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YRL MEMBER LIBRARY PROCEDURES MANUAL
YRL
Member
Library
Procedures
Manual
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010 YRL MEMBER LIBRARY PROCEDURES MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
INTRODUCTION TO YRL
What do I do as a Newly Appointed Librarian?
What is Yellowhead Regional Library?
What is TRAC?
Yellowhead Regional Library Mission Statement
Yellowhead Regional Library History
YRL Headquarters Staff Contacts & Organizational Chart
Yellowhead Regional Library Member Public Libraries
YRL Participating Municipalities
Who Does What?
Definitions and Abbreviations
Resources for Library Managers
What is a friends group?
Public libraries in schools - facts & tips for success
LIBRARY POLICIES
The Alberta Libraries Act
The Libraries Regulation
Required Policies
Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP)
Occupational Health and Safety
Revenue Canada
Additional Recommended Policies
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SERVICES
Alberta Municipal Affairs, Public Library Services Branch
Programs offered
Annual report statistics
Conferences
Book Allotment Accounts and Reports
Explanation of the Fund columns
Special notes
Communicating with YRL
Toll free telephone
Regular telephone
Fax
Email
YRL Website
Listservs
Consulting with YRL staff
Client Services
Technology Services
Desktop and network support
Helpdesk
GoToAssist
Training and consulting services
Colibri Machine
Disc Repair Service (DVDs and CDs)
FAQs
E-Resources
Online databases
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Overdrive
Online Catalogue: TRACpac
ChiliFresh
Professional Collection
Programming in Your Library
TD Summer Reading Club (SRC)
Teen Reading Club
Other programs
Local library programming
Benefits of programming
Programming ideas
Public Libraries Council
YRL Public Librarians Council Executive Committee
Reference Questions (AAQ)
Dealing with reference questions in your library
Statistics
Reference question tracking form sample
Special Collections
Aboriginal kits
World Language Books
Storytime kits
Free Supplies
TRAC/TAL Card
Visunet
Who can use the Visunet service?
Materials available through Visunet
VisuCAT
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YRL MEMBER LIBRARY PROCEDURES MANUAL
What this service means for your library
YRL Website
COLLECTION MANAGEMENT
Collection Development
Collection development policy
Selecting materials
Donations
Procedures
Collection Development Resources
Yellowhead Regional Library
Selection and review tools
Intellectual Freedom in Collection Management
Complaints about Library Materials
Request for reconsideration of library material
Shelving Library Materials
Understanding the Dewey Decimal System
Best Practices for shelving Collections
Serials
Cataloguing
YRL cataloguing standards
Assigning age and reading level
Polaris item records
Changing Statuses
Explanation of statuses
Withdrawn/Missing/Bindery/Unavailable
Lost materials
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Damaged items
Weeding
Why weed?
Who is responsible for weeding?
How often should we weed?
Weeding policies
How to weed
What to do with weeded books
MAIL AND DELIVERY SERVICES
Handling Mail
Email
Regular mail
Interlibrary loan mail
Van Run Delivery
YRL delivery of Interlibrary Loans
For TRAC member libraries
For libraries outside of TRAC
Date due flags
Shipping procedures
ILL inclusions list for nodes and associates as of September 2009
Government courier locations for interlibrary loan delivery
RESOURCE SHARING - HOLD REQUESTS
Placing a hold
Holds requests in TRACpac
Requesting an item in TRACpac
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Letting a patron cancel or suspend an unfilled hold in TRACpac
Holds requests @ TAL Online
In-Transit Procedures
Hold Request Terminology
COLLECTION INVENTORY
Why do inventory?
Recommended inventory schedule
Inventory planning steps
TECHNOLOGY IN LIBRARIES
Polaris
What number to call for help?
Computer troubleshooting tips
Basic printer troubleshooting
Wireless guest access
Internet access
Public access to the Internet
Statement of intent
Conditions
Procedures
Schedule A: Sample user procedure
Schedule B: Sample public access to the Internet user agreement
YRL helpdesk
Technology plan
Technology recommendations for purchase
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Desktop & Administrative Support Services – Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Core competencies for Technology (APLEN)
Community Access Program (CAP)
WELCOMING NEW PATRONS
Library Cards
TRAC background
Conditions
What to do if a patron presents a TRAC card from another library
What to do is a patron presents a TAL card
What to do if a patron presents a library card from another library
TAL cards – participating libraries
Patron codes
Renewing memberships
APPENDICES:
PIM User Manual
Simply Reports Guide
VDX Manual
Overdrive Manual
*Note: Polaris Client training materials can be found @ www.yrl.ab.ca*
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YRL MEMBER LIBRARY PROCEDURES MANUAL
INTRODUCTION TO YRL
What do I do as a Newly Appointed Librarian?
What is Yellowhead Regional Library?
What is TRAC?
Yellowhead Regional Library Mission Statement
Yellowhead Regional Library History
YRL Headquarters Staff Contacts & Organizational Chart
Yellowhead Regional Library Member Public Libraries
YRL Participating Municipalities
Who Does What?
Definitions and Abbreviations
Resources for Library Managers
What is a friends group?
Public libraries in schools - facts & tips for success
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YRL MEMBER LIBRARY PROCEDURES MANUAL
WHAT DO I DO AS A
NEWLY APPOINTED LIBRARIAN?
Welcome to Yellowhead Regional Library! You’re hired! Start here:
Obtain relevant information on the history of your community's involvement with Yellowhead
Regional Library (YRL).
Visit the YRL website www.yrl.ab.ca to see what the system has to offer you and your patrons.
YRL has an annual half-day orientation workshop for all new library staff at YRL Headquarters in midSeptember. Please call the Administrative Associate to register.
Phone YRL headquarters and introduce yourself to the Administrative Associate who can schedule an
orientation visit from a Client Services Librarian.
Familiarize yourself with the procedures manual. Write down questions to ask the Client Services
Librarian(s) over the phone or when he/she visits or when you come to headquarters.
Familiarize yourself with your own library’s services and collections. Write down all your questions and
don’t be afraid to ask them. YRL is here to help you in any way we can.
Review your library’s Plan of Service and take note of when it expires. Ask your board any questions
you have about the document’s development or contents. A new plan of service is required every five
(5) years. Contact YRL headquarters if your plan has expired or is expiring soon. A current Plan of
Service is a mandatory requirement for public libraries in Alberta.
As you become more familiar with library policies and procedures …
… welcome and help everyone who comes to the library.
• Be sensitive to the needs of all the people in your community, whether they are teenagers,
seniors, immigrants, unemployed workers, children, homemakers or anyone else.
• People who only use the Internet are just as important as the people who only read books.
… learn how to take and to fill patron requests for books from other libraries.
• Check your local library materials first for any reader requests.
• Always suggest that the patron put a hold on any item they want to borrow which is not
available at your local library.
• Handle interlibrary loans/requests/holds from your patrons and requests/holds sent to your
library within 24 hours.
• Remember, the role of the library is service: a library is useless if the books remain on the
shelves.
… establish and maintain ongoing communication with YRL headquarters.
• Inform headquarters of any changes in staff, hours, location, phone or email address.
• Please send headquarters a copy of your most recent:
9 Plan of Service
9 Technology Plan
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9 Annual Report
9 Policies
• Review your allotment reports.
• Send requests for TRAC/TAL cards, patron barcodes, plastic covers, and bookmarks to
headquarters.
• YRL is here to serve your staff and library’s needs. Please contact us with your questions.
… operate the library under the guidelines established by your local board.
• Establish and maintain ongoing communication with your library board members.
• Report on your local library at every regular board meeting.
• Know the difference between board responsibilities and library manager responsibilities.
SEE The Handbook: Alberta Library Trustees Association. Edmonton: Alberta Library
Trustees Association, 2003. It is also available at:
http://www.librarytrustees.ab.ca/Default.aspx?pageId=190867
… maintain accurate and relevant usage statistics of library use.
• Complete the annual report for the Alberta Municipal Affairs, Public Library Services Branch.
Send a copy to YRL headquarters, keep a copy for your board file, and send the original to the
Libraries Branch.
• Communicate statistics to your board and community regularly.
… be aware of and knowledgeable about YRL services:
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TRAC/TAL Card
Facilitation of interlibrary loans
Online catalogue: www.TRACpac.ab.ca
Integrated Library system: Polaris
YRL’s website: www.yrl.ab.ca
Online databases Available on YRL & TRACpac websites
Weekly van deliveries
Ordering, processing, cataloguing and delivery of library materials
Support and training for a variety of library management and training needs
Computer and network support for members on the YRL network
Allotment for purchasing library materials
Summer reading clubs for children and teens
Conferences and workshops
Virtual reference : Ask a Question
Special collections: Storytime kits, World Language Books (multilingual resources),
Aboriginal kits
… tips for success
ƒ Maintain a well-organized and attractive library.
ƒ Aim to be informed about community, provincial, national, and global topics as well as library
issues.
ƒ Attend all Public Libraries’ Council meetings, held three times per year at YRL.
ƒ Contact the Public Library Council Executive who is the liaison for your library. For more
information, refer to the YRL website at www.yrl.ab.ca
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ƒ Join professional associations such as the Library Association of Alberta (LAA).
SEE the LAA website at: http://www.laa.ca for information and membership rates and to
register online.
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Attend workshops and conferences to further your own professional development, such as
YRL workshops and conferences.
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Establish a good rapport with businesses and the newspaper in your town.
9 Contribute regularly to a column for library news in the local newspaper.
9 Maintain a high library profile in the community so businesses will use your resources
and support you when you need it.
9 Public relations and community awareness are good tools for overcoming tough times for
your library.
9 Seek to collaborate with other agencies/organizations/groups in your community.
• Plan and oversee the summer reading program, including supervising summer staff each year
and applying for STEP grants to fund them.
• Promote the online teen (summer) reading club, TeenRC: www.teenrc.ca
• Every year, review the periodicals (magazines) you are ordering to determine if they are
meeting your customers' needs and reorder more appropriate titles or cancel subscriptions.
• Email and mail is the vital link among member libraries and between member libraries and YRL
headquarters. Please handle all email and mail promptly and respond to any deadlines or
questions mentioned in correspondence.
• Weed on a regular basis to maintain a collection that is current and attractive; keep the
collection up-to-date and the library materials in good repair. Keep shelves dust free. Weeding
is a service offered by YRL Client Services Librarians. Please contact them if you need
assistance.
• Perform an inventory every three to five years. For assistance, contact someone the Client
Services Associate or Librarian.
• Display best sellers and new books prominently in your library.
• If you need help with any of your job responsibilities, call a Client Services Librarian.
• Refer to books and other resources that provide you with in-depth information and ideas on
library services and programs.
• Don't forget to have fun while doing your job!
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YRL MEMBER LIBRARY PROCEDURES MANUAL
WHAT IS YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY?
Yellowhead Regional Library (YRL) is one of seven cooperative library systems operating in the
province of Alberta. YRL is headquartered in Spruce Grove, Alberta, and provides services to public
and school libraries within 27,342 square mile boundary on a membership basis. Funding is provided
by member municipalities, member school boards and the Province of Alberta.
YRL is incorporated under the Alberta Libraries Act and is governed by a Board. The YRL Board
consists of one member for each jurisdiction, either school board or municipality. YRL is the only
library system where school boards rather than individual schools are members.
ALBERTA’S SEVEN REGIONAL
LIBRARY SYSTEMS
1. Peace Library System *
Website:
www.peacelibrarysystem.ab.ca
Phone: 1-800-422-6875
2. Yellowhead Regional Library *
Website: www.yrl.ab.ca
Phone: 1- 877-962-2003
3. Parkland Regional Library
Website: www.prl.ab.ca
Phone: 1-800-567-9024
4. Marigold Regional Library *
Website: www.marigold.ab.ca
Phone: 1-800-332-1077
5. Chinook Arch Regional Library System
Website: www.chinookarch.ca
Phone: 1-403-380-1500
6. Shortgrass Library System
Website: www.shortgrass-lib.ab.ca/
Phone: 1-403- 529-0550
7. Northern Lights Library System *
Website: www.nlls.ab.ca
Phone: 1-800-561-0387
* Indicates TRAC members
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WHAT IS TRAC?
The Regional Automation Consortium
YRL is one of the founding members of TRAC (The Regional Automation Consortium).
TRAC is a partnership of four regional library systems in Alberta: Marigold Library System, Northern
Lights Library System, Peace Library System, Yellowhead Regional Library, and their member
libraries.
The four system headquarters plus their member public libraries jointly share an integrated library
software system called Polaris, which YRL operates under an ongoing contract.
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YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY MISSION STATEMENT
Yellowhead Regional Library (YRL) provides materials and services to public and school libraries, and
other organizations to assist them in meeting the informational, educational, cultural and recreational
needs of their communities.
YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY HISTORY
Yellowhead Regional Library was founded in 1971 by the Counties of Barrhead, Lac Ste. Anne,
Leduc, Parkland and Wetaskiwin to provide library services to the school and public libraries in those
areas. From the start, intellectual freedom has been a YRL core value. In 1974 library services offered
by YRL expanded to include interlibrary loans.
During the 1980s YRL grew steadily. The decade was highlighted by a provincial capital grant made in
December 1988 of $1,461,500.00 to fund a new building for the YRL headquarters.
Significant change came during the 1990s. The new headquarters building was officially opened on
November 23, 1990. During this decade funding issues for libraries posed ongoing challenges.
Additionally, in the mid 1990s when school boards were amalgamated and regionalized, YRL’s
governing structure no longer complied with the Libraries Act. Thus restructuring became necessary.
Partway through this process - in 1996 -YRL celebrated its 25th anniversary. After eighteen months of
discussions, presentations and meetings, the members signed a new membership agreement in June,
1998. Under this model each school board and each municipality became an independent member of
YRL and each had a seat at the board table. This is YRL’s current governance model.
In 1999, The Regional Automation consortium (TRAC) was formed by an agreement between
Marigold Library System, Northern Lights Library System and YRL. The servers used to house the
jointly purchased Dynix Integrated Library Software (ILS) system were housed and managed at YRL
headquarters.
2004 was a year of notable change and growth. In the spring, Peace Library System joined TRAC and
their records were successfully merged into the TRAC Dynix database. This brought four of the seven
regional libraries in Alberta into the same consortium. Later that year, on September 18, the Town of
Devon joined YRL. This signaled a system completion for YRL in that all municipalities with a library
board within the Yellowhead geographic area had joined YRL.
Another major milestone at YRL and in TRAC was the migration to the new Polaris ILS. Owing to the
age of the Dynix ILS and changes to its vendor company, TRAC directors decided to replace it. After
thorough research and implementation processes, Polaris ILS went live for all TRAC libraries on
January 8, 2009.
During 2009, YRL administration and its Board went through a governance review as part of a plan to
address concerns raised by member municipalities. At the conclusion of this review, YRL had a new
governance structure with a new executive committee structure that receives input from the Public
Libraries Council on YRL Services.
Current statistics on YRL membership can be found on the YRL website. Please go to www.yrl.ab.ca
and click on the About Us tab. Click on Board and go to the Orientation page which features the
Public and School Libraries Fact Sheets.
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YRL HEADQUARTERS STAFF CONTACTS
& ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
A current copy of YRL’s staff contacts and organizational chart is located on the YRL website.
This page is updated each time staff changes occur at YRL headquarters and you can bookmark this
page for easy reference.
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YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY
MEMBER PUBLIC LIBRARIES
AABM
ALBERTA BEACH MUNICIPAL
LIBRARY
AAF
ALDER FLATS PUBLIC LIBRARY
ABEAM
BIBLIOTEQUE DE BEAUMONT
ABARR
BARRHEAD PUBLIC LIBRARY
ABRC
BLUE RIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY
ADUF
DUFFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY
ABRM
BRETON MUNICIPAL LIBRARY
AENT
ENTWISTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY
ACALM
CALMAR PUBLIC LIBRARY
AEV
EVANSBURG & DISTRICT MUNICIPAL
LIBRARY
ADAR
DARWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY
AFAW
(FAWCETT) M. ALICE FROSE LIBRARY
AD
DEVON PUBLIC LIBRARY
AFA
FORT ASSINIBOINE PUBLIC LIBRARY
ADV
DRAYTON VALLEY MUNICIPAL
LIBRARY
AGC
GRANDE CACHE MUNICIPAL LIBRARY
ADVR
DRAYTON VALLEY ROTARY BRANCH
AJA
JARVIE PUBLIC LIBRARY
AED
EDSON & DISTRICT PUBLIC LIBRARY
AKEC
KEEPHILLS PUBLIC LIBRARY
AH
HINTON MUNICIPAL LIBRARY
AN
NEERLANDIA PUBLIC LIBRARY
AJ
JASPER MUNICIPAL LIBRARY
ANS
NEW SAREPTA PUBLIC LIBRARY
ALE
LEDUC PUBLIC LIBRARY
ANJGG
(NITON JUNCTION) GREEN GROVE
PUBLIC LIBRARY
AMA
MAYERTHORPE PUBLIC LIBRARY
ASANS
SANGUDO PUBLIC LIBRARY
AMI
MILLET PUBLIC LIBRARY
ATO
TOMAHAWK PUBLIC LIBRARY
AO
ONOWAY PUBLIC LIBRARY
AWI
WINFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY
ALAAC
PIGEON LAKE PUBLIC LIBRARY
(Formerly Lakedell)
ARV
RICH VALLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY
ASB
SEBA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY
ASG
SPRUCE GROVE PUBLIC LIBRARY
ASH
SWAN HILLS PUBLIC LIBRARY
ASP
STONY PLAIN PUBLIC LIBRARY
A TM
THORSBY MUNICIPAL LIBRARY
AWM
WABAMUN PUBLIC LIBRARY
AWA
WARBURG PUBLIC LIBRARY
AWES
WESTLOCK MUNICIPAL LIBRARY
AW
WETASKIWIN PUBLIC LIBRARY
AWH
WHITECOURT & DISTRICT PUBLIC
LIBRARY
AWILD
WILDWOOD PUBLIC LIBRARY
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YRL PARTICIPATING MUNICIPALITIES AS OF MARCH 2010
Jurisdiction
Alberta Beach Village
Barrhead County No. 11
Barrhead Town
Beaumont Town
Brazeau County
Breton Village
Calmar Town
Crystal Springs S.V.
Devon Town
Drayton Valley Town
Edson Town
Grande Cache Town
Grandview S.V.
Hinton Town
Jasper Town
Kapasiwin S.V.
Lac Ste. Anne County
Lakeview S.V.
Leduc City
Leduc County
Ma-Me-O Beach S.V.
Mayerthorpe Town
Millet Town
New Sarepta Village
Norris Beach S.V.
Onoway Town
Parkland County
Poplar Bay S.V.
Seba Beach S.V.
Silver Beach S.V.
YRL invoices member municipalities two times per year. The
first invoice requires that ½ of the membership levy be paid in
January and the second half of the member ship levy be paid
in July.
This membership levy fee helps to provide some of the
funding that allows YRL to operate. Additional funding is also
received from the Provincial Government as an annual
operating grant based on the population served by YRL.
The membership levy for YRL member municipalities is
based on the current population of that municipality multiplied
by the current rate. In 2010, for example, the rate is $4.30 per
capita, so a municipality of 1000 population would be
invoiced $4300.00.
Current populations are taken from the
Alberta Municipal Affairs Official Population Lists:
http://www.municipalaffairs.gov.ab.ca/mc_official_populations.cfm
These populations are updated each fall by this government
department. If you need to update your municipality’s
population, check these lists.
Silver Sands S.V.
Southview S.V.
Spring Lake Village
Spruce Grove City
Stony Plain Town
Sunset Point S.V.
Swan Hills Town
Thorsby Village
Val Quentin S.V.
Wabamun Village
Warburg Village
Westlock County
Westlock Town
Wetaskiwin City
Wetaskiwin County No.
10
Whitecourt Town
Woodlands County
Yellowhead County
Yellowstone S.V
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WHO DOES WHAT?
The Municipal Council
ƒ Appoints the representative and alternate to the YRL board and communicates changes in
appointments to YRL.
ƒ Pays levies to YRL
ƒ Signs agreement with YRL
ƒ Pays the provincial grant to the local library board
ƒ Maintains and develops the local library through the local library board
ƒ Is kept informed about YRL
9 Initiates political action through the MLA and Provincial Government and
9 Other local government/s
The Municipal Library Board
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Hires the library manager
Is aware of differences between job descriptions of board members and the library manager
Is responsible for the local library
Sets goals and develops a plan of action that arises from the plan of service
Holds regular meetings
Applies for the Annual Provincial Operating grant early each year
Prepares and circulates the Annual Report
Conducts a community needs assessment and plan of service every five years, and sends it to
the Libraries Branch.
