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John·
Glenn
Democratic presidential
hopeful John Glenn addressed 800 local
Democrats Monday night
at the Radisson Hotel in
Wilmington. Story on page
3.
Review photos by Pim Von Hemmen
1.1.1•
::c
-~
Vol. 107 No. 21
Student Center, University of Delaware,
• Friday, April15, 1913
Redd elected to fourth term as city's mayor
by Carrie Shugart
William Redd was reelected for his fourth term as
mayor of Newark, defeating
his opponent Daniel Ferry by
485 votes in Newark's
Municipal election Tuesday.
The election had an
unusually high turnout of
2,357 voters, approximately
45 percent of those registered
to vote. Redd lost in only one
of the six distr~cts. " The competition was good, almost too
good," he said.
Redd was obliged to vote by
absentee ballot due to a back
injury that kept him virtually
bedridden for the last two
weeks of the campaign.
Councilmen John Suchanec
(district 1) and Edwin Nutter
(district 4) ran for re-election
unopposed. Louise Brothers,
who also ran unopposed in the
second district, was elected to
the council, replacing retiring
councilman William Coverdale. Councilmen representing districts 3, 5 and 6 were
. not up for re-election this
year.
Redd believes the cam-
paign had strong partisan
overtones. "I hope we can get
back to the small town approach. I would hate to see
Newark go to partisan
politics." he said.
The re-elected mayor said
he has stayed involved in
Newark's municipal government for several reasons.
" We're large enough to
generate some fascinating
problems but we're small
enough to solve them in a collegial way, as opposed to an
adversary way." Redd
stressed that the council
works very well together
without the involvement of
partisan politics. ''We're just
there to do the best we can
and who cares who gets the
credit?" he said.
Challenger Ferry said the
campaign had been worthwhile but " a lot of bard
work." Ferry added that he
went into the campaign thinking, "No matter who wins, the
city is going to benefit and
that's worth it."
Ferry, 57, was born and
raised in Newark and practices law here: He said he has
no future plans '/.1 politics. " I
never was a politician and
I'm not now." Ferry said.
Redd, who is also a corP o r a t e r e 1o c a t i o n a dministrator for the DuPont
Co., said he enjoys living in
Newark. "I have always liked
Rise in drinking age considered
toRadio signal affects TV channel
by AI Kemp
DOVER - Most people
don't consider the state of
Delaware as a "last frontier"
but in some respects it is exactly that. In fact, since New
Jersey raised its legal drinking age earlier this year,
Delaware has had the lowest
drinking age of any of its surrounding states.
And now a bill aimed at
raising the drinking age from
20 to 21 looks like a sure bet to
pass through the Delaware
Hous'e of Representatives this
spring, good news for the
many Delaware residents
concerned with illegal border
crossings and alcohol-related
accidents, but bad news for
the many 19-year-olds anxiously awaiting the day when
they can finally call
themselves "legal."
The bill, House Bill 82, was
under consideration by the
House Community Affairs
Committee as of press time.
Committee Chair Marion
Anderson (D-Newark) said
she was "fairly sure" the bill
(Cofttlnued
by Marla Hirshman
WXDR, the university's non-commercial
radio station, has received complaints from
both students and community members about
the station's increased signal causing interference in the reception of television station WPVI- channelS, in Philadelphia.
Since WXDR resumed broadcasting last
Friday, the station has received over 50 calls
from Channel 6 viewers complaining of problems ranging from distorted video reception,
accompanied by WXDR's audio signal, to a
slight sound overlap with a normal picture,
· according to Station Manager.Bill Wohl.
The cause of the problem is that the frequency on which channel 6 broadcasts its
audio signal is very close to that of WXDR.
2)
Most TV sets do not use quality FM tuners
and cannot differentiate between the two
signals, Wohl explained. "The Channel6 audio
signal is cpnsidered distant; it's coming from
45 miles away. WXDR is strong and close and
the more intense FM channel overpowers the
weaker broadcast," he said.
The problem is permanent, but easily rectified, Wohl said. If moving the set and the
antenna does not alleviate the problem, a
relatively inexpensive device called a " trap"
can be attached to the back of the set. Wohl
said that all local TV and radio dealers have
been notified of the problem, and if they do not
carry the " traps, they can tell you where the
filters can be purchased.''
(Continued tor-10)
William Redd
college towns. The mix of industry and academia· IS
refreshing. If I lived in a corporate ghetto, I would go out
of my mind."
The 61-year-old Redd has
served three three-year
terms as mayor and also
represented the first district
on the council from 1970 to
1973. He attended the University of Maryland where he
received a B.S. in civil
engineering and an M.B.A. in
transportation. Redd latex:
taught civil engineering at
the University of Maryland
before moving to Delaware to •
work for the DuPont Co.
Looking forward to his
fourth term as mayor, Redd
said, "I think I'm helping.
I'm making a contribution,
.and I'm certainly getting a lot
of satisfaction, but never in
my wildest dreams did it ever
occur- to me to be the mayor
of a city of 26,000 people."
I
.I .drinking age to 21?
Page 2 • THE REVIEW • AprillS, 1983
TJSERS
SUPPORT OUR ADVER
.
_
I
!Conttnu..ttrom- 1)
levelling-offoftherateasthe
would be signed out of her num~er of fatalities ~ef!lains
~-;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;============:;::;;;;~ and
committee in the near future 2relatively constant Within the
that it should have no pro- 0 thr~:mgh 23 age gr~up.
blems passing through the
. W~~ Obe~l~ beheves ~he
House of Representatives.
bill .~Ill defimtely. have Im"I think it's needed " she pact, Torbert pomted out
said.
'th~t "most 20-year-olds have
"Our legal drinking age fnends who are _21 an_yway,"
should be consistent with the and that the bill will only
neighboring states," said bill " ~ rea t ~ more i 11 ega l
co-sponsor William A. Oberle drmkers.
Jr.
(R-Newark). "If it isn't
"I don't see how it's going
Friday the 15th
TUESDAY THE 19TH,
you become a haven and the to save any lives," said
9PM-1 AM
'Prime Rib Dinner- sgoo
potential for problems in- Torb~rt. " Why should we
_....._.., ISLAND NIGHT
creases."
penahze our legal adults just
'Ladies Nite • With proper i.d.
all ladies receive a Free drink
Oberle believes raising to ~top out-of-staters from
Wear
a
Hawaiian
ticket. (Cash value up to s} 50)
Delaware's legal age from 20 co~~ng over the borde~?
Shirt-Get A Free
to 21 will directly reduce
. I m_ not to~ally agamst the
Shooter!
alcohol consumption and bill. ! JUSt thmk people ought .
Captain Morgan
alcohol-related offenses and to thmk very carefully before
Planters Punch s 1°5
called the bill a "pra~tical they vote," _he _said. -"I:n
Yellow Birds 5 1os
solution" to a "practical pro- speak out agamst It but I will
Frozen Strawberry
blem."
not vote against_it. That's not
Coladas s 1°5
"I
personally
don't
feel
one
a
cop-out, it only means I feel
Hawaiian and
year makes a significant dif- I should raise my voice."
Mellonball Shooters
ference, but we should have a
. Torbe~t plans to introduce a
75'
legal age consistent with the bll~ of hi_s own ~o the Senate
'Brunch Served 9 a.m .. 2:30
Pitchers Rolling
other states in our area or This sprmg which would set
p.m.
Rock 5 la
'
we'll continue to have pro- harsher penalties f~r I.D.
'Early Bird Special - Bloody
Pitchers Heineken
5305
blems with alcohol," he said. fra~d _and for sellmg or
Mary's and Screwdrivers only
But Senator William c. dellvermg alcohol to minors.
30e 9 a.m. · 10 a.m. with
Beach Movies/With
Torbert (D-Dover) expressed . Under th~ ~resent. law the
breakfast
Every Island Drink
reservations about changing fu~e for. givmg alc~hol to
'1 oz. N.Y. Strip Dinner- 5 550
You Purchase
•Jazz with ELQ 9 p.m .. 1 a.m.
the drinking age, arguing that . mmqrs IS ~ften as h~tle as
Receive A Raffle
a higher legal age will not $10! he . said, ~ut his ~ill
Ticket-Chance For
necessarily mean a reduction would raise the f~ne to as high
Monday the 18th
Prizes
in the number of young as $1,500 for the first offense.
'Mug Day· 16 oz. Raven drafts
drinkers killed in . alcohol- . For P~~ple _arre~t~d f?r usWednesday the 20th
40e
related incidents one of the mg falsified IdentificatiOn to
• Beef 'n Beer Dinner - 5375 •
9 p.m. -1 a.m. Heavenly Hash
bill's primary ai~s.
purchase. alcopol the bill proCall Hotline for details
Statistics compiled by the poses. a fme of up to $500 for
'Late Night Special - Tacos
Division of Alcoholic the firs~ offense as w~ll as
2/5 1
Beverage Control, while ~evocatiOn. of t_he . dn":er:s
showing a variable and hcense until the fme IS paid m
For a daily updat~ on all movies, bands, promotions, and specials.
often high death rate among f~ll. Second offenders face a
the 16 thro'\lgh 18 age group, fme of_ up to $1,000_ a~d
indicate an apparent r_evocatwn ?f the dnver s
. . - - - - - - - - - - - " " hcense until the offender
reaches the legal drinking
age.
Torbert said he _thinks his
bill would be a better deterrent to the problems caused
by young drinkers than raising the drinking age and that
he .will introduce it to the
Senate this spring.
Association ~
J
r
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AprillS, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 3
Glenn stresses higher education in campaign
1
by Donna Stachecki
Standing beneath a banner procla~ing, '"84 for sure!,'' U.S. Sen.
· John Gltmn (D..Ohio) emphasized'the
need for student funding at the
Delaware Jefferson-Jackson dinner
in Wilmington Monday night.
Glenn, 61, who will declare his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination April 21, voiced his
disapproval over cuts in student
grants and loans during President
Ronald Reagan's term, referring to
college graduates as "the seed corn of
the future."
"Our nation established education
for everybody," Glenn said, "not just the kids in the castle or the country.
We need higher education to develop
students and break-through type
research.''
About 800 supporters, including
leading Delaware Democrats Sen.
Joseph Biden, Rep. Thomas Carper,
and the party's · state chairman
Samuel Shipley, attended the dinner -{'The policies of the Reagan adin the Radisson Hotel. Earlier in the
ministration aren't expanding our
evening a reception allowed local
dignitaries to mingle with the possible opportunities, they're eroding
Democratic nominee and his 51-yearthem."old wife Annie.
The first American to orbit the
e~rth,
Glenn repeatedly stressed knowledge and new technologies.''
The former a~tronaut, who
education and research during the
authored the Nuclear Nonevening.
"The Japanese, the French and the Proliferation Act of 1978, supports an
Germans are beginning to out- "immediate, mutual and verifiable"
compete us because they're making nuclear freeze. Glenn urged a reduceducation a top priority. Last year the tion in nuclear "stockpiles," an end to
United States graduated 63,000 the worldwide spread of nuclear
engineers-that's a lot of engineers- arms, the involvement of all nuclear
but Japan, with half of our population, . weapons states, and work to reduce
conventional weapons-if the freeze is
graduated 87,000.
"If we continue to cut back on put into effect.
"We believe in keeping our military
education and research, things that
made America what it is, we'll second to none," Glenn said, adding
· shorten the long hand (of opportuni- that "We must never seek to lower the
danger by lowering our guard.''
ty)."
Glenn traveled to the first state
Glenn recognized the university's
research in solar energy and marine after campaigning in Maine and
sciences, which will lead to "new Massachusettes. The senator has
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done little serious campaigning and
did not fare well in a straw poll taken
during his northern visit. Six hundred
fifty-five Massachussettes Democrats
rated Glenn a distant second behind
former Vice President Walter Mondale. Mondale garnered 32 percent of
the votes, Glenn 13 percent and
California Sen. Alan Cranston 3 percent. In a Gallup poll taken over a three
day period in early December, Glenn
won over President Ronald Reagan,
54 percent to 39 percent, with 7 percent undecided. Mondale also
defeated Reagan, 52 percent to 40 percent, with 8 percent undecided. Over
1,100 Republicans, Democrats and Independent pollsters were surveyed.
· The polling results do not alarm
Glenn, -who believes he started campaigning "where he should start, not a
four-year campaign." ·
"In the general population polls
where I'm matched head to head
against Reagan, I've been consistently far ahead," Glenn said, "but when
I'm matched against Democrats, I've
consistently run behind. I hope to
"Our nation established education
for everybody. We need higher
education to develop students and
break-through type research."
overcome that in time."
Glenn used the word "opportunity"
several times during his speech, and
the crowd applauded and cheered
when he attacked Reagan's policies.
"The policies of the Reagan Administration aren't expanding opportunities, they're eroding them.
They aren't inspiring confidence,
they're destroying it. And they aren't
promoting excellence--they're
discouraging it.
Review photos by Pim Von Hemmen
"Last year the United States
graduated 63,()(){) engineers that's a lot of engineers - but
Japan, with half of ourpopulation,
graduated 87,()(){)."
"In this country, the sky is not the
limit-so don't tell me America can't
rise above the depths of this recession. Given the right leadership, I say
our people can still out-work, outinvent, out-produce and out-compete
anyone on the face of this planet.''
Glenn also attacked Reagan's
.budget deficit of $200 billion. "In
every hour of every day since the
Reagan Administration assumed office," he said, over 200 people have
lost their jobs.
"If the President really believes his
program is working," Glenn said emphatically, "let him talk to an
American who isn't."
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P~ 4 •
THE REVIEW • April15, 1983
Faculty hiring process analyzed
SUMMER JOBS
YMCA Camp Tockwogh, Co-ed Resident Camp on
Chesapeake Bay, June 15- Aug. 27. Openings for:
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and takes part in an open
seminar that is set ·up for
him," Gaudy said.
"The people involved with
the seminar (faculty, dean,
and department chairperson)
evaluate the applicant after
the seminar is over.''
Mter the evaluations are
completed, the hiring committee IJleets and makes a
final decision.
'"Mter we have made a
separate judgment, we ask
ourselves 'Do we want to hire
this person? Would this person make a good addition to
the faculty?' We then get
together and agree on a
salary," he said.
The applicant is finally
recommended to the Provost
for final approval.
Gaudy said the engineering
faculty consists of people
hired from different fields.
"We just hired several people. One was from industry,
one was from the consulting
field and two were hired right
out of school."
Acting English department
chairn1an Dr. Philip Flynn
explained the hiring process
of the department.
"We first have a conference
with the dean and then we
check with affirn1ative action
and ask for their advice," he
said .
"Applicants ar.e asked to
send in a dossier, which we
evaluate. We meet with the
applicants at the Modern
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by Ken Murray
proved by the department
In wake of the current in- chairperson, cover very
terest in Dr. Paul Crafton, the specific teaching
"mystery professor" who assignments, such as
taught at the university, one teaching one semester of a
may wonder about the hiring particular course," he added.
Dr. Anthony Gaudy, chairprocedure here.
According to John Murray, man of the department of
director of continuing educa- civil engineering said the hirtion, the hiring process for ing p~ocess for his depart- .
teaching faculty is similar in
each college of the university.
"Most of the colleges follow ~~ candidate must have a
the same procedure, although Ph.D.,
burning
they do have certain infor the see/ring of new
dividual criteria," he said.
Murray explained the basic lmowledge and they have
hiring process for teaching
to
to work with
faculty.
