OAKLAND UNIVERSITY – BEAUMONT GRADUATE PROGRAM OF NURSE ANESTHESIA OAKLAND UNIVERSITY

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OAKLAND UNIVERSITY – BEAUMONT
GRADUATE PROGRAM OF NURSE ANESTHESIA
OAKLAND UNIVERSITY
School of Nursing
Human Health Building
Rochester, MI 48309-4401
BEAUMONT HOSPITAL
3601 W. Thirteen Mile Road
Royal Oak, Michigan 48073-6769
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Class of 2015
Material contained in this handbook is supplemental to material
found in the Oakland University School of Nursing Graduate Student
Handbook and in the Graduate Catalog for Oakland University
www.oakland.edu/nursing
September 2013
Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia
Table of Contents
September 2013
Welcome Letter
Program Overview
History, Overview, Mission and Philosophy
Overview-Oakland University/Graduate School of Nursing
Overview-Beaumont Hospital
Outcome Criteria
Ethics
Curriculum Design
Graduate Grade Conversion Table – School of Nursing
Academic Calendar 2012-2013 – Oakland University
Communication
Program/Hospital Property and Equipment
Attendance/Scheduling Policies
Time Commitment
Testing Procedure
Program Evaluation Process
Evaluation Forms
Clinical Internship Objectives I – VII
Clinical Internship Guidelines
Counting Clinical Experiences
Human Patient Simulation Laboratory (SIM Lab)
Care Plan Requirements
Clinical Advisement
Academic Conduct
Beaumont Hospital Manuals, Policies and Procedures
Nondiscrimination Policy
Impairment/Chemical Dependency/Substance Abuse
Pregnancy During the Program
Library Resources
Liability Insurance
Oakland University – Emergency Closing
Terminal Project
Student Employment
Student Health Care
Special Awards and Scholarships
Criteria for Graduation
Minimum Required/Preferred Number of Cases
Clinical Sites-communication information
Distance Student Guidelines
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Appendix
A.
Standards of Conduct for the Clinical Instructor- Student Anesthetist Relationship
B.
Social Media
C.
Student Agreement Signature Page
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School of Nursing
Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401
(248) 370-3497 Fax: (248) 370-4279
September 2013
Dear Student,
Welcome to the Oakland University - Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia. The program of
study over the next 28 months will include intense classroom and clinical experiences that will prepare you
as an advanced practice nurse in the speciality of anesthesia.
Program administration has developed this student handbook to provide you with a guide to program policies
and procedures. The program incorporates both Oakland University (OU) and Beaumont Hospital policies and
procedures. In addition to this anesthesia student handbook, it is essential that you read and understand all of
the information relating to the graduate school of nursing and nurse anesthesia in the current Oakland
University Graduate Catalog, the current School of Nursing (SON) Graduate Student Handbook, and relevant
Beaumont manuals, policies and procedures found online on the Beaumont website. Each student is
responsible for reviewing and adhering to the academic and clinical requirements for the program.
Because of the dynamic nature of anesthesia education, it is likely that program changes will occur
throughout the 28 months. The program reserves the right to revise all information in this handbook at its
discretion and to make reasonable changes in requirements to enhance the program or improve the quality of
education. Administration will communicate changes verbally, in writing, or electronically.
If you have any questions regarding the information in the program handbooks, please contact program
administration.
Sincerely,
Anne Hranchook, CRNA, MSN
Mary Golinski, PhD, CRNA
Andrea Bittinger, CRNA, MSN
John Roebuck, CRNA, MSN
Linda McDonald, CRNA, MSN
Laura Rodgers, CRNA, MSN
Program Director
Assistant Program Director
Admissions & Clinical Coordinator
Simulation & Clinical Coordinator
Clinical Coordinator
Clinical Coordinator
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History and General Overview
The Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia began in 1991 as a collaborative initiative to
address the nurse anesthesia shortage and provide an exceptional educational environment for training Certified
Registered Nurse Anesthetists. Authority for the program is shared between Oakland University and Beaumont Hospital.
It is one of several advanced practice nursing programs offered by the Graduate School of Nursing at Oakland
University. The first twelve students were admitted to the twenty-eight month program in April 1991. Since that time, over
2000 interested nurses from around the country have applied and over 300 students have graduated. Class size has
ranged from 7 to 31 students. Graduates from the program practice anesthesia across the country. For the most recent
graduating class of 2012, the attrition rate was 0%. The first time test taker pass rate on the national certification exam is
96% and the employment rate is 100%.
The Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia is 56-credits encompassing 28 months of
full time study, culminating in a Master of Science in Nursing degree. The graduates are qualified to take the National
Certification Examination administered by the NBCRNA; when they pass this examination they are certified and can
utilize the title: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The nurse anesthesia program includes core courses in
nursing, support courses in the sciences and specialty courses in nurse anesthesia. An intensive clinical internship
parallels the didactic courses, providing ongoing opportunity to apply theory to practice. The 28 month program exceeds
minimum accreditation standards set forth by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs
(COA) in both clinical and classroom instruction. For example, students graduate with approximately 800 cases while the
COA requires a minimum of 550 cases. The program offers extensive pharmacology course work, gross anatomic
dissection and research opportunities beyond what is required by national standards. The program offers additional
learning opportunities in the areas of patient safety, ethics, nursing theory, healthcare policy, the business of anesthesia,
practice management and diversity. The program also offers opportunities for students to explore leadership roles in the
areas of research, education, professional advocacy and management.
In 2003 the program was cited in the Federal Register as the only nurse anesthesia program in the United States to
receive an HHS grant for program development in distance education. Distance education students attend classes via
video conferencing and complete the majority of their clinical requirements at their primary hospital. Thirty- five
distance students have graduated from the three distance education sites which are, Marquette, Kalamazoo and
Northern Michigan.
The program offers the most advanced technology available including a Human Patient Simulation Laboratory. The
5,500 square foot, $4.5 million Surgical Learning Center at Beaumont Hospital Royal Oak- is designed to educate
surgical teams and others in advanced techniques through a combination of computer simulation and laboratory skills.
The Learning Center has two mock operating rooms where anesthesia students can approximate the complexities of
anesthesia in a simulated environment to develop critical thinking and decision-making skills. Here, students can
rehearse everything from basic skills to management of difficult case scenarios. The anesthesia classroom and
student study areas were recently renovated in 2011demonstrating the enduring commitment of Oakland University
and Beaumont Hospital to the education of nurse anesthetists. The high-tech classroom offers worldwide distance
learning capabilities through two-way high definition communication systems.
Program faculty, CRNA staff, and graduate students have published extensively in peer-reviewed journals, authored
chapters in books, as well as conducted numerous professional lectures and poster presentations across the nation.
Over the years, the faculty have served in a variety of leadership positions for the American Association of Nurse
Anesthetists (AANA) and the Michigan Association of Nurse Anesthetists (MiANA). In 2006, Oakland University School
of Nursing became the first university in the state of Michigan to offer a post-Master’s Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)
degree program. The DNP is the highest degree for clinical nursing practice.
Accreditation
The Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia has been fully accredited by the Council on
Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Education Programs (COA) since its inception and currently holds a 10-year
accreditation status through 2022. The Oakland University School of Nursing is accredited by the Commission on
Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the
Michigan Association of Colleges of Nursing. The University is accredited by the Council of Graduate Schools in the
US, Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools, and the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. All
hospitals affiliated with the graduate program are accredited by the Joint Commission.
Mission
The mission of the Oakland University-Beaumont Nurse Anesthesia Program is to provide the highest quality graduate
educational program that prepares nurses to function as Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). The
program advances nurse anesthesia knowledge through research and scholarship and strives to exemplify and
promote excellence in education, leadership and professional involvement.
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Educational Philosophy
The philosophy of the Oakland University-Beaumont Nurse Anesthesia Program is derived from the mission and goals
of Oakland University and the School of Nursing as well as the mission, values and guiding principles of Beaumont
Hospital. In addition, the program faculty believe that as advanced practice nurses, CRNAs provide high quality
anesthesia care to a variety of client populations spanning the continuum of human health states and life spans,
practicing in diverse locations and health care systems.
The Oakland University SON Mission and Philosophy and a reference to the American Nurses Association Standards
of Advanced Practice Nurses (APN) are found in the SON Graduate Handbook. The AANA Standards are found in the
AANA Professional Practice Manual.
OAKLAND UNIVERISTY
History and General Overview
Oakland University is a diverse, state-assisted institution with an enrollment of 19,740 students in 2012. The
institution is committed to high quality education for undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education students. Of
equal importance are cultural enrichment through the arts, a vigorous program of research, and public service to
assist business, industry, schools and other institutions in the university’s service area.
The University was founded in 1957 when the late Matilda R. and Alfred G. Wilson donated their Meadow Brook
Farms Estate of approximately 1,400 acres and $2 million to Michigan State University (MSU) to create a new
university in Oakland County. Oakland began operation in 1959 and was governed by MSU until 1970 when the
university received its independence and appointed its own Board of Trustees. Since 1959 Oakland University has
added to the Wilson's original gift and the current campus property totals 1,509 acres. Meadow Brook Hall, the 100room, Tudor-style mansion that was the Wilson home, has been converted into a conference and cultural center. The
mansion was designated a national historic landmark in March, 2012. Thousands have visited the hall for tours,
exhibits, or conference programs.
The major academic units are the College of Arts and Sciences, and the schools of Business Administration,
Engineering and Computer Science, Education and Human Services, Health Sciences, Medicine and Nursing. The
university offers more than 133 undergraduate programs and more than 128 doctoral, master’s degree and certificate
programs. The university has over 500 full-time faculty with 94 percent holding doctoral degrees. Faculty have been
chosen as members of advisory committees for units of the National Institutes of Health and are consulted in the
dispensing of millions of dollars in grant funds each year. Recent Oakland University records report $35 million in
total research expenditures and $18 million in federal awards for fiscal year 2010.
Enrichment of cultural life has been a goal of Oakland University since its founding. During the winter, Meadow Brook
Theater offers a full season of professional entertainment. Meadow Brook Music Festival is located on the Oakland
University campus and is the site of popular music concerts throughout the summer. In addition, the Meadow Brook
Art Gallery in Wilson Hall offers a full schedule of art exhibits. Student productions are presented in Varner Hall under
the auspices of the Center for the Arts and feature theater, music, and dance productions.
OAKLAND UNIVERISTY- SCHOOL OF NURSING
History
On May 14, 1973, the President of Oakland University officially informed the State Board of Nursing of the intent of
Oakland University to institute a four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program. The program was
approved by the Faculty Senate on April 17, 1974 and the Board of Trustees on May 22, 1974. The School of
Nursing became a bona fide academic unit within the university in the fall of 1974. Dr. Geraldine Felton was
appointed as the first dean of the School of Nursing.
In September 1975, the first class of students began their sophomore year of the baccalaureate nursing program and
graduated during the 1977-1978 academic year. After the required graduation of two classes, the nursing program
applied for and received full approval by the Michigan State Board of Nursing. In December 1980, the BSN program
was granted initial accreditation by the National League for Nursing; and received continuing accreditation in 1987
and 1995. In 2002 accreditation of the school was obtained from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
(CCNE) until 2012. Currently, the undergraduate nursing program serves both traditional and non-traditional students
and offers registered nurses a course completion sequence to earn the BSN degree.
The graduate program leading to the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree has evolved in the following
manner:
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1984
1986
1987
1988
1991
1992
1996
1997
2000
2002
2003
2005
2005
2006
2012
2013
MSN Nursing Administration track began.
The first student graduated from the master’s program.
MSN Adult Health Nursing track added.
MSN program received initial accreditation by the National League for Nursing, continuing
accreditation received in 1995 and 2002.
MSN Nurse Anesthesia track developed in collaboration with Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak.
Nurse Anesthesia track received initial accreditation by the Council in Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia
Educational Programs, continuing accreditation received in 1996 and 2002.
Post-master’s Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate track added.
Family Nurse Practitioner track added.
Nursing Administration and Adult Health tracks phased out.
MSN Clinical Nurse Specialist Adult Health track added.
MSN programs accredited by the CCNE.
MSN Adult/Gerontological Nurse Practitioner and Nursing Education tracks added, along with a
Graduate Certificate in Nursing Education.
Clinical Nurse Specialist track revised to become Acute Care Clinical Nurse Specialist.
Accelerated Second Degree B.S.N. program added.
RN-MSN program added.
Doctorate of Nursing Practice added.
School of Nursing moves to Human Health Building
Developing the plan for the BSN to DNP curriculum
The School of Nursing is a leader in distance education via Moodle, providing all nursing courses for BSN degree
completion students online since 2001 and offering five foundation courses for MSN students online since 2002.
The School of Nursing is committed to offering excellent undergraduate and graduate nursing programs designed to
accommodate the specific career needs of nursing students, and to prepare them to meet the healthcare needs of
individuals, groups, and communities in Michigan, around the U.S. and internationally.
Philosophy of Nursing Education
The Philosophy of Nursing Education at Oakland University is informed by insights into the empirical, aesthetic,
ethical, and personal knowledge that informs nursing as a practice discipline, the position that nursing holds in
society, and the relationship that exists between the School of Nursing and Oakland University.
Nursing’s disciplinary domain has both a scientific and professional practice component. Nursing science discovers,
develops, synthesizes, validates, and brings order to the theoretical and practical knowledge that informs the
professional practice of nursing. Professional nursing care of individuals, families, and communities is a social
mandate that carries with it the responsibility to educate nurses qualified to fulfill the professional role and uphold
standards of the profession.
The faculty of the SON believes that nursing education:
 Requires innovative approaches in order to meet the societal demand, now and in the future, for professional
nurses prepared to meet the nursing care requirements of individuals, families, and communities.
 Has a foundation in the arts and sciences of liberal education that is needed to ground nursing in the
complexity of the human experience.
 Prepares students to recognize, understand, and work with nursing phenomena and to understand the results
of these efforts in relation to human values including life, justice, personal freedom, health, and well-being.
 Prepares students to use empirical knowledge as a guide for judgment and decision-making in professional
practice.
 Prepares student nurses to learn, work, and live productively in an ever-changing global society.
 Students learn best when challenged by educational experiences that relate to real-life situations and
problems.
 Diversity among faculty, students, and members of society enriches the educational experience.
 A commitment to life-long learning is essential to the professional development of nurses, the health of
society, and the growth of the discipline.
 Faculty members are responsible for determining what is to be learned and how that learning can be
assessed, evaluated, and enhanced.
BEAUMONT
T
Overview
 The second in the country for number of surgeries – Royal Oak campus alone performed 26,974
annual inpatient and 31,787 outpatient surgeries last year.
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Inpatient admissions 55,689.
The only Level 1 trauma designation, by the American College of Surgeons, in Oakland and Macomb
counties
Comprehensive specialty areas and the most advanced procedures and technological advances
133 full-and part-time CRNAs
In January 2012, Beaumont was listed as Oakland County’s largest employer. with more than 14,000 full-time
equivalent employees.
Rankings and Awards
Beaumont Hospitals is a three-hospital regional health care provider with 1,696 licensed beds, with more than 14,000
full-time equivalent employees and 3,700 physicians in Oakland, Macomb and Wayne counties. All three Beaumont
Hospitals are represented in the 2012 U.S. News & World Report “Best Hospitals” lists.
Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak remains top rated in the state on the heart/heart surgery list. The hospital was also
named among the nation’s best for the following medical specialties: cancer; gastroenterology; geriatrics;
hormonal/endocrinology; neurology/neurosurgery; orthopedics; respiratory disorders and urology.
American Nurses Credentialing Association “Magnet Status” – In 2004, Beaumont, Royal Oak was the first Michigan
hospital granted the coveted “Magnet” designation. Magnet status is the highest recognition a nursing organization
can achieve. Beaumont Hospital – Troy was granted Magnet Status in 2009.
The Beaumont Standards
The Beaumont Standards will be known, owned and energized by all who wear the Beaumont badge.
SERVICE
●
OWNERSHIP
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ATTITUDE
●
RESPECT
We live the Beaumont Standards to achieve:
Our Mission
We will provide the highest quality healthcare services to all of our patients safely, effectively and compassionately,
regardless of where they live or their financial circumstances.
Our Vision
We will rank among the nation’s leading institutions in the provision of health care services, patient safety, medical
education, research and financial performance.
Expected behaviors:
 Response – Provide prompt and appropriate attention to our patients and visitors. If a patient’s call light goes
on, anyone is responsible to respond regardless of job classification.
 Information – Provide clear explanations and accurate information every 20 minutes or as appropriate.
 Assistance – Proactively take any concern or complaint seriously and seek resolution with empathy and
understanding. Ask for help if needed.
 Introductions – In person, or by phone, smile and introduce yourself by name, function and service you are
offering. Address patients/families by their name and proper title (i.e. Mr., Mrs., Ms.). Answer phone calls
within three rings, ask for permission to put a caller on hold (if needed) and always ask, “How may I help
you?”
Ownership – We are positive ambassadors who take responsibility for creating the “Beaumont Experience”
Expected behaviors:
 Directions – Offer to escort others who appear lost and in need of assistance. Use full hand gestures when
directing.
 Safety – Support a safe environment through pro-active attention to, and reporting of, potential hazards.
Wash your hands.
 Environment – Promote a clean, quiet and healing atmosphere. Refrain from loud talk and excessive noises.
 Eco-friendly – Pick up litter and recycle or reuse materials when possible.
 Innovation – Create a culture of excellence through suggestions, performance improvement and continued
personal growth and development.
Attitude – We demonstrate and encourage positive behaviors with the highest degree of integrity.
Expected behaviors:
 Courtesy – Use professional behaviors and language in all interactions. Greet everyone with an empathetic
smile and eye contact. Offer to exit elevators if needed for patients/visitors to use first.
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
Image – Observe the highest standards of professional behavior and appearance. Wear the Beaumont ID
badge with name and picture displayed at all times.
Respect – We treat everyone with dignity and respect.
Expected behaviors:
 Teamwork – Work together respectfully to create a team atmosphere. Avoid the use of hand held devices and
cell phones in meetings.
 Dignity – Respect diversity including cultural and spiritual differences. Affirm patients’ rights to make choices
regarding their care. Support emotional needs.
 Confidentiality – Hold all patients and employee information in the highest confidence. Discuss patient
information and use patient names in private areas.
 Privacy – Knock or ask permission before entering. Close doors and curtains during exams and procedures
and interviews with an explanation that this is done for privacy. Provide second gowns to cover patients as
needed.
Beaumont Hospital - Surgical Services Department
Mission
Surgical Services, a diverse multi-disciplinary team, provides the highest quality care for all patients in a personal,
efficient and economic manner. Provides a safe environment that promotes patient's confidence in our understanding
of their individual needs and in their ability to retain or recover their health. Value and maintain continuity of care,
communication and confidentiality.
Provide staff dedicated to maintaining and increasing competence, to developing relationships based on mutual
respect, and to understanding the rights and the wishes of our patients and their families. Foster excellence in
educational and research endeavors, which prepare new professionals and provide advances in scientific knowledge
and patient care.
Outcome Criteria – Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia
In accordance with the COA Standard III: Program of Study, Criteria C- 21 the program demonstrates that graduates
have acquired knowledge, skills and competencies in patient safety, perianesthetic management, critical thinking,
communication and the competencies needed to fulfill their professional responsibility.
1. Patient safety is demonstrated by the ability of the student to:
a. Be vigilant in the delivery of patient care.
b. Refrain from engaging in extraneous activities that abandon or minimize vigilance while providing direct
patient care ( e.g. texting, reading, e-mailing, etc.)
c. Protect patients from iatrogenic complications.
d. Participate in the positioning of patients to prevent injury.
e. Conduct a comprehensive and appropriate equipment check.
f. Utilize standard precautions and appropriate infection control measures.
2. Individualized perianesthetic management is demonstrated by the ability of the student to:
a. Provide care throughout the perianesthetic continuum.
b. Use a variety of current anesthetic techniques, agents, adjunctive drugs, and equipment while providing
anesthesia.
c. Administer general anesthesia to patients of all ages and physical conditions for a variety of surgical and
medically related procedures.
d. Provide anesthesia services to all patients, including trauma and emergency cases.
e. Administer and manage a variety of regional anesthetics.
f. Function as a resource person for airway and ventilatory management of patients.
g. Possess current Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certification
h. Possess current Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) certification
i. Deliver culturally competent perianesthetic care throughout the anesthesia experience.
j. Perform a comprehensive history and a physical assessment.
