Arts center planned for river bank

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fmmbeb 1885
Copyright 1964 Tha Daily Ptnnayfvaniasi
I'llll \l)l I I'HI \. Wednesday. November 12. IMi
Vol. (II, No. 107
Council
to study
proposals
Arts center
planned for
river bank
Sexual harassment
changes on agenda
By MARYANN BORRF.LLO
Imagine transforming the west bank of the
Schuylkill River into a cultural center that
will rival New York's Lincoln Center and
Milan's La Scala.
Imagine being able to walk six blocks from
campus to see world-famous orchestras and
ballet companies.
Such plans aren't too good to be true. In
fact, developers Leonard Fruchter and
Gerald Hines are putting the plan into
motion.
The area for the proposed project includes
30th Street Station and a 64-acre plot on the
By EDWARD SI SSMAN
i niversit) < ouncil will examine the
controversial suggested changes In
harassment grievance procedures at
its meeting this afternoon
Council voted last month to discuss
section In section each ol IOC 1 1 pans
ol the sexual harassment proposal and
the six parts ol the racial harassment
proposal
1 lie first sections ol the sexual
harassment report slated fot examina
lion include a statement Ol principles,
City Limits
Schuylki'.l River's west bank. The bleak landscape is the hottest transportation center on
the east coast at the moment, even though
the property is currently occupied by rail
yards and an aging power plant.
Despite the fact that the project's designs
are not yet finalized, $60 million worth of
remodeling will begin this year on the
52-year-old train station. The overhaul will
include the renovation of the main concourse
and 248,000 square feet of mostly vacant office space on the upper stories.
The land surrounding the station is considered a lucrative commodity not only
because of its central location along Amtrak's Northeast routes, but also because it
also allows easy access to the Philadelphia
International Airport.
In print
Magazine
will focus
on College
By ABBF. KLEBANOFF
The College of Arts and Sciences
will soon grab more headlines than
ever before.
Starting next semester, four
students will manage a 32-page
magazine focusing on the College of
Arts and Sciences, currently the only
undergraduate school at the University without its own publication.
College junior Chris Sprigman, executive editor of the Penn Collegian,
said Monday that the quarterly will
fill a void not met by other papers currently circulating on camr_us.
"There are a lot of issues and concerns that are not being touched by
other publications," Sprigman explained. "They don't provide the kind
of in-depth coverage we'd like to
sec."
In addition, Sprigman feels the
magazine will enhance the administration's efforts to improve the reputation of CAS.
"Most students at the University
are from the College, and the administration is making its move to improve the department and its image,"
he said. "I think what we are doing
goes hand in hand with the administration's goals."
The first Penn Collegian will focus
on the value of a liberal arts education, and subsequent issues will each
present a different theme.
"The usual response when I tell
people I'm a history major is, 'Well
what are you going to do with a
history degree?,' " he said. "I wanted
to find out if their skepticism was
founded."
The spring issue will also feature an
interview stressing what employers are
looking for in a CAS graduate and an
overview of the Political Science
Department.
"The Political Science Department
was very disillusioned with the Daily
Pennsylvanian article last month
which criticized the department's
reputation," he said. "They felt there
were extenuating circumstances, and
the Collegian plans a long in-depth
story on their plight."
The magazine's layout production
manager, Barbara Yorke, said she
believes the publication will stimulate
students' interest despite the other
campus journals.
"1 think this magazine can provide
[College] students with information
they cannot get anywhere else and can
be a unifying force." she said.
However, a lack of funding almost
kept the presses from rolling.
(Continued on page 8)
Plans for I he proposed cultural center on the propert> currently occupied b> ,30th Street Station
"It's a natural expansion of the city," said
Fruchter, the Philadelphia-based general
partner of AtlantiXenter, the company
chosen by Amtrak, along with Gerald D.
Hines Interests of Houston, to develop the
property.
A major development adjacent to 30th
Street Station will be marketable to New
York corporations who want to avoid the
high rents and costs associated with conduc-
Inside
The Other Half
Mayor Wilson Goode proclaimed this week "Women Veteran
Week" in a ceremony last Friday.
Goode said that women's role in
battle is often forgotten. Page 5.
Class Time
Administrators reacted
favorably to a proposal calling for
the creation of informal seminars
to provide freshmen with a unifying experience. Page 9.
Resolved
The Undergraduate Assembly
passed a resolution calling on the
University to maintain its current
admissions policy. Page 9.
ting business in New York ( ity.
"It's an important effort to take advui
tagc of 30th Street as the focal point of the
northeast area," Fruchter said. "It's a
regional center."
Regional Science Associate ProfOMOl
Stephen Gale, a member of the Busch Center
research team, has maintained an interest in
the area's development lor the last several
years.
"We see it as .in extension of the borderi
of Center City .ill the way up to <(>th Street
and beyond." he said this week
According to dale, the city's proximit) to
New York caused corporations to dismiss
ideas of moving to nearby Philadelphia in the
past.
"Philadelphia is only an liout from New
(( OHtlnutd mi page '>
Wall St. recruiters bound by rules
Salomon Bros, returns after complaint
By EDWARD BUSSMAN
Every year Wall Street banking
firms conduct hundreds of on-campus
interviews looking to lure the best and
weed out the rest.
Often interviews with top firms are
characterized by high-strung, pressure
filled questioning — with tens of
millions of dollars at stake companies
want to be sure individuals will be
able to handle the tension of Wall
Street. But there are boundaries
beyond which an interview should not
go.
Ten months ago a recruitei lor the
Wall Street investment banking firm
Salomon Brothers repeatedly asked a
student questions relating to his
religious background during an onCUnpus interview.
"You don't look Jewish, you look
WASPish — why do you suppose that
is?" the student reported being asked
in a complaint filed with the Career
Planning and Placement Office
The questions violated federal and
state laws prohibiting inquiry into a
job applicant's religious denomination. After the incident was brought
to light last April, the firm immediately apologized to the University and
barred the interviewer from returning
for the '86 '81 leason.
Tonight. Salomon Brothers will
renew its annual quest loi graduating
seniors with a presentation on COI
porate finance. Although the pilch
will probably be similiar to that ol
previous years, the preparation uiulei
taken by the recruiters has been
different
Since last year, Salomon Brothers
has instituted a training program
outlining iust what son ol questions
can and cannot be lawfull) asked ot a
potential employee
Among illegal questions are an)
(Continued on page II)
.1 proposed definition ol harassment
and methods ol reporting complaints.
I he portion! dealing with the
reporting ol complaints recommend
that the ombudsman keep central
records ol harassment incidents.
I hat proposal has ahead) drawn
heav) tire from critics who charge
that complaints can he anonymously
levied against individuals. Although
the ombudsman would know who filed a complaint, the accused harastet
would not be informed ol the com
plainant's identity
Proponents ol the measures assert
that a method ol collecting and acting
on informal complaints is needed to
address the majority ol harassment
incidents, usually not reported due to
tear ol icpnsals I lie present ombudsman MU\ two forma ombudsmen
have recentl) spoken against the central record keeping proposals, arguing that the measures would compromise the impartial nature ol the
office
University officials laid this week
that the) expect deliberations on the
two harassment proposal! to occup)
most ot t oiiiicii s time for the rest ol
the academic year.
After * ouncil makes us recommendations, the administration will decide
what, il am. action 10 lake I'o date
however. ti>p administrators have not
revealed their feeling! on the
proposals
Provost Ihomas I hrlich explained
tin- week that the administration first
wants to give the I niversity community an Opportunity to comment
lulu on the proposals,
"Unless we do it carefully and
deliberately, people will feel in HUM
way their views have been shortchanged." Ehrlich said.
I( ontinueil on page 9)
Construction
is first for
vice pres.
Tommy Laonardi/Daity Pennsylvania!!
My Hero
mm KIDS COLLECT FOOTBALL CARDS.
Flynn .* the Mkjta "f '»•"•>ou"f J ■ «J*
But this young admirer iikes to get the real thing autographs from his heroes. Quaker tailback Chris
Hynn is second in the Ivy League .a rushmg
behind teammate Rich < omirio.
RRRRI
By LAURIE GOLDBERG
Approximated $310 million will
flow out of the University's pocketbook in the next two years to fund
academically oriented construction
and deferred maintenance projects
In order to "face the challenge,"
Senior Vice President Helen O'Bannon has reorganized her management
staff.
Former Physical Plant Director Arthur Gravina was promoted last
month to associate vice president for
operations and maintenance, and he
now reports directly to O'Bannon.
The senior vice president said last
night that the move is intended to
allow Vice President for Facilities
Management John Anderson, to
whom Gravina previously reported,
to concentrate on the massive building
effort.
"I've taken away a lot of the environmental calls |from Anderson),
people complaining about the heat or
the toilets being backed up," O'Bannon said. "Those kinds of calls divert
anybody in senior management from
what their real objectives are. You
start running after those, and you
forget you've got a $50 million construction project going on outside
your window."
Anderson said yesterday that in the
year since he came to the University,
he has been able to spend "about 80
percent" of his time concentrating on
his facilities planning responsibilities.
He added that the portion of the
University's building effort that had
been sidetracked by the summer of
1985 demanded an organizational
overhaul within the department.
"When I first came aboard last
year, I don't think either (O'Bannon
or myself) understood the magnitude
of the backlogged construction projects," Anderson said. "There was a
JOHN ANDERSON
'Looking at big dollars'
need to get a belter handle on where
the money was spent, quality control
and project completion times."
He explained thai before he came
into the facilities management position, no internal quality assurance
department existed, and one director
supervised all the University's construction projects — a task he called
"impossible."
Anderson has since hired six project
managers and four quality control
specialists in an effort to better
monitor individual building efforts.
The project managers oversee all
design and construction on a job, collecting bids and making recommendations to the vice president on hiring
general contractors.
"Under the project management
system, one person is ultimately accountable and responsible for the project's success, and that success is
measured by how well the project
meets the school's goals," Anderson
said.
r( ontinued on page II)
PAGE 2
THK DAILY PKNNSYLVANIAN — Wednesday. November 12. 1986
Off the Wire
Today's news compiled from Associated Press dispatches
Shiite kidnappers
free 2 Frenchmen
Two moderates are
elected by bishops
for national offices
WASHINGTON — America's
Roman Catholic bishops, beating
back a challenge by conservative
prelates, elected two Midwestern
moderates yesterday to lead their national organization for the next three
years.
The group's new president. Archbishop John May of St. Louis,
spoke almost immediately of "a great
need for healing" among Catholics
who are chafing under church rules
(hat some sec as too rigid in the 20th
century.
However, May's comments made it
clear that he and others in the National Conference of Catholic Bishops
weren't about to push for any revolt
against Vatican authority.
"We arc members of the universal
Catholic Church," he said at a brief
news conference. "We are pledged as
bishops to work in unity with the visible symbol of unity who is the Holy
Lather, the pope.
"And we will do it. our healing, in
that way. There's no other way we
can." he said.
Still, election of May and of Cincinnati Archbishop Daniel Pilarc/yk as
vice president suggested a continuation of the activist bent of the bishops
conference — a stance that has been
unpopular with some high Vatican officials who see all church authority as
emanating from Rome.
Conservative bishops made a strong
push for Boston Cardinal Bernard
Law. However, a majority of the
bishops, many of whom are upset
over this year's Vatican disciplining of
liberal Seattle Archbishop Raymond
Hunthausen, defeated Law, who has
been outspoken in defense of the
Vatican's action in that and other
cases.
Many of the nearly 300 bishops attending the conference met behind
closed doors all yesterday afternoon,
thrashing out the Hunthausen case
and trying to decide what, if any,
public response to make.
Hunthausen was ordered by the
Vatican to turn over much of his
authority to a Vatican-appointed auxiliary bishop after being judged too
liberal in such matters as ministry to
homosexuals and divorced Catholics
and the dispensing of absolution for
sins to large groups.
The bishops were expected to make
at least a bare-bones statement late in
the day about what they had or hadn't
been able to decide in the private
meeting. Instead, after nearly four
hours, they began trickling out side
doors of the hotel meeting room,
making no comment when approached except that (he closed session
would resume in the morning.
Mascot
Forget the groundhog- Around here, squirrels are much more a sign of the
season than those burrowing creatures. This bushy-tailed specimen is obviously well into the foraging season.
PARIS — Two Frenchmen freed by
Shiite Muslim kidnappers after months of captivity in Lebanon came
home yesterday and were greeted by
Premier Jacques Chirac, who thanked
Syria for helping arrange the release.
Camille Sontag, 85, and Marcel
Coudari, 54, were released in west
Beirut Monday night and turned over
to French envoys in Damascus, Syria,
less than 12 hours later.
When they arrived at Orly airport
outside Paris, Chirac thanked Syria,
Saudia Arabia and Algeria for helping
arrange the release of the aptives.
Coudari, when asked if he had new s
of other French hostages, replied:
"No. But I can tell you that things
will happen soon." Asked if be wai
certain. Coudari said: "Well, yes,
more or less, more or less."
He told reporters, citing "a pretty
official source," that French hostage
Michel Seurat apparently had died of
natural causes. The pro-Iranian Shiite
Moslem group Islamic Jihad announced March 5 that he had been
killed.
Sontag came down the steps of the
French jet into the arms of his
84-year-old wife, and they hugged and
kissed as Chirac beamed. Blanche
Sontag then fumbled in her handbag
and handed a small object tojier husband — apparently a replacement for
the hearing aid broken during his
abduction.
Earlier in Damascus, both men
looked well after their ordeal, but the
white-haired Sontag appeared frail
and nervous. He was supported by
two burly Syrian officials when he
walked into a chandeliered room in
the Syrian Foreign Ministry for
yesterday's handover formalities.
Coudari, a businessman, chainsmoked American cigarettes as he and
Sontag, a retired auto dealer, waited
for more than an hour in an
anteroom, sipping thick Arabic coffee
from small blue cups.
He said Sontag was held in an
underground prison in south Beirut
with five other Western captives.
Spuking for Sontag, Coudari said
one of the prisoners was an Irishman.
Brian Keenan, an Irish teacher, was
kidnapped in west Beirut April 11 and
has not been heard from since. He is
the only Irishman among 17
foreigners still missing in Lebanon.
No group has claimed Keenan's
kidnapping or made any demands tor
his release.
The identities and nationalities of
the other four men were not known.
Coudari said Sontag saw them but
was not allowed to talk to them.
Sontag conveyed, however, that
one prisoner slipped him a scrap of
paper Monday on which was written:
"I am Irish. Please tell my family."
According to Coudari, Sontag did
not know whether Americans were
among the other prisoners. Six
Americans are among the missing.
Negotiator calls Geneva arms talks best so far
Summit set ground for progress, though differences remain
National
Wealth gap related more
to education, not race
WASHINGTON — The rich are
becoming richer, but the growing
gap in distribution of America's
wealth is related more to education
and age than to race and household
makeup, a new report says.
The report acknowledged an increase in income inequality but Mid
it has been greatly exaggerated by
the media.
"There has been a remarkable
rush to judgment, to the conclusion
that the Reagan administration is
responsible for increasing inequality," said the report presented Monday at a seminar sponsored by the
American Enterprise Institute.
Authors John Weicher of AEI
and Susan Wachter of the University of Pennsylvania looked at
Federal Reserve Board surveys between 1977 and 1983 and concluded
that "inequality increased because
of changes in the relationships between education and wealth and between age and wealth. The elderly
and the well-educated have gained;
the middle-aged and the
uneducated have lost."
Lava IJtes shine again
for college generation
CHICAGO — The Lava lite,
that undulating curiosity many
associate with the psychedelic '60s,
is oozing back into popularity, the
manufacturer says.
Actually, Lava Lites never went
out of style among the middle
Americans who buy most of them,
according to Lava-Simplex
Internationale.
But sales have increased sharply
in recent years, a boom that LavaSimplex President John Mundy attributes to the same generation that
has made The Monkees and paisleyprint clothes vogue again.
"I have heard that the college
kids are very interested in the product now," Mundy said at the company's Chicago headquarters.
"They're 18 and 19 and have never
seen a Lava Lite."
For those who missed them the
first time around. Lava Lites are
electric lamps that somewhat
resemble clear, 17-inch-tall beer
bottles.
City
Rizzo will resign from
job and run for mayor
PHILADELPHIA — Former
Mayor Frank Rizzo will resign from
a security job at the city-owned gas
works, quit the Democratic Parly
and oppose Mayor Wilson Goode
as a Republican, a source close to
Rizzo said yesterday.
Rizzo, 66, mayor from 1972 to
1980, already has rented a
downtown office that will be staffed by (wo of his closesl political
friends — Martin Wcinberg,
former campaign manager and attorney, and Anthony Zecca, who
was his press secretary and speech
writer during Rizzo's City Hall
days.
Weather
Skies will be partly sunny today,
with highs in the lower to middle
50s. Tonight will be mostly cloudy,
windy and much colder. Lows will
be in the upper 20s to the middle
30s.
GENEVA — The chief American negotiator said
the round of nuclear arms talks that ends today has
been the most productive so far, partly because of
"phenomenal agreements" reached at the United
States-Soviet summit in Iceland.
