Grammar Practice Workbook Teacher’s Annotated Edition Grade 11

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Grammar and Composition
Grammar Practice
Workbook
Teacher’s Annotated Edition
Grade 11
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission is
granted to reproduce material contained herein on the condition that such material be
reproduced only for classroom use; and be provided to students, teachers, and families
without charge; and be used solely in conjunction with Writer’s Choice. Any other
reproduction, for use or sale, is prohibited without written permission of the publisher.
Printed in Canada.
Send all inquiries to:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
8787 Orion Place
Columbus, Ohio 43240
ISBN 0-07-823364-X
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 079 04 03 02 01 00
ii
Contents
Unit 10
Parts of Speech
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.7–8
Unit 11
Parts of the Sentence
11.1–4
11.5
11.5
11.5
Unit 12
Clauses and Sentence Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Adjective Clauses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Adverb Clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Noun Clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Four Kinds of Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Sentence Fragments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Verb Tenses, Voice, and Mood
15.1–3
15.4–5
15.6–7
Unit 16
Prepositional Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Appositives and Appositive Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Participles and Gerunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Infinitives: Phrases and Clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Absolute Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Clauses and Sentence Structure
13.1–4
13.5
13.6
13.7
13.8
13.9
13.10
Unit 15
Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Direct and Indirect Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Object Complements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Subject Complements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Phrases
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.3
12.4
Unit 13
Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Action Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Conjunctions and Interjections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Verbs: Principal Parts and Tense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Verb Tenses and Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Compatibility of Tenses and Voice of Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Subject-Verb Agreement
16.2–3
16.4–6
Subject-Verb Agreement I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Subject-Verb Agreement II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
iii
Contents
Unit 17
Using Pronouns Correctly
17.1
17.2–3
17.4
17.5
17.6–7
Unit 18
Using Modifiers Correctly
18.1–2
18.3–4
18.7
Unit 20
Capitalization: Sentences and I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Capitalization: Proper Nouns and Adjectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Punctuation, Abbreviations, and Numbers
21.1–3
21.4
21.5
21.6
21.6
21.6
21.6
21.6
21.7–8
21.10
21.10–11
21.12
21.13–14
iv
Making Comparisons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Double and Incomplete Comparisons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Capitalization
20.1
20.2–3
Unit 21
Case of Personal Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Pronouns with Appositives and Than and As . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Reflexive and Intensive Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Who and Whom in Questions and Clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Pronoun Agreement and Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Period, Exclamation Point, Question Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
The Colon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
The Semicolon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Commas and Compound Sentences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Commas and Coordinate Adjectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Commas and Nonessential Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Commas: Titles, Addresses, Numbers and Direct Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Misuse of Commas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
The Dash and Parentheses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Quotation Marks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Quotation Marks and Italics (Underlining) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
The Apostrophe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
The Hyphen and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
10.1
Nouns
Key Information
A noun is a word that names a person, a place,
a thing, or an idea.
A concrete noun names an object that occupies space or that can be recognized by the
senses.
carpet
mouse
sky
An abstract noun names an idea, a quality, or
a characteristic.
surprise
goodness
intelligence
A singular noun names one person, place,
thing, or idea. A plural noun names more
than one.
A proper noun is the name of a particular
person, place, thing, or idea.
Ernest Hemingway
Canada
November
A common noun is the general—not the
particular—name of a person, a place, a thing,
or an idea.
writer
country
month
Proper nouns are capitalized; common nouns
are generally not capitalized.
A collective noun names a group.
jury
committee
herd
■ A. Identifying Nouns
Underline all the nouns in the sentences below.
1. Preparation for an athletic event such as the New York City Marathon involves
serious effort.
2. A weightlifter must have the capability to lift incredibly heavy weights.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Wrestlers wage individual battles but can earn points for a team.
4. Although basketball was invented in the United States, it is now played throughout the
world and is a part of the Olympics.
5. Soccer and lacrosse are sports that are gaining popularity in America.
6. A club sometimes sponsors swimmers, golfers, or other athletes in competitions.
7. A group of running events may be held on indoor tracks.
8. A league, such as the National Hockey League, can provide national organization.
9. A committee may judge events such as skating competitions.
10. In any sport only a handful will earn the reputation of a Monica Seles or a Michael Jordan.
■ B. Using Nouns
From the sentences above, list five examples of each of the following: Possible answers are given.
New York City Marathon, United States, Olympics, National Hockey League, Monica Seles
1. (proper nouns) _________________________________________________________________
team, club, group, league, committee
2. (collective nouns) _______________________________________________________________
weightlifter, weight, soccer, swimmers, tracks
3. (concrete nouns) ________________________________________________________________
effort, capability, popularity, preparation, reputation
4. (abstract nouns) ________________________________________________________________
weights, sports, athletes, events, swimmers
5. (plural nouns) __________________________________________________________________
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
1
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
10.2
Pronouns
Key Information
A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a
noun, a group of words acting as a noun, or
another pronoun. The word or group of words
that a pronoun refers to is called its antecedent.
A demonstrative pronoun points out specific
persons, places, things, or ideas.
An interrogative pronoun is used to form
questions.
A personal pronoun refers to a specific person
or thing.
A relative pronoun is used to begin a special
subject-verb word group called a subordinate
clause.
A reflexive pronoun refers to a noun or
another pronoun and indicates that the same
person or thing is involved.
An indefinite pronoun refers to people,
places, or things in a general way.
A possessive pronoun takes the place of the
possessive form of a noun.
■ Identifying Pronouns
Underline all pronouns below. Above each pronoun, write Per. (personal), Poss. (possessive),
Ref. (reflexive), Dem. (demonstrative), Int. (interrogative), Rel. (relative), or Ind. (indefinite).
Ind.
1. Never advise anyone to go to war or to marry.—Spanish proverb
Poss.
Per.
2. Admonish your friends privately, but praise them openly.—Syrus
Poss.
3. Ambition destroys its possessor.—Talmud
Per.
Per.
Per.
Ref.
4. I pledge you—I pledge myself—to a new deal for the American people.—F. D. Roosevelt
Ind.
Ind.
5. Many can argue; not many converse.—Alcott
Per.
Poss.
Per.
Per.
Ind.
7. Everything changes but change.—Zangwill
Ind.
8. All will come out in the washing.—Cervantes
Ind.
9. No one reaches a high position without daring.—Syrus
Per.
10. The best way out of a difficulty is through it.—Anonymous
Per.
Per.
Per.
11. I’m from Missouri; you must show me.—Vandiver
Per.
Poss.
Per.
Ref.
Poss.
12. God save me from my friends; I can protect myself from my enemies.—De Villars
Per.
Ref.
Per.
13. We set ourselves to bite the hand that feeds us.—Burke
Per.
Rel.
14. He laughs best who laughs last.—English proverb
Ind.
15. Nothing is sillier than silly laughter.—Catullus
Int.
16. What is the city but the people?—Shakespeare
Dem.
17. If a man bites a dog, that is news.—John Bogart
Ind.
18. Nothing succeeds like success.—Dumas
Per. Rel.
Ref.
19. He who is firm in will molds the world to himself.—Goethe
Per.
Per.
20. You must look into people as well as at them.—Chesterfield
2
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. As you make your bed, you must lie in it.—English proverb
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
10.3
Action Verbs
Key Information
A verb is a word that expresses action or a
state of being and is necessary to make a statement. A verb expresses time—present, past,
and future—by using tense forms.
An action verb tells what someone or something does. Action verbs can express either
physical or mental action.
He worked on the painting. (physical
action)
She admires Picasso. (mental action)
A transitive verb is an action verb that is
followed by a word or words that answer
the question what? or whom?
The chorus sang a new song. (The action
verb sang is followed by the noun song,
which answers the question sang what?)
An intransitive verb is an action verb that
is not followed by a word that answers the
question what? or whom?
The chorus sang loudly. (The action verb is
followed by a word that tells how.)
■ A. Identifying Action Verbs
Underline the action verb in each sentence. Identify each verb as transitive or intransitive by
writing T or I in the blank.
T
1. Duckbill platypuses pose a scientific enigma.
_____
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T
2. They possess flat, rubbery bills, no teeth, and webbed feet.
_____
T
3. Mother platypuses produce milk for their young.
_____
T
4. Platypuses flop their beaverlike tails.
_____
I
5. Platypuses live in rivers and lakes.
_____
I
6. They also feed there.
_____
I
7. They sleep in burrows in riverbanks.
_____
T
8. Male platypuses usually strike their victims.
_____
T
9. Scientists sometimes call the platypus a “bits-and-pieces animal.”
_____
T 10. Researchers still seek answers to the mammal’s mysteries.
_____
■ B. Using Action Verbs
Fill in the blank in each sentence below with an appropriate action verb. In the blank before
the sentence, identify the action verb as T (transitive) or I (intransitive).
T
watched
1. Everyone in the concert hall _________________
the conductor, who raised his
_____
baton to begin the final piece.
sounded
I
2. The first notes of the symphony _________________
from the percussion section
_____
like approaching thunder.
listened
I
3. The audience _________________
almost breathlessly as the conductor led the
_____
orchestra through a very personal interpretation of one of Wagner’s best pieces.
bought
T
4. During the intermission, the crowd _________________
refreshments.
_____
applauded
I
5. After the final piece, everyone vigorously _________________.
_____
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
3
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
10.3
Linking Verbs
Key Information
A linking verb links, or joins, the subject of a
sentence (often a noun or a pronoun) with a
word or expression that identifies or describes
the subject.
To determine whether a verb is an action verb
or a linking verb, substitute seem for the verb.
If seem can be substituted, the verb is probably
a linking verb.
Be in all its forms is the most commonly used
linking verb. Forms of be include am, is, are,
was, were, will be, has been, and was being.
Other verbs that can act as linking verbs include
appear, feel, look, seem, sound, taste, become,
grow, remain, smell, and stay. Most of these
verbs can also be action verbs.
Linking: The leaves turned red.
[Seemed makes sense.]
Action: The taxi turned the corner.
[Seemed cannot be substituted.]
■ Identifying Linking Verbs
Underline the linking verbs in the sentences below.
1. The great frigate bird is the most widespread of the five species of frigate birds on earth.
2. Warm islands located in the Pacific and Indian oceans are the nesting spots of these birds.
3. High, rocky cliffs are the homes of frigate birds.
4. The birds seem happiest on uninhabited islands.
5. For over a year, young frigate birds remain dependent on their parents.
6. Most of the time the young birds stay warm in their nests.
8. This sac looks balloon-like.
9. Adult great frigates are marvelous soarers and gliders.
10. In flight a great frigate bird sometimes looks free, like a ragged bundle of feathers floating
in the air.
11. Frigates seem happier in the air than on the ground.
12. Frigates appear capable of every kind of airborne movement; their flying ability is amazing.
13. Frigate birds are extraordinary; they are famous for snatching fish from other birds in flight.
14. They can also snatch fish from the ocean’s surface; fish are their staple food.
15. People sometimes feel clumsy next to these spectacular fliers.
4
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
7. A huge scarlet throat sac is characteristic of the full-grown male frigate bird.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
Adjectives
10.4
Key Information
An adjective is a word that modifies a noun or
a pronoun by limiting its meaning.
young girl
comic play
that goal
sudden stop last time
large flag
few dreams
these friends many troubles
Possessive nouns and pronouns are considered
adjectives because they modify nouns.
Wanda’s car his friend
our cat
Articles are the adjectives a, an, and the. A and
an are called indefinite articles. The is called a
definite article.
a movie
the answer
A proper adjective is formed from a proper
noun and begins with a capital letter.
American flag
Brazilian coffee
Ohio border
Chinese food
■ A. Identifying Adjectives
Underline each adjective that appears in the following sentences. (Include articles and
proper adjectives.)
1. The treetops of a tropical forest contain a marvelous community of plants and animals
living in a complex environment.
2. Exotic varieties of mosses, cacti, ferns, and orchids present unusual shapes and bright
colors that are unknown in our American forests.
3. Huge limbs and woody vines intertwine to create the topmost layer of trees in these
African and Asian forests.
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4. Yearly, biologists and naturalists gather to study the quiet, secret realm of the forests that
yield many benefits to the world’s population.
5. Natural products that were first discovered in these forests include the familiar and the
unfamiliar: rubber, copal, dammar, chicle, quinine, vanilla, cocoa, coffee, Brazil nuts,
avocado, rattan, and a large percentage of many favorite houseplants.
■ B. Using Adjectives
In each blank provided in the following paragraph, write an appropriate adjective from the list
below. Check to be sure that your completed paragraph makes sense.
thick
In the rain forest, (1) __________________
swarms of mosquitoes hover around the trees.
heavy
rotten
A (2) __________________
odor of (3) __________________
vegetation and
fragrant
humid
(4) _________________
flowers fills the (5) _________________
air. Animals usually found
highest
on the ground, such as mice, ants, even earthworms, live up in the (6) __________________
Deep
spacious
treetops. (7) __________________,
(8) __________________
caverns inside
hollow
(9) __________________
trees serve as homes to cockroaches, scorpions, vipers, and
many
(10) __________________
varieties of bats.
heavy
home
fragrant
happily
highest
vertical
spacious
orange
many
nature
thick
rotten
hollow
deep
humid
simply
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
5
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
10.5
Adverbs
Key Information
An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, an
adjective, or another adverb by making its
meaning more specific.
Antonia often calls me. (modifies verb calls)
You seem more upset than I. (modifies
adjective upset)
He answered too quickly. (modifies adverb
quickly)
I’ll do the job later. (when)
Fitz studies upstairs. (where)
He was treated kindly. (how)
Ana completely forgot that. (to what
degree)
The word not and the contraction n’t are considered adverbs. Certain adverbs of time, place,
and degree also have a negative meaning.
Adverbs tell when, where, how, and to what
degree.
We haven’t left for the play yet.
The performance had hardly begun.