3. Critical thinking is demonstrated by the student's ability to:
a. Apply knowledge to practice in decision-making and problem solving.
b. Provide nurse anesthesia care based on sound principles and research evidence.
c. Perform a preanesthetic assessment and formulate an anesthesia care plan for patients to whom they are
assigned to administer anesthesia.
d. Identify and take appropriate action when confronted with anesthetic equipment-related malfunctions.
e. Interpret and utilize data obtained from noninvasive and invasive monitoring modalities.
f. Calculate, initiate, and manage fluid and blood component therapy.
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g. Recognize and appropriately respond to anesthetic complications that occur during the perianesthetic
period.
h. Pass the Council on Certification of Nurse Anesthetists' (CCNA) certification examination in accordance
with CCNA policies and procedures.
4. Communication skills are demonstrated by the student's ability to:
a. Effectively communicate with all individuals influencing patient care.
b. Utilize appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and written communication in the delivery of perianesthetic care.
5. Professional role is demonstrated by the graduate’s ability to:
a. Participate in activities that improve anesthesia care.
b. Function within appropriate legal requirements as a registered professional nurse, accepting responsibility
and accountability for his or her practice.
c. Interact on a professional level with integrity.
d. Teach others.
e. Participate in continuing education activities to acquire new knowledge and improve his or her practice.
f. Demonstrate knowledge of wellness and chemical dependency in the anesthesia profession through
completion of content in wellness and chemical dependency.
Ethics
The Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia shall be conducted within the ethical and
moral standards defined by those professional groups (organizations, institutions, agencies, government boards, or other
entities) having an impact on the individual program and on nurse anesthesia in general.
I.
Interpretation and Guidelines
A. Those professional groups (organizations, institutions, agencies, or governmental entities) that have an
impact on this program and on nurse anesthesia in general are defined to include as a minimum, the
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, the American
Hospital Association, the American Medical Association and American Nurses Association as pertains to
medicine and nursing in general state and federal governmental agencies having to do with licensure and
other regulation of hospitals, health personnel, and consumer interest groups. Consumer interests are
further defined to include patients, employers and students (as a consumer of the educational program).
These third parties shall have access by oral and/or written presentations to the Council on Accreditation.
B. The maintenance of high ethical and moral standards is the joint responsibility of the conducting
institutions, the faculty, affiliating institutions, the students, and the accrediting agency. Many of these
responsibilities are reciprocal. However, each bears responsibility for assuring that those services
provided to patients are in conformance with defined ethical and moral standards.
C. The promotion of attitudes, conducive to the development of high ethical and moral standards among
practitioners, relative to the practice of nurse anesthesia, is a responsibility of the program of nurse
anesthesia. Attitudes and standards of conduct can seldom be learned from lectures or preachments.
The most effective means of teaching these is through acting as role models. Thus, the conduct of the
program, as well as the environment within which it exists, will be conducive to promoting appropriate
attitudes and standards of conduct, and criteria for graduation will be reasonable assurance that the
graduate has accepted these as a part of his or her own personal value system.
D. Loyalty, as a part of an ethical or moral code, flows up and down the organizational channels. It should
not be misconstrued to mean absence of valid critique, complaint, or discussion, nor total agreement with
consensus or other managerial decisions. It does imply support of management policies or decisions and
working within the system to effect change in those policies or decisions in which there is disagreement or
difficulty.
E. It is expected that students will demonstrate commitment/loyalty to institutions to which they have
accepted financial support and/or made employment agreements.
F. Third party presentations to the Council on Accreditation shall not be made without exhausting first all
avenues of due process within the conducting institution.
II.
Guidelines for Ethical Conduct of a Nurse Anesthesia Educational Program
These guidelines shall serve as the basis for assessing the ethical conduct of a nurse anesthesia educational
program. They are defined in relation to the rights and responsibilities of the major participants in this joint
endeavor - the profession, the patients, the students, the faculty, the conducting and affiliating institutions,
and the accrediting agency.
A. Relative to the Profession: Honesty and integrity will be the basis for representation of the program to
patient, students, and the public.
B. Relative to Patients:
1. Patients have a right to know who is administering their anesthesia, who will be supervising the
administration of the anesthetic and the relationship between the two. No practice shall be engaged
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in which is intended to deceive the patient in this regard. Student anesthetists are not to represent
themselves by title or function as a CRNA.
2. Patients have a right to expect that those anesthesia services provided by students will be under the
supervision of a CRNA or an anesthesiologist, consistent with the anesthesia risk of the procedure,
the magnitude of the anesthesia and surgery, and the educational level of the student. At all times
a CRNA or anesthesiologist shall be immediately available in all anesthetizing areas where students
are performing anesthesia.
3. Patients have a right to expect that the student and supervisory personnel providing their services
are mentally alert and not impaired by fatigue, drugs, or other incapacitating conditions. The
program has the right to require drug screening, physical and psychological assessment by the
Occupational Health Services or Emergency Center when impairment or fatigue is suspected.
4. The patient's surgeon, or responsible physician, shall be kept informed pertaining to the anesthetic
management and any complications arising from that management.
5. Patients have the right to expect that students will avoid conflicts between his or her personal
integrity and the patient’s rights. In situations where the student’s personal convictions prohibit
participation in a particular procedure, the student refuses to participate or withdraws from the case
provided that such refusal or withdrawal does not harm the patient.
6. Patients have the right to confidentiality as outlined in the HIPPA regulations.
C. Relative to Students:
1. Students have a right to expect that:
a. upon acceptance into an accredited program of nurse anesthesia that they will be provided that
quality of education necessary to fulfill the objectives of the program.
b. the program will prepare graduate nurse anesthetists who have the knowledge, skills and
competencies in patient safety, perianesthetic management, critical thinking, communication
and the professional role.
c. the program provides the opportunity for:
i. integrating theory underlying the practice of anesthesia with the actual practice.
ii. providing anesthetic management to all categories of patients for most or
all varieties of diagnostic or therapeutic interventions utilizing consultation as
required.
iii.
functioning with minimal supervision in all sizes and/or locations of hospitals or
agencies.
iv. assuring patient comfort and safety within the confines of those aspects of care over which
a nurse anesthetist has control or can influence through consultation, advice or other
actions.
v. incorporating sound ethical and moral practices into his/her own personal value system
relative to nurse anesthesia practice.
d. they will not be exploited relative to time commitment or pay for the profit of the conducting
institution or corporation.
e. enrollment in a program of nurse anesthesia is equivalent to an agreement
between the student and the program, and that the rights and responsibilities of
each party of the agreement are fully understood and complied with. Students
failure to achieve the goal within the time frame expected for which he/she enrolled is based on
valid, reliable data and information from evaluations, viewed objectively and fairly, and
reviewed as may be required by due process mechanisms when contested.
f. fair and accurate evaluations of their progress in the educational program and to be kept informed
of the status of that progress.
g. that the normal lines of student communication begin with the clinical and/or didactic faculty.
Subsequent steps include the Clinical Coordinator, Assistant Director, Program Director,
Associate Dean, and ultimately the Dean of the School of Nursing.
2. Students and graduates have the right to have access to transcripts of their academic and clinical
achievements and upon their request have verified copies furnished to institutions, agencies, other
programs of nurse anesthesia, or others specified by the student or graduate. A fee for copying
may be charged and payment would be the responsibility of the student.
3. Graduates have the right to expect that an official Transcript of Student Record will be forwarded to the
National Board of Certification & Recertification for Nurse Anesthetist in sufficient time for eligibility
determination so that graduates may schedule the Certification Exam at their earliest convenience
following program completion. Students will be held accountable for:
a. the quality of preparation, completion and performance of graduate work.
b. complying with the policies, procedures, and regulations pertaining to the program of nurse
anesthesia.
10
c.
4.
III.
fulfilling all responsibilities and requirements connected with the program defined at the time of
enrollment in the program, or made a part of the educational agreement during the period of
enrollment.
In addition to the information in this handbook, students are referred to the Oakland University
Graduate Catalog and the Oakland University School of Nursing Graduate Handbook. Students are
expected to read and be aware of the code of student conduct and rights, student responsibilities and
policies and procedures outlined in these publications.
Ethical Responsibilities
A. Relative to Research:
1.
Students who elect to conduct research must do so according to acceptable ethical research and
reporting standards established by public law, institutional procedures, and the health professions.
2.
The student protects the rights and well-being of people and animals that serve as subjects in
research.
3.
Students are expected to follow the policies and procedures of Oakland University, the School of
Nursing and the institutional review boards in the facilities in which they are conducting research.
B. Relative to Endorsement of Products and Services
1.
Students will adhere to Beaumont Hospital’s Code of Business and Ethical Conduct
# 350
C. Relative to Financial Aid, Student Loans:
1. Students have responsibilities regarding Financial Assistance received from public and
private sources. These Responsibilities include but are not limited to:
a. attending exit counseling if required through the Office of Financial Aid at Oakland University.
b. repayment, as required, of student loans or employment as required by
Work / Forgiveness clauses in employer loan agreement.
c. notifications of appropriate offices of changes in address or name.
d. notifications of appropriate offices of changes in graduation dates or
withdrawal / dismissal from the program.
e. fulfilling requirements, such as participation in surveys, as previously agreed to as a condition of
receiving financial aid, student loans or traineeships.
2. Prior to accepting any financial aid, student loan, traineeship or other form of financial
assistance – each student must seriously consider the obligations or conditions they are agreeing to
as party of the contract. If the student does not fulfill the conditions such as repayment, employment
or other participation it will be considered a breach of ethical behavior. Unfortunately, there may be
serious ramifications in the future as a result. Please read all contracts carefully and seek additional
information as needed to fully understand the obligations being assumed.
D. Relative to Protection of Patient Privacy:
1. Students will refrain from sharing or discussing protected patient information in public places or
through electronic media.
2. Students will uphold the standards, policies and procedures set forth by each institution they are
assigned in relations to HIPPA regulations and maintaining patient privacy.
Students will refrain from taking photos or sharing any information that may be used to identify patients
or violate privacy.
IV.
E. Social Media Policy – see attachments
Professionalism
Students are responsible for reviewing all content in the Oakland University Graduate Catalog, Oakland
University School of Nursing Graduate Handbook and Nurse Anesthesia Student Handbook.
Students who qualify are strongly encouraged to join Sigma Theta Tau, the International Honor Society for
Nurses. Students are encouraged to become active in Sigma Theta Tau, AANA, MiANA, MiANAS (Michigan
Association of Nurse Anesthesia Students), and other professional organizations. Students must be in good
academic and clinical standing in order to attend these activities.
As a Student Registered Nurse Anesthesia Student (SRNA), you are a representative of our profession,
Oakland University, and our affiliate clinical agencies. Students will conduct themselves in a professional and
respectable manner during class time, in the clinical area and during professional meetings and conferences.
All students should be dressed neatly and appropriately when on hospital property (no jeans, shorts, sweat
suits, low cut blouse/shirt, tight-fitting clothing, short skirts, flip-flops etc.). Professional dress/business attire is
11
required at all times in all academic and clinical settings. Clean lab coats and your hospital identification
badge MUST be worn while on hospital property and at affiliate sites. Students must read and adhere to the
Beaumont dress code policy, # 280. Maintenance of a professional appearance and demeanor facilitates the
acceptance of the profession and yourself by our clients and other professionals in the clinical setting.
SRNAs must always identify themselves as nurse anesthesia students and never misrepresent their
professional status.
12
Oakland University Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia
Curriculum Design
Class of 2015
NRS 500
NRS 605
BIO 501
NRS 607
BIO 502
NRS 615
NRS 651
NRS 617
Fall Semester 2013 – Year I
Theoretical Foundations in Nursing
3 CR
Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia
Practice I
Physiology and Pathophysiology
Introduction to NA Practice & Clinical Internship I
& Advanced Health Assessment I
Winter Semester 2014 – Year I
Physiology and Pathophysiology
3 CR
Nurse Anesthesia Practice II
Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia
Practice II
NA Clinical Internship II
1 CR
3 CR
3 CR
3 CR
12 CR
4 CR
3 CR
11 CR
NRS 627
BIO 503
Spring/Summer Semester 2014 – Year I
Nurse Anesthesia Practice III & Advanced
Health Assessment II
NA Clinical Internship III
Gross Anatomical Dissection
NRS 531
NRS 635
NRS 637
NRS 618
Fall Semester 2014 – Year II
Research in Advanced Nursing Practice
Regional Anesthesia & Pain Management
NA Clinical Internship IV
Biophysics for Nurse Anesthesia
NRS 625
4 CR
1 CR
3 CR
8 CR
4 CR
3 CR
1 CR
2 CR
10 CR
NRS 643
NRS 647
Winter Semester 2015 – Year II
Graduate Research: Project
Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia
Practice III
Professional Role Development
3 CR
NA Clinical Internship V
NRS 657
NRS 610
Spring/Summer Semester 2015 – Year II
NA Clinical Internship VI
Health Policy and Finance
NRS 521
NRS 667
Fall Semester 2015 – Year III
Diversity and Social Issues
NA Clinical Internship VII
NRS 687
NRS 652
1 CR
3 CR
1 CR
8 CR
1 CR
3 CR
4 CR
2 CR
1 CR
3 CR
TOTAL 56 CR
13
Oakland University Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia
Curriculum Design – Post Masters’ Degree
Class of 2015
NRS 605
BIO 501
NRS 607
BIO 502
NRS 615
NRS 651
NRS 617
Fall Semester 2013 – Year I
Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia
Practice I & Advanced Health Assessment I
Physiology and Pathophysiology
Introduction to NA Practice & Clinical Internship I
3 CR
3 CR
3 CR
9 CR
Winter Semester 2014 – Year I
Physiology and Pathophysiology
3 CR
Nurse Anesthesia Practice II
Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia
Practice II
NA Clinical Internship II
1 CR
4 CR
3 CR
11 CR
NRS 627
BIO 503
Spring/Summer Semester 2014 – Year I
Nurse Anesthesia Practice III &
Advanced Health Assessment II
4 CR
NA Clinical Internship III
Gross Anatomical Dissection
NRS 635
NRS 637
NRS 618
Fall Semester 2014 – Year II
Regional Anesthesia & Pain Management
NA Clinical Internship IV
Biophysics for Nurse Anesthesia
NRS 625
1 CR
3 CR
8 CR
3 CR
1 CR
2 CR
6 CR
NRS 647
Winter Semester 2015 – Year II
Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia
Practice III
NA Clinical Internship V
NRS 657
Spring/Summer Semester 2015 – Year II
NA Clinical Internship VI
NRS 667
Fall Semester 2015– Year III
NA Clinical Internship VII
NRS 652
3 CR
1 CR
4 CR
1 CR
1 CR
1 CR
1 CR
TOTAL 40 CR
14
Oakland University – School of Nursing
GRADUATE GRADE CONVERSION
PERCENTAGE
GPA
PERCENTAGE
GPA
99.00 - 100
4.0
80.00 - 80.99
3.0
97.00 - 98.99
3.9
78.00 – 79.99
2.9
95.00 - 96.99
3.8
76.00 – 77.99
2.8
93.00 - 94.99
3.7
74.00 – 75.99
2.7
91.00 - 92.99
3.6
72.00 – 73.99
2.6
89.00 - 90.99
3.5
70.00 - 71.99
2.5
87.00 - 88.99
3.4
68.00 – 69.99
2.4
85.00 - 86.99
3.3
66.00 – 67.99
2.3
83.00 - 84.99
3.2
64.00 – 65.99
2.2
81.00 - 82.99
3.1
62.00 – 63.99
2.1
60.00 – 61.99
2.0
15
2013-2014 ACADEMIC CALENDAR
Fall 2013
New Student Convocation
Classes begin
5 p.m.
Mid-term evaluation submission deadline
Tuesday
Sept. 3
Tuesday
Sept. 3
Friday
Oct. 18
Wednesday
Nov. 27
Thanksgiving recess begins
10 p.m.
Classes resume
7:30 a.m. Monday
Dec. 2
Classes end
10 p.m.
Saturday
Dec. 7
Sunday
Dec. 8
Exams begin
7:30 a.m. Monday
Dec. 9
Exams end
10 p.m.
Saturday
Dec. 14
Saturday
Dec. 14
Monday
Dec. 16
Study day
Fall Commencement
Grades submission deadline
5 p.m.
Winter 2014
Classes begin
7:30 a.m. Monday
Jan. 6
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
(classes suspended)
Monday
Jan. 20
Mid-term evaluation submission deadline
Friday
Feb. 21
Saturday
Feb. 22
Winter recess begins
10 p.m.
Classes resume
7:30 a.m. Monday
March 3
Classes end
10 p.m.
Saturday
April 19
Study period
Sunday
April 20
Exams begin
7:30 a.m. Monday
April 21
Exams end
10 p.m.
Saturday
April 26
Saturday
April 26
Monday
April 28
Spring Commencement
Grades submission deadline
5 p.m.
Summer Full Session 2014
Classes begin
7:30 a.m. Monday
Memorial Day holiday
May 5
Monday
May 26
Classes resume
7:30 a.m. Tuesday
May 27
Summer recess begins
10 p.m.
June 21
Classes resume
7:30 a.m. Monday
Independence Day holiday
Saturday
June 30
Friday - Saturday July 4-5
Classes resume
7:30 a.m. Monday
July 7
Classes end
10 p.m.
Aug. 16
Final exams begin
7:30 a.m. Monday
Aug. 18
Final exams end
10 p.m.
Saturday
Aug. 23
Grades submission deadline
5 p.m.
Monday
Aug. 25
Saturday
16
Lines of Communication
The purpose of this policy is to delineate various modes of communication that a student may use for conflict resolution
or questions.
Students have the right to expect that the normal lines of student communication begin with the clinical and/or didactic
faculty. Subsequent steps include contacting the clinical coordinator(s), followed by the assistant director, and then
program director. The Associate Dean, and ultimately the Dean of the School of Nursing at Oakland University may be
contacted after the program faculty. In general, any of the program administrative faculty can answer questions as they
arise.
Program Faculty
Anne Hranchook, CRNA, MSN
Director
Mary Golinski, PhD, CRNA
Assistant Director
Andrea Bittinger, CRNA, MSN
Admission & Clinical Coordinator
John Roebuck, CRNA, MSN
Simulation & Clinical Coordinator
Linda McDonald, CRNA, MSN
Clinical Coordinator
Laura Rodgers, CRNA, MSN
Clinical Coordinator
Beaumont Office:
(248) 898-1270
Oakland Office: (248) 364-8708
Cell:
(586) 480-0001
Beaumont Office
(248) 898-8043
Oakland Office (248) 364-8776
Page:
(248) 992-1960
Office:
(248) 898-7683
Page:
(248) 992-4752
Office:
(248) 898-7247
Page:
(248) 992-4541
Office
(248) 898-1812
Page:
(248) 992-4682
Office
(248) 898-6234
Page
(248)992-8285
Oakland University – School of Nursing
Phone numbers and e-mails are available on Oakland University’s website, www.oakland.edu.
Pagers
All students will be issued an alpha pager. Pagers are used as a means of communication between program faculty
and the student. Guidelines for pager use include:






Pagers are to be left on between 0600-2200 on all clinical and classroom days, including rotations to
affiliate sites. Pagers are to be left on outside of the hospital as well as within.
Pages from program faculty are to be answered within 15 minutes, unless involved in a case where this is
not possible.
If your pager is lost or was left at home, contact the program secretary immediately.
When in class or in OR, your pager must be on silent/vibrate.
Students are responsible for replacing lost pagers through the Beaumont Hospital Communications
department and are responsible for any applicable charges.
Pagers are to be used for hospital/program communication only.
E-mail
OU e-mail addresses must be checked daily for updates. Program faculty will use your OU e-mail address to
communicate important information. Oakland University will e-mail students each semester regarding registration
deadlines and many other important topics. Use professional language, appropriate grammar and spell check for all
emails, letters, phone messages, and pages.
Note: It is the responsibility of the student to provide current address, phone, and e-mail addresses to the program
secretary, Oakland University, and the AANA.
Moodle
Moodle is the e-learning site used by course instructors and students to look up course schedules, syllabi, outlines,
assigned readings, receive lecture handouts, communicate with instructors, and more. We encourage you to bring
your laptop to class and go green. Exam results and final grades are posted on Moodle. On-line courses are Moodle
based. Help and tutorials for Moodle are available on line. Students are required to check each course, including
Clinical Internships, on Moodle daily. The site is: www.oakland.edu and then log into SAIL using your username and
password.