Prepares and circulates library policies
Raises funds for the local library
Engages in public relations and community awareness on behalf of the local library
Keeps informed about the local library as well as wider library issues
Provides information to YRL regarding:
9 minutes of board meetings that relate to YRL
9 local library staff or board changes
Joins library associations such as the Alberta Library Trustees Association (ALTA) and
Canadian Library Trustees Association (CLTA)
Initiates political action at all levels of government
Needs—identifies what the local library requires in terms of information services, supplies and
assistance
Suggestions for local library boards:
9 Use the RITE line (310-0000) to speak to MLAs
9 Invite councilors and candidates running for office to your board meetings
9 Include your library’s success stories in your Annual Report
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The Local Librarian
ƒ Operates the library under the guidelines established by the board
ƒ Reports to the library board at every regular meeting
ƒ Communicates with YRL regarding:
9 Statistics: annually
9 Changes: in hours, routines, staff, location or phone number/fax/e-mail/website
9 Needs: for information, services, supplies and assistance
ƒ Engages in public relations and community awareness on behalf of the library
ƒ Continues to be informed about news and developments from YRL as well as in the larger
library community
ƒ Joins professional associations such as the Library Association of Alberta (LAA)
ƒ Attends workshops in order to keep current with the library world and to grow professional skills
and abilities
Suggestions for Staff and Local Board:
ƒ Identify local talent available in your community or the surrounding area and sponsor
programs such as concerts, local dramas, author readings, or craft exhibitions.
ƒ Engage in public relations and community awareness
ƒ Collaborate with local organizations that provide services in your community, such as Family
and Community Support Services or local health organizations.
ƒ Look for creative ways to reach out to your community.
ƒ Start a job list for volunteers. Ask people to perform a single job, but have a list available of
work to be done.
Yellowhead Regional Library Board Member
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Represents the board of Yellowhead Regional Library and promotes YRL
Is an avid user and supporter of libraries and advocates for them
Engages in public relations and community awareness
Manages YRL through establishing goals and policies for the system
Attends YRL Board meetings or has a knowledgeable alternate attend
Is a member of the local library board
Reports regularly to local board
Reports to Council after each YRL Board meeting
Communicates to YRL regarding local needs and concerns and local "political conditions"
Continues to expand knowledge of libraries by professional development:
Keeps informed about regional, provincial, and national library issues by attending conferences
Uses the "buddy" system: keeps in touch with other board members and shares information
Engages in advocacy: initiates political action through contacts with the area MLA, the local
council and municipal administrators.
ƒ Makes YRL aware of local library needs and requirements in terms of information, services,
supplies or assistance.
ƒ Suggestion to YRL Board Members: Write articles for library periodicals and newsletters
ƒ Takes initiative as a regional board member to write, act and do.
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DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS
AALT
Alberta Association of Library Technicians
www.aalt.org
AAQ
Ask A Question
www.askaquestion.ab.ca
Cooperative reference service venture among libraries in Alberta
AFA
Alberta Foundation for the Arts
www.affta.ab.ca
ALC
Alberta Library Conference
www.albertalibraryconference.com
Annual provincial conference held in Jasper, AB
ALTA
Alberta Library Trustees Association
www.librarytrustees.ab.ca
AMA
Alberta Municipal Affairs
www.municipalaffairs.gov.ab.ca
Ministry under which the Libraries Branch operates
APLEN
Alberta Public Library Electronic Network
www.thealbertalibrary.ab.ca/aplen.html
Provides opportunities for libraries to increase their capacity for electronic services to the public
CACL
Canadian Association of Children’s Librarians
Division of CLA
CAP
Community Access Program
A national initiative through Industry Canada to support connectivity to electronic resources for
Canadians
CAPL
Canadian Association of Public Libraries
Division of CLA
CARLS
Chinook Arch Regional Library System
www.chinookarch.ca
CASL
Canadian Association of School Libraries
Division of CLA
CASLIS
Canadian Association of Special Libraries and Information Services
Division of CLA
CPL
Calgary Public Library
www.calgarypubliclibrary.com
EPL
Edmonton Public Library
www.epl.ca
FCSS
Family and Community Support Services
FOIP
Freedom of Information and Protection
http://foip.alberta.ca
FTE
Full time equivalent (used in relation to staff)
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ILL
Interlibrary loan
LAA
Library Association of Alberta
www.laa.ca
LOA
Library Operations Assistant program
MARC
Machine Readable Cataloguing Data
MLS
Marigold Library System
www.marigold.ab.ca
NLLS
Northern Lights Library System
www.nlls.ab.ca
NFB
National Film Board
www.nfb.ca
Non-Resident As per the document “An Agreement By and Between the Parties comprising the Yellowhead
Regional Library", non-resident means all persons not residing in a municipality that participates
in the Yellowhead Regional library. Conversely, a resident means all persons residing in a
municipality, improvement district or special area which participates.”
OPAC
Online Public Access Catalogue
PRL
Parkland Regional Library
www.prl.ab.ca
PLS
Peace Library System
www.peacelibrarysystem.ab.ca
POS
Plan of Service
An outline of the actions required to meet goals and fulfill objectives; specifies who is responsible
and deadlines; usually covers five years.
RSS
Resource Sharing System
The RSS used in Alberta for interlibrary loan is VDX
SLS
Shortgrass Library System
www.shortgrass-lib.ab.ca
TAL
The Alberta Library
www.thealbertalibrary.ab.ca
TAL Online
The Alberta Library Online Catalogue
www.talonline.ca
TRAC
The Regional Automation Consortium
Marigold, Northern Lights, Peace, and Yellowhead
TRACpac
TRAC’s public access catalogue
www.tracpac.ab.ca
YRL
Yellowhead Regional Library
www.yrl.ab.ca
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RESOURCES FOR LIBRARY MANAGERS
The following books are useful sources of information for both new and experienced library managers. They are
available for interlibrary loan through TRAC.
Accounting
Smith, G. Stevenson. Managerial Accounting for Libraries and other Not-for-Profit Organizations.
Chicago: American Library Association, 2002.
Fundraising
Douglass, Alexander G. Essential Principles for Fundraising Success: An Answer Manual for the Everyday
Challenges of Raising Money. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2005.
Gerding, Stephanie K. and Pamela H. Mackellar. Grants for Libraries: a How-to-Do-It Manual.
NT: Neal-Schuman, 2006.
Library Management
Carson, Paula Phillips, Kerry David Carson and Joyce Schouest Philips. The Library Manager’s Deskbook:
102 Expert Solutions to 101 Common Dilemmas. Chicago: American Library Association, 1995.
Giesecke, Joan. Practical Strategies for Library Managers. Chicago: American Library Association, 2001.
Gordon, Rachel Singer. The Accidental Library Manager. Medford, NJ: Information Today Inc., 2005.
Landau, Herbert B. The Small Public Library Survival Guide: Thriving on Less. Chicago: American Library
Association, 2008.
Reed, Sally Gardner. Small Libraries: A Handbook for Successful Management. Jefferson, NC: McFarland &
Company, 2002.
Seiss, Judith A. The New OPL Sourcebook: A Guide for Solo and Small Libraries. Medford, NJ: Information
Today Inc., 2006.
Nelson, Sandra. Strategic Planning for Results. Chicago: American Library Association, 2008.
Nelson, Sandra. Implementing for Results: Your Strategic Plan in Action. Chicago: ALA, 2010.
Technology Plan
Matthews, Joseph R. Technology Planning: Preparing and Updating a Library Technical Plan. Westport, Conn:
Libraries Unlimited, 2004.
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WHAT IS A FRIENDS GROUP?
Friends of Libraries are non-profit charitable groups formed to support public libraries in their communities. A
Friends Group is made up of individuals who care about their local library and support it by engaging in some or
all of the following activities:
• Fundraising
• Advocacy
• Volunteering
• Programming/Special events
• Community support
• Public awareness
• Partnership with community groups
• Literacy promotion
To form a Friends Group you will need a reliable core group of people who have the time to spend planning and
organizing the necessary details to help your Friends group succeed.
More Information
•
For more information on this topic, The Friends of Canadian Libraries have an excellent website for
Canadian Friends groups at: http://www.accessola.com/focal/assoc.html
•
Friends of Libraries USA provides a listserv and other useful information on this topic at: www.folusa.org
•
A useful book available for ILL from TRAC is:
Mcnaughton, Dorothy. How to Form Your Friends of the Library Group. Sault Ste. Marie, ON: Friends
of Canadian Libraries, 2007.
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PUBLIC LIBRARIES HOUSED IN SCHOOLS
A public library housed in a school presents everyone involved with the challenge of bringing together two
segments of the community with very different goals and reasons for being. There are positive and negative
aspects to the arrangement which need to be appreciated to create a successful library operation. The goal of
this section is to help you understand the nature of these challenges.
Yellowhead Regional Library has 16 public libraries housed in schools. All share the same physical space except
for one location, where the public library and the school library are in separate rooms in the same building. In 6
locations, both the public and school libraries are members of YRL. In 8 locations, only the public library is a
member of YRL (and the school is not).
Library spaces are staffed differently as well. In some cases the same person serves both the school and the
public libraries. In others, there is a library manager for the school library and another for the public library.
Memorandum of Agreement
In order to ensure cooperation, understanding, coordinated risk management, staff training, ongoing operating
requirements and issues that arise, a signed agreement between the school division and the public library board
must be made. If your library already has an agreement (contract), locate it and keep it available should issues
arise. If there is no agreement in place, the Alberta Libraries Regulation requires your library board to put one in
place.
Alberta’s public libraries are administered under the Alberta Libraries Act. The Libraries Regulation, under the
authority of The Libraries Act states:
A municipal board shall not operate a library housed in a school unless the municipal board enters into
an agreement with the school authority that sets out the responsibilities of the employees of the
municipal board and the school authority for the operation of the library, including the responsibilities of
the employees and volunteers of both, the municipal board has its own bank account and signing
officers, none of whom are employees of the school authority, and the library is open to the public
outside of the hours during which the school is in operation for regular classes, including being open
during evening or weekend or both, and during the summer.
For assistance with issues relating to public libraries housed in schools, please contact Client Services at YRL.
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Paths to a Successful Public Library Housed in a School*
1. Agreement (Contract). It is essential that there be a comprehensive contract between two governing
bodies spelling out the nature of the relationship. It is crucial that the authority of the principal vs. the
library board be set out, specifying which of the two is ultimately in charge, and how conflicts will be
resolved.
2. Policies. Joint policies that set out loan periods, fines, overdue materials, internet usage and
challenged materials need to be put into place. Policies should not treat students differently from the
general public.
3. Access. The library must be accessible to its users. This includes a separate entrance from regular
school entrances, for the protection of students and benefit of library patrons. There needs to be
adequate signage and handicapped-accessible access to the library and washrooms.
4. Personnel. There needs to be clear definition of who the employer is – the school board or the public
library board. Staff must be trained to meet the needs of both client groups.
5. Hours of opening. The school library should be open during school hours. The public should have
access during these times, but also when the school is not open, such as weekends, evenings and
during the summer.
Another consideration is security of the school during hours the school is closed. People should not be
able to wander around the school after hours.
6.
Collection Development. The school library’s primary function is to support curriculum. Thus the
collection must be able to meet that need, but may not meet public library needs. Public library materials
may not be considered appropriate for the school. This has implications for the way the space is
arranged.
7.
Evaluation. Continuous evaluation is necessary to ensure that the goals and objectives of both the
school and the public library are continually met. This will go a long way toward an effective
collaboration.
* Taken from Position Paper on School Housed Public Libraries. Library Association of Alberta. April, 1994.
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Differences between School and Public Libraries
SCHOOL LIBRARIES
Goals
* Serve instructional and curricular
needs of students and teachers.
PUBLIC LIBRARIES
* Serve recreational reading, general
information & cultural needs of the
entire community.
* Teach students research skills
Library Materials
* Supports the curriculum of each
grade in the school to facilitate the
teaching & learning process.
* Emphasis on information, reference
materials & young people’s literature
to motivate a taste for reading.
Library Usage
* Since attendance at school is
required and students use the library
as part of class. There is usually little
need to attract users.
* Usage is usually in class groups by
students in the school.
Library
Facilities/Space
* The average school library is
seldom larger than a classroom.
* Need for class-size or more seating
capacity.
Personnel
* Located near the center of the
school.
* Staff is usually not formally trained.
* Staff is solely concerned with the
educational, curricular and reading
needs of the school population and
teacher requirements.
Programs
General
* Facilitate learning & self-education
from preschoolers to seniors.
* Aimed at all ages, levels and tastes
to meet a wide variety of
informational, cultural, educational,
recreational and research needs for
the entire community.
* Book collection is broad in scope
covering a wide range of subjects for
all ages.
* Usage is voluntary and informal,
therefore there is a greater need to
promote the public library.
*Serves the varied interests of all
ages and backgrounds. School-age
children are only one part of the
community.
* Wide range of space size.
* Located in visible, central area of
town with easy access and parking.
* Contains more space for materials,
more collections and less seating
than the school library.
* Ideally staffed with professional
librarians (depending on population)
and staff.
* Staff is concerned with meeting the
needs of the community at large.
* Aimed at teaching students to use
information, develop critical thinking
skills and love reading.
* Aimed at recreation, enjoyment, &
creative use of leisure time.
Library = resource centre
Library = community centre.
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LIBRARY POLICIES
The Alberta Libraries Act
The Libraries Regulation
Required Policies
Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP)
Occupational Health and Safety
Revenue Canada
Additional Recommended Policies
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POLICY LIST FOR PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARDS IN ALBERTA
Public library service in Alberta is defined by legislation from the Department of Municipal Affairs. The
Libraries Act is the law. The Act allows the Minister to set Library Regulation to guide or direct how the law is
operated.
The Libraries Act sets out a governance structure that enables the public library board to communicate and
effectively manage a public library service. The library community and the Public Libraries Section of the
Province of Alberta have identified specific areas of policy that are required by a library board. The ten areas
of policy that a library board must put into place according to the legislation are listed below.
Policies are living documents that can change depending on circumstance and community. Library policies
are the responsibility of each individual library board which regularly reviews and updates them. Policies must
comply with all legislation that affects them.
The Alberta Libraries Act:
http://www.qp.gov.ab.ca/documents/acts/L11.cfm
The Libraries Regulation:
http://www.qp.gov.ab.ca/documents/regs/1998_141.cfm
Required Policies from The Alberta Libraries Act (Alberta) from section 7 of The
Libraries Regulation:
1. Confidentiality of user records, except where disclosure is required by law. SEE FOIP on next page.
2. Orientation and continuing education of board members and staff, including expenses for attendance
at library meetings, conference workshops/courses and for memberships in library associations
3. Finance, including designation of expenses for which board members and staff will be reimbursed,
the form in which expenses shall be claimed and the appointment of signing officers for the board
4. Personnel, including job descriptions and performance appraisals for employees and volunteers,
qualifications for staff positions, working hours, conditions of employment and grievance procedure.
In addition to these requirements, we recommend including statements regarding personnel on:
a. Breaks, overtime, weekends
b. Leaves for vacation, sickness, jury duty, etc.
c. Staff evaluation, probation, promotion, termination, retirement
d. Fringe benefits, staff privileges
e. Conduct and attitude
*Also SEE Alberta Employment Standards at http://employment.alberta.ca
5. Collection development: selection, acquisition, purchase and disposition of library resources,
including a policy respecting gifts and donations. We recommend including a statement which affirms
the Canadian Library Association’s Statement on Intellectual Freedom:
http://www.cla.ca/about/intfreed.htm, establishes provisions for children’s access to material, and
includes procedures for dealing with patron complaints and challenged books
6. Resource sharing:
http://www.municipalaffairs.alberta.ca/documents/lcvss/Provincial_Resource_Sharing_Policy.pdf
7. Library service to people unable to use conventional print resources.
http://www.thealbertalibrary.ab.ca/services/visunet.html
8. Terms and conditions under which library members may borrow library materials
9. Library hours
10. Terms for use of space managed by board but not normally used for library purposes
(e.g. meeting room)
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Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP) (Alberta)
The library board must appoint a FOIP officer (usually the library manager).
1. Personal information banks (PIB): http://foip.alberta.ca/resources/publications/pibguide.cfm
2. Records retention. More information is available at: http://foip.alberta.ca/
Occupational Health and Safety (Alberta)
• The board must do a hazard assessment of the worksite.
• The library must have a First Aid kit on-site that meets Alberta’s guidelines for what is required; it can
be self-made or purchased.
• One staff member must be trained in First Aid.
• The library must hold fire drills twice per year.
• More information is available from OH&S website: http://www.whs.gov.ab.ca on the following:
1. Workplace violence and harassment:
http://employment.alberta.ca/documents/WHS/WHS-PUB_vah001.pdf
2. Staff working alone:
http://employment.alberta.ca/documents/WHS/WHS-PUB_workingalone.pdf
3. Disaster recovery plan
4. Staff training to train other staff about OH&S and access to proper documents & safety
guidelines
Revenue Canada (Canada)
1. Copyright
2. Applicable tax law (only if have a Friends group or other body with charity or society status)
Additional Recommended Policies
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Internet and public access computer use
Maintenance and use of the library’s own website
Unattended children
Library objectives and services offered
Where applicable: cooperation with other libraries (e.g. not members of the system)
Public relations, marketing, advocacy, and communications
Policy on policies: establishing, reviewing, revising policies
Contact
The Public Libraries Section of Municipal Affairs website has made available a variety of policy samples at:
http://municipalaffairs.gov.ab.ca/mc_public_library_policy_examples.cfm
For further information about public library policies, please contact the Client Services Department at YRL.
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SERVICES
Alberta Municipal Affairs, Public Library Services Branch
Programs offered
Annual report statistics
Conferences
Book Allotment Accounts and Reports
Explanation of the Fund columns
Special notes
Communicating with YRL
Toll free telephone
Regular telephone
Fax
Email
YRL Website
Listservs
Consulting with YRL staff
Client Services
Technology Services
Desktop and network support
Helpdesk
GoToAssist
Training and consulting services
Colibri Machine
Disc Repair Service (DVDs and CDs)
FAQs
Online Catalogue: TRACpac
E-Resources
Online databases
OverDrive
Professional Collection
Programming in Your Library
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TD Summer Reading Club (SRC)
Teen Reading Club
Other programs
Local library programming
Benefits of programming
Programming ideas
Public Libraries Council
YRL Public Librarians Council Executive Committee
Reference Questions (AAQ)
Dealing with reference questions in your library
Statistics
Reference question tracking form sample
Special Collections
Aboriginal kits
World Language Books
Storytime kits
Free Supplies
TRAC/TAL Card
Visunet
Who can use the Visunet service?
Materials available through Visunet
VisuCAT
What this service means for your library
YRL Website
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ALBERTA MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
PUBLIC LIBRARY SERVICES BRANCH
The Libraries Branch is part of Alberta Municipal Affairs. The Branch promotes high quality of library and
information service accessible to all Albertans through:
•
•
•
•
•
The support and monitoring of library legislation *
The development of public libraries and library systems
The encouragement of cooperation between all types of libraries.
The provision of specialized consultation
The support of equitable library service to all Albertans
* Library legislation in Alberta is governed by the Libraries Act and Regulation.
Full text of the Libraries Act (Chapter L-11) is available at:
http://www.qp.alberta.ca/574.cfm?page=L11.cfm&leg_type=Acts&isbncln=9780779726363
Full text of the Libraries Regulation (Alberta Regulation 141/98) is available at:
http://www.qp.alberta.ca/574.cfm?page=1998_141.cfm&leg_type=Regs&isbncln=9780779732661
Programs
Financial Assistance:
•
•
•
•
annual operating grants to public library boards
annual operating grants to library systems
one time establishment grants to library systems
funding for initiatives that research, develop and promote public library service
Consulting Services:
•
•
•
to library boards and municipal councils on provision of public library service
to individual libraries to assist with specific concerns
to councils, recreation boards, booksellers, publishers, education and community agencies of all
types interested in library service
Library System Development:
•
•
consulting services to library boards and municipal councils wishing to join systems
partnership and co-operation building among libraries and systems to provide quality library service
Networking and Resource Sharing/Information Services:
•
•
•
facilitating on-going resource sharing initiatives
coordinating the provincial Alberta interlibrary loan agreement
support for the Alberta Public Library Electronic Network (APLEN) through The Alberta Library (TAL)
to provide a telecommunications network linking all public libraries to a resource sharing network
and to the internet.
Continuing Education:
•
•
orientation of new trustees
regional and provincial workshops in conjunction with library systems, agencies and institutions
Contact:
Public Library Services Branch
Alberta Municipal Affairs
803 Standard Life Centre
10405 Jasper Avenue
Edmonton Alberta T5J 4R7
Telephone:
780 - 427 - 4871
Fax:
780 - 415 - 8594
Dial the RITE Line at 310-0000 anywhere in Alberta to call toll free.
E-MAIL: [email protected]
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ANNUAL REPORT STATISTICS
The Libraries Branch of the Alberta Municipal Affairs Department requires each library to record collection
and circulation statistics on their annual report form. These figures, and others from the annual report, are
used to show the government what libraries do.
There is a Polaris report that libraries can run that provides the statistics requested on the annual report
form. An Annual Report Workshop is also held at YRL annually to assist you with completing your annual
report.
Contact information for Libraries Branch:
Alberta Municipal Affairs
Public Library Services Branch
803, Standard Life Centre
10405 Jasper Avenue
Edmonton, AB T5J 4R7
Fax:
780-415-8594
Email: [email protected]
The Libraries Branch consultant for YRL member libraries is:
Kerry Anderson
Phone: 780-644-5487
Email: [email protected]
CONFERENCES
Yellowhead Regional Library holds conferences for both school and public libraries. This is a professional
development opportunity provided to all Yellowhead Regional Library Member Library Staff.
Built upon a new theme every year, the sessions are enlightening and contain practical applications for easy
implementation in your library setting. The cost for the conference is kept at a minimum for all participants.
