Manufacture and Wholesale Trading in Clothing including Corporate

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JOHANNESBURG OFFICE
BALLYOAKS OFFICE PARK, BUILDING B,
35 BALLYCLARE DRIVE, BRYANSTON EXT 7
P O BOX 3044, RANDBURG, 2125
TEL: +27 11 513 -1450 FAX: +27 11 463-2771
PORT ELIZABETH OFFICE
1ST FLOOR, BLOCK F, SOUTHERN LIFE GARDENS,
ND
70 2 AVENUE, NEWTON PARK
P O BOX 505, HUNTERS RETREAT, 6017
TEL: +27 41 394-0600 FAX: +27 41 363-2869
WEBSITE:
WWW.WHOOWNSWHOM.CO.ZA
REG NO: 1986/003014/07
Manufacture and Wholesale Trading in
Clothing including Corporate Wear and
Underwear
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
April 2013
COMPILED BY:
Kim Imrie
[email protected]
DIRECTORS: MAUREEN MPHATSOE (CHAIRPERSON), MICHELLE BEETAR (EXPERIAN), GLEN BALS (EXPERIAN), ANDREW MCGREGOR (MANAGING)
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Contents
Contents
1 INTRODUCTION
1 2 DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY
1 2.1 Industry Supply Chain
2 3 SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY
3 4 STATE OF THE INDUSTRY
8 4.1 Local
8 4.1.1 Corporate Actions
13 4.1.2 Regulations and Support Programmes
14 4.1.3 Black Economic Empowerment
17 4.2 Continental
17 4.3 International
19 5 INFLUENCING FACTORS
21 5.1 Government Intervention
21 5.2 Illegal Imports and Customs Fraud
22 5.3 Economic Environment
23 5.4 Retailers and the Quick Response Model
23 5.5 Access to Textiles
25 5.6 Technology and Information Technology
25 5.7 Rising Input Costs
26 5.8 Labour Resources
26 5.9 Cyclicality
27 5.10 Environmental Concerns
27 6 COMPETITION
27 6.1 Barriers to Entry
28 6.2 Research and Development
28 6.3 Innovation
28 7 SWOT ANALYSIS
28 8 FUTURE OUTLOOK
29 9 INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS
30 10 REFERENCES
31 10.1 Publications
31 10.2 Websites
32 APPENDIX 1
Background to the Clothing Industry
APPENDIX 2
Corporate Actions – Company closures between 2009 and 2012
APPENDIX 3
Import Tariffs on Clothing
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
33 33 35 35 39 39 Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
APPENDIX 4
Contents
43 NBC Compliant Companies
43 KZN CTC Members
53 List of CCTC Members
54 © Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
1
Page 1 of 57
INTRODUCTION
According to Statistics SA, the value of the local clothing manufacture industry in 2012 was
R14.8bn. The report provides a brief overview of a local manufacturing industry beset by closures
because of exposure to international market forces. It looks at a dual wage model which has
emerged, with metropolitan higher-margin manufacturing companies compliant with bargaining
council regulation co-existing with non-metropolitan lower-margin non-compliant manufacturing
companies.
2
DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY
To understand the current day clothing manufacture and wholesale trade industry it is helpful to
review the events of the past two decades. See Appendix 1 for a summary.
South Africa is a large importer of clothing with 67% of clothes sold in the year to June 2012
coming from China. The large demand for imports of this nature reflects a price-sensitive market
where approximately 80% of consumers have their demands met by discount stores. These
consumers are swayed more by price than by style, colour, print type, touch/feel, and sizing.
Higher end consumers like to choose from a wide variety of colours, styles and fabrics and
purchase small volumes of any one type of product, which is one of the main reasons why order
volumes are low in some categories. According to respondents, South African retailers source what
they can from the local market and make up the balance of their requirement through imports. Up
until recently it has been estimated that between 55% and 70% of the local market has been
catered for by imports. This is changing as retailers become more convinced of the quality and
reliability of local supply.
The domestic industry is concentrated mostly in the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal regions,
although some manufacturing activity also takes place in the Gauteng area. There are significant
regional differences.

The Western Cape, due to the high fashion orientation of its industry, has a concentration
of higher value-added manufacturing activities with a design-intensive, niche-market focus,
predominantly by medium to large-sized firms. Assisting the bigger concerns are a number
of small, flexible Cut, Make and Trims (CMTs) who have work outsourced to them by the
larger firms. According to The Apparel Manufacturer’s Association (AMSA) these companies
supply 10% to 15% of the market.

The KwaZulu-Natal area comprises a concentration of smaller factories and CMTs focused
on the mass market production of garment basics supplying the majority of the market
which is particularly price-sensitive.
In both regions there are manufacturing concerns of various sizes. To take up the demand left by
numerous factory closures a “proliferation of micro-enterprises, home industries and unregistered
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 2 of 57
firms” has arisen. There has been a move away from a formal factory model to a greater use of
sub-contracting out to CMTs as a means of survival. Thus instead of upgrading processes and
machinery, companies took to outsourcing to other companies, which has led to the industry
becoming globally less competitive. As a means of support to the ailing industry, the government
introduced “an industry upgrading incentive” as a replacement to the Duty Credit Certificate (DCC)
Programme, known as the Clothing and Textiles Competitiveness Programme (CTCP) which is
administered by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). See State of the Industry: Local and
Regulations for more information.
The clothing manufacturing industry is facilitated by the National Bargaining Council (NBC) which
has been in place since 2002. Clothing manufacturing companies are expected to be compliant with
NBC wage legislation which is determined on an annual basis through negotiation between the main
union, The South African Clothing and Textile Workers Union (SACTWU) and the Apparel
Manufacturers Association (AMSA). This association comprises seven employer organisations, the
Cape Clothing Association (CCA), Eastern Province Clothing Manufacturers’ Association (EPCMA),
Free State and Northern Cape Clothing Manufacturers’ Association (FSNCCMA), Natal Clothing
Manufacturers’ Association (NCMA), Northern Decentralised Clothing Manufacturers’ Association
(NDCMA), Transvaal Clothing Manufacturers’ Association (TCMA) and the Coastal Clothing
Manufacturers’ Association (CCMA). Typically these NBC-compliant companies supply clothing to
retail chains such as Woolworths, Foschini and Truworths. In areas of KwaZulu-Natal such as
Durban, Newcastle, QwaQwa and Botshabelo there are non-compliant factories, operating outside
NBC compliance. These are generally low-wage, low-margin operations producing for retailers such
as Mr Price, Jet and Ackermans, who cater to a lower LSM category of consumer.
2.1
Industry Supply Chain
Agents/ Design Houses
Suppliers of Raw Material Inputs
(Textiles, Yarn, Embellishments)
Importers of Clothing, Chinese
Importers/Retailers of Clothing
Clothing Manufacture Companies
(incl.Design teams)
CMTs
Formal Retailers
Exports to Regional Stores
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Consumers
Informal Chinese Retailers
Hawkers
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 3 of 57
The following six major retail groups, Edcon, Woolworths, Foschini, Truworths, Mr Price and Pepkor
dominate the sector and have a major influence on the manufacturing industry.
There is also
demand for clothing sold in speciality stores, which may be part of a group or independently
owned. Two examples are:

the Platinum Group, comprising designer labels Jenni Button, Hilton Weiner, Urban, Aca Joe
and Vertigo; and

the Queenspark group which operates 53 stores nationally and two franchise stores in
Botswana and one in Namibia.
In an attempt to ensure a steady supply of apparel targeted at their market, some retailers have
acquired their manufacturing supplier. For example:

Foschini purchased its supplier Prestige in early 2012;

Pep has long had its in-house manufacturing arm, Pepclo;

Rex Trueform created a retail arm, Queenspark in the early 1990s; and

Holdsport the sportsware retailer has in-house manufacturing capacity through its
ownership of specialist brand, First Ascent. It expanded its clothing line by buying Capebased outdoor wear specialists, Capestorm.
Apart from the retailers mentioned above there exists an extensive network of approximately 6000
Chinese shops selling almost 100% imported items. According to retired professor of economics at
Stellenbosch University, Professor Colin McCarthy, this informal network makes up an even bigger
retail chain in South Africa, bigger than any other operated by the large retailers mentioned above.
There are suspicions that a large proportion of items sold by these shops and hawkers has been
brought in without paying the required average import duty of 45%.
3
SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY
As of October 2012 there were 936 registered manufacturers nationally employing 54,737
employees. The industry has experienced substantial closures and loss of employment as indicated
in the table below.
No. of Clothing
Employees
Companies
January 2005
June 2009
October 2012
1 182
96 721
1008
61 173
936
54 737
[Source: National Bargaining Council]
The main clothing manufacturers, according to the NBC database, by number of employees are
presented below.
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 4 of 57
The main clothing manufacturers are presented below.
Company
Allwear (Pty) Ltd
Al’s Clothing cc
BAF Industrial Safety &
Description of Products

School uniforms

Menswear

Women’s wear

Girl’s wear

Infant wear.

Imports industrial
Workwear cc
Celrose Clothing (Pty) Ltd
Regions of
Operation
Revenue
KwaZulu-Natal
Employees
1098
Western Cape
300
Gauteng
protective clothing

Ladies’ wear

Men’s wear

Men’s wear

Ladies’ wear

Boys’ wear
DB Apparel South Africa (Pty)

Ladies’ lingerie
Ltd

Men’s underwear
Diva Fashions (Pty) Ltd

Ladies’ wear
Northern Cape
450
Durban Overall (Pty) Ltd

Ladies’ corporate wear
KwaZulu-Natal
682
Davinscot Tongaat (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
R257.0m
900
(2013)
KwaZulu-Natal
KwaZulu-Natal
800
R216.3m
943
(2012)
and uniforms

Men’s corporate wear
and uniforms
Fabio Milano (Pty) Ltd
Fields Wear cc

Imports underwear

Sleepwear

Hosiery

Ladies’ wear

Men’s wear

Children’s wear

Military uniforms
32
Northern Cape
464
KwaZulu-Natal
322

Body armour
F&R Clothing Manufacturers

Children’s wear
cc

Infant wear
Franz Falke Textiles (Pty) Ltd

Hosiery
Western Cape
R160.0m

Sports underwear
Northern Cape
(2012)
Giraffe Clothing cc

Ladies’ wear
KwaZulu-Natal

Men’s wear
Gina of Charles Street (Pty)

Children’s wear

Corporate wear
Gauteng
Ltd t/a [email protected]
Groovy Gears cc
House of Monatic (Pty) Ltd
400
374
R73.9m
466
(2012)

Ladies’ wear

Men’s wear

Children’s wear

Men’s wear

Ladies’ wear
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Western Cape
Western Cape
30
R174.0m
(2012)
750
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Company
Jacques Hau (Pty) Ltd
Description of Products

Children’s wear

Men’s and boy’s
Page 5 of 57
Regions of
Operation
Revenue
Employees
Western Cape
474
Gauteng
395
KwaZulu-Natal
480
sleepwear
Jaff & Company Ltd

Infant wear

Swimwear

Ladies’ and men’s
corporate wear

Ladies’ and men’s
formal wear and
leisure wear
Junit Manufacturing cc

Ladies’ and men’s
corporate clothing
Lancashire Manufacturing

Active and sports wear

School uniforms
Western Cape
500

Ladies’ and men’s
Western Cape
700
wear
Gauteng
Company (Pty) Ltd
Levi Strauss South Africa
(Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
Marburg Manufacturers (Pty)

Protective clothing
KwaZulu-Natal
Ltd t/a MB Workwear

Corporate clothing
Mathomo Group Ltd

Protective wear
Gauteng

Corporate and branded
Western Cape

Ladies’ and men’s
831
promotional wear
Ninian & Lester (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
1 166
underwear
Pals Clothing (Pty) Ltd

Swimwear

Hosiery

School uniforms

Ladies’ and men’s
Western Cape
483
wear

Parys Lingerie cc
Protective clothing

Corporate wear

Men’s, ladies’ and
Free State
4
children’s underwear
Pepkor Retail Ltd

Hosiery

Ladies’, men’s and
Western Cape
22 502
Western Cape
630
children’s wear

School uniforms

Ladies’, men’s and
children’s sleepwear
Peter Blond & Associates

Ladies’ wear
(Pty) Ltd
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Company
Seardel Group Trading (Pty)
Description of Products

Ltd:
Page 6 of 57
Regions of
Operation
Revenue
Ladies’, men’s and
Western Cape
R2,506.8m
children’s wear
KwaZulu-Natal
(2012)
Gauteng
(R907.0m
Employees
7 884

Berg River Textile

Underwear,

Brand ID

Lingerie

Brits Non Woven
R1,009.0m –

Easywear
Textiles)

First Factory Shops

Frame Knitting
–
Clothing;
Manufacturers

Frame Polypropylene

Hextex

Romatex Home Textiles

Seardel Apparel

Lilanie Clothing (Prestige)

