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JUNE 22, 2012
WEST WINDSOR
& PLAINSBORO
NEWS
Headliners:
Amy Lawrence sings for charity, page 21; Joseph Hsia solos, 25; Jinny Baeckler plans a reunion, 27.
Hats Off to a Picture-Perfect Class of 2012
Class of 2012:
College-Bound
New Ordinance
To Target
Massage Parlors
by Rikki N. Massand
W
by Rikki N. Massand
A
ccording to the final listings for the class of 2012, a
strong majority of West
Windsor-Plainsboro’s high school
graduates will remain in-state to
attend college. One trend continued, as Rutgers University drew
the highest number of WW-P students by an overwhelming margin.
From High School North’s
Class of 2012, 88 students will attend Rutgers University. Eightythree will be going to the New
Brunswick campus, four will go to
the Newark campus, and one will
go to the Camden campus. Meanwhile, from High School South’s
graduating class 70 students will
attend Rutgers in the fall. Sixtyone will be going to the New
Brunswick campus, seven will go
to Rutgers-Newark and two students from South will go to Rutgers-Camden.
Mercer County Community
College will also get a high number of WW-P graduates. Thirtytwo members of High School
North’s class of 2012 and 29 members of South’s class of 2012 are
headed to MCCC to begin their
collegiate careers.
Also in New Jersey, from
South’s Class of 2012, 10 students
will study at The College of New
Jersey in Ewing while eight students will attend Rider University.
Seven students from North will attend Rider while five North graduates will attend New Jersey Institute of Technology. Three students
from North will attend the College
of New Jersey. Other local colleges WW-P students selected included Monmouth University,
Middlesex County College, Kean
University, the College of Saint
Elizabeth, Seton Hall University,
and Montclair State University.
As for Ivy League schools, seven students from WW-P South are
set to attend Princeton and five are
Continued on page 18
Pomp & Circumstance: Top, seniors from High School South toss their caps at the
conclusion of the graduation ceremony. Above, Gillian McSpiritt, left, Naina Mehotra,
and Alyssa Meni of High School North pose for the camera. More photos, page 16.
est Windsor Police
Chief Joe Pica and Lieutenant Brian Melnick
spoke before township council and
40 residents at the Monday, June
11, Council meeting, outlining an
ordinance designed to put an end
to the pattern of massage parlor
prostitution in the past decade.
Council will hear the ordinance —
and vote on it — on Monday, June
25. With overwhelming support
from police and community leaders, it appears likely that Council
will approve the ordinance.
Council Vice President Linda
Geevers thanked the police for taking a proactive approach with the
new ordinance, saying the town’s
prostitution problem “must be
stamped out.”
“We need to eliminate this kind
of activity from our community; it
just can’t continue. When most
people think of redevelopment and
cleaning up Route 571 and the area
around the train station, they think
of Windsor Plaza or the new Rite
Aid. This is a whole other kind of
cleanup that we need to have,”
Geevers said.
Over the years many residents’
complaints (and anonymous tips)
about potential illegal activity at
massage parlors came directly to
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh, who says
regulation was due for a long time.
“This issue has been going on
for decades, long before I took
over as mayor. Once I got into office I really wanted to make sure
we could crack down on these
crimes,” Hsueh said.
Chief Pica said over the past
several years West Windsor has
been inundated with new massage
parlor businesses. “We felt the
need to regulate the industry somewhat in our town because of the
problems we’ve had in the past.
This ordinance will cover all types
of massage and therapy locations,”
Pica said.
The ordinance, modeled after
WW-P’S FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER
JUNCTION BARBER SHOP
traditional barber shop serving
our neighbors since 1992
Continued on page 12
WWPINFO.COM
Letters: A Family’s Case for Grover Farm
Sign Ordinance Back on Table
Former Plainsboro Fire Chief Dies in Fire
Summer Music Returns to Nassau Park Pavilion
Police Reports
30
Classifieds
FOLLOW WWPINFO ON FACEBOOK & TWITTER FOR TIMELY UPDATES
SEE AD PAGE 21
ISSUE DATE: JUNE 22, 2012
NEXT ISSUE: JULY 6
6
13
15
25
31
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Views & Opinions
JoanJoanEisenberg
Eisenberg
Joan
Eisenberg
Office:
609-951-8600
x110
Joan
Eisenberg
RE/MAX
Greater
Princeton
Office:
609-951-8600
x110
Mobile:609-306-1999
Princeton
Forrestal
RE/MAX
GreaterVillage
Princeton
[email protected]
Office:
609-951-8600
x
110
Mobile:609-306-1999
Princeton Forrestal Village
Mobile:609-306-1999
www.JoanSells.com
[email protected]
Office:
609-951-8600 x 110
[email protected] com
Mobile:609-306-1999
www.JoanSells.com
To the Editor:
Non-European
Languages Needed
[email protected]
Owner/Sales
Associate
VILLAGE
GRANDE
VALUES
West W
indsor V
alue
U.S. Department of State, Bureau
of Educational and Cultural Affairs, offers summer programs/institutes for 13 non-European languages (http://clscholarship.org/).
— National Security Language
s one of the initial writers
Initiative
for Youth (NSLI-Y) to
(when I was part of the NJ
provide
merit-based
scholarships
Education department) of
to
U.S.
high
school
students
and rethe grant that Edison eventually
cent
graduates
interested
in
learnwon to institute the teaching of
ing
less-commonly
studied
foreign
Hindi in schools, I am glad that the
WW-P community is finally con- languages overseas — seven lansidering the introduction of this guages.
— STARTALK (startalk.umdlanguage as part of the curriculum.
.edu/2012/)
has student and
I am very glad that parents are
teacher
summer
programs around
pushing for this idea to become rethe
country
to
learn
and prepare to
ality.
teach
10 non-EuAs mentioned
ropean
lanin one letter to
guages.
this newspaper, It’s not just the lan— The 2012
business may be guage; it is the language
Northeast
Conone reason for in real life and in all of
ference
on
the
learning Hindi in
Teaching
of
Forlife.
schools. Teacheign Languages
ing a language al(NECTFL) has a
so means teachsession
—
Bringing
Math and Ening a culture, and that is 50 percent
vironmental
Science
into a Culof the value of language instructure-Rich
World
Language
Curtion. It may indeed include the culriculum
—
showing
again
that
it’s
ture of doing business. But it does
not
just
the
language,
it
is
the
lanso much more.
The US state department has guage in real life and in all of life.
According to a May 12, 2012,
long needed non-European lanpost
on FederalTimes.com, Glen
guages and cultures to be taught in
Nordin,
principal foreign language
US schools, and within the last 10
advisor
for
the Office of the Under
years this has become more essenSecretary
of
Defense for Intellitial. For instance, Hindi is on the
gence,
said,
“The
biggest difficulty
list of languages in all US-sponwe
face
is
that
our
leadership is as
sored examples below:
unaware
of
the
needs
for languages
— The Critical Language
within
their
organizations
as the
Scholarship Program, part of the
A
Call Joan Today for More Information or to see a Property!
Office: 609-951-8600 x110 Mobile 609-306-1999
Lynn Miller
Community News Editor
Jamie Saxon
Features Editor
Sara Hastings
Special Projects
Craig Terry
Photography
Vaughan Burton
Production
Jennifer Schwesinger
Account Executive
Bill Sanservino
Production Manager
Lawrence L. DuPraz 1919-2006
Founding Production Adviser
Euna Kwon Brossman
Michele Alperin, Bart Jackson
Pritha Dasgupta
Phyllis Spiegel
Contributing Writers
For inquiries, call 609-243-9119.
Fax: 609-243-9020.
E-mail: [email protected]
Home Page: www.wwpinfo.com
Mail: 12 Roszel Road, Suite C-205,
Princeton, NJ 08540
E-mail Newsletter: Subscribe by
sending E-mail to [email protected]
We welcome letters. E-mail [email protected]
DONNA LUCARELLI
The Market Is Improving!
© 2012 Community News Service.
Callaway Henderson Sotheby's International Realty
Exceptional Service At Any Price Point
AM
AZ
IN
G
LO
CA
TI
SP
EC
TA
CU
LA
R
Sales are UP and
Mortgage rates DOWN.
PERFECT FOR BUYERS
AND SELLERS.
Rikki N. Massand
Municipal News
ON
West Windsor: 4BR, 2.5BA – Updated & Upgraded brick fronted
‘Oxford Federal’ model on Cul-de-Sac location. Renovated Eat-in
Kitchen w/cherry stained maple cabinetry, granite counters, island
& desk, SS appliances & tile flooring. Brick fireplace in Family
Room. Large Master Bedroom w/ Sitting Room. All Bathrooms
updated. Finished Basement w/Pergo flooring. Beautiful fenced
In-Ground Pool & oversized huge yard. All windows replaced, custom closets, 4 y/o Dimensional roof. NEW SEPTIC. Paver patio and
walkways. WW-P Schools. $699,000
Richard K. Rein
Editor
SOLD BY
DONNA
HOT! HOT! HOT!
SOLD IN WEST WINDSOR, June 1-June 20, 2012
Minimum Prices
Average Prices
Maximum Prices
Sold: $530,419
SOLD IN PLAINSBORO, June 1-June 20, 2012
Minimum Prices
Average Prices
Maximum Prices
Orig. List: $119,995
Orig. List: $709,900
Orig. List: $307,962
Sold: $110,000
Sold: $705,000
Sold: $290,627
I GET ALMOST FULL PRICES FOR MY LISTINGS
2420 Ravens Crest, Plainsboro 3 Stonelea, West Windsor
List $575,000
List $179,900
SOLD $560,000
SOLD $178,000
26 Arden, Old Bridge
List $335,000
SOLD $332,000
21 Berrien, West Windsor
List $299,000
SOLD $294,000
HATS OFF to the Graduates. May you
follow your DREAM and FIND WHAT
YOU LOVE AND LOVE WHAT YOU DO.
West Windsor, NJ - Heatherfield, 18 yr old,
5 bedroom, 3 full bath Colonial, gorgeous kitchen
with granite countertops, bedroom / bath on
main floor, finished walk-out basement, sunroom,
office, pool, private yard with multi-level deck,
backs to woods. $859,900
D
OL
R Y
A
T
E U
6Y A
10 BE
Y
Sold: $760,000
IT
Sold: $239,000
Cranbury, NJ - 7 year old, 5 bedroom, 6 full bath
Colonial, gourmet kitchen with granite, hardwood
throughout, private office, full bath on main floor,
bonus room above 3-car garage, fully finished
basement. $1,149,000
M
UN
Orig. List: $553,303
M
Orig. List: $835,000
CO
Orig. List: $239,000
55
+
2
Hamilton, NJ - Enchantment 55+ development,
5 yr old, 3 bedroom, 3 full bath Colonial, upgraded kitchen w/ granite and stainless app, LR,DR,
FR w/ bar, office, sunroom, master bedroom w/2
walk in closets and private bath. Upstairs large
loft, bedroom and bath. 2 car garage. $489,900
Titusville, NJ - Charming, yet elegant, Colonial
with old world style front porch, amazing original
woodwork, 3-4 bedrooms, living room and formal
dining room, 3 car garage, full basement, 2.66
acres backing woods across from Washington
Crossing Park. $350,000
Kathryn Baxter
Sales Associate
[email protected] • www.DonnaLucarelli.com
30 George Dye Rd. • Hamilton Sq., NJ 08690
All Stats taken from Trend MLS as of 6/20/2012
Office: 609-586-3700 • Cell: 609-903-9098
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Top Sales Agent for All of 2011 Weichert Princeton Junction Office, 2011
Ambassadors Club Achievement Weichert, NJAR Circle of Excellence 2002-2011
39 North Main Street, Cranbury, NJ 08512
Office: 609.395.0444 • Cell: 516.521.7771
[email protected]
CallawayHenderson.com/agent/KathrynBaxter
Each Office Independently Owned And Operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale, and withdrawal without notice.
JUNE 22, 2012
general populace is failing to be
aware of the needs for languages in
their community. It is a national
disgrace in that respect, and it’s
that lack of knowledge that we
need to correct. We need to find a
way to communicate to our people
just how important that interpreter/translator at the social services office is to a community’s
well-being.”
I could continue with examples.
I would certainly prefer, as I have
said in the past, that West WindsorPlainsboro lead forward with Hindi
and other non-traditional languages. An excellent place to start
is with a legacy language, since
many resources can be found within the community — as mentioned
by the parent group.
Lavinia Kumar
But Even in India
Hindi Not Needed
I
would like to add a personal experience to the well thought out
comments of Alok Sharma in his
June 8 letter. I am retired after 33
years in the apparel manufacturing
industry traveling to more than 40
different countries, mostly second
and third world.
India is a great example, where I
spent many weeks and months
traveling between Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, Calcutta, Ludhiana,
Mumbai, Tiripur, etc., and their
neighbors in Pakistan and
Bangladesh. I never experienced a
problem communicating with anyone in the factories, hotels, or
restaurants, because these coun-
treacherous to have to run in the
road, but the sidewalks leaving my
home and neighborhood are unsafe. Last October I had a serious
accident from falling when I was
forced back onto the sidewalk on
New Village Road where the bike
path ends. You are forced up onto
the sidewalk as a continuation of
the bike path. Immediately after
entering the sidewalk there is a
raised concrete section. In my case
the edge was covered by mud and
leaves and I did not see the elevated
sidewalk until it was too late.
This was not the first time I have
been injured from the deterioration
of the sidewalks. They are a true
danger.
My neighbors, including an elderly man with a cane and families
with children in strollers, must contend with walking/running in the
street because of the sidewalk hazards. In addition, there is a snapped
telephone pole on Edinburg Road
behind our development for years
that is held together with a piece of
rope at the top and bottom. Why?
Doesn’t the Department of Public
Works have the safety of residents
as one of their job requirements?
They came out last month to
clean the streets next to the curb and
scheduled the cleaning on trash day.
Therefore, most of the street curb
was not cleaned because the truck
went around the trash cans. It was a
complete waste of time and effort ––
and a waste of our tax dollars.
There is also a section of the
grass right-of-way on New Village
Road approaching Edinburg Road
that has two large ruts dug out from
an out of control car that nearly hit
a tree. The ruts fill up with water
every time there is a hard rain, creating a mosquito breeding ground.
In addition, the light poles in our
development need to be replaced.
One of the poles on Greenfield Drive is completely rotted at the top. It
is an accident waiting to happen.
I have seen the articles about
Village Grande and the inability of
the township to address their sidewalk and apron issues. Those residents have waited far too long for a
resolution of their problem. When
a problem is identified the resolution should be implemented in an
expeditious manner.
I will contact the local media regarding these issues. The next step
is a petition asking for a resolution
to these issues. Your prompt attention to this matter is appreciated.
Kathy Brazil
33 Highmont Drive
Continued on following page
THE NEWS
The WW-P News Gains 8 Siblings
T
he owners of Community
News Service in Lawrenceville and U.S. 1 Publishing
Co. in Princeton — parent company of the WW-P News — have
merged to create a single company
publishing 10 newspapers with a
combined circulation of more than
160,000 copies in Mercer County
and central New Jersey.
Jamie Griswold and Tom Valeri, co-publishers of Community
News Service, and Richard K.
Rein, founding editor and publisher of U.S. 1 and the News, share
ownership of the new company,
Community News Service LLC.
Rein will serve as editorial director
of the new company, and will continue as editor of the weekly U.S. 1
and the bi-weekly West WindsorPlainsboro paper. Griswold and
Valeri will be co-publishers of the
combined company, which also includes eight monthly papers serving Hamilton, Ewing, Trenton,
Lawrence, Robbinsville, Hopewell, Princeton, and Bordentown.
“I was a reporter and writer who
found myself suddenly immersed
in the business of journalism 27
years ago when I founded U.S. 1,”
says Rein, who previously worked
for Time magazine and as a freelancer for People, New Jersey
Monthly, and many other publications. “Jamie Griswold and Tom
Valeri are business people who got
involved in community journalism. The merger brings new
strength to both sides.”
“Another attractive part of the
merger was that we had virtually
no overlap in circulation or advertisers,” says Valeri. “We also feel
strongly that each of our newspapers should have its own community identity, and U.S. 1 followed
that approach when it started its
West Windsor-Plainsboro paper in
2000.” All three owners are longtime residents of Mercer County.
The new company, with a total
of 21 employees, will continue to
operate at its present locations. The
monthly publications will be edited at 15 Princess Road, Suite K,
Lawrenceville, under the direction
of managing editor Joe Emanski.
The non-monthly publications,
currently U.S. 1 and the WW-P
News, will be edited at 12 Roszel
Road, Suite C-205, in West Windsor. For more information contact
Griswold or Valeri at 609-3961511, or Rein at 609-243-9119.
Why should we spend
our tax dollars teaching
a language course that is
not needed when the intended country already
teaches English to its
students?
tries know that to do business with
the U.S. market they must have
English-speaking personnel.
Why should we spend our tax
dollars teaching a language course
that is not needed now, and I believe will not be needed in the future, when the intended country is
already equal to us in teaching English to its students? Education budgets are tight, and now is not the
time to spend where the return will
be so minimal.
Tom Linkimer
51 Murano Drive, West Windsor
Sidewalks & Safety
In West Windsor
The letter below was written to
West Windsor Mayor Shing-Fu
Hsueh.
ear Mayor Hsueh:
D
I have lived in the Dutch Neck
Estates development for 20 years. I
have witnessed the rapid deterioration of the sidewalks and lampposts within my side of the development. The sidewalks are completely unsafe to walk on in front of
many homes on Highmont Drive,
Greenfield Drive, and New Village
Road. The tipping point was seeing
the construction of a new asphalt
sidewalk around the perimeter of
the Mercer Oaks Golf Club. There
are no sidewalks at all on either
side of Conover Road for much of
the distance from Edinburg Road
to North Post Road.
As a runner I find it extremely
Innovations in senior care.
Built on 93 years of experience.
With one of the area’s first Acute Care units for seniors, we’ve learned what works best, simply
by asking our patients. So when we set about designing our new hospital, we married what we
learned with the latest advances in senior care. We built a special Acute Care Unit for Seniors –
each a single-patient room that increases privacy and reduces infection. We designed new easierto-read signs. Then we added details to prevent falls like special lower-set beds, handrails that
take you from the bed to the bathroom and even innovative paint color combinations to enhance
depth perception. Proving that in life, and in hospital design, it’s wise to listen to your elders.
Now Open
One Plainsboro Road at Route 1 North
//
3
Plainsboro, New Jersey
//
princetonhcs.org
4
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
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8 Madison Dr., West Windsor - Lovely 4 bed. plus den/study. Two story foyer, new
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My Priorities Are Simple. They’re Yours!
Wills & Estate Planning
Mary Ann Pidgeon
Pidgeon & Pidgeon, PC
Attorney, LLM in Taxation
600 Alexander Road
Princeton
609-520-1010
www.pidgeonlaw.com
SPA TREATMENT
IN YOUR HOME BY
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A
fter the Sh*t Mom Says
video, it was inevitable that
the Sh*t Dad Says video
would follow, and it did, just in
time for Father’s Day. Given Molly’s theatrical skills and uncanny
sense of mimicry, it was natural
that her siblings selected her to play
Dad, complete in sartorial splendor
dressed for the office for some
scenes, others with head wrapped
in weekend bike warrior bandana
and Under Armor workout wear.
I’ve had more than 22 years to
become accustomed to Bill’s
quirks; the kids managed to capture
the highlights in just about the funniest three minutes I’ve ever seen.
Where to begin? There’s his penchant for poaching on other people’s food. “Hey, Will, you gonna
finish that?” “Hey, Molly, you
gonna eat the rest of that?” “I’ll just
have a little taste, just a wee bite.”
And then there are his funny declarations, more like the stuff that
comes out of the Sh*t Girls say series than a father of three — “That
yogurt is so filling”, “I’ll have a
skinny decaf soy milk latte with
two Splenda.” Poor Bill. His kids
poke fun at him in a video. And
now I add fuel to the fire by putting
his quirks out for public view. But
he knows that is it purely out of
love and, yes, entertainment. One
of life’s greatest skills is having the
ability to laugh at yourself, and believe me, there is plenty of material
here for both of us.
Some of my Facebook friends
had a caption contest for a photo of
a new bride, resplendent in a flowing white gown engaged in an animated discussion on a cell phone.
One of the best in my book was “I
just found out he doesn’t have a
trust fund. Now what do I do.” But
my favorite was, “Isn’t it wonderful that I’ve found the one person I
can annoy for the rest of my life?” I
think I liked it so much because it
rings of great truth. I can be sweet
and loving but mean, even nasty
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Continued from preceding page
Another View of
WW Civility
At Town Meetings
A
Rebecca Rogers
Sales Associate
• Graduate Realtor Institute
• Accredited Buyer Representative
• Certified Residential Specialist
®
OF PRINCETON
343 Nassau Street • Princeton, NJ 08540
Office: 609-452-1887, ext. 7114
www.rebeccarogers.com
n editorial that appeared in the
Princeton Packet on June 15
titled “Meetings Need to be Controlled” referenced a lack of civility and respect by the citizenry perpetrated upon the poor helpless
mayor, administration, and town
council during public comments.
As a resident of West Windsor
who has been attending town council meetings since March, my assessment of the situation is the opposite scenario — one in which the
governing body of West Windsor,
with the exception of Councilman
Bryan Maher, treat the residents offering public comments with disdain, ridicule, and disrespect. Our
legitimate questions are not taken
seriously, and for the most part, go
unanswered. If Council President
Khamal Khanna is pleased by the
speaker, he or she is allowed to
speak for more than three minutes.
However, if questions are asked or
a topic comes up that makes the
mayor/administration uncomfortable, the speaker will be rudely cut
off in mid sentence.
I have seen Councilwoman
Kristina Samonte roll her eyes at a
speaker during public comments,
by Euna Kwon Brossman
sometimes, yes, I’ll admit it. And I
will also admit, again, in a public
forum, that sometimes I really
don’t know how Bill puts up with
me; often, I don’t deserve him.
I saw his diplomacy in action
very close up recently, and I understood not only why he’s survived
two-plus decades of marriage with
a scary woman, but how he has remained successful in the corporate
world where big egos, big mouths,
and big issues meet in a perfect
storm of challenge and stress. It
means understanding that while
you may be right, you will be
wrong unless you can make the
Child-rearing comes
with some tedious moments when you wonder when it will be over.
Yet all too soon those
days are over and done.
other guy accept and see things
your way. That means putting aside
your own ego and being big enough
to see the larger picture. It’s not just
in the workplace but as I said, in the
home.
This is also true when it comes to
kids coming home from college
with one set of expectations and
timetables, and the family with yet
another set of expectations and
rhythms established while they are
gone. It’s hard to tell a 21-year-old
to stay in touch and meet curfews
when they have had unleashed
freedom to do whatever they want
whenever they want. But when the
college kid pseudo-adult comes
home, they become your child all
over again, and as long as you are
paying for room and board, you get
to set the rules.
There are also expectations
around family dinners and schedules that often go haywire. I’m
and I have been shouted at and
scolded by Township Attorney
Michael Herbert for not following
“Robert’s Rules of Order.” Being a
lowly taxpayer, I am not well
versed in Robert’s Rules, but it
seems to me that they are only invoked when there is an attempt to
stifle the speaker’s right to free
speech.
A line in the June 15 editorial
that states “this behavior cannot be
allowed to continue.” That is what
you would expect to hear in the Soviet Union or China, not in the
USA where dissent and oversight
of elected public servants is considered a patriotic duty, not a
crime.
The editorial also mentions partisan politics being played on the
part of Republicans. Be reminded
that there are only two Republicans
and three Democrats sitting on this
council, and when the Republicans
pushed for a small amount of tax
relief the Democrats voted as a
block to defeat the proposal, not
even allowing Mr. Maher to give
input during the debate. Who is really playing partisan politics here?
I do agree with one thing the editorial stated — we should treat one
another with respect. I might add
that respect is a two way street, and
it must be earned by our public servants if we are to continue functioning as a democratic society.
Debbie Hepler
10 Dean Court, West Windsor
used to operating in a house of
chaos where, during the sports season du jour, dinner is caught on the
fly and we are lucky if we sit down
together once a week. Sad but a reality when the hubby is also commuting home from New York. Add
two more variables to the family
equation-not just one but two girls
home for the summer- and the calculus is infinitely more complicated.
As for fighting, I am happy to report that so far, there is actually
very little going on in our household, but then, the summer is still
very young. I’d like to think that the
older two have grown up to be infinitely more wise and recognize exactly just how wise I have been all
along. After all, they have had
much more opportunity to change
than I have over these last few
years-light years of change at a
time. I guess I am feeling my age.
How can you not, when the little
girls you used to drive to dance in
the carpool are now working in
New York, taking care of patients
at the new hospital, and flying off
to remote areas of the world.
I’d be less than honest if I didn’t
share that child-rearing comes with
some tedious moments when you
wonder when it will be over-when
they are crying endlessly with colic, when they want to chain-watch
Barney, when they have to play
Pretty Pretty Princess yet again.
And yet, all too soon, those days
are over and done and part of family history and you wish you could
turn back the clock. However,
when the kids are done with school
and no longer still home for you to
annoy and vice versa, for most of us
there is at least one constant who
will be there –– so words to the
wise — be careful who you marry.
They’ll try to annoy you for the rest
of your life and then let the kids
produce a video about it. If you’re
lucky, they won’t put it on
YouTube. Just be prepared to pay.
Gardner’s Recusal
Not Good Enough
I
n his letter to the editor “Setting
the Solar Record Straight,” Marvin Gardner politicizes the serious
issues of grave concern to numerous West Windsor residents by reference to “the President of the West
Windsor Republican Party.”
The adverse impact of the solar
project on West Windsor residents,
Mayor Hsueh’s either being asleep
at the wheel on the project or currying favor with the County Democratic “powers that be,” and Mr.
Gardner’s abdication of his fiduciary responsibilities are non-partisan issues, not Republican issues.
Gardner claims that he recused
himself on the advice of his attorney. Apparently it did not occur to
Gardner that he should have resigned from the board of trustees of
Mercer County College.
Gardner put his self-interest in
padding his resume ahead of his
fiduciary obligations to West
Windsor residents as chairman of
the planning board.
Gardner is a registered Democrat and key advisor to Mayor Hsueh
and Council President Khanna (the
chair and vice chair, respectively,
of the West Windsor Democratic
Municipal Committee). If West
Windsor were Oz and Mayor
Continued on page 6
JUNE 22, 2012
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© MMXII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. A Realogy Company. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal without notice.
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5
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Continued from page 4
Hsueh were the Wizard, Gardner
would be the guy behind the screen
pulling the levers.
For Gardner to suggest that
West Windsor has had no legal
power to stop the solar project is
disingenuous. Gardner and Mayor
Hsueh should have used their influence with the Democratic county
executive and the Democratic
board of chosen freeholders either
to stop the project or at least assure
West Windsor a place at the table.
Given the way “influence politics”
works in Mercer County, their efforts likely could have stopped the
project at its early stages.
Mr. Gardner insists that the solar
project “was and is public knowledge.” If the project was so well
known to so many people, then
Mayor Hsueh truly was asleep. Either that or he purposely ignored
the project to curry favor with the
Democratic county administration.
West Windsor residents have
not been well-served either by
Mayor Hsueh or by Planning
Board Chair, Marvin Gardner with
respect to the solar project.
Charles C. Morgan
24 Murano Drive, West Windsor
Join the Bike Ride
J
oin the West Windsor Bicycle
and Pedestrian Alliance for two
bike-related events this month.
This Saturday, June 23, we
launch our series of casual summer
bike rides around the community
with an easy ride for ice cream at
Rite Aid. We will gather by the tennis courts at Community Park at
2:45 p.m. and begin our ride at 3
p.m. The route is less than 1.5 miles
each way. Helmets are required and
children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult. The ride is free,
but bring money for ice cream. The
rain date is Sunday, June 24.
Visit wwbpa.org or Facebook
for details about other rides.
Got old bikes? Bring them to
West Windsor Farmers’ Market between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 30, for the WWBPA’s
bike drive to benefit the Boys and
Girls Club of Trenton. Bicycles of
all sizes and condition are accepted,
and donations are tax-deductible.
The bikes will be refurbished by the
volunteers of Bike Exchange and
sold at their store in Ewing.
Silvia Ascarelli
Trustee, WWBPA
Family Makes a Case For Saving Grover Farm
Among the people speaking in
support of preserving Grover
Farm at the June 11 West Windsor
Council meeting were Lauren
Kohn and her daughters, Sara, 17,
and Evie, 6. Excerpts of their statements are below.
M
y name is Sara RolfsenKohn and I am here to
talk to you about why the
preservation of local history is important to me as a young adult
I have been volunteering at the
Brearly House in Lawrenceville
for about two years now, and I am a
junior docent there. The Brearly
House is a historical home that was
built in 1761 that fell into disrepair
over the years. It got to the point
where there was a squatter, his 17
dogs, and multiple 400 pound pigs
living in the house. The township
did finally step in around 1978 and
recognized the need to preserve the
home. The Lawrenceville Historical Society was asked to raise 50
percent of the funds required to restore the home, with the promise
that the township would match it
when they reached their goal.