Program/Hospital Property and Equipment
17
Computers
Students have unlimited access to the computers designated for student use within the office and suites of the school
of anesthesia. Computers are located in the quiet study, faculty offices commons area and the student lounge.
Computer use is for graduate program education only. Personal use of computers or Internet service for non
academic purposes is not permitted. Students are not permitted to download software onto Beaumont or program
computers.
Students are expected to maintain proper care of all computers, distance education equipment, telephones, and
patient care equipment. If a computer is not working properly, call the help line at x72727 for service.
Hospital Property and Security
Equipment (hospital/program) cannot be removed from the hospital without proper authorization. Students who want
to take any property of the program from the premises must first obtain permission by the program director. An official
Beaumont permission form signed by the director must accompany this property. Beaumont security personnel
reserve the right to search all hospital areas, including lockers, and inspect all packages (purses, backpacks, etc)
entering and leaving the premises. Failure to comply with this procedure constitutes theft of hospital property and will
be subject to penalties.
Student Lounge
Books scribed as program property in the student lounge are to remain in the lounge at all times. Books are also
available for loan in the administrative office area at Beaumont and should be checked out with the help of the
program secretary. Students are responsible for maintaining a clean work area. Maintenance issues should be
reported to the program secretary or service department, x16300.
HIPAA
In accordance with HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), patient information is not to leave the
hospital or be left in open view of those not caring for the patient. Students should never copy, carry or share any
secured patient information (name, hospital number etc) outside hospital premises. Computers programs that display
patient information must be closed and not left unattended. This includes, but is not limited to the surgery schedule
used to obtain assignments and specific patient information obtained in preparation for your clinical day. Failure to
comply with HIPPA requirements could result in immediate dismissal from the program. All students should review
Beaumont Hospital’s HIPAA and Confidentiality policies found on the “Inside Beaumont” website.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 pertains to confidential student educational records.
This legislation allows students the right to view upon request their own confidential educational records and defines
the use of these records by others.
The Dean of Students is the university compliance officer for the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. A full
statement of students’ rights is available in the Office of the Dean of Students, 144 Oakland Center, 2200 North
Squirrel Road, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401, and (248) 370-3352. Any grievances,
complaints or other related problems may be addressed to this office and/or filed with the U.S. Department of
Education.
Telephone
Telephones in the student lounge are reserved for hospital related calls only. Students must use personal or pay
phones for personal/family communication.
Attendance Policies
Class Attendance
1.
Attendance for all lectures and exams is an expectation of the program.
2.
Students rotating to a distance site will be expected to attend class at the nearest location.
3.
Instructors are requested to notify program administration if a student is absent or consistently tardy to class.
4.
Students who are unable to attend a class day must notify the faculty of record for the course and email program
secretary at [email protected] within 2 hours of the scheduled class start time. Failure to do so may result in
an unexcused absence.
5.
Students are responsible for any material covered, assignments or testing missed due to absence.
6.
The academic calendar detailing specific class start dates, final exam dates and school breaks is available via
the Oakland University website and in the current Oakland University Graduate Student Catalog.
7.
Students are expected to be attentive and respectful of all lecturers. Casual conversation, inattentiveness,
behaviors that others will find distracting, and leaving the classroom during lecture is inappropriate and
disrespectful to classmates.
18
8.
9.
Laptops and electronic devices are to be used in class only for work related to the program.
Due to the nature of the anesthesia profession and because patient care is a priority, instructors may not be
available as scheduled. Therefore, class will occasionally be cancelled, moved to an earlier or later time, or
moved to a different day. The program makes every attempt to see that instructors arrive in a timely manner and
class is held as scheduled. Program faculty reserves the right to reschedule class/clinical days to meet learning
objectives.
Clinical Attendance
1.
The following steps must be followed in order to notify the clinical site and program of an unexpected absence
on a scheduled clinical day:
 Follow the individual clinical site’s guidelines for call in.
 Leave a message at Oakland SON Program Office 248-364-8774 or email [email protected]
2.
This procedure must be followed for each day of absence from class or clinical, unless discussed with program
faculty.
3.
Students must not leave clinical early without faculty permission. Doing so may result in being charged an
unexcused absence.
4.
Students are required to attend morning report and all departmental educational offerings on scheduled clinical
days at Beaumont Hospital (and affiliate sites if appropriate) unless excused by clinical coordinators.
Call In Procedure for Beaumont Royal Oak
At Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak:
1. Call 248-898-7814 before 0630. Leave your name, shift and OR to which you are assigned on the
“call-in” audix.
2. To call-in for an evening or midnight shift, dial 248-898-4400 and wait for the charge CRNA to pick up.
3. In Addition to the above:
a.
Leave message at the Oakland program office 248-364-8774 or email at [email protected]
b.
Text message the CRNA that you are working with on their pager. Pager numbers may be
found on the Inside Beaumont website or by calling the operator at 248-898-5000
Scheduling Policies
Student’s Monthly Schedule
th
1.
Schedule requests must be entered by the 15 of each month, on Typhon approximately 6 weeks prior to the
th
start of the new schedule. (Example: November schedule requests would be due by September 15 )
2.
Students may request a maximum of 1 weekend off per month.
3.
Requests will not be honored if submitted past the schedule request date.
4.
Schedule requests via e-mail will only be accepted for distance students and students on rotations at distance
sites.
5.
The program clinical coordinator prepares the schedule for students rotating to distance sites.
6.
The availability of enrichment clinical sites provides valuable experiences for independent practice and the
attainment of skills and techniques necessary. The number and types of rotations is determined by program
faculty.
7.
Vacation time will not be granted during the last six weeks of the program. Any sick days taken during the last 6
weeks must be made up. Students are responsible for scheduling their make-up days with their clinical
coordinator.
8.
Students may not change their clinical schedule at any clinical site. If an emergency arises, the student must
contact program faculty who will determine if clinical schedules will change. Program faculty reserve the right to
make changes as deemed necessary.
9.
Master Clinical Rotation Schedule-This schedule is usually published 1-2 months in advance of the start of
specialty rotations. If changes to the clinical rotation schedule are made, students will be informed of changes
as far in advance as possible. Revisions to rotation schedule will be made based on individual clinical site or
program need. If an emergency arises, please contact your clinical coordinator; responses will be within 24
hours.
Time Commitment
The AANA COA is committed to the wellness of its members and student members. In order to comply with the
Standards set forth by The Council on Accreditation, Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse
Anesthesia has implemented the following duty hour limits for student anesthetists:
1.
Clinical time will be scheduled for students based on the operating room schedule at the clinical sites. Shift times
vary as directed by clinical schedules and specific learning needs.
2.
Time commitment to the program will not exceed 64 hours a week and includes the sum of the hours spent in
class and all clinical hours. The weekly total may vary from week-to-week and is an average over 4 weeks.
19
3.
4.
Students must have a minimum 10 hour rest period between scheduled clinical duty periods (i.e., assigned
continuous clinical hours). At no time may a student provide direct patient care for a period longer than 16
continuous hours.
Call experience will be provided through scheduled off shifts throughout the program. The scheduling of clinical
experiences on the off shift and weekends will begin with Clinical Internship II.
Students will be scheduled for one eight-hour shift at a time. Because of the nature of a clinical assignment, the
student may need to extend their time beyond eight hours to achieve the optimum clinical learning experience.
Should your assignment extend beyond 14 hours, you are to contact the clinical coordinator.
Distance Education Student Schedules
1.
The distance site coordinator at the distance site reserves the right to amend student’s daily schedules
(assignments, rotations) to facilitate optimal learning experiences.
2.
Clinical issues should first be discussed with the distance site coordinator, followed by the program faculty.
Vacation Time
1.
A total of 25 vacation and 5 sick days are allotted to each student for the duration of the 28-month program. A
maximum of one week of vacation may be taken during a monthly schedule period. Any unused sick time may
be transferred to vacation time during last two semesters.
2.
Students are required to use at least half (12) of their vacation time by the end of the first 12 months of the
program unless otherwise agreed upon by program faculty.
3.
During the program, students are scheduled for clinical rotations during university-recognized breaks. Students
have the option to take vacation days during this time. Students are required to use all of their vacation time by
October 31 of their graduation year. Any unused vacation or sick time will be forfeited .Any vacation time or sick
days taken after this time must be made up before graduation.
4.
Students are expected to use vacation time between Christmas and New Years holidays. Exact number of
vacation days used at this time will vary from year to year.
5.
Vacation is not permitted during rotations at Children’s Hospital of Michigan and Detroit John Dingell VA Medical
Center
6.
A maximum of two vacations days may be used during the following rotations :Cardiovascular,
Vascular/Thoracic, Pediatrics, evening/midnight, St John evening/midnights, NENT, Mott ,Bell, OSF, Portage,
Dickenson, Allegan, Pennock, Oaklawn, Northern Michigan and Pennock.
7.
Vacation requests for Clinical Internships IV-VII must be submitted to clinical coordinator by the end of the
second semester.
Unplanned Absences
1.
Attendance in class is mandatory, vacation days are not permitted on class day.
2.
Unplanned absences include illness, unforeseen problems that prevent a student from attending clinical or
class, medical/dental appointments, or other necessary personal business.
3.
Students have a maximum of 5 unplanned absences to use during the program. If a student exceeds these 5
days, he/she may be required to make up days at the end of the program.
4.
Students who are habitually tardy or indiscriminately use sick call may be charged an unplanned absence or
recommended for dismissal.
5.
Unplanned absences on weekends and off-shifts must be made up on similar shifts.
6.
Patterns of unplanned absences, such as calling in prior to exams, immediately before or after vacations, etc. is
discouraged and will require a physician’s note.
7.
Absence due to illness on the day of an exam will require documentation from a physician.
8.
If a clinical instructor dismisses a student from clinical due to lack of patient and/or care plan preparation or
performance, the student must report immediately to program administration. The program faculty will
investigate and decide on the best course of action.
Leave of Absence
Nurse anesthesia students who are considering a Leave of Absence must seek immediate guidance from the nurse
anesthesia program director. Whenever possible, the request should be made in advance of the anticipated leave or as
soon as possible after commencement of an emergency leave. A letter of explanation detailing the circumstances
surrounding the request must be submitted to the program director along with notification. The curriculum builds upon
didactic and clinical experiences in a sequential manner. Students who are absent beyond the end of an approved
Leave of Absence are not guaranteed re-entry into the program.
It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the proposed leave is compatible with the regulations of any granting
agency from which funding would normally be received during the leave period and that such agencies are informed of
the proposed leave. Student on student loan or financial aid programs should determine the consequences that such a
leave may have on their repayment status.
20
Students with an assistantship granted a Leave of Absence will have his or her stipend suspended during the period of
the leave. Whenever possible, reappointment will be offered to the student upon his or her return. Reappointments are
not guaranteed.
Conference Time
1.
Students are required to attend departmental conferences at Beaumont-RO and other clinical sites where
offered including morning report and educational offerings. These include monthly Morbidity and Mortality
conferences, monthly guest speakers, and yearly offsite conferences. Currently at Royal Oak, guest speakers
are the first Tuesday of every month in the ABW auditorium and M & M conferences are the third Tuesday of
every month in the ABW auditorium. Both begin promptly at 7:00 a.m. Attendance is mandatory if you are
scheduled to be at Beaumont-Royal Oak at any time during that day.
2.
Students are encouraged to attend the AANA Annual Meeting and will receive 5 conference days. This time will
not be subtracted from the vacation bank. The five days include travel time. Students will be given an outline
each year regarding required scheduled sessions. Students must attend scheduled sessions each day or the
conference days may be rescinded and vacation time assigned.
3.
All students must attend at least one meeting of the Michigan Association of Nurse Anesthetists (MANA) each
year. MANA meetings are held in the spring and fall of each year. Seniors may attend CRNA Impact Day in
Lansing. No conference days are granted for attendance at MANA meetings unless student is traveling more
than 2 hours from their assigned clinical site to the conference.
4.
One conference day will be given for the purposes of taking a board review class. This includes travel time.
5.
Requests for additional conference time will be reviewed on an individual basis.
6.
Students must bring a copy of the Certificate of Attendance to the program secretary office within 5 days of
attending a conference or the student will be charged vacation time for the conference.
7.
A student must be in good academic and clinical standing to attend conferences/meetings. Conference
registration does not guarantee that a student will be permitted to attend. If academic, clinical or professional
performance is in question; permission to attend may be denied.
Certifications
1.
Required certifications for graduation from the program are BLS, ACLS & PALS. Required certifications may not
expire within the 3 months following graduation. One certification/recertification day will be granted during the
program. This must be used on the day of the certification/recertification course. All other
certifications/recertifications are to be completed on the students’ own time.
2.
The student is required to maintain current BLS and ACLS certification throughout the program. The
certification must be obtained from a program recognized by the American Heart Association. Students who
allow their certification to lapse must schedule full-course certification on their own time using unplanned
absence days. Students must provide proof of attendance to the program secretary and coordinators before
they can return to clinical.
3.
Students cannot attend clinical without current certification on file.
4.
Students will be responsible for costs of these courses.
Holidays
th
Six holidays per year are recognized: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, July 4 , Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas
Day. Students are not scheduled for class or clinical on these days.
Bereavement (per Beaumont policy):
1.
Up to 24 hours (three 8 hour days) of bereavement may be granted if needed for the death of an immediate
family member.
2.
Immediate family members are defined as wife/husband, grandparents, parents, brothers/sisters, children, and
grandchildren. All of the above designations include "step" and "in-law" derivations.
3.
If asked, students should be prepared to provide an obituary notice or other documentation.
Jury Duty, Military Commitment
Students must notify their clinical coordinator immediately upon notification of possible selection for jury duty. A copy of
the order to appear for jury duty must be submitted to program faculty. Military commitments will be handled on an
individual basis.
Flexible Scheduling
1.
Flexible scheduling includes twelve-hour shifts, scheduled at program faculty’s discretion in collaboration with
the distant site coordinator.
2.
Students eligible for participation will be chosen based on their clinical and didactic performance.
3.
All students may not be eligible.
4.
The weekly time will be equal to the amount of clinical time normally required during that semester.
5.
Scheduled clinical days will not exceed 12 hours.
21
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Students will be scheduled to assure 10 hour rest periods between times in the clinical area.
Students should never leave hospital premises before their scheduled clinical time even if there are no cases. If
cases are not available to participate in, students should call the shift supervisor and notify them of their location,
contact information and availability.
Students at Beaumont, Royal Oak, should page the board runner, #25532, or call
84400, prior to leaving at shifts end.
Senior students scheduled for “free” rotations at Beaumont-RO may be considered for flexible scheduling during
the last 6 months of the program.
Clinical expectations remain the same as other shifts (i.e. – finishing cases, etc).
Miscellaneous
Students must attend all scheduled orientations for OU and Beaumont. Graduating seniors are required to attend
program and university graduation events. Lower classmen are encouraged to show support for graduates and attend
the completion ceremony.
Testing Procedure
The purpose of this procedure is to identify the minimum guidelines required for the administration of examinations in
the nurse anesthesia didactic courses. Due to the nature of the field of practice, it is essential that evaluative
measures, such as written or oral examinations, be given in such a manner as to allow the student the opportunity to
demonstrate their knowledge to the greatest extent possible. At the same time, test security must be preserved, and
the opportunity for academic misconduct minimized. The following elements will be present when an examination is
administered as part of a nurse anesthesia didactic course.
1.
2.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
The instructor responsible for the class will provide an examination schedule. This schedule will include major
examinations, but may not include other evaluative measures such as quizzes, demonstration evaluations, or
oral examination.
During exam administration, the following measures may be employed:
 Seating of students via instructor prepared seating chart
 Spacing of students as the room permits, two rooms may be required
 Scrambled exams with each question out of order from another exam
 Seating that permits instructor clear view of laptop or computer
Students may not use a PDA, cell phone, or other unapproved electronic devices during examinations. If
calculations requiring a calculator are required, the instructor will provide one.
The instructor, or a proctor appointed by the instructor will administer exams. The table must be cleared of all
personal items except a pencil. Students will not be able to leave the classroom until their completed exam is
submitted. The instructor may allow students to leave as they finish the exam. However, once a student has
left the classroom, they will not be able to return until everyone has completed their exam.
Once a quiz or examination has been turned in to the instructor or proctor it is considered complete and the
student may not request to review the exam or change answers.
Examinations and quizzes are the property of the program and students may not possess or make copies of
any exams. Failure to observe this is a serious violation of academic conduct and will be handled according
to the policy on academic conduct.
Review of a completed exam must be done in the presence of program faculty or the program secretary. The
review period will be limited to three days immediately following the posting of grades except for students at
distance sites who will be allowed to review their exam by appointment on their next rotation to Beaumont,
Royal Oak.
Students are not permitted to make written notes regarding exams or place marks on the exam while
reviewing it.
Reviewing the exam immediately following administration is at the discretion of the faculty.
Testing Procedure for Students Located at Distance Sites
1.
At distant sites, students will be proctored via Tandberg distance technology.
2.
Identity of each student taking the exam will be done visually.
3.
Each distance site will assign a person designated to assist with exam distribution and exam return to the
program. This person will do the following:
a. if a paper and pencil test is employed, copy the exam that has been e-mailed to them from the faculty of
record or program secretary prior to the start of the exam.
b. provide the student the exam once proctor or faculty of record is present (either at the site or
via distance technology to observe the student)
c. if distance technology is not available or the student is making up an exam, proctor the
exam. A time will be arranged that is mutually agreeable with the proctor and program
faculty for this to occur.
22
d. receive completed exam from student once they have completed the exam
e. scan exam and send to program secretary’s private fax
f. mail original student copy of exam to program secretary at Beaumont
g. destroy electronic version of exam on computer.
Program Evaluation Process
Program Evaluation
Continuous evaluation of the nurse anesthesia program occurs at regular intervals. The nurse anesthesia program
administration, faculty, curriculum, students and resources will be continuously evaluated to assure attainment of
educational excellence and compliance with the Standards set forth by the Council on Accreditation. The evaluation
plan for both the undergraduate and graduate programs of the School of Nursing are described in the Oakland University
School of Nursing Evaluation Process document. Components that relate directly to the Graduate Program of Nurse
Anesthesia are described below.
Clinical Evaluation of Students
1.
Beginning with Clinical Internship I, clinical CRNA/MD instructors will complete a Clinical Performance
Evaluation tool each clinical day or monthly (site dependent) Students are required to submit and collect daily
clinical evaluations through the last clinical day of the program.
a. The Clinical Internship objectives are based on the Standards of Nursing Practice for
Advanced Practice Nurses (ANA), the AANA Standards for Nurse Anesthesia
Practice, and program outcome criteria.
b. It is the responsibility of the student to submit the clinical performance evaluation to the
clinical CRNA/MD instructor at the beginning of each clinical day.
2.
It is the student’s responsibility to completely fill out the top of the evaluation. The procedure, date, ASA status
ect must be filled out. Incomplete evaluation forms will be returned to the student. The instructor places the
program clinical coordinators read all submitted evaluations.
4.
Students review their written evaluations and, if necessary, request clarification from the CRNA/MD instructor if
they have questions.
5.
If students have questions about their evaluation they should speak with their instructor as a first step. Following
this, the student may proceed in the following order to discuss their evaluation: the site coordinator, program
clinical coordinator, assistant director and director.
6.
Students may provide a written response if necessary.
7.
Students who receive a “1”, indicating they performed an action that may be harmful, unsafe or that does not
meet the objective must discuss the circumstances with a program clinical coordinator (assistant or program
director if clinical coordinator is not available) within 48 hours of receiving the evaluation.
8.
Each student must be certain that they have received a completed written evaluation for each clinical day or
monthly (site dependent). Total semester evaluations will be tallied by the student and this information will be
documented on the student self-evaluation form.
9.
If an instructor fails to return an evaluation, the student should request the completed evaluation from the
CRNA/MD instructor.
a. If a student has difficulty obtaining completed evaluations, the student should notify a
clinical coordinator or affiliate site coordinator for assistance within one week.
b. Students are ultimately responsible for tracking evaluations and notifying a clinical
coordinator when assistance is required.
10.
Simulation Evaluation: Students will be evaluated daily when assigned to the simulation lab using
the student simulation evaluation tool and skill competency checklists as appropriate.
Student Self-Evaluation of Clinical Experience
1.
Students will complete a self-evaluation at the end of each semester, beginning with Clinical Internship I and
ending with VI.
2.
