ERIC HAMBER SECONDARY SCHOOL COURSE PLANNING

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ERIC HAMBER
SECONDARY SCHOOL
COURSE PLANNING
BOOKLET
FOR SCHOOL YEAR
SEPTEMBER 2014 - JUNE 2015
Revised January 2014
CONTENTS
GENERAL INFORMATION ......................................................................................................... 1
DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................................ 2
DOGWOOD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................... 3
BUSINESS EDUCATION .............................................................................................................. 6
ENGLISH ....................................................................................................................................... 8
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE .................................................................................... 10
FINE ARTS ................................................................................................................................... 12
HOME ECONOMICS .................................................................................................................. 22
MATHEMATICS .......................................................................................................................... 27
MODERN LANGUAGES ............................................................................................................ 29
PHYSICAL EDUCATION ........................................................................................................... 35
SCIENCE ...................................................................................................................................... 37
SERVICE CLASSES .................................................................................................................... 43
SOCIAL STUDIES ....................................................................................................................... 54
APPLIED SKILLS - TECHNICAL STUDIES ............................................................................ 58
SPECIAL PROGRAMS ............................................................................................................... 50
SKILLS/LEARNING STRATEGIES
WORK EXPERIENCE
VSB CAREER PROGRAMS
GENERAL INFORMATION
The course descriptions on the following pages are intended as a guide to assist students in
selecting courses for their programs. The course descriptions are general and do not outline the
total content of each course.
The requirements for graduation are established by the Ministry of Education. Some courses are
compulsory to meet graduation requirements, while others are chosen to meet individual
interests and goals.
While counsellors will assist students in the selection of their courses, final approval and
responsibility for students' programs rests with parents, and students. It is important to note
that fulfilling basic graduation is not the same as post-secondary admission. Admission
requirements change frequently, therefore, it is advisable to research the specific
requirements of the post-secondary institutes that you may be interested in and discuss
your post-secondary plan with your grade counsellor and the Career Information
Assistant.
Each student will have an individual timetable which must operate within the constraints of
facilities, staffing, graduation requirements and individual choice. Because of these constraints,
students should anticipate some conflicts in course scheduling and keep alternative courses in
mind.
The courses finally offered in the master timetable are determined by the number of students
requesting the courses. Generally, if an insufficient number of students request a certain course,
it will be dropped from the schedule. Consequently, not all of the courses described may be
offered each year. In addition, staffing changes or other circumstances may result in
modification of course offerings and descriptions without prior notice.
DEFINITIONS
The following terms are used to refer to categories of courses. These include Grade 10, 11 and 12 level courses
in the New Graduation Program.
REQUIRED
Courses a student must include in his program.
ELECTIVE
Courses a student may include in his program.
PREREQUISITE
Courses recommended to be completed before admission to a higher level
course.
BOARD AUTHORIZED COURSES
Locally Developed courses that meet a Ministry of Education Standard and approval. There is no limit to the
number of elective credits for BAA courses; they can also count as Grade 12 courses to meet graduation
requirements.
CREDIT
Grades 10, 11 and 12 course values are expressed in credits. In general, 1 credit represents about 30 hours of
course work. A minimum of 80 credits is required for graduation. To graduate, you require at least 48 credits
from Required Courses, 28 credits from Elective Courses, a 4 credit Graduation Transitions course and 5
Graduation Program exams, which include Science 10, Math 10, English 10, Social Studies 11 and English 12.
Courses described in this booklet are all 4 credit courses, unless otherwise stated.
EARN CREDITS TOWARD GRADUATION:
In addition to getting credits by successfully completing a course, you may also be awarded Grade 10, 11 or 12
course credits using the following policies:
Equivalency policy
If you have completed a course outside the BC school system, there may
be an equivalent course in the BC school system for which you can get
credit.
Challenge Policy
If you can show that you have already achieved the outcomes of a course,
you can get credit for that course without having to take it.
External credentials (courses)
You can receive credit towards graduation for some of the extra-curricular
activities or community learning you participate in after school. e.g. Royal
Conservatory of Music, Duke of Edinburgh, Provincial sports team, etc.
Post-secondary courses
Students can earn graduation credits for any course completed at a BC
publicly funded post-secondary institution.
Independent directed study policy If you have a particular interest in a specific subject area, this policy allows
you to chart your own course of learning, under the supervision of a
teacher, and earn up to two credits for completing the learning in each
course.
For more information on these policies, see your counsellor, or check the Ministry’s Handbook of Procedures
2
at: www.bced.gov.bc.ca/exams/handbook
DOGWOOD GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
English 10
English 11 or Communications 11
English 12 or Communications 12
Social Studies 10
Social Studies 11, BC First Nations 12 or Civics 11
Science 10
Science 11 or 12
Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10 or
Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10
Apprenticeship & Workplace Math11 or Pre-Calculus 11
Physical Education 10
Fine Arts or Applied Skills 10, 11, or 12
Planning 10
Graduation Transitions
Elective courses
TOTAL
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
4 credits
28 credits
80 CREDITS
Minimum of 16 credits at the Grade 12 level including Language Arts 12. All ministry authorized and
board/authority-approved courses count.
Eighty credits in Grades 10-12 (equivalent to 20 four-credit courses) are required for graduation. At least 48
credits must be from Required Courses, 28 from Required or Elective Courses, and 4 credits from successful
completion of the Graduation Transitions course. You may use any ministry-authorized or board/authority
approved courses at the 12 level for the other 12 credits. A Fine Arts Elective (4 credits) or an Applied Skills
Elective (4 credits) or a Fine Arts Elective (2 credits) and an Applied Skills Elective (2 credits) must be
completed at the grade 10, 11 or 12 level. You must write a Government Exam in English 10, Math 10, Science
10 and Social Studies 11 (worth 20% of your final mark) and English or Communications 12 (worth 40% of
your final mark).
Except in exceptional cases, students are not permitted to take senior electives (i.e. Grade 11 or 12 level) in their
Grades 9 or 10 years. Priority is given to Grade 11 and 12 students.
Don’t forget that post-secondary institutions often require you to complete specific courses to get into certain
programs. Careful planning in Grades 10, 11 and 12 will ensure you have all the courses and credits you need.
Please note carefully that the graduation requirements are NOT the same as University
entrance requirements.
GRADUATION TRANSITIONS PROGRAM (GT)
Students are responsible for submitting three packages: Personal Health, Career and Life and Community
Connections in Graduation Transitions 12.
It is the responsibility of the student to engage in activities that will satisfy all the intended learning
outcomes of the Graduation Transitions Program and to maintain records and submit evidence for
3
evaluation when requested by school staff. Students must become familiar with the requirements and
responsibilities for completion of this course. Information about GT can be found on Hamber’s website on
the Graduation page.
BUSINESS EDUCATION
BUSINESS EDUCATION 10
(MBEG-10)
The focus of this course is for you to develop an understanding of how the business world operates and to
learn about the importance of businesses in the Canadian economy. We will discuss the role of business
and doing business in Canada. Other topics include marketing, investment strategies, entrepreneurship,
and current events. Activities you participate in will be interesting, relevant, and worthwhile. This
includes going on field trips to apply the concepts learned in the classroom.
INTERNET TECH 10
(YCCT-0D-IT)
We also call this course Web 10. Regardless of the name, you will learn how to make Websites from
scratch using HTML. Then you will make them look beautiful using what we call CSS. Since both
HTML and CSS require attention to detail and problem solving, you must enjoy activities of that nature.
You will be exposed to a variety of software programs, including Adobe Photoshop and Espresso. You
will also have fun with iPhoto and Photobooth, as well as many programs found on the Internet, such as
WordPress.
Internet Tech is open to students in grades 9 and 10.
DIGITAL IMAGERY
(XAT--10DVP)
This is a 2 credit course that couples with a half year of Planning 10. It is open only to students enrolled in
Planning 10.
If you want to get more enjoyment out of the hundres of digital pictures you take each year, then this is the
course in Hamber’s iMac lab is for you. You will turn your digital images into prints, calendars, scrapbooks,
movies and videos. What’s more, the pictures you take will be better than ever because you will learn essential
photographic techniques. You will enjoy Photoshop re-touching skills and learning elements of graphic design.
ACCOUNTING 11
(MAC--11)
Accounting is the backbone of business programs at all universities and colleges. Learning it now is easy and
will benefit you later, especially if you pursue a commerce degree.
In this beginning course, you will learn to record business transactions and prepare financial statements. You
will also gain computer experience by working with Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and Simply Accounting
software.
Simulations add reality and interest to the course. Students especially enjoy playing the game of Monopoly,
which is fun yet reinforces many accounting skills and concepts.
ELECTRONIC DESIGN & PUBLISHING 11
(MICTM11)
Hamber has a tradition of graduating top Graphic Design students, and EDP11 has been key to their success.
You will produce many electronic works of art, the chief of which is a full colour, 16-page magazine on the
topic of your choice. In the process of creating your magazine, you will use Adobe Photoshop, Adobe
4
Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign. You will also learn the principles of graphic design that are needed to print any
professional-looking business document.
At the end of the year, you will have a colour printout of your magazine, which looks great in a personal
portfolio.
MARKETING 11
(MMK--11)
The focus of this course is for you to develop an understanding of how marketing is integral to the success of
businesses in the Canadian economy. Through a variety of teaching strategies, including guest speakers and
field trips, we will discuss the marketing concept, the role that consumers and competitors play in marketing,
market research, the four P’s of marketing. The school store is also an integral component of marketing, and
participation is mandatory. You will learn how to be a responsible employee, as well as develop your customer
service and communication skills. Students with outstanding performance in the school store have the
opportunity to become managers in their grade 12 year.
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 12
(MFA--12)
Financial Accounting 12 is intended for students who wish to pursue post-secondary studies in Commerce.
Most of the Financial Accounting content is similar to a university course, so taking it now will really help you
later—a fact confirmed by many former Hamber students. We even use the same textbook that was used at
UBC, SFU, and Langara, but we proceed at a slower, more reasonable pace.
Computer applications include work with Simply Accounting and Microsoft Excel. Note: Students who are
good in Math (A or B) succeed in Financial Accounting without taking a junior accounting course. Accounting
11 is still recommended, however, and is a must for students who are C+ or lower in Math.
ECONOMICS 12
(MEC--12)
Economics 12 introduces you to many dynamic issues that affect the way that all of us live. Many front-page
news stories are directly related to basic economic principles. Economics topics covered include the economic
problem, how demand and supply affect prices, the different type of market places, monetary policy (money
supply and creation), different economic models, global trade and investment strategies. Interesting activities
and simulations will enable you to learn valuable concepts and have fun at the same time. You will participate
in a survival simulation, a barter session, money creation, an all-day economics forum at a downtown hotel on
hot issues, and the Titan business simulation game. Economics is an important course in post-secondary
commerce programs. Your achievement in Economics can be counted for your entrance qualifications at UBC.
ELECTRONIC DESIGN & PUBLISHING 12
(MICTM12)
This course allows students who have taken and who love Electronic Design and Publishing 11 to deepen their
understanding of electronic graphic design. You will gain more expertise in industry-standard software,
especially Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Students taking this course also get the fun task of working as a
team to publish Hamber’s newsletters three times per year.
Many Electronic Design students take advantage of this course to create online portfolios, which have helped
them earn numerous district scholarships of $1000 each. They also take part in the Skills Canada Regional,
Provincial, and National competitions in graphic design, and they have a rich history of bringing home medals.
MARKETING 12
(MMK--12)
5
In this course, students will examine the role of international trade in the provincial and Canadian economy,
identify sectors in which British Columbia and Canada have a competitive advantage, and analyze how
businesses conduct global marketing. Additional topics include government involvement in, the effect of
various cultures on, and current events relating to international marketing. Students wishing to be managers of
the school store, and have taken Marketing 11, are required to take Marketing 12. This management opportunity
allows you to hone your leadership skills and prepares you for future employment success.
DIGITIAL IMAGING 12
(MICTC12)
In the iMac Lab at Hamber, you have great tools to get the very most out of your digital images. From
Photoshop to iPhoto to Photobooth, you are going to have fun learning today’s technology, and you will
develop skills that will set you up for a lifetime of capturing, improving and presenting memorable images.
In addition to developing your digital photography skills, your projects will include printing a digital portfolio
and creating slide shows and movies. You must LOVE photography if you want to take this course.
YEARBOOK 10/11/12
(YCCT-0CYRB), (YCCT-1CYRB), (YCCT-2CYRB)
Open to students in grades 10, 11, and 12. Individuals accepted into this class will produce the school’s
yearbook.
Course enrolment is limited with selection being made on the basis of information supplied on application
forms and in a personal interview. Students will be instructed in the areas of design elements, desktop
publishing, photography, interviewing, and article writing with the hope that they will return to the course in
future years. September to April will focus primarily on the production of the yearbook. Extra-curricular time
is expected in the first two terms when the majority of the work is done. May and June will consist of training
the staff and editors for the following year’s annual and developing future themes and ideas. A knowledge of
Adobe InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator is a benefit, but not required for acceptance in to the course.
ENGLISH
ENGLISH 8
(MEN--08)
In English 8, students will study short stories, novels, and poetry. They will become involved in classroom
drama, in part, by writing and acting out skits. The students will become more familiar with the literary
techniques used by the authors they study.
The "process" approach to writing will be emphasized as students develop their composing skills in paragraphs,
short essays and creative writing. They will learn to improve their planning, drafting, revising and editing skills
as they become more familiar with the breadth of expression in English.
Students will take part in presentations as individuals or in groups to improve their oral skills. Students may be
involved in a film study unit, as well.
ENGLISH 8 ADAPTED – COOP
(MEN--08COP)
This course is designed for students who have completed Grade 7 Language Arts, yet need to build reading,
writing, interpretation and/or oral communication skills. Students will be enrolled in the course based on
recommendations from their Grade 7 Language Arts teachers. The course will follow the regular Grade 8
6
curriculum: short stories, novels, poetry and drama. The objective of the course is for students to develop skills
that will prepare them to enter English 9.
ENGLISH CHALLENGE 8-10
(MEN--08CH8) (MEN--10CH9)
The English Challenge Program begins at the Grade 8 level and spans two school years. Students with a C+
average overall and no lower than C+ in the second year will receive credit for English 8, 9 and 10.
Students are accepted into the program based on District testing results and personal interviews. Students will
complete the requirements of English 8, 9 and 10 while demonstrating superior quality of work and a
willingness to accept with pride more sophisticated assignments. Students in Challenge English are expected
to take Literature 12, Writing 12, English 12 World Literature, and AELC-12 in their Grade 11 and 12
years.
ENGLISH 9
(MEN--09)
In English 9, students will be involved in activities similar to those in English 8, but they will read more
sophisticated material and be expected to demonstrate growth in their English skills. Written assignments will
require more fully developed analytic, research and composing skills. The study of a Shakespearean play is one
of the options a teacher may choose for his or her class.
ENGLISH 9 CREATIVE WRITING
(MEN--09ENR)
This course is offered to Grade 9 students. They should have an interest in writing, reading and speaking.
Students will be credited for English 9, and will cover all the usual English skills, as well as the various forms
of literature. At the same time, there will be an emphasis on original writing of various kinds such as poetry,
short stories, personal narratives and dramatic skits. Students will be encouraged to submit their work to one of
several contests open to them during the year. Self-motivation is especially important, as students will be
expected to offer materials from their own reading and writing for class discussion. Students must apply for
this course.
ENGLISH 10
(MEN--10)
English 10, while similar in many ways to earlier courses, requires the students to read much more literature
written for adults by authors of high reputation such as George Orwell, John Steinbeck, and Earl Birney.
Students will read poetry, short stories, non-fiction, novels and drama. Most students will read Shakespeare's
Romeo & Juliet or Julius Caesar. Students will not only be aware of the elements of the various forms of
literature but also be able to probe in depth the author's development of character and theme. Students will use
the library as they develop research skills while working on projects. They will write longer essays and other
assignments while improving their abilities to plan, to revise sentence structure and paragraphs, and to correct
usage errors. Students are required to sit the Language Arts 10 provincial examination in June. The examination
forms 20% of a student’s final grade.
ENGLISH 10 SPECULATIVE FICTION
(MEN10--ENR)
This course is offered to Grade 10 students who have an interest in science fiction, future oriented literature or
7
fantasy. Students will be credited for English 10 and will cover all the usual English skills along with creative
writing, creative thinking, debate and problem-solving. Students will write the Language Arts 10 examination in
June. The examination forms 20% of the student’s final grade. Students must apply for this course.
ENGLISH 11
(MEN--11)
The learning outcomes of English 11 are similar to those of English 10 but will involve reading more
sophisticated literature and completing more challenging assignments. Students read and study a Shakespearean
play within their drama unit. English 11 is an important foundation course for all Senior English courses.
ENGLISH 11 GIFTED
(MEN--11GIF)
This course is designed primarily for students emerging from the two-year English Challenge program. It may
also be available to students in the regular program. In both cases, teacher recommendation is required. The
course involves the critical analysis of literature. Through the study of various literary works, students will be
encouraged to contemplate perspectives foreign to them, and to develop their own ability to communicate
concepts both verbally and in writing.
