Annual report

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Annual report
REGISTRATION DOCUMENT 2007
3 Contents
1 »
Presentation of Crédit Agricole S.A.
3
4 »
Crédit Agricole S. A. management
report for the year 2007
69
Message from the Chairman
and the Chief Executive Officer
4
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s activity and results
70
2007 key figures
8
Crédit Agricole S. A. parent company
financial statements
97
Stock market data 2007
2 »
Corporate governance
and internal control
10
Employee, social and environmental information
in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
136
5 »
16
Statutory Auditors’ report
34
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
35
Composition of the Executive Committee
49
Crédit Agricole S. A. in 2007
106
15
Chairman’s report on corporate governance
and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders
on 21 May 2008
3 »
Risk factors
Financial statements
167
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended
31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
and submitted to the shareholders for approval
at the Annual General Meeting of 21 May 2008
168
Statutory Auditors’ report on the consolidated
financial statements
274
Parent company financial statements
at 31 December 2007 – in French Gaap – approved
by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
276
Statutory Auditors’ report on the parent company
financial statements
321
51
Company history
52
Organisation of Crédit Agricole Group and Crédit
Agricole S. A.
53
Significant events in 2007
54
Crédit Agricole S. A. business lines
56
6 »
General information
Information on the Company
323
324
Information concerning the share capital
342
Additional information
345
Statutory Auditors’ special report on related party
agreements and commitments
346
Crédit Agricole S.A. Annual General Meeting
of 21 May 2008
348
Persons responsible for the registration document
361
Cross-reference table
363
Annual report
Registration document 2007
3 Profile
Present across the entire spectrum of finance activities, Crédit Agricole
is a first-class player in retail banking in Europe. Its ambition: to create a
world-class European leader in banking and insurance, in accordance with
the principles of the United Nations Global Compact.
Crédit Agricole S.A. is responsible for ensuring a consistent development
strategy and financial unity throughout the Crédit Agricole group. Crédit
Agricole S.A. pursues a strategy of sustainable, profitable growth through
a unified approach between the Regional Banks and the Group’s specialist
business line subsidiaries.
A strengthened international presence
n 3 domestic markets: France, Italy, Greece
n 44 million private customers *
n Over 11,000 * branches in 20 countries
n In 58 countries in corporate and investment banking.
A committed and responsible player
n Signature of the United Nations Global Compact (2003) and of the
Diversity Charter (2008)
n Adoption of the Equator Principles by Calyon
n Signature of the Principles for Responsible Investment by Crédit Agricole
Asset Management.
*
Incl. Regional Banks.
Only the French version of the registration document has been submitted to the AMF. It is therefore the only version
that is binding in law. The original French version of this registration document was registered with the Autorité
des Marchés Financiers (AMF) on 20 March 2008 under number D. 08-0140, in accordance with article 212-13 of
the AMF’s Internal Regulations. It may not be used in support of a financial transaction unless accompanied by a
transaction circular approved by the AMF.
This document contains a correction to an error in the chapter “Risk factors” of the management report, on pages
106, 122 and 123. This amendment was registered with the AMF on 29 April 2008.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 1
2 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
1
Presentation
of Crédit Agricole S.A.
Message from the Chairman and the Chief Executive Officer
4
2007 key figures
8
TRENDS IN EARNINGS
8
GOOD BALANCE AMONG BUSINESS LINES
8
FINANCIAL STRUCTURE
9
RATINGS
9
HEADCOUNT AT PERIOD END
9
Stock market data 2007
10
SHARE DATA
10
OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
10
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. SHARES
11
2008 FINANCIAL CALENDAR
13
CONTACTS
13
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 3
1
RAPPEL_T1
PRESENTATION
OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
Message from the Chairman and the Chief Executive Officer
Message from the Chairman
and the Chief Executive Officer
»
OUR PERFORMANCE FALLS AGAINST THE BACKDROP
OF A TURBULENT BANKING INDUSTRY
A history of growth. Ever since it was created, Crédit Agricole S. A.
has achieved consistent growth. As well as expanding in terms
of size, we have achieved a far-reaching transformation. Our
business model has proved resilient to the difficulties created by an
international financial crisis of unparalleled scale. Our actions will
continue to be guided by our long-term vision, with a combination
of confidence and caution.
3 Major upheaval on a global scale
In August 2007, the first global financial crisis of the 21st century
began. Only a few months beforehand, the markets were still
counting on strong global growth. The downturn in the financial
cycle came quickly, and has been more severe than expected.
As well as its macroeconomic effects, which will prompt the
markets to adopt a more sensible approach to valuing risk, the
crisis is sure to have a major impact on the banking sector. Some of
the world’s largest banks have had to raise money from sovereign
wealth funds to shore up their finances, and others have been
shaken by economic difficulties of varying origins. It is hard to
predict how the crisis will develop. In early 2008, the extent of the
losses that will be borne by the various economic participants is
unclear, and confidence has not yet been restored.
Crédit Agricole S. A. has not been immune to this turbulence. Our
corporate and investment banking subsidiary Calyon had built up
substantial commercial positions in structured credit products, in
which its skills are widely acknowledged. Noting the deterioration in
the US residential real estate market, we stopped all new structuring
activity in February 2007. However, assets in the process of being
structured and remaining on our books have had to be written
down, in several stages, as the markets have deteriorated and the
problems have spread. We also suffered from the trading incident
that happened at our New York branch in September. Although
this was regrettable, the losses were limited, and the necessary
disciplinary action and measures have been taken. The effects of
the credit crisis are masking the excellent performance of Calyon’s
other businesses. For example, Calyon’s centres of excellence in
structured financing and brokerage saw revenues rise by 14% and
21% respectively.
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s diversified business model has proven
relevant. Our 2007 net income, down 16.8%, reflects the strong
resilience that arises from our balanced exposure to three business
segments. Although the credit crisis adversely affected capital
markets revenues, this was offset by strong momentum in all other
businesses. Net banking income was up 3.6%. Without the impact
of the crisis, it would have been up 25.5% and gross operating
income would have risen by 30.5%.
3 Developments of operations
across Europe
A unified European banking market is becoming a reality as a result
of a combination of political, legislative and regulatory initiatives.
MIFID, Basel II, Solvency II and SEPA are pan-European regulations
that are marking out a new unified framework for our market. The
financial sector has long been protected by national regulations.
However, borders are no longer a defence against competition,
and entry barriers are falling. Sector consolidation is accelerating,
and this is having a major influence. Many other industries – such
as steel, pharmaceuticals, IT and automotive – have undergone
consolidation, and the consequences are clear for all to see.
Far from being a threat to Crédit Agricole S. A., this development
represents an opportunity. It presents us with a historic opportunity
to extend the leadership that we already enjoy in France, one of
HIGHLIGHTS
2001
n 14 December: Crédit Agricole S.A. floats on the stockmarket
with a market capitalisation of €16 billion.
4 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
2002
n 14 December: exactly one year after the IPO, Crédit Agricole makes a
public offer for Crédit Lyonnais, in which it has already owned a 10%
stake since Crédit Lyonnais’ privatisation
PRESENTATION OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE
RAPPEL_T1
S.A.
Message from the Chairman and the Chief Executive Officer
Europe’s leading banking markets. Europe is our new domestic
market. In the last two years, we have made some decisive steps
forward, transforming the strategic minority stakes we acquired in
Greece and Italy in the 1990s into a majority-controlled network.
After a very quick acquisition and integration phase, we are now
taking advantage of our existing positions and developing new
business lines.
Cariparma FriulAdria in Italy and Emporiki in Greece are banks that
have a strong presence in their respective markets. We now have
30 million retail banking customers in Europe, giving us a solid
base that generates business for all our activities. Six months after
the acquisition of Cariparma FriulAdria, all its producer business
lines were plugged to the network. Bancassurance activities in
Portugal, developed in partnership with BES via BES Vida and
BES Seguros, are generating good results, in line with the excellent
performance of BES. Finaref’s borrower insurance platform
operates in 14 countries. In consumer finance, we operate in 20
European countries, making us a leading player in this business
with some very strong local positions. In asset management,
private banking and corporate and investment banking, we have
continued to strengthen our activities in Europe, where we already
had extensive coverage.
3 Changing outlook in France
New competitors – both from foreign countries and other industries
– combined with technological developments and the move to
open up provision of Livret A regulated savings accounts, are
causing rapid change in France’s banking sector.
France is our original market, and still accounts for half of our
business. For Crédit Agricole, the strength of our positions in
France is a major advantage: we have a market share of around
2003
n June: Crédit Agricole completes the acquisition of Crédit Lyonnais
and Finaref. Integration begins immediately, with an ambitious plan
to merge operations in each business line.
30% among personal banking customers, through our Crédit
Agricole and LCL brands. The good fit between our target
customer segments, our textbook development in insurance and
our move towards wealthy clients, combined with a very solid local
presence in place for well over a century, makes us a major player
in France.
To maintain and strengthen this position, we are constantly
seeking to adjust our products to new lifestyles and underlying
social trends. In mid-2005, we decided to adopt a new market
position, encouraging the “lasting relationship” between customers
and the Regional Banks and giving LCL a new identity. This was
accompanied by a new approach to marketing and product
innovation for both brands. For example, we have expanded our
range of bank cards, including the Regional Banks’ successful
“L’Autre Carte”, and introduced service guarantees at LCL.
We are taking a new approach to the real estate industry in France.
Upstream, we are building a solid business around Crédit Agricole
Immobilier, with a presence in all stages of the value chain,
alongside financing and insurance. This business increased in scale
in 2007 with the acquisition of developers Monné Decroix and RSB.
Downstream, the Regional Banks have confirmed their position as a
major player in the estate agent segment with the national Square
Habitat chain.
We are also making significant progress in multi-channel banking,
through technological innovation (contactless payments, electronic
signatures etc.) and new consumer habits and lifestyles.
In all of these areas, Crédit Agricole benefits from the collaboration
between integrated producers and its distributor networks, and
from the fact that services successfully trialled in France can be
rolled out abroad and vice-versa.
2004
n 30 April: creation of Calyon through the combination of Crédit
Agricole Indosuez with Crédit Lyonnais’ corporate and investment
banking business, following the largest transfer of assets ever
carried out by a bank, equal to €140 billion.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 5
1
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RAPPEL_T1
PRESENTATION
OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
Message from the Chairman and the Chief Executive Officer
»
OUR VISION FOR 2008 AND BEYOND
3 Outlook for 2008
In 2007, we achieved a solid set of results, underpinned by our
robust development model, which has proven resilient in the
face of turmoil. The main lines of our strategy, formulated in
our 2006-2008 plan, have proven relevant: these consist of a
balanced set of businesses (retail banking, specialised financial
services and corporate and investment banking) and international
diversification.
In the last six years, the Group has transformed itself, without
sacrificing profitability or efficiency. Revenues and earnings have
almost tripled, the number of customers has doubled, and we have
generated remarkable international momentum. Robust organic
growth, together with our ability to seize opportunities, explains
how this change has taken place in such as short space of time. We
have gained solid expertise in integrating acquisitions. With Crédit
Lyonnais, we have shown our ability to manage transactions large
enough to transform the Group, while our successful purchases
in international retail banking demonstrate our skills in integrating
businesses outside France. The Group’s reconfiguration has now
come to an end. We now have a well structured organisation in our
foreign subsidiaries, and growth momentum in our French networks
is supported by rigorous, tightly controlled management.
2005
All of our businesses have solid market positions. To mention
just a few, we lead the French retail banking market, we have a
retail banking presence in 19 additional countries, our insurance
business is in the world top 20, CAAM is in the world top 15 and
Calyon is in the European top 10. Our specialised financial services
segment has continued to expand outside France, consolidating its
position among Europe’s leading consumer finance players.
The Group’s financial position allows it to maintain organic growth,
while making significant investments in enhanced risk management.
Our existing achievements allow us to look forward to tomorrow’s
challenges clearly and confidently, with the ambition of becoming a
leading player in the European banking and insurance markets, with
global aspirations. The proposed 4.3% increase in the dividend to
€1.20 per share is a sign of our confidence in the future, and our
desire to reward the loyalty of our shareholders.
n The Regional Banks adopt their new market position, with the strap
n In December, Crédit Agricole presents its 2006/2008 development
line “Une relation durable, ça change la vie” (“a lasting relationship
makes a big difference”).
n Crédit Lyonnais becomes LCL and adopts the slogan “demandez
plus à votre argent” (“demand more from your money”).
plan, which includes a large-scale programme of acquisitions
outside France.
2006
n The 2006-2008 plan is implemented at record speed, with
acquisitions in Egypt, Ukraine and Greece in retail banking and
developments in bancassurance in Portugal.
6 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
PRESENTATION OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE
RAPPEL_T1
S.A.
Message from the Chairman and the Chief Executive Officer
3 The guiding principles behind
our activities: the United Nations
Global Compact
Our approach to social and environmental responsibility results
from our traditional mutual values and the ten principles of the
UN Global Compact, which we signed five years ago. The UN
Global Compact puts special emphasis on climate change and
international human rights.
In 2007, the remit of the Board of Directors’ strategy committee was
expanded to cover the Group-wide advancement of our sustainable
development policy. This decision confirms the importance we
place on integrating CSR into our strategy. Similarly, strategic
reviews of our various business segments include an examination
of their CSR policies.
In late November, we were proud to receive the “Bank of the Year”
award from The Banker magazine for our sustainable development
policy. We deepen our approach to social and environmental
responsibility and our asset management subsidiary has voluntarily
sought an external rating. In this context, this external recognition
of the progress we are making is highly encouraging for the Group
and our staff.
2007
n Cariparma FriulAdria: the acquisition announced in late 2006 takes
place in three stages, and is completed on 1 July. The integration is
completed in less than one year.
n Crédit Agricole is named Global Bank of the Year by The Banker
magazine for its sustainable development policy.
With our new scale and our significant and growing international
presence, we are committed to respecting the human rights in our
new markets, as we have always done in our home market. As
regards working conditions, we set up a European works council
in early 2008, and Crédit Agricole S. A. and eight subsidiaries have
signed the Diversity Charter.
We have a target of reducing energy consumption by 15% over
the next three years, and we have decided to offset some of our
greenhouse gas emissions by energy saving investments in South
countries with the U.N. label. Crédit Agricole has played an active
role in the “Grenelle de l’Environnement” (France’s environmental
think-tank), and in groups dealing with environmental issues in
farming and housing. The decisions taken will be integrated into our
growing range of “environmental” products.
Beyond combating corruption, for which the Group has a vigilant
policy and leading-edge tools, it actively addresses all compliancerelated issues. Fides, the Group’s compliance training programme,
has been rolled out to our new entities. Finally, the implementation
of MIFID was co-ordinated across all of the concerned subsidiaries
that operate in Europe.
2008
n Crédit Agricole S.A. and eight of its subsidiaries sign the Diversity
Charter, after Sofinco and Finaref.
n Crédit Agricole S.A. makes a commitment to fighting poverty
alongside Professor Yunus, founder and Chairman of Grameen
Bank, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize for his work in the field
of microfinance.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 7
1
1
RAPPEL_T1
PRESENTATION
OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
2007 key figures
2007 key figures
»
TRENDS IN EARNINGS
NET INCOME, GROUP SHARE
(in millions of euros)
CONDENSED INCOME STATEMENT
(in millions of euros)
2007
IFRS
2006
IFRS
2005
IFRS
2004
IFRS*
2004
2003
pro forma
Net banking
income
16,768
16,187
13,693
12,107
12,513
12,721
Gross operating
income
4,050
5,832
4,527 **
3,528 **
3,761**
3,832**
Net income
4,556
5,258
4,249
2,798
2,507
1,493
Net income,
Group share
4,044
4,860
3,891
2,501
2,203
1,140
BUSINESS OPERATIONS
(in billions
of euros)
31/12/2007 31/12/2006 31/12/2005 31/12/2004
IFRS
IFRS
IFRS
IFRS * 31/12/2004 31/12/2003
Total assets
1,414.2
1,260.5
1,061.4
933.3
815.3
786.0
Gross loans
397.3
336.3
261.4
209.3
259.1
262.2
Customer
deposits
564.9
513.6
416.5
391.0
406.2
388.3
614.4 ***
636.9
562.7
406.7
406.7
379.8
Assets under
management
(asset
management,
insurance
and private
banking)
RETURN ON EQUITY (ROE)
*
2004 IFRS figures are comparative figures including IAS 32 and IAS 39.
** Before integration-related costs.
*** Outstanding of asset management take into account the outcome of JV CAAM Sgr.
Note: the 2006 accounts were adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes in minority interests.
»
GOOD BALANCE AMONG BUSINESS LINES
CAPITAL ALLOCATED TO BUSINESS SEGMENTS
CONTRIBUTION TO NET INCOME, GROUP SHARE
(in millions of euros)
2006
2005
Regional Banks
778
759
778
LCL
553
680
590
International retail banking
460
529
439
Specialised financial services
595
463
401
Asset management, insurance
and private banking
1,899
1,547
1,225
Corporate and investment banking
(904)
1,645
1,253
663
(763)
(795)
Proprietary asset management
and other activities
8 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
2007
PRESENTATION OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE
RAPPEL_T1
S.A.
2007 key figures
»
FINANCIAL STRUCTURE
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
SOLVENCY RATIOS
(in millions of euros)
*
2004 IFRS figures are comparative figures including IAS 32 and IAS 39.
*
**
International solvency ratio.
CAD ratio.
Note: the 2006 accounts were adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes in minority interests.
»
»
RATINGS
HEADCOUNT AT PERIOD END
(full-time equivalents)
Crédit Agricole S. A. has been awarded high ratings by the main
rating agencies, reflecting its strong financial position.
SHORT-TERM
Moody’s
P1
Standard and Poor’s
A1+
FitchRatings
F1+
LONG-TERM
Moody’s
Aa1
Standard and Poor’s
AA-
FitchRatings
AA
OUTLOOK
Moody’s
Stable
Standard and Poor’s
Stable
FitchRatings
Stable
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 9
1
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RAPPEL_T1
PRESENTATION
OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
Stock market data 2007
Stock market data 2007
»
SHARE DATA
EARNINGS PER SHARE
NET DIVIDEND PER SHARE
MARKET CAPITALISATION
(in €)
(in €, before tax credit)
(in € billions at 31 December)
*
Adjusted data (capital increase in January 2007).
**
Subject to approval at the AGM on 21 May 2008 with an option for payment in shares up to 80%.
»
OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
On 31 December 2007, Crédit Agricole S. A.’s share capital comprised 1,669,756,872 shares. As of that date, to the best of Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s knowledge, ownership of share capital and voting rights was as follows:
Shareholder
SAS Rue la Boétie
Treasury shares
Number of
shares
% of share
capital
% of voting
rights
903,090,102
54.09
54.50
12,552,962
0.75
-
Employee share ownership plan
103,761,579
6.21
6.26
Institutional investors
520,433,879
31.17
31.40
Retail investors
129,918,350
7.78
7.84
1,669,756,872
100.0
100.0
TOTAL
All the shares are fully paid up. They may be in either registered or
bearer form at the holder’s choice subject to any prevailing legal
provisions. There are no double voting rights or additional dividend
rights attached to the shares.
A €4 billion capital increase with preferential subscription rights was
carried out between 4 and 23 January 2007. Subscription for new
10 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
shares was at a price of €26.75 on the basis of one new share for
ten existing shares. A total of 149,732,230 new shares were created,
carrying rights to dividends with effect from 1 January 2006.
A €500 million employee share offering was carried out from 10 to
21 September 2007. A total of 22,702,341 new shares were created
as of 5 December 2007, the settlement-delivery.
PRESENTATION OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE
RAPPEL_T1
S.A.
Stock market data 2007
»
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. SHARES
3 Share price performance *
SHARE PRICE PERFORMANCE SINCE 1 JANUARY, 2004
Comparison with the DJ Euro Stoxx Bank and CAC 40 (indices recalculated on the basis of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s IPO price)
40
35
30
25
20
15
TRENDS IN SHARE PRICE AND TRADING VOLUMES SINCE 1 JANUARY 2004
*
40
25,000
35
20,000
30
15,000
25
10,000
20
5,000
15
0
Adjusted data (capital increase in January 2007).
After an excellent year in 2004, when the shares outperformed the
CAC 40 index by 10 percentage points, 2005 was another good
year for the Crédit Agricole shares. In a relatively buoyant market,
they closed at €26.61, an increase of 20% over the year, just below
the CAC 40’s gain of 23%. In 2006, the shares also delivered a
positive performance, closing at €31.35 on 31 December, a rise
of 19.73% over the year, outperforming the CAC 40’s 17.53%
advance.
In 2007, the Crédit Agricole S. A. shares, like all financial sector
stocks, were adversely affected by market turbulence and were
hard-hit by the US subprime crisis in the summer. During the first
half, the shares fluctuated around the €30 mark, then began to
trend down, entering a rocky period in the wake of announcements
by the world’s major financial operators. The shares closed at
€23.07 on 31 December 2007, down 26.4% over the year. They
underperformed the CAC 40 index, which gained 1.3% in 2007.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 11
1
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RAPPEL_T1
PRESENTATION
OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
Stock market data 2007
A total of 1.418 billion shares were traded during 2007, with an average daily volume of 5.6 million shares.
Monthly trading volumes ranged from 83.3 million to 170.5 million shares.
(in €)
High
Date
Low
Date
Average
closing price
Average daily
trading volume
Q1
33.74
24/01/2007
28.35
14/03/2007
31.50
5,467,551
Q2
33.10
14/05/2007
28.99
02/04/2007
31.30
4 917,748
Q3
30.25
17/07/2007
26.00
16/08/2007
27.54
6,166 652
Q4
28.87
04/10/2007
20.63
22/11/2007
24.25
5,852,874
Source: Euronext.
3 Stock market indices
Crédit Agricole S. A. shares are listed on Euronext Paris,
compartment A, ISIN code: FR0000045072.
The shares are now included in five indices: CAC 40, DJ
EuroStoxx 50, DJ Stoxx 600 Banks, FTSEurofirst 80, ASPI
Eurozone and FTSE 4 Good European Top 50.
3 Share data
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
31/12/2005
31/12/2004
31/12/2003
1,669,756,872
1,497,322,301
1,497,322,301
1,473,522,437
1,473,522,437
Market capitalisation (€ billions)
38.5
47.7
39.8
32.7
27.9
Earnings per share (EPS) (in €) *
2.51
3.25
2.64
1.48
0.84
24.37
22.92
19.24
16.01
15.20
0.95
1.44
1.36
1.36
1.22
9.2
9.6
9.9
14.8
22.2
High
33.74
35.57
26.90
23.42
18.64
Low
20.63
26.22
19.69
18.67
12.45
23.07
31.35
26.18
21.84
18.64
Number of shares in issue
Book value per share (BVPS) (in €) *
Price/BV
P/E
Year’s high and low (in €) *
Latest
*
Adjusted data (capital increase in January 2007).
3 Dividends
Crédit Agricole S. A. paid a dividend of €0.55 per share for 2001 to 2003. The dividend was raised to €0.66 for 2004, €0.94 for 2005 and
€1.15 for 2006.
The Board of Directors will propose to the AGM a net dividend of €1.20 ** per share for 2007.
Amount (in €)
2007
2006
2005 *
2004 *
2003 *
Net dividend per share
1.20 **
1.15
0.92
0.65 (1)
0.54
0.92
(1)
0.81
Gross dividend per share
1.20 **
*
Adjusted data (capital increase in January 2007).
** With an option for payment in shares up to 80%.
(1) Including an interim dividend of €0.30 paid on 16 December 2004.
The tax credit for dividends paid as of 1 January 2005 has been cancelled.
12 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
1.15
0.80
1
PRESENTATION OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE
RAPPEL_T1
S.A.
Stock market data 2007
3 Total shareholder return
The table below shows total shareholder return for retail investors
in Crédit Agricole S. A. shares.
The calculation, which is based on the closing share price on the day of
the investment (initial public offering on 14 December 2001 or beginning
of the year in other cases), takes into account the reinvestment of
dividends received (until 2005, this included the tax credit in respect
of 2004, which accounted for 50% of the amount distributed).
Holding period
The calculation is based on the closing share price on the
investment day. It also assumes that investors sold their preferential
subscription rights and used the proceeds to take up the rights
issues at the end of October 2003 and January 2007. All figures
are before tax.
By way of example, an investor who invested in Crédit Agricole S. A.
shares at the time of the IPO and reinvested all dividends received
would have achieved an average annualised return of 10.1% at the
end of 2007.
Cumulative gross return
Average annualised return
-25.8%
-25.8%
Two years (2006-2007)
-7.0%
-3.5%
Three years (2005-2007)
13.8%
4.4%
Four years (2004-2007)
41.3%
9.0%
Five years (2003-2007)
115.2%
16.6%
67.4%
9.0%
78.5%
10.1%
One year (2007)
6 years (2002-2007)
Since 14 December 2001
(1)
(1) IPO at €16.60.
»
2008 FINANCIAL CALENDAR
5 March
Publication of 2007 annual results
15 May
Publication of 2008 first quarter results
21 May
Annual General Meeting in Nantes
27 May
Detachment of the coupon
23 June
28 August
13 November
»
Payment of the dividend
Publication of 2008 half-year results
Publication of 2008 nine-month results
CONTACTS
Group Financial Communications
Denis Kleiber
Tel.: +33 (0)1 43 23 26 78
Institutional investor relations
Tel.: +33 (0)1 43 23 23 81
[email protected]
[email protected]
Retail shareholder relations
Toll-free line (from France only): 0 800 000 777
[email protected]
www.credit-agricole-sa.fr
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 13
1
RAPPEL_T1
PRESENTATION
OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
14 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
2
Corporate governance
and internal control
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control
presented to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
16
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
16
INTERNAL CONTROL PROCEDURES
25
Statutory Auditors’ report
34
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
35
COMPENSATION PAID TO EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
35
OFFICES HELD BY EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
38
TRADING IN THE COMPANY’S SHARES BY EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
48
Composition of the Executive Committee
49
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 15
2
1
RAPPEL_T1 GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
CORPORATE
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
Chairman’s report on corporate governance
and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders
on 21 May 2008
as required by the “Financial Security Act” 2003-706 of 1 August 2003 as amended
(Code de commerce, article L. 225-37; Code monétaire et financier, article L. 621-18-3)
Financial year 2007
Dear Shareholders,
In addition to the management report, I am pleased to present my report on Crédit Agricole S. A.’s corporate governance and internal
control systems, particularly as they apply to financial and accounting information.
For the Crédit Agricole Group, the Chairman’s reporting duty as required by the Financial Security Act includes Crédit Agricole S. A. and
all the Regional Banks, as well the Group’s own major subsidiaries, whether or not they issue publicly traded financial instruments, or
as required to comply with good internal control practice.
Consequently, Crédit Agricole S. A. has a uniform vision of the operation of the Group’s decision-making bodies and additional
information on these entities’ internal control procedures, which supplements information gathered from internal reporting.
This report has been completed under my authority, primarily in coordination with the heads of Group Control and Audit, the Office
of the Company Secretary, Compliance, and Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls, based on existing documentation
on internal control and on risk management and oversight within the Group. This report was submitted to the Crédit Agricole S. A.
Audit and Risk Committee on 28 February 2008 and to the Board of Directors at its 4 March 2008 meeting.
»
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
3 1 – Board of Directors
General presentation
n 1 Director appointed by joint decree of the Ministry of Finance
and the Ministry of Agriculture, in accordance with the law of
18 January 1988 on the mutualisation of Caisse Nationale
de Crédit Agricole, which became Crédit Agricole S. A. on
29 November 2001;
Since Crédit Agricole S. A.’s stock market flotation, the company’s
Board of Directors has comprised 21 voting Directors and one
non-voting Director, including:
n 2 Directors elected by the employees of Crédit Agricole S. A.
n 18 Directors elected by the shareholders:
n 1 outside non-voting Director appointed by the Board of
n
12 Chairmen or Chief Executives of the Regional Banks,
n
1 Regional Bank Chairman representing SAS Rue La Boétie,
n
4 outside Directors,
n
1 Regional Bank employee;
16 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Group;
Directors.
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Directors who are Chairmen or Chief
Executives of the Crédit Agricole Regional Banks have the status
of directors of banking institutions.
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
The composition of the Board illustrates the desire of Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s largest shareholder (SAS Rue La Boétie, which
is owned by the Regional Banks and held 54.49% of the voting
rights at 31 December 2007) also to give the Regional Banks a
majority representation on the Board. As a result, the proportion of
outside Directors sitting on the Board and the special committees
is smaller than that recommended by French corporate governance
guidelines (IFA Corporate Governance Report, May 2007).
During one meeting, the Board discussed the composition,
organisation and modus operandi of the Board and its special
committees, in reference to the aforesaid corporate governance
Independent Director
guidelines. It concluded that the existing modus operandi
enabled the Board and its committees to fulfil their duties with the
required effectiveness, objectivity and independence, particularly
with respect to preventing potential conflicts of interest and
to the equitable consideration of all shareholders’ interests.
On the recommendation of the Appointments and Governance
Committee, the Board reviewed the situation of all the directors
and found that four of them could be considered to be independent
Directors in accordance with the aforesaid corporate governance
guidelines:
Main office
Office on the Crédit Agricole S. A. Board
Mr Philippe Camus
Co-Executive Manager of SCA Lagardère
Chairman, Compensation Committee
Member of the Audit and Risks Committee
Mr Xavier Fontanet
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer,
Essilor International
Member of the Strategic Committee
Former Secretary General, UK Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Member of the Audit and Risks Committee
Chairman, Institut Français des Administrateurs
Chairman of the Appointments and Governance Committee
Member of the Audit and Risks Committee
Mr Michael Jay
Mr Daniel Lebègue
Three of the Board’s four special committees are chaired by outside
Directors (Audit and Risks Committee, Compensation Committee,
and Appointments and Governance Committee). The Chairman of
the Audit and Risks Committee became a non-voting Director at
the Annual General Meeting of 21 May 2003, for reasons of age
limitation. The Board decided to re-appoint him as Chairman of the
said Committee, given his independent status (within the meaning
of corporate governance recommendations) and in order to ensure
continuity. The Chairman of the Crédit Agricole S. A. Audit and
Risks Committee also serves as Chairman of the Calyon Audit and
Risks Committee and of the LCL-Le Crédit Lyonnais Risks and
Accounts Committee. This structure provides a global view of the
position of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s two principal subsidiaries.
During 2007, the Board’s composition was affected by the following
events:
n ratification, by the AGM of 23 May 2007, of the appointment of
Mr Jean-Paul Chifflet, Regional Bank Chief Executive Officer,
who was co-opted by the Board in January 2007, to replace
Mr Yves Couturier, who resigned from his office as Director in
November 2006;
n the appointment by the shareholders at the AGM of 23 May 2007
of Mr Michael Jay as Independent Director to fill the vacancy
of Director left by the resignation of Mr Corrado Passera in
January 2007;
n the appointment by the shareholders at the AGM of 23 May 2007
of Mr Dominique Lefèbvre, Regional Bank Chairman, to replace
Mr Roger Gobin.
The term of office of Crédit Agricole S. A. Directors is fixed at three
years by the Articles of Association. Directors may not serve for
more than four consecutive terms.
The average age of Crédit Agricole S. A. Directors is 58.3. The
Articles of Association provide for a maximum age limit of 65,
and 67 for the Chairman.
In accordance with the Group’s practice of splitting the guidance,
decision-making and control functions from the executive function,
the offices of Chairman and Chief Executive of Crédit Agricole S. A.
have been separated. This structure was confirmed by the Board at
its meeting of 18 March 2002, as permitted by the ‘New Economic
Regulations’ Act of 15 May 2001.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 17
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RAPPEL_T1 GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
CORPORATE
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
Role and modus operandi of the Board
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Board of Directors’ Charter sets out the operating procedures
of the company’s Board and General Management, while taking
into account the separation of the offices of Chairman and Chief
Executive and the company’s duties as a central body under the
terms of the Code monétaire et financier. It comprises five articles:
1 – Organisation of the Board of Directors
This section describes:
n the role of the Chairman: “The Chairman guides and organises
the Board’s work. He calls meetings of the Board and sets the
agenda for the meetings”;
n the role of the Officers of the Board (consisting of the Chairman
and Deputy Chairmen): “The Officers of the Board are responsible
for preparing the Board’s work. They meet when called by the
Chairman as needed”;
n the special committees of the Board, which defines the duties,
composition and charter of such committees. These are the
Strategic Committee, Audit and Risks Committee, Compensation
Committee, and Appointments and Governance Committee.
2 – Powers of the Board of Directors
and Chief Executive Officer
n Powers of the Board of Directors: In addition to the powers
granted by law, “on the recommendation of the Chairman and
the Chief Executive Officer, the Board determines the Group’s
strategy directions, approves strategic investment projects,
defines the general principles applicable to the Crédit Agricole
Group’s internal financial organisation, and grants the Chief
Executive Officer the necessary authorities to implement these
decisions”.
The Board “is kept informed by the General Management on a
regular basis of major risks to which the Group is exposed and
reviews the situation concerning risks of all kinds at least once
a year”. Furthermore, “the Board takes all decisions concerning
the Crédit Agricole Regional Banks and falling within the scope
of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s duties as Central Body assigned by the
Code monétaire et financier”.
n Powers of the Chief Executive Officer: The Chief Executive
Officer has “the fullest powers to act in the name of the company
in all circumstances and to represent it with respect to third
parties. He must, however, secure the Board of Directors’ approval
prior to creating, acquiring or disposing of any subsidiaries and
equity investments in France or abroad for amounts exceeding
€150 million and for any investment, of any kind whatsoever,
in an amount exceeding €150 million. If, due to the urgency
of the situation, the Board cannot be called to deliberate on a
transaction that exceeds this ceiling, the Chief Executive Officer
18 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
may, with the Chairman’s approval, make any decisions that are
in the company’s interest in the areas set forth above (that is, in
areas that are subject to a Board resolution as indicated in the
section entitled “Powers of the Board of Directors” above. He
reports such decisions to the Board at its next meeting”.
3 – Modus operandi of the Board
“The Board is convened by its Chairman and meets as often as
required by the company’s interests and at least six times each
year. The Chief Executive Officer and any Deputy Chief Executive
Officers participate in the Board meetings but do not have the right
to vote. The Board may appoint one or several non-voting Directors
who participate in the Board meetings”.
“Directors concerned by matters deliberated by the Board shall
abstain from voting on such matters”.
“The Chairman and the Chief Executive Officer are required to
supply to each Director all documents or information needed for the
Director to fulfil his duties”. Prior to Board meetings, a file is sent
out to each Director describing items on the agenda and matters
that require special analysis and prior information, providing this
does not entail any breach of confidentiality. Such documents are
sent four days before each Board meeting, on average.
All Board members receive any relevant information on the
company, in particular any press releases issued by the company.
“By exception, the Board may hold a meeting by means of
videoconferencing, providing that at least three Directors are
physically present”. Pursuant to the law, videoconferencing is not
allowable for the following decisions: review of the annual accounts
and management report, and preparation of the consolidated
accounts and the report on the Group’s management.
4 – Special Committees
Four committees have been created within the Board. Their duties,
which are described under the relevant section of the Board’s
Charter, are set out in Section 2 of this report entitled “Special
Committees”.
5 – Crédit Agricole S. A. Director’s code of conduct
A charter for Crédit Agricole S. A. Directors is being developed under
the responsibility of Appointments and Governance Committee. It
will set out recommended rules of conduct for Board members,
bearing in mind that a Code of Conduct approved by Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s Board in July 2003 has been distributed throughout
the Crédit Agricole Group. In addition, the directors report all
transactions in Crédit Agricole S. A. shares whenever the aggregate
value of such transactions exceeds €5,000 in a given calendar
year.
At its meeting of 14 November 2007, the Board was also notified
of the implications of the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive
for the disclosure of directors’ personal transactions.
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
Review of the Board of Directors’ work
during 2007
The Board met nine times during 2007 including one
extraordinary session. Board members showed a strong
commitment to their duties. The attendance rate averaged 95% in
2007, with 94% for the originally scheduled ordinary sessions and
100% for the extraordinary session.
The Board also met during a seminar in July 2007 to discuss the
progress of the development plan setting the strategic objectives of
the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group for the period 2006/2008, in France
and internationally, and to update the Group’s strategic options.
A large part of the meetings held during the second half was
dedicated to reviewing the consequences of the financial market
crisis, for the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group and, more broadly, for
the Crédit Agricole Group, following a detailed examination of this
matter by the Audit and Risks Committee.
The Board also devoted part of its work to reviewing certification
by the supervisory authorities of the Basel II system (after review
by the Audit and Risks Committee), and the institution of a specific
internal system within the Crédit Agricole Group for the treatment of
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s minority holdings under Basel II. The outline of
this system was approved at the meeting of 18 December 2007.
Following the work carried out by the Banking Commission within
the entities Crédit Agricole S. A. Group and Crédit Agricole Group,
and after review by the Audit and Risks Committee, the Board was
informed of the follow-up letters from the Banking Commission
and information to be provided in response to the observations
contained in those letters.
The other meetings were principally dedicated to:
n approving the budget for Crédit Agricole S. A. and the Group
for 2007;
n approving the annual and half-yearly financial statements and
reviewing the quarterly financial statements of Crédit Agricole S. A.,
the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group and the Crédit Agricole Group,
after their review by the Audit and Risks Committee, and after the
Committee Chairman reported to the Board. Prior to approving
the periodic statements, the Board also heard the conclusions of
the statutory auditors’ on their work, after these were submitted
to the Audit and Risks Committee;
n terms and conditions for determining the fixed and variable
compensation of the executive officers, on the recommendation
of the Compensation committee (see section 4 below);
n the Company’s corporate governance; the appointment of two
Deputy Chief Executive Officers on the recommendation of
Appointments and Governance Committee, (and determination
of their compensation, on the recommendation of Compensation
Committee), the adjustment of the composition of the special
Board committees (expand the Audit and Risks Committee by
appointing a new independent Director within that committee,
appointing a new chairman of the Appointments and Governance
Committee, appointing a Director and replacement of another
Director within the Strategic Committee);
n review of the Group’s sustainable development projects in several
business lines (securities, specialised financial services, retail
banking in Europe, asset management, private banking, etc.);
n the creation of a covered bonds company to increase and
diversify Crédit Agricole Group’s sources of funding and the
definition of the terms and conditions for implementing the
system within the Group;
n approval of the agreement between Crédit Agricole S. A. and the
Foundation for World Agriculture and Rural Life (FARM) and the
creation of a world microfinance foundation;
n as Crédit Agricole S. A.’s central body for the Crédit Agricole
Regional Banks, review of the Regional Banks’ expansion plans in
Europe and the situation of Caisse Régionale de la Corse.
In July 2007, the Board was also informed of the new organisation
of the management structures of the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group.
After the assessment carried out in 2005, and on the
recommendation of Appointments and Governance Committee,
in July 2007, the Board also decided to commission a new
assessment of its operation, with the assistance of an outside
consultant. The main conclusions of this assessment, which was
carried out between November 2007 and January 2008, were
submitted to the Appointments and Governance Committee in
February 2008 in a presentation highlighting the improvements
made since 2005 and identifying areas for improvement. In the
spring of 2008, the Board will set out guidelines to improve
its operation based on the observations made during the
assessment.
n reviewing the annual internal control report for 2006 and the
interim report on internal control (for the first half of 2007), which
was drawn up in conjunction with Group Internal Control and after
the report was reviewed by the Audit and Risks Committee;
n the review of the annual risk scorecard of the Crédit Agricole
Group, after submission to the Audit and Risks Committee;
n in the area of compliance, and after review of the matters by the
Audit and Risks Committee: the report on compliance risks within
Crédit Agricole S. A. Group, including compliance risk mapping;
a synopsis of the assessment of compliance actions carried out
within the Crédit Agricole Group; the organisation of compliance
controls at a Crédit Agricole S. A. Group subsidiary;
Related party agreements and agreements
subject to disclosure
RELATED PARTY AGREEMENTS
In 2007, three new agreements governed by the provisions
of articles L. 225-38 et seq. of the Code de commerce were
authorised by the Board. These agreements, and agreements
entered into prior to 2007 that remained in effect during in 2007,
were sent to the statutory auditors, who will present their special
report on this matter to the General Meeting of shareholders of
Crédit Agricole S. A.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 19
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RAPPEL_T1 GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
CORPORATE
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
AGREEMENTS SUBJECT TO DISCLOSURE
As required by law, a list of agreements subject to disclosure and
their purpose was sent to the Board of Directors, who then advised
the Statutory Auditors.
The modus operandi and duties of the Committee are set out in a
charter approved by the Board of Directors. The Committee’s main
duties are:
n to review Crédit Agricole S. A.’s parent company and consolidated
financial statements;
3 2 – Special Committees
Four committees have been created within the Board: the Audit
and Risks Committee, the Compensation Committee, the Strategic
Committee and the Appointments and Governance Committee.
Committee members are appointed by the Board, on the
Chairman’s recommendation. Committee members are appointed
for the duration of their term of office on the Board. The Board may
terminate the office of a Committee member at any time. Likewise,
a Committee member may resign from his office at any time. All
Committee members, and all other persons who attend Committee
meetings, are bound by professional secrecy.
Audit and Risks Committee
As of 31 December 2007, the Audit and Risks Committee
comprised eight members, including seven voting Directors and
one non-voting Director:
n
Mr Moulard (Committee Chairman), outside non-voting
Director;
n
Mr Camus, Independent Director;
n
Mr Diéval, Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chief Executive;
n
Mr Dupuy, Vice-Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole
Regional Bank Chairman;
n
Mr Drouet, Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chief Executive;
n
Mr. Jay, Independent Director;
n
Mr Lebègue, Independent Director;
n
Mr Mary, Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chief Executive.
The Board resolved to enlarge the committee with the appointment
of Mr Jay as Independent Director in July 2007. Furthermore, in
July 2007, Mr Dupuy succeeded Mr Gobin as a member.
The Group Chief Financial Officer, the Head of Group Risk
Management and Permanent Controls, the Head of Group Control
and Audit, the Secretary of the Group Internal Control Committee,
the Company Secretary and the Head of Compliance attend
meetings of the Audit and Risks Committee.
20 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
n to examine changes and amendments to the significant accounting
policies used to draw up the financial statements;
n to ensure that internal control systems and procedures are
adequate for the Group’s business activities and risks; and
n to express an opinion on proposals to appoint or re-appoint the
statutory auditors of Crédit Agricole S. A.
The Audit and Risks Committee met six times in 2007, including in
one extraordinary session. The attendance rate averaged 96%.
During the second half, the Committee devoted a large part of its
work to analysing the financial market crisis and its consequences
for Crédit Agricole S. A. and the Crédit Agricole Group before
submitting its report to the Board of Directors. The Chairman of
the committee informed the Board of the work of the Calyon Audit
and Risks Committee, of which he is also Chairman; the Calyon
managers submitted to the Crédit Agricole S. A. Audit and Risks
Committee their analysis of the trading incident at the subsidiary in
New York and the action plan that was implemented.
The Committee focused special attention on the Group’s subprime
exposure in corporate and investment banking and asset
management operations, on the current and projected situation,
and on liquidity management within the Group, as well as on
the adjustment measures taken by the Group in response to the
consequences of the financial market crisis.
During its extraordinary session in October 2007, the Committee
heard the reports of the Company’s statutory auditors without
management being present.
Other matters reviewed by the Committee during 2007:
n reviewing the annual, half-yearly and quarterly financial statements
prior to their presentation to the Board. During this session, the
Committee also heard the reports of the Company’s statutory
auditors;
n reviewing the annual and half-yearly report on internal control;
n in the area of compliance: reviewing compliance risks within
Crédit Agricole S. A. Group, the synopsis of the assessment of
compliance actions carried out within the Crédit Agricole Group,
status on relations with the regulatory authorities in the area of
compliance during the first half of 2007, review of the compliance
system at the London branch office, organisation of compliance
controls at a subsidiary of Crédit Agricole S. A. No significant
compliance failure warranting review by the Committee and,
if applicable, by the Board of Directors was brought to the
Committee’s attention in 2007;
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
n reviewing the Chairman’s report to the Annual General Meeting on
corporate governance and internal control;
n reviewing risks, provisions and sensitive matters at each balance
sheet date. The Committee continued its periodic review of
changes in the Group’s risks associated with different business
sectors. The following were reviewed: risk monitoring and
controls in international retail banking, Calyon’s exposure to
LBO risk, the Group’s positions in off-shore centres, the situation
in the US automotive sector, the risk situation at Predica, the
Crédit Agricole Group’s life insurance subsidiary, and risks in
project finance. Also reviewed were the cash CDO operations,
the issuance of structured negotiable medium-term notes (BMTN)
by the Regional Banks and the Regional Banks’ investments
in alternative funds, the risk strategy on exotic interest rate
derivatives and equity derivatives, and Calyon’s risks in Russia.
The Crédit Agricole Group’s risk scorecard at 31 December 2006
was presented to the Audit and Risks Committee prior to being
submitted to the Board;
n presentation of the programme for accelerating the Crédit
Agricole Group’s financial information production and the
permanent control system for accounting and financial information
within the Crédit Agricole Group;
n status report on implementation of the Basel II system within the
Crédit Agricole Group;
n security of access to IT systems, review of the Business Continuity
Compensation Committee
At 31 December 2007, the Compensation committee comprised
four members:
n Mr Camus (Committee Chairman), Independent Director;
n Mr Sander, Deputy Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole
Regional Bank Chairman;
n Mr Bru, Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chairman;
n Mr Pargade, Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chairman.
The Head of Group Human Resources attends Compensation
Committee meetings.
The modus operandi and duties of the Committee are set out in
a charter approved by the Board of Directors. Its key duties are
to make proposals principally concerning the fixed and variable
compensation payable to the Chairman, the Chief Executive Officer
and Deputy Chief Executive Officer(s), the total amount of Directors’
fees to be proposed for approval at the Annual General Meeting of
shareholders and its allocation among the members of the Board,
and the terms and conditions relating to the grant of stock options
under plans approved by the shareholders.
The Compensation Committee met four times in 2007 of which
two times in exceptional circumstances. The attendance rate was
100%. The Committee’s sessions in 2007 were devoted to the
following matters:
Plan system, and security projects within the Group in 2007;
n presentation of the findings following the work carried out by
the Banking Commission within Crédit Agricole S. A. and the
Crédit Agricole Group, particularly on consolidated oversight of
Crédit Agricole’s risks, prior to submitting these to the Board of
Directors;
n presentation on a regular basis of periodical control activities, with
a synopsis of the audit assignments carried out at the Regional
Banks in 2006, follow-up on the progress of the 2007 audit plan
within Crédit Agricole S. A. Group entities and, during the second
half, presentation of the findings of the assignment carried out at
Calyon New York following the trading incident;
n presentation of the issue on the treatment of Crédit Agricole S. A.
minority holdings under Basel II.
The Chairman of the Audit Committee reported to the Board on the
work accomplished at each Committee meeting. He also reported
to the Board on the work he accomplished in between Committee
meetings in his capacity as Chairman, particularly during the
second half in the climate of financial market deterioration.
A report is drawn up on each Committee meeting and distributed
to all the Directors.
COMPENSATION PAID TO EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
AND DIRECTORS
n determining the variable compensation of the Chief Executive
Officer and Deputy Chief Executive Officer in respect of 2006;
n criteria for determining fixed and variable compensation of the
executive officers (Chief Executive Officer and Deputy Chief
Executive Officer) for 2007, by reference to market practices
and performance criteria. These proposals were approved by
the Board in March 2007;
n compensation of the Chairman of Crédit Agricole S. A. for 2007,
approved by the Board in March 2007; severance package
for an outgoing corporate officer, determined by the Board in
July 2007;
n determination of the amount of fixed and variable compensation
for two new Deputy Chief Executive Officers, determined by the
Board in August 2007.
The principles and rules used to determine the compensation paid
to Executive Officers and Directors of Crédit Agricole S. A. are set
forth in section 4 below.
OTHER MATTERS REVIEWED BY THE COMMITTEE
n Directors’ fees: after review of a benchmark on Directors’ fees
paid by major comparable groups, determination of the total
amount of Directors’ fees for 2007 (approved by the Board
in March 2007, then submitted to the AGM) and proposed
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 21
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RAPPEL_T1 GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
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Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
allocation among Board members (proposal approved by
the Board in July 2007), based on their attendance record
and any duties arising from their membership on a Special
Committee;
n proposed allocation of options to purchase Crédit Agricole S. A.
shares to Crédit Agricole S. A. Group employees within the ceiling
approved by the General Meeting of May 2006;
n characteristics of the Crédit Agricole S. A. share issue reserved for
Crédit Agricole Group employees;
n review of a study on compensation paid to senior executives of
Crédit Agricole S. A. Group.
The Chairman of the Compensation Committee reported to the
Board on the work accomplished by the Committee at each of its
meetings and submitted the Committee’s recommendations on
matters subject to approval by the Board.
Strategic Committee
The Strategic Committee comprises no more than six members,
including the Officers of the Board (Chairman and Vice-Chairmen),
one Chief Executive Officer of a Regional Bank, and one outside
Director. At 31 December 2007, the Committee comprised the
following members:
work to monitoring the progress of the 2006/2008 development
plan and to reviewing:
n acquisition projects by Group subsidiaries abroad in various
business lines (specialised financial services, securities,
insurance);
n foreign investment projects under this plan, before submitting
them to the Board of Directors.
It also devoted some of its meetings to a review of updating the
Group’s strategic options and set the agenda for the Board’s
mid- year strategic review seminar.
Lastly, the Strategic Committee’s duties and responsibilities were
expanded in 2007 to encompass the sustainable development
policy, which was submitted to it at the end of the year.
Appointments and Governance Committee
The Appointments and Governance Committee comprises six
members at most. At 31 December 2007, the Committee comprised
the following members:
n Mr Lebègue (Committee Chairman), Independent Director;
n Mr Carron, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Crédit Agricole
Regional Bank Chairman;
Mr Carron (Committee Chairman), Chairman of the Board of
Directors and Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chairman;
n Mr Sander, Deputy Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole
Mr Sander, Vice-Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole
Regional Bank Chairman;
n Mr Chifflet, Vice-Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole Regional
n
Mr Chifflet, Vice-Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole
Regional Bank Chief Executive;
n Mr Michaut, Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chairman.
n
Mr Dupuy, Vice-Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole
Regional Bank Chairman;
n
Mr de Laage, Crédit Agricole Regional Bank Chief Executive;
n
Mr Fontanet, Independent Director.
n
n
The composition of the Committee was changed, with the
appointment of Mr Chifflet as Strategic Committee Member in
January 2007.
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Chief Executive Officer, Company Secretary
and Head of Strategy also attend Strategic Committee meetings.
The modus operandi and duties of the Committee are set out in a
charter approved by the Board of Directors. Its key duties are to
conduct in-depth reviews of the Group’s strategic planning for its
various business lines in France and internationally. As such, the
Committee reviews plans for strategic investments or acquisitions.
The Committee Chairman reports to the Board on the Committee’s
work.
The Strategic Committee met five times in 2007, in four
scheduled meetings and one extraordinary session. The
attendance rate was 93%. In 2007, the Committee devoted its
22 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Regional Bank Chairman;
Bank Chief Executive;
Mr Lebègue succeeded Mr Fontanet as Chairman of the Committee
in January 2007. Mr Fontanet resigned from the committee in
July 2007. In addition, Mr Chifflet was appointed Committee
Member in January 2007 and Mr Michaut was appointed Committee
Member in July 2007.
The Chief Executive Officer and Company Secretary of Crédit
Agricole S. A. also attend Appointments and Governance Committee
meetings as needed.
The modus operandi and duties of the Committee are set out in
a charter approved by the Board of Directors. The Committee’s
duties are:
n to make recommendations to the Board on the selection of
voting Directors and non-voting Directors from outside the Crédit
Agricole Group, bearing in mind that candidates for directorships
who are serving as Chairman or Chief Executive Officer of a
Regional Bank are proposed to the Board of Directors via the
holding company that controls Crédit Agricole S. A., pursuant
to the ‘Protocol Agreement’ signed prior to the initial public
offering of Crédit Agricole S. A. by the Regional Banks and Crédit
Agricole S. A. (the provisions of this agreement are set out in
the registration document of 22 October 2001 registered by the
Commission des Opérations de Bourse under number R01-453);
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
n with respect to Executive Officers and Directors:
n to issue an opinion on the Board Chairman’s recommendations
for the appointment of the Chief Executive Officer, in accordance
with the Board of Directors’ Charter, and on the Chief Executive
Officer’s recommendations on the appointment of Deputy Chief
Executive Officers, in accordance with the Board Charter,
n with respect to the succession of the Executive Officers, the
Committee implements a procedure for preparing succession
plans for the Executive Officers in the event of an unforeseeable
vacancy;
On the recommendation of Appointments and Governance
Committee, and based on the definition contained in the aforesaid
IFA report, the Board reviewed the situation of all of its members
and found that Messrs Camus, Fontanet, Jay and Lebègue could
be considered to be independent Directors insofar as they are not
in a position that is likely to influence their independent judgement
or to put them in a conflict of interest situation, now or in the
future.
Lastly, the Committee recommended that the Board submit the
nomination of an Independent Director to the General Meeting of
21 May 2008.
n to oversee the Board of Directors assessment process. In this
respect, it recommends any necessary changes in the rules of
governance of Crédit Agricole S. A. (charters governing the Board
and the special committees, etc.).
The committee met twice in 2007. The attendance rate was 92%.
The Committee proposed that the Board recommend to the
shareholders at the AGM the appointment of an independent
Director to replace Mr Passera, who resigned from his office as
Director in January 2007. Mr Jay’s nomination was approved by the
shareholders at the AGM of 23 May 2007.
In addition, when presenting the new organisation of the Crédit
Agricole S. A. Group, the Committee issued a favourable opinion
on the Chief Executive Officer’s proposal to submit to the Board for
approval the appointment of two Deputy Chief Executive Officers of
Crédit Agricole S. A., at the meeting held in July 2007.
After the assessment carried out in 2005, the Committee proposed
to the Board to carry out a new assessment, with the assistance
of an outside consultant. This assessment was approved by the
Board in July and was carried out between November 2007 and
January 2008. Its main findings were submitted to the Committee
in February 2008 in a presentation highlighting the improvements
made since 2005 and identifying areas for improvement. In the spring
of 2008, the Board will set out guidelines to improve its operation
based on the observations made during the assessment.
During the same meeting, in February 2008, the Committee
examined Crédit Agricole S. A.’s situation with respect to the
guidelines applying to independent Directors (IFA Corporate
Governance Report, May 2007). It found that Crédit Agricole S. A.
has fewer independent Directors than the number generally
recommended for companies controlled by a majority shareholder.
This shortfall naturally is reflected in the proportion of independent
Directors sitting on the special committees.
The Committee concluded that “the existing modus operandi
enabled the Board and its committees to fulfil their duties with the
required effectiveness, objectivity and independence, particularly
with respect to preventing potential conflicts of interest and to the
equitable consideration of all shareholders’ interests”. The Board
approved this assessment at its meeting of March 2008, when
it discussed the composition and modus operandi of the Board
and its special committees with regard to the aforesaid corporate
governance guidelines.
3 3 – Restrictions on the Chief
Executive Officer’s Powers exercised
by the Board of Directors
The Chief Executive Officer has the fullest powers to act in the
name of Crédit Agricole S. A. in all circumstances and to represent
the Bank with respect to third parties. He may exercise his authority
within the limits of the company’s object and subject to that
authority expressly reserved for General Meetings of shareholders
and the Board of Directors.
Restrictions on the Chief Executive Officer’s powers exercised by
the Board of Directors are described in section 1 above.
3 4 – Principles and rules
for determining the compensation
of executive officers
On the recommendation of the Compensation Committee, the
Board approves the principles for determining compensation paid
to Executive Officers and Directors of Crédit Agricole S. A., the
amount of which appears in the section entitled “Information on
Executive Officers and Directors”.
Compensation of the Chairman
of the Board of Directors
The fixed component of the compensation paid to the Chief
Executive Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A. is determined by the
Board, on the Compensation Committee’s recommendation, using
a benchmark drawn up by an outside consultant, by reference to
compensation paid to executives holding similar offices in major
listed companies. The Board approved this recommendation at its
meeting of 6 March 2007.
The Chairman also receives a bonus to fund his pension. The
Company also provides accommodation and the use of a car.
The amount of the bonus and the value of the housing allowance
appear in the Crédit Agricole S. A. registration document.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 23
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Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
The Board did not grant the Chairman any stock options under the
Crédit Agricole S. A. stock option plans approved by the Board, as
authorised by the General Meeting.
Compensation of the Chief Executive Officer
and Deputy Chief Executive Officers
The principles described below pertaining to the variable
compensation of the Chief Executive Officer and Deputy Chief
Executive Officer, who is also in charge of Calyon, were approved
by the Board in March 2007 and apply to variable compensation
payable to the Executive Officers in 2008 in respect of 2007.
The fixed and variable compensation paid to the Deputy Chief
Executive Officers appointed by the Board, on the recommendation
of the Appointments and Governance Committee, as from
1 September 2007, was determined by the Board at its meetings of
29 August 2007 and 4 March 2008.
COMPENSATION OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
COMPENSATION OF THE DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE
OFFICER OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A., WHO IS ALSO
IN CHARGE OF CALYON
The fixed and variable compensation of the Deputy Chief Executive
Officer in charge of Calyon is determined by Calyon’s Board, on
the recommendation of Calyon’s Compensation Committee, after
review by Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Compensation Committee. This
compensation is submitted to the Crédit Agricole S. A. Board of
Directors for review.
The fixed component of the Deputy Chief Executive Officer’s
compensation is determined by reference to market practice for
deputy chief executive officers.
The variable component, which is capped, is based on two sets
of criteria:
n quantitative criteria, assigned a weighting of 70% in respect of
2007 and reflecting:
n changes in Crédit Agricole S. A. financial performance indicators
The fixed component of the Chief Executive Officer’s compensation
is determined by reference to market practices, using a benchmark
recommended by the Compensation Committee.
(with a weighting of 21%), which are identical to those applied
to the Chief Executive Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A.: change in
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s net banking income (with a weighting of
7%) and earnings per share (with a weighting of 14%),
The variable component, which is capped, is based on two sets
of criteria:
n the change in an indicator of Calyon’s financial performance,
n quantitative criteria, assigned a weighting of 40% for 2007,
reflecting changes in Crédit Agricole S. A. financial performance
indicators, including the change in Crédit Agricole S. A.’s net
banking income (with a weighting of 12%) and earnings per share
(with a weighting of 28%);
n qualitative criteria, assigned a weighting of 60% for 2007,
reflecting: i) the design of the Group’s new development plan
and its international expansion; and ii) the assimilation of foreign
acquisitions and the continued implementation of the corporate
strategic plan and the system for managing senior executives.
For the quantitative criteria, the Chief Executive Officer’s
performance is assessed by comparing results achieved with the
targets defined by the Board for each indicator. For the qualitative
criteria, overall performance is assessed.
The bonus is based on a target value of 100%, up to a maximum
of 120%.
The Chief Executive Officer has the use of a company car. He does
not have the use of company accommodation.
The Chief Executive Officer is not eligible for any special pension
benefits approved by the Board. He is covered by the supplemental
pension plan established for the Group’s key executives, which
cannot be individualised, and the general characteristics of which
are described in the registration document.
24 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
based on GOI after risk-related costs, with a weighting of 49%;
n qualitative criteria, assigned a weighting of 30% for 2007 and
focused on cooperation among business lines in France and
abroad, cooperation with retail banking in France, managing the
Calyon executive teams, participation in managing the Group’s
executive resources, and progress in implementing the corporate
strategic plan.
The Deputy Chief Executive Officer’s performance is assessed
using the same criteria as for the Chief Executive Officer.
The amount of the bonus is based on a target value of 100%, up to
a maximum of 150%.
In addition to the performance evaluation based on meeting
the above criteria, the Board may grant additional variable
compensation, in the form of an exceptional bonus, as a function
of Calyon’s overall performance.
At its meeting of 17 July 2007, the Board of Directors duly noted
the resignation of the Deputy Chief Executive Officer in charge
of Calyon from his office as Deputy Chief Executive Officer of
Crédit Agricole S. A., effective as of 1 September 2007.
At its meeting of 29 August 2007, the Board of Directors of
Crédit Agricole S. A. appointed two new Deputy Chief Executive
Officers.
The fixed component of compensation paid to the Deputy Chief
Executive Officer in charge of French retail banking and Group
Marketing Strategy and of the Deputy Chief Executive Officer in
charge of International Development was determined by reference
to market practice for Deputy Chief Executive officers.
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
On the recommendation of the Compensation Committee, the Board
resolved that the variable component of the compensation payable
to the two new Deputy Chief Executive Officers in respect of 2007
would be fixed at 70% of their annual fixed compensation and
paid on a pro rata basis as from the date of their appointment. The
quantitative and qualitative performance criteria recommended by the
Compensation Committee for determining the variable compensation
of the two Deputy Chief Executive Officers in respect of 2008 were set
out in a resolution adopted by the Board at its March 2008 meeting.
The Chief Executive Officer, the Deputy Chief Executive Officer
in charge of Calyon and the Deputy Chief Executive Officer in
charge of International Business Development are covered by
the supplemental pension plan established for the Group’s key
executives, which cannot be individualised.
When applying stock option plans, on the recommendation of
Compensation Committee, the Board determines the number of
options granted to the Chief Executive Officer and to the Deputy
Chief Executive Officers.
Compensation of Directors
of total Directors’ fees to be submitted to the shareholders for
approval at the General Meeting. The conditions for allocating
Directors’ fees, as described below, are determined by the Board
on the recommendation of the Compensation Committee.
Compensation of Board members is based entirely on their
attendance at Board meetings. Directors receive the same
compensation for attending extraordinary sessions as regularly
scheduled meetings, up to a maximum of 10 meetings per year,
and each Board member may compensate between regularly
scheduled meetings and extraordinary sessions.
The Chairmen of the four special Board committees receive an
annual set fee, which varies by committee. Committee members
receive a set fee for each committee meeting they attend.
The amount of the set fee per Board meeting and committee
meeting is determined by the Board each year.
The Board has also set up a system for reimbursing Board members
for travel expenses, based on costs incurred by each member for
attending Board and committee meetings. This system is renewed
by the Board each year.
Board members receive Directors’ fees. On the recommendation of
the Compensation Committee, the Board determines the amount
»
INTERNAL CONTROL PROCEDURES
The Crédit Agricole Group’s internal control system complies
with all legal and regulatory requirements as well as with Basel
Committee recommendations.
The internal control system is defined as all procedures and
mechanisms designed to manage and control operations and risks
of all kinds and to ensure that all transactions are carried out in a
manner that is secure, effective and proper, in terms of complying
with laws, regulations and internal standards, in accordance with
the references listed in item 1 below.
The internal control system and procedures can be classified by
their purpose:
n financial performance, through effective and adequate use of the
Group’s assets and resources, and protection against the risk of
loss;
n timely provision of comprehensive, accurate information required
to take decisions and manage risks;
n compliance with internal and external regulations;
However, all internal control systems have their limitations, due
primarily to technical or human deficiencies.
In accordance with the Group’s principles, the internal control
system has a broad scope of application to cover supervision
and control of activities and to measure and monitor risks on a
consolidated basis. Each Group entity applies this principle to its
own subsidiaries, thereby ensuring a consistent internal control
system throughout the entire Group. The system implemented by
Crédit Agricole S. A., in line with the standards and principles set
forth below, is adapted and deployed across the various business
lines and risks at each level within the Crédit Agricole Group.
Through the procedures, tools and reporting systems that have
been implemented in this standardised framework, information is
delivered on a regular basis to the Board, the Audit Committee, the
Executive Officers and management on the operation of the internal
control systems and their adequacy (permanent and periodical
controls, reports on risk monitoring measurements, corrective
action plans, etc.).
n prevention and detection of fraud and error;
n accuracy and completeness of accounting records and timely
production of reliable accounting and financial information.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 25
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Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
3 1 – General internal
control environment
The general internal control environment and principles are in
keeping with the provisions of the Code monétaire et financier (1) ,
CRBF regulation no. 97-02 as amended(2), the AMF General
Regulation and Basel Committee recommendations on internal
control, risk management and solvency.
Fundamental principles
The organisational principles and components of the Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s internal control system that are common to all
Crédit Agricole Group entities cover obligations in terms of:
n reporting to the decision-making body (risk strategies, risk limits,
internal control activity and results);
n direct involvement of the executive body in the organisation and
These national and international external standards are
supplemented by internal standards specific to Crédit Agricole:
operation of the internal control system;
n comprehensive coverage of all business operations and risks,
n a body of permanent rules (both external regulations and internal
rules) governing the entire Crédit Agricole Group, compliance
with which is compulsory, and more particularly rules concerning
accounting (Crédit Agricole chart of accounts) and financial
management;
n the Code of Conduct of the Crédit Agricole Group;
n recommendations of the Regional Banks’ Executive Committee
for Internal Control;
n a set of procedures governing the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group,
concerning the company’s organisation and operation, and its
exposure to risk. In 2004, Crédit Agricole S. A. adopted a set of
procedures for controlling compliance with laws and regulations.
These procedures have since been adapted to changes in
regulations and deployed within the Group entities, in particular
in the areas of financial security (prevention of money laundering
and terrorism financing, etc.) and in the identification of failures
in applying laws, regulations, professional and compliance
standards, for example. These procedures are updated regularly
as required, and more particularly to take account of regulatory
developments and changes in the internal control scope.
3 2 – Organisation of the internal
control system
To ensure that the internal control systems are effective and
consistent throughout the Group, Crédit Agricole has established
a set of common rules and recommendations based on certain
underlying fundamental principles.
Each Crédit Agricole Group entity (Regional Banks, Crédit
Agricole S. A., banking or investment subsidiaries, and other
subsidiaries) must apply these principles at its own local level.
and accountability of all persons involved;
n clear definition of tasks, effective segregation of the commitment
and control functions, formal up-to-date authorised limits;
n formal, up-to-date standards and procedures, particularly for the
accounting function.
These principles are supplemented by:
n measurement, supervision and control mechanisms for credit
risk, financial risk, operational risk (transaction processing, quality
of financial and accounting information, information systems
processes) and compliance and legal risk;
n a control system, forming part of a dynamic and corrective
process, encompassing permanent controls, which are carried
out by the operating units themselves or by dedicated staff, and
periodic controls carried out by Group Control and Audit and
internal audit units of subsidiaries.
Supervision
In accordance with the changes instituted by Regulation 97-02 on
internal control and pertaining to the organisation of the control
functions, every individual who is responsible for an entity or
business line, every manager, employee and department within
the Group was reminded of their obligation to report and to be
in a position at all times to demonstrate that they have adequate
control over their business activities and the associated risks, in
accordance with the standards applicable to banking and financial
operations, to ensure the sustainable security of each activity and
development project and to adjust the control mechanisms to be
implemented to the intensity of risk incurred.
This requirement is based on organisational principles and
architecture of responsibilities, operating and decision-making
procedures, controls and reports to be followed in a formal,
effective manner at each level of the Group, including the head
offices, business lines, subsidiaries, operational units and support
functions.
(1) Article L. 511-41.
(2) Relating to internal control in financial institutions and investment companies, in application of the article referred to above, approved on 11 March 1997 and
amended by the Ministry of Finance decrees of 31 March 2005, 20 February 2007 and 2 July 2007.
26 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
THE GROUP INTERNAL CONTROL COMMITTEE
In accordance with the principles adopted during the previous year,
the Group Internal Control Committee, the body that oversees all
the systems, held periodic meetings chaired by the Chief Executive
Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A.
The purpose of this committee is to reinforce cross-functional
actions to be implemented within the Crédit Agricole Group. It is
responsible for reviewing internal control issues common to the
Group as a whole (Crédit Agricole S. A., subsidiaries of Crédit
Agricole S. A., the Regional Banks, resource pooling entities) and to
ascertain the consistency and effectiveness of internal control on a
consolidated basis. The Committee is a decision-making body and
its decisions are enforceable. It is composed of salaried executives
of Crédit Agricole S. A. In this respect, it is unlike the Audit and
Risk Committee, which is an arm of the Board of Directors.
The Committee is responsible for coordinating the three control
functions: Control and Audit, Risk Management and Permanent
Controls, Compliance.
THREE CONTROL BUSINESS LINES FOR THE GROUP
The Permanent Controls Officer, who is a member of Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s Executive Committee, is in charge of the Group
Risk Management and Permanent Controls Department, and the
Periodical Controls Officer, who is in charge of Group Control
and Audit report directly to the CEO of Crédit Agricole S. A. The
Head of Compliance reports to Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Company
Secretary, who sits on the Executive Committee. The Periodical
Controls, Permanent Controls and Compliance Officers have
extensive access to the Audit and Risks Committee and to the
Crédit Agricole S. A. Board of Directors.
The control functions are responsible for supporting the business
lines and functional units to ensure that all transactions are carried
out in a manner that is secure, effective and proper. Responsibilities
are divided as follows:
n the
Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls
Department (DRG) is responsible for oversight and control of
credit, financial and operational risks; it is also in charge of
third-line control of accounting and financial information and
of monitoring IT systems security and business continuity plan
deployment;
n the Compliance Department (DDC) and Legal Affairs Department
(DAJ) are responsible for compliance and legal risk prevention
and control. The Compliance Department is responsible for
prevention of money-laundering and terrorism financing,
compliance with embargos and obligations to freeze assets;
n Group Control and Audit is responsible for independent periodical
control to ensure that all Crédit Agricole Group entities are
operating properly.
In addition to the actions of the different control functions, the other
Crédit Agricole S. A. central functions, departments and business
lines participate in implementing internal control systems on a
consolidated basis, either through special committees or through
actions designed to standardise procedures and to centralise data
(accounting, management control, etc.).
Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries
The support functions, departments and business lines in turn
are supported by decentralised local units within each legal entity
(those direct subsidiaries forming part of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
internal control scope), comprising:
n Internal Control Committees, which meet quarterly: these are
executive decision-making bodies, which include the Chief
Executive Officer of the unit and the representatives of the
Crédit Agricole S. A. control functions, responsible mainly for a
critical assessment of the internal control systems and internal
audit work, monitoring audits and overseeing any corrective
measures;
n each entity’s special committees;
n a network of officers and committees dedicated to each business
line.
Crédit Agricole Regional Banks
For the Regional Banks, application of the Group rules and
procedures defined above is facilitated by the publication of
national recommendations on internal control by the Plenary
Internal Control Committee of the Regional Banks and by the Crédit
Agricole S. A. central control functions. The Plenary Committee,
which is in charge of strengthening oversight of internal control for
the Regional Banks, is composed of Regional Bank Chief Executive
Officers, executive managers and internal control officers, and of
representatives of Crédit Agricole S. A. Its scope was extended
by holding regular regional meetings and working and information
conferences between the Crédit Agricole S. A. internal control
officers and their counterparts at the Regional Banks.
Because of its role as central body, Crédit Agricole S. A. is
extremely active and vigilant in the area of internal control.
Crédit Agricole S. A. specifically monitors the Regional Banks’ risks
and controls through the Regional Banks’ Risk Management and
Permanent Controls Department and Compliance Department.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS (1)
The Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S. A. is aware of the
company’s overall organisational structure and approves its
internal control system. It is informed of internal control activities
and results and receives the annual and interim reports on internal
control, in accordance with banking regulations and Crédit
Agricole S. A. procedures. The Chairman of the Board receives
regular reports summarising the conclusions of audits conducted
by Group Control and Audit.
(1) Information on the Board of Directors’ work is detailed in the “Corporate Governance” section of this report.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 27
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Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
The Board is informed of the main risks incurred by the Company
by the Audit and Risks Committee.
The Chairman of the Crédit Agricole S. A. Audit and Risks Committee
reports to the Board on the Committee’s work in general and, more
particularly, on the presentation of the interim and annual report on
internal control and on risk measurement and monitoring. As of the
date of the Annual General Meeting, the annual report for 2007 will
have been presented to the Audit and Risks Committee and duly
sent to the French Banking Commission and the Statutory Auditors.
It will also have been presented to the Board of Directors.
this respect, the Chief Executive Officer receives regular reports
summarising the conclusions of audits conducted by Group
Control and Audit.
3 3 – Internal control procedures
and risk management and
supervision within Crédit Agricole
Risk measurement and supervision
ROLE OF AUDIT AND RISKS COMMITTEE
(1)
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Internal Control Officers report to the Audit
and Risks Committee created by Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Board of
Directors.
A key aspect of the Committee’s role is to verify the clarity of
information provided and to assess the appropriateness of
accounting methods and the quality of internal control. As such, it
has broad powers to request and receive any information relating
to periodical control, permanent control, including accounting and
financial information, and compliance control.
It receives periodic reports on the activity management systems
and risk measurement. An interim report on internal control and
risk measurement and supervision for the first half of 2007 was
presented to the Committee at its meeting of 8 November 2007.
The annual report for 2007 will be presented to the Committee at
its meeting of 24 April 2008.
The Chairman of the Audit and Risks Committee also receives
regular reports summarising the conclusions of audits conducted
by Group Control and Audit.
Crédit Agricole S. A. has risk measurement, supervision and control
systems covering all risks (counterparty risk, financial risk, market
risk, operational risk, legal and compliance risk, etc.), which are
adapted to its business activities and organisation, and form an
integral part of the internal control system. Information is reported
periodically to the Management Committee, the Board of Directors
and the Audit and Risks Committee, notably through the reports on
internal control and risk measurement and supervision.
Detailed information on risk management is presented in the
management report and in a separate note to the consolidated
financial statements.
We note that an incident occurred during the summer of 2007 in
proprietary trading operations in the Credit Markets & CDO product
line at Calyon New York. This incident was rapidly detected and
appropriate disclosure was made by the Group’s decision-making
and control bodies (particularly the Audit Committee) and steps
were taken immediately vis-à-vis local management. Following
this incident, Calyon initiated a programme consisting of eleven
projects organised around three focuses:
n governance, through a review of the operation of the Market Risk
ROLE OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER REGARDING
INTERNAL CONTROL
The Chief Executive Officer defines the company’s general
organisation and oversees its implementation by competent
qualified staff. He is directly and personally involved in the
organisation and operation of the internal control system. His
key responsibilities in this respect are as follows: defining roles
and responsibilities and allocating adequate resources to the
internal control function; ensuring that risk strategies and limits are
compatible with the financial position (capital base, earnings) and
strategic guidelines set by the Board of Directors; overseeing the
implementation of risk identification and measurement systems that
are appropriate for the company’s activities and organisation; and
ensuring that all essential information produced by these systems
is reported to him on a regular basis; ensuring the adequacy and
effectiveness of the internal control system through permanent
monitoring; receiving information on any failures identified by the
internal control system and the proposed corrective measures; in
and New Products and New Activities Committees, and of the
alert process;
n the control system, with a review of the market risk management
procedure and strengthened follow-up on activities;
n reporting, with enhanced financial statements to be provided to
the bank’s management.
Each project has been assigned to a clearly identified manager. A
monitoring committee has kept track of overall progress. It reports
to the Deputy Chief Executive Officer in charge of risks and support
functions. In the light of the February 2008 Lagarde Report, and as
of the date of this report, some of these systems have undergone
additional review.
Furthermore, as the financial crisis intensified in the autumn of
2007, the Group decided to draw up a master plan for Calyon’s
risks.
(1) Information on the Audit and Risk Committee’s work is detailed in the “Corporate Governance” section of this report.
28 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
The Risk Management and Permanent Controls function created
in 2006 in accordance with the changes instituted by Regulation
97-02 continued to round out its organisation and actions in 2007.
The DRG also coordinates the application of an appropriate
permanent control system for the Group overall (definition of key
controls by type of risks, organisation of reporting on results to
the relevant levels of consolidation within the Group based on
differentiated inclusion criteria).
The Risk Management and Permanent Controls function is
responsible both for overall risk management and for the Group’s
permanent control system. It manages and controls credit, financial
and operational risks, in particular those associated with the quality
of financial and accounting information and with physical security,
IT systems security, business continuity and supervision of key
outsourced services.
The DRG framework also includes a Business Line Monitoring
function that is in charge of general and individual relationships
between each Crédit Agricole S. A. Group subsidiary and the DRG.
Officers are appointed to monitor the business lines and are in
charge of the global and consolidated relationship (covering all
types of risks) with each Group subsidiary, especially in Corporate
and Investment Banking (Calyon).
The function reports to the Head of Group Risk Management
and Permanent Controls, who is not attached to any operational
function and in turn reports to the Chief Executive Officer of Crédit
Agricole S. A. It brings together the cross-functional departments
of Crédit Agricole S. A. (Group Risk Management and Permanent
Controls) and the decentralised risk management and permanent
controls functions, which are closest to the business lines, at each
Group entity, in France and abroad. The function employs 2,000
full-time equivalents within the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group scope.
Regional Bank risks are supervised by a special dedicated function,
which reports up the line to the DRG.
Risk Management and Permanent Controls
Its operation is based on structured governance bodies, including
the Internal Control Committees, the Group Risk Management
Committee (the forum where the Chief Executive approves the
Group’s strategies and is informed of its risk exposure), the Regional
Banks’ Risk Monitoring Committee, the Group Security Committee,
the Standards and Methodology Committee, the Basel II Steering
Committee, the Permanent Controls Steering Committee, the
Business Line Monitoring Committees, which bring together in
regularly scheduled meetings the Group Risk Management and
Permanent Controls Department and the subsidiaries, and other
committees in charge of the rating and IT systems. The Audit
Committee and Board of Directors are kept informed of risk
strategies and risk exposure on a regular basis.
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. CROSS-FUNCTIONAL
DEPARTMENTS (GROUP RISK MANAGEMENT AND
PERMANENT CONTROLS DEPARTMENT)
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Group Risk Management and Permanent
Controls Department (DRG) is responsible for monitoring and
managing the Group’s overall risk and permanent control systems.
The DRG oversees and measures overall risks for the consolidated
entity through specialised units for each category of risk; it defines
and implements risk management and consolidation systems
(standards, methodologies, IT systems and reporting systems).
The system applies more specifically to financial risks, and a special
Group financial risk consolidation project was initiated at the
beginning of 2007. Furthermore, in the current climate of financial
crisis, a system for closely monitoring liquidity risks was instituted
in 2007, underpinned mainly by a weekly committee chaired by the
Chief Executive Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A.
DECENTRALISED RISK MANAGEMENT
AND PERMANENT CONTROLS FUNCTIONS
AT EACH BUSINESS LINE
Within Crédit Agricole S. A. Group
Deployment at the business line is in the form of a hierarchical
business line with the appointment of a Risk Management and
Permanent Controls officer (RCPR) for each subsidiary or business
line. The Business Line RCPR reports up the line to the Group
RCPR and functionally to the executive body of the relevant
business line. This safeguards the independence of the local Risk
Management and Permanent Controls Departments.
Acting under the responsibility of its own RCPR, each subsidiary or
business line secures the resources it needs for managing its risks
and to ensure the compliance of its permanent control system, in
order to obtain a comprehensive, consolidated view of its risks that
will guarantee the entity’s sustainability across its internal control
scope.
Relationships between each subsidiary or business line with the
Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls Department are
based on the following main principles:
n each subsidiary or business line applies the cross-functional
standards and procedures defined by the DRG;
n each subsidiary or business line defines its own risk strategy,
which is approved by the Group Risk Management Committee
on the DRG’s recommendation, specifying the global limits on the
entity’s commitments;
n each subsidiary or business line enters into an operating
agreement with the DRG; this agreement is periodically revised
and specifies the procedures to be applied within the entity to
apply Group risk management and permanent controls rules to its
own operations, and namely the format for reporting to DRG;
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 29
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RAPPEL_T1 GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
CORPORATE
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
n authority is delegated from the Group RCPR to the Business
Line RCPRs, which report up the line to Group RCPR in carrying
out their duties; these officers are also subject to disclosure and
early warning obligations vis-à-vis the Group Risk Management
Department;
n a Business Line Monitoring Committee periodically brings
together the DRG and the entity to review the quality of the
risk management and permanent control system, including in
corporate and investment banking (Calyon).
Regional Banks
Banking regulations on risks apply to each Regional Bank
individually. Each Regional Bank has a Risk Management and
Permanent Controls Officer, who reports to his Chief Executive
Officer and is in charge of risk management oversight and
compliance of his entity’s permanent control system.
As the central body for the Regional Banks, Crédit Agricole S. A.
consolidates the risks borne by the Regional Banks and manages
their Risk Management and Permanent Controls function via the
Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls Department
by circulating the appropriate procedures to the Regional Banks,
particularly for implementing the Group permanent control system.
Furthermore, large credit exposures borne by the Regional
Banks must be presented to Foncaris, a credit institution that is
a 100%-owned subsidiary of Crédit Agricole S. A., which partially
guarantees such exposures. The requirement that the Regional
Banks must ask Foncaris to guarantee their main transactions gives
the central body an effective tool for assessing the associated risk
before accepting it.
INTERNAL CONTROL SYSTEM FOR INFORMATION
SYSTEMS SECURITY AND BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANS
The Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls Division
has set up organisations at Group level, inter alia in the areas
of governance and security organisation, giving Crédit Agricole
unified, consistent oversight across its entire scope and the
wherewithal to standardise its systems.
All Group entities (the subsidiaries and Regional Banks) have
implemented the system, which entails appointing a person in
charge of IT systems security (RSSI), a person in charge of the
business continuity plan (RPCA) and setting up crisis units at
several levels (entity, community, by business line and nationally).
The RPCA and RSSI are responsible for setting up user backup
plans and for ensuring they are operational through gradual
deployment of business continuity plans exercises, and for
ensuring IT systems security, primarily in the area of intrusion
detection, in compliance with Group regulations and standards.
The Group permanent control system, which was reinforced at
30 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
the beginning of 2007, provides for a minimum base of mandatory
controls for all entities in business continuity plans and IT systems
security, with results reported to the Group Risk Management and
Permanent Controls Division.
Internal control system for accounting
and financial information
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PREPARATION
AND PROCESSING OF FINANCIAL INFORMATION
In keeping with the applicable rules within the Group, the
organisational principles and responsibilities of the Group Finance
Department functions are set out in a procedure.
The Central Finance Function is organised as a business line within
the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group. The heads of the finance function
for a business line or subsidiary report up the line to the head of the
business line or subsidiary and to the Group Finance Director.
At each business line, the Finance Department acts as a relay for
circulating the Group’s principles with respect to standards and
information system organisation, as a function of each business
line’s special attributes; in some cases, it also constitutes an
intermediate level for preparation of the business line’s accounting
and business management information.
Each business line and/or entity must have the resources to ensure
that accounting and management information transmitted to the
Group for consolidation purposes is reliable. It must ensure that
data conform to Group accounting standards and are consistent
with the individual accounts approved by its decision-making
body, and it is responsible for reconciliation of accounting and
management data.
Within the Group Finance Department, three functions are primarily
responsible for preparation of published accounting and financial
information: Accounting, Management Control and Financial
Communication.
ACCOUNTING
The main purpose of the Accounting function is to draw up the
parent company accounts of Crédit Agricole S. A., the consolidated
accounts of the Crédit Agricole S. A. and Crédit Agricole Groups,
and segment reporting for the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group based on
the Financial Communication function’s definition of the business
lines. In accordance with applicable regulations, the Accounting
function defines and circulates the accounting standards and
principles that apply to the Group. It oversees accounting
standards, lays down the rules governing the architecture of the
accounting information and regulatory reporting system, and
manages the accounting processes for account consolidation and
regulatory reporting.
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
MANAGEMENT CONTROL
MANAGEMENT DATA
In the preparation of financial information, the Management Control
function defines the rules for allocating economic capital (definition,
allocation policy, consistency of profitability measurement tools)
and draws up the medium-term business plan and budget for the
Crédit Agricole S. A. Group. To fulfil its mission, Group Management
Control sets out procedures and methods of management
control and the architecture and rules for managing the Group’s
management control system.
Management data is produced by the Management Control function
of the Group Finance Division or the Group Risk Management
Division. Each business line and/or subsidiary forwards its
management information to Crédit Agricole S. A. after reconciling it
with its own accounting information.
FINANCIAL COMMUNICATION
In accordance with AMF and CESR recommendations, the use of
management data for preparing published financial information
meets the following guidelines:
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Financial Communication and Investor
Relations function is responsible for information published in press
releases and presentations to shareholders, financial analysts,
institutional investors and the press. This information is also
contained in documents subject to approval by the Autorité des
marchés financiers (AMF). In this respect, working under the
responsibility of the Chief Executive Officer and Crédit Agricole S. A.
Group’s Finance Director, the Financial Communication function
provides the basis for presentations of Crédit Agricole S. A. Group
results and all general information on the Group needed to enable
third parties to formulate an opinion, particularly on the Group’s
financial strength, profitability and outlook.
PROCEDURES FOR PREPARATION AND PROCESSING
OF FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Each Group entity has responsibility, vis-à-vis the Group and the
supervisory authorities to which it reports, for its own financial
statements, which are approved by its decision-making body.
Depending on the entity’s size, these financial statements are
subject to prior review by the entity’s Audit Committee, if it has
one.
As for the Crédit Agricole Regional Banks, once their financial
statements are drawn up, they are approved by the Accounting
Division of Crédit Agricole S. A.; this is one of its responsibilities
as central body, in accordance with Article R.512-11 of the Code
monétaire et financier.
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s consolidated financial statements
are submitted to the Audit Committee and approved by the Board
of Directors of Crédit Agricole S. A.
Most published financial information is based on accounting data
and on management data.
ACCOUNTING DATA
Figures for each individual entity are drawn up in accordance with
the accounting standards applicable where the entity operates. For
Group consolidated financial statement preparation purposes, the
local accounts are restated to conform with IFRS principles and
methods adopted by the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group.
In 2007, projects identified as part of the programme for accelerating
the time to publication for the Crédit Agricole Group’s consolidated
financial statements were initiated by Group entities.
Furthermore, external sources of information, such as the European
Central Bank and Bank of France, may be used for management
data, particularly for calculating market shares.
n the type of published financial information as defined by European
regulation No. 809/2004: historical information, pro forma data,
projections or trends;
n a clear description of the sources from which the financial
information was drawn. When published data are not extracted
directly from accounting information, the sources and definition
of calculation methods are mentioned to give investors a better
understanding;
n comparability of figures and indicators over time, which implies
ongoing use of the same sources, calculation methods and
methodologies.
DESCRIPTION OF PERMANENT ACCOUNTING
CONTROL SYSTEM
The permanent accounting control function, which reports up the
line to DRG as well as to the Group Finance Director, continued to
structure its organisation. The Group permanent accounting control
function is based on cross-linking the network of risk management
and permanent controls officers of the subsidiaries and Regional
Banks. It is directly in charge of carrying out control missions on
the functions that prepare Crédit Agricole S. A. Group financial
information.
The unit has four key roles:
n to define the standards and organisational and operational
principles of permanent controls within the Crédit Agricole
Group;
n to assess the quality of Group processes for producing and
verifying published accounting and financial information and
the system for monitoring risks associated with this information
implemented within the Crédit Agricole Group;
n to supervise and follow up on corrective measures implemented
at Group level;
n to report on the assessment of permanent controls on accounting
and financial information to the Group’s internal control oversight
committees and, at their request, to the decision-making body or
to the Audit and Risk Committee.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 31
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CORPORATE
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
In 2007, the priorities were placed on implementing quality
monitoring indicators for the account closing process within the
Group and on continuing to build the methodology databases for
the system.
PERSONAL INSURANCE BUSINESS LINE
In Life Insurance, Predica had appealed a French Insurance Control
Authority (Autorité de Contrôle des Assurances et Mutuelles) ruling,
mainly on guaranteed-rate policies, to the Council of State. During
2007, the Council of State confirmed this decision.
RELATIONS WITH THE STATUTORY AUDITORS
The registration document, its updates, and offering circulars and
prospectuses prepared for new share or debt issues, which contain
comprehensive financial information, are subject to approval or
registration by the AMF.
In accordance with French professional standards, the Statutory
Auditors perform those procedures they deem appropriate on
published financial and accounting information:
n audit of the parent-company and consolidated financial
statements;
n partial audit of half-year consolidated financial statements;
n overall review of quarterly financial information and materials
used as a basis for presenting financial information to financial
analysts.
As part of the duties assigned to them by law, the Statutory
Auditors submit to Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Board of Directors and
Audit Committee their observations on the financial and accounting
information they have reviewed in carrying out their assignment.
Compliance risk prevention and controls
Crédit Agricole S. A., its subsidiaries and the Regional Banks each
have their own compliance department. These functions employ
over 580 full-time equivalents within the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group
and some 170 people at the Regional Banks.
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Compliance Officer, who reports to the
Crédit Agricole S. A. Company Secretary, has functional authority
over the Compliance Officers of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s French
and foreign subsidiaries. This unit is responsible for overseeing,
coordinating and managing compliance verification for the Regional
Banks. The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group Compliance Officers
operate completely independently, with a hierarchical reporting line
and a functional reporting line.
32 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
The Group Head of Compliance is responsible for developing
policies on compliance with:
n the laws and regulations specifically monitored by the
Compliance function, their circulation and ascertaining that they
are observed;
n rules on prevention of money-laundering and terrorism financing,
on embargos and freezes on assets, and on prevention of
external fraud by organised crime.
In addition, monthly compliance failure reports and half-yearly
compliance reports with updated compliance risk maps are sent to
the Compliance Department.
The Compliance Management Committee, chaired by Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s Company Secretary, meets monthly. The Chief
Executive Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A. attends these monthly
meetings on a regular basis. The Committee takes the necessary
decisions for compliance failure prevention and on implementing
and monitoring corrective actions taken to remedy the most serious
compliance failures that are brought to its attention. The Committee
periodically reports on its work to the Audit and Risk Committee of
the Crédit Agricole S. A. Board of Directors.
Three units within the Group Compliance Department are dedicated
to Group entities: Regional Banks, French subsidiaries, international
subsidiaries. Three other cross-functional units are responsible for
operational controls, securities and IT systems project management
for those regulations specifically monitored by the Compliance
function.
During 2007, the Group Compliance Department supported the
International retail banking business line’s expansion in a secure
framework. Crédit Agricole S. A. undertook significant actions to
deploy compliance systems working within the FIDES procedures
governing the organisation and framework for intervention of the
Crédit Agricole S. A. Group Compliance function. Compliance
officers of the relevant international subsidiaries were formally
appointed by the Head of Group Compliance as they were integrated
into the organisation. Compliance Management Committees were
set up. In addition, the FIDES training modules were activated in
the relevant countries.
Actions were also undertaken to set up tools for profiling and for
monitoring customer accounts and transactions, in retail banking,
corporate and investment banking and asset management. The
use of these tools will improve the effectiveness of the moneylaundering prevention system. An IT tool (Fircosoft) for monitoring
inflows and outflows was installed on Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Swift
platform. It is being deployed in the international entities. The
ultimate purpose of this tool is to monitor inflows and outflows
in real time, to ensure compliance with embargos, asset freezes,
money laundering and terrorism financing prevention and to comply
with the provisions of SR VII (application of the European regulation
on funds transfers).
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Chairman’s report on corporate governance and internal control presented
to the Annual General Meeting of shareholders on 21 May 2008
Certain tools were also implemented in the area of market abuse
prevention, in keeping with European directives.
To implement the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive, the
Crédit Agricole S. A. Compliance Department provided support
to the Crédit Agricole Group to prepare it for meeting the
requirements of this directive and its transposition into French law
on 1 November 2007, while leaving the business lines in charge of
managing this project. The Compliance Department oversaw the
integration of requirements arising from the Directive into the Group
entities’ existing tools.
Periodical controls
Group Control and Audit, which reports directly to the Chief Executive
Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A., is the highest level of control within
the Crédit Agricole Group. It is responsible for periodical controls of
the Crédit Agricole Group through its audits, through oversight of the
Control and Audit business line of the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group,
which reports up the line to this function, and for supervision of the
Regional Banks’ internal audit units.
It also carries out field and office audits in the Regional Banks and
in all Crédit Agricole S. A. business units and subsidiaries, including
those that have their own internal audit teams.
These periodical audits include a critical assessment of the
internal control system implemented by the audited entities.
These procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance
that the system is effective in terms of transaction security, risk
management and compliance with external and internal rules.
They include verifying that the audited entity complies with
external and internal regulations, assessing the security and
effectiveness of operational procedures, ensuring that the system
for measuring and supervising all risks is adequate, and verifying
the reliability of financial information. During 2007, the work of
Group Control and Audit included audits of various Group units
and entities, particularly the foreign banks recently acquired by the
Group (Emporiki Bank of Greece, Index Bank in Ukraine, Crédit
Agricole Egypt, Cariparma Gruppo in Italy), preparing for the
implementation of the new international solvency ratio (Basel II),
financial security oversight, the permanent control system,
inclusion of key outsourced services in the internal control system,
and property risk exposure. Group Control and Audit also carried
out special audits in connection with the financial crisis in the
second half 2007 or arranged for such audits to carried out by the
internal audit units of subsidiaries.
Group Control and Audit also provides central oversight of the
control and audit function for all subsidiaries, including Calyon
and LCL, thereby improving the effectiveness of controls by
disseminating best audit practices designed to guarantee the
security and conformity of transactions carried out by the Group’s
various entities and to develop common areas of expertise. At
end-2007, the business line employed 810 full-time equivalents
within the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group (including Group Control and
Audit but not including audits of the Regional Banks, which have
344 staff members assigned to this task).
In addition, joint audit assignments are carried out regularly by Group
Control and Audit and the subsidiaries’ internal audit departments,
to encourage exchange of best practices. Special importance is
placed on topical and cross-functional investigations.
Through the relevant Group subsidiaries’ Internal Control
Committees, to which members of each entity’s senior management,
internal audit department, Permanent Controls Officer and
Compliance Officer belong, Group Control and Audit ascertains
that audit plans are successfully carried out, that risks are properly
managed, and, more generally, that each entity’s internal control
systems are adequate.
In 2007, work continued on projects designed to improve the
effectiveness and uniformity of the Group’s overall periodical
control system that were initiated in 2006 following a Banking
Commission examination.
Audits carried out by Crédit Agricole S. A. Group Control and Audit,
the internal audit departments and all external audits conducted
by supervisory authorities or outside firms are monitored through
a formal system to ensure that all recommendations made are
implemented through corrective and strictly prioritised action plans,
according to a clearly defined timetable.
The Board of Directors, of which I am Chairman, the Audit and Risks
Committee and the Chief Executive Officer, due to his own specific
responsibilities, are provided with comprehensive information on
internal control and exposure to risk, areas of potential progress
and any corrective measures adopted as part of an approach
designed to achieve ongoing improvement. The internal control
system and procedures are updated continuously to meet new
developments in regulations, business activities and risks.
All this information is contained in the annual report on internal
control and risk measurement and supervision, the annual
management report and regular reporting on operations and
control.
The Chairman of the Board of Directors
Crédit Agricole S. A.
René CARRON
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 33
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Statutory Auditors’ report
Statutory Auditors’ report
prepared in accordance with article L. 225-235 of the Code de commerce on the report prepared
by the Chairman of the Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S. A. on internal control procedures
relating to the preparation and processing of financial and accounting information
This is a free translation into English of a report issued in the French language and is provided solely for the convenience of English speaking readers.
This report should be read in conjuntion with, and construed in accordance with, French law and professional auditing standards applicable
in France.
Year ended 31 December 2007
To the Shareholders:
In our capacity as Statutory Auditors of the Company Crédit Agricole S. A., and in accordance with article L. 225-235 of the French company
law (Code de commerce), we report to you on the report prepared by the Chairman of your company in accordance with article L. 225-37 of
the French company law (Code de commerce) for the year ended 31 December 2007.
It is the Chairman’s responsibility to give an account in his report, notably of the conditions in which the duties of the Board of Directors are
prepared and organised and the internal control procedures in place within the Company.
It is our responsibility to report to you our observations on the information set out in the Chairman’s report on the internal control procedures
relating to the preparation and processing of financial and accounting information.
We performed our procedures in accordance with professional guidelines applicable in France. These require us to perform procedures to
assess the fairness of the information set out in the Chairman’s report on the internal control procedures relating to the preparation and
processing of financial and accounting information. These procedures notably consisted of:
n gain an understanding of the internal control procedures relating to the preparation and processing of financial and accounting information
underlying the information presented in the Chairman’s report and of existing documentation;
n gain an understanding of the work involved in drawing up such information and of existing documentation;
n determining whether any major internal control deficiencies in connection with the preparation and processing of financial and accounting
information that we may have identified in the course of our assignment have been properly disclosed in the Chairman’s report.
On the basis of this work, we have no matters to report in connection with the information regarding the Company’s internal control
procedures relating to the preparation and processing of financial and accounting information contained in the Chairman’s report, prepared
in accordance with article L. 225-37 of the Code de commerce.
Neuilly-sur-Seine, 19 March 2008
The Statutory Auditors
PricewaterhouseCoopers Audit
ERNST & YOUNG et Autres
Gérard Hautefeuille
Valérie Meeus
34 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
The information below concerning the compensation, terms of office and functions
of corporate officers is required by article L. 225-102 of the French Commercial Code taken from
the law on “New Economic Relations” of 15 May 2001, the Financial Security Act of 1 August 2003
and order No. 2004-604 of 24 June 2004.
»
COMPENSATION PAID TO EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
3 Board of Directors
The following sums were paid to Crédit Agricole S. A. Board Members in 2007 and in financial years 2006 and 2005 for serving as Directors
of Crédit Agricole S. A. or subsidiaries of the Group (Calyon, LCL – le Crédit Lyonnais):
DIRECTORS’ FEES
2007
Crédit Agricole S. A.
(in euros)
Calyon
LCL
Total
2006
2005
Directors elected by the shareholders
René Carron
18,900
18,900
16,500
15,000
Jean-Marie Sander
47,850
15,000
10,000
72,850
65,000
63,500
Jean-Paul Chifflet (1)
39,550
15,000
8,000
62,550
Noël Dupuy
46,650
56,650
46,500
42,500
56,500
43,000
44,500
51,500
51,050
37,000
16,500
31,200
31,200
24,000
12,500
(b)
44,400
44,400
18,000
(a)
43,800
43,800
34,500
38,600
38,600
30,500
Pierre Bru
(a)
37,500
Philippe Camus
(a)
Alain David
(a)
Bruno de Laage
Alain Diéval
Jean-Roger Drouet
10,000
19,000
34,000
Xavier Fontanet
(a)
27,750
27,750
24,500
26,000
Carole Giraud
(a)
31,200
31,200
24,000
25,000
Roger Gobin (2)
(a)
18,000
24,000
48,000
46,500
31,500
31,500
Lord Jay (3)
19,800
(a)
Daniel Lebègue
Dominique Lefebvre
6,000
(4)
Bernard Mary
19,800
55,050
55,050
16,200
(a)
10,000
26,200
40,800
40,800
33,000
30,000
Michel Michaut
28,200
28,200
26,500
25,000
Jean-Pierre Pargade
34,500
36,500
30,000
28,000
8,500
10,000
2,000
Corrado Passera (5)
Directors elected by employees
Daniel Coussens (6)
(b)
34,200
34,200
9,000
Guy Savarin (7)
(c)
34,200
34,200
9,000
(b)
34,200
34,200
21,500
20,000
(a)
42,500
97,500
89,500
90,000
Director representing the professional organisations
Jean-Michel Lemetayer
Non-voting Director
Henri Moulard
(1)
(a)
(b)
(c)
30,000
25,000
As from January 2007. (2) Until May 2007. (3) As from May 2007. (4) As from May 2007. (5) Until January 2007. (6) Until June 2006. (7) As from June 2006.
Including a €3,000 adjustment in respect of 2006, paid in the first quarter of 2007.
Including a €6,000 adjustment in respect of 2006, paid in the first quarter of 2007.
Including a €6,000 adjustment in respect of 2006, paid in the first quarter of 2007. It is specified that the two Directors representing employees transfer the full amount of compensation
received to their labour unions.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 35
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CORPORATE
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
n the Chairmen of the Audit and Risks Committee, of the
The total amount of Directors’ fees approved by the shareholders
of Crédit Agricole S. A. at the AGM of May 2007 was €950,000. This
sum was allocated to the Directors as follows, in accordance with
the following principles applied as from July 2007:
Strategic Committee, of the Compensation Committee and the
Appointments and Governance Committee received additional
annual lump-sum compensation of €18,000 for the Audit and
Risks Committee Chairman, €16,500 for the Strategic Committee
Chairman and €11,000 for the Chairmen of the Compensation
Committee and the Appointments and Governance Committee;
n for each Board meeting attended, each Director received €3,300
and the non-voting Director received €2,750;
n the Chairman of the Board received attendance fees only in his
n members of the Audit and Risks Committee and Strategic
capacity as Chairman of the Strategic Committee and member of
the Appointments and Governance Committee. His compensation
for serving as Chairman of the Board (as set out below in the
section entitled “Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Deputy
Chief Executive Officer”) is determined by the Board, based on
the recommendation of the Compensation Committee;
Committee received an additional €2,200 per Committee meeting
attended and members of the Compensation and Appointments
and Governance Committees received an additional €1,650 per
Committee meeting attended.
3 Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Deputy Chief Executive Officers
The following sums were paid to the senior executives of Crédit Agricole S. A. for serving as officers and under the terms of their employment
agreement:
2007
Executive officer
(gross amounts in euros)
2006
Directors’
fees paid
by Group Benefits
Variable companies in kind (2)
Compensation (1)
Fixed
René Carron
Chairman of Crédit
Agricole S. A.
420,000
Georges Pauget
Chief Executive Officer
of Crédit Agricole S. A.
920,000
Edouard Esparbès (7)
Deputy Chief Executive
Officer of Crédit
Agricole S. A.
until 1/09/2007
Chief Executive Officer
of Calyon until 30/09/2007
552,000 (6)
Jacques Lenormand
Chief Executive Officer
since 1 September 2007
141,667 (8)
Jean-Frédéric De Leusse
Chief Executive Officer
since 1 September 2007
100,000 (8)
2005
Fixed
Directors’
fees paid
by Group
Variable companies
Benefits
in kind (2)
16,500 (4)
2007
Stock-options (3)
Existing plans
Fixed
Directors’
fees paid
by Group
Variable companies
Benefits
in kind (2)
Plan
Number
Exercise
price
141,000
282,600
15,000 (4)
139,200
-
-
-
Compensation (1)
Compensation (1)
18,900 (4)
142,720
288,000
957,100
49,000 (5)
573,954
800,000
650,000
29,000 (5)
263,030
495,500
405,000
18,000 (5)
212,900
2003
2004
2006
40,164
70,000
100,000
14.59
20.48
33.61
957,100
8,000 (6)
441,902
700,000
850,000
8,000
403,817
600,000
500,000
8,000
254,500
2004
2006
70,000
70,000
20.48
33.61
2006
35,000
33.61
2004
2006
25,000
35,000
20.48
33.61
6,000 (9)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
Variable compensation consists of bonuses paid in 2007 in respect of 2006.