Seardel Group Properties
SA Cloth CMT Specialists cc

Ladies’ wear
Free State
Sterling Clothing (Pty) Ltd

Ladies’ and men’s
Gauteng
500
40
wear
Time Clothing (Pty) Ltd

Ladies’ and men’s
Eastern Cape
825
KwaZulu-Natal
350
950
wear

Corporate wear

Safety clothing
Twin Clothing Manufacturers

Children’s wear
(Pty) Ltd

School uniforms
Trubok (Pty) Ltd

Ladies’ and men’s
KwaZulu-Natal
casual and corporate
Gauteng
wear
Northern Cape
Corporate Wear Companies
Company
Regions of
Operation
Durban Overall (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
Gina of Charles Street (Pty) Ltd t/a [email protected]
Gauteng
Revenue
Employees
682
R73.9m
466
(2012)
Jade Corporate Clothing Concepts (Pty) Ltd
Gauteng
47
Jaff & Company Ltd
Gauteng
395
Jadine House cc
Gauteng
2
Jo Borkett Fashions (Pty) Ltd
Western Cape
Gauteng
Marburg Manufacturers (Pty) Ltd t/a MB Workwear
KwaZulu-Natal
Duchess Uniforms (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
M1 Latex Products (Pty) Ltd t/a The Kit Group
Gauteng
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
R41.0m
120
(2012
831
300
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Company
The Style Factory c
Page 7 of 57
Regions of
Revenue
Operation
Gauteng
R8.0m
Employees
50
(2012)
Karma Clothing (Pty) Ltd
Gauteng
Trubok (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
70
950
Gauteng
Northern Cape
Sweet-Orr & Lybro (Pty) Ltd
Western Cape
J Gross and Company (Pty Ltd t/a Gross & Company
Gauteng
Imagemakers (Pty) Ltd
Western Cape
400
90
R35.0m
35
(2012)
Colbar Clothing (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
85
Jonsson Workwear (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
45
Wynns Manufacturing (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
780
Underwear Companies
Company
Regions
of
Revenue
Employees
Operation
Buffalo Clothing cc
KwaZulu-Natal
DB Apparel South Africa (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
69
R216.3m
943
(2012)
Do Re Manufacturing cc
Western Cape
121
Groovy Gears cc
Western Cape
30
Kingsgate Clothing (Pty) Ltd
Gauteng
1 053
Western Cape
McIver Apparel (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
250
Ninian & Lester (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
1 166
Parys Lingerie cc
Free State
Pepkor Retail Ltd
Western Cape
Prikell Clothing cc
KwaZulu-Natal
SA Bias Industries (Pty) Ltd
Western Cape
Seamless Technologies (Pty) Ltd
KwaZulu-Natal
Seardel Group Trading (Pty) Ltd:
Western Cape
4
22 502
66
R549.0m
1 659
(2012)
 Berg River Textile
KwaZulu-Natal
 Brand ID
Gauteng
 Brits Non Woven
 Easywear
 First Factory Shops
 Frame Knitting Manufacturers
 Frame Polypropylene
 Hextex
 Romatex Home Textiles
 Seardel Apparel
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
134
R2,506.8m
(2012)
(R907.0m –
Clothing;
R1,009.0m –
Textiles)
7 884
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Company
Page 8 of 57
Regions
of
Revenue
Employees
Operation
 Lilanie Clothing (Prestige)
 Seardel Group Properties
Suzi Products cc
Western Cape
158
Triton Clothing Manufacturers cc
KwaZulu-Natal
270
4
STATE OF THE INDUSTRY
4.1
Local
More than 50 000 jobs have been lost in the last decade as clothing companies have been forced to
close due to a combination of factors including an influx of imports from China and an inefficient
local industry not geared up to compete in a global environment. As mentioned, the events of the
past two decades are summarised in Appendix 1. More recently the clothing manufacture industry
has stabilised, with further closures less likely as clothing companies tap into the government
incentives detailed below, and become more efficient.
As a means of support to the ailing industry, the government introduced “an industry upgrading
incentive” as a replacement to the Duty Credit Certificate (DCC) Programme, known as the Clothing
and Textiles Competitiveness Programme (CTCP) which is administered by the Department of Trade
and Industry (DTI). The CTCP forms part of the government’s Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP)
and aims to help the industry upgrade processes, products and people. The government recognised
that because levels of profitability are very low there has been little incentive to invest in capital
upgrades. With the assistance of a Production Incentive Programme (PIP) the aim is to encourage
competitiveness. Similarly, the Competitiveness Improvement Programme (CIP) is geared towards
supporting the cluster concept of similar manufacturing entities or value chain clusters made up of
manufacturers, suppliers and retailers.
Support offered by the government to NBC-compliant companies with the CTCP and PI incentives
revealed the following results as at August 2012:

PI - released R1 149m in funding;

PI - saved 49 888 jobs;

PI - created a further 12 205 jobs; and

CTCP - disbursed R39m.
AMSA head, Johann Baard believes that the "DTI funding is money well spent," as more jobs are
created in clothing manufacturing than in any other industry. According to him a further factor
encouraging stability is a changing business model. Companies in the metropolitan areas of the
Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal are tapping into the quick response model which has occurred as
manufacturing concerns have become more efficient through investments in production processes.
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 9 of 57
Lowered costs, greater flexibility, lower production runs, high variability of production and quicker
turnaround times are the result. This model centres on providing a quick response to consumer
buying patterns. The supply chain is positioned to replenish stock based on actual consumer
preferences within a buying season. Retailers monitor sales on a daily basis, while manufacturers
allow for a greater level of flexibility in their manufacturing process where final embellishments and
even fabric dyeing in some cases are left to the last minute. The advantage for local manufacturers
is that in order for this model to work, a quick, close and readily available source of supply is
necessary. Selwyn Eagles of Foschini and a number of other players in the industry are positive
about the quick response model.
Attempts have been made to assist companies not compliant with NBC regulations to become
compliant. Dates for phasing in compliance were set up following intervention by Economic
Development Minister Ebrahim Patel in 2010. Firms needed to be 70% compliant by the end of
March 2011, 90% compliant by 1 January 2012 and 100% compliant by 30 April 2012. SACTWU
adopted a ‘living wage campaign’ and collected 16 000 living wage demands from more than 1600
metropolitan and non-metropolitan workplaces nationally. The union believes that clothing workers
are the lowest paid in the manufacturing sector with the regulated minimum wage for a machinist
being R481 a week versus R340 a week paid by non-compliant companies. The recently negotiated
wage rates brought in a concessionary element where clothing manufacturers can pay new entrants
30% less. SACTWU agreed to it on the basis that 5000 new jobs would be created within three
years. So far these targets do not look as if they will be reached because of a lack of demand.
Without demand, factories are not able to increase jobs even if wages are lower. A number of noncompliant factories reiterated that employees are able earn higher wages because of productivity
bonuses linked to performance.
Since the end of March 2011 non-compliant companies have been issued with writs of execution to
either become compliant or face closure. Approximately 250 non-compliant firms formed The
United Clothing & Textile Association (UCTA) and sought legal counsel. Five Chinese-owned clothing
firms based in Newcastle brought a case against Labour Minister Mildred Oliphant and the NBC
challenging the extension of NBC rules to non-NBC parties. At stake in this case was the closure of
approximately 450 non-compliant clothing companies with the loss of 17000 jobs.
The outcome of the court case is that the non-compliant companies are now exempt from the 2010
bargaining council agreement. The judge ruled that since the signatories to the NBC agreement do
not represent more than 50% of all employees in the industry, the agreement cannot be applied to
the whole industry. The judge has ruled that factories who are not members of the NBC can hold
separate talks with their workers with regard to pay and working conditions.
At the start of the court case in January 2013, the Centre for Development Enterprise (CDE)
released a report entitled, “Job Destruction in the Clothing Industry: How an Alliance of Organised
Labour, the State and Some Firms is Undermining Labour-Intensive Growth.” The main point of this
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 10 of 57
document is that if the government wants to realise its 2020 goal of creating 5 million jobs as laid
out in the IPAP it should take greater cognisance of the large number of foreign-owned firms who,
although not compliant, are offering employment and operating on lower margins. The CDE views it
as positive that Chinese firms, moving away from an increasingly expensive China are able to
operate and employ mostly unskilled labour while paying less than the stipulated minimum wage.
SACTWU and the industry do agree on one aspect, which is the detrimental effect of the high level
of illegal imports and under-invoicing which occur at the ports and borders. This is done in order to
avoid paying the 45% import duty on clothing, which costs the government billions in lost revenue.
They believe that it is critical for the government to eradicate this problem which mainly stems
from apparel coming in from the Far East and mainland China in particular. Adrian Verhagen, Group
MD of Ninian and Lester, the Jockey brand underwear company stated that despite employing their
own investigators to confiscate and prosecute perpetrators from time to time, they “never get to
the big players.”
Clothing companies are working with SARS but according to respondents more resources and the
up-skilling of customs officers is needed. A National Economic Development and Labour Council
(Nedlac) customs fraud task team is now in its 2nd year of operation to inspect and control clothing
imports. A system of reference prices has been established for inspection officers to use when
evaluating whether or not fraud has been committed. The estimated value of clothing and textiles
seized by SARS in the 6 months prior to October 2012 are shown below.
[Source: SARS]
About 200 tons of 2nd hand clothing with an estimated value of R5m is included in the statistics.
What remains a concern is the inability to secure successful prosecutions of perpetrators who
operate behind the scenes. The 2nd hand clothing racket has become a cause for concern as goods
donated for welfare purposes are being used to provide cheap stock to traders. Frequently bales of
clothing are mixed with new clothing to avoid import duties.
Approximately two-thirds of clothing imports originate from China. Despite the fact that China’s
share of clothing imports has fallen by 5%, the value of Chinese imports is increasing. Of increasing
concern to the local industry is the increase in clothing imports from Mauritius and Madagascar.
According to Charl Roos of Charl Roos Agencies, a primary agent selling mostly to Edcon and Jet,
the level of quality of clothing coming out of Mauritius is “superb.”
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Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 11 of 57
The value of clothing imports since 2009 is shown below.
[Source: Cape Clothing Association Annual Report 2012]
On a cyclical basis imports grew by 35% from July to September 2012 compared to the same
period in 2011. However, on an annual basis to September 2012, they increased 18%, an increase
of R1.7bn from R9.74bn to R11.45bn. A study was compiled on the effects of the increase in tariffs
on 124 lines of clothing since November 2009 by the Trade Law Centre (Tralac). Statistics indicate
lower production and sales and recently improved exports. However, the main objective of
increasing duties, to deter lower priced imports mainly from Asia, has not been accomplished.
The industry is calling for the scrapping of a 22% import duty on imported fabric with the reasoning
that the local clothing industry is forced to import fabric as there is no local supply. AMSA believes
that the duty rebate schedule which reflects fabrics exempt from duty should be expanded to
reflect all fabric lines not available locally.
A textile scoping study prepared by Justin Barnes
indicates that the local textile industry is not able to supply fabric in the weaving portion of the
value chain as well as the knitted-woven spectrum in respect of synthetic fabric supply. Barnes
ascribes failure in the development of advanced capabilities in the dyeing and finishing sub-sector
to be a major hindrance and has suggested support for the Textile industry around a Duty Rebate
Mechanism. According to a source from the DTI, the department is currently investigating the
recommendations and the positions, comments and proposals of all parties concerned in order to
come up with a solution that will suit all.
As far as the export market is concerned, clothing exports account for just below 6% of the value
of imports. Exports grew by 13% in 2012 following two years of decline. Growth has come from an
increase in clothing exports to African countries, a growth of 27% in 2012 and a growth of 10%
each year from 2008 to 2012. Exports to Africa, which may involve re-exports by retailers, now
make up two-thirds of total clothing exports. Not all exports are locally manufactured items for two
reasons:
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A large proportion of exports are shipments by South African retailers to their regional retail
stores. The majority of these shipments comprise imported items with only a small volume
of garments manufactured in South Africa; and

Traders from African countries buy from South African wholesalers who stock imported
goods. These exports are declared as clothing exports from South Africa by the buyers/
exporters.
Exports to markets other than Africa have decreased. For example, clothing exports to the USA
have fallen more than two-thirds since 2008 and are now less than R50m a year while exports to
the UK decreased in 2011 despite it being the major purchaser of clothing in 2010.
Zambia,
Zimbabwe and Mozambique have taken its place as the main export destinations for clothing
exports from South Africa.
SA Clothing Exports per country for 12 month periods ending in June
[Source: Cape Clothing Association Annual Report 2012]
In the corporate wear sector of the industry, the gaining of contracts is vital for a company to
remain in business. Colin Joiner of Gina of Charles Street mentioned four contracts alone which
would provide an industry value of greater than R1bn. A recent Absa contract was worth R60m.
Other very large contracts are those for the Department of Health and provincial and government
hospitals. Jonssons who typically supply the packaged uniforms for Pick ‘n Pay won the Woolworths
contract to supply staff uniforms within the national Woolworths network.
However, a number of large companies have closed and include:

Previously ranked no 1, Carter Harris, a subsidiary of the L.A. Group, closed down at the
end of 2011;

Regency (RCG) closed in 2010 after generating a turnover of R120m in the last year. It
used to have the Netcare, Absa and FNB contracts;
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Bentex closed about four years ago and previously had the Post Office and Telkom
accounts; and

Corporate Clothing Consultants who were amongst the biggest, closed 10 years ago.
Colin Joiner ascribes some of these closures to inflexibility and the carrying of large stockholdings in
a global environment where flexibility and working around a client’s demand for speed is a
necessity. The ability to manufacture according to a client’s specifications and being able to
undertake small production runs has worked in the favour of Gina of Charles Street allowing it to be
in the top ranking of the Corporate Wear market. Recently it was awarded the Avis contract.
The manufacture of underwear is a niche market. After the closure of its underwear arm, Intimate
Apparel SA, a spokesperson for Seardel mentioned the following points.

The cost of producing brassieres is labour-intensive and in production terms has a “very
high minute rate” with the cost not being recoverable via the low selling cost.

Since brassieres are a close-fitting clothing item, large investments in design, preproduction, technical and other processes are required.

Margin pressures made it difficult to recover the cost of raw material inputs, labour and
overheads.

Wage and other differentials in comparison to international competitors made local
production unsustainable. The average imported landed cost of a brassiere was on average
20% lower than a locally manufactured item. Retailers wishing to meet targeted retail
margins chose to source intimate apparel off-shore.
Despite productivity improvements Intimate Apparel could not overcome the basic structural issues
faced above. This was displayed in losses of R30m in its year ending March 2010 with turnover
having dropped by 60% in the years prior to its closure. The company consequently joined the
ranks of other underwear companies such as De Re Manufacturing and Nautilus Underwear which
have closed since 2009.
4.1.1
Corporate Actions

March 2012, Holdsport acquired Cape-based outdoor wear specialists, Capestorm.

March 2012, Seardel settled litigation, underway since 2009, against directors to the value
of R247m. As a result of a forensic audit, HCI, the main shareholder launched an
investigation against the former directors of Seardel, in particular Aaron Searll.

February 2012 Seardel announced a loss of 1500 jobs due to restructuring. In the Western
Cape five facilities were restructured into two. In Ladysmith, KwaZulu-Natal two facilities
were consolidated into one. The company has stated that further restructuring is unlikely.

January 2012 The Foschini Group (TFG) bought its long-standing supplier, clothing
manufacturer Prestige.

December 2011 Holdsport bought the clothing line Capestorm.
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October to December 2011 Rex Trueform sold the remaining parts of its clothing
manufacturing interests to Pals Holdings, an unlisted company. It sold the first part to
Brimstone owner of clothing line, House of Monatic. Pals Holdings is both a manufacturer
and importer of garments and supplies retailers, Woolworths, Foschini, Edgars, Pick ‘n Pay,
Polo SA and Hilton Weiner. It also supplies defence and police forces in Africa.

2009-2012, Clothing and Allied Factories and CMTs closed in the Western Cape. Refer to
Appendix 2 for a list of 128 companies that closed during this time. Some of the more
notable of these included Seardel’s Intimate Apparel with the loss of 800 jobs announced in
July 2010.