The self-evaluation form, collected daily evaluations, and care plans are submitted by the student and turned
into the program clinical coordinator who will give them to the student’s assigned preceptor. The preceptor
formulates a summary evaluation and submits it to the clinical coordinator by the date designated.
Student End Semester Evaluation of Clinical Experience
Students are assigned a preceptor beginning with Clinical Internship I. The preceptor’s role is to instruct, preceptor,
and guide the student’s clinical performance. The student/preceptor relationship allows the clinical coordinator to
better communicate specific learning needs to the preceptor to improve the student’s clinical performance. Students
may use their preceptor as a resource person even when the student is assigned to work with other instructors. The
clinical coordinator attempts to schedule the student with their assigned preceptor as often as possible. At the end of
the semester the preceptor completes a semester summary of the student’s clinical performance and suggests a plan
for continued improvement.
23
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Evaluation materials will be distributed to each student's CRNA preceptor at the end of each semester by the
clinical or site coordinator.
The preceptor will review the self-evaluation, care plans, and the clinical performance evaluations.
The preceptor will develop a summary statement that details the student's progress and, based on strengths
and weaknesses, will offer recommendations for continued improvement and development in the clinical area.
At the end of the semester, students will have the opportunity to meet with the clinical coordinator to review and
discuss the Clinical Summary statement summarizing clinical performance. It will be signed by the student and
coordinator and placed in the student's file. Students will be given a copy of this summary.
For each clinical internship, a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) grade is assigned at the end of each semester.
Students are expected to earn a course grade of satisfactory in order to progress to the next clinical internship.
Students who fail to meet the objectives for the clinical internship will receive an unsatisfactory grade and be
recommended for dismissal from the program.
Didactic Evaluation
Evaluation of students’ didactic performance is by academic achievement in the classroom. Progression in the program
requires maintenance of a 3.0 GPA for each course. Faculty of Record will counsel and issue a midterm academic
advisement if a student’s course grade is less than 3.0. At the end of the semester, if the student’s course grade is less
than 3.0, program faculty will recommend that the student be dismissed from the program (Some foundation courses
may be repeated at the discretion of the Program Director and Dean).
Grading
As stated in the Oakland University Graduate Catalog, many programs have more stringent grade requirements for
credit and retention. Students enrolled in the Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia will
follow the policies in this handbook in regards to grading and progression for both didactic and clinical courses.
Students must successfully pass both the didactic and clinical component each semester in order to progress to the next
semester (Some foundation courses may be repeated at the discretion of the Program Director and Dean).
Self-Evaluation Examination (SEE)
1.
The SEE exam is a computerized adaptive test that is intended to help both students and programs identify their
respective strengths and weaknesses before students take the certification exam. Scores are scaled to adjust
proficiency according to a student’s level in the program. Individual SEE exam scores should meet or exceed
the national mean score for students at their level.
2.
Students are required to take the self-evaluation exam (SEE) each year while enrolled in the program. Students
will be given a day out of clinical to take a scheduled SEE exam.
3.
The faculty will determine a designated time period in which students are to take the exam.
4.
Students are responsible for contacting the testing center to schedule their exam during unscheduled class and
clinical hours.
5.
Students are responsible for the costs associated with taking the SEE exam.
Evaluation of Courses
1.
Course Evaluation — Students have the opportunity to evaluate each course at the end of each semester in
accordance with the Oakland University School of Nursing evaluation plan. Faculty effectiveness evaluations
are completed on line via Moodle.
2.
Guest Lecturers — Students will evaluate guest lecturers for topics presented throughout the semester.
Evaluation of Clinical Agencies and Clinical Instructors
1.
Students will evaluate clinical affiliate agencies and site coordinators at the end of each assigned rotation using
Typhon and the OU Clinical Agency Evaluation. This should be done within one week of completion of each site.
2.
Typhon results will be summarized and distributed to the affiliate sites during annual site visits. OU Clinical
Agency Evaluations are returned to OU and stored.
3.
Faculty will evaluate clinical agencies at least annually during site visits.
4.
Students have a professional responsibility to evaluate clinical sites.
5.
Evaluation of Clinical Instructors — Students evaluate clinical instructors and clinical sites using Typhon.
24
Evaluation of the Program
Evaluation of the Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia will occur as depicted
in the following tables:
Program Evaluation Summary
Student Evaluation:
Area
Clinical
Performance
Informal Daily
Self Evaluation
By Whom
CRNA/MDA
Clinical
Instructors
Form
Clinical Internship:
Evaluation of Clinical
Performance I; II; III-IV; V-VII
Frequency
Student
No Form
Each Clinical Day
Each Clinical Day or Monthly
(Site Dependent)
Formal Self
Evaluation
Student
Student Self Evaluation
Submitted at end of the
semester beginning with
Clinical Internship I-VI
Course Grades
Faculty of
Record
Posted on OU Website
Ongoing throughout course
Clinical
Preceptor
Clinical Evaluation Semester
Summary
At end of each semester for
Clin Int I-VI
Program
Faculty
Review of NBCRNA Annual
Report: Summary NCE/SEE
Performance: Review of
NBCRNA Self Evaluation
Examination Examinee
Score Reports
Annually
Form
OU Classroom Faculty
Effectiveness Tool
Frequency
End of each
semester
End of
Semester
Clinical
Summary
Self-Evaluation
Examination
Reported To
Student
Summary To
Program Faculty
Clinical Preceptor
N/A
Clinical Preceptor/
Program Faculty
OU SON
Assistant Dean/
Director Graduate
Study
Director
Student
Student/Program
Faculty
Program Evaluation
Committee
(October)
OU SON
Assistant Dean/
Director Graduate
Study
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of
Interest
Faculty Evaluation:
Area
Faculty of
Record
By Whom
Student
Didactic
Instructor
Student
Guest Lecture Evaluation
After each lecture
Clinical
Instructor
Student
Typhon Clinical Instructor
Eval
Each Clinical Day
OU or Beaumont Hospital
Performance Appraisal
Annually
Program Faculty
Program
Director
Program
Director
OU Dean and
Beaumont VP
of Surgical
Services
Reported To
Faculty of Record/Director
Didactic Instructor/Program
Faculty
(End of Semester)
Clinical Instructor/
Program Faculty
(Annually)
Individual Faculty
Program Director
OU Performance Appraisal
Summary To
OU SON Evaluation
Committee
OU SON Evaluation
Committee
OU SON Evaluation
Committee
Dean SON
Provost
Annually
Clinical Sites:
Area
By Whom
Clinical Site
Student
Clinical Site
Faculty
Form
Typhon Clinical Site
Evaluation
Written summary of annual
site visit
Frequency
End of rotation
Annually
Reported To
Program Faculty
Program Faculty
Summary To
OU SON Evaluation
Committee
OU SON Evaluation
Committee
25
Program Evaluation:
Area
Exit
Evaluation
By Whom
Students
Form
Senior Exit Evaluation
Frequency
End of Program
Reported To:
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May)
Summary To:
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
Program
Summary
Discussion
Students
Informal discussion with
Director and Assistant
Director reflected in notes
End of Program
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May)
Post
Graduate
Evaluation
Graduates
OUBGPNA Graduate Self
Evaluation
One year after Program
completion
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May)
Post
Graduate
Evaluation
Employers
OUGPNA Employer
Evaluation of Graduate
One year after Program
completion
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May)
National
Certification
Exam
Graduates
Annually
Program Evaluation
Committee
(October)
Annual
Report
Program
Review of NBCRNA
Annual Report Summary
of NCE/SEE Performance:
Review of NBCRNA
National Certification
Exam Program Director’s
Summary
COA Annual Report
Annually
Accreditation
Review
Council on
Accreditation
Program Self-Study and
COA Site Visit
Accrediting Cycle
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
OU SON Evaluation
Committee/Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
Annual
Faculty
Evaluation of
Program
Quarterly
Clinical
Faculty
Evaluation of
Program
Annual
Clinical Site
Evaluation of
Program
Quarterly
Program Staff
Meeting
Clinical Faculty:
CRNAs, MDAs
Non-clinical OU
faculty
Clinical Faculty:
CRNAs, MDAs
Annual Faculty Evaluation
Form
Annually
COA/
Program Evaluation
Committee
(October)
COA/
Program Evaluation
Committee
(October of accreditation
review year)
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May)
Quarterly Clinical Faculty
Evaluation
Quarterly
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May/October)
Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
Clinical Site
Coordinators
Clinical Site Evaluation
Annually in conjunction
with site visit
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May)
Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
Clinical Faculty:
CRNAs
Focused question and
discussion related to
program evaluation
reflected in minutes
Quarterly
Program Evaluation
Committee
(May/October)
Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
Students/
Faculty/
Community of Interest
26
STUDENT SELF EVALUATION
NAME:
DATE:
PRECEPTOR:
EVALUATION PERIOD :
NUMBER OF SIGNED CARE PLANS SUBMITTED:
NUMBER OF CLINICAL DAYS PROVIDING ANESTHESIA:
NUMBER OF RETURNED EVALUATIONS:
EVALUATIONS NOT RETURNED:
PLEASE RATE YOUR PERFORMANCE SINCE YOUR LAST EVALUATION IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:
5- ALWAYS
4-MOST OF THE TIME
3-USUALLY 2-SOMETIMES
1-NEVER
Assessment, diagnosis, and planning
Conducts appropriate health history, physical, ‘
And psychosocial assessment.
Utilizes gathered data and information in guiding plan of care.
Formulates appropriate written and verbal care plans.
Demonstrates perioperative preparation (patient, equipment, tabletop).
Integrates physiologic/pharmacologic/procedural principles.
Implementation and Evaluation
Meets criteria for safe induction.
Skillfully manages airway.
Monitors patients physiologic condition as appropriate for procedure
and specific patient’s needs.
Adjusts anesthetic care plan based on patient’s
physiologic response.
Maintains organization throughout the day.
Skillfully places regional/lines.
Timely charts completely, accurately and legibly.
Meets criteria for safe emergence.
Transfers responsibility of care to qualified practitioner in manner
which ensures continuity of care and patient safety.
Completes post operative evaluation.
Standards of Professional Performance
Exhibits a professional and ethical demeanor.
Respects and maintains the basic rights of patients.
Communicates and collaborates with members of the health care team.
Evaluates safety, effectiveness, and cost when choosing practice options.
Participates in required and optional educational activities.
1
2
3
4
5
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
Identify and describe two areas above in which you have shown the greatest improvement this semester.
Identify two areas above as goals for improvement during the next semester. Define a plan of growth in these areas.
Describe two challenging days this semester and state:
a) why they were challenging.
b) how you performed.
c) what you learned from this experience.
27
OAKLAND UNIVERSITY – BEAUMONT GRADUATE PROGRAM OF NURSE ANESTHESIA
CLINICAL EVALUATION – SEMESTER SUMMARY
Please return to the Clinical Coordinators by:
STUDENT:
SEMESTER:
EVALUATION SUMMARY COMPLETED BY:
Number of written evaluations reviewed (Please arrange evaluations in order by date from first to last):
Number of times you have worked with this student during this evaluation period:
Describe specifics about the student’s performance in the following areas:
A. Assessment and Diagnosis (Health history, physical assessment, chart review, etc)
B. Outcome (Preparation &education of client, agent/medication selection &administration), knowledge of anesthesia &
procedure, integration of pharmacologic & physiologic principles, etc)
C. Planning (Verbal and written care plans)
D. Implementation (Induction of anesthesia, airway management, maintenance of sound anesthetic state, documentation,
fluid replacement, emergence, transfer of care, protection from iatrogenic complications, etc)
E. Evaluation (Completes POR on all clients assigned & reports findings, provides post op pain control, etc)
F. Standards of Professional Performance (Interaction with clients, members of HCT, utilization of learning
environment, self evaluation, leadership, ethics, etc)
G. Technical skills (Intubation, airway management, arterial lines, equipment use, regional administration, etc)
H. List the student’s strengths.
I. List two specific suggestions the student can use to improve clinical performance:
Student comments:
Preceptor:
Date:
Clinical Coordinator(s):
Date:
Student: ________________________________________________________________________ Date:
28
Clinical Internship: *
Evaluation of Clinical Performance
Oakland University Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia
Student
Year
Clinical Site
CRNA
Date
Shift/Location
Anesthesiologist
Case
ASA
Technique
Case
ASA
Technique
Case
ASA
Technique
Evaluation Scale:
N = not applicable; 1=does not meet objective; unsafe or harmful, 2=meets objective with assistance, 3=meets objective
Faculty Comments
I. Assessment and Diagnosis
A. Performs health history, physical, and psychosocial assessment
B. Initiates and interprets diagnostic testing
C. Prioritizes data collection based on patient’s current needs
D. Derives appropriate diagnosis from assessment data
II. Outcome
A. Educates patient
B. Obtains informed consent
C. Incorporates evidence based practice to identify outcome
III. Planning
A. Formulates patient specific verbal & written anesthetic plan of
care
B. Selects appropriate equipment, medication, & monitoring
modalities
C. Performs and documents appropriate safety checks
IV. Implementation
A. Performs appropriate induction sequence
B. Performs appropriate airway management
C. Positions patient for optimal safety, comfort and surgical
exposure
D. Adjusts anesthetic plan according to patient’s physiological
response
E. Manages invasive procedures with skill
F. Tailors patient monitoring in accordance with patient needs
G. Completes accurate and timely documentation
H. Manages emergence
I. Assures patient safety while transferring responsibility of care
J. Collaborates with other health care professionals to provide
optimal care
K. Utilizes universal precautions
L. Protects patient from iatrogenic complications and nosocomial
infections
M. Adheres to safety precautions established by the institution
N. Practices standards that promote environmental health
V. Evaluation
A. Evaluates effectiveness of interventions
B. Completes post operative evaluation on patients
C. Participates in the continuous quality improvement process
VI. Standards of Professional Performance
A. Respects and maintains basic rights of patients
B. Collaborates with members of the interprofessional team
C. Seeks learning experiences to develop clinical knowledge
D. Seeks feedback regarding practice from health care team
E. Mentors peers in acquisition of clinical knowledge and skills
F. Models expert practice to interprofessional team
G. Utilizes appropriate resources with regard to safety and cost
effectiveness
Student Comments
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
N
N
N
N
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
N
N
N
1
2
3
N
1
1
2
2
3
3
N
N
1
1
2
2
3
3
N
N
1
2
3
N
N
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
N
N
N
N
N
1
1
2
2
3
3
N
N
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
N
N
N
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
N
N
N
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
N
CRNA Signature:________________________________________________
* Front of tool for Internships I-VII is the same-objectives on the back of the tool change for each Internship
29
CLINICAL INTERNSHIP OBJECTIVES
It is expected that nurse anesthesia students possess the knowledge, skills and abilities of basic nursing practice as
they enter the clinical internship sequence for the nurse anesthesia program. It is also expected that the student will
correlate didactic knowledge with clinical practice throughout the perioperative period during the course of graduate
study. This correlation is an integral part of the objectives for each clinical internship. There are seven clinical
internships throughout the program with specific leveled objectives.
NRS 607, NRS 617: Clinical Internship I & II Objectives
During Clinical internships I & II, the APN will attain the following:
I. Assessment & Diagnosis: Collects comprehensive data pertinent to the patient’s health &/or situation &
analyzes this data to determine the diagnosis. (ANA Standards 1 & 2, AANA Standard I)
A. Performs health history, physical, & psychosocial assessment
1) Generates thorough health history utilizing proper interview techniques & chart review.
2) Utilizes principles of physical assessment when examining major organ systems.
3) Assesses the effect of interactions among individuals, family, community, & social systems on health &
illness.
B. Initiates & interprets diagnostic testing
1) With guidance, utilizes assessment data & is able to initiate relevant lab work & specialty consultations.
2) Identifies normal & abnormal variations in regard to diagnostic testing.
C. Prioritizes data collection based on patient’s current needs
1) Identifies relevance of assessment data & diagnostic testing.
2) With guidance, prioritizes relevance of assessment data & diagnostic testing.
D. Derives appropriate diagnosis from assessment data
1) Identifies appropriate physical status using the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status
Classification System (ASA Status).
2) With guidance, incorporates assessment & diagnostic data along with hemodynamic parameters into
diagnosis.
II. Outcomes Identification: Obtains informed consent for the planned anesthetic intervention & identifies
expected outcomes individualized to the patient. (ANA Standard 3, AANA Standard II)
A. Educates patient & obtains informed consent
1) With guidance, discusses anesthetic plan and risks in language the patient
&/or legal guardian can understand.
B. Obtains informed consent
1) Verifies that informed consent has been obtained from qualified provider.
2) Identifies medical-legal issues involved in obtaining informed consent.
3) Documents that informed consent has been obtained.
C. Identifies expected outcomes incorporating evidenced based practice
1) Verbalizes expected outcomes based on current recommendations for practice found in literature.
III. Planning: Formulates a patient-specific plan & alternatives to that plan to attain expected outcomes.
(ANA Standards 4 & 9, AANA Standard for Nurse Anesthesia Practice III & VIII)
A. Formulates patient specific verbal & written anesthetic plan of care
1) Utilizing assessment data & planned procedure, writes patient specific care plan including assessment
& diagnostic strategies, & therapeutic interventions reflecting current evidence.
2) Communicates plan of care with instructors & with guidance, other members of the health care team.
B. Selects appropriate equipment, medication, & monitoring modalities
1) Identifies location & function of specific equipment/supplies.
2) Describes advantages/disadvantages of different anesthetic techniques.
3) Describes mechanism of action of different anesthetic therapies.
4) With guidance, utilizes assessment data to determine the type of monitoring devices, equipment, &
anesthetic interventions planned.
C. Performs and documents appropriate safety checks
1) Inspects anesthesia machine & monitors according to established guidelines, including readiness,
availability, cleanliness, & working condition of all equipment.
2) Inspects integrity of breathing system & ensures device capable of detecting disconnection with audible
alarm is intact.
3) Ensures functionality of oxygen analyzer & confirms audible alarm is intact.
4) Ensures safety measures taken to minimize risk of fire, explosion, electrical shock, & equipment
malfunction.
5) With assistance, identifies & troubleshoots problems with anesthesia equipment.
6) Documents safety checks on anesthetic record.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
30
7) Labels medications properly and secures in appropriate location.
IV. Implementation: Implements the identified plan (ANA Standard 5 & 16, AANA Standard IV, V, VI, VII, &
IX)
A. Performs appropriate induction sequence
1) Applies monitoring prior to the start of anesthesia.
2) Pre-oxygenates appropriately.
3) Selects & administers appropriate medication & dosage.
B. Performs appropriate airway management
1) Demonstrates proper ventilation techniques.
2) Secures airway with LMA or tracheal intubation utilizing basic techniques.
3) Verifies intubation
C. Positions patient for optimal patient safety, comfort, & surgical exposure
1) Identifies correct patient position for procedure.
2) Recognizes potential complications of various patient positioning.
3) Assesses patient positioning throughout procedure & with assistance makes appropriate interventions.
4) Verifies correct endotracheal tube placement after position changes.
D. Adjusts anesthetic plan based on patient’s physiologic response
1) Continuously assesses the patient’s response to the anesthetic/surgical intervention & with assistance,
intervenes as required to maintain patient in satisfactory physiologic condition.
2) Determines intraoperative fluid replacement based on patient factors & surgical procedure.
3) Monitors and calculates blood loss & with assistance, implements appropriate therapies.
E. Manages invasive procedures with skill
1) Successfully insert IV catheters.
2) With guidance, incorporates anatomy & theory to insert arterial lines.
F. Tailors patient monitoring in accordance with patient needs
1) Monitors continuously: ventilation, oxygenation, cardiovascular status, and when indicated temperature
& neuromuscular function.
2) Remains in constant attendance of the patient.
G. Completes accurate & timely documentation
1) Documents all anesthetic interventions & patient responses.
H. Manages emergence
1) Verbalizes extubation criteria based on patient history, surgical procedure, & anesthetic interventions.
2) With guidance, determines patient’s readiness for extubation.
I. Assures patient safety while transferring responsibility of care
1) With guidance, determines safe timing for transfer of responsibility of care to other qualified provider.
2) With guidance, accurately reports patient’s condition & all relevant information to the provider who is
assuming responsibility for patient.
J. Collaborates with other health care professionals to provide optimal care
1) With guidance, communicates change in patient’s status to appropriate person(s) in timely manner &
collaborates with surgeons regarding anesthesia care.
K. Utilizes universal precautions
1) Demonstrates the application of universal precautions in the perioperative setting.