Mter an applicant presents students." - Dr. Anthony
his credentials, a committee
including the department Gaudy.
chairperson is forn1ed to
review them, he explained. ment is "probably the same
"Once a person is approved as all the other departments.
at the department level, a
"If we have an open posicontract is written up and • tion, we decid~ what type of
agreed upon."
expertise we need and then a
Murray said the recom- decision is approved."
mendation then goes to the
Gaudy said an applicant for
dean of the college for ap- a teaching position must meet
proval and finally to Provost certain requirements.
L. Leon Campbell, who
"A candidate must have a
makes the final decision.
Ph.D., a burning interest for
Part-time or off-campus in- the seeking of new knowledge
structors are not hired the and they have to want to work
same way, Murray said.
with students," he said.
"Off-campus instructors
"When we hire, we look at
(Paul Crafton was one) are academic potential, the applinot faculty members. They cant's thesis and recommenare offered a supplemental dation by senior people who
contract (S-contract). In have aided in the educational
general, they have other process of (the applicant).
jobs," he said.
"An applicant comes to the
"S-contracts, which are ap- university for an entire day
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WHEN: April20, 1983
1:00 P.M. til3:30 P.M.
WHERE:- Rodney Rm., Student Center
-------------~----------------1
•
April15, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 5
Something's Happening
Friday
SEMIFORMAL Spring Barn
Raising Semiformal. Stone Barn, K~n­
nett Square, Pa. 6 a.m. to 1 p.m .. Sponsored by the Agriculture College
Council and Alpha Zeta. Tickets
available in 114. Ag Hall.
MEETING - UCA Meeting. 3 p.m.
Daugherty Hall. Sponsored by the
University Commuter Association.
FESTIVAL - 11th Black Arts
Festivl!l. 5tQ Annual Talent _Show. _7:15
p.m. Amy E. du PC?nt Music Building.
Mter Party. 11 p.m.- 3 p.m. Daugherty Hall. Sponsored by the Black Arts
Festival and the Minority Center. Cost
$2- 'fafeni show. S2.. S3 for both.
MEETING - Lesbian Rap. 8-10
p.m. Daugherty Hall, upstairs in the
study lounge. Sponsored by G.L.S.U.
PLAY - "Two Bottles of Relish"
and "The Wax Museum," two one-act
plays. 8:15 and 10:30 p.m. 014 Mitchell
Hall. Sponsoredby E52 Theatre
Group.
SUB 'SALE - Alpha Omicron Pi
Pledge Sub Sale. Noon delivery on
Saturday. Orders takim at Rodney
Dining Hall and Student Center.
Thursday and Friday 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Sponsored by Alpha Omicron Pi
Pledges. Bring $2.
MEETING - General Meeting.
Noon. R.A.S.A. Lounge, Daugherty
Hall. Sponsored by the Returning
Adult Student Association.
SEMINAR - "Remote Sensing of
Marsh Productivity." with Michael
Hardsky. Noon, 203 Robinson Hall.
Sponsored by Marine Studies. Free
and open to the public.
SEMINAR - "Fundamentals of
Direct Filtration in Portable Water
Treatment," with Dr. James Edzwald. 2 p.m. 340 DuPont Hall. Sponsored by Civil and Environmental
Engineering. Free and open to the
public.
SEMINAR- "NMR Can be Used to
Look at Proteins that Regulate Gene
Expression," with Ponzy Lu. 4 p.m.
203 Drake Hall. Sponsored by University of Pennsylvania and the
Chemistry department. Free and open
to the public.
FILM - "VictorNictoria." 140
Smith Hall. 7, 9:30p.m., and midnight.
$1 withi.D.
GATHERING Area Campus
Gathering. 7 to 9 p.m. Ewing Room,
Student Center (East Campus),
Honors Center (West Campus). Sponsored by the InterVarsity Christian
Fellowship. All Welcome.
RECEPTION International
Friendship Reception. 1:30 to 3:30
p.m. Collins Room, Student Center.
Sponsored by the InterVarsity Chris. tian Fellowship. All Welcome. Come
and join us!
Saturday
MEETING- Skydiving meeting. 12
p.m. 12 Prospect Ave. (By the Pencader stairs) Sponsored by Chris
Poulovin.
BEACH PARTY- N.C.E.A. Beach
party. 9 p.m..to 1 a.m. Pencader Commons III. Sponsored by N.C.E.A.
Refreshments served. Two J.D.'s required. North Campus only.
CONCERT - Delaware Brass, the
university's brass quintet. 8 p.m.
Loudis Recital Hall, Amy E. du Pont
Music Building. Sponsored by Department of Music.
FESTIVAL - Black Arts Festival
Children's hour. "The Bewitched
Tree," performed by the Wonderland
Puppet Theatre. Bacchus, Student
Center.! p.m. Free and open.
FILM- "Rocky.'' 140 Smith Hall, 7
p.m., 9:30 p.m. and midnight. $1 with
I.D.
PLAY- Black Arts Festival Program. "And Still I Rise," presented by
the Avante Theatre Company of
Philadelphia. Bacchus, Student
Center. 8 p.m. Free and open to the
public.
PLAY - "Two Bottles of Relish"
and "The Wax MuseUm." Two one-act
plays. 8:15 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. 014
Mitchell Hall. Sponsored by E-52
Theatre Group.
·Sunday
MEETING - "University Chapel
Service.'' Newark United Methodist
Church. 7:30p.m.
MEETING- "Student Fellowship
Gathering." Newark United
Methodist Church Lounge. 8:30p.m.
MEAL - "Sunday Feast." 168
Elkton Rd., Newark, Del. 6:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Bhakti-yoga Club. Dancing, singing, vegetarian feast, and a
lecture on reincarnation and the
origins of spiritual love.
MEAL - "College Dinner." St.
Thomas Church. Service, 5:30 p.m.
Dinner, 6 p.m. All students welcome.
$1 donation.
RECITAL - Soprano Jacqueline
Beach Faulcon, with Dr. Clarence A.
Faulcon III. Loudis Recital Hall, Amy
E. du Pont Music Building. 3 p.m.
Sponsored by the department of music
and Wilmington Music School. Free
and open to the public.
FILM - "8'h.'' 100 Kirkbride Lecture Hall. 7:30p.m. Free with I.D.
Monday
WORKSHOP "Term Paper
Workshop.'' Morris Library Lecture
Room. 7 p.m. to 8:30p.m Sponsored by
the Writing Center and Library
Reference Department.
.
PROGRAM - "Death and Dying.''
German House, 183 West Main Street.
7:30 p.m. Sponsored by the German
House.
COLLOQUIUM - "The Saturation
Effect in Large-Scale Software
Development:. Its Impact and Control." 116 Purnell Hall. 4 p.m. Sponsored by the Computer and Information Sciences. Refreshments will be
served at 3:30p.m.
SPEAKERS-- "The AIAW-NCAA
Anti-Trust Suit." ·Ewing Room, Student Center. 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by
the College of Physical Education,
Athletics and Recreation, the University Visiting Scholars and Speakers
Subcommittee and the Office of
Women's Affairs.
COLLOQUIUM - -"Plasticity of
Visual Pathway during Learning.'' 061
McKinly Lab. 4 p.m. Sponsored by the
Institute for Neuroscience and
Behavior. Refreshments will be served prior to the colloquium.
And ...
FILM "Officer and a
Gentleman.'' 7:15p.m. and 9:30p.m.
Friday through Monday. Castle Mall.
FILM - "The Trenchcoat.'' 7:30
p.m. and 9:30p.m. Friday, Saturday
through Monday. Castle Mall.
FILM- "Gandhi." 7:30p.m. Friday through Monday. Chestnut Hill
Theatre.
FILM- "Joystick.'' 7:30p.m. and
9:10 p.m. Friday through Monday.
Chestnut Hill Theatre.
FILM.- "Lords of Discipline.'' 7:15
p.m. and 9:30 p.m Friday through
Monday. 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
New Castle Square.
FILM- "48 Hours.'' 7:30 p.m. and
9:30 p.m. Friday through Monday. 1
p.m. Saturday and Sunday. New Castle Square.
FILM - "The Outsiders." 7 p.m.
and 9:10 p.m . Friday through Monday. Christiana Mall Cinema.
FILM - "Max Dugan Returns.''
7:15p.m and 9:20p.m. Friday through
Monday. Christiana Mall Cinema.
FILM - "E.T." 7 p.m. and 9:30
p.m. Friday through Monday. Christiana Mall Cinema.
FILM- " Harold and Maude." 9:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday. State
Theatre.
FILM- "King of Hearts" 7:30p.m.
Friday and Saturday. State Theatre.
FILM - " Ciao Manhattan" 7:30
p.m. and 9:30 p.m . Sunday. State
Theatre.
Retrospects
Scientists give up on Viking lander
Engineers' efforts to re-establish contact
with the Viking I lander at the Jet Propulsion
Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. were stopped
on Tuesday, according to the engineers working on the project.
The lander, that has been sending signals to
Earth from the surface of Mars since 1976,
mysteriously stopped in November. At that
time a spokesman for the labocatory said
engineers were "fairly confident" that the
communications could be resumed but they
have not been able to do so.
Molester chased off by teen hero
A 14-year-old junior high school student was
presented, Monday, with the Delaware
Heroism and Bravery Award for coming to
the rescue of a 13-year-old girl who was being
molested by a stranger on March 18.
Gov. duPont presented the award to Danny
Farley, an eighth grader at St. Helena's
School, according to Robert W. Perkins, the
governor's spokesrp.an.
Police said at about 8 a.m. March 18, as
Danny waited for a -school bus on Haines
Avenue near Gov. Printz Boulevard, a man
walked up to a nearby girl and grabbed her.
The girl, whose name was not released,
screamed for help, as Danny ran over and
began to punch and kick the man attacking
her.
"Everything }lappened sort of fast," said
Danny: ''He let" her go and picked up his
glasses from the ground and took off."
Police said Tuesday they have classified the
incident as a sexual assault adding that the attacker has not been found.
Since the incident, Danny said, the students
"are a little bit more aware," and now wait
for the bus in groups of four or more.
James J. Farley Sr., Danny's father, a
technician for Delmarva Power and Light Co.,
said that Farley's late grandfather, James W.
Farley, a Wilmington. Police officer, "would
have been very proud" of his grandson for getting involved.
Watt fears U.S. Christian persecution
The possibility of a second Holocaust makes
Interior Secretary James Watt fearful, according to the Associated Press.
Watt and his wife, who are both evangelical
Christians, have personally experienced
much hatred and persecution, he said.
"There is the threat of the seeds of the
Holocaust-type mentality here in America,"
Watt said in an interview conducted recently.
The media_and special interest groups are
responsible for much of the persecution.
"(This) makes us all the more aware of
fighting continually for political liberty and
(spiritual) freedom," he said.
Man gets job through president
A Washington County Pa. ex-steelworker,
with the help of President Reagan, has
found a job after being unemployed for a year.
Ron Bricker, 39, said that he was interviewed by Radio Shack on Friday an<;!. completed a
computer test and personality exam on Tuesday, according to the Associated Press.
He said he was "99 percent hopeful" of getting
a job.' •
/
Last Tue$day, in "sheer desperation,''
Bricker 'handed his resume to Reagan, who
was touring a school that retrains factory
workers to work with computers.
Reagan called Bricker on Thursday and offered him a tip on an available position at
Radio Shack.
Bricker was seeking a position as a field ser-:..
vice representative. The job pays a starting
salary of $6.50 per hour for fixing computers
on location.
Bricker was notified of Radio Shack's
decision on Wednesday.
ATTENTION
UNDERGRADUATES.
This spring or fall are you planning to travel
somewhere in the United States tor the purpose of:
-job interviews?
-graduate school interviews?
YOU ARE IN LUCK! Through the generosity
of our Delaware alumni, you have the opportunity to enjoy overnight accommodations
plus breakfast for FREE.
Some of the 60 plus areas with alumni hosts
include: Atlanta, Florida, Houston, Dallas,
Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego,
Chicago, New York City, Boston, Detroit.
Stop by the Alumni Office and ask for information on the HOME HOSPITALITY PROGRA~.
Alumni Office: up from Rhodes Drug Store, on
t::..M:i: ~r:e:(:3~-:3~1: __ • • _____il
Page 6 • THE REVIEW • April 15, 1983
-----editoriai---~-------------
1~1/E~lor.
Raise it to 21
It's getting to the point where an 18-yearold can't buy himself a beer on the East Coast
-· and for good reason. The great experiment
is over, and legislators have reluctantly come
to the conclusion that wl'tile an 18-year-old old
may be old enough to vote, he is still too
y011ng to drink.
Drinking -- responsible drinking, that is -takes a certain maturity not generally present
in a teenager's personality, and while it can
be argued that it takes time to learn the art of
responsible social drinking, it cannot be
denied that an older, mature person is more
capable of learning that art.
Delaware is now surrounded by states with
drinking ages older than her own. New
Jersey, Maryland and Pennsylvania all
observe a legal age of 21 years, one more
than Delaware's 20. The discrepancy is likely
to attract underage natives from oilr
neighboring states to visit Delaware gin mills
to quench their thirsts ; after loading up, these
young men and women will hit the highways
and zip back to their home states making
roads dangerous both to themselves and in·
nocent sober drivers and their families .
This state didn't create the stiffest drunk
driving laws in the nation in order to utilize
those penalties; no, the regulations were
passed in order to keep drinking drivers off
Wrtl\\\OU>\\1& ~ \M\E.R€ST
AWD 1>\VICE.ND lNCDME/
I
the road. In accordance with this thinking, it
would be in the First State's best interests to
raise the legal drinking age to that of surrounding states.
·
Teen-agers will always be able to obtain
booze; whether in high school or in College,
underage drinkers in every state of the union ·
can get their . hands on more than adequate
quantities of alcohol through friends,
relatives or false identification. Increasing the
drinking age, however, should keep these
drinkers out of bars and their prevailing atmosphere of unlimited drinks and keep them,
one would hope, at home where they are less .
likely to cause damage to themselves or
others.
The death of a middle aged man on Elkton
Road last weekend serves as an all too tragic
example of what can happen when younger
drinkers jump on the highways to test the
watering holes in a neighboring state. As the
two young men sped back to Maryland they
swung across the center divider, struck an oncoming car head-on and spun off the road .
The two headed for Maryland were treated
for minor cuts and bruises; the other car's
driver, however, died, and his wife wa~
treated for broken ribs before being released ·
from the hospital .
Need we say more?
T.S.N .
iMT MONEY \S OWEr>
To 1\\f. 60VERNME:NT
f\L'KEf-..DY- l1 S NOf A
~EW
iA.X
'
\
~~~~~~~~letters~~~~~~~~
Evaluating Reagan's record
To the editor:
have which is just a sharing Reagan program they found
In 1980, a majority of the of scarcity ... " But the truth is that each household with invoters elected Ronald that since Reagan took office, comes below $10,000 a year
Reagan on his promise to im- he has succeeded not only in lost $320, while households
plement supply-side decreasing real GNP (which with annual incomes over
economics to stop the reces- normally increases over the $80,000 gained an average of
sion and help spark a previous year) but also in $14,200 each.
recovery. Because the Presi- distriputing the largest part
In early 1981, Reagan also
dent said that his plan would of the small GNP to a wealthy said, " We can leave our
take time, the people watched few.
children with an unrepayable
as one policy after another
Last year real GNP declin- massive debt and a shattered
was passed through Con- ed 1.8% from the 1981 economy or we can leave
gress. Now that Reagan's average. This was the U.S. them liberty in a land where
economic predictions have economy's worst per- every individual has the opturned into mere hopes for formance in 36 years. Since portunity to be whatever God
the future, we know now that some, but far from all, of this intended us to be. All it takes
we must oppose this bad performance can be at- is a little common sense .... "
downward trend.
tributed to the already This is a really nice, idealistic
In the president's report to receding economy inherited statement but unfortunately
the nation on Feb. 5, 1981 he Budget Office provides Reagan's program has left us
stated that "Our aim is to in- another statistic which with both a massive debt and
crease our national wealth so makes Reagan's intentions very little opportunity for
all will have more, not just and progress much clearer. many low and middle income
redistribute wh~t we already . In the first two rounds of the people in this country.