■ Using Adverbs
Underline the adverbs in each of the following sentences. On the line, write the word each
adverb modifies, and identify whether the modified word is a verb, an adjective, or an adverb
by writing V., Adj., or Adv. (Note that some adverbs may modify verb phrases.)
1. American painter Marsden Hartley certainly deserves greater recognition.
deserves, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
2. His paintings almost always are innovative.
always, Adv; are, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
4. Soon he was studying art at the Cleveland School of Art.
was studying, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
5. Born Edmund, the artist later adopted his stepmother’s maiden name, Marsden.
adopted, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
6. Hartley traveled east to New York. There he met John Marin and other artists.
traveled, V.; met, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
7. In 1912 in Paris, museums, artists, and artistic ideas greatly impressed him.
impressed, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
8. For a time, people in America scarcely paid attention to Hartley’s work.
paid, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
9. Nowadays his paintings are very valuable.
are, V.; valuable, Adj.
__________________________________________________________________________________
10. His works are frequently exhibited around the country.
are exhibited, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
6
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Born in Maine, Hartley moved west to Cleveland when he was sixteen.
moved, V.
__________________________________________________________________________________
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
10.6
Prepositions
Key Information
A preposition is a word that shows the relationship of a noun or a pronoun to some other
word in a sentence.
The new car is behind the station wagon.
(Behind shows the spatial relationship of the
two cars.)
I saw him after the announcement.
(After relates the verb saw to the noun
announcement.)
She acted the part with difficulty.
(With relates the verb acted to the noun
difficulty.)
A compound preposition is a preposition that
is made up of more than one word.
They were late because of car trouble.
Prepositions are found at the beginning of
phrases that usually end with a noun or a pronoun called the object of the preposition.
She hit the ball over the fence. (Fence
is the object of the preposition over.)
■ Identifying Prepositions
Underline all of the prepositions in the sentences below.
1. In tennis a game begins with the serve, which many players consider the most important
stroke in the game.
2. The ball is tossed into the air and is hit flat or with spin over the net into the opponent’s
service box.
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3. After the return of the serve, the players trade shots, each trying to move the other around
the court.
4. The play ends when one player fails to hit the ball over the net within the boundary lines
of the tennis court on one bounce.
5. A player must not hit the ball beyond the baseline or into the net or miss two serves
in a row.
6. A good player hits the ball past the other player or over the other player’s head.
7. The best players can hit the tennis ball to any spot in the court; for them, the “feel” of the
ball against the racket strings is second nature.
8. Among the most prestigious tennis championships, after Wimbledon in southeast
England, is the U.S. Open.
9. Since 1978 the U.S. Open has been held at Flushing Meadows, New York; previously it was
held for many years at Forest Hills, New York.
10. During a big point in a late-round match of an important tournament in front of thousands of spectators, total silence reigns despite the number of people present.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
7
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
10.7–8
Conjunctions and Interjections
Key Information
A conjunction is a word that joins single words
or groups of words.
A subordinating conjunction introduces a subordinate, or dependent, clause—one that cannot
stand alone as a sentence.
A coordinating conjunction joins words or
groups of words that have equal grammatical
weight.
Although I wanted to go, I did not.
A conjunctive adverb is used to clarify the
relationship between clauses of equal weight
in a sentence.
I wanted to go, but I did not have time.
Correlative conjunctions work in pairs to join
words or groups of words that have equal
grammatical weight in a sentence.
I had little time; therefore, I did not go.
An interjection is a word or phrase that
expresses emotion or exclamation. An interjection has no grammatical connection to
other words.
Neither he nor I went.
A subordinating conjunction joins two
clauses, or ideas, in such a way as to make
one grammatically dependent on the other.
Alas, I couldn’t go.
■ Identifying Conjunctions and Interjections
Underline the conjunctions, conjunctive adverbs, and interjections in the following sentences.
Above each underlined word, label it as a coordinating conjunction (Coor. C.), correlative conjunction (Corr. C.), subordinating conjunction (Sub. C.), conjunctive adverb (Conj. Adv.), or
interjection (Int.).
Conj. Adv.
1. About 270 million people in 103 countries are presently infected with malaria; furthermore,
Sub. C
Sub. C.
though estimates are crude, the World Health Organization believes that between 1 million
Coor. C.
Sub. C.
2. Although quinine drugs have long been used to treat malaria, they have become
Sub. C.
unreliable because the parasites that cause malaria are becoming resistant to quinine.
Sub. C.
3. Unless new treatments are found soon, many people currently infected will die of the fatal
Sub. C.
fevers the disease can cause, since no other treatment is in widespread use.
Corr. C.
Corr. C.
4. Either scientists will have to discover new drugs or they will have to rely on an infusion of
wormwood leaves in water that traditional Chinese healers have used for 2,000 years to
treat malaria.
Sub. C.
5. If preliminary reports from Asia are borne out, the ancient remedy may one day be the
treatment of choice for the disease.
Sub. C.
6. Although one form of a drug derived from wormwood is being used in China, work is
Conj. Adv.
just beginning on toxicity tests; consequently, studies of effectiveness are several years away.
Sub. C.
Coor. C.
7. Until the drug has been tested and approved for use, it cannot be used to treat patients
Conj. Adv.
Corr. C.
Corr. C.
in much of the world; nevertheless, scientists are not only cautious but also optimistic.
Sub. C.
8. As soon as laboratory tests are completed, they expect to begin treating patients.
8
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 10
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
and 2 million people die each year of the disease.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
11.1–4
Subjects and Predicates
Key Information
The subject and the predicate are the two basic
parts of every sentence. The simple subject is
the key noun or pronoun that tells what a sentence is about. The simple predicate is the
verb or verb phrase that expresses the essential
thought about the subject of the sentence.
A compound subject is made up of two or
more simple subjects that are joined by a conjunction and have the same verb. A compound
predicate is made up of two or more verbs or
verb phrases that are joined by a conjunction
and have the same subject.
Forests/have survived.
Birch, cherry, and red maple/have luxuriated
and spread.
The complete subject consists of the simple
subject and all the words that modify it. The
complete predicate consists of the simple
predicate and all words that modify it.
In English the subject comes before the verb
in most sentences, as shown in the examples
above.
Urban forests/have survived toxic metals.
■ A. Identifying Subjects and Predicates
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In the space provided, identify the underlined word or words as one of the following:
(SS) simple subject, (SP) simple predicate, (CS) complete subject, (CP) complete predicate,
(CdS) compound subject, or (CdP) compound predicate.
SP
1. Scrimshaw has always been among the most exquisite American folk art forms.
_____
SS, CS 2. Herman Melville refers to it in Moby-Dick as “skrimshandering.”
_____
CdP 3. Scrimshawing produces or creates a decoratively carved bone or ivory object.
_____
CS
4. The art of carving items from whalebone was a favorite pastime among nineteenth_____
century American sailors.
CdS 5. Whale teeth and walrus tusks also were carved.
_____
CdS 6. Jackknives, large curved needles, and awls were used as carving tools.
_____
SP
7. The carefully carved lines were usually filled with colorful pigment.
_____
CP
8. Ships, seascapes, and bouquets of flowers were typical subjects for scrimshaw.
_____
CS
9. Subjects such as canes and workboxes were carved and polished with great care.
_____
CdP 10. Many fine examples of scrimshaw have been collected and are displayed in the
_____
Whaling Museum on Nantucket.
■ B. Using Normal and Inverted Sentence Order
On a separate sheet of paper, rewrite each of the following inverted sentences in normal
word order.
1. There were people at the museum.
People were at the museum.
2. In the corner of the room stood the stone statue.
3. On the second floor the exhibit continued.
The stone statue stood in the corner of the room.
The exhibit continued on the second floor.
4. In that part of the building are the jewelry and weapons.
The jewelry and weapons are in that part
of the bulding.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 11
9
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
11.5
Direct and Indirect Objects
Key Information
A complement is a word or group of words
that completes the meaning of a verb. There are
four kinds of complements: direct objects, indirect objects, object complements, and subject
complements.
An indirect object answers the question to
whom? for whom? to what? or for what?
after an action verb. The indirect object always
appears between the verb and the direct object.
A direct object answers the question what?
or whom? after an action verb.
Edgar Allan Poe wrote poems and stories.
(wrote what?)
Poe married Virginia Clemm. (married
whom?)
Holidays bring people joy. (Holidays bring
joy to whom?)
The baker always saves us the last pastry.
(The baker always saves the last pastry for
whom?)
Some people give their homes a holiday
look. (Some people give a holiday look
to what?)
■ A. Identifying Direct Objects
Underline the direct object in each of the following sentences. Some sentences have more than
one direct object.
1. Many famous people throughout history have kept unusual and preposterous pets.
2. Napoleon’s wife Josephine dressed an orangutan in dinner clothes.
3. Charles V of France built houses and jeweled cages for his feathered pets.
4. Augustus Caesar of Rome once entertained a raven.
■ B. Identifying Indirect Objects
Underline the indirect object in each of the following sentences. Some sentences have more
than one indirect object.
1. People give their friends gifts on some holidays.
2. Children write their grandparents thank-you letters for gifts.
3. Many children bring their teachers small gifts.
4. Some parents leave children money under their pillows for lost teeth.
5. Some people send friends and relatives flowers or plants on holidays.
6. No one should give children small pets as gifts.
7. Colorful decorations offer ordinary rooms a festive look.
8. Thanksgiving gives turkey farmers the greatest part of their annual income.
9. Rich holiday food can give party-goers indigestion.
10. Hectic holidays give some people feelings of mental and physical exhaustion.
10
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 11
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. In his wedding procession, the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II included camels,
monkeys, and leopards.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
11.5
Object Complements
Key Information
An object complement answers the question
what? after a direct object. That is, it completes
the meaning of the direct object by identifying
or describing it.
An object complement may be an adjective, a
noun, or a pronoun. It usually follows the direct
object.
Object complements will be found only in sentences that contain a direct object and one of
the action verbs listed on page 499 of your textbook or a similar verb with the general meaning
of “make” or “consider.”
Some people consider Poe’s poetry mysterious. (adjective)
A magazine made him a member of its
staff. (noun)
Poe’s short stories made popularity his.
(pronoun)
■ A. Identifying Object Complements
Underline the object complement(s) in each of the following sentences. Put parentheses
around the direct object(s) identified or described.
1. The inventors of modern dance found earlier(dance forms)shallow.
2. They called(vaudeville)mere entertainment.
3. They considered(ballet)rigid and somewhat childish.
4. The founders of modern dance made(dance movement)more intellectual.
5. Ted Shawn and Doris Humphrey made the(label)“pioneers of modern dance” theirs.
6. Dance historians call(Isadora Duncan and Ruth St. Denis)the founders of modern dance.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
7. Contemporary dancers now make the(works)of these artists available to the public.
8. An increasing number of modern dance companies are making strong (emotions)visible
through dance.
9. Many people consider the(Dance Theater of Harlem)stimulating and unique.
10. Most dance critics consider Martha Graham’s (choreography)distinctly original.
■ B. Using Object Complements
Underline the direct object in each sentence. Then complete the sentences by writing an appropriate object complement. Use the part of speech specified in parentheses. Answers will vary.
obsolete
1. The new invention rendered the old methods __________________.
(adjective)
hers
2. My sister considers my clothes __________________.
(pronoun)
chairperson
3. We elected Sarah __________________
of the committee. (noun)
Tom
4. Lucy named her cat __________________,
after one of the main characters in
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. (proper noun)
attainable
5. He believes the goal __________________.
(adjective)
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 11
11
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
11.5
Subject Complements
Key Information
A subject complement follows a linking verb
and identifies or describes the subject. There are
two kinds of subject complements: predicate
nominatives and predicate adjectives.
Tigers are carnivores.
A predicate adjective follows a linking verb
and points back to the subject and further
describes it.
A predicate nominative is a noun or pronoun
that follows a linking verb and points back to
the subject to identify it further.
This tiger seems hungry.
■ A. Identifying Subject Complements
Underline the subject complement in each sentence. Identify each subject complement as
a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective by writing PN or PA in the space provided.
PN 1. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was a famous basketball player.
_____
PA 2. Some of the new regulations seem very unfair.
_____
PA 3. The water in the ditch looks polluted.
_____
PN 4. A dog is a wonderful companion for a person who lives alone.
_____
PA 8. Many Mexican foods taste deliciously spicy.
_____
PA 9. The appreciation for handmade lace has grown greater.
_____
PN 10. The opposing lawyers remain friends.
_____
■ B. Using Subject Complements
Follow the directions in parentheses to write a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective in
the space provided. Answers will vary.
1. (Use a predicate adjective.)
ancient
The art of lace-making is __________________.
2. (Use a predicate adjective.)
damp
After a heavy rain our basement always feels __________________.
3. (Use a predicate nominative.)
marsupials
The kangaroos of Australia are __________________.
4. (Use a predicate adjective.)
offensive
Some of the remarks he makes seem __________________.
5. (Use a predicate nominative.)
cats
Lions, tigers, jaguars, and cheetahs are big __________________.
12
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 11
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
PN 5. Abraham Lincoln was president during the Civil War.
_____
PA 6. The travelers sounded tired at the end of the day.
_____
PN 7. The Statue of Liberty was a gift from France to America.
_____
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
12.1
Prepositional Phrases
Key Information
A prepositional phrase is a group of words
that begins with a preposition and usually ends
with a noun or pronoun called the object of
the preposition. A preposition may have more
than one object.
Which of the horses is older? (adjective
phrase modifying the pronoun which)
When a prepositional phrase is used as an
adverb, it modifies a verb, an adjective, or
another adverb.
A prepositional phrase usually functions as an
adjective or an adverb. When a prepositional
phrase is used as an adjective, it modifies a
noun or a pronoun.
Rosa lives on a dairy farm. (adverb phrase
modifying the verb lives) She is proud of
her prize-winning cow. (adverb phrase
modifying the adjective proud)
The old house on the hill has been sold.
