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THECOOPERUNION
COURSE CATALOG 2012|13
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
WWW.COOPER.EDU
THECOOPERUNION
for the Advancement of Science and Art
is a private college that occupies a singular place in America’s educational and social landscape.
The Cooper Union’s graduates, with a rigorous education I narchitecture, art or engineering,
become the visionary thinkers, creators and innovators who change the world in the service
of human kind.
RANKINGS
The rigor of The Cooper Union’s academic programs has made it one of the top-ranked
institutions of higher education in the nation.
• Ranked second in Regional College North Rankings by U.S. News and World Report.
• Ranked first in Best Value Schools by U.S. News and World Report.
• Ranked fourth in the nation among Undergraduate Engineering Colleges by U.S. News
and World Report; ranked second in undergraduate engineering colleges for chemical
and electrical engineering.
• Ranked third in research culture among architecture schools worldwide in a survey by the Key
Centre for Architectural Sociology.
• Listed among the Best Design Schools for Creative Talent by Business Week.
• Listed among the Nation’s 25 Hottest Universities by the Newsweek-Kaplan College Guide.
• Listed among the Most Selective Colleges by The New York Times.
• Listed in “The Best American Colleges” and “The Best Value Colleges” by The Princeton Review
as “…one of the best overall bargains—based on cost and financial aid— among the most
academically outstanding colleges in the nation.”
STUDENT, ALUMNI AND FACULTY ACHIEVEMENT
With approximately 1,000 students, The Cooper Union wins a vastly disproportionate share
of the nation’s most prestigious awards:
• Thirty-three Fulbright scholars since 2001
• Thirteen National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships since 2004
• At least one first prize—and often more than one—in student competitions sponsored
by professional societies every year for the past seven years
• Forty percent of graduates go to top-tier graduate programs
Among the prestigious awards recently won by our alumni:
• Twelve Rome Prizes
• Twenty-one Guggenheim Fellowships
• Three MacArthur Fellowships: Whitfield Lovell (A’83), Elizabeth Diller (AR’79),
Ricardo M. Scofidio (AR’55)
• One Nobel Prize in Physics: Russell A. Hulse (Ph’70)
• Nine Chrysler Design Awards
• Three Thomas Jefferson Awards for Public Architecture
• One inaugural Jane Jacobs Medal: Barry Benepe (A’54)
ENROLLMENT
For the 2012–2013 academic school year, all Cooper Union students will receive
the full-tuition scholarship valued at $38,550. For the academic year 2011–2012:
• Eight percent admission rate.
• Approximately 1,000 full-time undergraduate students: 51 percent in engineering;
33 percent in art; 16 percent in architecture.
• Seventy students in the Maurice Kanbar Graduate Institute working toward the
Master of Engineering degree and Master of Architecture.
• Sixty-five percent male, 35 percent female.
• Fifty-six percent from New York City and State.
• Thirteen percent are international students.
• Twenty-eight percent are Asian; 20 percent are African American, Caribbean or Latino;
two percent are Native American; 38 percent are Caucasian, non-Latino.
• 8.5 to 1 student-faculty ratio.
• The student to faculty ratio is 8.5 to 1.
Cover photo: Mario Morgado
TABLE OF CONTENTS
2012–2013 Academic Calendar
Mission
A Brief History of The Cooper Union
2
3
4
General Information
Programs
Facilities and Resources
Application and Admission Information
Fees and Expenses
Financial Aid
Scholarships, Fellowships, Awards and Prizes
General Regulations
A Code of Conduct
5
5
6
9
16
17
20
23
31
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture
Mission
Bachelor of Architecture Curriculum
Academic Standards and Regulations
Master of Architecture II Curriculum
Academic Integrity
Facilities
Courses
Faculty
35
35
36
38
43
44
45
47
49
The School of Art
Mission
Bachelor of Fine Arts Curriculum
Academic Standards and Regulations
Facilities
Courses
Faculty
51
51
52
55
58
60
68
The Albert Nerken School of Engineering
Mission
Overview
Facilities and Research
Bachelor of Engineering Curriculum
Academic Standards
Grades of Record
Master of Engineering Curriculum
Course Designation
Departments and Programs
Courses
Faculty
Engineering Advisory Council
70
70
71
72
74
77
78
80
80
81
98
119
122
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Aims and Objectives
Academic Regulations
Courses
Faculty
123
123
123
125
134
Trustees, Faculty, Officers, Administration, Emeriti
Non Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies
Index
136
138
147
Applications
149
2
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
2012–2013 ACADEMIC CALENDAR
AND HOLIDAY SCHEDULE
September 1 Saturday
Move-in day for Residence Hall
September 2–3 Sunday –Monday
New student orientation
September 3 Monday
Labor Day (Staff Holiday)
September 4 Tuesday
Fall semester classes begin
NOTE: TUESDAY CLASSES MEET
September 10 Monday
There will be a $25 fee for Dropping classes after this date
September 18 Tuesday
Fall Festival
November 20 Tuesday
NOTE: MODIFIED SCHEDULE; THURSDAY CLASSES MEET
November 21 Wednesday
NOTE: MODIFIED SCHEDULE; FRIDAY CLASSES MEET
November 22–November 25 Thursday–Sunday
Thanksgiving (Staff Holiday)
November 27–December 3Tuesday–Monday
Registration for Spring 2013 classes
December 12 Wednesday
Last day of HSS classes
December 13–19 Thursday–Wednesday
Final Exam Week
December 19 Wednesday
Last day of fall 2012 semester
December 20–January 21 Thursday–Monday
Winter recess; all schools
December 22–January 1 Saturday–Tuesday
Staff Holiday
January 2 Wednesday
Administrative Offices reopen
All grades are due in the Office of Admissions and Records
before Noon
January 21 Monday
Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday (Staff Holiday)
January 22 Tuesday
Spring semester classes begin.
NOTE: MODIFIED SCHEDULE; MONDAY CLASSES MEET
January 28 Monday
There will be a $25 fee for Dropping classes after this date
February 13 Wednesday
NOTE: MODIFIED SCHEDULE; FRIDAY CLASSES MEET
February 15–18 Friday–Monday
Founder’s Day/President’s Day (Staff Holiday)
March 16–24 Saturday–Sunday
Spring recess (administrative offices remain open)
April 23–26 Tuesday–Friday
Registration for Fall 2013 classes
May 8 Wednesday
Last day of HSS classes
May 9–15 Thursday–Wednesday
Final Exam Week
May 15 Wednesday
Last day of spring 2013 semester
May 16 Thursday
Senior grades due in the Office of Admissions
and Records before 4 pm
May 20 Monday
All non-senior grades are due in the Office of Admissions
and Records before 4 pm
May 27 Monday
Memorial Day (Staff Holiday)
May 28 Tuesday
Commencement rehearsal; annual student exhibition
May 29 Wednesday
Commencement
July 4 Thursday
Independence Day (Staff Holiday)
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
THE COOPER UNION
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT
OF SCIENCE & ART
MISSION STATEMENT
Through outstanding academic programs in architecture, art and
engineering, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science
and Art prepares talented students to make enlightened contributions to society.
The college admits undergraduates solely on merit and
awards full-tuition scholarships to all enrolled students. The institution provides close contact with a distinguished, creative faculty
and fosters rigorous, humanistic learning that is enhanced by the
process of design and augmented by the urban setting.
Founded in 1859 by Peter Cooper, industrialist and philanthropist, The Cooper Union offers public programs for the civic,
cultural and practicable enrichment of New York City.
3
4
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
A BRIEF HISTORY
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art,
established in 1859, is among the nation’s most distinguished
institutions of higher education.
Located in New York City’s East Village, The Cooper Union is
an all-honors college that provides full-tuition scholarships to all
undergraduates accepted. The college offers degree programs
in architecture, art and engineering and courses in the humanities
and social sciences. The Cooper Union has an enrollment of
approximately 1,000 undergraduate students, all accepted
on merit alone, and was the first college to forbid discrimination
based on race, ethnicity or gender. The rigor of its three professional schools—The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture, the
School of Art and the Albert Nerken School of Engineering—
has made The Cooper Union one of the most selective colleges in
the nation.
Peter Cooper was a workingman’s son who had less than a
year of formal schooling. Yet he went on to become an industrialist
and an inventor; it was Peter Cooper who designed and built
America’s first steam railroad engine. Cooper made his fortune
with a glue factory and an iron foundry. Later, he turned his entrepreneurial skills to successful ventures in real estate, insurance,
railroads and telegraphy. Once, he even ran for president.
In the late 1850s, when Cooper was a principal investor and
first president of the New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph
Co., the firm undertook one of the 19th century’s monumental
technical enterprises—laying the first Atlantic cable. Cooper also
invented Jello—with help from his wife, Sarah, who added fruit to
his clarified gelatin.
As a boy, Peter Cooper learned carpentry, beer brewing and
hat and coach making. But he was acutely aware of his lack of
“even a common education,” a deficiency that bothered him
throughout his life. Though he later became one of America’s
richest men, he could not spell. So in 1800, as a nine-yearold apprentice carriage-maker in New York City, he sought a
place where he could learn scientific techniques and theory to
supplement his innate inventiveness and manual skill. He found
no such place.
As he became one of the most successful businessmen of
America’s Gilded Age, Cooper never forgot his beginnings or his
lack of education. He thought children of immigrants and the
working class deserved access to education. Inspired by a polytechnic school in Paris, he spent the last 30 years of his life
creating and nurturing a school for the “boys and girls of this city,
who had no better opportunity than I.”
As one of the first colleges to offer a full-scholarship education
both to men and women of working-class families, The Cooper
Union was a pioneer long before access to education became
public policy. Cooper’s example motivated the founders of other
prestigious colleges, such as Andrew Carnegie, Ezra Cornell and
Matthew Vassar.
At first, The Cooper Union provided night classes for men and
women in the applied sciences and architectural drawing. In addition, the college’s Women’s Art School, open during the day,
offered free art classes and training in the new occupations of
photography, telegraphy, “type-writing” and shorthand.
Those classes—a landmark in American history and the
prototype for what is now called continuing education—have
evolved into the three distinguished schools that make up The
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.
Cooper, however, founded more than a college. From the
beginning, The Cooper Union also provided a public reading room
and library, and a meeting place for artists and inventors. In the
historic 900-seat Great Hall, the public heard social and political
reformers as well as free lectures on science and government.
Before they were elected, Presidents Lincoln, Grant, Cleveland,
Taft, Theodore Roosevelt and Barack Obama spoke in the celebrated auditorium. Abraham Lincoln gave his “Right Makes Might”
speech from the Great Hall podium, earning him the nomination
for the presidency. Woodrow Wilson, Bill Clinton and Barack
Obama also spoke there as sitting presidents. Today, the Great Hall
continues as a home for public forums, cultural events and
community activities.
Many social and political movements were born in the Great
Hall and the Cooper Union: the Red Cross and NAACP were
convened here, suffragist Susan B. Anthony had her offices at
Cooper, and, in more recent times, researchers developed the
prototype of the microchip at Cooper.
Peter Cooper’s dream was to give talented young people the
one privilege he lacked—a good education. He also wanted to
make possible the development of talent that otherwise would
have gone undiscovered. His dream—providing an education
“equal to the best”—has come true. Since 1859, The Cooper
Union has educated thousands of artists, architects and engineers, many of them leaders in their fields. Today, his dream is still
our mission.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
PROGRAMS
The following programs at The Cooper Union have been registered
by the New York State Education Department.
Program
Architecture
Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Interdisciplinary Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Fine Arts
Fine Arts
Master of Engineering
Master of Architecture
Hegis Code
0202
0901
0906
0908
0909
0901
0910
1001
5610
0901
0202
Degree
B.Arch.
B.S.
B.E.
B.E.
B.E.
B.E.
B.E.
B.F.A.
Certificate
M.E.
M.Arch. II
Accreditation The Cooper Union is accredited by the Middle
States Commission on Higher Education; all of the degree
programs are registered with the New York State Education
Department. In addition, the program leading to the bachelor of
architecture degree is accredited by the National Architectural
Accrediting Board, the program leading to the bachelor of fine arts
degree is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art
and Design and the four programs (chemical, civil, electrical and
mechanical engineering) leading to the bachelor of engineering
degree are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
The National Architectural Accrediting Board mandates that
the following information be included in catalogs: In the United
States, most state registration boards require a degree from an
accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for
licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB),
which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional
degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of
degrees: the bachelor of architecture, the master of architecture,
and the doctor of architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year,
3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of
its conformance with established educational standards.
Doctor of architecture and master of architecture degree
programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree
and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However,
the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an
accredited degree.
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture of The Cooper
Union offers the following NAAB-accredited degree programs:
Bachelor of Architecture. (160 undergraduate credits). The next
accreditation visit for this program will be in 2016.
Cooper Union operates on a semester calendar, typically with the
fall starting after Labor Day and the spring after Martin Luther King
Day. Please refer to our academic calendar for specific term start
and end dates. A limited summer term is offered with a small
inventory of courses.
Consistent with New York State guidelines, one credit earned
at Cooper Union represents a minimum of 750 minutes of
instructor supervised class time (50 minutes per week for 15
weeks.) Many courses exceed the 50 minute/week requirement
determined as per the needs of each academic department.
5
6
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
The Cooper Union comprises five buildings at Manhattan’s
Cooper Square, between Sixth and Ninth Streets and Third and
Fourth Avenues.
The Foundation Building At the center of this educational
complex is the Foundation Building, the college’s original structure, which was built under Peter Cooper’s supervision. Housed
in the building are the Great Hall, The Cooper Union’s historic
auditorium; The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture; much of
the School of Art; the library; The Arthur A. Houghton Jr. Gallery
and the Office of the President. The building also includes the
Architecture Archive, classrooms, shops and studios.
The building is open during the fall and spring semesters from
8 am to 2 am, Monday through Thursday; 8 am to midnight, Friday
and Saturday; and noon to 2 am on Sunday. Hours may be
extended during high-use periods such as the last two weeks of
the semester. The School of Architecture office is open Monday
through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. The School of Art office is open from
8:30 am to 6 pm during the academic year. Shops, special labs, the
computer studio and other facilities that require supervision are
open on a more restricted basis; each facility posts its own hours.
A detailed schedule is available from the School of Art office.
During the summer months, the Foundation Building is open
from 8 am to 6 pm Monday through Thursday; the administrative
offices are open from 9 am to 5:15 pm Monday through Thursday;
and all of the educational facilities are closed except to high school
students who participate in the Saturday/Outreach Program and
participants in the Summer Residency Program.
41 Cooper Square In September 2009, The Cooper Union opened
41 Cooper Square, its newest facility. The building was designed by
Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, and features stateof-the-art laboratories, classrooms and studios along with conference rooms, lounges, 41 Cooper Gallery and the Frederick P. Rose
Auditorium. It houses the Albert Nerken School of Engineering, the
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Louis and Jeannette Brooks Computer Center, The Herb Lubalin Study Center, The
Saturday Outreach Program and provides student and teaching
studios. In the fall of 2010, the U.S. Green Building Council awarded
41 Cooper Square the LEED Platinum rating, its most rigorous level
of certification that acknowledges the building’s array of green
features which reduce energy use and enhance the environment.
41 Cooper Square is the first academic building in New York City to
achieve the LEED Platinum status.
The building is open from 8 am through 2 am Monday through
Thursday, 8 am through midnight Friday and Saturday, and noon
through 2 am on Sundays. The Albert Nerken School of Engineering
Office and the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Office,
are both open from 9 am to 5 pm Monday through Friday, and 9 am
to 5:15 pm Monday through Thursday during the summer. The
Brooks Computer Center is open from 9 am to midnight Monday
through Friday, and noon through 8 pm on Saturday and Sunday.
30 Cooper Square The Business Office, Center for Design &
Typography, Office Services (mail, photocopies), and the Offices of
Admissions and Records, Registrar, Student Services (financial aid,
career counseling, health, recreation and safety) and External
Affairs (Alumni Relations, Annual Fund, Alumni Association, Development, Public Affairs,The Saturday Outreach Program and Continuing Education and Public Programs) are housed at 30 Cooper
Square. The building is open for public service from 9 am to 5 pm,
Monday through Friday. Summer hours are Monday through
Thursday, 9 am to 5:15 pm.
Student Residence The Cooper Union Student Residence is
located on Stuyvesant Street and Third Avenue. The Student Residence was opened in 1992 and provides housing for approximately 178 students. Each unit contains a bathroom and
kitchenette. The building amenities include a laundry room, a
study room, the Menschel Common Room, and the Peter Torraco
Alumni Space. The building is equipped with sprinkler and alarm
systems, security cameras and a palm scanner for residents to
gain access to the building.
The privilege of residing in the building is generally extended
only to students in their first year of study. New students receive
instructions on how to apply when they are admitted to the Cooper
Union. Continuing students who have a special need for an accommodation or modification to this policy (i.e. medical or financial
problems) will be considered for housing on a case by case basis
(accounting for the student’s special circumstances and the
space available) should inform the Director of Residence Life of
their special circumstances at the time of re-application in April.
The purpose of residence life is to provide a safe, comfortable
residential community. The residence life staff is dedicated to
creating a positive and productive co-curricular experience. The
staff promotes student and community development. The Student
Residence is staffed by the Director of Residence Life, the Assistant Manager, the Housing Coordinator, seven resident assistants,
24-hour security guards and maintenance staff.
Housing fees for the 2012-2013 academic year are $11,110 per
student per single room per year and $9970 per student per
double room per year.
Refund Policy for Student Residence Please refer to Section 10
of The Cooper Union 2012-13 Student Housing Affiliation Occupancy Agreement for a schedule of refunds and penalties imposed
for cancellation.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
21 Stuyvesant Street The historic townhouse at 21 Stuyvesant
Street, which is known as the Stuyvesant Fish House, was given
to the college as a gift in the late 1990s. Renovated by Cooper
Union architecture alumna Toshiko Mori, it serves as the President’s Residence.
public programs comprise an effort to extend the creative and
intellectual life of the college into the larger community, as well as
to complement Cooper’s undergraduate offerings. Many of the
programs, including courses, are free to Cooper Union students,
faculty and staff.
Hecht Viewing Gardens Located in front of the student residence
are the George Hecht Viewing Gardens, made possible by a gift
from Hecht, a 1930 electrical engineering alumnus.
The Great Hall The Great Hall of The Cooper Union has stood for
over a century and a half as a bastion of free speech and a witness
to the flow of American history and ideas. When the hall opened in
1858, more than a year in advance of the completion of the institution, it quickly became a mecca for all interested in serious
discussion and debate of the vital issues of the day. It has
continued in that role ever since.
The Cooper Union Library The Cooper Union Library
(library.cooper.edu) features one of the finest collections in Art,
Architecture and Engineering in New York City. The Library also
provides resources in related areas of the pure sciences, and in the
humanities and social sciences.
Located on the ground floor of the landmark Foundation
Building, the Library houses over 100,000 volumes of books and
periodicals, maintains collections that include visual and historic
materials, and provides access to a wide variety of electronic
resources, including more than 30,000 e-journals, over 30,000 ebooks and technical reports, thousands of digital images, and
many specialized research databases.
The Library’s electronic resources are accessible from any
computer on campus as well as to authorized users off campus.
Special collections include the Visual Resources Collection and
the Cooper Archives, which preserve materials relating to the
history of The Cooper Union, its founder Peter Cooper and the
Cooper and Hewitt families.
Professional librarians are always available during library
hours. The librarians advise users in research techniques and
regularly provide individual and group instruction.
The Cooper Union Library is a member of a consortium of
academic libraries that includes New York University’s Bobst
Library and the libraries of The New School. These libraries share
a combined online catalog, and students and faculty of The
Cooper Union have access and borrowing privileges at the consortium libraries. Cooper faculty and students also have borrowing
privileges at the library of the Polytechnic Institute of New York
University and access to the Cardozo School of Law library.
When classes are in session, Library hours are as follows:
Monday through Thursday 8:45 am–9 pm, Friday 8:45 am–6pm,
Saturday noon–5 pm and Sunday 2–8 pm. The Visual Resources
Collection is open Monday through Friday 9 am–5 pm. The Cooper
Archives is available by appointment.
Continuing Education Continuing Education offers to the general
public and the Cooper Union community a wide range of lectures,
symposia, readings, performances and evening courses. These
Student Life With fewer than 1,000 students, The Cooper Union
is a small community of professionals-in-training within the larger
community of New York City. The intellectual ferment of New York
City provides the background for students’ rigorous studies in
architecture, art or engineering, and students enjoy the abundance of cafés, galleries, theaters, movie houses, restaurants,
shops and clubs within walking distance. The local stations of two
major subway lines provide easy access to midtown Manhattan
and the outer boroughs.
The dean of students and the staff of the Office of Student
Services oversee many aspects of student life outside the classroom, including student clubs and the student government, career
counseling, financial aid, athletics and recreation and the production of the Campus Safety, Security and Fire Safety Report.
Life on campus is shaped by the current interests of
students. The Joint Student Council has representatives from all
class years in all three schools and allocates funding to student
clubs through the Joint Activities Committee (JAC). Under the
rules of the JAC Constitution, clubs are readily formed and as a
result, new clubs emerge every year. Up to 80 clubs have flourished annually, including multiple professional organizations, a
drama society, several musical groups, dance clubs, the student
newspaper, a variety of ethnic and cultural groups and recreational
groups. The clubs have sponsored lectures, exhibits, field trips,
conferences, poetry readings, films, dinners, publications,
performances, ice cream socials, international food fairs and
community service work. Each year, the clubs jointly sponsor the
Fall Festival where members recruit new students to join the clubs
and give information about upcoming activities. Professional societies compete in national design competitions and have a stellar
record of bringing home prizes.
Students at The Cooper Union also participate in an extensive program of athletic and recreational activities supervised by
the associate dean of student services. There are varsity women’s
7
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
and men’s volleyball teams, basketball, cross-country, women’s
and men’s tennis teams, soccer and ping pong teams, as well as
classes in fencing, yoga, aerobics and tae kwan do. Varsity teams
have won Hudson Valley Athletic Conference championships in
several different sports in recent years and individual players have
been voted player of the week. Cooper Union students have access
to two athletic facilities very close to the school where they can
enjoy these activities. Each year, several hundred students, alumni
and friends go on annual ski trips to Mont Sutton, Quebec, during
the winter breaks in January and February.
Services for Disabled Students The Cooper Union is an equal
opportunity institution that admits students without regard to their
disabilities. The Cooper Union makes reasonable accommodations and modifications to policies, practices and procedures and
provides auxiliary aids and services necessary to meet the needs
of students with disabilities on campus. These aids and services
can include, but are not limited to, providing note takers, readers
and interpreters.
Students with disabilities seeking any accommodations,
modifications or auxiliary aids or services regarding any aspect of
the full Cooper Union experience—including anything pertaining
uniquely to one of the Cooper Union’s distinct schools—should
contact the Dean of Students for assistance, ideally at least six
weeks before the beginning of the semester. Such requests may
also be given to the Vice President for Finance, Administration &
Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer.
Career Development The mission of the Center for Career Development is to advance personal, educational and professional
growth. The Career Center complements The Cooper Union's
academically centered tradition by preparing students to make a
successful transition from studying with a distinguished and
creative faculty to applying their knowledge and skills to a professional practice. The Career Center facilitates student inquiry into
relevant applications of the education they have received at the
institution, strengthening The Cooper Union's historic commitment to science and art.
The Career Center helps both students and alumni to further
their professional development by teaching them how to use selfknowledge in relation to career decisions, conduct career-related
research, identify and pursue opportunities, prepare competitive
application materials, and document and present their accomplishments. The Career Center’s staff seeks to achieve these goals
while striving to maintain impartiality and refraining from imposing
personal biases. The Career Center cultivates positive relationships with employers, experiential-learning sites, graduate-study
institutions, and not-for-profit resource organizations; identifies
and promotes external grants, fellowships, and scholarships; helps
shape and aid institutional goals; provides direction and consultation within the institution on career-development concerns; fosters
constructive, reciprocal internal relationships; supports institutional assessment and relevant research endeavors and their publication, especially in relation to accreditation standards; and helps
maintain Cooper Union’s history through its archival practices.
Students are encouraged to review career-development
resources at www.cooper.edu/career. In addition, students are
advised to utilize the Cooper Career Connection, the Career
Center's online job and internship board. The Career Center staff
hosts events and workshops throughout the academic year and
are readily available for student career-counseling appointments.
The Cooper Union Alumni Association The Alumni Association
comprises all Cooper Union graduates and former students who
were not graduated but who matriculated and attended at least
one year, left The Cooper Union in good standing and whose
classes have been graduated. The Association was organized in
1936 to foster loyalty and support of this unique institution. Each
year, all members of the Association receive ballots to select the
members of the Alumni Council which is the leadership body of the
Association. Members of the Alumni Council serve on committees
which collaboratively, with the Office of Alumni Affairs & Development, organize events commemorating Founder’s Day, assist with
planning reunions and young alumni events, as well as several
casual alumni gatherings throughout the year. Members of the
alumni body also provide mentoring and career insights through
the [email protected] program, Engineering Career Evening and Mock
Interview Night, in conjunction with the Office of Career Services.
The Association also recognizes outstanding seniors with the
Service to School awards and presents four annual prestigious
alumni awards: Alumnus of the Year, Gano Dunn, John Q. Hejduk
and Augustus Saint Gaudens. Through the Alumni Council, alumni
are represented on various faculty committees and on the Board
of Trustees.
The Office of Alumni Affairs and Development is responsible
for alumni events, communications and fundraising for Cooper.
Working collaboratively with the Alumni Association, the Office
engages alumni and parents throughout the United States through
regional and on-campus events and manages the Annual Fund
and other fundraising for the school.
You can learn more about the Office of Alumni Affairs &
Development, the Alumni Association and purchase Cooper Union
merchandise by visiting www.cualumni.com or e-mailing Alumni
Affairs at [email protected]
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
APPLICATION AND
ADMISSION INFORMATION
The Process The admission process varies according to the school
to which an applicant applies (architecture, art, engineering).
First-year applicants to The Irwin S. Chanin School of
Architecture submit their applications no later than January 7 of
the year they plan to attend. In late January or early February, each
applicant is sent a hometest with specific instructions. The hometest contains projects that must be completed and returned to the
Office of Admissions and Records within approximately 30 days.
Each hometest is then reviewed by the School of Architecture
Admissions Committee. Admission is offered to approximately 2530 students, based on the hometest and a review of the student’s
previous academic record. The hometest becomes the property of
The Cooper Union and may be exhibited anonymously for
academic purposes.
First-year applicants to the School of Art submit their applications no later than January 9 of the year they plan to attend. In
late January or early February, each applicant is sent a hometest
with specific instructions and a series of personal essay questions.
The hometest contains projects that must be produced and
returned to the Office of Admissions and Records, together with
the essays and a portfolio of previous work, within approximately
30 days. Each complete record is then reviewed by a faculty
committee. Final decisions are made by the Art School Admissions
Committee based on all elements of the application, with substantial weight given to the hometest. Admission is offered to approximately 65 students.
First-year applicants to the Albert Nerken School of
Engineering submit their applications no later than February 1 of
the year they plan to attend. Once the initial application is filed,
each applicant is sent a series of questions to be answered in essay
format. Academic components of an applicant’s record—the high
school average, SAT I (or ACT) scores, SAT II scores in mathematics (I or II) and physics or chemistry and strength of course
selection—are used in evaluating a student for admission. Essays
and teacher/counselor recommendations are also considered to
ensure that the admission offers reflect an accurate match
between applicant and institution. Admission is offered to approximately 180 students.
For information about the SAT I or II exams, please visit
www.collegeboard.org. For information about the ACT, which can
be taken in lieu of the SAT I exam only, please visit www.act.org. For
further information about The Cooper Union, please visit our
website at cooper.edu.
Application Calendar for Architecture (Undergraduate)
Submit first-year application before:
Submit high school records before:
Apply to the College Board
for SAT I at least one month before taking test.
Recommended SAT I test date before:
Submit transfer application before:
Application Calendar for Architecture (Graduate)
Submit application and all materials before:
Apply to the College Board
for GRE at least one month before taking test.1
Recommended GRE test date before:
Application Calendar for Art
Submit first-year application before:
Submit high school records before:
Apply to the College Board for
SAT I at least one month before taking test.1
Recommended SAT I test date before:
Submit transfer application before:
Application Calendar for Engineering (Undergraduate)
Submit first-year application before:
Submit high school records before:
Apply to the College Board for
SAT I at least one month before taking test.1
Recommended SAT I test date before:
SAT results not acceptable if older than:
Apply to the College Board for
Math I or II and Physics or Chemistry SAT II Tests
at least one month before taking tests.1
Recommended SAT II Test date before:
Submit transfer application before:
Application Calendar for Engineering (Graduate)
Cooper Union students should submit
graduate applications before:
Graduates from other colleges may submit
graduate applications before:
January 7
January 31
January 31
January 7
February 1
December 3
January 9
January 31
January 31
January 9
February 1
January 31
January 31
April 2010
January 31
February 1
February 1
February 1
The Cooper Union offers its full-tuition scholarship education to
admitted undergraduate, regardless of their race, religion, sex,
color, age, national and ethnic origin or handicap. Graduation from
an approved secondary school course covering at least 16 units or
the equivalent is required of all candidates. Admission requirements and procedures are not the same for all curricula taught at
The Cooper Union. (See the application calendar above, and
subsequent pages for details.)
The application is available to be downloaded or transmitted
online at www.cooper.edu. A $70 non-refundable application fee
is required when the application is filed. The admissions office is
open for public service from 9 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday.
Information is readily available at cooper.edu.
1
Applicants should visit collegeboard.org for test dates and registration information.
9
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
General Application Procedure
Each candidate should:
1. Complete and return or electronically file an acceptable
application and the $70 application fee (no cash).
2. Submit official high school and college records before the
specified deadlines.
3. Take all the required tests.
4. Some students may be asked to appear for an interview,
though this is not a general requirement for admission.
1
2
2
To be enrolled, each admitted candidate must:
1. Accept offer of admission and pay the appropriate deposit.
2. Submit a final transcript before July 15.
3. File medical—including vaccination and immunization—
records.
4. Document certification of citizenship status.
5. Register for courses.
The Cooper Union has agreed with many other colleges to use May
1 prior to the fall for which admission is sought as the deadline for
students who are accepting our offers of admission. This is known
as the candidate’s reply date.
First-Year Application Requirements—
Bachelor of Architecture Degree
Applications for first-year admission must be submitted before
January 7.
Applicants for first-year admission in architecture will be
required to complete and submit a home test. Details will be sent
to applicants in late January or early February.
High school records must show graduation with a minimum
of 16 units before July 15 of the year for which admission is
sought, with required and elective subjects as follows:
3
Subject
English
History and Social Studies
Mathematics (including Trigonometry, Algebra II
and Pre-calculus)
Science
Other Electives
Total Units Required
Units Required
for
Architecture
4
3
34
3
6
19
A waiver of application fee may be granted if the student files a written request with the application
and formal documentation of need (FAFSA or W2 form).
See the appropriate section below to discover which high school subjects, which college records and
which tests are required for the curriculum you wish to enter at Cooper Union.
3 A unit represents a year’s study in a subject, with classes meeting at least four times a week in a
secondary school.
4 As calculus is a required first year course for all architecture students, applicants must have studied at
a minimum pre-calculus prior to enrolling.
1
2
Students who apply while attending high school will be expected to
supply transcripts of subjects studied during the first three years of
high school (Grades 9, 10 and 11). High school graduates must
supply the full four-year record. High school transcripts should be
sent during the fall and winter months, but no later than January 31
if supporting a freshman application. Each candidate should make
certain that the high school subjects required for his or her major are
completed prior to graduation since The Cooper Union will not be
able to verify the candidates senior program until final transcripts
arrive in June or July. This is too late to make up a missing required
subject or to make plans for admission to another college. All
freshman candidates for degrees must submit acceptable scores
on the College Board Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT I or ACT).
Test scores should be sent to The Cooper Union (CEEB Code No.
2097). Testing later than January 31 of the year for which admission
is sought is not acceptable; results must reach The Cooper Union
before March 1. Applicants are required to have completed mathematics through Trigonometry, Algebra II and Pre-calculus. Students
who have not demonstrated an appropriate level of mathematics
achievement will be required to complete a precalculus course in
the summer prior to their enrollment,in preparation for Calculus and
Analytic Geometry, a first-year requirement.
Recognizing that communication skills (both verbal and
written) are integral to all curricula of The Cooper Union, all
incoming students will be required to participate in a writing workshop conducted by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
during the new student orientation program. An assessment based
on the outcome of this workshop may indicate that student(s) will
benefit from use of the resources of the Center for Writing (see
page 124 for more information) in order to meet the expectations
of the program as well as to develop the critical analytical and
communication skills that provide the foundation for creative,
academic and professional success.
Applicants whose first language is not English must submit
documentation of their English language proficiency. The Test of
English as a Foreign Language will be taken into consideration in
all admission deliberations (most admitted students score at least
250 [CBT], 100 [IBT] or 600 [paper test] on the TOEFL exam).
Admission decisions will be made available in early April;
candidates are expected to reply before May 1, the candidate’s
reply date.
11
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
First-Year Application Requirements—Art Degree Applications
for first-year admission must be submitted before January 9.
Applicants for freshman admission in art will be required to
complete and submit the hometest and a portfolio of their
(completed) work. Details will be sent to applicants in late January
or early February.
High school records must show graduation with a minimum
of 16 units before July 15 of the year for which admission is
sought, with required and elective subjects as follows:
First-Year Application Requirements—Engineering
(Undergraduate) Candidates should file their applications
before February 1 of the year for which admission is sought and
their official high school transcripts before January 31.
High school records must show the following:
6
Subject
5
Subject
English
History and Social Studies
Mathematics
Science
Other Electives
Total Units Required
Units Required
for Art
4
2
1
1
8
16
Students who apply while attending high school will be expected
to supply transcripts of subjects studied during the first three years
of high school (Grades 9, 10 and 11). High school graduates must
supply the full four-year record. High school transcripts should be
sent during the fall and winter months, but no later than January
31 if supporting a freshman application. Each candidate should
make certain that the high school subjects required for his or her
major are completed prior to graduation since The Cooper Union
will not be able to verify his or her senior program until final transcripts arrive in June or July. This is too late to make up a missing
required subject or to make plans for admission to another college.
All first-year candidates for degrees must submit acceptable
scores on the College Board Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT I or
ACT). Test scores should be sent to The Cooper Union (CEEB
College Code No. 2097). Testing later than January 31 of the year
for which admission is sought is not acceptable; results must
reach The Cooper Union before March 1. Applicants whose
first language is not English are encouraged to submit alternative
documentation of their English language proficiency. The Test
of English as a Foreign Language will be taken into consideration
in all admission deliberations (most admitted students score at
least 250 [CBT], 100 [IBT] or 600 [paper test] on the TOEFL exam).
Admission decisions will be made available in early April;
candidates are expected to reply before May 1, the candidate’s
reply date.
5
A unit represents a year’s study in a subject, with classes meeting at least four times a week in a
secondary school.
English
History and Social Studies
Mathematics
Physics
Chemistry
Electives
Total Units Required
Units Required
for
Engineering
4
2
4
1
1
5–7
17 minimum
19 recommended
Students in high school will be expected to supply transcripts
covering subjects taken during the first three years of high school
(Grades 9, 10 and 11). High school graduates must supply the full
four-year record. High school transcripts should be sent during the
fall and winter months, but no later than January 31 if supporting
a freshman application.
Each candidate should make certain that the high school
subjects required for admission are completed prior to graduation
since The Cooper Union will not be able to verify his or her senior
program until final transcripts arrive in June or July. This is too late
to make up a missing required subject or to make plans for admission to another college. In the area of mathematics, candidates
may offer somewhat different patterns of preparation provided
they will be ready for the intensive study of calculus at college.
Preparation beyond the listed minimum in mathematics is highly
recommended. College Board Advanced Placement Mathematics
are suitable courses for such further preparation.
All engineering candidates must send to The Cooper
Union (College Board Code No. 2097) results of the SAT I or
ACT and of the SAT II in physics or chemistry and in either
Level I or Level II mathematics. Applications for the SAT I and II
should be filed with the College Board in Princeton, NJ, at least one
month before the testing dates. Testing later than January 31 of
the year for which admission is sought is not acceptable; results
must reach The Cooper Union before March 1. Results of an SAT
or ACT taken before April 2010 will not be accepted. Applicants
whose first language is not English are encouraged to submit alternative documentation of their English language proficiency. The
Test of English as a Foreign Language will be taken into consideration in all admission deliberations (most admitted students score
at least 250 [CBT], 100 [IBT] or 600 [paper test] on the TOEFL
6
Including calculus.
12
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
exam) Admission decisions will be made in early April; candidates
are expected to reply before May 1, the candidate’s reply date.
First-Year Profile–Fall 2011 In 2011, The Cooper Union received
3,415 first-year applications; 264 students were admitted (8
percent) and 198 of those students accepted our offer (75
percent). The School of Architecture received 696 applications;
21 students were admitted (three percent) and 21 of those
accepted our offer (100 percent).The School of Art received 1,537
applications; 68 students were admitted (four percent) and 65 of
those students accepted our offer (96 percent). The School of
Engineering received 1182 applications; 175 students were
admitted (15 percent) and 112 of those students accepted our
offer (64 percent).
Geographically, 19 percent of the first-year architecture
students lived in New York State; 35 percent of the first-year art
students lived in New York State; and 74 percent of the first-year
engineering students lived in New York State. In all, 56 percent of
all Cooper Union first-year students came from New York State.
Twenty-eight percent of all Cooper Union first-year students
are Asian; 20 percent are African American, Caribbean or Latino;
2 percent are Native American; 13 percent are international
students; and 38 percent are Caucasian, non-Latino. Thirty-five
percent of all Cooper Union first-year students are women.
Please Note: SAT or ACT scores do not significantly enter the decision-making process of the School of Art but are important ingredients of the architecture and engineering admissions criteria. The
middle 50 percent of the architecture freshmen scored a high
school average between 90 and 95 and SATs between 1160 and
1340. The middle 50 percent of the art freshmen scored a high
school average between 80 and 94 and SATs between 1090 and
1320. The middle 50 percent of the engineering freshmen scored
a high school average between 94 and 98 and SATs between 1360
and 1540.
Retention and Graduation Rate Ninety-three percent of the fall
2010 School of Architecture first-year students returned for fall
2011 and 71 percent of first-year students entering the School of
Architecture in fall 2005 graduated within six years. Architecture
students may expand their professional options with outside experience (foreign or domestic) for up to one year during their course
of study at The Cooper Union. (See page 40 for information about
Leave of Absence/Interim Year.) Ninety-seven percent of the fall
2010 School of Art first-year students returned for fall 2011 and
87 percent of first-year students entering the School of Art in fall
2006 graduated within five years. Ninety-six percent of the fall
2010 School of Engineering first-year students returned for fall
2011 and 84 percent of first-year students entering the School of
Engineering in fall 2006 graduated within five years.
Transfer Application Requirements—Bachelor of Architecture
Degree Transfer applicants for the architecture program are those
who will have completed elsewhere at least one year of an accredited architecture program by June of the year for which admission
is sought.
Other individuals may be eligible to apply through the
transfer application process if they can submit a portfolio of their
creative work. This includes individuals who have or will have by
June a bachelor’s degree or the equivalent in a discipline other
than architecture or those who have begun studies in a discipline
related to architecture. Transfer applicants must apply before
January 7 for September classes. Transfer applicants will be
required to complete and submit a home test. Details will be sent
to applicants with the portfolio instructions. The admission decisions and the levels of entry for transfer students will be based
upon a review of college record, the home test and portfolio work.
Special instructions concerning the content and form of transfer
portfolios are sent to applicants in late January or early February,
to be returned to us by the posted date. All transfer applicants
must submit official transcripts of previous educational experiences (high school and college and prior SAT or ACT scores).
If admitted, transfer students are offered admission into a
specific year of the five-year design sequence. Placement in the
Design sequence is a condition of the offer of admission and not
subject to further review or appeal. By accepting the offer of
admission, the transfer student agrees to this placement and
acknowledges his/her anticipated graduation date. It will be
necessary for the matriculating transfer student to successfully
complete the design studio to which he/she is admitted, as well as
all subsequent studios, as part of his or her degree requirements.
There is no opportunity for transfer students to accelerate through
the required Design sequence.Transfer applicants from programs
other than accredited architecture programs will likely be placed
in the first-year Design studio (Architectonics). The official
academic transcript of a transfer student will be reviewed prior to
the student’s first registration. This review will determine what, if
any, additional coursework may be eligible for transfer credit. (See
page 38 for more information on transfer credit evaluation by the
School of Architecture.)
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Application Requirements—Master of Architecture II Degree
The post-professional Master of Architecture degree program is
open to applicants who:
• hold the professional degree of Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.),
the professional Master of Architecture I (M.Arch. I) or an equivalent
professional architectural degree from a foreign institution
• have completed a minimum of one year of work experience after
obtaining their first professional degree.
another institution. (See also page 55.) All transfer applicants must
submit official transcripts of previous educational experiences
(high school and college and prior SAT or ACT scores). An
accepted applicant who has previously earned a baccalaureate
degree in a discipline other than art will be treated as a transfer
student for purposes of evaluating completion of degree requirements and length of time allotted at The Cooper Union to complete
the B.F.A.
All applicants must submit the following:
• A completed application form (available at cooper.edu).
• Application fee of $70.
• Official academic records (transcripts) from all colleges and
universities from which you have received credit.
• Recent GRE scores.
• Recommendation letters (three are required).
• Resume/CV.
• Written essay: The essay should succinctly explain your
interest in the M.Arch. II program as well as the specified area of
concentration.
• Portfolio: Applicants must submit a portfolio that includes their
most important and representative design and written work. The
portfolio should consist of professional, academic and/or scholarly
work. It should be bound into a brochure no larger than 9" x 12"
(overall size). Applicants should not submit CDs, slides, loose
sheets or original drawings. Simple packaging is preferred.
• Potential candidates will be required to be available and make
necessary arrangements for a personal interview. Interview
expenses will be the responsibility of the candidate.
Transfer Application Requirements—Engineering Transfer
applications should be submitted before February 1 of the year for
which admission is sought. It may be necessary to wait until late
May, when the available space may be predicted accurately,
before receiving notification of the admission decision. Transfer
applicants must have completed all of The Cooper Union’s firstyear program at another accredited college. If space is available,
they are admitted on the basis of prior college records. All transfer
applicants must submit official transcripts of previous educational
experiences (high school and college and prior SAT or ACT scores).
Special emphasis is placed on college-level grades in calculus,
chemistry and physics.
Deferral of an Offer of Admission—Architecture Due to the
small size of the programs, the deferral of an offer of admission to
the B.Arch. (undergraduate) and/or M.Arch. II (graduate) program
is not permitted.
Transfer Application Requirements—Art Transfer applicants for
the art degree or certificate programs are those who will have
completed between 18 and 60 credits of college studio art courses
by the time they enroll at The Cooper Union.
All other applicants are freshman candidates. Transfer applicants must apply before January 9 for classes beginning in
September. The admission decisions for transfer students will be
based upon a review of prior college record and of portfolio work,
including the hometest. Special instructions concerning content
and form of transfer portfolios are sent to applicants in late January
or early February, to be returned to us by the posted date. Transfer
applicants must not have completed more than 60 credits at
Master of Engineering Application Requirements Students are
accepted on an academically competitive basis subject to the
availability of an adviser and of suitable facilities for the proposed
thesis research. To be admitted to the program, a student should
have completed an engineering baccalaureate program that is
accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Undergraduate students are not guaranteed
admission to the program. Masters applicants must apply by
February 1.
Cooper Union Undergraduates must have a minimum 3.0 grade
point average in the major upon graduation. Consult the department chairman regarding specific departmental requirements.
Generally, students entering Cooper Union undergraduate
programs as freshmen require five years to complete the master
of engineering and no more than six years. For BSE students, an
overall 3.0 grade point average is required in all engineering
courses. That grade point average will be calculated using courses
with the prefixes ChE, CE, ECE, ME, EID and ESC. Furthermore
there must be a sufficient number of these engineering courses in
a student’s record for the grade point average to be meaningful.
Cooper Union undergraduates will be required to pay the nonrefundable $70 application fee when applying to the Master of
Engineering program.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Graduates from Other Colleges Depending on the availability of
faculty and facilities, the engineering departments may be able to
admit a few outstanding students into their master’s degree
programs from outside The Cooper Union. To be considered for
admission, a student should have completed an engineering
baccalaureate program that is accredited by the Accreditation
Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Applicants must
submit official transcripts. Graduates of foreign institutions whose
native language is not English are required to submit scores of the
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Admitted students
may be required to take advanced engineering courses to make
up any deficiencies in their preparation. Specific admission
requirements may be waived upon recommendation of the faculty
in the area of the student’s major interest.
All application forms must be submitted to the Office of
Admissions and Records by February 1. The application form is
available to be downloaded at cooper.edu.
College Boards All candidates for first-year admission to The
Cooper Union’s undergraduate degree programs and for the certificate program in art are required to take the Scholastic Assessment
Test (SAT I) of the College Entrance Examination Board. College
Board application forms and SAT descriptions may be obtained in
most high schools or by visiting collegeboard.org. College Board
applications, with the required fee, should be returned to the
College Board (not to Cooper Union) at least one month before the
test date. The board tests are given at centers readily available
around the world. Please visit collegeboard.org for more information. In addition, all candidates for freshman admission to the
School of Engineering must take the SAT II in math (I or II) and
physics or chemistry. (See Application Calendar on page 9). All
College Board test results must be sent to Cooper Union (CEEB
College Code No. 2097). SAT or ACT scores do not significantly
enter the decision-making process of the School of Art, but are
important ingredients of the architecture and engineering admission criteria.
