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SAEM
Society for Academic
Emergency Medicine
2013 Annual meeting
The Westin Peachtree Plaza
May 14-18, 2013
Jointly sponsored by the University of Cincinnati
atlanta
Table of Contents
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 4
Senior Leadership Faculty Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
AEM Consensus Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Grant Writing Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Residency Program Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Resident Leadership Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Medical Student Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Junior Faculty Development Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
SAEM Annual Business Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Best of CORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Photo Exhibit and Visual Diagnosis Contest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Daily Schedule and Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-32
Maximize Your Time at the SAEM Annual Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Didactic Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-54
Abstracts for Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53-73
Innovations in Emergency Medicine Education (ME) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-75
European Society of Emergency Medicine (EuSEM) Abstracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Gallery of Excellence Nominees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76-78
Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Late Breaker Abstracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79-81
Moderators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Abstract Submission Reviewers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84-87
Exhibitor Announcements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90-91
The Westin Peachtree Plaza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92-95
200 Peachtree Conference Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Visit our Exhibitors in Peachtree Ballrooms (8th Level)
• Thursday, May 16, 2013: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm
Morning Coffee service at 7:00 am - 8:00 am
• Friday, May 17, 2013: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm
Morning Coffee service at 7:00 am - 8:00 am
Coffee Break at 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
i
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
SAEM is not responsible for printing errors or omissions.
SAEM
Society for Academic
Emergency Medicine
2013 Annual meeting
The Westin Peachtree Plaza
May 14-18, 2013
Welcome to the SAEM Annual Meeting!
This program is our best ever and includes the best of the best emergency medicine education and research. Here at the annual
meeting, you have the chance to interact with the presenters, authors, and researchers who have produced this work. In this process,
you have the opportunity not only to learn and grow, but also to teach. Engage with the presenters, question, debate, and in this method
you will make the work better, more thoughtful, and, I believe, make a contribution to the advancement of the science. Most of all, have
fun. This meeting is the place we can all come together to share and celebrate our accomplishments and the joy we derive from our
professional roles. Enjoy your time in Atlanta. You are the best and brightest emergency medicine has to offer, so contribute and make
this the best SAEM Annual Meeting ever!
Thanks for coming to the 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting in Atlanta.
Cherri Hobgood MD, FACEP
President
SAEM
Welcome to Atlanta for the 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting!
How does one begin to summarize such a spectacular meeting? This year represented the largest submission of didactics, abstracts,
and innovations ever for the annual meeting. In order to showcase these spectacular submissions, your Program Committee has
scheduled the most didactics, abstracts, and innovations in the history of SAEM. We were able to secure a wonderful keynote speaker,
Dr. Thomas Frieden, Director of the CDC, as one of the highlights of the meeting. This keynote address will occur on Thursday, May 16,
from 2:00 - 3:00 pm, just prior to the Plenary Session from 3:30 - 5:00 pm. This year we also decided to recognize the best abstract
submissions to the meeting by showcasing them in the “Gallery of Excellence.” This extravaganza will run concurrently with the opening
reception, also on Thursday, May 16, and our hope is that you will be able to browse through the offerings and enjoy the quality of the
abstracts whilst enjoying the company of colleagues and friends. This year’s Consensus Conference, “Global Health and Emergency
Care: A Research Agenda,” will focus on emergency medicine on a global scale. Our specialty is expanding worldwide with a phenomenal
trajectory, so be sure to register to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of emergency medicine on an international
scale. The perennial favorites SIM Wars and SonoGames™ are back, so feel free to come and cheer on the teams as they aim for
SAEM glory as victors of the games. Senior and Junior Faculty Development Forums, Resident Leadership Forum, Medical Student
Symposium, Residency and Fellowship Fair…the list goes on! Worried about missing important parts of the meeting? Don’t. This year’s
digital and social media will keep you up and running. With your own personal planner available on the website, the mobile app, email
updates, Twitter feeds, Facebook updates, and message boards, you will be able to keep it all straight and enjoy everything SAEM has
to offer.
This year’s meeting should meet the needs of everyone in the emergency department, from medical student to seasoned veteran.
This meeting is a dynamic forum for educators, researchers, policy makers, and administrators to exhibit the very best of the specialty.
It will provide you with opportunities to learn something new, develop new ideas, improve your patient care, network with a colleague,
and most importantly, pause to appreciate what we as a specialty have achieved and inspired.
Thanks for coming to the 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting in Atlanta.
Christopher Ross MD
Chair of the 2013 Program Committee
SAEM
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
1
General Information
Welcome to the 2013 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting. As you attend the meeting, hopefully you will notice
the many significant innovations we have implemented for 2013.
Registration
For the cost of the basic registration fee, attendees may attend all paper, poster, and didactic sessions, except those sessions that
have limited enrollment, require pre-registration, or require an additional registration fee. For those who have pre-registered to attend
sessions that require pre-registration, be sure to arrive a few minutes early.
Continuing Medical Education
Target Audience: This conference has been created for emergency medicine physicians who want to expand and update their knowledge
of quality instruction in emergency medicine training programs and improve the quality of emergency medical care.
Overall Program Objectives:
•
Apply research findings to your emergency medicine practice.
•
Apply key statistical indicators in analyzing research results.
•
Utilize acceptable research methods and study design in the development of research projects.
•
Realize the details of the framework for ABEM so that the intended practice improvements are vetted through this prism.
Joint Accreditation Statement:
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the essential areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the University of Cincinnati and Society for Academic Emergency
Medicine.
2
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
The University of Cincinnati is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University
of Cincinnati designates this live activity for a maximum of 24 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit
commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
Faculty Disclosure Declaration:
According to the disclosure policy of the University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine, all faculty, planning committee members, and
other individuals who are in a position to control content are required to disclose any relevant relationships with any commercial
interest related to this activity. The existence of these interests or relationships is not viewed as implying bias or decreasing the
value of the presentation, and any conflict of interest is resolved prior to the activity. All educational materials are reviewed for fair
balance, scientific objectivity and levels of evidence. Disclosure will be made at the time of the activity.
Learner Assurance Statement:
The University of Cincinnati is committed to resolving all conflicts of interest issues that could arise as a result of prospective
faculty members’ significant relationships with drug or device manufacturer(s). The University of Cincinnati is committed to
retaining only those speakers with financial interests that can be reconciled with the goals and educational integrity of the
CME activity.
Annual Business Meeting
The Annual Business Meeting will be held on Friday, May 17, 2013, from 3:30 - 5:00pm, in Plaza Ballroom A-B-C. Keynote speakers,
Gordon Wheeler, Atul Grover MD, PhD and Walter J. Koroshetz MD will discuss “The Future of Health Care Reform and Implications for
Emergency Medicine. The SAEM Board of Directors elections will be announced, in addition, the Young Investigator Award Recipients;
the recipients of the Research Training, Institutional Research Training; and the recipients of the 2012 Annual Meeting Best Presentation
Awards will be presented to the membership.
Cherri Hobgood MD, will present her presidential summary address to the membership. Incoming President Alan Jones MD, will then be
introduced and address the membership with his preview of the coming year.
Clinical Pathologic Case Presentation
The 2013 Semi-Final CPC Competition will be held on Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 8:00 am-5:00 pm in the following rooms: International
B/C/D/E/F/F. Annual Meeting attendees are encouraged to attend the competition and support the various residency program
participants. There is no registration fee to attend the competition, which showcases EM residency programs. The CPC consists of the
presentation and discussion of the best 72 cases submitted. The competition finalists from each of the tracks will be announced during a
reception held from 5:30pm-8:00pm on Wednesday in Augusta Room 1-2. The CPC Final Competition, consisting of presentations by the
six semi-finalist teams, will be held during the ACEP Scientific Assembly, in Seattle, Washington, in October 2013. The CPC Competition
is sponsored by ACEP, CORD, EMRA, and SAEM.
Academy Meeting dates and times
AAAEM Academy of Administrators in Academic Emergency Medicine
• Business Meeting: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 8:00a-12:00p Vinings Room I (6th Level)
AEUS Academy of Emergency Ultrasound
• Business Meeting: Friday, May 17, 2013 8:00a-12:00p Vinings Room I (6th Level)
AGEM Academy of Geriatric Emergency Medicine
• Business Meeting: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00a-12:00p Vinings II (6th Level)
AWAEM Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine
• Business Meeting: Friday, May 17, 2013 8:00a-12:00p Vinings II (6th Level)
• Luncheon: Friday, May 17, 2013 12:00p-2:00p Conference Room 1-2 (7th Level)
CDEM Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine
• Business Meeting: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00a-12:00p Conference Room 5 (7th Level)
GEMA Global Emergency Medicine Academy
• Business Meeting: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00a-12:00p Vinings Room I (6th Level)
SIM Simulation Academy
• Business Meeting: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00a-12:00p Conference Room 4 (7th Level)
ADIEM Academy for Diversity & Inclusion in Emergency Medicine
• Business Meeting: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 1:00p-5:00p Vinings Room I (6th Level)
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
3
Social Events
Opening Reception & Gallery of Excellence
Join us on Thursday, May 16, 2013, for the opening reception from 5:30pm7:00pm. This is a great opportunity to socialize and network with other
SAEM members. It will be located in the Grand Atrium.
AWAEM Luncheon
The 4th Annual AWAEM Luncheon will be held on Friday, May 17, 2013
from 12:00-2:00pm in PT-Conference Room 1-2 (7th Level). This is a great
opportunity to network and discuss hot topics within emergency medicine
today. Lunch is $75.00 per person and seating is limited.
“Cocktails and Dreams” Foundation Awareness Reception
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 from 4:30pm-6:30pm in Carnegie Foyer.
Enjoy FREE wine/beer and hors d’oeuvres while learning how the SAEM
Foundation helps young physicians jump start their careers. Also, register
to win the latest iPad.
Visit us on Facebook & Twitter
See what everyone is saying about the Annual Meeting on Twitter and join
in on the conversation. Use the hashtag #SAEM13 on Twitter and follow
@SAEMOnline.
Visit and like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/saemonline.
2013 Annual Meeting
Program Committe
Harrison Alter MD
Alameda County Medical Center
Highland Hospital
Gillian Beauchamp MD
University of Cincinnati
College of Medicine
Steven Bird MD
University of Massachusetts
Medical Center
Andra Blomkalns MD
University of Cincinnati-College
of Medicine (SAEM BOD Liaison)
Jennifer Carey MD
Brown University
Moira Davenport MD
Allegheny General Hospital
Kevin Ferguson MD
University of Florida
Susan Fuchs MD
Children’s Memorial Hospital
Chris Ghaemmaghami MD
University of Virginia
Eric Gross MD
Hennepin County Medical Center
Sanjey Gupta MD
New York Hospital Queens
Todd Guth MD
University of Colorado
Cocktails
&
Dreams
Wednesday, May 15, 2013
4:30 – 6:30 pm
In Carnegie Foyer
Join us for a free glass of beer or wine
and discover how the SAEM Foundation has
helped to jump start the careers of many
young emergency medicine physicians.
4
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Carolyn Holland MD
University of Florida Gainesville
Jason Hoppe MD
University of Colorado
Denver Health Science
Lauren Hudak MD
Emory University
School of Medicine
Gabe Kelen MD
Johns Hopkins University
Hollynn Larrabee MD
West Virginia University
JoAnna Leuck MD
Carolinas Medical Center
Jason Liebzeit MD
Emory University
School of Medicine
Henderson McGinnis MD
Wake Forest Baptist Health
Joseph Miller MD
Henry Ford Hospital
Henderson McGinnis MD
Wake Forest University
Angela Mills MD
University of Pennsylvania
Dave Milzman MD
Georgetown University
James Olson, PhD
Wright State University
Charissa Pacella MD
University of Pittsburgh
Daniel Pallin MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
and Children’s Hospital Boston
Peter Pryor MD
Denver Health
Ali Raja MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Megan Ranney MD
Brown University
Rhode Island Hospital
Linda Regan MD
Johns Hopkins University
Kevin Rodgers MD
Indiana University
Sarah Ronan MD
University of Cincinnati
College of Medicine
Brett Rosen MD
York Hospital
Christopher Ross MD
Cook County Hospital
(Program Committee Chair)
Todd Seigel MD
Brown University
Rhode Island Hospital
Lorraine Thibodeau MD
Albany Medical Center
R. Jason Thurman MD
Vanderbilt University
Medical Center
Jody Vogel MD
Denver Health Medical Center
Joshua Wallenstein MD
Emory University
Robert Woolard MD
Texas Tech El Paso
Senior Leadership Faculty Forum
PT - 200 Conference Room 3
Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday, May 14, 2013
12:00 – 1:00 pmLunch
8:00 - 8:15 am
1:00 – 1:50 pm
Building a Team – T Crocco
This presentation will cover the essential elements of team building.
The differences between team work and effective team building will
be discussed. Additionally, common mistakes in building a team will
be highlighted. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants
should have a new perspective on team development.
Objectives:
1. To understand the purpose of a team.
2. To explain the difference between team work and establishing an
effective team.
3. To discuss the essential elements of team building.
Welcome/Introduction – K Robinson
8:15 – 10:00 amLeadership Lessons – Barsan/Hockberger
Participants in this session will be able to answer the following questions:
1. What is the difference between management and leadership?
2. What leadership qualities are most important for success?
3. What particular leadership style best fits my personal traits and skills?
4. How do I develop a vision for others to follow?
5. How do I develop relationships that lead to results?
6. What leadership goals should I set for myself in the coming year?
10:00 – 10:50 am
Developing and Sustaining a Vision – B Zink
This session will describe how a leader can collaboratively formulate
a vision for his/her organization. We will examine the components of
a successful vision statement, how to track and measure success of
the vision, and how to revise the vision as the organization succeeds
and matures.
Objectives:
1. Participants will learn how to create a strong vision statement for
their organization.
2. Participants will consider the components of a vision statement
and how to measure and track the success of a vision statement.
3. Participants will learn how to assess, and revise the vision as the
organization moves forward.
10:50 – 11:10 am
Break
11:10 am – 12:00 pm Facilitating Effective Meetings – R Strauss
“Oh no! Not another meeting!” This course will review when to and
when NOT to have a meeting, and how to make the meetings you do
have more effective and rewarding. Learn how to guide the discussion,
create focus and deal with the overbearing, the sarcastic, the bashful,
and the detractor. Discover effective methods to open and close
discussions. This is one meeting that will help to improve the rest of
your meetings. During the presentation, interspersed pre-recorded
vignettes will be used to demonstrate points and generate discussion.
Objectives:
At the conclusion of this presentation, the participant will be able to:
1. Describe when to and when not to have a meeting.
2. Describe effective meeting planning and preparation
and “rules of engagement”.
3. Develop an effective and accomplishable agenda.
4. List problems that occur during a meeting and methods
to resolve them.
5. Review common traps that chairs fall into, such as wandering
discussion, taking a side, berating members.
6. Describe what to do when the meeting has concluded,
accountability and follow-up.
7. Using pre-taped scenarios, discuss methods to bring
the meeting back on track.
2:00 – 2:50 pmConflict Resolution – J Adams
Objectives:
1. List the common, predictable causes of conflict in the
healthcare environment.
2. Describe how our human nature is designed to create conflict
3. D
escribe techniques that will reduce the negative,
destructive conflicts.
4. E
xplain the techniques of communication that will facilitate
conflict resolution and achievement of productive goals.
2:50 – 3:10 pm
Break
3:10 – 4:00 pm
Strategic Planning – S Schneider
The course will summarize the strategic planning procedures starting
with why and when to undertake strategic planning. A general outline
of the procedure will be discussed with examples of tools often used
in the drafting of a plan such as SWOT analysis. Several templates
of strategic plans will be discussed. Finally implementation and
evaluation of the plan will be examined.
Objectives:
1. Describe the benefits of strategic planning and optimal times to
undertake this endeavor.
2. Describe the tools for creating a plan, including mission statement,
vision statement, SWOT analysis.
3. D
escribe the creation of a timeline and check points for the
implementation of a strategic plan.
4:00 – 5:30 pm
Reception
Wednesday May 15, 2013
7:30 – 8:20 am
Human Resources – L Zun
Physician managers in emergency medicine frequently deal with
human resource issues. Rarely are emergency physicians trained
in hiring, firing, compensating and evaluating physicians, midlevel
providers and others providers in the emergency department. Many of
the human resource challenges will be addressed such as dealing with
disruptive physicians, identifying impaired physicians, recruitment
challenges and hiring the wrong care provider. Land mines that can
*Additional fee and ticket required
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
5
Senior Leadership Faculty Forum
PT - 200 Conference Room 3
Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
interfere with operations of the emergency department such as
wrongful discharge, conflict resolution and remediation will also
be discussed. This presentation will provide the basic approach to
human resource management for emergency physician managers to
address many of the challenges and to avoid many of the landmines
through a case based approach. This discussion will not address
credentialing or privileging issues.
Objectives:
1. To understand the essential issues in human resources management.
2. To use the best approach in hiring, firing, compensating, and
advancing.
3. To avoid the pitfalls in human resource management.
8:30 – 9:20 amED Operations Overview – K Robinson
This presentation provide an overview of ED operations, including
recent history, models and evidenced process improvements in ED’s,
with a focus on academic ED when possible.
Objectives:
1. Describe the context in which ED operations performance
improvement projects are conducted.
2. Describe the most widely accepted model of Input-ThroughputOutput for describing ED operations.
3. Describe evidenced-based process improvements for many steps
in the Input-Throughput-Output model.
4. Identify key resources for further understanding of the ED
Operations literature.
9:30 – 10:20 amChange Management – T Sanson
Leaders are judged in times of adversity and change, not in times
of success. Change is very much a part of our everyday lives.
Change leadership needs to be part of any leader’s essential skills.
This presentation will identify the characteristics of leaders who
initiate, guide, and provoke change. We will discuss how to catalyze
people around change, how to recognize the personal and emotional
difficulties people have with change. We will discuss how to encourage
risk during volatile times while maintaining trust and wellness for
your organization. We will learn how to effectively lead staff to move
through periods of disengagement and crisis.
10:20 – 10:40 am
Break
10:40 – 11:30 amNegotiating for Your Department/Faculty
– K Heilpern
Objectives:
1. To understand the interests of the university or administration.
2. To understand the interests of the department or faculty.
3. To gain knowledge about how to most effectively negotiate in
support of your department or faculty.
11:30 am – 12:30 pmLunch
12:30 – 1:20 pm
Overview of Department Finance – J Bihun
This session will focus on describing the various sources of
departmental funding. It will help you appreciate what can be done
to understand and to influence your department’s financial position.
Objectives:
1. Understand where departmental funds come from.
2. Appreciate how funding amounts are determined.
3. L
earn about productivity and process variables that influence the
financials.
4. G
ain a perspective on the typical expenses in an academic
environment.
1:30 – 3:30 pmCommunication Skills – B Clyne
Part I-Interpersonal Communication
What type of first impression do you make? Does your body language
convey confidence? Are you readily perceived as trustworthy? This
interactive session focuses on the power of personal “presence” and
how seemingly minor, yet controllable behaviors affect our ability
to engage others and lead effectively. Participants will learn and
practice nonverbal communicating skills to increase confidence,
decrease stress and increase their leadership potential.
Objectives:
1. Understand the science and power of non-verbal communication.
2. Learn to use body language and facial expressions to build rapport.
3. U
nderstand how posture and gesture affect confidence and
leadership ability.
Part II-Presenting To Change The World
Are you an exceptional public speaker? Do you communicate clearly
and with credibility? Exceptional presentation skills open doors
to leadership opportunities. The first step toward improvement is
understanding the components of any presentation. In this interactive
session, participants will learn to create presentations with:
• A Message that is focused and relevant.
• Visuals that are simply designed and uncluttered.
• A Delivery that is authentic and conversational.
Objectives:
1. Understand how to organize, refine and structure a presentation.
2. Learn to create powerful visual aids that reinforce key points.
3. Practice techniques for engaging the audience.
4. Learn to reduce nervous energy and avoid verbal fillers.
*Additional fee and ticket required
6
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
SAEM’s 14th Annual AEM Consensus Conference
GLOBAL HEALTH AND EMERGENCY CARE: A RESEARCH AGENDA
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 – Plaza Ballrooms A, B and C (10th level)
7:30 - 8:00 am
Registration
8:00 - 8:10 am
Welcome, Opening Remarks, Consensus Process Principles
8:10 - 8:35 amPlenary Session 1: Defining Acute and Emergency Care as a Human Right and a Global Research Agenda
Jeffrey P. Koplan MD, MPH, Vice President for Global Health; Director, Emory Global Health Institute Emory University
8:35 - 9:20 am
Discussion: Evidenced-Based Summary of the Trajectory of Global Emergency Care Research
Adam C. Levine MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine Co-Director, Global Emergency Medicine Fellowship,
Brown University Alpert Medical School; Clinical Advisor for Emergency and Trauma Care Partners in Health - Rwanda
9:20 -9:50 am
Plenary Session 2: HIV as a Global Emergency: Unique Opportunities in Treatment and Prevention
Myron Cohen MD, J. Herbert Bate Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, and Epidemiology and
Associate Vice Chancellor for Global Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
9:50 - 10:00 am
Break
10:00 am - 12:00 pmConcurrent Breakout Session 1: Global Research, Collaboration from Nations to Specialties
Breakout
Topic
Breakout
Session
Leader(s)
1: Medical Education
(UME, GME, CME)
2: Data Collection,
Management & Analysis
3: Ethical Issues
in Research:
4: Funding
Generating a research agenda for undergraduate,
graduate, and post-graduate medical education in a
global health setting, with the goal of better defining
learner competencies, learner and program evaluation
practices, and outcomes to learners and patients
Analyzing how emergency care
data informs systems development
and prevention, such as burden of
emergency care disease
Discussing key ethical
issues, including cultural
considerations, consent
IRBs, and publications
Surveying global trends in
research funding priorities
for global acute and
emergency care
Ian Martin
Janis Tupesis
Hani Mowafi
Teri Reynolds
Mark Bisanzo
Cameron Crandall
Phillip Seidenberg
Mark Hauswald
Bhakti Hansoti
Michelle Biros
Jon Mark Hirshon
Mark Hauswald
Kinjal Sethuraman
Scott Sasser
Alex Vu
Herbie Duber
12:00 - 12:15 pm
Break
12:15 - 1:30 pmLunchtime Keynote Panel Discussions: Cross-Cutting Issues in Conducting Global Research
Linda C. Degutis DrPH, MSN (Moderator), Director, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention
Meena Nathan Cherian MD, Emergency & Essential Surgical Care (EESC) Clinical Procedures Unit, Department of Health Systems Policies
& Workforce, World Health Organization
Lee Wallis, MBChB, MD, FRCS, FCEM, FCEM(SA), FIFEM, Head of Emergency Medicine, Provincial Government Western Cape; Head,
Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University; President, African Federation for Emergency
Medicine (AFEM)
Margaret M. Murray, PhD, Director, Global Alcohol Research Program, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. National
Institutes of Health
1:30 - 1:40 pm
1:40 - 3:40 pm
Breakout
Topic
Breakout
Session
Leader(s)
Break
Concurrent Breakout Session 2: Practical Issues in Implementing and Sustaining Emergency Care Research in the Global Environment
5: Health Services
6: Clinical/
Translational Research:
7: Health Systems Research: Vertical +
Horizontal = Diagonal
8: Basic Sciences
Research/
Resuscitation
Examining critical vs. desired
services in acute medical care at
all levels of the healthcare system
(community, primary health clinic,
district hospital, referral hospital)
Defining goals, priorities, and
metrics when integrating
research in a developing
emergency care system
Investigating Health Systems Research, one of a few
dominant “health system” theories proposing that
models can usefully deconstruct complex systems
into more basic functions and components
Learning about emerging
resuscitation research, with
a particular focus on injury
and cardiac resuscitation
Rachel T. Moresky
Mark Bisanzo
Regan Marsh
Michael Runyon
Hendry Sawe
Christian Theodosis
Emilie Calvello
Lee Wallis
Tom Aufderheide
Marcus Ong
3:40 - 3:55 pm
Break
3:55 - 4:40 pm
Discussion: Consensus Building for a Global Research Agenda in Emergency Care
4:40 - 5:00 pmClosing Remarks
*Additional fee required
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
7
2013 SAEM Grant Writing
Workshop
Residency Program
Update Session:
Wednesday, May 15, 2013
International H (6th Level)
Breakout sessions in
Tower Rooms 1405, 1406 & 1407
What you HAVE to know from the RRC,
to the NAS to the CCC
7:30 amContinental Breakfast
Be sure to keep up-to-date with all of the latest information to
keep your residency running smoothly as we transition into the
Next Accreditation System!
7:55 am Introduction (Prasanthi Govindarajan MD,
University of California, San Francisco)
8:00 amDeveloping Your Funded EM Research
Program (Lori Post PhD, Yale University)
9:00 amThe Anatomy of Science (Mark Angelos MD,
The Ohio State University)
9:30 amWriting the Specific Aims Section of the
Grant (Jeffrey Kline MD, Indiana University)
10:00 am
Break
10:15 amDeveloping the Grant Budget: Managing the
Project Requirements within the Budget
Restrictions (James Holmes MD, MPH, UC
Davis)
10:45 amResponding to Reviews and Resubmitting
(Alan Jones MD, University of Mississippi)
11:15 amNIH Review Session
(Walter Koroshetz MD, NINDS)
12:00 pmNetworking Lunch (with course faculty)
1:00 pm
Small Group Session (with course faculty) *
2:30 pm
Break
2:50 pmCareer Development Awards
(Manish Shah MD, University of Rochester)
3:20 pmCareer Development Grant Panel Discussion
(Manish Shah MD, University of Rochester,
moderator)
3:50 pmWrap-Up and Transition to Optional
Breakout Session (with course faculty) **
4:00 pm
Optional Breakout Session
5:00 pmClose
*Small Group Session: Participants will rotate through four 20-minute skillbuilding stations which will each focus on a specific aspect of successful grant
writing. Stations will include: specific aims section, training plan and letter of
recommendation from primary mentor, revising and resubmitting grants, and
managing your grant budget.
**Optional Breakout Session: During this optional session, participants who
have submitted grants for feedback will have the opportunity to speak one-onone with reviewers to discuss how they can improve their applications.
Additional fee and ticket required
8
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Wednesday, May 15 – 8:30-2:30
PT-200 Conference Room 1, 7th level
Two sessions will focus predominantly on the latest information
from the ACGME including the Next Accreditation System (NAS),
Milestones and Clinical Competency Committees. Sessions will
focus on practical information that you can use when you return
home. The remaining two sessions will tackle the tough topics of
faculty accountability and resident motivation, especially important
as we move forward with more complex educational systems.
8:30 - 9:50 amRRC Update and Q&A Session:
Wallace A. Carter MD &
Lynne Meyer PhD, MPH
10:00 - 11:00 amFaculty Accountability - From
Didactics to the Bedside
Sarah Stahmer MD
11:00 am - 12:00 pmTrophies, Blue Ribbons...and the
Woodshed - Motivating Residents in
the Age of Milestones
Damon Kuehl MD
12:00 - 1:00 pm
Break for Lunch
1:00 - 2:30 pm
orkshop on Clinical Competency
W
Committees (CCC) - Everything You Need
to Know to Create a Successful CCC
Susan Promes MD & Mary Jo Wagner MD
2013 SAEM Resident Leadership Forum
Thursday, May 16, 2013
PT-200 Conference Room 1-2-3
Resident Leadership Track
7:00 - 7:30 am
Breakfast/Introductions
2:00 - 3:00 pmSAEM Keynote Address:
Dr. Thomas Frieden, CDC Director
7:30 - 8:00 amHidden Gems:
Developing the Leader Within You
(Top 10 Attributes of Successful Leaders)
Robert Hockberger and Bill Barsan
3:00 - 3:30 pm
Break
3:30 - 5:00 pm SAEM Plenary Session
8:00 - 8:30 amTalk the Talk: Maximizing Your
Communication & Negotiation Skills
Jim Adams
8:30 – 9:00 amHave A Vision: Identifying and
Developing Your Career Leadership Track
Andra L. Blomkalns
9:00 - 9:30 amReaching for the Stars:
Roadmap to National Leadership
Cherri Hobgood
9:30-10:00 am
Break / Move to Separate Track Rooms
Chief Resident Forum Track
10:00 - 10:30 amWish I’d Thought of That:
Transitioning to the CR Leadership Role
Felix Ankel and Eric Katz
Resident Academic Track
10:00 - 10:30 amIs This For Me?
Selecting and Planning an Academic Career
(includes Promotion and Tenure discussion)
Carey Chisholm
10:30 - 11:15 amPoint-Counterpoint: All Academic Faculty
Should Be Fellowship Trained
Don Yealy and Paul Pepe
11:15 am - 12:05 pmLunch with Academic Leaders
12:05 - 12:15 pm
Break
12:15 - 12:45 pmFostering Academic Productivity &
Research for All Faculty
Alan Jones
12:45 - 1:15 pmIn the Spotlight: Teaching Anywhere
Mike Epter
10:30 - 11:00 amCaught in the Middle!
The Art of Middle Management
(Delegation, Meetings, 360° Management,
Managing Up/Managing Down)
Jennifer Walthall MD
1:15 - 1:45 pm
Survival 101: Work-Life Balance/Wellness
Jason Liebzeit
1:45 - 2:00 pm
Move to Keynote
11:00 – 11:50 amDon’t Waste Your Energy:
RRC Non-Negotiables
(Lunch with the Program Directors)
PDs
3:00 - 3:30 pm
Break
3:30 - 5:00 pm SAEM Plenary Session
2:00 - 3:00 pmSAEM Keynote Address:
Dr. Thomas Frieden, CDC Director
11:50 am - 12:00 pm Break
12:00 - 1:15 pmYou Can’t Do That:
Managing Difficult Resident Problems
(Dealing with the “Resident in Crisis”:
Depression/Suicide, Drug / Alcohol Abuse,
Unprofessional / Disgruntled / Tardy
Resident; Sexual Harassment, Resident
Health Issues, Confidentiality and Fairness
Issues)
Phillip Shayne MD
Mary Jo Wagner MD
Steve Bowman MD
1:15 - 1:45 pmAnd The Answer Is…
Pearls and Pitfalls From Former CRs
(SAEM / EMRA / AAEM RSA
Chief Resident Panel)
EMRA/AAEMRSA
1:45 - 2:00 pm
Move to Keynote
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
9
Medical Student Symposium
friday, may 17, 2013 – 8:00am - 2:00pm
Augusta Room 1-2-3 (Seventh Level)
7:30 – 7:45 am
Objectives
Welcome
Todd Guth MD, University of Colorado
The Medical Student Symposium is primarily tailored
to medical students who have identified emergency
medicine as their future specialty but is also valuable
for students still contemplating specialty choice. The
symposium includes presentations from seasoned EM
educators, roundtable discussions geared for more
individualized guidance, lunch with residency program
directors, and a panel discussion with current EM
residents. Major themes of the symposium include
highlighting career options within EM and navigating the
residency application and selection process. The program
is followed by a residency fair representing most EM
programs from across the county
Herbert Hern MD, Alameda County Medical Center
8:45 - 9:15 am
Q&A with Drs. Liebzeit & Hern
9:15 - 9:30 am
Break
At the completion of the session,
participants will be able to:
10:00 – 10:30 amFinding the Match Made in Heaven: How to Select
the Right Residency
7:45 - 8:15 amIs EM Right for Me?
Jason Liebzeit MD, Emory University
8:15 - 8:45 am
Oh, the Places You’ll Go: Career Paths in EM
9:30 – 10:00 amHow to Shine and Get the Most
out of Your EM Clerkship
Gus Garmel MD,
Stanford University/Kaiser Permanente
1) A
ssess their personal and career goals
that make EM a good “fit”,
James Colletti MD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester
10:30-11:00 am
Mistakes EM Students and Applicants Make
2) I dentify the multitude of career paths
that exist within EM,
Maria Moreira MD,
Denver Health Medical Center - University of Colorado
3) O
ptimize their fourth-year schedule,
11:00 – 11:30 am
Q&A with Drs. Garmel, Colletti & Moreira
4) M
aximize their performance in the EM clerkship,
11:30 am – 1:00 pmLunch with Program Directors
5) I dentify key factors and variables
in selecting potential training programs,
1:00 – 1:30 pmThe Written Word: SLORs, MSPE,
& the Personal Statement
6) A
ssemble a strong and compelling application
package, and
7) Perform their best during interviews.
Bernard Lopez MD, Jefferson Medical College
1:30 – 2:00 pmThe Interview: Selling Yourself without
Shooting Yourself
Michael Gisondi MD, Northwestern University
2:00 – 2:15 pm
Q&A with Drs. Lopez and Gisondi
2:15 – 3:00 pm
Small Group Breakout Sessions
Osteopathic Students Marc Squillante DO,
University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria
Women in EM
Tracy Sanson MD, University of South Florida
International Medicals Students
Christain Jacobus MD, Synergy Medical Education
Alliance
Strategic Planning for M1&M2 Students
Jeffrey Barrett MD, Temple University
Optimizing Your Fourth-Year Schedule
Jennifer Avegno MD, Louisiana State University
10
3:00 - 3:15 pm
Break
3:15 - 4:30 pm
Resident Panel (EMRA and AAEM-RSA)
4:30 – 6:30 pm
Residency Fair
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
JUNIOR FACULTY DEVELOPMENT FORUM
friday, may 17 – 8:00 am - 2:00 pm
PT Conference Room 3
Overall Workshop Objectives:
• Provide specific guidance on building a
foundation for success in academic EM
•
Develop and cultivate junior faculty to
become the next generation of academic
leaders in research, administration and
education
• Nurture emergency medicine junior faculty
collegiality and collaborations across
institutions
8:00 – 8:55 amOverview of Academic Medicine: How to Survive
& Thrive
Speakers: Philip Shayne MD and Terry Kowalenko MD
• Summarize the three pillars of academic medicine: clinical care, research and education.
• Understand what makes a career in academic medicine unique.
• Examine the distinctive challenges that face junior faculty.
9:00 – 9:55 am
Developing Skills in EM Administration
Speakers: Leon Haley MD and Eric Gross MD
By the end of this program,
participants will
• Review ED administration positions and potential avenues to reach these positions/careers.
1. Understand the structure of a career in
academic emergency medicine, including a
general overview of the promotion process
• Describe leadership principles and characteristics necessary for ED Administration.
2. Receive an overview of 3 major career
pathways in academic EM: Administration,
Research and Education
3. Gain insight into the skills and steps
required for success in EM administration
• Highlight the pros and cons of ED Administration roles.
10:00 – 11:25 am
Developing Skills in EM Education
Speakers: Fiona Gallahue MD, David Gordon MD and Brian Stettler MD
• Gain a basic understanding of the continuum of medical education and relevant accreditation
agencies and requirements.
• Examine educational leadership opportunities in medical education.
4. Review strategies for success in medical
education, including mechanisms for more
effective teaching and feedback
• Identify the diverse venues and learners faculty teach at academic medical centers.
5. Understand fundamental skills of creating
a career in EM research, including a review
of funding mechanisms
• Acquire basic skills in teaching, giving feedback and evaluation.
6. Receive specific advice for successful
professional development from current
leaders in the field
• Highlight the critical need to provide effective feedback to learners.
• Discuss the challenges and strategies for managing poorly performing residents.
11:30 am – 12:55 pm Developing Skills in Research
Speakers: Jason Haukoos MD, MS, Tamara Espinoza MD and David Cone MD
• Provide a general overview of funding structures for academic medicine and EM more specifically.
• Detail the step-by-step process for setting up a research project.
• Highlight skills necessary to lead effective and successful research programs.
• Understand the importance of fostering innovation and teamwork/collaboration for a successful
research career.
• Discuss grant opportunities.
• Identify the varied venues for sharing research findings with academic colleagues.
12:40 - 1:55 pmSenior Faculty Roundtable: “Lessons Learned: If I
Knew Then What I Know Now…”
• Learn from senior faculty the opportunities, support, resources, and relationships that will foster a
successful academic career.
• Understand the benefits and the logistics of identifying and working with a mentor.
Moderator: Andra Blomkalns MD
Speaker: Brian Zink MD
Roundtable Discussants: B
rian Clyne MD, Deborah Diercks MD, Kate Heilpern MD,
Cherri Hobgood MD, Alan Jones MD
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
11
SAEM ANNual business meeting
Friday, May 17, 2013, 3:30 – 5:00 pm
The Westin Peachtree Plaza, Atlanta, GA – Room: Plaza Ballroom A-B-C
All SAEM members are urged to attend
Keynote Speakers: The Future of Health Care Reform
and Implications for Emergency Medicine
a. Gordon Wheeler, Associate Executive Director of the Public
Affairs Division/Washington Office, ACEP
b. A
tul Grover MD, PhD, Chief Public Policy Officer, AAMC
c. Walter J. Koroshetz MD, Deputy Director, National Institute of
Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Acting Director, NIH
Office of Emergency Care Research
SAEM Awards – Cherri D. Hobgood MD and
Alan E. Jones MD
a. Hal Jayne Excellence in Education Award
- Michael S. Beeson MD, FACEP b. Excellence in Research Award – Gail D’Onofrio MS, MD
c. John Marx Leadership Award – Vincent P. Verdile MD, FACEP
d. Young Investigator Awards
– Nathan J. White MD, MS; Daniel K. Nishijima MD, MAS;
Comilla Sasson MD, MS
e. Advancement of Women in Academic Emergency
Medicine Award
- Kathleen J. Clem BSN, MD, FACEP
f. Master Clinician Bedside Teaching Award: Erik G. Laurin MD
Grant Presentations
– Spadafora Toxicology Scholarship
Meghan Spyres MD, NYU School of Medicine
– Research Training Grant
J. Scott VanEpps MD, PhD, University of Michigan
– Institutional Research Training Grant
Roland C. Merchant MD, MPH, ScD, Rhode Island Hospital
SAEM-approved Research Fellows
Jestin Carlson MD, University of Pittsburgh
Anitha Mathew MD, Emory University
Danielle McCarthy MD, Northwestern University
Bryn Mumma MD, University of California, Davis
SAEM Academy Awards
– Academy for Diversity & Inclusion in Emergency Medicine
•M
arcus L. Martin Leadership Award - Lisa Moreno-Walton
MD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
• Visionary Educator Award - Iris M. Reyes MD, Perelman
School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
• O
utstanding Academician Award - Jeffrey P. Druck MD,
University of Colorado School of Medicine
• O
utstanding Future Academician Award - Juron Foreman MD,
Emory University School of Medicine
– Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine
• Early Career Faculty Award - Renee Yuen-Jan Hsai MD, MSc
• Outstanding Resident Award - Laura N. Medford-Davis MD
• Research Award - Debra Elaine Houry MD, MPH
– Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine
• Outstanding Clerkship Director Award
• Outstanding Young Educator Award
• Innovation in Medical Education Award
– Global Emergency Medicine Academy
• Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award
• EM Globalization and Advancement Award
• Academic Achievement Award
• Humanitarian Service Award
• Young Physician Award
2012 Annual Meeting Awards
Best Faculty Presentation
– Alan E. Jones MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center
Best Young Investigator Presentation
– William J. Meurer MD, University of Michigan Medical School
Best Basic Science Presentation
– Nathan J. White MD, University of Washington
School of Medicine
Best Resident Presentation
– Nicole Dubosh MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/
Harvard Medical School
Best Fellow Presentation
– Darlene R. House MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
Best Medical Student Presentation
– Andrew J. Thomas MPH, Oregon Health & Science University
School of Medicine
Resident Visual Diagnosis Contest Winner
– Elizabeth Placzek MD, Regions Hospital/Children’s Hospital
Medical Student Visual Diagnosis Contest Winner
– Felix Huang, University of Illinois College of Medicine
SAEM Annual Business Meeting
a. AEM Report b. Treasurer’s Report
c. Election Results
d. Recognition of Board of Director members whose terms
are expiring
e. Remarks of Outgoing President – Cherri D. Hobgood MD
f. Introduction of 2013-14 President – Alan E. Jones MD
Other New Business
Adjournment
Note: N
ewly elected members of the Board of Directors, Nominating Committee, and Constitution/Bylaws Committee, along with all award, fellowship, and grant recipients, are asked
to remain after the annual business meeting to participate in a brief photo session. Photos will be published in upcoming issues of the SAEM Newsletter.
12
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Best of CORD
Friday, May 17, 2013 – 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
International Room B (seventh Level)
Web 2.0: 10:00-10:45 am
Robert Cooney MD; Michael Bond MD; Michelle Lin MD
This session will detail the current trends in Web 2.0 technology and how they
apply to emergency medicine education. Participants will learn how people
are using blogs, wikis, and podcasts in medical education and will be given a
plan how to develop their own blog, wiki, or podcast. In addition to covering
the basics of voice recording and podcast design, the presenters will discuss
and demonstrate how to incorporate vodcasting (video and audio) into
medical education.
Objectives:
• Understand the uses of web 2.0 tools, including blogs, podcasts, and wikis
• Choose among the tools and effectively apply the tools to medical education
at their institution
• Demonstrate the basic principles of creating a basic blog, wiki, and podcast
• Understand how to use vodcasting in medical education
Social Media & Professionalism: 10:45-11:30am
Hollynn Larrabee MD; Janis Tupesis MD
Social Media plays an increasingly large role in our day-to-day interactions.
Studies have demonstrated an increasing number of physicians are using
Facebook, Google, Twitter, and other electronic accounts in their daily life.
This session will discuss the current social media environment as well as the
possible risks to professionalism that can occur. The session will address how
to educate your department on the pitfalls of social media using examples
from medical education and legal cases. The talk will conclude with examples
of how to develop an individualized social media policy.
Objectives:
• Describe how social media has impacted professionalism
• Discuss social media utilization effectively with residents and faculty
• Develop social media policies to protect your department and institution.
ED Transitions of Care - What Constitutes a Good
Handoff Between ED Residents: 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Gene Hern MD
Handoffs present a risk for communication error and may adversely affect
appropriate patient care. Although standardization is widely believed to be
the means to improve handoff efficacy, consensus on the procedural and
logistical components of an effective handoff has not yet been reached. This
workshop will use several simulated resident-to-resident handoff videos,
followed by small group discussions of the data points required for a safe,
effective handoff. This session serves as an opportunity to reflect on the
needed communication skills of residents delivering handoff information
to peers in the time-pressured, easily distractible environment of a busy
ED. Tools to provide resident feedback and education in the context of Joint
Commission National Patient Safety Goals and ACGME expectations will be
reviewed, as will the assessment of resident competency with the handoff
process. Strategies for clear documentation of the time for transition of
care will also be explored.
Objectives:
• Describe best practices for what constitutes a good handoff.
• Define best practices for safe, complete resident handoffs.
• Describe best practices for effective feedback to residents after
handoffs have occurred.
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
13
PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT & VISUAL DIAGNOSIS CONTEST
There were 52 cases and photos submitted to the Program
Committee for consideration of presentation at the Annual Meeting.
Selected photos and cases will be displayed in two formats.
Photography Exhibit &
Visual Diagnosis Participants
Medical students and residents will be invited to participate in
the Visual Diagnosis Contest. Winners in both medical student
and resident categories will be awarded a one-year membership
to SAEM, including a subscription to the Academic Emergency
Medicine Journal (AEM), free registration to attend the 2014 SAEM
Annual Meeting in Dallas, a major emergency medicine textbook,
and a subscription to the SAEM Newsletter. Recipients will be
announced in the July/August issue of the SAEM Newsletter.
Brett Monroe MD
Baylor College of Medicine
Brian T. Kloss MD
SUNY Upstate Medical University
Patrick Sullivan MD
Brown University/Rhode Island
Hospital
Richard Cantor MD
SUNY Upstate Medical University
“Clinical Pearls” photos will be displayed for the benefit of all
attendees. These photos will include a case history, as well as the
diagnosis and “take home” points. SAEM is proud to display original
photos of educational value and gratefully acknowledges the efforts
of the individuals who contributed to this year’s Clinical Pearls and
Visual Diagnosis Contest entries.
Neha Raukar MD, MS, FACEP
Brown University/Rhode Island
Hospital
Nicholas Caputo MD
Columbia University Medical Center
Elizabeth Dubey MD
Columbia University Medical Center
Sukru Ardic MD
Gulhane Military Medical Academy
Ibrahim Arziman MD
Gulhane Military Medical Academy
Teymur Caferov MD
Gulhane Military Medical Academy
M. Emre Kesim MD
Gulhane Military Medical Academy
Ken Adams MD
Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
Lisa Moreno-Walton MD, MS, MSCR
Louisiana State University
Marney Gruber MD
Louisiana State University
Ian C. May MD
Madigan Army Medical Center
Gerald J. Hopkins MD
Madigan Army Medical Center
Ian Wedmore MD
Madigan Army Medical Center
2013 SAEM Medical Photography
Exhibit/Visual Diagnosis Contest
Please join us for our annual exhibition of outstanding medical
photographic images, which will be on display throughout
the duration of our Annual Meeting in the main poster hall.
The images will be presented initially as case unknowns, with
challenging questions to answer for the viewer’s interest. If
desired, residents and medical students may enter answer
sheets for a contest that will reward the highest scoring entrant
in each category with a copy of the textbook, The Atlas of
Emergency Medicine, featuring over 1,500 high-quality medical
images. Entries for the contest will be accepted from May 15
at 8:00 am to May 16 at 4:00 pm, when the contest officially
closes. At this time, all answers for the case unknowns will be
posted alongside the images. Additionally, we will offer teaching
rounds for anyone interested, and our faculty volunteers will
“round” on the cases with participants at 4:00 pm on May 16,
9:00 am on May 17, and 3:00 pm on May 17, teaching on the
cases and answering questions along the way. We look forward
to seeing you at the exhibit this year!
14
Suzanne Bialeck MD
Maimonides Medical Center
David Saloum MD
Maimonides Medical Center
Lawrence Haines MD
Maimonides Medical Center
Steve C. Christos DO, MS, FACEP,
FAAEM
Resurrection Medical Center
Joseph Grueter MD
Resurrection Medical Center
Suzanne Roozendaal MD
St. Luke’s University Health Network
Grant Lipman MD
Stanford University School of Medicine
Eric Ladd MD
Stanford University School of Medicine
Randy Barros MD
SUNY Upstate Medical University
Nicholas E. Nacca MD
SUNY Upstate Medical University
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Meenal Sharkey MD
The Ohio State University
Sarah Greenberger MD
The Ohio State University
Maxwell Hill MD
The Ohio State University
Tapan Desai DO
Thomas Jefferson University
Masashi Rotte MD
Thomas Jefferson University
Van Ton MD
Thomas Jefferson University
Joseph Portale MD
Thomas Jefferson University
Natalie Kreitzer MD
University of Cincinnati
Francisco Fernandez MD
University of Cincinnati
Jeremy Fried MD
University of Connecticut
Veronica Tucker DO
University of Connecticut
Joseph Shiber MD
University of Florida, Jacksonville
Emily Fontane MD
University of Florida, Jacksonville
Petra Duran MD, RDMS
University of Florida, Jacksonville
Brian Hawkins MD
University of Kentucky
Kelly Barnett MD
University of Kentucky
Zachary Dezman MD
University of Maryland
T. Andrew Windsor MD
University of Maryland
Nicholas Daniel MD
University of Nebraska
Brian Doane MD
University of Southern California
Shannon Langston MD
Vanderbilt University Medical School
Greg Christiansen DO, Med, FACOEP
Virginia Commonwealth University
Business Meeting ~ Wednesday, May 15, 2013
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Vinings Room I on 6th Level
8:00 am - 9:30 am
General Business Meeting
9:30 am - 11:30 am
Presentation of the AAAEM
Annual Benchmark Survey Results
Panel discussion on how to use
data within your department,
hospital or clinical practice.
11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Wrap Up
For more information on how to
become a member of AAAEM
visit us www.saem.org
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
15
Our Mission
•To promote equal access to
quality healthcare and the
elimination of disparities in
treatment and outcomes for
all groups regardless of race,
sexual orientation, disability,
or socioeconomic status
through education and
research
•To enhance the retention and
promotion of those historically
underrepresented in
medicine and to create an
inclusive environment for the
training of emergency
medicine providers;
specifically using the AAMC’s
guide “to unite expertise,
experience, and innovation to
inform and guide the
advancement of diversity and
inclusion in emergency
medicine”
•To enhance the professional
development of all EM faculty
and residents with respect to
culturally competent medical
care
Why is ADIEM important?
Although the U.S. population
continues to become more
diverse, ethnic and racial
health care disparities persist.
The benefits of a diverse
medical workforce have been
well described, but the
percentage of emergency
medicine residents from
underrepresented groups is
small and has not significantly
increased. ADIEM has
partnered in a more powerful
way with SAEM, working
towards the realization of our
common goals of diversifying
the physician workforce at all
levels, eliminating disparities
in health care and outcomes,
and insuring that all
emergency physicians are
delivering culturally
competent care.
Academy for Diversity and
Inclusion in Emergency Medicine
Dear friends,
In ADIEM’s inaugural year, we are delighted to highlight our events for the SAEM
Annual Meeting. It is particularly meaningful for me as president of ADIEM and faculty
at Emory to welcome you to my home city of Atlanta. We are particularly pleased with
ADIEM’s didactics, including one that takes a historical look at diversity and inclusion
in emergency medicine in SAEM, and our groundbreaking didactic on LGBT health.
Our business meeting lends itself to
networking and sharing of ideas to expand our
mission of addressing cultural awareness for
all people. We had several submissions from
across the nation, and we look forward to
learning more and engaging in these very
important topics. The poster presentations
include “Barriers to the Emergency
Department Utilization of Interpreter Services”
and “Cultural Competencies in Emergency
Medicine: Caring for Muslim-American
Patients from the Middle East.”
Each year, we also honor and celebrate
SAEM members in several award categories.
This year’s winners are:
ADIEM Events at SAEM
Business meeting
(May 15 1:00 - 5:00 pm - Vinings Rm I [6th
floor])
Inaugural Didactic Presentations
(May 16 8:00 - 10:00 am International Rm B [6th floor])
“LGBT Health: Educating EM Physicians
to Provide Equitable and Quality Care”
“Disparities and Diversity in Emergency
Medicine: SAEM - Where are we now?”
Marcus L. Martin Leadership Award
Dr. Lisa Moreno-Walton, LSU Health Science Center
Visionary Educator Award
Dr. Iris Reyes, Univ. of Pennsylvania’s Perelman SOM
Outstanding Academician Award
Dr. Jeffrey Druck, Univ. of Colorado
Outstanding Future Academician Award
Dr. Juron Foreman, Emory SOM
Lastly, another activity on the horizon in which several
ADIEM members participate is the upcoming conference
of the National Medical Association Section of
Emergency Medicine. Leaders of ACEP and AAEM will
be present at this event, scheduled to be held July
27-31 in Toronto, Canada. All are invited to participate in
a national discussion on health disparities with this
year’s focus on the obesity epidemic and how
emergency providers can be part of the solution. Visit
www.nmanet.org for more information.
Thank you for your commitment to and engagement in the
topics of diversity and inclusion in Emergency Medicine.
Sincerely,
Sheryl Heron, MD, MPH
President - ADIEM
www.saem.org : [email protected]
16
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
NMA Annual Convention
and Scientific Assembly
All are invited to AGEM’s exciting slate of didactic and research presentations . . . . . . .
DIDACTIC PRESENTATIONS
Thursday, May 16
(Vinings II Room – 6th Floor)
Level)
8:00 - 9:00 am
AGEM Business Meeting
9:00 - 10:00 am
“Oncologic Emergency Medicine: An Emerging Subdiscipline?”
Knox H. Todd, MD, MPH
Professor and Chair; Department of Emergency Medicine, MD Anderson Cancer Center
10:00 - 11:00 am
"Working with Your Institution to Geriatricize Your ED"
Kevin Biese MD, MAT, Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine Residency Director,
University of North Carolina
and
Ula Hwang, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Geriatrics, and
Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
AGEM FEATURED PRESENTATION
FEATURED
“SeekingAGEM
Grant Support
from PRESENTATION
Foundations: Understanding Mission-Driven
“Seeking
Grant
Support
from Foundations: Understanding Mission-Driven
Philanthropy”
Philanthropy”
Marcus
Escobedo, MPA
Marcus
Escobedo,
MPA, Program Officer, The John A. Hartford Foundation
Program Officer, The John
A. Hartford
Foundation
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Friday, May 17
(International Room D, 6th Floor)
Level)
8:00 - 9:30 am
“Informed Consent in Emergency Research – Pitfalls and Practical Pearls.”
Ula Hwang MD, MPH; Adit Ginde MD, MPH; Jin Han MD, MSc; Lynne Richardson, MD
9:30 – 10:00 am
“Models of Subspecialty Geriatric Emergency Departments – The Silver Tsunami: The
Top Ten Interventions for Establishing a Geriatric (-Friendly) ED”
Kathleen Walsh, MD
GERIATRICS-RELATED ORAL PRESENTATIONS
Wednesday
Thursday
Thursday
Friday
Friday
May 15
May 16
May 16
May 17
May 17
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
8:00 – 9:00 am
12:00 – 1:00 pm
9:00 – 10:00 am
1:00 – 2:00 pm
Geriatric Pain
Geriatrics
Geriatric Trauma
Geriatrics
Geriatrics
Oral Presentations (Atlanta G)
Oral Presentations (Atlanta B)
Oral Presentations (Atlanta A)
Lightning oral
(Roswell 2)
Lightning oral
(Atlanta A)
AGEM is grateful for the support of the following institutions through AGEM group memberships:
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
17
Thursday, May 16
Thursday, May 16
AEUS small group meetings
(committee members only)
AEUS small group meetings
Room: Tower Room 1401
(committee members only)
Room:
Tower
Room 1401
8:00
-8:50
am REASON
Trial
8:00
Trial
9:00 -8:50
– 9:50am
amREASON
EUSFellowships
9:00
amam
EUSFellowships
10:00– –9:50
10:50
AEUS Board Meeting
10:00 – 11:50
10:50 am International
AEUS Board Meeting
11:00
Subcommittee
11:00 – 12:50
11:50 pm
am International
Subcommittee
12:00
Resident Subcommittee/Med
Student
12:00 – 12:50 pm Resident Subcommittee/Med
Student
1:00–
1:50 pm Membership Subcommittee
1:00––1:50
Subcommittee
2:00
2:50pm
pmMembership
Social Media/Grants
2:00 – 2:50 pm Social Media/Grants
Friday, May 17
Friday, May 17
AEUS Business Meeting
Room: Vinings Room I (6th floor)
AEUS Business Meeting
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room: Vinings Room I (6th floor)
8:00 amTeaching
– 12:00inpm
the Modern World: Social





Media, Apps and other technologies.
Teaching
in the Modern
World: Social
Panel of Experts
on Tele-Ultrasound;
Media,
Apps
and
other
technologies.
uses, challenges and solutions.
Panel
on Tele-Ultrasound;
Pearlsof
ofExperts
Grant Writing
uses,
challenges
and
solutions.
Awards and 2013-2014
BOD
Pearls
of
Grant
Writing
introductions
Awards and 2013-2014 BOD
introductions
AEUS Didactic Sessions
Room: International Rooms E-F (6th floor)
AEUS Didactic Sessions
1:00 – 3:00 pm
Room: International Rooms E-F (6th floor)
1:00 – 3:00 pm
Controversies in Emergency Ultrasound:
The Debate Rages On
Controversies in Emergency Ultrasound:
(1:00 – 1:50 pm)
The Debate Rages On
(1:00 – 1:50 pm)
Resident Education in Ultrasound: Meeting
the Milestone
Resident Education in Ultrasound: Meeting
(2:00 – 2:50pm)
the Milestone
(2:00 – 2:50pm)
www.saem.org/academy-emergency-ultrasound
18
www.saem.org/academy-emergency-ultrasound
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Activities 2013
Activities 2013
Saturday, May 18
Saturday, May 18
SonoGames™ 2013
Room: Plaza Ballrooms A-B-C Combined
SonoGames™ 2013
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room: Plaza Ballrooms A-B-C Combined
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Join us for the 2nd annual SonoGames™
and watch resident
teams compete to be
Join us for the 2nd annual SonoGames™
the nation’s top sonologists.
and watch resident teams compete to be
the nation’s top sonologists.
All aspects of ultrasound competence will
be assessed, including image acquisition,
All aspects of ultrasound competence will
image interpretation, and incorporation
be assessed, including image acquisition,
into clinical practice.
image interpretation, and incorporation
into clinical practice.
Will Boston Medical Center retain its title
of SonoChamps? Or will a new team claim
Will Boston Medical Center retain its title
the Cup?
of SonoChamps? Or will a new team claim
the Cup?
2
0
1
3
S
A
E
M
AWAEM Didactics
A
N
N
U
A
L
M
E
E
T
I
N
G
The AWAEM Meeting Initiative Committee
has prepared a remarkable Didactic lineup
for the 2013 SAEM Annual Meeting.
These didactics include cutting-edge content,
nationally recognized speakers, and
stimulating formats.
AWAEM Annual Meeting
Tips & Tricks for Women
Navigating Academic EM
May 17, 8:00 am-12:00 pm
Vinings II (6th floor)
AGENDA
-AWAEM Business Meeting
- Navigating the Academic Compass,
Directions for
Success: An
invaluable 80
minute faculty
development
session for medical
students, residents
and faculty in all career stages that will
include six topics, moderated by
Jeannette Wolfe: 1) Pros and Cons of
Academic versus Private EM by Kinjal
Sethuraman; 2) Tips for Residents to
Jump Start their Academic Career by
Alyson McGregor; 3) Hitting the Ground
Up and Running: A Guide for the First
Two Years of Your Academic Career by
Stephanie Abbuhl; 4) Educator's Portfolio:
How to Stay Organized and On Track by
Gloria Kuhn; 5) Networking: Why, How
and Where to Connect with Peers and
Mentors in Academic EM by Bhakti
Hansoti; and 6) Possibilities, Pearls and
Pitfalls of Part Time Academics by
Jeannette Wolfe.
- Managing People in Academic
Emergency Medicine: Tools of the Trade
for New Investigators by Kinjal
Sethuraman
- Technology: How Women Can
Maximize Their Productivity by
Utilizing Social Media, A Social Media
Primer by Bhakti Hansoti
22
AWAEM Annual
Networking Luncheon &
Awards Presentation
May 17, 2013 12:00p-2:00p
Conference Room 1-2 (7th floor)
Gender-Specific Men’s Health –
Top 5 Plays of the Day
May 18th, 9:30-10:00am
International Room C (6th floor)
The second presentation in the SAEM
Annual Meeting will take the audience
through five physiologic systems using
the ESPN style of “Top 5 Plays of the
Mining the Hidden Science in Your Day.” Each expert presenter, led by
EM Research: Gender-Specific Study Alyson
Design and Analysis
McGregor,
will update
May 18th, 8:00 – 9:30am
the audience
International Room C (6th floor)
on the top
Two hours of the SAEM Annual Meeting genderhave been designated for AWAEM’s
specific EM
support of gender-specific emergency
articles for
medicine. This first didactic aims to
2012-13 and how they impact men’s
stimulate interest in research on genderhealth. You will hear updates in
specific medicine and understand the
Cardiology with Basmah Safdar, Sports
challenges and solutions of performing
Medicine with Neha Raukar, Traumatic
gender-based analyses. This
Injuries with Federico Vaca, Sepsis with
session will be a
David Portelli and Neurologic
moderated panel led
Emergencies with Nina Gentile. Hold
by Esther Choo. A
onto your hat! This fast paced program
statistical expert,
will be sure to provide a stimulating
Heemun Kwok, will
learning opportunity.
discuss a framework
for considering
relevant genderspecific research questions within
diverse areas of emergency medicine
research and analytical strategies for
A big thank you to the
approaching the question of the impact
AWAEM Meeting
on gender on clinical outcomes. Two
Initiative Committee,
additional EM researchers, Deborah
led by Alyson McGregor,
Diercks and David Wright, will
with members Esther Choo,
demonstrate how they have applied
Basmah Safdar, Julie Welch,
these methods in their own work using
Jeannette Wolfe, Tracy Madsen,
specific approaches and analytical
and Preeti Jois.
methods.
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
19
CDEM Programming for SAEM Annual MeeƟng 2013
Educators of all levels are encouraged to aƩend the following sessions
surrounding emergency medicine educaƟon.
Thursday, May 16, 2013
8:00 am - 12:00 pm CDEM Business MeeƟng
PT – 200 Conference Room 5 (7th Level)
8:00 – 9: 00 am
Business Mee�ng
9:00 -11:00 am
CORD Take-Aways: Highlights from CDEM at CORD that each Clerkship
Director must have
Milestones for Medical Students (Stacy Poznanski, Wright State)
SLOR Update (SLOR Task Force)
Na�onal Exam vs. CDEM Exam (Emily Senecal, Corey Heitz)
11:00 am -12:00 pm Networking Fair
CDEM Ini�a�ves Fair: CDEM Any�me Anywhere (Self-study modules,
iBooks, iTunes U), Social Media, CDEM Communica�ons Commi�ee –
newsle�er, Assessments in EM – SAEMTests/ ACE EM ACE, EM OSCE
Friday, May 17, 2013
8:00 - 8:50 am
Educa�onal Por�olio: Your Secret Weapon for Promo�on
InternaƟonal E-F combined (6th level)
9:00 - 9:50 am
Good to Great: Effec�ve Feedback to Learners with Difficul�es
InternaƟonal E-F combined (6th level)
1:00 - 3:00 pm
EducaƟonal Topics and EducaƟonal Research (Formally Best of CDEM)
Hugh A. Stoddard, M.Ed., Ph.D.
“Dr. Strangedata: or, how I learned to stop worrying and love
accredita�on"
1:00 pm
20
How Good Are You, The LCME and ACGME Want to Know! Program
Assessment, Evalua�on and Improvement
InternaƟonal Room B (6th level)
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
The Globalization of Emergency Medicine Affects YOU
When you travel, do you want to be taken care of by professional emergency physicians? Do you want to know
they have had the right training? Do you want a good pre-hospital care system to take you to the right hospital?
All around the world, EM is emerging as a specialty. Working together, we can mutually strengthen our specialty.
GEMA (the Global Emergency Medicine Academy) of SAEM is YOUR VEHICLE to further academic emergency
medicine around the world.
Join us during our academy meeting
May 16, 2013
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Vinings Room I (6th Level)
8:00 am - 9:30 am
GEMA Business Meeting and Awards Ceremony
9:30 am -10:30 am
GEMA Global EM Fellowships Showcase
10:30 am -10:45 am 2013 AEM Consensus Conference Highlights
10:45 am - 11:00 am Break/Refreshments
11:00 am - 12:00 pm How to Get Global EM-related Endeavors Published?
