Black River High School Program of Studies 2012-2013

Document technical information

Format pdf
Size 529.5 kB
First found Jun 9, 2017

Document content analysis

Language
English
Type
not defined
Concepts
no text concepts found

Persons

Organizations

Places

Transcript

Black River High School
Program of Studies
2012-2013
Student and Parent Guide
Principal’s Message ..................................................................................................................................................... 1
Mission Statement ........................................................................................................................................................ 2
School-Wide Expectations For Student Learning ................................................................................................... 3
Academic Expectations ............................................................................................................................................. 3
Social And Civic Expectations................................................................................................................................... 3
Planning Your Academic Program........................................................................................................................... 4
Graduation Requirements And Recommended Program For College ........................................................ 4
Suggested Sequence Of Courses ......................................................................................................................... 4
Schedule Changes .................................................................................................................................................. 5
Change Of Schedule Requests ......................................................................................................................... 5
Adding Courses .................................................................................................................................................... 5
Dropping Or Withdrawing From A Course ....................................................................................................... 5
Related Information ................................................................................................................................................. 5
College Admissions And Testing ........................................................................................................................ 5
Promotion Requirements..................................................................................................................................... 6
Student Records Review And Release ............................................................................................................. 6
Nondiscrimination Policy ..................................................................................................................................... 6
Course Descriptions ..................................................................................................................................................... 7
English ......................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Science .................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Computer Studies................................................................................................................................................... 15
Foreign Languages ................................................................................................................................................ 16
Art And Music Programs ....................................................................................................................................... 18
Physical Education Program ................................................................................................................................ 19
Driver Education ..................................................................................................................................................... 20
Academic Support Program (Asp) ..................................................................................................................... 20
Virtual High School ................................................................................................................................................. 21
College Classes/Sat Course ................................................................................................................................. 22
Technical Education .............................................................................................................................................. 23
Four Year Planner
.......................................................................................................................................... 27
Black River High School and Middle School
Jim Frail
Principal
802-228-4721
43 Main Street

Ludlow, Vermont 05149
FAX 802-228-7233
Elizabeth McBain
School Counselor
802-228-3132
Spring 2012
Principal’s Message
Dear Students:
This Program of Studies is prepared to assist you in planning your overall high school
program and in selecting courses for your remaining years at Black River High School.
The course descriptions provide you with an overview of the courses offered here at
BRHS. Graduation requirements and other information are also included for you to
review and consider as you plan your individual program.
You should carefully consider your educational and career goals before deciding on
specific courses to include in your program for next year. Your choices should be made
based on a plan for your future and your abilities, interests, and needs. After considering
this information and making some tentative choices, you should consult with your parents,
your current teachers, and your school counselor to discuss your plans and course
selections. We encourage you to select courses that will be challenging and will meet
your needs and plans.
Your school counselor and teachers are very willing to help you in making course
selections and can provide you with insights about the program. In fact, this year we
have requested sign off from a math, English, science, and social studies teacher, as
world language where applicable. Students and parents who have questions concerning
information in this booklet or about the course selection process are encouraged to call the
school. Please take advantage of the help available at the school to insure you plan a
meaningful, satisfying high school experience that will help you prepare for and succeed
in your life after high school.
Final responsibility for planning your high school program rests with you and your
parents. You have many educational opportunities available to you at Black River High
School. Let us help you take advantage of those opportunities as you plan a program that
will provide for your continued growth and development and will meet your individual
needs and goals.
Sincerely,
James Frail
Principal
1
BLACK RIVER HIGH SCHOOL AND MIDDLE SCHOOL
MISSION STATEMENT
The Mission of Black River High School and Middle School is to provide a quality education,
appropriate for all students, that develops skills for life-long learning.

We believe the purpose of schooling is to provide quality education that is
appropriate for each student and helps each student develop life skills.

We believe that students need to learn communication skills, respect for
themselves and their surroundings, and the value of education.

We believe students learn best when they are treated with consistency
and fairness in an environment of mutual respect where they are
challenged with programs appropriate to their abilities and learning styles.

We believe teachers should provide an environment conducive to
learning, be responsive to student’s needs, and facilitate the learning
process.

We believe administrators should provide and facilitate educational
leadership and maintain open communication and high educational
standards.