L. Protects patient from iatrogenic complications & nosocomial infections.
1) Protects patient from identifiable risks.
2) Identifies and implements appropriate nausea/vomiting prophylaxis.
3) Minimizes risk of infection to the patient.
M. Adheres to safety precautions as established by the institution
1) Adheres to policies for safety precautions as written by institution.
N. Practices standards that promote environmental health
1) Implements precautions to secure anesthetic drugs when not in supervision of agents.
2) Implements necessary measures to ensure scavenging system functioning correctly.
3) Protects patients from radiation/laser exposure.
V. Evaluation: Evaluates progress toward attainment of expected outcomes & assesses their anesthesia
care to assure quality & contribution to positive patient outcomes. (ANA Standard 6 &14, AANA
Standard X)
A. Evaluates effectiveness of interventions
1) With guidance, reviews & evaluates quality and appropriateness of anesthesia care.
B. Completes post-operative evaluations on patients
1) Using assessment techniques performs postoperative evaluation on all patients cared for.
2) Documentation is timely & accurate.
3) Relays outcomes to appropriate providers.
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C. Participates in the continuous quality improvement process
1) Verbalizes an understanding of the continuous quality improvement process.
2) Recognizes post-anesthetic complications & notifies appropriate personnel for follow up.
3) Participates in continual process of self-evaluation & strives to incorporate new techniques into practice.
VI. Standards of Professional Performance: Practices ethically, attains knowledge & competence that
reflects current practice, contributes to quality practice, communicates effectively, demonstrates
leadership in the professional practice setting and the profession, collaborates with the patient and
family, & utilizes appropriate resources to provide care. (ANA Standard 7 & 8, AANA Standard X)
A. Respects & maintains basic rights of patients
1) Preserves the patient’s rights to privacy, confidentiality, & autonomy.
2) Demonstrates integrity, compassion, & competence.
3) Delivers culturally competent care throughout the anesthesia course.
B. Collaborates with members of the interprofessional team.
1) Participates in pre & post procedure briefing.
2) Treats health care team with respect & dignity, seeking continuous improvement in communication &
conflict resolution skills.
3) With guidance, provides direction to enhance effectiveness of health care team.
C. Seeks learning experiences to develop clinical knowledge
1) Identifies individual strengths & areas for improvement.
2) Utilizes feedback from clinical instructors & devises a plan for improving performance.
3) Attends and participates in morbidity & mortality conferences, departmental educational meetings, &
morning report.
4) Seeks opportunities to develop clinical skills
D. Seeks feedback regarding practice from HCT members
1) Maintains communication with other providers to minimize risks & improve outcomes in care delivery.
2) Engages in formal process seeking feedback regarding his/her own practice.
E. Mentors peers in acquisition of clinical knowledge & skills
F. Models expert practice to interprofessional team
G. Utilizes appropriate resources with regard to safety & cost effectiveness
1) Selects interventions that are appropriate & financially responsible.
NRS 627-637: Clinical Internship III - IV Objectives
In addition to the objectives achieved in Clinical Internships I-II, during Clinical Internships III-IV, the APN will
attain the following:
I. Assessment & Diagnosis: Collects comprehensive data pertinent to the healthcare consumer’s health
&/or situation & analyzes this data to determine the diagnosis or issues. (ANA Standards I & II, AANA
Standard I)
A. Performs health history, physical, & psychosocial assessment
1) Obtains rapid & thorough health history
2) Identifies abnormal pathology from assessment data
B. Initiates & interprets diagnostic testing
1) Utilizes assessment data & is able to initiate relevant lab work & specialty consultations
C. Prioritizes data collection based on patient’s current needs
1) Orders and prioritizes data based on the history and surgical procedure
D. Derives appropriate diagnosis from assessment data
1) Utilizes complex data & diagnostics in identifying diagnosis.
2) Synthesizes information obtained & is able to independently arrive at appropriate diagnosis
3) Identifies potential for difficult intubation using assessment data
II. Outcomes Identification: Obtains informed consent for the planned anesthetic intervention & identifies
expected outcomes individualized to the health care consumer. (ANA Standard 3, AANA Standard II)
A. Educates patient
1) Independently discusses anesthetic options & risks in language the patient &/or legal guardian can
understand.
B. Obtains informed consent
1) Obtains & documents informed consent for anesthetic
C. Incorporates evidenced based practice to identify expected outcomes
1) Identifies expected outcomes that incorporate cost & clinical effectiveness, patient & family satisfaction,
& that incorporate research & literature.
2) Modifies expected outcomes according to changes in the status of the patient
III. Planning: Formulates a patient-specific plan & alternatives to that plan to attain expected outcomes.
(ANA Standards 4 & 9, AANA Standards III & VIII)
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A. Formulates patient specific verbal & written anesthetic plan of care
1) Utilizing patient assessment data, problem analysis, anticipated surgical or therapeutic procedure,
patient &/or surgeon preference writes a minimum of one patient specific care plan for general rotation
& each assigned care plan for specialty rotations. Care plan should include interventions that reflect
current evidence, including data, research, & literature
2) Communicates plan of care with entire health care team.
B. Selects appropriate equipment, medication, & monitoring modalities
1) Utilizes assessment data to determine the type of monitoring devices, including invasive monitors,
equipment, & anesthetic interventions planned
2) Independently calculates pharmacologic agents based on patient’s current condition
C. Performs & documents appropriate safety checks
1) Identifies & troubleshoots problems with anesthesia equipment
IV. Implementation: Implements the identified plan (ANA Standards 5 & 16, AANA Standards IV, V, VI, VII, &
IX)
A. Performs appropriate induction sequence
1) Independently performs steps of induction
B. Performs appropriate airway management
1) Skilled at various modalities of basic airway management
2) Demonstrate understanding of advanced airway management
C. Positions patient for optimal patient safety, comfort, & surgical exposure
1) Independently directs health care team in patient positioning
2) Assesses patient position throughout the procedure & makes appropriate interventions
D. Adjusts anesthetic plan based on patient’s physiologic response
1) Continuously assesses the patient’s response to the anesthetic/surgical intervention & independently
intervenes as required to maintain patient in satisfactory physiologic condition
2) Independently determines, calculates, and adjusts perioperative fluid requirements.
3) Initiates blood replacement therapy when necessary
4) Identifies the need for intraoperative blood work
E. Manages invasive procedures with skill
1) Independently inserts arterial lines
2) Identifies proper anatomy associated with regional anesthesia
3) Inserts SAB independently, epidurals with assistance
F. Tailors patient monitoring in accordance with patient needs
1) Utilize all monitors correctly & shows ability to recognize, correlate, & integrate information obtained.
2) Demonstrates competency in monitoring of regional anesthesia
3) Determines need for transferring patients on monitors/with oxygen therapy
4) Identifies & implements appropriate pain management therapies
G. Completes accurate & timely documentation
1) Timely documents information
H. Manages emergence
1) Independently emerges & extubates patients.
I. Assures patient safety while transferring responsibility of care
1) Independently assesses patient’s status & determines when it is safe to transfer responsibility of care to
other qualified provider
2) Timely & accurately reports patient’s condition & all relevant information to the provider who is
assuming responsibility for patient
J. Collaborates with other health care professionals to provide optimal care
1) Independently communicates change in patient’s status to appropriate person(s) in timely manner &
collaborates with surgeons regarding anesthesia care
2) Assumes responsibility for anesthesia related functions when consulted by other practitioners
K. Utilizes universal precautions
L. Protects patient from iatrogenic complications & nosocomial infections
1) Independently protects patient from identifiable risks.
2) Actively evaluates & implements infection control procedures.
3) Independently identifies and implements appropriate nausea/vomiting prophylaxis
M. Adheres to safety precautions as established by the institution
N. Practices standards that promote environmental health
V. Evaluation: Evaluates progress toward attainment of expected outcomes & assesses their anesthesia
care to assure quality & contribution to positive patient outcomes. (ANA Standards 6 &14, AANA
Standard X)
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A. Evaluates effectiveness of interventions
1) Incorporates critical thinking to enhance ongoing assessment of clinical practice.
B. Completes post-operative evaluations on patients
1) Actively participates in CQI process
C. Participates in the continuous quality improvement process
1) Prepares for & actively participates in human patient simulator experiences
VI. Standards of Professional Performance: Practices ethically, attains knowledge & competence that
reflects current practice, contributes to quality practice, communicates effectively, demonstrates
leadership in the professional practice setting & the profession, collaborates with the patient and
family, & utilizes appropriate resources to provide care. (ANA Standards 7 & 8, AANA Standard X)
A. Respects & maintains basic rights of patients
1) Supports & preserves patient’s rights to personal dignity & ethical norms of practice.
B. Collaborates with members of the interprofessional team
1) Leads pre & post procedural briefing & identifies areas for improvement with post-procedural briefing
2) Provides direction to enhance effectiveness of health care team
3) Respects expertise & responsibilities of all health care providers involved in patient care
4) Functions as a team member during cardiopulmonary resuscitation
C. Seeks learning experiences to develop clinical knowledge
1) Presents cases in morning report
2) Presents original, evidence based research in journal club, leading a discussion on the topic
3) Incorporates new techniques into practice
D. Seeks feedback regarding practice from HCT members
E. Mentors peers in acquisition of clinical knowledge and skills
1) Assists other learners in securing airway skills & with theory content
2) Shares research reading with clinical instructors and other learners
3) Participates in & presents at M & M presentations
F. Models expert practice to interprofessional team
G. Utilizes appropriate resources with regard to safety & cost effectiveness
1) Assumes accountability for the worksite
NRS 647, 657, 667: Clinical Internship V - VII Objectives
In addition to the objectives achieved in Clinical Internships I-IV, during Clinical Internships V-VII, the APN will
attain the following:
I. Assessment & Diagnosis: Collects comprehensive data pertinent to the patient’s health &/or situation &
analyzes this data to determine the diagnosis or issues. (ANA Standards I & II, AANA Standard I)
A. Performs health history, physical, & psychosocial assessment
1)Demonstrates proficiency in obtaining comprehensive health history
2)Demonstrates the ability to rapidly assess all patients including chart review, health history &
physical assessment
B. Initiates & interprets diagnostic testing
1)Rapidly assesses data & identifies results that impact care
C. Prioritizes data collection based on patient’s current needs
1)Demonstrates sound judgment in prioritizing assessment data
D. Derives appropriate diagnosis from assessment data
1)Utilizes complex data & diagnostics in identifying diagnosis
2)Quickly incorporates information to identify diagnosis
II. Outcomes Identification: Obtains informed consent for the planned anesthetic intervention & identifies
expected outcomes individualized to the patient. (ANA Standard 3, AANA Standard II)
A. Educates patient
1)Demonstrates skill in educating clients & families regarding anesthesia care
B. Obtains informed consent
C. Incorporates evidenced based practice to identify expected outcomes
1)Identifies expected outcomes that incorporate cost & clinical effectiveness, patient & family
satisfaction, & that incorporate research, literature, & past clinical experience
III. Planning: Formulates a patient-specific plan & alternatives to that plan to attain expected outcomes.
(ANA Standards 4 & 9, AANA Standards III & VIII)
A. Formulates patient specific verbal & written anesthetic plan of care
1)Applies evidence & research into practice in decision-making & problem solving
2) Develops safe verbal care plan for basic cases with minimal preparation
B. Selects appropriate equipment, medication, & monitoring modalities
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34
1)Independently plans for care of patient
C. Performs & documents appropriate safety checks
IV.Implementation: Implements the identified plan (ANA Standards 5 & 16, AANA Standards IV, V, VI, VII, &
IX)
A. Performs appropriate induction sequence
B. Performs appropriate airway management
1)Demonstrates skill in advanced airway techniques
C. Positions patient for optimal patient safety, comfort, & surgical exposure
1)Advocate for patients to prevent positioning injuries
D. Adjusts anesthetic plan based on patient’s physiologic response
1)Recognizes & appropriately responds to anesthetic complications that occur
2)Independently manages the administration of pharmacologic agents during all types of anesthesia care
3) Demonstrates sound clinical judgment in prioritizing anesthetic interventions
4) Coordinates all aspects of blood transfusion independently
E. Manages invasive procedures with skill
1)Administers and manages a variety of regional anesthetics, including SABs, epidurals, & peripheral nerve
blocks
2)With guidance, places central lines
F. Tailors patient monitoring in accordance with patient needs
1)Functions as a resource person for airway & ventilatory management of patient
2)Interprets hemodynamic changes & intervenes using advanced clinical judgment
G. Completes accurate & in a timely documentation
H. Manages emergence
1) Independently determines the need for post-operative ventilation
I. Assures patient safety while transferring responsibility of care
J. Collaborates with other health care professionals to provide optimal care
K. Utilizes universal precautions
L. Protects patient from iatrogenic complications & nosocomial infections
M. Adheres to safety precautions as established by the institution
N. Practices standards that promote environmental health
V. Evaluation: Evaluates progress toward attainment of expected outcomes & assesses their anesthesia
care to assure quality & contribution to positive patient outcomes. (ANA Standards 6 &14, AANA Standard
X)
A. Evaluates effectiveness of interventions
B. Completes post-operative evaluations on patients
C. Participates in the continuous quality improvement process
1) Independently oversees most aspects of the CQI process
2) Prepares for, actively participates in, & leads human patient simulator experiences
VI. Standards of Professional Performance: Practices ethically, attains knowledge & competence that
reflects current practice, contributes to quality practice, communicates effectively, demonstrates
leadership in the professional practice setting & the profession, collaborates with the patient and family, &
utilizes appropriate resources to provide care. (ANA Standards 7 & 8, AANA Standard X)
A. Respects & maintains basic rights of clients
B. Collaborates with members of the interprofessional team
1)Exemplifies collegiality
2)Functions as a team member in cardiopulmonary resuscitation
C. Seeks learning experiences to develop clinical knowledge
1) Utilizes a variety of current anesthetic techniques, agents, adjunctive drugs, & equipment while providing
anesthesia
2) Presents & integrates journal articles into case presentations.
D. Seeks feedback regarding practice from HCT members
1) Critiques self relative to accepted anesthesia practice
E. Mentors peers in acquisition of clinical knowledge and skills
1) Leads group discussion in morning report
2) Leads M & M presentation
F. Models expert practice to interprofessional team
G. Utilizes appropriate resources with regard to safety and cost effectiveness
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CLINICAL INTERSHIP GUIDELINES
The purpose of these guidelines is to delineate the student's responsibilities relative to the clinical internship.
Although didactic courses are offered within the university calendar, the clinical internship spans the entire calendar
year to provide an optimal variety of case experiences.
The clinical internship provides an invaluable and essential educational opportunity for the student to apply didactic
learning in the clinical setting. The clinical internship requires the integration of information learned in the nursing
foundation, clinical core and specialty courses. In order to optimize the time spent in the clinical area, the student must
actively seek learning experiences and function in a self-directed manner to achieve the knowledge, skills and abilities
necessary to practice as a CRNA.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
The clinical time commitment will be scheduled for students based on the operating room schedule at the
clinical sites. Shift times vary as directed by clinical schedules and specific learning needs. The average
weekly time commitment to the program including study time, class time, and clinical time is 64 hours per
week or less.
Call experience will be provided through scheduled off shifts throughout the program. The scheduling of
clinical experiences on the off shift and weekends will begin with Clinical Internship II.
Students will be scheduled for one eight-hour shift at a time. Because of the nature of a clinical assignment,
the student may need to extend their time beyond eight hours to achieve the optimum clinical learning
experience. Should your assignment extend beyond 14 hours, you are to contact the clinical coordinator.
Students will have a minimum of 10 hours of rest between clinical experiences.
Near the end of the program, a limited number of students may have the opportunity to work 12-hour shifts.
Typhon Case Tracking:
The Typhon Nurse Anesthesia Student Tracking System (NAST) is a real time on-line tracking system of all
cases. The NAST system fulfills the case and time tracking requirement by the Council on Certification of
Nurse Anesthetists (CCNA), who is responsible for the certification of registered nurse anesthetists. The
Typhon NAST System is also used for daily instructor evaluations, clinical affiliate site evaluations,
simulation evaluations, time logs, and schedules.
Students are expected to enter case data daily, accurately, and honestly. Entering case data begins during
the first semester as instructed. Clinical instructor evaluations must also be completed each day the student
is in the OR. Clinical affiliate site evaluations are to be completed at the end of each monthly rotation at
clinical affiliate sites. Time log entry will begin in the first semester once system training is complete.
Case entry is tracked by the program clinical coordinator. Students failing to enter case data daily will be
contacted by the coordinator. If the situation is not quickly rectified or is a persistent problem, program
faculty will suspend the student from clinical. The time missed from clinical will be considered an
unexcused absence.
Counting Clinical Experiences
Nurse anesthesia students must have the opportunity to develop as competent, safe, nurse anesthetists,
capable of engaging in full scope of practice as defined by the AANA’s “Scope and Standards for Nurse
Anesthesia Practice” by the time they complete their program of study.
To ensure nurse anesthesia students develop the knowledge, skills and abilities for entry into practice,
students must participate in all phases of their clinical cases including preoperative, intraoperative and
postoperative anesthesia care. While it may not be possible to participate in all phases of care on every
case, students must at a minimum personally provide anesthesia for the majority of any case for which they
claim personal participation. In addition, personal participation must include the management of the patient
during the beginning or induction of the anesthetic experience and/or the ending or emergence of the
anesthetic experience. Students cannot take credit for an anesthetic case if they provide care on a limited
basis (e.g., only lunch/or break relief), are not personally involved with the implementation and management
of the anesthetic plan of care, or only observe another anesthesia provider manage a patient or their
anesthetic care.
Students Responsibilities in the Clinical Area:
a. Review clinical internship objectives
b. Be prepared to administer anesthesia for every patient assigned at the start of each assigned shift.
c. Submit an evaluation form and written care plan at the beginning of each day to the clinical instructor, in
accordance to care plan guidelines for each clinical internship.
d. Check the operating room schedule for any changes on arrival and throughout the day.
e. Arrive promptly and be prepared to participate in scheduled department meetings and morning
conference. All students assigned to the clinical area must attend morning conference unless assigned to
a heart room, OB, ECT’s, or to a case in progress.
f. Check with a clinical coordinator regarding reassignment whenever cases are cancelled.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
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11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
g. Comply with departmental policy regarding time spent out of the department for breaks and lunches. (2 15 minute breaks and a 30 minute meal period per 8 hour shift when at Beaumont)
h. Use unassigned clinical time for educational endeavors. Clinical days are always at least an 8-hour
commitment. Students are expected to remain on site for the entire clinical day. Pagers must be activated
and carried on all clinical and simulation lab days as students may be assigned to do emergency cases.
i. Observe the dress code policy of the program and the clinical site. Business wear and/or lab coats are
mandatory in the classroom setting. Lab coats are required over scrubs when seeing patients in the
hospital.
j. Identify informed consent, verify correct patient, procedure, site and sidedness, and participate in final
preoperative verification for the surgical procedure according to institutional policy.
k. Verbalize drug name, dose, route, rationale for administration, and concentration of infusion of all drugs
administered.
l. Falsifying information about a patient or anesthetic care, or in any way failing to share information
regarding a patient or their anesthetic care is considered unethical behavior and grounds for dismissal
from the program.
m. Complete pre- and post- anesthetic assessments on all inpatients assigned and follow-up with appropriate
clinical instructors.
n. Participate in continuous quality improvement activities relative to post anesthesia assessments and
review of perioperative anesthetic complications.
o. Any major complication involving a student should be reported to a clinical coordinator immediately. A
copy of the anesthesia record and a detailed description of the incident should follow as expeditiously as
possible for review.
It is expected that the student will continually review didactic material and work toward meeting the terminal
objectives of the program.
Students may be required to present a brief case report during scheduled CRNA staff meetings at Beaumont
and also at affiliate sites.
The student must adhere to all program policies and the policies of each clinical site where they rotate. Any
student who does not abide by a clinical site’s policies or who exhibits unprofessional behavior or conduct
endangering patient safety may be recommended for dismissal from the program. A student may be placed
on probation or recommended for dismissed for demonstrating willful or negligent actions reflecting
professional misconduct.
Students are not permitted to bring backpacks or textbooks into the operating room.
Time designated for clinical internship may be assigned for other educational activities such as simulator lab,
demonstrations, continuous quality improvement activities, journal clubs, seminars, learning laboratory,
interviews, IV starts, career fairs, and other professional activities. Program faculty will determine which
students will be assigned to these activities based on availability, current academic standing, and rotation
schedules.