Equals the value of any benefits derived from the use of a company residence and amounts paid by the company to fund retirement benefits.
Mr Carron received no Crédit Agricole S. A. stock-options under the different plans.
As Chairman of the Crédit Agricole S. A. Strategic Committee and member of the Appointments and Governance Committee.
As Chairman of LCL (in 2006 and 2007) and Director of Calyon (in 2005, 2006 and 2007).
Compensation paid until 1 September 2007, the end of his term as Deputy CEO of Crédit Agricole S.A and until 30 September 2007, the end of his term as Chief Executive Officer of
Calyon. Directors’ fees received for serving as a Director of LCL (2007).
(7) Variable compensation paid to Edouard Esparbès covering the period from 1 January 2007 until 30 September 2007, paid In March 2008, amounted to €552,000.
(8) Fixed compensation paid to new Deputy CEOs since 1 September 2007, the date of their appointment as Deputy CEOs of Crédit Agricole S. A.
(9) As Director of LCL.
36 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Chairman
The Chairman’s compensation consists of a fixed salary plus a
specific retirement benefit.
In 2007, he received €420,000 in fixed compensation. The value of
benefits in kind, consisting of the use of a company residence and
the retirement benefit, amounted to €142,720.
Chief Executive Officer and Deputy Chief
Executive Officers
The Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S. A. determined the
composition and level of compensation paid to the Chief Executive
Officer and Deputy Chief Executive Officers of Crédit Agricole S. A.
Compensation principles
meeting the quantitative and qualitative criteria determined at its
meetings of 7 March and 18 July 2006:
n 40% was based on the Group’s performance indicators, with
12% of this based on Crédit Agricole S. A.’s net banking income
and 28% on its earnings per share;
n 60% was based on an assessment of implementation of
the managerial aspect of the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s
development plan and corporate strategic plan, completion of
acquisitions and control over the cost/income ratio.
The bonus was based on a target value of 100%, up to a maximum
of 120%.
In the light of the Group’s results and of the performance
assessments, the amount of the bonus was close to the ceiling
amount.
Compensation comprises a fixed component and a variable
component:
Mr Esparbès’ variable compensation was determined by the
Calyon Board of Directors at its meeting of 28 February 2007 and
fixed at €957,100, as follows:
n the fixed component is determined by reference to market
n 50% was based on performance indicators, with 30% of this
practices;
n the variable component, which is capped, in turn consists of two
parts:
based on GOI growth after Calyon’s risk-related costs, 6% on
growth in net banking income, and 14% on Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
earnings per share;
n the first is based on financial performance indicators applied to
n 50% was based on the assessment of a number of criteria
the Group and on results for the business lines for which the
relevant party is responsible,
relating to the overall operation of Calyon and the contribution to
Crédit Agricole S. A. Group cross-functional projects.
n the second is determined by a qualitative assessment based on
The bonus was based on a target value of 100%, up to a maximum
of 120%.
predefined targets.
Fixed compensation paid in 2007
Annual compensation paid to Mr Pauget, Chief Executive Officer of
Crédit Agricole S. A. for 2007 was determined by a resolution of the
Board of Directors dated 6 March 2007, fixing it at €920,000.
Annual compensation paid to Mr Esparbès, Deputy Chief Executive
Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A. for 2007 was €736,000, the same as
in 2006, as determined by a resolution of the Board of Directors of
Calyon.
Fixed compensation paid to Mr Lenormand, Deputy Chief Executive
Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A. in charge of French Retail Banking
and Group Marketing Strategy, was determined by a resolution
of the Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S. A. dated 29 August
2007, fixing it at €425,000 as from 1 September 2007.
Fixed compensation paid to Mr de Leusse, Deputy Chief Executive
Officer of Crédit Agricole S. A. in charge of International Development
was determined by a resolution of the Board of Directors of Crédit
Agricole S. A. dated 29 August 2007, fixing it at €300,000 as from
1 September 2007.
Variable compensation paid in 2007
in respect of 2006
Mr. Pauget’s variable compensation was fixed at €957,100 by
the Board of Directors at its meeting of 6 March 2007, based on
Based on Calyon’s results for the year ended 31 December 2006,
variable compensation calculated on the above variables was fixed
at €837,100, with a performance index of 119.6%, which was close
to the maximum, and the Board decided to pay an exceptional
bonus of €120,000.
Variable compensation paid to Mr Lenormand and Mr de Leusse
in respect of 2006 was based on the offices previously held by
them, (Mr Lenormand was Group Head of Business Development
in France and Mr de Leusse was Group Head of International
Business Development, Head of International Retail Banking and
Head of the Private Banking business line).
The Chief Executive Officer, Deputy Chief Executive Officer in
charge of Calyon and the Deputy Chief Executive Officer in
charge of International Business Development are covered by
the supplemental pension plan established for the Group’s key
executives, which cannot be individualised. Beneficiaries accrue
benefits under this plan only if they remain within the Group until
retirement age. The plan is a differential scheme that supplements
the pensions acquired through general schemes and mandatory
supplemental schemes during their career inside or outside
the Crédit Agricole Group. Provisions are booked globally each
year (without specific calculations for corporate officers), on the
basis of profiles established as a function of the beneficiaries’
characteristics (average age, average pay and typical career, in
order to recreate the pension rights of general schemes).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 37
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Information on Executive Officers and Directors
»
OFFICES HELD BY EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
René Carron
CRCAM DES SAVOIE
4, avenue du Pré-Félin
BP 200
74942 Annecy-Le-Vieux
No. of shares held: 7,070
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
20/05/1999
2008
Chairman
of the Board
Chairman
of the Strategic
Committee
and member of
the Appointments
and Governance
Committee
Main offices
outside the company
Chairman, CRCAM des Savoie
Deputy Chairman, FNCA
Member of the Supervisory Board,
Lagardère
Chairman, FARM (Fondation pour
l’Agriculture et la Ruralité dans le Monde)
Director, Suez, Fiat S.p.A.
Director, Sacam and Sacam Participations
Deputy Chairman, CNMCCA
Permanent Representative
of Crédit Agricole S. A.
Director, Fondation de France
Director, Fondation du Crédit Agricole
Pays de France
Director, Crédit Agricole Solidarité
et Développement
Director, Scicam
Executive Committee Member, Gecam
Chairman, Cica
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
38 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Member of the Supervisory Board, Eurazeo
(until June 2005)
Advisor, Banque de France de la Savoie
(01/2003)
Director, Crédit Agricole Indosuez
(2000-2003)
Director, Crédit Lyonnais (2002-2003)
Director, Fonds Coopération
Crédit Agricole Mutuel (L.1901)
(until 2003)
Chairman, FNCA (06/07/2000-30/04/2003)
and ex-officio member of Association
des Présidents
Chairman, SAS Rue La Boétie (until 2003)
Chairman, Local Bank of Yenne
(until 2004)
Director and Vice-Chairman, Banca Intesa
(December 2006)
General Councillor, Member
of the Standing Committee,
General Council of Savoie
Chairman, GIE Gecam (until 2004).
Director, Rue Impériale (until 2004)
Director, SAS Sapacam
Director, Sofinco (until 2004)
Member of the Management Committee
and Executive Manager of Adicam (2003)
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
20/05/1999
2009
Vice-Chairman
of the Board
(Representative
of SAS
Rue La Boétie)
Member
of the Strategic
Committee,
Appointments
and Governance
Committee, and
Compensation
Committee
Chairman, CRCAM d’Alsace-Vosges
Chairman, FNCA
Chairman, SAS Rue La Boétie
Chairman, SAS Sacam International
Deputy Chairman, SAS Sacam
Développement
Chairman, Sacam Participations
Executive Committee Member,
Adicam SARL
Director, LCL and Calyon
Chairman, CNMCCA
Chairman, Conseil économique et social
d’Alsace
Chairman of Management Committee,
Gecam (GIE)
Director, Sacam
Director, Scicam
Director, GIE Cirecam
Non-voting Director, Electricité de
Strasbourg
Legal representative of the Chairman
(SAS Sacam Participations) in the following
companies: SAS Segur, SAS Miromesnil,
SAS Sacam Santeffi, SAS Sacam
Assurance Caution,
SAS Sacam Pleinchamp,
SAS Sacam Fireca, SAS Sacam Progica
Director, Predica (until April 2004),
Sapacam S. A. (until 27/06/2002).
Chairman, SAS Sapacam
(until 30/12/2003)
Jean-Paul Chifflet
31/01/2007
CRCAM CENTRE-EST
1, rue Pierre de Truchis de Lays
69410
Champagne au Mont d’or
No. of shares held: 4,060
2010
Deputy Chairman
of the Board
Member
of the Strategic
Committee and
of the Appointments
and Governance
Committee
Chief Executive Officer,
CRCAM Centre-Est
Secretary-General, FNCA
Chairman, SAS Sacam Développement,
Carvest
Deputy Chairman, SAS Rue La Boétie
CEO, SAS Sacam International
Director, LCL, Calyon, Crédit Agricole
Financements S. A. (Suisse), S. A. DeltAger,
Fédération Rhône-Alpes du Crédit Agricole,
SAS Sacam, SAS Sacam Participations;
SCI Scicam; GIE AMT
Executive Committee Member,
Adicam Sarl
Director, GIE Attica
Chairman and Director, Pacifica
Director of Predica (until 20 June 2007)
Deputy Secretary-General, FNCA
(2003-2006)
Director, Banque de Gestion Privée
Indosuez S.A (until March 2007)
Executive Committee Member,
SAS Sacam Santeffi (until February 2007)
Director, Apis CA,
Director, Crédit Agricole Capital
Investissement et Finance (March 2007)
21/05/2003
2009
Deputy Chairman
of the Board
Member
of the Strategic
Committee
and of the Audit and
Risks Committee
Chairman, CRCAM de la Touraine
et du Poitou
Deputy Chairman, FNCA
Deputy Chairman, Caisse Locale
de la Vallée de l’Indre
Director, LCL
Director, Sapacam, Sacam, SCI Cam,
Crédit Agricole Titres
Director, Predica, Representative
of Crédit Agricole S. A.
Member of the Supervisory Board,
Eurazeo, and of Comité National
de l’Assurance en Agriculture
Director, IDIA Participations, Sofipar
(until 31 December 2007)
Jean-Marie Sander
CRCAM D’ALSACE-VOSGES
1, place de la Gare
BP 440
67008 Strasbourg CEDEX
No. of shares held: 14,635
Noël Dupuy
CRCAM
TOURAINE ET POITOU
Boulevard Winston-Churchill
37041 Tours CEDEX
No. of shares held: 5,129
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Main offices
outside the company
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 39
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CORPORATE
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
Pierre Bru
CRCAM NORD
MIDI-PYRÉNÉES
219, avenue François-Verdier
81000 Albi
No. of shares held: 647
25/05/2000
2010
Director,
Member
of the Compensation
Committee
Chairman, CRCAM Nord Midi-Pyrénées
Chairman, Sodagri
Director of Calyon; Member
of the Compensation Committee
Director, Inforsud Gestion, Inforsud
Editique; Inforsud FM; Inforsud Diffusion;
Graphi (SAS); Mérico Deltaprint; Chabrillac,
Idia Participations, Sofipar
Director, Caisse Locale de Pont de Salars
Chairman, l’Institut Universitaire
Technologique de Rodez,
SAS NMP Développement
Executive Manager, GFA du Pont des Rives
and GAEC Recoules d’Arques
Non-voting Director, Grand Sud Ouest
Capital.
Non-voting Director, SEM 12
Chairman, CR Quercy Rouergue
(Regional Bank merged into CR Nord Midi
Pyrénées in May 2004)
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer,
Inforsud Gestion (until December 2004)
Chairman, FNCA National Negotiating
Commission and Employee Relations
Commission (until December 2004)
Director, Société des Caves de Roquefort
(until 2003)
Director, Camarca and CRCCA
(Caisse de Retraite Complémentaire
du Crédit Agricole, Scicam, Sacam
and Sacam Participations, (2006)
Member and Treasurer, Bureau Fédéral
FNCA (2006)
Director, Sica (1995-2003);
GIE Gecam (2006)
Philippe Camus
LAGARDÈRE
441 2nd Avenue North Naples
Florida (USA)
No. of shares held: 1,364
18/05/2005
2008
Director,
Chairman
of the Compensation
Committee,
Member
of the Audit and
Risks Committee
Co-Executive Manager, Lagardère SCA
Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Sté ARJIL
commanditée - Arco (SA)
Representative of Sté ARJIL
commanditée - Arco (S. A.),
General Partner and Co-Executive
Manager, Lagardère SCA
Supervisory Board Member,
Hachette Filipacchi Medias (SAS)
Supervisory Board Member,
Lagardère Active (SAS)
Director, Editions P. Amaury (S. A.)
Permanent Representative of Lagardère
SCA on the Board of Directors
of Lagardère Active Broadcast SA
(Monaco)
Permanent Representative
of Hachette SA on the Board of Directors
of Hachette Distribution Services (SA)
Permanent Representative
of Lagardère SCA on the Board
of Directors of Hachette SA
Director, Accor
Chairman and CEO, Lagardère North
America Inc.
Honorary Chairman, Gifas
Director, Cellfish Media, LLC. Senior
Managing Director, Evercor Partners Inc.
Director, Schlumberger
Executive Chairman, EADS
(until 11 May 2005)
Director, Dassault Aviation
(until 11 May 2005)
Director, Credit Lyonnais (until 30/07/2003)
Co-Executive Chairman, EADS N.V.
(until 11/05/2005)
Co-Executive Chairman, EADS
Participations N.V. (until 11/05/2005).
Chairman, Groupement des Industries
Françaises Aéronautiques et Spatiales
(until 11/05/2005).
Member of the Compensation Committee,
Airbus (until 11/05/2005)
Member of the Partners’ Committee,
Airbus (until 11/05/2005)
Director, La Provence (SA)
(until 16/10/2006)
Director, Nice Matin (SA)
(until 23/10/2006)
Main offices
outside the company
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
40 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Alain David
CRCAM D’ILLE-ET-VILAINE
45, boulevard de la Liberté
35000 Rennes
No. of shares held: 874
18/05/2005
2010
Director
Chairman, CRCAM d’Ille-et-Vilaine
Chairman of the Human Resources
Commission, FNCA
Chairman, Federal Negotiating Delegation,
FNCA
Member of Agriculture Commission
Director, Camca
Alternate Director, Camarca
Deputy Director of FNCA to AG CCPMA
Retraite et Prévoyance, Camarca
and CRCCA
Chairman, CA Handicap et Emploi
Association.
Chairman and Director, Caisse Locale
du Grand-Fougeray
Chairman, Intercommunalité du Pays
du Grand Fougeray
Director: Crédit Immobilier de Bretagne,
Uni Expansion Ouest, Société
d’Aménagement et de Développement
d’Ille-et-Vilaine
Mayor of Grand-Fougeray
Member, CES de Bretagne representing
Crédit Agricole
Head of a small business
Executive Manager, SCI Bruseca,
Divad - SARL A David
Member of the Human Resources
Commission, FNCA (until March 2005)
Bruno de Laage
CRCAM
DE L’ANJOU ET DU MAINE
40, rue Prémartine
72083 Le Mans CEDEX 09
No. of shares held: 1,211
May 2006
2010
Director,
Member
of the Strategic
Committee
Chief Executive Officer,
CRCAM de l’Anjou et du Maine
Chairman, John Deere Crédit SAS
Chairman, GIE Atlantica
Director, Cacif (Crédit Agricole Capital
Investissement et Finance)
Director, Crédit Agricole Titres
Director, Uni Expansion Ouest
Director, Euro Securities Partners
Deputy Secretary-General, FNCA
(Dec. 2006)
Director, Uni-Éditions (Sept. 2007)
Executive Committee Member,
Adicam Sarl (June 2007)
Alain Diéval
CRCAM NORD DE FRANCE
10, square Foch 59800 Lille
No. of shares held: 3,109
19/05/2004
2008
Director,
Member
of the Audit
and Risks
Committee
Chief Executive Officer,
CRCAM Nord de France
Chairman of the Board, Crédit Agricole
Belge, Keytrade Bank
Chairman & CEO, SA MRACA
Chairman & CEO, SA Vauban Finance
Chairman & CEO, SA Participex
Executive Committee Member,
SAS Belgium CA
Director, CA Cheuvreux S.A.,
Finorpa regional venture capital company;
Vauban Partenaires; SAS Creer
Chairman, Sedaf S. A.; SAS IM NORD;
SAS Arcadim
Member, FNCA Development Committee
and Marketing Steering Committee
Member, Comité d’Orientation
de la Promotion (COP)
Regional Committee Chairman, Banques
Nord - Pas-de-Calais (2002-2005)
Member of the Management Board,
Nordpicom (06/2002)
Secretary-General, Camca (1995-2006)
Main offices
outside the company
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 41
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1
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1
RAPPEL_T1 GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
CORPORATE
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
Jean-Roger Drouet
CRCAM TOULOUSE
ET MIDI TOULOUSAIN
6-7, place Jeanne d’Arc
BP 40535
31005 Toulouse CEDEX 06
No. of shares held: 1,100
November 2005
2008
Director,
Member
of the Audit and
Risks Committee
Chief Executive Officer, CRCAM
Toulouse et Midi Toulousain
Member, FNCA Customer Relationship
Quality Committee, FNCA Risk
and Security Committee
and Group Security Committee (CSG)
Director, Attica, Ifcam, Sotel and Apis SA,
CACIF
Deputy Chairman, Comité des Banques
Midi Pyrénées
Chairman, Grand Sud Ouest Capital
Director of relations with
the Crédit Agricole S. A. Regional Banks
(2001-2003)
Director, Cedicam, Difcam,
Groupement des Provinces de France
and Sofinco (2004)
Member of the Supervisory Board, Sefa
(2004)
Executive Committee Member,
TLJ Permanent Representative
of Crédit Agricole S. A.
Director, Foncaris, Sofipaca.,
Member of the Supervisory Board, Sofilaro,
(resigned in 2004)
Senior Vice-President, Fédération
Midi Pyrénées du Crédit Agricole (Campy)
(2007)
Director, Asterion Sud
and GIE Exaprod (2007)
Xavier Fontanet
ESSILOR INTERNATIONAL
147, rue de Paris
94127 Charenton CEDEX
No. of shares held: 3,601
29/11/2001
2008
Director,
Member
of the Strategic
Committee
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer,
Essilor International
Chairman: EOA Holding Co Inc (USA)
Director: L’Oréal, Essilor of America Inc.,
Nikon-Essilor Co Ltd. (Japan), Shanghai
Essilor Optical Company Ltd. (China),
Transitions Optical Inc. (USA), Transitions
Optical Holding B.V. (Netherlands), Essilor
Manufacturing India PVT LTD (India),
Essilor India PVT LTD (India)
Director: Beneteau (28/01/2005),
Transitions Optical Ltd. (Ireland)
(27/07/2004), IMS - Entreprendre
pour la Cité (Ass) (19/10/2005);
Essilor Laboratories of America Holding Co
Inc (USA) (March 2004)
Chairman, Medef Ethics Committee
Carole Giraud
CRCAM SUD RHÔNE-ALPES
15-17, rue Paul Claudel
BP 67
38041 Grenoble CEDEX 9
No. of shares held: 10
29/11/2001
2009
Director
representing
Regional Bank
employees
Webmaster Analyst,
CRCAM Sud Rhône-Alpes
Electronic communication management
analyst, CRCAM Sud Rhône-Alpes
(2003- 2005)
Project manager, Organisation Department,
CRCAM Sud Rhône-Alpes (2002)
Michael Jay
HOUSE OF LORDS
London, SW1A OPW
No. of shares held: 100
23/05/2007
2008
Director
Member
of the Audit and
Risks Committee
Former Secretary General,
UK Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Member of the House of Lords,
International Institutions Select Committee
Vice-Chairman, Business for New Europe
Director, Valeo; Candover Investment PLC
Independent Director, Associated British
Foods (ABF)
Partner, BUPA
Member, European Law and Institutions
Sub-Committee, Globe,
inter-parliamentary group on climate
change
Honorary member, Magdalen College
(Oxford)
Permanent Under-Secretary,
Ministry of Foreign Affairs (United Kingdom)
and of the Commonwealth (2002-2006)
Personal Representative of the British
Prime Minister at the G8 summits
in Gleneagles and Saint Petersburg
(2005-2006)
British Council Trustee (2002-2006)
Main offices
outside the company
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
42 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Daniel Lebègue
IFA
7, rue Balzac
75008 Paris
No. of shares held: 200
19/05/2004
2008
Director
Chairman
of the Appointments
and Governance
Committee Member
of the Audit and
Risks Committee
Chairman, Institut Français
des Administrateurs (IFA)
Chairman, Transparency Internationale
(France)
Chairman, IDDRI (Institut
du Développement Durable et des
Relations Internationales)
Director: Alcatel-Lucent, Technip and Scor
Director, Gaz de France (2005),
Thales (2004)
Chief Executive Officer, Caisse
des Dépôts et Consignations (1997-2002)
Director, Areva (2006)
Dominique Lefebvre
CRCAM VAL DE FRANCE
1, rue Daniel Boutet
28002 Chartres
No. of shares held: 708
23/05/2007
2009
Director
Farmer
Chairman, CRCAM Val de France
Chairman, Pleinchamp, Competitiveness
and Customer Satisfaction Committee
(June 2007), Industrial Development
Steering Committee
Director LCL, Sacam Participations
Board Officer and Treasurer, FNCA,
member of the Adicam Steering
Committee, Information Systems Strategic
Committee, Strategic Committee
for Purchasing
Strategic Committee Member, Fireca
(June 2007)
Bernard Mary
CRCAM DU NORD EST
25, rue Libergier
51100 Reims
No. of shares held: 4,930
29/11/2001
2009
Director,
Member
of the Audit and
Risks Committee
Chief Executive Officer,
CRCAM Nord-Est
Deputy Chairman, FNCA
Director, Crédit Agricole Belge.
Director, GIE Cirecam, Gecam, Gecica,
SA Sapacam, Sacam and Sacam
Participations, SCI CAM, FRCA Picardie,
Camca, Caisse Locale de Développement
Partagé, Sofagri Participations
Director and Secretary-General,
FRCA Champagne Ardennes
Permanent Representative,
CRCAM Nord-Est
Chairman, Belgium CA; Synergie Chairman
and Director, Association Industries et Agro
Ressources (competitiveness division)
Co-Executive Manager, SCI EPPES
Nord Est
Member of the Supervisory Board,
Siparex Développement (SCA)
Executive Manager, SCI Le Clos Barrois
Director, Crédit Agricole Solidarité
et Développement; Sofipicardie,
(June 2005), Difcam; Ifcam (June 2005);
and CAELS
Director: Sofipar, Idia Participations,
(until 28/12/2007) IDIA Agri Capital SAS,
(until 12/06/2007) Montpensier Finance,
(until 7/02/2007); COFINEP
(until 25/06/2007)
Michel Michaut
CRCAM DE CHAMPAGNE
BOURGOGNE
269, faubourg Croncels
10000 Troyes
No. of shares held: 1,595
19/05/2004
2008
Director
Member
of the Appointments
and Governance
Committee
Chairman,
CRCAM de Champagne Bourgogne
Chairman, Crédit Agricole Leasing
Director, Camca
Member, Development Orientation
Committee
Member, FNCA Association des Présidents
Member, FNCA Employee Relations
Committee and Federal Negotiating
Delegation
Executive Board Member, Adicam
Chairman and Vice-Chairman
of the Supervisory Board; GDFPE
Member, GIE Agricompétences
Chairman, Fédération des CRCAM
de Bourgogne and Officer of the Board,
FNCA (2000-2004)
Managing partner and Executive Manager,
GAEC de la Baderie in Lixy (1998-2006)
Main offices
outside the company
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 43
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RAPPEL_T1 GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
CORPORATE
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
Date first
appointed
23/05/1996
Jean-Pierre Pargade
CRCAM D’AQUITAINE
304,
boulevard du Président Wilson
33076 Bordeaux CEDEX
No. of shares held: 8,017
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
2009
Director, Pacifica (Dec. 2007)
Chairman, CRCAM d’Aquitaine
Director Member
Deputy Chairman, Conseil Economique et
of the Compensation Director, Crédit Agricole Asset
Social Aquitaine (Dec. 2007)
Management, FDSEA 40, Segespar,
Committee
CA-Leasing, LCL, Chambre d’Agriculture
Grands Crus, Grands Crus Investissement,
Sem des Lasers
Chairman, Foncaris
Chairman, Caisse Locale de Samadet
Chairman, Centre de Gestion
des Exploitations Agricoles des Landes
Officer of the Board, Chambre d’Agriculture
des Landes
Member, Chambre Régionale d’Agriculture
d’Aquitaine.
Executive Manager, Agri-Informatique
Services
Main offices
outside the company
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Daniel Coussens
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.
ECP/AG
91-93, Boulevard Pasteur
75015 Paris
No. of shares held: 2,874
June 2006
2009
Director representing
employees
Head
of Commercial
Marketing
for Institutional
Investors, Local
Authorities and
the Professions
Project Officer, Agriculture Office,
Agriculture and Local Community
Institutions Department (1990-2003)
Guy Savarin
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.
SIG/GE
83, boulevard des Chênes
78000 Guyancourt
No. of shares held: 12,012
June 2006
2009
Director representing Director, Adsaca.
employees
Trade union representative (CFTC)
and former Chairman of the trade union
of Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries
(until May 2006)
National Delegate to Fédération CFTC
des Banques (until May 2006)
Jean-Michel Lemétayer
FNSEA
11, rue de la Baume
75008 Paris
No. of shares held: 2,416
November 2001
2008
Director
Chairman, Fédération Nationale
des Producteurs de Lait (FNPL)
(1995-2002)
Chairman, CNIEL (Centre National
d’Economie Laitière)
Chairman, FNSEA
Member, Conseil Economique et Social;
Chairman, Space (Rennes Livestock Fair),
Agro Campus Rennes (Ecole Nationale
Supérieure Agro and Agro-alimentaire
de Rennes); Copa
Director, Unigrains
Member, FRSEA Bretagne, Chambre
Régionale d’Agriculture de Bretagne,
Conseil Economique et Social Régional
de Bretagne
Member of the Supervisory Board, Sial
Director, Sopexa
First Deputy Chairman, Ille-et-Vilaine
Chamber of Agriculture, Crédit Agricole
d’Ille-et-Vilaine
Deputy Chairman, Ille-et-Vilaine FDSEA
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
44 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address
and number
of shares held (1)
Henri Moulard
TRUFFLE VENTURE
25, rue Marbœuf
75008 Paris
No. of shares held: 13
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
May 2003
2009
Non-voting
Director - Chairman
of the Audit and
Risks Committee
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Main offices
outside the company
Chairman, HM et Associés
Chairman, Invest in Europe
Chairman of the Supervisory Board,
Dixence
Deputy Chairman of the Executive
Committee, Gerpro
Chairman, Attijariwafa Bank Europe
Non-voting Director on the Board
of Directors of Calyon and LCL
Chairman of the Calyon Audit Committee
and LCL Risks and Accounts Committee
Non-voting Director, GFI Informatique
Director, Elf-Aquitaine, Burelle S.A,
Unibail-Rodamco, Atlamed S. A.
Member of the Supervisory Board,
Financière Centuria
Governance Committee Member,
Française de Placement Investissement
(SAS)
Director, GFI Informatique (until 2002)
Director and Audit Committee Member,
Attijariwafa Bank (Morocco)
Director and Audit Committee Chairman,
Banque du Sud (Tunisia) (2007)
Director and Audit Committee Member,
Foncia (2006)
Chairman of the Appointments
and Compensation Committee,
Unibail-Rodamco (2007)
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 45
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CORPORATE
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
Name, given name,
business address and
number of shares
held (1)
Date first
appointed
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
Main offices
outside the company
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Advisory Council Member, Paris Europlace
Chairman, Cedicam (2003-2006)
Director, Banque de Gestion Privée
Indosuez S. A. (2003-2006)
Director, Europay France (2003-2006)
Director, Holding Eurocard (2004-2006)
Director and Deputy Chairman,
Pacifica S. A. (2003-2006)
Director and Deputy Chairman,
Predica S. A. (2003-2006)
Chairman and Executive Committee
Member, TLJ SAS (2003-2006) Chairman,
Uni-Éditions SAS (2003-2006)
Director, Predi Retraite (2003-2005)
Chairman, Servicam SAS (until 2003)
Chief Executive Officer, LCL
(until 03/11/2005)
Deputy Chief Executive Officer,
Crédit Agricole S.A (until September 2005)
Deputy Chief Executive Officer
of Crédit Agricole S. A. in charge
of the Regional Banks business line
and of the life insurance businesses
(until December 2003)
Chief Executive Officer, Pyrénées
Gascogne Regional Bank (until 2002)
Director, Bankoa S. A. (2005)
Director, Gecam (GIE)
Director, Crédit Agricole Indosuez S. A.
(until 2003)
Director, Crédit Agricole Indosuez
Cheuvreux S. A. (until 2003)
Director, Crédit Agricole Indosuez
Cheuvreux Gestions S. A. (until 2003)
Director, Crédit Lyonnais (until 2003).
Director, Foncaris S. A. (until 2003)
Director, Mercagentes, S. A., SVB
(until 2003)
Director, Sacam S. A.S (until 2003)
Director, Sapacam SAS (until 2003)
Director, SCI CAM (until 2003)
Permanent Representative,
Crédit Agricole S. A.
Member of the Supervisory Board,
Fonds de Garantie des Dépôts (until 2004)
Georges Pauget
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.
91-93, boulevard Pasteur
75710 Paris CEDEX 15
No. of shares held: 60,443
12/09/2005
Chief Executive
Officer
Chairman, LCL
Chairman, Calyon
Deputy Chairman and Executive
Committee Member, French Banking
Federation
Director, VALEO
Permanent Representative
of LCL - Le Crédit Lyonnais
Director, Fondation de France
Jacques Lenormand
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.
91-93 Bd Pasteur
75710 Paris CEDEX 15
No. of shares held: 215
01/09/2007
Deputy Chief
Executive Officer
Head,
Retail Banking
in France
and Group
Marketing
Strategy
Consultant (1998-2004)
Director, Crédit Agricole Asset
Management, Crédit Agricole Asset
Management Group, LCL, Pacifica, Sofinco
Chief Executive Officer, Fireca
Chairman, Uni-Editions
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
46 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
Name, given name,
business address and
number of shares
held (1)
Jean-Frederic de Leusse
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.
91-93 Bd Pasteur
75710 Paris CEDEX 15
Date first
appointed
01/09/2007
Term
of office
ends
Main office
within
the company
Deputy Chief
Executive Officer
Head
of International
Development
Other offices held
in any company within
the past five years
Main offices
outside the company
Chairman of the Board, Emporiki Bank,
IUB Holding
Deputy Chairman, Crédit Agricole
Egypt S. A.E.
Director, Banco Espirito Santo (BES),
Bespar, BSF (Banque Saudi Fransi)
Executive Committee Member, Calyon
Member of the Executive Board,
De Dietrich
Chairman of the Supervisory Board,
Lukas Bank (21/03/2007)
Supervisory Board Member, Crédit
du Maroc (07/09/2007)
Director, Banque Libano-Française
(16/11/2007)
Chief Executive Officer, Fédération
Nationale du Crédit Agricole (2001-2004)
Head of International Retail Banking
and of “Capital Funds” business line,
Crédit Agricole S. A. (2004 – 2007)
(1) Are only included shares directly held by Executive Officers and Directors (excluding these held through employee share ownership plans).
At 31 December 2007, Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Board of Directors
comprised 21 Directors, including one executive officer of SAS
Rue La Boétie, which is owned by the Regional Banks and owns
54.09% of Crédit Agricole S. A., and twelve executive officers of the
Regional Banks in which Crédit Agricole S. A. is a 25% shareholder.
The Regional Bank representatives therefore take 62% of the seats
on the Board. This illustrates the desire of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
leading shareholder (SAS Rue La Boétie) to give the Regional
Banks a broad representation to reflect the Crédit Agricole Group’s
decentralised structure.
The interests of the Regional Banks and of SAS Rue La Boétie
could differ from those of Crédit Agricole S. A. or of other Crédit
Agricole S. A. shareholders. This could lead to potential conflicts
of interests between the duties to Crédit Agricole S. A. of persons
serving as both Director of Crédit Agricole S. A. and corporate
officer of SAS Rue La Boétie or of a Regional Bank and their duties
to SAS Rue La Boétie or to a Regional Bank. For information,
it is noted that Crédit Agricole S. A. acts as the central body for
the Regional Banks, in accordance with the provisions of articles
L. 511-30 to L. 511-32 and L. 512-47 to L. 512-54 of the Code
monétaire et financier.
There exist no service contracts between the members of the
administrative or management bodies and Crédit Agricole S. A. or
any of its subsidiaries that grant benefits to such members.
To the Company’s knowledge, there are no family ties among the
Corporate Officers, Directors, Chief Executive Officer and Deputy
Chief Executive Officers of Crédit Agricole S. A.
Crédit Agricole S. A. complies with the corporate governance
regulations applicable in France. The terms of these regulations
are described in the Chairman’s Report to the Annual General
Meeting of 21 May 2008 (pursuant to Financial Security Act
2003-706 dated 1 August 2003) and are reproduced in full in this
registration document.
To the Company’s knowledge, as of this date, no member of an
administrative or management body of Crédit Agricole S. A. has
been convicted in relation to fraudulent offences during the last
five years.
To the Company’s knowledge, as of this date, no member of an
administrative or management body of Crédit Agricole S. A.
has been associated with any bankruptcy, receivership or
liquidation during the last five years.
Details of any official public incrimination and/or sanctions
ruled against any member of an administrative or management
body:
At the beginning of May 2004, the CONSOB initiated proceedings
against the Italian bank Banca Intesa, its directors and senior
executives, and former directors and senior executives of Cariplo,
Comit and BAV, for a period running from the beginning of 1999
until the end of 2002.
As part of such proceedings, in March 2005, Mr Jean Laurent and
Mr Ariberto Fassati, member of the Executive Committee, received
notification from the Italian Ministry of Economy and Finance that
it was assessing fines of €33,800 for Mr Laurent and €24,800 for
Mr Fassati for breach or inadequacy of internal procedures at
the above-mentioned Italian banks with respect to information
provided to customers and the suitability of products offered to
such customers. These decisions were appealed to the Milan Court
of Appeals.
No member of the administrative or management bodies of
Crédit Agricole S. A. has been disqualified by a court from acting
as a member of an administrative or management body or from
participating in the management or conduct of the business of
Crédit Agricole S. A. within the last five years.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 47
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CORPORATE
Information on Executive Officers and Directors
»
TRADING IN THE COMPANY’S SHARES BY EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
Summary of trading in the company’s shares by senior
executives and corporate officers of Crédit Agricole S. A. and
other persons covered by article L. 621-18-2 of the Code
monétaire et financier during 2007, for trades exceeding an
aggregate ceiling of €5,000 (pursuant to article L. 621-18-2 of the
Code monétaire et financier and article 223-26 of the Autorité des
Marchés Financiers General Regulation).
These trades have been reported to the AMF.
Name and Office held
Trades
Rene Carron
Chairman of the Board of Directors
Bought and subscribed for 4,824 shares for €127,419 (five trades)
Georges Pauget
Chief Executive Officer
Bought and subscribed for 47,185 shares and other financial instruments for €762,328 (five trades)
Jean-Paul Chifflet
Vice-Chairman of the Board
Subscribed for 1,471 other financial instruments for €32,379 (one trade)
Jacques Lenormand
Deputy Chief Executive Officer
Subscribed for 1,471 other financial instruments for €32,379 (one trade)
Philippe Camus
Director
Bought 3,636 shares for €84,878 (one trade)
Sold 1,364 other financial instruments for €802 (one trade)
Alain Diéval
Director
Subscribed for 306 shares for a total of €8,186 (three trades)
Bernard Mary
Director
Subscribed for 655 shares for a total of €20,087 (two trades)
Michel Michaut
Director
Bought and subscribed for 387 shares for a total of €10,067 (seven trades)
Sold 100 other financial instruments for a total of €82 (one trade)
Daniel Coussens
Director
Bought and subscribed for 859 shares and other financial instruments for €20,650 (three trades)
Guy Savarin
Director
Subscribed for 1,091 shares for a total of €29,184 (two trades)
Sold 11 other financial instruments for €5.50 (one trade)
Jean-Michel Lemétayer
Director
Subscribed for 319 shares for a total of €8,533 (one trade)
There are no specific provisions relating to restrictions or
interventions of directors in trading in the company’s securities.
Because each director, by definition, is a ‘permanent insider’, the
rules on ‘windows’ for subscription/prohibition against trading in
Crédit Agricole S. A. shares apply to each director.
In addition, following implementation of the decree of 9 March 2006
amending article 222-14 of the AMF General Regulation, during
48 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
the Board of Directors’ meeting of 19 April 2006, the Head of
Compliance of Crédit Agricole S. A. reiterated to all corporate
executives officers the rules of transparency pertaining to trading
in financial instruments of the Company and the reporting
requirements arising therefrom.
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNALRAPPEL_T1
CONTROL
Composition of the Executive Committee
Composition of the Executive Committee
As of 1 March 2008
Georges Pauget, Chief Executive Officer
Jacques Lenormand, Deputy Chief Executive Officer in charge of Retail Banking in France and of Group Marketing Strategy
Jean-Frédéric de Leusse, Deputy Chief Executive Officer in charge of International Development
Mohammed Agoumi, Deputy Chief Executive Officer of LCL
Bertrand Badré, Group Chief Financial Officer
Jérôme Brunel, Head of Group Private Banking and of Crédit Agricole Capital Investissement & Finance
Agnès de Clermont Tonnerre, Corporate Secretary
Marie-Christine Dumonal, Head of Group Human Resources
Christian Duvillet, Chief Executive Officer, LCL
Ariberto Fassati, Head of Crédit Agricole S. A. Group for Italy – Chairman of Cariparma
Patrick Gallet, Group Head of Corporate Development – Head of Operations, Crédit Agricole S. A.
Gilles Grapinet, Head of Strategy
Jérôme Grivet, Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Calyon
Jean-Yves Hocher, Head of Crédit Agricole Insurance division, Chief Executive Officer, Predica
Marc Litzler, Chief Executive Officer, Calyon in charge of Corporate and Investment Banking
Gilles de Margerie, Head of Insurance, Asset Management and Wealth Management
Alain Massiera, Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Calyon
Bernard Michel, Head of the Property division and the Purchasing and Logistics department – Chairman, Crédit Agricole Immobilier
Yves Perrier, Head of Asset Management, Securities and Investor Services
Chairman and CEO of CAAM Group and CAAM
Alain Strub, Head of Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls
Patrick Valroff, Head of Specialised Financial Services, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Sofinco
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 49
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50 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
3
Crédit Agricole S. A.
in 2007
Company history
52
Organisation of Crédit Agricole Group and Crédit Agricole S. A.
53
Significant events in 2007
54
SIGNIFICANT EVENTS BY MONTH
54
Crédit Agricole S. A. business lines
56
SIX BUSINESS LINES
56
FRENCH RETAIL BANKING – CRÉDIT AGRICOLE REGIONAL BANKS
58
FRENCH RETAIL BANKING – LCL
59
INTERNATIONAL RETAIL BANKING
60
SPECIALISED FINANCIAL SERVICES
61
ASSET MANAGEMENT, INSURANCE AND PRIVATE BANKING
63
CORPORATE AND INVESTMENT BANKING – CALYON
65
SPECIALISED BUSINESSES AND SUBSIDIARIES
66
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 51
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CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE S.A. IN 2007
Company history
Company history
»
1894
Creation of the first “sociétés de Crédit Agricole”, later named Local
Banks of Crédit Agricole Mutuel.
»
1899
Law grouping the Local Banks into Crédit Agricole Regional
Banks.
»
1920
»
1999
Acquisition of Sofinco and an initial stake in Crédit Lyonnais.
»
2001
Reincorporation of CNCA as Crédit Agricole S. A., which was
floated on the stock exchange on 14 December 2001.
»
2003
Acquisition of Finaref and Crédit Lyonnais.
Creation of the Office National du Crédit Agricole, which became
Caisse Nationale de Crédit Agricole (CNCA) in 1926.
»
»
1945
2005
Presentation of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s three-year strategic development
plan.
Creation of Fédération Nationale du Crédit Agricole (F.N.C.A.).
»
1988
Law mutualising the CNCA, which became a limited company
owned by the Regional Banks and the Group’s employees.
»
1996
»
2006
Significant development in international retail banking, with the
acquisition of Emporiki Bank in Greece and the announced
acquisitions of Cariparma, FriulAdria and 202 Banca Intesa
branches in Italy.
»
2007
Acquisition of Banque Indosuez.
Launch of LCL competitiveness plan.
Acquisition of Italian branch networks completed.
Cariparma FriulAdria and Emporiki development plans announced.
52 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
RAPPEL_T1
IN 2007
Organisation of Crédit Agricole Group and Crédit Agricole S.A.
Organisation of Crédit Agricole Group
and Crédit Agricole S. A.
At 31 December 2007
The Crédit Agricole Group’s scope of consolidation comprises Crédit Agricole S. A., all of the Regional Banks
and the Local Banks, and their subsidiaries.
(*)
Except for Caisse Régionale de la Corse.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 53
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CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE S.A. IN 2007
Significant events in 2007
Significant events in 2007
»
SIGNIFICANT EVENTS BY MONTH
3 January
3 May
Crédit Agricole S. A. enters into a partnership with Ubifrance to
enhance support of French SMEs on export markets.
Finaref and Téléshopping roll out a first in m-commerce: payment
by mobile phone with the OKshopping card.
CAAM opens an office in Sydney.
LCL announces a new approach to private banking, with the
creation of 38 dedicated branches in France.
CA and LCL launch an innovative range of personal services, with
a differentiated approach for each network.
3 February
€4 billion share issue meets with success.
The Crédit Agricole Group wins “Grand Mécène” award from the
French Ministry of Culture and Communication for all of its actions,
alongside LCL.
Crédit Agricole Luxembourg acquires Bank Sarasin Europe S. A.,
a Luxembourg bank.
Calyon obtains approval to create a full-service banking subsidiary
in Algeria.
Crédit Agricole S. A. and the EIB enter into an agreement to finance
facilities powered by renewable energy.
Crédit Agricole launches a comprehensive range for young working
people.
3 March
3 June
The Group acquires control of Cariparma and FriulAdria in Italy.
LCL launches a competitiveness plan to stimulate growth.
Pacifica acquires all of Assurances Fédérales IARD shares from
AGF.
3 April
Crédit Agricole launches the “energy savings” loan, a range
combining sustainable development with a lasting relationship.
Crédit Agricole Asset Management expands its range and sets up
a platform of specialists dedicated to liability-driven investment
(LDI).
Presentation of 5-year strategic plan for Emporiki Bank’s
transformation and growth.
Crédit Agricole Group and OSEO enter into a partnership agreement
for Small Office, Home Office financing.
FriulAdria acquires 29 Intesa branches in Italy.
LCL obtains ISO 9001 certification for all of its telephone call centre
operations.
Cariparma acquires 173 Intesa branches in Italy.
Ideam launches the “Danone.communities” mutual fund.
3 July
ISO 14001 certification for the Group’s operations in the Ile-deFrance region managed by Crédit Agricole Immobilier.
Emporiki Bank joins Crédit Agricole in the FTSE4Good index of
socially responsible companies.
Crédit Agricole Immobilier acquires property developer Monné
Decroix.
Sofinco Saudi Fransi created in a partnership between Sofinco and
Banque Saudi Fransi.
CACEIS announces acquisition of the custody business of
HypoVereinsbank (HVB).
54 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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Significant events in 2007
3 August
3 November
Crédit Agricole Immobilier acquires property developer RSB.
Partnership between Crédit Agricole and Un Avenir Ensemble.
Calyon and Société Générale enter into an agreement to create
Newedge by merging Calyon Financial and Fimat.
Crédit Agricole S. A. announces acquisition of 15% of Bankinter
bank, subject to approval by the Spanish authorities.
Sale of equity holding in Banco del Desarrollo (Chile).
Crédit Agricole launches the first affinity bank card with the France’s
national football team, l’Equipe de France de football.
3 September
Crédit Agricole gains foothold in Japanese life insurance market.
Creation of UAF Patrimoine Formation, dedicated to training wealth
management professionals.
Finaref enters into a partnership agreement with GO Sport.
3 October
Crédit Agricole Asset Management inaugurates a branch office in
Frankfurt.
The Cariparma FriulAdria Group unveils its 2007-2010 corporate
strategic plan.
Crédit Agricole wins Recrutement et intégration des personnes
handicapées award for hiring and integration of disabled people.
Sofinco acquires Interbank and DMC Groep, thereby becoming the
leading consumer finance company in the Netherlands.
Crédit Agricole (Suisse) SA acquires Banque Nationale du Canada’s
subsidiary in Nassau (Bahamas).
3 December
Crédit Agricole is named “Bank of the Year” by The Banker
magazine for its sustainable development policy.
CACEIS acquires Olympia Capital International, which specialises
in alternative fund management
Flotation of a €500 million share issue for employees only.
Crédit Agricole S. A. and Intesa Sanpaolo finalise the unwinding of
the CAAM Sgr joint venture and Sofinco acquires Intesa Sanpaolo’s
equity interest in Agos.
3 January-March 2008
Operational launch of Newedge, the joint venture between Calyon
Financial and Fimat.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 55
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Crédit Agricole S.A. business lines
Crédit Agricole S. A. business lines
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SIX BUSINESS LINES
French retail banking –
Regional Bank (*)
French retail banking – LCL
3 Net income accounted for
at equity (*): €691 million
3 Net banking income:
€3.7 billion
Banking services for personal customers,
farmers, small businesses, companies and
public authorities, with a very strong regional
presence.
LCL is a French retail banking network
with a strong focus on urban areas. It is
organised into four main segments: retail
banking for individuals, retail banking for
small businesses, private banking and
corporate banking.
The Regional Banks provide a full range
of banking and financial products and
services, including mutual funds (money
market, bonds, equity), life insurance,
lending (particularly mortgage loans and
consumer finance, to small businesses and
corporates), payment systems, bankingrelated services and wealth management. In
addition to life insurance, they also provide
a broad range of property & casualty and
death & disability insurance.
These services are available both through
the local branch network and electronic
banking channels, primarily the internet and
mobile phones.
• 20 million customers (**)
• 7,025 branches
• Market leader in (source: Banque
de France; Company data):
▸ personal deposits: 24%,
▸ personal loans: 22%,
▸ farming sector: 80%,
▸ small businesses: 34%.
(source: CSA 2006)
(*)
Crédit Agricole S. A. accounts for 38 of the
Regional Banks using the equity method (25%).
Caisse Régionale de la Corse is not consolidated.
(**) Excl. professional and corporate customers.
56 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
LCL offers a full range of banking
products and services, together with
asset management, insurance and wealth
management. These services are distributed
through a variety of channels: the branch
network, with locations dedicated to
business customers and private banking;
websites and telephone.
• 6 million personal customers
• 2,064 branches:
▸ 50% of them in towns with over
200,000 inhabitants,
▸ 85 locations dedicated to business
customers,
▸ 54 private banking locations.
International retail banking
3 Net banking income
of consolidated subsidiaries:
€2.7 billion
Contribution from companies accounted for
by the equity method: €168 million.
Crédit Agricole S. A. holds a very strong
position in retail banking in Europe,
particularly in the euro zone, and, to a
lesser extent, in Africa and the Middle East
and Latin America.
In Italy, Crédit Agricole operates under
the Cariparma and FriulAdria banners. A
vast majority of these two networks’ 725
branches is in Northern Italy. They serve
over 1.4 million customers.
Crédit Agricole is active in Greece via
Emporiki, the No. 4 bank in that country.
With 380 branches in Greece, Emporiki
has a 9% market share and 1.5 million
customers. Emporiki is also present in the
Balkans.
Crédit Agricole also has a significant
presence in Portugal, through its 24.0%
stake in Banco Espirito Santo, the No. 3
local bank.
Outside the euro zone, Crédit Agricole S. A.
operates in Serbia via Meridian Bank,
Ukraine via Index Bank and Poland via
Lukas S. A.
In Africa, Crédit Agricole S. A. manages
Crédit du Maroc, Crédit Agricole Egypt and
banks in seven countries in Sub-Saharan
Africa – Cameroon, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire,
Gabon, Congo, Madagascar and Djibouti.
In Latin America, Crédit Agricole S. A. owns
Credit Uruguay Banco.
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
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Crédit Agricole S.A. business lines
Specialised financial services
Asset management, insurance
and private banking
3 Net banking income:
€3.0 billion
3 Net banking income:
€4.3 billion
3 Net banking income:
€2.8 billion
Consumer finance: a European leader
with operations in 20 countries in Europe,
Morocco and Saudi Arabia (source:
Company).
Asset Management: leader in mutual
funds in France and Europe (source:
Europerformance, Lipper) and one of the
top 5 asset managers in Continental Europe
(source: IPE)
Calyon is among the top ten in corporate
and investment banking in Europe, with
operations in 58 countries.
Sofinco and Finaref specialise in consumer
finance, which is distributed in France
through several channels: retail outlets (cars,
household equipment); a direct network
of branches; and partnerships with the
Regional Banks and LCL, as well as with
major retailers, mail order companies, car
manufacturers and financial institutions
(primarily insurance companies).
€61.7 billion in consumer finance
outstandings.
Lease finance: No. 2 in France with Crédit
Agricole Leasing (source: ASF), a specialist
in lease finance, financing and rental with
services (cars and computer equipment)
as well as public-private partnerships.
Crédit Agricole Leasing is also the leader in
property leasing.
The Group also has a lease finance operation
in Poland with EFL, the local leader in
equipment leasing.
Lease finance outstandings: €13 billion.
Factoring: No. 1 in France with Eurofactor
(source: ASF); 23% market share.
Eurofactor has the most extensive factoring
network in Europe, with operations in six
countries.
Factored receivables: €41 billion.
The Group’s asset management business,
which is conducted principally by the
Crédit Agricole Asset Management group,
encompasses mutual funds for retail,
corporate and institutional investors, and
discretionary management services for
corporate and institutional investors.
Assets under management: €525 billion.
Insurance: number two insurer in
France (source: FFSA); one of the top 20
worldwide.
The Insurance business line covers all
customer needs, with an extensive range
of savings and provident products in
personal Insurance and a broad array of
property & casualty insurance products
for retail, farming and business customers
sold through the Regional Banks and LCL.
In 2007, it expanded to encompass creditor
insurance and is developing all of these
businesses abroad.
Business in force: €182 billion.
Premium income: €21 billion.
Private banking: the Crédit Agricole Group
is a leader in private banking, both in France
where it is No. 1 in the high net worth
segment through BGPI, the Regional Banks
and LCL, and internationally, with operations
in Switzerland (including its subsidiaries and
branches in the Bahamas and Singapore),
Luxembourg, Monaco, Brazil, Miami (USA)
and Spain.
Corporate and investment
banking – Calyon
Capital markets and investment banking
encompasses Fixed income markets, Equity,
and Investment banking. Fixed income
markets is active in the major financial
marketplaces with six product lines: treasury,
foreign exchange, commodities, fixedincome derivatives and hybrids, debt and
credit markets, and credit derivatives. The
Equity line comprises two segments: equity
derivatives and funds, and brokerage. Equity
derivatives and funds includes trading and
the sale and arbitrage of equity derivatives,
indices and funds. Brokerage activities are
carried out by three subsidiaries: Cheuvreux,
which has a strong presence in Europe;
CLSA, the leader in the Asia – Pacific
markets; and Newedge, created by the
merger of Calyon Financial and Fimat.
Lastly, Investment banking encompasses
corporate finance activities (mergers &
acquisitions and equity capital markets).
Financing activities cover structured
finance and corporate banking. Structured
finance covers the entire spectrum of
asset and export financing world-wide,
including aircraft, railway and ship finance,
international trade finance, property and
hotel finance, project finance and telecom
finance. Corporate banking is in charge
of acquisition finance, bank syndication,
commercial banking, e-business and cash
management.
Assets under management, excluding the
Regional Banks and LCL life insurance:
€96 billion.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 57
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FRENCH RETAIL BANKING – CRÉDIT AGRICOLE REGIONAL BANKS
3 Business and organisation
Crédit Agricole S. A. owns 25% of each Regional Bank (with the
exception of Caisse Régionale de la Corse).
The Crédit Agricole Regional Banks are co-operative entities and
fully-fledged banks. They provide a full range of banking and
financial products and services to personal customers, farmers,
small businesses, companies and local authorities. They have a
network of 7,025 branches plus 8,000 in-store cash points which
provide Crédit Agricole customers with basic banking services.
3 Events in 2007
The Regional Banks have a leading position in almost all areas of
the retail banking market in France. They take about 24% of the
personal banking market with 20 million customers (source: Bank
of France). The Regional Banks continue to broaden their product
and service offering, working in close association with Crédit
Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries. They provide a comprehensive
range of banking and financial products and services, including
deposits and savings, equity, bond and mutual fund investments,
life insurance, lending (particularly mortgage loans and consumer
finance, to corporate clients and small businesses), payment
systems and property & casualty insurance. These services are
available both through the local branch network and electronic
banking channels (interactive voice server, internet, interactive TV
and mobile phone).
The Regional Banks continued to gain market share in all customer
segments. In 2007, they had reached their target of new individual
sight deposit accounts opening, leading to a total number of
19.2 million accounts, with a focus on young customers and
young working people. As part of a national campaign in June,
new packages of products and services tailored specifically to
young people just entering the workforce were rolled out, with
advertising primarily over the internet and mobile phones (WAP
site).
Multi-channel products were another active focus for development.
Online banking continued to expand, with 14% more customers
using online services and a 30% jump in the number of connections.
Crédit Agricole is developing partnerships designed to strengthen
multi-channel prospecting and is expanding its online range, with
a new e-brokerage offer, consumer loans and property & casualty
insurance quotations now routinely provided over the internet.
As the main bank used by 84% of farmers for their business
(source: Ipsos 2007), Crédit Agricole is the leader in financing for
farmers in France, with a market share of 80.3% (source: RICA
2006). In investments, its market share in interest-bearing deposits
and negotiable securities is over 70% (source: Ipsos 2007).
Nearly 25 Regional Banks representing 485 branches launched a
real estate business. Most of these branches will use the national
“Square Habitat” brand. Crédit Agricole is asserting its position as
a leader in the property market. Its target is to lift its share of the
property transaction market to 10%.
For corporate customers, 720 account representatives serve as
mainstays of the business relationship. They offer customers
the Crédit Agricole Group’s full range of products, services and
expertise, from commercial banking to investment banking via
financial engineering and wealth management for top executives.
35% of all small and mid-size companies bank with the Group
(source: TNS-Sofres 2007).
In savings, Crédit Agricole is enhancing its position, which is
based on forging lasting relationships, in developing ranges and
informational material for customers. It is marketing a range of mutual
funds with associated services and a range of multi-investment life
insurance policies. For non-regulated passbook accounts, it opted
to pass on the increase in interest rates in the middle of the year,
thereby offering passbook savings at competitive rates to attract
new customers. For its private banking clients, Crédit Agricole
offers diversification solutions, including dedicated solutions to
promote capital growth, as well as decision-making tools suited to
the customer’s level of involvement in investment decisions.
The Regional Banks have consolidated their position as the No. 3
lender to local authorities and public healthcare institutions.
Some 150 specialists who handle relationships with public sector
customers at the Regional Banks offer solutions in financing,
insurance, savings and services.
Where it will improve their financial strength and competitiveness,
some Regional Banks are merging in order to provide their
customers with a better quality of service. The number of Regional
Banks has fallen from 94 in 1988 to 39 at 31 December 2007. Each
merger is carefully planned and prepared to ensure that Crédit
Agricole preserves its local roots and continues to provide a highquality local service.
As the leading bancassurer to farmers, Crédit Agricole continues to
develop innovative products designed specifically for this customer
segment. The bank made a breakthrough with the DPA Account,
a business investment range restricted to farmers, and with the
PER Convergence retirement savings plan for farmers with farm
employees. Crédit Agricole continued to help farmers manage their
risks by expanding its insurance range and distribution network:
with 106,000 policies sold in 2007, it controls over 17% of this
market.
Fifteen Regional Banks have raised funds in the financial markets
by issuing listed Certificats Coopératifs d’Investissement, a form of
non-voting shares.
For small business customers, the Regional Banks launched
Prêt à piloter, an innovative financing solution that adjusts to
58 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
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Crédit Agricole S.A. business lines
fluctuations in the company’s business. Crédit Agricole continues
to support its corporate customers in their foreign operations and
has enhanced its range of custom-tailored services for small and
mid-size companies. Lastly, as a leading operator in local authority
and public housing financing, Crédit Agricole is a frontrunner in
»
public/private partnerships as a provider of financing for hospitals,
police stations and schools.
FRENCH RETAIL BANKING – LCL
LCL, which operates under its own brand name launched in
August 2005, is the only domestic branch bank in France to focus
exclusively on retail banking for personal, business and corporate
customers.
3 Business and organisation
LCL has set up a structure that is consistent with its strategic
objectives, namely its priority of stepping up business development.
Its organisation consists of four divisions: retail banking for
individuals, retail banking for small business customers, private
banking and corporate banking.
With six million customers, personal banking is LCL’s core
business. It provides all retail customers with a full range of
products and services covering all their needs in savings,
investments, consumer finance, personal loans, mortgage loans,
payment systems, insurance and advice. LCL has a network of
2,064 branches and 3,000 ATMs across France. They are being
automated and renovated under a vast programme to be phased
in over three years.
LCL also has a comprehensive, structured range of remote banking
services. The internet offering includes the Personal Banking
section of LCL’s website for online distribution of products and
services for retail customers and LCL Interactif for consulting
and/or managing accounts and securities portfolios. Customers
can also use LCL’s online bank, e.LCL, to access all products and
services wherever they may be in the world. Online bank customers
also have a personal adviser who can be contacted by e-mail or
telephone. LCL also offers remote banking services by phone, with
a single access portal, Accueil Conseil en Ligne and by mobile
phone (account information available over mobile internet and SMS
via LCL Avertis).
In private banking, LCL created a dedicated structure in 2007
around 38 branches located at the heart of their target markets.
To meet the expectations of its 300,000 small business and
corporate customers, LCL dedicates nearly 1,200 advisers across
France to tradespeople, small retailers, liberal professions, farmers
and small businesses. A personal adviser serves as a single point
of contact to help these customers manage their daily affairs and
achieve their business and personal projects.
The corporate banking division – an autonomous network dedicated
to mid-cap companies and institutional investors in France – was
reorganised at the beginning of 2007 to meet the twin requirements
of proximity and growth. This resulted in denser territorial coverage
around 47 business centre corporate divisions and 28 branches
for corporate customers, supported by regional centres with
expertise in commercial and corporate banking. Their activities are
broken down into two main areas: commercial banking, offering a
broad range of products and services for these customers’ routine
operations and needs, and corporate finance, which specialises
in LBOs/MBOs and mergers and acquisitions, to provide support
for their major projects. LCL Corporate Banking now has 26,000
customers.
3 Events in 2007
LCL develops its new banking model and boosts its name
recognition: two years after LCL was launched, seven out of
ten French people recognise the name. The new LCL branch
network organisation and the creation of Private banking laid the
groundwork for further growth in 2007. This will continue in 2008
with the launch of an ambitious development plan.
LCL is also implementing the competitiveness plan it unveiled in
mid-2007. The plan is designed to enhance the effectiveness of the
sales networks, to streamline administrative functions, to rationalise
IT spending and to optimise the use of LCL’s property in Ile de
France. The programme to modernise the 2,000 branch network
will continue. This reflects the fact that LCL’s network is a top
priority in its development strategy. At the same time, the support
and administrative functions will be streamlined. Two measures will
help to achieve this: first, an early retirement scheme available to all
employees age 57 and older, for which some 3,000 employees will
be eligible; second, a policy of not systematically filling vacancies
occurring through attrition.
In 2007, the IT system was optimised and simplified by combining
several of the Group’s payment instruments and collection activities.
This resulted in a significant reduction in operating costs.
Under the new organisation that was set up in 2007, the top
priorities are customer satisfaction and increasing the penetration
rate both in number of products sold and in number of clients. In
the retail banking network, this has resulted in more accountability
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 59
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for branch managers and increased contact by advisers who work
with small business customers. These measures were underpinned
by marketing innovations in the form of new products, banking
offers closely tailored to customer needs (new Zen agreement,
back-to-school range for students, etc.) and innovative services
such as the Groom Services range of personal services and Gaz
de France’s Dolce Vita energy contracts marketing, which are a
new source of revenue. Remote banking continued to expand
appreciably. The private banking range was also enhanced with
numerous new products.
»
In the small business segment, business was buoyed by an
expanded marketing range, with the launch of the IP ADSL offer
for small business customers in November 2007, which generates
savings for those customers and saves time on their payment
transactions.
In the business customer network, sales staff was increased by
20% and 10 new sales outlets were opened.
INTERNATIONAL RETAIL BANKING
With 27,000 employees serving 5.1 million customers in 19
countries through 2,006 branches, Crédit Agricole S. A. has a
substantial presence in retail banking in Europe and around the
Mediterranean Basin, and, to a lesser extent, in Sub-Saharan
Africa, the Middle East and Latin America.
3 Business and organisation
The main purpose of the International retail banking division is to
support, control and underpin the development of entities abroad
and to support the roll-out of all Group business lines in the local
market.
In Italy, the Group completed the acquisition of Cariparma and
FriulAdria announced at the end of 2006. Crédit Agricole S. A.
now owns 75% of the Cariparma FriulAdria group, alongside
the Regional Banks, which own 10%, via Sacam International,
and the Cariparma Foundation (15%). FriulAdria is 79% owned
by Cariparma and 21% owned by retail shareholders. With
operations in 9 regions and 45 provinces of Italy that encompass
60% of the country’s population and 70% of its GDP, the entity
covers what is now the Crédit Agricole Group’s second largest
domestic market, with 725 branches, 6,750 employees and
1.4 million customers.
Crédit Agricole is active in Greece with Emporiki Bank, the No. 2
branch network and the No. 4 bank in that country with a 10%
market share. Emporiki Bank has 380 branches and 1.5 million
customers. Outside Greece, it operates in Romania, Bulgaria,
Albania and Cyprus.
Crédit Agricole S. A. is present in Portugal through the No. 3
Portuguese bank, Banco Espirito Santo, in which it holds a 24.0%
interest.
In Central and Eastern Europe, in addition to its presence in
Poland, which dates back to 2001 with Lukas Bank, the Group is
active in Serbia via Meridian Bank and in Ukraine via Index Bank.
Including Emporiki’s presence in Albania, Bulgaria and Romania,
the Group’s network in Eastern Europe encompasses six countries
and more than 600 branches.
60 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
In Africa and the Middle East, Crédit Agricole S. A. manages
Crédit du Maroc, Crédit Agricole Egypte and seven banks in
Sub- Saharan Africa: Cameroon, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon,
Congo, Madagascar and Djibouti. With 200 branches, Crédit
du Maroc offers a comprehensive range to its retail banking
and corporate and investment banking customers. Created in
September 2006, Crédit Agricole Egypt resulted from the merger
between Calyon Egypt and EAB, which the Group acquired in
February 2006. Crédit Agricole S. A. owns 60% of the entity
alongside its Egyptian partner, the Mansour Maghrabi Group.
In Latin America, it owns 100% of Credit Uruguay Banco.
3 Events in 2007
2007 was a year of integration and business development, after the
major acquisitions of the previous 18 months.
In October, the Cariparma FriulAdria Group unveiled its 2007-2010
corporate strategic plan, which has three main focuses:
n to strengthen high-potential customer segments, both retail and
commercial;
n to increase the network’s density and expand its geographic
coverage;
n to develop synergies with Crédit Agricole S.A. business lines in
life insurance, credit insurance, specialised financial services and
asset management.
In April, Emporiki presented its operational, organisational and
commercial transformation plan, which it began to implement
immediately. At the same time, Emporiki worked on building
momentum to capture market share with new offerings and new
marketing tools targeting both retail and corporate customers.
During the first quarter, it launched a successful campaign offering
mortgage loans with a fixed rate over three years. It also opened
10 business centres dedicated to small and mid-size business
customers.
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
RAPPEL_T1
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Crédit Agricole S.A. business lines
In Eastern Europe, it continued its strategy of organic growth
through its subsidiaries in Poland, Serbia and Ukraine with a view
to strengthening the business franchise.
Crédit du Maroc stepped up its growth with the target of becoming
one of the five leading banks in Morocco by 2010 with a 10%
commercial market share. In 2007, the network was expanded
appreciably with 30 new branches opened during the year. New,
improved, targeted innovative ranges were launched. At the same
time, in retail banking, Crédit du Maroc is developing strong
business synergies with LCL.
»
At the beginning of 2007, Crédit Agricole Egypt adopted a
development plan designed to make it one of the four leading
banks in Egypt and to achieve a more even balance in its business
portfolio, which has historically focused heavily on corporate
customers. For retail customers, Crédit Agricole Egypt set up a
significant programme to expand the branch network with some 20
new openings each year. New offers were rolled out and extremely
well received, including in car loans, consumer finance and
electronic payment systems.
SPECIALISED FINANCIAL SERVICES
Within Crédit Agricole S. A. Group, Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Specialised
financial services business line encompasses consumer finance,
lease finance and factoring.
3 Consumer finance
Business and organisation
It is also developing a joint venture with Banque Saudi Fransi in
Saudi Arabia: Sofinco Saudi Fransi. Sofinco also provides support
for Crédit Agricole’s Polish subsidiary, Lukas, in developing its
consumer finance business. Lastly, it owns 50% of Fiat Group Auto
Financial Services thanks to a European partnership with Fiat.
LUKAS
Lukas is the leading consumer finance company in Poland. It enjoys
an excellent brand image and a strong presence in its market, with
140 credit centres in operation at the end of 2007.
SOFINCO
Sofinco has operations in France and seventeen other countries,
mostly in Europe.
In France, Sofinco offers its customers and partners a
comprehensive range of consumer loans including repayment
loans, revolving credit and hire purchase products. Its lending
products are accompanied by an array of insurance options and
other services, such as cards, maintenance, extended warranty,
assistance and loyalty programmes.
Sofinco distributes its products through four channels: directly
under the Sofinco brand, with rapid growth through the internet;
at points of sale in retail outlets; through business introducers;
and through partnerships with major national groups, mostly car
manufacturers, retail chains and financial institutions (banking and
insurance), with or without a shareholder relationship. Sofinco also
manages revolving credit facilities and car loans on behalf of the
Regional Banks, as well as LCL’s entire consumer finance book
(revolving credit and bank loans).
Abroad, Sofinco’s business activities and products are similar
to those in France, drawing on local skills to support its own
expertise. Sofinco has subsidiaries in nine countries: Germany
(Creditplus), Spain (Finconsum), Greece (Emporiki Credicom),
Hungary (Credigen), Italy (Agos), Netherlands (Ribank), Portugal
(Credibom), Czech Republic (Credium) and Morocco (Wafasalaf).
FINAREF
Finaref is the leader in private-label cards and distance selling of
financial products. It has two complementary areas of expertise:
consumer credit and insurance.
Finaref develops and distributes financial services for customers
of its partner stores and companies (La Redoute, Fnac, Printemps,
Club Méditerranée, Surcouf, Verbaudet, Cyrillus, etc.) in France
and abroad. It has a multi-channel distribution strategy, which
combines direct sales (call centres and e-commerce sites) with a
network of 400 in-store outlets at partner locations.
Finaref has developed an insurance business, which is centred on
credit insurance. These insurance operations are included in the
Group’s Insurance business line.
Outside France, Finaref has a structured network in Belgium and
Northern Europe (Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark).
Events in 2007
Sofinco and Finaref consolidated their positions in a climate of
slowing consumer finance business in Europe.
They entered into new partnerships in France and abroad with
prestigious names, including mass-market retailers, speciality
retailers and carmakers.
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On the internet and the e-commerce market front in general,
Sofinco and Finaref pressed ahead with their policy of technological
innovation: the Receive & Pay solution developed by Sofinco is
now present on over 150 e-commerce sites and in March, Finaref
and Téléshopping introduced mobile phone payments via the
OKshopping card, followed by the electronic signature solution
for prospects.
Abroad, in addition to organic growth and the development of
partnerships, new bases were created. Substantial synergies were
developed within the European partnership with Fiat. In France, the
first co-branded auto bank card was launched, depicting the new
Fiat 500, and an agreement was signed in the Czech Republic to
handle Fiat’s financing business in that market. In Saudi Arabia,
Sofinco Saudi Fransi was created with Banque Saudi Fransi. The
company, which distributes a comprehensive range of Islamic
financing, operates in business climate that is highly favourable
to the development of consumer finance in that market. Sofinco
acquired Interbank N.V. and DMG Groep, thereby strengthening its
positions in the Netherlands, where it is now the leading consumer
finance company. It also took control of a major broker in that
country in a market where 40% of consumer loans are distributed
through brokerages.
3 Lease finance –
Crédit Agricole Leasing and EFL
Business and organisation
Crédit Agricole Leasing provides lease finance solutions to
companies, small businesses, farmers and local authorities to
finance their investment in new property assets and equipment.
In France, it ranks number one in property leasing, number two in
equipment leasing and rental, and number one in Sofergie energy
financing (source: ASF, Company data).
Crédit Agricole Leasing is developing its range through several
distribution channels: the Group’s branch bank networks and
partnerships with equipment manufacturers and distributors,
primarily in equipment leasing. Through its dedicated subsidiaries,
each with its own sales network, Crédit Agricole Leasing boasts the
most comprehensive offering in the market, encompassing:
n public sector and public authority equipment financing (Fip);
n sustainable development finance projects (Unifergie);
n information systems leasing and management of computer
installations (Etica); and
n corporate car fleet rental and management (Ucalease).
Crédit Agricole Leasing operates abroad, where it supports the
Group’s expansion through subsidiaries and equity investments
or within partnerships. In Poland, its subsidiary called EFL is the
leader in leasing, with an 11.4% market share.
62 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Events in 2007
In 2007, Crédit Agricole Leasing reaped the first fruits of the
strategy it initiated at the end of 2006. It captured business in
high value-added segments such as property lease, international,
sustainable development and local authority finance. It also
bolstered its presence within the Group’s branch bank networks
and the networks of its equipment manufacturer and distributor
partners.
Crédit Agricole Leasing financed the cellars of a grand cru bordelais
for a total of €25 million and became the French leader in corporate
aircraft finance. Crédit Agricole Leasing also confirmed its positions
in sustainable development and public sector finance through
financing agreements signed on its behalf by Crédit Agricole S. A.
with the Council of Europe Development Bank (CEB) and the
European Investment Bank (EIB).
3 Factoring – Eurofactor
Eurofactor is the leading integrated factoring network in Europe
and helps companies in all sectors. It devises trade receivables
management solutions tailored to its clients’ strategy, business
sector, size and customer profile both in France and abroad. It also
has a pan-European offering.
Business and organisation
Eurofactor provides its customers with a local service through a
team of professionals who understand their country’s economic,
cultural and legal specifics, drawing on its network across
Germany, Benelux, Spain, Portugal, the United Kingdom and Italy,
its holdings in Morocco and Tunisia, and its membership of the
International Factors Group (IFG), which has 60 partners in 35
different countries.
Apart from trade receivables management, Eurofactor now offers a
syndication solution in France which has already proved successful
in the Anglo-Saxon countries. Capitalising on its success, Eurofactor
has extended its offering to include debt recovery, a completely
confidential service that helps customers recover their debts and
reduce their payment periods without having to develop their own
in-house expertise.
Eurofactor has developed an open model with its various partners
in the factoring market, which include branch banks (about 50% of
its business in France), networks of business introducers in France
and Europe, partners in Europe, and trade organisations and
related businesses and associations.
International business accounts for 43% of factored receivables.
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Events in 2007
In March, Eurofactor launched a new service via its Clientys
subsidiary. It now offers comprehensive services for managing
the entire customer cycle, from issuing invoices to collecting the
final payments. It also signed its first asset-based lending (ABL)
contracts, under which financing is backed to assets other than
receivables, such as inventories or equipment.
»
Eurofactor continued to strengthen its European network. It
established a base in Italy, the world’s second largest factoring
market, and increased the density of its coverage in Germany,
Spain and the United Kingdom.
ASSET MANAGEMENT, INSURANCE AND PRIVATE BANKING
3 Asset management, securities
and issuer services
Asset management
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s asset management business is conducted
mainly through Crédit Agricole Asset Management and its
subsidiaries. It also owns BFT, which offers institutional investors,
companies, banks and local authorities tailored financial products
and services.
BUSINESS AND ORGANISATION
Crédit Agricole Asset Management is responsible for developing
and managing investment products and asset allocation services
for personal and corporate customers and institutional investors.
CAAM has a multi-disciplinary arm (traditional investment,
employees savings), as well as specialist investment companies.
It offers its expertise to French and international institutional
investors, corporations, individuals and small businesses. It is
highly reputed in the market for its expertise, which has won a large
number of awards.
With €525 billion in assets under management at end-2007, CAAM
is among the top European players.
Products are distributed through the Crédit Agricole and LCL
branch networks, and through approved partners. CAAM is also
developing its own commercial capability in France and abroad to
target corporates, institutional investors and distribution partners.
CAAM takes a “multi-local” approach, with eight international asset
management centres in Paris, London, Milan, Madrid, Hong Kong,
Singapore, Tokyo and Seoul. The Group has commercial bases
in over 20 countries in Europe, Asia-Pacific, North America, the
Middle East and North Africa.
Six specialist investment companies complete the group:
n socially responsible investment (SRI): I.DE.A.M.;
n alternative investment: Systeia Capital Management;
n alternative multi-manager investment: CAAM AI;
n structured investment: CASAM, a joint venture with Calyon;
n property and land investment: Crédit Agricole Asset Management
Real Estate;
n active investment: CPR Asset Management.
EVENTS IN 2007
CAAM continued to expand its range and its international
footprint.
CAAM set up a platform of specialists dedicated to liabilitydriven investment (LDI) to support investors seeking optimum
management of financial risks associated with their long term
liabilities. CAAM offers these investors customised solutions based
on active, pragmatic management of the investor’s assets while
taking account of the structure of its liabilities.
Abroad, CAAM opened a sales office in Sydney, Australia. Very
early in 2008, this office was converted into a subsidiary to tap
the Australian market’s vast potential and to develop its local
customer base. CAAM then created a sales subsidiary in Canada.
In Saudi Arabia, it created a subsidiary jointly with Banque Saudi
Fransi, CAAM Saudi Fransi, which is 60% owned by Banque Saudi
Fransi and 40% owned by CAAM. During the second half, CAAM
opened a branch office in Frankfurt to enhance its presence among
institutional investors and outside distributors in Germany and
Austria.
In Italy, in unwinding its joint venture with Intesa San Paolo, CAAM
reasserted its development strategy on the retail market through
the Cariparma and FriulAdria networks and with the networks of
outside distributors with which CAAM SGR has forged close ties
and on the institutional investor market.
Securities and issuer services: CACEIS
BUSINESS AND ORGANISATION
CACEIS is a bank group specialising in asset servicing: depository/
custody activities, fund administration and issuer services for
institutional investors and large corporations. Leader in France,
CACEIS is also active in ten countries: Luxembourg, Germany,
Ireland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United States,
Canada, and Bermuda. With 3,230 employees, CACEIS ranks
within the first ten companies world-wide as a custodian with a total
of €2,272 billion in assets under custody. It is a European leader
in fund administration with a total of €944 billion in assets under
administration.
CACEIS is owned 50/50 by Crédit Agricole S. A. and Natixis.
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EVENTS IN 2007
2007 has been an important year of growth for CACEIS, illustrated
by two acquisitions that significantly increased its international
presence. It acquired the custody business of HypoVereinsbank
(HVB), which gave it a base in Germany with 15% market share
(outstanding €400 billion), and Olympia Capital International, which
administers nearly €50 billion in funds domiciled in Bermuda, the
Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, Ireland and the USA.
3 Insurance
Business and organisation
The Insurance business line covers all customer needs. It consists
of Predica in life insurance and Pacifica in property/casualty
insurance. In 2007, it enlarged its scope to include creditor
insurance with Finaref Insurance and it is expanding abroad in all
of these segments.
No. 1 in bancassurance and No. 2 in insurance in France, ranked
by premium inflows (source: FFSA), the Group stepped up its
international expansion, initiated two years earlier, with a special
focus on Europe: the Group is No. 2 in Portugal in bancassurance
with BES Seguros and BES Vida and No. 4 in Greece in life
bancassurance. It is developing its operations in Italy in conjunction
with Cariparma FriulAdria; it is also the leader in life bancassurance
in Lebanon and has just initiated operations in Japan.
PREDICA
Created in 1986, Predica is the Crédit Agricole Group’s life
insurance subsidiary. The merger with Union des Assurances
Fédérales (UAF) on 30 June 2004 helped Predica strengthen its
leading positions: it is now the No. 1 bancassurer and No. 2 life
insurer in France (source: FFSA).
Predica’s life and personal risk insurance offerings are designed to
meet the diversified needs of personal customers, private banking
customers, farmers, small businesses and companies. Its products
are distributed through bank branch networks:
n Crédit Agricole Regional Banks;
n LCL branches;
n BGPI for private banking clients; and
n other networks: La Médicale de France, which specialises in the
healthcare professions and a network of independent wealth
management advisers through UAF Patrimoine.
PACIFICA
Pacifica, the Group’s property & casualty insurance subsidiary
created in 1990, is one of the top ten players in personal insurance
in France. Its main aim is to develop products that complement its
banking and financial services.
64 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Pacifica initially focused on the personal market, offering Crédit
Agricole Group customers a full range of insurance products to
meet their needs at all times of their lives: car, household, private
healthcare, legal protection, personal accident, and also insurance
for motorcycles, caravans, hunting, yachting, etc.
Pacifica then capitalised on Crédit Agricole’s experience and strong
position to launch a comprehensive offering for active and retired
farmers in 2001, which it extended to the small business market
(tradespeople, shopkeepers and liberal professions) in 2006.
Pacifica is the third largest insurer to the French agriculture industry
(source: FFSA, Company data).
CREDITOR INSURANCE
The creditor insurance business was developed by Finaref, via
a multilingual management platform in Ireland that covers all
European Union countries. Its insurance offering is mostly linked
to financing, including loan insurance, products related to goods
sold by the retail stores (extended warranty, replacement value) and
death and disability insurance.
INTERNATIONAL INSURANCE
The Group exports its expertise abroad and is expanding its
international business, either with banking partners or directly
with Group entities that already have operations in the countries
concerned. It now has operations in 10 countries.
Events in 2007
In personal insurance, the Group asserted its leadership in
“Fourgous” transfers, with over 60% of transfers effected by
bancassurance companies. The multi-investment range was
enhanced by a plethora of formula-based funds designed to attract
savings while guaranteeing the investor’s principal. The Group’s
network turned in a handsome performance in the provident death
segment.
In non-life insurance, Pacifica acquired 100% of Assurances
Fédérales IARD. Underpinned by this expanded development
base, Pacifica continues to grow in the retail segment with the
convergence to Pacifica of the offers distributed to LCL customers
as from 1 January 2008.
Abroad, business is increasing rapidly due to the activities’
international expansion and to the creation of new bases. In the first
half, life insurance companies were set up in Serbia and Poland.
They will distribute their products through the Meridian Bank and
Lukas Bank networks, respectively. In Italy and Greece, two non-life
bancassurance companies were created and will begin to operate
during the first half of 2008. Lastly, in the second half of 2007,
Pacifica created a life insurance company in Japan, the world’s
second largest life insurance market. It will distribute unit-linked
retirement savings products through partner branch bank networks
in Japan.
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3 Private banking
Business and organisation
The Group is a major operator in the private banking market
in Europe. In France, the various Group entities – the Regional
Banks, the private banking platform structured around Banque
de Gestion Privée Indosuez (BGPI) and its asset management
company Gestion Privée Indosuez (GPI), and the business lines that
provide investment products and services – work in partnership.
By working together, they can offer customers innovative ranges of
products and services, such as remote advisory services or guided
investment services. LCL still runs its private banking operations on
an autonomous basis, under a segmentation project designed to
identify high net worth customers in the network and to offer them
service through the specialised regional private banking units.
Abroad, private banking operations are carried out under the
Crédit Agricole Private Bank brand. The subsidiaries hold leading
positions in the regions where they operate. In Switzerland, Crédit
Agricole (Suisse) S. A. is now one of the leading foreign private
banks in the country, with €32.6 billion in assets under management
»
(source: Company). In Luxembourg, Credit Agricole Luxembourg is
one of the major local private banks, and CFM remains the leader
in Monaco’s banking market (source: Company). The Group also
has a significant presence in the United States (Miami), Spain and
Brazil.
Events in 2007
During the year, the business line expanded appreciably organically
and through large acquisitions. In Luxembourg, Crédit Agricole
Luxembourg acquired Sarasin Europe. Crédit Agricole Suisse
acquired National Bank of Canada’s subsidiary in the Bahamas.
The Group also stepped up its presence in high-growth regions:
the Middle East, with a new base in Qatar; Latin America, with a
surge in Brazil driven by an outstanding performance for investment
products; Asia, with the opening of a branch office in Hong Kong
at the beginning of 2007 and the recruitment of a new team. In the
USA (Miami), the business activities previously managed under the
LCL name were combined under the Crédit Agricole Miami Private
Bank brand, which is dedicated to non-resident South American
customers.
CORPORATE AND INVESTMENT BANKING – CALYON
Calyon is one of Europe’s top ten investment banks.
In 2007, Capital markets and investment banking was organised
around three segments: Fixed income markets, Equity and
Investment banking:
3 Business and organisation
n fixed income markets covers six product lines: treasury, foreign
With operations in 58 countries, Calyon focuses on major corporate
clients and financial institutions throughout the world, offering
them a comprehensive range of financial products and a powerful,
extensive international network. In addition to its strong presence
in the leading financial marketplaces (London, New York, Tokyo
and Hong Kong), Calyon derives a substantial percentage of its
revenues from Western Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. Calyon
is also developing its operations in the Middle East, primarily
through Banque Saudi Fransi, one of Saudi Arabia’s leading banks,
which is 31% owned by Calyon, and in Central Europe. In France,
customers of the Regional Banks and LCL have access to capital
markets and investment banking expertise through Calyon’s
branches.
Calyon’s operations are broken down into two lines: Capital
markets and investment banking and Financing activities.
exchange, commodities, fixed-income derivatives and hybrids,
debt and credit markets, and credit derivatives;
n equity covers two segments: equity derivatives and funds, and
brokerage. Equity derivatives and funds encompasses trading,
sales and arbitrage of equity, index and fund derivatives, ranging
from cash products such as warrants, convertible bonds and
certificates to more sophisticated investment solutions such as
structured products. Brokerage is organised into three leading
companies: CA Cheuvreux the Crédit Agricole Group’s European
broker, whose offices rank among the Top 5 for local research and
which is ranked No. 1 in Europe in French equities by Institutional
Investor; Newedge (formerly Calyon Financial), created in 2007
and jointly owned with Société Générale, which offers its
customers a comprehensive range of clearing and execution
services for financial instruments and commodities options and
futures contracts and for OTC-traded fixed-income products,
currency products, equities and commodities. CLSA, the leader
in the Asian markets, which offers brokerage, investment banking
and private placement services;
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 65
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n investment banking is organised around three major segments:
global corporate finance, which covers merger and acquisition
advisory services; global equity capital markets, which
encompasses services to issuers of equities or securities giving
access to capital, and transactions for customers that use equity
derivatives to handle corporate finance issues; and investment
banking origination, which is responsible for securing mandates,
with a sector-based organisation.
Financing activities cover structured finance and corporate
banking:
n structured finance, an area in which Calyon excels, covering the
full range of asset and export finance on a global scale: aircraft
and rail finance; ship finance; international trade (export finance,
trade finance, commodities trade finance, structured commodities
finance); property and hotel finance; project finance; telecoms;
n corporate banking includes acquisition finance, with a cross-
functional organisation to facilitate Calyon’s relations with
investment funds on a global scale; banking syndication; and
the global E-Business and cash management business created
at the end of 2006 to offer a global range, cross-functionally with
the product lines, by capitalising on Calyon’s strengths in France,
in Central and Eastern Europe and in Asia.
»
3 Events in 2007
In the Equity segment, Calyon’s world market share in equity and
fund derivatives expanded appreciably in 2007, in a market that
enjoyed rapid growth, especially in the first half.
In investment banking, Calyon ranks among the very top firms
in France. It is rated No. 1 in primary equity deals in France by
Thomson Financial and No. 5 in advisory services in France by
Thomson Financial in number of deals closed. Despite difficult
market conditions starting in the summer, it delivered robust
revenue growth.
Abroad, in 2007 it opened an office in Hamburg dedicated to
shipping to expand its position in a highly active German market
and to strengthen client coverage in Russia. Calyon also secured
a licence to offer full investment banking services from the
international financial marketplace in Dubai. In Algeria, Calyon
Algérie was chartered as a full-service bank. Crédit Agricole and
Banque Saudi Fransi entered into three joint ventures in 2007,
including one with Calyon: Calyon Saudi Fransi, which is active in
equity capital markets, debt capital markets and corporate finance
advisory services.
SPECIALISED BUSINESSES AND SUBSIDIARIES
3 Private equity
Crédit Agricole Private Equity
Crédit Agricole Private Equity, an AMF-approved management
company, is dedicated to acquiring direct equity stakes in
unlisted companies. Crédit Agricole Private Equity is active in a
variety of private equity segments: expansion and buyout capital,
venture capital, secondary market, mezzanine, renewable energy,
infrastructures held under private/public partnerships. It manages
€2.8 billion in various types of private equity vehicles (FCPR,
SICAR, FCPI, SCR).
Idia Agricapital
Idia Agricapital works with companies in the farming and agrifoods
industry and with cooperative farm groups to provide private equity
(expansion capital, LBO/MBO finance). It also manages financial
and forest groups and acquires majority interests in wine domains.
66 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Sodica
Sodica specialises in midcap deals. It provides advisory services
to corporate executives in their M & A and divestment projects
and in financial engineering. It is a leader in midcap mergers and
acquisitions and is also developing a stock market engineering
business. Sodica helps its clients bring their projects to fruition both
in France and abroad.
3 Crédit Agricole Immobilier
A subsidiary of Crédit Agricole S. A., Crédit Agricole Immobilier
is active in all property segments except financing – property
development and investment, property management and investment
advice, public and private sector contracting management, rental
management, operating premises and transactions. Crédit Agricole
Immobilier is active in all property markets: office, residential, retail,
hotels, light industrial, logistics, and public facilities in France and
in Europe.
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In 2007, CA Immobilier strengthened its presence in residential
property development with the acquisition of Monné-Decroix, one
of France’s leading property developers, and of RSB, a property
developer that operates exclusively in Brittany.
3 Uni-Éditions
Uni-Éditions is Crédit Agricole S. A.’s press subsidiary that
publishes 6 magazines oriented towards general public, with
around 100 people working equally in commercial, administrative
and accounting functions for one part and writing functions for the
other. It also has a news agency that offers the Regional Banks
and Crédit Agricole S.A. a wide array of newsletters and guides
covering special topics of interest to their customers and in-house
magazines.
Dossier Familial, Uni-Éditions’ flagship title, confirmed its position
as France’s leading monthly magazine in paid circulation, with
1,218,000 subscribers. Détente Jardin is now the most popular
gardening magazine in France, with average paid circulation of
304,000 in France in 2007. In just six years, Maison Créative has
become No. 1 in the home/decoration category, with average
paid circulation of 279,000 in France. Régal is making its mark
in the culinary and gastronomic category, with paid circulation of
113,000.
In 2007, Uni-Éditions launched I comme Info, a practical monthly
news magazine that draws on Dossier Familial for inspiration but is
intended for LCL customers. In September, Uni-Éditions acquired
the monthly Santé Magazine, one of the main titles in healthcare
in France. With strong name recognition (over 4,300,000 readers)
and a powerful brand, Santé Magazine is entirely in keeping with
Uni-Éditions’ strategy in publishing.
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4
Crédit Agricole S. A.
management report
for the year 2007
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s activity and results
PRESENTATION OF THE CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP’S FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ENVIRONMENT
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. CONSOLIDATED RESULTS
RESULTS BY BUSINESS LINE
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
PRUDENTIAL RATIOS
RELATED PARTIES
INTERNAL CONTROL
RECENT TRENDS AND OUTLOOK
Crédit Agricole S. A. parent company financial statements
ANALYSIS OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL SUMMARY
RECENT CHANGES IN SHARE CAPITAL
CHANGE IN SHARE OWNERSHIP OVER THE PAST THREE YEARS
AUTHORISATIONS TO EFFECT CAPITAL INCREASES
PURCHASE BY THE COMPANY OF ITS OWN SHARES
INFORMATION ON EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
Risk factors
70
70
72
72
74
88
91
93
93
93
97
97
98
99
100
101
103
105
106
CREDIT RISK
MARKET RISK
RISKS RELATED TO THE RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE SECTOR IN THE USA
ASSET/LIABILITY MANAGEMENT
INSURANCE SECTOR RISKS
OPERATIONAL RISKS
LEGAL RISKS
NON-COMPLIANCE RISKS
INSURANCE AND RISK COVERAGE
Employee, social and environmental information
in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
107
118
122
124
129
132
134
135
135
136
KEY SOCIAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
KEY COMMUNITY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
KEY ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS IN THE CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. GROUP’S CORE
BUSINESSES
KEY ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
136
153
154
158
161
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 69
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MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s
activity and results
»
PRESENTATION OF THE CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP’S
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
3 Changes to Accounting Principles
and Methods
Application of IAS/IFRS accounting standards
The introductory note to the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s
consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December
2007 sets out the regulatory framework and highlights comparability
issues with the figures for 2006.
Since 1 January 2005, Crédit Agricole S. A.’s consolidated financial
statements have been prepared in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted by the European
Union at the balance sheet date.
The IFRS applicable to the annual financial statements and
reporting information at 31 December 2007 include new standards
and new interpretations adopted by the International Financial
Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) that were approved by
the European Union and mandatory at 31 December 2007. These
standards are the same as those used to prepare the consolidated
financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2006,
except for the change in method on treatment of minority interests
described in Note 1.2 of the Notes to the Financial Statements.
They are also supplemented as required by the provisions of those
standards and interpretations that must be applied in 2007 for the
first time.
These cover the following:
n IFRS 7 on information to be provided on financial instruments;
n the amendment to IAS 1, Presentation of Financial Statements,
on additional quantitative and qualitative information to be
provided on shareholders’ equity;
n IFRIC 7 applying the restatement approach under IAS 29 financial
reporting in hyperinflationary economies;
n IFRIC 8 clarifying the scope of IFRS 2 relating to share-based
payments;
n IFRIC 9, Reassessment of embedded derivatives;
n IFRIC 10, Interim financial reporting and impairment.
70 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
These new arrangements are described in Note 1 to the financial
statements, “Principles and methods applicable in the Group”,
which provides a description of the main accounting principles and
methods used by the Group and their mode of application.
They did not have a significant impact on the financial statements
during 2007.
The Group did not apply optional standards and interpretations
during the year.
Changes in accounting methods
We draw readers’ attention to the change in accounting method
applied to movements in minority interests in fully-consolidated
subsidiaries, which has been applied as from 1 January 2007, to
ensure comparability with market practices.
To restore comparability over time, this change of accounting
method has been applied retroactively to net opening equity at
1 January 2006 as well as to the consolidated financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2006.
This change of method and its impact on the accounts are
explained in Note 1.2 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial
Statements for the year ended 31 December 2007.
3 Changes in the scope of consolidation
At 31 December 2007, the Group’s scope of consolidation
encompassed 444 subsidiaries and equity investments compared
with 426 at 31 December 2006. Notes 12 and 3.1 to the financial
statements present the Group’s scope of consolidation and
changes to the scope during the year.
Since 31 December 2006, the scope of consolidation has been
expanded, following Crédit Agricole S. A.’s acquisitions of FriulAdria
(Banca Popolare FriulAdria S.p.A.) and Cariparma (Cassa di
Risparmio di Parma e Piacenza) as of 1 March 2007, followed by
their acquisition of 29 and 173 former Banca Intesa branches on
1 April and 1 July 2007, respectively.
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Conversely, Banca Intesa S.p.A., which was previously
consolidated as an equity associate by the Crédit Agricole S. A.
Group, was deconsolidated as from 1 January 2007 following
the Intesa Sanpaolo merger. Furthermore, on 27 December 2007,
Crédit Agricole S. A. and Intesa Sanpaolo unwound their joint
venture specialising in asset management in Italy, CAAM Sgr.
Crédit Agricole S. A. sold to Intesa Sanpaolo business activities
representing the 65% interest in Nextra Investment Management
acquired from Banca Intesa in December 2005, which generated a
€220 million gain on disposal, and created a new subsidiary, Crédit
Agricole Asset Management SGR.
n Crédit Agricole Luxembourg’s acquisition of Bank Sarasin
European S. A., the Luxembourg subsidiary of Bank Sarasin. Since
2 July 2007, Bank Sarasin Europe S. A. has been operating under
the name Crédit Agricole Luxembourg Bank, a 98%- owned, fully
consolidated subsidiary of Crédit Agricole S. A. Crédit Agricole
Luxembourg Bank and Crédit Agricole Luxembourg are scheduled
to merge by mid-2008;
n Crédit Agricole Immobilier’s acquisition during the second half
of 2007 of a majority stake in the Monné Decroix group, one of
France’s largest residential property developers. This group is
now fully consolidated in the accounts of Crédit Agricole S. A.
2007 results reflect the inclusion of the financial results from the
Intesa Sanpaolo merger in the Group’s accounts (a €1,097 million
gain on dilution) and from the disposal of part of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
interest in the new group (a €472 million gain on disposal).
Other consolidation changes in 2007 had no material impact on the
Group’s financial statements. They consisted mainly of mergers or
absorptions of companies within the Group or name changes.
The main changes in the scope of consolidation between 2006 and
2007 were also a result of:
Conversely, some of the changes in the scope of consolidation
affecting the comparability of the 2006 and 2007 accounts are due
to transactions completed in 2006. These mainly include:
n the deconsolidation of Banco del Desarrollo in December 2007,
following the sale of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s 23.7% stake in the
Chilean bank, which was previously accounted for on the equity
method;
n the acquisition by Sofinco of 100% of the two following
n the purchase via a tender offer of a 67% stake in the Greek bank,
Emporiki Bank, which has been fully consolidated in the Group’s
accounts since the second half of 2006;
n the acquisition of 100% of Index Bank (JSC Index Bank HVB) in
the Ukraine, which was completed on 31 August 2006 and has
been fully consolidated since that date;
subsidiaries of ABN AMRO: Interbank N.V., a consumer finance
company in the Netherlands, and DMC Groep N.V., a brokerage
specialising in consumer finance distribution. Since the fourth
quarter of 2007, these companies have been fully consolidated in
the accounts of Crédit Agricole S. A.;
n the consolidation of FGAFS, a joint venture in consumer finance
n Pacifica’s acquisition in September 2007 of the 60% of
n acquisitions of majority interests by Crédit Agricole S. A. in
Assurances Fédérales IARD previously owned by AGF. Following
this transaction, Assurances Fédérales IARD, which is now
wholly-owned by the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group, merged with
Pacifica;
the ESFG (Espirito Santo Financial Group) bancassurance
subsidiaries in Portugal, which were renamed BES Vida and BES
Seguros. These companies, in which the Group owns 61.9% and
56% respectively, were fully consolidated during the second half
of 2006.
n the acquisition by CACEIS of the independent alternative fund
administration services group Olympia Capital International and
its subsidiaries. The transaction, which was completed in the
fourth quarter, resulted in the inclusion of these entities in the
Group’s scope of consolidation;
n the acquisition by CACEIS of Financial Services Markets Bank
GmbH, a subsidiary of HypoVereinsbank (HVB) in charge of
HVB’s custody business. The entity, which was renamed CACEIS
Bank Allemagne, has been proportionately consolidated in the
Group’s accounts since the end of 2007;
created at the end of 2006 with the Fiat Group. This entity is
consolidated on the proportional method;
In all, substantial changes in scope took place during 2006 and
2007 as a result of strategic transactions, especially abroad. The
impact of these changes in scope on the main intermediate income
statement balances was significant in 2007: they accounted for
13.4% of net banking income, 12.1% of expenses and 15.6% of
gross operating income.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 71
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MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
»
ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ENVIRONMENT
2007 was split into two distinct periods. During the first part of the
year, the world economy continued to grow at a surprisingly
robust pace. The slowdown in the US was confined to the property
market, with no real visible effects spreading to other business
sectors. In the rest of the world, the economy was resilient. Europe’s
growth surpassed its potential and the momentum from the catchup effect in emerging countries continued to act as a driver. On
the financial front, the first cracks began to appear in the spring,
as the default rate on subprime mortgages began to escalate and
the first wave of mortgage bank failures swept the USA. Even so,
the stock exchanges quickly recovered and risk premiums sank
to record lows. This episode served as a reminder of the inherent
weaknesses of strong world-wide growth underpinned by steadily
widening financial imbalances – a runaway US trade deficit,
climbing consumer debt, inflated real estate prices, investors using
more and more leverage to achieve higher returns – and fed by low
interest rates, which are synonymous with cheap credit. Abundant
world liquidity added fuel to the fire.
When the crisis erupted in the summer of 2007, it revealed the
extent of the damages caused by mega-marketing of mortgage
loans to subprime customers in the USA. The default rate on
»
subprime mortgages began to soar, aggravated by the plunge
in property prices. It then spread to the different securitisation
tranches, causing their prices to collapse on world financial
markets. The entities were no longer able to refinance maturing
paper and this led to an explosion in demand for liquidity at a
time when the money market was nearing paralysis. This was the
starting point of the liquidity crisis that began on 9 August. The
central banks were left with no choice other than to bridge the
liquidity gap throughout the summer and beyond. In September, in
response to the threat that the crisis would intensify and spread to
the real economy, the Fed cut its funds rates.
The loss of confidence in securitised finance spread like wildfire. In
response to this double face crisis, starting in the 30 June interim
financial reporting period, the banks began to take large impairment
charges for assets with exposure to the US mortgage markets.
By the end of the year, confidence had not yet been restored and the
crisis had settled in for the duration. Even so, despite the bad news
from the financial sector, economic statistics showed no cause for
alarm, and the world economy was still showing resilience.
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. CONSOLIDATED RESULTS
2007 was a mixed year for Crédit Agricole S. A. and was marked by
two key events. First, the Group met some of the goals set at the
end of 2005 for its 2006-2008 development plan ahead of schedule.
The end result was profitable, controlled, balanced growth over the
year, in a context of international expansion in all business lines.
The Group completed a major stage in its transformation, with the
acquisitions and successful integration of Emporiki in Greece and
the Cariparma – FriulAdria group in Italy. The Group also acquired a
20% stake (including 14.66% in a deal completed in February 2008)
in Bankinter, one of Spain’s fastest-growing, most technologically
advanced banks.
Outside international retail banking, the Group also stepped up
diversification of international operations in its target businesses
and regions, particularly in consumer finance with FGAFS, a joint
venture created at the end of 2006 with the Fiat Group in Italy, and
with the acquisition in 2007 of two companies, Interbank N.V. and
DMC Groep N.V. in the Netherlands; in asset management, with the
(1) Entities not consolidated in 2007.
72 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
successful reconfiguration of the organisation in Italy, the formation
of a joint venture in Saudi Arabia and the creation of a subsidiary
in Australia (1); in insurance, with the launch of a life insurance
company in Japan (1) and, in Private banking (1), with the acquisition
of Bank Sarasin Europe S. A. in Luxembourg.
Second, the world banking sector as a whole was affected by
difficulties associated with the US subprime crisis, which was
considerably magnified as from the summer of 2007. In this difficult
and highly unstable environment, in keeping with its rigorous and
cautious approach, every quarter, the Group tightened up the
impairment policy it applies to financial instruments exposed to
the crisis.
2007 results reflect the appreciable reinforcement of risk scenarios
associated with the credit derivative markets. This stringent
counterparty market risk impairment policy is consistent with
maintaining a sound financial base.
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENTS - KEY INTERMEDIATE INCOME STATEMENT BALANCES
(in millions of euros)
Net banking income
2007
2006 *
Change
2007/2006
Change
2007/2006 **
+25.5%
16,768
16,187
+3.6%
(12,718)
(10,355)
+22.8%
+22.8%
4,050
5,832
-30.6%
+30.5%
Risk-related costs
(1,897)
(612)
x3.1
Operating income
2,153
5,220
-58.8%
Income from equity affiliates
1,269
1,671
-24.1%
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and changes in the value of goodwill
1,395
(40)
n.m.
Pre-tax income
4,817
6,851
-29.7%
Tax
(257)
(1,590)
-83.8%
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
Gross operating income
NET INCOME
4,556
5,258
-13.4%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
4,044
4,860
-16.8%
2.51
3.31 ***
Base earnings per share (euros)
*
The 2006 accounts have been adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes in minority interests: Net gains (losses) on other assets for the year ended 31 December 2006
were reduced by €61 million (see Note 1.2 of the Notes to the Financial Statements).
** Excluding charges to/write-backs from provisions for home purchase savings plans and the impact of the US subprime crisis on NBI.
*** Diluted earnings per share after share issue on 6 February 2007: €3.25.
After deducting the €512 million of minority interests (up 28.6%),
net income (Group share) was €4,044 million, down 16.8% on the
previous year, despite the €2.7 billion negative impact from the
crisis in the structured credit markets.
Net banking income rose by 3.6% year-on-year to €16,768 million,
after €3,220 million of losses and asset impairment charges for
capital market activities in the wake of the US residential mortgage
crisis. Excluding this effect and the revenues from write-backs
of provisions for home purchase savings plans (€135 million in
2007 against €366 million in 2006), NBI was 25.5% higher. This
performance was underpinned by the momentum of the three
business lines – French and international retail banking, Specialised
financial services and Corporate and investment banking – that
made a balanced contribution to the Group’s revenues. It reflects
strong organic growth as well as the contribution from business lines’
growth engines, particularly international ones, that the Group has
set up in each business line. It also includes the €472 million gain
on the disposal of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s interest in the Intesa San
Paolo group.
On a like-for-like basis and at constant exchange rates, and
excluding the two foregoing impacts, NBI advanced by over 13%.
Operating expenses moved up 22.8% to €12,718 million; this trend
was due to three factors: the consolidation of new entities, LCL’s
competitiveness plan and organic growth.
More than half of the 12.1% increase in expenses was
attributable to the consolidation of newly acquired entities (mainly
Cariparma FriulAdria, Emporiki, FGAFS, Meridian Bank, Index
Bank, Monné Decroix, and AF Iard).
