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July 1, 2013
1
Table of Contents
Board of Directors ............................................................................... 3
Information Sources ........................................................................... 5
Calendar .............................................................................................. 6
The College .......................................................................................... 9
Accreditation and Memberships ......................................................... 12
Academic Support Services................................................................ 13
Admissions ........................................................................................ 15
Financial Aid ...................................................................................... 20
Tuition ............................................................................................... 29
Evening and Weekend Programs ....................................................... 34
Service Learning ................................................................................ 35
Center for Transcultural Learning ...................................................... 37
Study Abroad ..................................................................................... 39
Student Life & Development .............................................................. 41
Academic Regulations and Information ............................................. 48
Degree Requirements ........................................................................ 69
Academic Programs ........................................................................... 73
Student Learning Goals ..................................................................... 75
Courses of Study (General Education Curriculum) ............................. 76
Programs of Study………………………………………………………………..….…79
Course Descriptions……………………………………………………………….….190
Administration and Faculty………………………………………………….….….278
Cooperating Agencies…………………………………………………………….….291
July 1, 2013
2
Board of Directors
Chair of the Board
Doug Wilwerding
Managing Principal
The Optimas Group, LLC
Vice Chair
Kathleen Dodge
President & CEO
NEI Global Relocation
Secretary
Jane Huerter
Retired, Executive Vice President of
Corporate Services and Corporate
Secretary Mutual of Omaha
Treasurer
Deborah Macdonald, J.D.
Retired, President
Kinder Morgan Natural Gas Pipeline
Group
Jean Bartman
Partner
RSM McGladrey, Inc.
Terri Campbell ‘93
Sales Manager
Omaha World Herald
Jane Carmody DNP, RN
VP & System CNO
Alegent Health
Lorraine Chang, J.D.
Strategic Leadership Consultant
Patrick Corrigan
President & CEO
Access Bank
William Cutler
Funeral Director
Heafey, Hoffmann, Dworak & Cutler
Mortuaries
Ivan Gilreath
Chief Executive Officer
Boys and Girls Clubs of the Midlands
Richard (Rick) P. Jeffries, J.D.
Partner
Cline Williams Wright Johnson & Oldfather,
L.L.P.
Carol Kontor
Chartered Financial Analyst
Retired Nebraska State Investment
Officer
Marcia Koory
Portfolio Manager/ Vice President
Pflug Koory, LLC
David Kramer
Partner
Baird Holm Law Firm
Dr. Sheila Megley RSM
West Midwest Leadership Team
Sisters of Mercy of the Americas
Daniel K. O’Neill
President
First National of Nebraska
Daniel Padilla
Business Banking Officer
First National Bank
Steven Ritzman
President & CEO
American National Bank
Sr. Marilyn Ross, RSM ‘64
Executive Director
Holy Name Housing
Dr. Michon Rozmajzl, RSM ‘65
Professor and Associate Dean Emerita
Boise State University
July 1, 2013
3
Annette Smith
Community Leader
Dr. Maryanne Stevens, RSM
President
College of Saint Mary
Sue Weiler-Doke
Division Business Director
Kiewit Companies
July 1, 2013
4
Information Sources
For specific information concerning the College, write or call one of the following:
General Affairs of the College
Academic Information
Student Development
Academic Records
Admissions
Financial Aid
Business Matters
Gifts and Bequests
Public Information
Alumnae Affairs
Student Accounts
Information Center (402-399-2400)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (402-399-2693)
Vice President for Student Development (402-399-2422)
Registrar (402-399-2443)
Vice President for Enrollment Services (402-399-2355)
Director of Financial Aid (402-399-2415)
Vice President for Financial Services (402-399-2427)
Vice President for Institutional Advancement (402-399-2457)
Director of Public Relations (402-399-2454)
Coordinator of Alumnae (402-399-2457)
Express Center (402-399-2429)
The catalog is compiled and published by the Office of the Vice President for Academic
Affairs, Registrar’s Office, College of Saint Mary, 7000 Mercy Road, Omaha, NE 68106;
telephone, (402) 399-2442.
The information in this catalog was accurate at the time of publishing; it is subject
to change without prior notice and without obligation.
July 1, 2013
5
Academic Calendar
FALL SEMESTER:
AUGUST 2013:
Thurs. 8
Sat. 10
Sat. 10
Tues. 13
Wed. 14-Thur. 15
Thurs. 15
Fri. 16
Sat. 17
Sat. 17
Sat. 17
Mon. 19 - Tue. 20
Wed. 21
Fri. 23 – Sun. 25
Sat. 24
Mon. 26
Wed. 28
Sat. 31
September 2013:
Mon. 2
Fri. 6– Sun. 8
Mon. 9
Thur. 12
Wed. 11 – Wed. 18
Fri 13 – Sun. 15
Mon. 16
Fri. 20 – Sun 22
Mon. 23
Tues. 24
Mon. 30
October 2013:
Fri. 4 – Sun. 6
Thur. 3– Wed. 9
Mon. 7
Fri. 11
Thur. 10 – Fri. 11
Mon. 14
Fri. 18
Fri. 18 – Sun. 20
Mon. 21
Mon. 28
November 2013:
Fri. 1 – Sun 3
Mon. 4
Mon. 4 – Fri. 15
Mon. 11
Fri. 15
Fri. 15 – Sun. 17
Mon. 18
Mon. 25
July 1, 2013
Soccer and volleyball athletes move into residence halls
Graduate Student Orientation (MAT, MSE, MSN, EDD) (8:30 am -12)
Graduate Student Orientation (MAT, MSOL, PBPLG) (2:30-6:30 pm)
New Full Time Faculty Orientation 12-4 pm
Faculty In-service
Adjunct Faculty In-Service, 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Program Planning and Division Meetings (TBD)
New Students Arrive for Move-In
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING CLASSES BEGIN
MS IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP CLASSES BEGIN
Advising/Registration for Students
DAY AND EVENING CLASSES BEGIN
WEEKEND CLASSES BEGIN #1
BUSINESS LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT CLASSES BEGIN
FACULTY COMMITTEE MEETINGS, 12:45 P.M.
Last Day to Drop/Add/Late Registration for Day/Evening
LABOR DAY WEEKEND – NO CLASSES
LABOR DAY HOLIDAY, COLLEGE CLOSED
Weekend College #2
Opening Convocation: Dedication of the 2013-14 Academic Year – 1:00
p.m.
CSM Founder’s Day
Early Warning Alerts – deadline for entry is 9/18
Alumnae Reunion Weekend
Academic Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Weekend College #3
Faculty Assembly, Meeting Room, 12:45 p.m.
Mercy Day
Faculty Committee Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Weekend College #4 (Mid-Term)
Mid-Term Week
Academic Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Weekend Mid-Term Grades Due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
FALL BREAK – NO CLASSES
FACULTY FORUM (IF NEEDED)
Day/Evening Mid-Term Grades Due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
Weekend College #5
Faculty Assembly, Meeting Room, 12:45 p.m.
Faculty Committee Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Weekend College #6
Academic Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Focused Registration for Spring and Summer 2014
Faculty Assembly, Meeting Room, 12:45 p.m.
5:00 p.m. – Last Day to Withdraw from Weekend AND
DAY/EVE classes
Weekend College #7
Faculty Committee Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Thanksgiving Luncheon
6
Wed. 27 – Sun. 1
Thu. 28– Fri. 29
Sat. 30
December 2013
Mon. 2
Fri. 6 – Sun. 8
Mon. 9
Tue. 10 – Fri. 13
Fri. 13
Sat. 14
Sat. 14
Mon. 16
Wed. 18
Tues 24 - Wed. Jan 1
THANKSGIVING VACATION FOR STUDENTS
THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY, COLLEGE CLOSED
Thanksgiving Holiday - NO CLASSES
Academic Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Weekend College #8 (Finals)
Faculty Assembly, Meeting Room, 12:45 p.m.
FINAL EXAMS
Weekend Grades Due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
Graduate Grades Due by 12:00 p.m.
BACCALAUREATE, Our Lady of Mercy Chapel, 5:00 p.m.
GRADUATE RECEPTION, Dining Hall, 6:00 p.m.
GRADUATION (Commencement and EdD/Master Candidate Hooding)
Lied Fitness Center, 7:30 p.m. (times subject to change)
CHRISTMAS VACATION FOR STUDENTS BEGINS
Day/Evening Grades Due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
CHRISTMAS BREAK, COLLEGE CLOSED
SPRING SEMESTER:
January 2014:
Thu. 2
Mon. 13
Mon. 13 – Tues. 14
Wed. 15
Fri. 17 – Sun. 19
Mon. 20
Wed. 22
Mon. 27
Fri. 31 – Sun. 2
College Offices Open
Faculty In-service
Advising/Registration for New Students
DAY AND EVENING CLASSES BEGIN
WEEKEND CLASSES BEGIN
Faculty Committee Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Last Day for Late Day/Evening Registration Drop/Add
Academic Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
WEEKEND COLLEGE #2
February 2014:
Mon. 3
Wed. 5 – Wed. 12
Mon. 10
Fri. 14 – Sun. 16
Mon. 17
Mon. 24
Fri. 28 - Sun. 2
FACULTY ASSEMBLY, MEETING ROOM, 12:45 P.M
Early Warning Alerts – deadline for entry is 2/12
Faculty Committee Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
WEEKEND COLLEGE #3
Academic Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
FACULTY ASSEMBLY, MEETING ROOM, 12:45 P.M
Weekend College #4 (Mid-Terms)
March 2014:
Mon. 3 – 7
Mon. 3
Mon. 10 – Fri. 14
Fri. 14
Fri. 14 – Sun 16
Fri. 21
Mon. 17
Mon. 24
Fri. 28 – Sun. 30
Mon. 31
Mon. 31 – Fri. Apr 11
Mid-Term Week
Faculty Committee Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
SPRING BREAK
Weekend Mid Term Grades due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
Weekend College #5
Day/Evening Mid-Term Grades Due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
Faculty Forum (if needed)
Academic Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m
Weekend College #6
Faculty Assembly, 12:45 p.m
Focused Registration for Fall 2014
April 2014:
Mon. 7
Thur. 10
Fri.11– Sun. 13
Fri. 11
Mon. 14
Academic Committee Meetings, 12:45 p.m.
Spirit of Service Day (no day classes)
Weekend College #7
5:00 p.m. Last Day to Withdraw from DAY/EVE and Weekend Classes
Faculty Division Meetings, 12:45 p.m
July 1, 2013
7
Thu. 17
Fri. 18 - Mon. 21
Fri. 18
Fri. 25 – Sun 27
Mon. 28
Wed. 30
May 2014:
Fri. 2
Mon. 5
Mon. 12
Tues. 13 – Fri 16
Sat. 17
Sat. 17
Sun. 18
Fri. 23
College closes at 5:00 p.m. for Easter Break—no night classes
Easter Break - NO CLASSES
GOOD FRIDAY, COLLEGE CLOSED
Weekend College #8 (Finals)
Faculty Appreciation Luncheon, Meeting Room 12:00 pm
Student Scholars’ Day (No Classes)
Weekend College Final Grades due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
Recognition Day
Faculty Assembly, 12:45 p.m.
Final Exam Week
Graduate Grades Due by 12:00 p.m.
BACCALAUREATE, Our Lady of Mercy Chapel, 5:00 p.m.
HONORS CONVOCATION, Our Lady of Mercy Chapel, 7:30 p.m.
CERTFICATE CEREMONY, Gross Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.
MASTERS HOODING CEREMONY, Lied Fitness Center, 7:30 p.m.
(times subject to change)
GRADUATION, Century Link Center, 10:30 a.m.
(times subject to change)
Day/Evening Grades Due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
SUMMER SESSIONS:
May 2014:
Fri. 9 – Sun. 11
Mon. 19
Fri. 23
Sat. 24
Mon. 26
Tues. 27
Tues. 27
PLG CERT WEEKEND COLLEGE BEGINS (SUMMER)
SUMMER SESSION BEGINS (5/19 – 8/3)
Last day to Drop, Add, or Register for Three-Week session
Memorial Day Weekend - NO CLASSES
MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY, COLLEGE CLOSED
Three-Week Summer Session Begins (May 27– June 13)
PRACTICAL NURSING PROGRAM BEGINS
June, 2014:
Fri. 30 – Sun. 1
Wed. 4
Fri. 13
Fri. 13
Fri. 13 – Sun. 15
Mon. 16
Fri. 27
Fri. 27 - Sun. 29
PLG Cert Weekend College #2
Last day to withdraw “W” from 3-week session
Three-Week Summer Session Ends
Last Day to Drop, Add, or Register for Six-Week session
PLG Cert Weekend College #3
Six-Week Summer Session Begins (June 16 to July 25)
THREE-WEEK SESSION Grades due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
PLG Cert Weekend College #4 (mid terms)
July, 2014:
Fri. 4
Fri. 11
Fri. 11– Sun. 13
Fri. 11
Fri. 18– Sun. 20
Fri. 25
INDEPENDENCE DAY HOLIDAY, COLLEGE CLOSED
Last day to withdraw “W” from Six-Week session
PLG Cert Weekend College #5
Last day to withdraw “W” from Weekend classes
PLG Cert Weekend College #6
SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION ENDS
August, 2014:
Fri. 1
Fri. 1 – Sun 3
SIX-WEEK SESSIONS Grades Due in Self Service by 5:00 p.m.
PLG Cert Weekend College #7 (Finals)
July 1, 2013
8
The College
In keeping with the Catholic principles upon which the College was founded and is operated,
College of Saint Mary does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion,
disability, age, marital status, or national origin. Although a college for women on the
undergraduate level, College of Saint Mary is in compliance with applicable Federal and
State laws prohibiting sex discrimination. College of Saint Mary is an equal opportunity
employer.
College of Saint Mary has made modifications to its buildings and grounds in order to
provide all of its students, faculty, staff, and visitors with equal access to its programs,
events and facilities. In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and
the Americans with Disabilities Act, the College has taken measures to assure that students
with disabilities have access to its academic programs and to provide them with the
auxiliary aids necessary to help them reach their degree objectives.
For additional information, assistance in accommodating individual needs, or for the lodging
of any complaints or grievances concerning these Federal regulations, contact the
Achievement Center Director, (402) 399-2366.
Mission
Committed to the works, values and aspirations of the Sisters of Mercy, College of Saint
Mary is a Catholic university dedicated to the education of women in an environment that
calls forth potential and fosters leadership.
This mission inspires us to:
• Academic excellence, scholarship, and lifelong learning
•
Regard for the dignity of each person
•
Attention to the development of mind, body, and spirit
•
Compassionate service to others
Declaration of Open Discourse
In the spirit of intellectual inquiry, College of Saint Mary is committed to the exchange of
diverse ideas and viewpoints. In this environment, honest discourse is valued; demeaning
remarks are not tolerated. Each member of the campus community is encouraged to:
• Recognize the basis of her or his own assumptions and perspectives,
• Acknowledge the assumptions and perspectives of others,
• Promote understanding and respectful dissent
Leadership Qualities
CSM has identified six key leadership skills and qualities that students should develop.
Becoming “self-aware and confident” includes developing self-knowledge, understanding
one’s own strengths and weaknesses, and embracing those strengths and weaknesses in
order to live authentic and balanced personal and professional lives.
Becoming “values-driven” means developing a high level of integrity and honesty, operating
from a set of core values that honors the dignity of each individual.
July 1, 2013
9
Becoming a “good effective communicator” means being able to communicate effectively,
both verbally and nonverbally, at all levels (including interpersonal and group contexts) to
build professional networking and presentation skills.
Becoming “other-oriented” includes developing an understanding of and respect for diverse
populations and learning the value individuals can offer to achieve a common goal while
respecting differences.
Becoming “action-oriented” includes being assertive, taking initiative, asking for both wants
and needs, taking the lead in tasks, and being willing to take risks when appropriate.
Becoming a “strategic thinker” starts with acquiring a solid base of expertise, learning to be
methodical and organized in gathering and processing new information, as well as
developing the skills to facilitate group problem-solving and decision-making processes.
Becoming a “visionary” means being able to see long-range opportunities for themselves,
their peers, and the groups, organizations, and communities in which they are involved.
History
Catherine McAuley founded the Sisters of Mercy in Dublin in 1831 to respond to the
desperate poverty of Ireland’s Catholics under the British penal laws. Catherine used her
inheritance to open Baggot Street House, where she and like-minded women instructed
children and taught young women the skills they needed to become independent. They
visited the sick in hospitals and in their homes and became known in Dublin as “The Walking
Nuns.” The community was formally recognized by Rome in 1841, shortly before Catherine
died.
Frances Warde, one of the first women to profess her vows as a Sister of Mercy, came to
the United States in 1843 in response to requests from the bishops to minister to Irish
immigrants. In 1864, Frances sent seven of her Sisters from New Hampshire to Omaha, a
small town on the banks of the Missouri River. The Sisters immediately set about opening a
school, visiting the sick and imprisoned and caring for orphans.
As the Mercy community of Omaha grew, the Sisters continued to dream of the day they
could educate their own Sisters to carry on the work of Catherine McAuley. They wanted a
college where they could provide an education to women desiring to become teachers and
health care providers. Catherine had said, “No work of charity is more productive of the
good of society than the careful instruction of women.”
In 1923, College of Saint Mary opened its doors at 15th and Castelar Streets as a junior
college. In 1955, the College moved to its present campus and became a four-year college.
The first baccalaureate degrees were granted in 1956. Master’s programs began in 2005
and doctoral programs were added in 2007.
Today, College of Saint Mary is operated by an independent board of
directors inclusive of the Sisters of Mercy. The founding beliefs established by the Sisters
of Mercy still guide CSM and were reaffirmed in 2004 by the formal affiliation of CSM with
the Conference for Mercy Higher Education (CMHE). CMHE is comprised of the eighteen
colleges/universities in the U.S. founded by the Sisters of Mercy.
Omaha Campus
Situated at 72nd Street and Mercy Road, just minutes north of Interstate 80 and 15 minutes
southwest of downtown Omaha, College of Saint Mary’s campus has been called a “park
within the city.” The campus is completely wireless and accessible.
July 1, 2013
10
Walsh Hall, named after Sr. Constance Walsh, RSM, the first dean of College of Saint Mary,
houses the administrative offices, classrooms, Our Lady of Mercy Chapel, Hillmer Art Gallery
and faculty offices. Computer laboratories are located on the second floor and nursing and
occupational therapy labs are located on the ground floor.
Walsh Hall is connected to Mercy Hall by a skywalk. Mercy Hall houses the dining room,
Enrollment Services offices, the Campus Store, and meeting rooms.
The Math and Science Hall provides classrooms, laboratories (including a cadaver lab), and
offices for science and mathematics faculty.
The adjacent Daniel and Louise Gross
Conference Center seats 250.
The Hixson-Lied Commons, named after Christina Hixson, the sole trustee of The Lied
Foundation Trust, houses the library, a one-stop shop Achievement Center for advising and
tutoring and a coffee shop.
Also situated on campus are four residence halls. Lozier Tower, Gallagher, McAuley, and
Madonna Hall for single student mothers and their children. Each residence hall provides
spacious rooms with wireless and network capability, lounges, and workrooms.
The Lied Fitness Center includes a gymnasium, an elevated walking track, a weight and
exercise room, a training room, tennis courts, a classroom/aerobics room and a six-lane,
25-yard swimming pool. The Center is used for physical education classes, intercollegiate
and intramural sports and leisure and fitness activities for students, faculty and staff.
Nearby Heritage Park includes softball and soccer fields.
The Connie Spellman Early Childhood Education Center, on the south side of the campus,
provides early childhood development opportunities for 120 children from infancy through
kindergarten. The Center provides a laboratory for CSM’s early childhood education major
and for students studying child development in psychology, nursing, and education.
July 1, 2013
11
Accreditation and Memberships
Accrediting Agency
Contact Information
College of Saint Mary
Higher Learning Commission
of the North Central
Association of Colleges and
Schools
30 North LaSalle Street,
Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
800-621-7440
Education Program
Nebraska Department of
Education (NDE)
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
402-471-2295
Occupation Therapy
Program
Accreditation Council for
Occupational Therapy
Education (ACOTE)
4720 Montgomery Lane
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220
301-652-6611, ext. 2914
National League for Nursing
Accrediting Commission
(NLNAC)
3343 Peachtree Road NE
Suite 850
Atlanta, GA 30326
404-975-5000
www.nlnac.org
Nursing Programs
(ASN, BSN)
Nebraska State Board of
Nursing
Nursing Program
(PN)
Nebraska State Board of
Nursing
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
402-471-4376
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
402-471-4376
Business: Analytics
and Strategic
Communication
Program
Business Information
Systems Program
International Assembly for
Collegiate Business Education
(IACBE)
11257 Strang Line Road
Lenexa, KS 66215
913-631-3009
American Bar Association
Standing Committee on Legal
Assistants
750 North Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL, 60611
312-988-5618
Business Leadership
Program
Paralegal Studies
Program
The College holds memberships in the National Coalition of Women's Colleges, Mercy
Conference for Higher Education, Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, Council
for Independent Colleges, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Nebraska
Council on Teacher Education, Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of
Nebraska, Nebraska Independent College Foundation, and the National Catholic Education
Association.
July 1, 2013
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Academic Support Services
Computer Labs
Computer labs, located on the second floor of the east wing of Walsh Hall, are open to all
students when the labs are not reserved for class time. Professional staff and student
workers provide assistance to students should they have any questions. There are two
instructional labs as well as a general use lab. The Computer lab hours can be found on the
University website at www.csm.edu.
Online Learning Management System
ANGEL Online Learning is utilized for all courses. ANGEL allows our instructors to take a
creative and student-focused approach to their instruction through the use of threaded
discussions, online rubrics, and electronic grading. Students requiring assistance with
ANGEL should visit my.csm.edu or Email [email protected]
myCSM Portal
myCSM offers all community members a personalized web interface for viewing
announcements and events as well as personal document storage and collaboration spaces.
Students requiring assistance with myCSM are encouraged to visit my.csm.edu or Email
[email protected]
Tegrity Lecture Capture System
Tegrity lecture capture web service allows instructors to automatically capture, store, and
index classes for later review by students online, or on iPods and mobile devices. Students
requiring assistance with Tegrity are encouraged to visit my.csm.edu or Email
[email protected]
Wireless
The CSM campus wireless network service provides laptop and mobile device users with fast
and convenient access to the Internet, CSM email and other web-based services, including
myCSM. The wireless network is available in all classrooms and public spaces including the
plaza and many other outdoor areas. Students requiring assistance with the wireless
network are encouraged to visit www.csm.edu or Email [email protected]
Library
The College of Saint Mary Library provides instruction, reference service, a collection of print
and electronic resources, and experienced staff to assist members of the CSM community in
their study, research, and teaching. Conveniently located in the Hixson-Lied Commons, the
Library is open seven days a week while classes are in session, with adjusted hours during
midterm and final exams and holiday breaks.
The Library offers five study rooms which can be reserved for group or private study.
Resources also include scanners, a copier, a printer, and twenty workstations loaded with
the Microsoft Office Suite. Wireless internet access is available throughout the building.
Laptop computers, digital video cameras, voice recorders, and other types of electronic
equipment are available for checkout.
The collection includes a variety of print and electronic resources: books, journals, and
databases covering all subjects taught at CSM. Databases and electronic journals are
accessible to members of the CSM community both on and off site. The Library shares its
online catalog with seven other private colleges and universities in eastern Nebraska. CSM
July 1, 2013
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students and faculty may borrow materials from these libraries on presentation of a CSM ID
card.
Librarians are available to provide specialized reference and instruction to both individuals
and classes. Reference questions can be submitted either in person, by e-mail, telephone,
and via the Ask a Librarian link on the Library web page. Interlibrary loan services are
available to all registered users at no extra charge.
July 1, 2013
14
Admissions
Admissions Policy
Each candidate for admission is considered individually in the selection process by the
committee on admissions, based on ACT/SAT scores, high school/college transcripts, and
other program-specific requirements.
High school students will be considered for full admission to the College with no restrictions
if they meet the following criteria: Score an 18 or above on the American College Test
(ACT) or an 860-890 (Verbal + Math) or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) AND
possess a cumulative GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, determined by transcript.
Applicants who do not meet the criteria above may be considered for conditional admission.
The ACT score, when available, will always be one of the criteria used for determining
admission. If a student with an ACT score below 18 is admitted, it will always be on a
“conditional” basis. Applications from prospective students with an ACT score of 16 or 17
and meeting all other enrollment criteria will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee and
may be allowed to enroll conditionally. Applicants without an ACT or SAT score available
will be required to take one of the standardized aptitude tests, at their own expense. This
will not apply to transfer students who transfer in more than 12 credits. All other cases will
be reviewed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the College Admissions
Committee.
Each applicant’s record is considered in its entirety. Final selection of applicants to be
admitted shall be made by the College, which reserves the right to deny admission to any
applicant for any lawful reason. Qualified students are admitted in compliance with Federal
and state non-discrimination laws.
Admissions Criteria
Applicants for admission are evaluated on the basis of the following criteria:
1. High school record. An applicant for a degree program must have graduated or
will have graduated with 16 high school units from an accredited high school. The
college preparatory program is strongly recommended to high school students.
Ordinarily this program includes four years of English and two years of social
studies, science and mathematics. (NOTE: Occupational Therapy and two-year
nursing applicants are required to have high school chemistry and biology).
Chemistry and biology are also recommended for all three-year nursing, medical
technology, chemistry and biology applicants. Applicants for the Accelerated
Combined degrees in human biology and Physician Assistant Studies are required
to have seven units of high school scienace and/or math. They also must be
ready to enter college algebra and general chemistry.
2.
3.
American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores.
College/university record for transfer students
Students who have successfully completed the General Education Development Test (GED)
and have not accumulated at least 12 transfer hours with a 2.0 GPA or better may be
admitted conditionally.
Students without a high school diploma may be conditionally admitted to the college based
upon satisfactory completion of 6 credit hours of collegiate level work that is applicable
toward a degree or certificate offered by CSM that is completed at a regionally accredited
institution. The credit hours need not be obtained at CSM.
July 1, 2013
15
Applicants may be required to meet additional criteria for certain programs. The Test for
Academic Skills (TEAS) is used for admission into the Nursing Programs. College and
program admission are normally announced concurrently.
Questions regarding the
admission criteria for specific programs should be directed to Enrollment Services.
The College reserves the right to withdraw its offer of acceptance under the following
conditions:
1. A high school student fails to graduate.
2. A final transcript from a student attending another college is at or below the
standard for academic dismissal at College of Saint Mary.
3. There is falsified information on any credentials submitted.
4. The student otherwise fails to comply with the admission policies and regulations
of the College.
Transfer Students
Transfer students are admitted to the College if they have a transfer GPA of 2.0 or above
and maintained a grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in college. Transfer students
who do not meet these standards but show potential for success may be admitted
conditionally.
Transfer credits are evaluated on the basis of the following:
1. The accreditation of the institution from which the student transfers.
2. The comparability in nature, content and level of credit earned to that offered
by College of Saint Mary.
3. The appropriateness of the credit earned in relation to credit offered by
College of Saint Mary and the student’s educational goals.
4. The age of the credits depending on the major.
The College does not accept grades below C (2.0) for transfer or credits for
remedial/developmental courses. Transfer credits are shown in semester credits on the CSM
transcript but are not included in the grade point average calculation. Credit will not be
given for duplication of courses. Students enrolling in a bachelor or associate degree
program must complete 30 of their last 45 hours at College of Saint Mary. Students who
study abroad may request special consideration from the Vice President for Academic Affairs
if fewer than 30 of their last 45 hours will be taken at College of Saint Mary due to study
abroad.
Transfer students are required to take a minimum of 12 credit hours of their major courses
at College of Saint Mary. Individual programs may require a higher number of College of
Saint Mary credit hours in the major field. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the
program director for specific program requirements. A maximum of the equivalent of 64
semester hours of transfer credit from accredited community colleges will be accepted
toward the 128 hours required for a College of Saint Mary bachelor’s degree. Students
entering the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program with their Associate of Science in
Nursing (or nursing diploma) and a license to practice as a nurse may transfer 85 credits
from an accredited community college. Specific program requirements may differ.
The College maintains articulation agreements with several area community colleges. These
agreements enable a community college student to plan ahead for transfer to College of
Saint Mary. Curricula designed in a specific articulation agreement take precedence over all
other program requirements.
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Articulation agreements are available on the CSM website: College of Saint Mary
First-year Students
First-year students must submit:
• Application for admission.
• Non-refundable application charge.
• Official high school transcript showing rank in class and grade point average.
American College Test (ACT) or SAT scores. NOTE: ACT and/or SAT scores should
be sent directly from the ACT or SAT records office. College of Saint Mary's ACT
code is 2440 and the SAT code is 6106. Applicants who have received a high school
diploma more than five years prior to application to College of Saint Mary or
transfer students with at least 12 semester credits are not required to take the ACT
or SAT.
Transfer Students
Transfer students, in addition to the above, must submit:
• An official transcript from each college and university attended.
Applicants for Part-time (fewer than 12 hours) Enrollment
Degree-Seeking: A student who wishes to enroll as a degree-seeking student on a part-time
basis or for teacher certification must submit:
• Proper credentials as listed for first-year or transfer students.
Non-Degree-Seeking: A student who wishes to enroll for classes but does not plan to earn a
degree need only register for classes at the beginning of each semester. Please contact the
Registrar’s Office to register. Note: A non-degree-seeking student must submit proper
credentials before degree-seeking status can be granted. Non-degree students will not be
assigned an academic advisor. Non-degree students are not eligible to apply for federal
financial aid.
International Students
College of Saint Mary welcomes and is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant
students from outside the United States. Persons who are not United States citizens are
required to submit the following:
• International student application form.
• Non-refundable application charge.
• Complete certified copies of records from all secondary schools, colleges and
universities attended. These records must be translated into English.
• Certificate of Financial Responsibility (to be sent directly to the College from the
applicant’s bank).
• Student must meet the following language requirements: a score of 80 on the TOEFL
iBT (internet-based test) or a score of 4 or above on the Test of Written English
(TWE), or completion of Level 9 at an ESL Language Center.
• After receiving the I-20, international students must pay the Student and Exchange
Visitor Information System (SEVIS) charge (Form I-901). This must be submitted
before going to the U.S. Embassy or consulate for visa interview.
NOTE: International students are urged to apply for admission six months to a year before
they plan to attend.
It is especially critical that international students have access to health care services in the
United States, since it may be impossible for an international student to travel to her home
country in the event of a health emergency due to illness or accident. Accordingly, the
College requires that all international students be covered by a health insurance plan that
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will pay for health care services rendered by health providers in the United States.
International students may meet this requirement in either of the following two ways:
a) The student may provide to the College a certificate of insurance coverage evidencing
coverage for health care services rendered in the United States. Such certificate shall be a
condition of admission to the College and must be provided before the student moves into
the residence hall or attends classes. The certificate must identify the duration of the
insurance coverage (e.g. beginning and ending dates of coverage). If coverage expires
while the student is attending the College, a new certificate of insurance must be provided
in the same manner.
b) The student may sign a statement agreeing to purchase and pay for coverage under a
health insurance plan. This plan shall cover health care services rendered in the United
States. The student must sign the statement as a condition of admission to the College and
before the student moves into the residence hall or attends classes. Any international
applicant for admission to the College will be denied admission and/or continued registration
if she fails to satisfy the requirement for health insurance coverage.
When to Apply — Rolling Admissions
Any student who wants to apply for admission may do so as early as one year prior to
entrance. Notification of admission status will generally be made within two weeks, but the
College reserves the right to take longer if needed. If applying for financial aid, a student’s
application file must be completed before financial aid may be awarded.
Early application is recommended since some programs can accommodate only a specified
number of students. Applicants are considered in the order in which the application and all
other materials are received.
Students are admitted for enrollment in fall, spring and summer sessions.
Tuition Deposit Requirement:
Every new student is required to submit a $150 tuition deposit as an advanced payment on
tuition charges. The tuition deposit must be paid prior to registration of classes. College of
Saint Mary encourages students to deposit only when they are fully committed to attend
CSM. Therefore, CSM strongly discourages students from double-depositing (the practice of
remitting deposits to multiple institutions) or depositing prior to full commitment.
Tuition Deposit Refunds:
Applicants who pay a tuition deposit for the Summer or Fall semester may request a refund
through May 1 and for the Spring semester through November 1. Students must request
a refund in writing prior to the deadline in order to get a full refund. Requests made after
the May 1st or November 1st deadline will not be considered.
College Courses for High School Students
College of Saint Mary offers two means for high school students to earn college credit while
still enrolled in high school. The first option is through a Dual Credit program in which
students take a course for dual credit (both high school and college credit). In most cases
dual credit courses are taught at a regional high school. The second option is through the
Early College Start program in which high school students register for regular college
courses taught on the CSM campus.
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Dual Credit and Early College Start Programs
Dual credit courses offered to high school students are delivered at a collegiate level. All
syllabi, course outcomes and assessments are comparable to similar courses offered on the
CSM campus. All courses offered for dual credit will be courses already offered at CSM or
acceptable experimental courses as judged by the program faculty and approved by the
Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Because College of Saint Mary is a Catholic college dedicated to the education of women in
an environment that calls forth potential and fosters leadership, it offers undergraduate
students a unique chance to learn and grow in a women's environment.
Thus,
undergraduate dual credit or early college start courses taught exclusively or primarily on
the CSM campus must enroll women students only. Dual credit courses taught at regional
high schools may enroll both women and men. Tuition for dual credit or early college start
courses is due on or before the first day of the class meeting. The refund and drop/add
policies are the same as the college policy.
Application for Dual Credit: All high school students who wish to take a dual credit
course must complete an application for dual credit and submit it to CSM prior to
registration. Eligible students must be at least 16 years of age and have a minimum 3.0
cumulative GPA as documented by an appropriate high school administrator.
Application for Early College Start: All high school students who wish to take an early
college start course must contact the Office of the Registrar to complete an information
sheet and a registration form. The phone contact is 402-399-2443.
Former Students
Former students (who have not been registered at College of Saint Mary during the previous
semester) must submit:
• An application for re-admission, unless they have been granted an approved leave of
absence. Information regarding leaves of absence may be found in the Academic
Regulations section of this catalog.
• If the applicant attended another college or university since last attending College of
Saint Mary, an official transcript.
Students academically suspended from College of Saint Mary must participate in an
interview with the Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) and submit an essay outlining
what changes have been made to increase academic success. The VPAA makes the final
determination for re-admittance after a thorough review of all information. An application
fee is not required for re-admission.
A student who is re-admitted to the College after having not been enrolled for two
semesters or more will be subject to the degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission.
Readmission – Military Service
College of Saint Mary will readmit students who leave in order to perform military service
with the same academic status as when the student left, as long as the absence is less than
5 years. Students should contact Enrollment Services to initiate the readmission process
and should identify themselves as returning from military service. They will be readmitted
under the same academic catalog requirements for their program as when they were called
to military service.
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Financial Aid
College of Saint Mary offers a variety of student financial aid options. Scholarships, grants,
loans, and work study are available individually or in combination to assist with the cost of
attending College of Saint Mary.
CSM participates in the Department of Education’s Campus-Based Programs, which include
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program, Federal Work-Study
(FWS) Program, and Federal Perkins Loan Program. Because these funds are limited, the
earlier an eligible student applies, the more likely she is to receive available campus-based
aid.
Students who receive outside scholarships, vocational rehabilitation, or any other outside
assistance should inform the Financial Aid Office as early as possible, as these funds will be
considered in the awarding process. In no case may a student’s total aid award exceed the
total cost of attendance.
Students must apply and be accepted for admission to a degree or certificate program at
College of Saint Mary to be considered for financial aid. Students who are interested in
applying for financial aid must complete a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
each year so that financial need may be reviewed annually. Include our school code:
002540 on your FAFSA so that the information will be sent to our financial aid office.
Types of Financial Assistance
CSM Institutional Scholarships: Qualified full-time students may be eligible to receive
College of Saint Mary scholarships. Academic merit and financial need-based scholarships
and grants are awarded automatically to eligible students upon acceptance to the College.
CSM welcomes transfer students and offers competitive transfer scholarships and grants
which are also based on academic merit and financial need. One-half of a scholarship is
applied to the fall semester and one-half to the spring semester. Institutional scholarships
are not available for the summer term. Institutional scholarship and grant funds are not
available for students receiving discounted tuition or students enrolled in a masters or
doctorate program.
In addition to merit and need-based assistance, College of Saint Mary offers various other
scholarships to help keep our students education affordable:
• Academic Achievement Scholarship
• Academic Opportunity Grant
• Transfer Academic Achievement Scholarship
• Marie Curie Award
• McAuley Scholarship
• Sister Frances Warde, R.S.M. Academic Scholarship
• Mother Leo Gallagher, R.S.M. Academic Scholarship
• Art & Music Fine Arts Scholarship
• Leadership Scholarship
• Graduates of Mercy High School Award
• First Generation Scholarship
• Valedictorian and Salutatorian Award
• Youth & Campus Ministry Award
• Phi Theta Kappa Award
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• Graduates of a Catholic High School Award
• Latina Summer Academy Award
• Tuition Remission for children of employees from a number of regional colleges
Residence Hall Scholarships: All continuing students receiving an academic merit
scholarship who live on campus in the residence halls will receive a $3000 Residence Hall
Scholarship.
Athletic Scholarships: Students with athletic ability in basketball, cross-country, soccer,
softball, swimming, golf, or volleyball may receive athletic scholarships. These scholarships
are based on both athletic talent and the teams’ need and are awarded on an annual basis.
One-half of a scholarship is applied to the fall semester and one-half to the spring semester.
Athletic scholarships are not available for the summer semester.
Study Abroad Scholarship: CSM students planning to study abroad are eligible to apply
for a $2500 CSM Study Abroad Scholarship if they meet the eligibility requirements and
agree to fulfill certain expectations. To be eligible for the Study Abroad Scholarship, the
student must be a CSM undergraduate student applying to any credit-bearing study abroad
program; have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher; plan to study abroad during the fall
and/or spring semester (not summer); and be ordinarily charged CSM’s regular full-time
package rate of tuition (not eligible for reduced-rate tuition).
Financial Aid Grant or Financial Aid Transfer Grant is an institutional fund awarded to
qualified full-time continuing students with financial need. The grant does not have to be
repaid.
The Federal Pell Grant is awarded according to rules set by the U.S. Congress and
eligibility is based on the student’s FAFSA information. If a student is eligible, CSM will
award the student her Federal Pell Grant.
Federal TEACH (Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education)
Grant is awarded to undergraduate juniors, seniors, and graduate students based on their
program of study verified by the CSM Teacher Education Department. Eligible students must
be completing coursework as necessary to begin a career in teaching, and agree to serve for
at least four years as a full-time, highly qualified teacher in a high-need subject area at a
low-income school. Recipients must maintain a 3.25 cumulative GPA. TEACH Grant funds
are converted to a Direct Unsubsidized Loan if requirements described in the Agreement to
Serve are not fulfilled.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is awarded to students
based on need and who are eligible for the Federal Pell Grant. Funds are limited.
The Nebraska Opportunity Grant (NOG) is awarded to students based on need and who
are eligible for the Federal Pell Grant and are paying the regular full-time tuition package
rate. The student must be enrolled full time and be a resident of Nebraska. Funds are
limited.
Federal Work-Study Program gives students the opportunity to earn money working on
campus. Federal Work Study is awarded to students based on financial need and who are
paying the regular full-time tuition package rate. Funds are limited.
Federal Perkins Loan is awarded to students based on financial need and who are paying
the regular full-time tuition package rate. Perkins loans have a 5% fixed interest rate and
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are funded by the Federal government. No interest is charged or repayment required until
nine months after the student drops below half-time enrollment. Funds are limited.
Federal Stafford Loans are long-term, low-interest loans that students may borrow to
help pay for educational expenses. A student must be enrolled in at least six credit hours
per semester to borrow a Stafford loan. These loans are not credit based and must be
repaid. There are two types of Stafford loans:
• Subsidized Stafford loans are awarded to students based on financial need. The
Federal government pays the accrued interest while the student is in school.
• Unsubsidized Stafford loans are not need based. Interest accrues on this loan
immediately and students are encouraged to make the interest payments
while in school.
Federal Parent PLUS loans are fixed-rate, low-interest loans, which parents may borrow
to help pay for the educational expenses of their dependent students. These credit-based
loans are not based on financial need. Repayment begins 60 days after the loan is fully
disbursed, but a parent borrower may contact the lender to request deferment while the
student is enrolled at least half time.
Federal Graduate PLUS loans are fixed-rate, low-interest loans which graduate students
may borrow to help pay for educational expenses. These credit-based loans are not based
on financial need. Interest accrues while the student is in school, but repayment is deferred
until six months after the student drops below half-time enrollment.
Nursing Loans are available to CSM nursing students. Loans are awarded to qualified fulltime students who have financial need and are paying the regular full-time tuition package
rate. Nursing loans have a 5% fixed interest rate; interest does not accrue while the student
is enrolled at least half time. Repayment and interest begin nine months after the student
drops below half-time enrollment. Funds are limited.
Alternative Loans are credit-based loans that students may apply for from private lenders.
Loan terms are set by the individual lenders and a cosigner may be required. Repayment
may be deferred while the student is in school, but interest accrues. Loan amount borrowed
is limited to the student’s cost of attendance minus other financial aid received.
Veterans’ Benefits: College of Saint Mary is approved for the training of veterans and
their dependents. For more detailed information about this program, visit www.gibill.va.gov.
Any student who is eligible for financial assistance from the Department of Veterans Affairs
should contact the Registrar’s Office.
ROTC: Reserve officer training scholarships are available through the Army, Air Force, and
Navy. Military scholarship recipients will have a service obligation in either the reserves or
active duty after graduating from college. For further information about these programs,
students should contact a local U.S. armed forces recruiter.
Vocational rehabilitation programs: The Department of Education’s Rehabilitation
Services Administration provides grants to state vocational rehabilitation agencies to help
individuals with disability obtain employment and live more independently. State vocational
rehabilitation agencies are listed in the state government section of the telephone book.
AmeriCorp, a program of national and community service, provides funding for education.
Individuals may work before, during, or after their postsecondary education and can use
funds either to pay current or future education expenses or to repay federal student loans.
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Participants must be at least 17 and be United States citizens, nationals, or lawful
permanent residents. For more information, go to www.americorps.org.
Job Training: The U.S. Department of Labor administers the Workforce Investment Act
(WIA) through the individual states. Participants have access to preparation for
postsecondary education and/or job training. For a list of state WIA contacts or for general
information, visit www.doleta.gov/usworkforce.
Health Professions: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
administers several programs for undergraduate students.
For more information on
financial aid programs administered by HHS, visit www.bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa.
Renewal of Aid
Students should renew their FAFSA online each year after January 1 at www.fafsa.gov.
Priority will be given to those who submit their application by March 15. CSM’s school code
is 002540. Financial aid awards are based on anticipated hours of enrollment. Financial Aid
will renew institutional scholarships for students maintaining the required GPA and the
regular full-time tuition rate. After the first week of classes each semester, enrollment
status is verified and adjustments are made accordingly.
Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements
To maintain eligibility for all types of financial aid, satisfactory progress toward completion
of a degree must be maintained on qualitative and pace standards while students attend
College of Saint Mary. Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) review is completed annually at
the end of spring term and/or at the end of summer term, if the student receives financial
aid for summer enrollment. SAP requirements for financial aid recipients are defined below.
Qualitative standard
Degree or certificate-seeking students must maintain a cumulative grade point average
(GPA) of at least 2.0 at the end of each SAP review period. Repeated coursework is
allowed, according to the CSM Academic Catalog, for C, D, and F grades. The highest CSM
grade earned will be used by the Registrar’s Office to calculate cumulative GPA.
Pace standards
Degree or certificate-seeking students must successfully complete at least 67% of the
cumulative credit hours attempted at the end of each SAP review period.
• To earn hours at CSM, one must receive a grade of A, B, C, D, P, or SA. All other
grades do not earn hours.
• Classes from which a student withdraws after the drop/add period count as
attempted but not earned hours. Withdrawing from classes after the drop/add
period will negatively affect students’ ability to satisfy the hours earned standard.
• Accepted transfer credits count as both attempted and earned hours.
• For repeated coursework taken at CSM, both the repeated and the original
attempt count as attempted credit hours, while only successfully completed
courses will count as completed.
• Classes with an Incomplete grade will count as attempted but not earned hours
until the grade is confirmed and then will count as attempted and earned hours,
if a passing grade is earned.
Students may not exceed 150% of the program requirements measured in credit hours
attempted. For example:
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•
•
•
Students working toward a Bachelor degree requiring 128 credit hours may not
exceed 192 attempted credit hours.
Students working toward an Associate Degree requiring 64 credit hours may not
exceed 96 attempted credit hours.
Students working toward a Certificate requiring 44 credit hours may not exceed
66 attempted credit hours.
Financial Aid Ineligibility
Students not maintaining satisfactory progress according to Qualitative and/or Pace
Standards at the time of SAP review are no longer eligible to receive any federal, state, or
institutional financial aid. While ineligible, a student will need to make other payment
arrangements for any CSM credits.
Financial Aid Appeals & Financial Aid Probation
Students who are ineligible may appeal to request a Financial Aid Probation semester or
term. Financial Aid Appeals include, a written request detailing the extenuating
circumstances which led to failure to meet SAP, documentation of these circumstances, a
graduation plan, and an explanation of what has changed to allow the student to meet SAP
in the future. The request for Financial Aid Probation will be reviewed and a written
response will be provided to the student. Extenuating circumstances may include, but are
not limited to, serious illness or injury, death in the immediate family, or other special
circumstances beyond the student’s control. For students on Financial Aid Probation, SAP
will be evaluated at the end of each semester or term according to the terms of their
Financial Aid Probation. Failure to meet SAP requirements set forth by their Financial Aid
Probation will result in financial aid ineligibility.
Financial Aid Reinstatement
Students who are ineligible or have been granted a Financial Aid Probation term may
reestablish eligibility by taking CSM classes which bring the cumulative GPA back to 2.0 or
above and successfully complete 67% of credit hours attempted. A student may request in
writing that financial aid eligibility be reinstated. If financial aid ineligibility is due to
reaching the maximum time frame of 150%, financial aid eligibility cannot be reinstated
without an approved appeal. Reinstatement establishes eligibility for federal and state
financial aid. Institutional aid will be reinstated at the minimum academic scholarship
amount.
Mid-Year Grade Review
The Financial Aid Office reviews academic records at the end of each semester or term that
a student receives financial aid. Students with a cumulative GPA below 2.0 and/or have not
completed 67% of the cumulative credit hours attempted at CSM will be notified that they
are in danger of becoming ineligible for financial aid at the subsequent SAP review.
Academic records are not reviewed mid-year relating to the maximum time frame of 150%
of the program requirements.
Students who have questions about the satisfactory academic progress policy for financial
aid recipients or any of the procedures may contact Financial Aid at (402) 399-2362 or
[email protected]
Disbursement of Aid
For all types of financial aid, including all types of federal, state, and institutional grants and
loans, disbursement begins the business day after the last day to add or drop classes with a
100% tuition refund each semester. For summer term, this date is the business day after
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the last day to add or drop classes with a 100% refund for the last session a student is
enrolled in for summer.
Disbursement dates are coordinated with the Student Accounts Office in order to facilitate
issuing refund checks within the 14 days required for a Title IV credit balance.
Students are eligible to have their financial aid disbursed only if all the following are true:
• All required financial aid documents are submitted and reviewed by the Financial Aid
Office
• Enrolled in an eligible degree or certificate seeking program
• Enrolled in the same number of credits on which their financial aid eligibility is based
• Completed their Semester Financial Arrangements
Prior to disbursing any financial aid, all of the items above are reviewed and checked for
each student.
Financial aid is disbursed into the student’s account on campus where it automatically goes
toward paying institutional charges. Students who receive wages under the Federal workstudy program may pick up their checks at the Express Center on the last working day of
each month.
Student Appeals
The Financial Aid Appeal Committee renders decisions on student appeals and/or grievances
that pertain to financial aid awards and/or institutional aid awards. Students who wish to
appeal an award decision are asked to complete the Professional Judgment Form to describe
the basis for the appeal and return it to the Financial Aid Office. All appeals will then be
directed to the committee for review and final decision.
Financial Aid Rights and Responsibilities
Students benefiting from financial aid in the pursuit of education have the privilege of
certain rights and assume specific responsibilities relating to their aid.
•Right to Know
Financial aid programs available
How eligibility is determined and funds are disbursed
Eligibility requirements for federal, state, and institutional awards
Consequences of withdrawing from a class(es) either officially or
unofficially
Satisfactory academic policy for financial aid recipients
Availability of federal student assistance funds for study abroad programs
• Right to appeal
• Right to decline awards
• Student Responsibilities
Complete the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.gov each year after January 1 and after
filing previous year’s taxes. Never pay to file the FAFSA
Return signed award letter
New students must complete entrance counseling and a Federal Direct Stafford Loan
Master Promissory Note (MPN) if accepting the Federal Direct Stafford Loan awarded
in the award letter
If the parent accepts the Federal Direct PLUS loan, the student’s parent must
complete a Federal Direct PLUS Master Promissory Note
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If awarded a Federal Perkins Loan, new students must complete Perkins Loan
entrance counseling and all Federal Perkins Loan paperwork, which is sent separately
to the student
Complete SFA (Semester Financial Arrangements) process online each semester
Must officially add/drop classes through Self-Service. After the add/drop period,
students must complete “Withdrawal” or “Withdrawal from All Classes” forms, which
are available in the Express Center.
Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements
College of Saint Mary Return of Title IV Funds
Students who receive Title IV financial aid (Federal Pell grant, Iraq and Afghanistan Service
Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), TEACH Grant,
Federal Perkins Loan and/or William D. Ford Federal Direct Loans) are subject to federal
refund calculations if the student completely withdraws from College of Saint Mary or ceases
attendance in all classes during the enrollment period. For all programs offered in modules,
a student is a withdrawal for Title IV purposes if the student ceases attendance at any point
prior to completing the payment period, unless the school obtains written confirmation from
the student at the time of the withdrawal that he or she will attend a module that begins
later in the same payment period.
The withdrawal date is considered to be the date of official withdrawal. If the student does
not officially withdraw, the withdrawal date is considered to be the midpoint of the payment
period unless documentation exists in the financial aid office that the student attended
through a later date. If this is the case, the last date of attendance will be used for the
refund calculation.
The refund amount is determined using Return of Title IV Funds on the Web, located on the
FAA Access Web site. This is a Department of Education Website, which helps the Financial
Office calculate and manage the Return of Title IV funds. If you received less assistance
than the amount that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. If you
received more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned by the school
and/or you. CSM will return any unearned Title IV funds it is responsible for returning as
soon as possible but no later than 45 days of the date the school determined the student
withdrew, and offer any post-withdrawal disbursement of loan funds within 30 days of that
date. Institutional data is collected from the institution and student information is entered
on the website which calculates the Return of Title IV funds according to Ed’s Student
Assistant General Provisions. The following is the calculation process performed by Return of
Title IV funds on the Web.
1) Determine institutional charges (institutional charges include tuition; it includes room
and board only if the student is living on campus).
2) Determine the amount of Title IV financial aid received and subject to return.
3) Calculate the percent of payment period completed by dividing the number of days
attended by the total number of days in the payment period.
4) The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a pro rata basis. For
example, if you completed 30% of your payment period (as determined in step three),
you earn 30% of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have
completed more than 60% of your payment period, you earn all the assistance that you
were scheduled to receive for that period.
5) If you did not receive all of the funds that you earned, you may be due a Postwithdrawal disbursement. This occurs in very rare cases. If your Post-withdrawal
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disbursement includes loan funds, you must give your permission before loan funds can
be disbursed. Your Post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds may automatically be
used for tuition and room and board charges.
6) The percent of unearned Title IV aid is calculated by subtracting the percentage of
earned Title IV aid (step four) from 100%. The amount of unearned Title IV aid is
calculated by multiplying the amount of Title IV aid received and subject to return (step
two) by the percentage of unearned Title IV aid. The amount of unearned Title IV aid
must be returned.
7) If you receive excess Title IV aid that must be returned, CSM must return a portion of
the excess equal to the lesser of either your institutional charges (step one) multiplied
by the percentage of unearned Title IV aid (step six), or the entire amount of excess
funds. Any refund amount is applied in the following order: Direct Unsubsidized Stafford
Loan, Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan, Federal Perkins Loan, Direct PLUS Loan (Graduate
Student), Direct PLUS Loan (Parent), Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, and TEACH
Grant.
8) Title IV aid returned by CSM will likely result in a balance due on your CSM student
account for which you must make satisfactory repayment arrangements with the
Express Center.
9) If CSM is not required to return all of the excess funds, you must return the remaining
amount. Any loan funds that you must return, you (or your parent for a Parent PLUS
Loan) repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. Any amount of
unearned grant funds that you must return is called an overpayment. The maximum
amount of a grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the grant funds you
received or were scheduled to receive. You do not have to repay a grant overpayment if
the original amount of the overpayment is $50 or less. You must make arrangements
with your school or the Department of Education to return the unearned grant funds.
This occurs in very rare cases, most of the time, CSM is required to return the grant
and/or loan funds (steps seven and eight).
The College of Saint Mary refund policy is a separate policy which pertains to refunds of
tuition after withdrawal and applies to CSM students not receiving Title IV aid as well.
Donor Scholarships
Through the generosity of College of Saint Mary donors, endowed and annual scholarships
underwrite tuition assistance to students. Scholarships include the following:
Olive Arkoosh Endowed
Charles A Frueauff Foundation
Sharon Lovely Merritt Memorial
Baburek/Deeths Endowed
Scholarship
Paul and Rachel Gallagher
Rachel M. Micek Memorial
Coreen Barba Endowed Memorial
Joan B. Halsted Memorial
Clara and Henry Miller Memorial
Jesse J. and Angela M. Bavaresco
Memorial
Hawks Foundation
Tim Moylan Memorial
Carl and Peg Bendixen Endowed
Holland Foundation
Edmund and Bernadette Bosin
Memorial
William Randolph Hearst
Foundation
Sr. Mary Mechtilde Hill, RSM
Scholarship for Academic
Excellence
Mary Schwertley Brown/Sally
Bisson Endowed
Sr. Thea Bowman
July 1, 2013
Nancy Glatter Hittner Memorial
Joseph F. and Helen Clare Murphy
Family Scholarship Fund
Nebraska Independent
College Foundation
NE Mercy Ministry Fund
Imelda Nolan Memorial
27
Elizabeth Carlin Schultz Endowed
Matthias Hugo Memorial
Edward and Lila Robinson
Charitable Trust
Melanie and Joanne R. Carlson
Endowed
A.F.and Ruth Jacobson Memorial
Helen Russell Memorial
Mrs. Frank Cech Memorial
Kathleen Turner Jeffries Memorial
Madelene McKenna Schaber
Class of 1940
Kean Scholarship
William and Ruth Scott Family
Foundation
Patricia Colchin Lavey Endowed
Kersey-Geisler Endowed
Harriett and John M. Shonsey
Memorial
Luke and Shirley Coniglio
Endowed
Peter Kiewit Foundation
Sisters of Mercy McAuley Scholars
James M. Cox Foundation
Marjorie Langhorst Memorial
Paul and Annette Smith
Dr. C. C. and Mabel L. Criss
Memorial Foundation
Blanche Laughlin Memorial
Morton and Ella S. Steinhart
Foundation Memorial
Mary Cronin Memorial
Joan Laughlin Endowed
Dr. Maryanne Stevens, RSM
William E and Rose Marie Davis
Foundation
Lawless Family Scholarship
Dr. Electra O’Rourke Strub
Colleen Dostal Stormberg
Memorial
Les and Phyllis Lawless Endowed
Gilbert C. Swanson Foundation
Bernice M. Ebel Memorial
Kenneth Lueder Memorial
Fran Thul Memorial
Patricia Ann Eckardt Memorial
St. Mary Christelle Macaluso, RSM
Memorial
Union Pacific Foundation
Harvey D. Ferer Memorial
Deborah A. Macdonald Foundation
George and Susan Venteicher
Amanda Nicole Florance Memorial
Maggio/Kanel Memorial
Vernon and Kathryn Von Seggern
John J. Franey Memorial
Elizabeth A. Mannlein Endowed
Sr. Constance Walsh Memorial
Stephen T. McGill Memorial
July 1, 2013
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Tuition
All students are required to make semester financial arrangements for tuition and room and
board prior to each semester. These arrangements, referred to as “SFA,” must be made in
the Express Center or using the on-line SFA process. At the time of student financial
arrangements, each student will be required to sign a promissory note acknowledging that
she is responsible for all charges including tuition, books, and room and board, plus any
collection agency fees in the event that her student account becomes delinquent and is
turned over to a collection agency. Students will be administratively withdrawn from
classes if satisfactory payment arrangements are not made.
Tuition and Charges 2013-2014 Academic Year
Tuition - Undergraduate Programs
Full-time Student (12-18 credits) - per semester
$13467
Part-time Day courses (fewer than 12 credits) – per credit hour
Internet or Independent Study – Pay according to tuition plan
Part-Time Evening courses (fewer than 12 credits) – per credit
hour
Special Tuition Rates for Alegent Employees – per credit hour
Practical Nursing Program – per credit hour
Paralegal Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program – per credit
hour
Business Leadership and Management – per semester
All Omaha Campus Summer 2013 Courses – per credit hour
Weekend Undergraduate – per credit hour
Audit – per credit hour
Audit for Post BA/BS/BBLM Alum
Applies to one three-credit hour course per semester
Senior Citizen (over 65)
Applies to one three-credit hour course per semester
880
605
640
300
460
6195
540
335
½ tuition charge
No tuition charge
No tuition charge
Residence Life Room and Board
Double Room – per semester(Lozier and Madonna Hall)
Lozier Private Room* – per semester
$
3,400*
3,700*
Residence Hall Contract Breakage Penalty
500
Summer 2013 Residence Hall Rate – All Summer
*Certain restrictions apply; contact Director of Residence Life
925
Financial Charges
Payment Plan/Corporate Deferred Charge– per semester
Late Payment Penalties – per month
Late Semester Financial Arrangements Penalties – per semester
Return/Stop Pmt Check Penalty – per check
40
60
100
25
Alternatives for College Credit
July 1, 2013
29
Credit by Exam or Challenge Exam – per credit hour
Portfolio Assessment – per credit hour
Dual Credit and Early College Start Programs (per credit hour)
Dual Credit and Early College Start Music Lessons (per course)
$
120
120
100
$330
Payment Options
Methods of Payment
The following methods of payment are accepted by the College of Saint Mary: Cash or
Check in Person or Mail, Automated Withdrawal from Checking/Savings Account (ACH)
or Credit/Debit Card (MasterCard, Discover, and American Express accepted). These
payment plans are done through ecashier at www.csm.edu/sfa. Note: A convenience
charge of 2.75% is charged for all credit/debit card transactions.
Payment in Full
Payment in full can be done in person in the Express Center. You may also pay your
balance in full by visiting www.csm.edu/SFA.
Payment Plan
You may sign up for the following payment plan options by going online at
www.csm.edu/SFA.
Fall
Enroll
By
Pmt
Months
6 month
05/21/13
5 month
06/20/13
4 month
3 month
3 month
Plan Type
Spring
Summer
Pmt
Enroll By
Months
Enroll By
Pmt
Months
Jun - Nov
11/20/13
Dec - May
03/24/14
Apr-Aug
Jul - Nov
12/19/13
Jan - May
04/21/14
May-Aug
07/22/13
Aug - Nov
01/22/14
Feb - May
05/21/14
June-Aug
08/21/13
09/23/13
Sep - Nov
Oct - Dec
02/19/14
Mar - May
06/20/14
July-Aug
Your payment is withdrawn on the 5th day of the month. A setup charge of $40 is
charged when the plan is initiated and processed immediately. You may also make an
optional down payment when you set up your plan.
Please note, if your amount due changes after you have signed up for a plan, your
remaining payments will be adjusted accordingly. It is your responsibility to review your
agreement balance online through mypaymentplan.com or contact the Express Center
to confirm any changes.
Corporate Deferred
If your employer reimburses your tuition cost after your course ends, you can defer the
amount due until the conclusion of the semester. You can sign up for this option at
www.csm.edu/SFA. You will also need to fill out the form available and be approved to
use this option.
Your payment will be withdrawn on February 5th for the Fall Semester, July 5th for the
Spring Semester, or September 5th for the Summer Sessions.
July 1, 2013
30
A setup charge of $40 is charged when plan is initiated, and processed immediately.
College of Saint Mary Refund Policy
Students who want to withdraw from one or several courses or the entire semester, must
complete the WITHDRAWAL CHECKLIST. The student must complete the withdrawal
checklist with all required signatures and submit the completed form to the Express Center.
Students who fail to submit a withdrawal checklist as required will not receive a refund.
The date of withdrawal will in every case be considered the date on which the written
statement of withdrawal is initiated. The date the process is initiated, as stated on the
withdrawal checklist, will become the basis for a possible refund of tuition.
Students who withdraw from all classes and are receiving federal financial aid will have their
federal financial aid adjusted in accordance with Federal Return to Title IV Funds
regulations. See the Express Center or Financial Aid Office for more information.
July 1, 2013
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Refunds are calculated as follows:
Regular Full Time & Masters in Occupational Therapy (12-18 CREDITS)
Dropping below 12 credit hours but is still enrolled
Before the end of the 1st week of
100% Financial Aid adjusted based on credits
classes
enrolled
st
After the 1 week of classes
0%
Financial Aid is not adjusted
Courses Scheduled for Full Semester
(Including Regular Full Time and MOT withdrawal from all classes)
Before the end of the 1st week of
100%
classes
During the 2nd week of classes
75%
During the 3rd week of classes
50%
After the 3rd week of classes
0%
Courses Scheduled for Less than Full Semester
Before the 1st class meeting of each
100%
course or within 48 hours after end of
first class meeting (except 1 day
courses)
Thereafter, no refund
0%
Weekend College
Before and through the 1st class
meeting
Before and through the 2nd class
meeting
After the 3rd class meeting
100%
50%
0%
Summer Sessions
(For BLM & MAT, refunds are calculated based on the Less than Full Semester Schedule
above)
Before the first class meeting
100%
When class has met for 6 or less instructional hours
75%
When class has met for 7-9 instructional hours
50%
When the class has met for more than 9 instructional
0%
hours
On-Line Summer Classes
Before the first day of the class activation
When class has been active for 1 week
When class has been active for 2 weeks
When the class has been active for more than 2 weeks
100%
75%
50%
0%
Resident Hall Charges
If a resident hall student withdraws from the College, room and board charges will be
refunded on a prorated weekly basis. If a resident hall student decides to move out of the
residence hall during the school year, a $500 penalty will be charged for breaking the
housing contract.
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Bookstore Vouchers
Students whose financial aid exceeds the total amount of their tuition may apply for a
Bookstore Voucher, or apply the balance to their campus card if done on-line, for an amount
no greater than the anticipated credit balance which will be created by the application of
their financial aid. Vouchers may be obtained in the Express Center once you have
completed your SFA and may be used in the Bookstore through the expiration date
indicated on the voucher. Any funds left on a student’s campus card bookstore account
when student refunds are issued will be taken off, and a check will be issued.
Payments of Excess Financial Aid
If a credit balance is created on a student’s account by the application of any type of
financial assistance, a refund check will be issued to the student. Students picking up their
checks in person must present picture identification. Please allow up to ten working days
from the time a credit balance is created for a refund check to be issued. Checks that are
not picked up on the day the Express Center receives them, will be mailed out the following
evening. Please make sure we have your accurate address.
Past Due Student Accounts
The definition of a past due student account is any account which has not received a
payment within 5 days of the required due date. The College will place a financial hold on
the student's account. The hold will remain until the past due payment plus the late
payment penalty is paid in full. Financial hold status will preclude the student from
receiving any grades or transcripts and will not permit the student to register for additional
courses until such time that the amount in arrears is paid in full. Each month the College
will send each such student an itemized statement of the balance due.
Delinquent Student Accounts
If a balance remains following the conclusion of the current semester, the account is
considered delinquent and the College will transfer the student account to delinquent status.
Attempts will be made to collect the amount due or make appropriate payment
arrangements. Payment arrangements will require a new promissory note to be signed and
all payments to be made by automatic monthly bank debit. If a student has not made
payment arrangements after the above delinquency procedures, the College will notify the
student that the account is being placed with a collection agency and reported to the credit
bureau.
Holds on Student Accounts
Financial Services and/or the Financial Aid office will place a hold on a student's account for
the following reasons:
Past due or delinquent account
Semester Financial Arrangements (SFA) not completed
Fines (library, parking, athletic equipment, etc.)
Insufficient checks
Default on student loan (Stafford, Perkins, Nursing, etc.)
Immunization records not received
Incomplete student loan counseling (entrance or exit counseling)
Incomplete financial aid paperwork (i.e., master promissory note, award letter)
The hold may result in the student not being able to register, obtain transcripts or diplomas,
or participate in graduation.
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Evening and Weekend Programs
Evening and weekend programs offer an important educational alternative for working
individuals. Students unable to attend traditional day courses due to work and family
obligations find the evening and Saturday formats of some CSM programs offer the
opportunity to obtain a degree or another level of professional education outside of the
regular work day. Students find these programs to be a viable way to increase competence,
advance in a career or prepare for a career change.
Advising
Advising assistance is available to students taking evening or weekend courses from
program faculty. Enrollment advisors are available to answer questions regarding transcript
evaluation, career opportunities, course schedules and registration. Contact the Enrollment
Services Office at 402-399-2355 for more information.
Omaha Campus
Master Degrees:
Master of Arts in Teaching
Master of Science in Education
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership
Bachelor Degrees:
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication
Business Leadership and Management
Associate Degrees:
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication
Certificates:
Business Information Systems
Paralegal Studies (Post Baccalaureate)
Many courses from the general education curriculum are available on weekday evenings on
the Omaha campus.
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Curricular Service-Learning
College of Saint Mary manifests its mission for academic excellence and student
development through curricular service-learning. CSM faculty in all divisions offer servicelearning courses that help students achieve their learning goals and contribute to the wider
community.
Curricular service-learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates community
service into academic courses to meet specific learning goals for students. Faculty, in
partnership with representatives of community organizations, design service- learning
projects based on two main objectives: teaching students course-specific knowledge, skills
and values; and responding to community-identified needs and assets. Strong reflective and
analytical components are built into the course.
Curricular service-learning can occur in a compressed form (such as an immersion seminar
where students travel to a different location to offer service and learn about the issues
facing that location) or an extended form (such as a semester-long course where students
offer service to a local community agency over the course of the semester).
Research on student learning indicates that service-learning is an effective learning strategy
because it:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
requires student engagement in the learning process
allows students to practice skills within complex social settings
includes regular and systematic reflection and analysis
develops critical thinking and communication skills
builds skills and knowledge regarding cultural competence
encourages responsible citizenship and community-building
develops students' leadership skills
changes the roles of teacher and learner in creative ways
Research on community partners’ perceptions of service-learning indicates that they value
service-learning because they:
•
•
•
•
educate students and faculty about the community's assets and needs
receive assistance on projects they identify as priorities
collaborate with CSM on common goals and projects
contribute to developing students who have a lifelong commitment to social
responsibility
The purposes of the Service-Learning Program are the following:
•
•
•
Provide faculty development opportunities and resources for CSM faculty who use
service-learning as a teaching strategy.
Support faculty and departments as they develop and enhance service-learning
courses.
Facilitate communication about service-learning among faculty, students,
administration, and community organizations.
The following criteria indicate that a project can be considered as service-learning:
July 1, 2013
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•
•
•
•
The primary activities of the project are service and learning about why service is
needed.
Faculty prepares the students prior to the service activities. This includes
discussion of readings about the issues students are studying through the
project, information about culture and language of the people with whom
students will work, and other relevant information.