Students who take this course are expected to continue with enriched English by selecting some combination of
Writing 12, English World Literature 12, Literature 12 or AP English Literature.
ENGLISH 11 ENRICHED CREATIVE WRITING
(MEN--11ENR)
Creative Writing 11 is an enriched English 11 course. This course is designed to inspire students to write and
to think creatively by being exposed to a variety of literature and writing. Students will also continue to develop
skills in reading, speaking, listening, and critical thinking. Because creative writing is the focus of this course,
students will have the opportunity to define and submit their writing to publishers for fun and for experience,
and to experience the world of literature in our community. This course has been created for students who love
to write, who are motivated to learn, and who are open to all types of literature. Students must apply for this
course.
COMMUNICATIONS 11
(MCOM-11)
Communications 11 gives students the opportunity to refine the writing, reading and oral skills needed to
complete typical adult tasks and to enjoy the cultural side of life. The course is meant to appeal to students not
planning on pursuing a post-secondary education at the university level.
ENGLISH 11 COOP
(MEN--11COP)
This course focuses on student’s organization of ideas in writing and analysis of themes contained in short
stories, novels, and film. The aim of the course is to provide an alternate setting to ensure individual student
success with Senior English and/or the English 12 Provincial Examination. There will be a real focus on moving
students to multi-paragraph compositions and thesis writing.
ENGLISH 12
(MEN--12)
English 12 stresses the development of student writing skills as they prepare for their post-secondary education.
Students have limited opportunity to select their own reading material. However, they will study writers such as
Shakespeare, Steinbeck, Orwell, Miller, Solzhenitsyn, Atwood, and Camus. All literary genres will be explored
at a sophisticated level as bases for essays. Researching, planning, composing, revising and editing skills will be
8
emphasized. Students will spend much time assisting each other as they learn to write and communicate more
effectively.
ENGLISH 12 WORLD LITERATURE
(MEN--12WLT)
English 12 World Literature emphasizes university preparation through the study of international literature. This
enriched English 12 course should appeal to students who are avid, curious, serious readers and very capable
writers. Students wishing to write the Advanced Placement examinations could benefit from taking this class
alongside or before the Advanced Placement course. Students must apply for this course.
AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITON 12
(AELC-12)
AP English Literature and Composition is designed to be a college/university level course. Students will be
provided with intellectual challenges and a workload consistent with a typical undergraduate university English
Literature/Humanities course. Students will be exposed to a generous portion of the English Canon. It is
expected that students enrolling in this course will be strong readers, writers, and thinkers. Students will write
the AP Examination in May.
ENGLISH 12 COOP
(MEN--12COP)
The aim of this adapted English 12 course is to provide an alternate setting for students who can be successful
in the English 12 Provincial Examination. The course will focus on writing, the analysis of literature and exam
preparation.
COMMUNICATIONS 12
(MCOM-12)
The course continues the emphasis outlined in Communications 11. Students will be required to write a
Ministry of Education Exam, at the end of the course. This course takes the place of English 12.
Note: Communications 12 will satisfy graduation requirements, but it is usually not sufficient for most postsecondary programs.
ENGLISH LITERATURE 12
(MLIT-12)
English Literature 12 is the provincial Ministry of Education's most sophisticated English course and is offered
to Grade 11 and 12 students. Students who take it have by far the greatest success in passing first year
university English courses. This course should be taken by all students who have a special interest in English.
It surveys English literature from Beowulf to Margaret Atwood. Renowned writers such as Chaucer,
Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Tennyson, Browning and Austen are explored.
Students probe some of the world's greatest poetry, prose and drama while they improve their analytical skills.
WRITING 12 – FOCUS ON FILM
(MWR--12)
Writing 12 is offered to grade 11 and 12 students. It is an elective course that can be taken along with or after
English 12. This course will use film and those who write about film as a launching point for critical and
creative writing assignments. There will be some required assignments and others will be based on student
interest. Students will have the opportunity to write biography, review, diary, and memoir and think about voice
and audience. The course is designed for those who like to write and who have a genuine interest in film.
ENGLISH COURSES FOR ELL LEARNERS
JUNIOR TRANSITIONAL ENGLISH & ELC (XLDCE08TRE & XLDCE08ELJ)
9
SENIOR TRANSITIONAL ENGLISH & ELC (MEN—10TR1 & XLDEC09ELS)
These course pairs are designed for students with an ELL background who need to strengthen their
understanding and appreciation of English literature as well as sharpen their writing skills prior to entering
mainstream English courses. For most students, these are year-long courses. In a few cases, exceptional students
who demonstrate strength in language acquisition will be moved to mainstream English classes during the year.
Senior Transitional English and Junior Transitional English are double block courses.
ENGLISH LEARNING CENTRE 2
(XLDCE08EL2)
The ELC is designed to provide language support services to grade 8 and 9 students whose level of English
proficiency reflects comprehension and vocabulary development beyond the scope of students at the ELL level.
Students who are registered to take English 8 or 9 and who have completed Junior Transitional English or those
who received minimal ELL support in grade 7 are required to take this course. The program reviews and
develops those language skills previously introduced in the ELL program, as well as emphasizes higher order
thinking skills, communicating skills, reading skills and writing skills. Increased knowledge of the structure of
the English language is another objective of the ELC.
ENGLISH LEARNING CENTRE 3
(XLDSE08EL3)
This course is required for grade 10, 11 and 12 students enrolled in a regular English course for the first time,
and who have just completed Transitional English Senior. ELC 3 is designed for students to improve their
academic written ability, critical reading skills, oral presentation skills, and vocabulary development. Areas of
focus include sentence skills, organization, support, and development. Students will explore a variety of written
and oral forms such as paragraphs, essays, reports, speeches and creative writing.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
(Formerly English as a Second Language)
The ELL program at Eric Hamber is comprised of two sections: Foundations and Intermediate, which are both
multi-grade and multi-age. Students may have up to 4 of their 8 courses in the ELL program. Students’
language levels are assessed before they are placed in ELL classes, and movement between levels is based on
teacher recommendation.
Foundations - Students who are in the beginning stages of learning the English language and whose aural
comprehension, writing ability and oral communication are at the most basic level are placed in this group.
Intermediate - Students in this grouping are at the beginning to intermediate stage of English language
development. Both aural and oral communication is developing. Writing ability is developing and
comprehensible. Students’ reading comprehension is generally 4 years below grade level.
Assessment of ELL students’ progress in ELL Language Arts, ELL Social Studies and ELL Science is carried
out on a regular basis. Letter grades are not used in the ELL program. Students are assessed on work habits: i.e.
Excellent, Good, Satisfactory or Needs to Improve. As well, comments are given to reflect students’ progress or
areas requiring improvement. Students, through consultation with all ELL teachers, are recommended to either
continue in the program or progress to the transitional level.
Students are assessed and placed in courses appropriate to their English language
level. Below is the usual support classes a student will take in any given level.
10
ELL Level 1:
ELL 1 Reading
ELL 1 Writing
ELL 1 Socials
ELL Science
ELL Level 2:
ELL 2 Reading
ELL 2 Writing
ELL 2 Socials
Transitional
Science 10
Transitional
Transitional
English
ELC
Transitional
Socials
Mainstream
ELC 2 or 3
(student takes
mainstream
English and
Socials classes)
ELL LANGUAGE ARTS
ELL 1 READING
ELL 1 WRITING
ELL2 READING
ELL 2 WRITING
(XLDCE08RE1)
(XLDCE08WRI)
(XLDCE09RE2)
(XLDCE09WR2)
Students enrol in both an ELL Reading and ELL Writing class at the appropriate level. The intent is to enable
students to acquire the skills needed for mainstream English. Skills such as listening, writing, reading and
speaking are learned through the enjoyment of novels, short stories, poetry, fables, picture books, fairy tales,
folk tales, non-fiction and plays.
These courses involve activities such as silent reading, teacher reading aloud, film viewing, literature response
journals, novel studies, journal writing, letter writing, paragraph writing, creative story writing, and writing
poetry. Figures of speech and the parts of the novel and short story are emphasized. The aim of these courses is
to promote daily reading and writing as a way to acquire English. Students are expected to practice their oral
English regularly. Our emphasis is to promote literacy and the enjoyment of literature for life-long learning.
ELL SOCIAL STUDIES
ELL 1 SOCIAL STUDIES
ELL 2 SOCIAL STUDIES
(XLDCE08SS1)
(XLDCE09SS2)
ELL Social Studies serves as a bridge to Transitional Social Studies and Social Studies courses in the
mainstream. This course offers students a basic introduction to Canada, in its geography, history, and culture.
At the same time, ELL Social Studies is intended to facilitate English language acquisition through reading,
writing, listening, and thinking activities. Content in ELL Social Studies includes Canadian geography, basic
mapping skills, Canadian history, the basic structure of Canadian government, the rights and responsibilities of
Canadian citizens, current events, and strategies for critical thinking.
ELL SCIENCE
(XLDCE09SC1)
ELL Science is for students of grade 8 or 9 age who do not have the language skills necessary to be successful
in Science 8 or Science 9. ELL students of grade 10 age or above will also be programmed into ELL science if
they are functioning at a level of language development such that they would have difficulty in Transitional
Science. The aim is to build a vocabulary and reading level so that students will be successful in mainstream
Science.
*Note: There is no expectation that students coming from ELL Science would move through the transitional
level before being mainstreamed. That is, students successfully completing the ELL Science program would
11
move directly into Science 9 or Science 10, unless they are specifically recommended to Transitional Science
by their ELL Science teacher. Students who successfully complete Transitional Science would be expected to
move directly into a grade 11 Science course unless other recommendations are made by the Transitional
teacher.
TRANSITIONAL SCIENCE
(MSC--10TRS)
Transitional Science is for students of grade 10, 11 or 12 age whose English language proficiency is sufficient
to access modified grade 10 curriculum, but not developed enough for them to be successful in regular classes.
They also may be new arrivals to the school, or they may come from ELL Science.
FINE ARTS
Hamber is proud to offer a very comprehensive variety of Fine Arts courses, taught by a very dedicated group
of staff. Students have the opportunity to explore and develop skills in the following areas:
a) Visual Art, Photography & Video Production
b) Dance
c) Drama, Theatre Production, & Film Studies
d) Music -- Band, Choir, Guitar, and Strings
Fine Arts courses are open to all students and are encouraged as a mode of creativity, team building, skill
development, and performance. Some senior level classes may require a prerequisite or permission of the
teacher, but the majority of opportunities are open to all.
A. VISUAL ART
Eric Hamber Secondary School offers a well-developed secondary art program which includes opportunities for
students: to develop imagination and personal imagery; to engage in the production of art; to appreciate the art
of others; to develop an informed aesthetic and critical awareness; to evaluate their own work and that of others;
and to pursue post-secondary art education and careers in art.
PREREQUISITES
There are no prerequisites for entry into any art courses prior to Grade 12. However, in a 12 level course,
students must have successfully completed an appropriate 11 level course.
SUPPLEMENTAL FEES – Visual Art
Only basic materials are provided. The following supplemental fees offer the students access to a more
comprehensive set of materials, a greater art experience, and a wider variety of project opportunities (i.e.,
sketchbook, etching materials, canvas, fabrics)
Art, Half-year Gr. 8
$ 10.00
Art Courses, Gr. 9 – 12
$ 20.00 per year
Photography Courses
$ 30.00 per year
FINE ARTS 8 ROTATIONS
(XAT--08AC) Art & Choir
(XAT--08AD) Art & Drama
These are pairs of five month courses. The Art course will offer the Art Foundations content, namely drawing
and painting, design, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture, textiles, art history and art criticism.
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VISUAL ART FOUNDATIONS – Gr. 9/10/11/12
VISUAL ARTS 9: ART FOUNDATIONS
(MVA--09AF)
VISUAL ARTS 10: GENERAL
(MVAG-10)
VISUAL ART FOUNDATIONS 11
(MAF--11)
VISUAL ART FOUNDATIONS 12
(MAF--12) – note prerequisite MAF--11
This series of courses will provide for learning experiences in several visually expressive areas, namely:
drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, etc. The teacher will select appropriate content to ensure that students
achieve learning outcomes.
STUDIO ARTS – Gr. 9/10/11/12
VISUAL ARTS 9: DRAWING & PAINTING
VISUAL ARTS 10: DRAWING & PAINTING
STUDIO ARTS 11: DRAWING & PAINTING
STUDIO ARTS 12: DRAWING & PAINTING
(MVA--09DP)
(MVAD-10)
(MSADP11)
(MSADP12) – note prerequisite MSADP11
These courses will provide students with sequentially cumulative drawing and painting strategies. Students will
develop ability to use imagery, the elements and principles of design, historical and contemporary
developments, reasoned criticism, the application of materials, tools, equipment, processes of art, and a
vocabulary in drawing and painting.
CERAMICS & SCULPTURE – Gr. 9/10/11/12
CERAMICS & SCULPUTRE 9
CERAMICS & SCULPTURE 10
CERAMICS & SCULPTURE 11
CERAMICS & SCULPTURE 12
(MVA--09CS)
(MVAC-10)
(MSACS11)
(MSACS12) – note prerequisite MSACS11
Students will learn a variety of expressive strategies in ceramics and sculpture.
Unit 1 - Preparing Clay and Safety
Unit 2 - Basic Constructing - pinch, coil, slab, wheel, vases, bowls
Unit 3 - Decorating Strategies
Unit 4 - Intermediate Constructing - cups, mugs, combination pots
Unit 5 - Kilns and firing strategies
Unit 6 - Advanced Constructing - lidded pots, teapots
Unit 7 - Basic Sculpting - abstract forms, maquette
Unit 8 - Intermediate Sculpting - the figure
Unit 9 - Advanced Sculpting - the portrait
STUDIO ARTS 10 & PLANNING
(XAT--10ART) – paired with Planning 10
2 credits
This course is designed for students who wish to focus on visual arts techniques as a half year study. Students
will experience drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture, all of which later could be used for their
graduation portfolio.
BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHY 10
(YVPA-0KPHO)
This is an introductory course providing students with the skills to use and develop high quality digital
photographs in black and white. Students will blend theory and practice including: the history of photography,
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the social importance of photography in modern society; camera basics using a SLR; rules of good composition;
and basic dark room skills. Students will learn through a series of school and community-based photo
assignments which will challenge both their photographic and social awareness skills. By the end of the course,
each student will have a portfolio of their work. Students will be provided with field trips, guest speakers, and
Internet opportunities. Students must have their own Single Lens Reflex (SLR) camera and digital camera.
INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY 11
(YVPA-1PHO)
Students taking this course must already have a basic knowledge of camera and darkroom skills using black and
white film. Students will work with digital technology and manipulation, and develop their individual areas of
interest – landscape, fashion, social awareness, environmental portraits, photographic essays – while gaining
greater control over the camera. The majority of work completed in the course will focus on developing a
greater understanding of our community and of the world we live in through photographs. In order to reach
outside of school, time will be required outside of regular hours – in the evenings and on weekends - to shoot
pictures. Students will be provided field trips, guest speakers, and Internet opportunities. By the end of the
course, each student will have a portfolio of their work. Students must have their own Single Lens Reflex (SLR)
camera and/or digital camera.
Note: A Career Prep option is available. Career Prep students will complete a portion of the 100 hours required
over 2 years. Students taking the Career Prep option will take Photo 12 the following year.
PHOTOGRAPHY 12
(YVAP-2NPHO)
Photo 12 is the 2nd of two consecutive Career Prep courses in Photography; as such, students wishing to take
this course must have completed Photo 11. Although the Photo 11/12 program offers the mandatory 100 hours
of work experience as an integral component, Photo 11/12 is also open to students not wishing to complete the
work experience component. Students will be given the opportunity to work with digital cameras and explore
digital manipulation as well as continue to develop their professional portfolio using black and white film.
VIDEO PRODUCTION 11: INTERMEDIATE (YCCT-1BDVP)
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of video production. The class covers practical
knowledge of video camera use, music and iMovie editing software as well as lighting techniques,
storyboarding and storytelling. The class will investigate the works of music video directors like Michel
Gondry, Spike Jones, Anton Corbijn, Mark Romanek as well as different film genres (action, comedy, horror,
coming-of-age, musical etc.) and their individual conventions. The student is expected to build a film
vocabulary and discuss their work and the work of others respectfully and articulately in class. This course
requires that students work well in a team and can stay focused and patient with each other and the filming
circumstance. There is a $25 deposit if the student requires the use of school cameras.
VIDEO PRODUCTION 12: ADVANCED
(YCCT-2HDVP)
This course builds on the ideas and skills presented in the Intermediate Video course. The class will continue to
develop a vocabulary in the world of film. Students are expected to develop their own projects from preproduction through post production and screen finished work. The intermediate Video student will edit in
second term on Final Cut Pro: an industry standard editing software program.