Reagan's promises are now
turning into shades of bitter
reality. The 1984 budget
deficit is projected at $189
billion compared to his
U,ltU .
Center, University of Delaware
September, 1981 projection of
Tobias Naegele
$0 billion. He has also managEditor-in-Chief
ed to cut 01: dissolve almost
Kim
Keiser
Dove Hamill
every social program that
Business Manager
Manag ing Editor
provides opportunity for adCyrus M. Brinn
Pim Von Kemmen
laura Likely
vancement in today's society.
Executive Editor
Advertising Director
Editorial Page Editor
Among these cut programs is
. . Bill Everhart , Jeanoo Leahy,
News Editors .. . .. . ..·. • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ . ... .
financial aid for education
Donna Stachecki , Kathleen Qu inn
which hits college students
Feotur.e s Editor .. . ............... . . . ......... . ........ . ..................... Virginia Rossetti
Sports Editor ...........•• . . . .. . ..•........ . •........ .. . .. .......... . .. . ..... Karyn Soraga
the hardest.
Photo Editor . . ............. . . . . ... . .......... . . . .... . .................
Bifl Wood , Jr.
It is hard for me to undersCopy Editors ..... .. .. , . . .......... . ............. ... .. ............ Garry George , Ke'n Murray,
Dennis Sandusky
tand Reagan's common sense
Assistant Features Editors .......•..... . .. .. ••. ·.. . ... • , •• . ..... Clare Brown , Marlo Oufendach
if he thinks that he can mainAssistant Sports Editors . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . ... . •
. ... Jim lanzalotto, Andy West .
tain opportunity for all while
Assistant Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • • . . . . . . . . . . . ... ~ ........ Oon Piper
Assistant Business Manager. . . . . . . . .
. . . . ...• . · " • ........................ Julie Sterner
opposing education, training
Assistant Advertising Director ...... .. ...... . .. ....... . .. . ................... . .... . Scott Currie
and jobs programs and now
Contributing Editors . . . . . . . . ..... ..., ....... .. ~ .. . .... .. . ., . • .... . . Jim Hugh~s . Casey Gilmo~e.
Scott l . Manners
that there is little doubt that
... C.S. Wayne
Illustrator
.. . ....•. .. . . . . . , •••.. . ....• • . . ..
the economy is getting better
M
khelle
Mod~nabeit•
a
Advertising Art . . . . . . . . .....
the question remains: For
StnH Writ•rs ..... . ......... .............................. Chris Goldberg, lizanne Sobolesky:t
Sheila Saints, AI Kemp , lort Hill
whom is it getting better; the
Published twice weekly during the academic year and once weekly dunng Winter session by the
rich few or the majority of the
student body of the University of Delaware , Newark , Delaware , 19711.
people?
Editorial and business office at 1-1 Student Center . Phone 738·2771. 738-2772, 738-2774 . Business
hours 10 a .m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Ken Weinstein BE 85
4 • • • • • • • • • • • • , •• • •.•• • • • • • • • • • ••• •
·
From the Capitol ~~~by Art Buchwald~
No Conflict
I worry about doctors. Not
all doctors. But just the ones
who have investments in
private hospitals. The reason
I worry about them is that
when you're a stockholder in
a hospital you might have a
conflict of interest between
doing what is right for the patient, and what is good for the
corporation.
Dr. Wesley Heights, who
owns a piece of the Kidney
Stone Memorial Hospital, told
me he saw no ethical problem
in a doctor investing his
money in a private hospital.
"Doctors should own
hospitals," he said. "Then
they can personally see that
their patients get the best
treatment money can buy."
"But some people argue," I
said, "that if a doctor has a
financial interest in a medical
facility he may subconsciously hospitalize people, just to
keep the occupancy rate up."
"That's ridiculous," Dr .
Heights said. "I've never put
a patient in Kidney Stone
Memorial unless he absolutely needed to be there. As a
matter of fact, I don't even
put all. my sick people in
Kidney Stone. I send many of
them to the Sisters of Mercy,
which is a nonprofit
hospital."
''How do you decide?''
"It's strictly a medical
decision. If they have a good
health insurance plan, I put
them in Kidney Stone. If they
don't, I find them a bed at
Sisters of Mercy."
"Sisters of Mercy must be
thrilled to get all your in·
digent patients.''
"They probably would like
more who can pay their way,
but Kidney Stone Memorial's
computers are not set up to
handle non-insured patients,
while Sisters of Mercy has
been doing it for years. So I
know when I send a destitute
patient to Sisters he'll get
much better treatment than
he would at Kidney Stone."
"Will Kidney Stone take a
non-insured person?''
"Of course we will if it's a
life or death situation. But as
a profit-making hospital we
owe it to our stockholders to
make sure our loss-per-bed is
held to a minimum. Some
people have accused us of trying to put the nonprofit
hospitals out of business. This
is not true. We need them as
much as they need us."
"If you worr}r about the bottom line and your patient, you
could have a conflict in
medical judgment.''
"The patient always comes
f\rst,'' Dr. Heights said angrily. "I don't know one doctor
at Kidney Stone who has ever
kept a client there longer than
was absolutely necessary,
unless it was a nice weekend
and no one was waiting for
the bed."
(c) 1983, Los Angeles Times
Syndicate
April15, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 7
~~AreYouKiddingMe?
byCaseyGilmore~~ ~OutThere,NotHere
Gorsuch, Watt, and Adelman
This nascent spring
weather is making me so lazy
that I wanted to throw
together a column on
something -which would be
easy to write and not too taxing on my overworked brain.
The answer soon became obvious- Reagan.
Criticizing Reagan is, for
me, a cathartic delight after
watching with frustration and
incredulity the daily unfolding drama of the Reagan
administration. No soap
opera comes near the present
White House for scandal, intrigue and abuse of power.
l3efore I get started, I'll
concede the man's record on
promises is great. He cut
taxes, interest rates are
down, social spending is
down, defense spending uphe's a very successful presi-
l've never greatly
respected Reagan but, as I
learn more about the pettple he selected to run this
great nation of ours, my
opinion ofhim continues to
erode. There's a definite,
sinister pattern in his appointment of top of11
~· .:.. r,
J.1CUW)
... "
dent, at least by these
measures.
I've never greatly
respected Reagan but, as I
learn more about the people
he selected to run this great
nation of ours, my opinion of
him continues to erode.
There's a definite, sinister
pattern in his appointment of
top officials ·which shatters
some of my basic illusions of
what good government is all
about.
The first notorious example
of Reagan's failing the public
trust to gain wide attention
was Secretary of the Interior
James Watt. Watt has done
for t,he Department of the Interior what Phyllis Schafly
did for the ERA. With the zeal
of an evangelist among a
pack of heathens, Watt took
over the Interior _Department
with a mission. His mission
was to destroy the carefully
garnered trust of public lands
and wildernesses which environmentalists had long
fought to preserve in a
pristine, unadulterated state.
Watt offered coastlines,
rangelands, forests and
various other natural
resources to anyone with a
drill, axe or shovel, and a
healthy American interest in
private enterprise. I'm
reminded of a ballad by the
Eagles: "Some rich man
came and raped the
land/Nobody caught him/Put
up a bunch of ugly boxes/And
Jesus people bought 'em."
Essentially, Watt has taken
what belonged to the
American people and sold it
for a Qiminished, short-term
gain, neglecting the people's
long-term interest in it.
And then there's the recent
debacle at the Environmental
Protection Agency. Since the
utilitarian aims of the body
are also not in tune with the
Reagan money making ethic,
he saw to it that it would be
rendered ineffectual, if not
harmfully counterproductive,
by appointing incompetent officials who were sympathetic
to private industry. I was
stupefied by Reagan's continued support of ex-agency
bead Anne Gorsuch and
upheld her "splendid
record," even after the noxious waste hit the fan, so to
speak. He said he was sorry
to let her go. What does this
say about this man's commitment to keeping our environment habitable?
Reagan is apparently not
too worried about making the
earth habitable either, as his
nomination of Kenneth
Adelman to be chief nuclear
arms negotiator has proven.
While our unsettled European
allies are begging us for
serious arms negotiations,
Reagan throws this young
whippersnapper at the Senate
for confirmation.
Here's what the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
thought of Mr. Adelman,
whose appointment is being
voted on this week: "His interest in arms control was
revealed to be more general
control issues limited, his
background in 20 years
history of negotiations
shallow, his approach
political rather than substantive," and yet Reagan continues to muscle doubting
Republican senators into supporting him.
A "hit list" was made
public in which Edward L.
Rowny, the chief strategic
arms negotiator, Adelman
and others in the arms
regulating field, listed people
who must be kept away from
the talks in Geneva. The list
inNudes Democrats and
Republicans alike who have
shown progressive views on
byScottManners~
Don't Read This!
The clamps of spring are tightening, finals are becoming
a frightful premonition of dark despondency, there's too
much to do and riot enough caffeine, the Review office is
emptying, and I've a column to write. Unfortunately, I
haven't a topic with which to fill this fifteen inch grave. So
instead of pretending to have something to write about and
masturbating with a skeleton of futile adjectives (catch
that?), I've decided to mention a few things that never
seemed to warrant an entire column. This could get bleak,
so remember, classifieds start on page 15.
arms control and are too willing to compromise. Just goes
to show how much we can expect from our present arms
negotiating team.
Anyone concerned with
defense strategy must be .
dismayed with Reagan's
choices for the top slots in the
* * *
defense department and the
Prison
officials
in
Selma,
Albama have concluded that it
arms negotiations. They were
costs more to prepare food on tlie premises than to order
picked from an alarmist
group called the Committee . out. The prisoners in Selma start every morning with an
Egg McMuffin. Now I'd be the first to argue in favor of a
on the Present Danger, whose
convicts inalienable right to fast food. Especially
motto could well be "Arm,
McDonalds. What I'd like to know is why the university
arm, for God's sake arm."
can't do the same thing. I know my morning would begin
Their selection was a bad sign
much more brightly if I saw a golden arch atop the Student
Center.
* * *
~~ 1hit list' was made
Still there? Didn't think so. Sometime last semester there
public in which Edward L. was a semi-controversy (or what in a political hotbed like
Rawny, the chief strategic Newark could be called a semi-controversy) about students
being ticketted by Newark police for not walking on the
negotiator, Adelman sidewalks.
God, there was even a' letter in the Review about
and others in the· anns it. Anyway, there was a fine involved and the Newark
Police seemed poised to make the sidewalks full again.
regulating field, listing First,
I wonder if anyone ever paid those fines, and second,
people who must be kept has the "problem" been solved? I suppose the last solution
the "problem" was the construction of the Habitrail. Is
away from the talks in to
the City of Newark planning another Habitrail with the
Geneva. The list includes jaywalking fines, if any, that were collected? Who cares
anyway?
arms
Democrats and
Republicans alike who
have shown progressive
views on arms control. .. "
for our panicky European
friends and for anyone wbo
takes arms control seriously,
something which I think none
of us can afford not to do.
The pattern through these
three areas Of governmental
regulation is, if R~agan
doesn't like the aim of one of
these departments, he undermines their efforts by appointing people who are also opposed to the agency's work. I
guess it's too much to ask for ·
a president to rise above his
partisan concerns to let alone
the workings of these
established bodies, so I won't.
These departments and
their bureaucracies have been
built up over a long tim~ in a
logical way to best handle the
work they were set up to do.
Someone like Watt comes in
with a different idea of what
their work should be so he
reorders the .carefully structured department to make it
ineffectual and unable to con{Contlnued to page I)
*
*
*
On the subject of walking the streets (this can't get any
worse), at the corner of South College and Park Place there
are six sullen signs to direct unsuspecting pedestrians to
walk or don't walk. As of tonight only four of them were lit
up, but that's not the point (if there is a point). All of the
signs permanently read don't walk. I found this out
firsthand during the jaywalking scandal. I was afraid of
getting arrested for crossing illegally, so I stood for fifteen
minutes before deciding .to sprint innocently across the
pavement. The signs still say don't walk.
* * *
Lastly (heavy sigh), graduation is slithering towards us,
and as one of the soon-to-be-unemployed, I feel obliged to
ask yet more useless rhetorical questions. In order to _
receive a diploma, would-be graduates are required to pay
a $10 fee as an application for degree. I realize that $10 is
nearly insignificant compared to the thousands of dollars
already spent on a university education, but couldn't the
university have given students a solitary break? Couldn't
we have been allowed the rose-colored image of E.A. Trabant throwing his head back with a smile saying, "Oh, and
that diploma, kid, it's on me. 11 '?
Page 8 • THE REVIEW • April15, 1983
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~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
....faculty hiring process explained
university does not have set
quotas for women and minority faculty positions.
"There are no such things
as quotas here," he said. "We
set goals. A goal is something
mutually agreed upon that is
established by a compliance
agency (the Office of Civil
Rights of the U.S. Department of Education) and the
university. You set your goals
based upon the availibility
"Delaware was one of the pools and the number of jobs
first schools to have the available."
Institutions are required to
plan accepted... I feel that set quotas when they have
found in non-c~mpliance
we have tailored to the ·been
in courts, he said.
needs of women and Ahmed mentioned otheruniversities, such as the
blacks." - Muhammed University
of Minnesota and
Ahmed
the University of California at
Berkley that have been found
"An in-depth interview is in non-compliance. These mmade and we come to a deci- stitutions were required to set
sion," Flynn explained. " We hiring quotas for women and
minorities, he said.
offer the first choice a job.''
"Delaware was one of the
Flynn added that serious
attention is paid to black and first schools to have the
(goal) plan accepted, he said.
women candidates.
According to Muhammed " I feel that we have tailored
Ahmed, university coor- to the needs of women and
dinator of Affirmative Action,
women constitute 21 to 25 percent of the teaching faculty,
blacks make up two to five
percent, and the combined
(Continued from ...... 7)
percentage of women and tinue its work.
blacks is 25 to 28 percent.
Since these departments
According to Ahmed, the were set up with specific
'~"""' ...... 4)
Language Association Conference, held after Christmas
each year," he said.
Flynn said the next step is
to choose the four or five best
dossiers. The department offers the applicants the chance
to prove themselves by allowing them to teach a class,
usually during winter session.
blacks."
Search committees meet
with Aluned at the beginning
of each hiring process for
teaching faculty.
"I give input to what kind of
questions they should ask the
applicant," he said.
Ahmed said he is pleased
with the situation of Af-
We still have a long way
go. We're still trying to
recruit more women and
blacks." - Muhammed
Ahmed
11
to
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;:;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;:.
firmative Action at the
university.
" I have complete confidence from the president
and the provost. We still have
a long way to go. We're still
trying to recruit more women
and blacks," he said.
" You have to have day-today support from the president and the provost. There is
no problem whatsoever."
...railing against Reagan
Tuesday, June 7 thru
Saturday, June 18, 1983
Eves. at 8 PM; Wed . & Sat.
Mats. at 2 PM; Sun. at 3 PM
aims- protecting our land,
our environment and our
future--! don't think the
choice of their leaders should
be left to partisan whim.