Faculty help students analyze and reflect upon their learning regularly throughout
the project and at the end of it. Students may write journals, discuss their
learning as a group, write papers that connect the service experiences to other
parts of the class, and make plans for how they will continue their commitment to
the people and issues encountered through the service-learning project in the
future.
Faculty consults with the Service-Learning Program Director on the servicelearning project, which may be eligible for grant funding.
The Service Learning Program offers the following statement about Partnership Relations in
order to provide guidance for faculty and community partners who collaborate on service
learning projects.
For more information about the Service-Learning Program, contact the Director of ServiceLearning and see the website at http://www.csm.edu/Academics/Service_Learning/
Service Learning Partnership Relations
"Committed to the enduring concerns of the Sisters of Mercy, College of Saint Mary is a
Catholic university dedicated to the education of women in an environment that calls forth
potential and fosters leadership." (College of Saint Mary Mission Statement)
One of the ways College of Saint Mary manifests its mission for academic excellence and
student development is through curricular service learning. Faculty in all academic divisions
offer service learning courses that help students achieve learning goals and contribute to
the greater Omaha community.
CSM Faculty Role: CSM faculty have requested that students serve at your organization
because our students can learn from your well-led programs and participate in your
provision of service. Faculty will inform you of specific learning goals they want students to
achieve at your organization by giving you the part of the syllabus that addresses this, and
will provide you with evidence of student learning at the end of the semester. Prior to
students' engagement in service learning, faculty provide students with an orientation that
includes expectations that students demonstrate their commitment and respect to the
organization by maintaining confidentiality, communication, and professional behavior.
Community Partner Role: You are contributing to the education of CSM students. Thank
you. CSM values your feedback on our students and our Service Learning Program. We will
email you a link to a very short survey at the end of each semester, so that you can
anonymously provide feedback. The Program also welcomes any feedback about our
students at any point in the semester, which can be directed to a faculty member or Service
Learning Director. CSM wants our partnership with you for service learning to evolve to
meet the changing needs of both your organization and the Service Learning Program.
July 1, 2013
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Center for Transcultural Learning (CTL)
The Center for Transcultural Learning (CTL) at College of Saint Mary provides innovative
services intended to foster culturally competent and relevant training and education
necessary for the social and economic integration of the culturally diverse population of
Omaha. The most recognized services provided by the CTL are language acquisition and
interpreting trainings.
Language Acquisition: English (ESL)
English language acquisition courses are offered at various levels to enable non-native
English speakers to function and thrive in and English-speaking society. Courses range from
pre-beginning, designed to help students with basic communication skills, to advanced,
which prepares a student to enter college.
Language Acquisition: Spanish
Intensive Spanish for Professionals: This program exists to bring non-Spanish speakers to a
Limited Working Proficiency that makes them able to satisfy routine social demands and
specific work requirements.
Medical Interpreting Certificate
The Center for Transcultural Learning (CTL) and the Department of World Languages grant
credits to students who complete the required courses for a Certificate in Medical
Interpreting. This certificate program provides professional training to bilingual speakers
who seek training in interpretation modes and techniques, specialized vocabulary, and the
ethics of the interpretation industry.
The Medical Interpreting program is designed as a series of interconnected modules that
cover different aspects and levels of Medical Interpreting. Students who complete the
program will be either prepared to take the certification exam of the National Board of
Certification for Medical Interpreters or at least have taken the minimum of 40 contact
hours of training included among the requisites for taking that exam of certification.
Community Interpreting Certificate
The Center for Transcultural Learning (CTL) and the Department of World Languages grant
credits to students who complete the required courses for a Certificate in Community
Interpreting. This certificate program provides professional training to bilingual speakers
who seek training in interpretation modes and techniques, specialized vocabulary, and the
ethics of the interpretation industry.
The Community Interpreting program is designed to explore the complex systems of
community services and to train interpreters to meet linguistic and cultural challenges.
Furthermore, it offers introductory level training in legal interpreting and medical
interpreting.
Cultural Competence
Cultural competence is the term used to describe the set of congruent attitudes,
behaviors, and policies that are enacted at a personal, social, organizational, or systemic
level that can help to deal effectively in cross-cultural situations. Because it is impossible to
have a universal template for dealing with people from diverse cultural backgrounds,
cultural competence is useful in helping to promote awareness of the meaning of being
part of a multicultural society in which differences and commonalities have an important
role in our interactions.
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By facilitating the awareness and understanding of the new reality of the growing cultural
diversity in our region, the Center for Transcultural Learning offers a program of seminars in
cultural competence as a way to promote understanding, collaboration, and conflict
reduction.
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Study Abroad
College of Saint Mary recognizes the rich cultural experiences and increased global
awareness studying abroad offers. The College encourages its students to study overseas
and assistance is given to interested students to help them navigate the studying abroad
process. Further information about the programs listed below is available from the Study
Abroad Coordinator.
Transfer of Credits
It is the student’s responsibility to find out if and how the courses she takes overseas will
translate into credits at CSM. Students work with advisors to obtain approval for transfer
credit prior to the study abroad experience.
Financial Aid
Most Federal financial aid funds can be used for study abroad. Institutional funds, such as
scholarships and College of Saint Mary grants, will be suspended while the student is
involved with study abroad. However, a student who studies abroad during the fall or spring
semester is eligible to apply for a CSM Study Abroad Scholarship. See below for details. The
Financial Aid Director can provide clarification.
Application Process
To begin the process, a student interested in studying abroad meets with the Study Abroad
Coordinator to discuss options for studying abroad, such as program, location, duration,
cost, and available options while overseas. Complete the Study Abroad Application Form,
which requires visiting with a financial aid counselor, the Registrar, and the student’s
academic advisor. The student will also need to complete the application process required
by the program sponsoring the study abroad experience, if applicable.
A student interested in studying abroad should begin the exploration and application
process at least one semester before the semester in which she plans to study abroad.
Application deadlines for CSM are as follows: Fall: March 15th; Spring: October 15th;
Summer: April 1. If a student studies abroad with an outside organization, other deadlines
may apply.
When accepted into the program and approved by CSM, the student will be registered as a
current CSM student with “Study Abroad” designation. Actual courses will be recorded on
the transcript when the student returns to CSM and the study abroad transcript is received
by the College.
CSM Study Abroad Scholarship
CSM students planning to study abroad are eligible to apply for a $2500 CSM Study Abroad
Scholarship if they meet the eligibility requirements and agree to fulfill the expectations
outlined below.
CRITERIA FOR ELIGIBILITY FOR A CSM STUDY ABROAD SCHOLARSHIP:
•Be a CSM undergraduate student applying to any credit-bearing study abroad program
•Have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher
•Plan to study abroad during the fall and/or spring semester (not summer)
•Enrolled in a regular, full-time degree program. Students in certificate programs and other
programs with special tuition rates are not eligible for this scholarship.
July 1, 2013
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CSM’S APPLICATION PROCESS**:
•Complete the College of Saint Mary Application for Study Abroad and submit it to the
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (Study Abroad Coordinator)
•Complete and submit the CSM Study Abroad Scholarship Application, which is attached to
the College of Saint Mary Application for Study Abroad.
•Attach a copy of your unofficial transcript (available from Self Service)
•Attach your personal statement
oSubmit a typed, double-spaced essay no longer than two pages. Include your
name on the upper right-hand corner of the page. The essay should address
the following topics:
Reasons why you have chosen to study abroad
Specific academic rationale for the program you have chosen
Anticipated benefit of study abroad for your career and long-term goals
Statement of objectives outlining what you hope to accomplish by
studying abroad
•The application is reviewed by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and the student is
notified whether or not she will receive a scholarship.
** If using a third-party provider you need to complete their application process as well.
STUDY ABROAD APPLICATION DEADLINES:
Students studying abroad in:
Should begin the application
process by:
Application Deadline
FALL
SPRING
SUMMER
FEBRUARY 1
AUGUST 1
DECEMBER 1
MARCH 15
OCTOBER 15
APRIL 1
*Check the application dates of the program for which you are applying; they may differ.
SCHOLARSHIP AMOUNT AND EXPECTATIONS
Students who are awarded a CSM Study Abroad scholarship will receive $2500 for each
semester of study abroad, with a maximum of two semesters abroad.
By accepting this scholarship, the student agrees to demonstrate how her objectives were
met either by writing a paper or making a presentation to a group or groups about the
study abroad experience. This requirement will be met by the end of the semester following
the study abroad semester and will be supervised by the Associate Dean for Academic
Affairs.
Programs
The programs listed on our Study Abroad webpage are just a few of many programs
available to students who want to study abroad, and students are not limited to using one
of the programs described below. The Study Abroad Coordinator has information about the
several programs, and there are links to these programs on the csm.edu Study Abroad web
page. Scholarships or grants may be available to students choosing one of these programs.
College of Saint Mary may establish new affiliations and these will be updated on the CSM
website. (http://www.csm.edu/Academics/Study_Abroad/)
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Student Life & Development
The Student Development team provides a variety of opportunities for CSM students to
become involved in campus life which attends “to the development of mind, body and
spirit.” Students are encouraged to participate in the many co-curricular programs and
activities that enhance learning, including leadership development. The Student Handbook
contains the guidelines for student living. All students enrolled at College of Saint Mary are
expected to become acquainted with its contents and observe the policies contained within
it.
CSM Achievement Center
The Center provides centralized services to help students improve individual academic
performance through tutoring, career development, ADA accommodations, learning style
assessment, single parent success resources and innovative academic support programs.
The Center provides a "one-stop shop" within an environment that encourages students to
attain their full academic potential. In addition, a group study area and three computers
are available for student use.
Services include:
Individual and small group tutoring
Testing services
Specialized academic support workshops and academic skill building
Writing assistance
Professional math tutoring
Single parent success resources and programming
Accommodations for students with disabilities who self-identify (ADA)
Intensive college preparation program (CSMAdvantage) prior to the beginning of fall
classes for at risk students
Individualized consulting and mentoring for CSM Advantage students
Learning style assessment and planning
Career exploration and advising
Job preparation assistance and resume review
On-line academic preparation resources
Counseling
CSM partners with Alegent Occupational Health Services (OHS) to provide short-term
counseling to all full-time students and their family members free of charge. The Counseling
Assistance Program (CAP) is a confidential, 24-hour access service with locations throughout
the Omaha metropolitan area, including one near the CSM campus. Students who want to
discuss issues that are interfering with academic or personal goals may call CAP (402-3985566) to set up an appointment. Anxiety, high stress, concern for a friend or depression are
among the many reasons students take advantage of this confidential, free service.
Health Care
All students should be covered by a comprehensive health insurance plan. International
students are required to have health insurance. Further information about obtaining health
insurance can be found in the Insurance section of this catalog.
CSM partners with Alegent Occupational Health Service (OHS) to provide student illness
evaluations at a cost of $40 each. These services are the financial responsibility of the
students and can be paid by cash, check, credit/debit card at the time of service. For x-rays
or additional testing, additional charges will be required. Alegent OHS is located near the
July 1, 2013
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CSM campus at Bergan Mercy Medical Building One at 7710 Mercy Road, Suite 124.
Appointments may be made by calling 402-398-6581 between 7:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
Housing
To provide a positive college living/learning environment, College of Saint Mary requires all
full-time, first-and second-year students to live in a campus residence hall. Exemptions are
made for students who meet at least one of the following conditions:
- Married or have dependents
- Transfer students with Junior status (60+ credit hours. This does not include first or
second year students who have transferred in college credit from high school)
- Students who are over 21 years of age
- Living at home with parents within a 40-mile radius of College of Saint Mary
Requests for other exceptions to the residence requirement must be submitted in writing to
the Assistant Dean of Students for approval at least one month prior to the first day of
classes for any regular enrollment period.
Students who live in the residence halls have leadership opportunities available to them,
provided by the Residence Hall Council. Each floor community has a resident advisor who
provides support and community and academic programming.
Campus housing is restricted to those full time students studying for undergraduate degrees
at CSM. However, if a student completed her undergraduate work at CSM and is continuing
on as a full time student for a graduate degree at CSM, she may live in the residence halls
for the durations of her graduate studies.
Mothers Living & Learning
CSM’s Mothers Living & Learning residential option provides on-campus housing in Madonna
Hall to single mothers and their children. Students are responsible for their individual tuition
and room and board expenses; however, their children can live and eat on campus for free.
Intercollegiate Athletics
College of Saint Mary sponsors seven sports: basketball, cross-country, golf, soccer,
softball, swimming, and volleyball. CSM is a member of the NAIA (National Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics) and the (MCAC) Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference, and is a
participant school in the NAIA Champions of Character program. Participation in CSM’s
athletic teams and eligibility for CSM athletic scholarships is limited to those students who
meet the eligibility requirements of the NAIA and have been recommended by a coach.
Lied Fitness Center
Leisure and fitness activities and intramural sports opportunities are offered at the Lied
Fitness Center. The swimming pool, gymnasium, walking track, cardio room and weight
room are available to all CSM students when not in use for classes or other scheduled
activities. All those using the center must have a valid ID and swipe in at the door. Towels
and sports equipment are issued at the front desk. CSM students with valid IDs may use the
Center at no charge; some classes and special activities, or use of the Center by guests of
CSM students requires payment of a nominal charge.
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Campus Ministry/Faith Opportunities
The Campus Ministry office provides opportunities designed to encourage the exploration
and development of faith and spirituality. Open to students of all faith traditions, and
rooted in our Catholic identity, Campus Ministry offers ecumenical faith sharing groups,
Catholic liturgies, retreats, community service opportunities and alternative spring break
trips. The Campus Ministry student led service club, DUO, Do Unto Others, provides regular
opportunities for service and justice events and activities.
Student Leadership and Organizations
The Office of Student Leadership and Organizations assists and supplements campus
organizations in providing educational and community building programs and events for
CSM students.
College of Saint Mary offers involvement in clubs and organizations, as well as leadership
opportunities, to enhance the collegiate experience. Whether a student is looking for ways
to be involved with his/her academic major, providing service to others, or representing
peers on Student Senate or the Residence Hall Association; there is something for
everyone. The Office of Student Leadership and Organizations can help find an organization
that meets the needs and interests of every student.
Welcome Days
When students arrive on campus in August, they will participate in Welcome Days.
Welcome days are designed to provide fun-filled community building and educational
activities preceding the start of the academic year. Students have a chance to meet other
new students, participate in group activities, gain insight into majors, find classrooms, and
settle into residence halls.
Code of Conduct
A student enrolled at College of Saint Mary assumes an obligation to conduct herself/himself
in a manner compatible with the University’s function as an educational institution.
Misconduct, for which students are subject to discipline ranging from verbal reprimand to
expulsion and referral for prosecution, includes but is not limited to, the following:
1.
Obstruction or disruption of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary
procedures, or other University activities including its public service functions or
other authorized activities on University premises;
2.
Abuse of any person on University-owned or University-controlled property, or a
University sponsored or supervised functions, or conduct which threatens or
endangers the health or safety of any such person, including self;
3.
Intentionally harassing any person in such a way as to interfere with that person’s
emotional, or academic pursuits; creating a hostile, abusive, coercive or
intimidating environment; and/or slander or defaming another’s character; this
includes on-line/digital communication;
4.
Intentionally and substantially interfering with others’ freedom of expression;
5.
Disorderly conduct or lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct or expressions on
University-owned or controlled property or at University-sponsored or supervised
functions;
6.
Conduct which adversely affects the student’s suitability as a member of the
academic community;
7.
Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism or knowingly furnishing false academic
information (see also Policy for Academic Honesty); this also includes furnishing
false information to any University official, faculty member, or office;
8.
Unauthorized access, destruction of, or interference with computer programs,
computer databases, computer files, or computerized information stored in
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9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
University computer systems;
Forgery, alteration or misuse of University documents, records, or identification;
Theft or unauthorized possession of, or damage to, property of the University or
of a member of the University community or campus visitor;
Unauthorized entry or use of University facilities or unauthorized possession of
University keys, access cards, and codes;
Use, possession, or distribution of marijuana, narcotics or dangerous drugs; use,
possession, verbal or written threat of weapons or explosives of any kind;
Violation of rules governing residence in University-owned or controlled property;
Violation of University policies or of campus regulations including, but not limited
to the provisions of the student handbook, other University publications and
residence hall rules and regulations;
Failure to comply with directions of University officials acting in the performance
of their duties;
Hazing, which is a broad term encompassing any action or activity which does not
contribute to the positive development of a person, or which inflicts or intends to
cause mental or bodily harm or anxieties, or which may demean, degrade, or
disgrace any person;
Illegal or unauthorized possession of firearms, explosives, or other weapons, on
University premises;
Violation of any federal, state or local law;
Manipulation of the Disciplinary Review Process, including but not limited to:
a. Failure to comply with the notice from a University official to appear for a
meeting or a hearing as part of the Disciplinary Review Process.
b. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of any information during the
Disciplinary Review Process.
c. Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a disciplinary Review
proceeding.
d. Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, our use of,
the Disciplinary Review System
e. Attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of the review, prior to,
and/or during the course of the Disciplinary Review proceeding
f. Harassment (verbal, physical, or written) and/or intimidation to any student or
professional prior to, during and/or after the Disciplinary Review proceeding
g. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Disciplinary Review
System.
A student of College of Saint Mary must abide by this code of conduct, as well as the
following sets of policies and agreements: student handbook, academic catalog, residence
hall contract, community agreement, and Federal, state and local laws. Any student
engaging in any manner of conduct prohibited under these guidelines shall be subject to one
or more of the following sanctions, as well as others that may be deemed appropriate at the
University’s discretion: warning, fines, financial restitution, community service, mandatory
counseling or participation in an appropriate treatment program or testing service, research
and/or reflection, reprimand, disciplinary probation, disciplinary removal from University
residence halls, disciplinary suspension, disciplinary expulsion, referral for prosecution, or
any other appropriate sanction.
Parents may be notified if it is anticipated that a student infraction may result in disciplinary
probation, removal, suspension and/or expulsion, if the student is: (1) age 18 or younger,
and/or (2) financially dependent on her parent(s) (as defined by the Federal government for
income tax purposes), or (3) when the student is in violation of law or policy governing the
use of alcohol or drugs, if the student is under 21.
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When a student is suspected of being involved in an infraction, she will be expected to
participate in its resolution. The nature of the infraction and the student’s situation will help
determine whether the opportunity for discussion of responsibility will occur in an
administrative hearing or mediation with a staff member designated by the Vice President
for Student Development.
Disciplinary Review
Students at the university are regarded as adults and citizens of the community as a whole.
The main premise of the process is that we expect students to take responsibility for their
behavior. The disciplinary process is fundamentally a learning process for the students. For
the staff who work with students in question, the process provide the challenge and support
necessary for students to learn from the experience. Typically, the Assistant Dean of
Students will review conduct cases.
Appeal Process
A student has the right to appeal a judicial decision; to do so; she must prepare and hand
deliver a written appeal to the Vice President for Student Development within five working
days. Pending the response to the appeal, the student’s status as a student will remain
unaltered except in cases where there are reasons relating to the emotional or physical
welfare of the student or of others, or reasons involving the safety of persons or property.
The student may appeal only on the following grounds:
1.
Procedural due process;
2.
Absence of sufficient evidence to support the decision;
3.
Submission of new evidence.
Note that concern as to the severity of the sanction is not considered an acceptable reason
to appeal.
Appeal letters must be complete enough so that a personal appearance will not be
necessary. A letter which merely lists the grounds of appeal, without description of
the merits or concern for the individual case at hand is not sufficient. A meeting
will be held with the student to share the appeal decision within ten days, unless
unusual circumstances are present.
The standards and procedures set forth in this document are those the University normally
applies to disciplinary matters. The University reserves the right to take necessary and
appropriate action to protect the safety and well-being of the campus and community. This
includes the right to suspend, expel, or request the withdrawal of a student at any time,
with or without specific charge or hearing, subject only to the student’s right to request
review of the decision.
Drug-Free Campus Policy
College of Saint Mary standards of conduct prohibit the unlawful possession, use or
distribution of illicit drugs and/or alcohol by students on College property or as part of any
of the College’s activities. “Illicit drug use” means the use of illegal drugs and the abuse of
other drugs or alcohol. State and Federal laws, and any applicable city ordinances,
pertaining to the possession and use of illicit drugs and alcoholic beverages shall be
observed by all College students. By way of illustration, this means that it is a violation of
College policy for students to unlawfully purchase, manufacture, possess, consume, use, sell
or otherwise distribute such items on campus or during College activities.
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Student violations of the standards stated in the above paragraph shall result in disciplinary
sanctions, as set forth in the CSM Code of Conduct included here and in the student
handbook.
Policy for a Tobacco-Free Campus College of Saint Mary
Smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings and anywhere on campus property.
• For the purposes of this policy, smoking is defined as burning any type of tobacco product
including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, and pipes. Smokeless tobacco is also
prohibited.
• Tobacco advertisements are prohibited in college publications or any publications
endorsed by CSM to be distributed on campus.
The Campus Wellness Coordinator provides smoking cessation resources if needed.
General Student Information
I.D. Card
All students must have a College of Saint Mary identification card. Campus Security
personnel as well as other persons in authority may request to see I.D. cards at any time. If
an I.D. Card is lost, the student should contact the Campus Information Center immediately
for a replacement at a nominal cost. Upon withdrawal from the College, the I.D. Card is to
be returned to the Campus Information Center.
Meals
The College dining room is open 7 days a week and offers a full board plan for resident
students. Non-resident students may also purchase a meal plan or put money on their ID
card in the Express Center. Hours of operation are posted in the dining room and published
in the Student Handbook. Christina’s Place, located in the Hixson Lied Commons, sells hot
and cold beverages along with breakfast and lunch items.
Notary Public
For the convenience of the students and the entire College of Saint Mary community, notary
publics are available during office hours in the Registrar and Student Development Offices,
Walsh Hall.
Parking
All cars must be registered and have a College of Saint Mary sticker placed in the proper
position in the vehicle. Fines for violations must be paid in the Express Center. Stickers,
maps and parking regulations are available from the Information Center.
Solicitations
The on-campus sale or solicitation of anything (including distribution of samples) is
prohibited without prior authorization in writing from the Information Manager.
Student Handbook
A handbook describing policies and information of interest to students is available on-line at
http://www.csm.edu/Student_Life/Student_Policies/ All students are expected to read the
Student Handbook and abide by its policies.
Immunization Requirements
College of Saint Mary requires that all students entering our college for the first time be
immunized against measles, mumps, and rubella and must show proof of MMR 1 and MMR
2. As these are preventable and contagious diseases, CSM wants to prevent the possibility
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of an epidemic and facilitate the maintenance of a healthy campus. All students must
submit accurate immunization records that show evidence of immunity to measles, mumps,
and rubella. Submission of this record is mandatory, and failure to comply will result in
future registrations being cancelled or restricted.
College of Saint Mary also reserves the right to deny access to campus facilities, including
residence halls, if documentation of compliance has not been provided.
Further, in
accordance with public health recommendations, non-immune students may be excluded
from the CSM campus in the event of an outbreak of any of these diseases. According to
the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the
Centers for Disease Control (CDC), a student may demonstrate immunity to measles,
mumps, and rubella in one of the following ways:
• Students born before January 1, 1957 are considered immune to Measles,
Mumps, and Rubella.
• Documentation of a positive antibody titer proving immunity to Measles
(rubeola), Mumps, and Rubella (German measles) is acceptable.
• Documentation of two doses of (MMR) vaccine, separated by at least one
month on or after the first birthday and after January 1, 1968, must be
provided.
In addition to the above immunization measles requirement for all students, certain
academic programs may also require a physical examination and additional immunizations
prior to acceptance into the program. Students should review any specific program
requirements prior to beginning their course work at College of Saint Mary. All athletes are
also required to submit a medical form. Athletes return completed forms to the Athletic
department.
MLL Students must provide immunization documentation for their child/children to Student
Development at the beginning of each semester (fall, spring, and summer).
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Academic Regulations and Information
Academic Responsibility
The Vice President for Academic Affairs is the official representative of the College
in matters pertaining to the scholastic life of the student body. Regulations made
by her/him in addition to, in abrogation of, or in interpretation of, the following
regulations have the same force as the regulations themselves.
In case of a discrepancy between the College catalog and other publications or
academic information provided by any faculty or staff member other than the Vice
President for Academic Affairs, the catalog takes precedence.
The College reserves the right to terminate or modify program requirements,
content and sequence of courses, and program offerings. Students withdrawing
from the College completely for a period of one calendar year or more are bound
by the catalog in effect when they re-enter, unless the student is away for one
year on Official Leave of Absence.
It is the responsibility of each student to be acquainted with all requirements for
her degree program and to assume responsibility for meeting those requirements.
In case of ambiguity, discrepancy, or disagreement, the regulations and
requirements stated in this catalog and any subsequent modifications or
interpretations by the Vice President for Academic Affairs will prevail.
Academic Advising
During the degree-seeking student’s first year at College of Saint Mary, she is assigned an
academic advisor who assists in academic matters and helps in planning a cohesive program
to achieve the goals set by the student. Any major decisions regarding the academic
program should be handled through the academic advisor. Final responsibility for
meeting degree requirements rests with the student. A student may request a
change of advisor through the Registrar’s Office.
Academic Appeals Board
The Student Academic Appeals Board exists to provide the student with a means to appeal a
specific academic decision that the student considers unwarranted, unjust or capricious. A
student who wishes to make an appeal related to an academic matter must begin the
process no later than one month after the end of the semester in which the decision was
made.
It is the responsibility of the instructor to inform students of course requirements, evaluate
students fairly on the basis of the academic performance, encourage free and open
discussion, inquiry and expression in the classroom, and identify methods of
evaluation/grading that will be used for the course. It is the responsibility of the student to
inquire as to course requirements when in doubt, maintain the standards of academic
performance established by the professor, and to follow the appeal process if academic
rights have been violated.
The process for an Academic Appeal is as follows:
1) Discuss the matter of appeal with the instructor.
2) Discuss the matter of appeal with the Program Director of the course.
3) Discuss the matter of appeal with the course Division Chairperson.
4) Discuss the matter of appeal with the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
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5) If the appeal is then not resolved, submit an “Application to the Academic Appeals Board”
(forms are available in the Academic Affairs Office, Walsh 118). The Vice President will
convene the Academic Appeals Board.
It is the responsibility of the Academic Appeals Board to evaluate each case confidentially
and fairly and to develop a course of action that will resolve the matter. The Academic
Appeals Board will notify the offending party and schedule a hearing in which both parties
are present to state their side of the case. The board will make a decision within two weeks
following the hearing.
Membership in the Student Academic Appeals Board consists of two faculty members and
one alternate, to be elected by the Faculty Assembly, and two students, to be elected by
the student body association. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will serve as Chair. In
addition, for each case there will be one faculty member, to be appointed by the student
registering the complaint, and one student, to be appointed by the faculty member against
whom the complaint is filed.
Recommendations made by the Student Academic Appeals Board and the Nursing Student
Policies Committee are forwarded to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Her/his
decision is final.
Academic Load
The normal load a student should carry in order to pursue in-depth those subjects
undertaken in any academic semester is 16 hours of credit. Overloads of more than 18
credit hours require the approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Normally
students will not be permitted to take more than an additional 3 credits beyond 18 credit
hours. A student may carry no more than 12 semester hours during a summer session
without the approval of her advisor and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. In order to
be eligible for an overload, a student must meet all of the following requirements:
• Must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0
• Must acquire a GPA of at least 3.0 for the semester preceding the semester for which
the student is requesting an overload
• Must not have an Incomplete “I” for the semester preceding the semester for which
the student is requesting an overload.
Academic Probation and Dismissal
All students at College of Saint Mary are expected to make continuous academic progress
while they are enrolled at the College. Continuous academic progress is considered a
semester and cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. All
students will be reviewed at the end of the fall and spring semesters. The summer session
may contribute to the cumulative GPA, but is not considered for academic actions. All
students who are conditional admittances (full or part time) will be reviewed at the end of
the fall and spring semester to determine if they remain on academic probation. If the fall
or spring term GPA is 2.0 or above, conditional admittance will be lifted. If the fall or spring
term GPA is less than 2.0, the student is subject to academic probation, dismissal, or
continuance of the conditional status.
A student who does not maintain a semester 2.0 grade-point average or who does not have
a cumulative 2.0 grade point average at the end of the semester which is being reviewed is
subject to academic probation in the subsequent semester. Students on probation are
required to take the IDS 097 (Study and Learning) course and must complete an Academic
Needs Assessment Form and an interview with the Director of the Achievement Center.
Exceptions to this requirement will be rare and must be requested by filling out an exception
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form and submitting it to the Office of Academic Affairs for approval. Students who have
already taken IDS 097 in a previous semester and did not maintain a semester 2.0 grade
point average or do not have a cumulative 2.0 grade point average must still meet with the
Director of the Achievement Center to develop a continued plan for improvement. If the
student achieves a semester and cumulative 2.0 or higher grade-point average in her
probationary semester, she will be removed from probation. If she continues with either a
semester or cumulative grade point average below 2.0, she will be subject to 2nd probation
for the succeeding semester. A student who, after two probationary semesters at the
College, has still not attained a semester and cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is
eligible for dismissal. Any student who does not achieve a 1.0 grade point average in any
semester, regardless of her probationary or non-probationary status, is eligible for
dismissal.
Students who are subject to academic dismissal have the right to petition for continuing
enrollment. If a student chooses to petition, she must write a letter to the Vice President
for Academic Affairs stating the reasons for her sub-standard academic performance. The
letter should also identify any mitigating circumstances that would warrant consideration
and specific steps she intends to take to improve her performance were her petition
granted.
The Academic Action Review Board, chaired by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, will
review the petition. The two faculty members and one alternate elected to Student
Academic Appeals Board will also serve as members of the Academic Action Review Board,
which hears appeals of student academic dismissals, as well as a member of the Retention
Leadership Council.
The Academic Action Review Board, chaired by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, will
review the petition. Membership on the Academic Action Review Board is determined by the
Vice President for Academic Affairs and is drawn from the full time faculty and the Retention
Leadership Council.
The decision of the Academic Action Review Board is final. The student will be notified of the
decision by the Office of Academic Affairs prior to the beginning of the next semester. The
Academic Action Review Board has the right to stipulate conditions for continuing enrollment
of a student subject to dismissal who is permitted to return to the College.
Students who have been academically dismissed from the College may not reapply for
readmission until one semester has passed. The letter of readmission must also address
the issues that led to academic dismissal in the first place. It should identify concrete
actions that have taken place to avoid the recurrence of substandard academic
performance. It should also address any specific conditions that were stated in the original
letter of dismissal as conditions for readmission. A student who is dismissed a second time
from the College may not reapply until five years have passed.
Academic Action as Applicable to Students in the Health Professions Division
Students are formally admitted into the Health Professions programs after they have been
successfully admitted to the College. In addition to being governed by the probation and
dismissal policies stated above, students in the Health Professions Division must remain
students of good standing in these programs.
While students may be accepted into the College, the Nursing program and the Occupational
Therapy program have additional specific requirements for being enrolled and to progress in
those programs. For details, please consult the respective handbooks for each program.
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Academic Year and Semester Hours
The academic year is divided into two semesters of 15 weeks each and a summer session. A
semester credit hour represents one 50-minute period of class lecture and discussion or a
minimum of two 50-minute periods of laboratory or studio work pursued weekly for the
semester. Clinical lab and field experience may require a larger number of contact hours per
credit hour earned. The number of semester credit hours is specified after each course in
the catalog.
Advanced Placement
Students who have taken advanced or college-level courses in high school on the College
Board Advanced Placement Tests are responsible for having scores forwarded to the
Registrar’s Office at the College to apply for college credit and/or advanced placement. The
amount of credit allocated is determined by the following chart.
AP EXAM
REQUIRED
TEST SCORE COURSE AWARDED
CREDIT
EARNED NOTES
Art History
3,4,5
ART 202
3
Biology
3,4,5
BIO 100
3
Calculus AB
4,5
MTH 201
4
Calculus BC
4,5
MTH 202
8
Chemistry
4,5
CHM 110
3-4,6-8
Computer Science A
3,4,5
BIS 101
3
Econ: Macro
3,4,5
ECO 131
3
Econ: Micro
3,4,5
ECO 132
3
Eng Language/Comp
3,4,5
ENG 101
3
Eng Literature/Comp
3,4,5
ENG Literature elective
6
Environmental Science
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
European History
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3,6
French Language
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3,6
French Literature
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3
German Language
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3,6
Govt&Politics:Compare
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3
Govt&Politics: US
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3
Human Geography
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3
Classic Languages
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3,6
Music Theory
3,4,5
ELECTIVE CREDIT
3
Physics B
4,5
PHY 202, 203, 204, 205 8
Psychology
3,4,5
PSY 101
3
Spanish Language
3,4,5
SPN 111
3,6
Spanish Literature
3,4,5
SPN 411 OR SPN 412
3
Statistics
4,5
MTH 242
3
Studio Art (2D,3D,Drawing) 3,4,5
ART ELECTIVE
3
US History
3,4,5
HPS 131, HPS 132
3,6
World History
3,4,5
HPS 160
3
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51
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
If you have a certifiable learning or physical disability and require special accommodations,
please call and make an appointment with the Achievement Center ADA office at 402-3992366 or email [email protected] Considerable lead-time is required for accommodations, so it
is important that your request is received in the Achievement Center ADA office as early in
the semester as possible.
Please note that your request will be handled
confidentially.
The College will make reasonable accommodations for an otherwise qualified disabled
student in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans
with Disabilities Act.
Students are responsible for self-identifying and requesting
accommodations.
Faculty are not required to make disability accommodations unless official documentation in
provided to them by the ADA officer.
Attendance
No person is allowed to attend class unless officially enrolled on a credit or non-credit basis
with the appropriate tuition paid.
Regular attendance at classes is expected of all students. The student is directly responsible
to the instructor for attendance at classes and for work missed through late registration,
illness or any other cause. Each instructor will explain in his/her classes the procedures
he/she wishes to follow in case of absence. This policy is to be included in the course
syllabus and given to each student at the first class meeting. Each instructor is responsible
for enforcing his/her stated attendance policy. In case of unsatisfactory work due to
excessive absence, the instructor, after giving oral or written warning to the student, may
initiate withdrawal action with the concurrence of her/his division chair or dean
(Administrative Withdrawal).
Absence (University-Authorized) for University-Sponsored Activities
In addition to a documented and bona fide medical emergency or the death of an immediate
family member, absences from class are authorized for students who, as individuals or
members of athletic teams or other organized groups, represent the university in universitysponsored activities.
The following groups are included: (1) members of authorized varsity teams (athletic and
otherwise) participating in scheduled intercollegiate competitions (practices and training
sessions are excluded); (2) participants in university-sponsored curricular and co-curricular
activities led by faculty and/or staff; and (3) student engagement sponsored by the
institution and approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs (e.g., research
presentations, and performances at national conferences or events). Though such absence
for university-sponsored activities is authorized by the university, faculty and staff leading
such activities should make every effort to ensure minimal disruption of student class
attendance.
The student is responsible at a minimum for notification to the faculty in the first week of
the semester or as soon as possible, preferably in the first class meeting, of any absences
that will occur as well as notification the week before the absence, including departure
times. A student who anticipates missing class for an excused absence is required to discuss
this issue with the instructor during the first week of class or as soon as possible to
determine the possible solutions or consequences of missed course meetings. Courses in
some programs with special accreditation or licensure requirements should not be taken in a
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semester where a student anticipates a high number of absences. The student will need to
work with her advisor to take classes appropriate for the requirements in the curricular or
co-curricular activities.
If the student provides adequate notification as outlined above, faculty are expected to
honor a valid university excuse for a university-authorized absence and to provide
reasonable make-up work without penalty as specified in their syllabi. Class experiences
that are impossible to make up should be discussed during the first week of classes when
there is sufficient time for a student to drop the course or determine if an alternative
assignment is possible. Academic Programs can determine acceptable parameters for
“reasonable make-up work” for their faculty.
The Vice President for Academic Affairs will make the final decision in the event of questions
or the need for an exception to the above policy.
Audits
Students who audit courses are not held responsible for the work and receive no grade or
credit and may attend once approved tuition has been paid. A course that is audited may
not be changed to a credit course after the late registration period.
Authorship Guidelines
Scholarly Presentations and Publications: When the faculty person has offered substantial
guidance and feedback during the scholarly project process, student(s) are listed as
authors; the faculty person is listed as contributing author or placed sequentially following
the student author(s). This would include course work that has been required for a course.
The faculty should be informed, involved in the editing/proofing and included as second
author.
Use of student work: Permission should be obtained and attribution should be given, if
appropriate,* when faculty use student work in their own professional presentations or
publications.
Credit to other organizations: Credit is limited to College of Saint Mary unless another
organization has provided resources for a portion or all of the work. In that instance, they
may be credited with providing resources. Other organizations such as the place of
employment should not be included in the credits.
Permission from other sources: Permission must be obtained in writing from sources used
such as diagrams or theoretical frameworks prior to publishing.
*If students are identified, written permission from the student(s) must be obtained.
Change of Catalog
A student is allowed to change her program of study to the requirements of another course
catalog.
This change will affect all academic requirements for Major(s), Minor(s),
Supporting Fields and General Education. There can be no retroactive use of the form. The
form is signed by the student, her advisor and the program director.
Change of Program
Once a student is officially accepted by the College and into her chosen major program, the
student is assigned a permanent advisor from the major field. Students usually retain the
July 1, 2013
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same advisor for the rest of their College years but may request a change through the
Registrar’s Office.
A student who wishes to change majors must discuss this change with both the current
academic advisor and the faculty of the program to which the student is changing. If the
decision to change is made, the student must file a Change of Major Form at the Registrar’s
Office.
Classification of Students
Students who meet entrance requirements are classified as first-year students. Upon
satisfactory completion of 30 semester hours of credit, students are classified as
sophomores; upon satisfactory completion of 60 semester hours, students are classified as
juniors; upon satisfactory completion of 90 semester hours, students are classified as
seniors.
A part-time student is considered half-time if she carries between 6 and 11 credits. A
student is classified as less than half time if she carries less than 6 hours. An audit student
is one who takes courses on a non-credit basis.
Competencies
All degree-seeking students at College of Saint Mary must demonstrate basic competencies
in English and mathematics.
Students are placed in the appropriate English and/or math course based upon their
ACT/SAT scores or their transfer credits. In the absence of these scores or appropriate
transfer credits, a placement exam will determine the appropriate level of course as
required by their academic program. A student may request to take the placement exam
in lieu of the ACT/SAT scores.
Conditional Admission/Study and Learning Course
All conditionally admitted students are required to take IDS 097 (Study and Learning)
during their first semester at CSM. This course is repeatable.
Courses at Other Institutions
Degree-seeking students (bachelor and associate degree candidates) attending College of
Saint Mary are required to take all classes at the College. Under special circumstances,
students enrolled in a degree-seeking program, whether full- or part-time, may transfer in
credit hours from another accredited institution while enrolled in a degree program at
College of Saint Mary. The number of credit hours allowed may never exceed nine credit
hours.
Credits from a study abroad program or credits from a concurrent dual degree program with
College of Saint Mary and another institution are not subject to this policy.
The above policy does not affect credits earned prior to a student’s transfer to College of
Saint Mary from another institution, articulation agreements and courses required for the
major not offered at College of Saint Mary. Degree-seeking students must complete a
minimum of 36 hours of the last 45 credit hours at College of Saint Mary.
Students who study abroad may request special consideration from the Vice President for
Academic Affairs if fewer than 36 of their last 45 credits will be taken at CSM due to the
study abroad.
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PRIOR PERMISSION must be obtained from the Division Chair before taking an off-campus
course. The Approval for Course to be Taken at Another College Form (available in the
Express Center) must be filled out with appropriate justification and signatures (student’s
advisor, Registrar, and Division Chair).
Requests for prior approval to take a course at another institution will not be accepted if:
•any of the required signatures are not on the form
•a justification is not stated on the form
•the justification is not adequately sufficient to merit approval in the opinion of the
Division Chair
•the student has already enrolled in or taken the course for which prior approval is
being sought
Students should not enroll in an off-campus course or courses before receiving final
approval. This policy applies to all degree-seeking students at College of Saint Mary,
regardless of their degree program.
Acceptance of transfer credits by College of Saint Mary cannot be guaranteed without this
prior permission.
Credit For Prior Learning
Students may have the opportunity to gain credit for college-level learning obtained outside
the college setting. Learning is considered college-level if it is generally applicable, includes
both a theoretical and a practical understanding of the material and if it meets the following
criteria:
1.
The student can demonstrate that what was learned is equivalent to the
achievement levels expected of college work.
2.
The maximum number of credits to be gained through alternate means is limited
to 10 percent of the completed study program degree requirements.
3.
Credits by alternate means are not considered among the credits to be taken in
residence except portfolio credit.
4.
All requirements for credit granted by alternate means must be completed prior to
the beginning of the final semester before graduation.
5.
After completion of challenge, acceptable grades of “P” (pass), “S” (satisfactory)
or a letter grade of C or above will be recorded on the transcript as transfer credit.
Credit by portfolio will be recorded as College of Saint Mary credit.
Methods by which college-level learning can be demonstrated include challenge
examinations, CLEP examinations, DSST examinations, and credit by portfolio assessment.
Individuals must be enrolled as students at College of Saint Mary to take advantage of these
options.
Credit by Challenge Examination
Students may earn credit without formal enrollment in courses, subject to availability of this
option in specific departments. Courses must be approved by the Division Chairperson and
the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Departments may require laboratory projects, written reports, evidence of satisfactory
skilled performance, etc., in lieu of, or in addition to, examination performance.
Procedure: To apply for credit by examination for a course, a student registered at College
of Saint Mary must obtain an Alternatives for College Credit Form from the Express Center,
obtain written approval from her academic advisor and the Program Director of the program
offering the course, pay the required charge, and obtain the approval of the Vice President
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for Academic Affairs. Upon receipt of an approved request, the chairperson of the
department offering the course will be responsible for the following:
1.
Establishing the procedure and standards for granting course credit by
examinations without enrollment in the course.
2.
Providing for the administration of the examination, usually through the
Achievement Center.
3.
Notifying the Registrar of the appropriate grade when a student has earned course
credit by examination (Alternatives for College Credit Form to be used).
A student may not receive credit by examination for a course that is a prerequisite for a
course already taken or for an equivalent college course already taken. Students should
plan to take credit by examination early in their college careers, preferably during the first
year of matriculation at the College.
Credit by College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
This computer-based program may be used for granting college credits to those who
demonstrate proficiency in specific subjects. The following are guidelines for accepting
credit:
1.
Hours earned by CLEP are granted to enrolled students. Such hours may be
counted toward degrees but count as transfer credit: i.e., they may not be
included in the residency requirements for graduation.
2.
No credit will be granted for the CLEP General Examinations except the English
Composition with essay. This exam will be accepted in lieu of ENG 101.
Traditional and transfer students will be required to take ENG 103, Research
Writing, for one semester hour. The primary use of the remaining tests will be
placement, guiding a student into a particular field and assessing the student’s
general background in these areas.
3.
College of Saint Mary accepts the ACE recommended score to award elective
credit for CLEP tests, however it is at the discretion of each department to
determine the score required to meet a program requirement or additional
requirements such as essay parts of tests or laboratory experiences. Students
fulfilling additional requirements will be subject to regular charges. Regular tuition
will be charged for a one-hour lab requirement.
4.
The College will use the CLEP recommendation for the number of credit hours
accepted, except where additional requirements are made (see 3 above).
No grades or quality points will be assigned to CLEP credits.
5.
A student may not receive credit through CLEP for a course that is a prerequisite
for a course already taken or for an equivalent college course already taken.
Credit through Portfolio Development and Assessment
Portfolio Credit must be requested before the end of the first week of classes each
semester. The Request for Portfolio Credit form is available in the Express Center or
myCSM.
Steps for developing a portfolio are as follows:
1.
The student reviews her prior learning and notes which experiences are
comparable to college level learning. This might encompass such experiences as
employment, education (non-credit courses or seminars), volunteer work,
recreation and hobbies, civic and political activities, publications travel, awards,
organizational involvement, music or theater work, or languages. In documenting
these activities or experiences, the student must demonstrate what knowledge or
competencies were attained from these learning opportunities and these must be
July 1, 2013
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2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
comparable to college level learning. The specific competencies gained must be
fully documented.
The student meets with the advisor and the Portfolio Program Coordinator to
review. The student may be referred to other faculty members in the specific
areas where learning has occurred to give the student an opinion on whether
there is potential college credit involved.
If the advisor believes the experiences appear to have involved college learning,
the advisor completes a Request for Portfolio Credit form including whether the
student will get a letter grade or prefers the Pass/Fail option (only used for
elective credit), obtains required signatures, and forwards it to the Portfolio
Program Coordinator.
The Portfolio Program Coordinator reviews the request and, if approved, assigns a
faculty reviewer.
All portfolios will be bound in a manner described by the Portfolio Program
Coordinator and consistent with the academic discipline for which the portfolio is
prepared. The portfolio may be a written paper, or other substantive project or
product that demonstrates college-level learning as assessed by a faculty review
and consistent with the rigor appropriate to that discipline. Any form of portfolio
should demonstrate academic excellence with respect to its development,
presentation, and delivery.
A portfolio will generally consist of the following minimum requirements:
a.
A title page which shall list the course(s) being petitioned together with the
name, address, and telephone numbers (work and home) of the student;
b.
A Table of contents;
c.
Resume;
d.
Statement of learning goals;
e.
Degree plan or program(s) of study;
f.
Portfolio proposal;
g.
Divider for each course petitioned. Each section to include:
i.
Petition for credit;
ii.
Expanded course description;
iii.
Essay describing competencies and skills achieved;
iv. Supporting documentation (In the event of projects or products that
cannot be reduced to writing in an 8 ½ x 11 inch format, photographs,
drawings, source codes, or other evidence may be submitted at the
discretion and direction of the faculty reviewer to fulfill this
requirement.)
v.
Reviewer’s evaluation and grading.
The portfolio is presented by the student to the Portfolio Program Coordinator who
ensures that all required components are included in the portfolio.
The Portfolio Program Coordinator forwards the portfolio to the faculty reviewer.
After grading the portfolio, the faculty reviewer will notify the Portfolio Program
Coordinator that grading is complete. The final grade will be entered by the
faculty reviewer assigned to the portfolio during final grade entry for the semester
in which the portfolio is completed.
The portfolio will be kept on file with the documentation for 30 days after the grade has
been posted. When credit is accepted, a letter or pass/fail grade will be given as stipulated
in the course petition.
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Restrictions:
Students may not receive credit through Portfolio Development and Assessment for:
1.
A course that is a prerequisite for a course already taken
2.
An equivalent college course already taken
3.
Certain restricted courses (please see the program coordinator for restricted
courses)
Students must be degree seeking or seeking certification or recertification and be currently
enrolled at College of Saint Mary to seek portfolio credit.
A time limit of one traditional semester for completion is allowed. The college policy for
incomplete grades may be applied if requested.
Students have the opportunity to develop portfolios throughout their academic careers at
College of Saint Mary, but may not exceed 10% of the total credit hours required for their
degree.
Note: Credits obtained by these alternative methods, excluding some DSST
examinations, are accepted at College of Saint Mary. Official documentation must be
provided in order to obtain these credits. Policies at other educational institutions may
vary.
Credit established through Prior Learning and Portfolio Program Development and
Assessment is accomplished through College of Saint Mary initiated outcomes and evaluated
by College of Saint Mary faculty, and therefore, will record those credits as being earned
from College of Saint Mary.
Developmental Courses (Courses numbered below 100 level)
Any courses numbered below 100 level will receive college credit, but such credit will not be
counted toward the academic hours required for degree completion.
Examinations
Course examinations are given at the close of each semester. An equivalent evaluative
instrument may be used in place of a written examination. A final examination or equivalent
instrument is required. Students must be at the scheduled final examination unless excused
by the instructor of record. The final examination schedule is located on the Registrar’s
Office web page. http://www.csm.edu/Campus_Services/Registrars_Office/
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
College of Saint Mary is in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA). Any student at College of Saint Mary may personally inspect, review, and at the
student’s expense, have a copy made of any records (except another school’s transcript)
kept regarding her college career. Where more than one student is involved in a record, the
student may have the information concerning only her transmitted orally.
Listed below are the records presently kept by the College. A student wishing to examine
any record should make a request of the appropriate administrator. Requests have to be in
writing. The record will be made available within 45 days.
Student Record
Administrator
Academic record
Registrar
Department record
Advisor or Program Director*
Financial record
Bursar**
Health record
Alegent Occupational Health
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Financial Aid record
Financial Aid Director**
Graduation requirements checklist
Academic Advisor
* Where a student has declared a major, the student should file a request with the
Program Director; otherwise, with the advisor.
** Students may not examine any item revealing financial information about their parents.
The Registrar's academic file for a student contains the latest transcript, academic action
letters, test results, credit by exam, change of grade/major/curriculum, academic plan,
name change, transfer credit evaluation, any documentation related to FERPA hearings, and
any relevant correspondence. These records are scanned and stored permanently off site.
The information in the advisor file is usually a duplicate of this file or personal
correspondence and does not need to be retained after the student graduates or leaves.
Directory information is information not generally considered harmful or an invasion of
privacy if disclosed. This information includes, but it is not limited to: name, address,
telephone listing, field of study, weight & height of athletes, most recent previous school
attended, date and place of birth, participation in officially recognized activities and sports,
and dates of attendance, degrees, academic awards and honors. Directory information may
be disclosed without prior written consent unless the student has notified the College not to
release this information. Written notice must be made to the Registrar’s Office within 10
days following the beginning of each semester. Any student choosing to have this
information withheld should note that her name will not be released for Dean’s List or other
honors, nor will it be included in the commencement program.
In order to protect the right to privacy, the College will not make any records not
designated as directory information available, without the student’s written consent, to
anyone other than College of Saint Mary officials with a legitimate educational interest,
officials of other schools to which the student has applied, certain governmental officials,
parents who establish student’s dependency status, and certain persons in connection with
an application for financial aid.
As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education's FERPA regulations expand the
circumstances under which your education records and personally identifiable information
(PII) contained in such records — including your Social Security Number, grades, or other
private information — may be accessed without your consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller
General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local
education authorities ("Federal and State Authorities") may allow access to your records and
PII without your consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to
evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any
program that is "principally engaged in the provision of education," such as early childhood
education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education
agency or institution. Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to your
education records and PII without your consent to researchers performing certain types of
studies, in certain cases even when we object to or do not request such research. Federal
and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from
the entities that they authorize to receive your PII, but the Authorities need not maintain
direct control over such entities. In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data
Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without
your consent PII from your education records, and they may track your participation in
education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about you
that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development,
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unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant
student records systems.
If a student concludes that her record contains inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise
inappropriate data, the student may request an informal meeting with the appropriate
administrator to see if, through discussion, a satisfactory agreement can be reached
concerning correction, explanation, or deletion of material.
If a satisfactory agreement cannot be reached informally, the student may file with the Vice
President for Academic Affairs a written request for a hearing before the Academic Appeals
Board of the College. Any member of the board having a direct interest in the case may not
participate. The board’s decision will be rendered in writing within a reasonable period of
time and is final.
The student has a right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education
concerning alleged failures by College of Saint Mary to comply with the requirements of
FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Ave SW
Washington, DC 20202-8520
Students may request a copy of any such records (except transcripts) in College of Saint
Mary’s possession at a cost of 10 cents per page. Anything in a student’s record that the
student does not understand will be explained. The records are reviewed and materials
expunged periodically.
Grade Point Average
The grade point average (GPA) of a student is computed by dividing the total number of
quality points by the GPA credits. Grades for transfer hours are not included in the College
of Saint Mary GPA.
Grade Reports
Midterm and final grade reports are available on-line through Self Service (myCSM.edu).
Grades are entered per the published deadline in the academic calendar (located on
myCSM). Courses which end before the semester end date will be entered within two
weeks of the end of the course. Because of the provisions of the Students’ Right to Privacy
Act, no grade information can be given over the telephone.
Grading System
A student’s final grade in each subject is based on class work and participation, tests and/or
other requirements completed during the course and the final examination. Class
attendance is also considered if it states so in the instructor's syllabus. The quality of a
student’s work, expressed in terms of letters and points, is reported as follows:
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GRADE
A or A+
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
AF
AU
W
AW
FW
DESCRIPTION
Superior intellectual initiative and
achievement
Above Average Attainment
Above Average Attainment
Above Average Attainment
Above Average Attainment
Average (satisfactory work)
Average (satisfactory work)
Low Average (Inferior but passing*)
Inferior but passing*
Inferior but passing*
Inferior but passing*
Failure
Failure—excessive absences
Audited course (no credit)**
Official Withdrawal (no credit)**
Administrative Withdrawal (no credit)**
Administrative Withdrawal (no credit)
QUALITY
POINT
(PER SEM. HR.)
4
3.67
3.33
3
2.67
2.33
2
1.67
1.33
1
.67
0
0
0
0
0
0
I
Incomplete**
0
IR
Incomplete Research Project in progress**
0
P
Pass-Fail Option: pass (credit)**
0
NP
Pass-Fail Option: no pass (no credit)**
0
NC
No Credit**
0
SA
Satisfactory: Clinical (credit)***
0
UN
Unsatisfactory: Clinical (no credit)***
0
* Grades of C- and D are not considered passing in many majors and programs. See your
academic advisor for specific information.
** Not included in calculating GPA.
*** Used to record grades in clinical labs and field experiences. It is not an individual
grading option as is P/NP but applies to all students in the course. Credit earned with SA
(satisfactory) may be counted toward graduation but is not included in GPA. However,
UN (unsatisfactory) functions as a failure in the GPA.
Honors and Awards
Dean’s List: A student who successfully completes at least 12 semester hours and earns a
grade point average of 3.5 or above in any one semester is named to the Dean’s List.
Honor Roll for Part Time Students: A student who successfully completes 6 to 11 credit
hours and earns a 3.5 GPA in any one semester is named to the Honor Roll for Part Time
Students.
Honors at Graduation: Graduation with honors is based on the student’s GPA for College
of Saint Mary courses only. To be eligible for honors, the student must complete at least 65
semester hours of College of Saint Mary courses at the bachelor’s degree level or 37
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semester hours at the associate’s degree level. To graduate with honors, a student must
meet the following standards:
Summa Cum Laude (B.A., B.S., B.G.S., B.B.M.L., B.R.S) . 3.9 GPA
With Highest Honors (A.A. or A.S.) ............................ …..3.9 GPA
Magna Cum Laude (B.A., B.S., B.G.S., B.B.M.L., B.R.S) ... 3.7 GPA
With High Honors (A.A. or A.S.) .................................... 3.7 GPA
Cum Laude (B.A., B.S., B.G.S., B.B.M.L., B.R.S.) ............ 3.5 GPA
With Honors (A.A. or A.S.) ........................................... 3.5 GPA
(These GPAs for honors are effective July 1, 2008 for all students with a matriculation term
and year of Fall 2008 or later.)
Honors Night Convocation: Each year at the annual Honors Night Convocation, public
recognition is given to students who have excelled in academic leadership activities.
Students recognized for the following awards are selected through a process which involves
faculty and staff nominations of students meeting eligibility requirements, completion of
biographical information by nominated students, and final selection by an Honors
Committee comprised of faculty and staff.
Undergraduate Achievement Award: The Saint Catherine Medal is given by Kappa
Gamma Pi to a full time student, who in her first two or three years of college, has
maintained an outstanding record of academic achievement and has also exemplified high
standards of character and leadership.
Spirit of Saint Mary Award: Recognizes one graduating student for her outstanding
contributions to the quality of campus life at College of Saint Mary through her leadership,
academic achievement, and service to the community.
Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges: Students are admitted annually on
the basis of scholarship, leadership and service. Nominations are presented to the Honors
Committee for final selection.
Sigma Phi Sigma: This National Mercy Honor Society honors students distinguished for
scholarship, fidelity and service as exemplified in the educational ideals of Catherine
McAuley, founder of the Sisters of Mercy.
Kappa Gamma Pi: The National Catholic College Graduate Honor Society emphasizes
scholarship and campus leadership before graduation and encourages active participation in
all phases of adult life after graduation. Selection of candidates must be made among
students graduating with honors who are in the upper 10 percent of their class.
“Walk Tall” Honors Program
Students may participate in the “Walk Tall” Honors Program by completing an application
available in the Express Center. Students enrolled in the program take a zero credit course,
HNR 101, in which they will participate in a monthly activity and reflection to challenge and
educate them intellectually, socially, ideologically, and/or philosophically. This includes a
variety of experiences, including special speakers, activities, tours, book and topic
discussions, forums, etc. Students must participate in four of the five Walk Tall activities,
one of which must be the Honor’s Breakfast, each semester. Students who have completed
four semesters in the program will graduate from the “Walk Tall” program and will be
identified at graduation with a medallion and a note on their transcript indicating they are
an honors scholar.
Student Eligibility Criteria: In order to enroll in the program, students must meet the
following criteria: First Year Students: ACT>24, SAT>1100, High School GPA > 3.75 OR in
the top 10% of their class.
Continuing and transfer students: college cumulative GPA > 3.5 (on more than 12 credit
hours)
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All students need to maintain a cumulative GPA >3.5 to continue enrollment in the program.
Incompletes
A grade of Incomplete may be used in circumstances when, for serious and unforeseen
reasons beyond the student’s control, she is unable to complete the work of the course. A
student needing an extension of time beyond the semester will file with the instructor a
written application for a grade of “I” (Incomplete) giving reasons for the request. The form
is available in the Express Center. The student must have achieved a passing grade at the
time of application and must have completed the majority of assigned work for the course.
The student must apply two weeks before the end of the semester. If extenuating
circumstances prevent applying within two weeks, document on the application and
consideration will be given to waive the two-week deadline. Some courses do not allow for
the grade of Incomplete.
If the instructor grants permission, the instructor and student meet to determine:
1. The means to be used to complete the work.
2. The time limit set for completion, not to exceed six weeks from the time the course
concludes. Copies of the completed application will be filed with the Registrar’s Office,
instructor, student advisor and the student.
If a further extension of time is needed, the student will file, before the deadline, a written
application for extension with the instructor, who will in turn seek the permission of the Vice
President for Academic Affairs. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will notify the
Registrar’s Office of the extension of time, if granted. All Incomplete grades must be
removed by the end of the semester following the term in which the Incomplete was
received.
If the Incomplete is not removed within the specified time, the Incomplete becomes a failing
grade of “F”.
The Incomplete Research (IR) grade is used for research-in-progress, which may not be
complete within one semester. Incomplete Research (IR) grades must be removed by the
end of the first semester after a student finishes her program of study or the grade
becomes an “F”.
Insurance for National and International Travel
All CSM students are required to have health insurance for CSM sponsored domestic and
international travel. It is possible to purchase affordable health insurance for short periods
of international and national travel. This will be required of uninsured students who desire to
participate in international travel and for those students whose domestic health insurance
policy does not cover international travel. For national travel, students will provide proof of
health insurance that covers them while traveling and would indicate that they possess
health insurance, or (if they do not possess insurance) will indicate that they are responsible
for their health care costs (if any) incurred during the trip.
Short-term international and national medical insurance coverage can be obtained through
the following websites:
(for coverage outside of the United States)
http://www.globalunderwriters.com
http://www.culturalinsurance.com/
http://www.hthtravelinsurance.com/students_plans.cfm
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(for coverage within the United States)
www.temporaryinsurance.com
http://www.medhealthinsurance.com/temporary.htm
International Baccalaureate (IB)
http://www.ibo.org IB is an international program for students through the high school
level which develops their intellectual, personal, and social skills. The program exposes
students to languages, social studies, experimental sciences, mathematics and fine arts.
Students may study at the standard level (SL) or higher level (HL). They take an
examination at the end of the program and are awarded scores from 1 to 7 (7 being the
highest).
CSM will grant up to 28 semester credits to students who successfully complete the program
and meet the required test score indicated in the table below. Listed are the exams for
which CSM will award credit.
IB SUBJECT
EXAM
REQUIRED
TEST SCORE
COURSE
AWARDED
Biology
HL 5, 6 or 7
BIO Elective
Chemistry
HL 4, 5, 6 or 7
CHM 100/101
CREDIT
EARNED NOTES
General Education Science –
3
no credit for Biology majors
General Education Science or
Math – no credit for
4
Chemistry majors
English
HL 5, 6 or 7
ENG 101
3
General Education English
English
HL 5, 6 or 7
ENG Elective
3
General Education English
Foreign Language
HL 5, 6 or 7
Elective Credit
3
Elective
History
HL 5, 6 or 7
HPS 110
3
Math
SL, 5, 6 or 7
MTH Elective
3
Philosophy
HL 5, 6 or 7
PHL 206
3
Sociology
HL 5, 6 or 7
SOC 101
3
General Education History
General Education Science or
Math, or Elective
General Education
Philosophy
General Education Social
Science
Leave of Absence (LOA)
This program is a planned interruption in a student’s formal educational program. It is
designed for full-time or part-time students in good academic standing. Students are not
required to register or maintain active status while on a leave of absence. The leave does
not apply toward degree time limits. If approved, a student may go on leave for a minimum
of one complete semester, and no more than two semesters or one calendar year. Leaves
will not be granted retroactively. Permission for a leave of absence requires the approval of
the advisor, the Division Chair and the Vice President for Academic Affairs although the final
decision for approving a LOA lies with the major or program in which the student is enrolled
at the time of the application. Students should check with their major advisor or the
Program Director BEFORE applying for the LOA to ascertain if their program allows students
to apply for a LOA. If courses are to be taken at another institution during the leave of
absence, the student must consult the Vice President for Academic Affairs to secure
permission for transient study, and provide the Registrar's office with transcripts upon her
return.
Students who take a leave of absence will be subject to the guidelines and
requirements of the academic catalog under the year in which they were first admitted to
the college.
July 1, 2013
64
To qualify, a student must satisfy the following criteria:
• Be registered during the Fall/Spring semester immediately prior to the beginning of the
leave;
• Have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0—both at the time of application for leave and
following the posting of grades for the semester immediately preceding the term of the
requested leave of absence;
• Have her College of Saint Mary account paid in full, both at the time of leave application
and following the posting of grades for the semester immediately preceding the term of
the requested leave of absence;
• Apply for LOA at any time, but no later than two weeks after the beginning of the next
regular term; and
• Have no pending disciplinary action.
The complete guidelines and forms are available from the Express Center or on-line at:
http://www.csm.edu/Campus_Services/Registrars_Office/Forms/
Mid-Semester Evaluations
Evaluations of students are made at mid-semester. Grade reports are available on-line
through Self Service on the CSM web page, www.csm.edu. Each student doing low-passing
or failing work in any course is expected to meet with her academic advisor.
Pass-Fail Courses
Students have the opportunity to elect some courses on a pass-fail basis. Often students
desire an elective course in a field unrelated to their own, but hesitate to enroll in the
course because they do not wish to compete with students majoring in the area covered by
the course.
In order to encourage such students, pass-fail courses may be chosen according to the
following stipulations:
1. Students are allowed to take a maximum of four courses for which they may
receive a grade of pass or fail.
2. Only one pass-fail course may be taken per semester.
3. Pass-fail courses may only be elective courses. They may not be courses in the
General Education Core, in the student’s major, minor or supporting fields.
4. Students should submit a letter to the Registrar's Office with the following
information: the course to be taken, request that grade should be entered as passfail, advisor's signature and instructor name. The Registrar will verify that the
course meets the criteria above and will forward a copy of the letter to the
instructor.
5. After registering for a course on the pass-fail basis, students may not change to
taking the course for a grade (or vice versa), no matter how well they do in the
course when they are taking it. Students do, however, have the regular one week
after registration to make changes.
6. Pass-fail courses will be counted toward the credits required for graduation, but
they will not be considered in computing the GPA.
Policy for Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty is a serious offense. It is a form of theft and will be treated as such.
In keeping with its mission, College of Saint Mary seeks to prepare its students to be
knowledgeable, forthright and honest. It expects academic honesty from all its members.
Academic honesty includes adherence to guidelines established by the instructor in a given
course and prohibits, among other things, plagiarism, cheating, tampering with the work of
other students or knowingly furnishing false information.
July 1, 2013
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Plagiarism is the representation of another person’s words or ideas as if they were one’s
own. Examples of plagiarism include submitting a paper in one’s own name that was
written by someone else, including in a paper sentences or ideas taken from a source
without giving credit to that source. Cheating is giving or receiving information or using
materials in exams, assignments, and project which it is not allowed. Examples of cheating
include copying from another person during an exam, and submitting a laboratory or
practicum report based on data not obtained by the student in the manner indicated by the
instructor. Collusion is working together with another person in the preparation of work
that the instructor expects to be accomplished by the student alone.
The following procedure will be followed upon discovery of academic dishonesty:
1) Penalties for academic dishonesty will be imposed by the instructor and may include a
grade of “F” on the work in question or for the entire course.
2) The instructor will fill out the Academic Dishonesty form and send a copy to the student
and to the student’s advisor and the Registrar for inclusion in the student’s file.
3) Upon receipt of one or more Academic Dishonesty forms for the same student, the
Registrar shall report the violation(s) to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Vice
President for Academic Affairs may expel a student for repeated instances of academic
dishonesty or upon the recommendation of the student’s program director.
A student penalized for academic dishonesty has the right to appeal a judgment the student
believes to be in error. In making this appeal, the student should follow the steps outlined
in the Academic Appeals Board procedure. A copy of this procedure may be obtained from
the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Policy for Repeating Courses
A student may remove a C, D or F grade from the GPA by repeating the course. The course
to be repeated must be repeated at College of Saint Mary. The credit and GPA for the
highest grade earned will be used to recalculate the cumulative GPA. Semester hours and
GPA from the lowest grade earned will be removed from the cumulative average. The
original course entry will remain on the permanent record.
Registration
All currently enrolled students and new students register via on-line registration. All degreeseeking students must meet with their advisors to discuss their registrations. The advisor
then authorizes the student to register on-line. Students who have a second major, minor,
or secondary education minor, should meet with that advisor first, have the advisor sign a
Registration Authorization form, and then take that form to their primary advisor for
authorization. The student may register and make any changes to her registration via
PowerCampus Self Service located in myCSM (https://selfservice.csm.edu/Home.aspx).
Students are solely responsible for any changes made in their schedule of classes without
prior approval of their advisors. Registration for the fall semester takes place in early spring
and, for the spring and summer semesters, in late fall. Registration for classes incurs a
financial obligation and enrollment is finalized when the student makes semester financial
arrangements for payment of tuition either online or in the Express Center. Students are
expected to complete registration prior to the first day of classes, as indicated by the
directives from the Registrar’s office.
Late registration, for valid reasons, is permitted. The last date for late registration for day
and evening classes is one week after the first day of class. Late registration for classes held
in summer or weekend formats is only permitted if the student has attended the first class
meeting.
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Senior Capstone
Each baccalaureate degree program requires of its majors a final overview. This may take
the form of a written or oral comprehensive examination, research project, recital, exhibit or
other approved project.
Student Directory
The College will make available an online Student Directory in myCSM listing each student’s
name, home address, home telephone number, local address, local telephone number, and
a CSM E-mail address. Any student who does not wish to have information published about
her should provide a written request to the Registrar’s Office. A notification form is available
in the Express Center. The Registrar will then omit her listing from the Student Directory.
This information is for College of Saint Mary community use only, not to be released to
another person or organization.
Transcripts
A student wanting a transcript of credits must submit a written request to the Registrar’s
Office. Transcript request forms are available in the Express Center. No transcript is
released until all accounts are settled with the Bursar, including any delinquency on
outstanding loans or library fines. The College does not release copies of transcripts (high
school or college) or other documents received from other institutions.
Requests can also be made on-line through the Department of Education Student
Clearinghouse using a credit card.