2011 Seardel set up NyeNye Clothing in Lesotho to continue producing lingerie there after
the closure of Intimate Apparel SA.
There has been some controversy concerning the shareholding of SACTWU. The union has a large
investment fund, started in 1993, with a 42% investment in Hosken Consolidated Investments
(HCI) worth more than R450m. HCI in turn has a 70% share in Seardel. In South Africa the
subsidiaries of Seardel are companies compliant with NBC regulation. However one company is
based in Lesotho where wages are lower than those demanded by SACTWU in South Africa.
4.1.2
Regulations and Support Programmes
1. 45% Import Duty on Clothing
At the end of April 2009 the DTI announced a Draft Rescue Package for the Clothing and
Textile Sector. One of the measures was an increase of certain clothing tariffs to their
bound rate of 45%. The items affected are listed in Appendix 3. Other clothing imports not
on this list are subject to 40%. South Africa is party to different trade regimes and as a
result certain clothing can enter the country at preferential rates of between 0% and 20%.
2. The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) provides market access to the US for
37 designated Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The Act was originally for the time
period from October 2000 to September 2008, but amendments signed in 2004 extended
AGOA to 2015. AGOA allows import duties to be removed provided there is compliance with
the relevant Rules of Origin. The industry believes it is prejudiced as it is not considered a
“less developed country” and is compelled to use domestic textile apparel fabrics for dutyfree access to the US.
3. Labelling requirements
According to Merchandise Marks Act No. 17 of 1941 and General Notice 1831 of 2006
published on 14 December 2006, all products in the Harmonized Commodity Coding and
Description System (HS) Chapters 61 and 62, whether or not imported or local, must carry
labels which identify their source (country of origin), and provide information on their care
and fibre content. If products are reconditioned, rebuilt or remade, this must also be
indicated on the label. The intention is for the public to make informed buying decisions.
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Labels must also be in conformity with South African national standards for fibre content
and care labelling.
The government has highlighted the Clothing, Textiles, Footwear and Leather industry as one of the
sectors within its IPAP to receive support in 4 areas.
1. Via the DTI and its Clothing and Textiles Competitiveness Programme (CTCP)
described earlier, it aims to stabilise employment and to improve competitiveness by
means of the following programmes.
a.
Competitiveness Improvement Programme (CIP) is aimed at developing
the global competitiveness of clusters. Development is expected to occur in the
core focus areas of People, Process, Product and Market Development.
i. Ordinary
Clusters
manufacturers
or
a
are
defined
combination
as
a
of
group
of
manufacturing
at
least
and
five
related
organisations. A cost-sharing grant incentive of 75% of the qualifying
project cost up to a total of R25m on cluster projects is offered. Costs
pertaining to machinery, equipment, commercial vehicles, land or
buildings are not included.
ii. National Clusters are clusters which occur more widely and have
value chain co-operation and integration as a pre-requisite. They are
expected to include, “retail, manufacturers, service providers and
suppliers.” A technology partner and an educational institution are also
recommended. A five-year development plan needs to be submitted.
South African registered entities are offered investment support as
follows:
o
100% in year 1;
o
95% in year 2;
o
90% in year 3;
o
80% in year 4, culminating in;
o
70% in year 5.
In both cluster programmes the balance of the costs must be provided by the cluster
participants. Applications must be accompanied by declarations of good standing with
SARS and evidence of Bargaining Council Compliance by each member of the cluster.
The CTCP desk of the DTI will monitor the outputs and level of competitive
improvement of clusters through the use of benchmarking. Both programmes run until
31 March 2016.
2. Production Incentive Programme (PIP) provides funding assistance to invest in
‘competitiveness improvement interventions.’ In this sector, it can be granted to
clothing and textile manufacturers, CMT operators and design houses provided they
partner with one or more CMTs. PIP has two components.
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a.
b.
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An Upgrade Grant Facility to be used on any of the following:
o
Upgrading of existing plant and equipment;
o
Acquisition of new plant and equipment;
o
Developing people;
o
Improving manufacturing processes;
o
Optimising materials used;
o
Developing new products; or
o
Market development.
An Interest Subsidy for Working Capital Facility which arose out of the
fact that manufacturers were finding it increasingly difficult to access finance in
the face of the economic crisis. This facility aims to reduce the cost of funding
to companies who successfully raise working capital facilities within the IDC or
another institution. This facility will only be available for a limited period and
will reduce over time.
The PI is calculated as an incentive benefit equating to 7.5% (year ending 31 March
2013) of a company’s Manufacturing Value Addition (MVA) calculated as follows:
Sales
Less:
Sales value of Goods Manufactured outside of South Africa
Less:
Sales value of other Bought in Finished Goods
Less:
Material Input Costs (Used in the manufacturing process)
Less:
Outsourced CMT costs
=
MVA
The incentive benefit will then become the benefit ceiling or maximum amount
available to an applicant in a specific year. An applicant can either use the full benefit
as an Upgrade Grant Facility or for an Interest Subsidy Facility or a combination of
both.
3. Illegal Imports Programme in conjunction with SARS has as its goal the clamping
down of illegal imports that are flooding the country either through under-invoicing or
by using incorrect tariff codes.
4. Skills Development working with the CSIR to develop succession plans and to place
more emphasis on providing equipped technicians, technologists, production managers
and scientists into the industry.
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Black Economic Empowerment
The Industry is governed by the standard BBBEE Codes of Good Practice. Revised BBBEE codes of
good practice were released on 2 October 2012. Business Unity South Africa (BUSA) believes that
the impact and consequences of the revised codes need to be evaluated thoroughly while the
Minister of Trade and Industry said that the revised codes would help address shortcomings such
as fronting, tick-box compliance and the paying of large sums of money to consultants to acquire
BBBEE-compliancy.
According to Colin Joiner of Gina of Charles Street, good BEE codes are very important when
tendering for business. Absa Bank requires at least a level 3 from its suppliers. Gina of Charles
Street is now a level 4 having dropped from a level 3 as a result of the impact of the revised codes.
4.2
Continental
The African continent has grown in importance as an importer of clothing from South Africa. As
already seen from the table of world exports under State of the Industry, Zambia, Zimbabwe and
Mozambique have become the main importers of South Africa’s clothing. The table below reflects
South African exports into Africa for the period 2008/9 to 2011/12.
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Industry stakeholders believe that increased volumes are due to consolidated clothing shipments
sent by South African retailers to their retail branches in African countries. A large proportion of
these shipments comprise imported items with only a small proportion of garments being
manufactured in South Africa. Because export data is not well-policed, it is not currently possible to
distinguish between exports and re-exports.
The increase in the strength of regional players such as Botswana, Lesotho, Mauritius, Malawi and
Madagascar as suppliers of clothing into South Africa was mentioned by respondents. These
markets gained importance after South Africa was forced to resource supply away from China
because of the imposition of the China Voluntary Restraint Arrangement.
Coinciding with this
arrangement was simultaneous reduction in South African Development Community (SADC) tariffs
on clothing to zero. Mauritius, in particular, has gained success from having the following
capabilities: strong design capacities incorporating current fashion trends; quality; flexible
production schedules and quick turnarounds; and shorter delivery times than imports from Asia.
A further advantage for regional producers of clothing in countries such as Lesotho, Botswana and
Malawi is the benefit obtained from AGOA which allows them preferential export to the United
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States. Being able to pay lower wages according to a piece rate system has also worked to their
advantage.
According to Johann Baard who has recently returned from travelling extensively in Africa, “The
second hand clothing trade is the single biggest obstacle in the way of many African countries
getting their domestic clothing manufacturing sector out of the starting blocks. It has a massive
destructive impact on industrialisation, job creation and skills development.” Despite the fact that
Western charities believe they are donating for a good cause, the true effect on the ground is to
cause African communities to be dependent on hand-outs. Analysts believe this negates efforts to
develop skills and manufacturing infrastructure.
The six main retailers in South Africa have a regional presence and major expansion plans.

Edcon has 94% of its operations in South Africa with the remainder in Namibia, Botswana,
Lesotho, Swaziland and Zambia. Its intention was to expand further into Zambia and
commence operations in Mozambique towards the end of 2012.

Foschini opened up operations in Lesotho, which marks a reappearance of its brand there
after the original store was closed because of looting in 1998. It has also opened in Levy
Junction, a mall located in Lusaka, Zambia, making this its second store in Zambia.

Both Edgars and Foschini have booked stores in a new Nairobi shopping mall in Kenya in an
attempt to take advantage of the increased spending power of a growing middle class.

Retailers Truworths, Woolworths and Mr Price have had to enter into franchise agreements
with local retailer Deacons in order to succeed in Kenya.
4.3
International
Global clothing companies supplied R9 094.5bn ($1,025.9bn) worth of retail apparel in 2008. Retail
trade in apparel accounted for R3 208.2bn ($361.9bn) of this amount. China is the world’s largest
exporter of apparel accounting for 33.2% of this figure at approximately R1 062.4bn ($120.06bn).
Its position as the main clothing exporter is being challenged by other low-cost clothing
manufacturing regions which include India, Mexico, Turkey and Vietnam. It has been suggested
that for China to continue to compete effectively in the face of rising production costs it will have to
“move up the global clothing value chain” producing higher value-added goods. In terms of global
competitiveness ranking South Africa has dropped from 50th to 52nd out of 144 countries. Despite
the drop, South Africa and Mauritius at 54th, lead the regional ranking in Africa. The Global
Competitiveness Index (GCI), released by the World Economic Forum in September 2012, is
calculated according to a country’s ‘set of institutions, policies and factors that determine the level
of productivity of a country’.
According to Verdict Research, between 2007 and 2012 spending on clothing fell 4.3% in Europe
with countries like Spain most affected by the debt crisis, showing poor results. Out of the top five
European countries, only France and Germany had increased sales between 2007 and 2012.
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A trend which is being adopted locally is the ‘speed to market’ business model which international
companies, Zara and H&M developed over the last decade with much success. Another continuing
trend is greater competitiveness in the global value chain. Due to apparel production being labourintensive, wage costs have a large influence on where production is located. Currently labour costs
have risen in China, to the extent that wages have increased between 30% and 50% since 2009,
which is making regions such as Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia and even South Africa more
attractive due to lower wage rates.
The graph below shows how labour costs have been increasing in China.
[Source: www.shanghaidaily.com]
In July 2012, sportswear brand Adidas confirmed the closure of its only completely owned factory in
China. The reason given was a “realignment of its global resources" but it is suspected that it is due
to rising labour costs. Adidas has confirmed that it will still continue to source goods from
approximately 300 factories across China. The company has not yet indicated if it is going to
relocate to a cheaper manufacturing environment. Nike, similarly, closed its Chinese operations
three years ago to move to other Asian sites. According to an independent market watcher of the
clothing industry, China’s competitiveness in terms of labour costs has been eroded in the past few
years.
A further impact of the importance of labour costs on the industry internationally is the trend for
production in industrialised countries to be outsourced. There has been more emphasis on
innovations in design, the reduction of inventories and a greater emphasis on marketing. The
developing countries have had as their focus the lower value-added segment of the manufacturing
process. China would appear to be moving away from the lower valued-added model to a more
advanced industrialised one as it upgrades its clothing manufacturing facilities.
A preferential trade agreement between India and SACU members has been under discussion but
may be limited to tariff exchanges on a limited number of products. There have been long delays in
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reaching a conclusion to the agreement because of concerns about the impact that preferential
access would have on certain sectors of South African industry and in particular on the clothing
industry. Bilateral trade has improved between the two countries to the extent that India moved
from being South Africa's 20th largest trading partner in 2000 to its sixth largest trading partner in
2011.
5
INFLUENCING FACTORS
5.1
Government Intervention
Government intervention has proven to have both an inhibiting and contributing role in the success
of the clothing manufacturing industry. Inhibiting aspects include the following.

The average import duty of 22% on fabrics. The demise of the local textile industry has led
to the unavailability of a large range of local textile inputs into clothing manufacture. Given
that the local textile industry has shrunk so much, analysts question whether it is still
necessary to have an average import duty on fabrics of 22% which only increases the input
costs and creates administrative problems for clothing manufacturers. According to Johann
Baard, the only protected line of fabric should be HS5806300: woven cotton fabric which
was one of the top exports for the South African region in that category in 2010.

The principle in AGOA where South Africa is considered not a “less developed country.” As a
result South Africa is prohibited from using imported fabric in exports to the US in order to
derive duty free access under AGOA.

The China Voluntary Restraint Arrangement, in existence between 2007 and 2008, which
the government believed would assist the industry, actually hindered the industry. Due to
its late implementation it prevented local companies accessing certain lines of imported
fabric, no longer currently available. It did however benefit the growth of strong regional
players, Mauritius, Madagascar, Malawi and Botswana, a now strong competitive force for
local manufacturers.

According to SACTWU a major cause of job losses is due to the tariff reduction scheme
introduced by the government under its Growth, Employment and Redistribution (GEAR)
policy in 1996.
Positive aspects include the following.

The DTI support offered under IPAP is according to Johann Baard, “money well spent” as he
states that clothing manufacturing creates more jobs for the investment than does any
other industry.
To back this up he says that for every R20 623 invested in clothing
manufacturing one job is created while R206 792 is required in the agriculture sector to
create one job. Under IPAP the State, being a major consumer, is bound to procure locally.
The local industry has become progressively more efficient through investment in
production processes over the last 10 years.
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The provision of duty free access to South Africa by SADC countries has also been of great
assistance which has helped increase exports.
5.2
Illegal Imports and Customs Fraud
The main negative factors mentioned consistently by industry respondents, having an even more
negative effect than the increased importation of legitimate imports, are illegal imports and
customs fraud. According to the Cape Clothing Association Annual Report the Sector Forum is
continuing to work with SARS to apprehend the masterminds who bring in clothing and textiles at
artificially reduced prices. Due to this continuing problem the local industry has to compete with
clothing which is being sold at prices which are cheaper than the fabric used to make the garments.
As mentioned, more than 6000 Chinese shops have opened in South Africa over the last five years.
According to a report in Noseweek, exports of clothing from China increased from R4bn in 2005 to
R11.3bn in 2010. Declared imports by importers reflect figures which are far less than Chinese
export figures.
Although the subsidisation policies, used to develop the Chinese economy had a debilitating
influence on the local manufacturing industry, it is currently playing less of a role. This is because
local companies are becoming more globally competitive as they tap into established avenues of
business and government support towards a quick response business model. Conditions have
reversed to the extent that growth opportunities are now arising from the increased wage costs
occurring in China. China is becoming a less viable production venue and businesses are looking to
move their manufacturing concerns. With businesses in South Africa having been granted more
leverage to set wages through internal negotiation, due to a recent court ruling, it is likely that
growth of factories producing for the mass market will continue.
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Economic Environment
The latest Stats SA figures show that unemployment levels in South Africa are standing at 24.9%
for the fourth quarter of 2012. IPAP has focused on the clothing manufacturing industry as a means
of fulfilling its political objective of increasing jobs and the state is bound to a policy of procuring
locally in line with IPAP.
According to Charl Roos the retail economic environment is “tough” with a main factor being the
vastly fluctuating exchange rate. Factors cited for recent exchange rate impacts are:

the current account balance of payments deficit widening during 2012; and

global and domestic risk perceptions of South Africa changing due in part to adverse
developments in the South African labour market, and downgrades by various ratings
agencies.
Wholesalers who trade in clothing have had to absorb more of the knock-on effect of a weakening
rand/dollar exchange rate where exports have become significantly cheaper and imports more
expensive. A South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry survey released in January 2013
show that conditions in wholesale and retail trade deteriorated sharply in December 2012. Retailers
with their set price points are reluctant to pass on price increases to a mostly price-conscious
consumer base. The influence of exchange rates has been greater on the imports of clothing and
raw material inputs than on exports given that exports stand at approximately only 6% of imports.
Although exports appear to be increasing they have yet to reach the levels attained in 2008.
Consumers are feeling pressured by the higher costs of the basic necessities of energy, transport,
education, medical services and water, leaving less disposable income to spend on consumer goods
such as clothing. However, retail trade sales of the textiles, clothing, footwear and leather goods
category increased by 3.6% in the last quarter of 2012 compared to the 4th quarter of 2011.
5.4
Retailers and the Quick Response Model
Retailers are the “primary drivers” of the local clothing industry and have an influence on the
success of local manufacturers as well as on the level of annual imports. According to Johann
Baard, retailers “pay for a price point” implying that in order for manufacturers, particularly those
producing for the lower LSM categories, to meet the price that retailers are willing to pay they have
to reduce costs drastically. Only approximately between 10% and 15 % of the market is supplied
by niche manufacturers to retailers at slightly higher price points, while the balance is provided for
retailers at lower price points to mass market consumers.
According to Statistics South Africa, total retail sales in 2011 of textiles, clothing, footwear and
leather goods amounted to R121.5bn while in 2009 this figure was R99.7bn. The table below
indicates that these sales are likely to have grown in 2012.
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Retail Trade Sales
R'million
TCFL* Current prices
2007
2008
2009
84 727
96 280
96 279
TCFL at Constant 2008 prices
2012
2010
2011
99 679
111 721
121 514
116 146
94 328
105 402
113 241
105 566
J-Nov
*TCFL= textiles, clothing, footwear & leather
[Source: Stats SA]
According to the Retailers Liaison Committee (RLC), Clothing and Footwear (C&F) sales accounted
for 60% of 2012 retail sales. This reflects a compound annual growth rate of 8.4% since 2007.
Over 90% of the C&F market is accounted for by five main retailers, with Edcon having the largest
market share, almost twice the size of its nearest competitor.
The emergence of the so-called “black diamonds” has boosted expenditure on clothing. This group
has a desire for quality and/or branded clothing and is prepared to pay a higher price for it. The
Edcon 2012 Annual Report acknowledges this fact noting that C&F spend as a percentage of
household expenditure has increased due to a “rapidly emerging black middle class, which has
more than doubled in size since 2000.” Due to this factor retail clothing sales have remained
buoyant in an otherwise depressed economic environment. This is reflected by the performance of
the main retailers as depicted below.
Retailer
Woolworths
Turnover
(Rm) 2012
9,585
Increase in
Turnover
over 2011
+11.6%)
Profit (Rm)
2012
1,647
Increase in
Profit over
2011
No. of
Stores
+25%
(Before Tax)
Holdings (Clothing
& General
Merchandise)
Truworths
Edcon
8,830
1,395 (Net)
27,884
4,041
1167
(EBITDA)
Foschini Group
4,254
13.3%
2,502
516
(Before Tax)
Mr Price Group
Pepkor Holdings
12,122
1,209 (Net)
Not disclosed
(Pty) Ltd
The main five retailers are actively becoming more involved in their supply chains in order to
improve speed-to-market and fast fashion capability. Foschini reported that the quantity of units
produced by its in-house manufacturing division, TFG Design Centre, continued to grow in 2012.
This is due to closer collaboration between TFG Design Centre and its CMT factories. There was an
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increased focus on the generation of products for their Foschini, Donna-Claire and Fashion Express
chains. Other categories of increased focus due to high demand were children’s wear and
sleepwear. As a result of greater use of the design centre they have been able to achieve shorter
lead times and faster responses to repeat orders.
5.5
Access to Textiles
The domestic textile industry has decreased in size due to numerous factory closures and is now
“characterised by plants of varying technical ability”. The local textile industry which at its peak in
2003 employed 70 500, today stands at approximately 25,000. Brian Brink of The Textile
Federation said that although closures of textile companies appear to have halted as a result of the
positive effects of government support, because of production gaps, clothing manufacturers have
had to rely on fabric imports which incur an import duty of 22%. The local and regional textile
industry is particularly deficient in the supply of synthetic fabrics in a fully printed form. This
inhibits manufacturers in their endeavours to adapt their value chain towards a quick response
model.
With the information gathered from the textile study provided to the DTI the government hopes to
develop niche specialities within the textile industry. The idea is that through specialisation, the
textile industry will be able to supply products that clothing manufacturers and retailers demand
and which are currently being imported.
5.6
Technology and Information Technology
The influence of Technology on this sector is considered so vital that it is specified as a
‘competitiveness improvement intervention’ of National Clusters (see Regulations). Clusters are
expected to introduce either new software technology not previously used or new hardware
technology. Qualifying hardware is expected to be “world-class cutting edge” technology and it is
expected to show a noticeable improvement to process costs and/or times of processing as one of
the means of improving global competitiveness.
In addition, the IPAP allows for the identification of technologies where commercialisation is
possible in the following areas:

The establishment of a garment-sizing database using 3-dimensional (3-D) body-scanner
technology;

Computer-aided design using 3D- scanner data; and

The processing of new natural fibres such as flax, wild silk, cashmere and kenaf.
Justin Barnes highlighted the lack of development of advanced capabilities with regard to textiles in
the dyeing of light weight polyesters and the printing of light weight polyesters and other synthetic
fabrics as being “a strategic failure.” So important is this capability, that without it, he states there
is very little reason to source local polyester and/ or polyester/ cotton knits or wovens.
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A new Gerber cutter has come onto the market which is better able to cut wider fabric up to 2.2m.
It is expected that the hardware and software systems, once installed, will save money and give
manufacturers flexibility in the cutting room. This technology is suitable for the new trend in
smaller, quick turnaround orders. Manufacturers are using wider materials in order to maximise the
material and to cut full-size parts that do not require sewing.
5.7
Rising Input Costs
Clothing manufacture is a labour-intensive industry, with labour costs accounting for between 30%
and 50% of final production costs. Fabric costs account for half the manufacturing costs of
garments so increased electricity, transport and labour costs together with import duties on fabric
of 22% make continued viability in a low-margin industry difficult. As mentioned, 80% of fabric
inputs are imported because of the demise of the domestic textile industry and they are subject to
exchange rate fluctuations.
A number of industry respondents spoke well of a vertically integrated manufacturing model.
Examples of this are Foschini which purchased its supplier, clothing manufacturer, Prestige and
Ninian and Lester who knit their own fabric and do the dying, printing and finishing required for
their manufacturing process. Small production runs and flexibility allow for better cost
management. According to Ninian & Lester, garments are divided into categories of high and low
“minute value” depending on the length of manufacturing time. Of concern to Ninian & Lester
Group MD, Adrian Verhagen is increasing utility costs which could potentially jeopardise their ability
to “dye and finish” their garments.
5.8
Labour Resources
100 000 workers in this sector are represented by the South African Clothing and Textile Workers
Union (SACTWU). Wage negotiations occur on an annual basis between SACTWU and AMSA which
consists of a number of employee bodies who currently do not represent more than 50% of the
workforce. The existence of compliant and non-compliant companies working alongside one another
has become a problem and SACTWU in particular is calling for an equalisation of wage rates to
occur. Although SACTWU is not in favour of wages being eroded downwards they conceded to a
provision which allows companies to link a portion of the minimum wage of new entrants to plant
level productivity with “stringent” provisions including that employers are to grow jobs by 14% by
2014.
Seardel Trading was one of the first companies to participate in an advanced skills development
programme for Supervisors and Team Leaders called TRACE. By up-skilling its workforce in
principles of World Class Manufacturing (WCM), its aim is to improve overall operational
competitiveness and efficiency. Companies such as Ninian & Lester provide in-house training. It
began its own training school in 2005/6 and as a result has multi-skilled its labour force. The
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conditions of employment are good and consequently labour retention is high with 85% to 90% of
its workforce employed on a permanent basis.
IPAP has recognised that there are very few graduates entering the industry and that most of the
industry leaders are nearing retirement age. For this reason succession planning is becoming a
focus with the development of young graduates a core focus. The TFG Design Centre has recently
focused on improving their design skills base by hiring experienced designers in 2012 for products
sought by their Foschini, Donna-Claire and Fashion Express chains.
5.9
Cyclicality
There are two buying seasons: summer and winter. The summer buying season is from mid-August
through to March comprising 60% of the year and the winter season is from April through to midAugust, 40% of the year. The lead time on orders used to be between 90-120 days and retailers
would start buying their winter stocks in December-January and their summer stocks in May,
usually in two deliveries. However, lead times are becoming shorter because of the quick response
model. Retailers report that the most important trading periods are Easter and Christmas: 34% of
Edcon’s sales occur in April, November and December. Results can also be affected by unseasonal
weather conditions which can result in decreased retail sales and higher markdowns.
5.10
Environmental Concerns
South African retailers are moving towards ‘green procurement’ with retailer Woolworths leading
the way with its Good Business Journey launched in 2007. A Supplier Code of Business Principles
exists against which all suppliers are regularly audited. A condition of supply is that conformity with
the code is a pre-requisite for all suppliers. Organic production, conservation and a new approach
to packaging are environmental priorities as Woolworths continues to drive its organic clothing
offering.
6
COMPETITION
In the opinion of Johann Baard from AMSA, it is likely that non-compliance confirms the fact that
factories are not competitive and that costs are too high. Metropolitan compliant factories are
shrinking while pockets of non-compliant factories in non-metropolitan areas, working on a piecerate system, are growing. Apparel and textile manufacturer, Seardel has had to restructure its
clothing manufacture operations in the face of losses. Competition from lower wage-paying
manufacturers domestically and outside the country has meant that it was not able to recover
rising input costs from higher pricing.
Traditionally most competition in this industry has come from imports from China but in the last
three to four years Charl Roos of Charl Roos Agencies believes that regional suppliers, Mauritius,
have gained ground. They have proven themselves to be suppliers of quality, high fashion
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garments adept at fitting in with retailers’ ever-changing schedules. Added to this their relative
closeness to market provides them with a competitive advantage over China. China is experiencing
higher production costs with the clothing industry in China experiencing shifts in production form
high cost regions to lower cost regions. It must be noted that the quick response model only
applies to approximately 15% of the consumer base. South Africa’s growing middle class has led to
a greater demand for large-size clothing which Asian countries struggle to supply.
6.1
Barriers to Entry
Entry by new entrants into the industry at the most basic level can be easily facilitated with just a
few sewing machines, a low level of skills with some training and minimal investment. However, at
the top end of the industry, a high level of investment is required both in terms of competitive
interventions, government investment, mechanisation, advancements in design and highly trained
employees.
6.2
Research and Development
Much research and development is occurring within the industry mainly because of its capacity,
highlighted by IPAP, to employ a large number of unskilled and semi-skilled employees. IPAP has
tasked the CSIR to further research into the areas of Skills Development and Innovation and
Technology. Through the support provided by the CTCP and PI programmes the government is
providing support to clothing manufacture companies to assist them to become more efficient, with
an emphasis on meeting retailers’ demands for a quick response model. The two clothing clusters
based in the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal offer substantial support in this regard.
6.3
Innovation
Innovations occur in the local industry as global trends feed through to the local market. In order
for local companies to compete, innovation changes with regard to design, processes and
packaging have become a pre-requisite. Innovative changes to become internationally more
competitive include cost-cutting techniques such as Just-In-Time (JIT) inventory practices,
Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) techniques and Quality Control programmes. Support offered by the
two clothing clusters as well as the government via its support packages has also placed emphasis
on advances in innovation.
7
SWOT ANALYSIS

Strengths
o
Potential to be a large employer of people and recognised as such by IPAP.
o
The successful development of the quick response model and the competitive
advantage of flexibility, innovation and speed to market.
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o
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The support provided by the DTI via the CTCP and PIP programmes and the
public/private partnerships provided by the clothing clusters in the Western Cape
and KwaZulu-Natal.
o
Current buy-in of the six main retailers in supporting an integrated value chain, in a
retailer-driven industry.

Weaknesses
o
Incapacitation of the industry after years of protection and the resulting
inefficiencies as well as a focus on low value-added items.

o
Inability of the government and SARS to harness the illegal imports of clothing.
o
Customs fraud remains a concern.
Opportunities
o
Higher wage rates and production costs in China are causing factories to seek
cheaper locations such as South Africa and its regional neighbours.
o
The development of a two-tier local manufacturing environment with the existence
of low margin factories producing for the mass market and high end niche
manufacturers producing for niche upper end categories.
o
The exchange rate is favourable for export opportunities, which could make the
quick response fashion model even more viable.
o
Increased sales prospects if SARS is able to combat illegal imports and underinvoicing.

Threats
o
Increased imports of clothing.
o
The spending power of consumers is being eroded by the slow growth in real
household income, the increased cost of basic necessities and increased debt.
o
Increasing imports from Mauritius and Madagascar.
o
The continuation of illegal imports, customs fraud and the influx of 2nd hand
clothing.
8
FUTURE OUTLOOK
Retail spending is likely to remain buoyant given the growing middle class and compound annual
growth rates of 8.7% despite GDP predictions for 2013 being revised down from 2.9% to 2.6%.
According to Gill Marcus of the South Africa Reserve Bank, inflation levels which averaged 5.6% in
2012 are expected to average 5.8% in 2013 and 5.2% in 2014 which could encourage consumer
spending. However, consumers are weighed down by high levels of debt and rising living costs.
The local manufacturing industry has become more stable because of the support of government
initiatives and it is expected that the recent DTI commissioned study by BM Analysts, “Status quo
of the Textile Industry in South Africa, SACU and Zimbabwe” will lead to further assistance and
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development. Johann Baard of AMSA believes that clothing manufacture in South Africa can be
used as an effective way to provide employment and increase GDP, as was the case in China. As
the industry becomes more advanced through investment and competitiveness interventions, the
lower wage model, which it seems will be allowed to continue, is eventually expected to change to
a value-added high-wage model.
9
INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

National Bargaining Council (NBC)
According to its constitution the responsibilities of the NBC include concluding and enforcing
collective agreements, resolving labour disputes and establishing and administering one or
more pension or other type of funds of one or more parties to the Council or its members.
Tel No.: +27 21 460 4019
Website: www.nbc.org.za
See Appendix 4 for a List of Compliant Companies 2013

The Clothing and Textiles Competitiveness Programme (CTCP) desk of the DTI
Clothing Manufacturers can apply for funding from programmes offered by the CTCP
whether they are in a cluster situation or operating as a single entity.
Programme Manager: Ms Joy Balepile
Tel No.: +27 11 269 3762
Email: [email protected]
Fund Administrator: Ms Gillian Venter
Tel No.: +27 11 269 3593
Email: [email protected]

The KwaZulu-Natal Clothing & Textile Cluster (KZN CTC)
The KZN CTC is a not-for-profit public/private sector partnership of clothing, textile,
footwear and retail firms in KwaZulu-Natal. It has core, fee paying members who receive
the full benefits as per the cluster programmes as well as over 300 associated members
from manufacturers to government and supporting institutions who receive industry related
information, research findings and newsletters.
Tel No.: +27 31 764 6100
Fax No.: +27 86 607 4510
Email: [email protected]
See Appendix 4 for a list of members.

The Cape Clothing and Textile Cluster (CCTC)
The aim of the CCTC is to assist clothing and textile firms to bolster their competitiveness.
Project Manager: Matthew Fletcher
Tel No.: +27 21 552 0240
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Fax No.: +27 21 552 6702
Email: [email protected]
See Appendix 4 for a list of members.