I have also spent over 60 hours
volunteering at the Howell Living
History Farm over the past nine
months.
The Howell Farm has been restored to represent a working farm
from the early 1900s, though its
roots can be traced as far back as
1737. The land and buildings were
donated to Mercer County, and
while the home on the property was
in good condition, many of the outbuildings and barns had become
unsafe due to decay. A group of
volunteers was formed to work to
restore the buildings using primarily grants and donations.
History is important, especially
small town history, because understanding how our town came about
and what has made it what it is today is fundamental to appreciating
what we have and making good decisions about where we are going.
Volunteering at Howell Farm and
the Brearly House has given me a
greater respect for hard work and
personal accomplishment, because
at the end of the day I can put down
my shovel and see the tangible effects of the work I have done. Inez
Howell’s goal when she donated
the Howell Living History Farm
was education, education about
how a farm works. I can personally
say that this goal has been accomplished, since in the small amount
of time I have been on the farm I
have learned so much.
By having a historical farm here
in West Windsor, we can pass these
values on in a personal way to the
younger generations in our community. It’s one thing to read about
the past in a book or listen to a
teacher talk about it in class, but it’s
another thing entirely to experience it hands-on. I believe that this
hands-on experience will benefit
us by bringing the community closer together through an appreciation
of our hard work and shared history. You can most definitely count
on seeing me with the rest of us
who care if it comes to rebuilding
the Grover legacy.
H
ELLO.
MY NAME IS Evie Kohn.
I am here tonight to talk about
why Howell Living History Farm
is important to me. I have been going to the farm each week since last
fall to a program called Hatchery. I
get to do farm chores and learn
about the farm.
Howell Farm is meant to look
like the old days. I like learning
about what farm girls and boys did
as they grew up. It is fun to do these
things instead of just look things up
or read about them. I have learned
about pigs, cows, horses, sheep,
chickens, and more. We learned that
pigs are playful, so we gave them a
basketball to play with. They stay
muddy to keep the flies away, especially in the summer. I learned that
chickens peck to keep themselves
and their chicks safe. We gathered
eggs from the hen house.
I learned that corn takes a long
time to shell. We shell the corn, or
take the kernels off the cob, so we
can have popcorn and other foods.
Here is a joke about corn: Why
should you not ever say bad things
The fate of the Grover Farm structures rests with
West Windsor Council. See story, page 13.
about corn? Because corn has ears!
I have also learned about how
wool is used. I am learning about
how the women used wool and
dyed it to make sweaters, coats,
hats, gloves, and pants.
These are just some of the things
I learned at Howell Farm. It is an
important place to me and I am
looking forward to participating in
their programs again next fall.
Y
OU HAVE JUST HEARD my
daughters talk about the wonderful experiences they have had at
preserved historical sites in Mercer
County. I’ve volunteered at Howell
Farm over the past nine months,
too, doing everything from cleaning out the chicken coop and raking
the sheep yard to teaching school
kids about shelling corn and
Destroying the Grover
House would be relatively easy. The house
would be gone, but so
would its potential.
threshing wheat. As an adult, my
experiences at Howell Farm have
given me a strong appreciation for
the modern conveniences we have .
Cleaning up after farm animals
makes walking the dog look like a
walk in the park. Seeing baking in a
wood-fired oven makes me happy
to see the microwave.
So much of our participation at
the farm has been about connections. We have a stronger connection to our own family now — from
enjoying the shared fruits of our
labors (Sara and I make a good
“The Castle” as it’s known as is being offered
and being sold “as is”. This unique property,
built in the early 1980’s by the current owners,
sits on 6.71 acres with 3 1/3 acres buildable
and combined with the front lot. Some of this
property is perseveration land, wet lands and
woods. Possible uses: a church, museum,
nursery school, landscaping business.
For more information call Linda November.
$650,000
RO
BB
IN
IN
W
T
W
Linda November
Realtor Associate/Owner
609-951-8600 ext. 107
609-462-1671 (mobile)
[email protected]
www.LindaNovember.com
SV
IL
DS
O
N
IL
TO
M
HA
Why rent when you can become the proud
owner of this adorable 2-story cape that offers
a remodeled bathroom, 2 bedrooms up,
1 bedroom on main level. Hardwood floors
thru-out. Eat-in kitchen w/stainless steel
appliances (included) which leads to the
enclosed back porch. Windows and sliding
glass door recently replaced, full walk-out
basement. This is a great starter home.
$174,900
LE
R
NO MATTER WHAT THE MONTH ALWAYS THINK ‘NOVEMBER’
For all of your real estate needs.
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5 Emerald Road, Robbinsville, NJ 08691.
Cubberly Meadows. Majestic, Meticulous
4 bedrm 3 full bath Colonial w/Brick exterior
features h/w floors main level, upper foyer & mbr. Gourmet kitchen with
granite counters & island, under cabinet lighting, pot filler, open to a
2-story fam. rm w/gas fireplace & 2nd staircase. MBR suite offers 2 wic’s,
totally upgraded master bath. The library has bay windows and could be
5 th bedrm. Plantation shutters thru-out,full basement, paver patio and front
walk/steps just some of the outstanding features of the barely lived-in
home…at a fantastic price of $689,000
GREATER
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team on the farm, and that translates to when we’re at home, too) to
understanding more about our relatives. My grandfather (the girls’
great grandfather) holds a Ph.D. in
dairy farming. He spent his life
working with farmers to implement best practices, and thanks to
our experiences at the farm, I have
a more substantial knowledge base
to use to discuss his life’s work. My
parents took me to Howell Farm
when I was a kid. Now that my children have had a chance to go and
enjoy the farm, it’s connecting
them to their grandparents.
The Grover house has potential
to provide these types of connections to all of us here in West Windsor. First, there’s the connection to
our community’s history and the
people who live in West Windsor
who still remember when Canal
Pointe was potato farms. There are
the connections we’ll build as a
community as we work together to
preserve this piece of West Windsor’s history. No matter where we
came from or when we arrived, understanding the history of our community has the potential to unite us.
There are plenty of things in
West Windsor that bear the Grover
name, but what’s missing is why.
Preserving the Grover house will
give us the potential to make that
connection for current and future
residents of all ages.
In my understanding, the Grover
property is about half of the size of
the Howell Living History Farm.
This is beneficial — good can still
be done, and hopefully with a lower pricetag. Without the addition of
animals, the maintenance would be
substantially less and it would still
be possible for us to appreciate the
historical import of the Grover
family in West Windsor.
And if the community — not
just the mayor, not just the Council
— makes a decision that saving the
Grover home isn’t necessary because of just the Grover family,
then I believe that it has historical
value simply as a working farm. If
we value our community’s history,
then we must continue to value
farming. And as with anything we
value, we must put money and effort towards that. Destroying the
Grover House would be relatively
inexpensive and easy. The house
would be gone, but so would its potential — its potential to draw the
community together; its potential
to educate people of all ages; its potential to connect us to our individual and shared histories.
The Grover House has potential
to impact our community in a multitude of positive ways. As such,
the solicitations for bids for demolition should be canceled. I’ll echo
Sara’s offer and the offers of others
and say that I, too, am ready to contribute my time and money to preserve this piece of our community.
Lauren Kohn
11201 Harcross Court
JUNE 22, 2012
THE NEWS
NEW LISTINGS
People In The News
RADHA CHEERATH
BROKER ASSOCIATE
“Excellence is not an act, but a habit”
• NJAR Circle of Excellence Award Level ‘03-‘11
• Mercer County Top Producers Association ‘01-‘11
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 609-577-6664
Direct: 609-750-4118
Office: 609-799-8181 x208
Eagle Scout: Steve Per of Boy Scouts’Central NJ Council, left, Troop 759 committee
member Menal Chavan, Eagle Scout Niv Marameddy, Eagle advisor Alison Snieckus,
Central NJ council member Ann Jackman, and Eagle mentor Neil D’Souza.
For Maramreddy,
Eagle Scout Project
Is Personal
Continued on following page
64 Jill Court, So. Brunswick
Offered at 309,000
Beautiful brick front colonial with 4,000 sq. ft of
living space on 1 acre of land. The sun-lit 2 story
entrance is enhanced with beautiful arched windows,
there’s a first floor library/study along with a lovely
conservatory. The 2 story family room has a back
staircase to the second floor. For more information on
this wonderful home call Radha Cheerath..
A great opportunity to buy in desirable Monmouth
Walk. Wonderful 3 bedroom townhome with 1 car
garage and unique floor plan. Spacious living room,
eat in kitchen with hardwood floors on the main level.
Large bedrooms, this home has much too offer. Close to
all major highways, shopping and So. Brunswick
schools. Minutes to downtown Princeton.
50 Princeton-Hightstown Rd
Princeton Jct., NJ
RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
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Why Choose a Single Agent
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Harveen Bhatla 609-273-4408 • Dr. William Usab, Jr 609-273-4410
www.Bhatla-Usab.com
[email protected]
24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654, Enter ID
$1,070,000
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$1,250,000
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ALSO FOR RENT $7000
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PRINCETON JUNCTION - 14 Newport
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SKILLMAN - 137 Bedens Brook. 4BR, 4full
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UN
oy Scout Troop 759 of Plainsboro has had its share of Eagle
Scouts, but Nivruth Maramreddy’s project was a little different.
This time, it was personal. “I was
inspired by my mother, who encouraged me to do a project for the
Joseph Cappello School,” Maramreddy said. “My younger brother,
Nityanth, attended Joseph Cappello School in order to improve
his speech capabilities. Seeing that
the school has made a significant
difference for my family, I wanted
to express my gratitude.”
The project that Maramreddy
undertook was to adapt toys for the
special needs students at the
school, which is on the campus of
Mercer Community College and
serves students with physical and
behavioral challenges.
“A kid at Joseph Cappello
School doesn’t have either the
strength or the hand-eye coordination to operate certain toys using
the same on and off switch that
was originally installed on the
toy,” Maramreddy says. “An external switch will be connected to
the wiring of the toy and will allow
for a challenged child to operate
the toy. The external switch can be
a very large and light button. Any
protruding wiring or contents of
the toy can be covered up so that
the children do not hurt themselves.”
He also built a wooden cart for
the school to house these toys.
“Here at the Cappello School, we
serve many students with various
disabilities,” says Karen Machin,
a teacher at the school. “The adapted toys help many of our students
with hand over hand activities, Niv
has been a great asset to our
school.” For information about the
school call at 609-588-8485.
A new graduate of High School
South, Maramreddy will attend the
Air Force Academy in Colorado
Springs. Troop 759, chartered
through Queenship of Mary
Church in Plainsboro, meets most
Fridays at 7:30 p.m. Visit www.troop759nj.org for information.
724 Ridge Road, So. Brunswick
Offered at 669,000
PRINCETON JUNCTION - 4 Farmington
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5Br/2.5Ba colonial in West Windsor Estates.
Fully remodeled kitchen, 1st floor Br/Office,
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EAST WINDSOR - 4 Washington Ct. 2BR,
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100 Canal Pointe Blvd. • Princeton, NJ • 609-987-8889
7
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
A WEST WINDSOR-PLAINSBORO NEWS ADVERTISING FEATURE
Realty Insights by Donna Reilly
How Much To Put Down In Order To Move Up
The U.S. Real Estate market is picking up in many areas, with continued low interest rates turning more and
more renters' thoughts to how
they can achieve their dream
of homeownership this year.
In many cases, the only obstacle coming between renting
a home and buying one is
coming up with the down payment. While the ideal down
payment is 20 percent of the
purchase price, it's important
to recognize that there are a
number of options available
that can provide assistance
through low down payment
programs.
For example, you may want
to investigate Federal Housing
Assistance (FHA) loans, administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD), or –– depending on where you want to
buy –– a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
loan. If you've served in the
armed forces, you may qualify
for a VA loan, which is backed
by the Veteran's Administration. Your lender will be able to
give you details on these, and
other programs that may apply
more specifically to your situation, or even to your neighborhood.
On another note, if you're a
current homeowner thinking
about moving "up" in the market, your first step is to confirm
the equity you have in your existing home and ask your real
estate sales representative to
find out its current market value. Between the equity you
have in your home, and today's low borrowing costs,
your dream home may be
more affordable than you
think!
Please call me today for the
latest market updates! And, remember, up to the minute
West Windsor real estate information is always available at
West-Windsor-Homes-NJ.com
or Facebook.com/West.Windsor.Homes.NJ.
In many cases, the only obstacle coming between renting a home
and buying one is coming up with the down payment.
Continued from preceding page
Abrams, Hutchinson & Associates
Celebrate Retiring Manager
Ed Bershad
Ed Bershad is retiring from his position as manager of Century 21 Abrams, Hutchinson & Associates
after 8 years of exemplary service. An accomplished realtor for over 25 years in his own right, Ed taught
all new sales associates the in’s and out’s of conducting real estate transactions with wisdom, humor,
and endless patience. The professionalism and knowledge of the sales associates is due, in no small
part, to the methods learned in Ed’s classes. Ed was always available to assist, almost around
the clock, in addition to making sure the workplace was running smoothly and successfully.
Gloria Hutchinson, Rich Abrams and the entire team at Century 21 Abrams, Hutchinson thank
Ed for all of his dedication and hard work and wish him well going forward.
Loss of Central Vision
Macular degeneration is the cause of blindness for
baby boomers. At least 1 in 7 people over age 65 suffer from
loss of central vision, and risk losing out on life.
Tiffanie Pfaltzgraff of West
Windsor is the recipient of the District Award of Merit from the Mercer Area District of the Boy Scouts
of America. She is a committee
member and trainer for Pack 759 in
Plainsboro. She also served on Cub
Scout Day Camp staff for three
years and chaired the Tiger Cub
Fun Day. She also served as Popcorn Kernel — leading the Mercer
Area District to a sales record of
$305,000. The mother of four children, Pfaltzgraff is also a Girl
Scout leader and PTA volunteer.
Team From WW-P
Wins National Math
Competition
U
sing their own resources, 15
middle and high school students from West Windsor and
Plainsboro schools participated in
the American Regional Mathemat-
Tiffanie Pfaltzgraff
received the District
Award of Merit from
the Mercer Area District of the Boy Scouts
of America.
ics League competition at Penn
State and received the national title. The team members include
Aaron Berger, Aleck Zhao,
Alexander Clifton, Apoorva
Shah, Bill Yan Huang, Brice
Huang, Catherine Lee, Chaitanya Asawa, Charlie Gu, Chris
Shao, David Geng, Ishan
Mazumdar, Jason Shi, Kevin Li,
and William Jiao.
Chaitanya Asawa, a student at
High School South, wanted to enter
the competition and started the application process last summer.
“The students have been trying to
form a team for years now,” says
his mother, Vanita Asawa. “Different people have tried but the
team could not be formed due to
CHIHLAN “LANA” CHAN
• Certified Relocation Specialist
• NJAR Circle of Excellence since 1993
Gold Level 2003, 2008, 2009, 2010
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Plainsboro: $425,000 4 BR,
newly renovated, move-in ready,
walk to shopping, parks, schools
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Plainsboro: $499,000 New kitchen, 4 BR, 2 Car garage, full basement. move-in condition.
N
8
Plainsboro: $695,000. Classical
Cape Colonial, Absolutely beautiful.
5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths.
Plainsboro: $745,000. 3178 sq
ft, 5BR, 3 Baths, Finished basement.
Lana Chan, (Office) 609-799-2022 x 171
(cell) 609-915-2581
email: [email protected]
44 Princeton Hightstown Rd.,
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
various reasons such as starting too
late, or not having a coach,”
He worked with executives of
ARML to approve a non-teacher
for a coach and succeeded in his
cause. His father, Govind Asawa,
an engineer involved with mathematics, was the coach; and Anne
Clifton was the second coach for
the team.
During spring break Chaitanya
invited kids from WW-P schools to
West Windsor Library to try out for
the team. Practice for the various
rounds of the competition began in
May for the team selected.
The competition included a
team round, a power question (in
which a team solves proof-oriented
questions), an individual round,
and two relay rounds in which a
contestant solves a problem and
passes his/her answer to another
team member, who uses this answer to solve another problem.
Close to 120 teams participated.
Brice Huang placed 18th in the
nation in the individual round. The
team earned close to $3,000 in
prizes.
Two WW Residents
Earn Silver Awards
S
aachi Bedi and Allie Dignan
recently completed their silver
award. Both West Windsor residents are 14 and members of Troop
70216. Bedi will attend High
School North in the fall and Dignan
heads to Notre Dame High School.
The intent of the project was to
alert the community about SAVE,
the animal shelter in Princeton —
JUNE 22, 2012
THE NEWS
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Graduates: The class of 2012 includes Ben Sang from Northfield Mount Holyoke
High School in Massachusetts; Emily Looney from Geisel School of Medicine at
Dartmouth College; and Katie Brossman from Johns Hopkins University.
and to make it more visitor-friendly. They held two events where
children made toys for the animals
including roll and scratch toys for
cats and decorated dog leashes and
collars. Information was distributed to promote animal adoption.
Dog and cat treats were baked to
feed the animals in the shelter. The
audience was also invited to meet a
resident animal.
Bedi and Dignan decorated the
front of the building with stones.
With the money earned from the
events and bake sales the girls were
able to purchase agility training
equipment for the dogs at SAVE.
Their goal was to provide more
playful dogs for adoption.
For information about joining
Girl Scouts contact Louisa Ho at
609-371-2119
or
E-mail
[email protected]
Private Schools
Northfield Mount Hermon
School: Benjamin Sang of West
Windsor graduated from the grades
9 to 12 school in Massachusetts.
Pennington School: Kenneth
Pepper of West Windsor graduated from middle school.
In College
University of Connecticut:
Phillip Louis Menard of Plainsboro is on the dean’s list.
Geisel School of Medicine at
Dartmouth College: Emily C.
Looney graduated with an M.D.
degree. A 2003 graduate of High
School South, she will be relocating to Boise, Idaho, to begin her
family medicine residency training.
Johns Hopkins University:
Katie Brossman of Plainsboro
graduated with honors in her major
of writing seminars. As an undergraduate, she was an intern in the
Office of Alumni Relations and an
editorial intern at the EatingWell
Media Group, Baltimore Magazine
and the Johns Hopkins University
Press. She also brought sustainable
food initiatives to campus as a
member of Real Food Hopkins and
served as food chair for the annual
spring fair. A contributing writer
for the food blog, Big Girls Small
Kitchen, Brossman writes a personal food blog at www.cookiesandkimchi.com. A 2008 graduate of Princeton Day School,
Brossman will be writing her food
and travel blog as she travels to Korea, China, Hong Kong, and Singapore this summer.
Lehigh University: Kyle Stiefel
of West Windsor scored a 3-goal
“hat-trick” in Lehigh’s NCAA Division I playoffs vs. the University
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of Maryland. A rising senior, he
graduated from Peddie School in
2009. Commentators on ESPN
have compared Kyle to the sharpshooter Ray Allen of the Boston
Celtics. To watch highlights of the
game, google ESPN mens lacrosse
Lehigh vs. Maryland
Providence College: Anna O’Connell of Plainsboro received a
bachelor’s degree. She graduated
summa cum laude and was awarded the Reverend Leo S. Cannon,
O.P. award for excellence in musicianship. O’Connell, a member of
the I Cantori, the school’s elite
choir, will study choral and sacred
music at the University of Southern
California.
Rowan University: West Windsor residents on the dean’s list include Jose A. Calves, a senior ma-
Allie Dignan, left, and
Saachi Bedi earned
Silver Awards.
joring in history; Linda T. Gosselin, a sophomore majoring in advertising; and Laura A. Slatas, a
senior majoring in elementary education. Katherine I. Lacenere of
Plainsboro is also on the dean’s list.
She is a senior majoring in English.
Scholarship
Kelsey Daniels and Alexandra
Waters, both of West Windsor, received scholarships from the New
Jersey Association of Realtors Education Foundation.
Continued on following page
ERA PROPERTIES UNLIMITED
“Integrity, Exceptional Service, Outstanding Results”
CONGRATULATIONS
2012 GRADUATES!
301 N. Harrison St., Ste. 31
Princeton, NJ 08540
www.SellingNJ.com ~ 609.921.2200
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John Terebey
Graduate of 2012
WWP HS South
John Terebey, Jr.
Broker/Owner
“Proud Dad”
9
JUNE 22, 2012
Naval Academy
Christian Galkowski, a junior
at Hun School, will participate in
the Naval Academy Summer Seminar program. Academics, athletics, and professional training are
key elements in the six-day program. After participating in seamanship and navigation classes
students will take a cruise aboard a
Navy Yard Patrol craft to apply
what they learned in class. Visit
www.usna.edu.
Legion of Honor
Lewis Bloom, 94, of Plainsboro
received a Legion of Honor medal
on May 8 at West Point for his secret missions during World War II.
An Army veteran, he served in
Army Intelligence analyzing the
strength, command structure, and
weaponry of competing military
forces.
He was awarded the medal by
Francois Delattre, the French
Ambassador to the United States;
and Guy Wildenstein, president of
the American Society of the French
Legion of Honor. One of the highest awards in France, it was created
by Napoleon in 1808.
Although Bloom’s contributions were overlooked for more
than 65 years, his wife, Adaline,
pursued his records that were lost
in a sea of bureaucracy. He received the United States Army
bronze star from Senator Robert
Menendez in 2010.
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Peter S. Juzefyk, 86, of Union,
died June 5. Survivors include
daughter and son-in-law, Donna
and Jim Shuell of West Windsor
Board Appointment
Daniel R. Guadalupe of Plainsboro has been elected to the board
of trustees of CentraState Healthcare System. He is an equity member of Norris, McLaughlin, & Marcus, a commercial law firm with offices in New Jersey, Pennsylvania,
and New York City.
A graduate of Columbia College
and the University of Pennsylvania
Law School, Guadalupe has practiced law for 26 years. He is a former president of the New Jersey
Hispanic Bar Association, a former
general counsel of the Hispanic National Bar Association, and was appointed in 2011 by Gov. Christie to
the New Jersey Center for Hispanic
Policy and Research, an advisory
committee on Hispanic issues.
Guadalupe is the main U.S. outside counsel for Swiss medical
equipment manufacturer Schiller
A.G. and Schiller America and
medical device company Life
Medical Technologies. He is also
on the roster of construction arbitrators of the American Arbitration
Association and has served as an
International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Arbitrator, and as adjunct professor at Seton Hall Law
School.
G
igh School South’s Model
United Nations Club is one of
the largest, oldest, and successful
clubs at the school. Advisors are
Brad Borsuk and Erin Schomburg.
“Students in our team debate
pressing world issues, write breathtaking resolutions, and compete to
win awards for the quality of their
speaking, leadership, and written
works,” says Arnav Sood, the public relations representative. “In
preparing for a conference we are
assigned countries that we will represent as a delegation and individual positions and our members
dedicate themselves to researching
their specific topics and brainstorm
solutions to the problems.
As a public school group the
members involve the student body
with in school mocks that include
hundreds of students. “We strive to
include everybody, not just our
best,” says Sood.
At a recent competition they received the Outstanding Large Delegation award confident in their
ability to go higher. At Georgetown they won five best delegate
gavels and best small delegation.
Officers included Nikhil Gavai,
president; Pranav Rao, Adeline
Lee, and Michael Liu as vice presidents; Prashant Sharma and
Ahush Gupta, secretaries. Next
year’s officers include Sharma as
President; Vedant Sachdeva and
Suchira Sharma as vice president;
Arnav Sood as public relations;
and Abhimanya Muchhal as secretary.
IN
H
Robert W. Harbourt, 48, died
June 1. He attended WW-P schools.
Survivors include his parents, Marion and Richard Harbourt of West
Windsor. Donations may be made
to Second Chance Heart Transplant
Support Group, 182 Conover Road,
West Windsor 08550.
ST
South Model UN
Recognized
Deaths
Daniel Guadalupe of
Plainsboro has been
elected to the board of
trustees of CentraState
Healthcare System.
LI
Continued from preceding page
W
THE NEWS
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MLS6061883
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Classic colonial, cascading staircase, HW flrs, LR
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HW flrs, LR, DR, FR, open kitchen w/brkfst area, lrg deck
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Helen Leming, 90, of Austin,
Texas, died June 6. Survivors include a son, Paul Leming of West
Windsor.
Andrew “Andy” Francis
Butchko, 79, of The Villages,
Florida, died June 6. Survivors include a daughter, JoAnn Giuliana
of Plainsboro. Donations may be
made to the American Cancer Society, 1650 West Main Street, No.
3, Leesburg, FL 34748.
Carol Fisher Parker, 86, of Indian Land, South Carolina, died
June 7. Survivors include her
brother-in-law, Royal Parker of
West Windsor. Donations may be
made to Unity Presbyterian Church
Building Fund, 303 Tom Hall
Street, Box 1267, Fort Mill, SC
29716.
Carole T. Reed, 68, of Allentown, died June 8 at Memorial
Sloan-Kettering, Manhattan. Born
and raised in West Windsor, she
was a graduate of Princeton High
School. A longtime resident Dutch
Neck, she was a former elder at the
Dutch Neck Presbyterian Church.
Survivors include her husband
of 50 years, Stuart L. Reed Jr.; her
children, Jeffery Reed and his girlfriend, Nila Zelenak of Allentown,
Laura Mount of Allentown, and
David Reed and his wife Linda of
Robbinsville; her mother, Margaret
Tindall; brothers and sister-in-laws,
Melvin and Joyce Tindall III of Indiana, Alfred and Elizabeth Tindall
of Allentown, and Ronald Tindall
of Florida; nine grandchildren, and
many nieces and nephews.
Donations may be made to
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital, P.O. Box 27106, New York,
NY 10087-7106.
Charles W. Spence Sr., 60,. of
Levittown, Pennsylvania, died
June 10 at Frankford Torresdale
Hospital, Philadelphia. Survivors
include a son and daughter-in-law,
Charles and Jennifer Spence of
Plainsboro, and their children.
Albert Leibowitz, 87, of Union,
died June 10 at Overlook Medical
Center in Summit. Survivors include his son Kenneth of West
Windsor. Donations may be made
to the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, Box 1245, Albert Lea, MN.
56007, or to the American Heart
Association.
Larry Metzger, 52, a former
Plainsboro resident, died June 11 in
a fire at his home in Springfield.
Born in Trenton, he had lived in
Hamilton, Springfield Township,
and Plainsboro before returning to
Springfield 12 years ago. He was a
lead consultant engineer for
Sprint/Nextel Communications.
He served as chief of the Plainsboro Fire Department from 1992 to
1994. He operated Fire Service
Communications, a ham radio repair shop in Ewing.
Survivors include his wife of 17
years, Adrienne Blummer Metzger; his sons, Adam J. Metzger of
Springfield, and Lawrence C. Metzger Jr. of Trenton; daughter and
son-in-law, Lauren P. and James
Bird of East Windsor; his brother
JUNE 22, 2012
and sister-in-law, Charles and Lynda Metzger of Mansfield; his sister,
Linda Andre of Hamilton Township; and two grandchildren. Donations for Adrienne and Adam Metzger may be sent to the Springfield
Township Fire Company, c/o Brian
Kokotajilo, 2470 Monmouth Road,
Jobstown 08041.
Robert C. Gasman, 74, of West
Windsor died June 12. Survivors
include his wife, Frances; his sister, Mary Jo; two daughters, Jeanne
and Julie; a son, Charles; and four
grandchildren.
Gasman’s career as a chemist
and research director spanned
many industries. His patents included waterproof bandage adhesive. Donations may be made to the
Parkinson Research Foundation or
the Alzheimer’s Association.
Frank M. Basile, a former
Plainsboro resident, died June 13.
Born and raised in the Bronx, he attended City College of the City University of New York and did graduate work in marine biology at the
University of Delaware. He worked
for the U.S. Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C. and as director of the Outer Continental
Shelf Office in New York City.
Survivors include a son and
daughter-in-law, Frank and Kim,
and grandchildren, Artemis and
Paris, all of Hopewell; a son, Jason
Basile of Houston, Texas; sister
and brother-in-law, Catherine and
Arthur Suss of Holbrook, New
York; a sister, Lenore Smith; a
niece, Teresa Rose of Washingtonville, New York; brother and
sister-in-law, Leonard and Paula
Basile of Verona; nephew,
Leonard Basile of San Francisco,
CA, and former wife, Nancy Basile
of Plainsboro. Donations may be
made to the soup kitchen of choice.
Leonard E. Schuster, 89, of
Plainsboro died June 14 at the University Medical Center of Princeton. Born in Chippewa Falls, Wisc.,
Schuster worked at the WalkerGordon farm from 1948 to 2003.
Survivors include three daughters, Judy E. Thompson, Mary A.
Schuster, and Sue J. Schuster; two
sons, Raymond Thompson and
Leonard W. Schuster; five grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Donations may be made
to the WDVR FM Radio Station,
Box 191, Sergeantsville 08557.
Irving Lopatin, 85, of Monroe
died June 18. Survivors include his
brother, William, of West Windsor. Donations may be made to either American Cancer Society or
Hadassah Medical Center.
Grace Ann Schock Gibbs, 78,
of Spotswood died June 18. A former resident of Plainsboro, Gibbs
worked for 38 years at the AMF
Bowling Center in East Brunswick,
retiring in 2005 as manager.