A registration brochure is sent out early on so that you can choose your sessions. As well as the sessions,
there is an exhibit area where you can meet book vendors and view/discuss library related products.
Librarians and interested board members are encouraged to attend.
For more information on conferences, please contact the Client Services Department.
Please see the Events Calendar on our website at www.yrl.ab.ca
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BOOK ALLOTMENT ACCOUNTS & REPORTS
Every January, YRL member libraries receive book allotment funds for library resources for the current fiscal
year. These funds are administered by the Bibliographic Services department, which has the resources to
order, receive, catalogue, process and ship library materials to our member libraries. The bulk purchasing
power and centralized cataloguing/processing of these items frees up money and staff time for our member
libraries to use in other areas. Items purchased with this budget are the property of your local library.
The allotment for public libraries (as of 2010) is $.50 per capita.
There are 4 types of book purchasing accounts:
• Regular Book Allotment
• Outside Purchases Reimbursement (since 2010)
• Purchase Additional Allotment funds
• Non-Allotment purchases or Bill Direct Accounts
Regular Book Allotment
Each library is encouraged to spend the allotment funds throughout the year. Funds may be spent on library
resources of formats including: hardcover books, paperback books, reference books, CD ROMS, audio
books on CD ROM, DVDs, and kits. Funds may not be spent for textbooks and/or other types of library
supplies such as posters etc.
Using publishers’ lists provided to the library from Acquisitions at headquarters, (for example United Library
Services (ULS) Hot lists or Paperbacks Bestsellers), as well as other selection tools, member libraries create
their orders and send them directly to HQ for processing. The libraries can also set up standing orders for
series, large print, etc. through the Acquisitions section of Bibliographic Services.
Outside Purchases Reimbursement
Member public libraries are able to get reimbursement for library materials purchased outside of YRL
Acquisitions from their allotment account. Information on this process and the required form are available on
the YRL website at www.yrl.ab.ca
Purchase Additional Allotment Funds
Member libraries may also deposit extra funds for library materials purchasing with YRL headquarters by
sending in a cheque with the funds designated to purchase additional allotment funds. A receipt for the
funds is issued upon request. If member libraries do not spend all their allotment funds, these funds will be
rolled over into the upcoming fiscal year.
Non-Allotment Accounts or Bill Direct Accounts
Member libraries may also be invoiced by YRL for library materials purchased through YRL headquarters.
Libraries frequently use this option when they have finished their allotment for the fiscal year and/or for
internal accounting purposes, do not want to purchase additional allotment funds. When a member library
orders library material through YRL acquisitions, YRL will pay initially for the material ordered and then YRL
will invoice the library for the materials upon delivery. Member libraries need to set up this option with YRL
acquisitions.
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Reports
To keep track of the various allotment accounts, the member libraries can find the current fund balance in
Polaris.
Each member library in YRL has one allotment account.
Some member libraries will have additional accounts such as a bill-direct account or an additional
allotment account as required by the library and set-up by YRL.
Fund reports in Polaris provide “real-time” status of the funds activity. It will change each time an
item is ordered, received, credited, etc.
Directions to find fund balances are available by contacting the Bibliographic Services Manager.
Explanation of the Fund columns:
Name:
Begins with the national library code and additional information such as A
(additional allotment account) or 7 as a Bill-Direct Account, e.g. ASGYA is an
additional allotment account; ASGY7 is a bill direct account where-in Yellowhead
places orders for your library and then invoices your library for the expended funds
Alternative Name:
Provides a more complete description of the account & its purpose
Fund Type:
Describes the type of fund, for YRL purposes all funds are regular
Status:
Indicates that the fund is useable and should have a status of OPEN during the
current fiscal year
Total allocated:
Indicates the budget balance in the specific account, when funds are transferred
within or out of the account, this budget balance changes
Encumbered:
Refers to the purchase order line item cost of all items that are “on order”
Expended:
Refers to the actual costs incurred when the line item is received
Free balance:
Indicates how many funds are available for future orders. A negative balance is
indicated by parentheses ( ). All Bill Direct Accounts will have a negative balance
since the library is to be invoiced for the amount.
Fiscal Year:
Indicates that the current fiscal year that it is for Yellowhead Regional Library
Owner:
Indicates the “owner” of the fund, in this case your library
Special Notes:
Total Allocated column: When additional allotment funds are received at YRL for a library, the funds are
initially put into this account for auditing purposes. The funds are transferred into the regular allotment
account of the library as they are needed throughout the year.
The Total Allocated balance will indicate the transfer of funds. E.g. you may have sent in $10,000 in
additional allotment, but as funds are transferred into the regular allotment account, the total allocated
balance will decrease in the additional allotment and increase in the regular allotment account.
Bill Direct Accounts (have a 7 in the Fund Name): The amount of Total Allocated is normally 0 since
your library is to be invoiced for these purchases.
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Encumbered: This fund figure represents the amount of the orders at the point of the purchase order being
processed. It will not accurately reflect the exact dollars that may be spent on any items as variances such
as discounts or change in pricing is applied at the point of receiving the order items.
If you have any questions about Book Allotment Accounts & Reporting, please contact Wendy Sears-Ilnicki,
manager of Bibliographic Services, at [email protected] or 1-877-780-962-2003 ext 225.
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COMMUNICATING WITH YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY
Yellowhead Regional Library Website
YRL’s website is the main place to go for information about Yellowhead Regional Library. The main page is
updated on an ongoing basis with current information and events. You can access the YRL website at:
www.yrl.ab.ca
Extension numbers and email addresses for staff can be found on our website.
Consulting with YRL Staff
YRL staff welcome your questions and concerns. The staff list on the YRL website shows whom at YRL to
call about your specific concern. If you don’t know whom to call, please contact the Administrative
Associate, Laurie Brock, or a Client Services librarian, and they will refer you to the appropriate staff
member.
Toll Free Telephone
Member libraries can call 1-877-962-2003 to contact YRL. Each YRL staff member has an individual
extension number.
Local and YRL board members are also encouraged to use this number when calling YRL headquarters.
YRL pays for the use of this service.
Regular Telephone
1-780-962-2003
Fax
Local fax: 1-780-962-2770
Toll free fax: 1-888-962-2770
Email
Current staff emails can be found on the www.yrl.ab.ca website as mentioned above.
Listservs
Librarians are encouraged to participate in the two email lists moderated by YRL and its TRAC partners.
YRLpub is a listserv for Public Library staff and YRL to discuss public library related topics. It is also
used as a tool for YRL staff to communicate with the public library members. It is strongly suggested
that all library staff subscribe to this listserv, since it is one way to keep updated with new information
and events.
• To subscribe, send an email to
[email protected]
and include your name and address in the body of the message.
• To unsubscribe, send an email to [email protected]
• To post a message, send it to
[email protected]
TRACsharing acts as a discussion group for TRAC (The Regional Automation Consortium) member
libraries to share and trade ideas, materials, problems, issues and solutions relating to their libraries.
TRACSharing Listserv membership is not mandatory.
• Post message:
[email protected]
• Subscribe:
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• Unsubscribe:
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CLIENT SERVICES
Changes to staffing levels in 2009 resulted in a merger of the Technology Services and Training and
Development Departments. Together, the staffs from these departments now make up a new department
called Client Services.
Technology Services
The Client Services Associate and Network Administrators provide support for the internal network at YRL
headquarters, the member libraries on the YRL network and the Polaris Integrated Library System (ILS).
YRL has partnered with three other regional libraries (Northern Lights Library System, Peace Library
System, and Marigold Library System) to have all their member libraries operate off the same ILS database.
This partnership is called TRAC (The Regional Automation Consortium) and consists of 156 public library
service points in the province that carry out their library operations (circulation, online public access
catalogue) on the shared ILS database.
YRL is the Central Site for the TRAC ILS and the Client Services Department supports all elements of the
hardware and network portions of maintaining the shared database. The TRAC consortium has nearly 3
million holdings and nearly 700,000 titles.
Desktop and Network Support
Libraries that choose to connect to the Supernet via Yellowhead Regional Library are eligible for a range of
services to augment the base services, such as access to the ILS Software and the online catalogue. The
network and desktop support services YRL offers are:
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Network connectivity/wireless hotspot connectivity
Email services via Microsoft Exchange
Domain and web site hosting
Helpdesk services
First level Backup/Disaster Recovery Services
Hotspare equipment loan service
Recommendation services
Helpdesk
To use the helpdesk, go to YRL’s website at www.yrl.ab.ca . Scroll down to the bottom right-hand corner.
Click on “Helpdesk” and place your request.
GoToAssist
GoToAssist allows a desktop administrator to solve your computer problem remotely. It is also located on
the bottom right of YRL homepage.
Training and Consulting Services
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Yellowhead Regional Library employs professional librarians to provide for the training and consulting needs
of member library staff. YRL believes that provision of expert advice by consultants is an essential service
for member librarians and library boards. Consultation serves as a communication link among and between
libraries and headquarters, facilitating problem solving, promotions and projects in member libraries.
Whether the consultation can be taken care of by telephone, email or requires a visit to the library, YRL
Client Services staff are here to help you.
The consultants aim to visit member libraries at least once a year, at a time convenient for the library
manager. The primary goal of the visit is to touch base with library staff, determine what their primary
consulting needs are, and help them with their strategic planning, among other things. It may also involve
training.
New librarians are given a half-day orientation to the services offered by Yellowhead Regional Library at a
two-hour workshop every September. As well as an introduction to YRL, this workshop provides basic
information on ordering materials, the interlibrary loan process, information on the Polaris system and further
training opportunities.
Special training sessions may also be arranged by request. Headquarters staff try to do site visits when the
library is closed or when there is someone to cover the desk while they are working with the librarian.
The Client Services Librarians provide the following services:
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Plan and host conferences
Collection development consultations including evaluation, weeding, selection, development, and
planning
Consulting on specific questions or issues
Information on current library issues
Policies and Procedures
Assistance with Programming for all age groups
School library evaluations
Assistance with needs assessments and plans of service
Training on a wide variety of topics, including databases and YRL services, such as OverDrive.
Workshops or seminars on library management skills
Please contact the librarians in Client Services if you have questions or need information.
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COLIBRI MACHINE
YRL owns a CoLibri machine which is available for loan to YRL member libraries. YRL also has a stock of
covers available for purchase. The CoLibri System is an internationally patented book protection system.
With CoLibri, a library can quickly and easily apply a special transparent, custom fitted durable, re-usable
and protective covering to books.
For an online demonstration of the CoLibri Machine, please visit the YRL website.
The CoLibri machine can be borrowed from YRL by sending an email to [email protected]
The email must give:
• The desired dates for usage
• The number of covers and sizes needed.
The machine with instructions and requested covers will be sent out on the next available van run to the
member library along with an invoice for the covers.
Loan Period:
The machine may be loaned out for a maximum of 6 weeks before needing renewal. If the machine is
already out at another location, the requesting library will be notified and the machine will be reserved for the
next available time.
Cover prices are listed below. Covers are available in bulk amounts only.
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250 Mini Covers (fit standard paperbacks)
250 Regular Covers (fit standard hardcover books)
125 Large Covers (fit oversize books)
$212.50 plus GST
$225.00 plus GST
$117.50 plus GST
Questions about the CoLibri machine may be directed to the Bibliographic Services Manager.
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DISC REPAIR SERVICE
YRL offers a free disc repair service to its member libraries. This service repairs most scratches on 12cm
discs including Music CDs, Books on CD, DVDs and CD-ROMs.
YRL uses the Eco-Junior disc repair unit which is known for its industrial-grade repairing abilities. It is a 4
stage unit that uses a wet buffing process to remove even the deepest scratches.
Frequently Asked Questions
Q. ARE THERE DAMAGES THAT THE MACHINE CANNOT FIX?
A. If the disc is cracked, warped or contains original manufacturer’s defects, the disc cannot be repaired. As
well, discs can only be wet buffed so many times (approx. 10-12 times), before there is nothing left to read
on the disc.
Q. DO YOU CHECK THE DISCS AFTER BUFFING TO SEE IF THEY WORK?
A. YRL staff will inspect the disc visually to ensure scratches are removed and will note upon the
accompanying form if we were unable to remove all the visible scratches; however, staff will not be able to
check each disc to determine if it is working properly. We suggest libraries play the disc upon its return
before loaning it out again.
Q. IS THERE A COST FOR THIS SERVICE?
A. This is no current cost for the service. YRL will review the use of the service annually and will determine
if a fee per disc ever needs to be applied.
Q. HOW DO I SEND IN MY DISCS TO BE REPAIRED?
A. Libraries need to fill out a Disc Repair form for each disc that is being repaired. The form is available on
the YRL website. A copy of the completed form is shipped with the disc on the weekly van run (properly
packaged) and the library keeps a photocopy of the completed form for their records.
Q. WHAT IS THE TURNAROUND TIME FOR THE DISC REPAIR SERVICE?
A. The turnaround time varies between 1-4 weeks depending upon the number of discs needing to be
repaired. If you have a large number of discs to send in at one time, please contact the Bibliographic
Services Manager at YRL to determine the best time for sending in these items.
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ONLINE CATALOGUE: TRACPAC
www.tracpac.ab.ca
The online public access catalogue of the Polaris integrated library system is called TRACpac. TRACpac
contains the holdings of Yellowhead Regional Library, Peace Library System, Northern Lights Library
System and Marigold Regional Library. These four system headquarters and their member public libraries
share one library automation system, which is housed at Yellowhead Regional Library.
Residents with a membership can search, place holds, renew items, download audiobooks or eBooks and
check on the status of items they want.
A generic TRACpac brochure is available on our website. You can edit the parts in red to customize the
brochure for your library’s patrons.
You can find tutorial on using TRACpac on the YRL website at www.yrl.ab.ca
If you have questions or need further information, please call the Client Services department.
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E – RESOURCES
Online Databases
Online databases are electronic information databases containing thousands of full-text materials
traditionally available in print, put into an organized collection in computerized form. They are created by
publishers, businesses, government agencies, professional groups, and many other organizations.
As a member of The Alberta library (TAL), YRL has negotiated access to online databases for patrons of
member public libraries. These databases can be accessed in TRACpac. Access is provided to 44
databases under following topics:
Business Sources
Do it Yourself
Newspaper, Magazine and Journal Articles
Especially for Teachers and Educators
Encyclopedias and Reference
Genealogy
Health and Wellness
Literature, Fiction, Poetry, Film & the Arts
Science
Children’s & Teen Audiobooks
For a complete list of databases, including databases only available to YRL members and therefore not in
TRACpac, please see www.yrl.ab.ca
To use the databases:
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Browse the list of titles, which are organized by subject area.
Choose a database and click on the title.
Companies that produce the databases are listed in parentheses after the title.
Some databases are geared for General use and some are geared for Academic use.
Each person with a valid library membership can access the databases by using her/his own barcode and
PIN number. The PIN number is usually the last four digits of the patron’s telephone number.
TRAINING in effective ways of searching the databases is provided from time to time. Contact Client
Services for scheduling or check the YRL Events Calendar on our website.
You can also access the databases from TRACpac, under the “E-Resources” tab.
Overdrive
Overdrive is a service provided to TRAC member libraries that allows patrons with library memberships to
download audiobooks and eBooks to their computers, iPods, MP3 players and Sony eBook readers.
It is available at www.tracpac.ab.ca Click on the
icon.
You can learn how to browse, check out and download digital books and audiobooks by taking the Overdrive
tour at: http://www.overdrive.com/products/dlr/tour/
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PROFESSIONAL COLLECTION
To assist member libraries, YRL has a collection of materials pertaining to library operations and
management. The collection includes books on advocacy, using the internet, promotion and public relations,
personnel, marketing, advocacy, collection development, library planning, choosing books for children,
programming for all age groups, storytelling, fundraising, board development plus many other related topics.
This collection is housed in YRL headquarters and is available on interlibrary loan to any member library
staff as well as patrons with library memberships.
All items are available for interlibrary loan from TRACpac at: http://www.tracpac.ab.ca
Call Client Services if you have any questions about the professional collection.
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PROGRAMMING IN YOUR LIBRARY
TD Summer Reading Club (SRC)
Every summer kids can improve their reading skills and reduce summer learning loss while having fun. Each
year, public library staff develop a wide range of exciting activities around a different theme to help kids
enjoy reading. The SRC encourages children to use the library during the summer and to read different
kinds of books; reinforces reading and vocabulary skills learned during the school year; encourages nonusers to come to the library; and provides all children with a positive library experience.
YRL supports the national Summer Reading Club, and encourages member libraries to participate. Kids, 12
and under, who register with their local library for the TD Summer Reading Club receive a poster, stickers
and an activity book - all free - as a part of their reading kit. Order forms for free materials will be sent to you
in January. Each year a theme is chosen and, in addition to the free materials, the national program
produces a manual, an extensive booklist and a website on the theme. The website can be found at
www.td-club-td.ca
If you are ordering books or other items for your collection from the Summer Reading Club list, be sure your
order is in to the Acquisitions Clerk by the end of March for timely arrival.
The seven regional libraries in Alberta take turns making a number of theme-related prizes available for
libraries to purchase to use in their Summer Reading Clubs. Order forms for purchased materials will be
sent to you in March.
In late May or early June, YRL runs a Summer Reading Program preparation workshop for the Librarians
and their staff, to introduce library staff to the theme for the summer. This includes a roundtable where
library staff share craft and programming ideas.
The remainder of the Summer Reading Program is determined and carried out by local library staff.
Teen Reading Club
The Teen Reading Club began as a teen summer reading club, but is now available all year at:
www.teenrc.ca/ The Canada-wide, year-round Teen Reading Club is run by the British Columbia Library.
It was developed by library folks for teens interested in reading and connecting with other teen readers
across the country. Volunteer library staff from across Canada help moderate reviews, chats, forums and
also keep the gears of the program running throughout the year.
Teens across Canada can register for the program and then use their accounts to submit book reviews,
participate in online forums, and take part in library-moderated author and genre chats. Teens also have
online space dedicated to their own writing -- where they can submit theirs for comment and provide
constructive feedback to other teen writers. Teens in many jurisdictions become eligible for prizes by
submitting book reviews. This program is the first national online teen program run by public libraries.
Volunteer participating libraries support TeenRC by providing moderators: library staff and library school
students from across the country check book reviews, blog comments, and discussion forums to ensure that
teens are in a safe online environment. They also support teens by providing reading suggestions and
writing support.
YRL purchases posters and bookmarks for the summer program as well as prizes for draws for participating
teens in YRL member libraries. As of 2010, a membership fee for participation in TeenRC is paid for by YRL
on behalf of its member libraries.
The TeenRC website for librarians is: teenrc.bclibrary.ca/ Please see the website for more information.
Since this program is online, it needs to be promoted by the local library to local teens.
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Other Programs
From time to time YRL offers workshops on varied topics. Libraries are informed via the YRLpub listserv
and YRL website.
Other programming events include Canada Book Day, Alberta Library Week, winter reading programs, Web
Awareness workshops, Young Reader’s Choice Awards, Chrysalis, and Canadian Children’s Book Week.
YRL also has a number of titles on programming available in the Professional Collection. To locate these
items, simply search using the keywords “library programs” in TRACpac. All items are available for interlibrary loan.
Please contact Client Services if you have any questions about the Summer Reading Program in your
library.
LOCAL LIBRARY PROGRAMMING
Libraries are many things to their communities. They offer the practical information people need to improve
their quality of life and to increase individual options in a complex society—information about health,
education, business, child care, computers, the environment, looking for a job... and much more.
Libraries also give their communities something less tangible, yet just as essential to a satisfying and
productive life—nourishment for the spirit. Programs in the humanities and the arts that encourage people to
think and talk about ethics and values, history, art, poetry, and other cultures are integral to the library’s
mission. Such programs help to illuminate the experiences, beliefs and values that unite us as human
beings. They stimulate us to make connections where we noticed none before—between our ancestors and
ourselves, between one culture and another, between the community and the individual.
Programs complement other library services by providing an opportunity to highlight collections, promote
services and share knowledge and expertise. They are a strong mechanism for outreach and promotion
which allow the library to forge partnerships with a wide variety of groups and individuals. They attract both
regular and new users of all ages and backgrounds. Programs raise the library's profile in the community
and have a positive impact on library use.
Benefits of Programming
Library programs benefit the community by:
• being responsive to current interests
• serving as a forum for idea sharing, information gathering and education
• promoting cultural awareness
• developing information literacy
• offering training and assistance with new technologies
• fostering a love of reading and learning
• providing early literacy experiences to young children
• providing a safe, welcoming environment for meeting with others
• perception by the community of the library as a community centre
• community awareness / development
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Programming Ideas
The following websites contain useful programming information.
Mid Hudson Library System (Poughkeepsie, NY)
http://midhudson.org/program/main.php
This website provides a scope of programming ideas for different age groups and adult interests.
Programming Resources from Ontario Library Service
http://www.library.on.ca/links/clearinghouse/publicservices/programming.htm
Programming Manual from Ontario Library Service
http://www.library.on.ca/publications/sourcebooks/services4programming.pdf
Adult Programming Guide
http://msl.mt.gov/whatsyourstory/programmingguide.pdf
For more information on library programming, please contact YRL Client Services librarians.