We believe parents and community should be supportive, become
actively involved in their school, and feel welcome at the school.
EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY
We believe that well-educated citizens are our nation’s most valuable resource: Therefore,
we are committed to providing public education of the highest quality. In meeting this
challenge, the educational programs at Black River High School must be both
comprehensive and purposeful in their efforts to provide students with meaningful exposure
to a wide variety of academic and career alternatives, enabling them to compete in the
local, national, and international job markets.
Black River High School is committed to producing graduates who possess the basic skills
needed to continue learning, recognize their strengths and potential for success and set
attainable goals based on their abilities and interests.
The administration and staff recognize that discipline is an essential part of the learning
process. Accordingly, a safe and orderly atmosphere of trust and mutual respect between
faculty and students is a vital ingredient in making this education process successful, as is the
cooperation and support of parents and the community.
back to Contents
2
SCHOOL-WIDE EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING
The following School-wide Expectations for Student Learning were developed by the faculty at Black
River High School/Middle School in accordance with the New England Association of Secondary
Schools standards for accreditation. In addition to the traditional classroom assessments, beginning
the 2005/06 school year teachers shall base classroom assessment of student learning on school-wide
and course specific rubrics.
Academic Expectations
All Black River High School students will:
1. Communicate effectively and demonstrate understanding through expression
2. Write effectively for a wide variety of purposes
3. Read critically to understand, interpret, and respond to a variety of materials
4. Use effective reasoning and questioning strategies
5. Solve problems and conduct research in various fields of knowledge
6. Use technology appropriately to gather and communicate information, ideas,
and concepts
Social and Civic Expectations
All Black River High School students will:
7. Demonstrate respect for others and for themselves
8. Develop satisfying, productive, and collaborative relationships with others
9. Develop skills needed to make healthy lifestyle choices and informed decisions
10.
Take an active role in service to the school and community
back to Contents
3
PLANNING YOUR ACADEMIC PROGRAM
The Counseling Office of Black River High School makes available this handbook as a guide to your
high school academic program. You must remember that the recommendations are general. The
only true program is one that you have chosen with:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Careful and resourceful consideration
Your future in mind
Counseling and advisement with an eye to employment trends
Postsecondary school prerequisites
Parents are encouraged to contact the School Counselor with any questions or concerns about the
course selection process at 228-3132.
Graduation Requirements and Recommended Program for College
Minimum Requirements for
Graduation
English
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Health
Art/Music
Physical Education
Electives
Total
Recommended Program for
Competitive Colleges
4
3
3
3
Credits
Credits
Credits
Credits
.5 Credit
1 Credit
1.5 Credits
12 Credits
28 Credits
English
4 Credits
Mathematics
4 Credits
Science
4 Credits
Social Studies
4 Credits
Foreign Language 3-4 Credits (consecutive years)
Health
.5 Credit
Physical Education 1.5 Credits
Art/Music
1 Credit
Electives
9-12 Credits
Total of 28 Credits is required for graduation.
Specific course requirements include selected English courses, U.S. History/AP U.S. History, and World
History as noted under the Course Descriptions. Physical Science and Laboratory Biology are required
for graduation as well. Each student also must carry a minimum course load of seven (7) credits each
year while carrying no fewer than three and a half (3 1/2) credits each semester.
Suggested Sequence of Courses
Freshman
English 9
Algebra I, Pre-Algebra, or Basic Math
World History I
Physical Science I & II
Foreign Language
Physical Education
Electives:
Art/Music/Computer Courses
Sophomores
English 10: Mythology
Algebra I or Geometry
World History II
Laboratory Biology
Foreign Language
Health
Driver’s Education
Physical Education
Electives
Juniors
English 11: American Literature or Honors
Geometry or Algebra II
US History or AP US History
Lab Chemistry or Practical Chemistry
Foreign Language
Electives
Technical Program
Seniors
English 12: British Literature or AP English Literature
Algebra II, Trigonometry, or Calculus
AP US History, Psychology, or Contemporary Problems
AP Biology, Laboratory Physics, or Advanced Chemistry
Foreign Language
Electives
Technical Program
back to Contents
4
As a school, we are committed to providing a quality education for all students through a range of
courses that allow all students to meet the graduation requirements. When planning a program for
your remaining years at BRHS, you should remember that the courses listed in the Program of Studies
are proposed course offerings and that selected courses are offered only in alternate years.
Furthermore, actual enrollment, staffing changes, and budgetary constraints may result in changes or
deletions to the program.
New Opportunity
Juniors and Seniors who have exhausted some of the curriculum options at Black River High School
may be eligible to participate in a Virtual High School or Vermont Virtual Learning course. Students
may also take classes through CCV and apply credit at BRHS.
Schedule Changes
Change of Schedule Requests
Courses for the school year are chosen by the student and approved by teachers, parents, and the
Counseling Director. Some course levels are determined by teacher recommendations. Classes and
teacher assignments are arranged to accommodate the choices you make. Schedules are NOT
constructed to accommodate later changes of mind. Therefore, any request for a change will be
considered only for the most compelling of reasons. Such reasons are:
1. The schedule does not include a graduation requirement that must be met.
2. The schedule does not account for work taken during summer school.
3. The schedule has an error or omission.
If a student’s schedule contains an error, an omission, or a similarly acute problem as outlined above,
the student must initiate the change with his or her counselor. Schedule change requests are to be
made during the two weeks prior to the opening of the school and will require teacher and parent
signatures on an add/drop form.
Adding Courses
Students may add courses for credit if there is room in the class. The request to add a course should
be made to the counseling office during the two weeks prior to the opening of school or within the first
week of the semester.
Dropping or Withdrawing from a Course
A request to withdraw from a course must be made during the first week of the new semester. If
permission to withdraw from a course is granted, you must obtain a form from the counseling
secretary. The request must be approved and the form signed by your parents, teachers, and school
counselor. Completed forms must be returned to the counseling office.
Related Information
College Admissions and Testing
In evaluating applications, many colleges rely in part on objective tests, especially the ACT and the
SAT. Each of these tests measures verbal and mathematical abilities. The ACT includes a section on
science and reading. All college-bound sophomores and juniors are encouraged to take the PSAT
given in October. Black River students expecting to apply for early decision/early action should take
the SAT in May or June. Seniors who have not taken or who wish to retake the SAT may do so in the first
semester of the senior year.
back to Contents
5
The SAT contains three sections: critical reading, mathematics, and writing. The critical reading section
of the test focuses on sentence completions, and reading comprehension, both long and short
reading passages. The mathematics section will reflect the mathematics that college-bound students
typically learn during their first three years of high school. (ie. Through Algebra II). The SAT writing
section will measure a student’s mastery of developing and expressing ideas effectively. It will include
both a multiple-choice section and a direct writing measure in the form of an essay. Specific colleges
indicate their expectations for applicants concerning these exams and recommend high school
courses in their catalogues or on their website.
Promotion Requirements
The promotion requirements for students are as follows:
Freshmen (Grade 9) will move to the Sophomore year (Grade 10) upon the attainment
of seven (7) academic credits.
Sophomores (Grade 10) will move to the Junior year (Grade 11) upon the attainment
of fourteen (14) credits.
Juniors (Grade 11) will move to the Senior year (Grade 12) upon the attainment of
twenty-one (21) academic credits.
Students not attaining the above-mentioned academic credits will remain a member of the lower
class (i.e., a Sophomore who attains less than 14 credits will be retained in the Sophomore class).
Students who earn enough credits by the end of semester 1 will be considered a member of the Junior
class. If such Junior is scheduled for enough credits to graduate and has passed all subjects at the
end of the first semester, he or she will be considered a Senior and enjoy all the privileges of that class.
Student Records Review and Release
In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, Black River
High School provides students the right to inspect and review their educational records and to
challenge the contents of these records to ensure that such records are not inaccurate, misleading, or
in violation of the student’s privacy or other rights. Until a student reaches the age of eighteen (18) or
enters a postsecondary school, his or her parents have the right to access, but once the student turns
eighteen (18) or enters a postsecondary school, the right moves from the parent to the student.
In addition, Black River High School will not release personally identifiable records to any individual
agency or organization without prior written consent, except as provided by law. However, under
federal law, the school is required to release students’ names, addresses, and telephone numbers to
military recruiters and institutions of higher education upon request unless a parent specifically requests
in writing that no student contact information be released without the parent’s consent.
Nondiscrimination Policy
In accordance with Title VI, Title IX, NCLBA, IDEA, Section 504 ADA, and federal and state law, it is the
policy of Black River High School that no person shall be excluded from the participation in, denied the
privileges of, or subjected to discrimination in any educational program or activity at the school upon
the basis of race, color, national origin, creed or faith, gender, age, handicapping condition and/or
disability, or sexual orientation. Inquiries concerning the application of these policies should be
referred to the Superintendent of Schools, 8 High Street, Ludlow, VT 05149.
Courses are open to all students in Grades 9-12, unless prerequisites or restrictions apply. BRHS reserves
the right to cancel or combine courses with low enrollment or other instructional service conflicts.
back to Contents
6
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ENGLISH
English courses at BRHS are designed to enable students to read, write, speak, and listen competently; we
hope students can understand and appreciate how literature and writing relate to their lives and society.
To fulfill the four-credit English requirement for graduation, the following guidelines should be followed:




1 full credit from the English 9 course selections (Role Models or Page & Stage)
1 full credit from the English 10 course selection (Mythology and Writing)
1 full credit of English 11 course selections (American Literature or Honors American Literature)
1 full credit of English 12 course selections (British Literature, Contemporary Literature*, or
Advanced Placement Literature & Composition)
Students are also encouraged to take classes from the English Electives section. These courses do not
count towards the four English credits needed for graduation.
English 9: Role Models
Grade 9
1 Credit
All Year
In this year-long Freshman Lit. course, we examine role models through the ages, from ancient
Babylon, Greece and China; through the faith and fantasies of the Medieval; the development of the
modern world during the Renaissance and Enlightenment; the return to basics in the Romantic
movement; and the convulsions of the modern world. We will observe how heroes and heroines
developed and changed through time, in order to keep up with the times. High-school-essential skills
include: writing mechanics; building vocabulary; reading/speaking in public; research, citations, and
technology; reading comprehension and retention.
English 9: Page and Stage
Grade 9
1 Credit
1 Semester
We encounter works of many genres, from American non-fiction crime drama to Shakespeare’s
comedies to Russian poetry. Each text is accompanied by a film, and it’s the class’s job to consider the
changes and adaptations made by the filmmakers. We cover differences in tone, voice, and purpose.
Often there are multiple films to accompany a particular text. For instance: During our study of
Shakespeare, we watch The Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare in Love, Kiss Me Kate, and 10 Things I
Hate about You. Students hone their writing skills: grammar, spelling, syntax; enhance their vocabulary;
close read literary texts, including rhyme schemes and poetic meter. Students write in a variety of
media like newspaper articles, Facebook pages, persuasive essays, and more.
English 10: Mythology and Writing
Grade 10
1 Credit
Full Year or
1 Semester
The primary focus of this course involves the study of Greek mythology, relating these to today’s
society. Students develop a vocabulary list, and create projects. Outside reading is required nearly
every day. While writing about the issues arising from these myths, students will be introduced to and
practice a variety of essay types as prescribed by the Vermont Standards. Students will also learn
about documenting sources using the MLA system. Other literary genres are read as well, including
two plays and poetry.
back to Contents
7
English 11: American Literature
Grade 11
1 Credit
Full Year or
1 Semester
This course follows the chronology of American literature, relating each piece to the events and values
of its time. Genres include poetry, essays, short stories, autobiography, biography, historical
documents, historical narratives, drama, and the novel. Outside reading is required nearly every
day. Vocabulary study continues and writing skills are extended through a variety of composition
assignments, including MLA documented responses to literature and persuasive essays that include
Works Cited, and personal essays.
English 11: Honors American Literature
Grade 11
1 Credit
Full Year or
1 Semester
Honors English is designed for juniors who have compiled an exemplary record in the study of English
as underclassmen. The focus of the course is on close reading of literary works and the writing of
analytical essays. Admission to the course is based on past performance in English classes and
previous teacher recommendations. Like its counterpart, this course follows the chronology of
American literature, relating each piece to the events and values of its time. Genres include poetry,
essays, short stories, autobiography, biography, historical documents, historical narratives, drama, and
the novel. Outside reading is required nearly every day. Vocabulary study continues and writing skills
are extended through a variety of composition assignments, including MLA documented responses to
literature, persuasive and personal essays.
English12: AP Literature & Comp
Grade 12
2 Credits
2 Semesters
AP English is designed for seniors who have compiled an exemplary record in the study of English. The
focus of the course is on close reading of literary works and the writing of analytical essays. This class
will be covering British and World Literature. This class, along with Honors American Literature, will
prepare seniors to take the Advanced Placement examination in May which may lead to advanced
standing in college. Admission to the course is based on past performance in English classes and
previous teacher recommendations. Students who do not maintain satisfactory progress may be
asked to drop the class.
This class will require the student to take the AP Exam at the completion of the course. Exemptions for
this exam are at the teacher’s discretion.
English 12: British-Irish Literature
Grade 12
1 Credit
Full Year or
1 Semester
In British-Irish Literature, we focus on the melting pot of the English language and the global influence
of Anglo-Irish literature. The oral tradition flourished in the Gaelic and Anglo-Saxon epics. The Norman
conquest brought a broadening of language and world view, and the Middle English of The
Canterbury Tales. The Shakespearean playhouse was unique in the history of theater and promoted
the superstar of the age. Anglo/Irish philosophers contributed important essays and novels, from
politics to poetry, to The Enlightenment. The English Romantics were social crusaders whose
impassioned novels and poetry denounced the modern, mechanized world. Tiny Ireland, upholding its
story-telling traditions, produced the finest poets, short-story writers, novelists, and playwrights in recent
history. We’ll hone 21st century thinking skills through a multi-media approach. Students produce a
professional portfolio suitable for job or college interviews.
back to Contents
8
Contemporary Literature
Grades 11or 12
1 Credit
1 Semester
Although comparable to British Literature in rigor, this English course focuses on contemporary issues
and themes in literature. Fiction and nonfiction of the 20th and 21st centuries will form the basis for
discussion, study and analysis. Students will be expected to demonstrate mastery of standards-based
writing. In addition, workplace texts and writing will be explored. *Teacher permission needed to
enroll in this course.
English Electives
Classic American Films and Comedies: A Century of Laughs at the Movies
1 Credit
1 Semester
We look at the movies that stand up as great American literature. Starting with Chaplin, we move
forward through two dozen films: from classic screwball comedy and musicals, to modern indie and
edgy favorites. We examine the film industry and how the business and its productions reflected the
American values of the period. Students will read film scripts and reviews; write essays, reviews, and
press kits.
Creative Writing
Grades 11-12
.5 or 1 Credit
1 Semester
This course seeks to introduce students to the writing in the genres. Students will write creatively in
poetry and prose, and these writing experiences will constitute the majority of their semester
portfolio. There will be a minimum of expository writing, mostly limited to short in-class essays that
check for reading comprehension and provide a basis for class discussions on craft.
Journalism
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course will allow students to learn the fundamentals of journalism while also producing a school
newspaper. Students will be asked to participate in all phases of newspaper production and be
required to accomplish a wide variety of writing typically found in periodicals. This class is student
centered and works well for self-motivated individuals who can take initiative and meet
deadlines. Students may take this course as many times as desired.
Yearbook Production
Grades 11-12
0 Credit
This course will utilize desktop publishing software to apply publishing design, layout and text writing
skills. Students will be designing Black River High School’s Banner Yearbook. Yearbook staff members
should register for this course.
back to Contents
9
MATHEMATICS
The mathematics department has adopted a traditional model of high school math for the 2012-2013
school year and will no longer teach the Integrated Mathematics Program. This decision was made in
part to align with recommendations from the Department of Education. Topics examined include
Algebra, Geometry, and Advanced Algebra. Exceptional mathematics students will be able to take
calculus as a senior. Students must collaborate with their current math teacher (or most recent math
teacher) to choose a course of study for next year. Students must consult with a math teacher and get
sign-off, even if they have met the math requirements for graduation. Please note that upper level
classes require that students have taken the prerequisite sequence prior to enrollment.
All Classes are One Credit and the Sequence of Classes includes:
Algebra 1
OR
Geometry
OR
Algebra 2
OR
Pre-Calculus
Trig/Prob/Stat
Calculus
Basic Math
Pre-algebra
Modified algebra 1
Informal Geometry
Modified Algebra 2
Consumer Math
SCIENCE
Physical Science I & II
Grade 9 or Grade 9 &10
2 Credit
Required
1Credit per Semester
These courses introduce and explore the very basic principles of general science, chemistry, and
physics. Mathematics is stressed as the basic tool of science. Topics include classification of matter,
forces and motion, energy, and the use of scientific models.
Laboratory Biology
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
Required
1 Semester
This course is designed for the college-bound student. The course places major emphasis on the
cellular level of organization of living organisms, and classification of organisms. Units to be studied
include cell structure and physiology, cell reproduction, the structure and function of DNA and RNA,
and inheritance of traits, followed by natural selection. Laboratory investigations will be used to
reinforce the topics studied.
PREREQUISITE: Physical Science I & II or with teacher permission if only one section of Physical Science
Astronomy
Grades 9-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
This course will deal with studying various aspects of the universe. Topics may include: our solar system,
