnto
being Either ye proper parties or such as represent them or have full pwoer & authority from them to Receiue
their parts and shares of ye money aforesd and such of vs as haue orders from some of ye parties concerned to
receive their parts and shares doe avouch them to be real and good so that for whomsoever wee take vpon us to
receive any such sum we doe oblige ourselves to Idemnify ye said Comitte to all Jntents constructions &
purposes, wee say Recieved this 19th day of February anno Domi 1711-12 & in ye Tenth year of...from the
Topsfield Historical Collections Volume 11, p. 285-290.
Children of Robert Eames and Rebecca Blake are:
385
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Hannah Eames, born 18 Dec 1661; died 08 Jul 1731; married Ephraim Foster.
Daniel Eames, born 07 Apr 1663.
Robert Eames, born 28 Feb 1666/67.
John Eames, born 11 Oct 1670.
Dorothy Eames, born 20 Dec 1674.
Jacob Eames, born 20 Jul 1677.
Joseph Eames, born 09 Oct 1681.
Nathan Eames, born 19 Nov 1685.
772. John Poore, Sr., born 1615 in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England; died 23 Nov 1684 in Newbury, Essex
Co., MA25. He married 773. Sarah ? 1641 in Newbury, Essex, MA.
773. Sarah ?, born 1618 in Newbury, Essex, MA.
Notes for John Poore, Sr.:
JOHN POORE AND HIS FAMILY:
JOHN POORE, the patriarch of one stock of his name, came, according to Mr. Coffin in his history of Newbury,
from Wiltshire, England, in 1635, which was the next year after several families--who that year also settled in
Newbury--came to Ipswich.
According to depositions on file in the office of the Essex County Court, he was born about 1615, consequently
he was about twenty years old when he came to this country.
After a careful examination of the records of the State, Counties, Towns and Churches in Massachusetts, we
conclude that this was the earliest of his family name who came to America.
He settled upon the southerly side of Parker River in Newbury, Massachusetts, that part of the town being called
the "Neck." The street leading over Parker River to Rowley was laid out as far as his house through the north part
of his land, then it turned westward.
The lot east of John Poore's was, from generation to generation, occupied by the Thurston family. Next east of
Thurston's lot, and on the end of the Neck, was the homestead of the Plummer family. Through these estates is a
street extending by the south side of Mr. Poore's house and the Thurston and Plummer houses, to the end of the
Neck. The lot west of Poore's was owned by the Hale family; all of these lots extend across the Neck from Parker
River to the Plumb Island River. He had laid out to him by Rowley, in 1661, about thirty acres of upland, at a
place in that town called "The Island beyond the Cow Bridge Meadow."
The house which he built, together with additions, is still standing, and has been owned by the family, from
father to son, until this time (1878), eight generations having been born in it, the eight and ninth generations now
residing there.
At times the old mansion has been used as an Inn. It is on the ancient highway leading to Rowley, and about
four miles southward from Market Square, and Stations on the Boston & Maine and Eastern Railroads in
Newburyport.
By an inventory of his personal estate we find the date of his decease to be "about" November 21, 1684.
Tradition says that he was out hunting, and losing his way, perished by cold and hunger in the woods near
Andover. On file in the office of the Clerk of the Courts in Essex County, Volume XLIII, page 73, in the report
of the jury of inquest, summoned to inquire into the cause of his death, dated Nov. 24th, in the year of our Lord--A Memoir and Genealogy of John Poore, page 5
108
Children of John Poore and Sarah ? are:
386
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
John Poore, Jr., born 21 Jun 1642.
Hannah (1) Poore, born 14 Oct 1645.
Elizabeth Poore, born 08 Nov 1647.
Hannah (2) Poore, born 25 Mar 1649.
Henry Poore, born 13 Dec 1650.
Mary (1) Poore, born 06 Mar 1651/52.
Joseph Poore, born 04 Oct 1653 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; died 1732 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA;
married Mary Wallington 06 Aug 1680 in Newbury, Essex, MA.
Mary (2) Poore, born 12 Dec 1654.
Sarah Poore, born 05 Jun 1655; married Samuel Pettingell 13 Feb 1673/74; born 09 Feb 1644/45 in
Salem, Essex, MA; died 1711.
Notes for Samuel Pettingell:
SAMUEL, (Richard,) born in Salem, bapt. 9 (12), 1644, that is on the ninth day of the last month of their
year, February, in the year which English people called 1644, but which had been called 1645 since the
1st of January by the people of Holland and some other countries. To be exact, we should write it 9
February, 1644-5.
He came to his manhood at old Newbury. He was a good hunter, whether with traps or flint-lock gun
deponent saith not ; but the town paid him a bounty of a shilling for killing a fox in 1667. In 1687 he is
noticed on the town records as one of those who were raising sheep. He took the oath of allegiance with
other townsmen in 1678, "aged 33."
He married, Feb. 13, 1673-4, Sarah, daughter of John Poore, an early resident of Newbury ; she was the
second child of the name, and was born 5 June, 1655 ; she survived her husband and was recorded a
member of the church in 1716. Samuel died in 1711. In his will, dated July 9, 1709, proved Jan. 2,
1711, he bequeathed his property to his wife Sarah and children, Samuel, Richard, Daniel, John,
Thomas, Mary, Sarah, Joanna, and Benjamin.---A Pettingell Genealogy, arranged for publication by
Charles Henry Pope. Boston, Mass., 1906 p. 8-9.
x.
xi.
xii.
xiii.
Lydia Poore, born 05 Dec 1656.
Edward Poore, born 04 Apr 1658.
Abigail (1) Poore, born 26 Mar 1660.
Abigail (2) Poore, born 05 Aug 1661.
774. Nicholas Wallington, born 1629 in Wallop, Nether, Hamps., England; died 1680 in Argone. He
married 775. Sara Travers 30 Aug 1654 in Newbury, Essex, MA25.
775. Sara Travers, born 1636 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; died 22 Aug 1709. She was the daughter of
1550. Henry Travers and 1551. Bridget Fitts.
Notes for Nicholas Wallington:
Nicholas Wallington came from England in the ship Confidence from London in 1638, landing in Boston.
Customs House record published in the NEHGR are prefaced with the following note: "The List of Names of the
Passengers Inteded for New England in the good shipp the Confidence of London of CC [200] tonnes, john
Jobson, M[aste]r And thus by vertue of the Lord Treasrs warr[an]t of the xjth [11th] of Aprill, 1638.
Southampton, 24 Aprill, 1638." Among the passengers were Stephen and Margery Kent, husband and wife aged
17 and 16 respectively, whose origins in England were not stated on the passenger list as were most of the other
passengers. [One source states the Stephen was from Salisbury, England and his wife Maargery (Norris) was from
Wallopp, co. South.] With them were four young people aged 9 through 20 described as servants, as well as
"Nicholas Wallington, a poore boy", whose age was not given. The fact that he was listed among the servants yet
not described as one probably means that he was not a servant. In any case from this we can guess that he was
probably aged in the range of 5 to 15 years old at the time, give or take. A. Sheckford gives his age as 9, but no
age appears in the published reccords in the New England Historical and Genealogical Resiter so this is suspect.
Pope's Pioneers of Massachusetts" also gives him a fictitious age of 9. If he was 19 at the time he would have
been born about 1619, married at age 35 to a woman about 18 years his junior, had his last child at age 61, and
disappeared at sea aged in his early 60s. It would seem more likely that he was about nine years old and born
closer to 1630 than to 1620, which makes the 1630 baptism in Fareham right on target.
One other possible clue to his origins is in the way they referred to him as "a poore boy." Rahter than referring
to his socioeconomic status, this may have been meant to infer a relationship to the Poore family. Based on his
uncle Gore's will we know that he had Poore cousins, one of his children married a Poore, and the Poores were
resident in Newbury at the same time as the Wallington family. No Poores were on the ship manifest, and no
109
other children were referred to as "poore."
His whereabouts between his arrival in 1638 and his first appearance in the records in 1654 is unknown. He was
likely a minor until the lat 1640s, and may have been living with another family as a servant or perhaps, given his
later occupation as seaman, he may have been at sea as a cabin boy or apprentice seaman. He may very well have
stayed with the Kent family with whom he traveled to America. The Kents lived in Newbury.
By 1654 Nicholas was living in Newbury, Mass., as he was married there in August. Also that year "Nicholas
Wallington" was one of the many Newbury residents to sign a petition to the Massachusetts General Court
protesting an action against Lt. Robert Pike of Salisbury. In May of 1653 the General Court had passed a law
making it illegal for anyone to preach in any town in the colony without the consent of the elders of four
neighboring churches or with the approval of the county court. Lt. Robert Pike protested this as an infringement
on personal rights of freemen and was censured by the General Court for seditious speech. He was find,
disenfranchised and prohibited from holding public office. This angered many residents of the towns of
Newbury, Haverhill, Andover, Salisbury and Hampton and petitions were circulated in all those towns asking for
the penalties to be rescinded. Most of the preemen in these towns signed the petition, which angered the General
Court further. Rather than grant the petitioners' request they considered the petitions to be highly censurable.
The Court did "deeply resent that so many persons of serveral towns, conditions and relations, should combine
together to present such an unjust and unreasonable request." They appointed a commission to meet with the
petitioners in each town and "require a reason for their unjust request, and how they came to be induced to sign
the said petition." In October 1654 Capt. William Gerrish and Nicholas Noeys reported back regarding the
Newbury petitioners. The Court ordered the petitioners whose answers to the commission they deemd
unsatisfatory to appear in court and give bonds to answer for their offences. Only eight Newbury men were so
ordered, and Nicholas Wallington was not one of them, so he must have been one of the many who apologized in
some way to the commission for signing the petition. Joshua Coffin, in his history of Newbury, remarks" "The
whole case is a very instructive one. It exhibits, on the one hand, the watchful jealousy of the people in
consequence of any supposed, or ral, encroachment on their civil or ecclesiastical rights; and, on the other hand,
the determination of the magistrates not to have their authority lightly called in question.
On 1 October 1659 Richard Window of Glouscester and his wife Bridget, widow of Henry Travers, conveyed to
Nicholas Wallington of Newbury four acres and a house formerly beloinging to said Travers. The land was
bordered on the east by the street going to Merrimack, on the south by the South Street, on the west by Richard
Brown's land, and on the north by the land of Tristram Coffin. On 26 October 1659 Nicholas turned right around
and sold the land to John Browne of Newbury. Henry Travers was of course his father-in-law.
Nicholas Wallington witnessed the will of John Cutting of Newbury 22 October 1659. On 18 June 1662 he
owned land in the town of Rowley, as shown by a lease of that date in which Phillip Nelson of Rowly let to
Robert Savery and William Bolton of Newbury a farm in Rowley of 300 acres, bounded on the east by the
Newbury town line, on the west by land of "Nicolas Walington", on the north by the Merrimack River, and on the
south by Crane Meadow.
Nicholas Wallington served as surveyor of Highways, fences and chimneys in Bradford in 1667 with John
Hardy.
In a Court held at Salem, Mass., 25 June 1667: "Copy of deed, dated Oct. 16, 1661, John (his mark) Willcot of
Newbury and Mary, his wife, to Nocolas Wallington of Newbury, the half farm he purchased of Hilip Nellson of
Rowley, etc. Wit: Joseph Muzzey, Trustram Coffin, Robert Lange, John Pike, and Hugh Marsh. Acknowledged
Mar. 25 1662, by John Wolcott. Copy made, June 24, 1667, by Robert Lord." At a later Court held in Ipswich
on 24 September 1667, Nicholas sued John Wolcott for not making good on this parcel of land. The verdict was
for the defendant.
In February 1670 Nicholas "Wallinghton" was mentioned in court records as someone who "frequently
communed with" memboers of Mr. Edwafd Woodman's chuch despite not being a member. He took an oath as a
freeman in Newbury on 11 October 1670. In November 1672 he owed 3 pounds to the estate of Abraham
Toppan of Newbury. On 24 February 1672 town orders regarding fences, swine, cattle, and horses were signed
by five people, including Nicolas Wallingford. No town was stated in this record, but since Bradfor came into
existence in 1675 it was most likely Newbury. "Noclas Walington" was a member of a grand jury in Ipswich, 25
September 1677. By a deed acknowledged on 29 January 1677[/8?] he gave one acre of meadow in the Crane
Meadown, bounded on Crane Brook, "to have an able & faithful ministry settle amongst the inhabitants of the
s[ai]d Towne of Bradford" (Essex Deeds, 4 Ips.:130)
He settled in Newbury, Mass. and judging by the birth records of his children, was apparently living in Bradford
by 1672, which is when that town was first named. He may have lived a short time in Rowley, Mass., about 16623, as evidenced by the fact that he owned land there in 1662 and one of his children's birth's was recorded in the
Rowley town records (although also in the Newbury town records at the same time). Of course, Bradford was
originally part of Rowley, known as "Merrimack" or "The Merrimac Lands", so these lands may have been in
110
what later bacame Bradford.
Nicholas was a seaman and his last voyage to sea apparently led to his being captured on his way to England and
his death in captivity. The first word yet found of his disappearance is in a letter date 24 Ocltober 1680 from
Samuel Sewall of Boston to his brother Stephen Sewall of Bishop-Stoke, Hampshire, England. At one point in
this letter Samuel writes, "Mr. Lidget is well & brisk in London: enqurie if he can tell any thing of Nic
Wallingford. Samuel Sewall was a rich merchant who later became a judge, but in these early years he had
recently come of age in the town Of Newbury where his father and grandfater were early settlers. It seems
reasonable to imagin that the Wallingford family appealed to Sewall
Notes for Sara Travers:
Sara Travers was the daughter of Henry Travers and Bridget. Name sometimes spelled Travis. Mother (widow
Bridget) married 3/30/1659 Richard Winslow of Gloucester, MA. Henry Travers left for England around 1654
(probate records seem to indicate Henry deserted Bridget).
Nicholas Wallington married Sarah Travers, 30 August 1654, in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Sarah
was born about 1636 or 1638. Sarah was the daughter of Henry Travers and Bridget. Her father, whose name is
sometimes spelled Travis, came from London, England in the "Mary and John" in 1633. He was living in
Newbury, Mass. in 1642, if not earlier. His wife Bridget may have been the sister of Richard Fitts of Ipswich and
Newbury, Mass., as in the latter's will dated 2 December 1672 he mentions his sister "Travisse's " daughter.
Henry Travers made a will dated 26 July 1648, then returned to England and died there before 1659. The widow
Bridget married, 30 March 1659, Richard Winslow of Gloucester, Mass. She may have been married to a
Goodwin before marrying Henry Travers.
Nicholas' name was usually spelled Wallington in the early records, but by the second generation most of the
family was using the spelling 'Wallingford.' It was spelled Wallingfor in his uncle William Gore's will. This will,
dated 22 January 1655/6 and proved 29 March 1656 has a clause giving "To Nicholas & Margaret, son and
daughter of my late sister Wallingford, twenty pounds apiece in one year after my decease." William Gore was
from the town of Nether Wallop in Southampton, England, and was probably the son of William and Joane
Gore/Goore, also of Nether Wallop.--Norton-Grimes Genealogy submitted by Frank Grimes
([email protected]]
Children of Nicholas Wallington and Sara Travers are:
387
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
xiii.
Mary Wallington, born 22 Apr 1663 in Newbury, Essex, MA; died in Newbury, Essex, MA; married
Joseph Poore 06 Aug 1680 in Newbury, Essex, MA.
John Wallington, born 06 Jan 1654/55.
Nicholas Wallington, born 02 Jan 1655/56.
John Wallington, born 07 Apr 1659.
Sara Wallington, born 20 May 1661.
James Wallington, born 22 Apr 1665.
Hanna Wallington, born 27 Nov 1667.
William Wallington, born 26 Feb 1668/69.
Joseph Wallington, born 20 Apr 1672.
Elizabeth Wallington, born 23 Jun 1674.
Esther Wallington, born 09 Jun 1676.
Benjamin Wallington, born 27 Jun 1678.
Abigail Wallington, born 24 Jun 1680.
776. Timothy Dwight, born 1635. He married 777. Hannah Flynt.
777. Hannah Flynt, born 11 Sep 1643.
Child of Timothy Dwight and Hannah Flynt is:
388
i.
Capt. Henry Dwight, born 19 Dec 1676; died 26 Mar 1732 in Hatfield, MA; married Lydia Hawley 27
Aug 1702.
778. Capt. Joseph Hawley, born 28 Jan 1654/55 in Roxbury, MA; died 19 May 1711 in Northampton, MA.
He married 779. Lydia Marhsall.
779. Lydia Marhsall, born 13 Feb 1655/56; died 28 Oct 1732.
111
Notes for Capt. Joseph Hawley:
Captain Joseph Hawley, b. in Roxbury, Jan 28, 1655-6, and grad. at Harvard in 1674, settled at once at
Northampton, where he was at first a schoolmaster, and where he died May 19, 1711, aet. 56. He was the son of
Thomas Hawley of Roxbury and Dorothy Harlittle. Lydia Marshall, his wife, b. Feb. 18, 1655-6, was the dau. of
Capt. Samuel Marshall of Winsor, Ct., and Mary Wilton, dau. of Lt. David Wilton, whome he m. May 6, 1652.
She d. Oct. 28, 1732, aet. 75.--The History of the Descendants of John Dwight of Dedham, Mass. by Benjamin
W. Dwight, Vol. II, 1874, page 624.
Children of Joseph Hawley and Lydia Marhsall are:
389
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Dorothy Hawley, born 06 Sep 1678; died 23 Aug 1682.
Lydia Hawley, born 07 Jul 1680; died 27 Apr 1748; married Capt. Henry Dwight 27 Aug 1702.
Joseph Hawley, born 28 Aug 1682; died 01 Jun 1735.
Dorothy Hawley, born 20 Aug 1684.
Samuel Hawley, born 23 Feb 1686/87.
Thomas Hawley, born 29 Sep 1689.
Ebenezer Hawley, born 02 May 1694.
780. John Pynchon, born 15 Oct 1647; died 25 Apr 1721. He was the son of 1560. John Pynchon and
1561. Amy Wyllys. He married 781. Margaret Hubbard.
781. Margaret Hubbard, born 17 Oct 1647.
Child of John Pynchon and Margaret Hubbard is:
390
i.
Col.. John Pynchon, born 15 Oct 1674; died 12 Jul 1742; married Bathshua Taylor 18 Feb 1701/02.
782. Edward Taylor, born 1642. He married 783. Elizabeth Fitch.
783. Elizabeth Fitch She was the daughter of 1566. James Fitch.
Child of Edward Taylor and Elizabeth Fitch is:
391
i.
Bathshua Taylor, born 11 Jan 1682/83; died 20 Jun 1710; married Col.. John Pynchon 18 Feb 1701/02.
800. Thomas Seymour, born 15 Jul 1632 in Sawbridgeworth, Hert, England; died 15 Oct 1712 in Norwalk,
Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 1600. Richard Seymour and 1601. Mercy Ruscoe. He married 801. Hannah
Marvin 05 Jan 1653/54 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
801. Hannah Marvin, born Oct 1634 in Great Bentley, Essex, England; died Aft. Nov 1680. She was the
daughter of 1602. Matthew Marvin and 1603. Elizabeth.
Notes for Thomas Seymour:
THOMAS SEYMOUR (Richard), of Norwalk, Conn., baptized at Sawbridgeworth, co. Herts, England, 15
July 1632, died at Norwalk, Conn., between 22 Sept. 1712, the date of his will, and 15 Oct. 1712, when the
inventory of his estate was taken. He married first, at Norwalk, 5 Jan. 1653/4, HANNAH MARVIN, born in co.
Essex, England, about Oct. 1634, living in 1680, daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth; secondly, between 1690 and
1697, SARAH, widow of Thomas Wildman of Bedford, N.Y. ; and thirdly, ELIZABETH __________.
He was brought to New England by his parents about 1638-9, when he was about six years old, lived with
them at Hartford, Conn., until about 1651, and then removed with them to Norwalk. As his mother remarried
very soon after his father's death in 1655 and he was the only one of the children who was of age at that time, he
succeeded to his father's lands in Norwalk, and lived there until his death. He was freeman in 1668, one of the
patentees in 1686, and a deputy from Norwalk to the Connecticut General Court in 1690.
The will of Thomas Seymour, copied verbatim from the original in the files, follows. The inventory of his
estate, taken 15 Oct. 1712 by John Raymond and Samuel Smith, showed property appraised at L351.5s.
In the Name of God Amen the Tweenty second Day of September In the Year of our Lord 1712 I Thomas
Seamer of Norwalk in ye County of Fairfield of the Colony of Connecticut in New England, being Verry sick and
Weak in Body, but of perfect Mind & Memory thanks be given unto God ; therefore Calling to mind the
mortallity of my Body, and Knowing that it is appointed for men once to dye, Do Make and ordain this my Last
will and Testament, that is to say principally and first of all, I give and Recomend my Soul into ye hands of God
that gave it, Hopeing through the Merrits, Death and passion of my Saviour Jesus Christ to have full and free
pardon and forgiveness of all my sins, and to Inherit Everlasting Life ; and my Body I Comit to the Earth to be
112
Decently Buried at ye Discretion of my Executrs here after Named, Nothing Doubting but at ye Generall
resurrection I shall Receive ye same again by the Mighty power of God.--And As Touching Such Worldly Esstate
Wherewith it hath pleased God to Bless me in this life, I give Demise and dispose of ye same in ye following
maner & form--That is to say, first I Will that all those Debts and Duties as I do Ow in Right or Consience to any
Maner of person or persons Whatsoever, shall be Well and true Contented & paid or Ordained to be paid in
Convenient time after my Decease by My Executrs hereafter Named.-Item: I Give and bequeath to Elizabeth Seamer my dearly beloved Wife, all & whatsoever of goods or Estate that
she Brought with her and one pair of Curtains that she made since her liveing with me and one of my Cows as she
may Chose forever.-Item I give to my said Wife the Use and Improvement of my House & Barn, Half my Orchard & the West End of
my Home Lott from the swamp, with also all of my Meadow Land on stony Hill (as may be Sufficient to aford
Hay for ye Keeping one Cow or more) also my Bed Beding & Bedsted, my Copper Kettle and all other such
Necessary Houshold Utansels as may be for her Comfort and all this Dureing her Continuance my Widdow. Also
I give to my said Wife What provision shall be found Lay'd in for ye families Use at my Decease,--also I give to
my said Wife My New Bible:
Item I give to my Son John Seamer the Use & Improvement of the other half of my Orchyeard Dureing my Wifes
Coninuing my Widdow And to my sons Matthew & John Seamer ye Use of my Kill & malk House-Item I give and bequeath to my Well beloved Grand son Thomas Seamer my House Barn Home Lott &
Orchyeard Upon my afor siad Wife Decease or Marriage to be to him his heirs and Assigns forever.
Item. I give and bequeath to my Well beloved Sons viz Matthew Seamer & John Seamer the Rest of my Lands
and meedows whatsoever & Moveable Estate that I have in Norwalk or Else where to be Divided Equally
between them and my Will is that my Son John Seamer Have In part of his part my Barren Marsh Meedow
Joyning to his own Land-Item My Will is that my said sons Matthew and John Seamer shall in some Convenieant season after my Decease
pay to Each of My Surviveing Daughters four pounds in provision pay apiece Except my Daughter Elizabeth
Knap they paying to her ye sum of tweenty shillings in pay abovesaid-I likewise Constitute make and Ordain My said sons Matthew Seamer & John Seamer Executers of this my
Last Will and Testament And I do hereby Utterly Dissalow Revoke and dissanul all and Every Other former
Testaments Wills & Leagacies Bequests and Executrs by me in any Wayes before this time Named Willed &
bequeathed rattifying and Confirming this and no Other to by my Last Will & Testatment-In Witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and Seal the Day and year above Written,
Signd, Sealed Published pronounced and delcared by the said Thomas Seamer as his Last Will and Testament in
the presence of us the Subscribers--Thomas Betts Senr, John Copp Mark Thomas TS Seamer (seal) his
The forgoing original will of Thomas Seymour may be seen in the probate files in the State Library at
Hartford, with the original seal charged with the two wings conjoined in lure, forming the paternal coat of the
Seymours of Penhow. It is small, of crumbling reddish brown wax, and evidently an impression froma well-worn
signet, undoubtedly brought from England by his father. Photographs of the will itself and of the seal enlarged
will be found in the present volume.
October the 15th : 1712
An Inventory of the Estate of Thomas Semer Late of Norwalk dececed Taken by us whose names are under
written : as followeth in primes
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
it:
to one rackcoone hat
to one new druget cote
to one duget cote : 12s: to [o]ne druget uest
to one paire of flanel briches
to one new flanel uest not finished
to two paire of Linin briches
to one paire of Lether briches
to two shurts
to one muslen neeckclath
to three paire of stockens
to one hat
to one new shurt clath
to one fetherbed and bolster
to two fether pillows
01- 5-0
02-10-0
01-10-0
00-07-0
01-04-0
00-08-0
00-06-0
00-06-0
00-10-0
00-09-0
00-02-0
00-10-0
00-02-0
00-09-0
113
it: to one rudg 1 L : 0 0 to one checker couerled
02-10-0
it: to one blanket
01-04-0
it: to one blanket
00-10-0
it: to one more blanket
01-00-0
it: to one blanket and one couerled
01-10-0
it: to one fether boulster
00-16-0
it: to one rudg
00-08-0
it: to foure paire of sheets
07-00-0
it: to one paire of old sheets
00-05-0
it: to curtens and uallants
02-08-0
it: to one bedsteed and cord
00-12-0
it: to two paire of pillowbears
00-16-0
it: to : 8 : napcens & towels
00-16-0
it: to two tableclaths
00-07-0
it: to one straining clath
00-01-6
it: to one table
00-10-0
it: to one great chest
00-12-0
it: to one old box
00-02-0
it: to one chest
00-12-0
it: to one warming pan
00-17-0
it: to one old chest
00-02-0
it: to one great brass cettel
07-10-0
it: to one copper cettel
00-12-0
it: to one brass scillet and frame
00-05-0
it: to two putter platters
00-10-0
it: to two putter basons : 10s: and :3 : putter pots all:
17-0
it: to two putter porengers :4 : and one tumbler
00-04-6
it: to one tin cullender
00-02-0
it: to foure putter platters
01-10-0
it: to three putter plats : 6[s] : 0: to three putter basons : 12[s]: all: 18-0
it: to two putter cups : 3: and old putter one shiling all
04-0
it: toearthenware--15--and two ston pots--all
18-0
it: to four spoons--02: and ten trenchers--all
00-03-6
it: to three payels--03: and three trayes--all
00-06-0
it: to one ston cup--00-6 : and :5 glass bottel : all
00-03-6
it: to one paire of tayllers sheeres : and one inkhorn-00-03-6
it: to one rayser and hone and knife
00-05-0
it: to two iron candolstick
00-02-0
it: to one fryingpan : gridgiron : and fleshforke
00-09-0
it: to one iron pot and pothocks
00-15-0
it: to one tramel : 8[s] : and fireflis : 8[s] : and tongs : all:
00-17-0
it: to one great iron pot
00-15-0
it: to new iron : 5 : and one paire of stilyards : all
01-01-0
it: to one small iron cettel
00-07-0
it: to one hamer and foure gimblets : and goudg
00-04-0
it: to bettel rings : and ads : and old iron
00-06-0
it: to foure exes : 8[s] : and one shaueing knife
00-09-6
it: to one paire of pinchers : and sheep sheeres
00-03-0
it: to armes and amanition
01-00-0
it: to iron : crow : 10[s] : and horse geeres : 5[s] : all
00-15-0
it: to one old saddol : 06 : and one chaping knif
00-06-6
it: to plow and plow irons
01-10-0
it: to wheet and barly in the barn
02-02-0
it: to flex to drees : 15[s] : and one frow 2:6:all:
00-17-6
it: to three sickels 4: and peesehoock : 1-6-all
00-05-6
it: to one broode how : and crackel
00-05-6
it: to one grinston and extree and winck
00-05-0
it: to old iron : 4[s] : and one great bible
00-14-0
114
it: to one bible : 10: and : 1 great boock : & : 4: small books 01-00-0
it: to three chaires : 8:-0 : and flex to wingle
all 00-18-0
it: to one paire of chards : 5[s] : and wool
all 00-09-0
it: to malt in the house -2-0-0: and indion corn
all 04-14-0
it: to one corn fan 1-0-0: and one half bushel
all 01-01-6
it: to wool : and one old how
00-09-0
it: to one yoke and yoke irons
00-05-0
it: to butter and cheese : 1-16-0 : and meet in the house : 03-00-0
it: to one earthen pot : and one stone pot :&: wooden bottel 04-0
it: to one churn and small tubs : 2 pigeins all
00-10-0
it: to one box iron : 8 : and one Looking glas--all
00-13-0
it: to tobacon 1-0-0 : and hops
02-07-0
it: to one hare clath 1-10-0 :&: bucket hoops & ball :
1-13-0
it: to tubs : and cask : and boudering tubs : and meete troufes : 2-00-0
it: to blanket yarn : and tow yarn
00-10-0
it: to : 5 : swine : 3-0-0 : and one cheesepres : & : one hiue of bees all: 3-13-0
it: to one hors : 3-0-0 : and two oxen : 12-0-0 : & :3 cows : 10-0-0: all 25-00-0
it: to one yere old steer : 2-0-0: and two calfs -02-00 all
04-00-0
it: to the house barn malthouse & orchard and homelot--all 80-00-0
it: to the frutfull spring Lot
30-00-0
it: to the stonhill Lot : 48-0-0 : and a peece of salt meddow at scatuck plain
54--00-0
it: to the Land at dryebrook
45-00-0
it: to the raylehill Lot
16-00-0
it: to the Land att the woulfpit hills
18-00-0
it: to the Land att the old hill
18-00-0
it: to the Land on the east side the riuer at pimpewalk
10-00-0
it: to the Land on the horse pound hill between the parts
08-00-0
it: to the Land and meddow at baranmarsh
50-00-0
it: to the sheep in the flock
05-00-0
it: to one paire of specttuckls
00-02-0
it: to a : 11 pound and a half of Linin yarn
01-14-6
it: to one iuiry come : a : 2 : paire of old sisus
00-03-6
it: to cart and wheels and cart tacklen
03-10-0
it: to two iron wedges and one iron presing iron
00-04-0
it: to one paire of glasses
00-02-6
Itm: two acres of Land ouer sacotck riuer
04-00-00
Itm: one iron chayne
00-15-00
M[rs] Elisabeth Seamer made
John Raymond
oath to the Ineuntory of her
samuel smith
Deceased Husbands Estat
Before: James: Olmsted Justic:
January 7th 1712/13
Ensign Mathew Semer and John Seemer appeared in y[e] prerogtive Court held in Fairfield Jan[ry] 7th 1712/13,
and gave oath to the truth of the aboue Inventory and if any thing shall after appear they will Cause the same to be
inserted--AHistory of the Seymour Family: Descendants of Richard Seymour of Hartford, Connecticut by Donald
Lines Jacobus. New Haven, Connecticut: 1939, pages 28-33.
Notes for Hannah Marvin:
Hannah Marvin came to America in the "Increase," with her father.--Larry Maxwell WorldConnect Project
Children of Thomas Seymour and Hannah Marvin are:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Hannah Seymour, born 12 Dec 1654.
Abigail Seymour, born Jan 1655/56.
Mary Seymour, born Sep 1658.
Sarah Seymour, born Sep 1658.
Thomas Seymour, born Sep 1660.
Mercy Seymour, born Nov 1666.
115
vii.
400
413
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
Capt. Matthew Seymour, born May 1669 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 1735 in Norwalk, Fairfield,
CT; married Sarah Hayes; born 19 Sep 1673 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
Elizabeth Seymour, born Dec 1673.
Rebecca Seymour, born Jan 1675/76.
John Seymour, born 1679 in Norwalk, CT; died 1746 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; married Sarah Gregory.
Elizabeth Seymour, born Abt. 1696; married Eleazer Bouton 1721.
802. Jachin Gregory, born 1640 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 22 Feb 1695/96 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
He was the son of 1604. John Gregory and 1605. Sarah Duxbury. He married 803. Mary 1666.
803. Mary, born 1644 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
Child of Jachin Gregory and Mary is:
401
i.
Sarah Gregory, born 15 Sep 1678 in Norwalk, CT; married John Seymour.
804. Daniel Belding, born 20 Nov 1648. He married 805. Elizabeth Foote.
805. Elizabeth Foote, born 1654.
Child of Daniel Belding and Elizabeth Foote is:
402
i.
William Belding, born 26 Dec 1671; married Margaret Arms.
806. William Arms, born 1654. He married 807. Joanna Hawks.
807. Joanna Hawks, born 08 Feb 1653/54.
Child of William Arms and Joanna Hawks is:
403
i.
Margaret Arms, born 06 Oct 1683; married William Belding.
808. Joseph Smith, born 13 Mar 1634/35; died Jan 1689/90. He married 809. Lydia Hewett 20 Apr 1656.
809. Lydia Hewett, born 1635 in Wraxall, Warwick, England; died 1711. She was the daughter of 1618.
Ephraim William Hewitt and 1619. Isabel Overton.
Children of Joseph Smith and Lydia Hewett are:
404
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Joseph Smith, born Mar 1656/57 in Hartford, CT; died 01 Oct 1733.
Samuel Smith, born May 1658 in Hartford, CT; died Oct 1660.
Ephraim Smith, born 08 Sep 1659 in Hartford, CT.
Lydia Smith, born Apr 1661 in Hartford, CT; died Oct 1664.
Simon Smith, born 02 Aug 1662 in Hartford, CT; married Hannah Bliss 01 May 1689 in Hartford, CT.
Nathaniel Smith, born Oct 1664 in Hartford, CT.
Lydia Huitt Smith, born 14 Feb 1664/65 in Hartford, CT; died 19 Jun 1716.
Susannah Smith, born Jun 1667 in Hartford, CT.
810. Samuel Bliss, born 1642. He married 811. Mary Leonard.
811. Mary Leonard, born 17 Jul 1647.
Child of Samuel Bliss and Mary Leonard is:
405
i.
Hannah Bliss, born 26 Dec 1666 in Hartford, CT; married Simon Smith 01 May 1689 in Hartford, CT.
812. John Seymour, born 1639. He married 813. Mary Watson.
813. Mary Watson, born 1647.
Child of John Seymour and Mary Watson is:
406
i.
Thomas Seymour, born 12 Mar 1667/68; married Ruth Norton.
814. John Norton, born 24 May 1651. He married 815. Ruth Moore.
815. Ruth Moore, born 05 Jan 1656/57.
116
Child of John Norton and Ruth Moore is:
407
i.
Ruth Norton, born 1675; married Thomas Seymour.
816. Jonathan Morehouse He was the son of 1632. Thomas Morehouse and 1633. Isabella Keeler. He
married 817. Mary Wilson.
817. Mary Wilson She was the daughter of 1634. Edward Wilson.
Children of Jonathan Morehouse and Mary Wilson are:
408
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Jonathan Morehouse, born 01 Jan 1677/78 in Fairfield, CT; married Rebecca Hull 08 Aug 1706 in
Stratfield, CT.
Martha Morehouse, born 02 Nov 1679.
David Morehouse
Deborah Morehouse, married John Sturdivant.