Max Kampelman said the basis for the Reykjavik
agreements between President Reagan and Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev was laid in previous sessions of the Geneva talks, which began March 12,
1985.
Kampelman said American and Soviet
negotiators made progress at the sixth round in all
three fields covered in Geneva: medium-range
missiles; long-range, or strategic, nuclear weapons
and space and defense systems.
'The agreements in Reykjavik as translated here
have narrowed the gap between us," the U.S.
delegation chief said in an interview with The
Associated Press. "We still have a gap to narrow
further, and we still have serious significant differences of opinion and differences of interest."
"But when I look at the round and see all that has
been accomplished here, I have to say this is the
most productive round we've had."
The United States feels an arms control agreement could be reached in the next year if each side
makes a serious effort, he said. Both Washington
and Moscow have brought new proposals to Geneva
since the summit October 11-12.
Agreement is nearest on medium-range missiles,
Kampelman said, noting that Reagan and Gorbachev agreed to eliminate them in Europe and retain 100 warheads each on U.S. and Soviet
territory.
"This means in effect a 100 percent reduction in
Soviet SS-20s in Europe and an 80 percent reduction
of Soviet SS-20s in Asia," he said, calling that a
"very significant agreement."
One hindrance to an accord is the Soviet insistence that agreements be reached simultaneously
in all three areas, Kampelman said.
He said they dropped that condition before Reykjavik, saying a separate intermediate-range agreement was possible, but Gorbachev introduced it
again at the summit.
Inherent in the Soviet position is a demand that
research for the American space-based defense project commonly called "Star Wars" be confined to
the laboratory for the same length of time. The
Soviets contend that research beyond that would
violate the treaty, which the United States denies.
The Kremlin has not specifically defined
laboratory research, according to Kampelman.
Soviet officials have hinted publicly that the term
could be interpreted loosely, not necessarily meaning all research must occur indoors.
Turning them loose
Conservatives surest alternatives to prison
WASHINGTON — Confronted
with spiraling costs and crowding in
United States prisons, a group of conservative scholars and politicians is
advocating alternatives to prison like
restitution, community service and
even beatings.
f
Several of the 29 contributors to a
new book published here yesterday,
which departs from conservative
dogma on incarceration, are eyeing
the Republican presidential nomination in 1988.
There was wide agreement on reserving expensive prison space for
violent criminals and putting those
who commit non violent property
crimes to work, often outside prison,
to repay their victims.
"The traditional conservative view
is: 'Lock 'em up and throw away the
key,' " Patrick McGuigan, co-editor
of the book. Crime and Punishment
s
»6 an***"
in Modern America, said in an
interview.
"Leftists have talked for years
about opening up the jails. Here are
some conservatives who say: 'Don't
just let them go, but here are some
possible paths out of increasing
crowding and an increasing burden on
the taxpayers' " McGuigan added.
McGuigan is director of the Institute for Government and Politics of
the Free Congress Research and
Education Foundation, an influential
conservative thinktank here.
Another institute compendium in
1983, "Criminal Justice Reform: A
Blueprint," contained 10 chapters
(hat ultimately paralleled 10 of the 16
sections of the sweeping Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984.
Like that book, this one is studded
with prominent contributors from a
broad range of conservatism, in-
cluding Attorney General Edwin
Meese.
The new book has chapters on
prison policy by former Delaware
Gov. Pete du Pont, a declared candidate for the 1988 GOP nomination,
and by Sen. William Armstrong of
Colorado, whose chance for that
nomination was the subject of a recent Conservative Digest cover story.
Rep. Jack Kemp, the former professional football quarterback from
Buffalo, N.Y., who has made no
secret of his presidential ambitions,
also addressed the subject, as did
Herbert Titus, dean of the School of
Public Policy at CBN University,
founded by the Rev. Pat Robertson,
also now weighing a bid for the GOP
nomination.
Armstrong and Sen. Sam Nunn, the
conservative Democrat from Georgia,
described their bill to limit prison to
federal convicts who threatened or used force, endangered national security, lived solely off crime, were paid
for crime, dealt drugs, violated gun or
explosive laws, or misused public office. Other convicts would be given
very short prison time or probation,
both coupled with restitution to their
victims and community service.
"Penal imprisonment is not always
an appropriate punishment for certain
types of criminal offenses," they
wrote, adding that their proposal
"reflects dissatisfaction with
American prisons, which are critically
overcrowded, waste millions of tax
dollars, and do little to rehabilitate
the hunderds of thousands of
prisoners currently incarcerated."
They noted the U.S. prison population grew 10 times faster than the
general population between 1975 and
1985.
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|-\(.l
i
30th Street area to become cultural center
(Continued from page I)
York," he explained. "As the prices
in New York rise, however, more
companies are moving to Southern
New Jersey and the Philadelphia
area."
"The project will extend up to
Franklin Field." Gale added. "It will
do great things for the University."
The potential development of the
area above the station's rail yards has
been debated for more than 20 years.
The land was considered as a possible
site for Veteran's Stadium and the
1976 Bicentennial celebration.
The present 30th Street plan aims to
create an entirely new section of the
city stretching north from the station
to Spring Garden Street. The multibillion dollar project will begin with a
performing arts center and two office
towers, and it could eventually include as many as 12 office buildings,
condominiums, highrise apartments,
hotels and a science research center.
Conceptual designs for the office
complex and cultural center have been
done by Dan Peter Kopple and
Associates of Philadelphia in association with architect Charles Moore.
The proposed arts center will include a concert hall, a 5000 seat hall
for opera and ballet, and a theater
complex for the dramatic arts.
Furthermore, the renovation process will not neglect the banks of the
Schuylkill River. In fact, a bridge connecting the river's east and west banks
is also part of the conceptual model.
Philadelphia's cultural facelift has
been long awaited. A report by the
Mayor's Cultural Advisory Council
last year said that the city lacks performing space for arts groups "of all
sizes."
Al Simpkins, artistic director of the
Bushfirc Theatre of Performing Arts,
coordinated the report issued by the
Mayor's Council last year.
"There aren't enough facilities
right now," Simpkins said. "The
more you have, the better it is."
"There are three main spaces in
Center City right now: the Walnut
Street Theater, the Shubert Theater
and the Academy of Music," he added. "You only have to travel for half
a block in New York and you find
more than three [performing] spaces
— it's a statement on the part of the
city."
The Philadelphia International
Center for the Performing Arts is a
non-profit group responsible for
garnering support from local theater
groups and for developing an
economic plan for the proposed
center. Gale, the group's executive
what aoes up there doesn't take away
from < enter City," Bartlett said.
I he iv.o .mil ,i hall >eai Mudy also
recommends thai Market Sireci be
converted to one wni cist bound in
the SOtii Street vicinlt) and thai JFK
Boulevard be converted to one-way
westbound from 2oih Street to the
station
\ ordlni to the developer, the city
was iware ol ins plans and incorporated them into the stud)
"The dtj understands that what
wen- doing increases the importance
ot the city," l ruchtei said "It complements what's going on In the rest
ni the dt)
Othei imminent plans on the pro
pert) include a parking garage and a
landscaped square around winch the
proposed cultural centei and ihe first
five office towers will be built.
"The first dieces ol ihe cultural
'People hear about the
project and think of it as
some sort of flashy
Donald Trump venture.'
— Assoc. Professor
Stephen dale
comer will siari going in soon as part
of the lirsi phase of the project," said
(rale. PICPA executive director.
l he developers' plan also involves
the use ol an iijilils above Ihe
Schuylkill Expresswaj Building over
theexpresswa) will allow ihe center to
overlook the river Ihe enure project
is designed to maintain I view of the
Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Although some rerouting of traffic
patterns will be necessary. Ciale explained llial the changes will proceed
gradual!) In order to poet the lout
possible inconvenience.
"People heat BDOUl the project and
think ol n as some sort of flashy
Donald hump veniure." Gale said.
" [htt's IkOl the vase here at all."
Frldtjol H Lorentien D.i.i
30th Street Station and a 64-acre plot on the Schuylkill River's west bank will be transformed into a business and cultural center
director, said that the project's funding will come from bond issuances
and commercial spinoffs.
Among the groups negotiating with
PICPA are the Philadelphia Festival
Theatre for New Plays and the Pennsylvania Ballet.
A proposition by developers to
build a new concert hall for the
Philadelphia Orchestra in the center
has been rejected by the orchestra
board's site committee. The orchestra
may leave the Academy of Music
because the hall's acoustics are not
considered appropriate for the ensemble's repertoire. If the orchestra
decides not to build on a site al Broad
and Spruce Streets, Academy renova-
tions will make the concert hall unsuitable for ballet and operatic performances and may force these perform
ing arts groups to move to the new
center.
"The area will go for a different
market rather than trying to do
something like relocate (he
Philadelphia Orchestra." explained
COUPON
PENN PLAYERS PRESENTS
RUNAWAYS
Book, music and Lyrics by Elizabeth Swados
Directed by Terry Guerin
Open Night Thursday, November 13 8 p.m.
Parents' Weekend Performances:
November 14 8:30 pm November 15 8 pm.
Future Performances:
November 20, 21, 22 8 pm.
Harold Prince Theatre
Annenberg Center
Tickets $4.00 Call 898-6791
NOMINATIONS FOR THE UNDBACK AWARDS
for
DISTINGUISHED TEACHING
will be accepted
through December 5, 1986
"It'sa net addition," to continued.
Steve Bartlett, the dty'i Chiel
Transportation Planner.
According to ;i * n> Plannini t <>m
mission study issued in September,
the commission wants to be sure that
the 30th Sued development
"compknuots rathei than competes"
with Philadelphia's existing facilities
"We want to make ver> certain thai
TWO DINNERS
FOR THE
PRICE OF ONE.
fLowesi price Item la
compUments of the
house 3 pm ttl closing)
"Nothing's being taken away from
( enter City."
However. Philadelphia's cultural
renaissance WOO'I happen overnight.
It is estimated that (he project will
near COmpletioa in It) to 20 years.
"We don't have a crystal ball on
[his," Bartlett said "The plan isn't
predicated on any sei time limit."
l
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Information Available:
Office of the Vice Provost
112 College Hall/6303
Ticketson sale at The Annenberg Center
Box Office and on Locust Walk
funded by SAC
The
Campus Tradition
Lives On!
REFLECTIONS
OF BRILLIANCE
The Peon,
Tea Party
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Copies on Astrobrite Papers
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FACE 4
THE DAILY PKNNSYLVANIAN — Wednesday. November 12. 19t6
Campus Events
Campus Briefs
A listing of University news and events
A summary of University news
NOTICE
TODAY
FUTURE
CAMPUS EVENTS are Mad daily
as a pad pubfcc service o< the
Urnvaraily o* Pennsylvania, and are
adrrenoMrrt tor the Umversrfy by
The Dmty Ptnmytvanan There is
no charge to amhorued UnrvenMy
afMiated groups tor listings of FREE
events Listings may be mailed or
placed in person at The Dmfy
P*m$ytv*ruan Business Office.
4015 Walnut Street, from 9 a m to
5pm Monday through Friday
Campus Events will not be
accepted by phone 25 word limit
Ttm Omfy P»nn$y*mnian r—ana*
the right to edit Campus Events
accordng to apace limitations
KOSHER CHINESE FOOD
BOOTH Wed 11/12 from 1130
until 2 00 Egg rolls, soup, and
more 38th and Locust Sponsored
by Lubavitch House 4032 Spruce
St Info 382-1247
AFTER REYKJAVIK Where do
we stand in arms control?" Hear
Ambassador Ralph Earle. II
Nov 17th. 4p m . Christian Association Auditorium Sponsored by
the Slrangelove Society
LIBERTARIAN MEGA MEETIf>G
tonite! We'll cast our debaters
prep bills, strategic lor victory n
PPU Parliament next week Food
dnnk. the works. 7pm. Houston
Hall 303
ARTISTS' PENN REVIEW is took
ing for artwork for its fall issue
See your work in a creative-arts
magazine Call 222-3529 or
243-5728 for information today
A CONCERT FEATURING Diane
Bish on the Curtis Organ will be
held Wednesday. November 12.
8:00 p m in Irvine Auditorium
896-2848 Tickets available in
Annenberg
AMERICANS FOR DEMOCRATIC
Action will have a speaker al
College Democrats/PPU Liberal
Party meeting discussing the fall
election Wednesday. 7 30. 167
McNeil All are welcome
ANOTHER CLASSIC "Kiss ol the
Spiderwoman" tonite, 7 30 p m at
Penn Newman. 3720 Chestnut
Street Discussion to follow All
welcome
ATTENTION1 Penn Israel Alliance
meeting 7pm. Front Lounge.
Hillel
BORED AFTER MIDTERMS? Join
the many committee representatives on new committees, including search lor Director of Student
Life Applications UA/NEC office.
11/11-11/13. 11-4 pm Call
898-8906
CHESS CLUB 7 30 3rd floor Hous
ton Hall AM Welcome Amateurs
and experts No tee
COMIC COLLECTORS ol U of P
meelmg. with staff member from
Comico! Wednesday November
12, 8 30 p m . Houston Hall room
309. For info, call Steve.
243-7894
CONTRACEPTIVE INFORMATION PROGRAMS coed or
women only. 75 mm am or p m .
call for appt. 662-2874 Student
Health
1
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED
Volunteer performers (jugglers,
musicians, mimes) to entertain
children at Center tor Autistic
Children For more info, contact
Penn Extension. 115 Houston
Hall
EXTERMINATE your boredom,
come to the Event Horizon
Science Fiction Club meting Tues
day November 12 at 9 p m in
Houston Hall room 301
FREE MICROCOMPUTER
TRAINING1 Bits and Pieces noon
time seminar Mac Terminal
Wednesday. Nov 12, 12-1 pm.
1st floor Van Pelt Library All
Welcome! For into, call Computing
Resource Center 898-1 780
HELP' HELP' HELP! HELP'
Volunteers desperately needed to
work in Kensington Soup Kitchen
Every Wednesday 4pm Leave
from Newman Center Questions?
Kathleen 222-3477
IEEE MEETING Wednesday
November 12. High Rise North.
Fourth Floor Lounge. 8 p m
Includes information on Professional Engineer Examination and
Student Papers New members
welcome
PENN WOMEN'S ALLIANCE
Important general meeting.
Wednesday November 12. 5-7
pm, rm 305 Houston Hall New
members welcome
SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS
available tor graduate study in
preparation for executive careers
in Jewish Communal Service For
information call Barbara Nussbaum. 898-8265 ^^^^__
TURKCE KONUSMA SAATI Turkish conversation hour All Turcophones welcome 8th floor lounge
Williams Hall Wednesday. 5
November 1 OOp m
BRIDGE PLAYERS Play Duplicate Bridge Every Wednesday
night at 7pm. Houston Hall.
above Wendy's cafalena For info
call Dan at 243-7802
COME CELEBRATE PARENTS
Weekend with Hillel Bring your
parents to services & dinner
Friday, 11/14 with special speaker
& Kiddush following services Sal
11/15 x7391
CHEMICAL BANK Information
session on operation Nov 13
4 30-6 30p m . HSP room. Hous
ton Hall CPPS
CHOATE ROSEMARY HALL
Summer School. Wallingford, Ct
will hire leaching interns to assist
master teachers and supervise
dorms and sports For details.
CPPS books under "Education"
GRADUATE STUDENTS in Arts
and Sciences. Annenberg and
Fine Arts "Get Ready to Find a
Job" workshops. November 12 &
13. 12-1 pm . Bishop White Rm
Call x7530 to sign up CPPS
INTERNATIONAL INTERNSHIPS
Students speak and answer questions about their summer internship experiences November 13. 7
p m . Ben Franklin Room, Houston Hall All welcome' Refreshments CPPS
FRIDAY NIGHT SHABBAT dinner
6pm Guest speaker about how
to bridge the generation gap
following dinner A discussion will
follow Lubavitch House. 4032
Spruce
KIDDER PEABO0Y Information
session Corporate Finance.
Financial Analyst Program Nov
13. 7-9p m Bodek Lounge. Houston Hall CPPS
HAPPY 100TH BIRTHDAY BEN
GURION' Shabbaton- celebrating
Zionism Nov 21-22 Join us for a
full weekend of workshops,
discussions. Iriends. and fun'
Please call Esther 898-8265 lor
more info
KYW TV WILL PRESENT a seminar on Internship Opportunities
at KYW" Wednesday, Nov. 12th.
3-5 p m Room 111, Annenberg
Center Randy Covington. News
Director, and Ray Murray of Evening Magazine, speaker
WHAT MOVIES WOULD YOU
LIKE to see next semester? Come
to PUC's movie selection meeting
and let us know' Wed Nov 12,
5 00 Romm 301 Houston Hall
OPEN HOUSE Chinese dinner
Sunday 11/16 at 5 pm followed
by "The Frisco Kid" at 6 p m
Suggested donation if possible
Lubavitch House. 4032 Spruce.