Students must maintain and provide proof of the Annual Clinical Requirements (found under clinical agency
and OU Health Requirements section of this handbook). If not on file, the student will not be permitted in the
clinical area and an unexcused absence will be deducted each day until proof is provided. In addition
students must maintain the following:
 Michigan RN License
 Annual completion of Mandatory Education Modules (including distance students)
Human Patient Simulation Laboratory (SIM Lab)
Beginning with Clinical Internship I, students are assigned to the SIM Lab to further enhance their understanding of
didactic material presented in lecture and are provided a wide variety of simulated clinical experiences. The SIM
Lab provides instructor-student interactions using scenarios for patient assessment utilizing standardized patients,
introduction to basic airway skills, difficult airway management, central invasive line insertion, administration of
regional anesthesia including ultrasound guided techniques, critical thinking and decision-making in anesthesia,
crisis management, crew resource management, team training and specialty anesthesia management skills
(obstetrics, cardiovascular, vascular, thoracic, trauma, and pediatrics). Students are expected to schedule additional
simulation sessions and utilize task trainers on their own as needed to improve individual areas of weakness.
Students may also get approval to use the lab independently.
Simulation hours, simulated case experiences or task training is never counted as real patient experiences.
Simulation time cannot be counted as hours of clinical case time.
1.
Assignment to the SIM lab is for an 8-hour day. The student is expected to be available in the hospital for this
entire time. Time outside of the Sim Lab can be used for assignments that will vary and may include
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
37
2.
opportunities such as: clinical cases, perform regional anesthesia, IV starts, emergency add-on cases or assist
in hospital general nursing orientation.
Students assigned to the SIM Lab will be responsible for:
a. Assisting with ECT and POR
b. Starting IVs in preop hold areas and patient care areas
c. Responding to CPR codes in patient care areas.
d. Providing the simulation lab coordinator with a student simulation evaluation form and/or skills validation
sheet
e. Performing skills and discussing anesthesia management for specialty anesthesia topics
f.
Using critical thinking skills to independently manage simulated scenarios
g. Maintaining confidentiality regarding simulation scenarios
Simulation lab sessions and their content are proprietary. Purposeful dissemination of this information to other
users is cause for academic censure and possible dismissal.
Care Plan Requirements
The purpose of this policy is to define the requirements for completion of verbal and written care plans within the
context of the clinical internship. A well-researched plan of care is essential to the safe management of a patient. It
is one of eleven standards in the AANA Scope and Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice.
Standard III
Formulate a patient-specific plan for anesthesia care.
Interpretation The plan of care developed by the CRNA is based upon comprehensive patient assessment, problem
analysis, anticipated surgical or therapeutic procedure, patient and surgeon preferences, and current anesthesia
principles.
The following guidelines must be followed in order to meet the requirements of the program in preparation of care
plans:
1. The student must complete a thorough assessment of the patient and chart review whenever possible.
2. The care plan must include a review of the surgical procedure, anesthetic implications of the surgical
procedure and patient’s health history, management of induction, maintenance, emergence, and potential
post-operative complications as well as a discussion of pertinent pharmacology in relation to the patient’s
medications and anticipated anesthetic agents.
3. The program-derived care plan template is to be used.
4. Careplans must demonstrate in depth preparation and planning. Students are not to copy and paste care
plans.
5. All care plans must be patient specific whenever patient information is available.
6. All students are required to submit to their clinical instructor a minimum of one care plan per day.
Frequently more than one care plan will be required.
7. A care plan for the most complex surgical procedure or patient diagnosis (co-existing disease) is to be
completed and submitted daily.
8. Any surgical procedure or patient with a co-existing disease not previously cared for by the student will
require a care plan.
9. Specialty rotation care plans must be completed prior to each rotation. Daily patient specific care plans
must be completed.
10. Year III (September of graduation year) students are relieved of the one care plan per day minimum with
the following exception: a care plan must be completed on any cases not previously done or patient disease
states not previously encountered during the previous 24 months in the program.
11. 70% of care plans for the semester must be returned to the Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate
Program of Nurse Anesthesia clinical coordinator. Deficiency in numbers may result in an incomplete for
the clinical internship.
12. Care plans must be submitted to the clinical instructor at the beginning of the day along with the appropriate
daily clinical evaluation.
13. Care plans must be signed and dated by the instructor.
14. Although collaboration and sharing of ideas is encouraged, individual work is required on care plans.
Copying information from other’s care plans or texts is not permitted and is considered academic
misconduct. (See section in handbook regarding this).
15. Students will discuss their plan of care verbally with their clinical instructor and anesthesiologist prior to
proceeding with an anesthetic.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
38
16. Students having difficulty writing care plans are encouraged to seek assistance from their preceptor
followed by program faculty.
17. Students continuing to have difficulty developing care plans will meet with the program clinical coordinator
for remediation.
Clinical Advisement
Clinical Internships are graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U), students are expected to earn a course grade of
satisfactory. Students who are not making satisfactory progress in the program may be placed on probation with
conditions imposed for retention in the program or may be recommended for dismissal from the program.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Students must pass the clinical component each semester in order to progress through the program.
Clinical Advisement - Clinical internships are graded as Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U). A student who
is not making satisfactory progress during a clinical internship will receive a Clinical Advisement from
program faculty.
a.
A written copy of the advisement will be given to the student.
b.
The Dean of the SON at OU will be notified of the clinical advisement.
c.
During the advisement period, program faculty will meet with the student weekly to discuss the
student’s clinical performance.
d.
A student who continues to make progress and meets the clinical objectives will receive a Satisfactory
grade.
e.
A student who fails to progress in meeting the Clinical Internship Objectives or demonstrates unsafe or
egregious practice will receive an Unsatisfactory grade for that Clinical Internship and be recommended
for dismissal from the program.
f.
A student can be placed on a maximum of one clinical advisement period during the program. Any
subsequent pattern of performance that falls below acceptable standards will result in recommendation
for dismissal.
While the procedure for dismissal of a student for clinical performance is generally preceded by an
advisement period, grave misconduct may warrant immediate dismissal. Grounds for dismissal from the
program may include, but are not limited to, the following:
a.
Gross professional misconduct or insubordination
b.
Theft
c.
Cheating
d.
Any egregious practice
e.
Conviction of a felony
f.
Inappropriate credentials/willful misrepresentation with respect to any information provided to the
program or clinical affiliates
g.
Confirmed drug abuse
h.
Breach of ethical conduct
i.
Willful or negligent action that may lead to deleterious effects on the patient
j.
Violation of any rules governing license to practice nursing
k.
Failure to abide by the policies and procedures of the program and/or any clinical affiliate
Any student who feels that he/she has received unfair disciplinary action or unsatisfactory management of
allegations relating to his/her failure to meet clinical objectives or professional misconduct may initiate
grievance proceedings. Students are directed to comply with the guidelines and procedures outlined in the
Oakland University School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook.
Academic Conduct
Students are expected to practice and uphold standards of academic integrity and honesty as outlined in the
Oakland University graduate catalog under the section titled “Academic Conduct.” Academic dishonesty may result
in a numerical grade of 0.0 for a course.
In addition to the Oakland University Academic Conduct policy in the School of Nursing, completion of all course
related assignments must be the result of the student’s individual effort, except in the circumstance where the
assignment requires group effort.
1.
Students are required to follow instructions contained in policies and procedures provided by the instructor,
program and university. The student is charged with the responsibility of assuring that rules and procedures
are understood in order to avoid inadvertent misrepresentation of their work.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
39
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Individual work on in-class, take-home or on-line examinations, reports, care plans, and on line course work is
expected unless the instructor specifically makes an exception to this policy. Documentation of references
must be honest and accurate.
Students must assume that an instructor intends for work to be completed for that course only. Any work that a
student completed for a course taken in the past, or is completing for a concurrent course, must not be
submitted in that instructor's course unless the student receives the instructor's specific permission.
Misrepresentation by words or conduct regarding the source of a student's work is characterized as academic
misconduct, meaning a student is claiming credit for ideas or work that is not actually his or hers, and the
student is thereby attempting to obtain a grade that is not earned. The following are examples of
misrepresentation:
a. Looking at another student’s test during the exam
b. Using materials such as books, notes, or electronic devices when not authorized by the instructor during
exams
c. Taking advantage of prior information not authorized by the instructor regarding questions to be asked on
the exam or in the simulation lab
d. Copying from another student's work, paper or care plans
e. Sharing answers or working together on take home or on-line exams
f. Helping someone copy work
g. Substituting another person or that person's work during an examination or on any coursework
Plagiarizing from the work of others is prohibited. When utilizing written sources, a clear distinction should be
made between quotations, which reproduce information from the source word for word within quotation marks
and paraphrases, which are a restatement of the source information produced in the student's own words.
Both direct quotations and paraphrases must be referenced. Sources are crosschecked by computer
verification.
Falsifying information about a patient or anesthetic care, or in any way failing to share information regarding a
patient or their anesthetic care.
The practice of anesthesia requires a commitment to honesty and integrity at all times. Because of the potential for
patient harm in the clinical area, any examples of ethical or academic misconduct are extremely serious and will not
be tolerated.
Students are required to report any evidence of academic or clinical misconduct or dishonesty to their instructor and
program director. This information will be kept in confidence and an investigation conducted.
Withdrawal or Resignation
Any student who wishes to withdraw or resign from the program must submit a letter stating such to the director of
the program and or the Dean of the School of Nursing.
Beaumont Hospital Manuals, Policies and Procedures
Manuals, policies, and procedures for Beaumont are found after logging into Inside Beaumont. From the drop down
menu select Documents > Manuals/Policies/Procedures > Choose: Patient Care, Infection Control, Medication
Management, Organizational Functions and more.
To perform a word search, select a manual from the drop-down menu and click on “Go.”
Below is a sample list of some of the important policies:
 # 216-CRNA’s Working during Pregnancy
 # 252-Chemical Dependency/Theft/Possession
 # 255-Identification Badge
 # 256-Smoke-Free Environment
 # 257-Violence in the Workplace Policy
 # 280-Dress Code, Grooming and Image Policy
 # 286-Sexual Harassment
 #297-Social Networking and Other Web Based Communications
 #840-Nursing Research Policy
 HIPPA and Confidentiality
 Keystone Initiatives- Patient Identification/Surgical Site/Surgical Procedure Verification
 Medical Abbreviations
 Universal Precautions
Nondiscrimination Policy
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
40
Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia complies with the requirements of the
American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
Candidates for admission will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin,
age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, disability, sexual orientation or any factor protected by law. In
order to successfully meet the objectives of the nurse anesthesia program, students must be able to perform the
skills and functions of a nurse anesthetist. The student nurse anesthetist must be able to perform the following
motor, sensory, cognitive, and behavioral skills.
Motor Skills - The student nurse anesthetist must be able to:
 Recognize and respond to various alarms and changes in the patient’s condition that require the
anesthetist to perform physical interventions.
 Exhibit the physical ability to stand or sit for extended periods of time.
 Exhibit the physical ability to move about the constraints of the operating room and non
operating room anesthetizing locations.
 Exhibit the physical ability to move and position patients and equipment.
 Exhibit the physical ability to perform and utilize various airway adjuncts.
 Exhibit the physical ability to coordinate gross and fine motor movements required of the nurse
anesthetist to provide all types of anesthesia. These tasks include, but are not limited to: insertion of
intravascular monitoring lines, performance of various airway management skills administration of
regional anesthesia, and response to hospital emergencies.
Sensory Skills - The student nurse anesthetist must be able to:
 Communicate effectively via oral and written modalities interacting with all members of the
health care team.
 Detect and interpret changes in monitoring alarms and equipment.
 Interpret alterations in patient responses using various sensory stimuli (ex. auditory, tactile,
visual, etc).
Cognitive Skills - The student nurse anesthetist must be able to:
 Synthesize and interpret data from auditory and visual sources and develop an appropriate
anesthesia plan.
 Correlate nurse anesthesia theory with clinical practice congruent to leveled didactic and
clinical objectives.
 Demonstrate the ability to analyze, perform mathematical calculations, apply reason, problem solve,
and critique one’s performance.
Behavioral Skills - The student nurse anesthetist must be able to:
 Consistently uphold the moral and ethical expectations of Oakland University graduate
students and Beaumont Hospital.
 Maintain flexibility with change.
 Contribute to a positive learning environment and facilitate the learning efforts of others.
Impairment/Chemical Dependency/Substance Abuse
As noted in the Ethics section in this Student Handbook, patients have the right to expect that the student and
supervisory personnel providing services are mentally alert and not impaired by fatigue, drugs or other
incapacitating conditions. Therefore students must not be impaired by drug or alcohol use, fatigue, physical or
mental illness or any condition that causes impairment at any time during the program. This includes clinical and
classroom education at all locations. Students are expected to report any student suspected of drug, alcohol or
cognitive impairment to the program director at any time during the program.
Students in the program are subject to the Oakland University Conduct Code, the judicial system and the policy and
procedures of the institutions that they rotate to. When rotating within the Beaumont Health System refer to
Beaumont Hospital Chemical Dependency/Theft/Possession Policy # 252. All students are directed to review this
policies and procedures for the individual institutions they are assigned to as primary sites (Beaumont Health
System, Kalamazoo, Northern Michigan, and Marquette).
Pregnancy During the Program
1.
Pregnancy during the program presents certain challenges to both the student and the program. All students
are encouraged to read current literature and educate themselves regarding the risks of anesthesia and
pregnancy.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
41
2.
3.
4.
5.
All clinical days, rotations and assignments missed are to be made up at the end of the program. It is possible
that a “maternity leave” or “medical leave” for complications for an extended period of time could compromise
the student’s ability to meet the clinical and didactic expectations of the program. Circumstances may not
permit the student to continue in the program.
Case assignments can be adjusted for the pregnant student to minimize exposure to anesthetic gases,
methyl methacrylate, and radiation.
Adjustment of case assignments to minimize exposure during pregnancy may preclude the pregnant student
from being involved in certain types of cases until after delivery.
These cases, including specialty areas such as pediatrics must be completed prior to graduation.
Library Resources
The purpose of this policy is to delineate various library resources available to students in the program. Students
may use the Beaumont Medical Library, Oakland University’s Kresge Library and the Program Department Library.
Students have access to thousands of books, journals, periodicals and e-books through on line services of both
libraries. Students are expected to comply with all the rules and regulations of the various libraries.
Department Library
 Students may select a book from the library outside of the faculty’s office by signing the book out and
submitting the card from the inside cover to the program secretary.
 Books signed out from the department collection must be returned within 7 days.
 Books that are missing for two weeks will be replaced or paid for by the student.
 Students may use the program office copying machine. Please use paper conservatively for important
educational materials only.
Medical Library
 Students may use the medical library at Beaumont Hospital during its operating hours.
 The student must bring their library card and ID badge whenever using library services.
 Students may request a med-line search by the library staff or perform their own.
Oakland University Kresge Library
 A student may obtain an Oakland University library card by applying at the Kresge Library. The student
must bring their Student Registration Card when they apply.
 The library's automated catalog allows a student to identify titles held, not only in Kresge Library but also in
collections at various universities and a number of other libraries in the area.
 Reference librarians will help students find materials and use the library. Inter-library lending is available.
Liability Insurance
Students must apply for student liability insurance through the AANA. Proof of liability insurance and or renewal of
liability insurance must be maintained for the remainder of the program. Students will not be able to rotate to
affiliate sites without student liability insurance coverage from the AANA. Any clinical missed due to failure to obtain
coverage or lapse in coverage will be deducted from a student’s vacation bank.
Oakland University Emergency Closing
An emergency closing is an unanticipated official closing of the university in which scheduled classes (on campus) are
cancelled and all university offices are closed. An emergency closing will generally occur when the university is
unable to function because of utility failure, inability to clear campus roadways and parking lots because of excessive
snowfall and when a snow emergency is declared by the State Police. Off-campus clinical and classroom sites are
considered extension centers. Clinical and classes held in extension center may be cancelled if the same conditions
occur as on campus. According to the university policy, students should be sent home only if the clinical agency's
roads and sidewalks are equally impassable.
If the situation occurs that the clinical agency is located where there is weather or other emergency, the agency rules
must be followed. The safety of students, faculty and nature of clinical commitments are key factors in determining
closing a clinical period.
Oakland University encourages you to explore the information on their website. To sign up to receive text message
alerts in the event of a major campus emergency, university closure or campus wide cancellation of classes, visit
the Emergency Notification website. To register, you must have a Grizz ID and valid OU e-mail address. Voice
alerts are available for OU community members without text message capability.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
42
Terminal Project
Program faculty recognizes the importance of nursing research and support students as they complete a scholarly
literature review or research project. Refer to the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook for guidelines on
completing the Graduate Research Sequence. Students must make every effort to schedule appointments with their
faculty advisors outside of clinical and class hours. Time for conducting research will be granted on an individual basis.
The program director and/or assistant director will determine the amount of time granted off for any student or
research group.
Faculty that contributes significantly to the development of publishable materials such as student research, articles and
chapters will be recognized as co-authors when these works are submitted. At minimum, the content expert and
project chair will be included.
Student Employment
The purpose of this policy is to define the position of the school as it relates to student employment while enrolled in
the program. The time commitment involved in graduate study may prohibit a student from working during the
program. In the event that a student chooses to work, the following guidelines are given:
 The student's performance in the program will dictate how much the student may work. If a student is
experiencing difficulty in either the didactic or clinical areas, the student may be advised to stop working as
part of the corrective plan for didactic/clinical deficits.
 Under no circumstances may a student be employed or represent themselves as a Certified
Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) by title or function while matriculating in the program.
Violation of this policy is grounds for immediate dismissal from the program.
Student Health Care
Health Insurance
Students must obtain and maintain health insurance coverage for the duration of the 28 month program.
1.
Students may choose to a) obtain health insurance coverage on their own b) enroll in the Beaumont
Hospital Student Health Program or 3) enroll in the student health insurance available through Graham
Health Center.
2.
The Beaumont insurance program provides hospitalization coverage for the student only at Beaumont
Hospital facilities. There is a monthly minimal cost for coverage. This plan excludes maternity, dental and
vision coverage.
3.
Student and family health insurance is available through the Graham Health Center.
4.
Clinical agencies are not required to provide free treatment for students and will bill individuals for use of
their emergency or employee health services.
5.
OU does not cover any costs associated with student accidents at clinical.
Clinical Agency and Oakland University Health Requirements
1.
Admission Requirements: Students starting classes in the Oakland University School of Nursing
Anesthesia program must submit proof of all the below requirements by July 1, 2013. Complete packets
must be submitted via US mail. Faxes, walk-ins, and incomplete packets will not be accepted. Packets
must contain an updated clinical requirements Clearance Form as the first page. Section I must be
completed by the student.
a. Submission of a completed health assessment, including inoculation for tetanus (T-dap); skin testing for
tuberculosis (possible chest x-ray); proof of immunity to Rubella, Rubeola, Mumps (MMR), Varicella
and Hepatitis B.
b. Documented completion of an approved CPR course (BLS + ACLS through American Heart
Association required)
st
c. Documented completion of Flu immunization (required after October 1 of each year). Proof must be
submitted to School of Nursing)
2.
The following are required by clinical agencies where students are placed for clinical courses:
a. State of Michigan Criminal background check
b. Urine drug screen (testing for illicit drugs – not urinalysis)-(breakdown of drugs tested required
in result) NOTE: Background checks and drug screens must be done within 45 days of the
deadline.
3.
Annual Requirements for Continuing Students:
a. All students are required to complete or maintain the following clinical requirements yearly
according to the published deadlines (see below), students in the nursing program must
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
43
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
supply proof of the following:
1) Skin testing for tuberculosis and/or chest x-ray result, if positive (along with completed
questionnaire).
2) Documented certifications for ACLS, BLS and PALS through the American Heart Association
st
3) Documented completion of Flu immunization (required after October 1 of each year).
Proof
must be submitted to School of Nursing)
Students are responsible for any costs associated with these requirements.
Packets must contain new clinical requirements Clearance Form each year as the first page.
Section I must be completed by the student.
Section II can be signed by the Health Care Provider handling the TB or can be left blank.
Please complete the TB portion with the newest date.
Note: If you have already had your health assessment/physical in your first year it is not
required again.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
44
Clinical Requirements Submission Checklist – Nurse Anesthesia students
____________________________________________
Student Name
[email protected]
Student (Oakland) email address
Note: This form does not need to be included in your packet. It is only for completion process assistance.