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PUBLIC LIBRARIES COUNCIL
The Yellowhead Regional Library Public Libraries' Council met for the first time on April 20, 2001. The
council was created to provide a forum for YRL member libraries to present ideas on YRL services and for
YRL staff to share information and discuss issues. The council also provides a forum to discuss common
interests and problems that arise in member libraries. It is a chance to share what is happening in individual
member libraries, what programming and services are being offered locally, what grants have been
received, building plans etc. It also provides an opportunity for library staff from diverse locations to get to
know each other.
The Public Libraries Council is a group made up of the member library managers of each of our member
libraries. It is a recognized group with each library having one vote. It also has an executive.
YRL library managers are strongly encouraged to attend Public Libraries’ Council meetings in order
to keep informed and network with other YRL library managers.
The YRL Public Libraries’ Council Meetings are held three times a year, in April, June and October. Public
Libraries' Council Meetings take place at Yellowhead Regional Library in Spruce Grove.
Invitations are sent by YRL. Library staff who wish to attend are asked to register ahead of time. Minutes of
each meeting are available on YRL’s website at: http://www.yrl.ab.ca/content/minutes-0
YRL Public Libraries' Council Executive Committee
A list of current Public Libraries Council Executive Committee members can be found on the YRL website at
www.yrl.ab.ca
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REFERENCE SERVICE
Yellowhead Regional Library uses the Ask a Question service available at http://askaquestion.ab.ca/
“The Ask a Question service is a cooperative venture among libraries throughout Alberta. The collected
experience and background of Alberta's diverse librarians means you get the best answer possible to your
question - whatever the topic! (quoted from the Ask A Question website).
The Ask a Question service is very easy to use. All you need is an email address and a postal code.
From the homepage of the website (address given above), you type in:
• Your questions
• Your email address
• Click yes or no to the question “Do you live in Alberta?”
• Your postal code
• Click ‘submit’.
An immediate response will be sent to your email that says your question has been received and includes a
confirmation request number. You will receive an answer within 12 to 24 hours.
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Dealing with Reference Questions in Your Library
Ask the patron if he/she would like to use the Ask a Question service. If so, show him/her how to use it.
Take advantage of the situation to tell patrons about the E-resources (online databases) that are available,
and show them how to access them.
If a customer has a request for information that you wish to fill from your local library resources, here are
some questions to ask the patron:
1. Clarify what it is that the patron wants information about. Say, “I understand that you want…” and
repeat what they have said to you. Ask questions about what they want until you understand.
(Often the first thing people ask for is not what they really want. Part of the function of the
Reference Interview is to make this clear.)
2. Secondly, ask the patron:
• Is there a time limit on the information required?
• Level - For what reading level is the information required. E.g. elementary, high school,
university, adult.
• Depth - How much information is needed? Example: one or more books, photocopy, one or
more viewpoints for research paper.
• Currency - Is the latest piece of information necessary (as in scientific subjects) or is general
information enough?
• Purpose of request - Is this for recreational reading, term paper, general interest?
Statistics
All libraries are strongly encouraged to track the number of reference questions they handle. Knowing how
many questions your library handles can assist in planning, budget allocation, and evaluation of services.
Alberta Public Libraries Branch also requires that libraries report their reference statistics in their Annual
Report.
For example, if, in the process of tracking your reference stats, you notice that Tuesday afternoons are
extremely busy, you may choose to have extra staff in on that day.
You may notice trends in the type of reference questions being asked, and may choose to allocate some of
your book allotment in order to answer that particular need.
Your Board should be kept informed as to the number of reference questions being handled. This number
may provide supporting documentation for increasing library hours or library staff. The stats may also act as
verification that a change the Board implemented was justified such as increasing hours or increasing
programming. Low numbers may signal a lack of training/lack of confidence in the service - and this needs
to be addressed.
Please SEE the next page for an example of a reference question tracking form.
Keep this form at the reference desk, and try to get into the habit of marking down the questions. You may
be surprised at how many questions are handled! By modifying the form, you may include other things you
would like to track, such as how many times your staff needed to do computer instruction with a patron.
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REFERENCE QUESTION TRACKING FORM SAMPLE
Date
Quick
Directional Reference
Research
Readers
Advisory
Computer
Instruction TOTAL
TOTAL
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SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
The Special Collections are collections of books and materials that supplement member libraries’ existing
collections. Special Collections available for loan from YRL:
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Aboriginal Kits
World Language Books
Storytime Kits
Aboriginal Kits
The aboriginal kits are circulating collections of fiction and nonfiction material for both adults and juveniles in
a variety of formats. These kits were created to supplement local public library collections on aboriginal
topics. Selection for these kits was focused primarily on Alberta and secondarily on Canadian Aboriginal
peoples. Each aboriginal kit contains adult and juvenile books, music, television and radio programs, as well
as other materials.
Aboriginal Kits Available for Loan
Block 1: Religion, spirituality, traditional philosophy, and elders. Resources on past and present
issues with religion and spirituality; traditional philosophy in both historical and current contexts; writings and
sayings of elders.
Block 2: Women’s identity, issues, & culture. Non-fiction and fiction resources exploring the complexities
of women’s culture within a First Nations context.
Block 3: First Nations, colonialism, relations with government past & present. Includes treaty
information, law, property rights, resources concerning residential schools, governmental issues, and related
research.
Block 4: Language resources: mixed levels. Bilingual storybooks, phrase books, music, dictionaries, and
workbooks. Particular emphasis on the Cree language.
Block 5: Health & Wellness. Resources related to traditional healing & medicine, addictions, mental
health, sacred plants, and nutrition.
Block 6: Literature, storytelling & performing arts, leisure, sports, and games. Plays, radio
performances, traditional stories and storytelling; essays on aboriginal literature, performer and athlete
biographies, traditional sports and games, current sports, sports fiction.
Block 7: Peoples, nations, and groups. Identity issues related to specific First Nations groups and
regions.
Block 8: Pride and identity. General discussion of issues related to First Nations pride and identity
through non-fiction, fiction, music, and documentary.
Block 9: Traditional music, festivals, & pow wow. Primarily DVD documentaries and cd recordings
featuring festivals, dances, and pow wow music. Some non-fiction and picture books.
Block 10: Land, nature, environment, & relationships with the natural world. Explores the links
between people, plants, animals, landscapes, and other natural phenomena.
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Block 11: Children’s and young reader’s resources. Fiction and non-fiction, history, every-day life, past
and present, picture books, and juvenile fiction.
Block 12: Arts and crafts, architecture, cookery, and fashion. Traditional and modern arts and crafts of
all sorts. Includes history, instructional books, cookbooks, and documentaries. Primarily non-fiction.
Block 13: Business, biography, adult and young adult fiction, popular music. Wide assortment of
music CDs, documentaries, biographies, fiction and non fiction.
Block 14: Children’s and young reader’s resources. Children's music, history, every-day life, past and
present, picture books, and juvenile fiction and nonfiction.
Aboriginal Kits Procedures
Requesting Procedures
To book an Aboriginal Kit, phone, fax or email requests to YRL.
Phone: (877-962-2003)
Fax:
(780-962-2770)
E-mail: [email protected]
Receiving Procedures
Kits are sent via the YRL Delivery System and will arrive on your regularly scheduled van run.
Returning Procedures
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•
Please be sure to return aboriginal kits when they are due. Late returns result in delays for other
libraries wanting to borrow them. Please be considerate of others and conscious of loan periods.
There is a contents list in every kit.
Please check the contents list as you repack the kit to ensure you return all the pieces.
World Language Books (Alberta Multilingual Book Consortium)
The World Language Book Collection is a collection of books in many different languages that supplement
member public libraries' existing collections. The multilingual books come in boxes (blocks) of 25 books
each and are made up of a variety of both fiction and nonfiction titles. Both adult and juvenile blocks are
available in most languages.
This service is coordinated by the Parkland Regional Library System. Yellowhead Regional Library pays a
membership fee on behalf of our member libraries so that YRL member libraries can participate in this
valuable service.
Check out the webpage devoted to this service at http://www.prl.ab.ca/AMBC.
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Multilingual Blocks are available in the following languages:
Albanian
Arabic
Bosnian
Chinese
Cree
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
Estonian
Farsi
Finnish
Gaelic
German
Greek
Gujarati
Hebrew
Hindi
Hungarian
Italian
Japanese
Korean
Lithuanian
Norwegian
Panjabi
Polish
Portuguese
Russian
Serbian
Slovakian
Spanish
Swedish
Tagalog
Turkish
Ukrainian
Urdu
Vietnamese
Welsh
Alberta Multilingual Book Consortium Books Procedures
Within the block, each book has been labeled with the box number and item number (e.g. DUT 23F)
Requesting Procedures
•
•
•
•
Request from PRL via an online form at http://www.prl.ab.ca/AMBClanguagerequest
Indicate language, reading level (adult or juvenile), and number of blocks desired.
If there are no blocks available in the language of your choice, you will be placed on a waiting list
and the next available block will be sent to you.
If your library is on Government Courier, the blocks will be sent directly to you. If your library is not
on Government Courier, the blocks are sent to your regional library headquarters and sent on to you
via the regional library delivery system.
Circulating Procedures
•
•
•
Multilingual books are generally circulated to patrons as Polaris On-the-fly items.
Please do not affix any barcodes directly to the books. All books have a pocket so you can slip a
barcoded card into the pocket when the item is checked out and remove the card when the item is
returned.
If an item is damaged or has been mislabeled (wrong language or reading level) or if there are other
problems with a book, please put a note on the item before returning to PRL so we can remedy the
situation.
Returning Procedures
•
•
Repack all the books from each block into the appropriately labeled box before returning to PRL
(e.g. repack DUT 23 A to DUT 23 Y into the box labeled DUT # 23).
Please return a complete block if you are able. If a few items are missing from a block that is
otherwise ready for return, send all the books you have in the appropriately labeled box and put a
note in the box indicating which items are missing. Those missing items can be sent back to PRL
when you do receive/find them.
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Storytime Kits
The storytime kits are thematic “programs in a box” and are available to both school and public member
libraries. Each storytime kit includes picture books, puppets, props, games, programming resources, craft
ideas, music, and other material. These kits can be used to supplement member library programming
resources. The kits come in large plastic tubs and are organized by theme.
Storytime Kits available for loan:
All About Bugs and Insects
All About Me and My Friends
Animal Tales: On Safari
Animal Tales: Zoo
Bears
Bedtime, Birthdays and Mother
Goose
Birds
Christmas A,B,C,D & E
Circus
Dinosaurs
Down by the Pond
Earth
Fairy Tales
Fall A,B,C & D
Families A & B
Farm Animals
Folk Tales
Food Stories
Library Skills A & B
Monsters and Magic
Mouse Tales
Nursery Rhymes and Mother
Goose
Our Community
Pets
Polar Bears and Penguins
School A & B
Space
Spring A & B
Spring: Ducks and Frogs
Spring: Vegetables Growing
Things
Stories in Song and Rhyme
Things that Go
Under the Sea A & B
Weather
Wild Wild West
Winter A,B,C & D
Storytime Kit Procedures
Requesting Procedures
•
•
•
To book a Storytime Kit, phone, fax or email requests to YRL.
Kits can be booked up to six months in advance.
Storytime kits are loaned for one month. There is a limit of one kit per library per month.
Phone 780-962-2003 or 1-877-962-2003
Fax 780-962-2770 or 1-888-962-2770
E-mail [email protected]
Receiving Procedures
•
•
•
Kits are sent via the YRL Delivery System & will arrive on your regularly scheduled van run.
Kits arrive in large plastic tubs with two cable ties to hold the lid in place.
Please make sure hands are clean and do not use kits around food or drinks.
Returning Procedures
Please make sure to return storytime kits when they are due. Late returns result in delays for other
libraries wanting to borrow kits. Please be considerate of others and conscious of loan periods.
There is a contents list in every kit. Please check the list as you repack the kit to ensure you return
all the pieces of the kit. Please put all puppets back into plastic bags and sort all books into author
order.
DO NOT LOAN storytime kit material to patrons. If a patron wants to borrow a book from the kit,
place a hold on another copy in Polaris.
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SUPPLIES
YRL supplies our member libraries with a number of items free of charge as well as items that are invoiced
at a cost recovery price.
When ordering supplies contact the appropriate department as indicated below. Supplies will be sent out via
van run to the member library.
Supply List
Items available from the Bibliographic Services Department
(Contact [email protected] )
Library Registration Materials:
•
•
•
•
•
TRAC/TAL cards
expiry labels (for TAL/TRAC card)
Plastic sleeves for TAL/TRAC card
patron barcodes
item barcodes
Items available from Client Services
Summer Reading program supplies:
•
Free posters, bookmarks, stickers, invitations & activity books provided by TD bank
•
An order form will be sent to you, asking for the number of items of each that you require.
TAL supplies:
•
•
bookmarks to be used for returning books borrowed through TAL
TAL card brochures and bookmarks
Delivery bins:
•
•
Bin(s) for HQ deliveries (No. of bins depends on the size of library)
Ask Bibliographic Services or van driver for additional bins
ILL supplies:
•
Cloth ILL shipping bags
Supplies that are invoiced & costs provided at time of order:
•
•
•
Label rolls for spine label printers
(750 labels per roll)
CoLibri sheets of various sizes
Spine label protectors roll
(1000 labels per roll)
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TRAC/TAL CARD
The Regional Automation Consortium (TRAC)
This is the shared database, interlibrary loan and circulation system for Yellowhead Regional library,
Northern Lights Library System, Marigold Library System and Peace Library member libraries.
The shared database and the automated services are available from the TRAC Society.
The Alberta Library (TAL)
TAL is multi-type consortium of publicly funded libraries, including several university and college libraries
and most public libraries. YRL is a member of TAL. By extension, all YRL member libraries are also TAL
members.
The TRAC/TAL Card
•
The TRAC/TAL card provides access to all member libraries, to all libraries that have card recognition
agreements with YRL, and to all libraries participating in The Alberta Library (TAL) card program.
•
YRL’s membership in TRAC allows card holders to borrow materials, place holds and renew items at all
of the TRAC member libraries and the four headquarters.
•
•
•
•
YRL membership in TAL (levy based on population) allows card holders to borrow material from
any participating library in the province.
See http://www.thealbertalibrary.ab.ca
Look under member information for a list of participating libraries.
Anyone living in a municipality participating in YRL is eligible for a TRAC/TAL card.
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VISUNET
The Alberta Library, under the auspices of the APLEN project, has signed an agreement with the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) to provide access to the CNIB’s VISUNET: CANADA service for all
TAL member libraries. This program is open to libraries of all types, including public, academic and special
libraries.
The CNIB provides service to people with visual impairments. The TAL agreement will allow libraries to also
offer CNIB materials to people with other conditions that prevent them from using regular print materials.
This would include individuals with a reading or learning disability, and those with an illness or orthopedic
disability, (e.g. arthritis) which prevents them from being able to hold a book or turn pages. In these cases,
the library would be considered the CNIB client and would pass on the materials to its users – essentially, an
interlibrary loan.
Who can use the Visunet Service?
It’s easy to use the services of the Visunet Program. The only requirements are that the patron be a
member of your library and fit into the definition of Print Disabled. This service is provided to anyone who is
print disabled because of blindness, visual impairment, physical disability and/or learning disability in
accordance with the definition provided for “perceptual disability” in Section 32.(1) of the Canadian Copyright
Act. Thousands of Albertans are unable to read print because of blindness, visual impairment, physical
disability, and/or learning disability. Many senior citizens would fall into this category. All participants must
be members in good standing of their local library.
What kinds of materials are available through Visunet?
Services include access to the CNIB's Online Public Access Catalogue, linking to the VisuCAT database to
search and place requests for patrons borrowing materials, primarily talking book cassettes. It also provides
access through your local library to VisuTEXT, a collection of full text versions of many electronic and digital
materials including books, encyclopedias, academic journals and other information resources on the
Internet. Access is also provided to VisuNEWS, which is telephone and Internet access to a variety of daily
newspapers and magazines.
With the partnership of your library and the CNIB's Library for the Blind there is much to offer as far as
resources are concerned. The VisuNet Library consists of:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
DAISY (Accessible Digital Media) over 5,000 titles
Talking Books: 16,000 titles
Braille Books: 15,000 titles
Electronic Text (E-text): Over 1,300 titles
Print Braille Book: Over 1,600 children's picture book titles
Braille Music: 18,000 music scores
Magazines: 8 popular magazines (English and French), available in audio, plus 50 magazines in
Braille
• Descriptive Video Service: Over 250 films and PBS television programs
• Audio Cinema: Over 50 films
• Internet and World Wide Web access in your Public Library.
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VisuCAT
The Visunet Canada Partners Program (VCPP) provides local library access to Canada's largest collection
of alternative format books and online resources for people who have difficulty reading print due to a visual,
physical or learning disability. Partner libraries pay an annual subscription fee and in turn are able to borrow
books and other reading materials and facilitate registration to The CNIB Digital Library and Children's
Discovery Portal for their patrons.
Currently CNIB's collection contains approximately 80% materials in English and 20% materials in French
and is suitable for all ages.
For access to VisuCAT (CNIB’s) catalogue collection:
•
•
Go to: http://www.cnib.ca/en/services/library/libraries-schools/visunet/default.aspx
Click on: “partner access to the online catalogue”
What this service means for your library:
The cost of subscribing to VISUNET: CANADA has been covered for TAL member libraries. However,
libraries will have to cover costs such as forms for tracking loans, identifying users, etc. Mailing back
materials to the CNIB is free as it is done under the Literature for the Blind postal program (for more
information on this program, go to http://www.canadapost.ca/tools/pg/manual/PGlitblind-e.asp
For more information on the VISUNET: CANADA Partners Program, visit
http://www.cnib.ca/en/services/library/libraries-schools/visunet/default.aspx
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WEBSITE
www.yrl.ab.ca
YRL’s website makes it easy to find the information that is needed by member library staff, as well as the
“go-to place” for all current information about YRL. You are strongly encouraged to explore the website, in
order to become familiar with where things are.
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COLLECTION MANAGEMENT
Collection Development
Collection development policy
Selecting materials
Donations
Procedures
Collection Development Resources
Yellowhead Regional Library
Selection and review tools
Intellectual Freedom in Collection Management
Complaints about Library Materials
Request for reconsideration of library material
Shelving Library Materials
Understanding the Dewey Decimal System
Best Practices for shelving Collections
Serials
Cataloguing
YRL cataloguing standards
Assigning age and reading level
Changing Statuses
Explanation of statuses
Withdrawn/Missing/bindery/Unavailable
Lost materials
Damaged items
Weeding
Why weed?
Who is responsible for weeding?
How often should we weed?
Weeding policies
How to weed
What to do with weeded books
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COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT
Yellowhead Regional Library supports its each member library’s right to build its own library’s collection.
Each year member libraries receive a library materials budget called the allotment which is administered
from YRL. The library materials purchased with the allotment are the property of the library which ordered
them.
Allotment funds are placed in accounts held at YRL headquarters. Member libraries can order materials
as desired. To increase flexibility of purchasing power, YRL allows libraries to set up accounts for outside
purchases as well as extra funds accounts.
Collection Development Policy
A collection development policy directs the local library collection toward fulfilling the library’s goals and
toward the local community. The policy should be a guide for the following:
1. Selecting and buying materials for the library
2. Accepting gifts and donations
3. Weeding and disposing of weeded materials, gifts, or donations
4. Providing information to the public regarding the reason for the selection or rejection of any
materials
5. Handling complaints from library users about controversial materials
6. Deciding whether to buy particular items requested by patrons
For more information about drafting a collection development policy, please use the Manual for Collection
Development and Assessment for Small Public Libraries, Volume 1: Collection Development (Alberta
Culture and Multiculturalism, Libraries Branch, 1991, available through the library catalogue) and read
page 1-2.
For an example of a collection development policy, please see the Halifax Public Library’s:
www.halifaxpubliclibraries.ca/about/documents/policies/collection-development.html
Selecting Materials
A team approach to collection management is essential: the local library’s own collection policies
determine subject needs; however, selection advice from Yellowhead Regional Library headquarters staff
and selection tools provided by YRL help to meet those needs.
Local boards should identify collection and patron needs through formal needs assessments every five
years. Collection and patron needs should be monitored and assessed on an ongoing basis for revision
by local library managers. Consultants at YRL are available to provide expertise for future planning. The
document Standards for Member Libraries within Alberta’s Regional Library Systems provides guidance
regarding adequate collection size based on the population in your community.
Selection of library materials should be based on criteria in both content and physical form.
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Content
•
Purpose, Scope, and Audience: Does the purpose of the book match the interests and needs of
your community?
•
Authority, Honesty, and Credibility of the Author: Certain authors are more credible for
certain topics than others. Reviews can help you establish which authors are credible and which
are not.
•
Subject Matter: Can you foresee a need for a book (or more books) on a particular subject?
•
Timeliness: New books are used far more than old books so think twice before you purchase
books that are a few years old. Also consider the durability of the subject: avoid purchasing too
many fad diet books, for example (a good nutrition book will have far more stamina in your
collection). Materials for teens also date quickly. Local history materials may be an exception to
this criterion.
•
Accuracy: Accuracy is often difficult for non-specialists to determine so it’s important that patrons
can rely on library managers to provide accurate information. Atlases should show national
boundaries as they are and census numbers should be accurate. Reviews might help you
establish the accuracy of a particular work.