Mercy Morehouse, married David Webster 01 Dec 1709.
818. Samuel Hull, born 1653. He married 819. Deborah Beers.
819. Deborah Beers, born 1665.
Child of Samuel Hull and Deborah Beers is:
409
i.
Rebecca Hull, born 1688; married Jonathan Morehouse 08 Aug 1706 in Stratfield, CT.
824. John Bouton, born 30 Sep 1659. He was the son of 1648. John Bouton and 1649. Abigail Marvin.
He married 825. Sarah Gregory.
825. Sarah Gregory, born Dec 1667. She was the daughter of 928. John Gregory and 929. Elizabeth
Moulthroup.
Child of John Bouton and Sarah Gregory is:
412
i.
Eleazer Bouton, born Jun 1701 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; married (1) Elizabeth Seymour 1721; married
(2) Mary Pettit Bouton 18 Feb 1731/32.
832. Walter Woodworth, born 1612 in Kent, England; died 02 Mar 1685/86 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA.
He married 833. Elizabeth Rogers 1639 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA.
833. Elizabeth Rogers, born 1620.
Notes for Walter Woodworth:
The WOODWARD family in the United States is very numerous and comes from several distinct sources. The
name is found in the earliest records of Boston, Salem, Watertown, Scituate, Taunton and elsewhere, indicating
early settlers from the mother country. There was a HENRY WOODWARD, who came over in the ship "James,"
in 1635, and settled in Dorchester, whose name is frequently spelled in the early records, Woodworth, and he may
have been a brother of WALTER WOODWORTH, of Scituate. He was the ancestor of a large family, some of
whom afterward settled in Lebanon, Ct., where many of the descendants of Walter had made their home. And in
the Lebanon records there appears, in 1710, the name HENRY WOODWORTH, who was undoubtedly a
descendant of HENRY WOODWARD and a son of JOHN WOODWARD and Ann Dewey, born March 18,
1680, at Lebanon. In Scituate we find the names of the descendants of WALTER spelled variously
WOODWORTH, WOODWARD, WOODARD, WOODART. Among an unlettered people devoted to
agriculture and busy in their leisure hours defending themselves against the Indians little attention was paid to
niceties of spelling and pronunciation so long as the identity of the individual was preserved. The name
WOODWORTH is a little difficult to pronounce and it came much easier to say WOODRUFF or WOODARD or
WOODWARD--we have all been through with that experience even in these later days--and thus there came at
last a new spelling and the evolution of a new name and perhaps the complete obliteration of a family as
WOODWORTHS. In like manner it is probable that many WOODWARDS have become WOODWORTHS;
possibly, too, there has Been a similar mixture with the WOODWORTHS and WOODRUFFS. On this account a
great deal of confusion has arisen and there has been great difficulty in making these researches to keep the
families distinct.
WALTER WOODWORTH probably came from Kent, England. There is no absolute proof of this
statement, but it may be reasonably inferred from the well-authenticated fact, as stated in Dean's History of
117
Scituate, that Scituate was settled by "men of Kent." The religious nature, which in a marked manner has
characterized his descendants, may be accounted for by the probability that for ages the WOODWORTH family
had breathed the religious atmosphere of Canterbury Cathedral, where perhaps an early ancestor had listened to
the preaching of St. Augustine and received into fruitful soil the first seeds of Christianity, which in later years
became disciplined and strengthened by the austerity of Thomas a Becket. It is a noticeable fact, however, that
the great majority of WALTER'S descendants are Dissenters, and, among a considerable number of clergymen,
none are Episcopalians.
It is not likely that our family "came over with William the Conqueror." We do not find the name enrolled
among William's knights at Battel Abbey. The name as well as the physical and intellectual characteristics of the
family are Saxon rather than Norman. But the origin of the family must, for the present at least, remain a matter
of conjecture. Behind Scituate the veil of the Atlantic is drawn and our ancestry is lost in the mist of bygone ages.
To WALTER WOODWORTH in 1635 was assigned the third lot on Kent street, which runs along the ocean
front, at the corner of Meeting-house lane, and there he built his house. In 1635 he appears to have owned other
lands, a tract on the First Herring Brook not far below Stockbridge Mill, where afterward stood the residence of
the poet, SAMUEL WOODWORTH, and another tract on Walnut Tree Hill just west of the present Greenbrush
or South Scituate R.R. Station, which was, in early times, called Walter Woodworth's Hill; and in 1666 he
becomes the purchaser of 60 acres at Weymouth. In 1640 WALTER was assessed 9s "for public use." March 2,
1641, he was admitted as a freeman and on June 4, 1645, he was appointed surveyor of highways in Scituate, and
again in 1646 and 1656. His name appears frequently on the town records of Scituate as juror, witness and in the
performance of other public duties. In 1654 he was a member of the First Church, which ordained Charles
Chauncey as its minister. But his religion was not of the showy kind, although he enjoyed it as much as some of
the more cantankerous Puritans. However meek he may have been in his general living, WALTER'S love of
peace and goodwill to men had its limitations, for when his next door neighbor, Japhet Turner, in 1661 pulled
down WALTER'S fence and obliterated his boundary lines, WALTER promptly sued him and obtained a verdict
for oe 5 and costs. The moral effect of this verdict was healthy and stiffened up the backbones of his children, all
of whom became successful and respected citizens. His daughter, Mehitabel, is mentioned as having been
"unfortunate as to her health." She was afflicted with some nervous disorder, which in those superstitious days
was synonymous with being "possessed with the devil;" in other words, she was under the influence of witchcraft
and Mary Ingham was charged with being the witch. On March 6, 1676, she was indicted in the following
language:
"Mary Ingham, thou art indicted by the name of Mary Ingham of the Town of Scituate, in the jurisdiction of
New Plymouth, for that thou, having not the fear of God before thine eyes, hast by the help of the Devil in a
witchcraft or sorcery, maliciously procured much hurt, mischief and pains unto the body of Mehitabel
Woodworth, the daughter of WALTER WOODWORTH, of Scituate aforesaid, and some others; particular
causing her, the said Mehitabel to fall into violent fits, and causing great pains unto several parts of her body at
several times so as she, the said Mehitabel Woodworth hath almost been bereft of her senses and hath greatly
languished to her much suffering thereby and the procuring of great grief, sorrow and charge to her parents--all
which thou hast procured and done against the law of God and to His great dishonor, and contrary to our
Sovereign Lord the King, His crown and dignity."
Mary was tried and acquitted and thus an end was put to the nonsense of witchcraft in the town of Scituate.-from Descendants of Walter Woodworth of Scituate, Mass. retold by Rick Wall ([email protected])
from WorldConnect Project
Since the "Descendants of Walter Woodworth" was printed, Mr. Frank E. Woodward, of Malden, Mass., has
unearthed the last Will of Walter Woodward, of Scituate, coming upon it quite by accident among the records of
deeds in Plymouth County, Mass. It is a very important discovery, and it is unfortunate that it did not come to
light in time to adjust the Woodworth Genealogy in conformity with it. The following is the Will and inventory:
Will of Walter Woodward
In the name of God, Amen. I, Walter Woodward, of Scituate, in the jurisdiction of New Plymouth in New
England, in America, being weak in body, but of sound and perfect memory, praise to Almighty God for the
same, do make this my last will and testament in manner as followeth:
First, and most principally, I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God, my creator, in and through
Jesus Christ, my only Saviour and Redeemer, and my body unto decent and burial at the discretion of my
executors with the advice of the rest of my sons hereafter named.
And my temporal estate I dispose of as hereafter followeth:
Item. I give and bequeath unto Thomas Woodward, my eldest son, a parcel of upland containing acres, lying
118
in Scituate aforesaid, bounded by the lands of Henry Ewell on the south and the Common on the north, to be
enjoyned to him and his heirs forever.
Item: I give unto my two sons, Thomas and Joseph, acres of Marsh land, to be equally divided between
them, which lyeth by Suzons--bounded by the Marsh of Anthony Collimer on the east, by the Marsh of Thomas
Clap, deceased, on the north, in Scituate aforesaid to be enjoyned to them and their heirs forever.
Item: I give to Thomas Woodward, my son, one-third part of all my land at Seconet, which I purchased. The
other two-thirds I give unto my two sons, Benjamin and Isaac Woodward, to be equally divided between them, to
be enjoyned to them and their heirs forever, excepting twenty-five acres, of which I do give unto my son Joseph,
to be enjoyned to him and his heirs forever. Ten acres of which I do give unto my daughter, Martha, to her, her
heirs forever, of which two quantities of land is to be deducted out of the two-thirds of my land lying at Seconet
given to my two sons, Benjamin and Isaac aforesaid. All the rest of my land at Seconet, which is yet to be
purchased, I give unto my two sons, Thomas and Joseph Woodward, to be divided equally between them, to be
enjoyned to them and their heirs forever.
Item: I give to Benjamin, my son aforesaid, my dwelling-house with my barns and other outhousing, with all
my land, both upland and marshland thereunto belonging, that is to say, twenty acres of upland, be it more or less,
bounded by land of John Turner to the west and by land of Joseph Otis to the east, and six acres of marshland
more or less bounded by the land of Joseph Otis to the northeast, and by the first herring brook towards the south-all of which aid housings and land with all the appurtenances thereof, the commons and privileges thereunto
belonging I give to the said Benjamin, my son, his heirs forever, always provided upon condition that my son,
Benjamin, aforesaid, do pay and allow the sum of seventy pounds unto my son, Joseph, and my six daughters,
Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, Mehitabel and Abigail, ten pounds apiece, to be paid to them at three payments,
viz., one-third part of the seventy pounds to be paid to my said children within three years after my decease and
the other two-thirds to be paid in the two following years, that is to say--in each year a third of the said sum of
seventy pounds, and each payment to be paid, the one-half in silver and the other half to be paid in corn; and
(cattell?). Further, my will is that my son Benjamin, aforesaid, do allow my two daughters, Mehitabel and
Abigail, the lower room or parlor at the northeasterly end of my dwelling house aforesaid, for their use during the
time they do live unmarried.
Item: I give and bequeath unto my said two daughters, Mehitabel and Abigail, my feather bed with the
furniture thereunto belonging, and all the rest of my household goods I give unto my six daughters, Sarah,
Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, Mehitabel and Abigail, to be divided equally among them. The rest of my estate
undisposed of by this my last will and testament, I give and bequeath to all my children, all my debts, funeral
expenses being first paid, to be equally divided amongst them.
Item: I do constitute and appoint my son, Benjamin, aforesaid, the sole executor of this my last will and
testament, whom I do appoint to pay all my debts and legacies and I do appoint my two sons, Thomas and Joseph
Woodward, overseers of this last will and testament.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twenty six day of November, 1685. the mark of- WALTER X WOOWARD. Signed, sealed and acknowledged in presence of-- THEO. KIN, Senior,
THOMAS PALMER, CHARLES STOCKBRIDGE.
Thomas King, Senior, Thomas Palmer, Charles Stockbridge, the witnesses to this above said will, appeared
before the Court and gave oath that they, the said above Theo. King, Senior, Thomas Palmer and Charles
Stockbridge, did see Walter Woodward above said, sign, seal and deliver this instrument to be his last will and
testament, taken before the Court March 2d, 1685-6.
Attested to--NATHANIEL CLARKE, Secretary. AN INVENTORY of all and singular goods, lands and
chattels of Walter Woodward, of Scituate, late diceased, taken by us whose names are hereunder written:
In purse, and apparel and books 05 10 00
In one bed and furniture 05
In one bed and furniture 04
In bedding 02
In one brass kettle and warming pan 02 05
In one iron pot 00 12 06
In one dripping pan and peeler 06
In one enamelled frying pan and tongs 08
In one cupboard 03
In one table 01
In one set work, cubs or tubs V spinning wheel 01 10
In one bedstead and three chairs 08
In chests 00 08
119
In hemp sheep wool and yarn 00 15 06
In four cowes 10
In one oxen and three young cattell 06
In two sheep 00 10 00
In forks, loges (not decipherable) and iron hoops 07
In one-third part of chairs? 05
In 12 bushels Indian corn 01 10
In dwelling-house and barn and upland and meadowland adjoining thereto, with common privileges 140
In ten acres salt meadowland 50
In five acres upland 20
In one who share of land in Seconet 100
______oe355 10
SAMUEL CLAP, JOHN WILLIAMS.0 Benjamin Woodward appeared before the Court and gave oath that the
above-written is a true inventory of his late father, Walter Woodworth, deceased, so far as he knows, and when
more comes to his knowledge, he is to bring it to this inventory by virtue of the oath in Court, March 2d, 1685-6.
(Attest) NATH'L CLARKE, Sect'y.
It will be observed that the name is spelled Woodward, except in the oath of Benjamin, where it is spelled
Woodworth. The transition from one name to the other seems to have been remarkably easy in those early days.
All the above from The Wall Family World Connect Project ([email protected])
"Walter Woodworth came from Kent Co., England, to Scituate, Mass., 1635. He was assigned the third lot on
Kent St., which runs along the ocean front, at the corner of Meeting House Lane, and there he built a house. In
that year he owned other land, a tract on the First Herring Brook not far below Stockbridge Mill, where
afterwards stood the residence of the poet Samuel Woodworth, and another tract on Walnut Tree Hill, just west of
the present (1901) Greenbush or South Scituate R.R. Station, which was in early times called Walter
Woodworth's Hill, and in 1666 he became a purchaser of sixty acres at Weymouth. In 1640 Walter was assessed
nine shillings for the public use, and March 2, 1641, freeman and in Jun 4, 1645, he was appointed surveyor of
highways in Scituate, and again in 1646 and 1656. His name appears frequently on the town records of Scituate
as juror, etc. In 1654 he was a member of the First Church, which ordained Charles Chauncy as their minister."-"Little Compton Families", page 798.
"Walter Woodworth was freeman in Scituate 1640, and settled amongst the men of Kent, 3d. lot on Kent street,
south side of Meeting-house land in 1635. He had other lands in 1635, viz. on the first Herring brook 30 rods
below Stockbridge's mill: and on the northwest side of Walnut tree hill. He left no record of the births of his
children; from incidental records we find Benjamin, Walter, Thomas, Joseph, Mary, wife of Aaron Simons 1677,
Martha, the wife of Lieut. Zachary Daman 1679, Mehitable, who was unfortunate in regard to her health, (see
witchcraft)."--"History of Scituate", by Samuel Deane
Other notes: ca 1639 when Walter was 27, he married Elizabeth Rogers, daughter of Thomas Rogers (ca 1586-12
Nov 1638) & Mary [Rogers]. Born ca 1620 Elizabeth bef 1685; she was 65. They had the following children: i.
Thomas (ca 1641-ca1718); ii. Sarah (ca 1643-); iii. Joseph (ca 1645-1718); iv. Elizabeth. born ca 1648 in
Scituate, MA. Elizabeth died in Duxbury, MA in 1709; she was 61. Elizabeth had a child out of wedlock with
Robert Stetson about 1675; v. Mary (1651-1718); vi. Benjamin (ca1656-1728); vii. Martha (1657-ca1721); vii.
Isaac (ca 1658-1714); ix. Mehitable--born 15 Sug 1662 in Scituate, MA. Mehitable "who was unfortunate with
regard to her health," and "suffered from withcraft.; x. Abigail, born ca 1664 in Scituate, MA. On 24 Dec 1695
when Abigail was 31, she married John Jackson, in Scituate, MA.
More About Walter Woodworth:
Burial: Scituate, Plymouth, MA
Children of Walter Woodworth and Elizabeth Rogers are:
416
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Thomas Woodworth, born 1641.
Sarah Woodworth, born 1643.
Joseph Woodworth, born 1645.
Elizabeth Woodworth, born 1647.
Benjamin Woodworth, born Aug 1649 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA; died 22 Apr 1728 in Lebanon,
Connecticut; married Hannah Damon.
Mary Woodworth, born 10 Mar 1650/51.
Martha Woodworth, born 1657.
Isaac Woodworth, born 1660.
Mehitable Woodworth, born 15 Aug 1662.
Abigail Woodworth, born 1665.
120
834. John Damon, born 11 Nov 1621. He married 835. Martha Howland.
835. Martha Howland, born 19 Dec 1632.
Child of John Damon and Martha Howland is:
417
i.
Hannah Damon, born 02 Dec 1672 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA; married Benjamin Woodworth.
836. Nicholas Munger, born 1630 in Cranbrook, So. Kent, Surrey, England; died 16 Oct 1668 in East
Parrish, Guilford, New Haven, CT. He married 837. SarahHall/Hull 02 Jun 1659 in Guilford, New Haven, CT.
837. SarahHall/Hull, born 04 Oct 1640 in Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 31 Jan 1688/89 in Guilford,
New Haven, CT. She was the daughter of 1674. William Hall and 1675. Esther.
Notes for Nicholas Munger:
Nicholas Munger was probably born 1630 or 1635. He came to Guilford, Conn. in 1639. He was a step-son of
Henry Godam. Nicholas came from England when a youth, settled on the north bank of Neck River (Madison)
on the public road probably as early as 1651. He took the oath of fidelity 1652 in Guilford. He m. June 2, 1659,
Sarah Hall, dau. of William and Esther Hall. She m. (2) Dennise Crapmton and d. Jan. 31, 1689. Nicholas d.
Oct. 16, 1668, East Parish of Guilford, Conn.--The Munger Book by J.B. Munger. Savage Gen. Dict.
Children of Nicholas Munger and SarahHall/Hull are:
418
i.
ii.
John Munger, born 26 Apr 1660.
Samuel Munger, born 1662 in East Parrish, Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 05 Mar 1716/17 in Guilford,
New Haven, CT; married Sarah Hand 11 Oct 1688.
838. Joseph Hand, born 1642 in Lynn, MA; died Jan 1733/34 in East Guilford, New Haven, CT. He was
the son of 1676. John Hand and 1677. Alice Stanborough. He married 839. Jane Wright.
839. Jane Wright, born 1644 in East Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 16 Dec 1724 in East Guilford, New
Haven, CT.
Notes for Joseph Hand:
Joseph Hand2, John1
Settled in Eastern part of Guilford, Conn. after 1660. He m. 1664 jane Wright, dau. of Benjamin and Jane
Wright. She d. Dec. 1724. He d. Jan. 1924, age 85 yrs. He headed a petition to the General Court in 1697, that
East Guilford might be made a separate ecclesiastical parish. In 1720, he was sent to the General Court as a
representative.--Ref. Hist. of Guidford and Madison, Conn. by Steiner, p. 132, 162, 195
Children of Joseph Hand and Jane Wright are:
419
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Sarah Hand, born 02 Mar 1663/64 in East Parrish, Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 01 Aug 1751;
married Samuel Munger 11 Oct 1688.
Jane Hand, born 19 Sep 1668.
Joseph Hand, born 02 Apr 1671.
Benjamin Hand, born 08 Feb 1672/73.
Stephen Hand, born 08 Feb 1674/75.
Elizabeth Hand, born 12 Mar 1676/77.
Silence Hand, born 12 Nov 1679.
Ann Hand, born 10 Jul 1683.
Jane Hand, born 25 Apr 1686.
864. John Linley, born 1647 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died 09 May 1684 in Branford, New Haven,
CT. He was the son of 1728. John Linley and 1729. Ellen Dayton. He married 865. Hannah Griffin Abt. 1670
in Branford, New Haven, CT.
865. Hannah Griffin, born 04 Jul 1649 in Simsbury, Hartford, CT; died 16 Feb 1736/37 in Branford, New
Haven, CT.
Notes for John Linley:
According to the Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, Vol. 2 (May 1665 - November, 1677), John
121
Linsley is on a list of the names of the Freemen living in y* Towne of Brainford on 11th of October, 1669.
Child of John Linley and Hannah Griffin is:
432
i.
Jonathan Linsley, born 1676 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 03 May 1725 in Branford, New Haven,
CT; married Dorcas Phippen 24 Sep 1706 in Milford, New Haven, CT.
866. Joseph Phippen, born Aug 1642. He married 867. Mary Stanford.
867. Mary Stanford, born 1642.
Child of Joseph Phippen and Mary Stanford is:
433
i.
Dorcas Phippen, born 22 Dec 1678 in Salem, Essex, MA; died 05 May 1760 in Wallingford, New
Haven, CT; married Jonathan Linsley 24 Sep 1706 in Milford, New Haven, CT.
868. Thomas Wheadon, born 31 May 1663 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died 16 Oct 1707 in
Branford, New Haven, Connecticut. He was the son of 1736. Thomas Wheadon and 1737. Ann Small Harvey.
He married 869. Hannah Sutcliffe 1686 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
869. Hannah Sutcliffe, born 19 Dec 1665 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 24 Nov 1743 in North
Brandford, New Haven, CT. She was the daughter of 1738. Nathaniel Sutcliffe and 1739. Hannah Plympton.
Children of Thomas Wheadon and Hannah Sutcliffe are:
i.
ii.
iii.
434
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Hannah Wheadon, born 1686 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut; died 05 Nov 1754 in Branford,
New Haven, Connecticut.
Abigail Wheadon, born 1688 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut; died 03 Oct 1742 in North
Brandford, New Haven, CT.
Thomas Wheadon, born 20 Feb 1691/92 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut; died 1752 in Branford,
New Haven, Connecticut; married Eunice Swaine 06 May 1714 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut;
born 01 Aug 1692 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
John Wheadon, born Sep 1694 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut; married Mary Crowfoot 10 Jan
1716/17 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
Nathaniel Wheadon, born 06 Jul 1697 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
Rebecca Wheadon, born Sep 1701 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
Jonathan Wheadon, born 1704 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
Martha Wheadon, born Jan 1707/08 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 18 Mar 1773 in Southington,
Hartford, CT; married Stephn Barnes 05 Jan 1724/25 in Branford, New Haven, CT; born 02 Jan 1703/04
in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 27 Mar 1777 in Southington, Hartford, CT.
870. Joseph Crowfoot, born 1630 in Cornwall, England; died 08 Apr 1678 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
He married 871. Mary Hillyer Hilliard.
871. Mary Hillyer Hilliard, born 25 Dec 1639 in Windsor, Hartford, CT; died 13 May 1681 in Springfield,
Hampden, MA.
Children of Joseph Crowfoot and Mary Hilliard are:
435
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Mary Crowfoot, born 11 Jan 1694/95 in Weathersfield, Hartford, CT; married John Wheadon 10 Jan
1716/17 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
Joseph Crowfoot, born 29 Jun 1660 in Springfield, Hampden, MA; died 1722 in Weathersfield,
Hartford, CT.
John Crowfoot, born 02 Aug 1663 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
Samuel Crowfoot, born 13 Oct 1665 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
James Crowfoot, born 23 Jan 1668/69 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
Daniel Crowfoot, born 23 Jan 1668/69 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
Matthew Crowfoot, born 05 Apr 1672 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
David Crowfoot, born 11 Oct 1674 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
Sarah Crowfoot, born 13 Aug 1677 in Springfield, Hampden, MA.
872. Edward Barker, born Abt. 1625 in England; died 1703 in Branford, New Haven, CT. He married
873. Elizabeth Fowler.
873. Elizabeth Fowler, born 1646; died 16 Apr 1705.
122
Notes for Edward Barker:
BARKER GENEALOGY, ELIZABETH FRYE BARKER, NEW YORK, FRYE PUBLISHING CO., 1927
PAGE 105
There is no connecting link that has been established which unites the various Barker families that appear as some
of the early settlers in this country. Among the early settlers that established Barker lines are:
ROBERT of Plymouth Colony ............1628
JOHN of Duxbury, Mass.....................1628
JAMES of Rhode Island.......................1634
JAMES of Rowley, Mass......................1638
EDWARD of Branfod, Conn...................1640
RICHARD of Andover, Mass.................1643
SAMUEL of Delaware..........................1682
The family is of Anglo-Saxon origin and the name Barker is supposed to come from the word Beorc or the AngloFrench word Berquier, meaning Shepard. Variations of the name are Le Barere; Barke; Barka and Barkar.
Edward Barker , born about 1625, was said to have come from England in 1640 and was a well known merchant
in 1650 in New Haven, Conn. where he carried on an extensive trade with Barbados, West Indies.
Not being in accord with the church government in the colony of New Haven, forty seven men of whom Edward
was one, drew up and signed a New Plantation and Church Covenant on 20 January 1667. This Covenant was to
insure the Congregational form of church worship and to provide settlement of boundary and other questions.
Wishing a nearby locality, they selected Branford, a few miles from New Haven.
On Nov. 13, 1671 Abraham pierson of Newark, N.J. sold to Edward all his accommodations in Branford,
including house, home-lot, orchard, horse pasture and other lands with a "brown bay horse without any artificial
marks, very well known and often seen about Quiennsbough(?), receiving in payment 120 pounds.
Being a man of distinction, Edward was prominent in all civic and other affairs, was agent for Branford in
conveying town lands 11/5/1677 was on committee 2/25/1678 to view land capable of improvement, was on com.
8/15/1678 to treat with Mr. Harrison in reference "to his coming amonst us to carry on Ye work of Ye Ministry."
On 6/17/1680 was to treat with New Haven concerning some pretended claims on lands, on 3/31/1681 was to
designate what houses shall be fortified.
When the towns of Connecticut were required by the General Court "to take patent of the land to hold title to the
lands", the twon of Branford appointed a committee of Edward and eight others and it is recorded "the said lands
having been purchased or otherwise lawfully obtained of the Indian native proprietors, the patent lawfully
obtained of the Indian native proprietors, the patent was granted 16 Feb 1685 to Edward Barker and others, the
present inhabitants of Branford, their heirs, and assigns forever." signed and sealed, Robert Treat, Governor, by
order of the General Court, John Allyn, Secy.
Edward conveyed homestead and land to his son William 7/20/1701 and died about 1703. He married Elizabeth
b. d. 4/16/1705.
Children of Edward Barker and Elizabeth Fowler are:
436
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
William Barker, born 1668.
Edward Barker, born 1670.
Mary Barker, born 15 Aug 1671.
Jonathan Barker, born 28 Jan 1673/74.
Lt. Daniel Barker, born 27 Jan 1675/76 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 25 Jan 1751/52; married
Keziah Moulthrop 24 Aug 1701 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
874. Matthew Moulthrop, born 1639; died 01 Feb 1690/91 in East Haven. He was the son of 1748.
Matthew Moulthrop and 1749. Jane. He married 875. Hannah Thompson 26 Jun 1662 in East Haven, CT.
875. Hannah Thompson, born 1643. She was the daughter of 1750. John Thompson and 1751. Eleanor.
123
Notes for Matthew Moulthrop:
According to the Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, Vol. 2 (May 1665 - Nov. 1677), Mathew
Moulthrop is listed as a New Haven freeman in October, '69.
Children of Matthew Moulthrop and Hannah Thompson are:
i.
ii.
iii.
437
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Hannah Moulthrop, born 02 Nov 1663.
Hannah Moulthrop, born 20 Apr 1665.
John Moulthrop, born 05 Feb 1667/68; died 14 Feb 1712/13; married Abigail Bradley; born 09 Sep
1671; died 03 Sep 1743.
Matthew Moulthrop, born 18 Jul 1670.
Abigail Moulthrop, born 18 Jul 1670.
Lydia Moulthrop, born 08 Aug 1674.
Samuel Moulthrop, born 24 Jun 1677.
Samuel Moulthrop, born 13 Apr 1679.
Keziah Moulthrop, born 16 Apr 1682 in Branford, New Haven, CT; died 31 Dec 1767 in Branford, New
Haven, CT; married Lt. Daniel Barker 24 Aug 1701 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
876. Thomas Baker, born 26 Jul 1654. He married 877. Ann Topping.
877. Ann Topping
Child of Thomas Baker and Ann Topping is:
438
i.
Samuel Baker, born 05 Apr 1702; married Mercy Schellinx.
878. Jacob Schellinx, born 1666. He married 879. Hannah Conkling.
879. Hannah Conkling
Child of Jacob Schellinx and Hannah Conkling is:
439
i.
Mercy Schellinx, born 04 Nov 1699; married Samuel Baker.
880. Richard Cadman He was the son of 1760. William Cadman and 1761. Elizabeth. He married 881.
Sarah Almy.
881. Sarah Almy, born 17 Apr 1662.
Notes for Richard Cadman:
"Richard (2) William (1) Cadman's date of birth is not of record but he was a freeman of portsmouth on May
6, 1684, when with others he was voted a Freeman of taht town (Rhode Island colonial Records) vol. 3 pg. 150)
and on March 2, 1677 the town meeting was held at his home (Records of the Town of Portsmouth pub. by Rhode
Island Historical Society, 1901, p. 238) as well as other meetings at later dates. In 1684 he served on the jury
(Records of the Twon of Portsmouth pub. by Rhode Island Historical Society, 1901). On September 22, 1688 he
and his wife Sarah deeded 28 acres of land with house, barn and other outbuildings and on the same day, as son of
William (1) Cadman, he and his mother, the widow Elizabeth Cadman joined in a deed of land (A. 268).
The date of his marriage is not of record but he married Sarah (3) Christopher (2) William (1) Almy. She
was born April 17, 1662 (A. 237), the first child of Christopher and Elizabeth Cornell Almy of Portsmouth.
Elizabeth Cornell ws the daughter of Thomasand Elizabeth Fiscock Cornell (A. 54). Christopher Cornell in his
will date September 4, 1708 bequeaths property to his children and grandchildren and to "children of deceased
daugher Sarah, formerly the wife of Richard Cadman and latterly the wife of Jonathan Merihew that is, to her first
born William (3) Cadman 10 shillings for a Bible. To he second son Christopher (3) 10 pounds. To the two sons
she had by Merihew, viz: John and Thomas each 10 pounds."
After the death of Richard Cadman, Sarah Almy Cadman married her her second husband Jonathan Merihew
(A. 237). The first of her four children by her second husband was born in 1695. It is therefore evident that
Richard (2) Cadman's death occurred sometime previous to that date and after 1688 when he and his wife Sarah
deeded land (a. 268)."--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by
Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
Children of Richard Cadman and Sarah Almy are:
440
i.
ii.
William Cadman, died Aft. 06 May 1760; married Amy.
Elizabeth Cadman, born Abt. 1686; died Aft. 1768; married William White; born Abt. 1682.
124
Notes for Elizabeth Cadman:
"Elizabeth (3) George (2) William (1) Cadman, the only known child of George (2) and Hannah
(Hathaway) Cadman, dates of birth and marriage are not known. The wills of William White, Sr., her
husband, and their son William Jr., are on file in the Registry of Probate office, Bristol County, Mass.
From these and the wills of George (2) Cadman and his wife Hannah, are determined the names of the
eleven children of William and Elizabeth (Cadman) White. (M. Sdc. 22: 2-7). William White in his will
names his eleven children and he mentions eighteen grandchildren, eleven of whom are named.
Elizabeth Cadman White died after 1768 as she is mentioned in the will of Williama White, Sr., her
husband, who made his will January 6 of that year, and as she is mentioned in the will of her son in 1777
as being deceased at that date, the date of her death may be placed between 1768 and 1777. Elizabeth
(Cadman) White inherited a large estate on the Accoxit or Westport River near what is now known as
Hix's Bridge in Old Dartmouth. Wm. White was a blacksmith and so called himself in deeds. In his will
however he calls himself "gentleman". Wm. White was a member of a petit jury July 5, 1705 (M. Dsc.
12: 117. As he was of age for this service at this date it is probable he was born about 1680-1684."-WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G.
Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
iii.
iv.
Rebecca Cadman
Christopher Cadman, born 1686; married Mary; died 03 Sep 1780.
Notes for Christopher Cadman:
"Christopher (3) b. 1686 (A. 237). He died july 12, 1716 (a. 269.) and is called of Newport. In 1716 he
was justice of Peace of Portsmouth. The date of his marriage is not of record but he married Mary ---------, who for her second husband married on Feb. 26, 1718, Gideon Wanton, son of Joseph Wanton (V.R.
7: 8.), who became Governor of Colonial Rhode Island. In 1712, Christopher Cadman purchased land in
Newport and in the deed for the purchase of that land he is called "Mariner", and in acknowledgment of
his will he is called "Captain Christopher Cadman". he died without issue and left his property to his
wife Mary (Newport Twon Council Records--not published; 3: 11,12) who died Sept. 3, 1780, age 87,
and is buried at the Friend's Burial Ground at newport R.I. (Wanton Genealogy by Russell Bartlett).
Christopher in his will bequeaths "ten oa piece to my two youngest brothers and sisters: viz., John
Merihew, Thomas Merihew and Rebekah Cadman." (Newport Town Council Records -- not published 3:
11, 12, 89.) **NOTE. The vital Records of Rhode Island under the title of Friends records vol. 7 page 8
states that Gideon Wanton married mary Cadman, widow of Newport, on Feb. 6, 1718. Some
biographical sketches of Gideon Wanton state he married Mary Codman. A search of the records reveals
no other Codmans in Rhode Island at that time. In view of the redords of the Firends where Mary is
called a widow, it is evident that Austin was correct in his statment on page 269 that she, the widow of
Christopher Cadman married for her second husband Gideon Wanton. Austin (Arnold?) vol. 4-19
Newport Marriages also gives the record as Mary Codman as being married Feb. 26, 1718."--WILLIAM
CADMAN OF PORTMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing,
Michigan, 1935
888. Simon DeWolf, born 1650 in Wethersfield, Hartford, CT; died 05 Sep 1695 in Lyme, New London,
CT. He was the son of 1776. Balthazar DeWolf and 1777. Alice Peck. He married 889. Sarah Lay 12 Nov
1682 in Lyme, New London, CT.
889. Sarah Lay, born 04 Feb 1664/65 in Lyme, New London, CT.
Child of Simon DeWolf and Sarah Lay is:
444
i.
Josiah DeWolf, born 15 Nov 1689 in Lyme, New London, CT; died 1767 in Lyme, New London, CT;
married Anna Waterman 14 Nov 1713 in Lyme, New London, CT.
890. Thomas Waterman, born 30 Nov 1644 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA; died 01 Jun 1708 in Norwich,
New London, Connecticut. He was the son of 1780. Robert Waterman and 1781. Elizabeth Bourne. He
married 891. Miriam Tracy 01 Oct 1675 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
891. Miriam Tracy, born 1649 in Saybrook, Middlesex, CT; died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
She was the daughter of 1782. Thomas Tracy and 1783. Mary Mason.
Notes for Thomas Waterman:
Thomas Waterman was nephew to the wife of John Bradford. Robert Waterman and Elizabeth Bourn of
Marshfield were married Dec. 9, 1638. Thomas, their second son, was born in 1644, and probably came to
Norwich with his uncle Bradford. In November, 1668, he was joined in wedlock with Miriam, only daughter of
125
Thomas Tracy. The Waterman house-lot was next to that of Major Mason, and the dwelling-house was built at a
slifht turn of the town street, opposite the residence of the late Dr. Turner. It projected awkwardly into the
highway, which now passes over a part of the site. The old well that stood by the house, is under the street.
A granite stone records in rude capitals the decease of this proprietor.
SERt
THOMAS
WATERMAN
DECd JVNE 1st
1708. Aged 64y
The invetory of Thomas Waterman amounted to L855.11.4. He had ten ozen, ten cows, and abundant
household goods, showing a condition of thrift, comfort, and independence. He left three sons and five daughters.
Elizabeth, the oldest daughter, married John Fitch, one of the sons of the reverend minister of the town, and
settled in Windham.