LCL’s 2007-2010 competitiveness plan, unveiled on 1 June 2007,
represents a total cost of €601 million after inclusion in the fourth
quarter of the additional impact from the 2008 Social Security Financing
Act. It is allocated to Retail banking - LCL (€189 million) and the
Proprietary asset management and other activities business line
(€412 million) based on their pro rata share of projected cost reductions.
After the plan has been fully implemented (in 2011), costs are expected
to be cut by €300 million a year, or 11% of the 2006 cost base.
On a like-for-like basis and at constant exchange rates, and
excluding the LCL plan, expenses rose by 6.2% due to substantial
organic growth and continued investments, primarily in IT systems,
human resources (the headcount increased by 1,470 not including
changes in scope) and to strengthen controls.
Gross operating income was €4,050 million, a 30.6% drop from
2006. On a like-for-like basis and at constant exchange rates
and excluding the impact of the financial crisis, GOI would have
increased by 15.4%.
Risk-related costs were €1,897 million, €1,285 million higher than
in 2006. They include an impairment charge of €807 million for
counterparty risk for credit enhancer ACA Financial Guaranty and
€75 million in other provisions for the stuctured credit market crisis
booked in capital market activities. They also reflect a €107 million
increase in collective provisions in financing activities and the
integration of the new foreign entities (primarily Cariparma FriulAdria
and Emporiki).
Doubtful loans amounted to €10.2 billion at 31 December 2007.
This represents 2.7% of gross amounts due from banks and loans
and advances to customers (not including leasing), compared
with 2.8% in 2006. Provision cover amounted to 59.1% excluding
collective provisions. Adjusted for the acquisition of a portfolio of
impaired assets, the coverage rate was 64.4%.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 73
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MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
The contribution of equity affiliates fell by 24.1% from €1,671 million
in 2006 to €1,269 million in 2007, mainly due to the deconsolidation
of Intesa, whose equity-accounted contribution came to €419 million
in 2006. Excluding this item, net income from equity affiliates was
stable; the share of net income from the Regional Banks, which
accounts for the bulk of this item, moved up 2% to €865 million.
The net gain on disposal of other assets of €1,474 million includes
the gains recognised by Crédit Agricole S. A. following the Banca
Intesa – San Paolo IMI merger (€1,097 million gain on dilution on
»
Intesa and €220 million gain on disposal from the unwinding of the
CAAM Sgr joint venture in asset management). It also includes the
gain on the disposal of the 23.7% stake in Banco del Desarrollo
in Chile.
The tax charge came to €257 million, down significantly on the
previous year, primarily due to the loss registered by Capital
markets and investment banking.
Return on equity was 12.2% (before unrealised gains).
RESULTS BY BUSINESS LINE
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group is organised into six business
lines:
n French retail banking – Regional Banks;
n French retail banking – LCL;
n international retail banking;
n specialised financial services;
n asset management, insurance and private banking;
n corporate and investment banking; and
n proprietary asset management and other activities.
The organisation and business activities of these business lines
are described in Note 6 in the Notes to the Financial Statements,
“Segment reporting”.
The organisation of activities between business lines did not change
in 2007. However, Banca Intesa S.p.A., which was previously
accounted for by the equity method (16.8% interest) within the
International retail banking business line, was deconsolidated on
1 January 2007 following the creation of the new Intesa Sanpaolo
S.p.A. group and the resulting dilution of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
stake in this new entity. The residual interest (just over 5%) is now
included in available-for-sale financial assets under Proprietary
asset management and other activities.
3 Allocation of capital
The method of allocating capital by business line is described in Note 6 in the Notes to the Financial Statements, “Segment reporting”.
RISK-WEIGHTED ASSETS APPLIED FOR CAPITAL ALLOCATION PURPOSES
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
118.6
108.5
Crédit Agricole Regional Banks (25%)
69.3
63.3
LCL
49.4
45.2
International retail banking
47.9
22.1
Specialised financial services
55.3
41.7
(in billions of euros)
French retail banking
Asset management, insurance and private banking
Corporate and investment banking
74 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
20.8
19.0
160.7
132.7
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RAPPEL_T1
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The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
ALLOCATED CAPITAL BY BUSINESS LINE
(in billions of euros)
French retail banking
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
7.4
6.6
Crédit Agricole Regional Banks
4.4
3.9
LCL
3.0
2.7
International retail banking
3.4
3.8
Specialised financial services
3.3
2.5
Asset management, insurance and private banking
7.8
7.2
Corporate and investment banking
Capital markets and investment banking
Financing activities
10.0
8.3
3.0
2.5
7.0
5.8
31.9
28.4
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
French retail banking
23.2%
23.4%
International retail banking
10.7%
13.3%
Specialised financial services
10.5%
8.9%
Asset management, insurance and private banking
24.4%
25.4%
Corporate and investment banking
31.2%
29.0%
CAPITAL ALLOCATED TO BUSINESS LINES
100%
100%
TOTAL CAPITAL ALLOCATED TO BUSINESS LINES
(in %)
For each business line, ROE is calculated by dividing the corresponding annualised net income (after rebilling any equity surplus/deficit) by
the amount of capital allocated to the business at year-end.
3 Activity and results by business line
CONTRIBUTION BY BUSINESS LINE TO CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.’S NET INCOME (GROUP SHARE)
(in millions of euros)
French retail banking
31/12/2007
31/12/2006 *
1,331
1,439
International retail banking
460
529
Specialised financial services
595
463
Asset management, insurance and private banking
1,899
1,547
Corporate and investment banking
(904)
1,645
Proprietary asset management and other activities
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
*
663
(763)
4,044
4,860
By comparison with previously published figures, net gains or losses on other assets for the year ended 31 December 2006 have been reduced by €61 million subsequent to the change in
accounting method for treating movements in minority interests (see Note 1.2 of the Notes to the Financial Statements).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 75
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MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
1. French retail banking – Regional Banks
In 2007, the contribution of the 38 Regional Banks, which are
25% equity-accounted, to Crédit Agricole S. A.’s net income
was €778 million, a rise of 2.5% on the previous year. The
increase is 7.7% after restating movements in provisions on
home purchase savings plans. In a difficult financial environment
(financial crisis, flattening of the interest rate curve) and a climate of
persistently intense competition, the Regional Banks’ results reflect
a solid operating performance with tightly controlled expenses and
increased risk cover.
2007
2006
Change
2007/2006
Aggregate IFRS net banking income
12,998
12,860
+1.1%
Restated IFRS net banking income *
11,960
12,093
-1.1%
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
(7,005)
(6,922)
+1.2%
Aggregate gross operating income
4,955
5,171
-4.2%
Risk-related costs
(984)
(841)
+17.0%
3,971
4,33
- 8.3%
865
848
+2.0%
Tax **
(87)
(89)
-2.7%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
778
759
+2.5%
(in millions of euros)
AGGREGATE OPERATING INCOME
Income from equity affiliates
*
**
Aggregate data of the 38 equity-accounted Regional Banks restated for dividends and similar income received from Crédit Agricole S. A.
Tax impact of dividends received from the Regional Banks.
In 2007, the Regional Banks registered a high level of business
generated by the growth momentum initiated in 2006. New,
innovative offerings intended for priority targets, such as young
people, young working people and high net worth customers
met with unqualified success. They met their annual target for
opening new accounts, boosting the total to 19,212,000 demand
deposits and youth accounts at year-end. In addition to the national
campaigns, this new business was captured through an active policy
of opening new branches, with 137 locations added during 2007
compared with 109 in 2006. The online offering yielded excellent
results, with new business attracted in multi-channel mode, mainly
through the partnership with SeLoger.com, sales of products online
with the electronic signature solution, quotes on financing, etc.).
Business growth was respectable, on the whole. Total customer
deposits outstanding at the Regional Banks moved up 4.3%
year-on-year to €498.6 billion at 31 December 2007. In a climate of
financial crisis that was unfavourable for risky assets, this increase
was driven primarily by precautionary savings and money market
products.
On the balance sheet, deposits in term accounts (excluding
“PEP” popular savings plans) surged 76.5% year-on-year, driven
primarily by the “Grandito” range. Likewise, deposits in Sustainable
development passbook accounts, which benefited from the
increase in the regulated ceiling rate, jumped 23.4%; Youth and
LEP ‘popular savings’ passbook accounts registered increases
of 5.9% and 4.9%, respectively. Outflows from home purchase
savings plans, which have lost some of their appeal over the
past two years, slowed, to €3 billion over the year compared with
€5.7 billion in 2006. Lastly, year-on-year growth in demand deposits
was 2% in 2007 compared with 5.1% in 2006.
76 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Off-balance sheet customer deposits increased by 3.7%. Life
insurance outstandings rose by 7.6% in 2007 after an exceptional
year in 2006, which was also atypical due to transfers out of the
former home purchase savings plans. Multi-investment policies
enjoyed robust growth of 67% year-on-year, owing to transfers
authorised under the “Fourgous amendment”. In mutual funds,
inflows were concentrated in money-market and guaranteed
products, with an 8.7% rise in outstandings. Conversely, owing to
the financial and stock market climate, securities (stocks and bonds)
retained in customer portfolios receded by 3.1% over the year.
In lending, the Regional Banks’ significant efforts, with new offers
for customers and a plethora of national campaigns, enabled them
to sustain high production over the year, at €70.2 billion, up 1.9%
on the very high level in 2006. This growth was driven primarily by
financing for the farm sector (up 10.5%) and business customers
(up 8.7%). In residential mortgage loans, business slowed as
interest rates moved up, with a rise of 1.5% after growth of 11.2%
in 2006. Even so, it still accounts for 56% of production.
As a result, loans outstanding advanced by a handsome 10.7%
year-on-year, at the same pace as in 2006; they amounted to
€327.9 billion at the end of 2007. Growth in residential mortgage
loans decelerated but remained robust, at 12.2% year-on-year
compared with 14.7% in 2006. Loans to local community
institutions advanced by a respectable 9.6%, while lending to
business customers jumped 16.8%, underpinned by the upturn in
productive investment.
Risks remained confined to a low level; bad and doubtful debts
receded to 2% of gross customer loans outstandings from 2.3%
in 2006. However, a cautious provisioning policy was maintained.
The loan loss cover rate moved up 1.2 point, to 70.8% (excluding
collective provisions) from 69.6% at 31 December 2006.
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Aggregate gross operating income for the 38 consolidated
Regional Banks was €4,955 million (based on aggregate IFRS data
adjusted for dividends and similar income received from Crédit
Agricole S. A.). It was 4.2% lower than in 2006, when GOI included
substantial gains from write-backs of provisions for home purchase
savings plans resulting from the change in tax treatment that
occurred at the end of 2005. Adjusted for these provisions, which
amounted to €7 million in 2007 against €231 million in 2006, gross
operating income was 0.2% higher.
The Regional Banks’ net banking income rose by 1.1% to
€13 billion. After elimination of dividends and similar income
received from Crédit Agricole S. A. and changes in provisions for
home purchase savings plans, it was 0.8% higher than in 2006 and
up 1.2% excluding IFRS-related volatility. In a context of flattening
interest rate curves, write-downs of old, high-margin loans and
strong competitive pressure, the interest margin was held up by
good results in financial management. Fee income received by
the Regional Banks was 5.9% higher than in 2006; it was buoyed
by attracting new customers and increasing the penetration rate
among existing customers. Commissions on sales of insurance
products continued to benefit from strong momentum, with a rise
of 8.3%. In non-life insurance, the penetration rate among existing
individual customers moved up by 4.5 percentage points year-onyear to 41.4%. Fees from services and other banking transactions
advanced by 5.1% and fees from account management and
payment instruments rose by 5.2% as customers upgraded to
premium bank cards (Gold, Visa Premier and Platinum).
Significant investments were made in real estate for the gradual
renovation of the franchise and the creation of new branches (137
opened in 2007), in increasing the number of staff and in new
(in millions of euros)
Net banking income
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
Gross operating income
Risk-related costs
Operating income
product launches. In the light of these expenditures, operating
expenses were tightly controlled, edging up 1.2% to €7 billion. As a
result, the Regional Banks’ cost/income ratio was 58.6% (based on
NBI excluding dividends and similar income received from Crédit
Agricole S. A. and restated for changes in provisions for home
purchase savings plans).
The Regional Banks’ risk-related costs amounted to €984 million,
17% higher than in 2006 due to the increase in collective
provisions.
After consolidation of their subsidiaries’ accounts and consolidation
adjustments, the Regional Banks’ share of net income was
€865 million, up 2% on the €848 million contributed in 2006. The
Regional Banks business line’s contribution to Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
consolidated net income came to €778 million, a rise of 2.5% and of
7.7% excluding changes in provisions for home purchase savings
plans. ROE was 17.4% (before Crédit Agricole S. A. tax).
2. French retail banking – LCL
In 2007, LCL developed its new banking model and strengthened its
name recognition: two years after its launch, nearly eight out of ten
French people recognise the LCL name. The new sources of growth
that were set up starting in the first half of 2007 with a new franchise
organisation and the creation of private banking began to bear fruit.
Business momentum drove up the number of individual accounts by
80,000 over the year and net income (Group share) rose by 10.4%,
excluding exceptional items (movements in provisions for home
purchase savings plans and competitiveness plan). The target of a
1% growth differential between NBI and operating expenses was
exceeded during the year and reached 1.6%.
2007
2006
Change
2007/2006
+0.3%
3,664
3,652
(2,706)
(2,495)
+8.5%
958
1,157
-17.2%
(127)
(151)
-16.5%
-17.3%
831
1,006
Income tax
(249)
(302)
-17.3%
NET INCOME
582
704
-17.3%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
553
680
-18.6%
On-and off-balance sheet customer deposits outstanding increased
by 2.7% during the year to €136.7 billion. The financial market crisis
obscured a good performance by the branch franchise in deposits
in term accounts (+13.3%) and passbook accounts (+10.3%),
owing to the success of Livret Cerise and “Compte Sur Livret taux
boosté” campaign. Momentum in winning new customers also
contributed to the 3.4% rise in demand deposits. Conversely, as
could be predicted, deposits in home purchase savings plans
continued to shrink, with a decline of 11.7% in 2007 after a drop of
14.4% in 2006, following the trend initiated after the tax treatment
of home purchase savings plans was changed at the end of 2005.
Overall, on-balance sheet deposits rose by 3% to €57.9 billion.
Off-balance sheet deposits benefited from strong momentum in
life insurance (+7.2%) but were adversely affected by a highly
unfavourable climate for mutual funds and equities.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 77
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2007
MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
After an exceptional year in 2006, demand for credit remained
brisk in 2007 and new loan production reached €19.4 billion.
Loans outstanding advanced by 10.4% to €68 billion at year-end.
This robust growth was driven by surges of 17.6% in loans to
SMEs and of 11.5% in residential mortgages, which amounted
to €39.6 billion at 31 December 2007. In an intensely competitive
market, consumer loans outstanding moved up 1.1%, primarily
following a sharp upturn in the production of personal loans during
the last four months of the year, with a jump of 13% on the same
period in 2006. Production of loans to small business customers
was robust, boosting outstandings in this segment by 4.2% to
€9.3 billion.
The cost/income ratio showed a further 1.1 point improvement,
contracting to 69.5% at the end of 2007.
The LCL branch franchise’s business momentum pushed up net
banking income by 2.5% to €3,664 million, excluding the impact
of write-backs of provisions for home purchase savings plans
(€41 million in 2007 against €119 million in 2006). Including this
item, the increase was 0.3%. The interest margin dipped again
over the year, by 3% excluding home savings plan provisions, in
an intensely competitive climate. Fee income rose by a handsome
8.3%, fed by the franchise’s sales performance in insurance
(+22.8%) and by fees from account management, services and
payment instruments (+8.2%), which reaped direct benefits
from the increase in services sold to existing customers (cards,
agreements, remote information services).
3. International retail banking
Operating expenses were confined to €2,706 million. They include
the provision for the competitiveness plan announced on 1 June
2007 (€189 million after the additional impact of the Social
Security Financing Act for 2008 registered in the fourth quarter).
Excluding this exceptional item, expenses would have risen by
only 0.9%. During the year, significant efforts were devoted to
enhancing productivity, particularly through reductions in force
and savings on IT system costs as investments in workstations
began to pay off. The savings achieved were used, inter alia, to
finance continued investments in property, including the creation
of 38 Private Banking divisions and the opening of 26 branches,
and in advertising, with 14 television advertising campaigns in
2007.
As a result of tightly controlled expenses, gross operating income
moved up 6.5% year-on-year, excluding the impact of provisions
for home purchase savings plans and the competitiveness plan.
78 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Risk-related costs were kept under control at €127 million,
amounting to 26 basis points of risk-weighted assets compared
with 33 basis points at the end of 2006. This led to a 10.4%
increase in operating income.
LCL’s net income (Group share) was €553 million, down 18.6% on
2006. Return on equity was 19.6%. Excluding exceptional items
(movements in provisions for home purchase savings plans and the
competitiveness plan), net income rose by 10.4% year-on-year.
In 2007, the international retail banking business line consolidated
the formation of its franchise. Because of this, the composition
of the 2007 income statement has undergone major changes
by comparison with prior years, making it difficult to analyse
changes.
The international retail banking business line generated net banking
income of €2,650 million in 2007, 3.2x more than in 2006, which
did not include Italy and only included Emporiki’s contribution
during 4.5 months. Operating expenses were €1,763 million
compared with €625 million in 2006. Gross operating income was
€887 million, 4.5x higher than in 2006. Risk-related costs were
€292 million and also reflected the impact of changes in the scope
of consolidation. It amounted to €73 million in the previous year.
The net income of equity affiliates was down appreciably due to
the deconsolidation of Banca Intesa in 2007, following the Intesa
Sanpaolo merger. It amounted to €168 million in 2007 compared
with €522 million in 2006. The strongest contributor to net income
of equity affiliates is now BES at €152 million, a 93% increase on
the 2006 contribution. The stake in Banco del Desarrollo (Chile)
was sold in November 2007, generating a gain on disposal of
€117 million. However, this positive effect was partially offset by a
€65 million goodwill impairment charge for Index Bank.
The international retail banking business line’s net income (Group
share) was €460 million in 2007, down 13.1% on 2006. ROE was
17.4%.
4
1
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
(in millions of euros)
Net banking income
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
Gross operating income
2007
2006
Change
2007/2006
x3.2
2,650
824
(1,763)
(625)
x2.8
887
199
x4.5
Risk-related costs
(292)
(73)
x4
Operating income
595
126
x4.7
Income from equity affiliates
168
522
-67.7%
52
-
n.m.
815
648
+25.9%
(195)
(76)
x2.6
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and change in the value of goodwill
Pre-tax income
Tax
After-tax income from discontinued or held-for-sale operations
(4)
(3)
nm
NET INCOME
616
569
+8.3%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
460
529
-13.1%
In Italy, the process of acquiring the Cariparma FriulAdria group
and its fast-paced integration were completed. Italy is now the
Group’s second-largest domestic market.
In addition to the 29 branches acquired by FriulAdria on 1 April
and the 173 branches acquired by Cariparma on 1 July, 30 new
branches were opened during the year, thereby increasing the
total number of branches to 725 at 31 December 2007. Business
momentum drove up credit outstandings to nearly €24 billion.
Deposits amounted to €21.5 billion at 31 December 2007.
A 2007-2010 business plan was announced on 5 October 2007
to remain on this growth track. It calls for strengthening customer
segments offering high potential, expanding geographic coverage
and stepped-up synergies with Crédit Agricole S. A. business lines.
In 2007, the Cariparma FriulAdria Group contributed €1,149 million
to the International retail banking business line’s net banking
income, for six months of full operation and three additional months
of partial operation. Expenses for the year came to €609 million,
reflecting surplus costs generated by integration of the franchise
as well as the creation of the holding and lead company functions
in Italy. Gross operating income was €540 million and net income,
Group share was €197 million.
In Greece, the transformation plan for Emporiki was launched.
Crédit Agricole S. A. became Emporiki’s largest shareholder in
August 2006. Market share-building momentum is underway, with
10 new branches opened during the year. Emporiki now has 450
branches, including 70 in south-eastern Europe, a rapidly growing
region. New offers and new marketing systems were rolled out,
primarily in mortgage loans and in segmentation of sales outlets
for business customers with 12 new business centres dedicated
to the SME segment. The bancassurance range was expanded to
include a new non-life insurance company, Emporiki Assurances
(not consolidated in 2007).
A development plan was also initiated to achieve a combination of
operational, organisational and sales targets. A new organisation is
now in place and new collection tools have been installed.
At 31 December 2007, Emporiki’s contribution to the business line’s
net banking income was €928 million compared with €353 million in
2006, when the bank was consolidated over 4.5 months. Expenses
rose to €655 million from €232 million at 31 December 2006. Most
of this increase came at the end of the year. It was due mainly to
non-recurring items, such as early-out incentives and marketing
and corporate communication costs.
Gross operating income came to €273 million for the year, 2.3x
higher than in 2006. Risk-related costs advanced to €176 million
over the year from €40 million in 2006. Net income (Group share)
rose to €45 million.
Excluding Italy and Greece, the business line’s other entities
continued to expand steadily in 2007. Their contribution to net
income (Group share) rose sharply, from €112 million in 2006 to
€218 million in 2007, reflecting the vitality of these operations. BES
is now the biggest contributor, with €152 million.
In Poland, net income rose appreciably. Lukas delivered a 47%
jump in net banking income for its retail banking operations
(excluding consumer finance operations, which are allocated to
Specialised financial services). Egypt, where a new marketing catch
phrase “not just a promise, but a commitment” was rolled out,
also delivered handsome growth, with net income (Group share)
topping €35 million in 2007 (€14 million in 2006). This reflects the
effects of the changes in scope in 2006 following the merger of EAB
and CA Egypt. In Morocco, Crédit du Maroc continued to expand.
It opened 30 new branches in 2007 and the entity’s net income
(Group share) rose from €17 million to €18 million.
The Group also strengthened its European franchise with the
acquisition of 15% of Bankinter, thereby increasing its stake in
the Spanish bank to nearly 20%. The deal was approved by the
Bank of Spain at the end of February 2008. This acquisition of a
holding in a rapidly growing, highly profitable bank is designed to
create a sustainable shareholder relationship that is profitable for
all stakeholders.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 79
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2007
MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
4. Specialised financial services
In 2007, the specialised financial services business line, which
encompasses consumer finance, factoring and lease finance,
continued to expand. It consolidated its positions in its domestic
market while developing its operations abroad.
(in millions of euros)
2007
2006
Change
2007/2006
Net banking income
2,977
2,637
+12.9%
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
(1,577)
(1,389)
+13.5%
Gross operating income
1,400
1,248
+12.3%
Risk-related costs
(491)
(421)
+16.6%
Operating income
909
827
+10.0%
8
7
+14.5%
Income from equity affiliates
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and change in the value of goodwill
28
(59)
n.m.
945
775
+22.1%
Tax
(310)
(280)
+11.2%
NET INCOME
635
495
+28.3%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
595
463
+28.5%
Pre-tax income
In consumer finance, the Group’s momentum bolstered its
leadership positions in a climate of slowdown in this business in
Europe.
For Sofinco, 2007 was a year of international expansion, both
organically and through acquisitions. At the end of the year, Sofinco
acquired Interbank and DMC Groep in the Netherlands, making it
the leader in consumer finance in that country. In Saudi Arabia,
it created a new subsidiary, Sofinco Saudi Fransi, specialised
in developing point-of-sale financing for the car and household
equipment markets. In Italy, Créditlift, the new Sofinco subsidiary
dedicated to near-prime customers which is already active in
France, embarked on the first stage of its international deployment.
Conversely in Spain, Sofinco sold its 45% stake in Finconsum at
the beginning of the year.
It entered into new partnerships in France and abroad with
prestigious names, including mass-market retailers, speciality
retailers and carmakers. The Fiat Group Auto Financial Services
(FGAFS) joint venture created with Fiat Auto at the end of 2006
is fully operational. The first co-branded automotive card was
launched, depicting the new Fiat 500 and Sofinco’s Czech
subsidiary Credium entered into an agreement with Fiat to handle
the carmaker’s financing business in the Czech Republic.
In France, the partnerships with the LCL and Regional Bank
networks continued to develop their operations. In 2007, more
Regional Banks commissioned Sofinco to handle their consumer
finance business.
*
Finaref confirmed its position as the leader in private-label cards
in France and rolled out new marketing innovations: the first
Printemps Collector card, a genuine tool for differentiation and
value for Printemps customers, a mobile-phone payment solution
in partnership with Téléshopping, and the Madelios card reserved
exclusively for a single store. Finaref also entered into a partnership
with GO Sport to assist that company in customer relationship
management. At the end of the year, Finaref launched an innovation
representing a big step forward for the digital economy, with the
‘prospect’ electronic signature solution, which enables customers
to open an account with Finaref online, including for prospects who
are not in the databases.
In Poland, in 2007, Lukas became the new leader in bank credit
cards. It continued to develop its franchise with the opening of 22
new credit centres and 48 bank branches.
Total consumer finance production came to €32.1 billion over
the year, up 28.3% on 2006. In 2007 for the first time, foreign
production exceeded domestic production, amounting to 55% of
the total.
Credit outstandings followed the same favourable trend. They
advanced by 12.9% on 2006 to €61.7 billion. International
operations accounted for 57.3% of outstandings in 2007.
On a like-for-like basis *, credit outstandings abroad rose by 13.8%
between 2006 and 2007, reflecting the vitality of international
operations. This growth was driven partly by a handsome
In 2006, including 100% of FGAFS outstandings and excluding Finconsum; in 2007, mainly excluding Interbank.
80 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
performance from FGAFS, which was consolidated over the full
year for the first time (up 9.6% on December 2006). Other foreign
operations also made a significant contribution: with rises of
14% for Agos in Italy, 53.8% for Credicom in Greece, 24.8% for
Wafasalaf in Morocco, 25.4% for Ribank in the Netherlands, and
14% for Credibom in Portugal. In addition, on 27 December 2007,
Crédit Agricole S. A. and Intesa Sanpaolo announced that Crédit
Agricole S. A. would purchase Intesa Sanpaolo’s stake in Agos.
The transaction is scheduled to become effective during 2008 and
will increase the Group’s interest in Agos to 100%.
In France, cooperation with the franchises is being stepped up.
The amount of outstandings with the Regional Banks increased by
14.3% in 2007.
The net banking income of the Consumer finance segment came to
€2,517 million, a rise of 15% on 2006. 45% of NBI was generated
internationally, compared with 36% in 2006.
Most of this growth is attributable to the consolidation of FGAFS,
which contributed €258 million to net banking income in 2007.
Consumer finance in France was adversely affected by an
unfavourable interest rate effect, as the increase in funding rates is
not automatically passed on to customers.
In 2007, Crédit Agricole Leasing also enhanced the competitive
position of some of its businesses. Notable progress was made
in equipment leasing and rentals for industry, particularly in the
tractor-trailer and semi-trailer market, in ships and in machine tools.
IT system operating lease production also expanded, owing to an
excellent showing in the software sector.
Also in step with its development plan, Crédit Agricole Leasing
turned its penetration of the Group’s distribution franchises into a
key factor of success. Business with the Regional Bank franchise
expanded in 2007, in both equipment leasing and property lease
finance.
Gross operating income in lease finance rose by 2.7% year-on-year
to €79 million. The business line’s cost/income ratio improved,
receding to 66.9% from 68.7% in 2006.
In factoring, Eurofactor met with a number of successes in 2007.
It remains the leader in France in a rapidly growing market and
continues to expand internationally. Eurofactor is investing in a new
IT system to support its growth.
In 2007, growth in factored receivables was 17.4% year-on-year; it
was 13.8% for the international subsidiaries.
Operating expenses rose by 18% year-on-year to €1,275 million
2006. The increase is due mostly to changes in the scope of
consolidation and to growth in the business.
Net banking income amounted to €222 million in 2007, an advance
of 9.2% compared with 2006. This growth was due to a favourable
volume effect (an increase in receivables financed) and in the
interest rate climate, despite higher costs of funding.
Gross operating income in consumer finance was €1,242 million,
up 12% over the year.
Operating expenses edged up 0.5% on 2006 to €129 million.
In lease finance, the strategy initiated at the end of 2006 started
to bear fruit in 2007. Business was solid in all segments, with
annual production volume of €4.8 billion, up 10% on the previous
year. Robust growth persisted abroad, driven primarily by the
development of the EFL subsidiary in Poland.
In keeping with its medium-term plan, Crédit Agricole Leasing
continued to capture high value-added segments. A number of
enviable deals were closed in property leasing, including financing
of the cellars of a grand cru bordelais. Crédit Agricole Leasing
also confirmed its positions in sustainable development finance
and public sector finance via two financing agreements signed
on its favour with the Council of Europe Development Bank (CEB)
and the European Investment Bank (EIB). Internationally, the
Group consolidated its positions through business generated by
the branch office in Spain and the solid momentum of the Polish
subsidiary. In 2007, the business line derived 19% of its NBI from
abroad.
As a result, gross operating income jumped 24.2% to €93 million
in 2007.
Overall, net banking income for the Specialised financial services
business line rose by 12.9% year-on-year to €2,977 million.
Expenses increased commensurately, by 13.5% to €1,577 million
as of 31 December 2007, tracking the trend in business growth. Net
income (Group share) was €1,400 million. The cost/income ratio
was virtually the same at 53%.
Risk-related costs rose by 16.6% to €491 million as of
31 December 2007. This was due mainly to changes in scope of
consolidation. Excluding these changes, the rise would have been
6.5%.
Net income (Group share) was €595 million, up 28.5% on 2006,
which included €63 million in goodwill impairment for Crédit
Agricole Leasing. Excluding this impairment charge, net income
(Group share) rose by 13.1% over the year, lifting return on
allocated equity to 19.5%.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 81
4
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RAPPEL_T1
2007
MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
5. Asset management, insurance
and private banking
In a difficult climate characterised by high volatility in the financial
markets, a liquidity crisis and an upturn in risk aversion, among
other things, the Asset management, insurance and private banking
business line delivered a solid performance in terms of business
(in millions of euros)
Net banking income
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
Gross operating income
Risk-related costs
Operating income
Income from equity affiliates
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and change in the value of goodwill
Pre-tax income
Tax
growth and operating income. Over the full year, net banking
income advanced by 11.2% and operating income, by 14.7%. The
business line’s net income includes the gain from unwinding of
the CAAM Sgr 50/50 joint venture between Crédit Agricole Asset
Management and Intesa Sanpaolo; as a result, its contribution to
the Group’s net income climbed by 22.8%.
2007
2006*
Change
2007/2006
+11.2%
4,306
3,873
(1,803)
(1,680)
+7.3%
2,503
2,193
+14.1%
4
(7)
n.m.
2,507
2,186
+14.7%
8
46
-82.5%
215
0
n.m.
2,730
2,232
+22.3%
(782)
(657)
+19.0%
NET INCOME
1,948
1,575
+23.7%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
1,899
1,547
+22.8%
*
The 2006 accounts were adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes in minority interests: Net gains (losses) on other assets as of December 2006 declined by €20 million
(see Note 1.2 of the Notes to the Financial Statements).
At the end of 2007, assets under management within the business
line, excluding double counting, amounted to €614.4 billion.
Aggregate new inflows reached €36.6 billion, with €10 billion in
asset management, €5.7 billion in Private banking and €21 billion
in life insurance.
In asset management, assets under management by Crédit
Agricole Asset Management Group and BFT amounted to
€525 billion at 31 December 2007. The Group is one of the top
five asset management firms in Continental Europe (source:
IPE, December 2007) and ranks first in France (source: FininfoEuroperformance, December 2007).
Despite the world financial and stock market crisis that began in the
summer of 2007, assets under management expanded by 4.7% to
€23.5 billion over the year on a like-for-like basis, that is, after the
spin-off of the Italian business operations.
This increase was driven partly by a favourable €13.6 billion
valuation impact between the end of 2006 and the end of 2007 and
partly by solid business momentum. Net new inflows for the year
were close to €10 billion after some €10 billion in buybacks during
the second half, concentrated mostly on specialised products
(mainly highly liquid absolute return funds in the VaR range) and, to
a lesser extent, equity funds.
In France, new inflows increased by €10.4 billion over the year to
€440.6 billion at the end of 2007.
Abroad, the Group continued to expand its international franchise.
In Italy, in accordance with the commitments made under the Intesa
Sanpaolo merger agreement, the CAAM Sgr joint venture between
82 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Crédit Agricole Asset Management and Intesa Sanpaolo S.p.A.
was unwound at the end of December 2007. Crédit Agricole S. A.
sold to Intesa Sanpaolo business activities representing its 65%
interest in Nextra Investment Management acquired from Banca
Intesa in December 2005. With €26 billion of assets sold in Italy
at 31 December 2007, of which €14,3 billion managed locally, the
new Crédit Agricole Asset Management SGR entity is the leading
foreign operator in Italy. The distribution strategy is now based on
four major pillars: the Cariparma and FriulAdria franchises acquired
in 2007, the franchises of external distributors, which in many cases
are partners of the Group (such as Intesa Sanpaolo), the Private
banking client base, and institutional investors.
After the spin-off of the Italian business operations, assets under
management sold by the Group’s foreign entities amounted to
€84.4 billion at 31 December 2007, a rise of 18.4% year-on-year on
an unchanged consolidation basis.
In 2007, Crédit Agricole Asset Management Group created a branch
office in Frankfurt (CAAM Deutschland) to gain a solid foothold in
that financial marketplace and to step up its development in the
German and Austrian markets. It opened a subsidiary in Montreal
and a new sales office in Beijing. The business line added new
sales staff to its Abu Dhabi office and created a joint venture with
Bank Saudi Al Fransi (BSF) in Saudi Arabia to reap the full benefits
of growth potential in the Middle East. In Australia, after opening
a sales office in Sydney in early 2007, CAAM Group strengthened
its presence in the country at the beginning of 2008 with the
creation of a wholly-owned subsidiary, Crédit Agricole Asset
Management Australia Ltd. These entities were not consolidated as
of 31 December 2007.
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Crédit Agricole Asset Management Group also bought the 10%
that it did not already own in IDEAM, a management company
dedicated to socially responsible investment which is now a
wholly-owned subsidiary. With the emergence of employee share
ownership plans, the Group also consolidated its positions in
employee share savings schemes, with €16.9 billion of assets
under management.
After securing AMF approval at the end of June as a portfolio
management company authorised to manage OPCI property
investment mutual funds, Crédit Agricole Asset Management Real
Estate (CAAM RE) became one of the first management firms to
launch an OPCI product for institutional investors (CAAM OPCI
France Régions Dynamic). It is waiting for approval to distribute its
first product for high net worth individuals.
In securities and issuer services, the CACEIS Group, which
is 50% proportionally consolidated in the accounts of Crédit
Agricole S. A., encountered commercial successes and delivered
solid financial results.
The company expanded its international presence. Hence,
there were many changes in scope during the year. After the
deconsolidation of CACEIS Bank Espana (formerly Ixis Urquijo) in
December 2006, the scope of consolidation now primarily reflects:
n the change of consolidation method for CACEIS Fastnet
(following the acquisition of the CAAM shares), which was 46.5%
consolidated on the proportional method at the end of 2007
(it was 57.4% fully consolidated in 2006);
n the acquisition in late November of Olympia Capital International
and subsidiaries, a group specialising in alternative fund
management with some US$70 billion in funds domiciled in
Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands and the
USA);
n the acquisition by CACEIS at the very end of the year of Financial
Services Markets Bank GmbH, the HypoVereinsbank (HVB)
subsidiary in charge of its custody business. The acquisition of
this entity, which was renamed CACEIS Bank Allemagne, is a
major step forward in CACEIS’ international development. Its
results will be proportionately consolidated as from 2008.
2007 was a mixed year for business performance. The first half saw
robust growth in funds under management, with rises of €125 billion
in assets under custody and €67 billion under administration, while
the second half was adversely affected by financial market trends.
Funds under management expanded by 21.5% year-on-year,
mainly due to acquisitions. On an unchanged consolidation basis,
growth was 4.8%. Assets under custody increased by €486 billion
year-on-year to €2,272 billion at the end of 2007 while assets under
administration advanced by €83 billion to €944 billion. CACEIS is
now one of the leading fund administrators in Europe and is among
the Top 10 in the world (source: Globalcustody).
In private banking, assets under management amounted to
€96.4 billion at the end of 2007. During the year, as customers
took a wait-and see stance in the second half due to the downturn
in the equity markets and the subprime crisis, AUM expanded by
9.7% to €8.5 billion despite the negative dollar/euro impact. This
exceeded €2 billion, primarily in Switzerland, where 45% of wealth
is in dollars. This growth stems partly from the acquisition in early
July of Bank Sarasin Europe S. A. (+€2.4 billion). It also reflects the
performance of the financial markets over the period (+€2.4 billion)
and even more, a robust €5.7 billion increase in new inflows.
In France, LCL Private Banking continued its strategy of commercial
redeployment. By creating a dedicated private banking organisation
with 38 divisions and 16 satellite centres in France’s major
metropolitan areas, LCL confirmed that this is a strategic market
in its business growth. Through gradual development, LCL Private
Banking expanded its range to serve over 90,000 customers.
Private banking also continued to deploy its operations
internationally. At the end of 2007, 64% of assets under
management were outside France, with three quarters of these in
Switzerland and Luxembourg.
CL Miami was renamed Crédit Agricole Miami Private Bank on
1 May 2007.
After securing approval from the authorities at the beginning of July,
Crédit Agricole Luxembourg acquired Banque Sarasin’s subsidiary,
Bank Sarasin Europe S. A., Luxembourg, which now operates
under the name Crédit Agricole Luxembourg Bank. This 98%owned subsidiary is fully consolidated in the accounts of Crédit
Agricole S. A. The acquisition strengthens the Group’s private
banking business in Europe and Crédit Agricole Luxembourg
now ranks among the top five private banks in Luxembourg,
with €14 billion in assets under management. Crédit Agricole
Luxembourg Bank and Crédit Agricole Luxembourg are set to
merge by mid-2008.
At the end of November 2007, Crédit Agricole (Suisse) S. A.
announced that it had entered into an agreement to acquire 100%
of National Bank of Canada Ltd., the Bahamian subsidiary of
Banque Nationale du Canada specialised in international private
banking.
In life insurance, 2007 followed an exceptional year in 2006,
when the business benefited from transfers from the former home
purchase savings plans, on which the tax treatment was amended
at the end of 2005. Even so, business was robust in 2007.
Total premium income was €21 billion, down 14.9% on the
unusually high level of 2006 but 2.7% higher than in 2005 on an
unchanged consolidation basis. In addition to a strong performance
by Predica, BES Vida’s premium income climbed by 18% to
€1.6 billion. It has refocused its production, most of which is
generated from capitalisation products, to higher-margin pension
and provident schemes.
In another area, the “Fourgous Transfer” campaign met with
great success, under the impetus of efforts by the sales force:
€11.6 billion was transferred into multi-investment contracts, 95%
secured, i.e. over 60% of all transfers effected by bancassurance
companies in 2007. Unit-linked accounts generated 22% of savings
inflows during the year, compared with 19% in 2006).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 83
4
1
4
1
RAPPEL_T1
2007
MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Lastly, the Group developed new growth engines. The Regional
Bank and LCL networks delivered a handsome performance
in provident death insurance, primarily with their funeral cover
and Prévilion ranges. Abroad, in June 2007, Crédit Agricole S. A.
won approval to create a life insurance company in Japan, the
world’s second-largest life insurance market. “Crédit Agricole Life
Insurance Company Japan Ltd.” (not consolidated in 2007) will
sell unit-linked retirement savings products via partner networks in
Japan. This transaction is an important stage in the business line’s
strategy of international expansion, which it initiated two years
ago in Portugal and which it is setting up in all countries where its
distribution network was acquired, mainly in Italy, Greece, Serbia,
Poland and Egypt.
In all, mathematical provisions rose by 8% over one year to
€182 billion. With €174.9 billion, Predica confirmed its position as
No. 1 in bancassurance and No. 2 in insurance in France.
In the non-life insurance market, business momentum remained
solid. Total premium income expanded by 25.7% year-onyear to €1,865.2 million, driven by the networks’ impressive
accomplishments over the two previous years. Organic growth was
high, at 16.4% including 14.6% for Pacifica, 26% for Finaref and
17.7% for BES Seguros. At the end of September 2007, Pacifica
acquired 100% of Assurances Fédérales IARD (AF IARD) by
purchasing AGF’s 60% stake.
Pacifica’s traditional motor and comprehensive insurance lines did
extremely well, as did the new ranges it launched in 2007. In the
small business market, premiums registered a substantial 36%
rise owing to an excellent start for small business comprehensive
insurance. Individual healthcare also delivered robust growth (22%
on a like-for-like basis). The comprehensive homeowner’s line,
launched in early 2007, boosted production by 10%.
Pacifica’s portfolio advanced by 10.9% year-on-year in 2007, on an
unchanged consolidation basis. Including AF IARD’s contribution,
the number of policies rose to nearly 6.6 million.
84 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Underpinned by this expansion in its development base, Pacifica
plans to step up the deployment of its non-life insurance business
via LCL. Starting in 2008, the branch franchise will sell Pacifica’s
automotive, comprehensive homeowner’s, personal accident
insurance and healthcare policies.
The Group is rapidly expanding its non-life business, both via its
existing foreign entities and by creating new bases throughout
the world. Emporiki Insurance in Greece and Crédit Agricole
Assicurazioni in Italy will begin operations during the first half of
2008. Finaref has been developing its creditor insurance business
from Ireland with partners in 14 European countries. In addition to
the existing sales office in Milan, it is opening one in Madrid and
another in Frankfurt.
AF IARD, which was previously 40% equity consolidated, merged
with Pacifica on 28 December 2007, effective retroactively to
1 January 2007.
Momentum across all segments generated a robust increase in net
banking income for the business line, with a rise of 11.2% (10.1%
like-for-like) to €4,306 million. Operating expenses rose by 7.3% and
gross operating income advanced by 14.1% year-on-year (by 12%
like-for-like) to €2,503 million. The cost/income ratio showed a further
1.5 point improvement year-on-year, receding to a very low 41.9%.
Net income from equity affiliates fell from €46 million in 2006 to
€8 million in 2007 following changes in consolidation methods
applied to the Portuguese life insurance subsidiaries (BES Vida and
BES Seguros) and to AF IARD, which were fully consolidated in
2007 (negative impact: €39 million).
Net gains on other assets include the €220 million gain on
unwinding the CAAM Sgr joint venture between Crédit Agricole S. A.
and Intesa Sanpaolo.
The business line’s total net income (Group share) was
€1,899 million, up 22.8% on 2006. This includes a €107 million
net impairment charge in the third quarter for a product under
development. ROE was 24.7%.
4
1
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
6. Corporate and investment banking
After world-wide growth during the first half, 2007 ended in a climate of international financial crisis, which adversely affected the business
line’s performance.
(in millions of euros)
2007
2006 *
Change
2007/2006
2007 **
Change
2007/2006 **
Net banking income
2,781
5,456
(49.0%)
6,001
+10.0%
(3,537)
(3,321)
+6.5%
(3,537)
+6.5%
(756)
2,135
n.m.
2,464
+15.4%
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
Gross operating income
Risk-related costs
Operating income
Income from equity affiliates
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and change in the value
of goodwill
Pre-tax income
Tax
(957)
10
n.m.
(75)
n.m.
(1,713)
2,145
n.m.
2,389
+11.4%
135
160
(15.2%)
135
-15.2%
(1)
(17)
(94.1%)
(1)
n.m.
(1,579)
2,288
n.m.
2,523
+10.3%
767
(577)
n.m.
(603)
+4.6%
NET INCOME
(812)
1,711
N.M.
1,920
+12.3%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
(904)
1,645
N.M.
1,827
+11.2%
*
**
The 2006 accounts were adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes in minority interests.
Excluding crisis-related losses.
In 2007, the credit structured markets deteriorated steadily, with
the crisis in the US mortgage market, weakened position for
credit enhancers, and slowdown in LBOs. This negative trend
was aggravated by high volatility in the equity markets, rising
commodities prices, and the plunge in the dollar, which lost about
10% of its value against the euro in one year.
The crisis in the credit structured markets generated a loss of
€2.7 billion in corporate and investment banking net income.
The €4.1 billion negative impact on pre-tax income includes:
n €2.2 billion in impairment charges for US residential mortgage
ABSs and CDOs;
n a €1.2 billion allowance for counterparty risk on monoline
insurers;
n a €807 million charge for risk-related costs for the monoline
insurer ACA and €75 million in other impairment charges;
n a €188 million gain from the revaluation of structured issues at
fair value.
As a result, in 2007, net income (Group share) for corporate and
investment banking was a loss of €904 million. This also includes a
€230 million isolated trading loss in the US recognised in the third
quarter.
The impact of this severe crisis on corporate and investment
banking, however, obscures the business line’s performance.
Excluding the crisis impact, net banking income, which was
€2,781 million, would have risen by 10% to €6,001 million owing to
a handsome performance in structured finance.
The 6.5% rise in operating expenses was due to continued
investments in some businesses and in IT infrastructure and control
systems. Average headcount advanced by 5.5% year-on-year.
After three good years, risk-related costs were a net charge of
€75 million, excluding crisis-related impairment charges, reflecting
still-limited deterioration in counterparty risk. Collective provisions
amounted to €1,168 million at 31 December 2007 compared with
€1,125 million a year earlier.
Operating income was a loss of €1,713 million but would have been
€2,389 million excluding the crisis impact, a rise of over 11%.
Income from equity affiliates, which consisted almost entirely of the
contribution from Bank Saudi Al Fransi, receded by 15.2% in 2007,
primarily due to the dollar’s decline following a substantial 33%
increase during the previous year.
On the whole, excluding the crisis impact, net income (Group share)
would have been €1,827 million in 2007, up more than 11%.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 85
4
1
RAPPEL_T1
2007
MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
(in millions of euros)
2007
2006*
Change
2007/2006
Net banking income
2,300
2,135
+7.8%
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
(935)
(875)
+7.0%
Gross operating income
1,365
1,260
+8.3%
Risk-related costs
(104)
10
n.m.
Operating income
1,261
1,270
-0.7%
130
159
-17.8%
(1)
(5)
-80.0%
Pre-tax income
1,390
1,424
-2.4%
Tax
(277)
(342)
-19.2%
NET INCOME
1,113
1,081
+3.0%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
1,072
1,043
+2.8%
Income from equity affiliates
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and change in the value of goodwill
*
The 2006 accounts were adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes in minority interests.
Underpinned by its leading positions, structured finance registered
revenue growth of 20% (excluding the discount on syndication
outstandings) and contributed 61% of the financing activities’
net banking income. Business momentum was very strong in
international trade, acquisition finance and project finance.
In financing activities, operating and financial performances
showed further improvement in 2007 despite a somewhat less
favourable business climate during the second half.
Financing activities sustained their return on risk-weighted assets
in a climate of strong growth in business volume and maintained
a highly respectable level of operational efficiency, with the
cost/income ratio contracting to 40.7% from 41% in 2006.
Commercial banking in both France and abroad also registered a
substantial 20% rise in revenues but it was affected by the fact that
there were no loan restructuring operations in 2007.
Net banking income was up nearly 8% year-on-year, despite a
slowdown in syndication business during the second half, which
resulted in discounting outstandings remaining to be placed by
€55 million.
Risk-related costs mainly reflect the increase in collective provisions.
Total net income (Group share) was €1,072 million, up 2.8% by
comparison with 2006.
CAPITAL MARKETS AND INVESTMENT BANKING
(in millions of euros)
Net banking income
2007
2006 *
Change
2007/2006
2007 **
Change
2007/2006 **
+11.4%
481
3,321
(85.5%)
3,701
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
(2,602)
(2,446)
+6.4%
(2,602)
+6.4%
Gross operating income
(2,121)
875
n.m.
1,099
+25.6%
Risk-related costs
Operating income
Income from equity affiliates
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and change in the value
of goodwill
Pre-tax income
Tax
(853)
0
n.m.
29
n.m.
(2,974)
875
n.m.
1,128
+28.9%
5
1
x5
5
x5
0
(12)
n.m.
0
n.m.
(2,969)
864
n.m.
1,133
+31.2%
1,044
(234)
n.m.
(327)
+39.6%
NET INCOME
(1,925)
630
N.M.
806
+27,9%
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
(1,976)
602
N.M.
754
+25,5%
*
**
The 2006 accounts were adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes minority interests.
Excluding crisis-related losses.
86 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
4
1
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Revenues in capital markets and investment banking were severely
affected by losses and assets impairments due to the crisis in the
US mortgage market, as described above. As a result, net banking
income was €481 million for 2007.
Excluding the crisis impact, revenues from Capital markets and
investment banking rose by 11.4% year-on-year to €3,701 million.
Capital markets expanded by 22%, restated for losses on credit
derivatives. Underpinned by strong business momentum, the fixedincome derivatives, equity derivatives, debt securities issuance and
foreign exchange businesses delivered significant revenue growth.
The second half was also favourable for treasury operations.
2007 was another very good year for brokerage, where revenues
moved up 29%, and by 21% excluding gains on the disposal of
stock exchange seats. This excellent performance was driven by
CLSA in Asia, where revenues jumped by a remarkable 38% in
2007, by CA Cheuvreux (up 10%) and by the listed derivatives
business of Calyon Financial (up 8%), which became Newedge at
the beginning of 2008.
In investment banking, revenues surged in corporate finance
advisory activities (equity derivative products) and remained high in
the primary equity segment.
Operating expenses were 6.4% higher, reflecting continued targeted
investments, particularly for the brokers, and the strengthening of
market infrastructures.
The sharp deterioration in risk-related costs reflects the increase
in counterparty risk in this business, and the specific case of the
impairment of the monoline insurer ACA.
Excluding crisis-related losses, net income (Group share) was
€754 million, up 25.5% on 2006.
Including credit market losses and after recognition of a deferred
tax asset against these impairment charges, capital markets and
investment banking generated a net loss of €1,976 million.
7. Proprietary asset management and other activities
(in millions of euros)
Net banking income
Operating expenses, depreciation and amortisation
Gross operating income
2007
2006 *
Change
2007/2006
390
(255)
n.m.
(1,332)
(845)
+57.7%
(942)
(1,100)
-14.3%
Risk-related costs
(34)
30
n.m.
Operating income
(976)
(1,070)
-8.6%
-4.8%
Income from equity affiliates
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of other assets and change in the value of goodwill
Pre-tax income
85
88
1,101
36
n.m.
210
(946)
n.m.
Tax
599
391
+53.6%
NET INCOME
809
(555)
N.M.
NET INCOME – GROUP SHARE
663
(763)
N.M.
*
The 2006 accounts were adjusted to reflect the change in method for treating changes in minority interests: net gains (losses) on other assets at 31 December 2006 declined by €29 million
(see Note 1.2 of the Notes to the Financial Statements).
In 2007, results for proprietary asset management and other
activities registered several exceptional items which make a
comparison with the previous years difficult.
They include the financial impact on the accounts from the Banca
Intesa - San Paolo IMI merger on 1 January 2007, which led to the
recognition of a €1,097 million gain on dilution, and of the disposal
of part of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s stake in the new Intesa Sanpaolo
group, which generated a €472 million gain on disposal in 2007.
Following these transactions, as of 1 January 2007, Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s interest in Intesa Sanpaolo S.p.A. was
deconsolidated. Therefore, the results of Proprietary asset
management and other activities also include €222 million in
dividends received during the first half of 2007 from Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s residual 5.4% shareholding in the Italian group.
In addition, the €601 million total cost (after the additional impact of
the Social Security Financing Act for 2008) of LCL’s 2007-2010
competitiveness plan unveiled in mid-2007, being allocated based
on the pro-rated share of projected cost reductions, €412 million is
allocated to Proprietary asset management and other activities.
2007 was a very active year in private equity. New funds were
launched via Crédit Agricole Private Equity (CAPE) – Capenergie
(€105 million), PPP/Infrastructure (€500 million), VC Israel Fund
of Funds ($50 million), Co-investissement (€100 million), FCPI
LCL (€25 million) – and in third-party advisory management
(€850 million).
At end-December, private equity funds under management stood at
€2.8 billion, a 16% year-on-year increase.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 87
4
1
RAPPEL_T1
2007
MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
These activities generated net banking income of €147 million in
2007, reflecting this strong business momentum. NBI consists of
revenues from equity interests cash products and the investment
portfolio, management fees and net gains on the portfolio of assets
measured at fair value. Its €18 million reduction from the 2006 level
was due to the decline in financial markets.
After a rise in expenses (+€17 million to €44 million) and risk-related
costs (+€9 million to €13 million), net income (Group share) was
€84 million.
Excluding the private equity business, the business line’s net
banking income rose from a loss of €420 million in 2006 to a profit
of €243 million in 2007. This includes the above-mentioned gains
on disposal and dividends from Intesa. Conversely, it includes lower
exceptional gains from write-backs of provisions for the old home
purchase savings plans resulting from the change in tax treatment
that occurred at the end of 2005 (€95 million in 2007 compared with
€247 million in 2006).
»
Excluding these atypical items, and despite the 7.8% increase in
financing costs associated with the recent acquisitions abroad, net
banking income was €145 million higher than in 2006, primarily due
to a rise in portfolio and asset/liability management revenues.
Excluding the €412 million provision for LCL’s competitiveness
plan, operating expenses moved up 7%, owing to some €40 million
in supplemental charges for anticipated pension liabilities at LCL
under the 2006-2007 retirement plan booked to provisions in the
first quarter of 2007.
Net income from equity affiliates was €85 million, consisting mainly
of income from the stake in Eurazeo. In 2007, it also includes a
negative €24 million adjustment to Intesa’s final net income (equityaccounted) for 2006.
Net income from other assets includes the €1,097 million dilution
gain on Intesa after the new Intesa Sanpaolo S.p.A. group was
created.
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
At end-2007, Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s total assets rose to
€1,414.2 billion from €1,260.5 billion a year earlier. This represents
an increase of 12.2% or €153.7 billion.
This increase stemmed mainly from the expansion in the Group’s
businesses. 2.6% of the advance was also due to the addition
of newly acquired companies (primarily Cariparma FriulAdria and
Interbank) to the scope of consolidation. The currency impact
(depreciation in the major currencies, mainly the dollar, yen and
Swiss franc against the euro between the end of 2006 and the end
of 2007) shaved less than 1% off growth.
On a like-for-like basis and at constant exchange rates, total assets
were up almost €128.8 billion, a rise of 10.2% year-on-year.
3 Assets
The main items on the asset side of the balance sheet consist of
financial assets at market value through profit or loss (32%), loans
and advances to banks (22%) and customers (21%), and availablefor-sale financial assets (12%). These items together accounted for
76.5% (€117.6 billion) to the increase in total assets.
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss amounted to
€459 billion. 93% of the portfolio consists of securities that are
classified under financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
88 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
as a result of a genuine intention to trade them, primarily securities
bought under repurchase agreements (€94.8 billion), trading
securities in the form of bonds and other fixed-income securities
(€85.6 billion) or shares and other variable-income securities
(€29 billion) and derivatives (€175.4 billion).
The portfolio also comprises securities (7%) that are classified as
financial assets at fair value through profit or loss as a result of an
option taken by the Group. The majority of these (€29.2 billion) are
assets backing unit-linked policies, of which the 23.3% growth
relative to 2006 was driven by the strength of new inflows on these
products.
Overall, financial instruments at fair value through profit or loss
moved up 9.8% year-on-year. This increase was due to two factors:
the expansion in business activity and the asset valuation effect.
The 39.8% advance in derivative financial instruments reflects an
increase in the balances of these instruments in the accounts, as
their accounting treatment under IFRS allows only a small amount
of the positive fair value of derivatives with the same counterparty
recognised on the asset side to be netted against the negative fair
value on the liabilities side. There is less credit risk associated with
these instruments, since in most cases, they are covered by netting
agreements between Calyon and its counterparties.
Conversely, the deterioration in the financial and equity markets
between 2006 and 2007 cut into the growth of securities portfolios.
Trading securities in the form of bonds declined by €13 billion to
€85.6 billion in 2007 from €98.5 billion in 2006, while equities and
other variable-income securities fell by €6.4 billion.
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Repurchase transactions, most of which were carried out by
Calyon, receded by €3.9 billion. The repo business is mainly
focused in Paris, which accounted for 79% of securities bought
under repurchase agreements.
The 24.9% year-on-year rise in financial assets at fair value
through profit or loss reflects the insurance companies’ success in
attracting inflows into unit-linked policies and the increase in the
value of mutual funds.
Available-for-sale financial assets
Available-for-sale financial assets (net of impairment) declined by
€3.8 billion from end-2006 to end-2007, to a total of €169.7 billion.
These include bonds, equities, and treasury bills and similar items,
which are booked neither as financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss nor held to maturity, and are marked to market at year
end. €2.4 billion of provisions were booked against impairment
of available-for-sale securities and receivables. Net gains on
available-for-sale financial assets came to €6 billion after tax.
Loans and advances to customers and banks
This item comprises unlisted financial assets that generate fixed
or determinable payments, adjusted for any impairment. Total
outstandings exceeded €620 billion, a robust increase of nearly
15% (€80.3 billion) compared with 2006.
Loans and advances to customers (including lease finance
operations) amounted to €302.4 billion at year-end, a jump of
21.9% (€54.3 billion) over the year. Part of this increase (9.4%
or €23.4 billion) was due to the consolidation of the Cariparma
FriulAdria group. This growth was also driven by solid customer
lending by the Group’s business lines both in France and
internationally, in a climate of strong credit demand, primarily
from individuals but also from business customers. Outstandings
expanded by 16.7% or €17 billion for Calyon’s financing activities,
by 10.6% (€6.3 billion) for the LCL branch franchise in France, and
by 18.8% (€5 billion) for the Sofinco group in consumer finance.
Most of the rise in loans and advances to customers applied
to “Other loans and advances to customers”, which grew by
€34.5 billion, and debit balances on customer current accounts
(+€23.9 billion). Provisions for impairment of loans to customers
increased by 12.5% (€950 million), in keeping with new additions to
the scope of consolidation (€400 million) and in step with business
growth (gross loans advanced by 21.6%). These provisions include
€2.2 billion in collective provisions.
Amounts due from banks reached €318 billion at 31 December
2007, a rise of 8.9% (€26 billion) over the year. This category
mainly includes Group internal transactions (€230 billion), primarily
time deposits and accounts from Crédit Agricole S. A. to the
Regional Banks. The components of this item reflect the financial
mechanisms between Crédit Agricole S. A. and the Regional Banks.
Its strong 10% increase (€20.6 billion) in 2007 mirrors the growth in
the Regional Banks’ lending activity.
Amounts due from banks outside the Group grew by 6.5% (up
€5.4 billion) over the year to €88.4 billion. The bulk of the advance
came from movements in opposite directions: loans and advances
increased by €7.6 billion, while securities declined by €2.5 billion
over the year.
Held-to-maturity financial assets
This category encompasses securities with fixed or determinable
payments that the Group intends and has the capacity to hold until
maturity. They are recognised at amortised cost using the effective
interest method. The amount remained relatively unchanged over
the year, totalling €21.1 billion at year-end 2007 compared with
€18 billion at 31 December 2006 (up 17.4%).
Investments in equity affiliates
Investments in equity affiliates fell from €17.2 billion in 2006 to
€14.4 billion in 2007 after the deconsolidation of Intesa.
Goodwill
Goodwill advanced by €2.7 billion to €18.6 billion, following the
additional investments made during the year (primarily Cariparma
FriulAdria, CACEIS Group, AF Iard) and the disposal of Nextra.
3 Liabilities
Liabilities mainly comprise financial liabilities at fair value through
profit or loss (24%), amounts due to banks (12%) and to customers
(27%), debt securities in issue (13%) and insurance company
technical reserves (14%), which together account for more than
90% of the Group’s liabilities excluding shareholders’ equity.
Financial liabilities at fair value through
profit or loss
Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss amounted
to €332.6 billion. This portfolio consists of debt instruments
measured at fair value as of the reporting date and taken to the
income statement. It includes derivative financial instruments
held for trading (€172.8 billion), securities sold under repurchase
agreements (€106.5 billion), securities sold short (€26.5 billion) and
debt securities in issue (€26.2 billion).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 89
4
1
4
1
RAPPEL_T1
2007
MANAGEMENT REPORT
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Total financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss rose
by 11.9% or €35.3 billion year-on-year. This was due to a 44%
(€52.8 billion) increase in the negative fair value of derivative
financial instruments, particularly interest rate, credit, equity and
market index derivatives.
Amounts due to customers and banks
Amounts due to customers and banks exceeded €559 billion, an
increase of over €74 billion (15.3%) by comparison with 2006.
Amounts due to banks, which include €20.1 billion in Crédit
Agricole Group internal transactions (movements of funds resulting
from internal financial transactions between the Regional Banks
and Crédit Agricole S. A.), rose by nearly €38 billion (28.2%). Most
of this increase was in deposits (up €28.5 billion) and securities sold
under repurchase agreements (up €4.5 billion).
Amounts due to customers totalled €387.2 billion at 31 December
2007. The increase of €36.4 billion (or 10.4%) reflects growth
in bank deposits at the entities of Crédit Agricole S. A. Group
in France and abroad, as well as the acquisition of the Italian
branch franchise. Moreover, because of Crédit Agricole Group’s
internal financial mechanisms, savings deposits at the Regional
Banks (passbook accounts, home purchase savings schemes,
savings bonds and time accounts, “PEP” popular savings plans,
etc.) are centralised on the balance sheet of Crédit Agricole S. A.,
and accounted for 43% of it or over €167 billion. The increase in
amounts due to customers is due primarily to current accounts in
credit, which expanded by €17 billion to €71.6 billion, and other
amounts due to customers (time deposits, savings certificates,
etc.), which advanced by 16.4% to €97.6 billion in 2007, driven by
solid inflows of new deposits in retail banking in France (LCL and
the Regional Banks). Securities sold under repurchase agreements
rose by €6.2 billion to €15.8 billion. Conversely, funds invested in
special savings schemes edged down €1.2 billion due to outflows
from home purchase savings plans.
An analysis by geographic region highlights the Group’s international
growth: amounts due to foreign customers represented 30% of the
total in 2007, compared with less than 16% three years earlier.
90 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Debt securities in issue
Debt securities in issue (excluding securities at fair value through
profit or loss, see note 7.2.) increased by €14.9 billion (9.1%) over
the year to €177.7 billion at 31 December 2007, as the Group raised
an additional €17 billion on capital markets by issuing bonds.
Insurance Company technical reserves
Insurance Company technical reserves increased by €12 billion (or
6.4%) to €198.2 billion on the back of business growth at Predica
and Pacifica, the Group’s life and non-life insurance subsidiaries.
Insurance liabilities remain partially valued under French GAAP, as
required by IAS and IFRS regulations.
Shareholders’ equity
Shareholders’ equity (Group share) of the Crédit Agricole S. A.
Group (including net income for the year and before payment of
the 2007 dividend) amounted to €40.7 billion at year-end, a rise
of €6,372 million (18.6%) since the end of the previous year. This
increase is attributable primarily to two factors:
n the two capital increases during the year (including the Crédit
Agricole employee share issue) for €4,490 million;
n net income for the period (€4,044 million),
less dividends paid in respect of 2006 (€1,614 million after deducting
dividends from the Regional Banks and the subsidiaries).
Including minority interests (€5.8 billion) and subordinated debt
(€22.8 billion), gross capital funds amounted to €69.3 billion, a
rise of €5.8 billion on 2006. Subordinated notes issued as part of
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s liability management process decreased by
€1.6 billion.
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The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
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PRUDENTIAL RATIOS
3 Crédit Agricole S. A. Group European
solvency ratio
In accordance with banking regulations, since 14 December 2001,
the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group has calculated its European
solvency ratio on a quarterly basis.
This calculation is shown in the table below, which details the risks
of Crédit Agricole S. A. Group measured in credit risk equivalents
(after counterparty weighting) and the regulatory capital levels on
the dates indicated, calculated in accordance with the French
CRBF regulations on solvency ratios (91-05) and capital (90-02),
as amended.
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Credit risk
319.9
248.1
Market risk
25.2
15.5
Interest rate risk
7.9
4.8
Risk of fluctuations in security prices
0.8
0.6
Settlement risk
0.3
0.4
Foreign exchange risk
1.7
0.8
Commodity risk
0.1
0.0
(in billions of euros)
Risk
Risks calculated by internal model
14.4
8.9
345.1
263.6
Tier 1
28.0
21.6
Tier 2
16.0
18.8
TOTAL RISK-WEIGHTED ASSETS
Available capital
Tier 3
Deductions
0.8
0.9
-15.1
-18.2
TOTAL AVAILABLE CAPITAL
29.7
23.1
Tier 1 solvency ratio
8.1%
8.2%
Total solvency ratio
8.6%
8.8%
At 31 December 2007, the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group’s CAD/RSE
ratio was 8.6%, compared with 8.8% a year earlier. The Tier 1
solvency ratio was 8.1% against 8.2% at 31 December 2006. Since
31 December 2006, these ratios are stated after application of
reforms under the Financial Conglomerates Directive.
Changes in the various components of this ratio are analysed
below:
n risk-weighted assets were €345 billion at 31 December 2007,
a rise of more than €81 billion (31%) over the year. Credit risk
increased by close to €72 billion (29%) over the period, primarily
reflecting the consolidation of the Italian acquisitions, as well
as organic growth in Corporate and investment banking. After
receding during the first half due to a reduction in risks calculated
by the internal model (with full application of the Calyon Value at
Risk model), market risk rose appreciably at the end of the year
because of the crisis;
n Tier 1 capital was €28 billion at 31 December 2007, a rise of
over €6 billion, due to retained earnings over the period and
to two capital increases, one for €4 billion at the beginning of
the year and the other for €0.5 billion in December reserved for
employees. Several lower Tier 1 issues were also carried out
during the year, for an amount of €2.2 billion. These increases in
capital funds contributed to repaying the shareholders’ advance
made by the Regional Banks to Crédit Agricole S. A. at the end
of 2006 (in anticipation of the capital increase) and to financing
goodwill recognised in 2007;
n Tier 2 capital declined by €2.8 billion to €16 billion, mainly due to
redemptions of redeemable subordinated notes;
n Tier 3 capital fell to €0.8 billion;
n deductions from capital funds were €3.1 billion lower, primarily
due to the deconsolidation of Intesa.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 91
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The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
3 Crédit Agricole S. A.
capital management
Within the meaning of prudential regulations, preferred shares are
treated as core capital. Since 2003, deeply subordinated notes
have been treated as Tier 1 capital for prudential purposes.
Crédit Agricole S. A. periodically carries out employee share issues,
as was the case in 2003, 2005 and 2007. Furthermore, Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s undistributed earnings are included in reserves,
thereby effectively increasing shareholders’ funds.
It is also noted that any increase in Tier 1 capital releases potential
for increases in Lower Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital.
n 80% of these requirements until 31 December 2009.
As from the period ended 30 June 2007, during the parallel
calculation phase preceding application of the new ratio, Crédit
Agricole has reported its CRD ratio to the Banking Commission on
a half-yearly basis, at the different reporting levels required, in the
COREP format required by the regulations.
3 Methods of treating minority interests
in transition to Basel II
The consequences of implementing Basel II are:
n highly positive for the Regional Banks, as Basel II results in an
additional surplus of prudential capital for them;
3 Solvency ratio reform
Since 1 January 2006, when the European Financial Conglomerates
Directive came into effect, to comply with the new reporting rules,
Crédit Agricole S. A. has been required to:
n produce a “non-insurance” banking ratio that eliminates
insurance companies’ contribution from the numerator and the
denominator;
n monitor assets more closely to ensure that the Group’s
consolidated capital covers both its overall banking capital
requirements and the solvency margin requirements of its
insurance companies.
As an extension of the proposed transposition of the European CRD
system (2006-48-EC and 2006-49-EC) into French law, the decree
of 20 February 2007 defined “capital requirements applicable to
credit institutions and investment companies”. In accordance with
the provisions of this decree, in 2007, the Crédit Agricole S. A.
Group has incorporated the impact from the transition to the new
European CRD directive into its capital and risk management
process. The directive defines the methods of calculating the
solvency ratio as from 1 January 2008.
More specifically, the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group manages its
capital funds so as to comply with French Banking Commission
prudential capital requirements, within the meaning of regulation
90-02.
Until 1 January 2008, all financial institutions may continue to report
their ratios in CAD/RSE format (European solvency ratio), the only
one that has legal effect.
n negative on the whole for Crédit Agricole S. A. because half of
the value of minority interests in bank holdings is deducted from
Tier 1;
A dual system has been adopted: issuance of preferred shares
and a solution internal to the Group.
n The issue of preferred shares to increase Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
capital funds was authorised by law in 2004 and specifically
recognised by prudential regulations at the end of 2006.
Preferred shares, which entail less dilution than ordinary shares
for the same prudential effect, will be offered through internal
and external placements and fully guaranteed by the Regional
Banks.
n The Group’s internal solution is to transfer deductions from
Crédit Agricole S. A. to the Regional Banks to reduce Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s capital funds requirement. The Banking
Commission has approved this solution, known as “Switch”,
which enables Crédit Agricole S. A. to transfer to the Regional
Banks the most extreme portion of the risk that it carries due to
its holdings in the Regional Banks. This risk is highly diversified,
in essence.
The cost for Crédit Agricole S. A. (remuneration for the Regional
Banks) is based on market spreads for the mix of Lower Tier 1
and Lower Tier 2 subordinated instruments to which the “Switch”
solution is equivalent, and a fair value will be guaranteed by an
assessment carried out by an independent third party.
Aggregate capital requirements:
n following the transition to Basel II, the Tier 1 requirement is
As from 1 January 2008, the CRD ratio will have legal effect.
However, banks will continue to calculate the CAD ratio during
a parallel phase, as the Regulatory Authority has defined the
following floors for capital funds until the end of 2009:
n 95% of capital requirements as they would have been calculated
under CAD until 31 December 2007;
n 90% of these requirements until 31 December 2008;
92 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
€7.1 billion (€5.5 billion for equity interests in the Regional Banks,
€1.6 billion for minority interests outside the Group). These
requirements will be covered by:
n €3.6 billion of preference shares,
n €1.25 billion of “Switch” (Tier 1 equivalent of the value of the
“Switch” arrangement),
2007 MANAGEMENT
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The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
n €2.25 billion in own funds representing the cumulative capital
funds surplus:
n
as of 31 December 2007 (Tier 1 ratio: 8.1%),
n
released as part of the transition to Basel II (€1 billion gain on
prudential treatment of Insurance businesses),
n
available in the form of unutilised potential Lower Tier 1
issues.
»
The implementation timetable is the following:
n all transactions are to be implemented by the end of 2008, once
the legislative amendment facilitating issues of preference shares
has been enacted. During the interim period, the Regional Banks
will make a €3.6 billion shareholders’ advance.
RELATED PARTIES
The main related-party transactions entered into as of 31 December 2007 are described in the consolidated financial statements for the year
ended 31 December 2007, under “General framework – Related parties”.
»
INTERNAL CONTROL
As required by the French Financial Security Act of 1 August 2003,
in a report appended to the Management Report, the Chairman
of the Board of Directors must submit a report on corporate
governance and on the internal control procedures implemented
throughout the Company, on a consolidated basis.
This report, which is published under the terms and conditions set
forth by the Autorité des Marchés Financiers and is incorporated
into this document on pages 16 to 33, comprises two parts:
»
n part I deals with the work of the Board of Directors of Crédit
Agricole S. A.;
n part II of the report contains information on the organisational
principles applying to the internal control systems and to the
risk management and monitoring procedures in effect within the
Crédit Agricole Group. It contains descriptions of the permanent
controls, compliance risk prevention and periodical control
systems.
RECENT TRENDS AND OUTLOOK
3 2008 outlook
In early 2008, the crisis moved beyond the realm of subprime
mortgages. The question of whether the financial shock will
spread to the real economy has become more acute, raising the
spectre of a possible worldwide recession. Yet the US policy mix
is proving to be responsive and pragmatic. While the American
economy showed clear signs of weakening at the beginning of
the year, it could rebound as early as the second half owing to the
effects induced by monetary and fiscal stimuli.
The central scenario is a severe slowdown but without a
real rift in the United States, sluggish growth in Europe and
a gradual downturn in the rest of the world, especially in the
emerging countries.
In the USA, the first half is likely to be critical, as growth slows
close to recession levels. The US policy mix will remain very
active. The Fed lowered its key rate from 5.25% to 3% between
September 2007 and January 2008. It is expected to reduce it by
an additional 50 to 100 basis points during 2008. A US$150 billion
tax stimulus package should start to produce a visible impact
on growth as from mid-year. Average annual growth in 2008 is
forecast at around 1.8% compared with 2.2% in 2007.
In Europe, several factors will hold down growth to a projected
1.6% in the euro zone, including the slowdown in the US economy,
tightening of credit terms, the soaring euro, surging commodities
prices and some loss of resilience in European property markets.
Against this backdrop, the ECB could take a pragmatic stance and
lower its rates twice during 2008, with the first cut in the second
quarter.
In France, economic growth is expected fall a bit short of the 1.9%
registered in 2007. It could be stimulated by domestic demand,
primarily consumer spending, as the delayed impact of job market
improvement coupled with the stimulus from the “tax package”
continue to push up disposable income. While prospects for
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 93
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The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
capital investment in the domestic market still look good on the
whole, the international climate and borrowing terms will not be as
favourable.
The financial markets could gradually start to return to normal levels
around mid-year, even though the crisis is bound to leave some
marks. Long rates are expected to move up gradually, leading to
a steepening of the yield curves worldwide but especially in the
US following the easing of monetary policy. The dollar should firm
up a bit in 2008, once the serious concerns over US growth have
dissipated.
Outlook for the Crédit Agricole S. A. Group
The banking sector has been profoundly shaken by the international
financial crisis and is facing a major shift in consumer behaviour, as
well as global consolidation in the industry. In this increasingly
complex and highly unstable environment, the Group defines itself
as “a group of committed, responsible entrepreneurs, which is
working for its customers and shareholders as a team, to build
a European leader with a global dimension in the banking and
insurance market”.
The Group will be able to capitalise on its strengths, which give
it the wherewithal to confidently face the challenges in the years
ahead: all of its business lines hold solid European and sometimes
global positions; solid momentum has set in as platforms have
been scaled up; and its extensive know-how in integration bodes
well for its ability effectively to manage its international expansion.
3 Recent events
Newedge offers clients a full range of clearing and execution services
covering options and futures contracts for financial products and
commodities, as well as for money market instruments, bonds,
FX, equities, and commodities on OTC markets. Newedge
also provides a range of value added services, including prime
brokerage, asset financing, an electronic platform for trading and
order routing, cross margining, and the processing and centralized
reporting of client portfolios.
Newedge gives its institutional clients access to over 70 markets
worldwide. Headquartered in Paris and with operations worldwide,
Newedge has around 3,000 staff, located in the world’s 25 major
financial centres.
Sale by Crédit Agricole S. A. of its shareholding
in Suez
Press release – 14 January 2008
As previously announced, Crédit Agricole S. A. today completed the
sale of its direct shareholding in Suez. 24,558,219 shares (1.88%
of Suez’s capital) were sold through an accelerated placement
to institutional investors, in which Calyon acted as sole global
coordinator, and Calyon and Deutsche Bank were Joint Lead
Managers and Bookrunners.
This transaction was well received by investors. The price was set
at €45 per share of Suez. Crédit Agricole S. A. also granted to the
Joint Lead Managers an over-allotment option for 2,455,821 shares
of Suez (or 10% of the total placement) exercisable no later than
13 February 2008.
The effect of this transaction on the 2008 consolidated net income
of Crédit Agricole S. A. is expected to exceed €500 million.
The following events were announced after 31 December 2007:
Newedge: a new force in global brokerage
Operational launch of Newedge, brokerage
subsidiary of Société Générale and Calyon
Press release – 2 January 2008
Société Générale and Calyon have today concluded the merger
of the brokerage activities of their respective subsidiaries, Fimat
and Calyon Financial, which was announced on 8 August 2007.
This makes effective the operational launch of Newedge, a world
leader in the execution and clearing of listed derivative products.
The objective of both shareholders is to arrange an IPO for the new
entity within 18 to 24 months.
Newedge is controlled 50/50 by Société Générale and Calyon. Its
Chairman, Marc Litzler, CEO of Calyon and the Vice-Chairman,
Philippe Collas, Deputy CEO of Société Générale with responsibility
for its Global Investment Management and Services division, have
been appointed for a period of two years, with an alternation
between Société Générale and Calyon.
Patrice Blanc, Chairman and CEO of Fimat, has been appointed
CEO of Newedge and Richard Ferina, Chairman and CEO of Calyon
Financial, will be Deputy CEO.
94 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Extract from press release dated 22 January 2008
Newedge, a leading new force in global multi-asset brokerage
business, is detailing today in a press conference in Paris, the
thinking behind the company’s creation, its priorities and the
opportunities ahead. Newedge is also launching today its brand
identity and positioning, advertising campaign, and website
(www newedgegroup.com), reflecting a highly innovative brand
strategy.
Newedge is a 50/50 joint-venture between Société Générale and
Calyon, the corporate & investment banking division of Crédit
Agricole Group, and combines the Fimat and Calyon Financial
businesses. Marc Litzler, Chief Executive Officer, Calyon, and
Philippe Collas, Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Société Générale,
have been appointed as Chairman and Vice-Chairman respectively,
for the first two years. These roles will be assumed by Société
Générale and Calyon alternately, rotating every two years. Patrice
Blanc, former Chairman and CEO of Fimat, is CEO of Newedge and
Richard Ferina, former Chairman and CEO of Calyon Financial, is
Deputy CEO.
2007 MANAGEMENT
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The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Newedge benefits from the backing of Société Générale and Crédit
Agricole’s strong credit ratings, while operating independently of its
parent shareholders. Benefiting from bank status, Newedge offers
robust financial strength to its customers, specifically in financing
and margining operations. The complementarity of the combined
entities in terms of products, services and geography gives to
Newedge a highly diversified revenue base that should enhance its
competitiveness and the quality of its future earnings.
With a leading market position in its core business as a Futures
Commission Merchant (FCM), Newedge ranks among the top
5 global players in clearing and execution on all of the top 10
exchanges, with more than 5 million contracts executed on average
per day. Pro-forma, Newedge generated over €1 billion in revenues
in 2007.
Focusing its strategy on its clients’ needs, Newedge provides a
wide range of standard products in futures and options, securities,
FX and OTC. Newedge also offers a portfolio of leading-edge
services centred on Global Asset Execution, Global Asset Clearing
and Prime Brokerage.
Building on its strong market position in global execution and global
clearing, Newedge intends to extend its prime brokerage offer on
multiple asset classes (including equities, bonds, currencies and
commodities) and will actively pursue business opportunities from
its e-Brokerage platform.
Newedge has a strong global franchise with a presence in 25
locations in 17 countries, with direct access to more than 70
derivatives and stock exchanges all over the world. Newedge’s
employees (around 3,000 people) are strategically located to serve
the 24 hour-a-day business needs of their customers – financial
institutions, hedge funds, asset managers, professional trading
groups and corporates.
Crédit Agricole Asset Management Group
confirms its presence and growth ambitions
in Italy through a new subsidiary:
Crédit Agricole Asset Management SGR
In addition to its core business of managing mutual funds
and SecondaPensione, an open-ended pension fund, Crédit
Agricole Asset Management SGR operates through the following
companies:
n Crédit Agricole Alternative Investment Products Group SGR
(CA AIPG SGR), Italy’s second-largest (1) firm in the field of multi
alternative investment management;
n CAAM Real Estate Italia SGR, which manages notably two
property funds: CAAM RE Italia and CAAM RE Europa;
n Selezione e Distribuzione SIM, a specialist distributor.
Crédit Agricole Asset Management Group
develops its Australian presence with the launch
of “Crédit Agricole Asset Management”
Extract from press release dated 14 February 2008
Considering the importance of the Australian market and the
development of its local client base, Crédit Agricole Asset
Management Group (CAAM Group) has decided to enhance its
presence in this country. After opening a representative office in
Sydney in early 2007, CAAM Group has created a wholly owned
subsidiary: Crédit Agricole Asset Management Australia Ltd (CAAM
Australia).
The launch of CAAM Australia underlines the Group’s commitment
to Australia and New Zealand and its confidence in the local asset
management industry. Over the past year, local AUM have grown
to just under US$1.2 billion (€726 million).
CAAM Group also announces the appointment in Australia of John
Maragiannis who assumes the role of Director of Distribution,
joining from Crédit Suisse Asset Management (CSAM) where he
was head of Institutional Sales until March 2006. Prior to this,
he ran the institutional sales function for Schroder Investment
Management.
Reporting to country head Richard Borysiewicz, Maragiannis will
be responsible for new client sales and relationships in institutional
and retail markets.
Extract from press release dated 6 February 2008
Following the unwinding of the joint venture between Intesa
Sanpaolo S.p.A. and Crédit Agricole, Crédit Agricole Asset
Management SGR today unveiled its new organisational structure.
Crédit Agricole Asset Management SGR is the largest foreign asset
manager in Italy, with more than €26 billion under management. It
is a subsidiary of Crédit Agricole Asset Management Group (CAAM
Group), a leading player in the European investment industry.
Creation of Grameen - Crédit Agricole
Microfinance Foundation
Extract from press release dated 18 February 2008
Crédit Agricole S. A., in partnership with 2006 Nobel Peace Prize
winner Professor Muhammad Yunus, announces the creation of the
Grameen - Crédit Agricole Microfinance Foundation and endows it
with €50 million.
(1) Source: MondoHedge.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 95
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The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s activity and results
Crédit Agricole S. A. is committed to fighting world poverty
alongside Professor Muhammad Yunus, founder and Managing
Director of Grameen Bank and laureate of the 2006 Nobel Peace
Prize for his efforts to promote microcredit.
Looking to foster the development of microfinance institutions in
developing countries and emerging economies, Crédit Agricole S. A.
has decided to team up with Grameen Trust to create a dedicated
foundation and endow it with €50 million. The Foundation,
“Grameen-Crédit Agricole pour la microfinance dans le monde”, will
provide microfinance institutions with a complete range of financing
facilities in the form of credits, guarantees and equity capital, along
with a platform for advisory services, information exchanges and
technical assistance. Fondation Grameen Crédit Agricole Crédit
Agricole S. A. will provide a team of specialists.
Today, we are also launching a website in French and in English
dedicated to the Foundation ‘Grameen-Crédit Agricole pour la
microfinance dans le monde’ at: www.grameen-credit-agricole.org.
Crédit Agricole Asset Management strengthens
its position in the Middle East through
a joint venture with Banque Saudi Fransi
in Saudi Arabia: “CAAM Saudi Fransi”
Extract from press release dated 20 February 2008
Pursuant to its Middle East development strategy, Crédit Agricole
Asset Management (CAAM) announces the formation of CAAM
Saudi Fransi, an asset management joint venture with Banque
Saudi Fransi (BSF), the sixth largest bank in Saudi Arabia.
Held 60 per cent by BSF and 40 per cent by CAAM, the joint
venture has been approved by local regulators.
Based in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, CAAM Saudi Fransi will benefit from
CAAM group’s technical skills and capacity for innovation, as well
as from BSF’s excellent knowledge of the local market.
CAAM Saudi Fransi’s staff of more than forty professionals
provides private customers, companies and Saudi institutions
with a comprehensive and growing range of investment funds
including both conventional and Sharia-compliant funds, along with
discretionary management services and structured products.
The Chairman of CAAM Saudi Fransi is Ibrahim Al-Touq, also
Chairman of BSF. Richard Lepère, formerly CAAM Head of RFP and
Consultant Relations, has been appointed CEO.
CAAM has historic ties with all the Gulf countries and has also been
present in Abu Dhabi since 1998. The Abu Dhabi representative
office, headed by Ziad Sikias, aims to reinforce relationships with
clients such as investment banks, retail and private banks, pension
funds, insurance companies and corporates in Gulf Cooperation
Council (GCC) countries.
96 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
CAAM also recently appointed Christian Lainé as Head of Relations
with the major Sovereign Wealth Funds and State Entities in the
Middle East. He is based in Abu Dhabi.
With this new venture, CAAM is building up a presence in a region
with strong growth potential, in line with its strategic international
development plan.
Crédit Agricole S. A. welcomes Bank
of Spain decision to authorise it to increase
its stake in Bankinter
Press release – 21 February 2008
The Bank of Spain today announced the authorisation for Crédit
Agricole S. A. to take a significant stake in Bankinter. The Bank
of Spain’s decision will allow Crédit Agricole S. A. to finalise
the acquisition of 14.66 per cent in Bankinter from Ramchand
Bhawnani. This stake is in addition to the 4.75 per cent bought in
the market by Crédit Agricole S. A. in recent months. In addition the
Bank of Spain has also authorised Crédit Agricole S. A. to increase
its stake to the level requested.
This transaction is in line with Crédit Agricole S. A.’s strategy to
strengthen its presence in the European banking market and in
particular in the Spanish market.
Crédit Agricole S. A. welcomes and is very pleased with the
decision of the Bank of Spain and now wishes to establish an
ongoing long-term dialogue with the management of Bankinter, as
well as with other shareholders.
Systeia Capital Management becomes
a wholly- owned CAAM subsidiary
and appoints a new board
Extract from press release dated 26 February 2008
Jean-Louis Juchault and David Obert, co-founders of hedge fund
manager Systeia Capital Management, have sold their 22 per cent
stake in the company, thus exercising the put option granted when
they set up Systeia in December 2000.
As a result, Systeia Capital Management, which specialises in
alternative management, is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Crédit Agricole Asset Management (CAAM).
Systeia Capital Management’s supervisory board today appointed
a new management team composed of:
n Andrew Watson, Chairman of the Executive Board;
n Emmanuel Bourdeix, Member of the Executive Board;
n Frédéric Fouquet, Member of the Executive Board.
2007 MANAGEMENT
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Crédit Agricole S.A. parent company financial statements
Crédit Agricole S. A. parent company
financial statements
»
ANALYSIS OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. PARENT COMPANY
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
At year-end 2007, Crédit Agricole S. A. (parent company) posted
net banking income of €2,944 million, €40 million less than the
€2,984 million registered in 2006.
This near-stability is the result of two opposing trends:
n first, revenues from variable-income securities, which mainly
include dividend and similar income, rose by €80 million yearon-year to €4,231 million. This improvement reflects growth in
the subsidiaries’ net income in 2007 and the enlargement of the
Group’s scope of consolidation;
n second, the cost of funding investments in non-consolidated
subsidiaries increased due to the full-year effect of the acquisitions
made in 2006 and 2007 (mainly, the Cariparma group). This
financing cost totalled €1,601 million, up from €1,506 million in
2006.
Other net banking income was a loss of €125 million, compared
with a loss of €69 million in 2006, primarily due to costs associated
with the recent acquisitions.
Gross operating income amounted to €2,353 million in 2007, an
increase of €47 million over the €2,306 million recorded in 2006.
Risk-related costs remained very low, with a net release from
provisions of €8 million as opposed to €28 million in 2006.
Net income on disposal of non current assets amounted to
€1,982 million, mainly including a €1,857 million gain on the
disposal of Intesa Sanpaolo shares.
Tax gains, resulting from the tax consolidation mechanism in
France, with Crédit Agricole S. A. at the head of the tax relief group,
came to €602 million in 2007, up from €619 million in 2006.
€49 million was allocated to the fund for liquidity and solvency
banking risks, in line with the terms of the agreement established
when the fund was set up at the time of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
flotation.
Net income for Crédit Agricole S. A. (parent company) was
€4,896 million, a rise of €1,939 million on the €2,957 million
registered in 2006.
Operating expenses totalled €591 million, €87 million less than
in 2006 (in 2006, personnel costs included a €99 million charge
corresponding to the cost of optional hedging for the stock option
plan arranged in the autumn of 2006).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 97
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FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL SUMMARY
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
Share capital at year-end
4,420,567,311
4,420,567,311
4,491,966,903
4,491,966,903
5,009,270,616
Number of shares issued
1,473,522,437
1,473,522,437
1,497,322,301
1,497,322,301
1,669,756,872
13,825
14,708
16,945
22,580
27,674
539
1,032
1,381
2,116
4,333
Results and transactions for the financial year (in millions of euros)
Gross revenues
Income before tax, employee profit-sharing, depreciation,
amortisation and provisions
Employee profit-sharing
4
0
0
0
1
(433)
(383)
(455)
(619)
(602)
Income after tax, employee profit-sharing, depreciation,
amortisation and provisions
611
1,249
2,451
2,957
4,896
Dividends paid
800
954
1,407
1,894
2,004 (2)
Income after tax, employee profit-sharing, but before depreciation,
amortisation and provisions
0.657
0.960
1.226
1.660
2.955 (2)
Income after tax, employee profit-sharing, depreciation,
amortisation and provisions
0.415
0.847
1.636
1.795
2.932 (2)
0.55
0.66
0.94
1.15
1.20 (1) (2)
2,983
2,685
2,882
2,928
3,076
165
157
177
189
201
84
81
144
151
123
Tax
Per share data (in euros)
Dividend per share
Employee and social data
Average number of employees (3)
Wages and salaries paid during the financial year (in millions of euros)
Employee benefits and social contributions paid during the year
(in millions of euros)
(1) Net dividend proposed to the AGM of 21 May 2008.
(2) Calculation taking into account the number of shares issued at the AGM of 21 May 2008, i.e. 1,669,756,872 shares outstanding.
(3) Refers to head office staff numbers.
98 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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Crédit Agricole S.A. parent company financial statements
»
RECENT CHANGES IN SHARE CAPITAL
The table below shows changes in Crédit Agricole S. A.’s share capital over the last five years:
Amount
of share capital
Date and type of transaction
(in euros)
Number of shares
2,916,629,697
972,209,899
+1,059,857,214
3,976,486,911
+353,285,738
1,325,495,637
+75,699,792
4,052,186,703
+25,233,264
1,350,728,901
24/11/2003
Share issue for cash
(Board meeting of 09/09/2003)
+368,380,608
+122,793,536
Share capital at 31/12/2003
4,420,567,311
1,473,522,437
Share capital at 31/12/2004
4,420,567,311
1,473,522,437
+71,399,592
+23,799,864
Share capital at 31/12/2005
4,491,966,903
1,497,322,301
Share capital at 31/12/2006
4,491,966,903
1,497,322,301
06/02/2007
Share issue for cash
(Board meeting of 21/11/2006)
+449,196,690
+149,732,230
+68,107,023
+22,702,341
5,009,270,616
1,669,756,872
Share capital at 31/12/2002
19/06/2003
New share issue
(Board meeting of 10/06/2003)
10/10/2003
Employee share offering
(Board meetings of 21/05 and 09/09/2003)
26/08/2005
Employee share offering
(Board meetings of 08/03 and 18/05/2005)
05/12/2007
Employee share offering
(AGM of 23/05/2007)
Share capital at 31/12/2007
Since 5 December 2007, Crédit Agricole S. A.’s share capital
amounted to €5,009,270,616 divided into 1,669,756,872 shares
with a par value of €3 each. During 2007, the share capital
increased by €517,303,713 following the completion of two capital
increases:
n the first was a capital increase for cash with pre-emptive rights
retained, to involve Crédit Agricole S. A.’s shareholders in its
growth. It was floated in January 2007 (from 4 to 23 January).
149,732,230 new shares were issued for a total nominal amount
of €449,196,690 (including a €4 billion share premium). The new
shares were admitted to trading on Euronext Paris as from
6 February 2007. They have the same characteristics as the existing
shares and are eligible for the dividend as from 1 January 2006;
n the second was an employee share issue floated from 10 to
21 September 2007, to involve Crédit Agricole Group staff
members more closely in the Company’s expansion. On
5 December, the settlement-delivery date, 22,702,341 new shares
were issued for a total nominal amount of €68,107,023 (including
a €500 million share premium).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 99
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CHANGE IN SHARE OWNERSHIP OVER THE PAST THREE YEARS
The table below shows change in the ownership of Crédit Agricole S. A. over the past three years:
At 31/12/2006
At 31/12/2005
Shareholders
Number
of shares
At 31/12/2007
% of voting
rights
% of share
capital
% of share
capital
% of share
capital
SAS Rue La Boétie *
903,090,102
54.50%
54.09%
54.73%
54.73%
1.76%
Treasury shares **
12,552,962
-
0.75%
1.01%
Employees (ESOP)
103,761,579
6.26%
6.21%
5.63%
5.83%
Institutional investors
520,433,879
31.40%
31.17%
29.77%
27.05%
Retail investors
129,918,350
7.84%
7.78%
8.86%
10.63%
1,669,756,872
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
100.00%
TOTAL
*
**
SAS Rue La Boétie is wholly-owned by the Crédit Agricole Regional Banks.
The treasury shares are held as part of the share buyback programme designed to cover stock options, which are recognised on Crédit Agricole S. A.’s balance sheet, within an agreement
to provide liquidity for the shares on the stock market.
The Company’s ownership structure has not changed materially
over the past three years.
The Regional Banks, acting together and for the long term, own a
majority share (between 54% and 55%) of Crédit Agricole S. A. via
SAS Rue La Boétie.
Until the beginning of December 2007, the Regional Banks’
interest was stable, at 54.7%, as they maintained their ownership
percentage by subscribing (via la SAS Rue La Boétie) to the
6 February 2007 capital increase with pre-emptive rights retained.
Their stake then declined from 54.7% to 54.1% after the
Crédit Agricole Group employee share offering, effective as of
5 December 2007.
100 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Following the second transaction, the percentage interest held
by employees through employee share ownership plans and
savings schemes increased by nearly 0.6 percentage point, from
5.6% at 31 December 2006 to 6.2% at 31 December 2007 (with
103,761,579 shares).
Institutional investors increased their base appreciably. Their
interest rose by 1.4 percentage point to 31.2% at 31 December
2007 from 29.8% at end-2006 and 27% at end-2005. As a result,
the percentage held by retail shareholders fell to 7.8% from 10.6%
two years earlier.
2007 MANAGEMENT
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Crédit Agricole S.A. parent company financial statements
»
AUTHORISATIONS TO EFFECT CAPITAL INCREASES
Table summarising authorisations in force granted by the
General Meeting of Shareholders to the Board of Directors to effect
capital increases and use made of such authorisations during the
year (information required by Order no. 2004-604 of 24 June 2004
reforming the system applicable to negotiable securities):
General Meeting
Resolution
Purpose of grants of authority
to the Board of Directors
Duration, ceilings,
limitations
Use made of grants
during 2007
General Meeting
of 17/05/2006
19th resolution
Capital increase by issuance of ordinary shares
and/ or any other negotiable securities giving immediate
and/ or future access to the share capital,
with pre-emptive subscription right waived,
with the authority to further delegate as provided by law
Ceilings:
n the total nominal amount of capital increases shall not
exceed €4 billion or the equivalent value thereof;
n the total nominal amount of debt securities granting
rights to the share capital shall not exceed €5 billion
or the equivalent value thereof.
Valid for a term of 26 months
Authorisation cancelled by combined GM of 23/05/2007
(14th resolution)
Issue of 149,732,230
new shares with
a par value of €3 each
on 6 February 2007 *
General Meeting
of 17/05/2006
25th resolution
Grant options to purchase and/or to subscribe for
Company shares to employees and corporate officers
Ceiling:
n options granted shall give access to no more than 2%
of the Company’s existing share capital.
Valid for a term of 38 months
Two stock option plans
were created:
n on 6/10/2006 and
n on 17/07/2007
(see Note 8.6 to the
Financial Statements)
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
14th resolution
Capital increase by issuance of ordinary shares
and/or any other negotiable securities giving immediate
and/or future access to the share capital,
with pre-emptive subscription right waived, with
the authority to further delegate as provided by law
Ceilings:
None
n the total nominal amount of capital increases shall not
exceed €2.5 billion or the equivalent value thereof;
n the total nominal amount of debt securities granting
rights to the share capital shall not exceed €5 billion
or the equivalent value thereof.
Valid for a term of 26 months
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
15th resolution
Capital increase by issuance of ordinary shares
and/or any other negotiable securities giving immediate
and/or future access to the share capital,
with pre-emptive subscription right waived, with
the authority to further delegate as provided by law
Ceilings:
None
n The total nominal amount of capital increases may
not exceed:
n €1 billion or the equivalent thereof in the event
of an issue with a priority subscription period;
n €500 million or the equivalent thereof in the event
of an issue without a priority subscription period;
n the total nominal amount of debt securities that may
be issued shall not exceed €5 billion or the equivalent
value thereof;
n all such issues must be covered by the unused
portion of the ceilings set out in the 14th resolution.
Valid for a term of 26 months
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
16th resolution
Increase the number of shares to be issued for each
share issue
Ceiling:
n 15% of the initial issue, at the same price;
n this ceiling counts towards the total maximum limits
as defined by the 14th and 15th resolutions.
Valid for a term of 26 months
None
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
17th resolution
Issue equity securities and other securities giving access
to the share capital in consideration for contributions
in kind consisting of equity securities or other securities
giving access to the share capital, other than through
a public exchange offer,
with the authority to further delegate as provided by law
Ceiling:
n 10% of the share capital;
n this ceiling counts towards the total maximum limits
as defined by the 14th and 15th resolutions.
Valid for a term of 26 months
None
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 101
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*
General Meeting
Resolution
Purpose of grants of authority
to the Board of Directors
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
18th resolution
Determine the issue price of ordinary shares or any other Ceiling:
securities giving access to the share capital, in the event n 5% of the share capital per year.
the preferential subscription rights are waived
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
19th resolution
Capital increase by incorporating reserves, profits, share
premiums or other items, with the authority to further
delegate as provided by law
Ceiling:
n €3 billion, independent from the total maximum
amount set forth in the 14th and 15th resolutions.
Valid for a term of 26 months
None
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
20th resolution
Share offerings for employees of the Crédit Agricole
Group who are members of a Company employee share
ownership scheme, with the authority to further delegate
as provided by law
Ceiling:
n nominal value: €150 million.
Valid for a term of 26 months.
Issue of 20,852,755
new shares with
a par value of €3 each
on 5 December 2007 **
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
21st resolution
Share offerings for Crédit Agricole International
Employees Company, with the authority to further
delegate as provided by law
Ceiling:
n €40 million (nominal value).
Valid for a term of 18 months
Issue of 1,791,819
new shares with
a par value of €3 each
on 5 December 2007 **
General Meeting
of 23/05/2007
22nd resolution
Ceiling:
Share offerings for employees of the Crédit Agricole
Group who are members of a Company share savings
n €40 million (nominal value).
scheme in the United States, with the authority to further Valid for a term of 26 months
delegate as provided by law
Issue of 57,767
new shares with
a par value of €3 each
on 5 December 2007 **
On 28 December 2006, the Chief Executive Officer used
the authority granted to him by the Board of Directors at its
meeting of 21 November 2006 to carry out a capital increase
in a nominal amount of €449,196,690 by issuing 149,732,230
new shares with a par value of €3 each, with preferential
subscription rights. This issue was carried out pursuant to the
19th resolution adopted by shareholders of Crédit Agricole S. A.
at the Combined General Meeting of 17 May 2006. This
transaction, which took effect on 6 February 2007, increased
the share capital of Crédit Agricole S.A. to €4,941,163,593
and the number of shares that make up the share capital, to
1,647,054 531.
102 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Duration, ceilings,
limitations
Use made of grants
during 2007
None
** In accordance with the authorisations granted by the Extraordinary
General Meeting of 23 May 2007, Crédit Agricole S. A. carried
out a capital increase reserved for employees of the Crédit
Agricole Group. 22,702,341 new shares were issued for a
nominal amount of €68,107,023 (€499.7 million including the
share premium). This issue was carried out pursuant to the
20th, 21st and 22nd resolutions adopted by shareholders of
Crédit Agricole S.A. at the Combined General Meeting of
23 May 2007. This transaction, which took effect on 5 December
2007, increased the share capital of Crédit Agricole S.A. to
€5,009,270,616 and the number of shares that make up the
share capital, to €1,669,756,872.
2007 MANAGEMENT
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»
PURCHASE BY THE COMPANY OF ITS OWN SHARES
Under the 13th resolution adopted at the Combined
General Meeting of 23 May 2007, the shareholders of
Crédit Agricole S. A. authorised the Board of Directors to
trade in Crédit Agricole S. A. shares, pursuant to articles
L. 225–209 et seq. of the Code de commerce and of European
Commission Regulation 2273/2003 of 22 December 2003.
3 Thirteenth Resolution: Grant
of authority to the Board of Directors
to trade in the Company’s shares
Having heard the Board of Directors’ management report, and
voting in accordance with the quorum and majority requirements
to transact ordinary business, the shareholders authorise the
Board of Directors, with the right to further delegate this authority
under the conditions provided by law, to trade in the company’s
own shares in accordance with provisions of Articles L. 225-209
et seq. of the Code de commerce and European Commission
Regulation 2273/2003 of 22 December 2003.
This authority, which replaces the authority granted at the Ordinary
General Meeting of 17 May 2006, is valid until renewed at a future
ordinary general meeting and, in any event, for a maximum period
of eighteen (18) months from the date of this meeting.
Share purchases made by the Board of Directors pursuant to
this authority may under no circumstances result in the company
holding more than ten percent (10%) of its share capital. However,
the number of shares purchased by the company for the purpose
of holding the shares purchased with a view subsequently to
exchanging them or using them to pay for a potential merger,
spin-off or asset transfer shall not exceed 5% of the company’s
share capital.
Under the share buyback programme established by the company,
shares may be traded on one or more occasions and by all and
any means, including on the market, over the counter or by way of
derivatives traded on organised markets or over the counter (such
as call and put options or any combination thereof), as provided
for by the appropriate market authorities and at such times as the
Board of Directors or its duly authorised representative deems
appropriate. The entirety of the share buyback programme may be
completed through block purchases.
The number of shares purchased may not exceed 10% of the total
number of shares comprising the company’s share capital (on this
date equal to 164,705,453 shares) on the date of purchase, and
the maximum number of shares held after said purchases may not
exceed 10% of the share capital.
The total cost of all such share purchases made during the term of
this authority may not exceed three (3) billion euros. The purchase
price may not be more than fifty (50) euros. However, the shares
may be allotted for no consideration in accordance with the
provisions of the law.
This authority is designed to allow the company to trade in its own
shares either on the market or over the counter for any purpose
permitted by applicable laws or regulations. The company may use
this authorisation for the following purposes:
n to allot stock options to some or all employees and/or officers
and directors serving in an executive capacity within the company
and companies or groups affiliated to it now or in the future, as
defined by article L. 225-180 of the Code de commerce;
n to allot shares in the company to the employees referred to in
the above paragraph as part of an employee profit-sharing or
share ownership plan and in connection with the transactions
covered by articles L. 225-197-1 to L. 225-197-3 of the Code
de commerce;
n to hold the shares purchased with a view subsequently
to exchanging them or using them to pay for a potential
acquisition;
n to ensure coverage of securities giving access to the company’s
share capital;
n to ensure that liquidity is provided for the shares on the equity
market by an investment services provider under a contract that
complies with the AFEI (French Association for Investment Firms)
Code of Conduct;
n to retire the purchased shares, subject to adoption of the 23rd
resolution.