382 1247
MACY'S INFORMATION session
Nov 13. 4:30-630pm, Bodek
Lounge. Houston Hall CPPS
TOMORROW"
PARENTS WEEKEND Shabbat
dinner We welcome all guests
with good food stories and singing with L'chaims Open to all 6
p m Lubavitch House. 4032
Spruce. 382-1247.
VSE, KTO XOCET GOVORIT
Po-Russki I Interesuets'a russkoj
kulturoi! Prixodite Na Russkij Caj
(Modern Languages College
House 3940 Locust Walk) Kazdu|u
Sredu V 4 Casa
WHAT ARE THE NATIONAL political trends? An Americans for
Democratic Action representative
will speak to PPU Liberal Party
and College Democrats Wednesday. 7 30. 167 McNeil
ARE HUMAN RIGHTS intellectually defensible'' U of P Students of
Objectivism meeting. Objectivist
radio/TV commentator Raymond
Newman speaking
Thursday
November 13. 7 30 p m . Houston
Hall room 301
BEIT CAFE' Beginner, intermediate, and advanced Hebrew speakers welcome! Come practice your
Hebrew in an informal environment every Thursday 4 30-6 p m
at Hillel front lounge Music' Food'
BLOOD DRIVE Thurs
from 2 00 to 7 00
al Hillel
SHABBAT LUNCH open house for
Parents Weekend Good home
cooking Come and join in the
singing, stories and L'chaims,
12 30pm Lubavitch House. 4032
Spruce. 382-1247
SPEND WINTER BREAK on the
beach in Eilat!' Student tours to
Israel Dec 21 10 Jan 6th Don't
miss out' You'll have the time of
your life! For more info call Esther
898-8265
COME TO THE JERUSALEM
Experience Speaker. Phillip
Yakar Religious Realities in Isreal Today", short film, live music,
food. Bodine Lounge from
9 00-11 00p.m.
UTV WANTS YOU' We are electing new members to our Board ol
Directors Interested in a Leadership Position' Call Jay lor more
information: 243-7642
DR FORREST MCDONALD ol
the University ol Alabama speaking on "Interpreting the Constitution Ihe Judges vs History",
Thursday November 13, 8 p m. in
room 103 McNeil
WHY SHOULD JEWS GIVE
MONEY TO ISRAEL? What kind
of Zionism does Israel need? A
two part series on Zionism Tues
Nov 11 and Nov 18 sponsored by
Telem 617 S 42nd St call Liz
222-7627
OBJECTIVISTS WILL SPONSOR
a discussion by talkshow host and
author Raymond Newman on
"The Destruction ot Individual
Rightrs Across the Political Spectrum" Thursday 7 30 p m . Houston Hall-301
SELF DEFENSE WORKSHOP
Nov 13. 7pm lo 8 30pm
McClelland Hall So
Lounge
Study, work and walk safely To
register call 8-4481 or 8-8611
Limited enrollment
TRADITIONAL THEMES Irom
Myth and Epic an Iranian Example" Dr Wm Hanaway, Oriental
Studies, 4 OOp m . University
Museum. Classroom I (Phila
Alliance tor Teaching Humanities
in the Schools)
VSE. KTO XOCET GOVORIT
Po-Russki I Interesuets'a russkoi
kulturoi1 Prixodite Na Russki| Ca|
(Modern Languages College
House 3940 Locust Walk) Kazduju
Sredu V 4 Casa
WOHS PRESENTS DJ TRAINING
on 11/14 at 11 am and 11/15 at
10 am Also 11/16 at 10 a m Sign
up at 3905 Spruce St
WEEKEND
WOHS PRESENTS DJ TRAINING,
on 11/14 at 11 am and 11/15 at
10 a m Also 11/16 at 10 a m Sign
up at 3905 Spruce St
OFFICIAL
BUYERS UP. University City
group buying cooperative for
home energy needs seeks administrative assistants to manage business Computer and communications skills desirable CPPS
Books "Management"
DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT
Information session Accounting
Position discussed Nov 13,
7-9p m . Bishop White room.
Houston Hall CPPS
NORHTWESTERN UNIVERSITY
Medill School of Journalism will be
recruiting on campus on Thursday, November 13lh Please sign
up in CPPS with Jan
PEACE CORPS INFORMATION
session Nov 12, -100 6 00pm.
Bishop While Room, Houston
Hall CPPS
PENNIES FROM HEAVEN"
Penn Alumni speak about careers
in non-profit and social change
organizations
November
l2.7-9pm., BF room. H H. Sign
up with Kathleen in CPPS.
HUP health fair offers
free testing, services
The second annual health fair, sponsored by the
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, will take
place today at the Philadelphia Hilton Hotel.
HUP departments and community agencies, including
the American Red Cross, the American Cancer Society
and Alcoholics Anonymous will offer a variety of free
health services at more than 40 different booths.
Screenings are available to test for health problems including breast cancer, diabetes, hearing and blood
DEN.SE,
f?fc wc nu46 (jut. *k cvat a pfocuwie twrfiuty <vit& you..
HEUN AN<J RJTA
Rita.
Hope Vaughn recovers quickly. Vou need some fl & R...and
I'm not talking Big Bird. Sleep soon!
Alison
PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY
Graduate School ol Business will
be recruiting on campus on
Wednesday. November 12th
Please sign up in CPPS with Jan
PHILADELPHIA ZOO sponsors
zoo-wide full-time internships lor
four-monlh periods including
summer Participate in management area including children's
education program For details.
see CPPS books.
Environmental "
SALOMON BROTHERS Info
session Sales and Trading.
Financial Positions discussed
Nov 12. 7-9 p.m. , HRN Rooftop
Lounge CPPS
STUDY ABROAD Interstudy.
Information meeting on semestei
and year-long academic programs
in the United Kingdom Wednesday. November 12. from
11:00-12 00. 133 Bennett Hall
BOB PASNAU
Nighl I iliiui
LAURA SHAW
Wire EfMtor
NOBODY
Photo Nighl Kdilor
LITTLE MOW
Sports Night Kditor
LISA LEYIN
JENN DOMIM I /
Ad Layout Editors
FRANCES GOLD
DON CHOE
Ad Copy Editors
PAULA MICHAELIM
DANIELLE DINENNA
Production Day Managers
5PEG I A L 5
MARGARITA MADNESS
WEDNESDAY
AT 7 PM
TACOS & MARGARITAS!
O/y^i/tV/*)
DINING
3925 WALNUT
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA STUDENTS OF OBJECTIVISM
and
PHILADELPHIA OBJECTIVISTS ASSOCIATION
present:
Our unique and intensive training program combines classroom settings with
hands-on experience to help you develop the business and merchandising skills
needed to be a successful manager.
THURSDAY, NOV. 13 7:30 PM
HOUSTON HALL ROOM 301
Come to our Seminar,
Thursday, November 13,4:30-6:30PM.
Bodek Lounge, Houston Hall
www
SftKffl^
If you'd rather set trends than follow
them, if you thrive in fast-paced environments and crave a career with plenty of
opportunity for advancement, consider
Macy's, New Jersey
DtfOfWW
Celebrate
her
Annivctsatv
chesira
formation
nV
student^
ES»-**
EV2
Are you looking for a career that will offer these attributes'? Then look into Macy's,
New Jersey (formerly Bamberger's). If you've got the ability to learn quickly, entrepreneurial curiosity and the desire to succeed. Macy's, New Jersey will teach you
the business from the ground floor up.
a talk by RA YMOND NEWMAN,
NYC radio/TV commentator and object ivist writer
FREE TO ALL
SALOON
STREET
RESPONSIBILITY
OPPORTUNITY
CHALLENGE
"...when the secret police come, when the torturers violate
the innocent, there is nothing to be said to them. "
Richard Rorty, The fate of philosophy, 1982
ARE HUMAN RIGHTS
INTELLECTUALLY DEFENSIBLE?
pressure. In addiiion. there will be a special computer
available to determine an individual's health risks.
The mayor will make a brief appearance at I p.m.
Karen Weidner. a HUP client services coordinator,
said yesterday that she hopes this year's turnout will be
as good as last year's fair, which drew over 800 people.
"The purpose of the fair is to educate the public about
health information and prevention of disease," Weidner
said. "We also want to make the public aware of our services at the hospital."
The health fair will take place on the ballroom level of
the Hilton, located at 34th Street and Civic Center
Boulevard. Activities are scheduled from II a.m. to 7
p.m.
— t.ileen Chang
srsss*■■
An unsurpassed leader, Macy's, New
Jersey sells over a billion dollars yearly,
with 24 stores in five states New York,
New Jersey. Pennsylvania, Delaware
and Maryland In the near future, we'll
be expanding our success to new
stores in the Baltimore and Washington,
DC areas
Learn more about careers with Macy's,
M
New Jersey at our Seminar on November 13. Or if you are unable to attend our
presentation, please send your resume
and cover letter to: Manager, College
Relations, Macy's, New Jersey,
Dept.UP15,131 Market St., Newark,
NJ 07102. We are an equal opportunity
employer, m/f.
bamberger's takes the family name
5I95
THE DAILY PKNNSVLVANIAN - Wednnda). November 12, IVJM.
Women in War
Mayor Goode dedicates week to female veterans
By EVAN GAHR
Mayor Goode recently focused attention on an often forgotten group
of veterans — women.
During a City Hall ceremony last
Friday, Goode proclaimed this week,
November 10th to 14th, "Women
Veterans Week."
Citizens should fly "their American
flags in salute to those women who
have dedicated their lives to maintaining the freedom and independence we
enjoy today," the mayor said.
The mayor was urged to issue the
proclamation by the Greater
Philadelphia Womens Marine
Association — one of 75 nationwide
chapters of a group of nearly 4000
women stationed with the Marines
during both world wars and the
Korean War.
Randi Brooks, the Philadelphia
chapter president, spearheaded the
lobbying effort for the the proclamation. She said Monday that attention
to women veterans is long overdue.
"We kind of get forgotten," said
Brooks, who was an aircraft radio
mechanic during the second World
War.
According to Brooks, the women
Marines did "just about everything
the men did" and deserve recognition.
"I wanted to honor all women
veterans who served the United Stater,
government," she said.
Philadelphia Veterans Administration Unit Supervisor Margaret Manning also praised the mayor's proclamation for acknowledging the
female contribution to the armed
forces.
"[Women) veterans have not been
adequately recognized," she said this
week. "They deserve all the attention
they can recieve."
Washington D.C. Veterans Administration Spokesman Donna St.
John said Monday that most
Americans do not realize that women
made a significant contribution to
past war efforts.
"People tend to believe that
veterans are only men," she said.
"(Women)
also."
should
be
recognized
According to St. John, Goode's
proclamation coincides with an effort
PA«F. 5
HISTORY 27. Ancient Some and HISTORY 25.
Ancient Near East cue now listed under
ANCIENT HISTORY (Not History) in the
Course Roster.
HITS AND PIECES
by President Reagan to honor women
veterans.
Reagan recently declared this week
"National Women Veterans Recognition Week" in order to "focus on
women's contributions to the armed
forces." she added
Noontime Computer Training Seminars
MacTerminal
:::::::::::::j»8»
'ig-iviaBB
^-jjjH^ife
/"""Amy
/
-X*?,
It's just amazing
how much campus
news there is to
get in the DP every
Y
N\
Wednesday,
November 12
x
-"i Pell Libran
1st Moor Conference Room
,2
Noon — 1:00 pm
Follow the Blue Balloons
ALL AH!-, WTXCQMl,;:
day!
Sponsored by the
Computing Resource Center
898-1780
.
Plan Your Holiday Parties
Now At
Indian Restaurant
110 South 40th Street, Phila.
(215) 222-2245
$20 Off For Parties of Six or More Adults
Offer not good Saturday evenings
Br«ateSaST 13 3«.rv»e<± Monday -Friday 7-3o-|o:30,
ScrN Son 9:oo- ir.Ooa*"»(3uhcJi»y By-vie.1! i|-3p*0At:co*n*,od<vtlo*s Jjor br«A^Qi-r m^i^s a< UL>
TO JO people. Tafca-oJ* * Ccfttrina also tffcUfeC*
SALOMON BROTHERS INC
cordially invites
University of Pennsylvania
Seniors
to attend a
PRESENT A TION
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12
WH1TE DOG CAFE
Breok^Qst' Lutnch -Dinner- BQV * Grill
34SLO Sar\som ST-'B8^-qJ3H-op€^7dqys
at 7:00 p.m.
Rooftop Lounge
High Rise North
to discuss Sales,
Trading & Finance
opportunities at the Firm.
And now for something completely different..
The Curtis Organ Restoration Society
presents
DIANE
BISH
The First Lady of the Organ"
You loved Phantom of the Opera; now enjoy stellar classical works
by Bach. Vierne, Widor, and more...
Wednesday, November 12, 1986 at 8:00 pm
Irvine Auditorium - 34th & Spruce Streets
Tickets $6. $8. and $10 at the Annenberg Center Box Office
Student discount $2 with valid identification. 898-6791
Salomon Brothers Inc
KEATS AND YEATS ON YOUR SIDE
GElje Jlailtj f emxsxAxvcmmn
The Independent NewspapeVffl n\e L'nhersitx of Pennsylvania
Hi 1st Year of I'tiMictrtion
*i
■*
P\(.v 6
Wednesday. November 12. 1986
Gosh! I just
hale lo see
human rights
violations...
MUEVETE
Minority Attrition
Ne»\ thai a dose friend ma) toon
be transferring oui ol Perm has
rekindled m> infuriation with the in
adequ.io ><i efforts to improve the
quality of life for minorit) itudenti al
the University.
rwo sens ago, the Office foi
University Life released .i report on
the retention rate of students al Penn
riii- minorit) attrii ion statistics
ihocked the
1 niversti) communit) One-third
oi .ill blacks and
Hispanic: i }5 percent and '2 pel
cent respectively)
thai matriculate at •
Penn leave before
Pedro
completing then
degrees
VI hftes,
Ramos
on ihe other hand.
have a retention rate of S*i percent.
The report also indicated that less
than two percent of the minorities
mentS cliche Main have returned to
their loeal college or university.
Mi hough loeal schools usually
don't enjoy "the prestige of the Ivy
I eague," students don't have to feel
like outsiders in their own college. In
addition, even if the school lacks adequate support -en ices and facilities
foi minorities, the support
mechanisms of the community are
more familiar and accessible.
Relatives, high school teachers.
friends and local role models are near
when you need I hem
Institutions like Penn are entirely
different worlds. There arc very few
minorit) faculty members, making ii
ver) haul to find role models thai wc
can identify wish. (There is not one
Hispanic American on the Penn
faculty). Course! that deal with our
heritagi are scarce if the) exist at all.
Moreover, the contributions of
minorities throughout history are ignored in the curriculum.
To many minorities. Penn can be
One-third of all blacks and Hispanics
(35 percent and 32 percent respectively)
that matriculate at Penn leave before
completing their degrees.
that left were forced 10 lease because
of academic problems.
Upon these discoveries, the l nited
Minorities Council asked thai the
University direct special attention to
this serious problem. The administration responded thai because
minorities did not have a "monopoly" on attrition, they would conduct a
study of the attrition of all students
They did not see an unexplained
minority attrition rale thai w;is more
than twice as high as thai of whiles at
something meriting individual alien
tion. James Bishop, ihe Vice Provost
for University Life, was charged with
the responsibility of a follow-up in
vestigation of the attrition problem
among all students at the Universit)
Nothing has been heard since. In the
meantime, minority students continue
to silently disappear al alarming rales
While there is no research on why
minorities leave Penn, there are the
sentiments of those who have left.
Friends and acquaintances of mine
have given different reasons for leaving. But all had one thing in common:
they hated Penn.
"Well," you say, "then they did
the right thing by leaving. And if you
don't like it. you can leave too." Unfortunately, too many have taken the
advice of the numerous arrogant Penn
students who have made such com-
lociall) and culturall) devastating. If
one is not accustomed to dealing with
wealthy, suburban while kids who
believe stereotypes they don'i like
challenged (or even admit that the)
possess). Penn can be a bewildering
experience. A high degree of social
segregation has tended to create many
loners who don't fit into — or are Br-
and socio-economic self-segregation
that they are generally based upon.
While it will be a long time before
the University develops any policies to
combat minority attrition, some existing policies merit attention. Minority attrition statistics that are twice as
high as those of whites indicate that
the experiences of blacks and
Hispanic-Americans cannot be compared or confused with that of whites.
The administration must examine
separately the experiences of blacks
and Hispanics on campus.
An unofficial policy that deserves
treat scrutiny and may be seen as the
solution could be in the Admissions
Office's new approach to minority
recruitment. Rather than recruit
culturally diverse sthdents who may
not 111 in, they recruit a statistically
different but culturally homogeneous
student body. The ideal minority is
one that looks different but shares the
same socio-economic and cultural
backgrounds as everyone else at Penn.