What hope is there of a stable
department if its reason for
existing changes every four
years? The executive should
have input, veto and review
powers over the agencies but
their leader ·should be chosen
from within, since the agency's members know best who
is competent in running their
operation.
~111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111~
IDue to Prin- !
I
Error in !
, I Margheritas I
I coupon of I
I April12, the
coupon was I
I onlygood I
I from April I
I 12th to 14th,I
~~ ting
I
The International Musical Hit
DATES &PRICES
ORCH.
Mon. thru Thurs . Eves. $30.00
and Sun. Mat.
~
BALC.
$30-29.00 $22.00
Wed . & Sat. Mats.
$25.00
$25- 24.00 $17.00
Fr:. & Sat. Eves.
$35.00
$35-34.00 $27.00
A SUBSCRIPTION
SELECTION
Make checks payable to thP. PLAYHOUSE
THEATRE. Please enclose a stamped. sell-
addressed envelope for return of tickets;
otherw1se held at the Box Office V1sa,
Mastercard and WSFS cards accepted. NO
REFUNDS, but tickets may be exchanged.
.__ _ _ (302) 656-4401 FOR RESERVATIONS __ _ _..
§
I
! NOT GOOD!
I THIS I
I WEEKEND. I
~1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111~
r
Few students call co]1gressmen
by Marla Hirshman
" Disappointing."
That's the way Chris Christie, lobby chairman for the Delaware Undergraduate Student
Congress (DUSC) described Wednesday's turnout for DUSC's " Call Your Congressman
Day. "
" It was goddamned terrible," Christie said
_of the 41 person turnout during the six hours
the DUSC office wa& open. Last year, the program yielded 150 calls, and a similar response
had been hoped for this time, he said.
Students were given the opportunity to call
their senators from the DUSC office between
the hours of 10 a .m. and 4 p.m. to discuss
financial aid. Members of the lobby committee manned the office to aid the students in
placing calls.
The purpose of the program, according to
Christie, was " to make it as easy as possible
for students to have their presence .felt on
Capitol Hill."
·
Christie was at a loss to explain the lack of
participation. "I think the program is worth
continuing-perhaps we need to examine our
April 15, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 9
~
publicity." He said the nice weather may have
been a factor, since people remained outside.
Also, the fact that financial aid has received
less press coverage this year may have contributed to the bad turnout.
·
DUSC President Rich Mroz stressed the
value of student involvement in projects such
as this. " It shows our representatives that we
are serious about our problems," he said,
"We're making a stand in a sophisticated
manner that shows we know our subject."
Christie said a letter is a more effective lobby form than an individu~l phone call because
it requires more effort. However, he pointed
out that often students do not have the time to
draft a letter, so this program offers the opportunity to make a contribution in a way that
is quick, cost-free and simple. A prepared
statement was even available for those who
needed it.
The calls were taken by aides rather than
the legislators themselves. Christie said
specialized aides may know more about
educational issues at any one time than the actual members of Congress.
\;
medical center
birth
control
counseling
by Jeanne Jarvis
"Hell yes!" is RA Jennifer
Drayton's answer to the question of the existence of racism
at the university. To prove
her point and present day to
day experiences faced by ·
black students, she uses a
video program titled "Black
Sociodrama Project." The
video was shown on north
campus earlier this week.
Ignoring blacks at dorm
meetings, the close
scrutinization of blacks when
they are_entering university
facilities, and the lack of
tolerance of black music on
dorm floors, were examples
of the skits presented in the
video. "These are all true incidents that happen on a daily
basis," Drayton said. The
program was put together as
a project of the Difference
Committee in Residence Life.
" When black students talk in
a group they realize that it is
more than just a personal
abortion
facility
Phil~ph;.
DeKALB PIKE AND BORO LINE ROAD
KING OF PRl,ISSIA. PA 19408
LESBIAN - GAY
AWARENESS WEEK
April17-23
sunday
monday
Picnic. Volleyball, refreshments. Carpenter State Park, Rt.
896 north of Newark. Picnic begins at noon, volleyball game
at2:00p.m. •
tuesday
wednes.
thursday
friday
Parents of Gays. This Philadelphia-based group will give in·
sights into having sons and daughters who are gay. Also In
the Rodney Room of the Student Center. 7:30p.m.
Barbara Gittings, longtime lesbian activist and author.
Topic: " lesbian and Gay Heritage; A Personal Perspective." Rodney Room, University of Delaware Student
Center, Academy Street, Newark. 7:30p.m.
Movie; The Word Is Out. Gays and lesbian paint a human
portrait in interviews. State Theatre .. 39 E. Main Street.
thing, and lt is just over- preconceived notions and
Newark. Sponsored by the State Theatre. 8:00 p.m.
whelming. We want to bring stereotypes, how the small
)ltovie; Pink Triangles. Contemporary documentary on gays
an awareness to the issue by black population has an imand homophobia. Refreshments. WUIIamson Room, University Student Center. 7:30p.m.
initiating thoughts in some pact on blacks not being
Concert; Jahrusalamb. Great reggae band and a Delaware
people's heads and bringing it heard, and whether people
favorite. Bacchus coffeehouse, University Student Center.
to their attention."
are afraid, unaware or they
Doors and bar/refreshments open at 8:30, concert begins at
"The tape acts as a catalyst 1 just don't care. Also, the idea
9:30p.m . Tickets $2.50 each.
to discussion," said Jean of blacks being seen as a
Day Trip to New York City. leaves University Student
Center at 10:00 a.m., departs from New York at 12:00 mid·
Scott, Chrstiana Towers Hall threat or in a negative way
night. Tickets S 10.00 each. Limited seats.
director, "and it only pin- and being treated as if they
points a few problems. One, is are invisible or like half a
All events open to the public.
dealing with the unknown and human being was also
Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Student Union (302) 738-8066
categorizing people with discussed. The other area
preconceived notions."
discussed was blacks rela"SHARING OUR
One skit dramatizes an inci- tionship with other blacks, for
dent where a black student is instance, when a black RA
PROUD HERITAGE"
questioned by security of- must confront a black student
ficers when entering a
(Continued to page ~o>
residence hall. According to
_6.
~ J~ Jt
~
~
to _I:" ~ ~ _to -~ ~ ..1:1 _r.- ~ -~ -~ -1:'
Karl Mayfield, an RA who .- .,- •
W • •
.- • .- W • • •
•
•
• • • W
assists Drayton in the discussion of the tape, "being black ~
saturday
~=~:~.~.attention that is not
"Topics vary with each
presentation," Drayton said.
" I let people talk and answer
their questions." Sunday
night students discussed
_t
•
/
-~ .
•
J
··················~~···
ELECTIONS . ·~
i
! ~·
*
!
*
* i
~
...* •
SIGN UP FOR ELECTIONS AT THE * 1
DUSC OFFICE
* I
:
106 STUDENT CENTER BY 5:00P.M . . :
*
TUESDAY, APRIL 19th
Jt- J
*~
* I
!
*
!
*
*
~
.,...
*
*
*
outpatient
(215) 265-1880
20 minutn from
.\..
Program-focuses on UD racism
free
early detection
pregnancy 18sting
ATTENTION all candidates for
College Council, University
Commuter Association (UCA),
Resident Student Association
(RSA), and Delaware
U. n d ergra d uate Student C ongress (OUSC) positions:
All candidates must attend a mandatory meeting at 5 :30p .m. on April
19th in the Student Center to discuss
election rules .
;
Attentt•on All Music Lov.ers!
-~
._,
•
J
0 n sun d ay
.-
Apri/17 at 4:00pm
~
~
~
.-
Warner Hall Presents: ~
The Gospel Choir ~ ·
Free and Open
to the Public
~A
I
1
I
J
I
I
* I
~
*
* lJ#I~i(J~IJ~JJ~~ . ~~,~
*••··················~~
:::
...-
:
Page 10 • THE REVIEW • April 15. 1983
•
,..~c1sm
• • • .& a
(Continued from- 9)
because of hall policies,
sometimes loyalties seem
split. "Blacks feel like they
are tom with pressures from
the black community because
of their small numbers."
Scott said she saw the program as developing a sensitivity to blatant and subtle
discrimination.
"I think there is racism
here at the university and I
came (to the program)
because I wanted to know the
extent," said senior Steve
Kelly, "I found out just how
subtle these things can be. I
thought there would be more
people here but it seemed that
just the liberal people are interested."
The program is also used in
RA orientations and training
sessions throughout the year
and is shown in other
residence halls, Drayton explained. Scott said this is one
of several residence life programs dealing with differences being held on north
campus. Others have dealt
with interracial relationships
and gay/lesbian issues.
Drayton said many
students need to change their
attitudes and she hopes this
program is one way of doing
it.
...radio signal affects TV reception
The situation is not unique casting a message every half
to WXDR, Wohl said. Similar hour asking people to call the
Dean of Students Raymond problems have occurred at station if they are experiencEddy said the office of Hous- college stations across the ing any interference proing and Residence Life is country when they have in- blems. Station Manager Cate
looking into putting traps on creased their wattage by such Cowan explained that a 10
all master antennas in the a great arnount.
day testing period is required
university.
by the Federal Communica-1
The station's signal is now tions Commission (FCC) once
According to Wohl, the dif- 100 times stronger than it was a station goes on the air to
ficulties are not confined to before the increase.
judge the impact of the inuniversity residents alone.
"It is a problem the station terference. She added that
Any community member anticipated," Eddy said, " but after this period the station
within a one mile radius of until they went on the air, will continue to make "a conWXDR's transmitter, which there was no way to certed effort" to help the
is on top of the Christiana reasonably know the extent of public deal with the problem.
East Tower, may find their the interference."
reception affected.
WXDR has been broad(Continued from- I)
dSTATEh
•39-E~._.M.,..AIN ST NEWARK ~B-~3-16·1~1
ENDS SAT.
HAROLDand MAUDE
STAIIIIING
RUTH GORDON
BUD CORT
9:30
From the
creator of
"Silver Streak"
and "Foul Pia
plus
"KING OF
HEARTS"
7:30
ANDY
WARHOL
SUPERSTAR
EDIE
SEI)GWICK
7:30
9:30
The
Contest:
The
Rules:
1. Carry-out orders and
Oomind Pizza will award
free, 30 large pizzas and
$50.00 cash for liquid
refreshments to the group
purchasing the most
pizzas starting 4/15 and
running through 4/24.
all deliveries made
from your area's
Domino's Pizza store
will be counted if we
are given your group's
name and address.
2. Any pizza over $10.00
will be counted twice.
3. The winning group:s
name will be published
in the local newspaper.
4. The location and time
of the party will be
convenient to both the
winners and Dominds
Pizza
5. The 30 pizzas will be
2· item pizzas. The
winner will have the
choice of items. The
pizzas do not have to
be the same.
Call us.
366-7630
232 E. Cleveland
Prices do not include
applicable sales tax.
Our drivers carry less
than $10.00.
Umlted delivery area.
01983 Domino'a Pizza. Inc.
How )W liYe may saYe )Wf life.
April 15, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 11
~~~~~etcetera~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bagels and sprouts
Malt Shoppe offers sandwiches for all different tastes
by Nina Patricola
The hungry lunch crowd
shuffles in, invading the
casual atmosphere with a ·
stream of dedicated
customers. A line quickly
forms, but patrons don't mind
waiting for their favorite
Malt Sboppe specialties.
Susan Ambry, owner of The
Malt Shoppe, takes pride in
the popularity of her
business. She believes she has
accomplished her goal of
satisfying the diverse tastes
of Newark.
"I tried to think of things
nobody else was selling on
Main Street," Ambry said.
"She geared the menu
towards health food when the
shop first opened, but now
there are many new additions, she explained.
The variety of food at The
Malt Shoppe is partial · to
sandwiches and bagels. The
selection of sandwiches
ranges from the traditional
ham and cheese to unconventional treats like cream
cheese and olives.
Ambry feels her shop is different from ner competitors
because of its relaxed atmosphere, and because she
"tries to cater to vegetarian
palates."
"My basic interest is in
food and I believe there's ·
nothing else like it," she said.
"I think I offer the best prices
for the product."
The specialties at The Malt
Shoppe are original recipes
created especially for the
shop by Ambry herself. These
specialties include the Shoppe
salad, which consists of let- _
tuce, 'cucumbers, sprouts,
carrots, and green peppers, a
carrot salad made with carrots, raisins, pineapple and
walnuts, and a "veggie" egg
roll. "The specialties are a
conglomeration of things I've
seen," she said.
Aside from the specialties
and sandwiches, The Malt
Shoppe is well-known for its
delicious ice cream. There is
an array of popular flavors
which can be served on cones,
in hot fudge sundaes,
Review photo by Dan Piper
milkshakes or banana splits.
"We try to have specials SCRUMPTIOUS SPECIALTIES abound amidst the informal atmosphere of the Malt Shoppe on
when we're not too busy,"
Ambry said. She said she ~M~a~i_n_S_t_re_e_t~·~~--~----------------~~--~~--~~--------~----~--~~----­
must cater the food according tober are also busy because absence of the students, she man who smoked cigars
to the seasons and finds that students return to school.
relies on the Local Main while scooping ice cream,"
April and May are busy
"I have enough regular Street person n e 1 and she explained. When she
because of the warm weather clien.t ele to make up for the shopkeepers for breakfast, started, "There were no other
and the desire for cool ice students who are away," Am- lunch, or just a snack. During sandwich shops- now there
cream. September and Oc- bry explained. With the the regular term of the school are three just pn Main
year', Ambry said about one Street," she said.
'
third of her customers are
Jeff Beck an employee on
local people and the rest a~e Main Street, has a mixed opistudents.
nion about The Malt Shoppe.
Ambry explained that six "I like the food, especially the
years ago she wa~ walking ice cream because they have
milliseconds in which the fate down Main Street and saw real strawberries, but the atof a person is momentarily The Malt Shoppe (its original mosphere is like a commune.
arrested and ... is controlled, name for ten years) for sale. I feel like Jerry Garcia is goin that instant, by many peo- She decided to buy it right ing to walk in," he said.
ple," Savoy said, summariz- then, despite the fact that she Despite this, he said, "It's the
ing the film's theme.
. h;id no experience il) business only place on Main Street
An orange, chosen ar- at all.
where you can get a decent
bitrarily by Savoy, sym"I bought it from a little old sa~~wich- it's quaint."
bolizes the imminence of
death. Mr. Frank, an old man
who leads a very boring life,
lies on his deathbed. In his
brain exists a cast of writers,
actors and technicians
representing the chemicals in
'TJ:R~I;;;&;:;~~;;~~:J~~~~E::
a particular nerve center who •-LA:....-__........_-'-'-..__,JL.l~~~~~~~Wii
are responsible for producing
With warmer weather ap- Wednesday, The Allstars.
dreams. Realizing Mr. proaching, you know you're
CRABTRAP- Friday, High
Frank's impending expira- bound to put your books back Tops; Saturday, Girlfri~nds;
Greg Savoy
tion, the actors are obligated on the shelf. So why not ven- Sunday, White Lightning;
__________;::_____:______ to give him a "final realiza- ture out this weekend and Tuesday, Crystal Creek.
·
nothings will ultimately do . tion," Savoy explained.
take advantage of the local
REFLECTIONS- Friday
things for the right reasons,
His "boring brain" upstages watering spots and the enter- and Saturday, Chaser.
he said. In other words, peo- itS act durmg "the final tainment they offer? Sounds
HOXTER'S- Friday, E.B.
ple need to be given a chance. realization," in which Mr. ranging ·from the Jack of Hawkins Band plus Shakin'
"Just becau,se you're doing Frank dies. The point, Savoy Diamonds at the Stone Flamingos; Saturday, White
something and someone else said, is that this boring man Balloon to a Grateful Dead Lightning - Grateful Dead
isn't doesn't mean he's who spent most of his time Party at Hoxter's catered by Party. ·
unable to complete the same sleeping had a mind of great White Lightning should not
TALLEY-HO- Friday and
task,'' Savoy said.
potential that never got a be missed.