•
Impartiality: It’s better to have a gap in your collection than to support only one side of a
contentious issue. For example, if you have a pro-choice book about abortion, you must also
have a pro-life one.
•
Literary Merit: Use reviews and awards lists to determine if the book is well-written as well as
relevant and appealing to your readers. It is important to broaden fiction collections by collecting
works by international writers (beyond the United States and Western Europe!).
•
Arrangement and Organization: Do chapters follow each other logically? Is there an index?
(History and science books are difficult to use without an index!) Are illustrations in appropriate
places?
•
School Assignments: Public libraries usually don’t collect materials to directly support the
school curriculum. Is the book you’re considering likely to be used by other people out of general
interest or will it only be used by a class to write a report? In a school-housed public library, of
course, you need to be careful to avoid spending your public library budget on school materials
and vice versa.
•
Demand: Even if books don’t qualify for literary merit, local demand may dictate that
you purchase them anyhow. Danielle Steel and Nora Roberts rarely receive good
reviews or win awards, but your patrons will miss these authors if you don’t collect
their books.
•
Canadian and Local Content: Libraries should strive to find good quality Canadian
material. Library users of all ages have a right to expect good representation of
Canadian and local authors in public libraries.
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Physical Form
•
Format: Language? Talking books? VHS or DVD? The easiest way to decide on appropriate
format is to use your community needs assessment and local statistics to divide your book
allocation budget at the outset.
•
Binding: hard-covers last longer than paperbacks but not all books need to last forever. Consider
spending the extra money on library-bound materials for classic children’s’ books (Dr. Seuss and
Robert Munsch books, for example).
•
Appearance: Books that look nice circulate more than books that don’t.
•
Illustrations: are most important for children’s’ books and appropriate non-fiction titles. Ensure
the illustrations are accurate and of good quality.
•
Size: Young children often adore small books while teens generally won’t read anything that
looks like a picture book (unless it’s a graphic novel). Over-size books may be tricky to handle if
your shelves are small or if the spines of the books are weak.
•
Price: sometimes good and important information comes in pricey packages. If you think the
book is important to your collection and to your patrons, consider buying it even if it means you
might not be able to buy something else. Although they tend to be the cheapest books available,
it is important to keep purchases of mass-market paperbacks low because they meet few of the
content requirements for collection development (limited literary merit, little Canadian content,
etc.).
•
Series: If a series is a fairly short one, consider purchasing all the books in it. For longer or more
expensive series, make patrons aware that the other books are available through interlibrary loan.
DONATIONS
YRL recommends that member libraries have a donation policy.
Below is a sample of the Toronto Public Library’s Gift and Donation policy:
Gifts and Donations
a. The Library welcomes gifts of materials from individuals or groups.
b. Gifts-in-kind to the Library's Special Collections follow the Donations of Gifts-In-Kind to Special
Collections Policy.
c. The same criteria and guidelines that apply to the selection of all Library materials are used to
evaluate gifts. It is understood that gifts are freely given without conditions attached, unless
specifically negotiated beforehand, and that all donations will be used or disposed of as the
Library deems appropriate. The library may designate donated items that cannot be used in the
collection for the book sale or recycling.
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Procedures
Your local library’s collection policies determine the subject areas for which you purchase materials. You
can also obtain selection advice from YRL Client Services staff. There are also a variety of selection
tools available.
Standing Orders: Through YRL you can place standing orders for annual publications (Example:
Guiness Book of World Records), paperback plans, and young adults/ children’s series. These are orders
you can set up once a year for your library and then have these titles sent automatically to your library
throughout the year. Standing order lists are available on the United Library Services website at:
www.uls.com
Collection Reviews: Collection and customer needs should be continuously monitored and assessed
for revision by local librarians. Consultants at headquarters are available to provide expertise for future
collections planning and will conduct collection reviews upon your request.
E-Resources: YRL also provides access to online resources that are available to member libraries and
their patrons to use for resource materials. These can be accessed through TRACpac or the YRL
website.
Visunet: YRL provides service to the visually impaired through VISUNET.
World Language Books: YRL provides multilingual materials through participation in the International
Collection Consortium.
SEE: http://www.yrl.ab.ca/content/multilingual-books for information.
Depository: YRL is an official depository library for provincial government documents. Items are made
available through TRACpac.
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COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES
Selection tools help you evaluate items to purchase for your collection. Evaluative tools are those that
appraise items and state whether or not they are recommended for purchase. Non-evaluative tools do
not offer any critical analysis. They are simply lists of materials available.
A. Yellowhead Regional Library
YRL can assist you in the selection of materials. YRL subscribes to a number of selection magazines or
journals. You can borrow them or add your name to the routing list by contacting Bibliographic Services.
YRL also offers a Collection Review (evaluation) service. A consultant from Client Services can come to
your library and review your collections to determine which subject areas are good and which one/s need
information or more information. Usually nonfiction collections are analyzed. A written report of the results
will be provided. If you wish this service, please contact Client Services.
B. Selection and Review Tools
Company Catalogues
Companies such as United Library Services and others produce useful catalogues of in print materials.
Award winners, reading/grade levels and other information is noted in item descriptions.
Annotated Lists
Specialized bibliographies are lists of materials that include brief descriptions of the materials listed.
Because they date quickly, some of the books they recommend may be out of print. YRL purchases a
number of these, such as Best Books for Fiction Catalogue, Best Books for High School Reads, A Guide
to Canadian Children’s Books, etc.
If you search TRACpac for “bibliography” as a subject search you will find a large number of selection
tools for interlibrary loan. Please note that the publishing date should not be older than 2 or 3 years.
Reviews
Please see the list of magazines on the following page for reviewing journals. Reviews for books can be
found at www.amazon.com
Collection Development Theory
The following resources are available for interlibrary loan from TRACpac.
Alabaster, Carol.
Developing an Outstanding Core Collection: A Guide for Libraries.
Chicago: American Library Association, 2002.
Cassell, Kay Ann and Elizabeth Futas.
Developing Public Library Collections, Policies, and Procedures: a How-to-do-it Manual for Small and
Medium-sized Public Libraries.
NY: Neal-Schuman,1991.
Manual for Collection Development and Assessment for Small Public Libraries: Volumes One & Two.
Edmonton: Alberta Culture and Multiculturalism, Library Services Branch, [1992].
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Selection Tools
Booklist www.booklistonline.com/
The library field’s best-known review journal. Contains reviews of the latest books and electronic media
for adults and children, as well as reference books, electronic reference tools, and other audiovisual
materials. Booklist also publishes a wide variety of feature articles including author interviews,
bibliographies, book-related essays by well-known writers, and a selection of columns. Biweekly.
Library Journal www.ljdigital.com/
Library Journal is the oldest independent national library publication. Library Journal combines news,
features, and articles on topics of interest to library stakeholders. This is in addition to the hundreds of
evaluative reviews of everything from books, audio and video, CD-ROMs, websites, and magazines.
LibrarySparks www.highsmith.com/librarysparks
A children’s programmer’s dream-come-true. Full of ideas for activities, storytimes, and more. Also
contains interviews with authors, curriculum connections (useful for school/public library managers!), and
readers’ theatre. Published 9 times a year.
Publishers Weekly (PW) www.publishersweekly.com/
A major reviewing journal. Contains book industry news, but the focus is on book reviews. Covers mainly
adult fiction and non-fiction, but also has a section covering children’s books. The reviews are brief and
concise. As indicated by the title, this journal comes out weekly.
Quill & Quire www.quillandquire.com/
Monthly Canadian review journal. Not as many reviews as Booklist or PW, but covers Canadian titles
exclusively. There is a review section, covering adult fiction and non-fiction, as well as the BfYP, or Books
for Young People section. Contains articles pertaining to the Canadian book publishing industry, as well
as education and librarianship.
Resource Links www.resourcelinks.ca/
Another Canadian source published five times a year and covering Canadian children’s materials.
Covers fiction, non-fiction, AV resources, French titles, and professional materials.
SB&F: Science Books & Films www.sbfonline.com/
Reviews science resources for all ages (adults, young adults, and children). Reviews are grouped by age
category and then by Dewey call number. Also review AV materials, websites, and science TV shows.
This is a great resource for building up a science collection and for providing resources all the people with
an interest in science.
VOYA: Voice of Youth Advocates www.voya.com/
A magazine for people who work with young adults. Contains book reviews, articles, and program ideas.
Reviews cover fiction, science fiction/fantasy/horror, non-fiction, series non-fiction, reference, professional
books, and reprints. Bimonthly.
Award Winners
Including book award winners in the local collection is one way to collect quality resources.
A comprehensive list of book awards is available at the Bookspot website:
http://www.bookspot.com/awards/
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INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM IN COLLECTION MANAGEMENT
Freedom to read is a precious heritage. It is part of a much larger heritage common to the human spirit
which we call freedom of expression. It is the purpose of libraries to support free access to ideas, to
promote free expression, to provide public information, and to foster enlightenment. These goals are
accomplished through a collection that includes the widest diversity of views and expressions including
those that are unorthodox, popular and unpopular, from whatever viewpoint. A rigorous adherence to the
principle of Intellectual Freedom protects these important rights.
Yellowhead Regional Library affirms the Canadian Library Association's "Statement on Intellectual
Freedom" which reads:
STATEMENT ON INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM
All persons in Canada have the fundamental right, as embodied in the nation's Bill of
Rights and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, to have access to all
expressions of knowledge, creativity and intellectual activity, and to express their
thoughts publicly. This right to intellectual freedom, under the law, is essential to the
health and development of Canadian society.
δχ
Libraries have a basic responsibility for the development and maintenance of
intellectual freedom.
δχ
It is the responsibility of libraries to guarantee and facilitate access to all expressions
of knowledge and intellectual activity including those which some elements of society
may consider to be unconventional, unpopular or unacceptable. To this end, libraries
shall acquire and make available to widest variety of materials.
δχ
It is the responsibility of libraries to guarantee the right of free expression by making
available the entire library's public facilities and services to all individuals and groups
who need them.
δχ
Libraries should resist all efforts to limit the exercise of these responsibilities while
recognizing the right of criticism by individuals and groups.
δχ
Both employees and employers in libraries have a duty, in addition to their
institutional responsibilities, to uphold these principles.
(Ratified by the Board of Directors and Council at the 29th Annual
Conference in Winnipeg, June 1974 and amended November 17, 1983
and November 18, 1985)
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Local boards handle all challenged material issues according to local policy.
There are generally accepted steps you should take if a customer has a complaint about any
material in the collection.
•
Be familiar with your local board's policies on selection and intellectual freedom. Does it have a
Request for Reconsideration form?
•
Listen politely to the customer. You could point out the Statement on Intellectual Freedom and explain
your board's policies.
•
Ask the customer to fill out the Request for Reconsideration form. Please contact a YRL Client
Services consultant if you have any questions or need more information.
•
Give the completed form and the book to your board for it to handle.
•
For more information on books that have been challenged please see:
http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/frequentlychallenged/index.cfm
•
Information on dealing with challenges to books and other library materials, please see the ALA
website at:
http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/challengeslibrarymaterials/essentialpreparation/index.
cfm
Please keep headquarters informed
of any complaints and the actions taken.
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REQUEST FOR RECONSIDERATION OF LIBRARY MATERIAL
LIBRARY: ___________________________________________________________________
LIBRARY MATERIAL:
Author:
______________________________________________________________
Title:
______________________________________________________________
Publisher:
______________________________________________________________
Copyright Date:
_____________________
Description: ____________________________
(hardcover, paperback, etc.)
REQUEST INITIATED BY
Member’s Name: _______________________________________________________________
Library Card #:
_______________________________ Telephone: ______________________
Address:
________________________________________________________________
Under library policy, only signed requests for reconsideration will be reviewed. Your personal views or
opinions are protected under the authority of Section 1 (n) ix of the Freedom of Information and Protection of
Privacy Act.
COMPLAINT
1. How did you learn of this material?
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
2.
How much of the publication did you read?
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
3.
To what do you object? (refer to page numbers)
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
4.
In your opinion, does it contain anything of value?
_____________________________________________________________________________________
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SHELVING LIBRARY MATERIALS
The shelving in most libraries is set up as a number of bays making up a range. The shelving may be
one-sided and attached to the wall or a free-standing double-sided unit. The physical arrangement of the
shelves should be plotted on a floor plan before actually moving the units around. As well as location of
the shelving, the floor plan should include the type of material that will be placed on the shelves.
Adjustable shelving should be used for hardcover collections. Periodicals and paperbacks should be
placed on their own type of shelving designed specifically for that type of material.
Books are shelved left to right in one bay before moving to the top shelf of the next bay.
Commercial grade open stock, adjustable metal shelves should be purchased. They will last indefinitely
since they are made to accommodate the height and weight of books as well as heavy usage. If open
stock is purchased, you will be able to match the style and color of shelving you already have, should the
need arise. Library shelving manufacturers offer a range of accessories which enable a basic shelf unit to
be adapted for other library materials such as magazines, CDs, audiocassettes, newspapers or displays.
For flexibility, purchase shelving on wheels, especially in Children’s Areas. This allows quick and easy
changes to be made to enable activities that require more space. Carpenter-built shelving is often a false
economy. It does not meet library standards and will not last as long or be as adjustable and strong as
commercial metal shelving.
Side or end panels on the shelves help to tidy the space by hiding the visual clutter of metal shelf ends.
They also provide useful signage and display space. If the shelves in your library do not have end
panels, consider adding them. Bottom shelves are often difficult for patrons to access. Slanted slower
shelves are available to enable easier browsing and access.
Range of shelving showing proper shelving order of books
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UNDERSTANDINGING THE DEWEY DECIMAL SYSTEM (DDC)
A call number is the combination of letters and numbers on each book spine. We assign Dewey Decimal
numbers to nonfiction materials. A call number acts as the book's address by indicating where it should
be put on the shelf.
000 General Knowledge
100 Psychology and Philosophy
200 Religions and Mythology
300 Social Sciences and Folklore
400 Languages and Grammar
500 Math and Science
600 Medicine and Technology
700 Arts & Recreation
800 Literature
900 Geography and History
Books are shelved in increasing order, both numerically and alphabetically. There are 3 simple steps to
shelving by Dewey Decimal order.
1.
Look at the numbers BEFORE the decimal point as if they were dollars. In this example, $391 goes
before $392, which goes before $399.
391.103
WET
2.
392.93
SMO
399.94
CLA
If the numbers before the decimal point are the same, you have to look at the numbers AFTER the
decimal point. In order to compare decimals, you need to give them an equal number of digits. For
example, .103 has three digits, .93 has two digits, and .940 has three digits. Add zeros so they will
both have the same number of digits.
391.08
QZ 1,2
Digits
391.103
SA 1,2,3
digits
391.93
LI 1,2
digits
391.940
MO 1,2,3
digits
Therefore, look at the numbers as 080, 103, 930, and 940. Now, look at these numbers as if
they were pennies. As you can see, 80 pennies goes before 103 pennies, which would go
before 930 pennies.
3.
If the numbers before AND after the decimal point are the same, shelve alphabetically by the letters
below them.
391.103
SAT
391.103
SMI
391.103
TYE
That's all there is to it! Sorting by the Dewey Decimal System may take a little getting used to.
Think of it in terms of dollars (before the decimal point) and pennies (after the decimal point).
If you need more clarification or practice using the Dewey Decimal System, please visit the “Let’s Do
Dewey” website at: http://frank.mtsu.edu/~vvesper/dewey2.htm
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BEST PRACTICES FOR SHELVING COLLECTIONS
The following section provides some best practices information for shelving your library’s collection. Not
all member libraries may be able to follow these guidelines due to space restrictions. The more separate
"collections" you have in the library, the more space that they will use. Shelve like material with like
material. That is, all non-fiction should be kept together; the adult fiction should be separate from the
juvenile and picture book material.
Non-fiction
•
•
Non-fiction material is shelved in Dewey number order beginning with 001.
Member libraries, especially those with less square footage, may choose to combine juvenile and
adult non-fiction to give their library a more comprehensive collection in that area. This enables
the collection to be housed using less floor space and allows those who browse to find all the
books on the one topic in one area of the library.
Fiction
•
•
•
•
•
Adult, young adult and juvenile fiction should be shelved as separate collections alphabetically
by author's last name.
Young adult is designated with a "Y" above the call letters.
Juvenile is designated with a "J" above the call letters.
If the library is short of space, the J and Y collections may be combined.
File by author's last name ignoring the J and Y. Separate genre collections (Example: mystery,
romance, western) are not recommended.
Easy (picture books)
•
•
These books are best shelved on shelving made especially for them with bookends or shelf ends
every eight inches. Given the size of picture books, they stand up more readily in this type of
shelving.
Picture books can be designated with an E and shelved by the first letter of the author's last
name. It is almost impossible to keep picture books in order so broad-sorted by A, B, C, etc.
works the best.
Large Print
•
•
Large print is shelved by author's last name or by Dewey-number.
Large print material should be kept in a separate section with a LARGE PRINT sign designating
the area.
Displays
•
•
•
Displays function in libraries to keep patrons aware of the variety of books and other library
materials available to them. The use of displays also increases circulation.
Filling the shelves 2/3 to 3/4 full allows room for books to be displayed at the end of each shelf as
well as allows space for collection growth. In the extra space at the end of the shelf place a book
with the cover facing forward. Book covers are designed to attract attention so they should be
given every opportunity to do just that.
Shelf ends can also be used to display books.
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•
•
•
•
Other displays should be set up for a period of time no longer than 2 weeks and then replaced
with a new display.
Books about displays are available from the professional collection in headquarters. Look under
“Library Exhibits” in the TRAC catalogue.
Along with displays, booklists such as the “Best Seller List”, lists of authors who write in a
particular genre or authors who write like favorite authors can be posted.
For help with booklists, please SEE:
Novelist online database or Genreflecting: A Guide to Popular Reading Interests.
Diana Tixler Herald. Westport, CONN: Libraries Unlimited, 2006
(available for ILL on TRACpac).
SERIALS
If you wish to enter the title of a magazine or serial into the Polaris database, you can search by serials
title to find the item bibliographic record. You can then link it to an item record.
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CATALOGUING
Yellowhead Regional Library Cataloguing Standards
All materials received at headquarters or sent in by member libraries are catalogued by the Bibliographic
Services Department at YRL according to the following standards:
•
YRL is part of TRAC - All cataloguing is standardized and consistent with practices established by
DDC*, LC*, AACR2* and MARC* manuals.
•
Materials are classified according to the Dewey Decimal Classification System (DDC).
•
YRL will make changes in classification according to updated versions of the DDC. These changes
will not apply to previously catalogued materials.
•
YRL will make changes in descriptive cataloguing standards as needed and as dictated by updated
versions of the Anglo American Cataloguing Rules. These changes will not apply to previously
catalogued materials.
•
YRL will make changes in subject heading usage as dictated by updated versions of Library of
Congress Subject Headings. These changes will not apply to previously catalogued materials.
•
Member libraries have cataloguing templates at headquarters, which details the cataloguing
variables for the various types of materials that the library has in its collection. Individual member
libraries may create their own individual cataloguing templates as well. Directions on how to create a
template are available through the Bibliographic Services Manager.
•
In order for TRAC bibliographic records to be altered because of a mistake, notification of changes
must be sent to: [email protected]
•
In order to create a ‘Bibliographic’ record in Polaris and the TRAC database, the item should be
physically received at headquarters.
•
Libraries who have received OCLC authorizations and training may send in OCLC* Bibliographic
Records to [email protected]
*DDC
Dewey Decimal Classification System
*LC
Library of Congress
*AACR2
Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules
*MARC
Machine Readable Coding
*OCLC
Online Computer Library Center
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ASSIGNING AGE AND READING LEVEL
The purpose of cataloguing is to uniquely describe material so that it may be located in the catalogue and
on the library shelf. The Dewey Decimal System of classification ensures that books on a similar aspect
of a subject are shelved together. The spine label shows the call number, which consist of the Dewey
number on the top line and the cutter number (i.e. the first three letters of the author’s last name) on the
bottom line.
If you question a particular book's classification, contact the Bibliographic Services Manager at YRL
headquarters to discuss your concerns. The following section provides the YRL standards for classifying
various contents, unless specific directions in your member library’s cataloguing profile indicate another
local practice.
Juvenile Fiction and Non-fiction
Occasionally questions arise concerning the appropriate classification of juvenile material. The following
points are routinely considered when determining the correct classification of juvenile fiction and nonfiction. When reviewing these points, please keep in mind the following:
•
The classification of library materials will always be subjective to some degree. Given the
uniqueness of the human experience, it is unlikely that all librarians and customers will agree with all
cataloguing decisions.
•
The centralized cataloguing which is practiced at YRL assures consistency throughout the system.
•
No single factor (i.e. subject) determines the placement of a book in the collection. All relevant points
are taken into consideration during the cataloguing process.
Easy Non-fiction: E or DDC number
Points to consider:
Complexity of the content
Subjects such as history, technology, science, and biography are
usually classed in the DDC number.
Language level
Books containing mainly simple words and sentences are often "E",
whereas more complex language indicates that a DDC number may
be appropriate.
"E" books usually have large type.
Size of print
Space ratio of illustration to
text
Index and/or bibliography
present
Importance of accessibility
In "E" books, this is approximately one page of illustration to one
page of text, or less.
This is an indication of the complexity of the material.
What age group is most likely
to use the book?