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B. DRAMA (STAGE, FILM & TELEVISION)
FINE ARTS 8 ROTATIONS
(XAT--08CD) Choir & Drama
These are pairs of five month courses. The main emphasis in the Drama course is on providing students with an
introduction to dramatic expression, appreciation and performance. Emphasis will also be placed on telling
stories through drama and portraying simple characters.
DRAMA 9
(MDR--09)
Drama 9 builds on work introduced in Drama 8 but is still an introductory course. Students will learn more
about creating their own scripts through improvisation and movement. They will also learn to create a character,
experience role-playing, and to do introductory scene work.
DRAMA 10
(MDR--10)
This is a full year course that, in addition to building on skills introduced in Drama 9, provides the basic
foundation for acting skills that will be further developed in Theatre Performance 11 and 12. Students work
under the direction of the directing and scriptwriting classes as well as doing scene work and monologue work
from selected playwrights including Samuel Beckett and William Shakespeare. Additionally, students will be
required to view dramatic presentations.
DRAMA 10 & PLANNING 10
(XAT--10DRA) – paired with Planning 10
2 credits
This course covers most of the major objectives of Drama 10 (performing original and scripted scenes and the
development of production skills) though students will receive less opportunity to practice skills. Additionally,
students will be required to view dramatic presentations. It is strongly recommended that students who intend to
continue with Theatre Performance 11 enroll in the full year Drama 10 course.
THEATRE PERFORMANCE 11: ACTING
(MTPA-11)
This course is an advanced acting course. It is assumed that students already feel at ease on stage and have
satisfactory speech skills, script skills and a basic ability to develop characters.
Students in this course will focus on script interpretation through performance of scenes, monologues, or other
scripts. They will learn to develop theme and character in a scene and will focus on how to make their
performance rich and memorable. Additionally, students will be required to both read and view dramatic
presentations. This is a highly verbal course.
THEATRE PERFORMANCE 12: ACTING
(MTPA-12)
This is an advanced acting course that allows students to continue the work begun in Acting 11. Additionally,
students will be required to both read and view dramatic presentations.
DIRECTING & SCRIPT WRITING 12
(MTPDS12)
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This is an advanced course for students with an interest in directing and scriptwriting for stage. Students will
learn basic directing skills and methods by practical application of those skills working with drama 10 students.
They will also write, direct and stage one full play. Some limited acting is involved. Students will be expected
to analyze script as well as engaging in mentored self-directed studies.
THEATRE PRODUCTION 11
(MTPR–11)
This is an advanced course for students with an interest in the technical aspects of theatre. Areas covered in this
course include safety, lighting, properties, costuming, make-up and set construction. Particular emphasis will
be placed on learning the skills for successful stage management, organization techniques, and script analysis. It
is strongly suggested that students have some experience in production work before enrolling in this course.
THEATRE PRODUCTION 12
(MTPRT12)
This is an advanced course that allows students to continue the work begun in Theatre Production 11. More
advanced skills are taught in the same technical areas and students are provided additional opportunities to
apply their skills. Students in this course must be able to achieve success in a largely self-directed course.
FILM STUDIES 11
(MDFT-11)
Students with an interest in enhancing their enjoyment of film or with aspirations of working in a film-related
industry will benefit from this comprehensive course which addresses topics such as:
§ the Great Films of our past and present
§ International Film
§ important social issues as they relate to film (sex, violence, censorship, self-image, etc.).
FILM STUDIES 12
(MDFT-12)
The second year allows students who have completed Film Studies 11 to broaden and deepen their
understanding of both the past and present of film. Additional films will be viewed and related, but different
topics will be addressed. This course is highly recommended for any student planning to work in any filmrelated field.
C. MUSIC – BAND, CHOIR, STRINGS, & GUITAR
The Music Department provides students with the opportunity to participate in four main streams, namely:
Band (Concert Band & Stage Band), Choir (Concert Choir & Vocal Jazz), Orchestra (Strings), & Guitar. Our
music ensembles have a long and proud performance history in our school, our community, and abroad. All
music classes will teach students the fundamentals needed for developing strong musicianship and performance
skills. The goal is to share our music with the school and community at large by performing several concerts
throughout the year. Performances are a required aspect of music classes. Part of the program may include a
music tour out of the city.
BAND
Band courses are one year in length and are grouped according to level (Beginning, Junior, Intermediate,
Symphonic Band, and Wind Ensemble). Students are placed in appropriate levels by the Band Director
according to their experience and capabilities on their instrument. Evaluation is based on performance,
participation in class, and playing tests. Students will receive credit for the grade in which they are enrolled.
However, it is possible for a student to remain in one band class more than one year in order to maximize skill
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building opportunities. Most students provide their own instruments through purchase or rental from a music
store. The school has some of the larger instruments available at a minimum rental. A method book may also
be recommended for a specific class. All pertinent information regarding instruments will be distributed at the
start of the year.
BEGINNING BAND
(MMU--08BG8)
Beginning Band is a full-year course for Grade 8 students wishing to learn a band instrument. Students will be
guided in choosing an instrument, and subsequently will acquire (purchase or rent) an instrument in order to
build their skills. Students will learn basic instrumental techniques as well as music notation, vocabulary, and
symbols. The goal of this class is to perform alongside the other bands in our School Music Concerts.
Enrolment in Beginning Band is strongly recommended for any Grade 8 considering taking future band courses,
but who has not had experience in elementary band.
BAND 8 ADVANCED
or JUNIOR BAND 9
(MMU--08BA8)
(MMU--09BA9)
NOTE: Any Grade 9 or 10 student who wishes to join the band program should sign up for the Junior Band 9
course code, but also speak with the Instructor.
This full-year course is designed for Grade 8, 9, & 10 students with 1 or 2 years of experience on a band
instrument. This allows experienced Grade 8 players to bypass beginning band. Students will continue to learn
instrumental techniques and musicianship skills. At this level more attention will be devoted to developing
range, articulation, tone, and sight reading skills. This course will introduce students to many different styles of
music in the concert band repertoire. Performances are considered part of the course curriculum.
INTERMEDIATE CONCERT BAND 10
(MMCB-10INT)
This level is for students with 2 to 3 years of playing experience on a band instrument. Students will develop
playing skills in small ensembles (duets, trios, quartets) as well as the concert band medium. Students will learn
theory materials applicable to the performance pieces, including vocabulary, symbols, rules of notation,
transposition, and form. Performances are considered part of the course curriculum.
SENIOR CONCERT BANDS
SYMPHONIC BAND 10
SYMPHONIC BAND 11
SYMPHONIC BAND 12
(MMCB-10SRB)
(MIMCB11SRB)
(MIMCB12SRB)
This level is for students who have three to four years (or more) of performance experience and instruction on a
band instrument. This course provides an opportunity for moderately advanced ensemble and solo playing. This
ensemble participates in annual touring to retreats and festivals. Performances are considered part of the course
curriculum.
WIND ENSEMBLE 10
WIND ENSEMBLE 11
WIND ENSEMBLE 12
(MMCB-10SRA)
(MIMCB11SRA)
(MIMCB12SRA)
This is the highest level of wind band at Eric Hamber and enrolment is by permission of the director only. It is
designed for students with four to five (or more) years of experience on their instrument, and provides an
opportunity for advanced ensemble and solo performance and high-level artistry. This ensemble tours annually
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throughout Canada and internationally. Performances are considered part of the course curriculum.
JUNIOR JAZZ BAND 9/10
JUNIOR JAZZ BAND 9
JUNIOR JAZZ BAND 10
(MMU--09JZB)
(MMJB-10JR)
This course is for Grade 9 or 10 students who are interested in the jazz and big band idiom. Students must have
acquired basic playing technique on their instrument before entering this course. Students will learn the basics
of the jazz medium including interpretation and improvisation. The student must be simultaneously enrolled in
one of the band courses. Approval from the instructor is required.
INTERMEDIATE JAZZ BAND 10/11/12
JAZZ BAND 10
JAZZ BAND 11
JAZZ BAND 11
(MMJB-10)
(MIMJB11)
(MIMJB12)
This course is for senior students at an advanced performance level who are interested in the jazz and big band
idiom. Students will learn improvisation and performance techniques in the jazz and big band idiom. Students
will also learn about arranging in this medium and be provided opportunities to write and perform their own
arrangements. Student must be simultaneously enrolled in the senior concert band. Approval from the instructor
is required.
CHOIR
The Choral Program at Hamber has enjoyed a long legacy and continues to be a bright light in the community.
Students have opportunity to develop their confidence in singing and to experience music-making in an
ensemble setting. The Choral classes are performance focused; that is, all classroom efforts will ultimately be
shared through concerts in the school and community.
Deposit: There is a deposit of $15.00 which covers wear, damage, or loss of our Choir Music.
FINE ARTS 8 ROTATIONS
(XAT--08AC) Art & Choir
(XAT--08CD) Choir & Drama
These are pairs of five month courses.
In Chorus 8, students will develop their vocal skills and general
musicianship within a choral ensemble. Emphasis will be placed on making a confident sound, singing with
solid tone, and ways of offering a musical performance. Songs will be selected from popular, folk and classical
music, culminating with a performance one of the Choral Department Concerts as well as at the District Festival
in March.
CHORUS 9
(MMU- -09CHO)
Chorus 9 is offered to students with some musical ability, interest, and experience. Students will develop their
knowledge and skills in singing, including breathing, tone, confidence, and part singing. Students will also
build strategies for strong performances. Emphasis on professional standards will be encouraged through
concerts, both in and outside the school.
CHORUS 10
(MMCC-10)
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Chorus 10 further develops musical ability, interest, and experience. The student will broaden their knowledge
and skills in singing, including tone production, three to four-part harmony, and sight reading. Students will be
taught professional responsibilities and approach as they engage in more performance opportunities.
SENIOR CONCERT CHOIR 11/12
SENIOR CONCERT CHOIR 11
SENIOR CONCERT CHOIR 12
(MCMCC11)
(MCMCC12)
The Senior Choir is the largest Concert Choir of the school. The course is designed for senior students who are
eager to express artistry through singing. Students will fine-tune their vocal skill, develop four to eight-part
singing, embrace professional standards of performance, learn standard musical terminology, and proudly
represent the school at many performances throughout the year. Opportunities for solo and small ensemble will
be given.
High caliber performances are a regular part of the course curriculum.
Advanced Choir Classes
There are three senior choral ensembles that are advanced in nature – Chamber Choir, Women’s Chorale, and
Vocal Jazz. These classes focus on high-calibre repertoire, advanced singing technique, and focused
performance practice. Entrance to these enriched choral classes is by audition which is scheduled in late
January or early February.
CHAMBER CHOIR 11/12
CHAMBER CHOIR 11
CHAMBER CHOIR 12
(YVPA-1C)
(YVPA-2C)
Chamber Choir is for experienced singers who want to embrace high-caliber performance. Singers in this
auditioned group (auditions held in early February) will highly develop singing skills and musicianship
through a variety of advanced repertoire. This ensemble has a very active performance schedule, providing
many concerts in our city and community. Students entering this course must have some sight-reading skills
and/or experience in choir. Instructor approval is required.
WOMEN’S CHORALE 11/12
WOMEN’S CHORALE 11
WOMEN’S CHORALE 12
(MIDS-1C)
(MIDS-2C)
The Women’s Chorale focuses on advanced repertoire for the female voice. Singers in this auditioned group
(auditions held in early February) will expand their vocal technique to accommodate the challenging
demands of the music which can range from unison singing to 8-part voicings. Professional manners in
performance will be pursued as students share their artistry through select concerts in the school and
community.
VOCAL JAZZ ENSEMBLE 11/12
VOCAL JAZZ 11
VOCAL JAZZ 12
(MCMJV11)
(MCMJV12)
Vocal Jazz is an enhancement course for experienced singers. Singers in this auditioned group (auditions held
in early February) will develop style and musicianship skills through jazz, Latin & pop repertoire. Small
ensemble and solo opportunities are encouraged, with emphasis on improvisational techniques. This vocal
group has an active performance schedule, providing many concerts in our city and community. Students
entering this course must have some sight-reading skills and all members must be simultaneously enrolled in
Concert Choir, Chamber Choir, or Women’s Chorale. Instructor approval is required.
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STRINGS
BEGINNING STRINGS ORCHESTRA 8/9
BEGINNING STRINGS 8
BEGINNING STRINGS 9
(MMU--08STB)
(MMU--09STB)
This a full year course. This course is designed for Grade 8 and 9 students who have an interest in learning to
play string instruments (violin, viola, cello, bass). Students will learn basic instrumental techniques as well as
basic music theory.
JUNIOR STRINGS ORCHESTRA 8/9
JUNIOR STRINGS 8
JUNIOR STRINGS 9
(MMU--08STA)
(MMU--09STA)
This course is designed for students of Grades 8 and 9 who have taken a minimum of one or two years in the
VSB string program or private instruction on the violin, viola, cello or bass. Students will be introduced to a
variety of musical styles in the string orchestra repertoire. Performances are considered part of the course
curriculum.
INTERMEDIATE STRINGS ORCHESTRA 10 (MMOS-10)
This course is designed for students of Grades 10 through 12 who have taken a minimum of two years in the
VSB string program or private instruction on the violin, viola, cello or bass. Students will be introduced to a
variety of musical styles in the string orchestra repertoire. Performances are considered part of the course
curriculum.
SENIOR STRINGS ORCHESTRA 11/12
SENIOR STRINGS ORCHESTRA 11
SENIOR STRINGS ORCHESTRA 12
(MIMOS11)
(MIMOS12)
This course is the highest level offered in the string orchestra program. Students are expected to have minimum
3 to 4 years of experience on a string instrument. This course provides an opportunity for learning advanced
techniques and developing skills in small ensemble playing, as well as in full string orchestra. Performances are
considered part of the course curriculum.
GUITAR
BEGINNING GUITAR
(MMGR-10]
For grade 9-12 students with no experience in guitar. Basic guitar techniques will be covered, including finger
picking, strumming, note reading, first position chords and tablature notation.
INTERMEDIATE GUITAR
(MIMG-11)
For grade 10-12 students with one or more years of experience in guitar. Students will learn advanced first
position chords, barre chords in the A and E form, finger picking, note reading, tablature notation, and a wide
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variety of musical repertoire.
SENIOR GUITAR
(MIMG-12)
For grade 10-12 students with two or more years of experience in guitar. In this course, students will study
musical notations in 1st, 5th, and 7th position, tablature notation, advanced finger picking, barre chords in the A,
E, C, and D forms, and altered tunings. A wide variety of repertoire will be covered with an emphasis on finger
picking, solo, and ensemble playing.
D. DANCE PERFORMANCE & CHOREOGRAPHY
DANCE PERFORMANCE 10
(MDNP-10)
This course introduces the fundamentals of dance through the use of the elements of movement (body, space,
time dynamics and relationship). You will learn the skills and attitudes necessary to work within a performance
group, including teamwork, adaptability, support, leadership, and responsibility for stagecraft elements such as
props, costumes, light, music and scenery. This course emphasizes the knowledge, skills and attitudes required
throughout the process of learning new movements and rehearsing and refining towards a polished product. You
will be expected to work in groups and independently. Attitude, effort and participation are key to being
successful in these courses. The dance types that the course will cover will be hip-hop, ballet, jazz,
contemporary, and time permitting, ballroom and cultural dances such as Bhangra and Bollywood.
DANCE PERFORMANCE 11
(MDNP-11)
The focus of this course is on the use of the elements of movement (body, space, time dynamics and
relationship). You will learn the skills and attitudes necessary to work within a performance group, including
teamwork, adaptability, support, leadership, and responsibility for stagecraft elements such as props, costumes,
light, music and scenery. This course emphasizes the knowledge, skills and attitudes required throughout the
process of learning new movements and rehearsing and refining towards a polished product. You will be
expected to work in groups and independently. Attitude, effort and participation are key to being successful in
this course. The dance types that the course will cover will be hip-hop, ballet, jazz, contemporary, and time
permitting, ballroom and cultural dances such as Bhangra and Bollywood.
DANCE PERFORMANCE 12
(MDNP-12)
The focus of this course is on the refined use of the elements of movement (body, space, time dynamics and
relationship). You will learn the skills and attitudes necessary to work within a performance group, including
teamwork, adaptability, support, leadership, and responsibility for stagecraft elements such as props, costumes,
light, music and scenery. This course emphasizes the knowledge, skills and attitudes required throughout the
process of learning new movements and rehearsing and refining towards a polished product. You will be
expected to work in groups and independently. Attitude, effort and participation are key to being successful in
this course. The dance types that the course will cover will be hip-hop, ballet, jazz, contemporary, and time
permitting, ballroom and cultural dances such as Bhangra and Bollywood.
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DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY 10
(MDNC-10)
This course introduces the fundamentals of creating dance of various styles and genres for a variety of informal
and formal settings and for a variety of purposes. Students learn to explore, create, refine, and produce dance
using the elements of movement (body, space, time dynamics and relationship) to serve artistic intentions. By
working through the creative process (exploration, selection, combination, refinement, and reflection), students
develop an understanding of these elements and how they combine to form the final product, a choreographed
piece.
DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY 11
(MDNC-11)
The focus of this course is on the fundamentals of creating dance of various styles and genres for a variety of
informal and formal settings and for a variety of purposes. Students learn to explore, create, refine, and produce
dance using the elements of movement (body, space, time dynamics and relationship) to serve artistic
intentions. By working through the creative process (exploration, selection, combination, refinement, and
reflection), students develop an understanding of these elements and how they combine to form the final
product, a choreographed piece.
DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY 12
(MDNC-12)
This course further provides students with opportunities to create dance of various styles and genres while
drawing upon all the learned movement elements and skills. This process requires a nurturing environment that
encourages risk taking. Such an environment enables students to become comfortable moving back and forth
through the creative process of exploring, selecting, combining, refining and reflecting. Students learn to
discuss their own creative processes and those of others as they describe and respond to choreography.
HOME ECONOMICS
HOME ECONOMICS 8
APPLIED SKILLS 8 ROTATION
(MHE-08)
Home Economics 8 introduces students to the areas of food preparation, nutrition, consumerism, family
management and clothing and textiles. Safe use and care of equipment in the home will be stressed. Students
will prepare snacks as well as learn to bake. Students will gain an understanding of basic sewing skills that are
used in clothing construction. Home Economics aims to develop an appreciation for the work that goes into
making food and textile products. Course evaluation is based on the quality of individual projects in clothing
and textiles and small group projects completed in the foods lab in addition to the completion of assignments
and quizzes. Students will spend one term in Home Economics as part of the Applied Skills 8 rotation.
FASHION SEWING BASICS 10
(MTXT-10)
Fashion Sewing Basics 9/10 builds on the skills learned in Home Economics 8. Students will make five projects
including pants and a skirt, a shirt or blouse, a t-shirt and summer dress/sportswear. Students will learn how to
use commercial patterns, basic clothing construction techniques (e.g. darts, zippers, waistbands, pockets, hems,
buttons, seam finishes) as well as mastering the use of a sewing machine and serger. There is one introductory
class project which all students will make in order to learn specific skills before they start working on their own
garments. Students will also learn some basic modelling skills and will participate in the annual school fashion
show to be held in May.
FASHION SEWING for BEGINNERS 11
(YVHE-1BEG)
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This course is designed for senior students who have limited or no experience in the use of commercial patterns.
Garment construction projects such as a top, skirt or pants, and a whole outfit will enable students to learn basic
clothing construction skills and how to use a commercial pattern. In order to develop a variety of skills, all
students will make a stuffed decorator bear, and a t-shirt on the serger. These projects are designed to teach
students specific skills before they start working on their own garments. Students will also learn some basic
modelling skills and will participate in the annual school fashion show that is held in May.
FASHION SEWING INTERMEDIATE 11
(MTXT-11)
In this course students will learn techniques to enable them to work quickly and accurately as well as some
factory and contemporary design techniques. Student will also learn the basics of wardrobe planning, and ways
to maximize their fashion dollars. Class time is concentrated on the construction of a four-piece capsule
wardrobe, and a special occasion outfit, such as a prom dress. Basic pattern drafting will be taught so that
students can design their skirts and tops. For their introductory project, a designer garment bag will take the
place of most required samples. Students will be required to model their projects in the annual school fashion
show that is held in May. This is the first core course required for the Fashion Design & Merchandising Career
Preparation Program.
FASHION SEWING ADVANCED 12
(MTXT-12)
This course is designed to strengthen the working relationship between the student, and advanced sewing
techniques as well as using specialty fabrics. Designer clothing construction techniques will be taught. The
number and type of projects will be individually negotiated with the instructor to guarantee the inclusion of new
techniques and sewing experiences. Students will be required to model their projects in the annual school
fashion show that is held in May.
ADVANCED FASHION CONSTRUCTION 12 (YVHE-2DADV)
Students will learn advanced contemporary techniques of tailoring used in commercial construction as well as
traditional European couture methods. They will learn to handle special fabrics and advanced designer
techniques. Students will be required to complete three major projects: 1) tailored suit (jacket plus pant or skirt,
2) formal wear, 3) jacket or coat made from outer wear fabric or leather. Students will be required to model
their projects in the annual school fashion show that is held in May.
ADVANCED FASHION CONSTRUCTION 12 – part 2 (YVHE-3DADV)
Students will learn more specialized contemporary techniques and construct a classic Chanel jacket. Some of
the contemporary techniques developed by Julian Roberts and Shingo Sato will be taught. These will include
transformation reconstruction, subtraction technique and zero wastage. Students will be required to model their
projects in the annual school fashion show that is held in May.
FASHION DESIGN 12A
(YVHE-2A)
In this course, students will explore the creativity and individuality of fashion design concepts. They will gain
skills and knowledge in the technical aspects of pattern making through flat pattern manipulations, pattern
drafting techniques, draping and/or computer generated techniques. After completing 1/4 scale flat pattern
manipulations, students will complete a process from original design ideas to pattern construction, to prototypes
of designs, to finished garments (Dior 50’s and Mod 60’s.) They will be required to design and make 3
complete outfits for a collection and 2 period garments. Students will be required to model their projects in the
annual school fashion show that is held in May.
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FASHION DESIGN 12B
(YVHE-2B)
In this course, students will further develop skills from YVHE2A in creating original designs, pattern making
and garment construction from those patterns. Creativity and self-expression through clothing design and
construction are stressed. Students will design and create garments using various pattern making techniques
such as flat pattern design, computer assisted design, and draping. Students will be required to design a
collection of 4 complete outfits as well as 2 period garments (1920’s and 1930’s.) This course is a must for any
student who is interested in continuing fashion design studies at the post-secondary level. Students will be
required to model their projects in the annual school fashion show that is held in May.
FASHION DESIGN & MERCHANDISING 12A (YVHE-2EFDM)
This course is designed for students who are interested in fashion design and merchandising careers, and is a
requirement for the Fashion Design and Merchandising Career Preparation program. Students will be
introduced to a wide variety of fashion related careers, principles of design, fashion history, textile science and
market effect, as well as fashion promotion and retailing. Assignments such as fashion illustration and the
creation of a personal fashion portfolio will enhance the students’ understanding of the evolution and dynamics
of the fashion industry. Students will be required to maintain a portfolio that will be used for interviews. The
successful completion of this course will benefit students who wish to apply to college and university fashion
design and/or merchandising programs. This course is only offered every other year. It will be offered in the
2014/2015 school year.
Note: Both the Vancouver Fashion District Program and the Fashion Design & Merchandising Career
Preparation Program are offered at Hamber. The District program requires students to take 8 courses between
grade 11 and 12 as well as 90-100 hours of work experience. These courses are scheduled on the same day
allowing more time to develop advanced techniques in both construction and design. The required courses are
MTXT11 and/or 12, Advanced Fashion Construction 12 (YVHE-2DADV), Fashion Design 12A (YVHE-2A),
Fashion Design 12B (YVHE-2B), Fashion Design & Merchandising 12A (YVHE-2EFDM), Advanced Fashion
Construction 12 part 2. The Fashion Career Preparation program requires a selection of fewer courses than the
District program. Articulation is being sought with post-secondary fashion programs which will give these
students some credits towards their post-secondary program. More details to follow.
FOODS FUNDAMENTALS 9/10
(MFDN-10)
This course involves the use of techniques and equipment for the planning, preparation and serving of nutritious
meals for oneself and the family. Students will learn to bake and cook meals as well as master time
management, and safety and sanitation skills. The main focus of this course will be healthy eating choices and
preparation to enhance the quality of life. Foods for special occasions and recipes from around the world will
be introduced. Students will make products such as tasty fajitas, stir-fries, teriyaki burgers, soups and finish the
year with cakes and dessert. Some perennial favourites such as pizza, and shish kebobs are also included.
Evaluation is based heavily on practical work and approximately 50% is based on theory.
NOVICE CHEF ON THE RUN 11
(YHEC-1ACON)
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This course is designed for senior students who have limited or no experience in the kitchen or who have not
taken MFDN10. Novice Chef on the Run involves the use of techniques and equipment for the planning,
preparation, and serving of nutritious meals for oneself and the family. Foods for special occasions and recipes
from around the world are also introduced. The main focus of this course will be healthy eating choices and
preparation to enhance the quality of life. Students will make products such as tasty fajitas, stir-fries, teriyaki
burgers and cakes. Some perennial favourites such as pizza and shish kebobs are also included. Evaluation is
based heavily on practical work and approximately 50% is based on theory.
*Please note that Culinary Arts will be offered in odd-numbered years and Global Gourmet will be
offered in even-numbered years. Students will receive credit for MFDN11 in their first year in one of
these courses and will receive credit for MFDN12 when both courses have been successfully completed.
CULINARY ARTS 11/12
(MFDN-11 or MFDN-12)
In this course, senior students will learn all about food - from its production, processing, marketing, preparation,
presentation, and finally what it can do for one’s health. This course will develop students’ culinary skills to
enable them to plan, prepare, and serve appealing meals for their families and for special occasions. Students
will have the opportunity to use their etiquette and hospitality/food service skills when they entertain guests.
There will be an opportunity to learn basic cake decorating skills and experience an in-class Iron Chef
competition. The aim of this course is to have students achieve a standard of excellence in preparing simple to
advanced dishes with an emphasis on technique and service. Some popular labs include the classic Pavlova,
Chicken Vol-au-vent and Napoleon puff pastry products. Evaluation will be based on mastering food
preparation techniques, understanding the theory that underlies the preparation of healthy, appealing, and
efficient meals, as well as being creative with the foods presentation. This course will be offered in the 20152016
school
year.
GLOBAL GOURMET 11/12
(MFDN-11 or MFDN-12)
This course will enable students to develop international culinary skills and an appreciation of foods from
around the world. In addition, students will learn about special diets, nutrition, and contemporary food issues,
and increase their culinary vocabulary. Cuisines of Asia (Chinese, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean, & Thai),
Europe (French & Italian), Mexico and other parts of the world will be covered in this course. Learning
activities will include tastings, buffets as well as small group food preparation. Favourite labs are the classic
French soufflé and crepes, Italian homemade pasta and Asian curries. Evaluation will be based on mastering
food preparation, and the understanding of the theory that underlies the preparation of healthy, appealing, and
efficient meals. This course will be offered in the 2014-2015 school year.
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 11
(MFM--11)
This course focuses on learning about yourself and others which is a great asset when you are considering any
type of human services or people-oriented career. You will have the opportunity to practice and improve your
communication and team-building skills; learn about the classic personality theories such as Freud’s
psychoanalytical theory; explore stress management techniques, as well as how to build and maintain rewarding
relationships in your life. A course such as Social Psychology 11 looks good on your resume, as employers are
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always looking for employees who will work well with other staff members. Evaluation will be based on
participation in class activities and a variety of assignments and some tests.
FAMILY SOCIOLOGY 12
(MFM--12)
Family Sociology explores the family in society - its development, its forms and its relationships. The topics of
this course are designed to include much of what every person encounters in his or her lifetime. Family
Sociology 12 includes topics such as: preparing yourself for independent living, factors which contribute to
healthy, happy, long term relationships; the institution of marriage; exploring and building family strength, and
lifestyle changes such as marriage, aging, parenting, etc. You will have the opportunity to develop your own
personal philosophy to guide your life decisions, to discover what kinds of relationships will be more satisfying
for you, and how you can form the best possible family situation including raising responsible, well-adjusted
children. Current issues that affect the structure and integrity of the family will also be discussed in class.
Evaluation will be based on the student’s participation in class activities as well as a variety of assignments and
some tests.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 12 (APSY-12AP)
This course will cover topics found in an introductory university psychology course. Students must be prepared
to set aside additional time for assignments and study. Topics will include research methods, biological aspects
of psychology, perception, learning and memory, cognitive abilities and language, consciousness, emotions,
developmental psychology, personality and social behaviour, stress, and psychological disorders and their
treatments. Evaluation will be based on chapter tests, homework and term projects. The AP psychology College
Board examination in May requires payment of a fee, and if students are successful in this exam the student will
gain credit for first year university psychology.
BAKING/PASTRY ARTS 10 & PLANNING 10 (XAT--10BAK) – paired with Planning 10
credits
2
This is a demonstration and hands-on course covering products like cookies, cakes, yeast breads, and pastries.
In this course students will learn to produce a variety of advanced baked products and the principles involved in
each aspect of baking. Students will learn to use a variety of baking equipment properly and safely. The
nutritional value of various baked goods and how to evaluate baked goods will be covered. Students will also be
engaged in designing ways to improve baked goods nutritionally and/or in flavour, eye appeal and mouth feel.
They will demonstrate effective time management skills, work in a team setting, and learn to read and follow
instructions. Students will be introduced to the basic skills necessary in pursuing a career in the baking and food
industry.
FIBRE ARTS 10 & PLANNING 10
(XAT--10FIB) – paired with Planning 10
credits
2
Fibre Arts is a multi-faceted form of artistic expression that may include some or all of the following
techniques: appliqueing, beading, crocheting, embroidering, knitting, macramé, quilting, sewing, and any other
form that uses natural or synthetic fibres as its basic material.
This course will introduce students to various fibre arts techniques that will provide them with lifelong skills,
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interests, and hobbies. They will learn how to safely use and care for equipment as well as the elements and
principles of design. Students will be required to make 5-6 mini sample projects and one major project using
one of the techniques learned in class.
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MATHEMATICS
Mathematics Course Structure
Mathematics 8 POD
Mathematics 9 POD
Apprenticeship &
Workplace Math 10
Apprenticeship &
Workplace Math 11
12
Apprenticeship &
Workplace Math 12
MATHEMATICS 8
Mathematics 8
Challenge
Mathematics 8
Mathematics 9
Challenge
Mathematics 9
Foundations Math 10/
Pre-Calculus Math 10
Foundations of
Mathematics 11
Pre-Calculus
Mathematics 11
Mathematics
11 Enriched
Foundations of
Mathematics 12
Pre-Calculus
Mathematics 12
Calc 12 or
AP Calc
(MMA--08POD)
This course is intended for students who need a thorough review of foundational concepts, and a good
grounding in the fundamentals of Mathematics 8. In most cases students would have been recommended by
their elementary school teacher. Successful students will move on to Mathematics 9, upon recommendation of
the teacher, or to Math 9 POD.
MATHEMATICS 8
(MMA--08)
This course should be viewed as a richer extension of Mathematics 7. The emphasis is on multiplicative
reasoning applied to mathematical objects encountered in elementary mathematics, such as integers and
fractions. Ratio and rates, surface areas and volumes, and linear relations are among the key concepts explored
in this course.
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MATHEMATICS 8/9 CHALLENGE
(MMA--08CH8) (MMA--10CH9)
This is a two year program for students who have demonstrated an interest in mathematics in elementary school,
as well as an aptitude and a work ethic that will enable them to learn the Mathematics 8-10 curriculum in two
school years. The Math 8 course and at least one-half of the Math 9 material will be taken in Math 8 Challenge,
and the second half of the Math 9 and the Math 10 course will be studied in Math 9 Challenge. Students will be
expected to complete other math enrichment activities and to compete in various mathematics competitions, as
they occur throughout the program. The students will be exposed to a faster rate of material coverage, and will
learn to function academically in an oral and written sense commensurate with that expected of a class of highly
motivated and able students. Students must maintain a C+ average to remain in this program. Successful
completion of these two courses leads to either Pre-Calculus 11 or Pre-Calculus 11 Enriched.
MATHEMATICS 9
(MMA--09)
Reasoning and foundational algebraic concepts (linear equations) are the focus in this course. Students will
explore notions such as inequality and non-linear growth, and learn deductive reasoning skills in the context of
circle geometry.
MATHEMATICS 9 POD
(MMA--09POD)
This course has its content selected and organized for the continuing learner who is weak in basic skills. It
continues to extend the development of basic skills learned in previous courses. Successful students may move
on to Foundations Math 10/Pre-Calculus Math 10 upon recommendation of the teacher. In most cases, students
will move on to Apprenticeship and Workplace Math 10 the following year.
FOUNDATIONS & PRE-CALCULUS MATH 10 (MFMP-10)
This course is intended for students who have demonstrated mastery of Mathematics 8 and Mathematics 9. The
level of abstraction in this course is a quantum leap up from earlier years. The building blocks of calculus –
functions, slope, and polynomial algebra – are at the core of this course. Students completing this course will
have three options for the following year:
APPRENTICESHIP & WORKPLACE MATH 10
(MAWM-10)
This course is intended for students who do not need abstract algebraic skills for their future studies including
students who plan to enter college programs such as those offered by BCIT or Langara. The focus will be on reenforcement of fundamental reasoning skills in the contexts of income and currency exchange, basic
trigonometry, analysis of games and puzzles, and manipulation of formulas.
PRE-CALCULUS MATH 11
(MPREC11)
This course is algebra-heavy; students must be fluent in algebraic symbol manipulation, and have a sound
understanding of graphs and trigonometry. The study of functions is central to PC Math 11. Students taking this
course plan to enter a university program where calculus is a required first-year course, such as Faculties of
Science or Engineering.