GEMA Didactic Sessions
May 17, 2013 -International Room E-F (6th level)
10:00 am - 10:50 am - Life and a Career in Global Health: Can You Have It
All?
11:00 am - 11:50 am - The Top 10 Global Emergency Medicine Articles from
2012: Highlights from the Global Emergency Medicine
Literature Review
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
21
Your Simulation Academy is comprised of
emergency medicine physicians who are
committed to enhancing education, research,
and patient safety through the use of simulation
Thursday, May 16, 2013 ~ 8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Conference Room 4 on 7th level
o 08:00 to 08:30 SimulaƟon Academy Board
o 08:30 to 10:00 SimulaƟon Academy Business MeeƟng
o 10:00 to 12:00 DidacƟc / Q & A Panel on EducaƟonal
StaƟsƟcs
DidacƟc DescripƟon: The NAS Taskforce has been
working with staƟsƟcians to create a data analysis plan
for simulaƟon-based milestones data. This panel
discussion will consider choice of analysis methods and
sample size consideraƟons. Topics include Classical
Reliability TesƟng, Item Response Theory, and
Generalizability Theory. Strengths, drawbacks, and the
reasoning behind our evolving choices will be discussed
in a panel Q&A format, with brief didacƟc introducƟon
by Dr. Bruce Center PhD.
SIM WARS
Friday, May 17, 2013 ~ 8:00 am - 1:00 pm
Plaza Ballrooms A-B-C on 10th floor
An EMRA-sponsored educational program and an inter-disciplinary simulation competition
between healthcare providers.
22
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
daily schedule – Wednesday, May 15, 2013
7:30 - 9:00 am
Academy Meeting
• Committee of Academy Leaders meeting (COAL)/
PT-200 Conference Room
8:00 - 5:00 pm
Other Sessions
• Leadership Conference/PT-200 Conference Room 3
• Grants Workshop/International H
• AEM Consensus Conference/Plaza Ballroom ABC
• CPC Finals/International Rooms B/C/D/E/F/G
• MERC sessions/International A
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Academy Meeting
• AAAEM Academy Business Meeting/Vinings I
9:30-11:30 Presentation of the AAAEM Annual Benchmark
Survey Results – Panel discussion on how to use data within your
department, hospital or clinical practice.
8:00 - 8:50 am
Didactics
• The Role of Electroencephalography and of Reduced Lead EEG in
the Emergency Department/Peachtree A & B
Jay Brenner MD, Ed Michelson MD
• How to Effectively Supervise and Teach Residents:
Entrustment and Autonomy/Peachtree C
Bill Bassin MD, Sally Santeen MD, Katie Saxon MD, Meg Wolff MD
• In the Middle: Non Physician Providers in the Emergency
Department/Peachtree D
Henderson McGinnis MD, Jeff Hinshaw PA,
Randy Howell DO, FACOEP
• Development of Clinical Decision Instruments in Emergency
Medicine/Peachtree E
Robert Rodriguez MD, James Holmes MD,
Nate Kuppermann MD, PhD, William Mower MD, PhD
9:00 - 9:50 am
Didactics
• ED-Based Critical Care Resident Rotations & Experiences
as Opportunities for Teaching Critical Care in the Emergency
Department/Peachtree A & B
Kevin Ferguson MD, Lillian Emlet MD,
Robert Sherwin MD, FACEP, FAAEM, Scott Wiengart MD
• Impact of the 2010 AHA Post-Cardiac Arrest Care Guidelines:
Assessing Knowledge Translation & Implementation/Peachtree D
Kelly Sawyer MD, MS, Teresa Camp-Rogers MD, MS,
Michael Kurz MD, MS-HES
9:00 - 10:00 am
Abstracts
• Pediatric Abdominal Pain/Presentation # 7-10/Atlanta A
Moderator: Nathan Kuppermann MD, MPH
• Hemorrhagic Shock/Presentation # 19-22/Atlanta G
Moderator: Michael Gibbs MD
•M
easures for Emergency Medicine/Presentation # 23-28/Atlanta B
Moderator: Jeremiah D. Schuur MD
• Congestive Heart Failure and Dyspnea/
Presentation # 29-34/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Alan B. Storrow MD
Detailed Didactics can be found starting on page 34. Detailed Abstracts can be found starting on page 53.
• Emergency Medical Services/Presentation # 35-40/Roswell 1
Moderator: Michael Runyon MD
• Toxicology/Presentation # 41-46/Roswell 2
Moderator: Ed Otten MD
9:00 - 10:20 am
Didactics
• Not Another Boring Lecture:
Five Ways to Spice Up Your Didactics!/Peachtree C
Meg Wolff MD, Mary Jo Wagner MD,
Sally Santen MD, PhD, Stacey Poznanski MD
• Introduction to Statistics/Peachtree E
Roger Lewis Harbor MD, PhD
9:00 - 11:00 am
Abstracts
• Ultrasound/Presentation # 11-18/Atlanta E & F
Moderator: James H. Moak MD
10:00 - 10:50 am
Didactics
• The Current State of Critical Care Fellowship Training for
Emergency Medicine Residency Graduates/Peachtree A & B
Kevin Ferguson MD, Andrea Gabrielli MD,
Jay Menaker MD, Mike Winters MD
• Fulfilling the Residency Educational Mission at Independent
Academic Medical Centers/Peachtree D
Arvind Venkat MD, Moira Davenport MD,
Gus Garmel MD, Eric Katz MD
10:00 - 11:00 am
Abstracts
• STEMI/Presentation # 73- 76/Atlanta G
Moderator: Deborah B. Diercks MD
• Clinical Efficiency/Presentation # 87-92/Roswell 2
Moderator: Richard Zane MD
10:00 - 12:00 pm
Abstracts
• Radiology/Presentation # 47-55/ Atlanta A
Moderator: Ali S. Raja MD, MPH, MBA
• Traumatic Brain Injury/Presentation # 56-63/Atlanta B
Moderator: Opeolu Adeoye MD
• Acute Coronary Syndromes/Presentation # 64-72/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Chad E. Darling MD
• Pediatrics/Presentation # 77-85, 817, 834/Roswell 1
Moderator: Brent R. King MD
10:30 - 11:50 am
Didactics
• Systems Milestones for Academic Programs:
Moving from Novice to Expert/Peachtree C
Felix Ankel MD, Robin Hemphill MD, Sally Santen MD, PhD
• Team Science in Research:
What is the Role of Emergency Medicine?/Peachtree E
Chadwick Miller MD, MS, Roger Lewis MD, PhD,
Alan Storrow MD, Gregory Fermann MD
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
23
Wednesday, May 15, 2013
11:00 - 11:50 am
Didactics
• Advances in EMS Education for Residents/Peachtree A & B
Michael Hilton MD, David Cone MD, Jonathan Fisher MD, MPH,
Christian Martin-Gill MD, MPH
• The Non-Quantitative Aspect of Resident Training in the
Community ED/Peachtree D
Michael Hochberg MD, Al Sacchetti MD,
Kevin Klauer MD, Chad Kessler MD
11:00 - 12:00 pm
Abstracts
• Critical Care/Presentation # 93-96 Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Robert Rodriguez MD
• Geriatric Pain/Presentation # 97-100/Atlanta G
Moderator: Robert Woolard MD,
• Accelerate Your ED/Presentation # 101-106/Roswell 2
Moderator: David F. Brown MD
1:00 - 1:50 pm
Didactics
• Thriving in the Wilderness: What Wilderness Medicine Fellowship
Applicants and Directors Need to Know/Peachtree A & B
N. Stuart Harris MD, MFA, Tracy Cushing MD, MPH
• I nvestigator Initiated Research without an Existing Research
Infrastructure: How to Succeed in Any Practice Setting/Peachtree D
John Cienki MD, MSPH, Robert J Hoffman MD,
Brigitte Baumann MD, MSCE, Judd Hollander MD
• Asking the Question that Clinicians Want Answered within an
Adaptive Comparative Effectiveness Trial/Peachtree E
William Meurer MD, MS, Jason Connor PhD, Roger Lewis MD, PhD
1:00 - 2:00 pm
Abstracts
• Health Services Research/Presentation # 107-110/ Atlanta A
Moderator: Keith E. Kocher MD
• Clinical Decision Rules/Presentation # 111-114/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Ian G. Stiell MD
• Critical Care/Presentation # 115-118/Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Michael Gibbs MD
• Renal Colic/Presentation # 119-122/Atlanta G
Moderator: Romolo Gaspari MD
• Learning Styles/Presentation # 123-128/Roswell 2
Moderator: Brandon Maughan MD, MHS
• Imaging in Trauma/Presentation # 129-134/Atlanta B
Moderator: Greg Hendey MD
• Triage/Presentation # 135-140/Roswell 1
Moderator: Gabor Kelen MD
1:00 - 2:20 pm
Didactics
• Taking Advantage of the Teachable Moment: A Workshop for
Efficient, Learner-Centered Clinical Teaching/Peachtree C
Todd Guth MD, Elise Lovell MD, Sneha Shah MD, Mike Epter DO
1:00 - 5:00 pm
Poster Session
(Posters will be attended by authors from 2:00-4:00)
• Presentation # 141-263/200 Gallery -level 6
Academy Meeting
ADIEM Academy Business Meeting/Vinings I
24
2:00 - 2:50 pm
Didactics
• From the Bleachers to the Sidelines: Careers and Opportunities in
Sports Medicine/Peachtree A & B
Jeffrey Feden MD, Daniel Garza MD, Moira Davenport MD
• Creating a Successful Research Assistant Program in Your
Emergency Department/Peachtree D
Daniel Keyes MD, MPH, Ed Panacek MD, MPH,
Judd Hollander MD, Daniel Pallin MD, MPH
• Real Strategies for Quasi-Experiments: How to Identify Causation
Using Non-Randomized Data/Peachtree E
Lisa Schweigler MD, MPH, MS, Jason Haukoos MD, MSc,
Christopher Kabrhel MD, MPH
2:30 - 3:50 pm
Didactics
• Is the Patient Safe? Assessing Procedural Competence/Peachtree C
Laura Hopson MD, Suzanne Dooley-Hash MD, Doug Ander MD,
Ernest Wang MD
3:00 - 3:50 pm
Didactics
• The Business of EM: Defining Productivity/Peachtree D
Michael Hochberg MD, Brent King MD,
Richard Zane MD, Kirsten Rounds RN, MS
• An Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Emergency Medicine
Research/Peachtree E
Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS, Karin Rhodes MD, MS,
Adam Landman MD, MS, MIS
3:00 - 4:20 pm
Didactics
• How to Become a Trailblazer: Perspectives of Resident Innovators/
Peachtree A & B
Marie Vrablik MD, Carey Chisholm MD, Jonathan Heidt MD,
Karen Lind MD, Shereaf Walid MD
4:00 - 5:00 pm
Abstracts
• Cardiac Risk Stratification/Presentation # 264-270/ Atlanta A
Moderator: Andra L. Blomkalns MD
• Psychiatry/Presentation # 271-275/Atlanta B
Moderator: Rebecca Cunningham MD
• Trauma Resuscitation/Presentation # 276-281/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Eric Legome MD
• Ultrasound/Presentation # 282-287/ Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Romolo Gaspari MD
• Toxicology/Presentation # 288-293/Atlanta G
Moderator: Aaron Skolnik MD
• Clinical Decision Rules/Presentation # 294-297/Roswell 1
Moderator: Michael Brown MD, MSc
• Training Competencies/Presentation # 298-303/ Roswell 2
Moderator: Jeffrey Love MD
4:30 - 6:30 pm
Event
• Cocktails and Dreams Reception/Carnegie Foyer
5:30 - 8:00 pm
Event
• CPC Reception/Augusta Room 1-2
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Detailed Didactics can be found starting on page 34. Detailed Abstracts can be found starting on page 53.
tuesday - Wednesday, May 14-15, 2013
The Following SAEM Committees/Interest Groups/Task Forces
will NOT be meeting at the 2013 Annual Meeting in Atlanta:
• Constitution & Bylaws Committee • Fellowship Certification Task Force • CPR/Ischemia/Reperfusion Interest Group
• Observational Medicine Interest Group • Palliative Medicine Interest Group
• Quality Medical Management Interest Group • Uniformed Services Interest Group
Tuesday, May 14, 2013 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy Interest Group/Board Meetings
8:00am-5:00pm
4:00-5:00pm
SAEM BOD Meeting
SAEM PC Sub-Committee Meeting
Executive Boardroom (6th Level)
TBD
Tuesday, May 14, 2013 – Affiliated Meetings
7:00am-5:00pm
9:00am-5:00pm
ABEM- EM Model Review Task Force EMRA BOD Meeting PT-200 Conference Room 1 (7th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 2 (7th Level)
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:00-8:00am
7:30-9:00am
8:00am-12:00pm
9:00-10:00am
9:00-10:00am
9:30-11:00am
11:30am-1:00pm
1:00-2:00pm
1:00-2:30pm
1:00-2:30pm
1:00-5:00pm
2:00-3:00pm
2:00-3:00pm
2:00-3:30pm
2:30-3:30pm
5:00-6:00pm
PC Daily Meeting
SAEM Committee of Academy Leaders meeting (COAL)
AAAEM Academy of Administrators in
Academic Emergency Medicine-Business Meeting SAEM Social Media Committee Meeting
SAEM Disaster Medicine Interest Group Meeting
SAEM/ABEM Ex. Committee Meeting
SAEM Faculty Development Committee Meeting
SAEM Development Committee Meeting SAEM Evidence Based Medicine Interest Group Meeting SAEM CBAPO Task Force Meeting
ADIEM Academy for Diversity & Inclusion in
Emergency Medicine- Business Meeting SAEM External Collaboration Committee Meeting
SAEM International Outreach TF Meeting
SAEM Academic Informatics Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Trauma Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Neurologic Emergencies Interest Group Meeting PT-200 Conference Room 5 (7th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 4 (7th Level)
Vinings Room I (6th Level)
Tower Room 1401 (14th Level)
Tower Room 1201 (12th Level)
Ex. Board Room (6th Level)
Tower Room 1401 (14th Level)
Tower Room 1207 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1403 (14th Level)
Tower Room 1401 (14th Level)
Vinings Room I (6th Level)
Tower Room 1208 (12 Level)
Tower Room 1402 (14th Level)
Tower Room 1404 (14th Level)
Tower Room 1403 (14th Level)
Tower Room 1407 (14th Level)
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 – Affiliated Meetings
8:00am-5:00pm
Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials Nett Collaborative Meeting 9:00am-12:00pm
EMRA BOD meeting 1:30-2:30pm
EMRA Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation
1:30-2:30pm
EMRA Regional Representative Committee
1:30-5:30pm
EMRA Medical Student Governing Council 2:30-3:00pm
EMRA Conference Committee Orientation Meeting 3:00-4:00pm
EMRA Reference Committee Public Hearing 3:00-6:00pmNational HIV Testing Consortium Meeting
4:00-5:00pm
EMRA Reference Committee Work Meeting
4:00-5:30pm
EMRA Quiz Show Contest
4:00-6:00pm
EMCREG-International Steering Committee- By Invitation Only
6:30-9:30pm
U of M Society for Academic EM Dinner - By Invitation Only
Tower Room 1408 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1203 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1204 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1205 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1206 (12th Level)
Augusta Room 3 (7th Level)
Augusta Room 3 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1201 (12th Level)
Augusta Room 3 (7th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 5 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1208 (12th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 2-3 (7th Level)
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
25
daily schedule – thursday, May 16, 2013
7:00 - 9:30 am
Other Session
• Resident Leadership Forum: in AM joint session/
PT-200 Conference Room 2
8:00 - 8:50 am
Didactics
• LGBT Health: Educating EM Physicians to Provide Equitable and
Quality Care. Academy Sponsored - ADIEM/ International B
Paul Krieger MD, Joel Moll MD, Thea James MD,
Ellen Slaven MD, Ted Corbin MD
• Future Directions in Electrocardiography in Acute Coronary
Syndromes/International C
Stephen Smith MD
• Choosing a High-Impact Resident or Student Quality Improvement
Project and Getting it Published/Plaza Ballroom A
Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS, John J. Kelly DO, FACEP,
Arjun Venkatesh MD, MBA
• Careers & Opportunities at the CDC/Plaza Ballroom B
Kevin Munjal MD, MPH, David Sugerman MD, MPH,
Samuel Graitcer MD
8:00 - 9:00 am
Innovations
• Didactics Spotlight/Presentation # 8-11/ Atlanta H
Abstracts
• Geriatrics/Presentation #304-307/Atlanta B
Moderator: Christopher R. Carpenter MD
• Clinical Efficiency/Presentation #324-327/Atlanta G
Moderator: Tom Scaletta MD
• Atrial Fibrillation/Presentation # 328-333/Atlanta A
Moderator: Richard Summers MD
• IV Access/Presentation # 334-339/Roswell 1
Moderator: Alexander T. Limkakeng
• Disaster Management/Presentation # 340-344/Roswell 2
Moderator: Richard Zane MD
8:00 - 10:00 am
Abstracts
• Sepsis/Presentation #308-315/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Emanuel Rivers MD, MPH
• Therapeutic Hypothermia/Presentation #316-323/Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Stephen Trzeciak MD
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Innovations
• Innovations Exhibits/Presentation # 1-7, 11/200 Gallery -level 6
Posters
• Presentation # 366-490/200 Gallery -level 6
Innovations Exhibits and Posters will be attended by
authors from 10:00am-12:00pm
Academy Meeting
• SIM Academy Business Meeting/PT-200 Conference Room 4
8:00am-12:00pm (7th Level)
8:00-8:30am Simulation Academy Board
8:30-10:00am Simulation Academy Business Meeting
10:00am-12:00pm Didactic / Q&A Panel on Educational
Statistics
26
• CDEM Business Meeting/PT-200 Conference Room 5
8:00-9:00am Business Meeting / Awards
9:00-11:00am CORD Highlights
Milestones for Medical Students
SLOR Update
National Exam vs CDEM Exam
11:00am-12:00pm Networking Fair:
CDEM Initiatives Fair: CDEM Self-study
Modules
Twitter
CDEM newsletter
Exam
• AGEM Business Meeting/Vinings II
8:00 - 9:00am AGEM Business Meeting
9:00 - 10:00am Oncologic Emergency Medicine:
An Emerging Subdiscipline?
10:00 - 11:00am Working with Your Institution to
Geriatricize Your ED
11:00am - 12:00pm Seeking Grant Support from Foundations:
Understanding Mission-Driven Philanthropy
• GEMA Business Meeting/Vinings I
8:00 - 9:30am GEMA Business Meeting and Awards Ceremony
9:30 -10:30am GEMA Global EM Fellowships Showcase
10:30 -10:45am 2013 AEM Consensus Conference Highlights
10:45 -11:00am Break/Refreshments
11:00am -12:00pm How to Get Global EM-related
Endeavors Published?
9:00 - 9:50 am
Didactics
• Disparities & Diversity in Emergency Medicine: SAEM Where Are We Now? Academy Sponsored -ADIEM/International B
Sheryl Heron MD, MPH, Marcus Martin MD,
Michelle Biros MS, MD, Lynne Richardson MD
• Harnessing the Emergency Medicine Perspective: Emphasizing
Key Differences Between Adult and Pediatric Chief Complaints
to Enhance Resident Training in Pediatric Emergency Medicine/
International C
Jeffrey Hom MD, MPH, Robert Cloutier MD, MCR
• The War on MRSA: Lessons for Success in Planning, Funding, and
Executing Clinical Research in Infectious Diseases/Plaza Ballroom B
Daniel Pallin MD, MPH, Jeremiah Schuur MD, MS, David Talan MD
9:00 - 10:00 am
Innovations
• Technology Spotlight/Presentation # 12-15/Atlanta H
Abstracts
• Abdominal Pain in Adults/Presentation # 356-360/Atlanta A
Moderator: Brigitte M. Baumann MD, MSCE
• Sickle Cell Management in the Emergency Department/
Presentation # 361-365/Roswell 2
Moderator: Jeffrey A. Glassberg MD
• Out of Hospital Telemedicine/Presentation # 345-348/Atlanta B
Moderator: Steven Horng MD
• Anticoagulants/Presentation # 349-352/Atlanta G
Moderator: Daniel K. Nishijima MD
• AEM Consensus Conference on Global Health/
Presentation # 353-355/Roswell 1
Moderator: Jon Mark Hirshon MD
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Detailed Didactics can be found starting on page 34. Detailed Abstracts can be found starting on page 53.
thursday, May 16, 2013
9:00 - 10:20 am
Didactics
• The Inside Scoop: Background Information and Tips on Using the
Large National Datasets Provided by NCHS and HCUP, including
NHAMCS and NE/Plaza Ballroom A
Lisa Schweigler MD, MPH, MS, Brendan Carr MD, MS
Linda McCaig MPH, Ryan Mutter PhD,
Stephen Pitts MD, MPH, Emilie Powell MD, MS, MBA
10:00 - 11:20 am
Didactics
• Navigating the AMA Discharge - Case Studies/International B
Mark Clark MD, James Adams MD
• The Great Pediatric Sedation Debate!/International C
Amy Drendel DO, MS, Frank Petruzella MD, Patrick Solari MD,
Rakesh Mistry MD, MS, Robert Kennedy MD
• Minimizing the Pain of Maximizing Pain Relief: Strategies for
Emergency Physicians To Treat Pain Safely/Plaza Ballroom B
Lewis Nelson MD, Jeanmarie Perrone MD, Edward Boyer MD, PhD,
Robert Hendrickson MD
10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Other Session
• Resident Leadership Forum: Chief Resident Forum Track (Lunch)/
International E-F
• Resident Leadership Forum: Resident Academic Track
International D
10:30 - 11:50 am
Didactics
• Can We Trust Clinical Practice Guidelines?/Plaza Ballroom A
Eddy Lang AB, Michael Brown MD, MSc, Francis Fesmire MD,
Clifton Callaway MD, PhD
11:30 am - 12:50 pm
Didactics
12:00 - 1:00 pm
Innovations
• Medical Student Spotlight/Presentation # 3, 16-18 /Atlanta H
Abstracts
• Milestones in Training/Presentation # 491-494/Atlanta B
Moderator: Christopher Ross MD
• Patient Communication/Presentation #495-498 /Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Emilie Powell MD, MS, MBA
• Geriatric Trauma/Presentation # 499-502 /Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Timothy F. Platts-Mills MD
• Ischemic Conditioning/Presentation # 503-506 /Atlanta G
Moderator: Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH
• Emergency Department Quality/Presentation # 507-512 /Atlanta A
Moderator: Arjun K. Venkatesh MD
• Undergrad Education/Presentation # 513-518 /Roswell 1
Moderator: Lorraine Thibodeau MD
• Prehospital CPR/Presentation # 519-524 /Roswell 2
Moderator: Jane Brice MD
2:00 - 3:00 pm
Keynote
Thomas Frieden, Director
- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Plaza Ballroom ABC
3:30 - 5:00 pm
Plenary
• Presentations # 1-7/Plaza Ballroom ABC
Moderator: David Cone MD
• Voices from the Past Informing the Future of Academic
Emergency Medicine: Brian Zink MD/Plaza Ballroom ABC
5:30 - 7:00 pm
Event
• Opening Reception and Gallery of Excellence/Grand Atrium
• Challenging the Physician-Patient Relationship: Negotiating
Deception, Manipulation, and Medical Mistakes/International B
Joel Moll MD, Jean Abbott MD, MPH,
Tammie Quest MD, Mark Clark MD
• We All Make Mistakes - But What Do You Do Afterwards?/
International C
Robert Wears MD, MS, PhD, Kathleen Lanava MD, Albert Wu MD,
MPH, Terry Fairbanks MD, MS
•B
uilding Blocks for Establishing Hospital-Based Violence
Intervention Programs in (Your) Emergency Departments/
Plaza Ballroom B
Thea James MD, Theodore Corbin MD, Rochelle Dicker MD
12:00 - 12:50 pm
Didactics
• Optimizing Electronic Health Records in an Academic Emergency
Department: The Administrative and Informatics Perspective/
Plaza Ballroom A
Daniel Handel MD, MPH, Kevin Baumlin MD, Nicholas Genes MD,
PhD, Mark Moseley MD, MHA
Detailed Didactics can be found starting on page 34. Detailed Abstracts can be found starting on page 53.
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
27
thursday, May 16, 2013
Thursday, May 16, 2013 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:30-8:00am
8:00-9:00am
8:00-10:00am
8:00am-12:00pm
8:00am-12:00pm
8:00am-12:00pm
8:00am-12:00pm
8:00am-12:00pm
9:00-10:30am
10:30-11:30am
11:00am-12:00pm
11:00am-12:30pm
11:00am-12:30pm
12:00-1:00pm
12:00-1:00pm
12:00-1:30pm
12:30-1:30pm
12:30-2:00pm
1:00-2:00pm
5:00-7:00pm
6:00-10:00pm
PC Daily Meeting
SAEM Consultation Services Committee Meeting
Ex. Leadership of EM Organizations-By Invitation Only AEM CC 2014 Planning Meeting
AGEM Academy of Geriatric Emergency Medicine-Business Meeting CDEM Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine -Business Meeting
GEMA Global Emergency Medicine Academy-Business Meeting SIM Simulation Academy - Business Meeting
SAEM Public Health Interest Group Meeting
SAEM ED Crowding Interest Group & Clinical Directors
Interest Group Meeting SAEM EM Medical Education Research IG Meeting
SAEM Research Committee Meeting
SAEM Research Directors Interest Group Meeting SAEM EMS Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Medical Toxicology Interest Group Meeting
AEM Reviewers Lunch
SAEM Health Services & Outcomes Interest Group Meeting
SAEM Grants Committee Meeting
SAEM Pediatric EM Interest Group Meeting International EM Fellowship Consortium Meeting
AACEM Dinner-By invitation Only
International Room H (7th Level)
Tower Room 1202 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1201 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1205 (12th Level)
Vinings Room II (6th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 5 (7th Level)
Vinings Room I (6th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 4 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1207 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1202 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1204 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1203 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1206 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1204 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1205 (12th Level)
International Room H (7th Level)
Tower Room 1404 (14th Level)
Tower Room 1206 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1204 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1206 (12th Level)
Commerce Club
Thursday, May 16, 2013 – Affiliated Meetings
8:00-8:30am
8:00am-5:00pm
8:00am-5:00pm
8:00am-12:00pm
8:30am-12:00pm
10:30-11:30am
11:00am-2:00pm
11:30am-2:00pm
12:00-1:00pm
12:00-1:30pm
12:00-2:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
28
EMRA Rep. Council Welcome Breakfast & Registration AAEM/RSA Board of Directors Meeting CORD Committee Meetings Physio-Control Usability Interviews- By Invitation Only
EMRA Rep Council Meeting & Town Hall ACEP Joint Milestones Task Force Meeting WestJEM Advisory Board and Educational Meeting - By Invitation Only
ABEM/ACEP Officer’s Meeting
EMRA Rep Council Lunch ACEP Research Forum Meeting Emergency ID Net Investigators Meeting -By invitation only
EMRA International Committee EMRA Health Policy Committee EMRA Research Committee Meeting EMRA Critical Care Committee Meeting EMRA Technology Committee Meeting
EMRA Awards Committee EMRA EMS Committee Meeting EMRA Wilderness Medicine Committee Meeting EMRA EM Resident Advisory Committee Meeting EMRA Education Committee Meeting EMRA Ultra Sound Committee Meeting Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Augusta Room 1-2 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1408 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1403 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1402 (12th Level)
Augusta Room 1-2 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1208 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1406 (12th Level)
Executive Boardroom (6th Level)
Augusta Room 3 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1208 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1207 (12th Level)
Augusta Room 1 (7th Level)
Augusta Room 2 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1201 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1202 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1203 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1201 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1202 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1203 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1204 (12th Level)
Augusta Room 1 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1207 (12th Level)
daily schedule – friday, May 17, 2013
8:00 - 8:50 am
Didactics
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Innovations
• Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Exposure: How Much is
Too Much?/International B
Jennifer Marin MD, MSc, Angela Mills MD,
Kimberly Applegate MD, MS
• Preventing Opioid Analgesic Overdose Among ED Patients/
International C
Edward Boyer MD, PhD, Kavita Babu MD
• Educational Portfolio: Your Secret Weapon for Promotion/
Academy Sponsored - CDEM/International E-F
Corey Heitz MD, Gloria Kuhn DO, PhD, Douglas Ander MD
• Innovations Exhibits/Presentation #23-28/200 Gallery -level 6
8:00 - 9:00 am
Innovations
8:00 am - 1:00 pm
Other Sessions
• Oral Presentations/Presentation #19-22/Atlanta H
• SIM WARS/Plaza Ballroom ABC
Abstracts
8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Other Sessions
• Pain Management/Presentation #525-528/Atlanta B
Moderator: Sergey M. Motov MD
• Patient Informed Consent/Presentation #536-539/Atlanta G
Moderator: Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH
• Academic Emergency Medicine/Presentation # 540-545/Atlanta A
Moderator: Susan Promes MD
• Novel Cardiovascular Ideas/Presentation #546-551/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Chad E. Darling MD
• Injury Prevention/Presentation #552-557/ Roswell 1
Moderator: Megan Ranney MD
• Emergency Department Discharge/
Presentation #558-563/Roswell 2
Moderator: Ziad Obermeyer MD
8:00 - 9:20 am
Didactics
• Informed Consent in Emergency Research - Pitfalls and Practical
Pearls. Academy Sponsored - AGEM/International D
Ula Hwang MD, MPH, Adit Ginde MD, MPH,
Jin Han MD, MSc, Lynne Richardson MD
8:00 - 10:00 am
Abstracts
• Ultrasound/Presentation # 529-535/Atlanta E & F
Moderator: David J. Blehar MD
Other Session
• EuSEM Session/PT-200 Conference Room 3
Overcrowding in EDs: What Are the Solutions in Europe?
Eric Revue
Organisation of STEMI Care: What Is the Difference between
USA and Europe?
Abdel Bellou
Evolution of Mortality of Acute Heart Failure in Europe :
Said Laribi
Policy on Quality Metrics in Emergency Medicine in Europe :
Nathalie Flacke
Detailed Didactics can be found starting on page 34. Detailed Abstracts can be found starting on page 53.
Poster Session
• Presentation #155, 236, 594-717/200 Gallery -level 6
Innovations Exhibits and posters will be attended by
authors from 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Academy Meeting
• AWAEM Business Meeting/Vinings II
• AEUS Business Meeting/Vinings I
• Residency & Fellowship Fair/Grand Atrium
• Junior Faculty Forum/PT-200 Conference Room 5
9:00 - 9:50 am
Didactics
• Mapping the Path for Current and Future Research for Safe,
Effective, and Appropriate Trauma Imaging/International B
Kaushal Shah MD, Michael Gibbs MD, Ian Stiell MD,
Eric Legome MD, Ali Raja MD, MPH, MBA
• Good to Great: Effective Feedback to Learners with Difficulties.
Academy Sponsored - CDEM/International E-F
Sorabh Khandelwal MD, Marcia Perry MD,
Sally Santen MD, PhD, Lalena Yarris MD, MCR
9:00 - 10:00 am
Innovations
• Oral Presentations/Presentation #29-32/Atlanta H
Abstracts
• Frequent Emergency Department Users/
Presentation #572-577/Atlanta A
Moderator: Martin Reznek MD, MBA, FACEP
• Neurology/Presentation # 578-583/Atlanta G
Moderator: Edward Jauch MD, MS
• Pediatric Decision Tools/Presentation #584-587/Roswell 1
Moderator: Michele Nypaver MD
• Geriatrics/Presentation #588-563/Roswell 2
Moderator: James Miner MD
• Pain Management/Presentation #564-567/ Atlanta B
Moderator: Sergey M. Motov MD
• Coronary Angiograph/Presentation # 568-571/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Judd Hollander MD
9:00 - 10:20 am
Didactics
• Identifying the Value of Emergency Care in the
Climate of Health Reform/International C
Keith Kocher MD, MPH, MPhil, Arthur Kellermann MD, MPH,
Brent Asplin MD, MPH, Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS,
Adam Sharp MD, MS
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
29
friday, May 17, 2013
9:30 - 9:50 am
Didactics
• Models of Subspecialty Geriatric Emergency Departments.
Academy Sponsored - AGEM/International D
Kathleen Walsh DO, MS, Mark Rosenberg MD, Knox H. Todd MD
10:00 - 10:50 am
Didactics
• Where is the Evidence III: Common Pediatric Infections in
Emergency Medicine/International D
Rakesh Mistry MD, MS, Todd Florin MD, MSCE
• Life and a Career in Global Health: Can You Have It All?
Academy Sponsored - GEMA/ International E-F
Bhakti Hansoti MD, Stephanie Kayden MD, MPH,
Tracy Sanson MD, Bobby Kapur MD, MPH
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Other Session
• Best of CORD/International B
10:30 - 11:50 am
Didactics
• Policy Change 101: A How-To Primer for Emergency Physicians/
International C
Lauren Hudak MD, MPH, Megan Ranney MD,
Art Kellerman MD, MPH, Sara Patterson MA
11:00 - 11:50 am
Didactics
• Emergency Department Evaluation and Management of Pediatric
Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/International D
Mark Zonfrillo MD, MSCE, Rachel Bengtzen MD
• The Top 10 Global Emergency Medicine Articles from 2012:
Highlights from the Global Emergency Medicine Literature Review.
Academy Sponsored - GEMA/International E-F
Gabrielle Jacquet MD, Adam Levine MD, MPH
1:00 - 1:50 pm
Didactics
• Pediatric Airway Management in the 21st Century:
Muddling to Mastery/International D
Nathan Mick MD, Joshua Nagler MD, Aaron Donoghue MD
• Controversies in Emergency Ultrasound: The Debate Rages On.
Academy Sponsored - AEUS/ International E-F
Christopher Raio MD, Andrew Liteplo MD, J. Christian Fox MD
1:00 - 2:00 pm
Innovations
• Oral Presentations/Presentation #33-36/Atlanta H
Abstracts
• Electronic Medical Records/Presentation #718-721/Atlanta B
Moderator: John P. Marshall MD
• Cardiovascular Basic Sciences/
Presentation # 722-725/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Michelle Biros MS, MD
• Geriatrics/Presentation #726-731/Atlanta A
Moderator: Kevin Baumlin MD
30
• Health Services Research/Presentation # 732-737/Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Jesse M. Pines MD
• Video Laryngoscopy/Presentation #738-743/Atlanta G
Moderator: Ron Walls MD
• Pediatric Trauma/Presentation #744-747/Roswell 1
Moderator: Rakesh Mistry MD
• New Ideas in Education/Presentation #748-752/Roswell 2
Moderator: Kevin Rodgers MD
1:00 - 2:20 pm
Didactics
• Inauguration of the NIH Office of Emergency Care Research/
International C
Charles Cairns MD, Roger Lewis MD, PhD,
Walter Korshetz MD, Scott Somers PhD
1:00 - 3:00 pm
• Hot Topics in Medical Education and Education Research/
International B
2:00 - 2:50 pm
Didactics
• Child Abuse Pediatrics Research Update - New Innovations, New
Best Practice/International D
Daniel Lindberg MD, Philip Scribano DO, MSCE
• Resident Education in Ultrasound: Meeting the Milestone.
Academy Sponsored - AEUS/International E-F
Nova Panebianco MD, MPH, Resa Lewiss MD,
Saadia Akhtar MD, Jason Nomura MD
2:00 - 3:00 pm
Abstracts
• Information Technology/Presentation #754-757/Atlanta B
Moderator: D. M. Courtney MD
• Markers and Treatment of Sepsis/
Presentation # 758-761/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Donald M. Yealy MD
• Emergency Medical Services/
Presentation #762-765/Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Theodore R. Delbridge MD
• Emergency Department Crowding/
Presentation #766-769/Atlanta G
Moderator: James Holmes MD
• Pediatric Infectious Diseases/
Presentation #770-775, 86/ Atlanta A
Moderator: TBD
• Health Services Research in Trauma/
Presentation # 776-782/Roswell 1
Moderator: Brendan Carr MD
• Residency Training/Presentation #782-788/Roswell 2
Moderator: Christian Arbelaez MD
3:30 - 5:00 pm
Business Meeting - The Future of Health Care Reform and
Implications for Emergency Medicine/Plaza Ballroom ABC
4:30 - 6:30 pm
Resident/Fellowship Fair/Grand Atrium
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Detailed Didactics can be found starting on page 34. Detailed Abstracts can be found starting on page 53.
friday, May 17, 2013
Friday, May 17, 2013 – SAEM and Committee/Task Force/Academy Interest Group/Board Meetings
7:00-8:00am
7:00-9:00am
7:30-8:00am
8:00-9:00am
8:00am-12:00pm
8:00am-12:00pm
9:00-10:00am
9:00-10:30am
9:00-11:00am
9:30-10:30am
10:00am-3:00pm
12:00-1:00pm
12:00-1:00pm
12:00-2:00pm
12:00-2:00pm
1:00-2:00pm
5:00-6:30pm
5:00-6:30pm
SAEM Past Presidents, Breakfast
AEM Editorial Board Meeting Breakfast PC Daily Meeting
SAEM Web Evolution Committee Meeting
AEUS Academy of Emergency Ultrasound-Business Meeting
AWAEM Academy for Women in
Academic Emergency Medicine-Business Meeting SAEM Resident & Student Advisory Committee Meeting
SAEM Ethics Committee Meeting
SAEM GME Committee Meeting
SAEM Awards Committee Meeting
2014 PC Planning Meeting
SAEM Patient Safety Interest Group Meeting SAEM Sports Medicine Interest Group Meeting SAEM Foundation Board Luncheon-By Invitation Only AWAEM Academy for Women in
Academic Emergency Medicine-Luncheon SAEM Membership Committee Meeting
AWAEM/AAWEP Reception
SAEM Wilderness Medicine Interest Group Meeting
Tower Room 1401 (14th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 1 (7th Level)
PT- Conference Room 2 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1202 (12th Level)
Vinings Room I (6th Level)
Vinings Room II (6th Level)
Tower Room 1206 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1203 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1202 (12th level)
Tower Room 1204 (12th Level)
International Room A (7th Level)
Tower Room 1202 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1203 (12th Level)
Ex. Board Room (6th Level)
PT- Conference Room 1-2 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1205 (12th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 3 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1203 (12th Level)
Friday, May 17, 2013 – Affiliated Meetings
8:00am-1:00pm
8:00am-5:00pm
8:00am-5:00pm
8:00-10:00am
8:30am-3:00pm
10:00-11:30am
12:00-1:00pm
12:30-2:00pm
5:00-6:00pm
6:00-7:00pm
5:30-7:00pm
SIM WARS CORD Committee Meetings Physio-Control Usability Interviews- By Invitation Only
ACEP Academic Affairs Meeting
EMRA BOD Meeting & Committee Updates ACEP-SAEM Research WG Meeting Janssen Product Theater ACEP Research Committee Meeting CTSA Research Network Meeting EMRA Spring Awards Reception ACEP EMBERS’ Alumni Reception Plaza Ballroom A-B-C combined (10th Level)
Tower Room 1403 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1402 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1208 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1201 (12th Level)
Tower Room 1208 (12th Level)
International H (6th Level)
Tower Room 1208 (12th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 5 (7th Level)
PT-200 Conference Room 1 & 2 (7th Level)
Tower Room 1207 (12th Level)
Visit our Exhibitors in Peachtree Ballrooms (8th Level)
• Thursday, May 16, 2013: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm
Morning Coffee service at 7:00 am - 8:00 am
• Friday, May 17, 2013: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm
Morning Coffee service at 7:00 am - 8:00 am
Coffee Break at 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
31
daily schedule – saturday, May 18, 2013
8:00 - 8:50 am
Didactics
• Motivating Success: Conducting High Quality Behavioral
Interventions for Addiction in Ed Patients - Lessons Learned From
The Smart-Ed Multisite Trial/International B
Cameron Crandall MD, Ryan McCormack MD,
Alyssa Forcehimes PhD
• Presentation Design - An Evidence-Based Approach to
Creating Impactful, Effective Visual Aids/International G
Malford Pillow MD, MEd
8:00 - 9:00 am
Abstracts
• Post-Cardiac Arrest Care/Presentation #809-814/Atlanta A
Moderator: Richard Summers MD
• Simulation in Emergency Medicine/
Presentation #815-820/Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Daniel Handel MD, MPH
• Prescription and Abuse of Opiates/
Presentation #821-826/ Roswell 1
Moderator: Steven B. Bird MD
• Toxicology/Presentation #827-833/ Roswell 2
Moderator: Kavita Babu MD
8:00 - 9:20 am
Didactics
• The Hidden Science in Your Emergency Medicine Research:
Gender-Specific Study Design and Analysis.
Academy Sponsored-AWAEM /International C
Esther Choo MD, MPH, Roger Lewis MD, PhD,
Deborah Diercks MD, David Wright MD
8:00 - 10:00 am
Abstracts
James Holmes MD, MPH, Mark Courtney MD, MSCI,
Andrew Chang MD, MS, Comilla Sasson MD, MS
• Deliberate Practice: A Learning Technique That
Improves Mastery, Execution, and Retention of
Medical Knowledge/International G
Rodney Omron MD, MPH, Doug Franzen MD, M.Ed,
Rahul Patwari MD
9:30 - 9:50 am
Didactics
• Top 5 Plays of the Day: How Gender-Specific Medicine Impacts
Men’s Health. Academy Sponsored-AWAEM/ International C
Alyson McGregor MD, Frederico Vaca MD, MPH, Nina Gentile MD,
Basmah Safdar MD, Neha Raukar MD, David Portelli MD
10:00 - 10:50 am
Didactics
• NIH Individual Research Career Development (K) Awards:
A Pathway to Research Independence/International B
Jane Scott ScD, MSN, Lance Becker MD,
Benjamin Abella MD, MS, Sean Collins MD, MSc
• Enhancing the Quality and Transparency of Health Research:
An Introduction to the EQUATOR Network and Implications
for Emergency Medicine/International C
Christopher Carpenter MD, MSc, Brian Hiestand MD, MPH,
Zachary F. Meisel MD, MPH, MSc
• Peer Mentoring: Enhancing Academic & Research Mentoring/
International G
Stephen Cico MD, Med, Kelly Black MD, MSc,
Joseph House MD, Cemal Sozener MD
• Improve Your Teaching: Evidence-Based Teaching Workshop Using
Articles That Will Change Your Teaching Practice/International H
Sally Santen MD, PhD, Sue Farrell MD, Med,
Robin Hemphill MD, MPH, Laura Hopson MD
• Airway Management/Presentation #789-796/Atlanta B
Moderator: Diane Birnbaumer MD
11:00 - 11:50 am
Didactics
8:00 - 11:30 am
Abstracts
• NHLBI K12 Research Career Development Programs in
Emergency Medicine Research/International B
James Holmes MD, MPH, Arthur Kellermann MD, MPH,
Jane Scott ScD
• Superstars of Social Media: How to Incorporate
Social Media Into Teaching and Education/International C
James Miner MD, Michelle Lin MD, Scott Joing MD, Sean Fox MD
• Trauma and Teamwork: Lessons from Iraq/International G
Martin Makela MD
• Quantifying the Worth of My Publications for
Promotions and Grants: The h-Index, m-quotient, Eigenfactor,
and Other Measures of Academic Currency/International H
Christopher Carpenter MD, MSc, Cathy Sarli MLS, AHIP
• International Emergency/Presentation #797-808/ Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Charles Gerardo MD
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Other Session
• SonoGames/Plaza Ballroom ABC
9:00 - 9:50 am
Didactics
• SAEM AND EMF Grants:
Opportunities and Submission Process/International B
Saturday, May 18, 2013 – Affiliated Meetings
9:00am-12:00pm
32
EMRA BOD Meeting Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Tower Room 1201 (12th Level)
Detailed Didactics can be found starting on page 34. Detailed Abstracts can be found starting on page 53.
Maximize your time at the SAEM 2013 Annual Meeting:
A guide for residents and medical students
Winter has dragged on and on for many of us across the country. From
the record snowfalls in the Northeast to the frigid temperatures in the
Midwest, spring seems a little far off, even for those of us out West with
ski slopes to enjoy the long winter! After all these cold months, SAEM
couldn’t have picked a better place for our 2013 Annual Meeting than the
Peach State, and ‘Hot-lanta’, as the locals affectionately call their capital
city. The nickname might stem from the warm weather of the South
or the exciting nightlife of Atlanta, but either way we have a lot to look
forward to, and we haven’t even talked about the conference yet! Now,
let’s focus on a few of the many stand-out conference sessions available
to you at the 2013 meeting.
Day 1, May 15, offers some excellent sessions from a professional and
educational standpoint. Come be inspired by some former residents
(also known as junior faculty) selected from a nationwide search for
individuals who brought innovation and leadership to their respective
programs as residents (“How to Become a Trailblazer: Perspectives from
Resident Innovators” 3:00 pm.) If you are already thinking about what to
do after residency, check out some of the fellowship-focused sessions –
from critical care (“The Current State of Critical Care Training” 10:00 am)
to EMS (“Advances in EMS Education” 11:00 am) to wilderness medicine
(“Thriving in the Wilderness” 1:00 pm), there is something for every
interest.
Here’s hoping your after-hours activities on Day 1 didn’t run too late,
as the session “Choosing a High-Impact Quality Improvement Project as
a Resident or Student AND Getting it Published” at 8:00 am promises
to provide maximum impact. All residents are required to engage in
quality improvement and scholarly works, so why not learn to tackle
both tasks simultaneously? Later in Day 2, “Challenging the PhysicianPatient Relationship: Negotiating Deception, Manipulation and Medical
Mistakes” will deal with some controversial and hard-hitting topics we
will all face during our careers. And of course, don’t miss the keynote
speaker, Dr. Thomas Frieden, the director of the CDC, which can also be
found right here in Atlanta.
In the second half of the conference, we have some additional sessions
that we think would be worthwhile for residents to attend. Let’s start
with the sessions on Friday, May 17. Though we all like to sleep in to
some degree, “Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Exposure: How Much
is too Much?” promises to be worth waking up to attend at 8:00 am! At
some point, a patient has asked you about the radiation exposure of all
the studies you order, and this talk will address some of these concerns.
Additionally, the 10:30 am didactic on “Policy Change 101: A How-To
Primer for the Emergency Physician” should be of value to residents
and students. In this day and age of graduate medical education cuts,
trimming of costs from hospitals, and yet even more patients, it is
important to be involved in the health policy debate.
On the last day of the conference, there are a number of outstanding
sessions. During residency (and beyond,) we will have to give a lecture
or presentation on a topic. At 8:00 am, “Presentation Design: An
Evidence-Based Approach” should help you with this important skill.
And finally, we are all hearing more and more about Twitter, Facebook,
LinkedIn, blogs, podcasts, and all other types of social media within EM.
Wondering what in the world is a hashtag? Or, do you keep hearing about
FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) and want to know what the big
craze is about? One of the final sessions of the conference at 11:00 am
is about incorporating social media into education. See how this new
phenomenon is changing the way we learn and debate information. Also,
be sure to check out SonoGames; either bring your own ultrasound team
or be a spectator at the fight for sonographic supremacy!
The SAEM Annual Meeting is the premiere event for the latest and
greatest research within EM. No matter what sessions you choose
to attend, you are bound to learn something that will help you in your
practice. The more meetings you attend, the better you will be able to
critically evaluate posters and didactics. Use this information that you
gain to decide how to shape the way you practice EM. One of the authors
of this article (BR) has been to 5 annual meetings already and feels
strongly that the knowledge you will learn WILL shape your practice and
put you on the cutting edge of EM. Another great reason to come to the
meeting is for networking with your colleagues from across the country
(and the world!) Virtually all of the interest groups hold meetings here,
and you get to join one free with your membership! Additionally, all of
the academies have their own meetings. For residents and students, the
Residency & Fellowship Fair is a great place to network with program
directors and other faculty/residents/fellows from individual programs.
This is the best time to ask your questions and get a feel for the program
before deciding to apply. The list of programs at the fair is published
in advance - make sure you circle the ones you want to go to and have
questions ready for them. You will be surprised by how friendly everyone
is and how quickly you can catch someone’s eye or make a connection!
In conclusion, the Annual Meeting is the face of the Society and all that
it does over the course of the year. The Society is the only emergency
medicine organization that represents all residents in every program
throughout the country as THE academic society in emergency medicine.
It is worth attending as a student or resident at a minimum once. In
addition to all of the great academic material you will learn, you will have a
great time! Between the social events, experiencing Atlanta, and gaining
knowledge, it will be a great conference and we look forward to seeing
many of you here. And, of course, to those unable to attend because they
are staffing our emergency departments, we thank you too!
Brett Rosen MD – member, Resident and Student Advisory Committee
Marie Vrablik MD – co-chair, Resident and Student Advisory Committee
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
33
SAEM 2013 Annual Meeting Didactic Presentations
May 14 - 18, Atlanta, GA
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15th
The Role of Electroencephalography and of Reduced Lead EEG in
the Emergency Department.
DS001 – Peachtree A & B
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
Historically, EEG has been used in the emergency department setting on a
limited basis when prompted by neurological consultants. Dr. Brenner has been a
proponent of the use of EEG with reduced lead to diagnose nonconvulsive status
epilepticus. Dr. Michelson has pursued the use of EEG in the recognition of stroke.
He will also review the recent literature and current trials on quantitative EEG
in assessment of traumatic brain injury. Together, they are studying the use of
reduced lead EEG in a multicenter trial. They will each review the indications and
limitations of reduced lead EEG in the emergency department setting.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to
recognize the indications for reduced lead EEG use in the ED and be aware of the
limitations of its interpretations.
Jay Brenner MD – submitter, presenter
SUNY-Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY
Ed Michelson MD - presenter
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
How to Effectively Supervise and Teach Residents: Entrustment
and Autonomy
DS002 – Peachtree C
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
Development of Clinical Decision Instruments
in Emergency Medicine
The purpose of residency is to train residents to manage patients independently
while the role of the attending faculty varies in supervision and allowing
autonomy. This concept has been termed entrustment (ten Cate, 2006). This is
the key to Entrustable Professional Activities which further delineate the new EM
Milestones. As residents progress along the milestones, the role of the supervising
physician is to facilitate incremental increase in responsibilities of patient care
to residents with concurrent reduction in clinical oversight. Entrustment varies
based on attending factors (experience, confidence), resident factors (level of
training, characteristics), patient factors (severity of illness, complexity) and
environment (volume, service expectations). In this session, we will discuss
how leveraging entrustment can create an effective learning environment. We
will explore resident perceptions of autonomy, the learning environment, and
strategies for faculty to enhance resident learning within this framework. The
workshop will be highly interactive, requiring participants to use and understand
resident supervision and autonomy, review their own current practice, and then
apply new techniques to their clinical teaching. This session will start with short
didactic presentation and large group discussion to understand entrustment and
autonomy. We will then incorporate facilitated small group discussions to further
understand the concepts and develop ways to improve each participant’s ability to
engage with a resident at an appropriate level of supervision and autonomy. Small
group facilitators: Nadia Juneja, Robin Hemphill, Felix Ankel, and Sheryl Heron.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the factors affecting autonomy,
2. Demonstrate the ability to navigate the barriers to entrustment,
3. A
ppropriately facilitate resident autonomy and grant-trainee-suitable
entrustment of patient care to enhance resident education while maintaining
appropriate supervision.
Sally Santen MD, PhD – submitter, presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Ben Bassin MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Katie Saxon MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Meg Wolff MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
DS004 – Peachtree E
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
In the Middle: Non-Physician Providers in the Emergency Department
DS003 – Peachtree D
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
34
There are an increasing number of non-physician providers (NPs and PAs)
working in academic and community emergency medicine departments. Many
departments may have initially turned to non-physician providers as a way
to increase staffing and provide direct patient care. Some departments have
integrated the non-physician providers fully into their academic structure and
mission. These providers are now responsible for resident and student education,
research and professional development in addition to their duties of patient care.
Just like physicians, they must balance the demands on their time and chart a
course for career advancement. We will examine the evolution of opportunities
for non-physician providers in the emergency department and illustrate how
non-physician providers can become an integral part of an academic emergency
medicine department. There will also be a discussion for non-physician providers
on where to turn for resources for career development.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. D
efine current and future roles for non-physician providers in academic
emergency medicine.
2. D
iscuss the challenges and rewards of integration of non-physician providers
in emergency departments.
3. Review resources for education and integration of non-physician providers.
Henderson McGinnis MD - submitter
Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston Salem, NC
Jeff Hinshaw PA - presenter
Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston-Salem, NC
Randy Howell DO, FACOEP - presenter
West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV
Decision Instruments (DIs) allow for safe, effective diagnostic test utilization
with resource savings and other notable benefits, such as decreased radiation
exposure. The following topics will be discussed: 1) Choice of DI topics (how
to choose appropriate topics for a DI), 2) Basics of DI study design (derivation
and validation techniques), 3) Study methodology including controlling for bias
(especially work-up bias), and 4) Statistical concepts (sample size, recursive
partitioning vs. logistic regression). During the first 36 minutes, presenters will
discuss the above topics in three 12 minute Power-point presentations. During the
last 14 minutes, the moderator will summarize the discussion and lead a question
and answer session.
Objectives: On completion of the session, participants should be able to:
1. D
escribe the utility of DIs and how to choose a topic for DI development.
2. D
escribe the basics of DI study design.
3. Define the need for controlling elements of bias4: Discuss basic statistical
concepts inherent in DI methodology.
Robert Rodriguez MD – submitter, presenter
UCSF, San Francisco, CA
James Holmes MD - presenter
UC Davis Dept of Emergency Med, Davis, CA
Nate Kuppermann MD, PhD - presenter
UC Davis, Davis, CA
William Mower MD, PhD - presenter
UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
ED-based Critical Care Resident Rotations &
Experiences as Opportunities for Teaching
Critical Care in the Emergency Department
DS005 – Peachtree A & B
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
Critical Care has long been a major part of Emergency Medicine. For the most
part clinical critical care has been taught by inpatient intensivists on inpatient
ICU’s with the expectations the methods and techniques would be naturally
transitioned to the ED. Due to many factors including increasing numbers of
Emergency Intensivists on residency faculties providing bedside teaching of
critical care techniques has expanded. While inpatient ICU experiences are still
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
*Disclaimer: Didactics are placed in the program how they were submitted to SAEM.
of value in resident education programs are now creating ED-based critical care
rotations. This session will provide results of a survey of programs on the current
use of both inpatient and ED-based critical care education. Panelists will present
2 current ED-based critical care rotation designs describing the educational
methods and resident responses to the courses. After the panelist’s presentation
there will be time for questions from the audience about the survey results and the
courses described as well as the potential evolution for this type of experience in
other programs.
Objectives: At the completion of this session participants should be able to:
1. Describe the current critical care education methods reported in the survey of
residency programs.
2. D
escribe the emerging use of ED-based clinical critical care rotations and
experiences in resident education.
3. D
efine the facilities and resources needed to establish ED-based critical care
rotations.
4. D
emonstrate how to create ED-based critical care experiences without a
dedicated ED critical care unit.
Kevin Ferguson MD - submitter
University of Florida., Gainesville, FL
Lillian Emlet MD - presenter
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Robert Sherwin MD, FACEP, FAAEM - presenter
Sinai Grace Hospital/Detroit Receiving Hospital, Detroit, MI
Scott Wiengart MD - presenter
Sinai School of Medicine & Elmhurst Hospital Center, New York, NY
Not Another Boring Lecture: Five Ways to Spice Up Your
Didactics!
DS006 – Peachtree C
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 9:00 - 10:20 am
This session will challenge participants to branch out of their comfort zone by
demonstrating and encouraging the use of modern instruction. Learners only
retain 10-30% of what they hear in standard lectures often because little attention
is paid to learning theories and principles of instructional design that promote
improved attention and knowledge retention. During the session, participants will
participate in several methods of interactive teaching that demonstrate dynamic
opportunities for the teacher to engage the learner. These will include the flipped
classroom methods, slide presentation principles framed within Richard Mayer’s
cognitive theory of multimedia learning, embedding active learning in the lecture
format, and innovative lecture techniques. At the completion of the session,
participants will be able to incorporate new teaching methods into their practice.
Due to the interactive nature of this workshop there will be 4 facilitators: Robin
Hemphill, Ben Bassin, Mary Jo Wagner and Philip Shayne.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Recognize examples of less effective instruction
2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of modern learning theories and their role
in instructional design
3. E
mploy new teaching tools effective for their environment.
Margaret Wolff MD - submitter, presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Mary Jo Wagner MD – presenter
Central Michigan University, Saginaw, MI
Sally Santen MD, PhD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Stacey Poznanski MD - presenter
Wright State University, Dayton, OH
Impact of the 2010 AHA Post-Cardiac Arrest Care Guidelines:
Assessing Knowledge Translation & Implementation
DS007 – Peachtree D
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
In 2010 AHA and ILCOR published guidelines that advocated implementation of
comprehensive post-cardiac arrest care, including therapeutic hypothermia,
to improve outcomes after cardiac arrest. Resuscitation research has surged
in the last decade explicitly because the results of two randomized controlled
trials showed that the application of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac
arrest positively influenced neurologic outcomes. Now over two years since the
2010 Guidelines, the impact on systems of care remains largely unknown and
highly variable. Numerous factors play roles in the acceptance and adherence to
published guidelines, including 1) individual knowledge of such recommendations
and 2) institutional expertise, experience (patient volume), and resources.
In the US, there are several different models of post-arrest care, from the
multidisciplinary, on-call team approach to a protocol-driven order set initiated
upon admission to the intensive care unit. Emergency Medicine physicians
are uniquely positioned as experts in emergency care to resuscitate patients
suffering both in- and out of hospital cardiac arrest. As such, knowledge of current
guidelines and appreciation for potential limitations to their implementation may
improve our ability to initiate comprehensive post-arrest care and advocate in
the best interest for our patients. Evidence-based recommendations for postarrest care will be reviewed though specific management techniques will not
be discussed. The conversation will incorporate a discussion of future research
directions within cardiac resuscitation as pertaining to the guidelines.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the concept of comprehensive post-cardiac arrest care and the general
evidence-based goals as laid out in the 2010 Guidelines
2. I dentify the variations in implementation of the 2010 Guidelines in the US
3. D
escribe limitations to knowledge translation and developing systems of care
for cardiac arrest
4. I dentify future research directions within cardiac resuscitation
Kelly Sawyer MD, MS – submitter, presenter
William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI
Teresa Camp-Rogers MD, MS - presenter
UT Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX
Michael Kurz MD, MS-HES - presenter
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
Introduction to Statistics
DS008 – Peachtree E
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 9:00 - 10:20 am
To succeed in research and academia, a fundamental knowledge of important
statistical concepts is a necessity. This knowledge will allow investigators to plan a
sound research study, develop testable hypotheses, choose appropriate analytical
methods, and determine the feasibility of performing a study in a given population
and setting. In this session, Dr. Lewis will discuss introductory statistical topics
such as types of data, common statistical tests, p values, confidence intervals,
and sample size and power calculations. An overview of subgroup analysis, interim
data analysis, and intention to treat will also be provided. Through discussion of
these concepts at this session, attendees will increase their understanding of
statistical concepts and will be able to apply this knowledge to their research and
practice.
Objectives:
1. Describe types of data, common statistical tests, p values, and confidence
intervals
2. Apply sample size and power calculations
3.Distinguish subgroup analysis, interim data analysis, and intention-to-treat
concepts
Roger Lewis. Harbor MD, PhD – submitter, presenter
UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA
The Current State of Critical Care Fellowship Training for
Emergency Medicine Residency Graduates
DS009 – Peachtree A & B
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 10 - 10:50 am
Decades of effort to open Critical Care Training and certification to Emergency
Physicians are culminating in rapid expansion of Fellowships and Certification
Pathways. Currently ABEM and ABIM have defined a pathway to certification
for Emergency Physicians who have completed a 2 year IM based program.
Anesthesiology and Surgery are currently exploring and developing pathways for
Emergency Physicians to complete Critical Care fellowships in their programs.
This session will provide an update on these developments and provide insight
to the curriculums of the various programs. A survey of current CCM programs
accepting emergency physicians and current state of ABEM certification
agreements will be presented by the moderator. Panelists consisting of Program
Directors from Medicine, Anesthesiology and Surgery Fellowships that accept
EP’s will make brief presentations on their current or planned curriculum, pathways
to certification for their graduates and potential employment opportunities
as emergency intensivists in their institutions or departments. After the panel
presentations there will be a period of questions and answers from the audience
to the panel.
Objectives:
1. Summarize the results of a recent survey of critical care fellowship directors
regarding emergency physician applicants
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
35
2. D
escribe the differences in the curriculums of anesthesia, medicine and
surgery fellowships
3. I dentify the various pathways to certification for graduates of the various
fellowships.
4. D
efine the potential career options as emergency intensivists in their
institutions and departments.
Kevin Ferguson MD - submitter, presenter
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Andrea Gabrielli MD - presenter
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Jay Menaker MD - presenter
Univ. of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore MD
Mike Winters MD - presenter
University of Maryland, Baltimore MD
Fulfilling the Residency Educational Mission at Independent
Academic Medical Centers
DS010 – Peachtree D
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 10 - 10:50 am
Independent academic medical centers represent an important setting for the
training of emergency physicians. Neither university-based departments of
emergency medicine nor community hospitals serving as secondary training
sites, independent academic hospitals are home to nearly one-third of accredited
allopathic emergency medicine residency programs. This session will explore the
unique challenges and opportunities that exist in training emergency medicine
residents in the independent academic hospital setting. Dr. Katz will provide
an overview of the common practice setting differences between universitybased and independent academic hospitals and their implications for residents
and faculty in the independent academic environment. Dr. Garmel will describe
the challenges and opportunities faced by faculty educating residents while
working at an independent academic hospital, with specific focus on didactic and
bedside teaching in this environment. Dr. Davenport will elucidate the challenges
and opportunities for emergency medicine residents who train at independent
academic hospitals, with specific focus on the clinical environment, the diversity
of teaching faculty, and approaches for residents to maximize their academic
preparation in this setting. Dr. Venkat will discuss the challenges and opportunities
for resident scholarly activity in the independent academic environment, with
specific focus on garnering resources for research and approaches to increasing
scholarly productivity by residents in this setting as preparation for an academic
career. The session will conclude with a question-answer session to further
discuss the challenges and opportunities of residency education in this setting.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the challenges to training emergency medicine residents at
independent academic medical centers, specifically within the categories of
clinical practice, didactics, and scholarly activity.