Survivors include her daughter
and son-in-law, Patricia and Ray
Manship of Old Bridge; her son and
daughter-in-law, James Jr. and
Yvonne of Helmetta; her brother,
Frederick Schock of Hamilton; her
sister, Catherine Imperale of Georgia; and five grandchildren. Donations may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Foundation or the Alzheimer’s Association.
Robert Hartzell, 76, of Clearwater, Florida, died June 18. Born
in Keyport, he was a resident of
Plainsboro until 1995. Survivors
include his wife, Bobbie; two sons
and daughters-in-law, Robert and
Linda Hartzell and Troy and
Stacey Hartzell; daughter and sonin-law, Kim and Rick Nymeyer;
and nine grandchildren. Donations
may be made to Suncoast Hospice.
Francis J. ‘Frank’ Walton, 86,
of West Windsor died on June 16.
He was a principal at Dutch Neck
School and superintendent of
schools for West Windsor Township from 1959 to 1969.
Born in Philadelphia, he was a
staff sergeant in the Army during
World War II and was a prisoner of
war in Germany. He received a
Purple Heart Medal, a Bronze Star,
and the Combat Infantry Badge.
A graduate of La Salle University with a degree in secondary education, Walton received his M.ED.
in secondary education and school
administration from Temple University. He also did post-graduate
and doctoral work at Rutgers.
Walton was instrumental in
bringing world language instruction to the elementary school curriculum, as well as bringing the
bookmobile to West Windsor prior
to the building of the library. He
was also involved in the forging of
the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District. An oak tree
dedicated to Walton in the early
1960s by Brownie Troop 145 still
stands at Maurice Hawk School.
Walton served as principal of
the Kreps School in East Windsor
for two years, and then 16 years as
head of the Mill Lake School in
Monroe, before retiring in 1987.
Survivors include his wife of 62
years, Claire Guertin; two daughters, Claire Ellen and Andrea; a sister, Mercedes; a brother and sisterin-law, Michael and Gwyn; a sister-in-law, Theresa; and a son-inlaw, Hamid.
Donations may be made to
Michael J. Fox Foundation for
Parkinson’s Research, michaeljfox.org; National Parkinson’s
Foundation, parkinson.org; and
American Heart/Stroke Association, honor.americanheart.org.
THE NEWS
11
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609-799-7500
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12
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Tutor:
Study Skills, History
and English/Writing
18 year veteran West Windsor-Plainsboro classroom teacher.
MS in Special Education from The Bank Street College
of Education in New York.
• Have co-taught American History since 1997
• Have taught specialized programs
Services:
• Developing study skills and research strategies,
particularly in non-fiction categories
(ex. history portfolio)
• Improving writing skills including:
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• Preparing students for college essays
609-649-2694
email: [email protected]
Landscape Designer
◆ Landscaping:
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• Brick walls &
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◆ Maintenance:
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Ordinance
Continued from page 1
similar regulations in place in East
Brunswick, Morristown, and
Woodbridge, would mandate all
businesses to have a person with
proper ID who can be held accountable for the institution —
whether the business owner or a
manager — as well as for all employees to be licensed massage
therapists. Police believe this will
stop the opportunities for massage
parlors to serve as a home base for
illegal immigrants who might also
be part of human trafficking operations. Melnick and Pica said that
many times the women involved in
massage parlor prostitution arrests
are unpaid illegal immigrants from
Asian countries, many of whom
are violently forced into participating in prostitution.
Councilman George Borek
commented on the problems law
enforcement has faced of making
prostitution arrests at massage parlors only to see the same places and
individuals in business again a few
days later, even after items were
confiscated from the establishments.
“Certainly your work here
seems to be a more positive way of
dealing with this issue. It’s definitely a step in the right direction,”
Borek said.
Police worked with Karen Cayci of the township’s law firm, Herbert, Van Ness, Cayci & Goodell,
to develop the ordinance. Melnick
was hands-on in drafting the ordinance, and in the course of his research and data collection he met
with several licensed, legitimate
massage therapy business owners
and employees. On June 11 he told
Council police understand that
“not all massage therapy business
has illegal activity going on.”
“The legitimate massage business owners are behind [the ordinance] 100 percent. Every time
they open a newspaper and there’s
a report about a prostitution arrest
at a massage business, it gives
them a black eye. There is legitimate business, legitimate profession, and a good health-promoting
reason to go for massage therapy,”
Melnick said.
Melnick also told the audience
that the same problems with prostitution that the township faced 10
years ago, when he started working
in the detective bureau in West
Windsor, had prevailed until this
spring when police raided a house
and the train station was advertised
in newspapers.
That aspect has contributed to
the potential for violent crimes.
Melnick spoke about two crimes in
2008 where money was stolen
from the massage parlors, which
usually operated on an all-cash basis, after male customers beat the
prostitute attending them and fled.
In 2006, Melnick said, a burglar
broke into 55 Princeton-Hightstown Road at 2:18 a.m. and attacked a prostitute who was sleeping at the massage parlor’s location. After the attack the woman
ran down Route 571 with her
clothes torn and multiple injuries,
where police spotted her. Melnick
says in that case and others, the female victims are hesitant to report
crimes to police because they are
illegal immigrants, they are involved in prostitution, and they do
not speak English. Therefore,
crimes can occur in West Windsor
without police finding out.
Besides the potential for increased crime in the community,
Melnick also deemed the prostitution crisis a serious “quality of life
issue.”
“We’ve had complaints from
spouses whose husbands have had
to go for sex addiction counseling.
Others have complained that a sexually transmitted disease was
brought back home from someone
who visited a massage parlor. Residents have helped by telling us the
exact locations of the massage parlors where prostitution was occurring,” he said.
With support from council,
Mayor Hsueh and the West Windsor Police Department hope to receive fewer anonymous tips with a
decrease in criminal activity.
Also at Council’s June 11 meeting, public hearings were held on
‘We’ve had complaints
from spouses whose
husbands have had to go
for sex addiction counseling. Others have
complained that a sexually transmitted disease
was brought home.’
at 148 Princeton-Hightstown Road
and arrested four women (WW-P
News, March 2).
The suburban house is walking
distance from High School South,
and like in many of the cases Melnick said police initially investigated it because of neighbors’ complaints about a constant flow of
cars (almost all male visitors) plus
late evening hours. He said the
massage businesses have traditionally attracted individuals from other areas to West Windsor, often because the proximity to highways
E
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JUNE 22, 2012
Geevers, Samonte Ask
For Community’s Help
With Grover Farm
A
t its June 11 meeting, Council Vice President Linda Geevers announced that she and Councilwoman Kristina Samonte would like residents to
come forward and contribute to the planned restoration of the Grover farm house.
“We are proposing to have a ‘community committee,’ and we would like to begin with an organizational meeting within the next two weeks. The committee
will be open to everyone — there’s been no applications submitted or decisions made as to who should be
on or not,” Geevers said.
Samonte said she looks forward to having residents
take ownership of the restoration project and “come up
with a vision. We are welcoming all participants. If
you have an interest in it, we are happy to have you.”
At recent Council meetings residents Marshall
Lerner and John Church, who had each been involved
in Habitat for Humanity projects, offered their hands
as volunteers for the Grover farm. Both men have ties
to the West Windsor Republican Club.
Former Republican candidate for West Windsor
Town Council Lauren Kohn brought her two daughters to the Council meeting to speak about their volunteer efforts and family bonding through work restoring the Brearly House in Lawrenceville, which was
built in 1761. Kohn, who ran on the “Strong Leaders
for West Windsor” slate with Bryan Maher and Gary
three ordinances. Council and
members of the public expressed
their concerns over the expenses
stated before ultimately approving
each ordinance.
Ordinance 2012-08 provides an
aggregate amount of $3,885,000,
with $3.7 million to be issued in
bonds or notes to finance capital
improvements in the township.
Business Administrator Robert
Hary explained that the ordinance
covered amounts that were not fully-funded through the township’s
2012 capital budget.
John Church of 11 Princeton
Place took issue with $800,000 that
was appropriated for a new fire
truck with a ladder and hose capable of reaching high-rise apartment
or office buildings. Church told
council that the Princeton Junction
fire house already has one truck
that could serve such a need, and
there was a minuscule chance that
West Windsor needs to have two of
these trucks to battle fires. Church
characterized the new truck as
“nice to have rather than need to
have” while making sure Council
knew he supports the objective of
community safety being put first.
But Councilman George Borek,
drawing on his firefighting experience, said the higher expense was
justified because such vehicles
must be built from the ground up
and specially outfitted.
A second ordinance, 2012-09, is
a capital improvement ordinance
for $1,018,522.55 covering fully
funded projects that will be paid for
through grant money or other fees,
such as the $150,000 for the
Schenck Farm and its Environmental Education Center that was
contributed by Centex (developer
of the Elements).
Councilman Bryan Maher and
Councilwoman Kristina Samonte
recently toured that facility, and at
the June 11 meeting Maher asked
Hary whether renovations at the
site including new bathrooms were
part of the ordinance monies. Hary
said that they were not, and in the
future Council will need to approve another contract, which Maher estimates at $100,000, for bathroom construction at the Environmental Center.
Geevers raised a question over
the inclusion of a Department of
Public Works facility being included in initial plans for the municipal
complex. A sum of $100,000 for
architect’s fees (rendering a con-
THE NEWS
13
Zohn last fall, spoke about the bonding her family has
enjoyed during their clean-up and preservation work
at the farm. (See column, page 6.)
Geevers outlined possible roles, including dealing
with the construction end, grant writing and fundraising, and other tasks that will need to be managed. She
says a timeline of organizing the group, getting input,
and putting forward an action plan to Council would
probably take all summer. Geevers expects to report
back to Council in early to mid-September on the
progress at the Grover farm.
“Our recommendations will be non-binding, but
everything is going to be on the table — especially regarding the structures that need to be razed or restored.
Community members have a lot of passion for the project, and agriculture is our history here in West Windsor. This is our last chance before any of the structures
are demolished,” she said.
On June 11 Council also officially canceled bids for
the demolition of the Grover house. Business Administrator Robert Hary said such action was required
once viable bids had been received but not acted upon
within 60 days of their submission. Despite Council
not accepting recommendations to demolish the
Grover house twice in the past month, Mayor Hsueh
supports Geevers and Samonte in their initiative.
“As long as there is no taxpayer money involved, I
will be 100 percent behind it. I am eager to see how
much people want to donate and contribute — and I’m
really happy to hear that we have so many enthusiastic
residents in West Windsor willing to step forward,”
the mayor said.
— Rikki N. Massand
ceptual design) for the municipal
building was included in the
$1.018 million, but Hary clarified
that the design would likely not include the post office building or a
new public works facility.
Ultimately the ordinance passed
after council amended it, removing
the mention of a public works facility tied into architect’s fees. Maher, however, remains against the
use of $2 million in liquor license
revenues for renovation at the municipal complex.
“It [the $100,000 in architect’s
fees] is so the mayor can dream up
what he wants for this building. In
a perfect world maybe the architects need only $50,000 or $60,000
to do the designs, and maybe somebody might step forward to do it for
free just for the exposure alone,”
Maher said.
One other capital improvement
ordinance was also approved. It appropriated $5,000 for Waterworks,
a move made every year by the administration.
Three recommendations from
the administration regarding animal control were passed by Council.
— A professional services
agreements with Weber’s Training
School (on Route 1) for $10,000
for the boarding and care of stray
animals.
— A professional services
agreement with Mercerville Animal Hospital for $2,000 for the
boarding and care of stray cats.
— A professional services
agreement of $8,000 for Nassau
Animal Hospital for veterinarian
services.
Other action taken by Council at
its June 11 meeting included the
following:
— William E. Antonides Jr. has
been re-appointed as West Windsor’s municipal auditor through
June 30, 2013. His new one-year
contract will be for $43,842, the
same as 2011-’12, and five percent
less than Antonides earned for
2010-’11 due to the mayor’s budgetary guidelines (for five percent
cuts) imposed one year ago.
— Council authorized Paul
Lee’s appointment to the Human
Relations Council, filling a current
vacancy. His term will expire on
December 31, 2013.
— Alcoholic beverage licenses
for West Windsor Township were
renewed for 2012-’13.
Sign Ordinance
A
t its Monday, June 25 meeting
today’s version of Town
Council, with Kristina Samonte
and Bryan Maher on board, will try
its hand at revising the township’s
current sign ordinance — much to
the chagrin of the administration.
In the past few months there has
been increased scrutiny of the variation of signs posted and permitted
in the township. After Councilman
George Borek took a proactive
stance (WW-P News, April 13)
Council asked to have an opportunity to revise the current ordinance.
Besides his concern over any
impact to the municipal budget,
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh, having
freshly created the township’s economic advisory group, cautioned
Council about a potential pitfall
behind a stricter sign ordinance —
being a detriment to businesses.
“You need to let businesses
make their own decisions. Geevers’ philosophy is that we need to
control more. Linda wants us to
have more control over the businesses. That is totally against economic development and that is the
reason the planning board refused
to accept this project,” Hsueh said.
In an interview the mayor mentioned financial oversight that is
needed. “Four or five years ago the
planning board didn’t want to
make the sign ordinance to become
so restrictive, and the Council voted 5-0 to take over its control, and
Council did all the things they
wanted to do against my opposition and Planning Board Chairman
Marvin Gardner’s opposition. It
appeared to them that they went too
far and that there was too much
governmental input. There were a
lot of complaints from the business
community,” Hsueh said.
According to Mayor Hsueh,
West Windsor had to previously
invest resources and manpower to
make sure signage procedures
were properly followed.
“When Marvin Gardner decided
that he would not get involved, he
said the township would have to
appropriate a minimum of $40,000
to do it. Now Council says they
want to change it, and Marvin says
‘I don’t want to touch that — let
Council take care of it,” the mayor
said.
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THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Continued from preceding page
Mayor Hsueh says the five
council members seem to have different directions. “If the planning
board reviews it, the planning
board will reject it. It will be interesting to see if and how they
(Council) will be able to come together,” he said.
Affordable Housing
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o avoid the state’s collection of
money from the township’s affordable housing trust fund, Council unanimously approved five
methods of allocating the $1.6 million currently in the account at its
meeting on Monday, June 11. The
deadline for municipalities to commit to spending plans and submit
them to the state is coming up on
Monday, July 16. Before Council
cast its votes, Township Planning
Board and Affordable Housing Attorney Jerry Muller made a presentation on the steps ahead with respect to affordable housing in West
Windsor.
The largest portion of the $1.6
million is $782,500 designated to
improve HVAC and hot water
heating equipment for affordable
housing units at the Windsor
Haven, Windsor Pond, and Village
Grande developments. The Hamlet
Bear Creek LLC also received a
contract of $482,500 to implement
the Hamlet Energy Efficiency Program in its affordable housing
units. In addition:
- The national program by Project Freedom Inc. receives a
$262,000 contract.
- A new affordable housing escrow account will be opened.
- The township entered into a
$110,000 contract with Piazza &
Associates Inc. to implement an affordable housing foreclosure and
bankruptcy revolving fund program.
Muller said that on Tuesday,
May 22, COAH approved the
spending plan. Business Administrator Robert Hary said the administration was waiting for the spending plan to be approved by the state
agency before having a formal pre-
sentation to Council. Hary says the
township took initiative to devise a
plan as soon as word came from the
state about possible collection of
the funds.
Project Freedom appears to be a
key strategy for West Windsor.
Council questioned Muller about a
potential influx of children into the
schools, coming “from families we
would expect to not contribute
much in terms of taxes,” as Councilman Bryan Maher stated. But
Muller and Hary said that Project
Freedom is primarily for households with developmentally-disabled individuals.
“Our biggest concern with Project Freedom would be the increased stress put on our public
safety personnel because the people it serves have very limited
physical capabilities and the first
aid squads and fire departments
must answer calls there a lot,”
Hary said.
While the township was not obligated to contribute funds for energy-efficiency upgrades at local
developments, the administration’s strategy may stand on its
merits. According to Muller, the
Hamlet owner will have an energy
assessment done for the property,
and an RFP (request for proposals)
needs to be advertised to secure design engineering services.
Business Administrator Robert
Hary says the plan to make affordable housing more energy efficient
is a “win-win” for all.
“One of the biggest concerns
people have these days, aside from
rent, is the cost of utilities. By making changes to the HVAC and cutting energy costs we are able to
‘I’d like to make sure
what’s paid for by West
Windsor residents, retailers, or developers
stays within our town,’
says Bryan Maher.
make homes more efficient, thereby saving affordable housing residents money as well,” Hary said.
Hary credits Piazza, township
staff, and the Affordable Housing
Committee with coming up with an
economical and environmentallyconscious plan. At the June 11
meeting Jean Jacobsohn, chairperson of West Windsor’s Affordable
Housing Committee, attempted to
clarify that the $1.6 million trust
fund was not related to taxpayer
money.
“That is money that had been
collected from people who were
developing projects. It was collected by us for a use by us,” she said.
Jacobsohn said the affordable
housing committee has worked for
a decade to get Project Freedom to
build units in West Windsor. “We
do not want to drop the ball at this
point,” she said.
But Councilman Maher took her
to task for stating that the money in
the trust fund was not from taxes.
He contended that indirectly, West
Windsor residents contributed that
money through builder’s fees that
they may have paid.
“When my house was being
built on Penn Lyle Road six years
ago, my builder had to write a
check to the town to cover the cost
associated with developing housing. That was a cost directly paid
by me through the purchase price
of the house, just like everybody in
this town whether that is through
commercial real estate, retail real
estate, or home real estate — they
have to pay the fee for the town.
The money didn’t just come from
nowhere,” he said.
“I’d like to make sure what’s
paid for by West Windsor residents, retailers, or developers stays
within our town, but it is money
that in one way or another did emanate from this town,” Maher said.
Muller and Mayor Hsueh took
up Maher’s specific example as an
unusual project that needed to
come before the planning board.
Jacobsohn also responded, telling
the crowd at the Council meeting
that she knew the subject well as
she was the tax collector in Plainsboro for three decades.
“I didn’t say that you don’t pay a
fee, I said this wasn’t tax money.
This was not a property tax — this
was a fee that a developer had to
pay,” she said.
However, Maher had the final
word. “You can call it a fee, I can
call it a tax, but when I have to
write a check for something it’s
money out of my pocket,” he said.
Attorney Reviewed
C
ouncil amended and approved
a contract extension for the
township attorney, Michael W.
Herbert, and his Lawrencevillebased law firm, Herbert, Van Ness,
Cayci & Goodell, at its June 11
meeting. The administration had
recommended a one-year contract,
expiring June 30, 2013, for a sum
of $229,917.30. That term was
changed to a six-month basis, expiring December 31 and to be reviewed again at the Council’s 2013
re-organization meeting early next
January. The amount will be
$114,958.65, or half of the proposed year-long deal.
Business Administrator Robert
Hary clarified that Council and the
administration had the option of
making the contract extension coincide with Mayor Hsueh’s current
term in office, which expires at the
end of 2013. That would have left a
possibility for Herbert’s contract
to be an 18-month deal, or a breakdown of 12 months and then six
months.
Hary also told Council that regardless of which choice was made
now, the township’s law firm contract was one of few that remain on
the July 1 to June 30 contract cycle
(from before township elections
were changed to November). Herbert said he had no preference and
that he would not take any comments made as a personal offense.
At the June 11 council meeting
Bryan Maher said that he would
feel more comfortable approving a
one-year contract for Herbert’s
firm if he had spent more time
working with the current township
attorney. Herbert and Maher joked
that they would have to go out for a
beer or pizza, but Maher and Linda
Geevers were adamant that the
contract should be reduced to six
months.
Mayor Hsueh was less than
pleased that Council made that decision. “This means in January we
have to do it again. Council can decide to do whatever they want to
do, but we cannot have a situation
where every time you have new
councilmembers you have to
change everything,” he said.
“I just wanted Council to have
some respect for the system. As a
mayor I have to make certain kinds
of decisions — that is governmental operations, standard operating
procedures. You cannot say I don’t
like it so therefore we will not go
forward with mayor’s decisions
and follow the system. Again, I
turned it over to Council and the
Council majority can decide whatever they want to do,” Hsueh says.
The appointment of a township
attorney is the responsibility of the
mayor alone. Council must ap-
JUNE 22, 2012
prove a contract, just as with other
firms hired by the township. “We
need to go through Council to
make sure they approve of the budget for the law firm and their
hourly fee,” Hsueh said.
Michael J. Herbert, the late father of current Township Attorney
Michael W. Herbert, earned the
initial contract as the township’s
law firm in 1997, four years before
Mayor Hsueh was elected. As a
councilman at the time, Hsueh
says he did not question Mayor
Carson’s appointment of the township attorney the way some members of council do now.“I never
thought about partisan issues with
regards to the law firm. My only
concern is that we have the services of a decent lawyer,” Hsueh
said.
Hary’s Successor
C
ouncilwoman Linda Geevers
announced that the field of
candidates for the Business Administrator position, which will be
vacated by Robert Hary on July 1,
has narrowed to two people. Hary
is retiring after 23 years of service
to the township and the last three
as the business administrator
(WW-P News, May 25).
The committee involved in the
review process includes Andy
Lupo, chairman of the West Windsor Parking Authority, Marvin
Gardner, Planning Board chairman, Hemant Marathe, president
of the WW-P school board, and
Council Vice President Linda
Geevers. Hary is also helping the
committee, but he has no input in
the selection. “Bob Hary has provided information and his opinions
Continued on page 19
•
•
•
•
•
Plainsboro News:
Hunters Glen Fire
R
esidents of Hunters Glen Drive were
evacuated on Friday, June 15, at approximately 1:40 a.m. after a fire erupted in
Building 18. Although no injuries were reported, Plainsboro’s police and fire departments
evacuated all residents from the building as well
as Building 16 as a precautionary measure. The
fire spread throughout Building 18 before firefighters could extinguish the flames.
Fire departments from East Windsor, Princeton Township, Princeton Borough, Princeton
Junction, South Brunswick, Kingston, Hightstown, Kendall Park, Monroe, Lawrenceville,
Cranbury, and the Princeton Plasma Physics
Laboratory also responded to the call. According to Plainsboro Fire Chief James Pedley, in all
50 firefighters were at the scene to battle the
fire, but the hydrant closest to the burning buildings was not operable. Fire crews then engaged
another nearby hydrant. Pedley said one firefighter sustained a minor injury to his arm, but
he was treated immediately and did not require
a trip to the hospital.
Hunters Glen unit 1804 was declared uninhabitable. Two units in Building 16 also sustained water damage during attempts to control
the blaze.
The Middlesex County Office of Emergency
Management and Central Jersey Red Cross provided more than 30 residents with temporary
shelter and supplies. The Hunters Glen leasing
office and Red Cross assisted residents in acquiring temporary accommodations.
Plainsboro Police and the township fire marshal are investigating the fire.
Former Chief Dies in Blaze
L
arry Metzger, who served as Plainsboro’s
fire chief from 1992 to 1994, died in a fire at
his home in Burlington County on Monday,
June 11.
At 5:17 p.m., Springfield Township
(Burlington) firefighters responded to reports of
a house fire on Columbus-Jobstown Road. They
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would learn that one of their own was a victim in
the deadly blaze. Years after his leading role in
Plainsboro, Metzger was an active volunteer
fireman with the Springfield Township department.
Initially, rescuers had no reports of deaths or
injuries. Metzger’s wife and son were at a local
store when the fire broke out. However, a body
was found the next morning, and was positively
identified later in the day as Metzger. The cause
of the fire is still under investigation.
Tom Healey of the Plainsboro Fire Company
said Metzger was an active member of the fire
company from 1980 to 2002. Metzger moved to
Springfield Township 11 years ago.
Plainsboro Mayor Peter Cantu remembers
Metzger as “a really good guy and a long-term
contributor to the community.” The mayor, who
was president of the Plainsboro Fire Company
in the early 1980s, knew Metzger from his early
days as a volunteer. He kept in touch with Metzger throughout the 1990s, but lost touch with
him once he moved out of Plainsboro.
“I was really sorry to hear about his passing.
Larry not only served the community through
his position with the fire company, but in addition he helped with service for the township’s
communications equipment on a contractual
basis for a number of years,” Cantu said.
Metzger had a business based in Trenton
called Fire Service Communications. Metzger’s company provided, installed, and serviced equipment in Plainsboro and several other municipalities. He set up all the radio systems
used by Plainsboro’s police, fire, and emergency services.
Metzger also worked as a project manager
for Sprint, where he was involved with the company’s emergency communications division.
Healey said Metzger was raised in the Hamilton-Trenton area. He says Metzger led by example in a number of ways.
“He was a very serious chief and firefighter
— he set a very high standard for firefighting
and for professionalism. But he was also a guy
who enjoyed a good laugh. He was part of a
group of couples that played cards in the firehouse every Friday night for about six years.
Larry would tell jokes, and we would laugh forever,” Healey said.
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On Tuesday, June 12, the Plainsboro Fire
Company released a statement on Metzer’s
passing:
“We are deeply saddened to learn of the death
of our former chief, Larry Metzger. Larry was a
very active and deeply committed member of
the Plainsboro Fire Company. He was a good
friend to many of us. He was serious about his
responsibilities but also enjoyed a good laugh in
the firehouse. We send our heartfelt condolences to his wife and children, his family,
friends and all who knew him.”
After the fire started neighbors ran to Metzger’s house to see if they could help. Witnesses told police and firefighters that they were not
able to locate Metzger. According to local television reports, Metzger’s neighbors pushed four
cars — Metzger’s vintage Pontiac GTO’s — out
of the garage before they could catch fire, as
gasoline might have sparked an explosion.
Springfield firefighters struggled to extinguish the blaze quickly because there are no hydrants in the rural area where Metzger lived.
Water used to fight the fire had to be trucked in.
Police Updates
R
esidents and businesses that receive updates from the Plainsboro Police through
Nixle will need to register on the township’s
new website — PlainsboroNJ.com — to receive
future notifications.
Beginning July 15, the township will no
longer utilize Nixle. All notifications for road
closings, hazardous weather conditions, emergency situations, and other informational
broadcasts will be made through the township’s
new and enhanced website, which debuted in
May.
A statement released Tuesday, June 12, referenced one of the goals of Plainsboro’s new
website: “to expand the township’s ability to
communicate directly with citizens and businesses, especially during times of emergency,
by using various methods of electronic notification as well as social media such as Facebook
and Twitter.”
Registering on the website allows participants to receive emergency information via
text, E-mail, or phone.
16
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
The Graduating Class of 2012
High School North
High School North graduated 415
students:
A
Zakiya Abdul-Malik, Kyle Adair,
Alexander af Ursin, Omar Ahmed,
Rutuja M. Ajgaonkar, Mikeal Alexanian, Chris Allen, Marilyn Elizabeth
Allen, Milan Anand, Charles Anderson, Sivapradeepreddy Arikatla,
Alexander James Arotin, Caroline
Arriojas, Pavithra Arunachalam,
Tiffany J. Au, and Alyssa R. Avino.
B
Chad Bailer, Emma J. Bailey,
Christopher Banks, Ruxandra Barbu,
Autumn Patricia Bardachino, Jocelyn
Barrera, Krste Basukoski, Krasimir
K. Bebenov, Paul Bellefleur,
Nicholas W. Bellezza, Joseph C.
Bensky, Bryan A. Berger, Melissa A.
Bergman, Aditya Bhagavathi, Veer
Bhalla, Daniel H. Billek, Erin N.
Bonafede, Sid Borsadia, Kristina
Botros, Jake Allen Bowser, Rachel
Lindsey Boyer, Austin Bozowski,
Ryan I. Bradbrook, Devin R. Brakel,
Christopher F. Brancone, Chloe S.
M. Brown, Taylor L. Brown, Christopher J. Bryde, Benjamin Bugge, Martin Bulik, Marlena Grace Buonanno,
David R. Burke, and Sarah Marie
Bush.
C
Kelly M. Cahill, Charles Cai, Gregory J. Caldwell, Nana Akosua
Konadu Cann, Andrea Rosa Cardenas, Anthony Joseph Carnevale,
Keira Castellitto, Kelley Crystel
Cave, Jessica Lacey Chaiet, Michael
Samuel Chaiet, Vijay Kiran Challa,
Sean Chambers, Meena Chandrasekar, Benjamin Chang, Austin
Chen, Christy Lee Chen, Jaimie
Chen, Liang Chen, Sean ChenStowers, Nicholas Adam
Chiarolanzio, Matthew Chin, Alison
Chinsee, Shafqat Choudhury, Tina I.
Christmas, Debora I. Cifuentes
Lopez, Kelbyn Cipagauta Torralba,
Amanda Brooke Clayton, Nesta R.
Cole, Dennis Colon Jr., Christian
Cooper, Kyree Cooper, Anne E. Corbett, Keia Coulthard, James E.
Courtney Jr., Ana Nada Covic,
Madeleine M. Craig, and Jack Cunningham.
D
Victoria Dalcourt, Mohit Dandekar, Lucy Davis, Amanda DeLeo,
Bhishma Desai, Sheena Desai,
Meera Dhawan, Matthew R. Dignan,
Andrew Doidge, Olivia Halliday Donaldson, Audrey Dong, Sara Duffy,
and Mike Duplak.
E
Emma Ecclesto, and Marisa Edwards.