(adjective phrase modifying the noun house)
■ A. Identifying Prepositional Phrases
Underline the prepositional phrases in the following sentences. The number of prepositional
phrases in each sentence is given in parentheses.
1. The island nation of the Philippines is located at the edge of Asia. (3)
2. The food of the country can surprise Americans. (1)
3. Visitors to Manila can sample Filipino food in small cafes. (2)
4. Egg rolls, called lumpia, are crisp on the outside and filled with an assortment of tasty
ingredients that may include shrimp, pork, and peanuts. (3)
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. A good Filipino chef can introduce you to a wide variety of Filipino foods with exotic
names: apritadang manok, abodong karne sa gata, and pinakbet. (3)
6. A Filipino “tea” called salabat is made with ginger, water, and brown sugar. (1)
7. Adobo is the national dish of the Philippines; the name is actually a general term used for
foods cooked in vinegar, garlic, and soy sauce. (3)
8. Adobo is a stew of meat cooked with those ingredients. (2)
9. Filipino cooking has been influenced by foods of many cultures. (2)
10. A hospitable Filipino cook prepares an abundance of food to place before the guests. (2)
■ B. Identifying Adjective and Adverb Phrases
Underline the prepositional phrase in each sentence. In the space provided write Adj. if the
phrase is acting as an adjective. Write Adv. if the phrase is acting as an adverb.
Adv. 1. Larry cannot vote unless he registers before Tuesday.
_____
Adj. 2. One of the letters did not have enough postage.
_____
Adv. 3. Mark drove home after the game.
_____
Adj. 4. The winner of this year’s speech contest is Simone Wong.
_____
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 12
13
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
12.2
Appositives and Appositive Phrases
Key Information
An appositive is a noun or pronoun that is
placed next to another noun or pronoun to
identify or give additional information about it.
An appositive phrase is an appositive plus any
words that modify the appositive.
Lee’s brother Jason is in the Coast Guard.
(The appositive Jason identifies the noun
brother.)
The armadillo, a nocturnal mammal, is
found from Texas south to Argentina. (The
appositive phrase a nocturnal mammal gives
more information about the noun armadillo.)
■ A. Identifying Appositives and Appositive Phrases
Underline the appositives and appositive phrases in the following sentences. (Some sentences
have more than one.)
1. Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States, was over six feet tall and was
nicknamed “Long Tom.”
2. Clarence Birdseye, founder of the frozen food industry, had an ancestor who saved the life
of an English queen by shooting an arrow through the eye of an attacking hawk.
3. Six hundred people died in the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, one of the nation’s
worst disasters.
4. George Gershwin, a writer of show music, became one of America’s greatest composers.
5. The bird with the largest number of feathers, the whistling swan, boasts about 25,000
feathers.
7. Each parent’s twenty-three chromosomes, carriers of human hereditary characteristics,
can combine in more than eight million ways.
8. The psychologist Dr. Catherine Cox estimates that Galileo, the seventeenth-century Italian
astronomer, mathematician, and physicist, would have had an IQ of 185, measured by our
modern IQ scale, on which a score of 100 is normal or average.
9. Men once wore spats, long cloth coverings for the instep and ankle.
10. Sugarcane, a type of tall tropical grass, is the main source of the sweetener sugar.
■ B. Using Appositives and Appositive Phrases
Expand the following sentences by adding an appositive or an appositive phrase to each one.
Write your expanded sentences on a separate sheet of paper. Possible answers are given.
1. The class required a great deal of work and concentration. , Advanced French Conversation,
2. The dogs that belong to our neighbor jumped the fence along the road. Joy Gilbert
3. The newspaper announced the outbreak of the war. an inevitable consequence of the arms buildup
4. Her cousin got a bit part in a movie. the hairdresser
5. The setting of my favorite book is Long Island. , The Great Gatsby,
14
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 12
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. The number of bones in an adult human, 206, is far fewer than the number of bones in
a human infant.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
12.3
Participles and Gerunds
Key Information
A verbal is a verb form that functions as a
noun, an adjective, or an adverb.
A participle is a verb form that can function as
an adjective. Present participles end in -ing. Past
participles often end in -ed.
We hurried through the closing doors.
(present participle modifying doors)
Sam replaced the cracked window. (past
participle modifying window)
Long admired for her short stories, the
writer published her first novel.
A gerund is a verb form that ends in -ing and is
used in the same way a noun is used.
Schooling takes many years. (gerund as
subject)
A gerund phrase contains a gerund and any
complements and modifiers.
A participial phrase contains a participle and
any complements and modifiers.
The left tonsil shows abnormal swelling.
■ A. Identifying Participles and Participial Phrases
Underline the participles and participial phrases that are used as adjectives below.
1. Horses are hoofed mammals.
2. Hunted by early people for food, the early horse crossed the Bering land bridge and
spread throughout Asia, Europe, and Africa.
3. First domesticated about five thousand years ago in central Asia, the horse returned to the
Americas with the Spaniards in the 1500s.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. Today, the only surviving wild horse is Przewalski’s horse, also called the Mongolian
wild horse.
5. Falling into two well-defined categories, modern horse breeds are either light horses used
for riding, racing, and driving or draft horses, which are massive work animals.
6. A team of towering draft horses at work is an awesome sight.
7. Their enormous strength has earned these horses the name “pulling horses.”
8. Hitched to a plow, mower, or sled, draft horses can do an incredible amount of labor.
9. Frightening in their power, draft horses are actually friendly animals.
10. In fact, they often respond to mere shouted commands.
■ B. Identifying Gerunds and Gerund Phrases
Underline the gerund phrase in each sentence.
1. Owning a hamster can be fun and does not require much work.
2. Hamsters are furry rodents with large cheek pouches, which they use for carrying food.
3. Hamsters generally feed on seeds and grains, but they also like eating fruits and vegetables.
4. Hamsters sometimes have the habit of running several miles at night on their
exercise wheels.
5. Hoarding their food is another habit of hamsters.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 12
15
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
12.3
Infinitives: Phrases and Clauses
Key Information
An infinitive is a verb form that is usually preceded by the word to and is used as a noun, an
adjective, or an adverb.
To escape is their goal. (infinitive as subject)
They want to leave. (infinitive as direct
object)
Her goal was to win. (infinitive as predicate
nominative)
The king granted permission to sail.
(infinitive as adjective)
The cat was too tired to move. (infinitive
as adverb)
An infinitive phrase contains an infinitive and
any complements and modifiers.
The children want to go camping.
Occasionally an infinitive may have its own subject. Such a construction is called an infinitive
clause.
The speaker asked Mr. Hu to come up
onto the stage.
Note that the subject of the infinitive clause
comes between the main verb and the infinitive.
■ A. Identifying Infinitives and Infinitive Phrases
Underline the infinitive, infinitive phrase, or infinitive clause in each sentence.
1. When she saw the clown in the park, the baby began to cry.
2. No one had time to go to the store until the week following exams.
3. His hope was to join the team.
4. To answer each question carefully and thoroughly should be the goal of every test-taker.
5. The judge asked the defendant to answer the prosecutor’s questions.
7. The group was eager to contribute to the fund as a way of helping the community.
8. The carpenter used the guide for as long as he could before it became too worn to
perform accurately.
9. Do you want this spilled sugar to attract insects and rodents?
10. The hurricane forced the vacationers to abandon the beach for a town one hundred
miles inland.
■ B. Identifying Infinitives as Parts of the Sentence
Underline the infinitive or infinitive phrase in each sentence. Then, write on the line whether it
is used as the subject (S), the direct object (DO), or a predicate nominative (PN).
DO 1. The villagers wanted to climb the mountain in search of the treasure.
_____
S
2. To follow the eastern side of the mountain would be the easier journey.
_____
PN
3. The goal of his career was to solve that particular problem.
_____
DO 4. They wanted to come to the party, but they did not have transportation.
_____
DO 5. The speaker wished to begin as soon as the music stopped.
_____
16
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 12
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. The crew wants to finish the roof before the rain begins.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
12.4
Absolute Phrases
Key Information
An absolute phrase consists of a noun or a
pronoun modified by a participle or a participial
phrase. An absolute phrase has no grammatical
relation to the rest of the sentence.
In some absolute phrases the participle being is
understood rather than stated.
The wind [being] just right, Eli and
Ronnie ran outside to fly their new kites.
The sun setting behind the hills, we
started our long hike back to the campsite.
■ Identifying Absolute Phrases
On the line following each sentence, write the absolute phrase. Then, place parentheses around
the participle or participial phrase within the absolute phrase.
1. Every year I look forward to the approach of September, autumn being my favorite season.
autumn (being my favorite season)
__________________________________________________________________________________
2. Full solar eclipses occurring rarely, we all looked forward to watching the day grow dark.
Full solar eclipses (occurring rarely)
__________________________________________________________________________________
3. My project completely finished, I couldn’t wait to give my presentation to the committee.
My project (completely finished)
__________________________________________________________________________________
4. I was thrilled when I won tickets to watch the San Antonio Spurs, basketball being my
favorite sport.
basketball (being my favorite sport)
__________________________________________________________________________________
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. His patience at an end, Tyrone decided it was time to call the plumber.
His patience ([being] at an end)
__________________________________________________________________________________
6. The game ended, Chelsea pushed her way through the crowd toward the exit.
The game (ended)
__________________________________________________________________________________
7. The Frisbee lost in the bushes, Maria decided to give up her search until morning.
The Frisbee (lost in the bushes)
__________________________________________________________________________________
8. Everyone exhausted from the day before, they ended rehearsal early and went home.
Everyone (exhausted from the day before)
__________________________________________________________________________________
9. Her back tire nearly deflated, Michelle walked her bike to a gas station to use an air hose.
Her back tire (nearly deflated)
__________________________________________________________________________________
10. The floor plan of the new library was utterly confusing, reading tables seemingly arranged
without rhyme or reason.
reading tables (seemingly arranged without rhyme or reason)
__________________________________________________________________________________
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 12
17
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
13.1–4
Clauses and Sentence Structure
Key Information
A clause is a group of words that has a subject
and a predicate and that is used as a part of a
sentence. A main clause has a subject and a
predicate and can stand alone as a sentence.
A simple sentence has only one main clause
and no subordinate clauses.
The game was close.
A complex sentence has one main clause and
one or more subordinate clauses.
We went to the ballpark.
A subordinate clause has a subject and a
predicate but cannot stand alone as a sentence.
The game was close when the visitors
loaded the bases.
Although our team lost, we enjoyed
the game.
■ Identifying Main and Subordinate Clauses and Simple and Complex Sentences
Write M above each underlined main clause; write S above each underlined subordinate clause.
In the space following each sentence, write whether the sentence is simple or complex.
M
simple
1. Pioneer ecologist Aldo Leopold owned a farm in southern Wisconsin. _________________
S
2. After several previous owners had almost ruined the land, Leopold purchased the
complex
Wisconsin farm in 1935. _________________
S
3. On the farm there was an old henhouse, which Leopold converted into a cabin.
complex
_________________
M
complex
_________________
M
simple
5. Waking very early each day, Leopold began writing at 3:30 A.M. _________________
S
6. Aldo Leopold was a professor at the University of Wisconsin, where he taught wildlife
complex
management. _________________
M
7. He remained largely unknown to the public until his books were published after his death.
complex
_________________
M
8. Many readers consider his Sand County Almanac as important as Thoreau’s Walden.
simple
_________________
9. According to Professor Leopold, nature, which could rejuvenate itself, would replenish
S
complex
itself when human beings left it alone. _________________
M
10. So that the ecological balance of his land could be maintained, Leopold’s farm was made
complex
into a twelve-hundred-acre reserve after his death. _________________
18
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 13
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. Whenever he spent time on the farm, Leopold lived in this rough cabin.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
13.5
Adjective Clauses
Key Information
An adjective clause is a subordinate clause
that modifies a noun or a pronoun. An adjective
clause normally comes after the word it modifies. Both relative pronouns (who, whom,
whose, that, and which) and the subordinating
conjunctions where and when may begin adjective clauses.
An essential, or restrictive, clause is an adjective clause that is needed to make the meaning
of the sentence clear.
The girl who is in the hall is Mawa.
The class that Mawa enjoys the most is
English.
A nonessential, or nonrestrictive, clause is
an adjective clause that is not needed to make
the meaning of the sentence clear. A nonessential clause is always set off by commas.
Mawa, who often talks in class, is a good
student.
Geometry, which Mawa enjoys, is taught
by Ms. Sampras.
■ Identifying Adjective Clauses
Underline the adjective clause(s) in each sentence. In the space provided, write E for an essential clause and N for a nonessential clause.
E
1. Every person who goes on a hiking trip should carry certain minimum equipment.
_____
E, N, E 2. One thing that you should have is a compass, which will allow you to know the
_____
direction in which you are traveling.
E, N 3. Wooden matches should be kept in a case that is waterproof or should be repeat_____
edly dipped in melted paraffin, which will make them waterproof.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
N
4. Concentrated foods, which are light and portable, include dried fruit and
_____
nut mixtures.
E
5. You need an area map that is up-to-date; topographic survey maps are detailed
_____
and accurate.
E
6. A filled canteen is an essential piece of equipment that most people forget.
_____
N
7. You should also have a good knife, which is an important tool.
_____
E
8. A hiker whose head, hands, and feet are warm will feel warm, so you should take
_____
extra socks, a pair of gloves, and a wool stocking cap.
E, N 9. Anyone who hikes in the wilderness should be able to read trail signs, which may
_____
be in the form of stacked rocks, bunched grass, broken branches, or tree blazes.
E 10. Three rocks that are stacked on top of one another like a snowman mean “This is
_____
the trail.”
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 13
19
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
13.6
Adverb Clauses
Key Information
An adverb clause is a subordinate clause that
modifies a verb, an adjective, or an adverb. It
tells when, where, why, how, to what extent,
or under what condition.