Best location for maximum
circulation.
Does the book include a guide
for parents/adults?
Either pre-school or school age children
Could the material be used for school work? If so accessibility
through a DDC number is necessary.
If so, a DDC number may be necessary for accessibility.
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E or J Fiction
Points to consider:
Space ratio of text to illustration
"J" books contain significantly more text than "E" books
Complexity of language, grammar,
and concepts (including length of
words and sentences)
Complexity of the story line
all are significantly more complex in "J" books
Who will most likely read the text?
"J" fiction will have more intricate plots and fully developed
characters than "E" fiction.
Parent to child (usually "E"), or child to herself (usually "J")
Age of the characters
Under the age of six is often but not always "E".
J or Y Fiction
Points to consider:
•
Presence of illustrations; this usually indicates a "J" book.
•
Complexity of language, grammar, and concept.
•
Could the subject be considered mature or controversial? Subjects such as sex, dating, pregnancy,
drug use, marriage, AIDs or the occult usually indicate a "Y" book.
•
Does the book contain controversial language such as swearing or explicit medical terms? If so, it is
most likely a "Y".
•
Age of the characters. Characters in high school (age 16+) often, but not always indicate a "Y" book.
For all of the fiction categories, there is no indication of the classification (Adult, Y, J, or E) in the DDC
field of the Bibliographic record. This appears in the item record (e.g. J OHA, Y OHA)
Adult Fiction
For call numbers, F is used on the first line. The first three letters of the main entry are used in capitals
on the second line. The main entry is usually the last name of the author. If there is no author, it is the
first 3 letters of the title, ignoring common articles such as The, An, etc. Ignore all punctuation and
accents
(Example: O'Hara would be F OHA). Example:
F
ABE
Young Adult Fiction
For call numbers, "Y" is used on the first line. The first three letters of the main entry in capitals are used
on the second line. Books in this category are usually aimed at the 13-18 year old age group. They may
be about controversial subjects or contain controversial language.
Example:
612
THO
Juvenile Fiction
For call numbers, "J" is used on the first line. The first three letters of the main entry in capitals are used
on the second line.
Example:
J
FIS
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Easy Reading
For call numbers, "E" is used on the first line. The first three letters of the main entry in capitals are used
on the second line. Ignore all punctuation and accents (e.g. O'Hara would be OHA).
Example:
E
OHA
Books in this area are usually aimed at very beginning readers or preliterate children who will have the
books read to them by an adult. A quick standard of identification is one page of text to one page of
picture.
Biographies
Biographies which focus on the person’s professional life are usually classified in the appropriate DDC
(e.g. a hockey player in the 796.962). Collective biographies are usually classified in the subject number
with the .09 subdivision.
Fairytales
Individual tales in an E format are classified E. Collected tales or individual tales in a format for more
advanced readers are classified in 398.21. Contemporary fairytales are classified as fiction.
Alphabet books
Alphabet books in an E format are classified in E. E format dictionaries (i.e. alphabet books with
definitions for the words) are classified in the 400's.
Occasion and Festival Books
Those stories in an E format are classified in E. Those in a format for more advanced readers are
classified in 394.2.
Nursery Rhymes
Regardless of format, they are classified at 398.8. An individual nursery rhyme in E format is classified as
an E.
Cartoon Books
Cartoon books with a story, like Asterix books, are classified in E or J as the format dictates. Sometimes
vocabulary and/ or content indicate a Y or Adult category.
PLEASE NOTE:
The preceding lists are meant as a guide only. As previously stated,
all of the points must be considered to make an informed decision;
the presence of only one or two aspects is not conclusive. The
book must always be considered as a whole in order to avoid taking
elements out of context.
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Call Numbers
Adult Fiction
F
MAG
For call numbers, F on the first line and the first three letters of the main entry are used in
capitals. The main entry is usually the last name of the author. If there is no author, it is the
first 3 letters of the title, ignoring of course, common articles such as The, An, etc. Ignore all
punctuation and accents (e.g. O'Hara would be F OHA).
Young Adult Fiction
Y
MAG
For call numbers, "Y" on the first line and the first three letters of the main entry in capitals on
the second line are used. Books in this category are usually aimed at the 13-18 year old age
group. They may be about controversial subjects or contain controversial language.
Juvenile Fiction
J
MAG
For call numbers "J" on the first line and the first three letters of the main entry in capitals on
the second line are used. Cartoons and comic books such as Asterix, Garfield, etc., are
classified in E or J as the format dictates. Sometimes words or content indicate a YA or Adult
category.
Easy Reading
E
MAG
For call numbers, "E" on the first line and the first three letters of the main entry in capitals on
the second line are used. Ignore all punctuation and accents (e.g. O'Hara would be E OHA).
Books in this area are usually aimed at very beginning readers or preliterate children who will
have the books read to them by an adult. A quick standard of identification is one page of text to
one page of picture.
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ITEM RECORDS
Individual TRAC libraries do not have access to the Cataloguing module of the Polaris system. This
means that items requiring cataloguing must be sent to YRL headquarters.
Libraries can, however, add item records for their own library. For instance, new titles (Item Records)
can be added to existing Bibliographic Records that already exist in the TRAC database. Libraries can
also edit or delete their own holdings as necessary.
Library materials that do not have an existing bibliographic (bib) record should be sent to headquarters
accompanied by a “Process Only” form available from the YRL website:
http://www.yrl.ab.ca/sites/default/files/files/Process_Only_form(1).pdf
CHANGING STATUSES
Explanation of Statuses
Bindery:
Only use for books that are actually being sent to be rebound.
For damaged items use Mending or Withdrawn.
In:
All items available for lending should be In.
Unavailable:
Use only for items on a very temporary basis, example: Weekly display, returning large
print blocks – patron’s can still place holds on items with Unavailable status. (Remember
to change the status back to IN when it is no longer needed.)
Mending:
Use for damaged items that are being repaired. Marigold items with this status are not
visible in the OPAC.
Missing:
Use when you cannot find the item to fill a hold. When the item is found, Check In the
item. Missing items are visible in the OPAC, however patrons cannot place holds. (Note:
if there is only one item attached to a record, and the status is changed to Missing, holds
for this item are not cancelled automatically.)
Withdrawn:
Use when you take an item out of your library collection. Example: Lost, damaged
beyond repair, weeding. Withdrawn items are not visible in the OPAC.
Note:
Before one can change the status of an item, the circulation status must be set to IN.
Note:
Checking in an Item with the status of Missing, Mending, Bindery, or Unavailable will
automatically change the status to IN. If the status was Withdrawn a message box will
appear; or if Lost, the resolve lost item box will appear
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Lost Materials
It is agreed that the borrowing library is responsible for making sure that the lending library is
compensated for lost or damaged library items by a patron.
The patron is responsible for damage or destruction he/she has caused to library materials.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Change the status to Lost and place a charge on the patron record based on the price listed in
the item record.
If there is no price in the item record, then the locally defined default fee should be levied.
Send cheque to the owning library including title of the library material and name of patron.
Cheques from patrons should not be sent to the owning library. Have the patron issue a
cheque to the home library, and then issue a library cheque to the owning library.
If the borrowing library is not able to collect the replacement costs from their patron, the
borrowing library is still responsible for the replacement cost.
The owning library can then replace the item.
The owning library will resolve the item record in Polaris.
Patrons and the borrowing library are not responsible for damage or loss that occurs during
transit.
Patron Contact
•
•
•
A delinquent patron may only be contacted with the permission of his / her home library.
Only the home library has the right to place a patron into collections.
Exception: Walk in patrons – they are subject to local policy and procedures of the library they
are currently in.
Damaged Items
•
•
•
•
•
Patrons are responsible for damage or destruction they have caused to library materials. The
patron pays the borrowing library for damage and the borrowing library pays the owning library.
Patron is not responsible for damage that occurs during shipping.
Receiving library judges the condition of materials.
If the item is received damaged, return the item to the owning library with a note to indicate that
the item was damaged upon receipt.
The borrowing library cannot repair the damaged item without the consent of the owning library.
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WEEDING
A library collection that consists mainly of current and attractive items serves its patrons more effectively
than one with old and shabby materials. Patrons tend not to want to search through old materials in order
to find what they want. Weeding is as important to the development and maintenance of a collection as is
the selection of new titles. Weeding should encompass all formats of items your library circulates.
Weeding is the art and ingenuity of separating the worthwhile book that is deserving of a
place in your library from something that is taking up valuable space and has no worth for
anyone. All libraries must weed. No public library in the country has so much space that it
can hold everything it now owns and still add material.
A small or rural public library cannot and should not be in the business of preserving old,
outdated, useless materials.
-Gervasi, Anne
Handbook for Small, Rural, and Emerging Public Libraries
Why Weed?
Save and make space: Unfortunately, you can’t keep everything. Shelves get full and you need to make
room for new books. Materials get old and are no longer useful. Sometimes your purchases will be duds,
and they won’t circulate for years. We can’t always predict what our patrons will find interesting so we
sometimes have to weed non-circulating items even though they look new. It’s best to make room for new
purchases and experiments.
Appearance is important: Patrons will appreciate a tidy, up-to-date, attractive collection. Attractive
collections are patron magnets!
Liability: No library worker wants to be responsible for providing false information. Consequences in the
legal and medical domains can be particularly onerous.
Funding -- build up your reputation: The tidier your library shelves are, the more people in your
community (including board members) will hear about the good job you’re doing. It’s hard to convince
funders to give more money when library shelves are stuffed full, loaded with brown paperbacks,
irrelevant non-fiction, and children’s books with pages missing!
Help your statistics: Good collections circulate more. There’s no point in keeping materials that no one
will take out. Those materials will also deter patrons – it’s easy to grab a gem from a library shelf when
that shelf contains nothing but gems!
Help break down stereotypes: Materials that perpetuate race, gender, and other stereotypes should be
weeded. Some may be kept for historical purposes, but every effort should be made to balance whatever
is left with contemporary materials that present other perspectives.
Find out what you have: There’s no better way to learn about your library’s contents than to go through
them one-by-one. If you know your collection well, you’ll be best able to help your patrons find what
they’re looking for. Shelf-reading and inventory are two other practices which, if done regularly, ensure
you are familiar with your collection and what your patrons are borrowing.
Find out what you need: The process of weeding helps you find the gaps in your collection and the
books that need to be replaced based on condition, date, accuracy, etc.
Make your job easier: The less crowded your shelves are, the easier it is to find materials and put them
back again.
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Who is responsible for weeding?
The general rule of thumb should be to never let anyone weed who does not already take part in the
selection of new materials. The primary responsibility for weeding must be handled by library personnel
who can view the library from the long-range perspective. These people have developed expertise
through many regularly scheduled hours working with and thinking about the local collection, and are
committed to the principles of library management in accordance with the collection development policy
and goals of the library. More often than not in TRAC libraries, the person responsible for weeding the
local collection will be the library director/manager.
The library manager should never delegate the weeding evaluation function to volunteers (including board
members), although they may certainly pull worn and damaged books to be evaluated for weeding. The
library manager may wish to seek assistance from the YRL Client Services staff, who have expertise and
additional resources on weeding. No matter what type of weeding assistance the library manager seeks,
the final weeding decision is left to the expert judgment of the resident library manager.
How often should we weed?
Do whatever you can to make the weeding a manageable project. Remember, though, that some areas
need to be weeded more often (travel guides, legal information if it changes, etc.) so make sure you work
those things into your annual plan!
If you can’t weed your whole collection every year, you may want to set up a four-year rotating schedule:
•
•
•
•
Year 1: Adult Non-fiction, Reference
Year 2: Adult Fiction, Large Print
Year 3: Juvenile Non-fiction, Juvenile Fiction, YA
Year 4: Children’s Books, Audio, Video, DVD
You may want to make another schedule for each year, beginning at a time when you’re not too busy:
•
•
•
Week 1: 000’s
Week 2: 100’s
Week 3: 200’s, etc.
TIP: You may find it easiest to do a bit of front-line work by weeding damaged materials as they go
through the circulation desk. If you (or other staff/volunteers) come across damaged or inappropriate
materials, set them aside for weeding. Don’t waste your time re-shelving them.
Weeding Policies
Weeding policies should be a part of your collection development policy. Here is an example:
Materials that no longer meet the stated objectives of the library (including those that have
become damaged or obsolete) will be systematically withdrawn on a continual basis according to
the accepted practices described in the YRL procedure manual. Disposition and replacement of
library materials so weeded will be at the discretion of the library director.
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How to Weed
1. Determine a reasonable weeding schedule that won’t deter you from doing it.
2. Arm yourself with a book cart.
3. Read over your library’s mission statement and collection development policy and put them on
the top shelf of the cart in case you need a reminder.
4. Get your community profile from Statistics Canada (www.statcan.ca) and make sure you know
who lives in your community and surrounding area. Print the profile and add it to the mission
statement and collection development policy on the top shelf of the cart.
5. Set some rules (and work them into your library’s collection development policy):
a. Out with the untouched. Many libraries weed books that have not been checked out for
two years (we recommend 2 years if your library is one of the larger ones, 3 if it’s
smaller). Set your own limits. Keep what’s sacred.
b. Know what’s sacred. Keep local histories, local writers, materials about your
community, “classics” in good condition, and special collections your library has
developed. Not all old books are worth keeping, especially not those that are falling apart.
Avoid keeping donations just because they’re donations: if you don’t have a clear way to
deal with them, help your board make a policy.
c.
What about Talking Books? Talking books are produced by the CNIB for print-disabled
readers. According to CNIB, “Public libraries that purchase restricted materials through
the CNIB Public Library Sales Program are required to discard works in a way that
prevents misuse. Total destruction is not necessary; it is acceptable to remove the tapes
or CDs from their packaging and tossing them randomly into a garbage bin. The intent is
to prevent whole works from being easily retrieved and used by people who do not have
a perceptual disability as defined in the Canadian Copyright Act." If you have any
questions, please contact the Client Services department.
6. First run a Weeding Report in Polaris to deal with the library materials your patrons ARE NOT
using. Contact Client Services if you require assistance with reports or weeding.
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7. Now deal with the materials your patrons ARE using. Use the YRL Weeding Guidelines. Use the
MUSTIE acronym (see below) to determine what should be removed from your library’s shelves.
According to MUSTIE, you should remove materials that are:
Misleading:
or factually inaccurate.
Ugly:
(or damaged beyond repair).
Highlighter or pen on the pages?
Yellow, brittle pages?
Broken spines?
Small print or cramped margins?
Unexplained stains?
Dirty, damaged, dog-eared?
Don’t want to touch (let alone read) it? Dump it.
Superseded:
by a newer edition or better source.
Trivial:
no discernable literary, scientific, or historical merit.
Irrelevant:
to your community’s needs and interests.
Elsewhere:
may be borrowed easily from another library.
Also check for multiple copies: get rid of duplicates of former bestsellers, or trade them with
another library for something you don’t have. Check the books for damage and keep the copy in
the best condition.
8. Decide what you’re going to replace. Misleading, Superseded, Trivial, Irrelevant, and Elsewhere
books do not need to be replaced. If the book is Ugly but perhaps a popular one, look up the total
number of check-outs, as well as the most recent check-out, then replace the book or find a
newer edition but only if you think it’s worthwhile to do so. If the book hasn’t been checked out in
two years, there’s probably no point in getting a fresh copy.
9. Withdraw the weeded items from TRAC.
10. Use a permanent marker to black out the barcode of any book you weed.
11. Dispose of weeded books discretely. Moldy books should be thrown away, not put in a book sale
or donated elsewhere. If you need to put books in a dumpster, make sure you are discreet, and
out of sight of patrons wondering why you’re throwing away “perfectly-good books”. For some,
weeding a book is akin to burning it. Be prepared to answer questions (you may use the Why
Weed? section as a guide if you like).
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What to do with weeded books
Before you weed, plan what to do with the items you remove from your collection.
Sell:
to the public, either in the library at a continuous book sale table or at a large annual sale
or from a continuous exhibit; or to a used-book dealer or a pulp dealer.
Donate:
to a hospital, nursing home, adult or juvenile correctional facility, charitable institution,
day care centre, Aboriginal reserve, Metis settlement, poor school district or a small nonsystem library.
Trade:
with another library (by posting it on the TRACsharing listserv), or with a used book
dealer, for a book your library can use.
Recycle:
by utilizing a local contractor, perhaps in cooperation with local government agencies.
Suggestion: EMCO Ltd. Building Products (Baseline road, Sherwood Park) recycles old
books into shingles. They will pay you a nominal amount for your discarded books. You
are responsible for delivering the books to them. For more information contact EMCO
directly at 780-440-7333. They are closed on Mondays.
Destroy:
by burning in an incinerator or putting it in the trash. Be sure the books will not be easily
seen by someone passing by who might misunderstand the reasons for destroying
“valuable” books.
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MAIL AND DELIVERY SERVICES
Handling Mail
Email
Regular mail
Interlibrary loan mail
Van Run Delivery
YRL delivery of Interlibrary Loans
For TRAC member libraries
For libraries outside of TRAC
Date due flags
Shipping procedures
ILL inclusions list for nodes and associates as of September 2009
Government courier locations for interlibrary loan delivery
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HANDLING MAIL
One of the most important procedures in the member library is handling the mail. It is vital that
you devote the proper attention to your mail/email and to the deadline for specific items.
Email
Check your email every day. There may be important messages about Polaris that you need to know
about. Messages from legitimate email sources, especially from Yellowhead Regional Library
headquarters or the library community, are easily identified.
If you do not recognize where your email is coming from, DO NOT OPEN THE MESSAGE—delete it.
Regular Mail
Mail, including email, is the vital link among member libraries and between member libraries and YRL.
Therefore, it needs to be handled quickly and efficiently. If a deadline has been put on the
correspondence for a response from you, it is very important that you do your utmost to meet that
deadline. Otherwise, we add to the cost of the initial mailing by having to phone (usually long distance) to
follow up the correspondence.
Here are some questions you should ask and hints on developing local mail procedures.
When?
- How often do you pick up the mail? daily, weekly?
Who?
- Does the same person always handle the mail?
Where?
- Where do you sort it?
How?
- How do you sort it?
Handle each item of mail once if at all possible.
Date stamp all your mail with the date of receipt, then sort it according to the TRAF technique: Toss,
Refer, Act, File
Toss
"Man's best friend, aside from the dog, is the wastebasket"
Ask "What is the worst thing that could happen if I throw it out?"
Refer
Delegate the work (assistant, board, volunteers)
Mark it with the name of the person you delegate to handle it, and put it in your "out" file
Establish a hot file for Board Chairman, Treasurer, or Secretary
Act
Mark all deadlines on your office calendar
Fill out proper forms for statistics
Plan (programs, displays)
Set out pamphlets, etc. for public use
Remember, decisions are actions
File
Have a "file" basket for later
Post item on your "to do" bulletin board
Handling the mail is a crucial job for the member librarian. Ensure that local procedures are developed
and followed.
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Interlibrary Loan Mail
When sending materials for purposes of interlibrary loan (ILL), please use delivery methods available in
the following order:
First choice – Government Delivery Service (Courier) if available
Second choice – Van Run - See Section 6 for instructions on sending ILLs via the van run
When possible, try to return ILLs using the same delivery method as they were sent. If items were
received via Government Courier, please return via Government Courier. If they were sent by van run,
please return via van run.
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VAN RUN DELIVERY
To receive items from Yellowhead Regional Library Headquarters:
•
YRL makes weekly deliveries of purchased materials, interlibrary loans and circulating collections
to member public libraries.
•
A YRL driver will deliver items according to the monthly schedule posted on the YRL website.
•
The YRL van driver will drop off YRL bins and pick up packed YRL bins to return to YRL
headquarters.
•
At the time of delivery, there are a number of types of items that may be exchanged:
o
New materials ordered at YRL for the library
o
Items to be catalogued and/or process only are picked up/delivered,
Note: Contact the YRL cataloguing team at [email protected] for information.
o
Notices or other communications to/from YRL & library including supplies such as barcodes,
patron cards, etc. Contact [email protected] to order supplies.
o
Special circulating collections including Aboriginal or Story Time kits.
Note: Contact Lynne Barnes at [email protected] to book or inquire.
These items will be packaged in the regular YRL blue bins. For special collections such as story time kits
or aboriginal kits other packaging may be used.
Thank you for having the materials to be picked up ready to go since the van driver is on a tight
schedule!
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
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YRL DELIVERY OF INTERLIBRARY LOANS
• Before running your library’s “Request Manager” report on Polaris, have your shipping bins open and
your various flags at hand.
• Run your “Request Manager” report and gather the items you are ready to send out.
• Insert the appropriate flag into the item.
• To help YRL staff later with the sorting of these items, please use the following procedures:
NOTE: To All YRL libraries that currently use the Alberta Government Delivery Service
Please continue to send and receive interlibrary loans via government delivery as you are
presently doing. Because YRL cannot transport all interlibrary loans items on the van run,
we need you to continue using the Government Courier system. You should only send the
interlibrary loans on the van run that you would have normally mailed through Canada Post.
Continue to use the “blue bags” to send Government Courier Mail as you are able.
For TRAC Member Libraries
•
Insert the correct book flag with the Library’s agency code/regional library code pointing upwards
in the item.
•
•
Please be sure you are using the right flag for the right item.
Book Flags:
For book flags, please visit the YRL website.