An alternative to Porter and Stetson's anti-attrition policy is best exemplified by the PennCap, Act-101
program. This program provides its
participants with a broad range of seri ices to make the adjustment to life at
Penn easier. While initially intended
as a support mechanism for lowerincome, first generation college
students from Pennsylvania, it has
been expanded to include people from
other areas. PennCap has enjoyed
wonderful success. Although it is not
old enough to compile much aggregate data, it seems as if the retention rale for participating students approximates that of the white
mainstream community at Penn
Obviously, PennCap is doing
something right. The administration
should take a look at what it is doing
and incorporate its strategies into
While there is no research on why
minorities leave Penn, there are the sentiments of those who have left. Friends
and acquaintances of mine have given
different reasons for leaving. But all
had one thing in common: they hated
Penn.
eluded from — any of the existing
social structures. When minorities do
begin to interact with people like
themselves in an environment in
winch they are com foi table, the white
community reacts displeasurably to
their segregation. Such institutions
are not encouraged. On the other
hand, white fraternities enjoy the
respect and the encouragemnt of the
campus, despite the blatant religious
University-wide programs for
minorities and socio-economic disadvantaged students. Otherwise, it
should step aside and let people who
have a grasp of the needs of all
students run the University.
Pedro Ramos, a College senior, is a
columnist for The Daily Pennsylvanian. Muevete appears alternate
Wednesdays.
Jesse jackson
Race relations at the University
have allegedly sunk to new lows, and
the Black Student League has taken a
lot of blame for riling things up. But
this interpretation of events is far too
one-sided; some recent vile conduct
by myself and two of my newspaper
colleagues justifies any bad impressions the BSL may have of the white
■ Penn community.
The matter concerns the scandalous appearance
of three of your
friends at the DP,
covering Jesse
Jackson's speech
on Sunday,
November 2. Collectively, photo
Ross
editor Tommy
Leonardi. reporter
Kerber
"^^^^™""^^" Robert Pasnau
and myself lowered the standards of
dress at the event by about 30 percent.
Some background: thinking I
would drift over to Jackson later, I
began the day sitting in the newsroom
trying to come up with some more
synonyms for "nifty" so I could complete my record review. But under the
impression that Pasnau wasn't there,
an editor asked me to get the story.
How to explain the rush, this news
addiction? There is no adrenaline kick
to compare to hearing of something to
be covered; GET THE STORY
scream all your neurons. Everything,
everything gets dropped as you grab
phones and start barking. Nobody is
going to stand in your way, for you
are the almighty fourth estate. Protector of the public interest. And if
Leonardi and that crumb-bum
Pasnau couldn't shake themselves out
of whosever bed(s) they were occupying from the night before, well, all the
better, that's their story lo beat them
on. Grab a notebook, charge down
the stairs and push your way confidently past people who've been
waiting, for an hour to hear Jackson
speak. You are the press, dammit!
"Out of my way!"
Anyhow, Leonardi was looking his
usual, the "I can't believe I'm not
sleeping" look of the grungy T-shirt
wiih the grungy real shirt over it and
boxer shorts. (Although he denies the
boxers, claiming they were only wellwashed fatigues since he needs the
pockets.) Pasnau did better — long
pants and a sweater — but his
military-surplus overcoat defeated
whatever effect he might have managed. And there's not much to say for
my own journogrub — sweatshirt,
cutoffs and shower thongs.
NBWi WtLPINO A uw*.
FAT HOMUY PKXON 15
fWCHW HMUPON
/
True, Tommy would have covered
the Pope in the same shorts, and
maybe Pasnau was just cold and
maybe I was in a hurry.
It was a disgusting spectacle, reminding me once again that journalism is
the process of buying paper at two
cents a pound and selling it at 10
cents. "The nattering nabobs of
negativism," Spiro Agnew called the
press. Yeah, I agree.
Sorry.
So with this explanation, will
everybody please lay off the
newspaper and whatever faction they
believe is their enemy? My number is
243-5457. Call me if you want to
bitch.
•
Dinginess aside, I was able to ask
Jackson whether the African National
Congress deserved U.S. support. I
asked him this on his way out, having
heard him speak of his trip to South
Send Us Mail
The Daily Pennsylvanian
welcomes comment from the
University community in the form
of columns and letters to the editor.
Signed columns, letters and cartoons appearing on this page represent the opinions of the authors and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of the DP Board of Managers.
Please limit letters to iwo
typewritten pages. The DP reserves
ihe right to condense all letters. Send
all material to Craig Coopersmith.
editorial page editor. The Daily Pennsylvanian, 4015 Walnut Street,
Philadelphia. PA 19104.
T-,, fc
JIlMi,
those who advocate burning suspected
collaborators to death.
Making our government realize that
it must deal with the ANC in some
capacity is one of the few remaining
contributions the nation's campuses
can make to the plight of South
Africa. Two things happen the longer
we don't — the more chaotic the
situation gets as we increase the
militants' credibility and the less likely
the inevitable ANC-influenced
government will be to regard the U.S.
as an ally.
1 mention the ANC because the
University has some prestige to
regain, after the Trustees' refusal to
help South Africa by not divesting.
The divestment argument was effectively removed from the campus
arena the moment GM and IBM announced they were pulling out last
month. From now on, companies
which withdraw from South Africa
ZUA/MfOR
ANeptm
/
'They say that tying in sports is
like kissing your sister. The fact
that /Harvard/ celebrated /after a
29-29 tie with Yale in 1968] just
proves something that I've always
felt about Harvard people.'
Yak running back
Ross Kerber, a College sophomore,
is a staff member of The Daily Pennsylvanian. Keats and Yeats On Your
Side appears alternate Wednesdays.
JEFFREY GOLDBERG. EXECUTIVE EDITOR
FEUPE ALBUQUERQUE. MANAGING EDITOR
JEFFREY METCALF. BUSINESS MANAGER
CRAIG COOPERSMITH. EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR
RUTH MASTERS
ALISON FELDMAN
NEWS EDITOR
Assoc MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT CHASEN
TOMMY LEONARDI
FINANCIAL MANAGER
ED GEFEN
SPORTS EDITOR
CHRISTOPHER DOWNEY
34TH STREET EDITOR
SUE JUNG
FEATURE EDITOR
LESLIE BRA UN STEIN
AD LAYOUT DIRECTOR
Quotation of the Day
will be following their corporate peers
instead of their academic ones.
By failing to add its voice to the
drive to divest, Wharton lost a piece
of whatever claim it can make on being the country's leading business
school. They could not have divested
stocks on their own, but the Wharton
community made no attempt to influence University policy on the
matter.
If Wharton were as pragmatic as it
claims, somebody (a student group, a
faculty coalition, a band of graduate
students) would have argued for
divestment on the grounds that it was
predictable their example would have
been followed by IBM, GM, etc. Or,
if the Wharton community thoughi
that divestment was a flawed policy,
they should have used their
knowledge of the coming pullouts to
buttress the moral arguments against
divestment. But their never was a
"Wharton" position. It was a nonissue.
The University's failure means thai
we owe the people of South Africa
whatever extra weight we denied the
divestment cause. 1 am not the person
to demand this because I don't live in
a shantytown patrolled by tanks, and
I don't have to carry a passbook to
visit my friends at Haverford. But
Bishop Tutu asked us to divest, and
he does know shantytowns and tanks
and passbooks. I trust his judgment
on the matter more than I trust the
Trustees'.
The Wharton school obviously
doesn't control investments independently from the University, so
they cannot be blamed for not
divesting. But they had more to lose
on the question than the College did.
So did they lose something? Did the
country's leading business school miss
a question of university financial
policy of such significance? Of course
it didn't; Harvard partially divested.
•
Maybe Jackson didn't answer my
question about the ANC because I
was just another reporter in shower
thongs on a gloomy Sunday in
Philadelphia. But now that the
University has lost on divestment, we
should be thinking about how we can
make it easier for our leaders to raise
one more issue. One more issue before
they all become academic.
%\\t ^atlrj Pemtoglhrntimt
MARKETING DIRECTOR
— Former
Calvin Hill.
r,-"
Africa and describe the need for
solidarity with the struggling peoples
of the region. 1 wanted to hear his
thoughts on U.S. policy for the
region.
Jackson looked right through me
and got into his car.
Can we blame him? Taking a stand
on such an issue poses impossible
political calculations for the most
popular and effective leader of the
black community. South Philadelphia
needs Jesse Jackson; how can he be
expected to open himself to attacks by
kooks like Ed Meesc and Pat Robertson by supporting the ANC?
The ANC has always been a
political as well as a military organization. Nelson Mandela is in jail
because the South African government is afraid of the popular support
he draws to the organization. His
absence, and the refusal of western
governments to recognize the group,
has given credibility to more militant
leaders of the ANC — those who arcwilling to attack civilian targets and
DEBRA WARSHAWSKY
mrr... NO. irs <A/ST THE siAff
CARtootiisr urns mm*
I mssep m peAPt-iNt
FOR TOP/trS COMIC /HP
tHSY RAN AN AP FOR A
^HOOVER VAC-Wti
\MfT9rVKe..
Tommy Leonardl/Daily Pennsylvanian
South Philadelphia needs Jesse
Jackson; how can he be expected to
open himself to attacks by kooks like
Ed Meese and Pat Robertson by supporting the ANC?
BLOOM COUNTY/Berke Breathed
LaxMOi&FtArrHe
and Beyond
STACYASHER
PRODUCTION MANAGER
ABIGAIL ABRASH
Assoc 34TH STREET EDITOR
Copynghl 1966 The Dairy Pennsylvanian Inc
No pan thereof may to reproduced m any lorm. in
wtiota or m pan. without Ihe written consent ol the
Business Manager
The Board ol Managers ot The Daily Pennsylvanun has sole authority lor the content of the
newspaper No other parlies are m any way
responsible tor the content ol the newspaper and
al inquiries concerning that content should to
drtaed to the Board ol Managers at the address
when follows
PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR
THOMAS HILL
SPORTS EDITOR
WENDYFREUND
SALES MANAGER
PATRICIA KIRUN
CITY EDITOR
ROBERT GORIN
CREDIT MANAGER
ROBBIE STEEL
SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR
ROBYN VOSHARDT
PRODUCTION MANAGER
CAROLYN WENNBLOM
Assoc 34TH STREET EDITOR
The Daily Pennsytvaman is published Monday
through Fnday al Philadelphia. PA during the ral
«nd ipnng semesters, and weekly during summer
sessions, eicept during examination and vacation
periods Third class postage paid at Philadelphia.
PA 19104
Subscriptions may be ordered tor $40.00 per
academic year at 401S Walnut Street. PhaedelPna. PA 19104 Display and classified advertising
may to placed at Ihe same address Business
(215) 8984581. News (215) 898-6565
THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIA* — Wednesday November 12. 1986
PAGI 7
HAPPY HOUR
Hey, boys and girls! Do you know
what lime it is?
It's prc-registration time!
(Chorus, to the tune of "Howdy
Doody•')//•$ pre-regisiralion
time/It's pre-regisiralion lime/It's
not just any time/It's preregistration time!
Yes, it's that wonderful, fun-filled
time of year
when your current classes are
beginning to get
on your nerves,
and you're
thinking about
all the mistakes
you've made
that you swear
you won't make
next semester.
You sit down
wi'h your course
description book, your class roster
and the supplemental roster, along
with the notes you have from your
Hey Kids — It's Pre-registration Time
biggie. The last one. The last chance
to take all those courses you've
wanted to take for so long but were
too busy trying to fulfill your requirements to do so. The last chance
to take a course with the professor
whom everyone told you that you
must take before graduating. The
last time you have to wait in line at 8
a.m. for a permit stamp for a class
you'll probably end up dropping
anyway. And for some of us seniors,
it's the beginning of the last semester
of classes, exams and homework
before we go out into "the real
world."
So now you're saying, "Gosh,
when you put it like that, this sounds
like pretty serious stuff. I guess I'd
better think about this prcregistration thing a little more. If
this is my last chance, whatever shall
I take?"
Well, to help you out, I've done
an extensive, expensive, statistically
accurate market research survey of
ti
You've got to wake up early and
wait in line forever just to get the
stamp." "The person in line in front of
you always gets the last spot.M "/ got
my own rubber stamp made up: no
more waiting in lines for me."
last meeting with your academic advisor three years ago.
"Let's see now. What do I need to
take to graduate?"
For seniors, this pre-registration
period is extra special. This is the
seniors past, present and future.
One hundred (plus or minus 96)
seniors surveyed, the question is:
"What criteria are most important in choosing courses for senior
year?"
The survey says (with selected
responses):
•Don't take any Friday classes.
"Friday is a weekend day." "Can't
go to class with a hangover." "Friday classes? Out of the question."
•Don't take any classes that meet
be/ore a reasonable hour. "Noon's
the cut-off. I can't think before
noon." "10:30 is okay twice a week,
if you don't have class on Friday,
which really goes without saying."
"Can't get out of bed if you party
all night." "COS is the best way to
start the day."
•Always leave room in your
schedule to meet friends for lunch.
"There is nothing more important
than sleep or food." "1 like to meet
Marcy at Skolnik's on
Wednesdays."
•Don't take any class whose final
exam is during the last few days of
exam week, or two classes with final
exams on the same day. "By the end
of finals week, you want to be out
partying in preparation for Senior
Week." "My birthday's during
finals. I won't take a class with a
final on my birthday."
•Take a class with a friend. "This
is the last chance to see each other
before we go off to live in different
cities." "I'm taking Biochem 1044
just to take a class with my
housemate." "We alternate class
days and share our notes so that we
only have to go to class half the
time."
•Don't take a course where you
need a permit stamp. "You'vegotto
wake up early and wait in line
forever just to gel the stamp." "The
person in line in front of you always
gets the last spot." "I got my own
rubber stamp made up: no more
Adam Gordon/Daily Pennsytvanian
waiting in lines for me."
•Look for classes which meet only
two hours per week. "It cuts down
on your time in the classroom."
"Upper level, but easier to deal
with."
•Don 1 take courses during good
TV shows. "I had to drop a COS
course because it conflicted with
'Moonlighting.' You can bet I'll
never make that mistake again."
"Partridge Family' at 9:30 a.m..
•Family Ties' at 10. Then, we'll talk
about classes."
Did not get the two votes
necessary to make the survey results:
•Take a class btCttUM you want to
learn about that subject.
One more note, all you preregistration aficionados. When
planning your schedule, it often
helps to see the schedule -maker's
perspective. A few things to keep in
mind:
•If you've been waiting for three
years to take a particular course,
and this is your last chance, (hen it's
not being offered this semester
•If you must take a course 10
fulfill a requirement, then it's only
offered at 9 a.m.
Once you've planned your semoi
\cai cIlSl schedule, it's lime to
schedule the really important Mufl
I el's see Mondav night, we'll go to
I he l.iseni, luesd.iss at Smokes.
Wednesday nighl is O'Piib, rhunda) is O'Mata's Saloon and then the
weekend begins
Remember, we have to keep our
priorities straight.
1.aura Trtcl. u College senior, is a
former associate business manager
o/The Daily I'ennsyKanian. Happy
Hour appears alternate
H cdncsdavs.
The Dean Responds
By Robert Marshak
1 write to provide a point by point response to Dr.
David Kronfeld's column headlined "Vet School Cover
Up" (DP, 10/28/86).
•The allegation that I knew that Veterinary faculty at
New Bolton Center (NBC) were violating the school's
ban on hunting is a misrepresentation.
Dr. Kronfeld states that he had complained to me "for
over 20 years about the vacillatory policy of declaring
NBC a wildlife sanctuary then letting a few favorites go
hunting." 1 deny this allegation. NBC's no hunting
policy, the result of a resolution I drafted and presented
to the faculty, has not been in effect for 20 years. I began
to reside at NBC in 1966, exactly 20 years ago. I lived
there for a number of years, probably no less than five,
before my resolution to create a wildlife sanctuary was
presented to the faculty.
On only one occasion did Dr. Kronfeld say anything to
me about an alleged hunting violation. It was a relatively
recent story about a deer apparently shot just off campus
that was alleged after flight to have fallen dead on New
Bolton Center ground (see my letter to the DP published
on October 8, 1985). Dr. Kronfeld admits that, "I, for
one, have never seen a person shoot an animal at NBC,
so I never really knew." Never really knowing, Dr.
Kronfeld nevertheless alleges to have "complained many
times to have complained to Dr. Marshak for over 20
years."
This is not to say that violations may not have occurred. But no one came forward, even anonymously, to
blow the whistle on offenders.
Since 1973, my base of operations has been in
Philadelphia, some 35 miles distant from the NBC campus; however, while still in residence at NBC, 1
reprimanded and chased off a faculty member when I
thought that he and some friends were planning to hunt
on campus property. On a few other occasions, I asked
strangers in hunting gear and carrying rifles to leave the
campus.
•Dr. Kronfeld's anecdote about hunting in the vicinity
of my former residence at NBC misrepresents the
situation.
Soon after NBC's no hunting policy had been
adopted, hunters constructed a blind in a field adjacent
to New Bolton Center property in sight of my house.
When 1 came out to confront them, I was informed that
our neighbor had given permission to hunt on his property. In effect, I was told to mind my own business. Since
hunting in Pennsylvania is legal, nothing beyond a
strong protest was possible.
•Dr. Kronfeld's statement about NBC lacking the
status of a "registered" wildlife sanctuary is misleading.