Jennifer jogs whenever she feels anxious.
(The adverb clause modifies the verb jogs.)
Glen is older than I am. (The adverb clause
modifies the adjective older.)
Stephanie runs faster than I do. (The
adverb clause modifies the adverb faster.)
I read short stories whenever I get the
chance.
Whenever I get the chance, I read short
stories.
Sometimes words may be left out of an adverb
clause in order to avoid repetition and awkwardness. The omitted words can easily be
supplied by the reader, however, because they
are understood, or implied. Such adverb clauses
are called elliptical adverb clauses.
Subordinating conjunctions introduce adverb
clauses. An adverb clause that modifies a verb
can come either before a main clause or after it.
She reads more novels than I (read).
■ Identifying Adverb Clauses
Underline the adverb clauses once and the subordinating conjunctions twice in the
following sentences.
1. As long as people need to protect their heads from the elements, hats like the Russian
shapka, a fur cap, will exist.
2. People also wear hats in order that others may know their position or rank in society.
4. The Chinese attached mirrors to a baby’s cap because mirrors supposedly kept away
evil spirits.
5. Muslims wore long black tassels so that Allah could pull them up to Paradise.
6. People in ancient times wore a simple band or fillet when they wanted to keep their long
hair away from the face.
7. Until the Greeks introduced the broad-brimmed petasus, hats had no brims.
8. Although the sombrero is of Mexican origin, it is also familiar as the Western ten-gallon hat.
9. The bowler hat became very popular in the United States as the derby, although it originated in England.
10. While he was riding on a train to Pennsylvania, Abraham Lincoln used his English
stovepipe hat as a makeshift desk to write part of the Gettysburg Address.
20
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 13
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Korean gentlemen traditionally wore tall hats made of horsehair so that others would
recognize them as married.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
13.7
Noun Clauses
Key Information
A noun clause is a subordinate clause used as
a noun. You can use a noun clause in the same
ways that you can use a noun or a pronoun:
as a subject, a direct object, an indirect object,
an object of a preposition, or a predicate
nominative.
That hang gliding is dangerous is a fact.
(subject)
Do you know who invented the camera?
(direct object)
These free booklets are for whoever
wants one. (object of a preposition)
Eating cake is what I like best about
birthdays. (predicate nominative)
These are some words that can introduce noun
clauses:
who
which
whom
whose
that
when
why
what
whoever
whichever
whatever
whomever
At times the introductory word is dropped from
the beginning of a noun clause.
She thinks (that) hang gliding is fun.
■ Identifying Noun Clauses
Underline the noun clause in each of the following sentences. Then, on the line that follows
each sentence, write whether the noun clause is used as a subject, direct object, indirect object,
object of a preposition, or predicate nominative.
1. Whoever takes bird-watching seriously should be grateful to Roger Tory Peterson, the
subject
author of the classic Field Guide to the Birds. __________________________________________
subject
2. Whoever wants to identify birds needs his pocket guide. _________________________________
3. The new edition of this book, first published in 1934, contains what is known about birds’
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
direct object
field markings and habitats. _______________________________________________________
4. Peterson’s beautiful, detailed illustrations may make an avid bird lover of whoever picks
object of a preposition
up the book. ___________________________________________________________________
5. Before Peterson published his book, avid bird-watchers gave whoever was interested
indirect object
information from personal experience._______________________________________________
6. What was sorely needed was a handy reference book that had accurate illustrations as well
subject
as information about bird songs and habits.___________________________________________
7. Peterson recorded in his book what he had observed about bird plumages and bird songs
direct object
over a period of many years. _______________________________________________________
predicate nominative
8. Watching birds is what many Field Guide readers enjoy most. _____________________________
subject
9. What Peterson began doing as a “lark” has since become an American institution. ____________
10. If you are a beginner, Peterson tells you how you can recognize birds by their size, shape,
direct object
behavior, flight, and field markings.____________________________________________________
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 13
21
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
13.8
Four Kinds of Sentences
Key Information
A declarative sentence makes a statement
and usually ends with a period.
An interrogative sentence asks a question
and ends with a question mark.
We have been waiting twenty minutes.
Will you come to the movie with us?
An imperative sentence gives a command or
makes a request. The subject “you” is understood in an imperative sentence. It, too, usually
ends with a period.
An exclamatory sentence expresses strong
emotion and ends with an exclamation point.
What a terrific game that was!
Please tell Jo that I called.
■ Recognizing Four Kinds of Sentences
Read each of the following sentences. Then write in the space provided whether it is
a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence.
declarative
1. It’s getting dark. __________________
imperative
2. Turn on the light. __________________
interrogative
3. Can’t you see where you’re going? __________________
imperative
4. Please don’t tease the cat. __________________
declarative
5. I don’t want to sit here anymore. __________________
declarative
6. I enjoy reading. __________________
interrogative
7. Do you like books? __________________
imperative
9. Please bring me the book from the table. __________________
declarative
10. The author of that book was a famous diplomat. __________________
interrogative
11. How many times did you read the ending? __________________
declarative
12. I didn’t think you liked that book very much. __________________
exclamatory
13. I need that book right now! __________________
imperative
14. Stop arguing and start reading. __________________
declarative
15. Reading is a relaxing activity. __________________
imperative
16. Turn to page 4 for information about the author. __________________
interrogative
17. Did you know this book was set in Helsinki? __________________
interrogative
18. How many books have you read this month? __________________
imperative
19. Read as much as you can. __________________
declarative
20. I recently finished an exciting mystery book. __________________
22
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 13
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
exclamatory
8. What a fascinating book this is! __________________
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
13.9
Sentence Fragments
Key Information
In general, avoid sentence fragments in your
writing. A sentence fragment is an error that
occurs when an incomplete sentence is punctuated as though it were a complete sentence.
Look for three things when reviewing your work
to detect sentence fragments. First, check for a
group of words without a subject. Then look for
a group of words without a verb, especially a
group that includes a verbal rather than a main
verb. Finally, check to see that a subordinate
clause is not punctuated as though it were a
complete sentence.
Because she could not understand what he
had said. (fragment)
Because she could not understand what he
had said, she asked him to speak more
slowly. (sentence)
■ A. Identifying Sentence Fragments
Write whether each of the following sentences is a sentence fragment or a complete sentence.
Then explain why each fragment is not a complete sentence.
fragment
1. The United States dollar, with its universal acceptability and trusted design. __________________
lacks verb
__________________________________________________________________________________
fragment
2. Is the most counterfeited currency in the world. _________________________________________
lacks subject
__________________________________________________________________________________
fragment
3. When the United States Secret Service was created to curtail counterfeiters.___________________
subordinate clause only
__________________________________________________________________________________
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. At that time, bogus bills amounted to almost one third of the nation’s currency.
sentence
__________________________________________________________________________________
fragment
4. Which posed a serious risk to the country’s economic stability.____________________________
subordinate clause only
__________________________________________________________________________________
■ B. Correcting Sentence Fragments
Rewrite each of the following sentence fragments to form a complete sentence. (There will be
more than one way to rewrite each sentence.)
1. The Philadelphia Eagles. Are favorites in the Super Bowl. __________________________________
The Philadelphia Eagles are favorites in the Super Bowl.
__________________________________________________________________________________
2. The Los Angeles Raiders were the ones. Who scored the first touchdown. ____________________
The Los Angeles Raiders were the ones who scored the first touchdown.
__________________________________________________________________________________
3. The Raiders leading 14–7 at halftime. __________________________________________________
The Raiders were leading 14–7 at halftime.
__________________________________________________________________________________
4. We always have a good time on Super Bowl Sunday. Watching the Super Bowl on television. ____
We always have a good time on Super Bowl Sunday watching the Super Bowl on television.
__________________________________________________________________________________
The game is played on the third Sunday in January.
5. The game played on the third Sunday in January. ________________________________________
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 13
23
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
13.10
Run-on Sentences
Key Information
Avoid run-on sentences in your writing. A
run-on sentence is two or more complete
sentences written as though they were one
sentence.
2. Another kind of run-on sentence is formed
when there is no punctuation between the two
main clauses.
She left to go to Mia’s house they are working on a project together. (run-on)
She left to go to Mia’s house. They are
working on a project together. (sentences)
The following are the three basic kinds of runon sentences:
1. A comma splice occurs when two main
clauses are separated by a comma rather than
by a semicolon or a period.
The power went out, we could not find
a working flashlight. (run-on)
The power went out. We could not find
a working flashlight. (sentences)
3. Still another kind of run-on sentence is formed
when there is no comma before a coordinating
conjunction that joins two main clauses.
Jake went to the drugstore and Mara went
to the hardware store. (run-on)
Jake went to the drugstore, and Mara went
to the hardware store. (sentence)
■ A. Identifying Run-on Sentences
Identify whether each of the following sentences is a run-on or a complete sentence. Use the
numbers in the box above to explain why each run-on is not a complete sentence.
1. Counterfeiting is now aided more by technology than it was in 1865, today, advancements
run-on; 1
in printing equipment require another step to protect currency. ___________________________
3. Simple counterfeiting is much easier today but the Secret Service remains effective in
run-on; 3
rooting out large-scale, professional counterfeiters. _____________________________________
4. The potential for small numbers of counterfeit bills to be passed in widely dispersed areas
complete sentence
presents a new law-enforcement challenge that needs to be met.___________________________
5. Technology has aided the criminal, it has also created sophisticated instruments that aid
run-on; 1
law enforcement in the battle against counterfeiters. ______________________________________
■ B. Correcting Run-ons
Correct each of the following run-ons on another sheet of paper. (There will be more than one
way to rewrite each run-on.) Possible answers are given.
1. I am really tired, I stayed up to watch the late movie last night. . . . tired. I stayed up. . . .
2. Debbie plays the slide trombone she also plays the trumpet. . . . trombone; she also. . . .
. . . greatly;
3. Word meanings may change greatly, for example, silly once meant “innocent.” for example,. . . .
4. Jack is a troubleshooter, he looks for and fixes broken machine parts. . . . troubleshooter. He
looks for . . .
5. The chambered nautilus has a pearly, many-chambered shell, it is beautiful. . . . shell; it is. . . .
24
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 13
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
2. A new threat is posed to currency the opportunity exists for inexperienced people with
run-on; 2
access to modern equipment to make counterfeits. _____________________________________
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
15.1–3
Verbs: Principal Parts and Tense
Key Information
All verbs have four principal parts—a base form,
a present participle, a simple past form, and a
past participle. All the verb tenses are formed
from these principal parts.
A regular verb forms its past and past participle by adding -ed to the base form. An irregular verb forms its past and past participle in
some other way.
The tenses of a verb are the forms that help to
show time. The six tenses in English are the
present, past, and future and the present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect.
Use the present tense to express a constant,
repeated, or habitual action or condition or a
general truth. Use the past tense to express an
action or condition that was started and completed in the past. Use the future tense to
express an action or condition that will occur in
the future.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
■ A. Using the Principal Parts of Irregular Verbs
Complete the sentences using the principal part of the verb indicated in parentheses. Refer to
the list of irregular verbs on pages 576–577 in your textbook to help you.
began
1. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
his professional basketball career with the
Milwaukee Bucks. (past form of begin)
burst
2. Carl Lewis
onto the world scene in 1988 when he became the “fastest
human” by setting a world record in the 100-meter dash. (past form of burst)
broken
3. That same year, Florence Griffith Joyner had
the women’s track records
for the 100- and the 200-meter dashes. (past participle of break)
shown
4. Audiences have noted that Brazilian tennis star Maria Bueno has always
grace in the midst of even the most intense tennis competition. (past participle of show)
became
5. In 1953 Maureen Connolly
the first woman to win the Grand Slam of
tennis. (past form of become)
been
6. Before 1981 for five consecutive years, Bjorn Borg had
the winner of the
men’s singles tennis title at Wimbledon. (past participle of be)
won
7. The Pittsburgh Steelers have
the Super Bowl many times. (past participle
of win)
bringing
8. Athletes are
exciting entertainment to millions of people through the
medium of television. (present participle of bring)
■ B. Identifying Tenses of Verbs
On the line next to each sentence, write Pres. (present), Past, or Fut. (future) to identify the
tense of the underlined verb.
Past 1. John Ruskin wrote, “Mountains are the beginning and end of all natural scenery.”
_____
Past 2. She sank back in her chair and watched the sun set behind a mountain.
_____
Fut. 3. Richard will drive upstate from New York City to ski in the mountains.
_____
Pres. 4. Every day people abandon the pressures of urban life for a more relaxed life style in
_____
rural mountain areas.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 15
25
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
15.4–5
Verb Tenses and Forms
Key Information
The tenses of a verb are the forms that help to
show time. Use the present perfect tense to
express an action or condition that occurred at
some indefinite time in the past or that began
in the past and continues into the present.
We will have gone by the time he eats.
Each of the six tenses has a progressive form
that expresses continuing action.
They have been traveling. (present perfect
progressive)
They had been traveling. (past perfect
progressive)
They will have been traveling. (future
perfect progressive)
He has traveled in Africa.
He has traveled every year for four years.
Use the past perfect tense to indicate that one
past action or condition began and ended
before another action started.
Radu had eaten before he arrived.
Use the future perfect tense to express one
future action or condition that will begin and
end before another future event starts.
The present and past tenses have additional
forms, called emphatic, that add special force,
or emphasis, to the verb.
He does travel quite a bit.
He did travel quite a bit before he retired.
■ A. Identifying the Perfect Tenses
pres.
perf. 2. We have seen this kind of behavior before today.
_____
past
perf. 3. Before she entered politics, the mayor had worked as a consumer advocate.
_____
past
perf. 4. They had finished their homework before they left for the movies.
_____
fut.
perf. 5. 1 will have lived here for six months by the end of this year.
_____
past
perf. 6. He had been a businessman before he went into teaching.
_____
fut.
perf. 7. By noon she will have been to three job interviews.