National Clothing Retail Federation of South Africa (NCRFSA)
The NCRFSA represents the interests of clothing retailers and has as its members the six
main retail groups: Edcon, Mr Price, Queenspark, TFG, Truworths and Woolworths.
Executive Director: Michael Lawrence
Tel No.: +27 21 531 9551
Website: www.ncrfsa.org

Western Cape Clothing and Textile Service Centre (CLOTEX)
CLOTEX was established in the Mid-1990s. It came about as a means of support to small,
medium and micro enterprises which came about as a result of the demise of larger
manufacturers and factories. As an industry body it assists and supports the increased
number of smaller design houses and CMTs in the Western Cape.
Executive Director: Averil Appollis
Tel: +27 21 637 3648
Email: [email protected],

Cape Town Fashion Council (CTFC)
The CTFC is a representative body for local fashion brands and industry stakeholders across
the clothing and textiles value chain. It has as its aim and objective the support of
initiatives and opportunities that support Western Cape fashion designers as well as to
address and resolve issues within the industry. It has recently played a key role in
establishing a National Fashion Council. Between 2010 and 2012 it increased its
membership base from 300 members to 930 members.
Executive Director: Bryan Ramkilawan
Tel No: +27 21 461 1498
Email: [email protected]
10
REFERENCES
10.1
Publications

Final Comments Regarding the Revised Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Codes
of Good Practice, Business Unity South Africa

Cape Clothing Association Annual Report 2012

South Africa: A Market for Clothing from Africa, International Trade Centre (ITC), 2010

Adjusting to Chinese Ascendancy in the Global Clothing Industry, African Clothing &
Footwear Research Network, September 2012
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
African Cotton & Textile Industries Federation (ACTIF), Grant Reports for 2011 & 2012

“NCTO Praises US Decision to Join WTO Consultations on China Textile Subsidy Case”,
National Council of Textile Organizations, 30 October 2012

Western Cape Government 2012 Report: Support Given to the WC Clothing Industry,
Western Cape Government

Programme Guidelines: Competitive Improvement Programme For Clusters in the Clothing,
Textile, Footwear, Leather and Leather Goods Industries for the 2012/13 financial year, DTI

Programme Guidelines: Production Incentive Programme FY2012/13, DTI

“Retail sales growth fails to boost subdued outlook”, Business Day, 17 January 2013

“Woolworths leads pack with 18% jump”, Business Day, 17 January 2013

Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) 2012/13 – 2014/15

“China grabs the spoils as region scraps over textiles”, Dr Greg Mills – Sunday Times, 9th
September 2012

10.2
Edcon Annual Report 2012
Websites

http://mg.co.za

www.picknpay-ir.co.za

http://tralac.org

www.platinumgroup.co.za

www.bdlive.co.za

www.sabinetlaw.co.za

www.capeclothingcluster.org.za

www.safpi.org

www.cbn.co.za

www.shanghaidaily.com

www.edcon.co.za

www.stanlib.com

www.engineeringnews.co.za

www.statssa.gov.za

www.exchange-rates.org

www.tfg.co.za

www.fastmoving.co.za

www.toptenwholesale.com

www.fin24.com

www.transcend.co.za

www.kznctc.org.za

www.woolworthsholdings.co.za

www.ncrfsa.org

www.noseweek.co.za
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APPENDIX 1
Background to the Clothing Industry

South Africa and other industrialised countries were protected from excessive Asian imports
by the Multi-fibre Agreement (MFA) which placed export quota restrictions on 73 countries
for export to the US and Europe and was in place between 1974 and 2004. It determined
where production was arranged globally, based on the fact that once a quota for clothing
exports to the US and Europe from a particular country was reached, production shifted to
another country.

South Africa became a member of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in 1994 and thus
moved from being a protected economy to one that became exposed to global competitive
forces.

A weak exchange rate between 1995 and 2006 together with the local Duty Credit
Certificate Scheme resulted in the industry being focused on the export of low value-added
items.

US legislation in the form of The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) made exports
to the US advantageous. It provided and still provides market access to the US for 37
designated Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries.