2. List ways to mitigate these challenges to advance the educational mission of
residencies in independent academic hospitals.
3. Describe the opportunities available for residents and faculty at independent
academic hospitals.
Arvind Venkat MD – submitter, presenter
Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA
Moira Davenport MD - presenter
Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA
Gus Garmel MD - presenter
Stanford/Kaiser Permanente, Palo Alto, CA
Eric Katz MD - presenter
Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ
Systems Milestones for Academic Programs: Moving from
Novice to Expert
DS011 – Peachtree C
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 10:30 - 11:50 am
The Next Accreditation System (NAS) is based in the Dreyfus Model of individual
milestone development from novice to expert. A parallel development of
milestones for systems can be created for academic programs when leaders
manage the domains of autonomy, coping with complexity, and perceiving
context. The workshop will be highly interactive, requiring participants to reflect
on their programs and design elements of improvement in their academic program
in a strategic fashion. This session will start with a short didactic presentation
followed by a large group discussion. During the session participants will have
the opportunity to reflect on the Dreyfus’ Model, work in small groups to
develop a strategy that fits within the context of their institution’s culture, and
36
develop a blueprint for moving academic programs towards the expert level.
To allow for effective small group facilitated discussion, additional small group
facilitators include: Stephanie Taft MD (Regions Hospital), Sheryl Heron MD
(Emory University), Laura Hopson MD (University of Michigan) and Sam Hauff MD
(University of Michigan).
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the Dreyfus Model of novice, beginner, competent, proficient, and
expert through the domains of autonomy, context, and complexity
2. Reflect on systems milestones needed to develop expert programs
3. Design a 10-point blueprint for system expertise to bring back to participants’
local programs
Felix Ankel MD – submitter, presenter
Regions Hospital, Saint Paul, MN
Robin Hemphill MD - presenter
National Center for Patient Safety, Veterans Health, Ann Arbor, MN
Sally Santen MD, PHD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MN
Team Science in Research: What is the Role of
Emergency Medicine?
DS012 – Peachtree E
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 10:30 - 11:50 am
Whether the project is basic science or clinical research, the team approach to
research is not only necessary but a competitive advantage. In these teams,
each member contributes specific resources or areas of expertise to accomplish
the goals of the project. Because EM is not disease specific, integrating EM
investigators into a research team can be less intuitive than with other specialties.
In the first part of this panel discussion, EM investigators who have been
successful PIs of large multi-disciplinary proposals will share tactics and pitfalls
associated with the EM investigator as team science PI. Topics covered will
include methods for leading a team, seeking out researchers and study personnel
from various disciplines, congealing the team, honing the approach, and keeping
team members accountable for deliverables. During the second part of this panel
discussion, experienced EM investigators will share examples of collaborations
in which their involvement as Co-I was successful and those that were not. These
examples will serve to outline a framework in which EM investigators generally
contribute: a) access to patients; b) research infrastructure for enrollment of ED
patients; and/or, c) intellectual expertise. Discussions will focus on negotiations
of items such as academic credit, expected deliverables, consumption of research
resources, and financial compensation. These experts will also provide examples
of EM investigators who have developed an area of intellectual expertise that
successfully integrates into research teams. In the conclusion of this presentation,
the panel will present a list of general principals to guide EM investigators as they
develop and contribute to research teams.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe approaches for EM investigators to be successful research team
leaders
2. Conceptualize successful and unsuccessful arrangements when joining a
research team as a co-investigator.
3. Describe, with examples of successful teams involving EM investigators:
a. Implementation of a clinical trials unit,
b. Development of a multicenter federally sponsored clinical trial,
c. Definition of an area of intellectual expertise as an EM investigator.
Chadwick Miller MD, MS – submitter, presenter
Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
Roger Lewis MD, PhD - presenter
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Torrance, CA
Alan Storrow MD - presenter
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Gregory Fermann MD - presenter
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
Advances in EMS Education for Residents
DS013 – Peachtree A & B
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
The American Board of Medical Specialties recently established Emergency
Medical Services (EMS) as a sub-specialty of Emergency Medicine, recognizing
that EMS comprises a distinct practice and fund of knowledge. Emergency
Medicine residents have varied exposure to pre-hospital care and EMS systems
depending on their training location and departmental priorities/resources. The
SAEM EMS Interest Group and its EMS Curriculum Development Task Force have
sought to continue to develop the new sub-specialty, cultivate the fertile ground
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
for research, spark an interest in residents and students to pursue careers in
EMS, and improve patient care in all phases of healthcare that interact with EMS
by refining and further developing standard EMS curricula for EM residents and
students. This session will begin with overview of, and commentary on, the Interest
Group’s recommendations with a focus on resident education. The remainder of
the session will be devoted to a discussion of how to implement and achieve these
important educational objectives. Audience participation will be encouraged to
create a vibrant discussion. Ideas raised in this session will be incorporated into
the task force’s final report.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to
1. Describe the current model of EMS education for residents;
2. Describe EMS educational objectives for residents, as well as methods to
achieve these objectives.
Michael Hilton MD - submitter
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
David Cone MD - presenter
Yale University, New Haven, CT
Jonathan Fisher MD, MPH - presenter
Harvard University, Boston, MA
Christian Martin-Gill MD, MPH - presenter
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
The Nonquantitative Aspect of Resident Training in the
Community ED
DS014 – Peachtree D
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
We all remember what it was like to be a resident: the long days and the hard nights,
the feeling that maybe, perhaps, you missed something, the joy over successfully
intubating. Faculty in turn takes great pride in enriching the experience. However,
education is simply one piece of the resident-faculty interaction. Supervising
residents on a clinical shift can have other intended and unintended consequences
besides the creation of a positive learning environment. This session will explore
the additional responsibilities community based academic emergency physicians
encounter when residents are added into their departments. In particular topics
to be presented will include 1) The financial costs of residents (Most affiliates
now pay their salary) with a focus on the cost benefit of having a resident vs. midlevel provider as caregiver 2) the time demands for bedside teaching and how
that influences physician coverage of other patients 3) the impact of residents
on patient flow, patient satisfaction, and HCAHPs 4) the relationships between
resident and medical staff, and resident and ancillary staff.
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Identify both the positive and the negative aspects of having residents in
community teaching EDs.
2. Define the options available to resolve any adverse consequences, while at the
same time enhancing the good aspects of a residency program.
3. Describe how to establish programs and effectively communicate between
residency directors and ED community faculty.
Michael Hochberg MD – submitter, presenter
Saint Peter’s University Hospital/Drexel, Saint Peter’s University Hospital/
Drexel,
Al Sacchetti MD - presenter
Our Lady of Lourdes
Kevin Klauer MD - presenter
EMP
Chad Kessler MD - presenter
Jesse Brown Hospital
Thriving in the Wilderness: What Wilderness Medicine
Fellowship Applicants and Directors Need to Know
DS015 – Peachtree A & B
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 1:00 - 1:50 pm
Wilderness Medicine Fellowships are an increasingly popular means of gaining
sub-specialty training in the provision of resource-limited medical care under
austere conditions. Wilderness Medicine Fellows are trained through clinical
and scholarly work at the nation’s major medical centers and in the planet’s most
austere and remote environments. Following graduation, fellows contribute to
the advancement of EM in a range of capacities: from starting new fellowships
at leading academic medical centers, to teaching & providing clinical care on the
slopes of Denali, the shores of post-tsunami Japan, and underserved areas of
Africa. Fellowships produce scholars with active research careers funded by the
NIH and other governmental sources. This panel discussion will provide emergency
medicine residents with actionable data on how to assess advanced training
options in wilderness medicine. We will describe how to create a vibrant research,
clinical care, and teaching career as academic wilderness medicine specialist.
We will provide a practical, pragmatic introduction to critical fellowship topics
including: realistic goals for field experience, how to get started in wilderness
medicine research, assessing research productivity and fit with applicant’s
interests, key features of WM curriculum, and sources of WM expertise.
Additional topics will include how to investigate potential WM field clinical care
experiences, how to arrange synergistic interactions with other fellowships, and
to highlight the benefits to EM residents and EM faculty provided by a vigorous
WM Fellowship. Finally, we will discuss the creation and content of the unified
national WM Fellowship Curriculum in the service of establishing ACGME/ABMS
certification for wilderness medicine fellowships.
Objectives: At the completion of this Panel, participants should be familiar
with methods for assessing the quality and personal fit of advanced wilderness
medicine training opportunities. They should be able to define the role of training
in research, teaching, and clinical care expertise in advanced wilderness medicine
practice. Additionally, this should provide directly applicable training on how
academic EPs can establish a successful wilderness medicine fellowship.
N. Stuart Harris MD, MFA
Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Tracy Cushing MD, MPH
University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
Taking Advantage of the Teachable Moment: A Workshop for
Efficient, Learner-Centered Clinical Teaching
DS016 – Peachtree C
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 1:00 - 2:20 pm
When working in a chaotic emergency department with competing priorities,
clinical teaching may be sacrificed for the sake of patient flow and throughput.
An organized, efficient approach to clinical teaching based upon constructivist
educational theory helps focus the teaching on what the learner needs at that
moment, incorporates regular feedback, keeps the department on track, and
prevents over-teaching. In this interactive workshop, participants will discuss
characteristics of ideal clinical teachers, the theoretical underpinnings of
learner-centered education, and common barriers to effective clinical teaching.
Learner-centered teaching models, such as the one-minute preceptor, SNAPPS,
and L-CARE, will be compared. Videos illustrating examples of effective and
ineffective teaching encounters will serve as a springboard for small group,
case-based practice using the teaching models. At the end of this workshop,
participants will be prepared to seize the teachable moment and provide timely
and learner-centered clinical educational encounters.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss characteristics of ideal clinical teachers
2.
Recognize constructivist educational theory applied to learner-centered
education
3. Discuss barriers to effective clinical teaching
4. Incorporate learner-centered teaching techniques into their clinical practice
Todd Guth MD - submitter
University of Colorado, School of Medicine, Aurora, CO
Elise Lovell MD - presenter
Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL
Sneha Shah MD - presenter
University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA
Mike Epter DO - presenter
University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
Investigator-Initiated Research Without an Existing Research
Infrastructure: How to Succeed in Any Practice Setting
DS017 – Peachtree D
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 1:00 - 1:50 pm
The focus of Emergency Medicine research has changed dramatically in the last 30
years. EM research has developed from a friendly homespun, investigator-initiated
endeavor into a highly complicated competitive undertaking on a multimillion
dollar national level. The NIH investment in emergency care research asks
emergency physicians to identify research areas that aim at improving efficiency
and resource utilization in our increasingly overburdened emergency care system.
Physicians from every practice in Emergency Medicine play a critical role in this
mission. But how can community based physicians and even those in academic
centers without existing emergency medicine infrastructure accomplish this in
our rapidly changing research landscape? Community-based academic medical
centers, midway between university-based departments of emergency medicine
and community hospitals without academic affiliation, frequently lack the
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
37
research infrastructure of a university based institution. Even many university
based programs lack sufficient infrastructure necessary to undertake seemingly
basic research questions. The lack of institutional support as well as barriers to
performing research can confound and overwhelm an unseasoned researcher. The
speakers will address steps to facilitate study design, maximize data collection,
and achieve support for research.
Objectives: The objective of this didactic is to help faculty and residents learn
the challenges and obstacles that face researchers in these settings, and various
methods for dealing with them. At the end of this session, participants should be
able to:
1. Identify sources to assist in the development of research proposals.
2. Identify the challenges in and find solutions for data collection and research
assistants.
3. Identify avenues for obtaining institutional and outside resources to conduct
this research.
John Cienki MD, MSPH – submitter, presenter
Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL
Robert J Hoffman MD - presenter
Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY
Brigitte Baumann MD, MSCE - presenter
Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ
Judd Hollander MD - presenter
Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Asking the Question that Clinicians Want Answered Within an
Adaptive Comparative Effectiveness Trial
DS018 – Peachtree E
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 1:00 - 1:50 pm
Our discussion of adaptive clinical trials will focus on a very specific class of
flexible designs. Our use of the term adaptive refers to trials which make use of
accumulating information from enrolled subjects to make changes in the conduct
of the ongoing trial. Importantly, all of these changes are prospectively planned
using extensive numerical simulation and sensitivity analyses. These designs
can help the trial investigators concurrently accomplish important scientific
and medical goals. In this session we will identify situations where specific types
of adaptive clinical trial designs could be useful. In addition, we will situations
in which adaptive designs may not be as useful or may even be less efficient.
Adaptive trials offer potential benefits in improving trial efficiency (smaller
trials which are more likely to be successful) that must be balanced against the
additional complexities (extensive up-front simulation work and the need to
rapidly incorporate accumulating data from participants within the on-going trial).
We will provide an overview of the key characteristics of high-quality adaptive
clinical trial designs, with a specific example of a comparative effectiveness trial
designed to determine which treatment or treatments to use for established
status epilepticus. In the workshop, we will present a real example of a simulated
trial (using statistical software package R – participants are encouraged to bring
laptops with R loaded), and demonstrate potential strengths of using simulation in
research planning. Finally, the panel discussion will focus on lessons learned from
the trial design process and the attendee will learn about potential methods to
enhance the efficiency of trial design.
Objectives: The learner should be able to:
1. Describe the taxonomy of adaptive clinical trial designs and areas where such
designs may be useful.
2. Describe the advantages of using numerical simulation in clinical trial design and
encourage attendees to consider using these methods when designing clinical
research
3. Anticipate potential process issues within trial or research design and use
best practices identified through ADAPT-IT to maximize the efficiency of the
process.
William Meurer MD, MS – submitter, presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Jason Connor PhD - presenter
Berry Consultants, Austin, TX
Roger Lewis MD, PhD - presenter
Harbor UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
From the Bleachers to the Sidelines: Careers and Opportunities
in Sports Medicine
DS019 – Peachtree A & B
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 2:00 - 2:50 pm
Primary care sports medicine has traditionally been practiced by family medicine
physicians, internists, and pediatricians, but the subspecialty has seen growth in
emergency medicine in recent years as well. Emergency physicians offer a unique
38
skill set and are well-positioned for success in sports medicine. With the proper
training, experience, or special interest, there are a variety of opportunities in
sports medicine available to the emergency physician. This session will discuss
the role of the emergency physician in sports medicine, the current state of
sports medicine fellowship training, and career paths and other opportunities for
residents and practicing emergency physicians with or without fellowship training.
Each speaker practices academic emergency medicine, clinical sports medicine,
and team medicine in settings encompassing high school, college, and professional
sports. Jeffrey Feden MD, will provide an overview of the subspecialty, options for
fellowship training, and typical career paths (10 minutes). Daniel Garza MD, a team
physician at Stanford University and Medical Director for the NFL’s San Francisco
49ers, will highlight the role of the emergency physician in team medicine (10
minutes). Moira Davenport MD, Associate EM Residency Director and sports
medicine fellowship faculty member at Allegheny General Hospital will offer her
perspective on balancing a career in academic emergency and sports medicine
(10 minutes). The program will conclude with a panel discussion moderated by
Dr. Feden, during which all three speakers will share their recommendations
for pursuing sports medicine within the academic setting (15 minutes). A brief
question and answer session will follow (5 minutes).
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Identify the fundamental practice of primary care sports medicine and routes of
entry into the subspecialty;
2. Define the role and unique qualifications of the emergency physician in sports
medicine;
3. Recognize the spectrum of career paths available to the fellowship-trained
emergency physician;
4. Identify areas of involvement for the interested resident or emergency
physician without formal training.
Jeffrey Feden MD - submitter, presenter
Brown University, Warwick, RI
Daniel Garza MD - presenter
Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
Moira Davenport MD - presenter
Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA
Creating a Successful Research Assistant Program in your
Emergency Department
DS020 – Peachtree D
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 2:00 - 2:50 pm
Emergency medicine core faculty faces difficult demands on their time and often
do not have the resources to initiate original research. Creating a team of research
assistants (RAs) to enroll patients is a core part of succeeding at this mission.
This session will describe two successful ways of accomplishing these goals:
1) University-based Research Associates Program: this method is sometimes
referred to as an Emergency Medicine Research Associates Program or EMRAP.
In this approach, a group of motivated students are selected for a college credit
program volunteer in the ED as RAs enrolling patients. The research associates
program recruits college students though a competitive process involving an
application and selected interviews. Those who are selected receive training in
research ethics, HIPAA compliance, use of the electronic medical record (EMR)
and live training on how to enroll patients into clinical study. These programs
often make use of a permanent research coordinator to co-direct the program.
It is estimated that as many as 20 of these programs exist around the US. This
segment will provide insight in how to start such a program at your site.2) Funding
salaried RAs through use of departmental funds and grants: this segment will
discuss ways to fund salaried research associates, who are employees in the ED.
Advantages of this approach include having longer-term RAs who require fewer
episodes of training, and to allow them to be paid for their services. Requirements
include establishing a long-term coordinator to run the program, and obtaining
initial and steady-state funding, through a mix of grants and contracts from
government, foundation and industrial sources.
Objectives: Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1) Identify two ways to create a research associates team within an emergency
medicine residency program.
2)Describe the basic process of creating a program, as well as some of the pitfalls
that may occur, as well as growing and maturing the program.
Daniel Keyes MD, MPH – submitter/presenter
University of Michigan EM Residency Program, Ann Arbor, MI
Ed Panacek MD, MPH - presenter
University of California, Davis, Davis, CA
Judd Hollander MD - presenter
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Daniel Pallin MD, MPH - presenter
Harvard University, Boston, MA
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Real Strategies for Quasi-Experiments:
How to Identify Causation Using Non-Randomized Data
DS021 – Peachtree E
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 2:00 - 2:50 pm
Many EM researchers are interested in determining whether an intervention
(any event impacting subjects) has an effect on practice or patient outcomes.
However, often it is not possible to do a true randomized, controlled experiment,
usually because of feasibility or ethical issues. In general, non-randomized,
non-controlled data need to be used cautiously when assessing the effect of an
intervention, as internal validity may be compromised by a number of factors such
as confounding, temporality, selection bias, diffusion of intervention effects, or
regression to the mean. Quasi-experimental study designs and analytic methods
minimize threats to internal validity using a variety of approaches. Some of the
methods to be discussed are also applicable to the analysis of observational data,
but the focus will be on how to work with data collected under circumstances
where the researcher has control over the intervention but not necessarily over
who is exposed.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe principles of causal inference and related concepts
2. Discuss a broad range of quasi-experimental study methods and determine
whether and how to apply these methods to their own data and research
questions
3. Appreciate how quasi-experimental methods can be used to perform highquality EM research.
Lisa Schweigler MD, MPH, MS – submitter, presenter
Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI
Jason Haukoos MD, MSc - presenter
University of Colorado/Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO
Christopher Kabrhel MD, MPH - presenter
Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Is the Patient Safe? Assessing Procedural Competence
DS022 – Peachtree C
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 2:30 - 3:50 pm
Procedural skills involve a complex combination of cognitive and technical skills.
The new ACGME milestones and potentially requirements for maintenance of
certification are increasingly requiring that learners and practitioners be formally
assessed for competency. In addition, assessment also provides an opportunity
for feedback to enhance skill development. Both of these goals require use of
effective and valid tools. This session will review the evidence supporting the use
of various assessment modalities including self-assessment, direct-observation,
use of non-physician evaluators, and simulation. It will also review available
assessment tools such as the OSATS instrument. The session will cover issues
related to determining the validity of an assessment and development of a toolbox.
Through the use of case examples and small groups participants will practice use
of common assessment instruments and strategies for their implementation.
Due to the interactive nature of the small group sessions, additional facilitators
may employed for these sections of the workshop including Samantha Hauff MD;
Alyssa Bryant MD; Jeff Siegelman MD; and Jared Novack MD.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the needs, benefits, and limitation of assessment of procedural
competency
2. Discuss the educational rationale behind assessment of skills
3. Identify methods that optimize use of available resources to perform procedural
assessment on trainees.
4. D
evelop a plan to implement an assessment of procedural skills
in a variety of scenarios
Laura Hopson MD – submitter, presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Suzanne Dooley-Hash MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Doug Ander MD - presenter
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Ernest Wang MD - presenter
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
How to Become a Trailblazer: Perspectives of Resident Innovators
DS023 – Peachtree A & B
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 3:00 - 4:20 pm
This novel session will be a moderated panel discussion including junior and senior
faculty. Nominations for the panelists were solicited from program directors
via the CDEM listserve. After reviewing the nominations and descriptions, the
SAEM Resident & Student Advisory Committee voted for top candidates. Three
speakers were selected to describe a change they implemented at their program
– why it was needed, steps they took toward their goal, barriers they faced, and
outcomes. The panelists include Dr. Karen Lind, Maimonides Medical Center,
Dr. Shereaf Walid, Detroit Receiving Hospital, and Dr. Jon Heidt, Washington
University. Each panelist will be allotted 15 minutes to discuss their innovation or
leadership experience as a resident. Dr. Lind will discuss creating and pioneering
the education fellowship at her institution, Dr. Walid will discuss his transformation
of his program’s didactics, and Dr. Heidt will discuss his work on a national level as
a resident advocate in curricular reform. The senior faculty, Dr. Carey Chisholm,
Indiana University, serving as the expert on leading from within was selected
by the Committee co-chairs due to his tenure as the longest-serving program
director in EM and his commitment to innovation. He will be allotted 10 minutes in
closing remarks on what makes a resident successful in implementing change. In
the remaining 20 minutes participants will break into 3 groups led by each panelist
to discuss steps residents can take to create change in the panelists areas’ of
expertise: curricular reform, post-residency education and national committee
involvement. Dr. Marie Vrablik will serve as the session moderator.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to
describe a framework for promoting change and leading initiatives within a
residency program or department. Participants should also have the opportunity
to establish a network or identify a mentor for promoting specific changes to their
respective programs related to the panelists’ experiences.
Marie Vrablik MD – submitter, presenter
Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
Carey Chisholm MD - presenter
Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
Jonathan Heidt MD - presenter
Washington University, Saint Louis, MO
Karen Lind MD - presenter
Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Shereaf Walid MD - presenter
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
The Business of EM: Defining Productivity
DS024 – Peachtree D
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 3:00 - 3:50 pm
As EM physicians we are expected to perform a myriad of duties---the sum of
which is meant to define us within the context of an EM department. Academic
chairs are subsequently faced with the seemingly difficult burden to somehow
determine how much someone is worth. The days of simply saying that we teach
residents and therefore it equals 10 hours of protected time are long distant
memories. Academic emergency departments face the same dilemma that every
community organization faces: how to keep costs down and maximize profitability
for not just the department but for the organization at large. Every hour must be
accounted for, every academic obligation charted, and every clinical shift covered.
Justifying a new full time employee or someone’s protected time requires combing
through complicated formulas. Formulas which are meant to explain productivity.
From a clinical standpoint, our productivity is measured in RVUs; each of which is
generated from our procedures, our documentation, our level of billing and coding.
Ascribing a Relative Value Unit to resident education, clerkship directorships,
committee involvement, EMS oversight, and research (to name but a few of the
roles we play) is a much trickier and more complicated recipe. A panel of academic
administrators, chairs, and business leaders in EM will analyze and discuss how
productivity is defined; how to potentially maximize one’s productivity; and what
the potential impact of a tightening health care system will have on academic
dollars. A short question and answer period will follow at the end of the panel
presentation to allow for audience participation.
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Define productivity in terms of clinical and academic output.
2. Identify the budget challenges academic departments face in the present and
the future
3. Promote how physicians can work collaboratively with administration to
create a set of goals to ensure that both the academic and clinical mission of a
department are met.
Michael Hochberg MD – submitter, presenter
Saint Peter’s University Hospital/Drexel, New Brunswick
Brent King MD - presenter
University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX
Richard Zane MD - Presenter
University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
Kirsten Rounds RN, MS - Presenter
Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
39
An Introduction to Qualitative Methods
in Emergency Medicine Research
DS025 – Peachtree E
Session Time: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 3:00 - 3:50 pm
Qualitative research seeks to develop concepts to better understand complex
social phenomena in natural settings. Qualitative study designs commonly use
in-depth interviews, focus groups, and field observation. Qualitative methods are
particularly relevant in emergency medicine, where research questions often have
little existing research background and outcomes are difficult to measure. These
techniques are being used increasingly in emergency medical research, however,
they are frequently misunderstood and few emergency physicians have formal
training in this area. This introductory session will enhance participants’ capacity
to design and conduct scientifically sound qualitative research. The faculty are
emergency physician researchers with experience in qualitative methods and
will use their projects to highlight concepts. Dr. Landman will discuss when to use
qualitative methods and will describe how he used in-depth interviews to study
emergency medical services agencies implementation of electronic patient care
reports. Dr. Rhodes will provide an overview of qualitative methods focusing
on core principles and practices, including selecting a study design. Dr. Rhodes
will discuss how she used audiotaped ED visits to understand doctor-patient
communication and focus groups and semi-structured interviews to identify
asthma patients’ preferences for ED or primary care. Dr. Schuur will describe how
to plan a qualitative research study, find mentors and collaborators, and resources
required. Dr. Schuur will discuss how he used interviews and focus groups to
identify successful infection prevention strategies in EDs. A question and answer
session will follow.
Objectives: At the end of this session participants should be able to:
1. Define and describe qualitative research methods;
2. Select appropriate qualitative methods for emergency medicine research
questions;
3. D
escribe example emergency medicine qualitative research studies.
Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS – submitter, presenter
Brigham & Women’s, Boston, MA
Karin Rhodes MD, MS - presenter
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Adam Landman MD, MS, MIS - presenter
Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
thursday, MAY 16th
LGBT Health: Educating EM Physicians to
Provide Equitable and Quality Care
DS026 – International B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
In March 2011, the Institute of Medicine published a landmark report, The Health
of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for
Better Understanding. The report concluded that to advance understanding
of the health needs of all LGBT individuals, researchers need more data about
the demographics of these populations, improved methods for collecting and
analyzing data, and an increased participation of sexual and gender minorities
in research. The Joint Commission and the Department of Health and Human
Services have both followed suit with plans for addressing the health needs of
LGBT individuals, citing a need for education of health care providers. Recently,
JAMA reported that medical schools, on average, have less than 5 hours of LGBTspecific content. The literature shows that 40% of LGBT patients cite lack of
provider education as a barrier to care; 10% report being refused care outright;
and 27% fear being treated poorly by providers. The SAEM position statement on
diversity highlights the imperative that all physicians be trained to treat patients
from all cultural backgrounds. As LGBT health takes a national spotlight, it is
essential that our specialty responds with the appropriate educational tools to
train the next generation of physicians to care for sexual minorities. The proposed
panel discussion will address key areas related to LGBT health and the status of
LGBT healthcare education.
Objectives: At the end of this session participants should be able to
1. List LGBT terminology and definitions
2. Describe the role of EM physicians in providing a better health care experience
for LGBT patients.
3. Describe LGBT health care disparities and the complex variables, including
current laws that affect LGBT health
4. Summarize the results of a survey of EM programs regarding their current LGBT
Health curricula and their educational gaps. Describe Public Health implications
for LGBT Health
40
Paul Krieger MD – submitter, presenter
Beth Israel Medical Center/Albert Einstein, New York, NY
Joel Moll MD - presenter
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Thea James MD - presenter
Boston Medical Center/BU School of Medicine, Boston, MA
Ellen Slaven MD - presenter
LSU Health Science Center, New Orleans, LA
Ted Corbin MD - presenter
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
Future Directions in Electrocardiography in
Acute Coronary Syndromes
DS027 – International C
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
The electrocardiogram is the initial test in patients with suspected ACS and the
defining element of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Its most
important use is in the detection of acute coronary obstruction and it is the most
important, cost-effective, and immediately available initial test in the decision for
emergency reperfusion therapy. However, its full potential is not being realized.
In more than 25% of Non-STEMIs, the infarct-related artery (IRA) is occluded,
and in these patients, biomarker levels and mortality are high. However, there is
little in-depth ECG analysis helpful in identifying this group. Thus, there is a high
false negative cath lab activation rate, and future research should be aimed at
improving the sensitivity and specificity of the EKG for acute coronary occlusion.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. To describe the State of the Art in the use of ECG in acute coronary occlusion,
2. Describe opportunities for research pathways in the future.
Stephen Smith MD – submitter, presenter
Hennepin County Medical Center, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, MN
Choosing a High-Impact Resident or Student Quality
Improvement Project and Getting it Published
DS028 – Plaza Ballroom A
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
Emergency Medicine Residency competencies and milestones require a
substantive experience in quality improvement (QI). For example, the recently
released RRC-EM and ABEM Milestones consider participation in institutional
process improvement and the use of analytical tools to assess quality and
safety central to resident development. One key part of this is participation in
a QI project. A well-designed QI project gives a resident hands-on experience
in systems-based practice and excellent preparation for employment in our
rapidly changing healthcare environment. Yet in a resident’s busy schedule it can
be difficult to identify, develop and complete a QI project that has a meaningful
impact on the ED and can be presented in a manner that supports academic
development. This session will enhance participants’ capacity to identify, design
and conduct impactful QI projects and promote their work through presentation
and publication. The faculty members are national experts on quality improvement
who have worked with residents and students to conduct and publish QI projects.
Dr. Kelly will review residency requirements regarding quality improvement
and present a framework for resident involvement in QI across the duration of
residency. Dr. Schuur will review methods of QI project design that are likely to
lead to valid improvements and can be presented or published. Dr. Venkatesh will
identify venues for funding, presenting and publishing resident QI projects. Using
actual projects the presenters will review appropriate topics for student and
resident QI projects. A question and answer session will follow.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Plan resident or student involvement in quality improvement across the duration
of residency
2. S
elect an appropriate topic for QI projects and a valid study design
3. Describe potential funding sources for QI projects and venues for academic
presentation and publication.
Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS – submitter, presenter
Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
John J. Kelly DO, FACEP - presenter
Department of Emergency Medicine, Albert Einstein Medical Center,
Philadelphia, PA
Arjun Venkatesh MD, MBA - presenter
Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, Yale University School of
Medicine, New Haven, CT
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Careers & Opportunities at the CDC
DS029 – Plaza Ballroom B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
Many of our members entered emergency medicine because they wanted to
help people, make a difference or be on the front lines of healthcare. A few bold
individuals step outside the ER to join the elite ranks of the Center for Disease
Control & Prevention (CDC) where they conduct epidemiologic investigations in
the field, oversee public health surveillance, and fight the global burden of disease.
The role of the CDC, the guidelines they produce, and the coordination of resources
they provide become increasingly important as healthcare shifts to a focus on
population health. In this session, members will hear from several members of
the CDC who got their start in emergency medicine followed by a fellowship in
Epidemic Intelligence Services (EIS). Panelists include David Sugerman MD MPH,
a Medical Officer in the Division of Injury Response who will talk specifically
about his work in trauma systems and disaster surveillance and response, and
Samuel Graciter MD, a medical epidemiologist with the Immunization Services
Division. Both panelists will explain how their work and that of the CDC is relevant
to the practice of emergency medicine, how it relates to hospital emergency
management, and how it is effecting and effected by evolving trends in healthcare
policy. They will also discuss their career paths and ways to get involved with the
CDC. They will give an overview of next steps for emergency physicians interested
in a career or involvement with the CDC.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Define career options that exist at the CDC within medical epidemiology,
including EIS, and disease prevention.
2. Describe recent CDC initiatives such as pandemic flu preparedness, updated
field triage guidelines, treating and containing AIDS in Africa and Asia, and
establishing guidelines for the treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury.
Kevin Munjal MD, MPH - submitter
Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York City, NY
David Sugerman MD, MPH - presenter
Center for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Samuel Graitcer MD - presenter
Center for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Disparities & Diversity in Emergency Medicine: SAEM: Where
are we now?
DS030 – International B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
It will be 10 years since publication of the Academic Emergency Medicine’s (AEM)
Consensus Conference special issue on Disparities in Emergency Health Care.
The goal of the AEM 2003 Consensus Conference was to improve the emergency
medical care of patients by critically evaluating the presence, causes, and
outcomes related to disparities in emergency health care. With the founding of
the Academy for Inclusion and Diversity in Emergency Medicine (ADIEM), we
take a historical look at where we are in EM as it relates to topics of Disparities
and Diversity in EM. In addition, SAEM’s position statement published in 2000
believes that attaining diversity in EM residencies and faculty that reflect our
multicultural society is a desirable and achievable goal. We have pioneers in EM
who have been key leaders on these topics who can reflect on SAEM’s past and
make recommendations for the future.
Objectives: At the end of this session participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the history of Diversity and Disparities work in SAEM.
2. Review EM education on health care disparities including best practices.
3. I dentify ways to recruit, retain and promote a diverse EM physician workforce.
4. Illustrate strategies to ensure growth in SAEM’s mission to develop didactic,
educational, research and other programs to assist academic emergency
medicine departments to improve diversity at their institutions.
Sheryl Heron MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Marcus Martin MD - presenter
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
Michelle Biros MS MD - presenter
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Lynne Richardson MD - presenter
Mt Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Harnessing the Emergency Medicine Perspective: Emphasizing
Key Differences between Adult and Pediatric Chief Complaints
to Enhance Resident Training in Pediatric Emergency Medicine
DS031 – International C
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
General emergency physicians (EP) face the challenges of providing high quality
care for patients of all ages. Children are cared for by general emergency physicians
in 75% of all their Emergency Department encounters. In addition, greater than
90% of their care is provided in non-pediatric emergency departments. Children
present unique clinical challenges to EP’s. Current residency training requirements
dictate that only 16% of all patient encounters be pediatric; despite the fact in a
typical Emergency Medicine practice, children may account for 25% of all visits.
Therefore, training requirements do not reflect the patient mix encountered in
practice, making it imperative to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of
resident Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) training. As a PEM educational
framework, we seek to exploit the clinical acumen and heuristics resident utilize
for adult patient care and behaviorally translate it for applicability to pediatric
patients. Its clinical applicability to pediatric scenarios is largely shaped by
the notable clinical differences in children but done through a prism of more
developed general ED skills. Potentially, this framework could serve as a template
for other PEM educational opportunities. This didactic session will explore the
idea of harnessing key differences between adult and pediatric presentations to
enhance resident PEM training. Using the adult chest pain ABdominal pain and
resuscitative practice; we hope to transpose those elements of adult care most
applicable to PEM and highlight the notable differences to improve the EP’s
pediatric care acumen. Audience participation will be solicited along with an opendiscussion following the session.
Objectives: At the completion of the course, participants should be able to:
1. List ways to maximally leverage general EM knowledge bases to enhance PEM
skill sets of residents in their PEM training and
2. Describe critical differences in pediatric and adult diagnoses with significant
morbidity and mortality.
Jeffrey Hom MD, MPH - submitter
Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY
Robert Cloutier MD, MCR – presenter
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR
The Inside Scoop: Background Information and Tips On Using
The Large National Datasets Provided by NCHS and HCUP,
Including NHAMCS and NEDS
DS032 – Plaza Ballroom A
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 9:00 - 10:20 am
The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and AHRQ’s Healthcare
Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) provide well known national data resources,
including NHAMCS and NEDS, which EM researchers commonly employ to answer
questions and generate hypotheses on a national, regional, and state level. The
goal of this session is to provide inside perspectives on NCHS and HCUP data
products which will help EM investigators conduct novel and also appropriate
and effective research using these resources. At the beginning of the session, the
moderator will provide a brief overview of the data products provided by NCHS
and HCUP. Subsequently, two senior representatives from NCHS and HCUP will
give succinct presentations (20 minutes each) describing the resources available,
the history of these resources, how each resource is collected and made available,
how emergency medicine researchers may obtain access to the resources, and
how to use the resources most appropriately. This section will be followed by
presentations (10 minutes each) from two established emergency medicine
researchers on their experiences working with NCHS and HCUP data, focusing
on what kind of questions can be asked, examples of previous work, and issues
they have encountered in working with the data. The remaining time (15 minutes)
will be devoted to a panel discussion comparing the different resources available
and addressing common issues in their use, including how to most effectively work
with the NCHS and HCUP staff in conducting analyses and accessing internal files
and security processes, as well as answering audience questions.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the national data resources available through NCHS and HCUP.
2. Formulate research questions that may be addressed through use of the NCHS
and HCUP.
3. Identify potential issues they will encounter when using these resources and
how to overcome these issues.
Lisa Schweigler MD, MPH, MS - submitter
Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
41
Brendan Carr MD, MS - presenter
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia , PA
Linda McCaig MPH - presenter
CDC, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville MD
Ryan Mutter PhD - presenter
AHRQ/HCUP, Rockville MD
Stephen Pitts MD, MPH - presenter
Emory University, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta,, GA
Emilie Powell MD, MS, MBA – presenter
Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
The War On Mrsa: Lessons for Success in Planning, Funding,
and Executing Clinical Research in Infectious Diseases
DS033 – Plaza Ballroom B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
Emergency medicine researchers start out with a general area of interest.
The challenge lies in choosing a topic that will be fundable and bear fruit over
the course of several investigations. In this session, three panelists who have
succeeded in funding and executing patient-oriented research related to MRSA
will discuss their strategies for success. The presenters will demonstrate how
critical questions of importance to wide audiences can be pursued by descriptive
methods and modest budgets, and how descriptive research paves the way for
larger-scale work and interventional trials. They will use the example of MRSA
research to demonstrate: 1) Choice of a research question, 2) Selection of the
methodological approach, 3) Getting the resources needed to accomplish the
research, with discussion of funders including the NIH, CDC, AHRQ, intramural,
and industrial sources.
Dr. Pallin will give specific examples of publications, grants, and ongoing trials
related to MRSA. These will be used to demonstrate how important contributions
can be made with various methodologies and various budgets, ranging from
descriptive case series to large-scale epidemiology, surveys, qualitative research,
and clinical trials. Dr. Talan will describe n multicenter research from EMERGEncy
ID Net, a national network of emergency departments that is funded by the CDC,
EMERGEncy ID Net approach to CA-MRSA research. Dr. Schuur will demonstrate
how MRSA and other hospital-acquired infections can be a focus of healthcare
quality research, the importance of knowledge translation and mixed-methods
research in quality research, and discuss AHRQ as a funder of emergency medicine
research. There will be time for questions and open discussion.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Incorporate a Change in viewpoint of research from project-based to topicbased, accommodating career growth and multiple investigations.
2. Apply a general research interest to specific questions.
3. Describe patient-oriented research designs, from descriptive series to clinical
trials.
4. List greater than 4 avenues for financial support of clinical research
Daniel Pallin MD, MPH - submitter
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Jeremiah Schuur MD, MS - presenter
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
David Talan MD - presenter
Olive View - UCLA, LA, CA
Navigating the AMA Discharge: Case Studies
DS034 – International B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 10 - 11:20 am
This case-based interactive panel session will present actual cases of AMA
discharges followed by discussion and expert commentary from the panelists.
The discussion will clarify the most commonly encountered problematic aspects
of the AMA discharge and specifically address ethical and legal considerations
confronted by emergency physicians in practice. Specific topics to be covered
include: 1) What ethical and legal obligations does the emergency physician have
for these patients after an AMA discharge? 2) What are the nuts and bolts of the
AMA process? 3) What are the benefits and drawbacks to the commonly used
AMA forms? Does the signing of AMA forms lead to more or less risk and should
they be used? 4) When is a psychiatric evaluation of capacity required? 5) Does the
AMA discharge effectively relieve the EP from liability? 6) Are there populations
that are unsuitable for AMA discharge? 7) Is there evidence that AMA discharges
lead to preventable morbidity and mortality?
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Recognize the unique challenges inherent in the AMA discharge.
2. Describe best practices for navigating ethically and legally sound care to this
population and for teaching this topic to residents and junior faculty.
3. List ethical and legal pearls and pitfalls in the AMA process.
42
4. E
xplain when a capacity evaluation is an appropriate requisite
for an AMA discharge.
5. Summarize the limits of legal protection provided by AMA discharges.
Mark Clark MD –submitter, presenter
St. Luke’s Roosevelt, Columbia University, New York City, NY
James Adams MD - presenter
Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
The Great Pediatric Sedation Debate!
DS035 – International C
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 10 - 11:20 am
Want to learn more about the current evidence and variation in practice patterns
for pediatric procedural sedation across the country? Perplexed by the medication,
monitoring and resource utilization required for pediatric sedations? Few areas
of medical practice remain as non-standardized as pediatric sedation. During
this interactive session, 3 pediatric emergency medicine specialists with clinical
and research experience in procedural sedation will debate the management of 4
pediatric scenarios; including the use of alternatives to standard IV therapy and
discussion of innovative and state-of the-art approaches. This fast-paced session
will begin by utilizing an audience response system to determine the audience’s
approach to the scenario. The experts will then be given 3-5 minutes each to argue
the evidence supporting their sedation plan for this challenging case scenario. This
will be followed by a group discussion of the pros and cons of management choices
and the limitations of the current literature. At the conclusion of each scenario, an
audience response system will be used to tabulate whether the debate changed
the audience’s sedation plan. The audience is encouraged to bring their own
challenging pediatric scenario for panel discussion during the final 30 minutes of
the session. This session will critically evaluate the current literature, optimize
pediatric care and encourage an open exchange of ideas and practice styles that
will generate future research.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Utilize the latest published evidence and guidelines for pediatric sedation to
make management decisions about challenging pediatric scenarios.
2. Discuss the current national variation in practice for sedation and treatment
of pain for children. 3. Identify limitations in the current pediatric sedation
literature that may result in future study.
Amy Drendel DO, MS – submitter, presenter
Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
Frank Petruzella MD - presenter
Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, Richmond, VA
Patrick Solari MD - presenter
Seattle Children’s Hospital/ University of Washing, Seatttle, WA
Rakesh Mistry MD, MS - presenter
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Robert Kennedy MD - presenter
Washington University in St. Louis
School of Medicine St. Louis Children’s Hospital, St. Louis, MO
Minimizing the Pain of Maximizing Pain Relief: Strategies For
Emergency Physicians To Treat Pain Safely
DS036 – Plaza Ballroom B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 10 - 11:20 am
Opioid analgesics are important therapeutics in patient care but are burdened
by misuse and an ongoing public health crisis. Emergency physicians, as major
prescribers of these potent analgesics, are wise to perform risk assessment
prior to prescribing opioid medications to attempt to detect patients at risk for
aberrant drug related behaviors. However, most existing screening tools have not
yet been validated in emergency department settings and may indeed be limited.
We will present the data underlying the need for cautious prescribing, describe
strategies to identify and mitigate aberrant use, present effective responses
to complex patient demands, and review effective alternatives to opioid-based
analgesia. The moderator will frame the problem of ED pain management in the
context of patient centered goals and the epidemic of opioid analgesic overdose.
The development of tolerance and dependence and its impact on aberrant opioid
using behavior, pitfalls in screening tools in the ED, and research needs at the
intersection of pain management and addiction will be discussed. Methods will
be demonstrated to adapt conversations about non-opioid pain management to
conform to patient expectations, particularly those with chronic pain. The utility
and limitations of state-based prescription drug monitoring programs will be
described.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the scope of prescription opioid misuse and the need for increased
scrutiny in ED opioid prescribing.
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
2. Convey pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies to limit opioid
prescribing while maintaining patient centered care and satisfaction.
3. Summarize the current evidence supporting the use of PDMPs to identify
patients at risk for aberrant drug use and areas for future collaborative
research.
Lewis Nelson MD – submitter, presenter
New York University, New York, NY
Jeanmarie Perrone MD - presenter
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Edward Boyer MD, PhD –presenter
University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA
Robert Hendrickson MD - presenter
Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR
Can we Trust Clinical Practice Guidelines?
DS037 – Plaza Ballroom A
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 10:30 - 11:50 am
Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) play a key role in support of the decision-dense
and algorithmic nature of EM practice. Furthermore the broad nature of EM
demands evidence based guidance and decision support sanctioned by respected
organizations adopting sound and unbiased methods. CPGs can standardize
practice and suggest quality measures that monitor their impact; they can also
mitigate medico-legal risk if followed. Unfortunately, they are also resource
intense to develop, frequently inactionable, often out of date and supported by a
weak evidence base leading to a paucity of strong recommendations. As a result,
they are frequently perceived as watered-down and directionless and thus viewed
skeptically by some target end-users. The International Liaison Committee on
Resuscitation (ILCOR) and the American College of Emergency Physicians are
the developers and guardians of the highest impact CPGs in EM. This session will
highlight developments in CPG methodology that are being adopted by these
organizations which are designed to address many of these limitations. Particular
emphasis will be placed on how ACEP is attempting to meet the standards laid out in
the recent Institute of Medicine report entitled Clinical Practice Guidelines we can
Trust as well as ILCOR’s transition to the GRADE approach to CPG development.
The session will also highlight other pertinent developments in guideline science
designed to facilitate the critical appraisal, adaptation and implementation
of CPGs at the local level as well as opportunities for EM academics to become
involved in important national and international initiatives.
Objectives: At the completion of this session participants should be able to:
1. Explain the rationale and methodology underlying changes in guideline
development by ILCOR and ACEP.
2. Summarize the international efforts to improve guideline development and
implementation through rigorously developed instruments that address
grading the quality of recommendations and the strength of recommendations
3.Describe the tools for guideline appraisal, adaptation and implementation.
Eddy Lang AB - submitter
University of Calgary, Calgary AB
Michael Brown MD, MSc - presenter
University of Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI
Francis Fesmire MD - presenter
University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN
Clifton Callaway MD, PhD - presenter
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Challenging the Physician-Patient Relationship: Negotiating
Deception, Manipulation, and Medical Mistakes
DS038 – International B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 11:30 - 12:50 pm
The course will be based on the recently approved Ethics Curriculum produced
by the SAEM Ethics Committee, and approved by the SAEM Board of Directors.
It will serve as an introduction of the curriculum as a resource in addressing
ethical dilemmas and circumstances all emergency providers face in the practice
of emergency medicine. The complete curriculum is comprehensive, and as an
introduction, this course will focus only on the first module: The Physician Patient
Relationship. Specifically content will address concerns with competence,
beneficence, and compassion; confidentiality and privacy; and skillful
communication and truthfulness. After a general introduction to the curriculum
resources, participants will break into moderated small groups for a case based
discussion of ethical dilemmas. Groups will then reconvene and discuss in large
group format demonstrating use of the principles and resources of the newly
developed ethics curriculum.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the relationship between physician competency and professional ethics.
2. Describe challenges to maintaining compassion and beneficence in emergency
medicine.
3. Explain the roles of confidentiality and privacy in the emergency department
management of patients.
4. List the potential barriers to maintaining privacy in the emergency department.
5. Discuss the ethical handling of medical errors and the arguments for and against
full disclosure of errors in the emergency department.
Joel Moll MD - submitter
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Jean Abbott MD, MPH - presenter
University of Colorado, Denver, CA
Tammie Quest MD - presenter
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Mark Clark MD – presenter
St. Luke’s Roosevelt, Columbia University, New York City, NY
We All Make Mistakes. But What Do You Do Afterwards?
DS039 – International C
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 11:30 - 12:50 pm
You’re working a busy shift in the ED. Your next patient is an 82 year-old man who
tripped while getting out of bed last night; he has a 3.5 cm laceration to the left
eyebrow. There is some swelling around his eye but you don’t find anything else.
You suture the laceration and send him home. Five days later, he returns for suture
removal and is blind in the left eye. The ophthalmology consultant diagnoses
rupture of a previous corneal graft and endophthalmitis. The patient requires
enucleation of his left eye. In retrospect, you realize that the nurses forgot to
check a visual acuity (despite a policy in place about checking it on patients with
facial trauma). Also, the default H&P wording you accepted in the EMR failed to
document the extent of your physical exam and led to some incorrect statements.
Now what? The emergency department is a high-risk environment for adverse
outcomes – some inevitable and some due to medical errors. This interactive
panel discussion will provide tools for what to do in the face of such outcomes,
whether you are the provider involved, a faculty member responsible for safety
and quality improvement, or a faculty member who wants to model an appropriate
response for residents. Panelists will use this actual case to illustrate three key
action steps: (1) full disclosure of any errors to the patient and family, along with
an offer to help mitigate the medical, social and economic impacts of the event;
(2) support for the second victim, the medical staff involved in the error; and (3)
a diligent analysis, looking for the system-level factors that contributed to the
outcome and changing the system in ways that will reduce the likelihood of similar
events in the future.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the pitfalls of the traditional response to crisis – a slow, stonewalling,
defensive approach that risks antagonizing patient and family, blaming the
provider, and missing opportunities for systems-level improvement
2.Work with colleagues to develop a response plan for adverse outcomes in their EDs
Robert Wears MD, MS, PhD - submitter
University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL
Kathleen Lanava MD - presenter
University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI
Albert Wu MD, MPH - presenter
Johns Hopkins, Baltimore MD
Terry Fairbanks MD, MS - presenter
Medstar, Washington, DC
Building Blocks for Establishing Hospital-based Violence
Intervention Programs in (Your) Emergency Departments
DS040 – Plaza Ballroom B
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 11:30 - 12:50 pm
Each year, over 1.5 million victims are treated in hospitals nationwide for nonfatal
gunshot, stabbing, and other physical-assault injuries. A national study found 44%
of those under age 24 and hospitalized for violent injuries were later readmitted
due to violence and 22% became victims of homicide. Violence is the leading
cause of death for young African American males aged 15-34, and the 2nd leading
cause of death for young Latino males (but only 5th among white males age 1534). Disadvantaged & minority youth are not only at higher risk of violent injury,
but also at higher risk of long-term mental and physical morbidity. In 1998, the
U.S. Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime (VOC) responded to an
American Academy of Pediatrics’ report on youth violence and recommended that
hospital-based counseling and prevention programs be established in medical
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
43
facilities that provide services to gang violence victims. Today, the National
Network of Hospital-based Violence Intervention Programs (NNHVIP) connects
17 member programs from Boston, Chicago, Oakland and other cities across the
country through: (1) a comprehensive service model for violently-injured youth,
beginning in the ED; and (2) education of emergency physicians and staff on the
VIP model. However, there is a need for the VIP model to disseminate across the
country. During this special session; a panel of NNHVIP members will discuss
the challenges and details of successful models that address violence in our
communities. During this didactic, attendees will learn why and how to apply the
VIP model in their own ED. The discussion will close with next steps for research,
education, and dissemination of this model.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. List steps to introducing ED hospital based violence intervention programs to
medical centers and create a plan to develop one at their own ED
2. Describe Trauma Informed Care
3. Create a standardized data base to capture quantitative and qualitative data for
evaluating programmatic efficacy and quality.
4. Conduct research for program evaluation
5. Discuss how cross-site evaluations can be performed.
Thea James MD – submitter, presenter
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
Theodore Corbin MD - presenter
Drexel University College of Medicine, PA
Rochelle Dicker MD - presenter
University of California School of Medicine San Fr, San Francisco, CA
Optimizing Electronic Health Records in an
Academic Emergency Department:
The Administrative and Informatics Perspective
DS041 – Plaza Ballroom A
Session Time: Thursday, May 16, 2013 12:00 - 12:50 pm
Whether an academic emergency department (ED) is still on paper or has an EDonly electronic health record (EHR), sooner or later, we will all be using an electronic
health record system. As most academic emergency departments have already
made the transition to EHRs, the focus now is on how to use these tools to improve
care delivery. Given the content expertise of the moderator and panelists, all who
have led their respective academic EDs through this optimization, we will discuss
lessons learned on how best to harness the power available in EHRs. Next, we will
discuss the administrative steps needed to maximize the potential of the system
to support ED operations (including how one factors in the additional complexity
of residents and other healthcare learners). Lastly, we will explore steps that can
be proactively taken to assure that good data is available, both to monitor the dayto-day operations, but also for research and educational purposes.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the current environment of ED-only vs. hospital-wide EHRs and the
pros and cons of each type.
2. D
escribe the steps needed for successful EHR optimization, and use EHRs to
optimize how an academic ED runs.
3. U
se an EHR to provide meaningful data, both in real-time and for longitudinal
analysis.
4. D
escribe the roles faculty and residents must play in the optimization of EHRs.
Daniel Handel MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
OHSU, Portland, OR
Kevin Baumlin MD - presenter
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Nicholas Genes MD, PhD - presenter
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Mark Moseley MD, MHA - presenter
Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
friday, MAY 17th
Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Exposure:
How Much is Too Much?
DS042 – International B
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
The United States health care system has seen a dramatic rise in the use of
computed tomography (CT) during the past several decades. Emergency
departments are responsible for a large percentage of the CTs performed. In
many instances, CT scans are the optimal diagnostic modality in the ED, however,
at times CT is unnecessary and there can be significant drawbacks. Specifically,
CT scans are an important source of harmful radiation, lead to increased resource
44
utilization and length of stay, and may unnecessarily increase health care
costs. Recently, the cancer risk associated with diagnostic radiation has been
rigorously studied and publicized in the media. Consequently, physicians should be
knowledgeable of the true risks associated with CT, and the up-to-date strategies
involved in minimizing the unnecessary use of this modality as well as techniques
available to minimize radiation dosing. This didactic will review the current
knowledge regarding diagnostic imaging and radiation, critically discuss how to
incorporate this knowledge into emergency medicine practice, and discuss stateof-the-art research examining methods to decrease the unnecessary use of CT.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Understand the radiation dosing associated with various computed tomography
(CT) scans and the implications for different patient populations\
2. Recognize strategies to minimize unnecessary use of CT imaging including the
use of electronic clinical decision support and alternative imaging modalities.
3. Describe strategies to minimize radiation dosing that can be discussed with
your home institution’s radiology department.
Jennifer Marin MD, MSc - submitter
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
Angela Mills MD - presenter
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
Kimberly Applegate MD, MS - presenter
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
Preventing Opioid Analgesic Overdose Among ED Patients
DS043 – International C
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
Many ED patients have legitimate needs for opioid analgesics for pain control, yet
mortality among inpatients from therapeutic opioid analgesic administration is
increasing. For two reasons, emergency department patients are at heightened
risk for adverse effects from opioid analgesic administration. First, unlike
anesthesiologists who can provide analgesia before a painful stimulus is
generated, emergency physicians are required to control pain that already
exists. Emergency physicians, therefore, frequently administer elevated doses
of analgesics relative to colleagues. Second, emergency physicians cannot
know the timing, dose, and potency of opioid analgesics that a patient might
take before or after an ED encounter. This didactic session will use real-world
examples to highlight methods for avoiding in-ED opioid toxicity. The moderator,
Kavita Babu MD, will frame the problem of management of pain in the ED in the
context of patient satisfaction and the epidemic of opioid analgesic overdose.
(10 minutes). The presentation will rely upon a series of concrete examples of ED
opioid over- and misprescribing that have led to patient morbidity and mortality.
Dr. Boyer will then 1) review the literature and analyzes each case from a toxicologic
perspective; 2) describe methods that avoid preventable morbidity and mortality;
and 3) discuss next steps for patient safety and overdose prevention research.
Anticipated cases include: co-administration of opioids and benzodiazepines;
administration of opioids to obese patients; dispensing fentanyl patches from
the ED; and administration of a single opioid dose (e.g., one for the road) prior to
discharge (40 minutes).
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe dangerous opioid prescribing practices;
2. Effectively utilize techniques to safely and effectively treat pain, while providing
adequate analgesia;
3. D
escribe important next steps for ED-based analgesia research.
Edward Boyer MD, PhD – submitter, presenter
UMass-Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA
Kavita Babu MD - presenter
UMass-Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA
Informed Consent in Emergency Research: Pitfalls and Practical
Pearls.
DS044 – International D
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 8:00 - 9:20 am
Emergency clinical research, through design or execution, ideally should involve
situations or populations that may be challenging to include. In particular, consent
of subjects considered vulnerable based on their condition or situation may be
especially challenging. This panel session will discuss the recruitment and consent
of difficult populations including those from institutional settings, those with
cognitive impairment, and those facing life-threatening conditions. The speakers
will discuss frequently encountered barriers to consent and recruitment and
practical methods of overcoming these obstacles in multiple settings.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss challenges to recruitment and consent for institutionalized populations
and learn strategies to overcome these challenges.
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
2. List practical ways to overcome obstacles specific to performing ED research in
cognitively impaired elders, particularly obtaining consent.
3. Describe criteria for seeking an exception from informed consent for emergency
research on life-threatening conditions and responsibilities of investigators
who conduct such studies.
Ula Hwang MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Adit Ginde MD, MPH - presenter
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO
Jin Han MD, MSc - presenter
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Lynne Richardson MD - presenter
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Educational Portfolio: Your Secret Weapon for Promotion
DS045 – International E-F
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
Promotion within an institution can be challenging for someone with an
educational focus. Emergency medicine educators have varied responsibilities
and skill sets, some of which are difficult to highlight in a traditional curriculum
vitae format. An educational portfolio is a document, set of documents, website,
or other format which brings to attention and into one place all of the efforts put
forth by an educator. A properly completed portfolio can be quite powerful in
displaying your accomplishments to a P&T committee. This session will start by
briefly covering the creation and contents of an educational portfolio. This will
be followed by a panel discussion comprised of academic emergency physicians
who have experience with promotion and tenure decisions. These accomplished
academicians will provide examples of how educational portfolios can be used
to support promotion and will discuss features of portfolios which add to their
impact.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the basic concept and philosophy of an educational portfolio
2. List the components of an educational portfolio
3. Describe how to use the educational portfolio to support promotion and tenure
decisions
Corey Heitz MD - submitter
Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke, VA
Gloria Kuhn DO, PhD - presenter
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Douglas Ander MD - presenter
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Mapping the Path for Current and Future Research for Safe,
Effective, and Appropriate Trauma Imaging
DS046 – International B
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
During the past decade there has been a trend toward earlier identification of all
injuries in the initial assessment of a trauma patient. With increased availability,
speed and accuracy of CT imaging, a dramatic increase in the use of CT imaging has
occurred in the trauma setting. Much of this has occurred without an evidence base
in the literature. As health care costs continue to rise and public concerns about
radiation exposure escalate, emergency physicians will play an essential role in
defining the future of trauma imaging research. This didactic session will explore
the current state of research on the topics of chest and abdominal imaging for
patients with trauma. A panel of experts in various disciplines within emergency
medicine (trauma practice, research, quality measures) are brought together to:
(1) discuss the basis of the current state of trauma imaging (e.g. does pan scanning
improve mortality?), (2) debate the philosophical importance of identifying every
injury versus only the clinically important ones (does a clinical decision rule need
to be 100% sensitive for all abnormal findings?), and (3) develop a roadmap for
future research goals (what is the ideal study design to develop a trauma imaging
clinical decision rule?). Dr. Steill will discuss what the research methodology
needed to determine ideal imaging strategies for patients with trauma. Dr.
Legome will discuss the present research obstacles that exist at trauma centers
in the US. Dr. Raja will describe the current state of trauma imaging and imaging
quality measures at Level I Trauma Centers. Our short-term goal is to develop a
white paper from this didactic that will define the emergency medicine research
agenda for trauma imaging, with the eventual goal of developing the topic into a
Consensus Conference.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the current state of the art regarding trauma imaging strategies
2. Discuss how a list of relevant clinical findings will drive future efforts to improve
imaging strategies can best be defined
3. Define an emergency medicine-based trauma imaging research roadmap and
the next steps needed to make progress
Kaushal Shah MD - submitter
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Michael Gibbs MD - presenter
Carolinas Medical Center, Charolette, NC
Ian Stiell MD - presenter
Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, CA
Eric Legome MD - presenter
Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Ali Raja MD, MPH, MBA- presenter
Brigham & Womens Hospital, Boston, MA
Identifying the Value of Emergency Care in the
Climate of Health Reform
DS047 – International C
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 9:00 - 10:20 am
‘Value’ has become a buzzword in health policy circles. Yet the value of emergency
care remains poorly understood. This process is vital as health policy increasingly
focuses on accountability for costs and quality measures reflected in the move
toward Accountable Care Organizations, pay-for-performance, and bundled
payments. The ED is frequently stereotyped as being a wasteful cost center by
government and other payers who remain skeptical regarding the value of care
delivered in this setting, but emergency care must be assessed in the proper
context to understand its value. The reality is that EDs continue to see significant
patient demand for their services. Additional considerations include the societal
services the ED provides such as a universal safety net, disaster preparedness,
and public health surveillance that are important considerations when calculating
the value of emergency care. Emergency providers also sit at the cross roads of
the outpatient and inpatient arenas of the US health care system and control one
of the most routine expensive decisions in health care—the decision to admit or
discharge. Therefore, determining a value framework to measure emergency care
is critical due to the common and often costly decisions made in the ED setting.
Questions to be asked of the panel include: How would you define value in health
care? How is the value of emergency care best assessed by this definition? What
are 3 areas most ripe for measuring value in the practice of emergency medicine?
What are the top challenges to emergency providers in delivering value-based
health care? How will a focus on value under the current climate of health reform
most impact the everyday practice of emergency providers?
Objectives: At the completion of the session, participants should be able to
understand issues in defining and measuring value in emergency care, specifically:
1. Describe how value is defined in health care;
2. Conceptualize how value should be measured in emergency care;
3. Explore the implications of value-based health reform on the practice of
emergency medicine.
Keith Kocher MD, MPH, MPhil - submitter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Arthur Kellermann MD, MPH - presenter
RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA
Brent Asplin MD, MPH - presenter
Fairview Medical Group, Minneapolis, MN
Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS - presenter
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Adam Sharp MD, MS, BA - presenter
University of Michigan/RWJ Clinical Scholars, Ann Arbor, MI
Good to Great: Effective Feedback to Learners with Difficulties
DS048 – International E-F
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
Rationale: This workshop builds upon previous workshops to look at the advanced
skill of providing feedback to learners with difficulty. While educators view
providing feedback as a crucial step towards improving learner performance,
less is understood about how to provide effective feedback to problem residents
and students. We will draw upon seminal articles in the feedback literature to
both enable the participant to understand the psychological impact of feedback
from the receiver’s perspective, and empower participants to employ practical
strategies to successfully engage the learner in accepting feedback. Course
description: This session will utilize a combination of short didactic presentations
exploring the science of feedback, video stimuli for facilitated discussion and
deliberate practice (using residents trained to be learners with difficulty) to enable
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
45
participants to understand the challenges and develop effective practice. The
workshop will utilize large and small group exercises to understand key concepts
and develop ways to improve each participant’s feedback skills. Additional
facilitators include: Ester Choo MD MPH, Robin Hemphill MD MPH, Josh Kornegay
MD, John Martel MD, PhD
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Develop a plan to incorporate evidence from the feedback literature into their
clinical teaching practice
2. Outline steps required to provide effective feedback given the new conceptual
framework
3. Apply principles of feedback specific to the problem resident
Sorabh Khandelwal MD – submitter, presenter
The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Marcia Perry MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Sally Santen MD, PhD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Lalena Yarris MD, MCR - presenter
Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), Portland, OR
Models of Subspecialty Geriatric Emergency Departments
DS049 – International D
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 9:30 - 9:50 am
Geriatric patients are considered vulnerable and have the potential to raise
complex challenges in emergency treatment. Recognition of this specific patient
population and their potential for unique emergent presentations has prompted
the development of specialty sections within larger emergency departments or
separate subspecialty emergency departments altogether. Elder patients can
often present with distinctive and sometimes complex medical conditions, stay
longer for more extensive diagnostic testing and treatment regimens, and require
special needs during their visit all of which may make rapid triage, diagnosis and
disposition difficult in the traditional emergency department setting. In response
to healthcare reform legislation, hospitals are identifying the emergency
department as a priority among future facility development plans including
upgrading infrastructure and technology to better serve the patient population.