Leaving aside the fact that the Commonwealth abandoned years ago the registration of privately-owned
This is not to say that
violations may not have occurred. But no one came
forward, even anonymously, to blow the whistle on
offenders.
wildlife sanctuaries, the school's policy on hunting, no
less than any other school policy, is binding on every
member of the faculty. No university or school, including the Veterinary School, operates on any other
premise.
•Dr. Kronfeld's allegations that I approved and then
disowned the NBC Wildlife Resources Committee
misrepresents the facts.
I had nothing to do with the appointment of the
Wildlife Resources Committee. It is neither necessary or
customary to consult the dean on the formation at NBC
of committees which deal with local matters. Dr.
Kronfeld in his column states that a tenured faculty
member "originally proposed the concept of the com-
mittee and its functions to the associate dean for NBC."
But, if the Associate Dean for New Bolton Center had
sought my approval to establish such committees, I
would have given it gladly because at substantial cost to
the school, geese in the many hundreds were destroying
crops and inflicting serious environmental damage. I
would not have agreed, however, to the list of members.
There was insufficient representation (only one professor), and the committee was less than sufficiently
representative of divergent points of view. In their
wildlife management proposal, the committee recommended the trapping of fox, raccoons, opossums and
musk iat s. and the hunting of geese, doves, squirrels and
deer.
In a phone conversation with the Associate Dean in
late 1984, I agreed to a proposal to allow highly restrictive hunting of geese only, aimed at scaring off the huge
flocks that were feeding voraciously on our cultivated
fields. It was an unwise decision. Fortunately, 1 rescinded it before any hunting could begin.
Dr. Kronfeld states that he warned me about "incongruities" at a monthly meeting of the department
chairmen prior to the fall 1985 faculty and overseers
meetings. In 1985 I attended one, at the most two,
meetings of chairmen, and I have been assured by the
chairmen that, while the hunting issue did come up at
one of their sessions, I was not present. The chairmen are
in unanimous agreement mat Dr. Kronfeld's claim to
have "warned" me is false.
•Dr. Kronfeld's comment on my response to a
Since hunting in Pennsylvania is legal, nothing
beyond a strong protest was
possible.
Wildlife Management Committee recommendation
misses the point.
At a meeting on October 16, 1985. the faculty
authorized me to appoint a comprehensive committee to
study the problems of wildlife management at New
Bolton Center. Thus, on November 18, I appointed a
committee consisting of five professors and three staff
personnel. Dr. Kronfeld reports accurately that I rejected the Committee's proposal to employ a consulting
ecologist to study the whole ecosystem at New Bolton
Center, but he neglects to mention that the proposed
study had a price tag of $10,000. that the central problem
is crop destruction due to geese overpopulation and that
however interesting it would be to learn more about
NBC's ecosystem, the proposed study was a broad and
general one, unlikely to yield concrete recommendations
for protecting the fields. In my judgment, the school can
ill afford to spend $10,000 on a study that does not address the central problem.
•Dr. Kronfeld's final allegation that there is a "most
striking conflict" between the original Wildlife Resource
Committee's story and the dean's story about "his involvement or noninvolvement" with the Committees is a
misrepresentation.
Unfortunately, I was not present at the NBC faculty/staff meeting in question, but it is hard to imagine
that members of the Wildlife Resource Commitee could
have claimed that the dean was in anyway "involved"
with them. I did not appoint the Committee. I was not
consulted about its membership, nor did I meet or speak
with any committee member before or during their
deliberations. Most likely, the Committee reported on
my unfortunate approval to hunt geese, information
they could only have gotten directly from the Associate
Dean.
A story on the latter issue has already appeared in The
Daily Pennsytvanian. I haven't denied it, while pointing
out that my decision to lift the ban was rescinded before
any hunting took place.
Robert Marshak is the dean of the Veterinary School.
Letters to the Editor
Reader Chides
Coopersmith for
Being Insecure
To the Editor:
Once again. The Daily Pennsytvanian has chosen to publish in its pages
a column denouncing every other Ivy
League school in Craig Coopersmith's
"A Tale of Eight Bands" {DP.
11/7/86). Ironically, this embarrassing anthology of groundless accusations presented itself in the context of
an argument decrying the use against
Penn of the very same sorts of
epithets (or maybe I should say
"moronic statements about how
another Ivy school doesn't count").
This time, the attack focused primarily on Princeton. Last year's target was
Yale. Although last year I felt compelled to resist the temptation to respond (1 admit to a conflict of interest), I cannot allow this apparently
perennial event again to pass without
comment.
It strikes me as very odd that every
time a football rival says something
negative about Penn, some DP columnist feels compelled to present a
grand defense of this university, a
defense amounting to little more than
an exercise in name-calling. It appears
that no football rival should be permitted to poke fun at Penn, although
it is no breach of protocol for the DP
to publish on its front page a photo of
Penn students displaying a banner
that reads "Yale was my safety
school."
Why is it that other Ivy schools do
not react to similar jibes in the same
way that Penn does? I write to pose
one hypothesis: it seems that other Ivy
schools are better able to place these
antagonistic remarks in their proper
context. Derogatory cheers, banners
and buttons are part and parcel of college rivalry.
It is unfortunate that Craig
Coopersmith takes these college-rival
"attacks" to heart. To do so is but a
manifestation of Mr. Coopersmith's
own insecurity about his school. The
comments hurt only because he
suspects, however irrationally, that
they might be true.
If Penn is a second-rate Ivy League
school, it is so only because people
like Mr. Coopersmith believe that it is
so. When people like him have confidence enough to let all of the "safety
school" jokes slide by, then this
university will have attained the prominence that it richly deserves.
paper," also last spring.
Mr. O'Sullivan may not have seen
your newspaper's regular reports on
the progress the College has been
making in connection with plans to
revamp our distributional requirements. The judgment that we
should consider revisions very seriously followed careful analyses of detailed data that prove his, our and
SCUE's points about the present requirement's problematic qualities.
And, with faculty endorsement, we
will be on the way to the solution Mr
O'Sullivan appears to endorse! We
hope, precisely, to build ". . .a
generalized foundation for the more
specialized major." And the watchwords, right along, have been
"diversity," "structure" and
"coherence," terms echoed in Mr.
O'Sullivan's helpful commentary.
RICHARD L. GABRIEL
Law School '87
IVAR BERG
Associate Dean, College
Toothsome Eggs
and B.' Lauded
by Associate Dean
To the Editor:
1 much appreciated Mr. Michael
O'Sullivan's critique of the College's
present program (DP, 11/3/86); it
squares perfectly with misgivings expressed last April by our School's
Standing Committee on
Undergraduate Education in its report
to the faculty. His misapprehensions
about the status quo also match those
expressed very cogently, if more sympathetically, by Mr. O'Sullivan's
fellow students in SCUE's "white
Resources
Here are several resources on campus and in the city for people who
need advice, help or just someone to
talk to:
University Counseling — 898-7021
Student Health — 662-2860; after 5
p.m. and weekends — 662-2354
University Chaplain — 898-8456
Philadelphia Suicide Hotline —
686-4420
The Penn Women's Center —
898-8611
Gay and Lesbian Peer Counseling
Service — 898-8888
THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN — Wednesday. November 12. 1986
PAGE «
National board to review unionization bid
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10 am - 5 pm
1
B> CHUCK COHEN
University unwillingness to
recognize an attempt by Faculty Club
employees to unionize has stalled the
process, pending the involvement of
the National Labor Relations Board.
"We have to see how it unfolds
under the auspices of the National
Labor Relations Board," Human
Resources Director George Budd said.
On Monday, approximately 20 club
employees presented Faculty Club
Manager David Cantor with a petition
stating their intent to organize.
Federal labor law states thai management is not required to recognize a
union until a case is filed with the
NLRB and the union can prove that a
majority of the employees are in favor
of organization.
Patrick Coughlan, business agent
for Local 274 of Hotel Employees and
Restaurant Employees International
Union, said that the union plans to
wait a few days before going to the
NLRB.
"We're going to put that on hold
for a couple days," Coughlan said. "I
think it's fair to give the University a
couple days to respond rather than
start with unfair labor practice
charges."
Coughlan said that the petition,
which was signed by at least 30 of the
47 workers, demonstrates the union's
employee support.
"In my mind, a majority has
already been proven to them," •
Coughlan said.
At this point, neither the union nor
the administration anticipates a strike
by club employees.
Budd said that he had not yet seen
the petition but was surprised by the
employees' move to unionize.
"We had heard a grumbling, but no
specifics," he said. "But this came as
a surprise."
He added that the University must
work carefully to ensure the
employees' rights.
"This is very serious in the sense
that the rights of employees must be
protected," Budd said. "Both
management and labor have an
obligation to protect those rights."
"My job is to protect the
employees' rights in the matter, to
protect the University [and) to make
sure the law is followed," he added.
Should club employees succeed in
their unionization drive, they will be
the first group of University
employees to organize in 15 years.
The employees' complaints include
low wages and unfair working conditions. They claim that the gratuity
charge added to each club bill is not
equitably distributed to employees
and that some workers are given too
much work.
But Hospitality Services Director
Don Jacobs yesterday denied charges
that club employees are underpaid.
"My belief is that we are paying
competitive wages right now," Jacobs
said. "We have University benefits.
It's not only the dollar figure that
enters into negotiations."
"The important thing to us is that
the employees know that we have
their interests at heart." he added. "It
concerns me as a manager that individuals feel they need a union."
Students plan magazine to focus on the College
(Continued from page I)
Originally turned down last month by
the Student Activities Council
Finance committee, the Collegian
won final approval on appeal at last
week's SAC meeting.
"The primary reason we turned
down their proposal was funding."
SAC Finance Committee member
Steve Alloy said. "SAC has already
used all but S4000 of its $40,000 contingency fund for the semester."
The Collegian requested four issues
at S2S16 per issue including S46S for
color form — a highlighting process
— and $200 for mechanical graphics.
SAC could not provide all the monies
requested since it does not fund
technical production costs.
After approval from SAC, a compromise deal for approximately $2000
with a $500 loan was struck for their
spring trial issue.
But Sprigman said in order for the
Collegian to be a viable competitor, it
I c&*
An Extraordinary Opportunity
Meet world-renowed anthropologist and author
«8*
L*
must produce four issues per
semester.
"If we don't have at least four
issues, we'll drop from the face of the
earth." he said, adding that having
four issues a year will also maintain
the interest of their current writers
and draw in new ones.
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VOLUNTEER!!!
Opportunities in law,
medicine, counseling, tutoring,
childcare, and many, many
other fields!
Plan now for next semester.
Visit Penn Extension,
the student volunteer center, at
115 Houston Hall.
To register, or for more information, please
contact Kathleen Rellstab, program coordinator,
at 427-5159 or 5169.
Fee: $100; $50 for students with valid ID
Poor Richard's
Record
The Yearbook of the University of Pennsylvania,
would like to announce
Senior Portrait Sittings
for
Sponsored by St. Christopher's Hospital for
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Call 898-8720 or stop by
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Funded by SAC
|
PACT 9
THE DAILY PKNNSYLVANIAN - Uedn*<ula>. Wrmhcr 12. 19*6
Informal seminars for frosh approved
By LISA S. SMITH
Administrators reacted favorably
to a Student Committee on
Undergraduate Education proposal
that calls for the creation of informal
seminars to provide freshmen with a
unifying experience.
One hundred and fifty freshmen
will participate next fall in the noncredit Provost Smith Seminars on Exploring Society. Each seminar will
meet twice during New Student Week
and then once weekly for the first four
weeks of the semester, with each session lasting one hour.
SCUE Chairman Lynn Parseghian
said yesterday that this pilot program,
if successful, will form the basis for a
program designed for all freshmen.
Parseghian met yesterday with
President Sheldon Hackney and
Assistant to the President Nicholas
Constan to discuss the implementation of the seminars. Parseghian said
they were "enthusiastic" about the
proposal and agreed that the seminar
program should be adopted if
successful.
administrators.
"With the Penn traditions.
IHackney) recommended ap"We had a look at implcmenta- *» proaching them from a critical
tion," she said. "We will talk to
perspective and not just accepting
undergraduate deans and the Provost
them at face value," she said.
[Thomas Ehrlich], then we'll invite
And Constan said last night that
faculty members to be on a planning
"we agreed that the object |of the
committee."
seminars] is to get everyone thinking,
but not necessarily thinking a certain
The planning committee will work
way."
out the specifics of the pilot program,
such as recruiting this year's juniors
He said (hat the sessions should not
and setting up training sessions for
just provide facts about the Universifuture seminar leaders.
ty, such as collegiate traditions, but
should also explain the "whys"
The seminars will be based on six
behind them. He added that certain
topics, chosen because of their
relevance to the freshman class and topics, especially those dealing with
the University. The "discussion altered states, must be dealt with
modules" include Altered States of "very carefully because we have people coming from different
Perception, Media, Penn Traditions,
backgrounds and having different
Ethics, Why Are You Here? and Art.
perceptions."
Parseghian said that some "small
problems with the topics," were
Letters will be mailed to the Class
discussed during her meeting with the
of 1991 in early summer, inviting
them to take part in the seminars.
"I'm very optimistic." Parseghian
said. "1 don't think there'll be much
of a problem getting freshmen to participate because the first time it's gonatives to see if there are other ways it
can be done," Bloom said. "It's not
like this proposal is set in stone."
Certain Traditions
ing to be an exclusive kind of thing
And it's not requiring a vast number
of people to make it work."
"But we realize that a-, a trial run,
we'll have a lot to learn from the first
time out," she added.
Parseghian also said thai SCUI ll
working on incentives to encourage
juniors to apply for the non-salaried
seminar leader positions.
"We*W discussing the possibility of
some kind of indication on their
transcript under the 'action' column." she said. "And of course
there's the obvious incentive of
building your resume "
According to University Council
Steering Committee and
Undergraduate Assembly member
Wendy Bloom, there is some movement to form alternatives to certain
aspects of the proposals.
"People are looking for alter-
are always
Also on Council's agenda are the
recommendations of the Ad Hoc
Committee to Review Fall Break and
a discussion of undergraduate
admissons.
in style For Kxamplc.
Careers in Non-Profit and
Social Change Organizations
Penn Alumni will apeak .ibuut
employment In:
• Museums
• Advw .K i/ organization*
• Service organizations
Wednesday. November 12
7-9 PM
Ben Franklin Room
Houston Hall
All Welcome
Sign up with Kathleen in Houston Hall
DAEDALUS
EDUCATION
! SERVICES
Have YOU satisfied the
FOREIGN LANGUAGE KKQU1KEMENT?
Preregister now before it's too late.
foA -
REMEMBER - it is impossible to complete neglected
language courses after the beginning of the senior
year Accordingly it is incumbent upon YOU to build
Sexual harassment changes
(Continued from page I)
Other administrators, such as
Senior Vice President Helen O'Bannon, declined to comment on the proposals until University Council has
entirely concluded its discussion.
PENNIES FROM HEAVEN
your unfulfilled language courses into your course
schedule during preregistratlon
It is obviously impossible to complete the language
requirement when it is left until the end of your stay at
Penn.
*&'
A 'lost » IIS
Class Iti..I.!
Everyday in
The meeting, which is open to the
University community, will be held in
room 351 of Steinberg-Dietrich Hall
at 4 p.m..
I lu- Bookstore,
10 am - 2 |»m
BORCD ftFT€R MIDT€ftMS?
HILL
coLLecie House
7ke CMM§ ALUMNI seoes
fititxti
INFLU€NC€
P€NN'S FUTUR€
mi GiimmCc c w
Q
Join the many committee representatives
and
Let your opinions be heard
by faculty and administrators
_. i. .*
ri*i u—IOM —J
BM
i ,,..'.*•. t~,-tU l*,J*,tu4^«n*
cecruKf
6etiw%ftfoor
iNTrteTkofc
POSITIONS ON:
HOIAI LieetAL AttS &RAl\iAie&.
(AN> CTM&& 0*1 STAtnTt> IN
Student Health Advisory Board
"Vou are Here at Penn"
LUharton Computing
Search Committee for a new Director of Student Life
Lippincott library
Library
VxreNoveMBetzi3THURSPAS
Applications available starting Tues.. Nov. 11
Due Thurs.. Nov. 13
Interviews on Sun., Nov. 16
Come to the UA/NC-C Office 1st Floor Houston hall
Hours: 11 am to 4 pm
ptAceniu House
3333 WALNUT ST
ALL STUD6NTS W€lCOM€
FOR MOR€ INFORMATION CALL 898-8908
»
3
nKidder, Peabody fir Co.
Certain traditions are always in style.
liII|ii.!i!"»wiiiliiiiiMii!
IIMlM
liiiiU
Inrnrnoralpct
Incorporated
cordially invite* you to attend an
";|illll| <i|j||||!i
Informational Meeting
to discuss the two-year
r
i'
See the full selection of Jostens rings i in dis] >l;iy in v< >ur college
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Monday - Friday
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Thursday, November 13
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Bodek Lounge in Houston Hall
THE DAILY PKNNSYLVANIAN - Wednesday. November 12. 1986
This holiday season,
get the'We Stuff'
at the right price.