Saturday, Egdon Heath- $3
Theologically, "The ch~ncetoshine.
DEER PARK- Sunday, cover; Sunday and Monday,
Orange Interlock" portrays
The film exists on three ELQ; Wednesday, Heavenly Witness; Wednesday, Jasper.
people as part of a bigger levels. Level one is reality in Hash.
OSCAR'S- Friday, The Wild
working, Savoy said, but he the present where Mrs. Frank . STONE BALLOON- Friday Cards; Saturday, Jerry
wishes to disguise possible listens to a story told by her and Saturday, Jack of Speace.
religious statements by the husband's friend, a Diamonds- $3 cover; Monday,
BARN DOOR- Friday and
.use of comedy.
distributor of ora~ges, and, Johnny Neel; Tuesday, Grow- Saturday, Mr. Snooks; Sun"This film stresses the
(c-tnuec~to,...ul
ing Up Different- $3 cover; day, An~el and the Bees.
Student produces unique fihn
by Adam Hirshfeld
Lights! Cameras! Action!
It's showtime for Greg
Savoy, jl'nior English major
fledgling producer. His
film, still in the writing
is the Wilmington
... .,.H .."''s fourth step toward
he hopes to be a long
,. ,.,.ro...r in film making.
Tentatively titled "The
Interlock," Savoy's
IID•ror>os:ed one-hour film will
.......,,p greatly from his come.ted half -hour work,
"Points East," which is
scheduled to be ~hown on
campusMay21.
Whereas his earlier production was of a seriously
psychological nature with
many directions, "The
Orange Interlock" will be a
comedy exone idea with greater
' Savoy said. He wants
his films as varied as
-----"L'-, he added. Savoy has
produced two other
•""""~.,.. movies.
"The Orange Interlock"
makes an assertion that "the
world is backwards," Savoy
explained. People who are the
doers do things for the wrong
sons and eventually
society's outcasts
the so-called do-
'.
Page 12 • THE REVIEW • April 15, 1983
Hands-on experience
Theater class manages play
by Ginny Hearn
~
PEIJc:iEOT
NEW
P6
by
PEUGEOT
: ~~~: ~~;~~~ :i~.:u~n D•s19._n*_ _ _ * 28 pounds
• Peug.ot's Uf•tl,_ 'trlooonry ond ~rvic•
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fi~ee
._
every
New Bike Purchased
~
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Guaranteed Repairs
fwo WHEELED CYCLE
90 Ea1t ffialn /treet
Newark, Delaware 197TI
302·368-2685
UP THE ALLEY BEHIND BRAUNSTEIN$
AND WILM. TRUST
Imagine a final without
blue books, late nights at the
library or even a number two
pencil.
Instead, in Professor Dale
Hearth's Theatre Management class (THE451), you can
choose to organize committees or even direct a play.
This semester, Hearth offered students a choice between working on a project or
taking a final exam. Students
who opted for the project are
assisting the E52 Student
Theater Company with their
latest productions of "The
Wax Museum," and "Two
Bottles of Relish."
But don't reach for the
course catalog yet. "Working
on a play takes more time
than studying for an exam,"
Hearth warned. "It's almost
like an internship but on a
smaller scale."
The class of five students
first organized into a team of
managers. This project required a managing director,
who is in charge of the
management people, a house
manager, a box office
manager, two promotional
managers and a developmental manager, Hearth said.
Students used management
skills to set up goals and .
strategies for . achieving
them. Promotional
managers, for example, set a
percentage goal based on the
audience size. They are graded on how many people actually attend, Hearth said.
When the play is over, the
students compile a report on
the goals, strategies, and
what was actually ac·complished. ..,This counts as
one exam grade," Hea~h
said. "Students are graded on
how they work as a team and
how they reach their goals."
The advantage of doing a
project is that it provides "a
practical application of textbook theory," Hearth said.
The class members working with E52 must find solutions to the unexpected problems which always arise
with the theatre. "It's one
situation where we have to
constantly adjust and try to
do more in a lesser amount of
time," she said.
HOURS:
TUES., WEDS. 11 AM· 9 PM
THURS.
11 AM -10 PM
FRI., SAT.
11 AM -11 PM
SUN.
4PM-9PM
10°/o Discount TACO NIGHT .
Friday, April15, 7:30P.M.
Carpenter Sports Building
Tickets $4.
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ
On Any Luncheon
EVERY TUES.
Specials With
4:30-8:30
UofDI.D.On
ALL THE MEAT
TACOS YOU
CAN EAT
Tuesday Thru
Friday 11 AM to 3PM
100 Elkton Rd.
$4.50 =:~on
For Takeout Call
A benefit of integrating the
management class is that
"the Student Theatre can be
run on a semi-professional
basis," Bob Bedlow, managing director and director of
"Two Bottles of Relish" said.
Although the class itseU
consists of only eight people,
much diversity exists among
majors. Besides the expected
theatre majors, there are acc·o unting, business administration, psychology,
chemistry and even a continuing education student.
"I'm taking the course for
two reasons- for the Theatre
Management aspect itseU
and for the general skills,"
said Robert Kwapinski, Continuing Education student.
"I can take the skills and
use them in any aspect of my
public relations work," explained Kwapinski, who is
also the Director of Public
Relations/Publicity at Archmere Academy in Claymont.
Since Archmere Academy
is opening a Fine Arts Center,
they will need someone to
manage the theatre wing,
Kwapinski said.
This is the second semester
Hearth has taught Theatre
Management. For last
semester's project, class
members helped with University Theatre's production of
" Costumes on Parade."
Hearth will offer a similar
course in the summer called
Marketing the Arts. " I've had
a lot of calls about the summer session course already,"
he said.
April 15, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 13
Etcher co~nhines several crafts, skills
by Susan Bulley
'lbe ancient practice of etching in
metal has resurfaced once again in
the art world, despite the popularity '
althe mass reproduction of art works
in our culture. The etcher, unlike
most artists, must be a unique comlination of painter, chemist and craft1111811.
Debra ·McCulley is one of these few
artists who has revitalized the
I .PIIPularit;y of etching. She was intrigued
intricate process of the art form
attending the university and
• •IPitlo>tl to devote her graduate years to
111iscomplex work.
"Etcliiilg has·been around for hundreds of years, but most people don't
really understand how it's done," she
"Even well-known artists such
Goya, and Picasso
• ll'iactllce<l etching on the side."
Perhaps the most interesting aspect
af etching is the actual process. The
Italian term, intaglio, is used in etdling to describe the method of inking DEBRA MCCULLEY'S art work is a combination of painting , chemistry and metal
leaves ink in low places of a cut works, all forming the basis of etching .
. Prints can then be made
plate using a wide variety of deepen the lines where I have etched
The etching process is a painstakltec:bniiques, colors, and chemical pro- my design," McCulley explained.
ing one, but the finished product is
McCulley described the etching pro- worth the effort. " I work very slowly
you can see it done, it's a cess as being "very physical." The as a rule," she said. "It takes me at
Uifficult art to understand. Basically, plate must be cut, prepared, and least a month to resolve my image or
zinc or copper plate that is one- beveled to prevent the · sharp edges until I'm satisfied with it."
of an inch thick. The surface is from cutting the print paper. The
When asked about the content of her
with an acid r;esistant and plates are quite heavy and must be work, she said she wants to create' a
in a nitric acid bath. The acid carried many times from the work ·' certain mood through her images and
exposed areas and area, to the bath and to the press.
-striking color variations. Her prints
!.
•
In
are spiced with geometric shapes,
depth, and beautiful animals that capture the attention of both experienced
etchers and novice on-lookers.
"My work is a reflection of what I
am now at this point in my life," McCulley said. "After more than five
years of exhibiting my prints, I know
that this is what I want to do.
"I'm concerned with the distinction
between natural and modern structures.- The prominence of circles and
squares is definitely a conscious element," she said.
Animals also play an important role
in McCulley's prints and are a reflection of her personal life. Her German
Shepherd, Tesa, is the subject of a few
of her etchings because she loves the
form of the dog. "I use Tesa, horses,
and other fast-running animals
because they're so fluid. I like the contrast of the rigid geometric shapes
and the graceful movements of the
animals," she said.
McCulley's personal favorite
"The Window Watcher;" shows the
silhouette of two shepherds in the
foreground and above them are small
squares done in rich tones of blue,
pink, and green. She wanted the dogs
to be as dark as possible so she used
the aquatint process, which makes
images black. Spray paint is applied
to the metal plate and acts as an acid
resistant in the nitric bath. The acid
only bites into the small exposed
Well-Awareness Week Celebration
WELLSPRING OPEN HOUSE
TODAY
Friday, April15
***
10am-3pm
Students, Staff, Faculty Welcome!
Lower Level of Student Health Service
Free Balloons and Refreshments
ing
work
Growing Up Male in America
A Media Presentation by
DR. PERRY B. KAUFMAN
Tuesday, April19
Noon
Rodney Room, Student Center
CO-SPONSORED BY THE OFFICE OF WOMEN'S AFFAIRS AND THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
S.P.A. MUSICAL EVENTS
PRESENTS IN BACCHUS:
---------------------------FRIDAY, APRIL 15:
A SPECIAL GRATEFUL DEAD
D
~
PA
ITH
/
Delaware's
No.1
Dead
Band
8 P.M.
...student produces psychological com
(Continued,_ - 1 1 )
her first movie script
therefore, of death. Level challenging. "I have to interthree is the sequence in the pret what Greg's trying to
brain. Both level one and pull off and write a script that
level three will be shown in will convey his thoughts," she
color while level two, which said.
Finding people for the parts
concentrates on Mr. Frank,
will be shot in black and - auditions for the 20 to 25
white, Savoy said.
parts will be held soon, acThe orange will be the focal cording to Savoy- will help in .
point during transitions between levels. "The audience's
reaction to the end of the film "This film stresses the
will actually hinge on how it
milliseconds in which the
sees the orange," he added.
The deteriorating condition fate of aperson momenof Savoy's grandfather sparked the idea for the story line tarily arrested and...
of the film. "Stories start with controlled, in that instan~
something personal and then
bymanypeople."
fan out," he said.
Assisting him in creating
the film, which will cost him writing the dialogue, she add$2,500 to $3,000 from his own ed. She enjoys the large
pocket, are senior English amount of freedom she has
major Laurie Schildwachter, since the subject is not hardwriting the script, and Scott set and factual.
Roewe, a student at the _ The music, jazz from the
Berklee, School of Music in 1950s and 1960s, "is not
Boston, arranging the sound- mainstream music. It's not
expected in a college film,"
track.
Schildwachter finds writi~g Savoy said.
is
is
Savoy received inspiratioll
from William Snodgrass,
English professor and winner
of the 1960 Pulitzer Prize for
his collection of poems,
"Heart's Needle."
When it comes to productions other than his own,
Savoy prefers old movies,
"especi~lly avante-garde
cinema," because "they weD&
where they were supposed
to." On related topics, Savoy
said Steven Spielberg doesn't
go far enough in getting ideu
across to viewers, and "TV Ia
lousy."
One other task awaitine
this outdoorsman and former
Eagle Scout is completion of
the 2000-mile (Maine to
Georgia) Appalachian Trait
"I've only got 28 miles to go. I
just haven't gotten around to
it," Savoy said.
In the meantime, SaVOJ
continues to blaze traill
throughout the complel
movie industry, deviatiJIC
from the norm with his lJIIi.
que style of "psychologic~)
comedy."
...graduate student intrigued by etching
---------------------------SATURDAY, APRIL23
•
A ROCK A BILLV
SOCK-HOP WITH:
THE DIVERSIONS
!Contlnuecl"-~ 13l
areas and produces a dotted
effect. To make the images
completely black, she
repeated the process several
Plus
times until the dots could no
longer be seen.
SHECKY AND THE FAT CATS
"Although the images are
TICKETS
static
on the prints, they have
7:30P.M.
$2
lots of movement because of
ATTHEDOOR
their stances," she said.
"Some of the animals seem to
-------------------------------------,
LOOKING FOR CLUES TO HELP IN YOUR JOB SEARCH??
IT'S ELEMENTARY IF YOU ATTEND THE
JOB SEARCH PANEL DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, APRIL 19 3-5 pm in 006
KIRKBRIDE LECTURE HALL
KEYNOTE: DENNISCAREY,STATE
SECRETARY OF LABOR
REPS FROM ARTS, SOCIAL SCIENCE, &
NATURAL SCIENCE FIELDS
JUNIORS &SENIORS: GAIN INSIGHT INTO
THE "WORKING WORLD"
FRESHMEN &SOPHOMORES: DISCOVER CAREER
IDEAS AND OPPORTUNITIES
ALL INVITED TO ATTEND!
(A SERVICE OF·THE ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGE COUNCIL)
be running or flying across
the prints or looking off into
the distance."
The overall mood of MeCulley's etchings is one of action, freedom and open
spaces. She called it a
"beautiful medium" because
of its rich colors and versatility. Unlike other forms of art,
the etcher can satisfy many
buyers or collectors with an
original print. The metal
plate is capable of producing
many copies of the artist's etching and are all of the same
value. Like most etchers, Me-
... classifieds
(Continued,_ - 1 5 )
April, Happy B'Day! Well kiddo, it's got to
be said- "Just turned 22, WONDERIN what
to do??" Oh, I'm wonderin- How do you spell
relief? P-H-0-E-N ... They runned away!!
Happiness and Love to my bestest best
friend on her special day. Kath
BBQ Chicken Coming : April30.
DON'T LET THE SEMESTER PASS
BY! Study skills help available NOW.
the Center for Counseling and
10-4.
E52 is coming with two one-act productions.
These performances are assured to give you
an evenings of interesting entertainment.
Come see TWO BOTTLES OF RELISH and
THE WAX MUSEUM. Tickets on sale NOW
at Student Center. Performance dates April
15-16,22-24. Limited seating-SoHurry.
HEY JAMIE (alias Ralph) meet any bands
lately? Do you have holes in your
underwear? Tom T. Hall? ...I need
daiquiri!!
Grab your bed sheet and come TOGA with
Gilbert C on Friday, April 15th, Be in the
lounge at 9:00 and hear the live band IDK.
WHICH BAR IN NEWARK SERVES A
COLD DRAFT_F.9R 5t?
a
ALL37610
AS36780
MASTERWORKS OF GREEK CIVILIZATION
travel/study- Winter Session 1984
Professor Nik Gross
Languages and Literature
INFORMATIONAL MEETING
Wednesday, April20, 3:30p.m.
Memorial 036
,. ,, ....
The Review Classified
B-1 Student Center
Newark, DE 19711
announcements
Ap~i,ltS.' 1983;; THE REVIEW •
Send- y~ur ad to us with payment. For first 10
words, $5.00 minimum for non-students. $1.00 for
students with 10 , Then 5' for every word
thereafter.
.Classifieds
FOR SALE: 75-205mm Vivitar Zoom Lens
with Nikon mount. $150 or best offer (make
me an offer I can't refuse!). Call Tobias at
737-6442 or 738-2771 and leave message.
DORM SIZE REFRIG. Good condition- Call
Dave 738-1340.