As a result, many facilities are moving ahead with new construction to expand and/
or renovate existing emergency departments. In this lecture, we will address ways
to integrate changes to existing or future emergency departments specific to
geriatric patients. Issues addressed will include physical space, quality initiatives,
operational enhancements (observation protocols), staff and resident education
and overall coordination of hospital resources.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the clinical reasoning behind the establishment of geriatric emergency
departments.
2. Describe the infrastructure and personnel needed to establish a geriatric
emergency department (or section within larger department).
3. L
ist potential changes within your own emergency department for optimal care
of the geriatric patient.
Kathleen Walsh DO, MS – submitter, presenter
University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI
Mark Rosenberg MD - presenter
St. Joseph’s Healthcare System, Paterson, NJ
Knox H. Todd MD - presenter
Anderson Cancer Center, TX
Where is the Evidence III: Common Pediatric Infections in
Emergency Medicine
DS050 – International D
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 10:00 - 10:50 am
Pediatric emergency visits are for suspected infectious diseases and very
common; fortunately, most are benign in their pathogenesis and self-limited,
such as common on upper respiratory infections. However, the presentation of
infections such as pneumonia and urinary tract infections are often diagnostically
challenging for many ED physicians. Meanwhile, infections of the skin and soft
tissues pose an increased burden in the ED setting, and lack of consensus in
management is the rule rather than the exception. Overall, dilemmas remain for
each of these aforementioned infections, with respect to clinical evaluation,
approach to diagnostic testing, and choice of most appropriate antimicrobial
therapy. Accumulated evidence, including more recent trials, have advanced our
knowledge of pediatric infectious diseases, and have permitted evidence-based
approaches to their diagnosis and treatment. In this session, the most up-todate evidence for ED management of skin and soft tissue infection, pneumonia,
and urinary tract infections in children will be presented. The presenters will
46
discuss current epidemiology and review the evidence-based approach to clinical
evaluation and diagnostic testing for each of these infections. The discussants will
also synthesize current literature with respect therapeutic decisions, and present
recommended therapies from recent guidelines released by the Infectious
Disease Society of America and the American Academy of Pediatrics. In addition,
discussion of ongoing large scale, ED-based clinical trials for these infections will
be presented. Following the presentation, audience participation will be solicited.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the epidemiology and diagnostic evaluation for skin infections,
pneumonia, and urinary tract infections in children.
2. Form evidence-based management strategies for pediatric skin infections,
pneumonia, and urinary tract infections evaluated in the ED setting.
Rakesh Mistry MD, MS –submitter, presenter
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Todd Florin MD, MSCE - presenter
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, OH
Life and A Career in Global Health: Can You Have It All?
DS051 – International E-F
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 10:00 - 10:50 am
Many Emergency Medicine (EM) faculty, residents, and medical students have
some involvement in international collaborations and service. Despite the many
attractions in having a career in Global Emergency Medicine, there are inherent
challenges. These include child rearing, short-notice deployments, hazardous
work environments, among many others. The field of academic global health is
extremely diverse; this variability enables many different career options that
may allow flexibility when considering the constraints of work-life balance. By
sharing the collective experiences of successful GEMA and AWAEM members,
we will address some of the questions and concerns that emergency physicians
may have in pursuing this career choice. In this session, four nationally recognized
senior academicians in Global Emergency Medicine will participate in a panel
discussion on the trials and tribulations of choosing a career in global health. The
four panelists span a breath of global health-related career tracks and personal
life choices, thus making the discussion diverse and broad so that many issues are
discussed. Interspersed with the discussion, the moderator will provide a brief
review of the current statistics and literature in this field.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the breadth of global health career choices.
2. Navigate their career choices depending on their personal and professional
priorities.
Bhakti Hansoti MD – submitter, presenter
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD
Stephanie Kayden MD, MPH - presenter
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Tracy Sanson MD - presenter
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Bobby Kapur MD, MPH - presenter
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
Policy Change 101: A How-to Primer for Emergency Physicians
DS052 – International C
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 10:30 - 11:50 am
With the passing of the PPACA in 2010, it is imperative for emergency physicians to
have the skills to educate policymakers about our hospitals, our patients, and our
specialty. However, few emergency physicians think of themselves as proficient
in this type of communication. We tend to focus on the immediate challenges in
the ED rather than working for change on an institutional, state, or national level.
Moreover, even those emergency physicians interested in policy often lack the
necessary knowledge base and skills to be effective. This interactive session will,
first, broadly introduce participants to the impact that effective education and
engagement of policymakers can have on our specialty and our patients. We will
then provide an overview of essential skills and communication that academic
emergency physicians must know to engage in the policy process. Finally, the
session will offer a few specific examples of academic emergency medicinerelated policy successes. 1) Importance of the policy process for academic
emergency medicine (5 minutes) 2)Discussion of critical policy skills (25 minutes,
Sara Patterson) SP will describe key areas of the policy process: policy briefing vs.
analysis, policy implementation, policy promotion, and evaluation strategies. She
will then provide a focused overview of critical education and advocacy skills for
academic emergency physicians. 3) Examples of successful advocacy (30 minutes,
Art Kellerman) AK will discuss his experiences and challenges with health policy
and advocacy on national, state, and institutional policy levels. 4) Participant
round table breakout sessions with policy experts (20 minutes, 6 facilitators).
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the importance of engaging in the policy process for the specialty of
emergency medicine
2. Describe the key aspects of the Policy Process
3. Identify the key components of educating policymakers
4. Develop an effective strategy for a research, safety, or practice-related issue
that is important to academic EM
Lauren Hudak MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Megan Ranney MD - presenter
Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
Art Kellerman MD, MPH - presenter
RAND Corporation, Santa Monica ,CA
Sara Patterson MA - presenter
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
CDC Policy Specialists- presenter
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
and results, but also provide greater context to the research by discussing its
importance within the larger realm of global health. In order to save time, articles
with similar themes will be grouped together and discussed jointly. The didactic
will be presented by the current managing editor and editor-in-chief of GEMLR,
who will also be able to provide background during the discussion on how Global
Emergency Medicine research has evolved over the past decade.
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss the most recent, high-quality Global Emergency Medicine research
being conducted around the world
2. Describe evidence-based practices as it pertains to providing emergency care
around the world
3. Outline strategies for conducting ethical and high-quality Global Emergency
Medicine research, having learned from the experience of recent investigators.
Gabrielle Jacquet MD – submitter, presenter
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD
Adam Levine MD, MPH - presenter
Brown University Alpert School of Medicine, Providence, RI
Emergency Department Evaluation and Management of
Pediatric Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
Inauguration of the NIH Office of Emergency Care Research
DS053 – International D
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
Concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a disruption in normal brain
function caused by the impact of biomechanical forces on the head or the body.
Approximately 100,000-140,000 children and adolescents present to the
emergency department for concussion each year in the United States. Immediate
recognition of concussion and prompt initiation of treatment in the form of
complete cognitive and physical rest is essential to promote recovery, and to
prevent prolonged physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms. While emergency
departments frequently serve as the initial point of entry for the care of pediatric
concussion patients, providers may not have adequate training or tools necessary
to provide standardized and evidence-based care.
For this didactic session, the presenters will discuss the diagnosis, management,
and after-care for concussion. A growing body of basic and clinical research has
provided the evidence for standardized evaluation of concussion and prompt
treatment with physical and cognitive rest. General awareness of concussion
and a growing number of state laws requiring medical clearance before return
to activity has resulted in a significant increase in concussion-related visits in a
variety of clinical settings, including the emergency department. The presenters
will provide the recent literature and recommend evidence-based best practices
that emergency physicians can readily implement into their everyday practice.
Following the formal didactic presentation, there will be allotted time for
questions and discussion.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the principles of diagnosis and management of pediatric concussion.
2. Explain the role that emergency medicine physicians can play in initiating
cognitive and physical rest, and recommending appropriate follow-up.
Mark Zonfrillo MD, MSCE – submitter, presenter
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Rachel Bengtzen MD - presenter
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR
The Top 10 Global Emergency Medicine Articles from 2012:
Highlights from the Global Emergency Medicine Literature
Review
DS054 – International E-F
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
The Global Emergency Medicine Literature Review (GEMLR) was developed in
2005 to help EM providers navigate the growing abundance of Global EM literature.
Now in its eighth year, the GEMLR highlights and disseminates high-quality Global
Emergency Medicine research for use by both academics and practitioners in
the field. Each year, the GEMLR conducts a search of the Global EM literature,
producing about 7,000 articles from the published and grey literature. Our team
of 30 reviewers and editors then screen and score the articles using established
criteria to select those that are both high-quality and directly relevant to the
field of Global EM. The top articles selected each year by the GEMLR represent
a sample of the best research from around the world related to the bourgeoning
field of Global EM. In this didactic, we will highlight the ten original research and
review articles from 2012 that we believe will have the greatest impact on the
practice of Global Emergency Medicine while also stimulating future research in
this arena. For each article, we will not only summarize and critique its methods
DS055 – International C
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 1:00 - 2:20 pm
This session will highlight the leadership of the NIH OECR, the NIH Emergency
Care Research Working Group, (which includes representatives from most
NIH institutes and centers) which oversees the OECR and the scientific and
administrative support group at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences
(NIGMS) which houses the OECR . The panel will provide input on the development,
design, priorities and function of the OECR. The NIH OECR leadership perspective
(30 minutes) will be given by Dr. Walter Koroshetz from NINDS, Acting Director of
the NIH OECR and Dr. Alice Maschette (Associate Director of NIH OECR). The NIH
Emergency Care Research Working Group perspective (15 minutes) by the Chair of
the Steering Committee member (Dr. Judith Greenberg, Acting Director of NIGMS)
and the NIGMS scientific and administrative perspective (15 minutes) by Dr. Scott
Somers (NIGMS Program Director and member of the NIH Working Group). Dr.
Charles Cairns and Dr. Roger Lewis will serve as the moderators. The moderators
will lead a panel discussion (20 minutes) on how the OCER will interact with current
NIH funding programs, prioritize research initiatives and interact with emergency
care investigators.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Identify the leadership and support structure of the NIH OECR
2. D
escribe initial research initiatives of interest to emergency medicine
investigators.
Charles Cairns MD – submitter, presenter
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Roger Lewis MD, PhD - presenter
Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA
Walter Korshetz MD, - presenter
National Institutes of Health/NINDS, Bethesda MD
Scott Somers PhD - presenter
National Institutes of Health/NIGMS, Bethesda MD
Pediatric Airway Management in the 21st Century: Muddling to
Mastery
DS056 – International D
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 1:00 - 1:50 pm
Intubation in a small child is a low-volume, high-risk procedure and even a seasoned
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Attending will feel their pulse quicken when faced
with a challenging airway scenario in a small child. Pediatric airway management
is evolving rapidly with the advent of videolaryngoscopy and alternative airway
techniques coupled with research questioning some of the long-held basic tenets
of rapid-sequence intubation. In this session, 3 Pediatric Emergency physicians
from varied backgrounds (one Emergency Medicine-residency trained, one
Pediatric-residency trained and one dual-trained in Pediatric Emergency Medicine
and Pediatric Critical Care) will dissect the current state of the art in Pediatric
Airway Management with a focus on new techniques, the teaching of trainees
using simulation and current areas of controversy including ketamine in head
trauma and the use of atropine during RSI.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of videolaryngoscopy for pediatric
airway management based on current literature.
2. Explain the controversies over the use of etomidate and ketamine for induction
in pediatric RSI.
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
47
3. Assess the utility of simulation and critical-action training with regards to
pediatric airway management.
Nathan Mick MD – submitter, presenter
Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
Joshua Nagler MD - presenter
Harvard University, Boston, MA
Aaron Donoghue MD - presenter
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Controversies in Emergency Ultrasound: The Debate Rages On
DS057 – International E-F
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 1:00 - 1:50 pm
This session will feature a debate-style format with discussants utilizing an
evidence-based approach to dispute two controversial topics in emergency
ultrasound. First, should tele-sonography be employed in the clinical arena and
in what settings? Tele-sonography is the digital storage and transmission of
ultrasound images and video for either education and training or clinical use. The
role of Emergency Physicians in developing tele-sonography programs will be
discussed as well as issues related to implementation including synchronous vs.
asynchronous data transmission, image quality, appropriate clinical applications,
remote training, and technical and non-technical barriers to program development.
Second, what is the appropriate utilization of the FAST examination in trauma
patients? Discussants will review and debate issues related to the use of FAST in
blunt/penetrating trauma patients, non-operative trauma management, cardiac
imaging as a view in the FAST, limitations of the FAST, as well as outcomes data.
Objectives: At the completion of this session participants should be able to
describe these cutting edge and controversial issues in Emergency Ultrasound:
the utilization of tele-sonography around the globe the use of FAST exam in
trauma patients.
Christopher Raio MD – submitter, presenter
North Shore U. Hospital, Manhasset, NY, NY
Andrew Liteplo MD - presenter
Massachusetts General Hospital, Brookline, MA
J. Christian Fox MD- presenter
University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Irvine, CA
Jason Nomura - presenter
Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE
Child Abuse Pediatrics Research Update
- New Innovations, New Best Practice
DS058 – International D
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 2:00 - 2:50 pm
The last five years have seen an explosion of research in child abuse pediatrics, with
important implications for the practice of emergency physicians. Investigators
continue to negotiate unique ethical and logistical issues raised by abuse while,
at the same time, new technologies have been shown to improve screening. These
new techniques both support new guidelines to improve detection, and debunk
persistent dogma. This program will discuss recent and developing tools and
techniques in child abuse research, as well as the initial results of cutting edge
abuse research for the emergency physician. Attendees will improve their ability
to conduct research in child abuse detection and treatment in the emergency
department, and will understand current and developing best practice guidelines
for clinical practice.
Objectives: At the completion of this session participants should be able to:
1. Use new research techniques and technology in the design of child abuse
research protocols
2. Describe and incorporate recent advances to improve child abuse detection into
their clinical practice.
Daniel Lindberg MD – submitter, presenter
Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Philip Scribano DO, MSCE - presenter
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Resident Education in Ultrasound: Meeting the Milestone
DS059 – International E-F
Session Time: Friday, May 17, 2013 2:00 - 2:50 pm
The Emergency Medicine Resident Review Committee of the ACGME in
conjunction with CORD ABEM, and other organizations in 2012 released the
Milestones in Emergency Medicine. Specifically PC12 addresses the education
48
of EM residents in the use and integration of point of care ultrasound. Residency
programs will be responsible for meeting the implementation and assessment
of residents with regard to the Milestones. Not all programs have ultrasound
directors to implement and assess the milestones for their residents. This
didactic session will discuss a model curriculum for resident education in point
of care ultrasound, minimum elements to meet the EM Milestones, and methods
of assessments. The discussion will provide a framework and information that
can utilized by programs with and without an ultrasound director. The discussion
will highlight consensus work done through SAEM and CORD about ultrasound
education to meet the Milestone requirements.
Objectives: At the completion of this session participants should be able to:
1. Detail and specify a model curriculum design and resident rotation for
emergency ultrasound
2. Describe minimum standards that should be accomplished at every EM
residency program.
3. Detail an updated standardized model ultrasound education curriculum for
emergency medicine residents
4. Describe competency assessment tools for the novice and advanced resident
sonographer, which complement the milestones with a focus on simulation,
blended and ultrasound-based learning.
Nova Panebianco MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Resa Lewiss MD - presenter
St. Luke’s Roosevelt, New York, NY
Saadia Akhtar MD - presenter
Beth Israel, New York City, NY
Jason Nomura MD- presenter
Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE
saturday, MAY 18th
Motivating Success: Conducting High Quality Behavioral
Interventions for Addiction in ED patients:
Lessons Learned from the SMART-ED Multisite Trial.
DS060 – International B
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are potent tools that, if used properly, assess the
efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions for a wide range of problems and
patients. Conducting a high quality RCT is challenging under ideal circumstances;
conducting RCTs in the ED presents unique and often significant methodological
barriers compared to more traditional research settings. RCTs that test the
efficacy of behavioral interventions (BI) should ensure a high quality, high fidelity
BI across subjects, interventionists and sites. These challenges are particularly
problematic in chaotic environments, such as seen in many EDs. Many ED patients
with problematic substance use might appear ‘less-than-ideal’ subjects, given
economic barriers, homelessness and a generally unstable environment. We will
identify common challenges experienced by the researcher when conducting BI
in the acute care/ED setting. We will also describe strategies to identify, recruit
and maintain research subject interest, including strategies particularly useful for
the ‘less-than-ideal’ participant. We will draw upon our recent experience with the
SMART-ED (Screening, Motivational Assessment and Referral to Treatment in
Emergency Departments) multicenter trial. This NIDA funded trial delivered a high
fidelity BI across 6 different US ED sites. The design and sample size estimates
required enrollment of 1,285 subjects with at least 85% follow-up at 3-months
post-randomization. Because the efficacy of BIs for drug use in the ED is not
known, we will describe the steps used to ensure high fidelity and consistency of
the BI. We will describe challenges faced and strategies used to enroll our target
sample with nearly 90% follow-up at 3 months.
Objectives: At the completion of this session participants should be able to:
1. Discuss strategies and factors associated with the identification of subjects
during screening who will have a high probability of completing a behavioral
intervention (BI) study.
2. Describe steps and techniques to develop, test and maintain a high fidelity
behavioral intervention for substance use in ED patients.
3. Develop a cohort maintenance strategy to track and maintain participation of
subjects in a BI trial.
Cameron Crandall MD – submitter, presenter
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Ryan McCormack MD - presenter
Bellevue Hospital, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY
Alyssa Forcehimes PhD - presenter
University of New Mexico, Department of Psychiatry, Albuquerque, NM
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
The Hidden Science in Your Emergency Medicine Research:
Gender-Specific Study Design and Analysis
DS061 – International C
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 8:00 - 9:20 am
There is now clear evidence that gender plays a key role in health and disease
at a biological level and can significantly impact patient outcomes. As a critical
emerging field, high quality gender based research and data analysis is sought
after by medical journals and by the National Institutes of Health. However, little
gender-specific research has been conducted within emergency medicine. EM
scholars can consider important gender-based questions within their current
area of research. Such inquiry potentially impacts the medical care of both sexes
and may provide researchers with additional opportunities for scholarship. This
session aims to stimulate interest in research on gender-specific medicine and
understand the challenges and solutions of performing gender-based analyses.
The session will be an 80-minute moderated panel presentation with: 1) a brief
introduction (5 minutes, Dr. Choo); 2) discussion of a general framework for
considering relevant gender-specific research questions within diverse areas
of emergency medicine research and analytic strategies for approaching the
question of the impact of gender on clinical outcomes (25 minutes, Dr. Lewis); and
3) demonstration of how EM physicians have applied these approaches, using as
examples a) research on the diagnostic testing for cardiovascular disease (20
minutes, Dr. Diercks) and b) research on female hormone therapy for traumatic
brain injury (20 minutes, Dr. Wright). The session will conclude with 10 minutes for
questions from the audience.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe basic approaches that enable the study of the impact of gender on
clinical outcomes.
2. D
etail the scientific approaches to research on diagnostic testing in cardiovascular
disease and use of female hormone therapy for traumatic brain injury
Esther Choo MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
Brown Medical School, Providence, RI
Roger Lewis MD, PhD - presenter
Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
Deborah Diercks MD - presenter
University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA
David Wright MD - presenter
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
Presentation Design: An Evidence-based Approach To Creating
Impactful, Effective Visual Aids
DS062 – International G
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 8:00 - 8:50 am
The ability to give effective presentations is a critical skill for educators. Despite
the multitude of tools available, there is very little formal teaching on the education
and design principles necessary to create effective presentations. Often, the
tools used to supplement the lecture (usually PowerPoint) do not fully utilize
educational and design principles to optimize learning. Some of this may be due
to a lack of knowledge of the principles, and some of this may be lack of familiarity
with presentation software. There has been a recent explosion of a variety of
new presentation software and presenting tools, as well as increased interest in
podcasts and e-learning. As we continue to expand our educational arsenal, the
principles underlying effective design become even more important. This session
will start by making a case for a medical educators’ approach to presentation
design. Medical education has specific goals, separate from business or marketing
presentations, which play a direct role in designing the elements of a presentation.
The session will then review the existing literature on optimal retention,
motivation, learning styles, generational differences, and other key education
principles that underlie a presentation. Finally, we will discuss and demonstrate
the application of these principles, including several easy presentation software
elements that can be used to implement the principles.
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Review Mayer’s principles of multimedia design
2. Review Kosslyn’s theories on creating effective PowerPoint presentations
3. D
iscuss other key educational principles integral to effective presentation
design
4. List 3 principles of memory and retention in relation to presentation design
5. Take 3 example slides provided in the session and create 3 revised slides
implementing the principles discussed in the session.
Malford Pillow MD, MEd – submitter, presenter
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
SAEM AND EMF Grants: Opportunities and Submission Process
DS064 – International B
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
The SAEM Foundation and ACEP’s Emergency Medicine Foundation (EMF) provide
a variety of emergency medicine grants. Historically, many recipients of these
grants have gone on to highly successful research careers with federal funding.
These grants primarily target junior investigators including medical students,
residents, fellows and junior faculty. The most appropriate grant category and
application process, however, is often confusing to these interested individuals.
This session will provide an overview of each foundation’s grant offerings and the
submission and review process of each. Included will be the type of candidates
targeted for these grants, types of proposals that score well and the timeline of
review and the scoring system used.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the types of grants offered by SAEM and EMF
2. S
ummarize the keys to successfully applying for such a grant.
James Holmes MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA
Mark Courtney MD, MSCI - presenter
Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
Megan Ranney MD - presenter
Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
Comilla Sasson MD, MS - presenter
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO
Deliberate Practice: A Learning Technique That Improves
Mastery, Execution, and Retention of Medical Knowledge
DS065 – International G
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 9:00 - 9:50 am
The concept of deliberate practice, first described in 1993 by Ericsson et al, has
gained traction in medical education as it did before in sport, music, chess, and
economics as a way to define the process of obtaining expert performance. It has
been definitively demonstrated that exceptional performance in diverse fields and
domains has a common set of causes and goes beyond genetics, with significant
influence contributed by practice and training. Furthermore, it has been shown that
by applying the principles of deliberate practice, a person who has reached expert
level performance can remain at the same level and prevent skill decay. The steps
of deliberate practice are: 1. buy-in from the learner; 2. active learning tasks; 3.
immediate feedback; 4. repeated performance to refine the activity. The didactic
component of this course will introduce the learner to the step by step process of
deliberate practice. During the lecture, participants will be given real examples of
how to institute a deliberate practice model into their education endeavors and will
be given opportunities to have their questions answered.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Define the process of deliberate practice
2. Incorporate deliberate practice methods into the educational curriculum for
trainees and individual educational goals.
Rodney Omron MD, MPH – submitter, presenter
Johns Hopkins, Baltimore MD
Doug Franzen MD, M.Ed - presenter
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
Rahul Patwari MD - presenter
Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
Top 5 Plays of the Day: How Gender-Specific Medicine
Impacts Men’s Health
DS066 – International C
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 9:30 - 9:50 am
Gender-specific medicine is not the same as women’s health. As defined by
the Partnership for Gender-Specific Medicine, this relatively new science is
the study of the differences in the normal function of men and women and in
their experiences of the same disease. This holds true across the spectrum of
prevention, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment and palliation. The Emergency
Department (ED) has become a primary point of contact for health care in the
United States with encounters that reflect acute presentation of a spectrum of
diseases. The specialty is just beginning to appreciate the areas of acute care
medicine in which gender-specific treatment decisions can rapidly and directly
impact the outcomes of both women and men. This presentation will take the
audience through 5 systems using the ESPN style of Top 5 Plays of the Day.
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
49
Each expert presenter will update the audience on the top Gender-Specific EM
articles for 2012-13 in Cardiology, Sports Medicine, Traumatic Injuries, Sepsis and
Neurologic Emergencies and how they impact men’s health.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe concrete examples of physiologic gender differences with significant
implications for men’s health.
2. Discuss examples of a gender-specific approach to crucial emergency medicine
topics of cardiology, neurology, sports medicine, sepsis and trauma.
3. Describe the top gender-specific EM articles for 2012-2013 and how they relate
to the clinical practice of EM.
Alyson McGregor MD - submitter
Brown University, Providence, RI
Frederico Vaca MD, MPH - presenter
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
Nina Gentile MD - presenter
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
Basmah Safdar MD - presenter
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
Neha Raukar MD - presenter
Brown University, Providence, RI
David Portelli MD - presenter
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence
NIH Individual Research Career Development (K) Awards: A
Pathway to Research Independence
DS067 – International B
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 10 - 10:50 am
Jane Scott, ScD, MSN, (Director, Office of Research Training and Career
Development, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, NHLBI) will lead a discussion on
K awards. The K awards provide protected time for junior faculty as they conduct
research, write papers and compete for NIH grants, on their path to research
career independence. The goal of the session will be to provide a very brief
overview of the Institutional K12 awards and a more in-depth review of individual
K awards (K08 and K23). A panel of current and former K- awardee emergency
medicine investigators will discuss their experiences in applying for the K awards,
the benefits of the award, and comments on how the award helped them in their
research careers. Panelists will include: former K08 awardee Lance Becker MD,
former K23 awardee Benjamin Abella MD, MS, and current K23 awardee Sean
Collins MD, MS.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participants should be able to:
1. Describe the different types of K awards available to early career faculty and
fellows
2. Detail the benefits of such awards in seeking research career independence.
Jane Scott ScD, MSN – submitter, presenter
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health MD
Lance Becker MD – presenter
University of Pennsylvania SOM, Philadelphia, PA
Benjamin Abella MD, MS - presenter
University of Pennsylvania SOM, Philadelphia, PA
Sean Collins MD, MSc - presenter
Vanderbilt University SOM, Nashville, TN
Enhancing the Quality And Transparency Of Health Research:
An Introduction to the EQUATOR Network and Implications for
Emergency Medicine
DS068 – International C
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 10 - 10:50 am
Using didactic presentations this session will provide attendees with accessible
resources to guide the design, conduct, and reporting of emergency medicine
research. Publication guidelines for most research designs have been developed
and refined over the last decade. Researchers, methodologists, and journal editors
accepted all of these guidelines before disseminating them across a large variety
of clinical specialties. These guidelines include the CONSORT, PRISMA, STARD,
STROBE, and MOOSE statements. By promoting better-informed reporting
and enhanced reviewing, these guidelines minimize variability and reduce bias,
thereby enhancing the overall quality of the research product. Unfortunately,
most guidelines remain widely underutilized by research groups, journal editors,
and the readers of the medical literature. The result is highly variable, often
biased research reporting that increases the overall workload of the healthcare
consumer. The EQUATOR group is an international collaboration with the mission
to increase the general awareness, adoption and implementation of these
guidelines, while providing a forum for the refinement of future guidelines.
50
The presentation will consist of three 15-minute presentations by Dr. Hiestand,
Dr. Meisel, and Dr. Carpenter discussing the methodological process to develop
publication guidelines, the EQUATOR dissemination model, and the impact that
these guidelines have upon manuscript quality.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Understand why publication guidelines have been developed
2. Describe where to find appropriate publication guidelines
3. Detail how to incorporate the guidelines into ongoing work.
4. Describe resources to facilitate successful incorporation of these principles
into scientific and academic work-products.
Christopher Carpenter MD, MSc – submitter, presenter
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Brian Hiestand MD, MPH - presenter
Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
Zachary F. Meisel MD, MPH, MSc - presenter
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of P, Philadelphia, PA
Peer Mentoring: Enhancing Academic & Research Mentoring
DS069 – International G
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 10:00 - 10:50 am
The rationale and need for mentors is a recognized part of a successful
academic career. Mentoring goes beyond passing on knowledge and skill, and
involves teaching, sponsorship, guidance, socialization into a profession, and
moral support. Mentoring has been shown to enhance career development and
satisfaction, productivity and networking. Traditional mentoring involves a
higher-ranked, more experienced advisor who mentors a newer, less experienced
mentee. Traditional mentoring has been shown to be very effective but can have
limitations such as a shortage of mentors, and lack of consistency of mentors skills
and abilities. Peer mentoring involves a model where all members are essentially
the same age, rank and experience level. Peer mentoring may have the added
benefits of shared commonalities (stage of life and career), the development of
friendships and longer lasting relationships, increased collegiality, and decreased
professional isolation. Peer mentoring can be used as an adjunct to traditional
mentoring or may stand alone.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Justify the importance of mentoring in an academic career
2. Compare mentoring models traditional vs. peer
3. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of traditional and peer mentoring
4. Understand and interpret the current literature on peer mentoring
5. Apply the evidence to develop a peer mentoring model in their own setting
Stephen Cico MD, MEd – submitter, presenter
Lurie Children’s Hospital & Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL
Kelly Black MD, MSc - presenter
Seattle Children’s and University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Joseph House MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Cemal Sozener MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Improve Your Teaching: Evidence-Based Teaching Workshop
Using Articles That Will Change Your Teaching Practice.
DS070 – International H
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 10:00 - 10:50 am
In teaching, medical educators, like in clinical practice, should use the evidence
from the education literature and incorporate it into their teaching practice.
This workshop will help participants translate the evidence from some landmark
education articles including: 1) How to incorporate the evidence in clinical reasoning
about intuitive (pattern recognition) and analytical thinking into your teaching 2)
Best evidence in medical education (BEME); how do journal clubs affect learning
and practice 3) Learning retention 4) Model for programmatic assessment 5) Hot
topic in education research- thinking about validity evidence. The journal articles
(evidence) will be briefly presented, then, in small groups the participants will
discuss how these findings might be applied to their own settings. The workshop
will be highly interactive, requiring participants to use both the evidence and
apply it to their teaching, learning and assessment practices. The workshop will
incorporate large and small group exercises to understand the concepts and
develop ways to improve each participant’s teaching skills. The participants will
understand the evidence in these areas for effective teaching and assessment,
take home strategies for improving their teaching using and develop a plan for
how they will incorporate the evidence into their teaching practice. Additional
facilitators: Emily Senecal MD and Suzanne Dooley-Hash MD and James Takayesu
MD, Joe House MD
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Challenge your thinking about traditional teaching
2. Learn evidence from the teaching and learning literature
3. A
pply the evidence and develop strategies to change and improve your
teaching practice
Sally Santen MD, PhD – submitter, presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Sue Farrell MD, MEd - presenter
Harvard Partners, Boston, MA
Robin Hemphill MD, MPH - presenter
Veterans Association, Ann Arbor, MI
Laura Hopson MD - presenter
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
NHLBI K12 Research Career Development Programs in
Emergency Medicine Research
DS071 – International B
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
In July 2011 the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) funded
six institutional research career development (K12) awards to promote
multidisciplinary clinical research training programs in emergency medicine.
These programs are designed to prepare clinician-scientists for independent
research careers and academic leadership roles in Emergency Medicine. This
five year, $21 million award represents a major opportunity for junior emergency
medicine researchers to obtain NIH funded, mentored research career training. A
brief overview of the K12 program will initially be provided (structure of the K12,
eligible applicants, goals, etc). The panel will include a member from each of the six
K12 award programs. Members from each program will provide a brief description
of their respective programs. These presentations will highlight the strengths and
unique attributes of each individual program, the types of candidates they are
targeting, and the application process. Following the panel, interested individuals
will be able to meet and discuss issues related to the K12 programs with members
from each program (including current K12 scholars).
Objectives: At the completion of this session, the participants should be able to:
1. Describe the goals of the NHLBI K12 program,
2. Define who the targeted applicants for the program are.
3. Describe the application process and characteristics of each of the six K12
programs.
James Holmes MD, MPH - submitter
UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA
Arthur Kellermann MD, MPH - presenter
RAND, Santa Monica, CA
Jane Scott ScD - presenter
NHLBI, Bethesda MD
Superstars of Social Media: How to Incorporate Social Media
Into Teaching and Education
DS072 – International C
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
The internet has become a ubiquitous presence in Medicine and Academics. The
use of Social Media has become an important part of communication, and has
assumed an increasing role in teaching and education. As utilization grows we
have quickly gained some experience in approaches that have and have not been
successful, although there is still a great deal to be learned. The best approaches
have yet to be determined, but certain groups have found successful Social Media
approaches in EM education. This didactic will review the use and development of
Social Media through three successful approaches. The overall approach, specific
techniques, and barriers to success will be discussed. Finally the discussion
will focus on recommendations for the incorporation of Social Media tools for
teaching and education. A video conference preview of the lecture will be posted
at Academic Emergency Medicine and on SAEM Facebook page several weeks
before the Annual Meeting in order to encourage electronic discussion of the
topic prior to the meeting. Information and important points will be broadcast via
Twitter with the hash tag #SAEM13 by the moderator during the presentation.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe Social Media tools and their basic use.
2. Discuss the role of Social Media in education.
3. Provide recommendations for online engagement with learners.
4. Review current approaches in Social Media and discuss future directions.
James Miner MD – submitter, presenter
Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN
Michelle Lin MD - presenter
University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Scott Joing MD - presenter
Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN
Sean Fox MD - presenter
Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC
Trauma and Teamwork: Lessons from Iraq
DS073 – International G
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
This photo rich lecture chronicles the author’s experiences leading a Shock Trauma
Platoon in Fallujah Iraq, focusing specifically on traditional and innovative “onthe-job” methods to create a highly functioning team from a group of physicians,
nurses, and technicians who had not previously worked together. This lecture
discusses alignment of roles and purpose, cross training, patient care, functioning
with limited resources, risk-benefit calculations, mass casualty and other issues
directly applicable to civilian Emergency Department operations. Discussion of
specific teamwork skills necessary for a satisfying Emergency Medicine shift and
are applicable to Emergency Physicians at any career level.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe ways of improving teamwork within a newly formed team
2. Create a positive environment to foster innovative thinking
3. Understand some of the challenges of practicing Emergency Medicine with
limited assets in a battlefield environment, including the importance of true
teamwork when the entire team is under fire.
Martin Makela MD – submitter, presenter
University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA
Quantifying the Worth of My Publications for Promotions
and Grants: The h-Index, m-quotient, Eigenfactor, and Other
Measures of Academic Currency
DS074 – International H
Session Time: Saturday, May 18, 2013 11:00 - 11:50 am
Publications and grant funding are the promotional currency of academia.
These scholarly effort metrics are used to assess research performance, career
planning, and grant funding, as well as promotions and tenure. Traditionally,
promotions boards used the journal impact factor as estimates of relative value
of an individual researcher’s advancement package. Recent advancements
in technology have spurred new, more author-level specific measures to
demonstrate the impact of publications’ impact within the scientific and academic
community. These measures include the h-index, m-quotient, Eigenfactor, citation
counts, co-authorship patterns, usage data, and research foci trends. The first
25-minute presentation will introduce metrics based on publication data while
demonstrating how metrics are used to illustrate research impact from scholarly
publications. This didactic will introduce attendees to electronic resources
including the Web of Science® and SCOPUS which will be used to generate
h-index, citation reports, global dissemination, and collaborative publishing
reports and charts for individual researchers. The merits and disadvantages
of each source of publication impact will be reviewed. The second presentation
reviews two pragmatic applications for these impact metrics: promotions and
grant applications. The general considerations of promotions boards regarding
peer-reviewed publications will be summarized. Examples of annual academic
portfolios that incorporate author-level publication impact metrics will be
provided. In addition, a grant application incorporating measures of publication
impact to emphasize expertise within a field will be highlighted.
Objectives: At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of contemporary measures that are
increasingly being used to assess the worth of individual publications at the level
of the author and the publication.
2. Find resources to generate their own measures of publication impact for grants
or promotional packages.
3. Incorporate measures of publication impact into promotional packages or
grants to demonstrate the strength of your application.
Christopher Carpenter MD, MSc – submitter, presenter
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Cathy Sarli MLS, AHIP - presenter
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
51
“ Being part of a democratic group means that you
get to make decisions affecting your practice daily.”
“ It’s an amazing experience. I absolutely enjoy it
and truly believe in CEP’s partnership model.”
—True McMahan, MD
ED Medical Director
Garden Grove Hospital
Find out why CEP America is different.
Visit our booth
at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine’s Annual Meeting or
info.cep.com/saem2013
Your Life. Your Career. Your Partnership.
Ian Martin, MD current President of the Global Emergency Medicine Academy from
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill is one individual who took the SAEM
Foundation challenge and BECAME ONE.
Will you take the challenge and BECOME ONE member who changed the
future of academic emergency medicine?
Make your donation online today at www.saem.org
52
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
SAEM Annual Meeting Abstracts
May 15-18, 2013 Atlanta, Georgia
Listed below are the title, presenter name, and presenter Institution for the 834 abstracts that have been selected for presentation at the 2013
SAEM Annual Meeting from the 1,224 abstract submissions. Please note the abstracts are listed in presentation order. These numbers do not
correspond to the original abstract numbers given at time of submission.
*SAEM Gallery of Excellence Nominees 2013
Plenary Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 3:30 - 5:00 pm in Plaza Ballroom ABC
Moderator: David Cone MD, Yale University School of Medicine
1NEXUS Chest: Validation of a Decision Instrument for Selective Chest
Imaging in Blunt Trauma*
Robert M. Rodriguez MD, UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital
2Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin for Acute Treatment of
Severe Cyanide Poisoning in A Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model - a randomized,
controlled trial*
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center
3
Anaphylaxis; Clinical Features and Evidence for A Mast Cell-leukocyte
Cytokine Cascade in Humans.*
Simon G A. Brown MBBS, PhD, FACEM, Western Australian Institute for
Medical Research, Royal Perth Hospital and the University of Western
Australia
4
Accuracy of an Ultra-Low Dose CT Protocol for ED Patients with Suspected
Kidney Stone*
Chris Moore MD, RDMS, Yale University School of Medicine
5Latino Caregiver Experiences with asthma Health Communications: A
Qualitative Evaluation*
Antonio Riera MD, Yale University School of Medicine
6
Randomized Trial of Tenecteplase or Placebo with Low Molecular Weight
Heparin for Acute Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: assessment of
Patient-Oriented Cardiopulmonary Outcomes at Three Months*
Jeffrey A. Kline MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
WEDNESDAY, May 15th, 2013
Pediatric Abdominal Pain - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta A
Moderator: Nathan Kuppermann MD, MPH,
UC Davis
7
The Effect of Operator Experience on Test Performance Characteristics
for Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Diagnosing Appendicitis in Children:
Implications for Reducing Misdiagnosis-Related Medical Errors.
Inna Elikashvili, Mount Sinai Medical Center
8
The Effect of Point-of- Care Ultrasonography on Emergency Department
Length of Stay and CT Utilization in Children with Suspected Appendicitis.*
Inna Elikashvili, Mount Sinai Medical Center
9
Signs and Symptoms associated with Surgical Intervention in Children with
Abdominal Pain*
Melissa Tavarez MD, Children’s National Medical Center
10 Retrospective Review of Emergency Bedside Ultrasound for Diagnosis of
Pediatric Intussusception*
Samuel H. F. Lam, Advocate Christ Medical Center
Ultrasound - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 9:00 - 11:00 am in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: James H. Moak MD, RDMS, University of Virginia
11Ultrasound Confirmation of Central Femoral Venous Line Placement: the
FLUSH Study (Flush the Line and Ultrasound the Heart)*
Russ Horowitz MD, RDMS, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
12 Accuracy of Emergency Medicine Residents during Completion of the American
College of Emergency Physicians Minimum Ultrasound Training Benchmarks: A
Multicenter Multiple Application Longitudinal Validation Study*
John Bailitz Cook County (Stroger)
13Learning Curves in Emergency Ultrasound Education
David J. Blehar MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
*Disclaimer: Abstracts are placed in the program how they were submitted to SAEM.
14
15
16
17
18
Prospective Evaluation of Bedside Soft-Tissue Ultrasound Measurement
Threshold to yield Positive Purulence on ED drainage procedure
Carrie Fales MD, Carolinas Medical Center
Accuracy of Ultrasound as a Tele-medicine Component Using a
Commercially Available Tele-conferance System
Eric Zevallos MD, Georgia Health Science University
Success of Lumbar Puncture After Using Ultrasound to Identify Landmarks
Kevin Rooney MS4, University of California Irvine
Sonographic Inferior Vena Cava Measurements to assess Hydration Status
in Football athletes During Preseason Camp
Amish Shah MD, University of Arizona
The Effect of Patient Position on the Parasternal Long Cardiac Ultrasound View
Brian Euerle, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Hemorrhagic Shock - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta G
Moderator: Michael Gibbs MD, Carolinas Medical Center
19 A Markov Model Describes the Dynamics of Resuscitation in a Porcine
Hemorrhagic Shock Model.*
Heemun Kwok MD, MS, University of Washington
20Comparison of Intraosseous Infusion Rates of Plasma Under High Pressure
in An Adult Hypovolemic Swine Model in Two Different Limb Sites*
Julio Lairet, Emory University School of Medicine
21 The Value of Peripheral Perfusion Index in Predicting Mortality of Patients
Admitted to Intensive Care Unit and Association with APACHE II, SOFA and
SAPS II Scores
Yahya A. ACAR MD, Etimesgut Military Hospital
22 Fibrinogen Concentrate Reduces Blood Loss and Improves Survival in A
Porcine Model of Freely Bleeding Hemorrhagic Shock
Nathan White MD, University of Washington
Measures for Emergency Medicine - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta B
Moderator: Jeremiah D. Schuur MD,
Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School
23 Quality Measure Performance Varies Among Hospitals by Proportion of Low
Income Patients
Christopher W. Jones, Christiana Care Health System
24 Are Crowding Measures associated with Acute Myocardial Infarction
Mortality?
Rahul K. Khare, Northwestern University
25 Effect of Health Information Exchange on Repeat Imaging in the Emergency
Department
Keith E. Kocher MD, MPH, University of Michigan
26 Factors associated with Quality and Costs for Elderly Patients with Acute
Myocardial Infarction Who Present to Emergency Departments
Michael Wilson MD, PhD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
27 Blood Culture Use in ED Patients with Pneumonia after Modification of a
National Quality Measure
Leah S. Honigman MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
28 ED Crowding Measures and In-hospital Sepsis Mortality: Is Less Crowding
Really Better?
Emilie Powell MD, MS, MBA, Northwestern University
Congestive Heart Failure and Dyspnea - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Alan B. Storrow MD, Vanderbilt University
29 Bedside Lung Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Edema in Patients
Presenting with Acute Dyspnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
David Barbic, McGill University
30 The CUPID Study: Cardiopulmonary Ultrasound Protocol in Dyspnea
Krithika Muruganandan MD, Brown University
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
53
31
32
33
34
Evaluation of Dyspnea Severity assessment Methods
Howard A. Smithline, Baystate Medical Center
The Correlation Between Myocardial Ejection Fraction and MRproANP
Levels in ED Patients with Dyspnea
Orhan Cinar, Gulhane Military Medical Academy
Supplemental Thiamine for the Treatment of Acute Heart Failure
Howard A. Smithline, Baystate Medical Center
The Burden of Acute Heart Failure on US Emergency Departments*
Alan B. Storrow MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Vanderbilt
University Medical Center
51
Screening for Fever in the ED: the Role of Oral, Tympanic Membrane, and
Temporal Artery thermometry
Purvi D. Shah, Montefiore Medical Center
52 A Risk-Prediction Rule for Contrast-induced Nephropathy and Subsequent
Long-term Mortality
Alice M. Mitchell MD, MS, Indiana University School of Medicine
53 Frequency Optimization for Detecting Intracerebral Hemorrhage in an
Invivo Porcine Model Using Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Radiation
Joseph J. Korfhagen, University of Cincinnati
54 Adult Emergency Department CT Utilization for Facial Trauma, Facial
Fracture Rates, and Procedural Repair: A Retrospective Cohort Study
Joshua S. Broder MD, Duke University Medical Center
55 Test Characteristics of Quick-Brain MRI for Shunt Evaluation in Children: A
New Modality to Avoid Unnecessary Radiation
Matthew Hansen MD, Oregon Health and Science University
Emergency Medical Services - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Roswell 1
Moderator: Michael Runyon MD, Carolinas Medical Center
35 Degradation of Benzodiazepines After 120-Days of EMS Deployment*
Jason McMullan MD, University of Cincinnati
36 Do Prehospital Levels of End-tidal Carbon Dioxide Differ Between Chronic
Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Congestive Heart Failure?*
Christopher Hunter MD, PhD, Orange County EMS System
37 Prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale and Risk Stratification in Major Pediatric
Traumatic Brain Injury: Association with Mortality and Non-Mortality
Outcomes*
Daniel W. Spaite MD, Arizona Emergency Medicine Research Center,
University of Arizona
38 Racial Disparities in Stroke Recognition by Pre-hospital Providers
Prasanthi Govindarajan MD, MAS, University of California, San Francisco
39 Validation of Criteria to Guide Pre-Hospital Antidote Administration for
Drug Overdoses
Matt S. Friedman MD, Fire Department of New York
40Intranasal Midazolam is a Viable Alternative to Intravenous Midazolam for
Prehospital Seizure
Susanne J. Spano MD, FACEP, UCSF Fresno
Toxicology - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Roswell 2
Moderator: Ed Otten, University of Cincinnati
41 Do Mnemonics Help Healthcare Professionals Learn and Recall toxic
Syndromes for Cholinergic Hazardous Materials?
Nicholas B. Hurst MD, University of Arizona
42 “Hard” Versus “Soft” Patient Cues That Influence Emergency Medicine
Provider Perception of Potential Opioid Misusers
Lisa M. Mannina MD, San Antonio Military Medical Center
43Cost Savings associated with Poison Control Consultation by EMS Dispatch
Michael Levine MD, University of Southern California
44 An assessment of Opioid Prescribing Practices among Emergency Medicine
Providers
Shawn M. Varney MD, San Antonio Military Medical Center
45 Prescription Stimulant Misuse in a Military Population - Prevalence and
Risk Factors for Misuse
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center; AF Enroute Care
Research Center
46Contribution of Serum Ethanol Concentration to the Osmol Gap: a
Prospective Volunteer Study
Shaun D. Carstairs, Naval Medical Center
Radiology - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 10:00 - 12:00 pm in Atlanta A
Moderator: Ali S. Raja MD, MPH, MBA
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
47 Should We Communicate Radiation Risk from CT Scans to Patients? A
Mixed-Methods and Normative Ethical Analysis*
Thomas E. Robey, Yale-New Haven Hospital
48 Evidence Based Diagnostics: Meta-Analysis of the Accuracy of Physical
Exam and Imaging for Adult Scaphoid Fractures*
Ali S. Raja, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
49Comparing the Diagnostic Performance of Bedside Ultrasound to Plain
Radiography for Detecting Fractures of the Appendicular Skeleton in the
Emergency Department: A Prospective Study*
Paul E. Haiar DSc, PA-C, Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center
50 Diagnostic Testing and Treatment of Pediatric Headache in the Emergency
Department
Matthew L. Hansen MD, OHSU
54
Traumatic Brain Injury - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 10:00 - 12:00 pm in Atlanta B
Moderator: Opeolu Adeoye MD, University of Cincinnati
56 Emergency Department Initiated Interventions for Mild Traumatic Brain
Injury; A Systematic Review
Jocelyn Gravel, CHU Sainte-Justine
57 Elevated Levels of Serum SBDP150 in the Emergency Department Are
associated with Poor Outcome at One Month From Mild and Moderate
Traumatic Brain Injury*
Linda Papa MD, CM, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center
58 Anti-platelet and Anti-coagulants Do Not Increase Traumatic Intracranial
Bleeds in Elderly Fall Victims
Darin Agresti DO, St. Luke’s University Hospital
59 Early Results: Do All Patients with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Need
Hospital Admission?
Sarah K. Flaherty MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
60 Performance of Early Serum GFAP and UCH-L1 Individually and in
Combination in Distinguishing Mild and Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury
from Trauma Controls and in Detecting Intracranial Lesions On CT*
Linda Papa MD, CM, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center
61 The Synergistic Effect of Prehospital Hypotension and Hypoxia in Major
Traumatic Brain Injury: Profound Impact on Mortality
Daniel W. Spaite MD, Arizona Emergency Medicine Research Center,
University of Arizona
62 Emergency Department Disposition of the Mild Traumatic Brain Injured
Patient: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.
Jonathan J. Ratcliff MD, MPH, University of Cincinnati
63 Significance of Prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale in Hospital Outcomes of
Traumatic Brain Injury Patients
Irina F. Brennan MD, PhD, University of Florida
Acute Coronary Syndromes - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 10:00 - 12:00 pm in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Chad E. Darling MD, UMass Medical School
64 The Association between Pretest Probability of Coronary Artery Disease
and Stress Test Utilization and Outcomes in a Chest Pain Observation Unit
Anthony Napoli, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
65 External Validation of the Australasian ED Acute Coronary Syndrome Score
Jeffrey Shih, Mayo Clinic
66Utility of Routine Echocardiography in Low-to-intermediate Risk Patients
with Potential ACS
Judd Hollander, University of Pennsylvania
67 High Sensitivity Troponin Implementation for Patients with Suspected Acs
Increases the Rule-out Rate While Reducing Re-visits Resulting in Admission
Andrew McRae, University of Calgary
68 The Effect of Implementing High-Sensitivity Troponin Testing on ED
Operational Efficiency in Three Large Urban Emergency Departments
Andrew McRae, University of Calgary
69Can a Low-Risk Chest Pain Protocol Reduce Admission Rates Among
Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain? A
Quality Project
Michael Zwank, Regions Hospital
70Cost-effectiveness of A Multi-disciplinary Observation Protocol for Lowrisk Acetaminophen Overdose in the Emergency Department
Gillian Beauchamp, University of Cincinnati
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
71
72
Potentially Avoidable Chest Pain Observation Unit Utilization: Admission
of Very-Low-Risk Patients
Simon A. Mahler, Wake forest University Medical School
Prospective Evaluation of Outcomes in Geriatric Chest Pain Patients in an
Emergency Department Observation Unit
Matthew J. Fuller MD, University of Utah
STEMI - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 10:00 - 11:00 am in Atlanta G
90 Decreasing Turn-Around-Time with a Split ESI 3 Patient Flow Model
Rajiv Arya MD, UMDNJ-RWJMS New Brunswick
91 The Emergency Department Contribution to the Burden of HospitalAcquired Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI’s)
Timothy J. Reeder MD, East Carolina University
92 Patients Receiving Take Home Meds Instead of Prescriptions Are More
Likely to Return to the ED
Melissa Fleegler MD, University of New Mexico
Moderator: Deborah B. Diercks MD, UC Davis
73Young Women are Less Likely to Meet Reperfusion Guidelines for STEMI:
the VIRGO Study (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender On Outcomes)*
Gail D’Onofrio MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University
School of Medicine
74 Mode of Hospital Arrival in ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Ethnic and
Language Differences in an Urban STEMI Receiving Center
Stephanie Y. Donald, George Washington University
75 Evaluation of the Incidence and Outcomes of Contrast-induced
Nephropathy Following STEMI Protocol Activation
Brandon R. Allen MD, University of Florida
76 Risk Stratification of Acute Chest Pain in an Emergency Setting: ST
Segment Change on aVL Lead as a Predictor of Future MI
Andrew Keralis, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Critical Care - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 11:00 - 12:00 pm in Atlanta E & F
Pediatrics - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 10:00 - 12:00 pm in Roswell 1
Geriatric Pain - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 11:00 - 12:00 pm in Atlanta G
Moderator: Brent R. King MD, University of Texas Medical School
77 Associations of Length of Stay and Disposition in Pediatric Emergency
Department Patients
Isabel A. Barata MS, MD, North Shore University Hospital
78 Bronchiolitis Hospitalizations in the United States, 2000-2009
Kohei Hasegawa MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital
79Urban and Rural Patterns in Emergent Pediatric Transfer
to a Higher Level of Care
Timothy Horeczko MD, MSCR, University of California, Davis
80 High Emergency Department and Urgent Care Use When Sick Children
Cannot attend Child Care
Andrew N. Hashikawa MD, MS, University of Michigan
81Clinical Pathway Expedites Systemic Corticosteroids for Children with
Moderate-Severe asthma Exacerbation*
Christopher Fee MD, University of California San Francisco
817 Validation of A tool for the assessment of Trainees During Simulated
Pediatric Resuscitation
Jocelyn Gravel, Hôpital Sainte-Justine
82 Broselow Tape: A Time to Revisit?*
Muhammad Waseem MD, MS, Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
83 A New Pediatric Weight Estimation Device
Jennifer Watts MD, MPH, Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics
834 Self-assessment of Clinical Improvement by Pediatric Patients during an
Acute asthma Exacerbation*
Lori A. Montagna, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
84 Rapidly Administered Ketamine for Brief Pediatric Procedures: A DoseFinding Study
Sri Sankar Chinta MD, MBBS, Washington University in St. Louis
85 Does Use of the Needle Free Jet-injection System with Buffered Lidocaine
Device (j-tip) Improve IV Placement Success in Children?
Maren M. Lunoe, Medical College of Wisconsin
Clinical Efficiency - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 10:00 - 11:00 am in Roswell 2
Moderator: Richard Zane MD, University of Colorado
87 Financial and Quality Impact of Voice Recognition versus Dictation/
Transcription on Emergency Medicine Records
Roshanak Didehban MHS, FACHE, Mayo Clinic
88Impact of Varying Biomarker Sampling Intervals and Stress Testing Rates
and Availability On the Length of Stay in An Emergency Department
Observation Unit Using A Simulation Model
Jeremiah D. Schuur MD, MHS, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
89 ED Hemolysis is More Strongly associated with Device Used to Obtain Blood
Than Other Features of Phlebotomy*
Andrew Wollowitz MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Albert Einstein
College of Medicine
Moderator: Robert Rodriguez MD, UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital
93 The Relationship between Lactic Acidosis and Thiamine Levels in Patients
with Diabetic Ketoacidosis*
Ari Moskowitz MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
94 Variability in Intraosseous Flush Practices by Trained Emergency Physicians
Joseph Sontgerath, San Antonio Military Medical Center
95Correlation of Central and Peripheral Venous Blood Gas Compared to
Arterial Blood Gas in the Undifferentiated Critically Ill Patient
J. Daniel Hess MD, Christiana Care Health System
96 Defining the Geography of Infection-Related Death Rates in the United
States: Hotspotting Areas for Targeted Interventions.
Anish K. Agarwal MD, MPH, the University of Pennsylvania
Moderator: Robert Woolard MD, Texas Tech University (El Paso)
97 Age-related Differences in Pain Recovery After Motor Vehicle Collision: A
Prospective Longitudinal Study*
Greg Pereira, University of North Carolina
98 Randomized Clinical Trial of an IV Hydromorphone Titration Protocol
versus Usual Care for Management of Acute Pain in Older Emergency
Department Patients
Robert H. Meyer MD,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center
99 Pain Treatment in Older Adults During Prehospital Care in North Carolina: A
Descriptive Analysis
Katherine M. Hunold BSPH, University of Virginia
100 Are there Disparities in the Quality of Acute Pain Care for
Geriatric Patients in the ED?
Ula Hwang, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Accelerate Your ED - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 11:00 - 12:00 pm in Roswell 2
Moderator: David F. Brown MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
101Lean-Based Systems Engineering Improves Performance Measures in the
Emergency Department
Benjamin A. White MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
102Guest Relations assistants - How do They Impact Perception of
Care and Loyalty?
Neil Majmundar MD, St. John Hospital & Medical Center
103Implementation of an Electronic Medical Record System Reduces Physician
Productivity in an Academic Emergency Department
Gregory Lamb MD, University of New Mexico
104Comparative Effectiveness of an Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol Versus
23-Hour Observation for Chest Pain
Alan J. Smally MD,
Hartford Hospital and the University of CT School of Medicine
105 Building a Super Track: Use of Lean to Decrease Turnaround Times for Low
Acuity Patients
Bruce M. Lo MD,
Eastern Virginia Medical School, Sentara Norfolk General Hospital
106 Motivation and Predictors of Physician Productivity in an Academic
Practice Setting
Amisha D. Parekh, New York Methodist Hospital
Health Services Research - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta A
Moderator: Keith E. Kocher MD, University of Michigan
107 Ed Use of Online Social Media - Canadian National Survey of Physicians and
Trainees.
Maxim Ben-Yakov MD, CM, University of toronto
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
55
108National Study of Health Insurance and Underlying Reasons for Emergency
Department Presentation
Adit A. Ginde, University of Colorado School of Medicine
109Comparison of Geographic Distribution of U.S. Urgent Care Centers and
Emergency Departments
Adit A. Ginde, University of Colorado School of Medicine
110 Do Emergency Department Patients Receive a Pathological Diagnosis? The
Provision of Diagnosis at ED Discharge in a Nationally-Representative Sample
Leana S. Wen, Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency
Clinical Decision Rules - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Ian G. Stiell MD, University of Ottawa
111 Randomized Trial of a Quantitative, Computerized Method to Estimate
Pretest Probability of Acute Coronary Syndrome and Pulmonary Embolism:
Effect on Patient Safety, Radiation Exposure, and Cost of Care*
Jeffrey Kline, Indiana University School of Medicine
112 HINTS Outperforms ABCD2 to Identify Stroke in Acute Vestibular Syndrome*
David E. Newman-Toker MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of
Medicine
113 Evaluation of Clinical Prediction Rules for Clinical Deterioration Shortly
After an Emergency Department Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism*
Christopher Kabrhel, Massachusetts General Hospital
114 Derivation of a Decision Instrument for Selective Chest Imaging in Patients
with Falls from Standing
Ali S. Raja MD, MPH, MBA,
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Critical Care - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Michael Gibbs MD, Carolinas Medical Center
115 Ventilator-associated Pneumonia Prevention Education
in the Emergency Department
Joe Peraza MD, University of Arizona Health Network
116 Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity Decreases in Connection
with Profound Stress
Lars W. Andersen BS, Research Center for Emergency Medicine
117 Assessment of One-year Mortality Following Hospital Discharge Among
Survivors of Cardiac Arrest Who Receive Pre-hospital Fluids
David A. Pearson MD, Carolinas Medical Center
118 Plasmin loaded echogenic liposomes: A Novel Thrombolytic
Madhuvanthi A. Kandadai, University of Cincinnati
Renal Colic - Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta G
Moderator: Romolo Gaspari MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
119 ED Provider Pretest Probability Predicts Nephrolithiasis in CTs for
Suspected Renal Colic
Brock Daniels MD, Yale New Haven Hospital
120Normal Renal Ultrasound Identifies Renal Colic Patients at Low Risk for
Urologic Intervention: A Prospective Study.
Justin Yan, the University of Western Ontario
121Comparison of Emergency Physician Performed Bedside Ultrasound vs.
Computed tomography in the Diagnosis of Renal Colic*
Megan Leo MD, RDMS, Boston Medical Center
122 Radiation Dose Index of CTs for Kidney Stone Performed in the United
States
Adam Lukasiewicz MPH, Yale University School of Medicine
126 An Effective Remediation Program to Improve In-Training Exam Scores
David Saloum, Maimonides Medical Center
127 Development and Implementation of an asynchronous Curriculum Using a
Web-based Platform
Joshua G. Kornegay MD, Oregon Health & Science University
128 Frequent Interruptions Do Not Impact Critical Decision Making by
Emergency Medicine Residents and Attendings
Jonathan L. Jones MD, University of North Carolina
Imaging in Trauma - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta B
Moderator: Greg Hendey MD, University of California, San Francisco (Fresno)
129 Diagnostic Yields of Chest Imaging in Blunt Trauma
Robert M. Rodriguez MD, UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital
130 Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest
Computed tomography but not Chest Radiograph in Blunt Trauma Patients
Mark I. Langdorf MD, MHPE, University of California, Irvine
131Imaging of the NEXUS-negative Patient: When We Break the Rule
John Morrison MD, St. Luke’s University Hospital and Health Network
132Is Cervical Spine Imaging Required in Patients with Femur Fractures?
Robert T. Dahlquist MD, Carolinas Medical Center
133 Frequency and Mortality of Non-Contiguous Spine Fractures with CT Scan Use
Preeti Dalawari MD, MSPH, Saint Louis University Hospital
134Can Sentinel Clinical and CXR Findings Predict the Likelihood of an
Abnormal Chest CT Requiring Intervention following Blunt Trauma?
Michael Manka MD,
SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine, Erie County Medical Center
Triage - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Roswell 1
Moderator: Gabor Kelen MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
135 Does the Implementation of An Emergency Department Triage System
Improve the Timeliness of Analgesia Provision?
Sabine E. Lemoyne MD, Ghent University Hospital, Belgium
136 Reverse Triage in Pediatrics: A New Method to Increase
In-Hospital Surge Capacity
Eben Clattenburg, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
137Utilization of a Pneumonia Triage Pathway
Ryan Hunt MD, UC Davis Medical Center
138 Physician Telemedicine Triage in the Emergency Department: A Pilot Study
Stephen Traub MD, Mayo Clinic Arizona
139 Differences in Noninvasive thermometers in the Adult Emergency Department*
Joshua Zwart MD, University of Rochester
140 The Ability of the Physiologic Criteria of the Field Triage Guidelines to
Identify Children Who Need the Resources of a Trauma Center
E. Brooke Lerner PhD, Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals
Poster Presentations
– Posters will be attended by authors from 2:00 – 4:00 pm
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 5:00 pm in 200 Gallery -level 6
Learning Styles - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Roswell 2
Moderator: Brandon Maughan MD, MHS, Brown University
123 Dual Learning Enhances Knowledge Acquisition in an Emergency Medicine
Sub-internship
Jaime Jordan, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
124 Do Emergency Medicine Residents and Faculty Have Similar Learning
Styles When assessed with the Kolb Learning Style Inventory?