7
English Proficiency Students with low verbal SAT I or ACT scores
and records of poor achievement in English language study may
be required to take a placement examination and, on the basis of
that examination, to demonstrate increased proficiency in English
before registering for HSS1. The Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) will be taken into consideration in all admission
deliberations (most admitted students score at least 250 [CBT],
100 [IBT] or 600 [paper test] on the TOEFL exam).
Advanced Placement Credit and Credit by Examination The
School of Engineering may grant credit for high school work in
Advanced Placement courses in mathematics, chemistry and
physics, according to the following results on the Advanced Placement examinations:
AP Exam
Calculus B.C.
Chemistry
Physics, Mechanics (c)
Physics, Electro (c)
Score
4, 58
4, 5
58
58
Course Waived
Ma 111
Ch 110
Ph 112
Ph 213
Credits
4
3
4
4
Placement examinations are required before credit is granted in mathematics
and physics.
No student is required to accept Advanced Placement credit
from the School of Engineering. All students who score 5 on
Advanced Placement examinations in European history may be
eligible for three credits for the examination. In some cases,
instead of receiving credit, students may be permitted to fulfill part
of the humanities or social sciences requirement with an appropriate elective course. Those who wish to be considered either for
AP credit or for advanced placement in an elective course should
notify the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences before the
first week of classes. The Cooper Union will consider granting
credit for study in the Armed Forces, verified by U.S.A.F.I.
Early Decision (for Art Applicants) A select number of potential
School of Art students seen at portfolio reviews are invited to
complete their application and hometest for admission before the
application deadline. In addition, if the School of Art is a first-year
applicant’s first choice, he or she may choose the Early Decision
option. All Early Decision applications will be reviewed and decisions will be rendered by the end of February, about one month
before the normal notification date of April 1. Applicants who are
admitted under the Early Decision option must make their
commitment to the School of Art by April 1. Early Decision is an
option for both first-year and transfer art applicants.
Deadlines for Early Decision—School of Art
December 3 Last day to take SAT or ACT
December 3 Application and academic records due for applicants choosing
Early Decision option
Mid-December Hometest sent to applicants choosing the Early Decision option
Mid-January Completed hometest submission date for applicants choosing
Early Decision
Late-February Notification of admission decision for all Early Decision applicants
April 1 Early Decision candidate’s reply date
7
8
ACT scores may be substituted for SAT I scores only. Please visit www.act.org for more information.
Students who earn a grade of 5 must take a Department of Physics examination in order to receive
the 4 credits. In addition, students receiving a 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC exam must take a
Department of Mathematics placement exam to receive credit for Ma III.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Rolling Admission (for Art Applicants) Potential School of Art
students who have received a preliminary review at National Portfolio Days, which occur after The Cooper Union’s regular admission deadline (January 9), may be invited to apply after the regular
admission deadline. All reasonable effort is made by the School of
Art Admissions Committee to review these applications in a fair
and timely fashion.
Early Decision (for Engineering Applicants) If the School of
Engineering is the first choice of an applicant, the candidate may
apply under the Early Decision plan. The Cooper Union will
consider an application earlier than usual and give the applicant a
decision in advance of the normal notification date. Application,
test scores and high school record must be received by the Office
of Admissions and Records by December 3. Applicants who are
admitted under the Early Decision option must agree to enroll in
the School of Engineering at Cooper Union and withdraw all other
college applications.
Deadlines for Early Decision—School of Engineering
December 3 Application, test scores and records must be received
December 21 Notification of admission decision
January 21 Candidate’s reply date
Admission after Three Years of High School Candidates of
exceptional merit may be considered for admission after completion of three years of high school. Engineering applicants must
have excellent high school averages and test scores. Art and architecture applicants must have excellent high school records and
exceptional ability. A recommendation from the high school principal, at least one recommendation from a teacher and an interview will be required. In accordance with the regulations of
individual states, a student may or may not be eligible to receive
an Equivalency Diploma after completion of a specific number of
credits in appropriate subject areas at The Cooper Union. It is the
responsibility of the applicant to investigate his or her state regulations in this regard.
Gainful Employment Periodically, Cooper Union enrolls a student
in our Certificate of Fine Arts Program (see page 52).
Standard of Occupation Codes attributed to this program include:
27-1013.00 (http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/271013.00 for more information)
The Certificate in Art program is offered as an alternative to
the B.F.A. program. Candidates for the certificate program must
complete 60 credits in two years of fulltime study (with a minimum
of 30 credits per year). All foundation studio courses must be
completed and students must complete prerequisite course
requirements in selecting advanced studio. The Certificate in Art
program consists of 30 credits in foundation studio, 21 credits in
advanced studio and nine credits in art history. All admission
requirements, academic standards and regulations of the School
of Art apply to the certificate program.
Students in the certificate program may apply through the
Office of Admissions and Records for transfer to the B.F.A. program
after 42 credits of work have been completed at The Cooper Union.
Transfer certificate students may transfer a maximum of 12 credits
from another institution toward their certificate.
As all undergraduate students receive a full-tuition scholarship, the additional costs a certificate student can be expected to
incur are the following (see page 16 for more information on fees
and expenses):
Application Fee: $70
Annual Student Fee: $775/semester
General Lab and Studio Materials Fee: $75/semester
Health and Insurance Fee: $1,100/year
International Student Fee: $1,910/year
Graduation Fee: $110/year
Estimated Books, Supplies, Materials: $1,800/year
Estimated Personal and Transportation Expenses: $2,325/year
Estimated Room and Board Expenses: $1,500/year (commuter),
$13,970/year (residence hall double), $15,110/year (residence
hall single), $15,385/year (living off-campus)
International Students At Cooper Union we value the importance
of a diverse student body. We attract and enroll students from
around the world. Please read below for important information
pertaining to international students:
• International students are those who do not hold U.S. citizenship
or permanent residency.
• Applicants are required to use a United States mailing address
for their application. This can be the address of a family member
or friend who can receive correspondence on your behalf. All information related to the application will be sent to the United States
mailing address.
• International students are not eligible for Federal or State
Financial Aid.
• International applicants who have studied for less than three
years in English are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) to show English proficiency. A minimum TOEFL
score of 600 (paper format), 250 (computer format) or 100
(internet-based format) is required.
• All applicants to The Cooper Union are required to submit scores
from the SAT exam (www.collegeboard.com) or ACT exam
(www.act.org).
15
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
• Make sure the name on your passport matches your name on the
application, TOEFL and SAT/ACT scores.
• All high school and college transcripts must be translated into
English, notarized and sent to The Cooper Union.
• Students on visas (those who are non-citizens or who are not
permanent residents) who are accepted to The Cooper Union will
be required to file a Certificate of Finances with the Office of
Admissions and Records prior to their first registration. The Certificate of Finances must certify that students meet the minimum
financial support requirements for resident students. Please
see page 16 of the catalog for more information about fees and
other expenses.
• All international students are assessed a fee of $1,910 per year.
Budget We provide full-tuition scholarships to all undergraduate
enrolled students and for those who apply, administer financial aid
to help cover the additional costs of studying at The Cooper Union
(i.e., books, supplies, housing, meals, etc.). However, it is important for all students to consider these expenses and try to budget
accordingly.
FEES AND EXPENSES
Tuition For the 2012-2013 academic school year, all Cooper
Union students will receive the full-tuition scholarship valued at
$38,550.
Starting in the 2013-2014 academic school year, graduate
students enrolled in the School of Architecture will be charged a
tuition of $19,275 per semester. For the 2013-2014 academic
school year undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the
School of Engineering and undergraduate students enrolled in the
School of Art and School of Architecture will receive the full-tuition
scholarship.
Fees and Refunds A nonrefundable application fee of $70 is paid
by all candidates for admission.
Each student enrolled in a degree program pays a student
fee of $775 per semester. For new students, this fee is payable on
acceptance of admission and is not refundable.
For continuing students, the $775 fee per semester is
payable prior to the first day class; it is 100 percent refundable
prior to the beginning of classes and 50 percent refundable during
the first two weeks of classes. Thereafter, it is not refundable.
Continuing students must pay each semester’s student fee
in accordance with the bill’s “due date.”
All fees are subject to annual revision. Students who do not
pay the required fee will have their registration cancelled.
General Lab and Studio Materials Fee A general lab and studio
materials fee of $75 per semester will be charged to each student’s
account. As the title suggests, this fee covers normal usage,“wear
and tear,” and basic supplies for laboratory and studio projects.
Student Residence Fees Students electing to live in Student Residence will be responsible for paying the regular housing fees. The
fees for the 2012–2013 academic year are $9,970 for a double
(two students per bedroom) and $11,110 for a single (one student
per bedroom). The fees cover residence for the fall and spring
semesters and may be paid in two parts.
Refund Policy for Student Residence Please refer to Section 10
of The Cooper Union 2012-13 Student Housing Affiliation Occupancy Agreement for a schedule of refunds and penalties imposed
for cancellation.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Health Service and Insurance Fee Cooper Union requires all
students to submit proof, prior to registration, that they have health
insurance. Students who fail to supply the information requested
on the Student Accident and Sickness/Enrollment Waiver form by
August 15 will be billed $1,110 for the Health Service and Insurance Fee for the 2012–2013 academic year.
International Student Fee Students on visas (those who are noncitizens or who are not permanent residents with a “green card”)
are responsible for an additional fee of $1,910 per year payable by
August 15.
Graduation Fee A graduation fee of $110 is required of all students
entering their last year at The Cooper Union. This fee is payable
upon registration for the senior year and is refundable if a student
fails to meet graduation requirements that year.
Special Fees A charge of $110 will be made for late payment of the
student fee. A charge of $25 will be made per occasion involving
change of section or registration program.
The Cooper Union reserves the right to change its fees at
any time.
Graduate Student Fee The requirements for the master of engineering program must be completed within two years of admission
to graduate status, except with the expressed consent of the dean
of engineering. Requests for extension must be presented in
writing to the dean in the final semester of the second year. Thesis
adviser approval is also required. Master’s students who receive
approval to extend their studies beyond two years will be assessed
a maintenance of matriculation fee of $3,000 per semester. Graduate students are assessed a key/access fee of $150 per year.
Books, Materials and School Supplies Each student must
supply, at his or her own expense, textbooks, drawing materials,
hand tools and other necessary items.
If laboratory apparatus, machinery or studio equipment is
damaged by careless handling, the student will be charged for
repair or replacement. All students enrolled in School of Art
courses should be prepared to pay for consumable materials
supplied by the School for student use.
FINANCIAL AID
If you are enrolled as a full-time student (minimum 12 credits), are
a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, can demonstrate financial
need, have a valid Social Security Number, have a high school
diploma or General Education Development Certificate (GED), or
complete a high school education in a home school setting that is
treated as such under state law, are registered with the Selective
Service (if required), are making satisfactory academic progress
toward completing your course of study according to the standards and practices of the school, certify that you are not in default
on a Federal Perkins, Federal Family Education Loan or Federal
Direct Loan, do not owe a refund on a Federal Pell or Federal SEOG
Grant and certify that you will use federal student aid for educational purposes only—you may be eligible to receive financial aid.
The law suspends financial aid eligibility for any student
convicted for the possession or sale of illegal drugs for offenses
that occurred while the student was receiving federal student aid.
If you have a conviction or convictions for illegal drug offenses, call
1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243) to determine how, or if, this
law applies to you.
The U.S. Department of Education website can be accessed
through the Financial Aid for Students home page at www.studentaid.ed.gov.
For the most current information on financial aid at Cooper
Union, please visit our web site at http://cooper.edu or contact the
Financial Aid Office.
To apply for financial aid you must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You may submit the FAFSA
through the Internet using FAFSA on the Web at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
When processed, the form will produce an expected family contribution (EFC), which determines the family resources available to
meet your educational expenses and your eligibility for financial
aid. From this analysis we will attempt to package financial aid to
provide the greatest possible assistance to the neediest students
first and then to less needy students, as resources permit. We
reserve the right to request copies of your parents’ tax return if you
are considered independent under federal guidelines and your
non-custodial parents’ tax return if your parents are divorced. ALL
information submitted on the FAFSA as part of an application for
financial aid is subject to verification, a requirement of the U.S.
Department of Education. Please see our website for more information on the verification process. First-time applicants are also
required to file a CSS Profile Form.
FAFSA forms should be filed no later than April 15, and all
forms should be submitted to us no later than May 1.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
The Cooper Union offers financial aid awards suited to each
student’s need. Generally, these awards are “packaged,” which
means that more than one type of aid is provided. A typical award
will include some grant funds and some self-help in the form of a
loan, and possibly a work opportunity. It is expected that the entire
package will be accepted. A student is encouraged to use a portion
of summer employment earnings toward the following academic
year’s expenses.
Federal Pell Grants These grants are awarded to undergraduate
students who have not yet earned a bachelor’s degree. The
amount of a Federal Pell Grant is determined by the EFC and the
cost of attendance at Cooper Union. Pell Grants provide a foundation to which other aid may be added.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
These grants, which usually range from $200 to $4,000 per
academic year, are awarded to students with the greatest need.
They are funded by both federal sources and The Cooper Union.
Federal Direct Loan Program This program includes subsidized and unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans. During the first
year of undergraduate study, an eligible student may borrow up to
$3,500; $4,500 in the second year; and $5,500 in subsequent
years. Eligible dependent students may also borrow an additional
$2,000 unsubsidized Stafford Loan.
Students who meet the federal requirements for independent student status and dependent students whose parents
are not able to secure a Federal PLUS Loan may be eligible to
receive additional funds through the unsubsidized Federal
Stafford Loan. First- and second-year students may borrow up to
$6,000 and upper-class students may borrow up to $7,000.
Also available under this program is the Federal PLUS Loan.
Parents with good credit histories may borrow up to the cost of
education not covered by financial aid. These loans carry a fixed
interest rate of 3.4 to 6.8 percent for Federal Stafford Loans and
7.9 percent for Federal PLUS Loans.
Students and parents should always exhaust federal student
loan options before considering private educational loans.
Federal Perkins Loans This is a low-interest (5 percent) loan for
both undergraduate and graduate students with substantial need.
Repayment of these loans begins nine months after you graduate
or leave school.
Cooper Union Loans These loans are offered by Cooper
Union and carry the same conditions and interest rate as Federal
Perkins Loans.
Cooper Union Grants The Cooper Union has funds available
from which awards are made to qualified students in need of aid.
Federal Work Study Under this program, eligible students
may be employed on or off campus. Employment is generally
limited to about 10 hours a week during the academic year. In
addition, students may apply at the Office of Career Services for a
variety of part-time jobs.
Priorities In considering applications for aid, first priority is given
to first-degree undergraduates who have exceptional financial
need and therefore could not complete their education without
such aid. Second priority is given to first-degree students who
demonstrate relative need. Second-degree students are prohibited from receiving federal grants and are not eligible for institutional grants beyond the full tuition scholarship. Therefore,
second- degree students are referred to the various loan programs
for financial assistance.
Rights and Responsibilities Students who receive financial aid in
their first year at The Cooper Union generally continue to be aided
in accordance with their financial circumstances from year to year.
This does not imply, however, that the aid will be the same each
year. Each package depends on family resources, the availability
of funds, the student’s capacity for self-help and continued appropriations from the federal government. To continue to qualify for
financial aid, students must maintain good academic standing and
make satisfactory academic progress as determined by the standards of the school. Students on academic probation for two
semesters are ineligible for federal financial aid. Reduced
programs may result in a reduction in financial aid.
Federal regulations require that students who withdraw from
school prior to completing 60 percent of the semester will have
their eligibility for aid recalculated based on the percent of the
semester completed. For example, a student who withdraws after
completing only 30 percent of the semester will have “earned”
only 30 percent of any financial aid received. The remaining 70
percent must be returned by the student and/or the school.
Students should contact the Financial Aid Office to determine how
a withdrawal will affect financial aid.
Normally, financial aid is awarded for an entire academic
year, with payments made after the beginning of each semester.
Amounts in excess of Cooper Union charges may be used to meet
indirect costs and will be paid directly to the student each
semester. If Federal Work Study is part of the financial aid package,
a salary will be paid twice monthly, directly to the student.
The Cooper Union is willing to make every effort to assist the
student and the student’s family in helping to meet educational
costs, but the school is unable to assume the role of substitute for
the family.
19
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Students awarded a Federal Stafford Loan, a Federal Perkins
Loan or a Cooper Union Loan will be required to sign a legally
binding promissory note and agree to the terms of a prearranged
repayment schedule. Sample repayment schedules are available
on our web site. The terms of these loan obligations will be defined
at the time the loans are made to the student and before the notes
are executed. It should be noted that these loans must be repaid
so that future students may also receive loans.
Our three schools of Architecture, Art and Engineering each
have a Committee of Academic Standards that is responsible for
meeting with students that have not made satisfactory progress
toward degree completion. Each Committee is comprised of a
group of faculty, students and deans.
The Committees meet after the conclusion of the fall and
spring semesters (often mid-January and early June) at which
point the students who are placed on academic probation have an
opportunity to discuss their academic performance with the
members of the Committee.
The requirements to maintain satisfactory progress toward
degree completion vary for each school. More information can be
found in the Academic Standards section of the respective school.
In addition, students must also make satisfactory academic
progress by completing degree requirements on a timely basis.
Federal regulations require students who receive federal financial
aid to complete degree requirements within 150% of the
published length of the program. Failure to complete degree
requirements within this time frame will result in a suspension of
federal student aid.
Budget Guide for Students at The Cooper Union
This budget guide has been prepared with the hope that it will
assist students in anticipating their financial needs while attending
The Cooper Union. Based on our experience with students, we
believe this to be a realistic guide for a nine-month academic year.
It should be used as a guide and obviously does not reflect the
exact costs involved in individual cases.
Budget Guide for 2012–2013
Architecture & Art*
(includes an average of
$1,800 for supplies)
Engineering*
(includes an average of
$1,000 for supplies)
Commuter
Dormitory Resident
Off-campus Resident
$7,325
$19,745
$21,210
Commuter
Dormitory Resident
Off-campus Resident
$6,525
$18,945
$20,410
* Students without health insurance should add a Health Service
and Insurance Fee of $1,100
International Student Budget Guide for 2012–2013
Schools of Art and Architecture
Full-Time Matriculating
Fees
Room and Board
**Other
Total:
School of Engineering
Full-Time Matriculating
$3,610
$15,385
$4,125
$23,120
**Books and Supplies
Transportation
Personal Expenses
Total:
$1,800
$750
$1,575
$4,125
Fees
Room and Board
**Other
Total:
$3,610
$15,385
$3,325
$22,320
**Books and Supplies
Transportation
Personal Expenses
Total:
$1,000
$750
$1,575
$3,325
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS,
AWARDS AND PRIZES
Named Scholarships
To alleviate the pressing financial burden of the ever-increasing cost
of living in New York City, many alumni and non-alumni have
supported The Cooper Union students by establishing named
scholarships and prizes. The income generated by these special
funds offers vital supplemental financial aid to deserving students
in addition to the full-tuition scholarship awarded to each student
who is admitted.
Samuel J. Jaffe Medici Scholarship was fully funded in
2008 to help preserve the full-tuition scholarship policy and
ensure that this tradition continues far into the future. Medici
Scholarships underwrite the full-tuition scholarship of individual
students—one after another—in perpetuity.
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Gus J. & Helen
Condaris; Ismar David; Manuel & Flora Fernandez; John Q. Hejduk;
George & Selma Klett; John Loeb & Frances Loeb; Mari Souval
Spacedrafting Foundation.
School of Art Sylvia Appleman Award; Danny Arje; Alice
Noble Ball & Francis M. Ball; William & Mary Jane Brinton; Frank
Chesek Memorial; Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation; Ismar David; Lillyan deCaro Santo; James Trimble and Alice
Trimble DuBois; Antonya Eisen; Roberta Strauss Feuerlicht &
Herbert A. Feuerlicht; Ellen Fox; Dan Friedman; Adele & Louis
Gruber; Yip Harburg Foundation; William Randolph Hearst Foundation; Abraham Hersh; Rose Kleinfeld; George & Selma Klett;
Walter S. Kut; Mollie Levenstein; John Loeb & Frances Loeb;
Rhoda Lubalin; Sylvia Drucker Mavis; Henry & Sylvia Mavis;
Alphonse Normandia; Peter Ostuni; Veronica Lapinski Pastorini;
Marvin A. Schwam; Henry & Joan Wolf Slawson; Henry Wolf Foundation; Barbara White.
Albert Nerken School of Engineering Abdul Azimi; Edward
J. Barlow; Robert W. Bassemir; Meredith B. Blaustein; Brunswick/
Ennis; Leon Chernick; Tunny Chin; Henry Chu; Horacio Cundari;
David Davis; Franklin W. Diederich; Henry & Freda Eckhardt;
Margaret Lappin Fich; Samuel & Sally Gilman; Roger Gilmont;
Charles Greenfield; Robert Greenwald; William Grimshaw; Dr.
Michael S. Gross; Elizabeth and Robert Hammond; Edward & Lillian
Hawthorne; Wolfgang Homberger; Fanny & Irving Katz Memorial;
Alfred Laufer; John Loeb & Frances Loeb; Leonard R. Luke; Henry
Mankin; Vincent C. Morrone; Robert P. Muhlsteff; Emil J. Pansky;
Emil Parente; William F. Partridge; Norman L. Perry Internship; John
F. & Olga Petrowsky; Michael F. Roberti; Ann and Paul Rosche;
Emanuel Salma Memorial; Dr.Walter L.Schwartz; Lester D.Seymour;
The Starr Foundation; Switzer Foundation; Sol Tanne; Peter Torraco;
Ralph Torraco; Dale & Charlotte Zand.
General Financial Aid Scholarships Irwin & Lillian Appel; H.
Carl Bauman; Robert C. Bosch; Julius Dingenthal; Edward Durbin;
Kathleen Gerla; Mindy & Drew Greenwald; Alexander C. Grove
Prize; Salvatore & Tina Guzzardi; Julian Hirsch; Marilyn Hoffner;
Samuel J. Jaffe; Dr. Peter Kabasakalian; Estelle & Daniel Maggin;
Vincent P. Malahan; William H. Okun; Nathan G. Ramer; Michael
A. Rampino; Benjamin Reich; Charles Lowery Robertson; William
H.Sandholm; Louis Schmidt; Emil Schweinberg; Allen Speiser; The
Starr Foundation; Charles Stumpp; Solon E. Summerfield Foundation; Arlene and Irving Tashlick; Leonard E. Trentin; Clifford
Warren; Bert Weinstein
Book Funds Rose Sylvia Berger; Z. Braude;Anthony
Carbone; Julius Dingenthal; Clare W. Gerber; Adele & Louis
Gruber; Mary Hirsch; Joseph & Lucy Koosman; Norman S. Levy;
Sheridan A. Logan; Joseph Mechanik; Joseph Meltzer; Albert
Nerken & Jean Nerken; Oswald Ottendorfer; Frank O. Reisler;
Michael Robinson; Ruth Schwartz; George F. Sexton; Charles
Stubbe; Marie and Johannes Vodja.
Fellowships
The Irma Giustino Weiss Cultural Enrichment Fellowship
Launched in 2002–2003, the Irma Giustino Weiss Cultural Enrichment Fellowship Program at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art provides extraordinary access to cultural
resources for exceptional students who seek a deeper understanding of the context of art and architecture. Endowed by Mrs.
Irma Giustino Weiss, a 1945 alumna of the School of Art, this
unique program to enhance the undergraduate experience is
open to high-achieving, highly-motivated students in art and architecture, beginning in the freshman year. Throughout their years at
The Cooper Union, Irma Giustino Weiss Fellows will take part in a
focused exploration of the cultural riches in these select cities
including visits to museums and galleries, concerts, theatrical and
dance performances, specialized libraries and historical sites.
Guidance Counselors are encouraged to communicate this new
fellowship program—available only to entering freshman students
of The Cooper Union—to top high school students with strong
interest in higher education in art and architecture. Applications
will be made available to formally accepted students to the School
of Art and the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture. To view a
sample application form, please visit our website at:
www.cooper.edu/administration/admissions/weiss.html.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture William Cooper Mack
Thesis Fellowship, supports primary research and inquiry in the
Thesis year and honors William Cooper Mack, class of 2006.
School of Art Rhoda Lubalin Fellowship, The Rhoda Lubalin
Fellowship has been designated to the Herb Lubalin Study Center
of Design and Typography and honors Mrs. Lubalin’s husband.
Albert Nerken School of Engineering Henry C. Enders Fellowship.
Funding available to students wishing to pursue graduate study in
engineering; The Maxwell Lincer Fellowship. Mr.Lincer was a 1942
Cooper Union Civil Engineering graduate. The Harry Ploss Fellowship in Engineering, awarded annually based on merit and financial need to students who have completed their junior year in
engineering. Mr. Ploss is a 1968 graduate of The Cooper Union.
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Benjamin Menschel
Fellowships for Creative Inquiry. The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation endowed this fellowship with a grant in 1994 to support
students in the fields of art, architecture, design and engineering.
Fellowships for Study Abroad
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture Palmer Hayden
Travel Fellowship. Travel Abroad For African-American Students In
Art and Architecture.
School of Art Helen Dubroff Dorfman Travel Fellowship; Palmer
Hayden Travel Fellowship. Travel Abroad For African-American
Students In Art and Architecture; The O’Brien Fellowship for Study
Abroad; Martin Rothenberg Travel Fellowship.
Awards and Prizes
Edwin Sharp Burdell Award, to that member of The Cooper Union
community who during the past year has done most to further the
mutuality of science and art.
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture The Toni and David
Yarnell Merit Award of Excellence in Architecture, presented to a
graduating student who demonstrates exceptional ability and
outstanding merit; The American Institute of Architects Henry
Adams Medal and Certificate of Merit, to the first-ranked graduating student in a first professional degree program; The American
Institute of Architects Henry Adams Certificate of Merit, to the
second-ranked graduating student in a first professional degree
program; Alpha Rho Chi (National Professional Architectural
Fraternity) Medal, to a graduating student who has shown an ability
for leadership, who has performed willing service for his or her
school or department and who gives promise of real professional
merit; The Cooper Union Alumni Association Annual Award, to a
graduating student for outstanding service to the school; Abraham
E. Kazan Award, to a graduating student for outstanding performance in urban design; George Ledlie Prize, to a graduating student
as selected by the dean; Peter W. Bruder Memorial Prize, to a graduating student for excellence in structures; Allen N. Goldfischer
Memorial Award, for a fifth-year graduating student whose thesis
project best explores relationships between humanistic and
aesthetic principals in an urban context.
School of Art The Irma Giustino Weiss Prize, presented to a graduating student who demonstrates exceptional potential for creative
achievement upon earning a bachelor’s degree in art or architecture; The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Trust Award, presented to
a graduating student who demonstrates exceptional ability in the
field of painting or sculpture; The Toni and David Yarnell Merit
Award of Excellence in Art, presented to a graduating student who
demonstrates exceptional ability and outstanding merit; The
Cooper Union Alumni Association Annual Award, to a graduating
student for high academic achievement and outstanding service to
the school; Richard Lewis Bloch Memorial Prize; Vena T. Carroll
Award; Ethel Cram Memorial Prize; Mary M. Doyle Memorial Prize,
to a second-year student; Henry Dropkin Award, for excellence in
graphic design; Betty Morton Goldin Memorial Prize; Rolf Haerem
Award, to a fourth-year student for excellence in painting; Sarah
Cooper Hewitt Prize; Fred A. Lane Prize, to the most deserving
student in the third-year class; Elliot Lash Memorial Prize, for excellence in sculpture; Eleanor Gay Lee Gallery Prize to a deserving
third- or fourth-year student; A. A. Low Prize; Carin Tendler Lurkis
Prize for Watercolors, to a deserving second- or third-year student;
Vincent J. Mielcarek, Jr. Photography Award, to a student in the
third-year class for excellence in photography; Pietro & Alfrieda
Montana Prize, for excellence in drawing and sculpture; Michael S.
Vivo Memorial Prize, for excellence in drawing; New York Central
Art Supply Awards; Robert Breer Film Award; Hans G. and Thordis
W. Burkhardt Foundation Prize, to three graduating students; Tam
Prize in Fine Arts.
Albert Nerken School of Engineering The Harold S. Goldberg
Prize, presented to a graduating student who demonstrates technical leadership upon earning a bachelor’s degree in engineering;
The Cooper Union Alumni Association Annual Award, to a gradu-
21
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ating student for high academic achievement and outstanding
service to the school; The William C. and Esther Hoffman Beller
Fund for Merit in Engineering Studies, to the most meritorious
graduate in each of the following fields: chemical, civil, electrical
and mechanical engineering; The Leon Machiz Prize; Harald Kiel
Award, for service to the Cooper Union IT Department.
Chemistry Awards: Chemical Rubber Company Freshman Chemistry Achievement Award, to an outstanding freshman Chemistry
student; Robert Spice Fund Prize, for the best record in Instrumental Analysis and Electronics.
Chemical Engineering Awards: American Institute of Chemical
Engineers Award, to the AIChE student member having achieved
the highest scholastic; record after two years; The American Institute of Chemists Student Award, to a Chemical Engineering graduate who has demonstrated scholastic achievement in Chemistry
and Chemical Engineering, leadership, ability and character;
Herbert Baldwin Fund Prize, for the best record in the third year of
Chemical Engineering; Frederick Urban Memorial Scholarship
Award, to a Chemical Engineering graduate.
Civil Engineering Award: Joseph Kalb Fund Prize, to a civil engineering graduate on the basis of scholarship and professional
interest; Maxwell Lincer Prize Fund, for excellence and achievement in the study of civil engineering.
Electrical Engineering Awards: Yusuf Z. Efe Award, for the
outstanding electrical engineering master’s thesis; Abraham
Pletman Fund, for excellence in electrical engineering; Eugene Ogur
Memorial Award, for excellence in electrical engineering; Dale E.
Zand Prize, for outstanding achievement in electrical engineering.
Mechanical Engineering Awards: Wallace Chinitz Prize, for excellence in thermal studies; Alexander C. Grove Prize, to the student
who demonstrates scholarship, personal integrity and professional
promise in the field of mechanical engineering; Tyler G. Hicks Prize,
to a mechanical engineering Junior for academic achievement
during the first and second years; Wilson G. Hunt/Class of 1905
Prize, to a mechanical engineering graduate, based on general
excellence in engineering studies; Harold E. Rue Prize, for a senior
in either electrical or mechanical engineering; Nicholas Stefano
Prize, for an outstanding senior project in mechanical engineering.
Mathematics Awards: Class of 1907 Prize, for excellence
in calculus; Irvin Leon Lynn Prize, for excellence in mathematics;
Harry W. Reddick Fund Prize and Medal, for meritorious work
in mathematics.
Bachelor of Science Award: Henri D. Dickinson Fund Prize, to the
student having the highest cumulative rating at graduation in a
bachelor of science curriculum.
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences The John L. Alpert
Humanities and Social Sciences Prize; The Academy of American
Poets Elizabeth Kray Poetry Prize; The Raymond G. Brown Memorial Prize, for excellence in the Raymond G. Brown Seminar;
Professor Frank Caldiero Humanities Award, for the best essay
written in the first-year core courses (HSS1 and HSS2); Secondyear Core Curriculum Prize, for the best essay written in the secondyear core courses (HSS3 and HSS4); The History Prize, for an
outstanding essay in history; The Dale Harris Prize, for the best
essay written in an art history course; Charles Goodman Essay Fund
Award in Humanities, open to seniors in the School of Engineering;
Dr. Martin J. Waters Memorial Prize, for excellence in the humanities and social sciences.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
GENERAL REGULATIONS
The Cooper Union reserves the right to change or amend its regulations, curricula,fees and admission procedures without prior notice.
Registration Unless permitted by the dean of Admissions and
Records to do otherwise, all students must report on the scheduled dates to register and pay fees and laboratory deposits.
Students who fail to meet all financial obligations to The Cooper
Union will not be permitted to register. No student will be admitted
to classes without evidence of completion of registration. Students
who fail to register will be dropped from the rolls.
Attendance
School of Architecture and School of Art Classes and
studios are scheduled Monday through Friday between 9 am and
10 pm. Studio facilities usually are available to students on Saturdays and Sundays throughout the academic year.
Each student is required to be punctual and to attend each
scheduled class. In the case of unavoidable absence, the student
should, on his or her return, report to the instructor to explain the
absence and inquire about making up the lost work. All architecture students are provided with studio space and are expected to
work in the studio during regular building hours.
School of Engineering Each student is expected to attend
all classes and to satisfy other requirements in each course in such
ways as the instructor may prescribe. If a student is absent an
excessive number of times, he/she may, at the discretion of the
instructor and with the approval of the dean, be asked to withdraw
from the course.
After each absence, it is the student’s responsibility to
consult with the instructor, without delay, to determine the nature
of the makeup work required.
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Each student is
expected to attend all classes. No more than two unexcused
absences will be permitted during any given semester. In the case
of an unavoidable absence, the student should, on his or her
return, report to the instructor to explain the absence and inquire
about making up the lost work. Students who are absent three or
more times may receive a reduction of the final grade or, at the
discretion of the instructor, be asked to withdraw from the course.
Calendar Changes The academic year at The Cooper Union has
fall and spring semesters and runs from September to May. In
order to serve the student body most effectively during the
academic year, The Cooper Union cannot modify its calendar or
procedures to meet special demands of students.
Academic Standards and Regulations For specific academic
standards and regulations of each school, consult the appropriate
sections of this catalog.
Dismissal The Cooper Union reserves the right at any time to
dismiss a student whose conduct, attendance or academic
standing is, in its judgment, unsatisfactory and to grant or withhold
credits, certificates, degrees or diplomas. Disciplinary authority is
vested in the President’s Office.
Obligations Students will be held accountable for all individual
obligations, financial and other, entered into with The Cooper
Union. Students who fail to meet all financial obligations to The
Cooper Union will not be permitted to register. No student will be
included in the graduating class unless all obligations have been
accounted for prior to graduation. The Cooper Union will withhold
transcripts and other information about a student who has not met
financial obligations.
Transcripts Official transcripts of a student’s scholastic record are
issued directly to officials of other institutions or examining boards,
upon request to the dean of Admissions and Records and Registrar. Each copy of a transcript will cost $5 (there is no charge to
currently enrolled students). Requests should include the name
and complete address of the person who is to receive the transcript and must include the signature of the student or alumnus/a.
Transcripts are not issued for students during the period
of time in which grades are being recorded. Transcripts of student
grades are issued to inquiring employers and agencies if a student
notifies the dean of Admissions and Records and Registrar
in writing, authorizing the distribution of the transcript.
Official transcripts are issued directly to students or to alumni
in a sealed envelope.
Current students have access to their transcript and
registration information on SAIS, the Student Academic Information System, once they receive a password and a login at the
Computer Center.
Student Records
Notification of FERPA Rights The Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to
their education records. These rights include: 1) The right to
inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days
of the day The Cooper Union receives a request for access.
Students should submit to the Office of Admissions and Records
written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect.
The Office of Admissions and Records official will make arrange-
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ments for access and notify the student of the time and place
where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Office of Admissions and Records, the office shall
advise the student of the correct official to whom the request
should be addressed. 2) The right to request the amendment of
the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate. Students may ask the Office of Admissions and Records to
amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write
the Registrar and clearly identify the part of the record they want
changed and specify why it is inaccurate. If the Registrar decides
not to amend the record as requested by the student, the Registrar will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of
his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.
Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be
provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3)
The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the
extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One
exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure
to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school
official is a person employed by The Cooper Union in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research or support staff position;
a person or company with whom The Cooper Union contracted
(such as attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on
the Board of Trustees or a student serving on an official committee
(such as a disciplinary or grievance committee) or assisting
another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to
review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional
responsibility. 4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by The Cooper
Union to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and
address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy
Compliance Office, U.S Department of Education; 400 Maryland
Avenue, SW; Washington, DC 20202-5901.
Program Changes During the first several days of a semester,
courses may be added to or dropped from a student’s program
without penalty or fee (program adjustment). Adding of courses
after the posted date is not permitted. Students who wish to
change their academic programs should consult with appropriate
deans. All program changes must be reported by the student to
the dean of admissions and records. A $25 fee will be charged for
dropping courses after the drop/add period.
Transfer of Academic Credit Every effort is made to provide
admitted students with a preliminary evaluation of their transfer
credit. School-wide policies dictate that a grade of B or better must
be earned to be eligible for transfer of credit.
To seek credit or if there is a question about whether or not a
class taken at a previous institution is eligible for transfer of credit
please contact the department chairperson or respective dean of
the school to which you are interested in obtaining credit.
Each department/school reserves the right to ask for additional information, i.e., coursework, syllabus, portfolio, etc., before
granting transfer credit.
Currently enrolled students must always contact the appropriate department chairperson and dean of school at The Cooper
Union prior to registering for classes at other colleges or universities should there be interest in obtaining transfer credit at The
Cooper Union. Explicit permission must be granted by the department chairperson and dean of school before registering at another
college or university to ensure that the course will be transferable.
Please see pages 38, 55, 76 and 123 for more detailed information about transfer credit.
Health The Cooper Union requires a report of a physical examination from a licensed physician of the student’s choice. The Cooper
Union will provide its own medical form for this purpose and the
form must be completed in its entirety. This report must include a
record of vaccinations and immunizations. In addition, New York
state law requires that students respond to a query concerning
whether or not they have been immunized against meningitis.
The college reserves the right to exclude from attendance at
any time—temporarily or permanently—any student whose physical or emotional condition is such that, in the opinion of an appropriate medical officer, attendance would endanger the health or
welfare of other students and/or members of the Cooper union
community or otherwise disrupt the educational environment. A
student whose attendance at the Cooper Union has been interrupted by a dismissal or extended leave of absence—for any
reason—needs to submit new medical records before he or she
resumes attendance. Likewise, students continuing on to the graduate program at Cooper Union should submit new medical forms
at the time of beginning graduate study.
Discretionary Leave of Absence Students who have completed
at least one year of study may request an interruption of their
studies for a Discretionary Leave of Absence. A written request for
the Leave must be submitted to the student’s academic dean or
associate dean. A Discretionary Leave of Absence for up to one
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
year (2 semesters) with an automatic guarantee of reinstatement
may be granted to students in good academic standing who are
making satisfactory progress toward the degree.
A request for a Discretionary Leave beginning in Fall
semester must be made before April 15. A request for a Discretionary Leave beginning in Spring semester must be made before
November 15. Approval for a Discretionary Leave is neither automatic nor guaranteed.
Returning from a Discretionary Leave of Absence Students on
a Discretionary Leave must notify their academic dean of their
intention to return at least four (4) weeks prior to the registration
period for the semester of their intended return. The dean must
notify the registrar to reactivate the student record.
Medical Leave of Absence A student who must interrupt his/her
studies for medical reasons must submit a written request for a
Medical Leave of Absence to his/her academic dean along with
supporting documentation, which must include a letter from the
treating health care provider.
Returning from Medical Leave A student on a Medical Leave of
Absence must notify his/her academic dean of his/her intention to
return at least eight (8) weeks prior to the semester of the
student’s intended return. The student must also provide a letter
from his/her treating health care provider that he/she is ready and
able to return to school. The dean must notify the registrar to reactivate the student record.
Compulsory Medical Leave of Absence
The Cooper Union seeks to foster a safe and peaceful campus
environment (including, but not limited to its classrooms, laboratories, studios, shops, and dormitories) that nurtures its students’
well-being and allows them to focus on their studies.
The professional degree programs at The Cooper Union are
exceptionally rigorous courses of study that require a student’s full
commitment of time and effort and involve collaborative work in
shared studios and laboratories. Additionally, in light of the highly
specialized technical skills needed to run equipment in its shops
and laboratories, The Cooper Union has the highest concern for
safety on its premises and has appointed staff and faculty to supervise these facilities. Such concerns are carefully balanced with the
institution’s historic commitment to student rights.
If a staff or faculty member notifies the student’s academic
dean that a student’s conduct, actions or statements indicate that
the student: (i) poses a threat of harm to the safety of others (either
directly or through an inability to safely perform any necessary
functions as a student); and/or (ii) is engaged (or may engage) in
behavior or conduct that is disrupting the academic experience of
others on campus, the dean will promptly assess such concerns
and determine whether there is a problem, the nature, duration
and severity of the problem, and the probability that such harm or
disruption may occur. The dean or the dean of students will
promptly meet with the student to analyze the situation. If a
medical situation is involved, the student may be asked to provide
medical information from a healthcare provider in order to clarify
the situation as necessary. Considering all the information, the
dean will determine if a problem exists and, if so, whether a reasonable modification of policies, practices or procedures or the provision of auxiliary aids or services can appropriately mitigate the
problem. If so, following such an accommodation/modification, the
student will be permitted to continue with his/her studies. At any
point during the investigative process, the student will have the
right to take voluntary medical leave of absence following the
procedure stated above.
If an accommodation/modification cannot sufficiently alleviate the risk/disruption to allow the student to remain actively
enrolled, and the student is not able or willing to take a voluntary
medical leave of absence, the academic dean may recommend to
the Academic Leadership Team that the student be placed on
compulsory medical leave of absence. The student will be sent a
letter notifying him or her of the dean’s recommendation for a
compulsory medical leave of absence, the basis for such a recommendation, and inviting the student to a hearing on this matter.
This hearing – granting the student the opportunity to respond to
this recommendation – will be conducted by one member of the
Academic Leadership team and one other officer of The Cooper
Union and will be held no sooner than five (5) days after the letter
is sent to the student. If necessary, the student may request
accommodations (e.g., modifications to policies, practices, or
procedures; the need for an auxiliary aid or service) to participate
in the hearing. At this hearing, the student may submit additional
medical records and/or other appropriate information/documentation. The hearing officers will decide whether to accept the
recommendation, reject it, or modify it and will inform the student
within 24 hours of their decision, in writing. The hearing will be digitally recorded.
A student may be temporarily suspended from the institution
prior to this hearing.
A student may be placed on compulsory medical leave for
either a semester or a year, depending on the nature of the circumstances of the leave, submitted medical documentation, and the
student’s academic program. Students placed on compulsory
medical leave will be asked to provide an evaluation from a physi-
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
cian of Cooper Union’s choosing attesting to their medical readiness to resume their studies, with or without accommodation.
Appeal Process
A student who has been the subject of a hearing under these
procedures may appeal the decision of the hearing committee
within 3 business days by writing a letter to the Vice President for
Finance and Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer
or academic dean setting forth the reasons why the appeal is being
made. The Vice President will convene an Appeal Board within 3
days of receiving the appeal letter. The board will consist of the
Vice President or her designee and one member of the Presidential Leadership Team who was not involved in any way in the prior
hearing. The Appeal Board shall limit its review to these issues:
—does the record show that the party had a full and fair opportunity to present his or her case?
—does the solution imposed achieve the proper balance
between maintaining a safe and peaceful campus environment
and respecting the rights of the student to continue his or
her education?
After considering the record and the letter of appeal, the
Appeal Board may:
Accept the decision of the hearing committee;
Order a new hearing in keeping with the Appeal Board’s instructions;
Reverse the hearing committee’s decision in its entirety;
Accept the hearing committee’s decision but modify the solution.
If the Appeal Board accepts the decision of the hearing
committee, whether or not it modifies the terms of the compulsory
medical leave, the matter shall be deemed final.
Vaccination and Immunization New York State law requires that
all undergraduate and graduate students be immunized against
measles, mumps and rubella. The law applies to all students born
on or after January 1, 1957.
Proof of immunity consists of:
• Measles: Two doses of live measles vaccine administered after
12 months of age, physician documentation of measles disease or
a blood test showing immunity. The exact date of these shots in
month-day-year format must be written on the form and certified
by the physician.
• Mumps: One dose of live mumps vaccine administered after 12
months of age, physician documentation of mumps disease or a
blood test showing immunity. The New York State Assembly is
currently considering a proposal to require two mumps shots.
• Rubella: One dose of live rubella vaccine administered after 12
months of age or a blood test showing immunity.
Proof of immunity, including dates of immunizations, must be filed
with the Office of Student Services prior to each student’s initial
registration at The Cooper Union. Students who claim a religious
objection to being immunized must send a signed letter attesting
to this fact to the dean of students by July 15.
Students may not attend any events on campus, including
classes and orientation programs, without having submitted
these forms.
Meningitis Status New York State Public Health Law Section
2167 requires colleges to distribute information about meningococcal disease and vaccination to all enrolled students.
Meningitis is rare; however, cases of meningitis among young
adults have more than doubled since 1991. When the disease
strikes, its flu-like symptoms make diagnosis difficult. If not treated
early, meningitis can lead to swelling of the fluid surrounding the
brain and spinal seizures, limb amputation and even death.
The Cooper Union is required to maintain a record of the following
for each student:
• A response to the receipt of meningococcal disease and vaccine
information signed by the student or the student’s parent or
guardian, AND EITHER
• A record of meningococcal meningitis immunization within the
past 10 years, OR
• An acknowledgement of meningococcal disease risks and
refusal of meningococcal meningitis immunization signed by the
student or the student’s parent.
Students are asked to provide this information by July 15 of the
year they enter The Cooper Union.
Health Insurance The Cooper Union requires all students to
submit proof that they have health insurance prior to registration.
Students who fail to supply the information requested on the
Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Enrollment/Waiver
Form before August 15 will billed for the Cooper Union Student
Accident and Sickness Insurance at a cost of $1,100 for the
2012–2013 academic year.