The Board of Directors may trade in the company’s shares
pursuant to this authority at any time during the term of the share
buyback programme.
The company may also use the authority under this resolution and
continue to implement its share buyback programme as provided
by law, and in particular by the provisions of articles 231-1 et seq.
of the General Regulations issued by the Autorité des Marchés
Financiers, during a public cash or share exchange offer made by
the company.
The shareholders grant full powers to the Board of Directors to
implement this authority and to determine the method of so doing,
including without limitation placing stock market orders, signing
deeds, entering into agreements, accomplishing formalities and
filings, particularly with the Autorité des Marchés Financiers, and
more generally to do all that is necessary.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 103
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Crédit Agricole S.A. parent company financial statements
3 Board of Directors’ special report
to the shareholders
Pursuant Articles L. 225-209 and L. 225-211 of the Code de
commerce, the Board of Directors informs the general meeting
of the following activities undertaken in accordance with the
share buyback programme for the period from 1 January to
31 December 2007.
Number of shares registered in the Company’s name as at 31/12/2006
To cover commitments to employees
To provide volume to the market in the context of the liquidity agreement
Number of shares bought in 2007
To cover commitments to employees
To provide volume to the market in the context of the liquidity agreement
Transactions carried out as part of the programme in order to:
n cover commitments made to employees, in the context of either
stock option plans or the liquidity contract for Crédit Lyonnais
employees;
n provide volume to the market in the context of a liquidity contract
in accordance with the AFEI charter.
15,144,404
14,066,168
1,078,236
8,347,281
243,875
8,103,406
Volume of shares used to achieve the purpose set (1)
Coverage of commitments to employees
Liquidity contract (bought + sold)
3,422,169
15,619,960
Number of shares that may be reallocated for other purposes
0
Average purchase price of shares bought in 2007
€27.82
Value of shares bought in 2007 at purchase price
€232,256,601
Trading costs
Number of shares sold in 2007
€489,991
10,938,723
To cover commitments to employees
3,422,169
To provide volume to the market in the context of the liquidity agreement
7,516,554
Average price of shares sold in 2007
Number of shares registered in the Company’s name as at 31/12/2007
To cover commitments to employees
To provide volume to the market in the context of the liquidity agreement
€25.72
12,552,962
10,887,874
1,665,088
Net book value per share (2)
Shares bought to cover commitments to employees (historic price)
Shares bought as part of the liquidity contract (share price as at 31/12/2007)
Total net book value of shares
Par value
Percentage of share capital held by the Company as at 31/12/2007
€18.72
€23.07
€242,278,281
€3
0.75%
(1) Coverage of commitments to employees concerns shares sold or transferred to beneficiaries after the exercise of options (Crédit Agricole S. A. and LCL), as well as shares sold in order to
offset excess coverage of stock option plans, the liquidity contract concerns shares bought and sold in relation to the contract over the period in question.
(2) Shares bought to cover commitments to employees are recognised as securities held for sale and valued at their purchase price; shares bought in relation to the liquidity contract are
recognised as trading securities and valued at the market value at each accounting date.
104 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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INFORMATION ON EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
See the chapter entitled “Corporate governance and internal
control” on page 35 of the registration document for information
on the compensation, appointments and duties of the Group’s
directors and officers, as required by section L. 225-102 of
the Code de commerce under the French NRE (New Economic
Regulations) Act of 15 May 2001, by the French Financial Security
Act of 1 August 2003, and by Order 2004-604 of 24 June 2004.
A summary of trading in the Company’s shares by directors of
Crédit Agricole S. A. in 2007, as required by Article L. 621-18-2 of
the French Monetary and Financial Code and Article 223-26 of the
Autorité des Marchés Financiers General Regulation, is provided in
the chapter entitled “Corporate governance and internal control” on
page 48 of the registration document.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 105
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Risk factors
Risk factors
In accordance with IFRS 7 relating to disclosures on financial
instruments, this part of the management report sets out the type
of risks to which the Group is exposed, their extent and the systems
used to manage them.
IFRS 7 disclosures cover the following types of risks *:
n credit risk (including country risk): risks of losses arising from
default by a counterparty leading to that counterparty’s inability
to meet its commitments to the Group;
n market risks: risks of losses arising from changes in market
parameters (interest rates, exchange rates, prices, credit
spreads);
n risks related to the US residential real-estate sector;
n structural asset/liability management risks: risks of losses arising
from changes in interest rates (global interest-rate risk) and
exchange rates (exchange-rate risk), and the risk of not having
the necessary resources to meet commitments (liquidity risk),
including risks in the insurance sector.
To cover all risks inherent in the banking business, additional
(unaudited) information is provided concerning:
n operational risks: risks of losses resulting primarily from the
unsuitability or failure of processes, systems or people in charge
of transaction processing;
n legal risks: risks of the Group being exposed to civil or criminal
proceedings;
n non-compliance risks: risks related to the failure to comply
with laws and regulations in the Group’s banking and financial
activities.
Risk management is an integral part of the Group’s banking
activities, and lies at the heart of its internal control system that
is implemented by all staff involved in banking activities, from the
initiation of transactions to their final maturity.
Measuring and supervising risk is the responsibility of the dedicated
Risk Management and Permanent Controls function (DRG – Group
Risk Management Department), which is independent from the
business lines and reports directly to the Management Board.
Although risk management is primarily the responsibility of the
business lines, DRG’s task is to ensure that the risks to which the
Group is exposed comply with risk strategies defined by business
*
lines (in terms of global and individual limits and selection criteria)
and are compatible with the Group’s growth and profitability
objectives.
DRG carries out consolidated Group-wide monitoring of risks,
using a network of risk management and permanent control officers
who report hierarchically to the Head of Risk Management and
Permanent Controls and functionally to the executive body of their
entity or business line.
To ensure a consistent view of risks within the Group, DRG has the
following duties:
n it defines and/or validates methods and procedures for analysing,
measuring and monitoring credit, market and operational risks;
n it helps with the critical analysis of business lines’ commercial
development strategies, focusing on the risk impact of these
strategies;
n it provides independent opinions to the Management Board
on risk exposure arising from business lines’ positions (credit
transactions, setting of market risk limits) or anticipated by their
risk strategy;
n it lists and analyses entities’ risks, about which data are collected
in risk information systems.
The Financial Management unit of the Group Finance Department
(DFG) manages structural asset/liability risk (interest-rate,
exchange-rate and liquidity risk) along with the refinancing policy
and supervision of capital requirements.
The Management Board’s supervision of these risks is carried out
through ALM Committee meetings, in which DRG takes part.
DRG organises a periodic review of the main credit-risk and
market-risk issues through quarterly risk committee meetings,
which deal with the following issues: policies regarding the taking
of risk, portfolio analysis and analysis of risk-related costs, market
limits and concentration limits. These risk committees cover all of
the Crédit Agricole Group’s risks (including those of the Regional
Banks) and are chaired by the CEO of Crédit Agricole S. A.
The DRG regularly informs Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Audit Committee
about risk exposures, the methods used to measure them and
its recommendations for managing them in compliance with the
policies defined by the Board of Directors.
These disclosures are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007, and so are covered by the statutory
auditors’ report (unless the disclosures are specified as “unaudited”).
106 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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Risk factors
»
CREDIT RISK
A credit risk is realised when a counterparty is unable to honour
its obligations and when the book value of these obligations in the
bank’s records is positive. The counterparty may be a bank, an
industrial or commercial enterprise, a government or government
entity, an investment fund or a natural person. The exposure may
be a loan, debt security, deed of property, performance exchange
contract, guarantee or unused confirmed commitment. The risk
also includes the settlement risk inherent in any transaction
entailing an exchange of cash or physical goods outside a secure
settlement system.
3 I. Objectives and policy
The risks taken by Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries must
comply with the risk strategies approved by the Group’s Risk
Committee, which is a sub-committee of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
Executive Committee and chaired by its CEO. Risk strategies are
adjusted to each business line and its development plan. They set
out global limits, intervention criteria and arrangements for giving
decision-making authority. These risk strategies are adjusted as
required to each business line, entity, business sector or country.
Business lines are responsible for complying with these risk
strategies, and compliance is controlled by risk management and
permanent control officers.
Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries seek to diversify their risks
in order to limit their counterparty risk exposures, particularly in the
event of a crisis affecting a particular industry or country. To achieve
this, Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries regularly monitor their
total exposures (taking into account internal calculation methods,
depending on the type of exposure) by counterparty, by transaction
portfolio, by economic sector and by country. Calyon, the Group’s
corporate and investment banking unit, also carries out active
portfolio management in order to reduce the main concentration
risks borne by the Crédit Agricole S. A. group. The Group uses
market instruments, such as credit derivatives and securitisation,
to reduce and diversify counterparty risk, and this enables it to
optimise its use of capital. Similarly, potential risk concentration
is mitigated through the syndication of loans among external
banks and the use of risk mitigation instruments (credit insurance,
derivatives, sharing risk with Sofaris).
3 II. Credit risk management
1. Risk-taking: general principles
All credit transactions require in-depth analysis of the client’s ability
to repay the debt, and of the most efficient way of structuring the
transaction, particularly in terms of security and maturity. This
analysis must comply with the risk strategy of the business line
concerned, and with all limits in force, both individual and global
limits. The final lending decision is based on an internal rating
and on an independent opinion given by a representative of the
risk management and permanent control function, as part of
the authorisation system in place. The Group Risk Management
Committee and its Chairman constitute the Group’s ultimate
decision-making authority.
The principle of a risk limit applies to all types of counterparty,
whether business enterprises, banks, financial institutions,
governmental or quasi-governmental entities.
Each lending decision requires an analysis of the relationship
between the risk taken and the expected return. In the corporate
and investment banking business, an ex-ante calculation of a
transaction’s expected return is carried out (RAROC - risk-adjusted
return on capital).
2. Risk measurement methods and systems
2.1. INTERNAL RATING AND CREDIT RISK
CONSOLIDATION SYSTEMS
In 2007, the Crédit Agricole Group continued to implement and
improve its consolidated credit risk supervision system, with a
view to the operational implementation of Basel II. The system
was audited by the Commission Bancaire, and this resulted in
requests for remedial action, monitored by the Group’s General
Inspection. In late 2007, the Commission Bancaire authorised the
Crédit Agricole Group to use its internal rating systems to calculate
regulatory capital requirements with respect to credit risk on retail
and corporate loan books falling primarily within its scope.
Crédit Agricole S. A., its subsidiaries and Regional Banks are
constantly seeking to improve their systems by focusing on three
major themes:
n default management and internal ratings, with the aim of
1) ensuring that the definition of default is compliant and that it is
implemented uniformly within the Group; and 2) guaranteeing that
estimates of variables comply with Basel requirements and that
the rating process is reliable;
n single client and Group risk management, designed to ensure
accurate identification of single clients on which there is a
risk and to improve cross-functional single-client information
management, which is crucial to ensuring rating uniqueness and
the uniform allocation of exposures to Basel portfolios. This work
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 107
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forms part of efforts to improve the data used to monitor risk and
carry out regulatory calculations;
n improving the ratio production process (ratios produced quarterly
since the September 2005 accounts closing) at each balance
sheet date, mainly to ensure the reliability and completeness of
data used in the calculation.
With the same objective of enhancing reliability, the following control
procedures have been strengthened: accounting and risk data
reconciliation procedures, data management and administration
procedures, and specific rating supervision procedures.
In 2008, the Crédit Agricole Group has chosen to maintain a project
organisation dedicated to supporting change management (as the
Basel II system comes into force), fulfilling commitments made to
the Commission Bancaire as part of the authorisation process,
co-ordinating roll-out work (regarding the adoption of the IRB
approach by certain French subsidiaries along with Cariparma and
Emporiki), and finally the implementation of the second and third
pillars of Basel II.
Governance of the rating system relies on the Standards and
Methodologies Committee (CNM), chaired by the Group’s Head
of Risk Management and Permanent Controls, whose task is to
validate and disseminate standards and methodologies relating to
measuring and controlling risks.
In retail banking, each entity has the responsibility of defining,
implementing and substantiating its rating system, in accordance
with the group standards defined by Crédit Agricole S. A. The
Regional Banks have common risk assessment models. LCL’s
scoring tools, which have been operational within its own scope
since 1990 (IRPAR, IRPRO) have also been made compliant. The
consumer finance subsidiaries (Sofinco, Finaref and Lukas Bank)
have adjusted their rating systems in line with the new prudential
requirements. Back-testing procedures for parameters used in the
regulatory calculation have now been defined and are operational
in all entities. These parameters are gradually being integrated more
closely into each entity’s risk management methods.
For corporate clients, Crédit Agricole Group entities use common
rating methods that combine quantitative and qualitative criteria.
Substantial work has been carried out since 2006 to improve
validation and documentation of these methods, and to improve
implementation of audit trails.
The broad roll-out of internal rating systems is enabling the Group
to introduce counterparty risk management based on Basel II-type
indicators. In corporate and investment banking, expected loss,
economic capital and risk-adjusted return measurements are used
in processes governing loan approval decisions and the definition
of risk strategies and limits.
108 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
2.2. CREDIT RISK MEASUREMENT
The measurement of credit risk exposures includes both drawn
facilities and confirmed unused facilities. To measure counterparty
risk on capital markets transactions, Crédit Agricole S. A. and its
subsidiaries use an internal method of estimating the underlying
risk of derivative financial instruments such as swaps and
structured products. The risk basis is the sum of the positive market
value of the instrument and an add-on coefficient applied to the
nominal amount. This add-on coefficient represents the potential
credit risk arising from the change in market value of derivative
instruments during their residual lifespan. It is calculated using the
type and residual lifespan of the instrument, based on a statistical
observation of movements in its underlying instruments. Crédit
Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries use this method for the internal
management of counterparty risk, and it differs from the regulatory
approach used to meet the measurement requirements of European
and international solvency ratios or for reporting major risks.
Moreover, to reduce exposure to counterparty risks on derivatives,
the Crédit Agricole S. A. Corporate and Investment Banking
businesses, via Calyon, usually enter into collateralisation contracts
with their counterparties, in addition to netting agreements, which
are negotiated during the documentation process prior to setting
up the transactions.
3. Supervision system
Rules for dividing and limiting risk exposures, along with specific
decision-making and monitoring processes relating to commitments,
are used to prevent any excessive concentration of the portfolio.
3.1. PROCESS FOR SUPERVISING CONCENTRATIONS
BY COUNTERPARTY OR GROUP OF RELATED
COUNTERPARTIES
The total consolidated commitments of Crédit Agricole and all
its subsidiaries are monitored by counterparty and by group of
related counterparties. A group of related counterparties is a set
of French or foreign legal entities that are connected, regardless
of their status and economic activity, in such a way that the total
exposure to this group can be measured on the basis of exposure
to one or more of these entities. Commitments to a counterparty or
group of counterparties include all loans granted by the Group and
its subsidiaries, as well as corporate financing operations, bond
portfolios, financing commitments and counterparty risks relating to
capital market transactions. Exposure limits for counterparties and
groups of counterparties are recorded in the internal information
systems of each subsidiary or business line.
Each operational entity reports the amount of its commitments by
risk category on a monthly or quarterly basis to the Group Risk
Management and Permanent Controls Division. Exposures to
2007 MANAGEMENT
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major non-bank counterparties, i.e. those on which the aggregate
commitments of Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries exceed
€300 million after netting, are reported separately to the Group Risk
Management and Permanent Controls Division, so they may be
monitored by the Group Risk Management Committee.
◊ At end-2007, the risk commitments of Crédit Agricole S. A. and
its subsidiaries to its ten largest non-bank clients equalled 3.5% of
the total portfolio, down from 3.9% at 31 December 2006. ◊
At the Regional Banks, major counterparty risks are monitored
mainly via the Foncaris subsidiary. At 31 December 2007,
Foncaris provided a 50% guarantee on €7.2 billion of Regional
Banks’ exposure to major counterparties.
3.2. PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND SECTOR
MONITORING PROCESS
Periodic portfolio reviews by entity or business line are carried
out to identify deteriorating risks, to update counterparty ratings,
to monitor risk strategies and to supervise developments in
concentrations. Portfolio reviews are also carried out by economic
sector. Finally, the corporate and investment banking business
has a portfolio modelling tool that allows it to test its portfolios’
resilience to stress scenarios.
3.3. PROCESS FOR MONITORING COUNTERPARTIES
IN DEFAULT AND UNDER SUPERVISION
Counterparties in default and under supervision are subject to close
supervision by business lines, in conjunction with risk management
and permanent control officers. They are formally monitored by
committees dedicated to entities’ sensitive exposures, and undergo
quarterly consolidated monitoring by the Group Risk Management
Committee and the Audit Committee.
3.4. CONSOLIDATED RISK MONITORING PROCESS
Every quarter, the Group Risk Management Committee examines
the risk scorecard produced by the Group Risk Management and
Permanent Controls Division. This document gives the Committee
a detailed review of the Group’s risk situation across all its business
lines and on a consolidated basis. In addition, detailed periodic
reviews of banking risks, country risks and the main non-banking
risks are carried out in Group Risk Management Committee
meetings.
In 2007, consolidated risk monitoring continued to benefit from
the implementation of Basel II reforms, particularly as regards
improvements in internal rating systems, consolidated counterparty
management and the scope covered by the risk centralisation
system.
◊ Unaudited data
3.5. STRESS SCENARIO IMPACTS
Credit stress scenarios are applied periodically in conjunction with
business lines to assess the risk of loss and the risk of changes
in capital requirements in the event of a sharp deterioration in
the economic and financial environment. The results of these
stress tests are examined in Group Risk Management Committee
meetings.
4. Credit risk mitigation mechanisms
4.1. GUARANTEES AND SECURITY RECEIVED
The principles governing the eligibility, use and management of
guarantees and security received are defined by the Crédit Agricole
Group’s Standards and Methodologies Committee (CNM), in
accordance with the CRD system implemented as part of the
Basel II solvency ratio reform. This common framework ensures
a consistent approach across the Group’s various entities. It
documents aspects including the conditions for prudential use,
valuation and revaluation methods and all credit risk mitigation
techniques used. The various entities are in charge of implementing
this framework at the operational level (management, monitoring
valuations and implementation).
4.2. USE OF NETTING CONTRACTS
If a “framework” contract has been signed with a counterparty,
Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries apply netting to the
counterparty’s exposures. Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries
also use collateralisation techniques (deposits of cash or
securities).
4.3. USE OF CREDIT DERIVATIVES
The corporate and investment banking business may use credit
derivatives and a range of risk-transfer instruments, including
securitisation, in managing its banking book. The aim is to reduce
concentration of corporate credit exposures, to diversify the
portfolio and to reduce loss levels. The risks relating to these
operations are monitored by Calyon’s Market Risk Management
Division with the help of indicators such as VaR for all liquid
transactions through which Calyon buys and sells protection on its
own account.
The nominal amount of protection bought by Calyon in the form
of credit derivatives was €14.7 billion at 31 December 2007
(€12.5 billion at 31 December 2006). The notional amount of sell
positions totalled €2.0 billion (€2.6 billion at 31 December 2006).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 109
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3 III. Exposure
1. Maximum exposure
The table below sets out the maximum credit risk exposure of the Crédit Agricole S. A. group’s financial assets. This exposure corresponds to
the book value of financial assets, net of impairment, and before the effect of non-recognised netting agreements and collateral.
MAXIMUM EXPOSURE OF THE CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP
Notes
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (excluding variable-income securities and assets
representing unit-linked contracts)
7.2
400,052
358,064
Derivative financial instruments held for hedging
4.4
10,622
3,834
Available-for-sale assets (excluding variable-income securities)
7.4
130,568
152,413
Due from banks (excluding internal transactions within the Crédit Agricole Group)
7.5
88,440
83,076
Loans and advances to customers
7.5
302,444
248,145
Held-to-maturity financial assets
7.8
21,136
18,007
953,262
863,539
9
171,332
245,387
9
100,463
116,429
7.18
(262)
(286)
271,533
361,530
1,224,795
1,225,069
(in millions of euros)
Exposure to on-balance-sheet commitments (net of impairment)
Financing commitments given
Financial guarantee commitments given
Reserves – financing commitments
Exposure to off-balance sheet commitments (net of impairment)
TOTAL NET EXPOSURE
◊ At 31 December 2007, based on risk management data, loans
granted by the Crédit Agricole S. A. group to its clients (on- and
off-balance sheet non-insurance commercial commitments and
counterparty risk on market transactions in the banking book,
measured with an internal add-on excluding insurance business)
totalled €841 billion (€671 billion at 31 December 2006), an
increase of more than 25% in one year. This increase was the result
of acquisitions, particularly in Italy (integration of FGAFS and the
unit made up of Cariparma, FriulAdria and the Italian branches), and
business growth across all Group entities. ◊
110 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
The outstanding net book value of loans and advances was
€391 billion at 31/12/2007, an year-on-year increase of 18%.
Lending to clients, which accounts for more than two thirds of
on-balance-sheet loans and advances, increased by €54 billion or
23% relative to end-2006. This includes the impact of acquisitions,
particularly the Italian entities (Cariparma, FriulAdria and FGAFS).
The relative weight of lending to other banks (presented excluding
Crédit Agricole internal lending) and finance lease transactions was
stable overall.
◊ Unaudited data
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NET VALUES ON CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.’S CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
Net exposure (1)
at 31 December 2007
at 31 December 2006
in millions
of euros
% of total
in millions
of euros
287,104
73%
88,440
23%
Lending to customers
Lending to banks (1)
% of 2007 total
Change
233,515
71%
+23%
83,076
25%
+6%
Leasing
15,340
4%
14,630
4%
+5%
TOTAL
390,884
100%
331,221
100%
+18%
Source: Financial statements.
(1) On-balance-sheet values are net of reserves and exclude Crédit Agricole internal transactions.
2. Concentration
◊ 2.1. DIVERSIFICATION OF THE PORTFOLIO
BY GEOGRAPHICAL ZONE
The breakdown of loans granted to clients by the Crédit
Agricole S. A. group (€841 billion at 31 December 2007 versus
BREAKDOWN AT 31/12/2007 OF THE CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP’S OVERALL PORTFOLIO
BY GEOGRAPHICAL ZONE OF RISK
Source: Management data from the Group Risk Management
and Permanent Controls Division.
◊ Unaudited data
€671 billion at 31 December 2006) by geographical zone reflects
the impact of acquisitions in Western Europe, particularly in Italy
through the FGAFS joint venture and the unit formed by Cariparma
and FriulAdria. The relative weight of the Americas zone was stable
year-on-year.
BREAKDOWN AT 31/12/2006 OF THE CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP’S OVERALL PORTFOLIO
BY GEOGRAPHICAL ZONE OF RISK
Source: Management data from the Group Risk Management
and Permanent Controls Division.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 111
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2.2. DIVERSIFICATION OF THE PORTFOLIO
BY ECONOMIC SECTOR
The breakdown by economic sector of the portfolio of loans and
commercial commitments granted by the Crédit Agricole S. A. group
to clients (€841 billion at 31 December 2007 versus €671 billion at
31 December 2006) shows good diversification of risk, particularly
given the proportions relating to retail customers (17%) and the
banking sector (35%).
BREAKDOWN AT 31/12/2007 OF THE CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP’S OVERALL PORTFOLIO
BY ECONOMIC SECTOR
Source: Management data from the Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls Division.
Excluding retail customers, banks and other financial institutions
and the public sector, only three sectors account for 3% or more
of total outstandings:
n energy, whose relative weight fell from 5.5% to 5.3% in 2007.
This sector includes counterparties operating at various stages
of the oil industry value chain (production/exploration, trading,
refining etc.) and integrated majors, along with major European
electricity companies. The rest of this portfolio consists of
project financing exposures (particularly in the Middle East). The
size of the portfolio is consistent with the sector’s importance in
the world economy, particularly given the high oil price;
and particularly in emerging-market countries. The main
exposures are to leading players in these industries, which are
heavily globalised. The growth in the portfolio is partly due to
the rising price of several products and the financing of sector
M&A transactions;
n real estate, whose weighting increased from 2% to 3%, due
to increased structured financing activity in the corporate and
investment banking business. The UK and Spanish residential
real estate portfolios are very small. The US portfolio is being
reduced in view of the macroeconomic context.
Risks on other sectors are widely dispersed.
n heavy industry, including sectors like steel, chemicals and
cement, which are benefiting from strong growth worldwide
112 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
◊ Unaudited data
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BREAKDOWN AT 31/12/2006 OF THE CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP’S OVERALL PORTFOLIO
BY ECONOMIC SECTOR
Source: Management data from the Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls Division. ◊
2.3. BREAKDOWN OF LOANS AND ADVANCES BY CUSTOMER TYPE
BREAKDOWN OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.’S CONSOLIDATED GROSS LOANS AND ADVANCES OUTSTANDING
BY CUSTOMER TYPE
Gross outstandings (1)
(in millions of euros)
31 December
2007
31 December
2006
% of
2007 total
Central governments and non-bank institutions
15,057
5,701
4%
Banks
88,092
82,151
22%
160,439
150,282
40%
Corporates
Retail customers
TOTAL
133,669
98,133
34%
397,257
336,267
100%
Source: Financial statements.
(1) Including leasing, factoring and similar, and excluding receivables from subsidiaries.
The breakdown of gross outstandings by customer type shows the importance of exposures to corporate and retail banking clients
(74%, with 34% relating to individuals, professionals and SMEs).
◊ Unaudited data
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 113
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3. Quality of outstandings
◊ 3.2 ANALYSIS OF OUTSTANDINGS BY INTERNAL RATING
3.1. ANALYSIS OF LOANS AND ADVANCES BY CATEGORY
Loans and advances break down as follows:
Loans and advances
2007
(in millions of euros)
Neither past-due nor impaired
Past-due but not impaired
382,980
3,697
Impaired
10,580
TOTAL
397,257
2006 data unavailable.
According to IFRS 7, a financial asset is past-due when a
counterparty has failed to make a payment when contractually
due.
The internal rating policy used by the Crédit Agricole Group aims
to cover all of the “corporate” portfolio, i.e. corporate customers,
banks and financial institutions, government agencies and local
authorities. At 31/12/07, borrowers rated by the Group’s internal
rating systems accounted for more than 93% of the outstandings
borne by the Crédit Agricole S. A. group outside of retail banking.
The exposures broken down in the chart below consist of loans
granted by the Crédit Agricole S. A. group to its performing nonretail banking clients, i.e. €654 billion. The breakdown is presented
according to the Standard & Poor’s equivalents of the Group’s
internal ratings. Overall, portfolio quality improved in 2007 due to
the increase in the relative weighting of exposures with the highest
ratings (AAA and AA). At 31/12/2007, 89% of exposures related to
borrowers with investment-grade ratings (88.7% at 31 December
2006), and less than 1% related to borrowers under close
supervision (stable relative to 31 December 2006).
CHANGE IN CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. GROUP PERFORMING NON-RETAIL LOAN BOOK
BY S&P-EQUIVALENT INTERNAL RATING CATEGORY
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Source: Management data from the Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls Division. ◊
3.3. IMPAIRMENT AND RISK COVERAGE
3.3.1 Impairment and risk coverage policy
The policy for covering loan loss risks is based on two types of
impairment:
n individual impairment intended to cover probable losses on
impaired loans;
n collective impairment, in accordance with IAS 39, carried out
when objective indications of impairment are identified on one or
114 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
more homogeneous sub-groups within the credit risk portfolio.
These impairments aim to cover the deterioration in the risk
profile of exposures to certain countries, business sectors or
counterparties, not because they are in default but as a result
of their weak rating. Impairment is also carried out on a portfolio
basis in retail banking.
At 31 December 2007, impaired debts (on-balance sheet interbank
and customer loans) totalled €10.6 billion, of which €5.8 billion
were bad debts. These include non-performing debts and debts
◊ Unaudited data
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on which the Group sees the potential for non-recovery. Impaired
debts make up 2.7% (2.8% in 2006) of the Group’s gross book
outstandings. 58% of impaired debt outstandings (including lease
financing transactions) are covered by impairment (60% in 2006),
excluding collective impairment.
3.3.2 Impaired financial assets
The tables below give a breakdown by geographical zone and type
of customer for:
n bad and doubtful debts as a percentage of total gross book
outstandings in each region;
n coverage of total doubtful debts and bad debts with reserves.
BAD AND DOUBTFUL DEBTS AND IMPAIRMENT AT CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. AND SUBSIDIARIES BY REGION
Impairment
Of which
impairment
on bad debt
Coverage
rate of
impaired
debt
Coverage
rate of bad
debt
(in millions of euros)
Gross
Of which
impaired
debt
France
173,676
4,792
2,522
2,588
1,896
54%
75%
Other European Union countries
134,536
3,992
1,739
2,120
678
53%
39%
Outstandings
at 31 December 2007
Of which
bad debt
Other European countries
13,661
69
34
67
34
97%
100%
North America
25,023
1084
1073
875
870
81%
81%
Central and South America
12,973
190
136
119
102
63%
75%
Africa and Middle-East
14,568
410
305
319
247
78%
81%
Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan)
15,812
39
27
29
26
74%
96%
7,008
4
397,257
10,580
5,836
6,117
3,853
58%
66%
Coverage
rate of
impaired
debt
Coverage
rate of bad
debt
77%
Japan
TOTAL
Source: Financial statements.
With no reallocation of guarantees or credit insurance that shift risk for the Group.
(in millions of euros)
Gross
Of which
impaired
debt
France
152,674
5082
2583
2894
1977
57%
Other European Union countries
107,536
2949
1204
1829
401
62%
33%
Other European countries
10,114
175
113
98
69
56%
61%
North America
25,500
297
140
102
76
34%
54%
8,418
315
169
251
128
80%
76%
Africa and Middle-East
13,546
440
332
378
297
86%
89%
Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan)
13,022
181
169
142
136
78%
80%
5,457
9
2
2
2
n.m.
100%
336,267
9,448
4,712
5,696
3,086
60%
65%
Outstandings
at 31 December 2006
Central and South America
Japan
TOTAL
Of which
bad debt
Impairment
Of which
impairment
on bad debt
Source: Financial statements.
With no reallocation of guarantees or credit insurance that shift risk for the Group.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 115
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BAD AND DOUBTFUL DEBTS AND IMPAIRMENT AT CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A. AND SUBSIDIARIES
BY TYPE OF CUSTOMER
Gross
Of which
impaired
debt
Of which
bad debt
15,057
309
205
Outstandings
at 31 December 2007
(in millions of euros)
Central government
and institutions
Banks
Impairment
Of which
impairment
on bad debt
Coverage
rate of
impaired
debt
Coverage
rate of bad
debt
140
75
45%
37%
100%
88,092
70
43
67
43
96%
Corporates
160,439
4,618
2,317
2,999
1,842
65%
79%
Retail customers (1)
133,669
5,583
3,271
2,911
1,893
52%
58%
397,257
10,580
5,836
6,117
3,853
58%
66%
Gross
Of which
impaired
debt
Impairment
Of which
impairment
on bad debt
Coverage
rate of
impaired
debt
Coverage
rate of bad
debt
TOTAL
Source: Financial statements.
(1) Including leasing, factoring and similar.
Outstandings
at 31 December 2006
(in millions of euros)
Governments, government
agencies and local authorities
Financial institutions
Personal and small business
customers
Corporate customers and other
(including insurance companies) (1)
TOTAL
Of which
bad debt
5,701
113
109
94
94
83%
86%
107,426
338
186
300
185
89%
99%
98,133
4,312
2,129
2,894
1,682
67%
79%
125,007
4,685
2,288
2,408
1,125
51%
49%
336,267
9,448
4,712
5,696
3,086
60%
65%
Source: Financial statements.
(1) Including leasing, factoring and similar.
4. Risk-related costs
The Crédit Agricole S. A. group’s risk-related costs totalled
€1.9 billion, versus €0.6 billion in 2006.
The 2007 figure includes an addition to reserves (€807 million)
made by the corporate and investment banking business on credit
reinsurer ACA Financial Guaranty, along with net additions to
reserves made by Emporiki (consolidated on full year basis in 2007)
and Cariparma (which entered into the scope of consolidation for
the first time in 2007).
3 IV. Country risk
1. Country risk supervision
and management system
Country risk is the risk that economic, financial, political or social
conditions in a foreign country will affect the Bank’s financial
116 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
interests. It does not differ in nature from “elementary” risks (credit,
market and operational risks). It constitutes a set of risks resulting
from the bank’s vulnerability to a specific political, macroeconomic
and financial environment.
The system for assessing and supervising country risk within the
Crédit Agricole S. A. group is based on the Group’s own rating
methodology. Internal country ratings are based on criteria relating
to the economy’s structural solidity, ability to pay, governance and
political stability. Annually reviewed limits and risk strategies are
applied to each country whose rating is lower than the threshold
set by procedures.
Country-risk supervision is increasingly in-depth as a result
of regular reporting and reviews, involving increased use of
quantitative tools based on a portfolio approach. In addition,
scenario analyses are performed to test adverse macroeconomic
and financial assumptions, allowing the bank to develop an
integrated overview of the risks to which it may be exposed in
situations of extreme tension.
2007 MANAGEMENT
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Risk factors
The Group manages and controls its country risks according to the
following principles:
n activities exposed to country risk are defined and identified
through the development and monitoring of analytical country
risk management tools;
n acceptable country risk exposure limits are determined through
annual reviews of country strategies, depending on the portfolio’s
vulnerability to country risk. This degree of vulnerability is
determined by the type and structure of transactions, the quality
of counterparties and the term of commitments. These exposure
limits may be reviewed more frequently if developments in a
particular country make this necessary. These strategies and limits
are validated by Calyon’s Strategy and Portfolio Committee (CSP)
or Country Risk Committee (CRP) and by Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
Risk Management Committee (CRG);
n country risk is evaluated on a regular basis by corporate and
investment banking, based on ratings (updated every quarter)
on each country to which the Group is exposed. This rating
is produced using an internal country rating model based on
various criteria (structural solidity, governance, political stability
and ability/desire to pay). Specific events may cause ratings to
be adjusted before the next quarterly review;
n Calyon’s Country and Portfolio Risk Department validates
transactions whose size, maturity and country risk intensity may
potentially affect the quality of the portfolio.
Country-risk exposure is monitored and controlled in both
quantitative (amount and term of exposure) and qualitative
(portfolio vulnerability) terms through specific and regular reports
on all country risk exposures.
◊
2. Country risk policy
The Crédit Agricole S. A. group’s risk exposure to emerging-market
countries that are subject to limits is mainly US dollar-denominated,
and increased sharply to €73.5 billion at end-December 2007. This
reflects a substantial increase in activity in all regions.
In addition to standard types of financing, the strategy in the corporate
and investment banking business has been to focus on transactions
that improve the portfolio’s risk profile: structured transactions,
commercial financing and market transactions. Emerging-market
countries continued to enjoy positive economic conditions in the
first nine months of 2007, and their fundamentals improved, with
firm growth, current-account surpluses, growing foreign exchange
reserves and so forth. This led to rating upgrades for 17 countries
and no downgrades. The increase in assets took place mainly in the
least risky emerging-market countries. Countries in which economic,
financial or political developments are deemed to be a potential
cause for concern are monitored closely in terms of both ratings and
management of the Group’s exposures and exposure limits.
◊ Unaudited data
3. Exposure to country risk
Emerging-market country risk exposure remains highly concentrated,
with 33 countries making up 92% of the portfolio at end-2007, and
45% of the portfolio comprising exposure to seven countries. The
risk profile remained good in 2007. Exposure to investment-grade
emerging-market countries remained high at 55% of the total
at end-December 2007, while exposure to sensitive countries
remained modest at 8%. Three geographic zones remained
predominant in the portfolio, i.e. Middle East/North Africa, Eastern
Europe and Asia. International Retail Banking saw substantial
growth, reflecting the increase in assets in countries like Poland,
Morocco and Egypt.
MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA
The Middle East and North Africa is the main area of emergingmarkets exposure. Exposure in this region amounts to €26.5 billion
or 36% of the total.
Morocco and Egypt are the Group’s main exposures in this region,
due to Crédit Agricole S. A.’s stake in Crédit du Maroc and its 2006
acquisition of Egyptian American Bank (EAB), which has since been
merged with Calyon Bank (Egypt) to form Crédit Agricole Egypt.
The main other exposures are in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab
Emirates and other Gulf countries.
In addition to the expansion in the scope of consolidation,
persistently high oil prices led to a 42% increase in exposure in
the region, where the political situation still needs to be watched
closely.
EASTERN EUROPE
Exposure in this region accounted for 24% of the Group’s
emerging-market risks (€17.5 billion). It was concentrated in four
countries: Russia, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic.
ASIA
Exposure to Asia totalled €16.6 billion at end-2007, accounting for
23% of exposure to emerging-market countries. Activity remained
concentrated in the region’s two main countries (Greater China,
particularly Hong Kong, and India), as a result of their strong growth
momentum.
LATIN AMERICA
Over a period of more than three years, this region has seen a
substantial improvement in its economic and financial situation.
The Group had €7.3 billion of exposure to this region at end-2007,
80% of which was concentrated in three countries: Mexico, Brazil
and Chile.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 117
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Risk factors
SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
This region represented exposure of €5.8 billion at end-2007, of
which 53% was in South Africa. Retail banking exposure in this
area came to €1.6 billion, spread across the seven countries where
the Group has retail operations.
»
In 2007, all five regions saw acceptable growth, resulting in an
improvement in their economic and financial fundamentals. This
should make them more resilient to the effects of the current
financial crisis. ◊
MARKET RISK
Market risk is the risk of a negative impact on the income statement
or balance sheet caused by adverse fluctuations in the value of
financial instruments following changes in market parameters,
including:
3 II. Risk management
n interest rates: interest-rate risk is the risk of a change in the fair
The Crédit Agricole S. A. group has two distinct but complementary
levels of market risk management:
value of a financial instrument or the future cash flows from a
financial instrument due to a change in interest rates;
n exchange rates: currency risk is the risk of a change in the fair
value of a financial instrument due to a change in exchange
rates;
n prices: price risk is the risk of a change in the price or volatility of
equities and commodities, baskets of equities or stock indices.
The instruments most exposed to this risk are variable-income
securities, equity derivatives and commodity derivatives;
n credit spreads: credit risk is the risk of a change in the fair value
of a financial instrument resulting from movement in the credit
spreads of indexes or issuers. For more exotic credit products,
there is also the risk of a change in fair value arising from a
change in the correlation between issuer defaults.
1. Local and central organisation
n at the central level, the Group Risk Management and Permanent
Controls Division co-ordinates all Group-wide market risk
supervision and control issues. It standardises data and
processing work to ensure the consistency of consolidated risk
measurement and of controls. It provides information to the
executive body (Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Management Board) and
supervisory body (Board of Directors, audit committee) regarding
the degree of control over market risks;
n at the local level, for each Crédit Agricole S. A. group entity, a
risk management and permanent control officer supervises and
controls market risks resulting from activities. Within Calyon, the
Risk Management and Permanent Controls Division relies on
decentralised teams of risk controllers, generally based outside
France. These control functions rely on three teams, i.e. Risk
Management, quantitative analysis and business monitoring,
supplemented by cross-functional staff.
3 I. Objectives and policy
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group has a specific market risk
management system, with its own independent organisation,
monitoring and consolidation procedures, and risk identification
and measurement methods.
The system covers all market risks arising from capital market
activities, mainly arbitrage and directional positions taken by the
trading departments of the Calyon corporate and investment
banking subsidiary.
The investment portfolios of the finance divisions are monitored
separately.
2. Decision-making and risk monitoring
committees
Two committees are involved in the management of market risk at
the Crédit Agricole S. A. group level:
n the Group Risk Management Committee, chaired by Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s CEO, examines the market situation and risks
incurred on a quarterly basis. The Committee reviews the
utilisation of limits, significant breaches of limits and incidents,
and the analysis of net banking income from a risk point of view.
This committee approves the overall limits placed on all entities’
market risks when they present their risk strategy, and makes the
main decisions as regard risk control;
n the Standards and Methodology Committee meets periodically,
and is chaired by the Head of Group Risk Management
and Permanent Controls. Its brief includes approving and
disseminating standards and methods concerning the supervision
and permanent control of market risks.
118 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
◊ Unaudited data
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
REPORT
Risk factors
In addition, each entity has its own local Risk Management
Committee. The most important of these is Calyon’s Market Risk
Management Committee, which meets twice a month and is
chaired by the Management Board member in charge of risks. It
is made up of Calyon’s head of market risk and the risk managers
responsible for specific activities. This committee reviews Calyon’s
positions and the results of its capital market activities and verifies
compliance with the limits assigned to each activity. It is empowered
to make decisions on the entities’ requests for temporary increases
in limits.
3 III. Market risk measurement
and management methodology
The VaR calculation method undergoes constant improvement and
adjustment to take account of the changing sensitivity of positions
to risk factors and the relevance of methods to new market
conditions. For example, efforts are made to integrate new risk
factors and to achieve greater detail on existing risk factors.
LIMITATIONS OF THE HISTORICAL VaR CALCULATION
The main methodological limits relating to the VaR model are as
follows:
n
the use of one-day shocks assumes that all positions can be
liquidated or covered in one day, which is not always the case
for certain products and certain crisis situations,
n
the use of a 99% confidence interval excludes losses that may
occur outside of this interval: VaR is therefore an indicator of
risk in normal market conditions, which does not take into
account movements that are exceptional in scale,
n
VaR does not give any information about exceptional loss
amounts (outside the 99% confidence interval).
1. Indicators
Market risk management is based on several indicators that are
subject to global or specific limits. These indicators fall into three
main categories: Value at Risk, stress scenarios and complementary
indicators (sensitivities to risk factors, qualitative and quantitative
indicators).
n The main category of market risk indicator is Value at Risk (VaR),
which can be defined as the maximum theoretical loss in a
portfolio in the event of adverse movements in market parameters
over a given timeframe and for a given level of confidence. The
Crédit Agricole S. A. Group uses a confidence level of 99% and
a timeframe of one day, and uses one year of historical data. The
usefulness of this method is validated through a back-testing
procedure, which involves comparing a daily result with the
previous day’s theoretical VaR.
Two internal VaR measurement methods are used: historical VaR
and Monte Carlo VaR (for commodities).
The process of calculating a historical VaR for risk positions on a
given date D is based on the following principles:
n
n
creation of a historical database of risk factors reflecting the
risk of positions held by Crédit Agricole S. A. group entities
(interest rates, share prices, exchange rates, commodity
prices, volatilities, credit spreads, correlation etc.),
determination of 261 scenarios corresponding to 1-day
changes in risk factors, observed over a rolling 1-year period,
n
adjustment of parameters corresponding to date D according
to the 261 scenarios,
n
revaluation of the day’s positions based on the
261 scenarios.
The 99% VaR figure is equal, based on the 261 scenarios, to the
average of the second and third worst risks observed.
BACK TESTING
Under the internal model, a daily loss should not exceed VaR more
than two or three times per year.
Back testing allows permanent comparisons between VaR and the
daily results of product lines, calculated both on the basis of real
positions and assuming unchanged positions.
This allows the relevance of VaR measurements to be assessed.
In 2007, there were two exceptions to Calyon’s global VaR: on two
days, the previous day’s loss estimate underestimated the actual
loss.
n The second category of quantitative market risk indicators
consists of stress scenarios that supplement VaR, which does not
give an accurate model of extreme conditions in capital markets.
Stress scenarios simulate extreme market conditions and are the
result of three complementary approaches:
n
historical scenarios which replicate the impact of crises
observed in the past on the current portfolio,
n
hypothetical scenarios anticipating plausible shocks, which
are developed in conjunction with economists,
n
adverse scenarios, which adapt assumptions to simulate
worst-case positions based on the portfolio structure at the
time the scenario is calculated.
These scenarios are adjusted to the risks existing in the various
portfolios on which they are calculated.
Portfolios at all levels, from the most specific to the most general,
are evaluated on a regular basis and on request. The results are
presented to the Market Risk Committee.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 119
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Risk factors
n Complementary
indicators (sensitivity, nominal amounts,
outstandings, term to maturity etc.) are involved in the VaR
measurement, and most are subject to limits. Tighter risk
management is achieved by adopting sets of limits on a range
of indicators.
In addition to the periodic, standardised reporting systems, the
subsidiaries’ market risk control units must also inform the Group
Risk Management and Permanent Controls Division whenever a
major event concerning the status of the subsidiaries’ market risk
exposure is identified.
These activities are managed through a system of market-risk
indicators accompanied by limits designed to cover all risk factors.
These indicators are:
n VaR (historical, 99%, daily, including credit spread and
correlation risk);
n credit sensitivity;
n sensitivity to correlation;
n sensitivity to recovery rates;
n sensitivity to interest rates.
2. Sensitivity of fair value to non-observable
parameters
The system also includes stop loss limits and stress testing.
The sensitivity of CDO super senior tranches is described on
page 123. The fair value of other non-observable products,
representing 12% of total non-observable products’ fair value, is
not available.
Independent teams belonging to the Risk Management and
Permanent Controls Division are responsible for valuing positions,
calculating risk indicators, setting limits and validating models.
3 IV. Exposure
3. Use of credit derivatives
Within the capital markets business, Calyon has developed a credit
derivatives business encompassing trading, structuring and selling
products to its customers. The products handled range from simple
products (credit default swaps), where the principal risk factor is
credit spreads, to more structured products that introduce other
more complex risk factors (e.g. correlation).
Positions are measured at fair value with deductions for model and
data uncertainties.
The Crédit Agricole S. A. group’s market-risk exposure stems from
three types of activities: capital market activities, investments in
equity and activity resulting from trading in treasury shares.
1. Capital market activities (Value at Risk)
The change in VaR on Crédit Agricole S. A.’s capital markets
business between 31 December 2006 and 31 December 2007,
broken down by major risk factor, is shown below.
BREAKDOWN OF VaR (99%, 1 DAY)
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
Minimum
Maximum
Average
31/12/2006
Minimum
Maximum
Average
Fixed income
24
9
28
15
11
8
21
13
Credit
33
7
220
48
12
7
17
11
3
1
6
3
2
1
3
2
16
10
23
16
9
6
13
9
2
1
3
2
3
2
7
4
(32)
(18)
52
19
Foreign exchange
Equities
Commodities
Netting
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S. A.
GROUP VAR
(25)
53
2006 data unaudited.
120 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
18
200
(18)
14
34
21
2007 MANAGEMENT
RAPPEL_T1
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Risk factors
The Crédit Agricole S. A. group’s total VaR, including residual
market risks arising from subsidiaries of Crédit Agricole S. A. that
have little capital markets activity, is calculated by adding the
individual VaRs.
It amounted to €53 million at 31 December 2007, €44 million of
which related to Calyon, whose VaR model has been validated by
the Commission Bancaire. The remaining €9 million relates to other
entities (Crédit Agricole S. A., BFT, Emporiki, LCL, Caceis Bank
Luxembourg and Lukas Bank). The netting figure (-€25 million) is
defined as the difference between total VaR and the sum of VaRs
by risk factor.
n Credit VaR, which is calculated on credit market activities, was
€33 million at year-end. The levels reached by Credit VaR during
the course of 2007 (€220 million in August 2007) reflect the
fact that Calyon takes into account correlation shocks when
calculating VaR.
n Equity VaR, which is calculated on equity derivatives and fund
activities, was €16 million at year-end.
n Fixed-income VaR, which is calculated on cash and fixed-income
derivatives activities, was €24 million at year-end.
n Foreign-exchange VaR, which is calculated on spot and currency
options activities, was €3 million at year-end.
n Commodities VaR was €2 million at year-end.
The chart below shows movements in VaR during 2007, with a
sharp increase from July onwards as a result of major daily changes
in the main risk factors (credit spreads and default correlation
structure for exotic credit products) affecting Calyon’s credit market
activities.
Other risk factors (equity, interest-rate, currency), were broadly
stable throughout 2007.
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. GROUP VaR BETWEEN 01/01/2007 AND 31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
240
200
160
120
80
40
0
2. Equity investment activities
3. Treasury shares
Some Crédit Agricole S. A. Group entities hold portfolios that are
partly invested in equities (financial risk on bonds in these portfolios
is monitored by using ALM indicators). Total outstandings exposed
to equity risks through the Crédit Agricole S. A. group’s investment
portfolios amounted to €3.3 billion at 31 December 2007 (excluding
policyholders’ shares of investment company portfolios).
Information is provided on page 246 of the registration document.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 121
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Risk factors
»
RISKS RELATED TO THE RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE SECTOR IN THE USA
The crisis in structured credit markets affected Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
Corporate and Investment Banking business segment in 2007.
jointly with Crédit Agricole S. A., chaired by Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
Management Board. This committee also examined the liquidity of
securitisation conduits on behalf of customers.
The committee meeting weekly to monitor structured credit
activities was maintained. It supervised the initiative to list Group
positions liable to be affected by guarantor risks, along with the
methods for valuing these positions.
3 1. Management of the crisis
relating to the US residential
real-estate market
Since the first quarter of 2007, Calyon has stopped originating new
CDO transactions with US real-estate underlyings. A committee
was set up, meeting every week, to monitor structured credit
activities, chaired by the Management Board and consisting of
Risk, Markets and Finance staff.
In the second half of 2007, given the impact of the financial crisis
on liquidity, the Group set up a liquidity monitoring committee
3 2. Calyon’s exposures
Calyon’s exposures fall into two categories:
n non-covered exposures to US residential real estate;
n exposures covered by guarantors deemed risky.
2.1. Non-covered exposures
EXPOSURE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
Net value
Discount rate
31/12/2007
30/09/2007
31/12/2007
30/09/2007
30/06/2007
31/03/2007
1.0
1.1
29%
15%
2%
1%
Mezzanine
0.1
0.2
89%
80%
47%
21%
Super senior
2.7
4.0
33%
5%
1%
-
3.8
5.3
(in € billions)
ABS portfolio (1)
CDO tranches
TOTAL
(1) Of which 41% AAA and 46% AA at 31 December 2007.
This portfolio is partly covered by purchased protection (with a
mark-to-market value of €639 million at 31 December 2007 versus
€564 million at 30 September 2007).
n ABS (Asset-Backed Securities)
Valuation based on independent prices.
n Mezzanine tranches of ABS CDOs
Uniform valuation depending on the rating of the corresponding
mezzanine tranche.
122 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
The net impact on 2007 NBI of exposures not covered by monolines
totalled -€2.198 billion:
n ABS: -€327 million;
n Mezzanine CDOs: -€527 million;
n Super-senior CDOs: -€1.344 billion.
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Risk factors
BREAKDOWN OF SUPER-SENIOR CDO TRANCHES AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
Tranche 1
Tranche 2
Tranche 3
Tranche 4
Tranche 5
Nominal
812
598
507
566
397
612
523
4,015
Discount
81
60
459
57
40
353
290
1,340
(in millions of euros)
Net value
Discount rate
Attachment point
Tranche 6
Tranche 7
731
538
48
509
357
259
233
2,675
10%
10%
91%
10%
10%
58%
56%
33%
51%
51%
7%
51%
51%
40%
30%
High Grade
High Grade
High Grade
High Grade
Mezzanine
Mezzanine
Mezzanine
% of assets with subprime underlyings
produced before 2006
12%
33%
27%
27%
71%
0%
38%
% of assets with subprime underlyings
produced in 2006 and 2007
27%
10%
31%
31%
22%
98%
50%
Underlying
Total
In 2007, discounts were obtained from applying a credit scenario to
the underlyings (mainly residential mortgages) of the ABSs making
up each CDO.
The valuation of super-senior tranches was determined by applying
a credit scenario to underlyings (mainly residential mortgages) of
the ABSs making up each CDO.
This scenario involves:
n final loss assumptions depending on the quality and origination
date of each mortgage:
n subprime loans produced in 2006 and 2007: 20%,
n subprime loans produced before 2006: 10%;
n these losses being recognised over a period of 40 months.
The resulting valuation was compared with a valuation resulting
from the application of ABX indexes.
2.2. Exposure covered by guarantors (monolines)
The situation of all sellers of protection, as known and assessed
at the accounts closing, has been examined. Monolines were
considered to be the main guarantors at risk.
By making estimates on each monoline’s ability to honour its
commitments, Calyon was able to calculate an allowance on its
exposure at 31 December 2007. This exposure corresponds to the
positive fair value of protection bought on CDO tranches, valued
according to the same principles as non-covered CDOs (see
previous paragraph).
In 2007, Calyon booked a €807 million impairment charge on the
monoline ACA (in the “risk-related costs” item) and a €1,210 million
allowance on other monolines (in the “net banking income” item).
Exposure of €4.1 billion, after €2 billion of impairment and allowances,
gives net exposure of €2.1 billion, breaking down as follows:
A 10% discount was applied to super-senior tranches not
affected by this scenario (those whose attachment point is over
51%);
n fair-value sensitivity of non-observable parameters:
Sensitivity to a change in estimated loss rates by year of
production is as follows:
n a 12.5% increase in the estimated loss rate (increasing the rate
from 20% to 22.5% for example) would increase impairment by
€217 million at the net banking income level;
n a 12.5% fall in the estimated loss rate would reduce impairment
by €265 million at the net banking income level.
Other impact resulting from the crisis
Changes in issuer spreads resulted in a gain of €188 million (taken
to net banking income) on structured issues measured at fair value
in 2007.
Conduits
See note 3.4.
Calyon did not have to consolidate any conduits in 2007.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 123
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»
ASSET/LIABILITY MANAGEMENT
3 Asset/liability management –
structural financial risks
3 I. Global interest-rate risk
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Financial Management Division defines the
principles of financial management and ensures their consistent
application within the Crédit Agricole S. A. group. It has responsibility
for organising financial flows, defining and implementing refinancing
rules, carrying out asset/liability management and managing
prudential ratios.
1. Objectives and policy
Optimising financial flows within the Crédit Agricole S. A. group is
a key ongoing objective. The absence of arbitrage situations, both
within the Group and with respect to third parties, helps meet this
objective.
The principles of the Group’s ALM approach ensure that any
surpluses and/or shortfalls in terms of the Regional Banks and
LCL’s customer resources are centralised in Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
books.
Global interest-rate risk management aims to protect the capital of
Group entities and to optimise their interest margins.
Capital and interest margins vary according to the sensitivity of
on- and off-balance sheet financial instruments, in terms of both
their net present value and cash flows, to changes in interest rates.
This sensitivity arises when interest-rate resetting dates on assets
and liabilities do not coincide.
Much of the Group’s exposure relates to retail banking:
n in France, via the Regional Banks (a large portion of whose risk is
structurally matched and managed by Crédit Agricole S. A. as a
result of the Group’s financial centralisation rules) and LCL (whose
financial management organisation transfers the management of
certain risks to Crédit Agricole S. A.);
This resource pooling helps refinance other Group subsidiaries as
needed (including Crédit Agricole Leasing, Sofinco and Finaref).
n outside France (Emporiki, Cariparma etc.).
This system for centralising liquidity management at Crédit
Agricole S. A. allows optimised liquidity management, especially
since it is accompanied by partial interest-rate matching.
The activities of other subsidiaries including Calyon, Sofinco,
Finaref, Crédit Agricole Leasing, Lukas and EFL mean that they also
bear global interest-rate risk.
Consequently, Crédit Agricole S. A. Group has a high level of
financial cohesion, with limited diffusion of financial risks, particularly
liquidity risk. However, the Group’s various entities are responsible
for managing the risk that remains at their level, within the limits
assigned to them.
When new acquisitions take place, Crédit Agricole S. A. organises
the incoming entity’s adoption of the global interest-rate risk
management standards and methods in force, and prepares a
report calibrating the entity’s limits, which is then presented to the
Group Risk Management Committee for approval.
Limits are defined by the CEO of Crédit Agricole S. A. within the
Group Risk Management Committee, and relate to the Crédit
Agricole S. A. group:
The Crédit Agricole S. A. group uses the gap method (fixed-rate) to
measure its global interest-rate risk.
n subsidiaries that carry asset/liability risks comply with limits set by
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Group Risk Management Committee;
n asset and liability measurement, analysis and management
methods are defined by Crédit Agricole S. A. With regard to the
retail banking business, a coherent system of agreements and
run-off planning has been adopted for the Regional Banks and
LCL;
n subsidiaries report their ALM risk to Crédit Agricole S. A. for
monitoring and consolidation purposes. Results are monitored by
Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Treasury and ALM Committee;
n Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Financial Management Division and Risk
Management and Permanent Controls Division take part in the
main subsidiaries’ ALM Committee meetings.
124 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
This entails calculating the maturity schedules of assets, liabilities
and hedging derivatives that have fixed rates or that are sensitive
to inflation (particularly those on retail-banking balance sheets).
These maturity schedules are then aggregated for each period
(monthly or annually), on the basis of the average outstandings
over the relevant period. The maturity schedules take into account
risk until the date on which the interest rate is adjusted (set interest
rate period) for adjustable-rate instruments, or until the contractual
date for fixed-rate instruments which have a redemption date, while
modelling customer behaviour as necessary (early withdrawals or
redemptions etc.).
Given the characteristics of certain balance-sheet items (i.e. certain
types of capital as a result of PEL/CEL home purchase savings
plans regulations, or certain sight deposits and savings accounts as
a result of product characteristics), gap calculations require that the
runoff of these instruments in relation to interest rates be modelled,
to ensure that a cautious risk/return profile is used.
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Risk factors
The rules that apply in France to the Livret A interest rate, which
is a benchmark for part of the deposits collected by the Group’s
retail banking business (regulated products and others), mean that
part of the interest is indexed to inflation over a rolling 12-month
period.
The Group’s Financial Management Division and Risk Management
and Permanent Controls Division take part in subsidiaries’ ALM
Committee meetings, and harmonise methods and practices within
the Group, as well as monitoring limits allocated to each Group
entity.
As a result, the Group hedges the risk associated with these
balance-sheet items using instruments (on- or off-balance sheet)
that have inflation as their underlying.
Each Regional Bank’s situation as regards global interest-rate
risk is examined every quarter within the Regional Banks’ Risk
Management Committee.
Measured exposure also includes interest-rate risk arising from
equity capital and equity investments.
3. Exposure
Option risks are recognised at their delta equivalent.
The Group is mainly exposed to changes in interest rates in the
eurozone (real and nominal rates). The Group also manages
interest-rate positions related to other currency zones, mainly the
US dollar and Polish zloty.
The limits set at Group level, and at the level of the various entities,
restrict gaps and therefore the resulting global interest-rate risk. The
rules for setting limits are intended to enable the Group to comply
with the second pillar of Basel II regulations regarding global
interest-rate risk (change in equity capital of less than 20% in the
event of a 200-basis-point move in the yield curve). Measurements
made at 31/12/2007 confirmed that this objective had been met.
Each entity (including Crédit Agricole S. A.) carries out interest-rate
hedging of risks resulting from this financial organisation, at its own
level, through on- or off-balance sheet financial instruments (either
firm transactions or options).
2. Risk management
Each entity, in accordance with the Group’s limits and standards,
manages its exposures under the control of its ALM Committee.
The Group’s exposure to global interest-rate risk is regularly
presented to Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Treasury and ALM Committee.
This committee is chaired by the CEO of Crédit Agricole S. A. and
includes several members of the Executive Committee along with
representatives of the Risk Management and Permanent Controls
Division. It:
n examines the individual positions of Crédit Agricole S. A. and its
subsidiaries along with consolidated positions at each quarterly
closing;
n examines compliance with limits applicable to the Crédit
Agricole S. A. Group and to entities authorised to bear global
interest-rate risk, with these limits being granted in Group Risk
Management Committee meetings;
n validates
the management approach as regards Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s global interest-rate risk, managed by the Financial
Management Division.
The Group’s interest-rate gaps are broken down by type of risk
(nominal/real interest rate) in the various currencies. They measure
the surplus or deficit of fixed-rate resources. Conventionally, a
positive figure represents a risk in the event of falling interest rates
and a negative figure represents a risk in the event of rising interest
rates in the year under consideration. The figure indicates financial
sensitivity to a change in interest rates.
The results of these measurements at 31/12/2007 relating to the
scope of the Crédit Agricole S. A. group, which comprises more
than 90% of the balance-sheet scope of entities making up the
Group (excluding the Insurance business line), are as follows:
Gaps
(in € billions)
0-1 year
1-5 years
5-10 years
EUR gaps
(8.1)
(2.8)
(6.5)
Unaudited data.
As regards the sensitivity of NBI in the first year (2008), the Crédit
Agricole S. A. group is exposed to an increase in eurozone interest
rates and would lose €81.3 million in the event of a sustained
100-basis-point increase in interest rates, giving an NBI sensitivity
of 0.48% (reference NBI: €16.77 billion).
Based on these sensitivity figures, the net present value of the
losses incurred in the next ten years in the event of a 200-basispoint increase in the eurozone interest-rate curve is less than 3%
of the Crédit Agricole S. A. group’s prudential capital (Tier I + Tier II)
after the deduction of equity investments.
Gaps
(in € billions)
Other currency
gaps *
0-1 year
1-5 years
5-10 years
0.4
0.5
0.2
* Sum of the euro-equivalent absolute values of all gaps in all currencies.
Unaudited data.
In 2008, the overall sensitivity of NBI to a change (principally a fall)
in interest rates across all other currencies is 0.03% of the Crédit
Agricole S. A. group’s reference 2007 NBI. The main currencies to
which the Crédit Agricole S. A. group is exposed are the US dollar
and Polish zloty.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 125
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3 II. Currency risk
Currency risk is treated differently depending on whether the
currency position is structural or operational.
1. Structural currency risk
The Group’s structural currency risk arises from the Group’s
long-term investments in assets denominated in foreign currencies
(equity of the foreign operating entities, whether resulting from
acquisitions, transfers of funds from the head office, or capitalisation
of local earnings), with the Group’s reference currency being the
euro.
The Group’s main structural currency positions at 31/12/2007 were
in US dollar (and related currencies including the South African
rand and the Hong Kong dollar), pound sterling, Swiss franc and
Polish zloty.
Currency risks are mainly borne by Crédit Agricole S. A. and its
subsidiaries. The Regional Banks only retain residual currency risk.
Positions are determined on the basis of accounting statements.
The Group’s general policy is to limit its operational currency
positions and not to hedge revenues that have not yet materialised
unless there is a strong probability that they will materialise and if
the risk of impairment is high.
In accordance with currency risk monitoring and management
procedures, operational currency exposure positions are updated
monthly, and daily for our foreign exchange trading operations.
3 III. Liquidity and financing risk
1. Objectives and policy
As a credit institution, Crédit Agricole S. A. complies with the
liquidity requirements set out in the following regulations:
n CRBF regulation 88-01 of 22 February 1988 on liquidity;
n Commission Bancaire instruction 88-03 of 22 April 1988 on
liquidity;
n Commission Bancaire instruction 89-03 of 20 April 1989 on how
In most cases, the Group’s policy is to borrow the currency in which
the investment is made in order to immunise that investment from
currency risk.
The Group’s policy for managing structural foreign exchange
positions aims to achieve two main goals:
n first, to protect prudential ratios by immunising the Group’s
solvency ratio from currency fluctuations. Unhedged structural
foreign-exchange positions are sized to match the portion of
foreign-currency risk-weighted assets that is not covered by other
types of equity in the same currency;
n second, to protect assets by reducing the risk of loss in asset
to take account of refinancing agreements in calculating liquidity.
Like all credit institutions, the Group is exposed to a risk of
lacking sufficient funds to honour its commitments. This risk may
materialise, for example, in the event of massive withdrawals of
customer deposits, or a crisis of confidence or a general shortage
of liquidity in the market, resulting in limited access to interbank and
money markets. Liquidity risk management is based on:
n measuring risk by analysing contractual or modelled repayment
schedules for the bank’s funding and lending, in order to identify
amounts payable across a range of maturity dates;
n matching liquid resources to liquid assets.
value.
Five times per year, the Group’s foreign exchange positions are
submitted to the Treasury and ALM Committee, which is chaired by
the Chief Executive Officer. Decisions on how to manage positions
globally are taken during these meetings.
2. Operational currency risk
Operational currency risk arises mainly from revenues and
expenses of all types that are denominated in currencies other
than the euro, including specific and collective foreign-currency
provisions, net income generated by foreign subsidiaries and
branches, and dividends.
Crédit Agricole S. A. and each entity within the Group that bears
a significant risk manage positions that are affected by those
revenues and expenses that are centralised in its books. The
foreign subsidiaries’ treasury departments manage operational
currency risk in their local currency.
The Group’s objective is to optimise its refinancing costs and to be
able to deal with crisis situations.
2. Risk management
Crédit Agricole S. A. manages global liquidity for the Crédit Agricole
Group as a whole via the latter’s internal financial organisation.
As regards the Regional Banks:
n 50% of lending falling within the scope of internal financial
relations between Crédit Agricole S. A. and the Regional Banks
may be refinanced in the form of advances negotiated at
market rates with Crédit Agricole S. A., while Crédit Agricole S. A.
centralises 100% of medium- and long-term savings, with 50%
automatically then made available to the Regional Banks;
n the Regional Banks may use their monetary deposits (sight and
time deposits and negotiable certificates of deposit) to finance
their lending. Any surpluses are transferred to Crédit Agricole S. A.,
which therefore manages the resulting liquidity risk;
n if the Regional Banks are short of liquidity, they refinance
themselves primarily with Crédit Agricole S. A.
126 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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Similarly, Crédit Agricole S. A. matches the Group subsidiaries’
liquidity requirements, with the exception of Calyon which has
broader authorisation to access market refinancing, enabling it to
cover directly most of its liquidity and refinancing needs over both
the short and medium terms.
The Financial Management Division carries out overall supervision
over the Group’s liquidity, and prepares and implements Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s senior and subordinated debt issuance programme.
It co-ordinates the issuance programmes of Group entities
authorised to issue debt. Crédit Agricole S. A.’s treasury unit, which
reports to the Financial Management Division, manages short-term
liquidity (with a term of less than two years).
n as regards medium-term liquidity, mortgages granted by the
Regional Banks and LCL increase the Group’s ability to generate
liquidity, since they can be securitised through the issue of
mortgage-backed bonds. Since its usual sources of refinancing
became significantly narrower in the second half, the Group
made increased use of funding via Caisse de Refinancement
de l’Habitat (CRH). CRH is a credit institution that has a top
rating from rating agencies and carries out several bond issues
per year. All proceeds from these issues are lent to CRH
shareholders.
The financial and liquidity crisis that developed in the second half
of 2007 prompted the Group to reinforce its liquidity monitoring
system. Three main measures were taken:
This system allows Crédit Agricole S. A. to centralise management
of liquidity risk at the Group scale and to comply with the prudential
rules on liquidity.
n the Group’s liquidity stress scenario was updated three times,
The liquidity ratio corresponds to the ratio between cash and shortterm assets on the one hand, and short-term liabilities on the other.
It is calculated monthly and the minimum requirement is 100%.
n several tests were carried out to ensure that the Group could
A Treasury and Liquidity Committee has been created, and its role
includes giving guidance to the Treasury and ALM Committee on
managing the Group’s liquidity risks. The Treasury and Liquidity
Committee also brings Crédit Agricole S. A. and Calyon together to
co-ordinate financing from different market compartments in terms
of geographical location and type of security issued.
The Treasury and ALM Committee, chaired by Crédit Agricole S. A.’s
CEO, makes decisions on the principles and standards for managing
the Group’s liquidity. It validates the refinancing programme put to
the Board of Directors and examines measurements relating to the
Group’s liquidity situation presented by the Financial Management
Division.
The Group makes sure it has access to various sources of
refinancing and diversified market access. In 2007, it continued to
seek diversification of refinancing sources with the completion of
144A senior and subordinated bond issues in the US market in the
first half, and a Lower Tier One issue in New Zealand in the second
half. The Group also maintained its partnerships with the European
Investment Bank (EIB) and the Council of Europe Development
Bank (CEB).
Access to the financial market’s various compartments became
much more difficult in the second half of 2007. As a result, the
Group relied on its large pool of high-quality customer receivables
to supplement its sources of refinancing:
n as regards short-term liquidity, receivables held by the Regional
Banks on local-authority and corporate customers supplemented
a large pool of ECB-eligible receivables, which are available for
use as required;
based on assumptions that the crisis would persist and that
access to market refinancing would be limited or non-existent;
rapidly mobilise the liquidity reserves projected under the stress
scenario and rescue plan,
n weekly reporting to the Management Board was instituted
in August 2007, and in January 2008 a weekly meeting was
introduced between the main staff in charge of liquidity and Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s Management Board.
3. Methodology
The Group manages liquidity risk in three main ways:
n the regulatory 1-month liquidity ratio is the main indicator
used by Group entities to manage short-term liquidity. Each
entity measures, monitors and complies with this ratio, which
is therefore more restrictive than if it were applied on a
consolidated basis. This is particularly true for the Crédit
Agricole S. A. (parent company), which bears most of the
Group’s equity investments and goodwill and therefore has an
additional regulatory liquidity requirement. This disadvantage
is not balanced by an equivalent advantage in the ratios of
reporting subsidiaries. Cautious and rigorous projections are
made when calculating the regulatory ratio;
n the annual refinancing programme is based on an annual
calculation of the Group’s overall needs, which is updated
at least once during the year (to reflect organic growth,
acquisitions, forthcoming refinancing deadlines etc.);
n medium-term refinancing requirements are projected on the basis
of a periodic simulation of the Group’s refinancing requirements
over a medium-term horizon. These simulations are used to
determine strategies for diversifying refinancing sources.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 127
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Risk factors
4. Exposure
The liquidity ratio is the ratio between cash and short-term assets
on the one hand, and short-term liabilities on the other. It is
calculated on a monthly basis, the minimum figure being 100%.
It includes prudential capital and is not a consolidated ratio, since
Crédit Agricole S. A. centralises refinancing and therefore covers
the needs of Group entities.
At 31 December 2007, the liquidity ratio of the Crédit Agricole S. A.
parent company was 134% versus 111% at end-2006.
Crédit Agricole S. A. issued a total of €29 billion of bonds in 2007,
€17.9 billion of which were part of the Euro Medium Term Notes
(EMTN) programme.
3 IV. Hedging policy
Within the Crédit Agricole Group, derivative instruments are used
for three main purposes:
n to meet demand from Group customers;
n to manage the Group’s financial risks; and
n to take positions for the Group’s own account as part of specific
trading activities.
Derivatives not held for hedging (in the meaning of IAS 39) are
recognised in the “Trading Book” and so market risk is monitored
on these derivatives in addition to any counterparty risk.
Certain derivative instruments may be held for the economic hedging
of financial risks, without meeting IAS 39 criteria (prohibition on
hedging equity etc.). They are therefore recognised in the Trading
Book.
In all cases, the hedging intention is documented at the outset
and verified quarterly through appropriate tests (forward- and
backward-looking).
128 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Each Group entity manages its financial risks within limits set
by the Group Risk Management Committee chaired by Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s CEO.
Global interest-rate risk management aims to reconcile two
approaches:
n protection of the Group’s capital, which means matching on-
and off-balance sheet items that are sensitive to interestrate variations (i.e. fixed-rate items, for the sake of simplicity)
with fixed-rate instruments, in order to neutralise the fair-value
variations that arise if interest rates change. If this matching is
carried out through derivative instruments (mainly fixed-rate
swaps), these are regarded as fair-value hedge derivatives if
the instruments identified (micro FVH) or groups of instruments
identified (macro FVH) as hedged items are eligible within the
meaning of IAS 39. As mentioned above, these derivatives are
recognised in the Trading Book by default, even though they
provide economic hedging of risk. To check the suitability of
hedging, hedging instruments and hedged items are grouped
by maturity using contract characteristics or, for certain balancesheet items (particularly deposits), assumptions based on the
financial characteristics of products and historical behaviour.
The comparison between the two maturity schedules (hedges
and hedged items) means that hedging can be documented in a
forward-looking manner for each maturity;
n protection of the interest margin, which involves neutralising
movements in future cash flows associated with on-balancesheet instruments or items, arising from the future resetting of
interest rates on these instruments, either because they are
indexed to fluctuating interest-rate indices or because they will
be refinanced at market rates on an uncertain timeframe. If this
neutralisation takes place through derivative instruments (mainly
interest-rate swaps), these are considered as cash flow hedge
(CFH) derivatives. This neutralisation can also be carried out for
balance-sheet items or instruments that are identified individually
(micro CFH) or portfolios of items or instruments (macro CFH).
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◊ The tables below set out the amounts, broken down by projected occurrence, of cash flows subject to cash flow hedging.
at 31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Remaining term
Less than 1 year
1-5 years
More than 5 years
Total
10,758
14,004
15,156
39,918
Hedged cash flows
at 31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Remaining term
Less than 1 year
1-5 years
More than 5 years
Total
7,513
9,360
8,235
25,108
Hedged cash flows
(Outstandings excluding FGAFS in 2006).
◊
A third category of hedging is the protection of the Group’s capital
against fluctuations in exchange rates, resulting from holding
assets or liabilities in currencies other than the Group’s reference
currency of the euro.
»
The instruments used to manage this risk are classified as net
investment hedges.
At 31/12/2007, the Group did not document any net investment
hedge relationships.
INSURANCE SECTOR RISKS
The Crédit Agricole S. A. group operates in the insurance sector
through French and foreign subsidiaries that market savings and
personal risk insurance policies.
Most of the Group’s insurance liabilities (95% of the total at
31 December 2007) concern the savings activities of the life
insurance company Predica.
Predica manages and monitors four types of risk:
n market risks, mainly ALM-related, which may arise from interest-
rate risks, equity risks, surrender risks etc.; these risks must
be assessed with respect to the guarantees given to the client
(minimum guaranteed returns, minimum pay-out guarantees
etc.);
n counterparty risks on assets in the portfolio (issuer quality) and
on reinsurers;
n insurance underwriting risks, particularly related to pricing and
medical selection in personal risk insurance;
n operational risks, particularly relating to the execution of
processes.
3 1. Risk supervision and management
The risk measurement method is based on an internal model that
allows risks to be measured in accordance with the CFO Forum
standards, by simulating the asset/liability balance using economic
methods. The model includes the framework devised as part of the
European Solvency II project.
◊ Unaudited data
The internal model is focused on the savings and pensions
business.
It reflects the impact of the insurer’s strategy (in terms of asset
allocation, policy revaluation, etc.) and policyholder behaviour
(application of mortality tables, simulation of structural and cyclical
surrenders etc.) in various market conditions. It naturally includes
regulatory constraints (minimum policyholder bonuses, additions to
regulatory reserves, asset-related limits etc.).
A risk strategy has been formulated and validated by Crédit
Agricole S. A.’s risk management bodies. This strategy sets risk
targets and limits for the various businesses, including counterparty
limits, matching limits, allocation limits, underwriting rules and
coverage rules. It has been implemented with the use of risk
measurements established using the internal model.
These risks are reviewed every quarter by Predica’s Management
Board and by the Group as part of its consolidated supervision
system.
Predica’s ALM Strategy Committee meets every quarter to examine
risk reports and to formulate proposals for managing these risks.
These proposals are then put to the Board of Directors.
All of the company’s important commercial decisions (product policy,
policyholder returns etc.), financial decisions (asset allocation,
coverage programme etc.) and insurance decisions (reinsurance
programme etc.) are now simulated using the internal model. These
simulations supplement the discussions that take place as part of
the governance process.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 129
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Risk factors
in interest rates, corresponding to 20-35% of bond portfolio
outstandings, and by using assets that respond to rising
interest rates (around 25%).
In 2007, several decisions were analysed before implementation
in this way:
n Predica substantially increased the unit-linked portion of its
portfolio, with a focus on guaranteed-capital funds given the risk
profile of its policyholders;
n it reduced its exposure to real estate and equities;
n financial coverage of guaranteed minimum returns was
increased.
To integrate risk management more closely into its business
activities, Predica re-mapped its processes and risks, focusing on
core-business processes.
This enabled it to identify ways of mitigating risks arising from the
processes concerned. New control plans were defined, and these
will be implemented in 2008.
These efforts form part of Predica’s preparations for Solvency II,
particularly the second pillar of this project.
Technical reserves in the accounts are not sensitive to interestrate movements, since the initial assumptions on which they are
based remain unchanged.
n Stockmarket risk corresponds to the risk that equity investments
will fall in value as a result of a decline in stockmarket indexes.
In order to manage the volatility of the equity portfolio and to
optimise its risk/return profile, Predica has a policy of broad
diversification, using three methods:
n
geographical diversification of investments across all
international stockmarkets (Europe, USA, Japan, Asia,
emerging markets),
n
extensive sector diversification,
n
diversification of investment styles.
At end-2007, 20% of Predica’s portfolio value consisted of
unrealised capital gains.
3 2. Market risk
Predica constantly seeks to control financial risks by managing
the overall volatility of its investment portfolio value, through
diversifying asset allocation across all asset classes (bonds,
equities, alternative investments, real estate), in order to benefit
from decorrelated returns between them.
In addition, Predica aims to maintain a sufficient level of unrealised
capital gains to enable it to absorb a significant market shock.
n Interest-rate risk corresponds to the risk of a change in the value
of the bond portfolio as a result of a change in interest rates.
Variable-rate investments expose the company to fluctuations in
future cash flows, while fixed-rate investments expose it to the
risk that instruments in the portfolio will see a fall in fair value.
Predica has adopted hedging and risk management rules
covering:
n
n
the risk of a fall in interest rates, particularly given the presence
of liabilities that benefit from guaranteed minimum rates. This
risk is managed by setting a minimum 50% weighting for
fixed-rate bonds, and by using hedging instruments (swaps,
swaptions, floors),
the risk of a rise in interest rates, to protect the company in the
event that policyholders surrender their policies in response
to a sharp, sustained increase in long-term yields, or that
savings policies become less competitive by comparison
with other savings products. This risk is managed by using
instruments (caps) that hedge against the risk of an increase
130 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
As well as pushing down the value of equity portfolios, a substantial
decline in stockmarket indexes could result in an increase in
impairment reserves on positions showing high unrealised losses.
The variation in the value of investments used in unit-linked policies
is borne by policyholders, depending on whether the policy
includes a minimum pay-out guarantee or not.
Due to the way that technical reserves are calculated, a 10% fall
in stockmarket indices would have a limited effect on minimum
pay-out guarantee reserves.
n Currency risks arising from holding assets denominated in foreign
currencies. Predica’s exposure to this risk mainly arises from
its policy of attaining geographical diversification in its equity
portfolio, aimed at optimising the portfolio’s risk/return profile.
The basic principle is to hedge most currency risk and retain
residual positions. As a result, Predica’s exposure to changes in
exchange rates is not significant.
3 3. Credit or counterparty risk
The second way in which Predica manages financial risks is by
managing counterparty risk, i.e. the risk of default by one or more
issuers of bonds held in the investment portfolio.
Since 2002, Predica has had an enhanced prudential method of
managing counterparty risk, with multiple limits on global portfolio
risk and individual risks.
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The first way of managing counterparty risk is by setting global
limits based on issuer ratings. In the absence of any agency ratings,
the rating used is an internal rating awarded by Crédit Agricole
Asset Management’s Risk Management Division based on analysis
from Crédit Agricole S. A.
Authorised limits
AAA (and sovereign issuers in the eurozone)
No limit
BBB + A + AA
(excluding sovereign issuers in the eurozone)
50% maximum
BBB + A
20% maximum
BBB and unlisted
Average portfolio rating
5% maximum
AA-
Predica’s rules forbid direct ownership of securities rated lower
than BBB, except in the exceptional event that a downgrade takes
place after purchase and the issuer concerned still has the ability
to make payments. At end-December 2007, the weighting of these
assets was 0.76%.
In addition, Predica limits the counterparty risk authorised for each
issuer, and sets an utilisation rate that is restricted depending on
the rating of the counterparty concerned and on the company’s
gross non-consolidated shareholders’ equity at 31 December of
the previous year (excluding unrealised capital gains and earnings
for the current year).
In order to achieve diversification among the BBB-rated issuers
whose bonds are held in the portfolio, the Board of Directors has
decided to limit the weighting of the top 10 BBB outstandings (at
purchase price) to 75% of Predica’s non-consolidated prudential
equity capital.
At end-2006 and end-2007, no investment in the bond portfolio
was subject to impairment reserves arising from the risk of a
counterparty defaulting.
As regards reinsurance, the policy for monitoring counterparties is
based on the following principles:
n diversification, since several different reinsurers can be exposed
to the same reinsurer solvency risk, via financial ratings and the
pledging of reinsured reserves;
n continuity of relationships, based on expertise and underwriting
partnerships.
n a mismatch between the maturity schedules of investments and
insurance policy liabilities. To address this, Predica has defined
a prudential framework for managing liquidity as part of its ALM
policy.
Predica carries out a payability test to give an indication of its
liquidity in the event of large-scale policy surrenders (three times
the actual level). This report shows that Predica can cope with
large-scale surrenders in extreme cases, by carrying out limited
sales of its assets.
In addition, Predica has defined a responsiveness ratio, aimed
at reflecting its ability to find short-term liquidity without any risk
of impairment losses. This ratio is calculated as the relationship
between liquidity with a term of less than 2 years and the whole
portfolio. Liquidity with a term of less than 2 years includes cash,
money-market mutual funds, variable-rate or inflation-linked bonds
and fixed-rate bonds with a residual time to maturity of less than
2 years.
The redemption profile of subordinated debt is shown in the table
below. For perpetual subordinated notes, the maturity is taken to be
the date on which the early redemption option expires:
Maturity schedule
for subordinated liabilities
Less than 1 year
Outstanding
€87m
1-3 years
€422m
3-5 years
€344m
More than 5 years
€34m
3 5. Insurance risk
In life insurance, insurance risk results from the pricing, when
a contract is written, of risks relating to life expectancy or life’s
accidents.
Insurance risk results from assumptions that underpin the
pricing of guarantees and financial options, mainly relating to
surrender, prolongation and switching, which can be exercised by
policyholders.
Insurance risk breaks down into:
n four elementary biometric risks:
n mortality risk (death benefit),
3 4. Liquidity risk
n longevity risk (life benefit: annuities, whole life policies etc.),
Liquidity risk is the risk that the company may not be able to cover
liabilities when they fall due. It may arise from:
n morbidity risk (benefit in the event of disability and dependency),
n illiquid investments. For this reason, Predica has defined a
prudential framework for selecting investments that focuses on
their liquidity.
At end-2007, more than 85% of the portfolio consisted of liquid
assets listed on organised markets. More than 50% of real-estate
investments are in listed real-estate investment companies.
n incapacity risk (benefit in the event of being unable to work);
n behavioural risk is the risk of early surrender (or prolongation,
switching, cancellation etc.) of insurance policies compared with
the expected level;
n the risk of loading being insufficient to cover operating expenses
and commissions paid to distributors.
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Insurance risk is measured on the basis of observed differences,
arising from these risks, between the pricing factors used at
the time of underwriting and actual annual results on the policy
portfolio:
n for biometric risks, the tables of statistics used are based
either on national or international statistics or on statistics from
insurance portfolios (experience tables);
n for surrender risk, surrender rules are based on observations
made on the portfolio for structural surrenders, and mainly on
rules defined by experts for cyclical surrenders (for which there
are no statistical observations);
n for loading risk, the statistic is the observed difference between
fees actually charged and fees reported by the insurer.
To limit behavioural risk, the policy remuneration strategy takes
account of market conditions, using a forward-looking approach.
The strategy for distributing with-profits entitlements is based
on tests relating to sensitivity to market conditions or loss
experience.
»
As the Crédit Agricole Group’s life insurance unit, Predica makes
little use of reinsurance. Indeed:
n it focuses mainly on individual insurance savings products;
n personal risk insurance policies mainly consist of a very large
number of small risks;
n predica’s financial strength and cautious management mean
that the solvency margin required to carry out its activities is
comfortably covered.
Given the overall portfolio profile (in terms of aggregate risk and
average capital), only catastrophe risk is liable to have a genuine
impact on the results of the individual or collective personal risk
insurance business. Predica’s portfolio benefits from coverage
by BCAC (Bureau Commun des Assurances Collectives) in both
collective death insurance (loan coverage) and individual personal
risk insurance (open group), along with complementary coverage
of invalidity risk.
OPERATIONAL RISKS
Operational risk is the risk of loss resulting from shortcomings in
internal procedures or information systems, human error or external
events that are not linked to a credit, market or liquidity risk. It
includes legal risk but not strategic and reputational risk.
n identification and qualitative assessment of risks through risk
In 2007, the Crédit Agricole Group finished setting up its qualitative
and quantitative system for identifying, assessing, preventing and
monitoring operational risk. As a result, it obtained authorisation
from the Commission Bancaire to use the Advanced Measurement
Approach (AMA) from 1 January 2008 (when the new Basel II ratio
comes into force) for the following scope: the 39 Regional Banks,
Calyon, LCL, CAAM, Sofinco France and Finaref France (covering
more than 80% of the Group’s NBI).
to report significant incidents, which are consolidated in a
database used to measure and monitor risk-related costs;
3 I. Objectives and policy
The system comprises the following components, adjusted to each
Group entity, which are common to the entire Group:
n governance of the operational risk management function:
supervision of the system by the Management Board (via the
operational risk committee or the operational risk unit of the internal
control committee), the roles of Risk Management and Permanent
Controls officers (Crédit Agricole S. A. and entities) in system
oversight and co-ordination, responsibilities of entities in controlling
their risks through the network of Operational Risk Managers;
132 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
mapping, and the use of indicators to monitor the most sensitive
processes;
n collection of operational loss data and an early-warning system
n calculation and allocation of regulatory capital for operational
risks at consolidated and entity level;
n periodic production of an operational risk scorecard at entity
level, supplemented by a Group summary.
3 II. Risk management: organisation
and supervision system
The operational risk management organisation forms part of the
overall organisation of the Risk Management and Permanent
Controls function. Operational risk officers, most of whom now
cover permanent risk monitoring, report to entities’ Heads of Risk
Management and Permanent Controls.
Since 2005, Crédit Agricole S. A. Group has had an operational risk
scorecard covering most of all its business lines.
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This scorecard confirms the main sources of risks that affect most
business lines, along with exposure profiles that are differentiated
by subsidiary and type of business line: recurring risk, mainly arising
from external fraud involving payment systems in Retail Banking or
stockmarket errors in asset management, higher risk associated
with corporate and investment banking (counterparty litigation and
capital markets) and factoring (external fraud).
It also reflects the effect of action plans designed to reduce the
impact of exceptional risks (i.e. by strengthening information
systems and controls when encountering high unit losses primarily
affecting asset management and factoring operations) and to
reduce the frequency of recurring risks (ongoing reduction in
electronic banking fraud at LCL and heightened monitoring of
external fraud in the consumer finance businesses).
In the summer of 2007, an incident took place in the proprietary
trading business of Calyon New York’s Credit Markets & CDO unit.
The incident was detected rapidly, was reported in the appropriate
way to the Group’s various decision-making and control authorities
(including the Audit Committee). Immediate measures were taken
with respect to local management.
The steps taken by Calyon, in conjunction with the Group,
following this incident are described in the Chairman’s report to the
shareholders (page 28).
The authorisation to use the advanced method follows an audit by
the Commission Bancaire in the first quarter of 2007, which was
followed by an audit by the Group’s General Inspection aiming
to ensure that the measures required for authorisation (set out
in Appendix 1 of the Memorandum of Understanding with the
Commission Bancaire) had been taken by end-2007.
Work done in 2007 focused on:
n documenting the internal capital calculation and allocation model
using a statistical loss distribution approach (the Basel II advanced
measurement approach or “Loss Distribution Approach” used by
most major banks);
n implementing the actions set out in Appendix 1 in entities within
the advanced measurement approach (AMA) scope;
n developing the regulatory aspect of the new industrial information
The other major issue is the gradual integration of the Group’s
new international subsidiaries, particularly in Greece (Emporiki)
and Italy (Cariparma), which will be included in the 31 March 2008
regulatory capital calculation using the standardised approach.
3 III. Methodology
AMA capital calculation method
The advanced measurement approach (AMA) for calculating capital
requirements with respect to operational risk has the following
objectives:
n to increase control over operational risk-related costs, and to
prevent exceptional risks across the Group’s various entities;
n to determine the level of capital that corresponds with the risks
measured, which may be lower than that calculated using the
standardised approach;
n to promote improvements in permanent controls through
monitoring action plans.
The systems implemented within the Group aim for compliance
with all Basel II qualitative criteria (making risk measurement an
integral part of day-to-day management, independence of the risk
function, periodic disclosure of operational risk exposures etc.) and
quantitative criteria (99.9% confidence interval over a 1-year period;
incorporation of internal data, external data, analysis of scenarios
and factors reflecting the operating environment; incorporation of
risk factors that influence the statistical distribution etc.).
The AMA model for calculating capital requirements is based on a
“Loss Distribution Approach” actuarial model, which is unique to
the Group. The largest entities (Regional Banks and Calyon) handle
their own capital allocation based on centrally defined principles.
The model was designed and developed according to the following
principles:
n it must form an integral part of the risk policy;
n it must be pragmatic, i.e. methods must adjust to real operational
conditions;
system (Group Operational Risk System): frameworks, calculation
engines for the AMA and standardised approaches, COREP
disclosures (Basel II common reporting);
n it must have educational value, in order to encourage appropriation
n safeguarding the scope of data collection and improving
n it must be robust, i.e. it must be able to give estimates that are
documentation in the operational risk management system;
n defining a list of exceptional risk scenarios that must be assessed
by each Regional Bank in addition to internal data;
n calculating the group’s regulatory capital requirement in terms
by the Management Board and business lines;
realistic and stable from one year to the next.
The model has been regularly validated by the Crédit Agricole
Group’s Standards and Methodology Committee, chaired by the
Head of Group Risk Management and Permanent Controls.
of operational risk for entities under the AMA and standardised
approaches, and for the consolidated levels of the Crédit
Agricole S. A. group and the Crédit Agricole group.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 133
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Risk factors
»
LEGAL RISKS
As of today, there are currently no exceptional events or pending
litigation to the knowledge of Crédit Agricole S. A. that are likely to
have a material impact on the financial health, business operations,
results or assets of Crédit Agricole S. A. or the Crédit Agricole S. A.
group.
Any legal risks outstanding as of 31 December 2007 that could
have a negative impact on Group assets have been covered by
reserves based on the information available to the Management
Board.
The main legal and tax proceedings outstanding at Crédit
Agricole S. A. and its fully consolidated subsidiaries are described
in the 2006 Management Report. The cases presented below are
those in which there were some changes in 2007.
3 Litigation and exceptional events
Arbitration is currently taking place between the Tapie group’s
receivers and CDR.
IFI Dapta Mallinjoud
The Commissaire à l’Exécution du Plan (insolvency professional)
acting for the companies of the IFI Dapta Mallinjoud group initiated
proceedings against CDR and Crédit Lyonnais on 30 May 2005
before the Commercial Court of Thiers.
The suit alleges that CDR and Crédit Lyonnais committed violations
in arranging and financing the IFI group’s acquisition of the furniture
business line (ex-CIA) from the Pinault Group.
The Riom Court of Appeals, in its order dated 12 July 2006, referred
the matter to the Paris Court of Commerce.
In its ruling of 24 September 2007, the Paris Court of Commerce:
n ordered CDR to pay €2.9 million for making unjustified interest
claims;
Verte France
In 2006, Verte France, a trade union consisting of individuals, filed
a new action against Crédit Agricole enjoining Crédit Agricole S. A.
and all the Regional Banks to appear before the Paris Correctional
Court (Tribunal Correctionnel).
It alleges that Crédit Agricole improperly allocated part of the
Regional Banks’ reserves to financing the takeover bid for Crédit
Lyonnais and is asking that the reserves they were diverted be
returned to Crédit Agricole members.
In its ruling of 11 September 2007, the aforementioned court
dismissed all of Verte France’s requests and ruled that they were
unjustified.
Verte France appealed against this decision.
This action, which is not based on any legal or economic gravamen,
is in line with the actions filed by Verte France seeking a ruling to
nullify the Regional Banks, which were dismissed by the Paris Court
of First Instance in decisions dated 21 and 28 January 2003 then
by the Paris Court of Appeals (orders dated 1 April 2005) and more
recently by the Court of Cassation in an order dated 20 November
2007.
Bernard Tapie – Adidas
Following the order of the Paris Court of Appeals, which was
handling the Adidas case exclusively, the amount of the fine has
been paid. The sum has been placed in trust by the receivers.
CDR and Crédit Lyonnais filed a further appeal in February 2006.
On 9 October 2006, the Court of Cassation handed down a ruling
in favour of Crédit Lyonnais and CDR; this ruling overturns the order
of the Paris Court of Appeals and the matter has been referred back
to the Paris Court, differently composed.
134 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
n ordered Crédit Lyonnais to pay €5 million for taking wrongful
action;
n ordered Crédit Lyonnais and CDR to pay €50,000 under
article 700.
The Court did not make the judgment immediately enforceable
notwithstanding the lodging of an appeal.
The Commissaire à l’Exécution du Plan appealed against the
decision on 28 December 2007.
Strauss/Wolf/Faudem
US citizens and members of their families who were victims of
terrorist attacks attributed to Hamas and committed in Israel
between 2001 and 2004 have brought proceedings against
National Westminster Bank and Crédit Lyonnais before a New
York court. They claim that these banks were complicit with the
terrorists, since they each kept an account opened (in 1990 in the
case of Crédit Lyonnais) by a charity providing aid to Palestinians.
The account was used to transfer funds to Palestinian entities
accused, according to the plaintiffs, of financing Hamas.
The plaintiffs, who have not put a figure on the damages they
have suffered, are claiming compensation for “injury, anguish and
emotional pain”.
As the matter and the proceedings currently stand, the plaintiffs
have not provided proof that the charity was linked to terrorists,
or that Crédit Lyonnais was aware that its client could be involved
(if this were to be proven) in financing terrorism. The Court has
required the plaintiffs to provide this proof if they are to stand a
chance of winning the case.
Crédit Lyonnais considers that there is nothing in this matter that
would enable the plaintiffs to provide such proof.
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Risk factors
As a result, Crédit Lyonnais strenuously refutes these allegations
and is vigorously disputing them.
Crédit Agricole S. A. and its subsidiaries are also involved in a
number of other legal disputes, including class action suits in the
United States.
Moulinex-Brandt
The court-ordered liquidators of this company initiated wrongful
action proceedings against Crédit Lyonnais. The financial risk has
been transferred to Calyon.
»
Crédit Agricole S. A. is not bound to any patent or licence, or to any
industrial, commercial or financial supply contract.
NON-COMPLIANCE RISKS
The purpose of the Compliance Department is to draw up policies
relating to compliance with rules governing financial and banking
activities. These rules may be laws, regulations, professional
and ethical standards, or instructions from the CEO made in
accordance with guidelines given by the Board of Directors. The
Group has a dedicated control system that features the staff,
procedures and IT systems required to manage non-compliance
risk, and therefore the risk of financial losses, reputational damage,
and legal, administrative and disciplinary penalties.
Crédit Agricole S. A., its subsidiaries and each Regional Bank
have their own compliance function. Crédit Agricole S. A. has 580
staff working in compliance, while the Regional Banks have 170.
»
3 Binding Agreements
A Compliance Management Committee meets periodically to
take the necessary decisions to prevent compliance failure, and
to implement and monitor action taken to remedy compliance
failures. The Committee reports on its work to the Audit and Risks
Committee of Crédit Agricole S. A.’s Board of Directors.
The organisation and main actions relating to compliance and
financial security are presented below in the section dealing with
employee-related, social and environmental information in the
Crédit Agricole S. A. group, and in the report by the Chairman of
the Board of Directors with respect to the Financial Security Act of
1 August 2003.
INSURANCE AND RISK COVERAGE
The Crédit Agricole S. A. Group has secured insurance coverage
for its operational risks to protect its assets and profits. For highintensity risks, Crédit Agricole S. A. has taken out Group policies
from major insurance companies, including AXA, AIG, GAN, Ace,
Zurich and AGF, so as to harmonise the transfer of personal and
property risks and to set up specific professional civil liability and
fraud insurance programmes for each business line. Business-line
subsidiaries are responsible for managing lower intensity risks
themselves.
In France, insurance of operating assets (property and IT equipment)
includes third-party liability cover for buildings with the highest
exposure to the risk of damage. This insurance is supplemented
by special guarantee lines for civil operating liability (loss coverage
limit of €450 million per claim in France; supplemental coverage
of €150 million for the main sites in other countries; civil operating
liability guarantee of €40 million).
Crédit Agricole S. A. has secured Operating Loss, Fraud and
“Securities All-Risk” policies for its Group, with limits of €456 million
for operating losses, €145 million for fraud and €98 million for
securities all-risk coverage.
The Group has also renewed its professional civil liability and
officers’ and directors’ liability policies.
Low-frequency and low-intensity risks that cannot be insured on
satisfactory financial terms are retained in the form of deductibles
or are mutualised within the Crédit Agricole S. A. group by the
Group’s captive reinsurance subsidiary, whose aggregate exposure
does not exceed 6% of the above guarantees.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 135
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
Employee, social and environmental information
in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
Based on the values that embody the mutualist ideal – proximity,
solidarity and responsibility – and its “unified yet decentralised”
organisational structure, Crédit Agricole has undergone extensive
changes over recent years both in France and abroad.
In keeping with its history and its recent expansion, Crédit
Agricole S.A. has reasserted and implemented its values on the
basis of key themes: cohesion, openness, responsibility and
entrepreneurship.
The Group’s approach to social and environmental responsibility,
underpinned by these values, accompanies and supports its
changes and development both in France and abroad, respecting
its adherence to the ten principles of the Global Compact.
In 2007, efforts to take into account the direct and indirect impacts
of the Group’s activities on the environment were stepped up with
the implementation of measures in association with the strategic
decisions announced. Targeted measures to combat climate
change have therefore been implemented and will be continued in
all areas of the Group in order to provide an effective and lasting
response to this challenge.
Responsibility to employees of the company has also been
maintained via a policy centred around dialogue, listening, job
management and mobility of the Group’s staff. Management of
diversity and respect of human rights and cultures within Group
companies both in France and abroad are among the issues
»
to which Crédit Agricole will continue to pay particularly close
attention.
In addition, the Group has also reasserted its commitment to
integrating CSR principles into its activities. As part of this logic,
from 2008, yearly strategy reviews for each business line will
include a look at CSR.
This decision confirms the importance of integrating CSR issues
into the Group’s strategy, as demonstrated by the extension in
2007 of the scope of the Strategic Committee to include assessing
progress in sustainable development policy in all parts of the
Group.
In addition to the social and environmental information contained in
this chapter, which relates in particular to social and environmental
information required by the implementing decree of the French
NRE (new economic regulations) Act, other information will be
available in the sustainable development section of the Group’s
website, which will be available from early April 2008.
Lastly, Crédit Agricole S.A. has asked the sustainable
development experts of one of the Group’s statutory auditors
to review procedures for collecting environmental and social
data, as well as certain information published in this document
and on the dedicated website. Details of these works and the
associated certification are included in the “Analyst area”
section of the Group’s sustainable development website.
KEY SOCIAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
3 Methodology
Each company of the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group is attached to a
business line and has its own employee relations policy, which is
overseen by a Human Resources Director. Overall consistency is
ensured by Group Human Resources Department.
Entities covered by this reporting are those with employees that
are consolidated either fully or proportionally.
136 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Each item presented below is accompanied by an indication
concerning the scope of employees covered (as a percentage of
full-time equivalent employees at the end of the year).
The following information is provided in accordance with different
consolidation rules:
n for entities that are proportionally consolidated, data is stated
proportionally to the Group’s equity interest in the entity;
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n unless stated otherwise *, a breakdown of data by business line
n unless stated otherwise, the population in question is that of
“active” employees. The notion of active implies:
is provided on the basis of the core activity of each entity. For
entities exercising a number of activities, the dominant business
line is used;
n a legal tie in the form of a “standard” permanent or temporary
contract of employment (or similar for international activities),
n unless stated otherwise *, data is stated from the employer’s
n inclusion on the payroll and in the position on the last day of the
viewpoint and not that of the beneficiary. The difference relates to
employees seconded to one entity by another (with no changes
to the employment contract);
period,
n working time of at least 50%.
I. Crédit Agricole S.A. Group headcount, worldwide
A) BREAKDOWN BY BUSINESS LINE
2007
Headcount
(FTE)
French retail banking
International retail banking
Specialised financial services
Business line
Insurance, asset management and wealth
management
%
22,478
25.9%
27,156
31.3%
13,179
15.2%
2005
%
Headcount
(FTE)
%
23,764
30.8%
24,516
39.5%
19,799
25.7%
5,467
8.8%
11,540
15.0%
10,588
17.0%
7,947
9.1%
7,498
9.7%
6,981
11.3%
12,118
14.0%
11,122
14.5%
11,071
17.8%
3,988
4.5%
3,340
4.3%
3,489
5.6%
86,866
100%
77,063
100%
62,111
100%
France
41,039
47%
41,050
53%
41,952
68%
International
45,827
53%
36,013
47%
20,159
32%
Corporate and investment banking
Proprietary asset management and other activities
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. GROUP
Business scope outside France
100%
Changes in scope between 2006 and 2007 (acquisitions/
disposals):
n French retail banking (+0 FTE).
No change in scope.
n international Retail Banking (+6,293 FTE).
Acquisition in Italy of Cariparma (+3,599 FTE) and Banca Populare
FriulAdria (+1,300 FTE) and the consolidation of 173 Banca Intesa
branches into Cariparma (+1,685 FTE) and 29 into FriulAdria
(+223 FTE).
Consolidation of Antena (+24 FTE) into the Emporiki Group and
Banque International de Tanger (+2 FTE).
Sale of Phoenix Metrolife by the Emporiki Group (-495 FTE) and
liquidation of Emporiki Germany Bank (-45 FTE);
n specialised Financial Services (+1,114 FTE).
50% consolidation of Fiat Auto Financial Services (+914 FTE) and
acquisition of Saudi Fransi (+76 FTE) and BC Finance (+124 FTE);
n insurance,
Asset management and Wealth management
(+504 FTE).
In the Securities business, consolidation into the CACEIS Group
(50% owned) of CACEIS Germany (+249 FTE) and CACEIS
Switzerland (+18 FTE) and acquisition of Olympia via CACEIS
(+130 FTE).
*
2006
Headcount
(FTE)
100%
100%
In Asset Management, end of the joint venture with Banca Intesa
in Italy (-222 FTE) and continuation of business at CAAM Italy
(+127 FTE) and deconsolidation of the East Asia entity of the
CAAM Group (-13 FTE).