Jenna M. Fredette MD, Christiana Care Health System
125 A Structured Educational Intervention Effectively Improves Morbidity &
Mortality (M&M) Rounds - the Ottawa M&M Model
Lisa A. Calder, University of Ottawa
56
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
141 Emergency Medicine Resident Facilitated Procedural Sedation in the
Emergency Department
Laura Magnuson MD, Orlando Health
142 Prospective, Open-Label, Efficacy and Safety Trial of Intranasal Ketorlac on
Pain in Adults in the Emergency Department
Sharon E. Mace MD, Cleveland Clinic
143 ED Pain Care and its Effects on Short Term Hospitalization Outcomes.
Ammar Siddiqui, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
144 Evaluation of a Novel tool for Pain assessment in the Emergency Department
Philip W. Craven, University of Utah
145 Video Laryngoscopy May Reduce First attempt Complications of Airway
Management in a Medical Intensive Care Unit
Jarrod M. Mosier, University of Arizona
146 ACE-induced Angioedema in the Emergency Department:
An Observational Study
R. Mason Curtis, Queen’s University
147 The Association of Ventilating Technique and Number of assisted Breaths
Given after Rapid Sequence Induction with the Occurrence of Hypoxia
During Intubation attempts Among Patients Intubated in the Emergency
Department
James R. Miner MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
148 Accuracy of Ultrasound Guided Marking of the Cricothyroid Membrane Prior
to Simulated Failed Intubation.
Keith Curtis MD, University of Utah
149 Determination of A Learning Curve for the Pediatric Glidescope in Infant
Airway Management Novices - A Mannequin Study
Faizan H. Arshad, Yale New Haven Hospital
150 Are Geriatric Patients High Risk for Emergency Department
Procedural Sedation
Sharon E. Mace MD, Cleveland Clinic
151Comparison of Airway Ultrasonography and Continuous
Waveform Capnography to Confirm Endotracheal Tube Placement
in Cardiac Arrest Patients
Junho Cho, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital
152Use of a Novel Electronic Pre-Sedation Checklist Improves Safety
Documentation in Emergency Department Sedations
R. Jason Thurman MD, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
153 A Survey of Graduating Emergency Medicine Residents’
Experience with Cricothyrotomy
Andrew L. Makowski MD, St. Joseph’s Hospital
154 Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Impact of Obesity On Hemodynamic
Stability During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock
Sarah A. Sterling, University of Mississippi Medical Center
156Utility of Chest Radiographs in Emergency Department Patients
Presenting with Syncope
David T. Chiu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
157Utility of Trending CKMB in Emergency Department
Chest Pain Observation Unit.
Colin Mukubwa MD, VIdant Medical Center
158Comparison of Peak Troponin (cTnI) Levels Based on
Various Patient Characteristics
Dave Milzman, Georgetown U School of Medicine
159 Failure of the North America Chest Pain Rule and
“Sensitive” Troponin assays in Low Risk Patients
Anwar D. Osborne, Emory University
160Can Emergency Physicians Accurately Diagnose Pericardial
Effusion On Point-of-care Ultrasound?
Lori A. Stolz, University of Arizona
161 Survival Analysis of Patients Taking Dabigatran After Consulting
Emergency Department for Acute Bleeding: A First Alarm
Raoul Daoust MD, MSc, Hôpital du sacré cœur de Montréal
162 Pilot Study of Lactate Levels as a Marker of Tissue Hypoperfusion in ED
Acute Heart Failure Patients
Kori Sauser MD, University of Michigan
163 Differences in Nitrovasodilator Use and Rationale to Treat Acute Heart
Failure Patients between Emergency Physicians, Hospitalists, and
Cardiologists
Peter S. Pang MD, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University
164Improving Door to Balloon Time for ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction
Patients By Decreasing Emergency Department Door to ECG Time
Nicholas Testa, LAC+USC Medical Center
165 Safety of a Rapid Diagnostic Protocol with Accelerated Stress Testing
Olanrewaju Soremekun, University of Pennsylvania
166Initial ED Cardiac Troponin is Highly Predictive of Drug Overdose Mortality
Alex F. Manini MD, MS, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
167 A Randomized Controlled Trial of the BOA® -Constricting IV Band by
Paramedics and Nurses
Richard N. Bradley, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
168Gender Disparities in Stress Test Utilization in Chest Pain Unit patients
based upon the ordering Physician’s Gender
Anthony Napoli, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
169 Knowledge Deficiencies in Patients with Elevated Blood Pressure
Catherine T. Ginty MD, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
170 Establishing a Threshold for D-dimer Testing in the Diagnostic Evaluation
of Aortic Dissection: A Decision Analysis
Richard A. Taylor, Yale University
171 Systematic Review of Anti-Arrhythmic Drug therapy Compared to Lidocaine
for Termination of Stable Monomorphic Ventricular Tachycardia
Richard Sinert DO, Downstate Medical Center
172Young Adult Patients with Chest Pain: Utility of the Emergency Department
Observation Unit
Tamara Moores MD, University of Utah - Division of Emergency Medicine
173 Evaluation, Management and Disposition of ED Patients in Hypertensive Crisis
Catherine T. Ginty MD, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
174 Association Between Sex and Automated External Defibrillator Application
After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Jody Vogel, Denver Health Medical Center
175 A Prospective Trial of Video Podcast Use to Improve Knowledge and Confidence
in Violent Person Management within an Emergency Medicine Clerkship
Caroline A. Ball, Loyola University Chicago
176 Performance in Trauma Resuscitation at an Urban Tertiary
Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
Payal K. Gala, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
177 A Survey of the Current Utilization of asynchronous Education Among
Emergency Medicine Residents in the United States
Sarah Schlein MD, Univerisy of Utah
178Is An Email-based Evaluation System for Students in An EM Clerkship
Superior to That of A Handwritten, End-of-shift Evaluation System?
Jeffrey Barrett MD, Temple University School of Medicine
179Improving Sign-out Communication in the Emergency Department:
Outcomes Using A Standardized Sign-out Communication Method.
Grace Sousa MD, University at Buffalo SUNY
180Comparison of Landmark Preformed Lumbar Punctures versus Ultrasound
Guided Lumbar Punctures in A Novice Study Group
David P. Evans, Virginia Commonwealth University
181 Knowledge of Sexually-Transmitted Infections Among Patients
in an Urban Emergency Medicine Department
Julia L. Moon MPH, Drexel University, School of Public Health
182 The Impact of Standardized Testing on Interview Scoring and
Emergency Medicine Applicants’ Rank Position
Meaghen Finan MD, St. Luke’s University Hospital and Health Network
183Improving Patient Ability to Identify Acetaminophen-containing Products:
Preliminary Data of a Brief ED Educational Intervention
Joseph S. Palter MD, Cook County ( Stroger)
184Improvement in ACGME Core Competency Specific Summative Comments
by Faculty Following Implementation of a Core Competency Specific Daily
Feedback Cards program, a Faculty Incentive Program and Specific Faculty
Development on the Core Competencies and Giving Feedback to Residents
Todd Guth, University of Colorado
185 A Close Examination of Increased HIV Testing Following
A Computer-based Video Intervention in the ED
Theodore C. Bania MD, St. Luke’s - Roosevelt Hospital Center
186 Medical Student Peer Teaching in Simulation
Joseph House, University of Michigan
187 The Current State of Emergency Medical Training in
U.S. Schools of Podiatric Medicine
David A. Wald DO, Temple University School of Medicine
188 Self-regulated Learning and Study Time Allotment
Sally A. Santen MD, PhD, University of Michigan
189Comparison of Standard Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation versus Ultrasound
Guided Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation in A Novice Study Group
David P. Evans, Virginia Commonwealth University
190 A Required Fourth Year Emergency Medicine Clerkship Improves Medical
Students Self-assessment of Procedural Experiences
Luan Lawson MD, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
191 Evaluation of a Hands on Facial Anesthesia Lab
Todd M. Phillips, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
192 The Effect of Medical Students Upon Patient Satisfaction
in a University-affiliated Community ED
Christopher S. Kiefer MD, West Virginia University School of Medicine
193Interactive Spaced Online Education in Pediatric Trauma
Rohit Shenoi MD, Baylor College of Medicine
194 Are Emergency Medicine Resident Evaluations of Attending Faculty
Influenced By their Performance Scores?
Sarina Doyle MD, Orlando Health
195 Variability by Institution in Emergency Medicine Inservice Reviews with
Audience Response Units
Jaime Jordan, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
196 The Effect of an Educational Intervention on the Ability to Identify
Peripheral Nerves with Ultrasound
Sandra J. Williams DO, MPH, Baylor College of Medicine
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
57
197 The Use of an Endovaginal Task-Training Manikin as an Adjunct
in Teaching Emergency Ultrasound of Early Pregnancy to Residents CORD Educational Grant.
Micelle Haydel, LSU-New Orleans
198 An Observational Study of Superior Mesenteric Artery Blood Flow
in Septic Patients
Athena Mihailos, NY Methodist Hospital
199 Apples and Oranges? An Evaluation of 4-year Emergency Medicine
Residencies Using Program Websites and the SAEM Residency Directory.
Daniel Runde, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
200 Types of Diagnostic Errors in Neurologic Emergencies in the ED
Nicole M. Dubosh MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
201Current EM Ultrasound Training in Residency: Implications for Future Practice
Erin S. Rardon MD, West Virginia University
202Conducting a Patient Safety Needs assessment for
Undergraduate Medical Education
Paul S. Jansson BA, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
203 Factors Affecting Resident Perception of Faculty Entrustment of Autonomy
Benjamin S. Bassin MD, University of Michigan
204 Meaningful assessment of Resident Patient Handoffs Proves Challenging
Michelle J. Chastain MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center
205 Bedside Ultrasound Skills Acquisition by Medical Students
on Emergency Medicine Rotation
Christian Koziatek BA, Bellevue Hospital/NYU Medical Center
206 The Implementation of ED Team Training Across Seven Hospitals
Carrie D. Tibbles, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
207Ultrasound Competency Assessment in Emergency
Medicine Residency Programs
Richard Amini, University of Arizona Medical Center
208Characteristics of the Emergency Medicine Clerkship Director
David A. Wald, Temple University School of Medicine
209 Translating Relative Value Units for Clinical Productivity in a Mixed
Workload Academic Emergency Department
Amisha D. Parekh MD, New York Methodist Hospital
210 Validation of the BEEM Rater Scale: An Instrument to
Define the “Best Evidence” for Emergency Medicine
Christopher R. Carpenter MD, MSc, Washington University in St. Louis
211 Race Related Healthcare Disparities Among California Workers
Randy Woo MD, University of California, Irvine
212 Trends in EMTALA Violations from 2002-2012
Brian Raffetto MPH, LAC-USC
214 Time of Day, Severity of Illness, and Insurance Status Are associated with
Patients’ attempts to Seek Outpatient Care Prior to ED Visits
Kathryn Groner, Christiana Care Health Systems
215 Assessing the Rates of Error and Adverse Events in the Emergency Department
Matthew Wong MD, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center
216 Hospital- and County-Level Determinants of Emergency Department
Admission for Deep Vein Thrombosis
Kristin L. Rising MD, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
217 Survival and Health Care Utilization for ED Patients with Metastatic Solid
Tumors Randomized to Early Palliative Care Consultation versus Care as Usual
Corita R. Grudzen, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
218 Referral Systems for Patients in Low-income Countries: A Case Study
from Liberia
Jimin Kim MSc, University of Chicago
219 “Something is Fishy”: Emergency Department Visits for foreign Bodies in
the Larynx and Pharynx in Korea and United States
Viktor Livshits MD, Morristown Medical Center
220 Assessing Need for Prioritization of Emergency Services in fort Liberte, Haiti
Ayesha Khan, Stanford University Hospital
221 The Academic Contribution from Taiwan to Emergency Medicine Field from
1992 to 2011: A Perspective from Scientific Publications
Ching-Hsing Lee, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
222 A Novel First Aid Curriculum Improves First Aid Knowledge in
Laypersons in Rural Nicaragua
Breena R. Taira MD, MPH, Olive View UCLA Medical Center
58
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
223Impact of An Emergency Triage assessment and Teatment (ETAT)-based
Triage Process in the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) of A
Guatemalan Public Hospital
Heather L. Crouse MD, Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital
224 Development of Low Fidelity Simulation for the Low Resource Setting
Bhakti Hansoti MD, Johns Hopkins University
225 Analysis of Symptom Profiles in the NINDS Trial Using Latent Classification
Opeolu Adeoye, University of Cincinnati
226 Frequency and Speed of Early Antihypertensive Treatment of Severe
Hypertension in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients in a Broad
Community Setting.
Abraham Flinders, Keck School of Medicine USC
227 Safety and Efficacy of tPA administration in Ischemic Stroke Patients
Requiring Aggressive Blood Pressure-Lowering Treatment
Bryan F. Darger BA,MSII, University of Texas Medical School at Houston
228 The Efficacy of Intravenous Morphine for Acute Migraine
Benjamin W. Friedman MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
229 Parenteral Treatment of Tension-type Headache: A Systematic Review
Danielle Weinman MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
230Lack of Association Between Headache Relief and Reduction in Blood
Pressure Among Patients Presenting to An Emergency Department with
Migraine and Elevated Blood Pressure
Binoy W. Mistry BSc, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
231 The Neurocognitive Effect of Resistance and Simulated Use of force
Encounters on Standardized Field Sobriety Testing
Jeffrey Ho, Hennepin County Medical Center
232 Evaluation of Primary Intra-Cerebral Hemorrhage by Age,
Race and Stroke Volume
John Martel MD, PhD, University of Michigan
233 The Use of CTA Prior to Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke Was
associated with Increased, But Less Severe, Intracranial Hemorrhage
Arif Azam MD, the University of Texas Health Science Center
234Impact of microEEG on clinical management and outcomes of Emergency
Department patients with altered mental status
Shahriar Zehtabchi, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center
235 Management of Early Severe Hypertension in Acute Intracerebral
Hemorrhage in Primary Stroke Centers vs. Non-Stroke Center Hospitals.
Abraham Flinders, Keck School of Medicine USC
237 Monocyte Count is associated with ICH Mortality
Kyle B. Walsh, University of Cincinnati
238Impact of a County-wide Prehospital Routing Protocol On
Thrombolytic Rates for Acute Ischemic Stroke
Brandon Minzer MA, EdM, University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
239Characteristics of Participants with Pseudo-seizures and Other Nonepileptic Spells Mimicking Status Epilepticus in the Pre-hospital Setting in
the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial (RAMPART)
Donna Harsh, University of Michigan
240Characterizing Emergency Department Utilization By A Population-based
Cohort of Insured Pregnant Women
Karin V. Rhodes, University of Pennsylvania
241 Managing Missed Abortion in the Emergency Room with Manual Vacuum
aspiration: Factors Predicting Who Receives EDMVA
Kelly E. Quinley MD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
242 Ondansetron Versus Doxylamine/Pyridoxine for Treatment of Nausea and
Vomiting in First Trimester Pregnancy: A Prospective Randomized DoubleBlind Controlled Study
Lauren G. Oliveira DO, Naval Medical Center
243 Adherence to CDC Guidelines in the Evaluation and Management of Women
with Pelvic Complaints*
Dana E. Kozubal BS, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
244 Emergency Department Resident Physicians’ Comfort Levels with
Diagnosing and Treating Depression
Rasha Buhumaid MD, George Washington
245Incidence and Predictors of Traumatic Stress, Depression, and Substance
Abuse Diagnoses in Hospitalized Violently Injured Youth
Nathan A. Irvin MD, University of Pennsylvania
246Unmet Legal Needs among Emergency Department Patients
Matthew W. Miller BA, University of Colorado School of Medicine
247Caring for Homeless Patients in the Emergency Department: A Qualitative
Study of Emergency Medicine Residents’ Experiences
Kelly M. Doran MD, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars
Program, Yale University School of Medicine
248 Prevalence and Treatment Needs of Patients Presenting to the Emergency
Department with Alcohol Intoxication
Kenneth W. Dodd MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
249 Predictors of Post-concussive Syndrome after Mild TBI
Latha Ganti Stead MD, MS, MBA, University of Florida
250 Does A Wireless Incentive Structure Improve Retention, Subject
Satisfaction and Safety in Intimate Partner Violence Research?
Melissa A. Rodgers BA, University of Pennsylvania
251Utilization and Safety of a Pulmonary Embolism Treatment Protocol in an
Emergency Department Observation Unit
Matthew Stewart MD, University of Utah
252 Evaluation of An Age-adjusted D-dimer Threshold in the Diagnosis of Acute
Venous Thromboembolism
Joel C. Rowe MD, University of Florida
253 “A Doctor is a Doctor”: Reasons Adult Patients Choose the Emergency
Department Over Outpatient offices for Acute asthma Care - A Qualitative Study
Charlotte C. Lawson, University of Pennsylvania
254 The Effect of Empiric Systemic Anticoagulation Prior to Imaging for
Pulmonary Embolism on Mortality
Daren M. Beam MD, MS, Indiana School of Medicine
255 The Ventilatory Effects of the Prone Maximal Restraint Position on Obese
Human Subjects
Christian Sloane MD, UCSD Medical Center
256 Recommended Tidal Volumes are Not Commonly Started in Emergency
Department Patients Developing ARDS.
Michael G. Allison MD, University of Maryland Medical Center
257Intercellular Shear Destabilizes the Cell-Cell Junction
in Models of Acute Lung Injury
Ramaswamy Krishnan PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
258 The Effects of ED Crowding On Enrollment of Patients
in A Randomized Controlled Trial
Daniel Jafari MD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania
259 The Validity of Self-Reported Primary Adherence Among Medicaid Patients
Discharged From the Emergency Department with A Prescription Medication
Ru Ding, George Washington University
260 Estimating Negative Likelihood Ratio Confidence when Test Sensitivity is 100%
Keith A. Marill MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
261 Acuity Detection to Enhance Methods for Outbreak Biosurveillance
Meredith H. Arasaratnam ScD, National Collaborative for Bio-Preparedness
262 Handling Repeat Enrollments During an Emergency Clinical Trial: the Rapid
Anticonvulsant Medications Prior to Arrival Trial (RAMPART)
William Meurer, University of Michigan
263 Derivation of An Abbreviated Instrument for Use in Emergency Department
Low Back Pain Research: the Five-Item Roland Morris Questionnaire*
Laura W. Mulvey BS, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Cardiac Risk Stratification - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 4:00 - 5:00 pm in Atlanta A
Moderator: Andra L. Blomkalns MD, University of Cincinnati
264Immediate Exercise Stress Echocardiography versus Hospital Admission for
Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Low Risk Chest Pain
Danielle Minett MD, MPH, Christiana Care
265Low Risk Chest Pain Patients Less Than 40 Years Old do not Benefit from
Admission and Stress Testing
Anthony Napoli, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
266 Emergency Department Recidivism and Outcomes of Previously Evaluated
Chest Pain Unit Patients*
Anthony Napoli MD, FACEP,
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
267Yield of Provocative Testing in Emergency Department Chest Pain Unit Patients
Luke K. Hermann MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
268 Evaluation of a Novel Risk Stratification tool vs. the TIMI Score for Patients
with Chest Pain in an Emergency Department Observation Unit
Matthew J. Fuller, University of Utah
269Utility of Serial Troponin Testing in the Emergency Department
Observation Unit
Jason Dorais MD, University of Utah
270 High Rate of False-Positive Cardiac Testing in an Emergency Department
Observation Unit
Jason Dorais MD, University of Utah*
Psychiatry - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 4:00 - 5:00 pm in Atlanta B
Moderator: Rebecca Cunningham MD, University of Michigan
271Causal attribution, Perceived Illness Severity, and Smoking Stages of
Change in Emergency Department Patients
Michelle Jaques BA, University of Massachusetts Medical School
272 Knowledge, attitudes and Practices of Emergency Department Providers in
the Care of Suicidal Patients
Marian E. Betz, University of Colorado School of Medicine
273 Predicting Psychiatrist Continuation of ED Issued Psychiatric Holds:
Examining the Predictive Validity of Alcohol Use
Jerielle Adams MD, LSUHSC, Earl K. Long Medical Center
274Not Just for Kids: the Prevalence and Correlates of Eating Disorders in
Adult Emergency Department Patients
Suzanne Dooley-Hash MD, University of Michigan
275 Prior Mental Health Services Use Among Suicidal ED Patients with and
without Substance Abuse Histories
Lisa M. Schweigler MD, MPH, MS, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown
University
Trauma Resuscitation - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 4:00 - 5:00 pm in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Eric Legome MD,
Kings County Hospital, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine
276 A 4-year Analysis of Outcomes for Traumatized Patients Stratified by
Initial Systolic Blood Pressure
Colleen Tran DO, York Hospital
277 End Tidal Co2 as a Non-invasive Marker for Occult Shock in Trauma
Patients: A Prospective Cohort Validation Study
Chris Stahmer MD, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center
278 Determining the Relationship of Base Excess and Serum Lactate in Trauma:
Is Base Excess Useful as A Point of Care Test?
Douglas Fields MD, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center
279 The Influence of Prehospital Hypotension and Hypoxia on Non-mortality
Outcomes in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Implications for
Implementing the EMS TBI Management Guidelines
Daniel W. Spaite,
Arizona Emergency Medicine Research Center, University of Arizona
280 Serum GFAP Out-Performs S100B in Detecting Traumatic Intracranial
Lesions On CT in Trauma Patients
Linda Papa MD, CM, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center
281 Predictive Value and Appropriate Ranges of Prehospital Physiologic
Criteria for Identifying Seriously Injured Older Adults During Field Triage*
Derek Richardson MD, Oregon Health & Science University
Ultrasound - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 4:00 - 5:00 pm in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Romolo Gaspari MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
282 Pediatric Skin Abscesses Are More Difficult to Visualize with Bedside
Ultrasound Than Adult Abscesses
Russell Johanson MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
283 Does a Novel Simulator Provide Effective Hands On Training Versus
Traditional Trauma Ultrasound Training for a Disaster Response Team? A
Prospective Randomized Study
Michael Paddock DO, Cook County (Stroger)
284Impact of Decontamination therapy on Ultrasound Visualization of
Ingested Pills
Jason D. Bothwell MD, Madigan Army Medical Center
285Ultrasound Guided Central Line Placement by Emergency Physicians in
Beijing, China
Joseph Walline, Saint Louis University
286 The BREATH Pilot Study: Bringing Research in Echocardiography
assessment to Haiti*
Krithika M. Muruganandan MD, Rhode Island Hospital
287 The Number of FAST Exams Required for Proficiency*
Sharon Yellin MD, New York Methodist Hospital
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
59
Toxicology - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 4:00 - 5:00 pm in Atlanta G
Moderator: Aaron Skolnik MD, Banner Good Samaritan/Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Medical toxicology, Center for toxicology and Pharmacology Education
and Research, University of Arizona College of Medicine
288Intraosseous Versus Intravenous Cobinamide in Treating Acute Cyanide
toxicity and Apnea in A Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model*
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center; USAF Enroute Care
Research Center
289 The Effects of Increased Dosing of L-Carnitine in a Model of Verapamil Toxicity*
Jason Chu, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center
290 Pharmacotherapy with a Nicotinic Receptor Antagonist Protects the NMJ in
A Swine Model of Severe Parathion Poisoning
Steven B. Bird MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
291 The Effect of Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in an Oral Verapamil toxicity Model
Jason Chu MD, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center
292 Pretreatment with Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Reduces Mortality from
Cocaine toxicity in a Rat Model
Stephanie Carreiro MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
293Coral Snake Envenomations 2001-2011: Antivenin Use and Outcomes
Benjamin W. Hatten MD, Oregon Poison Center, Department of Emergency
Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University
Clinical Decision Rules - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 4:00 - 5:00 pm in Roswell 1
Moderator: Michael Brown MD, MSc, Michigan State University
294Narratives Outperform Summary Content in Promoting Recall of Opioid
Prescription Guideline Recommendations*
Austin Kilaru, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
295 Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Events in ED Patients with Drug Overdose*
Alex F. Manini, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
296 Modifying the Sgarbossa Criteria to Diagnose ST-elevation Myocardial
Infarction in the Presence of Left Bundle Branch Block: A Comparison of the
Smith ST/QRS Ratio Rule to the Selvester 10% Rule
Kenneth W. Dodd MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
297 Hypothesis Listing and Justification Rule Impact Upon Data-Gathering and
Clinical Decision Making
Dane Michael Chapman, University of Missouri, Columbia, School of Medicine
Training Competencies - Lightning Oral Presentations
Wednesday, May 15, 4:00 - 5:00 pm in Roswell 2
Moderator: Jeffrey Love MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine
298 Development of A Simulation Based assessment tool to Measure
Emergency Medicine Resident Competency
Kathleen Wittels, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
299 Outcome Feedback within Emergency Medicine Training Programs: An
Application of the Theory of Deliberate Practice
Timothy Dalseg MD, University of Ottawa
300Use of Electronically-Administered Patient Surveys to Evaluate Emergency
Medicine Residents on ACGME Competencies
Edward Durant MD, MPH, Alameda County Medical Center- Highland Hospital
301Can We Rely On EM Resident Self-Assessment of EM Knowledge?
Katherine Jahnes, New York Methodist Hospital
302 A Randomized Comparison Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a
Computer-based Teamwork Training Intervention on Medical Teamwork and
Patient Care Performance
Rosemarie Fernandez MD, University of Washington
303 Agreement Between Global assessment and Individual Competencies of
Medical Student Performance
David T. Chiu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
thursday, May 16th, 2013
Geriatrics - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta B
Moderator: Christopher R. Carpenter MD, Washington University in St. Louis
304 A Quick and Easy Delirium assessment for Non-Physician Research Personnel*
Jin H. Han MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University
60
305Comprehension of Emergency Department Care and Discharge Instructions
among Older Community-Dwelling Patients
Adam Frisch, University of Pittsburgh
306Using Biomarkers to Detect Delirium Among Elderly Emergency
Department Patients*
Maura Kennedy MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
307Impact of A New Senior Emergency Screening and Social Work Intervention
On Patient Satisfaction as Measured By Press-ganey Survey Methodology
Nicholas Branscomb, University of Michigan EM Residency Program
Sepsis - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Emanuel Rivers MD, MPH, Henry ford Hospital
308 Blood Transfusion Seemed Not to be associated with Mortality among
Patients with Severe Sepsis in ED*
Chih-Yi Hsu MD, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
309 The Prognostic Value of Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Combination with the
Sequential Organ Failure assessment Score in Septic Shock*
Won Young Kim MD, PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
310 Do Gender Differences Exist in Sepsis Mortality, Overall Surviving
Sepsis Campaign Bundle Completion, or Completion of Individual Bundle
Elements?: the DISPARITY Study
Tracy E. Madsen MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University
311 The Impact of Crowding Upon Implementation of Early Goal Directed
therapy in the Emergency Department.
Anish K. Agarwal MD, MPH, the University of Pennsylvania
312 Rapid Development of Septic Shock in a Swine Model Using Cecal Ligation
and Perforation Plus Fecal Inoculation
Lawrence A. DeLuca, University of Arizona
313Long-Term Mortality After Sepsis
Henry E. Wang, University of Alabama at Birmingham
314 Risk Factors for Infection with Resistant Organisms in Severe Sepsis
Patients Admitted from the Emergency Department
David F. Gaieski MD, The University of Pennsylvania
315 Higher Hospital Case Volume is associated with Decreased In-hospital
Mortality in Patients with Severe Sepsis.
Munish Goyal MD, FACEP, Georgetown University School of Medicine
Therapeutic Hypothermia - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Stephen Trzeciak MD, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center
316 Emergency Department Prediction of Survival and Neurologic Outcome
in Comatose Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia
is Unreliable.*
Catherine M. Wares MD, Carolinas Medical Center
317 The Use of Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring in Evaluating Resuscitative
Endpoints in Post-cardiac Arrest Therapeutic Hypothermia
Anne V. Grossestreuer MS, University of Pennsylvania
318Neuromuscular Blockade is associated with Improved Survival in Postcardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Induced Hypothermia
Michael Donnino, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
319 Aassociation between Blood Pressure Measurements, Vasopressor Use,
and Outcome in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients Treated with Therapeutic
Hypothermia From Four Sites
Sarah M. Perman MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania
320 The Impact of Pre-Hospital Therapeutic Hypothermia on Mortality and
Neurologic Outcomes in Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Systematic
Review and Meta-Analysis*
Benton R. Hunter MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
321 Pre-hospital Activation of an Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest
Response Team Improves ROSC and Hypothermia Utilization
Nathan Deal, Baylor College of Medicine
322Neurologically Intact Survival After Prolonged Cardiac Arrest in the Era of
Induced Hypothermia
Tyler Giberson BS, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
323National Trends in the Use of Post-Cardiac Arrest Therapeutic Hypothermia
and Factors Influencing Utilization
Charles Pearce MD, Northwestern University
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Clinical Efficiency - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta G
Moderator: Tom Scaletta MD, Edwards Hospital, Smart-ER
324 Scribes in the Emergency Department:
What Is the Effect On Facility Charges?
John H. Burton MD, Carilion Clinic
325 Decreasing ED Overcrowding Via Implementation of a Hospital Wide Surge Plan*
Shira Schlesinger, LAC+USC Medical Center
326Computed tomography without Oral Contrast for Abdominal Pain:
Effects on Emergency Department Efficiency and Patient Safety*
William C. Krauss MD, FACEP, Kaiser Permanente
327Impact of a Computerized Decision Support System on Screening for
Hyperlactatemia among Adults with Sepsis*
Jeffrey P. Green, UC Davis Medical Center
Atrial Fibrillation - Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta A
Moderator: Richard Summers MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center
328 An Evaluation of an Atrial Fibrillation Clinic for the Follow-up of Patients
Presenting to the Emergency Department with Newly Diagnosed or
Symptomatic Arrhythmia
Brandon Hone, University of Alberta
329 Emergency Department Visits for Atrial Fibrillation Between 2006 and
2009: Regional Variability in Hospitalization and Cardioversion
Tyler W. Barrett MD, MSCI, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
330 Evaluation of the HATCH Score for Predicting Progression to Sustained
Atrial Fibrillation in Emergency Department Patients with Newly Diagnosed
Atrial Fibrillation
Tyler W. Barrett MD, MSCI, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
331Incidence of 5-Day and 30-Day Adverse Events in a Prospective Cohort of
Emergency Department Patients with Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation and
Atrial Flutter
Tyler W. Barrett, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
332 Adaptation of a Disease-Specific Research Instrument for Quality of Life
assessments in Emergency Department Patients with Atrial Fibrillation/Flutter
Nimmie Singh BS, Kaiser Permanente Division of Research
333Nt-pro Bnp Rise as A Marker for Cardiac Arrhythmia in Patients with Syncope
Giorgio Costantino MD, Università degli Studi di Milano
IV Access - Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Roswell 1
Moderator: Alexander T. Limkakeng MD, Duke University
334 Association Between Multiple Needlesticks and Patient Pain Levels in the
Emergency Department
Nicole Piela MD, Thomas Jefferson University
335Lidocaine Infiltration By Injection vs. topical LET Gel for Anesthesia for Incision
and Drainage of Cutaneous Abscesses: A Randomized Controlled Study
Mark K. Ellis MD, University of Arizona
336 The Effect of Vapocoolant Spray on Pain Due to Venipuncture in Adults: A
Randomized, Blinded, Placebo-controlled Trial
Sharon Mace MD, Cleveland Clinic
337Using the VeinViewer Vision® to Increase the Identification of Peripheral Veins
for Intravenous Catheter Placement in Adults in an Emergency Department
Bruce M. Becker MD, MPH, Brown University
338 Prevalence and Characteristics of Patients Presenting with Difficult Venous
Access to the Emergency Department*
J. Matthew Fields MD, Thomas Jefferson University
339 Prevalence of Needle Phobia in Patients with Difficult Venous Access
Leah A. Davis MA, Thomas Jefferson University
Disaster Management - Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Roswell 2
Moderator: Richard Zane MD, University of Colorado
340 The Potability of and Analysis of Sterilization Techniques of Fresh Water
Sources Bordering the Flood Plain of South Long Island, NY and Queens, NY
Shiau Hui Chin MD, New York Hospital Queens
341 Effect of Hurricane Sandy on Prehospital Advanced Life Support Volume
and Treatment
Kimberly Baldino MD, Morristown Medical Center
342 Hurricane Sandy: the Effect of Multiple ED Closures on Patient Volume & Acuity
Gregg Husk MD, Beth Israel Medical Center
343Impact of Hurricane Sandy on the Presenting Complaints of Prehospital
Advanced Life Support Patients
Lisa Clayton DO, Morristown Medical Center
344 The Disease Frequency Among Evacuees After the Great Eastern Japan
Earthquake and Tsunami
Takahisa Kawano, Fukui University Hospital
Out of Hospital Telemedicine - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta B
Moderator: Steven Horng MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center / Harvard Medical School
345 Prehospital ECG Transmission Is associated with Reduced
False-Positive Cath Lab Activations
Nichole Bosson MD, MPH, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles
Biomedical Research Institute
346Use of a Medical toxicology Telemedicine Consult Service to assist
Physicians Serving Overseas: 2005-2012
Joseph K. Maddry, Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center
347 Breaking Down Barriers to ePCR Implementation in EMS: Turnaround Time*
Colby Redfield MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
- Harvard Medical School
348 Real-time Clinical Information Exchange between EMS
and the Emergency Department
Colby Redfield MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
- Harvard Medical School
Anticoagulants - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta G
Moderator: Daniel K. Nishijima MD, University of California, Davis
349 Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage After Minor Head Trauma
in Patients On Clopidogrel
Frank LoVecchio DO, Maricopa Medical Center
350 The Mortality and Severity of Bleeding in Trauma Patients Taking Dabigatran
Zachary DW. Dezman MD, MS, Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of Maryland
351 Does Anticoagulant Use Necessitate Triage to A Level 1 Trauma Center?
John J. Everett MD, William Beaumont Medical Center
352Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Does Not Reverse Dabigatran Induced
Anticoagulation in a Rat Model
Stephanie Carreiro MD, Brown University
AEM Consensus Conference on Global Health - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Roswell 1
Moderator: Jon Mark Hirshon MD, University of Maryland, Baltimore
353 Prospective Evaluation of Patients Presenting to An ED in Kathmandu, Nepal
Sneha Shrestha, Stanford School of Medicine
354 Assessment of Pneumonia in Children in Resource-Limited Settings
Payal Modi MD, MPH, Brown University
355 Overcrowding : European Emergency Department Needs A New Management!
Eric Revue, Director of the Emergency and Prehospital EMS,
Louis Pasteur Hospital
Abdominal Pain in Adults - Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta A
Moderator: Brigitte M. Baumann MD, MSCE,
Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
356 The Effect of Suspected Diagnosis on Physician Pretest Probability
for Abdominal Pain Patients Undergoing Computed tomography in the
Emergency Department*
Angela M. Mills MD, University of Pennsylvania
357 Emergency Physician Interpretation of Capsule Endoscopy: A Video Survey
Andrew C. Meltzer, George Washington University
358Is the Incidence of Intussusception increasing in the Adult Patient
Population and Do Age/gender Differences Exist?
Fred Fiesseler, Morristown Medical Center
359 The Finding of Gallstones Alone On Bedside Ultrasound Has Excellent
Sensitivity for Acute Cholecystitis.
Julian Villar MD, MPH, UCSF
360 Variation by Sex and Body Mass Index in Anterior Positioning of the
Acutely Inflamed Appendix in Relation to the Psoas Muscle
Craig Sisson MD, RDMS, University of Texas Health Science Center
San Antonio
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
61
Sickle Cell Management in the Emergency Department Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Roswell 2
Moderator: Jeffrey A. Glassberg MD, Mount Sinai
361 A Randomized-controlled Trial of Paracetamol Versus Morphine for the
Treatment of Acute Painful Crisis of Sickle Cell Disease*
Rifat Rehmani MD, MSc, King Abduaziz Hospital
362 The Use of Low Dose Ketamine and Hydromorphone for Patients in Sickle
Cell Crisis
Erin L. Simon DO, Akron General Medical Center
363 Variability in Pediatric ED Care of Sickle Cell Disease and Fever*
Angela M. Ellison MD, MSc, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
364 Elevated Lactate Levels in the Emergency Department Are associated with
Positive Blood Cultures in Children with Sickle Cell Disease*
Jay G. Ladde MD, Orlando Regional Medical Center
365 Emergency Provider attitudes towards Sickle Cell Patients
Caroline Freiermuth MD, Duke University Medical Center
Posters 2 - Poster Presentations Posters will be attended by authors from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Thursday, May 16, 8:00 am - 12:00 pm in 200 Gallery -level 6
366 Risk Factors associated with Urologic Intervention in Emergency
Department Patients with Suspected Renal Colic.
Justin Yan, the University of Western Ontario
367 The Effect of Shorter Resident Shifts On Emergency Department Efficiency
Brian N. Beer MD, Scott & White Healthcare
368 Team STEPPS Training: the Effect of Training on Both Nursing Staff
Perceptions Regarding Physician Behaviors and Patient Satisfaction Scores
in the Emergency Department
Shari Brand, Mayo Clinic Hospital
369 Does Implementation of a formal Sick Call System Affect the Utilization of
Sick Days by Emergency Attendings?
Michael Heller, Beth Israel Medical Center
370 Minimizing Transfer Time to an ST Segment Myocardial Infarction
Receiving Center: A Delphi Consensus
Conrad Williamson BS, UC Davis
371 Effect of a Dedicated Emergency Department Pharmacist on Antibiotic
Administration Times in Sepsis
Robert Graham DO, Geisinger Medical Center
372Correlation of Emergency Department Operational Factors with the Percent
of Patients Who Leave the Emergency Department without Being Seen and
the Average Length of Stay of Admitted Patients
Kenneth Robinson MD, Hartford Hospital
373Name Calling in the Emergency Department:
How Do Patients Want to Be Addressed?
Nathaniel Minnick DO, St John Hospital and Medical Center
374 Prospective Registry of Advanced IV Access: External Jugular Versus
Peripheral Ultrasound Guided
Michael D. Witting, University of Maryland
375 Variables associated with Community Hospital Overcrowding
Steven Weiss MD, University of New Mexico
376Impact of ED Crowding on Time to Antibiotic Initiation for Sepsis
Arica Nesper BA,
University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA
377 Accuracy of ED Medication Reconciliation as Determined By Mass
Spectrometry Analysis of Urine
Allyson A. Kreshak MD, University of California San Diego
378 Successful Hospital-Wide Practice Change Targeting Crowding in A Setting
of Increasing Demand
Drew Richardson MD, Australian National University
379 The Effect of Vessel Depth, Diameter, and Location on Success Rates for
Placement of Ultrasound-Guided, Extended-Dwell Midline Catheters: a
Comparison Between Two Brands.
Tristan Wihbey, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
380 Board or Walk Rounds?
Bobby Desai, University of Florida
381 Do Standardized Written Handoff Cards Improve Interservice Communication
During Emergency Department to General Medical Unit Transfers?
Sharmistha Dev MD, MPH, Henry ford Hospital
62
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
382 The Effect of Vessel Depth and Location on the Longevity of UltrasoundGuided, Extended-Dwell Midline Catheters: a Comparison Between Two Brands.
Tristan Wihbey, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
383 A Shorter Delay Before Analgesia Administration Has A Better Association
with A Reduction in Emergency Department Length of Stay Than Adequate
Analgesia in Patients with Severe Pain.
Raoul Daoust, Sacré-Coeur Hospital
384Using Computer Modeling to Study the Impact of Adding
A Fast Track to A Crowded ED
Hari Balasubramanian PhD, University of Massachusetts
385 Effect of Dezoning Physician Teams on Emergency Department Efficiency
Czarina Sanchez MD, BIDMC
386 Patient Satisfaction Variability by Chief Complaint in an Urban Community
Emergency Department
Kurt M. Isenberger MD, Regions Hospital
387 Hourly Measures of Patients Waiting to be Seen are Accurately Predicted
by a Discrete Event Simulation Model.
Eric J. Goldlust MD, PhD, Brown University
388 Reducing Alarm Fatigue in the Emergency Department
William Fleischman MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
389Improving Transfer of Care Accuracy and Information Delivery in the
Emergency Department
Justin Mazzillo, UT Health Science Center at Houston
390 Evaluating the Effect of Emergency Department Crowding on Triage
Decision Making and Patient Outcomes
Erin O’Connor MD, University of Ottawa
391 Prospective Evaluation of Computerized Physician Order Entry in the
Emergency Department
Steven Horng MD, MMSc, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center / Harvard
Medical School
392 The Impact of Interventions to Reduce Length of Stay in the Emergency
Department: A Systematic Review
Jameel Abualenain, The George Washington University
393 The Accuracy of Interqual Acute Care Criteria in Determining Observation versus
Hospitalization need in Chronic Heart Failure Patients in Emergency Department
David Fernandez MD, JPS Health Network
394 A Retrospective Review of Cardiac Stress Tests Ordered from the
Emergency Department (ED)
Lisa Moreno-Walton MD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences
Center-New Orleans
395 Physician Situational Awareness in the Emergency Department
Raphaelle Beard, Johns Hopkins University
396Ultrasound-Guided Midline Catheters: Patient and Operator Satisfaction.
Tristan Wihbey, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
397 An Online Teaching Module to Improve Critical Care Coding
Eric Steinberg DO, Beth Israel Medical Center
398 Balancing Responsiveness and Efficiency with Flexibility in the ED:
A Simulation Model
Lauren F. Laker MBA, University of Cincinnati
399 The Relationship between Patient Diagnoses and Observation Failure in a
24-hour Clinical Decision Unit
Andrew Chen, North Shore LIJ Health System
400Compliance of U.S. Camps with Guidelines for Health and Safety Practices:
the Camp Prepared Study
Kaylee M. Hollern, Penn State College of Medicine
401 Does a Patient Advocate during the Emergency Department Discharge
Process Improve 48-Hour and 6-Week Post-Discharge Patient Satisfaction?
Stephanie Haddad MD, North Shore University Hospital
402 Spatial Dynamics of Alcohol Misuse: Does Density of Crime and Alcohol
Outlets Characterize Likelihood of Youth Alcohol Misuse Independent of
Neighborhood and Individual Risk Factors?
Manya F. Newton MD, MPH, MS, University of Michigan
403Influence of Riding in Bike Lanes vs. Traffic Lanes on Injury Severity of
Bicyclists Involved in Crashes with Motor Vehicles
Dietrich Jehle, [email protected]
404 The Prevalence of Injury Vs. Illness in Children with and without ADD/ADHD
Presenting for Treatment to A Pediatric Emergency Department
Bruce M. Becker MD, MPH, Warren Alpert School of Medicine at
Brown University
405Changes in Bicycle-related Injuries in Urban and Non-urban EDs in
Massachusetts 2007-2010
Christopher Fischer MD, Beth Israel Deaconess/Harvard Medical School
406 Does An Educational Video Improve the Knowledge of Pediatric asthma
Patients Visiting A Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center Emergency Department?
Jay G. Ladde MD, Orlando Regional Medical Center
407 BMC Violence Intervention Advocacy Program: Understanding Challenges
to Recovery to Optimize Service Delivery for Victims of Violent Injury
Thea L. James MD, Boston Medical Center, Boston University
School of Medicine
408 Drink Driving and associated Prescription Drug Misuse among High-risk
Urban Youth Seeking Emergency Department Care
Patrick M. Carter MD, University of Michigan
409 Behaviors Increasing the Risk of Crash Injury in Latino Adolescent Males:
the Influence of Acculturation and Parent Connectedness
Daniel L. Summers MPH, Yale School of Medicine
410 Adolescent Balloon Analog Risk Task Performance and Behaviors that
Influence Risk of Injury
Jessica M. Walthall BS, Yale University School of Medicine
411Comparing the Effects of Age, BMI and Gender On Severe Injury (AIS 3+) in
Motor Vehicle (MVC) Crashes
Patrick M. Carter MD, University of Michigan
412 assault-injured Youth Presenting to the Ed for Care: Who? What? Why?
Megan L. Ranney MD, MPH, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
413 Distracted Drivers, at Risk Child Passengers
Michelle Macy, University of Michigan
414 Presence of Third Molars Predicts Increased Mandible Fractures
in Blunt Facial Trauma
Dave Milzman, Georgetown U School of Medicine
415 Home Falls in the Elderly: Eliciting the Mechanisms
Responsible for Severe Injury
Christopher W. Davis MD, University of Arizona
416Car Ratings Take a Back Seat to Vehicle Type:
Outcomes of SUV vs. Passenger Car Crashes
Dietrich Jehle, [email protected]
417 A Prospective Randomized Prevention Trial assessing Paper-tape in
Endurance Distances (Pre-TAPED)
Mark Ellis MD, Stanford University School of Medicine
418 A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Smoking Cessation Interventions
for Adult Emergency Department Patients
Jonathan H. Pelletier, Maine Medical Center Research Institute
419 The Effect of Legalized Sunday Alcohol Sales on Emergency Department
Visits for Alcohol Withdrawal
David L. Gutteridge MD, MPH, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
420Characteristics and Outcomes associated with Medicaid and Uninsured
Patients Presenting to the ED with Non-Emergent Complaints Previously
Evaluated by Other Health Care Providers
Meredith Camp. Binford MHS, Yale School of Medicine
421Is Health Literacy associated with Medication and Dietary Compliance in
Patients with Pre-existing Hypertension?
Emma Dwyer, St. Louis University
422 Emotions and Patient Satisfaction: Does a Patient Education and Expectation
Pamphlet (PEEP) Improve Patient Satisfaction?
Candice T. Cardon MD, Christus Spohn Memorial
423 Validation of An ICD-9 Code for Accurately Identifying Emergency
Department Patients Who Suffer An Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest
Steve B. Chukwulebe BS, BBA, University of Pennsylvania
424 Visit Urgency amongst the Chronic Disease Population in a Large
Metropolitan Region Emergency Department Network
Gary M. Vilke MD, University of California, San Diego
425 Patient Contact with Outpatient Providers Prior to
Visiting the Emergency Department
Kathryn Groner MD, Christiana Care Health Systems
426 Antiemetic Use in United States Emergency Departments
Elizabeth Savko DO, Saint Vincent Health Center
427 Planning for the Demographic Shift: Analyzing the Resources Required for
Managing Patients with Cancer in the Emergency Department
Anjana Patel, Mayo Clinic
428Comparison of Mortality, Charges, and Procedure Use Among Injured Adults
at Hospitals and Trauma Centers in California
Mark Zocchi MPH, George Washington University
429 Patient Literacy and Reasons for ED Use
Ann Tsung, University of Florida
430 Disparity in Patient Self-reported versus Charted Medication Allergy
Information
Preeyaporn Sarangarm Pharm D., University of New Mexico
431Correlation Between Opiate Prescribing Rates and State Medicaid Costs
Sarina Doyle, Orlando Health
432 Patterns of Recidivism in an Urban Academic Tertiary Care Emergency
Department
Lora AlKhawam MD, Northwestern University
433 Physician Practice Patterns and Association with ED Length of Stay for
Discharged Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Severe Hyperglycemia
Brian E. Driver MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
434 The Effect of Emergency Department Crowding On Physicians’ Decision to
Admit Patients with Transient Ischemic attack Or Minor Stroke.
Maxim Ben-Yakov, University of toronto (Division of Emergency Medicine)
435 The Role of Observation Services in 30 Day Recidivism
Amongst Patients with Congestive Heart Failure (HF)
Sean M. Lowe MD, Emory University
436 A Needs-Analysis of Uninsured Patients at the University of California,
Irvine Medical Center
Shahram Lotfipour MD, MPH University of California, Irvine
437 Public Participation in Research in the Emergency Department:
a National Study of Predisposing Factors
Enesha Cobb MD, MTS, University of Michigan
438It Matters More Than You Think: TG in the ED
Makini Chisolm-Straker MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
439 Pharmacists in the Emergency Department: A Study of Feasibility and Cost
Jesse B. Cannon MD, Emory University, Atlanta VA Medical Center
440Linkage to Care and Healthcare Utilization Subsequent to
HIV Diagnosis from an ED HIV Testing Program
Andrew H. Ruffner MA, University of Cincinnati
441 How Can We Improve the Emergency Department Experience for Patients?
A Multiphasic Study Using Kano Methodology.
Dipti Agarwal MBBS, Mayo Clinic
442Identifying Iowa’s Icu Staffing Models and Defining the
Role of the Emergency Physician
Elizabeth Hassebroek MD, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
443 Percentage of Medicare- and Medicaid-funded Patients Seen in
US ED’s Increased Between 2006 and 2010
Susan Watts PhD, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
444Impact of Gender on Patient Preferences for Technology Based
Behavioral Interventions
David J. Kim, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
445 Trail to Examine Text Message Based mHealth in ED Patients
with Diabetes (TExT-MED)
Sanjay Arora, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
446 Assessing the Satisfaction of Mobile Health (mHealth) Amongst ED
Inner-city Patients with Diabetes Who Received the TExT-MED Intervention
Sanjay Arora, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
447 Evaluating the Association Between Mental Health Professional
Availability and ED Visits and Hospitalizations for Mental Health
Related Conditions in California
Sophie Terp MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of
Southern California Keck School of Medicine
448 Text-message Reminders Increase Patient attendance at Outpatient
Appointment Following ED Visits
Elizabeth Burner MD, MPH, University of Southern California
449 Estimation of the Impact of Population Aging On Us Emergency Department
Visits and Hospitalizations Through 2050
Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
450 The Influence of Insurance Status On the Decision to Transfer Or Admit
Patients Presenting with Orthopedic Injuries
Dana Kindermann, George Washington University Hospital
451 Discharges to Nursing Homes Or Home with Additional Services Is associated
with Increased Readmissions Through the ED After An Index Hospitalization
Peter Smulowitz MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
452 Factors associated with Super Users of Emergency Department
Resources Admitted to Acute Care
Edward M. Castillo PhD, MPH, University of California, San Diego
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
63
453Use of Short assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish Adults (SAHLSA-50)
to Determine the Health Literacy Rate of the Spanish-speaking Population in
an Urban Emergency Department
Sheetal Thaker MD, Baylor College of Medicine
454 Variation in Emergency Department Admission Rates at the Hospital Level:
Role of Payer mix, Volume and Case Mix.
Amber K. Sabbatini MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine,
University of Michigan
455 Variation in National ED Admission Rates by Clinical Condition, 2009
Arjun K. Venkatesh MD, MBA, Yale University
456 A Comparison of Injury Severity and Resource Utilization between
Motorcycle Trauma and Gunshot Trauma
Sarah Fabiano MD, University of Rochester
457 Prevalence of Undiagnosed Acute and Non-Acute HIV
in a Lower Prevalence Urban Emergency Department
Phillip Moschella MD, PhD, University of Cincinnati
458 Discharge Glucose Levels and Amount of Glucose Reduction Are Not
associated with Short-term Adverse Outcomes in Discharged Patients with
Type 2 Diabetes with Severe Hyperglycemia
Brian E. Driver MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
459 Pediatric ED Observation Protocol Care: A Cost Comparison
Julie S. Weber, Wayne State University School of Medicine
460 Emergency Department Hospitalization Case Volume
and Mortality in the United States
Keith E. Kocher, University of Michigan
461 Describing the Mobile Health Capacity of Inner City Latino Emergency
Department Patients: Are National Estimates Accurate?
Sanjay Arora MD, Keck School of Medicine of the University of
Southern California
462 The Rapid Rise in Opioid Prescribing in U.S. Emergency Departments:
A Cause for Concern
Jesse Pines MD, MBA, MSCE, George Washington University
463 Orthopedic Observation Units Reduce Hospital Admissions
Amy Ernst MD, University of New Mexico
464 Pain Management in Children with Multi-System Trauma
Michael Kim MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
465 The Association Between Parental Language and 72-hour Revisits Following
Pediatric Emergency Department Discharge
Margaret E. Samuels-Kalow MD, MPhil, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
466 Return to School in Students After A Sport-related Concussion:
the Role of the School Nurse
Robert P. Olympia MD, Penn State Hershey Medical Center
467 Protocol-Directed Observation Care in Existing
Pediatric Emergency Department Space
Allison D. Cator MD, PhD, University of Michigan
468Car Safety Seat Usage in the State of Arizona and the
Adherence to the 2002 American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines
Allison Peasley MD, University of Arizona
469 Adult Chest Pain in the Pediatric Emergency Department:
Treatment and Timeliness From Door to Departure
Jeffrey H. Sacks MD, Emory University School of Medicine
470 Broselow Tape: How Reliable Is Weight Estimation in Hispanic Children?
Muhammad Waseem MD, MS, Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
471 Survey of Parents’ attitudes and Beliefs of Over the Counter Cold/Cough
Medications in the Pediatric Emergency Department
Urvi Thakker, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
472 How Well Can Adolescents assess their Own asthma Symptoms?
Tiffany Jan MD, the University of Chicago Medical Center
473 Emergency Department Presentation of the Pediatric Systemic
Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)
Timothy Horeczko MD, MSCR, University of California, Davis Medical Center
474 Frequency of Teratogenic Drug Administration without Pregnancy Testing
Among Adolescent Emergency Department Patients
Monika Goyal MD, Children’s National Medical Center,
The George Washington University
475 Do Pediatric Patients with Psychiatric Symptoms Need Screening
Tests to Rule Out Medical Etiology?
Reena Blanco MD, Emory University
64
476 Parental attitudes towards the Use of the Federal Exception From Informed
Consent (EFIC) for Emergency Studies of Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries
Nicholas J. Rademacher, University of Michigan
477 Knowledge and attitudes about Pediatric Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation
(p-CPR) among Parents Bringing their Children to the Pediatric Emergency
Department (ED)
Lisa Moreno-Walton MD,
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans
478Cost of Screening Laboratory Tests for Medical Clearance of Pediatric
Psychiatric Patients in the Emergency Department
J. Joelle Donofrio DO, Harbor UCLA Medical Center
479 External Validation and Comparison of Three Popular Clinical Dehydration
Scales in Children
Joshua M. Jauregui MD, Brown University Department of Emergency Medicine
480 Rate of Adherence to CDC Guidelines for Treatment of Influenza in a Pediatric
Emergency Department
Hamid R. Alai, Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
481Ill Appearing, Not Ill Appearing, Or Not Sure?
Paul Walsh, University of California Davis
482 The Growth of Fellowship Programs in Medical Simulation
Paul S. Jansson BA, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
483 Ability of Emergency Medicine Residents to Meet the Standard of Care for
tPA During Small Team-based Simulation
Timothy Koboldt MD, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
484 Physiology of Residents in Simulation Medicine
Dale Cotton MD, UC Davis Medical Center
485 Does a Physician Advanced Directive Survey Predict Bedside Response in
Simulated End of Life Scenarios?
Christopher R. Carpenter MD, MSc, Washington University in St. Louis
486 Design and Validation of a Difficult Airway Training Model:
A Prospective Observational Trial
Joan Noelker MD, Washington University St Louis
487 Evaluation of A Simulation-Based Curriculum for
Rotating Residents in the Emergency Department
David H. Salzman MD, Northwestern University
488 Simulation Emergency Department Thoracotomy:
A Novel Simulation Teaching Model to Enhance Residency Training
Erinn Hama MD, Georgetown University and Washington Hospital Center
489 Effectiveness of an Internal, Computer-Based Chest Compression
Simulator on CPR Training: A Longitudinal Study
Peter L. Griffin BS, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center
490Initiating and assessing a Team Training Curriculum
for the Emergency Department
Ambrose H. Wong MD, NYU School of Medicine
Milestones in Training - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 12:00 - 1:00 pm in Atlanta B
Moderator: Christopher Ross MD, Cook County Hospital
491 How Competent are Emergency Medicine Interns for Level 1 Milestones:
Who is Responsible?*
Laura Hopson MD, University of Michigan
492Inter-Rater Agreement of Emergency Medicine Milestone
PC12 for Goal-Directed Focused Ultrasound Is Excellent*
Stephen Leech, Orlando Regional Medical Center
493 Self-assessment and Feedback are Both Important Factors in the Retention
and Execution of Learning Goals by EM Residents
Amish Aghera, Maimonides Medical Center
494 How Do Practicing EM attendings Self-evaluate On the EM Milestones?
Timothy C. Peck MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Patient Communication - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 12:00 - 1:00 pm in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Emilie Powell MD, MS, MBA, Northwestern University
495 Preferences for Resuscitation and Intubation Among Patients with
Do-not-resuscitate/do-not-intubate Orders: A 1 Year Follow Up Study.*
John E. Jesus MD, Christiana Care Health Center
496 Does Anyone Know What We Are Talking About? A Comparative Analysis of
Emergency Department Verbal Communication and Patient Knowledge
Kirsten G. Engel, Northwestern University
497 Targeted Bedside Emergency Department HIV Screening
Does Not Impact Length of Stay
Bradley Hernandez MD, Regions Hospital
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
498 Evaluation of Competency for Physicians who Self Translate for Limited
English Proficiency Patients in the Emergency Department
David T. Chiu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Geriatric Trauma - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 12:00 - 1:00 pm in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Timothy F. Platts-Mills MD, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
499 Derivation of A Decision Rule for Obtaining A Head CT in the Elderly Fall
Patient with Baseline Mental Status
Darin Agresti DO, St. Luke’s University Hospital and Health Network
500 Elderly Falls On Level Ground: A Descriptive Study
Khalief Hamden MD, St. Luke’s University Hospital and Health Network
501 Do Trauma Patients Age 55 and Older Benefit From Air Medical Transport?
Howard A. Werman MD, Ohio State University
502Cervical Spine Injuries in Elderly Fall Patients Who Do Not Meet
Trauma Alert Criteria
Khalief Hamden MD, St. Luke’s University Hospital and Health Network
Ischemic Conditioning - Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 12:00 - 1:00 pm in Atlanta G
Moderator: Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
503 Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Endothelium Mediates
Post-Ischemic Vascular Remodeling and Functional Recovery in an in Vivo,
Closed-Chest Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction
Stacey L. House MD, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis
504 Opposite Effect of TNF Receptor 1 and Receptor 2 in Post-MI Remodeling and
the Underlying Mechanisms Involved
Yajing Wang MD, PhD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
505Critical role of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 2 in Blood Brain
Barrier Disruption, Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Neurovascular Injury in
Experimental Stroke.
Teresa Sanchez, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
506Long Term Adiponectin Administration Protects Against Myocardial
Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in High-Fat Diet Induced Diabetic Mice
Wayne Bond Lau MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Emergency Department Quality - Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 12:00 - 1:00 pm in Atlanta A
Moderator: Arjun K. Venkatesh MD, Yale University
507 There Is No Difference in Bystander CPR Rates for Male Versus Female
9-1-1 Callers
David E. Slattery, University of Nevada School of Medicine
508Implementation of Checklists for Central Line associated Blood Stream
Infection Prevention in the Emergency Department.*
Robert Klemisch AB, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
509 Reducing Blood Culture Contamination in a Community Hospital Emergency
Department with a Standardized Sterile Collection Technique*
Wesley H. Self MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
510 Emergency Physician Perceptions of the Quality Improvement and
Educational Value of a formal Peer Review Committee
Martin Reznek MD, MBA, University of Massachusetts Medical School and
UMassMemorial Medical Center
511 Emergency Department Error Characterization: Findings from 18 months of
formal Peer Review-based Error Analysis
Martin Reznek MD, MBA, University of Massachusetts Medical School and
UMassMemorial Medical Center
512Impact of A Change in Intensive Care Unit Admission Policy
On Length of Stay and Morbidity.
Jonathan McCoy, RWJUH/RWJMS
Undergrad Education - Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 12:00 - 1:00 pm in Roswell 1
Moderator: Lorraine Thibodeau MD, Albany Medical College
513 Directing Medical Students to a Comprehensive Set of
Chief Complaints can Standardize their Clinical Experience
Timothy Peck MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
514Current State of Undergraduate Education in Emergency Medicine
Sorabh ‘Khandelwal, Ohio State University
515 The National Emergency Medicine M4 Exam - an Update
Corey Heitz, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
516 The Efficacy of Electronic Versus Paper Medical Student Evaluations
David T. Chiu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
517 Text Messaging Enhanced Curriculum for Medical Student Emergency
Medicine Clerkship
Marjorie L. White MD, MPPM, MEd, University of Alabama Birmingham
518 Medical Student Perception of Resident and Attending Contributions to
Education during the EM Clerkship
Brian Barbas, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
Prehospital CPR - Lightning Oral Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 12:00 - 1:00 pm in Roswell 2
Moderator: Jane Brice MD, University of North Carolina
519 Prehospital Life Saving Interventions in Patients with Cardiac Arrest
in A Combat Setting - A Prospective, Multicenter Study
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center;
US Army Institute of Surgical Research
520Concordance of Prehospital and Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest
Resuscitation with Documented End-of-Life Choices in Oregon*
Derek K. Richardson, Oregon Health & Science University
521 Differences in Prognosis of Secondary Shockable Rhythms
in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Andrew J. Thomas, Oregon Health & Science University
522 The Impact of Pre-hospital Non-invasive Positive Pressure Support
Ventilation in Adult Patients with Severe Respiratory Distress: A Systematic
Review and Meta-Analysis*
Sameer Mal MD, University of Western Ontario
523Improvements in Survival for Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrests
in Singapore Over 10 Years
Hsuan Lai, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School
524Gender and Survival in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) - Results From
the OPALS (Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support) Study*
Basmah Safdar MD, Yale University
Keynote Speaker - Thomas R. Frieden MD, MPH
- Plenary Presentations, Thursday, May 16, 2:00 - 3:00 pm
Plenary Presentations - Plenary Presentations
Thursday, May 16, 3:30 - 5:00 pm in Plaza Ballroom ABC
Moderator: David Cone MD, Yale University School of Medicine
1NEXUS Chest: Validation of a Decision Instrument for Selective Chest
Imaging in Blunt Trauma
Robert M. Rodriguez MD, UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital
2Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin for Acute Treatment of
Severe Cyanide Poisoning in A Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model - a randomized,
controlled trial
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center
3
Anaphylaxis; Clinical Features and Evidence for A Mast Cell-leukocyte
Cytokine Cascade in Humans.