Student Property The Cooper Union assumes no responsibility
for loss of or damage to the work or property of students.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Policy on Copyrighted Material
Copyright Infringement The Cooper Union is obligated by federal
law to inform its students of its policies and sanctions related to
copyright infringement. Unauthorized distribution of copyrighted
material, including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing (e.g.,
using BitTorrent to obtain/distribute music or movies) may subject
students to civil and criminal liability, sanctions arising from a
violation of The Cooper Union’s Code of Fair Practice, and loss of
Internet services provided by the Cooper Union IT Department.
The basics of copyright law may be found at numerous websites,
including those of many universities whose policies relating to
copyright infringement generally and file sharing in particular are
similar to The Cooper Union’s policy:
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/dcom/olia/copyright/copyrightr
efresher.htm
http://www.copyright.umich.edu/file-sharing-faq.html
http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/lss/spot_illegalfilesharing.php
http://www.copyright.gov/title17/
Fair Use A limitation on copyright protection is known as “fair use.”
Permission of a copyright holder is not required (i.e., there is no
copyright infringement) where the use is for noncommercial activities such as teaching (including multiple copies for classroom
use), scholarship, research, studio work, criticism, comment, or
news reporting. [Note that while “teaching” activities may qualify
as fair use, the doctrine of fair use has a requirement relating to the
“amount and substantiality” of the copyrighted work that does not
permit, for example, the copying and distribution of an entire copyrighted textbook to a class.]
The routine use of file sharing programs to obtain music,
movies and software does not constitute fair use. For more information on fair use see:
http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html
Code of Conduct In addition to the sanctions for copyright
infringement provided by federal law, The Cooper Union’s Code of
Conduct explicitly prohibits:
• “illegally duplicating copyrighted or licensed software” (Category
B offense).
• “any unauthorized use of network and/or computer hardware”
(Category B offense).
A violation of copyright law might also be viewed as an act of
academic dishonesty or fraud, which are Category A offenses and
punishable by suspension or dismissal.
IT Department Responsibilities In order to receive a Cooper
Union computer account, a student is required to sign a document
provided by the IT Department in which they promise to respect
the rights of copyright holders. While the IT Department does not
monitor its networks for content, it may monitor the volume of use
(bandwidth) for each computer on its networks. A student who is
using excessive bandwidth may have his or her Internet access
reduced or terminated.
Students should be aware that representatives of copyright
holders routinely search the Internet for infringers, resulting in
lawsuits being filed against students. Such lawsuits may be very
expensive to settle.Copyright holders have frequently filed notices of
copyright violations directly with The Cooper Union, which requires
the school to take immediate action to eliminate infringement.
The IT Department advises against installing and/or leaving
file sharing programs on any computer attached to a Cooper Union
network. While there are legitimate reasons for using such
programs (e.g., the distribution of non-copyrighted software), by
operating “silently” they may put the owner of the computer in the
position of distributing infringing files, and being liable for such
distribution, even though he or she has no intent of doing so.
Policy on Religious Observances No student shall be refused
admission to or be expelled from The Cooper Union solely because
he/she is unable to participate in any examination, study or work
requirement because of religious observances and practices. It is
the intent of The Cooper Union to accommodate reasonably individual student and faculty religious obligations and practices
without penalty, based on good faith effort and due notice to those
relevantly concerned of the anticipated religious observance date.
There is a mutual obligation of students and faculty to provide prior
notice to each other of anticipated absences. Students absent
because of religious observances and practices will be given the
opportunity to make up any examination, study or work requirement missed without penalty.
Bicycle Policy As of September 27, 2010 Cooper Union has 24
indoor bicycle parking spaces (for non-folding bicycles) for faculty,
staff and students of the Cooper Union only. The parking facility is
located in the lower level of the Foundation building. Access to the
parking facility is as follows:
• To determine if there are spaces available, check the sign at the
entrance to the Foundation Building.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
• The security desk in the Foundation Building will have serialnumbered tags equal to the number of spaces available in the
parking facility at that time.
• To obtain a tag you must show valid Cooper ID and sign in.
• The security guard will give you the tag which must be locked or
chained to your bicycle at all times the bicycle is in the building.
• You must return the tag and sign out when you leave the building.
• When there are no more tags at the security desk, there is no
more indoor parking and your bicycle must remain outside.
• You must use the square elevator to reach the lower level and to
return to street level. You may not use the stairs or the round
elevator.
• No more than three bicycles may be in the elevator at the same
time.
• You must lock your bicycle and tag to the bike rack.
• No overnight parking—bicycles must be removed when the
building closes. (Except when there is 24 hour building access.)
• Failure to follow these guidelines will result in termination of an
individual's access to indoor bicycle parking.
• If a bicycle is found in any other part of the building, or in any
other building on campus, it will be removed without prior notice
to the owner.
• Harassing security or any other Cooper employee regarding
access to the facility will result in termination of an individual's
access to indoor bicycle parking.
THE BICYCLE POLICY IMPLEMENTED IN SEPTEMBER 2009
REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR ALL OTHER BICYCLES.
The Cooper Union encourages the use of the bicycle as a viable
mode of transportation to and from campus. To ensure the safety
of our faculty, students and staff, and taking into account the
college's space constraints, the following bicycle policy was implemented September 1, 2009.
Bicycles that do not fold are not permitted in the Foundation
Building, 41 Cooper Square, the Residence Hall or 30 Cooper
Square. Nor are loose bicycle tires permitted in these buildings.
Folding bicycles, which must be covered prior to entering the
building, may be stored in offices or lockers. Folding bicycles
stored in lockers must fit within the locker such that locker doors
remain closed. Bicycles found in public spaces such as studios,
hallways, laboratories and lounges will be removed. Violators of
this policy will be subject to disciplinary action and will be responsible for any assessed damages. Violations by persons represented
by a labor organization will be handled in a manner consistent with
the applicable collective bargaining agreement.
Bicycles may be parked outdoors only in those areas which
have been specifically designated for this purpose. A bicycle
parking area is indicated by the presence of bicycle racks.
Bicycles may not be parked in a way which would impede access
to a building entrance or exit. No bicycle may be parked at any
entrance, exit or access ramp to any Cooper Union owned building.
In the event that bicycles are stolen on campus, members of
the Cooper Union community should report the incident to the
Office of Buildings and Grounds. In addition, members of the
Cooper Union community are also encouraged to report the incident to the local Police Precinct (212-477-7811). The Cooper
Union is not responsible for lost or stolen personal belongings,
including bicycles.
Policy on Smoking In accordance with the New York City Clean
Indoor Act, as amended, and New York State Public Health Law
Article 13-E, the following Smoking Policy is effective at The
Cooper Union September 1, 2009:
Smoking is prohibited at all times in all college owned buildings, including but not limited to auditoriums, classrooms, laboratories, offices and public areas and the Student Residence Hall.
Furthermore, smoking is not permitted within 25 feet from a
Cooper Union facility entrance.
This smoking policy is intended to keep the air clear of smoke
for those within our facilities and for those entering and leaving
Cooper Union owned buildings.
The Cooper Union requests and expects your cooperation
and assistance in the implementation and enforcement of the
smoking prohibition. Those who do not comply with this policy will
be subject to disciplinary action up to and including fines and/or
expulsion from the college, or termination of employment.
Complaints against persons represented by a labor organization
will be handled in a manner that is consistent with the applicable
collective bargaining unit.
Conflicts related to smoking among employees should be brought
to the attention of appropriate supervisory personnel and, if necessary, referred to the Equal Opportunity Officer. To report an incident concerning violation of this policy, please send a written
report to the Director of Facilities Management.
Students alleged to be in violation of the policy are subject
to disciplinary action through the appropriate student conduct
jurisdiction.
In accordance with the law, any individual can voice objections to smoke that gathers in any smoke-free area without fear
of retaliation.
Policy on Alcoholic Beverages and Illegal Drugs The Cooper
Union strictly adheres to all local, state and federal laws relating to
the use, possession or illegal manufacture of drugs and alcohol on
its premises or at any official college-sponsored event. Violators
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
may be subject to prosecution in accordance with federal, state or
municipal law and are subject to The Cooper Union disciplinary
proceedings as outlined in A Code of Fair Practice. On campus,
students over the age of 21 may consume alcohol only in the
context of official campus events where there is a security guard
present to check IDs. Alcohol may not be carried from the room in
which it is served. Student groups recognized by the Joint Activities Committee and approved for a budget line for serving alcohol
must apply for an alcohol permit and follow The Cooper Union’s
procedures listed at the end of this section.
NEW YORK STATE LAW REGARDING ALCOHOL
Section 65 of the New York State Alcohol Beverage Control
Law states:
“No person shall sell, deliver, give away or cause or permit to be
sold, delivered or given away any alcoholic beverages to:
• Any person, actually or apparently, under the age of twenty-one
(21) years;
• Any visibly intoxicated person;
• Any habitual drunk.”
In addition, legislation enacted in November 1991 specifies that a
U.S. or Canadian driver’s license or non-driver’s identification
card, a valid passport or an identification card issued by the United
States Armed Forces must be used as written evidence of age for
the purchase of alcoholic beverages. New York State law also
prohibits the possession of alcoholic beverages with the intent to
consume by a minor and penalizes the use of a fraudulent proof of
age to procure alcohol. Social host liability may be imposed on any
person who serves alcohol to a minor.
Procedures for Use in Serving Alcoholic Beverages at Student
Events/Exhibitions: Student groups recognized by the Joint Activities Committee must first apply for and be approved for a budget
for their event. No later than two weeks before the approved event,
two members of the student group must apply for an alcohol
permit from the dean of students and complete arrangements to
hire security guards. These student sponsors must sign an agreement to follow the rules listed below:
Serving Alcohol
1. The serving of hard liquor is not permitted.
2. The Cooper Union has a New York State Liquor Authority permit
for the serving of wine and beer at student events. Such serving will
be limited to those persons who can prove attainment of the
minimum legal drinking age in New York State of 21 years. To facilitate quick identification of students of legal age at the point of
service, a process of carding that requires the presentation of a
Cooper Union ID will be carried out by a security guard available
solely for that purpose and paid for by the student sponsors either
through allocated JAC funds,or,in the case of student exhibitions,by
the student exhibitors. There are no exceptions to this requirement.
3. Sponsors of events have the primary responsibility for ensuring
that only those of legal drinking age are served alcohol. Sponsors
must include at least two persons 21 years of age or older, and they
must sign the required alcoholic beverage permit. Before authorization to hold an event can be given, all student sponsors must
undergo an orientation with the dean of students or a designated
representative of the Office of Student Services.
4. Such events must include the serving of food, in sufficient
amount for the numbers attending, and the displaying of a variety
of non-alcoholic beverages must be featured as prominently as
alcoholic beverages and dispensed in the same area.
5. The promotion of alcohol in advertisements for events is not
permitted. Other aspects of the event such as entertainment or
food should be emphasized in the advertisements.
6. The serving of alcoholic beverages should be discontinued at
approximately one hour before the end of the event.
7. Event sponsors must not only refuse to serve alcoholic beverages to anyone who appears intoxicated, but also must provide
appropriate assistance to such persons. Assistance may include,
but is not limited to, providing safe transportation arrangements
for intoxicated guests and arranging for medical help.
8. State law requires that a U.S or Canadian driver’s license or nondriver identification card, a valid passport or an ID issued by the
U.S. Armed Forces must be used as written evidence of age for
procuring alcoholic beverages.
9. The amount of alcohol permitted shall reflect the number of
students over 21 years of age expected at the event, as approved by
the dean of students, and in no case shall exceed two kegs of beer.
Exhibitions
Students who wish to serve alcohol in connection with a student
exhibition opening should consult the appropriate academic dean
for the policies and procedures to follow, including ordering a
guard. The following rules apply to all exhibitions where alcohol is
served.
1. The serving of hard liquor is not permitted.
2. Alcohol service will be permitted at student receptions only
when the student presenters are over 21 years of age. In the case
of a group presentation the majority of students must be over 21.
3. The Cooper Union has a New York State Liquor Authority permit
for the serving of wine and beer at student events. Such serving will
be limited to those persons who can prove attainment of the
minimum legal drinking age in New York State of 21 years. To facilitate quick identification of students of legal age at the point of
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
service, a process of carding that requires the presentation of a
Cooper Union ID will be carried out by a security guard available
solely for that purpose and paid for by the student exhibitors. There
are no exceptions to this requirement.
4. Such events must include the serving of food, in sufficient
amount for the number attending, and the displaying of a variety
of non-alcoholic beverages must be featured as prominently as
alcoholic beverages and dispensed in the same area.
5. The promotion of alcohol in advertisements for events is not
permitted.
6. Event sponsors must not only refuse to serve alcoholic beverages to anyone who appears intoxicated, but also must provide
appropriate assistance to such persons. Assistance may include,
but is not limited to, providing safe transportation arrangements
for intoxicated guests and arranging for medical help.
7. State law requires that a U.S. or Canadian driver’s license or
non-driver identification card, a valid passport or an ID issued by
the U.S. Armed Forces must be used as written evidence of age for
procuring alcoholic beverages.
8. The amount of alcohol served at a student reception shall not
exceed 48 (12 oz.) cans or bottles of beer or 12 (750 ml.) bottles
of wine.
Campus Security and Safety
“My earnest desire is to make this building and institution
contribute in every way possible to unite all in one common effort
to improve each and every human being, seeing that we are bound
in one common destiny and by the laws of our being are made
dependent for our happiness on the continued acts of kindness we
receive from each other.”
—Peter Cooper
It is in light of this statement that The Cooper Union establishes an
attitude toward campus security and safety. The Cooper Union has
been fortunate in maintaining an atmosphere where serious criminal activities have not occurred. Our goal remains to encourage
the integrity, honesty and responsibility of each individual student
to maintain an atmosphere of harmony and mutual respect.
Every incident of behavior that seems inconsistent with our
philosophy and principles of safety and security should be
reported to appropriate campus authorities. The guards in the
lobby of each building should be notified immediately of any emergencies. Depending on the circumstances, it may also be appropriate to call the police at 911.
Students and staff should also file an incident report with either the
office of the Director of Facilities Management or with the Office of
Student Services. Such reports help The Cooper Union respond to
breaches in security. The Director of Facilities Management maintains a daily log of such incidents. This log is available for inspection in room 111, 41 Cooper Square.
When appropriate, information about such incidents shall be
disseminated to the community as a whole via fliers or memoranda.
The Campus Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of
1990 requires colleges and universities to make available to all
current students and employees and to all applicants for enrollment or employment statistics concerning the prevalence
of certain types of crime on campus and in the neighborhood.
These statistics are published annually in the Campus Safety,
Security and Fire Safety Report available on the Cooper Union
website and from the Office of Student Services, 30 Cooper
Square, 6th floor, New York City, NY 10003. Crime statistics are
available online at http://opc.ed.gov/security.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
CODE OF CONDUCT
Preamble: As an educational community, The Cooper Union
affirms the freedom of its students to pursue their scholarly, artistic
and intellectual interests. The Cooper Union has developed policies to safeguard this freedom and to maintain an environment
conducive to academic endeavor. These rules are not intended to
replace federal, state or municipal laws. All Cooper Union students
are responsible for upholding such laws, and any violation of law
may result in disciplinary action being taken by The Cooper Union.
In addition to the Standards of Conduct defined below, students
are bound by the rules of their individual school or program, and
any rules regarding the use of the facilities or equipment at The
Cooper Union, including, but not limited to, classrooms, the library,
the Great Hall, the Student Residence, the Computer Center, laboratories, shops, studios, and other facilities.
The Cooper Union has established separate policies,
published elsewhere, to adjudicate claims of academic dishonesty, and claims of discrimination or harassment against a
protected class (e.g., race, sex, and disability).
The Cooper Union reserves the right to modify and/or amend
this Code at any time it deems necessary and in accordance with
applicable laws.
Part One: Student Rights
Students have certain rights established by federal, state or local
statutes or under institutional policy. Among these rights, but not
limited to these alone, are:
The freedom to engage in free discussion, inquiry and expression.
The freedom of access to public records.
The freedom of association.
Freedom from assault.
The right to express views on issues of institutional policy.
Freedom of the press.
Freedom from discrimination on the basis of age, race, religion,
sex, color, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin,
or any other legally protected characteristic.
Freedom from discriminatory or sexual harassment.
Freedom from improper academic evaluation.
Part Two: Standards of Conduct for Students
Category A The Cooper Union finds the following violations
extremely serious and subject to the highest penalties:
1. Physical assaults resulting in injury, including sexual assaults.
2. The sale of drugs in a manner that violates federal or state law.
3. Possession of drugs, as defined as a felony, under state or
federal law.
4. Undermining campus safety by setting off false fire alarms,
discharging fire extinguishers, tampering with security systems, or
ignoring the instructions of security guards or studio monitors.
5. Possessing or introducing dangerous weapons to campus in
the manner prohibited in the Weapons Policy.
6. Violations of campus alcohol policy that result in injury or
damage to property or undermine the safety and security of the
campus community, including acts of hazing.
7. Acts of fraud. Some examples of these acts, but not limited
to the following, are: misrepresentation, falsifying records or documents, assuming the identity of another person, or furnishing
fraudulent information.
8. Acts of theft or vandalism (including graffiti) against the
property of another student, guest, staff or faculty member or
against the property of Cooper Union itself.
9. Reckless behavior involving the interior or exterior structures
of campus buildings. Some examples of these acts, but not limited
to the following, are climbing the grid of 41 Cooper Square,
hanging over terrace balustrades, and accessing the roof of the
Student Residence.
For these categories of violation, the sanction will ordinarily
be suspension or dismissal. In some cases, the Presidential Right
of Summary Suspension will be invoked.
Category B The purpose and ideals of The Cooper Union depend,
for their full achievement, on respect, cooperation and integrity
among members of the community. The Cooper Union has
adopted the following rules of behavior in the interests of maintaining an orderly atmosphere.
1. At all reasonable times, a student shall comply with a request
for identification from an employee or security guard of The
Cooper Union.
2. Students will respect the building hours and will leave the
premises at the appropriate time.
3. Students will cooperate with the staff supervising the facilities of The Cooper Union.
4. Except for actions protected under state or federal law or the
institutional governances, a student may not willfully obstruct or
disrupt any authorized activities on college premises or other
Cooper Union activities, including its public service functions.
5. A student may not engage in libel or slander.
6. A student may not be involved in acts that cause physical or
psychological harm.
7. A student may not consume, buy, sell, borrow, possess, lend
or give as a gift any drug, narcotic, or alcoholic beverage in such a
way that would be a violation of any local, state or federal law or the
institutional alcohol policy.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
8. When a student has a guest on campus, the appropriate
guest procedures must be followed, and the student is responsible
for the conduct of his or her guest and for any damages caused by
that guest.
9. The use of the computer and network facilities is for the
purpose of supporting the educational experience at The Cooper
Union. Unauthorized or inappropriate use of these facilities is
prohibited. Misuse may include, but is not limited to, damaging or
altering records or programs; invading the privacy of other users
by using or manipulating directories, files, programs or passwords;
engaging in disruptive behavior; illegally duplicating or copyrighted or licensed software; using the facilities in support of a
commercial concern or venture or any unauthorized use of
network and/or computer hardware, software, accounts or passwords.
10. A student may not gamble for money or other valuables while
on the campus of The Cooper Union.
11. A student may not threaten members of the Student Judicial
Committee or attempt to tamper with witnesses to the Student
Judicial Committee.
12. A student may not smoke within any Cooper Union building
or within 20 feet of the entrance to any Cooper Union building.
Category C: Other Complaints. The Student Judicial Committee
may also consider complaints that are not delineated under Category A or Category B above, provided that the person against
whom the complaint is made is notified in writing as to whether the
proceeding will follow the rules of Category A or Category B, delineated below.
Part Three: Presidential Right of Summary Suspension.
Subject to prompt review, the President of The Cooper Union may
summarily suspend a student from the College when, in his or her
best judgment, such immediate action is necessary for protecting
the health and safety of the College and/or any member of the
College community. The President will consult with the student’s
academic dean prior to such action, if time permits. Any person so
suspended shall have all the rights as outlined in the Code of
Conduct. Summary Suspensions must be reviewed by a Judicial
Panel within seven regular business days of the suspension. Until
and unless the accused is found to have violated the Standards of
Conduct, his/her status as a member of the Cooper Union community shall not be altered. Any person so suspended shall have the
right, if the suspension is not upheld, to excused absences from all
classes and examinations during the suspension period.
Part Four: The Cooper Union Student Judicial Committee
4.1 Jurisdiction. The Student Judicial Committee of the Joint
Student Council shall have jurisdiction of all matters involving an
alleged violation of the Standards of Conduct stated above.
4.2 Membership. Each student council shall elect two representatives and two alternates to the Student Judicial Committee and
one representative and one alternate to the Judicial Appeals
Committee. Student Judicial Committee members must be
elected to the Joint Student Council with plurality and cannot be
on probation for academic reasons or have been issued a sanction
by the Student Judicial Committee. Judicial Panels shall ordinarily
be chosen from members of the Student Judicial Committee;
however, any member of the Joint Student Council eligible to serve
on the Student Judicial Committee can serve on a Judicial Panel
if necessary.
4.3 General Rules. Proceedings conducted by the Student Judicial Committee are completely independent of any civil or criminal
proceeding and may occur simultaneously with such court action.
The Student Judicial Committee is administrative, rather than
criminal or civil, in nature. The standard of proof applied by the
Student Judicial Committee shall be “preponderance of the
evidence.” Judicial Panels do not use technical rules of evidence.
Committee members may take notice of any matter in the
common experience of Cooper Union students.
Before calling a Judicial Panel, the Dean of Students shall
review the list of eligible panelists for possible prejudice with the
complainant and the person being accused. The Dean of Students
shall notify the members of the Judicial Panel as to the time and
date of the hearing. This does not preclude the Dean of Students
from acting as witness, if necessary.
Representatives to the Student Judicial Committee may also
serve as mediators in informal hearings.
All hearings shall be considered confidential except when
applicable law mandates disclosure to the community; the
complainant, however, shall have the right to be notified as to the
result of the hearing.
Every student charged under the Code of Conduct shall
be presumed not to have violated the Code of Conduct until the
Judicial Panel arrives at its decision.
If, because of a disability, a student participating in the any
stage of the hearings (or subsequent appeals process) in any
capacity requires a modification to policies, practices, or procedures, and/or an auxiliary aid or service the student should submit
such a request in writing to the Dean of Students at least five days
prior to the scheduled start of the hearing so that the request can
be appropriately assessed prior to the start of the hearing.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
4.4 Judicial Panels for Category A Violations. For a Category A
offense, the Judicial Panel shall be a subcommittee of the Student
Judicial Committee drawing one representative from each student
council plus any two administrative officers of The Cooper Union.
The associate dean of the school in which the student charged in
the complaint is registered shall ordinarily be invited to participate
as one of the administrative officers on the Judicial Panel in the
Category adjudication. Persons charged with a Category A offense
have the right to a representative of his or her choice at his or her
expense, but the representative’s role will be limited to providing
support to the person being charged. Cooper Union may also
appoint a lawyer to such committee to serve as an advisor to the
committee members.
4.5 Judicial Panels for Category B Violations. For a Category B
offense, the Judicial Panel shall be a subcommittee of three from
the Student Judicial Committee, generally one representative from
each school.
A Judicial Panel formed under the rules of Category B has the
right to stop the hearing and request that the case be heard
instead under Category A Rules, so long as the parties are notified
and the Category A hearing is scheduled within 7 days.
Part Five: Procedures for Filing Charges
1. Any member of the Cooper Union community may file
a written complaint about an infraction of the Standards of
Conduct by a student. Such complaint should be addressed to the
Student Judicial Committee and delivered to the Office of Student
Services, 6th floor, 30 Cooper Square, NY NY 10003, Attention:
Dean of Students.
2. A complaint must be made within 30 days of the alleged
infraction.
3. The complaint must set forth the basic facts of the alleged
infraction, including the date, time, and place in which the incident
occurred.
4. The Dean of Students will meet with the complainant to
determine if the complaint can be resolved informally or through
mediation. The penalties of warning, probation or loss of privileges
may be meted out in these cases by the Dean of Students, with the
agreement of all parties concerned.
5. Absent a successful resolution, the Dean of Students will
schedule a hearing within 10 business days. S/he will notify the
student being charged by letter of the charges, place and time
of the hearing, and whether it will be conducted as a Category A or
B hearing.
Part Six: Procedures for Conducting Hearings
1. The Judicial Panel shall elect one of its members to be chairperson and to preside over the hearing. The person presiding shall
exercise control over the proceedings to avoid needless consumption of time and to achieve orderly completion of the hearing. Any
person who disrupts a hearing, including the parties to the
complaint, may be excluded by the person presiding.
2. The failure of the student charged to appear at the stated
time and place shall constitute a waiver of the right to a hearing.
The complainant shall have the option of not appearing at
the hearing; however, a complainant cannot selectively attend
portions of the hearing but must follow the instructions of
the chairperson.
3. Any person being charged, having appeared at the hearing,
shall have the right to contest the acceptance into the record of
any evidence presented in support of the charges.
4. Each party shall have the right to summon witnesses,
provided that a list of these is presented to the Dean of Students
72 hours prior to the hearing. The chairperson of the hearing shall
have the right to exclude witnesses who appear to offer redundant
testimony.
5. Each party may question the other party’s witnesses, under
the supervision of the chairperson.
6. The chairperson shall summon witnesses into the hearing
room and ask them to withdraw once they finish testifying.
7. Hearings shall be taped on an audio recorder. Tapes shall be
destroyed at the expiration of the appeal process.
8. After testimony is concluded, the panel shall come to a decision and present the decision in writing to the person being
charged, either by hand or by mail to the last address given by
the student.
9. In the event of a disciplinary dismissal, the President shall
review the recommendation before it is put into effect.
Part Seven: Disciplinary Sanctions
By majority vote, the Judicial Panel may impose any of the
following sanctions. The Student Judicial Committee will retain a
written copy of the sanction in its file until the student permanently
separates from The Cooper Union.
7.1 Warning. A warning in writing, in the case of a minor infraction, that further violation of the Standards of Conduct may result
in a more severe disciplinary sanction.
7.2 Loss of Privilege. In cases that involve breaking the rules of a
specific facility, students may lose the privilege of using that facility
on a temporary or permanent basis or have the hours of their use
restricted.
A student who loses privileges may also be issued a warning
or higher penalty.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
7.3 Behavioral Probation. A letter of censure given in instances
of more serious violations of the Standards of Conduct. Behavioral
probation is a trial period in which a student who has been in difficulty has the opportunity to demonstrate that he or she can be a
responsible member of the community. The terms of the probation
may be varied to fit the individual circumstances.
7.4 Suspension. Given in cases where it is judged that the
student should be removed from the college community. This
penalty is for a stated period of time, either one semester or one
year. A suspended student is prohibited from being on any Cooper
Union premises during the period of the suspension without
written authorization from the Office of the President. A notification of the suspension will be sent to the Office of Admission and
Records, the Office of the President, and the Office of Buildings
and Grounds as well as to the student’s academic dean.
7.5 Dismissal. Subject to the approval of the President of the
College before taking effect, a disciplinary dismissal involves involuntary and permanent dismissal from the college. The President
shall have the right to accept, reject or modify the proposed
dismissal. The dismissal will be a permanent part of the student’s
file and will be noted on his or her transcript.
7.6 Other Actions. The Judicial Panel may impose other penalties that it deems appropriate to the infraction. Examples of such
penalties are: financial restitution for damages or for medical
expenses, letters of apology, community service work, etc.
7.7 Legal Action. The above listed penalties shall be in addition
to any penalties or liabilities pursuant to the laws of the State
of New York, both civil and criminal. Cooper Union or its designee
may, at its discretion, depending on the gravity of the violation,
file a criminal or civil complaint. Filing an action under this Code
does not preclude the complainant from also filing a civil or
criminal complaint.
Part Eight: Appeal Process
8.1 Filing an Appeal. Any student found to have violated any of
the Standards of Conduct may appeal the decision of the Judicial
Panel within 4 business days by writing a letter to his or her
academic dean setting forth the reasons why the appeal is being
made. The Dean will convene an Appeal Board within 5 days of
receiving the appeal letter.
8.2 Composition of the Appeal Board. The board will consist of
two students and one academic dean. Ordinarily, the academic
dean and one of the students shall come from the same school as
the appellant. The remaining student shall be from one of the other
schools. Alternates may replace student representatives and have
full rights to vote on the appeal board.
8.3 Limitations of the Authority of the Appeal Board. The Appeal
Board shall limit its review to these issues:
—does the record show that the party had a full and fair opportunity to present his or her case?
—was the sanction imposed fair and proper in light of the infraction proved?
8.4 Decision of the Appeal Board. After considering the record
and the letter of appeal, the Appeal Board may:
a. Accept the decision of the Judicial Panel;
b. Return the case to the Student Judicial Committee for a
further hearing in keeping with the Appeal Board’s instructions;
c. Reverse the Judicial Panel’s decision and dismiss the case;
d. Accept the Judicial Panel’s decision but reduce the
sanction. The sanction may not be increased.
If the Appeal Board accepts the decision of the Judicial
Panel, whether or not it reduces the sanction, the matter shall be
deemed final.
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN
SCHOOL OF
ARCHITECTURE
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture is to
provide for its students the finest professional education available
within an intellectual environment that fosters and expands their
creative capacities and sensibilities and establishes the foundation for a productive professional life. The school is committed to
the belief that one of society’s prime responsibilities is toward
learning and education in the deepest sense: that the exercise of
individual creativity within a willing community is a profoundly
social act. Fundamental to the mission of the school is the maintenance of an atmosphere in which freedom of thought and exploration can flourish, where students can explore and utilize their
special and individual talents, interests and modes of working, to
their highest potential.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE
PROFESSIONAL DEGREE CURRICULUM
Aims and Objectives The School of Architecture offers a five-year
program leading to the bachelor of architecture, a first professional degree accredited by the NAAB. The architecture
curriculum is designed to prepare students for a rich array of
opportunities in the profession, offering a broad cultural and intellectual foundation in the liberal arts as they relate to the design of
the environment at all scales. The discipline of architecture interpreted in the widest possible sense as a cultural practice is seen
as a basis for a fully-rounded education at the undergraduate level.
Students develop their knowledge and design skills within a framework of studios and courses that stimulate research and debate
into the nature and role of architecture as a cultural practice with
profound social and environmental implications.
The content of the curriculum, based on a wide cultural view
of architecture, reflects broad ethical values. Faculty-student
interaction is conducted on an intensive basis in the design studio
and other classes. Within this framework faculty members
encourage students to develop their individual interests and
strengths, with a constant stress on fundamentals and a basic
commitment intended to equip the graduate with a lasting ability
to produce an architecture that is a meaningful synthesis of the
social, aesthetic and technological. The relationship between
architecture and other creative disciplines is stressed through the
five years. Students are encouraged to express themselves both
verbally and visually.
In a moment where the nature, role and scope of the architect is rapidly assuming new directions and dimensions in both the
social and technological domains, the school emphasizes the principles of design and their underlying human values, while
preparing students to respond positively to change. The program
seeks to engender a strong sense of the responsibilities of service
and leadership, team-work and individual creativity essential to
the development of principled professionals dedicated to interpreting and constructing the spatial needs of the community.
The five-year design sequence is carefully structured to
introduce the student to the principles of architectonics, the investigation of program and site, structures and environmental and
building technologies, in a comprehensive and integrated
curriculum. The studios comprise an introduction to the basic
elements of form, space and structure; complex institutional
design problems in their urban context; and a year-long thesis that
demonstrates the student’s ability to synthesize a comprehensive
understanding of architecture in society. The traditional and
essential skills of drawing, model-making and design development
are complemented by a full investigation of the analytical and critical uses of digital technologies. The study of world architecture
and urbanism is deepened by the understanding of individual
cultures, environmental and technological issues at every scale.
The theory of the discipline, past and present, is investigated
through the close analysis of critical texts and related to the theory
and practice of other arts, such as public art, film and video. The
position of the School of Architecture, together with the Schools of
Art and Engineering and the Faculty of Humanities and Social
Sciences, offers a unique opportunity for interaction and interdisciplinary research and experience.
The Cooper Union’s location in New York City in the heart of
downtown Manhattan provides a stimulating professional, social
and cultural context for the education of an architect and an urban
laboratory for the study of design in society. The numerous cultural
institutions of the city provide an inexhaustible resource for
research and experience outside the studio and classroom. The
school’s faculty includes nationally and internationally recognized
architects; the school’s diverse student body consists of highly
talented and motivated individuals and its distinguished alumni
are leaders in architecture and related fields.
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
The Irwin S.Chanin School of Architecture offers a five-year program
leading to the bachelor of architecture degree. The degree requirements are intended to provide students with a rigorous training in and
exposure to the creative and technical aspects of architecture. The
professional courses in the curriculum are supplemented and
enhanced by required courses both within and outside the discipline
of architecture. The requirements are as follows:
Minor Students who complete a minimum of 15 upper-division
credits in a specific field of liberal arts may qualify for a minor in
that field of humanities and social sciences. Minors are offered and
will be designated on student transcripts in the following fields:
American studies; art history; literature; history and society. Additional information is available from the office of the dean of humanities and social sciences.
Credits
Courses
Sem 1
Sem 2
First Year
Arch 111 A-B Architectonics
Arch 114 A-B Freehand Drawing
Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I
Arch 118 A-B Computer Applications and Descriptive Geometry
FA100R A-B Introduction to Techniques
Arch 103-4 Calculus and Analytic Geometry
Freshman Seminar
Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits First Year
4
3
3
2
1
3
3
19
4
3
3
2
1
3
3
19
Second Year
Arch 121 A-B Design II
Arch 122 A-B Structures I
Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II
Ph 165-6 Concepts of Physics
The Making of Modern Society
The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Second Year
5
2
3
2
3
15
5
2
3
2
3
15
Third Year
Arch 131 A-B Design III
Arch 132 A-B Structures II
Arch 133 Introduction to Urban History and Theories
Arch 134 A-B Environmental Technologies
Arch 135 A-B Building Technology
Electives*
Total Credits Third Year
5
2
3
2
4
16
5
2
2
3
2
2
16
Fourth Year
Arch 141 A-B Design IV
Arch 142 A-B Structures III
Arch 143 A-B Construction Management
Electives *
Total Credits Fourth Year
5
2
1
7
15
5
2
1
7
15
Fifth Year
Arch 151 A-B Thesis
Arch 152 Structures IV
Arch 154 A-B Professional Practice
Arch 205/225 Advanced Concepts/Topics
Electives *
Total Credits Fifth Year
6
2
1
2
4
15
6
1
2
6
15
Total Credit Requirement for B.Arch. Degree
160
*The elective component for bachelor of architecture candidates can be fulfilled by elective courses in
areas such as humanities and social sciences, visual arts, mathematics and science and languages.
Approval for these elective courses must be granted by the appropriate academic faculty. A minimum
of six elective credits must be taken in the humanities and social sciences.
The School of Architecture curriculum includes 32 credits of required coursework in general studies
(non-professional coursework outside the discipline of architecture). In addition, students are required
to complete 13 more credits of elective coursework outside the discipline of architecture.
Accreditation
NAAB The National Architectural Accrediting Board mandates
that the following information be included in catalogs: In the
United States, most state registration boards require a degree
from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite
for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board
(NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S.
professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three
types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of
Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be
granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation,
depending on the extent of its conformance with established
educational standards.
Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree
programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree
and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However,
the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an
accredited degree.
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture of The Cooper
Union offers the following NAAB-accredited degree programs:
Bachelor of Architecture (160 undergraduate credits). The next
accreditation visit for this program will be in 2016.
The NAAB Conditions for Accreditation, including the
Student Performance Criteria, and the NAAB Procedures for
Accreditation are available on the NAAB website.
Conditions for Accreditation:
http://www.naab.org/accreditation/2009_Conditions.aspx
Student Performance Criteria:
http://www.naab.org/accreditation/2009_Conditions.aspx
(Part Two (II): Section 1)
Procedures for Accreditation:
http://www.naab.org/accreditation/2011Procedures.aspx
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
AND REGULATIONS
Credits Only those students who are officially registered in a
course (i.e., by approval of the dean of the School of Architecture
or a faculty adviser and notification of the Office of Admissions and
Records) will have grades and credits entered on their records.
Satisfactory Progress Toward Degree The bachelor of architecture degree program is a rigorous course of study that seeks to
prepare students intellectually and professionally for the investigation and making of architecture. The privilege of studying at The
Cooper Union, with the benefit of a full-tuition scholarship for all
admitted undergraduate students, brings with it important responsibilities. For students in the School of Architecture, these responsibilities include meeting the requirements of a demanding
professional curriculum. All students who accept our offer
of admission are expected to fully commit themselves to
completing the degree requirements in accordance with the
curriculum, which has been designed with great attention
to sequence, prerequisites and the relationships between course
work and the goals of each design studio. All classes that comprise
the curriculum are essential to the education of an architect, and
must be successfully completed by each student in the year
and sequence intended. Students admitted as freshmen
will complete the program in five years; transfer students will
complete the program in accordance with their placement in the
design sequence.
Students who do not successfully complete required courses
as outlined in the curriculum will not be permitted to advance to the
next year of study until the missing requirement(s) is/are completed.
Since make-up classes are not offered at The Cooper Union,missing
requirements may need to be fulfilled through coursework taken
outside The Cooper Union. The intention to complete requirements
outside The Cooper Union requires a meeting with the appropriate
academic adviser or faculty member in order to obtain advance
approval of the potential substitute course, and to confirm the
minimum grade required in order for transfer credit to be awarded.
It is the responsibility of the student to locate an eligible course at a
college/university that allows part-time/summer study; the
approved course will be taken at the student’s expense. Students
making up courses in this manner will be permitted to register for
Cooper Union classes in September only after the Office of Admissions and Records receives a transcript showing the successful
completion of these courses. It is in the best interest of each
student to complete their coursework here at Cooper Union in
conformance with the approved curriculum.
Students must pass a sufficient number of credits each
semester to complete his or her degree requirements within five
years of study. When dropping or adding courses, a student must
follow all degree requirements for their particular year of study.
The normal course load is 15–19 credits per semester.
Students are required to be registered for a minimum of 12 credits
per semester. Failure to maintain satisfactory progress toward the
degree may be grounds for dismissal.
Students are eligible to register for more than 18 credits per
semester, but not more than 20, if they have received at least a 3.0
rating for the previous semester.
Transfer Students When admitted, transfer students are offered
admission into a specific year of the five-year Design sequence.
Placement in the Design sequence is a condition of the offer of
admission and not subject to further review or appeal. By
accepting the offer of admission, the transfer student agrees to
this placement and acknowledges his/her anticipated graduation
date. There is no opportunity for transfer students to accelerate
through the required Design sequence.
Placement in the Design studio sequence is the only transfer
credit evaluation made at the time of the offer of admission. Independently of Design studio placement, transfer students must
fulfill all of their B.Arch degree requirements either through
transfer credit or by completing required and elective coursework
here. Transfer credit evaluation for required and/or elective
coursework in the B.Arch curriculum, other than the Design
studio, is the responsibility of the individual transfer student.
Transfer students are required to seek transfer credit for all other
eligible coursework. It may not be possible for transfer students to
complete all academic coursework simultaneously with their
Design studio requirements. It will be necessary for the matriculating transfer student to successfully complete the design studio
to which he or she is admitted, as well as all subsequent studios,
as part of his or her degree requirements. The official academic
transcript of a transfer student will be reviewed prior to the
student’s first registration. This review will determine what, if any,
additional coursework may be eligible for transfer credit.
Transfer Credit Incoming students who have completed collegelevel academic work outside The Cooper Union may be eligible to
receive transfer credit. Approval of transfer credit will be made by
the appropriate dean or faculty based on transcripts from other
schools and additional materials, including a course description,
a course syllabus with topics and course requirements, a reading
list and any quizzes, examinations, papers or projects, etc., that
demonstrate the level, content and requirements of the course, as
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
well as the student’s proficiency with the course topics. If necessary, a proficiency/placement exam may be administered in
certain subject areas. Transfer students must be prepared to
present these and other requested materials for each course for
which transfer credit is sought. Transfer credit evaluation must be
completed by the end of the first semester of study.
Currently enrolled students who find it necessary to complete
degree requirements at another institution for transfer credit to The
Cooper Union must have appropriate advance approval.
Credit may be granted for work done at another institution by
any student upon examination by the dean. This credit is to be
recorded after satisfactory completion of one semester’s work at
The Cooper Union.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Grades used, with their numerical equivalents, are: A (4.0), A(3.7), B+ (3.3), B (3.0), B- (2.7), C+ (2.3), C (2.0), C- (1.7), D+ (1.3),
D (1.0), D- (.7), F (0). The assigned numerical equivalents are used
in computing semester and annual ratings by multiplying the
numerical equivalent of the grade for each subject by the credits
assigned to the subject. The sum of such multiplications for all the
subjects carried by a student is divided by the total credits carried
by him/her for that period to determine the average rating.
course while passing the course requirements at the time of withdrawal. This permission must be obtained before the end of the
sixth week of the semester. The grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s semester rating but remains on the
student’s transcript. (See Change of Program: Withdrawing from
a Course, page 40.) Students are not permitted to withdraw from
required classes.
WF The student has received permission from the dean of the
School of Architecture and the instructor and has withdrawn from
a course while failing the course requirements at the time of withdrawal. This permission must be obtained before the end of the
sixth week of the semester. This grade is included in the calculation of the student’s semester rating, its numerical equivalent is 0,
and it remains on the student’s transcript. (See Change of
Program: Withdrawing from a Course, p.38.)
When appropriate, certain courses may be designated as
Pass/Fail courses.
Pass Requirements completed. This designation is not included
in the calculation of the student’s semester rating.
Fail Failure to meet the minimum requirements of a course. This
grade is included in the calculation of the student’s semester
rating; its numerical equivalent is 0.
The official meanings for letter grades are as follows:
A
Outstanding performance
B
Above average performance
C
Requirements satisfactorily completed
D
Minimum requirements met; passing but
unsatisfactory
F
Failure to meet the minimum requirements of a subject
I
The designation I indicates that the work of the course has
not been completed and that assignment of a grade and credit has
been postponed. An I designation is permitted only in cases of
illness (confirmed by a physician’s letter) or documentation of
other extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control.
The deadline for removal of an I designation will be determined by the instructor and recorded at the time the designation
is given, but will not be later than two weeks after the start of the
next semester. If the I is not removed within the set time limit,
either by completing the work in the subject or by passing a reexamination, the I will automatically become an F unless the dean of
the School of Architecture extends the time or the student withdraws from school.
The designation of I will be granted only with the approval of
the dean.
W The student has received permission from the instructor and
the dean of the School of Architecture and has withdrawn from a
Academic Probation/Final Probation A semester rating below
2.0 and/or a grade less than C in Architectonics, Design or Thesis
places a student on automatic probation and may be the basis for
final probation or dismissal, as determined by the Academic Standards Committee.
A student who receives a grade of C- or below in Architectonics, Design or Thesis may be required by the Academic Standards
Committee to repeat the studio. The student may also be removed
from automatic probation as determined by the Academic Standards Committee.
A student who receives a grade of D+, D or D- in Architectonics, Design or Thesis will be placed on automatic probation and
will be required to repeat the studio. The Academic Standards
Committee may place the student on final probation.The Academic
Standards Committee may also set further academic and/or grade
requirements for the student.
A student who receives an F in Architectonics,Design or Thesis
will be placed on final probation and will be required to repeat the
studio.The student will be required to receive a grade of C+ or better
in the repeated class. A student who fails to meet this condition may
be dismissed by the Academic Standards Committee.
A second probation may result in final probation or the
dismissal of the student. The Academic Standards Committee
may place a student on final probation.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
A student placed on automatic probation may be subject to
academic requirements as determined by the Academic Standards Committee.
A student on final probation who receives a semester rating
below 2.0 and/or a grade less than C in Architectonics, Design or
Thesis at any point in the remainder of his or her academic career
in the School of Architecture will be immediately, automatically
and permanently dismissed from The Cooper Union with a forfeit
of the right of appeal. Automatic dismissal on final probation
unconditionally and irrevocably terminates a student’s academic
career in the School of Architecture.
A student on probation may not carry more than 18 credits
a semester.
Each student is responsible for his or her total accomplishment and for being continuously aware of the standards defined
in the preceding paragraphs. Students whose work by mid
semester indicates possible failure to meet the minimum standards of a course, including excessive absences, should arrange
to meet with their respective faculty to address the matter in detail.
A student must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0
or better in order to graduate from the School of Architecture.
A student may not repeat any Design studio (or Architectonics and Thesis) more than once.
Any student who fails Arch 151 (Thesis) twice will be
dropped automatically from the program.
Additional credits for repeated Design studio (including
Architectonics or Thesis) do not count towards the 160 credits
required for the B.Arch degree.
Change of Grade A change in an official grade of record cannot be
made by the dean of Admissions and Records without the express
consent of the dean of the School of Architecture. The dean of
Admissions and Records will automatically convert an I designation to an F if an official change of grade is not submitted within the
two-week deadline after the start of the following semester. Grade
changes will not be accepted after one calendar year has elapsed
from the completion of the course.
Change of Program: Adding a Course Students are permitted to
add a course only during the first week of a semester, during the
drop/add period. They must receive the approval of the dean and
must report the addition to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Adding courses after the drop/add period is not permitted even
if the student has been attending the class(es).
Change of Program: Withdrawing from a Course Students may
withdraw from a course with appropriate written permission by
notifying the Office of Admissions and Records during the first
week of a semester, during the drop/add period. A withdrawal from
class during this period will result in the deletion of the course as
may be necessary from the student’s record. Students are not
permitted to withdraw from courses if doing so would impede
satisfactory progress towards the degree.