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FOUNDATIONS MATH 11
(MFOM-11)
Foundations Math 11 is for students who plan to enter university programs where calculus is not a required
first-year course, such as most (but not all) Faculty of Arts programs. At the time of writing Foundations of
Math 12 is also required for BC university entrance: students should check with the institutions to which they
plan to apply. Foundations Math courses offer the bare-bones of their Pre-Calculus counterparts, with everyday
statistics replacing abstract study of functions.
APPRENTICESHIP & WORKPLACE MATH 11 (MAWM-11)
Personal finance, compound interest and credit, formula manipulation, and familiarity with Imperial and SI
units are the key topics in this course. Students taking this course will be aiming to enter a college or technical
institute directly after graduating from high school. This course meets the Mathematics 11 graduation
requirement.
PRE-CALCULUS MATH 12
(MPREC12)
Preparation for first-year calculus is an aim of this course. This course is heavily theoretical in nature. Students
should have strong algebra skills and a sound grasp of concepts such as functions and trigonometry. The
detailed study of logarithmic, exponential, and sinusoidal functions lies at the heart of this course. Rote
memorization will not suffice for success in this course; there is an emphasis on proof and understanding of
underlying structures. Students should preferably have achieved a minimum of 70% in PC Math 11.
CALCULUS 12
(MCALC12)
This course is for students who are planning on taking more mathematics classes at the post-secondary level.
Topics that will be covered include properties of functions, limits, differential and integral calculus. Students
must generally have a minimum of 86% in both Pre-Calculus Math 11 and Pre-Calculus Math 12. In some
cases, Pre-Calculus 12 may be taken concurrently if a student has an outstanding Pre-Calculus Math 11 mark.
Permission of the Instructor and the Department Head will be needed in exceptional cases. Qualified grade 12
students have priority enrolment. Students will be qualified to write the AP Calculus (AB) exam in May.
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 10
(MINT-10)
An academic course in introductory computer programming using the Python language. This course teaches
students to create their own software from scratch. Programming concepts are introduced using real life
problems and assignments. Many students find this to be a challenging yet interesting and fun course. Students
who intend to go into Science, Engineering, Commerce or Mathematics will have a major advantage by taking
this course in high school. Get ready to learn something new every period. All programming courses are taught
in a Linux computer lab.
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 11
(MICTP11)
The second course of Python computer programming. In this course students can expect to learn how to make
GUI (Graphical User Interface) programs using the pyFLTK toolkit. Many cool games and assignments will be
covered including network programming. In addition, students will also be introduced to creating arcade style
video games using the pySFML library. This course will also introduce OOP (Object Oriented Programming)
using Python. An exciting and fun course aimed at application development.
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COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 12
(MICTP12)
The final course offered in computer programming. This course will introduce the C++ language. Advanced
concepts such as pointers, dynamic memory allocation, classes and inheritance will be taught. Some
assignments will also include higher level Math and other advanced algorithms. FLTK and SFML libraries will
also be revisited in native C++. Designed to give students who will be taking programming at University a head
start.
MODERN LANGUAGES
FRENCH
FRENCH 8
(MFR--08)
This course is intended to be the culmination of a four-year sequence of introductory French which began in
Grade 5. As some students have not studied French before, we will begin with an introduction to verbs, nouns
and other grammatical tools to provide students with a strong foundation as they work towards developing
communicative competency. Themes and topics introduced include description of oneself, leisure activities,
hobbies, health, nutrition, friendships, travel and francophone countries.
Grammatical concepts include: the conjugation of regular verbs, the partitive article, possessive adjectives,
ALLER, AVOIR, ÊTRE, FAIRE, VOULOIR and POUVOIR, the prepositions À, AU, AUX and EN, the
imperative and the comparative.
Please note that if a student is entering Grade 8 in September with a strong French language background, it
is imperative than an appointment be made with the Language Department Head in May in order to assess
the French level for correct placement. It may not be possible to accommodate or change the student’s
schedule in September due to timetable conflicts or lack of available space.
FRENCH 9
(MFR--09)
This course will provide students with several opportunities to strengthen their communicative skills. Topics
include: the outdoors, sports, music, environmental and humanitarian projects.
Grammatically successful students will become more proficient in using the comparative, the superlative, the
imperative, the demonstrative adjective, the placement of adjectives, the verb VENIR, direct object pronouns,
the near future and the compound past tense.
FRENCH 9ADV
(MFR--09ADV)
Prerequisite teacher recommendation. The 9ADV class will meet the same content as FR9. Course content will
be enriched by providing students with more challenging reading and interactive activities.
FRENCH 10
(MFR--10)
Students will be reintroduced to the compound past tense and acquire vocabulary based on themes which
include home life, personal history, life in Canada, and films. The imperfect tense will be introduced slowly,
and control of irregular past tense verb forms will improve. As students build upon their communicative
competency their oral interaction will be more engaging and their written expression will be driven by
creativity.
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FRENCH 10 ADV
(MFR--10ADV)
Prerequisite teacher recommendation. This course will cover essentially the same content as FR10, but with
more attention to speaking activities and supplementary projects in keeping with the students' abilities.
FRENCH 11
(MFR--11)
It is important that the passé composé be well-learned before attempting this course. Themes include world
cuisine, memories of childhood, and coping with stress. Grammatical concepts include the comparative and
superlative, the simple future tense, the conditional mood, relative clauses and the pronouns to introduce them,
the interrogative pronoun lequel, the present participle and the past participle as adjectives. Also included will
be special cases of agreement of past participle in passé composé of avoir verbs. Also, students will be exposed
to the direct object pronouns (DOP), indirect object pronouns (IOP), y, and en with the indicative and
imperative moods.
There is increased emphasis on the contrasting use of the passé composé and the imperfect tenses. Activities
include listening for general and specific information, reading for comprehension, pair and group conversation,
and projects requiring team cooperation.
FRENCH 11 ADV
(MFR--11ADV)
Prerequisite teacher recommendation. This course will cover the same grammatical concepts as Fr11, but will
be further enriched with more challenging reading, writing and speaking activities.
FRENCH 12
(MFR--12)
The goal of French 12 is for students to be able to use their prior knowledge of French more comfortably and
fluently. Various themes will be used to offer students practice in reading, writing and speaking.
Comprehension of spoken French will be reinforced by increasing use of the French language in instruction and
in exchanges between students.
Grammatical concepts include the pluperfect tense, the past conditional and subjunctive moods, the passé
simple tense for reading recognition and the "si-clause" patterns. Preposition patterns, pronouns and all
previously learned tenses will be reviewed and used in this course.
MANDARIN
NOTE: Mandarin courses are not intended to serve as "heritage language" courses. They are taught as a foreign
language and students who already read and write Mandarin are not expected to enrol.
MANDARIN 9
(MMAN-09)
Students in Grades 8-10 can take this course if they have no significant background in Mandarin. The typical
Mandarin 9 beginner might be able to say or write a few basic words, but is unable to produce connected
sentences.
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MANDARIN 10
(MMAN-10)
Students in Grades 10 or 11 who have some Mandarin skills or have completed Mandarin 9 should take this
course. The typical student might have had only 2 or 3 years of elementary Mandarin, and might possess a
limited vocabulary for self-introduction and family-centred topics.
Over the two years of Mandarin 9 and 10, the student will learn the sounds of Mandarin, with the Pin-Yin
system of romanized spelling. The characters of about 600 words will be learned, and the vocabulary of daily
situations will be practised: classroom expressions, self-introduction, the number system, time, foods, clothing,
pastimes, weather and seasons, sports, household items and parts of the body. Students will practice reading
aloud and reading for comprehension, formulate questions and create dialogues and a short personal letter.
**At the end of Mandarin 10, students will be ready to take an HSK Level 2 test (a series of standard Mandarin
tests used worldwide.)
MANDARIN 11
(MMAN-11)
This course will suit those who have completed Mandarin 10, or students who have had Chinese language
education but who do not yet speak Mandarin. The student will gain increased understanding of Chinese values
and customs and of the importance of Chinese language and culture to Canada and the world. Conversation
practice will focus on making arrangements, giving instructions, description, complaints and compliments,
stating preferences and intentions, and describing feelings and emotions. Reading will include Chinese literature
and culturally interesting stories. Students will respond to comprehension questions, make inferences and
paraphrase what is read. In writing, both simplified and traditional characters will be used. Calligraphy lessons
will include brush writing. Composition skills include informal note-writing, personal letters, short paragraphs
and simple compositions based on familiar topics and folk-tales.
**At the end of Mandarin 11, students will be ready to take an HSK Level 3 Test (a series of standard Mandarin
tests used worldwide.)
MANDARIN 12
(MMAN-12)
This course is for those who have completed Mandarin 11, with very few exceptions. Native speakers of
Mandarin are not expected to enrol in this or any other Mandarin course. By the end of this course, students
should be able to understand conversational exchanges and function well in daily situations, and to a lesser
degree discuss cultural differences and current social and political issues. They will hear recorded narrations of
short stories and view films. They will compose dialogues, advertisements for real or imaginary products,
commentaries on current events, and reports on weather and sports. They will engage in debate and make
individual presentations to the class. Reading will include a variety of poems, essays and articles, and writing
will include both simplified and traditional characters, including brush-writing. Compositions will be required
in the styles of some of the reading studied.
**Upon completing Mandarin 12, students will be ready to take an HSK Level 4 Test or even higher (a series of
standard Mandarin Tests used worldwide.)**
MANDARIN ACCELERATED PROGRAM
Students in this program should have completed the Mandarin bilingual program from grade 4 to grade 7 at
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Jamieson Elementary School. This program offers two separate courses in grade 8 and one course in grade 9.
The students are required to take all courses in order to remain in the accelerated program.
MANDARIN 8 ACCELERATED (Language)
(MMAN-08LA)
This course further develops Mandarin literacy and communicative proficiency using Chinese Made Easy, Book
2. Exploration into the Chinese culture will include history, art appreciation and selected literature. Students
learn to read and write the simplified characters and may use the traditional characters as an aide during this
transition. Pinyin is also introduced in the beginning of the year and is continuously used throughout the course
of the whole program. The emphasis is on proficient verbal communication with reading and writing
complimenting verbal fluency.
**This course is intended for students who have completed the Mandarin Bilingual Program at Jamieson
Elementary.
**Students enrolling in this course MUST ALSO register for Mandarin 8 Accelerated (Communication)
(MMANH-08CO)
MANDARIN 8 ACCELERATED (Communication) (MMAN-08CO)
This course builds on the language skills acquired in elementary school. Students continue to develop their oral
communication skills through a variety of creative works (i.e. songs, films, artwork, presentations and news
reporting). At the end of the course students should be able to express themselves orally in basic Mandarin.
*This course is intended for students who have completed the Mandarin Bilingual Program at Jamieson
Elementary.
**Students enrolling in this course MUST ALSO register for Mandarin 8 Accelerated (Language) (MMAN08LA)
MANDARIN 9 ACCELERATED (Language)
(MMAN-10LA)
This course is a continuation of Mandarin 8 Accelerated (Language). Students continue to acquire Mandarin
language proficiency through a communicative and a more literature-based approach using Chinese Made Easy,
Book 3. Creative writing and personal writing will be explored. Transference of a more literal writing style will
be encouraged in written expressions. Exploration into the Chinese culture will continue to include history, art
appreciation and selected literature. At the end of the course, students should be able to read comprehensively
and express themselves in writing in more meaningful contexts, such as notes, letters and descriptive
paragraphs. Students will proceed either to Mandarin 10 or Mandarin 11 the following year. This will be based
on teacher’s recommendation and result of final grade.
SPANISH
SPANISH 9
(MSP-- 09)
In this introductory course students will learn to exchange greetings, describe people, exchange school, family
and personal information, make plans for the weekend, express likes and dislikes and discuss the weather,
everyday activities and more.
Students will also gain an understanding of Hispanic culture, acquire reading skills and learn some grammar.
Through exposure to video and audio recordings, they will develop an ear for spoken Spanish modelled by
native speakers from around the Spanish-speaking world. The class will listen to a number of Spanish and
Latin-American songs reflecting a wide variety of musical styles.
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SPANISH 10
(MSP--10)
Students will build upon their communicative skills, enabling them to: shop, ask for and give directions, say the
right things in a restaurant, describe their daily routine, give orders, talk about sports, understand recipes,
describe health problems to a doctor and guide their family through a vacation in a Spanish-speaking location.
Students will also be able to talk about what they have done, trips taken and adventures experienced. Reading
skills and listening skills will be developed, and students will read several short stories.
BEGINNERS SPANISH 11
(MBSP-11)
This is an accelerated course, which covers the full curricula of Spanish 9 and 10 in one year. Upon successful
completion of this course, students will have an understanding of basic grammar as well as aspects of the
Spanish culture. This course is offered to students who have no experience in Spanish or those wishing to
improve their basic Spanish language skills before entering Spanish 11. As this is an accelerated program,
preference will be given to students in grades 10, 11, or 12 who are highly motivated.
SPANISH 11
(MSP--11)
Students will study Spanish-centered themes of teen activities, the communications media, geography and
cultural diversity. Students will be able to discuss more extensively the topics of school and classes, leisure
activities, the family, summer vacations, the environment, geography and much more. They will learn to make
comparisons, persuade, give orders and talk about the past. The cultural focus is on the Southwestern U.S.,
Venezuela, Chile and Peru, their regional geographies, people and their traditions. Reading and listening skills
will expand through hearing and reading numerous short stories, poems and songs.
SPANISH 12
(MSP--12)
The second half of the Spanish 11/12 text introduces such themes as health, a camping trip, jobs/careers and
making travel plans. Students will communicate hopes, opinions and emotions, give advice, give directions, tell
stories, extend and accept or decline invitations, speculate, assess probability, express doubt and make
suggestions. The cultural focus is on the regions and people of Spain, Costa Rica, Mexico and Argentina.
Reading and listening skills will continue to grow through intensive practice.
JAPANESE
JAPANESE 9
(MJA--09)
Japanese 9 is an entry level course. In this class, students will learn Katakana and Hiragana, components of the
Japanese writing system. Students will also learn simple greetings, school vocabulary and how to describe their
daily routines and favourite activities. The textbook Ikiteiru Nihongo, volume 1 and accompanying workbook
will be used daily in class. Chapters 1 through 5 will be covered in Japanese 9.
JAPANESE 10
(MJA--10)
In Grade 10, the second half of the Ikiteiru Nihongo, volume 1 (Chapters 6 through 12) will be used. Topics
include; describing objects and people, ordering at a fast food restaurant, talking about Japanese houses and
family, and locating objects and people. Students will be expected to read and write Hiragana and Katakana
fluently. Some basic Kanji (Chinese characters) will be introduced later in the year. Also included are an
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introduction to Japanese geography as well as cultural components such as holidays, seasonal customs and
events.
BEGINNERS JAPANESE 11
(MBJA-11)
This is an entry level course which will cover the Japanese 9 and 10 curricula in one year. Due to the
accelerated nature of the course, students are expected to have good work habits. This course is for senior
students who want to learn a new language. After completion of this course, those who want to continue can
take Japanese 11.
JAPANESE 11
(MJA--11)
In Grade 11, some of the previously covered topics will be further developed. Students will learn verb "te"
forms which will enable them to express gratitude or sympathy, to make requests, and to congratulate someone.
Students will also learn principles of paragraph organization in order to give directions, write messages and
compose letters. About 60 additional kanji will be introduced. Textbook used is Ikiteiru Nihongo, Volume 2.
JAPANESE 12
(MJA--12)
Ikiteiru Nihongo, volumes 2 & 3 are used in Japanese 12. The students will practice forming combined and
compound sentences to express themselves in a variety of social situations and to write well-organized
paragraphs.
Students will learn to manipulate Japanese to perform several language functions: to express cause and effect, to
give and receive favours, and to communicate in different social registers using different politeness levels.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
**Participation in any PE 10, 11 and 12 will fulfill the Graduation Transition requirement of 150 minutes a
week of daily physical activity (DPA). A student will not be required to log his/her activity unless a student has
more than five absences. In this case, the student will be asked to take the responsibility to record his activities
weekly at the Learn Now BC site.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 8/9/10
(MPE--08BOY) (MPE--08GRL) etc. for each grade
In the three courses comprising the compulsory Physical Education program to the end of Grade 10, students
will acquire a(n):
- positive attitude towards participation in physical activity and working positively with others, and their own
positive personal attributes;
- appreciation of the value of developing and maintaining an active lifestyle;
- understanding of concepts, rules, techniques, and strategies involved in various physical activities chosen
from team games, individual and dual activities, racquet sports, dance, and outdoor recreational pursuits;
- proficiency in motor skills for the students to apply in physical activities; and
- satisfactory level of physical fitness through knowledge of the components of fitness and how these can be
improved through practice.