Simon G.A. Brown MBBS, PhD, FACEM, Western Australian Institute for Medical
Research, Royal Perth Hospital and the University of Western Australia
4
Accuracy of an Ultra-Low Dose CT Protocol for ED Patients with Suspected
Kidney Stone
Chris Moore MD, RDMS, Yale University School of Medicine
5Latino Caregiver Experiences with asthma Health Communications: A
Qualitative Evaluation
Antonio Riera MD, Yale University School of Medicine
6
Randomized Trial of Tenecteplase or Placebo with Low Molecular Weight
Heparin for Acute Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: assessment of PatientOriented Cardiopulmonary Outcomes at Three Months
Jeffrey A. Kline MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
Voices from the Past Informing the Future of
Academic Emergency Medicine
Thursday, May 16, 5:00 - 5:30 pm in Plaza Ballroom ABC
Moderator: Brian Zink MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University
FRIDAY, May 17th, 2013
Pain Management - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta B
Moderator: Sergey M. Motov MD, Maimonides Medical Center
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
65
525 Transbuccal Fentanyl Provides More Rapid Pain Improvement
Than Oral Oxycodone
Peyton Holder MD, University of Oklahoma Department of Emergency Medicine
526 Opioid Pain Reliever (OPR) Adminstration and Prescribing Pattern in An
Urban ED for Patients Presenting with Chronic Back Pain
Nate Egger MD, Wayne State University
527 Dental Pain in the ED, Costs that Hurt Patients and EDs
Joseph S. Kim MD, University of Kentucky
528 Analgesia Prescriptions for ED Patients with Low Back Pain:
A National Perspective*
Adam J. Singer MD, Stony Brook University
Ultrasound - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 8:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: David J. Blehar MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
529 Evaluation of an Ultrasound Observed Structured Competency Exam (OSCE)
Over the Course of A Emergency Medicine Residency
Stephen Leech, Orlando Regional Medical Center
530 Bedside Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Subcutaneous Abscess Requiring
Incision and Drainage.
Isaac J. Farrell, University of Arizona
531 Sonographic Characteristics of MRSA Skin Abscesses
Romolo Gaspari MD, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
532 The Diagnostic Accuracy of Bedside Echocardiography in the Emergency
Department Patient with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome
Jordan Singleton MD, University of Arizona
533 Bedside Ultrasound for the Detection of Dehydration in Youth (Buddy Study)
Joshua M. Jauregui MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department
of Emergency Medicine
534 What Are the Baseline Measurements for Physeal Plate Widths in Healthy,
Uninjured Children?
Lorraine Ng MD, NYP Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York
535 The Diagnostic Accuracy of Bedside Ocular Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of
Retinal Detachment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.*
Hal J. Minnigan MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
Patient Informed Consent - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta G
Moderator: Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
536 Perceptions of Risk and Informed Consent in the Emergency Department
James Ahn, University of Chicago
537 Are Well-informed Potential Trial Participants More Likely to Participate?
Alexander T. Limkakeng, Duke University
538 The Impact of Race and Sex of Study Personnel On the Decision to
Participate in Research*
Kimberly W. Hart, MA, University of Cincinnati
539 Which Parts of an Informed Consent Document Do Potential Trial Participants
Consider Important?
Alexander T. Limkakeng, Duke University
Academic Emergency Medicine - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta A
Moderator: Susan Promes MD, University of California, San Francisco
540 Academic Career Interest in American Emergency Residents*
John Burkhardt, University of Michigan
541 Description and Productivity of Emergency Medicine Researchers Receiving
K23 Or K08 Mentored Research Career Development Awards*
Daniel K. Nishijima, University of California, Davis
542 Quantifying Federal Funding and Scholarly Output Resulting From the
Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conferences
Daniel K. Nishijima, University of California, Davis
543 Faculty Prediction of In-training Examination Scores of
Emergency Medicine Residents
Amer Z. Aldeen MD, Northwestern University
544 Performance on COMLEX-USA Exams Predicts Performance
on EM Residency In-training Exams
Deborah L. Pierce DO, MS, Einstein Medical Center
545Correlation of the National Emergency Medicine Clerkship Exam with USMLE
Examination Performance
Luan Lawson MD, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
66
Novel Cardiovascular Ideas - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Chad E. Darling MD, UMass Medical School
546Cerebral Oximetry Monitoring During CPR is associated with Return of
Spontaneous Circulation but Not Survival in ED Patients in Cardiac Arrest
Adam J. Singer MD, Stony Brook University
547 An Evaluation of Two Electronic Control Devices Using A Swine Comparative
Cardiac Safety Model
Donald M. Dawes MD, Lompoc Valley Medical Center
548 Pleth Variability Index Does Not Predict Fluid Responsiveness as Measured
By Pulmonary Artery Cathether thermodilution.
Brandon C. Maughan MD, MHS, Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert
Medical School of Brown University
549 ECG Predictors of 30-Day Cardiac Events After Syncope
Benjamin Sun, Oregon Health and Science University
550 A Prospective Study on Point-of-Care Focused Cardiac Ultrasound in
assessing for Thoracic Aortic Dimensions, Dilation, and Aneurysm in
Correlation with CT Angiogram in Suspected Cases of Pathology
Faizan Arshad, Yale New Haven Hospital
551 A Prospective Observational Study of Inter-observer Agreement for Pretest
Probability assessment of Deep Venous Thrombosis*
Krista Brucker MD, Northwestern University
Injury Prevention - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Roswell 1
Moderator: Megan Ranney MD, Alpert Medical School, Brown University
552 Outpatient Follow Up and Management of ED Patients with
Elevated Blood Pressure
Brigitte M. Baumann MD, MSCE, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
553Characterizing Intimate Partner Violence Victims Unwilling or
Unable to Participate in a Follow-up Intervention
Justin Schrager, Emory University School of Medicine
554 Safe Zones and Danger Zones: a Geographic Study of Violence and
associated Resilience Factors in the Urban Environment
Ward P. Myers, Boston University
555 One Dose of IV Antibiotics Increases the Risk of Antibiotic associated
Diarrhea in Patients Discharged Home from the Emergency Department
John P. Haran MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
556Can A Social Network HIV Testing Program Expand HIV Testing Beyond the
Usual Emergency Department Population?
Robbie E. Paulsen MD, University of Cincinnati
557 A Qualitative Study of Client Perception of Effectiveness and Impact of the
Boston Medical Center Violence Intervention Advocacy Program Peer Model
Salma Bibi MPH, Boston Medical Center
Emergency Department Discharge - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Roswell 2
Moderator: Ziad Obermeyer MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard University
558 Short-Term Bounce-back Admissions Following Emergency Department
Discharge in Medicare Patients
Gelareh Z. Gabayan MD, MSHS, West Los Angeles VA and UCLA
559 Emergency Department Crowding and 7-Day Bounceback Admissions
Following Discharge
Gelareh Z. Gabayan, West Los Angeles VA and UCLA
560Use of Teachback Discharge Instructions Does Not Improve Patient
Satisfaction in the ED
Yonitte Kinsella MD, Washington University in Saint Louis
561 Evaluation of Patient Understanding of ED Discharge Instructions:
Use of a Scale to assess Self Efficacy to Carry Out Discharge Instructions
Luke A. Stevens MA, Boston University School of Medicine
562 Verbal Communication of Discharge Instructions:
Where Are the Deficits Greatest?
Kirsten G. Engel, Northwestern University
563Limitations of Teach-Back Method in the Emergency Department
Maureen E. Gross MD, Barnes Jewish Hospital/Washington University
Pain Management - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta B
Moderator: Sergey M. Motov MD, Maimonides Medical Center
564 Does Treatment for Pain Influence Emergency Medicine Research Participation?
Alexander T. Limkakeng, Duke University
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
565Lack of Association Between Body Mass Index and Clinical Response to 1 mg
Intravenous Hydromorphone
Shujun Xia MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
566 Randomized Clinical Trial of the 2 mg Hydromorphone Bolus Protocol vs.
the “1+1” Hydromorphone Titration Protocol in Treatment of Acute,
Severe Pain in the First Hour of ED Presentation
Andrew E. Chertoff MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore
Medical Center
567Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain in the Emergency
Department - A Randomized, Prospective, Double-blinded Trial*
Joshua P. Miller MD, SAUSHEC
Coronary Angiograph - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Judd Hollander MD, University of Pennsylvania
568Clear for A Year: Coronary CTA Follow-up for Low-risk ED Patients in the
Community Hospital Setting.
Aveh Bastani, Troy Beaumont Hospital
569 Risk Stratification of Candidates for Coronary Ct Angiography Using High
Sensitivity Troponin I.
Frederick K. Korley, Johns Hopkins
570Coronary CTA in Elderly ED Patients with Low-to-intermediate Risk Chest
Pain
Adam J. Singer MD, Stony Brook University
571 One Year Outcomes of Patients Following Coronary Computerized
tomographic Angiography in the Emergency Department*
Judd E. Hollander, University of Pennsylvania
Frequent Emergency Department Users - Lightning Oral
Presentations
Friday, May 17, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta A
Moderator: Martin Reznek MD, MBA, FACEP, UMass Memorial Medical Center and
University of Massachusetts Medical School
572Comorbidity among Frequent Emergency Department Users with a
Psychiatric associated Discharge Diagnosis
Jesse J. Brennan MA, University of California, San Diego
573 Asthma Exacerbations in Japan: Who Are the Frequent Utilizers of the
Emergency Department?
Hiroko Watase MD, MPH, Japanese Emergency Medicine Research Alliance
574 Factors associated with Frequent Users of California
Emergency Department Resources
James P. Killeen MD, University of California, San Diego
575 Frequent Emergency Department Users: Examining Service Duplication
Across Hospital Systems
Bahareh Aslani MD, Henry ford Hospital
576 Reducing Frequent Attendance by Chronic Kidney Disease Patients at the
Emergency Department.
Connie Boh, Duke-National University Singapore Graduate Medical School
577Impact of Social Services Case Management on Homeless, Frequent Users of
Emergency Departments
Theodore C. Chan MD, University of California, San Diego
Neurology - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta G
Moderator: Edward Jauch MD, MS,
Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine
578 A Prospective Cohort Study to Differentiate Traumatic Tap from True
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Jeffrey J. Perry, University of Ottawa
579 Quantitative EEG for Identification of Brain Dysfunction in CT Negative
Acute Stroke Patients
Edward A. Michelson MD, FACEP, University Hospitals Case Medical Center
580 Thymosin 4 in the Treatment of Acute Stroke: A Dose Response Study
Daniel C. Morris MD, Henry ford Health System
581 A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intravenous Ketorolac Versus Intravenous
Metoclopramide + Diphenhydramine for Acute Treatment of Non-migraine,
Bland Recurrent Headache*
Victoria Adewunmi MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
582Intramuscular Midazolam versus Intravenous Lorazepam for the Pre-Hospital
Treatment of Status Epilepticus in the Pediatric Population
Robert D. Welch, Wayne State University
583Use and Importance of Emergency Medical Services in Rural Hospital
Delivery of Thrombolytics in Acute Ischemic Stroke
Cemal B. Sozener MD, University of Michigan
Pediatric Decision tools - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Roswell 1
Moderator: Michele Nypaver MD, University of Michigan
584Impact of An Evidence-based Guideline On Rates of
Diagnostic Testing for Pediatric Syncope*
Megan OBrien, Boston University School of Medicine
585 Emergency Department Variation in Head Computed
Tomography Scanning Among Pediatric Patients with Head Trauma*
Jennifer R. Marin MD, MSc, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
586 Performance of Plain Pelvis Radiography in Children with Blunt torso Trauma*
James Holmes, University of California -Davis
587 External Validation of the PECARN Head Injury Criteria for Verbal (Age 2-18)
Children in a Community Hospital Setting
Aveh Bastani, Troy Beaumont Hospital
Geriatrics - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 9:00 - 10:00 am in Roswell 2
Moderator: James Miner MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
588 A Rapid assessment to Predict ED Revisits, Hospital Admissions or
Death at 30 days Following ED Discharge in Older Individuals*
James D. Dziura PhD, Yale School of Medicine
589 Trends in Short Stay Hospitalizations for Older Adults from 1990-2010,
Implications for Geriatric Emergency Care*
Peter W. Greenwald MD, MS, Weill Cornell Medical College
590Is It the Volume Or the Hospital? A National Look at
ED Admission Rates for Geriatric Patients
Scott M. Dresden, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
591 Emergency Department Geriatric Visits Are Not Increasing Faster Than
Increases in total Visits
Michael E. Silverman, Morristown Medical Center
592Geographic Variation in Emergency Department Use by
Older Adults in North Carolina
Timothy F. Platts-Mills, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
593GEDI WISE: the Quality of Care Transitions for Older Adults Discharged
from the ED to Home
Corita R. Grudzen MD, MSHS, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Posters 3- Poster Presentations- Posters will be attended by authors
from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Friday, May 17, 8:00 am - 12:00 pm in 200 Gallery -level 6
155Identification of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 2 as A Critical Modulator
of Vascular Inflammation During Endotoxemia
Teresa Sanchez, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
236 EMS Accuracy for Stroke Identification: Seizures Lead to Overdiagnosis
Ethan Brandler, SUNY Downstate University Hospital of Brooklyn
594Low Acuity Heart Failure Patients That Bypass
the ED Observation Unit - Room for Improvement?
Matthew Wheatley, Emory University School of Medicine
595 Risk Estimates for the Canadian CT Head Rule
in Patients with Minor Head Injury
Edward R. Melnick MD, Yale School of Medicine
596 Examining Clinical Decision Support Integrity:
Is Clinician Self-Reported Data Entry Accurate?
Anurag Gupta MD, MBA, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
597 Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Rule for Symptomatic
Ureteral Stone: the “S.T.O.N.E. Score”
Chris Moore MD, RDMS, Yale University School of Medicine
598 Systemic Antibiotics after Incision and Drainage of Simple Abscesses:
A Meta-Analysis
Adam J. Singer MD, Stony Brook University
599 What Is the Acceptability of Using Text Messaging Communication
for Notification of Normal and Abnormal Laboratory Results Amongst
Emergency Department Patients?
Adrienne Hughes, Baylor College of Medicine
600 A Translational Study: Emergency Department Administrators’ Interest in the
Adoption of an Unstaffed Computer Kiosk for Health Screening and Education
Katie E. Dean MD, Emory
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
67
601 Medication Adherence Emerges as A Strong Target for Mhealth Interventions
in Qualitative Analysis of Text-med (Trial to Examine Text-based Mhealth for
Emergency Department Patients with Diabetes)
Elizabeth Burner MD, MPH, University of Southern California
602 How Do ED Patients Compare to the General Population in their Use of
Information Technology
Lori Post, Yale University School of Medicine
603Limiting Acute Lung Injury in the Emergency Department
Brian Fuller MD, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
604 The Efficacy and Use of Bolus-Dose Phenylephrine for Peri-intubation
Hypotension in the Emergency Department.
Jarrod M. Mosier, University of Arizona
605 How Does Performing Bedside Ultrasound Impact Utilization of Ct Scans in
Critically Ill Patients with Undifferentiated Hypotension?
Hamid Shokoohi, George Washington University
606 Body Mass Index is associated with Inappropriate Tidal Volume Settings in
Adult Patients Intubated in the ED
Shannon Graf MD, MedStar Washington Hospital Center
607 Physiologic Instability in the Emergency Department Predicts Clinical
Deterioration
Daniel J. Henning MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
608 Palliative Care Screening for ICU Admissions
Cheryl Courage, Wayne State University
609Gender Specific Differences in the Prevalence and Emergency Department
Management of Anaphylaxis: A Multicenter Study
Jonathan Bastian MD, University of Calgary
610CT Imaging of Pediatric Chest Deformation during Simulated CPR
George Glass, University of Virginia
611 The Use of An Ultrasonic Cardiac Output Monitoring (USCOM) Device
in Addition to Cardiac Ultrasound in Patients Undergoing Treatment for
Undifferentiated Shock
Johanna C. Moore MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
612Intravenous Thiamine Increases Oxygen Consumption in Critically Ill Patients
Katherine Berg MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
613 Do Do-Not-Resuscitate (DNR) Orders Affect Treatment and Interventions
Performed By Emergency Physicians?
Danielle Hollingworth, Orlando Health
614 Prehospital Intubation Duration Does Not Increase Risk for Early Ventilatorassociated Pneumonia in Trauma Patients
Nicholas M. Mohr, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine
615 A Survey Investigation of Knowledge and Confidence in the Performance of
Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Parents of Patients in A
Middle Eastern Hospital
Lisa Moreno-Walton MD,
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans
616 ECMO as Rescue Strategy for Refractory Cardiac Arrest and Profound Shock.
David F. Gaieski, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
617Lactate Clearance Is Not Prognostic in Cardiac Arrest Patients
David A. Pearson MD, Carolinas Medical Center
618 Modified Shock Index but Not Cross Product Predictive
of Outcomes after Cardiac Arrest
David F. Gaieski, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
619 Measurement of Retinal Venous Oxygen Saturation During Progressive
Hypoxia in Swine in vivo Using the Blue-Green Minima Technique
Lawrence A. DeLuca, University of Arizona
620Comparison of the Normal Saline and Heparinized Solutions for Maintenance
of Arterial Catheter Pressure-wave.
Yuri Ishii, Tokyo Medical University Hospital
621Initial Prospective Analysis of therapeutic Hypothermia for Inpatient
Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Comparison to Historical Controls
Kenneth Will MD, Cook County (Stroger) Hospital
622 Practical Skill Retention in Medical Students: Improving Cardiopulmonary
Resuscitation with Hands-On Practice
Alexander M. Dabrowiecki BS, St. George’s University
623Lack of Agreement Between Swan-Ganz Continuous Cardiac Output and
FloTrac Vigileo Cardiac Output in a Swine Model of Septic Shock
Lawrence A. DeLuca, University of Arizona
624 Factors associated with Delayed Cooling in Cardiac Arrest Patients
David A. Pearson MD, Carolinas Medical Center
68
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
625 Time to Epinephrine and Survival Following In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Michael Donnino, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
626 Patient Perceived “Acceptable Risk” of Chest Computed tomography in
Trauma and Pregnancy
Eric C. Silverman MD, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
627 How Many Ultrasound Examinations Are Necessary to Gain Proficiency in
Accurately Identifying the Nerves of the forearm?
Anthony De Lucia DO, University of South Florida
628 Determination of a Body Mass Index Upper Limit in Adults for the Diagnosis
of Acute Appendicitis Using a High Frequency Linear Ultrasound Transducer
Craig Sisson MD, RDMS,
University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
629 Severity of DKA is associated with Length of Stay for Low-income, Resource
Poor Patients
Elizabeth Burner MD, MPH, University of Southern California
630 Does CT Scan Affect Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Suspected
Renal Colic?
Michael D. Zwank, Regions Hospital
631 Retrospective Validation of High Yield Criteria for Obtaining Chest X-ray in
Non-traumatic Chest Pain
Karl Weller DO, St. Luke’s University Hospital
632 Reduction in Abdominal Computed tomography Use in Adult Trauma Patients
as Use of the Focused assessment with Sonography in Trauma Increases
Alexander Y. Sheng MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
633 Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Workup to Evaluate for
Possible Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department
Samuel H. F. Lam, Advocate Christ Medical Center
634 Does the Finding of Gestational Sac On Point of Care Ultrasound Decrease
the Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy?
Brooke Hensley MD, UCSF
635 History and Physical Exam plus Laboratory Testing and Ultrasonography for
the Diagnosis of Urolithiasis: An Evidence-Based Review
Richard Sinert DO, Downstate Medical Center
636 Bedside Echocardiography in Cardiac Arrest, Predicting Return of
Spontaneous Circulation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
Nicolaus Hawbaker MD, University of Arizona
637 Factors Interfered with the Accuracy of Noninvasive and Portable total
Hemoglobin Monitoring Device in Emergency Department Subjects
Chien-Hsiung Huang MD, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
638 A Comparison of “Hockey Stick” and Conventional Linear Array Transducers
in the Detection of foreign Bodies
Daniel Jafari MD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania
639Correlation of Resident Training Level with Identification of Soft Tissue
foreign Bodies
David J. Thomas, East Carolina University
640Ultrasound Measurement of Renal Resistive Index: A Comparison of
Emergency Physicians Versus Registered Sonographers
Christina M. Millhouse MD, UC Davis Health System
641 A Comparison of Three Different Approaches for Ultrasound Guided Central
Venous Cannulation of the Right Internal Jugular Vein
Amy Heard MD, Stony Brook University
642 A Lack of Data Supporting Contrast-induced Nephropathy Following CT:
A Meta-Analysis
Ryan D. Aycock, Staten Island University Hospital
643Utility of Ultra-Low Dose CT Scans to Detect Ureteric Stones in the
Emergency Department
Brian O’Neil MD, Wayne State University School of Medicine
644 Preliminary Analysis of Factors Related to Ct Use in Evaluation of Cervical
Spine Trauma in Low to Moderate Risk Patients
Steven Katz, Barnes-Jewish/Washington University in St. Louis
645 Effect of Educational Intervention on ED Physician Ability to Perform a
Rapid, Bedside Ultrasound assessment in Late Pregnancy
Sachita Shah, University of Washington School of Medicine
646 Analysis of Lawsuits Involving Emergency Physician Performed
Point-of-care Ultrasound
Lori A. Stolz MD, University of Arizona
647Image Quality Evaluation of a Pocket-Sized Ultrasound Machine for the
FAST Examination
Brian Euerle, University of Maryland School of Medicine
648 Bedside Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Symptomatic Nephrolithiasis
Matthew Kostura MD, University of Arizona
649Ultrasound-guided Peripheral IV Access:
A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Lori A. Stolz, University of Arizona
650 Earthquake-Related Injuries in the Pediatric Population: A Systematic
Review
Gabrielle A. Jacquet MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
651Computer versus Paper-based Hospital Triage in a Mass Casualty Event
Eric C. Cioe MD, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center
652 Analysis of Twitter Users’ Sharing of official New York City Preparedness
Messages During the Sandy Storm
Nicholas Genes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
653Child in Hand - A Hazard Identification, Vulnerability, and Disaster
Preparedness Analysis of Orphanages and Schools in Haiti
Srihari Cattamanchi MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center / Harvard Medical School
654 Effect of EMS Airway Selection on Neurologic Status of Survivors
After Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Jason McMullan, University of Cincinnati
655Impact of Viewing an Ultra-Brief Chest Compression Only
CPR Video on Lay Bystander CPR Performance in a Shopping Mall
Omar Meziab, University of Arizona College of Medicine
656 Published Research Is Inadequate for the Development of Guidelines for
the Basic Life Support Management of Airway Obstruction in Adults:
Results of a Systematic Review
Richard N. Bradley, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
657 Association between Prevalence of Diabetes and Incidence of Out-of-Hospital
Cardiac Arrest According to Age Group: a Nationwide Case-Control Study
Sang Do Shin MD, Seoul National University College of Medicine
658 Strategic Placement of Automated External Defibrillators Using A
Community-Based Participatory Research Approach
Comilla Sasson MD, MS, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine
659 Probability of Return of Spontaneous- Circulation as a Function of Timing of
Vasopressor Administration in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
William P. Bozeman, Wake forest University
660 A Validation of the Association Between A Quantitative CT Scan Measure of
Cerebral Edema and Outcomes Post Cardiac Arrest
Cristal Cristia MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
661 Prehospital End Tidal Carbon Dioxide Levels Are More Accurate in Predicting
In-hospital Mortality than Traditional Vital Signs
Christopher L. Hunter MD, PhD, Orlando Regional Medical Center
662 Abnormal Prehospital End Tidal Carbon Dioxide Levels Are associated with
a Diagnosis of an Acute ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarct in the
Emergency Department
Christopher L. Hunter MD, PhD, Orlando Regional Medical Center
663 Do the 2011 Revisions to the Field Triage Guidelines Improve Under- and
Over-Triage Rates for Pediatric Trauma Patients?
E. Brooke Lerner PhD, Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals
664 Distributive Education Can Be Used to Train Basic Emts to Treat Opioid
Overdose with Intranasal Naloxone
Michael W. Dailey MD, Albany Medical Center
665Compliance and Opportunity in the Use of a Prehospital Continuous Positive
Airway Pressure Protocol in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure
Chad M. Kovala DO, St. John Hospital & Medical Center
666 assessing Prehospital Airway Management Using the Florida EMS Tracking
and Reporting System (EMSTARS)
Salvatore Silvestri, Orlando Regional Medical Center
667 Paramedic Time to Endotracheal Tube Placement Using a Video Laryngoscope
Joshua G. Salzman MA, Regions Hospital
668 Factors associated with Positive Catheterization Among Patients who
Present to the Emergency Department with Prehospital ST-Elevation
Myocardial Infarction Notification
Ke Zheng MD, New York Hospital Queens
669 The Effects of Statewide Protocols On Helicopter
EMS Utilization in Maryland
Asa M. Margolis DO, MPH, MS, Johns Hopkins
670 Patients with Confirmed Myocardial Infarctions are Frequently Undertriaged
as Non-Emergent by Medical Priority Dispatch System™
Amy Cutright, East Carolina University
671 Factors associated with Delay to Out-of-hospital ECG in Patients with
Symptoms Suggestive of ACS
Alison L. Sullivan MD, Baystate Medical Center
672 Patient Recidivism in EMS: the Los Angeles Experience
Stephen Sanko MD, LAC-USC Medical Center, Los Angeles Fire Department
673 Ambulance Paramedics in a Metropolitan Australian Ambulance Service
frequently misdiagnose anaphylaxis
Craig Ellis, West Australian Institute for Medical Research
674 A Prospective, Observational Cohort Study of a Prehospital Protocol
for Fluid Resuscitation of Trauma Patients: Compliance and Outcomes
Samuel J. Prater MD, University of Texas Medical School @ Houston,
Department of Emergency Medicine
675 Markers of Acidosis and Stress in a Sprint Versus a
Conducted Electrical Weapon
Donald M. Dawes, Lompoc Valley Medical Center
677 Patient Survey of the Rationale of Using EMS Services vs. Alternate
Transportation for Medical Emergencies
Viral Patel MD, ME., St. Luke’s - Roosevelt Hospital Center
678 Factors associated with In-Hospital Mortality Among Patients who
Present to the Emergency Department with Prehospital Hypotension
Shih-Chin Chou MD, New York Hospital Queens
679Impact of attitudes and Understanding of Reporting Requirements on Latino
Immigrants’ Presentations to Emergency Department in Texas and California
Robert A. Weston MD, University Medical Center at Brackenridge
680Is there Agreement Between Emergency Physicians’ and Patients’
Interpretation of A Do Not Resuscitate Order?
Danielle Hollingworth, Orlando Health
681 Adequacy of Non-contrast Ct in the Evaluation of Abdominal Pain in Older Adults
Mary C. Bhalla, Summa Akron City Hospital
682 A Survey to Define the Minimally Essential attributes of the Geriatric
Emergency Department
Christopher R. Carpenter MD, MSc, Washington University in St. Louis
683 Performance of an Emergency Care Telemedicine Program for Older Adults
Manish N. Shah, University of Rochester
684Characteristics of Patients with Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Concurrent
Infections at a Large Urban County Teaching Hospital
Sophie Terp MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of
Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA
685Can Physicians Predict Wound Infections?
James Quinn MD, MS, Stanford University
686 Rapid Universal Opt-out HIV Screening in Adolescents and
Adults of All Ages in An Urban Level I Trauma Center Emergency Department
James T. Scribner MD, John Peter Smith Health Network
687Lipoproteins Inhibit HMGB1 Release and Cytokine Activities.
Haichao Wang, North Shore University Hospital
688 Diagnostic Characteristics of a Clinical Screening tool in Combination with
POCT Lactates in ED Patients with Suspected Sepsis
Adam J. Singer MD, Stony Brook University
689Chief Complaints of Patients Testing Positive in a Universal HIV
Screening Program
Michael Sanders, Orlando regional medical center
690 Mandatory Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing in the Emergency
Department: An Evaluation of Statewide Testing in New York State
Since the 2010 Legislation Making It Law
Daniel J. Egan MD, St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital Center
691Increased Endotoxin Activity is associated with Clinical Deterioration in
Moderate Severity Emergency Department Sepsis Patients: A pilot study
Ryan Arnold MD, Cooper University Hospital
692 Synthesis of Recombinant Proteins to Facilitate Development of a Novel
Staphylococcus aureus Diagnostic Test
Tichaendepi Mundangepfupfu, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center
693 Defining the Impact of Delayed Antibiotic Administration Using a
Comprehensive Electronic Health Record screen to Identify Severe Sepsis
Ryan Arnold MD, Cooper University Hospital
694Incidence of Emergency Department Visits Due to Pneumonia in the United
States, 2006-2009: Findings from the Nationwide Emergency Department
Sample (NEDS)
Wesley H. Self MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
695 Demographic and Treatment Patterns for Infections in Ambulatory Settings
in the United States, 2009
Larissa May MD, George Washington University
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
69
696 The Evaluation of Febrile Infants Less Than One year of Age between
Emergency Medicine Physicians and Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physicians
Antonio Muniz MD, Dallas Regional Medical Center
697 A Fungus Among US: Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department
After Exposure to Fungus-Contaminated Epidural Steroid Injections
Janet S. Young MD, Carilion Clinic
698 Antigen-Specific Influenza Antibody Responses in Acute Respiratory Tract
Infections and it’s Relation to Influenza Infection and Disease Course
John P. Haran, University of Massachusetts Medical School
699 Blood Culture Use and Appropriateness in US EDs, 2002-2010
Leah S. Honigman, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
700 Are High Risk Patients More Likely to Say Yes to An Human
Immunodeficiency Virus Test? An Evaluation of Emergency Department
Patients in a Rapid Testing Program
Rishi Vohra MD, St. Luke’s- Roosevelt
701Clinical and Laboratory Findings to Differentiate Herpes Simplex from
Enteroviral Meningitis
Layli Sanaee MD, University of Ottawa
702 Factors associated with Patients Declining Kiosk-Facilitated HIV Self-Testing
in the Emergency Department
Kaylin Beck BA, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
703 Surgical and Antimicrobial Treatment of Skin Infections in the Age of CA-MRSA
Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
704Loading Doses of Vancomycin in the Emergency Department: Is It Safe?
Jamie Rosini, Christiana Care
705Utilizing An Electronic Algorithm and Notification System to Improve ED
Treatment of Health Care-associated Pneumonia in Patients with Severe
Sepsis Or Septic Shock
Adrian Garofoli MD, Mayo Clinic
706Challenges to Preventing New HIV Infections in a High-Risk Urban Population
Daniel Egan, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt
707 Viral Respiratory Detections in Children and Adults with Communityacquired Pneumonia Compared with asymptomatic Controls: Evaluating the
Role of Viral Pathogens in Pneumonia
Wesley H. Self MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
708 Trends in Emergency Department Abscess Care
Melanie K. Prusakowski MD, Carilion Clinic
709 Organ Dysfunction in Survivors of Septic Shock Treated with Early
Quantitative Resuscitation
Sarah A. Sterling, University of Mississippi Medical Center
710Loading Vancomycin in the Emergency Department: A Prospective Study of
Initial Vancomycin Dosing
Brian Levine, Christiana Care
711 A Consensus-Based Gold Standard for Who Needs a Trauma Center
Brian Willenbring BA, NREMT-B, Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals
712Comparison of a Clinical Decision Rule Versus Usual Care to Risk Stratify
Children for Intra-abdominal Injury after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A CostEffectiveness Analysis
Daniel K. Nishijima, University of California, Davis
713 Does Increased CT Scan Usage Improve Mortality for Patients with Blunt Trauma?
Juliana Wilson DO, the State University of New York at Buffalo
714Is the Accuracy of FAST Interpretation by Emergency Medicine Residents
Consistent Across Trauma Team Activation Levels?
Joshua Parker, Scott and White Memorial Hospital
715 Efficacy and Safety of Eight Centimeter Catheters for Needle Chest
Decompression - A Radiographic Analysis
Samuel J. Chang MD, Carolinas Medical Center
716 The Role of Necroptosis in Burn Injury Progression in a Rat Comb Burn Model
Avanish S. Reddy BS, Stony Brook University
717Using the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test
(ASSIST) to Determine the Prevalence of Substance Abuse in the Rhode
Island Trauma Population
Ralph Rogers, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Electronic Medical Records - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta B
Moderator: John P. Marshall MD, Maimonides Medical Center
718 An Estimate of Inaccurate Physician Documentation Using Electronic Medical
Records in the Emergency Department
Jonathan W. Heidt MD, Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis
70
719 Patient Perceptions of Electronic Medical Record Data Entry Methods
Peyton Holder MD, University of Oklahoma Department of Emergency Medicine
720 An EHR-integrated Mobile App Quantitatively Improves Emergency Medicine
Resident NIH Stroke Scale Documentation
James R. Foster II MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel
Deaconess Medical Center, and Harvard Medical School
721 Effect of a Computerized Decision Support System on Time to Antibiotic
Initiation for Severe Sepsis
Brandan Crum MD, University of California Davis Medical Center
Cardiovascular Basic Sciences - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Michelle Biros MS, MD, University of Minnesota
722 A Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator, Bay 41-8543, Preserves Pulmonary
Artery Endothelial Function in Experimental Pulmonary Embolism*
John A. Watts PhD, Carolinas Medical Center
723Co-targeting of Thrombomodulin and Epcr to the Pulmonary Endothelium Is
Protective in A Mouse Model of Sepsis-induced Acute Lung Injury
Colin F. Greineder MD, PhD, University of Pennsylvania
724 A Novel Esophageal Device Successfully Induces and Maintains therapeutic
Hypothermia in a Large Animal Model
Erik Kulstad, Advocate Christ Medical Center
725 Activation of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Provides
Neuroprotection after Ischemic Brain Injury in a Brain Derived
Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-Dependent Way
Teresa Sanchez, PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,
Harvard Medical School
Geriatrics - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta A
Moderator: Kevin Baumlin MD, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
726 Focusing on Inattention: A Very Brief Method to Detect Delirium in the
Emergency Department*
Jin H. Han MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University
727 Adoption of New Media by ED Geriatric Patients
Lori A. Post, Yale University School of Medicine
728 A Qualitative Exploration of Emergency Department Revisits by Older Adults
Stacy Salerno, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
729 Screening for Frailty in Older Community-Dwelling Patients: How Well Do
Patient and Care Giver Agree on Deficits?
Adam Frisch MD, University of Pittsburgh
730GEDI WISE: Improvement in Patient Satisfaction After Implementation of a
Geriatric Emergency Department
Nicholas Genes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
731 Developing and Validating the ED GRAY(Geriatric Readmission assessment
at Yale)
Lori A. Post, Yale University School of Medicine
Health Services Research - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Jesse M. Pines MD, George Washington University
732 A Prospective, Randomized Evaluation of Facilitated Primary Care Follow Up
After ED Utilization*
Michael Bouton, Beth Israel Deaconess
733 A Study to Evaluate Emergency Provider Efficiency and Cognitive Load Using
Different Methods of Computerized Physician Medication Order Entry*
Dipti Agarwal MBBS, Mayo Clinic
734 Evaluating the Association Between Primary Care Provider Availability
and ED Visits and Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care Sensitive
Conditions in California
Sophie Terp MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of
Southern California Keck School of Medicine
735 Reducing Racial Disparities in Access to Care: Health Care Utilization Trends
in the Era of the Children’s Health Insurance Program
Adrianne Haggins MD, MS, University of Michigan
736 Does the “invisible Hand” Optimally Regionalize Acute Care Providers?
Ari B. Friedman, University of Pennsylvania
737Can a Mobile Health Intervention (TExT-MED) Reduce Emergency
Department Utilization and Hospital Admissions in Patients with Diabetes?
Sanjay Arora, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Video Laryngoscopy - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta G
Moderator: Ron Walls MD, Brigham & Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School
738 Video Laryngoscopy Reduces the Rate of Esophageal Intubations Performed
by Emergency Medicine Residents Compared to Direct Laryngoscopy
Parisa P. Javedani MD, University of Arizona
739 Success of Intubation by Novice Intubators using Direct Laryngoscopy, Video
Laryngoscopy (GlideScope), and Supraglottic Airway Laryngopharyngeal
Tube (S.A.L.T)
Kimberly Leeson MD, CHRISTUS Spohn Texas A&M University Emergency
Medicine Residency
740 Timeliness of Simulated Endotracheal Intubation by Emergency Medicine
Residents: A Comparison of Direct and Video Laryngoscopy
Erik M. Angles MD, Maine Medical Center
741 Do Emergency Medicine Residents Receive Appropriate Video
Laryngoscopy Training? A Survey to Compare the Utilization of Video
Laryngoscopy Devices in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs and
Community Emergency Departments
Anand Swaminathan, NYU/Bellevue
742 Effect of Blood on First Pass Success Rate of Videolaryngoscopes
Used in Emergent Intubations
John C. Sakles MD, University of Arizona
743 Video Laryngoscopy Improves First attempt Success and
Quality of Laryngoscopic View Compared to Direct Laryngoscopy
in a Medical Intensive Care Unit
Jarrod M. Mosier, University of Arizona
Pediatric Trauma - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Roswell 1
Moderator: Rakesh Mistry MD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
744 Oral Contrast in the Evaluation of Intra-Abdominal Injuries
in Children with Blunt torso Trauma
Angela M. Ellison, University of Pennsylvania
745Importance and Performance of the Abdominal Examination to Identify
Children with Abdominal Injuries
Kathleen M. Adelgais MD, MPH, University of Colorado
746 Pediatric Prehospital Lifesaving Interventions in A Combat Setting A Prospective, Multicenter Study
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center; US Army Institute of
Surgical Research
747 Progesterone for Children with Serious Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI):
A Feasibility Study in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research
Network (PECARN)*
Rachel Stanley, University of Michigan
New Ideas in Education - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 1:00 - 2:00 pm in Roswell 2
Moderator: Kevin Rodgers MD, Indiana University
748 Evaluation of Differences in Care Provided During A Novel, thematically
Paired Simulation assessment Between Adult and Pediatric Populations
Yuemi An-Grogan MD, Northwestern University
749 Development and Evaluation of a Multidisciplinary Simulation-based Crisis
Resource Management Curriculum to Improve Non-technical Skills in Trauma
Resuscitations
Benjamin S. Bassin MD, University of Michigan
750 The Effects of Expressive Writing on Medical Student Anxiety and Performance
Anne K. Merritt MD, Yale University School of Medicine
751 Predictive Value of a Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) for PGY-1 Performance in
Emergency Medicine.
Laura R. Hopson MD, University of Michigan
752 Deliberate Practice for the Development of Expert Performance in Basic
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
David Scordino MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Information Technology - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 2:00 - 3:00 pm in Atlanta B
Moderator: D. M. Courtney MD, Northwestern University
754 Health Evaluation and Referral assistant (HERA): Improving Linkage with
Tobacco Treatment
Edwin D. Boudreaux PhD, the University of Massachusetts Medical School*
755 Effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) on Emergency
Department Throughtput Metrics and Test Utilization*
Michael Manka MD, SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine,
Erie County Medical Center
756 The Effect of Clinical Decision Support on Physician Adherence to EvidenceBased Guidelines for use of CT Pulmonary Angiography in Patients with
Suspected Pulmonary Embolism in the ED
Anurag Gupta MD, MBA,
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
757 Automated Outcome Classification of Emergency Department
CT Imaging Reports
Kabir Yadav MDCM, MS, the George Washington University
Markers and Treatment of Sepsis - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 2:00 - 3:00 pm in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Donald M. Yealy MD,
University of Pittsburgh / University of Pittsburgh Physicians
758 Randomized Controlled Trial of Safety and Efficacy of L-carnitine Infusion for
the Treatment of Vasopressor Dependant Septic Shock*
Michael A. Puskarich, University of Mississippi Medical Center
759 Tanshinone IIA Sodium Sulfonate Inhibits HMGB1-induced Chemokine
Release and Protects against Lethal Endotoxemia.
Haichao Wang, North Shore University Hospital
760 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPS) in Emergency Department Patients
with Repeated Admissions for Sepsis
Michael Koury, University of Mississippi Medical Center
761 Performance of Procalcitonin as a Marker of Septic Shock in Adults with
Community- Acquired Pneumonia
Wesley H. Self MD, MPH, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Emergency Medical Services - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 2:00 - 3:00 pm in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Theodore R. Delbridge MD, East Carolina University
762 Barriers to Calling 9-1-1 in High-Risk Neighborhoods with Primarily Latinos in
Denver, Colorado*
Comilla Sasson MD, MS, University of Colorado Denver
763 Association Between Emergency Department Operation Characteristics,
Length of Stay, and Elopements by Change in ED Volumes*
Daniel Handel MD, MPH,
Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine
764Individuals who Self-Report Previous CPR Training Do Not Demonstrate
Higher Performance Confidence or Accuracy
Jennifer Sayegh MS, University of Cincinnati
765 The Effect of CPR Quality on Survival and Neurological Outcome
After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Uwe Stolz PhD, MPH, University of Arizona
Emergency Department Crowding - Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 2:00 - 3:00 pm in Atlanta G
Moderator: James Holmes MD, UC Davis School of Medicine
766 Effects of Emergency Department Expansion on Emergency
Department Crowding
James Y. McCue BS, UC Davis
767 The Effects Contact Precaution Policies On Emergency Department
Flow and Hospital Length of Stay
Kevin Kotkowski MD, University of Massachusetts
768 The Association Between Timely Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for
ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Emergency Department Crowding
Christopher W. Jones, Christiana Care Health System
769 Emergency Department Crowding is Negatively associated with
Pneumonia Quality Measure Performance
Christopher W. Jones MD, Christiana Care Health System
Pediatric Infectious Diseases - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 2:00 - 3:00 pm in Atlanta A
Moderator: TBD
770 Asymptomatic Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Screening within the Pediatric
Emergency Department of A Disease Prevalent Population
Devra Gutfreund, Newark Beth Israel
771 Management Practices for Febrile Neonates in US Pediatric Emergency
Departments
Shabnam Jain MD, Emory University
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
71
772 Are Emergency Medicine Clinicians Recognizing Acute Kidney Injury in
Pediatric Sepsis ?
Marie-Carmelle Elie-Turenne MD, University of Florida
773Identification of Inflammatory RNA Biosignatures in Adolescent Patients in a
Pediatric Emergency Department with Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
Fran Balamuth, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
774 There’s an App for That: An Electronic Health Record Sepsis Registry and
Clinical Protocol to Improve Quality of Care
Fran Balamuth MD, PhD, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
775 Practices, Beliefs, and Perceived Barriers to Adolescent HIV Screening in the
Emergency Department (ED)
Rakesh Mistry MD, MS, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
86Use of Nasal Capnography as a Measure of Hydration Status in Children
Presenting to a Pediatric Emergency Department with Gastroenteritis
Tovah G. Ellman MD, Orlando Health System
Health Services Research in Trauma - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 2:00 - 3:00 pm in Roswell 1
Moderator: Brendan Carr MD, University of Pennsylvania
776No Man Is An Island: Living in A More Disadvantaged Neighborhood Increases
the Likelihood of Developing Persistent Moderate Or Severe Neck Pain 6
Weeks After Motor Vehicle Collision*
Samuel McLean MD, MPH, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
777 The Association Between Geographic Access to Trauma Care and Injury Death
in the US
Catherine S. Wolff MS, University of Pennsylvania
778 The Impact of Adding Level II & III Trauma Centers On Volume and
Severity of Disease at A Nearby Level I Facility
Brendan G. Carr MS, MS, University of Pennsylvania
779 Disparities in Access to Trauma Centers in the United States
Ariel Bowman, University of Pennsylvania
780 Analysis of Road Traffic Accident Related Injuries and Outcomes at a Tertiary
Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia
Kate Cerwensky MPH, Center for Global Health and Development, Boston
University School of Public Health
781Cost of Care Relating to Road Traffic Injuries in Two Tertiary Care Centers in
the District of Kandy, Sri Lanka
Catherine A. Lynch MD, Division of Emergency Medicine, Duke School of
Medicine, DGHI,Duke University
782Is Being Insured a Risk Factor for Admission to a Non-Trauma Center vs.
Transfer Out Among Patients Presenting with Major Trauma?
M. Kit Delgado, Stanford University School of Medicine
Residency Training - Lightning Oral Presentations
Friday, May 17, 2:00 - 3:00 pm in Roswell 2
Moderator: Christian Arbelaez MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
783Increasing off-Service Resident Productivity while on their Emergency
Department Rotation Using the Hawthorne Effect
Deena Ibrahim MD, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
784 The Prevalence of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered (LGBT) Health
Education - Training in Emergency Medicine (EM) Residency Programs:
What Do We Know?
Joel Moll, Emory University
785 Residents Are Hesitant to Report Hollow-bore Needle Sticks and Most
Commonly Report Feeling Rushed During Procedures When Stuck
Jessica S. Rose MD, East Carolina University
786 Preparing Emergency Physicians for Malpractice Litigation: A Joint
Emergency Medicine Residency - Law School Mock Trial Competition
Stacey Marlow MD, JD, University of South Florida
787Implementation of a Structured Handoff tool, SOUND, Leads to an
Improvement in Patient Handoffs in a Pediatric Emergency Department
Priya R. Gopwani, Children’s National Medical Center
788 Self-reported Sleep Disturbances Presage Decreases in Residents’
Psychological Well-being
Julie M. Carland MD, University of Arizona Medical Center
72
SATURDAY, May 18th, 2013
Airway Management - Oral Presentations
Saturday, May 18, 8:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta B
Moderator: Diane Birnbaumer MD, Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA
789Intubation Skills Correlate with Accuracy of Self-assessment*
Amish Aghera MD, Maimonides Medical Center
790 Declining Rate of Direct Laryngoscopy Intubations in an Academic
Emergency Department
John C. Sakles MD, University of Arizona
791Identifying Predictive Factors for Degradation of Intubation Skills
Brian Gillett, Maimonides Medical Center
792 Repeated Intubation attempts by an Operator associated with a Decreased
Success Rate in the Emergency Department: An Analysis of Multicenter
Prospective Observational Study in Japan.
Tadahiro Goto MD, University of Fukui Hospital
793Complications of Airway Management Following Failed Noninvasive
Ventilation
Jarrod M. Mosier MD, University of Arizona
794 The Impact of Obesity on the First Pass Success Rate of Emergency
Department Intubations
John Sakles, University of Arizona
796Incidence and Duration of Oxygen Desaturation During Emergency
Department Intubation Using Continuous Data Acquisition Software
Jerry B. Bodily MD, University of New Mexico
International Emergency - Oral Presentations
Saturday, May 18, 8:00 - 11:30 am in Atlanta E & F
Moderator: Charles Gerardo MD, Duke Global Health Residency/Fellowship
797 Physicians’ Diagnostic Accuracy in Using Simple Clinical Signs for Detecting
Anemia and Its Severity in Patients Seen at the Emergency Department of A
Tertiary Referral Hospital in Tanzania.*
Hendry R. Sawe MD, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences
798 The Prevalence of Suspected Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus and use of
Random Blood Sugar to Detect Elevated A1c Among Emergency Department
Patients in a Developing Country*
Candace McNaughton, Vanderbilt University
799Characteristics of Adult Patients Presenting to
Two Public Referral Hospitals in Cambodia*
Lily Yan, Stanford University School of Medicine
800 assessment of the Revised Kampala Trauma Score (KTSII) to Predict
Mortality, Need for Admission, and Use of Hospital Resources at University
Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia
Hani Mowafi MD, MPH, Boston University
801Improving Patient Flow in Ghana with the Use of Computer Simulation
Allyson Best, University of Cincinnati
802Characteristics of Pediatric Population Presenting to Two Public Referral
Hospitals in Cambodia
Mackensie A. Yore, Stanford University School of Medicine
803Characterizing Prehospital Transported Patients in the Ashanti Region of Ghana
C. Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman, Emory University
804 Motor Vehicle Crash Patients: An International Comparison China V. the US
Paul Ko MD, SUNY Upstate Medical University
805 Trends in ED and Hospital Mortality associated with Opening of
A Full Capacity Emergency Department in A Tertiary Level Hospital
in Sub-Saharan Africa
Hendry R. Sawe MD, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences
806 Activated Learning in Global Health Education - A Pilot Study
Jaime Jordan, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
807 Access to Care among Adults with Previously and Newly Diagnosed
Cardiovascular Disease Presenting to the Emergency Department of a
Tertiary Referral Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya
Rita K. Kuwahara MIH, UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine
808 Epidemiology of Injuries, Outcomes, and Hospital Resource Utilization at
A Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia
Philip Seidenberg MD, University of New Mexico
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Post-Cardiac Arrest Care - Lightning Oral Presentations
Saturday, May 18, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta A
Moderator: Richard Summers MD, University of Mississippi Medical Center
809Lactate Clearance is associated with Improved Survival and Neurological
Outcome in Post-Cardiac Arrest*
Lars W. Andersen BS, Research Center for Emergency Medicine
810 Microcirculatory Impairment in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients*
Yasser Omar MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
811Initial Hyperoxia is associated with Survival in Post-Arrest Patients Enrolled
in the PATH Database
David F. Gaieski MD, University of Pennsylvania
812Initial Base Deficit and Arterial Carbon Dioxide Level associated with
Survival in Post-Arrest Patients
David F. Gaieski, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
813 Time to Target Temperature and Neurologic Outcome in Survivors of Cardiac
Arrest
Sarah M. Perman, University of Pennsylvania
814 Emergent CT Does Not Delay Cooling in Patients After Cardiac Arrest*
David A. Pearson MD, Carolinas Medical Center
828 Measurement of Venom and Clotting Function in Patients with Russell’s
Viper Coagulopathy and Response to Antivenom
Geoffrey K. Isbister FACEM, MD, Discipline of Clinical Pharmacology, University
of Newcastle and Department of Clinical toxicology, Calvary Mater Newcastle
829 The Impact of the Bugaboo Wild Fires on Regional Emergency Department
and Inpatient Visits
Glenn R. Gookin PhD, University of Central Florida
830Inhalant Abuse: Trends from United States Poison Centers
Janna H. Villano MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Department of
Emergency Medicine
831 Performance of a Multi-disciplinary Observation Protocol for
Acetaminophen Overdose in the Emergency Department
Gillian A. Beauchamp MD, University of Cincinnati
832 What Characteristics Can Be Used to Predict Ethylene Glycol Ingestion?
Cole A. Wiedel BA, University of Colorado School of Medicine
833 The Efficacy of CYP2D6 Dependent Analgesics and Antiemetics in
Emergency Department Patients
Andrew A. Monte MD, University of Colorado
Simulation in Emergency Medicine - Lightning Oral Presentations
Saturday, May 18, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta C & D
Moderator: Daniel Handel MD, MPH,
Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine
815 Emergency Medicine Resident Leadership Ability: A Simulation-Based
Longitudinal Study*
Matthew C. Carlisle, UC Davis
816 Effect of Simulated Rare Procedures Clinic on EM Faculty Clinical Procedural
Knowledge and Confidence
Amanda J. Carlson MD, Regions Hospital
818 Effects of Team Training on 4th Year Medical Student Management of
Simulated Critically Ill Patients
Daniel Runde MD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
819 A Comparison of Evaluation Metrics for High-Fidelity ACLS-based Simulation
Cases for PGY-1 and PGY-3 Level Learners
Jo Anna Leuck MD, Carolinas Medical Center
820 Surgical Specialty Residents Perform Better in Simulation Based Central
Venous Catheter Insertion assessment Than Medical Specialty Residents
Kosuke Mori, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tokyo Bay Urayasu/Ichikawa
Medical Center, Noguchi Hideyo Memorial International Hospital
Prescription and Abuse of Opiates - Lightning Oral Presentations
Saturday, May 18, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Roswell 1
Moderator: Steven B. Bird MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
821 Association Between Opioid Prescribing in Florida
and Statewide Morbidity and Mortality
Erin Caddell, University of Central Florida, College of Medicine
822U.S. Prescription Opioid Overdose Death: A Health Disparities Paradox
Tracy Macintosh MD, MPH, Yale-New Haven Hospital
823 Prevalence of Adverse Events From Opiates in the Emergency Department
Raoul Daoust, Université de Montréal
824 Does Prescribing Opiate Medication Correlate with Emergency Department
Patient Satisfaction Scores?
Matt Burge MD, Scott & White
825 Prevalence and Correlates of Nonmedical Prescription Opiate and
Nonmedical Prescription Sedative Use Among A Group of Adolescents and
Young Adults with Current Drug Use in An Urban Emergency Department
Lauren K. Whiteside, University of Washington, Division of Emergency Medicine
826 The Association Between Statewide Opiate Prescribing Patterns
and Drug-specific Mortality Rates Over A 10 Year Period
Sarina Doyle MD, Orlando Health
Toxicology - Lightning Oral Presentations
Saturday, May 18, 8:00 - 9:00 am in Roswell 2
Moderator: Kavita Babu MD, University of Massachusetts
827 Survival from Organophosphate Poisoning Induces
Changes in Respiration During Sleep
Romolo Gaspari MD, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
73
2013 Innovations in Emergency Medicine Education (ME)
14. M
ust-Read Article Of The Month: Cloud-based
Asynchronous Journal Club
James C. O’Neill, Iltifat Husain.
Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston Salem, NC
15. Cloud-based Online Continuing Medical Education for an Emergency
Medicine System
James C. O’Neill, Iltifat Husain, Casey Glass, David Manthey,
Cedric Lefebvre. Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston Salem, NC
*SAEM Gallery of Excellence Nominees 2013
Thursday, May 16, 2013
Innovations Exhibits
8:00 am - 12:00 pm in 200 Gallery -level 6
1. Predicting Annual Inservice Scores Using Audience Response System
Lucienne Lutfy-Clayton1, Kaushal Shah 2, Grant Wei3 , David P. Lisbon
Jr4, Sally A Santen5 , Katherine Jahnes6, Jaime Jordan7. 1Tufts University
Medical School Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA; 2Mt. Sinai
School Of Medicine, New York, NY; 3UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson, New
Brunswick, NJ; 4The University Of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS;
5
University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 6New York Methodist Hospital,
Brooklyn, NY; 7Harbor-UCLA, Los Ángeles, CA
2. Ultrasound-Guided Vascular Access Education:
A Homemade Phantom with Various Feedback Capabilities
Daniela Morato, Dina Seif. LAC+USC Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
3. Competency-Based Disaster Training for Medical Trainees
in Less Than One Day
Lancer A. Scott. MUSC, Charleston, SC
4. Geriatric Abdominal Pain Game
Nikki B. Waller, Kevin Biese, Kristen Barrio, Chris Howarth,
Ellen Roberts, Jan Busby-Whitehead.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
5. D
evelopment of a Simulated “Night on Call” Experience within a
Capstone Course at One U.S. Medical School
David A. Wald, Alisa Peet, Jane Cripe, Michael Curtis.
Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
6. Critical Actions In Common Floor Emergencies - A Multimedia,
Multimodal And Simulation Based Approach
Nelson Wong, Scott Goldberg, Christopher Strother.
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
7. R
esuscitation Elective for Emergency Medicine Residents Interested in
Critical Care
Jarrod M. Mosier, Alice Min, Albert Fiorello.
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
11. E
mergency Medicine Resident Education in Ophthalmology
Lara Phillips, Lawrence Stack. Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN
Innovations -Medical Student Spotlight
12:00 - 1:00 pm in Atlanta H
16. T
he Mentorship Gap: Bridging Residents and Medical Students through
a Near Peer Mentoring Program*
Robbie E. Paulsen, Matthew J. Stull, Sarah Ronan-Bentle.
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
17. E
MIG: A Student-Driven Integrative Curriculum Approach
to Simulation*
Annette Dorfman. George Washington University, Washington, DC
18. A
ssessment of Level 1 EM Milestones in Incoming Interns
Laura Hopson, Marcia Perry, Samantha Hauff, Eve Losman,
James Mattimore, Monica Lypson, Sally Santen.
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
3. Competency-Based Disaster Training for Medical Trainees
in Less Than One Day
Lancer A. Scott. MUSC, Charleston, SC
Friday, May 17, 2013
Innovations – Oral Presentations
8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta H
19. Milestone Tracking and Documentation Augmented via an Electronic
Tool Tailored to an Emergency Medicine Simulation Curriculum*
Raymond P. Ten Eyck. Wright State University, Kettering, OH
20. Attending Emergency Physician Airway Skills Assessment: The
Annual Checkride
Daniel R. Rodgers, Kevin C. King, Thomas E. Terndrup.
Penn State Hershey, Hershey, PA
21. Development Of A Novel, Competency-based Emergency Medicine
“Dean’s Letter”*
Cemal B. Sozener, Laura R. Hopson, Joseph House,
Suzanne L. Dooley-Hash, Samantha R. Hauff, Monica L. Lypson,
Sally A. Santen. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
22. Team Based Learning - Electrocardiogram Interpretation and
Application for Emergency Medicine Residents
Rebecca A. Bavolek, Chandra D. Aubin, Albert J. Kim. Washington
University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
Innovations - Didactics Spotlight
8:00 - 9:00 am in Atlanta H
8. Using iTunesU as a Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum
Deployment Device.*
Janis P. Tupesis, Nestor Rodriguez, Katy Oksuita, Matt Anderson,
Carrie Voss-Harvey, Will Sanderson.
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI
9. Developing Residency Education with Andragogy and Multimedia: The
DREAM Curriculum*
Karen R. Lind, Brian Gillett, David Saloum, Eitan Dickman, John Marshall.
Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
10. T
eams Teaching Other Teams: An Interactive Educational Session*
Chandra Aubin, Rebecca Bavolek, Evan Schwarz.
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
11. E
mergency Medicine Resident Education in Ophthalmology*
Lara Phillips, Lawrence Stack. Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN
Innovations Exhibits
8:00 - 12:00 pm in 200 Gallery -level 6
Innovations - Technology Spotlight
9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta H
12. T
he EM10 project: A High Yield, Mobile Device Based Learning Platform
for Medical Student Education during Emergency Department Shifts*
Jeffrey R. Vlasic. University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI
13. E
mergency Medicine E-Learning: Articulating the Facts,
Moving to the Future*
Cynthia Leung, Aaron Bernard, Nicholas E. Kman.
The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH
74
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
23. An Innovative Approach to Simulating the Repair of an Injured Nailbed
Tara Martin, Nicholas Greek, Claudia Ranniger.
George Washington University, Washington, DC
24. A Novel Clear Ballistics Gel Phantom for Ultrasound Training
Richard Amini, Lori Stolz, Srikar Adhikari. University of Arizona Medical
Center, Tucson, AZ
25. E
mergency Medicine Interpersonal Communication Skills Curriculum
Marquita N. Hicks1, Pooja Gajare1, Lisa Moreno-Walton 2. 1University of
Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; 2Louisiana State University
Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
26. E
quianalgesic Opioid Conversion Worksheet for Cancer
Pain Management
Kyle D. Minor, Zachary Binney, Tammie Quest.
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
27. Teaching Health Policy: Developing a Portable E-learning Tool for
Medical Student Education
Stephanie Y. Donald, Nathan Seth Trueger, Aisha Liferidge,
Janice Blanchard, Steven Davis, Malika Fair, Joneigh Khaldun,
Ali Pourmand, Cedric Dark.
George Washington University, Washington, DC
28. Innovation in Education: Integration of Emergency Medicine In The
Preclinical Years With A First Year Course, “Introduction To Emergency
Medicine.”
Amy Leuthauser. Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Innovations – Oral Presentations
9:00 - 10:00 am in Atlanta H
29. Voodoo or Valid? An Exercise to Promote Academic and Clinical
Integration toward Evidence Based Practice
Joel Moll. Emory University, Atlanta, GA
30. Integration of High Fidelity Simulation and Learning Management
Software to Effectively Teach Mechanical Ventilation in Emergency
Medicine
Amish Aghera, Brian Gillett, Anatoliy Golster. Maimonides Medical
Center, Brooklyn, NY
31. Using an Online Discussion Board for Asynchronous Learning in an
Emergency Medicine Curriculum
Christine Zink, Christopher Zernial, Salim Rezaie, Dan Mosely.
UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX
32. A
Flashcard Based Approach to Teaching Critical Appraisal Skills
Tom Evens1, Julie-Anne Greenslade2, Shweta Gidwani 2. 1Ealing Hospital
NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom; 2Northwick Park Hospital, London,
United Kingdom
Innovations - Oral Presentations
1:00 - 2:00 pm in Atlanta H
33. A
Collaborative Approach to a Novel, Goal Directed Echocardiography
Training for Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Physicians for
Management of Patients in Shock
Jarrod M. Mosier, Lori Stolz, Albert Fiorello, John Bloom, Srikar Adhikari.
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
34. T
he Next Generations’ Journal Club: An Innovative Approach to
Multimedia and Evidence Based Medicine
Evan Pushchak, Charles Pearce, Mark Courtney.
Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
35. D
irect Observation of Resident-to-Resident Communication during
Transition of Care in the Emergency Department
Adam Z. Tobias, Michele L. Dorfsman, Allan B. Wolfson.
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
36. Development of Low Fidelity Simulation for the Low Resource Setting
Bhakti Hansoti1, John Foggle2, Braden Hexom3 , Jared Novack4,
David Walker5 , Ernest Wang4. 1Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD;
2
Brown University, Providence, RI; 3Mount Sinai School of Medicine,
New York, NY; 4Northshore University HealthSystem, Chicago, IL;
5
Elmhurst Hospital Center, Elmhurst, NY
2013 SAEM Award Recipients
2013 John Marx Leadership Award
– Vincent Verdile MD, FACEP - Albany Medical College
2013 Young Investigator Award
– Nathan J. White MD, MS
University of Washington School of Medicine
2013 Young Investigator Award
– Daniel K. Nishijima MD, MAS
University of California, Davis
2013 Young Investigator Award
– Comilla Sasson MD, MS - University of Colorado-Denver
Hal Jayne Excellence in Education Award
– Michael Beeson MD, MBA, FACEP
Akron General Medical Center
2013 Excellence in Research Award
– Gail D’Onofrio MS, MD
Yale University School of Medicine
2013 Advancement of Women in
Academic Emergency Medicine
– Kathleen Clem BSN, MD, FACEP - Loma Linda University
2013 Master Clinician Award
– Eric G. Laurin MD - University of California, Davis
Small Group Values | Corporate Resources
European Society of Emergency
Medicine (EuSEM) Abstracts
Friday, May 17, 20138:00 - 10:00am
PT-200 Conference Room 3
Overcrowding in EDs: what are the
solutions in Europe
Eric Revue
Organization of STEMI care: what is the difference
between USA and Europe
Abdel Bellou
Evolution of mortality of Acute Heart
Failure in Europe
Said Laribi
Policy on Quality metrics in Emergency Medicine
in Europe
Nathalie Flacke
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May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
75
SAEM Gallery of Excellence Nominees 2013 Abstracts
1NEXUS Chest: Validation of a Decision instrument for Selective Chest Imaging in
Blunt Trauma
Robert M. Rodriguez MD, UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital
2Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin for Acute Treatment of
Severe Cyanide Poisoning in A Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model - a randomized,
controlled trial
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center
3Anaphylaxis; Clinical Features and Evidence for A Mast Cell-leukocyte Cytokine
Cascade in Humans.