1974 MGB. 60,400 miles. Dual carbS. No emission controls. Major repairs on engine ~ Spr11!g '82- now almost like new. AM/FM stereo
Cassette. 2 covers - boot cover for convertible top plus Tonneau Cover. Interior - Excellent Condition. Tagged till March '84. Exterior - very good condition - some Rusting.
$3500.00. 738-7877 Eves. MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE.
Sturdy wooden loft. Excellent condition. FitS
in traditional dorm room. Price negotiable.
Call 737-4 715.
Used furniture: .2 chairs and a couch. Ex~
cellent condition, inexpensive. Call 731-7470
after 5 p .m. Prices negotiable.
to
Female roommate neede<l
share 'h Foxcroft double, starting 8/1. $170/month +uti!.
Call Beth 737-9796.
NEED A PLAC';;E:-;;F;;:;O:;;R:-;;;THE=:-7:s;;u,.-:M:;:ME=R;;-:;?
Female roommate needed to sublet
townhouse for June, July and August. Own
~~~- Rent $93 per month. CALL now
Free info. Write IJC Box 52 - DE-l. -corona
Del Mar, CA92625.
Female roommate needed to share ¥. Towne
Court Apt. Rent approx. $120/mth. Call
Karen or: Steph3nie 738-1885.
FEMALE roommate needed to share 'I• of
house on AMSTEL AVENUE for summer
months. $125/month. YOU will have yon
,own room. CALL 738-1956.
UCENSED PHOTOGRAPHER AMATEUR
MODELS. 453-9802.
'ATI'ENTION! IF YOU DON'T WANT TO
MISS THE BIG COMMONS BASH
TONIGHT AT 9:00 IN COMMONS I, SEE
YO~ NEIGHBORHOOD CHEERLEADER
FOR INVITATIONS . UNLIMITED
REFRESHMENTS!
TOWNE
api.rtment available JlJNE1be Spring Bam Raising will be held tonight
SEPT. TWO roommates needed. $100from 6 p.m. to 1 a .m. , featuring Zachariah.
mo./ea. CALL 737-9319,6:00 p.m. or later.
Tickets available at the Student Center.
SUBLET: One bedroom/den apartment in
Ready for something different? Come see
PaperMill apts. During June, July August Mushrume April 15th 9:00p.m. Harrington C
call 737-9861 for info.
Lounge. Admission : One Dollar.
Roommate needed for apartment, in Dewey
The HUNT is on. Get Job Search Tips from
SHOW Youid'iliEND. HOW MUCH YOU
Beach • CHEAP RENT - nice place - great
Arts and Science Alumni. Guest speaker:
CARE. GIVE THEM AN ATOTUCKIN. Call
location. Call Gregg or Cris 366-9223.
Dennis Carey, State Secretary of Labor.
A.-;..ailable for sublet. June 1 with option' to . 368-9837. ASK FOR THE SMURF TUCK OR
Tuesday, Aprill9- 3:00-5 :00 in 006 Kirkbride
THE DIRTY TUCK!!
renew
lease...
large
Paper
Mill
Apt.,
2
Lecture Hall. Sponsored by Arts and Science
ALL CANDIDATES for · College Council
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, Pool. ..Don't miss
College Council
out ... Call368-4027.
Elections must sign up by 5 p.m. April 19th to
ALPHA OMICRON PI PLEDGE SUB SALE.
be a registered candidate. Sign up in the
Female roommate needed - June thru
Orders taken for Sat. Noon delivery at
DUSCoffice, 106 Student Center. Take an acAugust. Master bedroom of 2 be<lroom
Rodney ami Student Center- Thurs. and Fri.
tive
role in your College Council.
Papermill Apt. Call368-7257 Rent negotiable.
1:30 to 6:00 bring your $2.00 with you!
ALL ...CANI:>IDATES . for: College Council
Female
roommate
needed
for
1/3
of
a
2
BEACH PARTY! TOMORROW NIGHT
Elections must sign up by 5 p .m. April 19th to
Lost: G'oi.DiioNOR socrE'iYP'iN''on47s~
bedroom. Papermill apt. Takeover lease
from 9- 1 in Pencader Commons 'III. Sponbe a registered candidate. Sign up in the
Substantial REWARD-offered for its return.
Sept. I. Call368-7257.
•
sored by the N.C.E.A. music by DJ. Joe V:al.
DUSC office, 106 Student Center. Take an ac!"lease call~~~_._?_=!~!~ ~~E:!'~·
WANTED- Female Rooiillliates to suiiiet3
Refreshments served, tickets on sale for
tive Role in your College council.
·
LOST: Dark blue coaches jacket with "J.R . bdrm, . fully furnished house for summer
$2.00 in P encader dining hall. Beach wear
AOIIPLEix}E: SuB sAi.E:: Orders taken for
James
River"
logo
on
front.
Lost
at
Down
w/same. $100/month for private bedroom.
expected ! Open to North campus only. Don't
Sat. noon delivery at : Rodney and Student
Under on Saturday night 4/9. To return, call
On campus! Call738-7991.
miss it !
Center- Thurs. and Fri. 4:30 to 6:00, bring
731-5247. REWARD.
-students F-ur nished' rooms; . comfortable,
ATTENTION CAMPERS - The Outing Club
your $2.00 with you.
LOST: Female Husky/Shepard Mix. (Grey
convenient, 233 W. Main St., near Rodney.
is holding elections at its next meeting &
White)
.
Choker
·collar
w/yellow
tag.
"'The
sP'~ing Barn Raising Semiformal featuiMeal ticket suggested. Reservations now for
Wednesday, April 20. Nominations close
ing Zachariah, is tonight! Tickets are on sale
Answers to QUISHA. Call Mike 737-6114 .. ,
Fall '83 and summer school.
Monday; April 18. Sign-up for rock climbing
at Ag Hall and the Student Center. Don't
&theCLAMBAKE.
'
FOR RENT : $87.40/mo. - 2 rooms available
miss out!
in townhouse, June- August. 77 Madison Dr.
SKYDIVE! SKYDIVE! Sunday, April 17,
BBQChicken comingApril30.
-College Park. CALL 368-7871.
contact Chris, 737.$77.
Denise Fry, Happy 22nd Birthday, Wench!
FOXCROFT apartment available. June, JuGrab your bed s heet and come TOGA with
Let's hope you don't wake up in the same
ly, August. Rent $325/month. Call 368-3788.
Sublet: 2 Bedroom, semi-furnished -Towlle
Gilbert C on Friday, April 15th. Be in the
place as last year ! AS a B-day present we'U
Furnished.
Court Apartment. Available June, July,
lounge at 9:00 and h ear the live band IDK.
dedicate your tune " Bend me, shape me."
August. Rent cheap. If interested, phone 731PARK PLACE APT. available for summer
TYPING - Fast;'a ccurate, professional. Call
The
Masher and" D de Ia B"
.
4591
after
5
p.m.
·months. 2 bedrooms & den. ONLY $250/mo.
Nancy 368-8420.
Yo Masher - Did you feel the earth move?, or
Call Kathy 731-1160.
S-iTJ\iME_R _ HOUSING . 2-BEDROOM
SOON YOU CAN BUY · A 5¢ DRAFT IN
just the back seat? Those Ohio men are realAPARTMENT-AVAILABLE . CALL 368-2031
NEWARK. INSANE!
lyuptbpar. ???
FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS.
PREGNANT? The GYN Department of th~
PRE-CISION .SKATING TEAM, . LET'S
SouthGate Apartment availablP. for summer
Student Health Center, U of D offers FR.E E
FOR ' THE GOLD ON SATURDAY! ! !
sublet. Price negotiable. Furnished. Air conpregnancy testing for all full-time students,
(Because silver or bronze would clash· with
WANT A JOB AT THE BEACH? FINE
ditioning and pool for those hot summer
by appointment. Counseling and referrals
the costumes! ) Mark
TIMES Magazine Salesperson needed to
days. Call now 366-7438.
are provided. Confidentiality assured.
·haildle
advertising
in
Rehoboth/Dewey.
Call
N.C.E
.A. BEACH PARTY. Tomorrow' nighi
FOUR (4) ROOMMATES WANTED FOR
Laurel Hall - 2nd floor. Call 738-8035.
Linda Berryhill652-8223.
from 9 - 1 in Pencader Commons III. Music
BEACH HOUSE IN MARGATE N.J. $450
provided by DJ Joe Val. REFRESHMENTS
Wanted- Responsible sitter for the summerPER PERSON FOR SUMMER. CALL
SERVED! Tickets on sale now in Christiana
must drive. One child, 'Hockessin Area . Two
JOHN 738-1897.
-----Commons for only $2.00. Beach attire exmonths
guaranteed.
Flexible
hours.
Call652SUMMER SUBLET at SUNNY
pect~~ ' ~ ID'srequirlC~· ~o~bSa'!'pus only.
4048.
SOUTHGATE . 2 bedroom furnished balcony .
ATTENTION CAMPERS- The Outing Club
~rienced Typist- Call Louise 737-7203.
apartment. CHEAP! Call NOW737~210 .
2 roommates need house to share in
is holding elections at our next meeting Rehoboth tjlis summer .. If you need roomQuiet and neat femal<l roomm!l!e.· Av.ail~:~ble
Large , Paper- Mill· -Alii~- 2 be'd'rooffis~ -2
Wednesday,
April 20. Nominations close
mates
or
are
looking
for
a
place,
please
call:
far Park Place or Towne Court Apartment
bathrooms, Patio with poolside view, BEST
Monday, April 18. Sign-up for rock climbing
738-8310.
llarting ·september 198.1. ·Call Nancy 738LOCATION IN COMPLEX, Available June 1
+the
CLAM
BAKE.
1388.
Female roommate(s) needed to sublet fully
with options to lease September 1, Call 368ELECTIONS are coming on May 4 and· 5~
furnished Paper Mill Apt. starting June 1 un1277.
newly-married couple will house-sit for sumALL CANDIDAT~S . for College Council,
til Aug. 1. $95.00 a month plus electricity.
mer. Yard and pet care O:K . 737-3330.
University Commuter t\§Mr.iation .!UCS)
· Call368-9260.
Femaie.~oommate needed to sublet fulty furTYPING & NOTARY- performed skillfully,
Resident Student Association (RSA) and
nished Towne Court apartment, starting
Female roommate for next year. Call 738professionally - IBM Corrector II - 454-1588
Delaware Undergraduate Student Congress
1710 ask for Kim or Julie. Prime location.
June 1. Will have own .bedroom and the opalterS p.m.
(DUSC) positions - be a registered cantion to take over lease. $130.00 mo. Call Shari
R.ooM:MATEs WANTED, MIF ills m;drC>Oni
LARGE HOUSE TO SHARE OWN ROOM, 8
didate.
Sign up for elections at the DUSC ofor Amy at 4li4-8136- afternoons or evenings.
townhouse for summer and/or 83 - 84 year,
MILES FROM CAMPUS, NEAR, DE . $150
fice by 5 p .m ., Tuesday, April 19th.
NEED A pucE- FoR'1:iiEsuM'M:ER? 1
close to campus. Call737~535.
PER MONTH, PLUS SPLIT UTILITIES
BBQChicken Coming : April:lo.- ·· ·
BEDROOM PARK PLACE APT .
FOUR WAYS. 2 ROOMS AVAILABLE .
" SENSITIVE SPIRIT OF CARE AND CONWHICH BAR IN NEWARK SERVES A
AVAILABLE JUNE 1. OPTION TO TAKE_
CALL KEN 738-1110 UNTIL 4:30 OR 328-0208
CERN " ... THAT'S WHAT INSPECTION
COLDDRAFTFOR5t???
OVER LEASE. CALL NOW. 737-1685.
EVENINGS.
TEAMS SAY YEAR AFTER YEAR ABOUT
Tina, You're the BEST roommate ever. HapTHE MARY CAMPBELL CENTER NURS3 BR College Park Townhouse. Summe~
ROOMMATE- Male, 21, Willing to live with
PY 20th! ! Get psyched for a wild weekend!
ING STAFF. WE ARE A 54-BED INsublet/optional lease renewal in Fall.
anyone, male or female, as long as you're
Now we can both go to the same bouncer at
TERMEDIATE CARE FACIUTY FOR
$340/mo. + util. FEMALES ONLY. 454-7214.
not a total slob. Starting September 1, 1983.
DU. Love ya, Joan
THE MULTI-HANDICAPPED YOUNG
Would prefer Towne Court or vicinity. Call
PaP.;~..-~Mlll Apt. available for ·summer
ADULT
ANDBESIRE
AN
RN/LPN
FOR
A
'131-1738, 738-2771. Ask for Pim.
sublet. Furnished. 2 Bedrooms. Best sum'
PART-TIME POSITION. PLEASE COME
mer location around. Step out your door into
PROF(i;SSIONAL RACQUET STRU<GING.
LOOK US OVER ANYTIME . CONTACT
an ice cold POOL! Don'twait! Call Now! 368Prince stringing machine. Can string tennis,
SUSAN
KEEGAN-FRANCE, DIRECTOR
7801.
racquetball, squash racquets. 10% off any
OF NURSING, THE MARY CAMPBELL
restringing or regrip with this ad. Call Chuck
Sublet and Option to renewlease. 2 bedroom
CENTER, 4641 WELDIN ROAD, WILM737-4595.
in college building at Possum Park Apts.
INGTON, DE 19803, (302) 762-6025, M- F, 9Starting June 1. Call 738-9798.
Available for Summer S~blet : Furnished
_3,EOE.
.
two bedroom Towne Court Apartment. Price
1 or 2 female roommates needed to sublet
LONG BEACH ISLAND - Anyone needing
aegotiable ! ! ! PLEASE CALL 73'U442 for inPAPERMILL APARTMENT for the suman extra roommate or who is interested in
fo.
mer. Call368-4105.
renting a place in LONG BEACH ISLAND
TYPING : FAST, Accurate, & dependable.
this summer please call Mike 366-9175.
LARGE PAPERMILL APT . TWO
Call Pat. 738-2546, Reasonable Rates.
f roommates wanted sha~e ':iBEDROOMS,
l'h
BATHS,
EXCELLENT
CRUISE SHIP JOBS. Great income poteil:
TOWNE COURT APARTMENT in excellent
COND., NEW CARPET. AVAILABLE
lial. ·All occupations. For info. 602-998-0426.
location. AVAILABLE JUNE 1. CALL 737JUNE 1 W/OPTION TO LEASE AUGUST 1.
Elt.643.
4799.
737-4715.
EARN $5oo OR .MORE EACH SCHOOL CALL
Live-in babysitter!hoilsekeeper wanted for
Female
roommate
WANTED
to
sublet
own
YEAR. FLEXIBLE HOURS. MONTHLY
summer months or year-round in the Oceah
furnished rm. in !g. house for second sUmPAYMENT FOR PLACING POSTERS ON
City, N.J. area. $150 per week including
mer session, only. 738-7991.
CAMPUS. BONUS BASED ON RESULTS.
room, food and · ·car. Must have resume
AttrBctive 2 bedroom, fully furnished VicPRIZES AWARDED AS WELL. 800-526-0883 .
and/or references and recent photo. Must
toria Mews Apt. available for summer
adore children. Send inquiries to ·P .O. Box
sublet, lease takeover option, $336/month +
1~, Ocean City, N.J . 08228.
utilities, PETS ALLOWED. Call731-9614.
WANTED : FEMALE ROOMMATE ' FOR
Sublet : x-large 1 bedroom apartment at
T.C. APT. FOR FALL '83 SEM. PREFER A
Park Place. 275 + util. per month. Available
GRAD .SENIOR BUT WILL TAKE OTHERS.