Now you can get the competitive
edge when classes begin in January With a
Macintosh™ personal computer, and all the
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We call it the Macintosh "Write Stuff"
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when you buy a Macintosh "Write Stuff
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a bundle of extras—and save $250
Not only will you get your choice of a
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Plus, you'll also get an Image writer'1 II
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Plus, you'll get Macl.ightning,
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Together with your favorite Macintosh word
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turned in on time
What's more, there's a Macintosh
Support Kit tilled with valuable accessories
and computer care products from 3M.*
Complete with all the things you need to
keep your Macintosh running long after
you've graduated.
PACT 10
UA backs admissions diversity
Will bring resolution before U. Council
By DENA GITTF.LMAN
The Undergraduate Assembly passed a resolution calling for the University to maintain and further build
upon its admissions policy, which currently sanctions many acceptances on
the basis of diversity factors.
The UA representatives on University Council will present the statement
at this week's council meeting. The
council Committee for
Undergraduate Admissions and
Financial Aid is expected to recommend that the University deemphasize diversity and further stress
academic standards.
Current standards are based upon
the McGill report, a University statement issued in 1967 that outlines
percentages of admissions to be based
on non-academic standards.
UA Chairman Eric Lang explained
this week that the council committee
feels that by basing admissions on
diversity, the University is ignoring
academic standards. But the UA
statement calls for the University to
continue consideration of diversity in
its admissions policy.
"he committee] is saying that the
University, in order to achieve
geographic diversity, is ignoring traditional standards of excellence." Lang
said. "Basically, what this statement
is saying is this is what the
undergraduates think of admissions."
The UA also discussed sexual
harassment at the University, focusing on specific proposals made in the
report issued by the ad hoc Universin
Council Committee on Sexual
Harassment.
The report calls for the ombudsman
to keep centralized records of sexual
harassment reports. UA meniKtdebated using the ombudsman for this
purpose in light of his position as a
neutral party.
In other business, the UA passed a
resolution recommending that the
University make fall break a permanent occurrence and approved a motion commending President Sheldon
Hackney's South African Educational
Initiatives proposal. The president's
proposal calls for student and faculty
exchange programs between the
University and South African
institutions.
Public Safety Committee Cochairman Aram Nadcll announced
that he has made arrangements with
Ed Ryals, a policeman with
Philadelphia's 18th precinct, to go to
off-campus houses and offer students
security advice. Interested students
should call Ryals at 686-3180.
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"Vffer (««*/ *hit \uff>lia IM I 1996 Kifie I bmpuki />i, Sfpk and Uf VfU logo an rtfftUrtii iruikmurk' <v Kfplt i am/mm. ft*
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Learn,
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tarn
Become a Sales Representative
for The Daily Pennsylvanian.
Experience.
If you have an interest in sales,
advertising or business in general, we
might just have a part time job for you
as a member of our advertising Sales
Staff.
We offer you something you can't get
from any classroom — experience.
You want it. Employers look for it. And
this can be a great way to get it.
We're The Daily Pennsylvanian. Penn's
102-year-old student-run daily
newspaper, consistently judged one of
the top college papers in the United
States. Our experience, knowledge,
and resources can provide you with
professional background and training
you'll find invaluable no matter what
field you plan to go into.
Money.
As a member of our Sales Staif, you
have the chance to earn substantial
income on a commission basis. You
can expect to eventually earn several
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But make no mistake: this is a job, and
it requires a commitment of time and
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Act Now.
Think about it: who else is offering you
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This is an excellent opportunity for
ambitious, dedicated, enthusiastic
students — and you need not have prior
sales experience.
We have a limited number of positions
available. Introductory Meeting,
Wednesday, November 19, at 4:00 on
the second floor of The Daily
Pennsylvanian Offices, 4015 Walnut
Street. Interviews will be held
Wednesday, November 19, Thursday,
November 20 and Friday. November
21. If unable to attend, call Wendy
Freund at 898-6581.
Unlock your full potential. A job at The
Daily Pennsylvanian can open doors for
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The Daily Pennsylvanian
THE DAILY PKNNSY1.VANIAN - Wednesday Notembrr 12. IMJM,
Wall Street recruiting
(( onlinued from page 1/
"We're probably the broadest nrn
relating to an applicant's race, marital ol talent and divert backgrounds and
status and national origin. In .ill
the hungriest to find talent of any
some 22 categories — ranging from firm that you'll find," he said.
plans to have children io church
Still, Thompson said recruiters arc
membership — are forbidden. The often recent college graduates
statutes were enacted in an attempt to themselves and are operating under
insure thai hiring practices would be the specter of the free-wheeling
based only on an individual's abilities. business world. And frequently the
Last year's violation of interview
glib talk of business luncheons does
mg standards by Salomon Brothers not translate well at a university.
was considered an isolated incident,
"We send people to our college
and the student took no legal action campuses who by in large are not proagainst the firm. Salomon Brothers' fessional interviewers," he said.
representatives stress that the "They're used to conducting very offunlawful questioning was only the the-record conversations. . .What
result of an overzealous interviewer I'm trying to do is raise people's
and is not company policy.
awareness of the fact thai when they
"I think it's unrealistic to think any go to a campus they're speaking to
major American company would people that are in an entirely different
deny someone employment based on situation than in business."
any of those questions that are ilCareer Planning and Placement
legal," said Salomon Brothers lalei Associate Director Beverly Hamiltonadministrator John Thompson, who Chandler, who supervises recruiting
supervises recruitment and for- ai the Wharton School, said yesterday
mulated the new guidelines for the that the University has a clear policy
firm.
of making students aware of illegal
Largely gone, he said yesterday, are quetioning practices. In addition to a
the days of "blue-blooded" com- review at general information sespanies seeking a man of the right sions, CPPS makes available a combackground. Salomon Brothers par
prehensive list of all unlawful areas of
ticularly has a history of recruiting in- questioning. An average of 10 formal
Jiwduals capable of turning their raw complaints are filed at CPPS every
talent into profits, Thompson said.
year.
Anderson and construction
(Continued from page I)
He added that since the new program's implementation, every
acedemic building project has been
completed on schedule, and Ihe
University has saved hundreds of
thousands of dollars. Anderson called
this cost- and time-efficient approach
critical lo the mulli-million dollar
building and maintenance campaign
the University now faces.
"The impact of overrunning on
that amount of money would be to affect the quality of life for the University," he said. "Even a 10 percent
overrun, which is nol at all unusual in
the construction business, would
mean an extra $30 million. You're
looking at big dollars."
"It's easy for us to run the projects
by the seat of our pants," he continued. "It's another thing to put it
down on paper and lake the responsibility for it, and that's what we're
committing to."
Since Anderson's arrival, the
University has economized through
the use of several new contracting
strategies. These include fast-track
construction, in which time is saved
by proceeding with each phase of
work before the entire design is complete, as well as the use of construction managers who continually look
for ways to save money on a particular construction project.
Construction managers, experts in
value engineering and constructibilily
review, are hired on an individual project basis. Value engineering shaves
cost from a facility by replacing "luxury" materials with less costly ones,
while constructibility review cuts costs
by using fewer man hours than were
originally estimated.
In addition, Anderson has introduced the use of a computer program which maps out, in a logical sequence, those construction activities
that would be affected by project
delays or cost overruns.
The computer can provide a picture
of all future cost and scheduling setbacks to be expected from any problems and the gains io be made
through several possible contingency
measures.
O'Bannon said she feels the
managerial rearrangement is the best
way to exploit individual abilities.
"The University is blessed. . .with
two incredibly talented people in John
Anderson and Art Gravina, and what
I'm trying lo do with this organizational shift is to tap their individual
fueling geniuses," O'Bannon said.
"I'm trying to play to two huge
needs."
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JTl
PAGE II
nut
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come to
GRADUATE STUDENTS
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McClelland Hall
"GET READY TO FIND A JOB"
WORKSHOPS
• NOV. 12
Job Hunting
• NOV. 13
Interviewing skills
Coffee Hour
every Wednesday night
8:00 to 10:00
retreshments served
All 12-1 PM
Bishop White Room, Houston Hall
Bring Lunch
Call X-7530 to sign up
II II
SELF DEFENSE CLINIC
MC CLELLAND HALL, SOUTH LOUNGE
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7 - 8:30 PM
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Thursday, November 13th
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STUDY. WORK & WALK SAFELY
Featuring Speaker:
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INTERNATIONAL
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Students speak and answer questions
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On Thursday, November 13th at 7:00
p.m., DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT
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Houston Hall to make a presentation of
their company and employment
opportunities in the Internal Audit and
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THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 13, 1986
Ben Franklin Room - Houston Hall
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THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN - We*M «li>. November 12. I9B6
PAGE 12
ARE YOU USING YOUR FULL POTENTIAL?
Transcendental Meditation Program
Free Introductory Lecture
Hs Holiness
Mananshi Mahesn Yog
Founder of the
Transcendental Meditation
and TM Sdhi Program
Wednesday, Nov. 12
7:30 P.M. Room 305
Houston Hall
Success Without Stress
in just breakfast!
We're more than
X
WTHMTIOMl
HOISi .......
Ouakcrs on offense this year.
Tailback Rich Comizio broke Adolph
Belli/eare's school record for career
rushing yards last Saturday against
Lafayette, and both he and Flynn
have the opportunity to break Gerry
Santini's single-season mark. With
two games remaining, Comizio and
I I win need 7| and 115 yards, respectively, to break the standard of 880 set
in 1968. As a team, Penn needs just
333 more rushing yards to break the
school record of 2504 set in 1977.
"For the most part, the only times
that you get recognition is when
something major happens, as in the
case of Rich getting his major yards,"
Huonato said. "The other time you're
gonna recognize us is when you make
a mistake — the quarterback gets
sacked or the back gets nailed behind
the line of scrimmage. That's when
you gel noticed."
That hasn't happened very much
INTCRNRTIONRL HOUS6
OF PRNCflK€S
(Continued from back page)
first-round opponent in the NCAA
Tournament. Interestingly, the Harvard team, which faces Penn Friday (7
p.m. on Franklin Field), is composed
mostly of foreigners, two of whom —
Derick Mills and Stephen Hall —
served suspensions when it was learned thai they played a number of professional gaines for an English national team.
1720 Walnut
Off RiNenhousc Square
Sun til Midnight
OP€N 24 HOURS ON W€€K€NDS
After some investigation the NCAA
rules committee decided to let them
play, citing insufficient evidence and
reuoninj that the pair had served a
sufficient penally. The upcoming
match-up may be a good indication of
the real state of American soccer, and
an Eli victory would be, as Griggs
stated, tremendously satisfying to
many coaches.
"I think the whole thing is disap-
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/THE PRESIDENT S FORUM 1986 87
ATTENTION
GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS:
THE ANSWER TO YOUR DREAMS
"Jit fci^WUA^ ^i^P^jU^^Ct of faU
The President s Forum and The Christian Association Sponsor:
RESIDENT GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP
IN STOUFFER COLLEGE HOUSE
SPRING TERM, 1987
RACE, RELIGION
AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
**^;J**
2nd Floor Auditorium, Christian Association. 3601 Locust Walk
I.
THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 13
4 30 - 5 30pm
Dr. Samuel Proctor, Pastor, Abyssinian Baptist Church. New York
RELIGION, RACE AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY1
THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 20
7 30 - 8 30 p m
Dr. James Cone, Charles A Bnggs Protessor of Theology.
Union Theological Seminary. New York
MARTIN LUTHER KING. JR. AMERICA AS A DREAM?"
An Opportunity to Thrive in an Intellectual. Social,
Cultural Environment with Penn Faculty,
Graduate Students and Undergraduates
Free Board
Free Room
INFORMATION AND APPLICATIONS
ARE AVAILABLE FROM:
COLLEGE HOUSE PROGRAMS OFFICE
High Rise North Upper Lobby
3901 Locust Walk
898-5551 or
Ill
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21
Dr. James Cone
•MALCOLM X: AMERICA AS A NIGHTMARE!"
200-300pm
STOUFFER COLLEGE HOUSE
Reception Desk
3700 Spruce Street
(adjacent to the Quadrangle)
898-6827 or 243-6572
This series ol lectures and discussions will locus on the black
religious community s important contribution to the struggle against
racial preiudice and discrimination and its endeavors to bring
about social justice tor all groups in American society
DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 30, 1986
Deloitte
Haskins Sells
■ ■ill
KESTAURAMT
USA
MOW Tw/d€ TMe 5FAT5/
In my mind
there is no doubt.
If I had it to do
all over again, I'd make
the same decision.
Andrew G McMaster, Jr
Partner. DH&S Hew York
MBA. University ol Pennsylvania. 1976
Coming to work for DH&S was a
decision I felt good about, right from
the start.
The growth opportunities, exposure
to a lot of different business environments: all outstanding, better than
my original expectations.
At DH&S we have always been
strong on the quality of our people.
And because good people expect
your best, you look for every opportunity to give it.
On top of that, DH&S has always
been in the forefront of technical
changes within the profession -
this year — 32 times in 574 plays —
but there is more than just the actual
training aspect that has improved the
offensive line. Many other things contribute to the improvement in not only
the offensive line, bui also the entire
team.
"One of the things that I think the
Athletic Department and the football
coaching staff wanted when they
brought Coach Packman in was
somebody who was going to bring in a
good attitude into the weightroom,"
Buonato said, "to make people lift
weights and work hard. And by the
same token, they're going to get
somebody in here to make us more
athletic, make us more agile and to
prevent injury.
"The mental approach [to training)
has increased 100 percent. The guys
want to come in; they want to work;
they're not afraid of getting tired
while they're working out. That's one
aspect. The other aspect is the size,
the increase in strength of the players
as they've been working."
The process hasn't stopped since
the season started, though. With practice, there isn't as much time to devote
to training as there was in the offseason, but it has continued
nevertheless.
"That group has stayed with their
lifting throughout the season,"
Zubrow said. "You lose strength if
you don't lift during the season. So
it's important if you keep working at
it, and they have. They work in the
weightroom; they work on the field,
and they study film. That's all part of
what goes into Saturday."
"I give Packman credit," Buonato
said. "He's been in here; he's been
kicking a lot of people's asses and getting them in here and to lift. Whatever
it's been to get them in here, they've
been in here."
Foreign-born soccer players invade U.S. campuses
RISUIIUM
7 om - 10 pen Mon -Thur
Quakers' offensive line beefs up, speeds up
(Continued from back page)
Other notable size differences are
found when you compare tackle
Peterson's numbers. The Sporting
News preseason Division l-AA allAmerica now tips the scales at 274. He
has added 19 pounds to his 255-pound
frame of a year ago.
The numbers just keep getting big
ger: guard O'Bara has gone from 215
to 242; tight end Scungio has gone
from 212 to 233; tight end Novoselsky
has gone from 224 to 238.
Perhaps the greatest change.
Packman noted, was that in
sophomore center Tom Gizzi, who
came to Penn at a slim 198 pounds.
One winter with Packman and Gizzi
was up to 238 — and his waist didn't
get any bigger. The things that did increase were his speed and his jump.
All of those numbers have come
together to help produce some other
numbers — big numbers — for the
sampling techniques, new computer
modeling
But most important, we've recognized that the whole accounting profession is a changing environment.
It's not a numbers game; it's a people
profession. It's people, working
within a total business environment
We're always working as a team
directly with clients to help them
solve their problems We provide
input and advice on tax matters,
operations systems, accounting
questions - things that really impact
the bottom line.
There's no question. Ifs an
outstanding business career.
g^^-rti
*•♦»*<
I Hcz
totnofAMM*.
*r«t€T
pointing," Griggs said. "After a short
time, the good American kids lose interest in the schools that arc going
foreign. Many of the coaches that are
just going for the foreign players are
also involved in coaching in our youth
programs. It's hypocriteal; we should
only take coaches who are for
American kids."
Are American coaches, like Harvard's Jonathan Shattuck, betraying
their country in favor of personal
recognition? On the surface it may
seem like they are, but perhaps they
are making themselves more qualified
to coach American players by trying
to work with the best players they can
find.
"From our standpoint," David
Siroty, associate sports information
director at seventh-ranked Seton Hall
said, "it seems that our American
players blend well with our five Irish
players. They play such a different
game compared to our kids; both
sides adapt to the other."
"The Americans are very, very
skillful and compare favorably to
players in Ireland," said Seton Hall's
Ian Hennessy, recently voted the Big
East's most outstanding player. "The
Irish soccer system is a bit more structured and belter organized. Here, we
only play a couple times a week for
three months. In Ireland, we play one
or two times a week all year around. I
find that interest in American soccer
is very high in college, but not on the
professional level.
"What would 1 say to a fellow
foreign player about playing in
America? It's a great place, so come
and have a look."
Apparently, though, some college
soccer coaches are not yet willing to
welcome foreign players with completely open arms.
Simmons joins Explorers
(Continued from back page)
other with the same intensity," said
new La Salle head coach Bill
"Speedy" Morris. "[The Big Five in
the Palestra] was a unique and terrific
thing, but I'm glad we're still
playing."