(http://www.csm.edu/Campus_Services/Registrars_Office/Transcript_Request/)
Undeclared Majors
Students must declare a major no later than the end of their fourth semester at CSM. In
order to declare a major, a student must meet the admission requirements of the major,
meet with the Program director of the major, complete a change of Major/Minor/Advisor
form with the required signatures, and submit it to the Registrar’s Office.
Waiver of Liability for Off-Campus Studies and Activities
A student of College of Saint Mary who enrolls in any internship or other off-campus studies
or activities voluntarily waives any claim against the school authorities for any injury
suffered in connection with travel to and from and/or while at work or study involved in
such off-campus studies and activities. The student must look solely to the owners and/or
off-campus study/activity hosts and/or its insurance carrier for compensation. The student
is responsible for providing her own insurance for any injuries that may be suffered while
engaging in off-campus studies and activities.
Withdrawal from Course
Students, with the approval of their advisors, may withdraw from a full-semester course
with a grade of W up to the end of the 12th week of the semester. The deadline for
withdrawing with a grade of W from a non-traditional course (not full semester face to face
course) is the point when 80% of the course is complete. See examples below:
Course Length
15 weeks
12 weeks
10 weeks
8 weeks
6 weeks
3 weeks
July 1, 2013
Withdrawal Deadline
End of 12th week
End of 10th week
End of 8th week
End of 6th week
End of 5th week
End of 2nd week
67
The deadline for withdrawing from a one-credit seminar is 5:00 p.m. the day before the
course begins.
After the withdrawal date, a student can no longer withdraw from a class and will receive
the grade earned. Students who withdraw from a course receive no credit hours and the
hours attempted are not computed into the grade point average. Filing a course withdrawal
form with the Registrar’s Office completes the process.
Failure to follow stipulated
procedures may result in a failing grade.
Withdrawal from Academic Term/University
A student officially withdrawing from all classes during an academic term should follow this
process:
1) Obtain a withdrawal slip from the Express Center.
2) Go to Achievement Center to perform an exit interview.
3) Go to her academic advisor who must sign the withdrawal slip.
4) Go to Financial Aid to discuss any repercussions with loans or other financial aid.
5) Go to Student Billing to discuss any financial repercussions.
6) Go to Residence hall (if applicable) to check out of residence hall.
7) Go to the Campus Information Center (return ID card).
Refunds are determined by the date of the official withdrawal. A withdrawal is considered
official when the written notice, after being signed by the designated personnel, is returned
to the Registrar’s Office. A registration hold is temporarily placed on the student account.
The student will need to meet with her academic advisor before registering for the next
semester.
A student can be administratively withdrawn according to the following process. The
administrative withdrawal grade of “AW” is used to withdraw a student from one or more
courses or all courses when the student is unable to initiate the withdrawal herself due to
extraordinary circumstances such as serious illness, accident, etc. This withdrawal could be
done up until the last business day of the semester. An “AW” will not affect the GPA.
Steps: 1) Faculty and/or administrative staff will gather the documentation to support the
withdrawal. 2) Provide documentation to the Registrar who will initiate the withdrawal
form. 3) The Registrar will give the form and documentation to the VPAA who will
authorize the withdrawal.
The administrative withdrawal grade of “FW” is used to withdraw a student who has
stopped attending one or more courses or all courses. The student will be contacted
to encourage her to initiate a withdrawal before this process is initiated. This grade can
only be used up until the last day to withdraw. It will count as an F in the GPA calculation.
Steps: 1) Faculty and/or administrative staff will gather documentation to support the
withdrawal. 2) Provide documentation to the Registrar who will initiate the withdrawal
form. 3) The Registrar will give form and documentation to the VPAA who will authorize the
withdrawal.
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Degree Requirements
Candidates for Degrees
In order to graduate, a student must satisfy the degree requirements listed in the catalog
at the time the student began matriculation at College of Saint Mary if the student has
maintained continuous registration. The student should meet with their academic advisor
and verify satisfactory completion of degree requirements for bachelor and associate
degrees as outlined in the Academic Catalog. If the student has had more than a one-year
interruption in attendance at College of Saint Mary, then she will fulfill the requirements in
effect at the time of her re-admittance to the College. Although the academic advisor
will assist the student with planning, final responsibility for meeting degree
requirements lies with the student.
File an application for degree no later than April 1 for December graduation or September 1
for May or July graduation. The same date holds for students applying for certificates.
Forms are available in the Express Center.
All financial, library, and other college accounts must be settled before the diploma or
transcript is released.
In order to participate in the May graduation ceremony, a student must be an anticipated
May or July graduate (or a previous December graduate). A May graduate must have all
graduation requirements met by the end of the Spring Semester. A July graduate may have
no more than 10 hours of credits remaining to be completed by September 1. To
participate in the December ceremony, all graduation requirements must be met by the end
of the Fall Semester. A student who will be a May graduate may participate in December
commencement if three or fewer credits remain to be finished in the Spring semester.
Graduates must complete all degree requirements by September 1 following the date of
graduation. If degree requirements have not been met, the student will re-apply for the
next available graduation date by completing another Application for Degree.
Bachelor Degrees
College of Saint Mary grants the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor
of General Studies, Bachelor in Business Leadership and Management and Bachelor in
Rehabilitation Studies.
The Bachelor of Arts degree is granted in the following majors:
Applied Psychology & Human Services (APHS)
Art* (ART)
English* (ENG) (See Course of Study for minor and double major options.)
Humanities (HUM)
Language Arts* (LGA) (only for Secondary Education Certification)
Paralegal Studies (PLG)
Psychology (PSY)
Social Science* (SSC) (only for Secondary Education Certification)
Spanish*(SPN) (only for Secondary Ed Certification)
Theology* (THL)
The Bachelor of Science degree is granted in the following majors:
Biology* (BIO)
Human Biology (BIOHUM)
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication (BAC)
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Chemistry* (CHM)
Early Childhood Education (ECE) (See Course of Study for minors/endorsements)
Elementary Education (ELD) (See Course of Study for minors/endorsements
Mathematics* (MTH)
Medical Technology (MDT)
Science* (NSC) (only for Secondary Education Certification)
Nursing (BSN)
*Required courses for secondary teacher certification or K-12 in the State of Nebraska may
be taken in these areas.
Minors may be pursued in the following areas:
Art (ART)
Human Services (HSV)
Biology (BIO)
Mathematics (MTH)
Business: Analytics and Strategic
Music (MUS)
Communication (BAC)
Business Information Systems (BIS)
Paralegal Studies (Nurs majors only)(PLG)
Chemistry (CHM)
Philosophy (PHL)
Communication (COM)
Physical Education (PED)
Early Childhood Education (ECE)
Psychology (PSY)
English (ENG)
Secondary Education (SED)
Fine Arts (FNA)
Sociology (SOC)
Forensic Science (FOS)
Spanish (SPN)
Gallery Management (GMT)
Special Education (SPE)
General Science (SCI)
Theology (THL)
History (HIS)
Women's Studies (WST)
Interdisciplinary Leadership (LDR)
At least one half of the courses required for a minor must be taken at College of
Saint Mary.
A supporting field in one of the following areas may be chosen in place of a
minor:
Social Science: sociology, history, political science, psychology, economics
Behavioral Science: sociology, human services, psychology
Business Management: accounting, business, business information systems,
economics
Fine Arts: art*, theatre, creative writing**, music***
Humanities: art*, foreign language, literature, history, music***, philosophy, theology,
communication, drama/performance
Natural Science and Mathematics: biology, chemistry, physical science, science,
mathematics
Natural Sciences: chemistry, biology, physical science, science
* Any ART course except ART 372, 374 and 495.
** Any writing course beyond ENG 101
***Music: 3 hours must be in applied music or chorus (MUS 247); 3 to 6 hours must be in
other music classes.
A supporting field of at least 18 hours is a planned combination of courses from a broad
academic spectrum, which lends support to the major. A student choosing a supporting field
in place of a minor must do so by the first semester of her junior year. The chair of the
division from which the supporting field is chosen must approve the supporting field.
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70
The planned combination of courses must include 18 hours, of which at least 12 hours are
beyond Core requirements. Courses must be taken in at least two subject areas within the
general category and outside the major. Two options are available to students in fulfilling
the requirement:
1. A minimum of 9 hours may be taken in one subject area.
2. A minimum of 6 hours each may be taken in two subject areas.
Double Major
A student may complete a bachelor degree with a double major, in which case the second
major replaces the minor or supporting field requirement. (Only one diploma is awarded;
double major is recorded on the transcript.) In order to complete a double major:
1. The student must fulfill all departmental requirements for both majors along with
core requirements.
2. The request for a double major must be recorded by the Registrar.
3. The student must obtain the signature of her advisor in each program.
4. The student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in each major program.
If both majors require cross-listed courses, no more than six credit hours can
overlap to meet the 30-hour degree requirement.
Bachelor Degree Requirements
1. Total of a minimum of 128 hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher.
2. A major of at least 30 hours with a minimum of C- or better in all courses listed in
the major area. The student must also give an acceptable performance on the
departmental overview, a comprehensive examination or senior project, required in
the major. Individual programs may have higher GPA requirements which are
identified in the courses of study section of this catalog.
3. A minor or supporting field of at least 18 hours. Students completing a double
major are not required to fulfill the minor or supporting field requirement.
4. Completion of the English and mathematics competence requirements.
5. A minimum of 36 of the last 45 hours must be taken at College of Saint Mary. A
minimum of 12 of the hours taken at College of Saint Mary must be taken in the
major as specified by the program director. Students who study abroad may
request special consideration from the Vice President for Academic Affairs if fewer
than 36 of their last 45 credits will be taken at CSM due to the study abroad.
Associate Degrees
College of Saint Mary grants the degrees of Associate of Arts and Associate of Science.
The Associate of Arts degree is granted in the following majors:
General Studies (GNS)
Paralegal Studies (PLG)
The Associate of Science degree is granted in the following majors:
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication (BAC)
Early Childhood Education (ECE)
Nursing (NRA)
Associate Degree Requirements
1. Total of a minimum of 64 hours which may vary according to specific majors.
Consult departmental listings. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required.
2. A major of at least 18 hours with a minimum of C- or better in all courses listed in
the major area. Consult the departmental listings. Individual programs may have
higher GPA requirements which are identified in the courses of study section of this
catalog.
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71
3.
4.
A minimum of 36 of the last 45 hours must be taken at College of Saint Mary. A
minimum of 12 of the hours taken at College of Saint Mary must be taken in the
major as specified by the program director. Students who study abroad may
request special consideration from the Vice President for Academic Affairs if fewer
than 36 of their last 45 credits will be taken at CSM due to the study abroad.
Completion of the English and mathematics competence requirements.
Second Degree
A person who holds a bachelor’s degree from College of Saint Mary or an institution whose
accreditation is comparable to that of College of Saint Mary may obtain an associate’s or
second bachelor’s degree from College of Saint Mary by fulfilling the following requirements:
1. Be admitted into College of Saint Mary and be accepted into a major resulting in a
degree significantly different from the major of the existing degree.
2. Earn at least 30 hours beyond the original degree in residence at College of Saint
Mary. Normally, the 30 hours will be in the new major.
3. Fulfill all requirements for the major including supporting courses. These
requirements may total more than 30 hours. If previous courses satisfy some of the
major requirements, the department will designate other courses to enhance the
major to meet the 30-hour minimum requirement. Certain programs require
completion of supporting field requirements and other specific courses.
4. General Education Requirements: Associate degree: Take three credit hours of
theology and three credit hours of philosophy. Bachelor degree: Take six credit
hours of theology and three credit hours of philosophy. Appropriate transfer credits
may be accepted for this requirement on approval of program director.
Certificate Requirements
See individual program information for certificate requirements. At least half of the credit
hours required for any certificate program must be taken at College of Saint Mary.
When a pre-bachelor certificate seeking student finishes her requirements for a certificate
and continues into an associate or bachelor degree program, she should take the following
actions: Complete a change of major/degree/advisor form with her current advisor; contact
financial aid to have her financial aid package reevaluated; and, take the English and Math
placement tests, if no transfer credit or ACT scores exempt her.
Certificates are offered in the following programs:
Practical Nursing (PNC)
Business Information Systems (BIS)
Paralegal Studies (PLG) (Post-Baccalaureate Certificate)
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72
Academic Programs
The academic structure at College of Saint Mary is divisional in nature. A division is a unit of
related academic disciplines unified by one or more of the following concepts: common
cause, investigative methods or processes, philosophy, and body of knowledge. The
academic divisions are:
Arts and Sciences
Art
Biology
Chemistry
Communication
English
Experiencing the Liberal Arts
Fine Arts
First Year Seminar
General Studies
History and Political Science
Human Services
Interdisciplinary Core
Interdisciplinary Developmental
Studies
Humanities
Language Arts
Mathematics
Medical Technology
Music
Philosophy
Physician Assistant Studies
Physical Science
Psychology
Sociology
Theology
Theatre
World Languages
Health Professions
Nursing
Practical Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Professional Studies
Business: Analytics and Strategic
Communication
Business Information Systems
Business Leadership and
Management
Early Childhood Education
Economics
Elementary and Secondary Education
Paralegal Studies
Physical Education
Special Education
Course Numbering System
Undergraduate courses are numbered from 100 to 499; 100-199 are considered lower
division (primarily introductory and first year); 200-499 are considered upper division.
Courses numbered below 100 are developmental in context and do not meet degree
requirements. Graduate courses are numbered 500-999.
The first digit indicates the level of the course. In general, 100 courses are introductory and
400 courses are more advanced.
The second digit is used as follows: 0 indicates survey or introductory courses; 1-6 differs
with each department; 7 indicates practicum, clinical, field experience, or student teaching;
8 indicates experimental course; 9 indicates seminar, independent study, or research.
The third digit is used at the discretion of the department.
Three letter prefixes are used as follows to designate courses.
ACC
AES
Accounting
Military Science (Air Force ROTC)
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LAW
MDI
Paralegal Studies
Medical Interpreting
73
ART
BIO
BIS
BLM
BUS
COM
CHM
ECE
ECO
EDU
ELA
ENG
FYS
HPS
HUM
IDS
INT
MDI
Art
Biology
Business Information Systems
Business Leadership and Mgmt
Business: Analytics/Strategic Com
Communication
Chemistry
Early Childhood Education
Economics
Education
Experiencing the Liberal Arts
English
First Year Seminar
History
Humanities
Interdisciplinary Dev Studies
Interpreting
Medical Interpreting
MIL
MTH
MUS
NUR
OTH
PAS
PED
PHL
PHY
PNC
PSY
SOC
SPN
SPE
THL
THR
WST
Military Science (Army ROTC)
Mathematics
Music
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Physician Assistant Studies
Physical Education
Philosophy
Physics/Physical Science
Practical Nursing
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Special Education
Theology
Theatre
Women’s Studies
Course Delivery Section Designations
Online – all of the regularly scheduled classroom time is replaced by required activities
completed at a distance and managed online using Angel.
Hybrid – “part” of the regularly scheduled class time is conducted online.
Web-enhanced Courses – courses in which technology is used to enhance communication
but no part of the regular class meeting is replaced by required activities completed at a
distance.
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74
Student Learning Goals
1.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
COMPETENCE AND WISDOM: Students will become professionally competent.
Think creatively, critically, and reflectively, incorporating theory and practice
Communicate effectively in writing, speech, and non-verbal expression
Demonstrate professional demeanor as appropriate
Demonstrate personal accountability
Utilize current technological media in a proficient manner
Demonstrate financial literacy
CONTENT KNOWLEDGE: Students will be well-prepared to contribute to society as
educated citizens.
a. Demonstrate basic mastery in their disciplines
b. Plan and think strategically
c. Conduct primary and/or secondary research
d. Understand the value of the liberal arts
2.
3.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
SPIRITUALITY: Students will enrich their spirituality.
Appreciate religion and spirituality
Develop moral and ethical principles
Cultivate the integration of faith and reason
Understand the Critical Concerns of the Sisters of Mercy
Appreciate beauty and its link with peace.
4.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
WORTH AND DIGNITY: Students will deepen their sense of personal worth and
human dignity.
Appreciate the fundamental dignity of all persons
Engage in thoughtful self-reflection
Exhibit work/life balance
Develop confidence as a woman
Work effectively within groups and teams
5.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
LEADERSHIP: Students will be effective leaders.
Utilize effective leadership styles and approaches
Experience opportunities to exercise leadership
Understand the link between service and leadership
Recognize human interdependence with the earth, its resources, and all of creation
Contribute to the common good
6.
GLOBAL AND CULTURAL COMPETENCE: Students will broaden their personal
and professional perspectives
Acknowledge the sources of personal perspectives and attitudes
Evaluate historical, cultural, environmental, sociological, psychological, and political
influences
Create an inclusive environment that embraces differences
Challenge bias and inequity
Engage in thoughtful/respectful civil discourse
Experience another culture within or beyond the United States
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
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75
Courses of Study
General Education Curriculum
All programs of study at the College of Saint Mary include courses from the General
Education Curriculum. General Education courses must provide students with a background
in the Liberal Arts and with skills essential to academic success and to lifelong learning. The
General Education Curriculum gives students opportunities to experience domains of
learning that augment their programs of study, to cultivate intellectual versatility, and to
develop a moral foundation so that they will act with understanding, integrity, and
compassion in their personal and professional lives.
This experience helps students
integrate and apply knowledge from multiple perspectives and to deepen their
understanding of themselves and the world around them.
General Education Requirements
Courses must be approved for General Education credit by the General Education
Committee, Curriculum Committee and the Vice President for Academic Affairs to meet
these requirements. Some programs of study may require particular courses as part of the
General Education Requirements.
Associate Degree
Communications
Composition
First Year Seminar
GCD Domain Course
Moral Reasoning
Natural Science
Science Lab
Theology
*General Education Electives
Elective
3
3
1
3
3
3
1
3
6
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
hours
hours
hour
hours
hours
hours
hour
hours
hours
Total 26 credits
*Students can choose from General Education approved courses in the following disciplines:
Communication, Economics, ELA/GCD, English, Fine Arts, History, Math, Philosophy,
Psychology, Sociology, Theology, Women's Studies, and/or World Language.
Bachelor Degree
General Education requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree are divided into two levels. Level
1 courses must be completed or initiated in the first three semesters.
Level I: These requirements include:
Communications
Composition
First Year Seminar
Quantitative Reasoning
3
3
1
3
credit
credit
credit
credit
hours
hours
hour
hours
Level II: These requirements include:
July 1, 2013
76
English
Fine Arts
Global and Cultural Diversity
History/Political Science/Geography
Math or Natural Science
Philosophy (PHL 200 required)
Science
Science Lab
Elective
Social
Science
Theology
*General Education Elective
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
1
3
6
3
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
credit
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
hour
hours
hours
hours
Total 47 credits
Courses Approved for General Education
This course list was accurate at the time of printing. Other courses may have been
approved since then.
The Registrar and Academic Advisors have the most current
information.
Communications:
English Composition:
First Year Seminar:
Quantitative Reasoning
English:
Global & Cultural
Diversity
Diversity
Fine Arts:
History:
Science:
COM 101
COM 200
COM 202
COM 212
COM 225
ENG 101
ENG 102
FYS
ENG
GCD/ELA
BUS 410
EDU 375
PSY 350
HPS
SPN
ART
MUS
THR
HPS
BIO
CHM
PHY
Science Lab:
Mathematics or
July 1, 2013
Oral Communication Skills
Speech for Elementary Teachers
Speech for Language Arts Teachers
Speech for Professionals
Advanced Public Speaking
Composition
Advanced Composition
First Year Seminar
MTH 114 (or above), PHL 105 or BIS 140
All ENG courses except
101, 262, 320, 322, 495
All GCD and ELA approved courses
132, 160, 249
111, 112, 211, 212, 351, 352, 412
All ART courses are approved
All MUS courses are approved
All THR courses are approved
approvedapproappapprovedapproved
All HPS
courses are approved
All Biology, Chemistry or Physical
Science
Biology, Chemistry or Phy Sci Lab
Math > 114, 242 or 262, except 312
77
Natural Science:
Social Science
Philosophy:
Theology:
PHL
THL
Biology, Chemistry or Physical Science
ECO 150, any PSY or SOC courses
courcoursescoursesPersonalFinance
All PHL courses are approved
All THL courses are approved
*Students can choose from General Education approved courses in the following disciplines:
Communication, Economics, ELA/GCD, English, Fine Arts, History, Math, Philosophy,
Psychology, Sociology, Theology, Women's Studies, and/or World Language.
July 1, 2013
78
Art (ART)
The art curriculum is designed to give students a variety of experiences in different media,
which will provide them with a broad, knowledgeable background. The role of the art
program is to provide sequential instruction aimed at mastery in the disciplines of
aesthetics, art production, criticism, and art history.
Students in teacher education may earn a major in art. See Education Program for
information on admission, testing, student teaching and certification requirements. These
students are given insights and knowledge to create the methods and procedures for
classroom teaching situations. Students who are interested in art as a profession are given
every opportunity to foster their creative potential. Art is not reserved for the artist; each
student is taught to develop an understanding and appreciation for the creative art works of
others.
All ART courses are approved for fine arts credit for General Education.
Art Minor
18 credits of art courses including one art history course and ART 211, 213, and 215.
Gallery Management Minor
BUS 101 – Introduction to Business, BIS 230 – Introduction to E-Commerce, BUS
323 – Management Concepts, BUS 334 – Principles of Marketing, ART 388 – Gallery
Studies, BUS 497 - Internship
The Gallery Management Minor will help art students prepare for the business of being a
working artist. It will also prepare students to be able to facilitate and operate a working
gallery or work for a museum or an arts organization.
July 1, 2013
79
Bachelor of Arts
- Art -
GENERAL EDUCATION
44
COMP
GRD
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
1
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
3
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
3
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH 114,
3
PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
3
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
3
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
0
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
4
Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
3
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
3
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
6
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
3
3
3
44
36
18
30
128
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
36
ART History
ART History
3
3
ART 211 Color and Design
3
ART 213 Basic Drawing
3
ART 215 Beginning Painting
ART 217 Ceramics
3
3
ART 223 Printmaking
ART 225 Jewelry
3
3
ART 227 Sculpture
3
ART 333 Photography
3
ART 495 Senior Thesis
ART elective
MINOR
3
3
18
Can select any minor or
supporting field.
ELECTIVES
Elective credit or second major.
COMP
GRD
30
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits beyond first
major —must complete all major
courses and supporting courses
specified for second major.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
Student may be required to complete prerequisite courses.
July 1, 2013
80
Bachelor of Arts
- Art and K-12 Education -
GENERAL EDUCATION
38
COMP
GRD
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
1
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
0
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
3
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH 114,
3
PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
3
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity (EDU
0
375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
0
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
4
Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
3
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
3
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
6
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
SUPPORTING COURSE
COM 212 Speech for Prof*
3
3
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
38
54
MINOR
44
SUPPORTING COURSE
TOTAL
3
139
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
54
ART History
ART History
3
3
ART History
3
ART 211 Color and Design
3
ART 213 Basic Drawing
ART 215 Beginning Painting
3
ART 217 Ceramics
3
ART 223 Printmaking
3
ART 225 Jewelry
3
ART 227 Sculpture
3
ART 333 Photography
ART 250 Production Art
3
3
ART 313 Advanced Drawing
ART 315 Advanced Painting
CGR 112 Introduction to Comp.
Graphics
3
3
ART Elective
6
ART 495 Senior Thesis
EDUCATION MINOR K-12
EDU 101 Intro to Education
EDU 201 Tech in Classroom
PSY 203 Adoles. Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych.&
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
EDU 351 TeachReadMid/Sec
EDU 360 Teaching Middle/Sec
School
EDU 372 Integrating Fine Arts
EDU 375 Human Rel. in
Mul/Cult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist/ Phil & Trends/
Ed
EDU 470 Stud Teach: Primary
OR EDU 471
StdTeach:Intermed
EDU 472 Stud Teach:Sec
EDU 495 Stud Teach Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Special Educ.
3
44
3
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
2
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
Student may be required to complete prerequisite courses.
July 1, 2013
81
Biology (BIO)
The student who majors in biology will be prepared to seek employment in medical or
industrial research laboratories, research institutes, hospital laboratories, quality control
organizations, environmental organizations, or various Federal agencies. They will also be
prepared to make application to graduate school, medical, dental, or other professional
schools and with appropriate education courses, the student may teach science courses in
secondary schools.
Students admitted to the college who meet the following prerequisites should be able to
complete a biology degree in 4 years through consultation with an advisor:
1. Completing at least one year of high school biology and at least two years of college
preparatory mathematics with grades of C (2.0) or better.
2. Placement into Math and English courses at collegiate level (not developmental courses)
by examination or transfer of classes.
3. The following criteria are also recommended:
a. High school GPA of at least B (3.0).
b. ACT of at least 22 or combined Verbal & Math scores on the SAT of at least
920.
Students found deficient in these prerequisites will be allowed to enter the program but
need to be aware that it may take them longer than 4 years to correct their deficiencies and
complete the biology degree.
A student will not be permitted to progress in the program without departmental approval if
they have not maintained at least a grade of C- in all major or supporting field courses.
Graduation requirements for students majoring or minoring in biology include successful
completion of all biology course work with a GPA of 2.50 or better in all biology and
supporting field courses. In addition, majors will be required to successfully complete a
senior research project and pass a comprehensive senior examination. Students receiving a
double major will take comprehensive examinations in the field of their choice with
consultation of the departments.
Biology Minor
BIO 110, 111, 250, 251, 266, 267, and 8 hours of biology electives under the
direction of the program director.
Forensic Science Minor
Under the leadership of the Biology department, the Forensic Science program will
provide lecture, fieldwork, and laboratory curriculum to train students for careers in
forensic science. Students minoring in Forensic Science will find this curriculum
valuable in the fields of law, criminal justice, psychology, forensic nursing, medicine,
and many others.
BIO 100/101 or BIO 110/111 and BIO 120/121, BIO 265, BIO 465 and 6 hours of
electives from the following courses: BIO 290, 400, 268/269, PSY 344, or CHM 100
July 1, 2013
82
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
- Biology 37
COMP
GRD
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
1
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in first three semesters
Communications (COM 101,
3
200, 202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition
3
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
0
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
ENG 102 Advanced Comp
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
3
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
3
Theatre)
Science (any Biology,
0
Chemistry or Phy Sci) must
include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
0
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or
any Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective
(any Liberal Arts Course)
SUPPORTING FIELD
CHM 110 General Chemistry
CHM 111 General Chem Lab
CHM 112 General Chemistry
CHM 113 General Chem Lab
CHM 230 Organic Chemistry I
CHM 231 Organic Chem Lab I
CHM 232/233 Organic Chem II
& Lab
PHY 202 College Physics I or
PHY 212 University Physics I
PHY 203 Physics I Lab
PHY 204 College Physics II or
PHY 214 University Physics II
PHY 205 Physics II Lab
MTH 114 College Algebra
MTH 115 College Trigonometry
MTH 242 or higher – Statistics
ELECTIVES
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
BIO 110 General Biology
BIO 111 General Biology Lab
BIO 250 Zoology
BIO 251 Zoology Lab
BIO 266 Botany
BIO 267 Botany Lab
BIO 330 Genetics
BIO 331 Genetics Lab
Capstone Project (4 hours total)
BIO 473 Capstone Project
COMP
GRD
1
3
1
3
1
1
1
BIO 492 Science Comm
2
Any combination (BIO 192, BIO
292, BIO 392, or add’l BIO 473)
MAJOR ELECTIVES:
Choose from:
BIO 310 Adv. A&P I
3
6
3
3
41
3
1
3
21
4
1
BIO 311 Adv. A&P I Lab
BIO 312 Adv. A&P II
BIO 313 Adv. A&P II Lab
4
1
4
BIO 265 Forensic Science*
3
37 or 39
4
1
4
1
4
1
5
3
4
1
3
4
1
3
3
3
11 - 12
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
268
269
300
301
340
Environmental Biology
Environmental Biol Lab
General Microbiology
General Micro Lab
Biochemistry*
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
341
345
364
366
Biochemistry Lab*
Field Biology
Immunology
Pathophysiology
BIO 390 Molecular Biology
BIO 400 Intro to Toxicology
BIO 465 Advanced Forensic
Science*
CHM 220/221 Analy Chem&Lab*
BIO 460 Gross Anatomy
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING FIELD
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
* - only one of these courses may be counted towards the biology major AND any
3
1
3
1
4
1
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
5
37
41
37-39
11-13
128
other major or minor.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements. Student may be
required to complete prerequisite courses.
July 1, 2013
83
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
- Biology Secondary Education 37
COMP
GRD
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
1
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in first three semesters
Communications (COM 101,
3
200, 202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
3
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
3
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
BIO 110 General Biology
BIO 111 General Biology Lab
BIO 250 Zoology
BIO 251 Zoology Lab
3
1
BIO 266 Botany
3
1
BIO 267 Botany Lab
BIO 345 Field Biology or BIO
268/269 Environ. Bio/Lab
BIO 330 Genetics
0
3
Science (any Biology,
Chemistry or Physics) w/lab
0
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
0
History (any history class)
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or
any Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective
(any Liberal Arts Course)
3
BIO 331 Genetics Lab
Seminar Series -- BIO 192,
292, 392, 492
BIO 473 Capstone and/or
Components of the Sem Series
MINOR: NATURAL SCIENCE
CHM 100/CHM 100L Fund. Of
Chemistry and Lab
PHY 160 Physical Geology
6
3
3
24
12
NATURAL SCIENCES
CORE CURRICULUM
37
SECONDARY EDUCATION
44
ELECTIVES
11
TOTAL
COMP
GRD
3-4
3
3
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
SUMMARY
BIOLOGY MAJOR
24
3
1
128
PHY 100 Intro to Physical Sci
PHY 101 Intro to Phys Sci Lab
SECONDARY EDUCATION
MINOR
1
1-2
3-4
12
4
4
3
1
44
3
EDU 101 Introduction to Educ
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych.& Mrsmt
EDU 315 Assessment for
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading:
Mid.&Sec
EDU 360 Teaching MID/SEC
Students
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Introduction to Sp Ed
SPE 240 Guidance&Class. Mgmt
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed with (GCD)
after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete the
specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements. Student may be
required to complete prerequisite courses.
July 1, 2013
84
Human Biology (BIOHUM)
This program provides a more human focused program of study for the pre-physician
student and pre-physician assistant student than the current biology program of study. This
program is also the undergraduate component of our physician assistant program. It
creates a degree-awarding program of study which includes the prerequisites necessary for
a clinical career (physician, physician assistant, PT, dentist, etc.) while also providing a
broad range of exposure to the biological and psychological understanding of the human
being.
The required courses of the major tract provide: a fundamental basis of biologic knowledge
(general biology, genetics and biochemistry), specific understanding of the human body
(advanced anatomy and physiology and pathophysiology (the study of disease)), in-depth
coverage of difficult material (microbiology and immunology), and support for the future
clinician as a scientist (statistics and seminars on the scientific method and use of scientific
literature). Compared to the traditional biology degree, zoology and botany are left out so
that the pre-clinical student can focus on other aspects of the human instead of developing
a breadth of knowledge about living things in general. This opens up 8 credit hours for
additional coursework outside of the biology program. For the PA student these hours will
be used to “accelerate” the master’s portion of the program by allowing the student to begin
master’s coursework in their senior year. For other students in the Human Biology
program, this allows additional electives to be taken in biology, psychology, chemistry or
mathematics.
The supporting field for the human biology degree includes a significant psychology
component. An understanding of human psychology, development and behavior is critical
to dealing with patients and their families in any clinical endeavor, and is a component of
most clinical encounters.
It is also an important foundation on which to build an
understanding of mental illness and its treatment, which is covered in medical school or
physician assistant studies. To that end, Lifespan Development (PSY 220 – Developmental
Psychology) is the required general education “choice” component (credit overlap between
general education and the supporting field), and Abnormal Psychology (PSY 410) is also a
required supporting field course.
Admission requirements: To begin the Human Biology program students must meet the
prerequisites for MTH 114, ENG 101, BIO 110, and CHM 110 (by placement or past
coursework.
July 1, 2013
85
Bachelor of Science
- Human Biology COMP
GRD
2013-2014
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
43
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 212)
ENG 101 Composition
1
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114)
Level II
3
ENG 102 Advanced Composition
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Physics) must include Lab
Math (MTH 115)
History (any history class)
PSY 101 Intro to Psych
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (PSY
220)
SUPPORTING FIELD
CHM 110/1 General Chemistry
(with lab)
CHM 112/3 General Chemistry
(with lab)
CHM 230 Organic Chemistry I
(with lab)
CHM 232 Organic Chemistry II
(with lab)
PHY 202/203 General Physics
(with lab)
PHY 204/205 General Physics
(with lab)
MTH 114 College Algebra
MTH 115 College Trigonometry
PSY 101 Intro. To Psychology
PSY 220 Lifespan Development
PSY 410 Abnormal Psychology
3
3
BIO 301 Microbiology Lab
BIO 310 Advanced Anatomy
Physiology I
BIO 311 Advanced Anatomy
Physiology I Lab
BIO 312 Advanced Anatomy
Physiology II
BIO 313 Advanced Anatomy
Physiology II Lab
BIO 364 Immunology
BIO 330 Genetics
0
BIO 331 Genetics Lab
1
3
3
3
6
3
3
BIO 340 Biochemistry
BIO 341 Biochemistry Lab
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
MTH 242 Statistics or Biostatistics
BIO 192 Scientific Methods
4
1
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
31
5
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
BIO 110 General Biology
38
3
BIO 111 General Biology Lab
1
BIO 300 Microbiology
3
&
1
4
&
1
&
4
&
1
BIO 392 Scientific Literature
Comprehensive Exam (minimum
rank at 25 percentile)
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GRD
3
3
15
5
GENERAL EDUCATION
43
5
MAJOR
38
5
SUPPORTING FIELD
31
4
ELECTIVES
16
4
COMP
128
0
0
0
0
3
Pre-Medical School students should include Calculus I and II.
Those interested in General Biology should include Zoology and Botany (both with lab)
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title. Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The
student must still complete the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional
electives. Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation
requirements. Student may be required to complete prerequisite courses.
July 1, 2013
86
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication (BAC)
CSM Business blends a classic business curriculum with innovative course work and
experiences. CSM Business degree provides a foundation of liberal arts and traditional
business courses with an emphasis in the study of analytics and strategic communication.
The program was developed with feedback from the region’s top employers and will include
internships and job shadowing, developing networks and real life experiences. Students
who major in CSM Business are prepared to enter the business world and/or continue their
education in a business-related graduate program. Through successful completion of
professional coursework built upon a solid liberal arts foundation, graduates will have
mastered the principles on which business is based. Additionally, business students are
expected to develop critical thinking and research skills, problem-solve in a collaborative
environment, analyze complex business scenarios and strategically communicate within a
business setting. Students move past static business theories through practical application
to create a well rounded business professional.
The business program also offers an Associate of Science in CSM Business. This option is
designed for those students who want a short term program, enabling them to enter
business management positions, to advance in their current career path, or to provide a
seamless transition into the Bachelor of Science in CSM Business.
Non-business students may pursue a minor in Business, which, by providing knowledge of
the business aspect of their profession, complements any other major.
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication Minor
BUS 101, 328, 334 AND 9 HOURS FROM BUS
NOTE: Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication majors may not apply more than
nine (9) hours of a combination of independent study, directed readings or internship
credits toward degree completion.
Basic Business (Teacher Certification)
Students wishing to obtain certification to teach in Nebraska secondary schools (grades 712) earn a double major in business and secondary education. Information on admission to
the teacher-education program, testing, student teaching and State certification
requirements are located in the Education Program section. For professional education
course requirements, see the course sequence for a major in Secondary Education.
July 1, 2013
87
Interdisciplinary Leadership Minor
The interdisciplinary leadership minor is designed to provide students with an opportunity to
learn leadership principles, develop interdisciplinary leadership skills, and discipline-specific
leadership skills that are grounded on a strong liberal arts foundation. The minor allows for
expertise in leadership development to be drawn from different disciplines across campus to
provide students with diverse perspectives on leadership that mirror the environment they
will function after graduation. The students are expected to fulfill an experiential
requirement in a leadership role as a capstone experience.
Categories
9 credits of Principles and
Skills
Subcategories
Leadership Principles (3-6
credits)
Leadership Skills (3-6
credits)
Courses
BUS 328 (required)
SOC/PSY/BUS 325
PSY/COM/BUS 233
COM 210
COM 212
HSV/COM/BUS 231
9 credits of Liberal Arts and
Discipline Specific
Liberal Arts (3-9 credit
hours)
HPS 110
HPS 210
PHL 315
PSY/HSV 230
PSY/WST 360
THL 215
THL 290
Discipline Specific Leadership
(0-6 credit hours)*
Business: BUS 410
Business Leadership &
Management: BLM 330, BLM
430
Nursing: NUR 453, NUR 463
Psychology: PSY 332
Mathematics: MTH 342,
MTH 450
Theology: THL 320, THL
354, THL 365, THL 495
Paralegal Studies: LAW 450,
Special Topic: Arbitration
and Mediation
•
July 1, 2013
If no discipline specific
courses are available,
then all can be liberal
arts
88
Bachelor of Science – Business: Analytics & Strategic Communication - 2013-2014
GENERAL EDUCATION
44 COMP
GRD
Level 1
1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
3
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
3
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH 114,
3
PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
3
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity (BUS
0
410)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
3
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
4
Phy Sci) must include Lab
MTH 242 Statistics
3
History (any history class)
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
PHL 220 Business Ethics
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
SUPPORTING COURSES
3
3
BUS 101 Intro. to Business
MTH 112 or MTH 114
ECO 131 Macroeconomics
ECO 132 Microeconomics
ACC 161 Principles of Acct I
ACC 162 Principles of Acct II
BIS 230 Prin of E-Commerce
ELECTIVES
6
3
21
3
3
3
3
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
LAW 310 Adv. Business Law
42
3
BUS 317 Business Analytics
BUS 321 Financial Mgmt
BUS 328 Management &
Leadership
3
3
3
BUS 329 Business Comm.
3
BUS 334 Princ. of Marketing
BUS 347 Bus Resrch Meth
3
3
BUS 397 Prtnr Internship
BUS 410 Global Dimensions of
Business
BUS 417 Advanced Business
Analytics
2
BUS 429 Strategic Communication
BUS 454 – Production Oper.
BUS 493 Career Exploration (Job
Shadowing)
3
3
BUS 496 Business Policies
BUS 497 Internship
AREAS OF SELECTIVES (Bus or
Interdisciplinary)
Business (choose 4 courses)
BUS 335 Consumer Behavior
4
2
BUS 330 Project Mgmt
BUS 423 Entrepreneurship
BUS 453 Mrkting Analytics
BUS 322 Investments
COM 306 Intercultural Com
Interdisciplinary (Choose 12
credits approved by advisor)
COMP
GRD
3
3
1
12
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SELECTIVES
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
44
42
12
21
9
128
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
89
Associate of Science – Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication -2013-14
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
ENG 101 Composition
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number)
COM 212 Speech for Professionals
Level 2
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
Phy Sci (must include lab)
PHL 200
Ethics
PSY 101 Introduction to
Psychology
Global Cultural Diversity*
THL (any Theology course)
Choice (Chosen from any Gen Ed
course and languages)
SUMMARY
MAJOR COURSES
SUPPORTING COURSES
GENERAL EDUCATION
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
26
3
1
3
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
BUS 101 Intro. to Business
BUS 321 Financial Management
BUS 328 – Management &
Leadership
BUS 310 Adv Business Law
BUS 334 Principles of Marketing
36
3
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
15
21
26
2
64
SUPPORTING COURSES
ACC 161 Principles of
Accounting I
ACC 162 Principles of
Accounting II
BUS 317 Business Analytics
BIS 230 Prin. of E-Commerce
ECO 131 Macroeconomics
ECO 132 Microeconomics
MTH 112 Intermediate Algebra
or MTH 114 College Algebra
ELECTIVES
21
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
90
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
– Basic Business Secondary Education 44
Level II
English Literature
3
3
36
3
3
COMP
GRD
ACC 161, Principles of Accounting I
ACC 162, Principles of Accounting
II
BIS 215, HTML and Web Design
3
3
BUS 230, Intro. to E-Commerce
3
BUS 310 Adv Business Law
BUS 321, Financial Management
BUS 328 – Management &
Leadership
3
3
BUS 330, Project Management
3
BUS 334, Principles of Marketing
3
BUS 348, Risk Management
SECONDARY EDUCATION
MINOR
EDU 101 Introduction to Education
EDU 201 Tech.&Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
3
3
3
3
0
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
6
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
PSY 101 Introduction to Psych
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
SUMMARY
SECONDARY EDUCATION MINOR
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
1
Global & Cultural Diversity (EDU
395)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
ECO 131 Microeconomics
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
GRD
BUS 101, Intro. to Business
BUS 496, Business Policies
Seminar
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications 212
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
MTH 114 or MTH 262
COMP
2013-2014
44
36
44
4
128
EDU 315 Assessment of Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading
Mid/Sec.
EDU 360 Teaching Mid/Sec.
Methods
EDU 375 Human Rel. In MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil & Trends in
Educ
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Spec.Educ.
SPE 240 Guid.&Class Management
44
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Students completing this program must also complete an endorsement in Information
Technology (See the Teacher Education Program Director for more information.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
91
Business Information Systems (BIS)
College of Saint Mary offers a certificate and a minor in Business Information Systems.
The BIS certificate provides a solid foundation to support employment in the computer
information technology field.
The certificate consists of 30 credit hours of business
information systems courses with an option for the student to complete 3 to 6 credit hours
of internship. Internships help students attain experience in the information technology
field when they have not had previous work experience in this area. The certificate can be
tailored to meet the needs of the student and the future employer by selecting different
course options.
The BIS minor is appropriate with other programs, such as education, mathematics,
paralegal studies, art, business analytics and strategic communication, and business
leadership.
Certificate in Business Information Systems
BIS 101 or 220, 221, 140, 143 or 211, 230, 330, 331, 350, 360, and 365
Business Information Systems Minor
BIS 101, 140, 230, 331, 350, 360, 365
Computer Certification in Education K-12
Program Sequence: BIS 104, 140, 143 or 211, 331, 350, and EDU 201.
July 1, 2013
92
Business Leadership and Management (BLM)
The Business Leadership and Management program is designed as a degree completion
program for women possessing significant work experience who have the desire and
commitment to complete a college degree in about 15 months. This accelerated program,
70% face-to-face and 30% online, provides core business and leadership competencies
through a rigorous curriculum, which is designed to thoroughly prepare students for the
practical application of both business and leadership skills to the issues they face in their
careers. The program uses a variety of delivery formats, including classroom and online, in
achieving a high quality applied education.
The placement exams for mathematics and English must be waived by transfer credit or
taken prior to the completion of the first module, and requirements in general education
must be completed by the student before a bachelor in business leadership degree is
conferred by College of Saint Mary.
The Business Leadership Program is divided into four modules, 15 weeks per module, and
two Special Research Projects.
The Special Research Projects offer ongoing applied
research efforts that are conducted concurrently with all classroom work in the program.
Students first learn to format and conduct action research focusing on a workplace issue of
interest. This experience provides an integrating framework for course concepts throughout
the entire program. During the final two modules, students work with an actual client to
develop a complete business plan. A grade of “C” or better is required in all BLM courses. A
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better is required for graduation.
Each student in the program becomes part of a cohort group. This group of colleagues, as
well as the faculty in the program and other staff at CSM, provide a supportive, stimulating,
and empowering environment for women who are working, may be raising a family, and are
actively involved in their community.
All students are admitted as bachelor seeking students. Students will receive a Certificate
in Business Leadership and Management upon completion of the program requirements.
BLM students often qualify to receive credit for prior learning through the portfolio process.
Any transfer courses will be evaluated on an individual basis and the student will complete
the prescribed CSM General Education requirements for the Business Leadership and
Management program and the necessary elective credits for a minimum of 128 hours.
July 1, 2013
93
Bachelor in Business Leadership and Management
GENERAL EDUCATION
Placement Tests:
Math 098 Development Math*
Math 112 Algebra
ENG 099 Development English*
ENG 101 Composition
Theology (any theology class)
Choice ( ELA, ENG, HPS, PHL,
PSY, SOC, THL, WST)
ELECTIVES OR MINOR
OR 2ND MAJOR
18
3
3
3
3
6
6
48
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
ELECTIVES OR MINOR OR 2ND
MAJOR
TOTAL
18
62
48
128
COMP
GRD
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
BLM 210 Practice of Leadership
BLM 220 Business Communication
BLM 230 Dynamics of Org Behav
BLM 240 Teambuilding & Group
Process
BLM 250 Human Resource Mgmt
BLM 310 Marketing Mgmt
62
3
3
3
3
BLM 320 Business Statistics
BLM 330 Negotiation & Conflict
Mgmt
BLM 340 Legal Environment of Bus
BLM 350 Leading Projects in
Contemporary Organizations
BLM 410 Action Research
BLM 415 Financial Management
BLM 420 Critical and Systems
Thinking
BLM 425 Operations Management
BLM 430 Strategic Management
BLM 435 Capstone
Entrepreneurship
BLM 440 International Business
BLM 445 Managerial Economics
3
3
BLM 450 Management Information
BLM 455 Organization
Development and Change
COMP
GRD
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
* Not required unless determined by Placement Tests
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
94
Chemistry (CHM)
The student who majors in chemistry will be prepared to make application to graduate
school, medical, dental or other professional schools. With a bachelor’s degree in chemistry,
the student may be employed in medical or industrial research laboratories, in research
institutes, hospital laboratories, quality control organizations or various Federal agencies.
With appropriate specialized courses, the student may teach in the science area.
Students completing a minor in chemistry are prepared to enter pharmacy, physicians’
assistants, or cytotechnology schools, among others.
Students admitted to the college who meet the following prerequisites will be directly
admitted as a chemistry major:
•Completion of at least one year of high school chemistry and at least two years of
college preparatory mathematics with grades of C (2.0) or better.
•Exemption or successful completion of both the mathematics and English competency
examinations.
•Two of the three following criteria must be met:
· High school GPA of at least B (3.0).
· ACT of at least 22 or combined verbal and math SAT of at least 920.
· High school rank in the upper one-third of the graduating class.
Students not meeting these prerequisites may be accepted into the General Studies
Program for their first academic year to take remedial chemistry and mathematics courses.
Successful completion of these courses with grades of at least C (2.0) will allow the student
to be admitted into the chemistry program. Those students enrolling with a strong
background in science or mathematics may elect to take the CLEP test to eliminate firstyear courses.
A student will not be permitted to progress in the program without chemistry departmental
approval if they do not maintain at least a C average in all courses.
Graduation requirements for students majoring and minoring in chemistry include successful
completion of all chemistry course work with a GPA of 2.0 or C or better in all chemistry
courses.
Majors in chemistry will be required to successfully complete a senior research project.
Course work taken in support of the major (minor or supporting field) must be passed with
grades of C or better.
Chemistry Minor
CHM 110, 111, 112, 113, 230, 231, 232, 233 and eight hours of upper division CHM
selected under the direction of the program director.
July 1, 2013
95
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
– Chemistry –
40
COMP
GRD
Level 1
1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in first three semesters
2013-14
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
CHM 110 General Chemistry
CHM 111 General Chemistry Lab
CHM 112 General Chemistry II
45
4
1
4
CHM 113 General Chemistry II
Lab
CHM 220 Analytical Chemistry
1
1
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
3
3
CHM 221 Analytical Chemistry
Lab
CHM 230 Organic Chemistry I
1
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
3
CHM 231 Organic Chemistry I
Lab
CHM 232 Organic Chemistry II
1
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
CHM 233 Organic Chemistry II
Lab
CHM 340 Biochemistry
0
CHM 341 Biochemistry Lab
1
0
CHM 361 Instrumental Analysis
3
3
3
CHM 362 Instrum.l Analysis Lab
CHM 450 Physical Chemistry
1
4
6
3
3
3
CHM
CHM
CHM
CHM
1
4
2
4
3
3
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
1-3
MAJOR
MINOR
45
18
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
2224
1-3
TOTAL
128
40
451 Physical Chemistry Lab
473 Research Chemistry
495 Coordinating Seminar
elective
SUPPORTING COURSES
MTH 201 Calculus I
MTH 202 Calculus II
MTH 242 Statistics or
MTH 312 Biostatistics
MTH/SCI 300 or 400 level
PHY 202 College Physics I or
PHY 212 University Physics I
PHY 203 Physics I Lab
PHY 204 College Physics II or
PHY 214 University Physics II
PHY 205 Physics II Lab
MINOR
Choose any minor in catalog
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits beyond
first major —must complete all
major courses and supporting
courses specified for second
major
COMP
GRD
4
4
4
4
22 - 24
4
4
3
3
3
4
1
3
4
1
18
.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
96
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Div (EDU 375)
– Chemistry Secondary Education–
37
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
CHM 110 General Chemistry
CHM 111 General Chemistry Lab
1
2013-2014
28
4
1
4
COMP
GRD
CHM 112 General Chemistry
1
CHM 113 General Chemistry Lab
3
4
CHM 220 Analytical Chemistry
3
1
CHM 221 Analytical Chem Lab
3
CHM 230 Organic Chemistry I
CHM 231 Organic Chem Lab I
3
0
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
3
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs))
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
ELECTIVES
3
3
3
CHM 232 Organic Chemistry II
CHM 233 Organic ChemLab II
CHM 473 Chemistry Research
NATURAL SCIENCE
SUPPORTING FIELD
0
4
1
4
1
3
12
3
BIO 268 - Environmental Sci
0
3
3
6
5
SUMMARY
CHEMISTRY MAJOR
28
NATURAL SCIENCES
12
GENERAL EDUCATION
37
SECONDARY EDUCATION
44
7
ELECTIVES
Total
COMP
128
1
BIO 269 - Environmental Sci Lab
BIO/CHM 340 Biochemistry
BIO/CHM 341 Biochemistry Lab
PHY 100/101 Intro to Physical
Sciences w/Lab or PHY 160
Physical Geology/Lab or PHY 164
Meterology/Lab
SECONDARY ED MINOR
EDU 101 Introduction to Educ
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych.&
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment for
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading:
Mid.&Sec
EDU 360 Teaching MID/SEC
Students
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching
Seminar
SPE 101 Introduction to Special
Educ.
SPE 240 Guidance and
Classroom Mgmt
3
1
4
44
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
97
Communication (COM)
Excellent communication is a key to success and satisfaction in both personal and
professional roles. The need and demand for communication skills is greater than ever.
Students who wish to add a strong communication background to any baccalaureate degree
may do so by majoring in English-Communication, or choosing a minor in communication.
Major: See English-Communication major under English
Communication Minor
Any 18 credits of Communication classes.
July 1, 2013
98
Developmental Studies
Developmental Studies includes the following developmental courses (numbered below
100), which may be taken for college credit, but may not be counted toward the
academic hours required for associate or bachelor degree completion:
ENG 099 Developmental English (3)
English 099 is a basic writing course, designed to introduce students to college writing and
prepare them for the similar, but more demanding, writing of English 101, the entry-level
writing course. Students who pass the course are able to write a developed, unified, and
cohesive expository essay. Placement in this course is determined by ACT scores or
placement examination.
MTH 098 Developmental Math (3)
Includes basic concepts of the real number system, polynomials, first-degree equations and
inequalities, algebraic functions, exponents, radicals, graphing linear functions, and an
introduction to quadratic functions. Placement in this course is determined by ACT scores or
placement examination.
IDS 097 Study and Learning (2)
Study and Learning is designed to increase the student’s success in college. The course will
focus on assisting the student in developing practical study skills and learning strategies to
enhance academic success. Emphasis will be given to investigation of student’s individual
learning objectives. Topics in this course include time planning, test taking, study
techniques, learning style, classroom interaction, and personal issues that face many
college students. Note: this course does not count as General Education credit. IDS 097 is
a repeatable course.
July 1, 2013
99
Early Childhood Education (ECE)
The program is based on the premise that early childhood education encompasses
continuous education of young children from birth through age eight. The interdisciplinary
approach for educating teachers of young children develops competencies in using
community resources to coordinate the efforts of home, school and community in providing
a comprehensive program. Firsthand experiences of students with young children,
professional personnel and community resources personnel begin early in professional
preparation and continue throughout the program.
Students may apply for early childhood certification only, or in combination with elementary
education.
Students who successfully meet state required competencies qualify for a Nebraska
Teaching Certificate and the Iowa Provisional Certificate.
Completion of the education
program does not guarantee certification. Satisfactory continuous growth in knowledge,
pedagogy, and professionalism as well as satisfactory performance during student teaching
is required in the recommendation for certification.
Since certification requirements of various sites are not uniform, a student planning to teach
in a state other than Nebraska or Iowa should inquire about specific requirements for that
state.
Students seeking only an ECE major will select among minors in 1) Special Education in
order to apply for a Unified Early Childhood endorsement (PK-3); 2) English as a Second
Language (ESL) or 3) Child Life Supporting Life. Other minors may be selected with the
permission of the program director. Students seeking both ECE and Elementary Education
endorsements should consult with the program director. Program admission criteria and
requirements are identical to that of the elementary education major (refer to elementary
education admission, student teaching and certification requirements).
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy. Intensive reading and writing experiences are integrated into all Teacher
Education courses.
Early Childhood Education Minor
Consists of 18 hours of early childhood education classes. Consult early childhood education
faculty for specific course requirements. (ECE 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 242, 334)
July 1, 2013
100
Associate of Science
– Early Childhood Education -
GENERAL EDUCATION
Tier I
26
ENG 101 Composition
FYS First Year Seminar (any #)
COM (public speaking)
3
1
3
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include lab
MTH 112 Intermediate Algebra
4
PHL 200 Ethics
PSY 101 General Psychology
THL (any Theology course)
EDU 375
(Strongly recommended:
English Literature and MTH
262)
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
3
3
3
3
3
26
18
18
8
70
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ECE 231 Play, Creat & Art Dev
ECE 232 Language Arts in ECE
ECE 233 Health, Safety and Nutr
ECE 234 Mth, Sci & Soc Stud. In
ECE
ECE 235 Observ. & Assess. In
ECE
ECE 236 Phys. Dev. & Creat.
Movement
ECE 242 Admin. ECE Programs
ECE 334 Curr. Planning in ECE
SUPPORTING COURSES
EDU 101 Introduction to Educ.
2013-2014
18
COMP
GRD
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
18
3
3
PSY 200 Child Psychology
EDU 312 Ed. Psych & Msurment
EDU 342 Children’s Literature
SPE 101 Intron to Spec. Ed.
SPE 240 Guid. & Clasrm Mgmt
3
3
3
3
ELECTIVES
8
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
101
Bachelor of Science–Early Childhood Ed/Elementary Education 2013-14
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
44
GRD
1
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
3
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
PSY 200 Child Psychology
ECE 231 Play, Creat & Artis.Dev.
In ECE
ECE 232 Language Arts in ECE
ECE 233 Health, Safety and
Nutrition
ECE 234 Mth, Sci & Soc Stud. In
ECE
3
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
English Literature
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
History (any history class)
Psychology (PSY 101)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
3
0
ECE 235 Observ. & Assess. ECE
ECE 236 Phys. Dev. Creat. Move
ECE 242 Admin. ECE Programs
See Major
34
3
COMP
GRD
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
ECE 334 Curr. Planning in ECE
3
3
ECE 343 His. Trends in ECE
4
3
3
3
6
3
3
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
44
MAJOR
34
ELEMENTARY ED MAJOR
44
SUPPORTING COURSES
9
131
TOTAL
COMP
5
ECE 470 Student Teaching: ECE
ECE 495 Student Teaching: Sem
ECE 496 Research Seminar
ELEM EDUCATION MAJOR
EDU 101 Introduction to Educ.
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst. Mat in
Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
EDU 342 Children's Literature
EDU 350 Teaching Reading: El.
& Mid.
EDU 353 Teach. Nat&Soc.Sci.:El.
& Mid.
EDU 355 Teaching Math: El. &
Mid.
PED 357 Health & Phys. Educ.
Methods
EDU 372 Integ.Fine Arts Inst.in
Classrm
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCultural Society
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
SPE 430 Diag. & Evaluation of
Reading
EDU 470 Student Teaching: Prim
EDU 471 Student Teaching: El.
& Mid.
SUPPORTING COURSES
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or above
SPE 101 Intro to Special Ed.
SPE 240 Guid. & Clasrm
Mngment
2
3
44
3
3
3
2
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
OR
5
9
3
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
102
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
– ECE with Child Life Minor 40
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ECE 101 Introduction to Educ.
1
PSY 200 Child Psychology
ECE 231 Play, Creat & Artis.Dev.
In ECE
ECE 232 Language Arts in ECE
3
3
ECE 233 Health, Safety and Nutr
ECE 234 Mth, Sci & Soc Stud. In
ECE
ECE 235 Observ. & Assess. In
ECE
ECE 236 Phys. Dev. & Creat.
Movement
3
English Literature
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
History (any history class)
Psychology (PSY 101)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
0
SUPPORTING FIELD
BIO 120/121 Human
Anatomy/LAB
CHL 337 Hospitalized Child
*CHL 472 Child Life Prac/Exp.
OTH 201 Foundations of Health
Care
PSY 233 Group Process
PSY 332 Counseling Theory &
Prac.
COMP
2013-2014
45
3
3
COMP
GRD
2
2
2
2
2
2
See Major
ECE 242 Admin. ECE Programs
3
ECE 334 Curr. Planning in ECE
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
19
4
ECE 342 Children's Lit.
ECE 343 His. Trends in ECE
ECE 470 Student Teaching: ECE
ECE 495 Student Teaching: Sem
ECE 496 Research Seminar
SUPPORTING COURSES
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst.Mat.Clsrm
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of Lrners
EDU 350 Teaching Reading Elem
EDU 375 Human Rel. Mult-Clt.
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or higher
3
3
3
SPE 101 Intron to Spec. Ed.
SPE 240 Guid. & Clasrm Mgmt
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
3
3
MAJOR
SUPPORTING FIELD
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
3
10
2
3
24
3
3
2
4
3
3
3
3
40
45
19
24
128
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
103
Bachelor of Science – ECE with English as a Second Language Minor- 2013-14
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
44
1
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ECE 101 Introduction to Educ.
ECE 231 Play, Creat & Artis.Dev.
In ECE
42
3
2
COMP
GRD
2
ECE 232 Language Arts in ECE
ECE 233 Health, Safety and Nutr
ECE 234 Mth, Sci & Soc Stud. In
ECE
ECE 235 Observ. & Assess. In
ECE
ECE 236 Phys. Dev. & Creat.
Movement
3
3
3
English Literature
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
0
History (any history class)
Psychology (PSY 101)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
3
3
6
3
3
See
Major
2
2
2
2
ECE 242 Admin. ECE Programs
3
ECE 334 Curr. Planning in ECE
3
3
3
ECE 342 Children's Lit.
4
3
ECE 343 His. Trends in ECE
3
3
0
44
42
18
24
128
TOTAL
COMP
ECE 470 Student Teaching: ECE
ECE 495 Student Teaching: Sem
ECE 496 Research Seminar
SUPPORTING COURSES
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst.Mat.Clsrm
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of Lrners
EDU 350 Teaching Reading Elem
PSY 200 Child Psychology
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or higher
SPE 240 Guid & Management
SPE 101 Intro to Spec. Ed.
ESL MINOR
EDU 415: Teaching ESL
10
2
3
24
3
3
EDU 425: Assessment of ESL
Learners
COM/ELA 306: Intercultural
Comm.
ENG 320: Linguistics for
Teachers
EDU 473: ESL K/12 Practicum
EDU 375 Human Relations MultClt.
3
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
104
Bachelor of Science
– ECE with Special Education Minor -
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
44
COMP
1
GRD
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ECE 101 Introduction to Educ.
ECE 231 Play, Creat & Artis.Dev.
In ECE
COMP
GRD
2
ECE 232 Language Arts in ECE
ECE 233 Health, Safety and Nutr
ECE 234 Mth, Sci & Soc Stud. In
ECE
ECE 235 Observ. & Assess. In
ECE
ECE 236 Phys. Dev. & Creat.
Movement
3
3
3
English Literature
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
History (any history class)
Psychology (PSY 101)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
0
ECE 242 Admin. ECE Programs
See
Major
2
2
2
2
3
3
ECE 334 Curr. Planning in ECE
3
3
ECE 342 Children's Lit.
4
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
44
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
42
18
21
3
128
TOTAL
42
3
2
3
ECE 343 His. Trends in ECE
ECE 470 Student Teaching: ECE
ECE 495 Student Teaching: Sem
ECE 496 Research Seminar
SUPPORTING COURSES
PSY 200 Child Psychology
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst.Mat.Clsrm
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of Lrners
EDU 350 Teaching Reading Elem
EDU 375 Human Relations MultiCultural
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or higher
SPED MINOR
SPE 101 Intro to Spec. Ed
SPE 220 Nat. & Effects of Mild
Mod.
SPE 240 Guid. & Clasrm. Mgmt.
SPE 330 Inclusion in EC Classrm
SPE 372 Pract: Inclusive ECE
Classroom
SPE 430 Diagnosis & Eval. Of
Reading
10
2
3
21
3
3
3
2
4
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
105
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
– ECE/ELD/Special Education –
44
1
History (any history class)
Psychology (PSY 101)
3
3
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
6
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
SPECIAL EDUCATION END.
SPE 101 Introduction to Spec.
Education
SPE 220 Nat. & Eff. Mid/Mod
Han.
3
3
3
0
34
3
2
COMP
GRD
2
2
2
ECE 235 Observ. & Assess. ECE
ECE 236 Phys. Dev Creat. Move
ECE 242 Admin. ECE Programs
See
Major
2
3
3
ECE 334 Curr. Planning in ECE
3
3
ECE 343 His. Trends in ECE
4
3
3
21
3
3
3
3
SPE 240 Guid. & Class Mgmnt
3
3
SPE 333 Pol./Prog. For Except.
3
SPE 373 Critical Issues in SPED
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
DOUBLE MAJOR
SPEC ED ENDORSEMENT
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
PSY 200 Child Psychology
ECE 231 Play, Creat & Artis.Dev.
In ECE
ECE 232 Language Arts in ECE
ECE 233 Health, Safety and
Nutrition
ECE 234 Mth, Sci & Soc Stud. In
ECE
3
3
SPE 331 Instr. Strat/Rem. Main
GRD
2
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
English Literature
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
SPE 222 Inter. Mat. & Assess
COMP
2013-2014
44
78
21
3
146
5
SPE/ECE 470 Student Teaching:
SPE/ECE 495 Student Teaching:
Seminar
SPE/ECE 496 Research Sem
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
MAJOR
EDU 101 Introduction to Ed.
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst. Mat in
Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. & Msrmt
EDU 315 Assessment of Lrnrs
EDU 342 Children's Literature
EDU 350 Teaching Reading: El.
& Mid.
EDU 353 Teach. Nat&Soc.Sci.:El.
& Mid.
EDU 355 Teaching Math: El. &
Mid.
PED 357 Health & Phys. Educ.
Methods
EDU 372 Integ.Fine Arts Inst.in
Classrm
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCultural Society
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
SPE 430 Diag. & Eval of Reading
EDU 470 Student Teaching: Prim
EDU 471 Student Teach: El.&Mid
SUPPORTING COURSES
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or above
2
2
44
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
3
3
OR
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
106
Education (EDU)
Teacher education programs educate prospective teachers through professional courses
which emphasize the acquisition of knowledge, skills, competencies and professional
dispositions. The experiences offered within the educational program enhance and
complement the knowledge and values encompassed in the liberal arts component offered
at College of Saint Mary. The department provides for individual differences, interests and
needs within specific curriculum experiences while providing a broad overall theoretical and
philosophical background in education. Professional course work, labs, and field-based
experiences (at least 100 hours) provide students with practical knowledge regarding
learners, learning processes, and teaching competencies relevant to identified careers. All
methods courses provide opportunities for students to plan and conduct lessons consistent
with Nebraska K-12 Academic Standards. Appropriate use of instructional technology is
integrated into all content and pedagogy. Intensive reading and writing experiences are
integrated into all Teacher Education courses.
Teacher Education students select from:
1. Bachelor of science with an elementary education and an early childhood major.
2. Bachelor of science with early childhood education and a special education minor.
3. Bachelor of science with an early childhood education major and an ESL minor.
4. Bachelor of science with an early childhood education major and a Child Life Supporting
Field.
5. Bachelor of science with an elementary education and a special education major.
6. Bachelor of science with an elementary education major and an ESL minor.
7. Bachelor of science with an elementary education major and a minor in a subject area,
for example, art, English, math, music, physical education, science, social science,
world language, or a related area, such as information technology or psychology.
8. Bachelor of science/arts with specialization in a field or subject area.
Students may seek certification in the following areas:
Early Childhood Education (B-3)
K-12 Endorsements
Early Childhood Unified Educ. (B-3)
Art (K-12)
Elementary Education (K-6)
Middle Grades Education (4-9)
Secondary Education (7-12)
Basic Business
Biology
Chemistry
English
Language Arts
Mathematics (6-12)
Natural Science
Social Science
Spanish World Language
Health & Physical Education (K-12)
Religious Education (K-12)
Supplementary Endorsements
English as a Second Language K-12
undergraduate and graduate
Information Technology (K-12)
Coaching
Special Education (K-9) (7-12) (K-12)
July 1, 2013
107
Admission
Students are introduced to early childhood, primary, middle grades, and secondary school
programs through introductory courses in education and special education. These courses
explore the nature of teaching at varied levels and identify specific needs of exceptional
students. Students participate in guided experiences in diverse classrooms in schools in
Omaha or surrounding areas. Students complete course work in developmental science and
initial methodology courses within the second year.
During the spring semester of the sophomore year students are evaluated and considered
for formal acceptance into the teacher education program. Prior to or during the first
semester, sophomore year students take the Praxis I Test (PPST) that is required for
admission into the teacher education program. Praxis I scores, academic performance,
evidence of professional dispositions for successful teaching, practicum evaluations, and
command of oral and written language are factors considered in determining acceptance
into the teacher education program. Students must provide evidence of academic
competence and professional development by having attained a cumulative GPA of C+ or
2.5 in course work, providing an active digital portfolio of work that demonstrates
professional and scholarly growth, participation in the student professional organization and
completing of an interview with the Teacher Education Committee.
An official background check must be completed the first term a student is enrolled in a
practicum course. Another background check must be completed within 90 days of the
beginning of the student teaching semester. Application for formal admission must be
submitted to the Teacher Education Committee by March 1 using the online application form
found on the Teacher Education web site. This committee is composed of a student’s
advisor, all members of the Teacher Education Department, and other faculty members.
Evaluation procedures result in acceptance, provisional status, or non-acceptance.
Acceptance is granted to students who meet all of the requirements. Provisional status or
non-acceptance is granted at the discretion of the committee.
Student Teaching
Applicants for certification with a single endorsement student teach for sixteen weeks
in one or two settings. Those seeking multiple endorsements student teach for ten
weeks in each field for which they are seeking certification. Student teaching placements
are planned in regard to students’ specific needs and certification requirements. Placements
are intended to enhance prospective teachers’ exposure to various teaching styles,
philosophies, and cultural settings. The online application for student teaching must be
submitted no later than October 1 or February 1 during the semester immediately
preceding assignments.
Students applying for student teaching are expected to evidence cumulative scholastic
achievement (cumulative GPA of C+ or 2.50), and 2.75 GPA in the major, admission to the
Teacher Education Program, appropriate methodological background, up-to date electronic
portfolio, proficiency in spoken and written language, and a record of professional
dispositions for successful teaching. An official background check must be completed within
90 days of beginning student teaching. Transportation to student teaching sites are the
responsibility of the student. The Teacher Education Committee reviews applications for
consideration of placement. The committee may accept, not accept or defer a candidate’s
application. Deferred candidates may appeal and request a hearing before the Teacher
Education Committee.