REQUIREMENT
ACCEPTABLE PROOF REQUIREMENT MET
COMPLETED
CPR Course
Copy of CPR course completion card listing expiration date.
Course must be American Heart Association (BLS, ACLS, & PALS)
Health Assessment
Health Assessment completed by primary care provider within 4 months of admission year. Signature of
Health Care Provider is required.
Hepatitis B titer indicating immunity OR documented dates of 3 Hepatitis B vaccinations
OR formal refusal and signed Hepatitis B Vaccine Refusal and Acknowledgement of Risk and Release
if Hepatitis B series not complete by Health Requirements due date (This form can be downloaded from
Hepatitis B*
+ *refusal info
website).
Mumps*
Rubella*
Rubeola*
Tetanus*
TB
(PPD)
Varicella*
Titer or vaccination needed
– disease history is not
proof
Urine Drug
Screen/Criminal
Background Check
IGG titer indicating immunity (include lab work from Titer if not done at Graham Health Center)
OR documented dates of 2 Mumps vaccinations.
IGG titer indicating immunity (include lab work from Titer if not done at Graham Health Center)
OR documented dates of 2 Rubella vaccinations.
IGG titer indicating immunity (include lab work from Titer if not done at Graham Health Center)
OR documented dates of 2 Rubeola vaccinations.
Documentation of T-dap injection. (Expires after 10 years.)
Date and Results of PPD (If PPD expires during school year, you are responsible for sending updated
test prior to expiration) OR negative chest x-ray and completed Health Screening Questionnaire
for History of Positive TB test. (This form can be downloaded from nursing website)
IGG titer indicating immunity (include lab work from Titer if not done at Graham Health
Center)
OR documented dates of 1 (one) Varicella vaccination. (Note: Having had disease is not proof enough)
Both processes must be completed through American Data. Contact them at
www.oaklandunivcompliance.com
(not urinalysis)
Clearance Form
*Section I completed by student (including signature & healthcare provider)
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
45
Work Related Accident, Illness or Exposure:
1.
When a student has a work-related illness, exposure or injury, they should immediately report it to
program faculty and the anesthesia/operating room supervisor at the clinical site. All students
experiencing an injury must complete an incident report form found on Oakland University’s web site. The
Exposure Incident Report form can be found under environmental health and safety or Google “incident report”
on the OU home page. Scroll down to the link labeled Bloodbourne
Pathogens and look for the environmental
home page. The incident report must be filled out and
turned in to the Clinical Coordinator.
2.
For injuries occurring at Beaumont, students should call Occupational Health Services immediately after a
work related injury or illness to schedule an appointment. If Occupational Health Services
is closed
and urgent medical care is needed report to the Emergency Center (EC). The Beaumont Employee
Illness/Injury Form (“553”) is to be completed by the supervisor. Supervisors must make sure the form is
completed prior to signing, as OSHA mandates that this information be recorded.
When a student seeks care for work related injury in Beaumont’s Emergency Department, follow up with
Occupational Health Services must be completed as soon as possible. Contact Occupational Health Services at
248-733-7300 to schedule an appointment. Occupational Health Services is located at 550 Stephenson Highway
Suite 200 Troy, Michigan 48083. Business hours are
6:00 AM – 5:15 PM. If you have questions, contact
Occupational Health Services at 248-733-7300.
3.
The Graham Health Center at Oakland University, 248-370-2341, provides nurse practitioner health
care services to students, faculty and staff. The Health Center serves as a primary care facility to
enrolled students and services include treatment of acute illness, dispensing of prescription drugs,
allergy injections, and laboratory services as well as annual physicals. The Counseling Center, located in
the health center, offers a broad range of mental health services, including personal
counseling, psychological
and psychoeducational testing, career testing and counseling, and
substance abuse evaluation, treatment
and prevention. Additional information regarding these services can be found in the Oakland University Graduate
Catalog.
Exposure to Communicable Diseases
Any student who has been exposed to a communicable disease, i.e. chicken pox, and are known to be susceptible,
may not be allowed to provide patient care during the potential period of communicability. Students unsure of their
immune status should not provide care until proof of immunity is provided. Any student who believes they have a
transmissible infectious disease, including disease of the respiratory system, GI system or integumentary system
must report this to program administration.
Exposure to Environment and Chemical Hazards
Certain environmental and chemical hazards exist in the operating room, which the student entering the profession
of nurse anesthesia should be aware of.
1. Selected inhalation anesthetic agents are known to be hepatotoxic and on occasion an individual may
develop sensitivity to agents, which are reflected in abnormal liver function studies. In addition, studies
performed in the past have demonstrated an association between sustained exposure to an anesthetic
environment and an increased incidence of spontaneous abortions, birth defects and certain types of
malignancies for both male and female personnel. While no cause and effect relationship has been
established, consideration should be given to these findings in choosing anesthesia.
2. Students must always adhere to Universal Precautions. Students may be exposed to blood products, body
secretions, used syringes and needles. If a student is stuck by a needle or exposed to blood or body fluids
via the mouth or eyes, a variance report will be generated and the student will be referred to Occupational
Health Service. It is mandatory that students report all exposures to both affiliate site and program faculty
3. A student who has a suspected allergy or intolerance to latex and/or powder should be evaluated by their
health care provider
4. Students will be exposed to radiation during certain operative procedures. Lead aprons, thyroid shields,
and lead glass eye protection are available at each anesthetizing location and must be worn during
radiology procedures
5. Responsibility for accepting the risks associated with this specialty rests with the individual who chooses to
work within this environment, rather than with the institution, which takes required precautions to minimize
potential hazards.
Special Awards and Scholarships
The program encourages excellence in practice, enthusiasm for learning, dedication and commitment to the
profession, and volunteerism.
Petrovich Award
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
46
The Petrovich Scholarship was established in 1990 to recognize a graduate nurse anesthesia student that best
exemplifies the characteristics demonstrated by the late Dr. Edward Petrovich. Dr. Petrovich was a Beaumont
anesthesiologist known for excellence in clinical practice. This award is presented to a student who exhibits
excellent clinical judgement, compassion toward patients, and dedication to high standards in the practice of
anesthesia.
Agatha Hodgins Award
Anesthesia programs across the nation recognize an outstanding student by presenting the Agatha Hodgins Award.
This award was established in 1975 to recognize individuals whose foremost dedication to excellence has furthered
the art and science of nurse anesthesia. This award is presented at the Clinical Completion Ceremony at Beaumont
Hospital.
AANA/MANA Scholarships
Various scholarships are awarded each year by both the AANA and MANA. Students are encouraged to visit both
web sites often to inquire about and apply for any scholarships in which they may be interested.
Criteria for Graduation
A student will be eligible to take the National Certification Examination, administered by the NBCRNA only after they
have met all graduation criteria. Refer also to the Oakland University Graduate Student Handbook.
Program graduation criteria:
1.
Completion of all program and university requirements
2.
Achievement of all program outcome criteria as described in the student handbook
3.
Current ACLS, BLS and PALS
4.
Current RN license
5.
Return of program property, including keys, ID badge, pager and library materials
6.
Forwarding address and e-mail with program secretary
7.
Completion of Senior Exit Evaluation
8.
Submission of final case records. (See page 51 for minimum and preferred case totals required)
9.
Payment of all tuition and fees
10.
Students must submit their completed research project or study to their faculty research adviser for
signed approval. A copy of the manuscript with the signature page, HIC approval letter and OU IRB approval
letter placed in a binder is to be given to the Assistant Program Director.
Students who are following the 40 hour Post-Master’s Certificate curriculum will not be eligible to participate in
Oakland University’s commencement
Students will fill out the application for the National Certification Examination at a time determined by faculty prior to
graduation. Proof of a current nursing license as well as ACLS, BLS and PALS certification will be required and
must not expire prior to taking the exam. RN licensure must not expire within 90 days of the end date of the
program.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
47
Record of Clinical Experience
Codes: ( ) = Minimum Required Cases [ ] = Preferred Number of Cases
Review the academic and clinical experience records to make sure that all information and numbers are
accurate. The minimum didactic and clinical requirements must be met or the candidate will not be
eligible to write the Certification Examination.
I. Total Number of Anesthesia Cases (550)
II. Total Hours of Anesthesia Time
III. Patient Physical Status
A. Class I
B. Class II
C. Class III & IV
D. Class V
IV. Special Cases
A. Geriatric 65+ years
B. Pediatric
a. 2-12 years
b. under 2 years
c. Neonate (under 4 weeks)
C. Trauma/Emergency
D. Ambulatory/Outpatient
E. Obstetrical Management
1. Caesarean delivery
2. Analgesia for labor
V. Position Categories
A. Prone
B. Lithotomy
C. Lateral
D. Sitting
VI. Anatomical Categories
A. Intra-abdominal
B. Extrathoracic
C. Extremities
D. Perineal
E. Head
1. Extracranial
2. Intracranial
3. Oropharyngeal
F. Intrathoracic
1. Heart
2. Lung
3. Other
G. Neck
H. Neuroskeletal
I. Vascular
J. Other
VII. Pharmacological Agents
A. Inhalation agents
B. Intravenous induction agents
C. Intravenous agents –
muscle relaxants
D. Intravenous agents – opioids
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
XX
(100)
[5]
XX
[100]
(50)
[75]
[25]
[5]
[50]
(25)
(10)
XX
[40]
[15]
[15]
(30)
(100)
(30)
(10)
(10)
XX
(20)
(25)
(5)
(5)
XX
(75)
(15)
(50)
(15)
XX
[20]
[40]
[10]
[10]
[20]
(15)
(5)
(20)
(15)
(5)
(5)
(5)
(20)
(10)
XX
(200)
(200)
(200)
(200)
VIII. Methods of Anesthesia
XX
A. General anesthesia
(350)
B. Induction, maintenance, emergence
XX
1. Intravenous induction (200)
2. Inhalation induction [25]
(10)
3. Mask management [40]
(25)
4. Laryngeal mask airways[40]
(25)
(or similar devices)
XX
5. Tracheal intubation
XX
a. Oral
(200)
b. Nasal
[10]
6. Total intravenous anesthesia
[25] (10)
7. Emergence from anesthesia
(200)
C. Monitored anesthesia care
[50] (25)
D. Regional techniques
XX
1. Management
(30)
2. Administration (Total of a, b, c)
(25)
a. Spinal
[50]
b. Epidural
[50]
c. Peripheral
[40]
IX. Arterial Technique
XX
A. Arterial puncture/catheter insertion
(25)
B. Intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring
(25)
X. Central Venous Pressure Catheter
XX
A. Placement (Total of a, b)
[10]
(5)
a. Actual
b. Simulated
B. Monitoring
(15)
XI. Pulmonary Artery Catheter
XX
A. Placement
[5]
B. Monitoring
[10]
XII. Other
XX
A. Intravenous catheter placement
(100)
B. Mechanical ventilation
(200)
C. ACLS – Provide expiration date:
month _____ year_____
D. PALS – Provide expiration date:
month _____ year_____
E. Pain management (acute/chronic)
[10 cases]
F. Alternative airway management techniques XX
(Total of 1, 2)
[40] (10)
1. Fiberoptic techniques
XX
(Total of a, b, c)
[15]
(5)
a. Actual placement
b. Simulated placement
c. Airway assessment
2. Other techniques
[25] (5)
48
OAKLAND UNIVERSITY – BEAUMONT GRADUATE PROGRAM OF NURSE ANESTHESIA
Site
Manager/Director
Allegan General Hospital
555 Linn Street
Allegan, MI 49010-1524
Beaumont Health System
468 Cadieux Rd
Grosse Pointe, MI 48230-1507
Beaumont Health System
3601 W. 13 Mile Rd
Royal Oak, MI 48073-6712
Program Director:
Anne Hranchook, CRNA, MSN
Beaumont phone: 248-898-1270
Cell:
586-480-0001
Human Health Building #3024
Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401
Email:
[email protected]
Assistant Program Director:
Mary Golinski, PhD, CRNA
Beaumont phone: 248-898-8043
Pager:
248-992-1690
Human Health Building #3020
Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401
Email:
[email protected]
Beaumont Health System
44201 Dequindre Rd
Troy, MI 48085-1117
MaryAnn Garofalo, CRNA, MSN
Chief CRNA
Phone: 248-964-3030
Pager: 248-992-4537
Secretary: Connie
248-964-3000
Bell Hospital
901 Lakeshore Dr
Isheming, MI 49849-1367
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
Clinical Contact
Tim Fuller, CRNA, MS
269-686-4144
269-673-3900
Email: [email protected]
Glenn O’Connor, CRNA, MS
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Phone: 313-815-0440
Fax: 313- 343-1282
Pager:
Clinical Coordinators:
Andrea Bittinger, CRNA, MSN
Phone: 248-898-7683
Pager: 248-992-4752
Cell:
248-930-8780
Email: [email protected]
John Roebuck, CRNA, MSN
Phone: 248-898-1471
Pager: 248-898-4541
email: [email protected]
Linda McDonald, CRNA, MSN
Phone: 248-898-1812
Pager: 248-992-4682
Cell:
248-408-2016
Email:
[email protected]
Laura Rodgers. CRNA, MSN
Phone: 248-898-6234
Pager: 248-992-4544
Cell:
248-867-2941
Email: [email protected]
Carol Pywell, CRNA, MS
Phone: 248-964-3024
Email:
[email protected]
Bud Hart, CRNA
906-486-4431 ext 2708
Email: [email protected]
Home: 906-486-4854
Comments
Program Secretary:
Linda Garbacz
Phone: 248-898-8075
Fax:
248-898-8285
Email:[email protected]
Susan Davis
Phone: 248-364-8774
Email: [email protected]
CRNA Board Runner
North Tower Pager: 25532
NT Spectralink:
84400
South Tower Pager 25533
ST Spectralink
82991
CRNA Lounge:
North Tower
South Tower
248-898-1896
248-898-9508
Surgical Learning Center
Phone:
248-898-5566
Mock OR #1
248-898-2584
Mock OR #2
248-898-2596
Classroom #1248-898-2591/2592
Classroom #2248-898-2594/2595
Conference A
248-898-2571
Conference B
248-898-2570
Fax
248-898-7343
Classroom:
248-898-3271
Fax
248-898-8285
Boardrunner Spectralink:
43012
Workroom: 248-964-8460
Wendy Coombs – Secretary
[email protected]
49
Borgess Memorial
1521 Gull Rd
Kalamazoo, MI 49048-1640
269-226-7000
Borgess Health/SWMI Telehealth
NetworkAscension Health/Information
Services
SD Senior Analyst: Jim Wurtz
1521 Gull Road, Kalamazoo, MI
49048/LEC115
Office Phone:
269-226-8443
Cell phone:
269-744-6524
Fax:
269-226-7204
Email: [email protected]
Navigation Center
Contact:
Penny Conway
Phone:
269-226-8320
Fax:
269-226-5168
Classroom Phone 269-226-7382
Classroom Fax: 269-226-7062
Email: [email protected]
Bronson Methodist Hospital
601 John St
Kalamazoo, MI 4907
269-341-7654
Botsford
28050 Grand River Ave
Farmington Hills, MI 48336-5919
Childrens’ Hospital of
Michigan
3901 Beaubien St
Detroit, MI 48201-2119
Covenant Medical Center
700 Cooper Ave
Saginaw Michigan 48602-5383
Dickinson County Healthcare
System
1721 S. Stephenson Avenue
Iron Mountain Michigan
49801-3637
Kalamazoo Anesthesiology,
PC
900 Peeler St
Kalamazoo Michigan 49008
or
P.O Box 4095
Kalamazoo Michigan 49003
Karen M. Cesarz-Biagiolio, CRNA,
MSN
Interim Clinical Manager of
Anesthesia
Phone:313-745-5466
Phone: 586-201-7276
Manager: John Rzyhak, CRNA, MS
Office:
989-583-6237
Cell:
989-751-8027
Fax:
989-583-6032
Email:
[email protected]
Director: Donald G. Kube Jr. D.O.
Phone:
906-776-5457
OR:
906-776-5456
Cell Phone:
906-396-5711
Fax:
906-776-5488
Email: [email protected]
Interim Director:
John Sikora, MD
Cell:
269-615-1553
Pager:
269-413-0360
Email: [email protected]
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
Pat Siegel, CRNA, MS
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 248-471-8889
Fax: 248-471-8966
Lucia Scarpace-Meehan, CRNA, MS
Email: [email protected]
Michelle Thurman, CRNA, MS
Email: [email protected]
Secretary:
Jessica Ford
Phone: 248-471-8720
Email: [email protected]
Workroom: 313-745-5466
Secretary: Amy Pendleton
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 313-745-5535
Fax: 313-745-5448
Coordinators:
Dan Flanders, CRNA, MSN
Email: [email protected]
Jamine Penprase
Email: [email protected]
Becky Koeph
Phone:
248-431-8898
Email:
[email protected]
Coordinator:Peggy Pontti, CRNA
Email: [email protected]
Human Resources: Pam Foster 906776-5567
Coordinator:Chris Quertermus, CRNA,
MS
Pager:
269-212-0541
Fax:
269-345-1508
Text pager:
269-413-2697
Email: [email protected]
Office Phone:
269-345-8618
Cell phone:
269-720-6896
Home Address: 10466 N 17th St.
Plainwell, MI 49080
Assistant Coordinator:
Sara Barnett, CRNA
Pager:
269-413-0867
Email: [email protected]
Business Manager: Rob Keller
Phone:
269-342-7830
Email:[email protected]
50
Marquette General Health
System
580 W College Ave
Marquette Michigan 49855-2705
Coordinator:
Terri Durley, CRNA, MSN
Phone:
906-225-3035
Pager:
906-228-9440
e-mail: [email protected]
beeper # 464
McLaren Macomb
1000 Harrington St
Mt Clemens Michigan
Coordinator:
Bill Dallas, CRNA, MS
Pager:
586-856-1116
(use)
Email: [email protected] (use)
[email protected]
Phone:
586-493-1116
Vicki Struebing, CRNA, MSN
Phone:
586-856-1141
Wally, CRNA, MSN 586-856-1127
Coordinator:
Heather Smith, CRNA, MSN
Cell:
231-881-2376
Pager:
231-317-0014
email:
[email protected]
48043-2920
McLaren Northern Michigan
416 Connable Ave.
Petoskey, MI 49770-2212
Secretary:
Lisa Ward
Phone:
906-225-3595
Fax:
906-225-3697
Email: [email protected]
Ed. Student Coord: Cathy Thorrington
Phone:
906-225-6922
Fax:
906-225-3037
Classroom phone: 906-225-4508
Classroom fax
906-225-3203
IT Support:
906-225-3018
Videoconference:
Deborah Reed-Fowler
Email:[email protected]
Workroom:
586-493-2825
Fax:
586-493-8741
Medical Library Manager: Anne Foster
[email protected]
phone:
231-487-4503
Cell:
231-330-6094
Distance learning:
Polycom (analog jack): 231-487-7263
Classroom phone: 231-487-3525
IP address for connecting: 96.36.61.213
Medical Library and Learning Center:Phone: 231487-4500
Library Fax Number: 231-487-4516 Use for
sending tests, etc.