In Private Banking, acquisition of Bank Sarazin Luxembourg
(+85 FTE).
Positioning of the Private Equity business within the Insurance,
Asset Management and Wealth Management business line
(+82 FTE) and consolidation of Sodica (+33 FTE) and Idia
Agricapital (+15 FTE);
n corporate and Investment Banking (+3 FTE).
Consolidation of Calyon Financial Germany (+4 FTE) and
deconsolidation of Calyon Uruguay (=1 FTE);
n proprietary Asset Management (+419 FTE).
Positioning of the Private Equity business within the Insurance,
Asset Management and Wealth Management business line
(- 82 FTE).
In the Property business, acquisition of Monné Decroix (+496 FTE)
and consolidation of RSB (+5 FTE).
Excluding data in sections I.A, I.B and III.A.1, extracted from the monthly internal report on Crédit Agricole S.A. Group employees as at 31 December 2007, which
divides up entities with a number of business activities into each of their areas and treated from a beneficiary viewpoint.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 137
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B) BREAKDOWN BY REGION
BREAKDOWN OF THE WORLDWIDE
WORKFORCE (FTE) BY REGION
AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
The weighting of each region remained much the same as last year,
although the number of employees increased by nearly 13% over
the period.
France’s proportion of the Group total was 47.2% at end-2007,
down from 53.3% at end-2006.
C) CHANGES IN THE WORKFORCE
2007
Business line
Recruitment of
permanent staff
2006
Incoming/
existing ratio *
– permanent
Recruitment of
permanent staff
Incoming/
existing ratio *
– permanent
French retail banking
1,315
6.3%
1,394
5.7%
International retail banking
4,318
17.3%
3,545
20.7%
Specialised financial services
1,384
15.8%
992
13.2%
927
14.3%
714
14.0%
1,640
18.9%
1,640
18.3%
387
10.3%
174
6.5%
12.9%
Insurance, asset management and wealth management
Corporate and investment banking
Proprietary asset management and other activities
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. GROUP
9,971
13.6%
8,459
France
3,092
8.2%
3,089
7.9%
International
6,878
19.1%
5,370
20.2%
Business scope outside France
95%
* Ratio: number of incoming staff (permanent and contract) in year N relative to average yearly headcount for the business scope concerned in year N.
138 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
89%
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D) AGE STRUCTURE
E) PROFESSIONAL EQUALITY
Proportion of women (%)
% of workforce covered
Employees
53.8%
95%
Permanent employees
53.3%
95%
2 out of 21
100%
Management circles 1 and 2*
12.6%
100%
Top 10% of highest earning employees in each subsidiary
24.0%
87%
Group executive committee
*
Management circles comprise members of executive committees, members of management committees and the key frameworks of each entity.
Around 700 employees belong to circles 1 and 2.
II. Group employees in France
A) BREAKDOWN BY TYPE OF CONTRACT AT 31 DECEMBER
Active permanent staff (FTE)
Contract staff (FTE)
Total active staff (FTE)
Permanent staff on extended leave of absence (FTE)
TOTAL FRANCE (FTE)
The number of active employees remained stable as a result of:
n the acquisitions in 2007 of Monné-Decroix and BC Finance
(+620 FTE);
n organic growth of Corporate and Investment Banking, Insurance,
Asset Management and Wealth Management and Proprietary
Asset Management (+640 FTE);
2007
2006
2005
40,326
40,330
41,083
712
720
870
41,038
41,050
41,953
4,138
5,092
5,936
45,176
46,142
47,889
The decline in the number of inactive permanent employees
(-18.7%) corresponds to:
n the end of implementation of the early retirement scheme;
n the retirement of these employees under such schemes;
n the end of long-term leave taken within the framework of
job- saving plans.
n offsetting the reduction of 1,280 FTE in French retail banking.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 139
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Contract employees made up 1.8% of the active workforce at
the end of 2007. Of these, 29% were managerial staff. Contract
staff agreements signed in 2007 break down more or less evenly
between staff replacements (48%) and new hires associated with
increased business levels (52%).
B) BREAKDOWN OF THE ACTIVE PERMANENT
WORKFORCE AT END-2007
1) Breakdown by gender and category
Temporary staff accounted for 1.4% of the active permanent
workforce, with an average 567 FTE staff during the year.
Total relief staff (contract and temporary) therefore amounted to
3.2% of the total active permanent workforce.
Young people on work-study programmes or internships
represented 5.2% of the total active permanent workforce in 2007.
Average monthly headcount (FTE)
Professionnalisation contracts (e.g. qualification,
orientation, adaptation contracts)
566
Apprenticeship contracts
604
Student interns
937
% of business scope in France
99%
The breakdown of the active permanent workforce by gender
remained stable between December 2006 and December 2007,
with women making up 57% of the total.
In category terms, the 2006 trend continued, with the overall
percentage of managerial staff (men and women) rising by 3 points
to 47% at end-2007. There was a 1.8 point increase for women and
a 1.3 point rise for men.
2) Age and length of service
AGE STRUCTURE
The breakdown by age band changed significantly in comparison
with 2006. There was an increase in junior categories and a slight
decline in the number of employees aged over 50:
n the percentage of staff under 30 rose by 1 percentage point to
18%;
n the percentage of those aged over 50 fell by 1.5 percentage
points to 34%.
140 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Note that ageing of the active workforce has stabilised over the last
two years, with an average age of 42 and average length of service
of 18 years.
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
PROJECTED NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES WHO WILL REACH
AGE 60 OVER THE NEXT 10 YEARS
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
The projection for the next ten years shows that the number of employees reaching 60 will rise sharply (by 330%) between 2009
(600 employees) and 2012 (2,000 employees) before stabilising at 1,900 employees per year on average from 2013 to 2015.
C) WORKING TIME
1) Contractual working time
BREAKDOWN OF ACTIVE PERMANENT EMPLOYEES AT 31 DECEMBER 2007 BY CONTRACTUAL WORKING TIME
Hourly
Daily
Other
TOTAL
Management
%
Nonmanagement
%
5480
30.5%
21087
99.4%
26,567
67.8%
12299
68.4%
111
0.5%
12,410
31.6%
Total
%
199
1.1%
29
0.1%
228
0.6%
17,978
100%
21,227
100%
39,205
100.0%
% of business scope in France: 94%
The breakdown of staff by contractual working time within the Group remained stable in 2006-2007, with two-thirds of employees having their
contractual working time expressed in hours.
2) Part-time staff
2007
Management
2006
Nonmanagement
Total
Management
Nonmanagement
Total
Part-time staff
1266
4913
6179
1,262
5,438
6,700
Part-time staff as % of total
7.0%
23.1%
15.6%
7.0%
23.3%
16.2%
% of business scope in France
95%
98%
The percentage of part-time staff remained stable between 2006 and 2007. Most part-time staff are women (87%) and work in non-managerial
grades (80%).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 141
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
The second largest volume of new hires was in Corporate and
Investment Banking, with a rate of 14.3%.
BREAKDOWN OF PART-TIME STAFF BY WORKING TIME
The change in the structure of part-time staff in 2006-2007 is due
to the early retirement of LCL staff working under the “De Robien”
scheme (reduction in the “90-100% category from 39% to 36%).
D) EMPLOYMENT MANAGEMENT
1) New permanent employees
The number of new permanent employees remained stable relative
to 2006, rising from 3,089 to 3,092 in 2007.
Of the permanent employees recruited, 40% were under 26, a
reduction of 8 percentage points, while the proportion of over-50s
rose by 2 percentage points to 5%.
More than four in ten new employees were recruited in the retail
banking business with a recruitment rate (new hires/average
number of employees) of 6.3%.
The proportion of new recruits consisting of managers rose by
6 points to 47% in 2007.
2) Permanent staff departures (final departures)
2007
NonManagement management
Resignation
Voluntary departure (external
transfer)
558
630
2006
Total
1,188
Non% Management management
32.7%
429
583
Total
%
1,012
26.0%
7
8
15
0.4%
156
27
183
4.7%
Retirement and early retirement
524
1,305
1,829
50.4%
572
1,491
2,063
53.0%
Redundancy and dismissal
127
92
219
6.0%
162
73
235
6.0%
26
39
65
1.8%
17
39
56
1.4%
109
205
314
8.7%
79
268
347
8.9%
1,351
2,279
3,630
100%
1,415
2,481
3,896
100%
Death
Other reasons (departure in trial
period etc.)
TOTAL
% of business scope in France
99%
94%
Final departures decreased by 7%. The majority of departures were within the context of retirement/early retirement, which alone accounted
for half of total departures.
142 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
The majority of resignations related to the consolidation of Monné Decroix and the enlargement of the scope of data collected to include
CACEIS in particular.
2007
Retirement and early retirement (with
termination of employment contract)
2006
Management
Nonmanagement
Total
Management
Nonmanagement
Total
2,063
524
1,305
1,829
572
1,491
Men
359
418
777
390
486
876
Women
165
887
1,052
182
1,005
1,187
% of business scope in France
99%
94%
3) Promotions
2007
Promotion within non-managerial
category
Promotion from non-managerial
to managerial
Promotion within managerial
category
2006
Women
Men
Total
Women
Men
Total
2,532
988
3,520
2,680
1,228
3,908
516
387
903
516
373
889
568
860
1,428
462
731
1,193
TOTAL
3,615
2,235
5,850
3,658
2,332
5,990
%
61.8%
38.2%
100%
61.1%
38.9%
100%
% of business scope in France
94%
97%
The change in the number of promotions within each category should be regarded in the context of the increase in the number of managers
within the workforce (see II–B-1 Breakdown by gender and category).
E) INDIVIDUAL SALARIES AND COLLECTIVE INCENTIVE PLANS
1) Individual salaries
Average total annual compensation (fixed salary plus bonus) of
active permanent employees was approximately €49,190 in 2007,
compared with €44,150 at end-2006. Of the overall increase
since end-2006, 40% relates to an increase in the fixed portion of
compensation and the remaining 60% relates to an increase in the
variable portion.
AVERAGE BASE MONTHLY SALARIES FOR ACTIVE PERMANENT EMPLOYEES AT END-DECEMBER 2007
2007
2006
Women
Men
Total
Women
Men
Total
Management
€3,819
€4,700
€4,330
€3,689
€4,473
€4,154
Non-management
€2,167
€2,231
€2,186
€2,110
€2,150
€2,122
€2,740
€3,801
€3,196
€2,612
€3,560
€3,022
TOTAL
% of business scope in France
99%
The average monthly salary for non-managerial grades was €2,186
at 31 December 2007, up 3% year-on-year.
The average annual salary for managerial grades increased by
4.2% year-on-year.
98%
In 2007, 77% of Group staff worked for an entity that granted broad
increases in the basic salary benefiting some or all staff. A total of
53% of employees benefited from individual salary increases, an
increase of 5 percentage points on last year.
The average salary of female managers rose by 3.5%. Female
managers accounted for 26% of the Group’s top 10% of earners,
an increase of 0.8% compared with 2006.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 143
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
ANNUAL FIXED REMUNERATION
AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
2) Collective incentive plans
Almost all Crédit Agricole S.A. Group business units have a profit-sharing agreement and an incentive plan, which give employees the
opportunity to share in the results and growth of the companies they work for.
COLLECTIVE VARIABLE COMPENSATION PAID IN 2007
2007
2006
Total
No. of
beneficiaries
Average
amount
Total
No. of
beneficiaries
Average
amount
Profit-sharing
€64,858,151
45,442
€1,427
€55,507,325
13,363
€4,154
Incentive plan
€173,049,597
49,816
€3,474
€150,153,663
51,020
€2,943
€20,772,902
34,209
€607
€19,516,444
34,203
€571
Employee savings plan top-up
TOTAL
€258,680,650
€225,177,432
96%
97%
% of business scope in France
The 2006 financial performance of the Group’s entities allowed for
a 16% increase in payments made under profit-sharing agreements
and incentive plans in 2007 relative to the previous year.
144 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Note that, unlike in 2006, LCL employees received incentive
bonuses in 2007, which explains the significant increase in the
number of beneficiaries. However, this amount is still marginal
relative to the level of profit-sharing.
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
F) COMPANY-WIDE AGREEMENTS
In 2007, dialogue between employees and management led to the
signature of 91 company-wide agreements and two agreements
at Group level: the Group agreement relating to the creation of the
Crédit Agricole Special Negotiating Body, as well as the Group
agreement to encourage the employment of disabled workers.
Topic of agreement
2007
2006
48
40
Group reorganisation
Collective agreement, merger, composition of social and economic unions, adjustments to collective status
3
5
Training
4
3
14
13
2
7
12
8
Salary and related
Mandatory annual negotiations, collective variable remuneration, company savings plan, employee share
ownership plan, provident plans
Staff representation bodies
Employment
Early retirement and CATS pension plan, geographical transfers, staff transfers
Working time
Working time adjustments, working schedules, time savings account
Diversity and professional equality
Respect of the individual, professional development
5
Other
Information technology, work organisation, exceptional work
5
2
93
78
97%
94%
TOTAL
% of business scope in France
G) ABSENTEEISM BY REASON AND CATEGORY – EXCLUDING ANNUAL LEAVE AND REDUCTION OF WORKING HOURS (RTT)
ABSENTEEISM (NUMBER OF CALENDAR DAYS)
2007
Management
2006
Women
Men
Women
Men
No.
%
Ave.
days’
absence
Illness of less than
3 days
2,718
2,390
7,390
2,568
15,066
2.5%
0.4
21,606
3.2%
0.5
Illness of more than
3 days
41,758
36,890
177,599
54,040
310,287
51.3%
7.8
357,263
53.1%
8.8
825
443
4,779
1,103
7,150
1.2%
0.2
9,603
1.4%
0.2
Reason
for absence
Accidents during travel
to or from the workplace
Accidents
in the workplace
Non-management
Total
Total
No.
%
Ave.
days’
absence
1,286
634
6,029
1,677
9,626
1.6%
0.2
9,942
1.5%
0.2
Maternity/paternity
68,074
3,375
116,054
1,792
189,295
31.3%
4.8
192,981
28.7%
4.8
Authorised leave
12,535
12,518
22,891
6,886
54,830
9.0%
1.4
56,161
8.3%
1.4
7,092
5,233
3,576
2,824
18,725
3.1%
0.5
25,867
3.8%
0.6
134,288
61,483
338,318
70,890
604,979
100%
15.3
673,423
100%
16.6
Other reasons
TOTAL
% of business scope
in France
The average number of days of absence per employee was 15 in
2007 (including 5 days for maternity leave).
94%
97%
The overall number of days of absence fell by 10.2%. The decline
related to all categories but was more significant in “illness of
3 days or less” (down 30%) and “illness of more than 3 days”
(down 13%).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 145
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H) HEALTH AND SAFETY
2007
2006 *
Number of accidents
Management
Nonmanagement
Accidents in the workplace
181
536
Total
Management
Nonmanagement
Total
717
179
503
682
Accidents during travel to or from
the workplace
205
429
634
191
449
640
TOTAL
386
965
1,351
370
952
1,322
% of business scope in France
95%
91%
The accident frequency rate (number of accidents/average number
of employees) was 3.7% in 2007, up from 3.3% in 2006 *.
The total amount spent on crèches and on financial assistance for
employee childcare was more than €7 million.
In 2007, 670 meetings were held with the various Councils for
Occupational Safety, Health and Working Conditions (CHSCTs)
and over €38 million was spent on prevention to protect employee
health and safety.
In addition, a health campaign was launched focusing on nutrition
and physical exercise, spearheaded by the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group and with a programme devised by two nutritionists, to be
conducted over two years. In addition to information campaigns, a
dedicated website has been set up to allow employees to benefit
from personalised monitoring for the duration of the programme.
A total of 3,200 employees have signed up.
Expenditure was down relative to 2006, relating mainly to the
French retail banking division as a result of a number of measures
to improve branch safety in 2006, as well as the reduction in
security costs in 2007.
51% of the average workforce (active permanent staff and contract
staff) had a medical consultation in 2007.
A 2008 calendar created by the Ligue Contre le Cancer, containing
tips and recipes using fruits and vegetables in order to improve
one’s personal health was also distributed to employees.
Four group entities have crèche facilities.
In 2007, a crèche was opened for Finaref employees.
I) TRAINING
2007
Management Non-management
Number of employees trained
Number of hours training
% of business scope in France
Total
Women
6,752
13,586
Men
8,936
6,149
20,338
15,085
TOTAL
15,688
19,735
35,423
Women
298,948
239,171
538,119
Men
308,606
153,665
462,271
TOTAL
607,554
392,836
1,000,390
98%
In 2007, 35,423 staff received training, or nearly 85% of active
permanent staff at year-end, up from 81% in 2006.
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group spent approximately 4% of its
aggregate payroll on training in 2007.
The number of hours of training provided in 2007 decreased by
11% relative to 2006. Training efforts concerned a larger number of
employees (up 4.3%).
Training efforts were focused on insurance, which accounted for
more than a third of training hours provided. Average expenditure
per employee trained was €660 in 2007.
Each employee trained attended sessions lasting an average of
28 hours.
*
2006 data have been adjusted in 2007 to take account of accidents in the workplace/accidents during travel to or from the workplace at LCL without stopping
work.
146 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
2007
Theme
2006
No. of hours
%
No. of hours
%
47,922
4.8%
40,246
3.6%
Knowledge of the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
Personnel and business management
82,324
8.2%
70,953
6.3%
Banking, law, economics
223,962
22.4%
291,468
25.9%
Insurance
336,887
33.7%
398,876
35.4%
Financial management (accounting, tax etc.)
39,574
4.0%
32,505
2.9%
Risk
39,483
3.9%
36,694
3.3%
7,567
0.8%
Compliance
Methodology, organisation, quality
14,007
1.4%
19,318
1.7%
Purchasing, marketing, distribution
14,208
1.4%
24,336
2.2%
IT systems, networks, telecommunications
36,785
3.7%
51,858
4.6%
Languages
50,764
5.0%
47,492
4.2%
Office systems, software, new information
and communication technology
37,945
3.8%
38,807
3.4%
Personal development, communication
37,765
3.8%
35,496
3.2%
Health and safety
15,039
1.5%
17,969
1.6%
Human rights and the environment
Human resources
TOTAL
% of business scope in France
1,390
0.1%
1,487
0.1%
14,771
1.5%
17,473
1.6%
1,000,390
100.0%
1,124,978
100.0%
97%
BREAKDOWN OF TRAINING TIME BY THEME
J) EMPLOYMENT OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES
A total of 125 employees with disabilities were hired at the end of
the 2005-2007 three-year agreement, ahead of the 110 required
under the Group agreement signed to encourage employment of
workers with disabilities. A number of innovative measures in 2007
allowed for the development of professional training programmes
for people with disabilities:
n in partnership with Crédit Agricole d’Ile de France, the Group
introduced a 14-month university diploma for customer advisor
positions within the bank network;
n creation with seven other banks of the Handiformabanque
association for training programmes headed by CFPB for call
centre and customer advisors;
n LCL agreement with the French national association for
professional training for adults;
More than 400 disabled employees have benefited from the
introduction of more than 1,560 measures to improve their working
conditions (workstation adjustments, financing for prostheses) or to
safeguard their jobs.
In January and March 2007, two “Grand Corps Malade” concerts
were attended by 750 employees and members of executive
management. Audio-visual equipment is provided by Councils for
Occupational Safety, Health and Working Conditions (CHSCTs)
and human resources departments. These efforts have helped to
change attitudes and behaviour towards disabled employees.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 147
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
At the end of 2007, 2,055 disabled employees registered in France
within the workforce. This therefore represents 2.67% of the core
workforce compared with 1.98% in 2006.
In addition, Crédit Agricole is making greater use of “adapted
companies”(1). Each time Crédit Agricole signs a contract with an
“adapted company”, it receives a “disabled worker employment
certificate”. The certificate carries a number of “credit units”, which
varies according to the size of the contract. Contracts signed
increased by 6x between 2006 and 2007 to more than 60 credit
units.
III. Crédit Agricole S.A. Group employees outside France
A) BREAKDOWN OF THE WORKFORCE OUTSIDE FRANCE
1) Breakdown and development of the workforce by business line and region
BREAKDOWN OF WORKFORCE OUTSIDE FRANCE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007 (FTE)
Continent
Business line
International retail banking
Western
Europe
Central and
Eastern
Europe
Africa
Middle East
(incl. Turkey)
Asia-Pacific
Americas
(North and
South)
Total
13,198
7,723
5,768
-
-
467
27,156
Specialised financial services
3,601
3,733
-
98
-
-
7,432
Insurance, asset management
and wealth management
3,280
-
-
-
205
276
3,761
Corporate and investment
banking
TOTAL
1,916
493
75
320
3,033
1,641
7,478
21,995
11,949
5,843
418
3,238
2,384
45,827
Business scope outside France
100%
Students and trainees in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s international subsidiaries make up almost 2.5% of their workforce on average.
(1) An “adapted company” (“entreprise adaptée”) is a company within the ordinary working environment at which at least 80% of employees are disabled, thereby
enabling them to work in conditions adapted to their abilities.
148 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
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BREAKDOWN OF WORKFORCE OUTSIDE FRANCE (FTE) BY REGION AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
BREAKDOWN OF WORKFORCE OUTSIDE FRANCE (FTE) BY BUSINESS LINE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
Europe now accounts for 75% of international employees with 100
or so subsidiaries. The largest foreign operations are:
n in Italy (9,300 FTE at seven subsidiaries);
n in Greece (6,160 FTE at 10 subsidiaries);
n in Poland (6,000 FTE at four subsidiaries);
n in Ukraine (3,780 FTE at two subsidiaries).
CHANGE IN WORKFORCE OUTSIDE FRANCE (FTE) FOR CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. GROUP BETWEEN 2006 AND 2007
Continent
Western
Europe
Central and
Eastern
Europe
Africa
International retail banking
+82.3%
+15.8%
+5.9%
Specialised financial services
+46.3%
+7.4%
Insurance, asset management
and wealth management
+0.2%
Business line
Middle East
(incl. Turkey)
Asia-Pacific
Americas
(North and
South)
Total
+7.6%
+37.2%
N.M.
+25.2%
+7.9%
+220.9%
+5.9%
Corporate and investment
banking
+11.4%
+4.9%
+21.0%
+28.0%
+19.9%
-1.8%
+11.6%
TOTAL
+49.7%
+12.5%
+6.1%
+64.6%
+19.0%
+8.8%
+27.4%
Business scope outside France
100%
NM: Not meaningful.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 149
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
Main changes in scope:
n acquisition of Cariparma and FriulAdria and consolidation of 202
Banca Intesa branches (+6,807 FTE);
More than 80% of the increase in international employees results
from changes in scope. The remaining 20% relates to organic
growth, in particular in retail banking and specialised financial
services in Central and Eastern Europe.
n consolidation of Fiat Auto Financial Services (+914 FTE);
n international expansion of CACEIS (+442 FTE);
n reduction in scope of Emporiki Group (-540 FTE).
2) Proportion of women in the workforce outside France
Continent
Western
Europe
Central and
Eastern
Europe
Africa
International retail banking
47.3%
67.7%
38.1%
Specialised financial services
53.2%
60.1%
Insurance, asset management
and wealth management
45.2%
Business line
Middle East
(incl. Turkey)
Asia-Pacific
Americas
(North and
South)
Total
34.9%
52.6%
19.4%
54.1%
48.2%
41.8%
45.3%
Corporate and investment
banking
32.6%
58.9%
51.4%
54.2%
49.0%
33.1%
38.7%
TOTAL
46.5%
66.8%
38.3%
21.4%
48.9%
33.8%
50.5%
Business scope outside France
91%
Ratio calculated on the basis of permanent and contract staff by number of people.
The proportion of women in the workforce outside France decreased
by 2 percentage points relative to last year. This is mainly as a result
of structural effects relating to the various acquisitions carried out
over the year, in particular those in Italy (Cariparma and FriulAdria).
The Corporate and Investment Banking division employees the
lowest proportion of women.
3) Breakdown of workforce by category
Category
Total
% of
business
scope
International retail banking
1.0%
20.3%
78.6%
100%
100%
Specialised financial services
4.4%
14.1%
81.5%
100%
82%
Insurance, asset management and wealth management
3.2%
25.0%
71.8%
100%
77%
Corporate and investment banking
5.9%
27.1%
67.0%
100%
56%
TOTAL
2.0%
20.8%
77.2%
100%
89%
Business line
150 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Top Manager
Manager Non Manager
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B) CHANGES IN THE WORKFORCE OUTSIDE FRANCE
INCOMING STAFF
Incoming
Region
Incoming/
existing
Incoming/
ratio * existing ratio *
– permanent
– contract
% of
business
scope
Permanent
Contract
Total
Western Europe (excluding France)
2,250
1,084
3,334
12.1%
142.8%
Central and Eastern Europe
3,398
2,892
6,290
36.6%
137.4%
98%
440
585
1,025
9.5%
51.4%
100%
97
-
97
78.9%
0.0%
49%
Asia-Pacific
307
104
411
23.4%
71.3%
44%
Americas (North and South)
386
14
400
18.6%
28.0%
90%
6,878
4,679
11,557
19.1%
111.4%
91%
Africa
Middle East (including Turkey)
TOTAL
93%
* Ratio: number of incoming staff (permanent and contract) in year N relative to average yearly headcount for the business scope concerned in year N.
The 23% increase in recruitment compared with 2006 relates
primarily to the effect of changes in scope following the consolidation
of Cariparma and FriulAdria (60%) and a wider scope of data
collection in 2007 in Poland (20%).
Points of note include:
n significant use of temporary staff in Europe;
n an increase in recruitment in the Middle East relating to the
creation of a subsidiary;
n inflows of staff that do not take account of transfers from Banca
Intesa.
OUTGOING STAFF
Departures
Outgoing/
Outgoing/
existing ratio * existing ratio
Total – permanent
– contract
% of
business
scope
Permanent
Of which %
resigning
Western Europe
(excluding France)
1,853
46%
731
2,584
10.0%
96.3%
Central and Eastern Europe
2,075
44%
2,863
4,938
22.3%
136.0%
98%
388
68%
389
777
8.3%
34.2%
100%
Region
Africa
Middle East (including Turkey)
Asia-Pacific
Americas (North and South)
TOTAL
Contract
93%
11
55%
-
11
8.9%
0.0%
49%
229
89%
54
283
17.4%
36.7%
44%
270
72%
14
284
13.0%
28.0%
90%
4,826
50%
4,051
8,877
13.4%
96.5%
91%
* Ratio: number of outgoing staff (permanent and contract) in year N relative to average yearly headcount for the business scope concerned in year N.
In addition to resignations, which accounted for half of permanent
staff departures, nearly 20% of departures were retirements or early
retirements (primarily in Western Europe).
Half of departures were women.
n the increase in the number of employees and therefore the
increase in associated movements;
n an increase in retirements at Emporiki as a result of favourable
retirement terms (representing 12% of the increase).
The 39% increase in departures of permanent staff relative to 2006
was due to a number of factors:
n the effect of changes in scope, with wider coverage (84-91%)
and newly consolidated entities (with Italy accounting for 8% of
the increase);
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C) AGE AND LENGTH OF SERVICE
AVERAGE AGE OF STAFF OUTSIDE FRANCE
Continent
Western
Europe
Central and
Eastern
Europe
Africa
International retail banking
42.9
33.4
42.3
Specialised financial services
35.7
32.7
Insurance, asset management and
wealth management
39.2
35.9
32.9
Corporate and investment banking
38.1
37.1
39.1
34.1
38.7
40.5
38.9
TOTAL
41.1
33.4
42.2
32.5
38.4
40.8
39.1
Business line
Business scope outside France
There are major disparities in the age structure outside France
depending on the region and business line.
Middle East
(including
Turkey)
Asia-Pacific
Americas
(North and
South)
Total
43.0
39.7
31.0
34.8
38.8
91%
In Western Europe and Africa, one-third of employees are aged
under 35.
Two-thirds of employees within sales networks in retail banking
or specialised financial services in Central and Eastern Europe
(Ukraine, Poland etc.) are aged under 35.
BREAKDOWN OF PERMANENT STAFF OUTSIDE FRANCE
BY AGE BRACKET
BREAKDOWN OF PERMANENT STAFF OUTSIDE FRANCE
BY LENGTH OF SERVICE BRACKET
Out of 60 entities with more than 50 employees, more than 20 - primarily in retail banking (covering more than 20,000 employees) - have a
bonus system relating to length of service.
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D) TRAINING
Region
Training expenditure
(% of payroll)
Western Europe (excluding France)
0.8%
Training expenditure
Hours training
Number
of training courses
Relative to average headcount *
€598
29.7
2.9
Central and Eastern Europe
2.2%
€297
24.5
1.2
Africa
2.2%
€340
42.4
1.8
Middle East (including Turkey)
0.4%
€460
3.0
0.8
Americas (North and South)
0.6%
€828
12.3
2.6
Asia-Pacific
1.3%
€1,153
23.5
1.9
INTERNATIONAL
1.0%
€503
29.6
2.2
72%
72%
74%
86%
% of business scope
*
The denominator for ratios concerning professional training is the average annual number of permanent and contract staff for the business scope concerned.
BREAKDOWN OF TRAINING TIME BY THEME
Business scope outside France: 74%.
»
KEY COMMUNITY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
3 1. Community and cultural
sponsorship
3 2. Regional impact and development
Amounts donated by major Crédit Agricole Group entities in 2007
Amount invested in
local development and
support initiatives
Crédit Agricole S.A. (excluding subsidiaries)
Details about these initiatives can be found on the Group’s
website.
€3.6M
Regional Banks
€18M
Fondation du Crédit Agricole Pays de France
€1.2M
Crédit Agricole Solidarité et Développement
€0.7M
Fondation Solidarité Mutualiste
€0.2M
Reconstruction en Asie du Sud fund
For a number of years, the Regional Banks have been involved in
regional development and economic integration initiatives.
€2M
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KEY ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
3 1. Internal policy
A) Internal initiatives
TAKING ACCOUNT OF DIRECT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
AT CRÉDIT AGRICOLE IMMOBILIER
Crédit Agricole Immobilier, a subsidiary of Crédit Agricole S.A., is the
Group’s real estate arm, covering nearly all of its real estate activities
(with the exception of real estate financing): development, asset
management, public and private sector contracting management,
rental property management, transactions and property used in
operations.
Crédit Agricole Immobilier manages the Group’s operating premises
across four sites in the Paris region, with total floor space of
500,000 m² in 2007.
n bringing all sites managed by the Operating Premises department
up to standard in terms of energy and water consumption
management:
n standardisation of reporting procedures, distributed to all business
line technical managers;
n involving service providers and suppliers in the initiative:
n systematic inclusion in contracts of environmental clauses
specifying in particular the obligation to use “100% green”
cleaning products for office maintenance and abolishing the use
of phytosanitary products in green spaces;
n raising the awareness of the occupants of the 500,000 m² under
management:
n implementation of selective sorting,
n installation of more than 25,000 office waste bins.
Having made a commitment to an environmental policy since
2006, Crédit Agricole Immobilier demonstrated its desire in 2007 to
reinforcing and enhancing its achievements in this area.
From 2008, further measures will be taken to continue to make
buildings more energy efficient:
As part of this aim, the position of Head of Sustainable Development
was created within Crédit Agricole Immobilier.
n abolition of incandescent light bulbs and replacement with
This person, who reports to the Operating Premises department, is
responsible for the distribution and monitoring of CSR efforts within
the various divisions of Crédit Agricole Immobilier and relations with
Crédit Agricole S.A.’s Sustainable Development Mission.
n feasibility studies into two high energy consumption buildings
In addition, the management process for the Sites and Services
business line, which covers operating premises activities, obtained
ISO 14001 certification in 2007.
Crédit Agricole Immobilier has implemented a number of initiatives
in keeping with this certification concerning:
n the creation of a system for controlling its environmental impact:
n appointment of an environmental correspondent in charge of
applying the provisions of ISO 14001 certification,
n implementation of Group environmental reporting in order to
optimise management of energy consumption (electricity, gas
and district heating) and water consumption for premises in the
Paris region,
n creation of an Environmental Quality Management team,
comprising technical managers for each unit in the Paris region,
the main purpose of which is to improve the energy efficiency of
buildings by setting quantitative and qualitative targets.
The group met once a month in 2007 and defined a number of
measures to reduce energy and water consumption, such as
optimising use of heating and air conditioning and management
of office lighting;
low- energy bulbs;
to define works to be carried out with a view to obtaining HQE
(High Environmental Quality) certification, following the results
of energy audits of the buildings performed in collaboration with
EDF in 2007. Other energy audits for 2008 are currently being
considered;
n enlargement of the scope of energy and water consumption
monitoring to outside the Paris region with the implementation
of a reporting system for Crédit Agricole S.A. Group premises
in France (Calyon, LCL, Sofinco etc.), Greece (Emporiki Bank,
Calyon, etc.) and Poland (LUKAS Bank, Calyon, etc.).
AWARENESS RAISING
On the occasion of the 2007 Sustainable Development week,
Crédit Agricole S.A. showed employees the Al Gore documentary
“An Inconvenient Truth” about the risk of climate change.
A number of Group companies, such as Eurofactor and CACEIS,
also showed the film during the year.
In addition, online information available since 2005 on the Group’s
intranet site has helped to raise employee awareness within an
educational framework about sustainable development issues
and measures taken by Crédit Agricole within this area. This was
updated in 2007 and was certified by the Ministry of Ecology and
Sustainable Development in 2005.
WASTE
In 2007, paper recycling facilities were installed at Crédit Agricole S. A.
Group sites in the Paris region, managed by subsidiary Crédit
Agricole Immobilier.
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Segmented office waste bins to allow for paper to be separated from
other waste have been installed at all premises (i.e. 500,000 m²).
Employees are therefore encouraged to sort their office waste.
Cleaning companies now collect paper using twin container
trucks.
Extended to all of the Group’s sites in the Paris region in 2006,
the battery and ink cartridge collection and recycling system has
allowed for the collection of nearly 760 kg and the reconditioning of
7,940 kg of cartridges (excluding LCL).
At the end of 2007, SILCA (Crédit Agricole S.A.’s IT production
economic interest group) launched a system for the recycling of
obsolete IT equipment.
This project, initiated in 2006, consists of two phases:
n deletion of hard disk contents by in-house staff using a software
application validated by the Group’s security bodies;
n assessment of the working condition of equipment, which is then
sent for sorting at workshops owned by Emmaüs as part of its
partnership with Crédit Agricole S.A.
Equipment in working order will be reused by Emmaüs (1). Equipment
that is no longer usable will be destroyed in an environmentallyfriendly manner.
This also fits in with the Group’s social concerns, as it allows for
the optimisation of Crédit Agricole S.A. premises near Tours and
safeguards Crédit Agricole S.A. Group employees’ jobs in the
region.
Currently in its early stages, this project received strong support
from the staff concerned and should gain momentum gradually in
2008.
ENERGY
The carbon footprint of the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s operations
in the Paris region was assessed in 2006.
On the basis of the results of this assessment, the Sustainable
Development committee has set up three working parties to look
at measures to be taken to reduce the company’s impact on
the environment. The assessment revealed the contribution of
energy usage, transportation and procurement to greenhouse gas
emissions.
Three cross-departmental groups have been set up to address
these issues. The first two began operation in 2007 and the third
will be established in 2008:
n the energy management group met once a quarter and returned
its conclusions at the end of last year. In-depth energy audits
were carried out at three buildings and measures to improve
building management were implemented. Further audits will be
carried out in 2008;
n the transport group met twice and devised transportation rules for
France, encouraging train travel for all journeys of less than three
and a half hours. More structural measures such as a “company
travel plan” are being reviewed;
n the procurement group is due to meet in the first half of 2008.
However, the logistics department has already carried out an indepth study into paper purchasing.
The Sustainable Development committee, in accordance with the
proposals of the energy management group, has revised its target
for reducing the group’s energy consumption. The target of a 10%
reduction in one year, which was judged difficult to achieve in the
changing office environment, has been revised to a 15% reduction
in energy consumption in three years. The Group has therefore
reasserted its long-term target of reducing its impact on the
environment and its plans of action are now known.
In order to combat climate change effectively, the Sustainable
Development committee decided to offset the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group’s energy emissions. Two initiatives have been implemented
in this respect:
n the planting of a forest in France. In collaboration with a
technical partner, Crédit Agricole will oversee the choice of
species planted, the method of planting, the initial land used and
precise assessment of the amount of carbon dioxide stored. A
biodiversity assessment will also be carried out in collaboration
with an environmental association;
n purchasing of emission reduction certificates regulated by the
United Nations’ CDM (2) initiative. The project will form part of
a general sustainable development approach and focus on
biomass energy production.
B) Energy and water consumption
As in the last two years, an energy and water consumption
audit was carried out of part of the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s
operations in the Paris region (i.e. 500,000 m²), managed by Crédit
Agricole Immobilier.
The study concerned premises in the Paris region divided between
four of the five areas managed by Crédit Agricole Immobilier (i.e.
nearly 90% of the total scope managed).
However, due to changes to the Group’s property portfolio in 2007,
2007 data will be published on a like-for-like basis and on the basis
of the new overall scope, including a new indicator.
In addition, greenhouse gas emissions are also expressed as
tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent depending on the different
energy sources.
(1) French association working to combat poverty, oppression and exclusion.
(2) Clean Development Mechanism.
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COMPARISON OF ENERGY AND WATER CONSUMPTION BETWEEN 2006 AND 2007
% change
(like-for-like)
Unit
2006 consumption
2007 consumption
Water
m3
270,902
219,452
-18.99%
Gas
m3
360,924
418,775
+16.03%
Electricity
kWh
98,516,624
97,092,142
-1.45%
District heating
kWh
9,936,804
8,758,061
-11.86%
In addition, the number of meters for the same scope increased in
2007 compared with 2006.
Trends observed
Water
The reduction in water consumption of nearly 19% relates
primarily to optimisation of the use of emergency air conditioning
units.
Gas
The increase of more than 16% in gas consumption is mainly due
to heat reclaiming units not being used at one of the sites following
a change of service provider.
Electricity
The reduction in energy consumption relates primarily to the
introduction of the new standard (switching on air conditioning
only when the internal temperature reaches 26°).
The reduction of nearly 12% in consumption of district heating
was due to the reduction in surface area measured and
optimisation of heating regulations.
ENERGY AND WATER CONSUMPTION
TO 31 DECEMBER 2007
The total scope managed by Crédit Agricole Immobilier and for
which the Group is occupier of the four major sites in the Paris
region concerned amounted to more than 483,000 m² in 2007.
However, only consumption for which the Group pays directly is
taken into account in the following table. Consumption hidden in
rental costs cannot be recognised at present.
Scope covered
Scope concerned
Consumption
Ratio
55%
263,583 m²
241,912 m3
0.92 m3/m²
84,596 m² *
3
418,775 m
4,327,914 kWh
4.95 m3/m²
51.16 kWh/m²
97%
470,916 m²
99,205,382 kWh
210.66 kWh/m²
100%
117,438 m² *
10,415,312 kWh
88.68 kWh/m²
Water
Gas
100%
Electricity
District heating
*
District heating
Only a small proportion of buildings within the scope taken into account uses gas (17% of surface area measured) or district heating (24% of surface area).
This explains the low surface areas in the table. However, the figures provided correspond to 100% of meters installed at these sites.
In 2007, total energy consumption (gas, electricity and district
heating) came to 350.5 kWh per m². According to IPD (1), average
energy consumption for commercial offices was 327 kWh per m².
GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS EXPRESSED
AS TONNES OF CARBON DIOXIDE EQUIVALENT
DEPENDING ON DIFFERENT SOURCES OF ENERGY
USED DIRECTLY AT SITES
tCO2 equivalent*
Gas
Electricity
District heating
TOTAL
889
3,983
2,031
6,903
* Source of conversion factors: official figures from Group energy suppliers.
(1) Services company created in 1985 specialising in property market analysis.
156 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
In 2007, total greenhouse gas emissions in the energy sector came
to 6,903 tCO2 for the scope in question (483,000 m²), equivalent to
0,000013% of total greenhouse gas emissions in France in 2006
(541 million tonnes).
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3 2. External initiatives
A) Launch of LDD savings account and energy
savings loan
At the start of 2007, Codevi was replaced by the “Livret
développement durable” (LDD) savings account and the maximum
savings amount was raised from €4,600 to €6,000.
In connection with the LDD scheme, Crédit Agricole launched
the “PEE” energy savings loan in April 2007, providing financing
under preferential terms for energy-saving works in old homes,
such as insulation, solar heating, wood burners, windows etc.
Customers can benefit from a deferred payment period. At the end
of January 2008, 7,300 loans had been granted by 35 Regional
Banks, representing a total of €66 million. This is a satisfying result
for a strong-growth area and a service that has only really available
to customers since June.
Crédit Agricole is considering updating its environmental product
range developed in April 2006. The aim is to offer Regional
Bank customers products allowing them to invest in favourable
environmental processes while also benefiting from the best
financial terms.
B) Financing environmental investment
Certain Crédit Agricole S.A. subsidiaries also provide financing for
environmentally-friendly investments.
n In 2007, Unifergie – the Group’s Sofergie unit (fund for energy
efficient investments in industry) – continued its developments in
the fields of energy and environmental protection.
Achievements in 2007 include:
n involvement in the financing of a 62 MW electricity production
plant on Reunion island using bagasse (sugar cane residue) and
coal. Electricity produced by the plant is bought by EDF to cover
the island’s requirements,
n the financing of an eco-site (household and non-hazardous
industrial waste collection and treatment equipment) as part of a
public service contract for 110 local and industrial authorities in
the Essonne region.
In addition, Unifergie continued to support the development of
the wind energy sector in France with the construction of 15 new
wind farms representing output of 122 MW, bringing the total to
nearly 490 MW.
Lastly, Unifergie launched a new financing solution for
photovoltaic solar panels at the end of 2007. The development
of this market will concern primarily the renovation of roofs
through the installation of solar panels producing electricity,
which is sold back to EDF over a period of 20 years. Unifergie
has introduced a project evaluation system (technical ratings,
projected revenues, legal package) with which to offer its
expertise in supporting the Regional Banks and its clients and
prospects in obtaining financing.
n Crédit Agricole Private Equity, which endeavours to take
environmental considerations into account in its activities, looks
to support company managers implementing a research and
development policy with the aim of limiting the adverse effects of
their production on the environment.
It was with this in mind that in 2006 the Group’s private
equity subsidiary launched the first institutional venture capital
fund (“FCPR”) for renewable energies (wind energy, biomass,
hydroelectricity, solar thermal and photovoltaic power, geothermal
energy, biofuels etc.), as well operating infrastructures for the
sector (wind energy, biomass etc.).
The strategy of this “renewable energies” fund is to invest in
companies, such as developers, specialist real estate developers,
equipment manufacturers and operators, as well as to finance
energy projects. Capenergie’s investments currently stand at
€100 million, a quarter of which has already been used in six
projects.
n In 2007, Calyon continued with its initiatives to finance renewable
energy projects, which form an integral part of its Project Finance
business. Over the last 10 or so years, Calyon has made a
commitment to the sector, financing its first wind farms in 1997.
Wind energy projects now account for 10% of financing for
electricity production projects.
Calyon also arranged the financing of a solar energy project for
the first time in 2007. The project concerned two solar powered
ovens in southern Spain, each with output of 50 MW.
Calyon also supported the construction of the first Antarctic
research station, Princess Elisabeth, designed to run entirely on
renewable energies.
Calyon’s French regional unit sponsored all of the solar panels for
the new polar station, inaugurated in Brussels in September 2007
as part of the International Polar Year, in the presence of Prince
Philippe of Belgium and explorer Alain Hubert. The station is
planned to last for at least 25 years. It will be open to research
scientists from November to February 2008, during the austral
summer.
n Emporiki Bank has also supported the development of renewable
energies and co-generation procedures, providing financing
of €180 million for projects in these sectors representing total
capacity of over 335 MW.
C) Partnerships, external initiatives
In 2007, Crédit Agricole continued with its efforts to encourage the
development of more environmentally-friendly agriculture.
It has renewed its partnership with the Farre (1) association, initiated
in 2003. In a similar vein, it has also formed a partnership with
Agence Bio.
In addition, since 2006, Crédit Agricole has supported the work of
the French birds protection league in the area of “Agriculture and
biodiversity”.
(1) Forum for environmentally-friendly agriculture.
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Since 2007, Calyon has been involved in a three-year programme
to preserve the diversity and the development of a community
in China, spearheaded by Heifer International. This not-for-profit
»
association is dedicated to combating hunger around the world
by providing animals and training to help poor families to become
independent, while training them to the protection of environment.
SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS
IN THE CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. GROUP’S CORE BUSINESSES
3 1. The Equator Principles
directly into the Crédit Agricole Group’s sustainable development
policy.
In June 2003, 10 banks - including Calyon - publicly declared
their desire to adopt a system of shared environmental and social
criteria known as the Equator Principles (EP). Today, more than
50 financial institutions have voluntarily made a commitment
to respect these principles, confirming their solid foundations
and their role as a central standard. This approach is integrated
The Equator Principles constitute a methodological support for
factoring social and environmental impacts into the project finance
process. They allow for the assessment of the risks relating to
the environmental and social impacts of projects of more than
€10 million.
PROJECT CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM
Project classification is based on International Finance Corporation (IFC) classification, which comprises three levels: A, B and C.
A corresponds to a project presenting potentially significant negative social or environmental impacts that are uniform, irreversible
or unprecedented. B corresponds to a project presenting limited negative social or environmental impacts, generally relating to one
site, that are largely reversible and easy to resolve. Lastly, C corresponds to projects presenting minimal or no negative social or
environmental impacts.
Following the revision of IFC environmental and social standards and
after consultation with a group of clients and NGOs, the signatory
banks proposed a revised set of Equator Principles (EP2).
The aim of EP2 is to allow for clearer and broader application of the
principles while still respecting the balance between constraints
and demands. New standards have also been adopted, primarily
concerning social issues (in particular relating to working conditions:
union freedom, combating discrimination etc.) in accordance with
local legislation.
As part of an ever-growing effort to ensure transparency, the EP2
signatories are now committed to making public information about
procedures for the implementation of the Equator Principles and
statistics about the categorisations of projects studied on an annual
basis.
The re-adoption of the Equator Principles in 2006 was the result of
a collaborative process between the various signatory banks, their
158 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
clients and civil society. In 2007, this example of good governance
received a Financial Times Sustainability Award, awarded jointly to
the 11 main personalities from the banking sector who made the
project possible. Calyon’s pro-active approach has been rewarded
by the head of implementation of the Equator Principles, who in
September 2007 became head of Sustainable Development at
Calyon.
Improvement in project assessment
Since January 2007, Calyon has had a new IT system developed in
collaboration with Sustainable Finance Limited.
The methodology in the form of an assessment grid now allows
for more consistent, standard and detailed rating of projects
depending on their business sector (oil and gas industry, electricity
product, infrastructures etc.) and location.
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Based on EP2, the areas looked at are based directly on International
Finance Corporation environmental and social performance criteria
and cover the majority of potential impacts through more precise
questions. A project’s final rating is now given directly by the expert
system, which also carries out consistency checks between the
various answers.
The tool also looks at the client’s environmental and social
prerogatives and its ability to observe them.
Assessment of new transactions and portfolio
At Calyon, the adoption of the Equator Principles has been
developed on the initiative of the Project Finance team. The
assessment and management of environmental and social risks is
carried out initially by business managers, assisted by a network of
local EP correspondents who provide the support required within
each Project Finance regional structuring centre in permanent
collaboration with a Coordination Unit.
The Industry and Sector Research unit, an integral part of Crédit
Agricole S.A., provides support and additional information via its
expertise in environmental and social issues, allowing for more
refined analysis and identification of risks, depending on the
business sector.
This unit, consisting of operational staff from the project finance
business, co-ordinates the practical aspects of implementing the
Equator Principles. It manages the network of local correspondents
provides special training for staff concerned.
The Equator Principles Committee is responsible for monitoring
implementation of the assessment and management of
environmental and social risks based on the Equator Principles
2 Charter. Created in 2006, the committee meets formally at least
twice a year and validates the classification of projects as A, B or C.
However, specific consultations are held for all issues likely to be
rated A and for any urgent matters.
In 2007, Calyon assessed 123 projects: six were given an A rating,
103 were given a B rating and 14 were given a C rating.
At the end of 2007, all projects in Calyon’s portfolio had been
assessed by business managers and the risk management
department. With a few exceptions requiring additional information,
these projects were reviewed and validated by the Equator
Principles Committee.
A total of 433 projects were rated. 27 were given an A rating, 358
were given a B rating and 48 were given a C rating.
INVOLVEMENT IN COLLECTIVE EFFORTS
TO IMPROVE THE EP APPROACH
In 2007, working parties were set up within the group of
EP banks to look at issues as diverse and important as corporate
governance, sharing of best practices and dialogue with civil
society. Calyon headed up the group focusing on the latter issue
and which was more specifically in charge of organising a meeting
held on 4 December 2007 in Amsterdam between 18 EP banks
and 15 NGOs. Items on the agenda, devised jointly with Banktrack
(a network comprising a number of environmental and/or human
rights NGOs), included matters such as corporate governance,
transparency and the mechanism for settling grievances at project
level.
Dialogue with civil society concerning these important issues will
continue in 2008 with the aim of achieving ongoing improvement in
the quality of how environmental and social aspects are taken into
account in banking activities.
The review of the major corporate governance principles initiated in
2007 by the group of EP banks should also be completed in 2008.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 159
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BREAKDOWN OF PROJECTS BY RATING AND BY COUNTRY OF PRESENCE
BREAKDOWN OF PROJECTS BY SECTOR AND BY COUNTRY OF PRESENCE
3 2. Responsible equity research
Developed in 2005, socially responsible research at Cheuvreux,
Calyon’s brokerage subsidiary, has been fully integrated into its
“conventional” equity research. All analysts endeavour to identify
corporate social responsibility (CSR) problems and challenges at
each company.
Since 2006, Calyon has also been involved in the Quantitative
Finance and Sustainable Development Chair in partnership with
EDF and under the aegis of Institut Europlace de Finance.
CAAM has also included financial analysis in its research since the
end of 2000.
The extra-financial analysis team produces an assessment of the
company including economic, environmental, social and corporate
governance factors. In April 2007, CAAM launched a Scientific
Committee, made up of people from the worlds of science,
culture, politics and economics, to look at environmental, social
and corporate governance issues and their impact on investment
activities.
CAAM is also involved in the organisation and financing of the
first “Sustainable Development and Responsible Investment”
academic chair and the Responsible Investment Forum (FIR) prize
for “Finance and Sustainable Development”.
160 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
3 3. The principles for responsible
investment
By adopting the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) in
2006, CAAM Group is one of the first 70 signatories of this initiative
and has reasserted its commitment and that of its subsidiaries
(IDEAM, its CSR subsidiary, and also CPR AM) to supporting
responsible finance.
CAAM Group supports this initiative, which corresponds to its view
of investors as playing a central and financially responsible role,
obliged to take all material factors into account in their investment
management, including environmental, social and corporate
governance issues.
In 2007, CAAM Group continued with the implementation of PRI on
the basis of a number of axes, including equity research (see above)
and its voting policy.
CAAM Group has taken an active approach to voting in the AGMs
of investee companies since 1996. Since 2003, it has incorporated
social and environmental criteria into its voting policy worldwide.
CAAM Group takes a proactive stance: It holds pre-AGM
discussions with companies, informing them of motions against
which it is planning to vote.
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In 2007, 50% of companies replied to letters sent out compared
with 30% in 2006, which represents a significant increase.
The dialogue created has resulted in certain companies making
commitments, which have enabled CAAM to change its voting
procedures.
In particularly complicated cases, it convenes voting committee
meetings attended by asset managers and analysts and chaired by
the head of asset management.
AGM VOTING BY CAAM IN 2007
Number of AGMs in which CAAM voted
n in France
n internationally
2,885
179
2,706
Number of motions voted on
Number of motions on which CAAM:
n voted against
n abstained
Particularly concerning the following themes:
n directors’ terms of office
n executive compensation
n capital increases
22,006
2,596
898
420
436
480
Motions put forward by shareholders and supported by CAAM,
particularly on the following themes:
n corporate governance (executive compensation and terms
of office, anti-takeover poison pills, contributions to political
parties)
n social and human rights issues (ILO agreements,
anti-discrimination measures, supplier code
of conduct)
n environment, health and safety (climate change, GM crops)
»
537
As part of its policy of dialogue with shareholders, CAAM - as well
as its CSR subsidiary, IDEAM - supports the Carbon Disclosure
Project (CDP), the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative
(EITI), the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC)
and the Pharmaceutical Shareowner Group (PSG). These are
collective and coordinated international initiatives with the aim
of encouraging companies to improve their practices and public
authorities to adopt incentive measures.
CAAM also intends to apply the transparency rules it expects of
companies to itself. In 2007, CAAM asked extra-financial rating
agency VIGEO to assess its environmental and social responsibility
and corporate governance.
3 4. Proprietary investment
In 2007, the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group made the following decisions
concerning the management of its proprietary investments:
n the Group bans any direct investment in the form of shares,
dedicated funds or investment mandates in companies involved
in the manufacture or sale of anti-personnel mines under the
Ottawa Convention;
n regarding companies involved in submunition bombs, the Group
378
also intends to act responsibility and is involved in a working party
to define submunition bombs, which is a key stage in identifying
companies involved in their manufacture, storage and/or sale.
99
60
KEY ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
A) Compliance business line
in the bank. Conversely, failure to comply with regulations can
result in penal sanctions, sanctions from regulators, legal disputes
with clients and, more generally, a risk of damaging the bank’s
reputation.
Compliance concerns the observance of legal and regulatory
requirements relating to banking activities. It reinforces the trust of
the parties involved (clients, staff, investors, regulators, suppliers)
The Crédit Agricole Group allocates significant human resources
to ensure the smooth running of its Compliance function in
accordance with the Group’s development.
3 1. Group compliance
DEVELOPMENT OF THE NUMBER OF COMPLIANCE STAFF
2004
Number of compliance staff
Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
Total number of employees
Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
2005
2006
2007
358
0.6%
431
0.7%
564
0.7%
580
2.8%
62,001
100%
62,112
100%
77,063
100%
85,000
100%
The role of Crédit Agricole’s Compliance function is to define
and implement a policy to prevent the risk of non-compliance,
which take the form of the risk of money laundering, financing of
terrorism, violation of embargos, market abuse, conflicts of interest,
insufficient advice etc.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 161
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The Compliance function must also ensure that effective systems
are in place to guarantee compliance. In order to this, it:
B) Integration of new entities in international
retail banking
n translates laws and regulations into Compliance procedures and
One of the highlights of the Group’s recent development has been
its international expansion with the acquisition of Greek bank
Emporiki in 2006 and that of Italian banks Cariparma and FriulAdria
in 2007.
manuals;
n ensures that employees are trained in compliance issues;
n advises operating staff by giving its opinion on transactions when
n checks that the system works properly and checks transactions.
In order to accompany the expansion of international retail banking
within a secure framework, Crédit Agricole S.A. has rolled out
compliance procedures based on FIDES procedures:
Reference texts provided by the Compliance function include:
n compliance officers have been appointed at each subsidiary
requested;
n the Compliance Charter, translated by the Group into 10 languages
and provided to all new employees;
n the FIDES group compliance programme defined in 2004,
comprising procedural memos;
n texts reflecting regulatory changes since 2004 in Compliance.
The Compliance training plan (FIDES) has been rolled out within the
Group both in France and abroad.
The majority of the Group’s employees have undergone training.
In addition, they have participated in a number of training
programmes, in particular compulsory training in combating money
laundering, in all areas of the Group. The knowledge developed by
employees was tested in early 2006 with a quiz. The participation
rate was 75%.
Training efforts continued in 2007 involving new recruits and
employees of newly consolidated entities. Training programmes are
systematically deployed in the Group’s new companies.
Lastly, increasing importance has been attached to controls and IT
equipment facilitating controls.
n The keystone of the control system, the Compliance Management
Committee, chaired by Crédit Agricole S.A.’s Corporate
Secretary, monitors the organisation of group compliance and
the implementation of procedures and training within the Group.
It takes note of the principal conclusions of audits as well as
any important letters, reports or statements of findings from a
regulator relating to laws and regulations in France or abroad,
as well as the remedial action undertaken. The committee meets
every month.
n The compliance function also carries out the following work:
n it maps risks, which allows for the assessment of risks of non-
compliance within the Group,
n it provides reports that allow for assessment of the compliance
system within the Group,
n it checks compliance with US securities relations which, under
the Bank Holding Company Act (BHCA), allows it to carry
out reporting on the group’s US entities and on US non-bank
companies,
n it provides latest-generation financial security tools designed
to signal suspicious activity, initially internally and then to the
relevant authorities (see C) Financial Security).
162 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
during their consolidation. Compliance Management Committees
have been set up, usually chaired by local Chief Executive
Officers;
n FIDES procedures have been transcribed to international retail
banking units and Product Compliance Committees (NAP
Committees) are up and running. FIDES training modules have
been rolled out in French, English, Greek and Polish;
n IT tools for the monitoring of flows have been implemented or
are planned in order to prevent money laundering and combat
financing of terrorism. These tools will be extended as necessary
to efforts to combat market abuse in accordance with EU
directives.
In addition, monthly reports are sent to the Compliance department
concerning system failures, as well as quarterly reports concerning
investments and divestments within the framework of the US Bank
Holding Company Act (BHCA) and half-yearly compliance reports
including updated mapping of non-compliance risks.
Furthermore, management of Compliance and Financial Security at
all of the Group’s subsidiaries has been reinforced with the creation
of the “International Compliance” unit at the Crédit Agricole S.A.
head office.
The roll-out of compliance procedures within the Group’s new
subsidiaries, in particular Cariparma and FriulAdria – the acquisition
of which was finalised on 1 March 2007 – will continue in 2008.
C) Financial security
As regards financial security, Crédit Agricole S.A.’s Compliance
department is in charge of preventing money laundering, combating
financing of terrorism and managing the freezing of assets and
embargos.
n The Compliance department therefore has specific mechanisms
to prevent:
n corruption
All new client relationships require specific authorisation or
validation at the appropriate level. This authorisation is based on
a satisfactory level of client knowledge. Each Group entity with a
relationship with a client must have a “know your customer” file.
If on collating such as file it emerges that the client or effective
beneficiary is a politically exposed person (PEP), the Financial
Security department is asked to conduct further investigations.
2007 MANAGEMENT
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
Remember that a politically exposed person is a person who
holds or has held an important public position in a foreign
country.
The Financial Security department consults specialist databases
to ensure that the politically exposed person is not involved in
any cases of corruption. These people are subject to heightened
surveillance measures.
n money laundering
On entering into any new client relationship, checks required
concerning identification of the client constitute an initial filter for
preventing money laundering.
Certain sectors that are deemed sensitive - casinos, gaming,
diamonds, gemstones, fine art, charitable organisations, banks
governed by sectarian rules - are subject to reinforced vigilance,
with systematic use of prior approval by the Financial Security
department.
n financing of terrorism
Efforts to combat financing of terrorism also involve diligence
measures carried out on entering into new business relationships
in order to find out about and identify the client.
n The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s Compliance department also
has a number of tools designed to detect suspicious transactions,
which after verification are passed on to the relevant authorities.
In France, TRACFIN is the relevant authority that receives and
deals with declarations of suspicious activity passed on to it by
the bank.
Crédit Agricole’s Financial Security department ensures that
embargos are respected in order to avoid freezing of assets. Sums
blocked by Crédit Agricole amounted to $62,000,000 in 2006 and
$14,943,347 in the first half of 2007.
When carrying out transactions, staff - who are duly trained in
and aware of measures to combat money laundering - look out
for unusual activity.
The tools used by the Group are described in the following table:
Name
Description
BACARAT
n This is a database containing information about incidents reported in all areas of the Group.
n The tool is used to determine whether a person has already triggered an alert in the past.
FIRCOSOFT
This is the name
of a company that
provides two tools.
FIRCOSOFT MESSAGE
FILTER
n This is a tool used within the framework of measures to combat financing of terrorism and respect
of embargos.
n It allows for real-time monitoring of international payment flows using SWIFT *.
n An alert is issued if suspected names are identified (cross-information with a list of terrorists)
and if a country under embargo is identified.
n There are five filtering platforms (Paris, London, Geneva/Monaco, Singapore and New York).
FIRCOSOFT FILE
FILTER
n Tool used within the framework of preventing financing of terrorism.
n It goes through client records and identifies terrorists.
NORKOM
n Profiling and account monitoring tool used to detect money laundering.
n All account movements are reviewed in order to detect unusual activity.
n The tool issues alerts that are analysed and can, if necessary, result in a declaration of suspicious activity.
FACTIVA
n This is a secure online tool identifying whether are person is known to be “politically exposed”
or whether a person is a terrorist.
SYLCAT
These are three
“home-made” tools that
will eventually
be replaced.
ACTIMIZE
*
TRACKER
n Request tool for international payment flows.
n This allows for the identification of clients working with countries deemed at risk.
MONITORING
n Equivalent of Norkom.
n Tool for detecting unusual activity on a client account within the framework of measures to combat
money laundering.
LIST
n Tool used within the framework of preventing financing of terrorism.
n It goes through client records and identifies terrorists.
n Tool for detecting money laundering in investment banking.
n The tool can also be used to detect market abuse and insider dealing.
SWIFT: Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication, the head office of which is in Brussels. It operates a worldwide communication system for exchanging “standardised
messages” between financial institutions.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 163
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The reinforcement of financial security and prevention of corruption
in 2007 form part of the application of the 10th principle of the
Global Compact.
Lastly, specific training in measures to combat money laundering is
provided to new employees and staff more specifically exposed to
money laundering risks.
Finally, Crédit Agricole is a member of Transparence International
France, the leading civil-society organisation dedicated to
combating corruption.
3 2. Relations with customers
D) Private banking
A) Customer relations management
One of the main duties of the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s Private
Banking business line in terms of sustainable development is
to ensure that its day-to-day activities comply with the Group’s
compliance principles.
For several years, Group companies developed their own
barometers and/or studies to survey customer satisfaction, as
well as to define priority measures to be taken in order to improve
customer satisfaction.
The Private Banking division has implemented the FIDES enhanced
compliance programme, involving:
In addition, each entity has developed methods appropriate to
their business in order to optimise the process for monitoring and
handling customer complaints.
n the appointment within each Private Banking entity of a compliance
officer responsible for adapting principles on a local level and the
application of Compliance measures;
n setting out formal procedures in a number of areas, concerning
primarily know-your-customer, and the implementation of specific
measures to combat money laundering.
Know-your-customer is a fundamental aspect of Private Banking
and must be documented appropriately, based primarily on a
“customer profile” providing all information required to identify the
person as well as their financial knowledge, sources of income and
the origin of their wealth.
Private Banking uses units independent of commercial functions
to analyse documentation and ensure its compliance within the
framework of the decision-making process.
Procedures exist concerning sensitive or high-risk clients.
In parallel with the know-your-customer system, in accordance
with the FIDES programme, Private Banking has also implemented
a system using a number of sophisticated tools to prevent money
laundering. This system comprises primarily the following:
n private Banking entities have tools for detecting suspect names;
n private Banking sites use systems to control incoming and
outgoing Swift transfers in order to detect undesirable names
relating to transfers initiated or received by clients;
n the Private Banking network has a number of systems to allow
for identification of PEPs (1) requiring specific diligence in relation
to combating money laundering;
n large Private Banking sites use tools for monitoring account
activity in order to detect and analyse deviations from expected
behaviour or so-called “at risk” transactions.
(1) Politically exposed persons.
164 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
As part of the implementation of the FIDES enhanced compliance
control programme, a New Activities and New Products Committee
(CONAP), comprising representatives of the Compliance
department, checks that all products and activities offered within
the Regional Bank network are referenced so that regulators can
ensure that they comply with legislative requirements, codes of
conduct and internal procedures relating to banking and financial
services activities.
Similar committees have been set up at LCL, Finaref, Sofinco,
Predica and Pacifica.
Lastly, one of the main events of 2007 was the introduction of the
Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID) (see Chairman’s
report presented to the annual general meeting of shareholders).
B) Quality approach
Many Group companies use or have used quality systems intended
chiefly to enhance customer satisfaction, develop customer
understanding among staff and achieve sustained improvements
in performance.
In 2007, the “Carrefours de la qualité” forums were launched.
The result of a joint project by IFCAM and Crédit Agricole S. A.,
these forums respond to the desire to share the experiences
of the Regional Bank networks and the Group’s business lines.
Participants are persons responsible for quality, organisation
and customer relations, all of whom are concerned within the
respective companies with improving the quality of service
received by customers, whether in terms of day-to-day customer
relations management or handling the services to which they are
entitled.
2007 MANAGEMENT
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Employee, social and environmental information in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
The Customer Relations team reports to the Intranet Quality
Organisation division, an integral part of the Group’s central
functions. This team is in charge of handling complaints sent to
the Group’s Executive Management and coordinating mediation in
liaison with regulatory authorities.
Within the division, the Quality Institute heads up a network of
around 100 quality correspondents from the majority of the Group’s
units and subsidiaries and designated by their managers. Serving
as a body to advise and support the Group’s subsidiaries, in 2007
the Quality Institute encouraged sharing of best practices internally
and externally in various areas such as process modelling,
documentary management, management of documentary loans or
process modelling, and helped entities to implement and run the
ISO 9001 management system.
33 ISO 30 certificates are currently held by the Group’s main
business lines (Retail Banking, Corporate and Investment Banking,
Asset Management and Specialised Financial Services, as well as
support functions), compared with 30 in 2006.
C) Product range
Crédit Agricole’s asset management subsidiary CAAM Group offers
socially responsible products. CAAM Group includes IDEAM, an
asset manager dedicated entirely to socially responsible investment
(SRI).
In 2007, SRI assets managed by the company amounted to more
than €1.37 billion. Assets under advised management (in the form
of an advisory mandate) represented a total of €1.2 billion.
During the year, IDEAM also enlarged its range of dedicated funds
and, under delegation by CAAM Luxembourg, manages a waterthemed fund called “CAAM Funds – Aqua Global”. IDEAM also
enhanced its range of solidarity-based products with the launch of
the danone.communities fund.
SRI and shared return funds are sold by the Regional Banks and
LCL.
SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTMENT
Product
Atout Valeurs Durables
Network
Crédit Agricole
Dynalion Développement Durable
LCL
Oblilion Développement Durable
LCL
Hymnos
Danone.communities
LCL
Crédit Agricole and LCL
SHARED-RETURN FUNDS
Product
Partial coupon
recipient
Network
Pacte Solidarité Logement
Crédit Agricole
Fondation Solidarité
Mutualiste
Pacte Vert Tiers Monde
Crédit Agricole
Fondation Solidarité
Mutualiste
FCP Habitat et Humanisme
LCL
Association Habitat et
Humanisme
Eurco Solidarité
LCL
Comité Catholique
contre la Faim et pour le
Développement
Partagis
LCL
Action contre la faim
In terms of employee savings, CAAM offers all of its clients the
CAAM LABEL SRI range, the name of the label granted by the
Comité Intersyndical de l’Épargne Salariale (CIES). The range
consists of seven socially responsible employee savings funds:
three “pure” money market, bond and equity funds, three “profiled”
funds (prudence, balance and dynamic) and one balanced
solidarity-based fund also accredited by FINANSOL, as a mark
of the organisation’s respect of solidarity and transparency criteria.
SRI employee savings funds grew by 59% in 2007 to €226 million.
During the year, CIES renewed its accreditation of the range for the
fourth year in a row.
3 3. Relations with suppliers
Since 2006, the Procurement, Logistics and Operational Security
department has been committed to a structured sustainable
development approach, supporting measures already taken.
At the end of 2007, a plan of action reconfirmed and supported the
department’s initial approach, thereby asserting its desire to pursue
a policy of sustainable procurement. This strategy is reflected by
concrete measures.
Within this framework, the position of head of Sustainable
Development was created within the Procurement department,
in order to ensure that the policies defined are pursued and to
implement measures over the long term.
A sustainable development questionnaire sent to suppliers at the
time of the invitation to tender was revised at the end of 2007 in
order to take better account of issues relating to the business sector
of the companies questioned, as well as their type of structure.
Analysis of the results of these questionnaires and the awarding of
a CSR rating will allow the Procurement, Logistics and Operational
Security department to devise a reference framework for CSR
qualified suppliers. The rating given will also be included in the
multicriteria analysis grid, thereby taking into account the quality
of suppliers’ CSR approach, although this does not constitute a
criterion for exclusion.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 165
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Mapping of risks by procurement area will alert procurement
officers of the requirements expected of suppliers concerning the
environmental and social quality of their products and/or services.
In order to assess the relevance of responses, procurement officers
will have a documentary base (toolbox) referring in particular to
labels and certifications required in order to limit CSR risks.
Certain services – in particular maintenance of green spaces,
printing, cleaning and recycling – can be assigned to disabilityfriendly companies, thereby highlighting the Group’s policy
concerning the integration of disabled persons.
For example, Crédit Agricole S.A.’s Procurement, Logistics and
Operational Security department, as well as other Group companies
such as LCL and Calyon, has worked for a number of years with
ANAÏS (Association Nationale d’Action et d’Insertion Sociale),
a sheltered workshop specialising in printing simple documents.
(1) Forest Stewardship Council.
(2) Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Schemes.
166 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
In collaboration with the Integration of Disabled Persons department,
the Procurement, Logistics and Operational Security department
has also developed a catalogue of advertising articles with the
disability-friendly company “La Sellerie Parisienne”.
As regards paper consumption, the Group recommends the use
of recycled paper, particularly for client communications that
use a large amount of paper. For other applications, in particular
communications, paper should be FSC (1) or PEFC (2) certified.
In terms of environmental issues, measures have been defined
that form part of a transportation policy intended to reduce carbon
dioxide emissions resulting from work-related travel by employees,
encouraging travel by train rather than air and the use of videoconferencing.
Lastly, a number of eco-offers will be included in a “sustainable
procurement” catalogue in 2008.
5
Financial statements
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007
approved by the Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting
of 4 March 2008 and submitted to the shareholders for approval
at the Annual General Meeting of 21 May 2008
168
GENERAL FRAMEWORK
168
INCOME STATEMENT
174
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
175
CHANGE IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
177
CASH FLOW STATEMENT
178
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
180
Statutory Auditors’ report on the consolidated financial statements
274
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French
Gaap – Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
276
BALANCE SHEET OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. (PARENT COMPANY) AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
276
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS
277
INCOME STATEMENT
278
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
279
Statutory Auditors’ report on the parent company financial statements
321
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 167
5
1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
Consolidated financial statements for the year
ended 31 December 2007 approved by the
Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its
meeting of 4 March 2008 and submitted to the
shareholders for approval at the Annual General
Meeting of 21 May 2008
The financial statements consist of the general framework, the income statement, the balance sheet, the statement of changes in shareholders’
equity, the cash flow statement and the Notes to the financial statements.
»
GENERAL FRAMEWORK
3 Legal presentation
Since the extraordinary General Meeting of 29 November 2001, the
company’s name is: Crédit Agricole S.A.
Registered office: 91-93 Boulevard Pasteur, 75015 Paris.
Registration number: 784 608 416, Paris Trade and Companies
Registry.
APE code: 651 D.
Crédit Agricole S.A. is a société anonyme with a Board of Directors
governed by ordinary company law and more specifically by Book II
of the Code de Commerce.
168 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Crédit Agricole S.A. is also subject to the provisions of the Code
Monétaire et Financier and more specifically articles L.512-47 et
seq. thereof.
Crédit Agricole S.A. was licensed as an authorised lending institution
in the mutual and co-operative banks category on 17 November
1984. As such, it is subject to oversight by the banking supervisory
authorities, and more particularly by the Commission Bancaire.
Crédit Agricole S.A. shares are admitted for trading on Eurolist
by Euronext Paris. Crédit Agricole S.A. is subject to the prevailing
stock market regulations, particularly with respect to public
disclosure obligations.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
A Bank with Mutual Roots
Crédit Agricole has a unified yet decentralised organisation,
handling financial, commercial and legal issues in a cohesive
manner, while encouraging decentralised responsibility. The Local
Banks (Caisses Locales) form the bedrock of the Group’s mutual
organisation. With 5.8 million members and 33,400 directors, they
play a key part in maintaining a strong local presence and close
relationships between the Group and its customers. The Local
Banks hold the bulk of the capital of the Regional Banks, which are
co-operative entities and fully-fledged banks. The Regional Banks
own SAS Rue La Boétie, which in turn holds the majority of Crédit
Agricole S.A.’s share capital. The Fédération Nationale du Crédit
Agricole (FNCA) acts as a consultative and representative body,
and as a means of expression for the Regional Banks.
In accordance with the provisions of the Code Monétaire et
Financier (Articles L. 511-31 and L. 511-32), as the central body of
Crédit Agricole, Crédit Agricole S.A. is responsible for exercising
administrative, technical and financial control over the institutions
affiliated to it in order to maintain a cohesive network (as defined in
article R. 512-18 of the Code Monétaire et Financier), ensure their
proper functioning and their compliance with all regulations and
legislation governing them. As such, it has the powers and ability to
take the measures required to guarantee the liquidity and solvency
of both the network as a whole and of each of the institutions
affiliated to it.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 169
5
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RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
170 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 171
5
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1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
3 Crédit Agricole internal relations
Internal financing mechanisms
Crédit Agricole has instituted a number of internal financing
mechanisms specific to it.
REGIONAL BANKS’ CURRENT ACCOUNTS
Each Regional Bank holds a current account with Crédit Agricole S.A.,
which records the movements of funds resulting from internal
financial transactions within Crédit Agricole. This account may be
in credit or debit. It is presented in the balance sheet under “Due
from banks” on a specific line item entitled “Crédit Agricole internal
transactions – Current accounts”.
TIME LOANS AND ADVANCES
The Regional Banks collect savings funds (bonds, interest-bearing
notes and related time accounts, home purchase saving accounts
and plans, passbook accounts, “PEP” popular savings plans, etc.)
in the name of Crédit Agricole S.A. These funds are transferred to
Crédit Agricole S.A. and included in its balance sheet. They then
serve to finance advances made to the Regional Banks to enable
the latter to finance their medium and long-term lending.
A series of four internal financial reforms has been implemented.
These reforms have resulted in Crédit Agricole S.A. transferring
back to the Regional Banks a specific percentage of the funds
collected by them (first 15%, then 25%, 33% and, with effect since
31 December 2001, 50%), via “mirror advances” with maturities
and interest rates precisely matching those of the savings funds
received. The Regional Banks are free to use these mirror advances
at their discretion.
Since 1 January 2004, the financial margins generated from funds
collected and shared by the Regional Banks and Crédit Agricole S.A.
have been determined by using replacement models and applying
market rates.
Furthermore, 50% of credits falling within the field of application of
financial relations between Crédit Agricole S.A. and the Regional
Bank may be refinanced in the form of advances negotiated at
market rates with Crédit Agricole S.A.
There are also two other types of advance:
n advances for subsidised loans which serve to fund Government-
subsidised loans. Under this mechanism, the French government
pays Crédit Agricole S.A. a subsidy to bridge the gap between
its cost of funds and the subsidised loan rate (advances received
since 1 January 2004 have been paid over to the Regional
Banks);
n advances for other lending, which refinance 50% of non-
subsidised loans. These advances from Crédit Agricole S.A.
are granted to the Regional Banks upon substantiation of their
commitments.
Crédit Agricole S.A. may also make additional financing available to
the Regional Banks at market rates.
172 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
TRANSFER OF REGIONAL BANKS’ LIQUIDITY SURPLUSES
The Regional Banks may use their monetary deposits (sight and
time deposits and negotiable certificates of deposit) to finance
their lending. Liquidity surpluses must be transferred to Crédit
Agricole S.A., where they are booked as current or time accounts,
under “Crédit Agricole internal transactions”.
INVESTMENT OF THE REGIONAL BANKS’ SURPLUS
CAPITAL WITH CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
Surplus capital may be invested with Crédit Agricole S.A. in the form
of 3- to 10-year instruments, which must match the characteristics
of interbank money market transactions in all respects.
FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS
Crédit Agricole S.A. represents the Regional Banks with respect
to the Banque de France and centralises their foreign currency
transactions.
SPECIAL SAVINGS SCHEMES
Funds held in special savings accounts (“business passbook
accounts”, “popular savings accounts”, “sustainable development
passbook accounts”, home purchase savings plans and accounts,
“popular savings plans”, and “youth passbook accounts”) are
collected by the Regional Banks on behalf of Crédit Agricole S.A.
They are centralised by Crédit Agricole S.A. and booked in its
balance sheet as “Customer accounts”.
MEDIUM AND LONG-TERM BONDS ISSUED BY CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE S.A
These are placed mainly by the Regional Banks and booked
by Crédit Agricole S.A. either as “Debt securities in issue” or as
“Subordinated debt”, depending on the type of security.
LIQUIDITY AND SOLVENCY RISKS
In 2001, ahead of Crédit Agricole S.A.’s initial public offering,
CNCA (which subsequently became Crédit Agricole S.A.) entered
into an agreement with the Regional Banks governing internal
relations within the Crédit Agricole Group. The agreement notably
provided for the creation of a fund for liquidity and solvency risks
designed to enable Crédit Agricole S.A. to fulfil its role as central
body by providing assistance to any Regional Banks experiencing
difficulties. The main provisions of this agreement are set out in
Chapter III of the registration document filed by Crédit Agricole S.A.
with the Commission des Opérations de Bourse on 22 October
2001 under number R.01-453.
Furthermore, since CNCA’s mutualisation in 1988, the Regional
Banks have undertaken to make up any shortfall suffered
by creditors should Crédit Agricole S.A. become insolvent or
experience similar financial difficulties. The Regional Banks’
commitment under this guarantee is equal to the sum of their share
capital and reserves.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
Capital ties between Crédit Agricole S.A. and the
Regional Banks
The capital ties between Crédit Agricole S.A. and the Regional
Banks are governed by an agreement entered into by the parties
prior to Crédit Agricole S.A.’s initial public offering.
Under the terms of this agreement, the Regional Banks exercise
their control over Crédit Agricole S.A. through SAS Rue La Boétie,
a holding company wholly-owned by them. The purpose of SAS
Rue La Boétie is to hold enough shares to ensure that it always
owns at least 50% of the share capital and voting rights of Crédit
Agricole S.A.
In addition, under the agreement, Crédit Agricole S.A. directly owns
25% of the share capital of each Regional Bank (except for the
Caisse Régionale de la Corse).
Its holding is in the form of Certificats Coopératifs d’Associés
(CCAs) and Certificats Coopératifs d’Investissement (CCIs), both
types of non-voting share which are issued for a term equal to
the term of the company and which give the holder a right in the
company’s net assets in proportion to the amount of share capital
they represent.
Crédit Agricole S.A. also holds one mutual share in each Regional
Bank, which gives it the status of member.
These arrangements enable Crédit Agricole S.A., as the central
body for Crédit Agricole, to account for the Regional Banks using
the equity method.
companies are eliminated in full on consolidation. Therefore,
the consolidated financial statements are only affected by
those transactions between fully consolidated companies and
proportionately consolidated companies to the extent of the
interests held by other shareholders.
The corresponding outstandings in the consolidated balance sheet
at 31 December 2007 concern the CACEIS and FGAFS groups for
the following amounts: due from banks: €3,793 million and due to
banks: €2,234 million.
These transactions had no material impact on the income statement
for the year ended 31 December 2007.
Management of retirement, early retirement
and end-of-career benefits: Internal funding
contracts within the group
As presented in the section on significant accounting policies
(Note 1.1), the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group provides its employees
with various types of post-employment benefits. They include:
n end-of-career allowances;
n pension plans, which may be either defined contribution or
defined benefit plans.
Its liability in this respect is partially funded by collective insurance
contracts taken out with Predica, Crédit Agricole Group’s life
insurance company.
Under these contracts, the insurance company is responsible for:
3 Related parties
Parties related to the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group are those
companies that are fully consolidated, proportionately consolidated
or equity-accounted, and senior executives of the Group.
n setting up mutual funds for investing contributions made by the
employer to build up sufficient funds to cover end-of-career
allowances or pension benefits;
n managing the funds;
n paying the beneficiaries the benefits due under the various
Shareholders’ agreements
The shareholders’ agreement that bound the major shareholders of
Banca Intesa was dissolved on 1 January 2007.
The shareholders’ agreement pertaining to the Eurazeo group
ended on 31 December 2007.
No new shareholders’ agreement subject to public disclosure and
involving the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group was entered into in 2007.
Relationships between controlled companies
affecting the consolidated balance sheet
A list of Crédit Agricole S.A. Group companies can be found in
Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements. Transactions
and outstandings at the period end between fully consolidated
plans.
Information on post-employment benefits is detailed under Note 8,
“Employee benefits and other compensation” in Notes 8.3 and
8.4.
Relations with executive officers and senior
management
Detailed information on senior management compensation is
provided in Note 8.7 –“Employee benefits and other
compensation”.
There exist no material transactions between Crédit Agricole S.A.
and its executive officers and senior management, their families
or the companies they control and which are not included in the
Group’s scope of consolidation.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 173
5
1
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1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
»
INCOME STATEMENT
Notes
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Interest receivable and similar income
5.1
44,120
46,618
Interest payable and similar expense
5.1
(36,212)
(36,967)
Fee and commission income
5.2
9,940
8,617
Fee and commission expense
5.2
(5,259)
(4,812)
(in millions of euros)
Net gains (losses) on financial instruments at fair value through profit or loss
Net gains (losses) on available-for-sale financial assets
5.3
4,827
5,799
5.4 - 7.4
3,863
1,905
Income related to other activities
5.5
25,219
26,636
Expenses related to other activities
5.5
(29,730)
(31,609)
16,768
16,187
5.6 - 8.1 - 8.4 - 8.6
(12,119)
(9,848)
5.7
(599)
(507)
4,050
5,832
Net banking income
General operating expenses
Depreciation, amortisation and impairment of property, plant & equipment and intangible assets
Gross operating income
Risk-related costs
5.8
Operating income
(1,897)
(612)
2,153
5,220
1,671
Share of net income of affiliates
3.3
1,269
Net income on other assets*
5.9
1,474
23
Change in value of goodwill
3.6
(79)
(63)
Pre-tax income
4,817
6,851
(257)
(1,590)
(4)
(3)
4,556
5,258
512
398
Net income - Group share
4,044
4,860
Earnings per share (in €)
2.505
3.306
Diluted earnings per share (in €)
2.505
3.253
Income tax
After-tax income from discontinued or held-for-sale operations
Net income
Minority interests
*
5.10
By comparison with previously published figures, at 31 December 2006, net income on other assets was reduced by €61 million due to the change in accounting method for treating
movements in minority interests (see Note 1).
174 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
1
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
»
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
ASSETS
(in millions of euros)
Cash, due from central banks *
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
Notes
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
7.1
19,455
6,194
417,852
7.2
458,965
Derivative hedging instruments
4.2 - 4.4
10,622
3,834
Available-for-sale financial assets
7.4 - 7.6
169,691
173,530
Due from banks
4.1 - 4.3 - 7.5 - 7.6
318,188
292,207
Loans and advances to customers
4.1 - 4.3 - 7.5 - 7.6
302,444
248,145
Valuation adjustment on portfolios of hedged items
4.2 - 4.4
1,323
1,621
Held-to-maturity financial assets
7.6 - 7.8
21,136
18,007
1,327
607
Current tax assets
Deferred tax assets
7.10
2,385
1,042
Accruals, prepayments and sundry assets
7.11
66,900
55,913
Fixed assets held for sale
7.12
196
677
3.3
14,440
17,248
Investment property
Investments in equity affiliates
7.14
2,779
2,971
Property, plant & equipment
7.15
4,573
3,931
Intangible assets
7.15
1,170
811
3.6
18,629
15,943
1,414,223
1,260,533
Goodwill **
TOTAL ASSETS
*
Transactions with Banque Postale (formerly CCP) are now included under the heading “Due from banks”.
**
By comparison with previously published figures, at 31 December 2006, goodwill was reduced by €763 million due to the change in accounting method for treating movements in minority
interests (see Note 1).
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 175
5
1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(in millions of euros)
Notes
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Due to central banks *
7.1
398
89
Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss
7.2
332,571
297,284
4.2 - 4.4
11,493
4,244
134,239
Derivative hedging instruments
Due to banks
Customer accounts
Debt securities in issue
Valuation adjustment on portfolios of hedged items
4.3 - 7.7
172,099
4.1 - 4.3 - 7.7
387,253
350,811
4.3 - 7.9
177,688
162,824
4.4
Current tax liabilities
579
307
1,837
1,195
Deferred tax liabilities
7.10
266
226
Accruals, deferred income and sundry liabilities
7.11
57,508
54,792
Liabilities associated with fixed assets held for sale
7.12
97
655
Insurance companies’ technical reserves
7.17
198,166
186,154
Reserves
7.18
4,957
4,154
4.3 - 7.9
22,837
24,470
Subordinated debt
Shareholders’ equity **
46,474
39,089
Shareholders’ equity, group share
40,691
34,319
Share capital and reserves
21,533
17,006
Consolidated reserves
13,027
9,870
Unrealised or deferred gains or losses
2,087
2,583
Net income for the year
4,044
4,860
Minority interests
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
7.19
5,783
4,770
1,414,223
1,260,533
*
Transactions with Banque Postale (formerly CCP) are now included under the heading “Due to banks”.
**
By comparison with previously published figures, at 31 December 2006, shareholders’ equity was reduced by €763 million due to the change in accounting method for treating
movements in minority interests (see Note 1).
176 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
1
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
»
CHANGE IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Share capital and reserves
Share
Share
capital premiums
and
reserves
Elimination of
treasury
shares
(in millions of euros)
Shareholders’ equity at
31 December 2005
4,489
Change of accounting methods (1)
Shareholders’ equity at
1 January 2006
24,666
(618)
(635)
4,489
Retained Unrealised or deferred gains or losses
Net
earnings,
income,
On
Change Change in
Group
Group
foreign
in fair fair value
share
share
exchange
value of of hedging
availableinstrufor-sale
ments
financial
assets
28,537
213
1,963
(31)
(635)
24,031
(618)
100
(12)
27,902
213
1,963
(31)
Total Minority
equity, interests
Group
share
Total
equity
30,682
4,226
34,908
(635)
(3)
(638)
30,047
4,223
34,270
(358)
(1,740)
Capital increase
Change in treasury shares held
Dividends paid in 2006
Dividends received from Regional
Banks and subsidiaries
88
88
(1,382)
(1,382)
(1,382)
194
194
194
Impact of acquisitions/disposals on
minority interests
Change in value of available-forsale securities (IAS 39)
551
120
Cash flow hedges (IAS 39)
4,860
Net income at 31/12/2006
Share of change in equity of
associates companies accounted
for under the equity method
178
178
Impact of the treatment of changes
in minority interests (1)
Changes due to stock options
Other changes
Shareholder’s equity at
31 December 2006
4,489
Allocation to 2006 results
Shareholders’ equity at
1 January 2007
Capital increase
672
551
15
566
120
(4)
116
4,860
399
5,259
(211)
(444)
(233)
178
(64)
(64)
24
24
24
(64)
(64)
(64)
34
(30)
34,319
4,770
39,089
34,319
4,770
39,089
23,017
4,489
27,877
520
3,970
(630)
26,876
(20)
2,514
89
4,860
(630)
31,736
4,860
(20)
2,514
89
4,490
38
38
(1,880)
(1,880)
(1,880)
266
266
266
38
(64)
24
(4,860)
4,490
Change in treasury shares held
Dividends received from Regional
Banks and subsidiaries
672
(64)
4,860
Dividends paid in 2007
194
178
(233)
Change in foreign exchange
88
Impact of acquisitions/disposals on
minority interests
4,490
38
(375)
266
1,124
783
Change in fair value
(107)
(1,102)
Transfer in income statement
Net income at 31/12/2007
4,044
Share of change in equity of
associates companies accounted
for under the equity method
26
26
Impact of the treatment of changes
in minority interests (1)
(223)
(223)
1,124
676
6
682
(1,102)
(28)
(1,130)
4,044
512
4,556
(70)
(211)
(281)
(223)
(6)
(229)
26
(70)
Change in foreign exchange
(2,255)
26
Changes due to stock options and
discount on employee share issue
55
55
55
Other changes
52
52
52
(9)
43
40,691
5,783
46,474
Shareholder’s equity at
31 December 2007
5,009
30,143
(592)
34,560
(90)
2,195
(18)
4,044
55
(1) Change in accounting method relating to the treatment of changes in minority interests.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 177
5
1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
Consolidated reserves mainly include “Legal and contractual
reserves” and “Retained earnings” from the parent company
financial statements, amounts arising from the first-time application
of IFRS, and consolidation adjustments.
»
Amounts deducted from shareholders’ equity and transferred to the
income statement and relating to cash flow hedges are included
under net banking income.
CASH FLOW STATEMENT
The cash flow statement is presented using the indirect method.
Operating activities shows the impact of cash inflows and
outflows arising from the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s core business
activities, including those associated with assets classified as held
to maturity.
Tax inflows and outflows are included in full within operating
activities.
Investing activities shows the impact of cash inflows and
outflows associated with purchases and sales of investments in
178 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
consolidated and non-consolidated companies, property, plant
& equipment and intangible assets. This section includes strategic
investments classified as available-for-sale.
Financing activities shows the impact of cash inflows and outflows
associated with shareholders’ equity and long-term financing.
Net cash and cash equivalents includes cash, debit and credit
balances with central banks and the French postal system, and
debit and credit sight balances with banks.
5
1
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
2007
2006
Pre-tax income ***
Amortisation and depreciation of property, plant & equipment and intangible assets
Impairment of goodwill and other non-current assets
Net charge to impairment
Share of net income of affiliates
Net loss/(gain) on investing activities
Net loss/(gain) on financing activities
Other movements ***
Total non-cash items included in pre-tax income and other adjustments
Change in interbank items
Change in customer items
Change in financial assets and liabilities
Change in non-financial assets and liabilities
Dividends received from equity affiliates (1)
Taxes paid
Net decrease/(increase) in assets and liabilities used in operating activities
TOTAL NET CASH PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES (A)
Change in equity investments (2)
Change in property, plant & equipment and intangible assets
TOTAL NET CASH PROVIDED/(USED) BY INVESTING ACTIVITIES (B)
Cash received from/(paid) to shareholders (3)
Other cash provided/(used) by financing activities (4)
TOTAL NET CASH PROVIDED/(USED) BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES (C)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents (D)
Net increase/(decrease) in cash & cash equivalents (A + B+ C + D)
Opening cash and cash equivalents
Cash, central banks (assets & liabilities) *
Interbank sight balances (assets & liabilities) **
Closing cash and cash equivalents
Cash, central banks (assets & liabilities) *
Interbank sight balances (assets & liabilities) **
4,817
773
82
1,992
(1,269)
(527)
3,892
(2,966)
1,977
36,401
(9,663)
(6,056)
5,406
344
(1,599)
24,833
31,627
(215)
(811)
(1,026)
2,707
6,612
9,319
904
40,824
(6,474)
6,097
(12,571)
34,350
19,047
15,303
6,851
505
63
(301)
(1,671)
(64)
3,963
(8)
2,487
(37,735)
(9,569)
(832)
15,867
593
(841)
(32,517)
(23,179)
(1,915)
(509)
(2,424)
(1,538)
13,276
11,738
871
(12,994)
6,520
6,237
283
(6,474)
6,097
(12,571)
CHANGE IN NET CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
40,824
(12,994)
(in millions of euros)
*
Consisting of the net balance of “Cash, Due from central banks” as detailed in Note 7.1.
**
This is the balance of “debit balances on performing customer current accounts and performing overnight accounts and advances” as detailed in Note 7.5 and “customer current accounts
in credit and overnight accounts and borrowings” as detailed in Note 7.7 (including Crédit Agricole internal transactions).
*** By comparison with previously published figures, at 31 December 2006, net income on other assets was reduced by €61 million due to the change in accounting method for treating
movements in minority interests (see Note 1).
(1) For 2007, this amount mainly includes dividends of €254 million from the Regional Banks, €33 million from Bespar, €22 million from Bank AL Saudi Al Fransi, €18 million from BES and
€9 million from Eurazeo.
Dividends received in 2006 amounted to €243 million from Banca Intesa S.p.A., €219 million from the Regional Banks, €55 million from Eurazeo, €40 million from Bespar, €14 million from
Bank AL Saudi Al Fransi, and €9 million from BES.
(2) This line item shows the net effects on cash of acquisitions and disposals of investments in non-consolidated companies.
During 2007, the impact from acquisitions of investments in consolidated companies (subsidiaries and equity affiliates) on the Group’s cash was negative €4,880 million, mainly in
connection with the acquisition of Cariparma and FriulAdria (Italy), and, to a lesser extent, the acquisition by CACEIS of Financial Markets Service Bank GmbH (renamed CACEIS Bank
Deutschland GmbH) and the companies of the Olympia Capital Group, the acquisition by Crédit Agricole Immobilier of property developer Monné-Decroix, the acquisition by Crédit
Agricole Luxembourg of Bank Sarasin Europe S.A. (renamed Crédit Agricole Luxembourg Bank), the acquisition by Pacifica of Assurances Fédérales IARD, and the acquisition by Sofinco
of Interbank and DMC Groep. These external transactions are described in Note 3.2.
This amount also includes cash acquired as a result of the consolidation of these acquisitions, primarily a positive balance of €220 million from Crédit Agricole Luxembourg Bank and
negative balances of €473 million from Interbank and of €255 million from Cariparma.
Over the same period, the disposal of investments in non-consolidated companies added €3,536 million to the Group’s cash, mainly €2,947 million from the disposal of Intesa SanPaolo
shares and €172 million from the sale of Gecina shares.
During 2006, the net impact of acquisitions of investments in non-consolidated companies on the Group’s cash was a €1,908 million reduction, resulting mainly from the following
transactions: the acquisitions of Emporiki Bank (Greece), FAFS (car finance in Italy), Egyptian American Bank (Egypt), Index Bank (Ukraine) and Tranquilidade Vida (renamed BES Vida)
carried out to strengthen the partnership between Espirito Santo Financial Group S.A. and Crédit Agricole S.A. This amount includes €2,655 million in cash acquired following the addition
of these subsidiaries to the scope of consolidation.
(3) Cash received from/(paid to) shareholders includes dividend payments made by Crédit Agricole S.A. to its shareholders of €1,880 million for 2007 and €1,382 million for 2006.
This amount also includes dividend payments to minority shareholders of €214 million for 2007 and €228 million for 2006.
For 2007, this amount also includes €3,993 million in proceeds from the share issue carried out by Crédit Agricole S.A. in the first quarter and €495 million from the employee share
offering in the fourth quarter.
(4) During 2007, net reimbursements of subordinated notes came to €1,196 million. Bond debt increased by €11,669 million over the same period.
During 2006, net subordinated debt issues amounted to €3,687 million. Bond debt and similar debt increased by €13,124 million over the same period.
“Other cash provided/(used) by financing activities” is also used to record the change in interest paid on subordinated notes and bonds.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 179
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
»
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1
Note 2
Note 3
Note 4
Accounting principles and methods
181
1.1. Significant accounting policies
1.2. Consolidation principles and methods
(IAS 27, 28, 31)
181
192
Assessments and estimates used to prepare
the financial statements
195
Financial instruments at fair value through profit or loss
Investments in non-consolidated companies (see Note 3.5)
Retirement and other employee benefits, stock option plans
Impairment of securities
Impairment of unrecoverable debts
Provisions
Goodwill impairment
Ongoing tax audit at Calyon
Recognition of deferred tax assets
195
196
196
197
197
197
197
197
197
Scope of consolidation
198
3.1. Changes in the scope of consolidation
during the year
3.2. Main acquisitions during the year
3.3. Investments in equity affiliates
3.4. Securitisation transactions and special-purpose
entities
3.5. Investments in non-consolidated companies
3.6. Goodwill
205
207
208
Financial management, exposure to risk
and hedging policy
211
4.1.
4.2.
4.3.
4.4.
4.5.
211
216
220
223
224
Credit risk
Market Risk
Liquidity and financing risk
Derivative hedging instruments
Operational risk
Note 7
198
201
205
Note 8
Note 9
Note 5
Note 6
Notes to the income statement
224
5.1. Interest income and expense
5.2. Net fee and commission income
5.3. Net gains (losses) on financial instruments
at fair value through profit or loss
5.4. Net gains (losses) on available-for-sale
financial assets
5.5. Net income and expenses related
to other activities
5.6. General operating expenses
5.7. Depreciation, amortisation and impairment
of property, plant & equipment and intangible assets
5.8. Risk-related costs
5.9. Net income on other assets
5.10. Income tax
224
225
Segment reporting
229
6.1.
6.2.
6.3.
6.4.
230
232
232
233
Segment information by business line
Geographical analysis
Insurance activities
French retail banking – Regional banks
180 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
225
226
226
226
227
227
227
228
Notes to the balance sheet at 31 December 2007
234
7.1. Cash due from central banks
7.2. Financial assets and liabilities at fair value
through profit or loss
7.3. Derivative hedging instruments
7.4. Available-for-sale financial assets
7.5. Due from banks and loans and advances
to customers
7.6. Impairment deducted from financial assets
7.7. Due to customers and banks
7.8. Held-to-maturity financial assets
7.9. Debt securities in issue and subordinated debt
7.10. Deferred tax assets and liabilities
7.11. Accruals, prepayments and sundry assets
and liabilities
7.12. Non-current assets held for sale
and associated liabilities
7.13. Investments in equity affiliates
7.14. Investment property
7.15. Property, plant & equipment and intangible assets
(excluding goodwill)
7.16. Goodwill
7.17. Insurance company technical reserves
7.18. Provisions
7.19. Shareholders’ equity
234
243
243
244
244
246
Employee benefits and other compensation
248
8.1. Analysis of personnel costs
8.2. Employees (at end of period)
8.3. Post-employment benefits, defined
contribution plans
8.4. Post-employment obligations, defined
benefit plans
8.5. Other employee benefits
8.6. Share-based payments
8.7. Executive officers’ compensation
248
248
Financing and guarantee commitments
254
Guarantees and commitments given
Assets pledged as collateral for liabilities
Guarantees held and available to the entity
254
255
255
Note 10 Fair value of financial instruments
Fair value of assets and liabilities measured at cost
Fair value of assets and liabilities measured based
on non-observable data
Estimated impact of inclusion of margin at inception
(day one p&l)
Note 11 Subsequent events
Calyon and Société Générale merge
their brokerage activities
Disposal of equity stake in Suez
Acquisition of 15% of Bankinter
Acquisition of 49% of Agos S.p.A. from Intesa Sanpaolo
Note 12 Scope of consolidation at 31 December 2007
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
240
241
241
242
242
242
249
249
251
251
253
255
255
256
257
258
258
258
258
258
259
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1
Accounting principles and methods
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
On 19 July 2002, the European Union adopted EC Regulation
1606/2002, which requires European companies whose securities
are traded on a regulated market to produce consolidated financial
statements under IFRS as from 2005.
This regulation was supplemented by EC Regulation 1725/2003 of
29 September 2003 on the application of international accounting
standards, by EC Regulation 2086/2004 of 19 November 2004
allowing the adoption of IAS 39 in an amended format, and by EC
Regulations 2236/2004, 2237/2004 and 2238/2004 of 29 December
2004, 211/2005 of 4 February 2005, 1073/2005 of 7 July 2005,
1751/2005 of 25 October 2005, 1864/2005 of 15 November 2005,
1910/2005 of 8 November 2005, 2106/2005 of 21 December 2005,
108/2006 of 11 January 2006, 708/2006 of 8 May 2006, 1329/2006
of 8 September 2006, 610/2007 and 611/2007 of 1 June 2007, and
1358/2007 of 21 November 2007.
APPLICABLE STANDARDS AND COMPARABILITY
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in
accordance with IAS/IFRS and IFRIC interpretations as adopted by
the European Union and applicable at 31 December 2007.
These standards and interpretations are the same as those as
applied to the Group’s financial statements for the year ended
31 December 2006, except for the change in accounting method
for treatment of movements in minority interests described in
Note 1.2. They are supplemented by the provisions of those
standards and interpretations as adopted by the European Union
as of 31 December 2007 and that must be applied in 2007 for the
first time. These cover the following:
The application of these new standards and interpretations had no
material impact on the company’s income statement or balance
sheet.
Furthermore, it is noted that when the application of standards
and interpretations to the period is optional, these have not been
adopted by the Group, unless otherwise indicated. This applies to:
n IFRIC 11 arising from the regulation of 1 June 2007 (EC 611/2007)
on treatment of treasury shares and intragroup transactions under
IFRS 2 on share-based payments. This interpretation will be
applied on 1 January 2009 for the first time;
n IFRS 8 arising from the regulation of 21 November 2007 (EC
1358/2007), on operational sectors and replacing IAS 14 on
segment reporting. This interpretation will be applied on 1 January
2009 for the first time.
The Group does not expect the application of these standards
and interpretations to produce a material impact on its financial
statements.
Lastly, as standards and interpretations that have been published
by the IASB but not yet been adopted by the European Union will
become mandatory only as from the date of such adoption. The
Group has not applied them as of 31 December 2007.
PRESENTATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s balance sheet, income statement,
statement of changes in shareholders’ equity and cash flow
statement have been presented in the format set out in CNC
Recommendation 2004-R.03 of 27 October 2004.
n IFRS 7 on information to be provided on financial instruments.
The main impact of this new standard is to add quantitative and
qualitative information on financial instruments for the entity and
information on the nature and the materiality of associated risks
and management of such risks;
n the amendment to IAS 1, Presentation of financial statements, on
additional quantitative and qualitative information to be provided
on shareholders’ equity;
n IFRIC 7 applying the restatement approach under IAS 29,
Financial reporting in hyperinflationary economies;
n IFRIC 8 interpretation clarifying the scope of IFRS 2, Share-based
payments;
n IFRIC 9, Reassessment of embedded derivatives;
1.1. Significant accounting policies
FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (IAS 32 AND 39)
In the financial statements, financial assets and liabilities are
treated in accordance with IAS 39 as endorsed by the European
Commission on 19 November 2004, together with EC regulations
1751/2005 of 25 October 2005 and 1864/2005 of 15 November
2005 on use of the fair value option.
The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts
estimated future cash payments or receipts through the expected
life of the financial instrument or, when appropriate, a shorter
period, to obtain the net carrying amount of the financial asset or
financial liability.
n IFRIC 10, Interim financial reporting and impairment.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 181
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged, or
a liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm’s
length transaction. Market-quoted rates provide the best estimate
of fair value for financial instruments quoted in an active market. For
financial instruments that are not quoted in an active market, fair
value is determined using recognised valuation techniques based
on observable and non observable market data.