Withdrawal from a course during the drop/add period must be
accompanied by an addition of equivalent credits in another course
as may be necessary in order to maintain satisfactory progress
toward the degree.
Students who wish to drop a course after this deadline must
first receive permission from the dean. If the student is passing the
course at the time of withdrawal, a designation of W will appear on
his or her record. If the student is failing the course at the time of
withdrawal, a grade of WF will be recorded. It is the student’s
responsibility to obtain the necessary permission from the school
and to submit proper notification to the Office of Admissions and
Records in order to withdraw from a course.
Students are not permitted to withdraw from a course
after the sixth week of the semester. Failure to attend a class does
not constitute withdrawal; a student who fails to attend a class
without formally withdrawing will earn an F in the class.
Students may not withdraw from a class as a means of avoiding a
failing grade.
Required Academic Leave of Absence
A student’s academic record will be reviewed by the Academic
Standards Committee if it meets any of the criteria for Academic
Probation/Final Probation (see page 39 for more information).
If the student is permitted to continue, the student will do so
as per the instructions of the Academic Standards Committee. A
student who is required to repeat studio (Architectonics, Design
or Thesis) may also be required to meet other conditions set by the
Academic Standards Committee. If it is not possible for the student
to make significant progress towards the degree requirements in
the semester prior to repeating the studio course (as determined
by the Academic Standards Committee and/or the dean), the
student will be placed on a mandatory leave of absence for one
semester and will resume his or her studies in the following
semester by repeating the required studio and enrolling in other
classes for a total registration of at least 12 credits. The student’s
registration must be approved by the dean.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Discretionary Leave of Absence
Students who have completed at least one year of study may
request an interruption of their studies for a Discretionary Leave of
Absence. A written request for the Leave must be submitted to the
associate dean. A Discretionary Leave of Absence of absence for
up to one year (2 semesters) with an automatic guarantee of reinstatement may be granted to students in good academic standing
who are making satisfactory progress toward the degree.
A request for a Discretionary Leave beginning in Fall
semester must be made before April 15. A request for a Discretionary Leave beginning in Spring semester must be made before
November 15. Approval for a Discretionary Leave is neither automatic nor guaranteed.
Returning from a Discretionary Leave of Absence
Students on a Discretionary Leave must notify the associate dean
of their intention to return at least four (4) weeks prior to the registration period for the semester of their intended return. The dean
must notify the registrar to reactivate the student record.
Medical Leave of Absence
A student who must interrupt his/her studies for medical reasons
must submit a written request for a Medical Leave of Absence to
the associate dean along with supporting documentation, which
must include a letter from the treating health care provider.
Returning from Medical Leave of Absence
A student on a Medical Leave of Absence must notify the associate
dean of his/her intention to return at least eight (8) weeks prior to
the semester of the student’s intended return. The student must
also provide a letter from his/her treating health care provider that
he/she is ready and able to return to school. The dean must notify
the registrar to reactivate the student record.
Compulsory Medical Leave of Absence
The Cooper Union seeks to foster a safe and peaceful campus
environment (including, but not limited to its classrooms, laboratories, studios, shops, and dormitories) that nurtures its students’
well-being and allows them to focus on their studies.
The professional degree programs at The Cooper Union are
exceptionally rigorous courses of study that require a student’s full
commitment of time and effort and involve collaborative work in
shared studios and laboratories. Additionally, in light of the highly
specialized technical skills needed to run equipment in its shops
and laboratories, The Cooper Union has the highest concern for
safety on its premises and has appointed staff and faculty to supervise these facilities. Such concerns are carefully balanced with the
institution’s historic commitment to student rights.
If a staff or faculty member notifies the dean or associate
dean that a student’s conduct, actions or statements indicate that
the student: (i) poses a threat of harm to the safety of others (either
directly or through an inability to safely perform any necessary
functions as a student); and/or (ii) is engaged (or may engage) in
behavior or conduct that is disrupting the academic experience of
others on campus, the dean will promptly assess such concerns
and determine whether there is a problem, the nature, duration
and severity of the problem, and the probability that such harm or
disruption may occur. The associate dean of architecture or the
dean of students will promptly meet with the student to analyze the
situation. If a medical situation is involved, the student may be
asked to provide medical information from a healthcare provider
in order to clarify the situation as necessary. Considering all the
information, the dean will determine if a problem exists and, if so,
whether a reasonable modification of policies, practices or procedures or the provision of auxiliary aids or services can appropriately mitigate the problem. If so, following such an accommodation
/modification, the student will be permitted to continue with
his/her studies. At any point during the investigative process, the
student will have the right to take voluntary Medical Leave of
Absence following the procedure stated above.
If an accommodation/modification cannot sufficiently alleviate the risk/disruption to allow the student to remain actively
enrolled, and the student is not able or willing to take a voluntary
Medical Leave of Absence, the associate dean may recommend
to the Academic Leadership Team that the student be placed on
Compulsory Medical Leave of Absence. The student will be sent a
letter notifying him or her of the associate dean’s recommendation for a Compulsory Medical Leave of Absence, the basis for such
a recommendation, and inviting the student to a hearing on this
matter. This hearing – granting the student the opportunity to
respond to this recommendation – will be conducted by one
member of the Academic Leadership team and one other officer
of The Cooper Union and will be held no sooner than five (5) days
after the letter is sent to the student. If necessary, the student may
request accommodations (e.g., modifications to policies, practices, or procedures; the need for an auxiliary aid or service) to
participate in the hearing. At this hearing, the student may submit
additional medical records and/or other appropriate information/documentation. The hearing officers will decide whether to
accept the recommendation, reject it, or modify it and will inform
the student within 24 hours of their decision, in writing. The
hearing will be digitally recorded.
A student may be temporarily suspended from the institution
prior to this hearing.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
A student may be placed on Compulsory Medical Leave for
either a semester or a year, depending on the nature of the
circumstances of the leave, submitted medical documentation,
and the student’s academic program. Students placed on
Compulsory Medical Leave will be asked to provide an evaluation
from a physician of The Cooper Union’s choosing attesting to
their medical readiness to resume their studies, with or without
accommodation.
Appeal Process
A student who has been the subject of a hearing under these procedures may appeal the decision of the hearing committee within 3
business days by writing a letter to the Vice President for Finance
and Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer or dean
of Architecture setting forth the reasons why the appeal is being
made. The Vice President will convene an Appeal Board within 3
days of receiving the appeal letter. The board will consist of the Vice
President or her designee and one member of the Presidential
Leadership Team who was not involved in any way in the prior
hearing. The Appeal Board shall limit its review to these issues:
—does the record show that the party had a full and fair opportunity to present his or her case?
—does the solution imposed achieve the proper balance between
maintaining a safe and peaceful campus environment and
respecting the rights of the student to continue his or her education?
After considering the record and the letter of appeal, the Appeal
Board may:
Accept the decision of the hearing committee;
Order a new hearing in keeping with the Appeal Board’s instructions;
Reverse the hearing committee’s decision in its entirety;
Accept the hearing committee’s decision but modify the solution.
If the Appeal Board accepts the decision of the hearing
committee, whether or not it modifies the terms of the compulsory
medical leave, the matter shall be deemed final.
Readmission Students who have withdrawn from the School of
Architecture after having completed at least one year of study at
The Cooper Union must reapply to the school to be considered for
readmission as a transfer applicant.
Students who have withdrawn from school before they have
completed one year of study at The Cooper Union must reapply
through the freshman admission procedure.
Students who have been dismissed by the Academic Standards Committee or to whom the Academic Standards Committee
has given permission to withdraw in lieu of dismissal and are
eligible for readmission must apply within two years to the chair of
the Academic Standards Committee before May 15 for admission
in September and before November 15 for admission in January.
They should be prepared to demonstrate a change from the
circumstances that warranted their dismissal.
Former students who have been dismissed by the Academic
Standards Committee or to whom the Academic Standards
Committee has given permission to withdraw in lieu of dismissal
and who have been out of The Cooper Union for more than two
years (four semesters) at the time of anticipated return must apply
through the regular admission procedure. If offered admission,
previous Cooper Union credits earned may be evaluated for
transfer credit.
Residence A candidate for a degree must be enrolled and in residence during the entire academic year immediately preceding the
granting of the degree.
Graduation To be eligible for graduation, a student must complete
the minimum number of credits listed for his or her curriculum and
must spend a minimum of four semesters in full-time resident
study at The Cooper Union.
Students are responsible for their total accomplishment and
for being continuously aware of the standards for graduation.
Graduation requirements as outlined in this catalog are
guidelines that are subject to change.
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE II
POST-PROFESSIONAL DEGREE
CURRICULUM
Aims and Objectives The new Master of Architecture II post-professional degree program was launched in 2009 to extend the vision
and intellectual rigor of the undergraduate program and allow a
further development of the school’s preeminent position in the
education of architects.
The Master of Architecture II is a design research, postprofessional degree open to applicants with a first professional
degree in architecture (Bachelor of Architecture or Master of
Architecture I) from a program accredited by the NAAB or equivalent accrediting agency in another country. The program serves
professionals who wish to continue in practice with higher
research and design skills in those areas in which the program
offers specialization. It additionally prepares those with first
professional degrees who wish to develop parallel careers in
teaching and/or continue to engage in research toward an appropriate Ph.D. degree at another institution.
The program seeks to address modern and contemporary
issues in the practice and theory of architecture and urbanism,
incorporating considerations from history as well as the present
condition of globalization and the continual emergence of new
scientific developments and technologies.
The program offers concentrations in one or a combination
of three areas: theory, history and criticism of architecture, urban
studies and technologies. Prospective students will declare their
area(s) of concentration during the application process. Applicants are required to complete a minimum of one year of work
experience after obtaining their first professional degree before
applying to the program.
The design studio serves as a major component of the
program; students from all three concentrations will work together
on a common program under the direction of a studio critic during
the first two semesters. Seminars will address issues particular to
the concentrations as well as other topics making use of the interdisciplinary resources offered by The Cooper Union.
Theory, History and Criticism of Architecture Considers questions concerning the theory and criticism of modernism and
contemporary architecture, the philosophy and aesthetics of
architecture, the mediatization of architecture and broader
cultural and historical issues through the critical readings of texts,
the development of critical projects and a written thesis.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Urban Studies Addresses issues central to the design, planning
and development of cities and regions, including study of the
morphological, social and cultural effects of globalization; the
survival of local urban cultures; redevelopment of central cities,
suburbs and exurbs; and issues specific to New York and comparative cities.
Technologies Focuses on technological issues of architectural
design, representation, planning and production, such as the
impact of new information technologies, new materials and manufacturing processes; hardware and software development;
mapping and modeling techniques; and the technologies of fabrication as they influence new design strategies. This area focuses
as well on the economic, ethical and technological dimensions and
design potentialities of sustainability and developments in new
structural systems, materials and building assemblies.
Program Requirements All applicants to the Master of Architecture II program must 1) hold the professional degree of Bachelor
of Architecture (B.Arch.), the professional degree of Master of
Architecture (M.Arch. I) or an equivalent professional architectural
degree from a foreign institution; and 2) have completed a
minimum of one year of work experience after obtaining their first
professional architectural degree. The program is structured to be
completed in two full-time consecutive semesters with a final
thesis semester during the subsequent summer session. The Fall
semester runs from September-December (after Labor Day until
approx. Christmas), the Spring semester runs from January-May
(after Martin Luther King Jr. Day until approx. The Cooper Union’s
Commencement date), the Summer semester runs from Juneearly September (after Memorial Day until the date of the M.Arch
II final Thesis review and exhibition opening during the second
week of September). Final thesis presentations will take place
during the first week of the fall semester following the student’s
year of study. Graduate students must complete all 30 credits of
the M.Arch II degree requirements in full-time continuous resident
study at The Cooper Union.
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Courses
Semester I (Fall)
Arch 411
Arch 401
FA100R
Credits
Graduate Research Design Studio I
Proseminar
Introduction to Techniques
Seminar in concentration
Seminar out of concentration
Total Credits First Semester
Semester 2 (Spring)
Arch 412
Arch 402
FA100R
Graduate Research Design Studio II
Thesis Research Tutorial
Introduction to Techniques
Seminar in concentration
Seminar out of concentration
6
2
0
2
2
12
6
2
0
2
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Built upon Peter Cooper’s vision of education, The Cooper Union
from its inception has been dedicated to the highest ethical standards. The School of Architecture, founded on principles of independent and exploratory thought, maintains that individual
creativity within a willing community is a profoundly social act. In
fostering a context of intellectual rigor, the program gives emphasis
to a broad spectrum of cultural and ethical concerns which are of
significance in the preparation of students for a professional degree
and their role in society as practicing professionals of intelligence,
creativity and integrity.
2
Total Credits Second Semester
12
Semester 3 (Summer)
Arch 413
Graduate Thesis (written or studio)
6
Total Credit Requirement for M.Arch II Degree
30
Thesis In April of the spring semester prior to advancing to Arch
413 Thesis, each student will be required to present an elaboration of his or her thesis topic and program for review and acceptance by the faculty. Final thesis presentations will be made during
the first week of fall semester following the student’s year of study.
Seminars Out of Concentration It is recommended that students
register for courses originating in the graduate program (Arch 482,
Arch 483 and Arch 485) to satisfy their out-of-concentration
seminar requirements. As an alternative, the lecture component
of elective courses originating in the undergraduate program at
the advanced level (such as Arch 190 Structures Elective, Arch
225 Advanced Topics in History, Theory and Criticism, as well as
Arch 205 Advanced Concepts), will be open to students in the
graduate program for credit with tutorial meetings and with graduate-level requirements for written or project based work, to satisfy
requirements for their out-of-concentration coursework.
The undergraduate curriculum course numbering system is
structured such that a first digit of “2” or greater OR a second digit
of “4” or greater indicates an upper level course, which students
in the undergraduate program would normally take in their 4th or
5th year of study.
Graduate courses in the Albert Nerken School of Engineering
as well as select upper level undergraduate elective courses could
be made available to Master of Architecture II students with prior
permission from the student’s academic adviser and the individual
course instructor. Undergraduate courses may be used to satisfy
requirements for out-of-concentration coursework only.
Authorship Acts of academic dishonesty are extremely serious
violations of both the spirit and the substance of this community.
The Academic Standards Committee of the School of Architecture
will review acts of academic dishonesty including cheating, plagiarizing or the submission of work that has not been prepared by the
person claiming authorship. Such acts are viewed as extremely
serious violations,punishable by probation,suspension or dismissal.
The action of the Academic Standards Committee in such cases will
become part of the student’s permanent academic record.
The Studios/Studio Culture Central to maintaining a creative environment for intellectual investigation and intuitive exploration are
the shared design and computer studio spaces on the third and
seventh floors of the Foundation Building. Students must be aware
of and observe all policies and conditions for the use of the studios
(which are distributed at the beginning of each academic year).
Students are required to be present in studio for all hours that their
design studio meets and to develop their work in the studio.
In the studios, students work together as a community of individuals. Here, students and faculty from all years engage in a
process of rigorous inquiry, discussion and critique, freely sharing
knowledge, ideas and methodologies. Students study the principles
and works of architecture that have contributed to the betterment
of the human condition in the development of their own projects.
Students of the upper years serve as mentors for the lower years.
Diversity and balance are critical values in generating an academic
ambiance where humanistic ideals and ethical views serve as a
constant reference for individual growth and development. The
social and intellectual environment thus created is considered a
vital part of the students’ experience at The Cooper Union.
As articulated by our Architectonics (first-year Design studio)
faculty: Educational institutions are the stewards of discipline, they
are the crucibles in which the living form of a discipline is trans-
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
ferred through the generations. Many forms of resource are
marshaled toward animating this stewardship; the primary
resource, in fact the meaning and purpose of education, lies in the
community of teachers and students at the heart of an institution.
Young minds filled with endless possibilities come searching for a
sanctuary in which they can be inspired, strengthened and
tempered by listening to and working with voices of wisdom, knowledge and experience. There is no higher calling for an educational
institution than the stewardship and advocacy of this community.
The particular modes of knowledge that form the discipline of
architecture are to a large extent embodied knowledge; they are
acquired through a combination of intense study and present tense
creativity. The education of an architect requires a studio culture
that encourages the faculty and students to explore their creativity
in teaching and learning, it requires crafting and maintaining an
evolving studio environment that cultivates the personal imagination. Individual creativity within a willing community is a profoundly
transformative act. As each moment contains the potential for reinvention, "school" is not a means to a predetermined end, but rather
it is a place for significant works, for research and exploration, a
place of creative urgency, for people and their works to listen to
each other. Great educational institutions are great communities:
physically, geographically and intellectually, the studio is the center
of the community at the School of Architecture. The myriad
personal and public exchanges that form our studio culture lead to
new ideas, new forms of expression and movements of thought that
ultimately enrich our discipline and our humanity.
Annual Exhibition of Student Work The End of Year Show is a
major event, exhibiting student work developed during the
academic year to the academic and professional communities and
the public at large. It is an opportunity to present the pedagogical
framework of the school and faculty and to celebrate the rigor and
diversity of the student work. Preparation of exhibition spaces lobbies, halls and classrooms of the third and seventh floors, and
the Houghton Gallery - and hanging the work is a tremendous task
that must be accomplished in the very short period of time between
the end of classes and commencement. All students are required
to make requested projects available for the exhibition and are
expected to fully participate in the installation.
In addition to the Annual Exhibition,individual student work may
be requested for other purposes (other exhibitions, accreditations,
etc.). Students are required to provide requested projects or other
materials, which will be returned to them in a timely manner. While
student work is to be available for these purposes, work produced by
students as part of their coursework remains their property.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
FACILITIES
The facilities of the School of Architecture are housed on the third
and seventh floors of the Foundation Building, initially completed
in 1859 and now a National Historic Landmark widely referred to
as one of New York City’s great monuments. In 1974, John Hejduk,
the first dean of the School of Architecture, designed a major alteration of the interior. In 2002, the restoration of the brownstone
exterior was completed after two years of work.
The Studios All students in the School of Architecture are
provided individual workspace on the third floor within a shared
studio. With the first through fourth years sharing a single large
studio and the fifth-year thesis class and graduate students in
smaller studio spaces, a unique environment fostering cross-fertilization between classes and individual students is maintained.
Students are provided with individual studio workspace with individual and shared tables for drawing, work, reference, model
building, etc. The school does not support the principle or practice
of continual 24-hour studio access. Studios are generally open
Monday–Thursday 8 am–2 am, Friday and Saturday 8 am
–midnight, and Sunday from noon–2 am.
Computer Studio The School of Architecture Computer Studio on
the seventh floor of the Foundation Building is specifically
intended to support a design curriculum that recognizes the use
of computing as an instrument of investigation and practice and
which urges students to explore its formal and cultural implications. The facility utilizes both Macintosh and Dell Precision PCs
(including high-end multiple-processor rendering stations), scanning and printing capabilities and two large-format plotters. Software includes an array of imaging, drawing, drafting and 3D
modeling and rendering programs. This facility is open to all
students of The Cooper Union. Considered integral to the activities
of the design studio, the computer studio is open generally whenever the design studios are open, giving students access an
average of 17 hours a day. A student monitor trained to assist in
the effective use of the facility and to do simple troubleshooting on
the hardware is present whenever the center is open.
In addition to the School of Architecture’s 3D printer and lasercutter, other three-dimensional output capabilities include a lasercutter in the School of Art and a CNC machine and rapid prototype
machines in the School of Engineering.
Computing facilities designed to serve the specific needs of
the Schools of Art and Engineering are open for use by students of
the School of Architecture.
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Personal Laptops The School of Architecture Computer Studio is
open to all architecture students and is equipped with all of the
hardware and software necessary for their work and study. We
recommend that students who wish to purchase their own laptop
computers complete their first year of study before making a
purchase in order to fully test a range of programs and platforms.
Current students have selected a variety of laptop models in both
Mac and PC platforms for individual use.The Cooper Union assumes
no liability for personal laptops. Students who use/bring their
personal laptops to school are solely responsible for the safety and
security of their equipment and are strongly advised to secure their
laptops in their lockers when not in use.
Lecture Room A small auditorium on the third floor is used for
lecture classes and invited lecturers. Special lectures are open to
all interested Cooper Union students.
Shop An outstanding all-college sculpture shop administered by
the School of Art is located on the fourth floor. Integral to both the
program and pedagogy of the School of Architecture, the shop is
equipped for projects in wood, metal, plastics, plaster and clay,
and includes a bronze casting foundry. For a complete description
of the sculpture shop facility, please refer to the School of Art
section (page 46).
Study Collection The School of Architecture has fostered the
growth of a non-circulating Study Collection of books and other
visual material that are not otherwise accessible through the
Cooper Union library system, sometimes including rare or limited
edition items, often on loan from private collections. Students
make use of the room for quiet reading and study. The room is also
used for seminar classes and meetings.
School of Architecture Archive The School of Architecture
Archive is responsible for the ongoing collection, records and
storage of student work, and now has documentation of student
work produced at the school since 1983. This provides an invaluable record of the pedagogy of the school that can be used for
exhibitions, publications and student research. In addition, the
Archive’s Blueprint Collection, Lantern Slides, New York Postcard
Collection, Stanley Prowler Slide Collection, New York City Waterfront Archive, Limited Edition Books and rare books are resources
available for use by students and faculty for research and study.
The Archive also manages the loan of analog and digital video
cameras as well as other photographic equipment for student use
on class projects.
41 Cooper Square In September 2009, The Cooper Union opened
its first new academic building in fifty years at 41 Cooper Square,
opposite the landmark Foundation Building. This building houses
the School of Engineering and the Faculty of Humanities and
Social Sciences, studios for the School of Art, classrooms and
computing studios for all students, and a shared gallery and auditorium. The first academic building to achieve the LEED Platinum
status, 41 Cooper Square provides all students of The Cooper Union
with access to state-of-the-art tools to pursue creative and original
research and design in the course of their learning.
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
COURSES
Students should consult official class
lists for courses offered in a given
semester. There is no assurance that
a course listed in this catalog will be
given every year.
Be advised that each school
offers certain electives that are open
to all students; consult each school’s
course listing.
Arch 151 A-B Thesis
A synthesis of four years’ educational
experience. The choice of the area
of study is the responsibility of the
student. The scope of the problem is
defined by each student, who also
decides on his or her method of
exposition. Problems are analyzed and
studied with the aid of faculty from
each discipline and by visiting critics.
6 credits per semester
Mathematics (Required)
Undergraduate
Design (Required)
Arch 111 A-B Architectonics
Introduction to the study of
architecture; investigation of the
interrelationships of space, structure
and visual composition. Exploration of
the syntax of architecture. Models and
orthographic drawing.
4 credits per semester
All Architectonics students are
required to take an Introduction to
(Shop) Techniques course.
1 credit per semester
Arch 121 A-B Design II
Projects comprise elemental
architectural programs wherein the
student is required to sustain the
formal investigations of first year while
integrating the complexities of
program, context and site. Spatial,
structural, material, environmental and
visual design are integrated. Emphasis
is placed on communicating concepts
through drawings and models.
5 credits per semester
Arch 131 A-B Design III
Study and analysis of historical
precedents followed by a sequence
of design problems of increasing
complexity. Emphasis on the planning
of buildings and the interrelationships
among form, structure, detail and
technologies.
5 credits per semester
Arch 141 A-B Design IV
Investigation of urban programs and
sites requiring the integration of form,
structure and space. Examination of
the complexities implicit in the
resolution of urban problems. Analytic
studies and explorations generate
specific programs for development
of each project. Emphasis given to
large-scale integrations and the impact
of urban transformations upon
existing fabric.
5 credits per semester
Arch 103-104 Calculus and
Analytic Geometry
Emphasis on topics that involve the
mathematical approach to geometrical
and physical relationships and on basic
concepts and applications of calculus
and functions of one and two variables.
3 credits per semester
Structures (Required)
Arch 122 A-B Structures I
A qualitative examination of the
behavior of structures. Characteristics
and development of the stresses
generated from the simple to the
complex. A study of the materials of
construction used in structures.
2 credits per semester
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Environmental Technologies
(Required)
Arch 134 A-B Environmental
Technologies
Environmental and life safety systems
as they affect program and building
form, including mechanical (heating,
cooling, ventilating), water supply and
disposal, electrical, lighting, acoustics,
vertical transportation, communication,
security and fire protection. Principles
of sustainability. Passive and active
systems.
3 credits per semester
Building Technology (Required)
Arch 135 A-B Building Technology
Materials and methods of architectural
construction, lectures, examination and
discussion of classic as well as current
building techniques. Students
assemble full-size “mock-ups” of
details for class study germane to their
design classes. In general, this course
does not separate “construction” from
“design” but attempts to supplement,
by means of a more detailed study of
design assignments. Field trips may be
made to buildings under construction.
2 credits per semester
Drawing (Required)
Arch 132 A-B Structures II
The study of strength of materials is
applied to the quantitative design
procedures for wood and steel
structures. Students complete
individual projects in wood and lowrise steel structures.
2 credits per semester. Prerequisites:
Arch 103/104, Ph 165/166 and Arch
122 A-B Structures I
Arch 142 A-B Structures III
The design of reinforced concrete using
stress methods and plastic design is
combined with individual projects in
low-rise concrete structures. Elements
of soil mechanics and soil
investigations are included (Fall only) in
foundations design.
2 credits per semester. Prerequisite:
Arch 132 A-B Structures II
Arch 152 Structures IV
Intensive seminars are completed
on prestressed concrete, wind and
earthquake design for tall structures
and special structures, while the
student becomes the structural
consultant for individual assignments
for the structural solution of real
architectural projects covering
prestressed, high-rise steel and
concrete buildings and shells.
2 credits. Prerequisite: Arch 142 A-B
Structures III
Arch 114 A-B Freehand Drawing
Basic drawing skills, composition and
color perception. Studio and homework
assignments.
3 credits per semester
Arch 118 A-B Computer
Applications and Descriptive
Geometry
Descriptive geometry as a science of
graphical representation of threedimensional lines, surfaces and solids
with emphasis on development of
drawing and drafting skills.
Understanding how graphical and
construction information is represented
in the computer, how information is
represented in drawings, nature of the
overlap between the two. Develop a
critical facility to appreciate limitations
and strengths of representational
techniques.Computer as a mechanism
for communication and research.
2 credits per semester
History of Architecture (Required)
Arch 115 A History of Architecture I
(Sem. I) An introduction to the study of
the concepts, designs and built
examples of architecture from antiquity
through approximately the third century
C.E. Selected projects from throughout
the world will be analyzed in terms of
planning, design, structure, technique,
function, social context and meaning.
3 credits
Arch 115 B History of Architecture I
(Sem. II)
An introduction to the study of the
concepts, designs and built examples
of architecture from approximately the
fourth through the 15th century.
Selected projects from throughout the
world will be analyzed in terms of
planning, design, structure, technique,
function, social context and meaning.
3 credits
Arch 125 A History of
Architecture II (Sem. I) An
introduction to the study of the
concepts, designs and built examples
of architecture from approximately the
15th through the 18th century. Selected
projects from throughout the world will
be analyzed in terms of planning,
design, structure, technique, function,
social context and meaning.
3 credits
Arch 125 B History of
Architecture II (Sem. II)
An introduction to the study of the
concepts, designs and built examples
of architecture from approximately the
18th through the 20th century. Selected
projects from throughout the world will
be analyzed in terms of planning,
design, structure, technique, function,
social context
and meaning.
3 credits
Arch 133 Introduction to
Urban History and Theories
An introduction to Urban History and
to the principles, concepts, and
Theories of Urbanism, from antiquity
to the present, with an emphasis on
the 20th Century urbanism.
2 credits
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Advanced Concepts and Topics
(Required)
Arch 205 Advanced Concepts
This course is intended to be an
advanced course dealing with the
relationship between architectural
space and some other discipline in the
humanities. The course deals with an
interdisciplinary approach toward a
new poetic and the phenomenology,
psychology and metaphysics of space.
(After fulfilling the Arch 205 Advanced
Concepts degree requirement, a
student may enroll in other additional
Arch 205 Advanced Concepts classes
for elective credit.)
2 credits
Arch 225 Advanced Topics
in History, Theory, Criticism
Advanced study in history, theory,
criticism of architecture, urbanism
and technology.
(After fulfilling the Arch 225 Advanced
Topics degree requirement, a student
may enroll in other additional Arch 225
Advanced Topics classes for
elective credit.)
2 credits. Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B
History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B
History of Architecture II and Arch 175
Modern Architectural Concepts or
permission of the instructor
Professional (Required)
Arch 143 A-B Construction
Management
Introduction to construction
management principles, techniques
and methods including scheduling,
cost-estimating, planning and
controlling construction process.
1 credit per semester
Arch 154 A-B Professional Practice
The role of the architect in relation to
the community, client, builder, worker
and engineer. Societal, ethical, legal
and personal obligations. Office
organization and administration.
1 credit per semester
Elective Courses
Arch 153 Town Planning
A modernist response to the problems
of large metropolitan cities. Taking a
historical perspective, the course will
analyze town planning responses of
specific architects and groups for cities
such as Paris, London, New York,
Vienna and Chicago, questioning the
cultural determinants that made town
planning a modernist stance.
2 credits per semester
Arch 165 Analysis of
Architectural Texts
Introduction to analytical methods and
techniques and their relationship to
synthetic activity in the design process.
2 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
Arch 175 Modern Architectural
Concepts
The concepts and generators of form
and space relative to architecture of
the 20th century are explored and
investigated.
2 credits. Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B
History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B
History of Architecture II or permission
of instructor
Arch 176 Theory of Landscape
Architecture
Lecture/studio course explores the
interrelationships of nature, site design
and built form. Focus on basic
elements of nature addressed
ideologically, poetically, culturally and
practically through an interdisciplinary
study of works by selected artists,
writers, landscape architects and
architects. Work with landscape
fundamentals, continue on to more
complex issues of natural processes
and aesthetics, such as atmosphere,
ephemerality and time, and of site
planning, such as site selection,
topography, drainage, ecology and
climate, especially as related to
architecture and art in the land.
2 credits. Open to all students
Arch 177 Computer Graphics,
Image Processing and Vision
Introduction to basic concepts of
spatial description and manipulation by
computer enables student to use these
techniques as an aide in problems of
formal spatial drawing with a
computer. Examination of the issues of
“hand-eye axis” in computer-based
drawing and “paint” systems as well
as more abstract algorithmic methods
of drawing. Image acquisition and
transformation by computer, its relation
to computer vision and control of
robots and machines which build will
be another area of emphasis. Survey of
a wide variety of applications including
typeface design, page layout and
make-up, animation and interactive
control of video systems.
2 credits. Open to all students
Arch 178 Advanced Drawing
Seminar
The course will focus on the dialogue
between figuration and abstraction.
Students will be expected to plan and
elaborate an ongoing series of
drawings. The class will meet on a
seminar basis to critique work in
progress and to discuss issues relevant
to the language of drawing. There may
be an open studio available for those
students who wish to pursue drawing
from the model. However, students will
be encouraged to investigate a broad
spectrum of imagery and materials.
2 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
Arch 185 Crossings
This project-oriented studio course will
explore and investigate developments
in architecture, art, literature and
engineering that reinforce or
reintroduce the interrelationships of
these diverse disciplines including the
implications of recent scientific
developments that cross and disrupt
established boundaries and
foundations of compartmentalized
disciplines, giving us new insights into
the natural processes within the rich
diversity of nature. A revitalized and
stimulating field of inquiry is now
offered to architects, artists and
engineers, with technological and
cultural implications.
2 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of the instructor
Arch 185 Crossings
The Feltman Seminar
This seminar will investigate the
principles, aesthetics and
methodologies of lighting perception
and design. The Feltman Fund, a gift
to the school, makes this seminar
possible and supports its chairs.
2 credits. Open to all students
Arch 190 Structures Elective
The reason for the unique structural
solutions for existing building
structures is presented in depth.
These studies will include structures
of all sizes subject to gravity, wind
and/or seismic forces. The path
followed to arrive at the best solution
is analyzed in open discussion. The
correlation between the architectural,
structural and mechanical needs,
as well as considerations related
to the actual erection of these
structures, is presented.
2 credits. Prerequisites: Arch 122 A-B,
Arch 132 A-B, Arch 142 A-B, Arch 152
or permission of the instructor
Arch 194 Environmental
Technologies Elective
Advanced study in environmental
issues to include such topics as
cultural and environmental
sustainability, resource allocation, new
materials and methods, global
networks, urban growth, etc., as they
relate to architecture on many scales.
2 credits. Prerequisite: Arch 134 A-B
Environmental Technologies or
permission of the instructor.
Arch 300 Computer-Aided Design
and Descriptive Geometry
Architecture-specific exploration into
perception, methods and conventions
of the geometric representation of
space through the new perspective of
computer applications. Introduction to
concepts of projections, hinge and
projector lines as well as absolute and
relative coordinate systems through
local deduction by considering parallel,
axial, radiant and stereoscopic
projections as variations of the same
system. Introduction of CAD specific
methods such as Solid, NURBS and
Parametric Modeling, hierarchical- and
command-based programs. Critical
comparison of computer capabilities
and architectural tangible scale
modeling methods to understand
possibilities and limitations of
computer-aided design in architecture.
Critical exploration of methods and
media for representation and design of
specific works of architecture.
2 credits. Open to all students
THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Graduate
Required for students in
all concentrations.
All courses are one semester.
Arch 401 Proseminar
An introduction to research in
architecture and urbanism: theory,
research (methods and techniques) and
writing, for M.Arch. II degree students
only. Selected readings in
historiography, theory, criticism and
design and methods. Includes lectures
and seminars by faculty and visiting
specialists in the fields of history and
criticism, architecture and urban design
methods, research in representational
techniques, digital technology, etc.
Presentations by each student in the
program will encourage
interdisciplinary comparison and
shared knowledge.
2 credits
Arch 402 Thesis Research Tutorial
Individual thesis research conducted
under the supervision of an adviser
or advisers leading to the preparation
of a Thesis Prospectus required for
advancement to the third semester
of the program.
2 credits
Arch 411 Graduate Design
Research Studio I
The Design Research Studio 1 will
establish a general problem
incorporating aspects of architectural,
urban and technological design
research to be undertaken by the class,
with each student contributing to his or
her specific area of expertise. The
studio will include seminars by invited
guests on topics relevant to the
program’s principal areas of study.
6 credits
Arch 412 Graduate Design
Research Studio II
Individual design projects within
general guidelines established by the
faculty, each emphasizing the special
area(s) of research of the student.
6 credits
Arch 413 Graduate Thesis
The choice of the area of study is the
responsibility of the student. The scope
of the project and method of exposition
is defined by each student in
consultation with their thesis adviser
and must be approved prior to the
beginning of the summer term on the
basis of a thesis prospectus presented
to the group of faculty. Students will
develop a mutually agreed upon
schedule for meetings with their
adviser and for regular project reviews.
6 credits
Arch 482 Graduate Seminar
in Technologies
Selected topics in the advanced study
of technological issues in architectural
design, representation, materials,
planning, production and construction.
Open to undergraduate fourth- and
fifth-year architecture students as an
elective with permission of the
instructor and the dean.
2 credits per semester
Arch 483 Graduate Seminar
in Urban Studies
Selected topics in the advanced study
of urban form including readings and
case studies in urban analysis, global
development, historic preservation and
typological transformation. Open to
undergraduate fourth- and fifth-year
architecture students as an elective
with permission of the instructor and
the dean.
2 credits per semester
Arch 485 Graduate Seminar
in Theory, History and Criticism
of Architecture
Selected topics in the advanced study
of the theory and criticism of
modernism and contemporary
architecture, the philosophy and
aesthetics of architecture, the
mediatization of architecture and
broader cultural and historical issues,
through the critical readings of texts as
well as case studies. Open to
undergraduate fourth- and fifth-year
architecture students as an elective
with permission of the instructor and
the dean.
2 credits per semester
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
FACULTY
Administration
Anthony Vidler (Sabbatical August
2012–April 2013)
Dean, Professor
B.A. Hons., Dipl.Arch., Cambridge
University;
Ph.D., Delft University of Technology
(The Netherlands)
Elizabeth O’Donnell, Associate Dean
Monica Shapiro,
Administrative Associate
Pat De Angelis, Secretary
Emmy Mikelson,
Assistant to the Deans for Public
Programs and Research
Steven Hillyer, Director,
Architecture Archive
Sara Jones, Senior Coordinator of
Special Projects, Architecture Archive
Patrick McElnea, Collections Assistant,
Architecture Archive
Stephen Rustow
B.A., University of Rochester;
M.Arch., M.G.P., Massachusetts
Institute of Technology;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B.
Sean W. Sculley
B.A., Harvard University;
B.Arch., Columbia University;
R.A.
David Turnbull
B.A. Hons, Dipl.Arch., University
of Bath (England)
Lebbeus Woods
University of Illinois; Purdue University
Guido Zuliani
Diploma (M.Arch.), Istituto
Universitario d’Architettura di Venezia,
Italy
Associate Professor
Tamar Zinguer
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
M.Sc.,Technion-Israel Institute
of Technology;
M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University
Assistant Professor
Full-Time Faculty
Professors
Diana I. Agrest
Dipl. Arch., School of Architecture and
Urbanism, University of Buenos Aires;
Université de Paris: Ecole Pratique des
Hautes Etudes VI Section;
R.A., F.A.I.A.
Diane H. Lewis
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
The American Academy in Rome;
R.A., F.A.A.R.
Proportional-Time
Faculty
Professors
Kevin Bone
University of Colorado;
Wright/Ingraham Institute;
B.Arch., Pratt Institute;
Royal Danish Academy of Art;
R.A., F.A.I.A.
Anthony Candido
Georgia Institute of Technology;
B.Arch., Illinois Institute of Technology
David Gersten
New York Institute of Technology;
B.Arch., The Cooper Union
Roderick Knox
B.Arch., B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.Arch., Harvard University;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B.
Michael Young
B.Arch., California Polytechnic Institute;
M.Arch., Princeton University;
R.A.
Adjunct Faculty
Professors
Samuel M. Anderson
A.B., Harvard College;
Sussex University, England;
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
R.A.
William Clark
B.A., Pennsylvania State University;
M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University
Elizabeth O’Donnell
University of Minnesota;
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
R.A.
Ashok Raiji
B.Sc., University of Bombay, India;
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University;
P.E.
Peter Schubert
B.S.Arch., Ohio State University;
M.Arch., Columbia University;
R.A.
Michael Webb
Diploma, Regent Street Polytechnic
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Associate Professors
Susannah Drake
B.A. Dartmouth College;
M.Arch., M.L.A. Harvard University;
R.A.
Steven Kreis
B.S., University of Missouri;
M.S., Hunter College CUNY
Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa
Dipl. Arch., University of Buenos Aires
Escuela Superior de Bellas Artes
Ernesto de la Carcova Argentina;
M.Sc. University of Buenos Aires;
M.Arch., Princeton University
Markus Schulte
B.Sc., M.Sc., University of Hannover
(Germany);
P.E.
Georg Windeck
Dipl.Ing., Technical University of Berlin;
R.A.
Assistant Professors
David Allin
B.Arch., Cornell University;
M.Arch., Princeton University
Hayley Eber
B.A.S., The University of Cape Town;
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
M.Arch., Princeton University
Urtzi Grau
Diploma, Escuela Tecnica Superior
de Barcelona, Spain;
M.S.A.A.D, Columbia University;
M.A., Princeton University;
Ph.D. (in progress), Princeton University
MariaElena Fanna
University of Kentucky;
B.Arch., The Cooper Union
Lydia Kallipoliti
Diploma, Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki Greece;
SMArchS, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology;
M.A., Princeton University;
Ph.D. (in progress), Princeton University
Louis Katsos
B.C.E., M.B.A., New York University
James Lowder
B.Arch., Southern California Institute of
Architecture;
M.Arch., Princeton University
Michael M. Samuelian
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
M.Arch., Harvard University;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B.
Sheng Shi
B.S.C.E., M.S.S.E., Drexel University;
P.E.
Gia Wolff
BFA, Parsons School of Design;
M.Arch., Harvard University
Visiting Professors
Eduardo Cadava
Ph.D., University of California, Irvine
Katerina Kourkoula
B.Sc., Bartlett School of Architecture
(U.C.L.);
B.Arch., M.Arch., The Cooper Union
Daniel Meridor
Tel-Aviv University;
Venice International University;
B.Arch., M.Arch., The Cooper Union
Instructors
Aida Miron
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
Diploma, Bauhaus Stiftung Germany;
M.Arch., Escuela Tecnica Superior de
Barcelona, Spain
Laila Seewang
B.A., University of Tasmania, Australia;
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
M.Arch., Princeton University
Mersiha Veledar
B.Arch., The Cooper Union;
M.Arch., Princeton University
Uri Wegman
B.Arch., The Cooper Union
Previous Adjunct/Visiting
Professors
In order to indicate the distinction and
level of professional accomplishment
of these professors, we take pleasure
in listing appointments of the past
years: Anders Abraham, Wiel Arets,
John Ashbery, Manuel Baéz, Norman
Bryson, Sverre Fehn, Jay Fellows,
Robert Freeman, Remo Guidieri, Janis
Hall, Martin Harries, John Hawkes,
Christopher Janney, Josef Paul
Kleihues, Jana Leo de Blas, James
Merrill, Don Metz, Francesco Pellizzi,
Ahmad Rahimian, Gaetano Pesce, John
Rajchman, George Ranalli, Aldo Rossi,
Lindy Roy, Joseph Rykwert, Antonio
Sanmartín, Jürgen Sawade, Massimo
Scolari, Catherine Seavitt, D. Grahame
Shane, David Shapiro, Daniel Sherer,
Lee Skolnick, Richard Stapleford,
Bernhard Strecker, Anthony Titus,
Bernard Tschumi, Hans Tupker, Wim
van den Bergh, Tod Williams and Bruce
McM. Wright.
Emeriti
Peter D. Eisenman
The Irwin S. Chanin Distinguished
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
B.Arch., Cornell University;
M.S.Arch., Columbia University;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Cambridge;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B., F.A.I.A.
Sue Ferguson Gussow
Professor Emerita of Architecture
Pratt Institute;
The Cooper Union;
The Brooklyn Museum;
B.S., Columbia University;
M.F.A., Tulane University
John Q. Hejduk*
Dean of the Irwin S. Chanin School
of Architecture
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
The Cooper Union;
B.S. in Arch., University of Cincinnati;
M.Arch., Harvard University;
Università degli Studi, Rome;
Hon. L.H.D., University of Illinois
at Chicago;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B., F.A.I.A.;
Fellow of the Royal Society
Richard Henderson*
Associate Dean of The Irwin S. Chanin
School of Architecture
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
B.Arch., Cornell University;
R.A.
Ricardo Scofidio
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
The Cooper Union
B.Arch., Columbia University;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B.
Ysrael A. Seinuk*
Degree in Civil Engineering,
University of Havana;
P.E., F.A.C.I., C.Eng., F.I.C.E.,
F. A. S. C. E.
Chester Wisniewski
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
B.Arch., Syracuse University;
Taliesin. R.A., N.C.A.R.B.
THE SCHOOL OF ART
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
THE COOPER UNION
SCHOOL OF ART
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the School of Art is to educate artists in the broadest
sense, both as creative practitioners engaged with a wide range of
disciplines in the visual arts and as enlightened citizens of the
world who are prepared to question and transform society. The
program is structured around an integrated curriculum that
fosters connections between disciplines, as well as between traditional and new media. The studio experience affords the opportunity for the development of individual artistic vision in dialogue with
collective debates and experiments within an intimate community
of artists. The study of history, theory and criticism in the visual arts
and general studies in the humanities and social sciences are
considered essential in intellectually grounding studio practice.
Central to the school’s philosophy is the advancement of the
artist’s role in initiating critical responses and alternative models
in relation to the prevailing forms and institutions of cultural
production. Students are challenged to expand their research and
experimentation across The Cooper Union, as well as in the
surrounding urban environment and in the wider public sphere.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Bachelor of Fine Arts Curriculum
Goals and Objectives The goal of the B.F.A. program is to educate
students in the skills, knowledge and understanding necessary for
professional practice in art- and design-related fields. An integrated program not only teaches students in specific disciplines,
but also in the complex interrelation of all visual vocabularies.
The Foundation Program consists of a series of prerequisite
courses taken during the first year. This introductory year is
designed as a basis for the educational program of the School of
Art and is intended to prepare students for studies in all of the
disciplines offered within the curriculum. Through exposure to a
variety of two- and three-dimensional projects, students are given
a general introduction to the specifics of visual and spatial
phenomena, and to concepts, principles and techniques of the
visual arts.
Following the completion of the Foundation Program, the
disciplines offered are drawing, film and video, graphic design,
painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture. Elective studio
classes and seminars are also offered on a rotating basis. Students
may choose to focus their work in one or more areas of specialization and are encouraged to follow an integrated approach by
selecting from various areas while observing a prerequisite system
designed to allow in-depth study in specific disciplines.
Bachelor of Fine Arts Requirements Candidates for the bachelor
of fine arts degree are expected to complete 130 (131 for students
who entered in 2010 only) credits within eight semesters of study
and within the following disciplinary credit distribution. (See chart
at right.)
Certificate in Art Requirements A certificate in art program is
available for a small number of students for whom the B.F.A.
program is not appropriate. Candidates for the certificate program
must complete 60 credits in two years of full-time study (with a
minimum of 30 credits per year) or in four years of part-time study
(with a minimum of 15 credits per year). All Foundation studio
courses must be completed and students must follow prerequisite
course requirements in selecting advanced studio electives.
The certificate program consists of 24 credits in Foundation
studio and a minimum of 27 credits in advanced studio. Students
may take up to nine credits in art history.
All academic standards and regulations of the School of Art
apply to the certificate program.