F
Christian A. Fajardo, Cameron
Farmer, Alicia Feng, Neil Ferguson,
Freddy James Fernandez, Kimberly
Figueroa, Traci Fischer, Molly Helen
Fisch-Friedman, Sean Flannery,
Kevin M. Foley, Lauren Foss, Nicole
Foss, and Jason R. Foster.
G
Amr M. Gabale, Eric Gan, Kenneth S. Garron, Jesse Adler Gatling,
Ayaz Ghesani, Ryan Robert Gianettino, Jacob Goldman, Jessica Goldman, Nina T. Golshan, Akash (Sunny) Gopalkrishnan, Sharan Gottumukkala, Tejasvi Gowda, Abby
Gross, Sarah Grust, Marissa Guo,
Hirsh Gupta, and Aleksandra G. Gut.
H
Mohit M. Hajarnis, Hal T. Hamilton
Jr., Andrew S. Hanna, Sophie
Hanstveit, Biya Haq, Zara Haq, Girija
Hariharan, Ilexuz Chaunti Harris,
Joshua Harris, Reinier John Herrera,
Samantha D. Higgins, Jennifer Y.
Hu, and Jillian Hurley.
I
Jennifer R. Ibanez.
J
Alexander James, Abinav Janakiraman, Samantha Jeng, Grace
Jeong, Kurt Johnson, Lauren R. Jolly, and Michael Connor Jorgensen.
K
Sushruth G. Kamath, Kristen Antoinette Kane, Pooja Harit Kapadia,
Molly Rose Karlin, Megan Kemp,
Brendan Kenavan, Craig Scott
Kenkelen II, Vikram Kesavabhotla,
Faizan A. Khan, Gersh Killian, Eugene Kim, Jonathan Kim, Samuel
Kim, Brianna King, Amanda Lee
Kiplinger, Justin Klepach, Alexa Kogan, Marc Kolber, Kevin Kong,
Stephen Tyler Konowitz, and Sravya
Kulakarni.
L
Sameer D. Lalwani, Victoria Lam,
Benjamin Lao, Tracie Lynn Lauver,
An Le, Andrew Lee, Ann Hyun-ah
Lee, Daniel H. Lee, Grace Y. Lee,
Jeremy Lee, Tiffany Lee, Kristina N.
Leung, Rachel Levy-Leavitt, Michael
Li, Frances Liang, Jack Liang, Paul
Ligeti, Stephen Lin, Epiphany
Samantha Lindsay, Christina
LiPuma, Casey Litwack, Maya
Litwin, Carly Lorenz, Greg LouisJacques, Wilson Lu, Malin Tabea
Ludwig, Robert Luttrell, and Claudia
Lynn.
M
Kathleen Marie Mackenzie, Benjamin Mair-Pratt, Ritika Maknoor,
Harleena Malhotra, Brandon Mann,
Jennifer Mannheim, John Mannion,
Payal Marathe, Dajachae H. Martin,
Jonathan R. Martinez, Samanda McDonald, Lauren McGinley, Emma
Lynn McGregor, Jonathan McGuire,
Kerry Elizabeth McNeilly, Gillian
Ren‚e McSpiritt, Asif M. Mehedi,
Naina Mehrotra, Alessa Meni, Kevin
Michieka, Michael Miele, Christina
Sierra Mills, Igor D. Milyokhin, Alisha
Mir, Gabriel Pentangeles Miranda,
Christopher Misa, Steven Modica,
Luiza De Abreu Monetti, Nilah Montgomery, and Maria Arevalo Moran.
N
Sachin Natarajan, Robert Ndubizu, Sarah Neiheiser, Elaina Ng,
Nicky Nguyen, Madison Nicieza,
Christine Niciforo, James Nitsch, and
Suraj Nyalakonda.
The Northern Knights
High School North held its graduation for 415
members of the Class of 2012 on Friday, June
15, at Sun National Bank Center.
Pictured, top, are Autumn Bardachino, left,
Alexander (Paul) Arotin, and Mikeal Alexanian.
Above left, Prathiba Shankar; right, AP U.S.
history teacher Greg Bugge hugs his son, Ben.
Pictured at left, Marissa Guo.
Photos by Mark Czajkowski
O
Crystal Naomi Ochoa, Shannon
O’Connor, Reba A. Oduro, Logan T.
Ohlson, Alberta M. Onyuka, Breta
Osei-Bonsu, Dakota Jean Osmun,
and Obafemi Owoh.
P
Sanjana Padmanabhan, Ravali
Paidipati, Sean Paul Pais, Elizabeth
Palena, Wenji Pan, Ekta Panigrahi,
Aditya Deepak Parikh, Christie L.
Pasternick, Adit Patel, Angelie D. Patel, Devan Patel, Anwesha Patnaik,
Christina May Patti, Mounica Paturu,
Monika Pawar, Alexandra Pechota,
Stephen Pemberton, Sai Madhuri
Pentyala, Scott Perdigao, Kaitlin
Elizabeth Perrine, Glenn Richard
Perrine Jr., Daniel Edward Peterkin,
Taylor Phelan, Ryan Pitcherello,
Jonathan Plummer, Kia Ponader, Allison Ponticiello, and Melissa
Puthenpura.
R
Lee Rabin, Petko Antonov Radionov, Eva Rahman, Akshat Rajan,
Shanya Ranasinghe, Harshdeep
Randhawa, Rohit Rao, Suraj Rao,
Aman Rastogi, Foram Raval,
Pranitha Rayapudi, Pratyusha
Rayavarapu, Pratusha Reddy, Anup
Adithya Regunathan, Saba Rehman,
Matthew C. Rexroad, Immanuel
Reyes, Melissa Isabel Reyes, Jordan
A. Richardson, Kelsea Rispress, Ricardo Ignacio Rodriquez, Sara Belle
Rosenthal, William D. Rothschild,
Kelly Ann Rowland, Dennis Roy, and
Corinne Zoe Ryklin.
Greg Caldwell, left, and Nana Konadu Cann
Nesta Cole with Superintendent Victoria Kniewel
S
Hafsa Saleem, Aditya Samarth,
David Sandberg, Luis Sapon, Amish
Sattaluri, Amrita Sawhney, Jonathan
Sawyer, Ernest Scarborough, Tim
Schobel, George Senter, Divya
Sethi, Heer Kaur Sethi, Amber Shah,
Pratibha Shankar, Sarah Shapiro,
Arnav Sharma, Giri Sharma, Nikith
Shekar, Shivangi Sheladia, Angela
Sheng, Nikhil R. Shenoy, Kevin Shi,
Kimberly Shiao, Rachel Seungyun
Shin, Kaitlin Shuell, Robert C. Sibley,
Ryan Siegler, Paul Silva Jr., Cally
Simmons-Edler, Agamroop Singh,
Hermeet Singh, Jaswin Singh, Brandon Small, Daniel Smigaj, Felicity
Janene Smith, Rose Ashley Smith,
Natalia Soler, Nicholas Soller, Akshay Eashwar Rao Somana, Estefani L. Sosa, Chloe Spetalnick, Ryan
Spoltore, Chinmay Sridhar, Aaron
Srikantha, Garima Srivastava, Wynston A. Stanback, Quamir K. Stanley,
Hiyab Stefanos, Kelsey Stevens,
Co-class presidents Ann Lee, left, and Sarah Grust
Valedictorian Payal Marathe
Senior speaker Vikram Kesavabhotla
Milan Anand and Principal Michael Zapicchi
JUNE 22, 2012
Virginia Haye Donovan, Ryan John
Dontas, and Alexis Simone Dulan.
T
Isaiah Edmonds, Ross Ellison, Alice Eltvedt, Rachel Sarah Epstein,
Brandon Joseph Epstein, Christopher J. Evans, and Joseph Chukwudubem Ezeigwe.
U
Ajit Unnam, Rahul Upadhyay,
Sraavani L. Uppalapati, and Akari
Ura.
High School South held its graduation for 405
members of the Class of 2012 on Friday,
June 15, at Sun National Bank Center.
Pictured above are Andrew Gonzalez, left,
Austin Gioseffi, and Ayanna Gill.
At right: Paul von Autenried.
V
Saavanth Velury, Varun
Viswanathan, Meghan Claire Vogt,
and Pavel Vypritskiy.
W
Julia Wainwright, Anna Watson,
Emily Weinberg, Yoshua M. WertsGalloway, Jamal K. Wilcox, Emily
Wu, Nancy Wu, and Victor Wu.
X
Fei (Felix) Xiao, Kevin Xu, and
Edward Hua Xue.
Y
Derek Matthew Yan, Tiffany
Yang, Vivian Yang, Jeffrey Yao,
Maria Yepes, Kevin Yeung, Meea
Yim, Qi W. Yu, Veronica Yu, and Brian D. Yuan.
Z
The Senior Concert Choir performs at the ceremony
Senior speaker Divya Ramesh, left, Valedictorian Peter Ku, and Rachel Epstein address the class
B
C
Jane Calder, Aidan Callahan,
Christopher Campbell, Victoria J.
Campbell, Christine Yi Jun Cao, Emily Olivia Carlson, Jordan Steven Carroll, Christian Castro, Karthik S.
Chandrasekaran, Prathik K. Chandrasekaran, Jamie K. Chau, Alvaro
Chavez, Daniel Hwa Chen, Michael
Yuhan Chen, Yutong Chen, Yvette
Chen, Anna Chicco, Victoria Korea
Cho, Mayank Vinay Chowla, Brandon Kaiyi Chu, Kevin James Cloyes,
Joshua Mark Cohen, Amanda Cornfeld, Timothy Crew, Nicole Elizabeth
Crossey, Veronica A. Cruz, Hixlayne
Cuetia-Rodriguez, and Nicolas Sebastian Cuitino.
D
Kelsey Elizabeth Daniels, Anthony John D’Antuono III, Sophia Dar,
Kavita Dav‚, Brandon Scott Davis,
Mark G. De La Rosa, Travis J. De La
Rosa, Heather Deamond, Joshua G.
Dean, Frank Anthony DeMilt, Yash
G. Desai, Erik Nicolas DeSanctis,
Raja Deshpande, Catherine Ding,
Timothy R. Dix, Kathleen Donnelly,
Michael Herelle, left, and Colin Hall
Virginia Donovan, left, and Truman Levine
G
Tiffany Anne Gagliardo, Rohan Z.
Ganesan, Bhargavi Ganesh, Nikhil
Gavai, Megan E. Gay, Brenay
Gaynor, Satya N. Ghanta, Nicole Giambagno, William German Gilbertson, Ayanna S. Gill, Alyssa Gilman,
Austin Gioseffi, William J. Goldin,
Andrew Gonzalez, Stephanie Gonzalez, Kaitlyn A. Grant, Michelle H.
Grbic, Avin Singh Grewal, Mengyi
Guo, and Udit Gupta.
H
Mohammad Habibian, Evan N.
Hackett, Cai Cai Hahn, Gabriella
Hahn, Colin Hall, Kyoung Won
(Cathy) Han, Shwetha Hariharan,
Niveda Harishankar, Pooja Harjani,
Danielle Elizabeth Harris, Graham
Harter, Varun Hegde, Michael
Herelle, Nevenn Herve-Samant,
Corey Hess, Janell Hill-Bridgett, Brian Hiscock, Chao-Feng (Norman)
Ho, Ruth Hochberg, Evan Hua,
Carissa E. Hunter, and Simon Sun
Hwang.
I
J
Jacob E. Bacher, Danielle N.
Balzano, Sharanya V. Banavar, Harsha Bandreddi, William R. Bastedo,
Robert D. Baxter, Sidharth Bedi,
Emily M. Betancourt, Alana Natasha
Bhatla, Ira Hitesh Bhatnagar, Drew
R. Bongiovanni, Erica Borsack, Laura Bortnick, Glen Bortolus, Karen
Bortolus, Andrew T. Brazel, Lara
Brazel, Samantha Bright, Katherine
Elizabeth Bromberg, Jason K.
Brown, Mark Brown-McMillin, Faizan
Butt, Timothy Buttner, and Craig S.
Byll.
Jeffrey Yu speaks to the seniors
Mariame Michelle Fadiga, Celina
F. Fanik, Isabel R. Farf n, Sana
Fasihuddin, Troy Alexander Fernandez, Megan Elizabeth Fitzpatrick,
Martin J. Flatley, Raisha M. Friedman, and Allison J. Frullo.
High School South
Maksim Abadjev, Arka Adhikari,
Erica Anne Aduya, Alina S.
Afinogenova, Karen A. Aguirre,
Tanaz Tanzeeba Ahmed, Ambiah
Akbar, Sherry Alejandro, Ariella Alter
, Allison Elizabeth Altiero, Carlos Eduardo Alvarez, Jennifer Tomoko Antane, Sarah Caitlin Antony, Gilbert M.
Appleby, Rebecca Arias, Jeanine
Rose Asay, Cody Lee Ashford, Rewa
Atre, and Aamer Juzer Attaar.
Heather Deamond, left, and Chris Evans
F
Pavel Ilyukhin, Sumanth Inaganti,
Alexandra Marie Infante, Maya Inozemtseva, and Kyle Inverso.
A
Min Jeh Lee
E
Barbara Zhan, Christie Yeeman
Zhang, Connie Zhang, Isadora Yixiu
Zhang, Kelvin Zhang, Kevin Zhou,
Manshi Zhu, and Charlotte Zodel.
High School South graduated 405
students:
Class advisor Bob Schurtz, left, and Ryan Dontas
17
Zachary H. Strong, Angel Sun,
Nicholas M. Sun, Jonathan Sung,
Sridevi Suresh, Swaroop Suri, Harinee Suthakar, and Zahid Syed.
Steven Taft, Akanksha Tak,
Hanaa’ Tameez, Alicia Tan, Eugene
Cai Tang, Margaret Tang, Yubei
Tang, Abishek Thatigutla, Anirudh
Thuppul, Brian Titen, Caitlin Tom, Diana Lorena Torres Pinzon, Kristine
Morgan Towell, Anh Dao Tran, Aditi
Trivedi, Jasmine Tsai, Sean Tsaur,
Thomas Tu, and Akosua Nyarko
Tuffuor.
The South Pirates
THE NEWS
Kevin Oneal Jackson, Idin Jafari,
Sarath Jaladi, Sai Abhigna Jampana,
Sahana S. Jayaraman, FNU Jeevitha, Christopher Jones, Griffin
Alexander Jones, Nathaniel Jones,
Stacey Jou, and Ethan Frederic
Julius.
K
Phillip Kellam, Caroline R. Kellner, Keri Helene Ketchmark, Sukeerthi Rangan Khadri, Amina
Sophia Khaliq, Avik Khaneja, Brett I.
Killoran, JungHo Kim, Su Ah Kim,
Sun Moon Kim, Wooseok Kim, Yui
Tiffany Kitamura, Sofie Elena Kolakowski, Kaito Kondo, Alexander S.
Kong, Naveen A. Kotecha, Priyal B.
Kotian, Daniel Kravets, Peter Lai Ku,
Johnathan C. Kuan, Sahil Kulgod,
Lauren Victoria Carry Kullmann,
Nishitha Kumar, and Viranch Kumar.
L
Akhil Ramesh Lakhwani, Nicole
Lam, Adeline S. Lee, Albert Lee, Amy
Victoria Lee, Grant W. Lee, Harington
Lee, Hui Yi Lee, Lily Lee, Min Jeh
Lee, and Peter J. Lee. Michelle Leon,
Michael P. Leong, Hope Catherine
Letson, Truman Martin Levine, Jeffrey W. Leyden, Daniel Lim, Kevin
Lim, Po-Yuan Lin, Jonathan Ling,
Jennifer Elizabeth Litzinger, Luqian
Liu, Michael Wang Liu, Alejandro
Lopez-Campos, Thomas J. Loury,
Molly Rebecca Ming Lowell, Kevin
Luo, and Shreya Luthra.
M
Cameron Brent MacArthur,
Steven C. MacDougall, Shannon
Maura MacKay, Alex Kunio Maeda,
Carlos K. Maldonado, Meghana
Malepati, Alexandra Malinina, Alex
Mangone, Soumya Manikonda, Rajashekar Manimaran, Nivruth Reddy
Maramreddy, Irina Z. Matos, Conor
Charles McCabe, Emma Aileen
McElligott, Ryan McGovern, Kathleen C. McMillen, Sean McNerney,
Brae E. McQuade, Macklin McQuade, Kushaal Mehta, Elizabeth
Victoria Mendez, Andrew S. Merves,
Justin I. Meydman, Cori Michibata,
David H Miller, Aranya Mishra, Aishwarya Misra, Gokhuldass Mohandas, Joy Mohnot, Stephanie Anne
Mortel, and Madalyn P. Mozenter.
Continued on following page
Need Photos? Photos from the graduation ceremonies are
available to family and friends by contacting the photographer, Mark Czajkowski, at [email protected]
18
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Class of 2012
Continued from preceding page
N
Matthew J. Nagler, Sana Nambiar, Radu C. Neagu, Aram NematiRad, Carrie Nestel, Christopher T.
Ng, Thai Hien Nguyen, Diana Ivaylova Nikolaeva, Kunal S. Nischal, and
Aidan Nuttall.
O
Thomas O’Connor, Dylan Ogden,
Joo Hyoung Reveca Oh, Timothy
Oh, Anupa S. Otiv, Devin Ou, Nora
Owens, and Khalfani Owens.
P
Rilwan Pade, Christina S. Paek,
John M. Pakulski Jr., Justin Parag,
Isaac Park, Aakash Patel, Anish
Jayant Patel, Markan Samir Patel,
Prachi Patel, Radha Patel, Raina
Patel, Sagar A. Patel, Shivam V. Patel, Vishvash Patel, Logan Paul,
Lucy Pei, Samara Per, Thomas Piccirello, Shirin Pillai, Janina Pirela,
Yohana Maribel Pisabaj, Jonathan I.
Plester, and Mariel A. Porfido.
Q
Emily Qian and Elaina M. Quiles.
R
Jennifer Sara Rabbino, Justin G.
Ragone, Divya Ramesh, Vijayeetha
Ramesh, Pranav Valluru Rao, Brandon Reyes, Isabelle L. Reyes, Keren
Ribansky, Ryan Daniel Richards,
Michael Rios, Grace S. Ro, Christopher Robinson, Amrin Singh Roda,
Joshua S. Rose, Teddie Rose,
Nechama Ross, Daphne Rossler,
Lauren G. Rubenstein, and Benjamin Ruta.
S
Brian Sabino, Brianne Allison
Sabino, Dashmeet Singh Sahi, Katelyn Marie Salerno, Alexander J.
Sandberg, Grace Olivia Sandford,
Benoy Kiran Sanil, Pranav Sarda,
Sarah Louise Sasson, Lauren
Michelle Savage, Jordan C.
Schwartz, William Schweizer,
Nathaniel Scott, Khelsea M. Sealy,
Nikki Eleanor Senopoulos, Arusha
N. Shah, Kaustav Shah, Noopur
Shah, Joshua Shanker, Deepak K.
Shanmuganandamurthy, Varun
Sharma, Varun Sharma, Nicole H. K.
Shaub, Daniel Shek, Daniel Sheldon, Mihir M. Sheth, Ryan P. Shoemaker, Priya Shroff, Vinitha V.
Simhadri, Emma J. Sivertsen, Tenri
Arianna Sjamsu, Christopher Skolka, Amy Slothower, Cathryn
Michelle Smart, Daniel R. Smith,
Travis Smith, Nathaniel So, Suleyman Svein Soukouna, Amelia R.
Spina, Carlos Stanley, Ryan Steiner,
Jacob Steinhauser, Hayley Stocker,
Jennifer K. Suh, Mahima Sukumar,
and Varsha Sundararaman.
T
Anna Tadej, Jeffrey Tam, Lydia
H. Tam, John Terebey, Jonathan K.
Ting, Peter A. Toensberg, Nissim
Torres, and Paul Trujillo.
U
Tiffany Alesa Urena, Amber Urso,
and Danielle Urso.
V
James Vancheri, Jaime Leonardo
Vargas, Karishma H. Vaswani,
Gabriela Vazquez, Garrett H. Vena,
Paul von Autenried, and Alen
Vukovi.
W
Victoria R. Wang, Muhammad
Warraich, Michael Washington,
Danielle Weeks, Kathryn Wembacher, Logan Willans, Ryan Witter,
Matthew N. Wittkopp, Melissa Wojahn, Dijon Wong, Samantha Lynn
Woo, Aaron Wu, Ariel Danielle Wu,
and Dorothy X. Wu.
X
Chao Xu, Jerry Xu, and Anna
Huafang Yang.
Y
Elizabeth Yang, Irene Yang, Jane
Yang, Julia H. Yang, Cathy Z. Yin,
Erin Young, Alexander Yu, Jeffrey
G. Yu, Jesse G. Yu, Ronald Yu, and
Jocelyn P. Yuen.
Z
Sylvan Zheng, Charles L. Zhou,
and Benjamin Zhu.
School News
Continued from page 1
committed to Cornell University.
Three students from South will attend UPenn, while Harvard and
Columbia will each get two WW-P
South graduates. One student from
South will attend Dartmouth and
one will attend Brown.
Six members of High School
North’s Class of 2012 will attend
Princeton, while class valedictorian Payal Marathe will attend Yale
(WW-P News, June 8). North’s
class of 2012 has two members
heading to Cornell; one student
from North will attend Barnard
College (Columbia) while another,
golf prodigy Charles Cai, will attend Dartmouth.
Among other top-ranked colleges, three members of South’s
Class of 2012 will attend each of
the following institutions: the University of California-Berkeley,
Johns Hopkins University, and the
University of Chicago. Duke,
Northwestern, Tufts University
and Georgia Tech will each receive
two High School South graduates.
Two High School North students are headed to Massachusetts
Institute of Technology. Another
four will attend Johns Hopkins
University. Additionally, two
North graduates will attend each of
the following schools: Emory University, the University of Michigan, and Tufts. One student from
North will attend Colgate University, one will attend Rice University in Houston, and one will go to
Georgetown University.
New York University remains a
popular pick for WW-P graduates
as 12 students from South and 11
students from North are headed for
Greenwich Village this fall.
Other top out-of-state destinations for South graduates this year
included Michigan (with eight students committed); Drexel University in Philadelphia (seven students) and the University of
Delaware (drawing six students
from South). Other popular choices
included Carnegie Mellon University, The George Washington University, Lehigh University and the
University of Rhode Island as each
institution drew five students from
High School South.
For High School North graduates, top choices out-of-state included Penn State University
(eight students), the University of
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
(seven students), the University of
Maryland-College Park (six stu-
From WW-P’s classes of
2012 at both high
schools, 13 graduates
will attend Princeton
and 158 will attend Rutgers in the fall.
dents) and Carnegie Mellon (four
students). Lehigh University,
Boston College, Indiana University, and the University of Southern
California each drew three students
from North. One student from High
School North will attend the U.S.
Naval Academy while another will
another will go to Universidad de
Los Andes in Bogota, Colombia.
Of note, the lists of graduating
students and colleges they will attend gets reported to the state Department of Education as a cumulative school district, not with the
breakdown for each West Windsor-Plainsboro high school.
School District to
Set IT Policy
A
t its meeting on Tuesday, June
26, the West Windsor-Plainsboro school board will present the
second reading of its policy regarding the acceptable use of computer
networks, computers, and resources at school. The policy outlined the purpose of the school district’s computer networks: “to assist in preparing students for success in life and work in the 21st
century by providing them with a
wide range of information and the
ability to communicate with people
from throughout the world.”
The policy also describes the
purpose of the school district’s information technology (referred to
as WW-P ITS) as being used to increase communications, enhance
productivity, and assist district employees in upgrading their skills
“through greater exchange of information with their peers,” the
policy states.
Areas covered in the full text of
the policy include responsibilities
of the school district in providing
IT, the district’s limitation of liability, parameters for system access,
parental notification and responsibility, students’ rights to free
speech, selection of materials, and
privacy issues.
Of note, one of the 20 “responsibilities” outlined in the school district’s responsibilities mentions cyberbullying. “Users will not send,
access, submit, publish, display, or
print over the WW-P ITS any
defamatory, inaccurate, abusive,
obscene, profane, threatening, offensive or illegal material. Cyberbullying is specifically prohibited,” the policy states.
— Rikki N. Massand
JUNE 22, 2012
West Windsor News
Continued from page 15
on the candidates’ backgrounds,”
the mayor said.
According to Hsueh, once a job
advertisement was placed online,
the township received 37 applications. Hsueh then created the committee to review resumes. “Usually, according to our form of government, the mayor can directly appoint somebody. But I decided
there should be more of a consensus with the selection,” Hsueh said.
Although he doesn’t consider
politics part of the process, with the
current nature of council meetings
and public comments, Hsueh was
careful to strike a balance with political party affiliation. “Actually I
created a committee where three of
the four committee members (other
than the mayor himself) happen to
be Republicans, as I found out after
I created the committee. But I trust
they have the best interests of this
town in mind when evaluating candidates,” the mayor says.
Hsueh says the committee
picked its top five candidates early
on in the process, and during the
first week of June the field was narrowed down to two. The mayor
said that the committee was to have
a unanimous decision, but Lupo
could not make it to one of the final
meetings on selections. Hsueh then
invited him to interview the two
candidates, and the mayor expects
that process to wrap up by Saturday, June 23, at the latest. He would
like to be in a position to make a
formal announcement at the next
Council meeting, on Monday, June
25. But Hsueh and Hary say there
remains a small possibility that the
search would not wrap up by then.
Morgan’s Petition
F
ormer West Windsor Councilman Charles Morgan has taken
up a new crusade in the township
after leaving his post of 12 years
last December. Although Morgan’s permanent address is now in
Florida he retains a home at the Elements, where he recently went
door-to-door to tell registered voters and his former neighbors about
a petition — one that aims at
avenging the lawsuits against Mayor Hsueh that Morgan lost in court
over the past year.
The petition would endorse an
amendment to the township code
requiring the mayor to provide “a
direct and timely written response
when a council member requests a
report about a township matter.”
This stems from Morgan’s two unsuccessful lawsuits against Mayor
Hsueh for failure to provide him
with responses when he requested
information. The petition outlines
proposed change as follows:
“The mayor shall respond to
such request within a reasonable
period of time, not to exceed thirty
(30) days without the written permission of the requesting Council
member, by providing a written report to such Council member with
copies to the Township Clerk and
the other Council members. The
Mayor’s written report shall restate
the request made by such Council
member and shall be limited to answering the specific requests made
by the Council member. Nothing
contained herein shall prohibit the
Mayor from delegating to staff
and/or appropriate professionals
the research and preparation of answers for the Mayor to include in
the Mayor’s report to the Council
member. ‘Written’ includes elec-
tronic communications such as
email and attachments to email,”
the petition states.
But
Township
Attorney
Michael W. Herbert says this proposed amendment may be preempted by state law.
“Once the petition has the required number of signatures to appear on the ballot in the fall, the potential for a legal challenge, in principle, exists. A judge would have to
determine whether or not the proposed change (to township code) is
copasetic,” Herbert said.
Herbert, who Morgan recently
targeted in letters and in public
comments during Council meet-
‘This is not about me
and Hsueh, it’s about
fixing a problem that
has existed for more
than a decade and will
be a problem with the
next mayor.’
ings, says the mayor’s duties are
clearly outlined and abided by, and
all of Council’s questions are addressed by the administration.
“This amendment asks for a procedure that’s already being followed — Council members have
questions and the administration
answers those questions. If not the
council can bring the issue forward
and say their questions had not
been answered. But we haven’t
heard council members saying
their questions haven’t been answered,” he said.
Herbert added that the lawsuits
against Hsueh that Morgan lost
should not be a basis for the amendment. “The courts have already
found that, Mr. Morgan, you got
your answers,” he said.
However Morgan isn’t alone in
this endeavor. The petition lists
five West Windsor residents who
are responsible for its circulation
and filing: Nitin Shah, Paul Murphy, Andrew Hersh, James Solloway, and Deborah Hepler. Solloway and Hepler have each made
their presence known at council
meetings in the last six months,
speaking up about West Windsor’s
government and apparent shortcomings that they see.
Morgan and the group will file
the petition with Township Clerk
Sharon Young. Her office then
needs to verify that the petition
shows approval from 10 percent of
the voter turnout at the last election, calling for at least 456 signatures.
Morgan says once that happens
the question of “whether the mayor
can continue to be allowed to ignore council” will go on the ballot.
“After one week we obtained
more than 300 signatures. Very
few people have refused to sign the
petition — perhaps one person in
25,” Morgan wrote in an E-mail.
Besides the Elements and other
West Windsor neighborhoods,
Morgan collected signatures from
residents by standing outside the
West Windsor municipal complex
on Thursday, May 24, during and
after the special town hall held to
discuss the proposed solar field at
Mercer County Community College. In the process of soliciting
signatures, Morgan took a renewed
interest in hearing from residents in
general. He says people are surprised to learn that it is illegal for
council members to talk to the
township staff without the permission of the mayor.
“Residents are surprised to learn
THE NEWS
that council members must go
through the mayor or the administrator for information, and they’re
also surprised to hear that the mayor and/or the administrator will
refuse to provide answers to questions posed by council members,”
said Morgan.