Martha, the second daughter, went to Lyme, as the second wife of "Lyme's Captain, Reinold Marvin."
Miriam died unmarried, Sept. 22, 1760, aged 82.
Lydia married Eleazer Burnham, a new inhabitant of the Nine-miles-square, tht came in from Ipswich after
1700.
Ann, the youngest daughter, became the partner of Josiah DeWolfe of Lyme.
History of Norwich, Connecticut by A.M. Caulkins, pages 206-207.
Child of Thomas Waterman and Miriam Tracy is:
445
i.
Anna Waterman, born Apr 1689 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut; died 21 Dec 1752 in Norwich,
New London, Connecticut; married Josiah DeWolf 14 Nov 1713 in Lyme, New London, CT.
892. Hugh Calkins, born Jun 1659. He married 893. Sarah Sluman.
893. Sarah Sluman, born 1650.
Child of Hugh Calkins and Sarah Sluman is:
446
i.
Stephen Calkins, born 05 Sep 1700 in Norwich, New London, CT; died 02 Feb 1734/35; married Sarah
Calkins Abt. 1722 in Norwich, New London, CT.
894. Jonathan Calkins, born 09 Jan 1677/78 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut; died 15 Jul 1750 in
New London, CT. He was the son of 1788. David Calkins and 1789. Mary Bliss. He married 895. Sarah
Turner 11 Dec 1700 in New London, CT.
895. Sarah Turner, born 28 Oct 1683. She was the daughter of 1790. Ezekiel Turner and 1791.
Susannah Keeney.
Child of Jonathan Calkins and Sarah Turner is:
447
i.
Sarah Calkins, born 11 Jul 1703 in New London, CT; died 03 Dec 1774; married Stephen Calkins Abt.
1722 in Norwich, New London, CT.
896. Samuel Pettingell, born 09 Feb 1644/45 in Salem, Essex, MA; died 1711. He was the son of 1792.
Richard Pettingell and 1793. Joanna Ingersoll. He married 897. Sarah Poore 13 Feb 1673/74.
897. Sarah Poore, born 05 Jun 1655. She was the daughter of 772. John Poore, Sr. and 773. Sarah ?.
Notes for Samuel Pettingell:
SAMUEL, (Richard,) born in Salem, bapt. 9 (12), 1644, that is on the ninth day of the last month of their year,
February, in the year which English people called 1644, but which had been called 1645 since the 1st of January
by the people of Holland and some other countries. To be exact, we should write it 9 February, 1644-5.
He came to his manhood at old Newbury. He was a good hunter, whether with traps or flint-lock gun deponent
saith not ; but the town paid him a bounty of a shilling for killing a fox in 1667. In 1687 he is noticed on the town
records as one of those who were raising sheep. He took the oath of allegiance with other townsmen in 1678,
"aged 33."
He married, Feb. 13, 1673-4, Sarah, daughter of John Poore, an early resident of Newbury ; she was the second
child of the name, and was born 5 June, 1655 ; she survived her husband and was recorded a member of the
126
church in 1716. Samuel died in 1711. In his will, dated July 9, 1709, proved Jan. 2, 1711, he bequeathed his
property to his wife Sarah and children, Samuel, Richard, Daniel, John, Thomas, Mary, Sarah, Joanna, and
Benjamin.---A Pettingell Genealogy, arranged for publication by Charles Henry Pope. Boston, Mass., 1906 p. 89.
Children of Samuel Pettingell and Sarah Poore are:
448
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
Daniel Pettingell, born 16 Feb 1678/79 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; died 12 May 1726 in Abington,
Plymouth, MA; married (1) Mary Stickney 13 Nov 1699 in Newbury, Essex, MA; married (2) Esther
(Hester) French 26 Mar 1708 in Newbury, Essex, MA.
Unknown daughter Pettingell, born 13 Mar 1674/75.
Samuel Pettingell, born 03 Feb 1675/76.
Richard Pettingell, born 26 Aug 1677.
Richard Pettingell, born 24 Jan 1678/79.
John Pettingell, born 20 Sep 1680.
Thomas Pettingell, born 12 Nov 1682.
Joseph Pettingell, born 27 Nov 1684.
Mary Pettingell, born 20 Jan 1685/86.
Sarah Pettingell, born 20 Jan 1685/86.
Joanna Pettingell, born 10 Feb 1688/89.
Benjamin Pettingell, born 18 Dec 1692.
898. John Atkinson He married 899. Sarah Morse.
899. Sarah Morse, born 01 May 1641.
Notes for Sarah Morse:
Sarah Stickney's daughter, Mary Stickney, was born two years after Amos Stickney died. Here are the court
records in regard to Sarah Stickney and this child.
RECORDS AND FILES OF THE QUARTERLY COURTS OF ESSEX COUNTY, VOL. 8
1681
Page 99--"Sarah Stickny, widow, was ordered to be whipped for fornication, unless she pay a fine.*
*Newbury presentment. She had a child born in January last. Wit: Elizabeth Brown and Sara Hains."
Mar. 1682
Page 259--"Sarah Stickny, widow v. John Atkinson. Slander. Verdict for plaintiff.*
*Sara Stickney's bill of cost, 2li. 4s. 4d.
Page 260--"John Atkinson v. Sarah Stickney, widow. Slander. Verdict for plaintiff.+
+Writ, dated Dec. 22, 1681, signed by Anthony Smerby, clerk for Newbury, and served by Joseph Pike, constable
of Newbury, by attachment of the dwelling house and land of defendant. Bond of Sarah (her mark) Sticknee.
John Atkinson's bill of cost, 2li, 4d.
Sarah Stickny made oath that John Atkinson was the father of that child which she brought into court and for
which she asked maintenance.
Summons, dated Dec. 15, 1681, for the appearance of John Atkinson upon complaint of Sarah Stickney that
he is the father of her last child, which fact she had concealed upon his promise to maintain the child which he
now refeuses to do, also to said Sarah and her son to give evidence, signed by Daniel Denison.*(Autograph)
Richard Brown, aged thirty-two years, deposed that he was at the widow Stickney's house groundpinning a
leanto last October and Goodman Adkinson was there, etc. Sworn in court.
John March, aged twenty-three years, testified that last fall he, Samll. Lowle and John Atkinson jr., were
riding in a cart by Sarah Stickney's house. Deponent called to her and said,"here is Samll. Lowle what have you
to say to him?" She replied, "Ayou roge, yonder is yor Child under the tree, goe take it up and see it." Lowle
replied it was none of his, etc. Sworn in court.
Jonathan Haynes, aged about thirty-five years, testified. Sworn in court.
John Stickny testified that for the sheep that Jonathan Hayns had of his mother, said Hayns was to pay 5s. in
barley. Sworn in court.
Goorg Littel testified that he went along with Nicholas Rawlings to John Atkinson's to make an end of the
differences about the money which he said he lent to Atkinson. Sworn in court.
John Stickny testified that John Atkinson came to his mother's house and desired her to let deponent get some
wine for him, and at last Atcinson gave him some money and he went to Mrs. Ann White's and brought back a
127
quart. They both drank freely and Atcinson sent deponent to bed, etc. Sworn, Dec. 20, 1681, by Daniel Denison.
Nicolas Rawlings testified that Jonathan Hains said that the widow Stickne said the child was not Samuel
Leol's but another man's child in the town, etc. Sworn in court.
James Mirack, aged about thirty-one years, and Hannah Mirack, his wife, aged about twenty-two years,
deposed that Sarah Stickney came into their house and thold them that their brother John Attkinson came from
Haverhill and brought her news of her son at Bardford and of her sister-in-law Faith. Atkinson was about to hire
a house of said Faith, etc. Sworn in court.
Hanah Merrek, wife of James, and Hanah Merrek, his sister, testified that Sarah Stickney came into Jonathan
Haynes' house when John atkinson and his wife were there and asked said John if he were going to deny his child,
where-upon John's wife called her an impudent baud. Then Sarah used such opprobrious, reporachful and
reviling speeches that Haynes told her to go out of the house but she would not depart. Then Goody Atkinson
stepped to Goody Stickney "and Clapt her hand in her face and sd she would spit in the face of any that should
call her a baud: and spit att her." Sworn in court.
Marget Mireck, aged about fifty-nine years, and Hannah Chainy, aged about thirty-eight years, testified that
Sarah said she never had money of any man living to pay her fine nor for the child's maintenance. Some of her
money was from Goodman Downer for sheep that she sold and the rest was from Goodman Pilsbury. Sworn in
court.
Sara Stickny affirmed that John Atkinson called her out of her house, told her that the court was near and he
was going to Boston. He gave her 30s. in money and asked her to be true to him. John Stickny, her son, testified
to the same and that when Atkinson came to their house, he bade deponent put his horse out of sight. Sworn, Dec.
20, 1681, before Daniel Denison.
Ane Thurell, William Morse, Anthony Morse, Johuab Morse, Hester Smith and Frances Thoria testified that
Sarah Stickny told them after she returned from court that the magistrates had dealt very favorably with her and
better than she deserved and she had great respect for them all. Sworn in court.
Joshua Mors, aged twenty-seven years, deposed that he was at the house of his siter, Sarah Stickny, when
Epheram Wheller, John Atkinson's man, came to plow and sow her rye, etc. Sworn, Mar. 23 1682, before Daniel
Denison.
John Stickny, aged about sixteen years, testified. Sworn, Mar. 27, 1682, before Daniel Denison.
Robert Savory of Bradford, aged about forty-eight years, deposed that he went to buy a cow at Stickny's
house, etc. Sworn in court.
John Stickny testified that after his mother's child was born Atkinson came to see her, took the child in his
arms and kissed it, etc. Sown, Dec. 20, 1681, before Daniel Denison.
Elizabeth Browne testified that she was with Sarah at the birth of the child and she told her Samuel Lowel
was the father, and when he went away he said he would bring her whittles and clouts. Sworn in court.
James Mireck, jr., aged thirty-one years, deposed. Sworn in court.
Necolas Rollens testified that John Atkinson paid him the money he owed him because he was afraid he
would witness against him and as he said disgrace him and his family. Sworn in court.
John Woolcot, ar., testified that he was at Goodman Chene's house when Goody Chedni asked him who was
the father of Sarah's child, etc. Sworn in court.
Henery Akers testified about the money that Nicolas Rollens loaned John Atkinson, etc. Sworn in court.
William Morse, aged sixty-seven years, testified that Atkinson said before the honored major that he had not
been at Sarah's house for seven years. John Stickny testified to the same. Sworn in court.
Johannah Morse, aged twenty years, testified.
Page 264
John Atkinson v. John Woolcott. Slander. Verdict for defendant. Appealed to the next Court of Assistants.
Plaintiff bound, with Joseph Peasly and James Sanders as sureties.*
*Writ: John Atkinson of Newbury v. John Woolcote of Newbury; slander; for reporting that he tried to cheat
difendant of about 24li. by using means to persuade said Woollcott's wife to sign a receipt, when she would have
done had not her son-in-law Chadwick prevented, which made Atkinson very angry, Chadwick making another
receipt for the true amount which she signed and gave to Atkinson; dated Mar. 21, 1681-2; signed by Anthony
Somerby, cleric for Newbury; and signed by Joseph Pike, constable of Newbury, by attachment of the dwelling
house of defendant.
John Atkinson's bill of cost, 2li. 18s. 2d.
Page 288
Sarah Stickney, widow, declaring that John atkinson was the father of her child, the latter desired to be tried
128
by jury. They found him guilth and he was ordered to pay 12s. for the jury, 8li. for the past maintenance of the
child and to pay said Sarah 2s. 6d. per week until the court take further order.*
Sara Stickney's bill of cost, 7li. 6d.
Anna Cheny, aged about thirty-eight years, testified that the widow Stickney told her that the child was
Samuell Looll's and she would have had him marry her and carry her to Providence, but he said he had no money.
She siad she had money enough. He told her that he would be back from sea by the next Christmas and would
then marry her, etc. Sworn, 30:10:1681, before Nath. Saltonstall, assistant.
Joseph Pike, aged about forty-three years deposed as to what Sarah told him when he served the writ. Sworn
in court.
Jonathan Haynes and Sarah, his wife, deposed that Sarah never lisped the name of Mr. Jno. Atkinson in
connection with the child, etc. Sworn, 10:30:1681, before N. Saltonstall, assistant.
Jonthan Haynes and Sarah, his wife, testified that after Sarah came from court at Salem where she was fined
she said that the court did not regard the sin so long as they could get the money. Sworn, 30:10:1681, before
Nath. Saltonstall, assistant.
Page 289
John Atkinson was ordered to pay 26s. for striking Sarah Stickney.*
*Sara Stickney's bill of cost, 2li. 5s.
San Stickney's complaint for striking her with his staff so that her child fell almost into the fire, etc.
William Morse, aged sixty-seven years, and Joshua Morse, aged twenty-seven years, testified that John
Atkinson said he struck her. Sworn, Mar. 27, 1682, before Daniel Denison.
Page 296
John Atkinson of Newbury, being the reputed father of Sarah Stickney's last child, complained that he is hard
put to it to pay all charges, and court ordered that half of his payments should be in money and the other half
provision or clothing for the said child at money price.
Court being informed tht the clerk of the writs of Newbery had entered the bastard child of Sarah Stickney of
Newbery in the record of births as the child of John Atkenson, upon whom she charged it, although he did not
won it, it was declared to be a high irregularity, and the clerk was ordered to appear at the next Ipswich court
unless he give satisfaction to said Atkenson before that time. The clerk was ordered to erase the entry from the
book of records and cause it, if it be returned to the county records to be altered or erased from those records.
Child of John Atkinson and Sarah Morse is:
449
i.
Mary Stickney, born 10 Jan 1679/80 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; married Daniel Pettingell 13 Nov
1699 in Newbury, Essex, MA.
900. Uriah Leonard, born 10 Jul 1662. He married 901. Elizabeth Caswell.
901. Elizabeth Caswell, born 10 Jan 1664/65.
Child of Uriah Leonard and Elizabeth Caswell is:
450
i.
Uriah Leonard, born 10 Apr 1686; married Abigail Stone.
902. William Stone, born 1661. He married 903. Hannah Walley.
903. Hannah Walley, born 1665.
Child of William Stone and Hannah Walley is:
451
i.
Abigail Stone, born 09 Jul 1689; married Uriah Leonard.
906. Josiah Cleveland, born 26 Feb 1666/67. He was the son of 1812. Moses Cleveland and 1813. Anne
Winn. He married 907. Mary Bates.
907. Mary Bates, born 08 May 1667.
Child of Josiah Cleveland and Mary Bates is:
453
i.
Mary Cleveland, born 17 Mar 1691/92; married Richard Smith 30 Jan 1715/16 in Canterbury, Windham,
CT.
129
908. John Adams, born 1651 in Braintree, Norfolk Co. Massachusetts; died 26 Feb 1723/24 in Canterbury,
Windham, CT. He was the son of 1816. Peter Adams and 1817. Rachel Newcome. He married 909. Michal
Bloice 02 Apr 1685 in Medfield, Massachusetts Colony.
909. Michal Bloice, born 03 Apr 1664 in Watertown, Middlesex Co., Mass; died 14 Apr 1752 in
Canterbury, Windham, CT. She was the daughter of 1818. Richard Bloyse and 1819. Michal Jennison.
Notes for John Adams:
John Adams, son of Peter and Rachel Adams, was brought to Medfield when a boy. The first mention of his
name on the town books was his appointment to the office of "hog-reave" in 1686. This needful but rather
undesirable office was as a joke usually given by the towns-people to the newly married man, and here serves as
the first point of identification of this John Adams, as he was married in 1685. From this time he is always
recorded as "John son of Peter Adams," to distinguish him from his two cousins of the same given name who
were holding offices at the same periods, namely, John Adams the Miller (son of Henry Adams), and John Adams
the cordwainer (son of Edward Adams). As his occupation was never mentioned he was probably a yoeman or
husbandman. In 1692 John Adams of Medfield sold to Robert Harrington of Watertown, Mass., six acres of land
in Watertown butted by the land of Richard Bloyce, and his wife Michal Adams relinquishes her right of dower.
In Canterbury, Conn. town books, Vol. 2, page 21, John Adams of Medfield, Mass., on December 8, 1708,
bought four hundred acres of land at Canterbury of William Johnson (one of the first proprietors of the place).
March 16, 1718, the town of Canterbury confirmed to John Adams and to Samuel Adams, Jr. (his son), three
hundred acres of land by Rowland's Brook, the bounds beginning at a heap of stones on the top of the hill on the
west side, ran by Paine's land and that of Eleazer Brown; and another parcel of forty acres of land. John and
Samuel Adams being settled inhabitants by the vote of the inhabitants of the town June 15, 1718. In April 30,
1723, John Adams received one and a half shares in the common and undivided lands.
March 10, 1720, Joseph Adams of Medfield, Mass., bought of John Cady secundus, a mansion house and
eighty acres of land in Canterbury. This was a brother of John, who was then settled in that town. March 12,
1720, John Adams deeded to his son Richard land by that which he had before given to his son Isacc, which he
had previously purchased of William Johnson. On the same day he deeded land to his other son, John Adams, Jr.
John Adams married at Medfield, Mass., April 2, 1685, Michal, daughter of Richard and Michal (Jennison)
Bloyse, also spelled Bloyce and Bloice, of Watertown, Mass.
This John Adams's will was frwan February 14, 1724; in it he provides for his wife Michal and his daughter
Mary, who was to live with her mother; he gave his son Samuel a quarter part of his "wearing clothes"; leaves to
his three sons "who now live with me" his home lot to be equally divided between them, which lot is bounded
south by "my son Richard Adams's land, west by my son Samuel's land, east by the hundred acres I purchased of
William Johnson; also three fourths of the forty acres more lying northwest of the said home lot which I bought of
William Johnson and Mr. Paine for the convenience of a saw mill. To my cozen (i.e. niece) Ruth Adams who
now lives with me, five pounds provided she continues to live with my wife during the whole time," that is during
her minority; he also mentioned his daughter Ruth Paine and his youngest son Michal Adams.
John Adams died February 26, 1724; his widow Michal Adams died April 14, 1752. The settlement of his
estate is recorded in the Canterbury books, Vol. 5, page 393, where we read: "Whereas Mr. John Adams of
Canterbury late deceased, died seized of about one hundred acres of land bounded by that of Isaac Adams on the
north, west by the land of the heirs of Mr. John Adams, east by the land of Elisha Paine, and John Adams gave the
said land to his four sons Samuel, Joh, Isaac and Richard, who were the then surviving sons of the said John
Adams, and the said heirs held the land in common until about 1734, when Richard died and left one only child,
Lucy, whereupon she held the land in common with the other heirs until 1743, when Samuel died, leaving only
two daughters, Amy, late wife of Thomas Nowling, dec., and Mehitable, late wife of of John Smith, dec.,
whereupon his share descended to these daughters; Mehitable died in 1750 and left four children; whereupon
these heirs held the land in common, it is now desired to make a more natural division, etc."--The New England
Historical and Genealogical Register, 1894, Vol. XLVIII, Boston, pages 191-192.
Children of John Adams and Michal Bloice are:
454
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Samuel Adams, born 25 Feb 1684/85 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 24 Apr 1742 in Canterbury,
Windham, CT; married Mary Plimpton 02 Nov 1709.
Mary Marie Adams, born 11 Mar 1685/86 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA.
Patience Adams, born 21 Mar 1688/89 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 28 May 1698.
Ruth Adams, born 10 Dec 1691 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA.
Josiah Adams, born 04 Oct 1693 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA.
John Adams, born 14 Dec 1695 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA.
Isaac Adams, born 30 Jan 1696/97 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA.
130
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
Richard Adams, born 28 Sep 1699 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA.
Joshua Adams, born 02 Jul 1701 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 01 Apr 1706.
Abigail Adams, born 23 Apr 1703 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 14 May 1706.
Bethia Adams, born 08 Feb 1703/04 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 06 Apr 1706.
Michael Adams, born 01 Mar 1705/06 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA.
910. Joseph Plimpton, born 07 Oct 1653. He married 911. Mary Morse.
911. Mary Morse
Child of Joseph Plimpton and Mary Morse is:
455
i.
Mary Plimpton, born Jul 1692; married Samuel Adams 02 Nov 1709.
912. Samuel A. Fitch, born 16 Apr 1655 in Saybrook, New London, CT. He was the son of 1824. James
Fitch and 1825. Abigail Whetfield Whitfield. He married 913. Mary Brewster.
913. Mary Brewster, born 10 Dec 1660 in Norwich, CT; died 02 Dec 1750 in Guilford, New Haven, CT.
She was the daughter of 1826. Benjamin Brewster and 1827. Ann Addis.
Children of Samuel Fitch and Mary Brewster are:
456
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Mary Fitch, born 10 Mar 1679/80.
Samuel Fitch, born 05 Oct 1681.
Hezikiah Fitch, born 02 Jan 1681/82.
Elizabeth Fitch, born 15 Feb 1683/84.
Abigail Fitch, born 01 Feb 1685/86.
Samuel Fitch, born 28 Nov 1688.
Benjamin Fitch, born 29 Mar 1691 in Mohegin, New London, CT; died 10 Oct 1727 in Long Society,
New London, CT; married Hannah Reade 18 Nov 1713 in Norwich, New London, CT.
John Fitch, born 17 May 1693.
Jabez Fitch, born 03 Jun 1695.
Pelatiah Fitch, born 18 Feb 1697/98.
914. Josiah Reed He married 915. Grace Holloway.
915. Grace Holloway
Child of Josiah Reed and Grace Holloway is:
457
i.
Hannah Reade, born Jul 1688 in New London, CT; died 19 May 1761 in Norwich, CT; married
Benjamin Fitch 18 Nov 1713 in Norwich, New London, CT.
916. Roger Haskell, born 1657 in Rochester; died 15 Nov 1727 in Norwich, New London, CT. He married
917. Hannah Woodbury.
917. Hannah Woodbury, born 01 Apr 1664 in Salem, Essex, MA.
Child of Roger Haskell and Hannah Woodbury is:
458
i.
Roger Haskell, born 16 Oct 1697 in Beverly, Essex, MA; married Sarah Safford 01 Dec 1720 in Preston,
New London, CT.
918. John Safford, born 1662 in Ipswich, Essex, MA; died 29 Mar 1736 in Preston, New London, CT. He
married 919. Hannah Newman 15 Sep 1685 in Ipswich, Essex, MA.
919. Hannah Newman, born 16 Feb 1665/66 in Ipswich, Essex, MA.
Child of John Safford and Hannah Newman is:
459
i.
Sarah Safford, born 25 Dec 1694 in Preston, New London, CT; died 04 Apr 1729 in Preston, New
London, CT; married Roger Haskell 01 Dec 1720 in Preston, New London, CT.
920. James Giddings, born 1641 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts; died 1720. He was the son of 1840.
George Giddings and 1841. Jane Lawrence. He married 921. Elizabeth Andrews.
921. Elizabeth Andrews, born 07 Apr 1652 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts; died 22 Apr 1718.
131
Children of James Giddings and Elizabeth Andrews are:
460
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Joseph Giddings, born 1667.
James Giddings, born 1669.
John Giddings, born 1671.
Nathaniel Giddings, born 1673; married Sarah Lee.
George Giddings, born 1683.
Abigail Giddings, born 05 Jan 1683/84.
928. John Gregory, born 26 Jul 1636 in Cranberry, Norwalk, CT; died 1720 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT. He
was the son of 1604. John Gregory and 1605. Sarah Duxbury. He married 929. Elizabeth Moulthroup 18 Oct
1663 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
929. Elizabeth Moulthroup, born in Plymouth Colony, MA; died 09 Oct 1689 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
She was the daughter of 1748. Matthew Moulthrop and 1859. Jane.
Children of John Gregory and Elizabeth Moulthroup are:
464
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Mary Gregory
Elizabeth Gregory, born Jan 1664/65.
Sarah Gregory, born Dec 1667; married John Bouton; born 30 Sep 1659.
Jonathan Gregory, born Jun 1671.
Abigail Gregory, born Jun 1672.
Joseph Gregory, born 1676.
John Gregory, born 1677 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 18 Jan 1751/52 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT;
married (1) Sarah Seeley; married (2) Clement Denton Smith.
930. Robert Seeley
Child of Robert Seeley is:
465
i.
Sarah Seeley, born 1680 in Jamaica, Long Island, NY; married John Gregory.
936. John Benedict He married 937. Phebe Gregory.
937. Phebe Gregory, born 1654 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT. She was the
daughter of 1604. John Gregory and 1605. Sarah Duxbury.
Child of John Benedict and Phebe Gregory is:
468
i.
Thomas Benedict, married Millison Hyatt.
960. Johan Peter Scharffenstein, born 1693 in Flammersfled, Palatinate, Germany; died 29 May 1758. He
was the son of 1920. Theib Scharffenstein. He married 961. Maria Margaretha Bauer 23 Nov 1713 in
Niederbieber, Germany.
961. Maria Margaretha Bauer, born Dec 1692 in Niederbieber, Germany; died 1777 in Greenwich, New
Jersey.
Children of Johan Scharffenstein and Maria Bauer are:
i.
ii.
iii.
480
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
John Scharfenstein Sharpstone, born 1712.
Christina Margaret Scharfenstein Sharpsteen, born Apr 1713; died 20 Oct 1779.
Maria Margaretha Scharffenstein, born 22 Apr 1714 in Niederbieber, Germany; died 1719 in
Niederbieber, Germany.
Johan Jacob Sharpsteen, born 22 Nov 1716 in Niederbieber, Germany; died 1802 in Fiskill, Dutchess,
New York; married Maria (Marjye) Busch 06 Dec 1741.
Maria Eva Scharffenstein, born 26 May 1718 in Niederbieber, Germany; died 1719.
Christian Scharffenstein, born 01 Mar 1719/20 in Niederbieber, Germany; died May 1794.
Anna Maria Scharffenstein, born 02 May 1722 in Niederbieber, Germany; died 1724.
Johann Christ Scharffenstein, born 1725 in Niederbieber, Germany; died 1770.
962. Johann Henrich Busch He married 963. Maria Catharina Schawer.
963. Maria Catharina Schawer
132
Child of Johann Busch and Maria Schawer is:
481
i.
Maria (Marjye) Busch, born 1724 in Peoughkeepsie, Dutchess, New York; married Johan Jacob
Sharpsteen 06 Dec 1741.
Generation No. 11
1536. Reginald Foster, born 159526; died 1681 in Ipswich, MA27. He married 1537. Judith.
1537. Judith, died Oct 1644 in Ipswich, MA28.
Children of Reginald Foster and Judith are:
768
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Mary Foster, born 1618.
Sarah Foster, born 1620.
Abraham Foster, born 1622 in Exeter, Devonshire, England; died 25 Jan 1710/11 in Ipswich, MA;
married Lydiah Burbank 1655.
Isaac Foster, born 1630.
William Foster, born 1633.
Jacob Foster, born 1635.
Reginald Foster, born 1636.
1542. George Blake, born 1611. He married 1543. Dorothy.
1543. Dorothy, born 1615.
Child of George Blake and Dorothy is:
771
i.
Rebecca Blake, born Feb 1640/41 in Gloucester, Essex, MA; died 08 May 1721 in Boxford, Essex, MA;
married Robert Eames 1661 in Andover, Essex, MA.
1550. Henry Travers He married 1551. Bridget Fitts.
1551. Bridget Fitts
Notes for Henry Travers:
Henry Travers , whose name is sometimes spelled Travis, came from London, England in the "Mary and John"
early in 1634. Some secondary sources have said he was of Irish ancestry, but there is no evidence for this. The
passengers of the "Mary and John" went first to Agawam, now Ipswich, Mass., and in 1635 many of them, Henry
Travers included, moved to Newbury. He was granted six acres of salt marsh in the Great Marsh, and a house lot
of half an acre near the First Landing Place. Also four acres in another part of Newbury. He was on a list of 91
freeholders of Newbury on 7 December 1642.
Henry Travers was a seaman. In 1648 he went to London and never returned, leaving behind his wife Bridget,
daughter Sarah and a son James. Before he left he wrote a will than began "This 26th day of July, 1648, I Henrie
Travers of Newbury, having occasion to go to Sea and know not whether I shall live to Com againe, I do by this
present declare my last Will and Testament, as followeth..." To his daughter Sara he left a cow and a 3 year old
heifer, as well as two brass pots, a little kettel, a frying pan, and a table board.
Child of Henry Travers and Bridget Fitts is:
775
i.
Sara Travers, born 1636 in Newbury, Essex Co., MA; died 22 Aug 1709; married (1) Nicholas
Wallington 30 Aug 1654 in Newbury, Essex, MA; married (2) Onisiphorus Mash, Sr. 18 May 1691 in
Haverhill, Essex Co., MA.
1560. John Pynchon, born 1625 in Springfield, Essex County, England; died 17 Jan 1702/03. He was the
son of 3120. William Pynchon. He married 1561. Amy Wyllys 30 Oct 1645.
1561. Amy Wyllys, born 1624; died 09 Jan 1698/99.
Notes for John Pynchon:
Major John Pynchon (son of William Pynchon, the settler), b. in England in 1625, came to this country with his
father when but 5 years old. He. m. Oct. 30, 1645, Amy Wyllys, b. in England in 1624, (dau. of Gov. Geo.
Wyllys of Hartford, Ct., and Mary -----). He was a man of very superior talents, character and social position. He
represented the town of Springfield in the General Court in 1659, '62 and '63, and was for 21 years (1665-86) an
133
"Assistant" in it. He was spoken of and addressed by the title of "The Worshipful." From 1652 to 1660 (when
Hampshire Co. was incorporated) he, with two others, had a joint commission to hear and determine causes, and
from 1692 to 1702 he was Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas for Hampshire Co. He was a large farmer
and landholder, and owned several saw-mills and grist-mills, and was much engaged in public business. Even as
far off as New London, Ct., then was, he bought 2,400 acres there, in company with James Rogers.
In King Philip's war, in 1675, his brick house, built in 1660, was used as a fort for defense. At the beginning of
the attack in June he was in Hadley.
He d. Jan. 17, 1702-3, aet. 76. His wife d. Jan. 9, 1698-9, aet. 74.
--The History of the Descendants of John Dwight of Dedham, Mass. by Benjamin W. Dwight, Vol. II, 1874, page
630.
John Pynchon (1626-1703) was born in Springfield, Essex County, England, and came to New England with his
father, William, in 1630. His family settled in Roxbury and relocated when his father founded the town of
Springfield in 1636. The village was the northernmost trading post of the Connecticut Colony, seated on major
trading routes including the Connecticut River. In 1652, William Pynchon returned to England, leaving the
management of Springfield and of the family business to John, then only twenty-six. John expanded his father's
holdings, establishing tradingposts to the west (Westfield) and northward (Northampton, Hadley). John expanded
his business interests to include Boston and Barbados, and directly shipped Connecticut Valley furs to England on
the company's own ships. He ran the town of Springfield and represented it in Boston. He was captain of the
Springfield militia and fought in King Philips' War (1675-76). By the time of his death, he was the wealthiest and
most powerful landowner in Massachusetts.
Child of John Pynchon and Amy Wyllys is:
780
i.
John Pynchon, born 15 Oct 1647; died 25 Apr 1721; married Margaret Hubbard.
1566. James Fitch
Child of James Fitch is:
783
i.
Elizabeth Fitch, married Edward Taylor.
1600. Richard Seymour, born 27 Jan 1603/04 in Sawbridgeworth, Herts, England; died 1655 in Norwalk,
Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 3200. Robert Seymour and 3201. Elizabeth Waller. He married 1601. Mercy
Ruscoe.
1601. Mercy Ruscoe, born 1610 in Sawbridgeworth, Hert, England. She was the daughter of 3202. Roger
Ruscoe and 3203. Sarah.
Notes for Richard Seymour:
Richard Seymour, founder of the Connecticut family of the name, was baptized at Sawbridgeworth, co. Herts,
England, 27 Jan. 1604/5, the son of Robert and Elizabeth (Waller) and the grandson of John and Syzory (Porter),
and died at Norwalk, Conn., between 29 July 1655, the date of his will, and 10 Oct. 1655, the date of the
inventory of his estate. He married at Sawbridgeworth, 18 Apr. 1631, Mercy Ruscoe, born about 1610, daughter
of Roger and Sarah of Sawbridgeworth. She married secondly, 25 Nov. 1655, as his second wife, John Steele of
Farminton, Conn. who died there 27 Feb. 1664/5.
Richard Seymour came to this country in or slightly before 1639, bringing with him his wife Mercy Ruscoe, to
who he was married at Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, and their son Thomas, whose baptismal record was
entered in the parish registers of Sawbridgeworth. It was this eldest son Thomas who sealed his will in 1712 with
the wongs of the ancient family of the Seymours of Penhow.
Richard Seymour, though not an origianal proprietor, was one of the early settlers of Hartford. Just when he
joined the little settlement near "Dutch Point" on the Connecticut river we do not know, but probably in 1639,
when we find his name in the list of those "inhabitants who were granted lotts to have only at the town's courtesie
with liberty to fetch woode and keep wine or coues on the common." His lot was No. 70, on the north side, near
the "cow pasture." His house stood on what is now North Main street, near the Ely place. He also owned
outlying pieces of land including a portion of the tract running westward from the bluffs of the Trinity College
property to what is now West Hartford. In 1647 he was elected chimney-viewer, which calls to mind that the
houses of the first settlers were thatched, as in the old England they had left behind them, and on that account
were particularly exposed to fire loss, and all the more because built of wood rather than of masonry as most of
the corresponding English houses of the period were. Richard's duties, then, as chimney-viewer, were allied to
134
those of a building inspector and fire chief of our time.
The fact that Richard received an allotment of land by the "courtesey of the town" shows that, with his family, he
was judged to be an acceptable addition to the group of settlers forming the original proprietors, but his status was
not equal to theirs, inasmuch as they were entitled, as he was not, to their proportional shares of the extensive
areas of land held in common. Thus, every priginal proprietor might hope to secure as of right farm land for his
sons. No such opportunity was open to settlers who were landholders by the "courtesey of the town." This
situation may account for Richard's decision to cast his lot with the planters of Norwalk under Roger Ludlow.
Whatever the reason (and doubtless there were many), Rihcard and his former Sawbridgeworth neighbors, the
Ruscoes, removed about 1650 (perhaps a year or so later) to Norwalk, where he had the status of an original
proprietor of the new plantation, in the allotment of which he had a most favorable location.
We find his name among the number who made the agreement with Captain Patrick and the brilliant and restless
Roger Ludlow "for the settlinge and plantinge of Norwalke," 19 June 1650. As one of the planters of Norwalk,
Richard Seymour's name appears in the indenture date 15 Feb. 1651, between the Planters and Runckinheage and
other Indians. The exact date of his removal from Hartford to Norwalk cannot be fixed, but he had undoubtedly
taken up his residence there before the end of 1652, and perhaps earlier. His home-lot was well-situated, directly
opposite the meeting house and Parade Ground, and on the highway leading from Stamford to Fairfield. His
house was only a short distance from the present roadbed of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad.
Many of his descendants have probably unconsciously viewed the spot where their ancestor lived, while being
carried past the place in amanner of which he never dreamed. In the new plantation of Norwalk, Richard's
abilities were fully recognized. On 29 Mar. 1655, he was elected townsman, or selectman, as we should now say.