Morris should be glad. Thanks to
Dave "Lefty" Ervin's resignation at
the end of last season in order to go
into business, Morris finally has a
chance to be a part of the Big Five
after coaching in Philadelphia for 17
years on the high school level (IS at
Roman Catholic, two at Penn
Charter), and two more as head coach
of the women Explorers.
"To be a coach in the Big Five is
something I'm proud to say I am,"
Morris said. "I've always been a Big
Five fan. At one time or another, I've
rooted for each team."
There's no question about whom
he'll be rooting for this year and in the
future, however — and that's La
Salle. Though the Explorers finished
at 14-14 (1-3 Big Five) last year and
lost leading scorer Chip Grecnberg to
graduation, they are being labeled as
the choice to win their own Metro
Atlantic Athletic Conference. This is
due in no small part to the presence of
a second new face beside Morris —
6-6 Lionel Simmons out of Southern
HS.
Simmons's joining the Big Five being another reason why Big Five fans
shouldn't despair, he blitzed
Philadelphia high school basketball
last year, averaging 32 points and 12
rebounds per game. Widely regarded
as the best high school player in the city, Simmons chose not to follow the
trail blazed out of town by former
Philadelphia high school greats like
Gene Banks and Dallas Comegys, remaining in the city instead.
"I wanted to stay in the Big Five,"
Simmons said. "I've been going to the
Palestra since I was 10 or II to watch
the games, and La Salle just seemed
like the place for me to come and play
from the start."
And start he will if he continues to
play the way he has for Morris in
practice sessions.
"There's no question Lionel is a
good player," Morris said. "He's
very versatile, can play almost any
position on the floor, and if he gets
the ball inside, he can score."
Morris's only hope is that people
don't expect too much from Simmons
after hearing so much about him.
"He'll start and probably be one of
our better players," Morris explained.
"Bui people shouldn't expect him to
be a franchise, like a Ewing. They
have to remember that he's 6-6, not
seven feet.
"He is going to make some
mistakes, learn and improve. But I
know his best basketball is ahead of
him. He is a very hard worker — great
work habits."
Part of those work habits have
come as a result of Simmons's transition from high school to college
basketball.
"There's definitely more discipline
here," Simmons admitted. "But I
want to work hard and earn a spot.
All in all (the discipline] is beneficial
to the team."
For Morris, just having Simmons in
an Explorer uniform is beneficial —
as it will be for any Big Five fan who
hasn't gone hunting in hopes of at
least having turkey for Thanksgiving.
Smokey Joe's
The Pennstitution Since 1933
Entertainment Extravaganza!!!
Singer, Composer, Actor, Comedian, Recording Artists
PAT GODWIN
With His Special Guest
America's Fastest Rising Young Comic
TODD GLASS
All In The Upstairs Cabaret - 1.00 Admission.
Plus In The Downstairs Cafe'
The Dynamic Dental Duo D.J.'s
For Your Dancing Pleasure
Plus Peach Fuzzes $1.00 - 10 till 12
Shows Start At 10:00
40th & Walnut
222-0770
IHK DAILY PKNNSYI.VANIAN - MedneMlay. November 12. 1*86
SCOREBOARD
NHL
WALES CONFERENCE
CAMPBELL CONFERENCE
Patrick Division
W
PhilKtotphia
10
PittsOurgh
9
N.Y. Islanders
8
Washington
7
N«w Jersey
6
N.Y. Rangers
3
Quebec
Montreal
Hartford
Boston
Buffalo
Nornj Division
T P GF G*
1 21 59 32
2 20 M 53
1 17 59 46
2 16 55 64
1 13
66
4 10
62
Adams Division
w
T P
7
4 18
7
3 17
5
3 13
6
1 13
4
9
W
7
7
4
5
4
Toronto
Detroit
St Louts
Minnesota
Chicago
L T P GF GA
4 3 17 46 44
6 1 15 39 38
5 4 12 42 43
8 2 12 57 60
9 3 11 52 69
Smythe Division
W
GF
65
58
41
48
GA
54
54
47
51
2 10 55 55
Edmonton
Calgary
Winnipeg
Los Angeles
Vancouver
L
I
10 6
9 7
8 6
5 10
4 10
1
0
1
1
2
P GF GA
21
18
17
11
10
74
58
60
59
45
58
58
50
72
64
Tonight's Games
Boston at Pittsburgh
Buffalo at N Y Rangers
Quebec at Montreal
Detroit at New Jersey
Washington at Chicago
Toronto at St Louis
Hartlord at Vancouver
Last Night's Games
Edmonton 3, N V Islanders 2. OT
Washington 2. Minnesota 2
Calgary 5, Vancouver 3
Los Angeles 4, Winnipeg 3
PAGi 13
Mike Scott wins NL Cy Young Award
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Right
hander Mike Scott of the Houston
Astros, who went from mediocrity to
brilliance once he learned how to
throw the split-fingered fastball, was
named ihc National League's Cy
Young Award winner yesterday.
Scott, whose no-hitter on Sept 25
clinched Houston's first NL West
Division title since 1980, had six more
first-place votes than runner-up Fernando Valcn/uela of (he Los Angeles
Dodgers.
In voting conducted by the Baseball
Writers Association of America, Scon
received 98 points, 10 more than
Valen/uela. who won the award as a
rookie in 1981. Scon had 15 firstplace votes from the panel of 24
writers, while Valen/uela picked up
the other nine. Balloting was completed before the post-season games.
Scott, 31, was 18-10 with a majorIcague-lcading 306 strikeouts and 2.22
earned run average in becoming the
first Houston player lo win the Cy
Young twwd, which goes to the
league's best pitcher. Viknzutta *.i21-11 with 10 complete games, lops in
the majors
Scon, who returned from an exhibition lour ol Japan only lasl Saturday.
looked wavy as he met with reporters
at a hotel near I os Angeles Inicrna
tional Airport
Bui his joy came
through.
It s something I'm going to
cherish." Scolt said of the award
"It's nice to be on the list with SOUK
of the pitchen who are on there.
'Right now. it kind of means intend of the season. After a couple of
weeks ii will probably mean mote.''
Scon, who grew up in Ihc Los
Angeles area and attended I'eppcrdine
University in nearby Malibu. w.is the
second pick of the New York Met! in
the June. 1976 free agent draft.
He was traded by the Mets lo the
Astros on Dec. 10, 1982, in exchange
for outfielder Dannv Heap. Scott first
appeared in the major leagues with
curveball" he said "Things just turned around when I started throwing the
spin fingered fast hall."
Scotl capped his season by hurling
two brilliant complete games against
ihc Mets in the NL Championship
Serial, but ihose were Houston's only
IWO wins New Yorfc wen! on to win
the Mets in 1979, but he did not play
his first lull season until 1981 when he
went 5-1(1.
He was 7-13 wnh I 5 14 l-.RA for
the Mets m 1982 befOK he was iraded.
His record wnh New York was 14 2"
SCOII was 10 6 with .. ! 7J IRA lor
the Aslros in 1983 bin slipped lo 5-11
with a 4 61 I RA in 1984.
It was following the I9K4 Mason
that Scotl learned his split-fingered
pitch from ROM Craig, now the
in.iii.igei ol the San l randsco Qianti
but then a scoul for the Detroit
Tigers
the World Serial
Scotl
selected
the
Most
slup Serial despite the fact that his
team lost
Mike Kiukow of the San Francisco
(Hants, who had I 20-9 maik and a
I 03 BRA, was thud with 15 points.
I lnee Ol the IfctXl fOUl pitchers on the
list were I torn the Mets — Bob Ojeda
Of the Mets was fourth wnh nine
Along with the new pilch CSUDC
charges that he made a practice ol
scuffing the ball, charges he hat
denied
w.is
Valuable Playei in the Nl < bampiotv
And along with the new pitch
points, followed by leammie Ron
came .t different pitcher.
ai hue and Rick Rhoden ol Pittsburgh
tied with two points, and New York's
Dwighl Gooden with one.
Scotl is the lust non 2d game winnet 10 beat out at least one pitcher
who won 20 games lince lorn Seaver
did it m 1973
Scotl w.is 18-8 wild .i t 29 I R\ in
1985 with iwo shutouts .Mid foui com
plete games m <5 si.uts. lhat wai .i
sum of what w.is to COfM,
"l had tried everything, ever) wa)
to throw ■ slider, ever) wa) to throw ,i
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Midwest Division
W
L
Philadelphia
Boston
New Jersey
Washington
New York
Pet
W
GB
714
600
333
167
250
1
1Vt
3'/*
3'A
Central Division
W
L
Pet
Atlanta
5
1
833
Chicago
5
1
833
Milwaukee
5
2 .714
Cleveland
3
3
500
3
Indiana
3
500
Detroit
2
3
400
GB
1
V4
2
2
2'ri
Last Night's Games
New Jersey 114. Boston 110
New York 11l.Phoeni» 105
Chicago 112. Atlanta 110
Milwaukee '02. Indiana 94
Houston 116. San Anton* 95
War. 104, Dallas 103
LA Clippers 115, Denver 112
Sacramento 119. Cleveland 114
Portland 126, Golden Slate 108
Phrladetphia 121. Seattle 114
Houston
Utah
Dallas
Denver
Sacramento
San Antonio
L
1
2
3
3
4
5
Pet
.800
600
500
500
333
.286
Pacific Division
W
L A Lakers
3
Golden Slate
3
L.A. Clippers
3
Seattle
3
Phoenix
2
Portland
2
Pet
750
500
500
500
.333
286
GB
1
1V»
IVj
2V4
3
GB
1
1
1
2
2VS
Tonight's Games
Milwaukee at Boston
Chicago at Washington
Phoenix at Detroit
Houston at Dallas
Sacramento al Denver
Seattle al L A Lakers
Marinaro dominated Ivy football like nobody else
(Continued from back page)
On Saturday, Marinaro was in lihaca,
N.Y., along with his former teammates, celebrating lhal anniversary.
"I had a great lime, but I wasn't
there long enough," Marinaro said of
his visit. "It was good to see the guys
and be up in Ithaca again. I hadn't
been (here for five years."
Although Marinaro doesn't get
back to his alma mater often — the
Milford, N.J. naiive now lives in Los
Angeles — he enjoys looking back on
his fabulous career.
"It was a very exciting time in my
life, not just the tool ball part, but my
whole college lifestyle," Marinaro
said. "I allow myself to reflect on it;
it's not hard to do. When I left football (o start another career, it was difficult lo look back al lhat lime. You
wonder if the best years are behind
you in terms of excitement. Football
Harvard-Yale '68: Best Ivy game ever
(Continued from back page)
suspended in time for one long,
drawn-out moment, Champi hit Gatto from the eight, and Harvard had
miraculously pulled lo within two,
29-27.
In a way, the two-point conversion
attempt was anticlimactic. The mere
fact that they had come back from a
29-13 deficit in 2:40 seemed lo bring
the Crimson back from beyond the
point of complete exhaustion and give
them the extra speed, extra strength
and extra energy that they so
desperately needed.
Champi took the snap and scrambled lo the right. He spotted Varney in
the corner of the end zone, all by
himself. Then there was "the catch"
to end "The Game".
Jubilation swept over the Harvard
players, for they had seemingly won;
total dejection overwhelmed the Elis,
for they had apparently lost.
"There was no doubt of who had
won when we walked off the field,"
Gatlo said. "Calvin Hill even came
into our lockerroom after the game
and congratulated us on winning the
title."
"I really thought we'd lost," Hill
said. "In fact, I didn't realize until
two days later that we had lied. I
thought we lost by a point."
"For us it was a loss, and for them
it was a victory," Cozza said. "Harvard had a very good team, but we
were belter. We outplayed them for
the whole game except for the lasl
2:40. Everything that could have happened did."
"They say that tying in sports is like
kissing your sister," Hill said. "The
fact thai they celebrated just proves
something lhat I've always felt about
Harvard people."
The players were not alone in their
belief that Harvard had won the tie.
On Monday morning. The Crimson
beamed the headline: Harvard beats
Yale. 29-29.
"For its efforts. Harvard can lay
claim to more than a draw," The
Crimson read. "All save the most
fearless of its gambling partisans won
their bets, and all save the most
underhanded of the nation's
newspapers (one thinks of the The
Yale Daily News) will surely see fit to
play Cambridge over New Haven in
the headlines.
"A draw in name only, then. By
every other reckoning, a magnificent
victory."
Yet the true measure of the
greatness of an event is how long it
withstands the test of time, and "The
Game" remains vivid in the minds of
ihe players and fans.
"I'm an intuitive guy," Champi
said afterwards, "and when I woke up
this morning, I was son of in a dream.
It felt like something great was going
to happen to me. Then when 1 got to
the stadium, I still felt strange. Ii
didn't feel like I was here but
someplace else. I still don't feel like
I'm here. It's all very strange."
"It was just in ihe hands of
destiny," Cozza said. "A lot of
unbelievable things happened lhat are
hard to comprehend from a coach's
standpoint. Every once in a while people talk about it. I was even on The
Way It Was with Curt Gowdy and
some of the players."
"It was a great achievement," Gatto said. "The circumstances that went
our way strained reality. It was just
remarkable. As the years go by, the
score doesn't get any wider. But I
look back on it with a happy
memory."
So does just about everyone
associated with "The Game".
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APARTMENTS - ALL SIZES.
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Monthly leases Call 349-9429
APT. 40TH AND PINE one and
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EFFICIENCIES: 44th and 45th
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baths; $225 lo $275 includes heat
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LARGE. MODERN ONE
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excellent condition, well maintained, 9»m-9pm everyday
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UNIVERSITY CITV newly renovated. 1&2 BRS $38tV$50O/mo
including heal. 387-4137.
APARTMENTS
LARGE MODERN STUDIO 4109
Baltimore, separate kitchen, lireplace, carpeting, $310/monlh
including heal a water 386-1718.
549-5172 Grace
ROOMS AVAILABLE in Victorian
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LARGE ONE BEDROOM Apt
Vicinity 45th and Locust 3rd floor
kitchen, bath Available Dec 1.
$325 222-6294
LOGAN SQUARE TOWNHOUSE
(21sl and Arch) 3 bedroom, 2 1/2
bath, w/d, refrig. l/p. alarm, deck,
parking. One month Iree rental!
$875 985-4779.
ON CAMPUS various size apartments newly decorated Convenient public transportation.
Weisenlhal Properties 386-2380
4029 Spruce Street Mon thru Sat,
9-4
REGENT SQUARE and 42nd
streel(near PCPS and Clark Park)
4 Bdrm house on family oriented
street. $650 00 per month
EV6-2800
ROOM AVAILABLE in 2 bdrm
apartment $212/mo
utilities
Excellent location near Thrittway.
Kochs. Tile kitchen, bar, large
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anytime
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415 South 42nd St.
Phils., Pa.
Furnished &
Unfurnished
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to Baltimore An S21S.00 lo
MOO 00
Available now, Oocembf. and
January.
382-7167
382-5558
FOR SALE
USED COMPUTER TERMINALS:
for $200 Price cut' You can't find
a less expensive data terminal
Used Tandy Model DT-1 dala
terminals in excellent working
condition. On-screen configuration setup to emulate many popular terminal types Maintained
under on-sile service contract
since purchase. In current use on
campus, so you can see them in
operation Up lo 3 terminals available, $200 apiece. Call Eric
Jacobs al 898-6581 9 a m -5 p.m.
daily.
BROTHER HR-15XL Letterquality Printer Serial interlace,
works with Apple 11e. Macintosh,
others $220 00 w/cover. Carrying
case $40 00 546-2530
HELP WANTED
COLLEGE GRADUATES! Are you
looking lor your nitch in life?
Century 21- Donald Hibberd Realtors is conducting a Real Estate
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is great, bin it ends too soon. The rest
of your life you could end up looking
back. But now, everything in my life
is going well, so I can look back
easily."
Bui when he was a high school
player, Marinaro never dreamed thai
football would provide him with so
many good memories.
"I decided lo go to Cornell because
I thought the campus was beautiful,
and I was really interested in the hotel
administration program there,"
Marinaro said. "I was offered some
full scholarships at a lot of eastern
schools like Penn Slate and Rutgers,
but I never thought about football
beyond college. I was just looking for
a good education. I was a pretty good
player in high school, but I had never
done anything to think I'd be an allAmerican."
It didn'i take long for everyone to
realize that Marinaro was much better
than he thought. After playing for the
freshman learn in 1968 — Ivy rules
prohibit freshmen from playing vaisi
ty football — he was ready to explode
onto the national spotlight.
"It all started my sophomore
year." Marinaro said. "During the
prc-season I was battling for the starting tailback position, but 1 burst out
pretty quick. My first game, against
Colgate, I gained 162 yards. The second game I ran for 245 yards to
break the Cornell record. I had only
run for 200 yards once in high school,
so I really didn'i know what it was
like. Then in the fourth game I gained
281 yards (on 40 carries), and I was
Sports
lllustrated's
and
Ihe
Associated Press Player of the Week.
It was then I said, 'Hey, I'm pretty
good.'