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PHYSICAL EDUCATION 11/12
(MPE--11) (MPE--12)
The main objective of the senior PE classes is to continue to develop student interest and enjoyment in pursuing
lifelong physical activity. This will be achieved through participating in individual and initiative/cooperative
tasks as well as group activities from the four game categories: target games, net/wall games, striking games
and territorial games. All of our experiences in class are designed to achieve an enhanced awareness of
technical and tactical skills across all games. As with all our PE programs, students will continue to develop
positive leadership, problem solving and interpersonal skills essential to working within a group setting.
Throughout this course, we will be exploring the physical activity opportunities that exist in the Greater
Vancouver Area through various field trips. Field trips may include, but are not limited to: UBC High Ropes
Course, Dragon Boating, Curling, Wall Climbing, Hiking (Baden Powell Trail, Deep Cove, etc.), Pitch and Putt
Golf, Squash, Ski/Snowboarding, Shoe showing, Kayaking, Community Centre Fitness Classes.
All senior PE students are expected to complete ten (10) hours of service to the school intramural and/or athletic
programs.
RECREATION 11/12
(MPE--11REC) (MPE--12REC)
The focus of Recreation 11/12 is to provide students with a diverse recreational program. The course is
designed to encourage students to continue their participation in a variety of sport and leisure activities.
Activities will provide an enjoyable social experience and an opportunity to improve students’ skills and fitness.
Evaluation will be based primarily upon participation, and upon an assignments given class members.
The course goals are to:
• promote a lifelong involvement in sport and physical activity
• promote an appreciation for active healthy living including personal fitness
• promote the opportunity for all to participate regardless of skill, gender or experience; and,
• emphasize sportsmanship and acceptance of different levels of ability.
Students enrolled in Recreation 11 and 12 will also have the option to take part in the Hamber Recreation
Leadership Program. This program offers students the chance to practice their leadership skills by leading afterschool programs in elementary feeder schools.
FITNESS 11/12
(YHRA-1B) (YHRA-2B)
The focus of Fitness 11/12 is to provide students with the opportunity to explore activities which develop,
improve or maintain their fitness. Students will experience a range of training techniques including:
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•
•
•
•
Resistance training -- e.g. Machines, weights, exercise bands
Aerobic training -- e.g. Walking, running, step classes
Flexibility training -- e.g. Yoga, mat Pilates
Core strength training -- Bosu ball, fitness ball
Circuit training -- e.g. Power circuits, boot camp
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Students will get the information they need to develop a comprehensive training program including:
• Safety practices -- e.g. Injury prevention/rehabilitation, posture, body awareness
• Assessment tools -- e.g. Standardized testing, fitness journal, heart rate monitoring
• Physiological principles -- e.g. Principles of training/overtraining, stress, rest, nutrition
• Trends and Innovations in Fitness -- Guest experts will be employed
• Community Fitness -- Field trips to community/private/corporate fitness facilities
Fitness 11/12 is offered off timetable and runs Monday, Wednesday & Fridays at 7:30 a.m.
**Note: Students enrolling in PE 11 or 12 in addition to Recreation 11/12 in one school year will only receive
course credit for the course they achieve higher standing in. Students enrolling in PE 11/12 in addition to PE
Leadership 11/12 or Fitness 11/12 will receive credit for all PE courses in which they are enrolled.
PE LEADERSHIP 11/12
(YHRA-1A) (YHRA-1A)
The goal of this course is to develop Youth Leadership to deliver a variety of physical education and sports
activities for the Eric Hamber community. The time in class will be spent understanding the basic concepts of
proactive leadership and how to effectively use the concepts in life and within the school environment. Students
will have various opportunities to apply the concepts of leadership in a variety of settings that range from class
activities to school wide event planning. Leadership initiatives will include: planning and implementing grade
8/9 track meets, Midtown Showdown basketball tournament, intramural programs, and coordinating volunteers
in support of Hamber athletic programs (facility preparation, scorers, timers, referees, etc.). Students will
discover the benefits of volunteering and giving back to their school community and gain an appreciative
respect for the leaders who played a significant role in their lives.
SCIENCE
SCIENCE 8
(MSC--08)
This course presents an introduction to the four major areas that are studied in our Junior Science courses. Life
science (Cells & Systems): students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of living
things; relate the main features and properties of cells to their functions; explain the relationship between cells,
tissues, organs and organ systems. Physical Science (Optics): students will be able to: demonstrate
knowledge of the behaviour of waves and explain how this relates to the properties of light and other types of
electromagnetic radiation; explain how human vision works. Physical Science (Fluids & Dynamics): Students
will be able to: describe the relationships amongst solids, liquids, and gases using the kinetic molecular theory;
determine the density of various substances; explain the relationships amongst pressure, temperature, area, and
force in fluids. Earth and Space Science (Water Systems on earth): students will be able to: explain the
significance of salinity and temperature of the world’s oceans; describe how water and ice shape the landscape;
describe factors that affect productivity and species distribution in aquatic environments.
SCIENCE 9
(MSC--09)
This course will expand on areas that were introduced in Science 8. Life Science (Reproduction): Students will
be able to: explain the process of cell division and relate this and reproductive technologies to embryonic
development; compare sexual and asexual reproduction in terms of advantages and disadvantages. Physical
Science (Chemistry): Students will be able to: describe structure and components of atoms and molecules
using atomic theory and the periodic table; write and interpret symbols for elements and formulae for ionic
compounds; describe changes in the properties of matter. Physical Science (Electricity): Students will be able
to: explain and describe the nature of static and current electricity; compare series and parallel circuits involving
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varying voltages, resistances and currents; relate electrical energy to power consumption. Earth & Space
Science (Space Exploration): Students will be able to: describe the major components of the universe and solar
system; describe traditional perspectives of a range of Aboriginal peoples in BC on the relationship between the
Earth and celestial bodies; explain astronomical phenomena and examine newer technologies as they relate to
our understanding of space and the implications of space travel.
SCIENCE 10
(MSC--10)
This course will continue with the four main units covered in Science 8 and Science 9. Students are required to
take the Science 10 Provincial exam at the end of the course. Life Science (sustainability of ecosystems):
Students will be able to: explain the interaction of abiotic and biotic factors within an ecosystem; assess the
potential impacts of bio-accumulation; explain various ways in which natural populations are altered or kept in
equilibrium. Physical Science (Chemical Reactions & Radioactivity): Students will be able to: differentiate
between atoms, ions, and molecules using knowledge of their structure and components; classify substances as
acids, bases, or salts, based on their characteristics, name and formula; distinguish between organic and
inorganic compounds; analyse chemical reactions, including reference to conservation of mass and rate of
reaction; explain radioactivity using modern atomic theory. Physical Science (Motion): Students will be able to:
explain the relationship of displacement and time interval to velocity for objects in uniform motion;
demonstrate the relationship between velocity, time interval, and acceleration. Earth & Space Science (Energy
Transfer in Natural Systems): Students will be able to: explain the characteristics and sources of thermal energy;
explain the effects of thermal energy within the atmosphere; evaluate possible causes of climate change and its
impact on natural systems. Earth & Space Science (Plate Tectonics): Students will be able to: analyse the
processes and features associated with plate tectonics; demonstrate knowledge of evidence that supports plate
tectonic theory.
SCIENCE 8/9 CHALLENGE
(MSC--08CH8) (MSC--10CH9)
This is a two year program for students who have demonstrated a marked interest in Science in elementary
school, as well as an aptitude and work ethic that will enable them to cover the three years of Junior Science in
two school years. Basically, the Science 8 and one half of the Science 9 material will be taken in Science 8
Challenge, while the second half of Science 9 and the Science 10 course will be done in Science 9 Challenge.
Students will be exposed to a higher rate of material coverage and will learn to function academically in an oral
and written sense commensurate with that expected of a class of highly motivated and able students.
BIOLOGY 11
(MBI--11)
The Biology 11 course addresses a representative sample of organisms and introduces students to a variety of
biological skills and scientific problems. Core Topics are as follows: Methods & Principles: Students will
learn: to apply the scientific method to the description and explanation of adaptation and evolutionary change
and to the development of classification strategy. Microbiology: Students will learn: to state the characteristics
of viruses, bacteria, and protists and describe the significance of each to humans and other organisms. Plant
Biology: Students will learn: to state the characteristics and interrelationships associated with plants, from
simplest algae to the most advanced flowering varieties. Animal Biology: Students will learn: to identify
characteristics common to animals and to compare and contrast anatomical and physiological features of
vertebrates and the various phyla of invertebrates; to explain why insects and mammals have special
significance as representative classes.
BIOLOGY 12
(MBI--12)
The Biology 12 course has an emphasis on cell and human biology. Core topics are as follows: Methods &
Principles: Students will learn to: design an experiment to test a hypothesis and to explain the role of various
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controls; define homeostasis and relate to this concept in terms of positive and negative feedback. Cell Biology:
Students will learn to: identify and understand the function of compounds related to cell physiology; describe
the processes associated with cell metabolism, e.g. diffusion, enzyme action, cellular respiration. Human
Biology: Students will learn to: differentiate amongst tissues, organs and organ systems; identify and describe
parts and functions of major body systems: digestive, circulatory, nervous, respiratory, excretory, endocrine and
reproductive.
CHEMISTRY 11
(MCH--11)
Chemistry 11 is an introductory course which emphasizes scientific observation, chemical behaviour patterns
and molecular structure. The core topics are as follows. Lab Safety: Students will learn: to describe hazards
associated with the chemistry lab, and rules necessary to prevent accidents in order to work safely in the lab.
Properties of Substance: Students will learn: to identify physical properties of matter and describe how these
are related to classification; to record quantitative data and account for errors in measurement. Inorganic
Naming: Students will learn: to identify, by formula and name, a variety of chemical compounds. Mole
Concept: Students will learn: to describe the mole in terms of number of particles and quantity of mass and to
perform related calculations. Chemical Reactions: Students will learn: to identify different types of reactions,
balance equations and perform calculations associated with the mole concept. Atomic Structure: Students will
learn: to describe atomic structure and how it relates to the position of elements on the periodic table. Bonding:
Students will learn: to demonstrate the significance of electrons to ionic and covalent bonding. Organic
Chemistry: Students will learn: to understand the connection between structure and names of organic
compounds. Solutions: Students will learn: to describe the nature of different solutions; to explain the concept
of molarity and perform associated calculations; to relate general properties of acidic and basic solutions and
describe reactions between the two.
NEW: CHEMISTRY 11 - SEMESTERED
(MCH--11-S1)
This course is offered as a pairing with Chemistry 12 in the second semester and cannot be taken on its own.
Science 10 teacher recommendation is required to enrol for this course.
CHEMISTRY 11E
(MCH--11ENR)
Recommendation of Science 10 teacher required. This is an enriched Chemistry 11 course that will cover
approximately half of the AP Chemistry curriculum. All of the Chemistry 11 topics will be covered, usually to
greater depth and other areas will be explored as well. Students who maintain an A or B standing in this course
will be invited to continue with AP Chemistry 12 in the following year or they may take regular Chemistry 12
instead. The core topics are as follows. Significant Figures: Students will learn to: express numerical answers
properly. Atoms, Molecules & Ions: Students will learn to: describe matter in terms of basic particles, describe
atomic structure and cite evidence for the atomic theory. Mole Concept: Students will learn to: express mole
and mass relationships amongst substances. Chemical Reactions: Students will learn to: recognize types of
reactions and predict products. Reaction Stoichiometry: Students will learn to: use the mole concept in
reaction calculations. Thermochemistry: Students will learn to: describe energy relationships in chemistry,
perform calorimetry calculations, and use Hess's Law to determine changes in enthalpy. Atomic Structure:
Students will learn to: describe electron energy levels in terms of spectra, quantum numbers and orbitals.
Periodic Properties: Students will learn to: appreciate the periodicity of the elements. Gases: Students will
learn to: describe and use relationships amongst pressure, volume, temperature and moles. Liquids and
Solids: Students will learn to: describe the intermolecular forces associated with these two phases; use phase
diagrams. Organic Chemistry: Students will learn to: recognize functional groups and organic nomenclature.
Nuclear Chemistry: Students will learn to: describe the nature of various nuclear changes.
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CHEMISTRY 12
(MCH--12)
Chemistry 12 involves more advanced concepts than in Chemistry 11. (Students should have an aptitude for this
subject and a high level of achievement in Chemistry 11). The core topics are as follows. Reaction Rates:
Students will learn to: demonstrate that reactions can proceed at different rates and identify means of altering
rates; describe the various factors affecting rates with particular emphasis on catalytic influence. Chemical
Equilibrium: Students will learn to: to identify and explain characteristics related to equilibrium; predict the
effect on equilibrium of changing factors, and perform related calculations. Solubility: Students will learn to:
describe solutions in terms of ion concentration, and consequences of dilution and of mixing. Equilibrium:
Students will learn to: describe the equilibrium associated with solutions and perform related calculations.
Acids, Bases & Salts: Students will learn to: describe and explain the nature of acidic, basic and salt solutions;
explain the significance of pH and of the equilibrium concept as they relate to acidic, basic, and salt solutions.
Oxidation & Reduction: Students will learn to: identify a substance in a reaction as an oxidizing or a reducing
agent and to balance these reaction equations; describe how electrochemical and electrolytic cells are
constructed and how they function.
NEW: CHEMISTRY 12 SEMESTERED
(MCH—12-S2)
Prerequisite: CH11 & MA11
4 credits
This course is offered as a pairing with Chemistry 11 in the first semester and cannot be taken on its own.
Science Department Head recommendation is required to enrol for this course.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY 12 (ACHE-12)
This is the second half of the AP Chemistry course (the first half was covered in Chemistry 11E). The
Advanced Placement Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually
taken during the first college or university year in the USA and covers about 90% of the same course in a
Canadian college or university. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as first-year students,
second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institutions or to register in courses in other fields where
general chemistry is a prerequisite. The regular Chemistry 12 curriculum is included in this course although
topics are explored in greater depth here. Due to the heavy course load, students are expected to attend extra
classes beyond the regular schedule. The core topics are as follows. Chemical Kinetics: Students will learn to:
describe the various factors affecting rates with particular emphasis on catalytic influence and to calculate the
rate constant and describe its relationship within the rate law expression. Chemical Equilibrium: Students will
learn to: identify and explain characteristics related to equilibrium; predict the effect on equilibrium of
changing factors, and perform related calculations. Solubility Equilibrium: Students will learn to: describe
solutions in terms of ion concentration and the consequences of dilution or mixing; describe the equilibrium
associated with solutions, the common ion effect and perform related calculations. Acid-base Equilibrium:
Students will learn to: describe and explain the nature of acidic, basic and salt solutions; explain the
significance of pH and of the equilibrium concept as they relate to these solutions and to perform related
calculations; describe buffer action and hydrolysis and to perform related calculations. Electrochemistry:
Students will learn to: identify a substance as an oxidizing or a reducing agent and to balance these reaction
equations; describe how electrochemical and electrolytic cells are constructed and how they function; perform
calculations associated with Faraday’s Laws and the Nernst equation. Thermodynamics: Students will learn to:
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describe the relationships amongst enthalpy, entropy and free energy. Properties of Solutions: Students will
learn to: describe colligative properties of solutions. Chemical Bonding: Students will learn to: describe Lewis
structures of molecular substances. Molecular Geometry & Bonding Theories: Students will learn to:
describe geometries in terms of VSPEPR and valence bond theory.
*Students will be qualified to write the AP Chemistry exam in early May.
EARTH SCIENCE 11
(MESC-11)
This course involves investigation into some of the major fields of earth science in order to form an up-to-date,
broad understanding of the story of the earth and its environment in space. The core topics are as follows.
Geological Science: Students will be able to: identify and describe physical and chemical properties of selected
rocks and minerals; describe the origin, exploration, extraction and uses of fossil fuels and ores; identify and
describe the process and effects of various types of weathering and erosion; identify causes of, and features
related to earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geothermal phenomena; describe the process of, and identify
features related to, tectonic movement. Oceanographic Science: Students will be able to: describe features of
the ocean floor; describe the origins of, and techniques used to study, these features; describe the location of,
and production of ocean currents. Astronomical Science: Students will be able to: describe methods of
detection and study of, and features related to stars and galaxies; describe features and origins of the sun,
planets and other objects associated with the solar system; describe how data on terrestrial and lunar distances
and motions is obtained. Atmospheric Science: Students will be able to: describe the composition of the
atmosphere and predict the effects of changing conditions related to ozone, water vapour and carbon dioxide
content; outline the wind circulation patterns over earth; identify various cloud types and describe the
hydrologic cycle; describe factors which determine weather and climate. Earth's History: Students will be able
to: construct a geologic time scale and describe methods used to date geologic features; identify features related
to the major geologic time periods.
PHYSICS 11
(MPH--11)
The Physics 11 course will provide students with insights into the scope, nature, relevance, and limitations of
physics. The topics in the course illustrate the substance of physics and are related to other aspects of a general
education. The core topics are as follows. Kinematics: Students will learn to: relate by graphical analysis, the
factors of time, distance, velocity, displacement and acceleration. Dynamics: Students will learn to: describe
and perform associated calculations pertaining to gravitational, frictional, and elastic forces as well as to
Newton's Laws of Motion and Momentum. Mechanical Heat Energy: Students will learn to: describe the
concepts of work, power, energy and how they are related. Nuclear Physics: Students will learn to: describe
radiation and radioactivity as applied to atomic structure and compare and contrast nuclear fission and fusion.