July 1, 2013
108
Certification
Students who successfully meet state required competencies may qualify for a Nebraska
Teaching Certificate and the Initial Iowa License. Continuous growth in knowledge,
pedagogy and professionalism, as well as satisfactory performance during student teaching,
and completion of Praxis II (for elementary level teaching) is required in the
recommendation for certification. Completion of the education program does not guarantee
certification.
Since certification requirements of various states differ, a student planning to teach in a
state other than Nebraska or Iowa should inquire about specific requirements for that state.
In-Service Education
The education department recognizes its obligation to the community to provide leadership
in the field of education and to act as an educational center for schools within the
surrounding area. It recognizes the importance of requirements for certification and the
multiplicity of changes in techniques, technology and needs of individual students and
teachers. Therefore, some professional education courses are offered during summer
sessions and late afternoons or evenings.
Elementary and Middle School Major Sequences:
Academic preparation for elementary education majors may include a minor in a
subject area and/or supporting field useful in elementary and/or middle grades.
The professional courses that are required include: EDU101, 200, 201, 312, 315, 342,
350, 353, 355, 372, 375, 427, 430, 470 or 471, 495, and 496. Supporting courses
include PED 357 and SPE 101and 240.
Secondary Education Minor Sequence:
College of Saint Mary offers endorsement in these areas in secondary education:
Biology
Language Arts
Reading
Basic Bus
Mathematics
Religious Education
Chemistry
Science
Social Science
English
Health & Physical Education
Spanish/World
Language
During registration, students in secondary education are required to obtain signatures
for education courses in the education department.
The professional courses that are required include: EDU 101, 201, PSY 203, SPE 240,
EDU 312, 315, 351, 360, 375, 427, 471, 472 and 495 and ENG 262.
K-12 Endorsements
College of Saint Mary offers K-12 endorsement in these areas:
Religious Education or Art or Health and Physical Education
K-12 endorsements in art require methods and student teaching in K-6 and 7-12.
Supplementary Endorsements
College of Saint Mary offers supplementary K-12 endorsements in these areas:
English as a Second Language or Information Technology
Tremendous growth in numbers of immigrant children in the United States, particularly in
Nebraska, has created a need for teachers trained to teach English as a Second Language.
Undergraduate students at College of Saint Mary may earn a supplementary ESL
endorsement with a 15-credit-hour program (ENG 320; EDU 415; EDU 425; COM 306; and
EDU 473). When combined with EDU 375, teaching in a Multicultural Society, students
achieve a minor in ESL.
July 1, 2013
109
Bachelor of Science
– Elementary Education –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
44
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
1
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
3
English Literature
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
0
History (any history class)
3
Psychology (PSY 101)
3
Theology (any class)
6
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
3
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
EDU 101 Introduction to
Education
PSY 200 Child Psychology
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst. Mat in
Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
3
3
3
4
3
3
44
57
18
9
See
Major
EDU 342 Children's Literature
EDU 350 Teaching Reading: El.
& Mid.
EDU 353 Teach. Nat&Soc.Sci.:El.
& Mid.
EDU 355 Teaching Math: El. &
Mid.
PED 357 Health & Phys. Educ.
Methods
EDU 372 Integ.Fine Arts Inst.in
Classrm
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCultural Society
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
SPE 430 Diag. & Evaluation of
Reading
EDU 470 Student Teaching:
Primary
EDU 471 Student Teaching: El.
& Mid.
EDU 495 Student Teaching
Seminar
EDU 496 Research Seminar
2013-2014
57
COMP
GRD
3
3
3
3
2
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
2
3
SUPPORTING COURSES
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or above
SPE 101 Intro to Special Ed.
SPE 240 Guid. & Clasrm
Mngment
9
3
3
3
MINOR OR SUPPORTING
FIELD
18
128
TOTAL
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
110
Bachelor of Science – Elementary Education/Special Education –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
44
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
EDU 101 Introduction to Educ
1
PSY 200 Child Psychology
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst. Mat in
Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
3
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
3
English Literature
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
0
History (any history class)
3
Psychology (PSY 101)
3
Theology (any class)
6
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
3
3
ELECTIVES
3
SUPPORTING COURSE
3
MTH 112 Inter. Algebra or higher
3
47
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
3
2
EDU 315 Assess of Learners
3
3
See
Major
EDU 342
EDU 350
& Mid.
EDU 353
& Mid.
EDU 355
Mid.
Children's Literature
Teaching Reading: El.
4
Teach. Nat&Soc.Sci.:El.
3
Teaching Math: El. &
3
4
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
ELEMENTARY MAJOR
44
47
SPECIAL EDUCATION MAJOR
31
SUPPORTING COURSE
3
ELECTIVES
3
128
TOTAL
COMP
2013-2014
PED 357 Physical & Health Ed
EDU 372 Integ.Fine Arts Inst.in
Classrm
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCultural Society
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
SPE 430 Diag. & Evaluation of
Reading
EDU 470 Student Teaching:
Primary
OR
EDU 471 Student Teaching: El.
& Mid.
SPECIAL EDUCATION MAJOR
SPE 101 Introduction to Spec.
Ed.
SPE 220 Nat.
&Eff.Mild.&Mod.Hand. Con.
SPE 222 Assess. of Diverse
Learners
SPE 240 Guid. & Class
Management
SPE 331 Instr. Strat. For Diverse
Learners
SPE 333 Spec. Ed. Law & Ethics
SPE 373 Critical Issues in Spec.
Education
SPE 470 Student Teaching:
Primary -orSPE 471 Student Teaching:
El.&Mid.
SPE 495 Student Teaching
Seminar
SPE 496 Research Seminar
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
31
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
2
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
111
Bachelor of Science – Elementary Education/Middle Endorsement – 2013-2014
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
44
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 200)
1
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
3
English Literature
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
0
History (any history class)
3
Psychology (PSY 101)
3
Theology (any class)
6
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
History (any history course)
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
3
3
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
EDU 101 Introduction to
Education
PSY 200 Child Psychology
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst. Mat in
Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
3
3
3
4
3
44
54
18
18
See
Major
EDU 342 Children's Literature
EDU 350 Teaching Reading: El.
& Mid.
EDU 353 Teach. Nat&Soc.Sci.:El.
& Mid.
EDU 355 Teaching Math: El. &
Mid.
EDU 372 Integ.Fine Arts Inst.in
Classrm
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCultural Society
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
SPE 430 Diag. & Evaluation of
Reading
EDU 470 Student Teaching:
Primary
EDU 471 Student Teaching: El.
& Mid.
EDU 495 Student Teaching
Seminar
EDU 496 Research Seminar
SUPPORTING COURSES
ENG 262 Lit. for Young Adults
PED 357 Physical & Health Ed
PSY 203 Adolescent Psych
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or above
SPE 101 Intro to Special Ed.
SPE 240 Guid. & Clasrm
Mngment
54
COMP
GRD
3
3
3
3
2
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
2
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
3
134
TOTAL
MINOR OR SUPPORTING
FIELD
18
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
112
English (ENG)
The study of literature is a thought-provoking journey into the intellectual and spiritual
world of ideas. Fiction, poetry, drama, and essays from many historical periods and world
cultures expose students to the great range and depth of human experience.
Both analytical and creative approaches to writing are offered. Classes are small and
discussion-centered. The most important part of our jobs is teaching, and we professors
work closely with students. Through a variety of writing assignments, oral presentations,
and self-generated class projects, students develop the analytical skills of critical thinking,
the ability to make creative connections between ideas, and the expertise of translating
these skills into their writing.
Training in English is a valuable preparation for many professional areas, such as
education, communications, publishing, advertising, business, marketing, computer
information services, library sciences, law, and pre-med. The English and Education
programs work closely together to train prospective teachers. In short, the English program
prepares students for a rapidly changing world where communication skills, combined with
knowledge of technology, are in high demand.
Recent graduates have found jobs in teaching, desktop publishing, public relations, technical
writing, employee recruitment, or have gone on to graduate school in various areas:
English, American studies, Library Sciences, Education Administration, and Business
Finance.
Program Requirements: All English Majors (teaching and non-teaching) and Minors: The
student working toward a major or minor in English is subject to a reevaluation each year. A
grade of C or above is required in all English courses used toward a major or minor in
English. A minimum of 15 credit hours in English must be taken at College of Saint Mary for
a major or an endorsement in secondary education.
English Major: The English major is divided into three areas of concentration:
•
Writing and Literature: a traditional English major, preparation for graduate or
professional school.
•
Communication: combining English and Communication courses, preparation for the
communication industry or graduate school.
•
Education: English Endorsement as preparation for teaching English and Language
Arts in middle and secondary schools.
Language Arts Field Endorsement: This is a separate Academic Program, administered by
the English and Education Programs:
English Minor
18 hours including 6 hours of American literature, 3 hours of British literature, 3 hours of
world literature, 3 hours of advanced composition, and 3 hours of an English elective.
July 1, 2013
113
Bachelor of Art
– English English Communications Double Major
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
41
1
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
51
ENGLISH MAJOR
ENG 101 Composition
27
3
COMP
GRD
3
3
ENG 210/310 or 212/312
0
ENG Linguistics (ENG language
or Teach)
3
ENG British Literature
ENG American Literature
3
3
3
3
0
3
3
4
ENG American Literature
ENG World Literature
ENG Film/Literature
ENG/COM 495 Coordinating
Seminar
3
3
3
3
3
3
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
GRD
ENG Advanced Composition or
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
COMP
2013-2014
6
3
COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR
COM 100 Survey
Communication*
COM 150 News Writing
COM 210 Interpersonal
Communication
COM 330 Gender &
Communication
24
3
3
3
3
3
COM 365 Mass Media
COM Internship
3
COM electives
6
ELECTIVES
36
41
51
36
128
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
114
Bachelor of Art
– English Writing and English Literature
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
41
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
1
3
COMP
GRD
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
33
ENG 101 English Composition
3
ENG Advanced Composition OR
3
COMP
GRD
ENG 210/310 or 212/312
0
ENG British Literature
3
ENG British Literature
ENG American Literature
3
3
ENG American Literature
ENG World Literature
3
3
4
ENG World Literature
ENG electives
3
6
3
ENG 495 Coordinating Seminar
3
MINOR OR SUPPORTING
FIELD
Choice of minor or supporting
field.
ELECTIVES
Elective credit or second major.
18
3
0
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
36
3
41
33
18
36
128
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits beyond
first major —must complete all
major courses and supporting
courses specified for second
major.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
115
Bachelor of Art
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Div (EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
– English Secondary Education
35
1
0
33
ENG 101 English Composition
3
ENG Advanced Composition OR
3
COMP
GRD
ENG 210/310 or 212/312
3
3
ENG American Literature
ENG American Literature
0
ENG World Literature
ENG electives
ENG 262 Literature for Young
Adults
ENG Linguistics(Eng Lang or
Teach)
ENG 495 Coordinating Seminar
0
3
4
3
3
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
3
6
3
18
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
35
MAJOR
33
SECONDARY EDUCATION MINOR
41
MINOR OR SECOND SUBJ TEACH
ENDORSEMENT
TOTAL
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ENG British Literature
3
SUPPORTING COURSE
GRD
0
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
SECONDARY ENDORSEMENT
COMP
2013-2014
3
18
130
SECONDARY EDUCATION
MINOR
EDU 101 Introduction to
Education
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych.&
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment for
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading:
Mid.&Sec
EDU 360 Teaching MID/SEC
Students
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
EDU 472 Student Teaching:
Secondary
EDU 495 Student Teaching
Seminar
SPE 101 Introduction to Special
Educ.
SUPPORTING COURSE
COM 212 Speech for
Professionals*
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
41
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
116
Bachelor of Art
– Language Arts Secondary Education –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity (EDU
375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
ELECTIVES
32
1
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ENG 101 Composition
ENG ___ Adv Comp (Cr. Or
Exp.)
2013-2014
65
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
0
ENG 495 Coordinating Seminar
ENG ___ Linguistics(Eng Lang or
Teach)
0
3
3
3
COM 365 Mass Media & Society
COM 202 Spch for Lang.Arts
Teachers
COM ___ Dramatic Arts
0
3
3
3
COM ___ Journalism
0
LITERATURE
3
3
ENG ___British Literature
4
ENG ___British Literature
3
ENG ___ American Literature
ENG ___ American Literature
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
0
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
32
MAJOR
MINOR
65
41
TOTAL
138
ENG ___ World Literature
ENG 262 Literature for Young
Adults
ENG ___ (choice)
COM Public Speaking
Choice (Writing, drama, speech,
literature or language)
SECONDARY EDUCATION
MINOR
EDU 101 Introduction to Ed.
EDU 201 Tech.&Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading
Mid/Sec.
EDU 360 Teaching Mid/Sec.
Methods
EDU 375 Human Rel. In MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil & Trends in
Educ
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Spec.Educ.
3
9
3
11
41
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
117
Bachelor of Art
– Language Arts –
With Reading-Writing Subject Endorsement
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity (EDU
375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
32
1
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ENG 101 Composition
ENG ___ Adv Comp (Cr. Or
Exp.)
65
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
0
ENG 495 Coordinating Seminar
ENG ___ Linguistics(Eng Lang or
Teach)
0
3
3
3
COM 365 Mass Media & Society
COM 202 Spch for Lang.Arts
Teachers
COM ___ Dramatic Arts
0
3
3
3
COM ___ Journalism
0
LITERATURE
3
3
ENG ___British Literature
4
ENG ___British Literature
3
ENG ___ American Literature
ENG ___ American Literature
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
0
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
32
MAJOR/ENDORSEMENT
MINOR
71
41
144
TOTAL
COMP
2013-2014
Reading & Writing Subject
Endorsement
Required courses are italic
EDU 430 Diag.&Remed. In Read
3
EDU 490 Directed Rdgs on Read.
3
ENG ___ World Literature
ENG 262 Lit for Young Adults
ENG ___ (choice)
COM Public Speaking
Choice (Writing course required)
Choice (Writing, drama, speech,
literature or language)
SECONDARY EDUCATION
MINOR
EDU 101 Introduction to Ed.
EDU 201 Tech.&Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading
Mid/Sec.
EDU 360 Teaching Mid/Sec.
Methods
EDU 375 Human Rel. In MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil & Trends in
Educ
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Spec.Educ.
3
9
3
3
8
41
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
118
Experiencing the Liberal Arts (ELA)
The goals of the Experiencing the Liberal Arts (ELA) courses are to foster creativity and
stimulate critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making skills, and to encourage
reflection on one’s personal philosophy, spiritual, and ethical values. These courses also
offer the opportunity for students to interact with faculty from various disciplines as they
demonstrate the relationship of the liberal arts to a topic of current interest. In keeping with
the mission of College of Saint Mary, the courses attempt to build an awareness of and
respect for others regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, or gender; to examine topics from a
world community perspective, to include women’s roles in and scholarly contributions to the
topic, and to foster an attitude of responsibility toward service to others. Students will have
the opportunity to develop their competencies in oral and written communication.
July 1, 2013
119
Fine Arts (FNA)
The Fine Arts minor will allow students to pursue a broad course of study in the visual and
performing arts. Students will begin the minor sequence with three required survey courses
focusing on the history and basic principles of art, music and theatre. Students will then
choose additional courses selected from any of the three departments, customizing the
minor to coordinate with their interests, skills, and career plans.
*Students who demonstrate strong academic backgrounds in art or music may substitute
more advanced courses in art history or music history with the permission of the Fine Arts
Program Director. It is expected that most students will enroll in ART 200 and MUS 206.
Fine Arts Minor
ART 200, MUS 206, THR 101, and choice of 9 hours of any other art, music or theatre
courses.
July 1, 2013
120
First Year Seminar (FYS)
The CSM First Year Seminar is designed to encourage the development of a small group
interactive learning community. In this class, students will develop connections with other
first year students while learning to participate in and substantially contribute to a group
exploration of a particular topic in the liberal arts. Although the topics will vary, all sections
will be related to the mission of the university and will focus on discussion-based critical
inquiry.
First Year Seminar is to be taken during the first semester a student is enrolled at College of
Saint Mary.
FYS is required for all in-coming students unless they are transferring in 15 or more credits.
July 1, 2013
121
General Studies (BGS)
The Bachelor of General Studies is specifically designed for non-traditional students who
seek a bachelor’s degree for career advancement and self-improvement. This degree
completion program allows students who have an associate’s degree or have accumulated a
minimum of 64 semester hours with a GPA of 2.50 or above to earn their bachelor’s degrees
in a timely manner.
The Bachelor of General Studies program provides a curriculum of study which focuses on
the development of oral and written communication skills and analytical and ethical
thinking, combined with a liberal arts component to balance the technical knowledge
previously acquired. Students have the option of adding an Area of Focus.
The Bachelor of General Studies curriculum also allows students the flexibility to earn a
degree while using their acquired academic and professional training. The format, unlike a
traditional full-time schedule, allows students to move through the curriculum at their own
pace, either one course at a time or several courses each semester.
Students must meet Math and English competency requirements. English composition must
be taken in addition to the above if not included in the associate’s degree or transfer hours
earned.
HUM 495 Seminar (3)
The senior seminar is the culminating learning experience for the individual’s academic
program. It requires the student to synthesize several of the major elements of the
student’s degree program and design a senior project that reflects professional and
academic competence. The final form of the senior project will be negotiated between the
student and senior seminar instructor and may include other faculty for technical assistance
as necessary. If the student selects the “Area of Focus” option, the student will participate
in the regularly offered Senior Seminar with students of that major.
Students may choose a 24 credit hour Area of Focus in a specific program. Up to six hours
of this area can be obtained by portfolio. At least 12 hours must be taken at College of Saint
Mary. Hours included in the associate’s degree or 64-semester hour requirement cannot be
applied to the Area of Focus. If an Area of Focus is selected, the seminar course offered in
the focus area may be substituted for the BGS seminar requirement. Only the following
programs are appropriate for fulfilling the Area of Focus component.
Art: One Art History (3 hours), ART 211, 213, 215, plus 12 additional hours selected from
among the following ART courses: 217, 223, 225, 227, 250, and 333.
History: Any 24 hours of HPS are acceptable; however, the following courses are
recommended: HPS 110, 131, 132, 251, 349, 375, 376.
Music: Choose 24 hours from the following: MUS 118, 119, 204, 206, 208, 346, 347, 348,
six credits in applied music, six credits in chorus.
Philosophy: PHL 105, 206, 220, 310, ETH 200, plus six additional hours of Philosophy.
Communication: Any 24 credit hours in COM courses.
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication: Any 24 credit hours in BUS
courses.
English: English Minor plus six additional credit hours in ENG courses.
Social Sciences: Choose 24 hours from the following: SOC 101, 231, 242, PSY 101, 220;
ECO 131; HPS 132, 160.
July 1, 2013
122
Bachelor of General Studies
GENERAL EDUCATION
ENG 101 English Composition
Communications COM 101 or 212
40
3
3
English Literature
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theater)
HPS (any history course)
Social Science(ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Science (any Biology, chemistry
or Physical Science) must include
lab
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
PHL (any Philosophy course)
THL (any Theology course)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
HUM 495 Seminar
3
3
3
3
2013-2014
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
COMPONENT I (Associate
Degree or Transfer Credits or
CSM credits.
COMPONENT II (28 additional
hours—examination, portfolio,
or additional courses)
COMP
GRD
64
24
4
SUMMARY
3
3
6
3
3
GENERAL EDUCATION
COMPONENT I
COMPONENT II
TOTAL
40
64
24
128
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
123
General Studies (GNS)
The Associate of Arts in General Studies program of study is intended for students who are
unsure of the area in which they want to major. This associate degree formalizes each
student’s course work so that all General Education requirements for a bachelor’s degree
are completed by the end of the Associate of Arts in General Studies. In addition, the
student is offered a selection of courses to help her sample a variety of fields and possible
majors.
The Associate of Arts in General Studies allows the student to articulate into any bachelor’s
degree at College of Saint Mary (except the Bachelor of Science in Nursing or Bachelor in
Rehabilitation Studies).
July 1, 2013
124
Associate of Arts
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
TOTAL
– General Studies 47
COMP
GRD
2013-2014
REQUIRED ELECTIVES
(17 hrs. from following)
ACC 161 Prin of Accounting I
17
ACC 162 Prin of Accounting II
3
ACC 163 Accounting software
1
3
COMP
GRD
3
1
3
3
BIO 100 Survey of Biology
3
3
3
3
3
4
1
BIO 101 Survey of Biology - LAB
BUS 101 Introduction to
Business
BUS 323 Management Concepts
COM 100 Survey of
Communications
CHM 100 & Lab Fundamentals of
Chemistry
BIS 140 Intro to Programming:
BASIC -orBIS 143 Intro to Programming:
C++
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
4
6
3
3
EDU 101 Intro to Education
LAW 101 Intro to Paralegal
LAW 110 Legal Environment
MTH 114 College Algebra
MTH 115 College Trigonometry
3
3
3
3
3
PSY 200 Child Psychology
3
3
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
PSY 235 Social Psychology
SOC 231 Social Problems
3
3
47
17
64
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
125
History and Political Science (HPS)
The history program stresses the value of studying the past in order to better understand
human beings and the institutions they have created. One of the best ways to learn about
ourselves is to examine how people have behaved over an extended period of time.
History courses are also intended to provide students with an awareness of their social and
cultural roots and an appreciation of the variety in human thought and action.
Students are encouraged to study the past with a critical eye, concentrating upon
explanation, understanding, and evaluation, rather than simple memorization.
History Minor
18 hours of HPS courses. Courses must include HPS 131, 132, and either 375 or 376.
July 1, 2013
126
Human Services (HSV)
See Psychology for complete degree information. As part of the Applied Psychology
degree, the Human Services program prepares women to provide services to individuals and
families in need of assistance. Through participation in supervised fieldwork, graduates will
also have direct hands-on experience, which provides them with the knowledge and skills
necessary for a successful human services career.
Human Services Minor
(23 semester hours) HSV 377/378, plus PSY 230, PSY 233, PSY 332, and PSY 410.
July 1, 2013
127
Humanities (HUM)
Students wishing to major in the general area of humanities may receive a bachelor’s
degree in this area. The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities includes an interdisciplinary major
and minor and supporting courses that cover seven academic areas in the humanities.
These are: Communications (COM), English (ENG), History and Political Science (HPS),
Philosophy (PHL), Theology (THL), Visual Art (ART), and Performing Art (MUS and THR).
Also required is an interdisciplinary project designed to integrate knowledge and insights
from two or more humanities areas (HUM 495).
A graduate in humanities can bring to a variety of professions a broad background in the
liberal arts, an awareness of a person as an intellectual, emotional, physical, ethical, and
aesthetic whole; and an understanding of, and sensitivity to, the human condition. These
are qualities essential in interpersonal relationships in all professions.
Humanities Minor
18 hours with 9 from each of two additional humanities disciplines.
July 1, 2013
128
Bachelor of Arts
– Humanities -
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
47
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
1
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
COMP
GRD
MAJOR COURSES
Arts, Music, English, History,
Theology, Philosophy,
Communications
1st Emphasis MAJOR (choose 2
of above)
2013-2014
48
COMP
GRD
15
3
15
3
2nd Emphasis MINOR (choose 2
of above)
3
9
3
9
12
3
SUPPORTING COURSES
Choose 1 course in each
remaining area
3
HUM 495 Coordinating Seminar
4
3
21
ELECTIVES
3
3
SUMMARY
6
3
3
GENERAL EDUCATION
Hum. Major
Hum Minor
47
30
18
3
Supporting courses
12
Electives
21
TOTAL
128
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
129
Interpreting Certification
The Center for Transcultural Learning (CTL) and the Department of World Languages grant
credits to students who complete the required courses for a Certificate in Interpretation.
This program provides professional training to bilingual speakers who seek training in
interpretation techniques, situation specific terminology, and ethics of the industry.
Medical Interpreting: This certificate program is designed as a series of interconnected
modules that cover different aspects and levels of Medical Interpreting. Students who
complete the program will be either prepared to take the certification exam of the National
Board of Certification for Medical Interpreters or at least have taken the minimum of 40
contact hours of training included among the requisites for taking that exam of certification.
Certificate
- Medical Interpreting -
CERTIFICATE COURSES
MDI 100 Foundations of Interpreting
MDI 110 Musculoskeletal, Cardio and Digest. Sys.
MDI 120 Reproductive and Respiratory Systems
MDI 130 Medical Terminology
SUMMARY
2013-2014
12
3
3
3
3
12
COMP
GRD
Community Interpreting: This certificate program is designed to train bilingual individuals
to interpret in various settings: legal offices, medical clinics, schools, community
organizations, and social services. Future interpreters learn the vocabulary associated with
various interpreting environments. Students practice consecutive, simultaneous, and
telephonic interpreting modes through role plays and real life simulations.
Certificate
- Community Interpreting -
CERTIFICATE COURSES
MDI 100 Foundations of Interpreting
INT 110 Community Interpreting
INT 120 Legal Interpreting I
MDI 130 Medical Terminology
SUMMARY
July 1, 2013
2013-2014
12
3
3
3
3
12
COMP
GRD
130
Mathematics (MTH)
The mathematics program at College of Saint Mary is designed to meet the needs of
prospective teachers of mathematics, of those who require mathematics as a necessary
foundation for their work in other departments, of those who are studying mathematics as a
cultural element of a liberal education, and of those whose major interest is in the field of
mathematics. College of Saint Mary currently offers a structured four-year course sequence
leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics. See Education Program for
information on admission, testing, student teaching and certification requirements. See
Secondary Minor in Education Sequence for professional education course requirements.
Math Minor
12 hours beyond MTH 202 selected under direction of the program director.
A prerequisite Mathematics course cannot be taken for credit after a C or higher grade has
been earned in a higher level Mathematics course unless the program director of
Mathematics grants an exception.
July 1, 2013
131
Bachelor of Science
– Math –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
38
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
COMP
GRD
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
MTH 170 Discrete Mathematics
1
37
3
4
COMP
GRD
MTH 201 Calculus I
4
MTH 202 Calculus II
0
4
MTH 203 Calculus III
3
3
MTH 242 Statistics
0
3
MTH 266 College Geometry
3
3
MTH 342 Mathematical Statistics
3
MTH 350 Abstract Algebra
MTH 360 Linear Algebra
3
3
3
MTH 450 Differential Equations
4
0
3
3
6
3
3
MTH 495 Mathematics Seminar
BIS 143 Intro to Programming:
C++
SUPPORTING COURSES
COM 212 Speech for
Professionals
BIS 140 Programming Concepts
1
3
3
ELECTIVES
29
MINOR
Choose any minor in catalog
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits beyond
first major —must complete all
major courses and supporting
courses specified for second
major
18
6
3
3
38
37
18
6
29
128
.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
132
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity (EDU
375
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
– Math –
Secondary Education
35
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
MTH 170 Discrete Mathematics
1
37
3
4
COMP
GRD
MTH 201 Calculus I
4
MTH 202 Calculus II
0
4
MTH 203 Calculus III
3
3
MTH 242 Statistics
0
3
MTH 266 College Geometry
MTH 342 Mathematical Statistics
3
3
3
MTH 350 Abstract Algebra
0
3
MTH 360 Linear Algebra
3
3
MTH 450 Differential Equations
4
0
1
MTH 495 Mathematics Seminar
BIS 143 Intro to Programming:
C++
3
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
6
3
3
SUMMARY
37
MATH MAJOR
6
SUPPORTING COURSES
35
GENERAL EDUCATION
41
SECONDARY EDUCATION
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
COMP
2013-2014
9
128
SUPPORTING COURSES
COM 212 Speech for
Professionals
BIS 140 Intro to Programming
SECONDARY EDUCATION
MINOR
6
3
3
41
3
EDU 101 Intro to Education
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Ed. Psych.&
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment for
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading:
Mid.&Sec
EDU 360 Teaching MID/SEC
Students
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Special Educ.
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
133
Medical Technology (MDT)
The medical technology curriculum offers preparation to those who wish to do professional
diagnostic laboratory work. These professionals may find challenging opportunities in
hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, research, industry, and educational institutions. College of
Saint Mary offers two degree programs in this area:
1. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology (3 + 1).
2. Bachelor of Science in Chemistry or Biology (4 + 1).
Upon completion of the college course work, both programs require one year (12
months) of professional education in an approved medical technology school.
The major characteristics desired in an applicant include high moral standards, scientific
curiosity, manual dexterity, academic ability, and a genuine interest in people. In addition
to completing the academic college program, students must make application, meet the
designated entrance requirements, gain acceptance, and satisfactorily complete the
professional year of study before she can receive the baccalaureate degree in medical
technology from College of Saint Mary. The process and standards by which applicants are
selected for admission to the professional year vary slightly with each clinical institution.
The medical technology advisor will assist the student in the application and registration
procedures for entrance to the clinical facility during the fall semester prior to the
professional year of study. A minimum GPA of 2.5, reference letters, college transcripts, and
a personal interview are required for entrance to the clinical facility. Specific admission
information can be obtained directly from the clinical institution and/or the medical
technology director at College of Saint Mary. Enrollment in the clinical facilities is limited and
competitive. Therefore, those students who do not meet the professional admissions
requirements during the academic portion of the program are encouraged to pursue other
programs. A student in the ‘3 + 1’ program who is not accepted into a professional program
or who chooses not to continue may complete a biology degree at College of Saint Mary by
completing a 4th year of study. Upon graduation, students are eligible to take national
certifying examinations.
Chargess for the professional year vary with each clinical institution. These charges are paid
directly to the institution. A nominal payment rather than the regular tuition is paid to
College of Saint Mary during the professional year to cover the administrative and academic
work involved with the student and affiliating institution.
Graduate students with a bachelor's in chemistry and/or biology may be eligible for a
degree in medical technology by the satisfactory completion of MDT 364 and a year of
professional education in an approved school of medical technology.
BIO 364 is taken on campus at College of Saint Mary during the first three years. Medical
technology courses offered during the professional clinical rotation may vary slightly
depending upon the institution but generally the contents of the courses and credit hours
are similar to those given below.
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Bachelor of Science
– Medical Technology –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
37
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
BIO 110 General Biology
1
40
3
1
COMP
GRD
BIO 111 General Biology Lab
3
BIO 300 General Microbiology
3
3
0
1
BIO 301
BIO 250
Botany
BIO 251
Lab
BIO 330
Gen. Microbiology Lab
Zoology or BIO 266
3
Zoo Lab or BIO 267 Bot
1
Genetics
3
1
3
3
BIO 331 Genetics Lab
BIO 491 Advanced Topics in
Biology
4
4
CHM 110 General Chemistry
0
1
CHM 111 General Chemistry Lab
0
3
3
6
3
3
4
CHM 112 General Chemistry
CHM 113 General Chemistry Lab
CHM 230 Organic Chemistry I
CHM 231 Organic Chem Lab I
CHM 232 Organic Chemistry II
1
4
1
4
1
CHM 233 Organic Chem Lab II
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
37
MAJOR
PROFESSIONAL STUDY
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
40
29
20
2
128
TOTAL
COMP
2013-2014
SUPPORTING COURSES
20
BIO 364 Immunology
MTH 114 College Algebra
MTH 115 College Trig
3
3
3
MTH 242 Statistics
PHY 202/203 Gen Physics I/Lab
PHY 204/205 Gen Physics II/Lab
3
4
4
PROFESSIONAL YEAR OF
STUDY
HOSPITAL:
CITY:
STATE:
ENROLLED:
EDUCATIONAL COORDINATOR:
29
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
135
Military Science
Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (MIL)
The Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) program was established at College of
Saint Mary in February 1975, when the College concluded an agreement to provide the
program of instruction with the military science department of Creighton University. This
makes College of Saint Mary the first women’s college in the western United States to offer
Army ROTC to its students.
The ROTC program is prepared and presented by the military science department of
Creighton University and the U.S. Army under an independent contract with College of Saint
Mary.
Program Objectives
The program provides training designed to qualify students for an Army Commission while
also preparing them for civilian executive and management positions. Hence, the student
may earn a commission while earning an academic degree in a discipline of her choice.
Leadership training is the core of the Military Science program and is required each
semester. It is accomplished, in part, through a leadership laboratory conducted each week
and field exercises held each semester. The Basic Course develops an understanding of
teamwork and leadership techniques. Leadership is enhanced through practical application
in drill, leader reaction exercises and tactical exercises in field situations. Additionally, there
are opportunities for optional adventure training in Helicopter Rappelling and Air Assault,
Airborne and Mountain Survival Training. Advanced course students plan, organize and
conduct the Basic Course leadership program, thereby enhancing their management and
supervisory skills. Further growth is achieved through field exercises and enrichment
activities, Ranger Training, Physical Training, and Cadet Troop Leadership Training.
Advanced Course
Although Military Science Courses may be taken for credit by any student, only those
students formally enrolling in and successfully completing the Advanced Course will receive
a commission. If selected for and enrolled in the Advanced Course, the student must agree
to complete the remaining two years of ROTC and to accept a commission, if offered, upon
completion of the course.
Each Advanced Course student must attend a 32-day Advanced Camp, normally during the
summer between their junior and senior year. Advanced Camp consists of the practical
application of the instruction and skills learned at Creighton, with emphasis on leadership
and physical fitness. Students are paid travel expenses to and from camp as well as a daily
working salary. All accommodations, clothing, equipment, and food are provided.
Army Reserve/Army National Guard Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP)
The ROTC Program is normally a four-year program; however, under the Simultaneous
Membership Program (SMP), qualified juniors (those who are veterans or those who have
successfully completed three years of Junior ROTC or Basic Training with a reserve or
national guard unit) may, upon the approval of the Profession of Military Science (PMS),
enter the Advanced Course and earn a commission. The student may apply for Active Duty
with the U.S. Army upon graduation.
Qualified SMP students may apply for scholarships under the Guaranteed Reserve Forces
Duty Scholarship program. This is a two-year scholarship that could be worth nearly
$38,400. Other scholarships may also be available. In addition to the $350 per month and
July 1, 2013
136
the Reserve unit pay, SMP students are still eligible for selected Montgomery GI Bill college
assistance programs. Total monetary entitlements for even a non-scholarship SMP student
during the two-year program could exceed $28,000
Special Opportunities
Students who have completed 12 months of service in one of the U.S. Armed Services and
have achieved junior standing may, upon approval of the PMS, be granted credit for the
Basic Course and enroll in the Advanced Course. ROTC credit earned at other universities is
transferable to Creighton.
Numerous associated and allied programs and extracurricular activities are available to
ROTC students. CTLT (Cadet Leadership Training) and NSTP (Nurse Summer Training
Program) are great examples of opportunities available to ROTC students. During the
summer after junior year, ROTC students are given the opportunity to travel to various
Army Posts throughout the world. These are designed to broaden their knowledge and
understanding of the military profession and to allow them to acquire and develop new
skills.
ROTC Scholarships
Four- and three-year scholarships are available to all high school seniors who apply and are
selected to receive these scholarships while they attend an institution offering a four-year
Army ROTC program.
ROTC students who gain acceptance to a professional school in the medical field are eligible
to apply for the Uniformed Services Health Professions Scholarship Program, which pays the
recipient a monthly stipend plus tuition and other academic expenses. These scholarships
are offered in medicine, osteopathy, and psychology (Ph.D., clinical or counseling).
Students desiring graduate and professional education are permitted to apply for deferment
of service obligation resulting from their ROTC enrollment until the completion of such
additional studies. This educational delay is open to those pursuing advanced medical, legal,
and seminary professions. Feel free to call if there are any questions at (402) 2801155/2828.
Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AES)
The Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program was established at College of
Saint Mary in 1976. The Air Force ROTC program is prepared and presented by the
aerospace studies department at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and the United
States Air Force under an independent contract with College of Saint Mary.
The department of aerospace studies is a regular instructional department of the University
of Nebraska at Omaha and functions according to the rules and policies of the University
and those of the U.S. Air Force. The Air Force ROTC program is open to both men and
women and is designed to develop the skills and attitudes vital to the professional Air Force
officer. Upon successful completion of the Air Force ROTC program and graduation from the
College of Saint Mary, cadets are commissioned second lieutenants, U.S. Air Force.
Instruction includes a two-year basic course (General Military Course — GMC) and a twoyear advanced course (Professional Officer Course — POC). Students already in college may
qualify to join ROTC without completing all four years. Call the detachment for more
information.
A number of Air Force ROTC College Scholarships, covering tuition and books are available
to outstanding cadets. For complete information on the Air Force ROTC program, contact
the Department of Aerospace Studies at (402) 554-2318.
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137
Aerospace Studies
Aerospace Studies on all levels are presented to Air Force ROTC students as professional
courses designed to enrich their overall academic experience. The academic curriculum of
Air Force ROTC consists of two distinct courses. The General Military Course (GMC) covers
the freshman-sophomore academic years and is designed to introduce the student to the Air
Force. The Professional Officer Corps (POC) covers the junior-senior academic years, and
provides opportunities to hone leadership skills in preparation for active duty.
The courses are open to all full-time students. Textbooks and uniforms are furnished at
government expense. All students are provided leadership experience through participation
in an accompanying leadership laboratory. All courses also include voluntary trips to
various Air Force installations throughout the United States. Students enrolled in GMC
courses are not in the military service and assume no military obligation. Students with
prior military service or high school ROTC experience may receive credit for portions of the
GMC program. Entering freshmen should register for AES 131 and AES 001 during
registration.
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Music (MUS)
The music department offers courses that develop vocal and/or instrumental performance
abilities as well as knowledge of music history and theory. Ensemble experience is gained by
participation in the College of Saint Mary Chorus.
Individual applied music instruction is available for any student from the complete beginner
to the accomplished performer. A student wishing to minor in music is required to take a
preliminary examination in music theory and perform an audition in her chosen applied
music area. The exam and audition will allow the Director of Music to effectively advise
each student regarding her course of study. A student should declare a music minor no
later than her sophomore year in order to complete the required courses.
All MUS courses are approved for General Education credit.
Music Minor
A minimum of 18 hours including MUS 118, 119, 346, 347, two semesters of MUS 247 and
4 semesters of applied music, attaining at least intermediate level (MUS 210-229)
MUSIC COURSES TAKEN FOR NO CREDIT
Select music courses, to be determined by Fine Arts Director, may be taken as not-forcredit, instead of as a graded course. The following process should be followed: 1) Fill out
add/drop form (Express Center), 2) Obtain the signature of the Fine Arts Director, and 3)
Return the form to Express Center with a payment of $50. The Registrar Office enters the
course on the student’s schedule with zero credits and a grade of NC. A course may be
changed to no credit any time during the semester by a written request to the Registrar’s
Office with no additional charge. Courses may not be changed from NC to credit after the
add/drop period.
Applied Music
Any student may register for beginning level applied music courses. Intermediate or
advanced level courses require permission of the instructor and necessary prerequisites.
Private lessons will be 30 minutes in length. Daily practice is expected of all students
enrolled in applied music courses. Practice requirements are outlined in each instructor’s
syllabus. Any applied music course number may be repeated for credit. (Does not apply to
MUS 108 and 109.) Instruction in additional instruments may be offered. Contact the
Director of Music for information.
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Nursing (NUR)
Nursing education at College of Saint Mary began in 1969 with the establishment of the
Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) Program. In 1979, a plan was implemented to enable
licensed practical nurses to earn an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing. In 1983, the
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program was added. The Associate of Science in
Nursing Program is approved by the Nebraska State Board of Nursing. The BSN Program is
designed for registered nurses (RN) who have completed the ASN Program or transferred in
after completion of another basic program in nursing that leads to RN licensure. Both the
ASN and BSN Programs are fully accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting
Commission (NLNAC) located at 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326,
Telephone: 404-975-5000. The Practical Nursing Program (PN) was started in 2004.
All students in the nursing program are subject to the general policies and procedures
described in the appropriate sections of this catalog and in the Nursing Student Policies
Handbook.
The Programs
Practical Nurse Program (PNC)
College of Saint Mary has a program for the preparation of practical nurses. The practical
nurse program is a full-time, 12-month calendar year program leading to a certificate.
Students will take general education support courses that will enhance the understanding of
the practical nursing courses in the classroom and the clinical setting. Graduates of the
practical nurse program will be able to provide direct nursing care to individuals with
common health needs within a structured health care setting under the direction and
supervision of a registered nurse or physician. Upon completion of the program, graduates
are qualified to write the National Council of State Board of Nursing (NCLEX-PN)
examination for practical nursing.
Practical Nurse Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the PN Program, the student will:
- recognize abnormal client alterations in human beings across the life span;
- demonstrate the steps of the nursing process and the steps of a client's
psychosocial and physical assessment across the life span;
- utilize nursing care plans as they relate to selected alterations in care of the
client;
- apply therapeutic communication skills in interactions with the client and health
care team;
- apply the legal, ethical and professional responsibilities related to the role of a
practical nurse;
- apply the principles of human growth and development in client care across the
life span;
- apply principles of teaching learning;
- provide care to clients that recognizes cultural and spiritual diversity;
- implement basic management principles in the care of individuals.
Criteria for Admission
1.
High school graduate with GPA of 2.0 or GED with appropriate signatures.
2.
Official transcripts from all colleges attended.
3.
Satisfactory completion of TEAS.
4.
Satisfactory completion of basic skills testing in mathematics and English
July 1, 2013
140
5.
competency. If not, all developmental courses must be completed with a
minimum of a GPA of 2.0 prior to enrolling in practical nursing courses.
Prior to program start:
a.
Completed health record, including immunizations and laboratory results;
background check and drug screen
b.
Current CPR card
July 1, 2013
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Practical Nursing Certificate
SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 120 Prin. Of Anat & Phy
BIO 121 A&P lab
OR
BIO 202 Anat & Phy II
7
3
1
3
BIO 203 Anat & Phy II Lab
1
Prerequisite Course(s) to be
taken before starting PN
program:
ENG 101 English Composition
ENG 099 (if needed by placement
test)
SUMMARY
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
3
2013-2014
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
PNC 101 Intro to Practical Nurs
PNC 102 Med-Surg Prac. Nurs I
PNC 103 Med-Surg Prac.Nurs II
PNC 104 Maternal/Child Prac.
Nursing
PNC 105 Transition to Prac
Nurs. Practice
PNC 124 Intro to Pharmacology
PNC 131 Psychosocial Concepts
In Practical Nursing
(3)
35
7
42
PNC 142 Nutrition
PNC 143 Integrating Prac.
Nurs. Concepts
PNC 171 Practical Nurs Clin I
PNC 172 Med-Surg PN Clinical
PNC 173 Med-Surg PN II Clin.
PNC 174 Maternal/Child Clinical
PNC 175 PN Practice Clinical
35
3
3
3
2
COMP
GRD
2
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
1
1
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
142
Associate Degree in Nursing
Students complete a curriculum that includes a combination of nursing, General Education
and supporting courses. Clinical practice, which is a part of the curriculum, begins in the
first semester and extends throughout the program. A variety of health care agencies in the
community are used for clinical experience. Clinical practice courses require a 3:1 ratio of
contact hours per credit hour earned.
Transportation to the clinical facilities is the
responsibility of the student.
ASN Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the ASN program, the student will:
1. Incorporate an understanding of the identified categories of human functioning
into the planned nursing care of individuals with multi-system alterations.
2. Use the nursing process when providing care for individuals with multi-system
alterations in human functioning.
3. Use effective communication skills and principles when interacting with the
individual client and significant others and in collaboration with other health team
members.
4. Apply knowledge of human development when caring for clients and when
interacting as a member of the health care team.
5. Use teaching/learning principles as related to self in the educational process, as a
member of the health care team and as a provider of client care.
6. Examine the role of the associate degree nurse as a member of the discipline of
nursing.
7. Incorporate selected management principles and skills while functioning within
the role of the associate degree nurse.
8. Incorporate concepts of family in the provision of nursing care to individual
clients.
9. Identify community resources when appropriate for clients.
The Associate Degree program is designed to be completed in one of two tracks: Nursing 2
or Nursing 3. The Nursing 2 track allows the student to complete the ASN degree in two
years. The Nursing 3 track allows the student to complete the ASN degree in three years.
The plan of study is determined by admission criteria.
The associate degree in nursing plan for the LPN is designed as a day program. Credit for
prior nursing education may be achieved through successful passing of the NLN-ACE PN to
RN Exams.
Graduates are required to complete a minimum of 72 hours, at least 30 of which must be
completed at College of Saint Mary. Graduates of the associate degree program are eligible
to apply to take the licensure examination to practice as registered nurses as described in
Nebraska statutes relating to nursing, 71-1, 132.14.
High School Applicants: Criteria for Admission to the Nursing Program
ASN Two – Year Track Criteria – Applicant from high school, the following criteria will be
used:
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143
Criteria
Data Required
1. High school graduate with cumulative
GPA of at least 3.0 (B)
1. Official high school transcript
2. Composite of 23 or better. No other
sub score lower than 21.
2. ACT report form recorded on official
high school transcript.
3. Complete minimum one semester high
school biology and one year high
school chemistry.
3. Official high school transcript
ASN Three-Year Track - Criteria
Criteria
Data Required
1. High School graduate with grade point
average of at least 2.75 (C+)
1. Official high school transcript
2. Composite ACT score of 21 or above. No
2. ACT report form
subscore below 19.
FOR PROGRESSION TO NURSING CLASSES: the student must have a CSM college
cumulative GPA of 2.5 and have completed a minimum of one science requirement and
math elective by the end of Spring semester. A second science requirement must be
completed prior to beginning nursing classes. (See Policy 2.6, Progression and Graduation)
The nursing program reserves the right of retaining only those students who, in the
judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal
suitability for nursing.
ASN Applicant with College Transfer Credit:
Criteria
1. Cumulative grade point average of at
least 2.75 with a minimum of C in all
natural and biological sciences
2. Completion of at least 12 semester
hours which must include at least two
science courses in nursing curriculum. No
development classes will be included in
the 12 hour requirement.
3. Successful completion of English and
Math requirement
4. All students will be required to take the
Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS)
exam to determine acceptance to the ASN
program if ACT is greater than 2 years
old.
Data Required
1. official college transcript
2. College transcript
3. College transcript, ACT, and/or
placement test score
4. Test of Essential Academic Skills
(TEAS) scores:
1. TEAS composite score of 64%
2. TEAS reading sub-score of 78%
3. TEAS exam may be taken only
twice in a calendar year. An
official TEAS score that meets CSM
requirements but was taken
elsewhere may be accepted if
taken within the last two calendar
years
July 1, 2013
144
5. The Director of the Nursing Program
will consider requests for exceptions and
will make final decisions on admission
exceptions.
5. All of above (see 1-4)
Current CSM (undeclared) student seeking admission to the ASN program:
Criteria
1. Cumulative CSM grade point average of
at least 2.75
2. Minimum of C in at least 2 of the
required sciences
3. Successful completion of MTH 112
4. Successful completion of English 101
5. Students with a cumulative CSM GPA
below 3.2 will be required to take the Test
of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) exam
to determine acceptance to the ASN
program. The student is responsible
for providing TEAS results to her
academic advisor.
6. The Director of the Nursing Program
will consider requests for exceptions
and will make final decisions on
admission exceptions.
Data Required
1. CSM transcript
2. CSM transcript
3. CSM transcript
4. CSM transcript
5. Test of Essential Academic Skills
(TEAS) scores:
1. TEAS composite score of 64%
2. TEAS reading sub-score of 78%
3. TEAS exam may be taken only
twice in a calendar year. An
official TEAS score that meets CSM
requirements but was taken
elsewhere may be accepted if
taken within the last two calendar
years
6. All of above (see 1-7)
Prerequisite Requirements for Clinical/Practicum Courses
1.
Performance Standards: Successful completion of clinical nursing courses
depends on the ability to think critically and to use the nursing process, which
includes communication, motor, and interpersonal abilities (Nursing Student
Policy 1.2). Technological adaptations can be made for some disabilities;
however, a student must perform in a safe and reasonably independent manner.
It is not acceptable to use a trained intermediary, as a student’s judgment may
be influenced by someone else’s observations.
2.
CPR Certification: Prerequisite to and concurrent with all clinical and practicum
courses. (Nursing Student Policy 1.3).
3.
Health Record Requirements: Prerequisite to and concurrent with all clinical
and practicum courses. (Nursing Student Policy 1.3).
4.
Clinical Agency Requirements: Prerequisite to all clinical and practicum
courses. Meet standards set by clinical agency such as investigative background
checks and drug screening* A felony charge or pattern of misdemeanors may
block a student’s clinical placement or ability to take the National Council
Licensure Exam for Nurses (NCLEX). (Nursing Student Policy 1.3). *Students
must complete the background check form prior to registering for classes.
July 1, 2013
145
The nursing program reserves the right of retaining only those students who, in the
judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal
suitability for nursing.
Undeclared Students must complete a total of twelve credit hours (these twelve hours must
include two required science courses and math course and will exclude all developmental
courses: MTH 098 and ENG 099). Students must maintain a 2.75 CSM GPA (transfer
course from other colleges will not count towards GPA) and will then be eligible to complete
application process for ASN program.
For progression of LPN applicant to nursing courses, the student must meet the
requirements indicated in the “Licensed Practical Nurse to ASN Applicant Criteria” found in
the College’s Academic Catalog and meet an accepted score on the NLN Advance Challenge
Exam (ACE) Book One if the nursing transfer credit is desired. (See Policy 1.7)
Licensed Practical Nurse To ASN applicant:
Criteria
Data Required
1. Graduate of a Practical Nursing
Program with a GPA of 2.75
1. Official transcript from practical nursing
school, and official high school/GED
transcript.
2. Current unencumbered LPN license
2. Verification of Unencumbered current
license
3. Evidence of positive references for
nursing
3. Two positive references: one work
related and one from nursing program, if
graduated within last five years; otherwise
two work related
4. Required Sciences completed with a
“C” or better
4.Official college transcript
5. Successful completion of NLN Advance
Challenge Exam (ACE) Book One
5. Official ACE results (81% or above).
6. Successful completion of the Test of
Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) exam to
determine acceptance to the ASN
program if ACT is greater than 2 years
6. Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS)
scores:
TEAS composite score of 64%
TEAS reading sub-score of 78%
TEAS exam may be taken only twice in a
calendar year. An official TEAS score that
meets CSM requirements but was taken
elsewhere may be accepted if taken within
the last two calendar years
7.Successful completion of Nursing 144
7.Official CSM transcripts
Graduation: Associate Degree
The Associate of Science in Nursing degree is granted by College of Saint Mary to those
candidates who have been recommended by the faculty of the nursing program and who
have completed the following requirements:
1.
A minimum of 72 hours as prescribed in the curriculum including math and
English competency requirements.
2.
A minimum of 30 of the last 45 hours at College of Saint Mary.
July 1, 2013
146
Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing
The BSN nursing curriculum is known in nursing as a ladder program. This means the
student will complete the associate degree at CSM, take the licensing examination (NCLEXRN) and become a licensed RN before continuing to the bachelor’s degree level. Transfer
students will meet admission criteria for the bachelor’s degree listed on the following page.
The nursing course sequence for RN's is designed to be completed either in 12 months or by
pursuing part-time study over a longer period of time.
Students complete a curriculum that includes upper-division nursing, General Education and
support courses. Independent and facilitated clinical practicums are an integral part of the
curriculum. Clinical practicum courses require a 3:1 ratio of contact hours per credit hour
earned.
BSN Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the BSN program, the student will:
1.
Use nursing process when providing care for clients (individuals, families,
groups, and communities).
2.
Use communication principles and skills that demonstrate critical thinking,
reflection, and problem-solving skills.
3.
Assist clients to achieve optimal level of development.
4.
Facilitate optimal transitions with emphasis on wellness and prevention of
illness.
5.
Incorporate learning theories, teaching principles, and principles of life long
learning into professional practice.
6.
Participate actively in the changing dimensions of nursing.
7.
Apply research to practice at the baccalaureate level.
8.
Apply concepts of leadership and management in nursing practice.
9.
Utilize the concept of family in a variety of health care settings with major
emphasis on preventive health care.
10. Apply principles of community in nursing practice.
Admission to Nursing Programs Policies:
1.
Students desiring admission to the ASN or BSN Program apply through
Enrollment Services and must meet the CSM admissions criteria, which is
articulated in the current Academic Catalog.
2.
In addition the general high school course requirements, the ASN nursing
applicants are required to have satisfactory completion of one year of high
school chemistry and one semester of high school biology.
3.
Application materials for the nursing program are processed by Enrollment
Services and then submitted to the Nursing Program Directors for review.
4.
Applications are review by the appropriate Program Director upon receipt of all
of the following:
a) Application form
b) Official copy of high school transcript or GED with appropriate
signatures
c) Official school transcripts from all colleges attended
d) Official school of nursing transcripts, if student has attended a nursing
program
e) Results of ACT scores and/ or TEAS scores
f) Two completed “Nursing Applicant Evaluation Forms” references
5.
All students who have graduated from high school within two years of applying
for the nursing program will be assessed for entrance into the nursing program
July 1, 2013
147
6.
7.
8.
9.
based on their GPA from high school and their ACT scores per the policy in the
undergraduate catalog.
If the applicant meets the criteria for nursing. Enrollment Services will notify the
applicant of her acceptance in writing.
A personal interview may be requested by the appropriate Program Director.
The nursing program reserves the right of admitting only those students who, in
the judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and
person suitability for nursing.
To participate in clinical/practicum courses, the student must have the following
on file: a) CPR certificate, b) Clinical Agency Requirements, c) Health Record,
and be able to meet Performance Standards (See policy 1.2. and policy 1.3).
.
CSM’S ASN GRADUATES PROGRESSION DIRECTLY ON TO BSN PROGRAM:
General Criteria
Data Required
1. Graduate with a GPA of 2.5
CSM transcript
2. Registered nurse license in good standing
in the state of Nebraska or compact state
2. Verification of unencumbered RN license
to ASN/BSN secretary before starting
semester
REGISTERED NURSE TRANSFER OR READMIT APPLICANT (GRADUATE OF NLNAC
NURSING PROGRAM)
General Criteria
1. Graduate of an NLNAC
program with a GPA of 2.5
Data Required
accredited
1.Official transcripts from high school,
nursing program, and any other colleges
attended
2. Registered nurse license in good
standing in the state of Nebraska or
compact state
2. Verification
license
of
unencumbered
3. Evidence of positive references for
baccalaureate nursing
3. Two letters of reference – one
employment related and one from nursing
program, if graduated in last five (5)
years;
otherwise,
two
nursing
employment related
4. Successful completion of Math and
English requirements, ACT Math
and
English scores of 21 or higher, or
completion of college Math and English
courses (non-developmental)
4. College transcripts,
placement test score
ACT
RN
and/or
BSN PROVISIONAL APPLICANT (GRADUATES OF DIPLOMA OR NON – NLNAC
NURSING PROGRAM)
Criteria
Data Required
1.Graduate of a diploma or non-NLNAC
accredited ADN program
1. Official transcript from high school,
nursing program, and any other colleges
attended
2. Composite college GPA of 2.5*
2. Official transcripts from Nursing Program
and any other colleges attended
July 1, 2013
148
3. Validation of prior credit
successful completion of NUR 372
through
3. Validation of nursing credit by successful
completion of NUR 372
4. Registered nurse license in good standing
in the state of Nebraska or compact state
4. Verification of unencumbered RN license
5. Evidence of positive
baccalaureate nursing
for
5. Two letters of reference – one work
related and one from nursing program, if
graduated in last five (5) years; otherwise,
two work related
6. Successful completion of English and Math
requirement
6. College transcripts, ACT and/or placement
test scores
references
* Provisional and seeks admission to the BSN program with a GPA below 2.5:
a. Admitted as provisional student
b. Must achieve 2.5 GPA for minimum of 15 hours, included in those 15 hours must be NUR
372, MTH 242, and BIO 366.
c. If the fifteen (15) hours are achieved with a 2.5 GPA or greater, the student is accepted
into the BSN program unconditionally and then must meet criteria as previously established
to continue.
Prerequisite Requirements for Clinical/Practicum Courses
1.
Performance Standards: Successful completion of clinical nursing
courses depends on the ability to think critically and to use the nursing
process, which includes communication, motor, and interpersonal abilities
(Nursing Student Policy 1.2 .). Technological adaptations can be made for
some disabilities; however, a student must perform in a safe and
reasonably independent manner. It is not acceptable to use a trained
intermediary, as a student’s judgment may be influenced by someone
else’s observations.
2.
CPR Certification: Prerequisite to and concurrent with all clinical and
practicum courses. (Nursing Student Policy 1.3)
3.
Health Record Requirements: Prerequisite to and concurrent with all
clinical and practicum courses. (Nursing Student Policy 1.3)
4.
Clinical Agency Requirements: Prerequisite to all clinical and practicum
courses. Meet standards set by clinical agency such as investigative
background checks and drug screening.* A felony charge or pattern of
misdemeanors may block a student’s clinical placement or ability to take
the National Council Licensure Exam for Nurses (NCLEX). (Nursing Student
Policy 1.3) *Students must complete the background check form prior to
registering for classes.
Progression in the Program
In order to progress from one semester to the next, the student must complete the program
of study in the prescribed sequence. A student who fails a nursing course will be required to
repeat that course before progression to the next level of the nursing curriculum. The
student must maintain an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.5, earn a minimum
grade of C in all natural and biological science courses, math, general psychology and
general ethics, and earn a C or SA in each nursing course. A grade below C or an UN in a
nursing course is considered failing. When a student is not successful in one component of
the nursing course, both components are repeated. The student must comply with the
nursing program policies and the ethical standards of the nursing profession.
July 1, 2013
149
The nursing program reserves the right of retaining only those students who, in the
judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal
suitability for nursing.
Graduation: Bachelor’s Degree
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree is granted by College of Saint Mary to those
candidates who have been recommended by the faculty of the nursing program and have
completed the following requirements:
1.
A minimum of 128 hours as prescribed in the curriculum.
2.
A minimum of 30 of the last 45 hours at College of Saint Mary.
BSN general education requirements may be exempt for those students who transfer at
least 15 hours or more from another institution into College of Saint Mary, have successfully
completed the course of study for the Associate Degree in Nursing at College of Saint Mary;
and have been licensed as a registered nurse by the State Board of Nursing. Students must
have a philosophy and theology elective. Any remaining hours to meet the 128-hour BSN
degree are to be selected in consultation with the program director.
July 1, 2013
150
The nursing program reserves the right to change the curriculum as deemed
necessary for the continuation of high quality education.
Associate/Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2013-2014
PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT OR TRANSFER
CREDITS <15
ASN requirements are in gray BSN include all 128 credits
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH 114,
PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or Thr)
CHM 100, 100L and 101
MTH 242 Statistics*
History (any history class)
PSY 101 Intro to Psychology
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
SOC 101 Intro. To Sociology
MTH 112 is prerequisite/
concurrent for CHM 100 and MTH
242 (for BSN curriculum)
SUPPORTING FIELD/MINOR
47
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ASN Major
1
61
36
1
COMP
GRD
NUR 110 Nursing Concepts
1
NUR 211 Nursing Concepts
3
1
NUR 212 Nursing Concepts
3
1
NUR 213 Nursing Concepts
3
4
NUR 100 Intro to Nurs Theory
NUR 170 Intro to Nurs. Clin.
3
3
3
5
3
3
3
3+3
3
3
3
(3)
Natural Sciences met with
supporting courses
SUMMARY (ASN)
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
SUMMARY (BSN)
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
MTH 112 OR ELECTIVE
TOTAL
COMP
24
36
12
72
47
61
18
2
128
NUR 201 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 224 Pharmacology
NUR 271 Nurs Lifespan – Clin.
NUR 202 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 272 Nurs Lifespan - Clinl
NUR 253 Complex Nurs Theory
NUR 273 Complex Nurs - Cllin
Upper Division Major
NUR 372 Health Assessment
NUR 438 Nrsg Theories & Rsch
NUR 452 Pop. Based Com. Hlth
NUR 453 Lead&Mgmt in Hlth
Care
NUR 455 Prof. Roles Issues in
Nrs
NUR 463 Nursing Mgt &
Leadership
NUR 472 Pr: Pop.Based
CommHlth
NUR 494 Capstone Seminar
ASN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 200 Anat & Phy I
BIO 201 Anat & Phy I Lab
BIO 202 Anat & Phy II
BIO 203 Anat & Phy II Lab
BIO 230 Microbiology
BIO 231 Microbiology Lab
BSN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
Interdiscip.Cultural elective
4
4
2
3
4
3
4
4
25
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
4
12
3
1
3
1
3
1
6
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
151
Associate/Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2013-2014
PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS WITH 15 OR MORE
TRANSFER CREDITS.
ASN requirements are in gray BSN include all 128 credits
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level I
ENG 101 Composition
Communications (Public Speaking)
Level II
CHM 100 Fundamentals of Chem.
CHM 100L Lab
CHM 101 Recitation (optional)
MTH 242 Statistics*
PHL 200 Ethics
PSY 101 General Psychology
PHL (any Philosophy course)
THL (any Theology course) (3
ASN)
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
General Education Electives
MTH 112 is prerequisite/
concurrent for CHM 100 and MTH
242 (for BSN curriculum)
SUPPORTING FIELD/MINOR
Natural Sciences met with
supporting courses
SUMMARY (ASN)
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVE
TOTAL
SUMMARY (BSN)
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
47
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3+3
3
15
(3)
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ASN Major
NUR 110 Nursing Concepts
NUR 211 Nursing Concepts
NUR 212 Nursing Concepts
NUR 213 Nursing Concepts
NUR 100 Intro to Nurs Theory
NUR 170 Intro to Nurs. Clin.
NUR 201 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 224 Pharmacology
NUR 271 Nurs Lifespan – Clin.
NUR 202 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 272 Nurs Lifespan - Clinl
NUR 253 Complex Nurs Theory
NUR 273 Complex Nurs - Cllin
Upper Division Major
NUR 372 Health Assessment
NUR 438 Nrsng Theories & Resch
NUR 452 Pop. Based Comm. Hlth
23
36
12
1
72
47
61
18
128
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
453
455
463
472
494
Lead&Mgmt in Hlth Care
Prof. Roles Issues in Nrs
Nursing Mgt & Leadership
Pr: Pop.Based CommHlth
Capstone Seminar
ASN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 200 Anat & Phy I
BIO 201 Anat & Phy I Lab
BIO 202 Anat & Phy II
BIO 203 Anat & Phy II Lab
BIO 230 Microbiology
BIO 231 Microbiology Lab
BSN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
Interdiscip.Cultural elective
61
36
1
1
1
1
4
4
4
2
3
4
3
4
4
COMP
GRD
25
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
4
12
3
1
3
1
3
1
6
3
3
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
152
Associate/Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2013-2014
PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR SECOND DEGREE (Student already has
bachelor degree)
ASN requirements are in gray BSN include all credits
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level II
CHM 100 Fundamentals of Chem.
CHM 100L Lab
CHM 101 Recitation (optional)
MTH 242 Statistics*
PHL 200 Ethics
PHL (any Philosophy course)
THL (any Theology course) (3
ASN)
MTH 112 is prerequisite/
concurrent for CHM 100 and MTH
242 (for BSN curriculum)
SUMMARY ASN
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
SUMMARY BSN
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
18
TOTAL
SECOND DEGREE STUDENTS
MAY USE TRANSFER CREDIT TO
MEET REQUIREMENTS, BUT
MUST EARN A MINIMUM OF 30
CSM CREDITS
19
3
1
1
3
3
3
3+3
(3)
11
36
12
59
20
61
12
93
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ASN Major
NUR 110 Nursing Concepts
NUR 211 Nursing Concepts
NUR 212 Nursing Concepts
NUR 213 Nursing Concepts
NUR 100 Intro to Nurs Theory
NUR 170 Intro to Nurs. Clin.
NUR 201 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 224 Pharmacology
NUR 271 Nurs Lifespan – Clin.
NUR 202 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 272 Nurs Lifespan - Clinl
NUR 253 Complex Nurs Theory
NUR 273 Complex Nurs - Cllin
Upper Division Major
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
372
438
452
453
455
463
472
Health Assessment
Nrsng Theories & Resch
Pop. Based Comm. Hlth
Lead&Mgmt in Hlth Care
Prof. Roles Issues in Nrs
Nursing Mgt & Leadership
Pr: Pop.Based CommHlth
NUR 494 Capstone Seminar
ASN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 200 Anat & Phy I
BIO 201 Anat & Phy I Lab
BIO 202 Anat & Phy II
BIO 203 Anat & Phy II Lab
BIO 230 Microbiology
BIO 231 Microbiology Lab
BSN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
Interdiscip.Cultural elective
61
36
1
1
1
1
4
4
4
COMP
GRD
2
3
4
3
4
4
25
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
4
12
3
1
3
1
3
1
6
3
3
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
153
Associate/Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2013-2014
LPN (PRACTICAL NURSING) TRANSFER STUDENTS
ASN requirements are in gray BSN include all 128 credits
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level I
ENG 101 Composition
Communications (Public Speaking)
Level II
CHM 100 Fundamentals of Chem.
CHM 100L Lab
CHM 101 Recitation (optional)
MTH 242 Statistics*
PHL 200 Ethics
PSY 101 General Psychology
PHL (any Philosophy course)
THL (any Theology course) (3
ASN)
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
General Education Electives
MTH 112 is prerequisite/
concurrent for CHM 100 and MTH
242 (for BSN curriculum)
SUPPORTING FIELD/MINOR
Natural Sciences met with
supporting courses
SUMMARY (ASN)
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVE
TOTAL
SUMMARY (BSN)
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
47
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3+3
3
15
(3)
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
ASN Major
LPN Credit for Nur 100/110/170
NUR 211 Nursing Concepts
NUR 212 Nursing Concepts
NUR 213 Nursing Concepts
NUR 201 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 224 Pharmacology
NUR 271 Nurs Lifespan – Clin.
NUR 202 Nurs Lifespan Theory
NUR 272 Nurs Lifespan - Clinl
NUR 253 Complex Nurs Theory
NUR 273 Complex Nurs - Cllin
Upper Division Major
NUR 372 Health Assessment
NUR 438 Nrsng Theories & Resch
NUR 452 Pop. Based Comm. Hlth
NUR 453 Lead&Mgmt in Hlth Care
NUR 455 Prof. Roles Issues in Nrs
NUR 463 Nursing Mgt & Leadership
NUR 472 Pr: Pop.Based CommHlth
NUR 494 Capstone Seminar
23
36
12
1
72
47
61
18
128
61
36
9
1
1
1
4
2
3
4
3
4
4
25
3
COMP
GRD
4
3
3
3
2
ASN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 200 Anat & Phy I
BIO 201 Anat & Phy I Lab
BIO 202 Anat & Phy II
BIO 203 Anat & Phy II Lab
BIO 230 Microbiology
BIO 231 Microbiology Lab
BSN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
Interdiscip.Cultural elective
3
4
12
3
1
3
1
3
1
6
3
3
Nur 144 Bridging LPN to ASN
3
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
154
Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2013-2014
BSN Transfer (already holds RN License)
GENERAL EDUCATION
MTH 242 Statistics*
PHL (any Philosophy course)
THL (any Theology course)
MTH 112 is prerequisite/
concurrent MTH 242
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
12
COMP
GRD
3
3
6
(3)
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
Basic Nursing Courses or
Validation Credits
Upper Division Major
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
12
61
6
49
128
372
438
452
453
455
463
472
494
Health Assessment
Nrsng Theories & Resch
Pop. Based Comm. Hlth
Lead&Mgmt in Hlth Care
Prof. Roles Issues in Nrs
Nursing Mgt & Leadership
Pr: Pop.Based CommHlth
Capstone Seminar
BSN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
Interdiscip.Cultural elective
61
36
COMP
GRD
25
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
4
6
3
3
BSN Articulation agreement from 2 year college (already holds RN
License) – 43 credits required at CSM
GENERAL EDUCATION
MTH 242 Statistics*
PHL (any Philosophy course)
THL (any Theology course)
MTH 112 is prerequisite/
concurrent MTH 242
Choice (ART, BIO, COM, ENG,
HPS, MTH, MUS, PHL, SOC, THL,
WST)
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
MINOR OR SUPPORTING FIELD
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
12
3
3
6
(3)
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
Basic Nursing Courses or
Validation Credits
Upper Division Major
NUR 372 Health Assessment
NUR 438 Nrsng Theories & Resch
3
15
61
6
18
28
128
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
NUR
452
453
455
463
472
494
Pop. Based Comm. Hlth
Lead&Mgmt in Hlth Care
Prof. Roles Issues in Nrs
Nursing Mgt & Leadership
Pr: Pop.Based CommHlth
Capstone Seminar
BSN SUPPORTING COURSES
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
Interdiscip.Cultural elective
61
36
COMP
GRD
25
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
4
6
3
3
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
July 1, 2013
155
Occupational Therapy (OTH)
Occupational therapists are essential team members in today’s health care continuum. They
assist persons of all ages who experience problems in their occupational performance of
self-care, home management, work, education, or leisure. Such services are provided to
individuals through medical, health, and social service community programs. The
occupational therapist provides services of assessment, intervention, case management,
education, advocacy, research and consultation in a variety of health care, school, and
community settings.