_____
past
perf. 8. Even before he received the award, he had thought about his speech.
_____
pres.
perf. 9. I have wanted to go to that museum for a long time.
_____
fut.
perf. 10. By the time I graduate from high school, my sister will have graduated from college.
_____
■ B. Using the Progressive and Emphatic Forms
Replace the verb in parentheses with the progressive or the emphatic form of the verb.
did think
1. I _______________
(think, past emphatic) I was right.
do think
2. I still _______________
(think, present emphatic) that I am.
have been thinking (think, present perfect progressive) about this matter for some time.
3. I _______________
26
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 15
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
In the space provided before each sentence, identify the tense of the underlined verb by writing
present perfect, past perfect, or future perfect.
pres.
perf. 1. The famous director has promoted his new film for three months.
_____
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
15.6–7
Compatibility of Tenses and Voice of Verbs
Key Information
Do not shift or change tenses when two or
more events occur at the same time.
Sarah drove onto the street and
turned left.
Shift tenses only to show that one event precedes or follows another.
An action verb is in the active voice when the
subject performs the action.
The dog chased the cow.
An action verb is in the passive voice when its
action is performed on the subject.
The cow was chased by the dog.
After she had left, Sarah arrived.
■ A. Making Tenses Compatible
Underline the two verbs that appear in each sentence. Then on a separate sheet of paper, rewrite
the second verb to make it compatible with the first verb. If the verbs are already compatible,
write Correct.
1. When Herbert Hoover took office in 1929, the Roaring Twenties were coming to a close. Correct
2. Real estate booms, wild spending, and stock market speculation had punctuated the
decade, and America’s future looks bright. looked
3. Yet, on October 29 of that year, the economy started to unravel, and the United States subsequently had experienced the worst business collapse in its history. experienced
4. After the stock market crashed, the American economy had begun to fall apart at an
uncontrollable speed. began
5. Many people lost all their money, and banks have failed. failed
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. Factories and stores were closing, and businesses will have been mired in bankruptcies. were being mined
7. County and state governments were unable to collect enough taxes to cover expenses, and
foreign trade had nearly halted in the worldwide depression. halted
8. Today, as we look back at the severity of that depression, we will be surprised to learn of
Hoover’s reassurances of a quick recovery and of a speedy return to prosperity. are
9. More than two years into the depression, after conditions had grown steadily worse, the
Hoover administration finally began to implement steps to rescue the paralyzed economy. Correct
10. These steps were too little and too late, and the nation had voted overwhelmingly for
Franklin Roosevelt to lead it to recovery. voted
■ B. Changing the Voice of Verbs
On a separate sheet of paper, rewrite each of the following sentences to change the active voice
to the passive voice or the passive voice to the active voice.
1. Roosevelt advocated a New Deal for “the forgotten man.”
A New Deal for “the forgotten man” was advocated by Roosevelt.
2. Many bills initiated by Roosevelt were passed by Congress.
Congress passed many bills initiated by Roosevelt.
3. Taxation policies were changed by the government to fall the hardest on the wealthy.
The government changed taxation policies to fall the hardest on the wealthy.
4. Several congressional acts improved the working conditions and wages of the average
worker. The working conditions and wages of the average worker were improved by several congressional acts.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 15
27
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
16.2–3
Subject-Verb Agreement I
Key Information
A verb must agree with its subject in person and
number.
Only the simple subject (not a predicate nominative) affects the number of the linking verb.
Inverted sentences are sentences in which the
subject follows the verb. In such sentences,
locate the simple subject, and make sure that
the verb agrees with the subject.
The spectators’ cheers were the only distraction. (The subject is cheers; distraction is
a predicate nominative.)
Above the magazines is the dictionary.
There are good mysteries on television.
Do the boys like games?
■ A. Identifying Subject-Verb Agreement
Underline the verb form that agrees with the simple subject.
1. Many American artists (is/are) an important part of modern art.
2. High among nineteenth-century American painters (ranks/rank) Mary Cassatt.
3. There (is/are) many women among Cassatt’s subjects.
4. Among Winslow Homer’s paintings (is/are) scenes of nineteenth-century outdoor life.
5. His sea paintings (is/are) a testament to his skill with color and space.
6. Homer (was/were) a lithographer and a freelance illustrator before the Civil War.
7. There (is/are) few American painters more popular than Andrew Wyeth.
8. In Wyeth’s work (is/are) wonderful country scenes.
10. (Do/Does) the influence of these artists remain strong in art today?
■ B. Using Correct Verb Forms
Use present-tense verbs to complete each of the following sentences. Write the correct form of
the verb in parentheses.
are
1. Small New England towns _________________
(be) a favorite subject of the artist
Edward Hopper.
is
2. A popular theme ______________
(be) scenes of New York City.
seem
3. Hopper’s paintings often ________________
(seem) an invitation into stark interiors or
harsh, city night scenes.
show
4. Do Hopper’s paintings also _______________
(show) the remote landscape of
New England?
lies
5. Throughout the works of Hopper _______________
(lie) a pervasive feeling
of loneliness.
28
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 16
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
9. Other Andrew Wyeth works (is/are) meticulously detailed portraits.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
16.4–6
Subject-Verb Agreement II
Key Information
A collective noun is singular when it refers to a
group and plural when it refers to the members
of the group individually.
A title is always singular.
In compound subjects joined by or or nor, the
verb agrees with the nearer subject.
The team practices every day.
The team practice with one another.
Similarly, when a noun of amount refers to one
unit, it is singular. When it refers to a number of
individual units, it is plural.
Either the taxis or the bus runs at night.
Neither the bus nor the taxis run at night.
Intervening expressions do not create a compound subject.
Fifty dollars is the prize.
Fifty dollars are hidden around the room.
The girl, as well as her mother, sings.
■ A. Identifying Subject-Verb Agreement
Underline the correct form of the verb in parentheses.
1. The Abstract Expressionist group of painters (offers/offer) a very different kind of art.
2. Not all people (appreciates/appreciate) this art form.
3. Each artist (paints/paint) abstract colors and forms, not realistic scenes.
4. Today, one million dollars (is/are) the price for some of their paintings.
5. Pollock’s Moon Vibrations, as well as other works by Pollock, (serves/serve) as an example
of Abstract Expressionism.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
6. Another school of artists (is/are) the Pop Artists.
7. Both Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol (is/are) famous Pop Artists.
8. Rauschenberg’s Jammers (shows/show) a beautiful work of silk, twine, and cane.
9. In Pop Art, every road sign (becomes/become) a potential subject.
10. Soup cans, as well as other refuse, (is/are) actually incorporated into the work.
■ B. Understanding Subject-Verb Agreement
On a separate sheet of paper, complete each sentence. Use present-tense verbs. Answers will vary.
Possible verbs are given.
1. Either Florence or Venice . . . is
2. “Hugs and Kisses” . . . is
3. Both the White House and the Pentagon . . . are
4. Teri’s new eyeglasses . . . seem
5. The mother, accompanied by her children, . . . stands
6. Either her aunts or her uncle . . . stays
7. Roots . . . is
8. A delicacy such as quail eggs . . . tastes
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 16
29
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
17.1
Case of Personal Pronouns
Key Information
Pronouns that are used to refer to persons or
things are called personal pronouns. The case
of a personal pronoun depends on the pronoun’s function in a sentence.
Use the nominative case if the pronoun is the
subject of a sentence or follows a form of be.
The nominative pronouns are I, you, she, he, it,
we, and they.
It was they who arrived late.
The first people here were she, you, and I.
Use the objective case if the pronoun is the
object of a verb or the object of a preposition.
The objective pronouns are me, you, her, him, it,
us, and them.
She told them and us to take a seat.
We thanked her and sat down.
He and I are good friends.
It is time for you and me to leave.
We do many things together.
■ A. Identifying Case of Personal Pronouns
Underline the personal pronouns in the sentences below. Above each pronoun write Nom. for
nominative or Obj. for objective.
Nom.
Obj.
1. Janine and I are planning to go to the movie with Lauren and them.
Obj.
2. Alan has planned a surprise anniversary party for them.
Nom.
3. It was I at the awards assembly last night.
Obj. Nom.
Nom.
4. Unless we hear otherwise from them, I will be visiting the O’Connors next weekend.
Nom.
Obj.
5. We bought Keisha and her the tapes for Christmas.
Obj. Nom.
6. According to her, they have finally finished the project.
Nom.
Obj.
Obj.
Obj.
8. The company will hire him and us on a temporary basis.
■ B. Using Personal Pronouns
Underline the personal pronoun in parentheses that correctly completes each sentence.
1. Some important critics of the arts are Stanley Kauffmann, Arlene Croce, and (she/her).
2. The play was surprisingly well received by John Simon and (he/him).
3. The performers, especially Jim Dale, were much admired by (they/them).
4. My friends and (I/me) are avid moviegoers.
5. Critics and (we/us) viewers often have different opinions.
6. Critics often disagree with (we/us) viewers.
7. Sometimes critics condemn producers and (we/us) for our taste.
8. The variety of films astonishes critics and (we/us) in the audience.
9. Do you think that critics and (we/us) influence filmmakers?
10. Successful filmmakers listen to (we/us) viewers.
30
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 17
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Nom.
7. Julio and she have recorded a song they wrote for us.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
17.2–3
Pronouns with Appositives and Than and As
Key Information
Use the nominative case for a pronoun that is in
apposition to a subject or a predicate nominative.
We were the best ones, Jackie and I.
(Ones is a predicate nominative.)
Use the objective case for a pronoun that is in
apposition to a direct object, an indirect object,
or an object of a preposition.
They gave the second-place finishers, Ben
and her, red ribbons. (Finishers is an
indirect object.)
When a pronoun is followed by an appositive,
choose the case of the pronoun that would be
correct if the appositive were omitted.
We young men enjoy basketball. (We
enjoy basketball.)
In elliptical adverb clauses using than and as,
choose the case of the pronoun that you would
use if the missing words were fully expressed.
Jackson goes to the library more often than
I. (The nominative pronoun I is the subject
of the incomplete adverb clause than I do.)
■ A. Using Pronouns with and as Appositives
Underline the personal pronoun in parentheses that correctly completes each sentence.
1. We, Susan and (I/me), organized a pumpkin-carving contest last October.
2. The decision to award two prizes in each category was made by our judges, (she/her) and Carlos.
3. The first award of the night went to the carvers of the ugliest pumpkins, Georgiana and (he/him).
4. The sloppiest carvers, Toni and (she/her), were awarded bibs and rubber gloves.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. For the people who carved the happiest pumpkins, Ivan and (he/him), we had balloons
and candy.
6. We gave the carvers of the most villainous pumpkins, Matthew and (she/her), black capes
to wear.
7. The last contestants, (he/him) and Stuart, were awarded protractors for the most geometrically perfect abstract designs.
8. The people having the most fun were (we/us) other carvers, who just kept laughing.
9. The grand prize went to the carvers of the best all-around pumpkins, Rachel and (he/him).
10. The worst-dressed-pumpkins-of-the-night award was given to (we/us) judges.
■ B. Using Pronouns after Than and As
In each of the sentences below, underline the pronoun in parentheses that correctly completes
the sentence.
1. My friend and I argue about the movie Citizen Kane, which I like more than (he/him).
2. Few people appreciate the wonderful American musical Swing Time as much as (we/us).
3. One of his favorite movies is the Astaire-Rogers film Top Hat, which he likes more than (I/me).
4. My friends and I disagree. I admire Cary Grant as an actor much more than (they/them).
5. We all agree, however, that Alfred Hitchcock is superb; we cannot think of many directors
we like better than (he/him).
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 17
31
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
17.4
Reflexive and Intensive Pronouns
Key Information
Intensive pronouns add emphasis to another
noun or pronoun.
Reflexive pronouns refer back to a noun or a
pronoun and name the same person or thing.
The arm itself was broken.
They gave themselves credit.
Use himself and themselves instead of the incorrect forms hisself and theirselves.
Always use a reflexive pronoun when a pronoun
refers to the person who is the subject of the
sentence.
Howie completed the job himself.
INCORRECT: I had to make me pay attention
to the lecture.
CORRECT: I had to make myself pay attention to the lecture.
The guests helped themselves to seconds
of the delicious meal.
■ A. Identifying Reflexive and Intensive Pronouns
Underline the reflexive and intensive pronouns in the sentences below. Above each underlined
pronoun write Ref. if it is reflexive and Inten. if it is intensive.
Ref.
1. New York’s Museum of Modern Art outdid itself in the impressive Picasso exhibit.
Inten.
2. Picasso himself would have been pleased at the result.
Ref.
3. Thousands of people could see for themselves the full range of his genius.
Inten.
4. In Picasso’s Mandolin and Guitar the guitar itself is not apparent.
Inten.
5. Françoise Gilot, Picasso’s model, is herself an artist.
Rewrite each of the following sentences, correcting any error in the use of the pronouns. Write
Correct if the sentence needs no correction.
1. Jason was not certain that he had made the best decision for hisself.
himself
______________________________________________________________________________
2. I lost me a certain “B” when I failed to turn in that report on Taiwan.
myself
______________________________________________________________________________
3. Himself and Emilia went to the crafts show just last weekend.
He
______________________________________________________________________________
4. I could not believe what Marla bought for herself at the sporting goods store.
correct
______________________________________________________________________________
5. Doug brought three muffins to lunch the other day, one for hisself, one for myself, and one
for Liz.
himself; me
______________________________________________________________________________
32
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 17
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
■ B. Using Reflexive and Intensive Pronouns
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
17.5
Who and Whom in Questions and Clauses
Key Information
In questions, use who for subjects and whom
for direct and indirect objects and objects of a
preposition.
Who won the race? (Who is the subject.)
Whom are you asking? (Whom is the direct
object.)
Use the nominative pronouns who and whoever
for subjects and predicate nominatives in subordinate clauses.