But Richard did not live to hold this office long, since in his will, which he executed 29 July 1655, he is described
"very week & sike."
It is significant, on the social sode of the picture, that Richard's son Thomas was married after the arrival of the
family in Norwalk, to Hannah Marvin, the sixteen yer old daughter of Matthew Marvin, Sr., "one of the most
distinguised of the Norwalk fathers," who had also removed to Norwalk with his family from Hartford, where our
Thomas and his Hannah had doubtless been acquainted. Matthew Marvin, Sr. was born in England in 1600 and
died in Norwalk in 1680. On coming to Norwalk (he had, as well as Richard Seymour, signed the Agreement
with Ludlow) Marvin was assigned to what might be regarded as the "home-lot (No. 10) of honor" in the social
system of the day, i.e., the lot next to the meetinghouse, and his estate was the second largest of the Norwalk
settlers. To Richard Seymour was assigned a scracely less desirable and honorable home-lot (No. 11) of four
acres facing the "Town Street" and opposity the Parade Ground, a corner lot, and near lot No. 10 assigned to
Matthew Marvin, Sr. So Thomas and Hannah, even before their marriage, were ner neighbors in Norwalk.
It thus appears that Richard and his family were well placed in Norwalk. On 29 March 1655, he was chosen one
of the two townsmen, as we have seen. He was now aobut fifty years old, in the full tide of life, with a family of
four boys, and one of the chief figures in the community. What was it that overtook him then? No record, alas,
answers this question. All that we know is that at the end of July of this year he was "very week & sike" and
making his will, which he was unable to sign save by a mark. In this brief document he refers twice to "my loving
wife Mercy" and once to "my loving wife," suggesting at least a happy relationship to his wife, to whom he had
been married twenty-four years before, in Sawbridgeworth in Old England. The original will, after being duly
recorded, was doubtless returned to his executors, as was the custom of the time; it has long since disappeared.
The record book in which the will was copied had a quantity of ink spilled upon it, and so it happened that the
copy of the will, with many others, was made in part unreadable. Did Richard, in executing his will, use the seal
used by his eldest son, Thomas, in executing his will in 1712? The will itself seemingly answers the question in
the negative in its concluding words, viz., "to this my will and Testament I have set my hand this 29th July 1655."
The common language, "my hand and seal," is here contracted to "my hand." In a time of stress such as that
under which the will was drawn, the common phrasing "and and seal" may have been contracted to hand, so the
omission of "and seal" is by no means conclusive evidence that Richard's mark on his will was not supplemented
by a seal. One of the two witnesses to the will was John Ruscoe, a faithful friend over many years, of England, of
Hartofrd, of Norwalk, probably a cousin of his "loving wife Mercy," born a Ruscoe. The date of Richard's
untimely death is not known, but it seems reasonable to suppose that it took place soon after the execution of his
will, 29 July 1655, when he was "very week & sike" and unable to do more than make his mark upon it.
His estate, inventoried 10 Oct. 1655, was valued at Pounds255-09-00--not a large, but a fair estate. Considering
that Richard died at the age of about fifty yers and the circumstances of his shrt life, the value of his estate is well
above the majority of estates inventoried in 1655 or thereabout. The inventory was recorded in the same volume
as his will and met with the same disaster of an overflow of ink, and its top section is illegible. The only item
worthy of not is "bookes: valued at one pound. Comparatively fiew inventories of the period list any books at all.
The use of the plural shows tht at least there was something more than a Bible in the house. Indeed, the sum of
one pound in 1655 indicates that Richard had several books, and inferentially that he could both read and write.
135
The next chapter in our history opens with the surpising record at Farminton of the marriage on 25 Nov. 1655,
of the widow to the Hon. John Steele, who recorded the marriage in his own hand. But this does not show that the
marriage took place in Farmington, rather than in Norwalk, where Mercy lived. It was very common then for the
man to record his marriage where he lived, for obious reasons connected with inheritance.
The apparent pricipitancy of the marriage of Richard's widow to John Steele may be remarked upon here. Steele
undoubtedly knew Richard Seymour and his wife and family before they removed to Norwalk a few years earlier.
Mercy, the widow, was no longer young, she had but moderate means and had four sons, of whom three were
minors. She was no great "catch", it would seem, for one of the foremost men of the Colony. Must she not have
been uncommonly engaging or possessed of rar qualities of mind and heart to have led the Hon. John, even in
those days of dearth of available women, to marry her and bring her back from Norwalk and her Ruscoe relatives
there, with her three younger sons? Can she be blamed if it be considered who he was--"his place in the sun"--to
have made a "marriage of convenience," if such it was, though we can only speculate on that matter.
John Steele was one of the eight Magistrates appointed in 1636 by the Colony of Massachusetts Bay to govern
Connecticut, before that Colony had established a jurisdiction of its own. From then until 1658 he served without
intermission in the General Court or Assembly, as an elected Deputy for Hartford throught the year 1645.....
Mercy's remarriage seems to have been a happy one. The date of her death is not known, but she survived her
able and distinguished husband, who died 27 Feb 1664/5. In his will, date 30 Jan. 1664, he ebqueathed to his
"dear and loving wife Mercy Steele the house wherein I now dwell and the appurtenances belonging to it."
On Mercy's marriage to the Hon. John Steele, her three minor children, John, Zachariah and Richard, became
member of his household in Farmington. They could hardly have been better placed in any Connecticut
household of the time. It is a pleasure to record that the interests of Richard Seymour's minor children were
safeguarded. We quote from Selleck's Norwalk," p. 154:
"Richard Seymour executed his will July 29, 1655, and died within the next three months. He had appointed his
wife and his "fathful friend" Richard Olmsted administrators, leaving everything to his aforementioned children,
and commissioning his wife to take charge of the estates of the three younger boys "until such time as they shall
be fit to receive and dispos of" the same. Mrs. Steele sought the welfare of her Seymour offsping, as did also her
second husband. On Oct. 13, 1668, thirteen years after the decease of Mr. Seymour and four years after that of
Mr. Steele, the three lads, now arrived at majority, were paid the "full and just" amount due them, and
acknowledged before Samuel Steele and their brother Thomas that they were "fully satisfied." From the first
[John] of this trio of youths, bereft at an age when they most needed it, of a father's counsel, but still judiciously
cared for, have descended well-known New England and New York families."
The mutilated first volume of Fairfield Probate Records (page 6) contains the recorded copy of Richard
Seymour's will; the original is not in the files. We have no autograph of Richard Seymour and hence we do not
know his own spelling of his name, The surname is diversely spelled in various records pertaining to him and his
sons, but in those days spelling was largely phonetic and hence the spelling employed by early scribes is not
significant. By the time of his grandsons, the standard spelling of the name seems to have been generally
accepted.
[The will of Richar]d Semer (1655)
[ ] being very week & sike [ ] gods pon[?] mercy in [ ] doe leve this as my [ ] doe first will and [ ]
dust of wch it was [made and my soul into the] hands of God that gave it [and I doe will and] bequeath unto my
Loving wife Mercy [Seamor] my whole Estate: viz: my house & Lands Cattle and [all] my moveables : Except
that it is my Will that [my] Eldest sonn Thomas should have two steeres [
] year old and upward and my best
cartt: thease [to] receive soen after my decease:
It is alsoe my will that my other three sons John & Zachary [and] Ricahrd recive out of this Totall estate the sum
of forty pounds each of them viz: fourty pounds to John and fourty pounds to Zachary and forty pounds to
Richard: duly and faythfully to be payd to them severally at the age of twenty-one years: Unles the Executo[rs] of
this my Will shall see cause to doe it soener: It is alsoe my Will that my loving wife should have the dispose of
my three sons John Zachary & Richard untill such time as they shall be fit to receive and dispose of their Estate: It
is alsoe my will and apoiyntment that my loving Wife Mercy : togather with my faythfull freind Richard Olmsted
be the sole Executo[rs] and Administrato[rs] of this my Last Will and Testament the aforesaid Legasies and all
Lawfull debts and demands duly discharged by my loving wife Mercy : It is my will that shee posses and enjoy all
the rest of my Estate. to this my will and Testament I have set to my hand this 29th July 1655:
In the presence of us
Thomas Handford
the marke of Richard / Seamer
Jno Rescoe
25 octobar 1655
The Court haveing examined the will o f Richard Seamor they doe approve therof
136
William Hill
: Secretary
The top section of the inventory also has suffered and is partly illegible.
Anno Dom[ini]
1655
Octob[r] 10[th]
Imprim[is]
[
]
[
]
[
]
[
]
In w[earing apparel]
[08-05-00]
In Chest [s, wooden ware and] other mov[eables]
[06-05-00]
In Iron Tools and nayles
[03-02-00]
In hempe and flaxe
[02-10-00]
In butter and cheese
[02-10-00]
In a Cart plowe & dr[ag]get tackling
[05]-03-00
In Corn
16-02-00
In hay
08-00-00
In oxen
33-00-00
In Cowes and Calves
35-00-00
In steeres and heifers
21-00-00
In a mare and fole & a yong hors 28-00-00
In sort hoggs
17-00-00
In smaller hoggs and Piggs 20-05-00
In debts 11-00-00
In bokes 01-00-00
In armes and ammunition 03-02-00
______________________________________
Total 255-j09-00
Aprised by us
Mathew Campfeild
Richard Olmsteed
25 Octob[r] 1655
William Hill Secretary
The Court haveing examined this Inventory of Richard Seamors they doe approve therof.
The receipt of the three younger sons reads as follows [Fairfield Probate Records, vol. 2, p. 33] :
Octob[r] 30: 1668
Received by vs John Semer Zachary Semer Richard Semer of M[r] John Steele deceased the full and Just sum of
sixscore pounds sterling : that is to say forty pounds each of vs vpon the Ac[o] of ye legasies due to vs by the last
will of o[r] Honored father Richard Semer deceased and we doe acknowledg tht it is a full and compleat
acomplishment of ye aforesaid will Respecting our selues and doe by these present fully wholy compleatly acquit
and discharge ye aforesaid Steele and slsoe ye Executor and ye Executriz of ye estate of ye aforesaid Semer all
and every of them ther heirs Executors Administrators and assignes from any or all demands from or by our
selues our heirs Exeuctors Administrators & assignes respecting the premises or from any person from by or
vnder vs aknowlidging that we are fully satisfed as aforesaid and doe by these p[r]sents wholly discharge ye
aforesaid persons respecting ye p[r]mises--as witnes o[r] hands
Witnes hearof
Zackery Semer
Samuell Steele
Richard Semer
Tho: Semer
John Semer
This is a True Coppy acording to ye origenall Transcribed p me
Will[m] Hill Clarke
That the four sons of Richard Seymour made a place for themselves in their respective communities, may be
gauged by the fact that their combined inventories at death amounted to well over 2000 pounds, which of course
makes no allowance for property bestowed on the children of some of them before they died.--A History of the
Seymour Family; Descendants of Richard Seymour of Hartford, Connecticut by Donald Lines Jacobus. New
137
Haven, Connecticut: 1939. pages 21-28.
Children of Richard Seymour and Mercy Ruscoe are:
800
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Thomas Seymour, born 15 Jul 1632 in Sawbridgeworth, Hert, England; died 15 Oct 1712 in Norwalk,
Fairfield, CT; married (1) Sarah; married (2) Elizabeth; married (3) Hannah Marvin 05 Jan 1653/54 in
Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
Mary Seymour, born 1634 in Sawbridgeworth, Hert, England; died 1635 in Sawbridgeworth, Hert,
England.
Mercy Seymour, born 1636 in Sawbridgeworth, Hert, England.
John Seymour
Zachariah Seymour, born 1642 in Hartford, CT.
Richard Seymour, born in Hartford, CT.
1602. Matthew Marvin He married 1603. Elizabeth.
1603. Elizabeth
Child of Matthew Marvin and Elizabeth is:
801
i.
Hannah Marvin, born Oct 1634 in Great Bentley, Essex, England; died Aft. Nov 1680; married Thomas
Seymour 05 Jan 1653/54 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
1604. John Gregory, born Abt. 1613 in St. Peter's Parish, Nottingham, England; died 09 Oct 1689 in
Norwalk, Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 3208. Henry Gregory and 3209. Goody. He married 1605. Sarah
Duxbury.
1605. Sarah Duxbury, born in Plymouth Colony, MA; died 09 Oct 1689 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
Notes for John Gregory:
"John Gregory (Henry-1) was born around 1613, most likely in St. Peter's Parish, Nottingham, in England.
He was the son of Henry Gregory and his wife.
He married SARAH ------ ; her origins are presently unknown. They had six, possibly seven, children
(Joseph and Thomas recroded at New Haven):
John b.c 1638 m. Elizabeth Moulthrop; Jachin b.c. 1640 m. Mary -----; Judah b.c. 1642 m. Hannah Hoyt;
Joseph bpt. 26 July 1646 m. Hannah [Russell?]; Thomas bpt. 19 March 1648/9 m. John Benedict; Phebe b.c.
1654 m. James Benedict; Sarah b. 3 December 1652
Although his father settled in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, there is no recrod of Hohn there.
it may be that he set off on his own and was the John Gregory who was a proprietor in Duxbury, Plymouth
County, Massachusetts, in 1638. Plymouth Colony records dated 7 January 1638/9 show that a John Gregory was
granted six acres of land at the west end of New Field. New Field appears to be in what was later called
Barnstable, Plymouth County, which was where a William Crocker lived; John2 Gregory's sister Anne married a
man by the same name in New Haven.
What is certain is that John eventually settled in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, where he was
admitted as a member of the New Haven Court on 24 February 1644/5. he was not, however, on the list of those
taking the freeman's oath on 1 July 1644 so he cannot have been in town too long. He lived in the Yorkshire
quarter of New Haven, where he had a home on six acres, probably acquired from John Evance. A list of the
seatings in the meeting house dated 10 March 1646/7 show that he had the eight on the men's side and Sarah had
the eight on the women's side.
He worked as a shoemaker. On 25 May 1646, it was ordered "that Bor. Seely & Brother Gregory doe looke
that noe hydes come out of the tanners hands but those that are well tanned & that they seal them if they do allow
them & that they have 4d per hyde for viewing of them." He did some work with his father, who moved to New
Haven and then on to nearby Stratford and worked as acobbler in both towns.
On 6 June 1648, "Brother Seely" again complained about the quality of the work of several tanners, including
John. At a court on 31 January 1647/8, it was propounded to the shoemakers "that as hides were nearly as cheap
here as in England shoes might be sold more reasonably in New Haven than they were selling." John then
propounded "to the courte that a good while since there was a pare of shooes spake of in courte wch he sould
William Paine, of the tenns [size 10], French Falls, at 5s 10d, at wch their was some offence taken, and he
condemes himself that he hath let it lye so long uncleared, but now he presented a noat in courte wch showed the
perticulers howe they did amount to so much, under two shooemakers hands, but the courte professed they could
not see cause shooes should be sould at this rate."
138
Around 1649, John may have begun exploring removing further west. A record ated 8 January 1648/9 noted
that "John Cooper acquainted the court that he finds great difficultie in viewing fences, because some are gone
out of towne & other agoeing & leave none to take order about their fences." John Gregory was among those
mentioned as being absent. John Gregory sold his house and lot to Thomas Wheeler, and moved to Startford
where his father lived.
In Stratford, he owned: Item two house lotts five acres and a halfe more or less buting east upon the highway
and west upon the swampe bounded with Thomas uford on the north and John Hurd on the south. Item two acres
in the old feyld more or less buting north upon the highway and south upon the fresh pound bounded with Richard
Booth on the east and John Curtis on the west."
John's double home lot was on the west side of what later became Main STreet between south Avenue and
Birdsey Street; it was opposite the lot of William Crooker, his borther-in-law. In addition, he owned four acres
on the west side of "neesing-paw reef in the new feyld."
Sometime between 1651 and 1653, though, he had left Stratford; land records show that John Peacock
purchased John's land between 1651 -- when Peacock came to Stratford -- and 1653 when the land was recorded
as Peacock's. He settled further west in the newly-established town of Norwalk, Fairfield County, and was there
by -- at the latest -- the fall of 1653; a Norwalk record dated 24 april 1654 shows that the town ordered "that the
allotments to beginne to be layed out as following" Videlicett to beginne at the end of the hither plaine where
John Greggory mowed last year."
His connection to Norwalk was familial. his brother-in-law Richard Webb--his sister Elizabeth's husband-was one of the fourteen men who contracted with Roger Ludlow on 19 June 1650 to settle up to thirty families in
what became Norwalk. John owned home lot "No. 1" and four acres of it was an original grant, which supports
the conclusion that he was one of the earliest to settle in the town.
His homelot was in east Norwalk in what later became the obtuse angle formed by where East Avenue runs
south, then turned southwest towards the Norwalk River. It was bounded east by the highway, west by the land of
Lohn Raymond, north by "Mr. Haies" and John Benedict's lot, and south by the road running by the cove and by
his son John's lot. on 20 January 1665/6, "Goodman Greggorie [was] to have liberty to buy the homelot of
Stephen Beckwith [of four acres], to build a fence across the creek by his house and shopp, the fance to have a
gate and pair of barrs."
On 2 January 1670, the town challenged his ownership "of the lands he howlds from the right of James the
Indyan" as well as his right to "Cokkanus Island." The town traded him other lands in return for the island, so
that it -- like the other islands in Norwald -- would remain common property. He also owned Gregory's Point
which extended into the harbor from his house lot; it is presently owned by the Norwalk Country Club and
Gregory Boulevard runs into it. His total holdings were valued at 188.10.0 pounds in 1655, and had increased to
253.10.00 in 1671.
He was a Deputy for Norwalk in Hartford in October 1659, October 1662, May 1663, October 1663, March
1665, October 1667, May 1668, May 1669, October 1669, Octboer 1670, October 1671, May 1672, October
1672, May 1674, October 1675, October 1677, October 1678, May 1679, October 1680, and May 1681.
In addition to serving as Deputy, he held a number of other offices. In March 1656/7, he was elected a
Selectman -- an office he held in 1665, 1666, and 1669. In 1659, he was made cow herder. On 12 September
1660, he was voted "constubull for the Third yer insuing." On 1 June 1670, he was appointed to a committee to
mark out the bounds between the Norwalk and Saketuk Rivers. On 26 June 1672, he was sent to a special
meeting of the Legislature to consider was with Holland over the Dutch colony of Lieuw Nederland. And in
1674, he was appointed the sealer of leather.
John took a leading role in the movement that resulted in the founding of Neward, Essex County, New
Jersey. some of his former neighbors in New Haven, which had previously been a separate colony from the rest
of Connecticut, resented being ruled from Hartford, the new capital. They proposed -- with the permission of the
Dutch authorities in the area -- to establish a new town on the New Jersey side of Kill Van Kull. John was part of
the negotiating team.
"March 11, 1662. John Gregorie arrived here [New Amsterdam, later renamed New York] yesterday from
New England, requested further answer to the propsitins of some Englishmen...The following answer was given to
him...that there was no fundamental difference in religion between the two and only slight difference in church
government and in civil justice. The bearer, your present messenger and agent John Gregorie being not further
instructed, we shall break off for the present."
Negotiations continued, and in 1666 robert Treat and John Gregory, after consulting with Governor Cataret
of new Jersey (by then under English control), chose the site of Neward which was settled by families from New
Haven, Milford, Guildord, and Branford.
When the first division of lands was made, John drew lot 41 "upon consideration that he come with his
family to build and inhabit the same about two years." But it appears that John never left Norwalk; the town sold
139
his lot in 1668 to Henry Lyon, and in 1669 disposed of an upland lot "that was formerly laid out to John Gregory,
if he had come to town."
In 1689, John divided his estate between his wife and sons by deed of gift. He apparently made the deeds in
contemplation of his death, because a deed of gift to his wife -- written on 15 August of that year -- was presented
for probate on 9 October:
"Know all men by thes pres yt I John Gregory of ye Town of Norwalk in ye County of fairefield in the
Colony of Conocticut upon Right Consideration moveing me thereunto: do freely give unto my beloved wife
Sarah Gregory all my moveable goods houshoulds, cattle, chattels, and all moveables in house and shop, I doe by
this my act and deed pass over to ye sd Sarah my wife to be actually possesed of ye moveable estate and to be
hers to despose of after my deseace according to her owne will and descretion amongst the Children
I doe also give to my said belove Sarah my book of acct and all debts therin and what bills of debt are oweing
me I pass them over by deed of gift to my sd wife provided ye sd Sarah shall see yt what I owe to any upon these
account be duly paid wch is not [?] to wt is owed to me.
I do also give to my sd wife Sarah all my Lands not desposed of by deeds of gifte only shee shall after my
deseace either despose ye sd Lands and [give?] ye prise and monyes of them amongst my two daughters by an
equall proportionto each making ye devition by judisius descretion.
Jams Bennidick my son in Law may have so much as to answer ye worth as neer as may of that medow given
to John Bennedick in Consideration of the deed only cautioning my beloved wife to remember the grandchildren
in her dissposall of the goods given her.
I have set to my hand and seale this fiteenth of Agust in ye yeer of our Lord 1689."Posted on Gen Forum by
Rich Houghton
Notes for Sarah Duxbury:
"Sarah died in Norwalk in October 1689, sometime between 9 October when her will was wrtten and 28
October when her estate was inventoried; it may be that both husband and wife succumbed to the same illness.
The short will provided:
"Know all these prsts that I Sarah Gregory widow of ye town of Norwalk in ye County of fairefiled in ye
Colony of conecticut,, do choose ordaine confirme and appointe my trusty and well beloved friends Mr. Thomas
Handford and Sergt. John Plat boath of Norwalk afforsd to be Jointe over seers and administrators of my estate
and committ to them ye distribution thereof to my Children according to what instructions & derections I have left
in ther hand as to pertickular moveables expesed after my deseace and for Lands & Cattels or unspecified
moveables I leave it to my faithfull frends to distribute according to ther wisdom amonst all my aforsd Children.
I doe also by these put over into ye hands of those my Trustees all bills of debts and my book of account
giveing them full power to demand and sue or impower therunto whom of my sons they shall judg meet to
demand and sue any yt refuse to make Just and honist paymt of Debts due by bill or book as itt shall appear to be
due.
I doe also commit to these my Trusty frinds the care of dischargeing what Debts are oweing from me to ant
that shall make honnest and Just demands therof and for what time Labor and paines them out of ye sd estate
resonable and Just sattisfaction in conformation of ye severall premises above sd I do set to my hand this ninth
october Anno dom 1689."
The inventory of the estate, presented on 4 November 1689, listed the following:
"An inventory of ye Estate of Sarah Gregory as it was taken & apprised by us whose names are under writen
october: 28 1689.
l horse, 3 cowes, 1 calfe, 3 swine & pigs--20.15.00
4 sheep, 6 Turkeys, 16 Geese--05.15.00
1 fether abed, 1 bolster, 2 pillows, 2 blankets, 1 coverled, flocks--03.16.00
1 fetherbed, 1 bolster, 4 fether pillows--08.00.00
1 home made Rug, 1 bought coverled 1 Green Rug--04.10.00
2 fether bolsters, 1 flock bed, 2 beds--05.10.00
1home made coverled, 2 blankets, green Rug, 2 blankets--07.10.00
1 blanket, 1 bed and bolster 7 chairs, 11 Cushings--03.00.00
1 Bedstead, Curtains & Vattens, Truckle bed, 5 chests--05.00.00
1 table & Form, 2 boxes, Grindstone, Shop tooles--03.06.00
5 barrells, Pease, 21 pewter dishes 52 pounds weight--06.09.00
2 basons, 2 Candlesticks, 2 Small basons, 10 porringers--01.17.00
2 Saws, 1 Gill bottle, 1 cup, 2 chamber pots, ould pewter--00.16.00
1 Tankert, 1 Pinte pot, 10 Glass bottles, 1 quart pot, 1 Brass Kettle
1 lesser kettle, 3 Iron Kettles, 2 Iron potts--09.10.00
140
2 brase skillets, 1 warming pan, 2 frying pans, 1 Spitt--01.02.00
Cobirons, 2 Trammells, 1 Slice, 1 tongs, 2 pot hookes, 1 gridiron--02.02.00
1 hammer, 1 Trowel, hinges and latch, dripping pan, 1 Spade--00.19.00
2 Coulters, chain & hoaw, 1 chain, pwoder and led--01.13.06
1 Gun, 1 pistol, 1 Sword, Bandilears, 1 gun barrell--02.04.06
9 pr and 1 sheets, 1 Table cloth, 1 Table cloth--10.05.00
1/2 pint bottle, 2 Table cloathes, 2 Table cloths--01.11.06
13 Napkins, 2 Cotteon Pillowbees, 6 line Pillowbees--03.03.00
Wheat, Indian [corn], 4 barrells, 2 hogsheades--06.11.00
3 Canew Troughs, 1 Trough, 1 Trey, 2 Sives, handsaw--01.01.00
2 Stone jugs, 1 broaken juge--00.10.00
1 Cream pot, earthen pans, 3 jars, 1 Tub, barrells in the Seller--00.17.06
1 churne & milk boals, 6 Spoones, Salt meat--02.04.00
2 bills of Credit--29.12.00
Silver, ferret & Cotton Rib, sisers, knife, Razor, Silk--00.13.00
3 Parcells of Land--54.00.00
In Books--04.15.06
2 pair of Cotton shirts, 1 pillow bed--02.14.00
16lb of flaz, a Hetchel, 1 flagon, Spoones--01.07.00
1 Holland Sheet--01.08.00
The total value was 215.04.06 pounds
On 1 November 1689, the heirs entered into an agreement dividing the estate:
"Know all men by these presents yt we whos nams are underwritten, being Legatees to ye estate of ye
deseaced Sarah Grigory of norwalk our once survieing mother have jointly agreed among our selves to approve of
the declared will of our deseaced mother and do rest sattisfied with ye bequeathment therein to each of us John
Bennidick & Jams bennidick haveing receaved & declared themselves satisfied with ther portions do mutually
consent yt what estate is remaining in ye Inventory should be destributed amongst the five brothers John Jakin
Judah Joseph and Thomas Gregory according to the descretion of the Oversers and they do by these persens
mutually and severally binde themselves each to other ther heirs ans Assigns foreven hereafter to stand to this
agreement and to Avoid all furer strife and Contention about ye above sd estate in Confirmation of ye premises
we have each to other enterchangably set to our hands this first of November 1689."--Posting on Gen Forum by
Rich Houghton
Children of John Gregory and Sarah Duxbury are:
802
i.
937
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
928
vii.
viii.
Jachin Gregory, born 1640 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died 22 Feb 1695/96 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT;
married Mary 1666.
Judah Gregory, born 1642; married Hannah Hoyt 20 Oct 1664 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; born 1648.
Joseph Gregory, born 1646.
Thomas Gregory, born 1648.
Phebe Gregory, born 1654 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; died in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; married (1) John
Benedict; married (2) John Benedict 11 Nov 1670 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT.
Sarah Gregory, born 03 Dec 1652 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT;
married James Benedict 10 May 1676 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; born 06 Feb 1649/50 in Southhold,
Suffolk, New York; died 1717 in Danbury, Fairfield, CT.
John Gregory, born 26 Jul 1636 in Cranberry, Norwalk, CT; died 1720 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT;
married Elizabeth Moulthroup 18 Oct 1663 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
Judah Gregory, born 1643.
1618. Ephraim William Hewitt, born 1604; died 04 Sep 1644 in Windsor, Hartford, CT. He married
1619. Isabel Overton.
1619. Isabel Overton, born 1596; died 08 Mar 1660/61.
Notes for Ephraim William Hewitt:
Reverend Ephraim Hewitt came from Wraxall, near Kenilworth, England, to Windsor, August 17, 1639. He was
born in England and died September 4, 1644, in Windsor.
141
The arrival of Mr. Hewitt was an important event in the life of the settlement at Windsor. Rev. Mr. Warham,
owing to the death of his colleague, Rev. Mr. Maverick, in 1636, had been for three years without any associate in
his arduous pastoral labors, amid the harassing cares and trials of a new settlement.
Mr. Hewitt was then in the prime of life, possessing acknowledged abilities and high attainments. He had been
pastor of Wraxall, but had been persecuted by the Bishop of Worcester the year before for non-conformity, which
was probably the reason of his coming to this country.
At his request the General Court at Hartford granted him the large island in the Connecticut river, which one sees
in passing over the railway bridge at Warehouse Point. It was returned, however, in his will, and in 1681 it was
given by Massachusetts to John Pynchon. Hewitt's only published work is a commentary on the prophecies of the
book of Daniel, which was published in London in 1644.
A picture of his gravestone may be seen on page 467 of volume 6 of the Connecticut magazine. It is probably the
oldest one now standing (1909) in the Connecticut valley.--One Branch of the Booth Family:...by Charles Edwin,
1910, page 198.
Child of Ephraim Hewitt and Isabel Overton is:
809
i.
Lydia Hewett, born 1635 in Wraxall, Warwick, England; died 1711; married Joseph Smith 20 Apr 1656.
1632. Thomas Morehouse, died Aug 1658. He married 1633. Isabella Keeler.
1633. Isabella Keeler She was the daughter of 3266. Ralph Keeler.
Notes for Thomas Morehouse:
Morehouse
Thomas Morehouse I was at Weathersfield, says Savage, in 1640. He was among the first to receive a grant of
seven acres in Stamford. He is found at Fairfiled before 1653, where he had pruchased the house & home-lot of
John Barlow on the Ludlow Square. he was granted land by the town on the west side of the Uncoway River &
present Black Rock Birdge, where he ran a grist mill on the creek which empties into the river between Seely's
Neck & the Old Mill hill. He m Isabella d of Ralph Keeler of Norwalk, His will is dated 8 Aug 1658 in which he
leaves 1/3 of his estate to his wife Isabell; a double portion to his eldest s Samuel, homestead, mill & mill-lot,
which he was not to sell without the consent of the town; & furthure distributes his estate among his sons Thomas,
John, Jonathan & ds Mary and Ann. He mentions d Hannah, to whom he had already given a full portion.--The
History of Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut from the settlement of the town in 1639 to 1818 by Mrs.
Elizabeth Hubbell Schenck, Vol. 1 page 395 (published by the author New York 1889.
************************************************************************************
THOMAS MOREHOUSE, the immigrant ancestor, was in Wethersfield, Conn., as early as 1640. In 1641 he
removed to Stamford, and was one of the original twenty-nine white settlers of that town who purchased it of the
New Haven Colony, who had previously bought it of the Indians for one hundred bushels of corn. See New
Haven Colonial Records, 1638 to 1649, pp. 45 and 199
In 1653 he settled in Fairfield, and died there in 1658 leaving widow Isabell (who is supposed to have been a
second wife and not mother of his children) and children Hannah2, Samuel2 (who had five sons), Thomas2,
Mary2, Jonathan2 (who married Mary Wilson, daughter of Edward, of Fairfield), and John2 (who was an ensign
in King Philip's war, 1676 and settled in Southampton, L.I., where he died October 10, 1701, leaving children
John3, Mary3, and Phebe3).
Thomas Morehouse, as believed, was the ancestor of all the Morehouses in America; any assertion to the contrary
needs confirmation. His name was sometimes spelled in the early records Moorhouse and at least one branch of
his descendants now spell their name Morhous; it is believed that another has adopted the orthography of Morris.
His descendants were found in New Jersey near Newark, Elizabeth, etc., among the old families and settlers,
before the Revolution; in Saratoga Co., N.Y., and the northeastern counties of that State; and throughout the west.
Those of south-western Connecticut and of Dutchess and putnam Counties, New York are believed to have
descended from the son Samuel2 through his four sons Samuel Jr3, Thomas3, John3 and Daniel3, who married
Hannah, daughter of Lieutenant abraham Adams, of Fairfield, Conn.
142
Thomas1 by the records appears to have purchased in Fairfield on the 6th of August, 1653, twenty-four acres of
land on Sasco Hill, a beautiful location near the Sound, and on the 16th day of the same month he purchased of
Henry Jackson the first, and for many years the only, grist mill in the town. In September of the same year he was
one of the deputies to the General Court at Hartford. He died in August, 1658. His eldest son Samuel2 was the
executor of his will, and was given a double portion of his property including his houses, barn, mill and mill lot,
and other land. His body was probably buried in the south-eastern part of the old cemetery in Fairfield.
Samuel and Thomas were made freemen by the General Court, October, 1664--Colonial Records, Vol. 1
In the 1st Book of Record of Stamford is found the following: "The lands & housing now in possession of
Thomas Morehouse, and bounded and butted, Viz.: Two dwelling houses, two barns & out houses belonging
hereunto with two house lots containing six acres more or less bounded by John Chapman on ye north & Every
Sharon on ye south butting ye highway on the west to widows estate. And 8 other peices are described. 3 May
1649".
From Ancestry and Descendants of Gershom Morehouse, Jr., of Redding, Connecticut, A Captain in the
American Revolution, printed for private circulation by a descendant of Captain Gershom Morehouse, Press of
Tuttle, Morehouse and Taylor, New Haven, Conn. 1894
******************************************************************************************
Children of Thomas Morehouse and Isabella Keeler are:
816
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Jonathan Morehouse, married (1) Mary Wilson; married (2) Rebecca Knowles 16 Apr 1690 in Fairfield,
CT.
Hannah Morehouse
Samuel Morehouse, born 1642; died 1687.
Thomas Morehouse
Mary Morehouse
John Morehouse
1634. Edward Wilson
Child of Edward Wilson is:
817
i.
Mary Wilson, married Jonathan Morehouse.
1648. John Bouton, born Abt. 1636 in Hartford, Hartfod, CT; died Jan 1706/07. He was the son of 3296.
John Bouton and 3297. Alice Pratt?. He married 1649. Abigail Marvin.
1649. Abigail Marvin, born Abt. 1637 in Hartford, Hartfod, CT. She was the daughter of 1602. Matthew
Marvin and 3299. Elizabeth.
Notes for John Bouton:
"John Bouton (John-1) was born around 1636, probably in Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut. he was the
son of John Bouton and Alice-----.
His father died when he was still a child, and he grew up in Hartford in the jouse of his step-father Matthew
Marvin. he removed with his step-father to Norwalk, Fairfield County, around 1649.
He first appears in the Norwalk town records in 1655, when he was old enough to share in the land division. His
four acre lot was about 200 yards south of the Norwalk River, and was opposite Matthew Marvin Jr.'s, a little
further to the west on the Stamford Road, with the minister's and John Ruscoe's lots on the east, and Thomas
Lupton on the south. John's lot was opposite his brother-in-law Daniel Kellogg's.
On 1 January 1656/7, he married his step-sister ABIGAIL-2 MARVIN at Norwalk. Abigail was the daughter of
Matthew Marvin and Elizabeth [Gregory?], and was born in Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut around 1637
or 1638. They had eight children:
John b. 30 sep 1659 m. Mary Hayes
143
Matthew b. 24 dec 1661 m. ---- ---Hannah b.c. 1663 m. James Betts
Joseph b.c. 1665 m. ----- ----Rachel b. 15 dec 1667 m. Matthew St. John
Abigail b. 1 apr 1670 m. Ebenezer Smith
Mary b. 26 may 1671 d. young
Elizabeth b.p. 1671 m. Edward Waring
On 13 October 1664, he was made a freeman. Once he was enfranchised, he became active in town affairs. John
served as a Deputy to the Connecticut Legislature on may occasions. He was elected to that position on October
1669, October 1673, May 1674, May 1675, October 1676, May and Octover 1677, May 1678, October 1679,
May 1680, May 1681, May and October 1682, May 1683, May and october 1685. he was chosen Surveyor on 21
February 1670; and Selectman in 1671, 1674, 1679, 1683, 1684, and 1689.