The Program
The combined Bachelor/Master in Occupational Therapy (OT) is a five-year program.
College of Saint Mary’s program requires courses from different areas: biological science,
behavioral science, core/general education, and occupational therapy. Fieldwork experiences
play a vital role in the curriculum by providing opportunities for experiential learning. Level
I fieldwork opportunities are initiated in the third year to begin synthesis of academic
concepts into practical application. Level II fieldwork/clinical take place in the spring and
summer of the graduate year and are arranged by College of Saint Mary’s Academic
Fieldwork Coordinator. All OT students must complete their Level II Fieldwork within 18
months following completion of academic course work. Students should prepare to be in the
clinic full time and possibly away from Omaha during most of their fieldwork. All travel and
living expenses incurred are the responsibility of the students.
Program Objectives
Educational outcomes of the OT Program upon graduation include: (1) the preparation of
competent entry-level occupational therapists; (2) the fostering of attitudes supportive of
professionalism, lifelong learning, service, and respect for others that will continue postgraduation; (3) the provision of a balanced curriculum of general education and professional
course work, with campus co-curricular activities for the enhancement of mind, body, and
spirit; and (4) the development of interpersonal and professional communication skills.
Accreditation
The Occupational Therapy Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association
(AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220,
phone (301) 652-AOTA (www.aota.org). Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for
the national certification examination for the Occupational Therapist administered by the
National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful
completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR).
Most states require licensure in order to practice. State licenses are typically based on the
results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s
ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination, attain state licensure, or complete
fieldwork.
Admission to Occupational Therapy
Students applying to the occupational therapy program must first meet the entrance
requirements set for College of Saint Mary as set forth in the “Admissions” section of this
catalog. Admission to the occupational therapy program requires additional requirements to
those of regular college admission.
High school graduates with no college credits must meet the following
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156
criteria:
1.
High school grade point average of 3.0 or above on 4.0 scale.
2.
ACT composite score of 21 or above.
3.
Successful completion of high school chemistry and biology and three years
high school math.
4.
Exemption from or successful completion of the Mathematics Competency
Examination and the English Competency Examination.
College transfer students must meet the following criteria:
1.
Completion of 12 credits required in the occupational therapy program.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward fulfillment of this 12-hour
requirement. A minimum grade of C is required for successful transfer.
2.
One required science course must be included in the above mentioned 12
hours.
3.
A cumulative college GPA of 3.0.
Transfer students accepted into the OT Program may transfer credits that satisfy program
requirements according to criteria available in the Registrar’s office. Students who have
graduated from high school more than five years prior to application to the program must
meet transfer criteria.
Progression in the Program
In order to progress from one semester to the next, the student must complete the
curriculum in the prescribed sequence. A student who fails an occupational therapy course
will be required to repeat the course before progressing to the next sequence. The student
may repeat only one occupational therapy and one non OT course. The student must
maintain an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0, earn a minimum grade of C in all natural and
biological science courses, and earn a grade of C or P in each occupational therapy course. A
grade below C is considered failing. The student must comply with the occupational therapy
program policies and ethical standards of the profession. The occupational therapy program
reserves the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of the faculty,
satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health and personal suitability for occupational
therapy.
Options at College of Saint Mary for students who are unable to progress in the MOT
Program are addressed in the OT Student Handbook.
Requirements for Clinicals/Fieldwork Practicums
1
2.
3.
Performance Standards:
Successful completion of fieldwork courses depends on the ability to think
critically and to use the occupational therapy process, which includes
communication, motor and interpersonal abilities.
Technological adaptations can be made for some disabilities; however, a
student must perform in a safe and reasonably independent manner. It is not
acceptable to use a trained intermediary, as a student’s judgment may be
influenced by someone else’s observations.
CPR Certification:
Prerequisite to and concurrent with all fieldwork courses.
Investigative Background Report:
A background check is required of all students prior to fieldwork/clinical
experiences. The background report is your responsibility to set up and
purchase.
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4.
5.
Health Record Requirements:
Prerequisite to and concurrent with all fieldwork courses. The OT Program
requires additional immunizations, drug, or health screenings as needed to
meet clinical agency requirements. In addition, the student must show proof of
personal medical insurance prior to clinical assignment. The student is
responsible for any expense incurred in completing this process. The student
may be stopped out of fieldwork courses at any time if not in compliance with
this policy.
After 128 hours of coursework has been completed and before graduate level
classes, students will receive a Bachelor in Rehabilitation Studies. The MOT
Degree will be awarded after successful completion of all coursework.
Combined Bachelor/Master in Occupational Therapy Degree. Second degree seeking
students who already have a bachelor degree can receive the Bachelor in Rehabilitation
Studies degree, if and only if they complete the major sequence, graduate courses and
general education curriculum.
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Master in Occupational Therapy/Bachelor in Rehabilitation Studies
GENERAL EDUCATION
43
COMP
GRD
Courses in grey are not required for students who already
hold a bachelor degree and are seeking the Master degree
only. Exception: If a 2nd degree student wants to receive a
BRS, six credits of theology are required.
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
1
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
COM 101 Oral Communications
3
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
3
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH 114,
3
PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
3
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
3
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
3
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
0
Physics) must include Lab
MTH 242 Statistics
3
History (any history class)
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
Theology (any class) – Theology is
required for the BRS
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
PHL 350 Health Care Ethics
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
SUPPORTING COURSES
PSY 220 Lifespan Dev.
PSY 410 Abnormal Psychology
SUPPORTING FIELD
BIO 200 Anatomy & Physiology I
BIO 201 Anatomy & Physiology Lab
BIO 202 Anatomy & Physiology II
BIO 203 Anatomy & Physiology Lab
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
CHM 100 Fundamental of Chem
CHM 101 Fund. Of Chem Lab
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
CORE CURRICULUM
UNDERGRAD MAJOR
GRADUATE MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
SUPPORTING FIELD
TOTAL FOR MASTER IN OT
BACHELOR IN REHABILITATION
STUDIES
3
3
6
3
3
3
6
3
3
17
3
1
3
1
3
3
1
43
62
33
6
17
161
128
2013-2014
COMP
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
GRD
62
Undergraduate Courses
OTH 101 Introduction to OT
OTH 200 Therapeutic Use of
Self
OTH 201 Fund of Health Care &
Occupational Therapy
OTH 301 The Nature of Occup
OTH 303 Intro to Theories of
Practice
OTH 350 Evaluation and the OT
Process
OTH 373 Intro to Level I Field
OTH 355 Prin of Health
Promotion and Education
OTH 360 Clinical Reason I
OTH 362 Kinesiology
OTH 365 Neuroscience
OTH 364 Vision, Cognition and
Perception in OT
OTH 375 Level 1A Fieldwork
OTH 414 OT in Pediatrics I
OTH
OTH
OTH
OTH
OTH
OTH
OTH
OTH
OTH
OTH
424
428
433
475
434
444
452
490
460
476
OT in Physical Rehab I
OT in Upper Ext Reh
OT in Mental Health
Level 1B Fieldwork
OT in Pediatrics II
OT in Phys Rehab II
Prin of Neuro-Rehab I
Princ of OT Research I
Clinical Reasoning II
Level 1C Fieldwork
Graduate Courses
OTH 540 Comm Based OT
OTH 552 Princ of Neuro-Reh II
OTH 555 OT Management
OTH 560 Clinical Reason III
OTH 561 OT Leadshp/Advocacy
OTH 568 Physical Agent Modal
OTH 590 Princ of OT Resrh II
OTH 593 Princ of OT Resch III
OTH 573 Transition to Level II
OTH 674 Fieldwork IIA Jan-Mar
OTH 675 Fieldwork IIB Apr-Jun
OTH 676 Fieldwrk IIC (Opt 3-6)
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
3
2
4
3
2
1
4
4
3
4
1
4
4
2
3
2
1
33
3
2
2
3
2
3
3
2
1
6
6
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed with (GCD)
after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete the
specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental courses cannot
be counted toward graduation requirements.
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Paralegal Studies (LAW)
Upon completion of the Paralegal Studies program majors will:
• Demonstrate comprehensive understanding of selected areas of substantive and
procedural law.
• Demonstrate an understanding of the paralegal profession and its ethical dimensions
• Demonstrate effective legal research and writing skills
The Paralegal Studies Program will be recognized as a center of excellence for paralegal
education.
The CSM Paralegal Program is approved by the American Bar Association. The paralegal
generally works as part of a legal team in a law office, in government, or in a corporate or
business setting. The paralegal functions as a case coordinator, researcher, one who
interviews clients and witnesses, accumulates evidence, and prepares legal documents. The
paralegal is involved in virtually all aspects of the legal process but they work under the
supervision of an attorney. According to the American Bar Association, law offices of all
sizes and in all practice categories are employing more paralegals than ever before.
The student is introduced to the various topics in law and to the culture of the legal
profession. In fact, the student receives instruction in many of the same areas that are
required in most law schools, although paralegals are not attorneys and are not authorized
to practice law.
Transfer students are expected to take the majority of their credit hours of their major
courses at College of Saint Mary. Transfer credits will be evaluated carefully to assure
comparability in nature, content and level of credit. Transfer credits in the student’s major
will be limited to fourteen hours for bachelor students, nine hours for associate students and
six hours for Certificate students The College only accepts transfer credits in law courses
from American Bar Association approved schools.
CLEP and challenge examinations will not be given for paralegal courses.
College of Saint Mary offers three routes to a career in the paralegal field: bachelor’s degree
program, associate degree program, and a certificate program for individuals who hold a
bachelor’s degree in another field and want to earn a certificate in paralegal studies.
Paralegal studies majors may not complete more than 6 hours of required course work in
their major, supporting courses or general education requirements by independent study.
Students graduating with a degree or certificate in paralegal studies must have at least in C
in all LAW courses.
Note: Some courses will have a service-learning component.
Minors also available for nursing majors.
A paralegal studies major may obtain a minor in any of several fields, including medical
science. See the Director of the Paralegal Studies Program for information.
Students in this major may not apply more than six (6) hours of independent study credit or
more than nine (9) hours of a combination of independent study, directed readings, or
internship credit toward degree completion.
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Pre-Law Studies
A number of our CSM graduates wish to continue their education by attending law school.
We have designed the following courses of study that will assist a student in that endeavor.
Students who elect to follow a “Pre-Law Studies” curriculum will choose among four majors:
Paralegal, Humanities, English or Business. Students will complete courses totaling 30 or
more credit hours in the chosen major. The Pre-Law curriculum is completed in addition to
the required courses in the student’s major and minor. The Pre-Law courses cannot be
used as a concentration area for Business Administration majors or as credit for a paralegal
certificate. Students will be required to take 17 hours in LAW courses: LAW 110, 200, 210,
220, 300 and 310.
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Associate of Arts
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
ENG 101 Composition
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number)
COM 101 Oral Communication Skills
– Paralegal Studies 26
3
1
3
Level 2
MTH 112 Intermediate Algebra
PHL 200 Ethics
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
Phy Sci (must include lab)
Global Cultural Diversity*
THL (any Theology course)
3
3
4
SOC 101 Intro to Sociology
3
3
3
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
26
MAJOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
29
12
TOTAL
67
COMP
GRD
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
LAW 101 Intro to Paralegal
LAW 110 The Legal Environment
LAW 200 Legal Research &
Writing I
LAW 210 Legal Research &
Writing II
LAW 220 Law Office
Administration
LAW 230 Litigation I
ANY 3 OF FOLLOWING
LAW 300 Torts
LAW 310 Advanced Bus Law
LAW 320 Estates, Trust, Tax
Law & Prob
LAW 330 Real Estate Law
LAW 340 Contracts
LAW 350 Family Law
ANY 2 OF THE FOLLOWING
LAW 410, 430, 440, or 450
SUPPORTING COURSES
ACC 161 Principles of Accting I
COM 210 Interpersonal Comm.
HSV 231 Interviewing Skills
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
PHL 105 Principles of Reasoning
PHL 220 Business Ethics
29
3
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
3
3
9
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
12
3
3
3
3
3
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
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Bachelor of Arts
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
– Paralegal Studies 41
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (PHL 105
in supporting courses)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
1
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
PSY 235 Social Psychology
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy course)
0
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
3
3
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
LAW 101 Introduction to
Paralegal
44
3
COMP
GRD
3
LAW 110 The Legal Environment
LAW 200 Legal Research &
Writing I
LAW 210 Legal Research &
Writing II
LAW 220 Law Office
Administration
0
3
3
3
3
LAW 230 Litigation I
LAW 231 Litigation II
3
3
2013-2014
LAW 300 Torts
LAW 310 Advanced Business
Law
LAW 320 Estates, Trust, Tax
Law & Prob
4
3
3
3
3
3
LAW 330 Real Estate Law
3
3
3
6
3
4
41
44
18
18
7
128
LAW 340 Contracts
LAW 350 Family Law
LAW 490 Legal Seminar
LAW ELECTIVE (OPTIONAL)
LAW 470 Paralegal Internship
(May be substituted for LAW
490)
LAW 410, 430, 440, or 450
(choice of 2)
SUPPORTING COURSES
ACC 161 Principles of
Accounting I
BIS 220 Adv. Computer
Applications
COM 210 Interpersonal Comm.
HSV 231 Interviewing Skills
PHL 105 Principles of Reasoning
PHL 220 Business Ethics
MINOR
Choose any minor in catalog
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits beyond
first major —must complete all
major courses and supporting
courses specified for second
major.
3
3
3
3
2
18
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
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Post Baccalaureate Certificate
GENERAL EDUCATION
SUPPORTING COURSES
Any one of the following:
3
BIS 220 Adv. Bus. Applications OR
3
HSV 231 Interviewing Skills OR
3
ACC 161 Principles of Accounting
3
SUMMARY
MAJOR
26
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
3
29
– Paralegal Studies COMP
GRD
2013-2014
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
LAW 101 Introduction to
Paralegal
LAW 200 Legal Research &
Writing I
LAW 210 Legal Research &
Writing II
LAW 220 Law Office
Administration
LAW 230 Litigation I
LAW 231 Litigation II
AND 2 OF THE FOLLOWING
LAW 300 Torts
LAW 310 Advanced Business
Law
LAW 320 Estates, Trust, Tax
Law & Prob
LAW 330 Real Estate Law
LAW 340 Contracts
LAW 350 Family Law
ANY 2 OF THE FOLLOWING
LAW 410, 430, 440, or 450
26
COMP
GRD
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
A person pursuing a Certificate in Paralegal Studies who already holds a Bachelor Degree,
as stated below, is eligible for LAW 470 Paralegal Internship as a law elective.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
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Philosophy (PHL)
The philosophy program, inspired by Socrates and guided by the mission of College of Saint
Mary, seeks to encourage learning, self-reflection, and personal growth by challenging
students to explore their most basic assumptions and emphasizing the importance of
seeking the truth rather than accepting the status quo. Philosophy forces students to see
things from unfamiliar perspectives, and thus opens their minds to new ways of
understanding the world.
Upon graduation, students who have taken philosophy courses will be able to:
1. Think critically about philosophical issues and express such thoughts clearly and
in writing.
2. Read diverse philosophical works with an analytic eye.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of some of the varying issues, terminology, and figures
in philosophy.
4. Formulate reasonable arguments for their own beliefs and defend those
arguments against criticism.
5. Continue the philosophical examination of their beliefs and incorporate this
examination into their quest for lifelong learning.
The General Education requirement is met by taking PHL 200 and any other approved
philosophy course.
Philosophy Minor
18 hours to be approved by the philosophy program director and the Arts and Sciences
division chairperson.
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Physical Education (PED)
The College of Saint Mary health and physical education field endorsement program qualifies
the student to teach health and/or physical education classes to children in kindergarten
through grade 12, and to provide leadership to promote community health and fitness. The
endorsement requires 54 credit hours in child development, content, and pedagogy.
Through course work and experiential learning, students develop knowledge, skills and
dispositions essential to implementation of age-appropriate high quality health and physical
education programs in private and public schools.
Physical Education Minor
18 hours including 6 hours from PED 123-155, 208, 308, and 12 additional hours approved
by the program director.
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Bachelor of Science - Health & Physical Educ. K-12 Teaching End. - 2013-2014
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH 114,
PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262, 320,
322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity
(EDU375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
41
1
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
BIO 362 Kinesiology
ECE 236 Physical Dev. &
Creative Movement
48
3
2
COMP
GRD
3
0
PSY 200 Child Psychology
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
3
3
PED 101 Lifetime Health & Act
1
3
PED ____Activity Course
1
PED 160 Nutrition
PED 165 Safety, First Aid &
CPR Ch. & Youth
PED 210 Individual & Group
Sports
PED 235 Aquatics
3
3
PED 245 Mind, Body & Spirit
Development
PED 315 Health & Fitness
Assessment
PED 357 Tching Elem. Health &
PED
PED 358 Tching Secondary
Health & PED
PED 360 Adapted Physical
Education
PED ___ Exercise Physiology
PED 496 Research Seminar
3
3
0
3
4
3
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
3
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
3
3
SUPPORTING COURSE
COM 212 Speech for Prof*
3
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSE
TOTAL
COMP
6
41
48
45
3
137
EDUCATION MINOR K-12
EDU 101 Intro to Education
EDU 201 Tech in Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych.& Measur
EDU 315 Assessment of Lrners
EDU 350 TeachRead: El & Mid
or EDU 351TeachReadMid/Sec
EDU 342 Children's Literature
OR ENG 262 Young Adult Lit re
EDU 360 Teaching Middle/Sec
School
EDU 375 Human Rel. in
Mul/Cult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist/Phil & Trends/ Ed
EDU 470 Stud Teach: Primary
OR EDU 471 tdTeach:Intermed
EDU 472 Stud Teach:Sec
EDU 495 Stud Teach Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Special Educ.
SPE 240 Guid.&Class Mgmt
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
45
3
3
3
2
4
3
3
3
3
5
5
2
3
3
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements. Student may be
required to complete prerequisite courses.
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167
Physician Assistant Studies Program
The Physician Assistant (PA) Profession
As Americans live longer with greater health care options, the demand for professional
health care providers is projected to rapidly increase. PAs, as health care professionals that
practice dependently under the supervision of a physician, are uniquely qualified to fill this
need. As a part of this physician-PA team, PAs are delegated a wide range of medical tasks
and skills. This sets the PA profession apart from most other allied health care professionals
who normally function within a specified range and with well-defined responsibilities.
The scope of responsibilities for a PA varies widely and is often defined by the health care
setting where they are employed. Generally, PAs perform interviews and examinations,
diagnose illnesses, develop and carry out treatment plans, order and interpret lab tests,
assist in surgery, provide patient education and in most states prescribe medications.
PAs are in high demand in many health care fields and work in all types of health care
settings including private offices, clinics, hospitals, correctional facilities, community health
centers and long term care facilities. The entry-level training for PAs focuses on primary
care; as a result, PAs are often employed in family practice, pediatrics, women’s health and
internal medicine. However, PAs are also found in other fields to include surgery,
psychiatry, rehabilitation medicine, and infectious disease, to name a few.
Education for PAs follows the medical model designed to complement physician training thus
enhancing the close working relationship they have with physicians. Upon graduation,
Physician Assistants take a national certification examination developed by the National
Commission on Certification of PAs (NCCPA).
Program Details
Length of Program
College of Saint Mary (CSM) offers a five-year combined Bachelor of Science in Human
Biology and Masters of Science in Physician Assistant Studies (MSPAS).
The Five-Year BS/MS Program
The five-year BS/MS program is an accelerated and challenging, but rewarding, program.
The program has two components: a three-year Pre-Professional phase (Levels I, II, III)
and a two-year Professional phase (Levels IV & V). In the Pre-Professional phase, students
follow a prescribed academic sequence to complete requirements for a Bachelor of Science
(BS) degree in Human Biology. This course of study consists of liberal arts and preparatory
science prerequisites needed for the Professional phase of the program. These courses must
be successfully completed by the end of the third year in order to enter the Professional
phase.
Degrees Awarded
Students who complete the required coursework of the first four years of the five-year
program, receive a Bachelor of Science Degree in Human Biology during the fourth year
(Level IV). With completion of the two-year Professional phase of the program, students will
be awarded a Master of Science Degree in Physician Assistant Studies (MSPAS) and will be
eligible to take the National Board examination for certification as a Physician Assistant.
Accreditation Status:
July 1, 2013
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A PA must graduate from an accredited program for licensure. CSM is currently seeking
accreditation for the graduate level component of the program through the Accreditation
Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA). CSM's
PA accreditation will be considered in the spring of 2016 in time for students to take the
professional level PA classes. The CSM PA program anticipates matriculating its first class in
fall 2016 pending provisional accreditation. In all circumstances students will complete a
baccalaureate degree in Human Biology in four years.
Progression Criteria
During the Pre-Professional phase, a student must meet or exceed the “Progression Criteria”
to continue in the program. Review of these criteria will occur at the initial advisement
session and periodically throughout a student’s Pre-Professional coursework. A summary of
the criteria are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Maintain an overall cumulative GPA of 3.4 or higher.
A grade of less than a C+ in any course after the fall semester of the freshman
year will result in dismissal from the 5-year BS/MS program. The student would
be allowed to complete the BS in Human Biology. In science courses, the student
must earn a B- or greater to proceed to the next level.
Complete a minimum of 500 hours of direct patient contact clinical exposure of
which 300 hours of can be fulfilled with a service learning experience. A
minimum of 20 hours must be spent shadowing a Physician Assistant.
Complete a criminal background check during the spring of Level III.
Provide documentation of immunization status on MMR, tetanus/DTaP, hepatitis
B, influenza and a tuberculin (TB) test(s) as required.
Students will need proof of medical insurance at Level IV prior to the supervised
clinical practice experience (SCPE) rotations as this is part of our contractual
agreement with sites.
Students meeting the Progression Criteria in the Pre-Professional phase are assured a seat
in the Professional phase of the program. (See the Graduate Catalog for curriculum
information on the PA studies coursework.)
Admission Requirements
CSM’s accelerated dual degree program is designed for students to enter as first semester
freshmen; however, transfer students are welcome to apply. Transfer applicants will be
placed in Level I only at this time with placement dependent on their prior coursework. See
the Graduate Catalog for information on admission for applicants during Level IV.
First-time / Full-time Freshman (High School Seniors)
• ACT ≥ 24 or SAT ≥ 550 Reading / ≥ 560 Math / and ≥ 1110 combined
• High school cumulative GPA: 3.0 or above
• Completed seven units of high school science and/or math
• Ready to enter Math 114 (College Algebra) or higher; Math ACT ≥ 24 SAT Math ≥
560
• Ready to begin General Chemistry (CHM 110); requires completion of/or
concurrent enrollment in College Algebra (MTH 114)
• Essay
• Participation in high school extra- and co-curricular activities
• Names and contact information for three references
• Ability to comply with the CSM PA Program Technical Standards.
Transfer or Current CSM Student Admission
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Cumulative GPA: 3.4 (15 or more credits) or ACT ≥ 24 or SAT ≥ 550 Reading / ≥
560 Math / and ≥ 1110 combined
No collegiate science grade below BReady to enter Math 114 (College Algebra) or higher; Math ACT ≥ 24 SAT Math ≥
560
Ready to begin or have completed General Chemistry (CHM 110); requires
completion of/or concurrent enrollment in College Algebra (MTH 114)
Names and contact information for three references
Essay
Ability to comply with the CSM PA Program Technical Standards.
Enrollment Disclaimer
There is a limited capacity in the Professional Phase (Graduate-Level IV/V) that leads to an
MS in PA studies. Preference in filling the Professional phase (Graduate–Level IV/V) each
year will be CSM students in the five-year BS/MS Program who continue to meet
progression criteria.
July 1, 2013
170
Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies/BS Human Biology
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
43
FYS First Year Seminar (any number)
(1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in first
three semesters
Communications (COM 212)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG 102
Advanced Composition
MTH 114 College Algebra
Level II
ENG 102 Advanced Composition
1
Global & Cultural Diversity**
3
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry or
Physics) must include Lab
MTH 115 Trigonometry
History (any history class)
PSY 101 Intro to Psychology
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy course)
PSY 220 Lifespan Development
3
3
SUPPORTING FIELD
CHM 110/1 General Chemistry/lab
31
5
5
CHM 112/3 General Chemistry/lab
CORE CURRICULUM
UNDERGRADUATEMAJOR
SUPPORTING FIELD
ELECTIVES (Count as Undergraduate
Electives
UNDERGRADUATE COURSEWORK
GRADUATE COURSEWORK
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
Undergraduate Hum Bio Crs
37
BIO 110 General Biology
3
BIO 111 General Biology Lab
1
3
3
BIO 300 Microbiology
BIO 301 Microbiology Lab
3
1
3
4
1
4
3
BIO 310 Advanced Anat & Phys I
BIO 311 Adv Anat & Phys I/Lab
BIO 312 Advanced Anatomy &
Physiology II
BIO 313 Advanced Anatomy &
Physiology II Lab
BIO 364 Immunology
0
BIO 330 Genetics
3
3
3
3
6
3
BIO 331 Genetics Lab
BIO 340 Biochemistry
BIO 341 Biochemistry Lab
BIO 366 Pathophysiology
MTH 242 Statistics or MTH 312
Biostatistics
BIO 192 Scientific Methods
Comprehensive Exam (minimum
rank at 25 percentile)
Graduate Level Courses
Prof Issues in the PA Career
American Healthcare System
1
4
1
3
3
3
5
CHM 230 Organic Chemistry I/lab
CHM 232 Organic Chemistry II/lab
PHY 202/203 General Physics/lab
PHY 204/205 General Physics/lab
MTH 114 College Algebra
MTH 115 College Trigonometry
PSY 101 Intro. To Psychology
PSY 220 Lifespan Development
PSY 410 Abnormal Psychology
SUMMARY
COMP
2013-2014
5
4
4
0
0
0
0
3
43
37
31
17
128
90
Continuous Quality ImprovementsTheory and Practice
Clinical Medicine I
Pharmacology
Clinical Skills I
Clinical Medicine II
Health Care Ethics
Clinical Skills II
Clinical Practice I
Integrated Healthcare
Documentation, Billing and
Licensure
Clinical Practice II
Integrated Healthcare II
CQI Project – Implementation I
Clinical Practice III
Integrated Healthcare III
CQI Project – Implementation II
COMP
GRD
1
3
1
90
3
1
1
9
3
5
9
3
5
15
1
1
15
1
1
15
1
1
*THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS/MS PA PROGRAM OF STUDY IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE AS
CSM IS CURRENTLY SEEKING PROVISIONAL ACCREDITATION AND WILL MAKE NECESSARY
ADJUSTMENTS TO MEET THE ACCREDITATION STANDARDS.
**Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed with
(GCD) after the title. Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must
still complete the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements. Student may be required to
complete prerequisite courses.
July 1, 2013
171
Psychology (PSY)
Psychology is the scientific study of human mental processes and behavior. Psychology
professionals fit into two broad categories. Applied psychologists are dedicated to helping
people with psychological or social problems. These psychologists spend the majority of
their time interacting with clients, and work mainly in private practice, schools, hospitals,
and clinics. Research psychologists are dedicated to understanding all facets of behavior,
including cognitive processes, social interactions, human development, the influence of
biology on psychology, and even the study of animals. All of these areas contribute to a
complete understanding of the psychology of the human being.
The Program
Students can pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree in Applied Psychology and Human Services,
or a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology. Either of the two degrees prepares the student
well for graduate school, and the Applied Psychology and Human Services degree is
specifically designed for the student interested in starting her career in the helping
professions immediately upon graduation.
Program Requirements
The student must maintain good academic standing, which means that the student must
maintain a GPA of 2.0 or better. In addition, Psychology majors must receive a grade of “C”
or better in all psychology courses and an overall GPA of 3.0 or better in all psychology
courses to remain in the program. Should a student attain a grade below “C” in any
psychology course, the student will have one opportunity to repeat the course at College of
Saint Mary in order to raise her grade.
A significant component of successful work in the field of applied psychology is the ability to
work effectively with others on an interpersonal level. Prior to beginning HSV 377, each
student will be assessed as to whether or not she possesses the appropriate personal
attributes required for the field.
Minor in Psychology
(18 semester hours): PSY 101 and 15 semester hours of additional psychology
courses approved by both the student’s advisor and the Psychology Program
Director.
July 1, 2013
172
Bachelor of Art
- Applied Psychology and Human Services -
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
44
COMP
GRD
1
Level 1 completed or initiated in first three semesters
Communications (COM 101,
3
200, 202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
3
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
3
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
3
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*-0
PSY 350
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
3
Theatre)
Science (any Biology,
4
Chemistry or Phy Sci) must
include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
3
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
3
PSY 101 General Psychology
3
Theology (any class)
6
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
Psychology Courses
PSY 101 General Psychology
2013-2014
51
33
core
PSY 200 or 220 Develop PSY
PSY 233 Group Process and
Theory
PSY 240 Research Methods
3
3
PSY 242 Statistics
3
PSY 332 Counseling Theory
PSY 350 Cultural Psychology
3
3
PSY 410 Abnormal Psychology
3
PSY 440 An Integrative
Approach to Psychology
PSY elective
3
PSY elective
3
3
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
SOC 101 Intro to Sociology
ELECTIVES
3
HSV 231 Interviewing Skills
3
HSV 377 Fieldwork Experience I
HSV 378 Fieldwork Seminar I
HSV 477 Fieldwork Experience II
HSV 478 Fieldwork Seminar II
SUPPORTING COURSES
BUS 323 Management Concepts
SOC OR PSY OR HSV elective
SOC OR PSY OR HSV elective
3
2
3
1
9
3
3
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
44
33
18
9
24
128
GRD
3
PSY 492 Senior Seminar
Human Services Courses
HSV 101 Intro to Human
Services
HSV 230 Attitudes and Values
3
21
COMP
3
18
3
3
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits beyond first major —must
complete all major courses and supporting courses
specified for second major.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
173
Bachelor of Art
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated
in first three semesters
Communications (COM 101,
200, 202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
- Psychology 47
MAJOR PROGRAM
COURSES
2013-2014
34
COMP
GRD
core
PSY 101 General Psychology
PSY 200 or 220
Developmental PSY
3
3
PSY 240 Research Methods
3
3
3
PSY 242 Statistics
3
3
PSY 235 Social Psychology
3
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology,
Chemistry or Phy Sci) must
include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
3
3
PSY elective (200 level)
PSY 301 Experimental
Research
PSY 302 Experimental
Research Lab
PSY elective (300 or 400
level)
3
3
1
3
4
3
3
3
6
3
3
PSY elective (300 or 400
level)
PSY 410 Abnormal
Psychology
PSY 440 An Integrative
Approach to Psychology
PSY 492 Senior Seminar
3
3
3
3
MINOR
Choose any minor in catalog
18
SUPPORTING COURSES
(6 hours from SOC, 6 hours
from HSV, PSY, or SOC)
SOC OR PSY OR HSV elective
SOC OR PSY OR HSV elective
SOC 101 Introduction to
Sociology
SOC (any # except for 101)
9
3
ELECTIVES
20
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
47
34
MINOR
SUPPORTING COURSES
18
9
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
GRD
1
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
PSY 101 General Psychology
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
SOC 101 Intro to Sociology
COMP
20
128
3
3
core
3
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits
beyond first major —must
complete all major courses
and supporting courses
specified for second major.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
174
Science (SCI)
Major and Field Endorsement, Grades 7-12
The science field endorsement qualifies the student to teach general science, physical
science, chemistry, biology, physics and earth science in grades 7-12. The endorsement
requires 51 credit hours of course work in natural sciences and students may choose
between a chemistry emphasis or a biology emphasis.
July 1, 2013
175
Bachelor of Science
– Science Secondary Education Endorsement –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Div (EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or Thr)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
40
MAJOR PROGRAM
COURSES
BIOLOGY FIELD
51
COMP
GRD
12
3
BIO 110 General Biology
1
BIO 111 General Biology Lab
3
3
BIO 330 Genetics
3
3
3
0
3
0
1
BIO 331 Genetics Lab
BIO 250/251 Zoology/Zool
Lab or BIO 266/267 Botany
CHEMISTRY FIELD
CHM 110 General Chemistry
4
15
4
3
CHM
CHM
CHM
Lab
CHM
3
3
CHM 231 Organic Chem I Lab
PHYSICS FIELD
1
12
6
PHY 202/201 College Physics I
with Lab
PHY 204/205 College Physics
II with Lab
PHY 395 Capstone
EARTH SCIENCE FIELD
4
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
3
3
EDU 101 Intro to Education
EDU 201 Integ. Comp. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psychology &
Meas.
EDU 315 Assessment of Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading:
Mid/Sec
EDU 360 Teaching Mid/Sec Meth
EDU 375 Hum. Relations in
Mulit-Cult.
EDU 427 Hist.,Phi.,&Trends in Ed
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Special Educ
SPE 240 Guidance & Classroom
Mgmt
GRD
1
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
SECONDARY EDUC MINOR
COMP
2013-2014
44
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
3
111 General Chem Lab
112 General Chemistry II
113 General Chemistry II
1
4
1
230 Organic Chemistry I
4
BIO 268 Environmental Biol
BIO 269 Environmental
Biology Lab
PHY 160 Physical Geology
PHY 164 Introduction to
Meteorology
4
4
12
3
1
4
4
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
40
MAJOR
SECONDARY EDUC MINOR
51
44
TOTAL
135
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
176
Sociology (SOC)
Sociology is the scientific study of groups, institutions, and societies with a focus on how
they are organized and how they change. Sociologists attempt to build theories and discover
uniformities about societies, communities, institutions, organizations, small groups,
interpersonal relations, social movements, social classes, and social conflicts. Knowledge of
these social forms and processes provides both an enriched liberal arts education and
preparation for various professions.
The sociology department, in cooperation with other departments, offers a social science
major for teaching endorsement. The department also offers a minor in sociology.
Minor in Sociology
(18 semester hours): SOC 101 and 15 semester hours of additional sociology
courses approved by both the student’s advisor and the Behavioral Sciences Program
Director.
July 1, 2013
177
Bachelor of Art
– Social Science Secondary Education –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Div (EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or Thr)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
35
COMP
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
HPS 110 American Government
1
HPS 131 History of U.S. to 1865
HPS 132 History of U.S. Since
1865
3
3
60
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
3
HPS 160 World Geography
HPS 210 American Foreign
Policy
3
3
3
HPS 260 Regional Geography
HPS 349 Nazi Germany
3
0
3
4
2013-2014
HPS 375 Western Civ. To 1500
HPS 376 West. Civ. Since 1500
HPS History Elective
3
3
3
3
3
HPS U.S. History Elective
3
0
0
6
3
3
HPS/SOC/PSY/ECO/Anthro.
ECO 131 Macroeconomics
ECO 133 Microeconomics
PSY 101 General Psychology
PSY elective
SOC 101 Introduction to
Sociology
0
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
35
MAJOR
60
MINOR
41
TOTAL
136
SOC/Antro Elective
SECONDARY EDUCATION
MINOR
EDU 101 Introduction TO Educ
EDU 201 Tech.&Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading
Mid/Sec.
EDU 360 Teaching Mid/Sec.
Methods
EDU 375 Human Rel. In MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil & Trends in
Educ
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Spec.Educ.
6
3
3
3
3
3
6
41
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
178
Spanish (SPN)
Students entering CSM and wishing to enroll in basic Spanish courses should enroll
according to their previous experience with the language. The following are the placement
guidelines in the Department of World Languages Spanish major:
•
•
•
•
•
•
No prior knowledge of Spanish at all: the student should register in SPN 111.
One year in high school completed: the student should take SPN 112, but not SPN
111 unless she has taken the high school language course 4 years or more
previously, or has received a grade lower than C in the last course taken.
Two years in high school completed: the student should take SPN 211, but not SPN
111 or SPN 112 unless she has taken the high school language courses 4 years or
more previously, or has received a grade lower than C in the last course taken.
Three years in high school completed: the student should take SPN 212, but not SPN
111, SPN 112 or SPN 211 unless she has taken the high school language courses 4
years or more previously, or has received a grade lower than C in the last course
taken.
Four years in high school completed or the student is a native speaker: she should
take any course above SPN 212.
If you are not comfortable with the class level that is being recommended to you by
your advisor, please see the World Languages program director.
Spanish Minor
The Spanish program offers students the opportunity to learn and improve language
proficiency, as well as cultural awareness. Courses with an emphasis in medicine and
business are offered to meet the needs of professional programs that have a need for bilingual graduates.
Courses
A minimum grade of C is required for every course that is a prerequisite for another course.
Spanish Minor
The Spanish minor has a prerequisite of first year Spanish language (111 & 112). After
successfully completing those first year courses, the student will take 18 hours to
include SPN 211 and SPN 212 (6 credits); SPN 321 and SPN 322 (6 credits); and 6
credits of their choice from among the other available courses listed in the catalog.
Students whose native language is Spanish or who have had four or more years of
High School Spanish can test out of SPN 211 and SPN 212 by passing a comprehensive
exam administered by the World Languages Program. Please speak with the Program
Director if you wish to take advantage of this opportunity.
July 1, 2013
179
Bachelor of Art
– Spanish Secondary Education –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity (EDU
375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
ELECTIVES
SUMMARY
44
GRD
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
SPN 211 Intermediate Spanish I
1
36
3
3
COMP
GRD
SPN 212 Intermediate Span II
3
SPN 321 Conversation
3
3
3
3
SPN 421 Advanced Conversation
SPN 322 Grammar and
Composition
SPN 333 Literature for Child &
Youth
SPN 495 Research Seminar
3
3
3
3
0
SPN 499 Independent Study
12 HOURS FROM THE
FOLLOWING:
3
3
3
SPN 351 Civilization & Culture I
4
3
SPN 352 Civilization & Culture II
3
3
3
6
3
3
SPN 411 Survey Literature I
SPN 412 Survey Literature II
SPN 444 Study Abroad
SUPPORTING COURSE
ENG 320 Linguistics for Teachers
3
3
12
3
3
44
SECONDARY EDU MINOR
3
1
GENERAL EDUCATION
44
MAJOR
36
MINOR
44
SUPPORTING COURSE
3
ELECTIVES
1
128
TOTAL
COMP
2013-2014
3
EDU 101 Intro to Education
EDU 201 Tech.&Inst.Mat. In
Classroom
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
EDU 351 Teaching Reading
Mid/Sec.
EDU 360 Teaching Mid/Sec.
Methods
EDU 375 Human Rel. In MultiCult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist., Phil & Trends in
Educ
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Sec
EDU 495 Student Teaching Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Spec.Educ.
SPE 240 Classroom Management
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
10
2
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
July 1, 2013
180
Special Education (SPE)
Persons with this endorsement may teach children and youth who are mildly and/or
moderately disabled who are verified as per 92 NAC 51 as students with specific learning
disabilities, speech language impairments (language verification only), mental handicap:
mild, mental handicap: moderate behavior disorders, orthopedic impairments, autism, other
health impairments, and traumatic brain injury. Persons with this endorsement may also
teach verified children and youth who are placed in multi-categorical programs.
Requirements for the Mildly/Moderately Handicapped Endorsement are the following: SPE
101/501, 220/520, 222/522, 240/EDU 540, 331/531, 333/533, 373/573 430/530, 470 or
471/571, 495/595, and 496. These hours are taken in addition to required hours for
obtaining elementary education or middle/secondary school certification.
Students who successfully meet state required competencies qualify for a Nebraska
Teaching Certificate and the Iowa Provisional Certificate.
Completion of the Special
Education program does not guarantee certification. Continuous growth in knowledge,
pedagogy and professionalism as well as satisfactory performance during student teaching
is required in the recommendation for certification. Transportation during student teaching
is the responsibility of the student.
Since certification requirements of various states are not uniform, a student planning to
teach in a state other than Nebraska or Iowa should inquire about specific requirements for
that state.
Intensive reading and writing experiences are integrated into all Teacher Education courses.
Appropriate use of instructional technology is modeled and integrated into content and
pedagogy of all education courses.
Minor: A minor in special education is available upon completion of 18 hours in special
education course work as assigned by the special education advisor.
Program admission criteria and requirements are identical to that of the elementary
education major (refer to elementary education admission, student teaching and
certification requirements).
July 1, 2013
181
Bachelor of Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
Communications (COM 200)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
English Literature
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
History (any history class)
– ECE/ELD/Special Education –
44
1
3
3
COMP
GRD
2
2
2
3
3
0
2
ECE 236 Phys. Dev Creat. Move
ECE 242 Admin. ECE Programs
ECE 334 Curr. Planning in ECE
See
Major
4
3
3
3
21
3
3
3
3
SPE 240 Guid. & Class Mgmnt
3
3
3
44
78
21
3
146
3
3
3
ECE 343 His. Trends in ECE
3
3
3
SPE 333 Pol./Prog. For Except.
SPE 373 Critical Issues in SPED
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
DOUBLE MAJOR
SPEC ED ENDORSEMENT
SUPPORTING COURSES
TOTAL
34
3
2
ECE 235 Observ. & Assess. ECE
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
History (any history course)
SPECIAL EDUCATION END.
SPE 331 Instr. Strat/Rem. Main
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
PSY 200 Child Psychology
ECE 231 Play, Creat & Artis.Dev.
In ECE
ECE 232 Language Arts in ECE
ECE 233 Health, Safety and
Nutrition
ECE 234 Mth, Sci & Soc Stud. In
ECE
3
3
6
SPE 222 Inter. Mat. & Assess
GRD
2
Psychology (PSY 101)
Theology (any class)
SPE 101 Introduction to Spec.
Education
SPE 220 Nat. & Eff. Mid/Mod
Han.
COMP
2013-2014
5
SPE/ECE 470 Student Teaching:
SPE/ECE 495 Student Teaching:
Seminar
SPE/ECE 496 Research Sem
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
MAJOR
EDU 101 Introduction to Ed.
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst. Mat in
Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. & Msrmt
EDU 315 Assessment of Lrnrs
EDU 342 Children's Literature
EDU 350 Teaching Reading: El.
& Mid.
EDU 353 Teach. Nat&Soc.Sci.:El.
& Mid.
EDU 355 Teaching Math: El. &
Mid.
PED 357 Health & Phys. Educ.
Methods
EDU 372 Integ.Fine Arts Inst.in
Classrm
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCultural Society
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
SPE 430 Diag. & Eval of Reading
EDU 470 Student Teaching: Prim
EDU 471 Student Teach: El.&Mid
SUPPORTING COURSES
MTH 112 Inter Algebra or above
2
2
44
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
3
3
OR
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
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182
Bachelor of Science – Elementary Education/Special Education –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
Communications (COM 200)
44
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
EDU 101 Intro to Education
PSY 200 Child Psychology
EDU 201 Tech. & Inst. Mat in
Classroom
EDU 312 Educ. Psych. &
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
3
3
3
English Literature
3
Global & Cultural Diversity*
(EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Life Science (Biology) must
include Lab
Physical/Earth Science
0
History (any history class)
3
Psychology (PSY 101)
3
Theology (any class)
6
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
History (any history course)
3
3
3
ELECTIVES
3
SUPPORTING COURSE
3
MTH 112 Inter. Algebra or higher
3
3
3
4
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
44
ELEMENTARY MAJOR
47
SPECIAL EDUCATION MAJOR
31
ELECTIVES
TOTAL
GRD
1
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114 or 262)
Level II
SUPPORTING COURSE
COMP
3
3
128
EDU 342
EDU 350
& Mid.
EDU 353
& Mid.
EDU 355
Mid.
See
Major
2013-2014
47
3
3
COMP
GRD
3
3
2
3
Children's Literature
Teaching Reading: El.
4
Teach. Nat&Soc.Sci.:El.
3
Teaching Math: El. &
PED 357 Physical & Health Ed
EDU 372 Integ.Fine Arts Inst.in
Classrm
EDU 375 Human Rel. in MultiCultural Society
EDU 427 Hist., Phil. & Trends in
Educ.
SPE 430 Diag. & Evaluation of
Reading
EDU 470 Student Teaching:
Primary
OR
EDU 471 Student Teaching: El.
& Mid.
SPECIAL EDUCATION MAJOR
SPE 101 Intro to Spec. Ed.
SPE 220 Nat.
&Eff.Mild.&Mod.Hand. Con.
SPE 222 Assess. of Diverse
Learners
SPE 240 Guid. & Class
Management
SPE 331 Instr. Strat. For Diverse
Learners
SPE 333 Spec. Ed. Law & Ethics
SPE 373 Critical Issues in Spec.
Education
SPE 470 Student Teaching:
Primary -orSPE 471 Student Teaching:
El.&Mid.
SPE 495 Student Teaching
Seminar
SPE 496 Research Seminar
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
31
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
2
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
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Theology (THL)
The Theology Program approaches the study of theology as an academic discipline with its
own methodology, and it challenges students to apply critical analysis and reflection to the
events, people, and issues that have shaped our world in the past and in the present. The
Theology Program integrates religious experience, meaning, openness to truth, and the
search for God into the students’ personal lives as well as their professional/career paths.
A major in theology can provide the student with theological background helpful to the
following professions: CCD/Sunday school instructor, Director of Religious Education,
campus ministry, youth ministry, theology/religion instructor in a parochial/private school
system, parish/Church work, Catholic journalism, etc. In addition, a major provides the
academic background for graduate studies in theology.
Study in theology is both rewarding and fascinating for students because of contemporary
cultural interest in both spirituality and religion. In addition, theology addresses the central
questions regarding human existence, God, meaning and purpose, suffering, sin/evil and so
complements any current or later study in other disciplines.
Religious Identity:
While College of Saint Mary affirms its Roman Catholic and Mercy tradition and identity,
students need not be Catholic in order to take or succeed in a theology course and/or
pursue a major or minor in theology. The Theology Program seeks to honor and engage
other religious traditions in conversation with the Catholic tradition. A spirit of respect and
interfaith openness characterize each course in the Theology Program.
Theology Requirements
Bachelor degree-seeking students are required to take 6 hours of theology to satisfy
General Education Curriculum requirements. Students should verify that a particular course
fulfills the General Education Curriculum requirement and that they have taken any required
prerequisites.
The General Education Curriculum requires two courses or six (6) credits in Theology. One
of these courses must be at the 200 level or above to count for general education.
Associate degree-seeking students are required to take 3 hours of theology to satisfy
General Education Curriculum requirements. Students should verify that a particular course
fulfills the General Education Curriculum requirement and that they have taken any required
prerequisites.
Major Sequence:
Students seeking a major in theology are required to maintain a GPA of 2.5 or above in all
theology and supporting courses, as well as successfully complete 36 credit hours of
theology, as approved by the Program Director. These 36 credit hours must include at least
1 course in each of the 5 disciplinary fields of theology (as indicated in Course
Descriptions): Moral, Scripture (Old Testament), Scripture (New Testament), Spirituality
and Systematics. The 36 hours also include the senior theology research project that is
completed under the supervision and guidance of an assigned member of the Theology
Program. Students with a double major will be required to successfully complete a senior
research project under the direction of assigned faculty from each program. Unless they
are double majors, all theology majors are required to obtain a minor in another discipline.
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Major Sequence (teaching, K-12):
Theology majors seeking a teaching endorsement are required to maintain a GPA of 2.5 or
above in all theology and supporting courses as well as successfully complete 36 credit
hours of theology, as approved by the Program Director. These 36 credit hours must include
at least 1 course in each of the 5 disciplinary fields of theology (as indicated in Course
Descriptions): Moral, Scripture (Old Testament), Scripture (New Testament), Spirituality
and Systematics. The 36 credits also include the senior theology research project that is
completed under the supervision and guidance of an assigned member of the Theology
Program.
These theology majors seeking a teaching endorsement are also subject to all the
requirements of the Education Program. During registration such students are required to
also consult with the Education Program in addition to consultation with the Theology
Program. The supporting course for theology students seeking a teaching endorsement is
PSY 203.
Theology Minor
18 credit hours in at least 3 of the 5 disciplinary fields of theology: Moral, Scripture (Old
Testament), Scripture (New Testament), Spirituality and Systematics (which are indicated in
course descriptions). Students should consult with the Theology Program Director before
registering.
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Bachelor of Art
– Theology –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Diversity*
41
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or
Theatre)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
3
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
3
Philosophy (any Philosophy
course)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
GRD
2013-2014
3
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
Required (18 credits)
Scripture: Old Testament: THL
_____
Scripture:New Testament: THL
_____
Moral: THL ____
3
Systematics: THL ______
3
3
Spirituality: THL _______
3
Research Seminar: THL 495
Theology Electives
(18 credits.)
3
3
THL ____
THL ____
3
3
THL ____
3
THL ____
3
THL ____
3
0
3
THL ____
TOTAL THEOLOGY CREDITS:
MINOR
3
36
18
3
GENERAL ELECTIVES
33
1
36
COMP
GRD
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
CURRICULUM
MAJOR
MINOR
Electives
TOTAL
COMP
41
36
18
33
128
SECOND MAJOR (optional)
Minimum of 30 credits beyond
first major —must complete all
major courses and supporting
courses specified for second
major.
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives.
Developmental courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements
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186
Bachelor of Art
– Theology K-12 Teaching Endorsement –
GENERAL EDUCATION
Level 1
FYS First Year Seminar (any
number) (1ST semester)
Level 1 completed or initiated in
first three semesters
Communications (COM 101, 200,
202, 212, or 225)
ENG 101 Composition or ENG
102 Advanced Composition
Quantitative Reasoning (MTH
114, PHL 105, BIS 140)
Level II
English (any except for 262,
320, 322, and 495)
Global & Cultural Div (EDU 375)
Fine Arts (any Art, Music or Thr)
Science (any Biology, Chemistry
or Phy Sci) must include Lab
Math (MTH 242 or 262, or
> MTH 114) or Natural Science
History (any history class)
Social Science (ECO 150 or any
Sociology or Psychology)
Theology (any class)
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning
Philosophy (any Philosophy crs)
General Education Elective (any
Liberal Arts Course)
GENERAL ELECTIVES
38
GRD
3
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES
Required (18 credits)
Scripture: Old Testament: THL
_____
Scripture: New Testament: THL
_____
Moral: THL ____
3
Systematics: THL ______
3
3
Spirituality: THL _______
3
Research Seminar: THL 495
Theology Electives
(18 credits.)
THL ____
THL ____
3
THL ____
3
THL ____
THL ____
THL ____
3
3
3
EDUCATION MINOR K-12
EDU 101 Intro to Education
EDU 201 Tech in Classroom
51
3
3
3
1
3
0
3
4
36
COMP
GRD
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
SUMMARY
GENERAL EDUCATION
MAJOR
MINOR (Education)
Electives
TOTAL
COMP
2013-2014
38
36
51
3
128
PSY 200 Child Psychology
PSY 203 Adoles. Psychology
EDU 312 Educ. Psych.&
Measurement
EDU 315 Assessment of
Learners
EDU 350 TeachRead: El & Mid
or EDU 351 TeachReadMid/Sec
EDU 342 Children's Literature
OR ENG 262 Young Adult Lit re
EDU 360 Teaching Middle/Sec
School
EDU 375 Human Rel. in
Mul/Cult.Soc.
EDU 427 Hist/ Phil & Trends/ Ed
EDU 470 Stud Teach: Primary
OR EDU 471 StdTeach:Intermed
EDU 472 Stud Teach:Sec
EDU 495 Stud Teach Sem
SPE 101 Intro to Special Educ.
SPE 240 Guid.&Class
Management
3
3
2
4
3
3
3
3
5
5
2
3
3
*Acceptable courses for Global & Cultural Diversity: All ELA courses and any course listed
with (GCD) after the title.
Some courses may be counted in more than one category. The student must still complete
the specific total hours for graduation by taking additional electives. Developmental
courses cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.
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Theatre (THR)
The theatre curriculum is designed to give students a broad introduction to various aspects
of the theatrical arts. All THR courses are approved for fine arts credit for General
Education.
Theatre courses develop communication, presentation, and interpersonal skills that are
useful in many careers.
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Women’s Studies (WST)
Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program that provides opportunities to examine the
experiences and movements of women’s lives. In Women’s Studies courses, students will
study feminist methodology and theory and learn how to apply these to past and present
situations. Students may choose from a variety of courses that focus on women’s
contributions in the arts and literature, women’s history, and women’s philosophy and
spirituality. Other courses study women in the professions and their position in current
culture. Some courses incorporate a service-learning project at one of the many women’s
centers or services in the Omaha area.
A minor in Women’s Studies complements any major chosen by the student and provides an
interesting and often neglected perspective in education. A student choosing to minor in
Women’s Studies will have the opportunity to explore past and current trends that affect the
lives of women in their careers and in their personal lives. This minor is excellent
preparation for future experiences in the work force and in graduate school.
Women’s Studies Minor
Eighteen credit hours of courses designated WST must be completed. Of these 18 credit
hours, at least 12 must be beyond General Education requirements.
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Course Descriptions
Accounting
ACC 161 Principles of Accounting I (3)
Introduces the principles, concepts and applications of accounting as a business decisionmaking tool. Focus is on the understanding and completion of the accounting cycle and
producing and analyzing basic financial statements.
An introduction to a computerized
accounting program is also included. Prerequisite: MTH 098
ACC 162 Principles of Accounting II (3)
Continues the development of the concept that accounting is a decision-making tool.
Emphasis is on basic cost accounting and managerial decision techniques. Additional work
with a computerized accounting program is pursued. Prerequisites: ACC 161 or permission
of program director. Recommended: MTH 112.
Art
ART 200 Introduction to Art (3)
A non-studio course designed to acquaint the student with basic components of the visual
arts and architecture.
ART 202 Survey of Art History (3)
A survey of the development of the visual arts from prehistoric period to the 15th century.
ART 204 Survey of Art History (3)
A survey of the development of the visual arts from the 15th century to the early 20th
century.
ART 206 American Art History (3)
A study of the evolution of American art within a historical context. Artistic movements as
well as the work of individual artists are presented in light of historical and cultural trends.
ART 208 Women in Art (3)
A study of the role and work of women artists from the Middle Ages to the present in an
effort to foster an appreciation for the contributions of women to art which have been
largely overlooked. (Also listed as WST 208.)
ART 211 Color and Design (3)
Basic introduction to the elements and principles of visual expression both for the design
student and for the individual who wishes to develop an understanding of art. Studio six
hours per week.
ART 213 Basic Drawing (3)
Designed to expand the student’s conceptual range and capacity for critical and personal
vision. Basic problems are designed to experiment with a wide range of materials and
techniques. Studio six hours per week.
ART 215 Beginning Painting (3)
An introduction to basic techniques of painting with acrylic. Emphasis on representational
subject matter, primarily landscapes and still life. Studio six hours per week.
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ART 217 Ceramics (3)
Techniques in hand building, wheel throwing, glazing and decoration. Emphasis on
functional and aesthetic design. Studio six hours per week.
ART 223 Printmaking (3)
A study of materials and techniques involved in the fundamental processes of silk-screening
and relief printmaking. Studio six hours per week.
ART 225 Jewelry (3)
Techniques of metal work adapted to three-dimensional design. Cutting, soldering and
casting techniques are explored. Students work with silver, bronze, and copper metals.
Studio six hours per week.
ART 227 Sculpture (3)
An exploration of different materials, such as wood, clay, plaster, and plastics. Emphasis is
placed on learning various casting techniques and use of tools. Studio six hours per week.
ART 250 Production Art (3)
This course will touch briefly on the various aspects of preparing art for reproduction
(primarily lithoprinting). This would include layout, design, typography, and actual
production (keyline, paste-up). Also included will be problem solving with photography and
illustration as it pertains to production.
ART 287 Experimental Course (3)
Media and techniques of this course will vary from semester to semester in line with current
trends.
ART 313 Advanced Drawing (3)
Advanced students will work out problems with the instructor that will use sound drawing
skills with thought-provoking problems in composition and individual expression. Studio six
hours per week. Prerequisite: department approval.
ART 315 Advanced Painting (3)
This course serves as an opportunity for the serious painter to study in-depth. Students will
work closely with the instructor in developing a structured experience, balanced with an
opportunity for personal exploration. Studio six hours per week. Prerequisite: departmental
approval.
ART 333 Photography (3)
Introduction to basic concepts, processes and techniques of black and white photography
including camera use, exposure, darkroom procedures, lighting and its controlled
application. Studio six hours per week.
ART 360 Teaching of Art (3)
See Education 360.
ART 391 Independent Project (1-2-3)
Individual projects carried out by the student under faculty direction. Prerequisite:
departmental approval.
ART 495 Senior Thesis (3)
Directed study in a major area, culminating with an art exhibit in the Hillmer Art Gallery.
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The College reserves the right to keep for its permanent collection one piece of student
work completed under its direction. An exhibition in the Hillmer Art Gallery is a privilege
reserved for those students whose works meet standards established by the art
department. Studio six hours per week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
BIOLOGY
BIO 100 Survey Biology (3)
Survey of fundamental concepts of biology relating how those concepts influence or may
influence the student’s life. Designed primarily for non-science majors. Lecture meets 3
hours per week.
BIO 101 Survey Biology Laboratory (1)
An introduction to biological methods using microscopic and gross investigations of plants
and animals. Lab meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 110 General Cellular Biology (3)
A study of the basic principles of biology. Course topics will focus on cellular principles,
metabolism, and genetics. Lecture meets 3 hours per week. No prerequisites.
BIO 111 General Cellular Biology Laboratory (1)
A hands-on investigation of cellular principles, metabolism, and genetics.
hours per week.
Lab meets 3
BIO 120 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology (3)
An introductory study of the cells, tissue and organ systems of the human organism.
Nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and excretory physiology will be
emphasized.
BIO 121 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology Lab (1)
Using a hands-on approach, students will explore major anatomical and physiological
concepts. Cytological and anatomical concepts will be investigated through models.
Physiological concepts will be examined though in-class experiments as well as dissection of
preserved pigs, and cadaver observation.
BIO 188 Experimental Course (3)
The subject matter and method of this course will vary in keeping with current trends.
BIO 192 Scientific Methods (1)
The Scientific Method is the foundation of each seminar. Different aspects of it will be
highlighted in different seminars but all seminars will strive to develop a better
understanding of the scientific method from initial question and hypothesis formation
through to the presentation of results. Students will also begin to develop critical thinking
skills by observing and evaluating presentations by their peers. Students will become
familiar with: the steps of the Scientific Method; proper experimental design and use of
controls; and, the basic format of scientific papers and presentations.
BIO 200 Anatomy and Physiology I (3)
This course will cover structure and function of cells, tissues, body organization, and the
integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: CHM 100
or concurrent enrollment. Concurrent enrollment in BIO 201 is required.
BIO 201 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (1)
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Application of anatomical and physiological concepts in a laboratory setting. Microscopic
analysis of select tissues will be coupled with cadaver inspection, models, dissections, and
laboratory exercises to develop a better understanding of the body systems covered in BIO
200. Lab meets 2 hours per week. Concurrent enrollment in BIO 200 is required.
BIO 202 Anatomy and Physiology II (3)
This course will cover the structure and function of cardiovascular, immune, respiratory,
digestive, renal, and reproductive systems, as well as metabolism and homeostatic control.
Prerequisite: BIO 200/201 and CHM 100. Concurrent enrollment in BIO 203 is required.
BIO 203 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (1)
Application of anatomical and physiological concepts in a laboratory setting. Microscopic
analysis of select tissues will be coupled with cadaver inspection, models, dissections, and
laboratory exercises to develop a better understanding of the body systems covered in BIO
202/ Lab meets 2 hours per week. Concurrent enrollment in BIO 202 is required.
BIO 225 Personal Nutrition (3)
This course will offer students an additional choice for the general education science
requirement. Topics will include digestion and absorption of nutrients, minimum daily
requirements and functions of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals.
Students will also study the safety and function of food additives, “fad” diets, weight
management, the role of nutrition in good health and fitness, genetically modified foods,
and world hunger.
BIO 230 Microbiology (3)
A study of the general and medical bacteriology, immunology, virology, mycology, and
parasitology. Lecture meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in CHM
100 or equivalent, or higher.
BIO 231 Microbiology Laboratory (1)
An introduction to microbiological techniques. Investigations of bacterial anatomy and
physiology. Lab meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 245 Introduction to Field Biology (3)
An introduction to the basic techniques and methods used to study biology in an outdoor
environment. A brief survey of botany, zoology, and ecology concepts will be included.
Multiple outdoor experiments, collections, and field trips will be performed. Students may
not receive credit for both BIO 245 and BIO 345. Lecture and lab meet 4 hours per week.
BIO 250 Zoology (3)
An introduction to the morphological behavioral and ecological diversity of vertebrate and
invertebrate animals.
BIO 251 Zoology Laboratory (1)
A hands-on laboratory investigation of the morphological, behavioral, and ecological
diversity of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Special attention will be given to animals
that are parasites of humans. Lab meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 265 Forensic Science (4)
This course will survey the major principles and techniques used in forensic science. Topics
will include study of human and skeletal remains, trauma to the human body, facial
reconstruction, forensic entomology and botany, hair and fiber analysis, fingerprinting,
pathology used in identification, and toxicology. This course will also include an examination
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of the techniques used in recovery, replication, and analysis of DNA. Lecture and lab meet
4 hours per week.
BIO 266 Botany (3)
An introductory study of plants, their classification, identification, structure, and life cycle.
BIO 267 Botany Laboratory (1)
A hands-on laboratory investigation of the classification, morphological, life cycles, and
ecological diversity of plants. Lab meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 268 Environmental Biology (3)
Study of the basic principles and concepts of the biology of populations, communities, and
ecosystems as they relate to environmental sustainability and biodiversity. Environmental
threats to biodiversity and environmental sustainability including use of water, mineral, and
energy resources and threats from pollution and climate change will be explored. Lecture
meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 269 Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)
A hands-on laboratory investigation of the principles and concepts of environmental science
laboratory techniques. Lab meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 271 Practicum (1-4)
A supervised program in which the student may gain practical experience by participating in
an off-campus program in conjunction with a hospital, school system or community agency.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
BIO 292 Research Design (1)
The Scientific Method is the foundation of each seminar. Different aspects of it will be
highlighted in different seminars but all seminars will strive to develop a better
understanding of the scientific method from initial question and hypothesis formation
through to the presentation of results. Students will also begin to develop critical thinking
skills by observing and evaluating presentations by their peers. Students will write and
defend a proposal for their capstone project.
BIO 300 General Microbiology (3)
A study of the basic principles of microbiology. Topics covered will include the history of
microbiology including classic experiments, microbial structure and function, nutrition,
growth, control, metabolism, and genetics of microbes. Diverse microbial organisms will be
covered and include viruses, bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae, and protozoa. Microbial roles in
symbiotic relationships, the environment, and the food industry will be discussed.
Biotechnology involving microbes will also be covered. This course is designed for upper
level biology majors and minors but is appropriate as a general education science course as
well. Concurrent enrollment in the associated laboratory, BIO301, is required. Prerequisite:
BIO 110/111. Lecture meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 301 General Microbiology Lab (1)
An introduction to microbiological techniques. Investigations of bacterial anatomy and
physiology, growth conditions, genetics, and basic biotechnology will be conducted. Lab
meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 310 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
This course will cover the chemical organization, cellular organization and tissue
organization of the body. Using an organ system based approach students will learn the
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anatomy and physiology of the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system,
nervous system, and endocrine system. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the
physiology of osseous tissue, muscle contraction and nerve function and conduction, as well
as familiarity with the anatomy of neural pathways and CNS regional specialization. Lecture
meets 3 hours 20 minutes per week. Prerequisites: CHM 100 (not concurrent)
BIO 311 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (1)
Lab meets 2 hours per week.
BIO 312 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
Application of advanced anatomical and physiological concepts in a laboratory setting.
Microscopic analysis of select tissues will be coupled with cadaver inspection, models,
dissections, and laboratory exercises to develop a better understanding of the body systems
covered in BIO 310 and 311. Prerequisite: BIO 310/311
BIO 313 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (1)
Lab meets 2 hours per week.
BIO 330 Genetics (3)
An introduction to the basis of inheritance from molecular to organismal level with emphasis
on the role of genetics in evolution and adaptation to the environment, as well as
considerable human application. Lecture meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIO 110,
111, MTH 114.
BIO 331 Genetics Laboratory (1)
A study of basic genetic principles with the aid of a variety of organisms and online lab
exercises. The laboratory requires considerable independent work. Prerequisite: concurrent
enrollment in BIO 330 or permission. Lab meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 340 Biochemistry (4)
Structure and function of proteins (and enzymes), lipids and carbohydrates are discussed.
Energetics of biochemical reactions and enzyme kinetics are included. Lecture meets 4
hours per week. Prerequisite: Advanced standing in chemistry curriculum including
successful completion of the following courses or equivalent or permission: CHM 232/233 or
permission of the instructor. (Also listed as CHM 340.)
BIO 341 Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
Application of basic methods and techniques in biochemistry. Chemical and enzymatic
analyses are performed by colorimetric, electrophoretic and chromatographic techniques.
Lab meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in BIO 340 or permission
of the instructor. (Also listed as CHM 341.)
BIO 345 Field Biology (3)
An introduction to the basic techniques and methods used to study biology in an outdoor
environment. A brief survey of botany, zoology, and ecology concepts will be included.
Multiple outdoor experiments, collections, and field trips will be performed. Students
enrolled in BIO 345 should be able to apply the knowledge and techniques learned to design
and implement a field research project that demonstrates an understanding of the scientific
method as well as mastery of the field techniques covered in the class. Students may not
receive credit for both BIO 245 and BIO 345. Lecture and lab meet 4 hours per week.
BIO 361 Teaching of Biology (3)
See Education 360.
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BIO 364 Immunology (3)
A study of the nature and theory of antigen-antibody interaction, mechanisms of immunity,
principles and procedures of serodiagnosis. Prerequisites: BIO 110/111 or permission of the
instructor. (Also listed as MDT 364.) Lecture meets 3 hours per week.
BIO 366 Pathophysiology (3)
Deals with the disruption of normal physiology with the alterations, derangements, and
mechanisms involved in disruption and how they manifest themselves as signs, symptoms,
physical and laboratory findings. General methods of treatment will also be covered.
Prerequisites: BIO 202 and 203 or permission of the instructor. Lecture meets 3 hours per
week.
BIO 390 Molecular Biology (3)
Structure, function and regulation of genes and gene products are discussed extensively
using both eucaryotic and procaryotic systems. Cell structural/functional relationships are
stressed. Special emphasis is placed on biotechnology as it is employed in understanding
cell structure and regulation of cellular physiology. Lecture meets 3 hours per week.
Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in BIO 110/111, 250/251, 266/267 or departmental
approval.