Students in the certificate program may apply through the
Office of Admissions for transfer to the B.F.A. program after
completing 42 credits at Cooper Union.
Transfer students applying to the certificate program may
transfer, at the time of admission, a maximum of 12 credits from
another institution.
For Students who entered on or after September 2011
Course
Credits
Required Foundation Courses
Basic Drawing (Analytical and Descriptive)
2-Dimensional Design
3-Dimensional Design
4-Dimensional Design
Color
Introduction to Techniques
Foundation Project
61
61
61
31
21
11
11
Required Art History Courses
Modern to Contemporary: An Introduction to Art History
41
Art History Electives
10*
Required General Academic Studies
Freshman Seminar
Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
The Making of Modern Society
The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Science
31
31
32
32
3
General Academic Studies Electives
To be elected from Art History3, Foreign Language4,
History of Architecture, Humanities,
Social Sciences and Sciences
12
Prerequisite and Advanced Studio Courses
To be elected from any studio discipline
54
Required Senior Presentation
0
Free Electives
To be elected from courses in any discipline at Cooper Union
or at other institutions approved by the dean of the
School of Art
10
Total Credit Requirement B.F.A. Degree
130
* Including 2 credits in prehistory through 17th century art and 2 credits in global perspectives on art
1
First-year requirement for all students
Second-year requirement for all students
3
Maximum of three credits
4
With permission of the dean of the School of Art
2
THE SCHOOL OF ART
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
For Students who entered on or after September 2010
Course
Credits
Required Foundation Courses
Basic Drawing (Analytical and Descriptive)
2-Dimensional Design
3-Dimensional Design
4-Dimensional Design
Color
Introduction to Techniques
Foundation Project
61
61
61
31
21
21
11
Required Art History Courses
Introduction to Art History I
21
Introduction to Art History II
Introduction to Art History III
21
22
Art History Electives
Required General Academic Studies
Freshman Seminar
Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
The Making of Modern Society
The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Science
8
31
31
32
32
3
General Academic Studies Electives
To be elected from Art History3, Foreign Language4,
History of Architecture, Humanities,
Social Sciences and Sciences
12
Prerequisite and Advanced Studio Courses
To be elected from any studio discipline
54
Required Senior Presentation
0
Free Electives
To be elected from courses in any discipline at Cooper Union
or at other institutions approved by the dean of the
School of Art
10
Total Credit Requirement B.F.A. Degree
131
1
First-year requirement for all students
Second-year requirement for all students
3
Maximum of three credits
4
With permission of the dean of the School of Art
2
Studio Courses The student’s choice of studio courses is based
on individual interest in various disciplines, on prerequisite
courses for advanced areas of study and on the student’s interest
in working with particular instructors.
There are limitations on the number of credits a student may
take each semester in any one area of study, depending upon the
student’s progress in the program (number of credits completed
toward the degree). The number of credits allowed is determined
as listed below:
Credits Completed
Maximum Credits per
Semester per Area of Study*
B.F.A.
32 (Sophomore)
64 (Junior)
96 (Senior)
6
9
no limit
Certificate
30
45
9
no limit
* Includes related techniques courses
General Academic Studies Requirements and Electives During
the first two years, B.F.A. candidates must take four core courses
in the humanities and social sciences (12 credits), as well as one
course each semester in art history (two required courses and two
elective courses, eight credits total). At any time after the first-year
they must take a three-credit science course.
Throughout the last two years, they must complete a
minimum of 18 elective credits, six of which are required to be in
art history; the remaining 12 may be taken in humanities, foreign
languages (with permission of the dean of the School of Art), social
sciences, art history (maximum three credits), history of architecture and the sciences.
Foreign language credit for intermediate and advanced
courses, taught by language instructors with appropriate academic
credentials, will be granted two general studies credits per
semester with a limit of four credits accepted in the category of
general academic studies electives with permission of the dean of
the School of Art. Intermediate or advanced foreign language
studies beyond four credits counted toward general academic
studies will be acceptable for free elective credit, limited to two
credits in language studies per semester.
Free Electives During the last three years, students have a choice
of electives in the School of Art in addition to the required
curriculum. Courses designated with the prefix TE or SE receive
free elective credit, as do studio courses taken beyond the 54
credit requirement. Only one TE course per semester may be
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
taken. Students may also enroll in engineering or architecture
courses at The Cooper Union or courses at other accredited institutions with the permission of the dean of the School of Art (or the
academic adviser). Free elective credits are approved and granted
by the dean of the School of Art (or the academic adviser).
Outside Electives These electives may be used only to meet free
elective and/or general academic studies credit requirements;
they cannot substitute for prerequisite or advanced studio electives. Students may take up to three credits per semester at a
college other than The Cooper Union. For credit to be counted
toward the B.F.A. degree, permission of the dean of the School of
Art (or the academic adviser) is required before registration at
another institution for the semester concerned. No such credit will
be awarded retroactively.
Senior Presentation Requirement A public presentation of each
senior student’s work, normally in the student’s final semester, is
a requirement for graduation. Each student may satisfy this
requirement with an exhibition or, where appropriate, a screening,
performance or publication. No student will be permitted to
receive a degree unless this requirement is completed to the satisfaction of the faculty and the dean of the School of Art at a mutually agreed upon time and venue. Completion of the requirement
will be reflected on the student’s transcript. The 41 Cooper Gallery
will be reserved for senior student exhibitions during much of the
spring semester; other appropriate exhibition spaces will also be
made available.
Progress Toward the Degree Students are expected to maintain
normal progress toward their degrees, i.e., passing enough credits
each semester to complete degree requirements within four years
of study.
The normal work load is 17 credits per semester during the
Foundation year and 16 credits per semester thereafter (= 130
credits = B.F.A. degree requirement).
Students should consult with the Office of Academic
Advisement in order to assess their progress towards the degree.
Requirements for Nonresident Study Eligibility for non-resident
study, i.e., the exchange and mobility programs, is as follows:
Students who have completed at least 64 credits toward the bachelor of fine arts degree, have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 overall, and
have no outstanding first- and second-year requirements, may
apply for one semester of non-resident study. The student must
maintain good academic standing in the semester prior to departure, otherwise permission to participate may be revoked.
Transfer students must have completed at least 32 credits in
residence at The Cooper Union before applying for non-resident
study and must have an additional 32 credits to complete in
residence upon their return. Transfer students must also have
met all first- and second-year requirements and be in good academic
standing, defined as having a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 overall.
Students applying for non-resident study must be in residence during the semester when they are completing the application process.
Students may earn a maximum of 12 credits in studio
courses for one semester of study on exchange or mobility. A
maximum of six credits may be awarded by any one faculty
member for work done while on exchange or mobility.
Since foreign schools may have academic calendars at variance with that of The Cooper Union, students studying on
exchange who cannot return in time for the start of the next
semester at the School of Art must request an elective leave of
absence for that semester.
Students may participate in non-resident study only once
during their stay at The Cooper Union.
For information on details governing these programs, please
inquire at the Office of Academic Advisement and Off-Campus
Programs.
Exchange Programs The School of Art offers a number of
exchange programs with schools abroad. They currently include
opportunities to study in the Czech Republic, England, France,
Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and
Switzerland.
Mobility Program The Cooper Union School of Art is a member of
the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design
(A.I.C.A.D.). A list of schools participating in the mobility program
in the U.S. and Canada is available in the Office of Academic
Advisement and Off-Campus Programs.
Schools in the metropolitan New York City area are not available for a semester exchange.
Students should consult the Office of Off-Campus Programs
for information about these exchange and mobility opportunities.
Students from other institutions who are enrolled at the
School of Art as exchange or mobility students may not apply to
transfer to The Cooper Union School of Art while in residence at
The Cooper Union.
THE SCHOOL OF ART
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
AND REGULATIONS
Credits A credit is an academic unit of measure used for recording
progress in the program of study and in meeting the academic
requirements of the degree. In studio and lecture courses, one (1)
credit represents a minimum of three (3) hours of work during each
week of a 15-week semester dedicated solely to that course. These
criteria apply to each course in which the student is enrolled.
Example in studio courses:
Drawing, 3 credits, equals 9 hours of work per week (i.e., 4 hours
in class and 5 hours outside work [studio or home] or 3 hours in
class and 6 hours outside work).
Example in techniques courses:
Casting Techniques, 2 credits, equals 6 hours of work per week (i.e.
4 hours in class and 2 hours outside work).
Example in a lecture course:
English Literature, 3 credits, equals 9 hours of work per week (i.e.,
3 hours in class and 6 hours of outside work).
The number of credits awarded in each course represents the
fulfillment of an agreement by the student to satisfy the course
requirements as defined by each instructor, on time, and in accordance with the definition of credit.
Additional Credits in an Advanced Studio Course Permission to
add credits to individual course commitments may be granted only
under special conditions and must receive the written approval of
the instructor and the dean of the School of Art (or the academic
adviser) during the registration process.
Juniors and seniors in good academic standing (defined as
having earned a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. in School of Art studio
courses for the previous semester) may add credits to their individual course commitment under the following conditions: no
more that two (2) additional credits in one course and no more that
a total of three (3) additional credits in any one semester.
Additional Credits in a Semester Normal progress towards a
degree is 16 credits per semester. Students may register for up to
19 credits only if they earned a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. overall for the
previous semester. Under special conditions, students may
register for more than 19 credits only with the permission of the
dean of the School of Art (or the academic adviser). Students who
wish to register for less than 16 credits must do so in consultation
with the Office of Academic Advisement of the School of Art.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Independent Study Independent study is an alternative to classroom study and may be taken only with a member of the resident
faculty (defined as full-time or proportional-time faculty members
or adjunct faculty members on three-year appointments). Only
juniors and seniors in good academic standing (defined as having
earned a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. overall for the previous semester are
eligible for independent study. Independent study may be taken
only once during a semester in an advanced subject for one (1),
two (2) or three (3) credits. One (1) credit of independent study
represents a minimum of three (3) hours of work during each week
of a 15-week semester.
The major consideration in approving proposals for independent study is the educational value of the study project within
the structure of the degree requirements. Permission to undertake
study off-campus can be given only when it is required by the
nature of the specific project and when the experience has been
evaluated to be valid by the instructor and approved by the dean
of the School of Art.
Transfer Credits All incoming students (freshmen with advanced
standing and transfer) may apply for transfer credits to be counted
toward the B.F.A. degree requirements or certificate in art. These
credits must be approved by the dean of the School of Art, after
the evaluation by faculty based on official transcripts from other
schools. The transfer credits will be officially recorded only
after one semester of satisfactory work is completed at The
Cooper Union.
Transfer credits may be granted specifically in lieu of the
School of Art’s foundation, prerequisite or elective courses. A
maximum of 60 credits may be transferred toward the B.F.A.
degree, at the time of admission only. An accepted applicant who
has previously earned a baccalaureate degree in a discipline other
than art will be treated as a transfer student for purposes of evaluating completion of degree requirements and length of time
allotted at The Cooper Union to complete the B.F.A.
The required 10 credits of free electives, however, must be
completed during the student’s stay at The Cooper Union. No
previously earned credits may be transferred into this category.
Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the Admissions
Committee, with the approval of the dean of the School of Art, at
the time of admission only. (See also page 13.)
Attendance Attendance at classes is mandatory. Unexcused
absences and excessive lateness will be cause for probation
or dismissal.
Registration Only those students who are officially registered
in a course (i.e., by approval of the dean of the School of Art and
55
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
notification to the Office of Admissions and Records) will have
the grades and credits entered on their records. Students are
required to register for each semester during the announced registration period.
A student who receives a grade of F, W or WU in the first
semester of a one-year course will not be allowed to register for the
second semester of that course. In such a situation the student will
be called before the Academic Standards Committee for individual
review and/or counseling in order to determine a future program
of study. Students whose records by mid-semester indicate a
possible failure to meet required standards may be so informed.
Grades At the end of every semester each student receives a
grade for his or her semester’s work in each subject.
The grades, expressing the faculty’s evaluation of students’
work in School of Art courses, are: A (4.0), A- (3.7), B+ (3.3), B
(3.0), B- (2.7), C+ (2.3), C (2.0), C- (1.7), D+ (1.3), D (1.0), D- (.7),
F (0).
The numbers in parentheses give the assigned numerical
equivalents of the letter grade for each course. These are used in
computing semester index and cumulative index ratings by multiplying the numerical equivalent of the grade for each course by the
credits assigned to that subject. The sum of such multiplications
for all the subjects carried by a student is divided by the total
credits carried by him or her for that period to determine the index
or grade point average.
The meanings for the letter grades are as follows:
A
Outstanding performance
B
Above average performance
C
Requirements completed; average performance
D
Passing, but unsatisfactory
F
Failure to meet the minimum requirements of a subject
I
The designation I indicates that the work of the course has
not been completed and that assignment of a grade and credit has
been postponed. An I will be given only in cases of illness
(confirmed by a physician’s letter ) or documentation of other
extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control. The
designation of I will be granted only with the approval of the dean
of the School of Art.
The deadline for removal of an I designation will be determined by the instructor and recorded at the time the designation
is given, but will not be later than two weeks after the start of the
next semester. If the I is not removed within the set time limit,
either by completing the work in the subject or by passing a reexamination, the I will automatically become an F unless the dean of
the School of Art extends the time or the student withdraws from
school before the deadline date.
W Indicates that the student has received permission from the
dean of the School of Art and the instructor to withdraw from a
course while passing the course requirements at the time of withdrawal. This permission must be obtained no later than the end of
the eighth week of the semester. The grade is not included in the
calculation of the student’s semester rating.
WU Indicates that the student has dropped a course without
permission of the dean of the School of Art and the instructor after
the end of the eighth week of the semester. This grade is not
included in the calculation of the student’s semester rating.
When appropriate, certain courses may be designated as
Pass/Fail courses.
Pass Requirements completed. This designation is not included
in the calculation of the student’s semester rating.
Fail Failure to meet the minimum requirements of a course. This
grade is included in the calculation of the student’s semester
rating; its numerical equivalent is 0.
A change in an official grade of record, other than the I designation, cannot be made by the dean of Admissions and Records
without the express written consent of the instructor and the dean
of the School of Art. Grade changes will not be accepted after one
year has elapsed from the completion of the course.
Change of Program: Dropping a Course Students may drop a
course by notifying the School of Art office and the Office of Admissions and Records during the first week of a semester. A withdrawal from class during this time will result in deletion of the
course from the student’s record and must be accompanied by an
addition of equivalent credits in another course as needed to
maintain normal progress toward the degree.
Students who wish to drop a course after this deadline must
first receive permission from the dean of the School of Art and the
instructor. If the student is passing the course at the time of withdrawal, a designation of W will appear on his or her record. Any
course dropped by the student without permission of the instructor
and the dean of the School of Art and without notification to the
Office of Admissions and Records will be recorded as WU, however
the instructor is free to record an F grade in such cases.
If, in the opinion of the instructor, a student’s presence is
hindering the educational progress of the class, the student may
be dropped from the class at the request of the instructor. A grade
of W will be recorded for the course.
After the eighth week of the semester, a course may be
dropped only after consultation with the Academic Standards
Committee and with the approval of the dean of the School of Art.
THE SCHOOL OF ART
Change of Program: Adding a Course Students are permitted to
add a course only during the first week of a semester. They must
receive the approval of the dean of the School of Art and must
report the addition to the Office of Admissions and Records.
Change of Program: Change of Section Students who have
completed the Foundation program are permitted to transfer from
one section to another of the same course before midterm if they
are passing the course and if space is available at that time.
Permission of the dean of the School of Art and both instructors is
required for the change of section and students must notify the
Office of Admissions and Records.
Academic Probation and/or Dismissal from The Cooper Union
A semester rating of all courses, (i.e., School of Art and Faculty
of Humanities and Social Sciences) below 2.5 places students
on probation and makes them subject to dismissal by the
Academic Standards Committee. Students with unexcused
absences and those excessively late to class are subject to probation or dismissal. Students must maintain normal progress toward
the degree (see page 54). Failure to observe this standard is
grounds for probation or dismissal.
Appeal Students may appeal to the Academic Standards
Committee of the School of Art in person and/or in writing when
notified of their unsatisfactory academic performance. Students
have on-line access to their grades. Please contact the Registrar’s
Office for more information.
When students are called to the Academic Standards
Committee meeting, they are strongly advised to take this opportunity to communicate/explain/defend their unsatisfactory academic
performance. The student should appear in person. If this is not
possible the student may address the Committee in writing.
After the hearing and deliberation the Academic Standards
Committee shall either determine a probationary period or vote for
dismissal. The decision of the Committee is final.
Students on academic probation who do not improve their
academic standing during the probationary semester or who fail
to meet minimal academic standards during any subsequent
semester may be called to the Committee and are subject to
probation or dismissal from The Cooper Union.
Leave of Absence
See pages 24-26 for Cooper Union’s regulations governing leaves
of absence.
In the School of Art, discretionary leave is available only upon
completion of the first-year Foundation Program. Before taking
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
such a leave, all financial obligations to The Cooper Union must
be satisfied.
All requests for leaves of absence should be made through
the Office of Academic Advisement. Note that this office is closed
between June 10 and August 15 each year.
Students must request all leaves of absence in writing. A
written request for reinstatement is also required. A student on
leave does not have access to the facilities of The Cooper Union.
Withdrawal from School Written requests for withdrawal from
school should be addressed to the dean of the School of Art.
Readmission Students who have been dismissed or who have
withdrawn from the school and wish to be considered for readmission must reapply through the normal admissions procedures.
Such applicants may be asked to appear for an interview
with a representative of the Admissions Committee as part of
this process.
Graduation To be eligible for graduation students must complete
the minimum number of credits required for the B.F.A. degree or
the Certificate and must have been enrolled for a minimum of four
semesters at The Cooper Union as a full-time student for the
B.F.A., or a minimum of four semesters as a part-time student for
the Certificate in Art.
All candidates for the B.F.A. degree must satisfactorily
complete the requirement for a senior presentation.
Students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0
or better in order to graduate from The Cooper Union School of Art.
Students eligible to graduate and participate in commencement exercises must be approved by the Faculty of the School of Art.
Students who have not fulfilled the requirements for graduation will normally not be permitted to participate in commencement exercises.
Graduation requirements as outlined in this catalog are
guidelines that are subject to change.
Students are responsible for their total accomplishment and
for being continuously aware of the standards defined in the
preceding paragraphs.
Residence A candidate for a degree must have been enrolled
during two academic semesters preceding the granting of the
degree and in residence during the last semester.
57
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
FACILITIES
The School of Art is primarily housed in the 1859 landmark Foundation Building. The renovated studios and labs offer complete
facilities for a visual arts education. Seniors, juniors and many
sophomores are assigned individual studio spaces by lottery. In
addition, some Foundation Program classrooms, many student
studio spaces, the Herb Lubalin Study Center, and the 41 Cooper
Gallery are housed in the new academic building located at 41
Cooper Square.
Graphic Design Two multimedia classrooms at 41 Cooper Square
are equipped with high-definition projection teaching stations, and
with Apple MacPros which are connected to the Internet via T1
lines. In addition, the Computer Studio provides scanners, and
black-and-white and color printers.
A metal type shop, located on the fifth floor of the Foundation
Building, with Vandercook presses is also available with technical
staff assistance. The students’ personal studio areas provide individual drawing tables and flat file storage for advanced students.
A professional staff of technical assistants is available during
posted Computer Center hours.
Painting/Drawing Both the historic Foundation Building and 41
Cooper Square house facilities for Painting and Drawing. In the
Foundation Building, skylight ceilings flood abundant natural
daylight throughout a number of classrooms, workrooms and
student studio spaces dedicated to painting and drawing. Additional painting studios and a drawing classroom are located on the
ninth floor of 41 Cooper Square. Classrooms are equipped with
easels, model stands, palette tables, sawhorse tables and storage
room for props. Common workrooms are furnished with slop sinks,
worktables and storage racks to accommodate the preparation
and storage of artwork.
The painting offices in both buildings have equipment for
check-out and a limited number of art supplies for sale. Staff technicians are available during the week to provide technical support
and help facilitate a healthy and safe work environment. A staff
technician is now available during weekend and evening hours.
Photography The traditional photography lab area is equipped with
16 photo enlargers in a large black-and-white communal darkroom
that can print negatives sized from 35mm to 4x5 inches. There is
one color/black and white enlarger that can print film sized from
35mm to 8x10 inches. In addition, there is a large black-and-white
film processing area with automatic temperature control and a dedicated alternative-processes room with UV exposure units that can
produce up to 30x48 inch exposures.
The digital photography lab has 16 Macintosh workstations
with seven 13 inch wide professional quality inkjet printers, along
with two wide-format digital printers with the ability to print digitally
up to 44x90 inches. The digital lab is also equipped with a Hasselblad Flextight film scanner capable of scanning film sized from
35mm to 5x7 inches. There are also numerous 8.5x11 inch flatbed
scanners, two Nikon film scanners, and numerous Wacom tablets.
A well-equipped studio provides the space and tools to photograph two- and three-dimensional sets with tungsten and/or electronic flash lighting systems for traditional or digital imaging.
Large- and medium-format film cameras are available for
checkout as well as a range of professional DSLR cameras including
the Canon 50 Mark II.
A professional staff of technical assistants is available continuously during posted studio hours.
Printmaking A well-equipped and ventilated printmaking shop
accommodates intaglio, lithography, silkscreen and relief printing
processes and papermaking. The facility includes three lithography presses, three etching presses and three silkscreen vacuum
tables. There is a dedicated computer facility with two large format
printers for digital imaging and pre-press photographic work. There
are more than 100 stones for lithography and a collection of rollers
for lithography, monotype, and surface rolling in etching. The paper
mill is complete with beater, a 75-ton hydraulic press, vats and the
capability for both Western and Japanese papermaking.
A professional staff of technical assistants is available continuously during posted studio hours.
Sculpture A large, all-college sculpture shop supports opportunities for production of a wide range of three-dimensional work. This
facility is equipped with machinery for wood- and metal-working,
mold-making, bronze casting and projects using wax, clay, plaster
and some plastics. An Epilog 36EXT 60 Watt Laser cutting/
engraving system has recently been implemented.
A professional staff of technical assistants is available continuously during posted shop hours for management and supervision, as well as consultation and collaboration on projects from
many different studio disciplines.
Film The film area provides Super 8 and 16mm cameras,
supported by solid-state digital audio recorders, microphones,
lighting kits, tripods and other production equipment.
The editing facility includes Super 8 and 16mm telecine (film
to tape) transfer machines, Bolex and DSLR animation stands, a
16mm rotoscope system and a JK optical printer. Students can
edit on film using Steenbeck flatbed editors and Super 8 viewers,
or use Final Cut Studio to cut their projects on digital video. The
THE SCHOOL OF ART
sound room is equipped with a ProTools HD digital audio workstation with surround mixing capabilities and a vocal isolation booth.
ProTools LE Mbox systems are also available. The projection booth
is equipped for 16mm and Super 8 and offers flexible signalrouting with ties to the main classroom/ screening room, which
doubles as a theater for large-screen projection of film and video.
A professional staff of technical assistants is available continuously during posted studio hours.
Video The Video area provides Mini-DV, AVCHD & HDV
camcorders, as well as 3CCD 24p SD and HD camcorders, HDSLRs
and large sensor HD camcorders. Accessories include microphones, lighting kits, tripods and other production equipment.
The video editing facility has eight workstations with Final Cut
Studio, Adobe After Effects and Photoshop, Pro Tools LE and other
audio and video software. Additional outboard equipment includes
various analog audio and video decks, mixers and special effects
devices. Other equipment (monitors, speakers, projectors, VCRs
and DVD and media players) is also available for multi-media
installations. The video lab is networked and equipped with a
video/data projector for instruction and viewing student work.
Videos can also be viewed in the screening room equipped with an
HD video projector and surround sound system.
A professional staff of technical assistants is continuously
available during posted studio hours.
Animation Lab The computer lab adjacent to the film and video
areas provides workstations for two- and three-dimensional animation, stop motion capture, image processing and audio/ video
editing and compositing. Software includes Final Cut Studio, Adobe
After Effects and Photoshop, iStopMotion, Dragon Stop Motion, Pro
Tools LE and various other software for producing animation and
digital artwork. Additional hardware includes a flatbed scanner,
digital copy/animation stands, digital rotoscope station, vocal isolation booth and various analog and digital audio/video decks. The
animation lab also serves as a supplementary facility for students
working with film, video and sound projects and is networked and
equipped with an HD video/data projector with surround sound for
instruction and viewing student work.
A professional staff of technical assistants is continuously
available during posted studio hours.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
The Computer Studio The Computer Studio, a part of the Department of Information Technology, is located on the eighth floor
of 41 Cooper Square. It comprises two high-end Apple MacPro
classrooms and a central scanning and color output area. The
Department of Information Technology supports both PC and Mac
technology, and provides students with a wide range of digital
media and imaging options. The facility houses Apple MacPro
computers,which can boot into Mac or Windows operating systems,
and Dell PCs; high-resolution reflective and transparency scanners; black-and-white and color laser printers; and large format
color printers. The Computer Studio workstations are capable of
producing high quality digital video and audio for broadcast, new
media and web publishing.
Software available includes complete suites of applications
for graphic design, multimedia, 3D design, audio-video production
and animation. The fully-networked studio also provides Internet
access, CD and DVD production capabilities and printing to many
different types of media. Digital video cameras, digital still cameras
and microphones are available for loan by students in the lower
level 1 A/V Resource Center.
A professional staff of technical assistants is available seven
days a week during posted Computer Studio hours.
Center for Design & Typography The Center, located at 30
Cooper Square, combines education with public service.
Advanced graphic design students work in guided classroom situations with actual outside non-profit agencies as clients, and on
internal Cooper Union print and web design projects.
Galleries Several galleries around the campus are used to exhibit
the work of students and outside artists in solo or group shows. In
the new academic building at 41 Cooper Square, the 41 Cooper
Gallery and the Lubalin Center Gallery feature large windows
offering views from the building’s entrance and an abundance of
natural light. These spaces, often used in conjunction with one
another and with the adjacent Rose Auditorium, serve as a highly
visible site of artistic activity consisting of exhibitions, programs,
and screenings for the Cooper Union community, neighborhood
and city at large.
In the Foundation Building, a number of lobby galleries
present students’ artwork in the historical heart of the school, near
many of the studios and shops where it was created.
Beginning late in each fall semester and carrying through the
spring, gallery spaces in both the Foundation Building and 41
Cooper Square showcase work by seniors in The School of Art, with
additional exhibitions of exchange student work, class projects
and work by fellowship recipients. These exhibitions offer an
opportunity for students to contextualize and showcase projects
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
developed throughout the course of the year. The annual student
exhibition at the end of the school year—referred to colloquially as
the End of the Year Show—is mounted throughout the school’s
exhibition, studio and classroom spaces and features the work of
art, architecture and engineering students at all levels.
Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography Located
at 41 Cooper Square, adjacent to the Lubalin and 41 Cooper
Galleries, the Herb Lubalin Center’s core collection includes an
extensive archive of Herb Lubalin's work, as well as seminal design
ephemera by other important graphic designers. It also houses a
reference library pertaining to the history and theory of visual
communication. In addition to the archive, the Center maintains a
rich and varied programming schedule, including exhibitions and
lectures addressing major trends in graphic design.
COURSES
Students should consult official
schedules for courses offered in a
given semester. There is no assurance
that a courses listed in this catalog
will be given every year.
Each school offers a range of
elective courses that are open to
all students; consult each school’s
course listing.
Prefix Key
FA designates studio courses (meet
three or four hours per week)
SE designates seminars or lecture
courses (meet two or three hours
per week)
TE designates techniques courses
(meet four hours per week)
Required
Foundation Courses
FA 100.1, FA 100.2
Introduction to Techniques
An introduction to the physical aspects
of working with wood, metal,
plaster—and plastics, as well as an
introduction to on-campus computer
facilities and resources. A basic
introduction to the Adobe interface,
specifically Photoshop and Illustrator
will be provided.
1/2 credit per semester. One-year
course. Pass/Fail. Staff
FA 101 Color
A study of the physical, perceptual, art
historical and cultural aspects of color.
The phenomenon of color and
principles of light are explored in
various media towards an
understanding of color application in
all of the fine art disciplines
and architecture.
2 credits. Fall only. Ellis/Osinski/Vanni
FA 102.1, FA 102.2
Two-Dimensional Design
Exploration of the visual and
intellectual aspects of form on the twodimensional surface, in a variety of
media. Investigations into the
relationships of perception, process
and presentation.
3 credits per semester. One-year course.
Essl/Morton/Rubl/Tochilovsky
FA 104.1, FA 104.2
Basic Drawing (Analytical
and Descriptive)
A course in freehand drawing designed
to emphasize perceptual and inventive
skills in all drawing media.
3 credits per semester. One-year course.
Brown/Lawley/Masnyj/Richter
FA 105 Four-Dimensional Design
This course investigates the properties
of time and movement and the
fundamentals of four-dimensional
design. Students explore duration,
condensation, expansion, interruption,
simultaneity, stillness, action and
situation through a wide range of
materials.
3 credits. Spring only.
Hayes/Lehyt/Raad
FA 109.1, FA 109.2
Three-Dimensional Design
Students work on projects that explore
the fundamentals of forms and space
and investigate the properties of
materials, structure, mass, scale, light
and motion.
3 credits per semester. One-year course.
Adams/Ashford/Farmiga/Lins
SE 150 Foundation Project
A course that brings together all
Foundation year students around a
series of presentations that introduce
various artistic practices, critical
languages, and criticism. The course
intends to present contrasting
historical and contemporary models of
creating, seeing, speaking and thinking
about art.
1 credit. Spring semester only. TBA
Elective,
Prerequisite and
Advanced Courses
Students may enroll in advanced
studio classes with the same course
number multiple times. Instructors
and syllabi in these courses will vary.
In addition, the content of advanced
studio classes changes with the mix
of students in each class.
Consequently, the development of
individual students’ work varies with
the interchange of ideas among these
students and their instructor.
The School of Art believes that the
ability to work with the same
instructor in the same discipline
multiple times (even as the course
content changes) can foster a valuable
mentoring relationship between an
instructor and an advanced student.
THE SCHOOL OF ART
Calligraphy
TE 216 Calligraphy
Geometry, optical balance and the
stroke of the broad-edge pen are
primary influences that shape the
Roman alphabet. Students learn the
fundamentals of “beautiful writing”
through the study of historical models
and the principles that are the basis of
classical and modern letterforms.
Exercises in ink train the hand
kinaesthetically to write letters with
graceful movement. Exercises in pencil
train the eye to see and analyze the
subtle geometry and skeletal “ideal”
form of letters. Precise rhythm in letterspacing and careful line-spacing create
the color and texture of the page. The
class will have an emphasis on page
design involving hand written
compositions. Roman and Italic
capitals and small letters will be the
focus of first semester students. Those
who repeat may be introduced to other
historical hands.
2 credits. One-semester course. May
be repeated once. Free elective credit.
DiEdwardo
FA 419 Independent Study
in Calligraphy
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean of the School
of Art
Computer Techniques
TE 303 Techniques in Photoshop
This course explores techniques and
projects in Photoshop. Students will
complete projects that demonstrate
their skill and understanding of digital
image creation. Students will apply the
software to projects that they are
engaged in or planning. A structured
series of projects/problems will be
presented to help students master the
various techniques and tools as well
as the application of the software to
real world situations.
2 credits. One-semester course.
Cannot be repeated. Free elective
credit. TBA
TE 304 Techniques in After Effects
This course explores techniques and
projects in Adobe After Effects.
Students will complete projects that
demonstrate their skill and
understanding of visual effects and
motion graphics. Projects will be
faculty and student generated.
2 credits. One-semester course.
Cannot be repeated. Free elective
credit. McWreath
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
TE 305 Techniques in HTML
and Programming
This course explores techniques and
projects in HTML and programming.
Students will complete projects that
demonstrate their skill and
understanding of building web sites
and basic programming. The primary
software used in the course will be
BBEdit and PHP.
2 credits. One-semester course.
Cannot be repeated. Free elective
credit. Sparling
Contemporary Art
Issues
SE 401A&B Contemporary
Art Issues
Topic for Fall 2012
This seminar addresses issues
essential to an understanding of
contemporary aesthetic thought and
critical practice as explored by artists
and theoreticians. Integral to this
discussion is an examination of the
role of art in contemporary society, the
changing concept of the avant-garde
and the relationship of art to culture.
The format of the seminar provides for
required readings, oral and written
reports, guest speakers and regular
museum and gallery visits. This Fall the
class will focus on local art history: the
East Village and Soho between the late
fifties and the late eighties. Starting
with Kaprow, Maciunas, Grooms and
Oldenburg we will then revisit Warhol’s
Factory, Rene Block’s gallery where
Beuys performed and works of other
local artists like Yvonne Rainer and
Laurie Anderson. A later examination
of the East Village will show artists of
the early eighties, like Keith Haring,
Christy Rupp and others. Visits by
theorists and artists as well as visits to
local–often vanished or drastically
altered- sites are part of this hands-on
class that will require regular
presentations by students about
historical movements and
personalities. In order to
professionalize these presentations a
basic training is offered in the use of
images and texts for presenting, as
well as the use of programs like
Keynote and Powerpoint.
2 art history credits. One-semester
course. May be repeated once for art
history credit. Bos
Drawing
Prerequisite Course
FA 240.1A, FA 240.1B
Drawing I
The course is designed to explore the
phenomena of drawing as basic to the
visual language of all disciplines. The
fundamental notion of observation and
analysis in drawing is investigated.
As preparation for work in an advanced
level, the course involves further
development of drawing skills and
techniques, as well as an emphasis on
individual aesthetic development.
Assignments and group critiques are
central to the course.
3 credits per semester. One-semester
course. May be repeated once.
Prerequisite to all Advanced Drawing.
Visiting Artist Hasley Rodman (Fall
2012)/Gleeson/Goldberg/Lawley/
Merz
Advanced Courses
FA 341.1A, FA 341.1B
Advanced Drawing
Advanced studies in drawing
emphasizing the student’s conceptual
independence from traditional
draftsmanship. This course is for
students who have an established
direction in drawing.
3 credits. One-semester course. Barth
FA 342.1A, FA 342.1B
Advanced Drawing
Students are encouraged to explore
and experiment with drawing as a way
to further develop visual understanding
of pictorial and sculptural space. The
issues surrounding representation and
perception are addressed. The focus of
this class is to help students to use
drawing as a critical and procedural
tool. Using notebooks and journals as
well as reading and research methods
to process ideas, students will work
with drawing to advance and integrate
their individual studio practice both
technically and conceptually. Group
critiques and drawing sessions as well
as individual meetings with the
instructor are integral components of
the course.
3 credits. One-semester course. Bordo
FA 343.1A. FA343.1B Advanced
Drawing
Offered to students working
independently in any medium. Must be
self-motivated. There will be group and
individual critiques.
3 credits. One-semester course. Masnyj
FA 344.1A, FA 344.1B
Advanced Drawing
Offered to students working
independently in any medium. Must be
self-motivated. There will be group and
individual critiques.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Lawley
FA 345.1A, FA 345.1B
Advanced Drawing
This course offers an opportunity to
develop a vital vocabulary in drawing
through exploration of figuration,
abstraction, observation or
imagination. There will be an emphasis
on the development and evolution of
concepts, ideas— and observations
from the sketchbook to completed
works.
3 credits. One-semester course. L.A.
Miller
FA 346.1A, FA 346.1B
Advanced Drawing
This course will use the seminar format
to address the practice of drawing in
our contemporary context. Individual
meetings, assigned reading material
and group critiques will be integral
to the course. Emphasis will be placed
on balancing concerns of both form
and content through experimentation
or consistency in materials, research,
technique and installation.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Visiting Artist Nicole Awai (Fall 2012)
FA 347.1A, FA 347.1B
Advanced Drawing
Offered to students working
independently in any medium. Must be
self-motivated. There will be group and
individual critiques.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Gleeson
Advanced Drawing/Visiting Artists
Course description varies according to
the instructor. For Fall 2012:
FA 344.1A Advanced Drawing
For students who are highly motivated
and dedicated to their work. This
course focuses on individual
development through one-on-one
critique. Ideas will be presented for
group discussion through readings and
viewings of current museum and
gallery shows. Group critiques will
encourage students to develop and
voice strong opinions.
3 credits. One semester course.
Visiting Artist Hasley Rodman
For Spring 2013 and later semesters,
please see course schedule and
registration materials for course
descriptions specific to Visiting Artists
teaching that semester.
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FA 449A, FA 449B
Independent Study in Drawing
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean
of the School of Art
Film/Video
Prerequisite Courses
FA 270.1 Film I
An introduction to the techniques and
aesthetics of filmmaking. In a mixture
of theory and practice, participants will
be required to produce at least two
film projects in response to concepts
and issues raised. The course is in
three parts: technical instruction,
critique and screenings of artists’ work.
Students are trained in all aspects of
filmmaking from shooting, lighting and
sound to editing in film or on computer
and DVD authoring. There are weekly
reviews of student works-in-progress
and each class will include survey of
the history of artists working in film.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May not be repeated. Prerequisite
to all advanced film courses.
Pre- or corequisite to Animation I.
McLaren/Simpson
Note: Film I is required of all students
who wish to pursue additional work in
the medium.
FA 375.1 Film II
This introduction to 16 mm filmmaking
covers a wide range of techniques such
as shooting with the reflex Bolex,
lighting, single-frame construction,
sound and editing. Students learn
16mm filmmaking with hands-on
experience and are encouraged to use
the unique qualities of the medium to
express their original visions. This
course integrates theory and analysis
of cinematic language with film
practice. Films made by independent
filmmakers and artists will be screened
and discussed and advanced
filmmaking techniques such as opticalprinting and multiple-exposure will be
taught. Critiques of student work will
take place at various points during the
semester and students are required to
complete their own final 16mm sound
film by the end of the course.
3 credits. May not be repeated.
Prerequisite: Film I. Simpson
FA 208.1 Video I
An introduction to video production,
postproduction, history and criticism.
Students are introduced to basic
camera operations, sound recording
and lighting, as well as to basic editing
using Apple’s Final Cut Pro software,
and to DVD production using Apple’s
DVD Studio Pro. Three assignments are
to be completed during the semester:
two are assigned in conjunction with
the professor. Critiques of the
assignments are crucial to the course
as students are expected to speak at
length about the formal, technical,
critical and historical dimensions of
their works. Weekly readings in
philosophy, critical theory, artist
statements and literature are assigned.
The course will also include weekly
screenings of films and videos,
introducing students to the history of
video art as well as to other
contemporary art practices.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May not be repeated. Prerequisite
to Video II; pre- or corequisite to
Computer Image in Motion I.
Hayes/Raad/Simpson
Note: Video I is required for all
students who wish to pursue
additional work in the medium.
FA 209 Video II
Students develop shooting and editing
skills with an emphasis on using digital
camcorders and digital non-linear
editing and compositing systems.
A sequence of short assignments
introduces students to specific digital
techniques and a range of software.
Students will also begin developing
their personal conceptual orientation
and vocabulary. Students will complete
a series of short videos, as well as
explore both mainstream and
experimental approaches to the moving
image.
3 credits. May not be repeated.
Prerequisite: Video I. Gerdes
Advanced Courses
FA 376.1A Animation I
Students will learn an arsenal of
physically-based film animation
techniques from line animation, directon-film and roto-scoping to cut-out
animation. Students will apply their
skills and passions based in their own
work in other art forms (drawing,
painting, photography) and will make a
few short animation projects over the
semester. The course emphasizes the
creation of meaningful and realized
films through the integration of content
and ideas with aesthetics and
technique. All animation artwork will
be created non-digitally, though
students will learn to shoot and finish
their projects both digitally and to film.
Classes will incorporate basic technical
instruction, viewings and discussions
about a variety of classic and
contemporary animation films, handson animation work and critiques.
3 credits. May not be repeated. Reeves
FA 376.1B Animation II
Students will create and complete
individual advanced animations,
utilizing and building upon techniques
learned in Animation I. Through
presentations and critique, screenings
of classic and inventive animations,
and in-class work, students will
broaden their perception and command
of animation language and practice.
Several animation techniques will be
introduced. Projects begun in
Animation I may be expanded in
Animation II. The class will have a
screening at the end of the semester
to exhibit their completed projects.
Prerequisites: Film I or Video I;
Animation I, or permission of the
instructor.
3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisites:
Film I or Video I; Animation I,
or permission of the instructor.
Spring only. Reeves
FA 377.1A, FA 377.1B
Advanced Film
Independent projects workshop in
Super 8 and 16mm film. As well as
working in depth with film, students
are encouraged to explore all
possibilities of the moving image from
expanded projection techniques to
kinetic constructions.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May be repeated. Prerequisites: Film I
and one of the following: Film II or
Animation II. Hayes/Raad/Visiting
Artist Iman Issa
FA 380.1A, FA 380.1B
Advanced Video
Advanced students use all the facilities
of the video lab and continue to
develop their personal styles through
close individual instruction. Students
complete two fully realized
independent projects. Analysis and
discussion of current video exhibitions
supports group critiques.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May be repeated. Prerequisite: Video II.
Hayes/Raad/Visiting Artist Iman Issa
FA377.1 Advanced Film
Independent projects workshop in
Super 8 and 16mm film. As well as
working in depth with film, students
are encouraged to explore all
possibilities of the moving image from
expanded projection techniques to
kinetic constructions.
3 credits. One-semester course. May
be repeated. Prerequisites: Film I and
one of the following: Film II or
Animation II. Hayes/Raad
FA 381 Digital Sound Design
Workshop
An investigation of the structures of
the sounds around us and how to listen
to, analyze and manipulate them, with
special emphasis on sound for picture.
Discussion of how the gulf between
the sounds of the environment and
composed music was bridged in the
20th century. Training in the use of
Protools, an all-inclusive system for
recording, editing and mixing sound,
which has become the system of
choice in the modern studio.
3 credits. Offered Fall and Spring.
Pre- or corequisite: Film I or Video I
or Motion Graphics. May not be
repeated. J. Burckhardt
FA 382A, FA382B
The Question of the Document
This class is open to students working
in all forms. Students are expected to
initiate and work on independent
projects—individually or in groups and
must be willing to show work in class
while in the process of making it. The
focus of the class will be on the
question of the document in media art
and related themes of history, facticity,
testimony, witnessing and evidence.
Students are expected to attend all
screenings and exhibitions, keep up
with the assigned readings and write
short papers.
3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: One
advanced studio course. May be
repeated with a different instructor
TBA
FA 479A, FA 479B
Independent Study in Film
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean of the School
of Art
FA 489A, FA 489B
Independent Study in Video
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean of the School
of Art
Design
Prerequisite Courses
FA 211 Graphic Design I
An introduction to the techniques and
visual language of graphic design.
Weekly projects explore fundamental
concepts in form, composition, and
typography. Presentations and readings
in graphic design history will
complement weekly assignments.
Students will explore basic imagemaking processes as well as be
instructed in digital production
techniques.
3 credits. Fall only. Essl/Joel
THE SCHOOL OF ART
FA 212 Graphic Design II
The complex relationship between
word and image is explored. The study
of semiotics, emphasizing the
philosophy of communication, provides
a rich historical and intellectual base
for experimental projects combining
verbal and pictorial information.
Weekly projects reflect a broad range
of disciplines within the field of design.
Computer instruction will be provided
as it relates to specific projects.
3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisite:
Graphic Design I. Essl/Joel
FA 215 Typography
Empirical explorations of typographic
messages through placement, massing,
weight, size and color are analyzed to
develop an understanding of aesthetic
composition of typographic form and
meaning. Legibility, unpredictability
and sequencing, as well as the use of
grid structures, are investigated. The
development of critical judgment about
typography is emphasized.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design
I and II. Tochilovsky
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
FA 312.1 Experimental Typography
This course will emphasize innovation,
imagination and creativity in the realm
of typography, manipulating it freely as
a means of expression. Computer
techniques as well as hand drawing,
collages and pictures will be used to
compose layouts, including posters,
limited art books and animated
typography for the web. Students will
choose a theme and develop it with
abstract type expression.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design
I and II. Pre- or corequisite:Typography.
TBA
Advanced Courses
FA 313.1 Art of the Book
In this course the book will be explored
as an interdisciplinary medium,
placing emphasis on integrating and
experimenting with form, content,
structure and ideas. During the first half
of the semester, students will make a
number of books, examining sequence,
series and text/image relationships,
using various book structures. These
“sketches” will prepare students for an
extended book project during the
second half of the term.
3 credits. Fall only. Morton
FA 310.1A Information Design
The visual communication of complex
information is introduced through
presentations and studio projects that
explore organizational structures such
as charts, diagrams, maps, illustrations,
photographs and typography. Computer
instruction will be provided as it
relates to specific projects.
3 credits. Fall only. Prerequisites:
Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or
corequisite: Typography. TBA
FA 315A, FA 315B Advanced Design
Topic for Fall 2012: Guest Artist Series.
This course is for students who have a
strong commitment to graphic design.
Students will create three projects,
each presented by a visiting graphic
designer. Presentations, readings, and
trips to local design studios will
support group critiques.
3 credits. Fall and Spring semesters.
Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II.
Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Essl
FA 310.1B Publication Design
The complex issues unique to editorial
and publication design are explored
through studio projects and
presentations that emphasize the grid,
effective sequencing and typographic
form. Computer instruction will be
provided as it relates to specific
projects.
3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisites:
Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or
corequisite: Typography. Corbitt
FA 317A, FA 317B Advanced
Design: Open Studio
In this course students will complete
two fully realized independent projects.
Emphasis will be placed on
contemporary graphic design practices
and developing a personal aesthetic.