Held-to-maturity investments
This category includes securities with fixed or determinable
payments and fixed maturities that the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
has the intention and ability to hold until maturity other than:
n securities that are initially classified as financial assets at fair value
through profit or loss at the time of initial recognition;
n securities that fall into the “Loans and receivables” category.
Securities
Classification of financial assets
Under IAS 39, financial assets are divided into four categories:
Hence, debt securities that are not traded in an active market
cannot be included in the “Held-to-maturity investments”
category.
n available-for-sale financial assets;
To classify investments as held to maturity, an entity must have the
positive intention and ability to hold them to maturity, otherwise the
entire portfolio must be reclassified as available for sale and may
not subsequently be reclassified as held to maturity for a period of
two years.
n held-to-maturity investments;
However, there are certain exceptions to this rule:
n loans and receivables.
n the investment is close to maturity (less than three months);
n financial assets at fair value through profit or loss classified as
held for trading and financial assets designated as at fair value
through profit or loss;
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
classified as held for trading and financial assets
designated as at fair value through profit or loss
According to IAS 39, this portfolio comprises securities that are
classified under financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
either as a result of a genuine intention to trade them or designated
as at fair value by the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group.
Financial assets or liabilities at fair value through profit or loss
classified as held for trading are assets or liabilities acquired or
generated by the enterprise primarily for purposes of making a
profit from short-term price fluctuations or an arbitrage margin.
Financial assets may be designated as at fair value through profit
or loss when such designation meets the conditions defined in
the standard, in the three following cases: for hybrid instruments
containing one or more embedded derivatives, to reduce any
distortion of accounting treatment or in the case of a group
of managed financial assets whose performance is measured
at fair value. Under this method, derivatives embedded in
hybrid instruments do not have to be recognised and measured
separately.
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group has designated the following assets
at fair value through profit or loss:
n assets backing unit-linked insurance policies;
n private Equity portfolios.
Securities that are classified under financial assets at fair value
through profit or loss are recognised at fair value at inception,
excluding transaction costs attributable directly to their acquisition
(which are taken directly to profit or loss) and including accrued
interest. They are carried at fair value and changes in fair value are
taken to profit or loss. No impairment provisions are booked for this
category of securities.
182 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
n the sale occurs after the entity has collected substantially all of
the financial asset’s original principal (about 90%);
n the sale is justified by an isolated or unforeseeable event beyond
the entity’s control;
n if it is anticipated that the investment will be impaired, due to a
worsening of the issuer’s condition (in which case the asset must
be recorded in the available for sale category).
Hedging of interest rate risk on these securities is not allowed.
Held-to-maturity securities are initially recognised at acquisition
cost, including transaction costs that are directly attributable to the
acquisition and including accrued interest. They are subsequently
measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.
Where there is objective evidence of impairment, a provision is
booked to match the difference between the carrying amount and
the estimated recoverable amount discounted at the initial effective
interest rate. In case of subsequent enhancements, the surplus
provision is recovered.
Loans and receivables
Loans and receivables comprise unlisted financial assets that
generate fixed or determinable payments.
The securities are initially recognised at acquisition cost, including
transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition and
including accrued interest, and subsequently, at amortised cost
using the effective interest method adjusted for any impairment
provisions.
Where there is objective evidence of impairment, a provision is
booked to match the difference between the carrying amount
and the estimated recoverable amount discounted at the original
effective interest rate.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Available-for-sale financial assets
IAS 39 defines available-for-sale financial assets as the default
category.
The methods of accounting for available-for-sale securities are the
following:
n available-for-sale securities are initially recognised at acquisition
cost, including transaction costs that are directly attributable to
the acquisition and including accrued interest,
n accrued interest is recognised in the balance sheet under the
appropriate category of loans and advances and booked to the
income statement as interest and similar income;
n changes in fair value are recorded in reversible shareholders’
equity. If the securities are sold, these changes are reversed out
and recognised in profit or loss. Amortisation of any premiums or
discounts on fixed-income securities is taken to profit and loss
using the effective interest rate method;
n when there is objective evidence of significant or prolonged
impairment for equity securities or impairment evidenced by the
appearance of a credit risk for debt securities, the unrealised loss
initially recognised under shareholders’ equity is reversed out
and recorded in profit or loss for the year. In case of subsequent
increases in the fair value, such impairment is recovered through
profit or loss for debt instruments and through equity for equity
instruments.
Valuation of investments
All financial instruments classified as financial assets at fair value
through profit or loss or as available-for-sale financial assets are
measured at fair value.
The fundamental valuation method is the price quoted in an active
market. If this is not possible, the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group uses
recognised valuation techniques based on recent transactions.
When there is no quoted price in an active market for an equity
security and no recognised valuation method, the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group uses methods based on objective, verifiable criteria, such as
net asset value or any other method of valuing equity securities.
If there is no satisfactory method, or if the estimates obtained using
the various methods differ excessively, the security is valued at cost
and is recorded under “Available-for-sale securities”.
In this case, the Group does not report a fair value, in accordance
with the applicable recommendations of IFRS 7. These primarily
include investments in non-consolidated subsidiaries that are not
listed on an active market which are difficult to measure at fair value
because of their non-materiality within the Group or because of the
small percentage that the Group controls.
Impairment of securities
Impairment is booked when there are objective signs of impairment
of assets other than assets classified at fair value through profit or
loss.
Impairment is evidenced by a prolonged or significant decline in
the value of the security for equity securities or by the appearance
of significant deterioration in credit risk evidenced by a risk of non
recovery for debt securities.
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group uses quantitative guidelines to
identify a significant or prolonged decline: a provision is deemed to
be necessary when the equity instrument has lost 30% or more of
its value over a period of six consecutive months.
This criterion of prolonged or significant decline in the value of the
security is a necessary but not sufficient condition to justify the
booking of a provision. A charge is made to such provision only
if the impairment will result in a probable loss of all or part of the
invested amount.
Such impairment is recognised as follows:
n for securities measured at amortised cost through the use of an
impairment account, the amount of the loss is recognised in the
income statement, and may be recovered in case of subsequent
enhancements;
n for available-for-sale securities, the amount of the aggregate loss
deducted from equity is transferred to the income statement;
in the event of subsequent enhancements in the price of the
securities, the loss previously transferred to the income statement
may be recovered when warranted by circumstances for debt
instruments.
Recognition date of securities
Crédit Agricole S.A. recognises securities classified as held
to maturity on the settlement/delivery date. Other securities,
regardless of type or classification, are recognised on the trading
date.
Financial liabilities (IAS 32)
Distinction between liabilities and shareholders’ equity
A debt instrument or financial liability is a contractual obligation to:
n deliver cash or another financial asset;
n exchange instruments under potentially unfavourable conditions.
An equity instrument is a contract evidencing a residual interest in
an enterprise after deduction of all of its liabilities (net assets).
Pursuant to these definitions, shares in the Regional Banks and
Local Banks are considered as equity under IAS 32 and IFRIC 2,
and are treated as such in the Group’s consolidated financial
statements.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 183
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
In November 2006, the IFRIC also provided a status on IAS 32,
on which it had been asked for interpretations. This relates to the
classification of certain financial instruments as debt or equity. The
IFRIC noted that in order for its analyses to be operational, it was
important to follow a regulatory process that had not yet been
completed.
Purchase of treasury shares
Treasury shares (or equivalent derivatives, such as options to buy
shares) purchased by the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group, including
shares held to hedge stock option plans, do not meet the definition
of a financial asset and are deducted from shareholders’ equity.
They do not generate any impact on the income statement.
Temporary investments in/disposals of equity securities
Within the meaning of IAS 39, temporary purchases and sales of
securities (securities lending/ borrowing, repurchase agreements)
do not fulfil the derecognition conditions of IAS 39 and are regarded
as collateralised financing. Assets lent or sold under repurchase
agreements are kept on the balance sheet. If applicable, monies
received, representing the liability to the transferee, are recognised
on the liabilities side of the balance sheet. Items borrowed or
bought under repurchase agreements are not recognised on the
transferee’s balance sheet. Instead, if the items are subsequently
sold, the transferee recognises the amount paid out representing
its receivable from the transferor. Revenue and expenses relating to
such transactions are taken to profit and loss on a pro rata basis,
except in the case of assets and liabilities designated at fair value
through profit or loss.
Lending Operations
Loans are principally allocated to the “Loans and receivables”
category. In accordance with IAS 39, they are initially valued at fair
value and subsequently valued at amortised cost using the effective
interest rate method. The effective interest rate is the rate that
exactly discounts estimated future cash payments to the original
net loan amount, including any discounts and any transaction
income or costs that are an integral part of the effective interest
rate.
They do, however, represent a potential indirect risk with respect
to the financial strength of the Regional Banks. No provisions have
been made for these advances.
Hence, the Crédit Agricole Group classifies impaired loans or
receivables within the meaning of international standards into three
separate categories: bad debts, doubtful debts and restructured
loans (loans that have been restructured due to customer default).
Impaired loans or receivables
In accordance with IAS 39, loans recorded under “Loans and
receivables” are impaired when one or more loss events occurs in
the collection of such loans. Once these loans and receivables have
been identified, they may be individually or collectively assessed
for impairment. Foreseeable losses are assessed by recognition
of impairment in an amount equal to the difference between the
carrying amount of the loans (amortised cost) and the sum of
estimated future cash flows, discounted at the original effective
interest rate, or in the form of discounts on loans that have been
restructured due to customer default.
The following distinctions are made:
n loans individually assessed for impairment: these are doubtful
loans covered by provisions and loans restructured due to
customer default that have been discounted;
n loans collectively assessed for impairment: these are loans
that are not individually assessed for impairment, for which
impairment is determined for a uniform class of loans displaying
similar credit risk characteristics.
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group classifies individually assessed
impaired loans and receivables as bad and doubtful debts, which
are in turn classified as bad debts and doubtful debts.
Bad and doubtful debts
Loans and advances of all kinds, even those which are guaranteed,
are classified as bad or doubtful if they carry an identified credit risk
arising from one of the following events:
n the loan or advance is at least three months in arrears (six
Subordinated loans and repurchase agreements (represented by
certificates or securities) are included under the various categories
of loans and advances according to counterparty type.
months for mortgage loans and property leases and nine months
for loans to local authorities), to take account of their specific
characteristics;
Income calculated based on the effective interest rate is recognised
in the balance sheet under the appropriate category of loans and
advances and booked to the income statement as interest and
similar income.
n the borrower’s financial position is such that an identified risk
Advances made by Crédit Agricole S.A. to the Regional Banks do
not represent a direct risk for Crédit Agricole S.A. with respect to
the corresponding customer loans made by the Regional Banks.
184 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
exists regardless of whether the loan or advance is in arrears;
n the bank and borrower are in legal proceedings.
When a loan is recorded as doubtful, all other loans or commitments
relating to that borrower are also recorded in their entirety as
doubtful debts, whether or not they are collateralised.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group makes the following distinction
between doubtful and bad debts:
n bad debts are doubtful debts for which the prospects of recovery
are highly impaired and which are likely to be written off in time;
n all doubtful loans and advances which do not fall into the bad
debt category are classified as doubtful debts.
Restructured performing loans
These are loans on which the entity has changed the initial financial
terms and conditions (interest rate, duration) due to a counterparty
risk, while reclassifying the outstanding amount into performing
loans. The reduction in future payments to the counterparty at the
time of restructuring gives rise to recognition of a discount.
Credit risk provisions for loans individually assessed for
impairment
Once a loan is classified as doubtful, a provision is deducted from
the asset in an amount equal to the probable loss. Probable losses
in respect of off-balance sheet items are covered by provisions
recognised as liabilities in the balance sheet.
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group takes impairment for all foreseeable
losses in respect of bad and doubtful debts, discounted at the initial
effective interest rate.
Foreseeable losses in respect of portfolios of small loans with
similar characteristics may be estimated on a statistical basis rather
than individually assessed.
Treatment of discounts and impairment
Discounts in respect of restructured loans and impairment charges
against doubtful debts are recognised in profit or loss under riskrelated costs.
The discount represents future loss of cash flow discounted at the
market rate.
It is equal to the difference between:
n the nominal value of the loan;
n the sum of theoretical future cash flows from the restructured
loan, discounted at the original effective interest rate (defined as
of the date of the financing commitment).
For restructured loans classified as performing, the discount is
amortised in profit or loss under net interest income over the life
of the loan. For restructured loans classified as doubtful and all
non-restructured doubtful loans, impairment charges and reversals
are recognised in risk-related costs and any increase in the carrying
amount of the loan arising from an impairment reversal or discount
amortisation over time is recognised in net interest income.
Credit risk provisions for loans collectively assessed for
impairment
Statistical and historical customer default experience shows that
there is an identified risk of partial uncollectibility of loans classified
as performing. To cover these risks, which cannot by nature be
allocated to individual loans, the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group takes
various collective impairment provisions by way of deduction from
asset values, such as provisions for sensitive exposure (loans
under watch), calculated based on Basel II models and sector and
country impairment provisions:
n impairment for sensitive exposures:
n as part of the implementation of Basel II, the Risk Management
Department of each Crédit Agricole S.A. Group entity calculates
the amount of losses anticipated within one year, using statistical
tools and databases, based on a variety of observation criteria
that meet the definition of an “event of loss” within the meaning
of IAS 39,
n impairment is calculated by applying a correction factor to the
anticipated loss, based on management’s experienced judgment,
which factors in a number of variables that are not included in
the Basel II models, such as the extension of the anticipated
loss horizon beyond one year as well as other factors related to
economic, business and other conditions;
n other loans collectively assessed for impairment:
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group also sets aside collective
impairment provisions to cover customer risks that are not
individually allocated to individual loans, such as sector or
country impairment provisions. These provisions are intended
to cover estimated risks based on a sector or geographical
analysis for which there is statistical or historical risk of partial
non-recovery.
Subsidised loans (IAS 20)
Under French government measures to support the agricultural
sector and to help home buyers, certain Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
entities grant subsidised loans at rates fixed by the government.
The government pays these entities the difference between
the subsidised lending rate a predetermined benchmark rate.
Accordingly, no discounts are recognised against subsidised
loans.
The subsidy system is periodically reviewed by the government.
In accordance with IAS 20, subsidies received from the government
are recorded under “Interest and similar income” and amortised
over the life of the corresponding loans.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 185
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Financial liabilities
IAS 39 as endorsed by the European Union recognises three
categories of financial liabilities:
n financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss classified
as held for trading. Fair value changes on this portfolio are
recognised in profit or loss;
n financial liabilities designated as at fair value through profit or loss
classified as held for trading. Financial assets may be designated
as at fair value through profit or loss when such designation
meets the conditions defined in the standard, in the three
following cases: for hybrid instruments containing one or more
embedded derivatives, to reduce any distortion of accounting
treatment or in the case of a group of managed financial assets
whose performance is measured at fair value. Under this method,
derivatives embedded in hybrid instruments do not have to be
recognised and measured separately;
n other financial liabilities: this category includes all other financial
liabilities. These liabilities are initially measured at fair value
(including transaction income and costs) and subsequently at
amortised cost using the effective interest method.
Deposits
All deposits are recorded under “Amounts due to customers” in
spite of the characteristics of the collection system within the Crédit
Agricole Group, with deposits originating from the Regional Banks
centralised at Crédit Agricole S.A. For the Group, the ultimate
counterparty for these deposits is the end customer.
The deposits are initially measured at fair value and subsequently
at amortised cost.
Regulated savings products are by nature at market rates.
Provisions are taken where necessary against home loan savings
plans and accounts as set out in paragraph 7.18.
Derivatives
Derivatives are financial assets or liabilities and are recognised on
the balance sheet at fair value at inception of the transaction. At
each balance sheet date, derivatives are measured at fair value,
whether they are held for trading purposes or used for hedging.
Any change in the value of derivatives on the balance sheet is
recorded in an account in the income statement (except in the
special case of a cash flow hedging relationship).
Hedge accounting
Fair value hedges reduce the risk of a change in the fair value of a
financial instrument that is an asset or of a liability that has been
recognised or of a firm commitment that has not been recognised.
186 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Cash flow hedges reduce the risk of a change in future cash flows
from financial instruments associated with a recognised asset or
liability (for example, with all or part of future interest payments on
a floating rate debt) or a projected transaction that is considered to
be highly probable.
Hedges of net investments in a foreign operation are intended
to reduce the risk of an adverse movement in fair value arising
from the currency risks associated with a foreign investment in a
currency other than the euro.
Micro-hedges must meet the following criteria in order to be eligible
for hedge accounting:
n the hedging instrument and the instrument hedged must be
eligible;
n there must be formal documentation from inception, primarily
including the individual identification and characteristics of the
hedged item, the hedging instrument, the nature of the hedging
relationship and the nature of the hedged risk;
n the effectiveness of the hedge must be demonstrated, at
inception and retrospectively.
The change in value of the derivative is recorded in the accounts
as follows:
n fair value hedges: the change in value of the derivative is
recognised in the income statement symmetrically with the
change in value of the hedged item in the amount of the hedged
risk and only the net amount of any inefficient portion of the
hedge is recognised in the income statement;
n cash flow hedges: the change in value of the derivative
is recognised in the balance sheet in a special reversible
shareholders’ equity account and any inefficient portion of the
hedge is recognised in the income statement. Any profits or losses
on the derivative accrued under equity are then reclassified in the
income statement symmetrically with the hedged transactions;
n hedge of a net investment in a foreign operation: the change in
value of the derivative is recognised in the balance sheet in a
special reversible shareholders’ equity account and any inefficient
portion of the hedge is recognised in the income statement.
In the case of macro-hedging (i.e. hedging a group of assets or
liabilities with the same exposure to the risks that is designated as
being hedged), the Group documents such hedging relationships
based on a gross position in derivative instruments and hedged
items.
The effectiveness of macro-hedging relationships is measured by
maturity schedules based on average outstandings. In addition, the
effectiveness of macro-hedging relationships must be measured
through prospective and retrospective testing.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Depending on whether a macro cash flow hedging or fair value
hedging relationship has been documented, the change in the value
of the derivative is recorded by applying the same principles as
those previously described for micro-hedging. However, for macrohedging relationships, the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group documents
the hedging relationship for fair value hedges in accordance with
the “carve-out” version of IAS 39 as endorsed by the European
Union.
Embedded derivatives
An embedded derivative is the component of a hybrid contract that
meets the definition of a derivative product. Embedded derivatives
must be accounted for separately from the host contract if the
following three conditions are met:
n the hybrid contract is not measured at fair value through profit
or loss;
n the embedded component taken separately from the host
contract has the characteristics of a derivative;
n the characteristics of the derivative are not closely related to
those of the host contract.
Recognition of margins on structured financial instruments at
inception
Under IAS 39, margins on structured products and complex
financial instruments may be recognised at inception only if these
financial instruments can be reliably measured from inception. This
condition is met when such instruments are measured using prices
in an active market or based on “standard” internal models that use
“observable” market data.
Instruments traded in an active market
If there is an active market, the instrument is stated at the quoted
price on that market.
A market is regarded as active if quoted prices are readily and
regularly available from an exchange, dealer, broker, pricing service
or regulatory agency, and those prices represent actual and
regularly occurring market transactions on an arm’s length basis.
These models must be validated in advance by independent
controls:
n instruments valued using internal models based on observable
market data:
n when models used are based on standard models (e.g. discounted
cash flows or Black & Scholes) using observable market data
(e.g. yield curves or implied volatility ranges for options), the
margin at inception on such instruments is recognised immediately
in profit or loss;
n instruments valued using internal models based on non-
observable market data:
n in this case, the transaction price is deemed to reflect the
instrument’s market value. The margin at inception is deferred
and amortised to profit or loss generally over the period during
which the market data is deemed to be non-observable. If market
data subsequently become “observable”, the remaining deferred
margin is recognised immediately in profit or loss.
Net gains or losses on financial instruments
Net gains or losses on financial instruments at fair value
through profit or loss
For financial instruments designated at fair value through profit or
loss and financial assets and liabilities held for trading, this heading
mainly includes the following income statement items:
n dividends and other revenues from equities and other variable-
income securities which are classified under financial assets at
fair value through profit or loss;
n changes in fair value of financial assets or liabilities at fair value
through profit or loss;
n gains and losses on disposal of financial assets at fair value
through profit or loss;
n changes in fair value and gains and losses on termination of
derivative financial instruments not included in a fair value or cash
flow hedging relationship.
The market values adopted are buying prices for net selling
positions and selling prices for net buying positions. These values
also factor in counterparty risks.
This heading also includes the inefficient portion of fair value
hedges, cash flow hedges and hedges of net investments in foreign
currencies.
Instruments not traded in an active market
Net gains or losses on available-for-sale financial assets
In the absence of an active market, fair value is determined using
valuation techniques and models incorporating all factors that
market participants would consider in setting a price.
For available-for-sale financial assets, this heading mainly includes
the following income statement items:
These fair values are determined by factoring in liquidity risk and
counterparty risk.
income securities which are classified under available-for-sale
financial assets;
n dividends and other revenues from equities and other variable-
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 187
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
n gains and losses on disposal of fixed-income and variable-
income securities which are classified under available-for-sale
financial assets;
n losses in value of variable-income securities;
n net income on disposal or termination of instruments used for
fair value hedges of available-for-sale financial assets when the
hedged item is sold;
n gains and losses on disposal or termination of loans and
advances and held-to-maturity securities in those cases provided
for by IAS 39.
PROVISIONS (IAS 37, 19)
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group has identified all obligations (legal or
constructive) resulting from a past event for which it is probable that
an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation, and
for which the due date or amount of the settlement is uncertain but
can be reliably estimated. These estimates are discounted where
applicable whenever there is a material impact.
For obligations other than those related to credit risk, the Crédit
Agricole S.A. Group has set aside general provisions to cover:
n operational risks;
n employee benefits;
Financial guarantees
A financial guarantee contract is a contract that calls for specific
payments to be made by the issuer to reimburse the holder for a
loss incurred due to a specified debtor’s failure to make a payment
when due under the initial or amended terms of a debt instrument.
Financial guarantee contracts are recognised at fair value initially
then subsequently at the higher of:
n the amount calculated in accordance with IAS 37 “Provisions,
Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets”; or
n the amount initially recognised, less any amortization recognised
in accordance with standard IAS 18 “Revenues”.
Financing commitments that are not designated as at fair value
through profit or loss or not treated as derivative instruments
within the meaning of IAS 39 are not recognised on the balance
sheet. They are, however, covered by provisions in accordance
with IAS 37.
Derecognition of financial instruments
A financial asset (or group of financial assets) is fully or partially
derecognised if:
n the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset
expire or are transferred or are deemed to have expired or
been transferred because they belong de facto to one or more
beneficiaries;
n substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership in the financial
n financing commitment execution risks;
n claims and liability guarantees;
n tax risks;
n risks in connection with home purchase savings schemes.
The latter reserve is designed to cover the Group’s obligations in
the event of unfavourable movements in home purchase savings
schemes. These obligations are: i) to pay a fixed rate of interest
on the savings contract from inception for an undefined period of
time; and ii) to grant a loan to the saver at a rate fixed at inception
of the contract. The reserve is calculated for each generation of
home purchase savings scheme and for all home-purchase savings
accounts, with no netting of obligations between generations.
The amount of these obligations is calculated taking account of the
following factors:
n saver behaviour, as well as an estimate of the amount and term
of the loans that will be granted in the future. These estimates are
based on historical observations over a long period;
n the yield curve for market rates and reasonably foreseeable
trends.
The method of calculating this reserve has been drawn up in
accordance with CNC Notice No. 2006-02 of 31 March 2006 on
accounting for home purchase savings schemes.
Detailed information is provided in paragraph 7.18.
assets are transferred.
In this case, any rights or obligations created or retained at the time
of transfer are recognised separately as assets and liabilities.
If the contractual rights to the cash flows are transferred but the
Crédit Agricole S.A. Group retains some of the risks and rewards of
ownership as well as control, the financial assets are recognised to
the extent of the Group’s continuing involvement in the asset.
A financial liability is fully or partially derecognised only if the liability
is settled.
188 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (IAS 19)
In accordance with IAS 19, employee benefits are recorded in four
categories:
n short-term employee benefits, such as wages, salaries, security
contributions and bonuses payable within 12 months of the end
of the period;
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
n long-term employee benefits (long-service awards, bonuses and
compensation payable 12 months or more after the end of the
period);
n termination benefits;
Lastly, certain Group companies are liable to pay supplementary
pension benefits. A provision is calculated on the basis of the
company’s actuarial liability for these benefits. These provisions
are also shown on the liabilities side of the balance sheet under
“Provisions”.
n post-employment benefits, which in turn are recorded in the
two following categories: defined-benefit plans and definedcontribution plans.
Retirement and early retirement benefits – Defined
benefit plans
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group sets aside reserves to cover its
liabilities for retirement and similar benefits and all other employee
benefits falling in the category of defined-benefit plans.
In keeping with IAS 19, these commitments are stated based on
a set of actuarial, financial and demographic assumptions, and
in accordance with the projected unit credit method. Under this
method, for each year of service, a charge is booked in an amount
corresponding to the employee’s vested benefits for the period. The
charge is calculated based on the discounted future benefit.
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group does not use the optional “corridor”
approach and recognises all actuarial differences in profit and
loss. The Group has opted not to apply the option allowed under
IAS 19 § 93, under which actuarial gains or losses are recognised in
a special statement of changes in shareholders’ equity rather than
in the income statement. Consequently, the amount of the reserve
is equal to:
n the present value of the obligation to provide the defined benefits
as of the balance sheet date, calculated in accordance with the
actuarial method recommended by IAS 19;
n less the fair value of any assets allocated to covering these
commitments, which may be represented by an eligible insurance
policy. In the event that 100% of the obligation is fully covered
by such a policy, the fair value of the policy is deemed to be
the value of the corresponding obligation, i.e. the amount of the
corresponding actuarial liability.
For such obligations that are not covered, a reserve for retirement
benefits is recognised under “Provisions” on the liabilities side of
the balance sheet. This reserve is in an amount equal to the Group’s
liabilities towards employees in service at the year-end, governed
by the new Crédit Agricole Group collective agreement that came
into effect on 1 January 2005.
A reserve to cover the cost of early retirement commitments is also
taken under the same “Provisions” heading. This reserve covers
the additional discounted cost of the various early retirement
agreements signed by Crédit Agricole Group entities under which
employees of eligible age may take early retirement.
Pension schemes – Defined contribution plans
French employers contribute to a variety of compulsory pension
schemes. The funds are managed by independent organisations
and the employers have no legal or implied obligation to pay
additional contributions should the funds not have sufficient assets
to pay the benefits corresponding to current and past service
rendered by employees. Consequently, the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group has no liabilities in this respect other than their ongoing
contributions.
SHARE-BASED PAYMENTS (IFRS 2)
IFRS 2 on share-based payment requires share-based payment
transactions to be measured and recognised in the income
statement and balance sheet. The standard applies to share option
plans granted after 7 November 2002, in accordance with the
provisions of IFRS 2, and which had not yet vested at 1 January
2005 and covers two possible cases:
n share-based payment transactions settled in equity instruments;
n share-based payment transactions settled in cash.
The only share-based payments initiated by the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group that are eligible for IFRS 2 are transactions settled in equity
instruments.
Options granted are measured at their fair value on the date of grant
using the Black & Scholes model. These options are recognised
as a charge under “Personnel costs”, with a corresponding
adjustment to equity, spread over the vesting period (4 years for
existing plans).
Employee share issues made as part of an employee share
ownership plan are also governed by IFRS 2. The Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group applies the treatment set out in the release issued by
the CNC on 21 December 2004, supplemented by the release
issued by the CNC on 7 February 2007. Shares may be offered to
employees with a discount of no more than 20%. These plans have
no vesting period but the shares are subject to a lock-up period of
five years. The benefit granted to employees is measured as the
difference between the fair value per share acquired taking account
of the lock-up period and the purchase price paid by the employee
on the issue date multiplied by the number of shares issued. The
method is described in more detail in Note 8.6, “Share-based
payments”
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 189
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
CURRENT AND DEFERRED TAX
Deferred taxes are not discounted.
In accordance with IAS 12, the income tax charge includes all taxes
on profits, whether current or deferred.
Taxable unrealised gains on securities do not generate any taxable
temporary differences between the carrying value of the asset and
the tax base. As a result, deferred tax is not recognised on these
gains. Note: When the relevant are classified as available-for-sale
securities, unrealised gains and losses are recognised directly
through equity. The tax charge effectively borne by the entity arising
from these unrealised gains is reclassified as a deduction from
these gains.
The standard defines current tax liability as “the amount of income
tax expected to be paid to (recovered from) taxation authorities in a
given accounting period”. Taxable income is the profit (or loss) for
a given accounting period measured in accordance with the rules
determined by the taxation authorities.
The applicable rates and rules used to measure the current tax
liability are those in effect in each country where the Group’s
companies are established.
The current tax liability relates to any income due or that will
become due, for which payment is not subordinated to the
completion of future transactions, even if payment is spread over
several years.
The current tax liability must be recognised as a liability until it is
paid. If the amount that has already been paid for the current year
and previous years exceeds the amount due for these years, the
surplus must be recognised under assets.
In France, all but 5% of long-term capital gains on the sale of
investments in non-consolidated subsidiaries, as defined by the
General Tax Code, are exempt from tax as from the tax year
commencing on 1 January 2007; the 5% is taxed at the normally
applicable rate. Unrealised gains on securities recognised at the
end of the period also do not generate any taxable temporary
differences requiring the recognition of deferred tax.
Deferred tax is recognised in net income for the year, unless the
tax arises from:
n either a transaction or event that is recognised directly through
equity, during the same year or during another year, in which case
it is directly debited or credited to equity; or
Moreover, certain transactions carried out by the entity may have
tax consequences that are not taken into account in measuring the
current tax liability. IAS 12 defines a difference between the carrying
amount of an asset or liability and its tax basis as a temporary
difference.
n a business combination.
This standard requires that deferred taxes be recognised in the
following cases:
n the entity has a legally enforceable right to offset current tax
A deferred tax liability should be recognised for any taxable
temporary differences between the carrying amount of an asset or
liability on the balance sheet and its tax base, unless the deferred
tax liability arises from:
n the deferred tax assets and liabilities apply to taxes assessed by
n initial recognition of goodwill;
n initial recognition of an asset or liability in a transaction:
a) that is not a business combination, and
b) that does not affect either the accounting or the taxable profit
(tax loss) as of the transaction date.
A deferred tax asset should be recognised for any deductible
temporary differences between the carrying amount of an asset
or liability on the balance sheet and its tax base, insofar as it is
probable that a future taxable profit will be available against which
such deductible temporary differences can be allocated.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset against each other if,
and only if:
assets against current tax liabilities; and
the same tax authority:
a) either for the same taxable entity, or
b) on different taxable entities that intend either to settle current
tax assets and liabilities on a net basis, or to settle their tax
assets and liabilities at the same time during each future
financial year in which it is expected that substantial deferred
tax assets or liabilities will be paid or recovered.
When tax credits on income from securities portfolios and amounts
receivable are effectively used to pay income tax due for the year,
they are recognised under the same heading as the income with
which they are associated. The corresponding tax charge continues
to be recognised under “Income tax” in the income statement.
NON-CURRENT ASSETS (IAS 16, 36, 38, 40)
A deferred tax asset should also be recognised for carrying forward
unused tax losses and tax credits insofar as it is probable that a
future taxable profit will be available against which the unused tax
losses and tax credits can be allocated.
The Crédit Agricole S.A. Group applies component accounting for
all of its non-current tangible and intangible assets. In accordance
with the provisions of IAS 16, the depreciable amount takes account
of the potential residual value of property, plant and equipment.
The tax rates applicable in each country are used.
Land is measured at cost less any impairment charges.
190 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Property used in operations, investment property and equipment are
measured at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment
charges.
n foreign exchange differences on monetary items classified as
Purchased software is measured at purchase price less accumulated
depreciation and impairment charges.
Non-monetary assets are treated differently depending on the type
of asset:
Proprietary software is measured at cost less accumulated
depreciation and impairment charges.
n assets at historical cost are valued at the exchange rate on the
Other than software, intangible assets principally comprise
purchased goodwill, which is measured on the basis of the
corresponding future economic benefits or expected service
potential.
n assets at fair value are measured at the exchange rate on the
Fixed assets are amortised over their estimated useful life.
The following components and depreciation periods have been
adopted by the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group following the application
of component accounting for fixed assets. These depreciation
periods are adjusted according to the type of asset and its
location:
Component
Depreciation
period
Land
Not depreciable
Structural works
30 to 80 years
Non-structural works
8 to 40 years
Plant and equipment
5 to 25 years
Fixtures and fittings
5 to 15 years
Computer equipment
4 to 7 years
Specialist equipment
4 to 5 years
Exceptional depreciation charges corresponding to tax-related
depreciation and not to any real impairment in the value of the asset
are eliminated in the consolidated financial statements.
Based on available information, the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group has
concluded that impairment testing would not lead to any change in
the existing depreciable amount of its non-current assets (excluding
goodwill) as of the balance sheet date.
CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS (IAS 21)
In accordance with IAS 21, a distinction is made between monetary
and non-monetary items.
At the balance sheet date, monetary assets and liabilities
denominated in foreign currencies are converted into the functional
currency of Crédit Agricole S.A. Group at the closing exchange rate.
Foreign exchange differences arising from translation are recorded
in the income statement. There are two exceptions to this rule:
n for available-for-sale financial assets, only the foreign exchange
difference calculated on amortised cost is taken to the income
statement; the balance is recorded in shareholders’ equity;
cash flow hedges or that are part of a net investment in a foreign
entity are recorded in shareholders’ equity.
transaction date;
closing date.
Foreign exchange differences on non-monetary items are
recognised:
n in the income statement if the gain or loss on the non-monetary
item is recorded in the income statement;
n in shareholders’ equity if the gain or loss on the non-monetary
item is recorded in shareholders’ equity.
COMMISSIONS AND FEES (IAS 18)
Commission and fee income and expense are recognised in income
based on the nature of services with which they are associated.
When the outcome of a transaction involving the rendering of
services can be estimated reliably, revenue associated with the
transaction should be recognised by reference to the stage of
completion of the transaction at the balance sheet date:
n commissions paid or received in consideration for non-recurring
services are fully recognised in the income statement; this
category namely includes investment fees;
n commissions in consideration for ongoing services, such as
commissions on payment instruments, are recognised in the
income statement and spread over the duration of the service
rendered;
n commissions payable or receivable that are contingent upon
meeting a performance target are recognised only if all the
following conditions are met:
n the amount of commissions and fees can be reliably estimated,
n it is probable that the future economic benefits from the services
rendered will flow to the company,
n the state of completion of the service can be reliably estimated,
and the costs incurred for the service and the costs to complete
it can be reliably estimated.
INSURANCE BUSINESSES (IFRS 4)
Liabilities remain partially valued under local GAAP, as required
by IAS and IFRS regulations, pending further amendments to the
existing standards. Financial assets held by the Group’s insurance
companies have been reclassified into the four categories set out
in IAS 39.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 191
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
In accordance with the option allowed under IFRS 4, “shadow
accounting” is used for insurance policies with discretionary profit
sharing. Under this practice, positive or negative differences in
the corresponding financial assets that will potentially revert to
policyholders are recognised in a “Deferred profit-sharing” account
under liabilities.
In accordance with IFRS 4, at each reporting date, the Group
ascertains that insurance liabilities (net of deferred acquisition costs
and associated intangible assets) are adequate to meet estimated
future cash flows. The liability adequacy test used to verify this
must meet the following minimum requirements, as defined in
paragraph 16 of the standard:
n it must consider current estimates of all future contractual cash
flows, including associated handling costs, as well as cash flows
resulting from embedded options and guarantees;
n if the test shows that the liability is inadequate, the entire
deficiency is recognised in profit or loss.
Pursuant to the decree of 20 December 2005 on mortality tables,
as from 1 January 2006, insurance companies have applied new
mortality tables reflecting the increase in life expectancy. The Group
has applied these new tables in calculating its return guarantee
provision, as well as the new mortality tables for individual and
collective annuity contracts.
LEASES (IAS 17)
As required by IAS 17, leases are analysed in accordance with their
substance and financial reality. They are classified as operating
leases or finance leases.
Operating leases are treated as an acquisition of a fixed asset by
the lessee financed by a loan from the lessor.
In the lessor’s accounts, analysis of the economic substance of the
transactions results in the following:
n recognition of a financial receivable from the customer, which is
amortised by the lease payments received;
n lease payments are broken down into interest and principal,
known as financial amortisation;
n recognition of a net lease reserve, which is equal to the difference
between:
n the net lease receivable: amount owed by the lessee, consisting
of the outstanding principal and accrued interest at the end of
the period,
n the net book value of the leased assets,
n the reserve for deferred taxes.
In the lessee’s accounts, finance leases are restated such that
they are recognised in the same way as if the asset had been
192 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
purchased on credit, by recognising a financial liability, recording
the purchased asset under assets and depreciating the asset.
In the income statement, the theoretical depreciation charge (the
charge that would have been recognised if the asset had been
purchased) and the finance charges (incurred in connection with the
financing) are recorded in the place of the lease payments.
For operating leases, the lessee recognises payments as expenses
and the lessor records the corresponding income under rents, and
the leased assets on its balance sheet.
1.2. Consolidation principles and methods
(IAS 27, 28, 31)
Changes in accounting methods
As from 1 January 2007, in the interests of comparability with
standard practices, the difference between the acquisition cost and
the share of net assets resulting from an increase in the ownership
percentage in an entity that is already under exclusive control
is now recognised as a deduction from “Consolidated reserves
- Group share”.
Symmetrically, in the case of a decrease in Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group’s ownership percentage in an entity that remains under
exclusive control, the difference between the disposal price and
the carrying amount of the minority interests sold is also recognised
directly under “Consolidated reserves - Group share”.
The effect of this change of method as of 1 January 2007 is shown
in the statement of changes in shareholders’ equity.
As a corollary to this, the accounting treatment of put options
granted to minority shareholders is as follows:
n when a put option is granted to the minority shareholders of a
subsidiary that is already fully consolidated, a liability is recorded
on balance sheet, measured at the estimated present value of the
exercise price of the options granted to these shareholders;
n the corresponding asset is recognised by reducing the share of
net assets belonging to the minority interests concerned to zero
and accounting for the balance as goodwill;
n subsequent changes in the estimated value of the exercise price
will affect the amount of the liability and on the asset side, the
amount of goodwill recognised.
SCOPE OF CONSOLIDATION
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts
of Crédit Agricole S.A. and of all companies over which Crédit
Agricole S.A. exercises control, in accordance with IAS 27, IAS 28
and IAS 31. Control is presumed to exist if Crédit Agricole S.A.
owns over 20% of existing and potential voting rights in an entity,
whether directly or indirectly.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
As an exception, entities that do not have a material impact on the
consolidated financial statements of the group are not included in
the scope of consolidation.
n this company, in substance, has rights to obtain a majority of the
Materiality is assessed in the light of several criteria including the
size of the earnings or shareholders’ equity of the company to be
consolidated in relation to the earnings or shareholders’ equity of
the consolidated group, its impact on the structure of the financial
statements or on total assets, which is presumed to be material if it
exceeds 1% of the total assets of the consolidated subsidiary that
owns its shares.
n this company, in substance, retains the majority of the residual
DEFINITIONS OF CONTROL
In accordance with international standards, all entities falling under
exclusive control, joint control or material influence are consolidated,
providing that their contribution is deemed to be material and that
they are not covered under the exclusions described below.
Exclusive control is presumed to exist if Crédit Agricole S.A. owns
over half of the voting rights in an entity, whether directly or indirectly
through subsidiaries, except if, in exceptional circumstances, it can
be clearly demonstrated that such ownership does not give it
control. Exclusive control also exists if Crédit Agricole S.A., as the
owner of half or less than half of the voting rights in an entity, holds
majority power within management bodies.
Joint control is exercised in joint ventures in which each of the two
or more co-owners are bound by a contractual contribution that
provides for joint control.
Significant influence is defined as the power to influence but not
control a company’s financial and operational policies. Crédit
Agricole S.A. is presumed to have significant influence if it owns
20% or more of the voting rights in an entity, whether directly or
indirectly through subsidiaries.
Consolidation of special-purpose entities
The consolidation of special-purpose entities (entities created to
manage a given transaction or a set of similar transactions), and
more specifically of funds held under exclusive control, is specified
by SIC 12.
In accordance with SIC 12, special purpose vehicles are consolidated
when the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group exercises control in substance
over the entity, even if there is no shareholder relationship. This
applies primarily to dedicated mutual funds.
Whether or not a special-purpose entity is controlled in substance
is determined by considering the following criteria:
n the activities of the SPE, in substance, are conducted on behalf
of a Crédit Agricole S.A. Group company according to its specific
business needs, such that this company obtains benefits from
the SPE’s activities;
n this company, in substance, has the decision-making powers
to obtain a majority of the benefits of the SPE’s activities or
has delegated such decision-making powers by establishing an
“autopilot” mechanism;
benefits of the SPE’s activities and as a result may be exposed to
the risks related to the SPE’s activities; or
risks or risks arising from ownership relating to the SPE or its
assets, in order to obtain benefits from its activities.
Exclusions from the scope of consolidation
Equity interests (excluding majority interests) held by venture
capital entities are also excluded from the scope of consolidation
insofar as they are classified under financial assets designated as
at fair value through profit or loss.
CONSOLIDATION METHODS
The consolidation methods are respectively defined by IAS 27, 28
and 31. They are based on the type of control exercised by Crédit
Agricole S.A. over the entities that can be consolidated, regardless
of their business or of whether or not they have legal entity status:
n entities under joint control are proportionally consolidated,
including entities with different account structures, even if their
business are not an extension of that of Crédit Agricole S.A;
n entities over which Crédit Agricole S.A. exercises significant
influence or joint control are consolidated under the equity
method;
n entities over which Crédit Agricole S.A. exercises significant
influence are consolidated under the equity method.
Full consolidation consists of eliminating the book value of the
shares held in the consolidating company’s financial statements
and aggregating all assets and liabilities carried by each subsidiary.
The value of the minority interests in net assets and earning is
separately identified in the consolidated balance sheet and income
statement.
Proportional consolidation consists of eliminating the book value of
the shares held in the consolidating company’s financial statements
and aggregating a proportion of the assets, liabilities and results of
the company concerned representing the consolidating company’s
interest.
The equity method consists of eliminating the book value of the
shares held in the Group’s financial statements and accounting for
its interest in the underlying equity and results of the companies
concerned.
CONSOLIDATION ADJUSTMENTS AND ELIMINATIONS
Adjustments are made to harmonise the methods of valuating
the consolidated companies, unless they are deemed to be nonmaterial.
Group internal transactions affecting the consolidated balance
sheet and income statement are eliminated.
Capital gains or losses arising from intra-group asset transfers are
eliminated; any potential lasting impairment measured at the time
of disposal in an internal transaction is recognised.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 193
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
TRANSLATION OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES’ FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS (IAS 21)
Financial statements of subsidiaries expressed in foreign currencies
are translated into euros in two stages:
n the local currency (or, if applicable, the currency in which the
accounts are prepared) is converted into the functional currency
using the historical rate method, and all foreign exchange gains or
losses are fully and immediately taken to the income statement;
n the functional currency is then converted into the consolidation
currency using the exchange rate at the balance sheet date and
the translation adjustment is recorded in a separate line under
shareholders’ equity, showing the share attributable to the entity
and the share attributable to minority interests. This adjustment is
taken to the income statement when all or part of the interest in
the foreign subsidiary is sold or liquidated.
The functional currency of an entity is closely linked to whether or
not the entity is independent or not independent:
n the functional currency of an entity that is not independent is the
functional currency on which it is dependent, i.e. the currency in
which its main transactions are denominated;
n the functional currency of an independent foreign entity is its local
currency, other than in exceptional circumstances.
BUSINESS COMBINATIONS – GOODWILL (IFRS 3)
Business combinations after the transition date (1 January 2004)
are accounted for using the purchase method in accordance
with IFRS 3. However, as IFRS 3 does not apply to business
combinations between mutual organisations, mergers between
Regional Banks are accounted for at net book value in accordance
with IAS 8.
The cost of a business combination is the aggregate of the fair
values, on the date of acquisition, of assets given, liabilities incurred
or assumed, and equity instruments issued by the acquirer, in
exchange for control of the acquiree, plus any costs directly
attributable to the business combination.
On the date of acquisition (or on the date of each transaction in
the case of an acquisition by successive purchases of shares), the
acquiree’s identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities
which satisfy the conditions for recognition set out in IFRS 3 are
recognised and at their fair value. Restructuring liabilities are only
recognised as a liability if the acquiree is under an obligation to
complete the restructuring on the date of acquisition.
consolidated. If the acquiree is accounted for using the equity
method, the excess is included under the heading “Investments in
affiliates”. Any negative goodwill is recognised immediately through
profit or loss.
The difference between the acquisition cost and the share of net
assets resulting from an increase in the ownership percentage in
an entity that is already under exclusive control is now recognised
as a deduction from “Consolidated reserves – Group share”. In the
event that the Group’s percentage ownership interest in an entity
that remains under its exclusive control declines, the difference
between the selling price and the carrying amount of the minority
interests sold is also recognised directly under “Consolidated
reserves – Group share”, effective as of 1 January 2007.
Goodwill is carried in the balance sheet at its initial amount in the
currency of the acquiree and translated at the year-end exchange
rate.
It is tested for impairment whenever there is objective evidence that
it may be impaired and at least once a year.
For the purpose of impairment testing, goodwill is allocated to the
Cash Generating Units (CGUs) that are expected to benefit from
the business combination. The Group has defined its CGUs as the
smallest identifiable group of assets and liabilities within its core
businesses that can operate on the basis of a specific business
model.
Impairment testing consists of comparing the carrying amount
of each CGU, including any goodwill allocated to it, with its
recoverable amount.
“Recoverable amount” of the CGU is defined as the higher of
market value and value in use. The value in use is the present value
of the future cash flows expected to be derived from continuing use
of the CGU, as set out in medium-term business plans prepared by
the Group for management purposes.
When the recoverable amount is lower than the carrying amount, an
irreversible impairment loss is recognised through profit or loss and
deducted from the goodwill allocated to the CGU. This impairment
is irreversible.
NON-CURRENT ASSETS HELD FOR SALE AND
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS (IFRS 5)
A non-current asset (or a disposal group) is classified as held for
sale if its carrying amount will be recovered principally through a
sale transaction rather than through continuing use.
The initial valuation of assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities
may be revised within a period of twelve months after the date of
acquisition.
For this to be the case, the asset (or disposal group) must be
available for immediate sale in its present condition and its sale
must be highly probable.
The excess of the cost of acquisition over the fair value of the
Group’s share in the net assets acquired is recognised in the
balance sheet as goodwill if the acquiree is fully or proportionately
The relevant assets and liabilities are shown separately on the
balance sheet under “Non-current assets held for sale” and
“Liabilities associated with non-current assets held for sale”.
194 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
A non-current asset (or disposal group) classified as held for sale
is measured at the lower of its carrying amount and fair value
less costs to sell. A charge for impairment of unrealised gains is
recognised in the income statement. Unrealised gains are no longer
amortised when they are reclassified.
n is part of a single co-coordinated plan to dispose of a separate
A discontinued operation is a component of the entity that has
either been disposed of, or is classified as held for sale, and:
n the post-tax profit or loss of discontinued operations until the
n represents a separate major line of business or geographical area
n the post-tax gain or loss recognised on the disposal or on
of operations;
Note 2
major line of business or geographical area of operations;
n is a subsidiary acquired exclusively with a view to resale.
Are disclosed on a separate line of the income statement:
date of disposal;
measurement to fair value less costs to sell of the assets and
liabilities constituting the discontinued operations.
Assessments and estimates used to prepare the financial statements
A certain number of estimates have been made by management
to draw up the financial statements. These estimates are based on
certain assumptions and involve risks and uncertainties as to their
actual achievement in the future.
Actual results may be influenced by many factors, including but
not limited to:
n activity in domestic and international markets;
n fluctuations in interest and exchange rates;
n the economic and political climate in certain industries or
countries;
n changes in regulations or legislation.
This list is not complete.
Accounting estimates based on assumptions are principally used to
value the following assets and liabilities:
Financial instruments at fair value through
profit or loss
The fair value of financial instruments is determined using
recognised valuation techniques based on observable or nonobservable market data.
CLASSIFICATION OF MARKET DATA AS “OBSERVABLE”
AND “NON-OBSERVABLE”
Market data is officially classified as “observable” and “nonobservable” by a monthly valuation committee which comprises
representatives from the front office, the independent market risks
department and the finance department.
n Market data is regarded as observable if the market risks
department can obtain data from several sources independent of
the front offices on a regular basis (daily if possible), for example
from brokers or pricing services that collect data from a sufficient
number of market participants. A dedicated data management
team, which reports to the market risks department, regularly
checks the relevance of data obtained in this way and formally
documents it.
Most instruments traded over the counter are measured using
models that are based on observable market data.
For example, the fair value of interest rate swaps is usually
determined using market yield curves on the reporting date.
Other financial instruments are in many cases measured on a
discounted cash flow basis.
n Conversely, some complex products with a basket component,
where valuation requires correlation or volatility data that are not
directly comparable with market data, may be regarded as nonobservable.
Most of these instruments are complex fixed-income products,
credit derivatives (certain correlation products or products whose
measurement incorporates non-observable credit spreads),
equity derivatives (certain products with multiple underlying
instruments), or hybrid products and, to a lesser extent, foreign
exchange and commodities products. Certain traditional market
financial instruments with a long maturity may also be classified
as “non-observable’ if the only market data available to measure
them are for terms that are shorter than the contractual maturity of
such instruments and must extrapolated in order to measure fair
value. The Market Risk Department is also in charge of validating
the methods used to calculate non-observable market data.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 195
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
As described in the section on significant accounting policies, the
margin at inception is only immediately recognised in profit or loss
where the valuation models used are based on market data that is
regarded as observable.
All market products, regardless of their method of recognition in
profit or loss, are subject to the risk management system described
in the note on market risks. As a result, products for which the
variables are regarded as “non-observable” within the meaning of
IAS 39 are subject to the same control rules as other products (risk
indicator monitoring, stress tests, limits, etc.).
PRODUCTS THAT BECAME OBSERVABLE IN 2007
In 2007, the following products were reclassified as observable:
n certain fixed-income derivative products (Collaterized Debt
After assessing each monoline insurer’s capacity to fulfill its
obligations, an allowance was calculated for Calyon’s exposure
at 31 December 2007. This exposure corresponds to the positive
fair value of the protection purchased on CDO units valued in
accordance with the same principles as unhedged CDOs (see
previous paragraph).
CONTRIBUTION OF NON-OBSERVABLE PRODUCTS AS OF
31 DECEMBER 2007
The contribution of products incorporating non-observable market
data is analysed in Note 10 (outstanding assets and liabilities,
changes in fair value in the income statement, recognition of the
margin at inception).
SYNDICATION LOANS
Obligations or synthetic CDOs) with corporate or financial
institution underlyings, when their structure was sufficiently close
to that of standard baskets that are valued by organisations that
collect data from a sufficient number of market participants;
Loans to be sold are classified as assets at fair value through profit
or loss and marked to market.
n certain interest rate derivatives were deemed to be observable
Structured issues at fair value include the change in the Calyon
Group’s credit risk.
until longer maturities than previously due to increased availability
of market data.
VALUATION METHOD FOR CDOS WITH US RESIDENTIAL
MORTGAGE UNDERLYINGS
In 2007, CDOs with US residential mortgage underlyings were
deemed to be non observable, as were any hedges thereof.
n Mezzanine tranches:
In the absence of external prices, mezzanine CDO tranches were
valued by applying to each tranche a discount rate based on its
effective external rating as of the closing date.
n Super-senior tranches:
The value of the super-senior tranches was calculated by
applying a credit scenario on the underlying assets (mainly
residential mortgage loans) of the ABSs that make up each CDO.
This scenario breaks down as follows:
n into final losses, calibrated as a function of the quality and
origination date of each residential mortgage loan;
n the recognition period for these losses was fixed at 40 months;
the valuation obtained in this way was compared with a valuation
resulting from the application of ABX indices.
EXPOSURE HEDGED BY MONOLINE INSURERS
All sellers of protection were subjected to a review of their financial
position, as it was known and assessed as of the account closing
date. Monoline insurers were considered to be the main guarantors
presenting a risk.
196 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
STRUCTURED ISSUES AT FAIR VALUE
Investments in non-consolidated
companies (see Note 3.5)
Investments in non-consolidated companies may be valued at cost
rather than at fair value if fair value cannot be determined directly
by reference to an active market or valued by Crédit Agricole S.A.
using other valuation methods. These investments, which are listed
in Note 3.5, are intended to be held for the long term.
Retirement and other employee benefits,
stock option plans
Liabilities for retirement and other employee benefits are based on
assumptions made by management with respect to the discount
rate, staff turnover rate and probable increases in salary and social
security costs. If the actual figures differ from the assumptions
made, the liability may increase or decrease in future years (see
Note 8.3 of the Notes to the consolidated financial statements).
The return on plan assets is also estimated by management.
Returns are estimated on the basis of expected returns on fixedincome securities, and notably bonds.
Share-based payment plans are measured primarily using the Black
& Scholes model. A description of the plans and valuation methods
is given in Note 8.6, “Share-based payments”.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Impairment of securities
Equity instruments (other than those held for trading) are tested
for impairment and an impairment charge is recognised in case
of a prolonged or significant decline in their value. In general, a
prolonged or significant decline is presumed to have occurred
when the instrument has lost at least 30% of its value over a period
of six consecutive months. However, management may also take
account of other factors (type of investment, issuer’s financial
position, short-term prospects, etc.); these are not intangible in
nature.
n the reserve for legal risks is based on management’s best estimate
in light of the information in its possession at 31 December
2007;
n the reserve for home purchase savings plans is based on
assumptions regarding customer behaviour drawn from historical
experience, which may not necessarily reflect actual trends in
future behaviour.
Goodwill impairment
Goodwill is tested for impairment at least once a year.
Impairment of unrecoverable debts
Impairment provisions are deducted from the carrying value of
loans and advances when there is objective evidence of a risk of
non-recovery.
The provisions are discounted and estimated on the basis of
several factors, notably business or sector-related. It is possible
that future assessments of the credit risk may differ significantly
from current estimates, which may lead to an increase or decrease
in the amount of the impairment.
Collective impairment is also taken against performing loans. The
amount is based on the probability of default in each rating class
assigned to borrowers, but also on management’s experienced
judgement.
The assumptions made to measure the fair value of goodwill may
influence the amount of any impairment loss taken.
The method used is described in the paragraph on consolidation
principles and methods.
Ongoing tax audit at Calyon
Since 2 February 2007, Calyon’s accounts have been under a tax
audit covering the years 2004 and 2005.
A tax adjustment notice, performed to extend the tax
administration’s audit rights for 2004, was received at the end
of December 2007. In February 2008, Calyon defended its
position and challenged all items. A provision was set aside to
cover this risk, in an amount estimated by Calyon’s Tax
Department.
Provisions
Certain estimates may be made to determine the amount of
provisions:
n the reserve for operational risks, which although subject to
examination for identified risks, requires management to make
assessments with regard to incident frequency and the potential
financial impact;
Recognition of deferred tax assets
Deferred tax assets are recognised on all deductible temporary
differences to the extent that management believes there will be
sufficient taxable profits in the future to offset these differences.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 197
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3
Scope of consolidation
The scope of consolidation at 31 December 2007 is shown in detail
at the end of the Notes to the consolidated financial statements.
3.1. Changes in the scope of consolidation
during the year
NEWLY CONSOLIDATED COMPANIES AT 31 DECEMBER
2007
1) Newly created companies, new acquisitions or acquisitions of
additional shares, application of materiality threshold:
French retail banking
n Regional Bank subsidiaries
n Caryatides Finance
n Force Aquitaine
n S.A. Sedaf
n S.A.S. Immnord
n S.A.S. JPF
n SARL Arcadim Fusion
n SCI Crystal Europe
n SCI Quartz Europe
n Sequana
International retail banking
n Banca Popolare FriulAdria S.p.A.
n Cariparma
n Crédit du Maroc Leasing
n Emporiki Asset Management Mutual Funds
n Po Vita Compagnia di Assicurazioni S.p.A.
Specialised financial services
n Sofinco
n Crédit Lift S.p.A.
n Interbank Group:
n
Ajax Finance B.V.
n
Antera Incasso B.V.
n
Assfibo Financieringen B.V.
n
CA Deveurop BV
n
Crediet Maatschappij “De Ijssel” B.V.
n
De Kredietdesk B.V.
n
Dealerservice B.V.
198 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
n
DMC Groep N.V.
n
Eurofintus Financieringen B.V.
n
Euroleenlijn B.V.
n
Financieringsmaatschappij Mahuko N.V.
n
Finata Bank N.V.
n
Finata Sparen N.V.
n
Finata Zuid-Nederland B.V.
n
IDM Finance B.V.
n
Iebe Lease B.V.
n
InterBank N.V.
n
J.J.P. Akkerman Financieringen B.V.
n
Krediet ‘78 B.V.
n
Mahuko Financieringen B.V.
n
Matriks N.V.
n
NVF Voorschotbank B.V.
n
Regio Kredietdesk B.V.
n
VoordeelBank B.V.
n Logos Finanziaria S.p.A.
n SSF (Sofinco Saudi Fransi)
n Finaref
n ADM
n Argence Participation
n Assurfi
n BC Finance
n BC Provence
n Finanpar
Asset management
n Caceis
n Brooke Securities Holdings
n Brooke Securities Inc.
n CACEIS Bank Deutschland GmbH
n CACEIS Fastnet American Administration
n Olympia Capital Associates L.P.
n Olympia Capital Inc.
n Olympia Capital Ltd.
n Olympia Capital Ltd. Cayman
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
n Olympia Financial Services Inc.
REMOVALS IN 2007
n Olympia Ireland Ltd.
1) Sale to non-Group companies and deconsolidation
following loss of control
n Winchester Fiduciary Services Ltd.
n Winchester International Trust Company Ltd.
n CAAM
n CAAM AI London Branch
n CAAM Financial Solutions
n CAAM London Branch
n CAAM Real Estate Italia Sgr
n CAAM Sgr
n Predica
n Prediquant actions Asie
Corporate and investment banking
n Calyon
n Aguadana S.L.
n Cafi KEDROS
n CAIRS Assurance S.A.
n Calliope SRL (Ex Cordusio SRL)
n Calyon Algérie
n Calyon CLP
French retail banking
n Regional Bank subsidiaries
n Process Lorraine
n Routage Express Service
International retail banking
n Banca Intesa S.p.A.
n Banco del Desarrollo
n Phoenix Metrolife Emporiki
Specialised financial services
n Sofinco
n Finconsum ESC S.A.
Asset management
n CAAM
n CAAM SGR S.p.A.
n Epsilon SGR S.p.A.
n Nextra Alternative Investment SGR S.p.A.
Corporate and investment banking
n Fransabank France
n Calyon Financing Luxembourg SARL
n Crédit Agricole Luxembourg Bank
2) Application of materiality threshold or discontinued
activities
n EDELAAR EESV
French retail banking
n Indosuez Finance Limited
n Regional Bank subsidiaries
n SNC Shaun
n Defitech
Proprietary asset management and other activities
n Defitech Dauphicom
n Crédit Agricole Private Equity
n Defitech Routage et Communication
n Idia Agricapital
n L’Esprit Cantal
n Sodica S.A.S.
n Mat Alli Domes
n Crédit Agricole Immobilier
n LCL
n Monné-Decroix Group
n Crédit Lyonnais Benelux
n R.S.B.
n Crédit Lyonnais Notolion
n Other
n Casanli
n Crédit Agricole Covered Bonds
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 199
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Asset management
Specialised financial services
n CAAM
n Crédit Agricole Leasing
n Alternative Investment & Research Technologies LLC
n Etica Bail merged into Lixxbail.
n CASAM Cayman Ltd.
n Slibail Autos merged into Slibail Longue Durée (SLD).
n Pacifica
n Slibail Energy merged into Unifergie.
n Colisée 2001
n Finaref
Corporate and investment banking
n Jotex Finans AB and Finaref Securities AB merged into Finaref AB.
n Calyon
n FGAFS Group
n CAI Derivatives Products PLC
n Fidis Servizi Finanziari S.p.A. merged into FAFS.
n Calyon Investment Products Limited
n Sofice S.A. merged into FC France.
n Calyon Uruguay S.A.
n Fidis Retail Portugal AdV S.A. merged into Fiat Distribudora
n CASAM Futures Euro
n CASAM Systeia Pair Trading
n Ergifrance
n ESF
n FCC Masterace
Portugal.
n Tarfin S.A. merged into Fidis Finance.
n Fidis Dealer Services and Fiat Auto Lease N.V. merged into Fidis
Nederland BV.
Asset management
n Assurances Fédérales IARD merged into Pacifica.
n IIF BV (Indosuez International Finance BV)
n Mezzasia
n SNC Haussmann Anjou
n Other
n Cal FP (Holding)
n Cal FP Bank
Proprietary asset management and other activities
n CAAM
n East Asia Sits Co Ltd.
n CPR Group
n CPR Billets
3) Merger with or into another Group company
French retail banking
n Regional Bank subsidiaries
n Caisse Régionale Brie Picardie merged with Caisse Régionale
Oise; the new entity retained the name Caisse Régionale Brie
Picardie.
n Caisse Régionale Languedoc created by the merger of Caisse
4) Universal Asset transfer to a Group Company
French retail banking
n LCL
n Consortium Rhodanien de Réalisation
n Crédit Lyonnais Assurance, Réassurance, Courtage (CLARC)
Asset management
n Predica
n Immobilière Federpierre
Proprietary asset management and other activities
n CPR Gestion (CPRG)
n Sacam Consommation 1
n Sacam Consommation 2
n Sacam Consommation 3
n SOPAR
Corporate and investment banking
n Calyon
n Cisa S.A.
Régionale Gard, Caisse Régionale Midi and SCI Paysagère.
n Ical merged into Caisse Régionale Lorraine.
CHANGE OF COMPANY NAME
French retail banking
International retail banking
n Emporiki Asset Management Mutual Funds created by the merger
of Emporiki Asset Management A.E.P.E.Y. and Ermis Aedak.
n Regional Bank subsidiaries
n Gard Obligations renamed Gard Diversifié
n Other
n Corelyon renamed Crédit Agricole Reinsurance S.A.
200 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
International retail banking
n Pacifica
n BNI Crédit Lyonnais Madagascar renamed BNI Madagascar.
n Assurances Fédérales IARD, formerly equity-accounted, is now
n Crédit Lyonnais Cameroun renamed SCB Cameroon.
n Crédit Lyonnais Congo renamed Crédit du Congo.
n Crédit Lyonnais Sénégal renamed Crédit du Senegal.
Specialised financial services
n FAFS Group
fully consolidated.
Corporate and investment banking
n Calyon Global Partners becomes an intermediate consolidation
level encompassing Calyon Leasing Corporation, Calyon North
America Inc., and CLASI, which were individually removed from
the scope of consolidation.
n Fiat Auto Financial Services S.p.A. renamed FGAFS (Fiat Group
Automobiles Financial Services S.p.A.).
Asset management
n Predica
n Hypersud renamed Foncière Hypersud.
n Prédicai Europe renamed Predica Europe S.A.
Corporate and investment banking
n Calyon
n Aguadana renamed Aguadana S.L.
n CAI Merchant Bank Asia Ltd. renamed Calyon Merchant Bank
Asia Ltd.
n Calyon Global Partners renamed Calyon Global Partners Group.
n Calyon Turk A.S. renamed Calyon Yatirim Bankasi Turk A.S.
n Cordusio SRL renamed Calliope SRL.
n Crédit Lyonnais Invest Ltd. renamed Calyon Holdings.
n Indosuez Levante S.A. renamed C.A.P.B. Levante.
n Indosuez Norte SL renamed C.A.P.B. Norte.
n Minerva renamed Sagrantino Italy SRL.
CHANGE OF CONSOLIDATION METHOD
French retail banking
n Other
n Crédit Agricole Reinsurance S.A. is now fully consolidated.
Asset management
n CACEIS
n The entity CACEIS Fastnet is now consolidated on the proportional
method.
n CAAM
n CA Alternative Investment Products Group SGR is now fully
consolidated.
n Sim S.p.A. Selezione e Distribuzione is now fully consolidated.
3.2. Main acquisitions during the year
ITALIAN TRANSACTIONS
The merger of Banca Intesa and San Paolo IMI, which Crédit
Agricole S.A. had approved under the agreements signed on
11 October 2006 with Banca Intesa, was completed on 1 January
2007. As a result of this transaction, Crédit Agricole S.A.’s stake
in the new entity was diluted to 9.12% and the shareholders’
pact to which Crédit Agricole S.A. belonged was dissolved. These
events resulted in recognition of a €1,097 million gain on dilution(1)
(included in net income on the disposal of fixed assets) and the
deconsolidation of Crédit Agricole S.A.’s investment in Intesa
Sanpaolo as from 1 January 2007.
On 22 January 2007, Crédit Agricole S.A. announced that it had
sold 3.6% of ordinary Intesa Sanpaolo shares for €2,506 million.
Disposals of savings shares during the year generated total
proceeds of €441 million. These transactions generated a gain of
€532 million (included in NBI).
Asset management
On 24 January 2007, the future of the partnership in asset
management, which was deferred until January 2007 under the
11 October 2006 agreements, was determined: Crédit Agricole S.A.
and Intesa Sanpaolo announced that they had decided not to
pursue their European project in asset management and to dissolve
their partnership. Work to prepare the spin-off of CAAM Sgr, a joint
subsidiary of Crédit Agricole S.A. and Intesa Sanpaolo, was carried
out in 2007 and was completed in December. During this period,
CAAM Sgr was consolidated on the proportional method in the
accounts de Crédit Agricole S.A.
On 27 December 2007, in accordance with the terms of their
agreement, Intesa Sanpaolo and Crédit Agricole S.A. completed
the final stage in the unwinding of the CAAM Sgr partnership. This
entailed the acquisition by Intesa Sanpaolo of business activities
representing 65% of Nextra Investment Management sold by
Banca Intesa to Crédit Agricole S.A. in December 2005. The price
of these business activities (€864 million) was agreed based on the
December 2005 selling price and taking into account the spin-off
of the CAAM Sgr investment funds dedicated to the Cariparma and
FriulAdria branch networks (see below), together with the property
funds, into two new companies that CAAM Sgr had already sold to
CAAM S.A. Taking into account the historical value maintenance
adjustment applied in 2005 on the portion of the purchase cost
(1) By comparison with the amount published in the consolidated financial statements for the six months to 30 June 2007, which was adjusted for the share of reversible
reserves transferred.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 201
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for Nextra previously held by the Group through its stake in Intesa,
which was consolidated at the time, Crédit Agricole S.A.’s gain on
disposal on 27 December 2007 was €220 million. It is recorded
under “Net gain/(loss) on disposal of fixed assets”.
Retail banking network
On 1 March 2007, under the agreements of 11 October 2006,
Crédit Agricole S.A. completed the acquisition of 75% of Cassa di
Risparmio di Parma and Piacenza (Cariparma). At the same time,
Sacam International, a holding of Crédit Agricole’s Regional Banks,
completed its acquisition of a 10% stake in Cariparma. Cariparma
Foundation owns the remaining 15%. Crédit Agricole S.A., Sacam
International and Cariparma Foundation also subscribed and paid,
pro rata to their respective stakes in Cariparma, the first tranche of
the capital increase voted at Cariparma’s annual General Meeting
on 5 February 2007. This increase allowed Cariparma to acquire
76.05% of the shares of Banca Popolare FriulAdria (FriulAdria) from
Intesa Sanpaolo on 1 March 2007.
On 1 April 2007, under the agreements of 11 October 2006, Intesa
Sanpaolo transferred 29 branches to FriulAdria. On 21 June, after
securing the required approvals from the regulatory authorities,
Cariparma acquired from Intesa Sanpaolo the FriulAdria shares
created when the 29 branches were transferred. After this
transaction, Cariparma owned 78.68% of FriulAdria.
On 1 July 2007, under the agreements of 11 October 2006,
Intesa SanPaolo transferred 173 branches to Cariparma. On
6 July 2007, after securing the required approvals from the
regulatory authorities, Crédit Agricole S.A., Sacam International and
Fondazione Cariparma acquired from Intesa San Paolo the shares
created at the time of this transfer, pro rata to their respective
stakes in Cariparma.
After these transactions, Crédit Agricole S.A. owns 75% of
Cariparma, which in turn owns 78.68% of FriulAdria and 50% of
the insurance company PoVita, in which Cariparma has historically
held an equity stake.
These transactions are treated as follows in the consolidated
accounts of the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group for the year ended
31 December 2007:
Cariparma and FriulAdria have been fully consolidated as from
1 March 2007. The 29 branches transferred by Intesa Sanpaolo to
FriulAdria have been fully consolidated as from 1 April 2007. The
173 branches transferred by Intesa Sanpaolo to Cariparma have
been fully consolidated as from 1 July 2007.
The identifiable assets and liabilities of Cariparma, FriulAdria and
the 202 branches have been recognised at provisional fair value.
This includes recognition on the consolidated balance sheet of an
amortisable intangible asset of €432 million, representing projected
202 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
future profits on bank customers existing at the time of the
acquisition, net of contingent costs; an amortisable intangible asset
of €10 million (for 50%), representing projected future profits on
Po Vita life insurance policies in force at the time of the acquisition;
a €122 million adjustment of the property assets, reflecting the fair
value of the relevant assets. Recognition of these assets led to
recognition of deferred tax liabilities.
n Total purchase price
€5,769 million
n (Cariparma, Friuladria, 202 branches,
after share issue and including incidental costs)
n Intragroup share acquisitions
n Fair value of net assets acquired
-€500 million
€2,720 million
n Total goodwill recorded on consolidated
balance sheet
€2,549 million
Of which: Crédit Agricole S.A. Group
share of goodwill
€2,235 million
This goodwill has been calculated on a provisional basis and may
be adjusted over the 12 months following the acquisition date. It
belongs to the “International retail banking – Italy” cash-generating
unit.
EMPORIKI: DISPOSAL OF PHOENIX METROLIFE AND
ADJUSTMENT OF ALLOCATION OF ACQUISITION COST
On 9 August 2006, following a public tender offer, Crédit Agricole S.A.
acquired 72% of Emporiki Bank of Greece (“Emporiki”). This stake
was reduced to 67% at the end of December 2006 following the
sale of 5% of the shares to Sacam International, a wholly-owned
subsidiary of the Crédit Agricole Regional Banks.
Soon after it acquired control of Emporiki, Crédit Agricole S.A.
initiated the process of disposing of Phoenix Metrolife Emporiki
S.A. (“Phoenix”), a life insurance company controlled by Emporiki.
On 8 March 2007, it signed an agreement with Groupama to
acquire 100% of Phoenix. The sale of Phoenix to Groupama was
completed on 30 June 2007.
From an accounting perspective, the integration of Emporiki into
the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group and the disposal of Phoenix made it
possible to fine-tune the calculation of the fair value of Emporiki’s
identifiable assets and liabilities.
The fair value of the identifiable assets and liabilities includes
adjustments net opening equity, for a net reduction of €349 million
(for 100%), primarily for bringing general reserves for nonperforming loans and collective provisions for credit risk into line
with the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s rules, and the valuation of
Phoenix’s assets and liabilities based on the price at which they
were sold to Groupama.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Acquisition cost (after sale of 5%
to Sacam International)
€2,051 million
n
Fair value of net assets acquired
€535 million
n
Final goodwill
n
€1,516 million
This goodwill belongs to the “International retail banking - Greece”
cash-generating unit.
ACQUISITION BY PACIFICA, CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.’S
NON-LIFE INSURANCE SUBSIDIARY, OF 60% OF
ASSURANCES FÉDÉRALES IARD
Under the agreement of 23 December 2004 between AGF and
Crédit Agricole S.A., on 18 May 2007, AGF exercised its put option
for 60% of Assurances Fédérales IARD. After securing the required
approvals from the regulatory authorities, on 27 September 2007,
Pacifica acquired the corresponding shares, thereby becoming the
sole shareholder of Assurances Fédérales IARD. On 28 December
2007, this company was merged into Pacifica. The transaction was
backdated to 1 January 2007.
With this acquisition, Pacifica, whose range is primarily distributed
through the Crédit Agricole Regional Bank network, plans to step
up its deployment in non-life insurance by distributing Pacifica’s
products through the LCL branch network.
The identifiable assets and liabilities of Assurances Fédérales IARD
as of the acquisition date have been recognised at provisional fair
value:
The identifiable assets and liabilities of Crédit Agricole Luxembourg
Bank as of the acquisition date have been recognised at provisional
fair value:
n
Acquisition cost (including incidental expenses) €144 million
n
Fair value of net assets acquired
€48 million
n
Goodwill
€96 million
This goodwill has been calculated on a provisional basis and may
be adjusted over the 12 months following the acquisition date.
It belongs to the “International private banking” cash-generating
unit.
Crédit Agricole Luxembourg Bank has been fully consolidated since
2 July 2007.
ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY DEVELOPER
MONNÉ-DECROIX BY CRÉDIT AGRICOLE IMMOBILIER
Under the agreement of 17 July 2007, after securing the required
approvals from the regulatory authorities, on 25 July 2007, Crédit
Agricole Immobilier acquired control of the holding company of the
Monné-Decroix Group, a French property developer active primarily
in multi-family housing.
The acquisition reinforces Crédit Agricole Immobilier’s property
development operations.
Given the terms and conditions of the agreement of sale, 100% of
the Monné-Decroix Group was consolidated as of the acquisition
date. The identifiable assets and liabilities of the Monné-Decroix
Group as of the acquisition date have been recognised at
provisional fair value:
n
Acquisition cost (including incidental expenses) €126 million
n
Fair value of net assets acquired
€75 million
n
Goodwill
€51 million
n
Acquisition cost
(including incidental costs and the
estimated fair value of future payments)
€204 million
This goodwill has been calculated on a provisional basis and may
be adjusted over the 12 months following the acquisition date. It
belongs to the “Pacifica Group” cash-generating unit.
n
Fair value of net assets acquired
€116 million
n
Goodwill
The 40% stake in Assurances Fédérales IARD previously held
by Pacifica was accounted for on the equity method. In 2007,
Assurances Fédérales IARD was fully consolidated as from
1 January 2007.
ACQUISITION OF BANK SARASIN EUROPE S.A. BY CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE LUXEMBOURG
Under the agreement of 15 May 2007 between Banque Sarasin
& Cie S.A., Basle, Switzerland, and Crédit Agricole Luxembourg,
and after securing the required approvals from the regulatory
authorities, on 2 July 2007, Crédit Agricole Luxembourg acquired
100% of Bank Sarasin Europe S.A., which was renamed Crédit
Agricole Luxembourg Bank.
This acquisition strengthens Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s private
banking operations in Europe.
€88 million
This goodwill has been calculated on a provisional basis and may
be adjusted over the 12 months following the acquisition date. It
belongs to the “Groupe CA Immobilier” cash-generating unit, which
is part of the “Proprietary asset management and other activities”
business line.
The Monné-Decroix Group has been fully consolidated since
25 July 2007.
ACQUISITION BY SOFINCO, THE CONSUMER FINANCE
SUBSIDIARY, OF INTERBANK AND DMC GROEP
Under the agreement of 31 July 2007 with ABN Amro, after securing
approval from the regulatory authorities, on 15 November 2007,
Sofinco acquired 100% of Interbank N.V. and DMC Groep N.V.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 203
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The acquisition strengthens the Group’s market share in consumer
finance in the Netherlands, where Sofinco was already active via its
Ribank subsidiary.
n
The identifiable assets and liabilities of Interbank and DMC Groep
as of the acquisition date have been recognised at provisional fair
value:
n
n
Acquisition cost (including incidental expenses) €111 million
n
Fair value of net assets acquired
€29 million
n
Goodwill
€82 million
This goodwill has been calculated on a provisional basis and may
be adjusted over the 12 months following the acquisition date. It
belongs to the “Sofinco Group” cash-generating unit.
Interbank and DMC Groep have been fully consolidated since
1 November 2007.
TENDER OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. SHARES TO NOVA
SCOTIA’S OFFER FOR BANCO DEL DESARROLLO
On 5 October 2007, Crédit Agricole S.A. tendered its 23.7%
shareholding in Chilean bank Banco del Desarrollo to the public
tender offer launched by Canadian group Nova Scotia.
The stake in Banco del Desarrollo was deconsolidated on
1 October 2007. The disposal generated proceeds of €117 million
before taxes and duties, which is included under “Net income (loss)
on disposal of fixed assets”.
ACQUISITION OF OLYMPIA CAPITAL GROUP BY CACEIS,
JOINT SUBSIDIARY OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. AND
NATIXIS IN SECURITIES AND INVESTOR SERVICES
Under the terms of the agreement of 30 July 2007, after securing the
required approvals from the regulatory authorities, on 28 November
2007, CACEIS, via its subsidiary CACEIS Fastnet American
Administration (CACEIS Fastnet AA), acquired 100% of the Olympia
Capital Group, a fund administrator which specialises in alternative
investments and operates in the USA, Bermuda and Canada.
For CACEIS, this operation was part of its strategy of strengthening
its range of services to alternative investment funds.
Following this transaction, CACEIS Fastnet AA and the Olympia
Capital Group are fully controlled by CACEIS, which in turn is
jointly controlled by Crédit Agricole S.A. and Natixis. Consequently,
CACEIS Fastnet AA and the Olympia Capital Group are
proportionately consolidated in the consolidated accounts of
Crédit Agricole S.A.
The identifiable assets and liabilities of the Olympia Capital Group
as of the acquisition date have been recognised at provisional fair
value:
Acquisition cost (including
incidental costs) for CACEIS
€243 million
(price at 28 November 2007)
Fair value of net assets acquired
by CACEIS
€9 million
n
Goodwill booked by CACEIS
€234 million
n
Consolidated goodwill on
Crédit Agricole S.A. balance sheet
€117 million
This goodwill has been calculated on a provisional basis and may
be adjusted over the 12 months following the acquisition date. It
belongs to the “CACEIS Group” cash-generating unit.
CACEIS Fastnet AA and the Olympia Capital Group have been
proportionately consolidated since 28 November 2007.
ACQUISITION BY CACEIS, JOINT SUBSIDIARY OF CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE S.A. AND NATIXIS IN SECURITIES AND
INVESTOR SERVICES, OF THE CUSTODY BUSINESS OF
HVB
On 28 December 2007, under the agreement of 3 July 2007, after
securing the required approvals from the regulatory authorities,
CACEIS acquired 100% of Financial Markets Service Bank GmbH,
which handled the custody business of HypoVereinsbank (HVB). It
will operate its business within the CACEIS group under the name
CACEIS Bank Deutschland GmbH.
This acquisition is part of CACEIS’s strategy to expand its
operations in Europe.
Following this acquisition, CACEIS Bank Deutschland GmbH is
controlled exclusively by CACEIS, which in turn is jointly controlled
by Crédit Agricole S.A. and Natixis. Consequently, CACEIS
Bank Deutschland GmbH is proportionately consolidated in the
consolidated accounts of Crédit Agricole S.A.
The identifiable assets and liabilities of CACEIS Bank Deutschland
GmbH as of the acquisition date have been recognised at
provisional fair value:
n
Acquisition cost (including incidental expenses)
for CACEIS
€461 million
n
Fair value of net assets acquired by CACEIS
€100 million
n
Goodwill booked by CACEIS
€361 million
n
Consolidated goodwill on Crédit Agricole S.A.
balance sheet
€180 million
This goodwill has been calculated on a provisional basis and may
be adjusted over the 12 months following the acquisition date. It
belongs to the “CACEIS Group” cash-generating unit.
CACEIS Bank Deutschland GmbH has been proportionately
consolidated since 28 December 2007.
204 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
3.3. Investments in equity affiliates
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Equityaccounted
value
Financial institutions:
Market value
Total assets
Net banking
income
Net income
626
3,669
18,077
716
525
1,021
1,800
68,355
1,969
607
13,472
Bank Al Saudi Al Fransi
B.E.S.
Regional Banks and affiliates
1,136
11,764
Other
Share of net
income
129
152
867
61
(12)
Non-finance companies:
968
133
Eurazeo (1)
845
Other
123
5
14,440
1,269
Net book value of investments in equity
affiliates
765
13,448
2,204
973
128
(1) Asset, net banking income and net income published by the Company at 30/06/2007.
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Equityaccounted
value
Financial institutions:
Bank Al Saudi Al Fransi
B.E.S.
Regional Banks and affiliates
Banca Intesa SpA (1)
Market value
Total assets
Net banking
income
Net income
561
2,869
16,112
832
638
860
1,624
59,138
2,817
420
16,457
1,529
10,891
3,945
Share of net
income
153
79
861
6,788
282,729
7,795
2,173
419
Other
200
17
Non-finance companies:
791
142
Eurazeo (2)
649
Other
142
57
17,248
1,671
NET BOOK VALUE OF INVESTMENTS IN
EQUITY AFFILIATES
899
10,428
636
112
85
(1) Asset, net banking income and net income published by the Company at 30/09/2006.
(2) Asset, net banking income and net income published by the Company at 30/06/2006.
3.4. Securitisation transactions
and special-purpose entities
SECURITISATION TRANSACTIONS CARRIED OUT ON
BEHALF OF CUSTOMERS
These transactions usually involve the creation of special purpose
entities (SPEs) which are not consolidated if Calyon does not
exercise control. The criterion of control is usually appreciated on
an “in substance” basis (i.e. ownership in the risks and rewards).
Calyon has carried out a number of securitisation transactions on
behalf of its customers:
Corp and La Fayette Asset Securitization) in relation to
transactions carried out by customers. These SPEs finance
themselves by issuing short term notes and euro and USD
commercial paper. Calyon issues letters of credit to guarantee a
portion of the risk of default attaching to the assets securitised
by its customers, which amounted to €1.12 billion at
31 December 2007. Calyon had also granted a total of
€23.03 billion in cash lines to these SPEs at 31 December
2007. Total outstandings held by the conduits amounted to
€16.77 billion at 31 December 2007;
n Calyon also manages a consolidated SPE (ESF), which was
dormant at 31 December 2007;
n Calyon manages four non-consolidated SPEs in Europe and
America (Hexagon Finance a.r.l., LMA, Atlantic Asset Securitization
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 205
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
n Lastly, Calyon manages a consolidated French credit institution,
Ester Finance Titrisation, to which it had granted a total of
€162.5 million at 31 December 2007.
At 31 December 2007, Calyon had granted €261 million in letters of
credit and €1.92 billion in cash lines to securitisation funds which
are neither consolidated nor managed by the bank.
SECURITISATION TRANSACTIONS ON OWN ACCOUNT
Calyon and Sofinco carry out securitisation transactions on own
account:
1. Transactions carried out by Calyon
As part of its portfolio management strategy, Calyon carries out
synthetic securitisation transactions to transfer the credit risk on
some of its portfolios to the market.
In 2007, the bank carried out a new securitisation programme in
Europe and in the USA for a total of €2.37 billion to manage growth
in its corporate financing activities.
The loans concerned are kept on the bank’s balance sheet or in
off-balance sheet items, while most of the credit enhancement is
recognised in financial instruments.
2. Transactions carried out by Sofinco
The Sofinco group also carries out securitisation transactions. At
31 December 2007, the Sofinco Group managed 12 consolidated
consumer credit securitisation and dealer receivable financing
vehicles in Europe. The net book values of the relevant assets (net
of associated liabilities) amounted to €3,588 million at 31 December
2007 compared with €3,620 million at 31 December 2006. They
include customer loans with a net book value of €3,169 million at
31 December 2007 compared with €3,223 million at 31 December
2006.
Securitisation transactions carried out within the Sofinco Group are
not considered to be forming part of a deconsolidation transaction
and have therefore been reintegrated into the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group’s consolidated accounts.
At 31 December 2007, there were thirteen synthetic securitisation
transactions outstanding maturing between 2009 and 2013, with a
total nominal value of €50.9 billion.
OTHER SPECIAL PURPOSE ENTITIES – UNITS IN FUNDS
Calyon had retained a total of €1,329 million in non-investmentgrade risk, plus a residual share in the investment-grade tranches
amounting to €678 million.
The entities concerned appear in the list of consolidated companies
in Note 12.
206 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Special purpose entities and funds are consolidated when the
Group exercises control in substance.
At 31 December 2007, Calyon had fully consolidated five funds,
Predica, nineteen funds and Pacifica, three funds.
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
3.5. Investments in non-consolidated companies
These investments, which are included in the portfolio of “Available-for-sale assets”, consist of floating-rate securities representing a
significant percentage of the share capital of the companies that issued them and are intended to be held for the long term.
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Net book value
% interest
Net book value
% interest
AGRICEREALES
77
37.6
73
37.6
57
1.4
138
99.7
ATTIJARIWAFA Bank
74
1.4
237
4.8
BFO SA (5)
44
99.0
B IMMOBILIER
80
100.0
BANKINTER
CPR BK (4)
Crédit Logement (Shares A and B)
456
33.0
71
100.0
337
100.0
451
33.0
FONCIERE DES MURS
175
18.1
176
18.1
FONCIERE DEVELOPPEMENT LOGEMENT
155
15.1
221
15.1
848
10.3
249
12.4
188
12.4
3,538
5.1
216
27.1
281
27.1
GECINA NOM (3)
HOLDING INFRASTRUCTURES DE TRANSPORT (SANEF)
INTESA SAN PAOLO (6)
KORIAN
LOGISTIS II LUXEMBOURG (2)
PARCS GFR
SCI 1 TER BELLINI
74
40.5
135
6.5
48
40.5
112
33.3
96
33.3
73
50.0
22
50.0
126
33.3
189
50.0
SCI VAL HUBERT
110
50.0
78
50.0
SCI WASHINGTON
118
34.0
147
34.0
SICOVAM HOLDING
160
24.0
146
24.0
SCI ILOT 13
SCI LOGISTIS
SCI PAUL CEZANNE (2)
Other
BOOK VALUE OF INVESTMENTS IN NON-CONSOLIDATED
COMPANIES (1)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
1,604
1,789
7,678
5,491
Including €840m in long-term impairment recognised at 31 December 2007.
Disposed of in 2007.
Reclassified from Non-consolidated investments category.
Company liquidated in 2007.
Cancellation of shares, capital decrease duly recorded.
Deconsolidated in 2007.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 207
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
3.6. Goodwill
(in millions of euros)
Additions
(acquisi- Decreases
01.01.2007
tions) (disposals)
Impairment los- Translation
ses during
adjustthe period
ments
Other
movements (1)
31/12/2007
Gross value
French retail banking
Groupe LCL
5,263
5,263
Specialised financial services
Sofinco Group
1,082
85
Finaref Group – France
1,017
9
Finaref Group – Nordic
183
Danaktiv
1
(8)
1,160
1,026
183
41
41
264
264
CA Leasing Group
160
160
EFL
196
196
62
62
Lukas
Eurofactor Group
Asset management, insurance and private banking
CAAM Group
2,448
18
International Private Banking
497
96
Predica Group
483
Pacifica Group
33
51
CACEIS Group
92
296
Finaref Group
408
Insurance in Portugal
Corporate and investment banking
(465)
(4)
17
2,014
593
483
84
(1)
387
230
1
231
1,743
14
1,757
(3)
1,516
408
International retail banking
Serbia
Greece
28
28
1,519
Ukraine
170
(17)
Egypt
180
(11)
Italy
Proprietary asset management and other activities
4
27
180
169
2,549
2,549
97
101
Accumulated impairment losses
French retail banking
Specialised financial services
Finaref Group – Nordic
CA Leasing Group
(63)
EFL
(73)
Asset management, insurance and private banking
(10)
Corporate and investment banking
(14)
(63)
(73)
(14)
13
(2)
(11)
(14)
International retail banking
Ukraine
(65)
(65)
Proprietary asset management and other activities
NET BOOK VALUE *
*
15,943
3,201
(465)
(79)
(31)
60
18,629
By comparison with previously published figures, at 1 January 2007, goodwill was reduced by €763 million due to the change in accounting method for treating movements in minority
interests (see Note 1).
(1) Mainly adjustments made during the goodwill allocation period.
(2) Transferred to provisions for risks and expenses.
208 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Goodwill at 1 January 2007 was subject to impairment testing
based on the assessment of the value in use of the cash generating
units (CGU) to which it is associated. The determination of value
in use was calculated by discounting the CGU’s estimated future
cash flows calculated from the medium term plans developed to
meet budget process requirements. The following assumptions
were used:
n estimated future cash flows: projected data over three years,
based on the Group’s development plan;
Perpetual
growth rates
In 2007
Retail banking
(French & International)
Discount rate
2% to 3%
9.2% to 17.4%
SFS
2% to 2.5%
9.2% to 12.2%
Asset management, insurance
and private banking
1.5% to 2%
9.7% to 11%
0%
13.4%
Corporate and investment
banking
n perpetual growth rates: rates varying depending on the CGU, as
shown in the table below;
n discount rate: rates varying depending on the CGU, as shown in
After testing, a total impairment charge of €79 million was
recognised for 2007.
the table below.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 209
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of euros)
01.01.2006
Additions
(acquisi- Decreases
tions) (disposals)
Impairment losses during
the period
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements
31/12/2006
(12)
5,263
Gross value
French retail banking
LCL Group
5,261
14
559
522
Specialised financial services
Sofinco Group
1
1,082
Finaref Group – France
1,017
1,017
Finaref Group – Nordic
183
183
Danactiv
41
41
264
264
CA Leasing Group
160
160
EFL
196
196
62
62
Lukas
Eurofactor Group
Asset management, insurance and private banking
CAAM Group
2,533
49
(1)
(133)
2,448
International Private Banking
497
497
Predica Group
483
483
Pacifica Group
33
33
CACEIS Group
88
Finaref Group
408
Insurance in Portugal
Corporate and investment banking
6
(2)
92
408
230
1,759
94
230
(14)
(14)
(82)
1,743
International retail banking
Serbia
26
47
(45)
Greece
1,519
Ukraine
175
(5)
Egypt
175
(17)
Proprietary asset management and other activities
28
1,519
170
22
180
4
4
Accumulated impairment losses
French retail banking
Specialised financial services
Finaref Group – Nordic
CA Leasing Group
EFL
(63)
(63)
(73)
(73)
Asset management, insurance and private banking
(10)
(10)
Corporate and investment banking
(14)
(14)
International retail banking
Proprietary asset management and other activities
NET BOOK VALUE *
*
13,473
2,835
(16)
(63)
(36)
(250)
15,943
By comparison with previously published figures, at 1 January 2006, goodwill was reduced by €637 million at 1/1/2006 and €126 million over the period due to the change in accounting
method for treating movements in minority interests (see Note 1).
210 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 4
Financial management, exposure to risk and hedging policy
Crédit Agricole S.A.’s Financial Management division is responsible
for organising financial flows within the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group,
defining and implementing refinancing rules, asset and liability
management, and managing prudential ratios. It sets out the
principles and ensures a cohesive financial management system
throughout the Group.
The Group’s risk management is handled by the Group Risk
Management and Permanent Controls Department (DRG). This
department reports to the CEO, and its task is to control credit,
market and operational risks and to oversee projects affecting
management of these risks.
A description of these processes and narrative information now
appear in the management report in the section entitled “Risk
factors”, as allowed by IFRS 7. Nonetheless, the accounting
breakdowns are still presented in the financial statements.
4.1. Credit risk
Credit risk: A credit risk occurs when a counterparty is unable to honour its obligations and when the book value of these
obligations in the bank’s records is positive. The counterparty may be a bank, an industrial or commercial enterprise, a government
and its various entities, an investment fund, or a natural person.
The exposure may be a loan, debt security, deed of property, performance exchange contract, performance bond or unused
confirmed commitment. The risk also includes the settlement risk inherent in any transaction entailing an exchange of cash or
physical goods outside a secure settlement system (see management report, “Risk factors in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group”).
The tables below show the exposure of the different categories of
financial assets and of loans and advances to banks and customers
and customer accounts based on various risk concentration
criteria.
CONCENTRATION BY CUSTOMER TYPE
Information on an analysis by type of counterparty now follows the
lexical and correspondence rules defined by the FINREP regulatory
financial reporting framework.
An entity’s maximum exposure to credit risk is the gross book
value, net of any offset amount and any recognised loss of value.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 211
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Financial assets by customer type
31/12/2007
Payment arrears on non-impaired loans
(in millions of euros)
> 90 days > 180 days
≤ 90 days ≤ 180 days
≤ 1 year
-
-
Impairment of financial
assets, individually and
collectively tested
6,491
2,281
187
107
> 1 year
Equity instruments
Debt instruments
Net book
value of
impaired
assets
-
-
Central administrations
Banks
93
34
Institutions other than banks
88
22
6
51
4,406
8,615
31
100
4
49
Large corporations
Retail customers
Loans and advances
Central administrations
Banks
3,543
143
40
2
9
2
1,367
Institutions other than banks
37
140
99
Large corporations
77
2
7
1
1,524
4,760
2,022
139
2
1
2,707
3,607
3,543
143
9
2
11,084
11,003
Retail customers
TOTAL
Due from banks and loans and advances to customers by customer type:
Doubtful and impairement (excluding Crédit Agricole internal transactions)
31/12/2007
Impairment
of doubtful
debts
Bad debts
Gross
Doubtful
debts
Central administrations and institutions
other than banks
15,057
104
65
205
75
14,917
Banks
88,092
27
24
43
43
88,025
160,439
2,301
1,157
2,317
1,842
157,440
(in millions of euros)
Large corporations
Retail customers
TOTAL *
133,669
2,312
1,018
3,271
1,893
130,758
4,744
2,264
5,836
3,853
391,140
Net accrued interest
Net book value
Including €1 660 million in unimpaired restructured loans (performing customer loans).
212 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Total
397,257
Collective impairment
*
Impairment of
bad debts
1,903
(2,159)
390,884
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Central government and institutions other
than banks
Banks
Large corporations
Retail customers
TOTAL
Gross
Doubtful
debts
5,701
4
82,151
151
Impairment
of doubtful
debts
115
Bad debts
Impairment of
bad debts
Total
109
94
5,607
147
147
81,889
147,836
150,282
2,398
1,283
2,327
1,163
98,133
2,183
1,212
2,129
1,682
95,239
336,267
4,736
2,610
4,712
3,086
330,571
Net accrued interest
2,426
Collective impairment
(1,776)
Net book value
331,221
Commitments given to customers by customer type
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Financing commitments given to customers
Central government and institutions other than banks
Large corporations
Retail customers
TOTAL
8,561
5,183
112,767
91,308
38,699
27,924
160,027
124,415
Guarantee commitments given to customers
Central government and institutions other than banks
Large corporations
Retail customers
TOTAL
4,081
208
77,095
79,112
6,725
26,524
87,901
105,844
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Customer accounts by customer type
(in millions of euros)
Central government and institutions other than banks
54,067
8,965
Large corporations
62,268
85,087
269,624
255,643
385,959
349,695
Retail customers
TOTAL
Accrued interest
Net book value
1,294
1,116
387,253
350,811
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 213
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
BY GEOGRAPHICAL AREA
Due from banks and loans and advances to customers by geographical area
(excluding Crédit Agricole internal transactions)
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Gross
o/w doubtful
debts
Impairment of
doubtful debts
o/w bad
debts
Impairment of
bad debts
France (inc. overseas departments
and territories)
173,676
Other EU countries
134,536
2,270
692
2,522
1,896
171,088
2,253
1,442
1,739
678
132,416
Rest of Europe
North America
13,661
35
33
34
34
13,594
25,023
11
5
1,073
870
24,148
Total
Central and South America
12,973
54
17
136
102
12,854
Africa and Middle-East
14,568
105
72
305
247
14,249
Asia-Pacific (exc. Japan)
15,812
12
3
27
26
15,783
2,264
5,836
3,853
391,140
Japan
TOTAL *
7,008
4
397,257
4,744
7,008
Net accrued interest
1,903
Collective impairment
(2,159)
Net book value
*
390,884
Including €1,660 million in unimpaired restructured assets (performing customer loans).
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Gross
o/w doubtful
debts
France (inc. overseas departments
and territories)
152,674
2,499
917
2,583
1,977
149,780
Other EU countries
107,536
1,745
1,428
1,204
401
105,707
Rest of Europe
10,114
62
29
113
69
10,016
North America
25,500
157
26
140
76
25,398
8,418
146
123
169
128
8,167
Africa and Middle-East
13,546
108
81
332
297
13,168
Asia-Pacific (exc. Japan)
13,022
12
6
169
136
12,880
5,457
7
2
2
5,455
336,267
4,736
4,712
3,086
330,571
Central and South America
Japan
TOTAL
Net accrued interest
Collective impairment
Net book value
214 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Impairment of
doubtful debts
o/w bad
debts
Impairment of
bad debts
2,610
Total
2,426
(1,776)
331,221
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Commitments given to customers by geographical area
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
France (incl. overseas departments and territories)
63,488
58,095
Other EU countries
46,951
25,301
Rest of Europe
8,495
4,733
North America
(in millions of euros)
Financing commitments given to customers
25,079
25,794
Central and South America
4,978
2,648
Africa and Middle-East
4,818
2,691
Asia-Pacific (exc. Japan)
5,208
4,078
Japan
1,010
1,075
160,027
124,415
France (incl. overseas departments and territories)
59,993
49,787
Other EU countries
TOTAL
Guarantee commitments given to customers
12,716
40,082
Rest of Europe
2,356
1,626
North America
5,109
4,044
Central and South America
1,712
3,567
Africa and Middle-East
2,536
1,763
Asia-Pacific (exc. Japan)
3,263
4,697
Japan
216
278
87,901
105,844
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
266,449
253,659
51,848
41,569
Rest of Europe
9,906
8,018
North America
19,449
9,261
8,684
5,803
TOTAL
Customer accounts by geographical area
(in millions of euros)
France (incl. overseas departments and territories)
Other EU countries
Central and South America
Africa and Middle-East
13,652
13,173
Asia-Pacific (exc. Japan)
8,581
10,975
Japan
7,308
6,832
Supranational organisations
TOTAL
Net accrued interest
Net book value
82
405
385,959
349,695
1,294
1,116
387,253
350,811
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 215
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Derivative financial instruments – Counterparty risk
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Governments, OECD central banks and similar
Market
value
1,846
31/12/2006
Potential
credit risk * Market value
553
792
Potential
credit risk *
508
OECD financial institutions and similar
86,369
73,897
83,975
74,004
Other counterparties
24,518
10,381
9,935
11,445
112,733
84,831
94,702
85,957
TOTAL
Risk on:
interest rate, exchange rate and commodities
98,800
59,632
80,457
73,519
equity and index derivatives
13,829
25,956
14,146
12,525
Impact of netting agreements
TOTAL AFTER IMPACT OF NETTING AGREEMENTS
79,247
36,936
82,237
53,282
33,486
47,895
12,465
32,675
Contracts among members of the network are excluded as they carry no risk.
*
Calculated in accordance with prudential standards (ESR).
4.2. Market Risk
Market risk is the risk of a negative impact on the income statement or balance sheet of adverse fluctuations in the value of financial
instruments following changes in market parameters:
– interest rates: interest rate risk is the risk of a change in the fair value of a financial instrument or the future cash flows from a
financial instrument due to a change in interest rates;
– exchange rates: currency risk is the risk of a change in the fair value of a financial instrument due to a change in exchange
rates;
– prices: price risk is the risk of a change in the price or volatility of equities and commodities, baskets of equities and stock
indices. The instruments most exposed to this risk are variable-income securities, equity derivatives and commodity derivatives.
(see management report, “Risk factors in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group”).
216 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS: ANALYSIS BY REMAINING MATURITY
Derivative hedging instruments – asset fair value
31/12/2007
Exchange-traded
(in millions of euros)
Interest rate instruments
Futures
Under
1 year
36
31/12/2006
Over-the-counter
1-5 years
Over
5 years
Under
1 year
1-5 years
Over
5 years
Total Fair
value
Total Fair
value
-
-
4,036
2,997
2,619
9,688
3,100
33
2
2,181
8,949
2,700
6
10
21
376
33
Interest rate swaps
4,018
2,750
Interest rate options
4
Caps, floors, collars
14
247
432
693
3
1
154
87
88
329
282
154
87
88
329
280
-
2
77
41
162
205
Other options
Currency and gold
3
-
-
-
Currency futures
Currency options
Other
-
-
-
44
44
77
41
162
205
36
-
-
4,234
3,161
2,748
10,179
3,587
188
44
211
443
247
4,422
3,205
2,959
10,622
3,834
Equity and index derivatives
Sub-total
Forward currency transactions
Net book value
36
-
-
Derivative financial instruments – asset fair value
31/12/2007
Exchange-traded
1-5 years
Under
1 year
1-5 years
Over
5 years
Total Fair
value
Total Fair
value
-
-
33,105
16,314
60,582
110,020
91,623
192
35
227
35
31,331
10,091
35,851
77,273
73,885
20
1,209
6,106
7,335
17,616
1,299
3,660
6,162
11,121
59
263
1,319
12,463
14,064
28
3,170
1,813
75
5,058
8,262
Currency futures
147
1,187
17
1,351
5,277
Currency options
3,023
626
58
3,707
2,985
6,189
19,843
17,923
53,975
25,241
4,760
7,645
936
23,358
8,610
1,071
1,009
Interest rate instruments
19
Over-the-counter
Over
5 years
(in millions of euros)
Under
1 year
31/12/2006
FRAs
Interest rate swaps
Interest rate options
Caps, floors, collars
Other options
Currency and gold
Other
Equity and index derivatives
Commodities derivatives
19
-
-
-
3,055
5,333
1,632
3,052
5,333
1,632
3
1,068
Credit derivatives
Other
Sub-total
11,876
16,979
29,153
1
63
322
8
393
15,621
37,970
78,580
169,053
125,126
3,074
5,333
1,632
42,464
2,474
3,890
2
6,366
307
3,074
5,333
1,632
44,938
41,860
78,582
175,419
125,433
Forward currency transactions
Net book value
298
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 217
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Derivative hedging instruments - Liabilities and shareholder’s equity fair value
31/12/2007
Exchange-traded
(in millions of euros)
Under
1 year
1-5 years
Over
5 years
-
-
-
Interest rate instruments
Interest rate swaps
Under
1 year
2,493
9,262
3,865
2,466
9,221
3,726
20
23
103
7
14
1
4
35
2
4
-
5
1,089
553
110
1,752
277
1,089
553
110
1,752
274
0
3
1
11
Currency options
Other
-
-
-
Equity and index derivatives
1
-
-
1
Sub-total
3,448
2,603
1
11
11,015
4,153
-
-
-
4,964
145
33
300
478
91
-
-
-
5,109
3,481
2,903
11,493
4,244
Forward currency transactions
Net book value
Total Fair
value
2,895
Other options
-
Total Fair
value
2,890
Caps, floors, collars
-
Over
5 years
3,874
3
Currency futures
1-5 years
3,865
Interest rate options
Currency and gold
31/12/2006
Over-the-counter
Derivative financial instruments - Liabilities and shareholder’s equity fair value
31/12/2007
Exchange-traded
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Over-the-counter
Under
1 year
1-5 years
Over
5 years
Under
1 year
1-5 years
Over
5 years
Total Fair
value
Total Fair
value
5
-
-
34,985
18,732
59,609
113,331
90,333
Interest rate instruments
FRAs
174
Interest rate swaps
174
1
78,308
71,139
18,739
32,486
12,158
33,664
Interest rate options
36
1,314
6,017
7,367
Caps, floors, collars
1,511
3,242
7,959
12,712
82
952
1,844
11,969
14,770
372
395
5,549
233
6,177
8,140
178
1,324
8
1,510
5,475
Other options
5
Currency and gold
-
-
-
Currency futures
Currency options
Other
Equity and index derivatives
217
4,225
225
4,667
2,665
2,730
4,395
1,221
6,543
18,468
13,576
46,933
21,168
2,730
4,395
1,221
4,195
5,207
1,468
19,216
5,695
1,123
533
11,631
12,108
24,964
252
1,630
14,688
166,441
119,641
6,409
363
172,850
120,004
Commodities derivatives
1,123
Credit derivatives
1,225
Other
Sub-total
1,630
2,735
4,395
1,221
Forward currency transactions
Net book value
2,735
218 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
4,395
1,221
41,923
42,749
2,519
3,890
44,442
46,639
73,418
73,418
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS: TOTAL COMMITMENTS
(in millions of euros)
Interest rate instruments
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Total notional
amount
outstanding
Total notional
amount
outstanding
10,792,851
10,062,566
Futures
262,141
33,692
FRAs
802,985
707,810
Interest rate swaps
5,961,638
5,943,121
Interest rate options
2,191,490
1,856,377
Caps, floors, collars
1,567,385
14,123
(1)
7,212
1,507,443
Currency and gold
1,612,597
1,194,970
Currency futures
841,920
761,860
Currency options
770,677
433,110
2,159,087
872,667
363,349
249,738
Other options
Other
Equity and index derivatives
Precious metal derivatives
Commodities derivatives
Credit derivatives
Other
Sub-total
Forward currency transactions
NET BOOK VALUE
438
150
40,372
39,202
1,754,641
581,859
287
1,718
14,564,535
12,130,203
1,137,513
568,953
15,702,048
12,699,156
(1) In 2006, €1,449,910 million of the amount included under other options consisted of commitments relating to Cap-Floor-Collar derivatives.