BIO 391 Molecular Biology Lab (1)
Application of basic methods and techniques of biotechnology. Gene cloning, identification,
and mutagenesis techniques are emphasized. Methods employed are southern blots,
northern blots, western blots, DNA isolation, RNA isolation, plasmid and viral cloning
vectors, and chromatography. Lab meets 3 hours per week. Concurrent enrollment in BIO
390, or departmental approval.
BIO 392 Scientific Literacy (1)
The Scientific Method is the foundation of each seminar. Different aspects of it will be
highlighted in different seminars but all seminars will strive to develop a better
understanding of the scientific method from initial question and hypothesis formation
through to the presentation of results. Students will also begin to develop critical thinking
skills by observing and evaluating presentations by their peers. Students will improve their
scientific literacy by participating in a journal club. Primary literature will be discussed and
presented and critical analyses of experimental designs in journal articles and as presented
by students in other seminar courses (BIO 192, BIO 292, BIO 492)
BIO 400 Introduction to Toxicology (3)
The basic principles of toxicology covered will include measuring toxicity and assessing risk,
how toxins are absorbed, distributed, metabolized and excreted by the human body,
carcinogenesis and teratogenesis, response of different organ system to toxins, ecological
and environmental issues. Specific toxins or classes of toxins will be covered as appropriate
for each topic. A list of specific toxins that might be discussed includes but is not limited to
heavy metals, benzene, pesticides, nitrates, tetrodotoxin, mustard gas, nerve gases,
venoms, ricin or other compounds that appear in the news. Lecture meets 3 hours per
week. Prerequisite: BIO100/101 or BIO110/111.
BIO 420 Directed Readings in Biology and Medicine (1-3)
An overview of selected readings in biology and/or medicine designed to give the student a
general knowledge of the topics at the level of present day research. Prerequisite:
permission of the instructor.
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BIO 460 Gross Anatomy (5)
The course will offer a small number of students (capped at 6) an opportunity to learn
macroscopic (gross) anatomy using the cadaver as a teaching tool. Modeled after medical
school gross anatomy, the students begin the semester with an intact cadaver and, over the
course of the semester, work their way through dissecting the entire body. “Class time” is
really dissection time, as students learn by identifying structures, tissue planes and the
relationships between them using the dissection guide, cadaver and anatomy atlases as
resources. Class time is also used to present information to each other as well as to the
course instructor (part of assessment). The course requires a significant time commitment
on the part of the student – they will be in the lab dissecting for at least 4-5 hours per week
(often times more). In addition, students are responsible for a wide range of anatomic
terms and structures, so study time is also a significant requirement of the course. This
course is perfect for the student who enjoyed anatomy and wants to take their
understanding of the structure of the body to the next level. Prerequisite: C or better in
BIO 200 and BIO 202.
BIO 465 Advanced Forensic Science (4)
This course will examine advanced topics and lab techniques used in forensic science. Topics
will include study of human and skeletal remains, facial reconstruction, forensic entomology
and botany, hair and fiber analysis, fingerprinting, toxicology and DNA analysis & profiling.
Students will cap the course off by giving oral and poster presentations on a real forensic
case they researched. Lecture and lab meet 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: BIO 265.
BIO 473 Capstone Project (1-4)
Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, the student designs an independent project to be
completed before graduation. The final report must be written in scientific style as a thesis
and approved by two faculty members. A seminar presentation of the student’s project at
Scholar’s Day and possibly the Nebraska Academy of Sciences is required before
graduation. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
BIO 491 Advanced Topics in Biology (1-4)
An independent project enabling a student to gain some expertise in an area of interest.
Prerequisite: permission of the program director.
BIO 492 Scientific Communication (1)
The Scientific Method is the foundation of each seminar. Different aspects of it will be
highlighted in different seminars but all seminars will strive to develop a better
understanding of the scientific method from initial question and hypothesis formation
through to the presentation of results. Students will also begin to develop critical thinking
skills by observing and evaluating presentations by their peers. Students will develop
scientific writing skills by writing a final research report and presentation skills by
presenting their research project in preparation for Scholars Day.
Business: Analytics and Strategic Communication
BUS 101 Introduction to Business (3)
Students are introduced to business from a multitude of perspectives ranging from the
contributions made by free enterprise to the U.S. economy to an examination of the
interaction and interdependence among the discrete functions within a company. This
course also provides an overview of careers in business.
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BUS 150 Personal Finance (3)
An elective within the business program, personal finance is a study of the principles of
sound financial decision making in the context of the U.S. Economic structure. Students will
be guided through goal setting, techniques and guidelines for choosing between financial
alternatives, and processes for monitoring and evaluating financial performance. Major
topics are goal setting, budgeting, consumer credit, insurance, taxes, retirement and estate
planning. This course is a survey course. In-depth investment, tax, retirement and estate
concepts are presented in other courses.
BUS 212 Employment Law (3)
This course will provide students with an overview of the legal aspects under Federal and
state law of employment discrimination, including Title VII, the Equal Pay Act, disability
statutes, and sexual harassment. This course will also address employment issues found in
worker’s compensation law, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fair Labor Standards
Act, OSHA, family leave acts, and the legal issues involved in interviewing, hiring, discipline,
and firing. Prerequisite: BUS/LAW 110 and sophomore standing.)
BUS 226 Personnel Supervision (3)
Study of the principles of authority and responsibility, delegation and communication;
organization charts, job descriptions, policies and procedures; employee motivation,
discipline and performance evaluation.
BUS 230 Principles of Electronic Commerce (3)
This course provides an overview of E-commerce as it impacts business functions such as
accounting, economics, finance, management and marketing as well as addresses topics
such as security and safety when doing business in the Internet environment. Prerequisite:
None. (Also listed as BIS 230)
BUS 231 Interviewing Skills and Case Management (3)
Methods of obtaining relevant information in a variety of settings are discussed and
practiced. The documentation, reporting and use of information are presented for selection
of personnel or case planning. Methods of designing and implementing programs for clients
are practiced. (Also listed as COM and HSV 231.)
BUS 233 Group Process: Theory and Practice (3)
Theoretical and practical approaches to conducting and participating in task- and
experience-oriented groups are presented. Students practice various process skills in a
simulated group setting. A major focus is on assisting group members in working toward
and achieving group goals in a variety of settings. (Also listed as COM, PSY and HSV 233.)
BUS 242 Statistics (3)
Collection and tabulation of data, averages and measures of dispersement, correlational and
regression analysis, probability and sampling, hypothesis testing, performing Chi Square, t,
f, and some non-parametric tests. Prerequisites: C or better in MTH 112 or 3 years of high
school mathematics including advanced algebra or permission of program director. (Also
listed as MTH and PSY 242.)
BUS 300 Business Writing (3)
Being successful in business requires an ability to communicate effectively in writing. This
course focuses on appropriate techniques for framing and communicating various types of
information. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
BUS 317 Business Analytics (3)
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This course is an introduction of the use of data driven, analytical, and computing
approaches for effective business decision making. Students will be introduced to the
fundamentals of business analytics, the role of analytics in business performance, and the
tools that can be used to perform analytics in different business functions. The course will
provide a foundation for students to develop skills in these areas and enhance their
knowledge and marketability.
BUS 321 Financial Management (3)
A study of the principles governing the financial operations of business, the tools of financial
analysis, the methods of financing an organization, capital budgeting, mergers,
reorganizations, and bankruptcy. The role of accounting information in the financial
management process is emphasized. Prerequisites: ACC 161, 162, and MTH 112.
Recommended: MTH 242.
BUS 322 Investments (3)
The purpose of this course is to enable the student to gain an understanding of various
financial investments from an individual and, to a lesser degree, an institutional viewpoint.
Techniques of analysis of stocks, bonds, and other investments will be studied. The student
will also develop an appreciation of the importance of different financial models and markets
of the American free enterprise system.
BUS 323 Management Concepts: Theory and Application (3)
The study of the fundamental principles and techniques employed in the administration and
management of organizations. Management functions, including planning, organizing,
staffing, directing, coordinating, reporting and budgeting, are covered as well as leadership,
interpersonal relations and decision-making. A discipline-specific research project ties
application to theory. Prerequisite: 30 semester hours
BUS 325 Organizational Behavior (3)
This course is designed to provide an understanding of human behavior within
organizational environment and includes topics such as group dynamics, effective
communications, potential impact of organizational structure on communications and
processes, and change management.. (Also listed as PSY and SOC 325.)
BUS 327 Human Resources Management (3)
Contemporary theory and practices relating to the management of people together with the
theory and applications of behavioral science as a part of the total management system.
BUS 328 Leadership (3)
This Leadership course will prepare students for leadership roles; acquiring the knowledge,
attributes, skills and resources for roles in the community and in their professions. The
course will provide the students with both the theoretical and practical skills necessary to be
effective in a variety of settings. The course is a scholarly exploration of the complex
concepts of leadership. Students will learn to think critically about the leadership
phenomenon. We will consider leadership theories, delve into research on leadership,
examine leadership themes both historic and current as they apply to today's environment
providing a foundation for students to build and improve their leadership style.
BUS 329 Business Communication (3)
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Communication is essential for all business professionals. Business Communication teaches
students to communicate their ideas through writing, presenting, and interpersonal
discussions. Students are introduced to current business communication technologies and
techniques, and to longstanding principles for communicating individually. Students will
create several written assignments, give a variety of business presentations, and develop
interpersonal communication skills.
BUS 330 Project Management (3)
This course will provide the student with an understanding of methods and practices in the
field of project management. Project and program management is one of the fastest
growing professions in today’s business world. This course will study the functions involved
in project and program management and allow the student to develop a full understanding
of every aspect needed to become a competent project management professional. Students
will use project management software for an assigned project during the semester.
Prerequisite: BUS 323 or permission of the program director. (Also listed as BIS 330).
BUS 331 Money and Banking (3)
A descriptive and analytical study of the basic principles of money, banking, and finance as
they are related to business and public policy. A study of the creation of the nation’s money
supply and the impact of monetary policies on the performance of the economy.
Prerequisites: ECO 131. Recommended: MTH 112. (Also listed as ECO 331.)
BUS 334 Principles of Marketing (3)
A study of modern methods of marketing goods and services. Buying and selling behavior
and the marketing environment are related to promotion, pricing, distribution, and product
design decisions. Prerequisite: 30 semester hours.
BUS 335 Consumer Behavior (3)
A study of the economic, anthropological, political, psychological, and social aspects of the
consumer as they relate to the consumer decision-making process. Prerequisite: BUS 334.
BUS 336 Principles of Advertising (3)
A study of fundamental aspects of advertising, including media selection, test markets,
targeting strategies, market positioning, and government regulations in the field of
advertising. Prerequisite: BUS 334.
BUS 338 Public Relations (3)
This broad-based course provides an introduction to the field of public relations. Areas
covered are the communications process; publicity; media relations and selection;
promotion; community relations and planning; tools used in developing public relations and
publicity, and improving customer satisfaction; relationship-building strategies; and ethics.
PR strategies and tactics, theories, processes, and techniques involved in researching,
planning, scheduling, implementing, and measuring programs designed to influence public
opinion and human behavior are used. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and BUS 334.
BUS 339 Sales (3)
This course offers a study of the fundamental techniques of selling. It examines the
profession including ethical considerations in sales relationships, preparation for relationship
selling and the psychology of selling: why people buy, communication and sales knowledge.
Strategies analyzed are prospecting, planning, presentation methods, customer retention,
and time/territory management. Prerequisite: BUS 334.
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BUS 340 Employee Training and Development (3)
Students are introduced to the methods of assessing employee training needs, designing
curriculum and training materials, techniques for delivering training in an appropriate
fashion and evaluating results of training efforts in terms of subsequent contributions to an
organization.
BUS 345 Employee Relations (3)
The goal of this course is to help develop the knowledge, skills, and understanding needed
in a productive work environment. The course will also include the study of unionization
and collective bargaining in the public and private sectors, the mediation and arbitration
process, and current issues in labor relations.
BUS 347 Business Research Methods (3)
The Business Research course examines research designs commonly used in business
decision making. Students will develop an understanding of the meaning of research and
will practice various research techniques, covering topics including survey, observation, data
analysis, sampling and quasi-experiments as they relate to problems identified in an
organizational setting. The course concludes with writing a research proposal which
combines the business research elements.
BUS 348 Risk Management (3)
An introduction and analysis of various aspects of risk management, where risk is
encountered in individual life, as well as in business. Risks from operations, investment,
credit, liquidity, and capital are discussed. A significant focus is on risk reduction and
transfer mechanisms, including insurance and how it is applied in the individual, public, and
private organizational environments. Prerequisites: BUS 321.
BUS 391 Independent Study (1-3)
Special interest project undertaken
departmental approval.
and
developed
by
the
student.
Prerequisite:
BUS 397 Partnership Internship (2)
The internship is an actual work experience in a business organization, using business
management techniques. The intern is provided the opportunity to incorporate classroom
learning with practical experience at the work site. The Partnership Internship must be
completed with an affiliated company for at least 2 credits hours.
BUS 410 International Business (GCD) (3)
This course will study the world of international business and gain insight on global thinking.
It will focus on seven main concepts; globalization, cultural differences, global politics,
international trade and investment, international management and strategic management.
Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 334, and ECO 131 or the equivalents.
BUS 417 Advanced Business Analytics (3)
This course is a continuation of the Business Analytics course. It focuses on the
sophisticated use of analytics in organizations as they perform strategy identification,
effective decision making and successful execution of strategies. The students will learn how
to apply technologies such as Microsoft Excel application to solve complex business
problems.
BUS 423 Entrepreneurship (3)
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An entrepreneur is one who transforms innovations into economic goods, typically through
starting a new company.
Students will learn about the role and importance of
entrepreneurship in the global economy, the resources available to entrepreneurs, the
process of creating a new business venture, and factors in the success of those ventures.
The course will focus on opportunity recognition, assembly of the financial and human
resources needed when developing an idea and launching a new venture.
BUS 429 Strategic Communication (3)
This course focuses on strategies for integrating and augmenting professional
communication skills at the individual, group, organizational, and public levels. Content
includes strategies for managing meetings, addressing pros and cons of affinity groups,
decision-making in groups, mediating conflict, communicating with the media, developing a
strategic plan, and building social capital.
BUS 450 Retirement Planning (3)
For students interested in financial planning, this course is designed to provide preparation
on financial issues of retirement: income planning, Social Security, Medicare, long-term care
insurance, distributions from retirement plans, guardianships, conservatorships, durable
powers of attorney and living trusts. The implications of employee benefits related to
retirement will also be covered. Prerequisite: BUS 322.
BUS 452 Estate Planning (3)
This course provides finance students with a comprehensive review of estate planning topics
such as estate and gift taxes, various issues related to trust planning and administration,
property ownership issues, life insurance, private annuities, postmortem tax planning and
charitable giving. Prerequisite: BUS 322.
BUS 453 Marketing Research (3)
A study of the fundamental techniques of marketing research, including questionnaire
construction, determination of market potentials, sampling theory, interpretation of results
and report presentation. Prerequisite: BUS 334 and MTH/PSY/BUS 242 or permission. (Also
listed as PSY 453)
BUS 454 Production/Operations Management (3)
The myriad of decisions made at all levels of a service or manufacturing organization should
foster its long-term goals. This integrative course focuses on strategic, tactical and
operational decision-making techniques. Decision-making areas covered include: service
design, facility location, inventory, procurement, just-in-time, MRP I and II, project
planning, and total quality management. Prerequisites: ACC 162, and MTH 242.
BUS 455 Financial Strategy Simulation (3)
Decisions in the finance department affect every level of an organization.
This
comprehensive simulation course provides students the opportunity to analyze the impact of
various financial decisions. Prerequisites: BUS 321, BUS 322, MTH 242
BUS 460 HR strategy (3)
A key element of an organization’s success is its human capital. This course will cover the
role HR management plays in establishing business policies and in fulfilling competitive
strategies. Students will develop a strategic HR plan as one outcome of the course.
Prerequisites: BUS 212, BUS 327, BUS 340, and BUS 345 or permission of the program
director.
BUS 492 Directed Readings (1-3)
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An individual study course designed to allow a student to pursue special interests within the
field of business. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
BUS 493 Career Exploration (Job Shadowing) (1)
This course provides a student with real-world experience through our business
partnerships. The student is expected to go through career exploration by being
attached with a person currently pursuing a career the student has an interest in. The
career exploration class is planned and coordinated by the student's academic advisor
and the supervisor of the partnering organization.
BUS 496 Business Policies Seminar (4)
A study of business problems from a top management perspective. Actual business
situations are studied via the case study method. Students are involved in preparation of an
industry study that is related to cases being studied. Prerequisites: 21 hours BUS and senior
standing or permission.
BUS 497 Internship II (2)
The internship is an actual work experience in a business organization, giving students an
opportunity to incorporate classroom learning with practical experience. Prerequisite:
permission of the program director. Requirements for permission:
1.
2.
3.
Enrollment in the bachelor of science in business administration program;
Enrollment in the last year of course work, or permission of the BSA program director;
GPA of 3.0 in business administration major and specialization coursework and a
cumulative GPA of 2.5;
4. Completion and submission of application one semester before the desired start date of
the internship.
Application process:
1. Two letters of recommendation from CSM faculty—preferably one written by a BUS
professor and one by outside source knowledgeable of work abilities;
2. Current resume;
3. Written statement of the applicant’s qualifications, goals and objectives for the
internship program;
4. Interview with the business administration program director and advisor.
Business Information Systems
BIS 101 Introduction to Computers (3)
This is an introductory course in the theory and use of computers. Students will learn how
hardware, software, and people work together in an information society. Students with
minimal skills will learn to enhance their personal productivity and problem solving skills by
applying information technologies to problem situations and by designing and using small
information systems for individuals and groups. This prerequisite course enables students to
improve their skills as knowledge workers. The emphasis is on personal productivity
concepts using functions and features in computer software such as spreadsheets,
presentation graphics, and word processing. Topics explored will include the difference
between system software and application software, computer files and data storage,
computer architecture, local area networks, and the Internet. Labs, both in class and selfdirected, provide hands-on experience with the Internet, word processing, spreadsheet, and
presentation applications. Computer lab work outside of class is required. Prerequisite:
None.
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BIS 104 Computers in Education (3)
This is an introductory course in the theory and application of computers in education.
Students will learn how hardware, software, and people work together in an information
society. Labs, both in class and self-directed, provide hands-on experiences with the
Internet, word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications. Computer lab work
outside of class is required. Prerequisites: None.
BIS 140 Programming Concepts (3)
This course provides an introduction to elementary computer programming. It lays a
foundation for subsequent language specific programming languages that are taught in later
courses.
The course presents object oriented and procedural software engineering
methodologies in data definition and measurement, abstract data type construction and use
in developing screen editors, reports and other IS applications using data structures
including indexed files. It includes the use of logical and physical structures for both
programs and data. Programming in traditional and visual development environments that
incorporate event-driven, object-oriented design is explored. Language independent topics
include variables, expressions, statements, sequential execution, selection, iteration,
subroutines, simple data structures, structured programming, algorithm development, and
debugging. Prerequisite: BIS 101 or BIS 220.
BIS 143 Application Programming using C++ (3)
This course provides an introduction to elementary computer programming using the C++
language. Topics covered include variables, expressions, statements, sequential execution,
selection, iteration, subroutines, simple data structures, structured programming, algorithm
development, and debugging. Prerequisite: BIS 140 or a programming language.
BIS 190 Special Topics in Information Systems (3)
This course is designed to teach students about current industry driven technologies and
new technologies as they appear. Prerequisite: None
BIS 211 Structured Programming I - COBOL (3)
This is an introductory course in the application of COBOL. The course presents the student
with generalized techniques for analyzing, designing and developing computer programs
using COBOL. This course emphasizes structured design and modularization. Students are
introduced to design aides such as pseudo code, structured flow charts and hierarchical
charts. Prerequisite: BIS 140 or BIS 143 or a programming language.
BIS 212 Structured Programming II – COBOL (3)
This is an advanced course in the application of COBOL programming language. The course
builds on the information presented in BIS 211 and focuses on called modules, copy libs, file
handling, table processing, validation techniques and interactive processing. Analytical and
problem-solving skills are reinforced in this course. Prerequisite: BIS 211.
BIS 214 Visual BASIC and GUI Design (3)
This course will introduce students to two related topics. The course will discuss interfaces
for GUI applications and strategies for building a GUI interface. Students will learn how to
apply Visual BASIC in a GUI environment.
Prerequisite: BIS 140 or BIS 143 or a
programming language.
BIS 215 HTML and Web Page Design (3)
This is an introductory course in the design and development of HTML-based web pages.
Since creating web pages involves both an understanding of good design principles and a
strong knowledge of the tools used to create pages, the class has a dual focus. First, the
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course provides coverage of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and how it can be
directly used to create simple and advanced pages. Second, students will learn what
constitutes good page design. The course also includes extensive coverage of computer
imaging. Prerequisite: BIS 101 or BIS 220 or a programming language.
BIS 220 Advanced Business Applications (3)
This is a course in the theory and use of information systems as a tool for organizing,
analyzing, and presenting information in a variety of modern professional environments,
such as accounting, marketing, productions, sales, etc. Topics include data and information
flow throughout the information system: data management using database creation and
manipulation, data analysis using spreadsheets, data presentation using multimedia
presentation graphics software and desktop publishing, and the integration of Internet
resources into each area. Prerequisite: BIS 101 or basic computer literacy skills as
determined by CSM self-evaluation form.
BIS 221 Fundamentals of Information Systems (3)
This course focuses on the overview of systems theory, quality, decision making, and the
organizational role of information systems are introduced. Concepts of organizations,
information systems growth, and process improvement are introduced. Topics covered
include systems concepts; system components and relationships; cost/value and quality of
information; competitive advantage of information; specification, design, and re-engineering
of information systems; application versus system software; package software solutions;
procedural versus non-procedural programming languages; object oriented design;
database features, functions, and architecture; networks and telecommunication systems
and applications; characteristics of IS professionals and IS career paths; information
security, crime, and ethics. Prerequisite: BIS 101 or BIS 220.
BIS 230 Principles of Electronic Commerce (3)
This course provides an overview of E-commerce as it impacts business functions such as
accounting, economics, finance, management and marketing as well as addresses topics
such as security and safety when doing business in the Internet environment. Prerequisite:
None. (Also listed as BUS 230.)
BIS 243 Object-Oriented Programming: C++ (3)
This course presents a continuation of the computer programming topics introduced in BIS
143. The purpose of this course is to develop sound object-oriented programming styles
and techniques. Coverage includes data types (built-in and user-defined), structures, data
abstraction, classes, arrays (single and multidimensional), array processing techniques,
object-oriented software development, pointers, dynamics data, reference types, linked
structures, recursion, and file handling. Prerequisite: BIS 143.
BIS 244 Advanced Visual Basic (3)
Advanced Visual Basic is an advanced programming course with an emphasis on the Visual
BASIC language. It will enhance skills acquired in the introductory course and includes
accessing and updating ADO databases, developing multi-tier client/server applications,
creating active X .dll and .exe code components, authoring action X controls, developing
web-based database applications, creating DHTML and IIS internet applications, building
HTML Help files for user assistance, and incorporating Windows API methods into
applications. Prerequisite: BIS 214.
BIS 330 Project Management (3)
This course will provide the student with an understanding of methods and practices in the
field of project management. Project and program management is one of the fastest
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growing professions in today’s business world. This course will study the functions involved
in project and program management and allow the student to develop a full understanding
of every aspect needed to become a competent project management professional. Students
will use project management software for an assigned project during the semester.
Prerequisite: 20 credit hours or permission of the BIS Program Director. (also listed as BUS
330).
BIS 331 Database Systems (3)
This course presents theoretical and practical aspects of database management systems.
Students will gain experience with a relational Database Management System (DBMS).
Course work includes analyzing database requirements, designing a relational database
using the normalization process, and implementing the design using a relational database
application. This course covers information systems design and implementation within a
database management system environment. Conceptual, logical, and physical data models,
and modeling tools; models for databases: relational; design tools; data dictionaries,
repositories, warehousing, and data mining; database implementation including user
interface and reports; multi-tier planning and implementation; data conversion and post
implementation review. Prerequisite: BIS 140 or programming language.
BIS 332 Advanced Database Concepts (3)
This course provides in-depth study, investigation and application of advanced database
administration, database technology and the comparative evaluation, selection and
acquisition of Database Management Systems (DBMS). Prerequisite: BIS 331.
BIS 350 Hardware and Software Architecture (3)
This course provides technical topics related to computer systems with emphasis on the
components, functions, and relationships between hardware architecture, systems software,
applications software, and their implementation in the business setting. Principles and
application of computer hardware and software will be presented through lecture of the
theoretical underpinnings, installation, configuration, and operational laboratory
experiences. Prerequisite: BIS 101 or BIS 220.
BIS 355 Application Programming: C (3)
This course provides instruction in the use and correct style for the computer language C.
Students are introduced to object-oriented concepts. Prerequisite: BIS 140.
BIS 360 Computer Networks (3)
The focus of the course is on the technological and managerial implications of hardware,
software, and communications as they relate to information systems networking. Students
will gain in-depth experience of networking and telecommunications fundamentals including
LANs, MANs, WANs, intranets, the Internet, and the WWW. Data communication and
telecommunication concepts, models, standards, and protocols will be studied. Installation,
configuration, systems integration and management of infrastructure technologies will be
practiced in the laboratory. This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data
communications and networking requirements including networking and telecommunications
technologies, hardware, and software. The students study the ISO OSI Reference Model indepth. Prerequisite: BIS 350 .
BIS 365 Information Systems Security (3)
The course encompasses all areas of security including: personnel security, security
regulations, physical security, transmission security, risk analysis, emission security, and
cryptographic security. Prerequisite: BIS 350.
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BIS 380 Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)
Students who have constructed personal information systems will be exposed to the theory
of the Information Systems discipline. Application of these theories to the success of
organizations and to the roles of management, users, and IS professionals are presented.
This course provides an understanding of organizational systems, planning, and decision
process, and how information is used for decision support in organizations. It covers quality
and decision theory, information theory, and practice essential for providing viable
information to the organization and outlines the concepts of IS for competitive advantage.
Prerequisite: BIS 143 or BIS 211 or BIS 331.
BIS 391 Independent Study (Optional) (3)
Individualized projects designed and completed by the student under faculty supervision.
Prerequisite: permission of the program director.
BIS 461 Systems Analysis and Design (3)
Students with information technology skills will learn to analyze and design information
systems. Students will practice project management during team oriented analysis and
design of a departmental level system. This course examines the system development and
modification process. It emphasizes the factors for effective communication and integration
with users and user systems. It encourages interpersonal skill development with clients,
users, team members, and others associated with development, operation, and
maintenance of the system. Structured and object oriented analysis and design, use of
modeling tools, adherence to methodological life cycle and project management standards.
Life cycle phases, group-based approaches, structured versus object oriented
methodologies, RAD, prototyping, database design, and professional code of ethics.
Prerequisite: BIS 380
BIS 470 Internship (3-6)
The internship is an actual work experience in a business organization, using information
systems management techniques. The intern is provided the opportunity to incorporate
classroom learning with practical experience at the worksite. Prerequisite: permission of the
program director.
Requirements for acceptance to BIS 470:
1.
Enrollment in the Bachelor of Science in Business Information Systems program.
2.
Enrollment in the last year of course work, or permission of the BIS program director.
3.
GPA of 3.0 in business information systems course work and a GPA of 2.5 overall.
4.
Grade of C or better in all business information systems courses.
5.
Completion and submission of application two months before the desired start date of
the internship.
Application includes the following:
1.
Two letters of recommendation from College of Saint Mary faculty, preferably one
written by a business information systems professor and one by the general
education professor. Recommendation forms are available from BIS program
director.
2.
Current resume.
3.
Written statement of the applicant’s qualifications, goals and objectives for the
internship program.
4.
Interview with the BIS program director.
BIS 480 Information Resources Management (3)
This course lays the foundation for the Capstone course. Students will extend their
knowledge by evaluating cases, implementing an information system in an emerging
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systems environment. A wide variety of case studies are used to provide students with the
skills to evaluate and provide solutions to a variety of problems in different situations. This
course covers physical design and implementation of information systems applications in
response to business problems. Prerequisites: BIS 230 and BIS 331.
BIS 490 Capstone: Information Systems Policy and Strategy (3)
This is a seminar course emphasizing corporate and departmental-level planning, directing
and evaluating the information technology activities of a firm. The primary goal of this
course is to help future managers develop frameworks for thinking about the introduction,
evolution and assimilation of information technology into an organization. Advanced IS
majors operating as a high-performance team will engage in and complete the business
evaluation, business planning, recommendation of strategic options and implementation of a
real-life business organization in a cross-functional setting. This course provides an
opportunity for BIS majors to align the IS function with other business functions. Project
management, management of the IS function, and systems integration will be components
of the project experience. Prerequisite: BIS 480.
BIS 493 Current Topics in Business Information Systems (3)
This course is designed to teach students about new technologies as they are developed and
introduced in the industry. Prerequisite: As determined by course topic.
Business Leadership and Management
BLM 210 Practice of Leadership (3)
This course will help students focus on gaining self-awareness as a foundation for
developing leadership skills. Self-awareness is about understanding who we are and
developing insights into our strengths and limitations. It is through self-awareness that we
are able to identify self-imposed myths and fears, explore long-held beliefs, attitudes and
unconscious decisions that may have limited the many facets of our lives. Through selfawareness one discovers that one can become more than one has allowed oneself to be!
Thus, a significant portion of the course consists of activities are designed to enhance
students' leadership development through self-awareness.
BLM 220 Business Communication (3)
This course will teach communication theory and skills for developing professional
documents and oral presentations for a diverse audience. Students will learn to plan and
develop appropriate message strategies to achieve desired communication objectives by
analyzing audience, occasion and purpose.
BLM 230 Dynamics of Organizational Behavior (3)
Organizational behavior is the scientific study of the behavioral processes that occur in a
work setting. In the workplace today, a good understanding of the theory of human
relations is essential. This course is designed to provide an understanding of human
behavior within an organizational environment. It will explore contemporary organizational
issues such as individual and group dynamics, motivation, leadership, organizational
structure, morale, power, organizational change and development.
BLM 240 Teambuilding & Group Process (3)
Team building and Group Process provides theoretical and practical approaches to
conducting and participating in task- and experience-oriented groups. Students will practice
various process skills in a simulated group setting. A major focus will be on assisting group
members in working toward and achieving group goals in a variety of settings.
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BLM 250 Human Resource Management (3)
This course provides an overview of human resource management in organizations and
examines the role of the human resource (HR) function in contributing to the organization’s
business strategy and creating a competitive advantage. The strategies, systems, policies,
and practices used by organizations to create a competitive advantage through human
resources are therefore examined. Students will have the opportunity to study theories and
practices in areas of the human resource management functions such as staffing,
performance management, diversity, legal aspect of the employment relationship, training
and development, compensation, labor relations, HRIS, work and job design, HR
measurement, and current and future issues affecting human resource administration.
BLM 310 Marketing Management (3)
The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of economic concepts that have a
bearing on managerial decision making with respect to both the marketplace and internal
organizational structure. Students will apply economic tools, concepts and theories in
analyzing specific managerial problems and organizational decisions.
BLM 320 Business Statistics (3)
In Business Statistics students will learn how to collect and tabulate data, averages and
measures of dispersion, correlational and regression analysis, probability and sampling,
hypothesis testing, performing Chi Square, t, f and some nonparametric tests.
Prerequisites: C or better in MTH 112 or three years of high school mathematics including
advanced algebra or permission of program director.
BLM 330 Negotiation & Conflict Management (3)
Negotiation is a fundamental process that is used in making business deals, in managing
working relationships with others and in resolving conflicts. Negotiations occur for two
reasons: (1) to create something new that neither party could do on its own, or (2) to
resolve a problem or dispute between parties. Conflicts are common in any organization and
in any relationship between individuals or organizations. The ability to manage and resolve
conflicts effectively is critical in today’s organization. Because we all negotiate about many
things in many different situations, knowledge about and skill in negotiating is essential to
anyone who works with and through other people to accomplish objectives.
BLM 340 Legal Environment of Business (3)
This course will examine the American legal system and its inter-relationship and impact on
the regulation of businesses.
BLM 350 Leading Projects in Contemporary Organizations (3)
This course examines project management roles and environments, the project life-cycle
and various techniques of work planning, control and evaluation to achieve project
objectives. Students will learn to select and apply appropriate planning techniques and tools
to meet the project goals within time, cost and quality constraints.
BLM 410 Action Research (4)
Action research is a systematic inquiry conducted by stakeholders (rather than outside
researchers) in the work environment to gather information about the way their specific
organization operates. In this course students will develop the skillset to conduct action
research in their own organization.
BLM 415 Financial Management (3)
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A study of the principles governing the financial operations of business, the tools of financial
analysis, the methods of financing an organization, capital budgeting, mergers,
reorganizations, and bankruptcy. The role of accounting information in the financial
management process is emphasized.
BLM 420 Critical and Systems Thinking (3)
This course will address issues that transcend any single discipline or function of
management, and will particularly enhance student’s ability to identify critical questions
when exploring a new business issue, analyze issues, develop reasoned positions and make
compelling arguments. Students will be introduced to the vocabulary and methodologies
associated with the discipline of critical and systems thinking, and apply the tools, processes
and principles that aid in understanding how leadership decisions affect organizational
performance.
BLM 425 Operations Management (3)
The myriad decisions made at all levels of a service or manufacturing organization should
foster its long-term goals. This integrative course focuses on strategic, tactical and
operational decision-making technicalities. Decision-making areas that will be covered
include: service design, facility location, inventory, procurement, just-in-time concept,
project planning, Materials Requirement Planning (MRP) and Total Quality Management
(TQM).
BLM 430 Strategic Management (3)
The course will concentrate on the competitive approach of a business, examining issues
central to its long- and short-term competitive position. The course develops a set of
analytical frameworks that enable students to explain performance differences among firms
and make strategic decisions to enhance competitive position of a business. The case
method will be used extensively to combine theory and application.
BLM 435 Capstone Entrepreneurship (4)
In this capstone course students will develop a business plan for an active or prospective
business in the local area and apply the concepts learned in the entire BLM program.
BLM 440 International Business (3)
Students will explore the factors involved in operating an international business, such as the
international monetary system and the political, social, economic and legal considerations.
They will conduct research to gain an understanding of the geo-political forces influencing
international business relations in United States.
BLM 445 Managerial Economics (3)
The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of economic concepts that have a
bearing on managerial decision making with respect to both the marketplace and internal
organizational structure. Students will apply economic tools, concepts and theories in
analyzing specific managerial problems and organizational decisions.
BLM 450 Management Information (3)
Management Information Systems is designed to provide students with an understanding of
the role of information technology in achieving business goals, and how information systems
are changing the way a firm competes in a competitive business environment. Many areas
of information systems are discussed, including databases, telecommunications, information
security, and software/hardware concepts.
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BLM 455 Organization Development and Change (3)
This course will examine theories of organizational change and strategies used to implement
change efforts. Topics explored will include the phases of organization development and
change management in organizations, attributes of organizational culture, interventions to
facilitate change and ethical considerations in change management practice.
Chemistry
CHM 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3)
Principles of inorganic, organic and biochemistry that is relevant to health care professions.
Lecture meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: MTH 112 or concurrent enrollment or an
ACT of 24 as well as concurrent enrollment in CHM 100L.
CHM 100L Fundamentals of Chemistry Lab (1)
Lab meets 2 hours a week. Prerequisite: Co-enrollment in CHM 100.
CHM 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry Recitation (1)
Students will be allowed to work on difficult concepts under the direction of a faculty
member. No new material will be covered. Prerequisites: Co-enrollment in CHM 100.
CHM 102 General Chemistry Survey (3)
A survey of essential fundamental concepts of general chemistry for non-chemistry majors.
Lecture meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Successful completion of math competency
or permission of the instructor.
CHM 104 Organic Biochemistry Survey (3)
A survey of fundamental concepts of organic and biochemistry for non-chemistry majors.
Lecture meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHM 102 or equivalent.
CHM 110 General Chemistry (4)
A detailed, problem-oriented study of the fundamental principles that govern chemical
processes and reactions. Topics include (but are not limited to): Stoichiometry, redox
reactions, thermodynamics, atomic structure and chemical bonding, properties of gases,
reactions in aqueous solution and intermolecular attractions. Lecture meets 4 hours per
week. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in MTH 114 or permission of the instructor.
CHM 111 General Chemistry I Laboratory (1)
A series of experiments designed to demonstrate some of the theoretical principles
discussed in CHM 110, through the employment of a variety of laboratory techniques. Lab
meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with CHM 110
CHM 112 General Chemistry II (4)
A continuation of the problem-oriented study of chemical principles, theory and phenomena
begun in CHM 110. Topics include (but are not limited to): electrochemistry, kinetics and
equilibrium, spontaneity and entropy, orbital hybridization and molecular structure, solution
chemistry, acids, bases and buffers. Lecture meets 4 hours per week. Prerequisites:
Successful completion of CHM 110/111
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CHM 113 General Chemistry II Laboratory (1)
A series of experiments designed to complement the material covered in CHM 112, through
the use of a variety of laboratory techniques. Lab meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite:
Taken concurrently with CHM 112
CHM 220 Analytical Chemistry (4)
The theory of modern methods of quantitative analysis. Lecture meets 4 hours per week.
Prerequisites: CHM 232/233
CHM 221 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Application of the theory of quantitative analysis. Lab will include volumetric, gravimetric,
and instrumental methods. Lab: Lab meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHM
232/233.
CHM 230 Organic Chemistry I (4)
An introduction to the language of organic chemistry, and the theoretical principles that
govern organic reactions. Structures and nomenclature of organic compounds, mechanisms
of organic reactions, and many types of different organic reactions will be introduced.
Lecture meets 4 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHM 112/113
CHM 231 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1)
An introduction to the techniques of separation, isolation and purification of organic
compounds. Use of various techniques for identification of organic compounds will be
introduced. Techniques applied through the preparation of various organic compounds. Lab
meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with CHM 230
CHM 232 Organic Chemistry II (4)
A continuation of the study of organic reactions and their mechanisms. The theory of
organic compound synthesis will be introduced, as will the use of spectroscopy as an
analytical tool. Lecture meets 4 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHM 230/231
CHM 233 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1)
A continuation of the study of organic reactions, isolation and purification of organic
compounds, and identification of those compounds through use of chemical and
spectroscopic techniques. Lab meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Taken concurrently
with CHM 232
CHM 340 Biochemistry (4)
Structure and function of proteins (and enzymes), lipids and carbohydrates are discussed.
Energetics of biochemical reactions and enzyme kinetics are included. Lecture meets 4
hours per week. Prerequisites: CHM 232/233 (also listed as BIO 340).
CHM 341 Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
Application of basic methods and techniques in biochemistry. Chemical and enzymatic
analyses are performed by colorimetric, electrophoretic and chromatographic techniques.
Lab meets 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with CHM 341. (Also listed
as BIO 341.)
CHM 342 Special Topics in Biochemistry (2)
Advanced topics in biochemistry are discussed including hormonal action, organ
interrelationships in metabolism in mammals, and the major principles of molecular biology.
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Format: primarily a discussion/seminar course for advanced students. Prerequisite: CHM
340
CHM 361 Instrumental Analysis (3)
This course explores the physicochemical basis and operation of instrumentation used in
qualitative and quantitative analysis.
Sampling considerations, data processing and
analysis, and instrumental configuration will be discussed for atomic and molecular
spectroscopies (UV-Vis, FTIR, and fluorescence), chromatography, electrophoresis, and
mass spectrometry. Prerequisites: CHM 232/233 or permission of the instructor.
CHM 362 Instrumental Analysis Lab (1)
A hands-on course aimed at training students in the use and maintenance of modern
scientific instruments as well as interpretation of the data acquired. Prerequisites: CHM
232/233 or permission of the instructor.
CHM 450 Physical Chemistry (4)
An introduction to the scientific states and structure of matter, thermodynamics,
thermochemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, and quantum theory. Lecture meets 3 hours per
week. Prerequisites: CHM 232/233 or permission of the instructor.
CHM 451 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Laboratory experiments are selected to demonstrate physical chemistry principles by
employing a variety of laboratory techniques. Lab meets 3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with CHM 450.
CHM 473 Research in Chemistry (1-4)
Under the guidance of a faculty member, the student will complete a research project. The
results of the research must be written in scientific style as a thesis and approved by two
faculty members. A seminar presentation of the student’s thesis is required for graduation.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.
CHM 491 Independent Study (2-4)
An independent project is selected under the direction of a faculty member. A research
paper must be written in suitable scientific style reporting the results of the project. Offered
each semester. Prerequisites: advanced standing and departmental approval.
CHM 495 Chemistry Seminar (2)
An integration of special topics that have been approached from different points of view in
various courses. Required of seniors whose field of concentration is chemistry.
Prerequisites: CHM 232/233.
Communication
COM 100 Survey of Communication (3)
A survey of human interaction on the levels of interpersonal, group, and mass
communication. Areas of study include the nature of communication; the perceptions,
attitudes, and strategies which influence interaction; the individual as an effective
participant in the communication process.
COM 101 Oral Communication Skills (3)
This course focuses on the development of effective skills in oral presentations. It includes
the preparation and delivery a variety of oral presentations.
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COM 140, 240, 340 (1) Intercollegiate Forensics. Students participating on CSM’s
Speech Team may register for one hour of college credit per semester, with a limit of 6
hours of credit (two credits at each level). Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director
based on recommendation of the Forensics Coach.
COM 150 News Writing and Reporting (3)
Theory and practice of writing and reporting for print media, including the nature of news,
forms, and techniques in gathering and writing news.
COM 160 News Editing (3)
Evaluation, editing, and production of news for print layout. Fundamentals of page design
and headline writing, as well as elements of typography and printing.
COM 200 Speech for Elementary Teachers (3)
Theory and practice of communication in elementary education situations. Areas of study
include planning and participation in interviews, conducting personal conferences, small
group discussions, creative dramatics, public speaking, and other speech activities pertinent
to the elementary school.
COM 202 Speech for Language Arts Teachers (3)
Theory and practice of communication in language arts education situations. Areas of study
include planning and participation in interviews, conducting personal conferences, small
group discussions, creative dramatics, public speaking, and other speech activities pertinent
to the middle and secondary school Language Arts instruction.
COM 210 Interpersonal Communication (3)
Interpersonal communication is defined as the symbolic process of creating meaning
between 2 persons who have an established relationship. In this course, students will
examine both processes and theories of interpersonal communication, as well as critically
reflect on their own interpersonal skill competencies. Students will be asked to explore
interpersonal communication in their personal relationships, the media, and communication
research.
COM 212 Speech for Professionals (3)
Theory and practice of communication in professional situations. Areas of study include
communication theory and job-seeking skills in addition to individual and group
presentations.
COM 225 Advanced Public Speaking (3)
This course will focus on public speaking in its various forms and seek to polish skills in the
preparation, delivery, and evaluation of public speeches. Prerequisite: COM 212 or
permission of the instructor.
COM 231 Interviewing Skills and Case Management (3)
Methods of obtaining relevant information in a variety of settings are discussed and
practiced. The documentation, reporting, and use of information are presented for selection
of personnel or case planning. Methods of designing and implementing programs for clients
are practiced. (Also listed as BUS 231 and HSV 231.)
COM 233 Group Process Theory and Practice (3)
Theoretical and practical approaches to conducting and participating in task- and
experience-oriented groups are presented. Students practice various process skills in a
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simulated group setting. A major focus is on assisting group members in working toward
and achieving group goals in a variety of settings. (Also listed as PSY and BUS 233.)
COM 306 Intercultural Communication (3)
This class will link the study of communication with the study of culture. It will seek to
develop understanding of other cultures and insight on how to effectively communicate with
others of cultural backgrounds different than our own Prerequisites:
ENG 101 and
sophomore standing. . (Also listed as ELA 306 and Graduate level of COM/ELA 506.)
COM 330 Gender and Communication (3)
This course is designed to examine the construction of gender through communication,
grounded on the premise that all we create--including gender--is accomplished through
communication. It examines how (and why) masculinity and femininity are socially
constructed and maintained. (Also listed as WST 330.)
COM 365 Mass Media and Society (3)
An exploration of the role played by mass media in contemporary life. Examinations of the
nature and function of the media through such topics as communicator and audience;
content and control; patterns of influence; impact of media on information, entertainment,
economics, and social and cultural values.
COM 380 Experimental Course (3)
The context and method of this course will vary in accord with current needs and interests.
May be repeated for credit or non-credit.
COM 390 Independent Study (3)
Individualized projects carried out by a student under faculty direction. Prerequisite:
departmental approval.
COM 460 Communication Internship (3)
This course will use opportunities for on-the-job experiences in the communication field.
Prerequisite: permission of program director.
COM 495 (3) Coordinating Seminar. A senior project supervised by a faculty member in
the program. The project may be research-based or creative, depending on the interests of
the student and decided with the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of
the Program Director.
Early Childhood Education (ECE)
ECE 101 Introduction to Education (3)
See Education 101.
ECE 231 Play, Creativity, and Artistic Development in Early Childhood Ed (2)
Students select, plan, organize, and evaluate art, music, and drama experiences for
children. Students learn to plan and conduct lessons consistent with Nebraska Early
Learning Guidelines and K-12 Academic Standards.
Appropriate use of instructional
technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Play and creativity in the
learning environment is emphasized. Includes one hour per week field placement
requirement. Concurrent courses: ECE 233 and 235.
ECE 232 Language Arts in Early Childhood Education (2)
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Students select, plan, organize, and evaluate activities that facilitate language skills
development in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students learn to plan and conduct
lessons consistent with Nebraska Early Learning Guidelines and K-12 Academic Standards.
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy. Theories in language acquisition are presented. Includes one hour per week field
placement requirement. Concurrent courses: ECE 234 and 236.
ECE 233 Health, Safety, and Nutrition in Early Childhood Education (2)
Students learn to plan programs that ensure the health, safety, and nutrition of young
children. Students learn to plan and conduct lessons consistent with Nebraska Early
Learning Guidelines and K-12 Academic Standards.
Appropriate use of instructional
technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Basic information on
managing accidents and injuries, identifying child abuse, and planning health, safety, and
nutrition education are included. Includes one hour per week field placement requirement.
Concurrent courses: ECE 231 and 235.
ECE 234 Teaching Math, Science, and Social Studies in Early Childhood Educ (2)
Students select, plan, organize, and evaluate activities that facilitate learning of
mathematical and scientific concepts and social awareness in young children. Students
learn to plan and conduct lessons consistent with Nebraska Early Learning Guidelines and K12 Academic Standards. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into
instruction of content and pedagogy.
Includes one hour per week field placement
requirement. Concurrent courses: ECE 232 and 236.
ECE 235 Observation and Assessment In ECE (2)
Students learn to observe and assess children objectively, analyze their learning habits, and
provide for meeting the needs of children. Includes one hour per week field placement
requirement. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of
content and pedagogy. Concurrent courses: ECE 231 and 233.
ECE 236 Physical Development and Creative Movement (2)
Students select, plan, organize, and evaluate activities that facilitate physical development
of young children through physical activity, creative movement, and dance. Students learn
to plan and conduct lessons consistent with Nebraska Early Learning Guidelines and K-12
Academic Standards.
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into
instruction of content and pedagogy. Includes discussion of both fine and gross motor
development. Includes one hour per week field placement requirement. Concurrent courses:
ECE 232 and 234.
ECE 242 Administering Early Childhood Education Programs (3)
Students learn the duties and responsibilities of administrators of early childhood programs.
These include preparation, implementation, and evaluation of educational objectives,
selection, supervision and evaluation of staff members, budgeting processes, food and
health services, discussion of laws and regulations, and development of parent education
and community participation. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into
instruction of content and pedagogy.
ECE 334 Curriculum Planning in Early Childhood Education (3)
Students learn to plan, organize, and manage early childhood curriculum. Preparation of
goal statements, objectives, schedules, and units are included.
Appropriate use of
instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
ECE 342 Children’s Literature (3)
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See EDU 342.
ECE 343 History and Trends in Early Childhood Education (3)
Students evaluate history and philosophical theories and current trends in education and
gain experience in applying theories. Discussion of current legislation, advocacy, and
professional ethics is included. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into
instruction of content and pedagogy.
ECE 470 Student Teaching: Early Childhood Education (5)
Supervised teaching experience under the direction of a college faculty member and a
classroom teacher in the student’s teaching area. Prerequisite: permission. Appropriate use
of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
ECE 495 Student Teaching Seminar (2)
See EDU 495. (Also listed as SPE 495.)
ECE 496 Research Seminar (3)
Students evaluate educational research and analyze procedures, logic and strategies
implemented by researchers. Students complete research projects demonstrating effective
research designs. Presentation of papers to faculty members and the public is required.
(Also listed as EDU and SPE 496.)
Child Life Studies (CHL)
CHL 337 The Hospitalized Child (3)
This course is designed to help students understand the procedures, illnesses and stress
that are experienced by children and families during hospitalization. This course will
emphasize both theory and practice in working with children and families for professionals in
non-medical areas.
CHL 472 Child Life Practicum Experience(3)
The major purpose of this course is to provide students with a supervised practicum
experience to gain clinical skills for working with pediatric patients and their families.
Clinical experiences will be gained in the areas of child life programming, emotional
responses to the healthcare experience, therapeutic interventions, family centered care,
diagnostic and treatment information, documentation methods, and interdisciplinary
communication.
Economics (ECO)
ECO 131 Macroeconomics (3)
Introduction to economic principles, problems, and policies with an emphasis on Gross
National Product, income, and employment. Problem areas such as inflation and depression
are discussed as well as the effect of government monetary and fiscal policies.
ECO 132 Microeconomics (3)
This course investigates the process of production and distribution within the economy. The
effects of different market structures upon product price and output as well as the
determinants of the demand for labor and other resources are examined. Microeconomics
deals with the problems faced by individual firms and households, including consumption,
the distribution of wealth, and the price mechanism.
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ECO 150 Personal Finance (3)
This course is a study of the principles of sound financial decision making in the context of
the Unites States economic structure. Students will be guided through goal setting,
techniques and guidelines for choosing between financial alternatives and processes for
monitoring and evaluating financial performance. Major topics are goal setting, budgeting,
consumer credit, insurance, taxes, retirement and estate planning. This is a survey course.
In-depth investment, tax, retirement, and estate concepts are presented in other courses.
(Also listed as BUS 150)
ECO 331 Money and Banking (3)
A descriptive and analytical study of the basic principles of money, banking and finance as
they are related to business and public policy. A study of the creation of the nation’s money
supply and the impact of monetary policies on the performance of the economy.
Prerequisites: ECO 131. Recommended: MTH 112. (Also listed as BUS 331.)
ECO 387 Experimental Course (1-3)
A course not regularly scheduled but may be offered according to the needs of the student.
Subject matter will vary accordingly.
ECO 391 Independent Study (1-3)
Directed readings and an independent project allow the student to explore a specific area of
economics. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
ECO 494 Directed Readings - Economics (1-3)
An individual study course designed to allow a student to pursue special interests within the
field of economics. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
Education (EDU)
EDU 101 Introduction to Education (3)
Students survey the historical development of education and analyze the role of personnel
and career opportunities, problem areas and contemporary issues. Emphasis is placed on
the cultural diversity of American schools today. Students complete observations in school
settings. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content
and pedagogy. (Also listed as ECE 101.)
EDU 201 Technology in the Classroom (3)
Students learn strategies for integrating instructional technology in curriculum planning and
implementation. After receiving instruction in their use, students plan learning activities that
include instructional media, the Internet, web page construction, production and
organizational software, and multimedia programs in classrooms. In addition to computers,
students use video equipment, digital cameras, and scanners in preparing their lessons.
Methods for managing classrooms with varying levels of equipment are addressed.
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy.
EDU 240 Guidance and Classroom Management (3)
Students learn techniques, models and psychological theories related to managing individual
and small and large group learning activities. Practical methods are emphasized that
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enhance self-control and provide healthy classroom environments. Common behavior
problems of pre-K through grade 12 students and exceptional children and assessment
techniques are addressed. Effective collaboration in teams and communication skills with
students, families and professionals are emphasized. A 20-hour service-learning component
provides experience in implementation of the knowledge and skills learned in this course.
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy. (Also listed as ECE 240 and SPE 240)
EDU 312 Educational Psychology and Measurement (3)
This course involves the study of teaching/learning processes. Students learn the nature of
educational psychology and applications of major learning theories. They identify specific
relationships among learning and characteristics of learners, including cognitive, language,
psychosocial, and moral development. Discussion centers on thinking skills, problem
solving, and motivation in the classroom. Students learn strategies used in assessment and
evaluation of learning. Field experiences include 20 hours in an environment that matches
the level of learners of the anticipated certification. Appropriate use of instructional
technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. (Also listed as PSY 312.)
EDU 315 Assessment of Learners (3)
Assessments and tests are an essential part of the instructional process. When designed
and used appropriately, they can effectively evaluate and enhance student learning and
inform instruction. This course is designed to introduce students to key concepts and issues
in classroom assessment and large-scale, standardized educational assessment.
EDU 342 Children’s Literature (3)
Students interact with a wide variety of children’s literature that is representative of ethnic
and cultural diversity. Critical appraisal in light of significant authors and illustrators, quality
of writing and appropriateness of topic to age and/or experience level are emphasized.
Techniques and procedures for promoting lifelong reading habits are explored. A servicelearning project is a requirement in this course. Appropriate use of instructional technology
is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. (Also listed as ECE 342.)
EDU 350 Teaching Reading and Language Arts (4)
Instruction centers on theoretical background, Nebraska and National Standards in Reading
and Language Arts. Content emphasizes organization of programs, effective teaching
methodologies, and varied instructional materials for all students in elementary and middle
school literacy settings.
Techniques for enhancing literacy skills, verbal and written
expression are emphasized. Directed practicum of 40 hours is provided in local schools.
Appropriate technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
EDU 351 Teaching Reading: Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
This course is designed to provide teachers with an understanding of developmental
processes of reading and study techniques in middle grades and secondary education.
Students identify Nebraska and National Standards and assessment techniques used in
middle and secondary settings. Clinical activities focus on learners who struggle within the
reading process. Reading behaviors necessary for successful reading and effective strategies
used in reading applications in content areas are emphasized. Implementation of knowledge
of this curriculum is achieved in a directed reading practicum of 40 hours. Appropriate use
of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
EDU 353 Teaching Natural and Social Sciences: Elementary and Middle (3)
Study combines content methodology and appropriate materials for effectively presenting
social studies and science in elementary and middle school settings. Appropriate use of
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instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
Implementation of content and methodologies presented in “hands on” activities is achieved
in practicum experiences of 32 hours and in planning and teaching units of study.
EDU 355 Teaching Mathematics: Elementary and Middle (3)
Students learn current trends and strategies in teaching elementary and middle level math,
including content, methodology, and appropriate materials. Appropriate use of instructional
technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Implementation of
teaching strategies is achieved in practicum experiences of 32 hours.
EDU 357 Teaching Health and Physical Education (3)
Students learn how to coordinate and implement an elementary school physical education
program. They gain health education and wellness instructional procedures based on
mental, emotional, physical, and social characteristics of elementary/middle school children.
The health education curriculum includes nutrition, safety and first aid, family life, death,
divorce, drugs, aging, dental health, disease control and prevention, environment, selfconcept, the human body, and mental health. Contemporary fitness activities and skill
development are presented in physical education segments.
Appropriate use of
instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
EDU 360 Teaching Middle School and Secondary Students (3)
The course components emphasize middle school and secondary instruction for the
changing early and later adolescent. Instruction provides an educational response to the
development needs and characteristics of students between the ages of ten and fifteen and
fifteen and nineteen. It is designed to address intellectual, physical, emotional, and social
needs of these learners. It emphasizes skills and understandings that result in the provision
of effective learning environments for these students. Instruction explores teaching
methods, learning styles, motivation, teaming and classroom management, planning and
presenting techniques, and student evaluation. Students complete a teaching practicum of
40 hours in a middle or secondary school.
EDU 372 Integrating Fine Arts Instruction Into the Classroom (3)
Designed to provide prospective teachers with practical implementation of integrating fine
arts: art, music, drama and dance (visual and performing arts) into the classroom
curriculum. Basic concepts and instructional techniques of each area will be examined with
an emphasis of infusion into the academic curriculum. Appropriate use of instructional
technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
EDU 375 Human Relations in a Multicultural Society (GCD) (3)
Students identify characteristics of various ethnic groups that relate to learning, working,
and living in our pluralistic society. Students develop strategies for assisting people in living
jointly in our pluralistic society. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated
into instruction of content and pedagogy.
EDU 415 Teaching ESL (3)
A course focused on exploring instructional methods and materials to teach English as a
Second Language (ESL). Methods and materials will be evaluated for age appropriateness
and cultural sensitivity. (Graduate Level EDU 515)
EDU 425 Assessment of ESL Learners (3)
Designed to acquaint educators with assessment instruments and evaluation procedures
including language proficiency testing, entry and placement procedures, theories of second
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language acquisition, and selection, development, and evaluation of curriculum based on
language proficiency. (Graduate Level EDU 525)
EDU 427 History, Philosophy and Trends in Education (3)
Compare philosophical foundations of historical and contemporary education and consider
current issues using an informed discussion centered approach. Assess political and social
trends, laws, proper conduct and penalties for teachers, and shifts and technological
changes related to contemporary and future educational planning. Discussions center on all
levels of education from preschools to secondary schools. Students prepare a major
research paper. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of
content and pedagogy. Prerequisites: EDU 350 or 351, or permission.
EDU 430 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Reading (3)
This course is designed to provide teachers with assessment procedures for students on an
achievement spectrum from below grade level to above grade level and effective
instructional and diagnostic techniques in reading. Instruction is provided in a self-directed
portfolio mode featuring acquisition of theory, teaching strategies, and assessment
procedures. Students participate in formal and informal testing including achievement,
criterion references, observational, and portfolio strategies. Implementation of the teacher’s
knowledge of this curriculum is achieved within a directed reading practicum in a
partnership school. 40 hours of clinical experiences focus on effective assessment and
teaching procedures based on awareness of individual learners.
Appropriate use of
instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
Prerequisites: EDU 350. (Also listed as SPE 430.)
EDU 450 Content and Practice for Substitute Teachers (1)
To provide prospective substitute teachers with information regarding procedures,
classroom content and management, diversity issues, and expectations to help them
achieve success within substituting. The subject matter and methods for this course vary
from semester to semester in light of current trends. Appropriate use of instructional
technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Prerequisite:
60
semester hours.
EDU 470 Student Teaching: Primary (5 or 10)
Supervised teaching experience under the direction of a college faculty member and a
classroom teacher in the student’s teaching area. (To be taken concurrently with EDU 495.)
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy. Prerequisite: permission.
EDU 471 Student Teaching: Intermediate/Middle (5 or 10)
See Education 470. Prerequisite: permission.
EDU 472 Student Teaching: Secondary (5 or10)
See Education 470. Prerequisite: permission.
EDU 473 ESL/K-12 Practicum (3)
A practical experience teaching English as a Second Language in an age-appropriate setting
under supervision. Prerequisites: ESL Methods, Assessment of ESL Learners and foreign
language competency. (Graduate Level EDU 573)
EDU 481 Experimental Course (3)
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The subject matter and methods for this course vary from semester to semester in light of
current trends. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of
content and pedagogy.
EDU 482 Special Topics (3)
The subject matter and methods for this course vary from semester to semester in light of
current trends.
EDU 490 Directed Readings: Reading and Writing (3)
Students research current theories, strategies and evaluative techniques included in reading
literature. Selected experiences direct students to explore individual needs and areas of
interest. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content
and pedagogy. Prerequisite: EDU 350 or 351 or permission.
EDU 491 Independent Study (1-3)
Individualized projects carried out by a student under faculty direction. Prerequisite:
departmental approval.
EDU 495 Student Teaching Seminar (2)
The student teacher seminar is to provide an opportunity and environment for student
teachers and college faculty to share and discuss problems, success, teaching methods, and
innovations of mutual interest. Student teachers are encouraged to share their ideas,
insights and observations, for the benefit of others in the seminar. Students will learn
strategies for career planning and seeking professional employment. Emphasis will be
placed on professionalism, organizational skills and ethical behaviors for successful
employment in a teaching career. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated
into instruction of content and pedagogy.
EDU 496 Research Seminar (3)
Students evaluate educational research and analyze procedures, logic, and strategies
implemented by researchers. Students complete research projects demonstrating effective
research designs. Presentation of papers to faculty members and the public is required.
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy. (Also listed as ECE and SPE.)
English (ENG)
ENG 099 Developmental English (3)
English 099 is a basic writing course, designed to introduce students to college writing and
prepare them for the similar, but more demanding, writing of English 101, the entry-level
writing course. Students who pass the course are able to write a developed, unified, and
cohesive expository essay. Placement in this course is determined by ACT scores or
placement examination.
ENG 101 Composition (3)
Instruction and practice in the fundamentals of effective written composition, critical
reading, and writing. Prerequisite: successful completion of English Placement Exam or ENG
099.
ENG 102 Advanced Composition (3)
Continued instruction and practice in critical reading and writing, and research techniques,
including documentation conventions. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Can be substituted for Eng
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101 if certain requirements are met: ACT scores of 26 in English, plus satisfactory writing
sample during the first week of class.
ENG 105 Introduction to Literature: Short Story and Drama (3)
An introduction to the major forms of short story and drama. By a study and analysis of
works, students will discover the characteristics of these two genres. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 106 Introduction to Literature: Novel and Poetry (3)
An introduction to the major forms of the novel and poetry. By the study and analysis of
works, students will come to a better understanding of these two genres. Prerequisite: ENG
101.
ENG 202 World Literature: Studies in the Novel (3)
A selective study of significant novels by American, British, Asian, African, or European
novelists. Study will include the characteristics of fiction. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 203 World Literature: Studies in Poetry (3)
A selective study of the structure, form, and meaning of poetry from a variety of world
cultures. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 204 World Literature: Studies in the Short Story (3)
A study of the theory and practice of the short story as illustrated by works of 19th, 20th
and 21th century writers from around the world. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 210 Writing Literary Non-Fiction I (3)
An intermediate class in nonfiction writing, ENG210 addresses essential strategies for
writing and evaluating creative nonfiction.
Students read, discuss, and analyze
contemporary nonfiction and original nonfiction written for the class. Prerequisite: ENG 101
ENG 212 Creative Writing I (3)
An intermediate class in fiction writing, ENG212 addresses essential strategies for writing
and evaluating fiction. Students read, discuss, and analyze contemporary fiction and
original fiction written for the class. The course includes reading in the theory and practice
of writing. Prerequisite: ENG 101
ENG 231 American Literature I (3)
A study of the major forms, works, themes, and writers in American literature from colonial
times to 1865. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 232 American Literature II (3)
Selected readings from 20th and 21st century American writers, focusing on the diversity of
modern American literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 241 British Literature: Beowulf to the Neoclassic (3)
Literary movements, genres, and works from Beowulf through the 18th century.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 242 British Literature: Romantics Through Modern (3)
A survey of the literature of 19th and 20th century England. Selections from a variety of
genres will be analyzed. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 255 Contemporary Literature (3)
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A study of representative works from 1950 to the present. Includes a variety of genres and
themes. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 257 Women and Film (3)
An exploration of the portrayal of women in film and a study of film as a narrative form.
Prerequisite: ENG 101. Also listed as WST 257.
ENG 262 Literature for Young Adults for Teachers (3)
This course includes the study of some traditional and contemporary works written for or
about young adults. The works studied will be evaluated for their artistic merit and for their
insights into the adolescent stage of human development. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Does not
fulfill a general education requirement. For Education majors only.
ENG 266 Images of Women in Literature (3)
Women have been stereotyped (and have played stereotypes) in life; these traditional
images are reflected in literature. The study of these images of women is through writings
from various places around the world and from different time periods. Prerequisite: ENG
101. (Also listed as WST 266.)
ENG 310 Writing Literary Non-Fiction II (3)
An advanced reading and writing workshop in contemporary prose forms. Prerequisite: ENG
210 or departmental approval.
ENG 312 Creative Writing II (3)
An advanced reading and writing
departmental approval.
workshop
in
fiction. Prerequisite:
ENG 101
or
ENG 320 Linguistics for Teachers (3)
A study of the structure of the English language. Includes units on lexicography, semantics,
and dialects. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Does not fulfill
general education requirement.
(Graduate Level ENG 520)
ENG 343 Shakespeare (3)
Shakespeare as a dramatist and poet. A reading of representative plays, including comedy,
tragedy, history, and romance. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Also listed as THR 343.
ENG 345 Victorian Literature (3)
A study of the shorter fiction written by major British authors during the reign of Queen
Victoria (1837-1901), and of its enduring claims on our attention today. Prerequisite: ENG
101.
ENG 355 Women/Novels/Film (3)
A study of the respective narrative systems of film and novels, featuring modern American
novels and films. Prerequisite ENG 101 (Also listed as WST 355.)
ENG 356 American Memoir (online) (3)
An intensive study of 20th century American memoir. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 357 Studies in Authors: British (3)
An intensive study of selected genres, themes, movements, or authors in modern and
contemporary British literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 358 Studies in Authors: World (3)
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An intensive study of several significant world authors grouped according to a common
theme or genre. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
ENG 368 Women Writers (online) (3)
A study of traditional and contemporary works written by American women. Emphasizes
style and major themes in their literature . Prerequisite: ENG 101. (Also listed as WST 368.)
ENG 381-389 Experimental Courses (3)
The subject matter and method of these courses will vary from semester to semester in line
with current trends.
ENG 491, 492 Independent Study (1-3)
Individualized projects carried out by a student under faculty direction. Prerequisite:
departmental approval.
ENG 493, 494 Independent Writing Project (1-3)
Individualized writing projects supervised by the
departmental approval, ENG 101 and 310 or 312.
English
faculty.
Prerequisites:
ENG 495 Coordinating Seminar (3)
In-depth study on selected topic under the direction of an English faculty member and
presentation of the seminar paper at the annual Symposium. Senior English majors only.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.
Experiencing the Liberal Arts (ELA)
ELA 203 The Detective Novel and Society (3)
This course is designed to make students aware of the cultural richness and depth to be
found in the detective novel. It will focus on the question of what can be learned about our
culture and other cultures from the reading of these novels. The works to be studied and
compared deal with broader issues than the traditional “whodunits.” Some of those larger
considerations are gender issues, historical situations, social commentary, ethnic
differences, and religious customs. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and sophomore standing.
ELA 204 Drugs and American Society (3)
The course will explore both the attitudes and the practices of Americans regarding the use
of intoxicating drugs. This phenomenon will be considered from a variety of perspectives;
historical, biological, psychosocial and philosophical. Such study will provide perspective on
many current drug-related issues. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and sophomore standing.
ELA 207 Pulp Law (3)
This course will examine the representation and misrepresentation of legal issues as
presented in film and literature. Through the study of legal and moral theory, students will
critically evaluate movie and literary portrayals of criminal and civil law. Students will
explore the impact such films and books have on the knowledge, attitudes and moral
reasoning of audiences and society as a whole. Prerequisite: ENG101 and sophomore
standing.
ELA 266 Finding Your Voice (3)
In this course students will become acquainted with the way in which people respond to
voice quality and tone, thus providing them with creative options for asserting themselves
or otherwise participating in all areas of verbal interaction. Students will explore voice
physically, psychologically and socially and will study voice in the contexts of the dramatic
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arts, literature, psychology, and anthropology. Through written papers, monologues and
interviews, students will learn the intricacies of vocal exchange, learning that the way a
statement is made is just as important as the words that comprise it.