Preily good indeed. Marinaro was
named to the third-team all-America
squad in 1969 after rushing for 1409
yards. And then he got better. In 1970
and 1971 he was named to the allAmerica first-team after compiling
1425 and 1881 yards, respectively.
"It was a real shock to me,"
Marinaro said. "All of a sudden I was
leading Ihe nation in rushing. 1 wasn't
even an all county playei
in
high
lered Ins loot injury '» 1977. he tried
to prolong his careei wnh ihc axpaa
sion Seattle Seahaw ks, but n was tuns
to call it quits.
"If I wasn't doing whai I'm doing
now (acting), I'd be more frustrated
thai m\ caieei ended after only six
seals.'' Marinaro said
"Football
helped me get into acting, and I really
enjoy what I do "
What Marinaro had been doing Ihc
last five seals was playing his role on
///// Street. And he earned himself an
important role for himself despite
having very little experience in acting.
"I just auditioned loi a part, and
the) liked my work and made me a
regular." Marinaro said. "I was studying hard lo make il in Ihc business.
I had to be reads when the opporiuni-
school."
And how did he handle this new
lound MJCCeSS?
"A lot ol people would probahlv
tell you lhat I was a jcr k.'' Marinaro
said. "But I was only 19 yean old,
I'm sine I was cocks, and I said some
things that any 19-year-old would M)
I wasn't what you would call I hum
ble jock. Bui I was under a lot ol
pressure. I was the key lo Cornell's
success lo a large exlcnl I earned the
ball 40 limes a game, so all the attention was on me."
Bui despite all of his SUCOSM,
Marin.no was unable to lead his team
toan Ivy championship, al least until
1971 lhat year the Big Red shared
ihc crown with the dominant Ivy
League team of the eta, Dartmouth.
t\ came, and I was
Bul acting success was nol easiK
"We went from 4-5 to 6-3 to I I
when I was there." Maiin.no said.
"So we got better each season. I'm
glad we won the championship my
senior year, that's benei than winning
it as a sophomore and not doing it
again. Senior year was a culmination
of my entire career."
After leaving lihaca with his college
career behind him, Marinaro was
ready lo make his mark in ihe National Football league. He was
drafted highly by ihc Minnesota Vikings, bul things did not turn out as
well as Marinaro had hoped.
achieved.
" There's always resistance to
athletes; no one expects ihem lo be
am good," Marinaro said. "As far as
serious roses, DO one is going to give
them to an 'ex-athlete'; it's like a title.
Bin gelling to work on Hdl Street
gave me instant credibility. And 1 got
to work with some really talented
people."
But aliei live seats on the show,
Mannaio decided it was tune to move
on. He was gelling Kited wilh his
character and wanted a change of
pace.
"Some people say that I had a piet
ty mediocre pro career, bul I neve]
really had the opportunity to excel,"
Marinaro explained. "In Minnesota
we had Fran Tarkenion. so thai made
us a passing learn. And they used me
as a pass receiver and a blocking back.
Iwo things I didn't do in college. I
didn't get a chance to establish
myself. So after four years I left Minnesota and went to the |Ncw York)
Jels. There I had a chance to run Ihc
ball. During my first six games wilh
them, I twice ran for over 100 yards.
But I got hurt in the seventh game,
and lhal preily much ended my
career."
It was 1976 when Marinaro siil
"I've recently worked on three different projects with three completely
different roles," he said. "Fortunately I made enough money on Hdl
Street so lhal I can hold back for a
while and pick my projects. That's a
luxury for any actor."
Marinaro's recent work includes
lead roles in a feature film. "The
Sophia Conspiracy," an after-school
special lor CBS, and an ABC-TV
movie lhal is currently being made. So
his success in show business continues. And now ii is his acting that
will give him Ihe most recognition.
But some also recognize him as one
of ihe best Ivy football players ever.
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SPORTS
Page 14
The Daily Pennsylvanian
Wednesday, November 12, 1986
Questions arise about foreign-born soccer players
By WILLIAM BKOWN
"Where are we going?" Penn head soccer
coach Bob Seddon asked in reference lo ihe
receni increase in the number of foreign-born
soccer players competing ai American
colleges.
In 1978 there were approximately four
million soccer players in America; today that
figure is nearer to eight million. Soccer, once
hailed as the future sport of America, may be
faltering at perhaps its most crucial stage of
development — trie collegiate level, the stage
a( which high school hotshots are molded into
potential national team players
Although the sheer numbers may convey a
sense of security, the number of American
players on college rosters is dwindling, prompting many coaches to wonder if that levee
of talent is in need of replenishment.
"In my [coaching] years, and that's 28, we
as coaches have been struggling to bring soccer to the forefront — so it can take its place
along the side of sports like football and
baseball," Seddon said. "As long as coaches
continue to beef up their teams with so many
foreign players — except for a few as a training mechanism — soccer will remain a secondary sport to most Americans. I'm against a
coach who actively goes overseas to stock
their team; it's a total copout. I will never do
it."
Many of those involved in college soccer,
including Seddon, support the notion that if
the foreign invasion of players continues at its
present rate, there soon will not be enough
spots left for upcoming American talent. The
reasoning is that with fewer college roster
spots going to home-grown talent, the ad-
vancement of American soccer may stagnate.
In the eyes of others, however, like those of
Arnold Ramirez, head coach of the thirdranked Long Island University soccer team,
foreign players enhance and are a neccessary
part of college soccer.
"I understand their point of view,"
Ramirez said. "If I had a beautiful campus,
like Virginia or U.C.L.A.. and a larger
budget, then I could compete for the best
American players. But I'm in the middle of
Brooklyn, with an urban campus, and when
prospective American players come through,
they just aren't interested; I've tried. Yet,
even if I did have a beautiful campus, I still
would recruit foreign players.
"American soccer is as good up to about
age 16, then we can't compete. Our teams are
limited by [National Collegiate Athletic
Association) rules to a 22-game schedule; they
play at least 50-60 games a year in other countries. We need top competition at the college
level, and the foreign players can give us better competition and help the state of soccer."
Ramirez' Blackbirds, aside from being nationally ranked, are thoroughly foreign with
all 17 players being either foreign-born or
residents of foreign countries. His players hail
from several countries, including Bolivia,
Peru, Spain and Liberia, and three different
continents.
In marked contrast to L.I.U. are teams like
U.C.L.A., the second-ranked team in the
country, and Yale, a recent recipient of an
NCAA Tournament bid. The Bruins have no
foreigners whatsoever, and almost all their
players are Californian. Coach Sigi Schmid is
committed to running his program without
Big Five
survives
transplant
1986 marks the 30th anniversary of official competition of
the Ivy League in football. Today and tomorrow, the DP looks
at some of the highlights of the past 30 years.
Actor Marinaro
remembers career
as Ivy League star
By RICK KKNMt k
Millions of American ret ignize Ed
Marinaro as the actor who portrayed Officer Joe Coffey on NBC's drama. Hill
Street Hluc Some people know huii ai •>
former college and pro football playci. Unfortunately, only a few remember that he
was the most dominant running back in the
history of Ivy League football.
Marinaro played at Cornell from
1969 1971. and dining that time, he launched a full-fledged assault on the Ivj and
NCAA record books. In a threc-yeai col
legc career, Marinaro ran for 4715 yauis
liiui thousand, seven hundred fifteen
yards i hat's an average of 174.6 yards per
game. In 1971 alone, he rushed lor a then
NCAA record 1881 yards. To put that in
perspective, Perm's all-time career mark is
currently only 304 yards more than
Marinaro's 1971 figure. And despite playing only 27 games, he is still number seven
on the NCAA all-time rushing list. In other
words, this guy was awesome.
Arguably, Marinaro is the one player
who has made the biggest impact on the Ivy
League in the modern era. And as the Ivies
celebrate their 30th anniversary of official
competition in football, it was last weekend
that Marinaro look the time to celebrate
another anniversary. It has been 15 years
since that 1971 season, when Marinaro ran
the Big Red to their last Ivy championship.
(Continued on page 13)
Simmons gives
La Salle spark
Big Five
Notebook
Daily Pennsylvanian tile photo
Ed Marinaro gets tackled by two Penn players in a 1971 (tame at Franklin Field
Climactic 29-29 tie stands as Ivy highlight
B> ION WILNER
Vic Oatto was the captain of the 1968
Harvard football team. L;ven though 18
years have passed. Oatto still gels six or
eight inquiring calls every year. In 1983, the
15th anniversary of "The Came", he was
besieged with requests for appearances and
interviews
(iatto's popularity is but one indicator of
the overwhelming effect of what is generally cited as the greatest football game in Ivy
League history — Harvard against Yale. It
ended in a tie, 29-29, Perhaps it would have
been unfair it the gods had determined a
victor on the field, for the true winners
were undoubtedly the 40,280 spectators
who had the privilege of seeing it live,
When the two teams emerged from the
lockerrooms on Nov. 22, 1968. both
undefeated (8-0-0), the Ivj league championship at stake, the thriller to end all
thrillers in the making, they were destined
to participate in an event that would transcend time.
In 1968 the upper echelon of Ivy League
football was markedly different from its
current status. Then, Ivy powerhouse teams
such as Harvard and Yale were considered
to be on equal footing with traditional bigtime programs like Penn State and Army.
True to form, when that infamous day
began, the His had blitzkrieged 16 straight
opponents, while the Crimson boasted of a
string of eight consecutive wins.
lickets sold at $125 apiece; students with
no musical inclination whatsoever dressed
as band members in order to see the classic
showdown that Sports Illustrated later
voted one of the 10 most exciting games in
college football history.
"The biggest thing about that game was
that both teams were undefeated," Crimson end Pete Varney said. "People still
remember the climactic finish and the
outstanding athletes, such as [Yale running
back] Calvin Hill and [Elis' quarterback]
Brian Dowling, but as I said, the fact that
we were both undefeated was the key."
Even the oddsmakers, who had made
Yale a seven-point favorite by kickoff time,
were astonished to see the chain of events
of the opening half. Dowling moved the
Yale offense as if the Harvard team were
vacationing on Cape Cod. He ran for one
touchdown and had scoring strikes to Hill
and end Del Marting to give Yale a seem-
the help of foreign players. Similarly, Steve
Griggs' Elis were built mostly on the strength
of local talent, having only one foreign player.
Schmid and Griggs are two good examples
of coaches who have shown that they can win
with American players. Are they doing it with
mirrors, or are the Americans getting better?
"Coaches now are going after players on
European national teams," Griggs said. "The
average foreign player just can't cut it
anymore; only the older, more experienced
ones can compete with the best American
players. [The influx of foreign players] is a
great source of concern, but at the same time
is a source of tremendous satisfaction."
Yale presently is in a tight race with Harvard for the Ivy League championship and, in
addition, have drawn the Crimson as their
(Continued on page 12)
ingly safe 22-0 lead.
With his Crimson offense sputtering,
head coach John Yovicsin decided to try
second-string quarterback Frank Champi.'
Although the Harvard players doubted the
move, it proved to be a fortuitous one;
Champi connected with sophomore split
end Bruce Freeman for a 15-yard
touchdown as the half came to a close.
"At (he half, no one was so absurd as to
say 'okay, let's go out and win this one," "
Catto said. "You play the game long
enough, and you realize what you can and
cannot do."
Although Harvard did not realize it at
the time, this was a day when the can'ts
were cans, the irrationals were rational, and
the impossibles were possible.
"It's still hard to believe what happened," Yale head coach Carmen Cozza said.
"1 look at it like the game was played up in
heaven and dropped down on us."
The first time the Elis touched the ball in
the second half, a fumbled punt, was surely
an evil omen. Harvard recovered on the
Yale 25-yard line and scored in three plays.
The game seesawed for the remainder of
the quarter. Then Dowling got the Yale of-
fensive machine in gear and marched 45
yards to score and increase the lead to 29-13
with 10:44 remaining in the game.
Champi's Houdini act did not begin right
away. Instead, he waited . . . and
waited . . . and waited. Finally, the improbable set of circumstances began.
First, Yale, on the verge of a score,
fumbled the ball away at the Crimson
14-yard line. Second, a holding penalty on
the Elis kept the last-gasp Harvard drive
alive. Third, with only 42 seconds left.
Champi connected with Freeman for a
15-yard touchdown. Fourth, a Yale pass interference penalty on the two-point conversion gave Harvard a second try, on which
they were successful.
Need a moment to catch your breath?
It's understandable.
Next, the Crimson recovered their onside
kick and took possession with 42 seconds
on the Yale 49-yard line. A face-masking
penalty on Yale aided the Harvard drive,
and with three seconds left, Champi had
the Crimson on the Elis' doorstep.
"The Game" was reduced to a single
play. On a pass that appeared to stay
(Continued on page 13)
By ANDRKW BF.RESIN
When the presidents of the Big Five
schools met last June to determine the
fate of the nation's oldest city-series
collegiate basketball tradition. Big
Five fans around Philadelphia
covered their ears and awaited the
dreaded result. For those who haven't
yet removed their earplugs, the Big
Five survived — barely.
In order to save it however. La
Salle, St. Joseph's and Penn conceded
to Villanova and Temple. Under the
new agreement. Big Five play will
continue, but the Wildcats and the
Owls will be allowed to play their two
home Big Five games at their own
arenas. In all, four of the 10 scheduled Big Five contests will be moved out
of the Palestra.
But what Big Five addicts really
have to face up to is this: there will be
no Big Five doubleheaders during the
course of the upcoming 1986-87
season. That's none, as in zero and
zilch. Ever wonder what Thanksgiving would be like without turkey?
Bleak as it may seem, though, there
are still good reasons to get excited
about the Big Five season which will
start Dec. 2 when La Salle hosts Temple at the Palestra.
The school presidents may have
changed the scenery a bit, but that's
all they changed. They didn't say
anything about the Owls' Tim Perry
and the Hawks' Rodney Blake not being able to mix it up underneath, or
about Temple's Nate Blackwell and
Howard Evans and the Explorers'
Tim Legler not being allowed to
launch their long-distance rainbows.
And they didn't say anything about
Villanova's Kenny Wilson or Penn's
Perry Bromwell being prohibited
from running defenses ragged on the
fast break.
No, the excitement will still be
there. When Perry delivers his first
blocked shot via express mail service
into the eighth row, the fans won't be
checking to see if they are in the
Palestra or not before they become
rabid; it'll just happen. The competitiveness and intensity on the floor
as well as in the stands will continue in
typical Big Five tradition.
"The players will still go at each
• (Continued on page 12)
Bulking Up
Offensive line gets a boost
Tommy L«on«rdi/Daily Pennsylvanian
Tailback Jim Bruni finds a hole opened by guards Chris Wilkins (75) and Jim Panzini against Princeton
By ED GEFEN
There has been a big change in the Penn football team's
offensive line this season as compared to last.
The names have pretty much stayed the same — Steve
Buonato, Jim Pai.zini, Chris Wilkins, Scott Ernst, Marty
Peterson, Tim O'Bara, Jeff Sheftic, Brent Novoselsky,
Scott Scungio, Jim Miklos. Only Jeff Goyette was not
returning to the Ivy League championship front six.
So what could change?
Size.
This year's Penn offensive linemen are, on average, 15.6
pounds heavier than they were a year ago. That's 15.6
pounds per player. That means 15.6 more pounds for opposing defensive linemen to muscle out of the way when
they attempt to tackle a Quaker ballcarrier.
But where did all of this size come from? Did the Penn
offensive linemen spend the better part of last off-season
fattening up on Mom's cooking?
No. They spent more time in the weightroom. And they
weren't just bodybuilding; they were strength training.
Strength training is different from bodybuilding in the
sense that strength training is based on the quality of each
exercise, not the quantity of repetitions. When he arrived
at Penn in January, varsity strength coach Charles
Packman initiated a high-intensity program for members
of the football team that builds up stamina and endurance
as well as strength. The results have been incredible.
"It pays off through the whole game, but particularly in
our ability to still play at a tempo in the second half," said
Penn head coach Ed Zubrow. "Basically, that as much as
anything contributes to the game becoming a rout rather
than just a win. The margin between winning and losing is
always a thin one, and so is the margin between winning a
close one and a rout.
"Those kids kept the pressure on Lafayette, and
Lafayette wasn't able to stand up to it. You could really
see the Lafayette defense dragging its feet a little."
Last year Panzini was a typical, 235-pound, Ivy League
offensive guard. Now, Panzini wouldn't be out of place in
the Big Ten, checking in at an intimidating 275. But he's
not just bigger, he's more mobile. He is a walking advertisement, almost literally, for the benefits of strength
training.
"It allows us to do a lot of things that we wouldn't be
able to do without the size and strength," Panzini said.
"We're stronger and bigger for the most part than most of
the teams that we play. I don't think we rely on that solely.
It helps; it's a great advantage in coming off the ball and
getting into people and blocking them."
"You have a lot of things going on [with the offensive
line]," said center and co-Captain Buonato, "especially
with our team. A lot of pulling; we do some things that require a lot of athletic ability. Our guards and tackles are
doing things that most teams won't do with their guards
and tackles."
(Continued on page 12)

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