On June 1666, John and several others (including his brother-in-law Daniel Kellogg) were granted all that creek
lying between Thomas Seymour's barn and the Barren Marsh, for which they were to procure a highway to
Bowton's Island. On 4 December 1668, he drew lot number 26 in the division of the winter wheat field. In 1671,
his land was appraised at 100 pounds. In 1674, he purchased the lot to the immediate south of his from a Mr.
Platt, who had purcased it from Thomas Lupton in 1665. In 1685, a "Cattlelog of a division of land agreed to be
layd out at three acors to the hundred: with the severall lotts as they were drawn by the inhabitants" listed John as
John Bouton 16." On 12 December 1687, town records show the following:
" All common land Over the River, leaving sufficient for highways, to be laid out, to the inhabitans, according
to their estates. Three score acors of the same sequestered for the Indians. A division granted of 20 Acres to the
hundred. The number of Lotts and the order as they were drawn, of that Division of Land over Norwalk River
below the path leading to Meadow field ...John Bouton, senr., 49"
By 3 January 1687, his land value had risen to 184.15.00 pounds
He also served on a number of committees, many of which revolved around the town meeting house. On 31
January 1678, he was named to a committee "chosen to oversee the work about the meting-house", and to
entertain the gentlemen called upon to settle the differences about moving that building. In March 1678/9, it was
voted that the Committee "should goe on with the worke Committed to them, in refference to the meeting house,
and to goe on with the worke forthwith according to heir best Discression." In 1686, he was on a related
committee formed to seat the new meeting house and to "settle the differences about the head-lynes." Finally, on
16 January 1694/5, he was on a committee formed to "exercise their best prudence for to look out for, and
endeavorr what in them lyeth, in the use of all lawfull meanes, for to obtaine a faithful Minister and dispenser of
the word of the Gospel to us in this palce; and they are to take care for his entertainment when obtained." He also
served as a sergeant in the Norwalk Train Band.
Abigail was still alive in December 1680, when her stepmother died, but probably died soon after. Sometime
after 1689, he married as his second wife Mary (----) (Allen) [Stevenson?]. They had three children: Thomas
b.p. 1689 d.s.p.; Richard b.p. 1689 m. Lemuel Morehouse
In June 1692, he was named to a special jury charged with hearing one of the period's notorious withcraft
trials:
" At a Speciall Generall Court held at Hartford, June 22th 1692---Whereas there are at present in the county of
Fayrefeild severall persons in durance upon capitall crimes, which are not so capable to be brought to a tryall at
the usual Court of Assistans---this Court doe grant to the governor, Deputy Governor and Assistancts, to the
number of seven at lest, commission of oyer and terminer, to keep a speciall court in Fayrefeild the 2 Wednesday
in December next, to hear and determine all such capitall cases and complaints...Petit jurors John Bowton [and
others]."
A summary of the trial follows:
"At this court Mercy Disborough of Compo in Fairfield, goody Miller, goodwife alias Elizabeth Clawson,
and Mrs Staples were indicted for familiarity with Satan"--witchcraft. Two hunder depositions were taken---but
when the court was unable to decide their guilt one way or the other the judges resorted to the water test....which
consisted of tying the hands and feet of the victim and throwing her into a pond or river. If she sank she was not a
witch; if she floated she ws one...The jury found that "Mercy Disborough being bound hand and foot and put into
the water swam like a cork, thongh one labored to press her down [and she was found] guilty according to the
144
indictment."
Acccordingly, she was sentenced to death. But before the sentence could be carried out, a number of citizens
submitted a petition to the governor to either annual or withdraw the death warrant. Although the disposition of
the petition is not recorded, it appears it was granted; she was still alive in 1707.
In the years before his death, John engaged in a series of land transactions. On 7 May 1700, he conveyed to
his son Joseph four acres of land at Flaz Hill, Norwalk. On 25 october 1700, he witnessed the sale of land by
Joseph to John Fillio. On 4 February 1701, John sold land to William Haynes. On 8 November 1705, he sold
lands to Thomas Betts in Norwalk and Pempawalk; this is the last public record of him.
John probably died in January 1706/7; his will, dated 25 December 1706, was proved on 27 January 1706/7,
so he must have died between these two dates. It provided:
" In the name of God Amen. December the 25th and the year of our Lord God one thousand seaven hundred
and six. I John Boutton Senior of the towne of Norwalk in the county of Fairfield Being by the hand of God upon
me weak and infirme of Body but of perfect mind and memorye thanks be given unto God Therfore calling unto
mind the Mortallyty of my body and Knowing that it is appoynted unto all men once to dye Doe make and
ordaine This my Last Will and Testament. Principally and first of all I give and Recommend my Soale unto the
hands of God that gave it. And my body I Recommend to the earth after Death to be Decently and Christian Like
Buried at the Discretion of my friends: nothing Doubting but at the Generall Reserrection I shall receive the Same
againe by the mighty power of God; And as touching such worldly Estate wherewith it hath Pleased God to Bless
me in this Life, I Give, Demise and Dispose of the Same In following maner anf forme--after my Just Debts and
funerall charges payd and Legacyes also payd and Discharged.
Imprimus--I Doe give unto Mary Boutton my Beloved wife half my homlott and the whole hause, and half
my Barne, that side of the homlott next John Benedick Senr and the orchard on sd lott and allso my Lott of Land
at fruitfull Springs and allso my Lott of Land at pine hill; and to Dispose of sayd aprcills as she shall stand in need
for her relief and in case she shall not stand in need for her necessity to sell or dispose of them, then she may
dispose of them to my children by her as she shall see cause and allso I doe give to my sayd wife two cowes and
all my moveable Estate as shall or may remain when all Debts and dues payd as abovesayd. Allso my will is that
what moveable estate I had of her at marriage with her shall not be Inventoried as my Estate but to remaine to her:
All the above mentioned Estate I doe give unto her Duering her naturall Life.
Children of John Bouton and Abigail Marvin are:
824
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
John Bouton, born 30 Sep 1659; married Sarah Gregory.
Matthew Bouton, born 24 Dec 1661.
Hannah Bouton, born 1663.
Joseph Bouton, born 1665.
Rachel Bouton, born 15 Dec 1667.
Abigail Bouton, born 01 Apr 1670.
Mary Bouton, born 26 May 1671.
Elizabeth Bouton, born 1671.
1674. William Hall He married 1675. Esther.
1675. Esther
Child of William Hall and Esther is:
837
i.
SarahHall/Hull, born 04 Oct 1640 in Guilford, New Haven, CT; died 31 Jan 1688/89 in Guilford, New
Haven, CT; married Nicholas Munger 02 Jun 1659 in Guilford, New Haven, CT.
1676. John Hand, born 1611 in Stanstide, Maidstone, co. Kent, England; died 1660 in E. Hampton, Long
Island, New York. He married 1677. Alice Stanborough.
1677. Alice Stanborough
Children of John Hand and Alice Stanborough are:
838
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Joseph Hand, born 1642 in Lynn, MA; died Jan 1733/34 in East Guilford, New Haven, CT; married Jane
Wright.
John Hand
Stephn Hand
Mary Hand
Shaunger (Shamgar, Shager) Hand
145
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Benjamin Hand
James Hand
Thomas Hand
daughter Hand
1728. John Linley, born 1620 in Althorpe, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef. 13 Jul 1698 in New Haven,
New Haven, CT. He was the son of 3456. John Linsey and 3457. Elizabeth Messenger. He married 1729.
Ellen Dayton.
1729. Ellen Dayton, born Feb 1622/23 in Ashford, Kent, England; died 01 Apr 1654 in Guilford, New
Haven, CT.
Notes for John Linley:
Although reported as possibly arriving in New Haven in 1639, we find no definite record of our John till 1
Jul 1644 when he took the "oath of fidelity". Then the next year is recorded the court case from which we learn
that Francis, a brother was living with John in "John's howse" and so we conclude that John was married and
living in New Haven at least as early as 1645, probably 1644. Then we learn he got land in Branford, CT in
1646. This record in vol. 1 page 1 of the Branford Records 7 Jul 1646, may be merely a legal confirmation of
land that had been allotted in 1644 or 1645, as the Wethersfield group under Mr. Swain came down to take it in
1644, but the details of setting up a new settlement would take time. Then we find in book 1 page 7 16 Nov 1646
John is mentioned again in regard to a fence that needs to be build and again page 13, 4 Apr 1648 he acquires
more land in Branford. Both of these lists include very near the same names as the one of 7 Jul 1646.
Then in 1648 it appears he bought land of William Love in Guilford. For in the "Guilford Terrier" page 36 is
found "Terrir of all the landes belonging to Wm. Love in Guildord" in which several "parcells" of land are
described and then "John Linly accepted planter to said Lotts having bought them all of Mr. Robert Kitchell
atturney for the said Love for the some or price 3L and 10s about the 25 of March ano. 1648". And since the next
records we have of him are in Guildord, CT, and none show him living in Branford, we must assume he moved
there sometime in 1648 from New Haven where we believe he had been living in 1644-48 and where in all
probability his first two children were born, Sarah and John Jr., very likely in 1646 and 1648, although
confirmation records of his marriage and these births do not seem to be known. In. vol. A, page 40 Guilford
records, among those who would
Child of John Linley and Ellen Dayton is:
864
i.
John Linley, born 1647 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died 09 May 1684 in Branford, New Haven,
CT; married Hannah Griffin Abt. 1670 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
1736. Thomas Wheadon, born 1636 in Axminster, Devon, England; died 1691 in New Haven, New Haven,
CT. He was the son of 3472. Varient Wheadon. He married 1737. Ann Small Harvey 24 May 1661 in New
Haven, New Haven, CT.
1737. Ann Small Harvey, born Bet. 1635 - 1645 in New Haven, CT; died Bet. 1692 - 1694 in Branford,
New Haven, CT.
Notes for Thomas Wheadon:
Thomas Wheadon or Whedon or Wheaton was born about 1635 in the vicinity of Axminster, Devon, England,
and died 1691 in (New Haven), New Haven, Connecticut. He married Mary Ann Small 24 May 1661 in Hew
Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. She was born about 1633, and ded 1692 in Branford, New Haven, Connecticut.
He took the Oath of Fidelity in New Haven on 7 February 1657 [Records of the Colony of New Haven 16381649, p. 140].
He was sued in court at New Haven on 5 Dec 1665 for slander and defamation for having called the wife of
Richard Newman a Rayler; found guilty and fined 40 shillings plus costs. At the same court he was also found
guilty of slander and defamation for accusing William Bassett of stealing 3 bundles of flax, fined 15 shillings plus
costs, "and left a serious admonition about his Carriage with the neighbors for the future."
He was "of New Haven" on 20 Apr 1658 when he bought lands in Branford (LRI:275-6). He was living in
Branford by Jan. 20, 1667 when he signed the New Plantation and Church Covenant. "("Early Records of
Branford, now Branford, CT" "Genealogies of Connecticut Families" Vol. III P-W, p. 465-468]. He was there in
146
Mar 1668/9 when he helped build a dam there (LR1:354).
2 Mar, 1674-5 --Thomas Whedon entered an action vs. W.H. and Samuel Ward, collectors for the town, for a
debt due him from the town and costs for work done for the town 40s. Court awarded the plantiff ie1-11s., he to
pay the costs. [Hoadley Genealog Book, p.7].
Whedon, Thomas, New Haven, had been boun appr. in Eng. to John Meigs, just bef. com. to learn his art of
tanner, took oath of fidel. 1657, m. 24 May 1661, Ann Harvey (sic. Small), had Thomas
Notes for Ann Small Harvey:
Ann Harvey (later referred to an "Anne" or Mary Ann" in some records] m. Thomas Wheadon May 24, 1661 in
New Haven, CT-his first marriage, but it was her second* (several records indicate that ann Harvey was in fact
(Mary) Ann Small, daughter of Francis Small, who had an early common-law marriage to Sir Francis Harvey (see
below*)
Ann (Small) Harvey Wheadon and Thomas Wheadon had 5 children: Thomas Wheadon (jr.), b. 1662-63; Sarah
in 1666; Esther in 1667; John in 1671; and Hannah in 1674.
*Some researchers say that she married "Sir" Francis Harvey about 1658 in New Haven, CT. (Source: Mr. Gilbert
and "Wheaton Family" history prepared by Earnest Wheaton; and Lucy M. (Ruhman) Weaver, Defiance, OH,
April 2002). (Source: "Ancestors of Sarah Abigail Wheaton" prepared by Lucy M. Weaver, 100 Northfield Ave.,
Defiance, OH): New Haven, CT town records (pg. 426-27) for Dec. and Jan. 1659-60 indicate that a court was
held where Francis Harvey was summoned to "give answer concerning a treaty of marriage with a maid, carried
on as its understood & as they both have confessed, to the engaging of themselves to one another, & without
consent of parents or governor, contrary to the law here published". To which Francis Harvey answered that
"there was no such law in the places where he hath been." Ann pleaded ignorance of the law & the breach of it, &
that she "intended to serve out her time with her Master, but Mr. Yale, Her Master, said that she had within a
short time after she came to him, moved to be free." Ann also said she had engaged herself "without the consent
of her mother, who she confessed was living, for ought she knew, to whom it would be a great grief to hear of her
irregular proceedings." Mr. Yale informed the court that Ann Small, was a burden, and that she was a notorious
liar and unfaithful (having stolen several small things from his household.) Francis Harvey was told that he had
broken the law by his irregular proceeding in this "treaty of marriage" with Ann Small, and he was find 40
(pounds?). Ann Small was reproved for her "impudency and insensibility" and sentenced to pay 10 as fine for her
lying, 2 for her stealing, and 12 for the gloves (she admitted taking from Mr. Yale). The court ordered them to
not continue their relationship and Francis Harvey was "warned to remove out of town this spring." He
apologized to the court and asked to stay. The relationship must have shortly thereafter ended, however, as Ann
Small harvey (or sometimes Mary Ann Small/Harvey) married Thomas Wheadon two years later. In fact, this
record seems to indicate that there was a promise of marriage, and probably a relationship, but that the legal
marriage of Ann Harvey and Sir Francis Harvey probably never took place (source: "Wheaton Family" prepared
by Ernest Wheaton).
Children of Thomas Wheadon and Ann Harvey are:
868
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Thomas Wheadon, born 31 May 1663 in New Haven, New Haven, CT; died 16 Oct 1707 in Branford,
New Haven, Connecticut; married Hannah Sutcliffe 1686 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
Sarah Wheadon, born 23 Apr 1666.
Esther Wheadon, born 26 Jan 1667/68.
John Wheadon, born 22 Dec 1671.
Hannah Wheadon, born 21 Jul 1674.
1738. Nathaniel Sutcliffe, born 1643 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA; died 19 May 1679 in Deerfield, Franklin,
MA. He was the son of 3476. Abraham Sutcliffe and 3477. Sarah Sutlief. He married 1739. Hannah
Plympton.
1739. Hannah Plympton, born 01 Mar 1644/45 in Dedham, Norfolk, MA; died in Branford, New Haven,
CT. She was the daughter of 3478. John Plympton and 3479. Jane Damon.
Children of Nathaniel Sutcliffe and Hannah Plympton are:
869
i.
Hannah Sutcliffe, born 19 Dec 1665 in Medfield, Norfolk, MA; died 24 Nov 1743 in North Brandford,
New Haven, CT; married Thomas Wheadon 1686 in Branford, New Haven, CT.
147
ii.
iii.
iv.
Judith Sutcliffe, born 07 Jul 1667.
Nathaniel Sutcliffe, born 27 Jul 1672.
John Sutcliffe, born 1675.
1748. Matthew Moulthrop, born in England; died 22 Dec 1668. He married 1749. Jane.
1749. Jane, died May 1672 in New Haven, CT.
Notes for Matthew Moulthrop:
MATTHEW MOULTHROP, the founder of the Moulthrop family in America, was b. in England; was at New
Haven in 1639; d. 22d December, 1668. Admitted to First Church, New Haven, before 1644; m. in England,
Jane, surname unknown, who d. in May, 1672, in New Haven. Wills of both are found in Volume I of the New
Haven Probate Records. Matthew was prominent in the affairs of the New Haven and East Haven Colonies, in
both of which he held office; he fought in the Indian Wars.--Colonial Families of the United States, Volume VII,
Rhoades Family, Page 410
----------------------------------------------------------------------MOULTHROP, or MOULTROP : -- Matthew, New Haven, 1639; by wife Jan had Matthew, Elizabeth, and
Mary, perhaps the first two born in England ; Elizabeth born 1638, and Mary in 1641 ; were baptized in 1642.
He died 1668, and his widow died in 1672. Elizabeth married, 1663, John Gregory.
REFERENCES:--Am. Ancestry, VIII, 10; Dodd's History of East Haven, Ct., 137-9; Sharp's Hist. of Seymour,
Ct. 224-6.
Children of Matthew Moulthrop and Jane are:
874
i.
ii.
iii.
Matthew Moulthrop, born 1639; died 01 Feb 1690/91 in East Haven; married Hannah Thompson 26 Jun
1662 in East Haven, CT.
Elizabeth Moulthrop, born 1638.
Mary Moulthrop, born 1641.
Child of Matthew Moulthrop and Jane is:
929
i.
Elizabeth Moulthroup, born in Plymouth Colony, MA; died 09 Oct 1689 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT;
married John Gregory 18 Oct 1663 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
1750. John Thompson He married 1751. Eleanor.
1751. Eleanor
Child of John Thompson and Eleanor is:
875
i.
Hannah Thompson, born 1643; married Matthew Moulthrop 26 Jun 1662 in East Haven, CT.
1760. William Cadman, died Abt. 1686. He married 1761. Elizabeth.
1761. Elizabeth
Notes for William Cadman:
"William Cadman, or Cadmon, the name being used interchangeably, the first of the name to appear in this
country is generally credited as living in Portsmouth, R.I. several years before 1661 (Savage Genealogical Index).
The first official record of him is found in the records of Portsmouth June 5, 1654 (Records of the Town of
Portsmouth, pub. by Rhode Island Historical Society, 1901, p. 62), when he was received as a resident of that
place and from that date he was more or less prominent at all times in the affairs of the town, holding numerous of
the public offices until the time of his death.
At a meeting held the 16th of February 1658 he was chosen one of the jurymen to attend the General Court
Trials (Records of the Town of Portsmouth pub. by Rhode Island Historical Society, 1901 p. 88), and a little later
the same year he was find ten shillings for not attending the meeting (Rhode Island Court Records pub. 1920 Rhode Island Historical Society Vol. 1 p. 54). On Aug. 23, 1659 he complained to the Assembly that the money
due him from Qissucquoanch, by a judgment of the General Court had not been paid. (a. 268), (Rhode Island
Colonial Records 1:426), (Rhode Island Court Records pub. 1920--Rhode Island Historical Society 52, 53, 54).
At a meeting of the Freemen held October 12, 1664, he was elected as one of the Petty jurymen and to this
148
position he was again elected in 1667-1669. (Records of the Town of Portsmouth pub. by Rhode Island
Historical Society, 1901, 126, 127, 150).
In 1666 it was voted that two of his neighbors were to call on him and notify him that there was a town law
passed in 1654 which forbids any inhabitant to receive or entertain a stranger above one month without the
consent of the inhabitants, upon penalty of five pounds for every month he offends his neighbors in this manner,
and that he is not to entertain William Maze (Records of the Town of Portsmouth pub. by Rhode Island Historical
Society, 1901, p. 135). To the General Assembly he was chosen deputy in 1670-72-73-74-79 and 1682.
(Records of the Town of Portsmouth pub. by Rhode Island Historical Society, 1901, p. 155, 171, 175, 179, 199,
213). In the records of 1679 and 1682 he is mentioned as Lieut. Wm. Cadman. In 1671 he was one of a
committee of four persons to go to Governor Nicholas Easton and demand the charter and give a receipt for it (A.
268). He served as a member of the town council in 1673-74-75-77-80 and 81. (Records of the Town of
Portsmouth pub. by Rhode Island Historical Society, 1901 p. 180, 183, 190, 191, 192, 196, 204, 211). At a town
meeting held Aug. 13, 1673 he and four others were appointed a committee to prepare matters for the assembly
concerning drunkenness among the Indians, encouragement of the militia and consider the danger they were in by
the Dutch taking of New York.
In May 1674 he was on a committee to receive a charter from the late Governor Nicholas Easton and in 1676
at the April meeting he was appointed one of the commissioners "to take care and order the several watches and
wards on this island and appoint the places." and on Aug. 24, 1676 he was a member of the court martial held at
Newport for the trial of certain Indians charges with being engaged in King Phillip's designs (A. 268).
As a juryman to the Court of Tryalls he was chosen in 1676 (Records of the Town of Portsmouth...p. 190 and
1676, 78, 79, 80, and 1682 he was chosen overseer of the poor (Records of the Town of Ports...p. 191, 193, 200,
205, 206, 215). In 1678 he was chosen with others to establish the tax rate of the town (Records of the Town of
Ports...p. 198, and in the same year as one of a committee to adjust and audit the accounts between Newport and
Portsmouth owing to the Indian wars (Records of the Town...p. 198), and in 1679 and 1682 he was moderator
(Records of the Town...p.201. 214, 216). In 1678 he was of a committee appointed to make disposition of
Indians and place them as apprentices (Records of the Town...p. 431, 432, 133). During this entire period his
name often appears as a witness to wills and as appraiser of property for the distribution under wills, juryman, etc.
(Rhode Island Court Records pub. 1920 2: 31, 32, 33, 37, 55, 84, 87).
He was an extensive property holder of real estate as evidenced by the fact of Seth Howland's will, executed
in Portsmouth in 1729, in which he lists eight pieces of property formerly in the original right of William Cadman
(M. Dec. 21 : 180-183). On September 25, 1711 Benjamine Crane surveyed "Ye neck that belongs to Wm.
Cadmon." A number of other surveys follow and these surveys are probably the land mentioned by Austin as
being 512 acres surveyed in 1712. (N.B.) The land described by Crane as "Ye Neck" contained 90 acres. Crane
in the field notes uses various spellings for the name, including Cadman, Cadmon, and Cadmond.
Cadman's Neck may now be described as being that part of Westport, Mass., called South Westport. As
early as 1885 the Christian Baptist Society of Westport, Dartmouth, Fall River, New Bedford, and vicinity held
camp meetings there each summer. There are still the summer cottages there but the camp meetings were
discontinued several years ago.
On June 28, 1682 he deeded to his son, George of Dartmouth, half a share there (A. 268), and two years later
on January 11, 1684, he was appointed one of the overseers of the will of Hugh Parsons (A. 268). On September
28, 1688, his widow Elizabeth, joined in a deed made by her son Richard (a. 268), so it is evident that his death
occurred sometime between 1684, the date he was appointed overseer of Hugh Parson's will, and 1688, the date
his widow Elizabeth deeds property.
The date of his marriage to Elizabeth is not known, nor from the records do we know how may children he
had, but there were at least two sons and one daughter alive at the time of his death. George is given lands by his
father and Richard deeds land with his mother, so that the identity of the two, George and Richard, has been
definitely established (a. 268). The actual record proof of Mary's identity has not been established but sufficient
evidence is available to consider her a William's daughter (G.F.)"--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH
AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
Children of William Cadman and Elizabeth are:
i.
George Cadman, died 24 Nov 1718; married Hannah Hathaway; died Abt. 1749 in Tivertown, RI.
Notes for George Cadman:
"George (2) William (1) Cadman's date of birth is not of record, but the place was probably Portsmouth,
as no other place of residence of his parents has been found. He himself however spent most of his life
in Dartmouth, Mass. Early mention states that he was in Dartmouth in 1685 (Savage Genealogical
Index). Actual records show however that he served as a juryman in that place in 1676 (A. 268). in
1684, he was one of a committee to lay out a way through the town (a. 268), and in 1686 he was named
149
as one of the inhabitants of that place (New England Historic Genealogical Register 12: 160). He too, as
his father before him held many public offices, both appointive and elective. In 1686 he was a surveyor
of highways, and in 1688 he with one Wood and others were named in a suit against the proprietors. In
1692 he served on the Grand Jury and he served as a selectman in the years 1692, 1694, and 1696. In
1694 he was named in a deed to the residents of Dartmouth by William Bradford, (B. N. 33) and was
therefore one of the original fifty-six proprietors entitling him to the ownership to 800 acres of land
mentioned in the early recrods as the "800 acres division". He held the office of treasurer in 1698, 1709,
1711, and 1712. He was one time overseer of the poor. In 1697 he was appointed overseer of a will, the
appraisement of which he finished in 1704 (M. Dec. 7: 212). In 1712 he had 512 acres surveyed for him
(A. 268).
The date of his marriage is not known but he married Hannah (5) Hathaway. On September 9, 1710 she
was named in the will of her father, Arthur (4) Hathaway, and she receipted for her share of property,
(M. Dsc. 16: 110, 112). Her mother was Sarah (3) Cook, she being the daughter of John (2) Cook and
Sarah Warren. This John Cook was a son of Francis (1) Cook of the Mayflower (M. Dsc. 22: 2).
There are no children of George (2) and Hannah Cadman of record except the one daughter Elizabeth,
the date of her birth has not been determined. He died November 24, 1718 (New England Historic
Genealogical Register 20: 340), (D. 3: 22). In his will he appoints his wife, Hannah, as sole executrix
and names his daughter, Elizabeth White, and her husband, William White. From this will can also be
determined the names of his gradchildren, the children of William and Elizabeth (3) (Cadman) White,
(M. Dsc. 22: 6).
His wife, Hannah, on February 13, 1748/9 made her will which was probated May 2, 1749 ( M. Dsc. 22:
6), at Tivertown, Rhode Island. Whilliam White, her grandson, ws appointed the sole executer (A. 438).
She, in her will, names her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Both wills are on record in the
Bristol County probate records and copies have been printed in full in the Mayflower Descendat (Vol.
22).
On March 15, 1699, Samuel Cornell of Dartmouth executed his will (B. Wills 3: 214 1/2), proved
February 15, 1714. (B. Wills 3: 214 1/2). In this will he describes himself of Dartmouth. He was the son
of the first Thomas Cornell. His wife's name was Deborah and she had eveidetly predeceased him as she
is not mentioned in his will but she had executed a mortgage with him in 1716-17 (b. Deeds 10: 519). He
names in this will his oldest son, Thomas Cornell, son, Samuel Cornell and his daughter Comfort
Cornell. The executers and guardian of his children were "My lloving cousin, Thomas Cornell of
Portsmouth (i.e. the son of Thomas Cornell Jr.) and my cozen, George Cadman of Portsmouth." How
George Cadman was his "cousin" has not been determined from the records nor is any additional
evidence available on the subject."--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS
DESCENDANTS, compiled by Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
ii.
Mary Cadman, born 10 Jun 1655; died 29 Mar 1732; married James Cole; born 01 Nov 1655 in
Swansea, Essex, MA; died 17 May 1718.
Notes for Mary Cadman:
"Mary (2) Cadman was born June 10, 1655, (G. F.), and died March 29, 1732, (G. F.). The date of her
marriage is not of record but she married James (3) Hugh (2) James (1) Cole. James Cole was born in
1655 (Co. 32) and was a resident with his fatherHugh (2) Cole of Swansea, but because of trouble with
the Indians he removed to Portsmouth in 1675 (Records of the Twon of Portsmouth, pub. by Rhode
Island Historical Society, 1901 p. 186) and remained there two years after which time he returned to
Swansea, Mass. (Co. 27) James Cole was born November 1, 1655 (Co. 32) and died May 7, (or 17)
1718. To James Cole and Mary (Cadman) Cole was born one child, a daughter. (Co. 33).
The evidence placing Mary (2) as the daughter of William (1) Cadman is based on the following,
appearing in Vol. 1, Manuscript Genealogies of the Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R.I.: a
document relating to James Cole and his wife, Mary Cadman. it is a story of early days and only
excerpts are quoted and offered as proof for the placing of Mary Cadman.
"James Cole, my grandfather, boarn november the first (?) day of May 1654 his wife mary cadman was
born the 10 day of June 1655 and she dyed 29 day of march 1732 and their dafter abigail Cole was born
the 1 (?) day of December 1681 and she dyed in the 30 year of her age,"--"Mary Gould in the 36th year of her age hath rit some few loins for her children to rember what things
she Lost in the year 1733. my grandarther Coal gave me one silver tankard marked with his name and
his wife name of the first letters of their name C, I had fore silver spoons two of them marked G"
The second page tells of visits made by mary Gould to her sister, Elizabeth Hudson, at Swansea,
sometimes in company with her sister Ann Chalners. Then follow four lines of poetry date "Augst the 10
day 1747". And at the bottom of the page in another handwriting:
"Thomas B. Gould's Great Granson to Mary Gould from his Aunt Bathaby Gould the 5th day of the 6th
Month 1825"
His, Thomas B. Goulds, great granson to Mary Gould and give to him by the Daughter of M. Gould (B.
G.) Bathsheba Gould the 5 of ye 6th Month."
The document states very clearly and definitely that she was born June 10, 1655 and died March 29,
150
1732 and as yet there is no evidence or indicatin that the manuscript which was written about 1733 is not
genuine."--WILLIAM CADMAN OF PORTSMOUTH AND HIS DESCENDANTS, compiled by
Theodore G. Foster, Lansing, Michigan, 1935
880
iii.
Richard Cadman, married Sarah Almy.
1776. Balthazar DeWolf, born 1621 in Sagan, Selesia; died 1696 in Lyme, New London, CT. He married
1777. Alice Peck 1645 in Guilford, CT.
1777. Alice Peck, born 26 Feb 1624/25 in Liddington, Rutland, England; died 1687 in Lyme, New London,
CT.
Notes for Balthazar DeWolf:
DEWOLF
Among prominent old New England families no name carries more prestige than that of De Wolf. In Rhode
Island the family has been actively identified with the upbuilding of the State for generations. It has been said
that the history of the town of Bristol is the history of the De Wolfs. In the rugged pioneer days, when Bristol was
a port of consequence in the West Indies trade, the hardy members of this family for many years braved the perils
of the deep, and combining their courage, and a splendid capacity for business enterprise, they developed a
mercantile and shipping industry of large proportions. When the savage Indian from within their borders, or the
hostile foes from without menaced the safety of the colony, the De Wolfs were ever found patriotic and true,
offering themselves without reservation to the causes of liberty and justice. They were true blue in the widest
sense of the term, and their public spirit, sturdy, upright characters, and sound business judgment, won for them
the confidence and esteem of their fellow citizens and left for posterity the priceless heritage of an honored name.
The nae of "Wolf", with or without the prefix, or its equivalent, is to be found in many nations. In the
Teutonic languages the name is traced back to its Teutonic original, while in the Romance languages the forms of
the name are traced to their Latin derivations. Among the Romans, "Lupus" stood not only for the beast which
suckled the mystic founders of the State, but also designated members of the human family. The name suggests
the close association of primitive man with the animals of the forest, and was, no doubt, adopted because of the
fancied resemblance between some qualities in the man and animal. If space permitted it would be interesting to
mention and trace some of the forms this name has taken in the various Continental countries and in Great Britain.
The house of Guelph, of which the late Queen Victoria was perhaps the most distinguished and conspicuous
member, is traced to a German family of Welf or Wolf.
The De Wolfs belong to the oldest aristocracy of Flanders, Saxony and Livonia (the Baltic Provinces of
Russia). According to legend, the origin of the name de Wolf is practically the same in every country. According
to family tradition in Belgium, Frederick de Wolf's first known ancestor, Louis de Saint-Etienne, of the French
noble family of that name, was one of King Charles the Fifth's attendant on a hunting expedition. During the
case, a wolf cub crossed the King's path; Charles threw his lance at the cub, mortally wounding it, and breaking
the weapon against a tree. An enormous she-wolf, seeing her offspring wounded, rushed from the forest upon the
King, who had nothing but a hunting knife to defend himself with. Louis de Saint-Etienne rushed between the
wolf and the King and dispatced it with his sword, thus saving the King's life. As a reward, the King knighted
Louis, who from this time was called de Loup, and was ancestor of the noble French family of that name. His
grandson, Emile de Loup, accompanied the Princess Matilda to Germany at the time of her marriage. Emile de
Loup became a great favorite at the Saxon Court and had the tite of Baron conferred on him in 1427. He then
changed his name from French to German and was known afterwards as de Wolf. It was his direct direct
descendant, Maximillian de Wolf who founded the Belgium branch of the family.
1656, March 5: Balthasar De Wolf, or as the name is spelled, Baltazer De Woolfe, is first recorded in
American when he was one of those presented before "A Perticular Court in Hartford", Connecticut "for smoking
in the street contra to law". At that time he was evidently a resident of what is now Branford, for we find his
name on a list of persons who settled in that town between 1645 and 1660.
1664c: He was a resident of Wethersfield, Connecticut. Four years later he was a member of the train band
at Lyme, Connecticut with his three sons. It has been supposed that Balthasar De Wolf was about forty-five years
of age at that time.
1668c: Balthazar de Wolf and his three sons, Edward, Simon and Stephen are recorded as members of the
151
training band at Lyme. There is also a record that one Nicholas Jennings was indicted for withcraft in "causing
the death of the wife of Regnold Marvin and a child of Balthazar de Wolf."
1671, May: He was made a freeman by the court at Hartford.
1677c: he was chosen a member of the committeee of the town, and was yet alive in 1695.
1656, March 5: Balthazar DE Wof, the immigrant, is first found in New Genland in a court record in
Hartford, Connecticut, when he was fined for "smoaking in the streets contra the law". Balthazar was very
impatient with the puritanical restrictions of the town. It is said that having paid his fine, Balthazar lit his pipe,
and walked out! When he came over is unkown nor has his place of origian in Europe been found. Some of his
descendants believe he was French, but there is no evidence for this, and there was a large family of the name in
England.
1661, September 5: There is mention of a child "bewitched to death" in an indictment of Nicholas and
Margaret Jones for witchcraft.
1687, March 5: "His wife Alice is mentioned in a deed from him to his son, Simon acknowledged on
February 19, 1690."
From Randall and Allied Families on Rootsweb
Children of Balthazar DeWolf and Alice Peck are:
888
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
Edward Nathan DeWolf, born 1646 in Guilford, CT.
Stephen Peter DeWolf, born 1648 in Wethersfield, Hartford, CT.
Simon DeWolf, born 1650 in Wethersfield, Hartford, CT; died 05 Sep 1695 in Lyme, New London, CT;
married Sarah Lay 12 Nov 1682 in Lyme, New London, CT.
Hannah DeWolf, born 1652 in Middletown, Middlesex, CT.
Marah (Mary) DeWolf, born 10 Jan 1655/56 in Middletown, Middlesex, CT.
Child DeWolf, born 1661 in East Saybrook, New London, CT.
Susanna DeWolf, born 22 Dec 1664 in Lyme, New London, CT.
Alice DeWolf, born 1666 in Lyme, New London, CT.