ELA 302 A.B.U.S.E. - Awareness, Beliefs, Understanding, Strategies and
Empowerment (3)
This course will explore the concept of human abuse as it relates to women from a
psychological and health perspective. It will assist students to understand how abuse has
impacted men’s, women’s, and children’s roles, relationships, self-esteem, and their ability
to adapt to societal expectations. Content areas include an historical overview, media, and
treatment. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and sophomore standing.
ELA 304 American Cinema (3)
This course is a survey of the American film industry as an art form, as an industry, and as
a system of representation and communication. This course explores how Hollywood films
work technically, aesthetically, and culturally to reinforce and challenge America’s national
self-image. Formal analysis will be linked with historical research and cultural studies.
Prerequisites: ENG 101 and sophomore standing.
ELA 306 Intercultural Communication (3)
This class will link the study of communication with the study of culture. It will seek to
develop skills leading to more understanding of other cultures and how to effectively
communicate. Prerequisite: ENG101 and sophomore standing. (Also listed as COM 306 and
Graduate Level COM/ELA 506.)
ELA 309 Narratives of the Holocaust (3)
Personal narratives are used in this course to study the shattering impact that Nazi policies
of extermination had upon the lives of individual human beings. By combining the study of
history and literature, students are given the opportunity to examine both the historical
context of the Holocaust and the ways in which particular women and men used writing in
the service of both historical memory and personal survival. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and
sophomore standing.
ELA 310 Utopia: From Women’s Points of View (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the concept of utopian worlds, particularly
ideal worlds from women’s points of view. The course will deal with the following topics:
Utopian worlds, patriarchy, concepts of God, desire for immortality, uses of power, and uses
of language. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and sophomore standing. ( Also listed as WST 311.)
ELA 315 Self, Society, and Service (3)
This course explores the concepts of volunteering and service as they relate to individuals
and the community from health perspectives. The mental and physical health of members
of our society is affected by their occupational and leisure activities. These activities should
begin at a young age so patterns of positive health promotion are established throughout
the lifespan. Involvement in community service provides meaning and purpose in people’s
lives. Such qualities may in turn have protective effects on health outcomes. Volunteering
offers opportunities for persons to help solve critical community needs, develop new skills,
and open alternative career paths. These opportunities, in turn, reinvigorate the health of
the community and promote satisfaction among community members. The content areas
will include but not be limited to a historical overview of service and volunteerism, the
benefits to individuals and the community, current trends, life-span efforts, occupational
opportunities, and the concept of service-learning.
This is a web-enhanced course.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and sophomore standing.
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ELA 320 Liberty and Justice (3)
Examines the protection of individual freedoms through the Constitution and the Bill of
Rights. Students will critically evaluate the legal and moral issues inherent in the personal
rights embodied in the Bill of Rights. Students will be provided with a background in legal
and moral theory and terminology and will use such knowledge to discuss the importance of
protecting and promoting individual freedom in modern society.
ELA 325 Experiencing Latin American Cultures (3)
This course will be an inter-disciplinary introduction to some components of the diverse
socio-cultural expressions existing in Latin American (Mexico, Central America, part of the
Caribbean, and South America) as a result of the presence and interaction of its indigenous,
Hispanic and African heritages. Some of the components will be explored in the course are:
geography, history, socio-political issues, religion, economics, cinema, music, dance, and
food.
First Year Seminar (FYS)
FYS 101 Science and Social Issues (1)
This seminar will offer students the opportunity to explore the social issues presented by the
implementation of scientific knowledge and advancements. Students will critically examine
how science can benefit and/or harm societies and the environment.
FYS 102 Earth Wisdom (1)
This seminar will focus on the work of various writers and filmmakers that imparts “Earth
Wisdom”. The following question will be addressed: how can people live in a way that is
nourishing and respectful to the land, to wildlife, to the well-being of the human community,
and to the spiritual sustenance of all?
FYS 103 Music and Poetry (1)
This seminar explores the unique relationship between poetry and music and the ways in
which these art forms complement and enrich each other.
FYS 104 How Art Made the World (1)
This seminar is an introduction to the history of art and its influence on the development of
culture. Students will be exposed to the processes of art making through a historical look at
human creativity.
FYS 105 Historical Texts and the Movies (1)
The seminar will study the benefits and hazards of using film as a primary source for the
study of an historical period. Students will think critically about how movies can both
enlighten and mislead us about the past.
FYS 106 The Psychology of Prejudice (1)
This seminar will involve the exploration and study of prejudice, including stereotyping and
discrimination. Students will critically examine their own perspectives and biases, as well as
those of diverse others.
FYS 107 Rhyme and Reason (1)
This seminar will be a study of contrasts between the language of poetry (Rhyme) and
scientific prose (Reason) or the relation between language and thought, one of the oldest
mysteries we know of in every civilization and culture. The seminar will focus on ways of
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thinking that are so common that they are taken for granted, for example, the naming of
things.
FYS 108 Being a Global Citizen (1)
This seminar will explore how to integrate cross-cultural experiences into a plan of study
with the ultimate goal of becoming a global citizen. Today’s students must prepare
themselves for these activities by learning new languages, being open to exchange
experiences and seeking to broaden their horizons. Women need to be encouraged to take
advantage of these opportunities during their academic preparation so as to be open to lifechanging events.
FYS 109 D1 Women and the Law (1)
This seminar will explore the evolution of the legal protection and empowerment of women
in the United States. Students will study current legal issues that directly affect the lives of
women in American society. Students will become more aware of women’s legal issues and
will critically analyze whether such laws are applied in a fair and consistent manner.
FYS 110 Science and Sustainability (1)
This seminar will explore the current state of the global environment and the concept of
sustainability in order to increase the students’ understanding of the earth's limited capacity
to support all forms of life and to provide for the needs of human society. Students will
investigate opportunities to reduce negative environmental impacts and formulate
innovative improvements.
FYS 111 The Mercy Mission (1)
This seminar will discuss the historical reference of Catherine McAuley and the roots of the
Mercy Mission in Ireland and how these factors influence and relate to College of Saint Mary
today. The seminar will also include an in depth study of the Irish heritage of the Mercy
Mission.
FYS 112 Women as Leaders (1)
This seminar will focus on women’s roles in leadership in the 21st century. Students will be
introduced to the history and issues of women in leadership and the steps to becoming
leaders. Students will also have the opportunity of determining their personal leadership
styles.
FYS 114 Women of Courage (1)
This seminar will examine the lives and works of women throughout history who have
exhibited courage in the face of injustice or social needs. History does not frequently record
the deeds of women, therefore, the deeds of many of them have not been taught. Their
examples, however, can be sources of courage for women today.
FYS 115 Financial Literacy & Stewardship (1)
This seminar is built on the premise that life is filled with choices which reflect personal
values. Those who have the skill-sets to identify good choices and take advantage of them
have the power to better their lives and positively affect the society around them. This
seminar provides students with a foundation in career life-planning and goal-setting.
Students will explore methods to balance action with good financial decisions.
FYS 116 Research Rules (1)
The objective of this course is to infuse undergraduate research into the first year student's
curriculum by moving them from discussing how research influences much information
found in popular information sources to identifying a research question, conducting a
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literature review, and presenting their findings. The course will foster the development of
critical thinking skills, skills needed to effectively use library resources, and writing at a
college level.
FYS 117 Women & Culture - Chinese Women (1)
The focus of the course is a comparison of women in different cultures. Students will learn
about women's lives in different cultures, including education, social status, work,
friendship, parenting, and so on. The course will focus on discussion about similarities and
differences between women who live in different cultures and investigating why those
differences occur.
History and Political Science (HPS)
HPS 110 American Government (3)
An overview of the Federal government, including the study of its executive, legislative and
judicial branches and their relationships to each other. Current issues in foreign and
domestic policy are also dealt with in the course.
HPS 131 History of the United States to 1865 (3)
An inquiry into how, by studying the origins of the United States of America, we can better
understand American society, culture, and politics today. Special attention is given to the
topic of the witch trials in Salem, the role of key personalities in American politics, the
American Revolution, slavery, and the Civil War. The course also seeks to shed light on our
own day-to-day living by contrasting contemporary culture with that of Antebellum America.
HPS 132 History of the United States since 1865 (3)
This course surveys the remarkable story of America's rise to becoming a world superpower
and the consequences of this new role for both Americans and others throughout the globe.
Emphasis is placed upon the following: Reconstruction and the post-Civil War industrial
boom, America's becoming an imperial power with the Spanish American War; the decision
to fight in World War I; our response to Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 and Hitler's
declaration of war on the U.S.; assessment of the origins and significance of the Cold War,
including our involvement in Korea and Vietnam; and the development of what we recognize
today as "modern" American life, including critical assessment of the civil rights and general
cultural upheavals of the 1960's and their continued influence on our lives today. This
course includes instruction in effective use of the Internet as a tool for historical study.
HPS 160 World Geography (3)
This is a course in cultural geography. In essence, it is an investigation into how we may
better understand our own society by studying other nations and cultures.
HPS 210 American Foreign Policy (3)
Investigation into the origins, practice, and consequences of American foreign policy.
Special attention is given to World War II, the Cold War, and Vietnam.
HPS 236 History of the Sixties (3)
To identify and to understand the political, social and cultural developments of the sixties in
their historical context. After establishing this context, students are challenged to think
through just how the legacies of the sixties have affected us for good or ill in the 21st
century.
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HPS 240 History of Women in Europe (3)
An exploration of the lives of outstanding women in the Western tradition. These women
will be studied both as individuals and as reflections of their cultural context. (Also listed as
WST 240.)
HPS 260 Regional Geography (3)
An in-depth study of the physical and cultural geography of one particular region of the
world.
HPS 280 Experimental Course (3)
The subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester.
HPS 349 Nazi Germany (3)
A study of the political, social, and cultural forces behind Hitler, Nazi Germany, and the
murders of 11 million people.
HPS 360 Teaching of Social Studies (3)
See Education 360.
HPS 375 Western Civilization to 1500 (3)
Survey of the intellectual and cultural roots of Western civilization from the ancient
Sumerians to the Renaissance.
Major topics covered include the origins of several
contemporary aspects of our culture, including monotheism, democracy, Christianity and
the nation-state.
HPS 376 Western Civilization since 1500 (3)
Survey of the major cultural, political, and social movements in the Western world since
1500. Major topics include the Reformation, Counter-Reformation, Scientific Revolution, the
Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the growth of industrialization and nationalism in
the 19th and 20th centuries.
Honors Program
HNR 101 Honors Program (0)
For the purposes of tracking participation and academic performance in the Walk Tall
Honors Program, a zero credit hour course will be added to the transcript each semester of
participation. The grading for the course is pass/no pass.
Human Services (HSV)
HSV 101 Survey of Human Services (3)
Involves the history, theories, ethical principles, and values of human services. Students will
also explore specific areas of the human services field through experience in the
community.
HSV 230 Attitudes and Values (3)
Requires the student to examine herself, her values and belief systems, and the effect of
her belief system on the perception of and interaction with others. (Also listed as HSV 230.)
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HSV 231 Interviewing Skills (3)
Methods of obtaining relevant information in a variety of settings are discussed and
practiced. The documentation, reporting, and use of information are presented for selection
of personnel or case planning. Methods of designing and implementing programs for clients
are practiced. (Also listed as BUS and COM 231.)
HSV 236 Alcohol and Substance Abuse (3)
Examines the current research and findings on alcohol and substance abuse regarding
causes and treatments. Physical and psychological effects of substance abuse on the
person, in addition to the consequences for the family and society, are reviewed,. The
major intervention and therapeutic models are discussed and evaluated. (Also listed as HSV
236.)
HSV 377 Fieldwork Experience I (3)
Introduces students to the knowledge, skills, and personal development that happen in the
human services setting. Skills focus on understanding the human service organization and
the various roles and functions of human service workers. Course requires completion of
175 Fieldwork Hours. Prerequisites: HSV 231 and PSY 233. To be taken concurrently with
HSV 378.
HSV 378 Fieldwork Seminar I (2)
Problems, solutions, ethical issues, and other interesting situations experienced in HSV 377
will be discussed. To be taken concurrently with HSV 377.
HSV 424 Marriage and Family Counseling (3)
Explores the history of marriage and family therapy, prominent theorists, and major
methodologies. Prerequisite: PSY 332 or permission of the instructor. (Also listed as HSV
424.)
HSV 477 Fieldwork Experience II (3)
Engages the student in addressing and solving more complex problems in service delivery.
Greater autonomy and responsibility in the human services setting is expected of the
student during this course. Course requires completion of 175 Fieldwork Hours.
Prerequisites: HSV 377 and HSV 378. To be taken concurrently with HSV 478.
HSV 478 Fieldwork Seminar II (1)
Problems, solutions, ethical issues, and other interesting situations experienced in HSV 477
will be discussed. To be taken concurrently with HSV 477.
Humanities
HUM 495 Coordinating Seminar (3)
An advanced interdisciplinary research project under the direction of a faculty member from
one of the student’s areas of specialty. Prerequisite: departmental approval and senior
standing.
Interdisciplinary Studies
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IDS 097 Study and Learning (2)
Study and Learning is designed to increase the student’s success in college. The course will
focus on assisting the student in developing practical study skills and learning strategies to
enhance academic success. Emphasis will be given to investigation of student’s individual
learning objectives. Topics in this course include time planning, test taking, study
techniques, learning style, classroom interaction, and personal issues that face many
college students. Note: this course does not count as General Education credit. IDS 097 is
a repeatable course.
IDS 160 The Successful Single Mother (1)
Students who complete the Successful Single Mother will become confident parents and
self-assured, goal-oriented women. The Successful Single Mother will provide tools for
single mothers to set and meet goals that matter to them (be they related to academics,
parenting, health & wellness, etc.) The class will also provide opportunities to review and
understand the institutional oppression of single mothers, and the feminization of poverty,
in an effort to help students unlearn stereotypes and carry themselves with confidence. In
addition to gaining valuable life skills and access to resources in the community, students in
this class will also build camaraderie and support with their peers by sharing goals with one
another and participating in CSM Single Parent Success/Mothers Living & Learning events.
Interpreting (INT)
INT 110 Community Interpreting (3)
This course is designed to introduce future interpreters to vocabulary and interpreting skills
that are needed to successfully interpret in schools and social services environments.
Special emphasis is put on practicing consecutive and telephonic interpreting modes. Role
plays and simulated interpreting situations are incorporated into every class.
INT 120 Legal Interpreting (3)
Legal Interpreting I is an introductory course that focuses on the review of the US legal
system, building of specialized vocabulary, consecutive translation and sight translation
skills. Students learn the ethics of interpreting in legal environments.
Mathematics (MTH)
MTH 098 Developmental Math (3)
Includes basic concepts of the real number system, polynomials, first-degree equations and
inequalities, algebraic functions, exponents, radicals, graphing linear functions, and an
introduction to quadratic functions. Placement in this course is determined by ACT scores or
placement examination.
MTH 112 Intermediate Algebra (3)
An extension of the basic algebraic concepts includes first- and second-degree equations
and inequalities, and systems of linear equations. Prerequisite: satisfactory PSAT or ACT
score, satisfactory score on Math Competency Exam, or C or better in MTH 098, or
permission of program director.
MTH 114 College Algebra (3)
A study of functions, graphs, linear systems, and matrices. Prerequisite: C or better in MTH
112, or three years of high school mathematics including advanced algebra, or permission
of program director.
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MTH 115 College Trigonometry (3)
A study of the circular functions and their graphs, trigonometric functions, trigonometric
identities and equations, and applications of trigonometry. Prerequisite: C or better in MTH
114 or equivalent.
MTH 170 Discrete Mathematics (3)
A study of variable types and practical solution methods that use discrete sets such as the
natural numbers. Topics may include sets, relations, symbolic logic, mathematical induction,
counting, modular arithmetic, graph theory, matrices, linear programming, and their
applications. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in MTH 112, or equivalent.
MTH 201 Calculus I (4)
A study of limits and continuity, differentiation of algebraic functions, and elementary
integration with applications. Prerequisite: C or better in MTH 115 or equivalent.
MTH 202 Calculus II (4)
A continuation of MTH 201 including the differentiation of transcendental functions and
methods of formal integration with applications, and an introduction to sequences and
series. Prerequisite: C or better in MTH 201 or equivalent.
MTH 203 Calculus III (4)
The study of calculus of several variables including vectors, partial derivatives, multiple
integrals and Green’s theorem. Prerequisite: MTH 202
MTH 242 Statistics (3)
Collection and tabulation of data, averages and measures of disbursement, correlational and
regression analysis, probability and sampling, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: C or
better in MTH 112, or permission of program director. (Also listed as BUS and PSY 242.)
MTH 262 Numbers and Geometry with Applications (3)
A study of number systems with applications in geometry and probability. This course is
designed primarily for elementary education majors.
MTH 266 College Geometry (3)
Axiomatic systems, introduction to non-Euclidean geometry, and projective geometry.
Prerequisite: MTH 201.
MTH 288 Experimental Course (1-3)
The subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester in line with current
trends.
MTH 312 Biostatistics (3)
An introductory statistics course for students in public health and biomedical practice and
research. In particular, this course will focus on elementary descriptive statistics,
elementary probability, the methods of collecting and analyzing data, and the techniques of
making inferences based upon biology, chemistry, or health-related area data. The
emphasis is on an intuitive understanding of statistical methods and the applications on
biology, chemistry, or health-related area. The use of SPSS and Excel will be an integral
part of the course. Prerequisite: MTH 114 or equivalent course.
MTH 342 Mathematical Statistics (3)
The study of the theory and applications of statistics using a traditional Calculus based
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approach. Topics include finite and continuous distributions, inferences estimation, and
regression. Prerequisite: MTH 202.
MTH 350 Abstract Algebra (3)
An introduction to modern algebra, including groups, rings, integral domains, and fields.
Prerequisite: MTH 201.
MTH 360 Linear Algebra (3)
A study of finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, eigenvalues,
and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MTH 201.
MTH 367 Teaching of Mathematics (3)
Principles, objectives, methods, and functions of teaching mathematics are emphasized.
(Also listed as EDU 360.)
MTH 450 Differential Equations (3)
Methods of solution and applications
Prerequisite: MTH 202.
of
common
types
of
differential
equations.
MTH 491 Advanced Topics in Mathematics (1-4)
Allows students to pursue an in-depth study of an area of mathematics that they
would not be exposed to otherwise.
MTH 495 Mathematics Seminar (1)
Student investigation and presentation on topics not included in the usual mathematics
offerings. MTH 202 and departmental approval.
Medical Interpreting (MDI)
MDI 100 Foundations of Interpreting (3)
Foundations of Interpreting introduces basic concepts in interpreting, including professional
specific terminology, the various settings in which interpreters work, and the role of the
interpreter.
MDI 110 Musculoskeletal, Cardio and Digest. Sys. (3)
This course is designed to provide current Medical Interpreters or persons who wish to begin
a career in medical interpreting with skills pertaining to interpreting in health care settings.
The course will present a foundation for medical interpreter ethics, an overview of the US
healthcare system, and familiarize the students with the vocabulary used to describe some
of the main body systems, as well as with some medical procedures within the context of
real-life triadic encounters.
This course covers the first half of the Art of Medical
Interpreting textbook.
MDI 120 Reproductive and Respiratory Systems (3)
Medical Interpreting: Reproductive and Respiratory Systems is designed to provide current
Medical Interpreters or persons who wish to begin a career in medical interpreting with skills
pertaining to interpreting in health care settings. The course will present a foundation for
medical interpreter ethics and an overview of the US healthcare system, familiarization with
terms describing body systems and medical procedures in the context of real-life triadic
encounters. This course covers the second half of the Art of Medical Interpreting textbook.
MDI 130 Medical Terminology (3)
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Medical Terminology is a beginning, entry-level course that will cover medical terminology
via asynchronous discussions in class, text reading assignments, homework problems, and
assessments. Emphasis will be to recognize, evaluate and deduce meanings of medical
words by applying word-building rules. Study will be directed to define word parts, apply
word-building rules to form words from suffixes, prefixes and roots in the combining form.
An additional focus of study will be to define and use words pertaining to the digestive
system, reproductive systems, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, blood, lymphatic
and immune systems, musculoskeletal system and skin, sense organs, endocrine system,
oncology, radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, pharmacology and psychiatry.
Medical Technology (MDT)
All coursework related to the clinical year is taken at a participating institution. No MDT
coursework is offered at CSM.
Military Science (Courses offered at Creighton University or
University of Nebraska at Omaha)
MIL 100 Leadership Laboratory I (0)
Leadership Laboratory provides initial and advanced military leadership instruction in
military courtesy, first aid, and practical field training exercises.
Functions and
responsibilities of leadership positions are developed through cadet command and staff
positions. Required with enrollment in MIL 101, MIL 102, and MIL 103. May be repeated
one time.
MIL 101 Introduction to Officer Professionalism I (1)
Examination of the role of the commissioned officer in the United States Army. Discussion
focuses upon officer career opportunities, role of the officer, responsibilities of and basis for
the armed forces, and sources of officer commissioning.
MIL 102 Introduction to Officer Professionalism II (1)
Continuation of MIL 101. Further examines the role of the commissioned officer in the U.S.
Army. Focuses on customs of the service, role of the Army, Army Reserve, and Army
National Guard; organization of the Army; branches of the Army; and leadership principles
for the junior officer.
MIL 103 Foundation of Officership and Basic Leadership (2)
This course is an introduction for nursing students to issues and competencies that are
central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities.
These initial lessons establish a
framework for understanding officership, leadership, and Army values. Additionally, the
semester addresses “life skills” including fitness and time management. This course is
designed to give accurate insight into the Army Profession and the officer’s role within the
Army. Prerequisite: Nursing students only.
MIL 200 Leadership Laboratory II (0)
This second-year leadership laboratory parallels MIL 211/212 classroom instruction,
reinforcing concepts learned in class with practical hands-on training exercises and
activities. Training is focused on more advanced individual and collective small unit skills
such as small unit leadership and tactics doctrine, land navigation, basic rifle
marksmanship, and drill ceremonies. Required with enrollment in MIL 211, MIL 212, and
MIL 213. May be repeated one time.
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MIL 201 Basic Individual Leadership Techniques (1)
This course is designed to develop student leadership and critical individual skills. Training is
basic in nature and includes leadership techniques, written and oral communication, rifle
marksmanship, fundamentals of land navigation, and physical fitness. Prerequisite: MIL
101, 102, or Director Consent.
MIL 205 ROTC Leadership Training Camp (3)
Six weeks of preparatory training at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Travel pay and salary stipend
provided through the Military Science Department. The student is not obligated to any
military service as a result of attending Leadership Training Camp. Camp graduates are
eligible to enroll in Advanced Military Science courses. Students are also eligible to compete
for full tuition two-year scholarships. Prerequisite: Director Consent.
MIL 207 Fundamentals of Army Ranger Training (2)
Course designed to challenge the individual in leadership, physical endurance, special
operations and small-unit tactics.
Competitive area success would lead to regional
championship participation at Fort Lewis, Washington.
MIL 208 Advanced Army Ranger Training (2)
Continuation of MIL 207.
MIL 212 Advanced Individual Leadership Techniques II (1)
Continues the development of student leadership and critical individual military skills.
Training focuses on advanced military skills and includes orienteering, field survival skills,
operations, and training. Prerequisite: MIL 211.
MIL 213 Military Science and Leadership (2)
Nurse cadet only. This course compresses Military Science II year into one semester. It is
designed to develop students’ knowledge of self, self-confidence, and individual leadership
skills. Through experiential learning activities, students develop problem solving and critical
thinking skills, and apply communication, feedback and conflict resolution skills.
Prerequisite: MIL 103.
MIL 215 United States Military History (3)
A study of the theory and practice of war beginning in colonial times through the military
engagements and peacekeeping operations of the 1990s. Emphasis is on United States
participation in these military operations.
MIL 300 Leadership Laboratory III (0)
This laboratory parallels MIL 301/302 classroom instruction and places the student in
leadership positions within the cadet corps, providing greater challenges in order to build
confidence and enhance mastery of individual skills. Activities focus on honing military skills
and mastery of small unit leadership and tactics in preparation for MIL 351, ROTC National
Advanced Leadership Camp in Fort Lewis, Washington. Required with enrollment in MIL 301
and 302. May be repeated one time.
MIL 301 Fundamentals of Small Unit Tactics and Leadership (3)
Course designed to introduce the Advanced Course military science student to the technical
skills required to become an effective small unit leader. Includes fundamentals of terrain
navigation, oral and written communication skills, basic troop leading procedures, and an
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introduction to opposing forces capabilities, organization and equipment.
training exercise. Prerequisite: MIL 211, 212, or Director Consent.
Includes field
MIL 302 Advanced Small Unit Tactics & Leadership II (3)
Course involves the study and application of small unit tactics with emphasis on planning
and organizing principles learned in MIL 301. Designed to develop the self-confidence and
leadership abilities as well as the technical competence needed by the Advanced Course
student to complete Advanced Camp Training conducted at Ft. Lewis, Washington. Includes
field training exercises. Prerequisite: MIL 301.
MIL 351 Leadership Development Assessment Course (3)
The ROTC cadet attends five weeks of intensive leadership and management training. The
training is conducted during the summer months between the junior and senior years at
Fort Lewis, Washington. The student’s ability to lead her unit and to plan and conduct
military small unit operations is thoroughly evaluated. Travel pay and salary stipend
provided through the Department of Military Science. Prerequisite: MIL 301 and MIL 302.
MIL 352 ROTC Nurse Summer Training (3)
A three-week, 120-hour clinical assignment with an Army Nurse Corps preceptor at an Army
hospital in the U.S. or overseas. Available to ROTC nursing students with at least one
clinical nursing course, follows successful completion of MIL 351. The student receives
travel pay and salary stipend through the Military Science Department. Improved clinical
skills and self-confidence that comes with experience will enhance performance in nursing
curriculum and Military Science. Prerequisite: MIL 301 and 302, Director Consent.
MIL 400 Leadership Laboratory IV (1)
Laboratory designed to allow senior cadets to demonstrate mastery of leadership and
tactical skills developed throughout their cadet career in preparation for becoming
commissioned Army officers. The cadet battalion staff plans, resources, and executes
training for the MIL 100, 200, and 300 labs. Additionally charged with the leadership
development and assessment of the underclassmen, with a focus on the junior class in
preparation for Leadership Development Assessment Course at Fort Lewis, Washington in
the summer. Required with enrollment in MIL 401 and MIL 402. May be repeated one time.
MIL 401 Military Professionalism and Ethics I (2)
Seminar on contemporary problems facing junior officers dealing with ethics and military
professionalism. Standards of conduct are explained and applied to practical simulations
utilizing the ethical decision-making process. Prerequisite: MIL 301 and 302 or Director
Consent.
MIL 402 Military Management Seminar II (2)
Leadership and management problems involved in the operation of a small unit including
personal affairs, military justice, moral and social duties and obligations of a military officer.
Prerequisite: MIL 401.
MIL 493 Directed Independent Readings I, II (2)
Directed readings course designed to consider an issue or field of interest to society in
general and the military in particular. Prerequisite: Director Consent.
MIL 494 Directed Independent Study and Seminar I (2)
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Directed study course designed to consider an issue or field of interest to the society in
general and the military in particular. Prerequisite: Director Consent.
MIL 495 Directed Independent Study and Seminar II (2)
Directed research in Military Science to meet the individual needs of the student. Course
focuses on developing practical application of special interest subjects in a student-initiated
project. Prerequisite: Director Consent.
AES 001 Leadership Laboratory (0)
Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs) include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies,
drill and ceremonies, and military commands.
The LLAB also includes studying the
environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to
commissioned officers. During the junior and senior year, LLABs consist of activities
classified as leadership and management experiences. They involve the planning and
controlling of military activities of the cadet corps, and the preparation and presentation of
briefings and other oral and written communications. LLABs also include interviews,
guidance, and information that will increase the understanding, motivation, and
performance of other cadets.
AES 131, AES 132 Foundations of the United States Air Force I & II (1,1)
Survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and Air Force
Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air
Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer
opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills.
Leadership Laboratory is
mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with
followership experiences.
AES 231, AES 232 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I & II (1,1)
These courses are designed to examine general aspects of air and space power through a
historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the courses cover a time period from the
first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning system of the Persian Gulf
War.
Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force
capabilities (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what
has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the courses examine several
fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War and
Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, these courses provide students with a
knowledge level understanding for the general element and employment of air and space
power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, the students
will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force Core Values with the use of
operational examples and historical Air Force leaders and will continue to develop their
communication skills.
Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and
complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.
AES 311, AES 312 Air Force Leadership Studies I & II (3)
A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force
personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of
an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and
management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of
the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course
by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the
opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course.
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AES 411, AES 412 National Security Affairs/Prep for Active Duty I & II (3)
These courses examine the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership
ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a
profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active
duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued
emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory
complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the
opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
In addition to the above courses, Air Force ROTC awards credit through summer field
training exercises:
Two hours of credit are granted to students who complete four weeks of training at selected
Air Force bases. Travel pay and salary stipend provided. The student is not obligated to
any military service as a result of attending field training. Graduates of camp are eligible to
enroll in the Professional Officer Course (POC) and compete for two-year Air Force ROTC
scholarships.
Three hours of credit are granted to students who complete six weeks of training at selected
Air Force bases. Training is designed for students with no military experience, training, or
education. Travel pay and salary stipend provided. The student is not obligated to any
military service as a result of attending field training. Graduates of camp are eligible to
enroll in the Professional Office Course (POC).
Music (MUS)
MUS 100 Beginning Piano (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 108 and MUS 109 or permission of the program director.
MUS 101 Beginning Organ (1)
MUS 102 Beginning Voice (1)
MUS 103 Beginning Violin (1)
MUS 104 Beginning Guitar (1)
MUS 105 Beginning Trumpet (1)
MUS 106 Beginning Flute (1)
MUS 117 Beginning Tuba (1)
MUS 120 Beginning Oboe (1)
MUS 121 Beginning Cello (1)
MUS 126 Beginning Trombone (1)
MUS 127 Beginning Bassoon (1)
MUS 129 Beginning Clarinet (1)
MUS 108 Class Piano I (2)
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Beginning level instruction in piano is offered in a digital computer lab. This course is
designed for students with no previous musical background. Daily practice is expected of all
students.
MUS 109 Class Piano II (2)
Beginning level instruction in piano is offered in a digital computer lab. This course will
allow students who have completed Class Piano I to continue piano studies in a second
semester class.
MUS 118 Musicianship I (3)
A general introduction to the language of music intended to help the student gain fluency in
reading and understanding conventional musical notation.
Fundamental theoretical
concepts (melodic and rhythmic notation, intervals, scales, meter, tonality) are studied and
rudimentary applied skills (ear training, sight singing, keyboard harmony) are developed.
MUS 119 Musicianship II (3)
An introduction to the harmonic theory of the common practice period. The course begins
with a review of music fundamentals and then examines the nature of triads and seventh
chords, basic principles of voice-leading and harmonic progression, chord inversion, and
non-chord tones. Skills such as ear training, sight singing and keyboard harmony are
simultaneously cultivated. Prerequisite: MUS 118 or its equivalent.
MUS 204 Music of the People (3)
A listening course which explores types of folk music, instruments and dances important to
people of specific cultures and countries throughout the world.
MUS 205 Women in Music (3)
(Also listed as WST 205.)
MUS 206 Music of Western Civilization (3)
An introduction to the great music of Western civilization from the Middle Ages to the
present. The course begins with a discussion of the elements of music and proceeds with a
chronological overview of music history. Classical masterworks from all style periods are
studied.
MUS 208 History of Jazz and Rock (3)
An historical survey of the development of jazz and rock from their beginning to the
present.
MUS 210 Intermediate Piano (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 100 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 211 Intermediate Organ (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 101 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 212 Intermediate Voice (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 102 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 213 Intermediate Violin (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 103 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 214 Intermediate Guitar (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 104 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
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MUS 215 Intermediate Trumpet (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 105 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 216 Intermediate Flute (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 106 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 217 Intermediate Tuba (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 117 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 220 Intermediate Oboe (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 120 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 221 Intermediate Cello (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 121 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 226 Intermediate Trombone (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 126 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 227 Intermediate Bassoon (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 127 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 229 Intermediate Clarinet (1)
Prerequisite: Music 129 or its equivalent and permission of instructor.
MUS 247 CSM Chorus (NC, 1)
Choral literature in a variety of styles is learned and performed. The CSM Chorus performs
one major concert each semester and sings occasionally for events both on and off-campus.
Choir tours are included in this course in some semesters. Participation in rehearsals and
performances in addition to scheduled class time is required. Students may enroll in chorus
for credit or on a non-credit basis. Students may re-elect this course every semester.
Open to all students.
MUS 310 Advanced Piano (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 210 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 311 Advanced Organ (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 211 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 312 Advanced Voice (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 212 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 313 Advanced Violin (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 213 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 314 Advanced Guitar (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 214 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 315 Advanced Trumpet (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 215 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 316 Advanced Flute (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 216 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
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MUS 317 Advanced Tuba (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 217 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 320 Advanced Oboe (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 220 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 321 Advanced Cello (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 221 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 326 Advanced Trombone (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 226 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 327 Advanced Bassoon (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 227 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 329 Advanced Clarinet (1)
Prerequisite: MUS 229 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.
MUS 346 History of Music I (3)
A survey of music and its development in Western civilization from earliest examples
through the Baroque period. Emphasis is given to representative musical works and styles
and to the understanding of musical concepts in relation to their historical and cultural
background.
MUS 347 History of Music II (3)
A survey of music and its development in Western civilization from the Classical period
through the present day. Emphasis is given to representative musical works and styles and
the understanding of musical concepts in relation to their historical and cultural background.
Prerequisite: MUS 346
MUS 348 Twentieth Century Music (3)
Study of the forms and styles of classical music from Debussy to the present, including
impressionism, serialism, neo-classicism, minimalism, aleatoric music, electronic music, and
music in traditional major-minor systems.
MUS 349 Masterpieces of Sacred Music (3)
A survey of compositions for chorus and orchestra that have achieved the status of musical
and spiritual masterpieces.
Musical examples from the Middle Ages through the present
will be studied.
MUS 357 CSM Singers (1)
CSM Singers is a select choral ensemble whose members are chosen by audition from
students enrolled in CSM Chorus. Students will have the opportunity to develop advanced
choral skills, explore additional choral repertories, and perform in concerts both on and off
campus. In order to register for this course, a student must also register for MUS 247 (CSM
Chorus) during the same semester.
Prerequisites: One previous semester of MUS 247 (or its equivalent) and permission of the
instructor.
MUS 375 The American Musical (3)
A music appreciation course that also includes the dramatic and artistic elements of the
musical. From an historical perspective, the students study the development of the
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American musical from 1866 to the present. Through readings, video viewing, and music
listening, the students learn about this uniquely American style of performance that has
derived from jazz, folk, and opera.
MUS 380 Experimental Course (3)
The subject matter and methods of this course will vary from semester to semester in line
with current trends.
MUS 391 Independent Study (1-2-3)
Individual projects carried out by a student under faculty direction. Prerequisite:
departmental approval.
Nursing (NUR)
Practical Nursing (PNC)
PNC 101 Introduction to Practical Nursing I (3)
This theory course introduces nursing content that focuses on basic concepts and skills
related to categories of normal human functioning including growth and development,
selected alterations in categories of human functioning, nursing process, teaching/learning
and professional development related to the care of adult clients. Concurrent with: PNC
171, BIO 120/121 or BIO 202/203.
PNC 102 Medical-Surgical Practical Nursing I (3)
This theory course expands the knowledge of health promotion of the young, middle and
older adult, as well as the adaptation by the client to acute and chronic illnesses. The
student will continue to use the nursing process related to common disease conditions
incorporating health assessment, basic abnormalities of bodily functions of the disease
process, pharmacological and nutritional management of diseases and utilization of spiritual
and culturally sensitive nursing interventions to assist selected clients to adapt to alterations
in categories of human functioning and health. The selected alterations in categories of
human function that will be studied include protection (Integumentary and Endocrine),
sensory/perceptual (Eyes and Ears), nutrition and elimination (Gastrointestinal), growth and
development (Endocrine), and fluid-gas transport (Cardiovascular and Respiratory).
Prerequisites: PNC 101, 171, BIO 120/121 OR BIO 202/203. Concurrent with PNC 172, PNC
142, PNC 124 or NUR 224
PNC 103 Medical-Surgical Practical Nursing II (3)
This theory course expands the knowledge of health promotion of the young, middle and
older adult, as well as the adaptation by the client to acute and chronic illnesses. The
student will continue to use the nursing process related to common disease conditions
incorporating health assessment, basic abnormalities of bodily functions of the disease
process, pharmacological and nutritional management of diseases and utilization of spiritual
and culturally sensitive nursing interventions to assist selected clients to adapt to alterations
in categories of human functioning and health. The selected alterations in categories of
human function that will be studied include protection (Immune), sensory/perceptual
(Neurological), elimination (Renal), growth and development (Reproduction), and fluid-gas
transport (Hematology and Renal). Practical nursing care surrounding emergent and urgent
care situations will also be discussed. Prerequisites: PNC 102, PNC 172, PNC 142, PNC 124
or NUR 224. Concurrent with: PNC 173, PNC 123, PNC 113 and PNC 133.
PNC 104 Maternal-Child Practical Nursing (2)
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This theory course expands knowledge of health promotion and disease process throughout
the lifespan. Normal pregnancy experience along with selected alterations, care of the
normal newborn with selected alterations, and health and illness of children and adolescents
will be explored in this course. The student will expand the use of the nursing process to
include health assessment, alterations in selected bodily functions, pharmacological and
nutritional management of disease process and utilization of spiritual and culturally sensitive
nursing interventions to assist individuals and families to adapt to alterations across the
lifespan. Prerequisites: BIO 120 & 121 or BIO 202 & 203, PNC 101, 131, & 171.
PNC 105 Transition to Practical Nursing Practice (2)
Content for this course will address issues that have broad implications in the practice of
nursing for licensed practical nurses. As manager of care for selected clients, the student
will address principles related to coordination of care, prioritization, evidence based practice,
and quality improvement.
Role transition from student to the entry level of practical
nursing practice will be discussed. Prerequisites: BIO 120 & 121 or BIO 202 & 203, PNC
101, 102, 104, 124, 131, 171, 172, & 174
PNC 124 Introduction to Pharmacology (3)
This theory course involves the study of selected classes of drugs, which includes: names,
uses, mechanism of actions, systemic effects, adverse effects, compatibilities,
contraindications, and nursing implications. Specific examples of drugs will be used as
models to explain various classes and how they can be incorporated into each phase of the
nursing process. Specific analysis of the biochemical and physiological effects of drugs on
selected normal and alterations in categories of human functioning will be examined.
Prerequisites: BIO 120/121 or BIO 202/203.
PNC 131 Psychosocial Concepts in Practical Nursing (3)
Content for this course will address therapeutic and interdisciplinary communication
concepts as well as the management of clients with normal psychosocial functioning and
selected common psychiatric and behavioral conditions. The student will explore the
practical nurses’ role in the implementation of interventions that assist individuals of various
cultural and spiritual backgrounds to adapt to healthy functioning. Concurrent with: PNC
171, BIO 120/121 or BIO 202/203.
PNC 142 Nutrition (2)
This theory course will focus on the concepts of nutrition therapy and assist the student to
understand and apply nutrition therapy with nursing interventions to assist selected clients
to adapt to alterations in human functioning and health. Prerequisites: PNC 101,171
Concurrent with: PNC 102, 172, PNC 124 or NUR 224.
PNC 143 Integrating Practical Nursing Concepts (3)
This theory course will build on previous knowledge of selected alterations in categories of
human functioning with the focus of integrating practical nursing concepts. This course will
address physiological integrity of individuals with acute and chronic diseases across the
lifespan, with a focus on basic care and comfort, pharmacological and parenteral therapies
and a reduction of risk potential. The course will expand on the nursing process using a
variety of active teaching strategies. Prerequisites: PNC 102, PNC 172, PNC 142, PNC 124
or NUR 224. Concurrent with: PNC 103, 105, 173, 175
PNC 151 Leveraging Your Success in Practical Nursing (1)
This course assists students to attain knowledge and skills necessary to critically think about
nursing concepts and medication administration. Students will learn different techniques to
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solve medical administration problems, learn to utilize a medication handbook and read
medical labels all with hands on practical components.
PNC 171 Practical Nursing Clinical I (3)
This beginning-level clinical nursing course will focus on the initial skills needed to care for
the client. The clinical laboratory and long-term care will be used as practice settings. (14
hours per week plus prelab.)
Concurrent with: PNC 101, BIO 120/121 or BIO 202/203
PNC 172 Medical-Surgical Practical Nursing I (3)
This clinical nursing course will focus on applying the skills needed to care for selected adult
clients. The long-term care area will be used as the practice setting. (16 clinical hours per
week plus prelab.)
Prerequisites PNC 101, 171 Concurrent with: PNC 102, 142, PNC 124 or NUR 224
PNC 173 Medical-Surgical Practical Nursing II (3)
This clinical nursing course will focus on applying the skills needed to care for selected adult
clients. Long-term care with skilled units and acute hospital sites will be used as practice
setting. (16 clinical hours per week plus prelab.)
Prerequisites: PNC 102, 172, 142, PNC 124 or NUR 224. Concurrent with: PNC 103, 105,
143, 175.
PNC 174 Maternal-Child Practical Nursing Clinical (1)
This clinical nursing course will focus on applying the skills needed to care for selected
clients across the life span from fertilization through young adult. Acute-care, clinics,
daycares, and schools will be used as practice settings. (6-12 clinical hours per week)
Prerequisites PNC 101, 171. Concurrent with: PNC 102, 142, PNC 124 or NUR 224
PNC 175 Transition to Practical Nursing Practical Clinical (1)
This clinical nursing course will focus on applying the skills needed to act as manager of care
for selected clients. The student will apply principles related to coordination of care and
selected safety and infection control principles. Long term care facilities and clinics will be
used as practice settings. (6-12 clinical hours per week) Prerequisites: PNC 102, 172, 142,
PNC 124 or NUR 224. Concurrent with: PNC 103, 105, 143, 173.
Nursing (NUR)
NUR 100 Introduction to Nursing - Theory (4)
This course will provide the theoretical framework upon which subsequent nursing courses
will build. Concepts related to human functioning will be introduced. Nursing process,
communication techniques, and physical assessment skills will be developed. Concurrent
courses: NUR 110 and 170. Prerequisite or concurrent: BIO 200/201; CHM 100, 100L; Math
elective
NUR 110 Nursing Concepts I (1)
Nursing Concepts 110 is a beginning level course which introduces the student to nursing
and the nursing curriculum. Topics include nursing as a profession and the role of the nurse
on the health care team. The basic principles of growth and development, family, nursing
process, communication, and legal/ethical concerns will be addressed as they relate to the
beginning nursing student. Concurrent courses: NUR 100 and 170.
NUR 144 Bridging LPN to ASN - Theory (3)
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A course designed for LPNs articulating into the ASN program. Concepts of human function
and nursing process provide the integrating elements for this bridge course. The role of the
nurse in the health care system and the role of the student as a self-directed learner are
discussed. Prerequisite: Current unencumbered LPN license, successful completion of NLN
Advance Challenge Exam (ACE) Book One (81% or higher), and must successfully complete
2 required sciences (with a C or better) before taking NUR 144. (CHM 100/100L/101 or BIO
200/201 or BIO 230/231 or BIO 202/203)
NUR 150 Leveraging Your Success in Nursing – Theory (2)
This elective Nursing course assists students to attain knowledge and skills necessary to
critically think about nursing concepts and medication administration. Students will learn
different techniques to solve medication administration problems, learn to utilize a
medication handbook, and read medication labels all with hands on practical components.
It is individualized to meet the student's specific learning needs. Prerequisite: Program
Director Permission Required.
NUR 161 Building Nursing Success (Learning Circle I) – Theory (1)
This elective Nursing course assists first-level students to attain knowledge and skills
necessary to promote critical thinking about nursing concepts and to begin correlating them
with practice. Individual and group activities are a part of course content. Students work
alone and collaboratively to participate in active learning exercises that are designed to
augment their understanding and knowledge of theory/clinical content as well as to promote
critical thinking. Activities include, but are not limited to, unfolding case studies, NCLEX
review questions, think-pair-share, developing care plans, and role-playing activities. This
course provides a small-group learning environment which promotes remediation, group
discussion, and collaboration. Concurrent Courses: NUR 100/170
NUR 170 Introduction to Nursing - Clinical (4)
This beginning-level clinical nursing course will focus on the initial skills needed to care for
the client. The clinical laboratory and nursing home facilities will be used as practice
settings. Concurrent courses: NUR 100, 110. Prerequisite or concurrent: BIO 200/201; CHM
100/CHM 100L.
NUR 201 Nursing through the Lifespan - Theory (4)
The focus of this intermediate level course is nursing care of the client from birth through
middle adulthood. The nursing student will assist the client to maintain essential life
functions and adapt to alterations in human functioning. This course builds upon knowledge
and skills acquired in beginning level courses. Prerequisites: NUR 110, NUR100/170, BIO
200/201, CHM 100/100L. Concurrent: NUR 211 or NUR 212, and NUR 271. Prerequisite or
Concurrent: NUR 211 or NUR 212, and BIO 202/203.
NUR 202 Nursing through the Lifespan - Theory (4)
The focus of this intermediate level course includes both physical and psychosocial nursing
care of clients from adulthood through the aging process. The nursing student will examine
methods to assist the client to maintain essential life functions and to adapt to alterations in
human functioning while building upon previous knowledge. Concurrent: NUR 211 or NUR
212, and NUR 272. Prerequisites: NUR 110, 100/170, BIO 200/201, CHM 100/100L.
Prerequisite or Concurrent: NUR 211 or NUR 212, and BIO 202/203.
NUR 211 Nursing Concepts II (1)
This course further develops content in Nursing Concepts 110 related to curriculum
outcomes. Principles of human development across the lifespan are presented as related to
communication and teaching learning styles, family and cultural issues, and community
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resources. Class content can be applied in concurrent nursing clinical courses. The Student
Professional Portfolio continues to serve as a measurement of student development in the
nursing curriculum. Concurrent courses: NUR 201 and 271, or 202 and 272. Prerequisites:
NUR 110, 100, and 170.
NUR 212 Nursing Concepts III (1)
This course further develops content presented in previous Nursing Concepts courses.
Ethical principles are discussed as they relate to professional growth and client care. Issues
related to the scope of nursing practice will be presented and discussed from the
perspective of legal, ethical, and professional responsibility. Class content is applied in
concurrent clinical courses. The Student Professional Portfolio continues to serve as a
measurement of student development in the nursing curriculum. Concurrent courses: NUR
201/271 or 202/272. Prerequisites: ETH 200, NUR 211 (or ASN/BSN Program Director
Permission).
NUR 213 Nursing Concepts IV (1)
Content for this proficient level course will address issues that have broad implications in
nursing. As manager of care for selected clients, the student will address ethical/legal issues
related to changes in nursing care. Role transition from student to the entry level of nursing
practice will be discussed. Concurrent courses: NUR 253 and 273. Prerequisites: NUR 110,
NUR 211, NUR 212.
NUR 222 Building Nursing Success (1)
This course assists students to attain knowledge and skills necessary for nursing courses. It
is individualized to meet the student’s specific needs. Prerequisite: ASN/BSN Program
Director Approval).
NUR 224 Pharmacology (2)
This course focuses on the study of the classes of drugs, their uses, and mechanism of
action, systematic effects, adverse effects and contraindications. Specific examples of
drugs will be used as models to explain various classes of drugs and how they can be
incorporated into each phase of the nursing process. Prerequisites: BIO 200/201, CHM
100/100L, and NUR 100/170. Concurrent: NUR 201/271 or NUR 202/272. Prerequisite
or concurrent: BIO 202/203
NUR 253 Complex Nursing - Theory (4)
Complex Nursing is the proficient level ASN course. Multi-system alterations in human
functioning will be explored with emphasis on prioritization of comprehensive nursing care.
Independent functions of the nurse are explored to allow further development of the
associate degree nurse’s role, while building upon knowledge acquired in previous courses.
Concurrent courses: NUR 213 and NUR 273. Prerequisites: All intermediate level nursing
courses and all required sciences.
NUR 261: Nursing Through the Lifespan I-Learning Circle II - Theory (1)
This elective Nursing course provides the opportunity for students to attain knowledge and
skills necessary to critically think about course concepts with a focus on nursing through the
lifespan from birth to middle adulthood. Individual and group activities are incorporated as
part of the interactive learning environment. Concurrent courses: NUR 201/271 and NUR
211 or NUR 212. Prerequisites: NUR 100/170 and NUR 110.
NUR 262: Nursing through the Lifespan II-Learning Circle II – Theory (1)
This elective Nursing course provides the opportunity for students to attain knowledge and
skills necessary to critically think about course concepts presented in the Intermediate
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Medical-Surgical and Psychiatric nursing components of NUR 202/272. Individual and group
activities are incorporated as part of the interactive learning environment. Concurrent
courses: NUR 202/272 and NUR 211 or NUR 212
Prerequisites: NUR 100/170 and NUR 110
NUR 263: Building Nursing Success-Learning Circle III – Theory (1)
This elective nursing course assists students to enhance knowledge and skills necessary to
critically reason and correlate theory/clinical nursing concepts. Students work
collaboratively and participate in active learning exercises in order to augment their
understanding of knowledge of theory/clinical content. Activities are designed to promote
critical thinking and processing of knowledge. Activities include but are not limited to
unfolding case studies, NCLEX review questions, think-pair-share, and role-playing
activities. This course provides a small group learning environment which promotes
remediation, group discussion and collaboration. Concurrent courses; NUR 253/273 and
NUR 213
NUR 271 Nursing through the Lifespan - Clinical (3)
The focus of this clinical nursing course is on application of knowledge and expansion of the
nursing process. Emphasis will be on human development of the individual and the nurse as
a teacher. Opportunities for clinical experiences may include maternity environments,
pediatric facilities, and other selected acute-care and outpatient settings. This course builds
upon knowledge and skills acquired in beginning level theory and clinical courses. Students
will be expected to draw on this knowledge and these skills to successfully complete this
course. Concurrent courses: NUR 201, NUR 211 or NUR 212,. Prerequisites: NUR 110, and
NUR 100/170, BIO 200/201, and CHM 100/CHM 100L. Prerequisite or Concurrent:
NUR
211 or NUR 212, and BIO 202/203.
NUR 272 Nursing through the Lifespan - Clinical (3)
The focus of this intermediate level clinical nursing course is on application of knowledge
and expansion of the nursing process. Emphasis will be on human development and
communication with adults and the elderly. Opportunities for clinical experiences may
include; mental health facilities, acute/extended care environments, and selected
community settings. Students will be expected to draw upon knowledge and skills acquired
in previous courses to successfully complete this course. Concurrent courses: NUR 202, NUR
211 or NUR 212,; Prerequisites: NUR 110, NUR 100/170, BIO 200/201, and CHM 100/100L.
Prerequisite or Concurrent: NUR 211 or NUR 212, and BIO 202/203.
NUR 273 Complex Nursing - Clinical (4)
The focus of this proficient level clinical nursing course is on comprehensive nursing care for
selected clients with multi-system alterations in human functioning in a variety of settings.
Clinical opportunities to use selected management skills are provided. This course builds
upon knowledge and skills acquired in all previous courses. Students will be expected to
draw upon previously acquired knowledge and skills to successfully complete this course.
Concurrent courses: NUR 213, 253. Prerequisites: all intermediate level nursing courses and
all required sciences.
NUR 355 Internship (1)
This elective clinical course places intermediate students in a clinical setting under the
direction of a Registered Nurse preceptor. Students will apply the nursing process to
multiple clients with predictable outcomes. Sites and supervisions are individual arranged.
Prerequisites: NUR 100/170 (or their equivalent), NUR 110 (or it’s equivalent), faculty
recommendation, and interview/acceptance by contractual facility.
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NUR 372 Nursing Assessment (3)
The focus of this baccalaureate level nursing course is on history-taking, assessment of
health and developmental factors (e.g. psychosocial, cultural, intellectual, spiritual/moral,
transition, environment) and how each factor affects the individual at various ages. This
course will also examine factors related to the nurse's own professional development. The
student will develop skills in physical assessment. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of
one 200-level nursing courses or permission of ASN/BSN Program Director.
NUR 438 Nursing Theories and Research (4)
The focus of this baccalaureate-level nursing course is to provide an overview of nursing
theories, prepare the RN to become a consumer of research, and apply nursing research at
the baccalaureate level. There is an introduction to steps in the research process. The
basic components of qualitative and quantitative research designs are examined. Theories
of nursing are introduced as a basis for professional nursing practice. The purpose of
nursing research is examined in relationship to theory development in nursing. This course
fosters the practical application of the research, incorporating knowledge of statistics from a
previous course. Ethical considerations in nursing research and the role of nursing research
in health care are discussed. The critique process is introduced and used for the evaluation
of nursing research from the consumer’s perspective.
Prerequisite: current and
unencumbered RN licensure. Prerequisite or concurrent: MTH 242 or equivalent, BIO 366,
NUR 372, or permission of ASN/BSN Program Director.
NUR 452 Population Based Community Health (3)
This upper-division course builds on creative learning in nursing, humanities, and natural
and applied sciences. The content of the course focuses on health promotion, health
maintenance, and prevention of illness and injury for individuals, families, other groups, and
communities. Additionally, concepts related to public health organization, epidemiology,
and vital statistics are integrated throughout the course.
Prerequisite: current and
unencumbered RN licensure. Concurrent: NUR 472. Prerequisite or concurrent: MTH 242
or equivalent, BIO 366, NUR 438, and NUR 372, or permission of ASN/BSN Program
Director.
NUR 453 Leading and Managing in Health Care (3)
This baccalaureate nursing course provides the student with an opportunity to apply select
leadership and management principles to nursing. Students examine select social, political,
legal, ethical, and communication factors that influence nursing and the health care system.
Prerequisite: current and unencumbered RN licensure, MTH 242, and NUR 438, or
permission of ASN/BSN Program Director. Concurrent: NUR 463
NUR 455 Professional Roles and Issues in Nursing (3)
This upper-division nursing course examines the baccalaureate-prepared nurse role related
to various health care roles, including licensed practical, associate-prepared, baccalaureateprepared, and masters and doctorally-prepared nurses; and other health care professional
roles. Students are also introduced to functions characteristic of the baccalaureate role, and
are encouraged to discuss applications to the current health care arena. The course is
intended to prepare students for a leadership role as well as for graduate school;
consequently, a major paper is required, a presentation related to the paper is expected,
and a literature search related to a topic in nursing serves as the foundation for both.
Prerequisites: current and unencumbered RN licensure.
NUR 463 Practicum: Leading and Managing in Health Care (2)
This baccalaureate nursing course provides the student with an opportunity to apply select
leadership and management principles to nursing. Students examine select social, political,
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legal, ethical, and communication factors which influence nursing and the health care
system. Concurrent with: NUR 453. Prerequisite: current and unencumbered RN licensure,
MTH 242, and NUR 438, or permission of ASN/BSN Program Director.
NUR 472 Practicum: Population Based Community Health (3)
The practicum component of population-based community Health Nursing provides the R.N.
student the opportunity to function with individuals, families, and other groups and
communities to develop competency in recognizing and working with actual and potential
health problems evolving from basic human needs. Concurrent with:
NUR 452.
Prerequisite: current and unencumbered RN licensure. Prerequisite or concurrent: MTH
242, NUR 438, and BIO 366, or permission of ASN/BSN Program Director.
NUR 494 Capstone Seminar (4)
This upper-division nursing course provides an opportunity for the student to analyze and
synthesize concepts obtained from previous courses and incorporates them into a final
capstone project. In addition, this project entails the development of evidenced based
practice or quality improvement changes of a selected area of nursing practice. Students
work in teams and present the project at the Annual College Scholar Day. Students use the
critique process for the evaluation of nursing research from the consumer’s perspective.
Prerequisite: All other required BSN nursing courses or concurrent with the last semester of
400 level courses. Current and unencumbered RN licensure.
Occupational Therapy (OTH)
Level II Course:
OTH 101 Introduction to Occupational Therapy (3)
This course is designed as an introduction to occupational therapy. Students will gain
knowledge of the history of occupational therapy and professional organizations related to
occupational therapy. Students will develop a basic understanding of the occupational
therapy terminology, practice settings, and professional documents. Prerequisite:
Admission to the OT program
Level III Courses:
OTH 200 Therapeutic Use of Self (3)
This course focuses on fundamental interpersonal skills of developing the person as an
effective agent of change. Students will learn skills to build a therapeutic relationship with
diverse clients across multiple settings emphasizing professional communication, rapport
building and empathy. Students also will be introduced to concepts of task analysis and
group dynamics. Prerequisites: OTH 101 and PSY 101
OTH 201 Fundamentals of Health Care and Occupational Therapy (2)
This course is designed to instruct occupational therapy students’ basic knowledge
concerning health care system and delivery. Students will have an introduction to health
records, ICF, WHO; understand health care team members and roles. Students will also
learn reimbursement mechanisms within health care related services, gain knowledge
regarding health disparities, advocacy, and global health initiatives. Prerequisites: OTH 101
and SOC 101
OTH 301 The Nature of Occupation (2)
This course introduces students to the concept of occupational science as a discipline that
studies the correlation between daily occupations, health and well-being. The power and
importance of occupation is emphasized through a thorough investigation into the complex
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nature of occupation. Students will build on the work from OTH 101 to develop and
enhance their understanding of occupation. Prerequisite: OTH 101
OTH 303 Introduction to Theories of Practice (2)
This course examines select theories, models of practice, and frames of reference that have
been developed and used in the practice of occupational therapy. In addition, the
Occupational Therapy Practice Framework is used as the basis for teaching OT practice and
process. This course establishes the foundation for occupational therapy practice and the
development of critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills. Prerequisite: OTH 101
OTH 350 Evaluation and the Occupational Therapy Process (2)
This course is designed to teach the process of screening, evaluation, and referral to
determine the need for occupational therapy intervention. Students will understand how to
select and administer appropriate assessments, interpret the evaluation data, and document
evaluation results. Prerequisites: OTH 200 and OTH 303
OTH 355 Principles of Health Promotion and Education (3)
This course provides the foundation for systematically designing, implementing, and
evaluating learning experiences used in the education of clients, caregivers, family
members, and self. Education on instructional design, methods, skills, media, and
evaluation will be applied to wellness and prevention education with community partners.
Occupational therapy’s role in the promotion of health and wellness will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: OTH 201 and OTH 303
OTH 360 Clinical Reasoning I (2)
This course is the first in a three-part progression preparing students to be critical thinkers.
This introductory course establishes critical thinking as a method and concept for the
student to develop, examines how theory and practice are linked, and incorporates
knowledge for all level III OT coursework. Prerequisites: OTH 200 and OTH 201
OTH 362 Principles of Kinesiology (4)
This course focuses on the study of the musculoskeletal system and the principles of human
motion. An experiential learning component is integrated into this course and students will
learn goniometric and manual muscle testing assessment. Prerequisites: BIO 202 and BIO
203
OTH 364 Vision, Perception, and Cognition in Occupational Therapy (2)
This course will examine the impact of visual, perceptual, and cognitive deficits on
occupational performance. Evaluation and intervention methods will be examined based on
client context utilizing theoretical constructs. Prerequisites: OTH 303 and OTH 365
OTH 373 Introduction to Level I Fieldwork (1)
This course utilizes a seminar format to discuss aspects of Level I fieldwork experiences,
reinforce professional behaviors and prepare students for transition to Level I Fieldwork.
Prerequisite: OTH 201
OTH 375 Level IA Fieldwork (1)
This course is designed to enrich student learning through participation in selected aspects
of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40 hour fieldwork experience.
A classroom component is incorporated to prepare student for the fieldwork experience as
well as to offer the opportunity for reflection. The Level IA fieldwork will focus on the
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integration and application of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework to occupational
therapy practice. Prerequisite: OTH 373
Level IV Courses:
OTH 414 Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics I (4)
This is the first of a two course sequence focused on occupational therapy pediatric practice.
This course explores the development of normal occupations across the age continuum from
infancy to adolescence. There is an emphasis on how major developmental theories and
occupational therapy frames of references related to pediatric practice guide the selection of
assessment tools and in designing client centered interventions. Students will analyze the
influence of parenting and family systems as well as genetic and environmental factors on
occupational performance. Prerequisites: PSY 220 and OTH 303
OTH 424 Occupational Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation I (4)
This course focuses on the evaluation and treatment of individuals with physical disabilities.
Theoretical approaches to OT intervention will be practiced and analyzed. Remedial,
compensatory, and adaptive performance approaches will be integrated through
intervention education. Prerequisites: BIO 366 and OTH 362
OTH 428 Occupational Therapy for Upper Extremity Rehabilitation (3)
This course targets the designing, selecting and fabricating of orthotic devices to enhance
occupational performance and engagement or re-engagement with meaningful and
significant occupations. The course will include a review of upper extremity anatomy as it
relates to the correct application and fitting of orthotics. The course will also introduce the
use of prosthetic devices. Development of sound clinical reasoning and use of scientific
evidence for the use of orthotic and prosthetic devices is emphasized. Prerequisites: OTH
362 and OTH 365
OTH 433 Occupational Therapy in Mental Health (4)
This course focuses on the development of theory driven clinical reasoning in selecting
evaluation methods and designing interventions for mental health practice in a variety of
settings. Students will demonstrate application of group theory and group facilitation skills
with clients in a community or hospital setting. Students will examine current mental health
issues and learn advocacy skills to promote positive client centered outcomes.
Prerequisites: OTH 200 and PSY 410
OTH 434 Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics II (4)
This course is the second of a two course series focused on occupational therapy pediatric
practice. Commonly encountered diagnoses that affect children prenatally through
adolescence will be examined to understand how these conditions affect occupational
performance. Conceptual models for prevention, intervention, and team management are
utilized. Prerequisites: OTH 360 and OTH 414
OTH 444 Occupational Therapy and Physical Rehabilitation II (4)
This course is the second course in a sequence and is designed to teach evaluation and
intervention for complex physical dysfunction including neurological diseases processes and
deficits. Students will learn entry level skills necessary to practice in the area of physical
rehabilitation. Prerequisite: OTH 424
OTH 452 Principles of Neuro-Rehabilitation I (2)
This course is the first in a two semester sequence where students learn traditional and
contemporary models of practice and evidence-based interventions used in
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neurorehabilitation. A lab component will be utilized so that students can implement the
skills discussed in class. Prerequisites: OTH 362 and OTH 365
OTH 460 Clinical Reasoning II (2)
This course is the second in a three-part progression preparing students to be critical
thinkers in practice. This course builds on all OT coursework assisting the student to
develop as a critical thinker, reflective practitioner, and evidence based practitioner.
Application and analysis of case studies across the lifespan and practice areas will be utilized
to integrate theory, core OT concepts, therapeutic use of self and the OT process.
Prerequisites: OTH 360 and OTH 414
OTH 475 Level IB Fieldwork (1)
This course is designed to enrich student learning through participation in selected aspects
of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40 hour fieldwork experience.
A classroom component is incorporated to prepare student for the fieldwork experience as
well as to offer the opportunity for reflection. The Level IB fieldwork will focus on the
consideration of psychosocial factors that may affect the occupational therapy process.
Prerequisite: OTH 375
OTH 476 Level IC Fieldwork (1)
This course is designed to enrich student learning through participation in selective aspects
of the occupational therapy process during an approximately 40 hour fieldwork experience
in an occupational therapy practice setting. Preparation and reflection of fieldwork
experiences will be discussed in a seminar format. The Level IC fieldwork experience will
emphasize evidence based practice to support therapeutic interventions. Prerequisites: OTH
475
OTH 490 Principles of Occupational Therapy Research I (3)
This course is the first in a three-part progression that prepares students to use research
effectively and enact research ethically. Students will begin to critically analyze current
research in becoming a good consumer of research. Students will examine both
quantitative and qualitative design focusing on methodology, data analysis and critical
discussion of both types of research. Prerequisite: MTH 242 and PHL 350
Graduate Level Courses:
OTH 540 Community Based Occupational Therapy (3)
This course gives students the opportunity to design and provide services to address unmet
needs for individuals, groups, or populations in community settings. Students will explore
occupation in the context of community in applying components of program development
and grant writing. Prerequisites: OTH 301 and OTH 355
OTH 552 Principles of Neuro-Rehabilitation II (2)
This course is the second in a two semester sequence where students learn traditional and
contemporary models of practice and evidence-based interventions used in neurorehabilitation. An experiential learning component will be utilized so that students can
implement the skills discussed in class. Prerequisite: OTH 452
OTH 555 Occupational Therapy Management (2)
This course is offered in the graduate year of the occupational therapy curriculum. In this
course students implement the skills necessary for an occupational therapist to provide
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competent managerial services as a health care practitioner in a changing healthcare
environment. Prerequisites: OTH 201 and OTH 460
OTH 560 Clinical Reasoning III (3)
This course is the last in the three-part progression preparing students to be critical
thinkers. The course is designed to integrate theory and the knowledge of pathologies and
intervention strategies with an understanding of the OT process. The focus is on developing
the student’s ability to evaluate and synthesize information from complex situations and
practice setting involving individuals and populations. Prerequisites: OTH 460 and OTH 540
OTH 561 Occupational Therapy Leadership and Advocacy (2)
This course will explore various theories of leadership for enacting positive change and
develop leadership skills for advocacy and client centered practice. Students will explore
how sociopolitical factors impact health care policy and occupational therapy. Students will
examine personal and professional values as well as positive characteristics of leaders in
occupational therapy in articulating their own leadership style. Prerequisites: OTH 360 and
OTH 414
OTH 568 Physical Agent Modalities (2)
This course provides instruction in the safe and effective application of superficial thermal
and mechanical modalities. Students will explore limitations, contraindications and benefits
for the use of physical agent modalities to improve occupational performance or alleviate
pain. Prerequisites: OTH 424 and OTH 444
OTH 573 Transition to Level II Fieldwork (1)
This course is designed to prepare students for transition to Level II fieldwork experiences
and entry level practice, as well as ensure compliance with fieldwork site requirements.
Prerequisite: OTH 476
OTH 590 Principles of Occupational Therapy Research II (3)
This is the second course in the three-part research progression. Students will practice
interpreting basic descriptive quantitative statistics, as well as code, and synthesize
qualitative data to develop meaningful conclusions. Students utilize selected topics of
interest to initiate a literature review in developing their scholarship skills. The Institutional
Review Board process will be discussed as part of this course. Prerequisite: OTH 490
OTH 593 Principles of Occupational Therapy Research III (2)
This final course in the research continuum focuses on scholarly dissemination of research.
Students will complete the literature review initiated in Principles of Occupational Therapy
Research II to create a scholarly project and plan a mock research proposal. The research
series will conclude with a scholarly presentation based on occupational therapy research.
Prerequisite: OTH 590
OTH 674 Level IIA Fieldwork (6)
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to engage in all aspects of the
occupational therapy process during a twelve week fieldwork experience in an occupational
therapy practice setting. This course promotes the student’s development of competent,
entry level practice skills. Prerequisite: OTH 573
OTH 675 Level IIB Fieldwork (6)
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to engage in all aspects of the
occupational therapy process during a twelve week fieldwork experience in an occupational
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therapy practice setting. This course promotes the student’s development of competent,
entry level practice skills. Prerequisite: OTH 674
Paralegal Studies (LAW)
LAW 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies (3)
This survey course discusses the legal environment, law office procedures, legal ethics
including confidentiality, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, professional responsibilities
of the paralegal, interpreting statutes, employment opportunities, salary surveys,
regulations and other sources of law, paralegal-client relations, and includes a general
overview of the paralegal profession.