CURRENCY RISK
Analysis of the consolidated balance sheet by currency
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Assets
Liabilities and
shareholders’
equity
Assets
Liabilities and
shareholders’
equity
1,126,042
1,078,859
997,148
950,823
54,203
54,937
52,227
66,899
USD
156,529
210,559
131,310
168,934
JPY
26,604
27,694
26,334
25,119
Other currencies
50,845
42,174
53,514
48,758
1,414,223
1,414,223
1,260,533
1,260,533
(in millions of euros)
EUR
Other EU currencies
TOTAL
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 219
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
4.3. Liquidity and financing risk
Liquidity and financing risk is the risk of loss if the company is unable to meet its financial commitments in timely fashion and at
reasonable prices when they reach maturity.
These commitments include obligations to depositors and suppliers, as well as commitments in respect of loans and investments
(see management report, “Risk factors in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group”).
BREAKDOWN OF DEBT SECURITIES IN ISSUE AND SUBORDINATED DEBT BY CURRENCY
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Bonds
Fixed-term
subordinated
debt
Perpetual
subordinated
debt
52,769
9,530
7,986
Fixed-rate
22,457
8,663
1,257
Floating rate
30,312
867
Other EU currencies
3,438
89
(in millions of euros)
EUR
Fixed-rate
Floating rate
1,111
Bonds
Fixed-term
subordinated
debt
Perpetual
subordinated
debt
39,084
11,043
9,819
17,332
9,275
5,571
6,729
21,752
1,768
4,248
2,060
3,254
-
2,060
1,504
2,327
89
3,822
616
3,787
577
35
39
464
61
-
Fixed-rate
268
61
Floating rate
196
Other currencies
1,403
USD
Fixed-rate
Floating rate
JPY
Fixed-rate
Floating rate
TOTAL
1,750
1,359
51
1,282
2,246
1,501
745
1,809
535
2
340
291
531
2
1,019
1,518
4
7
64
7
64
403
715
12
259
12
259
274
685
121
51
129
30
-
61,896
10,347
11,808
44,869
11,654
12,326
Fixed-rate
28,905
9,301
3,931
19,819
9,882
7,333
Floating rate
32,991
1,046
7,877
25,050
1,772
4,993
> 1 year
to ≤ 5 years
> 5 years
Total
(Total principal outstanding, excluding unallocated accrued interest)
DUE FROM BANKS AND LOANS AND ADVANCES TO CUSTOMERS BY REMAINING MATURITY
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Loans and advances to banks
(incl. Crédit Agricole internal transactions)
Loans and advances to customers (o/w lease finance)
TOTAL
Accrued interest
Impairment
Net book value
220 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Under
3 months
> 3 months
to ≤ 1 year
111,040
54,701
78,402
72,746
316,889
79,265
41,763
103,090
85,047
309,165
190,305
96,464
181,492
157,793
626,054
3,262
(8,684)
620,632
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Loans and advances to banks
(incl. Crédit Agricole internal transactions)
Loans and advances to customers (o/w lease finance)
TOTAL
Under
3 months
> 3 months
to ≤ 1 year
> 1 to
≤ 5 years
> 5 years
Total
100,927
52,805
73,175
63,704
290,611
77,607
38,986
77,744
59,779
254,116
178,534
91,791
150,919
123,483
544,727
Accrued interest
3,556
Impairment
(7,931)
Net book value
540,352
DUE TO BANKS AND CUSTOMER ACCOUNTS BY REMAINING MATURITY
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Under
3 months
> 3 months
to ≤ 1 year
> 1 to
≤ 5 years
> 5 years
Total
Due to banks (including Crédit Agricole internal transactions)
134,606
14,898
13,067
8,300
170,871
Customer accounts
299,869
32,514
34,661
18,915
385,959
434,475
47,412
47,728
27,215
556,830
TOTAL
Accrued interest
2,522
Net book value
559,352
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Due to banks (including Crédit Agricole internal transactions)
Customer accounts
TOTAL
Accrued interest
Net book value
Under
3 months
> 3 months
to ≤ 1 year
> 1 to
≤ 5 years
> 5 years
Total
96,426
15,021
12,839
7,346
131,632
263,505
36,791
27,907
21,492
349,695
359,931
51,812
40,746
28,838
481,327
3,723
485,050
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 221
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DEBT SECURITIES IN ISSUE AND SUBORDINATED DEBT
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
≤ 3 months
> 3 months
to ≤ 1 year
> 1 year
to ≤ 5 years
> 5 years
Total
3,950
4,655
Debt securities in issue
Interest bearing notes
121
Money market instruments
Negotiable debt securities:
120
36
305
400
277
62,016
23,225
10,350
11,645
107,236
Issued in France
35,059
11,632
2,932
11,645
61,268
Issued in other countries
26,957
11,593
7,418
2,376
13,426
31,467
14,627
99
7
372
1,500
1,978
64,612
37,083
42,625
31,722
176,042
Bonds
Other debt securities in issue
TOTAL
45,968
Accrued interest
61,896
1,646
Net book value
177,688
Subordinated debt
Fixed-term subordinated debt
191
1,165
2,545
Perpetual subordinated debt
Mutual security deposits
Participating securities and loans
TOTAL
191
1,165
2,545
6,446
10,347
11,808
11,808
88
88
234
234
18,576
22,477
Accrued interest
360
Net book value
22,837
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
≤ 3 months
> 3 months
to ≤ 1 year
108
69
> 1 year
to ≤ 5 years
> 5 years
Total
Debt securities in issue
Interest bearing notes
Money market instruments
Negotiable debt securities:
22
24
223
705
3,950
4,655
64,794
30,341
10,480
4,581
110,196
Issued in France
45,220
11,096
6,968
4,458
67,742
Issued in other countries
19,574
19,245
3,512
123
42,454
2,065
7,747
26,018
9,039
44,869
8
1,005
1,111
37,233
18,599
161,054
Bonds
Other debt securities in issue
TOTAL
98
67,065
38,157
Accrued interest
1,770
Net book value
162,824
Subordinated debt
Fixed-term subordinated debt
Perpetual subordinated debt
Mutual security deposits
TOTAL
Accrued interest
Net book value
222 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
103
252
2,021
9,278
11,654
2,190
30
76
10,030
12,326
282
2,097
19,308
24,054
74
2,367
74
416
24,470
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
4.4. Derivative hedging instruments
Derivative financial instruments used in a hedging relationship are designated according to the intended purpose:
n fair value hedge;
n cash flow hedge;
n net foreign investment hedge.
Each hedging relationship is formally documented describing the strategy, item hedged and hedging instrument, and method of
measuring effectiveness (see management report, “Risk Factors in the Crédit Agricole S.A. Group”).
DERIVATIVE HEDGING INSTRUMENTS
31/12/2007
Market value
Positive
Negative
Fair value hedges
3,095
4,661
Interest rate
2,616
3,073
Equity
162
1
Currency
317
1,587
Cash flow hedges
7,527
6,832
Interest rate
7,072
6,189
455
643
10,622
11,493
(in millions of euros)
Credit
Commodity
other
Equity
Currency
Credit
Commodity
Other
Hedge of net investment in a foreign operation
TOTAL DERIVATIVE HEDGING INSTRUMENTS
31/12/2006
Market value
Positive
Negative
1,514
1,035
fair value hedges
1,438
992
cash flow hedges
75
32
1
11
Macro hedges (fair value)
2,319
3,207
Macro hedges (cash flow)
1
2
3,834
4,244
(in millions of euros)
Micro hedges
hedges of net foreign investments
TOTAL DERIVATIVE HEDGING INSTRUMENTS
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 223
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
4.5. Operational risk
Operational risk is the risk of loss resulting from shortcomings in internal procedures or information systems, human error
or external events that are not linked to a credit, market or liquidity risk (see management report, “Risk Factors in the Crédit
Agricole S. A. Group”).
Note 5
Notes to the income statement
5.1. Interest income and expense
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Loans and advances to banks
9,211
5,513
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
8,309
6,714
Loans and advances to customers
(in millions of euros)
16,356
11,586
Accrued interest receivable on available-for-sale financial assets
5,712
5,190
Accrued interest receivable on held-to-maturity financial assets
1,065
1,068
2,372
15,313
1,070
997
25
237
44,120
46,618
(11,388)
(4,908)
Accrued interest receivable on hedging instruments
(2)
Lease finance
Other interest and similar income
INTEREST INCOME
(1)
Deposits by banks
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
(943)
(812)
(12,022)
(8,824)
(9)
(198)
Debt securities in issue
(7,704)
(5,388)
Subordinated debt
(1,253)
(1,326)
(2,690)
(14,976)
(203)
(289)
(36,212)
(36,967)
Customer accounts
Available-for-sale financial assets
Held-to-maturity financial assets
Accrued interest payable on hedging instruments
(2)
Lease finance
Other interest and similar expense
INTEREST EXPENSE
(1) Including €181 million in individually impaired loans in 2007 against €173 million in 2006.
(2) In 2006, income and expenses were not netted.
224 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(246)
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
5.2. Net fee and commission income
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Income
Expense
Net
Income
Expense
Net
242
(134)
108
145
(139)
6
Interbank transactions
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
202
(691)
(489)
135
(705)
(570)
Customer transactions
1,545
(137)
1,408
1,707
(481)
1,226
Securities transactions
1,620
(577)
1,043
138
(194)
(56)
Foreign exchange transactions
67
(14)
53
29
(21)
8
Derivative instruments and other off-balance sheet items
1,316
(584)
732
759
(207)
552
Payment instruments and other banking and financial
services
1,478
(1,647)
(169)
2,393
(1,559)
834
Mutual funds management, fiduciary and similar operations
3,470
(1,475)
1,995
3,311
(1,506)
1,805
9,940
(5,259)
4,681
8,617
(4,812)
3,805
NET FEE AND COMMISSION INCOME
5.3. Net gains (losses) on financial instruments at fair value through profit or loss
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Dividends received
Unrealised or realised gains or losses on assets/liabilities at fair value through profit or loss
Financial assets designated as at fair value through profit or loss
Net gains (losses) on currency transactions and similar financial instruments (excluding gains or losses on hedges of
net investments in foreign operations)
Gains or losses from hedge accounting
NET GAINS (LOSSES) ON FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS AT FAIR VALUE THROUGH PROFIT OR LOSS
31/12/2006
304
173
3,049
3,056
305
1,707
1,211
824
(42)
39
4,827
5,799
NET GAIN OR LOSS FROM HEDGE ACCOUNTING
2007
(in millions of euros)
Gains
Losses
Net
Fair value hedges
10,816
(11,092)
(276)
Change in fair value of hedged items attributable to hedged risks
2,348
(2,088)
260
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives (including sales of hedges)
8,468
(9,004)
(536)
-
-
-
Hedge of a net investment in a foreign operation
911
(658)
253
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives - ineffective portion
911
(658)
253
Fair value hedge of the interest rate exposure of a portfolio of financial instruments
7,846
(7,865)
(19)
Change in fair value of hedged items
7,310
(7,530)
(220)
536
(335)
201
19,573
(19,615)
(42)
Cash flow hedges
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives - ineffective portion
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives
-
Cash flow hedge of the interest rate exposure of a portfolio of financial instruments
Change in fair value of hedging instrument - ineffective portion
Discontinuation of hedge accounting in the case of a cash flow hedge
TOTAL GAINS OR LOSSES FROM HEDGE ACCOUNTING
-
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 225
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
2006
Gains
Losses
Net
Fair value hedges
4,286
(4,633)
(347)
Change in fair value of hedged items attributable to hedged risks
2,300
(1,907)
393
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives (including sales of hedges)
1,986
(2,726)
(740)
-
-
-
(in millions of euros)
Cash flow hedges
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives - ineffective portion
-
Hedges of net foreign investments
446
(62)
384
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives - ineffective portion
446
(62)
384
12,225
(12,222)
3
Change in fair value of hedged items
6,167
(6,040)
127
Change in fair value of hedging derivatives
6,058
(6,182)
(124)
(1)
(1)
(16,918)
39
Fair value hedge of interest rate risk for a portfolio of financial instruments
Cash flow hedge of interest rate risk for a portfolio of financial instruments
Change in fair value of hedging instrument - ineffective portion
Discontinuation of hedge accounting in the case of a cash flow hedge
TOTAL GAINS OR LOSSES FROM HEDGE ACCOUNTING
16,957
5.4. Net gains (losses) on available-for-sale financial assets
(in millions of euros)
Dividends received
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
899
503
Realised gains or losses on available-for-sale financial assets
3,227
1,647
Impairment losses on variable income securities
(326)
(249)
Gains or losses on disposal of held-to-maturity financial assets and on loans and receivables
NET GAINS (LOSSES) ON AVAILABLE-FOR-SALE FINANCIAL ASSETS
63
4
3,863
1,905
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
84
(3)
5.5. Net income and expenses related to other activities
(in millions of euros)
Gains or losses on properties not used in operations
Policyholders’ with-profits entitlement
Other net income from insurance activities
Change in insurance technical reserves
Net income from investment properties
Other net income (expense)
INCOME (EXPENSES) ON OTHER ACTIVITIES
(4,148)
(5,104)
9,771
13,282
(11,692)
(13,914)
342
297
1,132
469
(4,511)
(4,973)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
(7,306)
(5,890)
5.6. General operating expenses
(in millions of euros)
Personnel costs
Taxes other than on income or payroll-related
External services and other expenses
OPERATING EXPENSES
226 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(300)
(339)
(4,513)
(3,619)
(12,119)
(9,848)
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
5.7. Depreciation, amortisation and impairment of property, plant & equipment and intangible
assets
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
(599)
(507)
0
0
(599)
(507)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
(3,181)
(1,967)
Property plant and equipment and intangible assets
Depreciation and amortisation
Impairment
TOTAL
5.8. Risk-related costs
(in millions of euros)
Charge to provisions and impairment
Available-for-sale financial assets
(37)
(3)
(2,834)
(1,560)
Other assets
(51)
(64)
Financing commitments
(79)
(62)
Loans and receivables
Held-to-maturity financial assets
Risks and expenses
(180)
(278)
Write-backs of provisions and impairment
1,233
1,388
Available-for-sale financial assets
6
24
957
1,076
Other assets
13
11
Financing commitments
75
93
182
184
(1,948)
(579)
Loans and receivables
Held-to-maturity financial assets
Risks and expenses
Net charge to impairment and provisions
Realised gains or losses on available-for-sale financial assets
(19)
Bad debts written off - not provided for
(83)
(134)
Recoveries on bad debts written off
195
188
(55)
(58)
Losses on held-to-maturity financial assets
Discounts on restructured loans
Losses on financing commitments
(1)
Other losses
(5)
(10)
(1,897)
(612)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Risk-related costs
5.9. Net income on other assets
(in millions of euros)
Property, plant & equipment and intangible assets
Gains
Losses
9
20
20
29
(11)
(9)
Consolidated equity investments
1,465
3
Gains
1,466
32
(1)
(29)
1,474
23
Losses
Net gains (losses) on other assets
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 227
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
5.10. Income tax
TAX EXPENSE
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Current tax charge
(1,673)
(1,266)
Deferred tax charge
1,416
(324)
Tax charge for the period
(257)
(1,590)
Base
Tax rate
Tax
3,624
34.43%
(1,248)
3.49%
(126)
(5.56)%
201
(3.08)%
112
(18.40)%
667
(in millions of euros)
RECONCILIATION OF THEORETICAL TAX RATE(1) AND EFFECTIVE TAX RATE
At 31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Income before tax, goodwill impairment and share of net income of associates
Impact of permanent timing differences
Impact of different rates on foreign subsidiaries
Impact of losses for the year, utilisation of tax loss carryforwards and temporary
differences
Impact of tax rate on long-term capital gains
Impact of other items
Effective tax rate and tax charge
(3.79)%
138
7.09%
(257)
(1) The theoretical tax rate is the tax rate applicable under ordinary law (including the additional social contribution) to taxable profits in France for the year ended 31 December 2007.
The effective tax rate is low because of the large amount of income taxable at a reduced rate in 2007 (mainly gains on the disposals of Intesa
San Paolo, Banco del Desarrollo and CAAM SGR shares).
At 31/12/2006*
(in millions of euros)
Income before tax, goodwill impairment and share of net income of associates
Impact of permanent timing differences
Base
Tax rate
Tax
5,240
34.43%
(1,804)
3.36%
(176)
Impact of different rates on foreign subsidiaries
(2.98)%
156
Impact of losses for the year, utilisation of tax loss carryforwards and temporary
differences
(2.16)%
113
Impact of tax rate on long-term capital gains
(0.40)%
21
Impact of other items
(1.91)%
100
Effective tax rate and tax charge
30.34%
(1,590)
*
Figures adjusted to reflect change of method described in Note 1.
228 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 6
Segment reporting
n French retail banking – Regional Banks,
Agricole Egypt, Union Gabonaise de Banque, Crédit Lyonnais in
Cameroon, Société Ivoirienne de Banque, etc.). This business line
does not include the foreign subsidiaries of the Group’s consumer
finance and lease finance subsidiaries (subsidiaries of Sofinco
and CA-Leasing, and EFL in Poland, etc.), which are part of the
specialised financial services business line.
n French retail banking - LCL branch network,
4. Specialised financial services
n International retail banking,
n Asset management, insurance and private banking,
Specialised financial services comprises the Group subsidiaries
that provide banking products and services to personal, small
business, corporate and local authority customers in France and
abroad. They include:
n Corporate and investment banking.
n consumer finance: Sofinco and Finaref in France and subsidiaries
DEFINITION OF BUSINESS SEGMENTS
Crédit Agricole S.A.’s activities are organised into seven business
segments:
n six business lines:
n Specialised financial services,
“Proprietary asset management and other activities”.
PRESENTATION OF BUSINESS LINES
1. French retail banking – Regional Banks
This business line comprises the Regional Banks and their
subsidiaries.
The Regional Banks provide banking services for personal
customers, farmers, business and corporate customers and local
authorities, with a very strong regional presence.
The Regional Banks provide a full range of banking and financial
products and services, including mutual funds (money market,
bonds, equity), life insurance, lending (particularly mortgage loans
and consumer finance), and payment systems. In addition to life
insurance, they also provide a broad range of property & casualty
and death & disability insurance.
2. French retail banking – LCL Branch Network
This business line comprises the Crédit Lyonnais branch network in
France, which has a strong focus on urban areas and a segmented
customer approach (personal customers, small businesses and
SMEs).
LCL offers a full range of banking products and services, together
with asset management, insurance and wealth management.
or partnerships abroad (Agos Itafinco, Credit-Plus, Lukas, Ribank,
Credibom, Dan Aktiv, Emporiki, Credicom, FGAFS);
n specialised financing for companies such as factoring (Eurofactor
France and its international subsidiaries) and lease finance
(CA-Leasing group, EFL).
5. Asset management, insurance and private banking
This business line encompasses:
n the asset management activities conducted by the Crédit
Agricole Asset Management group (CAAM) and BFT, principally
in traditional fund management and discretionary management
accounts, by CPR Asset Management, CA-AIPG in specialised
investment, and by CREELIA in employee share savings;
n securities and investor services: Caceis Bank for custody and
Caceis Fastnet for fund administration;
n personal insurance (Predica and Médicale de France in France,
BES Vida in Portugal);
n property & casualty insurance (Pacifica and Finaref Assurances in
France, BES Seguros in Portugal);
n private banking activities conducted mainly by Banque de
Gestion Privée Indosuez (BGPI) and by Calyon subsidiaries (CA
Suisse, CA Luxembourg, Crédit Foncier de Monaco, etc.).
6. Corporate and Investment Banking
3. International retail banking
International retail banking encompasses foreign subsidiaries and
investments -fully consolidated or accounted for by the equity
method- that are mainly involved in retail banking.
These subsidiaries and investments are mostly in Europe (Emporiki
Bank in Greece, Cariparma in Italy, Lukas Bank in Poland, Banco
Espirito Santo in Portugal, Bankoa in Spain, Crédit Agricole Belge in
Belgium, Index Bank in Ukraine, Meridian Bank in Serbia) and, to a
lesser extent, in the Middle East and Africa (Crédit du Maroc, Crédit
Calyon’s operations are divided into two main activities:
n capital markets and investment banking, encompassing all
capital markets activities, equity and futures brokerage, primary
equity markets and mergers & acquisitions;
n financing activities, encompassing traditional commercial banking
and structured finance: project, asset, property and hotel finance,
as well as management of Calyon’s portfolio of impaired assets.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 229
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Lastly, this business line also comprises the net impact of group
tax relief for the Crédit Agricole S.A. and Crédit Lyonnais groups,
as well as differences between the “standard” tax rates for each
business line and the actual tax rates applied to each subsidiary.
7. Proprietary asset management and other activities
This business line encompasses mainly Crédit Agricole S.A.’s
central body function for the Crédit Agricole network, asset and
liability management and management of debt connected with
acquisitions of subsidiaries or equity investments.
It also includes the Crédit Agricole Group’s private equity business
and the results of various other Group companies (Uni-Édition,
resource pooling companies, property companies holding properties
used in operations by several different business lines, etc.) and
dividends and other Crédit Agricole S.A. income and expense from
equity investments and other non-consolidated interests (excluding
international retail banking).
6.1. Segment information by business line
Transactions between the business lines are effected at arm’s
length.
Business line assets are calculated on the basis of accounting
items comprising the balance sheet for each business line.
Business line liabilities equating to allocated capital are based on a
standardised capital allocation calculation by business line.
It further encompasses results of work-out activities or activities
that were not transferred to a business line as part of the Group’s
restructuring.
31/12/2007
French retail banking
(in millions of euros)
Regional
Banks
LCL
International
retail banking
Specialised
financial
services
ProprieAsset matary asset
nagement,
manainsurance
gement
and private Corporate and in- and other
banking vestment banking activities
Total
Net banking income
3,664
2,650
2,977
4,306
2,781
390
16,768
Operating expenses
(2,706)
(1,763)
(1,577)
(1,803)
(3,537)
(1,332)
(12,718)
958
887
1,400
2,503
(756)
(942)
4,050
(127)
(292)
(491)
4
(957)
(34)
(1,897)
168
8
8
135
85
1,269
117
28
229
(1)
1,101
1,474
Gross operating income
Risk-related costs
Share of net income of affiliates
865
Net income on other assets
Change in value of goodwill
(65)
(14)
(79)
Pre-tax income
865
831
815
945
2,730
(1,579)
210
4,817
Corporate income tax
(87)
(249)
(195)
(310)
(782)
767
599
(257)
Gains (losses) on discontinued
operations
Net income
(4)
778
Minority interests
Net income Group share
778
(4)
582
616
635
1,948
(812)
809
29
156
40
49
92
146
4,556
512
553
460
595
1,899
(904)
663
4,044
1,202
33
656
855
14,440
Business line assets
- of which investments in affiliates
11,694
- of which goodwill arising during
the period
5,263
4,377
2,956
4,189
1,743
101
18,629
TOTAL ASSETS
11,694
99,557
73,388
86,591
303,314
807,817
31,862
1,414,223
Allocated capital
4,433
2,962
3,406
3,338
7,788
9,957
-
31,884
230 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
n corporate and investment banking: 6% of risk-weighted assets
Allocated capital by business line:
(financing and markets) plus 50% of the value of companies
accounted for by the equity method and investments in foreign
financial institutions;
n French retail banking: 6% of risk-weighted assets LCL branch
network and Regional Banks (for 25% of outstandings);
n international retail banking: 6% of risk-weighted assets plus 50%
n asset management and private banking: the higher of i) the capital
of the value of companies accounted for by the equity method
and investments in foreign financial institutions;
requirement based on 6% of risk-weighted assets and ii) an
amount equal to three months of operating costs, plus 50% of
the value of companies accounted for by the equity method and
investments in foreign financial institutions;
n specialised financial services: 6% of risk-weighted assets plus
50% of the value of companies accounted for by the equity
method and investments in foreign financial institutions;
n insurance: allocated capital reflects the statutory requirements
specific to this activity (i.e. 100% of the minimum solvency
margin).
31/12/2006
French retail banking
Specialised
financial
services
LCL
International
retail banking
Net banking income
3,652
824
2,637
3,873
5,456
Operating expenses
(in millions of euros)
Regional
Banks
ProprieAsset matary asset
nagement,
manainsurance
gement
and private Corporate and in- and other
banking vestment banking activities
Total
(255)
16,187
(2,495)
(625)
(1,389)
(1,680)
(3,321)
(845)
(10,355)
Gross operating income
1,157
199
1,248
2,193
2,135
(1,100)
5,832
Risk-related costs
(151)
(73)
(421)
(7)
10
30
(612)
7
46
160
88
1,671
4
3
(17)
33
23
Share of net income of affiliates
848
522
Net income on other assets
Change in value of goodwill
(63)
(3)
3
(63)
Pre-tax income
848
1,006
648
775
2,232
2,288
(946)
6,851
Corporate income tax
(89)
(302)
(76)
(280)
(657)
(577)
391
(1,590)
759
704
569
495
1,575
1,711
(555)
5,258
24
40
32
28
66
208
398
759
680
529
463
1,547
1,645
(763)
4,860
5,052
48
47
592
740
17,248
Gains (losses) on discontinued
operations
Net income
(3)
Minority interests
Net income Group share
(3)
Business line assets
- of which investments in affiliates
10,769
- of which goodwill arising during
the period
5,263
1,897
2,869
4,181
1,729
4
15,943
TOTAL ASSETS
10,769
95,171
37,419
75,072
271,877
750,822
19,403
1,260,533
Allocated capital
3,921
2,713
3,777
2,531
7,204
8,246
-
28,392
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 231
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
6.2. Geographical analysis
The geographical analysis of business line assets and results is based on the place where operations are booked for accounting purposes.
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Net income
Group share
o/w net
banking
income
Assets
Net income
Group share
o/w net
banking
income
France (including overseas departments and
territories)
Assets
2,046
Other EU countries
1,048
8,862
1,362,456
2,418
10,439
1,216,117
5,046
230,977
1,277
3,054
Rest of Europe
175,572
113
571
26,386
130
471
24,708
North America
136
876
86,560
522
1,352
70,621
69
123
1,397
51
95
3,227
Africa and Middle-East
255
503
16,497
249
420
14,533
Asia-Pacific (excl. Japan)
323
1,194
47,901
160
802
51,292
54
249
25,028
53
192
24,696
(656)
(382,979)
(638)
(320,233)
4,044
16,768
1,414,223
4,860
16,187
1,260,533
(in millions of euros)
Central and South America
Japan
Intragroup transactions
TOTAL
6.3. Insurance activities
GROSS INCOME FROM INSURANCE ACTIVITIES
The information given below has been provided by the insurance companies Predica and Pacifica.
31/12/2007
Insurance activities (in millions of euros)
Premiums written
Change in unearned premiums
Earned premiums
Investment income net of management expenses
31/12/2006
Life
Non-life
Total
Life
Non-life
Total
18,616
2,051
20,667
22,588
1,700
24,288
-
(60)
(60)
18,616
1,991
20,607
6,571
80
6,651
(51)
(51)
22,588
1,649
24,237
5,652
69
5,721
Gains (losses) on disposal of investments net of impairment and
amortisation write-backs
1,744
42
1,786
1,048
23
1,071
Change in fair value of financial instruments at fair value through profit or loss
1,203
15
1,218
1,700
15
1,715
(97)
-
(97)
(72)
2
(70)
Change in impairment of financial instruments
Investment income net of expenses, excluding financing costs
9,421
137
9,558
8,328
109
8,437
Total income from ordinary operations
28,037
2,128
30,165
30,916
1,758
32,674
Claims paid
(26,037)
(1,373)
(27,410)
(28,849)
(1,102)
(29,951)
Net expense or income on business ceded to reinsurers
Contract acquisition costs (inc. fees)
Amortisation of investment securities and similar
Administration expenses
Other operating income and expenses
Total other operating income and expenses
OPERATING INCOME
Financing costs
38
(53)
(15)
4
(71)
(67)
(669)
(369)
(1,038)
(726)
(324)
(1,050)
-
-
-
(228)
(89)
(317)
(251)
(71)
(322)
-
-
(59)
(59)
-
(63)
(63)
(26,896)
(1,943)
(28,839)
(29,822)
(1,631)
(31,453)
1,141
185
1,326
1,094
127
1,221
(23)
-
(23)
(258)
-
(258)
Corporate income tax
(354)
(39)
(393)
(215)
(28)
(243)
NET INCOME
764
146
910
621
99
720
764
146
910
621
99
720
Minority interests
NET INCOME - GROUP SHARE
232 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
-
-
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
INSURANCE COMPANY INVESTMENTS
The information given below has been provided by the insurance companies Predica and Pacifica.
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
1 Property investments (incl. assets in progress)
2 Equities and other variable-income securities other than mutual
funds
3 Mutual funds other than those in category 4. below
4 Mutual funds invested exclusively in fixed-income securities
5 Bonds and other fixed-income securities
6 Mortgage loans
7 Other loans and similar items
8 Deposits with cedants
9 Other deposits, cash collateral deposits and other investments
10 Assets backing unit-linked business
TOTAL
31/12/2006
Gross
value
Net value
Realisable
value
Gross
value
Net value
Realisable
value
3,228
3,213
3,681
3,587
3,577
3,979
12,975
12,830
16,054
11,164
10,863
14,916
3,368
3,368
3,577
19,532
19,532
24,026
1,806
1,806
1,891
6,398
6,398
7,353
115,381
115,756
114,035
104,505
105,064
107,277
-
-
-
2
2
2
353
353
353
319
319
319
1
1
1
1,175
1,240
1,301
-
-
-
2
2
2
29,161
29,161
29,161
23,659
23,659
23,659
166,273
166,488
168,753
170,343
170,656
182,834
Consolidation adjustments
Net book value
166,488
170,656
6.4. French retail banking – Regional banks
OPERATIONS AND CONTRIBUTION OF THE REGIONAL BANKS AND THEIR SUBSIDIARIES
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
11,960
12,093
(7,005)
(6,922)
Gross operating income
4,955
5,171
Risk-related costs
(984)
(841)
Operating income
3,971
4,330
(in millions of euros)
Adjusted net banking income
(1)
Operating expenses
Other items
Tax
Adjusted aggregate net income of consolidated Regional Banks
Aggregate net income of subsidiaries of consolidated Regional Banks
7
1
(1,339)
(1,444)
2,639
2,887
124
104
Consolidation restatements and eliminations
Consolidated net income of affiliates (100%)
2,763
2,992
Consolidated net income of affiliates (25%)
691
748
Consolidation restatements and eliminations
(13)
(12)
Gain on increase in share of Regional Banks’ retained earnings
48
(7)
Gain on increase in share of Regional Banks’ net income (2)
139
119
Share of net income of affiliates
865
848
(1) Aggregate net banking income of Regional Banks adjusted for SAS Rue La Boétie dividends received by the Regional Banks and interest on T3CJs issued by Crédit Agricole S.A.
(2) Difference between dividends actually paid by the Regional Banks to Crédit Agricole S.A. and dividends calculated on the basis of Crédit Agricole S.A.’s percentage ownership of the
Regional Banks.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 233
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 7
Notes to the balance sheet at 31 December 2007
7.1. Cash due from central banks
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Cash
Assets
31/12/2006
Liabilities
1,479
Due to central banks
TOTAL
Assets
Liabilities
1,184
17,959
391
5,002
89
19,438
391
6,186
89
Accrued interest
17
7
8
Net book value
19,455
398
6,194
89
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
426,560
391,903
32,405
25,949
Fair value on balance sheet
458,965
417,852
Of which lent securities
4,097
4,727
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
7.2. Financial assets and liabilities at fair value through profit or loss
FINANCIAL ASSETS AT FAIR VALUE THROUGH PROFIT OR LOSS
(in millions of euros)
Financial assets held for trading
Financial assets designated as at fair value
FINANCIAL ASSETS HELD FOR TRADING
(in millions of euros)
Loans and advances to banks
Loans and advances to customers
Securities bought under repurchase agreements
3,215
94,787
98,672
153,139
167,798
Treasury bills and similar items
38,538
33,865
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
85,569
98,529
- Listed securities
74,496
82,713
- Unlisted securities
11,073
15,816
29,032
35,404
27,185
34,788
Securities held for trading
Equities and other variable-income securities
- Listed securities
- Unlisted securities
1,847
616
Derivative instruments
175,419
125,433
Fair value on balance sheet
426,560
391,903
Securities bought under repurchase agreements include amounts that the entity is authorised to provide as collateral.
234 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL ASSETS DESIGNATED AS AT FAIR VALUE
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
29,161
23,659
3,244
2,290
2,524
1,549
- Listed securities
1,450
866
- Unlisted securities
1,074
683
720
725
(in millions of euros)
Assets backing unit-linked business
Securities held for trading
Treasury bills and similar items
16
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
Equities and other variable-income securities
- Listed securities
- Unlisted securities
Fair value on balance sheet
20
20
700
705
32,405
25,949
Securities bought under repurchase agreements include amounts that the entity is authorised to provide as collateral.
FINANCIAL LIABILITIES HELD FOR TRADING
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Securities sold short
26,454
39,829
Debt securities in issue
26,214
28,073
106,511
109,378
(in millions of euros)
Securities sold under repurchase agreements
Amounts due to banks
542
Derivative financial instruments
172,850
120,004
Fair value on balance sheet
332,571
297,284
DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS HELD FOR TRADING
Detailed information is provided in Note 4.2 relative on market risks, particularly for interest rates.
7.3. Derivative hedging instruments
Detailed information is provided in Note 4.4 on cash flow and fair value hedging, particularly for interest rates and exchange rates.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 235
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
7.4. Available-for-sale financial assets
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Treasury bills and similar items
41,725
51,829
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
86,664
98,570
80,269
79,882
(in millions of euros)
Listed securities
Unlisted securities
Equities and other variable-income securities
Listed securities
Unlisted securities
Total available-for-sale securities
Total available-for-sale receivables
Accrued interest
Fair value on balance sheet (1)
6,395
18,688
39,123
21,117
35,621
17,294
3,502
3,823
167,512
171,516
106
24
2,073
1,990
169,691
173,530
(1) Of which (€ 2,382) million in impairment of available-for-sale securities and receivables.
GAINS AND LOSSES ON AVAILABLE FOR SALE FINANCIAL ASSETS
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Fair value
Unrealised
gains
Unrealised
losses
Fair value
Treasury bills and similar items
41,725
153
(76)
51,829
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
86,663
2,413
(1,946)
98,570
Equities and other variable-income securities
31,446
4,082
(6)
15,625
7,678
1,930
(1)
5,492
(in millions of euros)
Non-consolidated investments
Available-for-sale receivables
Accrued interest
Fair value on balance sheet
Deferred taxes
Total unrealised gains and losses net of tax
236 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
106
24
2,073
1,990
169,691
8,578
(2,029)
(1,265)
678
7,313
(1,351)
173,530
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
7.5. Due from banks and loans and advances to customers
DUE FROM BANKS
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Loans and advances
54,918
47,349
of which performing current accounts in debit
22,923
20,286
of which performing overnight accounts and advances
10,016
1,391
(in millions of euros)
Banks
Pledged securities
3,203
451
28,469
33,761
Subordinated loans
405
432
Securities not traded in an active market
935
147
Other loans and advances
162
11
88,092
82,151
460
1,234
Securities bought under repurchase agreements
Total
Accrued interest
Impairment
Net book value
112
309
88,440
83,076
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
Current accounts
7,401
3,686
221,367
204,729
30
45
228,798
208,460
950
671
Net book value
229,748
209,131
Net book value on balance sheet
318,188
292,207
Time deposits and advances
Subordinated loans
Securities not traded in an active market
Total
Accrued interest
Impairment
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 237
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
LOANS AND ADVANCES TO CUSTOMERS
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Customer items
Bills discounted
Other loans
Securities bought under repurchase agreements
Subordinated loans
10,812
9,482
225,288
190,779
14,158
20,119
505
527
Securities not traded in an active market
4,693
4,254
Insurance receivables
2,392
2,505
Reinsurance receivables
237
136
Short-term advances
420
255
Current accounts in debit
Total
Accrued interest
Impairment
35,465
11,587
293,970
239,644
1,520
1,305
8,386
7,434
287,104
233,515
Property leasing
5,549
5,576
Equipment leasing, rental contracts with purchase option and similar transactions
9,646
8,896
15,195
14,472
331
346
Net book value
Lease finance
Total
Accrued interest
Impairment
Net book value
TOTAL
186
188
15,340
14,630
302,444
248,145
7.6. Impairment deducted from financial assets
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Changes in
scope
Charges
Write-backs
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements
31/12/2007
Interbank loans
309
11
(200)
(1)
(7)
112
Customer loans
7,434
400
2,856
(2,322)
(21)
39
8,386
1,776
102
439
(174)
2
14
2,159
188
12
129
(147)
4
186
of which collective impairment
Lease finance
Held-to-maturity securities
Assets available for sale
Other financial assets
TOTAL
-
0
2,856
19
363
(526)
221
1
38
(32)
11,008
432
3,397
(3,227)
238 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(29)
(51)
(301)
2,382
16
244
(249)
11,310
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
31/12/2005
Changes in
scope
Charges
Write-backs
Interbank loans
469
2
17
(91)
Customer loans
6,789
1,273
1,594
(1,929)
1,582
7
221
(153)
475
10
117
2,074
111
251
63
(12)
(1)
67
221
1,396
2,042
(2,430)
(64)
153
11,008
(in millions of euros)
of which collective impairment
Lease finance (1)
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements
31/12/2006
(88)
309
(45)
(248)
7,434
(2)
121
1,776
(119)
1
(296)
188
(279)
(19)
718
2,856
Held-to-maturity securities
Assets available for sale (2)
0
Other financial assets
TOTAL
104
9,911
(1) Other movements include € 289 million due to a change in presentation of compensation for termination of finance leases.
(2) Other movements include € 643 million due to reclassification of prolonged impairment for a mutual fund recognised under “trading securities” in 2005.
7.7. Due to customers and banks
DUE TO BANKS
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
111,249
82,782
Banks
Deposits
of which current accounts in credit
of which overnight deposits and accounts
Pledged assets
Securities sold under repurchase agreements
Total
Accrued interest
Net book value
13,243
12,413
8,425
17,989
11,576
7,091
28,158
23,953
150,983
113,826
1,000
2,391
151,983
116,217
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
Current accounts in credit
Time accounts and deposits
Total
Accrued interest
Net book value
Total
3,315
7,543
16,573
10,263
19,888
17,806
228
216
20,116
18,022
172,099
134,239
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 239
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
CUSTOMER ACCOUNTS
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Current accounts in credit
71,612
54,580
Special savings accounts
197,990
199,145
Other accounts
97,645
83,822
Securities sold under repurchase agreements
15,817
9,639
2,483
2,156
412
350
-
3
385,959
349,695
Direct insurance liabilities
Reinsurance liabilities
Cash deposits received from cedants and retrocessionaires against technical insurance commitments
Total
Accrued interest
Net book value
1,294
1,116
387,253
350,811
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
19,619
16,661
7.8. Held-to-maturity financial assets
(in millions of euros)
Treasury bills and similar items
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
1,100
999
20,719
17,660
Accrued interest
417
347
Net book value
21,136
18,007
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
277
223
Total
7.9. Debt securities in issue and subordinated debt
(in millions of euros)
Debt securities in issue
Interest bearing notes
Money market instruments
4,655
4,655
Negotiable debt securities:
107,236
110,196
Issued in France
61,268
67,742
Issued in other countries
45,968
42,454
61,896
44,869
Bonds
Other debt securities in issue
1,978
1,111
176,042
161,054
1,646
1,770
177,688
162,824
Fixed-term subordinated debt
10,347
11,654
Perpetual subordinated debt
11,808
12,326
88
74
Total
Accrued interest
Net book value
Subordinated debt
Mutual security deposits
Participating securities and loans*
Total
Accrued interest
Net book value
*
Previously included in subordinated debt.
240 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
234
22,477
24,054
360
416
22,837
24,470
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
At 31 December 2007, deeply subordinated notes outstanding amounted to €4,319 million (€2,206 million at 31 December 2006);
T3CJ securities outstanding amounted to €1,839 million, the same as at 31 December 2006.
7.10. Deferred tax assets and liabilities
Deferred tax liabilities (in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Assets available for sale
457
410
Cash flow hedges
142
12
Other timing differences
716
640
Other deferred tax liabilities
4,844
5,007
Effect of set-off by tax entity
(5,893)
(5,843)
266
226
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
TOTAL
Deferred tax assets (in millions of euros)
Non-deductible reserves for risks and expenses
1,386
1,035
Non-deductible accrued expenses
212
215
Cash flow hedges
203
93
Other deferred tax assets
6,477
5,542
Effect of set-off by tax entity
(5,893)
(5,843)
TOTAL
2,385
1,042
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
47,982
34,566
Deferred tax assets are netted on the balance sheet by taxable entity.
7.11. Accruals, prepayments and sundry assets and liabilities
PREPAYMENTS, ACCRUED INCOME AND SUNDRY ASSETS
(in millions of euros)
Sundry assets
Inventory accounts and miscellaneous
20
13
2,337
2,052
Miscellaneous debtors
29,422
25,992
Settlement accounts
15,213
5,013
2
2
Collective management of “Sustainable development passbook” securities
Due from shareholders - unpaid capital
Other insurance assets
487
216
Reinsurers’ share of technical reserves
501
1,278
Prepayments and accrued income
18,918
21,347
Items in course of transmission to other banks
10,734
9,594
Adjustment and suspense accounts
2,056
7,993
Accrued income
1,772
2,287
Prepayments
Other
Net book value
443
468
3,913
1,005
66,900
55,913
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 241
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
ACCRUALS, DEFERRED INCOME AND SUNDRY LIABILITIES
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Sundry liabilities (1)
38,581
27,937
Settlement accounts
15,049
5,355
Miscellaneous creditors
11,391
13,982
(in millions of euros)
Liabilities related to trading securities
Other
Sundry liabilities
(2)
237
81
11,904
8,519
18,927
26,855
9,256
8,948
Adjustment and suspense accounts
2,629
8,661
Deferred income
2,178
2,878
Accrued expenses
4,333
5,842
531
526
57,508
54,792
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
196
677
97
655
Items in course of transmission to other banks
Other
Net book value
(1) Amounts include accrued interest.
(2) Amounts shown net.
7.12. Non-current assets held for sale and associated liabilities
(in millions of euros)
Non-current assets held for sale
Liabilities associated with non-current assets held for sale
Most of these items relate to Phoenix Metrolife in 2006 and Emporiki Germany in 2007.
7.13. Investments in equity affiliates
Details are given in Note 3.3, under Scope of consolidation.
7.14. Investment property
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Changes
in scope
Increases
(Acquisitions)
Decreases
(Disposals and
redemptions)
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements
Balance at
31/12/2007
3,062
11
6
(230)
-
18
2,867
Investment property
Gross value
Depreciation and impairment
(91)
(2)
(12)
12
-
5
(88)
2,971
9
(6)
(218)
-
23
2,779
01.01.2006
Changes
in scope
Increases
(acquisitions)
Decreases
(disposals and
redemptions)
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements
Balance at
31/12/2006
Gross value
3,466
114
36
(239)
(8)
(307)
3,062
Depreciation and impairment
(188)
23
(10)
20
6
58
(91)
Net book value
3,278
137
26
(219)
(2)
(249)
2,971
Net book value
Including investment property let to third parties.
(in millions of euros)
Investment property
Including investment property let to third parties.
242 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
7.15. Property, plant & equipment and intangible assets (excluding goodwill)
31/12/2006
Changes
in scope
Increases
(acquisitions,
business
combinations)
6,686
757
1,051
(848)
(41)
306
7,911
(2,755)
(349)
(567)
486
22
(175)
(3,338)
3,931
408
484
(362)
(19)
131
4,573
1,901
343
445
(208)
(7)
68
2,542
(1,090)
(44)
(245)
95
4
(92)
(1,372)
811
299
200
(113)
(3)
(24)
1,170
31/12/2005
Changes
in scope
Increases
(acquisitions,
business
combinations)
Decreases
(disposals
and
redemptions)
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements
Balance at
31/12/2006
4,543
1,594
487
(708)
(47)
817
6,686
(1)
-
(2,084)
(494)
(331)
419
26
(291)
(2,755)
2,460
1,100
156
(289)
(21)
525
3,931
Gross value
1,357
215
388
(97)
(5)
43
1,901
Amortisation and impairment
(846)
(59)
(194)
37
3
(31)
(1,090)
511
156
194
(60)
(2)
12
811
(in millions of euros)
Decreases
(disposals
and
redemptions)
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements
Balance at
31/12/2007
Property, plant & equipment
Gross value
Accrued interest
(1)
-
Depreciation and impairment (2)
Net book value
Intangible assets
Gross value
Amortisation and impairment
Net book value
(1) Accrued rents on assets let to third parties.
(2) Including amortisation on rented assets.
(in millions of euros)
Property, plant & equipment
Gross value
Accrued interest
(1)
Depreciation and impairment (2)
Net book value
1
Intangible assets
Net book value
(1) Accrued rents on assets let to third parties.
(2) Including amortisation on rented assets.
7.16. Goodwill
An analysis of this item is provided in Note 3.6, under Scope of consolidation.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 243
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
7.17. Insurance company technical reserves
The information below was provided by the insurance companies Predica and Pacifica.
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Life
Non-life
Total
Life
Non-life
Total
55,104
394
55,498
38,855
351
39,206
117,611
-
117,611
120,714
-
120,714
Investment contracts without discretionary participation
features
3,213
-
3,213
3,582
-
3,582
Provision for future participation benefits and allowances
10,369
-
10,369
12,790
-
12,790
(in millions of euros)
Insurance contracts
Investment contracts with discretionary participation
features
Other technical reserves (claims, other, etc.)
TOTAL TECHNICAL RESERVES
785
1,660
2,445
1,800
1,364
3,164
187,082
2,054
189,136
177,741
1,715
179,456
(182)
(169)
(351)
(1,071)
(140)
(1,211)
186,900
1,885
188,785
176,670
1,575
178,245
Reinsurers’ share of technical reserves
NET TECHNICAL RESERVES
7.18. Provisions
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Change in
scope
Charges
Writebacks,
amounts
used
Writebacks,
amounts
released
Home purchase savings plans
547
Financing commitment execution risks
286
79
(9)
(74)
93
39
(11)
(16)
Operational risk
(1)
Employee retirement and similar
benefits (2)
Translation
adjustments
Other
movements 31/12/2007
(137)
410
(1)
(19)
262
(18)
87
1,531
293
707
(181)
(85)
(13)
4
2,256
837
78
340
(288)
(84)
(4)
23
902
25
3
6
1
28
Litigation
Equity investments
(7)
Restructuring
68
(1)
1
(7)
(43)
18
Other risks (3)
767
77
369
(76)
(225)
(2)
84
994
RESERVES
4,154
450
1,541
(572)
(628)
(20)
32
4,957
(1) The main contributors are specialised financial services, asset management and LCL.
(2) “Employee retirement and similar benefits” includes post-employment benefits for defined-contribution plans as detailed in Note 8.4 and provisions for obligations to employees arising from
the LCL competitiveness plan.
(3) This line includes provisions for sundry risks, primarily in connection with LCL’s new master plan in real estate in Ile-de-France.
244 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2005
Home purchase savings plans
955
Financing commitment execution risks
315
Changes
in scope
Charges
Writebacks,
amounts
used
Writebacks,
amounts Translation
released adjustments
(408)
62
(11)
(94)
56
20
34
(13)
(18)
Employee retirement and similar
benefits (2)
788
886
144
(196)
(24)
Litigation
840
58
177
(76)
(87)
(11)
Operational risk (1)
Participations
28
18
Equity investments
60
2
Restructuring
Other
movements 31/12/2006
547
(2)
16
286
14
93
(8)
(59)
1,531
(5)
(70)
837
(8)
(13)
25
(24)
41
68
(221)
-
221
Other risks
1,028
41
196
(147)
(213)
(5)
(133)
767
RESERVES
4,291
1,005
633
(454)
(876)
(20)
(425)
4,154
(1) The main contributors are specialised financial services, asset management and LCL.
(2) “Employee retirement and similar benefits” includes post-employment benefits for defined-contribution plans as detailed in Note 8.4, as well as provisions for long-service awards, time
savings accounts and early retirement benefits at LCL.
PROVISION FOR HOME PURCHASE SAVINGS PLANS
Deposits in home purchase savings plans and accounts during the saving phase
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Home purchase savings plans
Under 4 years old
6,415
Between 4 and 10 years old
40,693
Over 10 years old
30,240
35,019
31,670
Total home purchasing savings plans
70,933
73,104
Home purchase savings accounts
15,120
15,520
TOTAL DEPOSITS COLLECTED IN HOME PURCHASE SAVINGS SCHEMES
86,053
88,624
Age is determined in accordance with CNC Notice 2006-02 of 31 March 2006.
Customer deposits outstanding are based on book value at the end of November 2007 and do not include government subsidy.
Outstanding loans granted to holders of home purchase savings plans and accounts
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Home purchase savings plans
153
222
Home purchase savings accounts
324
348
TOTAL LOANS GRANTED UNDER HOME PURCHASE SAVINGS SCHEMES
477
570
(in millions of euros)
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 245
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Provisions for home purchase savings plans and accounts
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
11
66
155
285
Total home purchasing savings plans
166
356
Home purchase savings accounts
244
191
TOTAL RESERVES AGAINST HOME PURCHASE SAVINGS SCHEMES
410
547
(in millions of euros)
Home purchase savings plans
Under 4 years old
5
Between 4 and 10 years old
Over 10 years old
Age is determined in accordance with CNC Notice 2006-02 of
31 March 2006.
In the Crédit Agricole Group’s internal financial organisation, 100%
of deposits in home purchase savings plans and accounts collected
by the Regional Banks are included in Crédit Agricole S.A.’s
liabilities and the savings deposits shown in the tables below
therefore take all of these amounts into account. Conversely, Crédit
Agricole S.A. has exposure only to a portion of those deposits
(close to 42% at-end 2007); the balance is carried by the Regional
Banks: Only the amount of the actual exposure is provisioned in
Crédit Agricole S.A.’s accounts. Consequently, the ratio between
the provision booked and the outstanding amounts shown on the
Crédit Agricole S.A. Group’s balance sheet is not representative of
the level of provisioning for home purchase savings plans.
7.19. Shareholders’ equity
OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
To the Crédit Agricole S.A.’s knowledge, ownership of share capital and voting rights as of 31 December 2007 was as follows:
Shareholders
Number of shares
% of share capital
% of voting rights
903,090,102
54.09%
54.50%
SAS Rue La Boetie
Treasury shares
12,552,962
0.75%
-
Employees (ESOP)
103,761,579
6.21%
6.26%
Institutional investors
520,433,879
31.17%
31.40%
Retail investors
TOTAL
129,918,350
7.78%
7.84%
1,669,756,872
100.00%
100.00%
SAS Rue La Boétie is wholly-owned by the Crédit Agricole Regional Banks.
The treasury shares are held as part of the share buyback programme designed to cover stock options, which are recognised on Crédit Agricole S.A.’s balance sheet, or within an agreement
to provide liquidity for the shares on the stock market.
The par value of the shares is €3. All the shares are fully paid up.
To the company’s knowledge, no other shareholder owns 5%
or more of the share capital or voting rights, either directly or
indirectly.
During 2007, two capital increases were carried out:
n the first was a share issue with preferential subscription rights
retained, floated in January 2007. 149,732,230 new shares
were issued. They were admitted to trading on Euronext Paris
as from 6 February 2007 and have the same characteristics as
the existing shares; they are eligible for the dividend as from
1 January 2006;
246 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
n the second was a share issue reserved for Crédit Agricole Group
employees, floated from 10 to 21 September 2007. A total of
22,702,341 new shares were created as of 5 December 2007, the
settlement-delivery date.
On 31 December 2007, Crédit Agricole S.A.’s share capital comprised
1,669,756,872 shares (compared with 1,497,322,301 shares on
31 December 2006).
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PREFERRED SHARES
Amount of issue
Amount of issue
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Date of issue
(in millions of dollars)
(in millions of euros)
(in millions of euros)
(in millons of euros)
January-03
1,500
1,019
1,139
CA Preferred Funding LLC
July-03
550
374
418
CA Preferred Funding LLC
December-03
550
550
550
April-02
750
750
750
1,300
2,693
2,857
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
4,044
4,860
1,614,183,714
1,470,184,317
Issuer
CA Preferred Funding LLC
Crédit Lyonnais Preferred capital 1 LLC
2,050
EARNINGS PER SHARE
Net income used to calculate earnings per share (in millions of euros)
Weighted average number of ordinary shares in issue during the year
Number of potentially dilutive shares
1.000
0.984
1,614,183,714
1,494,089,753
BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE (IN EUROS)
2.505
3.306
DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE (IN EUROS)
2.505
3.253
Weighted average number of ordinary shares used to calculate adjusted earnings per share
Two dividend payment options will be proposed to the
shareholders:
DIVIDENDS
The Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S.A. is proposing a 2007
dividend of €1.20 per share, subject to approval at the annual
General Meeting.
n full payment in cash; or
n payment of 80% of the dividend in shares and the remaining
20% in cash.
Dividends
2007
proposed
2006
2005
2004
2003
Net dividend per share
1.20
1.15
0.94
0.66
0.55
Gross dividend
1.20
1.15
0.94
0.81
0.83
(in euros)
Dividend paid during the Year
The amount of dividends paid can be found in the statement of
changes in shareholders’ equity. It totalled €1,880 million 2007.
APPROPRIATION OF NET INCOME AND PROPOSED
DIVIDEND FOR 2007
The proposed appropriation of net income and dividend for 2007
are set out in the resolutions to be presented by the Board of
Directors at Crédit Agricole S.A.’s annual general meeting on
21 May 2008.
The proposed resolution reads as follows:
Voting in accordance with the quorum and majority requirements to
transact ordinary business, the shareholders hereby note that the net
income for the 2007 financial year amounted to €4,895,676,609.65.
Based on prior-year retained earnings of €2,253,079,831.75, the
total distributable sum is €7,148,756,441.40.
The shareholders, based on the proposal made by the Board of
Directors, resolve to appropriate this distributable sum as follows:
1. €23,434,444.49 to the legal reserve;
2. €2,003,708,246.40 to dividends, i.e. a dividend of €1.20 per
share with an entitlement to dividends payable with respect to
the 2007 financial year;
3. €5,121,613,750.51 to retained earnings.
The shares listed on Euronext Paris will go ex-dividend on 27 May
2008 and cash dividends will be paid from 23 June 2008.
Should Crédit Agricole S.A. hold any treasury shares as of the
dividend payment date, the dividends on such shares shall be
transferred to retained earnings, it being specified that all powers
are granted to the Board of Directors to effect this transfer.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 247
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
In accordance with the provisions of Article 243 bis of the Code
Général des Impôts, it is specified that the dividend is eligible for
the 40% allowance cited in paragraph 3, subparagraph 2 of Article
158 of the Code Général des Impôts, applicable exclusively to
shareholders who are natural persons.
The dividends paid with respect to the three previous financial
years are set forth in the table below.
Dividend
Tax credit (1)
Interim dividend (2)
€0.30
€0.15
Final dividend (3)
€0.36
€0.36
2005
€0.94
€0.94
2006
€1.15
€1.15
Year
Total
2004
€0.45
(1) The tax credit indicated is 50%, but in certain cases the rate is different.
(2) Paid in 2004.
(3) Paid in 2005, eligible for the 50% allowance.
Note 8
Employee benefits and other compensation
8.1. Analysis of personnel costs
(in millions of euros)
Salaries
(1)
Contributions to defined-contribution pension plans
Contributions to defined-benefit pension plans
Other social security expenses
Incentive schemes and profit-sharing
Payroll-related tax
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
(5,362)
(3,991)
(316)
(342)
(83)
(75)
(1,078)
(977)
(232)
(263)
(235)
(242)
(7,306)
(5,890)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
France
41,039
41,050
Outside France
45,827
36,013
86,866
77,063
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS
(1) Including €146 million for retirement benefits.
Including €41 million in charges for stock option plans.
8.2. Employees (at end of period)
TOTAL
248 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
rendered by employees. Consequently, the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group companies have no liability in this respect other than the
contributions payable.
8.3. Post-employment benefits, defined
contribution plans
French employers contribute to a variety of compulsory pension
schemes. The funds are managed by independent organisations
and the employers have no legal or implied obligation to pay
additional contributions should the funds not have sufficient assets
to pay the benefits corresponding to current and past service
Within the Group, there are several compulsory defined contribution
plans, the main ones being AGIRC/ARRCO, which are French
supplementary retirement plans, and some supplementary plans in
place notably within UES Crédit Agricole S.A.
ANALYSIS OF SUPPLEMENTARY RETIREMENT PLANS IN FRANCE
Entity
Compulsory supplementary
retirement plan
UES Crédit Agricole S.A.
Agriculture industry plan 1.24%
3,192
Calyon
“Article 83” type plan
4,392
BGPI
“Article 83” type plan
443
Business line
Central support functions
Corporate and investment banking
Investor services
Insurance
Number of employees covered
- estimate at 31/12/2007
Caceis
“Article 83” type plan
Predica
Agriculture industry plan
977
Pacifica
Agriculture industry plan
726
(Number of employees on the payroll at 31 December 2007)
8.4. Post-employment obligations, defined benefit plans
CHANGE IN ACTUARIAL LIABILITY
(in millions of euros)
Actuarial liability at 31/12/n-1
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
1,621
1,513
Foreign exchange difference
(49)
-
Current service cost (1)
559
75
62
58
Interest cost
Employee contributions
6
7
Plan revision / curtailment / settlement
2
13
14
19
Acquisitions, divestments (change in scope of consolidation)
Early retirement allowances
Benefits paid (obligatory)
Actuarial gains (losses) (2)
Actuarial liability at 31/12/n
(1)
1
(252)
(151)
360
86
2,322
1,621
(1) Including €437 million for LCL competitiveness plan.
(2) Certain pension schemes are covered by mutual contracts among all Crédit Agricole Group entities. A change in allocation was effected in 2007 for amassed contributions, obligations
and funds. This method is based on the financial data of the relevant populations, rather than on the number of full-time equivalents, as was previously the case. Hence, the impact is fully
offset throughout the complete scope of the Crédit Agricole Group.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 249
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
BREAKDOWN OF NET CHARGE RECOGNISED IN THE INCOME STATEMENT
(in millions of euros)
Current service cost
Interest cost
Expected return on assets during the period
Amortisation of past service cost
Amortisation of actuarial gains (losses)
Gains (losses) on plan curtailment/settlement
Gains (losses) on asset ceiling
Net charge recognised in the income statement
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
559
75
62
58
(50)
(45)
-
2
57
58
-
9
-
-
628
157
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
860
859
(36)
-
CHANGE IN FAIR VALUE OF PLAN ASSETS AND REIMBURSEMENT RIGHTS
(in millions of euros)
Fair value of assets/reimbursement rights at 31/12/n-1
Foreign exchange difference
Expected return on assets
44
41
177
31
Employer’s contributions
39
23
Employee contributions
6
7
Plan revision / curtailment / settlement
7
-
Actuarial gain (losses) on plan assets (2)
Acquisitions, divestments (change in scope of consolidation)
Early retirement allowances
Benefits paid
Fair value of assets/reimbursement rights at 31/12/n
18
-
-
1
(93)
(102)
1,022
860
(2) Certain pension schemes are covered by mutual contracts among all Crédit Agricole Group entities. A change in allocation was effected in 2007 for amassed contributions, obligations
and funds. This method is based on the financial data of the relevant populations, rather than on the number of full-time equivalents, as was previously the case. Hence, the impact is fully
offset throughout the complete scope of the Crédit Agricole Group.
NET POSITION
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
2,322
1,621
Closing actuarial liability
2,322
1,621
Closing fair value of assets/reimbursement rights
1,022
860
Closing net position (liability) asset
1,300
761
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
% bonds
70.5%
71.3%
% equities
19.6%
19.2%
9.9%
9.5%
(in millions of euros)
Closing actuarial liability
Unrecognised past service cost
Gains (losses) on asset ceiling
Information on annualised return on plan assets
Breakdown of assets
% other
250 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Defined benefit plans: key actuarial assumptions
Discount rate
Expected return on plan assets and reimbursement rights
Actual return on plan assets and reimbursement rights
Expected salary increase
Increase in healthcare costs
8.5. Other employee benefits
Among the various collective bonus plans within the Group, Crédit
Agricole S.A. Rémunération Variable Collective (RVC) is a global
plan encompassing the discretionary incentive scheme and the
compulsory profit-sharing scheme. The amount is calculated in
accordance based on the company’s performance as measured by
Crédit Agricole S.A.’s earnings per share (EPS).
A given level of EPS will give rise to an entitlement equal to a given
percentage of the total payroll.
The amount of the profit-sharing component is calculated in
accordance with the standard legal formula and is deducted from
the total RVC to obtain the amount of the discretionary incentive
entitlement.
Other compensation: in France, the Group’s main entities pay
long-service awards. The amounts vary according to practices and
collective bargaining agreements in place. They can reach up to 1.5
times gross monthly salary in some subsidiaries.
8.6. Share-based payments
The Board of Directors has implemented various stock option plans
using the authorities granted by extraordinary resolution of the
shareholders on 22 May 2002, 21 May 2003 and 17 May 2006.
At 31 December 2006, the Board of Directors had implemented
seven stock option plans.
In 2007, another new plan was created.
2003 STOCK OPTION PLAN
On 15 April 2003, the Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S.A.
created a stock option plan for executive officers and certain senior
managers of Crédit Agricole S.A. and its subsidiaries, using the
authority granted at the AGM held on 22 May 2002. The number of
shares that may potentially be issued under this plan is 4,231,847 at
a price of €14.59 each, which is equal to the average of the prices
quoted during the twenty trading sessions preceding the date of the
Board meeting, with no discount.
Furthermore, using the authority granted at the AGM held on
21 May 2003, Crédit Agricole S.A. also harmonised the various
stock option plans existing within the Group by converting the stock
option plans granted by certain of its subsidiaries (Crédit Agricole
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
2.25% to 4.99%
2.25% to 4.38%
4%
4%
4.15%
4.05%
2% to 3.5%
2% to 4%
4.50%
4.50%
Indosuez, Crédit Agricole Asset Management and Crédit Lyonnais
Asset Management) into Crédit Agricole S.A. options. Accordingly,
option holders in the three subsidiaries referred to above received
Crédit Agricole S.A. stock options plus a cash payment equal to
the capital gains generated at 31 December 2003. The number
of shares that may potentially be issued under these plans is
6,257,460 at a price of €18.09, which is equal to the average of
the prices quoted during the twenty trading sessions preceding the
date of the Board meeting, with no discount.
2004 STOCK OPTION PLAN
On 23 June 2004, the Board of Directors created a stock option
plan for executive officers and certain senior managers of Crédit
Agricole S.A. and its subsidiaries, using the authority granted by
extraordinary resolution of the shareholders at the AGM held on
21 May 2003. In addition, some of these options resulted from the
conversion of stock option plans granted by the subsidiary BFT as
part of the continued harmonisation of stock option plans within the
Group. The total number of shares that may potentially be issued
under this plan is 10,861,220 at a price of €20.48, which is equal
to the average price quoted during the twenty trading sessions
preceding the date of the Board meeting, with no discount.
2005 STOCK OPTION PLAN
On 25 January 2005, the Board of Directors converted the existing
plan at subsidiary CL Suisse by granting 25,296 Crédit Agricole S.A.
options to the beneficiaries using the authority granted by
extraordinary resolution of the shareholders on 21 May 2003. The
exercise price is €22.57, which is equal to the average price quoted
during the twenty trading sessions preceding the date of the Board
meeting, with no discount. On 19 July 2005 and 16 November
2005, the Board of Directors granted options to two new
employees. The first received 5,000 options at an exercise price of
€20.99 and the second received 15,000 options at an exercise price
of €24.47, which is equal to the average price quoted during the
twenty trading sessions preceding the date of each Board meeting,
with no discount
2006 STOCK OPTION PLAN
Pursuant to the authorisation granted by the extraordinary
General Meeting of 17 May 2006, the Board of Directors of Crédit
Agricole S.A. set the terms and conditions for granting a stock
option plan and granted the necessary powers to its Chairman to
carry out this plan.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 251
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The Board of Directors created a stock option plan for executive
officers and certain senior managers of Crédit Agricole S.A. and its
subsidiaries, for 12,029,500 options at a price of €33.61 per share,
for 1,745 beneficiaries.
2007 STOCK OPTION PLAN
Pursuant to the authorisation granted by the extraordinary General
Meeting of 17 May 2006, at its meeting of 17 July 2007, the Board
of Directors of Crédit Agricole S.A. created a stock option plan for
six employees who had joined the group, at the exercise price of
€29.99 per share, which is equal to the average price quoted during
the twenty trading sessions preceding the date of each Board
meeting, with no discount.
Following the capital transactions of November 2003 and
January 2007, the Board of Directors of Crédit Agricole S.A.
adjusted the number of options and the exercise price under the
plans.
As the exercise period for the April and December 2003 was
open, in accordance with the resolutions adopted by the Board
of Directors, it was decided to adjust the number of options and
exercise price under these two plans to take into account the
November 2003 and January 2007 capital transactions.
The following tables show the attributes and general terms of the
plans in place at 31 December 2007:
DESCRIPTION OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. STOCK OPTION PLANS
Crédit Agricole S.A.
stock option plans
Date of AGM that authorised
the plan
2003
22/05/2002
2004
21/05/2003
21/05/2003
2005
21/05/2003
21/05/2003
21/05/2003
2006
2007
17/05/2006
17/05/2006
Date of Board meeting
15/04/2003
17/12/2003
23/06/2004
25/01/2005
19/07/2005
16/11/2005
18/07/2006
17/07/2007
Option grant date
15/04/2003
17/12/2003
05/07/2004
25/01/2005
19/07/2005
16/11/2005
06/10/2006
17/07/2007
7 years
7 years
7 years
7 years
7 years
7 years
7 years
7 years
Term of plan
Lock-up period
4 years
4 years
4 years
4 years
4 years
4 years
4 years
4 years
First exercise date
15/04/2007
17/12/2007
05/07/2008
25/01/2009
19/07/2009
16/11/2009
06/10/2010
17/07/2011
Expiry date
15/04/2010
17/12/2010
05/07/2011
25/01/2012
19/07/2012
16/11/2012
05/10/2013
16/07/2014
Number of beneficiaries
Number of options granted
Exercise price
Performance conditions
428
288
1,488
17
1
1
1,745
6
4,294,616
6,350,020
10,860,220
25,296
5,000
15,000
12,029,500
127,500
€14.38
€17.83
€20.48
€22.57
€20.99
€24.57
€33.61
€29.99
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Total
33,707,152
Conditions in case of
departure from Group
Resignation
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Dismissal
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Forfeit
Retirement
Death
Retain
Retain
Retain
Retain
Retain
Retain
Retain
Retain
Retain (1)
Retain (1)
Retain (1)
Retain (1)
Retain (1)
Retain (1)
Retain (1)
Retain (1)
Number of options
Granted to executive officers
Granted to the ten largest
grantees
40,758
140,000
170,000
443,243
2,389,385
515,000
Exercised in 2007
2,056,119
156,415
2,000
Forfeited and exercised since
inception
2,474,413
904,525
525,140
2,321
Number of options
outstanding at 31 December
2007
1,820,203
5,445,495
10,335,080
22,975
5,000
15,000
11,850,500
127,500
31.90%
21.80%
18.00%
18.30%
18.30%
18.30%
28.60%
22.70%
Black
& Scholes
Black
& Scholes
Black
& Scholes
Black
& Scholes
Black
& Scholes
Black
& Scholes
Black
& Scholes
Black
& Scholes
Fair value (as a % of grant
price)
Valuation method
used
(1) If heirs and successors exercise within 6 months of death.
252 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
41,725
790,000
127,500
2,214,534
179,000
4,085,399
29,621,753
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
HISTORICAL DATA ON CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. STOCK OPTIONS PLANS
Crédit Agricole S.A.
stock option plans
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
17/07/2007
15/04/2003
17/12/2003
05/07/2004
25/01/2005
19/07/2005
16/11/2005
06/10/2006
4,031,897
6,068,326
10,491,080
22,975
5,000
15,000
12,009,500
Total
Number of options
Outstanding
at 31 December 2006
Granted in 2007
Forfeited in 2007
32,643,778
127,500
155,575
466,416
154,000
Exercised in 2007
2,056,119
156,415
2,000
Outstanding
at 31 December 2007
1,820,203
5,445,495
10,335,080
127,500
159,000
934,991
2,214,534
22,975
5,000
15,000
11,850,500
127,500
29,621,753
Coverage of Crédit Agricole S.A. stock option plans
Key assumptions used to value the stock option plans
The 2004 stock option plan (maturity: 2011) and the 2006 stock
option plan (maturity: 2013) are covered through Crédit Agricole S.A.
options to buy its own shares.
Crédit Agricole S.A. values the options granted and recognises
an expense determined on the date of grant based on the market
value of the options on that date. The only assumptions that may
be revised during the vesting period giving rise to an adjustment to
the expense are those relating to the beneficiaries (options forfeited
on resignation or dismissal).
The other stock option plans are covered by own shares held
directly by Crédit Agricole S.A.
PLANS
Date of grant
Estimated life
Rate of forfeiture
Estimated dividend rate
Volatility on the date of grant
15/04/2003
17/12/2003
05/07/2004
5 years
5 years
5 years
5%
5%
5%
3.46%
3.01%
40%
27%
06/10/2006
17/07/2007
5 years
7 years
7 years
5%
1.25%
1.25%
3.34%
3.22%
3.03%
4.20%
25%
25.00%
28%
28%
The Black & Scholes model has been used for all Crédit Agricole S.A.
stock option plans.
25/01/2005
19/07/2005
16/11/2005
The calculation shows the value of the benefit to be 33% of the
discount. The charge recognised in the income statement for the
year ended 31 December 2007 is €15 million.
Share subscription plans proposed to employees as
part of the employee share ownership plan
The amount of the 2007 employee share issue was €500 million for
68,039 applicants and an average subscription amount of €7,345
after the discount. The shares were subscribed for at €22.01
(€23.38 in the USA). This price is equal to the average opening
price for the Crédit Agricole S.A. shares quoted during the twenty
trading sessions from 24 September to 19 October 2007, to which
a discount of 20% was applied (15% for the USA).
8.7. Executive officers’ compensation
The discount was based on calculations using the method
recommended by the CNC notice of 21 December 2004. The value
of the discount granted was measured using a strategy that entailed
selling non-transferable shares forward and buying the same
number of shares on the spot market, financed by borrowing.
Compensation and benefits paid to the members of the Executive
Committee in 2007 were as follows:
The average rate used to assess the cost of this financing was
6.38% (the risk-free rate plus an average spread).
pension rights under the supplementary plan in place for the
Group’s senior executives;
Executive officers refers to all members of the Executive Committee,
namely the Chief Executive Officer and Deputy Chief Executive
Officers of Crédit Agricole S.A., the Chief Executive Officers of
the main subsidiaries and the heads of the Group’s core business
activities.
n short-term benefits: €27 million including fixed and variable
compensation, social charges and benefits in kind;
n post-employments benefits: €13 million in end-of-career and
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 253
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
n other long-term benefits: the amount of long-service awards
granted was not material;
n employment contract termination indemnities: not material.
These sums include compensation and benefits paid to the Chief
Executive Officer and Deputy Chief Executive Officers of Crédit
Agricole S.A. shown in the section on “Corporate governance and
internal control” of the registration document.
Total Directors’ fees paid to members of the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Board of Directors in 2007 in consideration for serving as Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. amounted to €816,100.
Note 9
Financing and guarantee commitments
Guarantees and commitments given
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Commitments given
Financing commitments
171,332
245,387
11,305
120,972
Customers
160,027
124,415
Confirmed credit lines
155,164
119,993
12,417
7,738
142,747
112,255
Banks
- Confirmed documentary credits
- Other confirmed credit lines
Other
4,863
4,422
100,463
116,429
12,562
10,585
2,464
2,080
- Other
10,098
8,505
Customers
Guarantee commitments
Banks
- Confirmed credit lines
87,901
105,844
- Property guarantees
2,552
26,493
- Financial guarantees
12,804
10,745
- Loan repayment guarantees
72,545
68,606
14,113
10,406
3,470
7,280
Commitments received
Financing commitments
Banks
Customers
Guarantee commitments
Banks
Customers
- Guarantees received from government bodies or similar
- Other
254 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
10,643
3,126
160,867
79,422
31,259
37,006
129,608
42,416
11,936
9,017
117,672
33,399
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Assets pledged as collateral for liabilities
(in millions of euros)
Liabilities (Securities lent, securities sold under repurchase agreements, deposits on market transactions)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
173,633
157,508
Guarantees held and available to the entity
Guarantees held by the Group and that it is authorised to sell or
pledge as collateral are not material and the use of such guarantees
is not covered by a formal policy that is systematically applied
Note 10
because it is marginal when related to the Crédit Agricole S.A.
Group’s overall business.
Fair value of financial instruments
The fair value of a financial instrument is the amount for
which that instrument asset could be exchanged, or a
liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties in
an arm’s length transaction.
The fair values shown below are estimates made on the reporting
date. They are subject to change in subsequent periods due to
developments in market conditions or other factors.
The calculations represent best estimates. They are based on a
number of valuation models and assumptions. To the extent that
these models contain uncertainties, the fair values shown may
not be achieved upon actual sale or immediate settlement of the
financial instruments concerned.
In practice, and in line with the going-concern principle, not all these
financial instruments would necessarily be settled immediately at
the values estimated below.
Fair value of assets and liabilities measured at cost
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Carrying value
Estimated
market value
Carrying value
Estimated
market value
Due from banks
318,188
316,430
292,207
291,705
Loans and advances to customers
302,444
301,656
248,145
247,985
21,136
21,428
18,007
18,960
2,779
4,567
2,971
4,638
Due to banks
172,099
172,402
134,239
133,610
Customer accounts
387,253
387,039
350,811
350,629
Debt securities in issue
177,688
177,675
162,824
162,849
22,837
22,926
24,470
24,743
(in millions of euros)
ASSETS
Held-to-maturity financial assets
Investment property
LIABILITIES
Subordinated debt
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 255
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
For financial instruments that are traded in an active market (i.e.
prices are quoted and disseminated), the best estimate of fair value
is their market price.
In the absence of a market and of reliable data, fair value is
determined using an appropriate method that is consistent with
the valuation methods used in financial markets: market value of a
comparable instrument, discounted future cash flows, or valuation
models.
Where it is necessary to assess fair value, the discounted cash flow
method is the most commonly used.
In some cases, market values are close to book values. This is
particularly the case for:
n assets or liabilities at floating rates where changes in interest rates
have no significant influence on fair value as the rates on these
instruments are frequently adjusted to market rates;
n short-term assets or liabilities where the redemption value is
considered to be close to the market value;
n regulated instruments (e.g. regulated savings accounts) where
prices are fixed by the government;
n sight liabilities.
Investment properties are valued by expert appraisers.
Fair value of assets and liabilities measured based on non-observable data
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Carrying value
(if not the same
as fair value)
Financial assets held for trading
426,560
Financial assets designated as at fair value through profit or loss
Financial liabilities held for trading
14,506
(3,179)
32,405
Available-for-sale financial instruments
Loans and receivables
Fair value Portion measured
recognised
using valuation
or provided in
methods not
the financial based on market
statements
data *
Change in
period of fair
value measured
using valuation
methods not
based on market
data *
169,691
620,632
2,481
618,086
332,571
272
Financial liabilities designated as at fair value through profit or
loss
*
These valuation methods are described in the Management Report under “Risk Factors”.
As described in Note 2, the fair value of certain financial instruments
is calculated using valuation methods not based on observable
market data. At 31 December 2007, these included mainly:
The negative €3,179 million change in fair value over 2007 mainly
reflects the effect of impairment recognised on the CDO units and
associated hedges.
n CDO units with underlying US residential mortgages;
At 31 December 2006, market data were available for valuing CDO
units and associated hedges.
n the fair value of hedges on certain of the above CDOs with
underlying US mortgages;
n to a lesser extent, the fair value of other fixed-income, equity and
credit derivatives.
256 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Carrying value
(if not the same
as fair value)
Financial assets held for trading
391,903
Financial assets designated as at fair value through profit or loss
1,329
25,949
Financial assets available for sale
Loans and receivables
Fair value Portion measured
recognised
using valuation
or provided in
methods not
the financial based on market
statements
data *
173,530
540,352
2,055
539,690
Other financial assets
Financial liabilities held for trading
297,284
199
2007
2006
Deferred profit at 1 January
444
399
Profit generated by new transactions during the year
292
218
(211)
(166)
Financial liabilities designated as at fair value through profit or loss
Other financial liabilities
*
These valuation methods are described in the management report under “Risk factors”.
Estimated impact of inclusion of margin at inception (day one p&l)
(in millions of euros)
Recognised in net income for the period
Amortisation and cancelled/reimbursed/matured transactions
Effect of variables or products reclassified as observable during the year
(75)
(7)
Deferred profit at 31 December
450
444
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 257
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 11
Subsequent events
Calyon and Société Générale merge their
brokerage activities
On 2 January 2008, Calyon and Société Générale completed the
merger of the derivatives brokerage of their respective subsidiaries,
Calyon Financial and Fimat. The merger was announced on
8 August 2007.
This made effective the operational launch of Newedge, a company
owned 50/50 by Calyon and Société Générale.
Acquisition of 15% of Bankinter
On 21 February 2008, the Bank of Spain announced the
authorisation for Crédit Agricole S.A. to take a significant stake in
Bankinter. This decision enabled Crédit Agricole S.A. to complete
the acquisition of 14.66% of Bankinter for a total of €809 million,
initiated on 19 November 2007 under the terms of an agreement
with a group of investors represented by Ramchand Bhavnani. This
stake is in addition to the 4.75 % bought in the market by Crédit
Agricole S.A.
The transaction will be recognised in the first quarter of 2008.
Disposal of equity stake in Suez
Crédit Agricole S.A. announced that on 14 January 2008 it had
completed the sale of its 2.07% direct shareholding in Suez, i.e.
27,014,040 shares, at the price of €45 per share, for a total of
€1,215 million.
24,558,219 shares (1.88% of Suez’s capital) were sold through
a placement to institutional investors. Crédit Agricole S.A. also
granted to the Joint Lead Managers an over-allotment option for
2,455,821 shares of Suez (or 10% of the total placement) which
was exercised on 15 January 2008.
The disposal proceeds will be recognised in the income statement
in the first quarter of 2008.
258 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Acquisition of 49% of Agos S.p.A. from
Intesa Sanpaolo
On 27 December 2007, Intesa Sanpaolo and Crédit Agricole S.A.
announced that they had agreed to the sale to Crédit Agricole S.A.
of Intesa Sanpaolo’s 49% interest in Agos S.p.A., their Italian joint
venture in consumer finance. Agos S.p.A. will continue to operate
as a subsidiary of Sofinco.
The transaction is to be completed in 2008, after securing all the
required approvals.
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 12
Scope of consolidation at 31 December 2007
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
Banque Chalus
France
Equity
25.3
25.0
25.3
25.0
Banque Thémis
France
Full
100.0
100.0
94.8
94.8
Caisse Régionale Alpes Provence
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Alsace Vosges
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Aquitaine
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Atlantique Vendée
France
Equity
25.1
25.1
25.1
25.1
Caisse Régionale Brie Picardie
France
Equity
25.2
25.0
25.2
25.0
Caisse Régionale Centre Est
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Centre France
France
Equity
25.3
25.0
25.3
25.0
Caisse Régionale Centre Loire
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Centre Ouest
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Champagne Bourgogne
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
(a)
French retail banking
Banks and financial institutions
Caisse Régionale Charente Maritime - Deux Sèvres
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Charente-Périgord
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Côtes d’Armor
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale de l’Anjou et du Maine
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale des Savoie
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Finistère
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Franche Comte
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
France
Equity
Caisse Régionale Guadeloupe
France
Equity
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
Caisse Régionale Ille et Vilaine
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Gard
Caisse Régionale Languedoc
(Out)(4)
(In)
25.0
25.0
25.0
France
Equity
25.0
Caisse Régionale Loire - Haute Loire
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Lorraine
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
28.2
28.1
28.2
Caisse Régionale Martinique
25.0
France
Equity
France
Equity
Caisse Régionale Morbihan
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Nord de France
France
Equity
25.3
25.5
25.3
25.5
Caisse Régionale Nord Midi Pyrénées
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Nord-Est
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Normandie
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Normandie Seine
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Midi
(Out)(4)
(4)
25.0
28.1
25.0
France
Equity
Caisse Régionale Paris et Île de France
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Provence - Côte d’Azur
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Oise
(Out)
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Pyrénées Gascogne
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Réunion
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Sud Méditerranée
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Sud Rhône Alpes
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 259
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
Caisse Régionale Toulouse Midi Toulousain
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Touraine Poitou
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caisse Régionale Val de France
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Cofam
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Interfimo
France
Full
99.0
99.0
93.8
93.8
LCL
France
Full
94.8
94.8
94.8
94.8
Mercagentes
Sircam
Spain
Equity
25.0
25.0
20.6
20.6
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Lease finance companies
Locam
France
Equity
France
Full
Bercy Participations
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
CA Centre France Développement
France
Equity
25.3
25.0
21.0
20.8
CACF Immobilier
France
Equity
25.3
25.0
25.3
25.0
CADS Développement
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Calixte Investissement
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Cofinep
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Crédit Agricole Centre Est Immobilier
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
France
Equity
Nord Est Agro Partenaires
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Nord Est Champagne Partenaires
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Slibail Autos
(Out)(4)
100.0
25.0
94.8
Investment companies
L’Esprit Cantal
(Out)(3)
25.0
25.0
25.0
Participex
France
Equity
32.2
33.9
28.4
28.4
Prestimmo
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Sepi
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Sequana
France
Equity
25.0
Socadif
(In)
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
22.8
25.0
22.8
Vauban Finance
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.2
25.2
France
Equity
45.3
45.5
39.6
39.7
Luxembourg
Full *
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.8
Adret Gestion
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Alli Domes
France
Equity
25.3
25.0
25.3
25.0
Alsace Elite
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
23.7
23.7
Germany
Full
100.0
100.0
94.8
94.8
Insurance
Assurances du CA Nord-Pas de Calais
Crédit Agricole Reinsurance S.A.
Other
C.L. Verwaltungs und Beteiligungsgesellschaft GmbH
CA Participations
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Caapimmo 4
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
24.8
24.8
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
France
Equity
25.3
France
Equity
25.3
Caapimmo 6
Caryatides Finance
(In)
Centre France Location Immobilière
Consortium Rhodanien de Réalisation
(4)
(Out)
Creagrisere
Crédit Lyonnais Assurance, Réassurance, Courtage
(CLARC)
260 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(Out)(4)
France
Full
France
Equity
France
Full
22.3
25.0
25.3
100.0
25.0
25.0
100.0
25.0
94.8
23.9
23.9
94.8
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
Crédit Lyonnais Benelux
(a)
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
(Out)(3)
Netherlands
Full
% control
31-Dec-07
% interest
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
100.0
31-Dec-06
94.8
Crédit Lyonnais Développement Économique (CLDE)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
94.8
94.8
Crédit Lyonnais Europe
France
Full
100.0
100.0
94.8
94.8
Netherlands
Full
Crédit Lyonnais Notolion
(Out)(3)
Crédit Lyonnais Preferred Capital
Créer S.A.
100.0
94.8
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
France
Equity
25.3
25.5
7.6
7.6
Defitech
(Out)(3)
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
Defitech Dauphicom
(Out)(3)
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
Defitech Routage et Communication
(Out)(3)
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
Europimmo
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
Force Alpes Provence
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Force Alsace
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.3
Force Aquitaine
(In)
Force CACF
France
Equity
25.0
France
Equity
25.3
25.0
25.0
25.0
Force CAM Guadeloupe Avenir
France
Equity
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
Force Charente Maritime Deux Sèvres
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Force Lorraine Duo
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.1
25.1
Force Midi
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Force Oise
France
Equity
25.2
25.0
25.2
25.0
Force Run
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.1
25.0
Force Tolosa
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Force Toulouse Diversifié
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Force 4
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Gard Diversifié (ex Gard Obligations)
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Green Island
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.1
25.0
(Out)(4)
France
Equity
Inforsud FM
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
23.8
23.3
Inforsud Gestion
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
22.1
22.1
Ical
(3)
25.0
25.0
France
Equity
Ozenne Institutionnel
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.2
25.2
Patrimocam
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Patrimocam 2
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
PCA IMMO
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Mat Alli Domes
(Out)
25.0
Process Lorraine
(Out)(2)
France
Equity
25.0
Routage Express Service
(Out)(2)
France
Equity
25.0
S.A.S. Immnord
(In)
France
Equity
25.3
S.A.S. JPF
(In)
25.0
25.1
25.0
25.3
France
Equity
25.3
SARL Prospective Informatique
France
Equity
25.2
25.0
25.3
25.2
25.0
SCI Capimo
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
SCI du Vivarais
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
SCI Euralliance Europe
France
Equity
25.3
25.5
25.3
25.5
SCI Hautes Faventines
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
24.9
24.9
SCI Les Fauvins
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
France
Equity
27.2
27.2
27.2
27.2
France
Equity
SCI Les Palmiers du Petit Pérou
SCI Paysagère
(4)
(Out)
25.0
25.0
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 261
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
Scica HL
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
24.7
24.7
Sparkway
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
SPI SNC
France
Equity
25.0
25.0
25.0
25.0
Sté Immobilière de Picardie
France
Equity
25.2
25.0
25.2
25.0
Sté Picarde de Développement
France
Equity
25.2
25.0
25.2
25.0
Tourism-property development
S.A. Sedaf
(In)
France
Equity
25.3
SARL Arcadim Fusion
(In)
France
Equity
25.3
25.3
16.5
SCI Crystal Europe
(In)
France
Equity
25.3
26.0
SCI Quartz Europe
(In)
France
Equity
25.3
26.0
(Out)(2)
Italy
Equity
(In)
Italy
Full
Chile
Equity
Spain
Equity
International retail banking
Banks and financial institutions
Banca Intesa S.p.A.
Banca Popolare FriulAdria S.p.A.
Banco del Desarrollo
(Out)(2)
Bankoa
17.8
75.0
16.8
59.0
23.7
30.0
30.0
23.7
28.5
28.5
Banque Internationale de Tanger
Morocco
Full
52.6
52.6
52.6
52.6
BES (Banco Espirito Santo)
Portugal
Equity
10.8
10.8
24.0
23.8
51.0
51.0
51.0
BNI Madagascar (ex BNI Crédit Lyonnais
Madagascar)
Madagascar
Full
51.0
Italy
Full
75.0
Crédit Agricole Egypt S.A.E.
Egypt
Full
59.3
Crédit Agricole Financement
Switzerland
Equity
45.0
45.0
39.6
39.6
Djibouti
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Cariparma
(In)
Crédit Agricole Indosuez Mer Rouge
Crédit du Congo (ex Crédit Lyonnais Congo)
Crédit du Maroc
Crédit du Sénégal (ex Crédit Lyonnais Sénégal)
Crédit Uruguay Banco
75.0
59.4
59.0
59.1
Congo
Full
81.0
81.0
81.0
81.0
Morocco
Full
52.6
52.6
52.6
52.6
Senegal
Full
95.0
95.0
95.0
95.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Uruguay
Full
(Out)(4)
Greece
Full
(In)
Greece
Full
49.3
Emporiki Bank
Greece
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
Emporiki Bank Albania S.A.
Albania
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
Emporiki Bank Bulgaria A.D.
Bulgaria
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
Cyprus
Full
61.5
54.4
61.5
54.4
Emporiki Bank Germany GmbH
Germany
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
Emporiki Bank Romania S.A.
Romania
Full
66.4
65.9
66.4
65.9
Greece
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
Europabank
Belgium
Equity
10.0
10.0
21.8
21.8
JSC Index Bank HVB
Ukraine
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Serbia
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
21.8
Emporiki Asset Management A.E.P.E.Y.
Emporiki Asset Management Mutual Funds
Emporiki Bank Cyprus
Emporiki Management
Meridian Bank CA Group
S.A. Crédit Agricole (Belgique)
SCB Cameroun (ex Crédit Lyonnais Cameroun)
Société Financière et Immobilière Marocaine
53.6
53.6
49.3
Belgium
Equity
10.0
10.0
21.8
Cameroon
Full
65.0
65.0
65.0
65.0
Morocco
Full
52.6
52.6
52.6
52.6
Société Ivoirienne de Banque
Ivory Coast
Full
51.0
51.0
51.0
51.0
Union Gabonaise de Banque
Gabon
Full
58.7
58.7
58.7
58.7
262 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
Country
(In)
% control
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
% interest
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
Lease finance companies
Crédit du Maroc Leasing
Morocco
Full
100.0
Emporiki Leasing S.A.
Greece
Full
67.4
67.0
68.4
67.4
67.0
Emporiki Rent
Greece
Full
100.0
34.2
83.2
34.2
Greece
Proportionate
33.7
33.5
33.7
33.5
Insurance
Emporiki Life
Phoenix Metrolife Emporiki
Po Vita Compagnia di Assicurazioni S.p.A.
(2)
Greece
Full
(In)
Italy
Proportionate
(Out)
70.3
50.0
70.3
39.3
Other
Belgium CA S.A.S.
Bespar
Emporiki Development & Real Estate Management
Emporiki Group Finance P.l.c.
Emporiki Venture Capital Developed Markets Ltd.
Emporiki Venture Capital Emerging Markets Ltd.
France
Equity
10.0
10.0
32.6
32.7
Portugal
Equity
32.6
32.6
32.6
32.6
Greece
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
United Kingdom
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
Cyprus
Full
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
67.4
67.0
67.4
Cyprus
Full
Greece
Full
Euler Hermes Emporiki
Greece
Equity
14.6
25.3
14.6
25.3
Greek Industry Of Bags
Greece
Full
39.6
47.1
39.6
47.1
Industry Of Phosphoric Fertilizer
Greece
Equity
28.4
29.5
28.4
29.5
IUB Holding
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Belgium
Equity
10.0
10.0
17.8
17.8
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
51.0
50.5
58.7
Ermis Aedak
(Out)(4)
Keytrade
Sopar Serbie
48.0
67.0
48.0
Specialised financial services
Banks and financial institutions
Agos S.p.A.
Ajax Finance B.V.
(In)
Alsolia
Italy
Full
51.0
Netherlands
Full
100.0
France
Equity
20.0
99.0
34.0
19.8
Antera Incasso B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
Assfibo Financieringen B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
BC Finance
(In)
France
Full
55.0
55.0
CA Deveurop BV
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
Italy
Equity
40.0
Carrefour Servizi Finanziari S.p.A.
CREALFI
Credibom
Crediet Maatschappij “De Ijssel” B.V.
(In)
Credigen Bank
Crédit Lift S.p.A.
(In)
Creditplus Bank AG
Dan-Aktiv
De Kredietdesk B.V.
(In)
99.0
99.0
40.0
20.2
23.5
France
Full
51.0
51.0
50.5
50.5
Portugal
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
Netherlands
Full
100.0
Hungary
Full
100.0
Italy
Full
100.0
Germany
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
Denmark
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
DMC Groep N.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
Poland
Full
100.0
Emporiki Credicom
Eurofactor AG (Germany)
99.0
50.5
Dealerservice B.V.
EFL Services
33.6
100.0
100.0
100.0
Greece
Full
100.0
100.0
83.2
83.0
Germany
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 263
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
Eurofactor France
Eurofactor S.A./NV (Belgique)
Eurofactor UK (UK)
Eurofactor S.A. (Portugal)
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Belgium
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Portugal
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Eurofintus Financieringen B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
Euroleenlijn B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
France
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Italy
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
FC France S.A.
FGAFS (Fiat Group Automobiles Financial Services
S.p.A.) (ex FAFS)
Fiat Auto Financial Services (Wholesale) Ltd.
United Kingdom
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Auto Financial Services Ltd.
United Kingdom
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Austria
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Auto KreditBank
Fiat Bank Polska S.A.
Fiat Bank GmbH
Poland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Germany
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Credit Belgio S.A.
Belgium
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Credit Hellas S.A.
Greece
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Portugal
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Distribudora Portugal
Fiat Finance Holding S.A.
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Finance S.A.
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Finansiering A/S
Denmark
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fiat Haendlerservice GmbH
Germany
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Austria
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
50.0
50.0
49.5
Fidis Bank GmbH
Fidis Credit Denmark
Fidis Dealer Services
(Out)(4)
Fidis Finance Polska Sp. Zo.o.
Fidis Finance S.A.
Denmark
Proportionate
Netherlands
Proportionate
Poland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
50.0
49.5
49.5
Switzerland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fidis Insurance Consultants S.A.
Greece
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fidis Leasing Polska Sp. Zo.o.
Poland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fidis Leasing GmbH
Austria
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fidis Nederland B.V.
Netherlands
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Fidis Retail Financial Services Plc
Fidis Retail IFIC S.A.
Fidis Retail Portugal AdV S.A.
Fidis Servizi Finanziari S.p.A.
(Out)(4)
(4)
(Out)
Finalia
Financieringsmaatschappij Mahuko N.V.
(In)
Ireland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Portugal
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Portugal
Proportionate
50.0
Italy
Proportionate
Belgium
Full
51.0
Netherlands
Full
100.0
49.5
50.0
51.0
49.5
51.0
51.0
99.0
Finaref AB
Sweden
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref AS
Norway
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref Benelux
Belgium
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finland
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref OY
Finaref S.A.
France
Full
(4)
Sweden
Full
Finata Bank N.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
Finata Sparen N.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
Finata Zuid-Nederland B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
Finaref Securities AB
264 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(Out)
100.0
100.0
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
% control
% interest
(a)
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
(Out)(2)
Spain
Full
FL Auto S.N.C
France
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
FL Location SNC
France
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Finconsum ESC S.A.
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
45.0
31-Dec-06
44.5
IDM Finance B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
Iebe Lease B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
InterBank N.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
99.0
Spain
Full
100.0
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
(Out)(4)
Sweden
Full
Krediet ‘78 B.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
Logos Finanziaria S.p.A.
(In)
Italy
Full
51.0
Poland
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Inter-Factor Europa (Spain)
J.J.P. Akkerman Financieringen B.V.
Jotex Finans AB
Lukas Bank
Lukas S.A.
Poland
Full
100.0
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
Matriks N.V.
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
France
Proportionate
50.0
Netherlands
Proportionate
50.0
NVF Voorschotbank B.V.
(In)
Regio Kredietdesk B.V.
(In)
100.0
100.0
99.0
100.0
Mahuko Financieringen B.V.
MENAFINANCE
100.0
100.0
99.0
25.8
99.0
99.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
49.5
Netherlands
Full
100.0
Netherlands
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
France
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
France
Proportionate
France
Full
99.0
Saudi Arabia
Full
100.0
Spain
Proportionate
50.0
(Out)(4)
Switzerland
Proportionate
Spain
Proportionate
50.0
(In)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
Morocco
Equity
34.0
34.0
33.6
33.6
Auxifip
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Climauto
France
Full
100.0
100.0
99.5
99.5
Crédit Agricole Leasing
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Czech Republic
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Ribank
Sedef
Sofice S.A.
(Out)(4)
Sofinco
SSF (Sofinco Saudi Fransi)
(In)
Tarcredit EFC S.A.
Tarfin S.A.
Targasys Stock
VoordeelBank B.V.
Wafasalaf
99.0
50.0
49.5
99.0
99.0
50.0
49.5
99.0
64.7
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
49.5
49.5
99.0
Lease finance companies
Credium
Etica
Etica Bail
(Out)(4)
Europejski Fundusz Leasingowy (E.F.L.)
FAL Fleet Services S.A.S.
Fiat Auto Contracts Ltd.
Fiat Auto Lease N.V.
Finamur
Finplus Renting S.A.
Leasys S.p.A.
(4)
(Out)
France
Full
France
Full
Poland
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
France
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
United Kingdom
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Netherlands
Proportionate
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Spain
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
50.0
49.5
Italy
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
Leicer
Spain
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Lixxbail
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 265
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
Lixxcourtage
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Lixxcredit
France
Full
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
NVA (Négoce Valorisation des actifs)
France
Full
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
Italy
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
49.5
49.5
(a)
Savarent S.p.A.
(Out)(4)
France
Full
Slibail Longue Durée (SLD)
France
Full
Ucalease
France
Full
100.0
100.0
99.5
99.5
Unifergie
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Unimat
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Slibail Energie
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Investment companies
Argence Investissement S.A.S.
Argence Participation
(In)
Nordic Consumer Finans
France
Full
100.0
France
Full
99.9
Denmark
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
50.5
58.7
99.9
Insurance
Arès
Assurfi
(In)
Eda
Ireland
Full
100.0
France
Full
55.0
France
Full
100.0
55.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
Other
ADM
(In)
France
Full
100.0
55.0
BC Provence
(In)
France
Full
100.0
55.0
France
Full
100.0
France
Full
100.0
Crédit LIFT
Finanpar
(In)
100.0
99.0
99.0
55.0
GEIE Argence Développement
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GEIE Argence Management
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
SCI Groupe Sofinco
France
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
Sofinco Participations
France
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
Valris
France
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
BFT (Banque Financement et Trésorerie)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
BFT Gestion
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
BGP Indosuez
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Switzerland
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Italy
Full *
90.0
90.0
88.3
74.3
CA Asset Management España Holding
Spain
Full
100.0
100.0
98.0
98.0
CA Asset Management Hong Kong Ltd.
Hong Kong
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
Japan
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
Asset management
Banks and financial institutions
CA (Suisse) S.A.
CA Alternative Investment Products Group SGR
CA Asset Management Japan Ltd.
CA Asset Management Ltd.
CA Asset Management Luxembourg
CA Asset Management Singapore Ltd.
CA Luxembourg
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
Singapore
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
CAAM
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
CAAM AI Holding
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
100.0
98.1
CAAM AI London Branch
CAAM AI Ltd.
266 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(In)
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
Bermuda
Full
100.0
98.1
98.1
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
CAAM AI S.A.S.
CAAM AI Inc.
CAAM Capital Investors
CAAM London Branch
(In)
CAAM Real Estate Italia SGR
(In)
CAAM Securities Company Japan KK
CAAM SGR
CAAM SGR S.p.A.
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
Italy
Full
100.0
Japan
Full
100.0
100.0
(In)
Italy
Full
Italy
Proportionate
France
Proportionate
50.0
(In)
% interest
Country
(Out)(2)
CACEIS Bank
CACEIS Bank Deutschland GmbH
% control
Method
31-Dec-07
98.1
98.1
100.0
98.1
98.1
98.1
65.0
50.0
69.7
50.0
50.0
Germany
Proportionate
50.0
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
CACEIS Corporate Trust
France
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
CPR AM
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.4
98.4
Crédit Agricole Asset Management Group
France
Full
98.1
98.1
98.1
98.1
CACEIS Bank Luxembourg
Crédit Foncier de Monaco
CREELIA
E.P.E.M. Inc.
(2)
50.0
Monaco
Full
70.1
70.1
67.4
67.4
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
Italy
Proportionate
Fastnet Belgium
Belgium
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
26.1
26.1
Fastnet Ireland
Ireland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
Fastnet Netherlands
Netherlands
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
26.1
26.1
Finanziaria Indosuez International Ltd.
Switzerland
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Italy
Proportionate
Epsilon SGR S.p.A.
(Out)
Fund Channel
Gestion Privée Indosuez (G.P.I)
NEXTRA Alternative Investment SGR S.p.A.
(Out)(2)
Nonghyup-CA
93.8
65.3
90.0
64.4
South Korea
Proportionate
40.0
40.0
39.3
39.3
Segespar Finance
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
Segespar Intermédiation
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
Italy
Full *
100.0
100.0
98.1
69.7
Sim S.p.A. Selezione e Distribuzione
Investment companies
Alternative Investment & Research Technologies LLC
(Out)(3)
USA
Full
CACEIS S.A.S.