Retailers having limited local supply, found other sources of supply off-shore. However,
when the rand strengthened and exports no longer became viable the local manufacturing
industry was not able to garner local demand for its low value-added items.
Due to years of protection, inefficiencies and a low value-added item focus, the industry was not
globally competitive. China in the time being, was receiving substantial government subsidisation
and having the advantage of an under-valued currency, became export driven. The local textile
industry which provided inputs into clothing manufacture also deteriorated and began its decline
after 2002 in the face of Asian textile imports. Imports of clothing from China increased drastically
between 1995 and 2006 in an economic environment where imports were now viable for South
Africa by reason of a drastically strengthened rand/dollar exchange rate. Locally factory shutdowns
escalated with the concomitant loss of employment.
As a means of supporting the industry which was left exposed after the demise of the MFA for a
whole 2 years, the China Voluntary Restraint Arrangement was introduced in January 2007 until the
end of 2008. However, the industry considered this too late as many factory closures including
those of key textile manufacturing concerns, had already occurred. South Africa was now prohibited
from importing certain lines of fabric from China which in the time being were no longer locally
available. This arrangement only resulted in a resourcing of fabric away from China to other
countries and encouraged “roundtripping” where China-sourced fabric gained entry via other
countries into South Africa. The advantage, however, of having to resource was the development or
discovery of other Asian countries such as Bangladesh, Vietnam and Indonesia as well as regional
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suppliers Mauritius, Madagascar, Malawi and Botswana who have subsequently made large inroads
into the South African market.
Despite there being substantial domestic demand from 2005 for clothing and textiles, the shortfall
in local capacity was made up by a “steady flow of imports”. According to the International Trade
Centre (ITC), imports of clothing grew by 42% between 2005 and 2009. Buoyancy in the local
market was and is due to the continued growth of a “strong middle class with access to larger
disposable incomes”. Local industry experts realised that a rethink of the local manufacturing model
was required. With the assistance of Justin Barnes a consultant who had achieved success with
global competitive interventions in the local automotive industry, clothing clusters were set up in
2005 in the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. A vertical integration concept was introduced
whereby efficiencies were improved along the whole clothing manufacture supply chain. Retailer
requirements could be met quickly which was advantageous in the face of an increasingly
demanding consumer base. The quick response model allowed for a value chain which could
respond quickly to retailer demands and thereby gain a competitive advantage over the long import
lead times of items coming from Asia.
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APPENDIX 2
Corporate Actions – Company closures between 2009 and 2012
Manufacturer
Date Opened
Date Closed
Shine The Way
24/10/2007
12/01/2009
Carlini Knitwear
Garment
Baby-Wear
Baby-Wear,Girlswear,Knitwear,Track
16/08/2006
13/01/2009
Suits
Star Knit
04/06/1981
13/01/2009
Commission Knitting,Knitwear
Exclusive Apparel
01/04/2004
20/01/2009
Underwear
Canterbury Int.
01/03/1996
29/01/2009
Shorts
01/01/1958
02/02/2009
Move On Up 1149
03/03/2009
03/03/2009
Golden Rewards 804
11/01/2006
13/03/2009
Ellen Arthur (No.2)
Dressing Gowns,Factory Reject
Sedway Clothing
Shop,Sleepwear
Blouses,Casual Wear,Cut Make & Trim Ladies'
Only,Dresses,Eveningwear,Girlswear,Jac
kets,Shirts,Shorts,Skirts,Slacks,T05/08/2003
15/03/2009
The Kremlin Clothing
Shirts,Trousers
Casual
Wear,Jeans,Shirts,Shorts,Skirts,T-
30/03/2006
27/03/2009
Shirts,Trousers,Vests
Levanti Fashions
07/08/2008
30/03/2009
Cut Make and Trim
Annabella Fashions cc
18/08/2006
07/04/2009
Ozone Clothing
01/06/1985
21/04/2009
Creative Fash.
27/02/1972
26/04/2009
Seardel/Cape Un
01/11/1938
26/04/2009
Seardel/Charmft
Casual Wear,Dresses,Shirts
Sleepwear,T-Shirts,Underwear
Activewear,Beachwear,Bedding,Foundati
on Garments,Household
Seardel/Cygnet
15/01/1968
26/04/2009
Textiles,Leotards,Sleepwear,Swimwear
08/07/1986
26/04/2009
Swimwear,Track Suits
Straton Cloth.
Cut Make and Trim,Dressing
Gowns,Jackets,Shirts,Skirts,Slacks,Sleep
01/01/1958
26/04/2009
Val-Hau Et Cie
wear
Dressing
Gowns,Pilchers,Sleepwear,Track
27/04/1937
26/04/2009
Stop Sign
22/05/1996
07/05/2009
Kaisha Design
19/03/1996
08/05/2009
Duette Embroid.
14/01/1981
26/05/2009
Wearever C.C. T/A Strip
01/05/2003
31/05/2009
Golden Rewards 895 C.C.
19/07/2006
24/06/2009
Knitwear
Monatic Atlantis
18/04/2005
16/07/2009
Jeans
Norval Fashions C C
07/05/2008
30/07/2009
Cut Make and Trim
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Suits,Underwear,Vests
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Manufacturer
EVM
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Date Opened
Date Closed
14/01/2009
20/08/2009
R.S Manufacturing
Garment
Blouses,Coats,Cut Make & Trim - Ladies'
Only,Cut Make and
29/05/2002
21/08/2009
Trim,Jackets,Skirts,Slacks,Suits
Gelonez / G.L Fash
08/07/2002
25/08/2009
Jackets,Shorts,Skirts,Trousers
Rhein Fashions
26/01/1977
29/09/2009
Cut Make & Trim - Ladies' Only
Jenny K
Blouses,Casual
Wear,Cocktailwear,Dresses,Eveningwear
22/04/2004
30/09/2009
L.T.K Clothing
,Skirts,Track Suits
Activewear,Football
Jerseys,Jackets,Shirts,Shorts,Slacks,Trac
Johnson Sportwr
04/07/2003
14/10/2009
01/01/1967
26/10/2009
Nu Dimension Cloth.
k Suits,Uniforms
Activewear,Shorts,T-Shirts,Track Suits
Dresses,Dressing
Gowns,Pilchers,Shirts,Shorts,Sleepwear,
01/01/1963
10/11/2009
T-Shirts
Yeyethu Clothing
02/08/2007
13/11/2009
Knitwear,Underwear
Zelkar/Brigitta
26/07/2006
16/11/2009
Delwray Clothing
05/03/2003
25/11/2009
Ferial Gool/Cosmo
06/12/2001
01/12/2009
Von Mnftg.
25/07/1991
04/12/2009
I C Designs
08/06/2009
14/12/2009
Cut Make and Trim
Stitchcraft Embroidery
02/02/2004
18/12/2009
Embroidery
World Focus 2053
09/02/2009
18/12/2009
T-Shirts
Traiz Design cc
17/12/2002
15/01/2010
Dressing Gowns,Eveningwear
Collar
03/02/2004
29/01/2010
Commission Knitting
Kanuzat Clothing cc
02/02/2010
02/02/2010
Delicia
05/12/1997
05/02/2010
Asd Clothing
09/05/2007
26/02/2010
Cut Make and Trim
Design Studio
01/07/2002
29/03/2010
Design Centre,Uniforms
Sugarberry Trading
21/08/2007
30/03/2010
Ceegee Fashions cc t/a Techni-
Kada Fashions
15/08/2005
16/04/2010
Bibi's Cmt Creations
29/11/1994
28/05/2010
Blouses
Ulka Mnftg
31/03/2006
28/05/2010
Embroidery,Leather Garments
Vula Garments
02/04/2009
28/05/2010
Cut Make and Trim
Ink Rags cc
14/10/2008
31/05/2010
Cut Make and Trim
Giulia Knitting Mills
01/09/2009
16/07/2010
Prs Promotions cc
29/01/2008
27/07/2010
01/03/2006
24/08/2010
Midnight Star Trading
413 cc
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Manufacturer
Date Opened
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Date Closed
Umsebenzi Designs
Garment
Dresses,Dressing Gowns,Handcrafted
Clothing,Shirts,Shorts,Skirts,Slacks,Slee
pwear,T-Shirts,Track
African Ag Fashions cc
01/04/1996
06/09/2010
29/06/2009
09/09/2010
Suits,Trousers,Vests
So So Investments
04/12/1995
30/09/2010
L.S Clothing cc
24/07/2007
01/10/2010
Two Tone/A.M Marketing
01/06/2007
01/10/2010
Embroidery,T-Shirts
Mustiqh cc
11/02/2009
18/10/2010
Cut Make and Trim
Cornstalk Inv.
26/06/2001
05/11/2010
Knitwear
A Jones Clothing cc
13/09/2002
08/11/2010
Blouses,Dresses,Knitwear,Shorts
Sasebo Investments
05/03/2009
12/11/2010
Finishing Logistics
16/04/2007
26/11/2010
Hong Fu Clothing
01/04/2009
30/11/2010
Bakbor
Blouses
Blouses,Casual Wear,Cut Make & Trim Ladies' Only,Cut Make & Trim - Men's
Only,Cut Make and
Trim,Dresses,Shirts,Shorts,Skirts,T-
01/03/1988
06/12/2010
Take Note / Instant
23/03/2007
21/12/2010
Fabuland cc
01/07/2004
22/12/2010
Snugglers Mnftg.
Dv Manufacturers
Shirts,Track Suits
Protectivewear
Blouses,Dresses,Embroidery,Shirts,Short
12/03/1965
22/12/2010
s,Sleepwear,T-Shirts,Track Suits
01/07/2010
11/01/2011
Knitwear
Marcelle Fash.
29/04/1976
17/01/2011
Irena Housewares cc
13/11/2000
04/02/2011
Pursuit Clothing cc
04/03/2009
15/02/2011
Full Moon Cloth
19/01/2000
21/02/2011
Crossgrade cc
26/01/2000
22/02/2011
Asma Clothing cc
12/08/2009
28/02/2011
Cut Make & Trim - Ladies' Only
Seardel/Intimate Apparel SA
27/04/2009
31/03/2011
Underwear
Mershir Fash.
14/05/2001
04/04/2011
Nautilus Underwear
25/02/2000
07/04/2011
Aman Creations cc
02/03/2009
18/04/2011
Silver Bird Clothing
01/08/2006
29/04/2011
Camian Clothing
21/01/2011
17/05/2011
Amici Clothing Mnftr
19/02/1997
31/05/2011
Underwear
Design Centre
Rex/L'uomo Atl.
10/05/1982
30/06/2011
Junetex cc
09/10/2008
29/07/2011
Madams & Maids
09/04/2009
09/08/2011
Charter/Emb.Crt
01/03/1989
16/08/2011
Baby-Wear,T-Shirts,Vests
Avril's Design cc
03/08/2009
23/08/2011
Knitwear
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Shirts
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Manufacturer
Date Opened
Page 38 of 57
Date Closed
A.M. Cloth Prom
Garment
Activewear,Casual Wear,Cut Make &
Trim - Men's Only,T-Shirts,Track
07/05/1987
01/09/2011
Suits,Vests
Knebley Investments
01/03/2009
06/09/2011
Socks(Hose)
Jireh Apparel
17/06/2011
09/09/2011
Activewear
Mecharl C.M.T
01/07/2001
14/09/2011
Embroidery Industries
01/11/2010
16/09/2011
Overwear And Duchess
Embroidery
Blouses,Dresses,Headwear,Jackets,Short
02/11/1976
16/09/2011
s,Skirts,Slacks
Khoisani Tours/H.P Cutting
16/10/2002
20/09/2011
Phase Fashions
15/10/1987
23/09/2011
Baroness
01/01/1979
01/10/2011
Jeans,Shirts,Shorts,Skirts,T-Shirts
Cynray
28/05/2007
02/10/2011
Knitwear
Ohio 94 Cloth
17/01/1994
08/10/2011
Mad Engine Clo
Casual Wear,Design
20/01/1988
18/10/2011
Centre,Shirts,Shorts,T-Shirts,Trousers
Mobile-Inventory
01/11/2011
01/11/2011
Raincoats
Zinzi
11/03/2011
04/11/2011
Cocktailwear
Ukwenza Clothing
04/08/2008
29/11/2011
Cut Make and Trim
Sallvit Trading 93 cc
Blouses,Cut Make & Trim - Ladies'
27/07/2011
09/12/2011
Only,Dresses,Skirts
Printex
01/09/2009
14/12/2011
Knits On 9th
03/02/2011
22/12/2011
Knitwear
C And R Clothing
01/06/2000
31/12/2011
Activewear
Abbey Road Cmt
28/09/2011
17/02/2012
Cut Make & Trim - Ladies' Only
Jukebox Design
01/03/2007
29/02/2012
Cut Make and Trim
Print Zone
05/07/1999
29/02/2012
Millennum Socks
14/03/2012
14/03/2012
De Re Manufacturing
Socks(Hose)
Cut Make and Trim,Foundation
29/05/1992
22/03/2012
Garments,T-Shirts,Underwear,Vests
Lynn's Cut, Make, Trim
24/01/2011
04/04/2012
Cut Make and Trim
Seardel/Bnwitd
01/03/1974
11/04/2012
Seardel/Bnwitm
12/04/1977
11/04/2012
Dreywin Finance
19/01/2009
02/05/2012
Baisch Knitwear
01/05/1974
10/05/2012
Equilibrium Design
01/03/2007
10/05/2012
Indygo Artwear
18/05/2001
17/05/2012
Avril's Cmt
06/06/2008
25/05/2012
Knitwear
Primi Embroidery cc
06/10/2009
01/06/2012
Embroidery
Colourtex Cotton Dyers (Pty) Ltd
03/07/2008
24/07/2012
Millsox
22/10/1968
10/08/2012
Socks(Hose)
Grhs Clothing
03/11/2011
14/08/2012
Dresses,Shirts,Skirts
17th Avenue Clothing
16/07/2009
25/09/2012
Cut Make and Trim
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Knitted Fabrics
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 39 of 57
APPENDIX 3
Import Tariffs on Clothing
HS code
Description
6103.3
Jackets and blazers:
General
EU
EFTA
SADC
6103.31
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6103.32
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6103.33
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6103.39
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6103.4
Trousers, bib and brace overalls, breeches and shorts:
6103.41
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6103.42
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6103.43
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6103.49
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.3
Jackets and blazers:
6104.31
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.32
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.33
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.39
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.4
Dresses:
6104.41
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.42
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.43
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.44
Of artificial fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.49
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.5
Skirts and divided skirts:
6104.51
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.52
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.53
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.59
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.6
Trousers, bib and brace overalls, breeches and shorts:
6104.61
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.62
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.63
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6104.69
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
61.05
Men‘s or boys‘ shirts, knitted or crocheted:
6105.1
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6105.2
Of man-made fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6105.9
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
61.06
Women‘s or girls‘ blouses, shirts and shirt-blouses, knitted or crocheted:
6106.1
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6106.2
Of man-made fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6106.9
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
HS code
Description
Page 40 of 57
General
EU
EFTA
SADC
Men‘s or boys‘ underpants, briefs, nightshirts, pyjamas, bathrobes, dressing gowns and
61.07
similar articles, knitted or crocheted:
6107.1
Underpants and briefs:
6107.11
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6107.12
Of man-made fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6107.19
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6108.2
Briefs and panties:
6108.21
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6108.22
Of man-made fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6108.29
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
61.09
T-shirts, singlets and other vests, knitted or crocheted:
6109.1
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6109.9
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
61.1
Jerseys, pullovers, cardigans, waistcoats and similar articles, knitted or crocheted:
6110.1
Of wool or fine animal hair:
6110.11
Of wool
45%
20%
20%
Free
6110.12
Of Kashmir (cashmere) goats
45%
20%
20%
Free
6110.19
Other
45%
20%
20%
Free
6110.2
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6110.3
Of man-made fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6110.9
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
61.11
Babies' garments and clothing accessories, knitted or crocheted:
6111.2
Of cotton
6111.3
6111.9
61.12
Tracksuits, ski suits and swimwear, knitted or crocheted:
6112.1
Tracksuits:
45%
20%
20%
Free
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6112.11
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6112.12
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6112.19
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
61.15
Pantyhose, tights, stockings, socks and other hosiery, knitted or crocheted:
6115.1
Graduated compression hosiery
Free
Free
Free
Free
6115.2
Other pantyhose and tights:
45%
Free
Free
Free
20%
Free
Free
Free
Other women's full-length or knee- length
6115.3
hosiery, measuring per single yarn less
6115.9
Other:
6115.94
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6115.95
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6115.96
Of synthetic fibres
40%
20%
20%
Free
6115.99
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
61.16
Gloves, mittens and mitts, knitted or crocheted:
Free
Free
Free
than 67 dtex
Impregnated, coated or covered with
6116.1
plastics or rubber
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
30%
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
HS code
Description
6116.9
Other:
6116.91
Page 41 of 57
General
EU
EFTA
SADC
Of wool or fine animal hair
30%
Free
Free
Free
6116.92
Of cotton
30%
Free
Free
Free
6116.93
Of synthetic fibres
30%
Free
Free
Free
6116.99
Of other textile materials
30%
Free
Free
Free
30%
18%
20%
Free
45%
20%
20%
Free
45%
20%
20%
Free
Shawls, scarves, mufflers, mantillas, veils
6117.10
and the like
Men‘s or boys‘ overcoats, car- coats, capes,
62.01
cloaks, anoraks(including ski-jackets),
wind- cheaters, wind-jackets and similar
articles (excluding those of
heading 62.03):
(including ski-jackets), wind- cheaters,
wind-jackets and similar articles (excluding
those of
heading 62.03):
Women's or girls' overcoats, car- coats,
62.02
capes, cloaks, anoraks (including skijackets), windcheaters, wind-jackets and
similar articles (excluding those of heading
62.03):
Men‘s or boys‘ suits, ensembles, jackets, blazers, trousers, bib and brace overalls, breeches
62.03
and shorts (excluding swimwear):
6203.1
Suits:
6203.11
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.12
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.19
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.3
Jackets and blazers:
6203.31
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.32
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.33
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.39
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.4
Trousers, bib and brace overalls, breeches and shorts:
6203.41
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.42
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.43
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6203.49
Women's or girls' suits, ensembles, jackets, blazers, dresses, skirts, divided skirts, trousers,
62.04
bib and brace overalls, breeches and shorts (excluding swimwear):
6204.1
Suits:
6204.11
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.12
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.13
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 42 of 57
HS code
Description
General
EU
EFTA
SADC
6204.19
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.3
Jackets and blazers:
6204.31
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.32
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.33
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.39
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.4
Dresses:
6204.41
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.42
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.43
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.44
Of artificial fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.49
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.5
Skirts and divided skirts:
6204.51
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.52
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.53
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.59
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.6
Trousers, bib and brace overalls, breeches and shorts:
6204.61
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.62
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.63
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6204.69
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
62.05
Men‘s or boys‘ shirts:
6205.2
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6205.3
Of man-made fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6205.9
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
62.06
Women‘s or girls‘ blouses, shirts and shirt-blouses:
6206.1
Of silk or silk waste
20%
20%
Free
6206.2
Of wool or fine animal hair
45%
20%
20%
Free
6206.3
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6206.4
Of man-made fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6206.9
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
62.07
dressing gowns and similar articles:
6207.1
Underpants and briefs:
6207.11
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6207.19
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
62.09
Babies‘ garments and clothing accessories:
6209.2
Of cotton
45%
20%
20%
Free
6209.3
Of synthetic fibres
45%
20%
20%
Free
6209.9
Of other textile materials
45%
20%
20%
Free
45%
Men‘s or boys‘ singlets and other vests, underpants, briefs, nightshirts, pyjamas, bathrobes,
[Source: South African Revenue Services, Customs and Excise, Schedule 1 / Part 1]
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Page 43 of 57
APPENDIX 4
NBC Compliant Companies
Registered Name Of
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
Expiry Date
A J C.M.T CLOTHING CC
A J C.M.T CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
July 16, 2013
A. FRASER & CO. LTD
A. FRASER & CO. LTD
WESTERN CAPE
August 7, 2013
A. LYONS EMBROIDERERS (PTY)
A. LYONS EMBROIDERERS (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
June 20, 2013
A.E. BARLOW EMBROIDERY CC
NORTHERN
June 27, 2013
NORTHERN
June 27, 2013
KZN
March 17, 2013
Company
LTD
A.E. BARLOW EMBROIDERY CC
(NIGHT SHIFT)
A.E. BARLOW EMBROIDERY CC
A.E. BARLOW EMBROIDERY CC (DAY
SHIFT)
A.J. CHARNAUD & CO (PTY) LTD
A.J. CHARNAUD & CO (PTY) LTD
ADAYAS SPORTSWEAR
ADAYAS SPORTSWEAR
NORTHERN
October 20, 2013
ADVANCED TECHNICAL SOCK
ADVANCED TECHNICAL SOCK
WESTERN CAPE
November 28,
INDUSTRIES
INDUSTRIES
AFRICAN COMPASS TRADING
AFRICAN COMPASS TRADING 682 CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 11, 2013
AFRICAN HAT AND CAP MNFRS CC
NORTHERN
October 9, 2013
2013
682 CC
AFRICAN HAT AND CAP MNFRS
CC
ALLEY CAT CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
ALLEY CAT CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
KZN
July 22, 2013
ALLWEAR (PTY) LTD
ALLWEAR (PTY) LTD
KZN
July 22, 2013
AL'S CLOTHING CC
AL'S CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 9, 2013
AMM CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
AMM CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
KZN
October 2, 2013
ANGORE DESIGNS CC
FOLIO
WESTERN CAPE
February 15,
2014
ANNABELLE TRICOTS CC
ANNABELLE TRICOTS CC (CLOTHING)
NORTHERN
August 20, 2013
ANNABELLE TRICOTS CC (KNITTING)
NORTHERN
August 20, 2013
ANNE-MARIE STANDER CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 2, 2013
ARC SPORTSWEAR CC
ARC SPORTSWEAR
WESTERN CAPE
April 17, 2013
ARTICLES DESIGN CC
JUST CRUZIN
WESTERN CAPE
July 13, 2012
ASD HOSIERY (PTY) LTD
ASD HOSIERY (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
(CLOTHING)
ANNABELLE TRICOTS CC
(KNITTING)
ANNE-MARIE STANDER
CLOTHING CC
November 10,
2013
B2B CLOTHING CC
B2B CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 25, 2013
BADIRAMOGO APPAREL (PTY)
BADIRAMOGO APPAREL (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
January 21, 2012
EXCEL CLOTHING
KZN
November 6,
LTD
BAMBAZANI CLOTHING CC
2013
BAMBI BABYNEEDS
BAMBI BABYNEEDS
NORTHERN
December 6,
2012
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Trading Name Of Company
Page 44 of 57
Chamber
Expiry Date
Company
BARRIE CLINE CLOTHING CC
BARRY CLINE CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
January 22, 2014
BAYWEAR CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
BAYWEAR CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
EASTERN CAPE
January 25, 2014
BEACHES CLOTHING CC
BEACHES CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 19, 2013
BENITO CREATIONS CC
BENITO CREATIONS CC (CLOTHING)
NORTHERN
July 11, 2013
BENITO CREATIONS CC (KNITTING)
NORTHERN
July 11, 2013
BERG CLOTHING
KZN
June 14, 2013
BERNADOTTE (PTY) LTD
SACKER CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
March 26, 2013
BISMILLA GARMENTS CC
BISMILLA GARMENTS CC
NORTHERN
July 25, 2013
BLACKINK RETAIL (PTY) LTD
VEEFOR CC
WESTERN CAPE
May 28, 2013
BLUE JEANS TRADERS (PTY)
SISSY BOY
WESTERN CAPE
June 14, 2013
BRAND ME STITCHING
BRAND ME STITCHING
WESTERN CAPE