Morgan also notes that people in
West Windsor are surprised to
learn that, in 1999, Mayor Hsueh
voted to subpoena records from
Mayor Carole Carson “because he
was not getting information from
the mayor that he felt he needed as
council president.” Morgan contends that the real problem has
nothing to do with the particular
person who is mayor or the people
who are on council.
“If a council member cannot get
the information he needs to make
an informed vote, then something
is seriously wrong,” he says.
“I am confident they will pass it.
The subpoena in 1999 from Hsueh
to Carson shows that this is not
about me and Hsueh, it’s about fixing a problem that has existed for
more than a decade and will be a
problem with the next mayor, whoever that might be. When the voters
approve the change, history will no
longer repeat itself in the future —
and we should have a lot less controversy,” Morgan writes.
Hsueh has a different take on the
past. “Morgan’s interpretation was
totally incorrect. At that 1999
meeting I supported the efforts of
another councilmember because
there was a total absence of background information on an open
space purchase. But I followed up
with Mayor Carson and got all the
information for Council members
to review, and we moved on it right
away. At the time and ever since, I
never wanted to create any legal issues in that regard,” he said.
Girls K-12 Ş Co-ed Preschool/JK
STUART CONGRATULATES OUR WINNERS IN THE
2012 NATIONAL STEM VIDEO GAME CHALLENGE!
Grade 8 Stuart Girls Julia Weingaertner, Madeleine Lapuerta, Emma Froehlich, Sarah
Lippman, and Chloe Mario won for designing and programming original math video games.
Limited space available in high school for fall 2012.
“They were the only girls amid the 28 winning students from throughout the country —
showing that the girl power of the Stuart School is a force to be reckoned with.”
Join Us for a Tuesday Tour
- Princeton Packet, May 25, 2012
“These games [by Stuart Girls] are better than 90 percent of the educational games in the app
store ... that the winners of this particular challenge were all girls makes me feel like we’re
headed in the right direction for getting more girls involved in future STEM careers.”
THINK. LEAD. CHANGE.
- wired.com, May 22, 2012
19
NMSGDƥ[email protected]@BGLNMSG
or call 609-921-2330 x235
STUART Country Day School of the Sacred Heart
[email protected]@CŞ/QHMBDSNMŞ[email protected]
20
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
DAY-BY-DAY IN WW-P
For more event listings visit www.wwpinfo.com. For timely updates,
follow wwpinfo at Twitter and on
Facebook. Before attending an
event, call or check the website
before leaving home. Want to list
an event? Submit details and photos to [email protected]
Friday
June 22
Once Upon a Mattress, Princeton
Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-759-0379. www.princetonfestival.org.
Musical.
$45. 8 p.m.
A Little Night Music, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org.
Sondheim
musical set on a country estate in
Sweden. $25. 8 p.m.
Our Town, Somerset Valley Players, 689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough, 908-369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Drama by Thornton
Wilder. $15. 8 p.m.
For Families
Movie Night, PNC Bank, Plainsboro Municipal Complex, 641
Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro,
609-897-1401. Balloon artist, magician, music by John and Carm,
popcorn, and screening of “Kung
Fu Panda 2.” Free. 7:30 p.m.
Summer Block Party, JaZams,
Palmer Square West, Princeton,
609-924-TOYS.
www.palmersquare.com. Crafts, games, food,
activities, and music. Screening of
“The Princess Bride” begins at
dusk on the green. Participants include Arts Council of Princeton,
Kitchen Kapers, Olsson’s Fine
Foods, Princeton Public Library,
Stone Soup Circus, Thomas
Sweet Chocolate, Winberie’s
Restaurant, and more. Free admission. Food available. 6 to 8
p.m.
On Stage
Jeffrey, Kelsey Theater, Mercer
County Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net. Celebrate the
10th anniversary of the James
Tolin Memorial Fund with Paul
Rudnick’s romantic comedy about
a gay actor. $25. For mature audiences. Pre-show reception and
silent auction. 7 p.m.
Desperate Affection, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. A dark, suspenseful comedy
about an unhappy New York actress in love with a hit man. $29.50
to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m.
The Music Man, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com.
Musical.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
My Fair Lady, Plays-in-the-Park,
Capestro Theater, Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South, Edison, 732548-2884. www.playsinthepark.com. Musical. Ethan Daniel Levy
of Plainsboro is in the ensemble.
Bring a chair. $7. Performance is
audio described. 8:30 p.m.
Film
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “The
Clean Bin Project,” a documentary
about a couple’s friendly competition to live waste-free for an entire
year. 7 p.m.
Dancing
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m.
Public Speaking
Meeting, Successfully Speak Up
Toastmasters, Pellettieri, Rabstein, & Altman, 100 Nassau Park
Boulevard, Suite 111, West Windsor, 732-631-0114. ssu.freetoasthost.ws. Members deliver
and evaluate prepared and impromptu speeches. 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Live Music
Courtyard Concert, Grounds For
Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way,
Hamilton, 609-586-0616. The
VooDudes bring the funk of roots
music to GFS after six recording
and tours of the United States,
Canada, Greece, and Switzerland
for more than 20 years. Register.
$12. Rain or shine. 7:30 p.m.
Anker, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771. 7:30 p.m.
Romantic Comedy: The James Tolin Memorial Fund celebrates its 10th anniversary
with a production of ‘Jeffrey’ at Kelsey Theater, Friday to Sunday, June 22 to 24.
Sound Bites, Arts Council of
Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.
Andrea Brachfeld and Phoenix Rising. $10. 8 p.m.
Open Mic Night, Infini-T Cafe, 4
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609712-3921. Hosted by Manish
Anand of West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Tom Trovas Group, Pure Restaurant and Lounge, 3499 Route 1
South, West Windsor, 609-9190770. www.pureprinceton.com.
9:30 p.m.
World Music
Prerna
School
of
Dance,
Evenings of Elegance, 276 West
Upper Ferry Road, Ewing, 908581-7138.
www.eveningsofelegance.com. South Asian dance
musical featuring dancers from
ages five to 40 plus. $25 to $100.
6:30 p.m.
Comedy
Orlando Baxter and Steve
Lazarus, Catch a Rising Star,
Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie
Center, West Windsor, 609-9878018. www.catcharisingstar.com.
Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Food & Dining
Restaurant Supported Agriculture Dinner Series, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.trepiani.com. Three
course farm to table dinner. Register. $29. 5 p.m.
Farm Markets
Farmers’ Market, Downtown
Hightstown, Memorial Park, Main
Street.
www.downtownhightstown.org. Produce, flowers, baked
goods, music, and area vendors.
Paddle boat rides in Peddie Lake
available. 4 to 8 p.m.
Wellness
Meditation Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. www.mcl.org. Stretching
and relaxation techniques with
Ann Kerr. Register. 2:30 to 3:30
p.m.
Summer Solstice Retreat, One
Yoga Center, Private home in
South Jersey, 609-918-0963.
www.oneyogacenter.net. Continues Saturday, June 23, 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.; and Sunday, June 24, 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. $299 includes all course
materials, supplies, and meals. 6
to 9 p.m.
Bhakti Yoga, Bhagavad Gita
Studies, 15 West Kincaid Drive,
West Windsor, 848-219-9383.
Free. 7:30 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Art Exhibit, Plainsboro Preserve,
80 Scotts Corner Road, Plainsboro,
609-897-9400.
www.njaudubon.org. “Species on the
Edge,” an art and essay contest by
fifth grade students, is on view to
July 8. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Pontoon Boat Nature Tour, Mercer County Park Commission,
Lake Mercer, Mercer County Park
Marina, West Windsor, 609-883-
6606.
www.mercercounty.org.
Tour includes history of the lake
and up-close encounters with
wildflowers, beaver lodges, basking turtles, and waterfowl. Binoculars provided. Ticket sales begin at
noon. Weather-permitting. $5 to
$7. 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Singles
Divorce Recovery Program,
Princeton Church of Christ, 33
River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889.
www.princetonchurchofchrist.com. Non-denominational
support group for men and
women. Free. 7:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Brown Bag Discussion, Princeton Senior Resource Center,
Suzanne Patterson Building, 45
Stockton Street, 609-924-7108.
www.princetonsenior.org.
“Eat
Well to Feel Better” presented by
Suzanne Rose of Princeton Regional Health Department. Bring
your lunch. Register. Free. Noon.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com.
Portland.
$11 to $27. 7:05 p.m.
Sports for Causes
Just for Joey Golf Outing, Eden
Institute Foundation, Heron
Glen Golf Course, Ringoes, 609987-0099. www.justforjoey.org.
Annual event benefits children
and adults with autism. Green
fees, cart, and refreshments included. Register. $155. 11 a.m.
Saturday
June 23
On Stage
CALL FOR A TOUR NOW
Programs for 18 months - 6 years
•
•
•
•
•
Math
Language Skills
Art
Foreign Language
Gym
Summer Camps
•
•
•
•
•
Weekly/Dally Schedule
Water Play
Minisports
Special Events
Academic Enrichment
•
•
•
•
Kindergarten Program
Summer Enrichment
Soccer
More
FREE
Registration
$50 value Coupon
Coupon expires July 6
PRINCETON JCT. • 609-275-8666
59 Cranbury Road, Near Train Station
Established 1998
Member, American Montessori Society
www.NHMontessori.org
Jeffrey, Kelsey Theater, Mercer
County Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net. Celebrate the
10th anniversary of the James
Tolin Memorial Fund with Paul
Rudnick’s romantic comedy about
a gay actor. $25. For mature audiences. Pre-show reception and
silent auction. 7 p.m.
Desperate Affection, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. A dark, suspenseful comedy
about an unhappy New York actress in love with a hit man. $29.50
to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m.
The Music Man, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com.
Musical.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent recommended. Picnics welcome. Food
available. $15. 7:30 p.m.
JUNE 22, 2012
Once Upon a Mattress, Princeton
Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-759-0379. www.princetonfestival.org.
Musical.
$45. 8 p.m.
A Little Night Music, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org.
Sondheim
musical set on a country estate in
Sweden. $25. 8 p.m.
Our Town, Somerset Valley Players, 689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough, 908-369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Drama by Thornton
Wilder. $15. 8 p.m.
My Fair Lady, Plays-in-the-Park,
Capestro Theater, Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South, Edison, 732548-2884. www.playsinthepark.com. Musical. Ethan Daniel Levy
of Plainsboro is in the ensemble.
Bring a chair. $7. Donations of
canned and packaged goods accepted for Middlesex County’s
food pantry. 8:30 p.m.
Family Theater
Disney’s The Aristocats Kids,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. www.dpacatoat.com. $5. Seat cushions and insect
repellent are recommended. 11
a.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Trenton Artists
Workshop Association, Ellarslie
Mansion, Trenton, 609-392-0766.
www.tawa-nj.org. First day for
“Trenton Makes,” an exhibit of
works by Mel Leipzig, Jon Naar,
Aubrey J. Kauffman, and others.
On view to September 1. A concurrent exhibit opens Tuesday,
July 31, at the Prince Street
Gallery in New York City, and runs
through August 18. 1 to 4 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Princeton Art
Gallery, 20 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-937-5089. Meet
Xinle Ma, a senior art advisor of
the Chinese Cultural Foundation,
in conjunction with his exhibit.
Trained in both Chinese brush
painting and Western art, Xinle focuses on painting horses and
tigers to raise the awareness of
environmental protection. 2 to 5
p.m.
Dancing
Dance Evening, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, 1 Monument Drive,
Princeton, 908-359-4837. www.princetoncountrydancers.org.
Calling by Kim Roberts. Music by
Perpetual eMotion. Experienced
dancers from 3 to 6 p.m. Potluck at
6 p.m. Dancing for all from 8 to 11
p.m. $10 to $22. 3 p.m.
California Mix, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Universalist Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill Road,
Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org.
West
coast swing lessons followed by
open dancing. $12. No partner
needed. 7 p.m.
8771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7:30 p.m.
15 Keys, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road,
Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic duo. 8 to
10 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
And the Beat Goes On Music Series, West Windsor Arts Council, Nassau Park Pavilion, West
Windsor, 609-716-1931. www.westwindsorarts.org. Sinfonietta
Nova, an orchestra based in West
Windsor, with classical and modern music. Bring chairs or blankets. Free. 7 p.m. See story.
Pop Music
Annual Show, Brothers in Harmony, Robbinsville High School,
155 Robbinsville Edinburg Road,
Robbinsville,
732-940-0224.
www.brothersinharmony.org.
“Musical Masterpiece XIX” presented by the 65-voice barbershop chorus and the Ringmasters
from Stockholm, Sweden. $15 to
$30. 1 p.m.
Good Causes
Yard Sale, Res-Q-Pets, 2749 Nottingham Way, Mercerville, 609944-8866.
www.resqpets.org.
Benefit for animal rescue organization that rescues and rehomes
cats and dogs in the Mercer County region. Clothing, accessories,
toys, home decor, kitchen utensils, pet supplies, books, plants,
artwork, and more. 9 a.m. to 3
p.m.
Rockfest, City of Angels, Mercer
County Park, West Windsor, 215321-6399. www.cityofangelsnj.org. Performers include Anonymity Project, Soul Fire, Stellar, and
Out of the Red. Non-profit organization in Hamilton that helps families and young people recover
from substance addiction. Rain or
shine. Car, truck, and motorcycle
show, strolling magician Matt
Schick, and children’s games.
Free admission. Noon to 7:30
p.m.
Pins 4 Paws Bowl A Thon, Paw
Prints 4 Pets, Linden Lanes, 741
North Stiles Street, Linden, 800582-5979. www.njspca.org. Benefit for New Jersey SPCA, an organization to protect animals in New
Jersey from cruelty and neglect.
Two time slots. Register. [email protected] for
information. $20 to $30. 4 and 7
p.m.
Frank Sinatra Night, ItalianAmerican Heritage Center, 2421
Liberty Street, Hamilton, 609-6317544.
www.italianamericanfestival.com. Benefit for Boys &
Girls Town of Italy. $40. 7 p.m.
Fairs & Festivals
Trenton Heritage Days Festival,
Mill Hill Park, Trenton, 609-7771771. www.trentonnj.org. Sarah
Dash and her band headline the
festival at 5:30 p.m. Outdoor heritage festival with food, music, children’s rides, face painters, storytellers, and marionette theater.
Free. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
my Lawrence of West Windsor and her colleagues, Maria
Tegzes and Geoffrey Burleson,
will be performing a concert that
has been in the making for 10
years. Lawrence and Tegzes were
roommates at the New England
Conservatory of Music. Burleson, a piano player, was Tegzes’
future husband. It took that long
for them to be in the same country
at the same time, find a venue, and
find a cause to benefit from their
music. “I was in Europe for eight
years, and they were busy,” says
Lawrence. They will perform at
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church,
177 Princeton-Hightstown Road,
West Windsor, on Sunday, June
24, at 3 p.m. The concert will benefit Make Some Noise Cure Kids
Cancer Foundation.
Lawrence, a soprano, has lived
in West Windsor for six years.
Her husband, Andrew Schaeffer,
is a copyright attorney. Their
daughter, Sara, 6, is a rising first
grader at Dutch Neck School.
Born in Pennsylvania, Lawrence was raised in New Orleans.
She has played the flute since
fourth grade. In high school she
became interested in musical theater and began taking voice
lessons and entering competitions. Lawrence teaches singing
and flute privately and is a member of the preferred private teachers of the West Windsor-Plainsboro School District.
She graduated from Florida
State University with a bachelor’s
degree in music and placed first in
the Metropolitan Opera National
competition for the Gulf coast region. She was also a semi-finalist
in Vienna’s Belvedere International competition. She received a
master’s in music from the New
England Conservatory of Music.
Soprano: Amy Lawrence
played Susanna in ‘The
Marriage of Figaro.’
A frequent guest soloist with
the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, she has played in principal opera houses in Norway, Germany, Switzerland, New Orleans,
and New York City. She made
her Carnegie Hall debut in the
American premiere of Goossens’
re-orchestration of Handel’s
Messiah. Lawrence is known for
her portrayals of Mozart’s leading ladies including Konstanze
(The Abduction from the
Seraglio), Susanna (The Marriage of Figaro), Madame Herz
(The Impressario), and Queen of
the Night (The Magic Flute).
Lawrence became acquainted
with the Make Some Noise: Cure
Kids Cancer Foundation when
her daughter’s swim team at Peddie School had a fundraiser. She
then became acquainted with the
music director at Prince of Peace
Church. “They were trying to get
more musical events and we were
looking for a venue,” says
Lawrence.
The organization, established
by an 11-year-old who had a malignant bone tumor, funds pediatric cancer research. (He is now
13). The designation of funds to
various research facilities is cancer-specific and based on the
foundation’s annual evaluation of
the latest research.
Burleson
has
performed
throughout Europe and North
America and is active as a recitalist, concerto soloist, chamber musician, and jazz performer. He is
also an associate professor of music and director of piano studies at
Hunter College and a professor of
piano at Princeton University.
Tegzes has presented cabaret performances in the United States,
Spain, England, and Switzerland.
The couple lives on Long Island.
The program includes classical
works; solo sets of Saint-Saens,
Sietes Canciones Populares by
Manuel de Falla, Richard
Strauss’ “Four Last Songs,” Eastern European Folksongs, and the
Trio from Mozart’s “The Impressario.”
— Lynn Miller
Benefit Concert, Make Some
Noise Cure Kids Cancer Foundation, Prince of Peace Church,
177 Princeton-Hightstown Road,
West Windsor. Sunday, June 24,
3 p.m. Suggested donation is $10.
609-647-4393
or
www.makenoise4kids.org.
JUNCTION BARBER SHOP
33 Princeton-Hightstown Rd Princeton Jct NJ 08550
Faith
Heartlands Hayride Band, WDVR-FM, Cultural Center, 522
Route 604, Sergeantsville, 609397-1620.
www.wdvrfm.org.
Country music show. Food available at 4:30 p.m. $12. 6 to 8 p.m.
Book Award and Lecture, Princeton Theological Seminary, Erdman Center, 20 Library Place,
Princeton, 609-497-7963. www.ptsem.edu. “Identity, Culture, and
Theology” presented by Nestor
Medina, assistant professor of
theology and culture at Regency
University. He will received the annual book prize for “Mestizaje:
(Re)mapping Race, Culture, and
Faith.” Reception follows the talk.
Free. 7 p.m.
Zero Hours, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-716-
Continued on following page
Live Music
A
Orlando Baxter and Steve
Lazarus, Catch a Rising Star,
Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie
Center, West Windsor, 609-9878018. www.catcharisingstar.com.
Register. $21.50. 7:30 and 9:30
p.m.
Opera New Jersey, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Young artists
in residence present highlights
from the summer season. The two
main stage productions at McCarter Theater include Verdi’s “Il
Trovatore” and Gilbert and Sullivan’s “H.M.S. Pinafore.” 3 p.m.
21
A WW Resident
Sings For Kids
Cancer Benefit
Comedy
Classical Music
Gianni Schicchi and Francesca
da Rimini, Princeton Festival,
Mccarter Theater, Princeton, 609759-0379.
www.princetonfestival.org. Opera double bill. $30
to $125. 8 p.m.
THE NEWS
Traditional Barber Shop
Serving Our Neighbors Since 1992
Tuesday - Friday 10am - 6pm • Saturday 8:30am - 4pm
No appointment - Walk-in service
609-799-8554 • junctionbarbershop.com
22
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Fireworks, Festivals, Music
T
he celebrations for the 236th
anniversary of the United State
of American begin early this year.
One of the first events is the eighth
annual Mercer County Freedom
Festival on Saturday, June 30, at
Mercer County Park in West
Windsor form 3 to 11 p.m. Admission is free.
“The Freedom Festival gets better each year, with help from our
lead sponsor, WPST, and we are so
pleased that it has become an annual attraction,” said Brian Hughes,
Mercer County executive. “Mercer
County Park is more popular than
ever and I invite everyone to come
to this free family event.”
The event features food, beer
and wine gardens, craft vendors,
live music, tethered hot-air balloon
rides, games, water rides, a mechanical bull, a children’s area with
inflatable rides, and more. There is
a fireworks display at nightfall.
The concert lineup starts at 3
p.m. with the Little Mac & the People’s Champ, Liquid A at 5:30 p.m.
followed by The Amish Outlaws at
7:30 p.m., and Incognito immediately after the fireworks.
Some of the numerous festivities in the area include:
Sunday, June 24
Concert
and
Fireworks,
Hopewell Valley Veterans Association, Alliger Park, 203 Washington Crossing Pennington Road,
Titusville. Sunday, June 24, 7:30
p.m. Concert by the 78th Army
Band followed by fireworks display. A variety of music including
military songs and traditional concert pieces. Alcohol is prohibited.
Carpooling is recommended. Free.
www.hopewellvalleyveterans.org.
Thursday, June 28
Fireworks,
Montgomery
Township, Montgomery High
School. Thursday, June 28, 6 p.m.
Music by the Funkin Soulnuts
band. Food available. Activities for
children. Fireworks at dusk. Raindate is Wednesday, July 11. Visit
website to purchase a parking pass.
No alcohol or pets. 347-385-5578
or www.montgomeryfireworks.com.
Friday, June 29
Friday Night Fireworks, New
Hope Chamber, New Hope and
Lambertville. Friday, June 29, 5
p.m. Happy hours, dining, shopping, live music, and celebrity
guests in conjunction with fireworks over the Delaware River at
9:30 p.m. Donations invited. Inclement weather cancels. 215-8629990
or
www.newhopeLambertvillefireworks.com.
Stars n’ Stripes, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville. Friday, June 29,
7:30 p.m. Musical revue features
America’s greatest composers.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flash-
JUNE 23
Continued from preceding page
Farm Markets
West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, Vaughn Drive Parking Lot, Princeton Junction Train
Station, 609-933-4452. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org.
Produce, flowers, baked goods,
and music. Music by Max McGuire.
Blood pressure screenings and
massages. Cooking demo by
Dorothy Mullen, founder of the
Suppers Program. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
light, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15.
Through July 1. 267-885-9857 or
www.dpacatoat.com.
Saturday, June 30
Freedom Festival, Mercer
County, Mercer County Park,
West Windsor. Saturday, June 30,
3 to 11 p.m. Food, games, beer and
wine gardens, craft vendors, tethered hot-air balloon rides, water
rides, mechanical bull rides,
games, and inflatable rides. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Band performances by Amish Outlaws at 7:30
p.m., and Incognito after the fireworks. Free admission. 609-4487107
or
www.wpst.com/freedomfestival.
Sunday, July 1
Independence Day Celebration, City of New Brunswick,
Boyd Park, banks of the Raritan.
Sunday, July 1, 7 p.m. Rumba Con
Son concert. Fireworks at 9:15
p.m. thecityofnewbrunswick.org.
Monday, July 2
Peace is Patriotic, Coalition
for Peace Action, Monument
Park, Route 206 and Nassau Street,
Princeton. Monday, July 2, 6 p.m.
Bring a picnic lunch, lawn chair,
and blanket. Music by the Solidarity Singers of the New Jersey Industrial Union Council. Honorees include Kip Cherry, Princeton Area
Interfaith Anti-Torture Group; Jeffrey Laurenti, former executive director of the UN Association of the
United States; and Edward Anthony Slater Jr., participant in Occupy
Trenton. Ending in time for the
Spirit of Princeton fireworks. 609924-5022
or
www.peacecoalition.org.
Fireworks,
Spirit
of
Princeton, Princeton Stadium.
Monday, July 2, 7 p.m. Independence Day celebration. Picnics
welcome. Bring blankets or chairs.
No alcoholic beverages. 609-6834008 or www.spiritofprinceton.homestead.com.
Tuesday, July 3
Fireworks, East Windsor
Township. Tuesday, July 3, 6 p.m.
Music by Jerry Rife’s Rhythm
Kings Dixieland Jazz Band, a six
piece band from the Delaware Valley region, and Trenton Brass
Quintet Plus One, a six piece ensemble from Central Jersey. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Raindate is Saturday, July 7. www.eastwindsor.nj.us.
Fireworks, Hamilton Township, Veterans Park, Hamilton.
Tuesday, July 3, 7 p.m. Music by
Jimmy and the Parrots. Fireworks
at dusk. Raindate is Sunday, July 5.
609-890-4028
or
www.hamiltonnj.com.
Ocean Grove Summer Band,
Ocean Grove Camp Meeting As-
Blood Drive
American Red Cross, Central Jersey Donor Center, 707 Alexander
Road, West Windsor, 800-4483543. www.redcrossblood.org. 7
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wellness
Prenatal Yoga, Yoga Above, 80
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609613-1378. $25. 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.
Yoga and Meditation Class, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, West Windsor, 732-4856200. Bring a yoga mat. Register.
Free. 10:30 a.m.
Before the Fireworks: The Amish Outlaws perform at Freedom Fest in Mercer
County Park on Saturday, June 30, at 7:30 p.m.
sociation, 54 Pitman Avenue,
Ocean Grove. Tuesday, July 3, 8
p.m. “Happy Birthday, America”
concert features the 1812 Overture,
highlights from “Jersey Boys” and
“The Music Man,” Sousa marches,
and a patriotic sing-along. Harry D.
Eichhorn conducts. Free will donations. 800-590-4064 or www.oceangrove.org.
Wednesday, July 4
Independence Day, postal and
bank holiday.
Independence Day Parade,
Ewing Township, Parkside Avenue, Ewing, 609-883-2900. ewingnj.org. Tone Rangers Band perform. The parade ends at the high
school. 10 a.m.
Celebrating America’s Independence Day, Princeton Battlefield State Park, 500 Mercer
Road, Princeton. Monday, July 4,
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Revolutionary
War reenactment soldiers and second Continental Artillery demonstrate drill, artillery, and flintlock
muskets. Period games for all ages.
Tour the Thomas Clarke House
and the Arms of the Revolution exhibit. Bring a picnic lunch, hike on
the trails. No barbecues or alcohol.
Free. 609-921-0074.
Old-Fashioned Celebration,
Fonthill Museum, East Court
Street
and
Swamp
Road,
Doylestown. Wednesday, July 4,
Noon to 5 p.m. Recreation of an
early 20th century July Fourth celebration including a decorated bike
parade, a town ball game (19th century baseball), a watermelon eating
contest, antique bicycle display,
old-time games, and live music. $4.
Bring your own picnic or purchase
from vendors. No dogs allowed.
Heavy rain cancels event. 215-3489461 or www.mercermuseum.org.
Integrative Nutrition, Integral Yoga of Princeton, 613 Ridge Road,
Monmouth Junction, 732-2742410. Presented by Manu. Register. 1 p.m.
T’ai Chi Ch’uan, Todd Tieger,
Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren,
Plainsboro, 609-439-8656. All levels. Free. 10 a.m.
History
Stony Brook Walking Tour, Historical Society of Princeton, Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker
Road, Princeton, 609-921-6748.
Follow a portion of the trail that
Washington took from Trenton to
Celebrate Independence Day,
Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46
Yard Road, Pennington. Wednesday, July 4, Noon. Bring a picnic
basket. Wine by the glass or bottle;
brick oven pizza, and cheese platters are available. Live music from
6 to 9 p.m. 609-737-4465 or www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com.
Independence Day, Middlesex
County Cultural Commission,
East Jersey Olde Towne Village,
1050 River Road, Piscataway.
Wednesday, July 4, 2 p.m. Meet
Abraham Lincoln portrayed by
Bob Gleason of the American Historical Theater. Register. Free.
732-745-3030 or www.cultureheritage.org.
Celebration, Monroe Township Cultural Arts Commission,
Thompson Park, Monroe. Wednesday, July 4, 5 p.m. Music and vendors. Fireworks at dusk. Free. 732521-2111 or www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com.
July 4 Jubilee, Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton.
Wednesday, July 4, Noon to 3 p.m.
Sign the Declaration of Independence, commemorate the 13
colonies at a bell ringing ceremony, demonstrations of colonial life,
meet George Washington, live music, refreshments, and more. 609924-8144 or www.morven.org.
Celebratory Organ Concert,
Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association, 54 Pitman Avenue,
Ocean Grove. Wednesday, July 4,
7:30 p.m. “Storms and Thunder,
Stars and Pipes” features Gordon
Turk on organ and Michael Stairs
on piano. Free. 800-590-4064 or
www.oceangrove.org.
July 4 Celebration, Oceanfest,
Promenade,
Long
Branch.
Wednesday, July 4, 10 a.m. Family-friendly festival features musical acts, children’s shows, sand
sculptors, crafters, food, entertainthe battlefield. The tour includes
stops at the meeting house and
cemetery. $4. 2 p.m.
For Kids
Community
Service
Opportunity, Prince of Peace
Church, 177 Princeton-Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609275-5820. Baking skills presented
for West Windsor and Plainsboro
youngsters in grades four to six.
Bake cookies for the hungry. Register. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
For Families
Oldtime Baseball, Howell Living
ment. Fireworks at 9 p.m. Free.
732-222-0400
or
www.oceanfestnj.com.
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park. Wednesday, July 4, 7:05 p.m.
New Britain. $11 to $27. The team
will wear stars and stripes jerseys.
Independence Day fireworks post
game. 609-394-3300 or www.trentonthunder.com.