types of stars, birth of stars, black holes, and existence of life elsewhere in the universe.
Ecology of Vermont
Grades 9-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
Ecology of Vermont will study the natural resources of Vermont and how they contribute to the human
experience both past, present and future. Topics will include geography, geology, climate, water,
plants, and wildlife. The material will be covered through readings, discussions, and in classroom labs.
back to Contents
10
Nutrition
Grades 9 – 12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
This course will deal with how the human body gets energy from the foods we eat. In addition to
analyzing various foods and food groups, a computer analysis of each student’s diet will be performed
and gone over in depth to determine the quality of that diet.
Practical Chemistry
Grades 10-12
Laboratory Chemistry
Grades 10-12
Advanced Chemistry
Grades 11-12
Laboratory Physics
Grades 11-12
Human Anatomy & Physiology
Grades 11-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course introduces and explores the practical principles of Chemistry. Atomic structure, phases of
matter, and how atoms and molecules bond will be among the topics explored. Emphasis will be
towards a hands-on approach to learning how the chemicals in our lives react with one another.
PREREQUISITE: Algebra I and Physical Science.
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course is structured for the college-bound student. The study of chemistry deals with the
composition of matter and changes that it undergoes in various types of reactions. Topics of study
may include energy and matter, atomic structure, bonding, periodic table, mathematics of chemistry,
formulas and equations, gases, solutions, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction, application of
principles of reaction, and representative elements. Extensive laboratory study of topics is conducted.
Students must be competent in algebra and measurement techniques.
PREREQUISITE: Algebra II and Physical Science or teacher permission
1 Credit
1 Semester
Advanced Chemistry will continue where Laboratory Chemistry leaves off. Topics to be covered
include electrochemistry, acid/base reactions, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. We will
make batteries, test for radiation, and make organic chemicals such as nylon, vanilla, and soap.
PREREQUISITE: Biology and Lab Chemistry, Algebra II.
1 Credit
1 Semester
Physics, an upper level course with a challenging curriculum, is broken into two areas of
concentration. During the first half of the semester, the mechanics of physics coordinates theory and
practical application of the basic laws governing the behavior of matter. Strong emphasis is placed
upon the use of mathematics as a tool to further explore and understand natural phenomena. The
second half of the semester utilizes the skills acquired the first half of the semester to explore such areas
as optics, wave motion, heat, electrostatics, electromagnetic and high energy physics.
PREREQUISITE: Laboratory Chemistry; Algebra II or equivalent; Trigonometry preferred.
1 Credit
1 Semester
This upper level course with its challenging curriculum is designed for the college-bound student
and/or any student interested in a health or science-related career. The structure and function of the
various systems of the human body will be studied in depth.
PREREQUISITE: Biology and Lab Chemistry.
back to Contents
11
Forensics
Grades 11-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
Examine the world of criminal science. In this course students will collect evidence, make observations
and conduct biological and chemical laboratory tests to solve criminal cases involving document
forgery, tools, teeth, tire marks, unknown substances, fingerprints, blood stain analysis, clothing fibers,
hair identification, blood detection, blood typing, DNA electrophoresis, soil analysis and skeletal
reconstruction.
PREREQUISITE: Lab Biology and Lab Chemistry
Genetics
Grades 10-12
Geology
Grades 9-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
Genetics is a course in the study of genes and how they determine characteristics of offspring. The
course will include studies of DNA and RNA as well as probability, pedigrees, and the Human Genome
Project. It will also investigate how genetic knowledge is being used today in law, medicine, and
society. Students will investigate ethical concerns about the use and regulation of genetic material.
PREREQUISITE: Lab Biology
.5 Credit
1 Semester
Geology is a journey into the process that affects the planet and its inhabitants. The study of geology
reveals the many physical changes planet earth has undergone in the 4.6 billion years of existence.
The geological time line is a record of the evolution of everything on earth including its inhabitants. By
studying the process and the geological time line, students will begin to appreciate the complexities
and puzzles that geologists deal with in understanding the past.
Health
Grade 10
.5 Credit
Required
1 Semester
In this course students learn about health and wellness and its relationship to longevity in individuals.
Topics studied include units on family studies and relationships, mental health, drugs, alcohol, AIDS and
communicable disease, and food and cancer prevention. In addition to learning the elements of
how to live longer, students receive training in communication, conflict resolution, anger control,
assertiveness, and stress reduction so that they can use these skills in peer support and crisis
intervention.
Biology of Body Systems
Grades 10-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
How do chemicals enter the body, what do they do once they’re there, what are the repercussions of
having these chemicals in our bodies? Chemicals included but not limited to: alcohol, marijuana,
aerosols, tobacco; natural ―chemicals‖ included but not limited to: hormones, fat, stress.
Environmental Ethics
Grades 9-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
Environmental Ethics is a science class which considers the interrelationships between humans and the
natural world. It addresses such questions as, do humans have obligations or responsibilities towards
the environment. What environmental obligations do we need to keep for future generations? Land
ethics, water ethics, over population, world hunger, pollution, and our own personal environmental
footprint, are all important topics. These topics and many more are researched and discussed with an
open mind, recognizing that most ethical question are very complex.
back to Contents
12
SOCIAL STUDIES
World History I: Prehistory to 1800
Grade 9
Required
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course provides an overview of major eras, trends, and events in world history up until the French
Revolution. The course focuses on the main development of western civilization and history and
examines the major thrusts of non-western civilizations. The major objective of this course is to
understand how the ancient past has set the stage for the modern world. Students are expected to
be active members of a community of learning. Students will conduct research, make presentations,
and further develop their writing and reasoning skills. Major topics will include: Early Civilizations, World
Religions, Ancient Greece, The Roman Empire, The Crusades, The Renaissance, The Black Death, The
Age of Discovery, and The French Revolution.
World History II: The Modern World
Grade 10
Required
1 Credit
1 Semester
The course provides an overview of major trends and events in world history from the French
Revolution and the Enlightenment up to the present. Students are expected to be active members of
a community of learning. Students will conduct research, make presentations, and further develop
their writing and reasoning skills. The course will examine different aspects of important cultures,
politics, and mass movements worldwide. Specific topics will include: Imperialism, Colonialism,
Marxism, The Russian Revolution, The Two World Wars, The Cold War, The Vietnam War, Post-Colonial
Africa, China since the Communist Revolution, and the fall of the Soviet Union. The outcomes and
effects of these events on current events will be emphasized.
PREREQUESITE: World History I
United States History
Grades 10-12
Required
1 Credit
1 Semester
This is a study of the birth, growth, and maturation of the United States, from a fledgling group of
colonies to the world’s only super power. Students will gain an understanding of our nation and
acquire a vision of our future by reviewing our past. Special emphasis is placed on major events,
historical figures, and unique conditions that helped contribute to our modern state. This class is
taught as a narrative using the reflections of individuals who experienced history firsthand. Thus, our
exploration of U.S. history becomes more relevant and rich. Course requirements include critical
thinking, student analysis and research of events using primary documents, written and oral reports,
projects, and research papers.
Sociology
Grades 11-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of some major topics in the field of
sociology. Students will learn basic principles of societal functions, cultural relations, gender issues,
family structure, social structure, popularization, urbanization, and racial ethnicities. Assessment
emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, written and oral
interpretations of documents and research.
back to Contents
13
Advanced Placement U.S. History (AP)
Grades 11-12
2 Credits
2 Semesters
The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and
factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history.
The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands
upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn
to assess historical materials—the relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their
importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. This
AP United States History course will develop the skills necessary for the student to arrive at conclusions
on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively
in essay format. (Offered only in alternate years)
This class will require the student to take the AP Exam at the completion of the course. Exemptions for
this exam are at the teacher’s discretion.
*Students may take Advanced Placement U.S. History in place of United States History.
Media Study