He asked who the girl in the red jacket
is. (Who is the predicate nominative in
the noun clause who the girl in the red
jacket is.)
Use the objective pronouns whom and
whomever for direct and indirect objects and
objects of a preposition in subordinate clauses.
We want whoever can kick the farthest.
(Whoever is the subject of the noun clause
whoever can kick the farthest)
We do not know to whom the letter was
addressed. (Whom is the object of the
preposition to.)
The chairperson will be whomever the
members elect. (Whomever is the direct
object of the verb elect.)
■ A. Identifying Uses of Who and Whom
In the sentences below, label the use of who or whom as subject (S), predicate nominative
(PN), direct object (DO), indirect object (IO), or object of a preposition (OPrep).
S
1. Who do you think will win the contest?
OPrep
2. We did not know to whom we should address our complaint.
S
3. The judge gave whoever played without sheet music good scores.
S
4. We should praise whoever did not panic.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
S
5. Who are the people that we should invite to the party?
■ B. Using Who and Whom in Questions and Subordinate Clauses
Underline the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence.
1. Do you remember (who/whom) played Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind?
2. Walt Whitman is the American poet (who/whom) I like best.
3. Alicia is the one (who/whom) Mrs. Kris appointed as head of the committee.
4. I never found out (who/whom) sent the flowers.
5. The person (who/whom) Jim admires most is his grandfather.
6. The people (who/whom) you invited should have arrived by now.
7. Everyone (who/whom) is interested in Ping-Pong can join the tournament.
8. Jenny is the kind of person (who/whom) everyone likes.
9. What is the name of the young man (who/whom) we met at Lila’s house?
10. I wonder (who/whom) Laura will ask to the dance.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 17
33
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
17.6–7
Pronoun Agreement and Reference
Key Information
An antecedent is the word or group of words
to which a pronoun refers or that a pronoun
replaces. All pronouns must agree with their
antecedents in number, gender, and person.
Ms. Santini mowed her yard.
The neighbors mowed their yards.
Each of the men cut his hedge.
When the antecedent of a pronoun is a collective noun, the number of the pronoun depends
on whether the collective noun is meant to be
singular or plural.
Make sure that the antecedent of a pronoun is
clearly stated and that a pronoun cannot possibly refer to more than one antecedent.
UNCLEAR: Raoul asked Frank for his keys.
(Whose keys?)
CLEAR: Raoul asked to borrow Frank’s keys.
Never use the pronouns this, that, which, and it
without a clearly stated antecedent.
The team won its final game.
The team took their places on the field.
UNCLEAR: Gold has led to many problems
throughout history, which can make people
greedy. (Which has no clear antecedent.)
CLEAR: Gold, which can make people
greedy, has led to many problems throughout history.
■ A. Identifying and Using Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement
In each of the sentences below underline the antecedent; then write the missing
personal pronoun.
it
1. A dolphin always looks as if __________________
is smiling
4. In marine biology, debate continues about whether dolphins have an actual language or
they
whether _______________
do not have one.
its
5. The novel Day of the Dolphin took _______________
story from dolphin research.
their
6. In the novel, both of the dolphins spoke to and often played with _______________
trainers.
my
7. After I read the book, _______________
attitude toward dolphins changed.
my
8. I found that _______________
reaction to the book was not what I expected.
■ B. Using Clear Pronoun Reference
Each of the sentences below contains a pronoun without a clear antecedent. On another
sheet of paper, rewrite each sentence correctly. (There will be more than one way to correct
each sentence.) Possible answers are given.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
their
2. At Flipper’s Sea School in Florida, scientists are continuing __________________
research on dolphin intelligence.
they
3. Dolphins have unusually large brains; ________________
are about the same size as
human brains.
1. An ordinary house spider is fascinating, which is the truth. It is true that an ordinary house spider is fascinating.
2. The house spider weaves majestically, which many people try to imitate. Many people . . . majestic weaving.
3. In a classical myth they tell where spiders came from. A classical myth tells where spiders came from.
4. The Roman goddess Minerva and the mortal Arachne competed at weaving,
which drew crowds. The Roman goddess Minerva . . . weaving, a competition which drew crowds.
34
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 17
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
18.1–2
Making Comparisons
Key Information
Most adjectives and adverbs have three degrees
of comparison: the positive, or base, form; the
comparative form; and the superlative form.
The positive form of a modifier cannot be
used to make a comparison.
Robert was loud.
He shouted loudly.
The comparative form of a modifier shows
two things being compared.
Robert was louder than Tyrone.
He yelled more loudly than Tyrone.
Robert was the loudest person in the class.
Of all the people in the class, he shouted
the most loudly.
A few commonly used modifiers have irregular
forms for the comparative and the superlative.
good
well
bad
badly
far (distance)
far (degree)
many
better
better
worse
worse
farther
further
more
(the)
(the)
(the)
(the)
(the)
(the)
(the)
best
best
worst
worst
farthest
furthest
most
The superlative form of a modifier shows
three or more things being compared.
■ A. Identifying Degrees of Comparison
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
In each of the sentences below, underline the adjective or adverb modifier. Then, in the space
provided, identify’ the form of the modifier by writing Pos. (positive), Comp. (comparative), or
Super. (superlative).
Pos. 1. Today is a lovely day to go sailing.
_____
Super. 2. The best part about dessert is eating it.
_____
Pos. 3. He smiled warmly and thanked his parents for their support.
_____
Comp. 4. When he restated his opinion, he voiced it more strongly.
_____
Comp. 5. The beginning of the movie was more exciting than the ending.
_____
Pos. 6. The wind blew fiercely from the north.
_____
Super. 7. In winter the winds blow hardest from the northeast.
_____
Pos. 8. Many landmarks dot the road to Provincetown.
_____
■ B. Using Degrees of Comparison
Complete each of the following sentences with the correct degree of comparison of the modifier in parentheses.
best
1. Fishing is the _________________
(good) activity for relaxing.
More
2. _______________
(many) people like to fish than to sail.
prettiest
3. Boats made of wood are the__________________________________________________
(pretty) of all.
sturdier
4. Workboats are usually_______________________________________
(sturdy) than
pleasure boats.
farther
5. They often have to venture _________________
(far) out into the ocean than pleasure craft.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 18
35
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
18.3–4
Double and Incomplete Comparisons
Key Information
Do not make a double comparison by using
both -er or -est and more or most in the same
sentence.
That is the most longest bridge I have ever
seen.
CORRECT: That bridge is longer than any
other bridge in the world.
Be sure your comparisons are between like
things.
Do not make an incomplete or unclear comparison by omitting other or else when you compare one member of a group with another.
INCORRECT: The length of the bridge is
greater than a football field.
CORRECT: The length of the bridge is greater
than the length of a football field.
INCORRECT: That bridge is longer than any
bridge in the world.
■ A. Identifying Double Comparisons
In each of the following sentences, cross out the unnecessary word or words.
1. The White Mountains are the more farther north than the Blue Ridge Mountains.
2. Camping is more better in the White Mountains than anywhere else.
3. Mount Washington is the most tallest mountain in New Hampshire.
4. Temperatures on top of the mountain are most coldest in January.
5. Driving is a more faster way to get to the top than walking.
■ B. Making Complete Comparisons
1. Camping in the White Mountains is better than the Smokies.
Camping
in the White Mountains is better than camping in the Smokies.
______________________________________________________________________________
2. There are more campsites and shelters there than in any park.
There
are more campsites and shelters there than in any other park.
______________________________________________________________________________
3. The members of the Appalachian Mountain Club are more active than other hiking clubs.
The
members of the Appalachian Mountain Club are more active than the members of other hiking clubs.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
4. The volunteers who pack supplies up to the shelters carry more than any hikers.
The
volunteers who pack supplies up to the shelters carry more than any other hikers.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
5. The conditions in the shelters make campers more comfortable than tents.
The
conditions in the shelters make campers more comfortable than they would be in tents.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
36
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 18
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Rewrite each of the following sentences to correct the unclear or incomplete comparison.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
18.7
Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers
Key Information
Misplaced modifiers modify the wrong word
or seem to modify more than one word in a
sentence. You can correct a sentence with a
misplaced modifier by moving the modifier as
close as possible to the word it modifies.
MISPLACED: She could not go to the party,
recovering from the flu. (Was the party
recovering from the flu?)
CLEAR: Recovering from the flu, she could
not go to the party.
MISPLACED: He saw a spider spinning a web
reading a book. (Was the web reading a
book?)
CLEAR: Reading a book, he saw a spider
spinning a web.
Taken logically, a dangling modifier seems to
modify no word in the sentence in which it
appears. You can correct a sentence with a dangling modifier by supplying a word or a phrase
the dangling phrase can sensibly modify.
DANGLING: Writing all afternoon, the
report was finished. (Who was writing?)
CLEAR: Writing all afternoon, he finished
the report.
CLEAR: By writing all afternoon he finished the report.
■ A. Identifying Misplaced Modifiers
In each of the following sentences, cross out the misplaced modifier. In the first blank, write
the word that the modifier seems to modify. In the second blank, write the word that it
should modify.
1. I read an article about the president taking a trip in the newspaper.
trip
_________________
article
_________________
2. He visited a neutral country attending a peace conference.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
country
_________________
He
_________________
3. Peace was the goal of the delegates between their nations.
delegates
_________________
Peace
_________________
4. Demonstrating in the square, television cameras filmed protesting students.
cameras
_________________
students
_________________
5. Democracy is the dream of many people with freedom and liberty for all.
people
_________________
Democracy
_________________
■ B. Correcting Modifiers
On another sheet of paper, rewrite each of the following sentences to correct the misplaced or
dangling modifier. You may need to make other changes to the sentences. Possible answers are given.
1. Scientists still study the instincts of pigeons baffled for years.
Baffled for years, scientists still study the instincts of pigeons.
2. Studying birds, pigeons have keener senses than humans scientists have discovered.
Scientists studying birds have discovered that pigeons have keener senses than humans.
3. Pigeons seem to find their way, detecting changes in the earth’s magnetic field.
Pigeons, detecting changes in the Earth’s magnetic field, seem to find their way.
4. Speculating about these birds, pigeons detect “invisible” light waves and soundless noises.
Scientists speculate that pigeons detect “invisible” light waves and soundless noises.
5. Changing course with different phases of the moon, scientists have a theory about pigeons.
Scientists have a theory about pigeons changing course with different phases of the moon.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 18
37
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
20.1
Capitalization: Sentences and I
Key Information
Capitalize the first word of every sentence,
including the first word of a direct quotation
that is a complete sentence.
A proverb states, “A fool and his money are
soon parted.”
Do not capitalize the first word of a quotation
that is not a complete sentence. Do not capitalize the first word of an indirect quotation. An
indirect quotation, often introduced by the
word that, does not repeat a person’s exact
words.
Capitalize the first word of a sentence enclosed
by parentheses provided the sentence stands by
itself. Do not capitalize the first word of a sentence enclosed by parentheses and contained
within another sentence.
Pablo Picasso was a cubist painter. (Cubism
stresses abstract forms.) Cubism shows several aspects of an object (an object is
viewed in the round) at the same time.
Always capitalize the pronoun I no matter
where it appears in the sentence.
Goethe said that architecture is “frozen
music.”
■ A. Identifying Errors in Capitalization
In the sentences below, underline all the words that contain an error in capitalization.
1. Thomas Jefferson’s epitaph says, “here was buried Thomas Jefferson, author of the
Declaration of Independence.”
2. Jefferson believed that His authorship of this document was more memorable than his
service as the third president of the United States.
4. Although he claimed to have mixed feelings about politics, Jefferson once said that he was
“Much an enemy to monarchy.”
5. Jefferson publicly supported the French Revolution (A republican uprising against the
Bourbon monarchy), though most of his friends did not.
6. Although Jefferson claimed to have mixed feelings about politics, Alexander Hamilton (No
admirer of Jefferson), once said of Jefferson that His politics were tinctured with fanaticism.
7. Jefferson said, “i was bold in the pursuit of knowledge.”
8. John Quincy Adams said that Jefferson told “Large stories.”
■ B. Correcting Errors in Capitalization
On a separate sheet of paper, rewrite each of the following sentences to correct all errors in
capitalization.
1. Thomas Jefferson said that “Politeness is artificial humor.”
2. Jefferson described the College of William and Mary (Which he attended) as “The finest
school of manners and morals that ever existed in America.”
3. Supporting the Revolutionary War, Jefferson said, “I think i speak the sentiments of America.”
4. Jefferson was such a poor public speaker (He mumbled through his speeches) that few
people could understand him.
38
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 20
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. in truth, science was Jefferson’s greatest passion. (he regarded politics as his duty.)
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
20.2–3
Capitalization: Proper Nouns and Adjectives
Key Information
Capitalize a proper noun.
Capitalize a common noun only when it is the
first word of a sentence.
Capitalize only the important words in proper
nouns composed of several words.
William the Conqueror
Capitalize articles (a, an, the) at the beginning
of a title only when they are part of the title
itself.
The Great Gatsby
the Washington Post
Capitalize titles used before a proper name and
titles used in direct address.
Governor Rafael Hernández
Rafael Hernández, the governor
Yes, Governor (direct address)
Yes, Sir (direct address)
Capitalize proper adjectives (adjectives formed
from proper nouns).
Victorian manners
Jewish tradition
American heritage
Puerto Rican countryside
■ Correcting Errors in Capitalization
Correct the following sentences by underlining each letter that should be capitalized.
1. Florence sabin was born on november 9, 1871, in a small mining town near the rocky
mountains in colorado.
2. After her mother died (when florence was seven years old), mr. Sabin sent his daughter to
lake forest, Illinois, to live with the family of her uncle, Albert Sabin.
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Years later, florence traveled east across the great plains to attend vermont academy, where
she decided to pursue a career in science.
4. With the support of uncle Albert, Sabin continued her studies at smith college in massachusetts and then at johns hopkins school of medicine in baltimore, maryland.