Choral Concert of Patriotic
Music, William Trent House, 15
Market Street, Trenton. Wednesday, July 4, 5:30 p.m. Trenton Capital Singers perform an outdoor
concert at 7 p.m. Bring a picnic.
The first floor of the museum will
be open for tours. Bring lawn chair
or blanket. 609-989-0087 or
www.Williamtrenthouse.org.
Thursday, July 5
Concert and Fireworks, Cranbury, Main Street. Thursday, July
5, 6:30 p.m. Concert by Mercer
County Symphonic Band followed
by fireworks at 9 p.m. Bring blankets and a picnic dinner (no alcoholic beverages). 609-395-0900.
Friday, July 6
Friday Night Fireworks, New
Hope Chamber, New Hope and
Lambertville. Friday, July 6, 5 p.m.
Happy hours, dining, shopping,
live music, and celebrity guests in
conjunction with fireworks over
the Delaware River at 9:30 p.m.
Donations invited. Inclement
weather cancels. 215-862-9990.
www.newhopeLambertvillefireworks.com.
Independence Day Celebration, South Brunswick Recreation, Crossroads Middle School,
635 Georges Road, Monmouth
Junction. Friday, July 6, 6:30 p.m.
Music at 6:30 p.m. Fireworks at 9
p.m. Bring chairs, blankets, and
picnics. Rain date is Saturday, July
7. 732-329-4000. www.sbtnj.net.
History Farm, 70 Wooden’s Lane,
Lambertville,
609-737-3299.
www.howellfarm.org. Howell Farm
Hogs vs. the Jersey Bulls play according to the rules that governed
baseball when bats were made of
axe handles and pitchers could be
fined for delivering unhittable balls.
Play or watch. Rules will be presented to prospective players at 11
a.m. An 1864 baseball games
takes place at noon between the
Flemington Neshanocks and the
New York Gothams with both
teams in period attire. Brad Shaw
presents the history of the game
and narrates “Casey at the Bat.” 11
a.m. to 4 p.m.
JUNE 22, 2012
Chess Tournament Awards Ceremony, Let’s Play Chess,
Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren
Street, Plainsboro, 732-322-3622.
lpcnj.com. Chess program for
ages five and up. Classes are presented by Render Cutts, a mentor
for the year-round program. 12:30
to 2:30 p.m.
Annual Chess Awards Ceremony, Plainsboro Public Library, 9
Van Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Students from ages 6 to 13 will be
honored. 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Lectures
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com.
Portland.
$11 to $27. 7:05 p.m.
Sports for Causes
Three on Three Basketball Tournament, UIH Family Partners, 4
North Broad Street, Suite 2R,
Trenton, 609-695-3663. www.uih.org. For ages 11 to 18 plus,
male and female, prizes. Register
online. Raindate is Saturday, June
30. 9 a.m.
Field Day, Delaware Valley Radio
Association, Trenton Mercer Airport, Ewing, 609-585-2001. www.w2zq.com. Ham radio operators
present emergency communication capabilities. Free. 10 a.m.
Sunday
June 24
Continuing Cultural Conversation, South Brunswick Library,
110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth
Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. “Looking Back at 9/11:
The World Trade Center as flashpoint for misinformation and misunderstanding” presented by Angus Gillespie, professor of American studies at Rutgers and author
of “Twin Towers: The Life of New
York City’s Trade Center,” and
Atiya Aftab, professor of politics
science at Rutgers and Center for
Middle Eastern studies. 2 p.m.
On Stage
Art of Living: Mind and Meditation Workshops, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner
Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. www.mcl.org. Deep relaxation, mental clarity, relief from
stress and anxiety through breathing techniques and meditation.
Free. 7 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Field Trip, Washington Crossing
Audubon Society, Assunpink
Wildlife Management Area, Imlaystown, 609-737-0070. Search
for birds and butterflies. Register.
Free. 8:30 a.m.
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton, 609-896-0546. Threemile walk on the towpath. Bad
weather cancels. Free. 10 a.m.
Ghost Tour, Princeton Tour
Company, Witherspoon and Nassau streets, 609-902-3637. www.princetontourcompany.com. $20.
8 p.m.
Shopping News
Yard Sale and Flea Market, Middlesex County 4-H, 645 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick, 732398-5261. Tables and food available. Rain date is Sunday, June
24. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Desperate Affection, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. A dark, suspenseful
comedy. $29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert. 1:30 p.m.
Jeffrey, Kelsey Theater, Mercer
County Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net. Celebrate the
10th anniversary of the James
Tolin Memorial Fund with Paul
Rudnick’s romantic comedy about
a gay actor. $18. For mature audiences. 2 p.m.
A Little Night Music, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org.
Sondheim
musical set on a country estate in
Sweden. $25. 2 p.m.
Our Town, Somerset Valley Players, 689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough, 908-369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Drama by Thornton
Wilder. $15. 2 p.m.
Once Upon a Mattress, Princeton
Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-759-0379. www.princetonfestival.org.
Musical.
$45. 3 p.m.
The Music Man, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com.
Musical.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
Family Theater
Disney’s The Aristocats Kids,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. www.dpacatoat.-
Please Join Dr Ron Suzuki
and
Suzuki Medical Associates
in Welcoming
Dr Jabbar Zafar and Rose Knapp, NP
Dr Zafar and Rose Knapp are now available to see
patients in both offices. We see children
and adults. Most major insurances
and Medicare are accepted.
65 South Main Street Bld. C
Pennington, NJ 08534
609 737 1116
11 Schalks Crossing Road
Plainsboro, NJ 08536
609 275 5700
THE NEWS
23
Class of 1987 Plans Reunion
W
est Windsor-Plainsboro High School Class
of 1987 is having a 25th reunion celebration.
In terms of fame classmates include Mark Flythe,
who was in the NFL; Brian Mount, the principal percussionist in the Minnesota Orchestra; and class adviser Tom Roberts, who is now a pastor. Jack Silbert
is coordinating the event.
The main event is Saturday, July 28, from 7 to 11
p.m. at Mercer Oaks, 725 Village Road West, West
Windsor. There will be appetizers, pasta, dessert,
and an open bar for beer, wine, and non-alcoholic
beverages for $40. A cash bar will be available.
A family brunch is scheduled Sunday, July 29,
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at West Windsor Community Park. Bring the kids and eat picnic-style. Assorted breakfast sandwiches, pasta salad, juices, and sodas will be served for $15 per adult and $7 for children under 10.
Commemorative shirts are available for $9. They
must be ordered in advance and can be picked up on
Saturday, July 28, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the fountain
outside of Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, or at the picnic on Sunday.
— Lynn Miller
25-Year Reunion, West Windsor-Plainsboro
High School, Class of 1987, E-mail
[email protected] to register. www.ww-p.org.
com. $5. Seat cushions and insect
repellent are recommended. 4
p.m.
Dancing
Dinner Dance, German American
Club, 215 Uncle Pete’s Road,
Hamilton, 856-764-3106. Monday
Blues Jazz Orchestra, a 20-member ensemble, performs. Full
menu available. Reservation suggested. $15. 3 to 7 p.m.
Classical Music
Piano
Competition
Finals,
Princeton Festival, Clark Music
Center, Lawrenceville School,
Lawrenceville,
609-759-0379.
www.princetonfestival.org. $30. 3
p.m.
Jazz & Blues
Cranbury Jazz, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Sextet of mostly Cranbury residents present jazz standards, blues, and bebop selections. 3 p.m.
Going Back: The Class of 1987’s senior yearbook.
Live Music
Fairs & Festivals
Dancing Goats, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
Trenton Heritage Days Festival,
Mill Hill Park, Trenton, 609-7771771. www.trentonnj.org. Grace
Little performs. Outdoor heritage
festival with food, music, children’s rides, face painters, storytellers, and marionette theater.
Free. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
World Music
Benefit Concert, Make Some
Noise Cure Kids Cancer Foundation, Prince of Peace Church,
177 Princeton-Hightstown Road,
West Windsor, 609-647-4393.
www.makenoise4kids.org. Performers include Amy Lawrence, a
soprano and West Windsor resident; Geoffrey Burleson, pianist
and professor of piano at Princeton University; and Maria Tegzes,
a cabaret singer. The program includes solo and group classical
works. 3 p.m. See story.
Car Wash
High School South Pirate Marching Band, Plainsboro Firehouse,
407 Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro.
www.piratemarchingband.org.
Donations
invited.
E-mail
[email protected] for more
information. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Faith
Original Mind Zen Sangha, Fellowship in Prayer, 291 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. www.originalmindzen.com. Zen meditation and Buddhist services.
Free. 7 to 9 p.m.
Wellness
Classes, Onsen For All, 4451
Route 27, Princeton, 609-9244800. www.onsenforall.com. Introduction to yoga at 9:15 a.m.
Gentle yoga at 10:25 a.m. Multilevel yoga at 11:30 a.m. Register.
$15 each. 9:15 a.m.
Continued on following page
24
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
JUNE 24
Continued from preceding page
Yoga to Reduce Stress, One Yoga Center, 405 Route 130 North,
East Windsor, 609-918-0963.
www.oneyogacenter.net. Workshop includes mindfulness skills,
breathing techniques, and asana
to increase mind and body awareness. For all levels. $45. 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Stress Management for Busy
People, Center for Relaxation
and Healing, 666 Plainsboro
Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro, 609750-7432.
www.relaxationandhealing.com. Workshop with Connie Jasper. Register. $22. 2 to 4
p.m.
History
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Two-hour walking tour
of downtown Princeton and
Princeton University includes stories about the early history of
Princeton, the founding of the University, and the American Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6 to 12. 2 to 4
p.m.
Author Event, Morven Museum,
55 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-924-8144. www.morven.org.
Linda J. Barth and Hazel Mitchell,
authors of “Hidden New Jersey,” a
seek and search book for ages 3 to
100, have book signing. 2 to 4
p.m.
Firefly Festival
Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-9242310. www.terhuneorchards.com.
An evening of music, nature, and
outdoor activities including pony
rides, wagon rides, and fire fly
hunting. Miss Amy and her Big
Kids Band presents family show.
Elaine Madigan talks about fireflies, using hands on materials,
crafts activities, and games. Food
available. Free admission. $5 for
craft activities. 4 to 9 p.m.
For Parents
Parents Through International
Adoption Group, Infertility and
Adoption Counseling Center, 2
Tree Farm Road, Pennington,
609-737-8750. www.iaccenter.com. Register. Free. 10 to 11:30
a.m.
Field Day
Delaware Valley Radio Association, Trenton Mercer Airport, Ewing, 609-585-2001. www.w2zq.com. Ham radio operators present
emergency communication capabilities. Free. 10 a.m.
Outdoor Action
Tree Walk, Princeton Shade Tree
Commission, 57 Mountain Avenue,
Princeton.
www.pbshadetree.org. “Tree Identification and Invasive Species” presented by Steve Hiltner, naturalist
with Friends of Princeton Open
Space. Free. 10 a.m.
Schools
Open House, Talent Development, 666 Plainsboro Road,
Plainsboro, 609-945-3983. Information about an after school academic tutoring center. 3 and 4 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com.
Portland.
$11 to $27. 1:05 p.m.
Monday
June 25
On Stage
My Fair Lady, Plays-in-the-Park,
Capestro Theater, Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South, Edison, 732548-2884. www.playsinthepark.com. Musical. Bring a chair. $7.
Open captioned performance.
8:30 p.m.
Film
Monday Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of
“Hugo.” 7 p.m.
Linkin Park Concert: Recorded
Live in Berlin, Fathom Events,
AMC in Hamilton, Multiplex in East
Windsor, and Regal in North
Brunswick. www.fathomevents.com. Screening of the band’s live
show in conjunction with their new
album, “Living Things.” 7:30 p.m.
Dancing
Salsa for Ladies, Drum & Dance
Learning Center, 4054 Quakerbridge Road, Lawrenceville, 609324-7383.
www.drumdancecenter.com. No experience or
partner needed. $15 to $20. 7 to
8:30 p.m.
Literati
Plainsboro
Literary
Group,
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. 20th
anniversary reunion read with current and founding writers including
Olivia Mitchell, Marvin Cheiten,
Jack and Kathie Meeker Cohen,
Donna Gelagotis-Lee, Joan Goldstein, Barry Grossman, Bill Hart,
Ed Leefeldt, Jamie Newinski,
Chris Marchetti, Cynthia Richards,
Ellen Foos, and Jinny Baeckler.
Free. 7 p.m. See story.
Pop Music
Performance and Party, Jersey
Harmony Chorus, Forrestal Village, 116 Houghtin Lane, Plainsboro,
732-236-6803.
www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony.
Performance in four-part harmony
by the chorus comprising women
of all ages from New Jersey and
Pennsylvania. For women who
love to sing, can carry a tune, and
have the desire to learn to sing in
four-part
harmony.
E-mail
[email protected] for
information. 7:30 p.m.
Mental Health
The Push Group, Saint Mark United Methodist Church, 465 Paxton
Avenue, Hamilton Square, 609291-0095. For men and women
with anxiety disorders. Free. 7
p.m.
Wellness
Common GI Disorders, Princeton HealthCare System, Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 888897-8979. www.princetonhcs.org.
“When to Seek Medical Advice”
presented by Kevin Skole, a gastroenterologist. Register. Free.
Noon.
Information Meeting, Princeton
HealthCare
System,
South
Brunswick Municipal Building,
Monmouth Junction, 888-8978979. www.princetonhcs.org. Information about the University
Medical Center of Princeton at
Plainsboro and other health related facilities moving to the Plainsboro site presented by Pam
Hersh, vice president for government and community affairs; and
Brian Rubin, major gifts officer,
Princeton HealthCare System
Foundation. 12:15 p.m.
History
Ladies, First., Historical Society
of Princeton, Updike Farmstead,
354 Quaker Road, Princeton, 609921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Luncheon inspired by the
traveling exhibition, “The Art of
Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist,” on view. Discussion
about healthcare in the global
community presented by Natalie
Douglas, CEO of Idis. Register.
$60. Noon.
Singles
Singles Night, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. Drop in for soups,
sandwiches, desserts, tea, coffee,
and conversation. Register at
http://ht.ly/3gd9w 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Sports
Summer Special
$99/Month
New Students Only
Race Clinic, Eastern Express
Swim Team, College of New Jersey, Aquatic Center, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, 908-2958133. For ages 6 to 12 able to
swim at least three strokes. Must
be a member of a summer league
swim team. 6 to 7 p.m.
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com.
Portland.
$11 to $27. 7:05 p.m.
Tuesday
June 26
On Stage
My Fair Lady, Plays-inthe-Park,
Capestro
Theater,
Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South,
Edison, 732-548-2884.
www.playsinthepark.com. Musical. Bring a
chair. $7. Donations of
canned and packaged
goods accepted for Middlesex County’s food
pantry. 8:30 p.m.
Film
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Screening of “Farmageddon,” a
film about local food followed by a
discussion with Judith Robinson,
Princeton Farmers’ Market. 7 p.m.
Literati
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ
08542, 609-497-1600. Michael
Curtis, author of “Should Israel Exist?” and a professor emeritus of
political science at Rutgers University. His other books include
“Religion and Politics in the Middle
East” and “Orientalism and Islam:
European Thinkers on Oriental
Despotism in the Middle East and
India.” 6 p.m.
Books on Tap, Princeton Public
Library, Yankee Doodle Tap
Room, Nassau Inn, 609-9249529. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Book group coordinated by librarian Kristin Friberg. 7 p.m.
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Princeton Garden
Statesmen, Plainsboro Library, 9
Van Doren Street, Plainsboro,
888-636-4449. Men of all ages
and experience levels are invited
to sing in four-part harmony. The
non-profit organization presents at
numerous charities. Free. 7:30 to
10 p.m.
Good Causes
Meeting, Allies, 1262 WhitehorseHamilton Square Road, Hamilton,
609-689-0136. For adult volunteers with hobbies or interests to
share with adults who have developmental disabilities. Register
with Linda Barton. 5:30 to 7:30
p.m.
Wellness
Managing Medications for the Elderly Patient, Princeton HealthCare System, Princeton Fitness &
Wellness Center, Princeton North
Shopping Center, 1225 State
Road, Princeton, 888-897-8979.
www.princetonhcs.org. Presented
by Liza Barbarello-Andrews, a critical care pharmacist and a professor at Rutgers University. Register. Free. Noon.
For Families
Read and Pick Program, Terhune
Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road,
Lawrenceville,
609-924-2310.
www.terhuneorchards.com.
“Monarchs, Swallowtails, and
Honeybees - Oh My!” Register. $7
per child. 9:30 and 11 a.m.
Flutist: Andrea Brachfield and Phoenix Rising perform at the Arts
Council of Princeton
on Friday, June 22, at
8 p.m.
Lectures
The Innovation Bridge, Einstein’s
Alley, Institute for Advanced
Study, Wolfensohn Hall, Einstein
Drive, Princeton, 609-799-8898.
www.einsteinsalley.org. “Enhancing American Competitiveness
and Job Creation Through Smart
Immigration” presented by Peter
Goddard, director of Institute for
Advanced Study; and Darrell
West, vice president and director
of Brookings Institution. Panel discussion moderated by Peter Kann,
former CEO of Dow Jones and
publisher of the Wall Street Journal. Register. 8:30 a.m.
Estate Planning, Hickory Corner
Library, 138 Hickory Corner
Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. www.mcl.org. Rob Morris of
the Brennan Law Firm in Cranbury
will discuss wills, trusts, and estate
planning. Register. Free. 7 p.m.
Meeting, Princeton PC Users
Group, Lawrence Library, 2751
Route 1 South, 609-423-6537.
www.ppcug-nj.org. Free. 7 p.m.
Planning for Retirement, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822. “Introduction to Your Lifestyle in Retirement” presented by Carol King,
director of Next Step programs. 7
p.m.
For Nurses Only
Mercer County Community College, Communications Building,
Room 109, 1200 Old Trenton
Road, West Windsor, 201-3551113. Information on earning a
BSN through Felician College.
Register by E-mail to [email protected] 4 to 7 p.m.
For Men Only
Men’s Circle, West Windsor, 609933-4280. Share, listen, and support other men and yourself. Talk
about relationship, no relationship, separation, divorce, sex, no
sex, money, job, no job, aging parents, raising children, teens, addictions, illness, and fear of aging.
All men are expected to commit to
confidentiality. Call for location.
Free. 7 to 9 p.m.
Socials
Meeting, Rotary Club of Plainsboro, Guru Palace, 2215 Route 1
South, North Brunswick, 732-2130095. www.plainsbororotary.org.
7:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Memoir
Writing
Workshop,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920.
Introductory
course for seniors by Maria Okros.
Register. 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Continued on page 26
JUNE 22, 2012
THE NEWS
25
‘And the Beat Goes On’ Returns
W
est Windsor Arts Council
kicks off its eighth free summer music series at Nassau Park
with Sinfonietta Nova, on Saturday, June 23, at 7 p.m. The concerts
will be held at Nassau Park Pavilion, between Target and Panera
Bread. Plan a picnic dinner, pull up
a chair, and enjoy the sounds of
summer. The season includes classical, rock, folk, salsa, and an open
mic night. Admission is free. In the
event of rain the concert takes place
under a tent.
“The selection process for our
music series begins in January,”
says Ted Ross, a committee member. He became involved in the arts
council when his wife, Heidi
Kleinman, joined the group looking to create a permanent home for
the arts in West Windsor.
The committee brainstorms
genres and acts to appeal to the audience they hope to attract. It uses
the internet to hear clips, watch
YouTube postings, and visit performers’ websites. “Fortunately,
many of the committee members
are active concert goers so they are
routinely exposed to local talent,”
Ross says. “A lot of debate occurs
until we reach a general consensus.
The artist is then approached as to
availability and price. Hopefully
there is a match and the performance date is locked in.”
Ross was raised in West Orange
and graduated from NYU with a
bachelor’s degree in accounting
and finance. He is the business
manager for Via Research, a medical research company. He moved
his family to West Windsor in 1997
after living in Belgium on a work
assignment with Wyeth.
Ross and Kleinman also created
Phubby, the novel cell phone ac-
cessory (www.phubby.com) —
and have sold close to 200,000 of
them (WW-P News, April 4,
2008). Kleinman, a licensed architect with a practice in West Windsor, is a former West Windsor
council woman.
Their daughter, Emma Ross,
graduated from High School North
in 2003 and received a degree in
economics from University of
Chicago. She lives in Los Angeles
and works in art direction.
Their younger daughter, Nell,
graduated from North in 2006. She
received a degree from the University of Pittsburgh and was a research assistant with the Colorado
School of Public Health’s National
Children’s Study. She enters NYU
in September as a candidate for a
master’s in clinical social work.
Sinfonietta Nova, the West
Windsor-based community orchestra under the guidance of Gail
Lee, is opening the series for the
second consecutive year. The musicians perform classical and modern selections. The orchestra, filled
with area musicians and music educators, strives to maintain strong
ties to schools. Through fostering
music appreciation, the organization provides students the opportunity to see their teachers perform
— and give opportunities for some
students to play with their teachers
in concerts.
Conductor Lee, a West Windsor
resident, has a master’s degree in
orchestral conducting from Northwestern University. She works
with the Seattle Symphony, the
Women’s Philharmonic in San
Francisco, and in Europe. She was
engaged by New Jersey Music Educators Association in 2007 to conduct the New Jersey All State Or-
chestra. She also served as a lecturer at the Mason Gross School of the
Arts at Rutgers University and has
led Rutgers University Sinfonia
and Opera at Rutgers in concerts.
Lee has invited Joseph Hsia, a
fifth grade student at Village
School, to perform a solo with the
orchestra. The concertmaster of the
Village Chamber Orchestra, he is
the first place winner of the NJMTA Young Musicians Competition, American fine Arts Festival,
Golden Strings of America, and
Young Classical Virtuosos of Tomorrow. Hsia has performed at
Carnegie Hall, the Kimmel Center,
Rutgers University, Westminster
Conservatory, and in France and
Germany. He will solo with the
Ocean City Pops Orchestra in
Ocean City on Sunday, August 26.
Are you a ready for a scene of
mob cellos? If so get your cello out
and bring it to “Cellos en masse.”
Suzanne Dicker, a cello player and
teacher, is coordinating hundreds
of cellos in the area to perform just
before intermission.
Star Performers: Sinfonietta Nova, above, and
soloist Joseph Hsia, inset.
“Cellists from the orchestra as
well as any cellists who are willing
and able, will assemble to perform
one of the most famous pieces for
cello — the Bach prelude in G major from Suite No. 1,” says Dicker.
“We’ve spread the word among
cello players and teachers, to gather as many cellists as possible, and
in unison, play this piece which is
normally intended only for a solo
cello.” E-mail [email protected] to be part of the performance.
— Lynn Miller
And the Beat Goes On Music
Series, West Windsor Arts
Council, Nassau Park Pavilion,
West Windsor. Bring chairs or
blankets. Free. 609-716-1931 or
www.westwindsorarts.org.
Saturday, June 23, 7 p.m. Sinfonietta Nova with classical and
modern music.
Saturday, July 7, 7 p.m. The Billy Walton Band with rock and
funky blues.
Saturday, July 21, 7 p.m. Open
mic for musicians and performers
of all ages, solo or with a group.
Register online.
Saturday, August 4, 7 p.m. Ray
Rodriquez y Swing Sabroso with
salsa and Latin music.
Saturday, August 18, 7 p.m.
Greg Trooper, a Jersey born singer
songwriter, presents folk music inspired by Memphis, Greenwich
Village, and Nashville. He has released 11 albums and has had songs
recorded by Steve Earle, Billy
Bragg, and Vince Gill.
26
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Classical Music
Continued from preceding page
Wednesday
June 27
On Stage
My Fair Lady, Plays-in-the-Park,
Capestro Theater, Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South, Edison, 732548-2884. Musical. Bring a chair.
$7. Sign language interpreted performance. 8:30 p.m.
Film
Film Premiere, Sourland Planning Council, Off Broadstreet
Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 908-466-7720.
www.sourland.org. Screening of
“Sourlands: Stories from the Fight
for Sustainability,” a documentary
directed by Jared Flesher of Hundred Year Films in Pennington.
$20 to benefit the Sourland Planning Council, includes refreshments. 7 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. “Fiberarts” by Liz
Adams features fiber arts. A longtime resident of Plainsboro, she
founded the library’s gallery and
summer arts program. On view to
June 28. 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Dancing
Princeton Salsa Slam, Princeton
Farmers’ Market, Hinds Plaza, 55
Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-356-0558. www.princetonfarmersmarket.com. All things salsa at the inaugural event features
salsa demonstrations by Henri Velandia and members of his Hot
Salsa Hot dance school, as well as
salsa samples from local eateries
and stores. 7 p.m.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Instruction followed
by dance. $8. 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Italian Night, Boheme Opera NJ,
Rosa’s Restaurant, 3442 South
Broad Street, Hamilton, 609-5819551. www.bohemeopera.com.
Italian arias and songs by Valeria
Bernhardt, soprano; Daniel Snyder, tenor; and William Andrew
Stuckey, baritone. Four pasta buffet with celebrity servers Senators
Linda Greenstein and Peter Inverso, freeholders, mayors, Rabbi Eric Wisnia, and more. Register. $50
to $55. 6 p.m.
Live Music
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
Food & Dining
Cornerstone
Community
Kitchen,
Princeton
United
Methodist Church, Nassau at
Vandeventer Street, Princeton,
609-924-2613. www.princetonumc.org. Hot meals served, prepared by TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30
p.m.
Celebrate New Jersey, Rat’s
Restaurant, 126 Sculptor’s Way,
Hamilton, 609-584-7800. www.ratsrestaurant.org. Hors d’oeuvres, cheese from area farms, and
beers brewed in New Jersey. Register. $27. Optional five-course
beer tasting menu available. 6
p.m.
Healthy Living, Whole Earth Center, 360 Nassau Street, Princeton.
www.wholeearthcenter.com. Discussion group co-hosted by
Palmer Uhl and V. Bea Snowden.
Register
by
E-mail
to
[email protected] Free. 7 p.m.
Health
Diabetes 360 Five, South
Brunswick Health Department,
Municipal Building, 540 Ridge
Road, South Brunswick, 732-3294000. “Diabetes and Eye Complications” presented by Bruce D.
Kastner, optometrist, NYS Commission for the Blind. Register.
Free. 10:45 a.m.
Blood Drive, Plainsboro Public
Library, 9 Van Doren Street, 609275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. 1 to 7 p.m.
Wellness
Gentle Tone and Movement,
Princeton HealthCare System,
South Brunswick Senior Center,
540 Ridge Road, Monmouth Junction, 888-897-8979. Presented by
Jacyln Boone, instructor of the
Feldenkrais Method. Register.
Free. 10:45 a.m.
Bladder Health for Women,
Princeton HealthCare System,
Princeton Fitness & Wellness
Center, Princeton North Shopping
Center, 1225 State Road, Princeton, 888-897-8979. Presented by
Heather van Raalte, MD, trained in
urogynecology. Register. Free. 7
p.m.
History
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-683-0057. New
Jersey governor’s official residence. Group tours are available.
Register. $5 donation. Noon to 2
p.m.
Lectures
Financial Literacy Seminar, McGraw-Hill Federal Credit Union,
120 Windsor Center Drive, East
Windsor, 800-226-6428. “Life’s
Winding Road and Your Investment Strategy: Charting a Path
Clear Skin!
3 Treatments for
(plus tax)
(40% Savings)
Offer good through 7/31/12
(Valid for one time only)
A Complete Approach
to Skin Care
Let our medically trained staff help to not only treat current skin
conditions, but educate you on how to prevent future breakouts.
The Aesthetics Center at
Princeton Dermatology Associates
Monroe Center Forsgate
5 Center Drive • Suite A
Monroe Township, NJ
609-655-4544
Toward Success” presented by
Michael Sabatino, managing director of financial planning and education. Register by E-mail to
[email protected]
Dinner, parking, and sample textbooks are included. Free. 5:30 to
7 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Native Plant Nursery, D&R
Greenway Land Trust, Johnson
Education Center, 1 Preservation
Place, Princeton, 609-924-4646.
www.drgreenway.org. Walk and
tour the more than 100 species.
Register. 4 p.m.
Sports
All-Comer Track, Princeton Athletic Club, Princeton High School,
Walnut Street, Princeton. www.princetonac.org. Running event
on the track. 3K, 100 meters, 800
meters, 4x100 relay. Register online.
$7
to
$10.
E-mail
[email protected] 5:30 p.m.
Race Clinic, Eastern Express
Swim Team, College of New Jersey, Aquatic Center, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, 908-2958133. For ages 6 to 12 able to
swim at least three strokes. Must
be a member of a summer league
swim team. 6 to 7 p.m.
Student Special!
$235
West Windsor Little League’s 12-Year-Old All-Stars:
Front row, from left: Dylan Welch, Matthew Michibata,
Blake Brown, Jack Lichtenstein, Jared Panson, and
Ben Goldstein; standing, from left, manager Steve Lichtenstein, Ryan Strype, Sahil Thube, Cole Millinger, coach
Jason Welch, David Philbin, Brian Murphy, Jack McNeilly, and coach Mike Strype. The team plays HTRBA
on Friday, June 22, at Ward Field.
2 Tree Farm Rd.
Suite A-110
Pennington, NJ
609-737-4491
Thursday
June 28
On Stage
Once Upon a Mattress, Princeton
Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-759-0379. Musical. $45. 8 p.m.