Grades 10-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and create media in a variety of forms. From
print to video to the Internet, media literacy builds an understanding of the role of media in society as
well as essential skills of inquiry and self-expression necessary for citizens of a democracy. This course
will help students develop an informed and critical understanding of the nature of mass media, the
techniques used by the media, and the impact of these techniques. More specifically, it is education
that aims to increase students’ understanding and enjoyment of how the media work. Media literacy
also aims to provide students with the ability to create media products. In this course students will
design and create various media products that inform, entertain, and communicate. Hands-on
application of classroom concepts will be emphasized. (Course is open both to students who have
and have not completed Media Literacy.)
PREREQUESITE: Media Graphics
Psychology
Grades 11-12
Current Issues & Affairs
Grades 10-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of some major topics in the field of
psychology. Students will learn basic principles of behavior, thought, intelligence, and emotion and
will study issues ranging from biology to philosophy. A major emphasis of the course is placed on
personality development and the study of psychological disorders. Assessment emphasis is placed on
critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, written and oral interpretations of documents, and
research.
1 Credit
This course will be based on both a student and teacher generated curriculum and is designed to
explore current issues and events in our community, our state, our country, and in our world. Students
will read, discuss, and debate weekly newspapers, magazines, and other media, and research the
background of various issues and events. Students will practice critical thinking skills to form educated
opinions on these various events. Written and oral argumentation are significant parts of the
evaluation for this course.
back to Contents
14
Contemporary Problems and Ethical Issues
Grades 11-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
This course is a survey of the political, social, and economic issues and implications in our
contemporary world. The theme of the course will emphasize the evaluation of current events, their
effect on society, and the moral implications of these events. Topics of study may include foreign
relations and war, human rights, environmental issues, genetic engineering, racism, criminal justice,
media ethics, and any pressing and crucial daily issues. Students are introduced and required to
research the numerous philosophical debates about these moral issues. A strong emphasis is placed
on logical evaluation of events. Students are asked to participate in discussion, think critically, read
various handouts and newspapers on a regular basis, write papers, make presentations, and defend
their positions.
COMPUTER STUDIES
Computer Applications
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course familiarizes students with the tools and features of Microsoft Office applications including
Microsoft Word, Publisher, PowerPoint, Excel, and Access. A working familiarity with these applications
is essential for producing high school or college schoolwork and for almost any job. The course will be
flexible enough to accommodate both beginners and advanced students. Each student will start at
their own level of experience to enhance and improve existing skills and learn new ones that will help
them in producing work for other classes. This course will improve schoolwork at the high school and
college levels, and improve overall marketability in the job market.
Digital Graphics I (Previously Computer Graphics)
Grades 9-12
Digital Graphics II
Grades 11-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
Understanding the elements and principals of design and how to use these in creating effective
communications and images in digital form is the objective of this class. Skill development will include
digital photography basics, working with digital image formats, understanding digital layout, graphics
terminology, working with letterforms (typography), the use of color and how it differs for print or digital
production, marketing and digital presentation materials, and learning basic HTML code to create a
personal website. Software we may explore includes Adobe Photoshop, Adobe In-Design, Microsoft
Publisher, Microsoft PowerPoint, Painter 11, Adobe Illustrator, and text editing applications. Although
not required, this class an excellent foundation for Media Graphics.
1 Credit
1 Semester
This class is for students who wish to continue studies from Digital Graphics I to achieve a higher
technical skill level. Students interested in delving deeper into mastery of digital photography, video,
filmmaking, TV broadcast, web design, digital illustration, digital painting, typography or graphic
design may use this class for independent study. Specific projects must meet established criteria and
structure that the student will submit under the teacher’s direction. Principals of design in creating
effective communication and meaningful images will be stressed. Students will provide their own
criteria for judging their projects and class structure will rely on collaborative critique. Visiting
professionals will visit as is possible. This class requires a high level of motivation, planning and selfdirection. Pre-Requisite Digital Graphics I
back to Contents
15
Media Graphics
Grades 10-12
1 Credit
*9th Grade w/Permission
1 Semester
How principals of design and storytelling are used in conjunction with digital media techniques to
convey meaning is the focus of this class. Aspects of media literacy, copyright law and fair use,
demographics and target audiences will be explored and incorporated into our understanding of the
media process. While analyzing mass media and film the Media Graphics class will begin mastering
digital techniques for story boarding, animation, sound and film editing and other media arts to create
a series of short digital film or media projects. We will work with LPCTV in understanding broadcast and
camera techniques and how they are used to communicate ideas and information. Projects from this
class may be aired on LPCTV placed in an e-portfolio or be incorporated into a dynamic web site.
Web Design
Grades 10-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This class is for the student who wishes to learn more about both the front end of web site design (the
part we see) and the back end (the part we don’t see). We will review HTML from Digital Graphics I
and use it for troubleshooting. We will as explore WYSIWYG editors like Dreamweaver and learn about
Open Source Software for design like Joomla. We will explore Flash animation and embedded media.
We will learn about servers, server languages, and the technical aspects of how it all fits together. We
will take a look at cloud computing and how it impacts on web design. Students will create a dynamic
web site with embedded media and a high level of skill and design.
Pre-Requisite Digital Graphics I
FOREIGN LANGUAGES
French 1
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
All Year
This course introduces students to basic French and is the foundation for the learning of the language.
The emphasis is on speaking and listening to enable the students to communicate in the language.
Students will write and present short dialogues, watch several films, and work on short projects to
further the acquisition of the language. Text: Bon Voyage! Volume 1.
French II
Grades 9-12
French III
Grades 10-12
1 Credit
Full Year or Semester
This course expands on the material learned the first year. The emphasis will continue to be on
communication and students will be encouraged to use French during class. There will e a gradual
increase in reading and writing in French to develop a proficiency in the language. Students will
continue to present dialogues, study French films, and work on short projects to better understand
French and French culture. Text: Bon Voyage! Volume 1
PREREQUISISTE: French I and Teacher Recommendation
1 Credit
Full Year or Semester
French III will build on the skills acquired in the first two years of language study, emphasizing reading
comprehension, writing exercises, and expanded literature and cultural study. Students will be
expected to communicate in French during class and discussions in French will be encouraged.
Several short stories will be read and a short novel. Text: Bon Voyage! Volume 2
PREREQUISITE: French II and Teacher Recommendation
back to Contents
16
French IV
Grade 11-12
1 Credit
Full Year or Semester
French IV The continuation of the study of French. We will move away from textbooks and read short
stories, scenes from plays, newspaper articles and visit web sites in French to work on reading
comprehension and writing. To work on our listening we will watch French films, listen to French music
and visit appropriate sites on the internet. Students will also study the history and culture of the French
world to better appreciate the role of the French language in the world economy.
PREREQUISITE: French III and Teacher Recommendation.
French V
Grade 12
1 Credit
Full Year or Semester
Advanced French language and literature.
Spanish I
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
All Year
This course gives the student a very sound foundation for progressing to the higher levels of language
study. The primary goal is to help the students communicate in Spanish with an emphasis on speaking
and listening skills. Basic grammar is also taught and reinforced, orally and by writing, and some
reading is done to begin learning reading comprehension. The students are given a brief look at
Hispanic culture.
Spanish II
Grades 9-12
Spanish III
Grades 10-12
Spanish IV
Grades 11-12
1 Credit
All Year
This course is a further refinement and mastery of those skills attained in the first year. Some new
grammatical concepts will be taught, but the emphasis will be oral communication and dialogue
between the teacher and students and among the students themselves. These concepts will be
reinforced with some writing. Some reading and translation will again be required in order to give the
students a necessary well-rounded knowledge of Spanish. We will continue to explore Hispanic
cultural topics and increasingly expose the students to the Hispanic culture.