Light Waves: Students will learn to: identify the properties of light in terms of wave motion and perform
calculations associated with measurements of speed, wavelength, frequency, angles of incidence, reflection and
refraction. Applied Optics: Students will learn to: illustrate the characteristics of mirrors, lenses, prisms in
terms of effect on light radiation. Special Relativity: Students will learn to: outline Einstein's theory on special
relativity and how it relates to the speed of light.
PHYSICS 11E
(MPH--11ENR)
Recommendation of Science 10 teacher required. This is an enriched Physics 11 course that will cover
approximately half of the AP Physics curriculum. It is mathematically more rigorous than regular Physics 11.
The Advanced Placement Physics course is designed to be the equivalent of the general physics course usually
taken during the first college or university year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as
first-year students, second-year work in the physics sequence at their institutions or to register in courses in
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other fields where first year physics is a prerequisite.
Students who maintain an A or B standing in this course will be invited to continue with AP Physics 12 in the
following year or they may take regular Physics 12 instead. The core topics are as follows. Kinematics:
Students will learn to: use graphical and vector analysis to relate time, displacement, velocity and acceleration
in one and two dimensions. Dynamics: Students will learn to: use two dimensional vector analysis to solve
problems involving Newton’s Laws and Momentum. Mechanical Energy: Students will learn to: use the
concepts of work, power and energy and analyse the relationship between them. Nuclear Physics: Students will
learn to: describe radioactivity and half-life, nuclear reaction, compare fission and fusion, describe the
electromagnetic radiation in terms of waves as well as photons, understand the photoelectric effect. Light and
Sound: Students will learn to: identify the properties of light and sound in terms of waves and look at
interference, diffraction, superposition, Doppler effect, dispersion of light, reflection and refraction. Special
Relativity: Students will learn to: understand the postulate of special relativity and their time, space and mass
effects. Applied Optics: Students will learn to: illustrate the characteristics and solve problems involving
mirrors and lenses.
PHYSICS 12
(MPH--12)
This course is intended to provide students with a grounding in the discipline of physics as those who take it
might engage in further study of the subject. The treatment of the topics is mathematically more rigorous than in
Ph11. The core topics are as follows. Vector Kinetics: Students will learn to: use vector analysis by graphical
and trigonometric methods to describe two dimensional displacement and velocity; examine and describe
projectile motion. Vector Dynamics: Students will learn to: apply vector analysis to two dimensional forces.
Mechanical Vectors: Students will learn to: describe the relationships amongst impulse, energy & mass and
perform associated calculations. Momentum: Students will learn to: calculate from appropriate data: mass,
energy, power, work, time. Equilibrium: Students will learn to: define and determine from appropriate data:
torque and force and understand how these are related to rotational equilibrium. Circular Motion: Students
will learn to: describe the relationships between centripetal force and centripetal acceleration; apply these
concepts to planetary motion and gravitation using Kepler’s and Newton’s Laws. Electrostatics: Students will
learn to: use appropriate data to calculate: force, charge, distance, electric field strength, potential difference
and work. Circuitry: Students will learn to: describe electric current in terms of amperage, voltage, resistance,
and power and use measuring instruments effectively. Electromagnetism: Students will learn to: describe the
relationships existing between current, magnetic field strength and turns of wire; calculate factors associated
with magnetic induction.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS 12
(APHY-12)
This the second "half" of the AP Physics course (the first half was covered in Physics 11E). The Advanced
Placement Physics course is designed to be the equivalent of the general physics course usually taken during the
first college or university year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as first-year students,
second-year work in the physics sequence at their institutions or to register in courses in other fields where first
year physics is a prerequisite. This is a one year non-calculus course which provides a systematic introduction
to the main principles in both classical and modern physics. The course encompasses a review of mechanics,
electricity, and magnetism, waves and optics, heat and thermodynamics, and modern physics. A knowledge of
algebra and basic trigonometry is required. In addition to the regular Physics 12 topics, the following topics are
covered. The core topics are as follows. Heat, Kinetic Theory & Thermodynamics: Students will be able to:
describe temperature, heat, mechanical equivalent, specific heat, heat of fusion, heat of evaporation, rate of heat
transfer, expansion. Waves & Optics: Students will be able to: describe the nature of waves, Doppler effect,
superposition, interference, diffraction, dispersion, inverse-square law; state and determine the factors that
define the above terms; describe the terms used in geometrical optics; examine and formulate the laws that
explain and predict reflection, refraction, formation of images by mirrors and lenses, and to describe the
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applications of these factors to optical instruments; describe the use of ray diagrams. Electricity: Students will
be able to: describe the principles applied to capacitors and energy storage; describe dielectrics and the
behaviour of capacitors in circuits; understand the electrostatics through fields and potentials of charge
distribution and parallel plate capacitors and relate elements of electric circuits, such as current, potential and
resistors through Ohm’s and Kirchoff’s laws.
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 11
(MSCT-11)
The Science Module focuses on scientific knowledge and processes while the Technology Module focuses on
technological applications. The goals for Science and Technology are as follows: GOAL 1: Science,
technology, society and environment (STSE) – Students will develop an understanding of the nature of
science and technology, of the relationships between science and technology, and of the social and
environmental contexts of science and technology. GOAL 2: Skills – Students will develop the skills required
for scientific and technological inquiry, for solving problems, for communicating scientific ideas and results, for
working collaboratively, and for making informed decisions. GOAL 3: Knowledge – students will construct
knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and
apply those understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge. GOAL 4: Attitudes – Students
will be encouraged to develop attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of scientific and
technological knowledge to the mutual benefit of self, society, and the environment.
SERVICE CLASSES
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 12
Prerequisite: Marketing 11 and Permission of teacher. Marketing 12 must be taken at the same time.
Students in this course will be a member of The Griff’s Management Team. As a store manager, students will
be responsible for the day-to-day operations of The Griff. Responsibilities include training and evaluating
employees, maintaining inventory and visual displays, promoting The Griff, record keeping and ensuring the
store is “business ready” each day. In addition, you will assume special manager roles and take on special
projects to contribute to the efficient operation and promotion of the store.
This course offers an opportunity to develop communication, teamwork, leadership, problem-solving and
interpersonal skills. Students must be dependable, responsible, mature, committed; show initiative; be able to
work well in a team as well as independently; and be able to take tasks from start to finish with little
supervision.
BA COMMUNITY SERVICE 11
(YCPM-1D)
This course is designed to involve students in a variety of service activities. These may include assisting
students and teachers in any subject area. This course promotes personal growth in terms of awareness of the
strengths and weaknesses of self and others and emphasizes the development of both organizational and
leadership abilities. Students see their counsellor to get a form which they take to a staff member in order to
sign up.
PEER TUTORING 12
(YIPS-2BPTU)
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This course is open to mature grade eleven and twelve students who are considering a career in teaching or in a
human service field. Permission of the grade counsellor is required to apply to work as a peer tutor. The
students will develop their communication, interpersonal and organizational skills while teaching students one
to one or in small groups. Often peer tutors work under the direction of the skills center teachers. Students may
work in the math department - permission of the math department head is required. Students may also
choose to work in the special education department in the Life Skills, LAC or LA Life Skills Programs permission of the special education department head is required.
PEER COUNSELLING 12
(YIPS-2C-PC)
Open to Grade 12 students only. Selection by application and interview. Goals of the course include: learning
communication skills, learning more about ourselves and understanding others, to give and receive honest,
constructive feedback, to work with groups, practice role-playing to gain insights, tutoring skills, conflict
resolution, and peer mediation skills. This training will help peer counsellors to assist others in self exploration,
decision-making and lead peer mediation sessions. Selection is made on the basis of information supplied on
application forms and in a personal interview. Personal qualifications include: strong personal and interpersonal
skills, good role modeling potential, commitment and ability to catch up with classes missed due to training
schedules, Grade 8 Camp and other needs and a good attendance record. Marks are based on: training
participation and punctuality, journal notes, placement teacher’s assessment and general involvement with peer
counselling activities.
SOCIAL STUDIES
TRANSITIONAL SOCIAL STUDIES
TRANSITIONAL SOCIALS JUNIOR
TRANSITIONAL SOCIALS SENIOR
(XLDCE09TSJ)
(MSS--10TRS)
Transitional Social Studies (Junior and Senior) are full year courses. The intent of these courses is to introduce
students to the geography of Canada and Canada’s evolution into nationhood. Both courses emphasize the
historical organization of Canada from the early settlers to the present. Successful completion of Junior
Transitional Social Studies will permit students to enrol in either SS8, SS9, or SS10. Successful completion of
Senior Transitional Social Studies will enable students to enrol in either SS10 or SS11. Student promotion to the
regular program grade level is dependent upon the student’s ability in oral and written English.
SOCIAL STUDIES 8
(MSS--08)
The Social Studies 8 course follows concepts learned in Social Studies 7. Students will learn basic geographical
and historical skills and utilize these skills in relation to developments in the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the
Reformation, and the Enlightenment periods in history. Students will be introduced to the idea that distinctive
cultures develop in response to a variety of influences. A few of the relevant themes in this course are: the rise
and fall of empires, the ever changing boundaries of nations, religious influences on societies, and the growth of
trade. Map work, design, map integration, and interpreting relevant map reading data is a major geographical
component in this course.
SOCIAL STUDIES CHALLENGE PROGRAM
45
Social Studies Challenge is an accelerated program in which students will complete three years of course work
in two. The course stresses the processes of learning with an emphasis on critical thinking and research skills.
SOCIAL STUDIES 8 CHALLENGE
(MSS--08CH8)
Social Studies 8 Challenge involves both the grade 8 course of studies as well as a portion of Social Studies 9.
Students are expected to be prepared to undertake more work than is required for the regular Social Studies 8
course. Students must achieve at least a ‘B’ standing if they intend to enrol in Social Studies 9 Challenge.
Students will learn basic geographical and historical skills and utilize these skills in relation to developments in
the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, Reformation, and the Enlightenment periods in history. Students will be
introduced to the idea that distinctive cultures develop in response to a variety of influences. A few of the
relevant themes in this course are: the rise and fall of empires, the ever changing boundaries of nations,
religious influences on societies, and the growth of trade. Map work design, map interpretation, and interpreting
relevant map reading data is a major geographical component in this course.
SOCIAL STUDIES 9
(MSS--09)
The Social Studies 9 course continues to expand on theories and topics in both history and geography learned in
Social Studies 8. Students will learn about the early development of Canada from the time of the first European
settlers arriving in New France in the 1600s. The historical time frame for the North American history is 1600 –
early 1800s. In addition, students will study the development of Canada in its historical and geographical
context. References will be made toward Canadian institutions such as the founding of the government, legal,
social and cultural heritage of Canada. The theme of nationalism from both Canadian and European
perspectives will be discussed and related to the growth of industrialization and the acquisition of overseas
territories.
SOCIAL STUDIES 9 CHALLENGE
(MSS--10CH9)
The Social Studies 9 Challenge accelerated program continues developing the themes and concepts previously
discussed in SS8 Challenge. Specifically, students will investigate the evolution of European colonial territorial
gain and their impact upon the economic and social development of North America. Furthermore, students will
study the development of Canada in its historical and geographical context. References will be made toward
Canadian institutions such as the founding of the governmental, legal, social and cultural heritage. The third
section of the course will focus on the economic geography of Canada and British Columbia.
SOCIAL STUDIES 10
(MSS--10)
Social Studies 10 continues the study of Canada in its North American setting from both the historical and
geographical perspectives. The time period is set from 1800 - 1914. The student will study many issues which
laid the foundation for our present day society: political, economic, cultural, and social. Topics surrounding the
Confederation of Canada, the Riel Rebellions, and Immigration Issues will be featured. The geographical
component of the course focuses on the Canadian landscape and regional areas of Canada.
GRADUATION OPTIONS FOR SOCIAL STUDIES:
For students choosing their Social Studies courses for graduation requirements they may select one (1) of Social
Studies 11, or First Nations 12. These courses will satisfy the minimum Social Studies 11 requirement. Further
courses at the Grade 12 level include Geography 12, History 12, Law 12, and AP American History.
SOCIAL STUDIES 11
(MSS--11)
46
Social Studies 11 is divided into three major components for this course: History, Government and Law, and
Human Geography. The history section of Social Studies 11 follows the evolution of Canada throughout the
twentieth century. Starting in 1914 the course explores Canada’s role in two world wars, its peace keeping
duties, the depression, post war reconstruction, and the modern political era including the Quiet Revolution. The
second component of government and law focuses on issues surrounding the role of government, either federal
of provincial government, in our lives, and the role of law in our lives. Finally for the geography component of
the course contemporary issues such as human population, demographics, food production issues, and the
geography of disease, will be highlighted. The course evaluation will cover all three components of the course.
The course includes the Provincial Final Examination which constitutes 20% of the student’s final mark.
SOCIAL STUDIES 11 ENRICHED
(MSS--11ENR)
Social Studies 11E is an enrichment course which is open for students by teacher recommendation. The course
content for Social studies 11E is the same as Social Studies 11. The course will delve into much more
educational enrichment opportunities for students to conduct further investigation into Canadian history,
culture, and society. The course includes the Provincial Final Examination which constitutes 20% of the
student’s final mark.
AP AMERICAN HISTORY
(AUSH-12)
6 credits
Students who enrol in AP American History will receive credit for a first year history course at most
universities. A number of Canadian universities such as UBC, SFU, UVic recognize AP American History. The
course material will be presented in a thematic approach. Units of study will cover the early settlement of the
Americas, the American Revolution, the Early Development of the United States, the Civil War and
Reconstruction, Pre and Post First World War issues, the Second World War and the Post War World.
Assignments will include individual readings, assigned readings, quizzes, and essays. An AP American History
Final Exam will be administered in May.
This is an ideal course for those students who wish to pursue studies in government, law, international relations
and geopolitics.
HISTORY 12
(MHI--12)
History 12 is a survey course of the 20th century which covers pertinent topics from 1870 to the present day.
The course is essentially a diplomatic/military history of global events from1870 to the present day. Students
will learn about the forces that have brought about two world wars, the growth and decline of political
ideologies, changes in diplomatic relations between major powers, and the establishment(s) of international
organizations to preserve world peace. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of critical thinking
and will reflect on the opportunities of decisions made in the past and how, in many instances, those decisions
continue to affect events of today.
This course is ideal for those students who wish to continue their studies with a focus on political science, law,
public policy, military science, and general studies.
GEOGRAPHY 12
(MGE0-12)
47
The Geography 12 course of study examines many of the characteristics and process of the physical
components of the Earth’s surface. Geography 12 students will examine human interactions with the Earth’s
environment; these studies focus on how the environment is used, misused, and altered. The course is designed
to facilitate students’ understanding of the dynamic nature of the environment. Geography 12 is comprised of
four elements: Environments and People, Physical and Natural Processes, Resources, and the challenge of the
Future. Topics will focus on weather and climate, vegetation and soils, tectonic forces (earthquakes) volcanism,
geographical structures, landforms, glaciers, beaches, and current issues of acid rain, pollution, and
desertification. Where time and funding permits an extended – a day field trip may be considered for students’
optional participation.
SOCIAL JUSTICE 12
(MSJ--12)
The Social Justice 12 course is designed to raise students’ awareness of social injustices and to enable them to
analyse situations from a social justice perspective, and to provide them with knowledge, skills, and an ethical
framework to advocate for a socially just world. A progressive, democratic country values diversity and
inclusion. It also fosters caring and fair communities. Social Justice 12 promotes the pursuit of social justice as
an important responsibility for all, and encourages students to develop the commitment and ability to work
toward a more just society. Students will review Charter case challenges and Human Rights Tribunal decisions,
while pursuing an understanding of issues surrounding injustices against individuals based upon age, marital
status, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, and so on. This is an ideal course for those entering careers or
studies in Social Services, Law, Education, Counselling, and Human Services/Resources.
BC FIRST NATIONS STUDIES 12
(MFNS-12)
BC First Nations Studies 12 focuses on the diversity, depth, and integrity of the cultures of British Columbia's
Aboriginal peoples. In emphasizing the languages, cultures, and history of First Nations Peoples, the course
addresses an important part of the history of British Columbia. BC First Nations Studies 12 addresses the
diversity of First Nations languages and cultures by exploring them within their own unique contexts. It is
intended to provide a conceptual foundation for all learners to develop an appreciation and respect for the
similarities among the differences between the cultures of the world.
This course includes a Provincial Examination which constitutes 20% of a student’s final mark.
LAW 12
(MLAW-12)
The course philosophy is based upon the premise that laws govern a great many of our actions. Therefore, a
knowledge and understanding of these laws will enhance an individual’s performance within our society.
In this course, students will learn:
- what is meant by law.
- why laws are needed and how they are derived.