June- August. Call368-7699 for more info.
SONY TELEVISION - Complete line of
WILL HAVE OWN ROOM. CALLTEllRIOR
lleplar and Big-Screen. Whole sale prices.
CHRISTEN AT 368-8190:
PRIME LOCATION! Takeover lease on
Cl1l Bill 454-8386.
large 2 bedroom University Garden Apart- ·
Roommates wanted for O.C.M.D. Apt. is
taab& :zoOcc.'for sale. Good condition. Call ment, June 1. Ann/June after 5-368-4523. Ann bayfront wlboat. Call Dean 738-1776.
-daytime 738-8754.
11-7438 for more info.
,
iuoE: if'o/rR6M: · a -EiioBoTH oN
Spaces available in Park Place Apt. June "iioVING! MU-ST SELL; · Wicker &
WEEKENDS. WILL SHARE EXPENSES.
Aug. Reasonable price. 737-7960.
llilc:ellaneous furniture; Marantz DuaUJBL
NEED A PASSENGER? CALL BROCCOLI
Slino System $495; Deere 8 hQrsepower
AT 368-95118.
Summer Sublet w/opt~k-;.;ye~:
rwtire (new) $775; 1971 Honda 175 MotorcyAvailable June 1. private bedroom in house.
ROOMMATES FORSUMMER AND/OR
de,4,000 miles, $375; 1978 MG Midget, 28,000
Full use of Kitchen and living area. One
FALL. INEXPENSIVE. PRIVATE ROOMS
llilel, beautiful! $3175; 1981 Datsun 280ZX,
block from Main Street. Brian: 368-9571.
IN HOUSE. CALL 368-9193 .o r 99M978.
T-nof, Immaculate, $11,875. Call 737-1174,
Room- -:: Female ·- White Shag Carpet,
Ride to/from campus with someone who
molngs,
Bookcase Bed, Chest, Desk. View of Pond works at Christiana Mall any of the followftlber semi-automatic MT6217 turntable.
Pool privileges- 454-1588 -Avail. June 1.
ing: M-W-F evenings and Sat; day. Will help
l:lc. condition. $175 or b .o. must sell. 737to pay gas. Call Lori 368-9732.
NEED AN APARTMENT FOR SUMMER
Ui.
SESSION? One bedroom apartment
1 or ~ roominates 10 S1iare""lf.i" or"lk. iif Paper
available. Walk to campus and Main St.
Mill Apt. Call454-8681: Ask for Lori.
Shopping. Available June and July for Sum2 ROOMMATES WANTED (F) to live in
mer Session. $270/month. Call 738-4182.
house for 83-84, private bedrooms - close to
·:w;edf.OOffi TOWNE COURT APARTMENT campus, reasonable 738-1885.
available June 1. TAKEOVER LEASE.
OVERSEAS JOBS - Summer/year round:
SECURITY DEPOSIT PAID. Excellent
Europe, S. Amer., Australia, Asia. All
location. CALL 737-4799.
Fields. $500 - $1200 monthly. Sightseeing.
cr.
• personals
-lost and found
----~-~~--------- - -·---·-·-·
rent/sublet
wanted
available <
do
-~- -- --- -- ---~~ ---------
-to-
for sale
bedroom
Page 15
Looking for an lnexpen8ive dtnDer in a quiet
atmosphere? Come to Supper Club, Friday
April 15th at Faculty Dining Room, Student
Center. Call for reservations, 738-2848.
06E;;;;.ST;;;E;;R~•·.I~f
HAVE YOU MOVED THIS SEM
you rented a fridge from the RSA IN YOUR
NAME we need to know where your fridge is
or else it will cost YOU$! You must call 7382773 or stop by 211 Student Center and let us
know if you moved and took your fridge with
you or if -you moved and left your fridge iii
your old room.
'iiils is it! The·Spring Bam Raising has ar'":
rived.
SUNSHINE, Yes! This is YOUR personal.
We're finally going to a semi! Glad I got to
see you in the Florida sunshine. You know,
you're cute. LOve, Me. P.S. I Love you.
SIFLA and JAMBO,
Life in a swingle can sure be fun,
especially when there is a lot of work to be
done.
Midnight talks, shower concerts,
Paradise Palace entertainments until all
hours,
aged Kahlua, and 'Whiskey Sours.
Don't forget the device,
a new pair of shoes, ·
It's worth the price,
whether it's 12:30,2: 15, or5:07 in heaven.
Is it the phone or the door?
Get the picture, my hair, who will it be?
What the heck,
It's always great where there is one, ·
two, and even three
LOVE YA, WILD WOMAN
Harriet B. - Have a great ,;eekend, and
thanks for the wild party! ASA love, Secret
Sis
.
NEED AN EXTRA STUDE]\IT DIRECTORY STOP BY THE RSA OFFICE, 211
STUDENT CENTER THIS WEEK!
SKYDIVE! SKVDIVE! Sunday, April 17.
. Contact Chris: 73.7-6677.
WHICH BAR IN NEWARK SERVES A
COLDDRAFTFOR5¢? .
Kath (Surprise! l Happy -a rilonthsJ Thanks
for making my life the happiest ever. Love,
Mike
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND: THE ATO
TUCK IN SERVICE. TIME TO GET BACK
AT THAT ROOMMATE OR FRIEND WHO
SCREWED UP YOUR SPRING VA CATION.
JUST CALL 366-9593. ASK ABOUT OUR
GROUP RATES FOR YOUR FLOOR OR
HALL!
Hey Awesome, Who ever knew 25¢ could buy
so much these days. Six months of water bottles, mint chocolate chip ice cream, Monopoly, talks till 4, and being snowed in. Things
have only gotten better since October 15.
Guess who?
BELMONT HOUSE SPONSORS AN OPEN
HOUSE! ! ! IF YOU ARE INTERESTED
TUES. MARCH 15, 8:00P.M.
ATTENTION ALL CANDIDATES- it's time
to sign up for ELECTIONS. If you're interested in running for a position on tl:je UCA;
the RSA, College Council or DUSC sign up by
Tuesday, April 19th, 5 p.m. in the DUSC office, 106 Student Center.
(Continued to page 14)
UNIVERSITY OF
DELAWARE
MARCHING BAND
SILK SQUAD TRYOUTS
MAY 14- 10:00 AM
TWIRLER TRYOUTS
MAY 14-2:00 PM
Amy E. duPont Field
Applicants should prepare a three
routine using one and two baton
technique to music of their choice.
Results will be posted 9:00 a.m.,
May 16, room 209 AED
Page 16 • THE REVIEW • April15, 1983
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PETER M. DOUGHERTY, Moving Consultant
· MORRIS & SONS, INC.
1409 Eastlawn Avenue, Wilmington, Delaware 19802
Telephones: (302) 764-4490 or (215} 222-0691
For the second tiine iD
three weeks, junior attack
wing Karen Emas was named
East Coast Conference
Player-of-the-Week for
women's lacrosse. She scored
eight goals and had two
assists in the Hens' 20-3 rooip
over Rutgers, and seven
goals in Delaware's 17-7 win
over James Madison.
... baseball
(Continued from -20)
their eighth in their last
nine ... the only hit off McDvaine was a 4th inning single
by Carlin Hart... Mark
Johnston had three strikeouts
in two innings of relief... the
Patriots left six runners on
base, while Delaware left
four ... the Hens travel to West
Chester on Sunday for a 1
p.m. game.
Boxscore
CALL COLLECT
Delaware 9, George Maaon I
Delawa re
Just dh
Carpenter dh
Donatelli rf
Trout2b
Ringiec
Hebertc
Cichocki c
Stanek 3b
Skrable lb
Bleckley ss
Burris If
Lloydlf
Postcf
Totals
George Mason
Youngblood ss
McMicharel cf
Anderson 3b
Hart lb
Cosbyrf
Oliver ph
Durhamc
Whitelf
Shelton ph
Bowersdh
Foster2b
Totals
Send Joanie back from college
for less than $200.
George Ma son
Delawa re
• .•
ab r b Ill
3 2 1 0
I 0 0 0
2 2 1 0
4 3 3 3
2 0 0 1
I 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
4 I I 3
4 0 0 0
3 1 I 0
2 0 0 0
I 0 I I
4000
31 9 a 1
ab r b Ill
1 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 I I
3 0 I 0
3 0 0 0
I 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 o
1 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 1 I 0
29 1 3 I
R HI
000 000 OIG-1 3 I
102 021 30l<-e a 1
Sports calendar
TODAY-Coif, Lehigh, home, 12:30
SATURDAY- Baseball, Rider (2), home,
p.m.; Women's lacrosse, Lehigh, aWIJ,
p .m .; Men's track, Rider/Drexel, home,
p .m.; Men' s lacr osse, Lehigh, home,
Men's tennis, Rider, away, 2
Bucknell/Seton Hall, South
p.m./4 p.m.; Men's rugby,
I p.m. SUNDAY-Baseball,
away, 1 p .m . ; MONDAv . oD ••••~-•
Salisbury State, home, 3 p.m.;
West Chester, 3 p .m. ; Women's
Trenton State, home, 3 p.m.
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April15, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 17
~~Captain's Profile
by Jolene·Kinsey
==
Lindenberg's bold leadership;motivates women runners
Being a ·bold, talkative perIn high school (Darien,
son can sometimes be more ct.), she changed her events
bannful than helpful.
to hurdling and the quarter
Not so for Julie Lindenberg. mile. She participated on the
'lbe 5'5" tri-captain of the indoor track team, and in her
women's track team feels senior year, she became a
otherwise.
Connecticut champion. In
"I think I can motivate peo- state competition that year,
ple," she said. "I'm one of the she was a member of the winmore outspoken members of ning 4x110 meter relay team·
the team, and being a senior, and individually, she placed
I'm a natural leader."
third in the 50-yard hurdles.
She feels that she was
elected as a tri-captain not
Running at Delaware, ·
because of her talent on the though, has taken its toll on
track but "more for leader- Undenberg. Having run three
Ju1ie Lindenberg
ship qualities.''
· seasons on both indoor and - - - - - - - - - - - - LJndenbergthinkstheteam outdoor track, she was forced same year.
"The track was real fast
benefits by having three cap- to skip her junior year due to
tains because each par- injuries. She was out with' and Penn is always the best
ticipates in a different event.
stress fractures when she competition," she said.
"came back too hard, too
The 1983 itldoor season went
"It's good because Della fast" and incurred a knee inwell for the team but was per(Myers) runs distance, Pam jury.
sonally disappointing for
(Hohler) sprints and I run
She recalled her best Undenberg. She became ill
hurdles, " the nursing major
explained. " It's a nice diver- season, her sophomore year, just prior to the East Coast
sity. We can reach out to a when the squad lost only one Conference (ECC) championmeet - against powerhouse ship meet, and the mile relay
good number of people."
team that had hopes of winnWest Chester.
Lindenberg began her
ing finished third.
track career 12 years ago in
Similarly, her finest in"I was a nervous wreck,"
the fifth grade, where she dividual performance was she said. " I'd been sick, and I
competed in the 50-yard dash her leg of the mile relay dur- was following the
and the long jump.
ing the Penn Relays that scorekeeper all day.
"It felt good when we won
it," Lindenberg smiled,
recalling that the Delaware
squad won the ECC's 12
points ahead of Bucknell
(after losing to the Bisons
during the regular season).
The rivals will face each
other again on April 30 at
what Undenberg says will be
a "highly emotional meet."
The dual meet, which
Bucknell will host, will also
include West Chester and La
Salle.
Studying nu.rsing at
Delaware is an accomplishment in itself, yet Lindenberg
finds approximately 20 hoursper-week to devote to her
track career.
·
The only confhct occurs on
the days that she works in the
hospital. "It's the clinic time
that interferes," she said.
" I'm in the hospital until3 :30,
and I get real frustrated
because I have a hard time
working out by myself."
For the 1983 outdoor
season, Lindenberg lists
three goals she wants to accomplish:
• to go undefeated as a
team.
• to place in the hurdles in
the ECC meet.
• to have the ntile relay
team go undefeated in the
ECC, win the ECC and set a
•
new school record.
The order of her goals
reveals a lot about
Lindenberg's personality.
She thinks first of the team
and then of herself.
"I would rather boast that
(an undefeated team season)
than an individual performance," she said.
She called her chances at
placing in t)te hurdles
"good", and she is confident
that the relay team will
achieve her hopes.
The current school record
for the mile relay is only one
season old, having been set in
1982. Lindenberg's team will
have to better 4:01.8. Currently, their fastest time is 4:09.0,
which was set indoor.
Although her family now
lives in Chicago, Lindenberg
plans to move to Birmingham, Ala., after graduation. She intends to work as a
Registered Nurse (R.N.) at
the Medical Center of the
University of Alabama.
WINTER SESSION 1984
TRAVEL/STUDY
DESTINATION: GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
DESTINATION: ITALY
BU/EC/PSC 341 The Environment of the Multinational Corporation (3 cr)
ML 167 Conversational French (1 cr)
PSC 467 · ConstitutioJlalism and Democracy in Italy
(3 cr)
All students will take BU/EC/PSC 341, The Multinational Corporation, a threecredit, interdisciplinary course which will explore the political and economic environment, current attitudes of public policymakers and techniques of profitmaking in often
hostile environments. All students will take ML 167 (P/F), a one-credit course in conversational French to assist in local travel, shopping and sightseeing . Students will
select any one of the following three-credit courses for further study.
BU 307 International Business Management (3 cr)
EC 340 International Economics (3 cr)
PSC 416 Transnational Relations and World Politics (3 cr)
FACULTY: W. Boyer; A . Billion (738-2555, contact during April)
An examinatio.~of politics and constitutional government in contemporary Italy.
Students will stud the process of government under the post-war constitution and the
current problems xtremist politics, the role of the Church, north-south divisions, the
fragmented party s stem) that contlnue to beset Italian democracy.
·
FACULTY: J. Magee (738-23551
DESTINATION: GREECE
ALL 367-10AS 367-80
Civilization (3 cr) ,.
Masterworks of Greek
A comprehensive survey of ancient Greek culture through analysis of its chief
material and literary remains . Includes study of major archeological sites and museums
in Central Greece, Peloponnese, Crete. Thessaly and Macedonia.
FACULTY: N. Gross (738-2591)
DESTINATION: BELGIUM
MAE 467/667-10
Advanced Experimental Techni- ques in Fluid M-echanics (3 cr) ·
MAE 467/667-11 Seminar on Recent Trends in Fluid
Dynamics (3 cr)
· These courses will focus on the following areas: Velocity measurements using
pressure probes, hot wires and laser velocimeter, transient and steady state he~t
transfer mass flow etc . Lectures will be given describing the current developments tn
research and applications in selected areas of fluid mechanics. The facilities and instrumentation at the von Karman Institute will be utilized.
Prereq: MEC 305 or CHE 341 or equivalent and permission of the instructor.
FACULTV: J.E. DAN BERG (738-8009)
I
DESTINATION: LONDON, ENGLAND
BU 391
Seminar on International Administrative
Management (3 cr)
~. BU 393
Seminar on International Marketing {3 cr)
Through visits to British corporations, American multinational corporations, financial
institutions, retailers, advertising agencies and governmental agencies, students can
explore issues in international business management. Presentations by British business
and governmental administrators will supplement informal seminars.
FACULTY: J. Krum; D. Ferry (738-2555)
'
P'oge 18 • THE REVIEW • April 15, 1983
Blue Hens roll
in
track
sweep
by Jolene Kinsey
896 Shops (1017 S. College Ave.)
·Newark, Del.
368-5555 .