May 22, 2013
BRASILFIT SPORTS CC
FIT SPORTS
WESTERN CAPE
April 29, 2013
BREATHING AIR SYSTEMS (PTY)
BREATHING AIR SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
November 24,
BRICLO CC
BRICLO CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 19, 2013
BRIGHT IDEA PROJECTS 305 CC
R.K CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
January 28, 2014
BUFFALO CLOTHING CC
BUFFALO CLOTHING CC
KZN
(CLOTHING)
BENITO CREATIONS CC
(KNITTING)
BERG CLOTHING
LTD
LTD
2012
February 13,
2013
BURHOSE A DIVISION OF ARWA
BURHOSE A DIVISION OF ARWA
WESTERN CAPE
(PTY) (LTD
CALTONI KNITWEAR CC -
December 27,
2012
CALTONI KNITWEAR
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
CALTONI KNITWEAR
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
CAPE MOHAIR (PTY) LTD
CAPE MOHAIR (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
March 16, 2013
CAPESTORM OUTDOOR
CAPESTORM
WESTERN CAPE
August 13, 2013
CARIOCA CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
September 1,
CLOTHING
CALTONI KNITWEAR CC KNITTING
APPAREL (PTY) LTD
CARIOCA CLOTHING CC
2012
CARMI HATTERS (PTY) LTD
CARMI HATTERS (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
CARTER HARRIS (PTY) LTD
CARTER HARRIS(PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
July 8, 2012
CARTOON CLOTHING
CARTOON CLOTHING
KZN
March 10, 2013
MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
CASRIX (PTY) LTD
CASRIX (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
February 23,
CELROSE (PTY) LTD
CELROSE-MANUFACTURING
KZN
2013
September 12,
2013
CHAMELEON SPORTSWEAR
DELTA 7 SPORTSWEAR
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
CHOC'LATE LACE CC
CHOC'LACE LACE CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 2, 2013
CHRISTELLAS EMROIDERY CC
CHRISTELLAS EMBROIDERY CC
NORTHERN
July 21, 2011
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 45 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
C A FASHIONS
WESTERN CAPE
Expiry Date
Company
CHRISTINA ALBERTYN
November 28,
2013
COMET UNDIES CC
COMET UNDIES CC
KZN
February 18,
2014
CORAL WETSUITS CC
CORAL WETSUITS CC
WESTERN CAPE
August 14, 2013
CORPORATE HOUSE PRINTING
CORPORATE HOUSE PRINTING
NORTHERN
January 21, 2012
COVERUP TRADING CC
KNITWEAR INTERNATIONAL
KZN
September 19,
CRUCIAL TRADE 51 (PTY) LTD
CRUCIAL TRADE 51 (PTY) LTD
KZN
March 30, 2013
DAVINSCOT TONGAAT (PTY)
DAVINSCOT TONGAAT (PTY) LTD
KZN
September 23,
2012
LTD
2013
DAVINSCOT TONGAAT (PTY)
DAVINSCOT TONGAAT (PTY) LTD -
LTD - VERULAM DIVISION
VERULAM DIVISION
DAWN AT THE COTTAGE
KAZAK
KZN
April 12, 2013
WESTERN CAPE
February 14,
2014
DAWN AT THE COTTAGE
P J CEES
WESTERN CAPE
February 18,
2014
DB APPAREL SOUTH AFRICA
PLAYTEX
KZN
February 7, 2014
DERLEE KNITTING MILLS (PTY)
DERLEE KNITTING MILLS (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
LTD (CLOTHING)
(CLOTHING)
DERLEE KNITTING MILLS (PTY)
DERLEE KNITTING MILLS (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
LTD (KNITTING)
(KNITTING)
DIROSE ENTERPRISES CC
DIROSE ENTERPRISES CC
KZN
September 10,
(PTY) LTD
2013
DISTINCTICE CHOICE 600 CC
THE HAT SHOP
WESTERN CAPE
April 9, 2013
DIVA FASHIONS CC
DIVA FASHIONS CC
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
DOUBLE RING TRADING 344
SWIFT EMBROIDERY
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
DRABTEX MANUFACTURERS CC
DRABTEX MANUFACTURERS CC
NORTHERN
May 30, 2013
EAST LONDON TEXTILE (PTY)
ELTEX
WESTERN CAPE
July 25, 2013
(PTY) LTD
LTD
ELITE MODA (PTY) LTD
ELITE MODA (PTY) LTD
KZN
August 13, 2013
ELLE DEE AGENCY CC
ELLE DEE AGENCY CC
WESTERN CAPE
August 4, 2012
ELLEN ARTHUR SA (PTY) LTD
ELLEN ARTHUR SA (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
July 8, 2012
EMBROIDERY MASTER CC
EMBROIDERY MASTER CC
EASTERN CAPE
July 28, 2013
EMBROIDTECH CC
EMBROIDTECH CC
NORTHERN
June 20, 2013
EMME JEANS & SPORTSWEAR
EMME JEANS & SPORTSWEAR (PTY)
WESTERN CAPE
June 12, 2013
(PTY) LTD
LTD
ERFS 979 AND 987 TAMBOERS
@309 UNIFORM SPECIALIST
WESTERN CAPE
April 9, 2013
KLOOF
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 46 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
Expiry Date
ETHEKWINI CLOTHING
ETHEKWINI CLOTHING
KZN
MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
ETHNE B S.A (PTY) LTD
ETHNE B S.A (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
June 1, 2013
EVOLVE DESIGN CENTRE CC
EVOLVE DESIGN CENTRE CC
WESTERN CAPE
March 16, 2013
Company
November 16,
2013
EXOTEX TEXTILES CC
EXOTEX TEXTILES CC
KZN
July 16, 2013
F & R CLOTHING
SINGTEX CLOTHING
KZN
December 14,
2013
F.S. UNIFORMS (PTY) LTD
F.S. UNIFORMS
WESTERN CAPE
March 17, 2013
FABIO MILANO (PTY) LTD
FABIO MILANO (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
June 24, 2012
FALMIT FIBREGLASS CC
FALMIT FIBREGLASS CC
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
FASHIONIQUE
FASHIONIQUE
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
FG UNIFORMS
FG UNIFORMS
WESTERN CAPE
February 22,
FIVE THIRTY CLOTHING
FIVE THIRTY CLOTHING
KZN
April 27, 2011
FOSCHINI INVESTMENTS (PTY)
PRESTIGE CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
July 26, 2013
PRESTIGE CLOTHING (CALEDON)
WESTERN CAPE
July 26, 2013
FALKE EUROSOCKS
WESTERN CAPE
March 16, 2013
FUNCTIONAL SPORTSWEAR CC
FUNCTIONAL SPORTSWEAR CC
KZN
March 10, 2013
GALO KNITWEAR (CLOTHING)
GALO KNITWEAR (CLOTHING)
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
GALO KNITWEAR (KNITTING)
GALO KNITWEAR (KNITTING)
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
GAUTENG CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
GAUTENG CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
June 30, 2011
GENERAL WORKWEAR
GENERAL WORKWEAR
KZN
July 28, 2013
GENUINE CONNECTION
GENUINE CONNECTION PROMOTIONS
WESTERN CAPE
February 23,
PROMOTIONS (PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
2013
LTD
FOSCHINI INVESTMENTS (PTY)
LTD
FRANZ FALKE TEXTILE (PTY)
LTD
2013
GERLI CLOTHING CC
GERLI CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
June 13, 2013
GINA OF CHARLES STREET
GINA UNIFORM SPECIALISTS
NORTHERN
July 11, 2013
GIRAFFE CLOTHING CC
GIRAFFE CLOTHING CC
KZN
April 17, 2013
GOLDEN WHEEL TRADING CC
GOLDEN WHEEL TRADING CC
KZN
July 28, 2013
GOPHER PROMOTIONS CC
GOPHER PROMOTIONS CC
NORTHERN
March 10, 2013
GREENMILE TRADING CC
COASTAL CLOTHING
KZN
September 19,
(PTY) LIMITED
2012
H.M.S CLOTHING
H.M.S CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS
MANUFACTURERS (CLOTHING)
(CLOTHING)
NORTHERN
June 20, 2013
H.M.S CLOTHING
H.M.S CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS
NORTHERN
June 20, 2013
MANUFACTURERS (KNITTING)
(KNITTING)
HATRICK SPORTS
HATRICK SPORTS
WESTERN CAPE
July 18, 2013
HIP HOP FACTORY
WESTERN CAPE
August 20, 2013
MANUFACTURERS & DESIGNERS
CC
HIP HOP FACTORY (PTY) LTD
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 47 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
Expiry Date
HOMEFRONT TRADING 49 CC
FUZION CLOTHING
KZN
August 13, 2013
HOUSE OF MONATIC (PTY) LTD
HOUSE OF MONATIC (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
May 24, 2013
IDENTIFIT (PTY) LTD
IDENTIFIT (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
May 16, 2013
IMATERIAL TEXTILE PRINTERS
IMATERIAL TEXTILE PRINTERS CC
WESTERN CAPE
July 16, 2013
INDI-SAFE CC
INDI-SAFE CC
NORTHERN
October 29, 2013
INTEGRAL MANUFACTURING
INTEGRAL MANUFACTURING CAPE
WESTERN CAPE
August 7, 2013
CAPE (PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
ITALIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRIES
ITALIAN TEXTILES INDUSTRIES CC
Company
CC
NORTHERN
CC
November 1,
2012
J 'n B SPORTSWEAR
J 'n B SPORTSWEAR
WESTERN CAPE
J. GROSS & CO. (PTY) LTD
J. GROSS & CO. (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
August 25, 2012
November 8,
2012
JACQUES HAU (PTY) LTD
JACQUES HAU (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
May 15, 2013
JACQUI COUTURE CC
JACQUI COUTURE CC
WESTERN CAPE
November 14,
JADE CORPORATE CLOTHING
JADE CORPORATE CLOTHING
NORTHERN
July 16, 2013
CONCEPTS (PTY) LTD
CONCEPTS (PTY) LTD
JAFF & COMPANY LIMITED
JAFF & COMPANY LIMITED
NORTHERN
June 24, 2012
2012
JAFF AND COMPANY LIMITED
JAFF AND COMPANY LIMITED
NORTHERN
July 16, 2013
JASPER MANUFACTURING CC
JASPER MANUFACTURING CC
NORTHERN
July 11, 2013
JEN KHAN CLOTHING CC
JEN KHAN
NORTHERN
August 20, 2013
JENDAS TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
JENDAS TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
KZN
April 9, 2013
JENSEN BELTS (PTY) LTD
JENSEN BELTS (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
April 17, 2013
JERSEY WORX SUPPLIES CC
JERSEY WORX SUPPLIES CC
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
JERSEYWORX
JERSEYWORX
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
JO BORKETT CORPORATE (PTY)
JO BORKETT CORPORATE (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
April 9, 2013
JONSSON UNIFORM SOLUTIONS
JONSSON UNIFORM SOLUTIONS
KZN
May 28, 2013
(PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
JUANRE CLOTHING MNFRS CC
JUANRE CLOTHING MNFRS CC
KZN
February 5, 2014
JUDY'S PRIDE FASHIONS (PTY)
FASHION WORLD
KZN
May 18, 2013
JUNIT MANUFACTURERS CC
JUNIT MANUFACTURERS CC
KZN
May 6, 2013
KAL CLOTHING CC
KERRY'S FASHIONS
NORTHERN
March 8, 2013
LTD
LTD
KALLA KNITWEAR (CLOTHING)
KALLA KNITWEAR (CLOTHING)
NORTHERN
October 29, 2013
KALLA KNITWEAR (KNITTING)
KALLA KNITWEAR (KNITTING)
NORTHERN
October 29, 2013
KARIN FASHIONS CC
KARIN FASHIONS CC
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
KARMA CLOTHING
KARMA CLOTHING
NORTHERN
November 13,
KEEDO INTERNATIONAL (PTY)
KEEDO INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
April 2, 2013
KIDS TALK CC
KZN
April 29, 2013
2013
LTD
KIDS TALK CC
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 48 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
Expiry Date
KINGSGATE CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
KZN
May 28, 2013
KIRKLAND TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
KIRKLAND TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
KZN
April 9, 2013
K-WAY MANUFACTURERS (PTY)
K-WAY MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
September 10,
L EN A SKOOL
L EN A SKOOL
NORTHERN
January 19, 2012
LANCASHIRE MANUFACTURING
LANCASHIRE MANUFACTURING
WESTERN CAPE
May 6, 2013
COMPANY (PTY) LTD
COMPANY (PTY) LTD
LEISURE BRANDS (PTY) LTD
LEISURE BRANDS (PTY) LTD
KZN
March 27, 2013
LENA FREZZA DESIGN STUDIO
LENA FREZZA DESIGN STUDIO
NORTHERN
March 29, 2013
LEO GARMENTS (PTY) LTD
LEO GARMENTS
KZN
September 27,
LIEHEI CLOTHING
LIEHEI CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS
NORTHERN
August 9, 2012
MANUFACTURERS CC
CC
LOFTUS VERSFELD
LOFTUS VERSFELD LAUNDRETTE
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
LOGOGEAR CC
LOGOGEAR CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 9, 2013
LONTANA MANUFACTURING CC
LONTANA MANUACTURING CC
WESTERN CAPE
March 16, 2013
LORD TIE (PTY) LTD
LORD TIE (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
June 20, 2013
M1 LATEX PRODUCTS (PTY) LTD
THE KIT GROUP
NORTHERN
November 6,
Company
KINGSGATE CLOTHING (PTY)
LTD
LTD
2013
2013
LAUNDRETTE
2013
MABY CORPORATE CLOTHING
MABY CORPORATE CLOTHING (PTY)
NORTHERN
September 10,
(PTY) LTD
LTD
MAHLONGWA CLOTHING
MAHLONGWA CLOTHING INDUSTRY
KZN
August 23, 2012
MALCOM DESIGNS
NORTHERN
February 9, 2013
2013
INDUSTRY
MALCOM DESIGNS
MANHOOD CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
MANHOOD CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
August 7, 2013
MARBURG MANUFACTURERS
MARBURG MANUFACTURERS (PTY)
KZN
July 18, 2013
(PTY) LTD
LTD
MARKET DEMAND TRADING 663
MARKET DEMAND TRADING 663
WESTERN CAPE
August 13, 2013
(PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
MARTHA EBERBACH
MARTHA FASHIONS
WESTERN CAPE
February 27,
2013
MARTONE TEXTILES (PTY) LTD -
MARTONE TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
July 26, 2013
MARTONE TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
July 26, 2013
MASANA CLOTHING
MASANA CLOTHING
NORTHERN
May 16, 2013
MAZE CLOTHING CC
MAZE CLOTHING CC
WESTERN CAPE
November 5,
CLOTHING
MARTONE TEXTILES (PTY) LTD KNITTING
2013
McIVER APPAREL (PTY) LTD
McIVER APPAREL (PTY) LTD
KZN
August 13, 2013
MEDICI CLOTHING S.A CC
MEDICI CLOTHING S.A CC
NORTHERN
May 6, 2013
MEIWAN TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
MEIWAN TEXTILES (PTY) LTD
KZN
April 9, 2013
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Trading Name Of Company
Page 49 of 57
Chamber
Expiry Date
Company
MHB JERSEYS
MHB JERSEYS
NORTHERN
July 25, 2013
MIGRA FABRICS (PTY) LTD
MIGRA FABRICS (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
May 28, 2013
MINISTRIES IN MOTION
M CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
August 7, 2013
MIZPAH CLOTHING
MIZPAH CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
October 29, 2013
MODAGREGO LIFESTLE CC
STEFANO CLOTHING
NORTHERN
July 21, 2011
MODE DESIGNS CC
MODE DESIGNS CC
KZN
June 14, 2013
MONEYLINE 680 (PTY) LTD
PIACENZA KNITWEAR
WESTERN CAPE
April 11, 2013
MONOGRAMICS CC
MONOGRAMICS CC
EASTERN CAPE
April 29, 2013
MY JEANS CLOTHING
MY JEANS CLOTHING
KZN
March 27, 2013
MY KATRAAR 37 CC
MY KATRAAR 37 CC
NORTHERN
November 24,
2012
MYFO FOAM PRODUCTS CC
MYFO FOAM PRODUCTS CC
NORTHERN
March 27, 2013
NATIONAL CAP FACTORY CC
NATIONAL CAP FACTORY CC
WESTERN CAPE
July 16, 2013
NATIONAL CLOTHING
NATIONAL CLOTHING
NORTHERN
March 10, 2013
MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
MANUFACTURERS
NAVADA CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
NAVADA CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
February 16,
NEW COE KNITS CC
NEW COE KNITS CC
WESTERN CAPE
August 5, 2013
NIAM EMBROIDERY
FULLIMPUT
KZN
July 23, 2013
NINIAN & LESTER (PTY) LTD -
NINIAN & LESTER (PTY) LTD -
KZN
July 22, 2013
CLOTHING DIVISION
CLOTHING DIVISION
NIRAN MANUFACTURING (PTY)
NIRAN MANUFACTURING (PTY) LTD
KZN
May 6, 2013
OTTUMWA INVESTMENTS
OTTUMWA INVESTMENTS
KZN
August 7, 2013
P5 CREATIONS CC
K. KNIT
NORTHERN
May 30, 2013
PALL MALL NECKWEAR CC
PALL MALL NECKWEAR CC
KZN
August 15, 2013
PALS CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
PALS CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
May 14, 2013
PAMADRIE VERVAARDIGING
PAMADRIE
WESTERN CAPE
April 17, 2013
PANDA SPORTS CC
NORTHERN
November 6,
2013
LTD
(EDMS) BPK
PANDA SPORTS CC
2013
PARISIAN MILLINERS CC
PARISIAN MILLINERS CC
WESTERN CAPE
May 11, 2013
PATRICK VAN DEN HEEVER CC
SEW & SO
WESTERN CAPE
April 17, 2013
PEP CLOTHING A DIVISION OF
PEPCLO
WESTERN CAPE
June 12, 2013
PETER BLOND & ASSOCIATES
PETER BLOND & ASSOCIATES (PTY)
WESTERN CAPE
August 22, 2013
(PTY) LTD
LTD
PHOENIX INDUSTRIAL &
PHOENIX INDUSTRIAL
NORTHERN
December 12,
PEPKOR RETAIL LIMITED
SAFETY SUPPLIES CC
2012
POWER HOUSE CLOTHING CO.
POWER HOUSE CLOTHING CO.
KZN
July 22, 2013
POWER WORKWEAR CC
POWER WORKWEAR CC
KZN
May 28, 2013
PRESLES (PTY) LTD
PRESLES (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
May 11, 2013
PRIDE FASHIONS
PRIDE FASHIONS
WESTERN CAPE
April 9, 2013
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 50 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
PRIKELL CLOTHING CC
KZN
Expiry Date
Company
PRIKELL CLOTHING CC
September 10,
2013
PROMO GEAR MANUFACTURERS
PROMO GEAR MANUFACTURERS
(PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
November 6,
2013
PROMO LOGO
THE KIT GROUP
NORTHERN
October 5, 2012
PROMOTEAM CORPORATE
PROMOTEAM CORPORATE
NORTHERN
September 17,
SOLUTIONS CC
SOLUTIONS CC
PROMOTION CLOTHING CC
PROMOTION CLOTHING CC
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
PROTEA MILLINERS CC
PROTEA MILLINERS CC
NORTHERN
June 20, 2013
PROTEA SPORTS (PTY) LTD
PROTEA SPORTS (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
March 4, 2012
PSG TRADING (PTY) LTD
FIRST BADGE
NORTHERN
2013
PROTEA MILLINERS CC
September 14,
2012
QUALITY SPRING CC
QUALITY SPRING CC
NORTHERN
December 6,
2012
R AND G CMT
R AND G CMT
NORTHERN
November 6,
2013
RADEEN FASHIONS (PTY) LTD
RADEEN FASHIONS
WESTERN CAPE
April 4, 2013
RADICAL SPORTS GEAR CC
RADICAL SPORTS GEAR CC
KZN
May 28, 2013
RAWA TRADING CC
RAWA TRADING CC
WESTERN CAPE
May 28, 2013
RB CLOTHING PROJECTS CC
RB CLOTHING PROJECTS CC
KZN
May 6, 2013
RED SEAL CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
RED SEAL CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
May 11, 2013
RELIANCE DESIGNS CC
RELIANCE DESIGNS CC
KZN
July 23, 2013
ROCK N ROLL CLOTHING
ROCK N ROLL CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
May 31, 2013
MANUFACTURERES CC
MANUFACTURERS
ROMA MANUFACTURING CC
ROMA MANUFACTURING CC
NORTHERN
November 24,
ROMEO AND JULIETTE DESIGN
DRESDEN LEE CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
March 8, 2013
ROWAN KNITTING MILL CC
KZN
June 14, 2013
2012
CC
ROWAN KNITTING MILL CC
ROWASH FASHIONS
ROWASH FASHIONS
KZN
April 12, 2013
ROWTEX PRINTERS CC
ROWTEX PRINTERS CC
KZN
April 12, 2013
RW DESIGN COMPANY (PTY)
RW DESIGN COMPANY (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
August 14, 2013
LTD
S DONALDSON EMBROIDERY
S DONALDSON EMBROIDERY
EASTERN CAPE
April 29, 2013
SANDPIPER CLOTHING
SANDPIPER CLOTHING
NORTHERN
September 29,
MANUFACTURERS CC
MANUFACTURERS
SATYAVIMALA CLOTHING
CITY FASHION MNFTRS
NORTHERN
July 11, 2013
SEAGULL INDUSTRIES (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
February 15,
2012
MNFTRS CC
SEAGULL INDUSTRIES (PTY)
LTD
SEARDEL GROUP (PTY) LTD
2014
LILANIE CLOTHING
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
KZN
January 22, 2014
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 51 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
Expiry Date
MONVISO KNITWEAR
WESTERN CAPE
July 4, 2013
SEARDEL GROUP TRADING
PRESTIGE CLOTHING
KZN
July 16, 2013
(PTY) LTD
MANUFACTURERS
SEARDEL GROUP TRADING
BONWIT DIVISION
Company
SEARDEL GROUP TRADING
(PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
(PTY) LTD
SEARDEL GROUP TRADING
DEMAR DESIGNS
WESTERN CAPE
BIBETTE
WESTERN CAPE
(PTY) LTD
SEARDEL GROUP TRADING
September 10,
2013
September 10,
2013
(PTY) LTD T/A BIBETTE
September 10,
2013
SEASONS FIND 1063 CC
BASIC MARKETING
WESTERN CAPE
March 17, 2013
SECOND SKINS
SECOND SKINS MANUFACTURING
WESTERN CAPE
April 9, 2013
MANUFACTURING (PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
SERVIPLEX 124 CC
TORPEDO CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
April 29, 2013
SEVENTH WAVE INVESTMENTS
NORTHERN
October 9, 2013
SEW-TRUE CC
SEW-TRUE CC
WESTERN CAPE
March 12, 2013
SHANTARA INDUSTRIES CC
SHANTARA INDUSTRIES CC
NORTHERN
March 8, 2013
(CLOTHING)
(CLOTHING)
SHANTARA INDUSTRIES CC
SHANTARA INDUSTRIES CC
NORTHERN
March 8, 2013
(KNITTING)
(KNITTING)
SHIVA CLOTHING
SHIVA CLOTHING
KZN
September 10,
MANUFACTURERS
SEVENTH WAVE INVESTMENTS
CC
2013
SIRDICKS UNIFORMS CC
SIRDICKS UNIFORMS CC
WESTERN CAPE
August 4, 2012
SKC DESIGNS CC
SKC CORPORATE IMAGES
NORTHERN
January 19, 2012
SMITH & THOMAS FABRICS CC
FASHION TEAM
WESTERN CAPE
July 28, 2011
SOCKIT MANUFACTURING (PTY)
SOCKIT MANUFACTURING (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
April 17, 2013
SO-DIFF CLOTHING MANUFACTURING
EASTERN CAPE
April 29, 2013
SOLAR SPORT
KZN
April 12, 2013
SOSKOLNE CLOTHING
SOSKOLNE CLOTHING ENTERPRISES
NORTHERN
March 8, 2013
ENTERPRISES (PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
SOUTHERN STAR PRODUCTION
SOUTHERN STAR PRODUCTION CC
LTD
SO-DIFF CLOTHING
MANUFACTURING
SOLAR SPORT MANUFACTURERS
(PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
CC
November 6,
2013
SOVIET JEANSWEAR COMAPANY
SOVIET JEANSWEAR COMPANY PTY
NORTHERN
July 28, 2011
PTY (LTD)
(LTD)
SPECIALITY SEWING SERVICES
SPECIALITY SEWING SERVICES CC
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
SPORTS ACCESS CC
EASTERN CAPE
July 28, 2013
CC
SPORTS ACCESS CC
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 52 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
Expiry Date
IMPAHLA CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
April 17, 2013
STANDARD CLOTHING
STANDARD CLOTHING
NORTHERN
October 17, 2012
MANUFACTURERS
MANUFACTURERS
STEPAHEAD MILITARY
STEPAHEAD MILITARY HEADWEAR
NORTHERN
October 17, 2013
HEADWEAR DISTR.
DISTRIBUTORS
STERLING CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
STERLING CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
KZN
May 28, 2013
SUNLIT FASHIONS (PTY) LTD
SUNLIT FASHIONS (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
March 10, 2013
SUPREME HAT & CAP
SUPREME HAT & CAP
NORTHERN
September 26,
MANUFACTURERS CC
MANUFACTURERS CC
SUZI PRODUCTS CC
SUZI PRODUCTS CC
WESTERN CAPE
May 28, 2013
SWAN ENTERPRISES CC
SWAN HAT MANUFACTURERS
NORTHERN
August 20, 2013
SWEET-ORR & LYBRO (PTY) LTD
SWEET-ORR & LYBRO (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
December 14,
Company
SPRING ROMANCE PROPERTIES
34 (PTY) LTD
2012
2013
T BIRCH & CO (PTY) LTD
T BIIRCH & CO (PTY) LTD
EASTERN CAPE
July 28, 2013
T.F.G APPAREL SUPPLY
T.F.G APPAREL SUPPLY COMPANY
WESTERN CAPE
July 4, 2013
COMPANY (PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
T.M LANG & G.M O'CONNOR T/A
MASTER PLEATERS
WESTERN CAPE
March 17, 2013
TEAMSPIRIT DISTRIBUTORS CC
NORTHERN
November 17,
MASTER PLEATERS
TEAMSPIRIT DISTRIBUTORS CC
2012
TECHNOSTITCH EMBROIDERY
TECHNOSTITCH EMBROIDERY CC
WESTERN CAPE
March 4, 2013
TECO WORKWEAR
WESTERN CAPE
March 16, 2013
THE JEAN MANUFACTURING CO.
THE JEAN MANUFACTURING CO.
WESTERN CAPE
June 12, 2013
(PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
THE NEW CLOTHING COMPANY
THE NEW CLOTHING CO. (PTY) LTD
WESTERN CAPE
June 1, 2013
CC
TECO MANUFACTURERS (PTY)
LTD
(PTY) LTD
THE STYLE FACTORY
THE STYLE FACTORY
NORTHERN
May 14, 2013
THOUSAND HILLS CLOTHING
THOUSAND HILLS CLOTHING (PTY)
KZN
September 14,
(PTY) LTD
LTD
TIE MAN TRADING (PTY) LTD
SKIPPER INTERNATIONAL
2012
NORTHERN
September 14,
2012
TIME CLOTHING
TIME CLOTHING
EASTERN CAPE
January 23, 2014
TON ARTS AND SIGNS
TON ARTS AND SIGNS
NORTHERN
June 24, 2012
TOPCAP CC
TOPCAP
WESTERN CAPE
August 13, 2013
TRACLO (PTY) LTD
TRACLO
NORTHERN
March 24, 2012
TRACLO INTERNATIONAL (PTY)
TRACLO INTERNATIONAL
NORTHERN
June 30, 2011
TRADELINK TEXTILE SERVICES
WESTERN CAPE
July 28, 2013
TRAFFIC CLOTHING
KZN
June 14, 2013
LTD
TRADELINK TEXTILE SERVICES
(PTY) LTD
TRAFFIC CLOTHING
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 3140 & 6131a
Registered Name Of
Page 53 of 57
Trading Name Of Company
Chamber
Expiry Date
TRIM TRENDS CC
GLITTERGEAR
WESTERN CAPE
May 13, 2013
TRUBOK (PTY) LTD
TRUBOK (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
June 27, 2013
TRUBOK (PTY) LTD (SANDOWN)
SANDOWN CLOTHING
KZN
October 5, 2012
TUJAY KNITWEAR CC
TUJAY KNITWEAR CC (CLOTHING
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
(CLOTHING SECTION)
SECTION)
TWIN CLOTHING
TWIN CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS
KZN
August 18, 2013
MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
UMBALA KNITWEAR CC
UMBALA KNITWEAR CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 29, 2013
UMUZI CLOTHING
UMUZI CLOTHING MANUFACTURERS
KZN
April 9, 2013
MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD
(PTY) LTD
UPTOWN TRADING 305 CC
PROFESSIONAL CLOTHING
NORTHERN
June 14, 2013
Company
INDUSTRIES
V.S ZWANE TRADING
V.S ZWANE TRADING
NORTHERN
January 19, 2012
VELDDRIF CLOTHING
VELDDRIF CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
April 29, 2013
MANUFACTURERS CC
MANUFACTURERS CC
VIMAL CLOTHING ENTERPRISES
VIMAL CLOTHING
KZN
March 10, 2013
VKB WEAR WORKS
THE WEAR WORKS
NORTHERN
May 26, 2012
VOG (PTY) LTD
VOG (PTY) LTD
NORTHERN
February 10,
2012
W.L. COLE (PTY) LTD
W.L. COLE
KZN
July 8, 2012
WESTSIDE TEXTILE PRINTERS
WESTSIDE TEXTILE PRINTERS CC
NORTHERN
March 2, 2013
WETSUITS SA (PTY) LTD
REEF WETSUITS
WESTERN CAPE
July 16, 2013
WYNNS MANUFACTURING (PTY)
WYNNS MANUFACTURING (PTY) LTD
KZN
November 15,
CC
LTD
2012
ZENZELENI CLOTHING (PTY)
ZENZELENI CLOTHING
KZN
July 11, 2013
ZENZELENI CLOTHING (PTY) LTD
KZN
October 29, 2013
ZERO INDUSTRIES CC
ZERO INDUSTRIES CC
WESTERN CAPE
April 19, 2013
ZIG ZAG CLOTHING
ZIG ZAG CLOTHING
WESTERN CAPE
April 9, 2013
ZUT RAGS CC (CLOTHING)
ZUT RAGS CC (CLOTHING
NORTHERN
July 11, 2013
ZUT RAGS CC (KNITTING)
ZUT RAGS CC (KNITTING)
NORTHERN
July 11, 2013
LTD
ZENZELENI CLOTHING (PTY)
LTD
KZN CTC Members