PREREQUISITE: Spanish I and Teacher Recommendation
1 Credit
1 Semester
This level builds on the skills obtained during the previous two levels, reinforcing grammar already
learned, and exploring some of the deeper concepts. There will be increased study of Hispanic
culture with closer looks at Spain, Mexico, Latin, Central, and South America, and Hispanic peoples
living in the United States. Several Spanish short stories will be read and, perhaps, a full-length novel.
Spanish conversation will be emphasized with the goal of increased speed and more creative and
spontaneous discussions.
PREREQUISITE: Spanish II and Teacher Recommendation
1 Credit
1 Semester
Spanish IV is for those students who are proficient in Spanish and motivated to study more intensively.
Much work will be done in Spanish literature, compositions, conversation, and oral presentations,
continued studies of Hispanic culture, and observation and discussion of Spanish videos. This level
aims to put a polish on each student’s skills and to get the students to enjoy speaking in another
language.
PREREQUISITE: Spanish III and Teacher Recommendation
back to Contents
17
ART AND MUSIC PROGRAMS
Art
Art I
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course provides students with experience in basic art concepts. It stresses the process and
conceptual, sequential development of ideas in two dimensions. The course builds a strong
vocabulary of techniques, terms and materials upon which students can expand and extend their
future art studies. Basic drawing and observation will be explored through the use of a variety of art
concepts and techniques in completing assigned art projects. Skill building techniques will be taught.
Art II
Grades 10-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course is offered to students wishing to further their knowledge and experiences in Art. A multitude
of materials and techniques are designed to expand students’ aesthetic awareness through exposure
by assignments utilizing their required skills. Individual and group projects will be implemented in this
course.
The skills and concepts developed in Art I are explained in Art II. Since the knowledge acquired is
cumulative, students are expected to demonstrate expanded growth and knowledge in their skills.
Drawing techniques are repeated and amplified, with repetition serving as a valuable commodity for
improvement.
PREREQUISITE: Art I and Teacher Recommendation
Basic Photography
Grade 12
.5 or 1 Credit
1 Quarter or 1 Semester
This course will cover the operation of adjustable cameras, composition of pictures, and development
of black and white film. Class size is limited.
REQUIREMENTS: STUDENTS MUST SUPPLY THEIR OWN 35 MM CAMERA.
Studio Art
Grades 10-12
1 Credit
1 Semester
This course is designed for the highly motivated student. Art concepts will be reviewed and further
developed in this course. Students will use a variety of art mediums, or may choose one to
concentrate on. The students will focus on self-expression through participation in a variety of media.
The students will work on developing their imagination and creative potential. The student will be
responsible for self-discipline and setting realistic goals for achievement in the arts. Each student will
work individually on special talents and interests and their level of abilities.
PREREQUISITE: Art I and Teacher Recommendation.
Music
Band
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
Full Year
The Band is an inspiring symbol of our school, which establishes rapport with the local public and helps
develop a sense of discipline and self-control. Band is an advanced music class in which students
should have previously participated in Band, Elementary Band, or have permission from the
instructor. By preparing for performances, students study rhythm, sight reading, instrument technique,
range, standards in band repertoire and musicality. High school students will receive one credit for this
year-long course.
back to Contents
18
Chorus
1 Credit
Full Year
Chorus is a non-auditioned ensemble intended for students who demonstrate an interest in improving
their performing skills and vocal proficiency through performance in chorus. The primary goal of this
ensemble is to foster the growth of the individual chorister as an ensemble member and enhance
his/her knowledge of vocal music as an art form.
Guitar (limit 10 )
Grades 9-12
Grades 9-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
Learn to play the guitar. We will work on the basics of reading music and tabs. We will cover unites on
classical guitar, chords, and jazz. Students will work on projects that improve their playing in a genre of
their own choice. Students must provide their own acoustic guitar to participate in this class.
General Music (limit 12)
Grades 9-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
In General Music students will cover a wide variety of topics and music skills. Units will include; African
drumming, intro to guitar, intro to keyboard, composition and 20 th century music history. There will be
an emphasis on the use of music technology, including sequencing, recording, notating software and
multimedia software. 20th century music history will cover classical music, jazz, rock and pop music
and their effect on history, the arts and culture.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
Physical Education
Grades 9-12
1 Credit
Required*
1 Semester
This is an introductory class required for all freshmen. Through a Fitness for Life curriculum students will
explore fitness and team building activities. Knowledge of fitness basics and how to apply them are
a critical component in achieving a healthy fitness level and lifestyle. The goal of this class is to give
students the knowledge and tools necessary to achieve a healthy fitness level and to be able to
maintain that fitness level as adults. Each student will have an opportunity to measure their fitness
levels and then explore activities that will support a healthy lifestyle. It is assumed that all students will
participate in proper attire during each unit, unless dismissed for medical reasons. In addition to class
participation, the students are required to complete written and skills exams.
*REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION: 1.5 credits
Fun and Fitness
Grades 11-12
.25 Credit
1/2 Semester
This is an elective course offered to upper level students. Students will have the opportunity to
develop their own fitness training program through the use of weight and cardiovascular training while
also exploring a variety of physical activities. The main focus is on providing students with an
opportunity to develop a fitness training program which they will maintain on alternating days. On
alternate training days students will also participate in organized sports which may include indoor
soccer, basketball, volleyball and other activities. It is assumed that all students will participate in
proper attire during each unit, unless dismissed for medical reasons. In addition to class participation,
the students are required to complete written and skills exams.
back to Contents
19
Introduction to Athletic Training
Grades 11-12
.25 Credit
*Grade 10 with permission
1/2 Semester
This course is offered to upper level students and serves as an introduction to the field of athletic
training. Students will review the history of athletic training and how it has evolved through today’s
practice of medicine. Emphasis will be on the care and prevention of athletic injuries. Students will be
required to complete reading, writing and class assignments and will be responsible for a final project
and presentation.
Contemporary Issues in Sports
Grades 11-12
.25 Credit
*Grade 10 with permission
1/2 Semester
This is an elective course for upper level students. It is designed to help students understand the role of
sports in society. Students will explore the following issues related to contemporary sports: Philosophy
and ethics in sports, Deviant behavior associated with sports, Sport as a reflection of society in race,
gender, and religion, Economic impact of sports, Politics and the media in sports.
This course will
allow students to think critically and reflect on sports as part of the social life. Students will be required
to complete reading, writing and class assignments and will be responsible for a final project and
presentation.
DRIVER EDUCATION
Driver Education
Grades 10-12
.5 Credit
The minimum requirements for this course include 30 hours of classroom instruction and 6 hours of road
instruction. All students also must have 6 hours of observation time in a vehicle. Class participation,
projects, and writing assignments are required. This course is scheduled primarily for sophomores.
REQUIREMENT: EACH STUDENT MUST BE 15 YEARS OLD AND HAVE A VERMONT DRIVING PERMIT BEFORE
STARTING THIS COURSE.
*There will be two Driver’s Education classes offered; Quarter 1 and Quarter 3. Driver’s Education will
be held during the school day from 8:30 – 9:15 am
ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAM (ASP)
Academic Support Program (ASP)
Grades 9-12
.25 credit
Quarter/Semester
ASP teacher will work with the students individually and in small groups as needed; assisting
with assignments, preparation for quizzes and tests and a providing quiet place for reading and
studying.
The ASP is a quarter credit elective class with a maximum of 2 credits earned throughout a high school
career.
The ASP is graded as a pass/fail class based on work done during period. The grade is determined by
a point system that includes rating completion of Assignment Book/Planner, possession of Materials
needed, Student Engagement, and Citizenship.
Students are not allowed to take more than one- 45 minute ASP per semester.
back to Contents
20
VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL
Virtual High School offers a catalog of full semester courses in the Arts, Foreign Language, Language
Arts, Life Skills, Math, Science, Social Studies, Technology and AP1 Study to students in VHS member
schools. Core courses are NCAA accredited. The courses listed are current at the time of publication
(March 2006); Visit our website at www.goVHS.org for the most recent offerings.
About VHS: VHS is a non-profit collaborative of nearly 200 participating high schools offering the gold
standard of full-semester online courses to high school students in 22 states and 8 countries.
Benefits of Taking a VHS NetCourse