Click on the yellow tab on the bottom left hand side of the page (Template) for directions on
printing the book flags.
For libraries outside of TRAC
(All those libraries that are NOT on the TRAC Polaris system. This includes all libraries that are NOT
members of Peace Library System, Northern Lights Library System, Marigold Library System or
Yellowhead Regional Library)
Alberta Government Delivery List:
If you are one of the libraries that has access to Government Delivery, please note the following:
•
•
•
If a location is on the list, you can send ILL items to them via government delivery service:
please include the full address of the library, do not use just the national library code.
If a location is NOT on this list, PLEASE do not send them items via government courier!
Doing so creates lots of “misdirected” traffic to Chinook Arch which results in service delays and
extra work for HQ staff.
SEE the end of this section for the Government Delivery Service Locations.
SEE the list of inclusions for a list of items that libraries or library regions are willing to loan out on
interlibrary loan. This is of particular importance to those who are managing VDX at your library.
PLEASE don’t ask for items from libraries who do not normally loan out those items.
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
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Date Due Flags
•
Date Due Flags should accompany interlibrary loans that are going outside of TRAC.
•
•
Date due flags are available on the YRL website.
Please note that you need to include on the date due flag:
o The name/national library code of the library borrowing the item for their patron
o The name and address of your own library that is lending the item
o The expected due date for the item to be returned to your library
•
The reason for this flag is so that library staff at all organizations can easily see where an item is
being shipped to, when it is due back and to which library to return the item. The use of these
flags will really expedite the interlibrary loan process.
Shipping Procedures
•
Place all items into the shipping bins.
•
You can place items up to the fill line in each bin without making the bins too heavy for the
drivers/sorters. DO NOT OVERFILL THE BINS.
•
If you have a number of items going to the same library, please put them all together in the bin as
it eases sorting once the items get to headquarters.
•
The books should be laid flat and stacked on top of each other with the “book” flags all in one
direction for ease of sorting.
•
Note: AV materials should be wrapped in bubble wrap or similar packaging to avoid
breakage
•
Continue to fill bins as necessary, close lids and leave in location designated for pickup by the
driver.
•
When the driver comes for the next delivery, he will drop off bins with interlibrary loans for your
library. Once you have emptied those bins, you can refill them with interlibrary loans for the next
pickup.
•
If you need extra bins, please let the driver know and he will ensure you get some more. If you
run out of bins, you may substitute a sturdy box of the same size.
The National Library Codes
These are available on the YRL website at www.yrl.ab.ca
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
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ILL Inclusions List for Nodes & Associates as of September 2009
Category
Audiotapes
(music)
Bestsellers
&
Current Year
fiction
general
Books on CD
Books on Tape
Compact Discs
(music)
Computer Software
(CD or disk)
DVDs
Multimedia Kits
Periodicals
Reference Material
Talking Books
(requiring certification)
Videotapes
Will Lend
Peace**
Chinook Arch **
Red Deer **
Edmonton**
Shortgrass **
Ft. Saskatchewan**
St.
Albert
**
Marigold**
Yellowhead**
Northern Lights**
Northern
Lights
Chinook Arch
Red Deer
Fort McMurrayShortgrass
Marigold
St. Albert
Peace
Yellowhead
Parkland
Red Deer**
Chinook Arch **&
Shortgrass**&
Edmonton**
Strathcona County**
Ft. McMurray **
St. Albert **
Ft. Saskatchewan**
Yellowhead**
Marigold**
Peace **
Northern Lights**
Chinook
Arch
**& Peace **
Red Deer **
Calgary **
Shortgrass **&
Edmonton**
Strathcona County**
Ft. McMurray **
St. Albert **
Ft. Saskatchewan**
Yellowhead **
Marigold **
Northern Lights **
Red Deer **
Chinook Arch **
Shortgrass **
Edmonton**
St. Albert**
Ft. Saskatchewan**
Strathcona County**
Marigold**
Yellowhead**
Northern Lights**
Peace**
Chinook Arch **
Grande Prairie Public **
Shortgrass **
Chinook Arch **
Ft. Saskatchewan** (excluding new releases)
Marigold** (excluding Canmore)
Northern Lights**
Peace**
Red Deer **
Shortgrass **
Yellowhead**
Chinook Arch **
Marigold **
Red Deer **
St. Albert **
Shortgrass **
All will provide photocopies.
Will loan whole issues:
Red Deer **
Shortgrass **
All will provide photocopies.
Northern Lights**
Calgary
Peace**
Chinook Arch
Red Deer
Edmonton
Shortgrass
Ft. Saskatchewan**
Yellowhead **
Marigold**
Peace**
Calgary**
Red Deer**
Chinook Arch**
Shortgrass**
Edmonton****
Strathcona County**
Ft. Saskatchewan**
St. Albert**
Marigold**
Yellowhead**
Northern Lights**
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
Grande Prairie is represented by Peace Lethbridge is represented by Chinook Arch Medicine Hat is represented by Shortgrass **
Lends to libraries who reciprocate
**& Lends to libraries who reciprocate
AND
to all CNIB certified patrons
or equivalent
**** Lends ASL & public performance videos
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GOVERNMENT COURIER LOCATIONS FOR INTERLIBRARY
LOAN DELIVERY
AIRDRIE
ATHABASCA
BARRHEAD
BLAIRMORE
BONNYVILLE
BOW VALLEY
BOYLE
BROOKS
BROWNFIELD via Coronation
CALGARY
CAMROSE
CANMORE
CARDSTON
CARMANGAY
CASTOR
CHESTERMERE
CLARESHOLM
COALDALE
COCHRANE
COLD LAKE
CONSORT
CORONATION
DEVON
DIDSBURY
DRAYTON VALLEY
DRUMHELLER
EDMONTON
EDSON
EVANSBURG
FAIRVIEW
FALHER
FOREMOST
FORT MACLEOD
FORT MCMURRAY
FT. SASKATCHEWAN via EPL
FORT VERMILION
HANNA
HIGH LEVEL
HIGH PRAIRIE
HIGH RIVER
HINTON
INNISFAIL
KILLAM
LAC LA BICHE
LACOMBE
LAMONT
LEDUC
LETHBRIDGE
LLOYDMINSTER
MANNING
MCLENNAN
MEDICINE HAT
MORINVILLE
OLDS
OYEN
PEACE RIVER
PINCHER CREEK
PONOKA
PROVOST
RED DEER
RIMBEY
ROCKY MT. HOUSE
ST. ALBERT via EPL
ST. PAUL
SEDGEWICK
SHERWOOD PARK via EPL
SLAVE LAKE
SMOKY LAKE
SPIRIT RIVER
SPRUCE GROVE
STETTLER
STONY PLAIN
STRATHCONA COUNTY via
EPL
STRATHMORE
SUNDRE
SWAN HILLS
TABER
FOX CREEK
GRANDE CACHE
GRANDE PRAIRIE
GRIMSHAW
THREE HILLS
TOFIELD
VALLEYVIEW
VEGREVILLE
VERMILION
VULCAN
WAINWRIGHT
WESTLOCK
WETASKIWIN
WHITECOURT
YOUNGSTOWN
REGIONALS
CHINOOK ARCH (Lethbridge)
MARIGOLD
(Strathmore)
PARKLAND
(Lacombe)
PEACE
(Grande Prairie)
SHORTGRASS (Med. Hat)
YELLOWHEAD (Spruce Grove)
NORTHERN LIGHTS (Elk Point)
For inquiries
or to make changes to this list, please contact: Chinook Arch Regional Library System [email protected] Phone (toll free) : 1 (866) 941‐9262 UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES (N.B. NOT PRIVATE COLLEGES)
FAIRVIEW COLLEGE
GRANDE PRAIRIE REGIONAL COL.
GRANT MACEWAN UNIVERSITY
KEYANO COLLEGE
LAKELAND COLLEGE
LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE
MOUNT ROYAL UNIVERSITY
MEDICINE HAT COLLEGE
NAIT
NORQUEST COLLEGE
RED DEER COLLEGE
SAIT
NORTHERN LAKES COLLEGE
•
Slave Lake YES
•
Wabasca NO
ATHABASCA UNIVERSITY
AUGUSTANA UNIVERSITY
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY
UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE
ALL ALBERTA GOVERNMENT LIBRARIES
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
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RESOURCE SHARING - HOLD REQUESTS
Placing a hold
Holds requests in TRACpac
Requesting an item in TRACpac
Letting a patron cancel or suspend an unfilled hold in TRACpac
In-Transit Procedures
Hold Request Terminology
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HOLDS
Placing a Hold
If an item isn’t at your library, you can place a hold on it. You decide whether the hold is for a specific
copy of the item or for any copy.
The system will not let you place a hold in these situations:
•
All copies of an item have a status such as lost, missing, mending, unavailable, or withdrawn.
•
The patron already has a specific-copy hold on this copy of the item.
•
The library that owns the book is not live on Polaris, for instance if the book is held at Edmonton
Public Library or Red Deer Public Library. If this is the only copy of the item, you may request it
through interlibrary loan.
•
Bibliographic record is the authoritative record in the system for each title. A different bibliographic
record is created for each format of the title.
•
Item record refers to the specific library’s copy of the title. These item records are attached to the
bibliographic record when they are added to the system.
•
A hold placed on an item is a specific copy hold. A bibliographic hold request will trap all of the
items associated with the record, regardless of where the item is located.
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HOLDS REQUESTS IN TRACPAC
Requesting an Item in TRACpac
Patrons can place requests on items with the online catalogue.
1. Search for the item you would like to request by dusing a keyword, browse, or advanced search.
Check the format of the item.
See how many copies are available
and if there are holds on the item.
To request this, click Place Request.
To see if the book is held at your
library, click the Where is it? link.
2. When you have found the item, click the Place Request link.
3. If you are not already logged in, you will have to login with your barcode or username and
password.
4. The item you will be placing a hold on will appear at the top of your screen with the following
information:
Change your pickup library to the library you want to pick up the item or leave as “Patron’s
Library” to have the item delivered to your home branch. As well, the activation date can be reset
in order to suspend the hold; otherwise a year from the date the hold is placed will be the default.
5. Click Submit Request and the hold has been placed.
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Letting a Patron Cancel or Suspend an Unfilled Hold in TRACpac
Patrons can cancel or suspend their own unfilled holds in the online public access catalogue, TRACpac.
1. Go to www.tracpac.ab.ca to access the online catalogue. The patron will have to log on to their
account using their barcode or username and password. In the My Account tab, click on the
Requests subtab. This will list all items on hold for a patron.
2. To cancel one or more items on hold, select the items you want to cancel by checking the boxes
on the left hand side. Then click the Cancel Selected button. To cancel all of the holds, you do
not need to select each title, instead, click the Cancel All button.
3. To suspend the hold on the item, select the item and click Suspend/Reactivate Selected or
Suspend/Reactive All. You will be directed to a new screen where you can enter a new date for
the activation of the hold.
Accidentally cancel an item? Click
the Suspend/Reactivate Selected/All
button to reactive the request.
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IN-TRANSIT PROCEDURES
Checking in “Items in Transit” To Your Library
Transit is a feature used by the system to indicate that items are, although not checked out, on their way
to another location. The transit feature is used most effectively when sending items between automated
branches. The system automatically sets books in transit when there is a hold on them at another
branch. Books can be set in transit manually also, for instance, books going to a library outside of TRAC.
For libraries on Polaris, you will see a message on the screen as you check items in. The message will let
you know if there is a hold on the item, or if the item was sent to you in transit. If the item was placed on
hold, you must make a note of the hold so you can notify the patron, or forward the book to the library
where the patron will pick up the book. Items that do not belong to your library will automatically be put in
transit to the proper destination.
Items with the status of ‘in transit’ are those that were:
• checked out at your library, but returned at another library,
• interlibrary loans,
• items being shipped to your library from Yellowhead Regional Library or from another library.
To check these items in, you just need to perform a normal check-in procedure, as with any other book.
You will see the Status change from “In Transit” to “In”.
If the item is on hold for a patron, an In Transit note will appear with the borrower’s information so you
can contact them. If the patron receives notification by email, an email will be sent to them notifying them
that the item is ready for pick up.
As well, an in-transit receipt can be printed automatically.
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HOLD REQUEST TERMINOLOGY
•
Active – When a hold request is placed in the queue, its status is automatically set to active.
There is an item in the System that will satisfy the hold. Bindings are created between the items
and the hold request. The items can now be trapped to fill the request.
•
Cancelled – Cancelled hold requests remain in the database and visible on Polaris work forms.
A cancelled request cannot be filled. You can, however, reactivate it or delete it.
•
Expired – If a hold request is not filled within the specified period of time, the request status
automatically changes to expired. An expired request cannot be filled. You can, however,
reactivate or delete the request, or convert it to an interlibrary loan request.
•
Held – A Held request means an item has been trapped to fill the request, and the circulation
status is Held. The item has been checked in at the pickup branch and is ready for the patron to
pick up.
•
Inactive – An inactive hold request means that a hold has been successfully placed but has an
activation date in the future. The request does not appear in the queue, and an item cannot be
trapped to fill the request until the activation date.
•
Not Supplied – If no items can fill the request (for example, if no items are attached to the
bibliographic record), the request status is not-supplied. You can delete the request or convert it
to an interlibrary loan request. You can also reactivate a not-supplied request, but if the reason it
was not-supplied has not changed, the request becomes not-supplied again.
•
Pending – The hold request is included in the Request-to-Fill list, otherwise pending functions the
same as Active status. Requests that bind to items that are In become Pending. These items
must be pulled from the shelves and checked in, in order to fill the hold. Such items appear on
the Request-to-Fill list, which is printed from the Pending view. When an active request is routed
to another library to be filled, the status changes to pending. If none of the items there have a
status of In, the request keeps its active status, and items can be trapped to fill the request.
•
Processing – The activation date has been reached and the system is creating bindings. This
status does not display. The processing status lasts only a short time until bindings are created.
The request status will display as Inactive until the status changes to Active or Pending.
•
Shipped – A shipped hold request means that an item was trapped at a branch other than the
pickup branch, and is being shipped to the pickup branch. A request that is Shipped should be
bound to an item that is In-transit.
•
Unclaimed – If the requesting patron does not pick up the held item within the specified period of
time, the hold request status automatically changes from held to unclaimed. Unclaimed requests
are bound to Held items. Unclaimed requests must be deleted and the items checked in.
Unclaimed requests may be deleted automatically through an administration setting.
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
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COLLECTION INVENTORY
Why do inventory?
Inventory planning steps
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
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WHY DO INVENTORY?
An inventory of a local member library’s materials is an important step in the collection management
process. An inventory allows the local library staff the opportunity to clean up their local holdings
information on the TRAC database by:
1.
Determining which items listed in the TRAC database are actually available in their library’s
collection and which are lost, missing or misshelved.
2.
Finding items that have never been added to the online catalogue.
3.
Viewing the physical condition of each item as the barcode is scanned into the Polaris Inventory
Manager.
4.
Weeding an item if it is no longer useful.
Depending upon the size of your library, a library may choose to do an inventory once a year, or once
every two or three years or on a continual basis if you do only certain parts of your collection at a time.
For example, you may choose to inventory all the items in your video collection every year because of the
high usage rate, whereas you may inventory your regular hardcover fiction only once every 5 years.
Inventory planning steps
•
Deciding when to do an inventory is fairly easy - if you have never done an inventory since having
your library’s collection put on to Polaris and you are constantly running to the stacks for items
that the online catalogue says should be in and never are, now is the time for an inventory.
•
Some other criteria to consider:
9 The size of your collection
9 The number of staff you can allocate to help out with the scanning of the barcodes.
9 Do you want to do the inventory when the library is open to the public or closed?
•
Weed the collection(s) you plan to inventory. This will reduce the amount of work involved.
•
Shelf read the collection(s) you plan to inventory once you have weeded. (Shelf reading is
looking at each call number along the shelf to ensure that the books/items are in proper shelving
order, either according to the Dewey Decimal Class for the nonfiction collection or author last
name alphabetical order for the fiction collection.)
•
You may refer to the User Manual for the Polaris Inventory Manager available on our website.
Please read the introductions and review the steps to doing inventory.
•
Once you determine a date for conducting the inventory, contact the YRL Client Services
department as soon as possible to book the laptop equipped with the Polaris Inventory Manager
(PIM) and a wireless barcode scanner.
© YELLOWHEAD REGIONAL LIBRARY 2010
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TECHNOLOGY IN LIBRARIES
Polaris
What number to call for help?
Computer troubleshooting tips
Basic printer troubleshooting
Wireless guest access
Internet access
Public access to the Internet
Statement of intent
Conditions
Procedures
Schedule A: Sample user procedure
Schedule B: Sample public access to the Internet user agreement
YRL helpdesk
Technology plan
Technology recommendations for purchase
Desktop & Administrative Support Services – Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Core competencies for Technology (APLEN)
Community Access Program (CAP)
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POLARIS
What number do you call when you need help?
•
For ALL problems during regular hours call YRL headquarters:
Local:
Toll Free:
•
780-962-2003
1-877-962-2003
If you come across any problems with the Polaris system, or if you cannot access the Polaris system,
please call the after-hours emergency phone number. AFTER business hours, call the Emergency
Pager:
1– 877 – 452 – 8722
Time periods covered for after hours:
Monday to Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
4:30 — 8:00 pm
4:30 — 6:00 pm
9:00 — 5:00 pm
1:00 — 5:00 pm
After dialing the pager number,
please either type in your phone
number followed by the pound
sign (#), or leave a voice
message so that support staff
can contact you about your
problem. When leaving a voice
message, please provide as
much information as possible.
Only call the emergency support pager number if a problem is encountered within the covered time periods
(as noted above) that results in a library being unable to carry out critical functions.
Critical functions are defined as:
•
•
•
•
Login
Check Out/In
TRACpac Searching
Patron registration
If you cannot login or are unable to check in any items,
these ARE certainly emergencies. However, if you have a
problem checking in a single item, this IS NOT an emergency.
Problems that are not emergencies should be directed to YRL
headquarters staff the next business day.
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COMPUTER TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS
The tips in this section cover the most common computer problems librarians encounter.
• Follow the steps for solving the problem sequentially.
• If you are unable to resolve the problem after following the steps, then contact a Desktop & Network
Administrator in the Client Services department or contact the Helpdesk.
My computer is dead… I think. What do I do?
1. Check - do you have power? Plug a lamp, radio etc in same plug-in that computer is plugged in, to
check if outlet is operational.
2. If you have power, then check that the power bar/surge protector/UPS is turned on. A light on the bar
will be on.
3. If the light is on, check that cables are inserted correctly and tightly into the back of the computer and
power bar.
Something is wrong with my monitor. I can’t see anything on it. What do I do?
1. Check if monitor is turned on. Status light on front should be on
2. Check CPU cable. Is it inserted correctly or is it loose?
3. Check power plug on back of monitor. Is it inserted correctly and tightly?
My printer isn’t working! What do I do?
1. Are all the computers and printers turned on and logged in? If this is a shared printer on the network
and it is physically connected to a computer via a parallel port or USB cable, that computer MUST be
turned on (doesn’t have to be logged in) for other computers on the network to access that particular
printer.
2. If yes, check to see if cables are inserted correctly or are loose. Wiggle, tighten, or remove and reinsert
the cables.
3. If the printer has an LCD readout on the front, check for any error messages or fault lights.
4. Try turning the printer off, wait 5-10 seconds, then turning it on again and retry the print job. Also try
rebooting the computer the printer is connected to.
5. Refer to “Basic Printer Troubleshooting” at the end of the Troubleshooting Tips section.
Polaris is frozen! What do I do?
1. Wait. Sometimes there is a delay on the server and you just need to be patient.
2. If that doesn’t work, you need to exit your Polaris session. You may need to use your task manager to
do this (CTRL+ALT+DEL).
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Basic Printer Troubleshooting
If you are using an XP machine, please ensure you have Service Pack 3 and .net Framwork 3.5 installed.
If you are using Vista, you will need to have Service Pack 1 .net Framwork 3.5 installed. These are the first
things we will check if you call us with printing issues – without these upgrades, we cannot guarantee your
printers will work from Polaris.
Steps:
1. Install the appropriate driver on your machine and print a test page to make sure it works locally.
2. It is also necessary to ensure that .net Framework version 3.5 is installed on the local machine. This will
be visible in Add/Remove Programs. If it is not, go to the following website to download:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=333325FD-AE52-4E35-B531508D977D32A6&displaylang=en
Follow the download and install instructions, then continue. One other prerequisite is if you’re running
XP Pro, you will need Service Pack 3 or Vista with Service Pack 1. SP 3 is available here:
http://update.microsoft.com/microsoftupdate/v6/default.aspx?ln=en-us
Without the Service pack or .net update it is likely that not only your receipt printer will not work, your
other regular printers won’t either. Windows Server 2008 easy print will not properly redirect (map) your
printers without these 2 updates.
3. On the Local Resources tab within the Remote Desktop Connection, make sure that there is a check
mark in the box beside ‘printers’. Also ensure that when you click on the “more” button that all the boxes
are checked. Then ensure you save these changes by going back to the General Tab and click “Save”
(as shown in the Logging on to Polaris documentation).
4. Log into Polaris and make the following changes for the appropriate printer within Checkout and Checkin
(choose Tools, Options):
Star TSP 100
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Epson TM88IV
Older Epson printers (TM88II and TM88III) will probably work with the TM88IV settings if the Epson printer
driver is loaded on the local machine. They do work well with a Generic/Text driver.