LAW 110 The Legal Environment (3)
This survey course considers the different substantive areas of the law: the history of the
American legal system; a general overview of the type of law applicable to the legal
assistant (corporate law, litigation, estate administration, real estate, bankruptcy, torts,
contracts, family law, and the like); an introduction to basic legal principles, including the
judicial system; a discussion of the court system and the role of the courts-trial and
appellate; Federal and state limitations in seeking judicial relief; judicial decision-making;
judicial remedies; criminal procedures and legislation; administrative and government law;
the sources of the law; and an overview of the elements of a trial.
LAW 200 Legal Research and Writing I (3)
This course emphasizes the basics of legal research methods and good written
communication, with an emphasis on precise writing. The course uses a case-study
approach for developing organizational, legal style and analytical skills. It is an introduction
to the use of research materials in the law library, including WESTLAW, Lexis, Internet
basics, and CD-Rom resources. The course also includes familiarization with the preparation
of legal memoranda and briefs encountered in the general practice of law, with specific
research problems to be completed and researched. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Prerequisite or
departmental approval for concurrent enrollment in LAW 110.
LAW 210 Legal Research and Writing II (3)
A continuation of LAW 200. Prerequisite: LAW200.
LAW 220 Law Office Administration and Technology (3)
This course includes a study of administrative systems, file management, docket control,
retrieval, time keeping, billing, accounting, dictation, word processing, types of legal fees
and their handling, and the role of the attorney, paralegal, legal administrator, and legal
secretary in a law office. This course will also include practices in business, corporations,
insurance companies and government offices that are relevant to paralegal employment.
The use of the technology and software in the law office will be part of this course
LAW 230 Litigation I (3)
This course is an introduction to the civil litigation process, with emphasis on the practice
associated with a civil action. Topics covered include: civil procedure, preparation and use of
pleadings, discovery, evidence, client interviewing, and investigative techniques. It is
recommended that this class be taken as soon as possible after completion of LAW 200.
Prerequisites: LAW 110 and 200.
LAW 231 Litigation II (3)
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This course is a continuation of LAW 230 with an emphasis on the functions of a paralegal in
trial preparation and pretrial and trial procedures including the gathering and organizing of
materials, investigating, interviewing, , appellate procedures, preparation of the trial
notebook, and assisting during and after a trial. Prerequisite: LAW 230.
LAW 300 Torts (3)
This course is an introduction and overview of intentional torts, negligence, strict liability,
product liability, professional negligence, worker’s compensation, medical malpractice, and
their defenses. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 310 Advanced Business Law (3)
This course emphasizes the practice related to formation and operation of sole
proprietorships, partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability corporations, limited
liability partnerships, and corporations. It includes partnership agreements and corporate
documents, the formation of corporations, corporate financial structures, dividends and
liquidations, changes in corporate structure, and the dissolution of corporations. This course
also includes incorporation procedures in Nebraska and the preparation and drafting of
documents. Prerequisite: LAW 110 and LAW 200. (Also listed as BUS 310.)
LAW 320 Estates, Trusts, Tax Law, Probates (3)
This course includes a study of intestate succession, wills, and trusts with an emphasis on
the administration of an estate. It includes the preparation and drafting of wills, trust
instruments, and documents related to the probate process. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 330 Real Estate Law (3)
This course deals with laws and regulations affecting real estate ownership and use,
including ownership interests, conveyancing, mortgages, title assurance, landlord-tenant
relationships, public and private land-use controls, foreclosures, and the preparation of real
estate documents, such as leases, contracts and deeds. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 340 Contracts (3)
This course is an introduction to principles of contract law with an emphasis on contract
interpretations and clear and effective contract drafting and editing. Topics covered include:
contract formation, defenses to formation, excuses for performance, various types of
contracts, applicable provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code, and remedies for breach
of contracts. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 350 Family Law (3)
This course is an introduction to family law, including the role of the lawyer as counselor.
Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects related to divorce, separation, the scope of
family law, custody, support, adoption, guardianship, tax consequences, legal rights of
women, juvenile law, and interfamily torts. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 410 Bankruptcy Law (1)
This course introduces the basics of bankruptcy, secured creditors, liquidation and
transactions associated with bankruptcy acts, voluntary and involuntary petitions, liens,
preferences, the powers of trustee, the rights of creditors and the discharge of bankruptcy.
Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 430 Federal Practice and Constitutional Law (1)
This course includes an overview of the U.S. and Nebraska Constitutions and of the Federal
court system, Federal rules, and local rules. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
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LAW 440 Medical Terminology and Malpractice (1)
This course introduces the relevant terminology and medical/legal questions in civil
litigation. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 450 Special Topics in the Law (1)
For example: Poverty Law, Criminal Law, Environmental Law, Labor Law, Administrative
Law, Mediation Law, Worker’s Compensation and Insurance Law. Prerequisite: LAW 200.
LAW 470 Paralegal Internship (3)
Law 470 is a 3 credit class and consists of the following format:
1. Mock Interview – Each student will complete a practice interview with the Program
Director prior to interviewing with prospective internship hosts.
2. Orientation– An initial interview outlining the intern’s responsibilities and an
orientation session conducted by the internship firm are required to familiarize the
intern with the work environment.
3. Work Experience – the internship entails a minimum of 160 hours. These hours are
to be scheduled in full day or half-day blocks within the framework of the semester
in which the internship occurs.
4. Online Discussion Board and Assignments: internship students will be expected to
participate in online discussion board questions and assignments throughout the
semester.
Admission
Requirements for acceptance to LAW 470*
1. Permission of the Program Director.
2. Enrollment in the certificate, bachelor’s, or associate degree in paralegal studies
program.
3. Enrollment in the last semester of course work.
4. Students must demonstrate suitability for the paralegal profession based on the
following factors: academic performance, character and professionalism, dependability,
cooperation and command of oral and written language skills.
5. Completion of at least 75 percent (65 percent for certificate seekers) of law credit hours.
6. Recommended registration in no more than 12 hours in addition to Law 470.
7. QPA of 2.5 in law course work and QPA of 2.5 overall
8. A grade of C or better in all law courses.
9. Completion of an interview with the Program Director.
10. Completion and submission of application.
* The Program Director reserves the right to waive requirements. Law 470 may not be
taken as an audit course.
LAW 490 Coordinating Seminar (3)
This seminar is a capstone course designed to integrate all prior course work with real world
experience and case studies. The course includes preparation of a senior project in which
the student demonstrates the application of paralegal skills in a practical setting.
Prerequisite: senior standing.
Philosophy (PHL)
PHL 105 Principles of Reasoning (3)
This course is designed to help students develop skills in recognizing, constructing, and
evaluating arguments. The course covers basic concepts in logic and reasoning including:
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argument recognition; categorical and propositional logic; and informal reasoning and
fallacies.
PHL 200 Moral Reasoning (3)
Moral reasoning is a study structured around contemporary moral and ethical issues and the
theoretical questions with which ethics is concerned. It is designed to help students think
through moral problems more effectively. Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended.
PHL 206 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
This course is an introduction to some of the important problems that have arisen in the
history of ideas. Attention is given to both philosophical problems and philosophical
methods. Readings developing several philosophical problems are analyzed. Prerequisite:
ENG 101 recommended.
PHL 220 Business Ethics (3)
An examination of the most important moral issues that arise in the contemporary world of
business. Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended.
PHL 301 Issues and Trends in Philosophy (1-2-3)
The subject matter and methods of this course will vary from semester to semester. The
material will usually be handled in three one-hour modules. A student may elect to take
one, two or three of the modules. Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended.
PHL 310 Philosophy of Women (3)
The question about what it is to be a woman will be the major topic of this study. Selected
works of philosophy and related disciplines, both ancient and contemporary, will be critically
examined. (Also listed as WST 310.) Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended.
PHL 350 Health Care Ethics (3)
Health Care Ethics is an applied ethics course in which students critically apply moral theory
to moral problems specifically related to the health care professions. The course includes a
review of philosophical moral theories and focuses on the critical analysis of issues in health
care ethics through the use of case studies. Prerequisite: ETH/PHL 200 or permission of
instructor.
PHL 360 Theories of Knowledge and Reality (3)
This class is focused on the in-depth examination of issues in metaphysics and
epistemology. These issues include the nature of knowledge, the problem of perception, the
problem of memory, the problem of other minds, the problem of free will, the nature of
time, and personal identity. Prerequisite: PHL 101 or PHL 206 (Intro. to Philosophy) or
permission of instructor.
PHL 380 Experimental Course (3)
The subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester in order to study
current trends and issues. Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended.
PHL 391 Directed Readings (2-3)
Under PHL 391 an opportunity is offered the student to do philosophical studies and/or to
consider in greater depth a particular problem, philosopher, or historical era on a nonclassroom basis. Prerequisites: 3 hours in philosophy and departmental approval.
Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended.
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Physical Education (PED)
PED 101 Lifetime Health and Activity (3)
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of activities
that will enable them to develop fitness programs appropriate to each state of life.
Activities will include individual sports, wellness programs, and exercise options. Leadership
in developing and planning programs that support well-being will be emphasized.
PED 104 Varsity Swimming (1)
Advanced instruction in swimming. Varsity competition with other colleges and universities.
(No more than four hours may be applied towards a degree). Prerequisite: departmental
approval.
PED 105 Varsity Volleyball (1)
Advanced instruction in volleyball. Varsity competition with other colleges and universities.
(No more than four hours may be applied towards a degree). Prerequisite: departmental
approval.
PED 107 Varsity Softball (1)
Advanced instruction in softball. Varsity competition with other colleges and universities.
(No more than four hours may be applied towards a degree). Prerequisite: departmental
approval.
PED 108 Varsity Soccer(1)
Advanced instruction in soccer. Varsity competition with other colleges and universities.
(No more than four hours may be applied towards a degree). Prerequisite: departmental
approval.
PED 109 Varsity Golf (1)
Advanced instruction in golf. Varsity competition with other colleges and universities.
(No
more than four hours may be applied towards a degree). Prerequisite: departmental
approval.
PED 110 Varsity Basketball (1)
Advanced instruction in basketball. Varsity competition with other colleges and universities.
(No more than four hours may be applied towards a degree). Prerequisite: departmental
approval.
PED 111 Varsity Cross Country (1)
Advanced instruction in cross country.
Varsity competition with other colleges and
universities. (No more than four hours may be applied towards a degree). Prerequisite:
departmental approval.
PED 112 First Aid and CPR (1)
Emphasis on prevention, certification and care of common home and school injuries.
Student will be certified upon successful completion of the course.
PED 123-159 Physical Education Activities (1)
The purpose of these classes is to provide the opportunity for the student to experience the
following; exercise and participation in an activity on a regular basis, development of
physical fitness, development of recreational skills that can be pursued throughout life,
knowledge of games, sports and activities, courteous participation in recreational activities
and knowledge as a consumer in regard to selection and care of personal recreational
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equipment. Medical waivers are not automatically granted. See program director for
modified programs.
123 Aerobics
124 Badminton/Archery
125 Basketball/Volleyball
126 Bicycling
127 Bowling
128 Canoeing
129 Dance
130 Golf
131 Racquetball/Badminton
132 Healthy Lifestyles
133 Hiking
134 Lifetime Sports
135 Personal Fitness/Weight Training
136 Sailing
137 Self Defense for Women
138 Soccer/Volleyball
139 Softball/Basketball
140 Square Dance/Folk Dance
141 Beginning/Intermediate Swimming/CPR
142 Tennis/Racquet Sports
143 Water Aerobics
144 Water Sports
145 Relaxation Techniques/Stress Management
146 Camping
147 Advanced Swimming
148 Weight Training
149 Racquetball/Tennis
150 Swimming for Fitness/Variety Aquatics
151 Water Safety Instructor/
Lifeguard Training
152 Advanced Aerobics
153 Fitness for Living
154 Outdoor Education/Recreation
155 Floor & Water Aerobics
157 Yoga
158 Pilates
PED 160 Nutrition (3)
A study of human nutrition and its relationship to human performance. Consideration is
given to nutrients-function, food source, health concerns and implications, energy intake
and expenditure. Special considerations: body composition, including weight gain and loss,
ergogenic aids, competitive athletes, older adults, children and teens, pregnant women,
disease risk, fluid and electrolyte balance and sport activities.
PED 165 Safety, First Aid and CPR for Children and Youth (3)
This course is designed to provide students with basic instruction in First Aid and CPR as
well as evaluate and implement safety and prevention programs in and out of the
classroom. Students will determine necessary actions for providing activities in a safe
environment. Students will learn certification in First Aid and CPR upon completion of the
course.
PED 208 Lifeguard Training (1)
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Red Cross Certification. Prerequisite: Able to swim 500 yards, strong swimmer.
PED 210 Individual and Group Sports (3)
This course is designed to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to teach the sports of
archery, badminton, golf, tennis, basketball, soccer, softball, flag football, and volleyball.
With these skills the candidate will be able to orchestrate the learning environment for
physical education students. Emphasis will be placed on both indoor and outdoor activities.
PED 220 Sports Psychology & Theory (3)
Examines the psychological characteristics and needs of athletes and applies the knowledge
as it relates to coaching.
PED 235 Aquatics (3)
This course is designed to prepare students in assuming the duties and responsibilities of a
water safety instructor. The main areas of focus will be accident prevention in and around
the water, recognition of a person in distress and a drowning victim, development of an
emergency plan and articulation with emergency rescue service. The purpose of this course
is to teach those enrolled how to teach the various swimming skills and water aerobics.
This would include teaching beginning swimming through emergency water safety as well as
providing opportunities for students with special needs.
(Students who satisfactorily
complete the course will be issued a Water Safety Instructor Certificate.)
PED 245 Mind, Body and Spirit Development (3)
This course is designed to provide physical education majors with knowledge and skills
necessary to provide a holistic approach to a physical fitness program that includes
instruction in yoga, tai chi, Pilates and meditation. Students will develop an understanding
of the relationship between the cognitive, physical, emotional, and spiritual domain.
PED 308 Water Safety Instructor (1)
Red Cross certification for teaching swimming. Prerequisite: Strong swimming skills
including ability to perform all strokes, dives, etc.
PED 315 Health and Fitness Assessment (3)
This course is designed to provide students with basic instruction in First Aid and CPR as
well as evaluate and implement safety and prevention programs in and out of the
classroom. Students will determine necessary actions for providing activities in a safe
environment. Students will earn certification in First Aid and CPR upon completion of the
course.
PED 320 Coaching Athletics (1)
Theory and technique of coaching. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
PED 321 Coaching Theory-Volleyball (1)
Theory and technique of coaching volleyball. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
PED 323 Coaching Theory-Softball (1)
Theory and technique of coaching softball. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
PED 340 Exercise Physiology (2)
This course will provide knowledge of the physiological principles applicable to training and
conditioning. Prerequisite: PED 120.
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PED 357 Health and Physical Education Methods (3)
Students learn how to coordinate and implement an elementary school physical education
program. They gain health education and wellness instructional procedures based on
mental, emotional, physical, and social characteristics of elementary/middle school children.
The health education curriculum includes nutrition, safety and first aid, family life, death,
divorce, drugs, aging, dental health, disease control and prevention, environment, selfconcept, the human body, and mental health. Contemporary fitness activities and skill
development are presented in physical education segments. (Also listed as EDU 357).
PED 358 Teaching Secondary Health and PE (Practicum) (3)
Similar to EDU 357. In this course students will learn to coordinate and implement a
secondary school physical education program. They will gain health education and wellness
instruction procedures based on mental, emotional, physical, and social characteristics of
adolescents. Implementation of knowledge of this curriculum is achieved in a directed
physical education practicum of 40 hours. Prerequisite: Adolescent Psychology.
PED 360 Adapted (3)
A study of the special physical activity and exercise needs, interests, and problems of the
exceptional learner, with considerable emphasis on the development of methods and
competencies in modifying physical activities. This course will enhance the skills of the
teacher to orchestrate the learning environment for students with special needs.
Prerequisite: SPE 101 Introduction to Special Education.
PED 470 Physical Education Practicum (5)
Application of knowledge and skills. Practical off-campus experience available in
Recreation and physical education. Prerequisite: permission of program director.
PED 471 Coaching Practicum-Volleyball (2)
Opportunity to work with a sports team implementing coaching techniques and
strategies. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
PED 473 Coaching Practicum-Softball (2)
Opportunity to work with a sports team implementing coaching techniques and
strategies. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
PED 474 Coaching Practicum-Track and Field (2)
Opportunity to work with a sports team implementing coaching techniques and
strategies. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
PED 475 Coaching Practicum-Basketball (2)
Opportunity to work with a sports team implementing coaching techniques and
strategies. Prerequisite: departmental approval.
PED 496 Research Seminar (3)
Students explore and evaluate research in physical education and strategies implemented
by researchers. They complete research projects demonstrating effective research designs
and present findings to faculty and the public in a symposium.
Physical Science (PHY)
A minimum grade of C is required for every course that is a prerequisite for another course.
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PHY 100, 101 Introduction to the Physical Sciences (3, 1)
A correlated presentation of the fundamental principles of the physical sciences for nonscience majors. Lecture three hours per week and lab three hours per week, to be taken
concurrently.
PHY 160 Physical Geology (4)
A study of the structure and materials of Earth’s crust, the development of topographic
features by weathering, erosion, volcanism, plate tectonics, and the relationship of Earth to
the cosmos. Lecture and laboratory will be used as needed.
PHY 162 Descriptive Astronomy (3)
General knowledge of the facts of astronomy, the methods by which they are obtained and
the theories which account for them are integrated in light of recent information. Some
aspects of space science will be treated in detail. Concepts of meteorology will also be
considered. Lecture three hours per week.
PHY 164 Introduction to Meteorology (4)
A study of the basic processes occurring in the earth’s atmosphere. Topics to be covered
include the influence of temperature and pressure on atmospheric circulation and windrelated storms and humidity, precipitation and clouds, all of which result in earth’s weather
and climatic systems. Lecture and lab will be used as needed.
PHY 202 College Physics I (3)
A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Lecture
meets 3 hours per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 203. Prerequisite: MTH 114
and 115, or equivalent.
PHY 203 Physics Laboratory I (1)
A variety of physics laboratory techniques are used to demonstrate the theoretical principles
under discussion in the lecture. Lab meets 3 hours per week. Must be taken concurrently
with PHY 202 or PHY 212.
PHY 204 College Physics II (3)
A study of the fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern
physics. Lecture meets 3 hours per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 205.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in PHY 202.
PHY 205 Physics Laboratory II (1)
A variety of physics laboratory techniques are used to demonstrate the theoretical principles
under discussion in the lecture. Lab meets 3 hours per week. Must be taken concurrently
with PHY 204 or PHY 214. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in PHY 203.
PHY 212 University Physics I (4)
A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves, using the
tools of calculus. Lecture meets 4 hours per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHY
203. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MTH 201 or equivalent.
PHY 214 University Physics II (4)
A study of the fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern
physics, using the tools of calculus. Lecture meets 4 hours per week. Must be taken
concurrently with PHY 205. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MTH 202 or equivalent.
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PHY 388 Special Topics Course (3)
The subject matter and method of this course will vary from semester to semester in line
with current trends, and the needs and interests of students.
PHY 395 Physics Capstone Project (4)
Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, the student designs an independent project that
uses both theories and applications of physics. Applications can be in any area, including
astronomy or meteorology. The final report must be written in scientific style, and a
seminar presentation of the student’s project at Scholar’s Day is required before graduation.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.
Psychology (PSY)
PSY 101 General Psychology (3)
The scientific exploration of human behavior and mental processes. The goal of this course
is to survey the basic concepts and research in the field
PSY 200 Child Psychology (3)
The study of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development from conception
through adolescence. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Note: Students cannot get credit for both
PSY 200 and PSY 220.
PSY 203 Adolescent Psychology (3)
The study of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the normal
adolescent from puberty to young adulthood. The goal of this course is to develop a
meaningful workable concept regarding the adolescent period of development. Prerequisite:
PSY 101.
PSY 220 Lifespan Development (3)
The study of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development from conception
through old age.
Prerequisite: PSY 101. Note: Students cannot get credit for both PSY
200 and PSY 220.
PSY 230 Attitudes and Values (3)
Requires the student to examine herself, her values and belief systems, and the effect of
her belief system on the perception of and interaction with others. (Also listed as HSV 230.)
PSY 233 Group Process: Theory and Practice (3)
Theoretical and practical approaches to conducting and participating in task- and
experience-oriented groups are presented. Students practice various process skills in a
simulated group setting. A major focus is on assisting group members in working toward
and achieving group goals in a variety of settings. (Also listed as BUS 233 and COM 233.)
PSY 235 Social Psychology (3)
Examines the psychological forces such as social interaction and cognition underlying human
behavior in social situations. The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the
interaction between self-directed behavior and the influence of the social situation.
Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 101. (Also listed as SOC 235.)
PSY 236 Alcohol and Substance Abuse (3)
Examines the current research and findings on alcohol and substance abuse regarding
causes and treatments. Physical and psychological effects of substance abuse on the
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person, in addition to the consequences for the family and society, are reviewed,. The
major intervention and therapeutic models are discussed and evaluated. (Also listed as HSV
236.)
PSY 240 Research Methods (3)
Addresses the basic methods of designing, conducting, and evaluating psychological
research. Research ethics and research writing in APA style are also emphasized.
Prerequisite: PSY 101. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MTH/PSY 242
PSY 242 Statistics (3)
Collection and tabulation of data, averages and measurements of dispersements,
correlational and regression analysis, probability and sampling, hypothesis testing,
performing Chi Square, t, F, and some nonparametric tests. Prerequisites: C or better in
MTH 112 or three years of high school mathematics including advanced algebra or
permission of program director. (Also listed as BUS 242 and MTH 242.)
PSY 301 Experimental Research (3)
Involves the student in independent research with an emphasis on experimental design. To
be taken concurrently with PSY 302. Prerequisites: PSY 240 and MTH/PSY 242.
PSY 302 Experimental Research Lab (1)
Lab course taken concurrently with PSY 301.
PSY 312 Educational Psychology and Measurement (3)
This course involves the study of teaching/learning processes. Students learn the nature of
educational psychology and applications of major learning theories. They identify specific
relationships among learning and characteristics of learners, including personality,
intelligence, motivation, and transfer of learning.
Students learn strategies used in
measurement and evaluation of learning. (Also listed as EDU 312.)
PSY 325 Organizational Behavior (3)
This course is designed to provide an understanding of human
organizational environment and includes topics such as group
communications, potential impact of organizational structure on
processes, and change management. (Also listed as BUS 325 and SOC
behavior within the
dynamics, effective
communications and
325.)
PSY 332 Counseling Theory and Practice (3)
Essential skills for crisis intervention and other methods of short-term counseling are
practiced. Students also study major theories of counseling and psychotherapy and major
counseling intervention strategies. Skills involved in providing feedback to clients are
developed and multicultural approaches to counseling are introduced. Prerequisite: HSV
231 or permission of the instructor.
PSY 340 Cognitive Psychology (3)
Explores the fundamental processes of the human mind, including memory, attention,
problem solving, representation of information, reasoning, and language. Prerequisite: PSY
101.
PSY 342 Psychology of Personality (3)
Addresses how an individual’s own personality can affect human behavior. Toward this end,
the student should develop competencies in addressing the “whys” of human behavior from
various personality perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
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PSY 344 Forensic Psychology (3)
Focuses on the psychology of crime and how society addresses criminal behavior. This
course will not allow the student to perform the work of a Forensic Psychologist, but she will
become familiar with many of the areas of Forensic Psychological practice. Prerequisite:
PSY 101.
PSY 345 Psychology of Learning (3)
Explores theories and research on human and animal learning. The focus of the course is on
classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning. Prerequisite: PSY
101.
PSY 350 Cultural Psychology (GCD) (3)
Examines the impact of culture on human behavior and mental processes. Students will
explore theories and research in psychology from a cross-cultural perspective. Prerequisite:
PSY 101.
PSY 355 Human Sexuality (3)
Discusses all aspects of human sexuality including the biological components of human
sexuality, the psychological ramifications of sex and sexuality, and cultural influences on
sexual behaviors. Frank discussion of sexual issues is necessary to a successful class and
should be expected by the student. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
PSY 360 Psychology and Women (3)
Explores issues and life experiences that affect women. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
PSY 365 Physiological Psychology (3)
Explores the complex interaction between the physiological and psychological components
of the human being, with an emphasis on brain function and the effects of the body’s
chemicals on our thoughts and behaviors. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and BIO 100 or higher.
PSY 368 In Their Prime: Men and Women at Mid-life (3)
Considers facets of the lives of adults in their middle years, including physical, cognitive,
and emotional development. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSY 101. (Also listed as SOC 368.)
PSY 380 Experimental Course (3)
A course not regularly included in the curriculum will occasionally be offered for psychology
credit. Subject matter of the course varies. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the
instructor.
PSY 391 Independent Study (1-3)
Allows for an opportunity for students to explore individual interests within the field of
psychology under the guidance of a psychology faculty member.
Arrangements for
independent study are made on an individual basis between the student and the faculty
member. This course is offered as needed. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
PSY 393 Laboratory Research (1-3)
Involves active, faculty-guided research in the field. Students will work under the direct
supervision of faculty on a psychological research project and participate in the design,
implementation, analysis, and reporting of the research. Students and faculty will agree on
the scope and duration of the work at the beginning of the semester, as well as the amount
of credit received. Prerequisite: PSY 240.
PSY 410 Abnormal Psychology (3)
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Considers the etiology and dynamics of abnormal behavior in relation to normal behavior.
Emphasis is placed upon the principles of learning, motivation, perception, and quantitative
classification as related to deviant behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 101. Not open to freshmen
without permission of the instructor.
PSY 424 Marriage and Family Counseling (3)
Explores the history of marriage and family therapy, prominent theorists, and major
methodologies. Prerequisite: PSY 332 or permission of the instructor. (Also listed as HSV
424.)
PSY 440 An Integrative Approach to Psychology (3)
Encourages the student’s integration of previous semesters of psychology courses into a
coherent whole. The content is similar to PSY 101, but is examined at a more sophisticated
level. Application of psychological concepts to one’s life is emphasized.
Successful
completion of the comprehensive examination at the end of the course is required for
graduation. Prerequisites: At least 30 semester hours in psychology.
PSY 453 Marketing Research (3)
A study of the fundamental techniques of marketing research, including questionnaire
construction, determination of market potentials, sampling theory, interpretation of results,
and report presentation. Prerequisite: BUS 334 or permission. (Also listed as BUS 453.)
PSY 492 Senior Seminar (3)
Involves completing an independent project of original thought. The student will design a
research study and follow it through to completion. The results of the research will be both
written and presented to the CSM community at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: 30
hours of psychology, including PSY 101 and PSY 440.
PSY 493 Advanced Lab Research (1-3)
Involves active, faculty-guided research in the field. Students will work under the direct
supervision of faculty on a psychological research project and participate in the design,
implementation, analysis, and reporting of the research. Students and faculty will agree on
the scope and duration of the work at the beginning of the semester, as well as the amount
of credit received. Prerequisite: PSY 393.
Sociology (SOC)
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (3)
Examines basic social relationships, the corresponding social structures, and the processes
affecting society. Students will receive the basic framework and concepts necessary for a
foundation in the upper-division courses.
SOC 231 Social Problems (3)
Survey of current social problems related to the needs of: minority groups; the aged; the
abused child and spouse; the poor; the mentally, emotionally, learning, and physically
disabled; the consumer, and; the unemployed. Prerequisite: SOC 101.
SOC 235 Social Psychology (3)
Examines the psychological forces such as social interaction and cognition underlying human
behavior in social situations. The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the
interaction between self-directed behavior and the influence of the social situation.
Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 101. (Also listed as SOC 235.)
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SOC 252 Sociology of Leisure (3)
Examines what is leisure time, the ways in which it is used, its function for society, and its
consequences as a new institution of industrial society and as a social problem. Prerequisite:
SOC 101.
SOC 262 Deviance and Social Control (3)
Discusses what constitutes deviant behavior in American society including the processes
involved in defining and distinguishing deviant behavior from normal behavior, and the
consequences of labeling particular behaviors and individuals as deviant. Prerequisite: SOC
101.
SOC 263 Topics in Sociology (3)
Topics of special interest will be considered. (Examples: women’s issues, collective
behavior, urban sociology, sociology of education, minority relations.) Subtitles will be
included in course schedules. Course may be repeated under different subtitles.
Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor.
SOC 305 The Family (3)
Analyzes the family as a social institution by examining the basic history of and social
adjustments to marriage, the relationships between family members, and the place of the
family in social, economic, and religious institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of
the instructor.
SOC 325 Organizational Behavior (3)
This course is designed to provide an understanding of human behavior within the
organizational environment and includes topics such as group dynamics, effective
communications, potential impact of organizational structure on communicators and
processes, and change management. (Also listed as BUS and PSY 325.)
SOC 368 In Their Prime: Women and Men at Mid-life (3)
Considers facets of the lives of adults in their middle years, including physical, cognitive,
and emotional development. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSY 101. (Also listed as PSY 368.)
SOC 491 Independent Advanced Research (3)
Involves advanced research in a field of sociology carried out by the student under faculty
direction. Prerequisite: A course in the methods of behavioral science research and
departmental approval.
Spanish (SPN)
SPN 111 Beginning Spanish I (3)
Spanish 111 is a Beginning Spanish course part one. The student will work on the four
language skills:
speaking, listening, reading and writing. Multicultural elements are
interwoven through the study of the Spanish Language which includes the diverse people
that make up the Hispanic society worldwide. Prerequisite: None.
SPN 112 Beginning Spanish II (3)
Spanish 112 is a Beginning Spanish course part two. The student will continue working on
the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. More multicultural
elements will be presented through the study of the Spanish Language. Prerequisite: SPN
111 or equivalent or satisfactory placement score.
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SPN 141 Spanish for Health Care (3)
This is a Beginning Spanish course designed for those healthcare workers and nursing
students who may have little to no knowledge of the Spanish language. Course content will
therefore be limited to basic Spanish grammar, basic health-related vocabulary, and simple
role-playing activities that would prepare students to engage with and provide essential care
to their Hispanic patients. Students interested in a more challenging class should consider
signing up for SPN 341. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
SPN 211 Intermediate Spanish I (3)
Spanish 211 is designed as a continuation and extension of the materials introduced in the
first year of Spanish. It offers a study of grammatical structures and an expansion of
vocabulary through an introduction to cultural and literary readings. All skills (reading,
writing, listening, and speaking), as well as the three basic fields (grammar, literature, and
culture) will be emphasized during the course. Prerequisite: SPN 112 or equivalent or
satisfactory placement score.
SPN 212 Intermediate Spanish II (3)
Spanish 212 is designed as a continuation and extension of the materials introduced in the
first year of Spanish and in Spanish 211. It offers a further study of grammatical structures
and an expansion of vocabulary through an introduction to cultural and literary readings. All
skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking), as well as the three basic fields (grammar,
literature, and culture) will be emphasized during the course. Prerequisite: SPN 211 or
equivalent or satisfactory placement score.
SPN 321 Spanish Conversation (3)
This course is designed primarily for those students whose native language is not Spanish.
As a result, class time will be dedicated to developing the student’s spoken Spanish through
oral discussions of everyday topics and events. Some emphasis will also be placed on
writing as well as pronunciation and general vocabulary building. Prerequisite: SPN 212 or
equivalent.
SPN 322 Spanish Grammar and Composition (3)
A systematic study of Spanish morphology, sentence structure, and usage applied to a
variety of written discourse styles such as description, narration, and exposition.
Prerequisite: SPN 212 or equivalent.
SPN 333 Children and Youth Literature (3)
This course is a survey of traditional and contemporary children's and adolescent literature
from Spain and Latin America written originally in Spanish. We will examine picture books,
folktales, poetry, theater and novels from a literary/artistic point of view and for their value
in education and cultural development. Prerequisite: SPN 321 & 322 or equivalent or
instructor permission.
SPN 341 Emphasis on Medicine (3)
This course is designed as a continuation and extension of the materials introduced in SPN
141 to prepare health care students and professionals to better serve and assist their
Spanish-speaking patients. Specific cultural aspects and practices related to health care
professionals and patient communication will be addressed. Emphasis on vocabulary
building and linguistic forms related to health care issues. Prerequisite: SPN 212 or
equivalent.
SPN 342 Emphasis on Business (3)
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Introduction to the terminology and etiquette of business practice in the Spanish-speaking
world. Emphasis on appropriate terminology and structures for business letters and other
forms of business communication. This course is highly recommended for students
majoring/minoring in international business and for those who wish their Spanish major or
minor emphasis to be in business. Prerequisite: SPN 212 or equivalent.
SPN 351 Civilization and Culture I (3)
An introduction to the culture and civilizations of Latin America. A study of Latin American
historical development and aspects and issues of its social, artistic, intellectual, and political
life today. Prerequisite: SPN 321 & 322 or equivalent or instructor permission.
SPN 352 Civilization and Culture II (3)
An introduction to the culture and civilizations of Spain. A study of physical and human
geography, historical development, and major aspects and issues of contemporary Spanish
society. Prerequisite: SPN 321 & 322 or equivalent or instructor permission.
SPN 360 Mid/Sec Methods (3)
(See Education section for further information.)
SPN 411 Survey Literature I (3)
The principal objective of this course is to provide an introduction to the literatures of Spain
and Spanish America produced during the last three centuries (XVIII-XX). It will emphasize
both the major periods and movements in light of cultural, artistic, social and historical
contexts and the methodology for reading those texts through literary analysis appropriate
for a variety of genres. Significant literary works will be examined along with the historical
context in which they were produced. A research/writing project requires a detailed
examination of an author or theme during the periods covered. Prerequisite: SPN 321 &
322 or equivalent or instructor permission.
SPN 412 Survey Literature II (3)
A panoramic study of Spanish literature from the medieval period through the Spanish
Golden Age, the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Essay, narrative, poetry
and drama of particularly prominent writers shall be discussed and read. A research/writing
project requires a detailed examination of an author or theme during the periods covered.
Prerequisite: SPN 321 & 322 or equivalent or instructor permission.
SPN 421 Spanish Advanced Conversation (3)
The primary goal of this course is to accommodate the oral competency needs of those
students who are either native Spanish-speakers or have an advanced knowledge of the
language. Consequently, all written and oral activities will focus on topics like the literature,
history, culture, and cinematographic art of the Spanish-speaking world. The ultimate
objective here is to prepare students for success in those courses in which the
aforementioned topics are the focus. Prerequisite: SPN 321 or equivalent.
SPN 444 Study Abroad Program
Number of courses taken will vary according to foreign institution attended and student
preferences. Student may complete no more than 12 credit hours in any approved Study
Abroad Program. Prerequisite: SPN 321 & 322 or equivalent or instructor permission.
SPN 495 Research Seminar in Spanish (3)
Students evaluate educational research in the Spanish Language Teaching and analyze
procedures, logic, and strategies implemented by researchers. Students complete research
projects demonstrating effective research designs. Presentation of papers to faculty
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members and the public is required. Appropriate use of instructional technology is
integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Papers may be written in English or
Spanish. Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of the student’s research project by
the instructor.
SPN 499 Independent Study in Spanish (3)
This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in independent research and
writing under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing and
approval in writing of the student’s proposal by the instructor.
Special Education (SPE)
SPE 101 Introduction to Special Education (3)
Designed to provide a general survey of various areas of exceptionality: high ability
learners, mental disability, behaviorally impaired, visually impaired, hearing impaired,
learning disabled, orthopedically impaired, speech language impairments, autistic,
Asperger’s, traumatic brain injury, multiple and severely handicapped, physically disabled,
and health impaired. History, philosophy and future trends of special education are
discussed relevant to educational implications and inclusion/mainstreaming is emphasized
for each area of exceptionality. Field trips and speakers are arranged. Appropriate use of
instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
SPE 220 Learners with Mildly/Moderately Handicapping Conditions (3)
Students examine learning and analyze strategies used in individual educational programs
of mildly and moderately mentally handicapped specific learning disabled, behaviorally
impaired, orthopedically impaired, autistic, other health impairments, speech language
impaired and traumatic brain injured. Assisting learners in making healthy transitions
between special education and regular classrooms along with inclusion is emphasized.
Presents historical overview and current literature of mildly/moderately handicapped.
Recent legislation and its impact on the regular classroom are emphasized. Individual work
with para-educators information and the best practices for classroom use. Appropriate use
of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
SPE 222 Assessment Techniques for Diverse Learners (3)
Presents techniques and methods of administering formal and informal assessments.
Students analyze learning tasks in visual, auditory, motor, language and behavioral areas.
Students examine and practice tying I.E.P. /I.F.S.P. process to assessment. Writing
appropriate instructional strategies, goals and materials to implement IEP/IEFP objectives or
gifted program objectives based on analysis of learning tasks and instructional needs are
presented. Current research regarding effective assessment and remediation strategies
across a spectrum of needs is presented. Appropriate use of instructional technology is
integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Prerequisite: SPE 220 &101/501.
SPE 240 Guidance and Classroom Management (3)
Students learn techniques, models and psychological theories related to managing individual
and small and large group learning activities. Practical methods are emphasized that
enhance self-control and provide healthy classroom environments. Common behavior
problems of pre-K through grade 12 students and exceptional children and assessment
techniques are addressed. Effective collaboration in teams and communication skills with
students, families and professionals are emphasized. A 20-hour service-learning component
provides experience in implementation of the knowledge and skills learned in this course.
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Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy.
SPE 330 Inclusion in early Childhood Classrooms (3)
Adapting environments, equipment and materials to meet social, cognitive, nutritional,
physical motor, communication and medical needs of children, birth through 8, with diverse
learning needs and disabilities in inclusive setting s for young children. Designing and
evaluating Individual Education Plans (I.E.P.’s) and/or Individual Family Service Plans
(I.F.S.P.’s), supervising paraprofessionals in educational settings.
SPE 331 Instructional Strategies: Inclusive Practices (3)
Students examine and practice tying I.E.P./I.F.S.P process to instruction through
modification of curricula.
Students practice designing curricula for various areas of
exceptionality for special needs populations. Plan strategies for student transitions and
training Para Educators. Emphasizes task analysis, individualized instructional strategies
and interventions, and use of assistive technology.
Appropriate use of instructional
technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Prerequisite: SPE
101/501 & 220
SPE 333 Legal and Ethical Issues in Special Education (3)
Students examine processes and use skills necessary for identifying verifying special needs,
the I.E.P. /I.F.S.P. process, transition planning, and organizing and maintaining student
special education records. This course acquaints students with state and local resources for
improving and strengthening educational programs for special populations. National, state,
local laws and policies and procedures affecting special populations are emphasized.
Discussion of current legislation, advocacy, and professional ethics is included. Appropriate
use of instructional technology is integrated into instructions of content and pedagogy.
Prerequisite: SPE 101/501 & 220
SPE 372 Practicum in the Inclusive Early Childhood Classroom (3)
Supervised classroom experience in inclusive early childhood education classrooms working
with children who have a range of disabilities. Students work under the supervision of
onsite cooperating teachers and college instructors. Emphasis will be on including children
with disabilities in the general classroom environment. Students will complete a minimum
of 3 hours per week at their practicum site for a total of 40 hours. Appropriate use of
instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
Prerequisite: SPE 330
SPE 373 Critical Issues in Special Education (3)
Students observe and implement effective approaches for remediation, through supervised
practicum experiences in self-contained classrooms, resource rooms, or inclusive settings
for a total of 40 hours. Critical issues in Special Education will be investigated, discussed
and presented.
Current research regarding each topic and appropriate remediation
strategies will be discussed and presented. Appropriate use of instructional technology is
integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Prerequisite: SPE 101/501 & 220
SPE 401 Education for High Ability and Talented Learners (3)
This course focuses on defining giftedness and identifying characteristics of talented and
gifted children.
Analyzing problems and needs of the high ability learners is discussed.
This course acquaints students with appropriate methods and strategies for teaching high
ability learners. Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instructions of
content and pedagogy.
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SPE 430 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Reading (3)
This course is designed to provide teachers with assessment procedures and effective
instructional and diagnostic techniques in reading. Instruction is provided in a self-directed
portfolio mode featuring acquisition of theory, teaching strategies, and assessment
procedures. Students participate in formal and informal testing including achievement,
criterion references, observational, and portfolio strategies. Implementation of the teacher’s
knowledge of this curriculum is achieved within a directed reading practicum in a
partnership school. Forty hours of clinical experiences focus on effective assessment and
teaching procedures based on awareness of individual learners. Appropriate use of
instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Prerequisite:
SPE 101/501 & EDU 350/551/550
SPE 470 or 471 Student Teaching (4-5)
The culminating experience for recommendation for Special Education Endorsement.
Included are opportunities to observe, instruct, participate in teacher and parent
conferences and the opportunity to develop individual educational plans (I.E.P.s) for specific
students. Student teachers have the opportunity to become familiar with the team approach
to diagnosis and to participate in diagnostic procedures used in schools. Appropriate use of
instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy. Prerequisite:
permission.
SPE 495 Student Teaching Seminar (2)
Provides opportunities to reflect on student teaching experiences, discuss specific topics of
interest, share experiences, and receive professional assistance and feedback. Appropriate
use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and pedagogy.
Seminar is taken concurrently with SPE 470 or 471. (Also listed as ECE and EDU.)
SPE 496 Research Seminar (3)
Students evaluate educational research and analyze procedures, logic, and strategies
implemented by researchers. Students complete research projects demonstrating effective
research designs. Presentation of papers to faculty members and the public is required.
Appropriate use of instructional technology is integrated into instruction of content and
pedagogy. (Also listed as ECE and SPE.)
Theology (THL)
THL 103 Introduction to Christianity (3)
This course will study the origins of Christianity from its Jewish roots to its beginnings as a
religion based on faith in Jesus Christ and its historical development to the present day. It
will also cover the development of beliefs, religious worship, and moral codes as Christianity
evolved throughout its history. (Field: Systematics)
THL 190/290/390 Topics in Theology (3)
These courses are designed to provide the opportunity for students and faculty to explore
topics of special interest in Theology. Examples of topics include the following: the
Protestant and Catholic Reformations, Spirituality of Justice, Theology of Suffering, and
Theology and Literature. These courses also include study abroad independent study as
well as internships. Faculty will determine the course number of the Topic in Theology based
upon the topic and method of inquiry. (Field determined by topic.)
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201 Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (3)
This course introduces students to the Hebrew Bible as well as the extra books found in the
Catholic Old Testament. There will be emphasis on the content of the scriptures as well as
on the study of the ancient world in which they were produced. Such a study will be done
through modern methods of biblical interpretation. (Field: Scripture: Old Testament)
THL 202 Introduction to the New Testament (3)
This course will introduce the student to the content of the New Testament as well as the 1st
century Middle East world which produced it. There will be historical analysis and an
exploration of the text as a document of the Christian faith. (Field: Scripture: New
Testament)
THL 209 Ways of Faith (3)
Intended as an introduction to religion, this course will explore topics such as the reality of
God, universal forms of religious experience, the implications of evil, the nature of ritual and
religious symbolism, and the goals of salvation as evidenced in a variety of different
religious traditions in the world. (Field: Systematics)
THL 215 Christian Life and Service (3)
This course engages the student in active theological reflection
and service in light of Christian scripture, human experience,
contemporary expression of service in the church and the world.
application of these perspectives in light of students’ current or
Moral)
on everyday Christian life
church tradition, and the
Focus will also include the
vocational careers. (Field:
THL 223 Jesus: Yesterday and Today (3)
This course will focus on the basic and traditional Christian beliefs about Jesus. Central to
this endeavor will be the exploration of the person of Jesus as reflected in the early
Christian Church as well as the examination of early heresies and the development of
Christian doctrine. Select discussion will take place on contemporary perspectives. (Field:
Systematics)
THL 227 Christian Signs & Symbols (3)
Study of the nature of religious symbols and ritual, in particular Christian rituals and
sacraments, in terms of their foundations in human experience and in their history within
the Church. This course will also include a comparative study of Christian rituals with other
multi-cultural rituals or those of other religions. (Field: Systematics)
THL 310 Approaches to God (3)
This course on prayer in the area of spirituality will be divided into three segments: various
ways to approach God; the God who is approached; and the individual who approaches God.
The first part of the course will examine different classical and contemporary types of
prayer. Each class will provide an experiential dimension of these prayer forms. The second
part will study the language, images and metaphors used to speak of God. The third part of
the course will utilize a variety of ways that can indicate prayer forms best suited to an
individual. Prerequisite: ENG 101 (Field: Spirituality)
THL 320 Church and Social Justice (3)
The social teachings of the Church have often been depicted as its best kept secret. Church
and Social Justice explores the social teachings of the Church and their application to the
concrete economic, social, and political problems of the contemporary world. The course
focuses on social issues such as poverty, hunger, racism, immigration, war, the
environment, and workers’ and human rights. (Field: Moral)
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THL 327 Women in the Bible (3)
This course is about women in the Bible and women and the Bible. It will be based on the
study of the rich heritage of the stories of women in the biblical narrative which range from
the strong leadership of women to “terror-filled” stories about women. In addition, the
course will explore the following questions: What were the general attitudes towards
women based on the biblical texts that emerged in a patriarchal world? Through the use of
biblical critical methods, what are the modern day attitudes towards women based on
biblical texts? And finally, how do we explain the attitudes that women have towards the
bible which range from complete rejection to unconditional acceptance? Prerequisite: ENG
101. (Field: Scripture)
THL 354 Christian Spirituality (3)
This course is an academic study of the nature of Christian spirituality as both religious and
lived experience. The student will be exposed to the biblical and theological foundations of
Christian spirituality, its overall origins and development, and the varieties of Christian
spiritualities that have appeared throughout history in both groups and in specific
individuals who have been viewed as exemplary of Christian spiritual life. (Field:
Spirituality)
THL 360 Women in the Christian Tradition (3)
The course examines some of the major doctrines of Christian theology in light of women's
experiences and theological reflection. These major doctrines include Christology, creation,
sin, redemption, theological anthropology, and the church. (Field: Systematics)
THL 365 Theology and the Environment (3)
This course takes as its starting point an acknowledgment that the planet, a gift from God,
is in a state of grave peril because of climate change and other threats. The course draws
upon interpretation of central biblical texts on creation, as well as historical and
contemporary theology, to construct a contemporary theology and ethics of the
environment. Because the course meets in person once every 2 weeks, with an online class
in alternating weeks, students who are motivated by independent learning methods and
who enjoy use of technology in learning are encouraged to register. Prerequisite: ENG 101.
(Field: Moral)
THL 491 Independent Study (3)
This course provides an opportunity to do advanced study in the field of theology.
Prerequisite: approval of Program Director. (Field determined by topic.)
THL 495 Theology Research Seminar (3)
Through focused and extensive study on an approved topic of interest, students
demonstrate their cumulative ability to research, reflect critically, and think theologically.
Presentation of research to faculty members and the public is required. Prerequisite:
approval of the Theology Program Director. (Field determined by topic.)
Theatre (THR)
THR 101 The Art of the Theatre (3)
This introduction to theatre will acquaint students with each element of the art and
discipline of the theatre. The class will explore the development of live performance and
touchstone plays. Students will learn about the techniques of acting, directing, and
production. Students’ examination of this area will be undertaken through attending
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lectures, play reading and study, reading aloud in class, and visiting a theatre or theatres in
various states of production. No prerequisite.
THR 201 Dramatic Literature (3)
Students will study significant plays from the Greek classic through contemporary eras and
the historical periods which fostered them.
When possible, works discussed will be
enhanced by live theatre or audiovisual productions. Prerequisite: THR 101 and ENG 101.
THR 343 Shakespeare in Performance (3)
A careful examination of several Shakespeare texts and the way in which they translate into
live theatre. This course is designed to enable students to understand the words, the plots
and the theatrical conventions which bring the plays to life. When possible, works discussed
will be enhanced by live theatre or audiovisual productions. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Also
listed as ENG 343.
THR 360 Theatrical Production (3)
Theory and practice in the experience of theatre. Study in the philosophy of the form will
provide a basis for play selection, casting, directing, and production techniques.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Women’s Studies (WST)
WST 137 Self Defense for Women (1)
This class is designed to teach the preventive techniques of defending oneself if attacked.
(Also listed as PED 137.)
WST 205 Women in Music (3)
This course, taught from an historical perspective, focuses on the accomplishments of
women as composers and performers from the early days of the Christian church to the
present. (Also listed as MUS 205.)
WST 208 Women in Art (3)
A study of the role and work of women artists from the Middle Ages to the present in an
effort to foster an appreciation for the contributions of women to art which have been
largely overlooked. (Also listed as ART 208.)
WST 240 History of Women in Europe (3)
An exploration of the lives of outstanding women in the Western tradition. These women will
be studied both as individuals and as reflections of their cultural context. (Also listed as HPS
240.)
WST 251 History of Women in the United States (3)
The role of women in American society from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis is
placed upon the 20th century. (Also listed as HPS 251.)
WST 257 Women & Film (3)
An exploration of the portrayal of women in film and a study of film as a narrative form.
Prerequisite: ENG 101. (Also listed as ENG 257.)
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WST 260 Women in Christian Tradition (3)
This course will provide a survey of the message, significance, and impact of women from
biblical times to the present. Emphasis will be on women in the Protestant and Catholic
Christian traditions. Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended. (Also listed as THL 360.)
WST 266 Images of Women in Literature (3)
Women have been stereotyped (and have played stereotypes) in life; these traditional
images are reflected in literature. The study of these images of women is through writings
from various places around the world and from different time periods. Prerequisite: ENG
101. (Also listed as ENG 266.)
WST 310 Philosophy of Women (3)
The question about what it is to be a woman will be the major topic of this study. Selected
works of philosophy and related disciplines, both ancient and contemporary, will be critically
examined. Prerequisite: ENG 101 recommended. (Also listed as PHL 310.)
WST 311 Utopia: From Women’s Points of View (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the concept of utopian worlds, particularly
ideal worlds from women’s points of view. The course will deal with the following topics:
Utopian worlds, patriarchy, concepts of God, desire for immortality, uses of power, and uses
of language. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and sophomore standing. (Also listed as ELA 310.)
WST 330 Gender and Communication (3)
This course is designed to examine the construction of gender through communication,
grounded on the premise that all we create--including gender--is accomplished through
communication. It examines how (and why) masculinity and femininity are socially
constructed and maintained. (Also listed as COM 330.)
WST 346 Women’s Spiritual Journeys in Literature (3)
A study of 20th century narratives that explore the nature of women’s spiritual experiences.
Prerequisite: ENG 101. (Also listed as ENG 346)
WST 355 Women/Novels/Film (3)
A study of the respective narrative systems of film and novels.
(Also listed as ENG 355.)
Prerequisite:
ENG 101.
WST 360 Psychology and Women (3)
Issues and life experiences that are unique to women are explored, with an emphasis on
how those issues affect today’s women. Past and current contributions of women to the field
of psychology will also be addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
WST 368 Women Writers (online) (3)
A study of traditional and contemporary works written by women. Emphasizes style and
major themes in women’s literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101. (Also listed as ENG 368.)
WST 382 Women and the Bible (3)
This course is about women in the Bible and women and the Bible, based on the study of
the rich heritage of stories of women in the biblical narrative. (Also listed as THL 382)
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Administration and Faculty
Senior Leadership Team
Maryanne Stevens, R.S.M., Ph.D.
President
Tara Knudson Carl, Ph.D.
Vice President for Student
Development/Special Assistant to the
President
Christine Pharr, Ph.D.
Vice President, Academic Affairs
Greg Fritz
Vice President, Enrollment Services
Sarah Kottich, CPA
Vice President, Finance and
Administration
Jason Degn
Vice President, Institutional Technology
Not currently filled
Vice President, Institutional
Advancement
President’s Office
Maryanne Stevens, R.S.M., Ph.D.
President
Shirley Gunderson
Executive Assistant to the President
Rose Crowley
Volunteer
Maria Luisa Gaston
Coordinator, Latino Community Outreach
Office of Mission Integration
Rebecca Hilton
Assistant to the President for Mission
Integration
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Victoria Zobrist
Director of Campus Ministry
278
Academic Affairs
Christine Pharr, Ph.D.
Vice President, Academic Affairs
Pam Humphrey, Ph.D.
Associate Dean, Academic Affairs
Heather Noyes
Administrative Assistant
Robyn Kniffen
Administrative Assistant
Registrar’s Office
Faculty Support
Debbie Nugen
Registrar and Assistant Dean
Twyla Liburd
Staff Assistant
Health Care Professions
Ann Hennen
Associate Registrar
Not currently filled
Assistant Registrar for Academic Records
Joyce Baltz
Secretary
Health Care Professions
Arleen Bailey
Secretary
Health Care Professions
Maggi Nall
Faculty Secretary
Professional Studies
Arts & Sciences
Library
Sara Williams
Library Director
Danielle Kessler
Cataloger
July 1, 2013
Judith Patricia Healy, R.S.M., M.L.S.
Reference/Interlibrary Loan Librarian
Michael Steinbrink, M.L.S.
Reference Librarian
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Financial Services
Sarah Kottich, C.P.A.
Vice President, Finance and
Administration
Bridgette Renbarger
Controller
Carolyn Ziemann
Administrative Assistant
Sarah Marie Livingston
Director of Human Resources
Kathy Cepuran
Accounts Payable Coordinator
Kim Savicky
Chief Administration Officer
Denise Bierma
Temporary Loan Fund Accountant
Express Center
Beth Sisk
Director of Financial Aid
Karen Brown
Student Accounts Director
Teasha Key
Human Resource Assistant/Financial
Services
Information Center
Katie Fletcher
Campus Information Center Manager and
Facilities Coordinator
Sara Nordquist-Davis
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
Campus Store
Annetta Lee
Financial Aid Counselor
Steve Westenbroek
Campus Store Manager
Nicole Casey
Financial Aid Assistant
Copy Center
Kelly Petry
Student Accounts Assistant
Not Currently Filled
Copy Center Technician
Not currently filled
Express Center Assistant
July 1, 2013
280
Information Services
Jason Degn
Vice President, Institutional Technology
Jon Henrichs
Telecommunications/Network Manager
Mark Baumgartner
Systems Support Specialist/Computer
Lab Manager
Lisa DeLair
Application Specialist
Jason Schlesiger
Instructional Technology Specialist
Benjamin Volden
Helpdesk/Web Technician
Engineering/Maintenance
Dan Spargen
Director of Engineering
Patricia Chism
Coordinator Custodial Service
LeRoy Peters
Associate Director of Engineering
Jesse Arrellin
Custodian
Robert Schab
Groundskeeping
Ping Li
Custodian
Rich Kottich
Groundskeeping
Sherri Shelton
Custodian
Matt Sharp
General Maintenance/Painting
Florida Francisquez
Custodian
Not Currently Filled
General Maintenance/Plumbing
July 1, 2013
281
Student Development
Tara Knudson Carl, Ph.D.
Vice President for Student
Development/Special Assistant to the
President
Rita Wiley
Administrative Assistant
Athletic Department
Jim Krueger
Director of Athletics
Emilie Kluth
Assistant Athletic Director
Veronica “Katty” Petak
Assistant Dean of Students
Sr. Corrine Connelly
Administrative Assistant
Jamie Meints
Interim Director of Residence Life
Chuck Brewer
Head Basketball Coach
Head Softball Coach
Stephanie Struckhoff
Assistant Director of Residence Life
Not Currently Filled
Director of Single Parent Success
Samantha Hammond
Head Volleyball Coach/Wellness
Coordinator
Caelee Lehman
Director of Student Leadership and
Organizations
Shad Beam
Head Soccer Coach/Sports Information
Director
Angela Fernandez
Director of the Achievement Center
Ben Porter
Head Swimming Coach/Aquatics Director
Not Currently Filled
Assistant Director, Achievement Center,
Advising and Career Services
Mary Schlueter
Assistant Director, Achievement Center
Tutoring and Testing
David Ferber
Director of Safety and Security
July 1, 2013
Amy Sauser
Head Cross Country Coach
Keri Rodriguez
Head Golf Coach
Jeff Hume
Athletic Trainer
282
Enrollment Services
Greg Fritz
Vice President, Enrollment Services and Marketing
Erica Eichhorst
Operations Manager/VP Assistant
Sarah Carse
Coordinator of Enrollment Data
Amy Poggendorf
Admissions Counselor/Team Manager
Megan Maryott
Admissions Counselor/Director of
Graduate Recruitment and Services
Not Currently Filled
Admissions Counselor
Jyoti Gandha
Admissions Counselor
Jamie Hilz
Admissions Counselor
Valyn Gipson
Admissions Counselor
July 1, 2013
283
Faculty
Deanna Acklie
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., University of Nebraska-Kearney
M.A., University of Nebraska-Kearney
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Mindy Barna
Instructor of Nursing
B.S., College of Saint Mary
M.S.N., Nebraska Methodist College
Karla Bergen
Associate Professor of Communication
B.S., Nebraska Wesleyan University
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Sally Bisson
Associate Professor of Paralegal Studies
B.A., University of Nebraska-Omaha
J.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Steve Brewer
Instructor of Marketing
B.A., Drake University
M.B.C., University of St. Thomas
Marty Wheeler Burnett
Associate Professor of Music
B.M., Rice University
M.M., Rice University
D. Min., University of the South-Sewanee
Jing Chang
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., Central South University of
Technology
M.S., Tennessee Technological University
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University
Cristy Daniel
Associate Professor of Occupational
Therapy
B.S., Creighton University
M.S., College of Saint Francis
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
Marcella Echternacht
Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., University of Nebraska Medical
Center
M
July
1, 2013of Colorado
M.S.N.,
University
Melanie Felton
Associate Professor of Education
B.S., Iowa State University
284
M.S., University of Colorado
Anna Fuder-Boehm
Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., Creighton University
M.S.N., Nebraska Wesleyan University
Kristin Geist
Assistant Instructor of Nursing
B.S.N., College of Saint Mary
M.S.N., College of Saint Mary
Michael Gendler
Associate Professor of History
B.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Christi Glesmann
Assistant Professor of Nursing
A.S.N., College of Saint Mary
B.S.N., College of Saint Mary
M.S.N., College of Saint Mary
Tracey Green
Instructor of Nursing
B.S.N., Nebraska Methodist College
M.S.N, Nebraska Methodist College
Yolanda Griffiths
Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy
B.S. University of Puget Sound
M.H.R., University of Oklahoma
O.T.D., Creighton University
Kristin Haas
Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy
B.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
M.O.T., Midwestern University
O.T.D., University of Saint Augustine
Syed Jamal Haider
Assistant Professor of Business Leadership
B.S., Minnesota State University
M.B.C., University of St. Thomas
M.E.L., University of St. Thomas
M.B.A., University of St. Thomas
Ed.D., University of St. Thomas
Phyllis Higley
Division Chair of Arts and Sciences
Associate Professor of Biology
B.S., Cornell University
M.S., Iowa State University
July 1, 2013
285
Ph.D., Iowa State University
Jamie Hilderbrand
Instructor of Nursing
B.S.N., College of Saint Mary
M.S.N., Nebraska Wesleyan University
Maureen Hoppe
Fieldwork Coordinator and Instructor of Occupational Therapy
B.S., Creighton University
M.A., University of Nebraska-Omaha
Pamela Humphrey
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
B.S., Blue Mountain College
M.A., University of Northern Iowa
Ph.D., Capella University
Rebecca Hoss
Associate Professor of Human Services and Psychology
B.A., Creighton University
M.A., University of Texas
Ph.D., University of Texas
Susan Joslin
Division Chair of Professional Studies
Associate Professor of Business
B.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Roxanne Kardell
Instructor of Nursing
B.S.N., College of Saint Mary
M.S.N., Nebraska Wesleyan University
Jeffrey Keyte
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.A., University of Chicago
M.D., St. Louis University School of Medicine
Melissa Kimmerling
Instructor of Occupational Therapy
B.G.S., College of Saint Mary
M.O.T., College of Saint Mary
Amy Knox-Brown
Assistant Professor of English
B.F.A., Stephens College
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
J.D., University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
July 1, 2013
286
Jennifer Kolker
Instructor of Nursing
B.S.N., Creighton University
M.S.N., College of Saint Mary
Colette Kroeten
Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., Midland Lutheran College
M.S.N., Nebraska Wesleyan University
Eric Kyle
Assistant Professor of Theology
B.S., Texas A & M
M.S., Texas A & M
M.Div., The Claremont School of Theology
Ph.D., The Claremont School of Theology
Danielle Ladwig
Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Ed.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Anthony Limato, III
Assistant Professor of Biology
B.S., National University of Health Sciences
D.C., National University of Health Sciences
Lois Linden
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S., Midland Lutheran College
M.S.N., University of Minnesota
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
Susan Liston
Instructor of Nursing
B.S.N., Mount Marty College
M.S.N., Case Western Reserve University
Shannon McMahon
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., Creighton University
M.A., Creighton University
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Vicky Morgan
Director, Teaching Learning Center
Professor of Education
B.S., Nebraska Wesleyan University
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Ganesh Naik
July 1, 2013
287
Associate Professor of Chemistry
B.S., University of Mumbai
M.S., University of Mumbai
Ph.D., University of Mumbai
Sr. Aline Paris
Associate Professor of Theology
B.A., Trinity College
M.A., St. Michael’s College
D.Min., Catholic Theological Union
Mary Jean Petersen
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S., Morningside College
B.S.N., Creighton University
M.S.N., University of Nebraska Medical Center
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
Christine Pharr
Vice President for Academic Affairs
B.A., Mount Marty College
M.A., University of South Dakota
Ph.D., University of Idaho
Shari M. Prior
Associate Professor of Philosophy
B.A., Syracuse University
Ph.D., University of Iowa
Jennifer Reed-Bouley
Professor of Theology
B.A., University of Notre Dame
M.A., Loyola University
Ph.D., Loyola University
Brenda Romero-Lake
Assistant Professor of World Languages
B.A., University of Utah
M.A., University of Utah
Ph.D., University of Utah
Jennifer Rose-Woodward
Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., Dana College
M.S., University of Nebraska-Omaha
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
Mark Sand
Professor of Mathematics
B.A., Drake University
M.S., University of Minnesota
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
July 1, 2013
288
Merryellen Schulz
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., Wayne State College
M.S., University of Nebraska-Omaha
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Narcissus Shambare
Assistant Professor of Business
M.B.A., Nottingham Trent University
M.S., Edinburgh Business School
M.S., Central Michigan University
Ph.D., Northcentral University
Mary Kay Smid
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., Creighton University
M.S.N., University of Nebraska Medical Center
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
Mary Smith
Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy
B.O.T., Creighton University
M.O.T., College of Saint Mary
Jeff Spencer
Assistant Professor of Art
B.A., University Nebraska-Omaha
M.F.A., University of Tennessee
Virginia Tufano
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S., Incarnate Word College
M.S.N., University of Texas Health Science Center
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
Kari Wade
Assistant Professor of Nursing
B.S.N, Creighton University
M.S.N., Nebraska Wesleyan University
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
Callie Watson
Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy
B.A., Hastings College
B.O.T., Creighton University
O.T.D., Creighton University
Molly Wernli
Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of Nebraska-Omaha
M.A., University of Nebraska-Omaha
Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln
July 1, 2013
289
Kathleen Zajic
Division Chair of Health Professions
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., Creighton University
M.S.N., University of Nebraska Medical Center
Ed.D., College of Saint Mary
July 1, 2013
290
Cooperating Agencies
Alegent Health: Behavioral Services
6828 N. 72 St., Ste 4300, Omaha, NE
68122
Alegent Health: Bergan Mercy
Medical Center
7500 Mercy Road, Omaha, NE 68124
Alegent Health: Immanuel
Fontenelle
6901 N. 72 Street, Omaha, NE 68122
Alegent Health: Immanuel Medical
Center
6901 N. 72 Street, Omaha, NE 68122
Alegent Health: Lakeside
17030 Lakeside Hills Plaza, Omaha, NE
68130
Alegent Health: Mercy Hospital
800 Mercy Dr., Council Bluffs, IA 51503
Alegent Health: Midlands Community
Hospital
11111 S. 84 Street, Papillion, NE 68046
Alegent Health System
1207 S. 13th Street, Omaha, NE 68108
Alegent Women’s Health
7070 Spring Street, Omaha, NE 68106
The Ambassador
1540 N. 72nd Street, Omaha, NE 68114
Bergan Mercy Child Development
Center
1919 S. 74 Street, Omaha, NE 68124
Bryant-LGH Hospital
1600 S. 48th Street, Lincoln, NE 685061299
Central Iowa Health System
700 E. University Ave, Des Moines, IA
50316
Children’s Hospital
8301 Dodge Street, Omaha, NE 68114
Children’s Respite Care Center
14245 Q Street, Omaha, NE 68137
Clarkson Hospital
44th & Dewy, Omaha, NE 68106
Council Bluffs – WIS
300 W. Broadway #9, Council Bluffs, IA
51503
Community Alliance
4001 Leavenworth St., Omaha, NE
68105
Community Alliance North Star
3321 Fontenelle Blvd. Omaha, NE 68104
Creighton University Medical Center
601 N. 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131
Douglas County Correctional Center
710 S. 17tSt., Omaha, NE 68102
Douglas County Youth Center
710 S. 17 St., Omaha, NE 68105
Educational Service Unit #145
PO Box 426, Waverly, NE 68462
Filmore County Hospital
PO Box 193, Geneva, NE 68361
Fremont Area Medical Center
450 E. 23 Street, Fremont, NE 68025
Friendship Program
7315 Maple St. Ste. #1, Omaha, NE
68134
Glenwood Resource Center
711 S. Vine, Glenwood, IA 51534
Grand Island Physical Therapy
3004 W. Faidley Ave., Grand Island, NE
68803
Handprints and Footsteps
5930 Vandervort Drive, Lincoln, NE
68156
Home Access Solutions
1004 Lincoln Rd. Ste. 103, Bellevue, NE
68005
July 1, 2013
291
Jennie Edmundson Memorial
Hospital
933 E. Pierce, Council Bluffs, IA 51501
Kids on the Move
3823 N. 88th Street, Omaha, NE 68134
Lincoln Regional Center
PO Box 94949, Lincoln, NE 68509-4949
Loess Hills AEA 13
2600 S. 9 St., Council Bluffs, IA 51501
Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital
5401 South Street, Lincoln, NE 68506
Mary Lanning Hospital
715 N. St. Joseph Ave., Hastings, NE
68901
Millard Good Samaritan
12856 Deauville Drive, Omaha, NE
68137
Mory’s Haven
1112 5th Street, Columbus, NE 68601
Munroe Meyer Institute
985450 Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68198-5450
Munroe-Meyer Rehabilitation
Institute
600 S. 42 Street, Omaha, NE 681985450
Nebraska Hospital Association
1640 L St. Suite D, Lincoln, NE 685082509
Nebraska Medical Center
987537 Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE 68198
Nebraska Medical Center/Clarkson
West Medical Center
2727 S. 144th Street, Omaha, NE 68144
Nebraska Orthopedic Hospital
2808 S. 143 Plz., Omaha, NE 68144
Nye Wellness Center
655 W. 23 St., Fremont, NE 68025
Open Door Mission
2828 N. 21 St. E., Omaha, NE 68110
Physicians Clinic, Inc.
720 N. 87th St., Ste. 206, Omaha, NE
68114
ProCare3
13336 Industrial Rd. #105, Omaha, NE
68137
Project Harmony
7110 F St., Omaha, NE 68117-1014
Rehab Visions
11623 Arbor Street, Omaha, NE 68144
Risen Sun Christian Village
3000 Risen Son Blvd., Council Bluffs, IA
51503
Rose Blumkin Home
323 S. 132nd Street, Omaha, NE 68154
Sarpy County Cooperative Head Start
701 Olson Drive, Papillion, NE 68046
St. Elizabeth Community Hospital
555 S. 70 Street, Lincoln, NE 68510
St. Elizabeth Physician Network
5730 S. 57 St., Lincoln, NE 68516
University of Nebraska Medical
Center
Emile at 42 St., Omaha, NE
July 1, 2013
292

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