Visiting lecturers, readings, and
individual meetings with the instructor
will complement group critiques.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic
Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite:
Typography. Essl
FA 320.1 Visual Identities Design
The class will concentrate on
innovative solutions to graphic identity
systems. Students will increase their
proficiency in developing symbols and
typography to build a visual language
that amplifies the narrative of a
company, organization or product.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic
Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite:
Typography. Visiting Artist Bobby
Martin (Fall 2012)
FA 322A, FA322B
Professional Practice
Graphic design projects for non-profit
institutions, under the direction of
faculty and in cooperation with the
staff of the Center for Design and
Typography, provide students with an
opportunity for professional
experience. Portfolio presentation and
professional ethics will be addressed.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II.
Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Lang
FA 326 Interactive Design Concepts
An exploration of the nature of
interactive design and how it informs
and transforms experience. Information
structures, navigational issues, design
strategies and social implications of
interactive experiences using
traditional as well as electronic media
will be examined.
3 credits. One-semester course. May
not be repeated. Prerequisite:
Techniques in HTML and Programming
or permission of the instructor.
Sparling
FA 327 Advanced Interactive
Design Concepts:
Computational Media
An advanced design course in
interactive computational media. The
course will explore advanced
interactive design concepts utilizing
software which that includes
Processing and Macromedia Flash as
well as XHTML coding. Students will
complete two fully realized
independent projects. Analysis of
relevant work and readings support
group critiques.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisite: Interactive Design
Concepts. TBA
FA 328 Motion Graphics
Students will explore the conceptual
and technical challenges of design for
the television screen. All aspects of
industry video/ broadcast production
are introduced and integrated into a
design core focused on strong
communication. Projects include
identity design, combining kinetic
typography, animation, sound and
video. The course includes workshops
in After Effects, Final Cut Pro and
Protools.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II.
Pre- or corequisite: Typography.
Vondracek
FA 429A, FA 429B
Independent Study
in Graphic Design
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean of the School
of Art
Techniques
TE 306 Techniques in Letterpress
This course explores techniques and
projects in typesetting. Students will
complete projects that demonstrate
their skill and understanding of
typographic composition and
letterpress printing techniques.
2 credits. One-semester course.
Cannot be repeated. Free elective
credit. TBA
TE 324.1 Design Production:
From Digital To Press
Study of the planning, materials and
techniques involved in producing
printed material from digital files,
transparencies and photographic
prints. Familiarizes students with offset
lithography’s terminology, options,
limitations, costs and trade customs.
This course covers line, halftone and
color separation theory; scanner
functions; Photoshop enhancement of
photographs for reproduction; manual
film assembly; electronic imposition;
proofing, press and paper options;
binding techniques; finishing methods;
and printing quality evaluation and
control throughout
the process.
2 credits. Spring only. May not be
repeated. Free elective credit. Sanders
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IntraDisciplinary Seminar
Painting
SE 403A, SE 403B
IntraDisciplinary Seminar
This course is a hybrid between a
lecture series and discussion seminar.
It is intended to provide a stimulating
and rigorous forum between students’
artistic concerns and those of twelve
visiting speakers in a public lecture
series of the School of Art. Class
discussions will center on diverse
presentations by artists, theorists,
activists, designers, writers, curators,
gallerists and other practitioners
involved in the arts from positions that
embody an interdisciplinary approach
or that imply new uses for disciplinary
traditions. Accordingly, the course is
designed to introduce students to some
of the debates currently driving
contemporary art and the larger social
context it embodies. Members of the
class are expected to be active
participants and will therefore be
asked to respond with some
intellectual invention to a variety of
topics with weekly discussions,
readings, and written or oral
presentations.
2 credits. Free elective credit. Raad
Prerequisite Course
Mathematics in Art
Ma 151.1 Mathematics in Art
This course deals with the period
beginning with Pythagoras in ancient
Greece and goes up to the present day.
Topics included: Godel’s work on the
limits of mathematics, Euclidean and
non-Euclidean geometries, infinity,
paradoxes and soap film experiments.
Also discussed are black holes, the Big
Bang theory, relativity, quantum theory
and atomic particles. The course is
open to all Cooper Union students but
is primarily oriented toward making the
above-mentioned concepts
comprehensible to those with very
little mathematics in their background.
The relatedness of seemingly disparate
fields (science, art, mathematics,
music) is a central theme of the course.
3 general studies credits. Spring only.
Bailyn
FA 130A, FA 130B Painting
A studio experience with the physical,
compositional and conceptual
components of pictorial invention and
image-making. Readings, assignments
and critiques will enhance the
development and articulation of an
inventive individual approach to the
painting discipline in preparation for
advanced level work.
3 credits per semester. One-year
course. Prerequisite to all Advanced
Painting courses. Bordo/Conway/True
Advanced Courses
FA 331A, FA 331B
Advanced Painting
For students who wish to have their
work critiqued primarily on an
individual basis. High motivation and
dedication are of primary concern.
There will be occasional group
critiques.
3 credits. One-semester course. True
FA 334A, FA 334B
FA 335A, FA 335B
Advanced Painting
A seminar course for students who
have the ability to work independently
in their studios with a primary focus in
drawing or painting. Students will be
expected to develop their ideas and
work independently, but the class will
meet together every week or two for
discussion of each other’s work, as well
as various museum and gallery shows,
readings or slide presentations of
current work. The course will
emphasize experimentation and
expansion of one’s visual language and
process, and the ability to articulate
these ideas in discussion.
3 credits. One-semester course. Bordo
FA 337A, FA 337B
Advanced Painting
Students will explore the inner
reservoirs of the imagination and
investigate, as well, specific external
resources for imagery. The course will
seek to develop a range of expressive
vocabulary including representation
and abstraction. Group and individual
critiques will be augmented through
discussions of museum and gallery
exhibitions and slide presentations.
Emphasis will be upon developing a
personal visual direction.
3 credits. One-semester course. L.A.
Miller
FA 338A, FA 338B
Advanced Painting/Water Media
Students will focus on water media—
acrylic, transparent watercolor and
gouache—through work on canvas and
paper. The class will explore the
specific technical challenges and
characteristics inherent in these media
including the range from transparency
to opacity. Individual approaches will
be encouraged in developing the
aesthetics of the evolving image from
spontaneity to studied expression, from
figuration to abstraction. Exposure to
selected examples of historical and
contemporary imagery will be
accomplished through slides,
exhibitions and gallery or studio visits.
3 credits. One-semester course. L.A.
Miller
FA 339A, FA 339B Advanced
Painting/Guest Artist Series
This course is for students who have
made a strong commitment to painting.
Students are expected to work
independently in their studios on a
series of paintings that will develop
during the semester in response to a
dialogue with the different guest
artists.
3 credits. One-semester course. Bordo
Advanced Painting/Visiting Artists
Course description varies according to
the instructor. For Fall 2012:
FA 332A Advanced Painting
In this course, students develop their
individual studio work through
experimentation, risk taking and
rigorous evaluation of how to explore
questions of content in their work.
Students are encouraged to work
through their ideas and relationship to
painting to find their own distinct voice
and ways of working. The course is
centered around individual meetings,
with occasional group critiques for
group evaluation and discussion.
Supplemental readings, image
presentations, discussions, and
gallery/museum visits expand the
knowledge of the open field of painting
today and its potential for invention
and the production of meaning.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Visiting Artist Jessica Dickinson
FA 336A Advanced Painting
The course will emphasize attention in
equal parts to art-making and analytical
thinking in students’ studio practices.
We will work at consistently defining
the language and terminology used in
class discussions, individual meetings
and group critiques so that students
will leave the course with a solid
understanding of crucial concepts in
the field. Discussions will be focused
around readings, artist interviews,
assigned exhibition visits, student
presentations and class trips to
galleries, museums and artists’
studios. The aim of the course is to
prioritize critical engagement, both in
and out of the studio.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Visiting Artist Cameron Martin
For Spring 2013 and later semesters,
please see class schedule and
registration materials for course
descriptions specific to Visiting Artists
teaching that semester.
FA 439A, FA439B
Independent Study in Painting
1-3 credits. Requires approval
of instructor and the Dean
of the School of Art
Techniques
TE 417.1 Painting Techniques
and Materials
Differences in scope, techniques,
appearance and behavior between oilbase and water-base media, as well as
emulsion techniques, acrylics and other
plastifiers, are covered. Their qualities
and limitations are examined through
experimentation and comparison. The
work of the old masters of the 13th15th centuries is understood through
the study of water-base and emulsion
techniques on hard surfaces and gesso
grounds. The majority of class time is
used to study egg tempera and its
derivatives. Elements of ancient
paintings are copied to understand
certain effects. Students produce work
using the techniques learned.
Original paintings are produced by the
students in distemper, egg tempera,
emulsion, acrylics or encaustic.
Students produce an authentic fresco.
Execution of a 1:1 detail preparing
the arriccio, sinopia and veil of a fresco
is required.
2 credits. One-semester course. May
not be repeated. Pre- or corequisite:
Junior standing or FA 130B. Free
elective credit. Vanni
THE SCHOOL OF ART
TE 418.1 Water Media Techniques
This course provides a foundation for
techniques, processes and materials
involved in painting with watercolor,
gouache and acrylic. The class explores
the specific technical challenges and
characteristics inherent in these media,
including the range from transparency
to opacity. Acquaintance with a wide
range of brushes, tools, materials,
pigments and papers will be offered. A
range of approaches will be introduced
from traditional to experimental so that
the student can acquire mastery of the
medium through a variety of
experiences. The relevance of
technique and imagery to each
student’s personal work and interests
will be developed through discussions
and resource examples.
2 credits. One-semester course. May
not be repeated. Free elective credit.
L.A. Miller
Performance
FA 290 Elements of Performance
This course examines the elements
that unify the diverse set of practices
gathered as “performance art.”
Engaging concepts of time, movement,
voice, text and body in performancebased work, the course addresses both
the historical development of
performance practices within the field
of contemporary art, as well as their
current manifestations. Lectures,
screenings, readings and discussions
support the development of individual
and collaborative studio work.
3 credits. One-semester course. May
not be repeated. Hayes
FA 395 Performance
Performance or the live event has been
a continuous element of art practice
throughout most of the 20th century.
The changing technologies of sound
and digital recording devices and their
increasing availability have enhanced
the possibilities of documentation and
allowed artists to consider the
mediation and documentation of a live
event as an integral part of the work
itself. In this course, students will
examine the interaction between
performance and its documentation
through practical, historical and
theoretical interrogation. The class
proposes to address documentation,
not as an inadequate representation
nor as a nostalgic marker but as
something that operates within a
distinct system that can become a vital
site of art production. This class takes
an interdisciplinary approach to making
performance work. The medium of
performance and its utilization of
photography, video and sound will be
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
explored. Students will read and discuss
texts, looking at the work of other artists
and making their own work.
3 credits. One semester course. Hayes
Photography
Prerequisite Courses
FA 106.1 Photography I
A one-semester course which explores
the visual language of photography
through both black-and-white and color
mediums. Students will learn camera
controls through the use of 4x5 and
digital cameras. 35mm cameras are
optional. Darkroom printing augments
class assignments and student projects.*
3 credits. One-semester only. May not
be repeated. Mickey/Osinski/Williams
FA 206 Photography II
The emphasis of this class is on the
development of ideas within photobased work. Student work will be
discussed in relation to contemporary
art practice as well as significant ideas
in the history of photography and in the
context of larger cultural issues.
Readings and discussions will provide
students with a critical backdrop.
Fundamentals of digital work:
calibration of monitors, scanning and
color correction will be explored along
with medium format cameras and
lighting options.*
3 credits. One-semester only. Pre- or
corequisite: Photography I or by
permission of instructor. Pre- or
corequisite to Advanced Photography.
May not be repeated.
Morton/Osinski/Vahrenwald
*It is recommended that students have
digital cameras. Instructors will make
camera recommendations on the first
day of class for those students who
may wish to purchase one.
Advanced Courses
FA 361A Advanced Photography:
Large Scale
This course will concentrate on subject
matter, methodology, size, scale, genre,
style, theory and history of
photography. The orientation will be
the development of projects, from the
inception of ideas to professional
presentation and execution of artistic
work with an emphasis on making
large negatives and/or producing large
prints. Students are encouraged to take
advantage of the full range of imagemaking resources available to aid in
the creation of works that challenge
perceptions. Various options of
cameras and large scale printing will
be explored.
3 credits. TBA
FA 363A, FA 363B Advanced
Photography/ Digital Photography
This studio course focuses on issues
related to digital imaging. Students will
explore ideas related to digital work as
well as techniques such as color
management, various corrective
measures, and options in digital cameras
and printers. Issues central to
photography in the digital era will be
explored. Students will pursue individual
projects that will be discussed in group
and individual critiques.
3 credits. Osinski/Sanders
FA 364A, FA364B
Advanced Photography
This course will concentrate on
critiques of the students’ work.
Personal vision will be the subject and
interpretation of the print will be the
focus. Individual projects will be set for
each student. Students will also be
required to see exhibitions as well as
research books and other forms of
image reproduction.
3 credits. TBA
FA 365A Advanced Photography:
Photographic Craft and Technology
Projects provide students with the
technical resources to address the
broad spectrum of photographic
practice. Students learn how to
produce photographic prints and
transparencies that meet publication
standards. Seminars cover an
evaluation and application of
photographic tools, including digital
cameras and scanners.
3 credits. Fall only. Sanders
FA 365B Advanced Photography:
Studio Photography
The course will provide a practical
application of FA 365A in a studio
setting, including the use of—
incandescent and electronic flash light
for direct, bounce and diffused
illumination as well as various camera
formats, films, filters and lenses.
Instruction and use of digital cameras
and scanners will be included. Weekly
assignments and critiques are part of
this course.
3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisite:
FA 365A. Sanders
FA 366 Advanced Photography:
Alternate Processes
A course for students who wish to
explore the possibilities of handapplied photographic emulsions and
alternative methods of printing.
Processes will include liquid light,
cyanotype, palladium, color copier and
digital printing options. Student work
will be discussed in relation to
contemporary art issues.
3 credits. Williams
FA 366A, FA366B
Advanced Photography
Students will produce work using
photographic material(s), camera or
any photographic device of their
choice. Work will be discussed in
group critiques as well as individual
conferences with the instructor.
Photographic issues and representation
will be the subject of reading and
class discussions.
3 credits. Osinski/Vahrenwald.
FA 368A, FA 368B
Advanced Photography:
Guest Artist Series
This course is intended to help
students clarify and further the growth
of their own work through group and
individual critiques, classroom
presentations and discussions with
contemporary guest artists and the
instructor.
3 credits. Osinski
FA 369A Advanced Photography
Students will produce work using
photographic material(s), camera or
any photographic device of their
choice. Work will be discussed in
group critiques as well as individual
conferences with the instructor.
Photographic issues and representation
will be the subject of reading and class
discussions.
3 credits. Fall only. Raad
FA 369B Advanced Photography
This course will explore multiple-image
structures in photography and will
include issues and examples of
sequencing, time, fictional and nonfictional narratives and meta-narratives
and image and text relationships.
Studio projects will be combined with
lectures, presentations, field trips,
readings and class discussions to
provide the critical framework leading
to the development and production of
projects that address traditional as
well as experimental methods of
multiple-image structures. Projects can
include but are not limited to:
color/black and white, film/digital/
film stills.
3 credits. Spring only. Morton
Advanced Photography/
Visiting Artists
Course description varies according to
the instructor.
For Fall 2012:
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
FA 364A Advanced Photography
This course will concentrate on
critiques of the students’ work.
Personal vision will be the
subject and interpretation of the print
will be the focus. Individual projects
will be set for each student. Students
will also be required to see exhibitions
as well as research books and other
forms of image reproduction.
3 credits. Visiting Artist Patterson
Beckwith
For Spring 2013 and later semesters,
please see class schedule and
registration materials for course
descriptions specific to Visiting Artists
teaching that semester.
FA 469A, FA469B
Independent Study in Photography
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean of the School
of Art
Printmaking
Prerequisite Courses
FA 250 Silkscreen I
This course explores screen printing as
a means of communication with
emphasis on the execution of these
images. Students visit museums to
learn to appreciate posters from
various historical periods. The actual
screen printing will be taught with the
use of images, type and color. The goal
of the course is to combine the
components of art, printing and
communication.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May not be repeated. Clayton
FA 251 Lithography I
An introduction to traditional and
contemporary image-making on
lithographic stones and commercial
aluminum plates, with emphasis on the
technical aspect of the medium. The
various areas to be examined include
stone graining, crayon and tusche
drawing, processing, proofing and
edition printing procedures, etc.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May not be repeated. Nobles
FA 252 Etching I
An introduction to etching images on
metal plates, through the use of
hardground, aquatint softground. The
emphasis is on the technical
understanding of the medium. Other
image-making processes to be covered
are drypoint and engraving.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May not be repeated. De Armendi
Advanced Courses
FA 350A, FA 350B
Silkscreen Workshop
An advanced workshop in which the
students are free to explore screen
printing, graphic arts and photography.
There will be formal teaching of
advanced photographic processes such
as halftone and color separation.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisite: Silkscreen I.
Clayton/Nobles
FA 351A, FA 351B
Lithography Workshop
An advanced workshop concentrating
on individual projects and further
investigations into the reproducible
image and its implications. Discussion
and demonstration will be offered both
in the direction of a more technical and
chemical understanding of lithography
and working in conjunction with other
traditional print techniques.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisite: Lithography I. Nobles
FA 352A, FA 352B
Etching Workshop
This course will involve individual
directions in etching as well as the
development of projects combining
print technique and aesthetic goals.
The understanding and use of the
contemporary professional print shop
will be discussed.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisite: Etching I. Osterburg
FA 355A, FA 355B
Relief
Students will be instructed in various
relief printing techniques, including
traditional Japanese water-based
woodblock and Western techniques
with oil-based inks on wood and
linoleum. Use of the hydraulic press
will allow large format works to be
produced. Hand-printing techniques
will be taught as well. Small edition
printing in multiple colors will be
emphasized.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Shibata
FA 356A, FA 356B
Etching Workshop: Photogravure
This class will primarily teach
approaches to the 19th century process
of photogravure. Photogravure is a truly
continuous tone photographic intaglio
process. Tonalities are created by an
ink layer, gradually varying in depth,
with a very fine aquatint to hold the
ink. Photogravure will be the starting
point for the projects rather than the
final step. Students should be open to
continuing to work on plates with
traditional intaglio techniques.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisite: Etching I or Photo I.
Osterburg
FA 459A, FA 459B
Independent Study in Printmaking
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean of the School
of Art
Techniques
FA 354A, FA 354B
Experimental Printmaking
The course will supplement the
traditional printmaking techniques of
etching, lithography and silk screen
with an introduction to linoleum
woodcut techniques and monoprint/
monotype combination of methods
appropriate to developing an aesthetic
understanding of the vocabulary of the
print. Color, multiple printing, work in
series or book formats will be
discussed in developing student
projects.
3 credits. One-semester course.
Prerequisites: 2 of the following 4
courses: Silkscreen I, Lithography I,
Etching I or Papermaking Techniques.
Gleeson/Nobles
TE 353.1 Papermaking Techniques
This course includes the making of
traditional Western paper from rags to
a finished sheet and the making of
traditional Oriental paper from tree
bark to a finished sheet. Students learn
to use a pulp beater, dyes, sizings and
a small vacuum table for molding the
pulp. Simple binding and box-building
techniques as well as marbling are
demonstrated.
2 credits. One-semester course.
Free elective credit. DiEdwardo
Projects
FA 349 Senior Presentation Project
This project class seeks to mentor
students in the development of their
senior presentations. The class
presents and explores traditional and
alternative curatorial and exhibition
models, including one-person and
group exhibitions, collaborative and
curatorial projects, site- and
institution-specific installations,
interventions and performance. Class
discussions and individual meetings
with the instructor will allow for a full
range of critical interaction. A written
component is an intrinsic part of this
project whether towards the writing of
project proposals, artist statements,
power point lectures, or artist talks and
performances. Each student is required
to make a presentation to the class
outlining the parameters of his or her
artistic theses. Three recent graduates
of the School of Art representing
different artistic practices and goals,
ranging from those who attend(ed)
graduate school, to those in the
process of developing individual or
collaborative artistic practices, will be
invited to give artist talks and to join
in class discussions as a further
articulation of the senior presentation
experience within the extended Cooper
community.
3 credits. One-semester. Bordo
FA 384A Projects
This course is open to all third and
fourth year students who intend to
initiate or pursue a longer term (longer
than a semester) art project. Students
are expected to present their work-inprogress weekly, to research the works
of other artists, writers, and thinkers,
and to participate actively in class
discussions.
Open to all 3rd and 4th year students.
May be repeated with instructor's
permission. Raad
Science
RS 201 Science Topics vary.
3 general studies credits. Required
science course. To be taken during the
sophomore, junior or senior year.
Armstrong/Nadin
RS 201c Science of the Mind
Over the last 10 years there has been a
revolution in our understanding of the
workings of the mind. This course
offers a comprehensive yet accessible
survey of these new developments in
the understanding of the workings of
the brain. It will explore how these
discoveries are altering the most basic
concepts we have about ourselves and
how we perceive the world. The course
begins by familiarizing the students
with an outline of the anatomy of the
brain and its neurological function and
then progresses to consider new
theoretical models of consciousness.
The course also explores the laws of the
visual brain and how those laws govern
our perception of the visual world.
THE SCHOOL OF ART
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
RS 201d Optics for Artists
This course covers the fundamentals of
optics using a non-mathematical
approach, relying on provocative
demonstrations and hands-on
experimentation with an emphasis on
explaining phenomena observed in
everyday life. Topics will include the
nature of light, optical elements
(lenses, mirrors, prisms), cameras, the
theory of “color,” visual perception and
optical illusions, light detection (eye,
film, digital cameras) and more
advanced concepts of particular
interest to the students (holography,
lasers, liquid crystals, etc.).
RS 201h Topics in Physics: Space,
Time, Light, and Matter
The course provides an overview of
discoveries in physics over the past
two millenia, focusing on the
development of modern theories.
Topics include nature of light and
matter, relativity, quantum mechanics,
evolution of the universe and the
nature of science. Knowledge of basic
algebra is assumed. Field trips and
computer lab assignments are included
in the syllabus.
RS 201e Pattern Formation
Patterns, both in space and time, are
ubiquitous in the natural world. In this
course, we will distinguish between
patterns that arise from explicit design
and construction and those that arise
spontaneously from the actions and
behaviors of simple units. Concentrating
on these self-organizing systems, we
will explore topics such as: the
characteristic stripes and spots of
animals, the shifting landscapes of
desert sand dunes, the hexagonal
forms of honeycombs, the symmetry of
snowflakes, the synchronization of
flashing in firefly swarms, the
transformation from embryos to
organisms, convection patterns in
fluids, the development of social
networks and the growth of cities. Our
focus will be on understanding the
mechanisms that can explain how such
systems come to be. The course will be
conducted as a combination of lectures,
seminars, laboratory exercises, and
independent projects.
FA 391A, FA 391B
Sculpture
This course helps students develop
projects related to their own vision and
ideas. Class discussions address the
full range of conceptual and material
processes that generate production.
Research and development will be
given equal weight to finished work.
Intention, form, materiality and context
will be analyzed against larger
questions of culture in relation to
artistic practice. Student work will be
reviewed by the entire class and by the
instructor on an individual basis.
Lectures, readings and field trips will
complement studio critiques.
3 credits. One-semester course. Adams
RS 201f Current Issues in Biology
This introductory course will provide an
understanding of the science behind
many of the current issues facing
society. The goal is to provide
biological literacy in order to evaluate
scientific arguments presented in
topics related to human disease and
current events affecting human health
such as stem cell research, geneticallymodified food and genetic testing.
RS 201g Astronomy
This course begins with an historical
overview and then introduces the
contemporary understanding of the
universe. Students learn about the key
elements of the universe, including
motion, energy, gravity and light.
Topics include; the solar system and its
origins; the sun; stellar evolution
including white dwarfs, neutron stars,
and black holes; galaxies beginning
with the structure of the Milky Way;
dark matter, dark energy and the Big
Bang theory. Labs and field trips to an
observatory augment class discussion.
Sculpture
FA 394A, FA 394B
Sculpture
This course takes a concrete approach
to the development of critical discourse
about works of art. It exercises the
student’s ability to analyze the activity
of making sculpture in particular and
advances the student’s understanding
of how to proceed in the studio.
Problems of structure, materials,
meaning, intention and context are the
subject of class discussion.
3 credits. One-semester course. Logis
FA 396A, FA 396B
Sculpture: Seminar in Public Art
This course focuses on the production
of artworks that question and/or reinvent the boundaries between public
and private spheres. Student projects
will be generated and analyzed in
relation to current transformations in
culture and technology as they affect
the meaning of “publicness.”
Complementing studio production will
be lectures, readings and discussions
that engage social, political and urban
issues relevant to the topic. Traditional
approaches to public art, such as
enhancement and commemoration will
be challenged by more temporal and
critical strategies Historical examples
will be examined, including the Flaneur,
Russian Constructivism, the
Situationists, Fluxus and
Conceptualism, as well as the most
recent example of public interventions.
3 credits. Adams
FA 397A, FA 397B
Sculpture
This course takes a concrete approach
to the development of critical discourse
about works of art. It exercises the
student’s ability to analyze the activity
of making sculpture in particular and
advances the student’s understanding
of how to proceed in the studio.
Problems of structure, materials,
meaning, intention and context are the
subject of class discussion.
3 credits. One-semester. Ashford/Lins
Sculpture/Visiting Artists
Course description varies according
to the instructor.
For Fall 2012:
FA 398A Sculpture
This course will breakdown the notion
of genius and originality, particularly
within our contemporary technological
driven culture. If we are creative social
bodies, where does an idea come from,
how do shapes and materials form
meaning, and why the insistence
that art is unique? This course will
include individual presentations and
critiques of each student’s work, as
well as lectures and discussions
exploring the prevalence of
collaboration in the development of
2oth and 21st century art practices and
political movements. We will examine
ego, anonymity, social practice, muses,
affinity, consensus, and conformity.
‘Shared Form’ will culminate in a group
effort developed over the course of
the semester.
3 credits. Visiting Artist A.K. Burns
(Fall 2012)
Spring 2013 and later semesters,
please see class schedule and
registration materials for course
descriptions specific to Visiting Artists
teaching that semester.
FA 499A, FA 499B
Independent Study in Sculpture
1-3 credits. Requires approval of
instructor and the Dean of the School
of Art
Techniques
TE 390.1 Casting Techniques
Casting Techniques is a process
intensive course covering the methods
of translating a wax positive into
bronze or other non-ferrous metals. All
associated techniques from beginning
a plaster or rubber mold to casting,
chasing, finishing and patination of
metal sculptures will be covered.
Students will explore a variety of
approaches to casting, as well as
engage in discussions involving the
history of bronze casting, and its place
in contemporary art.
2 credits. One-semester course. May
not be repeated. Free elective credit.
Alwin/Wilhelm
Sound Art
FA 281 Project in Sound Art
This class will introduce strategies for
understanding and participating in the
aural world. The course is divided into
specific weekly topics, including
acoustic ecology, circuit-bending, radio
transmission, synaesthesia and others.
Screenings, readings and discussion
are supported by hands-on workshops
in capturing, manipulating and
reproducing sound in unconventional
ways. Grading is based on three
student projects and participation in
class discussions.
3 credits. One-semester course.
May not be repeated. Poff
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
FACULTY
Administration
Saskia Bos, Dean
Assistant Professors
Sharon Hayes B.A., Bowdoin College
M.F.A., University of California,
Los Angeles; Whitney Museum
Independent Study Program
Steven Lam, Associate Dean
Judith Cantor Bernstein
Coordinator of Academic Operations
David William
Coordinator of Student Exhibitions
and Special Projects
Tia Shin, Budgets Coordinator
Margaret Wray, Assistant to the Dean
Amy Westpfahl,
Coordinator, School of Art Admissions
Office of Academic Advisement
and Off-Campus Programs
Day Gleeson
Academic Adviser
Margaret Morton
Director, Off-Campus Programs
Joyce Bishop, Coordinator,
Office of Academic Advisement
Full-Time Faculty
Professors
Dennis Adams
B.F.A., Drake University;
M.F.A., Tyler School of Art
Proportional-Time
Faculty
Jennifer Todd Reeves
B.A., Bard College;
M.F.A., University of California,
San Diego
R. Scott Richter
B.F.A., Parsons School of Design
Norman Sanders
Champlain College;
B.S., New York University
Associate Professors
Yasuyuki Shibata
B.F.A., Kyoto Seika University, Japan
Douglas Ashford
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Michael Vahrenwald
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
M.F.A., Yale University
Niki Logis
B.A., Brooklyn College, CUNY
David True
B.F.A., M.F.A., Ohio University
Adjunct Faculty
Professors
Betsy Alwin
B.A., B.F.A., Mankato State University;
M.F.A., Illinois State University
Jack Barth
B.A., California State University;
M.F.A. University of California at Irvine
Larry Brown
B.A., Washington State University;
M.F.A., University of Arizona
Jacob Burckhardt
B.A., University of Pennsylvania
Gian Berto Vanni
University of Rome
Andrew Wilhelm
B.F.A., Kutztown University;
M.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth
University
Instructors
Eve Armstrong
B.A., Columbia University;
M.S., University of California
at San Diego
Anna Conway
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
M.F.A., Columbia University
Warren Corbitt
B.A., Vassar College;
M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art
Lee Anne Miller
B.S., Utah State University;
M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art;
Pratt Graphics Center;
The Slade School of Art
Lorenzo Clayton
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Aurora De Armendi
B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.A., M.F.A., University of Iowa
Cara DiEdwardo
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Ben Degen
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Margaret Morton
B.F.A., Kent State University;
M.F.A., Yale University
Stephen Ellis
B.F.A., Cornell University;
New York Studio School
Adriana Farmiga
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
M.F.A., Bard College
Christine Osinski
B.F.A., School of the Art Institute
of Chicago;
M.F.A., Yale University
Glenn Goldberg
New York Studio School;
M.F.A., Queens College, CUNY
Benj Gerdes
B.A., Brown University;
M.F.A., Hunter College of CUNY;
Whitney Museum Independent
Study Program
Associate Professors
Robert Bordo
McGill University;
New York Studio School
Mike Essl
B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art
Day Gleeson
B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design
Walid Raad
Rochester Institute of Technology;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester
Mindy Lang
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Lisa Lawley
B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.F.A., Yale University
Pamela Lins
M.F.A., Hunter College, CUNY
Ross G. McLaren
A.O.C.A., Ontario College of Art
Peter Nadin
B.A., University of Newcastleupon-Tyne, United Kingdom
Lothar Osterburg
Diploma in Fine Arts, Staatliche
Hochschule fur Bildende Kunst,
Braunschweig, Germany
Beverly Joel
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Jeremy Mores McWreath
B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.F.A., University of
Southern California
Jill Magid
B.F.A., Cornell Unversity;
M.A., Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
Yuri Masnyj
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Katie Merz
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Darin Mickey
B.F.A. School of Visual Arts
Scott Nobles
B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.F.A., Hunter College (CUNY)
Zach Poff
B.A., University of Maryland
Roy Rub
B.F.A. The Cooper Union
Mary Simpson
B.A., Pacific Lutheran University
M.F.A., Columbia University
Erin Sparling
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Alexander Tochilovsky
B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art
John Vondracek
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
Jennifer Williams
B.F.A., The Cooper Union;
M.F.A., Goldsmith’s College (London)
Visiting Artists
Nicole Awai (Fall 2012)
B.A., M.F.A, University of South Florida
Patterson Beckwith (Fall 2012)
B.F.A., The Cooper Union
M.F.A., University of California
Los Angeles
Jessica Dickinson (Fall 2012)
B.F.A., Maryland Institute College
of Art;
M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art
Iman Issa (Fall 2012)
B.F.A., American University in Cairo
(Egypt)
M.F.A., Columbia University
Bobby Martin (Fall 2012)
B.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth
University
M.F.A., School of Visual Arts
Cameron Martin (Fall 2012)
B.A., Brown University
Whitney Independent Study Program
Halsey Rodman (Fall 2012)
B.A., University of California
Santa Barbara
M.F.A, Columbia University
THE SCHOOL OF ART
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Staff
Daniel Porvin
Lab Supervisor, Film/Video
Betsy Alwin
Technical Assistant, Sculpture
Robin Potter
Technical Assistant, Photography
Blake Carrington
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Robin Randisi
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Sam Chun
Technical Assistant, Printmaking
Maggie Sullivan
Technical Assistant and Studio
Monitor, Painting/Drawing
Eric Clausen
Night Monitor, Painting/Drawing
Lorenzo Clayton
Technical Assistant, Printmaking
Tommy Coleman
Technical Assistant, Sculpture
Malcolm Davis
Technical Assistant, Painting/Drawing
Pablo Diaz
Technical Assistant, Type Shop
Cara DiEdwardo
Technical Assistant, Printmaking
and Head Technician, Type Shop
Ben Fries
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Pedro Gonzalez
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Anna Hostvedt
Senior Coordinator, Painting/Drawing
Haisi Hu
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Einat Imber
Technical Assistant, Sculpture
Andres Janacua
Painting Office Coordinator,
Painting/Drawing
James Kendi
Technical Assistant, Photography
Richard Knox
Co-Supervisor, Sculpture
Frank Kurtzke
Co-Supervisor, Sculpture
Heidi Lau
Technical Assistant, Printmaking
Kevin Leonard
Technical Assistant, Sculpture
Ross McLaren
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Eric Monasterio
Technical Assistant, Sculpture
Martyna Szczesna
Technical Assistant, Painting/Drawing
Dylan Thuras
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Colin Todd
Head Technician, Photography
Jersey Walz
Technical Assistant, Photography
Andrew Wilhelm
Technical Assistant, Sculpture
Jennifer Williams,
Technical Assistant, Photography
Bryan Zimmerman
Head Technician, Photography
The Center for Design
and Typography
Mindy Lang
Director
Inessa Shkolnikov
Assistant Director
Mark Rossi
Senior Designer
The Herb Lubalin Study Center
of Design and Typography
Alexander Tochilovsky
Curator
Emily Roz
Archive Coordinator
The Saturday/Outreach Program
Marina Gutierrez
Co-Director
Stephanie Hightower
Co-Director
Karma Mayet Johnson
Saturday Program Writing Liaison
Daniel Morris
Technical Assistant, Type Shop
Charles Fambro
Saturday Program
Curriculum Coordinator
Scott Nobles
Digital Specialist Print Technician,
Printmaking
Pablo Diaz
Outreach Program Manager
Zach Poff
Technical Assistant, Film/Video
Aisha Tandiwe Bell
Saturday Program General Coordinator
Victoria Febrer
Office Manager and Instructor
of Studio Arts
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
THE ALBERT NERKEN
SCHOOL OF
ENGINEERING
MISSION STATEMENT
The Albert Nerken School of Engineering will create an educational culture with a commitment to excellence. We will bring
together the best and brightest engineering students; we will
nurture and develop their talents; we will encourage them to work
and learn at their highest levels; and we will instill in them the
desire and the ability to use their engineering background to fulfill
their potential as knowledgeable, creative and responsible leaders
in society.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
OVERVIEW
With an average enrollment of about 550 undergraduate students,
engineering is the largest of The Cooper Union’s schools. The
school maintains small class sizes in courses and laboratories in
order to provide for personal attention. It offers bachelor of engineering (B.E.) degree programs in chemical, civil, mechanical and
electrical engineering, accredited by the EAC commission of
ABET .
In addition, the school offers a general engineering program
(B.S.E.). This program empowers students to create their own
curricula (within carefully set parameters) in those areas of engineering that cross traditional boundaries—for example, bioengineering, energy engineering, infrastructure engineering,
environmental engineering, electro-mechanical engineering,
robotics, etc.
The B.S.E. program provides an excellent preparation for
graduate work in law, medicine, business, etc.
The integrated master’s program offers the opportunity to
earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in an engineering
discipline at The Cooper Union within four, five or six years. A thesis
is required.
Although the School of Engineering strongly encourages
undergraduate research activities, and permits juniors and seniors
to register, when appropriate, for graduate level courses, this does
not guarantee admission to the Master’s program. However, a
student may apply for a place in the Master’s program as soon as she
or he has met the requirements for graduation.Final semester registration may be used in anticipating meeting these requirements.
Degree programs are designed to prepare students to enter
the engineering profession immediately after graduation or to
pursue graduate study. An extraordinary number of Cooper Union
engineering graduates have gone on to earn Ph.D. degrees at the
nation’s most prestigious graduate schools. Other graduates have
gone on to study in fields such as medicine, law or business. Many
of our graduates have risen to leadership positions in industry,
education and government.
The early curricula in engineering are based on intensive
work in the sciences, mathematics, computer science and engineering sciences, which serve as preparation for in-depth study
within the various engineering fields. Building on a strong base of
mathematics and sciences, and emphasizing the integration of
knowledge, these curricula are concerned with an understanding
of nature, the limitations of our present knowledge and the potential for advancing that knowledge.
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ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Strong mathematical and computer skills are developed in
all engineering students. This includes the ability mathematically
to model and then to solve problems algorithmically, in a suitable
language, and to use existing commercial packages for analysis
and design. Students are expected to be fluent in at least two
computer languages, and many specialized packages are used
both in elective and in required courses. The faculty expect assignments to be carried out using the computer in appropriate ways,
both as a design tool using packages and also as a platform for
original software.
Defining characteristics of the School of Engineering’s
programs are the emphasis on project-based learning and opportunities for undergraduate research. Students and their peers regularly join the faculty in solving real-life problems that exist in
contemporary society. Multi-disciplinary teams work together,
frequently cooperating with outside professionals, who act as
mentors. Superior analytical abilities and thorough grounding in
engineering fundamentals and design enable students to participate with faculty members on these research projects. Their results
may be published, presented at conferences or even patented.
A strong background in engineering design threads throughout the curriculum, starting with the first year. This design experience takes into consideration factors such as environmental
issues, sustainability, economics, teamwork, societal impact,
safety and political climate—showing students that a “design” is
much more than a purely technological solution.
Some design problems are offered in collaboration with foreign
universities to increase awareness of the global nature of the engineering profession (e.g.,The Cooper Union’s study abroad and international programs). Others may involve collaboration with industry
or hospitals.
Ample electives are offered so that interested students can
add a background in business and entrepreneurship, additional
mathematics and science or a “concentration” in an additional
engineering area.
Like The Cooper Union’s other schools, the Albert Nerken
School of Engineering is intimately involved with the New York
metropolitan area. Sometimes, the city and its infrastructure are
used as a laboratory. The school also draws on the region’s abundant talent and resources, including an outstanding array of engineers and scientists employed at major corporations, governmental
agencies and consulting firms in the New York region. The school
calls on physicians, lawyers and other specialists to collaborate in
research and mentoring and to give unique insights into contemporary problems and social issues confronting modern engineers.
Students benefit from close contact with the faculty, who are
devoted teachers, and the school’s loyal alumni, who delight in
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
sharing their experiences and insights with students, and in
serving as role models. Our students are encouraged to participate
in The Cooper Union’s rich seminar and cultural programs as well
as to attend talks by guest speakers. They join various appropriate
professional societies, many of which have chapters at The Cooper
Union. Students are inspired to qualify for membership in national
engineering honor societies. They also participate in student
government and sports, and take advantage of the vast cultural
environment offered by New York City and the neighborhood.
In preparation for their responsibilities as engineers who are
affected by the dynamics of technological advance and social
change, students are exposed to and challenged in the fields of
social science, humanities and other general studies.
Graduates of The Cooper Union are recruited regularly by
major national and international corporations and graduate
schools nationwide. Alumni are found in the top management and
research leadership of many American corporations; hold key
positions in federal, state and city agencies; and distinguish themselves on university faculties and administrations nationwide.
Through their many and varied professional accomplishments,
alumni have earned for the school its reputation for excellence.
FACILITIES AND RESEARCH
The Brooks Computer Center is available to all students and
faculty. It provides a centralized administration and technological
support for all academic computing needs, and allows students to
take advantage of rapidly emerging hardware and software technologies. The center maintains an ample supply of computers of
all major types—Intel™ based machines, Apple Macintosh™, Sun
Microsystems,™ IBM™ are examples. The machines are concentrated in computer classrooms, offices, laboratories, the residence
hall and special centers.
The Department of Information Technology provides a wired
and wireless network designed to give a rich and reliable
computing environment. It is locally accessible through the
intranet, which connects all but specialized stand-alone systems.
Students have access to all of the major operating systems such
as the varieties of Microsoft Windows™, Solaris™, Linux™ and
Mac/OS™.
The Department of Information Technology has both formal
classroom instructional facilities and informal drop-in accommodations. Currently, there exist no restrictions or charges for
computer time and availability of machines is widespread.
A full complement of applications, programming languages
and Internet tools are available. Multimedia hardware includes
audio/video capture and output, print and film scanners, digital
cameras, CD burners and large-format color plotters.
Data communications with the outside community are maintained via multiple dedicated high-speed Internet connections.
Students and faculty have access to software packages and
programming languages on the local network and can download
content from all Internet sites worldwide. Students are expected
to pay careful attention to copyright and ethical uses of the
Internet and to conduct themselves professionally at all times.
C.V. Starr Research Foundation The C.V. Starr Research Foundation, whose forerunner was established in 1976 as The Cooper
Union Research Foundation, is a not-for-profit corporation and
sponsors many of the externally funded research projects in the
School of Engineering. By encouraging and supporting research,
the foundation augments the educational opportunities for
students, enhances professional development of faculty,
promotes multi-disciplinary research and serves the community
through its research and development efforts and as a sponsor of
public seminars and conferences.
Participation in research activities by faculty and students is
essential to the vitality of the educational programs. In attempting
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
to meet this objective, The C.V. Starr Research Foundation plays
an important role for faculty and students having research talent
who wish to pursue sponsored research individually or in concert
with other faculty and students. The foundation facilitates collaboration with other universities, hospitals, industry and government.
Projects undertaken by The C.V. Starr Research Foundation
are externally funded. Faculty serve as project directors, assisted
by other faculty members, outside consultants and undergraduate
and graduate students of The Cooper Union.
The C.V. Starr Research Foundation is poised to support all
programs in all of the schools at The Cooper Union, both at the
undergraduate and graduate levels, by providing real-life research
projects throughout the curriculum. To this end, several inter-disciplinary research centers have been developed.
Each of the centers aims to draw upon the varied faculty
expertise across The Cooper Union and uses laboratory resources
in the School of Engineering, as well as the resources of the
Schools of Art and Architecture.
Recent research sponsors of The C.V. Starr Research Foundation include Zimmer, Pfizer, EPRI, Con Edison, the National
Security Agency, the City of New York Departments of Transportation, Environmental Protection and Design and Construction,
Transpo, Lucent, NYSERDA, the U.S. DOE, Lenox Hill Hospital, the
National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health,
Albert Einstein, STRYKER. Verdant Technologies and The Howard
Hughes Medical Institute.
The C.V. Starr Research Foundation has a proprietary
interest in several new technologies, all of them patented and most
of them developed at The Cooper Union. Examples include several
patents in asphalt technology, a clean coal-burning technology, an
innovative hydro-electric generation process, fuel-cell processes,
a micro-balance sensor and several patents in telecommunications and environmental measurement devices.
The Maurice Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering, where
research is ongoing in orthopaedic bio-mechanics, tissue engineering, rehabilitation, neurology, etc. This center has established
collaborative relationships with several hospitals and medical
research institutions in the New York City area.
The Center for Innovation and Applied Technology is an interdisciplinary research and educational resource that provides
answers to our technological and productivity challenges. We link
bold and innovative concepts with successful planning and practical implementation strategies.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Innovation is the result when creative conceptualizations are
developed and brought to market. Inventors, innovators and entrepreneurs are needed to make lasting societal contributions. We
enable collaborations between the Cooper Union community and
distinguished mentors from the alumnae, industry and educational
institutions who contribute their time, insights, and resources.
Applied skill sets are required to develop, fund, and ultimately bring to market a successful product. The Center will
provide the Cooper Union and its students with a supportive and
flexible research and learning laboratory based upon real world
problem solving.
Technology depends upon the skills of numerous disciplines
and lateral thinkers. CIAT will make a difference by solving some
of today’s challenges by providing a forum where the disciplines
can be merged.
The Center for Urban Systems and Infrastructure has started
research in the areas of urban security and protective design,
infrastructure rehabilitation, new energy technologies, acoustics
and noise abatement and sustainable environment. Industrial
partnerships have been formed with various corporations and
government agencies. The Cooper Union Institute for Urban Security operates under the auspices of this center, and the following
institutes are being developed:
• The Institute of Water Resources and the Environment,
• The Institute of Renewable Energy and
• The Institute for Soil Structure Interaction and the Underground
Built Environment.
The Center for Materials and Manufacturing Technology will be
engaged in research in composite materials, fire-resistant and
blast-resistant materials, robotics, mechatronics, nano-technologies and nano-biosensors. The center will also be active in innovative product design and automation.