A Little Night Music, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org.
Sondheim
musical set on a country estate in
Sweden. $25. 8 p.m.
My Fair Lady, Plays-in-the-Park,
Capestro Theater, Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South, Edison, 732548-2884. Musical. Bring a chair.
$7. Donations of canned and
packaged goods accepted for
Middlesex County’s food pantry.
8:30 p.m.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 732789-5272. Class and practice session. $12. 8 p.m.
JUNE 22, 2012
Classical Music
History
Choral Conductors Workshop,
Princeton
Festival,
Miller
Chapel, Princeton Theological
Seminary, 609-759-0379. www.princetonfestival.org.
Performance of the conducting workshop ends with a concert. $20. 7
p.m.
Walking Tour, Cranbury Historical Society, Cranbury Museum, 4
Park Place East, Cranbury. www.cranburyhistory.org. 90 minute
walking tour. Register by E-mail to
[email protected] Free. 11 a.m.
Live Music
Open Mic Night, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7 p.m.
Tony DeSimone, Alchemist &
Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
Lectures
Herb Society of America,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920.
www.mcl.org.
“Culinary Herbs of the World” presented in a slideshow of plants.
Food prepared using herbs from
the group’s garden will be available for tasting. Register. Free. 7
p.m.
Summer Courtyard Concert Series, Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Shopping Center, 301
North Harrison Street, Princeton,
609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.
Blawenburg
Band, one of the oldest community bands in New Jersey, has 75
musicians ranging from teens to
nineties. Bring a lawn chair. Free.
6 to 8 p.m.
Princeton Area Anti-Torture
Group, Unitarian Universalist
Church, 50 Cherry Hill Road,
Princeton, 609-924-4232. “Torture, the Constitution, and Solitary
Confinement: Preview of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Report” presented Elisa
Massamino, president and CEO of
Human Rights First and a world
leader in issues related to torture
and civil liberties around the world.
Free. 7:30 p.m.
Good Causes
Outdoor Action
Outdoor Concerts
Benefit Dinner, Italian-American
Heritage Center, 2421 Liberty
Street, Hamilton, 609-631-7544.
www.italianamericanfestival.com.
Buffet dinner featuring ItalianAmerican foods. DJ and door
prizes. BYOB. $14; $7 children. 5
p.m.
Fireworks
Montgomery Township, Montgomery High School, 347-3855578.
www.Montgomeryfireworks.com. Music by the
Funkin Soulnuts band. Food available. Activities for the children.
Fireworks at dusk. Raindate is
Wednesday, July 11. Visit website
for more information and to purchase a parking pass. No alcohol
or pets. 6 p.m.
Food & Dining
Healthy Living, Whole Earth Center, 360 Nassau Street, Princeton.
www.wholeearthcenter.com. Discussion group co-hosted by
Palmer Uhl and V. Bea Snowden.
Register
by
E-mail
to
[email protected] Free. 9:30 a.m.
Wine and Dine Summer Festival,
Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. Wine and
beer sampling, cuisine from the
fresh menu, Meg Hanson & Mikey
Jr with music, and prizes to benefit
Eden Autism Services. Register.
$60 to $70. 5 to 9 p.m.
Farm Markets
Princeton Farmers’ Market,
Hinds Plaza, Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-655-8095. www.princetonfarmersmarket.com.
Produce, cheese, breads, baked
goods, flowers, chef cooking
demonstrations, books for sale,
family activities, workshops, music, and more. Rain or shine. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Pontoon Boat Nature Tour, Mercer County Park Commission,
Lake Mercer, Mercer County Park
Marina, West Windsor, 609-8836606.
www.mercercounty.org.
Tour includes history of the lake
and up-close encounters with
wildflowers, beaver lodges, basking turtles, and waterfowl. Binoculars provided. Ticket sales begin at
noon. Weather-permitting. $5 to
$7. 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Green Initiative, D&R Greenway
Land Trust, Johnson Education
Center, 1 Preservation Place,
Princeton, 609-924-4646. www.drgreenway.org. “Think Globally,
Act Locally” presented by Mario
Gandelsonas, professor of architectural design at Princeton University. He will unveil his innovative greenway plan for New Jersey. Reception followed by the
talk. Register. 6:30 p.m.
Bridal Show
American Bride, Hamilton Manor,
30 Route 156, Hamilton, 609-5816782. www.Americanbride.com.
Meet wedding professionals, preview of wedding packages, bridal
fashion show, interactive wedding
show, cocktail hour, and prizes.
Register online. 6:45 p.m.
For Seniors
Wellness Walk, Grounds For
Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way,
Hamilton, 609-689-1089. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Walk followed by a discussion presented
by Stoneking Wellness Center
and Springpoint Foundation. For
mature adults. Includes healthy
refreshments and park admission.
Register. $10. 9:30 a.m.
Sports
Horse Show, Princeton Show
Jumping, Hunter Farms, 1315
The Great Road, Princeton, 609924-2932. Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Friday
June 29
Plainsboro Literary
Group Gathers For
20th Reunion
On Stage
T
Desperate Affection, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. A dark, suspenseful comedy
about an unhappy New York actress in love with a hit man. $29.50
to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m.
Stars n’ Stripes, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com. Musical revue features America’s greatest
composers. Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics
welcome before show. Food available. $15. Through July 1. 7:30
p.m.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream,
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Shakespeare ’70 presents the light-hearted tale of four
young lovers and a group of amateur actors in a moonlit forest. A reception with the cast and crew follows the opening night performance. $16. 8 p.m.
Once Upon a Mattress, Princeton
Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-759-0379. www.princetonfestival.org.
Musical.
$45. 8 p.m.
A Little Night Music, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org.
Sondheim
musical set on a country estate in
Sweden. $25. 8 p.m.
My Fair Lady, Plays-in-the-Park,
Capestro Theater, Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South, Edison, 732548-2884. www.playsinthepark.com. Musical. Bring a chair. $7.
Donations of canned and packaged goods accepted for Middlesex County’s food pantry. 8:30
p.m.
Family Theater
Snow White, Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, 355 Washington
Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com. $5. Seat
cushions and insect repellent are
recommended. 11 a.m.
Dancing
Mostly Waltz, Princeton Country
Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. Waltz basics with Peggy Leiby and Ret Turner. Music by
the Hills Brothers. 2:30 p.m.
wenty years ago they met for
the first time, a group of aspiring writers who formed the Plainsboro Literary Group. On Monday,
June 25, at 7 p.m. current and
founding writers will celebrate
their journey with a “Reunion
Read” at Plainsboro Public Library
at 9 Van Doren Street. “The writers, as well as the library, have enjoyed continued growth, migrating
from a small two room school
house at 506 Plainsboro Road, to a
14,000 square foot facility at 641
Plainsboro Road, to the current
community anchor at 9 Van Doren
Street,” says Jinny Baeckler, former director of the library.
“Impetus for the group came
when Olivia Mitchell proposed a
writers’ group to the library director, who thought it best to wait until
the library had moved to the municipal complex and had more space
available,”
says
Baeckler.
Mitchell, then a co-adjunct professor at Rutgers working on a crime
novel entitled “Delphiny” was eager for instant action. She wanted it
immediately and so it was. “I can
still feel her hand on my arm saying...I mean NOW,” says Baeckler.
“Success was immediate,” says
Baeckler. Among the original
group poet Ricardo Bogaert, novelist Alan Grayson, and Olivia
Mitchell all entered a regional contest and won prizes. Other writers
published pieces in national magazines and completed novels for
publication.
“Unlike many writers’ groups,
every writer reads every time, with
no limitation on format or experience,” says Baeckler. “The group
welcomes writers of all levels and
ages, and includes poets, song writers, feature article writers,and
newspaper reporters. Negativism
is banned, following the old time
notion, that if you can’t say something positive or constructive,
don’t say anything.”
Many of the founding members
will be reading in addition to a
sprinkling of newbies. Founder
Olivia Mitchell will return from
North Carolina, and be joined by
Marvin Cheiten, Jack and Kathie
Meeker Cohen, Donna GelagotisLee, Joan Goldstein, Barry Grossman, Bill Hart, Ed Leefeldt, Jamie
Newinski, Chris Marchetti, Cynthia Richards, and Ellen Foos.
Alan Grayson, now deceased,
who used the group as a sounding
board for his novel “Mile End,”
will be celebrated by poet Ellen
Foos, who edited Grayson’s work
for publication, and will conclude
the evening with a reading of her
favorite passage.
“We at last arrived at a facility
that matched the multiple programs we developed — for young
and old,” says Baeckler. “There
have been some stellar teens in the
group — but they grow up — and
move away.”
The program is free and open to
the public, with a special invitation
to all writers who wish to sit back
and enjoy the craft of writing with
fellow travelers. For details and or
directions contact Jinny Baeckler
at [email protected]
— Lynn Miller
Plainsboro Literary Group,
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street. Monday, June 25, 7
p.m. 20th anniversary reunion read
with current and founding writers
including Olivia Mitchell, Marvin
Cheiten, Jack and Kathie Meeker
Cohen, Donna Gelagotis-Lee, Joan
Goldstein, Barry Grossman, Bill
Hart, Ed Leefeldt, Jamie Newinski,
Chris Marchetti, Cynthia Richards,
Ellen Foos, and Jinny Baeckler.
Free. 609-275-2897 or www.lmxac.org/plainsboro.
Continued on following page
24 years in the same location:
24 years in the same location:
10 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, NJ 08536
10 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, NJ 08536
609-275-7272
609-275-7272
Superfresh shopping center
Superfresh shopping center
(next door to the Indian Hut restaurant)
(next door to the Indian Hut restaurant)
2083 Klockner Road, Hamilton Square, NJ 08690
2083 Klockner Road, Hamilton Square, NJ 08690
609-588-4999
609-588-4999
www.plainsborofootandankle.com
27
Trendsetter: Olivia
Mitchell had the original idea to start a writers’ group at the Library in 1992.
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m.
Also located at:
Also located at:
THE NEWS
28
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Outdoor Action
JUNE 29
Continued from preceding page
Public Speaking
Successfully Speak Up Toastmasters, Pellettieri, Rabstein, &
Altman, 100 Nassau Park Boulevard, Suite 111, West Windsor,
732-631-0114.
ssu.freetoasthost.ws. Members deliver
and evaluate prepared and impromptu speeches. 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Jazz & Blues
Adam Parker Jazz Trio, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822.
Adam Parker-Lavine, a pianist
and graduate of Princeton High
School, leads the trio. 7 p.m.
Live Music
DJ Spoltore, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771. 7:30 p.m.
Open Mic Night, Infini-T Cafe, 4
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609712-3921. Hosted by Manish
Anand of West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Comedy
Rob Falcone, Catch a Rising
Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, West Windsor,
609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Food & Dining
Restaurant Supported Agriculture Dinner Series, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.trepiani.com. Three
course farm to table dinner. Register. $29. 5 p.m.
Wellness
Bhakti Yoga, Bhagavad Gita
Studies, 15 West Kincaid Drive,
West Windsor, 848-219-9383.
Free. 7:30 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Read & Pick Program, Terhune
Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road,
Lawrenceville,
609-924-2310.
“Monarchs, Swallowtails, and
Honeybees” combines hands-on
farm activity and a story for ages
preschool to eight. Register. $5 includes a craft project to take
home. 9:30 and 11 a.m.
Race Clinic, Eastern Express
Swim Team, College of New Jersey, Aquatic Center, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, 908-2958133. For ages 6 to 12 able to
swim at least three strokes. Must
be a member of a summer league
swim team. 6 to 7 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Plainsboro Preserve,
80 Scotts Corner Road, Plainsboro, 609-897-9400. “Species on
the Edge,” an art and essay contest by fifth grade students, is on
view to July 8. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Pontoon Boat Nature Tour, Mercer County Park Commission,
Lake Mercer, Mercer County Park
Marina, West Windsor, 609-8836606. Tour includes history of the
lake and up-close encounters with
wildflowers, beaver lodges, basking turtles, and waterfowl. Binoculars provided. Ticket sales begin at
noon. Weather-permitting. $5 to
$7. 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Just a Hike, Mercer County Park
Commission, Belle Mountain,
Route 29 and Pleasant Valley
Road, 609-989-6540. Wear sturdy
hiking shoes and bring a water
bottle. Free. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Saturday
June 30
On Stage
Desperate Affection, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. A dark, suspenseful comedy
about an unhappy New York actress in love with a hit man. $29.50
to $31.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m.
Stars n’ Stripes, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com. Musical revue features America’s greatest
composers. Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics
welcome before show. Food available. $15. 7:30 p.m.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream,
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Shakespeare `70 presents the light-hearted tale of four
young lovers and a group of amateur actors in a moonlit forest. $16.
8 p.m.
Once Upon a Mattress, Princeton
Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-759-0379. www.princetonfestival.org.
Musical.
$45. 8 p.m.
A Little Night Music, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org.
Sondheim
musical set on a country estate in
Sweden. $25. 8 p.m.
Having suffered from hemorrhoids
for over 20 years, I had them removed
painlessly in less than 30 seconds by Dr. Dhar
who is not only exceptionally
knowledgeable but also very pleasant.
- Bernie, East Windsor
”
✔ Dr. Dhar is a highly trained Interventional
Gastroenterologist
✔ Assistant Professor of Medicine
at Columbia University
✔ All procedures performed in East Windsor, NJ
in a luxurious office setting
✔ Remarkably free of complications
✔ Reimbursed by most Medical
Insurance Plans
Dr. Vasudha Dhar, M.D.
609.918.1222
Family Theater
Snow White, Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, 355 Washington
Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
$5. Seat cushions and insect repellent are recommended. 11 a.m.
Film
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. Screening of “The
Phantom Tollbooth.” 2 p.m.
Literati
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ
08542, 609-497-1600. Jared
Rosenbaum, author of “Plant Local,” a celebration of native plants,
and the founder of D&R Greenway’s native plant nursery. 3 p.m.
Painless, Quick, Non-Surgical
Hemorrhoid Treatment
“
My Fair Lady, Plays-in-the-Park,
Capestro Theater, Roosevelt
Park, Route 1 South, Edison, 732548-2884. www.playsinthepark.com. Musical. Ethan Daniel Levy
of Plainsboro is in the ensemble.
Bring a chair. $7. Donations of
canned and packaged goods accepted for Middlesex County’s
food pantry. 8:30 p.m.
300B Princeton Hightstown Road
Suite 206 • East Windsor, NJ 08520
Classical Music
Meet the Artists, Opera New Jersey, McCarter Theater (Berlind),
Princeton University, 609-7997700. www.operanj.org. “Il Trovatore” singers present discussion.
11 a.m.
Gianni Schicchi and Francesca
da Rimini, Princeton Festival,
McCarter Theater, Princeton, 609759-0379. Opera double bill. $30
to $125. 3 p.m.
Cabaret Concert with Sylvia McNair, Princeton Festival, Frist
Theater, Princeton University,
609-759-0379. www.princetonfestival.org. A solo show featuring
opera, oratorio, cabaret, and musical theater. $45. 7 p.m.
Live Music
John Henry Goldman and the
Straight Jazz Trio, Tusk Restaurant, 1736 Route 206 South,
Montgomery,
908-829-3417.
Goldman on trumpet, Jason Fraticelli on bass, and Spencer Caton
on piano. Reservations suggested. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3-26 Rodney & Eva, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7:30 p.m.
Anker, It’s a Grind Coffee House,
7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic, covers, and
originals. 8 to 10 p.m.
Good Causes
Benefit Evening, Ivy Inn, 248
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609462-4641. www.ivyinnprinceton.com. Benefit for Children’s Organ
Transplant Association, a national
charity dedicated to organizing
and guiding communities in raising funds for transplant needy patients. In honor of Liam, born in
2008, who has biliary atresia and
is on the waiting list for a liver
transplant since January. Hors
d’oeuvres, beverages, and live
music. $40. Visit cotaforliamb.org
for information. 4 to 7 p.m.
Comedy
Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center,
West Windsor, 609-987-8018.
www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $21.50. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Fairs & Festivals
Freedom Festival, Mercer County, Mercer County Park, West
Windsor, 609-448-7107. www.wpst.com/freedomfestival. Food,
games, beer and wine gardens,
craft vendors, tethered hot-air balloon rides, water rides, mechanical bull rides, games, and inflatable rides. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m.
Band performances by Amish
Outlaws at 7:30 p.m., and Incognito after the fireworks. Free admission. 3 to 11 p.m.
76 Trombones: Kate Gentry is Marian Paroo and Louis
Palena is Harold Hill in ‘The Music Man’at Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater through Sunday, June 24.
Farm Markets
For Families
West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, Vaughn Drive Parking Lot, Princeton Junction Train
Station, 609-933-4452. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org.
Produce, flowers, baked goods,
and music. Blood pressure
screenings and massages available. Music by Acoustic Tide. Bike
and food drives. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Horsedrawn Wheat Harvest and
Ice Cream Party, Howell Living
History Farm, 70 Wooden’s
Lane, Lambertville, 609-7373299. Farmers cut and shuck this
year’s crop of winter wheat. Try
milling in the granary and taste
homemade wheat bread in the
farmhouse. Freshly ground wheat
flour will be for sale.Drawn by 3 big
horses,
Cyrus
McCormick’s
“reaperbinder” will chatter through
waves of ripened grain,bundling it
into sheaves.Public is welcome to
watch,photograph, or work with
the harvest crew. Music, wagon
rides, games, contests, and lots of
ice cream making will be offered.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Blood Drives
American Red Cross, Central Jersey Donor Center, 707 Alexander
Road, West Windsor, 800-4483543. www.redcrossblood.org. 7
a.m. to 2 p.m.
American Red Cross, Holiday Inn,
339 Monmouth Street, Hightstown, 800-733-2767. www.redcrossblood.org. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Health
Balance
Screening,
St.
Lawrence Rehabilitation Health
Center,
2381
Lawrenceville
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-8962515. slrc.org. Information session and personalized balance
screening. Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Wellness
Prenatal Yoga, Yoga Above, 80
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609613-1378. $25. 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.
Yoga and Meditation Class, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, West Windsor, 732-4856200. Presented by Siti. Bring a
yoga mat. Register. Free. 10:30
a.m.
Beyond Time Management, Center for Relaxation and Healing,
666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. “Eliminate Time Stealers and Find
Peace of Mind” presented by Karin
Stewart. Register. $25. 2 to 4 p.m.
T’ai Chi Ch’uan, Todd Tieger,
Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren,
Plainsboro, 609-439-8656. All levels. Free. 10 a.m.
History
Play Ball, Historical Society of
Princeton,
Princeton
High
School, 25 Valley Road, Princeton,
609-921-6748.
www.princetonhistory.org.
Historical
reenactment of 19th century baseball — no gloves. Flemington Neshanock and Elkton Eclipse play a
competitive game using rules from
1864 and 1873. A short history of
the game and a recitation of
“Casey at the Bat.” Hot dogs available. Free admission. Rain or
shine. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lectures
Art of Living: Mind and Meditation Workshops, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner
Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. www.mcl.org. Deep relaxation, mental clarity, relief from
stress and anxiety through breathing techniques and meditation.
Free. 7 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Peddie Lake Paddle, Stony
Brook Millstone Watershed,
Main Street, Hightstown, 609-7377592.
www.thewatershed.org.
Jeff Hoagland leads a view of the
lake from a different perspective.
Register. $25 includes rental of a
craft, paddle, personal floatation
device, a guide, and certified lifeguard. 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton, 609-896-0546. Threemile walk on the towpath. Bad
weather cancels. Free. 10 a.m.
Ghost Tour, Princeton Tour
Company, Witherspoon and Nassau streets, 609-902-3637. www.princetontourcompany.com. $20.
8 p.m.
Book Sale
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Hardbacks, $1; paperbacks, 50 cents;
miscellaneous media and art at
bargain prices. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For Kids
Race Clinic, Eastern Express
Swim Team, College of New Jersey, Aquatic Center, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, 908-2958133. For ages 6 to 12 able to
swim at least three strokes. Must
be a member of a summer league
swim team. 10 to 11 a.m.
JUNE 22, 2012
Call for Art
Jewish Family & Children’s
Service is accepting applications
from college graduates for a 1,700hour Americorps volunteer. Volunteers receive living allowance
benefits and a final education
award for higher education loans or
tuition.Responsibilities
include
case management, intake, and
overseeing a food pantry. Contact
Lara Wellerstein at [email protected] or call 609-987-8100.
Good Cause
Coalition for Peace Association is accepting reservations for
an event at McCarter Theater with
Arlo Guthrie on Saturday, October
13. A reception with Guthrie follows the concert dedicated to
Woody Guthrie on his 100th birthday. $100 to $125. Register at
www.peacecoalition.org.
Drama
Theater to Go, a theater company based in Lawrenceville, Is seeking donations, investments, and
producing partners for its first project, “Roebling: The Story of the
Brooklyn Bridge.” Playwright
Mark Violi and producer/director
Ruth Markoe have had two productions in New Jersey and have partnered to bring the show to an Equity Showcase production in New
York City in March. Call 866-7012187, E-mail [email protected], or visit www.theatertogo.com.
Villagers Theater has auditions
for “God’s Favorite,” a comedy by
Neil Simon, on Monday and Tuesday, June 25 and 26, at 7:30 p.m. at
475 Demott Lane, Somerset. Roles
are from 20 to 50 plus. Production
is September 14 to 30. E-mail
[email protected]
Yardley Players has auditions
for “Born Yesterday,” a play about
business and politics, on Friday,
June 29, 7 to 9 p.m.; and Saturday,
Sunday
July 1
On Stage
A Midsummer Night’s Dream,
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333. Shakespeare ’70
presents the light-hearted tale of
four young lovers. $16. 2 p.m.
A Little Night Music, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. Sondheim musical
set on a country estate in Sweden.
$25. 2 p.m.
Stars n’ Stripes, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
Musical revue features America’s
greatest composers. Blankets,
seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended.
Picnics welcome before show.
Food available. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Family Theater
Snow White, Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, 355 Washington
Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
$5. Seat cushions and insect repellent are recommended. 4 p.m.
Art Exhibits
Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-937-5089.
Tribute to I-Hsiung Ju, a professor
of art for 30 years at Washington &
Lee University. He had a studio in
the Princeton area until his death.
On view to July 15. Noon.
June 30, noon to 5
p.m. Roles for ages
20 to 60s. Call Marge
Swider at 215-9681904 for a time slot.
Visit yardleyplayers.com. Performances are weekends,
Friday, September 21 to Sunday,
September 29, at Kelsey Theater in
West Windsor.
Opportunities
Theater/Dance Workshop is
looking for plays with single sets
and small casts for its play contest.
Winning play will be given a full
production in the fall and the playwright receives $100. Send plays
to Theater/Dance Workshop, 1012
Brunswick Avenue, Trenton
08638. Deadline is Tuesday, July
31.
College Essays
Princeton Writing Tutor offers a series of common application
boot camps for students who would
like to complete their college essays before senior year begins. Susan Danoff will run sessions during
the weeks of June 25 and August
29, from 9 a.m. to noon. Visit
www.princetonwritingtutor.com.
Donate Please
HomeFront needs the help of
the community for its annual camp
program for homeless children.
The current economy and job market have created increases in the
number of people seeking resources from HomeFront. As contributions are more difficult to
come by, several programs at risk
include the camp serving more
than 120 children from 2 to 16
years old.
HomeFront’s summer camps
are a combination of volunteer efforts, community donations, and a
caring staff providing recreational,
athletic, academic activities, and
nutritious meals. The cost of the
camp is $135 per camper per week.
Visit www. Homefrontnj.org.
Mercer Alliance to End
Homelessness is seeking summer
clothing donations for the Thursday, June 28, ninth Mercer County’s Project Homelessness Connect. Donations are accepted at
3131 Princeton Pike, building 4,
Suite 113, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
Tuesday, June 26. Requested donations include pants, shorts,
shoes, and sneaker for men; thin
beach towels, gym bags, rain coats,
and sweatshirts. Contact Tarry
Truitt at 609-844-1008 or E-mail
[email protected]
PEAC Health & Fitness and
Catholic Charities are collecting
food pantry items for area families
in need. The food pantry is often a
point of entry into a comprehensive
array of services, resources, and
understanding. PEAC will be accepting non-perishable food items
during the month of July at 1440
Lower Ferry Road, Ewing. Contact
Christine Tentilucci at 609-8832000, by E-mail [email protected], or visit
www.peachealthfitness.com.
Faith
Sharim V’Sharot, central New
Jersey’s Jewish chamber choir, has
auditions for new singers in June,
August, and September by appointment. Upcoming concerts are
in Princeton, Lawrenceville, and
more. The largely a cappella choir
sings in Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino,
Italian, and English, and has openings for all voices. Visit www.sharimvsharot.com, call 609-22CHOIR, or E-mail [email protected]
Law Scholarship
Mercer County Bar Foundation offers scholarships to individuals pursuing a legal education in
accredited law schools. The Foundation’s scholarship is awarded to
a student who shows financial need
and is involved in community organizations. Applicants must have
some ties with Mercer County. Application deadline is Tuesday, July
31. Call 609-585-6200 or E-mail
Christine Brennan at [email protected]
Summer Meals
Cranbury Township invites
application for the inaugural farmers and vendors market that will
occur every Friday, noon to 4 p.m,
from July 13 to September 21, on
Park Place West. All produce must
USDA offers a summer food
service program for children in
low-income areas to get a free meal
during the summer months when
schools are closed. Summer meals
are free for children 18 and under at
History
YWCA Princeton offers summer English lessons in pronunciation, conversation, grammar, and
writing. The five-week classes begin Monday, July 9. Register for
one week or more with open enrollment throughout the summer.Call
609-497-2100, ext. 329 or register
at www.ywcaprinceton.org/esl.
The
Jewish
Community
Youth Foundation is starting its
tenth year with more than 160 teens
participating in the project administered by the Ricky and Andrew J.
Shechtel Philanthropic Fund, Jewish Family & Children’s Service,
and the Jewish Federation of
Princeton Mercer Bucks. Registration for students in grades eight to
ten is in progress. Visit www.jfcsonline.org/jcyf.html or contact
Celeste Albert at 609-987-8100 or
[email protected] The first
meeting will take place in the fall.
Each year the participants are
required to contribute $120 which
is then matched by the Shechtel
Philanthropic Fund and the Federation. The dollars are pooled together, so that each group of 20
participants has $7,200 to allocate
to worthy causes. The students
meet six times between October
and March in the Princeton area.
For Creative Kids
K’NEX Brands offers a building challenge for young designers.
The annual search invites young
builders to design a creative, original model made entirely from
K’NEX parts. The age groups are 5
to 6, 7 to 8, and 9 to 12. The models
are judged on creativity, uniqueness, and detail. The three grand
prize winners will receive a trip for
three to K’NEX headquarters near
Philadelphia, for the award ceremony. An additional seven finalists will each receive a check for
$500 and a $250 K’NEX shopping
spree. The deadline is Tuesday,
September 4. Winners are announced in October. Visit www.knex.com for an entry form and information.
American Red Cross, Gold’s
Gym, 761 Route 33 West, Hightstown, 800-733-2767. www.redcrossblood.org. Register. 8 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
Wellness
Classes, Onsen For All, 4451
Route 27, Princeton, 609-9244800. www.onsenforall.com. Introduction to yoga at 9:15 a.m.
Gentle yoga at 10:25 a.m. Multilevel yoga at 11:30 a.m. Register.
$15 each. 9:15 a.m.
imm
Carillon Concert, PrincetonGUnie
F r e eHistorical
S h e e p Society
Hassle Fre Walking Tour,
!
versity, 88 College Road West,
Shopping of Princeton,
W i t hBainbridge
e v e r y House,
Princeton, 609-258-3654. Jeff
158 Nassau
P e r f e cStreet,
t S l e e pPrinceton,
er
Davis from California performs on
609-921-6748.
Two-hour
walking
Purc
hase
the Class of 1892 bells. Rain or
tour of downtown Princeton and
shine. Free. 1 to 1:45 p.m.
University.
$7; $4 for
Belvedere Firm
Set UpPrinceton
Set
ages 6 to 12. 2 to 4Twin
p.m.
$649
Good Causes
For Singers
New Farmers’ Market
Classical Music
No
icks,
open sites. In addition to a healthy
meal, the program offers enjoyable
learning activities held in a safe
place. Call the hotline at 866-3486479 for locations.
Summer ESL
Blood Drive
$799
Removal
Book Sale
Full Set
King Set
Twin Set
Full Set
King Set
Addison
$899
Twin Set
Full Set
King Set
Aaron’s Jump, South Brunswick
Food Pantry, Cross Keys Airport,
Public
VanWang Pillow Top
Promise 9Vera
CrystalPlainsboro
Vera Wang Euro
Top Library,
Freefall Adventures, 300 Dahlia
Set
Doren TwinStreet,
609-275-2897. Twin Set
Avenue, Williamstown, 732-297Full Set
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro.
Hard- Full Set
King Set
2233.
www.aaronsjump.com.
backs, $1;
paperbacks, 50 cents; King Set
Aaron Rosloff of Kendall Park is
miscellaneous media and art at
celebrating his 91st birthday by
bargain
prices.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sofa
& Recliner
parachuting from a plane. Last
Sale
year’s event raised more than Roller
Whole
Month
Derby
$3,000 for the food pantry. Send
of JANUARY!