,15% Off On
.
the 400 meter run. She finish- Millersville who also jumped
The depth of field that the ed with a time of 59.0 to set a . 5'4".
women's track coach Sue new school record and a
Vanginhoven claimed a seMcGrath boasted of in the stadium record. Hohler also . cond stadium record in the
pre-season made her word as took first in the 200 meter 400 meter hurdles with a time
good as gold on Tuesday.
dash clocking in at 26.4.
of 102.4.
The team, now 6-o, defeated
Sophomore Kim Mitchell
The fourth and final record
Towsori State, · Millersville remained in the limelight in· came on Carol Peoples' 39.98
State . College, Glassboro her best event, the 5000 meter meter throw in the discus,
· State and St. Joseph's Univer- run. Mitchell established a which was also good for a
sity in their last home meet of new stadium record of 18.10.9 first place finish.
; the season.
with her third win in the 5000
Despite the excellent show·
ing; there was still a small letTowson, the strongest com- this season.
down. The disappointment of
petitor of the field, fell to .
Junior Jody Campbell also the day occurred in the 4x100
Delaware
by a score
of 86-49. put her name on a school meter relay when first leg
The
Hens topped
Millersville,
83.5-42.5, while they breezed record, a stadium record and Laura Fauser suffered a pullpast Glassboro, 107-24. St. a first place finish with her ed hamstring muscle.
McGrath said it is not as
Joseph's .earned only 16 10.00.2 time in the 3000 meter
race.
This
time
is
.2
seconds
bad
as they had expected, but
points from the Hen women
over the qualifying time for it will keep Fauser from
and lost. 104~16.
the Penn Relays, but working out for at. least a
The field that McGrath McGrath said she will submit week. She will then have to
placed her confidence in it in hopes they will accept it. make a gradual build up
In the field events, because as with most i&
came through with six first
place finishes, five stadium Delaware had an impressive juries, " if you come back too
records and four new school showing with a new school soon you just keep injuring
and stadium record credited it."
records.
Tri-captain Pam Hohler, to a freshman, Jan Woolson.
Fauser did contribute to the
coming off a knee injury that Woolson high jumped 5'4" to Hens' heyday, however, with
prevented her from running earn the honor. She ·shares a first place finish in the long
in last Saturday's invitational the stadium record with jump with a 17'2" jump made
meet, captured high honors in Joyce Vanginhoven of before the incident.
__
All Keg Beer. ~~
1.----------------------•
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Tennis team pulls out ~in, 8-1
April ·19 10-6April 20 2-5 ·
Collins Room, Student Center
Sponsored By Pre-Law Students Association
by B.J. Webster
University (3-3) Tuesday.
"It was a great effort
Being able to win close matches is a sign of an improving against a solid team," said
Hen coach Roy Rylander. "I
team.
The Delaware men's tennis was definitely pleased to see
team (3-4) pulled out four us win all of those close matthree-set matches en route. to' ches."
Number two player Chuck
an 8-1 East Coast Conference
(ECC) victory over American Herak started the Hens rolling with a 6-4, 6-4 win.
Number three and four
players Ron Kerdasha and
captain Randy Cerce . both
dropped a set, but came back
to win.
Kerdasha upped his singles
record to 4-3 with a 3-6, 6-4, 6-1
triumph. Cerce won the first
set of his match, 6'-2, and was
comfortably ahead in the second when a groin injury
hampered his play.
After losing the second set
in a tiebreaker, the senior
came back to win the match,
6-3; in the third set.
Freshman Sam Sneeringer,
the number five player,
stayed undefeated (7-Q) in
singles play with a straightset 6-4, 6-4 victory. Number
six player Gordon Furlong
outlasted his opponent, 6-2, 46, 6-3.
Rylander, who was not
11th Annual Black Arts Festival
8/ack Kaleidoscope"
11
Saturday, April16
PLA V:
CHILDREN'S HOUR
II
And Still I Rise"
presented by Avante Theatre Company (A
tribute to the Black voices, past and present,
that have contributed to the American culture).
Bacchus, Student Center 8:00p.m.
featuring the
~~Bewitched
Tree"
by the Wonderland Puppet People Bacchus, ·
Student Center 1:00 p.m. Sponsor: MSPAB
Both events free and open to the public.
pleased with his team's
doubles play during the
Florida trip, feels they played
well against American.
"Doubles play looked better Tuesday, but we must
keep improving as the season
progresses," said Rylander.
The first doubles team fi
Jon Eckhard and Cerce were
victorious, 6-3, 6-4. After
dropping the first set, the
numbet: two team of Herak
and Kerdasha fought back
win, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Sneeringer a1,1d Furlq
won easily, 6-2, 6-3, to wrap
the win.
-Weather, says Rylander,
plays an important role ill
any tenniS season.
"So much of our sea:•t•
depends on being
play," said Ry
very difficult to re-lscll41!81
matches during the
and in preparing for
Championships we wu11W11. .
to play as many eonlfenillll
opponents as po:ssu:ue.
The Hens
conlfenllll
foe Rider tomorrow.
day, Delaware opens
season against West
at3p.m.
AVAILABLE: Student
Information Center
1983-84 Coordinator
Pick Up Applications In
Room 306, Student Center
Application Deadline April 22
April 15, 1983 • THE REVIEW • Page 19
by Ange Brainard ~~
=::::Captain's Profile
ADVERTISE
IN THE REVIEW
Shramek emphasizes team unity_
The philosophy, "The team
should always come first,"
can be a problem for some
team members, but for soft~all co-captain Lynn
Shramek, it is her sole concern.
"I'm not satisfied with the
way I've been hitting in the
past, but team goals have to
come before personal goals,"
said the senior physical
therapy major. "I just want
to try to accomplish the most
I can in the allotted time. For
me, it's the team first,
defense second and offense
third."
She added that it is hard to
put aside your personal goals
but you have to for the good of
the team. This includes
sacrificing position changes,
playing time and supplying a
more team-oriented attitude.
Shramek formally started
her softball career in high
school in Bel Air, Md., where
she took her post in the outfield, but during her
sophomore year in college
she changed to catcher.
"I was splitting time in the
outfield. I had a good arm and
the team needed a catcher, so
I decided to try it · out,"
Shramek said. Now, she says,
her biggest thrill is throwing
out runners.
"Softball is an individual
sport as well as a team sport,
especially catching," she
said. '!You have to always be
mentally alert; calling pitches, watching the runners. I
guess that's why I like catching better than the outfield."
Shramek shares her catching time with Jill Fuchs. Of
course, she would like to
catch all the time, but
Shramek said, "Ido what I
can when I'm not playing,
With the new young talents
and plenty of hard work,
Shramek believes they can
have a successful season.
"The fact that we give our
best every game and work
hard should result in a successful season, but to me, the
win-loss record doesn't
justify success. The fact that
we are working hard and
playing as a team will mean
we have accomplished what 6 Getup to a $50 rebate _o n Raleigh®, the ~hoice of t~e ~
we have set out to do."
~ U.S. NATIONAL Cyclmg Team for the 84 OlympiCs. ~
[--RiilE"i;HEUBE:Sl~1·
~OF
CYCLES AND!
: SAVE UP TO 00 ;
0:
Reflecting on last year's
winning season, Shramek
sees only positive things for
this season and stresses the
importance and positive
results of team unity.
"We had a good record last
year and I hope we have an
even better one this season,"
-Shramek said. "We all get
along well, and it makes it
more fun to play on a winning
team that plays together.
"Team -unity goes a long
way. When we play together,
a lot can be accomplished."
Shramek acknowledges the
fact that the squad has its
share of young and inexperienced players but feels
the teams' closeness and
dedication will prove itself.
"It will be a little difficult at
first because we have a lot of
young people and a lot of people in different positions,"
she said. " We have the potential, it's just a matter of dojng
it."
Girls- Guys
Have you ever wanted to be Miss January1
How about Mr. October
NOW~
!
Shramek concluded that §
Lynn Shramek
she tries lo take the season ~
one game at a time but the ~
like remembering certain pit- ultimate goal is still the East ..
ches for certain batters and Coast Conference champion- d
that type of thing. Jill and I ships and "another shot at La
help each other out that Salle."
wa:y."
YOUR CHANCE!
Photogenic models
needed ·tor 1983-1984
calendar·
Call453-0179 Ask for Jeff
Please respond no later than
April 30th
~
...lacrosse
(Continued from- 20)
confidence going into those
games."
The Hens' 5-4 record also
puts them only one victory
away from last year's season
total of six. They should equal
that number after Saturday's
game against Lehigh.
D e1a ware d emorlSh e.d the
Engineers, 23-6, in their
meeting last season.
GROUNDBALLS -- As
Shillinglaw stated, the Blue
Hens upcoming schedule is
indeed worthy of concern.
After Lehigh, they will face
Adelphi, Towson State and
Johns Hopkins - all of whom
beat Delaware last
season ...the Hens will host
East Coast Conference foe,
Lehigh, tomorrow at 2:30
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Trout hammers away
in 9-1 Hen explosion
by Jim Lanzalotto
So far this spring, Delaware second
baseman Jeff Trout has lived up to
preseason expectations.
And then some.
With a .553 batting average and a
13-game hitting streak, Trout has
silenced the critics.
"I'm confident up there (at bat),"
said Trout, who went 3-for-4 with a
home run and three RBI's in Wednesday's 9-1 rout of George Mason.
"I'm swinging at good pitches," added Trout. "Everything is falling
together, I'm not swinging anxiously,
and I'm comfortable at the plate."
So far this season, the preseason
All-American pick has done the job
for the Hens (14-11), leading the club
in a number of offensive categories,
including RBI's (27) and hits (47), and
is tied in home runs with five.
But in the case of the Hen cocaptain, his presence in the Delaware
line up goes past simple statistics.
"When it gets tough, he's the man
you want up there," said Mike Mcilvaine, Wednesday's winning pitcher.
"He gets the hits when you need it."
After the Hens jumped out to a 1-0
first inning lead, they opened it to 3-0
in the third on a RBI triple by Trout,
who later scored on a wild pitch.
In the Delaware fifth, rightfielder
Andy Donatelli walked and scored
after Trout hit a John Boucher curve
just inside the leftfield foul line for his
fifth home run of the season, to make
Delaware
'Powers'by
Baltimore
the score 5-0.
"It was an outside curve," said the
switch-hitting Trout. "I didn't .hit it
hard, but I got a little help from the
wind:"
Meanwhile, Mcilvaine was shutting
down the George Mason offense by
allowing only one hit over seven innings and striking out five, but still was
· not pleased with the results.
"My arm felt lively and strong, but
I did not have the sharpness," said
Mcilvaine. "I felt uncomfortable out
there. I just could not get into a
groove."
In the seventh, third baseman Mike
Stanek extended the Hen lead as he
jumped on a 2-0 fastball by Boucher
for his fifth home run of the season to
make it9-0.
"We hit the right spots today," said
Delaware coach Bob Hannah. "We
had timely hitting. We have the
chance to develop the team we want.''
***
The Hens swept a doubleheader
from Bucknell Tuesday, 9-1 and 7-2 to
raise their East Coast Conference
(ECC) mark to 5-1.
Co-captain Bob Vantrease (4-1) won
the opener as he went the distance,
allowing just five hits and striking out
eight.
Delaware broke a scoreless tie in
the top of the fifth as they erupted for
Review photo by Pim Von Hemmen
JEFF TROUT TRIPLES in Wednesday's win over George Mason. The Hen captain
leads th.e East Coast Conference in hitting with a .553 batting average.
four runs on five hits. Stanek led the
surge with a two-run single. Catcher
Mark Ringie went 3-4 in the win. Stanek (2-4) and Trout (2-3) had two
RBI's each to pace the Hebs in thesecond game. Doug Shaab (2-3) was the
winning pitcher. Tom Skrable had a
solo home run in the fifth.
***
The Hens, atop the ECC, host second place Rider tomorrow at noon in
a key conference doubleheader.
"This is a pivotal series for us,"
said Hannah. "We're where we want
to be at this point of the season, we're
well positioned. This doubleheader
will tell us our progress to this point."
FOUL BALLS-Delaware pitcher
Mike Piascik was named co-ECC
player-of-the-week for his three-bit
shutout vs. La Salle last Week ...the
win was the Hens' fourth straight and
(Continued ~ pate 16)
Brown, Coleman set
new softball records
by Ange Brainard
record for career wins. The
For the womens softball record of 16 w~s originally set
by Bruce Bink
team (3-4 overall, 1-2 East by graduate Terri Short.
Coast Conference), WednesThe Delaware men's
"Records really don't mean
day was a day for breaking that much to me," said Collacrosse team finally had
records.
some decent weather in
. eman. ''The most important
Junior Marge Brown, who thing is that we won."
which to play and responded
was 3-for-3 in Wednesday's
by stinging the University of
The Hens win was initiated
10-5 win over Drexel, tied the · in the second inning with
Baltimore Super Bees, 9-4,
record of 61 career hits which Carole Carter scoring on a
this past Wednesday.
she now shares with 1982 fielding error by Drexel'•
With the not so fond
graduate Karen Stout.
memory of last year's 12-5
shortstop.
Brown said she had "no
loss to Baltimore, Delaware
Hen shortstop Betsy Helm
idea" going into the game
was set on revenge from the ·
that she was within reach of then ripped a four-run homer,
start. The-Hens jumped out to
breaking the record.
putting the Hens ahead 5-0.
a 6-0 lead, and it was not until
The first baseman was very
"We really needed a Iii
two minutes before the half
happy with the results of the win," Coleman said. "We
that the Super Bees finally
Review
Pim Von Hemmen
team as a whole over her per- finally played like we were
scored.
"We had a real fine defen- MIKE MCILVAINE DELIVERS TO THE PLATE in Wednesday's 9-1 sonal performance and ex- capable of playing."
Delaware continued with
sive effort and we just win over George Mason. The Hens are 14-11 overall and 5-1 in pressed how important the
victory was for the Hens.
consistant hitting and alert
dominated the attack," Hen the East Coast Conference.
•
"I'm really glad about the base running to capture tbe
coach Bob Shillinglaw said.
"Randy Powers played very except the third, and they out- "Dave stopped 27 shots and record," said Brown, "but victory.
The Hens ran into mllme~II- ..J•
well, but the entire attack shot Baltimore, 60-41. The played very well," Shill- I'm really glad we got
together as a team and got tary difficulty in the fiftbt
unit was responsible for the Hens also scooped up 48 inglaw said.
·
scoring."
ground balls to the Bees' 29.
The victory was important our bats working, something however, when Drexel scored
five runs on costly errors.
Powers led the Delaware·
"We seemed to dominate to the Hens for reasons other we were missing before.
"I think we showed
''The most important tbiDI
scorers with five goals. Ac- all four quarters," . Shill- than just revenge. According
counting for the other four inglaw said. Indeed, the to Shillinglaw, "We thought · ourselves that we have the is that they finally showed II
Hen goals were Tom Nuttle, Hens' · play was superior in that it was a key game potential to be an excellent each other the kind of
they are capable of
Chris Guttilla, Mark Seifert nearly every offensive and because we have some pretty team." '
Another statistic standout said Hen coach
and Pat O'Connor. Co-captain defensive category.
big matches coming up soon.
Nuttle also added two assists.
Shillinglaw was also pleas- This win made our record 5-4, was winning pitcher Sue Col- Ferguson.
The Hens will next be in
Delaware outscored the ed with the performance of and that will give us more eman.
Coleman tied the Hens tion with Lehigh tnrnm~~•Super Bees in every quarter goaltender Dave Darrell.
(Continued to pate 19)

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