We've found that VHS classes offer more time to be reflective about discussions. Students are not
bound to just the class period of 45 or 89 minutes to discuss a topic -- that's one of the benefits Virtual
High School scheduled asynchronous courses bring to education. Students have the opportunity to
work with other students in a virtual classroom space -- students (and teachers) from other states, other
countries, other cultures. It's a tremendous enhancement to a student's educational experience and
lots of fun! VHS classes also help students better prepare for college and work-force learning. VHS
students tell us that they feel better prepared for college because in VHS they learned to work
independently, and were responsible for managing their time and learning. In fact, many colleges are
now using online courses to enhance face-to-face college courses, and VHS students have a head
start because they are already accustomed to learning in an online environment! Virtual High School
offers a terrific way for students to broaden their educational horizons and take classes that would
otherwise be unavailable to them, in an environment that
is safe, challenging, and fun.
Student Attendance
A Virtual High School class, because it is conducted entirely over the Internet, in many ways offers
more flexibility than traditional face-to-face classes. However, just as in a face-to-face class,
attendance in a VHS class is very important. Students can access their class in the evening and on
weekends, as well as during the normal school day. With that flexibility, comes responsibility. Your
child's VHS teacher and classmates will be posting assignments, commenting to discussions, and
providing feedback in class throughout any given week. To actively participate in class your student
needs to login to their VHS class *at least* three times per week. Many students access their class daily
as their school and home schedules allow so they are sure to get the latest assignments and
instructions from their teacher.
Self Discipline
Because of the flexibility in VHS classes, it can be easy to fall behind with work. It's up to each student
to check assignment due dates, set his or her own pace, and submit work on time. Assignments in
Virtual High School classes vary from class to class and may include quizzes and tests, reading and
writing assignments, term papers, special projects, lab exercises, class discussion, and group activities.
One of the biggest mistakes new VHS students make is not giving themselves enough time to
complete their work. Help your student avoid problems by encouraging him or her to complete work
early! Please note that the VHS calendar may differ from your local school calendar. Students are
expected to follow the VHS calendar while participating in their VHS course. This means if a student will
have vacation periods or school breaks during their VHS course - they must be sure to notify their VHS
teacher IN ADVANCE, so alternate arrangements can be made for the submission of work. There are
no official school breaks in Virtual High School, but most teachers will be flexible if given advance
notice of a student's absence.
Communicating with the VHS Teacher and Site Coordinator
In a VHS class, your student is responsible for much of his or her own success. Because the teacher isn't
located in the local school and all communication is done online, students must remember to post
back to Contents
21
messages for their VHS teacher as soon as they have a question or are having trouble understanding a
concept. We ask that teachers respond to student inquiries within 24 hours, Monday-Friday. Students
can expect to receive regular communication from their teacher, which will include feedback on the
work they post, as well as general comments, but it is up to each student to take responsibility for
asking questions. If students have trouble logging into their VHS class, their school site coordinator is
the person who can help. The site coordinator acts as a liaison between the student and the VHS
teacher, and is responsible for reporting VHS grades to the student's local school.
Vermont Virtual Learning Cooperative
VTVLC
VTVLC was founded in 2010 as Vermont’s first state-wide Internet-based public high school. Today,
VTVLC serves high school students with more than 60 courses and serves over 30 schools. VTVLC offers
courses in math, English, science, social studies as well as elective credit courses including Advanced
Placement. Students must take an online orientation prior to course registration. Registration is on a first
come, first serve basis. Students enrolling in VTVLC should see the counseling office as soon as possible
and see registration instructions that are located on the counseling website. A complete list of course
offerings is available at: www.VTVLC.org.
COLLEGE CLASSES/SAT COURSE
Intro to College Studies
Grades 11-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
Introduction to College Studies is a free course available each semester through the Community
College of Vermont. This course provides high school students with an introduction to the college
experience and the opportunity to explore the skills and expectations necessary at the college level.
Students work on goal setting, time management, stress management, study skills, communication
skills, and learning to seek and use informational resources. This course is also an opportunity to gain
valuable information about career exploration, selecting and apply7ing to colleges, financial aid and
personal financial management. It is generally offered in a 13 week session with classes meeting once
a week for two hours. Successful completion of this course makes Vermont students eligible to apply
for a voucher for a free class at any of these colleges: CCV, Castleton, Johnson, Lyndon, Vermont
Tech, UVM, Burlington College, Champlain College, College of St. Joseph, Green Mountain College,
New England Culinary Institute and Southern Vermont College
SAT Prep Course
Grades 11-12
.5 Credit
1 Semester
The SAT Prep course is split into math and English sections, one marking period each. In addition to a
full review of the mathematics topics that commonly appear on the new SAT test, the math portion of
the course will include test-taking strategies and practice. The English half of the course will address
both the reading and writing portions of the test. Students will learn to assess their own writing using
the rubrics published by ETS. Several practice tests will be administered and studied to correct
common errors and identify common pitfalls. While score improvements cannot be guaranteed, past
students have reported improved scores and confidence.
back to Contents
22
TECHNICAL EDUCATION
Juniors and seniors will have to option to apply to any of the following ½ day technical programs.
Freshman and sophomores have the option of the Pre-tech program only, unless special permission is
granted. For those students interested in the level 2 programs, please see guidance for more details.
River Valley Technical Center at Springfield
Students enrolled at the Technical Center spend one-half of their school day in Springfield. Most
programs run for the entire school year and involve two hours of instruction each day. Four (4) credits
toward graduation can be earned for each year enrolled. A variety of work experiences,
apprenticeships and advanced college credit for work completed awaits students of the Technical
Center. Listed below is a brief description of each program. Each program involves technical,
academic and employability skill development. For further information, contact the Guidance Office
or call the Technical Center directly at (802)-885-8484. State approved embedded credit will be
granted after completion of the two year program.
Pre-Technical Studies Program
Pre-Tech
Grades 9 & 10
The Pre Technical Studies program is an exploratory program for freshmen and sophomores. Over the
course of the school year, students will explore and participate in all technical programs at the Center.
Students will spend two to three days in the actual program accompanied by the Pre Tech
paraeducator. For the remainder of the two weeks, students will be in class completing various English
and mathematics work to increase their academic skills as well as complete projects which are
related to each particular program. Program explorations will allow the students to make informed
decisions regarding future career choices as well as to be better prepared to enroll in a regular RVTC
program.
Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Career Cluster
Horticulture and Natural Resources
Grades 11&12
This program is for the student considering a career in landscaping, urban forestry, or greenhouse
management. Students spend much of their time outside in our on-site nursery, greenhouse, and
school landscapes. Students are also exposed to offsite work experiences on several community
landscapes, woodlots, and fruit orchards, where they develop skills to get an immediate job. Students
also have the opportunity to become a member of the FFA and develop their potential for premier
leadership, personal growth, and career success.
Architecture and Construction Career Cluster
Carpentry
Grades 11 & 12
This program provides students the opportunity to gain skills and explore potential careers in Carpentry.
Carpentry and other construction skills will be developed through the building of playhouses and
sheds in year one and a house in year two. Students will be involved in the theory and practice of
construction as a profession. Construction projects will be the focus of applied learning through
hands-on, experiential learning. Students will have the opportunity to earn industry credentials through
the National Center for Construction Education and Research.
back to Contents
23
Industrial Trades
Grades 11 & 12
This program offers diverse construction-based opportunities to obtain skills in Welding, Electrical, and
Plumbing using an applied approach from the classroom to the lab. Skills such as wiring residential
circuits, soldering copper pipes, cutting metal using oxy-fuel and plasma torches, and various welding
applications are developed over a two-year period making career choices or post-secondary school
choices numerous. If your interest lies in construction type trade areas and you would like some
choices, this program provides opportunities to learn using hand-on experiences as well as the