New
Jersey
Hellrazors,
Kendall
donations to South Brunswick HuANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
Park Roller Rink, 3550 Route 27,
man Intervention Trust, Box 190,
ENTIRE MONTH OF JUNE
Kendall
Park,
908-240-2412.
Monmouth Junction 08852 or doEVERYTHING
ON SALE!
www.njhellrazors.com.
Vs.
Skynate online. 1 p.m.
land Roller Girls of Hackettstown.
The members of Hellrazors, a
Faith
team based in New Brunswick, inOriginal Mind Zen Sangha, Felclude women of all ages. $12. 6:30
Where quality still matters.
lowship in Prayer, 291 Witherp.m.
4621 Route 27, Kingston, NJ
spoon Street, Princeton. www.originalmindzen.com. Zen meditation and Buddhist services. Free. 7
Monday-Friday 10-6; Saturday 10-5; Sunday 12-5
to 9 p.m.
Design Services Available.
www.riderfurniture.com
Continued on following page
$1199
29
have been grown in
New Jersey. All prices
must be marked. Call
609-395-0900,
ext.
234 for application.
MCFOODS, Middlesex County’s emergency food distribution
network, seeks donations. Bring
canned and packaged goods include tuna fish, cereal, condensed
milk, canned meats, peanut butter,
jelly, toiletries, baby supplies, and
paper products to Plays-in-the Park
performances through August 11.
1 Pine Drive, Edison, www.playsinthepark.com.
Art Way Gallery, Princeton Alliance Church, 20 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-7346546.
www.artwaygallery.org.
Opening reception for “Inverted
Minds,” a joint project with Dalet
Gallery of Philadelphia, curated by
Sheila Geister. The exhibit features paintings by Thibaud
Thiercelin and photography by
Leo Vayn. On view to July 22.
Thiercelin, a self taught French
painter, presents autobiographical
paintings focusing on his son,
Valentin, who was diagnosed with
autism at age 3. 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
THE NEWS
$1399
Rider Furniture
609-924-0147
30
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Plainsboro
Harassment. On Saturday, May
19, police responded to a call about
a harassing E-mail received by an
employee of Bristol-Myers Squibb
at 777 Scudders Mill Road. The Email was sent by a former employee
whom the victim had previously
terminated from the company.
Criminal Mischief. Police responded to a complaint of criminal
mischief at the Raven’s Crest
apartments on Saturday, June 9.
The victim reported that his black
2004 Acura TL had been scratched
in multiple areas with an unknown
object between Thursday, June 7,
and Saturday, June 9. Damage to
the vehicle is estimated at $500.
Police are investigating a complaint of criminal mischief after the
rear wiper blade was ripped off of a
2012 Honda Fit parked at the Deer
Creek apartments. The alleged
crime was committed between 10
p.m. on Wednesday, June 13, and 5
p.m. on Thursday, June 14. The
Honda belongs to a 40-year-old
resident of the apartment complex.
Under the Influence of CDS.
On Saturday, June 9 at 3:50 a.m.
police stopped a 2011 Infiniti
speeding at 74 miles per hour on
Route 1 north. Police investigated
and administered field sobriety
tests to the driver, 30-year-old Bin
Wei Choo of Westfield. Police said
Choo failed a battery of tests and
was placed under arrest. He was issued a complaint summons for being under the influence of a controlled dangerous substance as well
as motor vehicle summonses for
DWI, reckless driving, and speeding. Choo was later released with a
future court date.
From The Police Blotter
Jewelry Theft. Police are investigating a report from a guest of the
Wyndham Hotel at 900 Scudders
Mill Road that a white gold diamond solitaire necklace worth
about $3,000 was stolen from her
room. The incident allegedly occurred between 8 and 11:30 a.m. on
Sunday, June 10.
Drug Paraphernalia. On Saturday, June 9, at 9 p.m. police investigated a report of drug paraphernalia found by a resident of
Wyndhurst Drive in her son’s bedroom. The mother contacted police
after she discovered a small glass
pipe with foil attached to the top
that appeared to have burnt marijuana residue inside.
DWI. Police arrested 23-yearold John Murphy of Billerica,
Mass., after observing him driving
erratically on Route 1 north near
Independence Way at 2:48 a.m. on
Sunday, June 10. Police determined that Murphy was intoxicated. Murphy was arrested and his
vehicle was impounded. After processing Murphy was released to a
friend. He faces charges of DWI,
reckless driving, and failure to
maintain a lane.
Just before 1 a.m. on Sunday,
June 17, Plainsboro Police arrested
26-year-old Matthew Parker of
Neptune. Police observed Parker
driving erratically on the wrong
side of Hunters Glen Drive. Parker
issued summonses for DWI, reckless driving, and failure to keep
right at an intersection. He was released with a future court date.
Car Fire. On Sunday, June 17,
at 11:39 p.m. Plainsboro Police responded to a report of a BMW on
fire in a parking lot on Aspen Drive. The Plainsboro Fire Department extinguished the blaze.
The owner of the BMW was listed as a resident of Bayonne. Cars
parked on either side of the burning
BMW were partially damaged and
the owners were notified. The fire
began in the car’s engine and was
not deemed suspicious by police.
Bag Stolen. A 54-year-old resident of West Orange Township reported a bag stolen from Morris
Davison park between 11 a.m. and
1 p.m. on Sunday, June 10. He told
police the next day he had been
playing a soccer game attended by
about 60 people. The man says he
placed the bag containing his
iPhone, wallet, credit cards, cash,
and several personal items on the
ground near the soccer field before
the game. The value of the bag and
its contents was estimated at $450.
The case was turned over to Plainsboro’s detective bureau.
Windshield Smashed. On
Tuesday, June 12, at 7:33 a.m. a 54year-old resident of the Ravens
Crest apartments notified police
that the rear windshield of her Mercedes was smashed inward. The
resident parked her car at 10 p.m.
on Monday, June 11, in the parking
lot for building 50 on Ravens Crest
Drive. The estimated damage to the
vehicle is $500.
Sunglasses Stolen. On Wednesday, June 13, police responded to a
call from a High School North student that a pair of Oakley Holbrook
sunglasses valued at $150 was
stolen from his car in the school’s
parking lot at 90 Grover’s Mill
Road. The theft allegedly occurred
between 12:30 and 3:40 p.m.
West Windsor
Marijuana Possession. On Saturday, June 2, West Windsor Police were conducting a business
check of the LukOil gas station at
351 Route 1 when they noticed a
man leaning out of the driver’s
door of a gray Subaru. Police approached the driver, and they noticed several small bags that appeared to contain marijuana on the
front passenger’s seat. The driver,
20-year-old Jarrett Johnson of
Plainsboro, moved the bags to the
floor of the car. He later admitted to
police that the bags contained marijuana, and Johnson was placed under arrest. He was issued summonses for possession of marijuana under 50 grams, operating an
unregistered vehicle, littering, and
having a CDS (controlled dangerous substance) in a motor vehicle.
He was processed, released, and
given a future court date.
On Monday, June 4, police arrested 19-year-old Nicholas Zinsmeister of Princeton, who was
parked in front of Panera Bread in
Nassau Park. Police noticed his car
in a suspicious spot in the parking
lot. Upon investigation they found
Zinsmeister reclined in the driver’s
seat with the odor of marijuana
coming from inside the vehicle.
Police found Zinsmeister in possession of under 50 grams of marijuana as well as drug paraphernalia. He was taken to headquarters
and issued criminal summonses for
those offenses as well as a traffic
summons for possession of a controlled dangerous substance in a
motor vehicle. Zinsmeister was later released with a future court date.
Shoplifting. On Wednesday,
June 6, police responded to a complaint of shoplifting at Wal-Mart at
101 Nassau Park. Wal-Mart’s loss
prevention team told police that the
alleged criminal, 22-year-old
Michael Bohnert of Trenton, entered the store empty-handed and
picked up several items in the store.
He then presented the items to the
returns department along with a
fraudulent receipt and received
$27.32. Loss prevention said
Bohnert then bought merchandise
valued at $10.97 with store credit.
Police arrested Bohnert, who was
issued criminal summonses for
shoplifting and theft by deception.
After processing in West Windsor
he was turned over to a neighboring
jurisdiction on an outstanding warrant.
Police responded to a call from
Wal-Mart loss prevention on Sunday, June 3. Forty-six year old
George T. Lewis of Trenton was in
the custody of store security after
he allegedly took items from the
tool department and left the store
without paying. The value of the
items was estimated at $576.84.
Lewis was arrested and issued a
criminal summons for shoplifting.
He was released pending a future
court date.
Continued from preceding page
Fireworks
Monday
July 2
Health
On Stage
A Grand Night for Singing, Bucks County
Playhouse, 70 South Main Street, New
Hope, 215-862-2041. www.buckscountyplayhouse.com. An evening of Rodgers and
Hammerstein’s greatest hits. $29 to $54.
Through Sunday, July 22. 8 p.m.
Film
Spirit of Princeton, Princeton Stadium,
609-683-4008.
www.spiritofprinceton.homestead.com. Independence Day celebration. Picnics welcome. Bring blankets or
chairs. No alcoholic beverages. 7 p.m.
Monthly
Meeting,
Compassionate
Friends, Capital Health System, 1445
Whitehorse-Mercerville Road, Hamilton,
609-516-8047. www.tcfmercer.org. Meeting to assist families toward the positive resolution of grief following the death of a child
of any age and to provide information to help
others be supportive. 7:30 p.m.
Politics
Plainsboro Artists’ Group, Plainsboro
Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street, 609275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro.
Painters, sculptors, mixed media artists,
and photographers meet to exchange ideas
and connect with each other. 6:30 p.m.
Peace is Patriotic, Coalition for Peace Action, Monument Park, Route 206 and Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-924-5022.
www.peacecoalition.org. Bring a picnic
lunch, lawn chair, and blanket. Music by the
Solidarity Singers of the New Jersey Industrial Union Council. Honorees include Kip
Cherry, Princeton Area Interfaith Anti-Torture Group; Jeffrey Laurenti, former executive director of the UN Association of the
United States; and Edward Anthony Slater
Jr., participant in Occupy Trenton. Ending in
time for the Spirit of Princeton fireworks. 6
p.m.
Pop Music
Singles
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “The City
Dark.” 7 p.m.
Art
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony Chorus, 112
Main Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro,
732-469-3983.
www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members are welcome. 7:15 p.m.
Schools
Off the Page, Lawrence Library, Darrah
Lane and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. Participatory
“table read” for aspiring actors and other
amateurs. E-mail: [email protected] Register. 6:30 p.m.
Acting with a Day Job: Exploring Ways to
Be Theatrical, Lawrence Library, Darrah
Lane and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. Seminar for
theater enthusiasts who want to get involved in local theater followed by “table
read” by attendees. With actress Jenny
Scudder. E-mail: [email protected] Register. 6:30 p.m.
Singles Night, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road,
West Windsor, 609-716-8771. Drop in for
soups, sandwiches, desserts, tea, coffee,
and
conversation.
Register
at
http://ht.ly/3gd9w 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Socials
General Meeting, Italian American Festival Association, Heritage Center, 2421
Liberty Street, Hamilton, 609-631-7544.
www.italianamericanfestival.com. Seeking
volunteers for the September festival. Open
to the public. 7 p.m.
For Kids
Race Clinic, Eastern Express Swim Team,
College of New Jersey, Aquatic Center,
2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, 908-2958133. For ages 6 to 12 able to swim at least
three strokes. Must be a member of a summer league swim team. 6 to 7 p.m.
JUNE 22, 2012
THE NEWS
31
WW-P News Classifieds
HOW TO ORDER
HOME MAINTENANCE
BUSINESS SERVICES
INSTRUCTION
GARAGE SALES
Mail, E-Mail, or Fax: That’s all it takes
to order a classified in the West WindsorPlainsboro News. Mail your ad to the 12
Roszel Road, Princeton 08540. Fax it to
609-243-9020, or use our e-mail address:
[email protected] We will confirm
your insertion and the price, which is sure
to be reasonable: Classifieds are just 50
cents a word, with a $7.00 minimum. Repeats in succeeding issues are just 40
cents per word, and if your ad runs for 12
consecutive issues, it’s only 30 cents per
word.
Amazing
house
painting.
Interior/exterior. Wallpaper removal,
deck & fence refinishing, powerwashing, stucco/aluminum siding (painting).
Licensed and insured. Owner operated.
Free estimates. 215-736-2398.
ing and/or administrative needs. Many
services available. Reasonable rates.
Work done at your office or mine. Call
Debra @ 609-448-6005 or visit www.vyours.com.
Music Lessons: Piano, guitar, drum,
sax, clarinet, F. horn, oboe, t-bone,
voice, flute, trumpet, violin, cello, banjo,
mandolin, harmonica, uke, and more.
$28 half hour. School of Rock. Adults
or kids. Join the band! Princeton 609924-8282. Princeton Junction 609-8970032.
Hightstown
609-448-7170.
www.farringtonsmusic.com.
chairs & much more. June 23 & 24, 9-3,
36A North Mill Road, Princeton Junction, 609-799-4257.
OFFICE RENTALS
Plainsboro - 700 SF to 3,000 SF Office Suites: in single story building in
well maintained office park off Plainsboro Road. Immediately available. Individual entrance and signage, separate
AC/Heat and electricity. Call 609-7992466 or E-mail [email protected]
CONTRACTING
Handyman/Yardwork:
Painting/Carpentry/Masonry/Hauling/A
ll Yard Work from top to bottom. Done
by pros. Call 609-737-9259 or 609-2735135.
PM Whitney Power Washing and
Deck Care: Siding, patios, roofs and
decks. 20 years experience, exceptional quality, fully insured and licensed.
609-658-0073.
HOME MAINTENANCE
A Quick Response Handyman: will
give you a free estimate for electrical,
plumbing, painting, repair or other project around your house. Please call 609275-6631
Tuesday
July 3
Dance
Get Into Step, Lawrence Library,
Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. www.mcl.org. Aerobic
warmup followed by workout
dance routine. With certified fitness trainer Maria Okros. E-mail:
[email protected]
Register.
5:00 p.m.
On Stage
A Grand Night for Singing,
Bucks County Playhouse, 70
South Main Street, New Hope,
215-862-2041.
www.buckscountyplayhouse.com.
An
evening of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s greatest hits. $29 to $54. 8
p.m.
Literati
Poetry Workshop, Delaware Valley Poets, Lawrence Public Library, Darrah Lane, 609-8829246. www.delawarevalleypoets.com. Visitors welcome. Bring 10
copies of your poem. Free. 7:30
p.m.
Classical Music
Community Sing In, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Vivaldi’s Gloria, and Bach’s
Magnificat. Bring your own score
or borrow one. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Princeton Garden
Statesmen, Plainsboro Library, 9
Van Doren Street, Plainsboro,
888-636-4449.
www.menwhosing.org. Men of all ages
and experience levels invited to
sing in four-part harmony. The
nonprofit organization presents at
numerous charities. Free. 7:30 to
10 p.m.
INTERIOR PAINTING & CARPENTRY: 20 years experience, exceptional
quality, fully insured and licensed, PM
WHITNEY. 609-658-0073.
Landscaping Maintenance: Clean
up, mulching, mowing, trimming, planting and more. Call or Text: 609 7221137.
robthehandyman- licensed, insured, all work guaranteed. Free Estimates. We do it all - electric, plumbing,
paint, wallpaper, powerwashing, tile,
see website for more: robthehandym a n . v p w e b . c o m
[email protected],
609-2695919.
Sump Pump Failed? How can you
survive when your sump pump fails or
the power is out? Want to avoid a flooded basement? For a low cost plan,
please call 609-275-6631.
DECKS REFINISHED
Cleaning/Stripping and Staining of
All Exterior Woods: Craftsmanship
quality work. Fully insured and licensed
with references. Windsor WoodCare.
609-799-6093.
www.windsorwoodcare.com.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Bookkeeper/Administrative Specialist: Versatile & experienced professional will gladly handle your bookkeep-
Good Causes
Meeting, Allies, 1262 WhitehorseHamilton Square Road, Hamilton,
609-689-0136. For adult volunteers with hobbies or interests to
share with adults who have developmental disabilities. Register
with Linda Barton. 5:30 to 7:30
p.m.
Fireworks & Music
East Windsor Township. www.east-windsor.nj.us. Music by Jerry
Rife’s Rhythm Kings Dixieland
Jazz Band, a six piece band from
the Delaware Valley region, and
Trenton Brass Quintet Plus One, a
six piece ensemble from Central
Jersey. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m.
Raindate is Saturday, July 7. 6
p.m.
Blood Drive
American Red Cross, Cranbury
First Aid Squad, 68 Maplewood
Avenue, Cranbury, 800-4483543. www.redcrossblood.org. 2
to 7 p.m.
Wellness
Full Moon Meditation, Authentic
Yoga Tradition, Website. www.authenticyogatradition.com. Yoga
in the Himalayan tradition with
Acharya Girish Jha. Register. Donations benefit charities. 10:30
p.m.
Socials
Meeting, Rotary Club of Plainsboro, Guru Palace, 2215 Route 1
South, North Brunswick, 732-2130095. www.plainsbororotary.org.
7:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Memoir
Writing
Workshop,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. Introductory course for seniors to reflect on a significant life experience and put it on paper. Facilitated by Maria Okros. E-mail [email protected] Register. 2:30 to
4:30 p.m.
COMPUTER SERVICES
Computer problem? Or need a
used computer in good condition $80? Call 609-275-6631.
ADULT CARE
Best At Home Senior Care Non
Medical home care services. Experienced and professional home care staff
to help you in your home. Individualized
services at your own pace. We are
available 24/7 @ 1-888-908-9450.
www.mybestseniorcare.com
INSTRUCTION
College Essay Writing Coach: Help
selecting topics and editing college application essays. Clients accepted to
top universities. Twenty-five years experience teaching writing to graduate
students. [email protected] 609-902-2777
Learn to play the Cello. Special Introductory Summer Rates. 6 lessons for
the price of 5. Certified NJ and Suzuki
Cello Teacher. Now accepting new students ages 4-8. Call Alan for details.
609-558-6175. E-mail [email protected]
www.thecellolearningcenter.com
Lessons in Your Home: Music
lessons in your home. Piano, clarinet,
saxophone, flute and guitar. Call Jim
609-737-9259 or 609-273-5135.
Wednesday
July 4
Independence Day. Postal and
bank holiday.
Dancing
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Instruction followed
by dance. $8. 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Classical Music
Operatic Arias Concert, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Participants in the CoOperative program perform arias. Free.
7:30 p.m.
Food & Dining
Cornerstone
Community
Kitchen,
Princeton
United
Methodist Church, Nassau at
Vandeventer Street, Princeton,
609-924-2613. www.princetonumc.org. Hot meals served, prepared by TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30
p.m.
History
Celebrating America’s Independence Day, Princeton Battlefield State Park, 500 Mercer
Road, Princeton, 609-921-0074.
Revolutionary War reenactment
soldiers and second Continental
Artillery demonstrate drill, artillery,
and flintlock muskets. Period
games for all ages. Tour the
Thomas Clarke House and the
Arms of the Revolution exhibit.
Bring a picnic lunch, hike on the
trails. No barbecues or alcohol.
Free. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
July 4 Jubilee, Morven Museum,
55 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-924-8144. www.morven.org.
Sign the Declaration of Independence, commemorate the 13
colonies at a bell ringing ceremony, demonstrations of colonial life,
meet George Washington, live
Piano and Flute Lessons with experienced instructor, M.A. All levels/ages.
Excellent rates. 609-936-9811
Tutor — SAT, ACT, SSAT — Reading, Writing, Essays: Boost your
scores with outstanding private instruction from college English professor.
Many excellent references throughout
West Windsor-Plainsboro. My former
students are attending top colleges.
Reasonable rates. 609-658-6914.
WANTED TO BUY
Antique Military Items: And war
relics wanted from all wars and countries. Top prices paid. “Armies of the
Past LTD”. 2038 Greenwood Ave.,
Hamilton Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail outlet is open Saturdays 10 to 4:00,
or by appointment.
OPPORTUNITIES
Seeking medical professionals,
nurses, techs, pharmaceutical reps.
Work from home in partnership with other doctors with dream income potential.
Call 609-851-1582.
HELP WANTED
MERCHANDISE MART
Tenor or Bass Trombone Needed:
College-bound player needs to buy one
of each to take the place of high school
loaners. If you have one gathering dust
please E-mail [email protected]
GARAGE SALES
Big moving sale: Victorian & 1910s
oak antique furniture, custom 12 x 16
burgundy/beige wool rug and runner —
mint condition, African/world masks,
ladders, spreader, household miscellaneous, clothes & more. June 23 & 24 93, 36A North Mill Road, Princeton Junction, 609-799-4257.
Preschool liquidation: closing after
32 years! Educational supplies: science, art, math etc., toys, hundreds of
children’s books, high chair, tables,
music, refreshments, and more.
Noon to 3 p.m.
Choral Concert of Patriotic Music, William Trent House, 15
Market Street, Trenton, 609-9890087. www.Williamtrenthouse.org. Trenton Capital Singers perform an outdoor concert at 7 p.m.
Bring a picnic. The first floor of the
museum will be open for tours.
Bring lawn chair or blanket. 5:30
p.m.
Lectures
Camera Club, South Brunswick
Arts
Commission,
South
Brunswick Community Center,
124 New Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. Free. 7 to 9
p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com. New Britain.
$11 to $27. The team will wear
stars and stripes jerseys. Independence Day fireworks post game.
7:05 p.m.
Thursday
July 5
On Stage
A Grand Night for Singing,
Bucks County Playhouse, 70
South Main Street, New Hope,
215-862-2041.
www.buckscountyplayhouse.com.
An
evening of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s greatest hits. $29 to $54. 4
and 8:30 p.m.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 8 p.m.
Family Theater
Little Red’s Wild Ride, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. $9. 11 a.m.
Property Inspectors: Part-time
$30k, full-time $80k. No experience, will
train. Call Tom, 609-731-3333.
SALES - REAL ESTATE Need a
Change? Looking to get a RE License?
We take you by the hand to ensure your
success and income! FREE Coaching!
Unlimited Income! No Experience
needed! Contact Weidel Today! Hamilton:
Judy
609-586-1400,
[email protected]; Princeton: Mike
609-921-2700, [email protected]
Trainers, spin/group exercise instructors wanted at Plainsboro fitness facility. Fax resumes to 609-7992822 attention Stephanie or call
Stephanie at 609-799-2800.
Art
Art Exhibit, Lawrence Library,
Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. First day for “A Painter’s
Songbook,” an exhibit featuring
the works of Bill Plank of Lawrenceville. On view to July 30. Reception on Saturday, July 14, 2 to
4 p.m. 10 a.m.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 732789-5272. vivatango.org. Class
and practice session. $12. 8 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer Courtyard Concert Series, Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Shopping Center, 301
North Harrison Street, Princeton,
609-924-8777. The Jazz Lobsters.
Free. Bring a lawn chair. 6 to 8 p.m.
Concert and Fireworks, Cranbury, Main Street, 609-395-0900.
Concert by Mercer County Symphonic Band followed by fireworks
at 9 p.m. Bring blankets and a picnic dinner (no alcohol). 6:30 p.m.
Farm Markets
Princeton Farmers’ Market,
Hinds Plaza, Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-655-8095. Produce, cheese, breads, baked
goods, flowers, chef cooking
demonstrations, books for sale,
family activities, workshops, music, and more. Rain or shine. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Pontoon Boat Nature Tour, Mercer County Park Commission,
Lake Mercer, Mercer County Park
Marina, West Windsor, 609-8836606. Binoculars provided. Ticket
sales begin at noon. Weather-permitting. $5 to $7. 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park, 609-394-3300. New Britain.
$11 to $27. 7:05 p.m.
Continued on following page
32
THE NEWS
JUNE 22, 2012
Continued from preceding page
Friday
July 6
Legally Blonde: The Musical,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. www.dpacatoat.com. Musical based on the film.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream,
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Shakespeare `70 presents the light-hearted tale of four
young lovers and a group of amateur actors in a moonlit forest. $16.
8 p.m.
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “Moneyball.” 7 p.m.
Art
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. For
beginners. Bring a drum or use
one provided. Other percussion
welcome. With Ange Chianese of
Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah Entertainers.
E-mail: [email protected] Register. 4:30 p.m.
Dancing
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 p.m.
Comedy
Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center,
West Windsor, 609-987-8018.
www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Classical Music
Giulio Cesare in Egitto, Opera
Modo, All Saints Church, 16 All
Saints Road, Princeton, 609-4510608. www.operamodo.weebly.com. Italian Baroque opera by
George Frideric Handel. $25. 7
p.m.
Operatic Arias Concert, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Participants in the CoOperative program perform arias. Free.
7:30 p.m.
Family Theater
Live Music
Little Red’s Wild Ride, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. $9. 11 a.m.
Bob Orlowski, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road,
Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Jazz and easy listening. 8 to 10 p.m.
Snow White, Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, 355 Washington
Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com. $5. Seat
cushions and insect repellent are
recommended. 11 a.m.
Open Mic Night, Infini-T Cafe, 4
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609712-3921. Hosted by Manish
Anand of West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
Drum Circle
Art Exhibit, Small World Coffee,
14 Witherspoon Street, Princeton.
smallworldcoffee.com. Opening
reception for “Time and Light,” an
exhibit featuring the works of Mary
Witterschein. 4:30 p.m.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 8 p.m.
Film
net. Music at 6:30 p.m. Fireworks
at 9 p.m. Bring chairs, blankets,
and picnics. Rain date is Saturday,
July 7. 6:30 p.m.
Food & Dining
Restaurant Supported Agriculture Dinner Series, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.trepiani.com. Three
course farm to table dinner. Register. $29. 5 p.m.
Wellness
Drum Circle, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro,
609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Register. $15.
7:30 p.m.
The Rain in Spain: Ethan Daniel Levy of Plainsboro
is part of the ensemble of ‘My Fair Lady’ at Plays in
the Park in Edison through Saturday, June 30.
Kids Stuff
Drama Workshops, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. “Movement
and Dance” for aspiring actors
ages 7 to 12. Register. $35. 1:30
to 4:30 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
For Families
Independence Day Celebration,
South Brunswick Recreation,
Crossroads Middle School, 635
Georges Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbtnj.-
Mr. Ray, Forrestal Village, College Road West and Route 1
South, Plainsboro, 609-799-7400.
www.princetonforrestalvillage.com. Family concert. 6:30 to 7:30
p.m.
Singles
Divorce Recovery Program,
Princeton Church of Christ, 33
River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889. Non-denominational support group for men and women.
Free. 7:30 p.m.
Horse Show
Horse Show, Princeton Show
Jumping, Hunter Farms, 1315
The Great Road, Princeton, 609924-2932. Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park, 609-394-3300. New Britain.
$11 to $27. 7:05 p.m.
DONNA LUCARELLI
WHO WOULD YOU TRUST
TO SELL YOUR HOME?
SOLD BY
DONNA
I Get Close to Asking Price for My Listings
SOLD IN 2012! CLOSE TO ASKING PRICE!
2420 Ravens Crest, Plainsboro
List $179,900, SOLD $178,000
3 Stonelea, West Windsor
List $575,000, SOLD $560,000
26 Arden, Old Bridge
List $335,000, SOLD $332,000
21 Berrien, West Windsor
List $299,000, SOLD $294,000
MY CURRENT LISTINGS
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ACT
UNDER CONTR
IN 66 DAYS!
3 Roseland Ct., West Windsor 5 bed 2.5 bath TOTALLY
UPGRADED IN 2005 NEW KITCHEN AND 3 NEW BATHROOMS.
$600,000.
8 Cartwright Dr., West Windsor. 5 Bedroom Colonial beautifully
UPGRADED HOME GRANITE COUNTERTOPS IN KITCHEN AND
BATHROOMS, FRESHLY PAINTED. $550,000.
165 Conover Rd. West Windsor. MAGNIFICENT 3500 sq. ft
home Toll Bros at its best. Kitchen flows to family room and then
comes an Elite room (29x13). $660,000.
T
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IN
G
MEET
DONNA
HERE!
W
ES
407 Centre St.,
Beach Haven.
NE
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10 Wilson Way S. West Windsor. PERFECT in every way.
Totally UPGRADED home with a perfectly executed FULL FINISHED
BASEMENT to enjoy. $619,000.
36 Mark Twain. Hamilton Square. 3 BR, 1½ BAs. Newer Oak
Kitchen. Newer windows, hdwd floors, freshly painted. STEINERT HS.
Shows like a model. Beautiful deck. $265,000.
Top Sales Agent for All of 2011
Weichert Princeton Jct. Office,
2011 Ambassadors Club Achievement Weichert,
NJAR Circle of Excellence 2002-2011
4 bed 2.5 bath home
totally UPGRADED.
Walk 3 blocks
to the ocean walk
3 blocks to the bay.
4 Decks $585,000.
Office: 609-586-3700
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Cell: 609-903-9098
[email protected] • www.DonnaLucarelli.com
30 George Dye Rd. • Hamilton Sq., NJ 08690
All stats taken from Trend MLS as of 6/6/12.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

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