Africa Trade 2060 Investments

Crossley Holdings

Allwear Clothing Manufacturers and

DB Apparel
Exporters

Durban Overall

Apparel Industries (Pty) Ltd

Dyefin Textiles

Bresan Footwear

Edcon

Celrose (Pty) Ltd

Eddels Shoes
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
Manufacture and Wholesale Trade in Clothing
Siccodes 34240
Page 54 of 57

Fashion World

PMC Group

Frame Textile Group

Powerhouse Clothing

Freudenberg Non-Wovens

Prestige Apparel Group

Imraan Textiles

Prilla 2000

Intercloth

Saddler Belts

International Trimmings & Labels SA

Spectrum Textiles
(ITL)

Texmate Textiles

Ninian & Lester

United Buttons

Pall Mall Neckwear

Zorbatex
List of CCTC Members

African Nature Trading ( PTY) LTD

K-Way Manufacturers (Pty) Ltd

Apparel

Natasha's CMT
(Pty) Ltd

Newcoe Knitting Co.

ARC Sportswear CC

Nike South Africa (Pty) Ltd

B2B Clothing cc

Pep Stores

Beaches Clothing CC

PepClo

Berg River Textiles

Peter Blond & Associates

Bernadotte (Pty) Ltd

Prestige Clothing (2012 - acquired by

Blue Jeans Traders

Bri-Clo

Prime Fastener

Cape Union Mart

Radeen Fashions

Cotton Traders CC

Rock N Roll Clothing

East London Textiles (Pty) Ltd

Rotex Fabrics (Pty) Ltd

Farbe

Seardel Apparel Cape

Franz Falke Textiles (Pty) Ltd

The Foschini Group (TFG)

Freudenberg Nonwovens (Pty) Ltd

Waltex Carpets CC

Greenways CMT

Watson Shoes

Hextex

Woolworths

House of Monatic (Pty) Ltd

International Trimmings & Labels SA
Component
Manufacturers
(Pty) Ltd
© Copyright Who Owns Whom (Pty) Ltd
TFG)

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