To add a Generic/Text driver on the local machine if the older Epson driver is already installed:
• Right click properties on the printer within printers/faxes
• Advanced
• Choose the Generic/Text driver
• Apply
• (If the Generic/Text driver is not in the list, click Add Driver and choose
• Generic and Text)
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WIRELESS GUEST ACCESS
The Wireless service will be available only by logging in with a library card. But, due to the rules set forth by
the CAP grant, it is illegal to deny access to non-library card holders. Therefore, you will need to create
special guest cards that will allow access to the wireless, but deny borrowing privileges.
Here’s how it works:
Have a library card with a barcode at the desk that is marked specially for wireless guests. This one card
can support multiple users. To create this card, do the following:
In Polaris:
o
File – New – Patron Record
o
Enter the barcode #
o
Last name: Stony Plain Guest
(Use your library’s name in place of the word “Stony Plain”, e.g. Elk Point Guest)
o
First Name: use a period or a dash
o
Patron Code: Limited Services
o
Address: use your library’s address
o
Email: use your library’s email
o
Phone: use your library’s telephone #
o
Switch to the General screen
o
Gender: N/A
o
Password: (use a random 4 digit number and change it every month)
o
Check off the “Do not delete patron record” box
o
Where they live: Not in the list
o
Local Library Statistic #3: Wireless Internet Access
o
Save
o
Go to Links – Patron Status, and from the left side click on G for General
o
Click on “Add Block”
o
In the pop-up, click on the second item “Free text”
o
In the space provided enter “Wireless Guest only! No borrowing privileges”
o
Click “OK” and save.
Recommendations:
1. Do not actually hand the card to the wireless user. Have the barcode and password pre-printed on
slips of paper to hand out.
2. Change the password once a month.
3. Make sure all library staff know where the barcode # and password slips are kept.
4. Advertise that your library has free wireless access and users are to see a staff member for
information.
5. Encourage guest card users to get their own library cards.
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INTERNET ACCESS
Public Access to the Internet
This policy is a guide. Please follow your own local policies and procedures, if applicable.
Statement of Intent
TRAC offers public access to the internet at our member libraries. The internet, as an information
resource, enables the library to provide information beyond the limits of its own collection.
Conditions
All members of the community have equal access to the internet either through stationary public
access computer(s) or wireless devices, during open hours.
The Internet is an unregulated global environment. While it offers a wealth of information that is
personally, professionally, and culturally enriching, it also contains information that may be
offensive, disturbing, or illegal.
People are responsible for the information they access; not all internet information sources provide
accurate, complete, or current information. The library does not monitor and has no control over
the information accessed through the internet and is not responsible for its content.
Parents or guardians are solely responsible for the information accessed by their children and for
their children’s use of the internet.
The library and its staff cannot control the availability of access to the internet, including wireless
service, to specific information sites, or to e-resources. Access is not available at all times and
information sites change rapidly and unpredictably.
Use of the public access computer(s) is at the sole risk of the user. The library will not be
responsible for damage to a person’s hardware or software, or for any loss of data, damage, or
liability that may occur from a person’s use of the library’s computers, whether from computer virus
or otherwise.
The library is not responsible for any information that is compromised, or for any damage caused
to hardware or software when using the library’s wireless network services. Causes for damage
may include, but are not limited to: power surges, security issues, hacking, or viruses. People are
responsible for protecting their wireless devices from viruses and other security threats.
Users are responsible for any willful damage to the library’s computer or equipment for online
activity, including but not limited to, commercial transactions made while using the library’s Internet
connection.
Misuse and/or abuse of the computer terminal or the rules governing internet access will result in
suspension of Internet access privileges at the discretion of the Library Manager.
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Procedures
Each library designates one or more computers for public access to the internet.
There will be no charge for using the public access computers. Libraries may charge for printing.
The current rate for the printing service is set by the Library Manager.
Users will sign a Public Access to the Internet User Agreement before using the public access
computer for the first time (see Schedule B). A parent or guardian must sign for children up to and
including 17 years of age or as designated by the library.
If requested, patrons will be provided a copy of these procedures and/or the signed Public Access
to the Internet User Agreement.
Access will be made available on a first come, first served basis. Time limits on Internet
workstations and bandwidth limits on wireless access (where applicable) may be enforced at the
discretion of library employees and/or volunteers to ensure that all patrons have the opportunity to
use internet resources.
Users must sign in before using the computer. Sign-up sheets use first name, initials, nicknames
or numbers. The sheets are reduced to statistics and destroyed at the end of the day.
While striving to assist people in accessing information on the Internet, library staff cannot provide
in-depth training on the internet, computer hardware/software use, or computer jargon.
Only parents or guardians may restrict their own children when using the public access
computer(s) and the internet.
Library Managers will establish local computer and internet access procedures.
procedures are set out in Schedule A, which is posted and available to users.
The current
For more information on this subject and to view examples of internet policies & procedures, check
the Public Library Services Branch web page at:
http://municipalaffairs.gov.ab.ca/documents/lcvss/Acceptable_Use_Policy.pdf
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Schedule A
Sample User Procedures
Responsible, ethical use of the Internet includes:
Using the Internet for educational, informational, and recreational purposes only; not for
unauthorized, illegal, or unethical purposes.
Not attempting to modify or gain access to files, passwords, or data belonging to others;
not seeking unauthorized access to any computer system, or damaging or altering software
components of any network database.
Not sending, receiving, or displaying text or graphics which are illegal or may reasonably
be construed as obscene or offensive, at the discretion of the Library Manager.
Users will sign a Public Access to the Internet User Agreement before using the public access
computer for the first time (see Schedule B). A parent or guardian must sign for children up and
including 17 years of age or as designated by the library.
Users may send or receive email only if they set up an Internet-based account.
There will be no charge for using the public access computer. There may be a per page charge to
print. This fee is set by the individual library.
Use of the public access computers is on a first come, first served appointment basis. You must
sign-in prior to using the computer.
Misuse and/or abuse of the computer terminal or the rules governing Internet access will result in
suspension of Internet access privileges at the discretion of the Library Manager.
Users cannot use their own software programs, computer hardware, or saving devices on the
public access computer. This will help prevent computer viruses that are common to public access
computers. Only library-owned software programs will be used on the public access computer(s).
All software and CD-ROMs are copyright protected and may not be copied. Deliberate tampering
may result in fines and loss of computer privileges.
Library staff are not able to provide technical assistance to people in configuring their wireless
devices to access the library’s wireless network.
People are responsible for providing their own laptops or wireless devices and related networking
software. The library does not guarantee that people will be able to successfully make a
connection to the library’s wireless network.
Wireless device users are responsible for the power required to operate their wireless device while
in the library. Access to electrical outlet use in the library is dependent on availability and safety.
Precautions need to be made to ensure all electrical cords are clear of any traffic areas.
Users must ask staff if they wish to save files. Files may only be saved to a saving device. Saving
devices may be available for purchase at a cost. Once a saving device has been taken from the
library, it cannot be used again in the public access computers or anywhere else within the
school/library building. If a person wishes to leave his/her saving device at the library, library staff
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can arrange this. These procedures will minimize the potential for the introduction of computer
viruses to the public access computer(s).
Warning:
The public access computer has virus-protection software installed, but this will not
completely prevent a virus from being downloaded along with computer files. Software
downloaded from the Internet may contain a virus. Customers should have virusprotection software on their own computer and check all saving devices.
Library staff are available to help people access the Internet and other e-resources but cannot
provide in-depth training. During library hours, staff may be able to assist with general questions
and offer search suggestions. Library staff can suggest library resources and training sessions for
customers that need more assistance. Due to staff scheduling, Internet-trained staff may not
always be available to provide assistance.
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Schedule B
Sample Public Access to the Internet User Agreement
For _______________________________ Library
Everyone must sign this form before they can use the public access Internet computer for the first
time. A parent or guardian must sign for children up to and including 17 years of age.
This form asks for the user’s name, address, and telephone number in the event that irresponsible
use of this service results in damage or in commercial transactions. This information will only be
used for this purpose and will not be disclosed without the permission of the user.
All users of electronic information sources such as the Internet are expected to follow the library
procedures and code of ethics outlined below:
Responsible, ethical use of the Internet includes:
1.
Using the Internet for educational, informational, and recreational purposes only; not for
unauthorized, illegal, or unethical purposes.
2.
Not attempting to modify or gain access to files, passwords, or data belonging to others;
not seeking unauthorized access to any computer system or damaging or altering software
components of any network database.
3.
Not sending, receiving, or displaying text or graphics which are illegal or may reasonably
be construed as obscene or offensive at the discretion of the Library Manager.
User Name:____________________________________________________________
Address:_______________________________________________________________
Telephone Number:______________________________________________________
As a user of electronic information resources, such as the Internet, I will use these resources in a
responsible manner, consistent with the educational and informational purposes for which they are
provided. I have read and will follow the library’s code of ethics as outlined above and the library’s
Public Access to the Internet Procedures. I realize that failure to do so will result in loss of
computer privileges and may result in criminal or legal proceedings. I realize that I am responsible
for the cost of any wilful damage or commercial transactions.
Signature:______________________________________________Date:____________
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YRL HELPDESK
If you are having technical problems that you cannot solve, YRL has an online helpdesk for member library
staff to use.
The YRL Helpdesk is a way to reach Client Services Department staff to get help and assistance without
having to decide who to ask for when you phone or who to send an email to. It provides a website you can
log into to place your request for help, track the progress of your requests, or look up old requests to find out
what the answer was last time before launching a new request. It provides an automated system for dealing
with the wide variety of requests the staff in the department get. Anyone in the YRL region can use it to
submit a request for help or report a problem with Polaris or TRACpac, and those on the YRL network can
use it for any questions related to any desktop and network service we offer. You can also email the
helpdesk @ [email protected] and know that your email is being received by the entire Client Services
Department ensuring the most prompt response possible.
To access the helpdesk, go to YRL’s website at www.yrl.ab.ca
All member libraries are registered users who have access to the online helpdesk ticket creation site. Your
username is your library name, your password is your national library code + yrl. Example: asgyyrl. Once
you log in you can post new requests, see your old requests and see answers to Frequently Asked
Questions by clicking on “self–service help”.
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GoToAssist
Click on “Helpdesk” and complete the form that appears.
A member of the Client Services team will contact you regarding your problem.
In order to solve a problem, a member of the Client Services team may have to take remote control of your
computer. If that is the case, you will be asked to click on “GoToAssist” (to the left of “Helpdesk”).
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TECHNOLOGY PLAN
“A technology plan identifies what systems and services will fulfill your library’s mission and best meet user
needs.”
(Cohn, John M, Ann L. Kelsey & Keith Michael Fiels.
Writing and Updating Technology Plans. NY: Neal-Schuman, 1999)
Because the technology required to run libraries and serve patrons is in constant change and development,
libraries need to write and implement a technology plan. Computer hardware and equipment rapidly
becomes dated and needs to be replaced. Thus it is important for the local library to work out a technology
plan for replacing technology on an ongoing basis.
Computers may be financed by the Community Access Program (CAP)
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cap-pac.nsf/eng/home. They provide funds to provide public access terminals
for the library. However, staff computers and equipment must be purchased by each local library. It is for
these that the library needs to plan ongoing replacement.
For a complete description of how to write a technology plan, please see:
A Technology Planning Kit for Ontario Public Libraries.
Prepared by Katherine Slimman for Southern Ontario Library Service and
Ontario Library Service – North. May, 2001
SEE YRL’s website for:
Technology Recommendations for purchase &
Desktop and Administrative Support Services
www.yrl.ab.ca
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CORE COMPETENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGY (APLEN)
Definition
Technology core competencies are defined as a combination of skills, knowledge and behaviors related to
library technology and are important for organizational success, personal performance, and career
development. This combination of skills, technical knowledge and personal attributes, contributes to a
staff member’s success in any library position. These core competencies apply to all library staff; however,
some aspects of each of the competencies may not apply to every staff person.
Background
Library staff members work in a constantly-changing environment, which requires a level of adaptability. The
use of electronic information and related technologies has become indispensable in the delivery of quality
library services. Continuous technological changes in public libraries over the past decade have resulted in
library staff needing to maintain and upgrade their technological skills as they provide service to library
patrons. In addition, public libraries have experienced turnover of staff members which means that the basic
technology training (how to use productivity software, knowledge of the Internet and email) is never truly
completed. For many libraries, access to training sessions can be limited by budget restrictions, distance,
lack of staff members and availability of appropriate sessions. It is generally accepted that today, local library
staff members need basic technology competencies that exceed knowledge and use of the automated
library system.
Current Situation
The development of basic technology core competencies is a way to examine the skills required in public
libraries, as well as a way to assist APLEN in providing the most support to the nodes and public libraries. At
the most fundamental level, computer literacy skills are needed in each library.”
Excerpt from:
Core Competencies for Technology.
Reviewed and updated by members from the Alberta Public Library Electronic Network (APLEN) Technology
Training Committee. Alberta, Canada: November 2007
For a complete listing of technology competencies and checklist, go to:
http://www.yrl.ab.ca/content/standards-and-competencies
Community Access Program (CAP)
The Community Access program (CAP) is a national initiative through Industry Canada
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/ic1.nsf/eng/home . The goal of the program is to support connectivity to electronic
resources and to encourage Canadians to become Internet literate. The Alberta Public Library Electronic
Network (APLEN), through The Alberta Library, has coordinated the CAP program since 1997. Residents
and tourists can access electronic services (Internet, e-mail) for free at the 309 public libraries in the
province.
Each year CAP has provided funding for the purchase of computers and other equipment through the local
regional library. YRL Client Services staff will contact you when grants are made available to determine with
you the computer equipment choice(s) for your library.
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WELCOMING NEW PATRONS
Welcoming New Patrons
Library Cards
TRAC background
Conditions
What to do if a patron presents a TRAC card from another library
What to do is a patron presents a TAL card
What to do if a patron presents a library card from another library
TAL cards – participating libraries
Patron codes
Renewing memberships
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WELCOMING NEW PATRONS
Your main opportunity to welcome and inform new patrons about your library services, collections and
programs occurs when they first register for a library card. Make the most of it!
ƒ Welcome each new patron and provide a TAL/TRAC library card and plastic sleeve
ƒ Advise new patrons that they can use other libraries that are members of Yellowhead Regional
Library as well as libraries that are members of Northern Lights Library System, Marigold
Library System and the Peace Library System. These form TRAC or The Regional
Automation Consortium.
ƒ They can also use their card to borrow up to 5 books at participating TAL libraries, if they are
18 years old or over.
ƒ Give each new patron a short tour of your library.
ƒ Tell new patrons about the available services, programs, collections, and resources. Providing
a brochure is useful.
ƒ Advise them of your library hours.
This strategy personalizes the library and makes it immediately useful to the new user. The library has
been described as the living room of the community. To be sure it is hospitable, you as the host must
work to welcome your guests (patrons, customers) and see to their needs.
YRL issues a TRAC/TAL card as its membership card. The TAL card:
ƒ Provides access to the resources of participating libraries throughout Alberta
ƒ Eliminates non-resident or community borrower fees at other participating libraries.
ƒ Is free to members of a participating library
ƒ Is convenient - borrowed materials can be returned to any participating library
Suggestion:
Make up a New Patron Package to give to new patrons as they receive their membership card. It
could include:
ƒ TAL/TRAC Brochure
ƒ Your library brochure
ƒ Bookmark that says: “Welcome to [your library’s name] Public Library”
ƒ TRACpac brochure that describes how to use TRACpac and highlights 24/7 access to
information
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LIBRARY CARDS
TRAC Background
Nearly ten years ago, the bibliographic and patron records from three of Alberta’s regional libraries -Marigold Library System, Northern Lights Library System and Yellowhead Regional Library -- were
merged onto one integrated library system to form TRACpac, a shared online catalogue. In 2004
Peace Library System joined this consortium, bringing the total number of member libraries to 150.
These four regional libraries make up The Regional Automated Consortium (TRAC).
TRAC/TAL Card
Yellowhead Regional Library is also a member of The Alberta Library (TAL). TAL is a multi-type library
consortium offering the citizens of Alberta access to the books of over 265 libraries.
ƒ A common TRAC/TAL patron card is issued to patrons of TRAC member libraries, and is
recognized at all TRAC and TAL libraries. All YRL member libraries issue TRAC/TAL cards.
ƒ YRL’s membership in TRAC allows card holders to borrow materials, place holds and renew
items through all four systems member libraries and the four headquarters.
ƒ YRL’s membership in TAL (YRL pays a membership levy based on population) allows card
holders to borrow material from any participating library in the province. See the TAL website
and the TAL online catalogue at www.talonline.ca. Patrons can place holds on books in the
TAL catalogue and have them delivered to their home library.
ƒ YRL provides the following free supplies to member libraries:
9 membership cards
9 plastic card pockets (for membership cards)
9 barcodes for both patrons and library materials
ƒ Please call YRL headquarters (877-962-2003 Ext.243) or email [email protected] if you
need more of the above supplies.
Conditions
ƒ Anyone living in a member municipality of YRL is eligible for a TRAC/TAL card.
ƒ The TRAC/TAL card is only issued to residents of your municipality and surrounding county.
Individuals from another municipality obtain their TRAC/TAL card from their member library.
ƒ Patrons agree to abide by the rules and regulations of the member library.
ƒ Children are given the same privileges as adults and are allowed to borrow any library material
they need or want, unless restricted in writing by their parents.
ƒ Complete a library card for each patron. All patrons should be advised that:
9 Their library card must not be loaned to anyone else.
9 No one should borrow books for a non-resident on this library card.
9 The patron is responsible for all material checked out on the card.
ƒ Indicate the date the card is issued and have the Patron sign the card.
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ƒ Encourage patrons to bring their library card to the library.
9 It eliminates errors in circulation. (Their card has the right number.)
9 Because the TRAC/TAL card is needed when the patron visits another TAL library.
What to do if a patron presents a TRAC card from another library
ƒ You can identify a TRAC card from a TAL card by the front logo, which will say TRAC, and by
the barcode, which will indicate Marigold, Yellowhead, Northern Lights or Peace library
systems.
ƒ You do not need to attach another barcode to this card. Use the one already affixed to the
back of the card. The home library will have already entered the patron data onto Polaris.
ƒ Process the patron loans as according to your TRAC card policy.
What to do if a patron presents a TAL card
ƒ Check to see if there is a barcode already attached from a Marigold, Yellowhead, Peace or
Northern Lights library.
ƒ If there IS a barcode from Marigold, Yellowhead, Peace library system attached to the TAL
card:
ƒ DO NOT attach another barcode to this card. Use the existing one from Marigold,
Yellowhead, or Peace and process the loan according to your TAL card policy
ƒ You may want to record the patron data for your own library use. Include, in this case,
the name of the home library as well as the TRAC barcode number issued.
ƒ If there is NOT already a TRAC barcode attached to this card:
ƒ Attach a Yellowhead Regional Library barcode on the inside of the card.
ƒ Register the patron in Polaris. In the Patron Cardholder drop-down menu, choose “TAL
Cardholder” to identify them as a TAL patron
ƒ DO NOT charge them a membership fee!
ƒ Process the loan as per your TAL card policy.
What to do if a patron presents a library card from another library
ƒ Encourage the patron to get a TAL card from their home library. For example, if your patron
presents an Edmonton Public Library card, they can get a TAL card from EPL at no charge
and then use it in your library.
ƒ If the patron is unable to return to her/his home library and their home library has a reciprocal
lending agreement with Yellowhead Regional Library, as does Edmonton or St. Albert Public
Library, for example, you may issue them a membership card from your library and you may
charge them your local membership fee.
ƒ When registering the patron on the Polaris database, use the New Patron Workform. In the
Patron Cardholder drop-down menu choose Local library only.
TAL Cards – Participating Libraries
For a list of participating libraries, please go to:
http://www.thealbertalibrary.ab.ca/services/talcard/libraries.html
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Patron Codes
Patron codes define available services, loan periods, fines, and limits for specific classes of patrons.
They are also used for reports. Patron codes help to define patron privileges and are used according
to local policies. One list of patron codes is used throughout the entire system but you may not use all
of them.
Standard
regular patrons who received general library services; most patrons will be
registered as ‘standard’
Limited Services
usually non-residents; no access to on-line databases
Institutional
groups of people; i.e. Preschool group, Senior’s Lodge
Exception
to be used for patrons who do not fall into other categories; ie: loan
period for this level can be extended to apply for teachers (local
policy)
Staff
used to identify staff; staff could be standard or have different access levels
Library
generally used for ILLs; permission codes may be different from standard
TAL cardholder
limited to only five (5) print items and no AV items; no access to
online databases
Print disabled
will allow patrons access to all standard services as well as print
disabled items such as Daisy audio books
RENEWAL OF MEMBERSHIPS
ƒ Member library boards establish the local membership fees and the policy for renewal of
memberships.
ƒ When the patron’s membership has expired, Polaris will place a system-generated block on
the patron record. The next time the patron checks out a library item, library staff can reset the
new membership expiry date. If your library charges membership fees, you can receive
payment or place a charge against the patron’s account.
ƒ Affix an expiry date sticker to the patron’s card and fill in new expiry date.
ƒ Ensure the card is signed by the patron
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