Joseph DeWolf, born Apr 1668 in Lyme, New London, CT.
Peter DeWolf, born 1670 in Lyme, New London, CT.
1780. Robert Waterman, died 10 Dec 1652 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA. He was the son of 3560.
Thomas Waterman. He married 1781. Elizabeth Bourne 11 Dec 1638 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA.
1781. Elizabeth Bourne, born in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA; died 12 Dec 1663 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA.
Child of Robert Waterman and Elizabeth Bourne is:
890
i.
Thomas Waterman, born 30 Nov 1644 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA; died 01 Jun 1708 in Norwich, New
London, Connecticut; married Miriam Tracy 01 Oct 1675 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
1782. Thomas Tracy, born 07 Nov 1610 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England; died 07 Nov 1685 in
Norwich, New London, Connecticut. He married 1783. Mary Mason 1641 in Wethersfield, Connecticut.
1783. Mary Mason, born in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died 20 Feb 1658/59 in Saybrook, CT.
Notes for Thomas Tracy:
Thomas Tracy came to America as a young boy. He traveled on the ship "The Supply". The Supply was the
companion ship to the Mayflower. It left 3 weeks late from England and, unlike the Mayflower, it found it's way
to Virginia. The ship arrived on the 29th of January 1620. On board the ship were: Governor William Tracy,
Mary Tracy, his wife, Thomas Tracy, their son, Joyce Tracy, their daughter.
Thomas Tracy moved to Watertown, Massachusetts in 1636. He was a ship carpenter by trade, and settled
first in Watertown, Mass. where he removed to Salem in 1636. On February 23, 1737 he went to Wethersfield,
Conn. and was on the jury at Hartford, the same year. In 1649 he had removed to Saybrook.
In 1645 he and Thomas Leffingwell, with oters, relieved Uncas, the sachem of the Mohegans, when he was
besieged, with provisions and Uncas afterwards gave 400 acres of land to both. This led to the grant of the town
of Norwich in 1659. He removed to Norwich in 1660 and was one of the proprietors of the town.
152
In 1662 he was appointed one of the Court of Commission; in 1666 ensign. He served many years as deputy
of the general court. In 1673 he was lieutenant of the New London County Dragoons, the forces raised to go
against the Dutch and Indians. In 1674 he was commissary or quartermaster to the Dragoons, and in 1678,
Justice. In King Philip's war in 1675, he and John Bradford were appointed Commissary and Quartermaster. He
owned much real estate, more than 5000 acres.
Thomas Tracy married Mary in 1641 in Wethersfield, Connecticut. This was Mary's second marriage. He
first marriage was to Edward Mason about 1632.
Mary is thought to be the daughter of Sir John Conway and Catherine Verney. There is also a theory that
Mary is Mary Lock. In either case, she is the widow of Edward Mason.
The deed for the town of Norwich (originally "Mohegan") reads as follows:
"Know all men that Onkos, Owaneco, Attawanhood, Sachems of Mohegan have Bargained, sold, and passed
over, and doe by these presents sell and pass over unto the town and Inhabitants of Norwich nine miles square of
land lying and being at Mohegan and the parts thereunto adjoining, with all ponds, rivers, woods, quarries, mines,
with all royalties, privileges, and appurtenances thereunto belinging, to them the said inhabitants of Norwich, their
heirs and successors forever--from thence the line run nor north east nine miles, and on the East side the
aforesaidd river to the southward the line is to join with New London bounds as it is now laid out and to run east
two miles from the aforesaid river, northwest nine miles to meet with the western line.
In consideration where of the Onbkos, Owanexo and Attawanhood do acknowledge to have received of the
parties aforesaid the full and just sum of seventy pounds and doe promise and engage ourselves, heirs and
successors, to warrant the said bargain and sale to the aforesaid parties, their heirs and successors, and them to
defend from all claims and molestations from any whatsoever.
In witness whereof we have hereunto swet out to our hands this 6th of June, Anno 1659.
Unkos
Owaneco
Attawanhood
Witness hereunto, John Mason, Thomas Tracy
http://freepages.genealogy.rootweb.com/~edgerton/FoundersMonument.htm
Norwich Founders Monument
Child of Thomas Tracy and Mary Mason is:
891
i.
Miriam Tracy, born 1649 in Saybrook, Middlesex, CT; died in Norwich, New London, Connecticut;
married Thomas Waterman 01 Oct 1675 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
1788. David Calkins, born 03 Nov 1639 in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts; died 25 Nov 1717 in
Norwich, New London, Connecticut. He was the son of 3576. Hugh Calkins and 3577. Ann Eston or Eaton.
He married 1789. Mary Bliss 1672 in New London, New London, CT.
1789. Mary Bliss, born 07 Feb 1648/49 in Saybrook, CT. She was the daughter of 3578. Thomas Bliss and
3579. Elizabeth Birchard.
Notes for David Calkins:
According to the History of New England, DAvid chose to spell his name Caulkin[s].
WILL
Will dated 20 Jun 1717, probated 10 January 1717/18. Witnesses--John Plunebe, Daniel Apply and Thomas
Bartlett. Mentions loving wife, Hannah Calkins, "With what more is coming to me of the estate of her deceased
husbend, Banjamin Abell, of her doury." His sons--Joseph, John, grandson David, son of my son John and
daughters--Ann Burchard, Mary Bushnell and Lydia Kelle. As to my son son, David, deceased, and my son,
Jonathan, I have already given them their full portion in land, by deed of gifts, Son Joseph to be sole executor.
MISC
David located in the Nahntick grant of his father, near the Niantic river, or Rope Ferry Bar, in what was then
New London, now Waterford. The farm remained in the possession of the descendants, in direct line, until 1855.
He married Mary, daughter of Thomas Bliss of Norwich and had eight children. David's birth is not recorded.-Memoir of Frances Manwaring Caulkins
153
Hugh Calkins and his son, John, removed to Norwich in 1660. David, the younger son, remained in New
London, and inherited the homestead farm, given by town to his father at Nahntick. Edward Palmes, John
Prentis, David Caulkins and William Keeny lived on adjoining farms, and for a considerable period occupied a
district by themselves, around the present Rope Ferry and Millstone Point.--History of New London, Connecticut
Children of David Calkins and Mary Bliss are:
894
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
David Calkins, born 05 Jul 1674 in New London, New London, CT.
Ann Calkins, born 08 Nov 1676 in New London, New London, CT.
Jonathan Calkins, born 09 Jan 1677/78 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut; died 15 Jul 1750 in New
London, CT; married Sarah Turner 11 Dec 1700 in New London, CT.
Peter Calkins, born 09 Oct 1681 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
John Calkins, born 11 Mar 1682/83 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
Mary Calkins, born 26 Mar 1690 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
Joseph Calkins, born 03 Nov 1694 in New London, New London, CT.
Lydia Calkins, born 09 Aug 1696 in New London, New London, CT.
1790. Ezekiel Turner, born 07 Jan 1649/50 in Scituate, MA; died 16 Jan 1703/04 in New London, CT. He
was the son of 3580. John Turner and 3581. Mary Brewster. He married 1791. Susannah Keeney 26 Dec
1678 in New London, CT.
1791. Susannah Keeney, born 06 Sep 1662 in New London, CT; died 13 Dec 1748 in New London, CT.
Notes for Ezekiel Turner:
Ezekiel Turner, of Scituate, born 7 January 1651, baptized 19 January 1650/1, died 16 January 1704 in New
London, Connecticut. He married in New London, Connecticut, on 26 December 1678, Susanna Keeney of New
London, born 6 September 1662, died there 13 December 1748. Susanna married second in New London, as his
second wife, 20 August 1706, Johseph Minor, born in New London 6 Auguest 1666, died there Monday 6 April
1752, aged 86 years, son of Clement and Francis (Burcham) (Willey) Miner.
In 1679, Ezekiel was a sailor with Master Thomas Simond when the bark Providence was wrecked on a rock
near Fisher's Island, according to his deposition dated November 29th.
Ezekiel Turner died intestate. The inventory of his estate was taken 11 May 1704 and amounted to 217
pounds, 10 shillings, 6 pence. Administration of the estate was granted to widow Susanna and on 9 November
1705 she posted bond with Richard Christophers as Surety. On 1 October 1706, Susanna Minor, "Relict of
Ezekiel Turner," presented her accounting of the estate.
On 12 March 1706/7, the Court ordered a division of the "Real and personal estte of Ezekiel Turner, late of
New London, deceased." The aid real estate contained a "Lott formerly belonging to William Nichols, [and] was,
by a deed of Gift, given by John Keney of New London to his son and Daughter, Ezekiel Turner, and their heirs
for ever..." On 17 June 1707, Susanna (now Susanna Minor, wife of Joseph Minor), claimed the lot and the Court
ordered the "use, benefit and profit of said Lott be to said Susanna during her life..." and it was taken out of the
inventory.
An addition was made to the inventory on 20 June 1707, recording "several things delivered by the deceased
to Jonathan Calkins and to Adam Pickett, as part of his wives portions.: Division of the remaining estate of
Ezekiel Turner was made 25 November 1707, and recorded 29 November 1707, to widow Susanna (1/3), son
Ezekiel (double portion), and the other eleven children, with each child named in the order of their recorded birth.-Turner, c.1605-aft. 1710--Rootsweb.
Children of Ezekiel Turner and Susannah Keeney are:
895
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
Sarah Turner, born 28 Oct 1683; married Jonathan Calkins 11 Dec 1700 in New London, CT.
Susannah Turner, born 02 Jan 1684/85.
Mary Turner, born 30 May 1686.
Ruth Turner, born 02 Mar 1687/88.
Lydia Turner, born 05 Sep 1690.
Grace Turner, born 29 Aug 1692.
Hannah Turner, born 08 Sep 1694.
Elizabeth Turner, born 05 Dec 1696.
Ezekiel Turner, born 14 Mar 1698/99.
Lucretia Turner, born 20 Jan 1700/01.
Abigail Turner, born 1702.
1792. Richard Pettingell, born 1620 in England. He married 1793. Joanna Ingersoll 1643 in Salem,
154
Essex, MA.
1793. Joanna Ingersoll, born 1624 in Sutton, Bedford, England; died 1693 in Newbury Old Town, Essex,
MA. She was the daughter of 3586. Richard Ingersoll and 3587. Ann Agnes Langley.
Notes for Richard Pettingell:
RICHARD PETTINGELL was born in England about the year 1620, as we learn from the following
deposition:
The Deposition of Richard Pettingell aged 47 testifyeth that John Webster came to me of a Lords day before
the sun was down & charged me and my son to take charge of John Atkinson untill he had occasion to call for
him.
Afterwards wee went to Mr. Thomas his house & John Atkinson proferred m. Thomas that if m. Thomas
wold pay him within one month what he owed to him he shold have that Cagg of sturgeon which was now in John
Kents boat delivered to him for his use at boston againe but m. Thomas wold not. [Not signed.]
Testified at a meeting of the Commissioners for Small Causes in Newbury Sept. 4, 1667. [Essex Court Files
XIII, 49.]
When giving testimony in court at Hampton (now in New Hampshire), 14(8) 1673, he deposed that he was
"about 52 years old;" in 1678, when he took the oath of allegiance, he is said to have been "about 60." The
statements were approximate, of course. His testimony at Hampton was in a trial about the rights of certain heirs
to Giles Fuller's estate and was, viz.: "Rich. Pettingell aged about 52 years saith yt being very well acquainted
with Giles Fuller of Hampton deceased & with Mr Fuller of Bastable doctor both in Old England & here in New
England & both told mee they were of Kinn & ye sd Giles Fuller have told mee in old England & now that Matt.
Fuller doctor now of Bastable was ye nearest kinsman he had.
"Sworn before ye County Court held att Hampton ye 14 : 8 m. 1673 as attested." Fuller is positively known
to have come from Topcroft in Norfolk, England, [N.E.H.-G. Register, LV, 192] and must have been a member of
the church ; for he was admitted to the freemanship of the colony June 2, 1641, a dignity to which none attained at
that date except members of the church, recommended by the minister of the place. He had a grant of a lot of
land --- 10 acres --- at "Enon" (afterward Wenham) in 1642, and removed to that section, where he resided
several years. He was received to the church there by letter from that of Salem 4(6) 1649. He witnessed the will
of Samuel Smith at Enon 10(5) 1642.
Richard Pettingell was a man of weight of character, as the following shows: [From the Salem Town
Records.]
At a general towne meeting held the sevent day of the fifth month 1644, ordered, ---That twoe be appointed
every Lords day to walke forth in the time of Gods worshippe, to take notice of such as either lye at home, or in
the fields w.out giving good account thereof, and to take the names of such psons, to present them to the
magistrate, whereby they may be accordinglie pceeded against; the names of such as are ordered to doe this
service are: [here follows a list] on the seventh day Richard Pettingell and John Ingersoll.
He again made a change of residence to a place further east, the plantation of Newbury, where he bought a
tract of land April 8, 1651, having sold his houses and lands in Wenham to Samuel Forster. he made his home
near what is now known as "The Upper Green," on the high road, on the right-hand side; part of the house is still
standing (1900). The town gave him, in 1651, 14 acres of marsh in consideration of his giving a right of way 4
rods wide through his land, situated on what is now called Ocean avenue (formerly Rolfe's lane). In 1661 Richard
Pettingell and others were chosen grand jurymen for the year. In 1665 he was granted an island in Plum Island
river near Sandy beach by a committee appointed by the town to settle the dispute between Richard Pettingell and
John Emery regarding the division as laid out. He was one of those chosen in 1671 "for the Jury of Tryalls at
Ipswich court."
July 15, 1695, in separate deeds, he conveyed certain houses and farms in Newbury and other interests to his
sons Samuel, Matthew, and Nathaniel. He died shortly after, his wife having died two or three years before.
The family became one of much note in Newbury; in the tax list of 1711 we find the following names of
descendants of Richard : Matthew, Matthew, Jr., Nathaniel, Nathaniel, Jr., John, Nicholas, Samuel, Richard,
Joseph, Thomas, and the widow Sarah. Daniel and Cutting, of taxable age, were also living in the town, as we
believe, at that time. In subsequent years, also,, the family has been largely represented, as will be seen in the
following pages.
He married some time before 1644 Joanna, daughter of Richard Ingersoll (name sometimes written Ingerson
and Inkerson), probably by his wife Ann.
Richard Ingersoll came from Bedfordshire, England, to Salem in 1629, under contrct the the Massachusetts
Bay company to take a place in the force of planters they were gathering. His family was to be brought over, and
he was well spoken of by the company's secretary in a letter to Gov. John Endecott. [See Suffolk Dees, I.] He
maintained a ferry at Salem in 1636; had large property. He died in 1644.
155
It has been asserted that a cdrtain house at Salem was built by Ingersoll and was the original of the romance
by Hawthorne---"House of the Seven Gables." Ann, the widow, married second John Knoght, Sen., of Newbury.
Some years later litigation arose over the farm her husband had willed her, and in the trial her son-in-law gave the
follwing testimony:
"I, richard Pettingell, aged About 45 years doe testify that this farm of land that is now in contriversy was
Reserved by the widow Inkersoll to her self before her marriage to John Knight Senior and she verbally gave this
land to John Inkersoll her son. I Richard Pettingell doe farder testify that about the year 52 the said John Knight
cam hom too Newbury and told his wif that hee had promised m. pain sum timber at the lot at frost fish river: she
was then troubled at it and said what have you to doe to sell my timber wher upon the said John Knight promised
her twenty shillings: and the said John Knight Senior did then oun that he had no right in that land." [Essex Court
Files, XIV, 28-32.] Mr. Knight then joined with his wife in conveying the farm to her sons John and Nathaniel
"Ingerson," as the deed was written by the scrivener.---A Pettengill Genealogy, arranged for publication by
Charles Henry Pope. Boston, Massachusetts, 1906, pages 1-7.
Children of Richard Pettingell and Joanna Ingersoll are:
896
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Samuel Pettingell, born 09 Feb 1644/45 in Salem, Essex, MA; died 1711; married Sarah Poore 13 Feb
1673/74.
Matthew Pettingell, born 1648.
Mary Pettingell, born 06 Jul 1652.
Nathaniel Pettingell, born 21 Sep 1654.
Son Pettingell, born 15 Nov 1657.
Henry Pettingell, born 16 Jan 1658/59.
1812. Moses Cleveland, born 02 Feb 1619/20 in Ipswich, England; died 09 Jan 1701/02 in Woburn. He
was the son of 3624. Isaac Cleveland and 3625. Alice. He married 1813. Anne Winn.
1813. Anne Winn, born 1629. She was the daughter of 3626. Edward Winn and 3627. Joanna Hatch.
Notes for Moses Cleveland:
MOSES OR MOYSES1 CLEVELAND OR CLEAVELAND, the common ancestor of all the Clevelands or
Cleavelands of New England origin, came, when a youth, from Ipswich, Suffolk county, England. According to
family tradition he sailed from London, Eng., and arrived in America in the year 1635. he first landed somewhere
in Massachusetts, probably either at Plymouth, Plymouth co., or at Boston, Suffolf co., Mass.
Moses1 Cleveland was born probably at Ipswich, Eng. about 1624 (according to court files of Woburn he was 39
years old in 1663), died at Woburn, January 9, 1701-2; "Maryed in Woburn, ye 26th: 7th mo. (September) 1648
Ann Winn, "born, according to family tradition, in Wales, or, according to another account, in England, about
1626, died probably at Woburn prior to May 6, 1682 (no record of dates and places of either her birth or death), a
daughter of Edward and Joanna (???) Winn.
Moses1 Cleveland arrived in this country, according to all accounts and traditions, about the year 1635, only
fifteen years later than the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, 1620. (From a letter of inquiry written from
Ipswich, Essex co., Mass., by his great grandson, Rev. John4 Cleaveland, No. 233 (Josiah3, Josiah2, Moses1)
Perhaps Moses1 landed at Plymouth, but more probably at Boston, where in 1635 there were far better docks. He
likely remained from 1635 to 1640 in Boston or vicinity.
The earliest settlement was made in the part now called North Woburn, Middlesex co., Mass. Persons who of late
years have had the pleasure of visiting Woburn (only a short distance from Boston) could not but admire the great
beauty of this model New England town.
(Woburn Militia Muster Roll, 1663: "Moses Cleveland, aged 39 years": therefore he was born 1624.)
In Tax List--26 6mo 1666 Moyses Cleveland. Committee's report, 1659-60, assigns to each of the seven
proprietors (Moyses Cleveland being one) of New Bridgefield his share of the fence to build.
1:55--A Cuntary Rate made 18: of the 6:moth 674 Moyses Cleavland three persons and Eftest .00 .08 .05.
43--The nams of thofe that have wright in the common lands of this Towne of Woburn and the fred feverall
156
proportions shown according to their perfons and estate agreed upon by which not only the present upland and
swamp is to be divided but also all the following divisions: Moyses Cleveland Efteat 1092, Acres 67; 3 of 2 mo
1668 Moyses Cleavland Efteat .03, Acres 11.
63--The select men meet and Commiffioner and Collector of their several inhabitance a Rate for the Cuntary in
the Town of Woburn: Moyses Cleavland, Senr 2 persons to effect .000 .05 .11.
Reference: "Cleveland Family,"--E.J. and H.G. Cleveland, Vol. 1, p. 22-32, 39-40.
Moses1 Cleveland became a man of some prominence in New England and, it would seem, was identified with all
the political movements of the day.
Moses1 Cleveland is probably buried in the Old First Burying -Ground at Woburn near the grave of his son
Aaron2.
Mrs. Ann (Winn) Cleveland died probably previous to May 6, 1682, for at that date her father, Edward Winne,
made his will mentioning her three youngest children, but not herself.
--Three Hundred Colonial Ancestors and War Service Their Part in Making American History from 495 to 1934
by thier Lineal Descendant Mrs. (Oscar Herbert) Elizabeth M. Leach Rixford, Tuttle Company, Rutland,
Vermont, 1934.
Children of Moses Cleveland and Anne Winn are:
906
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
Moses Cleveland, born 01 Sep 1651.
Nannah Cleveland, born 04 Aug 1653.
Aaron Cleveland, born 10 Jan 1654/55.
Samuel Cleveland, born 09 Jun 1657.
Miriam Cleveland, born 10 Jul 1659.
Joanna Cleveland, born 19 Sep 1661.
Edward Cleveland, born 20 May 1664.
Josiah Cleveland, born 26 Feb 1666/67; married Mary Bates.
Issac Cleveland, born 11 May 1669.
Joanna Cleveland, born 05 Apr 1670.
Enoch Cleveland, born 01 Aug 1671.
1816. Peter Adams, born 01 Mar 1620/21 in King Weston, Sommersetshire, England; died 23 Oct 1690 in
Medfield, Massachusetts Colony. He was the son of 3632. Henry Adams and 3633. Edith Squire. He married
1817. Rachel Newcome.
1817. Rachel Newcome, born Oct 1632 in Saint Albans, Hertford, England.
Notes for Peter Adams:
In his will of 1646, Henry Adams mentions his son Peter; in 1652, Peter Adams with his wife and son John
appeared at Medfield, Mass., where, in 1652, he is recorded as having a family of three persons. In the Indian
raid of 1675 his house was burned, and he was one of the signers of a petition to the Great and General Court for
aid. He died in 1690, and the inventory of his estate was taken October 23, 1690.--The New England Historical
and Genealogical Register, 1894, Vol. XLVIII, page191.
Children of Peter Adams and Rachel Newcome are:
908
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
John Adams, born 1651 in Braintree, Norfolk Co. Massachusetts; died 26 Feb 1723/24 in Canterbury,
Windham, CT; married Michal Bloice 02 Apr 1685 in Medfield, Massachusetts Colony.
Rachel Adams, born 1650.
Peter Adams, born 20 Apr 1653.
Hannah Adams, born 16 Jun 1655.
Mary Adams, born 01 Mar 1660/61.
Jonathan Adams, born 11 Jul 1663.
Jonathan Adams, born 15 May 1664.
Ruth Adams, born 20 Jun 1665.
Joseph Adams, born 25 Aug 1668.
Samuel Adams, born 02 Apr 1671.
Henry Adams, born 06 Jan 1673/74.
157
1818. Richard Bloyse, born 1623; died 07 Aug 1665. He was the son of 3636. Edmund Bloyse and 3637.
Mary. He married 1819. Michal Jennison.
1819. Michal Jennison, born 17 Dec 1640 in Watertown, Middlesex, Mass; died 14 Jul 1713. She was the
daughter of 3638. Robert Jennison.
Children of Richard Bloyse and Michal Jennison are:
909
i.
ii.
iii.
Richard Bloice, born 07 Dec 1659.
Mary Bloice, born 11 Dec 1661.
Michal Bloice, born 03 Apr 1664 in Watertown, Middlesex Co., Mass; died 14 Apr 1752 in Canterbury,
Windham, CT; married John Adams 02 Apr 1685 in Medfield, Massachusetts Colony.
1824. James Fitch, born 24 Dec 1622 in Bocking, England; died 18 Nov 1702 in Lebanon, New London,
CT. He married 1825. Abigail Whetfield Whitfield.
1825. Abigail Whetfield Whitfield, born 01 Sep 1622 in Ockley, Surrey, England; died 09 Sep 1659 in
Saybrook, CT. She was the daughter of 3650. Henry Whetfield Whitfield and 3651. Dorothy Sheaffe.
Notes for James Fitch:
The Rev. James Fitch, a native of the County of Essex, England, born Dec. 24, 1622, was brought by his mother,
with other sons, to America in 1638. It appears that the father of the family had previously died. All that is
known of young Fitch previous to his ordination, in 1646, is the statement of his birth, emigrating at the age of
sixteen, and seven years of theological instruction at Hartford under Revs. Hooker and Stone. After a pastorate of
fourteen years at Saybrook, he, with the larger portion of his Church, removed to Norwich in 1660. He was a
useful and valued citizen, one of the most prominent of the founders of the town. "As a pastor, he was zealous
and indefatigable. In addition to his other labors, he trained several young men for the ministry, as he himself had
been trained by Mr. Hooker. Rev. Samuel Whiting, of Windham; Taylor, of Westfield; and Adams, of New
London, received a part at least of their theological instruction from him." Mr. Fitch was twice married and had
fourteen children, the first six of whom were born at Saybrook. He married (first) in October, 1648, Abigail,
daughter of Rev. Henry Whitefield. She died at Saybrook, Sept. 9, 1659, and in October, 1664, he was married to
Priscilla Mason, who survived him. Rev. Mr. Fitch, in the year 1701 retired to the new plantation of Lebanon--a
plantation in which he took great interest, having figured in lands there, and where several of his children had
established their homes. Here he died November 18 or 19, 1702, when in the eightieth year of his age. His son
Samuel settled on a farm in Preston.--Genealogical & Biographical Record of New London County CT. Chicago:
J.H. Beers & Co., 1925 p. 45.
Children of James Fitch and Abigail Whitfield are:
912
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
James Fitch, born 02 Aug 1649.
Abigail Fitch, born 06 Aug 1650.
Elizabeth Fitch, born 02 Jan 1650/51; married John Pynchon.
Hannah Fitch, born 17 Dec 1653.
Samuel A. Fitch, born 16 Apr 1655 in Saybrook, New London, CT; married Mary Brewster.
Dorothy Fitch, born Apr 1658.
1826. Benjamin Brewster, born 17 Oct 1633 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass.; died 14 Sep 1710 in Norwalk,
Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 3652. Jonathan Brewster and 3653. Lucretia Oldham. He married 1827.
Ann Addis 28 Feb 1659/60 in Norwich, New London, CT.
1827. Ann Addis, born 17 Mar 1627/28 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass.; died 09 May 1709 in Norwich, New
London CT. She was the daughter of 3654. William Addis and 3655. Millicent Woods.
Notes for Benjamin Brewster:
Benjamin Brewster served as Deputy to the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut in 1668, '89, '90, '93-'97.
He was a Lieutenant of New London troops in 1673, and Captain of the Military Company of Norwich, 1693.
Benjamin settled on the family homestead at Brewster's Neck, having acquired the land from his father in 1658,
and from his brother-in-law John Pickett, in February 1661/2.
More About Benjamin Brewster:
Burial: Sep 1710, Brewster's Plain, New London, CT
More About Ann Addis:
158
Burial: May 1709, Brewster's Plain, New London, CT
Children of Benjamin Brewster and Ann Addis are:
913
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Mary Brewster, born 10 Dec 1660 in Norwich, CT; died 02 Dec 1750 in Guilford, New Haven, CT;
married Samuel A. Fitch.
Anne Brewster, born 29 Sep 1662.
Daniel Brewster, born 18 Mar 1663/64.
Jonathan Brewster, born 30 Nov 1664.
William Brewster, born 22 Mar 1668/69.
Ruth Brewster, born 16 Sep 1671.
Bejamine Brewster, born 25 Dec 1673.
Elizabeth Brewster, born 23 Jun 1676.
1840. George Giddings, born Sep 1609 in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; died 01 Jun 1676 in Ipswich,
Essex, Massachusetts. He married 1841. Jane Lawrence.
1841. Jane Lawrence, born 18 Dec 1614 in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; died 02 Mar 1679/80 in
Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 3682. Thomas Lawrence and 3683. Jane Joanne
Antrobus.
Notes for George Giddings:
From what particular branch of the Giddings family in England, or who were the immediate ancestors of
George Giddings, the first of the name here, we are unable to say; but the fact is well authenticated that George
Giddings, at the age of 25, and Jane Tuttle, aged 20, came from England in 1635, and settled in the town of
Ipswich, about 25 miles from Boston, Mass. Hotten's list of emigrants gives the names of George and Jane
Giddings and three servants. The following is a copy taken from "Our Early Emigrant Ancestors, edited by John
C. Hotten."
"2 April, 1635.
"Theis underwritten are to be transported to New England, imbarqued in the Planter, Nicholas Frarice Mr. bound
thither, the parties have brought certificates from the Minister of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, and attestacon from
the Justices of peace according to the Lord's order.
"GEORGE GIDDINS, husbandman 25 years.
JANE GIDDINS,
20 "
"Thomas Carter 25
Michael Willinson 30
Servants of George Giddins."
Elizabeth Morrison 12
That George Giddings was a man of property and position is inferred from the fact that he brought over with
him three servants, as in those days only people of means could afford the luxury of servants.
He brought with him a letter of recommendation from the rector, or minister, of St. Albans, Hertfordshire.
He was born in 1608, and died June 1 1676. "An agreement between the sons of George Giddings deceased,
viz.: Thomas, the eldest, John, James, and Samuel, respecting a division of the property of their father, was
entered into Sept. 26, 1676."
"We whose names are here under written the sonns of George Giddings desceased have joyntly agreed: as
foloweth and in wittness hereof have set too our hands that Thomas eldest sonne to the said George shal have a
Dubble portion of the estate and possession of his father equally to be devided viz. pasture arable and medow
land; with house barne commonage with all purtenances and preveledges thereunto belonging with cattle; to him
the said Thomas his heirs excetteters adminnestraters and assignes as his propor right inheritance for ever
peaceabley and quietly to injoy without mollestation as from us: the rest of his Brethren: together with the land
that was formerly given him by his father 7 acres more or less where he now lives: and we doe also agree not to
sell any of our land of from one another: and we doe expect and agree every one to beare his proportionable part
in fencings.
THOMAS GIDDINGE
JOHN GIDDINGE
JAMES GIDDINGE
SAMUEL GIDDINGE
The agreement allowed by the court held at Ipswich the 26th of Sept. 1676
ATT Robert Lord Clerk
159
Inventory June 19 1676 L1021-1206"
He was one of Major Denison's subscribers in 1640, a commoner in 1641, one of the twenty sworn
freeholders who paid the highest rates out of two hundred and thirty in 1664, deputy to the General Court in 1641,
1654, 1655, 1659, 1661, 1663, 1664, 1668, 1672, and 1675. Selectman 1661 to 1675, and for a long time a
ruling elder of the first church. Says the historians of Ipswich: The inventory of his estate June 19, 1676,
exhibitied a total value of L1,021, 12s, of which 152 acres of land with six acres of marsh, at Plumb Island, was
appraised at L772. His widow, Jane, died March, 1680.
We have good evidence that this ancestor of our family in this country had a mind of his own, with a purpose
to carry out his will, in the record of a long law-suit, which he carried through all the courts to its final
termination, for the purpose, as it seems, of establishing a principle. A lengthy report of the trial is thought
worthy of insertion here.
"Copy of the Case of George Giddings and others of Ipswich, Referring to Mr. Cobett.
And the case being of very weighty concernment in the country (I conceive), I shall express the grounds of
my judgment. I understand this to be about a fundamental law, properly so called. It is such a law as that God
and nature have given to a people, so that it is the trust of their governors in highest place, and others, to preserve,
but not in their power to take away from them, of which sort are these. 1. Viz., election of the supreame
governours. 2. That every subject shall and may enjoy what he hath a civill right or title unto, so as it cannot be
taken from him, by way of gift or loan, to the use, or to be made the right or property of any other man, without
his owne free consent. 3. That such lawes (though called libertyes) yet more probably, they may be called rights,
and in this sense this may be added as a third fundamental law, viz.: That no custome or precedent ought to
prevayle in any morall case, that may appear to be sinnfull in respect to the breach of any law of piety against the
first table, or of righteousness against the second. And so for brevity sake, I shall now forbear to write further,
and respite what I have more to say, to be expressed in another paper, what doth more clearly and fully tend to
inlighten my judgment in this case, ready to be manifested where occasion is.
SAMUEL SYMONDS."
"June 22, 1657, George Giddings, plaintiff, against Edward Browne, defendant, in action of trespass upon the
case for entering his house and severing his pewter dishes or platters and marking of them.
"I find in this case for the plaintiff,
L s. d.
Damage, 010
Costs, 058
"June 23, 1657. Edward Browne appealeth from the sentence in the case above unto the next county court,
holden ast Salem, and acknowledgeth himself bound to this gov ernment in the summ of three pounds to
prosecute his appeale to effect according to the law provided about appeales.
SAMUEL SYMONDS."
Further documents of this lengthly court case may be read in The Giddings Family: or the Descendants of
George Giddings who came from St. Albans, England, to Ipswich, Mass., in 1635 by Minot S. Giddings, 1882,
pages 15-20.
Children of George Giddings and Jane Lawrence are:
920
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Thomas Giddings, born 1638.
John Giddings, born 1639.
James Giddings, born 1641 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts; died 1720; married Elizabeth Andrews.
Samuel Giddings, born 1645.
Rebecca Giddings, born 1647.
Abigail Giddings, born 1649.
Joseph Giddings, born 1650.
Mary Giddings, born 1658.
1748. Matthew Moulthrop, born in England; died 22 Dec 1668. He married 1859. Jane.
1859. Jane
160
Notes for Matthew Moulthrop:
MATTHEW MOULTHROP, the founder of the Moulthrop family in America, was b. in England; was at New
Haven in 1639; d. 22d December, 1668. Admitted to First Church, New Haven, before 1644; m. in England,
Jane, surname unknown, who d. in May, 1672, in New Haven. Wills of both are found in Volume I of the New
Haven Probate Records. Matthew was prominent in the affairs of the New Haven and East Haven Colonies, in
both of which he held office; he fought in the Indian Wars.--Colonial Families of the United States, Volume VII,
Rhoades Family, Page 410
----------------------------------------------------------------------MOULTHROP, or MOULTROP : -- Matthew, New Haven, 1639; by wife Jan had Matthew, Elizabeth, and
Mary, perhaps the first two born in England ; Elizabeth born 1638, and Mary in 1641 ; were baptized in 1642.
He died 1668, and his widow died in 1672. Elizabeth married, 1663, John Gregory.
REFERENCES:--Am. Ancestry, VIII, 10; Dodd's History of East Haven, Ct., 137-9; Sharp's Hist. of Seymour,
Ct. 224-6.
Children of Matthew Moulthrop and Jane are:
874
i.
ii.
iii.
Matthew Moulthrop, born 1639; died 01 Feb 1690/91 in East Haven; married Hannah Thompson 26 Jun
1662 in East Haven, CT.
Elizabeth Moulthrop, born 1638.
Mary Moulthrop, born 1641.
Child of Matthew Moulthrop and Jane is:
929
i.
Elizabeth Moulthroup, born in Plymouth Colony, MA; died 09 Oct 1689 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT;
married John Gregory 18 Oct 1663 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
1920. Theib Scharffenstein, born 1665; died 31 Dec 1742. He was the son of 3840. Henrich
Scharffenstein.
Child of Theib Scharffenstein is:
960
i.
Johan Peter Scharffenstein, born 1693 in Flammersfled, Palatinate, Germany; died 29 May 1758; married
Maria Margaretha Bauer 23 Nov 1713 in Niederbieber, Germany.
Generation No. 12
3120. William Pynchon, died 09 Oct 1661 in Wyrardsburgh, England.
Notes for William Pynchon:
William Pynchon, was one of the patentees of the colony charter of Mass. Bay, and was appointed magistrate
and assistant in 1629 in England. He came hither in 1630, with Gov. Winthrop, and began the settlement of
Roxbury, Mass., being its principal founder, and the prime mover in forming the Congregational Church
established there. In 1636 he removed to Springfield, Mass. (Indian, Agawam), and made a settlement there--thus
laying the foundations himself of two important American towns.