Simon G A. Brown MBBS PhD FACEM, Western Australian institute for Medical
Research, Royal Perth Hospital and the University of Western Australia
4Accuracy of an Ultra-Low Dose CT Protocol for ED Patients with Suspected
Kidney Stone
Chris Moore MD, RDMS, Yale University School of Medicine
5Latino Caregiver Experiences with asthma Health Communications: A Qualitative
Evaluation
Antonio Riera MD, Yale University School of Medicine
6Randomized Trial of Tenecteplase or Placebo with Low Molecular Weight Heparin
for Acute Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: assessment of Patient-Oriented
Cardiopulmonary Outcomes at Three Months
Jeffrey A. Kline MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
8The Effect of Point-of- Care Ultrasonography on Emergency Department Length
of Stay and CT Utilization in Children with Suspected Appendicitis.
Inna Elikashvili, Mount Sinai Medical Center
9Signs and Symptoms associated with Surgical Intervention in Children with
Abdominal Pain
Melissa Tavarez MD, Children’s National Medical Center
10Retrospective Review of Emergency Bedside Ultrasound for Diagnosis of
Pediatric intussusception
Samuel H. F. Lam, Advocate Christ Medical Center
11Ultrasound Confirmation of Central Femoral Venous Line Placement: the FLUSH
Study (Flush the Line and Ultrasound the Heart)
Russ Horowitz MD, RDMS, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
12Accuracy of Emergency Medicine Residents during Completion of the American
College of Emergency Physicians Minimum Ultrasound Training Benchmarks: A
Multicenter Multiple Application Longitudinal Validation Study
John Bailitz, Cook County (Stroger)
19A Markov Model Describes the Dynamics of Resuscitation in a Porcine
Hemorrhagic Shock Model.
Heemun Kwok MD, MS, University of Washington
20Comparison of Intraosseous infusion Rates of Plasma Under High Pressure in An
Adult Hypovolemic Swine Model in Two Different Limb Sites
Julio Lairet, Emory University School of Medicine
34The Burden of Acute Heart Failure on US Emergency Departments
Alan B. Storrow MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Vanderbilt University
Medical Center
35Degradation of Benzodiazepines After 120-Days of EMS Deployment
Jason McMullan MD, University of Cincinnati
36Do Prehospital Levels of End-tidal Carbon Dioxide Differ Between Chronic
Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Congestive Heart Failure?
Christopher Hunter MD, PhD, Orange County EMS System
37Prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale and Risk Stratification in Major Pediatric
Traumatic Brain injury: Association with Mortality and Non-Mortality Outcomes
Daniel W. Spaite MD, Arizona Emergency Medicine Research Center, University of
Arizona
47Should We Communicate Radiation Risk from CT Scans to Patients? A MixedMethods and Normative Ethical Analysis
Thomas E. Robey, Yale-New Haven Hospital
48Evidence Based Diagnostics: Meta-Analysis of the Accuracy of Physical Exam
and Imaging for Adult Scaphoid Fractures
Ali S. Raja, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
49Comparing the Diagnostic Performance of Bedside Ultrasound to Plain
Radiography for Detecting Fractures of the Appendicular Skeleton in the
Emergency Department: A Prospective Study
Paul E. Haiar DSc, PA-C, Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center
76
57Elevated Levels of Serum SBDP150 in the Emergency Department Are associated
with Poor Outcome at One Month From Mild and Moderate Traumatic Brain injury
Linda Papa MD.CM, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center
60Performance of Early Serum GFAP and UCH-L1 individually and in Combination in
Distinguishing Mild and Moderate Traumatic Brain injury from Trauma Controls
and in Detecting intracranial Lesions On CT
Linda Papa MD.CM, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center
73Young Women are Less Likely to Meet Reperfusion Guidelines for STEMI: the
VIRGO Study (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender On Outcomes)
Gail D’Onofrio MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of
Medicine
81Clinical Pathway Expedites Systemic Corticosteroids for Children with ModerateSevere asthma Exacerbation
Christopher Fee MD, University of California San Francisco
82Broselow Tape: A Time to Revisit?
Muhammad Waseem MD, MS, Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
89ED Hemolysis is More Strongly associated with Device Used to Obtain Blood
Than Other Features of Phlebotomy
Andrew Wollowitz MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Albert Einstein
College of Medicine
93The Relationship between Lactic Acidosis and Thiamine Levels in Patients with
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Ari Moskowitz MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
97Age-related Differences in Pain Recovery After Motor Vehicle Collision: A
Prospective Longitudinal Study
Shannon M. Matthews, University of North Carolina
111Randomized Trial of a Quantitative, Computerized Method to Estimate Pretest
Probability of Acute Coronary Syndrome and Pulmonary Embolism: Effect on
Patient Safety, Radiation Exposure, and Cost of Care
Jeffrey Kline, Indiana University School of Medicine
112HINTS Outperforms ABCD2 to Identify Stroke in Acute Vestibular Syndrome
David E. Newman-Toker MD PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
113Evaluation of Clinical Prediction Rules for Clinical Deterioration Shortly After an
Emergency Department Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism
Christopher Kabrhel, Massachusetts General Hospital
121Comparison of Emergency Physician Performed Bedside Ultrasound vs.
Computed tomography in the Diagnosis of Renal Colic
Megan Leo MD, RDMS, Boston Medical Center
139Differences in Noninvasive thermometers in the Adult Emergency Department
Joshua Zwart MD, University of Rochester
243Adherence to CDC Guidelines in the Evaluation and Management of Women with
Pelvic Complaints
Dana E. Kozubal BS, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
263Derivation of An Abbreviated instrument for Use in Emergency Department Low
Back Pain Research: the Five-Item Roland Morris Questionnaire
Laura W. Mulvey BS, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
266Emergency Department Recidivism and Outcomes of Previously Evaluated Chest
Pain Unit Patients
Anthony Napoli MD FACEP, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
270High Rate of False-Positive Cardiac Testing in an Emergency Department
Observation Unit
Jason Dorais MD, University of Utah
281Predictive Value and Appropriate Ranges of Prehospital Physiologic Criteria for
Identifying Seriously injured Older Adults During Field Triage
Derek Richardson MD, Oregon Health & Science University
286The BREATH Pilot Study: Bringing Research in Echocardiography Assessment to
Haiti
Krithika M. Muruganandan MD, Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Emergency
Medicine
287The Number of FAST Exams Required for Proficiency
Sharon Yellin MD, New York Methodist Hospital
288Intraosseous Versus intravenous Cobinamide in Treating Acute Cyanide toxicity
and Apnea in A Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical Center; USAF Enroute Care
Research Center
289The Effects of increased Dosing of L-Carnitine in a Model of Verapamil Toxicity
Jason Chu, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
294Narratives Outperform Summary Content in Promoting Recall of Opioid
Prescription Guideline Recommendations
Austin Kilaru, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
295Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Events in ED Patients with Drug Overdose
Alex F. Manini, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
304A Quick and Easy Delirium assessment for Non-Physician Research Personnel
Jin H. Han MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University
306Using Biomarkers to Detect Delirium Among Elderly Emergency Department
Patients
Maura Kennedy MD, MPH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
308Blood Transfusion Seemed Not to be associated with Mortality among Patients
with Severe Sepsis in ED.
Chih-Yi Hsu MD, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
309The Prognostic Value of Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Combination with the
Sequential Organ Failure assessment Score in Septic Shock
Won Young Kim MD, PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
316Emergency Department Prediction of Survival and Neurologic Outcome in
Comatose Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia is
Unreliable.
Catherine M. Wares MD, Carolinas Medical Center
320The Impact of Pre-Hospital Therapeutic Hypothermia on Mortality and
Neurologic Outcomes in Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Systematic Review and
Meta-Analysis
Benton R. Hunter MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
325Decreasing ED Overcrowding Via Implementation of a Hospital Wide Surge Plan
Shira Schlesinger LAC+USC Medical Center
326Computed tomography without Oral Contrast for Abdominal Pain: Effects on
Emergency Department Efficiency and Patient Safety
William C. Krauss MD, FACEP, Kaiser Permanente
327Impact of a Computerized Decision Support System on Screening for
Hyperlactatemia among Adults with Sepsis
Jeffrey P. Green, UC Davis Medical Center
338Prevalence and Characteristics of Patients Presenting with Difficult Venous
Access to the Emergency Department
J. Matthew Fields MD, Thomas Jefferson University
347Breaking Down Barriers to ePCR Implementation in EMS: Turnaround Time
Colby Redfield MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center - Harvard Medical
School
356The Effect of Suspected Diagnosis on Physician Pretest Probability for
Abdominal Pain Patients Undergoing Computed tomography in the Emergency
Department
Angela M. Mills MD, University of Pennsylvania
361A Randomized-controlled Trial of Paracetamol Versus Morphine for the
Treatment of Acute Painful Crisis of Sickle Cell Disease
Rifat Rehmani MD, MSc, King Abduaziz Hospital
363Variability in Pediatric ED Care of Sickle Cell Disease and Fever
Angela M. Ellison MD, MSc, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
364Elevated Lactate Levels in the Emergency Department Are associated with
Positive Blood Cultures in Children with Sickle Cell Disease
Jay G. Ladde MD, Orlando Regional Medical Center
491How Competent are Emergency Medicine interns for Level 1 Milestones: Who is
Responsible?
Laura Hopson MD, University of Michigan
492Inter-Rater Agreement of Emergency Medicine Milestone PC12 for Goal-Directed
Focused Ultrasound Is Excellent
Stephen Leech, Orlando Regional Medical Center
495Preferences for Resuscitation and intubation Among Patients with Do-notresuscitate/do-not-intubate Orders: A 1 Year Follow Up Study.
John E. Jesus MD, Christiana Care Health Center
508Implementation of Checklists for Central Line associated Blood Stream infection
Prevention in the Emergency Department.
Robert Klemisch AB, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
509Reducing Blood Culture Contamination in a Community Hospital Emergency
Department with a Standardized Sterile Collection Technique
Wesley H. Self MD MPH, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
520Concordance of Prehospital and Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest
Resuscitation with Documented End-of-Life Choices in Oregon
Derek K. Richardson, Oregon Health & Science University
522The Impact of Pre-hospital Non-invasive Positive Pressure Support Ventilation in Adult
Patients with Severe Respiratory Distress: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Sameer Mal MD, University of Western Ontario
524Gender and Survival in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) - Results From the
OPALS (Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support) Study
Basmah Safdar MD, Yale University
528Analgesia Prescriptions for ED Patients with Low Back Pain: A National
Perspective
Adam J. Singer MD, Stony Brook University
535The Diagnostic Accuracy of Bedside Ocular Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of
Retinal Detachment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
Hal J. Minnigan MD, indiana University School of Medicine
538The Impact of Race and Sex of Study Personnel On the Decision to Participate in
Research
Kimberly W. Hart MA, University of Cincinnati
540Academic Career interest in American Emergency Residents
John Burkhardt, University of Michigan
541Description and Productivity of Emergency Medicine Researchers Receiving K23
Or K08 Mentored Research Career Development Awards
Daniel K. Nishijima, University of California, Davis
551A Prospective Observational Study of inter-observer Agreement for Pretest
Probability assessment of Deep Venous Thrombosis
Krista Brucker MD, Northwestern University
567Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain in the Emergency
Department - A Randomized, Prospective, Double-blinded Trial
Joshua P. Miller MD, SAUSHEC
571One Year Outcomes of Patients Following Coronary Computerized tomographic
Angiography in the Emergency Department
Judd E. Hollander, University of Pennsylvania
581A Randomized Controlled Trial of intravenous Ketorolac Versus intravenous
Metoclopramide + Diphenhydramine for Acute Treatment of Non-migraine, Bland
Recurrent Headache
Victoria Adewunmi MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
584Impact of An Evidence-based Guideline On Rates of Diagnostic Testing for
Pediatric Syncope
Megan OBrien, Boston University School of Medicine
585Emergency Department Variation in Head Computed tomography Scanning
Among Pediatric Patients with Head Trauma
Jennifer R. Marin MD, MSc, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
586Performance of Plain Pelvis Radiography in Children with Blunt torso Trauma
Maria Y. Kwok, Columbia University Medical Center
588A Rapid assessment to Predict ED Revisits, Hospital Admissions or Death at 30
days Following ED Discharge in Older individuals
James D. Dziura PhD, Yale School of Medicine
589Trends in Short Stay Hospitalizations for Older Adults from 1990-2010,
Implications for Geriatric Emergency Care
Peter W. Greenwald MD MS, Weill Cornell Medical College
722A Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator, Bay 41-8543, Preserves Pulmonary
Artery Endothelial Function in Experimental Pulmonary Embolism
John A. Watts PhD, Carolinas Medical Center
726Focusing on inattention: A Very Brief Method to Detect Delirium in the
Emergency Department
Jin H. Han MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University
732A Prospective, Randomized Evaluation of Facilitated Primary Care Follow Up
After ED Utilization
Michael Bouton, Beth Israel Deaconess
733A Study to Evaluate Emergency Provider Efficiency and Cognitive Load Using
Different Methods of Computerized Physician Medication Order Entry
Dipti Agarwal MBBS, Mayo Clinic
747Progesterone for Children with Serious Traumatic Brain injury (TBI): A Feasibility
Study in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN)
Rachel Stanley, University of Michigan
754Health Evaluation and Referral assistant (HERA): Improving Linkage with
Tobacco Treatment
Edwin D. Boudreaux PhD, the University of Massachusetts Medical School
755Effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) on Emergency Department
Throughtput Metrics and Test Utilization
Michael Manka MD, SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine, Erie County Medical
Center
758Randomized Controlled Trial of Safety and Efficacy of L-carnitine infusion for the
Treatment of Vasopressor Dependant Septic Shock
Michael A. Puskarich, University of Mississippi Medical Center
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
77
762Barriers to Calling 9-1-1 in High-Risk Neighborhoods with Primarily Latinos in
Denver, Colorado
Comilla Sasson MD MS, University of Colorado Denver
763Association Between Emergency Department Operation Characteristics, Length
of Stay, and Elopements by Change in ED Volumes
Daniel Handel MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine
776No Man Is An Island: Living in A More Disadvantaged Neighborhood increases
the Likelihood of Developing Persistent Moderate Or Severe Neck Pain 6 Weeks
After Motor Vehicle Collision
Samuel McLean MD, MPH, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
789Intubation Skills Correlate with Accuracy of Self-assessment
Amish Aghera MD, Maimonides Medical Center
797Physicians’ Diagnostic Accuracy in Using Simple Clinical Signs for Detecting
Anemia and Its Severity in Patients Seen at the Emergency Department of A
Tertiary Referral Hospital in Tanzania.
Hendry R. Sawe MD, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences
798The Prevalence of Suspected Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus and use of Random
Blood Sugar to Detect Elevated A1c Among Emergency Department Patients in a
Developing Country
Candace McNaughton, Vanderbilt University
799Characteristics of Adult Patients Presenting to Two Public Referral Hospitals in
Cambodia
Lily Yan, Stanford University School of Medicine
809Lactate Clearance is associated with Improved Survival and Neurological
Outcome in Post-Cardiac Arrest
Lars W. Andersen BS, Research Center for Emergency Medicine
810Microcirculatory Impairment in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients
Yasser Omar MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
814Emergent CT Does Not Delay Cooling in Patients After Cardiac Arrest
David A. Pearson MD, Carolinas Medical Center
815Emergency Medicine Resident Leadership Ability: A Simulation-Based
Longitudinal Study
Matthew C. Carlisle, UC Davis
834Self-assessment of Clinical Improvement by Pediatric Patients during an Acute
asthma Exacerbation
Lori A. Montagna, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
innovations
8Using iTunesU as a Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Deployment Device.
Janis P. Tupesis, Nestor Rodriguez, Katy Oksuita, Matt Anderson,
Carrie Voss-Harvey, Will Sanderson. University of Wisconsin School of Medicine
and Public Health, Madison, WI
9 Developing Residency Education with Andragogy and Multimedia: The DREAM
Curriculum
Karen R. Lind, Brian Gillett, David Saloum, Eitan Dickman, John Marshall.
Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
10 Teams Teaching Other Teams: An Interactive Educational Session
Chandra Aubin, Rebecca Bavolek, Evan Schwarz. Washington University School of
Medicine, St. Louis, MO
11 Emergency Medicine Resident Education in Ophthalmology
Lara Phillips, Lawrence Stack. Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN
12 The EM10 project: A High Yield, Mobile Device Based Learning Platform for
Medical Student Education during Emergency Department Shifts
Jeffrey R. Vlasic. University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI
13 Emergency Medicine E-Learning: Articulating the Facts, Moving to the Future
Cynthia Leung, Aaron Bernard, Nicholas E. Kman. The Ohio State University
Medical Center, Columbus, OH
16 The Mentorship Gap: Bridging Residents and Medical Students through a Near
Peer Mentoring Program
Robbie E. Paulsen, Matthew J. Stull, Sarah Ronan-Bentle. University of Cincinnati
College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
17 EMIG: A Student-Driven Integrative Curriculum Approach to Simulation
Annette Dorfman. George Washington University, Washington, DC
19 Milestone Tracking and Documentation Augmented via an Electronic Tool
Tailored to an Emergency Medicine Simulation Curriculum
Raymond P. Ten Eyck. Wright State University, Kettering, OH
21 Development Of A Novel, Competency-based Emergency Medicine “Dean’s Letter
Cemal B. Sozener, Laura R. Hopson, Joseph House, Suzanne L. Dooley-Hash,
Samantha R. Hauff, Monica L. Lypson, Sally A. Santen. University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS for
Abstracts & Moderators
I wanted to personally thank you for the significant
time, effort, and resources you devoted to reviewing
and moderating the many excellent abstracts
submitted for the SAEM Annual Meeting this year.
This was a record-breaking year for submissions
in sheer numbers, so your service was appreciated
more than ever. It is only through your efforts that the
SAEM Annual Meeting continues to be the best peerreviewed forum for research in emergency medicine.
The continued success of these important academic
achievements depends on your continued enthusiasm
in supporting the SAEM mission.
Gratefully,
Christopher Ross MD
on behalf of
Program Committee, SAEM Annual Meeting 2013
** Applications for consideration to be an abstract reviewer
are posted in the SAEM newsletter and in Academic Emergency
Medicine summer issues.
78
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Future SAEM
Annual Meetings
May 14-17, 2014
Sheraton Dallas Hotel
Dallas, TX
May 13-16, 2015
Sheraton San Diego
Hotel & Marina
San Diego, CA
Late Breaker Abstracts
# 3 Innovations Thursday, May 16 12:00 -1:00 pm in Atlanta H
Competency in Chaos: A Novel Approach to
Emergency Preparedness Training (EPT)
suitable patients. Among adult patients, 44% were previously found to
qualify for reverse triage, representing the greatest surge-bed source.
Objectives: The primary objective is to discover the proportion of
pediatric patients suitable for reverse triage. The secondary objective
is to determine characteristics associated with reverse triage eligibility.
Lancer A. Scott, Christopher Ashby Davis, Derrick Swartzenruber,
Christina L. Bourne, Eric J. Larson, MUSC, Charleston, SC
Providing comprehensive EPT for medical trainees is important
to the future success of US emergency preparedness operations.
Unfortunately, US medical schools have been slow to develop EPT
curricula for medical students. In addition, few EPT training programs
possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure
performance during a simulated disaster.
Methods: This is a retrospective chart review, by 3 trained reviewers,
of pediatric inpatients on 3 general medical/surgical floors in the
same tertiary academic hospital that participated in the adult study.
Simulating a disaster, patients were deemed suitable for early discharge
if they had no critical interventions (CI) over a 4-day period beginning
with the first day of chart-review. Previously published CIs mandating
continued admission were adapted for pediatric populations. Kappa
statistic was calculated after 10% of charts were re-abstracted.
When developing new EPT curriculum for patient care providers, it is
important to consider that disasters are rare, complex events involving
many patients and environmental factors often difficult to reproduce
in a training environment. In addition, lengthy courses lasting several
weeks are often unnecessary to achieve basic competencies.
Results: Of 526 pediatric patients, 41% were black, 48% Caucasian,
46% female and 54% male. Mean age was 8.7 (±6.2) years and the mean
length of stay was 3.5 (±4.5) days. The highest proportion of patients
(45%) was admitted from the ED and 25% were elective admissions.
There were 27 (5.1%) patients eligible for reverse discharge. Elective
admission patients (RR 0.09) and older age (RR 0.93) are associated
with lower eligibility for reverse triage in an adjusted multi-variable log
binomial regression. Patients on nonsurgical services are more likely to
be eligible for reverse triage (RR 2.75). Elective admission cancellation
opens 25% of beds compared to reverse triage’s 5.1% and opening
licensed beds’ 2.7%. Kappa statistic was 0.96.
We developed a 1-day, competency-based disaster course for patient
care providers that recreate a multi-actor clinical disaster inside a
humansimulation lab (see photo of lab). Our course enhanced provider
knowledge, comfort level and disaster skill. Trainees were able to
resuscitate twounstable simulated patients and prevent anthrax
exposure to the hospital during a loud and chaotic disaster scenario. We
believe ours is the first civilian curriculum in the US that combines high
fidelity, multi-actor scenarios to measure the life-saving performance of
patient care providers confronted with >10 patients at once.
Conclusions: Unlike previous reports for adults, reverse triage at large
academic centers for pediatrics may be an ineffectual strategy for
increasing surge capacity. This question needs to be studied in the lower
acuity community setting.
We will showcase our innovative curriculum utilizing posters and digital
video of our training sessions (available at www.musc.edu/chpter). We
will also ‘stage’ components of our disaster small group and/or team
exercises to demonstrate how faculty can introduce clinical disaster
preparedness into existing curricula. The purpose of the demonstration
is to show faculty that disaster preparedness competencies can be
achieved quickly, with measurable results, without compromising
existing curriculum schedules.
Table 1. Adjusted risk ratios for reverse triage eligibility.
Variable
#136 Wednesday, May 15 1:00- 2:00 pm in Roswell I
Reverse Triage in Pediatrics: A New Method to Increase In-Hospital
Surge Capacity
Eben Clattenburg, Lauren Sauer, Gabor Kelen, The Johns Hopkins School
of Medicine, Baltimore MD
Background: After disasters, hospitals are expected to provide four
days of care without government help. Cancelling elective admissions,
using alternative spaces, and reverse triage are strategies to increase
bed capacity. Reverse triage involves the safe, early discharge of
Risk Ratio
95% CI
Age Category
0-4
5 -12
13 +
1
0.37
0.62
(0.13 – 0.98)
(0.26 – 1.47)
Hospital Service
Pediatric Surgical
General Pediatric
1
2.46
(1.05 – 5.73)
Admission Source
Emergency Department
Elective Admission
External Transfer
Transfer from PICU
Transfer from NICU
Direct Admission
1
0.14
0
0.94
0
0
(0.02 – 1.06)
0
(0.40 – 2.15)
0
0
Table 2. Number of patients eligible for reverse triage over four day period by simulated start day since admission.
Simulated Start
Day After
Admission
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
1
14
10
2
1
15
4
1
0
3
1
0
8
1
1
1
3
1
1
0
1
1
1
Discharge Day
2
3
4
5
6
10
Day 5
Day 6
Day 7
Day 8 Day 9
0
# Eligible for
Reverse Triage
# of Patients
Hospitalized
at Start
% of Patients
Eligible for
Reverse Triage*
27
526
5.13 %
20
351
5.70 %
14
235
5.96 %
11
166
6.63 %
5
104
4.81 %
3
69
4.35 %
* Chi squared test p-value= 0.975
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
79
Late Breaker Abstracts
#234 Wednesday, May 15 1:00 – 5:00 pm in 200 Gallery-Level 6
Impact of microEEG on clinical management and outcomes of
Emergency Department patients with altered mental status”
#248 Wednesday, May 15 12:00 – 5:00 pm in 200 Gallery-Level 6
Prevalence and Treatment Needs of Patients Presenting to the
Emergency Department with Alcohol Intoxication
Shahriar Zehtabchi1, S. G. Abdel Baki2, A. Omurtag2, R. Sinert3, G. Chari3,
S. Malhotra3, J. Weedon3, A. A. Fenton2, A. C. Grant3. 1State University of
New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; 2Bio-Signal Group
Corporation, Brooklyn, NY; 3State University of New York, Downstate
Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
Kenneth W. Dodd, B. Woodbury, A. Schick, A, Lila W. Steinberg, Max
Fitzgerald, Ethan Forsgren, Johanna C. Moore, James Miner,. Hennepin
County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN
Background: Emergency Department patients presenting with Altered
Mental Status (AMS) are at risk of nonconvulsive seizure (NCS). Our
previous study revealed 78% EEG abnormalities including NCS (5%) in
ED patients with AMS.
Objective: To assess the impact of EEG on clinical management and
outcomes of ED patients with AMS.
Methods: Randomized controlled trial at two urban teaching
hospitals. Inclusion: Adult patients (>18 years old) with AMS. Exclusion:
immediately correctable cause of AMS (e.g. hypoglycemia), and
admission before enrollment. Patients were randomized to routine care
(control) or routine care plus EEG (intervention). Research assistants
used a rapid (5-min) easy to apply scalp electrode set with a miniature,
wireless EEG device (microEEG) to record a standard 30-min EEG from
patients assigned to the intervention group upon presentation. The EEG
results were reported to the ED attending by an off-site epileptologist
within 30 minutes. No workup protocol was specified for either group.
Primary outcomes: EEG results, change in ED management (differential
diagnosis, diagnostic work-up, and treatment plan from enrollment to
disposition). Secondary outcomes: length of ED and hospital stay, ICU
requirement, and in-hospital mortality. The top 3 differential diagnoses
were recorded with subjective probabilities (0-100%) by an ED attending
at each time point. Statistical analysis: Data were reported as medians
and quartiles or percentages with 95%CI. Groups were compared
using Fisher’s exact or Mann-Whitney tests. Changes in probability of
differential diagnoses were compared using Kolmogorov–Smirnov test.
Results: 149 patients were enrolled (76 controls and 73 interventions).
Patients in the two arms had comparable characteristics at baseline.
EEG in the intervention arm revealed abnormal findings in 93% (85-97%)
including NCS in 5% (2-13%). The impact of EEG on clinical management
in the intervention arm is shown in the table. Changes in probabilities of
top 3 differential diagnoses from initiation of enrollment till disposition
were statistically significant (p=0.030) between the groups. Secondary
outcomes did not differ significantly between groups.
Conclusion: EEG can be obtained in the ED with minimal impact on
resources and can significantly impact clinical management (diagnosis
and treatment) of these patients.
80
Impact of
EEG
Upon receiving
EEG result
N (%, 95% CI)
At final
ED disposition
N (%, 95% CI)
Helped establish a
diagnosis
41/73 (56%, 41 - 70%)
43/73 (59%, 47 - 69%)
Changed overall
diagnostic work up
36/73 (49%, 38 - 60%)
Changed the overall
treatment plan
31/73 (42%, 31 - 53%)
Background: Patients with alcohol intoxication consume a significant
amount of ED resources. However, the overall treatment needs in
patients intoxicated with alcohol presenting to EDs is unknown.
Objectives: To determine the prevalence of alcohol intoxication in the
ED as well as the treatment needs of such patients.
Methods: For this cross-sectional study, all patients presenting to
the ED of an urban, Level 1 trauma center from 11/1/2012-11/30/2012
were prospectively screened by trained research associates. When an
intoxicated patient was identified, study information including patient
demographics, diagnoses, vital signs, blood alcohol concentration
(BAC), GCS on arrival ABility to ambulate independently on arrival, use
of physical or chemical restraint, previous ED visits, length of stay, and
health insurance was collected. Data was analyzed using descriptive
statistics.
Results: During the study period, 7106 patients presented to the ED and
6192 (87%) were screened by research assistants. Of those screened,
681 (11%) were eligible and 668 (11%) were enrolled. The median age
was 45 (range 14-82, IQR 33-52). 455 (68%) arrived by EMS, 122 (18%)
by police, and 46 (7%) were ambulatory. 141 (21%) had a systolic blood
pressure <100 or >180, 145 (22%) had a heart rate >110 or <60, 30 (4%)
had a respiratory rate <12 or >24. The median BAC was 0.240 (range
0.008-0.462, IQR 0.174-0.288). The median ED visits in the last year was
4 (range 1-85, IQR 1-12) and the median ED visits ever was 10 (range 1-213,
IQR 2-35). The median ED length of stay was 467 minutes (range 28-1824,
IQR 319-635). Health insurance was lacking in 135 (20%) patients, while
52 (8%) had private insurance, and 479 (72%) had public insurance.
There were 122 (18.3%) patients that did not meet any of these criteria.
Of 368 (55%) patients with agitation requiring restraints, 283 (77%)
required chemical restraint, 276 (73%) required physical restraint, and
191 (52%) required both. In patient’s requiring chemical restraint, the
most common medications were droperidol 182 (64%), olanzapine 102
(36%), and benzodiazepines 34 (12%).
Conclusions: Of the patients screened during this study period, 11%
were intoxicated with alcohol and 82% met criteria for needing ED care.
Table: Criteria Defining Need for ED care
36/73 (49%, 38 - 61%)
31/73 (42%, 31 - 53%)
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Inability to ambulate independently or
provide basic medical information
Agitation requiring physical and/or chemical restraint
Admission to the hospital
Required Imaging
29% (180/615)
55% (368/668)
7% (44/668)
22% (149/668)
Required ECG
12% (78/668)
Required Procedure
12% (77/668)
Required Laboratory Workup
(excluding one-time blood glucose)
18% (122/668)
Required Medications
(excluding sedatives, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nicotine)
28% (184/668)
Number of Patients Meeting ≥ 1 of the Above
82% (505/615)
Late Breaker Abstracts
#438 Thursday, May 16 8:00 – 12:00 pm in 200 Gallery – Level 6
It Matters More Than You Think It Does
Makini Chisolm-Straker1, Logan Jardine2, Peter L. Shearer1. 1Mount Sinai
School of Medicine, NYC, NY; 2SUNY Downstate College of Medicine,
NYC, NY
Background: Gender refers to the self-expression of identity that
relates to masculinity, femininity and their various combinations. For
individuals who identify as transgender (TG), or having a gender identity
different from their assumed sex, presenting for health care requires
finding nonjudgmental and supportive providers. This may take years
and is not an option in emergency circumstances. Such emergency
patients face an unsafe decision point: To be potentially maltreated
versus the potential for serious health consequences, including death, of
not seeking emergent medical treatment.
Objective: Our aim is to determine if persons who identify as TG fail
to present to emergency healthcare; furthermore, we want to know
how those who do present as emergency department (ED) patients
experience the healthcare they receive. We hypothesized that many TG
persons do not present to EDs and those who do have poor experiences
with the healthcare personnel.
Methods: This observational study anonymously surveys TG patients,
recruited from Facebook and a local health clinic that specifically aims
to serve the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender community. Selfidentified TG patients, who are English-speaking and older than 17years,
are eligible to participate in the survey. The study began June 1, 2012, is
ongoing.
hypotension in the Emergency Department (ED). Over the past few years
a number of goal-directed bedside US protocols have been developed
for this purpose.
Objectives: To identify the effect of using bedside US on the number
of CT scans ordered by emergency physicians in the critically ill
hypotensive patients.
Methods: A prospective, observational study of a convenience sample of
non-traumatic hypotensive patients who received the standard care plus
a goal-directed US within the first hour of their presentation in an urban
ED between 2008-2010. The treating physician completed a pre-US and
post-US questionnaire that included the need for computer tomography
(CT) of chest ABdomen or pelvis in the evaluation of the patient. The
chart was reviewed for the results of the CT scans that were done.
Results: A total number of 118 patients were included in the study.
The number of CT scans that the physician decided to order pre and
post preforming US was 47 and the number of CT scans that were
eventually done was 69 of which 39.1% had a positive diagnostic finding.
The number of CT scans that the physicians decided to cancel after
preforming US was 13 and none of them had a missed finding that was
identified during their hospital course. The number of CT scans that the
physician decided to order after the bedside US is 13 of which 2 had a
positive diagnostic finding.
Conclusion: Preforming bedside goal directed US did not change the
overall number of CT scans the emergency physician ordered for the
critically ill hypotensive patients but it helped identify cases where
preforming CT scan was crucial for accurate diagnosis.
Results: 111 surveys have been completed. 75% of the participants
surveyed noted that they had occasion to want to use an ED; of these,
90% sought emergency medical care. 29% of respondents reported a
negative experience, 21% had a positive experience and 14% reported a
mixed experience; 46% only described their chief complaint. With some
participants having multiple suggestions for improvement in care, 56%
recommended providers ask and use the patient’s preferred pronoun or
name and 42% recommended providers only ask about or discuss TG
status when it is relevant to the medical issue at hand.
Conclusions: While it appears that most survey participants who
thought they needed emergent medical care visited an ED, it is important
to note that this sample is biased: Nearly 84% have at least graduated
college and, as a convenience sample, many are already connected to
healthcare. Still, more than a third of participants reported having at
least one negative experience in the ED due to their TG identity. This data
indicates the need for further research, particularly recruiting from a
population that is not as well connected with the healthcare community.
Also, ED providers should receive training on how to serve this patient
population in a culturally sensitive manner.
#605 Friday, May 17 8:00 – 12:00 pm in 200 Gallery – Level 6
The use of bedside ultrasound in critically ill patient influences
utilization of CT scans in the emergency department
Hamid Shokoohi, Keith Boniface, Ali Pourmand, Yiju Teresa Liu, Melissa
McCarthy, Kabir Yadav, Rasha Buhumaid, Mohammad Salimian. George
Washington University, Washington, DC
Background: Literature suggests that the use of bedside ultrasound
(US) in the evaluation of patients with undifferentiated shock allows for
rapid assessment and improves accurate diagnosis in undifferentiated
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
81
Moderators for the 2013 annual Meeting
Opeolu Adeoye MD
University of Cincinnati
Christian Arbelaez MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Kavita Babu MD
UMass-Memorial Medical Center, MA
Brigitte M. Baumann MD, MSCE
Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
Kevin Baumlin MD
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
Steven B. Bird MD
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Diane Birnbaumer MD
Los Angeles County-Harbor-UCLA
Michelle Biros MS, MD
University of Minnesota
David J. Blehar MD
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Andra L. Blomkalns MD
University of Cincinnati
Jane Brice MD
University of North Carolina
David F. Brown MD
Massachusetts General Hospital
Michael Brown MD, MSc
Michigan State University
Christopher R. Carpenter MD, MS
Washington University in St. Louis
Brendan Carr MD
University of Pennsylvania
David Cone MD
Yale University School of Medicine
D.M. Courtney MD
Northwestern University
Rebecca Cunningham MD
University of Michigan
Chad E. Darling MD
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Theodore R. Delbridge MD, MPH
East Carolina University
Deborah B. Diercks MD, MSc
University of California -Davis
Romolo Gaspari MD
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Charles Gerardo MD
Duke Global Health Residency/Fellowship
Michael Gibbs MD
Carolinas Medical Center
Jeffrey A Glassberg MD
Mount Sinai
Daniel Handel MD, MPH
Oregon Health & Science University
School of Medicine
Greg Hendey MD
University of California, San Francisco (Fresno)
Jon Mark Hirshon MD
University of Maryland, Baltimore
82
Judd Hollander MD
University of Pennsylvania
James Holmes MD
University of California
Davis School of Medicine
Steven Horng MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Harvard Medical School
Edward Jauch MD, MS
Medical University of South Carolina
College of Medicine
Gabor Kelen MD
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Brent R. King MD
University of Texas Medical School
Keith E. Kocher MD
University of Michigan
Nathan Kuppermann MD, MPH
University of California
Davis School of Medicine
Eric Legome MD
Kings County Hospital,
SUNY Downstate College of Medicine
Alexander T. Limkakeng MD
Duke University
Jeffrey Love MD
Georgetown University School of Medicine
John P. Marshall MD
Maimonides Medical Center
Brandon Maughan MD, MHS
Brown University
Nathan Woodburn Mick MD
Maine Medical Center
James Miner MD
Hennepin County Medical Center
Rakesh Mistry MD
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
James H. Moak MD, RDMS
University of Virginia
Sergey M. Motov
Maimonides Medical Center
Daniel K. Nishijima MD
University of California -Davis
Michele Nypaver MD
University of Michigan
Ziad Obermeyer MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Harvard University
Ed Otten MD
University of Cincinnati
Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Jesse M. Pines MD, MPH
George Washington University
Timothy F. Platts-Mills
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Emilie Powell MD, MS, MBA
Northwestern University
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Susan Promes MD
University of California - San Francisco
Ali S Raja MD, MPH
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Megan Ranney MD, MPH
Alpert Medical School, Brown University
Martin Reznek MD, MBA, FACEP
University of Massachusetts
Memorial Medical Center and
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Emanuel Rivers MD, MPH
Henry Ford Hospital
Kevin Rodgers MD
Indiana University
Robert Rodriguez MD
University of California –San Francisco
San Francisco General Hospital
Christopher Ross MD
Cook County Hospital
Michael Runyon MD
Carolinas Medical Center
Daniel E. Rusyniak
Indiana University School of Medicine
Tom Scaletta MD
Edward Hospital. Smart-ER
Jeremiah D. Schuur MD
Brigham & Womens Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Aaron Skolnik MD
Banner Good Samaritan/Phoenix Children’s
Hospital Medical Toxicology, Center for Toxicology
and Pharmacology Education and Research,
University of Arizona College of Medicine
Ian G. Stiell MD
University of Ottawa
Alan B. Storrow MD
Vanderbilt University
Richard Summers MD
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Lorraine Thibodeau MD
Albany Medical College
Arjun K. Venkatesh MD
Yale University
Ron Walls MD
Brigham & Womens Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Robert Woolard MD
Texas Tech University (El Paso)
Donald M. Yealy MD
University of Pittsburgh
University of Pittsburgh Physicians
Richard Zane MD
University of Colorado
Abstract Submission Reviewers
Srikar Adhikari MD
University of Arizona Medical Center
Gregory J. Fermann MD
University of Cincinnati
Larissa May MD
George Washington University
Michael G. Allison MD
University of Maryland Medical
Center
Katherine J. Glasrud MD
Regions Hospital
Jason McMullan MD
University of Cincinnati
Anthony E. Grippo MD
Advocate Christ Medical Center
William J. Meggs MD, PhD
East Carolina University
Hallam M. Gugelmann MD
University of Pennsylvania
Angela M. Mills MD
University of Pennsylvania
Sanjey Gupta MD
New York Hospital Queens
David Milzman MD, FACEP
Georgetown U School of Medicine
Todd Guth MD
University of Colorado
Danielle Minett MD
Christiana Care Health Systems
Michael F. Harrison MD
Henry Ford Health System
Jillian Mongelluzzo MD
University of California, San
Francisco
Mark G. Angelos MD
The Ohio State University
John Ashurst, DO
Lehigh Valley Health Network
Ryan D. Aycock MD
Staten Island University Hospital
Smita Badhey MD
St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital Center
Rebecca Barron MD
Brown University
Rachel Berkowitz MD
Bellevue/NYU
Jonathan W. Heidt MD
Washington University
School of Medicine in Saint Louis
Brendan Carr MD
University of Pennsylvania
Carolyn K. Holland MD
University of Florida, Gainesville
Mary K. Murphy PhD
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Wallace Carter MD
New York Presbyterian Hospital
Dennis Hsieh JD, MD
Alameda County Medical Center
Highland General Hospital
John T. Nagurney MD, MPH
Harvard Medical School
Anna Marie Chang MD
Hospital of the University of
Pennsylvania
Lauren Hudak MD
Emory University
Hangyul M. Chung-Esaki MD
University of California San Francisco
Ula Hwang MD, MPH
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Robert Louis Cloutier MD
Oregon Health and Science University
Janetta Iwanicki MD
Denver Health Medical Center
Robert Cooper MD
Ohio State Medical Center
Brian Johnson MD
Alameda County Medical Center
Eric J. Cortez MD
The Ohio State University
Samantha P. Kadera MD
UCLA Medical Center
Zachary D. Dezman MD
University of Maryland
Daniel Keyes MD
Univ of Michigan EM Residency
Program
Katherine Douglass MD
The George Washington University
Brian Driver MD
Hennepin County Medical Center
Marie-Carmelle Elie MD
University of Florida
Marc Ellingson MD
Regions Hospital
Kevin L. Ferguson MD
University of Florida
William A. Knight IV MD
University of Cincinnati
Rebecca Kornas MD
Hennepin County Medical Center
Melinda Morton MD, MPH
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
John Neuffer MD
West Virginia University
Daniel K. Nishijima MD
University of California, Davis
Jason T. Nomura MD
Christiana Care Health System
Charissa Pacella MD
University of Pittsburgh
Daniel J. Pallin MD, MPH
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Joseph D. Pate MD
Georgetown/Washington Hospital
Center
Elizabeth M. Phillips MD
Case Western Reserve University
Peter Pryor MD
Denver Health
Nate Lisenbee MD
UF Shands Gainesville
Robert Redwood MD
University of Wisconsin
Hospital and Clinics
Michael Martinez MD
Oregon Health and Science University
Karin V. Rhodes MD, MS
University of Pennsylvania
Rebekah Richards MD
The Ohio State University Wexner
Medical Center
Brandon A. Roberts MD
LSUHSC- New Orleans
Robert Rodriguez MD
UCSF/San Francisco
General Hospital
Dan Rolston MD
St. Luke’s Roosevelt
Pedro Roque MD
Maricopa Medical Center
Arthur Sanders MD
University of Arizona
Jonathan Schonert MD
WVU
David C. Seaberg MD
University of Tennessee
Todd Seigel MD
Brown University/Rhode Island
Hospital
Salvatore Silvestri MD
Orlando Regional Medical Center
Sameer Sinha MD
St. John hospital
Howard Smithline MD
Baystate Medical Center
Joseph P. Tagliaferro DO
MetroHealth Medical Center
Nik Theyyunni MD
University of Michigan
Susan Thompson DO
Christiana Care Health System
J. S. VanEpps MD, PhD
University of Michigan
Amar Vira MD
University of Arizona
Taher Vohra MD
Henry Ford Hospital
Eric Wei MD
University of Michigan
Ambrose Wong MD
NYU School of Medicine
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
83
Abstracts Innovations – Speakers with No Disclosures
Jameel Abualenain,
The George Washington University
Yahya A. ACAR,MD, Etimesgut Military Hospital
Jerielle Adams,MD, LSUHSC, Earl K. Long Medical
Center, Department of Emergency Medicine
Kathleen M. Adelgais,MD MPH,
University of Colorado
Opeolu Adeoye, University of Cincinnati
Victoria Adewunmi,MD,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Negean Afifi,DO, Cook County ( Stroger)
Anish K. Agarwal,MD, MPH,
The University of Pennsylvania
Dipti Agarwal,MBBS, Mayo Clinic
Amish Aghera,MD, Maimonides Medical Center
Darin Agresti,DO, St. Luke’s University
Hospital and Health Network
James Ahn, University of Chicago
Hamid R. Alai, Department of Emergency Medicine,
Johns Hopkins University
Amer Z. Aldeen,MD, Northwestern University
Lora AlKhawam,MD, Northwestern University
Brandon R. Allen,MD, University of Florida
Michael G. Allison,MD,
University of Maryland Medical Center
Richard Amini,
University of Arizona Medical Center
Lars W. Andersen,BS,
Research Center for Emergency Medicine
Erik M. Angles,MD, Maine Medical Center
Yuemi An-Grogan,MD,
Northwestern University
Meredith H. Arasaratnam,ScD,
National Collaborative for Bio-Preparedness
Ryan Arnold,MD, Cooper University Hospital
Sanjay Arora,MD, Keck School of Medicine of the
University of Southern California
Faizan H. Arshad, Yale New Haven Hospital
Rajiv Arya,MD, UMDNJ-RWJMS New Brunswick
Bahareh Aslani,MD, Henry Ford Hospital
Chandra Aubin,
Washington University School of Medicine
Ryan D. Aycock,
Staten Island University Hospital
Arif Azam,MD,
The University of Texas Health Science Center
John Bailitz, Cook County (Stroger)
Fran Balamuth,MD, PhD,
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Hari Balasubramanian,PhD,
University of Massachusetts
Kimberly Baldino,MD,
Morristown Medical Center
Caroline A. Ball, Loyola University Chicago
Theodore C. Bania,MD,
St. Luke’s - Roosevelt Hospital Center
Isabel A. Barata,MS MD,
North Shore University Hospital
Brian Barbas, Cooper Medical School of
Rowan Univerisity
David Barbic, McGill University
Elizabeth Barlow,DO,
Saint Vincent Health Center
Jeffrey Barrett,MD,
Temple University School of Medicine
Benjamin S. Bassin,MD, University of Michigan
Aveh Bastani, Troy Beaumont Hospital
Jonathan Bastian,MD, University of Calgary
Christopher W. Baugh,MD, MBA,
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Brigitte M. Baumann,MD, MSCE,
Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
Rebecca A. Bavolek,MD, Washington University in
St. Louis School of Medicine
Daren M. Beam,MD, MS,
Indiana School of Medicine
Raphaelle Beard, Johns Hopkins University
Gillian A. Beauchamp,MD,
University of Cincinnati
Vikhyat S. Bebarta, San Antonio Military Medical
Center; US Army Institute of Surgical Research
Kaylin Beck,BA,
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Bruce M. Becker,MD, MPH, Warren Alpert School of
Medicine at Brown University
Brian N. Beer,MD, Scott & White Healthcare
Maxim Ben-Yakov,MD.CM.,
University of Toronto
Katherine Berg,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Allyson Best, University of Cincinnati
Marian E. Betz,
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Mary C. Bhalla, Summa Akron City Hospital
Salma Bibi,MPH, Boston Medical Center
Meredith Camp. Binford,MHS,
Yale School of Medicine
Reena Blanco,MD, Emory University
David J. Blehar,MD,
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Jerry B. Bodily,MD, University of New Mexico
Connie Boh, Duke-National University
Singapore Graduate Medical School
84
Nichole Bosson,MD, MPH,
Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles
Biomedical Research Institute
Jason D. Bothwell,MD,
Madigan Army Medical Center
Edwin D. Boudreaux,PhD, The University of
Massachusetts Medical School
Michael Bouton, Beth Israel Deaconess
Ariel Bowman, University of Pennsylvania
William P. Bozeman, Wake Forest University
Shari Brand, Mayo Clinic Hospital
Ethan Brandler, SUNY Downstate University
Hospital of Brooklyn
Irina F. Brennan,MD, PhD, University of Florida
Jesse J. Brennan,MA,
University of California, San Diego
Joshua S. Broder,MD,
Duke University Medical Center
Simon G A. Brown,MBBS PhD FACEM,
Western Australian Institute for Medical
Research, Royal Perth Hospital and the
University of Western Australia
Krista Brucker,MD, Northwestern University
Rasha Buhumaid,MD, George Washington
Matt Burge,MD, Scott & White
John Burkhardt, University of Michigan
Elizabeth Burner,MD MPH,
University of Southern California
John H. Burton,MD, Carilion Clinic
Erin Caddell, University of Central Florida,
College of Medicine
Lisa A. Calder, University of Ottawa
Jesse B. Cannon,MD,
Emory University, Atlanta VA Medical Center
Candice T. Cardon,MD,
Christus Spohn Memorial
Julie M. Carland,MD,
University of Arizona Medical Center
Matthew C. Carlisle, UC Davis
Amanda J. Carlson,MD, Regions Hospital
Christopher R. Carpenter,MD, MSc,
Washington University in St. Louis
Brendan G. Carr,MS MS,
University of Pennsylvania
Stephanie Carreiro,MD,
Alpert Medical School, Brown University
Emily Carrier,
Center for Studying Health System Change
Shaun D. Carstairs, Naval Medical Center
Patrick M. Carter,MD, University of Michigan
Edward M. Castillo,PhD, MPH,
University of California, San Diego
Allison D. Cator,MD, PhD,
University of Michigan
Srihari Cattamanchi,MD, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center / Harvard Medical School
Kate Cerwensky,MPH, Center for Global Health
and Development, Boston University School of
Public Health
Theodore C. Chan,MD,
University of California, San Diego
Samuel J. Chang,MD, Carolinas Medical Center
Dane Michael. Chapman, University of Missouri,
Columbia, School of Medicine
Michelle J. Chastain,MD,
Advocate Christ Medical Center
Andrew Chen, North Shore LIJ Health System
Andrew E. Chertoff,MD, Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center
Shiau Hui Chin,MD, New York Hospital Queens
Makini Chisolm-Straker,MD,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
David T. Chiu,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Junho Cho,
Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital
Shih-Chin Chou,MD, New York Hospital Queens
Jason Chu,MD,
St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center
Steve B. Chukwulebe,BS, BBA,
University of Pennsylvania
Orhan Cinar, Gulhane Military Medical Academy
Eric C. Cioe,MD, State University of New York
Downstate Medical Center
Eben Clattenburg,
The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Lisa Clayton,DO, Morristown Medical Center
Enesha Cobb,MD, MTS, University of Michigan
Giorgio Costantino,MD,
Università degli Studi di Milano
Dale Cotton,MD, UC Davis Medical Center
Cheryl Courage, Wayne State University
Philip W. Craven, University of Utah
Cristal Cristia,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Heather L. Crouse,MD, Baylor College of Medicine/
Texas Children’s Hospital
Brandan Crum,MD,
University of California Davis Medical Center
Keith Curtis,MD, Univerisy of Utah
R. Mason Curtis, Queen’s University
Amy Cutright, East Carolina University
Alexander M. Dabrowiecki,BS,
St. George’s University
Robert T. Dahlquist,MD,
Carolinas Medical Center
Michael W. Dailey,MD, Albany Medical Center
Preeti Dalawari,MD, MSPH,
Saint Louis University Hospital
Timothy Dalseg,MD, University of Ottawa
Brock Daniels,MD, Yale New Haven Hospital
Raoul Daoust,MD MSc,
Hôpital du sacré cœur de Montréal
Bryan F. Darger,BA, MSII,
University of Texas Medical School at Houston
Christopher W. Davis,MD, University of Arizona
Leah A. Davis,MA, Thomas Jefferson University
Anthony De Lucia,DO,
University of South Florida
Nathan Deal, Baylor College of Medicine
Katie E. Dean,MD, Emory
M. Kit Delgado,
Stanford University School of Medicine
Lawrence A. DeLuca, University of Arizona
Bobby Desai, University of Florida
Sharmistha Dev,MD, MPH, Henry Ford Hospital
Zachary DW. Dezman,MD, MS, Department of
Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland
Roshanak Didehban,MHS, FACHE, Mayo Clinic
Ru Ding, George Washington University
Kenneth W. Dodd,MD,
Hennepin County Medical Center
Stephanie Y. Donald,MD,
George Washington University
Michael Donnino,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
J. Joelle Donofrio,DO,
Harbor UCLA Medical Center
Suzanne Dooley-Hash,MD,
University of Michigan
Jason Dorais,MD, University of Utah
Kelly M. Doran,MD, Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, Yale
University School of Medicine
Annette Dorfman,
George Washington University
Sarina Doyle,MD, Orlando Health
Sarina Doyle,MD, Orlando Health
Scott M. Dresden, Northwestern University
Feinberg School of Medicine
Brian E. Driver,MD,
Hennepin County Medical Center
Nicole M. Dubosh,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Edward Durant,MD, MPH, Alameda County Medical
Center- Highland Hospital
Emma Dwyer MD, St. Louis Univeristy
James D. Dziura,PhD, Yale School of Medicine
J. Matthew. Edwards,MD,
Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center
Daniel Egan, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt
Daniel J. Egan,MD,
St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital Center
Nate Egger,MD, Wayne State University
Marie-Carmelle Elie-Turenne,MD,
University of Florida
Inna Elikashvili, Mount Sinai Medical Center
Craig Ellis,
West Australian Institute for Medical Research
Mark Ellis,MD,
Stanford University School of Medicine
Angela M. Ellison,MD,MSc, University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Tovah G. Ellman,MD, Orlando Health System
Kirsten G. Engel, Northwestern University
Amy Ernst,MD, University of New Mexico
Brian Euerle,
University of Maryland School of Medicine
David P. Evans,
Virginia Commonwealth University
Tom Evens,MBBS BSc, Ealing Hospital NHS Trust
John J. Everett,MD,
William Beaumont Medical Center
Sarah Fabiano,MD, University of Rochester
Carrie Fales,MD, Carolinas Medical Center
Isaac J. Farrell, University of Arizona
Christopher Fee,MD,
University of California San Francisco
David Fernandez,MD, JPS Health Network
Douglas Fields,MD,
Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center
J. Matthew Fields, Thomas Jefferson University
fred fiesseler, Morristown Medical Center
Meaghen Finan,MD, St. Luke’s University Hospital
and Health Network
Christopher Fischer,MD, Beth Israel Deaconess/
Harvard Medical School
Sarah K. Flaherty,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Melissa Fleegler,MD, University of New Mexico
William Fleischman,MD,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Abraham Flinders,
Keck School of Medicine USC
Jenna M. Fredette,MD,
Christiana Care Health System
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Caroline Freiermuth,MD,
Duke University Medical Center
Ari B. Friedman, University of Pennsylvania
Benjamin W. Friedman,MD,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Matt S. Friedman,MD,
Fire Department Of New York
Adam Frisch,MD, University of Pittsburgh
Brian Fuller,MD, Washington University in
St. Louis School of Medicine
Matthew J. Fuller,MD, University of Utah
Matthew J. Fuller, University of Utah
Gelareh Z. Gabayan,MD, MSHS,
West Los Angeles VA and UCLA
David F. Gaieski,MD,
The University of Pennsylvania
Payal K. Gala, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Adrian Garofoli,MD, Mayo Clinic
Romolo Gaspari,MD, PhD,
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Tyler Giberson,BS,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Brian Gillett, Maimonides Medical Center
Adit A. Ginde,
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Catherine T. Ginty,MD,
Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
George Glass, University of Virginia
Eric J. Goldlust,MD, Ph.D., Brown University
Glenn R. Gookin,Ph.D.,
University of Central Florida
Priya R. Gopwani,
Children’s National Medical Center
Tadahiro Goto,MD, University of Fukui Hospital
Prasanthi Govindarajan,MD, MAS,
University of California, San Francisco
Monika Goyal,MD, Children’s National Medical
Center, The George Washington University
Shannon Graf,MD,
MedStar Washington Hospital Center
Robert Graham,D.O., Geisinger Medical Center
Jocelyn Gravel, Hôpital Sainte-Justine
Jeffrey P. Green, UC Davis Medical Center
Peter W. Greenwald,MD MS,
Weill Cornell Medical College
Colin F. Greineder,MD PhD,
University of Pennsylvania
Peter L. Griffin,B.S.,
Penn State University Hershey Medical Center
Kathryn Groner,MD,
Christiana Care Health Systems
Maureen E. Gross,MD,
Barnes Jewish Hospital/Washington University
Anne V. Grossestreuer,MS,
University of Pennsylvania
Corita R. Grudzen,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Anurag Gupta,MD, MBA,
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Devra Gutfreund, Newark Beth Israel
Todd Guth, University of Colorado
David L. Gutteridge,MD, MPH,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Stephanie Haddad,MD,
North Shore University Hospital
Paul E. Haiar,MPAS, PA-C,
San Antonio Military Medical Center
Erinn Hama,MD, Georgetown University and
Washington Hospital Center
Khalief Hamden,MD, St. Luke’s University Hospital
and Health Network
Jin H. Han,MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University
Daniel Handel,MD, MPH, Oregon Health & Science
University School of Medicine
Matthew L. Hansen,MD, OHSU
Bhakti Hansoti,MD, Johns Hopkins University
John P. Haran,MD,
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Kimberly W. Hart,MA, University of Cincinnati
Kohei Hasegawa,MD, MPH,
Massachusetts General Hospital
Andrew N. Hashikawa,MD, MS,
University of Michigan
Elizabeth Hassebroek,MD,
University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
Benjamin W. Hatten,MD, Oregon Poison Center,
Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon
Health and Science University
Nicolaus Hawbaker,MD, University of Arizona
Micelle Haydel, LSU-New Orleans
Amy Heard,MD, Stony Brook University
Jonathan W. Heidt,MD, Washington University
School of Medicine in Saint Louis
Michael Heller, Beth Israel Medical Center
Daniel J. Henning,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Brooke Hensley,MD, UCSF
Luke K. Hermann,MD,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Bradley Hernandez,MD, Regions Hospital
J. Daniel Hess,MD,
Christiana Care Health System
Marquita N. Hicks,MD,
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Peyton Holder,MD, University of Oklahoma
Department of Emergency Medicine
Judd E. Hollander, University of Pennsylvania
Kaylee M. Hollern,
Penn State College of Medicine
Danielle Hollingworth, Orlando Health
Brandon Hone MD, University of Alberta
Leah S. Honigman,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Laura Hopson,MD, University of Michigan
Timothy Horeczko,MD, MSCR,
University of California, Davis
Steven Horng,MD MMSc, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center / Harvard Medical School
Russ Horowitz,MD, RDMS, Ann & Robert H. Lurie
Children’s Hospital of Chicago
Joseph House, University of Michigan
Stacey L. House,MD PhD,
Washington University in St. Louis
Chih-Yi Hsu,MD, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
Chien-Hsiung Huang,MD,
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
Adrienne Hughes, Baylor College of Medicine
Katherine M. Hunold,BSPH,
University of Virginia
Ryan Hunt,MD, UC Davis Medical Center
Benton R. Hunter,MD,
Indiana University School of Medicine
Christopher L. Hunter,MD, Ph.D.,
Orlando Regional Medical Center
Nicholas B. Hurst,MD, University of Arizona
Gregg Husk,MD, Beth Israel Medical Center
Deena Ibrahim,MD, University of California, Irvine,
School of Medicine
Nathan A. Irvin,MD, University of Pennsylvania
Geoffrey K. Isbister,FACEM MD, Discipline of
Clinical Pharmacology, University of Newcastle
and Department of Clinical Toxicology, Calvary
Mater Newcastle
Kurt M. Isenberger,MD, Regions Hospital
Yuri Ishii, Tokyo Medical University Hospital
Gabrielle A. Jacquet,MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine
Daniel Jafari,MD MPH,
University of Pennsylvania
Katherine Jahnes, New York Methodist Hospital
Shabnam Jain,MD, Emory University
Thea L. James,MD, Boston Medical Center, Boston
University School of Medicine
Tiffany Jan,MD,
The University of Chicago Medical Center
Paul S. Jansson,BA, Northwestern University
Feinberg School of Medicine
Michelle Jaques,B.A.,
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Joshua M. Jauregui,MD, Alpert Medical School of
Brown University, Department of Emergency
Medicine
Parisa P. Javedani,MD, University of Arizona
Dietrich Jehle, [email protected]
Karla P. Jeri-Lozano,BS, Human Biology, University
of California, Irvine
John E. Jesus,MD, Christiana Care Health Center
Russell Johanson,MD, University of Massachusetts
Medical School
Christopher W. Jones,MD,
Christiana Care Health System
Jonathan L. Jones,MD,
University of North Carolina
Jaime Jordan, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
Madhuvanthi A. Kandadai,
University of Cincinnati
Steven Katz,
Barnes-Jewish/Washington University in St. Louis
Takahisa Kawano, Fukui University Hospital
Maura Kennedy,MD, MPH,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Andrew Keralis,
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Daniel Keyes, University of Michigan
Ayesha Khan, Stanford University Hospital
Sorabh Khandelwal, Ohio State University
Rahul K. Khare, Northwestern University
Christopher S. Kiefer,MD,
West Virginia University School of Medicine
Austin Kilaru, Perelman School of Medicine at the
University of Pennsylvania
David J. Kim, The Warren Alpert Medical School of
Brown University
Jimin Kim,MSc, University of Chicago
Joseph S. Kim,MD, University of Kentucky
Won Young Kim,MD, PhD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Dana Kindermann,
George Washington University Hospital
Austin Kinney,MD, University of California Irvine
Yonitte Kinsella,MD,
Washington University in Saint Louis
Robert Klemisch,AB, Washington University
School of Medicine in St. Louis
Paul Ko,MD, SUNY Upstate Medical University
Timothy Koboldt,MD, Washington University in St.