necessary employability skills needed. Certifications are available through the American Welding
Society, OSHA, and the National Center for Construction Education and Research.
Business, Management & Administration Career Cluster
Business/Financial Services
Grades 11 & 12
Ever thought about running your own business, or running someone else’s business? Students get to
design their own business from the group up, as well as work in retail, accounting, marketing and
personnel fields. AS a student in this program you will have the chance to work in and manage the
Campus Connection school store and join DECA – An Association of Marketing Students. DECA
provides opportunities to participate in marketing competitions and to travel. Students have the
opportunity to receive national certifications in Business Fundamentals, Business Math and/or Customer
Service and earn college credit while still in high school!
Health Science Career Cluster
Health Careers
Grade 11 & 12
The Health Careers Program is a two-year program that integrates classroom studies with clinical and
practical application. Students are exposed to a vast array of careers in healthcare. They will visit
various medical facilities to get a first-hand look at the choices available to them. Guest speakers,
classroom learning, and skills training in a realistic lab setting are part of the first year. During Level II, a
combination of classroom learning and onsite clinical rotations will comprise the training which will
fulfill the Vermont Board of Nursing requirements necessary to allow students to sit for the Licensed
Nurse Assistant (LNA) exam. Level II also provides the opportunity for clinical externships, work
cooperatives and dual enrollment with River Valley Community College; an option that offers three (3)
transferable college credits. Students will receive American Red Cross certification in CPR and AED for
Workplace and Community.
The Health Careers Program will focus on RVTC’s center-wide
employability skills; Dependability, organization, communication, problem-solving and collaboration.
This, along with the program curriculum, prepares students for college entry or for entering the
workplace after high school.
Hospitality and Tourism Career Cluster
Culinary Arts
Grade 11 & 12
Want to be a chef, baker, or food-service professional? An exciting career in the food service industry
is at your fingertips when you study Culinary Arts. Students will develop practical skills as they rotate
through the commercial kitchen, bake shop and student-run dining room, the River Valley Café.
Instruction involves demonstrations, lectures, skill development and practical applications. Earn
industry credentials and college credit to enhance employment opportunities.
back to Contents
24
Human Services Career Cluster
Human Services
Grade 11 & 12
Do you have a sincere interest in helping others? Are you creative? Do you like to use your
imagination? Are you thinking about a career in early childhood education, elementary education,
or human services? Whether you enjoy working with children, adolescents, the elderly or people with
special needs, this program will give you the skills and knowledge to be successful in a wide range of
careers in the Human Services field. The program includes instruction in human development and
psychology, training in communication and ethics, certification in CPR and First Aid, and first-hand
experience in area preschools, schools, nursing homes, and other human service agencies in
surrounding communities. Students will participate in group activities designed to promote individual
growth, professional development, and the development of leadership skills.
Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Career Cluster
Website Development, Photoshop, Intro to Game Development, Programming, Animation “Technology
Essentials”
Grade 11 & 12
Students signed up for Technology Essentials will have the option of choosing from four of the six
options listed above. Working in 10-week segments (school year quarters), students will spend time
with instructors and students in the MAT program to provide you more choice and greater variety.
More choice gives you the options of tailoring the program to your interests. More choice = more fun!
Develop a broad range of IT skills:
 Create an advanced web page using HTML, Dreamweaver
 Flash Animation
 Create and edit video production
 Record and edit sound files
 Program interactive games
Hands on Computer Systems
Grade 11 & 12
Build, upgrade and repair computer systems. Hand-on Computer Systems provides a in-depth study of
computer components and operating systems. Through a combination of classroom supported online
curriculum and hands on activities and labs, students gain a solid working knowledge of Windowsbased systems. Students will also have exposure to Macintosh and Linux based systems. Trouble
shooting, best practice in safety and maintenance, and responsible disposal of equipment is stressed.
Students are prepared for national credential, CompTIA A+ certification. Earn up to three college
credits.
Media Arts & Technology: Audio, Video, Motion 4.0
Grade 11 & 12
(Web Development, Flash, Game Development offered in partnership with Tech Essentials)
The MAT Program is made of several pathways in order to better serve students and the demands of
today’s multi-media industry. During MAT Level I, students will choose from several ―mini-courses‖ or
pathways that focus on Audio, Video, Graphics, Web and Animation. During the first year of the
program students will have the ability to choose mini-courses from three of these pathways and then
culminate the year with a final project that demonstrates everything they have learned during the
program. In the second year of the MAT Program, students will have the ability to focus on one of
three major pathways: Audio Engineering, Video Production, or Web Design & Computer
Programming. For more information visit us online at rvtc.org/RVTCSTUDIOS.
back to Contents
25
Law, Public Safety & Security Career Cluster
Law Enforcement
Grade 11 & 12
This program is designed to help students make a career choice in one of the numerous occupations
offered within the Criminal Justice field. Emphasis is placed on the legal, ethical, and professional
standards necessary in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. These are just a few of the subjects
introduced in the program in which students will get on-hand experience: fingerprinting, rappelling,
crime-scene investigation, crime scene diagramming, accident investigation, building searches, traffic
stops, and a ride-along program. There is an intern program for level II students with a number of
different police agencies within the region. Upon completion of the two-year program, students, if
qualified, can accrue up to a total of three hours of college credit from each of the following
colleges: Community College of Vermont and River Valley Community College (NH).
Manufacturing Technology
Manufacturing Technology
Grade 11 & 12
The purpose of this 2 to 3 year course is to provide ―hands-on‖ training in manual and computer
numerical control (CNC) machining techniques that will prepare graduates for entry-level jobs as CNC
Machine Operators, machinists and programmers. Students will learn to operate more than 20
different machine tools, including milling machines, engine lathes, precision grinders and fully
automated CNC machining centers. The sparkling clean, ―state-of-the art‖ manufacturing lab is one
of only two NIMS (National Institute for Metalworking Skills) certified training centers in Vermont. All
students have the opportunity to earn NIMS credentials, which are recognized across the country as
the premiere, competency based certification for machine operators and machinists. In addition, all
hours accumulated in this training program count towards the Vermont Adult ―Apprenticeship
Program. If you passion is making things by hand and seeing how they work, this course is for you.
Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Career Cluster
Engineering Technology
Grade 11 & 12
Ever thought of becoming an engineer and engineering technician? Spend the first year of this twoyear program tearing apart and 3D modeling a complex machine like a working internal combustion
engine. Then use industrial machinery, such as lathes and mills, to actually make a complex machine
of your own to take home! Design, build, and program an industrial robot to perform everyday tasks!
Explore civil engineering by learning to survey, architectural engineering by drawing house plans, and
electro-mechanical engineering through UVM’S annual TASC (Technology and Society Connection)
competition. Students completing this program go on to college for engineering or to technical
school to become engineering technicians and CADD operators. College credit is available through
this program.
back to Contents
26
FOUR YEAR PLANNER
STUDENT NAME:__________________________
This page is intended for students and parents use to develop a four year program of studies.
Year One (Grade 9)
1. __________________________________
5. __________________________________
2. __________________________________
6. __________________________________
3. __________________________________
7. __________________________________
4. __________________________________
8. __________________________________
Year Two (Grade 10)
1. __________________________________
5. __________________________________
2. __________________________________
6. __________________________________
3. __________________________________
7. __________________________________
4. __________________________________
8. __________________________________
Year Three (Grade 11)
1. __________________________________
5. __________________________________
2. __________________________________
6. __________________________________
3. __________________________________
7. __________________________________
4. __________________________________
8. __________________________________
Year Four (Grade 12)
1. __________________________________
5. __________________________________
2. __________________________________
6. __________________________________
3. __________________________________
7. __________________________________
4. __________________________________
8. __________________________________
Graduation Requirements – 28 Credits
English
4
Math
3
Science
3
Social Studies
3
Art/Music
1
Physical Ed
1.5
Health
.5
Electives
12
27

Similar documents

×

Report this document