5. For nearly twenty-three years, dr. sabin worked at johns hopkins as both a teacher and a
researcher.
6. The famous doctor made important discoveries about the lymphatic system, and dr. Sabin
made news as the first woman elected to the national academy of sciences.
7. As her reputation grew, Sabin published several of her papers in the american journal
of anatomy.
8. The baltimore sun carried a story about the doctor when she was offered a position at the
rockefeller institute for medical research in new york city.
9. During world war II, dr. sabin served on the board of an institution that was trying to
relocate european scholars who were fleeing from the nazis in germany.
10. When the war ended, the governor of the state of colorado appointed dr. sabin to a state
commission, and the celebrated doctor became a crusader for public health.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 20
39
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.1–3
Period, Exclamation Point, Question Mark
Key Information
Use a period at the end of a declarative sentence and at the end of a polite command.
Declarative Sentence: Shakespeare wrote
A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
Polite Command: Prepare to discuss Act I
of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
Use a question mark to indicate a direct
question.
Was Shakespeare a good writer?
A question mark should not follow a declarative
sentence that contains an indirect question.
Use an exclamation mark to show strong feeling
or to indicate a forceful command.
He asked when Shakespeare wrote
A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
That was an exciting play!
Read that exciting play!
■ A. Inserting Correct End Punctuation
Provide the appropriate end punctuation for the sentences below.
1. The professor asked questions about the American Revolution.
2. Did the Boston Tea Party influence the colonists in other colonies?
3. He asked if the issue of taxes was related to the Tea Party.
4. What unfair treatment the colonists received!
5. I wonder how they felt about taxation without representation.
6. Paul Revere is today considered one of America’s finest silversmiths.
8. I was asked whether I agreed with the actions the colonists took.
9. Tell me what you think.
10. Were the colonists successful in their revolution?
■ B. Using Correct End Punctuation
Respond as directed to each item below. Include the correct end punctuation. Possible answers are given.
1. Politely ask a librarian for assistance.
Where can I find the computerized catalog?
______________________________________________________________________________
2. In a sentence name the last book you read.
I have just finished reading Jane Eyre.
______________________________________________________________________________
3. Express your pleasure at winning a game.
Fantastic! We won!
______________________________________________________________________________
4. Complete this sentence: Robert asked me what
Robert asked me what I needed for the trip.
______________________________________________________________________________
40
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
7. We must be free from England!
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.4
The Colon
Key Information
Use a colon to introduce a list, especially after
a statement that uses such words as these, the
following, or as follows. A colon is not used to
introduce a list that immediately follows a verb
or preposition.
The works of Shakespeare are legendary:
they create a culture of their own.
Use a colon to introduce a long or formal
quotation.
Thus Hamlet ponders: “To be or not to be:
That is the question.”
Among the plays that Shakespeare wrote
are the following: Hamlet, A Midsummer
Night’s Dream, King Lear, and The Tempest
BUT: Shakespeare wrote Hamlet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, King Lear and
The Tempest
Use a colon between the hour and the minute
of the precise time, between the chapter and
verse in biblical references, and after the salutation of a business letter.
Use a colon to introduce material that illustrates,
explains, or restates the preceding material.
■ A. Inserting Colons
Supply colons where necessary in the sentences below. (Some sentences may not need a colon.)
1. It is advisable to make long-distance calls after 11:00 P.M. or before 8: 00 A.M.
2. In English class I learned the difference between the following: polyglot and linguist.
3. The official languages of the United Nations are as follows:English, Spanish, French,
Chinese, Arabic, and Russian.
4. Williamsburg is a living museum: the city is a slice of colonial life.
■ B. Using Colons in Writing
Rewrite the following passage correctly, adding colons where they are needed. Write Correct
if a sentence needs no colons. Use a separate sheet of paper. Carets indicate position of colons.
<
(1) The Trinity Alps wilderness is an experience walking through the forest is a revelation. :
(2) The forest contains these trees ponderosa pines, incense cedars, and white firs. (3) The old- :
growth forest is home to woodpeckers, spotted owls, martens, and bears. (4) The diversity of
plant life includes the following wildflowers, shrubs, and grasses. :
<
<
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. Birds of the Chesapeake Bay include the osprey, cormorant, and great blue heron. no colon
(5) Spotted owls depend on large areas of old growth for survival. (6) They feed mainly on
such rodents as flying squirrels, red-backed voles, and others that inhabit these ancient forests.
(7) Many other animals also depend on the forest for survival. (8) Two of these are marbled
murrelets and giant salamanders.
<
(9) Neither the animals nor the plants can break down the cellulose and lignin of dead plant
matter directly both animals and plants depend on a variety of microorganisms to provide this :
service. The forest, then, is an interdependent community. (10) As T. S. Eliot once said, perhaps in reference to an old-growth forest like that of the Trinity Alps, “What are the roots that
clutch, what branches grow out of this stony rubbish?”
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
41
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.5
The Semicolon
Key Information
Use a semicolon to separate main clauses that
are not joined by a coordinating conjunction
(and, but, or, nor, yet, and for).
Use a semicolon to separate the items in a series
when these items contain commas.
The Itos visited Washington, D.C.; Chicago,
Illinois; and Decorah, Iowa.
The World Trade Center towers over the
city; the view from the top is staggering.
Use a semicolon to separate two main clauses
joined by a coordinating conjunction when such
clauses already contain several commas.
Use a semicolon to separate main clauses joined
by a conjunctive adverb such as however, therefore, nevertheless, moreover, and consequently
or by an expression such as for example or
that is.
The vacation trip, which included stops in
New York City, Boston, and Philadelphia,
was exciting and enjoyable; but it was also
educational.
The World Trade Center is very tall; however, the Sears Tower is even taller.
■ A. Identifying Semicolon Uses
Insert semicolons in the sentences as needed. Carets indicate position of semicolons.
<
1. Three Scots founded the Encyclopaedia Britannica: Colin Macfarquhar, a printer William
Smellie, a scholar and Andrew Bell, an engraver of dog collars.
<
<
2. Booker T. Washington wrote Up from Slavery in 1901 however, he is better known for
starting the Tuskegee Institute.
<
3. Barbra Streisand is one of the most popular singers in the world today her voice reaches
out to all people.
<
5. Major volcanoes of the world include Asama, located in Japan Mount Tarawera, located in
New Zealand and Mount Wrangell, located in Alaska.
<
■ B. Using Semicolons
On a separate sheet of paper, rewrite the following sentences correctly, adding semicolons
where they are needed. Carets indicate position of semicolons.
<
1. Cubism is considered to be a revolutionary art movement that is, it is a movement that
departed from representational art.
<
<
2. Some famous painters are Claude Monet, an impressionist Georges Seurat, a pointillist
Salvador Dalí, a surrealist and Pablo Picasso, a cubist.
<
<
3. Vincent van Gogh is remembered for the frenzied activity characteristic of his troubled
life moreover, his works exhibit a similar intensity and energy.
<
4. Michelangelo was a great painter moreover, he was also an architect and a sculptor.
<
5. Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance man, was a great artist furthermore, he was also a
scientist, inventor, and engineer.
42
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
<
4. Jazz is a highly improvisational musical form that is, much of the music is made up as it is
being performed.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.6
Commas and Compound Sentences
Key Information
Use a comma between the main clauses in a
compound sentence.
The comma may be omitted when two very
short main clauses are connected by a coordinating conjunction, unless the comma is needed
to avoid confusion.
You should use a comma before a coordinating
conjunction (and, but, or, nor, yet, or for) that
joins two main clauses.
Lao mowed the grass and Emma trimmed
the hedges. (clear)
Lao mowed the grass and the hedges
needed trimming. (unclear) Lao mowed the
grass, and the hedges needed trimming.
(clear)
Our team played well, but they did not win.
The team needs to win next week, or our
rivals will be in first place.
■ A. Inserting Commas Correctly
Insert commas where necessary in the sentences below. If no commas are needed, write
Correct after the sentence. Carets indicate position of commas.
<
1. Einstein was born in Germany and he was a physicist.
<
2. I know Einstein worried about Nazism for he left Germany when Hitler came to power.
<
3. Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1921 and he became a U.S. citizen in 1940.
<
4. Albert Einstein dabbled in theoretical physics and then he went on to publish the theory
of relativity.
■ B. Writing with Commas
Carets indicate position of commas.
On another sheet of paper, rewrite the sentences below inserting commas where necessary.
<
1. New York has impressive skyscrapers and renowned museums but my town has the best
sledding hill in the world.
<
2. Be sure to visit the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston for you will be dazzled by the
Impressionist paintings that hang there.
3. The Gobi Desert is cold and flat but people still travel there to explore its beauty.
<
4. Should we go to the seven o’clock movie or is there something else that you would rather do?
<
5. The roads around Los Angeles stretch for miles but they still are inadequate for all the
traffic they must carry.
<
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
<
5. His special theory of relativity led to the development of the atom bomb yet Einstein
worked devotedly for peace throughout his life.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
43
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.6
Commas and Coordinate Adjectives
Key Information
Place a comma between coordinate adjectives
that precede a noun.
Coordinate adjectives modify the same noun to
an equal degree. One way to tell whether adjectives in a sentence are coordinate is to reverse
their order or put the word and between them.
The adjectives are coordinate if the sentence still
sounds natural.
A comma should not be used between adjectives preceding a noun if they sound unnatural
with their order reversed or with and between
them. Adjectives that describe size, age, shape,
and material usually do not need a comma
between them.
Rover is an energetic, friendly, adorable
St. Bernard.
COORDINATE: The books were stored in a
solid, valuable box.
NONCOORDINATE: The books were stored in an
old wooden box.
■ A. Identifying Correct Use of Commas
Write Correct after the sentence if the commas are used correctly. Write Incorrect if they are not.
1. Mohandas Gandhi was a tolerant, peaceful, educated human being. Correct
2. Abraham Lincoln was noted for his intelligent, timely, acerbic language. Correct
3. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was a gifted, Austrian performer and composer. Incorrect
4. Washington Irving was the first internationally famous American author. Correct
5. Roald Amundsen was an adventurous Norwegian explorer and discoverer of the South Pole. Correct
■ B. Using Commas Correctly
<
1. Every year I eagerly await the warm damp spring that brings plants sprouting from the
muddy earth.
<
2. Cheryl dusted off her old leather glove and headed out to the neglected overgrown
ballfield.
<
3. After he had worn it for years, Bo finally had to throw out the faded tattered shirt that
he wore to play baseball and football.
<
<
4. The dilapidated graying building gave way to a shiny startlingly stark skyscraper.
<
5. Taking the rutted potholed road was the only way to reach their friend’s wonderfully
peaceful farm.
44
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Carets indicate position of commas.
On another sheet of paper, rewrite the sentences below, inserting commas where necessary.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.6
Commas and Nonessential Elements
Key Information
Use commas to set off nonessential elements—
participles, infinitives, and their phrases, adjective clauses, and appositives. A nonessential
element is not essential to the meaning of the
sentence.
adjective clauses, and appositives.
The man who directed Notorious was the
talented Alfred Hitchcock.
The director of the suspense film Notorious
was Alfred Hitchcock.
One of the most famous films directed by
Alfred Hitchcock was Notorious.
Alfred Hitchcock, who was a master of
suspense, directed Notorious.
Alfred Hitchcock, a master of suspense,
directed Notorious.
Alfred Hitchcock, known as a master of
suspense, directed Notorious.
Use commas to set off interjections (such as oh
and well), parenthetical expressions (such as
on the contrary and in fact), and adverbs and
conjunctive adverbs (such as however and
consequently).
Do not use commas to set off essential elements—participles, infinitives, and their phrases,
■ A. Identifying Correct Use of Commas
Insert commas where necessary in the following sentences. If no commas are needed, write
Correct after the sentence. Carets indicate position of commas.
<
<
1. Daily newspapers reaching millions of people print news from all over the world.
<
<
2. In fact most international news comes from wire services which maintain bureaus and
correspondents in key spots around the world.
3. Two press associations that provide most of our news are the Associated Press and Reuters. correct
<
<
5. By the way the term pi has a special meaning in the newspaper business; furthermore this
same meaning applies in other printing industries.
<
6. Pi which in geometry expresses a ratio in printing is an abbreviation for pica.
<
<
7. Used as a noun to refer to the mess that results when printing types are mixed together
indiscriminately pi is also used as a verb meaning “to mix types indiscriminately.”
<
8. Computer typesetters who have essentially replaced the linotypers who used to cast type
by the line compose many newspapers today.
<
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
<
<
<
4. Oh the New York Times a famous newspaper runs its own wire service.
■ B. Using Commas Correctly
On a separate sheet of paper, rewrite the following sentences, inserting commas where necessary. Write Correct if a sentence needs no correction. Carets indicate position of commas.
<
<
1. Johannes Gutenberg the celebrated fifteenth-century German printer would probably be
impressed by modern printing equipment.
<
2. The concept of movable type evolved with Gutenberg who printed some of the earliest books.
<
<
3. Gutenberg’s most famous printing job an edition of the Bible was printed before 1456.
<
4. Naturally the Gutenberg Bibles that still exist today are very valuable.
<
<
5. Incidentally you can see a Gutenberg Bible in Pasadena a city near Los Angeles.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
45
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.6
Commas: Titles, Addresses, Direct Address
Key Information
Use commas to set off titles when they follow
a person’s name.
She was born on June 11, 1982.
Independence Day is celebrated on July 4
every year.
Use commas to set off parts of a reference that
direct the reader to the exact source.
Elizabeth Duran, M.D., was elected president of the association.
Use commas to separate the various parts of
an address, a geographical term, or a date.
A comma is not used when only the month
and the day or year are given.
Read the passage in Grapes of Wrath,
pages 27–31.
Use commas to set off words or names used
in direct address.
He lives at 403 Cove Road, Brook Haven,
New Jersey, each summer.