The Center for Signal Processing, Communications and
Computer Engineering (S*PROCOM2) engages in recent and
ongoing research in biomedical signal and image processing,neuroscience, software engineering, mapping algorithms to FPGA and
other specialized architectures,network security,Monte Carlo simulations and wireless communications. Other areas of interest
include sensor arrays and networks,embedded control systems and
cognitive systems.Partnerships and collaboration have been established with technology firms,both small and large,medical research
institutions and financial firms in and around New York City.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
The Center for Sustainable Engineering, Art and Architecture—
Materials, Manufacturing and Minimalization (SEA2M3), SEA2M3
seeks to develop an awareness of solutions to engineering problems that preserve the integrity of the commons; it is a space where
true cross-disciplinary conversation and reciprocal learning
generate real solutions that can be imagined, created and implemented. Using their ability to communicate and infused with an
understanding of the world, its people and cultures, students create
and disseminate designs suited to, and in harmony with their place
of use. SEA2M3 provides a forum within which students from the
schools of engineering, art and architecture come together to
develop new design criteria that yield materials, manufacturing
techniques, habitats and lifestyles that are sustainable, and that,
ultimately, reduce the chasm between the rich and the poor.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING
CURRICULUM
The requirements for the bachelor’s degree programs must be
completed within four years of first registration, except with the
explicit consent of the dean/associate dean. Requests for extension must be presented in writing to the dean’s office prior to the
sixth semester of registration (or the end of the junior year). It is the
responsibility of the student to maintain normal and reasonable
progress toward the degree. If courses are made up elsewhere for
credit, the student is responsible for all costs incurred. Prior appropriate adviser(s) approval is required. If a student elects to take
additional courses at other institutions, the student must do so (a)
with prior academic approval if transfer credit is desired and (b) at
his or her own expense. Additionally, ABET accreditation requires:
• one year of a combination of mathematics and sciences (some
with experimental experience) appropriate to the discipline,
• one and a half years of engineering topics consisting of engineering sciences and engineering design appropriate to the
student’s field of study and
• a general educational component that complements the technical content of the curriculum and is consistent with the program
and institutional objectives.
In order to graduate,all students must meet the following conditions:
• A minimum of 135 credits are required;
• Satisfaction of all program curricula;
• Satisfaction of the residence study requirements;
• A minimum grade point average (G.P.A.) of 2.0;
• A minimum grade point average (G.P.A.) of 2.0 for the junior and
senior years combined.
Humanities and Social Sciences The requirements in this area
are satisfied by courses offered by The Cooper Union Faculty of
Humanities and Social Sciences or by transfer credit for liberal arts
courses taken at other institutions. The courses in this area are
intended to provide both breadth and depth and should not be
limited to a selection of unrelated introductory courses.
The Cooper Union liberal arts courses, shown elsewhere in
the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences catalog section,
have prefixes H, S and HTA. The basic courses HSS1–HSS2 and
HSS3–HSS4 are prerequisites for all higher level courses in the
same prefix family. H and S courses carry three credits each; HTA
courses carry two credits. Engineering students should consult
with the dean of Humanities and Social Sciences about choice of
courses to satisfy particular interests.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Transfer credits for liberal arts courses must be approved by the
dean of Humanities and Social Sciences. Courses that cannot be
used to satisfy the Humanities and Social Sciences requirement
are:
• language skills courses such as introductory foreign language,
public speaking, report writing;
• craft and performance courses unless accompanied by theory
or history;
• subjects such as accounting, finance, engineering economy,
industrial management, personnel administration.
Some programs require “free electives or non-technical electives.”
For transfer credit for particular courses, the School of Art or the
School of Architecture may be a more appropriate authority to
sanction the transfer. Students who are uncertain should approach
the Office of the Dean of Engineering in the first instance and be
directed to the correct group of faculty.
Program Requirements The specific programs for entering
students are shown in detail in the curriculum tables. From time to
time, changes are made to these programs following curricular
developments authorized by the faculty. Advances in technology
and new technologies are closely monitored and are reflected by
adjustments in all the engineering programs.
Course Substitutions and Credits A student may request to
substitute for a required course or courses given in the School of
Engineering provided that:
• the substitution is limited to 12 credits maximum toward the total
number of credits required for graduation,
• the substitution is approved by the dean/associate dean and
program adviser(s) and
• ABET accreditation requirements are not violated.
• The Chemical Engineering Department does not permit the
substitution of any courses.
The number of academic credits for each course generally is
based on the following relationship:
• 1 credit per contact hour in class
• 1 ⁄ 2 credit per contact hour of laboratory
This relationship was established on the basis that generally two
hours of preparation are expected of the student for every contact
hour in class or project activities and generally one hour of preparation is expected for every contact hour of laboratory.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Residence Study Requirement A candidate for a bachelor’s
degree must be enrolled during the entire academic year immediately preceding the granting of the degree and must carry at
least 12 credits per semester during that period. Also, the candidate must have been enrolled for a minimum of four semesters at
The Cooper Union as a full-time student for the bachelor’s degree.
Honors and Special Programs
Dean’s List The Office of Admissions and Records determines a Dean’s List twice a year, at the end of each semester, on
the basis of the record of the completed grade in every subject at
the official end of the grading period. To qualify, a student must
have a 3.5 or better semester grade point average for a study
program of at least 12 credits during that semester with no grade
lower than C and no grades of Incomplete (I).
Course Overload A student having a grade point average of
3.0 or better may elect to take an overload of one course in any
given semester. In all other cases of overload, approval of the
student’s academic adviser(s) and the written approval of the
dean/associate dean of engineering must be obtained. Overload
beyond 21 credits requires the written permission of the
dean/associate dean and no overload is permitted for students
with a prior semester G.P.A. of less than 3.0 or a cumulative G.P.A.
of less than 3.0.
2
Graduation with Honors Each graduating senior in the School of
Engineering who has achieved an overall cumulative rating of 3.8
or higher is awarded the degree with the notation summa cum
laude. Magna cum laude requires a G.P.A. of 3.7 or higher and
cum laude requires at least a 3.5 G.P.A.
Faculty Advisers All first-year students have the same faculty
adviser. For subsequent years, students will be assigned one, two
or more advisers each, appropriate to their field of study. Each
student’s program is established in consultation with his or her
adviser(s); changes may be made only with the adviser(s)’s
approval. Advisers for BSE students will be assigned according to
the student’s educational interests and goals.
Curricular Transfers Students wishing to change their course of
study should first discuss their interests with the current adviser(s)
in both the current and the new speciality areas. Transfer is at the
discretion of the dean’s office and the receiving department or the
BSE committee. It may be affected by the student’s grades and
availability of program resources. It becomes effective when the
required petition form, approved by the dean or associate dean of
engineering, has been delivered to the Office of Admissions and
2
Students may petition the dean/associate for reconsideration in the Dean’s List after the Incomplete (I)
has been made up.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Records.First-year students may not change their area of study until
the end of the year when two semesters’ grades are available. A
G.P.A.of 3.0 or better is required for approval to transfer curriculum.
Transfer Credit Students, at their own expense, desiring to register
for courses at another institution for transfer credit to The Cooper
Union must have appropriate advance approval. For courses in
mathematics, sciences or engineering, this approval is to be
obtained from:
• the department responsible for the course at The Cooper Union
and
• the dean or associate dean of engineering.
For liberal arts courses, approval is to be obtained from the dean of
Humanities and Social Sciences. In order that transfer credits from
another school be accepted, a grade of B or better is required. An
exception may be granted in special circumstances only upon
formal appeal to the Committee on Academic Standards.
Transfer credit is never granted for paid summer internships or
work experience or paid or unpaid research.
3
Pre-Medical, Pre-Law or Pre-Business Studies Upon completion of the engineering degree, some graduates may decide to
attend medical, dental, business or law school. Most of the prerequisites for such a course of action are offered at The Cooper Union.
For medical school or dentistry, students are advised to take one
year of organic chemistry and one year of biology. For law or business, additional economics, political science and professional
ethics courses are useful. Students should consult their adviser(s).
Study Abroad The Cooper Union offers suitably qualified,
approved students the opportunity to participate in research
programs at various foreign universities during the summer. For
example, students have attended universities in England, Ireland,
Scotland, Australia, Hong Kong, Germany, China, Japan, Italy,
Spain, Ghana and France. Cooper Union credit (up to six credits at
the 300 level) is granted upon successful completion of the
research work, presentation of a written report and its approval by
the Office of the Dean. Applications are available in the dean’s
office in mid-January. (Students on probation are ineligible for this
program). Credit is only allowable for exchange programs authorized by The Cooper Union School of Engineering.
Professional Development Mastering the technical aspects of an
engineering field is only part of being a successful engineer. There
are many other areas that go toward building and continuing a
professional career.
3
A grade of B- cannot be ttransferred
The School of Engineering has established the Aba and Leja
Lefkowitz Program for Professional Development to strengthen
the non-technical attributes required of its engineering undergraduates. Under this umbrella, a number of successful Cooper
Union initiatives have been consolidated to provide a comprehensive program of experiences and training for all engineering undergraduates.
This training is provided through zero-credit courses of seminars and
workshops that span a student’s career at The Cooper Union.Attendance at the seminars and workshops is mandatory for engineering freshmen and sophomores. The courses are designed to
introduce students to the profession of engineering, as well as deal
with their professional development. The Cooper Union’s
CONNECT (Cooper’s Own No Nonsense Engineering Communication Training) program is an integral part of these courses and
provides intensive, regular training in effective communication. A
wide range of topics are covered (in addition to communication
skills) including ethics, environmental awareness, life-long learning,
career development, conflict resolution, entrepreneurship,
marketing, workplace issues, professional societies, professional
licensure, organizational psychology, teamwork skills, etc. These
topics are dealt with using methods such as case studies,role playing
and interactive activities—“learning by doing.” In addition, guest
professionals, experts and alumni participate where appropriate.
These experiences make students aware of the importance
of the non-technical skills needed for professional success.
Through this program students are given significant help in easing
the transition into the workplace and ensuring success there.
Engineering Advisory Council
The School of Engineering is advised in key engineering issues,
such as leadership, ethics, communication skills, entrepreneurship
and corporate responsibility, by its Advisory Council, which is
comprised of company presidents, C.E.O.s, Nobel Laureates, engineers, physicians, attorneys and other business and professional
experts. The Council meets annually with faculty and students to
discuss important issues in engineering education. In addition, the
Technology Transfer Advisory Committee is made up of appropriate
individuals to advise students and faculty about issues such as
patents, commercialization of inventions, entrepreneurship, etc.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
Academic Integrity
Plagiarism is the presentation of another person’s “work product”
(ideas, words, equations, computer code, graphics, lab data, etc.)
as one’s own. Whether done intentionally or unintentionally,
plagiarism will not be tolerated in the School of Engineering.
There are many types of plagiarism, some of which are listed
below. (The list is not exhaustive. Speak with the appropriate
faculty member or the dean or associate dean of engineering if you
are uncertain as to what constitutes ethical conduct in a particular
situation.)
You are plagiarizing if:
• You present as your own work product a homework assignment,
a take-home exam or a class project that includes the efforts of
other individuals. The contributions of other individuals (if
permitted by your instructor) must be acknowledged in writing on
the submitted assignment, exam or project.
• You copy the work of other students on an in-class examination or
communicate with other individuals in any fashion during an exam.
• You submit as part of a homework assignment, take-home exam
or class project material that has been copied from any source
(including, but not limited to, a textbook, a periodical, an encyclopedia, the Internet) without properly citing the source, and/or
without using quotation marks. It is also prohibited to submit such
materials in a minimally altered form without proper attribution.
Improperly copied material might include text, graphics
(computer or otherwise), computer source code, etc.
Other prohibited acts of academic dishonesty include (but are not
limited to):
• Attempting to obtain a copy of an examination before it is
administered.
• Dishonesty in dealing with a faculty member or a dean, such as
misrepresenting the statements of another faculty member.
• Bringing notes into an examination when forbidden to do so.
• Bringing any device into an examination (computer/ PDA/calculator), which permits the retrieval of examination-related materials
unless expressly permitted by the instructor.
• Bringing any device into an examination that allows communication with other individuals or computers or computer databases
unless expressly permitted by the instructor.
Faculty members may not unilaterally resolve incidents of
academic dishonesty. Each faculty member is required to report all
cases of plagiarism or academic dishonesty to the engineering
dean’s office on an Academic Integrity Incident form. If documen-
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
tary evidence of the incident exists, it should be attached to the
form. The dean’s office, in consultation with the faculty member
and the student, will select from the following sanctions: a grade of
F for the assignment,a grade of F for the course or dismissal of the
student from the school. A record of all incident forms will be kept
in the dean’s office and second-time offenders are candidates for
dismissal from the school. Students who are dismissed because of
academic dishonesty should be aware that incident reports and
any responsive actions by the dean’s office or Academic Standards
Committee become part of their permanent record.
Sexual or Racial Harassment
Such behavior will not be tolerated. Incidents should be reported
immediately. Students should see the dean or associate dean, and
also the dean of students as soon as possible.
Code of Conduct
Students are required to read and abide by the code of conduct
published by the Office of Student Services.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
GRADES OF RECORD
The definitions below deal with the student’s attainment in the
formal work of the subject. Nevertheless, it should be understood
that such essential qualities as integrity, adherence to class regulations, enthusiasm, motivation, clarity in presentation of work and
sense of obligation, together with ability to use the English
language correctly and intelligibly, are reflected in the grade. The
course grade is assigned by the instructor in conformity with definitions indicated in this section.
The grade A indicates a superior and comprehensive grasp
of the principles of the subject. It denotes an ability to think quickly
and with originality toward the solution of difficult problems.
The grade B indicates evidence of a good degree of familiarity with the principles involved in the subject. It implies less originality and a tendency to hold to patterns of thought presented in
the formal subject matter.
The grade C indicates an average knowledge of the principles involved in the subject and a fair performance in solving problems involving these principles. This grade implies average ability
to apply the principles to original problems.
The grade D indicates a minimum workable knowledge of
the principles involved in the subject. This grade denotes low
achievement and therefore the number of such grades permitted
any student is limited in a manner prescribed by the section on
Scholastic Standards.
The grade F indicates unsatisfactory understanding of the
subject matter involved. A grade of F may be made up only by
repeating the subject in class; both the new grade and the new
credits and the original grade and credits are included in the
permanent record and in the grade point average. A student who
receives an F grade in a repeated course is a candidate for
dismissal by the school’s Academic Standards Committee.
The Incomplete (I) Grade
The designation of l indicates that the work of the course has not
been completed and that assignment of a grade and credit has been
postponed. This designation will be given only in cases of illness
(confirmed by authorized physician’s letter) or of other documented
extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control. The l
designation will be given only with the approval of the dean or associate dean of engineering. At the time of submission of an l designation, the instructor will indicate whether the student’s progress to
that point has been satisfactory or unsatisfactory, offering an estimation of grades whenever possible as a means of assisting the
Committee on Academic Standards in their deliberations.
The deadline for removal of an l designation will be determined by the instructor, but will not be later than six weeks after
the start of the spring semester for students who receive such a
designation in the fall semester and not later than two weeks after
the start of the fall semester for students who receive such a designation in the spring semester. If the l is not removed within the set
time limit, either by completing the work in the subject or by
passing a re-examination, the l will automatically and irrevocably
become an F unless the dean or associate dean of engineering, in
consultation with the instructor, extends the time or the student
withdraws from the school.
Dropped Courses and Withdrawals
Change of Program, 1st and 2nd week See General Regulations, page 15. Dropping a course during this period of classes
constitutes a program adjustment. The course will not be entered
on the transcript.
Adding Courses, including independent study, may not be
added after the second week.
Dropping Courses, weeks 3–8. A student anticipating
inability to continue an assigned program should immediately
seek counseling. A student’s program may be adjusted at the
discretion of and after conference with the adviser(s) and the dean
or associate dean of engineering, but only in cases where
scholastic performance is handicapped by conditions beyond the
control of the student, such as health or home conditions. This
should be done during the first eight weeks of the term.
The designation W indicates that the student has withdrawn
from the course. For credit, the course must be repeated.
Dropping Courses after the 8th week A student may lighten
his or her academic load and receive a W grade after the eighth
week of classes only with the approval of the course instructor, the
adviser(s) and the dean/associate dean. It is the policy of the
faculty and the Office of the Dean of Engineering not to approve
any withdrawal after the eighth week of classes except under
extreme, extenuating circumstances. The designation WU indicates that the student has withdrawn from a course without
permission of the dean or associate dean of engineering and notification of the dean of Admissions and Records. However, the
instructor is free to record an F grade in such cases; the W grade
is not applicable.
Repeating a Course When a course is repeated (due to
failure or any other reason), the grade earned each time the course
was repeated is calculated into the G.P.A.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Grade Point Average or Ratings To determine academic ratings,
numerical equivalents are assigned to grades as follows: A is
represented by 4, B by 3, C by 2, D by 1 and F by 0. The sum of the
products of credits attempted and grade equivalents earned in a
period at The Cooper Union, divided by the sum of credits for that
period, is the rating for that period.
Only Cooper Union grades of A, B, C, D and F will be used in
determining ratings. Grades from other colleges and other designations such as l and W are not used in Cooper Union ratings.
Grade Changes A change in an official grade of record, other than
the designation l, cannot be made by the dean of Admissions and
Records without the express consent of the dean or associate
dean of engineering. Grade changes will not be accepted after one
year has elapsed from the completion of the course.
Final Examinations Final examinations are held in most subjects.
They sometimes are not held in subjects whose content does not
readily lend itself to formal examination, such as laboratory or
project work. In certain other subjects, the class record may be
ample for determining student standing. The decision on giving a
final examination in a given subject is made by the instructor.
Academic Probation, Withdrawal, Dismissal Probation is the
consequence of unsatisfactory scholarship. It is a warning that
may involve a compulsory reduction of academic load, interviews
with an assigned adviser and additional academic counseling.
A student on academic probation must fulfill conditions as
prescribed by the Committee on Academic Standards.
• A student whose semester grade point average is 1.5 and below
is on automatic probation and is a candidate for dismissal by the
Committee.
• A student whose semester grade point average falls between 1.6
and 2.0 is on automatic probation. Two semesters of automatic
probation may cause the student to be a candidate for dismissal
by the Committee.
• Estimates of grades in subjects with I designations may be
included in all Committee deliberations.
• Students who fail to register will have their records annotated:
“Dropped: Failure to Register.”
• A student who is obliged to leave school for one semester or one
year must petition the dean or associate dean of engineering for
permission to withdraw. If a medical situation is a factor, consultation with the dean of students may be required. A student who has
withdrawn may apply for readmission to the appropriate department and to the dean or associate dean of engineering. A change
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
in circumstances that indicates that the educational program may
be resumed with a probability of success must be demonstrated.
If a medical situation existed, consultation with the dean of
students is also required. Furthermore, medical certification of
fitness to resume study will probably be required by the Office of
the Dean of Engineering.
• A student who wishes to return after an absence of more than
two semesters must apply for readmission to the Committee on
Academic Standards.
• The records of all first- and second-year students will be
reviewed by the associate dean of engineering for recommendations to the Committee on Academic Standards for appropriate
action. Students who have not completed satisfactory progress
toward their degree may be excluded from the third year and may
be required to withdraw from The Cooper Union in order to
complete course work elsewhere at their own expense.
• The Committee on Academic Standards reserves the right to
determine probation and/or dismissal at any point in a student’s
career for appropriate academic reasons.
• Students who believe that a modification of their status should
be made because of extenuating circumstances may petition, in
writing, to the Committee on Academic Standards.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
MASTER OF ENGINEERING
CURRICULUM
The integrated bachelor/master of engineering program is
intended to integrate work at the undergraduate and graduate
levels and prepare graduates for entry into the engineering profession at an advanced level or for further graduate study. It affords
diversification and versatility by requiring a student to elect a field
of study—the major—offered in the School of Engineering, and a
minor in a different field of engineering or science; this provides
depth and breadth. The school offers master’s degrees in chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering and
mechanical engineering.
The faculty have determined that B.S.E. graduates are
eligible for admission to the graduate program. Such graduating
students must join the chemical, civil, electrical or mechanical
programs, and may be required to “make up” fundamental
courses by the department.
Admission Procedure Please refer to the “Application and Admission Information” section, page 9.
General Requirements
Applicants are expected to have a superior undergraduate record
and to have given evidence of ability for independent work.
Students are accepted on an academically competitive basis
subject to the availability of an adviser and of suitable available
facilities. Undergraduate students are not guarenteed admission
to the graduate program.
Cooper Union Undergraduates To be considered for admission to
the master’s program, one must be a currently enrolled Cooper
Union undergraduate, with a minimum 3.0 grade point average
according to the major. For B.S.E. students, a 3.0 grade point
average is required in all engineering courses. Consult with the
program faculty. Generally, students entering Cooper Union
undergraduate programs as first-year students require four, five or
six years to complete the integrated bachelor/master of engineering program.
Specific admission requirements may be waived upon recommendation of the faculty in the area of the student’s major.
Graduates of Other Colleges The School of Engineering may
admit outstanding students or qualified practicing professionals,
on a tuition basis, into the master’s degree programs. To be considered for admission, a student should have completed an engineering baccalaureate program that is accredited by the
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).
Applicants must submit official transcripts. Graduates of foreign
institutions whose native language is not English are required to
submit scores of the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL). Admitted students may be required to register for
advanced engineering courses to make up for any deficiencies.
Time Limitation A maximum of two years are allowed to complete
the master’s degree, beginning with admission to the program.
Any extension beyond the two years must be approved,
and is subject to a maintenance of matriculation fee of $3,000
per semester.
COURSE DESIGNATION
The designation of a course offered in the School of Engineering
uses an alphabetical prefix and a three-digit numbering system.
The first digit usually denotes:
(1, 2) lower level undergraduate courses,
(3) advanced undergraduate courses and
(4) graduate courses.
Course Prefix
Biology
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Sciences
Interdisciplinary Engineering
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Physics
Bio
ChE
Ch
CE
CS
EE, ECE
ESC
EID
Ma
ME
Ph
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Students should consult official class schedules for courses offered
in a given semester. There is no assurance that a course listed in
this catalog will be given every year.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
AND PROGRAM
FACULTY
Be advised that each school at The Cooper Union offers certain
electives that are open to all students; consult each school’s
course listing.
Unless otherwise indicated, credit listings are for single semesters.
Courses are not generally offered in the summer.
Definitions
• A free elective is any course (for which a student is qualified)
given within The Cooper Union. Foreign language courses do not
count as free electives.
• The status advanced engineering elective is to be determined by
the adviser(s) and the Office of the Dean. Normally, such courses
will require prerequisites and are usually taken by juniors, seniors
or graduate students.
• A core elective is defined as any course required in either the first,
second or third year of the CE, ChE, EE or ME programs.
• A minimum of 12 credits of engineering electives must be at an
advanced level.
Brazinsky (chair), Davis, Lepek, Okorafor, Stock
MISSION STATEMENT
The Cooper Union’s Department of Chemical Engineering is
committed to the development and graduation of engineering
professionals. The department will promote student learning and
understanding of science and engineering fundamentals and
guide and encourage the application of this knowledge to the
ethical, professional practice of chemical engineering. This will be
undertaken in an environment that is responsive to new technologies and that encourages life-long learning and research.
Program Objectives
• Our chemical engineering graduates will understand the fundamentals of science and engineering and their use in the application of chemical engineering.
• Our graduates will have an understanding and awareness of the
professional, ethical and safe application of their knowledge.
• Our graduates will grasp the concept of life-long learning and
appreciate the continuing development of new technologies and
issues in the professional field.
• Our graduates will transition easily into their professional careers
and demonstrate success in that role.
• Those graduates who pursue graduate studies and research at
The Cooper Union and/or other institutions will have the necessary
technical background, support and preparation to succeed.
The education of the chemical engineer requires a strong foundation in chemistry and physics, which must be applied through the
medium of mathematics to the solution of design, modeling, scaleup, and control problems. A thorough knowledge is required of
chemical structures, together with the energetic and kinetic relationships predicted in chemical reactions and molecular transport. The chemical engineer deals with the application of these
principles to processes carried out on a variety of scales from
micro-reactors to an industrial scale, in which matter undergoes
changes in physical state, chemical composition or energy
content. Emphasis is placed on developing creative ability; facts
and theories are presented primarily to stimulate further thought
and study in all fields of chemical engineering.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Formal instruction is supplemented by visits to several plants and
companies where the contribution of engineers can be observed
and understood with respect to equipment, utilities, safety, costs,
environmental impact, labor and supervision. The students get
first-hand experience in the chemical engineering laboratory in
applying engineering analysis to equipment performance, and in
learning limitations of theoretical concepts. In the senior year, the
student learns how to design chemical plants from fundamental
data on new processes and to recognize areas of limited knowledge from the results of the design, and thus recommend pilot
plant studies, if necessary.
Chemical engineering graduates find employment in a wide
variety of areas. In addition to the chemical and petroleum industries, chemical engineers are involved heavily in the biomedical,
materials and environmental fields. A chemical engineering
education can also be easily applied to other interdisciplinary
areas such as biochemical and biomedical engineering, energy
resources, environmental engineering and materials science. As
a result, chemical engineers are also finding employment in nonindustrial institutions such as government, research think-tanks,
policy study groups and even publishing companies.
The chemical engineering department does not make use of
the 12-credit rule; see “Course Substitutions and Credits” under
“Bachelor of Engineering Curriculum.”
Biomedical Engineering
ECE 343/Bio-instrumentation and Sensing, EID 121/Biotransport
Phenomena, EID 122/Biomaterials, EID 123/Biosystems and
Instrumentation, EID 124/Bioengineering in Safety Design and
Injury Analysis and Prevention, EID 125/Biomechanics, EID 320/
Special Topics in Bioengineering, EID 325/Science and Application of Bioengineering Technology, EID 326/Ergonomics,
EID327/Tissue Engineering, Ch 340/Biochemistry (also Bio 102),
Bio 101/Molecular and Cellular Biology, ECE 422/ Selected Topics
in Embedded Systems, ME 421/Rehabilitation Engineering (also
EID 421), ME 423/Measurement of Human Performance (also EID
423), EID 424/Bioengineering Applications in Sports Medicine, Ch
440/Biochemistry II.
Minors
A minor can be obtained by a student in chemical engineering
taking any four (4) classes in one of the fields below. The courses
listed are examples of courses currently in the Cooper Union
catalog. Note that some may require prerequisites or permission
of the instructor. Additionally, note that it will not be necessary to
obtain a minor in any field in order to graduate with a bachelor of
engineering in chemical engineering.
Applied Chemical Technology
ChE 311/Introduction to Polymer Technology, ME 313/ Science of
Materials for Engineering Design (also EID 313), ME 314/Introduction to Composite Materials (also EID 314), Ch 364/Solid State
Chemistry, Ph 319/Introductory Quantum and Solid State Physics,
ChE 411/Polymer Technology and Engineering, ME 410/Materials,
Manufacturing Process (also EID 410), ChE 421/Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering
Note: You will be given a letter by the chemical engineering
Department certifying that you have completed a minor.
Environmental Engineering
ChE 340/Industrial Waste Treatment, CE 141/Environmental
Systems Engineering, CE 142/Water Resources Engineering (also
EID 142), CE 346/Hydraulic Engineering, EID 141/Air Pollution
Control Systems, CE 414/Solid Waste Management, CE 435/GeoEnvironmental Engineering (also EID 435), CE 440/Industrial
Waste Treatment Design, CE 441/Water and Wastewater Technology, CE 446/Pollution Prevention or Minimization, CE
447/Stream and Estuary Pollution, CE 449/Hazardous Waste
Management, Che 447/Sustainability and Pollution Prevention.
Energy Engineering
ME 130/Advanced Thermodynamics, ME 131/Energetics (also
EID 131), ME 133/Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration
(also EID 133), ME 330/Advanced Engine Concepts, ME
334/Combustion (also EID 334), ChE 421/Advanced Chemical
Reaction Engineering, ChE 430/Thermodynamics of Special
Systems, ChE 434/Special Topics in Combustion (also ME 434),
ChE 435/Transport Processes in Internal Combustion Engines (also
ME 435), ECE 422/Selected topics in Embedded Systems, Ph
462/Nuclear Physics.
Graduate Program
In addition to advanced courses in chemical engineering and other
areas, the student must complete a thesis for the M.E. degree. The
candidate must choose a full-time Cooper Union faculty member
from either the chemistry or chemical engineering department as
one of his or her thesis advisers. Before choosing a thesis topic,
however, the student should explore various professors’ research
interests. Research interests of chemical engineering faculty
members include non-Newtonian flow, crystal growth from hightemperature melts, polymer extrusion, heat and mass transfer with
change of phase, drag coefficients in dense phase transport,
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
construction of a database of engineering materials, mathematical modeling of bio-heat transfer in micro-circulation, mathematical modeling of whole-body heat transfer, analysis of oxygen
transport in the cardiovascular system and an integrated gasification process for the simultaneous disposal of sludge and garbage
with concomitant production of steam and electricity, biochemical separation, protein-purification, environmental engineering
and mathematical modeling, evaluation of sustainability, batch
process design and optimization, pollution prevention and mitigation, infinite linear programming, particle technology, multiphase
flow and fluidization, pharmaceutical engineering and processes,
nano-materials and energy systems and processes.
Chemical Engineering Program
Freshman Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
ESC 170 Energy and Material Balances
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
Ch 231 Organic Chemistry I
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
83
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
1.5
3
3
15.5
Credits
0
3
2
2
4
1.5
3
3
18.5
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 214 Physics III: Optics and Modern Physics
Ch 232 Organic Chemistry II
Ch 233 Organic Chemistry Laboratory
ESC 130.1 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ESC 121 Basic Principles of Electrical Engineering
Ch 251 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Ch 261 Physical Chemistry I
ChE 131 Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
ESC 140 Fluid Mechanics and Flow Systems
Engineering or Science Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
Ch 262 Physical Chemistry II
ChE 121 Chemical Reaction Engineering
ChE 141 Heat and Mass Transfer
ChE 151 Process Simulation and
Mathematical Techniques for Chemical Engineers
Engineering or Science Elective
Free Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ChE 162.1 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I
ChE 161.1 Process Evaluation and Chemical Systems Design I
ChE 142 Separation Process Principles
ChE 152 Chemical Process Dynamics and Control
Engineering or Science Elective
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
0
3
3
2
2
3
3
16
Credits
2
2
3
3
3
3
16
2
3
4
3
3
3
18
Credits
1.5
3
3
3
3
3
16.5
Spring Semester:
ChE 162.2 Chemical Engineering Laboratory II
ChE 161.2 Process Evaluation and Chemical Systems Design II
ESC 110.1 Materials Science for Chemical Engineers
Engineering or Science Elective
Free Elective
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
1.5
3
3
3
3
3
16.5
Total credits required for degree
135
84
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
AND PROGRAM
FACULTY
J. Ahmad (Chair), Cataldo, Guido, Tzavelis, Yapijakis
MISSION STATEMENT
To prepare our students as civil engineering professionals who will
have the depth and breadth of knowledge, sense of social and
ethical responsibility, commitment to a safe environment and a
desire to serve the society in leadership positions.
Program Objectives
• Our civil engineering graduates will engage in life-long learning
to stay abreast of the latest body of knowledge and professional
practices in civil engineering and allied disciplines throughout
their careers.
• Our graduates will excel in teamwork, interdisciplinary concepts,
organizational skills and problem-solving methodologies in their
professional careers.
• Our graduates will attain positions of leadership as professional
practitioners, government officials, academicians, inventors,
researchers, etc., during their professional careers.
• Our graduates will have a strong sense of commitment to excellence, independent thinking, innovation and modern professional
practices throughout their careers.
• Our graduates will have a strong commitment to professional and
ethical responsibility during their careers.
• Our graduates who pursue careers in engineering will seek and
successfully achieve professional licensure in their chosen fields.
Student Outcomes
The Civil Engineering Department has established the following
set of outcomes that our undergraduate students are expected to
achieve by the time of graduation:
1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and
engineering
2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to
analyze and interpret data
3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet
desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
4. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
7. An ability to communicate effectively
8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of
engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and
societal context
9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning
10. A knowledge of contemporary issues
11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern
engineering tools necessary for engineering practice
12. A broad fundamental knowledge to qualify for and pass
the New York State FE Exam administered in April of the year of
their graduation.
Program description
Civil engineering, earliest of the engineering professions, has
evolved into a broad spectrum of specialities: structural, geotechnical, hydraulic, environmental, transportation, urban planning,
construction management, sustainable design, urban security and
infrastructure rehabilitation. Depending on his or her interests and
abilities, the modern civil engineer also may become involved in
research, design and development related to projects in alternative energy sources, space structures, protection against natural
and man-made disasters, etc. The civil engineer also studies and
develops new materials, new structural systems and new strategies for optimizing design. Basic research, especially in the areas
of applied and experimental mechanics, often arises either as a
preliminary or adjunct requisite to these studies.
The civil engineer who wishes to practice creatively in any of
these fields must be thoroughly grounded in the basic sciences,
mathematics and applied mechanics, structures and structural
mechanics, engineering sciences and computer applications.
The members of the civil engineering faculty are actively engaged
in research in their specialities, which include modern advances
in structural engineering and materials, geotechnical engineering,
alternative energy sources, green design of buildings, water
pollution control technologies, water resources engineering and
urban security.
Within the civil engineering program, students may elect to
pursue specialized study through an appropriate choice of electives in two areas:
• Structural and Geotechnical Engineering
• Water Resources and Environmental
Graduate level courses in these areas are available to seniors with
superior academic records as indicated in the following lists:
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Structures and Geotechnical Engineering: CE 422, CE 425,
CE 426, CE 427, CE 428, CE 431, CE 432, CE 433, CE 434, CE 450,
CE 470.
Water Resources and Environmental Engineering: CE 414,
CE 440, CE 441, CE 442, CE 443, CE 444, CE 445, CE 446, CE 447,
CE 448, CE 449.
Graduate Program
Completion of the master of engineering degree program in civil
engineering is important for entry into the profession in any of the
specialized areas discussed above. The civil engineering department offers many graduate level courses in the cited areas, such
as structural engineering and environmental engineering. Graduate minors may include computer engineering, civil engineering
management and others. Also recognized are minors in interdisciplinary areas of engineering.
Civil Engineering Program
Freshman Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total credits fall semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total credits spring semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
ESC 100 Engineering Mechanics
ESC 110 Materials Science
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total credits fall semester
85
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
1.5
3
3
15.5
Credits
0
2
2
4
1.5
3
3
3
18.5
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ESC 120 Principles of Electrical Engineering
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 214 Physics III: Optics and Modern Physics
ESC 101 Solid Mechanics
CE 120 Fundamentals of Civil Engineering
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total credits spring semester
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
CE 121 Structural Engineering
CE 141 Environmental Systems Engineering
ESC 130 Engineering Thermodynamics
ESC 140 Fluid Mechanics and Flow Systems
0
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
Credits
4.5
4.5
3
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total credits fall semester
3
18
Spring Semester:
CE 122 Structural Engineering II
CE 131 Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering
CE 142 Water Resources Engineering
CE 341 Design of Steel Structures
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total credits spring semester
3
4.5
4.5
3
3
18
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
CE 342 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures
CE 351 Urban Transportation Planning
CE 363 Civil Engineering Design I
Engineering or Science Electives
Total credits fall semester
Credits
3
3
3
6
15
Spring Semester:
CE 361 Civil Engineering Experimental Projects
CE 364 Civil Engineering Design II
Engineering or Science Electives
Total credits spring semester
2
3
9
14
Total credits required for degree
135
86
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT AND PROGRAM
FACULTY
Ahmad, Cumberbatch, Fontaine (Chair), Keene, Kirtman, Sable
MISSION STATEMENT
To develop a highly trained, consummate engineer: able to lead, to
practice in a professional manner, to grow with technological
advances, to express himself or herself in written and in oral form,
to function as a project engineer immediately upon graduation and
to pursue graduate studies in a variety of professional fields.
Program Objectives
Each of our electrical engineering graduates:
• will be capable of functioning as a first-class project engineer,
• will have exceptional technical knowledge and professional
design skills,
• will be capable of professional-level written and oral expression,
• will be capable of demonstrating leadership skills and
• will be open-minded and receptive to new ideas and viewpoints,
with a commitment to excellence, independent thinking, research,
life-long learning, innovation and the use of the latest technologies
and modern professional practices throughout his or her career.
Program description
Basic courses in electrical circuits and signal processing (or
computer systems or computer engineering), along with core
mathematics, science and humanities courses, are taken in the
freshman and sophomore years. Students may then elect to
pursue study through an appropriate choice of electives in three
areas:
• Electronic Systems and Materials
• Signal Processing and Communications
• Computer Engineering
Students plan their electives with the assistance of a faculty
adviser to specialize in areas of interest and to obtain a wellrounded and diverse educational experience. By the senior year,
strong students are encouraged to take graduate-level electives
beyond the requirements of the bachelor’s degree as part of an
integrated five-year master’s program.
The curriculum interweaves strong theory, grounded in
mathematics and science, with extensive use of CAD tools and
practical projects. Team and individual projects begin in the
freshman year and culminate with year-long senior projects.
All laboratory courses, and many recitation courses, are
project based. By the time students commence their senior projects, they perform open-ended system design, implementation
and testing, cost analysis and prepare written and oral presentations. They act as project managers under the guidance of a
faculty adviser.
There are numerous research and independent study opportunities involving close work with faculty and practicing professionals on cutting-edge problems.
Graduate Program
The candidate must choose a full-time Cooper Union faculty
member from the electrical engineering department as one of his
or her advisers. Possible areas of concentration or thesis topics are
numerous and reflect the diverse interests of the faculty. Some
examples are digital signal processing, image and video
processing, biomedical engineering, wireless communications,
computer networks, machine learning, mapping algorithms to
architecture, advanced computing and simulation methodology,
electronic materials, integrated circuit engineering and sustainable
engineering. Thesis topics that are research-oriented or targeted
towards commercial application are particularly encouraged.
Web Site
The Electrical Engineering program maintains a website at
www.ee.cooper.edu.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Electronic Systems and Materials Track
in Electrical Engineering
(for students admitted prior to September 2010)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
ECE 150 Digital Logic Design
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 141 Circuit & Electronics I
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 110 MATLAB Seminar: Signals and Systems
ECE 111 Signal Processing & Systems Analysis
ECE 131 Solid State Materials
ECE 151 Computer Architecture
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 214 Physics III: Modern Physics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
87
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
3
1.5
3
3
18.5
Credits
0
3
2
3
4
1.5
3
16.5
0
0
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 101 Communication Theory
ECE 114 Digital Signal Processing
ECE 121 Control Systems
ECE 142 Electronics II
ECE 193 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects I
Ma 326 Linear Algebra
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
3
1.5
3
3
19.5
Spring Semester:
ECE 103 Communication Networks
ECE 135 Engineering Electromagnetics
ECE 194 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects II
ECE 341 Integrated Circuit Design
3
4
4
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
17
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 195 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects III
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
4
3
7
13
Spring Semester:
ECE 196 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects IV
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
3
8.5
14.5
Total credits required for degree
135
88
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Electronic Systems and Materials Track
in Electrical Engineering
(for students admitted September 2010 and later)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
ECE 150 Digital Logic Design
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 140 Circuit Analysis
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 110 MATLAB Seminar: Signals and Systems
ECE 111 Signal Processing & Systems Analysis
ECE 141 Electronics I
ECE 151 Computer Architecture
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 214 Physics III: Modern Physics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
3
1.5
3
3
18.5
Credits
0
3
2
3
4
1.5
3
16.5
0
0
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 101 Communication Theory
ECE 114 Digital Signal Processing
ECE 121 Control Systems
ECE 142 Electronics II
ECE 193 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects I
Ma 326 Linear Algebra
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
3
1.5
3
3
19.5
Spring Semester:
ECE 103 Communication Networks
ECE 135 Engineering Electromagnetics
ECE 194 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects II
ECE 341 Integrated Circuit Design
3
4
4
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
17
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 195 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects III
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
4
3
7
13
Spring Semester:
ECE 196 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects IV
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
3
8.5
14.5
Total credits required for degree
135
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Signal Processing and Communications Track
in Electrical Engineering
(for students admitted September 2010 and later)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
ECE 150 Digital Logic Design
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 140 Circuit Analysis
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 110 MATLAB Seminar: Signals and Systems
ECE 111 Signal Processing & Systems Analysis
ECE 141 Electronics I
ECE 151 Computer Architecture
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 214 Physics III: Modern Physics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
89
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
3
1.5
3
3
18.5
Credits
0
3
2
3
4
1.5
3
16.5
0
0
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 101 Communication Theory
ECE 114 Digital Signal Processing
ECE 121 Control Systems
ECE 142 Electronics II
ECE 193 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects I
Ma 326 Linear Algebra
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
3
1.5
3
3
19.5
Spring Semester:
ECE 103 Communication Networks
ECE 135 Engineering Electromagnetics
ECE 194 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects II
ECE 302 Probability Models & Stochastic Processes
3
4
4
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
17
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 195 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects III
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
4
3
7
13
Spring Semester:
ECE 196 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects IV
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
3
8.5
14.5
Total credits required for degree
135
90
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Computer Engineering Track in Electrical Engineering
(for students admitted prior to September 2010)
First Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Experessions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
ECE 150 Digital Logic Design
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 140 Circuit Analysis
ECE 161 Programming Languages
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 110 MATLAB Seminar: Signals and Systems
ECE 111 Signal Processing & Systems Analysis
ECE 141 Electronics I
ECE 151 Computer Architecture
ECE 164 Data Structures and Algorithms I
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 214 Physics III: Modern Physics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
3
1.5
3
3
18.5
Credits
0
3
3
2
3
4
1.5
3
19.5
0
0
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
19
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 101 Communication Theory
ECE 114 Digital Signal Processing
ECE 142 Electronics II
ECE 165 Data Structures and Algorithms II
ECE 193 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects I
Ma 352 Discrete Mathematics
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
2
1.5
3
3
18.5
Spring Semester:
ECE 103 Communication Networks
ECE 194 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects II
ECE 302 Probability Models & Stochastic Processes
ECE 361 Software Engineering & Large System Design
3
4
3
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
16
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 195 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects III
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
4
3
6
13
Spring Semester:
ECE 196 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects IV
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
3
6.5
12.5
Total credits required for degree
135
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Signal Processing and Communications Track
in Electrical Engineering
(for students admitted prior to September 2010)
Freshman Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
ECE 150 Digital Logic Design
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 141 Circuits & Electronics I
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 110 MATLAB Seminar: Signals and Systems
ECE 111 Signal Processing & Systems Analysis
ECE 131 Solid State Materials
ECE 151 Computer Architecture
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 214 Physics III: Modern Physics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
91
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
3
1.5
3
3
18.5
Credits
0
3
2
3
4
1.5
3
16.5
0
0
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 101 Communication Theory
ECE 114 Digital Signal Processing
ECE 121 Control Systems
ECE 142 Circuits and Electronics II
ECE 193 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects I
Ma 326 Linear Algebra
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
3
1.5
3
3
19.5
Spring Semester:
ECE 103 Communication Networks
ECE 135 Engineering Electromagnetics
ECE 194 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects II
ECE 302 Probability Models & Stochastic Processes
3
4
4
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
17
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 195 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects III
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
4
3
7
13
Spring Semester:
ECE 196 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects IV
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
3
8.5
14.5
Total credits required for degree
135
92
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Computer Engineering Track in Electrical Engineering
(for students admitted September 2010 and later)
First Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Experessions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
ECE 150 Digital Logic Design
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 140 Circuit Analysis
ECE 161 Programming Languages
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ECE 110 MATLAB Seminar: Signals and Systems
ECE 111 Signal Processing & Systems Analysis
ECE 141 Electronics I
ECE 151 Computer Architecture
ECE 164 Data Structures and Algorithms I
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 214 Physics III: Modern Physics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
3
1.5
3
3
18.5
Credits
0
3
3
2
3
4
1.5
3
19.5
0
0
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
19
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 101 Communication Theory
ECE 114 Digital Signal Processing
ECE 142 Electronics II
ECE 165 Data Structures and Algorithms II
ECE 193 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects I
Ma 352 Discrete Mathematics
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
2
1.5
3
3
18.5
Spring Semester:
ECE 103 Communication Networks
ECE 194 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects II
ECE 302 Probability Models & Stochastic Processes
ECE 361 Software Engineering & Large System Design
3
4
3
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
16
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ECE 195 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects III
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
4
3
6
13
Spring Semester:
ECE 196 Electrical & Computer Engineering Projects IV
Non-technical Elective
Engineering or Science Electives
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
3
6.5
12.5
Total credits required for degree
135
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT AND PROGRAM
FACULTY
Baglione, Delagrammatikas, Lima, Orbach (visiting),
Sidebotham, Wei (chair), Wootton
MISSION STATEMENT
The Cooper Union’s Department of Mechanical Engineering will
produce broadly- and rigorously-educated graduates, able to
practice professionally, pursue advanced studies and innovate in
a wide range of fields. Together with our faculty and staff, our
students will develop a commitment toward lifelong interdisciplinary learning, fulfill their potential for responsible leadership and
inspire others to continuously pursue excellence by example.
Program Objectives
Our graduates will
• apply their broad and rigorous education to responsible, interdisciplinary problem solving,
• communicate clearly and effectively in their chosen professions
and
• continue to learn and educate themselves in their fields of pursuit.
Program description
Mechanical engineering is concerned with the devices and
phenomena related to the generation, transmission, application
and control of power. Mechanical engineering grew up with the
Industrial Revolution and is today the broadest of the engineering
disciplines, encompassing many activities and fields of interest.
Mechanical engineers may be involved with research and development, design, manufacturing, sales, application and service,
administration and management, as well as teaching and
consulting. Fields of interest include solid mechanics, materials,
fluid mechanics, vibrations and acoustics, heat transfer and
thermodynamics, combustion, control systems, manufacturing,
CAD/CAM and robotics or combinations of these as is often the
case in the design and development work of complex projects.
(Examples: the space shuttle, the investigation of alternate energy
from renewable resources, the development of completely automated factories, robotics and biomedical engineering systems.)
At the Albert Nerken School of Engineering, the mechanical engineering faculty and students have been, and continue to be,
involved in these and other exciting new developments through
their project work, research work or consulting.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Mechanical engineering is an ideal foundation for careers in
the aerospace industry, ocean engineering, marine engineering,
biomedical engineering, the automobile industry, the power and
utility industries and virtually any area of activity that requires analytical abilities combined with a strong background in design practice.