In 1650 he was censured for having published a work entitled "The Meritorious Price of Man's Redemption,"
and cited to appear before the court, and laid under heavy bonds. It was a dialogue in form, and is described as
having been "a book full of errors and weakness, and some heresy, which the General Court of Massachusetts
condemned to be burned." "The grand error of the book consisted," it was said, "in regarding the sufferings of
Christ as merely trials of his obedience." The next year he retracted his sentiments, and the censure was
suspended; but he was so much dissatisfied that he went back to England, and never returned to this country
again. He was a man of high mark for both intellect and excellence. It was in 1652 that he left the new world,
after 22 years' residence here, for his old home.
His wife, whose name is unknown to the author, d. in 1630, shortly after his arrival here: and he m. for a 2d wife
Widow Frances Sanford, "a grave matron of the church of Dorchester," Mass. She d. in England, Oct. 10, 1657.
He d. in Wyrardsburgh, Eng. Oct. 9, 1661, aet. 72.--The History of the Descendants of John Dwight, of Dedham,
Mass. by Benjamin W. Dwight, Vol. II, 1874, page 629.
Child of William Pynchon is:
161
1560
i.
John Pynchon, born 1625 in Springfield, Essex County, England; died 17 Jan 1702/03; married Amy
Wyllys 30 Oct 1645.
3200. Robert Seymour He was the son of 6400. John Seymour and 6401. Dyzory Porter. He married
3201. Elizabeth Waller.
3201. Elizabeth Waller
Child of Robert Seymour and Elizabeth Waller is:
1600
i.
Richard Seymour, born 27 Jan 1603/04 in Sawbridgeworth, Herts, England; died 1655 in Norwalk,
Fairfield, CT; married Mercy Ruscoe.
3202. Roger Ruscoe He married 3203. Sarah.
3203. Sarah
Child of Roger Ruscoe and Sarah is:
1601
i.
Mercy Ruscoe, born 1610 in Sawbridgeworth, Hert, England; married Richard Seymour.
3208. Henry Gregory, born Abt. 1590 in Nottingham, England; died 14 Jun 1655 in Stratford, Fairfield,
CT. He was the son of 6416. John Gregory and 6417. Alicia Barkey. He married 3209. Goody.
3209. Goody, born in Nottingham, England; died in Stratford, Fairfield, CT.
Notes for Henry Gregory:
"Henry Gregory, the immigrant acenstor, was born around 1590 in England, probably Nottingham. While his
parentage is presently uncertain, he is thought to be the Hnery Gregory of St. Peter's Parish, Nottinghamshire,
who was the son of John Gregory of the same shire.
A William Gregory of Nottingham, England, "Gentleman," in a will dated 18 June 1650 and proved on 5
February 1651, gave a legacy to his brother Henry Gregory "now in New England." While there is as of yet no
evidence of his birth year, when he died in 1665 Henry was called "an old man" in the town records. The
Nottingham record of William's will refers to Henry of new England, and no other Henry Gregory has been
uncovered in New England. The Nottingham Henry was a shoemaker, as was the New England Henry (and seven
generations of his descendants). Henry of New England named his eldest son John, which was the name of Henry
of Nottingham's father. Nottingham Henry has a daughter named Anne, of the correct age to be Henry of New
England's daughter Anne.
He married ----- ----- ; nothing is known about her or her origins. They had at lest six, possibly ten, children
(except for John, not necessarily in order): John; A daughter m. -----Perry; Anne bpt. 29 Jan 1625 m. William
Crooker; Judah m. Sarah Burt; Elizabeth m. Richard Webb; Triphosa bpt. 23 Sep 1627 bur. 2 Oct 1629;
Elizaphatt; William bpt. 27 Jun 1630 bur. 6 Aug 1635; Abigail bpt. 17 Mar 1632 bur. 25 Mar 1633.
Henry came to New England sometime after 6 August 1635, probably in 1636. He appears to have settled
first in Boston, but by 1639 had settled in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts; a recrod there dated 16
January 1638/9 noted that:
"[i]t is ordered that the three rod of grownd yt lyes betwixt John Woodcodks pale and Goodman Grigorys
Lott shall be apropiated 2 rod of it to Gooman Grigory & one rod of it to Rich: Everitt reserving 40 rod for a
place for a meeting howse wch is to be alowed out of Gooman Grigorys Lott."
He was probably there by march 1637/8. The original land grants in Springfield were made conditional on
the recipient remaining at least five years; since the town bought Henry's land back from him on 14 March
1642/3, he must have fulfilled that condition. Henry's original homelot ran southwesterly from Town (later Main)
Street to the Connecticut River -- a distance of about 1337 feet. It had an eight rod frontage on the street, and two
additional rods were granted to him in trade for land upon which the church was to be built. The lot contained
about five acres, less forty rods for the church. Opposit e his lot he owned land of the same frontage that ran
northeasterly through a "hassocky marsh" and up a wooded ridge to present-day School Street. It contained two
acres of marsh and four acres of woodland.
Like many of the early settlers, he was involved in his share of court cases. On 16 June 1640, "John Leonard
complain[ed] in an acton of the case against Henry Gregory for taking more recompense for driving home of
certaine stray sowes than his share comes to & for taking more pigges with his sow than his share come to." The
jury found for the plaintiff in the sum of 0.08.00 pounds. That same day, William Warrener, Henry's neighbor to
the northwest, lodged a complaint against him "for layinge false imputations of wronge dealing in taking of those
162
pompions [pumpkins] that Richard Everit gave to both of them wch Hnery Gregory affirmeth to be contrary to the
appointment of Richard Everit;" no verdict is recorded.
On 10 September 1640, Henry sued his neighbor to the southeast John Woodcock for 4.14.00 pounds
relating to a pig and "the double ingagment of the hogges." The jury awarded him 4.07.03 pounds 0.03.00
pounds in court costs, but in a moment of excessive generosity he consented to a new trial and on 24 September
this time found himself on the losing side to the extent of 2.02.00 pounds and 0.09.00 pounds in costs. As the
magistrate noted, the verdict did not sit well with Henry:
"Henry Gregory after the verdict was much moved & said ["]I marvill with what conscience the jury can find
such damages seeing in the case of John Searles I had of him but twenty shillinges for three slanders,["] and he
added ["]But such Juries--["] He was about to speak more but Mr. Moxon [Rev. George Moxon, the minister] bid
him take heed, take heed, and so gave him grave admonition. presently after the admonition Henry Gregory
acknowledged his fault & earnestly craved pardon & promised more care & watchfulness for tyme to come and so
all the Jury acknowledged satisfaction in hopes of reformation."
Finally, on 24 December 1640/1, Henry and two others were accused of violating a town ordinance against
selling or pawning cannoes to outsiders. The court gave him five months to reacquire them.
The court appearances were not confined to Henry. On 15 February 1640/1, he and his wife were witnesses
in a suit against John Woodcock and testified to Woodcock making false statement regarding how much he
owned. Pynchon wrote:
"Goody Gregory being accused by oath of John Woodcoke & Richard Williams for swearing before God ["]
i could break thy head["]; she did acknowld it was her great sin & fault & saith she hath bin much humbled for it.
She is fined 12d to the pore to be paid to Henry Smuth within a month; or if she doe not she is to sit 3 hours in the
stockes."
Sometime in 1642 or early 1643, Henry decided to sell his land in Springfield. At a town meeting on 14
March 1642/3, "Henry Gregory beinge purposed to sell his lott and ppoundinge it to ye Plantation by his son
Judah accordinge to order, Richard Everit beinge his chapman [buyer] the Plantation gave ye voate wherein they
disalowed ye chapman ppounded and resolved to buy ye lott accordinge to ye conditions expssed in a former
order Dated January 24th 1638."
Henry moved south down the connecticut River to New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, where his
son John lived. He remained there for a brief period, before finally removing west along the coast to Startford,
Fairfield County, sometime before 1647.
He spent time moving back and forth between Stratford and New haven, where he worked with his son as a
shoemaker. On 7 December 1647, John Meigs (No. 282:10:5762; No. 283:14:5774) of New Haven sued Henry:
"John Meges declareth that at two severall times or agreements, he bargained with Henry Gregory of
Stratford to make 14 dosson of shoes, and was to give him 12d a pare for makeing them, carrying them to him
readie cutt out, that he payed 48s of this before hadm and 6 pounds more he was to have when he had done halfe
the worl...that Goodman Gregory hath made 13 dosson of them, but they are all naught and fall in peces, some in
a weeke, some in 14 dayes time, [Henry was accused of spoiling the shoe leather by laying the shoes out in the
sand, of making some without the required wooden heels, and of making others a size too small] so that the
plantiffe is damdged both in his name and estte. In his name, bothe at Connecticote, Long Island, Totoket,
Guilford, Startford, Farefield, they all cry out, and some think the plaintiffe worthy to be putt in prisson.
Henry Gregory, the defendant, saith that he received a hide from John Meges [Meigs was a tanner] at 48s
pric, for which hide he was to make hime 4 dosson of shooes wch came to 48s; pt of this he did before the other
bargaine, and he saw the ware and accepted it, and Mr. Evanc took it as currant and good, but it proved not so.
The plaintiff seing this ware agreed for the rest, but hee, this defendant, before the agreement, told the plaintiffe
he would make no more of such leather. The plaintiffe promised bothe boetter leather, and to procure hempe
from Connecticote to sow the shoes wth, but did not performe accordingly, so that the defendant was forced to
buy flaz at 18d p1, and sowed them with flaw. [The second hide furnished by Meigs was as bad or worse than the
first, causing Henry to remark, "It is pittie but the tanner should be hanged wch tanned it, for he cossens the
countrye."] The defendant dissiered to have hemp; the plaintiffe said that [flaz] thread would last as long as the
leather.
For making the showes lesse than they were cutt out it was because they were marked by hime [Meigs] more
than they would reach, for some wch was to be made up to ye tens whould not reache a nines last,but would teare,
they were so little and the leather so bad. [As for the charge concerning the wooden heels, Henry stated that he
had not been supplied with the proper materials.]
Juda Gregaory testifyeth upon oath that he looked upon pt of the leather wch his father was to worke of
Goodman Meges, and some of it was so hornie that according to his judgment no man could make shooes to pase
his word on them to hold. Allso shooes so tainted, though they might seem to be tanned, yet they would not hold
that a man was able to justify himselfe or the leather in it. Allso that his father complained to hime, this deponent,
163
and himself saw shoooes of the tenns marked for elevens, that by a size could not sowe them either for credite to
himself or proffitt to the countery ... Allso that Goodman Meges would have this deponent wrought, but he sawe
the lether so bad that if he never wrought more he would not worke it, in regard to the uncomfortableness to
worke, because it was hornie, and so little that it would not come together, and because it would be wrong to the
cuntry.
The wife of William Crooker [Henry's son-in-law] testifyeth upon oath ... that when Goodman Meges came
for the shoes he saw them lye upon a sandye bench in the sellar, and he said he like the lying of them very well
...[and] after Goodman Meges was gon and delaied to fetch away the shooes, her father wiped them with a cloth,
and took some clapboards and other things and laid under them. And further she saith her father blamed the
tanner for the leather not beinge well tanned. Goodman Meges answered he could not blame the tanner so much
for he was faine to take it out before it was tanned. She saith further she saw it tear in peces when her father put it
upon the last.
William Hooke junr testifyeth upon oath that he clearly remembereth Goodman Gregory was making 2 pare
of shooes in their shopp. Goodman Meges came in in the meantime and said to Goodman Gregory, flapp them up
together, they are to goe farr inoughe.
John gregory testifyeth upon oath that Goodman Meges said, flapp them up together, they are to goe far
inoughe, this was aboute the beginning of the last bargaine, wch was for the ten dosson-...John Gregory saith that
aboutethe time of the bargaine he gave Goodman Meges some cautions, because his father was old and his
eyesifht failed hime, and he durst not employe hime himself, for he could not do as he had done."
The outcome is not recorded.
In a pre- 1651 list of "every man's fense in the outfield." Henry appears as No. 32 with eight rods. In March
1652, the town gave him permission to cut a piece of meadow on "the west side of the dich" until otherwise
disposed of. Although it his clear he had a home lott -- a reference to Isaac Nichols' land described it a being
bordered by Henry's land on the west -- there is no record of the grant.
Henry died in Stratfor -- "an oulde man" -- in 1655, probably in June; on 19 June the court ordered his estate
distributed. An inventory of his estate included:
"5 pillowes, all the wooden ware, 3 Chayres & 1 wheel, 1 pair Skales, some pewter ware, 2 Iron pots, 1
skillit, 2 axes, 1 drawing knife, 1 meat knife, 2 spones, all the books, 1 howe, 1 pot hanger, 1 sieth, 1 Iron ringe, 3
pound of rosen, 1 baskitt, 1 maat, 1 coat, old pacede & bagg, Pease & hopps, Lasts."
The court appointed Henry's son John administrator of the estate, ordered all his debts to be paid, and the
remainder of the estate distributed to his children with a double portion to John as the eldest son."--Posted by
Rich Houghton on the Gregory Gen Forum
Children of Henry Gregory and Goody are:
1604
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
John Gregory, born Abt. 1613 in St. Peter's Parish, Nottingham, England; died 09 Oct 1689 in Norwalk,
Fairfield, CT; married Sarah Duxbury.
Daughter Gregory
Anne Gregory, born 1625.
Judah Gregory, born 1618.
Elizabeth Gregory
Triphosa Gregory, born 1627.
Elizaphatt Gregory
William Gregory, born 1630.
Abigail Gregory, born 1632.
Perry Gregory
Abigail Gregory, born 17 Mar 1632/33.
3266. Ralph Keeler
Child of Ralph Keeler is:
1633
i.
Isabella Keeler, married Thomas Morehouse.
3296. John Bouton, born Abt. 1615; died 1645. He married 3297. Alice Pratt?.
3297. Alice Pratt?, born Abt. 1610 in England.
Notes for John Bouton:
"John Bouton, the immigrant ancestor, was born in Europe around 1615, most likely in England. His
parentage is presently unproven, and old published reports that he was a son of Count Nicholas Bouton, a French
164
Huguenot immigrant are without any factual basis.
John came to New England in the summer of 1635 -- apparently unmarried -- aboard the ship Assurance of
London which sailed in July of that year from Gavesend, England, and landed in Boston, Massachusetts Bay
Colony, in December.
He probably settled first at Watertown, but removed to Hartford, Harford County, Connecticut, soon
thereafter. his name does not figure prominently in the first town records because of his young age, and his name
is not among those of the original founders who divided the lands of Hartford among themselves in 1639.
Around 1636 he married Alice [Kellogg?], most likely in Hartford. According to her will she was born
around 1610, perhaps in the Braintree or Great Leighs area of Essex, England; her parentage remains unproven.
She appears to have been very closely related to Hartford's Nathaniel Kellogg, who was born in Braintree, but to
what degree is unclear. They had three children: John married Abigail Marvin; Richard married Ruth Turney;
Bridget married Daniel Kellogg.
The only information about John comes from the will of his wife and some documents concerning his
children; he otherwise lived unnoted in the town records. He died sometime before 1647, most likely in
Hartford."--post on Gen Forum by Rich Houghton
"JOHN BOUTON born about 1615 in England. He was related to French Huguenots who fled France in 1600.
he married ALICE PRATT born about 1610 in England and they came to Boston in the ship, "Assurance" in
December 1635. he died in 1645. His widow married Matthew Marvin in 1647, and her will was dated 1 Dec
1680."--Theodore Pattengill Foster
Notes for Alice Pratt?:
"Around 1647, Alice married her son's father-in-law, Matthew Marvin; she was his second wife. They had
two children (surnamed Marvin): Samuel bpt. 6 Feb 1647/8 d. young; Rachel bpt. 30 Dec 1649 m. Samuel Smith.
Alice's second husband died in July 1680, and she followed soon after him around December of that year.
Her will was dated 1 December 1680, and her estate was inventoried on 9 January 1680/1, so she must have died
between these two dates. Her will provided:
"To all Christian people to whom these presents shall come greeting. I Alice Marvin of Norwocke in the
County of fairfield in the Colony of Conecticot; being aged seaventee years or therabouts; though weak and feeble
in body yet through the mercy of God of perfect mind & memory: I doe make ordayne and appoint this present
wrighting to be my last will and Testament.
Imprmis I doe will give and bequeath the sum of Twenty pounds to my Sonn John Bowton and to my
daughter Brdgit Killock to be equally devided betwen thetwo: That is to say Ten pounds apeese:
Item I doe give after my deceass: to my daughter Briggit Kellock my Scarfe and my best cloath wastcoat and
my best serg Coat and my best green Apron: and the best of my two under cotten coats & my spectacles.
Item I doe give unto my daughter Abigal Bowton my best hat and my best cloke and my Serge wastcoats: and
my under cotten wastcoat: and a pair of Cotten gloves: and a pair of lether gloves 2 brass small wayts:
Item I doe give to my daughter Rachell Smith my penne stone Coat: and my flannell wastcoat: and to my
granchild Sarah Brinsmead my Cheast: And to my grandchild Ruth Bowton: my brass bettle 3 old pewter dishes
and a brass Chafendish and a gilpot: And to my grandchild Rachell Bowton my bible. What remains not disposed
of: my will is shall be devided between my two dafter Brigget Kellock & Rachell Smith. The hetchell my will is
half to my sonn John Bowton and half to my daughter Brittit Kellock.
That this is my last will and Testament witnes my hand this 1 day of Decemr 1680."
Her estate was inventoried on the last day of January 1680/1:
" Imprmis her ordenary waring clothes, 1 red flannel wastcoat, 1 serge Coat, 1 pair stockings, 1 pennestone
Coat, 1 Cloath wastcoat & Serg Coat, 2 serg wastcoats & 1 Cloake, a hatt and band, 3 shifs, a green Apron, 2
Linsy woolsy Aprons, 2 blew Aprons 1 neckcloath, 3 peces of black stuffe, 2 pair of gloves, head Linnin, 1 bible,
1 Cheast and a scarfe, 1 p. Spectacles, Pewter, 1 Chafendish, a kettle, a p pattns, 1 hetchell, 1 small brass wayts,
deeds by Legasy from her husbands will 20 pounds."
The total value was 36.02.08 pounds"--Post on GenForum by Rich Houghton
Children of John Bouton and Alice Pratt? are:
1648
i.
ii.
iii.
John Bouton, born Abt. 1636 in Hartford, Hartfod, CT; died Jan 1706/07; married Abigail Marvin.
Richard Bouton, born 1639.
Bridget Bouton, born 1642.
165
1602. Matthew Marvin He married 3299. Elizabeth.
3299. Elizabeth
Child of Matthew Marvin and Elizabeth is:
1649
i.
Abigail Marvin, born Abt. 1637 in Hartford, Hartfod, CT; married John Bouton.
3456. John Linsey, died Bef. 26 Feb 1638/39. He married 3457. Elizabeth Messenger 09 Feb 1614/15 in
Althorpe, Lincolnshire, England.
3457. Elizabeth Messenger
Child of John Linsey and Elizabeth Messenger is:
1728
i.
John Linley, born 1620 in Althorpe, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef. 13 Jul 1698 in New Haven, New
Haven, CT; married Ellen Dayton.
3472. Varient Wheadon
Child of Varient Wheadon is:
1736
i.
Thomas Wheadon, born 1636 in Axminster, Devon, England; died 1691 in New Haven, New Haven, CT;
married Ann Small Harvey 24 May 1661 in New Haven, New Haven, CT.
3476. Abraham Sutcliffe, born 1610 in Yorkshire, England; died in Scituate, Plymouth, MA. He married
3477. Sarah Sutlief.
3477. Sarah Sutlief, born 1609 in Norfolk, MA.
Children of Abraham Sutcliffe and Sarah Sutlief are:
1738
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Abraham Sutcliffe, born 1631.
Thomas Sutcliffe, born 1633.
Branford Sutcliffe, born 1636.
Nathaniel Sutcliffe, born 1643 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA; died 19 May 1679 in Deerfield, Franklin,
MA; married Hannah Plympton.
3478. John Plympton, born 1620 in Dedham, Norfolk, Mass; died 19 Sep 1677. He married 3479. Jane
Damon.
3479. Jane Damon, born 1626 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Mass; died 1680 in Dedham, Norfolk, MA.
Children of John Plympton and Jane Damon are:
1739
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
xiii.
xiv.
Hannah Plympton, born 01 Mar 1644/45 in Dedham, Norfolk, MA; died in Branford, New Haven, CT;
married Nathaniel Sutcliffe.
John Plympton, born 21 Mar 1645/46.
Mary Plympton, born 09 Apr 1648.
John Plympton, born 16 Jun 1649.
Eleazer Plympton, born 07 Mar 1651/52.
Peter Plympton, born 07 Mar 1651/52.
Joseph Plympton, born 07 Oct 1653.
Jonathan Plympton, born 23 Nov 1657.
Eleazer Plympton, born 20 Feb 1658/59.
Eleazer Plympton, born 03 May 1659.
Lydia Plympton, born 02 Feb 1662/63.
Jane Plympton, born 02 Jun 1664.
Mehitable Plympton, born 15 Sep 1665.
Henry Plympton, born 09 Jun 1666.
3560. Thomas Waterman, born 19 Nov 1564 in Norwich, Norfolk, England.
Child of Thomas Waterman is:
166
1780
i.
Robert Waterman, died 10 Dec 1652 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA; married Elizabeth Bourne 11 Dec
1638 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA.
3576. Hugh Calkins, born 1603 in Waverton Parish, Cheshire, England; died 1690 in Norwich, New
London, Connecticut. He married 3577. Ann Eston or Eaton 1622 in England.
3577. Ann Eston or Eaton, born 1605; died Jun 1688.
Notes for Hugh Calkins:
Hugh Calkins (1603-1690)
"Hugh Calkins was a radical, in religion a non-conformist, and living in the troublous times of Cahrles, the
First, soon became satified that there were safe countries than England and Wales--for men who wished to
worship God accoridng to the dictates of their own consciences. Accordingly, he with his wife, Ann, and John,
their son, then four years old, joined a body of emigrants called the 'Welch Company,' and with their pastor, Rev.
Richard Blinman, embarked and came to America, about 1638 or 1640." William Cutter, Genealogical and
Personal Memoirs relating to the families of the state of Massachusetts, 1910.
They settled first at Green's Harbor (now Marshfield) in New Plymouth colony, but religious dissentions
arising, Mr. Blinman, Hugh Calkins and others removed to Gloucester. Hugh Calkins became one of the first
board of selectmen, and in 1650 was chosen deputy to the general court of Massachusetts Bay colony. He was
chosen again in 1651, but for some reason he and others removed in that year to Connecticut colony, some say to
Saybrook, but he could not have remained there long, as he was soon in New London. The Connecituct colonial
records show that Hugh Calkins was deputy at the general court from New London, May 20, 1652.
In all, he served twelve times as deputy from New London. By order of the general court, held October 3,
1654, Hugh and another were appointed a committee for enlisting men to fight the Narragansett Indians. The
records also show that he was a deputy magistrate.
In 1660 he again changed his residnece to the place where the city of Norwich now stands, then a wilderness
and owned by the Mohegan Indians. Just previously a treaty had been concluded, by and between the celebrated
major Mason and others with the Mohegan chiefs, by which a tract of land nine miles square around Norwich was
ceded to the whites, for the sum of seventy pounds sterling. Hugh and his son, John, were of the thirty-five
original proprietors. Hugh appears in the colonial records as a deputy from Norwich to the general court, then
times. He was an active worker there in all measures for the public good; and also at home constantly identified
with public interests. He was a deacon in the first church built in Norwich. William Hough and Sarah's father,
Hugh Calkins, were members of Rev. Blinman's religious group, and stayed with him through ministries near
Boston, Gloucester, and New London. William and Sarah stayed in New London after Blinman returned to
Britain, and Hugh Calkins moved up the Thames River (??) and was one of the founders of Norwich.--Caulkins
Rootsweb site.
Children of Hugh Calkins and Ann Eaton are:
1788
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Sarah Calkins, born 1626; died 1683.
Mary Calkins, born 1629; died 1717.
Rebecca Calkins, born 1631.
John Calkins, born 1634; died 1703.
David Calkins, born 03 Nov 1639 in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts; died 25 Nov 1717 in Norwich,
New London, Connecticut; married Mary Bliss 1672 in New London, New London, CT.
Deborah Calkins, born 1645; died 1717.
3578. Thomas Bliss, born 1628. He married 3579. Elizabeth Birchard.
3579. Elizabeth Birchard, born 1621. She was the daughter of 7158. Thomas Bircher and 7159. Mary
Robinson.
Child of Thomas Bliss and Elizabeth Birchard is:
1789
i.
Mary Bliss, born 07 Feb 1648/49 in Saybrook, CT; married David Calkins 1672 in New London, New
London, CT.
167
3580. John Turner, born 1621 in Terling, Essex, England. He was the son of 7160. Humphrey Turner
and 7161. Lydia Gaymer. He married 3581. Mary Brewster 12 Nov 1645 in Scituate, MA.
3581. Mary Brewster, born 16 Apr 1627. She was the daughter of 3652. Jonathan Brewster and 3653.
Lucretia Oldham.
Notes for John Turner:
John Turner, of Scituate, born in Essex, England 12 November 1645, died Sciituate between 4 March 1695
(date of will) and 20 May 1697 (date of inventory); marfried Mary Brewster, born Plymouth, Massachusetts, 16
April 1627, died probably in Scituate, after 23 March 1697/8.
John Turner was called "Senior", or "the Elder," because he had a younger brother also named "John" who
was referred to as "young John." John "Senior" was listed as freeman at Scituate in 1643. A tanner by trade, he
settled northwest of the present day Union Bridge on the North River, where he erected a tannery.
The will of John Turner, Senior, Husbandman, dated 4 March 1695, sworn and recorded at Plymouth, 22
June 1697, names the following persons: Son Jonathan Turner; Son Joseph Turner; Son Exekiel Turner; Six
Granchildren--Isaac Turner, John Hames, Thomas Prince, Margaret Turner, Alice Prince, and the eldest child of
my son Exekiel Turner; Son John Turner; son Elisha Turner; Son Amos Turner; Daughters Grace Christophers;
Wife Mary; "my four Daughters; That is to say Lydia, Mary, Ruth & Grace;" Son Benjamin Turner.
The inventory of the goods, Chattels and credits of John Turner, Sr., late of Scituate, was taken 20 May 1697
by Nathaniel Turner and Israel Hobart and was submitted to Judge William Branford, Esq., 22 June 1697. It was
recorded 24 July 1697.
On 23 March 1697/8, widow Mary acknowledged receipt of "fower Pound in moneys" from Peter Collamer
of Scituate in payment for six "uper Lether hids" he bought from her late husband, John Turner, deceased. The
receipt was witnessed by her son, Benjamin Turner, who wrote his name while Mary signed by a mark.--Turner,
c.1605-aft. 1710--Rootsweb.
Children of John Turner and Mary Brewster are:
1790
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
Jonathan Turner, born 20 Sep 1646.
Joseph Turner, born 12 Jan 1647/48.
Ezekiel Turner, born 07 Jan 1649/50 in Scituate, MA; died 16 Jan 1703/04 in New London, CT; married
Susannah Keeney 26 Dec 1678 in New London, CT.
Lydia Turner, born 24 Jan 1651/52.
John Turner, born 29 Oct 1654.
Elisha Turner, born 08 Mar 1655/56.
Mary Turner, born 10 Dec 1657.
Benjamin Turner, born 05 Mar 1659/60.
Ruth Turner, born 17 May 1663.
Isaac Turner, born 30 Apr 1665.
Grace Turner, born 02 Aug 1668.
Amos Turner, born 04 Jun 1671.
3586. Richard Ingersoll, born 16 Mar 1586/87 in Edworth, Bedforshire, England; died 21 Jul 1644 in
Salem, Essex, MA. He married 3587. Ann Agnes Langley 10 Oct 1616 in Sandy, Bedford, England.
3587. Ann Agnes Langley, born 1590 in Sandy, Bedforshire, England; died 30 Jul 1677 in Salem, Essex,
MA. She was the daughter of 7174. Thomas Langley and 7175. Ann.
Notes for Richard Ingersoll:
Richard Ingersoll and Some of His Descendants by Major-General A.W. Greely, U.S. Army.
RICHARD INGERSOLL is first mentioned in a letter, dated London, May 28, 1629, from the Governor of the
New England Colony to the Governor at Salem, in which he writes:
"There is also one Richrd Haward and Richard Inkersall, both Bedfordshire men, who we pray you may be
well accommodated, not doubting but they will well and orderly demean themselves."
The final record of his activites appears in the proceedings of the Salem town meeting, 7th day, 5th mo., 1644,
as follows:
"Ordered that two be appointed every Lords day to walk forth in the time of Gods worship, to take notice of
such as either lye about the meetinghouse, or that lye at home or in the fields, without giving good account
thereof, and to take the names of such persons and to present them to the magistrate, whereby they may be
proceeded against."
For the sixth day Richard Ingersoll was named, and his son John, for the seventh day.
168
Richard was well received and did his part as a member of the coloiny during the fifteen remaining years of his
life. He was granted 2 acres for a house lot and 80 acres for a plantation (1636), portions of land on Frost Fish
brook (1637), and 80 acres "of meadow in the great meadow" (1639). On his own part he was active in making
woodroads, established a ferry across North river (1637), and in the development of his property. His appearance
in several suits indicates his insistene upon not only his own rights but on those for the public weal,--as in
preventing excessive tolls at the grist-mill. His own infraction was confined to allowing his cows, with those of
eleven of his neighbors, to trespass on the common cornfields in 1642. Richard propered, added to his land by
purchase, and left a good estate, when he died in 1644. His will is as follows:-I, Rihcard Ingersoll of Salem in the County of Essex in New England being weake in body, but through God's
mercy in perfect memory doe make this my last will and testament as followeth, viz.
I give to Ann my wife all my estate of land, goods & chattells whatsoever except as followeth, viz.
I give to George Ingersoll my son six acres lying the the great meadow.
Item 1 give to Nathaniel Ingersoll my youngest son a parcell of ground, which I bought of John P_____, but if
the said Nathaniel dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten, then the land aforesaid to be equally share
between John Ingersoll my son, & Richard Pettingell & William Haines my sons in law.
I give to Bathsheba my yuoungest daughter two cowes.
I give to my daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland and meadow after my wife's
decease.
his
R x I
mark
i read this will to Rihcard Ingersoll & he acknowledged it to be his will. Jo. Endecott.
Proved in court upon oath 2 Jan. 1644-5.
Inventory taken 4 Oct. 1644.
Richard Ingersoll married in Sands, England, October 20, 1616, Agnes or Ann, Langley who is said to be a
cousin of John Spencer of Newbury. Ann married, second, John Knight Sr., in whoe will of May 4, proved June
23, 1670, Ann was mentioned with her grandson, Thomas Haines (Hoyt: Old Families of Salisbury). Ann died
July 30, 1677.
____________________________________________________
Richard Ingersoll, born 16 March 1587, Edworth, Bedford, England, died 21 July 1644 Salem, Essex,
Massachusetts, buried 5 January 1645 Salem. He married at St. Swithin's Church, Sands/Sandy, England,
20October 1611 or 1616, Agnes/Ann Langley, who is siad to have been a cousin of John Spencedr of Newbury.
She was born about 1590 in Sandy, Bedford, England and she died 30 July 1677 in Salem, Massachusetts. Ann
was the daughter of Thomas Langley, born about 1548, Sandy, died 12 July 1600, and Ann, born about 1552 in
Sandy, died and buried 29 July 1595, Sandy, After Richard's death, Ann married John Knight, "Merchant tailor
of Newbury." He was the father of John Knight, Jr., who married her youngest daughter, Bathsheba. Ann ws
John's second or third wife. She died 30 July 1677.
Richard and Ann Ingersoll came to Salem in 1629 with Higginson, arriving June 29. A letter from Matthew
Craddock, Governor of the company, to Mr. Endicott commends "Richard Inkersall and Richard Haward" who
with their families came from Bedfordshire, England.
In the original list of householders receiving "House lotts graunted by ye town" (1638) Richard Ingfersoll is
given two acres, also 80 acres on the Cape Ann side. Later, there was "grounted Richard Ingersoll 30 acres of
meadow in the greate meadow to be layd out by the towne."
In 1640 Richard Ingersoll's family is credited with nine persons and he is given an allotment of one acre.
The old towne records state that "It is agreed that Rich'd Inkersall shall henceforth have one peny (a tyme to
maintain the ferry) for every pson he doeth ferry over the north (ferry) river dureing the towns pleasure."
He died in Salem in 1644, probably soon after making his will, 21 July 1644. Some of the items of the
inventory of his estte included" 7 cows 34 pounds, 2 young steers 4 pounds, bull 7 pounds, pair of oxen 14
pounds, 2 horses and mare and a young colt 25 pounds, a farm of 80 acres 7 pounds. Among other items was a
moose skin suit. Mark A. Wentling--Ingersoll Website on Rootsweb.
Children of Richard Ingersoll and Ann Langley are:
1793
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
George Ingersoll, born 1618 in England.
John Ingersoll, born 1623 in England.
Joanna Ingersoll, born 1624 in Sutton, Bedford, England; died 1693 in Newbury Old Town, Essex, MA;
married Richard Pettingell 1643 in Salem, Essex, MA.
Sarah Ingersoll
169
v.
vi.
vii.
Alice Ingersoll
Bathsheba Ingersoll, died 24 Oct 1705.
Nathaniel Ingersoll, born 1632 in Salem, Essex, MA.
3624. Isaac Cleveland, born 01 Jan 1584/85. He was the son of 7248. Richard Cleaveland and 7249.
Alice. He married 3625. Alice.
3625. Alice
Child of Isaac Cleveland and Alice is:
1812
i.
Moses Cleveland, born 02 Feb 1619/20 in Ipswich, England; died 09 Jan 1701/02 in Woburn; married
Anne Winn.
3626. Edward Winn, born 1605. He married 3627. Joanna Hatch.
3627. Joanna Hatch, born 1605.
Child of Edward Winn and Joanna Hatch is:
1813
i.
Anne Winn, born 1629; married Moses Cleveland.
3632. Henry Adams, born 21 Jan 1582/83 in Barton St. David, Sommershire, England; died 06 Oct 1646 in
Braintree, Norfolk Co. Massachusetts. He married 3633. Edith Squire.
3633. Edith Squire, born 29 May 1587 in Charlton Mackrel, Somersetshire, England; died 21 Jan 1671/72
in Medfield, Norfolk Co., Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 7266. Henry Squire.
Notes for Henry Adams:
Henry Adams, immigrant ancestor, born in England, came from Braintree, England, to Braintree,
Massachusetts, which was first known as Mount Wallaston, or simply the "Mount," Boston, in 1632 or 1633. He
was allotted forty acres of land at the Mount for the ten persons in family, under date of February 24, 1639-40.