- the essential components of Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms; The Youth Criminal Justice Act;
Family Law, the court system, Criminal Law and Tort Law.
APPLIED
SKILLS
-
TECHNICAL
48
STUDIES
In Technical Studies, the emphasis is on “Doing Stuff”, students are expected to participate in the design and
manufacture of a variety of projects and processes. Lab safety is important in all technical areas and students
will be tested on safety in all courses. There will be optional local and international field trips related to course
content learning.
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 8
APPLIED SKILLS 8 ROTATION
(MTE-08)
This is a required course for all Grade 8 students entering Hamber. Tech Ed 8 introduces students to multiple
areas of applied technology and engineering. This course combines three areas: (1) Tech ED (2) Home
Economics; and (3) Business Education. Students will spend 1/3 if the school year in each area. The
Technology Ed 8 component emphasizes on team work and introduction to robotics.
DRAFTING or TECHNICAL DESIGN
Drafting is a universal method for communicating the thoughts and ideas of designers. Any student who is
considering a technological career should take at least one drafting course. Computer assisted drafting and
modeling is used in many technology related fields. Students will learn how to draw, create, and realize their
creative ideas.
DRAFTING & DESIGN 10
(MTED-10)
Topics covered will vary from year to year. Students will engage in a variety of learning styles and strategies,
but mostly it will be a ‘hands on’ course. This is a FUN introductory course ideal for students who want to
explore the world of architecture, interior design and/or engineering.
Topics will include: learning how to draw using pencils and other drawing related instrument, learning to see
geometric shapes and design in a different manner, and learning to express their creative ideas using hand
drawing and computer aided design software. This course will also see students create several scale models.
Students will spend a majority of the class time in creating individual drawings and designs, which will lead to
the creation of their architectural portfolio. Special topics include: hand lettering exercises, drawing various
architectural lines, and turning ideas into scale models.
DRAFTING AND DESIGN 11: ARCHITECTURE
(MDD--11)
Please note that Drafting satisfies the graduation credit requirements for both Technical Studies and/or Fine
Arts. This is an intermediate level course ideal for students who want to explore the world of architecture,
interior design and/or engineering.
Topics will include: using advanced CAD techniques to design and create 3D architecture models. Discussions
will include ‘Form vs. Function’, ‘good architecture design’ vs. ‘poor architecture design’, and intended and
unintended usage of space. Emphasis will also be placed on hand drawings and construction of scale models.
Students will spend a majority of the class time creating individual and collaborative designs which will be
added to their architectural portfolio. Special topics include: hand lettering exercises, drawing various
architectural lines, and turning ideas into scale models.
DRAFTING AND DESIGN 12: ARCHITECTURE
(MDDT-12)
This is an advanced level course ideal for students who want to explore the world of architecture, interior design
and/or engineering.
This course is designed to provide post-secondary and career exploration opportunities for students who may
want to consider this field as a possible career path. Topics will include: using advanced CAD techniques to
design and create 3D architectural models as well as to solve simulated design problems. Discussions will
49
include ‘Form vs. Function’, and intended and unintended usage of space. Students will also learn to apply
technologies associated with: land survey, aerial photo mapping and urban planning to solve engineering design
problems in an urban setting, as well as designing buildings and structures to support a busy urban center.
Students will also examine examples of ‘good architecture design’ vs. ‘poor architecture design’. Emphasis will
also be placed on hand drawings and construction of scale models. Students will spend a majority of the class
time creating individual and collaborative designs which will be added to their architectural portfolio.
ELECTRONICS & ROBOTICS
Electronics and Robotics will be the primary focus of every course under this heading. Students will learn to
build robots to solve basic and complex everyday problems. Additional topics covered will include computer
hardware and software architecture, troubleshooting simple and complex computer problems, as well as
introduction to computer networking technology.
ELECTRONICS 10
(MTEE-10)
This course is highly recommended for students interested in Engineering, Applied Science, and Advanced
Technology. Topics covered will vary from year to year. Students will engage in a variety of learning styles
and strategies, but mostly it will be a ‘hands on’ course. This is a fun course with emphasis on utilizing existing
technology to help us with our daily lives.
Topics include: LEGO Robotics, VEX Robotics, building computers, loading software, troubleshooting
software and hardware compatibility issues, simple and basic network setup, cell phone apps creation, and the
application of student’s knowledge to solve real everyday technology problems. Additional topics will include:
introduction to binary numbers, and exploration of the world of electronics technology.
ELECTRONICS 11
(MEL--11)
The course is a mixture of analog and digital circuits and systems. This course will allow students to bridge the
learning between the digital computer world to the analog everyday world. Computer programming will be
introduced. The use of a computer interface Arduino will be introduced as a training tool to help develop
advance circuit analysis skills. Additional opportunities will be available for students to further pursue robotics
and robotics competitions. Students will learn to work in design teams to solve challenges and be ready to
apply those skills to real life situations such as search and rescue, food production, and advanced medical
sciences.
ELECTRONICS 12
(MEL--12)
Students will continue their studies from Electronics 11. Post-secondary opportunities will be explored.
Students will learn to make definitive choices when selecting a post-secondary institution that would be best
suited to their abilities and personal interest. Students in this course will take an active leadership role in
mentoring junior students in the use of robotics and computer systems. Heavy emphasis will be on
understanding the materials covered in Electronics 10 and 11. Those with strong independent skills will be
encouraged and allowed to pursue advance personal projects. Students who successfully complete this course
will be encouraged to pursue post-secondary education in this technology field as a possible career pathway.
WOODWORK AND CARPENTRY
WOODWORK 10
(MTEW-10)
Woodworking 10 is a beginning woodwork course. Basic woodworking skills will be taught so students can
complete several student-oriented projects. Learn how to safely use a variety of power woodworking equipment
and perform more detailed hand tool techniques and finishing. Emphasis will be on working on well-designed
50
projects in a safe and sustainable manner. Course content starts with students building toys. The latter part of
the course will include construction of a simple furniture projects.
WOODWORK 11
(MCJ--11)
Woodwork 11 is an intermediate course in machine wood working where the student will develop an
understanding of the materials and processes of fine furniture manufacturing. Students will learn the safe use of
various woodworking machines to design and build furniture projects, within the limits of good design and
construction techniques. The focus of the course will be on quality design and product development with a
strong emphasis on proper procedures and safety. Each student will design, construct, and finish a major
furniture project. Students will be encouraged to work as part of a team. Some material costs will be paid by the
student.
WOODWORK 12
(MCJ--12)
Woodwork 12 is an advanced wood technology course that will broaden students’ understanding of
woodworking in various industries and technologies. This is a more advanced level course in cabinet making
and construction in which students are encouraged to build upon the skills they learned in MCJ11. Quality of
design, planning, and workmanship are keys to success in this course. Production procedures, drawing routines,
and cost sheet preparation theory will also be covered. Students who successfully complete this course will be
encouraged to pursue post-secondary education in this technology field as a possible career pathway. Students
will be required to pay for materials used in the manufacture of personal projects.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
ERIC HAMBER’S GIFTED PROGRAM
The Hamber Gifted Program now offers two options for students. The Challenge Module for Acceleration and
Enrichment and the Studio Module for Innovative Thinking.
The Challenge Module presents highly-able students with a challenging Grade 8-12 program that encompasses
both acceleration and enrichment. Students in the program will complete three years of study in Grades 8 and 9.
The program is offered in English, Social Studies, Science and Mathematics. These courses are available only
to students who have applied and been accepted in this program.
The Studio Module is a unique opportunity for gifted learners who thrive on learning “outside the box” and
who crave the ability to meaningfully influence the pace and content of their academic program. Students in the
Studio Module will receive a supplement to this course booklet with instructions as to what courses they
should be signing up for in each grade. This will include a combination of Studio classes and supplemental
classes from the regular course booklet.
Studio students who wish to enroll in regular math classes may sign up for the math courses in this booklet.
Studio students who wish to make other arrangements for their math will receive further instructions in the
supplement.
SKILLS DEVELOPMENT CLASS 8, 9, 10
LEARNING STRATEGIES 11/12
(XLDCD08SDC)
(YLE--1A)
Students taking these courses will have a demonstrated need for learning support, which may include an IEP
targeting specific learning difficulties. Enrollment is contingent upon a referral from a previous school, teacher
or counsellor.
51
These courses aim to develop metacognitive awareness and improve learning strategies for students who may
be weak in such areas as: attention and focus, auditory/visual processing, time management, organization, and
study skills. Students will develop effective, personal learning techniques through individual application and
practice.
The senior Learning Strategies course is an extension of the Skills course and helps students continue to
develop and apply these skills to manage more complex, sophisticated content.
ERIC HAMBER WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAMS
Do you want to explore a particular career and gain practical experience? Do you enjoy a certain subject, but are
unsure about what careers it can lead to? Are you unsure of what career to pursue or do you have a career in
mind that you would like to try?
If you answered yes to any of these questions, Hamber’s Work Experience Program is right for you. The
program integrates classroom learning with valuable experience in the workplace. This program provides
students in grades 11 and 12 the opportunity to earn four credits, explore potential career options, develop
positive attitudes, and practice your skills in the workplace. Students have the opportunity to work up to three
weeks at a business or in an industry in the community related to your career choice. There are eight focus areas
in the Work Experience Program, which include: Business and Applied Business; Fine Arts, Design and Media;
Fitness and Recreation; Health and Human Service; Liberal Arts and Humanities; Science and Applied Science;
Tourism Hospitality and Foods; and Trades and Technology. Work Experience students receive in-school
preparation and hands-on work experience. Students are placed with employers based on their interests,
aptitudes and career goals. While on the job, students gain valuable information, skills and experience in careers
they are interested in, from employers in that field. In addition, students enhance classroom learning and build
on existing skills by applying theory and practising skills on the job. This program is an excellent way for
students to discover the many career options available and plan for post-secondary and the future. You may
register for Work Experience 12A as a ninth course. Students will meet with the teacher individually and
communicate using e-mail. If you would like to be in one of Hamber’s programs (listed on the left under the 8
focus areas), you must be enrolled in two focus courses, one in Grade 11 and the other in Grade 12:
Business and Applied Business:
Focus #1 course
Accounting
Accounting 11
Marketing
Marketing 11
Focus #2 course
Financial Accounting 12
Marketing 12
Fitness and Recreation:
Sports & Recreation
Focus #1 course
PE 11/PE Leadership 11
Health and Human Service:
Focus #1 course
Social Science
Family Studies 11
Focus #2 course
PE12/PE Leadership 12
Focus #2 course
Family Studies 12/Psychology 12
Science and Applied Science:
Focus #1 course
Science
Chemistry 11
Focus #2 course
Pre-Calculus 12/Calculus 12
Fine Arts, Design and Media:
Focus #1 course
Focus #2 course
52
Art 11
Art 12
Drafting
Electronic Design
& Publishing
Fashion
Drafting & Design 11
Elect. Design & Pub. 11
Drafting & Design 12
Elect. Design & Publishing. 12
Textile 11
Fashion Design & Merchandising
Music
Jazz Band 11
Concert Band 11
String Orchestra 11
Jazz Band 12
Concert Band 12
String Orchestra 12
Photography
Photography 11
Photography 12
Liberal Arts and Humanities:
Focus #1 course
French
French 11
Japanese
Japanese 11
Mandarin
Mandarin 11
Spanish
Spanish 11
Focus #2 course
French 12
Japanese 12
Mandarin 12
Spanish 12
Tourism Hospitality and Foods:
Focus #1 course
Foods
Foods & Nutrition 11
Focus #2 course
Foods & Nutrition 12
Theatre
Theatre Performance 11
Theatre Production 11
Theatre Performance 12
Theatre Production 11
Trades and Technology:
Focus #1 course
Electronics
Electronics 11
Focus #2 course
Electronics 12
Computer Program.
Computer Programming 12
Computer Programing 11
53
ACE IT PROGRAMS
The Vancouver School Board offers several district programs for students interested in pursuing industry
certification or completing the foundation level of a trade program. These programs save both time and money
and offer a huge jump start for students while completing high school graduation. The benefits include:
• dual credit with a post-secondary institution (most programs)
• head start with Foundation program training
• registration with the Industry Training Authority (ITA) – if a trade program
• may lead directly into an apprenticeship
• work experience in the trade
For more information and an application form, please visit the VSB Career Programs website: www.vsb.bc.ca
→ Programs→ Secondary students → Career Programs – here you will find links to ACE IT programs and a
pdf brochure for each program. Also visit the Industry Training Authority website: www.itabc.ca. All
students applying for ACE IT programs should register at their home school with a full course load. Schools
will be asked to modify a student’s timetable when the student is accepted into an ACE IT program.
Certification: successful completion of program will lead either to Level 1 technical training credit or a
Certificate of Qualification from the Industry Training Authority.
Program
Where the
program is taught
Auto Refinishing
Preparation
VCC
Credits towards
graduation
program
20 credits
Timetable
Application
Due
Monday –
Thursday
November 30
Month
program
begins
February
Auto Collision
Repair
Technician
Auto Service
Technician
Baking and
Pastry Arts
VCC
28 credits
March 30
September
Britannia
16 credits
Day 2
March 30
September
VCC
24 credits
Monday –
Thursday
November 30
Vancouver
Technical School
28 credits
February 28
Carpentry
Killarney
16 credits
7 blocks in Grade
12 year +
Language Arts 12
Day 2
August
Or
February*
September
Hairdressing
March 30
September
Cook
Windermere or
Templeton
*must be a WN or
TM student
Sir Charles
Tupper
David Thompson
16 credits
Day 1 or 2
March 30
September
16 credits
Day 2
March 30
September
16 credits
Day 2
March 30
September
Piping Industry
College of BC
Finishing Trades
Institute of BC
BCIT
8 credits
November 30
June
November 30
June
20 credits
Mid June to late
July
Mid June to late
July
Monday – Friday
June 15
February
BCIT
20 credits
Monday - Friday
June 15
February
BCIT
20 credits
Monday – Friday
September 30
February
8:00 am – 3:00 pm
Monday –
Thursday
8:00 am – 3:00 pm
1:00 pm -7:15 pm
Cook
Cook
Plumbing
Painting
** Millwright
** Motorcycle
Mechanic
** Metal
Fabricator
8 credits
54
*VCC does not always provide 2 intakes for this program
**Limited spots available – contact Wendy Gilmour in the school year prior to the program
Secondary School Apprenticeship:
Students with the skills and connections can begin an apprenticeship while they are in high school. Many
students are already working in an apprenticeable trade and are able to formalize the apprenticeship relationship
with their employer. There are 4 courses (16 credits) available to these students when they have a formal ITA
agreement signed by an employer. Students should call Wendy Gilmour, Apprenticeship Facilitator
604·713·4470 for more information on this program. Information and an application forms are available on the
VSB website: www.vsb.bc.ca → Programs→ Secondary students → Secondary School Apprenticeship.
Tupper Tech - Skills, Careers and Trades Program at Tupper Secondary
This program is intended to assist those students who wish to enter a trade when they leave high school but are
unsure which trade they would like to pursue. Successful applicants will acquire a specific and documented set
of work place skills and attend class from 8:35 am until 3:07pm on Day 2s. Students can remain registered in
their home school Day 1, where they complete their graduation requirements and elective courses. Upon
program completion, students will receive 24 credits (4 Senior Trades courses and Work Experience 12A and
12B). Any student entering grade 12 is eligible to apply for one of 20 seats in the program (Students entering
grade 11 who intend to enter an apprenticeship or ACE IT program during their grade 12 year may be
considered.) For more information on Tupper’s SCT program contact Ms. Mavety (dmavety@vsb.bc.ca) or
visit: www.vsb.bc.ca → Programs→ Secondary students →Tupper Technical School
Other Dual Credit programs:
IT and CISCO Networking Academy Program
IT and CISCO Networking Academy is a one year cohort program offered to students in Grade 12 on Day 2 at
Killarney Secondary. Students will be given the opportunity to diversify and enhance their computer
knowledge beyond Microsoft Word, PowerPoint software and web design. They will develop skills building a
computer, installing software and connecting the computer to networks and to the internet. Students will learn
hands-on, in laboratory courses that stress working effectively in a group environment. Courses also provide
students the opportunity to prepare for industry recognized certification. With the accelerating use of
information technology, workers in this occupational group will continue to experience strong
demand. Successful students receive advanced placement at BCIT and save approximately $2000 in tuition.
Fashion Design and Technology
Fashion Design and Technology is a two-year cohort program starting in Grade 11 on Day 2 at Eric Hamber
Secondary. Students will improve and enhance their construction skills; be introduced to new and interesting
construction techniques; study topics such as history of costume, fashion merchandising, tailoring techniques
plus regular and computer-assisted pattern drafting. Basic design and fashion illustration will be taught and
enhanced through use of programs such as Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and others. Students will participate in
competitions and opportunities that enhance their abilities and portfolios. At the end of grade 12, students will
have completed the graduation collection and portfolio needed for post-secondary entrance. In the
future, students may have the opportunity to participate in dual credit opportunities in conjunction with the
Fashion Design Program at a local post-secondary institute.
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