Louis School of Medicine
Joseph J. Korfhagen, University of Cincinnati
Frederick K. Korley, Johns Hopkins
Joshua G. Kornegay,MD,
Oregon Health & Science University
Matthew Kostura,MD, University of Arizona
Kevin Kotkowski,MD,
University of Massachusetts
Michael Koury,
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Chad M. Kovala,DO,
St. John Hospital & Medical Center
Christian Koziatek,BA,
Bellevue Hospital/NYU Medical Center
Dana E. Kozubal,BS,
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
William C. Krauss,MD, FACEP,
Kaiser Permanente
Allyson A. Kreshak,MD,
University of California San Diego
Ramaswamy Krishnan,Ph.D.,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Rita K. Kuwahara,MIH,
UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine
Heemun Kwok,MD, MS,
University of Washington
Maria Y. Kwok,
Columbia University Medical Center
Jay G. Ladde,MD,
Orlando Regional Medical Center
Hsuan Lai, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School
Julio Lairet,
Emory University School of Medicine
Lauren F. Laker,MBA, University of Cincinnati
Samuel H. F. Lam,
Advocate Christ Medical Center
Gregory Lamb,MD, University of New Mexico
Mark I. Langdorf,MD, MHPE,
University of California, Irvine
Wayne Bond Lau,MD,
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Charlotte C. Lawson,
University of Pennsylvania
Luan Lawson,MD, Brody School of Medicine at
East Carolina University
Ching-Hsing Lee,
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
Stephen Leech,
Orlando Regional Medical Center
Kimberly Leeson,MD,
CHRISTUS Spohn Texas A&M University
Emergency Medicine Residency
Sabine E. Lemoyne,MD, senior emergency
consultant, Department of Emergency Medicine
Megan Leo,MD, RDMS, Boston Medical Center
E. Brooke Lerner,PhD, Medical College of
Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals
Cynthia Leung,MD, PhD, The Ohio State
University Medical Center
Amy Leuthauser,MD, MS,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Brian Levine, Christiana Care
Michael Levine,MD,
University of Southern California
Alexander T. Limkakeng, Duke University
Karen R. Lind,MD, Maimonides Medical Center
Viktor Livshits,MD,
Morristown Medical Center
Bruce M. Lo,MD, Eastern Virginia Medical School,
Sentara Norfolk General Hospital
Frank LoVecchio,DO, Maricopa Medical Center
Sean M. Lowe,MD, Emory University
Adam Lukasiewicz,MPH,
Yale University School of Medicine
Maren M. Lunoe, Medical College of Wisconsin
Lucienne Lutfy-Clayton, Tufts University Medical
School Baystate Medical Center
Sharon Mace,MD, Cleveland Clinic
Tracy MacIntosh,MD, MPH,
Yale-New Haven Hospital
Michelle Macy, University of Michigan
Joseph K. Maddry,
Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center
Tracy E. Madsen,MD,
Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Laura Magnuson,MD, Orlando Health
Neil Majmundar,MD,
St. John Hospital & Medical Center
Andrew L. Makowski,MD, St. Joseph’s Hospital
Sameer Mal,MD, University of Western Ontario
Alex F. Manini,MD, MS,
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
Michael Manka,MD, SUNY at Buffalo School of
Medicine, Erie County Medical Center
Lisa M. Mannina,MD,
San Antonio Military Medical Center
Asa M. Margolis,DO, MPH, MS, Johns Hopkins
Keith A. Marill,MD,
Massachusetts General Hospital
Stacey Marlow,MD, JD,
University of South Florida
John Martel,MD, PhD, University of Michigan
Tara Martin,MD,
George Washington University
Shannon M. Matthews,
University of North Carolina
Brandon C. Maughan,MD, MHS,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Larissa May,MD,
George Washington University
Justin Mazzillo,
UT Health Science Center at Houston
Jonathan McCoy, RWJUH/RWJMS
James Y. McCue,BS, UC Davis
Samuel McLean,MD, MPH, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Anesthesiology
Jason McMullan,MD, University of Cincinnati
Candace McNaughton, Vanderbilt University
Andrew McRae, University of Calgary
Edward R. Melnick,MD, Yale School of Medicine
Anne K. Merritt,MD,
Yale University School of Medicine
William Meurer, University of Michigan
Robert H. Meyer,MD, Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center
Omar Meziab,
University of Arizona College of Medicine
Athena Mihailos, NY Methodist Hospital
Joshua P. Miller,MD, SAUSHEC
Matthew W. Miller,BA,
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Christina M. Millhouse,MD,
UC Davis Health System
Angela M. Mills,MD, University of Pennsylvania
Dave Milzman, Georgetown U School of Medicine
James R. Miner,MD,
Hennepin County Medical Center
Danielle Minett,MD, MPH, Christiana Care
Nate Minnick, St John Hospital
Hal J. Minnigan,MD,
Indiana University School of Medicine
Kyle D. Minor, Emory University
Brandon Minzer,MA, EdM, University of Arizona
College of Medicine - Phoenix
Binoy W. Mistry,BS,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Rakesh Mistry,MD, MS,
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Alice M. Mitchell,MD MS,
Indiana University School of Medicine
Rebecca Mitchell,BA, University or Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health
Payal Modi,MD, MPH, Brown University
Nicholas M. Mohr,
University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine
Joel Moll,MD, Emory University
Lori A. Montagna, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Julia L. Moon,MPH,
Drexel University, School of Public Health
Johanna C. Moore,MD,
Hennepin County Medical Center
Tamara Moores,MD, University of Utah - Division
of Emergency Medicine
Daniela Morato,MD, LAC+USC Medical Center
Lisa Moreno-Walton,MD, Louisiana State
University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans
Kosuke Mori, Department of Emergency
Medicine, Tokyo Bay Urayasu/Ichikawa Medical
Center, Noguchi Hideyo Memorial International
Hospital
Daniel C. Morris,MD, Henry Ford Health System
John Morrison,MD, St. Luke’s University
Hospital and Health Network
Phillip Moschella,MD PhD,
University of Cincinnati
Jarrod M. Mosier,MD, University of Arizona
Ari Moskowitz,MD, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center
C. Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman, Emory University
Hani Mowafi,MD, MPH, Boston University
Colin Mukubwa,MD, VIdant Medical Center
Laura W. Mulvey,BS,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Tichaendepi Mundangepfupfu,
Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center
Antonio Muniz,MD,
Dallas Regional Medical Center
Krithika M. Muruganandan,MD, Rhode Island
Hospital, Dept of Emergency Medicine
Ward P. Myers, Boston University
Anthony Napoli,MD FACEP, Warren Alpert
Medical School of Brown University
Arica Nesper,BA, University of California, Davis
Medical Center, Sacramento, CA
David E. Newman-Toker,MD PhD,
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Manya F. Newton,MD MPH MS,
University of Michigan
Lorraine Ng,MD, NYP Morgan Stanley Children’s
Hospital of New York
Daniel K. Nishijima, University of California, Davis
Joan Noelker,MD, Washington University St Louis
Brian O’Neil,MD,
Wayne State University School of Medicine
Megan OBrien,
Boston University School of Medicine
Erin O’Connor,MD, University of Ottawa
Lauren G. Oliveira,DO, Naval Medical Center
Robert P. Olympia,MD,
Penn State Hershey Medical Center
Yasser Omar,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
James C. O’Neill,MD, Wake Forest Baptist Health
Anwar D. Osborne, Emory University
Michael Paddock,DO, Cook County (Stroger)
Daniel J. Pallin, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Amisha D. Parekh,MD, New York Methodist
Hospital
Joshua Parker,
Scott and White Memorial Hospital
Anjana Patel, Mayo Clinic
Viral Patel,MD, ME.,
St. Luke’s - Roosevelt Hospital Center
Robbie E. Paulsen,MD,
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Charles Pearce,MD, Northwestern University
David A. Pearson,MD, Carolinas Medical Center
Allison Peasley,MD, University of Arizona
Timothy Peck,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Timothy C. Peck,MD,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Jonathan H. Pelletier,
Maine Medical Center Research Institute
Joe Peraza,MD,
University of Arizona Health Network
Nithershini Periyasamy,MBBS,M.Sc MD
(Community Medicine), General Hospital
Jeffrey J. Perry, University of Ottawa
Lara Phillips,MD, Vanderbilt
Todd M. Phillips,
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Nicole E. Piela,MD, Thomas Jefferson University
Deborah L. Pierce,DO, MS, Einstein Medical
Center
Jesse Pines,MD, MBA, MSCE, George Washington
University
Timothy F. Platts-Mills, University of North
Carolina Chapel Hill
Lori A. Post, Yale University School of Medicine
Emilie Powell,MD MS MBA, Northwestern
University
Samuel J. Prater,MD, University of Texas Medical
School @ Houston, Department of Emergency
Medicine
Melanie K. Prusakowski,MD, Carilion Clinic
Evan Pushchak,MD, Northwestern University
Michael A. Puskarich, University of Mississippi
Medical Center
Kelly E. Quinley,BA, Perelman School of Medicine,
University of Pennsylvania
James Quinn,MD MS, Stanford University
Nicholas J. Rademacher, University of Michigan
Brian Raffetto,MPH, LAC-USC Department of
Emergency Medicine
Megan L. Ranney,MD MPH, Alpert Medical
School, Brown University
Erin S. Rardon,MD, West Virginia University
Jonathan J. Ratcliff,MD, MPH, University of
Cincinnati
Avanish S. Reddy,BA, Stony Brook University
Colby Redfield,MD, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center / Harvard Medical School
Timothy J. Reeder,MD, East Carolina University
Rifat Rehmani,MD;MSc, King Abduaziz Hospital
Eric Revue,Director of the Emergency and
Prehospital EMS, Louis Pasteur Hospital
Martin Reznek,MD, MBA, University of
Massachusetts Medical School and
UMassMemorial Medical Center
Karin V. Rhodes, University of Pennsylvania
Derek Richardson,MD, Oregon Health & Science
University
Kristin L. Rising,MD, University of Pennsylvania
Perelman School of Medicine
Kenneth Robinson,MD, Hartford Hospital
Daniel R. Rodgers,MD, RDMS, Penn State
Hershey
Melissa A. Rodgers,BA, University of
Pennsylvania
Ralph Rogers, Warren Alpert Medical School of
Brown University
Jessica S. Rose,MD, East Carolina University
Jamie Rosini, Christiana Care
Joel C. Rowe,MD, University of Florida
Andrew H. Ruffner,MA, University of Cincinnati
Daniel Runde,MD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
Amber K. Sabbatini,MD, MPH, Department of
Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan
Jeffrey H. Sacks,MD, Emory University School
of Medicine
Basmah Safdar,MD, Yale University
John C. Sakles,MD, University of Arizona
Stacy Salerno, University of Rochester School of
Medicine and Dentistry
David Saloum, Maimonides Medical Center
David H. Salzman,MD, Northwestern University
Joshua G. Salzman,MA, Regions Hospital
Margaret E. Samuels-Kalow,MD MPhil, Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia
Layli Sanaee,MD, University of Ottawa
Czarina Sanchez,MD, BIDMC
Teresa Sanchez,PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center, Harvard Medical School
Michael Sanders, orlando regional medical center
Stephen Sanko,MD, LAC-USC Medical Center,
Los Angeles Fire Department
Sally A. Santen,MD, PhD, University of Michigan
Comilla Sasson,MD MS, University of Colorado
Denver School of Medicine
Kori Sauser,MD, University of Michigan
Hendry R. Sawe,MD, Muhimbili University of
Health and Allied Sciences
Hendry R. Sawe,MD, Muhimbili University of
Health and Allied Sciences
Jennifer Sayegh,MS, University of Cincinnati
Sarah Schlein,MD, Univerisy of Utah
Shira Schlesinger, LAC+USC Medical Center
Justin Schrager, Emory University School of
Medicine
Lisa M. Schweigler,MD, MPH, MS, The Warren
Alpert Medical School of Brown University
David Scordino,MD, Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine
Lancer A. Scott,MD, FACEP, MUSC
James T. Scribner,MD, John Peter Smith Health
Network
Philip Seidenberg,MD, University of New Mexico
Manish N. Shah, University of Rochester
Purvi D. Shah, Montefiore Medical Center
Sachita Shah, University of Washington School
of Medicine
Alexander Y. Sheng,MD, Massachusetts General
Hospital
Rohit Shenoi,MD, Baylor College of Medicine
Jeffrey Shih, Mayo Clinic
Sang Do Shin,MD, Seoul National University
College of Medicine
Hamid Shokoohi, George Washington University
Sneha Shrestha, Stanford School of Medicine
Eric C. Silverman,MD,
Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
Michael E. Silverman, Morristown Medical Center
Salvatore Silvestri,
Orlando Regional Medical Center
Erin L. Simon,D.O., Akron General Medical Center
Richard Sinert,DO, Downstate Medical Center
Adam J. Singer,MD, Stony Brook University
Nimmie Singh,BS,
Kaiser Permanente Division of Research
Jordan Singleton,MD, University of Arizona
Craig Sisson,MD, RDMS, University of Texas
Health Science Center San Antonio
Christian Sloane,MD, UCSD Medical Center
Alan J. Smally,MD, Hartford Hospital and the
University of CT School of Medicine
Howard A. Smithline, Baystate Medical Center
Peter Smulowitz,MD, MPH, Beth Israel
Deaconess Medical Center
Joseph Sontgerath,
San Antonio Military Medical Center
Olanrewaju Soremekun,
University of Pennsylvania
Grace Sousa,MD, University at Buffalo SUNY
Cemal B. Sozener,MD, University of Michigan
Susanne J. Spano,MD, FACEP, UCSF Fresno
Chris Stahmer,MD,
Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center
Rachel Stanley, University of Michigan
Latha Ganti. Stead,MD, MS, MBA,
University of Florida
Eric Steinberg,DO, Beth Israel Medical Center
Sarah A. Sterling,
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Luke A. Stevens,MA,
Boston University School of Medicine
Matthew Stewart,MD, University of Utah
Lori A. Stolz,MD, University of Arizona
Uwe Stolz,PhD, MPH, University of Arizona
Garrick L. Stride,MD,
Naval Medical Center San Diego
Alison L. Sullivan,MD, Baystate Medical Center
Daniel L. Summers,MPH, Yale School of Medicine
Anand Swaminathan, NYU/Bellevue
Breena R. Taira,MD, MPH,
Olive View UCLA Medical Center
Melissa Tavarez,MD,
Children’s National Medical Center
Richard A. Taylor, Yale University
Raymond P. Ten Eyck,MD, MPH,
Wright State University
Sophie Terp,MD, MPH, Department of Emergency
Medicine, University of Southern California
Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA
Nicholas Testa, LAC+USC Medical Center
Sheetal Thaker,MD, Baylor College of Medicine
Urvi Thakker, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
Andrew J. Thomas,
Oregon Health & Science University
David J. Thomas, East Carolina University
R. Jason Thurman,MD,
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Carrie D. Tibbles,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Adam Z. Tobias,MD MPH,
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Colleen Tran,DO, York Hospital
Stephen Traub,MD, Mayo Clinic Arizona
Ann Tsung, University of Florida
Janis P. Tupesis,MD, University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and Public Health
Shawn M. Varney,MD,
San Antonio Military Medical Center
Arjun K. Venkatesh,MD, MBA, Yale University
Gary M. Vilke,MD,
University of California, San Diego
Janna H. Villano,MD, Advocate Christ Medical
Center, Department of Emergency Medicine
Julian Villar,MD, MPH, UCSF
Jeffrey R. Vlasic,
University of Michigan Medical School
Jody Vogel, Denver Health Medical Center
Rishi Vohra,MD, St. Luke’s- Roosevelt
David A. Wald,DO,
Temple University School of Medicine
Nikki B. Waller,MD,
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Joseph Walline, Saint Louis University
Kyle B. Walsh, University of Cincinnati
Paul Walsh, University of California Davis
Jessica M. Walthall,B.S.,
Yale University School of Medicine
Haichao Wang, North Shore University Hospital
Henry E. Wang,
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Yajing Wang,MD, PhD,
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Catherine M. Wares,MD,
Carolinas Medical Center
Muhammad Waseem,MD, MS,
Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center
Hiroko Watase,MD, MPH, Japanese Emergency
Medicine Research Alliance
Anna Waterbrook, University of Arizona
Jennifer Watts,MD, MPH,
Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics
John A. Watts,PhD, Carolinas Medical Center
Susan Watts,PhD, Texas Tech University
Health Sciences Center
Julie S. Weber,
Wayne State University School of Medicine
Danielle Weinman,MD,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Steven J. Weiss,MD, University of New Mexico
Robert D. Welch, Wayne State University
Karl Weller, DO,
St. Luke’s University Hospital
Leana S. Wen, Harvard Affiliated Emergency
Medicine Residency
Howard A. Werman,MD, Ohio State University
Robert A. Weston,MD, University Medical Center
at Brackenridge
Matthew Wheatley, Emory University School
of Medicine
Benjamin A. White,MD, Massachusetts General
Hospital
Marjorie L. White,MD, MPPM, MEd, University of
Alabama Birmingham
Nathan White,MD, University of Washington
Lauren K. Whiteside, University of Washington,
Division of Emergency Medicine
Cole A. Wiedel,BA,
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Tristan Wihbey,
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
Kenneth Will,MD, Cook County (Stroger) Hospital
Brian Willenbring,BA, NREMT-B, Medical College
of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals
Sandra J. Williams,DO MPH,
Baylor College of Medicine
Conrad Williamson,BS, UC Davis
Juliana Wilson,D.O.,
The State University of New York at Buffalo
Michael Wilson,MD, PhD,
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Kathleen Wittels, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Michael D. Witting, University of Maryland
Catherine S. Wolff,MS, University of Pennsylvania
Andrew Wollowitz,MD,
Department of Emergency Medicine,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Ambrose H. Wong MD, NYU School of Medicine
Matthew Wong,MD, Harvard Medical School,
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Nelson Wong, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Randy Woo,MD, University of California, Irvine
Shujun Xia,MD,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Kabir Yadav,MDCM MS,
The George Washington University
Justin Yan, The University of Western Ontario
Lily Yan, Stanford University School of Medicine
Sharon Yellin,MD, New York Methodist Hospital
Mackensie A. Yore,
Stanford University School of Medicine
Janet S. Young,MD, Carilion Clinic
Esther L. Yue,MD,
Oregon Health and Science University
Shahriar Zehtabchi, State University of New York,
Downstate Medical Center
Eric Zevallos,MD,
Georgia Health Science University
Ke Zheng,MD, New York Hospital Queens
Christine Zink,MD, UTHSCSA
Mark Zocchi,MPH, George Washington University
Michael D. Zwank, Regions Hospital
Joshua Zwart,MD, University of Rochester
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
85
Didactics CME
The following didactic speakers have disclosures:
Benjamin S. Abella MD, MS, Hospital of the University of
Pennsylvania, Advisory Board: HeartSine Corp; Consultant:
Velomedix Corp; Employee: Hospital of the University
of Pennsylvania; Grant Recipient: NIH NHLBI, Philips
Healthcare, Medtronic Foundation, Stryker Medical, Doris
Duke Foundation
Kimberly E. Applegate MD, MS, Emory University School of
Medicine, Advisory Board: American Imaging Management;
Other Relationship: Springer Publishing Company (Textbook
Co-Editor)
Brigitte M. Baumann MD. MSCE, Cooper University Hospital,
SAEM Board Member
Edward Boyer MD PhD, UMass-Memorial Medical Center, NIH
Grantee; NIH Grant Reviewer
Charles Cairns MD, University of North Carolina, Consultant:
bioMerieux
Clifton W. Callaway MD PhD, University of Pittsburgh,
Intellectual Property/Patent: Medtronics ERS, Inc; COI:
American heart Association, ILCOR
Teresa Camp-Rogers MD, MS, UT Health Science Center at
Houston, Volunteer Physician Member of American Heart
Association Research Working Group.
Andrew K. Chang MD, MS, Albert Einstein College of Medicine,
Grant Recipient: NIA, K23 Award
Esther Choo MD MPH, Brown Medical School, Grant
Recipient: NIDA K23
Sean Collins MD, MSc, Department of Emergency Medicine,
Advisory Board: Novartis; Consultant: Novartis, Trevena,
The Medicines Company; Grant Recipient: NIH/NHLBI,
Radiometer, Medtronic, Cardiorentis
Mark Courtney MD, MSCI, Northwestern University, SAEM
Board of Directors, SAEM Foundation Board of Trustees
Deborah Diercks MD, University of California Davis School of
Medicine, Consultant: LG, Daiichi Sankyo, Mylan, Novartis:
Board Member: SAEM, Society of Cardiovascular Patient
Care, Emergencies in Medicine; Grant Recipient: Nanoshere,
Radiometer, Cardiorentis; Radnor Registry, PCORI,
NIH. Otsuka
Doug Franzen MD, M.Ed, Virginia Commonwealth University,
Shareholder: Johnson & Johnson
Kevin Klauer DO, FACEP, Emergency Medical Physicians,
Board Member: ACEP Council Vice Speaker
Daniel Pallin MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Other
Relationship: Trius Therapeutics, Inc.(Site PI for Clinical Trial)
Gus Garmel MD, Stanford/Kaiser Permanente, Other
Relationship: Cambridge University Press
Keith Kocher MD, MPH, MPhil, University of Michigan,
Consultant: Magellan Health Services, Inc.
Christopher Raio MD, North Shore U. Hospital, Consultant:
Zonare Medical Systems, Inc.
Jason Haukoos MD, MSc, University of Colorado/Denver
Health Medical Ctr, Employee: Denver Health and Hospital
Authority; Board Member: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Editorial Board,ACEP Clinical Policies Committee; Grant
Recipient: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Nathan Kuppermann MD, MPH, UC Davis, InsuCalc (Co-Owner)
Ali S. Raja MD, Brigham & Womens Hospital, SAEM Program
Committee
Corey Heitz MD, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine,
CDEM Executive Committee, NBME EM Advance Clinical
Exam Committee
Brian Hiestand MD, MPH, Wake Forest University Health
Sciences, Consultant: NewMentor, Inc; Insight PD; Grant
Recipient: Radiometer; Dyax, Inc
Judd Hollander MD, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania,
Advisory Board: Janssen; Consultant: Radiometer: Board
Member: Annals of Emergency Medicine; Grant Recipient:
Alere ABbott, Siemens, Brahms, NIH, ACRIN
James Holmes MD, MPH, UC Davis School of Medicine,
Grant Recipient NHLBI, Emergency Medical Services for
Children, CDC.
Ula Hwang MD, MPH, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Grant
Recipient: NIA K23 AG031218, NIA R21 AG040734
Scott A. Joing MD, Hennepin County Medical Center,
Shareholder: Apple, Inc.
Christopher Kabrhel MD, MPH, Harvard Medical School/
Massachusetts General Hosp, Consultant: Stago
Diagnostica
Arthur L. Kellermann MD, MPH, RAND Corporation, Advisory
Board: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured;
IOM Governing Council
Brent King MD, University of Texas Houston, SAEM Board
Member; Grant Recipient: AHRQ; Editorial Board:
Emergency Medicine News, Pediatric Emergency Medicine:
Reviewer: UptoDate
Roger J. Lewis MD, PhD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center,
Consultant: Berry Consultants, LLC, Octapharma, USA,
Octapharma,AG, Venaxis, inc.; Applied Proteomics, Inc.;
Grant Recipient: NIH; Other Relationships: US Food and
Drug Administration, Center for Medicare and Medicaid
Services, COI: Society for Clinical Trials
Daniel M. Lindberg MD, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Legal
Representative:Goodell, DeVries, Leech & Dann, LLP, Group
Health Cooperative, Johnson, Graffe, Keay, Moniz & Wick,
Shymaker, Loop & Kendrick, LLP
Henderson McGinnis MD, Wake Forest Baptist Health, SAEM
Program Committee; Appalachian Center for Wilderness
Medicine
Zachary F. Meisel Meisel MD, MPH, MSc, Perelman School
of Medicine at the University of P, Consultant: Patient
Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Board
member: ZaBeCor Pharmaceuticals; Grant Recipient:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, NIH; Paid
Contributor: Time Magazine
Edward A. Michelson MD, Case Western Reserve University
SOM, Advisory Board and Grant Recipient: BrainScope
Chadwick Miller MD, MS, Wake Forest School of Medicine,
Advisory Board: Mylan Specialty L.P.; Grant Recipient:
Alere Scarborough, Dyax, 3M, Patent Application; Other
Relationships: Hinshaw and Culbertson LLP
Robert M. Rodriguez MD, UCSF Dept of Emergency Medicine,
Grant Recipient: CDC
Tracy Sanson MD, University of South Florida, Employee:
TeamHealth
Robert Sherwin MD, FACEP, FAAEM, Sinai Grace Hospital/
Detroit Receiving Hospital, Advisory Board: Pfizer.
David Talan MD, Olive View - UCLA, Advisory Board: Durata,
Merck; Board Member: Hospital Quality Foundation; Grant
Recipient: NIH, CDC
Knox H. Todd MD, MPH MD Anderson Cancer Center,
Advisory Board: Covidien; Consultant: CVS Caremark; Grant
Recipient: Pfizer, Archimedes
Ernest Wang MD, NorthShore University HealthSystem,
Shareholder: Pfizer
David W. Wright MD, Emory University School of Medicine,
Patent: BHR Pharma
Albert W. Wu MD MPH, Johns Hopkins, Advisory Board MAPI
Research Trust, Genetech; Consultant, Pfizer, Merck, BMS,
Intellectual Property, Joint Commission Book- Patient
Safety
Ryan Mutter PhD, AHRQ/CDOM, Employee: Holy Cross
Hospital
Jason T. Nomura MD, Christiana Care Health System,
Consultant: Emergency Ultrasound Consultants, LLC;
Board Member: Nomura Consulting LLC; Grant Recipient:
Emergency Medicine Foundation
Didactics CME
The following didactic speakers have nothing to disclose:
Jean Abbott MD MH, University of Colorado
James Adams MD, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine
Saadia Akhtar MD, Beth Israel Medical Center
Douglas Ander MD, Emory University
Felix Ankel MD, Regions Hospital
Brent Asplin MD, MPH, Fairview Medical Group
Kavita Babu MD, UMass-Memorial Medical Center
Benjamin S. Bassin MD, University of Michigan
Lance Becker MD, Department of Emergency Medicine
Rachel R. Bengtzen MD, Oregon Health and Science University
Michelle Biros MS MD, University of Minnesota
Kelly D. Black MD, MSc, Sanford USD Medical Center, Sanford
Children’s Hospital
Jay Brenner MD, SUNY-Upstate Medical University,
Michael Brown MD MSc, Michigan State University College
of Human Medicine
Christopher R. Carpenter MD, MSc, Washington University
Brendan Carr MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania
Carey Chisholm MD, Indiana University
Stephen Cico MD, MEd, Lurie Children’s Hospital &
Northwestern Univ.
John Cienki MD, MSPH, Jackson Memorial Hospital
Mark A. Clark MD, St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital Center,
Columbia University
Robert Cloutier MD, MCR, Oregon Health and Science
University
David Cone MD, Yale University
Jason T. Connor PhD, Berry Consultants
Ted Corbin MD, Drexel University College of Medicine
Cameron Crandall MD, University of New Mexico
Tracy Cushing MD MPH, Fellowship Director of the University
of Colorado
Moira Davenport MD, Allegheny General Hospital
Rochelle Dicker MD, University of California School of
Medicine San Francisco
Aaron Donoghue MD, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Suzanne Dooley-Hash MD, University of Michigan
Amy L. Drendel DO MS, Medical College of Wisconsin
Lillian Emlet MD, University of Pittsburgh
Mike Epter DO, University of Nevada
Rollin (Terry) Fairbanks MD, MS, National Center for Human
Factors in Healthcare, MedStar Institute for Innovation
Sue Farrell MD, MEd, Harvard Partners
Jeffrey Feden MD, Brown University
Kevin Ferguson MD, Univ. of Florida
Gregory Fermann MD, University of Cincinnati
Francis M. Fesmire MD, University of Tennessee
Jonathan Fisher MD, MPH, Jonathan Fisher
Todd A. Florin MD, MSCE, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
Alyssa Forcehimes PhD, University of New Mexico,
Department of Psychiatry
86
Sean M. Fox MD, Carolinas Medical Center
Andrea Gabrielli MD. University of Florida-Gainesville
Daniel Garza MD, Stanford University
Nicholas Genes MD, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Nina Gentile MD, Temple University
Michael A. Gibbs MD, Carolinas Medical Center
Adit Ginde MD, MPH, University of Colorado School of
Medicine
Samuel Graitcer MD, Centers for Disease Control &
Prevention
Todd Guth MD, University of Colorado, School of Medicine
Jin H. Han MD, MSc, Vanderbilt University
Daniel Handel MD, MPH, OHSU
Bhakti Hansoti MBchB MD MPH candidate, Johns Hopkins
University
N. Stuart Harris MD MFA, Massachusetts General Hospital
Jonathan Heidt MD, Washington University
Robin Hemphill Md, MPH, Veterans Association
Robert G. Hendrickson MD, Oregon Health Sciences
University
Sheryl Heron MD, MPH, Emory University
Michael Hilton MD, University of Pittsburgh
Jeff W. Hinshaw PA, Wake Forest Baptist Health
Michael Hochberg MD, Saint Peter’s University Hospital/
Drexel
Jeffrey Hom MD, MPH, Stony Brook University School of
Medicine
Laura Hopson MD, University of Michigan
Joseph B. House MD, University of Michigan
J. Randy Howell DHSc PA-C, Virginia Tech Carilion School
of Medicine
Gabrielle Jacquet MD, Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine
Thea James MD, Boston University School of Medicine
Bobby Kapur MD MPH, Baylor College of Medicine
Eric D. Katz MD, Maricopa Medical Center
Stephanie Kayden MD MPH, Harvard Medical School
John J. Kelly DO, FACEP, FAAEM, FCPP, Einstein Medical
Center Philadelphia
Robert M. Kennedy MD, Washington University in St. Louis
School of Medicine St. Louis Children’s Hospital
Daniel Keyes MD, MPH, University of Michigan EM Residency
Program
Sorabh Khandelwal MD, The Ohio State University
Walter Koroshetz MD, National Institutes of Health/NINDS
Paul Krieger MD, Beth Israel Medical Center/Albert Einstein
Gloria Kuhn DO, PhD, Wayne State University
Michael Kurz MD, MS-HES,
Virginia Commonwealth University
Heemun Kwok MD, MS, University of Washington
Kathleen M. Lanava , University of Michigan Health System
Adam Landman MD, MS, MIS, Brigham & Women’s Hospital
Eddy Lang AB, University of Calgary
Eric Legome MD, Kings County Hospital/SUNY Downstate
College of Medicine
Adam Levine MD, MPH, Brown University Alpert School of
Medicine
Resa E. Lewiss MD, St. Lukes Roosevelt
Michelle Lin MD, University of San Francisco
Karen Lind MD, Maimonides Medical Center
Andrew S. Liteplo , Massachusetts General Hospital
Elise Lovell MD, Advocate Christ Medical Center
Martin Makela MD, University of Washington Medical Center
Jennifer Marin MD, MSc, University of Pittsburgh School of
Medicine
Marcus L. Martin MD, University of Virginia
Christian Martin-Gill MD, MPH, University of Pittsburgh
Linda McCaig MPH, CDC, National Center for Health Statistics
Ryan P. McCormack MD, Bellevue Hospital, NYU School of
Medicine
Alyson McGregor MD, Brown University
William Meurer MD, MS, University of Michigan
Nathan Mick MD, Tufts University School of Medicine
Angela M. Mills MD, University of Pennsylvania School of
Medicine
James Miner MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
Rakesh Mistry MD, MS, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Joel Moll MD, University of Michigan
Mark G. Moseley MD, MHA, Ohio State University
William Mower MD, PhD, UCLA Medical Center
Kevin Munjal MD, MPH, Mount Sinai Medical Center
Mary Murphy PhD, Yale University School of Medicine
Joshua Nagler MD, Boston Children’s Hospital
Lewis Nelson MD, New York University
Rodney Omron MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins
Edward Panacek MD, MPH, University of California, Davis
Nova Panebianco MD MPH, University of Pennsylvania
Sara Patterson MA, Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention
Rahul Patwari MD, Rush University Medical Center
Jeanmarie Perrone MD, University of Pennsylvania
Marcia Perry MD, University of Michigan
Frank Petruzella MD, Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital
Malford Pillow MD, M.Ed., Baylor College of Medicine
Stephen R. Pitts MD, MPH, Emory University, Grady Memorial
Hospital
David Portelli , Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown
University
Emilie S. Powell MD, MS, MBA, Northwestern University
Stacey Poznanski DO, Wright State University
Tammie Quest MD, Emory University
Neha Raukar MD, Brown University
Karin V. Rhodes MD, MS, Dept. EM, UPenn
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Lynne D. Richardson MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount
Sinai
Mark Rosenberg DO, MBA, FACEP, FACOEP-D, St. Joseph’s
Healthcare System
Kirsten Rounds RN, MS, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown
University
Alfred Sacchetti MD, Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center
Basmah Safdar MD, Yale University School of Medicine
Sally Santen MD, PhD, University of Michigan
Cathy C. Sarli MLS, AHIP, Washington University
Comilla Sasson MD, MS, University of Colorado School of
Medicine
Kelly Sawyer MD, MS, William Beaumont Hospital
Kathleen Saxton MD, University of Michigan
Jeremiah Schuur MD, MHS, Department of Emergency Med.,
Brigham & Women’s
Lisa Schweigler MD, MPH, MS, Brown University/Rhode
Island Hospital
Jane Scott ScD, NHLBI, National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute
Philip V. Scribano DO, MSCE, Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania,
Kaushal Shah MD, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
Adam Sharp MD, MS, BA, University of Michigan/RWJ Clinical
Scholars
Ellen Slaven MD, LSU Health Science Center
Stephen Smith MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
Patrick Solari MD, Seattle Children’s Hospital/ University
of Washing
Cemal B. Sozener MD, University of Michigan
Ian G. Stiell MD, Ottawa Hospital
Alan B. Storrow MD, Vanderbilt University
David Sugerman MD, MPH, Center for Disease Control &
Prevention
Federico E. Vaca MD, MPH, Yale University School of Medicine
Arvind Venkat MD, Allegheny General Hospital
Arjun Venkatesh MD, MBA, Robert Wood Johnson Clinical
Scholars Program
Marie Vrablik MD, Indiana University
Shereaf W. Walid MD, Wayne State University
Kathleen Walsh DO, MS, University of Wisconsin Hospital
and Clinics
Robert Wears MD, MS, PhD, U of Florida
Scott Weingart MD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Michael Winters MD, University of Maryland
Margaret Wolff MD, University of Michigan
Lalena Yarris MD, MCR, Oregon Health and Science University
(OHSU)
Richard D. Zane MD, University of Colorado
Brian Zink MD, Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Mark R. Zonfrillo MD, MSCE, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
The following Abstract Authors have disclosures:
2013 Grant Writing Workshop Disclosures
Tyler W. Barrett MD MSCI, Vanderbilt University Medical Center,
K23 HL102069 from NHLBI, Grant Recipient
Steven B. Bird MD, University of Massachusetts Medical School,
NINDS. Grant Recipient; SAEM Program Committee, NonCommerical disclosure
Richard N. Bradley, The University of Texas Health Science Center
at Houston, North American Rescue, LLC, Grant Recipient,
Non-Commericial, The American Red Cross Scientific Advisory
Council
Sri Sankar Chinta MD MBBS, Washington University in St. Louise,
KEN GRAFF YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARD- AMERICAN
ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS- SECTION ON EMERGENCY
MEDICINE, NIH T32 Grant (T32HD049338-01A2), Grant
Recipient
Donald M. Dawes, Lompoc Valley Medical Center, TASER
International. Consultant, Shareholder
Gail D’Onofrio MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale
University School of Medicine, NHLBI 5R01HL081153, NIDA
5RO1DA025991-05, SAMHSA 5U79TI020253-05. Grant
Recipient
Rosemarie Fernandez MD, University of Washington, AHRQ,
Department of Defense. Grant Recipient; R18 Grant,
Congressional Grant. Grant Recipient
James R. Foster II MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth
Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Harvard Medical School,
EM Gladiators LLC., Officer, Committee, or Board Member
David F. Gaieski MD, University of Pennsylvania, Stryker Medical,
Consultant, Grant Recipient
Nicholas Genes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Emergency
Medicine Practice, Emergency Physicians Monthly, Medscape
Emergency Medicine, Medgadget LLC. Advisory Board
Corita R. Grudzen MD, MSHS, Mount Sinai School of Medicine,
CMS, Consultant; American Cancer Society. Grant Recipient;
Mentored Research Scholar Grant, Other Relationships
Adrianne Haggins MD, MS, University of Michigan, Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation, Clinical Scholar, Grant Recipient
Corey Heitz, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, C. Heitz:
Non-commerical, NBME
Jeffrey Ho, Hennepin County Medical Center, TASER International,
Inc. Shareholder, Medical Director
Ula Hwang, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NIA K23 AG031218.
Grant Recipient
Christopher Kabrhel, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Sanofi Aventis. Consultant; Biomarker Assays. Consultant;
Thromboembolism. Grant Recipient; Harvard Milton Fund. Grant
Recipient; Foundation Awards. Grant Recipient
Jeffrey Kline, Indiana University School of Medicine, CP
Diagnostics LLC., shareholder; AHRQ, Grant Recipient,
Genentech, AHRQ, Grant Recipient
Keith E. Kocher MD, MPH, University of Michigan, Magellan Health
Services, Inc. Consultant
Erik Kulstad, Advocate Christ Medical Center, National Science
Foundation. Grant recipeint; Advanced Cooling Therapy, LLC.,
Intellectual Property/Patents
Jo Anna Leuck MD, Carolinas Medical Center, J. Leuck: NonCommerical, SAEM Program Committee
Sharon E. Mace MD, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic. Employee;
Luitpold Pharmaceutical. Grant Recipient, Gebauer, Speaker’s
Bureau, McGraw-Hill, Intelletual Property Patent
Simon A. Mahler, Wake Forest University Medical School, NHLBI
T32, AHA, Grant Recipient
Andrew Chang MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Grant recipient - NIA
Jennifer R. Marin MD, MSc, University of Pittsburgh School of
Medicine, NIH NHLBI K12 research scholar receiving research
and salary support Grant Recipient (self), NIH NHLBI R01
funded investigator receiving research and salary support,
Grant Recipient (spouse)
Andrew C. Meltzer, George Washington University, Given Imaging,
Consultant
Edward A. Michelson MD, FACEP, University Hospitals Case Medical
Center, BrainScope Corp., Advisory Board
Andrew A. Monte MD, University of Colorado, Emergency
Medicine Foundation-Research Training Grant. Grant Recipient
Chris Moore MD, RDMS, Yale University School of Medicine,
Philips Healthcare Inc., Sonosite Inc. Consultant; AHRQ, Grant
Recipient
Peter S. Pang MD, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern
University, Novartis, Consultant; Otsuka, Consultant;
Trevena, Consutlant; Palatin Technologies, Consultant; Abbot,
Consultant; Alere, Consultant; Alere, Other relationship;
Beckman Coulter, Other relationship ; Momentum Research,
Other relationship; Nile Therapeutics, Other relationship;
MyLife, Other relationship
Linda Papa MD.CM, MSc, Orlando Regional Medical Center,
Banyan Biomarkers Inc. Consultant
Sarah M. Perman MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania, NIH T32.,
Grant Recipient
Ali S. Raja MD, MBA, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital,
Harvard Medical School, SAEM Program Committee, Noncommerical disclsoure
Antonio Riera MD, Yale University School of Medicine, Child Health
Innovation Grant Award from the Children’s Fund of Connecticut
and the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation. Grant Recipient
Thomas E. Robey, Yale-New Haven Hospital, Greenwall
Foundation, Grant Recipient
Robert M. Rodriguez MD, UCSF/San Francisco General Hospital,
Centers for Disease Control: RO-1 1 R01/CE001589-01, Grant
Recipient
Wesley H. Self MD MPH, Vanderbilt University Medical Center,
Affinium Pharmaceuticals, CareFusion, Astute Medical,
bioMerieux. Grant Recipient; Product, antistaphylococcal
antibiotic AFN 1252, Chloraprep, Astute Nephrocheck, Brahms
Vidas procalcitonin assay, Non-Commericial, Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, Etiology of Pneumonia in the
Community Study
Ammar Siddiqui, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, American
Federation on Aging Research, Grant Recipient
David E. Slattery, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Pfizer.
Consultant
Daniel W. Spaite MD, Arizona Emergency Medicine Research
Center, University of Arizona, National Institutes of HealthNINDS, Grant Recipient
Alan B. Storrow MD, Department of Emergency Medicine,
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Roche Diagnostics,
Consultant; Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Consultant ;Mylan
Specialty, LP, Consultant; NHLBI, Grant Recipient; Abbot
Diagnostics, Grant Recipient; Roche Diagnostics, Grant
Recipient; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Grant
Recipient; McGraw Hill, Other Relationship
Benjamin Sun, Oregon Health and Science University, American
Geriatrics Society, National Institutes of Health, Grant
Recipient
James F. Holmes MD, MPH, UC Davis School of Medicine, Grant recipient - NHLBI
Jeffrey A. Kline MD, Indiana University, Grant recipient - AHRQ and NIH
Walter J. Koroshetz MD, NIH/NINDS, Shareholder - Neurologica
Manish N. Shah MD, MPH, University of Rochester, Employee - University of Rochester Medical Center
2013 Grant Writing Workshop – no Disclosures
Prasanthi Govindarajan MD, MAS, University of California, San Francisco
Brendan Carr MD, University of Pennsylvania
Mary Murphy PhD, Yale University School of Medicine
Barb Forney, University of Cincinnati
2013 Jr. Faculty Development Forum Disclosures
Eric Gross MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
• Commercial Entity: Forests Labs- Taflaro- Pneumonia Skin Infection
Andra L. Blomkalns MD, University of Cincinnati
• SAEM Board of Director Member
2013 Senior Leadership Faculty Forum Disclosures
Todd Crocco, MD, West Virginia University School of Medicine
• Genentech- EMS Education Tool- Stroke
• Medical Dialogues Group- Acute Stroke Care-Stroke
Leslie Zun, MD, Mount Sinai Hospital
• Alexa Pharma-Medication Acquisition-did not get approved
Sandra Schneider, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
• Hereditary Angioedema Association-Mylar-Drug-Hereditary Angioedema Anaphylaxis
• Logical Images-Visual DX-rashes
CDEM Educational Topics and Educational Research
– no disclosures
Hugh Stoddard, M.Ed., Ph.D., Emory University School of Medicine
2013 AEM Consensus Conference – No Disclosures
Christine Babcock MD, MSc, FACEP, FAAEM,
University of Chicago
Michelle, H. Biros, MS MD, Hennepin County Medical Center
Mark Bisanzo MD, DTM&H, University of Massachusetts
Sabrina M. Butteris MD, University of Wisconsin
Emilie J.B. Calvello MD, University of Maryland
Meena Nathan Cherian MD, Emergency & Essential Surgical Care
(EESC) Clinical Procedures Unit, Department of Health Systems
Policies & Workforce, World Health Organization
Myron Cohen MD, North Carolina at Chapel Hill
David C. Cone MD, Yale University
Rebecca Cunningham, University of Michigan
Linda C. Degutis, DrPh, MSN, National Center for Injury Prevention
and Control Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Elizabeth L. DeVos MD, MPH, University of Florida
Kate Douglass MD, MPH,
The George Washington University
Saul Drajer MD, Clinica de la Esperanza
Herbie Duber MD, MPH, University of Washington
Stephen Dunlop MD, CTropMed®, Hennepin County Medical Center
Barb Forney, University of Cincinnati
Bhakti Hansoti MD, MBchB, BSc, University of Chicago
Stephen Hargarten MD, MPH, Medical College of Wisconsin
Mark Hauswald MD, FACEP, University of New Mexico
SueLin Hilbert MD, MPH, Director of Global Health Initiatives,
Washington University School of Medicine
Jon Mark Hirshon MD, PhD, MPH, FACEP, FAAEM, FACPM, University
of Maryland
C. James Holliman MD, FACEP, Center for Disaster and Humanitarian
Assistance
Stephanie Hubbard, MA, MPH, sidHARTe, Department of Population
and Family Health, Columbia University Mailman School of
Public Health
Gabrielle A. Jacquet MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine
Jaime Jordan MD, Harbor UCLA Medical Center
G. Bobby Kapur MD, MPH, Baylor College of Medicine
Kajal Khanna MD, Stanford School of Medicine
Adam C. Levine MD, MPH, Global Emergency Medicine Fellowship,
Brown University Alpert Medical School
Rohith R. Malya MD, MSc, Division of Global Health, University of
Texas Medical School at Houston
Regan H. Marsh MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard
Medical School, Partners In Health, Mirebalais Hospital, Haiti
Ian B.K. Martin MD, FACEP, University of North Carolina
Melissa McMillian, SAEM
Rachel T. Moresky MD, MPH, Columbia University
Hani Mowafi MD, MPH, Boston University School of Medicine
Ziad Obermeyer MD, M.Phil, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard
Medical School
Marcus Ong MD, MPH, Singapore General Hospital
Helen Ouyang MD, MPH, Harvard University
Ronald Pirrallo, Medical College of Wisconsin
Junaid Razzak, PhD, The Aga Khan University
Teri Ann Reynolds, PhD, University of California, San Francisco
Joshua C. Ross MD, University of Wisconsin
Scott Sasser, Emory University
Hendry R. Sawe MD, MMED-EM cand(MUHAS), Emergency Medicine
Association of Tanzania(EMAT)
Kinjal Sethuraman MD, MPH, University of Maryland
Sang Do Shin MD, PhD, Seoul National University College of Medicine
Sérgio Timerman, Escola de Ciêcias da Saúde
Janis Tupesis, University of Wisconsin
Benjamin W. Wachira, Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya
Lee Wallis, MBChB, Provincial Government Western Cape
2013 AEM Consensus Conference – Disclosures
Tom P. Aufderheide MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Board
Member - Take Heart America, Board Member - Citizen
CPR Foundation, Grant Recipient - NHLBI -ROC, Immediate,
Resqirial, Grant Recipient - NINDS-NETT, Volunteer - National
American Heart Association
Bentley Bobrow MD, Arizona Department of Health Services,
Grant Recipient - Medtronic Foundation - Heart Rescue
Project Grant to University of Arizona
Hillary Cohen MD, MPH, Maimonides Medical Center, Consultant
- World Health Organization
Debra Houry MD, MPH Emory University, Board Member - SAEM
and SAVIR, Grant recipient - CDC and NIH
Renee Hsia MD, University of California, San Francisco,
Employee - University of California, San Francisco, Grant
recipient - NIH/CTSI KL2; RWJF Physicians Faculty Scholars,
Emergency Medicine Foundation
Prof. Walter Kloeck, MB,BCh(Wits), DipPEC(SA), FCEM(SA),
FERC(Belg), FAHA (USA), Chairman - Resuscitation Council of
Southern Africa, Other - Academy of Advanced Life Support
Jeffrey P. Koplan MD, MPH, Emory Global Health Institute, Emory
University, Board Member - LifeAlly
Peter Layde MD, MSc, Medical College of Wisconsin, Expert
Witness – Bayer
Prof. Gavin Perkins, Warwick Medical School and Heart
of England NHS Foundation Trust, Advisory Board Glaxosmithkline, Institution Grant Recipient - UK Government
National Institute for Health Research, Editor - Resuscitation
Journal
Amelia Pousson MD, The George Washington University, Spouse,
Employee - Marriott International
Phil Seidenberg MD, University of New Mexico, Consultant Global Rescue LLC
Gerald van Belle, PhD, University of Washington, Consultant
- Novo Nordisk, Grant Recipient - NHLBI Resuscitation
Outcome Consortium
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• Democratic group process
• Excellent compensation and benefits
• 21 ultramodern facilities in Dallas/Fort Worth,
San Antonio, El Paso, and Oklahoma City
• Leadership development program
• Journal club
• Committee involvement
• Documentation and efficiency academy
• Mentoring and development
88
EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Let’s talk about what moves YOU.
Regina Rivera, MD / Emergency Medicine / Amateur Mountaineer
“When I finished residency, I wanted an EM group that would offer me
ownership in the practice, growth/development opportunities, and a
balance between my career and family. Questcare came through with all
of that plus state-of-the-art facilities and great colleagues.”
questcare
[email protected] or (972) 600-2885
www.questcare.com facebook.com/questcare
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
able to follow my passion.
“TeamHealth affords me every opportunity to
become the best emergency physician possible.
With access to resources and peers nationwide,
my knowledge base and career opportunities are
expanded beyond a limited geography. I’m able
to follow my passion for using digital medical
technology to improve practice efficiency and
enhance patient care.”
888.861.4093
Sujal Mandavia, MD
Ridgecrest Regional Hospital
www.MYEMCAREER.com
[email protected]
Download the TeamHealth Careers iPad App today!
Customize your emergency medicine job search. Download the free new app in the Apple App store.
We’re building for the future and We Want You to be a part of it.
University of Kentucky
Emergency Medicine Faculty Positions
Department of Emergency Medicine
The Department of Emergency Medicine at University of Kentucky College of Medicine is recruiting full-time faculty members
at the assistant or associate professor level. The desired individual must be BP/BC in emergency medicine. Academic
tenure track and non-tenure track positions available.
The Department of Emergency Medicine benefits from excellent institutional support from both a financial and facility
standpoint. Resident physicians learn the practice of emergency medicine from engaged and supportive faculty in a stateof-the-art 40,000 square-foot facility (adult and pediatric EDs are contiguous), which opened in July 2010 and now has
an annual census of over 65,000 patients. The University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center is an ACS certified adult
and pediatric Level I Trauma Center located in Lexington, in the heart of the “bluegrass” region of the state. Lexington is
one of the best small to medium sized cities in America because of the climate, the cost of living, safety and the atmosphere
of living in a “college town.”
If you are interested in learning more about this outstanding opportunity, please contact Roger Humphries, MD, Chair,
Department of Emergency Medicine, UK College of Medicine, Room M-53, Williard Medical Sciences Building, 800 Rose
Street, Lexington, KY 40536. Email contact is [email protected] and phone is (859) 323-5908.
The University of Kentucky is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from minorities and women. Upon offer of employment, successful
applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and undergo a national background check as required by University of Kentucky Human Resources.
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
Job#: Io-018188
Date: 05.14.13
89
exhibitor announcements
Questcare
Cornerstone Therapeutics
Challenger Corporation
Teed & Company
Questcare is a physician-owned Emergency
Medicine organization with an academic
focus on quality medicine. We are a
democratic group with an entrepreneurial
vision and dedication to career growth
and development. Questcare delivers
high-quality emergency care in twentyone ultra-modern facilities in Dallas-Fort
Worth, San Antonio, El Paso, and Oklahoma
City. Questcare focuses on supporting and
establishing successful emergency medicine
careers for new physicians.
We are a specialty pharmaceutical company
focused on commercializing products for the
hospital and adjacent specialty markets. We
are actively seeking to expand our portfolio
of products for these markets through the
acquisition of companies and products and
through internal development.
Challenger provides learning and testing
tools for program directors and institutions to
quantify the skill sets of residents and Pas in
training. Challenger’s reporting system yields
compliance, performance and remediation
data on individual users, program years, and
for your entire program. These statistical
outputs permit client institutions to prove
compliance and effectiveness to certifying
organizations.
Booth 111
Catherine Hanna, Marketing Manager
5100 Poplar Avenue, Suite 1410
Memphis, TN 38137
901-762-8449
[email protected]
Teed & Company is the nation’s preeminent
emergency medicine search and recruitment
firm. From chif search to director to academic
or clinical positions. Teed & Company provides
comprehensive service to hospitals, staffing
groups and partnerships. Senior level
physicians and newly graduating residents
have found Teed & Company’s in-depth
knowledge of the marketplace a resource on
which to depend. For expert knowledge and
guidance in furthering your own career, visit
our booth in the exhibit hall.
Booth 311
Sharon Hirst, V.P. Medical Staff Services
12221 Merit Drive, Suite 1610
Dallas, TX 75251
Phone: 214-217-1914
[email protected]
Booth 109
Linda Jenkins
1255 Crescent Green Dr., Suite 250
Cary, NC 27518
Booth 309
Andrea Light, Vice President
27 Ann Street
Norwalk, CT 06854
203-857-0191
[email protected]
CSL Behring
Physio-Control
QGenda, Inc.
SonoSim, Inc.
CSL Behring is a global biopharmaceutical
company committed to saving lives and
improving quality of life for people with
rare and serious diseases. The company
manufactures and markets a range of
plasma-derived and recombinant therapies
that are used around the world to treat
coagulation disorders including hemophilia
and von Willebrand disease, primary immune
deficiencies, hereditary angioedema and
inherited respiratory disease, and neurological
disorders in certain markets. CSL Behring’s
parent company is CSL Limited (ASX:CSL).
Booth 202
Susan Wong, Associate Director Acquired Bleeding
1020 First Avenue
King of Prussia, PA 19406
610-878-4359
[email protected]
Physio-Control partners with professional
responders al over the world to privde
solutions in emergency care. With
leading edge technologies such as the
LIFENET® SYSTEM for efficient patient
data management and the LUCAS™ Chest
Compression System, Physio-Control is
partnering with emergency response teams
to improve patient care and save lives.
Booth 101
Lynn Baker, Marcom Strategy Manager
11811 Willows Road, NE
Redmond, WA 98052
425-867-4125
[email protected]
QGenda is the leading provider of
automatically generated work schedules for
any size practice while abiding by the group’s
complex business rules. QGenda factors
in each Provider’s Skill Level, Specialty,
Availability, and Preferences allowing
requesting and swapping of assignments.
Access QGenda 24/7 via PC, Mac, and Smart
Phones.
Booth 406
Lori Brown, V.P. of Sales
Two Ravinia Drive, Suite 1210
Atlanta, GA 30346
770-399-9945
[email protected]
SonoSim creates the SonoSim Ultrasound
Training Solution, a revolutionary, realpatient based ultrasound training product. It
uses a laptop computer training environment
to deliver unparalleled didactic content,
knowledge assessment and hands-on
training. The refreshingly engaging learning
experience allows users the freedom to learn
anything -anywhere.
Booth 400
Stephanie Carney, Conference Coordinator
3030 Nebraska Avenue, suite 301B
Santa Monica, CA 90404
310-315-2828
[email protected]
Shift Administrators
LocumTenens.com
Emergency Consultants, Inc.
TeamHealth
Shift Admin is a completely web based
schedule management system designed for
emergency medicine.
Booth 103
Megan Louis, Sales
2818 Centerbury Road
Columbia, SC 29204
888-SHIFT-40
[email protected]
LocumTenens.com is a full-service staffing
firm serving physicians, CRNAs, NPs and Pas
searching for locum tenens and permanent
job opportunities and healthcare facilities
looking to solve employoment shortages.
Booth 105
Christina Cruz, Marketing Manager
2655 Northwinds Parkway
Alpharetta, GA 30009
770-643-5559
[email protected]
In 1972, ECI Healthcare Partners was founded
with a single, cherished principle: Quality
healthcare is achieved by valuing people.
Over the years, having efficiently managed
the care of over 27 million patients in over 30
states, we have prospered into a network of
professional
Booth 210
Michelle Morrisette,
Healthcare Marketing
Residency Services Consultant
4075 Copper Ridge Drive
Traverse City, MI 49684
800-253-5358, ext. 3957
[email protected]
TeamHealth was founded by physicians in
1979 and has been dedicated to creating the
best practice environment for emergency
physicians for the past three decades.
TeamHealth offers the administrative
support, leading resources, educational
activities, career advancement, and
professional collegiality to provide rewarding
careers. With a veriety of practice settings
from community hospitals to Level I trauma
centers across the United States, TeamHealth
is the practice of choice for thousands of
healthcare providers.
Booth 307
Meghan Benton, Marketing Coordinator
265 Brookview Centre Way, Suite 400
Knoxville, TN 37919
865-293-5485
www.teamhealth.com
90
Thursday, May 16 & Friday, May 17: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
exhibitor announcements
Thursday, May 16 & Friday, May 17: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm
TASER International
Emergency Medical Associates
CEP America
EmCare
TASER International was founded in
September 1993 and has remained
committed to providing solutions which
Protect Life, Protect Truth, and Protect
Family. From our industry-leading CEWs, to
our AXON/EVIDENCE.COM on-officer video
and storage system, we are committed to
reducing violent confrontation, providing
accountability, and preventing danger. We
are committed to protecting life by providing
innovative, high quality products and
services that exceed customer expectations
every time.
Booth 305
Danielle Cavan, Assistant Events Manager
17800 North 85th Street
Scottsdale, AZ 85255
480-463-2141
[email protected]
Emergency Medical Associates is one of the
country’s most respected, truly democratic
emergency medicine physician groups.
Widely recognized for clinical excellence, EM
research, our physicians enjoy exceptional
life-work balance, outstanding compensation
and unlimited growth opportunities. We are
currently seeking BC/BE EM physicians for
career positions on the east coast.
Founded in 1975, CEP America today is
one of the largest providers of acute care
management and staffing solutions in the
nation, with more than 1,800 providers at
over 100 practice locations, serving more
than 4 million patients annually.
Quality people. Quality Care. Quality LIFE.
EmCare is the nation’s leading physician
practice management company. It is known
for developing local practices, supporting
affiliated clinicians with regionally-located
clinical leadership and operational personnel,
and providing them access to unprecedented
national resources. Opportunities exist
at small and large hospitals in locations
nationwide. EmCare offers competitive pay
and exceptional benefits. Call (855) 367-3650
or search jobs at www.EmCare.com. EmCare
is…Making Health Care work Better™.
Emergency Medicine
Physicians
Healthcare Cost &
Utilization Project (HCUP)
For 20 years, our physician group model has
allowed us to forge the best relationships
with each other and our hospital partners. We
navigate the changing waters of healthcare
with our servant’s heart and owner’s mind.
We relate and innovate. And we always enjoy
the ride.
Booth 208
Phebe Dave
4535 Dressler Road NW
Canton, OH 44714
800-828-0898
[email protected]
HCUP is a family of health care database,
software tools, and products developed
through a Federal-State-Industry partnership.
Sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare
Research and Quality (AHRQ), HCUP database
provide the largest collection of all-payer,
longitudinal hospital care data in the United
States.
Booth 107
Jennifer Podulica
540 Gaither Road
Rockville MD 20850
866-290-4287
[email protected]
Booth 208
Dana Criscuolo
3 Century Drive
Parsippany NJ 07054
www.ema.net
Booth 301
Alie Tupman, Project Manager
2100 Powell Street, Suite 900
Emeryville, CA 94608
510-350-2686
[email protected]
Sharp Medical Products, LLC
Masimo
The Reactor ™ is a revolutionary new chest
tube device that should be faster, easier
and safer than the standard open technique
which has not changed in more than 100
years! Stop by our booth and see the future
of chest drainage!
Masimo is a global medical technology
company responsible for the invention of
award-winning nonivasive technologies,
medical devices, and sensors that are
revolutionizing patient monitoring, including
Masimo SET, Masimo rainbow SET Pulse
CO-Oximetry, noninvasive and continuous
hemoglobin (SpHb), acoustic respiration rate
(RRa), Masimo SafetyNet, and SEDLine, (EEGbased) Brain Function Monitors.
Booth 404
Jim Sash, Sales Director
2571 Kaneville Court
Geneva, IL 60134
630-921-6003
[email protected]
Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc
Carolina Care, PA
Premier Physician Services
The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies
of Johnson & Johnson are dedicated to
addressing and solving some of the most
important unmet medical needs of our time
in oncology, immunology, neuroscience,
infectious diseases and vaccines, and
cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.
Democratic Emergency Medicine Group
located in Columbia SC.
A key factor in Premier’s success is our
providers. We strive to enhance the provider
experience. We do so by offering a model that
emphasizes best practices without sacrificing
our commitment to satisfaction. Programs
and educational offerings assist you in taking
a career path that fits your lifestyle. After one
year, become a shareholder and participate
fully in the decisions and financial rewards
of the practice, without a buy-in. Talk to us
today about the many opportunities and
benefits Premier can offer you.
Booth 206
Mary Ann Gengo, CTSM
1000 Route 202
Raritan, NJ 08869
Office: 908.218.7551
www.janssen.com
Booth 303
Gregory Conde MPH
215 Redbay Rd
Elgin, SC 29045
[email protected]
Booth 200
Heidi Wilson, Event & Conference Planner
13737 Noel Road, Suite 1600
Dallas, TX 75240
214-712-2418
[email protected]
Booth 408/410
Tammy Russo
40 Parker
Irvine CA 92618
949-297-7353
www.masimo.com
NIDA/SAMHSA
Blending Initiative
The Blending Initiative aims to accelerate the
dissemination of research-based drug abuse
treatment into clinical practice, and catalyze
the creation of user friendly treatment tols
and products for use in front-line settings.
Joanna Weston
8757 Georgia Ave
Suite 1440
Silver Spring, MD 20910
332 Congress Park Drive
Dayton, OH 45459
(800) 726-3627
www.premierdocs.com
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
91
The Westin Peachtree plaza
The cafe / Registration / concierge – LEVEL 5
international rooms / vinings rooms – LEVEL 6
92
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
The Westin Peachtree plaza
atlanta ballroom / augusta rooms – LEVEL 7
peachtree ballroom / roswell rooms – LEVEL 8
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
93
The Westin Peachtree plaza
peachtree ballroom balcony – LEVEL 9
accessable elevator to pool
plaza ballroom / fitness center – LEVEL 10
accessable elevator to pool
94
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
The Westin Peachtree plaza
tower meeting rooms – LEVEL 12
tower meeting rooms – LEVEL 14
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
95
the Gallery
20,180
200’ x 100’
18’
700
2,000
100
mezzanine level
20,000
100’ x 250’
12’
920
2,000
80
200 peachtree
conference
center
cc room 1
66’ x 40’
2,380
12’
70
conference center
8,500
66’ x 172’
12’
470
566
630
190
136
275
60
cc room 2
1,870
66’ x 29’
12’
80
150
136
275
cc room 3
1,604
66’ x 24’
12’
70
133
136
200
cc room 4
1,742
66’ x 26’
12’
70
141
136
275
cc room 5
3,225
66’ x 53’
12’
180
260
136
275
cc rooms 1-5
10,821
66’ x 172’
12’
470
870
630
60
*measUreD at WiDest / hiGhest point
pEachTrEE STrEET
buILDINg FLOOR pLANS
ELLIS STrEET
sPeCiAL eveNTs (Lobby Level)
96
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
ELLIS STrEET
CONFeReNCe CeNTeR
(Mezzanine Level)
SAEM Annual Meeting Attendees,
Come cheer on your favorite residency team at the
2nd Annual SonoGames™
of the Academy of Emergency Ultrasound of SAEM
Saturday, May 18, 2013
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Plaza Ballrooms A-B-C Combined
This year’s contestants include:
The Pistol Shrimp (Boston Medical Center)
1540 (University of South Florida College of Medicine)
A Catholic, a Jew, and a Mormon walk into a Bar (Medical University of South Carolina)
ALARA (Indiana University)
Argyle Artifacts (Yale University)
Arizona Acoustic Enhancements (University Of Arizona)
Bellevue/NYU (Bellevue Hospital/New York University)
Endocavitary Explorers
(Texas A&M Christus Spohn EM Residency)
F.A.S.T. and the Furious (Emory University)
Ga. Probers (Georgia Regents University)
HAEMR Time (Harvard Affiliated EM Residency)
Half FAST (George Washington University)
Hertz So Good (University of Michigan)
Houston Lung Rockets (University of Texas at Houston)
Inferior Vena Cavaliers (University of Virginia)
Johns Hopkins (Johns Hopkins University)
Probe Masters (Maimonides Medical Center)
Probe-able Cause (Thomas Jefferson University)
Rare Birds
(Harborview Medical Center/University of Washington)
Rutgers Resolution (UMDNJ-RWJMS)
Sinai Supersonics (Mount Sinai)
Sonimus Maximus (Staten Island University Hospital)
SonoNinjas (Stanford University School of Medicine)
Sono-you-didn’t (St. Luke’s-Roosevelt)
Space City Sono Warriors (Baylor College of Medicine)
Stroger Endocavitrons (Cook County)
TBD (Henry Ford Hospital)
The County Kings (SUNY Downstate – Kings County Hospital)
The Dirty Shadows (University of Chicago)
The Ruptured Globe Trotters (University of Connecticut)
The SonoCats!?!? (University of Kentucky)
US Trojans (University of Southern California)
Sponsored by:
SonoChamps
2013
[Your School Here]
May 14-18, 2013 | Atlanta, Georgia
See You In Dallas, TX
May 2014
www.saem.org

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