President John Adams, who was a descendant, believed that Henry Adams came from Devonshire, and erected a
monument to the immigrant in the old burying ground at Braintree, now Quincy, with this inscription: "In memory
of Henry Adams who took flight from the Dragon persecution in Devonshire, England, and alighted with eight
sons near Mount Wollaston. One of the sons returned to England; and after taking time to explore the country,
four removed to Medfield, and two to Chelmsford. One only, Joseph, who lies here at his left hand, remained
here--an original proprietor of the township of Braintree." The monument commemorated "the piety, humility,
simplicity, prudence, patience, temperance, frugality, industry and perseverance" of the Adams ancestors. But
President John Quincy Adams, son of President John, dissented from the conclusion of his father to the effect that
Henry Adams was of Devonshire. Savage agrees with the younger Adams that the immigrant was of Braintree,
county Essex, and some of the sons from Chelmsford in that county. The pedigree of Henry Adams, tracing his
ancestry to Ap Adam, the father of John or Lord Ap Adam, who was called to Parliament by Edward I as baron of
the realm from 1296 to 1307, and stating that he came out of the marches or borders of Wales into Devonshire,
has been discredited by genealogists, though proof of error seems as much wanting as proof of correctness. If
correct, the lineage included kings of England and France, and goes back to Charlemagne.
The name of Henry Adams's wife is unknown, though it is generally believed that she returned to England
with her daughter Ursula and died there. Henry Adams died at Braintree, October 6, 1646, and was buried on the
eighth. His will was proved June 8, 1647. He mentions sons Peter, John, Joseph, Edward, Samuel, and daughter
Ursula.--Genealogical and Personal Memoirs; Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts,
Volume II, prepared under the editorial supervision of William Richard Cutter, 1908, pages 588-589.
************************************
More About Henry Adams:
Burial: Hancock Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk Co., Mass.
Children of Henry Adams and Edith Squire are:
i.
ii.
Henry Adams, born 1610.
Thomas Adams, born 25 Mar 1612.
170
1816
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Jonathan Adams, born Sep 1614.
Samuel Adams, born 1617.
Ursula Adams, born 19 Jul 1619.
Peter Adams, born 01 Mar 1620/21 in King Weston, Sommersetshire, England; died 23 Oct 1690 in
Medfield, Massachusetts Colony; married Rachel Newcome.
John Adams, born 04 Dec 1622.
Joseph Adams, born 09 Feb 1625/26.
Edward Adams, born 19 Apr 1629.
3636. Edmund Bloyse, born 1587; died 1681. He married 3637. Mary.
3637. Mary, born 1596; died 29 May 1675.
Child of Edmund Bloyse and Mary is:
1818
i.
Richard Bloyse, born 1623; died 07 Aug 1665; married Michal Jennison.
3638. Robert Jennison
Child of Robert Jennison is:
1819
i.
Michal Jennison, born 17 Dec 1640 in Watertown, Middlesex, Mass; died 14 Jul 1713; married Richard
Bloyse.
3650. Henry Whetfield Whitfield He married 3651. Dorothy Sheaffe.
3651. Dorothy Sheaffe
Child of Henry Whitfield and Dorothy Sheaffe is:
1825
i.
Abigail Whetfield Whitfield, born 01 Sep 1622 in Ockley, Surrey, England; died 09 Sep 1659 in
Saybrook, CT; married James Fitch.
3652. Jonathan Brewster, born 12 Aug 1593 in Scrooby, Nottinghmasire, England; died 07 Aug 1659 in
Norwich, New London CT. He was the son of 7304. William Brewster and 7305. Mary Wentworth Love. He
married 3653. Lucretia Oldham 10 Apr 1624 in Plymouth, Massachusetts.
3653. Lucretia Oldham, born 14 Jan 1599/00 in Derby, Derbyshire, England; died 04 Mar 1678/79 in
Brewster's Neck, Preston, New London, CT. She was the daughter of 7306. John Oldham and 7307. Lucretia.
Notes for Jonathan Brewster:
Jonathan Brewster, born 12 August 1593, Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England, died 7 August 1659, New
London, Connecticut; married in Plymouth, Massachusetts, 10 April 1624 Lucretia Oldham, baptized in Derby,
England 4 January 1600, died in Norwich (now Preston), Connecticut. She was the daughter of William Oldham
and Phillipa Sowter. Jonathan and Lucretia are both buried in Brewster Cemetery, Brewster's Neck, Preston,
Connecticut, where a monument has been erected to their memory by their descendants.
Jonathan's name was recorded in the Leyden records several times. He became a Dutch citizen 30 June 1617.
He was a witness to the reading and signing of the will of Thomas brewer and his wife Anna Offley on 7
December 1617. He also was a witness to the betrothal banns of John Reynolds entered 28 July 1617 and to the
betrothal banns of Edward Winslow entered 27 April 1618. Styled "Lintwercker" or ribbon maker, he lived in
Pieterskerhof while in Holland.
Jonathan arrived at Cape Cod on the Fortune 9 November 1621, and Lucretia came over on the Anne with her
brother, John Oldham, arriving about 10 July 1623. It was the murder of feisty Hohn Oldham that precipitated
King Phillip's War. Jonathan was also one of the men who undertook to discharge the debts of Plymouth Colony.
A freeman in 1633, he was active in the settlement of the town of Duxbury, incorporated 7 June 1637. Records
indicate that he served as a surveyor, laid out highways, practiced as an attorney, and was styled a "gentleman."
Jonathan served as a military commissioner in the Pequot War in 1637, was on a committee to raise forces during
the Narragansett Alarm of 1642, and was a member of Captain Myles Standish's Duxbury Company in 1643. He
served several terms as Deputy to the General Court of Plymouth Colony in 1639, and from 1641 through 1644.
In 1638, Jonathan Brewster established a ferry service to transport passengers and cattle across the North River.
In 1641, he sold this to Messrs. Baraker, Howell and others. Then, as the master of a small trading vessel, he
plied the coast from Plymouth to Virginia. This was evidently unprofitable, according to a letter written by Roger
171
Williams to John Winthrop, Jr.: "Sir, (although Mr. Brewster wrtie me not a word of it) yet in private I am bold to
tell you that I hear it hath please God greatly to afflict him in the thorne of his life: He was intended for Virginia,
his creditors in the Bay came to Portsmouth and unhung his rudder, carried him to the bay, where he was forced
to make over house, land, cattle, and part with all to his chest. Oh how sweet is a dry morsel and a handful, withg
quietness from earth & heaven."
This statement about his misfortune appears to be verified by Plymouth Colony Deeds Vol 2:24 which notes that
John Holland & Hopestill Foster of Dorchester, merchants, sold to William Paybody 80 acres of meadow granted
to them by "Jonathan Brewster ye elder of Duxburrow by vertue of his writing and deed bearing date fifteenth day
November Anno Domo 1648," which involved all "his dwelling house, out house, Barnes, Stables, orchyrds,
gardens, Land, Meddow & pastures."
Removing to Connecticut, he settled on land granted him as follows:
"April 1650, I, Unquas, Sachem of Mauhekon, doe give freely unto Jonathan Brewster of Pequett, a tract of
land, being a plaine of arable land, bounded on the south side with a great Coave called Poccatannocke, on the
north with old Poccatuck path that goes to the Trading Coave, &c. Fore, in consideration thereof, the said
Jonathan Brewster binds himself and his heirs to a keep a house for trading goods with the Indians."
Because Jonathan set up a trading post without the authority of the local government, he was censured, but the
deed was confirmed by the town on 30 November 1652. He was "clarke" of the Town of Pequitt (New London)
in September 1649, Deputy to the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut, 1650, 1655, 1656, 1657, and
1658, and served as the Assistant to the Town in 1657.
On 1 September 1656, Jonathan "resolved for Old England," according to a letter written to his sister-in-law,
Sarah Brewster, widow of Love Brewster. However, he did not return to England. He died intestate at New
London in 1659, having deeded all of his property to his son, Benjamin, and his son-in-law, John Pickett, in 1658.
John Pickett relinquished his rights to the property on 14 February 1661/2, and provided that his "mother-in law,
Mrs. Brewster, the late wife of his father, Mr. Jonathan Brewster, shall have a full and competent means out of the
estate during her life, from the said Benjamin Brewster at her own dispose freely and fully to command at her
own pleasure."
Jonathan Brewster left an invaluable legacy to the Brewster family known as "The Brewster Book," a record in
his own handwriting of the deaths of his mother and father, the birth dates of each of his children, and the
marriage dates of his daughters, Mary and Ruth, his son, William, as well as his own birth and marriage dates. He
apparently began the record after the marriage in Plymouth of his daughter, Mary, to John Turner in 1645,
perhaps after he moved to Connecticut, leaving Mary and his grandchildren behind in Plymouth Colony, but
before the date of his second entries, which follow the 1651 marriage of his son William. All of the entries in this
book were contemporary and made by three people, Jonathan, his son Benjamin, and Benjamin's great-grandson
Jabez Fitch, Jr. The book has been of inestimable value to the Brewster family.--Brewster of Plymouth Colony,
Massachusetts.
More About Jonathan Brewster:
Burial: 1659, Brewster Cemetery, Brewsters Neck, Preston, CT
More About Lucretia Oldham:
Burial: 04 Mar 1678/79, Brewster Cemetery, Brewsters Neck, Preston, CT
Children of Jonathan Brewster and Lucretia Oldham are:
i.
ii.
William Brewster, born 09 Mar 1624/25.
Mary Brewster, born 16 Apr 1627; married John Turner 12 Nov 1645 in Scituate, MA; born 1621 in
Terling, Essex, England.
Notes for John Turner:
John Turner, of Scituate, born in Essex, England 12 November 1645, died Sciituate between 4 March
1695 (date of will) and 20 May 1697 (date of inventory); marfried Mary Brewster, born Plymouth,
Massachusetts, 16 April 1627, died probably in Scituate, after 23 March 1697/8.
John Turner was called "Senior", or "the Elder," because he had a younger brother also named "John"
who was referred to as "young John." John "Senior" was listed as freeman at Scituate in 1643. A tanner
by trade, he settled northwest of the present day Union Bridge on the North River, where he erected a
tannery.
The will of John Turner, Senior, Husbandman, dated 4 March 1695, sworn and recorded at Plymouth,
22 June 1697, names the following persons: Son Jonathan Turner; Son Joseph Turner; Son Exekiel
Turner; Six Granchildren--Isaac Turner, John Hames, Thomas Prince, Margaret Turner, Alice Prince,
and the eldest child of my son Exekiel Turner; Son John Turner; son Elisha Turner; Son Amos Turner;
Daughters Grace Christophers; Wife Mary; "my four Daughters; That is to say Lydia, Mary, Ruth &
172
Grace;" Son Benjamin Turner.
The inventory of the goods, Chattels and credits of John Turner, Sr., late of Scituate, was taken 20 May
1697 by Nathaniel Turner and Israel Hobart and was submitted to Judge William Branford, Esq., 22 June
1697. It was recorded 24 July 1697.
On 23 March 1697/8, widow Mary acknowledged receipt of "fower Pound in moneys" from Peter
Collamer of Scituate in payment for six "uper Lether hids" he bought from her late husband, John
Turner, deceased. The receipt was witnessed by her son, Benjamin Turner, who wrote his name while
Mary signed by a mark.--Turner, c.1605-aft. 1710--Rootsweb.
1826
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Jonathan Brewster, born 17 Jul 1629.
Ruth Brewster, born 03 Oct 1631.
Benjamin Brewster, born 17 Oct 1633 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass.; died 14 Sep 1710 in Norwalk,
Fairfield, CT; married Ann Addis 28 Feb 1659/60 in Norwich, New London, CT.
Elizabeth Brewster, born 01 May 1637.
Grace Brewster, born 01 Nov 1639.
Hannah Brewster, born 03 Nov 1641.
3654. William Addis He married 3655. Millicent Woods.
3655. Millicent Woods
Child of William Addis and Millicent Woods is:
1827
i.
Ann Addis, born 17 Mar 1627/28 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass.; died 09 May 1709 in Norwich, New
London CT; married Benjamin Brewster 28 Feb 1659/60 in Norwich, New London, CT.
3682. Thomas Lawrence, born 02 Feb 1588/89 in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; died 20 Mar 1624/25
in Saint Albans, Hertford, England. He was the son of 7364. John Lawrence and 7365. Elizabeth Bull. He
married 3683. Jane Joanne Antrobus.
3683. Jane Joanne Antrobus, born 25 Jun 1592 in Antrobus Hall, Cheshire, England; died 02 Mar 1679/80
in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 7366. Walter Antrobus and 7367. Joan Arnold.
Children of Thomas Lawrence and Jane Antrobus are:
1841
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Joan Lawrence, born 1610.
Jane Lawrence, born 18 Dec 1614 in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; died 02 Mar 1679/80 in
Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts; married George Giddings.
Marie Lawrence, born 1616.
John Lawrence, born Jul 1618.
Thomas Lawrence, born 1619.
William Lawrence, born 1622.
3840. Henrich Scharffenstein, born 1600.
Children of Henrich Scharffenstein are:
1920
i.
ii.
Theib Scharffenstein, born 1665; died 31 Dec 1742.
Matthias Scharffenstein, born 1650.
Generation No. 13
6400. John Seymour He married 6401. Dyzory Porter.
6401. Dyzory Porter
Child of John Seymour and Dyzory Porter is:
3200
i.
Robert Seymour, married Elizabeth Waller.
6416. John Gregory, born in Nottingham, England; died 29 Jul 1637 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT. He was the
son of 12832. Thomas Gregory and 12833. Dorothy Beeston. He married 6417. Alicia Barkey.
6417. Alicia Barkey
173
More About John Gregory:
Burial: Norwalk, Fairfield, CT
Child of John Gregory and Alicia Barkey is:
3208
i.
Henry Gregory, born Abt. 1590 in Nottingham, England; died 14 Jun 1655 in Stratford, Fairfield, CT;
married Goody.
7158. Thomas Bircher He married 7159. Mary Robinson.
7159. Mary Robinson
Child of Thomas Bircher and Mary Robinson is:
3579
i.
Elizabeth Birchard, born 1621; married Thomas Bliss.
7160. Humphrey Turner, born 1593 in England; died 05 Jun 1673 in Scituate, Plymouth, MA. He married
7161. Lydia Gaymer 24 Oct 1618 in Sandon, Essex, England.
7161. Lydia Gaymer, born 18 May 1602 in Terling, Essex, England.
Notes for Humphrey Turner:
Humphrey Turner, of Scituate, Massachusetts, had come with his wife, Lydia Gamer, and eldest son John,
perhaps a second son John, and tradition would have him bring two more children from England where he had
been a tanner.
About 1628 they settled at Plymouth and some years later they removed to Scituate where he was one of the
founding members of the church in January 1635 and one of its earliest prominent members. There his wife
joined the church 10 January 1636. At Plymouth he was taxed in 1633 and 1634 and there probably were born
their children Lydia and Thomas. His children Mary, Joseph, Nathaniel and Daniel were probably born in
Scutate, where Humphrey and wife Lydia moved in 1634. He was a constable and representative of Scituate in
1640, 1652 and 1653. He died 1673; Lydia died sometime before then. Humphrey Turner's will, dated last day
of February 1669, mentioned his eldest son John Turner and his grandchildren, Jonathan Turner, Joseph Turner
and Ezekial Turner, the "sonnes" of my eldest sonne."--Turner, c.1605-aft.1710--Rootsweb
Children of Humphrey Turner and Lydia Gaymer are:
3580
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
John Turner, born 1621 in Terling, Essex, England; married Mary Brewster 12 Nov 1645 in Scituate,
MA.
John (the younger) Turner
Lydia Turner
Thomas Turner
Mary Turner
Joseph Turner, born 01 Jan 1636/37.
Nathaniel Turner, born 10 Mar 1638/39.
Daniel Turner
7174. Thomas Langley He married 7175. Ann.
7175. Ann
Child of Thomas Langley and Ann is:
3587
i.
Ann Agnes Langley, born 1590 in Sandy, Bedforshire, England; died 30 Jul 1677 in Salem, Essex, MA;
married Richard Ingersoll 10 Oct 1616 in Sandy, Bedford, England.
7248. Richard Cleaveland, born Jul 1542. He married 7249. Alice.
7249. Alice, born 1559.
Child of Richard Cleaveland and Alice is:
3624
i.
Isaac Cleveland, born 01 Jan 1584/85; married Alice.
7266. Henry Squire
174
Child of Henry Squire is:
3633
i.
Edith Squire, born 29 May 1587 in Charlton Mackrel, Somersetshire, England; died 21 Jan 1671/72 in
Medfield, Norfolk Co., Massachusetts; married Henry Adams.
7304. William Brewster, born 24 Jan 1559/60 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died 10 Apr 1644 in
Plymouth, Mass. He was the son of 14608. William Brewster and 14609. Prudence Peck. He married 7305.
Mary Wentworth Love.
7305. Mary Wentworth Love, born 1568 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died 17 Apr 1627 in
Plymouth, Mass. She was the daughter of 14610. Edward Love and 14611. Alice Pope.
Notes for William Brewster:
William Brewster, passenger on the Mayflower, was born about 1566/7, probably at Doncaster, Yorkshire,
England. William Brewster was the Reverend Elder of the Pilgrim Church at Plymouth, since their pastor, John
Robinson, remained behind in Leyden, Holland, with the majority of the congregation which planned to come to
America at a later time. William was a member of the Separatist Church movement from its very beginning, and
was the oldest Mayflower passenger to have participated at the First Thanksgiving, in his early fifties.
After graduating from Cambridge University, William was employed by Sir William Davison, Secretary of State
to Queen Elizabeth I, thus becoming an official in her Court. Davison was the center of a plot designed by Sir
William Cecil, Lord Burghley, and Elizabeth to absolve her from responsibility for the execution of her cousin
(once removed) Mary, Queen of Scots, and Davison and his staff were expelled from the court and many
imprisoned or hacked to pieces. William Brewster retreated to the manor house at Scrooby where he inherited
from his father the office of postmaster. In those days, a postmaster was an official of extreme importance,
responsible for the care and supply of horses for royal messengers and for passing on royal correspondence.
Letters from common folk were not yet carried by a government service.
William was later a fugitive from King James I of England because he published a number of religious
pamphlets while in Leyden which were directly critical of the King and opposed the tenets of the Church of
England.
William Bradford, Brewster's adoptive son, wrote a lot about William Brewster in his contemporary history of
the Colony entitled Of Plymouth Plantation, some of which follows:
"After he had attained some learning, viz, the knowledge of Latin tongue, and some insight in the Greek, and
spent some small time at Cambridge, and then being first seasoned with the seeds of grace and virtue, he went to
the court, and served that religious and godly gentleman, Mr. Davison, divers years, when he was Secretary of
State; who found him so discreet and faithful as he trusted him above all other that were about him, and employed
him in all matters of greatest trust and secrecy. . .he attended his mr. when he was sent in amabaage by the Queen
into the Low Countries. . .And, at his return, the States honored him with a gold chain, and his master committed
it to him, and commanded him to wear it when they arrived in England, as they rid through the country, till they
came to the court. . .Afterwards he went and lived in the country, in good esteem amonst his friends and the
gentlemen of those parts, especially the Godly and religious. He did much good in the country where he lived, in
promoting and furthering religion not only by his practice and example, and provocating and encouraging of
others, but by procuring of good preachers to the places thereabouts, and drawing on of others to assist and help
forward in such work; he himself most commonly deepest in the charge, and sometimes above his ability. . .They
ordinarily met at this house on the Lord's day, (which was a monaor of the bishops) and with great love he
entertained them, when they came, making provision for them to his great charge. He was the chief of those that
were taken at Boston, and suffered the greatest loss; and of the seven that were kept longest in prison, and after
bound over. . . After he came into Holland he suffered much hardship, after he had spent the most of his means,
having a great charge, and many children; and in regard of his former breeding and course of life, not so fit for
many employments as others were, especially as were toilsome and laborious. But yet he ever bore his condition
with much cheerfulness and contention.
Towards the later part of those 12 years spent in Holland, his outward condition was mended, and he lived well
and plentifully; for he fell into a way to teach many students, who had a desire to learn the English tongue, to
teach them English;. . .He also had means to set up printing, by the help of some friends. . .and by reason of many
books which would not be allowed to be printed in England, they might have had more than they could do. . .And
besides that, he would labor with his hands in the fields as long as he was able; yet when the church had no other
minister, he taught twice every Sabbath. . .For his personal abilities, he was qualified above many; he was wise
and discreet and well spoken, having a grave and deliberate utterance, of a very cheerful spirit, very sociable and
pleasant amongst his friends, of an humble and modest mind, of a peaceable disposition, undervaluing himself
and his own abilities. . .inoffensive and innocent in his life and conversation. . .he was tender-hearted, and
compassionate of such as were in misery, but especially of such as had been of good estate and rank, and were
175
fallen into want and poverty, either for goodness and religions sake, or by the injury and oppression of others;. . ."
William Brewster (Pilgrim) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He was the son of William Brewster and Mary Smyth and he had a number of half-siblings. His paternal
grandparents were William Brewster and Maud Mann. His maternal grandfather was Thomas Smyth. Brewster
may have been born in Doncaster.
Scrooby Manor was in the possession of the Archbishops of York. Brewster's father, William senior, had been
the estate bailiff for the archbishop for thirty-one years from around 1580. With this post went that of postmaster,
which was a more important one than it might have been in a village not situated on the Great North Road, as
Scrooby was then.
William Junior studied briefly at Peterhouse, Cambridge before entering the service of William Davidson in
1584. In 1585, Davidson went to the Netherlands to negotiate an alliance with the States-General. In 1586,
Davidson was appointed assistant to Queen Elizabeth's Secretary of State Francis Walsingham, but in 1587
Davidson lost the favour of Elizabeth, after the beheading of her cousin (once removed) Mary, Queen of Scots.
Cambridge was a centre of thought concerning religious reformism, but Brester's time in the Netherlands, in
connection with Davidson's work, gave him opportunity to hear and see more of reformed religion. While,
earlier in the sixteenth century, reformers had hoped to amend the Anglican church, by the end of it, many were
looking toward splitting from it.
On Davidson's disgrace, Brewster returned to Scrooby. There, from 1590 to 1607, he held the position of
postmaster. As such he was responsible for the provision of stage horses for the mails, having previously, for a
short time, assisted his father in that office. By the 1590's, Brewster's brother, James, was a rather rebellious
Anglican priest, vicar of the parish of Sutton and Lound, in Nottinghamshire. From 1594, it fell to James to
appoint curates to Scrooby church so that Brewster, James and leading members of the Scrooby congregation
were brought before the ecclesiastical court for their dissent. They were set on a path of separation from the
Anglican Church. From about 1602, Scrooby Manor, Brewster's home, became a meeting place for the dissenting
Puritans. In 1606, they formed the Separatist Church of Scrooby.
Restrictions and pressures applied by the authorities convinced the congregation of a need to emigrate to the
more sympathetic atmosphere of Holland, but leaving England without permission was illegal at the time, so that
departure was a complex matter. On its first attempt, in 1607, the group was arrested at Scotia Creek, but in 1608
Brewster and others were successful in leaving from The Humber. In 1609, he was selected as ruling elder of the
congregation.
Initially, the Pilgrims settled in Amsterdam, and worshipped with the Ancient Church of Francis Johnsonson and
Henry Ainsworth. Offput by the bickering between the two, though (which ultimately resulted in a division of the
Church), the Pilgrims left Amsterdam and moved to Leiden, after only a year.
In Leiden, the group managed to make a living. Brewster taught English and later, in 1616-1619, printed and
published religious books for sale in England though they were proscribed there, as the partner of one Thomas
Brewer. In 1619, the printing type was seized by the authorities under pressure from the English ambassador Sir
Dudley Carleton and Brester's partner was arrested. Brewster escaped and, with the help of Robert Cushman,
obtained a land patent from the London Virginia Company on behalf of himself and his colleagues.
In 1620 he joined the first group of Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower on the voyage to North America. When the
colonists landed at Plymouth, Brewster became the senior elder of the colony, serving as its religious leader and
as an advisor to Governor William Bradford.
As the only university educated member of the colony, Brewster took the part of the colony's religious leader
until a pastor, Ralph Smith, arrived in 1629. Thereafter, he continued to preach irregularly until his death in April
1644.
Brewster was granted land amongst the islands of Boston Harbor, and four of the outer islands (Great Brewster,
Little Brewster, Middle Brewster and Outer Brewster) now bear his name.
There are many notable descendants of William Brewster, including Zachary Taylor, Cokie Roberts, Roger Nash
Baldwin, Katharine Hepburn, Bing Crosby, Brewster Shaw, Lyndon LaRouche, George B. McClellan, Julia
Child, Richard Gere, Nelson Rockefeller, Norman Rockwell, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chevy Chase, Ted
Danson, Howard Dean, John Foster Dulles, David Souter, Adlai Stevenson III.
The Mayflower Compact
As the ruling elder and only university trained passenger on the Mayflower, it is likely that William Brewster
drafted the Mayflower Compact, the first constitution written and adopted in North America. The following is the
text of the Compact:
In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the Loyal Subjects of our dread Sovereigne
176
Lord, King James, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c.
Having undertaken for the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King
and Country, a Voyage to plant the first colony in the Northerne Parts of Virgina; doe, by these Presents,
solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into
a civill Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Futherance of the Engs aforesaid; And by
Virtue hereof do enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equall Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions, and
Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete and convenient for the General Good of the Colonies;
unto which we promise all due Submission and Obedience.
In Witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names at Cape Cod the eleventh of November, in the
Paigne of our Sovereigne Lord, King James of England, France, and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland, the
fiftie-fourth, Anno. Domini, 1620.
Mr. John Carver
Mr. Stephen Hopkins
Mr. William Bradford
Digery Priest
Mr. Edward Winslow
Thomas Williams
Mr. William Brewster
Gilbert Winslow
Isaac Allerton
Edmund Margesson
Miles Standish
Peter Brown
John Alden
Richard Bitteridge
John Turner
George Soule
Francis Eaton
Edward Tilly
James Chilton
John Tilly
John Craxton
Francis Cooke
John Billington
Thomas Rogers
Joses Fletcher
Thomas Tinker
John Goodman
John Ridgate
Mr. Samuel Fuller
Edward Fuller
Mr. Christopher Martin
Richard Clark
Mr. William Mullins
Richard Gardiner
Mr. William White
Mr. John Allerton
Mr. Richard Warren
Thomas English
John Howland
Edward Doten
Edward Liester
Notes for Mary Wentworth Love:
The maiden name of William Brewster's wife Mary has not been proven. The calim it was Mary Wentwork rests
solely on the fact that Mary Wentworth happened to live somewaht close to William Brewster in Scrooby,
Nottingham. That is very shaky evidence to say the least. Further, it has been propsoed that William Brewster
may have married Mary Wyrall, but the evidence is just as flimsy for that marriage. There are no fewer than
seven marriages from 1590-1610 that have been located in parish registers showing a William Brewster marrying
a Mary. All, however, have been satisfactorily eliminated as possible candidates for the William and Mary
(Brewster) who came on the Mayflower. So at present, there is no evidence to identify she who was William
Brewster's wife.--BREWSTER of Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts.
More About Mary Wentworth Love:
Burial: 27 Apr 1627, Burial Hill, Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass
Children of William Brewster and Mary Love are:
3652
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Elizabeth Brewster, born 26 Jul 1584.
Edward Brewster, born 1587.
Patience Brewster, born 1590.
Love Brewster, born 1592.
Jonathan Brewster, born 12 Aug 1593 in Scrooby, Nottinghmasire, England; died 07 Aug 1659 in
Norwich, New London CT; married Lucretia Oldham 10 Apr 1624 in Plymouth, Massachusetts.
Fear Brewster, born 1597.
Elizabeth Brewster, born 1603.
Love Brewster, born 1611.
Wrestling Brewster, born 1614.
177
7306. John Oldham He married 7307. Lucretia.
7307. Lucretia
Children of John Oldham and Lucretia are:
3653
i.
ii.
Lucretia Oldham, born 14 Jan 1599/00 in Derby, Derbyshire, England; died 04 Mar 1678/79 in
Brewster's Neck, Preston, New London, CT; married Jonathan Brewster 10 Apr 1624 in Plymouth,
Massachusetts.
John Oldham, born 1592 in Derby, Derbyshire, England; died 20 Jul 1636 in Block Island.
Notes for John Oldham:
John Oldham (1592-1636) was an early Puritan settler in Massachusetts. He was a captain, merchant,
and Indian trader. His death at the hands of the Indians was one of the causes of the Pequot War of
1637.
Oldham was born in Derbyshire, England in 1592, and was baptized at the Church of All Saints in Derby
on July 14, 1592. A follower of the Puritans from an early age, he emigrated to Plymouth Colony with
his wife, children, and sister in July 1623 aboard the Anne. Captain John Oldham was the brother of
Lucretia Oldham Brewster, who married Jonathan Brewster, son of William Brewster, a signer of the
Mayflower Compact. Oldham grew rich in coastal trade and trading with the Indians. After being exiled
for plotting against the government at Plymouth, Oldham became a representative to the General Court
of Massachusetts from 1632 to 1634. He was the overseer of shot and pwoder for Massac husetts Bay
Colony. Oldham's company granted then accres in assignment of lan ds in 1623 presumably for each
person in Oldham's family and for the following: Conant, Roger, Penn, and Christian.
As a trader, Captain Oldham sailed to Virginia and England, but by 1630 he was back in the
Massachusetts Bay.
He took up residence on an island in the Charles River and was a member of the church at Watertown.
Oldham represented Watertown in the colony's first General Court or assembly in 1634. He continued in
the Indian trade, sailing the coast from Maine to New Amsterdam.
In 1633 or 1634, Oldham led a group of ten men (which included Captain Robert Seeley), along the Old
Connecticut Path to establish Wethersfield, Connecticut, the first English settlement on the Connecticut
River.
In July 1636 he was on a voyage to trade with Indians on Block Island. On July 20 he was boarded by
hostile Indians, presumed to be Pequots. He and five of his crew were killed, and two young boys with
him were captured. The ship's cargo was looted. A fishing vessel rescued the boys and tried to tow his
sloop to port. When adverse winds afftected them, they scuttled the ship but brought the two boy home.
The Bay Colony was outraged at this latest incident, and sent John Endicott with a force to retaliate.-from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
7364. John Lawrence He married 7365. Elizabeth Bull.
7365. Elizabeth Bull
Child of John Lawrence and Elizabeth Bull is:
3682
i.
Thomas Lawrence, born 02 Feb 1588/89 in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; died 20 Mar 1624/25 in
Saint Albans, Hertford, England; married Jane Joanne Antrobus.
7366. Walter Antrobus He married 7367. Joan Arnold.
7367. Joan Arnold
Child of Walter Antrobus and Joan Arnold is:
3683
i.
Jane Joanne Antrobus, born 25 Jun 1592 in Antrobus Hall, Cheshire, England; died 02 Mar 1679/80 in
Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts; married Thomas Lawrence.
Generation No. 14
12832. Thomas Gregory He married 12833. Dorothy Beeston.
178
12833. Dorothy Beeston
Child of Thomas Gregory and Dorothy Beeston is:
6416
i.
John Gregory, born in Nottingham, England; died 29 Jul 1637 in Norwalk, Fairfield, CT; married Alicia
Barkey.
14608. William Brewster, born 1535 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died 10 Aug 1608 in Scrooby,
Nottinghamshire, England. He was the son of 29216. William Brewster and 29217. Maude Mann. He married
14609. Prudence Peck.
14609. Prudence Peck, born 1538 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died Jul 1590 in Scrooby,
Nottinghamshire, England. She was the daughter of 29218. Edward Peck and 29219. Prudence.
Children of William Brewster and Prudence Peck are:
7304
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
William Brewster, born 24 Jan 1559/60 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died 10 Apr 1644 in
Plymouth, Mass; married Mary Wentworth Love.
John Brewster, born 1565.
James Brewster, born 1568.
Edward Brewster, born 1568.
Prudence Brewster, born 1569.
Amy Anne Brewster, born 1571.
John Brewster, born 1590.
Children of William Brewster and Mary Smyth are:
i.
Brewster
14610. Edward Love He married 14611. Alice Pope.
14611. Alice Pope
Child of Edward Love and Alice Pope is:
7305
i.
Mary Wentworth Love, born 1568 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died 17 Apr 1627 in
Plymouth, Mass; married William Brewster.
Generation No. 15
29216. William Brewster, born 1510 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died 1558 in York, England.
He married 29217. Maude Mann.
29217. Maude Mann, born 1510 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England.
Children of William Brewster and Maude Mann are:
14608
i.
ii.
iii.
William Brewster, born 1535 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died 10 Aug 1608 in Scrooby,
Nottinghamshire, England; married (1) Prudence Peck; married (2) Mary Smyth.
Henry Brewster, born 1536.
James Brewster, born 1537.
29218. Edward Peck He married 29219. Prudence.
29219. Prudence
Child of Edward Peck and Prudence is:
14609
i.
Prudence Peck, born 1538 in Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England; died Jul 1590 in Scrooby,
Nottinghamshire, England; married William Brewster.
Endnotes
1. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p.306, b. Foster, R. I., April 3, 1812."
2. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 308, "He died of consumption Dec.
27, 1865, aet. 53."
179
3. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p.308, "b. at Scio, Mich., Jan. 16,
1834."
4. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p.308, "He bore them into the next
battle at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862, knowing that he was marching to certain death, and was shot in the left side of the neck."
5. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 217, b. Brookfield, Mass., April 29,
1752.
6. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 218, He d. Jan. 13, 1828. res.,
Providence, R. I.
7. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 160, ""b. Andover, Mass., Oct. 10,
1726."
8. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 161, "He d. Oct. 17, 1779. Res.,
Brookfield, Mass."
9. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 160, "m. May 18, 1749, Dorothy
Dwight, dau. of Brig. Gen. Joseph Dwight."
10. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 218, Rev. Noah Millard, b. at
Rehoboth, Mass., Oct. 10, 1758, was the son of Noah Millard and Jane Maxwell.
11. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 218, In April, 1805, he removed to
Burrillville, R. I., where he was ordained, Oct. 15, 1806, and preached until his death, Oct. 25, 1834.
12. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 138, "b. Andover, Mass. Nov. 12
1687."
13. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 138, "He d. Apr. 8, 1738. Res.
Andover, Mass."
14. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 138, "m. Jan. 17, 1716."
15. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 138, "She d. Aug. 28, 1747 in
Brookfield, Mass. while on a visit to her son."
16. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 130, "EPHRAIM FOSTER
(Abraham, Reginald), b. Ipswich, Mass., October 9, 1657."
17. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 130, "He d. Septermber 21, 1746.
Res., Andover, Mass., in that part now North Andover."
18. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 130, "m. ______, 1677, Hannah
Eames, dau. of Robert, b. 1661, d. July 8, 1731.
19. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p.130.
20. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 130.
21. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 124, "ABRAHAM FOSTER
(Reginald), b. Exeter, Devonshire, England, 1622;."
22. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 124, "He d. Jan. 25, 1711. Res.
Ipswich, Mass."
23. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 124, "m. 1655."
24. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 124, "m. 1655, Lydia Burbank, dau.
of Caleb and Martha of Rowley."
25. Vital Records of Newbury, Essex Co., MA.
26. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 129, "b. England abt. 1595."
27. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p. 121, "He d. in 1681; res. Ipswich,
Mass."
28. Pierce, Frederick Clifton, Foster Genealogy, (Chicago : W.B. Conkey Co., 1899), p.115, "Reginald Foster was 'twice
married'. First to Judith _____, in England, who died in Ipswich, October, 1644 [she was the mother of all the children]."
180

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