Joel, did you get the invitation I mailed?
■ A. Writing with Commas
In the space provided, rewrite each item, and supply the necessary commas.
17 Rodeo Drive, Los Angeles, California
1. 17 Rodeo Drive Los Angeles California_______________________________________________
December 7, 1941
2. December 7 1941________________________________________________________________
are you here?
3. Rob are you here? Rob,
_______________________________________________________________
47 Main Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74102
4. 47 Main Street Tulsa Oklahoma 74102 _______________________________________________
See Nausea, page 129.
5. See Nausea page 129. _____________________________________________________________
Richard M. Daley, Mayor
6. Richard M. Daley Mayor __________________________________________________________
Sunday, August 4, 2001
8. Sunday August 4 2001 ____________________________________________________________
Yes, sir, I know.
9. Yes sir I know. __________________________________________________________________
I’m home, Mom.
10. I’m home Mom. ________________________________________________________________
■ B. Using Commas Correctly
Supply commas where necessary in each of the sentences below. Carets indicate commas.
<
<
1. On June 1 1954 Armistice Day was changed to Veterans Day.
<
<
<
2. Isaac Asimov was born in Petrovichi Russia on January 2 1920.
<
<
3. The official residence of the president is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Washington D.C.
<
4. Maggie can you name the five Great Lakes?
46
<
<
5. I need information Mr. Harrison on John Quincy Adams, the famous son of John Adams.
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Virginia Lee, B.A.
7. Virginia Lee B.A. ________________________________________________________________
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.6
Misuse of Commas
Key Information
Do not use a comma before a conjunction that
connects the parts of a compound predicate
when there are only two parts.
We will eat at my favorite restaurant and
then see a movie at the historical society.
Do not use a comma alone to join two main
clauses that are not part of a series. Such a sentence punctuated with a comma alone is called
a run-on sentence (or a comma splice or a
comma fault). To avoid making this error, use a
coordinating conjunction with the comma, or
use a semicolon.
It was eight o’clock when we finished dinner, and the movie was scheduled to start in
fifteen minutes.
Never use a comma between a subject and its
verb or between a verb and its complement.
The movie we were going to see was on
the history of local architecture. The buildings in the movie included the library, the
city hall, and the post office.
■ Correcting Comma Usage
Rewrite each of the sentences below, correcting any comma errors. If a sentence is correct,
write Correct on the line.
1. Franklin is almost always late, but today he was five minutes early.
Correct
______________________________________________________________________________
2. Of all the things to eat, my favorites are, ice cream, pineapples, and popcorn.
no comma
______________________________________________________________________________
no comma
______________________________________________________________________________
4. We wanted to go swimming, but we couldn’t decide where to go.
Correct
______________________________________________________________________________
5. Pam’s best imitations include, those of her mother and the principal.
no comma
______________________________________________________________________________
6. Carlos left for the game late, he was detained by a phone call.
<
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. Whatever made that noise, is not around here anymore.
semicolon
______________________________________________________________________________
7. What I could not believe, was that he had never played before.
no comma
______________________________________________________________________________
8. Last year she won first place in the diving events, but this year she was last.
Correct
______________________________________________________________________________
<
9. Many years have passed, she still looks the same.
semicolon or comma and but
______________________________________________________________________________
10. After the game ended in a tie, we got some pizza, and then went to the dance.
no comma
______________________________________________________________________________
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
47
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.7–8
The Dash and Parentheses
Key Information
In typed material a dash is indicated by two
hyphens (--).
Use a dash to indicate an abrupt break or
change in thought within a sentence.
She lectured me on right and wrong—
I wish I knew what she thought I had done
wrong.
Use a dash to set off and emphasize supplemental information or parenthetical comments.
Use parentheses to set off supplemental
material that is not intended to be part
of the main statement.
Do not capitalize or add end punctuation to a
complete sentence within parentheses if the
parenthetical material is contained within
another sentence. If a sentence in parentheses
stands by itself, use both a capital letter and
end punctuation.
The collected data (see Appendix B) reveal
striking patterns.
The collected data reveal striking patterns.
(A list appears in Appendix B.)
I called Rose—Carol answered—and got the
assignment.
■ A. Using Dashes
<
<
Insert dashes where necessary.
—
—
1. Ebenezer Scrooge probably the most famous miser in literature is the protagonist of
Dickens’s Christmas Carol.
—
—
2. A wahine it’s a Hawaiian word is a female surfer.
—
3. The shrewish wife of Socrates was named Xanthippe what a name!
—
4. “It it wasn’t my fault,” I stammered.
—
—
5. The book I was talking about I remember it now was Ethan Frome.
—
—
6. Dachshunds such affectionate dogs were bred in Germany to hunt badgers.
<
<
<
<
<
Insert parentheses where necessary.
1. William Henry Harrison (1773–1841)was the ninth president of the United States.
2. These exercises pose typical problems.(See chapter 4 for a complete analysis.)
3. UNICEF (the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund)is one of the most
famous of the United Nations agencies.
4. Pikes Peak, in central Colorado, is 14,110 feet (4,301 meters high.)
-).
5. The capital of Ecuador is Quito(ke-´ to
6. Suffragists (from the Latin suffragium, meaning “vote”)advocated votes for women.
7. His suggestion was probably an expensive one.(His suggestions always are.)
8. Several varieties of daisies (especially Chrysanthemum leucanthemum)are common
wildflowers.
9. Thus, the substance remains in suspension. (See Roberts.)
48
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
<
<
<
■ B. Using Parentheses
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.10
Quotation Marks
Key Information
Use quotation marks to enclose a direct quotation. Place quotation marks around the quoted
material only, not around introductory or
explanatory remarks. Such remarks are generally
separated from the actual quotation with a
comma.
“Ripeness is all,” wrote Shakespeare.
Shakespeare said that love never ran
smoothly.
Use single quotation marks around a quotation
within a quotation.
Use quotation marks to enclose titles of short
works, unfamiliar slang and other unusual
expressions, or a definition that is stated directly.
When a quotation is interrupted by explanatory
words such as he said or she wrote, use two
sets of quotation marks.
“The course of true love,” wrote
Shakespeare, “never did run smooth.”
I listened to the song “Tie a Yellow Ribbon”
on the radio.
He said that it was “the cat’s meow.”
The word April comes from aperire, Latin
for “to open.”
Do not use quotation marks in an indirect
quotation.
■ A. Inserting Quotation Marks and Commas
Insert quotation marks and commas where necessary.
1. “If you do not think about the future, you cannot have one,”John Galsworthy once wrote.
2. “We are all in the gutter,”said Oscar Wilde,“but some of us are looking at the stars.”
3. Commodore Josiah Tattnell said,“Blood is thicker than water.”
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
4. “Laugh and the world laughs with you,”said Ella Wheeler Wilcox.“Weep and you weep alone.”
5. Carrie said,“My favorite quotation from Diderot is,‘I can be expected to look for truth but
not to find it.’”
■ B. Using Quotation Marks and Commas
Rewrite the following sentences, inserting quotation marks and commas where necessary. Not
all sentences will need to be changed.
1. The play’s the thing wrote Shakespeare wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king.
“The play’s the thing,” wrote Shakespeare, “wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king.”
__________________________________________________________________________________
2. The ticket agent said that there were no more seats for the show.
correct
__________________________________________________________________________________
3. Native Dancer, a one-act play, was one of the theatrical pieces to be performed.
correct
__________________________________________________________________________________
4. George had said, in describing this story, that it was totally awesome.
correct or “totally awesome.”
__________________________________________________________________________________
5. Roberta said I really enjoyed it when I saw it.
Roberta said, “I really enjoyed it when I saw it.”
__________________________________________________________________________________
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
49
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.10–11
Quotation Marks and Italics (Underlining)
Key Information
Italicize (underline) titles of books, lengthy
poems, plays, films, television series, paintings
and sculptures, long musical compositions, and
court cases. Also italicize the names of newspapers and magazines, ships, trains, airplanes,
and spacecraft.
Macbeth was one of Shakespeare’s most
famous plays.
Italicize (underline) and capitalize articles at the
beginning of a title only when they are part of
the title itself. Do not italicize (underline) the
article preceding the title of a periodical or the
word magazine unless it is part of the title.
the Wall Street Journal
Business Week magazine
Italicize (underline) foreign words and expressions that are not used frequently in English.
He believes in the motto carpe diem, “live
for the day.”
Italicize (underline) words, letters, and numerals
used to represent themselves.
Write T for true and F for false.
■ A. Using Italics
Underline any words in the sentences below that should be italicized.
1. She just began reading Gone with the Wind.
2. She had seen a review in the New York Times.
3. The reviewer considered the ending of the story to be comme ci, comme ça.
4. Gone with the Wind’s plot is both dramatic and romantic.
6. He consistently used the word literally when he really meant figuratively.
7. I think that the Beatles’ Abbey Road album was their finest work.
8. Did you see the latest issue of Sports Illustrated?
9. It had an article on the Stars & Stripes and other racing sailboats.
10. The five sailing safety rules were labeled a through e.
■ B. Using Italics and Quotation Marks
On a separate sheet of paper, rewrite the following sentences correctly, underlining the words
that should be italicized and inserting quotation marks where necessary.
1. I just finished reading Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story“My Kinsman, Major Molineux.”
2. In her bibliography she included an article from English Journal called“Mexican Poetry:
An Introduction to a Culture.”
3. “The Purloined Letter”is included in a volume called The Complete Stories of Edgar Allan Poe.
4. My favorite song in Priscilla Herdman’s album The Water Lily is“Do Not Think That I Do
Not Know.”
5. “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d”is Walt Whitman’s poem commemorating
Abraham Lincoln’s death.
50
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
5. Raoul gave a report to the class about the movie Casablanca.
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.13–14
The Apostrophe
Key Information
Use an apostrophe and -s for the possessive of a
singular indefinite pronoun.
someone’s opinion
Use an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive
of a singular noun, even one that ends in -s.
Russ’s suit
octopus’s garden
students’ books
the oxen’s strength
Use an apostrophe in place of letters omitted in
contractions.
you have = you’ve
cannot = can’t
Use the apostrophe in place of the omitted
numerals of a particular year.
Use an apostrophe alone to form the possessive
of a plural noun that ends in -s. Use an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive of a plural
noun that does not end in -s.
the ‘96 season
winter of ‘76
■ A. Writing Possessives
In the space provided, rewrite each of the expressions below, using the possessive form
of the noun.
Example: the novels of George Sand
George Sand’s novels
John Adams’s reputation
1. the reputation of John Adams ______________________________________________________
the states’ rights
2. rights of the states _______________________________________________________________
the boss’s toughness
3. the toughness of the boss _________________________________________________________
the children’s governess
4. the governess of the children_______________________________________________________
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
the Turners’ house
5. house of the Turners _____________________________________________________________
a chambered nautilus’s shell
6. shell of a chambered nautilus ______________________________________________________
■ B. Using Apostrophes Correctly
Insert apostrophes where necessary in the sentences below.
1. I shouldve known. should’ve
2. Whatll happen when were gone? What’ll, we’re
3. One hours driving should get us there. hour’s
4. The Joneses and Gomezes lawns are the greenest. Joneses’, Gomezes’
5. Dont go near that machine when its running! Don’t, it’s
6. What were you doing during the summer of 95? ’95
7. Ill be ready in ten minutes time. I’ll, minutes’
8. Hes a member of the class of 93. He’s, ’93
9. My aunt and uncles apartment is near ours. uncle’s
10. Five miles of walking brought us to the forests edge. forest’s
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
51
Grammar Practice
Name ...................................................................................... Class .................................................. Date ................................
21.13–14
The Hyphen and Abbreviations
Key Information
Usually hyphens are not used to join a prefix to
a word, but you should use a hyphen after any
prefix joined to a proper noun or a proper
adjective and after the prefixes all-, ex- (meaning “former”), and self- joined to any noun or
adjective.
pre-Cambrian
Hyphenate any spelled-out cardinal or ordinal
compound number up to ninety-nine or ninetyninth.
Hyphenate a fraction used as an adjective (but
not one used as a noun).
one-half price
all-knowing
Use a hyphen in a compound adjective that precedes a noun (but not one that follows).
sweet-tasting liquid but
The liquid was sweet tasting.
Hyphenate two numerals to indicate a span.
one half of the price
Use hyphens to divide words at the end of a
line, usually between syllables or pronounceable
parts.
Use abbreviations, or shortened forms of words,
to save space and time and to avoid wordiness.
Check your dictionary to see how to write a
particular abbreviation.
■ A. Using Hyphens
Rewrite the sentences below, using hyphens where needed. Then show where the underlined
word in the sentence would be divided if it had to be broken at the end of a line.
1. I guess you can say they are a happily married couple. (mar-ried)
2. They get along well three quarters of the time, and they both have an all inclusive interest
in art. all-inclusive (quar-ters)
4. She gave him a post Impressionist painting, and he presented her with a beautifully carved
pre Columbian sculpture. post-Impressionist, pre-Columbian, (paint-ing)
■ B. Using Abbreviations
Rewrite the sentences below, abbreviating the underlined words.
1. He was proud to live in the United States of America.
U.S.A. or USA
______________________________________________________________________________
2. Alfred Edward Housman wrote many wonderful poems.
A.E.
______________________________________________________________________________
3. We should all meet here at 5:30 post meridiem.
P.M.
______________________________________________________________________________
4. Doctor Sue Chin was to deliver a speech at the American Medical Association conference.
Dr., AMA
______________________________________________________________________________
5. The box is 2 meters, or 6.5616 feet, long.
m, ft.
______________________________________________________________________________
52
Writer’s Choice: Grammar Practice Workbook, Grade 11, Unit 21
Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
3. The wife is always warmhearted, although the husband, usually a rather good natured
man, is sometimes too self absorbed to be kindhearted. good-natured, self-absorbed, (some-times)

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