France
Proportionate
50.0
100.0
50.0
50.0
98.0
50.0
CAI BP Holding
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
CASAM
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.0
98.0
CASAM Advisers LLC
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
98.0
98.0
CASAM Americas LLC
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
98.0
98.0
(3)
USA
Full
CASAM US Holding Inc.
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
98.0
98.0
Lyra Capital LLC
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
98.0
98.0
Lyra Partners LLC
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
98.0
98.0
Ireland
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Argence Gestion Assurances
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Assurances Médicales de France
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
CASAM Cayman Ltd.
Space Holding (Ireland) Limited
Space Lux
(Out)
100.0
98.0
Insurance
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 267
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
BES Seguros
Portugal
Full
75.0
75.0
56.0
56.0
BES Vida
Portugal
Full
100.0
100.0
62.0
61.9
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
France
Full
(a)
BFT opportunité
Colisée 2001
(Out)(3)
100.0
100.0
Colisée Actions France Europe
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Colisée Actions 1
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Colisée Placements
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Federval
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref Assurances
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref Insurance Limited
Ireland
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref Life Limited
Ireland
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref Risques Divers
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Finaref Vie
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Foncière Hypersud (Ex Hypersud)
France
Proportionate
51.4
51.4
51.4
51.4
GRD1
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD10
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD11
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD12
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD14
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD2
Japan
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD3
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD4
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD5
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD7
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD8
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
GRD9
France
Full
Immobilière Federpierre
(Out)(4)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
Les Assurances Fédérales IARD
(Out)(4)
France
Full *
40.0
40.0
Médicale de France
France
Full
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
Pacifica
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Predica
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Predica 2005 FCPR A
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Predica 2006 FCPR A
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
100.0
99.9
99.9
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
France
Full
100.0
Prediquant opportunité
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Space Reinsurance Company Limited
Ireland
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Predica Europe S.A. (Ex Prédicai Europe)
Prediquant actions
Prediquant actions Asie
(In)
100.0
Other
Brooke Securities Holdings
(In)
USA
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
Brooke Securities Inc.
(In)
USA
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
USA
Full
100.0
(In)
France
Full
100.0
CAAM Real Estate
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
CACEIS Fastnet
France
Proportionate *
50.0
93.0
46.5
57.4
CAAM AI S Inc.
CAAM Financial Solutions
268 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
100.0
98.1
98.1
98.1
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
CACEIS Fastnet American Administration
(a)
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
(In)
France
Proportionate
CACEIS Fastnet (Suisse)
Fastnet Luxembourg
Ideam
Investor Service House S.A.
% control
31-Dec-07
50.0
% interest
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
50.0
Switzerland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
26.1
26.1
France
Full
100.0
90.0
98.1
88.5
50.0
50.0
50.0
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
USA
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
(In)
USA
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
(In)
United Kingdom
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
(In)
USA
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
Olympia Financial Services Inc.
(In)
Canada
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
Olympia Ireland Ltd.
(In)
Ireland
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
Olympia Capital Associates L.P.
(In)
Olympia Capital Inc.
Olympia Capital Ltd.
Olympia Capital Ltd. Cayman
Partinvest S.A.
SCI La Baume
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Systeia
France
Full
79.2
80.4
76.6
76.4
50.0
50.0
50.0
The Fastnet House S.A.
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
Winchester Fiduciary Services Ltd.
(In)
United Kingdom
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
Winchester International Trust Company Ltd.
(In)
United Kingdom
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
Corporate and investment banking
Banks and financial institutions
Aguadana S.L.
(In)
Al BK Saudi Al Fransi - BSF
Altra Banque
CA (Suisse) Bahamas
Spain
Full
100.0
Saudi Arabia
Equity
31.1
31.1
97.8
30.4
30.4
France
Equity
34.0
34.0
34.0
34.0
100.0
100.0
97.8
Bahamas
Full
Cal FP (Holding)
(Out)(3)
United Kingdom
Full
Cal FP Bank
(Out)(3)
United Kingdom
Full
(In)
Algeria
Full
100.0
Calyon Australia Ltd.
Australia
Full
100.0
Calyon Bank Hungary Ltd.
Hungary
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Poland
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Slovakia
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Ukraine
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
USA
Full
Calyon Algeria
Calyon Bank Polska S.A.
Calyon Bank Slovakia A.S.
Calyon Bank Ukraine
Calyon Leasing Corporation
(Out)(*)
Calyon Merchant Bank Asia Ltd.
Calyon North America Inc.
(Out)(*)
Calyon Rusbank S.A.
100.0
100.0
100.0
97.8
100.0
97.8
100.0
100.0
97.8
100.0
Singapore
Full
USA
Full
100.0
Russia
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
100.0
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
Calyon Yatirim Bankasi Turk A.S. (ex Calyon Turk A.S.)
Turkey
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Calyon S.A.
France
Full
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
(Out)(*)
USA
Full
Monaco
Full
100.0
(In)
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
Japan
Full
100.0
(Out)(2)
France
Equity
USA
Full
CLASI
Cogenec
Crédit Agricole Luxembourg Bank
Crédit Lyonnais Leasing Cpy Japan
Fransabank France
LF Investments
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
100.0
97.8
34.0
99.0
97.8
97.8
100.0
97.8
34.0
96.8
97.8
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 269
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
% control
31-Dec-07
% interest
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
Stockbrokers
Altura
CAI Cheuvreux
CAI Cheuvreux España S.A.
CAIC International Ltd.
CAIC Italia Sim S.p.A.
CAIC Nordic AB
CAIC North America Inc.
CAIC Securities Ltd.
Calyon Financial
Calyon Financial Hong Kong
Calyon Financial Inc.
Calyon Financial Singapore
Spain
Proportionate
50.0
50.0
33.4
34.2
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Spain
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Italy
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Sweden
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Hong Kong
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
97.8
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
Hong Kong
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Singapore
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Calyon Securities Japan
Japan
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Groupe Cholet Dupont
France
Equity
33.4
33.4
32.7
32.7
France
Full
49.6
49.6
48.5
48.5
France
Full
France
Full
Lease finance companies
Cardinalimmo
Ergifrance
(3)
(Out)
Financière Immobilière Calyon
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
Investment companies
Banco Calyon Brasil
Cafi KEDROS
(In)
Calyon Air Finance S.A.
Brazil
Full
100.0
France
Full
100.0
97.8
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Netherlands
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Calyon Finance Guernesey
United Kingdom
Full
99.9
99.9
97.7
97.7
Calyon Financial Products
United Kingdom
Full
99.9
99.9
97.7
97.7
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
USA
Full *
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
Cayman Islands
Full
United Kingdom
Full
Calyon Capital Market Asia BV
Calyon Capital Market International (CCMI)
Calyon Financing Luxembourg SARL
(In)
Calyon Global Banking
Calyon Global Partners Group
Calyon Holdings (ex Crédit Lyonnais Invest. Ltd.)
Calyon Investment Products Limited
(Out)(3)
Calyon Investments
97.8
100.0
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
97.8
97.8
Calyon North America Holding
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Calyon Securities USA Inc.
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Uruguay
Full
Calyon Uruguay S.A.
(Out)(3)
Capital Plus
100.0
97.8
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
CLIFAP
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
CLINFIM
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Compagnie Française de l’Asie (CFA)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Hong Kong
Full
100.0
100.0
69.0
76.0
Crédit Lyonnais Securities Asia BV
Doumer Finance S.A.S.
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Doumer Philemon
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Netherlands
Full
90.0
France
Full
100.0
EDELAAR EESV
Ester Finance
270 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(In)
88.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
Fininvest
France
Full
Fletirec
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
I.P.F.O.
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
(a)
ICF Holdings
Mescas
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
98.3
98.3
96.1
96.1
France
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Switzerland
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
(In)
France
Full
100.0
97.8
(In)
France
Full
100.0
97.8
Safec
SNC Shaun
31-Dec-07
Insurance
CAIRS Assurance S.A.
Other
Alcor
Hong Kong
Full
99.1
99.1
96.8
91.5
Aylesbury
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Bletchley Investments Limited
United Kingdom
Full
82.2
82.2
97.8
80.4
Spain
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
C.A.P.B. Levante (Ex Indosuez Levante S.A.)
C.A.P.B. Norte (Ex Indosuez Norte S.L.)
Spain
Full
95.0
95.0
92.9
92.9
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Ireland
Full
CAI Preferred Funding
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
CAI Preferred Funding II
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
France
Full
89.8
89.8
87.8
87.8
CA Conseil S.A.
CAI Derivatives Products PLC
(Out)(3)
Calixis Finance
Calliope SRL (Ex Cordusio SRL)
(In)
Calyon Asia Shipfinance Service Ltd.
Calyon CLP
(In)
Calyon Financial Canada
CASAM Equity Quant
(Out)(3)
100.0
Italy
Full
90.0
Hong Kong
Full
100.0
97.8
99.0
59.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
France
Full
100.0
Canada
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
97.8
Ireland
Full
99.9
96.9
97.7
94.7
Ireland
Full
CASAM Systeia Event Driven
Ireland
Full
99.9
99.6
97.6
97.4
CASAM Systeia Global Macro
Ireland
Full
97.7
99.6
95.6
97.4
CASAM Futures Euro
CASAM Systeia Pair Trading
(Out)(3)
Chauray
Cisa S.A.
(4)
(Out)
DGAD International SARL
ESF
(Out)(3)
European NPL S.A.
Ireland
Full
France
Proportionate
France
Full
Luxembourg
Full
France
Full
97.2
95.1
99.6
34.0
34.0
97.3
33.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
100.0
67.0
97.8
97.8
Luxembourg
Full
FCC Masterace
(Out)(3)
France
Full
100.0
97.8
IIF BV (Indosuez International Finance BV)
(Out)(3)
Netherlands
Full
100.0
97.8
(In)
Indosuez Finance Limited
67.0
33.2
65.5
65.5
United Kingdom
Full
100.0
Indosuez Holding SCA II
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
Indosuez Management Luxembourg II
Luxembourg
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Korea 21st Century TR
South Korea
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
Italy
Full
90.0
60.0
65.5
58.7
100.0
100.0
97.8
LSF Italian Finance Cpy SRL
MERISMA
Mezzasia
Sagrantino
Sagrantino Italy SRL (ex Minerva)
(Out)(3)
97.8
100.0
97.8
97.8
France
Full
Hong Kong
Full
Netherlands
Full
100.0
100.0
65.5
65.5
Italy
Full
90.0
90.0
65.5
88.0
100.0
97.8
86.9
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 271
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
SNC Doumer
SNC Haussmann Anjou
(3)
(Out)
UBAF
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
France
Full
99.9
99.9
97.7
97.7
France
Full
France
Proportionate
47.3
100.0
47.3
46.3
97.8
46.3
France
Parent
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
France
Full
100.0
100.0
94.8
94.8
99.8
99.8
99.8
Proprietary asset management
and other activities
Crédit Agricole S.A.
Crédit Agricole S.A.
Banks and financial institutions
BFC Antilles Guyane
CL Développement de la Corse
France
Full
France
Equity
France
Full
100.0
France
Full
100.0
Foncaris
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
G.F.E.R (Groupement de Financement des Ent.
Régionales)
France
Full
100.0
99.9
99.9
99.9
G.P.F (Groupement des Provinces de France)
France
Full
99.0
99.0
99.0
99.0
50.0
29.3
61.0
CPR Billets
(Out)(3)
CPR Online
Crédit Agricole Covered Bonds
(In)
GIE Attica
20.0
100.0
99.8
20.0
97.8
97.8
100.0
France
Equity
Sacam Consommation 1
(Out)(4)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
46.3
Sacam Consommation 2
(Out)(4)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
Sacam Consommation 3
(Out)(4)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
(In)
Investment companies
Casanli
Luxembourg
Proportionate
50.0
Crédit Agricole Bourse
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
50.0
100.0
Crédit Agricole Capital Investissement et Finance
(CACIF)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Crédit Agricole Private Equity
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Crédit Lyonnais Capital-investissement
France
Full
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
Crédit Lyonnais Venture Capital
France
Full
99.9
99.9
99.9
99.9
Delfinances
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
22.5
16.2
16.1
Eurazeo
IDIA Agricapital
France
Equity
23.5
(In)
France
Full
100.0
(Out)(4)
France
Full
100.0
Insurance
SOPAR
100.0
100.0
Other
CA Brasil DTVM
Brazil
Full
100.0
100.0
97.8
97.8
CA Grands Crus
France
Full
100.0
100.0
80.0
80.0
USA
Full
100.0
100.0
6.5
6.5
CACI 1
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Cedicam
France
Full
50.0
50.0
62.5
France
Full
CPR Holding (CPRH)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
CPR Investissement (INVT)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
CA Preferred Funding LLC
CPR Gestion (CPRG)
(Out)(4)
100.0
62.4
100.0
Crédit Agricole Capital Investissement
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Crédit Agricole Immobilier
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Crédit Agricole Immobilier Transaction
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
272 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Consolidated financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 approved by the Board of Directors
of Crédit Agricole S.A. at its meeting of 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole SA Group Scope of consolidation
(a)
Crédit Lyonnais L B 01
(3)
% control
% interest
Country
Method
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-06
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Japan
Full
Finasic
France
Full
100.0
100.0
98.1
98.1
GIE Silca
France
Full
100.0
100.0
99.3
99.3
East Asia Sits Co Ltd.
(Out)
100.0
98.1
Litho Promotion
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Progica
France
Equity
34.0
34.0
34.0
34.0
R.S.B.
France
Full
100.0
SCI Max Hymans
(In)
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
SCI Pasteur 3
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
SCI Quentyvel
France
Full
96.7
96.7
96.7
96.7
SCI Raspail
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Segespar Informatique Technique Services
France
Full
99.8
100.0
91.9
92.3
72.9
79.7
79.7
SIS (Société Immobilière de la Seine)
France
Full
72.9
France
Full
100.0
UI Vavin 1
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
Unibiens
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Uni-Edition
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Unimo
France
Full
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
France
Full
70.0
Sodica S.A.S.
(In)
98.9
100.0
Tourism-property development
Groupe Monné-Decroix
(In)
70.0
(1) Included in (In) or excluded from (Out) scope of consolidation.
(2) Sale to non-group companies and deconsolidation following loss of control.
(3) Deconsolidated due to non-materiality or discontinuation of business.
(4) Merged with another consolidated entity.
(*)
Change of consolidation method.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 273
5
1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Statutory Auditors’ report on the consolidated financial statements
Statutory Auditors’ report on the consolidated
financial statements
This is a free translation into English of the Statutory Auditors’ report issued in the French language and is provided solely for the convenience
of English speaking readers. The Statutory Auditors’ report includes information specifically required by French law in all audit reports, whether
qualified or not, and this is presented below the opinion on the consolidated financial statements. This information includes an explanatory
paragraph discussing the auditors’ assessments of certain significant accounting and auditing matters. These assessments were considered
for the purpose of issuing an audit opinion on the consolidated financial statements taken as a whole and not to provide separate assurance
on individual account captions or on information taken outside of the consolidated financial statements.
This report should be read in conjunction with and construed in accordance with, French law and professional auditing standards applicable in France.
Year ended 31 December 2007
To the Shareholders,
In compliance with the assignment entrusted to us by your Shareholders’ Meeting, we have audited the accompanying consolidated financial
statements of Crédit Agricole S.A. for the year ended 31 December 2007.
The consolidated financial statements have been approved by the Board of Directors. Our role is to express an opinion on these financial
statements based on our audit.
3 I. Opinion on the consolidated financial statements
We have conducted our audit in accordance with professional standards applicable in France. Those standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement. An
audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by the management as well as evaluating the overall consolidated
financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements give a true and fair view of the assets liabilities, financial position and results of the
companies and entities included in the consolidated group in accordance with IFRS standards as adopted in the European Union.
Without prejudice to the conclusion expressed above, we draw your attention to note 1.2 to the financial statements, which describes the
change in accounting methods relating to changes in minority interests.
3 II. Substantiation of our opinion
In accordance with the requirements of article L. 823-9 of the Code de Commerce relating to the substantiation of our opinion, we bring to
your attention the following matters:
n Note 1.2 to the financial statements describes the change in accounting methods relating to changes in minority interests in entities
that are already controlled. As part of our assessment of the accounting principles used by your company, we have examined the
appropriateness of this change in method, and of the information reported in the financial statements.
n As stated in note 2 to the financial statements, the Group books impairment reserves to cover identified non-recovery risks relating to
certain loans, which are inherent to its business activities. We have reviewed the arrangements put in place by management to identify
and evaluate these risks and to determine the amount of impairment it considers necessary, and we have verified that these accounting
estimates were based on documented methods that conform to the principles described in notes 1.1 and 2 to the consolidated financial
statements.
274 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Statutory Auditors’ report on the consolidated financial statements
n As stated in note 2 to the financial statements, the Group uses internal models to assess the fair value of financial instruments that are not
traded on organised markets. We have reviewed the procedures used by management to determine and control these models and the
parameters used and whether they reflect the risks associated with such instruments. We have verified that accounting estimates were
based on documented methods that conform to the principles described in notes 1.1 and 2 to the consolidated financial statements.
n As stated in note 2 to the financial statements, the Group has introduced, given the specific circumstances arising from the financial
crisis, arrangements for valuing financial instruments that are directly or indirectly exposed to the US residential real-estate market. We
have reviewed the arrangements put in place by management to identify and evaluate risks related to these instruments, and we have
verified that accounting estimates were based on documented methods that conform to the principles described in notes 1.1 and 2 to
the financial statements.
n As stated in note 2 to the financial statements, the Group has made estimates in order to factor changes in its own credit risk into the
measurement of “liabilities at fair value through profit and loss”. We assessed whether these estimates were reasonable.
n As indicated in notes 1.1, 2, and 7.18 of the financial statements, the Group establishes reserves to cover imbalance risks in home
ownership savings plans. The calculation of these reserves was determined in compliance with CNC opinion 2006-02 of 31 March 2006
relating to the recognition of home ownership savings accounts and plans. We have carried out various tests to verify application of
such calculation methods.
n As a customary part of the process of preparing financial statements, the Group’s management has made a number of other accounting
estimates as explained in note 2 to the financial statements, notably regarding the costs of pension provision and future employee
benefits, the valuation and impairment of non-consolidated equity securities, reserves for operational risks, reserves for legal risks,
impairment of goodwill and deferred taxes. We have reviewed the methods and assumptions used as described in notes 1.1 and 2 of
the financial statements, assessed the resulting valuations and checked that the notes give appropriate information.
Our assessments were made in the context of our audit of the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and therefore assisted us
in reaching our opinion as expressed in the first part of this report.
3 III. Specific verification
In accordance with professional standards applicable in France, we have also verified the information given in the Group management
report. We have no comments to report with respect to the fairness of their presentation and consistency with the consolidated financial
statements.
Neuilly-sur-Seine, 19 March 2008
The Auditors
PricewaterhouseCoopers Audit
ERNST & YOUNG et Autres
Gérard Hautefeuille
Valérie Meeus
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 275
5
1
5
1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
Parent company financial statements
at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors
on 4 March 2008
»
BALANCE SHEET OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. (PARENT COMPANY)
AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
ASSETS
Notes
(in millions of euros)
Cash, money market and interbank items
Cash, due from central banks
(1)
Treasury bills and similar items
Due from banks
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
Loans and advances to customers
Equities and other variable-income securities
31/12/06
77,099
54,817
3,179
1,056
5, 5.1, 5.2
5,046
3,726
3
68,874
50,035
3
229,876
209,230
4, 4.1, 4.2
2,114
1,431
Securities portfolios
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
31/12/07
25,971
26,570
5, 5.1, 5.2
24,025
22,435
5, 5.1
1,946
4,135
64,832
55,050
Fixed assets
Participating interests and other long-term investments
6, 6.1, 7
10,526
11,625
Investments in non-consolidated companies
6, 6.1, 7
54,105
43,239
Intangible assets
7
18
5
Property, plant and equipment
7
183
181
Treasury shares
8
Accruals, prepayments and sundry assets
Other assets
8
Accruals and prepayments
8
TOTAL ASSETS
(1) Operations with the Banque Postale (former CCP) are now classified under “Due from banks”.
276 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
242
293
30,513
25,145
15,280
13,197
15,233
11,948
430,647
372,536
5
1
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
RAPPEL_T1
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(in millions of euros)
Notes
Money market and interbank items
Due to central banks (1)
Due to banks
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
Customer accounts
Debt securities in issue
10
31/12/07
31/12/06
73,706
39,420
2
3
73,704
39,417
10
20,365
18,142
11, 11.1, 11.2
168,011
167,539
12, 12.1
84,352
76,533
27,185
20,668
11,274
6,752
Accruals, deferred income and sundry liabilities
Other liabilities
13
Accruals and deferred income
13
15,911
13,916
24,795
25,552
14, 15, 16
1,519
1,588
Subordinated debt
18
23,276
23,964
Fund for general banking risks
17
780
734
Shareholders’ equity (excl. FGBR)
19
31,453
23,948
Provisions and subordinated debt
Provisions
Share capital
Share premiums
Reserves
Regulated reserves and investment grants
Consolidated reserves
Net income for the year
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
5,009
4,492
16,554
12,584
2,738
2,738
3
1
2,253
1,176
4,896
2,957
430,647
372,536
31/12/07
31/12/06
24,761
19,111
3,838
3,988
(1) Operations with the Banque Postale (former CCP) are now classified under “Due to banks”.
»
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS
(in millions of euros)
Guarantees and commitments given
Financing commitments given
Guarantees given
20,923
15,123
Guarantees and commitments received
3,823
5,000
Financing commitments received
2,184
4,344
Guarantees received
1,639
656
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 277
5
1
RAPPEL_T1STATEMENTS
FINANCIAL
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
»
INCOME STATEMENT
(in millions of euros)
Notes
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Interest receivable and similar income
26
17,418
12,901
Interest payable and similar expense
26
(18,036)
(13,544)
Income from variable-income securities
27
4,231
4,151
Fee and commission income
28
409
330
Fee and commission expense
28
(881)
(879)
Net gains (losses) on financial instruments at fair value through profit or loss
29
(294)
(111)
Net gains (losses) on available-for-sale financial assets
30
222
205
107
74
Other banking income
Other banking expense
(232)
(143)
Net banking income
2,944
2,984
(580)
(665)
Operating expenses
31, 31.1
Amortisation and impairment of property, plant & equipment and intangible assets
Gross operating income
Risk-related costs
32
Net operating income
Net income (loss) on disposal of fixed assets
33
Pre-tax income on ordinary activities
Net extraordinary items
Corporate income tax
34
Net allocation to FGBR and regulated reserves
NET INCOME
Notes attached form integral part of balance sheets, off-balance sheet items and income statement.
278 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(11)
(13)
2,353
2,306
8
28
2,361
2,334
1,982
41
4,343
2,375
0
0
602
619
(49)
(37)
4,896
2,957
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
»
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1
Legal and financial background – Significant
events in 2007
281
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
281
281
282
282
Legal and financial background
Crédit Agricole internal financing mechanisms
Significant events in 2007
Subsequent events
Note 7
Movements in non-current assets
302
Note 8
Treasury shares, sundry accounts
and prepaid expenses
303
Impairment deducted from assets
303
Note 10 Due to banks - analysis by residual maturity
304
Note 11 Customer accounts - analysis by residual maturity
304
Note 9
Note 2
Accounting principles and policies
283
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
283
284
285
287
287
287
288
288
288
288
289
289
2.14
2.15
2.16
2.17
2.18
2.19
Note 3
Note 4
Note 5
Due from banks - analysis by residual maturity
289
290
290
290
290
290
290
291
Due from customers - analysis by residual maturity
291
4.1
4.2
292
292
Due from customers - geographical analysis
Due from customers - analysis by customer type
Trading, available-for-sale, held-to-maturity and
equity portfolio securities
5.1
5.2
Note 6
Loans and financing commitments
Subsidised loans
Securities portfolios
Demand and term deposits
Debt securities in issue
Reserves
Fund for general banking risks
Transactions on financial instruments
Foreign-currency transactions
Foreign branches
Recognition and depreciation of fixed assets
Revaluation
Retirement and early retirement benefits
and end-of-career allowances –
defined benefit plans
Pension schemes – defined contribution plans
Stock options and share subscriptions proposed
to employees as part of the employee share
ownership plan
Employee profit-sharing and incentive plans
Extraordinary income and expenses
Tax
Off-balance sheet commitments
Breakdown of listed and unlisted securities
between fixed-income and variable-income securities 294
Treasury bills, bonds and other fixed-income
securities – analysis by residual maturity
294
Investments in subsidiaries and associates
6.1
293
Estimated value of investments
in non-consolidated subsidiaries
295
301
11.1 Customer accounts - geographical analysis
11.2 Customer accounts - analysis by customer type
304
305
Note 12 Debts represented by a security - analysis by
residual maturity
305
12.1 Debts represented by a security –
analysis by residual maturity
306
Note 13 Other liabilities, sundry accounts
and unearned income
307
Note 14 Provisions
308
Note 15 Home purchase savings schemes
308
Deposits collected under home purchase savings
schemes during the savings period
Reserves against home purchase savings schemes
Note 16 Liabilities to employees - post employment
benefits defined benefit plans
Change in actuarial liability
Breakdown of charge recognised in income statement
Changes in fair value of plan assets
Change in provision
308
308
309
309
309
309
309
Note 17 Fund for general banking risks
310
Note 18 Subordinated debt - analysis by residual maturity
310
Note 19 Change in shareholders’ equity
311
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 279
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 27 Income from securities
317
Note 28 Net commission and fee income
317
Note 29 Trading profits/(losses)
317
313
Note 30 Net gain/(loss) on available-for-sale
and portfolio securities
318
314
Note 31 Operating expenses
318
Note 20 Capital
311
Note 21 Transactions with consolidated subsidiaries
and associated companies
312
Note 22 Operations carried out in currencies
312
Note 23 Foreign exchange transactions and borrowings
Note 24 Financial futures and options
24.1 Derivative financial instruments - analysis by
residual maturity
24.2 Derivative financial instruments - fair value
31.1 Average number of employees
315
315
319
Note 32 Risk-related costs
319
Note 25 Information relating to the counterparty risk on
derivatives products
316
Note 33 Net income on non-current assets
320
Note 26 Net interest and similar income
316
Note 34 Corporate income tax
320
280 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1
Legal and financial background – Significant events in 2007
1.1 Legal and financial background
Crédit Agricole S.A. is a French société anonyme (limited-liability
company) with share capital of €5,009,271,000 divided into
1,669,756,872 shares with par value of €3 each.
As of 31 December 2007, the share capital of Crédit Agricole S.A.
was held as follows:
n SAS Rue La Boétie: 54.09%;
n free float (including employees): 45.16%.
In addition, Crédit Agricole S.A. owns 12,552,962 of its own shares,
representing 0.75% of its share capital, following repurchases
intended to cover stock option plans.
Crédit Agricole’s Regional Banks are co-operative companies
whose status and operating procedures are defined by laws and
regulations codified in France’s Code Monétaire et Financier.
Crédit Agricole S.A. co-ordinates their activities, makes advances
to them through funds that they collect in its name, centralises their
liquidity surpluses and exercises a statutory right of supervision
over them in accordance with the Code Monétaire et Financier.
This relationship is described in more detail in section 1.2, “Crédit
Agricole internal financing mechanisms”.
France’s Banking Act of 24 January 1984, incorporated within the
Code Monétaire et Financier, confirmed Crédit Agricole S.A.’s role
as the group’s central body. In this respect, Crédit Agricole S.A.
represents the Regional Banks with respect to the Bank of France,
the Comité des établissements de crédit et des entreprises
d’investissement and the French Banking Commission.
Crédit Agricole S.A.’s task is to ensure the cohesion and proper
functioning of the network, as well as compliance with operating
standards designed to guarantee its liquidity and solvency.
Crédit Agricole S.A. exercises administrative, technical and financial
control over the Regional Banks’ organisation and management. It
guarantees the liquidity and solvency of both the Crédit Agricole
network as a whole and of each of the affiliated credit institutions.
Accordingly, in 2001 Crédit Agricole S.A. set up a reserve for
liquidity and solvency banking risks to enable it to fulfil its duties
as central body. This fund was recognised as Fund for General
Banking Risks (FGBR).
1.2 Crédit Agricole internal financing
mechanisms
Crédit Agricole has instituted a number of internal financing
mechanisms specific to it.
REGIONAL BANKS’ CURRENT ACCOUNTS
Each Regional Bank holds a current account with Crédit Agricole S.A.,
which records the movements of funds resulting from internal
financial transactions within Crédit Agricole. This account may be
in credit or debit. It is presented in the balance sheet under “Crédit
Agricole internal transactions – Current accounts”.
TIME LOANS AND ADVANCES
The Regional Banks collect savings funds (bonds, interest-bearing
notes and related time accounts, home purchase saving accounts
and plans, passbook accounts, “PEP” popular savings plans, etc.)
in the name of Crédit Agricole S.A. These funds are transferred to
Crédit Agricole S.A. and included in its balance sheet. They then
serve to finance advances made to the Regional Banks to enable
the latter to finance their medium and long-term lending.
A series of four internal financial reforms has been implemented.
These reforms have resulted in Crédit Agricole S.A. transferring
back to the Regional Banks a specific percentage of the funds
collected by them (first 15%, then 25%, 33% and, with effect since
31 December 2001, 50%), via “mirror advances” with maturities
and interest rates precisely matching those of the savings funds
received. The Regional Banks are free to use these mirror advances
at their discretion.
Since 1 January 2004, the financial margins generated from funds
collected are shared by the Regional Banks and Crédit Agricole S.A.
and are determined by using replacement models and applying
market rates.
Furthermore, 50% of credits falling within the financial relations
between Crédit Agricole S.A. and the Regional Banks may be
refinanced in the form of advances negotiated at market rates with
Crédit Agricole S.A.
There are also two other types of advance:
n advances for subsidised loans which serve to fund Government-
subsidised loans. Under this mechanism, the French government
pays Crédit Agricole S.A. a subsidy to bridge the gap between its
cost of funds and the subsidised loan rate. Advances made since
1 January 2004 have been repaid to the Regional Banks;
n advances for other lending, which refinance 50% of non-
subsidised loans (since 31 December 2001). Crédit Agricole S.A.
makes these advances to the Regional Banks against documentary
proof of their commitments.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 281
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Crédit Agricole S.A. may also make additional financing available to
the Regional Banks at market rates.
TRANSFER OF REGIONAL BANKS’ LIQUIDITY SURPLUSES
The Regional Banks may use their monetary deposits (sight
deposits, non-regulated time deposits and negotiable certificates
of deposit) to finance their lending. Liquidity surpluses must be
transferred to Crédit Agricole S.A., where they are booked as current
or time accounts, under “Crédit Agricole internal transactions”.
INVESTMENT OF THE REGIONAL BANKS’ SURPLUS
CAPITAL WITH CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.
Surplus capital may be invested with Crédit Agricole S.A. in the form
of 3- to 7-year instruments, which must match the characteristics
of interbank money market transactions in all respects.
FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS
Crédit Agricole S.A. represents the Regional Banks with respect
to the Bank of France and centralises their foreign currency
transactions.
SPECIAL SAVINGS SCHEMES
Funds held in special savings accounts (passbook accounts,
business passbook accounts, “popular savings accounts”,
“Sustainable development passbook accounts”, home purchase
savings plans and accounts, “popular savings plans”, and “youth
passbook accounts”) are collected by the Regional Banks on behalf
of Crédit Agricole S.A. They are centralised by Crédit Agricole S.A.
and booked in its balance sheet as “Customer accounts”.
MEDIUM AND LONG-TERM BONDS ISSUED BY CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE S.A.
These are placed mainly by the Regional Banks and booked
by Crédit Agricole S.A. either as “Debt securities in issue” or as
“Subordinated debt”, depending on the type of security.
1.3 Significant events in 2007
Crédit Agricole S.A. announced that on 21 January 2007, it sold
in a block trade 432 million ordinary Intesa Sanpaolo shares,
representing approximately 3.6% of ordinary shares and voting
rights of the group, for a total amount of €2,506 million.
Crédit Agricole S.A. built its branch network in Italy by acquiring
control of Cariparma and FriulAdria. During the first quarter of
2007, Crédit Agricole S.A. completed the acquisition of 75% of
282 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Cassa di Risparmio di Parma e Piacenza (Cariparma) under its
agreement with Intesa Sanpaolo. Concurrently, Sacam International,
a subsidiary of the Regional Banks, acquired 10% of Cariparma. As
a result, the Crédit Agricole group now owns 85% of Cariparma,
with the remaining 15% held by Cariparma Foundation.
Cariparma’s capital increase enabled it to acquire 76.05% of the
shares of Banca Popolare FriulAdria from Intesa Sanpaolo.
To complete this deal, Intesa Sanpaolo transferred 29 of its
branches to FriulAdria on 1 April 2007 and a further 173 to
Cariparma on 1 July 2007.
The share offering for Group employees launched during the
second half of 2007 reached the maximum authorised nominal
amount (€500 million).
During 2007, further progress was made in the area of risk
exposure, and Crédit Agricole S.A. obtained certification as Basel II
compliant bank.
1.4 Subsequent events
CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A. SOLD ITS DIRECT INTEREST IN
SUEZ
Crédit Agricole S.A. announced that on 14 January 2008, it had
completed the sale of its 2.07% direct shareholding in Suez, i.e.
27,014,040 shares, at the price of €45 per share, for a total of
€1,215 million.
24,558,219 shares (1.88% of Suez’s capital) were sold through
a placement to institutional investors. Crédit Agricole S.A. also
granted to the Joint Lead Managers an over-allotment option for
2,455,821 shares of Suez (or 10% of the total placement) which
was exercised on 15 January 2008.
The disposal proceeds will be recognised in the income statement
in the first quarter of 2008.
ACQUISITION OF 15% OF BANKINTER
On 21 February 2008, the Bank of Spain announced the authorisation
for Crédit Agricole S.A. to take a significant stake in Bankinter. This
decision enabled Crédit Agricole S.A. to complete the acquisition of
14.66% of Bankinter for a total of €809 million. The acquisition was
initiated on 19 November 2007 under the terms of an agreement
with a group of investors represented by Ramchand Bhawnani. This
stake is in addition to the 4.75% bought in the market by Crédit
Agricole S.A.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 2
Accounting principles and policies
Crédit Agricole S.A. prepares its financial statements in accordance
with the accounting standards applicable to banks in France.
The presentation of Crédit Agricole S.A.’s financial statements
complies with the provisions of CRB regulation 91–01, amended by
CRC regulation 2000-03 concerning the preparation of the individual
annual financial statements of companies within the jurisdiction of
the French Banking and Financial Regulations Committee, which
itself was amended by regulations 2004-16 and 2005-04 issued by
the CRC (French accounting regulations committee).
The following changes have been made in accounting methods and
the presentation of the financial statements in relation to last year:
n as from 1 January 2007, Crédit Agricole S.A. has applied CRC
regulation 2007-06 of 14 December 2007 pertaining to doubtful
overdrafts and amending article 3 bis of CRC regulation 2002-03
of 12 December 2002 on the accounting treatment of credit risk,
as amended by CRC regulation 2005-03 of 3 November 2005.
Application of this new regulation produced no material impact
on the income statement or balance sheet of Crédit Agricole S.A.
over the period;
n as from 1 January 2007, Crédit Agricole S.A. has applied CNC
Emergency Committee Opinion 2007-B of 2 May 2007 on
recognition of the tax credit arising from interest-free reimbursable
advances for purchasing or building residential housing for firsttime homeowners. The application of this new recommendation
did not concern Crédit Agricole S.A. over the period;
n furthermore, as from 1 January 2007, Crédit Agricole S.A. has
applied the CNC Emergency Committee recommendation 2007-D
of 15 June 2007 on the conditions for applying CRC
regulation 2004-01 on the accounting treatment or mergers and
similar transactions. The application of this recommendation did
not concern Crédit Agricole S.A. over the period;
n lastly,
CRC regulations 2007-04/2007-05 and CRC
regulation 2007-01 of 14 December 2007 replicate the provisions
of CNC recommendations 2006-10 and 2006-02, respectively.
The application of these new regulations did not concern Crédit
Agricole S.A. over the period.
financial statements according to their initial terms or the nature of
the loan: demand and term loans for banks; current accounts, time
accounts and term loans for Crédit Agricole’s internal transactions;
trade receivables and other assets for customers. In accordance
with regulations, the customers item includes transactions with
financial customers.
Subordinated loans and repurchase agreements (represented by
certificates or securities) are included under the various categories
of loans and advances according to counterparty type (interbank,
Crédit Agricole, customers).
Accrued interest is recognised in the balance sheet under the
appropriate category of loans and advances and booked to the
income statement as interest and similar income.
Financing commitments recognised off-balance-sheet represent
irrevocable commitments to advance cash and guarantee
commitments that have not given rise to funds movements.
Advances made by Crédit Agricole S.A. to the Regional Banks do
not represent a direct risk for Crédit Agricole S.A. with respect to
the corresponding primary loans made by the Regional Banks.
They do, however, represent a potential indirect risk with respect
to the financial strength of the Regional Banks. No provisions have
been made for these advances.
The implementation of CRC regulation 2002-03 relating to the
accounting treatment of credit risk has prompted Crédit Agricole S.A.
to recognise loans showing a risk of arrears in accordance with the
following rules:
BAD AND DOUBTFUL DEBTS
Loans and advances of all kinds, even those which are guaranteed,
are classified as doubtful if they carry an identified credit risk on an
individual basis arising from one of the following events:
n the loan or advance is at least three months in arrears (six
months for mortgage loans and property leases and nine months
for loans to local authorities, to take account of their specific
characteristics);
n the borrower’s financial position is such that an identified risk
exists regardless of whether the loan or advance is in arrears;
2.1 Loans and financing commitments
n the bank and borrower are in legal proceedings.
Amounts due from banks, Crédit Agricole group entities
and customers are governed by CRC regulation 2002-03 of
12 December 2002, amended by CRC regulation 2005-03 and CRC
regulation 2007-06, concerning the accounting treatment of credit
risks at companies within the jurisdiction of the French Banking
and Financial Regulations Committee. They are presented in the
For overdrafts, the age of the overdue amount is calculated as from
the date on which the borrower has exceeded an authorised limit
that the bank has notified to the borrower, or on which the borrower
has been notified that the outstanding overdraft exceeds a limit set
by the bank as part of its internal control procedures, or has drawn
sums without an overdraft authorisation.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 283
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Subject to certain conditions, in lieu of the above criteria, the bank
may calculate the age of the overdue amount from the date on
which the bank has issued a demand for total or partial repayment
of the overdraft by the borrower.
When a loan is recorded as doubtful, all other loans or commitments
relating to that borrower are also recorded in their entirety as
doubtful debts, whether or not they are collateralised.
Crédit Agricole S.A. makes the following distinction between
doubtful and bad debts:
n Doubtful Debts
All doubtful loans and advances which do not fall into the bad
debt category are classified as doubtful debts.
n Bad Debts
Bad debts are those for which the prospects of recovery are
highly impaired and which are likely to be written off in time.
Contractual interest is no longer recognised after the loan has
been transferred to bad debts.
Crédit Agricole S.A. also defines restructured loans as loans to
borrowers in financial difficulty, such that the bank alters their initial
characteristics (maturity, interest rate etc.) to allow borrowers to
honour the repayment schedule. As a result, Crédit Agricole S.A.
has decided to exclude the following from restructured loans:
n loans whose characteristics have been renegotiated on a
commercial basis with borrowers who do not show any solvency
problems;
n loans whose repayment schedule has been altered due to the
application of an option or contractual clause initially included
in the contract (e.g. payment holiday and extension of the loan
term).
IMPAIRMENT RESULTING FROM INDIVIDUALLY ASSESSED
CREDIT RISK
Once a loan is classified as doubtful, an impairment charge is
deducted from the asset in an amount equal to the probable loss.
Probable losses in respect of off-balance sheet items are covered
by provisions recognised as liabilities in the balance sheet.
Crédit Agricole S.A. books impairment charges for all foreseeable
losses in respect of bad and doubtful debts, at present value.
Foreseeable losses in respect of portfolios of small loans with
similar characteristics may be estimated on a statistical basis rather
than individually assessed.
284 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
TREATMENT OF DISCOUNTS AND IMPAIRMENT
Discounts in respect of restructured loans and impairment charges
against doubtful debts are recognised in profit or loss under riskrelated costs. For restructured loans classified as performing, the
discount is amortised to profit or loss in net interest income over the
life of the loan. For restructured loans classified as doubtful and all
non-restructured doubtful loans, impairment charges and reversals
are recognised in risk-related costs and any increase in the carrying
amount of the loan arising from an impairment reversal or discount
amortisation over time is recognised in net income, in accordance
with the option allowed by CRC regulation 2002-03.
IMPAIRMENT RESULTING FROM CREDIT RISK NOT
INDIVIDUALLY ALLOCATED TO LOANS
Crédit Agricole S.A. also books reserves on the liabilities side of
the balance sheet to cover customer risks that are not individually
allocated to loans, such as sector reserves. These reserves are
designed to cover identified risks for which there is a statistical or
historical probability of partial non-recovery against loans classified
as performing or not individually impaired.
2.2 Subsidised loans
Crédit Agricole distributes loans with reduced interest rates set by
the government to the agricultural sector. The government pays
Crédit Agricole S.A. the difference between the cost of resources
borrowed by Crédit Agricole S.A. and the interest rate on mediumor long-term loans set by the government.
Advance subsidies received from the government during the year
and the balance of subsidies corresponding to the difference
between the advance subsidies received and the estimated amount
of subsidies receivable with respect to the period are recorded
under “Interest and similar income”.
The subsidy system is periodically reviewed by the government.
New calculation methods have removed the time lag between
the cost of resources used to calculate subsidies and the interest
expense relating to these resources actually recorded in the
accounts. This time lag previously gave rise to a “subsidies
receivable” asset item, and the residual amount of this item is being
gradually taken to profit and loss.
Since 1 January 1990, other banks have been able to distribute
subsidised loans. The competitive subsidy is now equal, throughout
the term of the subsidised loan, to the difference between the
winning bid rate and the interest rate paid by the borrower.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
2.3 Securities portfolios
Crédit Agricole S.A. applies French Bank Regulation Committee
(CRBF) Regulation 90-01, amended by CRC regulations 2000-02
and 2005-01 concerning:
n French and foreign securities;
n Treasury bills;
n negotiable debt instruments issued in France and financial
instruments of the same type issued outside France;
n negotiable promissory notes.
Trading securities are recognised on the date they are purchased in
the amount of their purchase price, excluding transaction expenses
and including accrued interest.
Liabilities relating to securities sold short are recognised on the
liabilities side of the seller’s balance sheet in the amount of the
selling price excluding transaction expenses.
At each period-end, securities are measured at the most recent
market price. The overall balance of differences resulting from price
changes is taken to profit and loss.
2.3.2 AVAILABLE-FOR-SALE SECURITIES
These securities are presented in the financial statements according
to their asset class: public-sector securities (Treasury bills and
similar), bonds and other fixed-income securities (negotiable
debt instruments and money market instruments), equity shares
and other variable-income securities. They are classified in
portfolios defined by regulations (trading, available-for-sale, heldto-maturity, portfolio, other long-term securities, investments in
non-consolidated subsidiaries and affiliated companies).
This category consists of securities that do not fall into any other
category.
Crédit Agricole S.A. also applies CRC regulation 2002-03 on
determining credit risk and reserves on fixed-income securities.
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
2.3.1 TRADING SECURITIES
Available-for-sale securities are recorded at purchase price,
excluding transaction expenses.
Crédit Agricole S.A.’s portfolio of available-for-sale securities
consists mostly of bonds denominated in euros and foreign
currencies and mutual fund units.
Bonds are recorded excluding accrued interest, and interest
accrued but not yet due is recorded separately under “Interest and
similar income from bonds and other fixed-income securities”.
Trading securities are securities that were originally:
n bought with the intention of selling them in the near future, or sold
The difference between the purchase price and the redemption
price is spread over the residual life of the security.
with the intention of repurchasing them in the near future; or
n held by the bank as a result of its market-making activity. The
Equities and other variable-income securities
classification of these securities as trading securities depends
on the effective turnover of the securities and significant trading
volume taking into account market opportunities.
Equities are recognised on the balance sheet at their purchase
price excluding transaction expenses. Dividends are recorded as
income under “Income from variable-income securities”.
These securities must be tradeable on an active market and market
prices must represent real transactions taking place regularly in the
market in normal competitive conditions.
Income from mutual funds is recognised when received in the same
item.
Trading securities also include:
At period end, if the current value of an item or a homogeneous set
of securities (calculated from market prices on the balance sheet
date, for example) is lower than its carrying value, an impairment
loss is recorded. Potential gains are not recognised.
n securities bought or sold as part of specialist management of
the trading portfolio, including forward financial instruments,
securities or other financial instruments that are managed
together and on which there is an indication of recent short-term
profit taking;
n securities on which there is a commitment to sell as part of
an arbitrage transaction on an organised market for financial
instruments or similar market.
Trading securities may not be reclassified into another category,
and are presented and measured as trading securities until they
leave the balance sheet through being sold, fully redeemed or
written off.
Current value is equal to the market price.
Impairment charges and reversals and disposal gains or losses
on these securities are recorded under “Net gains (losses) on
available-for-sale financial assets” in the income statement.
Impairment intended to take into account counterparty risk and
recognised under risk-related costs is booked on fixed-income
securities as follows:
n in the case of listed securities, impairment is based on market
value, which intrinsically reflects credit risk. However, if Crédit
Agricole S.A. has specific information on the issuer’s financial
position that is not reflected in market value, specific impairment
is recorded;
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 285
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
n in the case of unlisted securities, impairment is recorded in
the same way as on loans and advances to customers based
on identified probable losses (note 2.1 Loans and financing
commitments – Impairment resulting from individually assessed
credit risk).
Sales of securities are deemed to take place on a first-in first-out
basis.
Purchase of treasury shares
Own shares repurchased by Crédit Agricole S.A., including shares
and derivatives held to cover stock option plans, are recorded on
the balance sheet in the securities portfolios, equities and other
variable-income securities (own-shares) category.
Impairment is recorded if the current value is lower than the
purchase price.
2.3.3 PORTFOLIO SECURITIES
Portfolio activity, as defined by CRC regulation 2000-02, consists
of investing, on a regular basis, part of a company’s assets in a
securities portfolio with the aim of securing a capital gain in the
medium term, with no intention of investing in the business on a
long term basis and taking an active part in its management.
Securities can only be included in this category if the activity is
carried out to a significant extent and on an ongoing basis within
a structured framework and gives the reporting entity a recurring
return mainly in the form of capital gains on disposal.
In principle, the category includes only variable-income securities.
These securities are valued individually.
They are recognised on the balance sheet at the lower of cost or
use value, which is determined on the basis of the issuer’s general
outlook and the time horizon for holding the securities.
For listed companies, use value is the closing price.
Impairment charges and reversals and disposal gains or losses on
these securities are recorded under “Net gain/(loss) on availablefor-sale financial assets”.
2.3.4 HELD-TO-MATURITY SECURITIES
Held-to-maturity securities are fixed-income securities with a
fixed maturity date that have been acquired or transferred to this
category with the manifest intention of holding them until maturity.
This category only includes securities for which Crédit Agricole S.A.
has the necessary financial capacity to continue holding them until
maturity and that are not subject to any legal or other constraint
that could threaten its plan to hold them until maturity.
These securities are recorded excluding accrued interest on the
purchase date.
The difference between the purchase price and the redemption
price is spread over the residual life of the security.
286 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Impairment is not booked for held-to-maturity securities if their
market value falls below cost. On the other hand, if the impairment
arises from a risk relating specifically to the issuer of the security,
impairment is recorded in accordance with CRC regulation 2002-03
on credit risk.
2.3.5 OTHER LONG-TERM SECURITIES
Other long-term securities consist of securities held with the
intention of promoting long-term business relations by creating a
special relationship with the issuer, but with no influence on the
issuer’s management due to the small percentage of voting rights
held.
These securities are valued individually.
They are recognised on the balance sheet at the lower of cost or
use value. Use Value represents the price the reporting entity would
be prepared to pay to acquire these securities if it had to buy them
due to any targets it had set.
Use value may be estimated on the basis of various factors
such as the issuer’s profitability and prospective profitability, its
shareholders’ equity, the economic environment and the average
share price in the preceding months.
Impairment charges and reversals and disposal gains or losses on
these securities are recorded under “Net gain/(loss) on disposal of
non-current assets”.
2.3.6 EQUITY SECURITIES
This category comprises securities the long-term ownership of
which is judged beneficial to the reporting entity, in particular
because it allows the reporting entity to exercise influence or
control over the issuer.
When entering the balance sheet, equity securities are recorded
at cost (purchase price excluding transaction expenses or transfer
value).
Subsequently, their value in use is measured, and they are
recorded on the balance sheet at the lower of cost or value in use.
Impairment is recorded if required after a case-by-case analysis
taking into account the security’s price or mathematical value, any
unrealised capital gains and the prospects of the investee.
Impairment charges and reversals and disposal gains or losses on
these securities are recorded under “Net gain/(loss) on disposal of
fixed assets”.
2.3.7 SECURITIES SOLD UNDER REPURCHASE
AGREEMENTS
Securities sold under repurchase agreements continue to be
recorded on the balance sheet. The amount received is recorded
as a liability.
Securities bought under repurchase agreements are not recorded
on the balance sheet, but the amount paid, representing the
receivable from the seller, is recorded as an asset on the balance
sheet.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Securities sold under repurchase agreements are subject to the
accounting principles corresponding to the portfolio from which
they originate.
2.3.8 MARKET PRICE
The market price at which the various categories of securities are
valued is determined as follows:
n securities traded on an active market are valued at the latest
Issue or redemption premiums on bonds are amortised over the
maturity period of each bond issue. The corresponding charge is
recorded under “Interest payable and similar expense from bonds
and other fixed-income securities”.
Crédit Agricole S.A. also amortises borrowing expenses in its
financial statements.
Financial service fees paid to the Regional Banks are recognised as
expenses under “Fee and commission expense”.
price;
n if the market on which the security is traded is not or no longer
considered active or if the security is unlisted, Crédit Agricole S.A.
determines the likely value at which the security concerned would
be traded using valuation techniques. Firstly, these techniques
take into account recent transactions carried out in normal
competition conditions. If required, Crédit Agricole S.A. uses
valuation techniques commonly used by market participants to
price these securities, when it has been demonstrated that these
techniques provide reliable estimates of prices obtained in actual
market transactions.
2.3.9 RECORDING DATES
Crédit Agricole S.A. records securities classified as held-to-maturity
securities on the settlement date. Other securities, regardless of
type or classification, are recognised on the trading date.
2.4 Demand and term deposits
Amounts due to banks, Crédit Agricole entities and customers
are presented in the financial statements according to their initial
terms or the nature of the deposit: demand and term deposits for
banks; current accounts, time accounts and term loans for Crédit
Agricole’s internal transactions; special savings accounts and other
deposits for customers (including financial customers).
Repurchase transactions represented by certificates or securities
are included in these categories depending on the type of
counterparty.
Accrued interest on these deposits is recognised under accrued
interest and taken to profit and loss.
2.6 Reserves
Crédit Agricole S.A. applies CRC regulation 2000-06 on liabilities
relating to the recognition and measurement of reserves falling
under this regulation’s scope.
Reserves include reserves relating to financing commitments,
pension and early retirement liabilities, litigation and various risks.
They also include country risk reserves. All of these risks are
assessed on a quarterly basis.
Country risk reserves are booked after an analysis of transaction
types, commitment terms, commitment types (receivables,
securities, market products) and the country situation.
Crédit Agricole S.A. partially hedges reserves on these foreigncurrency-denominated receivables by buying foreign currency, to
limit the impact of changes in exchange rates on reserve levels.
The reserve for home-purchase savings plan imbalance risk
is designed to cover the Group’s obligations in the event of
unfavourable movements in home-purchase savings schemes.
These obligations are: i) to pay a fixed rate of interest on the savings
contract from inception for an undefined period of time; and ii) to
grant a loan to the saver at a rate fixed at inception of the contract.
The reserve is calculated for each generation of home purchase
savings scheme and for all home-purchase savings accounts, with
no netting of obligations between generations.
The amount of these obligations is calculated taking account of the
following factors:
n saver behaviour, as well as an estimate of the amount and term
of the loans that will be granted in the future; these estimates are
based on historical observations over a long period;
2.5 Debt securities in issue
Debt securities in issue are presented according to their form:
interest bearing notes, interbank and other negotiable debt
securities and bonds, excluding subordinated securities, which are
classified in the “Provisions and subordinated debt” liability item.
n the yield curve for market rates and reasonably foreseeable
trends.
This reserve is calculated in accordance with the CNC’s work on
the recognition of home-purchase savings accounts and plans,
covered by CNC opinion 2006-02.
Interest accrued but not yet due is recognised under accrued
interest and taken to profit and loss.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 287
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
2.7 Fund for general banking risks
In accordance with the fourth European directive, CRBF
regulation 90-02 of 23 February 1990 and Commission Bancaire
instruction 90-01 of 1 April 1990 relating to shareholders’ equity,
this fund is maintained by Crédit Agricole S.A., at the discretion of
its management, to meet any charges or risks relating to banking
operations but whose incidence is not certain.
Reserves are released to cover any incidence of these risks during
a given period.
At 31 December 2007, the fund for general banking risks
corresponded with the fund for liquidity and solvency banking
risks, which is intended to enable Crédit Agricole S.A. to discharge
its duties as central body of Crédit Agricole.
2.8 Transactions on financial instruments
Hedging and market transactions on forward interest-rate, foreignexchange or equity instruments are recorded in accordance with
CRBF regulations 88-02 and 90-15 as amended. Commitments
relating to these transactions are recorded off-balance sheet in the
amount of the nominal value of the agreements.
Gains or losses relating to these transactions are recorded on the
basis of the type of instrument and the strategy used:
HEDGING TRANSACTIONS:
Gains or losses realised on hedging transactions are taken to
profit and loss symmetrically with the recognition of income and
expenses on the hedged item and under the same accounting
heading.
Income and expenses relating to forward financial instruments
used for hedging and managing Crédit Agricole S.A.’s overall
interest-rate risk are recorded under “Interest receivable (payable)
and similar – Other banking income (expense)”. Unrealised gains
and losses are not recorded.
MARKET TRANSACTIONS:
Instruments traded on an organised market or similar market,
or included in a trading portfolio within the meaning of CRBF
regulation 90-15 as amended, are valued at their market value on
the balance-sheet date.
Gains or losses (realised or unrealised) are taken to profit and loss
under the headings corresponding with the type of transaction:
“Net gains (losses) on financial instruments at fair value – Trading
securities and derivatives” and “Net gains (losses) on financial
instruments at fair value – Profit or loss on currency transactions
and similar derivatives”.
Gains or losses on instruments traded in illiquid markets or
constituting isolated open positions are taken to profit and loss
on settlement or on a pro rata basis, depending on the type of
instrument. On the closing date, reserves are booked for any
unrealised losses.
2.9 Foreign-currency transactions
Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currency
and forward foreign-exchange agreements included in off-balance
sheet commitments that correspond to hedging transactions are
translated at the exchange rate on the closing date.
Capital funds allocated to branches, fixed assets in offices abroad
and available-for-sale, held-to-maturity and equity securities in
foreign currencies bought with euros are translated into euros on
the transaction date. Only foreign exchange gains and losses on
available-for-sale securities are taken to profit and loss.
However, a reserve may be booked if there is an other-thantemporary deterioration in the exchange rate affecting Crédit
Agricole S.A.’s foreign equity interests.
Expenses paid and income received are recorded at the exchange
rate on the transaction date. Income and expenses accrued but not
yet paid are translated at the closing exchange rate.
At each closing date, forward foreign exchange transactions are
measured at the relevant forward exchange rate. Recognised gains
or losses are taken to the income statement under: “Net gains
(losses) on financial instruments at fair value – Profit or loss on
currency transactions and similar derivatives”.
2.10 Foreign branches
Branches keep separate accounts that comply with the accounting
rules in force in the countries in which they are based.
At each closing date, branches’ balance sheets and income
statements are adjusted according to French accounting rules,
translated into euros and integrated with the accounts of their head
office after the elimination of intra-group transactions.
The rules for translation into euros are as follows:
n balance sheet items other than capital funds are translated at the
closing exchange rate;
n capital funds are translated at the exchange rate in force when
they were recorded;
n income and expenses are translated at the period’s average
exchange rate.
Gains or losses resulting from this translation are recorded on the
balance sheet under “Other assets and liabilities”.
288 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
2.11 Recognition and depreciation of fixed
assets
Purchased software is measured at purchase price less accumulated
depreciation and impairment charges since purchase date.
Crédit Agricole S.A. applies CRC regulation 2002-10 of 12 December
2002 relating to the depreciation and impairment of assets.
Proprietary software is measured at cost less accumulated
depreciation and impairment charges booked since their completion
date.
As a result, Crédit Agricole S.A. applies component accounting for
all of its property, plant and equipment. In accordance with this
regulation, the depreciable base takes account of the potential
residual value of assets.
Land is stated at cost.
Buildings and equipment are stated at purchase price less
accumulated depreciation and impairment reserves since use.
Component
Land
Structural works
Fixed assets are amortised over their estimated useful life.
The following components and depreciation periods have been
adopted by Crédit Agricole S.A. following the application of the
transitional measures on component accounting for fixed assets.
These depreciation periods are adjusted according to the type of
asset and its location:
Depreciation period
Not depreciable
30 to 80 years
Non-structural works
8 to 40 years
Plant and equipment
5 to 25 years
Fixtures and fittings
5 to 15 years
Computer equipment
4 to 7 years (accelerated or straight-line)
Specialist equipment
4 to 5 years (accelerated or straight-line)
Based on available information on the value of its fixed assets,
Crédit Agricole S.A. has concluded that impairment testing would
not lead to any change in the depreciable base at 31 December
2007.
A reserve for retirement benefits is booked under “Provisions” on
the liabilities side of the balance sheet. The amount of this reserve
is equal to Crédit Agricole S.A.’s liabilities to employees in service
at period-end, governed by the new Crédit Agricole S.A. collective
agreement that came into effect on 1 January 2005.
2.12 Revaluation
A reserve to cover the cost of early retirement obligations is also
taken under the same “Provisions” heading. This reserve covers
the discounted additional cost of the agreement of 1 October 1993
extended on 28 June 1995, and the agreement of 1 July 1997
extended on 25 November 1999. These agreements enable Crédit
Agricole S.A. staff aged 54 and over to take early retirement.
The statutory revaluation in 1978 did not have any impact on Crédit
Agricole S.A.’s financial statements.
2.13 Retirement and early retirement
benefits and end-of-career allowances
– defined benefit plans
As of 1 January 2004, Crédit Agricole S.A. has applied CNC
recommendation 2003-R.01 of 1 April 2003 relating to the
recognition and valuation of obligations relating to pensions and
similar benefits.
In accordance with this recommendation, Crédit Agricole S.A.
sets aside reserves to cover its liabilities for retirement and similar
benefits falling within the category of defined-benefit plans.
Lastly, Crédit Agricole S.A. is liable to pay supplementary pension
benefits. A reserve is calculated on the basis of the company’s
actuarial liability for these benefits. These provisions are also shown
on the liabilities side of the balance sheet under “Provisions”.
In accordance with the recommendation, these obligations are
stated on the basis of actuarial, financial and demographic
assumptions, and in accordance with the projected unit credit
method. Under this method, for each year of service, a charge
is booked in an amount corresponding to the employee’s vested
benefits for the period. The charge is calculated based on the
discounted future benefit.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 289
5
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Since actuarial gains and losses are taken immediately to profit and
loss, the amount of the reserve is equal to:
2.16 Employee profit-sharing and incentive
plans
n the present value of the obligation to provide the defined benefits
Employee profit-sharing is recognised in the income statement in
the year in which the employees’ rights are earned.
as of the closing date, calculated in accordance with the actuarial
method advised by the recommendation;
n less the fair value of any assets allocated to covering these
obligations, which may be represented by an eligible insurance
policy. In the event that 100% of the obligation is fully covered
by such a policy, the fair value of the policy is deemed to be
the value of the corresponding obligation, i.e. the amount of the
corresponding actuarial liability.
2.14 Pension schemes – defined contribution
plans
French employers contribute to a variety of compulsory pension
schemes. The funds are managed by independent organisations
and the employers have no legal or implied obligation to pay
additional contributions should the funds not have sufficient assets
to pay the benefits corresponding to current and past service
rendered by employees. Consequently, Crédit Agricole S.A. has no
liabilities in this respect other than its ongoing contributions.
2.15 Stock options and share subscriptions
proposed to employees as part of the
employee share ownership plan
STOCK OPTION PLANS
Stock options granted to certain categories of staff are recorded
when exercised. Exercise gives rise to either an issue of shares,
recorded in accordance with requirements relating to capital
increases, or the transfer to employees of shares held as treasury
stock, previously purchased by Crédit Agricole S.A. and recognised
in accordance with the terms set out in the “Repurchases of own
shares” section.
SHARE SUBSCRIPTION PLANS PROPOSED TO
EMPLOYEES AS PART OF THE EMPLOYEE SHARE
OWNERSHIP PLAN
Share subscriptions offered to employees as part of the Employee
Share Ownership Plan, with a maximum discount of 20%, do not
involve a vesting period but are subject to a 5-year lock-up period.
These share subscriptions are recognised in accordance with
requirements relating to capital increases.
290 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
Incentive plans are covered by the 24 June 2005 agreement,
amended on 22 June 2006 and 21 June 2007.
The cost of employee profit-sharing and incentive plans is included
in “Personnel costs”.
2.17 Extraordinary income and expenses
These comprise income and expenses that are exceptional in
nature and relate to transactions that do not form part of Crédit
Agricole S.A.’s ordinary activities.
2.18 Tax
Crédit Agricole S.A. has had a tax consolidation mechanism since
1990. At 31 December 2007, 168 subsidiaries were signatories
to a tax consolidation agreement with Crédit Agricole S.A. Under
this agreement, each company that is part of the tax consolidation
mechanism recognises in its accounts the tax that it would have
had to pay in the absence of the mechanism.
2.19 Off-balance sheet commitments
As indicated in Note 1 (Legal and financial background), Crédit
Agricole S.A. is Crédit Agricole’s central body and as such is
subject to the obligations specified by the French Banking Act. The
commitments made in this respect are stated off-balance sheet.
The same is true of commitments made by the Regional Banks in
accordance with the agreement signed in 1988, under which they
guarantee the solvency and liquidity of the central body.
Reported off-balance sheet items do not mention commitments
on forward financial instruments or foreign exchange transactions.
Similarly, they do not include commitments received concerning
Treasury bonds, similar securities and other securities pledged as
collateral.
However, these items are detailed in the notes to the financial
statements.
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3
Due from banks - analysis by residual maturity
Residual maturity
Under 3 months
3 months to 1 year
(in millions of euros)
1-5
Over
years 5 years
Total
value
Accrued
interest
Total
31/12/2007
Total
31/12/2006
Banks
Loans and advances
Demand
23,222
-
-
-
23,222
30
23,251
15,369
Time
13,177
6,421
12,428
6,947
38,973
341
39,314
28,498
Pledged securities
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Securities bought under repurchase agreements
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6,294
6,294
21
6,315
6,266
36,398
6,421
12,428
13,240
68,488
392
68,880
50,133
(6)
(98)
68,874
50,035
Subordinated loans
Total
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
Current accounts
Time deposits and advances (1)
Total
7,401
-
-
-
7,401
23
7,424
3,694
30,455
47,685
73,152
70,232
221,525
927
222,452
205,536
37,856
47,685
73,152
70,232
228,925
950
229,876
209,230
229,876
209,230
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
(1) o/w subordinated loans €31 million at 31 December 2007 against €46 million at 31 December 2006.
Note 4
Due from customers - analysis by residual maturity
Residual maturity
(in millions of euros)
Under 3 months
3 months to 1 year
1-5
Over
years 5 years
Total
value
Accrued
interest
Total
31/12/2007
Total
31/12/2006
2,059
40
2,099
1,460
51
13
Customer operations
Other loans
Current accounts in debit
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
714
282
641
422
(36)
(42)
2,114
1,431
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 291
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
4.1 Due from customers - geographical analysis
(in millions of euros)
France (including overseas departments and territories)
Other European Union countries
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
1,421
1,317
689
116
Rest of Europe
-
4
North America
-
-
Central and South America
-
-
Africa and Middle-East
-
-
Asia-Pacific (excl. Japan)
-
-
Japan
-
-
Not affected and international organisations
-
-
2,110
1,437
40
36
Total
Accrued interest
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
(36)
(42)
2,114
1,431
4.2 Due from customers - analysis by customer type
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Individuals
Outstanding
gross
o/w
doubtful
debts
o/w
bad debts
31/12/2006
Impairment of Impairment
doubftul
of bad
debts
debts
294
Outstanding
gross
o/w
doubtful
debts
o/w
bad debts
Impairment of Impairment
doubftul
of bad
debts
debts
226
Farmers
Other profesionnals
Financial institutions
Corporates
Local authorities
803
1,007
173
35
6
1,030
36
35
8
5
4
1,437
41
-
39
-
41
-
39
-
Other
GROSS
Accrued interest
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
2,110
35
-
-
-
40
36
(36)
(42)
2,114
292 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
35
-
-
-
1,431
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 5
Trading, available-for-sale, held-to-maturity and equity portfolio securities
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Trading
Availablefor-sale
1,168
3,802
Treasury bills and similar securities
31/12/2006
Equity
portfolio Held-to-maturity
Total
Total
4,970
3,684
Residual net premium
200
122
Residual net discount
(50)
(12)
Accrued interest
118
118
68
Impairment
(42)
(42)
(26)
1,168
3,878
5,046
3,726
780
332
1,111
1,111
1,753
20,607
22,837
21,233
NET BOOK VALUE
Bonds and other fixed-income securities
(1)
Issued by pubilc bodies
Other issuers
477
Residual net premium
3
3
Residual net discount
(3)
(2)
90
102
Accrued interest
84
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
Equities and other variable-income
securities
2,533
21,008
11
832
Accrued interest
ESTIMATED VALUE
484
1,112
1
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
6
(14)
822
1,113
3,712
25,708
1,113
(11)
24,025
22,435
1,955
4,140
1
(10)
11
(14)
484
(10)
(5)
1,946
4,135
31,017
30,296
(1) o/w €2,567 million of subordinated debt at 31 December 2007.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 293
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
5.1 Breakdown of listed and unlisted securities between fixed-income and variable-income
securities
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Fixed-income and variableincome securities
Listed securities
Unlisted securities
Accrued interest
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
Bonds and
other fixedincome
securities
Treasury
bills and
similar
securities
31/12/2006
Equities
and other
variableincome
securities
Total
Bonds and
other fixedincome
securities
Treasury
bills and
similar
securities
Equities
and other
variableincome
securities
Total
23,949
4,970
1,955
30,874
22,344
3,684
4,140
30,168
2,291
4,313
1,083
7,687
2,227
3,339
968
6,534
21,658
657
872
23,187
20,117
345
3,172
23,634
90
118
1
209
102
68
(14)
(42)
(10)
(66)
(11)
(26)
(5)
(42)
24,025
5,046
1,946
31,017
22,435
3,726
4,135
30,296
170
BREAKDOWN OF MUTUAL FUNDS BY TYPE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
Book value
Cash-in value
Money market funds
64
66
Bond funds
10
8
(in millions of euros)
Equity funds
76
105
Other funds
253
278
TOTAL
403
457
5.2 Treasury bills, bonds and other fixed-income securities – analysis by residual maturity
(in millions of euros)
Under 3 months
3 months to 1 year 1-5 years
Over
5 years
Total
Accrued
interest
Total
31/12/2007
Total
31/12/2006
4,616
23,949
90
24,039
22,446
(14)
(11)
90
24,025
22,435
118
5,088
3,752
(42)
(26)
5,046
3,726
Bonds and other fixed-income
securities
Gross value
14,351
1,803
3,179
Impairment
(14)
NET BOOK VALUE
23,935
Treasury bills and similar securities
Gross value
Impairment
NET BOOK VALUE
294 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
350
4,620
4,970
-
(42)
4,928
118
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 6
Investments in subsidiaries and associates
(in millions of local currency units)
Share
capital
Company name and address
(in millions of euros)
Retained
earnings
and other Percentage
reserves ownership
Currency 31/12/2007 31/12/2007 31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Loans and
advances
outstanding
granted by
CA S.A.
Net
Book value of
investments
Gross
Guarantees
Net
and other Revenues income Dividends
commitfor the for the received
ments
year
year by CA S.A.
given by
ended
ended
during
CA S.A. 31/12/07 31/12/07
the year
INVESTMENTS WHOSE BOOK VALUE EXCEEDS 1% OF CRÉDIT AGRICOLE S.A.’S SHARE CAPITAL
1. BANKING SUBSIDIARIES (MORE THAN 50% OWNED)
39,570
39,104
30,508
BANCO BISEL
Cordoba 1437
provincia de Santa Fe
(Argentina)
ARS
N.A.
N.A.
100.0
237
-
-
N.A.
N.A.
CA PREFERRED
FUNDING LLC.
C/O Calyon
666 Third Avenue NY
10017 USA
USD
2,889 (2)
15 (2)
67.0
91
91
-
158 (2)
165 (2)
CALYON
9, quai du président
Paul Doumer
92400 COURBEVOIE
EUR
3,715
4,960 (3)
95.3
10,945
10,945
871
CARIPARMA
Via Universita n° 1
43100 PARMA (Italy)
EUR
628 (1)
473 (1)
75.0
4,452
4,452
CL DE
Avenue Napoléon III
DEVELOPPEMENT 20193 AJACCIO
DE LA CORSE
EUR
99
-
9.8
99
36
CRÉDIT
90 Boulevard Pasteur AGRICOLE ASSET Immeuble Cotentin
MANAGEMENT
75015 PARIS CEDEX
GROUP
EUR
16
1,159 (3)
94.3
3,112
CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE
LEASING
(UCABAIL)
1-3 rue du Passeur
de Boulogne
92861 ISSY-LESMOULINEAUX
EUR
92
243 (3)
100.0
CRÉDIT DU
MAROC
48-58 Boulevard
Mohamed V
CASABLANCA
(Morocco)
MAD
834 (1)
1,100 (1)
CRÉDIT
LYONNAIS
18 rue
de la République
69002 LYON
EUR
1,846
CRÉDIT
URUGUAY
BANCO SA
Crédit Agricole S.A.
central, Rincon 500
CP11000
MONTEVIDEO
(Uruguay)
UYU
EMPORIKI BANK
11 Sophocleous Street
GR 10235 ATHENES
(Greece)
EUROFACTOR
1-3 rue du Passeur
de Boulogne
92861 ISSY-LESMOULINEAUX
FINAREF AB
Box 932 - SE (FINAREF Groupe 501 10 BORAS
AB)
(Sweden)
7,777
6,493
4,175 (3) 1,531 (3)
1,952
756 (1)
137 (1)
-
-
-
3,112
804
543 (3)
469 (3)
334
334
1,083
-
47 (3)
1 (3)
52.6
115
115
-
319
75 (1)
13 (1)
10
580 (3)
94.8
10,835
10,835
4,878
7,415 (3) 1,193 (3)
428
729 (1)
169 (1)
100.0
49
30
EUR
728 (2)
85 (2)
67.4
2,203
2,203
1,716
EUR
110
295 (3)
100.0
506
506
2,023
SEK
25 (1)
286 (1)
100.0
273
260
9
26
60
276
12 (1)
5 (1)
1,165 (2)
76 (2)
169 (3)
40 (3)
38
9
2 (1)
16
4
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 295
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of local currency units)
Share
capital
Company name and address
(in millions of euros)
Retained
earnings
and other Percentage
reserves ownership
Currency 31/12/2007 31/12/2007 31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Loans and
advances
outstanding
granted by
CA S.A.
Net
Book value of
investments
Gross
38
564 (3)
146 (3)
152
320
97
10 (3)
43 (3)
41
232
161
26
28 (1) 0,362 (1)
75.2
386
386
4,365 (1)
93.7
166
103
70
194
1,226 (3)
98.8
2,930
2,930
18,726
770
7,520
7,520
219,577
5
(2)
(2)
10.8
502
502
198
(3)
100.0
2,284
2,284
Guarantees
Net
and other Revenues income Dividends
commitfor the for the received
ments
year
year by CA S.A.
given by
ended
ended
during
CA S.A. 31/12/07 31/12/07
the year
FINAREF SA
6, rue Émile Moreau
59100 ROUBAIX
EUR
14
FONCARIS
91/93,
boulevard Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
225
123 (3)
100.0
320
JSCINDEX BANK
HVB
42/4 Pushkinska
Street, KYIV 01004
(Ukraine)
UAH
400 (1)
-
100.0
LUKAS SA
Pl. Orlat LWOWSKICH
1, 53 605 WROCLAW
(Poland)
PLN
0,5 (1)
177 (1)
MERIDIAN BANK
CA Group
Futoski put 42-44
21000 NOVI SAD
(Republic of Serbia)
RSD
3,901 (1)
SOFINCO
128-130,
boulevard Raspail
75006 PARIS
EUR
2. BANKING ASSOCIATES (10-50% OWNED)
70
70
5
16 (1)
(6) (1)
1,651 (3)
158 (3)
211
3,218 (2)
488 (2)
18
BES
Avenida de Libertade
195 1250 LISBONNE
(Portugal)
EUR
RB ALPES
PROVENCE
Esplanade des Lices
13642 ARLES
EUR
114
955
25.0
210
210
6,242
398
99
8
RB ALSACE
VOSGES
1, place de la Gare
BP 440
67008 STRASBOURG
CEDEX
EUR
48
459
25.0
131
131
4,211
232
60
4
RB ANJOU ET
MAINE
40, rue Prémartine
72000 LE MANS
EUR
211
1,228
25.0
234
234
7,721
411
96
7
RB AQUITAINE
304, boulevard
du Président Wilson
33076 BORDEAUX
CEDEX
EUR
151
1,319
25.0
310
310
7,269
456
91
12
RB ATLANTIQUE
VENDÉE
Route de Paris 44949
NANTES CEDEX
EUR
113
1,085
25.1
196
196
7,649
403
95
6
RB BRIE
PICARDIE
500, rue
Saint Fuscien
80095 AMIENS
EUR
277
279
25.2
391
391
9,613
550
152
9
RB CENTRE EST
1, rue Pierre
de Truchis de Lays
69541 CHAMPAGNE
AU MONT D’OR
EUR
192
1,934
25.0
323
323
10,218
688
232
16
RB CENTRE
FRANCE
3, avenue
de la Libération
63045
CLERMONT FERRAND
CEDEX 9
EUR
144
1,484
25.0
318
318
7,353
486
150
11
296 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
2,500
337
2,219
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of local currency units)
Share
capital
Company name and address
(in millions of euros)
Retained
earnings
and other Percentage
reserves ownership
Currency 31/12/2007 31/12/2007 31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Loans and
advances
outstanding
granted by
CA S.A.
Net
Book value of
investments
Gross
Guarantees
Net
and other Revenues income Dividends
commitfor the for the received
ments
year
year by CA S.A.
given by
ended
ended
during
CA S.A. 31/12/07 31/12/07
the year
RB CENTRE
LOIRE
8, allée des collèges
18920 BOURGES
CEDEX
EUR
65
973
25.0
182
182
6,259
369
83
6
RB CENTRE
OUEST
29, boulevard
de Vanteaux BP 509
87044 LIMOGES
CEDEX
EUR
58
515
25.0
89
89
2,934
174
41
3
RB CHAMPAGNE 269, faubourg
BOURGOGNE
CRONCELS
10000 TROYES
EUR
112
632
25.0
114
114
5,664
312
73
5
RB CHARENTE
12, boulevard GuilletMARITIME - DEUX Maillet
SEVRES
17100 SAINTES
EUR
53
702
25.0
130
130
5,096
305
96
6
RB CHARENTE
PERIGORD
rue d’Epagnac BP21
16800 SOYAUX
EUR
96
497
25.0
77
77
3,060
233
55
4
RB COTE
D’ARMOR
La Croix Tual
22440 PLOUFRAGAN
EUR
92
638
25.0
118
118
3,768
204
61
4
RB DE
NORMANDIE
Avenue de Paris
50000 SAINT-LÔ
EUR
131
958
25.0
205
205
6,997
400
94
7
RB DES SAVOIE
PAE Les Glaisins
4, av. du Pré Félin
74985 ANNECY
CEDEX 09
EUR
188
886
25.0
152
152
9,218
433
112
7
RB FINISTÈRE
7, route du Loch
29555 QUIMPER
CEDEX 9
EUR
100
736
25.0
135
135
5,336
244
48
3
RB FRANCHE
COMTÉ
11, avenue
Élisée Cusenier
25084 BESANÇON
CEDEX 9
EUR
78
595
25.0
109
109
4,912
262
65
5
RB ILLE ET
VILAINE
19, rue du Pré Perché
BP 2025X
35040 RENNES
CEDEX
EUR
92
689
25.0
122
122
5,383
233
62
4
RB LOIRE HAUTE- 94, rue Bergson
LOIRE
42000 SAINT ETIENNE
EUR
31
702
25.0
131
131
3,826
239
68
4
RB LORRAINE
EUR
32
612
25.0
115
115
4,629
249
74
6
RB LANGUEDOC Avenue
du Montpelleret MAURIN
34977 LATTES CEDEX
EUR
204
206
25.0
239
239
9,972
611
150
11
RB MORBIHAN
Avenue de Kéranguen
56956 VANNES
CEDEX 9
EUR
83
534
25.0
92
92
3,985
225
58
4
RB NORD DE
FRANCE
27 à 33, Grand’Place
62009 ARRAS CEDEX
EUR
172
1,474
25.5
378
378
9,004
574
195
13
56, 58, avenue
André Malraux
54017 METZ CEDEX
5
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 297
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of local currency units)
Share
capital
Company name and address
(in millions of euros)
Retained
earnings
and other Percentage
reserves ownership
Currency 31/12/2007 31/12/2007 31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
Loans and
advances
outstanding
granted by
CA S.A.
Net
Book value of
investments
Gross
Guarantees
Net
and other Revenues income Dividends
commitfor the for the received
ments
year
year by CA S.A.
given by
ended
ended
during
CA S.A. 31/12/07 31/12/07
the year
RB NORD MIDI
PYRÉNÉES
53, rue Gustave
Larroumet BP 29
46021 CAHORS
CEDEX
EUR
125
432
25.0
181
181
6,647
414
100
8
RB NORD-EST
25, rue Libergier
51100 REIMS
EUR
220
1,670
25.0
252
252
8,779
458
118
8
RB NORMANDIE
SEINE
Cité de l’agriculture
BP 800
76230
BOIS GUILLAUME
CEDEX
EUR
92
873
25.0
162
162
5,065
316
93
6
RB PARIS ET ÎLE
DE FRANCE
26, quai de la Rapée
75012 PARIS
EUR
115
2,299
25.0
488
488
13,508
845
298
19
RB PROVENCE
COTE D’AZUR
Avenue Paul Arène
les Négadis
83002 DRAGUIGNAN
EUR
83
893
25.0
166
166
5,857
418
103
7
RB PYRÉNÉES
GASCOGNE
11, boulevard
Pt Kennedy
BP 329
65003 TARBES
CEDEX
EUR
59
750
25.0
139
139
6,106
312
100
7
RB RÉUNION
Parc Jean de Cambiaire
97462 SAINT DENIS
CEDEX
EUR
48
408
25.0
73
73
2,418
158
36
3
RB SUD
MÉDITERRANÉE
30, rue Pierre
Bretonneau
66000 PERPIGNAN
EUR
28
350
25.0
66
66
2,581
167
46
3
RB SUD RHÔNE
ALPES
15-17, rue
Paul Claudel BP 67
38041 GRENOBLE
CEDEX 09
EUR
71
801
25.0
138
138
6,215
357
95
7
RB TOULOUSE
ET MIDI
TOULOUSAIN
6-7, place
Jeanne d’Arc
31000 TOULOUSE
EUR
75
579
25.0
110
110
3,929
225
54
3
RB TOURAINE ET 18, rue
POITOU
Salvador Allende
86000 POITIERS
EUR
100
825
25.0
168
168
4,738
285
74
5
RB VAL DE
FRANCE
rue I.J. PHILIPPE
41913 BLOIS
CEDEX 9
EUR
43
568
25.0
104
104
3,415
218
61
4
Crédit Agricole
Egypt SAE
4/6 Hassan Sabry Street,
Zamalek
CAIRO (Egypt)
EGP
1,148 (1)
335 (1)
46.3
254
254
46 (1)
22 (1)
CRÉDIT
LOGEMENT
50, boulevard
Sébastopol
75003 PARIS
EUR
1,254
75 (3)
16.5
215
215
305 (3)
66 (3)
298 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
10
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of local currency units)
Share
capital
Company name and address
(in millions of euros)
Retained
earnings
and other Percentage
reserves ownership
Currency 31/12/2007 31/12/2007 31/12/2007
3. OTHER SUBSIDIARIES (MORE THAN 50% OWNED)
Loans and
advances
outstanding
granted by
CA S.A.
Net
Book value of
investments
Gross
8,902
8,875
99.5
262
262
100.0
70
70
314 (3)
100.0
943
107
12 (3)
100.0
EUR
5
77
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
151
EFL SA
Pl. Orlat LWOWSKICH 1,
53 605 WROCLAW
(Poland)
PLN
FIRECA
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
GIE SILCA
164
Guarantees
Net
and other Revenues income Dividends
commitfor the for the received
ments
year
year by CA S.A.
given by
ended
ended
during
CA S.A. 31/12/07 31/12/07
the year
50
69 (3)
69 (3)
-
943
-
64 (3)
57
271
271
21 (3)
10 (3)
2
100.0
69
69
53 (4)
53 (4)
28 (3)
100.0
171
171
26 (3)
28 (3)
26
276
443 (1)
100.0
356
356
93 (2)
25 (2)
16 (2)
EUR
152
(52) (3)
51.0
78
51
5 (3)
-
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
80
-
80.0
64
64
254(3)
-
IUB HOLDING
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
57
-
100.0
57
57
-
-
PACIFICA
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
227
64 (3)
100.0
302
302
1,206 (3)
45 (3)
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
44
CRÉDIT
91/93, boulevard
AGRICOLE
Pasteur
COVERED BOND 75015 PARIS
EUR
70
CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE
CAPITAL
INVESTISSEMENT
& FINANCE
100, boulevard
du Montparnasse
La Coupole
75014 PARIS
EUR
560
CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE
IMMOBILIER
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
CRÉDIT
AGRICOLE
REINSURANCE
S.A.
145, rue du Kiem L-8030
LUXEMBOURG
DELFINANCES
CA BOURSE
476 (3)
(in millions of euros)
164
50
-
18
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 299
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of local currency units)
Share
capital
Company name and address
(in millions of euros)
Retained
earnings
and other Percentage
reserves ownership
Currency 31/12/2007 31/12/2007 31/12/2007
5,895
(in millions of euros)
Loans and
advances
outstanding
granted by
CA S.A.
Net
Book value of
investments
Gross
Guarantees
Net
and other Revenues income Dividends
commitfor the for the received
ments
year
year by CA S.A.
given by
ended
ended
during
CA S.A. 31/12/07 31/12/07
the year
(3)
100.0
6,203
6,203
22,585 (3)
501 (3)
169
57
57
2 (3)
2 (3)
2
PREDICA
50-56, rue
de la Procession
75015 PARIS
EUR
916
SEFA
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
57
-
100.0
4. OTHER INVESTMENTS (10-50% OWNED)
3,955
3,918
BES VIDA
Avenida
Columbano Bordalo
Pinheiro, N° 75,
11° 1070-061
LISBONNE (Portugal)
EUR
250 (1)
3 (1)
50.0
475
439
437 (1)
33 (1)
26
BESPAR
Rua São Bernardo
n° 62, 1200 826 LISBONNE
(Portugal)
EUR
683
641
22.9
272
272
81
75
24
CACEIS SAS (ex
CAIS Holding)
1-3, place Valhubert 75013 PARIS
EUR
400
202 (3)
50.0
489
489
34(3)
37(3)
17
CASANLI
25 rue Goethe
1637 LUXEMBOURG
EUR
4,000 (2)
400 (2)
50.0
2,200
2,200
14 (2)
14 (2)
EURAZEO
3, rue Jacques Bingen
75017 PARIS
EUR
165
2,277 (3)
16.2
465
465
233 (3)
242 (3)
9
SCI Société
Immobilière
de la Seine
91/93, boulevard
Pasteur
75015 PARIS
EUR
100
-
45.5
53
53
3 (3)
3 (3)
4
2,804
2,734
OTHER INVESTMENTS (book value less than 1% of Crédit AgricoleS.A.’s share capital)
Banking subsidiaries
Banking associates
Other subsidiaries
Other associates
TOTAL SUBSIDIARIES AND ASSOCIATES
Advances and accrued income
NET BOOK BALUE
(1) Amounts at 30 June 2007.
(2) Amounts at 30 September 2007.
(3) Amounts at 30 June 2006.
(4) Amounts at 31 December 2006.
300 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
-
19,767
-
320
20.4
20
2,425.6
2,424
222.1
174
136.1
116
19,767
320
62,751 62,151
270,016
8,152
270,016
8,152
2,488.4
2,480
65,239 64,631
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
6.1 Estimated value of investments in non-consolidated subsidiaries
31/12/2007
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2006
Net book value
Estimated value
Net book value
Estimated value
Investments in associated companies
Unlisted
49,783
53,510
41,266
44,408
Listed
2,488
3,032
2,433
2,897
Advances
2,414
2,414
93
93
9
9
Accrued interest
Impairment
Net book value
(589)
(553)
54,105
58,965
43,239
47,399
Unlisted
6,645
6,708
6,705
6,776
Listed
3,711
5,681
4,797
8,991
Advances
126
126
139
139
62
62
2
2
Investments in non-consolidated subsidiaries
and other long-term securities
Investments in non-consolidated subsidiaries
Accrued interest
Impairment
Subtotal
(19)
(19)
10,525
12,577
11,624
15,908
1
1
1
1
Other long-term securities
Unlisted
Listed
Advances
Accrued interest
Impairment
Subtotal
Net book value
TOTAL
1
1
1
1
10,526
12,578
11,625
15,909
64,631
71,543
54,864
63,308
Total gross value
Unlisted
Listed
TOTAL
56,429
47,972
6,199
7,230
62,628
55,202
Estimated values are determined based on the use value of the securities. They include advances and accrued interest.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 301
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 7
Movements in non-current assets
(in millions of euros)
Value at the
beginning of
year
Increases
(Acquisitions)
Decreases
(Disposals,
due date)
Other
movements (1)
Value at the
end of the
year
43,699
10,213
(1,630)
(11)
52,271
93
2,357
(36)
-
2,414
(553)
(402)
366
-
(589)
Investments in associated companies
Gross
Advances
Impairment
Accrued interest
Net book value
-
9
-
-
9
43,239
12,177
(1,301)
(11)
54,105
11,502
5
(1,152)
-
10,356
Investments in non-consolidated subsidiaries
Gross
Advances
139
2
(14)
-
126
Impairment
(19)
(1)
2
-
(19)
2
70
(1)
-
71
1
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
Accrued interest
Other long-term securities
Gross
Advances
Impairment
Accrued interest
Net book value
11,624
75
(1,165)
-
10,526
TOTAL
54,863
12,253
(2,465)
(11)
64,631
(1) “Other movements” presents in particular the effect of variations rate of exchange on the value of the non-current assets in currencies
INTANGIBLE ASSETS AND PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT
(in millions of euros)
Value at the
beginning of
year
Increases
(Acquisitions)
Decreases
(Disposals,
due date)
Other
movements
Value at the
end of the
year
Property, plant & equipment
Gross
338
11
(2)
347
Amortisation and impairment
(157)
(9)
2
(164)
Net book value
181
2
-
24
15
-
183
Intangible assets
Gross
Amortisation and impairment
Net book value
TOTAL
302 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(19)
39
(2)
(21)
5
15
(2)
-
18
186
17
(2)
-
201
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 8
Treasury shares, sundry accounts and prepaid expenses
At 31 December 2007, Crédit Agricole S.A. held 12,552,962
treasury shares classified as available-for-sale securities with a
value of €203,864,701.34 and as trading securities with a value of
€38,413,580.16. The market value per share was €23.07.
OTHER ASSETS, SUNDRY ACCOUNTS AND PREPAID EXPENSES
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
730
740
12,537
10,773
Other assets (1)
Financial options bought
Miscellaneous debtors
“Livret de développement durable” bonds
2,013
1,684
15,280
13,197
Items in course of transmission to other banks (1)
4,174
3,887
Adjustment accounts
Net book value
Prepaid expenses
1,430
8
Unrealised losses and deferred gains on financial futures and options
516
549
Prepaid expenses
136
-
Accrued interest on financial futures and options commitments
7,203
6,595
Other accrued income
321
739
Deferred charges
387
-
-
169
1,066
1
Net book value
15,233
11,948
TOTAL
30,513
25,145
Bond issue premiums and discounts
Other
(1) Amounts shown are net of impairment and included accrued interest.
Note 9
Impairment deducted from assets
31/12/2006
Charges
Interbank loans
98
2
Customer loans
42
-
(8)
Securities transactions
42
136
(122)
(in millions of euros)
Write-backs Desactualisation
Other
movements
31/12/2007
(2)
6
Impairment deducted from assets
(92)
Other fixed assets
572
403
(371)
TOTAL
754
541
(592)
35
16
-
72
4
608
18
721
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 303
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 10
Due to banks - analysis by residual maturity
Under 3 months
Over
3 months to 1 year 1-5 years 5 years
in millions of euros
Total
value
Accrued
interest
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Banks
Deposits:
demand
12,483
time
36,710
Pledged securities
Securities sold under repurchase
agreements
12,483
6
12,489
11,886
1,268
4,793
8,030
50,801
274
51,075
20,247
1,655
4,348
3,350
9,353
197
9,550
6,977
590
307
73,704
39,417
590
BOOK VALUE
49,783
590
2,923
9,141
11,380
73,227
477
Crédit Agricole internal transactions
Current accounts
3,374
3,374
14
3,388
7,563
Time accounts and deposits
7,206
2,221
4,370
2,966
16,763
214
16,977
10,579
10,580
2,221
4,370
2,966
20,137
228
20,365
18,142
Total
value
Accrued
interest
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
7
BOOK VALUE
Note 11
Customer accounts - analysis by residual maturity
(in millions of euros)
Under 3 months
Over
3 months to 1 year 1-5 years 5 years
Current accounts in credit
1,104
1,104
Special savings accounts
160,117
160,117
1,111
1,014
160,117
160,922
demand
81,129
81,129
81,129
77,441
time
78,988
78,988
78,988
83,481
Other accounts
1,429
745
2,661
1,581
6,416
318
6,734
5,554
1,429
745
2,661
1,581
6,416
318
6,734
5,554
49
49
162,650
794
2,661
1,581
167,686
325
168,011
167,539
demand
time
Securities sold under repurchase
agreements
BOOK VALUE
49
49
11.1 Customer accounts - geographical analysis
(in millions of euros)
France (including overseas departments and territories)
Other European Union countries
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
166,981
166,926
8
10
Rest of Europe
357
249
Africa and Middle-East
342
-
Supranational organisations
Total
Accrued interest
BOOK VALUE
304 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
-
21
167,687
167,206
324
333
168,011
167,539
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
11.2 Customer accounts - analysis by customer type
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
153,565
165,632
Individuals
Farmers
11,462
Other professionals
Financial institutions
Corporates
Local authorities
Other
Gross
Accrued interest
TOTAL
Note 12
839
436
1,457
925
361
190
3
23
167,687
167,206
324
333
168,011
167,539
Debts represented by a security - analysis by residual maturity
(in millions of euros)
Negotiable debt securities (1)
Bonds
BOOK VALUE
Under
3 months
3 months
to 1 year
1-5 years
Over
5 years Total value
Accrued
interest
Total
31/12/2007
Total
31/12/2006
21,465
9,064
863
416
31,808
239
32,047
37,269
847
11,404
25,713
13,831
51,795
510
52,305
39,264
22,312
20,468
26,576
14,247
83,603
749
84,352
76,533
(1) o/w €7,028 million abroad
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 305
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
12.1 Debts represented by a security – analysis by residual maturity
(in millions of euros)
Euro
Under
1 year
1-5 years
Over
5 years
Outstanding
at 31/12/2007
Outstanding
at 31/12/2006
11,570
17,932
13,146
42,648
33,494
Fixed-rate
2,568
5,082
10,088
17,738
16,339
Floating rate
9,002
12,850
3,058
24,910
17,155
60
3,397
499
3,957
3,047
60
205
363
628
1,483
Other E.U. currencies
Fixed-rate
Floating rate
3,193
136
3,329
1,564
136
3,791
106
4,032
1,839
-
136
14
149
320
136
3,655
92
3,883
1,519
-
386
80
466
8
Fixed-rate
-
265
73
337
8
Floating rate
-
121
7
129
-
484
208
-
692
458
-
458
Dollar
Fixed-rate
Floating rate
Yen
Other currencies
Fixed-rate
Floating rate
Total
484
208
12,251
25,713
692
-
13,831
51,795
38,846
Fixed-rate
2,629
5,687
10,537
18,852
18,608
Floating rate
9,622
20,027
3,294
32,943
20,238
510
418
25,713
13,831
52,305
39,264
Accrued interest
TOTAL
306 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
510
12,761
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 13
Other liabilities, sundry accounts and unearned income
(in millions of euros)
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Other liabilities (1)
Financial options sold
72
29
609
-
Miscellaneous creditors
9,093
6,684
Payments in process on securities
1,500
39
11,274
6,752
Items in course of transmission to other banks (2)
4,370
4,377
Adjustment accounts
2,787
901
162
170
Settlement and negociaton accounts
Net book value
Sundry accounts and unearned income
Unrealised gains and deferred gains on financial futures
Unearned income
1,439
Accrued expenses on commitments on financial futures
6,225
5,933
840
2,535
Other accrued expenses
Other sundry accounts
88
Net book value
15,911
13,916
TOTAL
27,185
20,668
(1) Amounts include accrued interest.
(2) Amounts are net of impairment.
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 307
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 14
Provisions
Balance at
31/12/2006
Increases
(Charges)
Decreases
(Write-backs)
Other
movements
Balance at
31/12/2007
198
15
(5)
66
274
8
-
(1)
-
7
Country risks
30
-
(30)
-
-
Credit risk and sector risk
44
3
(7)
(7)
33
(in millions of euros)
Retirement and early retirement benefits
Financing commitment execution risks
Modernisation of information systems and restructuring
Income tax
2
(1)
Litigation and liability guarantees
Equity investments (negative net worth)
Internal charges on home purchase savings accounts
(2)
-
213
31
(36)
166
40
(55)
8
208
159
16
1
(4)
3
16
35
(12)
23
Risks on home purchase savings contracts
398
(96)
302
Other risks and charges
478
104
(65)
(20)
497
1,588
194
(313)
50
1,519
BOOK VALUE
(1) This item includes tax due under the tax consolidation arrangement.
Note 15
Home purchase savings schemes
Deposits collected under home purchase savings schemes during the savings period
(in millions of euros)
Home purchase savings plans:
Under 4 years old
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
61,823
62,687
-
5,718
Between 4 and 10 years old
35,747
29,945
Over 10 years old
26,076
27,024
Home purchase savings accounts
13,290
13,536
75,113
76,223
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
116
258
-
1
TOTAL DEPOSITS COLLECTED UNDER HOME PURCHASE SAVINGS SCHEMES
Age is determinated by reference to the midpoint of the generation of plans to which they belong.
Reserves against home purchase savings schemes
(in millions of euros)
Home purchase savings plans:
Under 4 years old
Between 4 and 10 years old
3
49
Over 10 years old
113
208
Home purchase savings accounts
186
140
TOTAL RESERVES AGAINST HOME PURCHASE SAVINGS SCHEMES
302
398
Age is determinated by reference to the midpoint of the generation of plans to which they belong.
Deposits do not include the government bonus.
308 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 16
Liabilities to employees - post employment benefits defined benefit plans
Change in actuarial liability
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
198
153
18
13
Discounting effect
8
6
Employee contributions
-
-
Plan revision / curtailment / settlement
-
-
Acquisitions, divestments (change in scope of consolidation)
-
-
Early retirement allowances
-
-
(41)
(18)
(in millions of euros)
Actuarial liability at 1 January
Service cost over the period
Benefits paid
Actuarial (gain)/loss
Actuarial liability at 31 December
91
44
274
198
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
18
13
Breakdown of charge recognised in income statement
(in millions of euros)
Service cost over the period
Discounting effect
8
6
Expected rate of return on plan assets over the period
(4)
(3)
Amortisation of past service cost
11
46
Other gains or losses
Net charge recognised in income statement
-
-
33
62
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
113
79
Changes in fair value of plan assets
(in millions of euros)
Fair value of assets / reimbursement rights at 1 January
Expected rate of return on plan assets
4
3
Actuarial gains or losses on plan assets
81
(3)
Employer contributions
22
49
Employee contributions
-
-
Plan revision / curtailment / settlement
-
-
Acquisitions, divestments (change in scope of consolidation)
-
-
Early retirement allowances
-
-
Benefits paid
(41)
(15)
Fair value of assets / reimbursement rights at 31 December
179
113
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
(85)
(74)
22
49
Change in provision
(in millions of euros)
(Provisions) / assets at 1 January
Employer contributions
Acquisitions, divestments (change in scope of consolidation)
-
-
Direct payments made by employer
1
2
Net charge recognised in income statement
(33)
(62)
(Provisions) / assets at 31 December
(95)
(85)
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 309
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 17
Fund for general banking risks
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
Fund for general banking risks
780
734
NET BOOK VALUE
780
734
(in millions of euros)
Note 18
Subordinated debt - analysis by residual maturity
(in millions of euros)
Under
3 months
3 months
to 1 year 1-5 years
Over
5 years
Total
Accrued
Total
interest 31/12/2007
Total
31/12/2009
11,476
95
11,571
11,984
11,466
11,466
238
11,705
11,980
20,565
22,943
333
23,276
23,964
Subordinated debts
Fixed-term subordinated debt
Euro
200
2,178
9,098
200
2,178
7,139
Dollar
1,960
Participating securities and loans
Other loans subordinated in the long term
Perpetual subordinated debt
Blocked current accounts of Local Banks
Mutual guaranty deposits
BOOK VALUE
310 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
200
2,178
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 19
Change in shareholders’ equity
Premiums,
reserves and
Share capital retained earnings
(in millions of euros)
Balance at 31 December 2004
4,421
Dividends paid in 2004
Change in share capital
15,629
Total Equity
2
20,052
(521)
(521)
71
Change in share premiums
Net income for 2005
71
323
323
2,451
2,451
Other changes
Balance at 31 December 2005
Regulated
reserves
Investment
grants
4,492
Dividends paid in 2005
17,882
(1)
(1)
1
22,375
(1,384)
(1,384)
Change in share capital
-
Change in share premiums
-
Net income for 2006
2,957
2,957
Other changes
-
Balance at 31 December 2006
4,492
Dividends paid in 2006
19,455
1
23,948
(1,880)
(1,880)
Change in share premiums
3,970
3,970
Net income for 2007
4,896
4,896
Change in share capital
517
517
Other changes
BALANCE AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
Note 20
26,441
2
2
3
31,453
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
31,453
23,948
780
734
Capital
(in millions of euros)
Shareholders’ equity (including net income for the year)
Fund for general banking risks
Subordinated debt and participating securities
TOTAL
5,009
23,276
23,964
55,509
48,646
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 311
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 21
Transactions with consolidated subsidiaries and associated companies
31/12/2007
Consolidated subsidiaries and associated companies
(in millions of euros)
Amounts receivable
270,016
Banks and credit institutions
270,016
Customers
-
Bonds and other fixed income securities
-
Amounts due
36,757
Banks and credit institutions
34,647
Customers
2,110
Debt represented by a security and subordinated debt
-
Commitments given
22,187
Financing commitments given to banks
1,272
Financing commitments given to customers
-
Guarantees given to banks
8,152
Guarantees given to customers
12,763
Securities acquired with repurchase options
-
Other commitments given
-
Note 22
Operations carried out in currencies
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
(in millions of euros)
Assets
Liabilities
Assets
Liabilities
Euro
318,598
384,839
375,108
341,724
Other European Union currencies
1,832
4,726
3,229
6,242
Swiss Franc
4,713
1,991
4,411
2,366
US Dollar
6,262
11,416
9,656
28,485
197
74
131
66
1,083
725
1,088
720
398,926
394,040
360,239
356,477
32,442
36,607
13,051
16,059
430,647
372,536
Yen
Other currencies
GROSS
Accrued interest, other accrual an deferral accounts
Impairment
TOTAL
312 I Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007
(721)
430,647
(754)
372,536
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 23
Foreign exchange transactions and borrowings
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
To be received
To be delivered
To be received
To be delivered
Spot
780
780
437
438
Currency
132
699
359
131
Euros
648
81
78
307
Forward currency transactions
40,694
42,060
30,351
31,219
Currency
39,503
6,109
28,375
4,640
1,191
35,951
1,976
26,579
779
345
888
290
42,253
43,185
31,676
31,947
(in millions of euros)
Euros
Foreign currency lending and borrowings
TOTAL
Crédit Agricole S.A. I Registration document 2007 I 313
5
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent company financial statements at 31 December 2007 – In French Gaap –
Approved by the Board of Directors on 4 March 2008
NOTES TO THE PARENT COMPANY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 24
Financial futures and options
(in millions of euros)
Futures and forwards
Hedging
transactions
Other
31/12/2007
31/12/2006
714,305
172,923
887,228
539,030
Exchange-traded (1)
49,798
49,798
28,144
Interest rate futures
48,838
48,838
27,903
960
960
241
Equity and stock index instruments
Other futures
Over-the-counter (1) (2)
714,305
123,125
837,430
510,886
Interest rate swaps
714,305
123,125
837,430
510,886
22,208
17,409
39,617
101,516
3,016
6,944
9,960
57,014
Bought
3,425
3,425
31,478
Sold
3,500
3,500
23,300
Options
Exchange-traded
Interest rate futures
Equity and stock index options
Bought
60
Sold
130
Currency futures
Bought
1,508
1,508
1,023
Sold
1,508
1,508
1,023
Other futures
Bought
19
19
19,192
10,465
29,657
44,502
600
371
971
1,406
2,080
371
2,451
2,246
14,647
4,798
19,445
8,411
42
4,798
4,840
30,182
Sold
Over-the-counter
Swap options
Bought
Sold
Interest rate forwards
Bought
Sold
Currency forwards
Bought
1,937
Sold
320
Equity and stock index options (3)
Bought
Sold
1,575
1,575
248
248
Other options
Bought
Sold
126
126
15,374
15,374
Bought
7,767
7,7