Support for the Distance Learning and classroom for students
OSF
St. Francis Hospital
3401 Ludington Street
Escanaba, Michigan 49829
Oaklawn Hospital
200 N Madison St
Marshall Michigan 49068-1143
Pennock Hospital
1009 W Green St
Hastings Michigan 49058-1710
Port Huron Hospital
1221 Pine Grove Ave
Port Huron Michigan 48060-3511
Portage Health
500 Campus Dr
Hancock Michigan 49930-1569
Chief CRNA:
Leighann Wood
Email:[email protected]
Charge CRNA:810-987-5000 x2205
Mike Salmi, CRNA
Director of Anestheisa
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
Coordinator:
Tom Kolinsky, CRNA, MS
Phone: 906-786-1424
[email protected]
Coordinator:
Pam Price, CRNA
Phone:
517-206-8667
Pager:
Email:[email protected]
Coordinator:
Howard Plattner,CRNA
Email:
[email protected]
Cell:
616-304-1741
Anesthesia offices 269 948-3114
Alt Coordinator:
Chris Quertermus, CRNA, MS
Cell:
269-720-6896
Coordinator:
Craig Huard, CRNA, MSN, MBA
Phone:
810-989-3238
Email:
Clinical Coordinator:
Mike Salmi, CRNA
Director of Anestheisa
Email:
[email protected]
Phone: 906-483-1000
Cell: 906-231-4049 preferred text msg during
wk hours
Peggy Merrill - Education Development
Coordinator 269-945-1212 ext 1337
Email:
[email protected]
Secretary:
Becky Bass
Phone: 810-989-3360
Education Coord:
Catherine Manderfield
Phone:
906-483-1567
Fax:
906-483-1511
Email:
51
Alt Contact: Kirk Klemme, MD
Email:[email protected]
Providence Hospital
16001 W 9 Mile Rd
Southfield, MI 48075-4818
Promedica ~
Flower Hospital
5200 Harroun Rd
Sylvania, OH 43560
Phone: 419-824-1444
Promedica ~
Wilwood Orthopaedic and
Spine Hospital
2901 N. Reynolds Rd.
Toledo, OH 43615
Promedica ~
Toledo Hospital
2142 N Cove Blvd
Toledo Ohio 43606-3895
Coordinator:
Kelly Trethewey, CRNA, MS
Phone:
248-849-5426
Pager:
248-367-5791
Email: [email protected]
Phone (Sue Breece):
248-849-3185
Fax:
248-849-5489
[email protected]
Site Coordinator: Beth Gajdostik
Phone:
419-824-1444
Email:[email protected]
Director of Anesthesia:
William Gallup, MD
Email:[email protected]
Cell:
419-704-6111
Clinical Director of Nurse Anesthesia
Education:
Howard Brown CRNA, MSN
Pager:
Email: [email protected]
St Johns Hospital and
Medical Center
22101 Moross Rd
Detroit, MI 48236-2148
Director: Marquita Crawford, CRNA,
MS
Phone:
313-343-7075
Education Coordinator: Ruth Watts, CRNA, MS
(contact Ruth re student rotation questions)
Emails:
[email protected]
[email protected]
Office Phone:
313-343-3750
Fax:
313-343-6862
Workroom: 313-343-4766
Cell:
313-570-7790
University of Michigan Health
Systems:
C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital
Department of Anesthesiology
F3900 Mott, SPC 5211
1500 E Medical Center Dr
Ann Arbor Michigan 481095211
Director:
Phone:734-936-6992
Mott Anes. Office: 734-763-2435
Pager:
Fax:
734-763-6651
Adm Asst
Meghan Young
Phone:
734-647-6923
Coordinator:
Emily MacNeil, CRNA, MSN
Pager: 734-936-6266 #15452
Email: [email protected]
University of Michigan Health
Systems
Kellogg Eye Center
1000 Wall Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
University of Michigan Health
Systems
East Ann Arbor Ambulatory
Surgery & Mdical Procedures
Center
4270 Plymouth Rd
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
University of Michigan Health
Systems:
[email protected]
Site Coordinator:
Deb Ball, CRNA
Secretary: Cheryl
(urgent message to Howard)
Phone: 419-291-4491
fax: 419-479-6905
email: [email protected]
Adm Asst:
Meghan Young
Phone:
734-647-6923
Email: [email protected]
Alternate/Student Coordinator:
Kristen Thulin, CRNA
Pager:
734-936-6266
Email: [email protected]
Mott Anes. Office: 734-763-2435
OR Front Desk
734-763-2430
Call in Line
734-615-0462
Coordinator:
Kathy Samoray, CRNA
Email: [email protected]
Site Coordinator:
Mary Neff, CRNA
Site Coordinator:
Teri Haney, CRNA
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
52
Livonia Center for Specialty
Care
19900 Haggerty Rd, Suite 100
Livonia, MI 48152
John D Dingell VA Medical
Center
4646 John R St
Detroit Michigan 48201-1916
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
Holly Franson, CRNA, MSN
Pager: 313-250-3057
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Administrative Office, Surgical Service
Name: Susan Tyler Davis
Phone: 313-576-3972
Email: [email protected]
Surgical Resident & Medical Student
Coordinator
Name: Mignon Footman – computer support
Phone: 313-576-1000 ext 61339
Fax:
313-576-1002
Email: [email protected]
Name: Lorriane Woods - secretary
Phone: 313-576-3924
Name: Leana Saylor - receptionist
Phone: 313-576-3251
Email: [email protected]
53
Distance Student Guidelines
Distance students have unique needs and concerns that program faculty recognize. Faculty and distance site coordinators are
committed to providing students the support and resources needed to succeed in the program.
The increasing use of technology in classroom instruction has grown exponentially over the years. Most universities and colleges
have adopted some form of online learning. Distance learning is a rapidly expanding educational advance in nurse anesthesia.
The Oakland University – Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia has made great strides in the use of distance
technology. In 2001, the Program was the first in the nation to receive a $300,000 grant to begin a distance education program.
As of 2012, over 35 distance students have graduated from the program. The Council on Accreditation requires that distance
education programs and courses meet the same standards and achieve the same outcomes as traditional educational offerings.
The OUBGPNA distance education program evidences high quality through the achievement of its graduates. Many have been
recipients of awards for academic and clinical excellence such as the prestigious Agatha Hodgins Award, the Edward Petrovich
Scholarship, and many academic honors from Oakland University. Graduates have also moved into high-level anesthesia
department managerial and administration roles.
One of the goals of OUBGPNA’s distance education program is to overcome barriers of place and time. Distance learning allows
education to reach those who are located at distance primary sites. The program endeavors to connect students at Beaumont,
Royal Oak and off campus in an atmosphere that promotes a feeling of belonging and camaraderie by the use of video, audio,
and active learning.
Some helpful tips for staying connected to your classmates include:









Develop a time management strategy
Make asking questions useful in learning
Make connection with fellow students
Establish a buddy relationship with a Beaumont classmate so that in the event you miss a concept presented or have
interruptions in transmission, you have an established contact person to provide you with missed information.
Do not hesitate to notify the instructor to adjust the camera or volume or pause to clarify a point. Take initiative!
Make sure your microphones are not muted. The back of the OU-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia
Student Handbook provides contact information for Beaumont, including the program secretary, classroom phone
number, etc. (see attached).
The program will have a list of your classroom phone and classroom fax in our classroom. Please provide your cell
phone numbers so we can contact you if needed.
We make every attempt to have our lecture material e-mailed (or posted to Moodle) prior to the scheduled lecture, but
that is not always possible. On occasion, lecture material will be faxed to your site. Take the responsibility to contact
the faculty of record if you do not have lecture materials prior to the scheduled lecture time.
It is each student’s personal responsibility for checking his or her OU email every day. As a distance student, you may
want to check it each morning before you come to class.
Communication
Microphones are in place at each table in the classroom at Beaumont, Royal Oak. Fellow classmates are instructed to use the
microphones for all discussions in order to assure that distance students are included in the discussions.
Distance students are encouraged to communicate frequently via e-mail or phone with the Oakland University-Beaumont clinical
coordinator and faculty of record for courses in order to maintain consistent, open dialogue about any matter of concern to you.
Evaluations at Distance Sites
Daily Clinical Evaluations:
Site coordinators collect and review the white copy of student evaluations. He/she will make a copy then forward the original to
the program clinical coordinator on a regular basis throughout the program.
The site coordinator may assign students to a clinical instructor. Each semester your site coordinator (clinical instructor) will
complete a summary of your clinical progress (see form in Student Handbook-End Semester Evaluation Summary), which will be
forwarded to the Beaumont clinical coordinator and placed in your files.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
54
Your first line of communication about clinical-related issues should be with the individual instructor, and then distance site
coordinator. If the issue cannot be resolved, you are directed to contact the OU-Beaumont clinical coordinator. Your next line of
communication would be the assistant director, then the program director. You are expected to contact the OU-Beaumont clinical
coordinator any time a sentinel event or major error on your part occurs (drug error).
You are asked to communicate with the OU-Beaumont clinical coordinator on a regular basis via phone or email to keep them
apprised of your clinical progress. This also provides students with an opportunity to communicate any questions or concerns
regarding didactic and clinical issues.
Instructor Evaluations:
All students are expected to complete instructor evaluations daily using the Typhon Case Tracking Instructor Evaluation form.
Distance Clinical Sites
Program faculty will visit distance sites at least annually and complete a site evaluation.
The program director will conduct an Exit Evaluation with all distance students.
Students evaluate their individual distance site using the typhoon tracking system.
Distance Student Rotation to Beaumont Hospital-Royal Oak
1.
Distance student will be required to spend 2 weeks at Royal Oak Beaumont in clinicals during the second and third
semesters of the program. Additional weeks may be required depending on the individual student’s performance. The
weeks you select must be full weeks (i.e. if there is a day off due to a conference that week, do not select).
2.
You may select the weeks separately or together. For sites that have more than 1 distance student, you may decide
to travel together. The program will make every effort to facilitate this but it is not guaranteed especially during
specialty rotations in the second year.
3.
Students select two weeks at the beginning of every semester in order to coordinate the weeks for all distance
students. A maximum of two distance students can be at Beaumont during the same week. Dates are confirmed on
a “first come first served” basis.
4.
Vacation time is not allowed during scheduled time at Beaumont.
5.
Once scheduled, students are to contact the OU clinical coordinator one week prior to their scheduled rotation to
communicate specific learning experiences needed. Students are responsible for making travel plans so that they are
able to get assignments, visit patients and collect all necessary information regarding cases preoperatively.
6.
The faculty will facilitate clinical experiences with distance students by working with them if possible during their
rotations to Beaumont. When not feasible, coordinators will facilitate assigning clinical instructors to work with
students.
7.
Students will be required to complete a clinical agency evaluation of the Beaumont site as well as daily instructor
evaluation each time they rotate via Typhon.
8.
Students are encouraged to communicate with the clinical coordinator frequently during their rotation at Beaumont.
9.
Students may be required to attend Simulation learning sessions after class or clinical hours while on your rotation to
Royal Oak Beaumont. **
10.
You will be required to come back to Beaumont more than 2 weeks/semester if it is determined that your primary site
cannot provide the mandated clinical experiences paralleling that of traditional classmates so that you attain the
objectives of your clinical internships and obtain needed experiences to graduate.
**One important consideration: Your position as a distance student is unique. You have the advantage of being assigned to
your “home site” for nearly all of your clinical training. Your 2-week/semester rotations to Beaumont provide the program faculty
with an opportunity to evaluate you over a very short period of time. An important goal of having students travel to Beaumont for
clinical experiences is to expose them to surgical procedures and anesthetic techniques that may not otherwise be gained at your
distance primary site.
Beaumont-Royal Oak
Anesthesia Classroom:
FAX
Oakland University-Beaumont
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
(248) 898-3271
(248) 898-8285
Linda McDonald, CRNA
Phone: (248) 898-1812
Email: [email protected]
Laura Rodgers, CRNA
Phone: (248) 898-6234
Email: [email protected]
55
Marquette Distance Students:
Clinical site coordinator:
Terry Durley, CRNA, MSN
Phone: (906)225-3035
Test proctor/Anesthesia Department Secretary: Lisa Ward
Phone:
(906)225-3595
Fax:
(906)225-3697
Classroom Phone:
(906) 225-4505
Classroom Fax:
(906) 225-3203
IT Support:
(906) 225-3018
Video conference:
Debra Reed-Fowler
[email protected]
Kalamazoo Distance Students:
Clinical site coordinator:
Primary
Chris Quertermus, CRNA
Pager (269) 212-0541
Text Pager (269) 413-2697
Email: [email protected]
Secondary
Sarah Barnett, CRNA
Pager (269) 413-0867
Email: [email protected]
 Clinical rotations for this site currently include Bronson and Borgess Hospitals. The OU-Beaumont clinical coordinator
must be notified of any schedule and clinical site changes.
 Classroom learning will primarily be held in the Navigation Center.

Classroom Phone:
(269) 226-7382

Classroom Fax:
(269) 226-7062
Test proctor:
Penny Conway, Education Assistant
(@ Front Desk of Navigation Center)
Phone: (269) 226-8320 or (269) 226-5170
Fax: (269) 226-5168
Email: [email protected]
Jim Wertz (Video Tech for Navigation Center)
Phone: (269) 226-8443
Cell: 269-744-6524
Fax: (269) 226-7204
Email: [email protected]
Kalamazoo Anesthesiology
Administrative Office: Lisa Fisher (for paper & additional toner cartridges)
Phone: (269) 345-8618 x 1223
Fax: (269) 345-1508
Email: [email protected]
Northern Michigan Hospital Distance Students:
Site Coordinator:
Heather Smith, CRNA
[email protected]
Test Proctor:
Anne Foster, Medical Library Manager
[email protected]
1-231-487-4503
Distance learning:
Polycom (analog jack): 231-487-7263
Classroom phone:
231-487-3525
IP address for connecting:
96.36.61.213
Medical Library and Learning Center:
Phone: 231-487-4500
Physician liaison:
Paul Dowsett, MD
Phone: (231)487-4090
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
56
Toledo Hospital Students
Clinical site coordinator: Howard Brown, CRNA, MSN
Pager: (419) 291-4491
Email: [email protected]


Clinical rotations for this site will include Toledo Hospital.
Toledo students will attend all Oakland University/Beaumont Nurse Anesthesia courses/exams at the scheduled campus
with their “Traditional” classmates.
Secretary:
Cheryl
Phone: (419) 291-4491
Fax: (419) 479-6905
Student Housing
Convenient housing arrangements are available to students interning at Beaumont Hospital. The Royal Manor Apartments are
conveniently located near the Royal Oak campus. They provide a comfortable atmosphere at reasonable rates. These large twobedroom apartments can accommodate four or more persons. Many distance students often opt to travel to Beaumont together
and divide the costs. Amenities include:
 Fully equipped kitchens (full-size appliances, cooking utensils, microwave, coffee makers and dinnerware)
 Linens and towels
 Soap and tissues
 Cable TV, telephone, alarm clock
 Internet access-dial up through your local internet connection
 Central air
 Coin operated Laundromat
 One day stays to extended stays
 24-hour registration
 No pets allowed
The contact person is Millie Crutcher.
 Phone: (248) 288-0715
 Pager: (248) 992-1951
We recommend that you make your reservations as soon as you confirm the weeks you will spend in Royal Oak (especially during
the first semester of the program) to ensure getting a room. Some distance students have been able to work out temporary
lodging arrangements with one of their classmates.
NOTE: Distance students are responsible for reviewing and acknowledging receipt of the Student Handbook as well as this
addendum.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
57
Appendix A
Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia
Standards of Conduct for the Clinical Instructor-Student Anesthetist Relationship
The Oakland University- Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia (OUBGPNA) recognizes the importance of clinical
instructors serving as role models for student anesthetists and that this role is fundamental to the educational mission of the
program. The clinical instructor-student anesthetist relationship confers rights and responsibilities on both parties. Behaving in
ways that represent the ideal instructor-student relationship fosters respectful behavior, minimizes the likelihood of student
mistreatment or abuse, and optimizes the educational experience for students.
Responsibilities of clinical instructors include:
Be prepared and on time
Provided learners with the most current materials
Treat students fairly, respectfully, and without bias based upon a legally protected characteristic
Give students timely, constructive and accurate feedback
Avoid the embarrassment or humiliation of students
Responsibilities of student anesthetists include:
Be prepared and on time
Be courteous and respectful of instructors and fellow students and without bias based upon a legally protected characteristic
Treat fellow students as colleagues and respect mutual the learning environment
Take responsibility for maximizing educational experiences
Address conflicts and discomforts which may impede learning while protecting the patient
Be an enthusiastic learner
Be trustworthy and honest
Know limitations and ask for help when needed
In the clinical setting:
Seek knowledge about patient illnesses. Put patient welfare ahead of educational needs
Treat all patients and members of the health care team respectfully, and without bias based upon a legally protected
characteristic
Be compassionate
Respect patients’ privacy
The responsibilities of teachers and learners constitute the School’s standards for respectful and professional behavior.
Behaviors, which fall outside of these standards, are clearly abusive or represent poor judgment, unprofessional behavior or
mistreatment. The behaviors listed below are clearly abusive.
Unwanted physical contact
Sexual harassment
Discrimination based upon a legally protected characteristic.
Requiring students to perform personal chores (i.e. running errands, babysitting, etc.)
Disrespectful or unprofessional behaviors, that may also disrupt the student’s educational experience, include:
Repeated questioning of a student with the primary intent to humiliate or embarrass
Clinical evaluation based on factors other than performance or merit
Coercing students to do something they find morally objectionable
Public humiliation
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
58
Appendix A
Requiring excessive menial, non-educational chores
Sharing information about student performance in a way that damages student’s chances to progress
Reporting Incidents of Mistreatment
Students who believe that they have been mistreated by another student as defined in the Oakland University Standards of
Conduct Policy should notify the Associate Dean of Student Affairs Immediately and must file a written report within 30 calendar
days of the alleged action in order for the allegation to be investigated in a timely manner.
Students who believe that they have been mistreated by a faculty member, clinical instructor (CRNA/MDA), or employee of
either Oakland University or Beaumont Health System should notify the OUBGPNA Program Faculty. Students are referred to
the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook for information on the process for communicating concerns related to
bullying.
Regarding an allegation against a faculty member or clinical instructor: A student may request to delay the forwarding of the
complaint and resulting action or remedy until after the student is evaluated academically.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
59
Appendix B
SOCIAL MEDIA GUIDELINES
Social networking sites have become an integral part of everyday life for millions of people around the world. How a
students and programs of nurse anesthesia are represented and viewed through this social media has become
increasingly important.
The following are the main points Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia students
should consider when using blogs, social networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and other social media.
Nothing is private: Anything you say online could be misunderstood or misinterpreted. Anyone with access to the
web can get access to your activity on social media sites. Regardless of how careful you are in trying to keep them
separate, in your online activity, your professional life and your personal life overlap.
Do no harm. Respect your audience. Don't use ethnic slurs, personal insults, obscenity, or engage in any conduct that
would not be acceptable at Oakland University or any of our many clinical sites. You should also show proper
consideration for others' privacy and for topics that may be considered objectionable or controversial—such as
politics and religion.
Be polite. Realize that social media communities have their own culture, etiquette and norms, and be respectful of
them.
Uphold patient confidentiality. Do not provide confidential patient information in any manner. Don’t publish or
report on conversations that are meant to be private.
Respect copyright, fair use and financial disclosure laws. It is critical that you show respect for the laws governing
copyright and fair use of copyrighted material owned by others, including copyrights and brands such as Oakland
University and Beaumont logos.
Don't pick fights. Be the first to correct your own mistakes, and don't alter previous posts without indicating that you
have done so.
Try to add value and create interest. Provide worthwhile information and perspective. Use your own voice and bring
your own personality to the forefront.
Be vigilant. Be aware of your association with Oakland University and Beaumont in online social networks. If you
identify yourself as an Oakland University-Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia student, ensure your
profile and related content is consistent with how you wish to present yourself with colleagues and patients.
Use your personal email address (not your Oakland.edu address) as your primary means of identification. Just as you
would not use Oakland or Beaumont letterhead when writing a personal correspondence, do not use your Oakland
email address to express your personal views.
Use your best judgment. If you're about to publish something that makes you even the slightest bit uncomfortable,
review the suggestions above and think about why that is. Ultimately, however, you have sole responsibility for what
you post to your blog or publish in any form of online social media.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
60
Appendix B
Students must know and abide by the following Social Networking and Other Web-Based Communications Policies:
Beaumont Policy (#297), Oakland University Policy #890 and the boundary violations policy stated in the OU School
of Nursing Graduate Handbook.
Student Handbook – Class of 2015
61
Appendix C
School of Nursing
Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401
(248) 370-3497 Fax: (248) 370-4279
September, 2013
I have received a copy of the Oakland University – Beaumont Graduate Program of Nurse
Anesthesia Student Handbook for students entering in September of 2012. I have had an
opportunity to review and discuss its contents and I agree, as a student enrolled in this program,
to adhere to the policies and guidelines set forth.
I am aware that simulation learning is a required component of the program and all instructional
direction, discussion, practice and testing are confidential.
I agree to not share any information used during the simulation session with anyone. I understand
that I may be videotaped during these sessions and that it may be used for educational purposes.
I agree to comply with student responsibilities as stated in the Standards of Conduct for the
Clinical Instructor-Student Relationship.
I agree to comply with Social Media Policy Guidelines as stated with the Beaumont Health
System and Oakland University Guideline policy #
I am aware that program faculty reserves the right to revise all information in this handbook at its
discretion and to make reasonable changes in requirements to improve the quality of education or
upgrade the program.
(Name)
(Date)

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