The sequences of courses shown in the undergraduate
curriculum table emphasize the fundamental engineering
sciences as well as their applications in a computer environment
and professional design practice. By the selection of electives and
of their design and research projects, students have a large degree
of flexibility in exploring their own interests.
Graduate Program
Areas of research include computer-aided design and engineering, robotics, biomedical engineering, automotive systems,
mechatronics, thermoelectric power generation, vibrations
and acoustics, combustion and other interdisciplinary areas of
engineering.
93
94
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Mechanical Engineering Program
Freshman Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Introduction to Computer Science
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
EID 103 Principles of Design
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total Credits Spring Semester
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester:
ESC000.3 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equation
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Laboratory
ESC 100 Engineering Mechanics
ESC 110 Materials Science
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Total Credits Fall Semester
Spring Semester:
ESC000.4 Professional Development Seminar
ESC 121 Basic Principles of Electrical Engineering
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 214 Physics III: Optics and Modern Physics
ESC 101 Mechanics of Materials
ESC 161 Systems Engineering
ME 155 Design and Prototyping
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Total Credits Spring Semester
1
2
Courses with prefix BIO, ChE, CE, CS, EE/ECE, ME, EID, ESC.
Any course, exept foreign languages, offered at The Cooper Union.
Credits
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
0
4
4
3
1.5
3
3
18.5
Credits
0
2
3
4
1.5
3
3
3
19.5
0
2
2
3
3
3
2
3
18
Junior Year
Fall Semester:
ESC 130 Engineering Thermodynamics
ESC 140 Fluid Mechanics & Flow Systems
ME 100 Stress and Applied Elasticity
ME 151 Feedback Control Systems
Engineering or Science Elective
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective1
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
Spring Semester:
ME 101 Mechanical Vibrations
ME 130 Advanced Thermodynamics
ME 142 Heat Transfer
ME 160 Engineering Experimentation
Engineering or Science Elective
3
3
3
3
3
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective
Total Credits Spring Semester
3
18
Senior Year
Fall Semester:
ME 120 Design Elements
or
ME 141 Fundamentals of Aerodynamics
ME 163 Mechanical Engineering Projects
ME 312 Manufacturing Engineering
Free Electives
Total Credits Fall Semester
Credits
3
3
3
4
13
Spring Semester:
ME 164 Capstone Senior Mechanical Engineering Design
ME 320 Mechanical Design
or
ME 300 Space Dynamics
Free Electives2
Total Credits Spring Semester
12
Total credits required for degree
135
3
3
6
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Core Curriculum of the School of Engineering
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN ENGINEERING CURRICULUM
Freshman Year
General Engineering
The School of Engineering offers a program in General Engineering
leading to the degree of bachelor of science in engineering
(B.S.E.). It is Intended for students who have a clear Idea of their
educational objectives. These may require a more flexible Interdisciplinary course of study. This program Is also suitable for
students who desire a strong, broad-based, rigorous engineering
background as preparation for graduate study in mathematics,
science or other disciplines.
Curriculum
While details of programs will vary according to educational goals
and adviser’s requirements, the core is as follows:
Core Courses
Humanities and Social Sciences
(over and above the core courses)
Engineering and Engineering Sciences1
(over and above the core courses)*
Free Electives2
Total credits
95
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Credits
55
minimum 6
minimum 44
30
135
The program is administered by an interdepartmental committeee. Approximately 10 percent of the engineering undergraduates currently undertake this program.
Each student is assigned an adviser from the committeee;
other faculty may also act as co-advisers. Choice of electives Is
closely monitored for academic rigor and coherence by the interdepartmental committeee.
Students who are considering applying to medical or dental
school after completing the program are advised to take one year
of biology. Law schools may require additional courses in the social
sciences.
The program is not suitable for students who wish licensure.
Credits
Fall Semester:
ESC 000.1 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear Algebra
Ma 111 Calculus I
Ch 110 General Chemistry
EID 101 Engineering Design and Problem Solving
CS 102 Computer Programming for Engineers
HSS 1 Literary Forms and Expressions
Total credits fall semester
0
2
4
3
3
3
3
18
Spring Semester:
ESC 000.2 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 113 Calculus II
Ch 111 General Chemistry Laboratory
Ch 160 Physical Principles of Chemistry
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New
Total credits spring semester
0
4
1.5
3
4
3
15.5
Sophomore Year
Credits
Fall Semester:
ESC 000.3 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Ma 224 Probability
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic Phenomena
Ph 291 Introductory Physics Lab
HSS 3 The Making of Modern Society
Electives
Total credits fall semester
0
2
2
4
1.5
3
6
18.5
Spring Semester:
ESC 000.4 Professional Development Seminar
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
Ph 214 Physics III: Optics and Modern Physics
HSS 4 The Modern Context: Figures and Topics
Electives
Total credits spring semester
3
3
3
10
19
0
96
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
MASTER’S PROGRAM
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Credit Requirements
A minimum of 30 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree must
be completed at The Cooper Union (in addition to possible undergraduate deficiencies). Of these, not more than six credits may be
undergraduate-level courses. The 30 credits offered for the degree
must satisfy the following distribution:
Program of Study
A complete program of study, major as well as minor, is designed
by the student with the assistance and approval of the academic
adviser(s) and approved by the Office of the Dean of Engineering.
Minors
Minor concentrations are offered in accordance with faculty interests and school resources. Courses in engineering and science are
chosen to form an innovative and coherent program of study for a
minor with the approval of the department and faculty adviser(s).
Credits
The major
minimum 12
A coherent concentration of graduate-level courses in the chosen field, which must
include courses approved by the adviser(s).
(A planned course of study must be submitted for approval by the dean’s office.)
The minor
minimum 12
A concentration in an area of engineering other than the chosen major.
Thesis project
Total Credits
6
30
Grade Requirement
A minimum overall grade point average of 3.0 is needed in all
courses used to satisfy the 30 credit master’s degree requirement.
Appropriate Excess Credits Taken as an Undergraduate
For Cooper Union baccalaureate holders, any credits of appropriate level, taken as undergraduates in excess of their bachelor’s
degree requirement, may be applied to the master’s degree,
subject to the above requirements and advisory approval.
Time Limitation
The requirements for the master of engineering program must be
completed within two years of admission except for extraordinary
circumstances that require the express consent of the dean or
associate dean of engineering. Requests for such extension must
be presented in writing to the Office of the Dean in the final
semester of the second year. Thesis adviser’s approval is also
required. Master’s students who receive approval to extend their
studies beyond two years will be assessed a maintenance of
matriculation fee of $3,000 per semester.
Thesis/Project
• Each student is required to submit a thesis or project in the major
or the minor area of study, equivalent to a maximum of six credits
(400 level), for partial fulfillment of the master of engineering
requirements. This project must be discussed with and approved
by an adviser prior to being started.
• The thesis or project must be successfully presented orally by the
student and submitted in written form.
Fellowships
One source of funding available to students wishing to pursue
graduate study in engineering is the Enders Fund, governed by the
will of Henry C. Enders and administered by the New York Community Trust. This fellowship is available to engineering graduates of
The Cooper Union who plan to do graduate work in either chemistry,
chemical engineering,chemistry-based environmental engineering
or chemistry-based bioengineering and, who have satisfactorily
completed all of the chemistry courses required of Cooper Union
chemical engineering graduates. Recipients are selected by the
joint faculties of chemistry and chemical engineering.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENTS
Chemistry
Faculty: Newmark (chair), Savizky, Topper
The Department of Chemistry offers a wide range of courses that
are necessary for the understanding of the various engineering
disciplines. All first-year engineering students enroll in General
Chemistry (a general quantitative and descriptive overview of
chemistry), Physical Principles of Chemistry (a quantitative
discussion of chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry and
chemical kinetics) and General Chemistry Laboratory recording ,
report writing and safety).
Sophomore and junior level courses required for chemical
engineering majors can also be taken as electives by those wishing
to further their knowledge in the areas of analytical chemistry,
biochemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry.
In addition, advanced elective courses in biochemistry, inorganic chemistry and theoretical chemistry are available which are
suitable for students interested in bioengineering, chemistry,
materials engineering, nanotechnology, or pre-medical studies.
Research at the undergraduate and master’s levels can be
conducted under the supervision of the chemistry faculty. Interested students should meet with the department faculty to discuss
possible research areas.
The Department operates laboratories in general chemistry,
organic chemistry and instrumental analysis for instruction and
research projects.
Mathematics
Faculty: Agrawal (chair), Bailyn, Hopkins, Mintchev, Simon
(Visiting), Smyth, Vulakh
The primary responsibility of the Department of Mathematics is
the maintenance and delivery of the core mathematics curriculum
for the School of Engineering. This consists of a sequence of
required courses given in the first two years covering calculus,
linear algebra, probability, vector calculus and differential equations. In addition to the core courses, there are a variety of elective
mathematics courses, some of which are computer-related. The
mathematics curriculum will more than adequately prepare the
student for professional work as well as graduate study in engineering and applied mathematics.
The faculty of mathematics strives to develop in the student
a firm foundation in, and an appreciation of, the structure and
methods of mathematics. Students interested in mathematics
research should consult the chair for specific areas of expertise.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
The department of mathematics offers a minor in mathematics.
Students seeking a minor in mathematics must complete at least
15 credits of mathematics coursework in addition to the 17 credits
required by every engineering department. These additional
credits must include Advanced Calculus I and II (Ma 350, 351),
Linear Algebra (Ma 326), Modern Algebra (Ma 347) and an elective course in mathematics at or above the 300 level. An overall
G.P.A., at graduation, of at least 3.0 among the mathematics
portion (32 credits) of the program is required to obtain a minor in
mathematics.
Physics
Faculty: A. Wolf (chair), Uglesich
The physics program at The Cooper Union provides a sequence of
introductory courses devised to introduce students in engineering
to fundamental physical concepts that underlie all the engineering
disciplines. Additionally, the Physics Department offers elective
courses that are crafted to provide an enhanced understanding of
specially selected fields of interest in engineering science.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Chemical
Engineering
Courses
Undergraduate
ChE 121 Chemical Reaction
Engineering
After consideration of chemical
reaction kinetics and thermodynamics,
the course focuses on the design
relationships for batch, semi-batch,
plug-flow and mixed reactors. The
application of these design
relationships is explored in ideal,
isothermal, non-isothermal, adiabatic
reactors. Homogeneous,
heterogeneous and biological systems
are discussed including the effect of
transport phenomena on reaction rates
and reactor design.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 170 and
ESC 140
ChE 131 Advanced Chemical
Engineering Thermodynamics
Concept of fugacity in imperfect gases;
chemical potential and partial molal
properties in mixtures; Gibbs-Duhem
Equation; ideal solutions of imperfect
gas mixtures; the Lewis and Randall
Rule; methods of calculating activity
coefficients in non-ideal mixtures;
vapor-liquid equilibria; checking
thermodynamic consistency of
vapor-liquid equilibrium data;
equilibrium constant, enthalpy change
and Gibbs free energy of formation in
chemical reactions.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 130.1
ChE 141 Heat and Mass Transfer
Introduction to heat and mass transfer.
Steady-state and unsteady-state heat
transfer. Steady-state and unsteadystate mass transfer. Interphase
transport and transfer coefficients.
Convective heat and mass transfer.
Internal and external forced
convection. Heat transfer equipment.
Natural convection. Boiling and
condensation. Radiation heat transfer.
4 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140.
ChE 142 Separation Process
Principles
Application of thermodynamic and
transport concepts to the design of
continuous-contact and staged mass
transfer processes common in the
chemical process industries.
Separation by phase addition, phase
creation, by barrier, by solid agent and
by external field or gradient.
Examination of the limitations of theory
and empiricism in design practice.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ChE 131 and
ChE 141
ChE 151 Process Simulation and
Mathematical Techniques for
Chemical Engineers
In this course computer-aided design
is applied to chemical engineering
problems in fluid flow, heat transfer,
mass transfer and chemical reactor
analysis. Topics include: matrices and
determinants properties and special
matrices, systems of linear equations
and methods of solution by matrices,
eigenvalues, eigenvectors and
applications to least squares and stage
processes. Steady and unsteady
general diffusion equation, one- and
two-dimensional heat transfer
equation, Fourier series, Laplace and Z
transforms and applications. Series
and numerical solutions, Power,
Bessel, Euler, Runge-Kutta, Milne,
Finite differences approximations and
Crank-Nicholson. Applications.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140
ChE 152 Chemical Process
Dynamics and Control
Introduction to logic of process
dynamics and principles of control in
chemical engineering applications;
block diagram notation, input
disturbance, frequency response and
stability criteria for chemical
equipment and chemical reaction
systems; single- and multiple-loop
systems; phase plane analysis of
reaction systems; application of analog
computer in solution of problems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 151
ChE 161.1 Process Evaluation
and Design I
The course uses design projects to
explore process flow diagrams and
initial equipment design estimates
based on process and unit operation
material and heat balances. Studies
include equipment cost estimation
methods that are developed into
process economic evaluations and
profitability analysis. The course
concludes with process and equipment
design using Simulation Science’s PROvision/PRO-II and an examination of
optimization techniques.
3 credits each. Prerequisites: ChE 141
and ChE 121
ChE 161.2 Process Evaluation and
Design II
This is a continuation of ChE 161.1,
and is the “capstone design course”
in chemical engineering. All aspects of
chemical engineering are integrated in
the design of a chemical process plant.
The design process consists of flowsheet development, equipment
selection and sizing, utility
requirements, instrumentation and
control, economic analysis and
formulation of safety procedures.
The plant design is carried out in class
and includes the use of professional
simulation packages. The AIChE project
is included in this course.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 161.1
ChE 162.1-162.2 Chemical
Engineering Laboratory I & II
This laboratory course emphasizes the
application of fundamentals and
engineering to processing and unit
operations. The experiments range
from traditional engineering applications
to new technologies and are designed
to provide hands-on experiences that
complement the theories and principles
discussed in the classroom.
Preparation of detailed project reports
and oral presentations are important
components of this course.
1.5 credits each. Prerequisite: ChE 121,
ChE 141; corequisite: ChE 142
ChE 311 Introduction to Polymer
Technology
Introduction to the chemistry and
physical status of polymer materials.
Discussion on formation of polymers
from corresponding monomers,
emphasizing mechanisms and kinetics
of various polymerization techniques.
Measurements of average molecular
weights and molecular weight
distribution of polymers. Viscosity and
rheology of polymer solutions and melts.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ChE 321 Chemical Reactor Design
Design and analysis of chemical
reactor systems; transport phenomena;
reactor dynamics; design optimization;
experimental techniques.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 121
ChE 340 Industrial Waste Treatment
This course deals with the treatment
of industrial waste streams. Topics
include: sources of wastewater,
characterization of industrial
wastewater, BOD, COD, TOC, The OD,
primary treatment by physical unit
operations (coagulation and
flocculation, sedimentation, flotation,
thickeners, filtration, absorption,…),
secondary treatment by unit processes
(ion exchange, chlorination, dechlorination,…); biological treatments
(kinetics and reactor design, aerobic,
anaerobic,…); industrial applications
and municipal and government
regulations. This course is 50 percent
engineering science, 50 percent
engineering design. The course also
includes a research paper on an
environmental topic.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 160
ChE 391 Research Problem I
An elective course available to
qualified and interested students
recommended by the faculty. Students
may select problems of particular
interest in some aspect of theoretical
or applied chemical engineering. Topics
range from highly theoretical to
completely practical, and each student
is encouraged to do creative work on
his or her own with faculty guidance.
3 credits. Prerequisite: senior standing
ChE 392 Research Problem II
Continuation of ChE 391.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 391
ChE 393 Research Problem 111
Continuation of ChE 392.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 392
ChE 394 Research Problem IV
Continuation of ChE 393.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 393
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Graduate
ChE 411 Polymer Technology
and Engineering
Structures and synthesis of CarbonCarbon and heterogeneous chain
polymers, mechanisms and kinetics of
emulsion, condensation, ionic stereospecific polymerizations. Rubber
elasticity. Rheological and viscoelastic
properties of polymers
and polymer solutions. Survey and
investigations of advanced topics
are required.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ChE 421 Advanced Chemical
Reaction Engineering
Principles and practices of chemical
reaction systems emphasizing
heterogeneous chemical kinetics,
coupled heat and mass transfer in
reacting systems and reactor dynamics.
Modeling and simulation of systems
are extensively applied.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 121
ChE 430 Thermodynamics of
Special Systems (same as EID and
ME 430)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 131
ChE 431 Advanced Chemical
Engineering Thermodynamics and
Molecular Theory
Modern methods of applying
thermodynamics and molecular physics
to phase behavior of fluid mixtures,
intermolecular forces and
thermodynamic properties, molecular
dynamic properties, molecular theory
of gases and liquids, theories of liquid
solutions and fluid mixtures at high
pressures.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 131
ChE 434 Special Topics in
Combustion (same as ME 434)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 334 or
permission of instructor
ChE 435 Transport Processes in
Internal Combustion Engines
(same as ME 435)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ChE 440 Advanced Fluid
Mechanics (same as EID and
ME 440)
Introduction to the energy equation.
Steady and transient heat transfer by
conduction. Convective heat transfer.
Energy transport in flowing media. Free
convection. Conservation of species
equation. Fisk’s law of binary diffusion.
Mass transfer with simultaneous
homogeneous or heterogeneous
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
reaction. Multicomponent heat and
mass transfer. Stefan-Maxwell
equations for multicomponent
diffusion. Simultaneous heat and mass
transfer. Transport in electrolyte
solutions. Special topics may include:
membrane separation processes, drug
delivery and controlled release,
turbulent heat and mass transfer,
boundary layer heat and mass transfer,
and chemically reacting flows.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 440 or ChE
440
ChE 452 Chemical Process
Optimization
Various algorithms of optimization
techniques are introduced. Methods
covered include both analytical and
numerical approaches. Applications to
optimal reactor design. Optimal control
of chemical process equipment
performance is demonstrated. Solution
by students of assigned optimization
problems in chemical engineering on
digital or analog computers is required.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 451
ChE 441 Advanced Heat and Mass
Transfer (same as EID 441)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 440
ChE 453 Digital Computer
Process Control
An introductory course in digital
computer control. Topics discussed
include basic mathematics of sampling
data systems; control algorithms using
transformation, direct digital control,
supervisory control, application of the
digital computer to advanced control
and optimal control. Analog to digital
and digital to analog conversions,
acquisition of laboratory data and
remote control of experimental
equipment are also covered.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 152
ChE 445 Particle Technology
Introduction to particle technology and
multiphase flow. Particle properties
and characterization. Granular
materials and flow. Gas-solid flows.
Flow through packed beds. Fluidization.
Gas-solid separations. Slurry transport.
Pneumatic transport. Powders and bulk
solids. Mixing and segregation. Particle
size reduction and enlargement.
Aerosol dynamics. Industrial
petrochemical and pharmaceutical
processes: fluid catalytic cracking, gas
cyclones, hoppers, granulation, coating.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140
ChE 447 Sustainability and
Pollution Prevention (same as
EID 447)
The first part of this course discusses
in detail a methodology for defining
and assessing the sustainability of an
entity. The course then proceeds with
more traditional topics in pollution
prevention for chemical processes,
outlining concepts on the macroscale,
(life-cycle assessment) and mesoscale
(pollution prevention for unit
operations). By the end of this course,
you should be able to use a fuzzy-logicbased methodology to define and
assess sustainability, perform a
sensitivity analysis which identifies the
most critical components of
sustainability for a given corporation,
perform a life-cycle assessment on a
product or process, identify and apply
chemical process design methods for
waste minimization, energy efficiency,
and minimal environmental impact and
design, size, and cost a simple wastetreatment process.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ChE 454 Advanced Experimental
Process Control
Advanced experimental process control
concepts and advanced digital
computer control. Three-mode feed
forward control of process variables
including temperature, pressure, level
and pH value. Feed forward,
proportional and cascade controls of
various process variables. Logic
programmable control. Series
communication control. Computer
controls step change, single-in, singleout and transfer function evaluation.
Computer data acquisition.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 152
ChE 460 Chemical Engineering
Equipment Design
The chemical engineer must develop,
design and engineer both the complete
process and the equipment used;
choose the proper raw materials;
operate the plant efficiently, safely and
economically; and see to it that
products meet the requirements set by
the customer. Chemical engineering is
both an art and a science. Whenever
science helps the engineer to solve a
problem, science should be used.
When, as usually the case, science
does not give a complete answer, it is
necessary to use experience and
judgement. The professional stature of
an engineer depends on skill in utilizing
all sources of information to reach
practical solutions to processing
problems. This course will concentrate
specifically on the theoretical and
practical principles of detailed
equipment design for mass transfer,
heat transfer and reaction operations.
Attempts will be made to emphasize
modern technologies used in these
operations. Equipment covered will
vary from year to year.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ChE 475 Pharmaceutical
Engineering
Introduction to pharmaceutical
engineering. Overview of the
pharmaceutical industry and drug
discovery and development. Clinical
trials, regulation, and validation.
Scientific principles of dosage forms
including solutions, disperse systems,
dissolution, stability, and surface
phenomena. Biopharmaceutical
principles of drug delivery.
Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics,
and biopharmaceuticals. Unit
operations for solid and liquid dosage
forms. Pharmaceutical plant design.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ChE 121, ChE
142, and ChE 262, or permission of
instructor
ChE 488 Convex Optimization
Techniques (same as EID 488)
This course discusses
in detail different methods for the
optimization of systems of engineering
and economic interest using the
techniques of linear and nonlinear
programming. The focus is on convex
optimization, which is the solution of
problems with only one best cost,
design, size etc. We will consider
problems such as least squares, supply
chain management, batch process
networks, network flow, dynamic
programming, portfolio optimization
and other examples across all
engineering disciplines. Students will
learn about optimization theory and
problem formulation, with some
computational component. By the end
of the course, students should be able
to: create optimization problems from a
physical situation, identify whether the
problem can be solved or not,
transform problems into equivalent
forms, list optimality conditions for
problems, find the dual of a problem
and identify its relation to the primal,
and use at least one method to solve a
convex programming problem using a
computer.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ChE 151
or ESC 161, Ma 326 (co-enrollment
is fine)
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100
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ChE 490 Process Synthesis
This course provides a new basis for
the design of integrated chemical
processes. The ability to predict, at the
outset, achievable design targets that
have a sound scientific basis is
fundamental to the approach. These
targets relate to energy, capital and
raw materials, costs and flexibility.
Topics will include review of basic
thermodynamic concepts,
capital/energy trade-off, process
integration–multiple utilities,
process/utility interface, reactors and
separators in the context of overall
process–power optimization, design for
flexibility, total sites layout, batch
processes and process plant retrofit.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ChE 161.1 and
ChE 161.2 or permission of instructor
ChE 499 Thesis/Project
Master’s candidates are required to
conduct, under the guidance of a
faculty adviser, an original
investigation of a problem in chemical
engineering, individually or in a group,
and to submit a written thesis
describing the results of the work.
6 credits for full year
Civil
Engineering
Courses
Undergraduate
CE 120 Civil Engineering
Fundamentals
Planning, execution and interpretation
of drawings and specifications for civil
engineering projects. Sample drawings
and specifications. Contractual
requirements. Sample contracts.
Permitting, scheduling and cost
estimation. Basic operations of design
and construction firms. Interface
with other disciplines on civil
engineering projects.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 101
CE 121 Structural Engineering I
Discussion of materials, loads and
forms of structures. Analysis of
determinate structures. Displacements
of structures and their importance in
applications. Experimental aspects of
materials behavior in structural
applications. Emphasis is placed on
basic experimental techniques, design
of experiments, selection and use of
appropriate instrumentation and
interpretation of results.
4.5 credits (3 hours of lecture, 3 hours
of laboratory).
Prerequisite: ESC 101
CE 122 Structural Engineering II
Modern methods of structural analysis
of indeterminate structures. Discussion
of energy methods, force methods and
displacement methods. Formulation of
elementary matrix stiffness and
flexibility methods. Computer
applications in structural analysis.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 121
CE 131 Introduction to
Geotechnical Engineering
Introduction to various indexing tests
of soils, clay mineralogy, permeability,
seepage and flow nets, stress
distribution in soil masses, onedimensional consolidation theory,
strength characteristics of soils,
application of Mohr’s Circle to soil
mechanics, stability of slopes.
4.5 credits (3 hours of lecture, 3 hours
of laboratory). Prerequisite: ESC 101;
prerequisite or corequisite: ESC 140
CE 141 Environmental Systems
Engineering
Qualitative and quantitative treatment
of water and wastewater systems as
related to domestic and industrial
needs and their effect on the
environment. Introduction to air
pollution sources and control and
solid/hazardous waste engineering.
Design of water and wastewater
treatment plants. Field and laboratory
techniques for measurement of water
quality parameters. Laboratory analysis
of representative waters and
wastewaters for commonly determined
parameters as related to applications
in water environment.
4.5 credits (3 hours of lecture, 3 hours
of laboratory). Prerequisite: ESC 140
CE 142 Water Resources
Engineering (same as EID 142)
Problems in conservation and
utilization of water. Hydrologic
techniques. Surface water and ground
water supplies. Water transmission
and distribution. Flood control,
navigation and irrigation. Introduction
to open channel flow and pipe
networks. Design of hydraulic
structures. Experimental aspects
of hydraulic phenomenon. Emphasis
is placed on basic experimental
techniques, design of experiments,
selection and use of appropriate
instrumentation and interpretation
of results.
4.5 credits (3 hours of lecture, 3 hours
of laboratory). Prerequisite: ESC 140
CE 331 Foundation Engineering
Layout of subsurface investigation
program, SPT (Standard Penetration
Test), Dutch-cone penetrometer.
Analysis and design of spread footings
on cohesive and cohesionless soil by
stability and settlement procedures,
combined footings, strap footings,
floating foundations and pile
foundations. Settlement analysis due
to deep-seated consolidation.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 131
CE 332 Lateral Earth Pressures
and Retaining Structures
Introduction to classical lateral earth
pressure theories (Rankine and
Coulomb). Analysis and design of
cantilever and gravity retaining walls,
cantilevered and anchored sheetpile
bulkheads, anchorage systems
(individual and continuous deadmen,
grouted tiebacks) and braced
cofferdams. Gravity Wall Systems
(Gabion Walls, Criblock Walls and
Double Wall).
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 131
CE 341 Design of Steel Structures
Study of behavior and design of
structural steel components and their
connections. Understanding and
development of design requirements
for safety and serviceability, as related
to latest structural steel specifications
by the American Institute of Steel
Construction (A.I.S.C.). Current
design emphasizing LRFD, fabrication
and construction practices.
Composite design.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 121;
corequisite: CE 122
CE 342 Design of Reinforced
Concrete Structures
Study of the behavior and design of
structural concrete components and
their connections. Understanding and
development of design requirements
for safety and serviceability, as related
to latest specifications by the
American Concrete Institute (A.C.I.).
Current design, fabrication and
construction practices. Introduction to
prestressed concrete.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 122
CE 346 Hydraulic Engineering
An integration and application of the
principles of fluid mechanics to
problems concerned with water supply
and distribution. Open channel flow
and design of hydraulic structures.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 142
CE 351 Urban Transportation
Planning
Historical background and evolution of
current procedures used in the “urban
transportation planning process.”
Covered are the historical framework,
urban development theories, land use,
trip generation, trip distribution
models, traffic assignment techniques,
modal split and introduction to urban
transportation systems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 352 Elements of Transportation
Design
Review of urban transportation
planning process. Specific design
elements of various highway and
public transportation systems. Included
are locational design, traffic service,
environmental impact analyses,
alternatives evaluation, geometric
design elements, operations and
capacity and level-of-service analysis.
Also, selected topics in urban
transportation systems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
CE 361 Civil Engineering
Experimental Projects
Exploratory experimental projects in
materials, hydraulics, soils,
environmental or other civil
engineering specialties. Projects are
conceived, designed and executed by
groups of students under faculty
supervision.
2 credits. Prerequisite: permission of
instructor. (Students are required to
have taken introductory civil
engineering subject(s) related to
project)
CE 363 Civil Engineering Design I
Individual or group design projects
based upon the interests of the
students and with the approval of the
instructor. Final engineering reports
and formal oral presentations are
required for all projects. Lectures by
faculty and professional practitioners
cover the following topics: engineering,
environmental and economic feasibility
assessment issues; preparation of
plans and specifications; cost
estimates; progress chart and critical
path; interfacing with community, etc.
Field visits to major New York City
projects under construction.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of
instructor. (Students are required to
have taken introductory CE subject(s))
related to project)
CE 364 Civil Engineering Design II
Continuation of CE 363.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 363
CE 369 Civil Engineering Project
Individual design, research or
experimental projects. Open only to
well-qualified students.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE/EID 390 Introduction to
Sustainable Design Sustainable
design minimizes the impact on the
environment by site planning and design,
energy and water conservation and
interior environmental quality. This
course will focus on the design of a
prototype structure using sun, light, air,
renewable materials, geological
systems, hydrological systems and green
roofing. Each student will develop a
project outlined by the U.S. Green
Building Council rating system known as
LEED. The six areas that will be
developed to design the project are:
sustainable sites, water efficiency,
energy and atmosphere, material and
resources, indoor environmental quality
and innovative design process. Class
time is separated into a series of
lectures, private consultations and
student presentations.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140, CE
122 or ME 100 and permission of
instructor
Graduate
CE 411 Introduction to Civil
Engineering Management
Overview of the civil engineering
profession and the importance of
infrastructure to society. The course
will emphasize the planning, design,
construction and maintenance of public
works. New York City will serve as
the laboratory for field visits and
course projects.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 412 Stochastic Concepts in
Civil Engineering
Introduction to probabilistic methods
and stochastic concepts in civil
engineering. Elements of applied
probability and statistics. Engineering
applications involving economic
decisions under uncertainty. Realistic
and common civil engineering
examples and problems in
transportation, structures, materials,
soils and water resources.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 224 and
Ma 240
CE 414 Solid Waste Management
Engineering aspects of solid waste
collection, transport and disposal,
including sanitary landfill design,
incineration, composting, recovery and
re-utilization of resources. Optimization
techniques of facility-siting and
collection route selection and
economic evaluation of factors
affecting selection of disposal
methods.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 421 Matrix Methods of
Structural Analysis
In-depth treatment of matrix methods.
Application to linear as well as
nonlinear analysis of plane and space
structures. Discussion of current
techniques. Computer applications.
3 credits. Prerequisites: CE 122 and
Ma 240
CE 422 Finite Element Methods
(same as EID 422)
Shape functions and generalized
displacements. Assemblage of
elements. Convergence criteria.
Triangular, rectangular and quadrilateral
elements in plane stress and plane
strain. Isoparametric formulations.
General solids. Hexahedral and
tetrahedral elements. Flexure in plates.
General shells. Natural coordinates.
Computer programs.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 122 or
ME 100
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
CE 424 Plates and Shells
Discretized grid-work and grillage
analysis by matrix techniques.
Development of the classical thin plate
theory. Mathematical and numerical
solutions of the plate equation.
Introduction to thin shell theory.
Practical applications such as
cylindrical shell roofs, spherical shell
with an edge ring and various cases of
shells of revolution.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 122
CE 425/EID 425 Structural
Dynamics
Dynamic behavior and design of
structures subjected to time-dependent
loads. Included in the load systems are
earthquakes, blasts, wind and vehicles.
Shock spectra and pressure impulse
curves. Special applications in blast
mitigation design.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 122
CE 426 Advanced Structural Design
Discussion of principal design codes
(AISC, ACI and AASHTO) as they relate
to ASCE Standards, the International
Building Code (IAC) and NYC Building
codes Advanced materials behavior.
Strength and serviceability requirements.
Design of composite girders and slabs.
Limit state response and formation of
plastic hinges in steel and concrete
structures. Structural upgrade and retrofit of existing structures.
3 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite:
CE 341
CE 427 Behavior and Design of
Prestressed Concrete Structures
Behavior and design of prestressed
members in flexure, shear, bond and
torsion; continuous beams; columns;
prestressed systems; loss of prestress.
Emphasis is placed on ultimate
strength design and the background of
latest ACI code.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 341
CE 428 Plastic Analysis and Design
Limit analysis of beams and frames.
Upper and lower bound theorems.
Collapse loads and displacements.
Applications to steel and concrete
structures. Special applications in blast
mitigation design.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 341
CE 431 Advanced Foundation
Engineering
Analysis and design of foundations
subjected to vibratory loading, beams
on elastic foundation (vertical subgrade
modulus), laterally loaded piles (with
software applications), Wave Equation
Analysis of Piles (with software
application of WEAP).
3 credits. Prerequisites: CE 131 and
permission of instructor
CE 432 Special Topics in
Lateral Earth Pressure and
Retaining Structures
Analysis and design of cellular
cofferdams, reinforced earth-retaining
structures, slurry walls and retaining
structures subjected to earthquake
loading, soil nailing.
3 credits. Prerequisites: CE 131 and
permission of instructor
CE 433 Advanced Topics in
Geotechnical Engineering I
Analysis of slopes using translatory
slides and available software packages
(PCSTABL). Ground improvement
technologies: including dynamic
compaction, grouting, ground freezing
and reinforced earth technologies.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 434 Advanced Topics in
Geotechnical Engineering II
Stresses in homogeneous and layered
systems due to surface and buried
loads. Development of flow network
concepts and the Terzaghi onedimensional consolidation theory,
secondary consolidation, site preloading, sand drains and prefabricated
vertical drains.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 435 GeoEnvironmental
Engineering (same as EID 435)
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 140,
CE 141, CE 131 and permission of
instructor
CE 437 Sustainability and
Environmental Impact Association
Forty years ago, when the world did
not know the word sustainability, smart
engineers were conducting
environmental impact assessments of
alternative designs and projects in
order to select the post option for
implementation. This course evaluates
the methodologies and problems
encountered and approaches to using
environmental impacts (which include
socio-economic impacts and beneficial
impacts) in order to achieve smarter,
more sustainable designs and
development. Case studies will be
presented and students will have to
write a term paper.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of
instructor
101
102
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
CE 440 Industrial Waste
Treatment Design
Integrated lecture and design periods
that cover the sources of industrial
wastewaters, their quantities and
characteristics, and their treatability
by physical, chemical and biological
processes. Status of regulations
involving categorical standards, local
and state industrial pretreatment
programs, NPDES permits, etc.
Problems and solutions involved in
combining municipal and industrial
waste treatment. Case studies.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 441 Water and Wastewater
Technology
Wastewater sources and estimates of
domestic, commercial and industrial
flows. Integrated lecture and design
periods that cover unit processes for
water and wastewater treatment.
Design projects include hydraulic and
process design of oxidation ponds,
screening, grit removal, sedimentation
tanks, secondary biological treatment,
other physicochemical processes and
outfall design.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 442 Open Channel Hydraulics
Derivation of the general onedimensional equations of continuity,
momentum and energy used in open
channel flow analysis. Steady uniform
flow and boundary resistance. Steady
nonuniform flows, channel transitions
and controls, hydraulic jumps, surges,
surface curves for gradually varied flow
including the effects of lateral inflow.
Unsteady flow in open channels.
Dynamic waves, method of
characteristics, surge formation.
Kinematic waves, flood routing and
overland flow. Design of channels and
other hydraulic structures.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 142
CE 443 Groundwater Hydrology
Physical process of flow in
homogeneous and heterogeneous
media. Development of governing
equations and boundary conditions,
analysis by analytical and numerical
techniques. Groundwater resources;
design of wells and prediction of
yield. Analyses of transport of
contaminants using deterministic
and stochastic methods.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 142
CE 444 Hydrology
Hydrology of the water cycle related to
air mass movement, precipitations,
evaporation, stream flow, floods,
infiltration and groundwater including
statistical hydrology. Design of
irrigation systems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 142
CE 445 Coastal Engineering
Introduction of the hydrodynamics
of waves in deep and shallow water
Emphasis on physical interpretation
of the results and their engineering
application. Wave refraction,
diffraction, storm surges and statistical
aspects of water waves.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 142
CE 446 Pollution Prevention
or Minimization
Introduction to the new concept and
regulations in the U.S. and Canada
of Pollution Prevention or Waste
Minimization for managing hazardous
pollution and protecting the
environment and public health.
Methodology of conducting
environmental audits and lessons
learned from successful pollution
prevention programs. Case studies
of various programs in industry, etc.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 447 Stream and Estuary
Pollution
Application of basic concepts of fluid
kinetics and dynamics to the analysis
of dispersal and decay of contaminants
introduced into lakes, streams,
estuaries and oceans. Analysis and
modeling of leachate and other
contaminants into groundwater.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 142
CE 448 Environmental and Sanitary
Engineering (same as EID 448)
Topics include types of environmental
pollution and their effects; water
quality standards and introduction to
laboratory analyses of water quality
parameters; sources and estimates
of water and wastewater flows;
physicochemical unit treatment
processes. Integrated lecture and
design periods cover water supply
network, wastewater collection system
and water treatment design projects.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 449 Hazardous Waste
Management
Definition and characteristics of
hazardous wastes. Generation,
transport, treatment, storage and
disposal of hazardous wastes.
Leachate characteristics and
management. Treatment technologies.
Monitoring and safety considerations.
Obligations under Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
and Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation and Liability
Act (CERCLA). Field trips.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
CE 450 Civil Engineering
Construction
Preparation of plans and specifications.
The bidding and award process.
Contractual relations between the
owner and the contractor. Preparation
of cost estimate for a competitively bid
project. Preparation of a progress chart
and critical path. Sequencing various
job elements. Engineering the actual
construction. Management of labor.
Interlacing with the community.
Environmental requirements. Job
safety. Changes and unanticipated
conditions. Contract disputes and their
resolutions.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 341
CE 460 Innovations in Urban
Infrastructure Design
Innovations in the design, delivery,
monitoring and rehabilitation of urban
infrastructure. Recent advances in
methods and technologies such as
remote sensing, visualization, data
acquisition systems, non-destructive
testing, data mining, geographical
information systems (GIS), and building
information modeling (BIM). Emphasis
will be placed on applications relating
to real-world projects in large urban
centers in the United States and the
world.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 121 or ME
101
CE 470 Urban Security
Design of urban systems to protect
against terrorism. Analysis of blast
loads. Blast mitigation design
considerations. Technology transfer:
military/defense to civilian sector.
Response spectra. Pressure-Impulse
Curves. Stand off distances. Blast
mitigation measures for buildings,
bridges and tunnels. Prevention of
progressive collapse in tall buildings.
Design of glazing. Retrofit upgrade
of existing urban infrastructure.
Proposed changes in New York City
Building Code to protect against
terrorism. Insurance issues for
commercial buildings.
3 credits. Prerequisites: CE 122 or
ME 101 and permission of instructor
CE 499 Thesis/Project
Master’s candidates are required to
conduct, under the guidance of a
faculty adviser, an original
investigation of a problem in civil
engineering, individually or in a group,
and to submit a written thesis
describing the results of the work.
6 credits for full year
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Electrical
Engineering
Electrical
and Computer
Engineering (ECE)
Undergraduate
ECE 101 Communication Theory
Information theory: entropy,
information, channel capacity, ratedistortion functions, theoretical limits
to data transmission and compression.
Error control coding: block, cyclic and
convolutional codes, Viterbi algorithm.
Baseband and bandpass signals, signal
constellations, noise and channel
models. Analog and digital modulation
formats (amplitude, phase and
frequency), MAP and ML receivers, ISI
and equalization. Coherent and noncoherent detection, carrier recovery
and synchronization. Performance:
computation of SNR, BER, power and
bandwidth requirements. TDMA,
FDMA, CDMA.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 224 and
ECE 111
ECE 103 Communication Networks
Analysis and design of communication
networks. Network protocols,
architecture, security, privacy, routing
and congestion control, Internet, local
area networks, wireless networks,
multimedia services. Physical layer,
multiple access techniques, transport
layer. Introduction to probabilistic
and stochastic analytic techniques
for communication networks.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 150
and Ma 224
ECE 110 MATLAB Seminar: Signals
& Systems
A weekly hands-on, interactive seminar
that introduces students to MATLAB, in
general, and the Signal Processing
Toolbox in particular. Students explore
scientific computation and scientific
visualization with MATLAB. Concepts
of signal processing and system
analysis that are presented in ECE 111
or other introductory courses on the
subject are reinforced through a variety
of demonstrations and exercises. It is
strongly encouraged for students
taking a first course in signals and
systems, or for students expecting to
use MATLAB in projects or courses.
0 credits.
ECE 111 Signal Processing &
Systems Analysis
A presentation of signals and systems
that does not rely on prior knowledge
of electrical circuits or differential
equations. Sine waves, phasors,
continuous-time and discrete-time
signals, sampling. Starting from
elementary discrete-time systems (FIR
filters), and moving on to more complex
systems (IIR digital filters and analog
filters), concepts such as impulse
response, convolution, frequency
response, transfer functions (ztransform and Laplace transform) are
presented. Block and signal-flow
diagrams. Linearity, causality, timeinvariance, stability. Feedback: openloop and closed-loop gain. Transient
response, poles and zeros. Vector
spaces of signals, Fourier analysis,
modulated signals, random signals.
Examples include speech and audio
signals, communication and control
systems. Extensive use of MATLAB.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113;
corequisite: ECE 110
ECE 114 Digital Signal Processing
Review of Laplace and z-transforms.
Minimum-phase and all-pass functions.
Multidimensional signals, systems and
Fourier analysis. Analog filter design,
digital IIR and FIR filter design.
Sampling, multirate systems and filter
banks, A/D and D/A converter models.
Discrete-time state-space. Filter
structures, quantization effects and
design to mitigate quantization effects.
DFT and FFT. Spectral analysis of
deterministic and random signals.
Introduction to adaptive filters.
Differential coding, transform coding.
Speech, audio and video signals.
Extensive use of MATLAB.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 240 and
ECE 111
ECE 121 Control Systems
Block and signal-flow diagrams,
Mason’s theorem. Laplace transform,
frequency response, Bode plots, root
locus, Routh-Hurwitz array. Analysis of
feedback control systems: open-loop
and closed-loop gain, Nichols chart,
Nyquist diagram, gain and phase
margin. Continuous-time state-space
analysis, state-variable feedback,
canonical forms, observability and
controllability. Second-order models,
transient and steady-state
performance. Emphasis on analog
systems, although digital control
systems will be discussed as time
allows. Extensive use of MATLAB.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 240 and
ECE 111
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
ECE 131 Solid-State Materials
Applied solid-state physics with
emphasis on semiconductor materials.
Crystals, quantum mechanics,
Schrodinger equation, energy bands,
Fermi-Dirac statistics, Fermi levels.
Semiconductor physics: electrons and
holes, doping, diffusion and drift,
generation-recombination, mobility.
Physics of PN junction and BJT;
depletion, carrier injection, minority
carrier profiles, Ebers-Moll equations,
junction capacitance, hybrid-pi model.
Breakdown, metal-semiconductor
contacts, heterojunctions, fabrication
techniques, temperature effects and
additional topics as time allows.
Diode circuits; DC analysis of BJTs in
active, saturated and cutoff modes;
single transistor amplifiers and smallsignal models.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 141
ECE 132 Electro-Mechanical
Energy Conversion
Analysis of energy sources
and energy converters. Principles of
electro-mechanical energy conversion;
singly and multiply excited systems;
rotating and linear machines; threephase circuits; magnetic circuits and
transformers; torque and induced
voltage from field considerations;
synchronous machines; induction
motors; DC machines. Introduction
to power electronics. Applications
including high-speed transportation,
energy storage and interconnection
of distant generating stations.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 120 or
ECE 140 and Ph 213
ECE 135 Engineering
Electromagnetics
This course emphasizes time-varying
fields, with topics presented from
electrostatics and magnetostatics as
necessary. Maxwell’s equations,
constitutive relations, phasor vector
fields, wave and Helmholtz equations,
potentials, boundary conditions. Plane
waves in lossless and lossy materials,
polarization, incidence. Transmission
lines: transient analysis, TDR, phasor
analysis, standing wave diagrams,
Smith chart, impedance matching.
Guided waves: TEM, TE and TM
modes, dispersion, evanescence,
cavity resonators. Microwave network
analysis and device characterization
with scattering parameters. Antennas,
antenna arrays and Fourier optics.
Additional topics from microwaves
and optics will be covered as time
allows. Students use a vector network
analyzer to perform measurements at
high frequencies.
4 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 223,
Ph 213, ECE 140 and ECE 111
ECE 140 Circuit Analysis
Circuit components, dependent and
independent sources, Kirchhoff’s laws,
loop and nodal analysis. Superposition,
Thevenin and Norton equivalent
circuits, and other techniques for
circuit simplification. Time-domain
analysis of RLC circuits, initial
conditions, transient response and
steady-state. Phasor analysis, complex
power. Ideal op-amps.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113. Ma
240 is a suggested corequisite
ECE 141 Electronics I
Semiconductor physics: band theory,
carrier distributions and transport
mechanisms. PN-junctions, PN junction
devices. Diode circuits. BJTs: current
relationships, operating region. Biasing
circuits, DC Analysis; small-signal
models, AC analysis. BJT amplifier
configurations.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 140
ECE 142 Electronics II
MOS circuits: DC operation and
analysis. Single stage MOS amplifiers,
circuit design, DC and small signal
analysis. Cascode amplifier. Current
mirrors, active loads. BJT and MOS
differential amplifiers. Monolithic
operational amplifiers. Output stages.
Frequency response. Introduction to
feedback theory, amplifier topologies.
Circuit design and analysis are
supplemented with industry standard
CAD software.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 141 and
ECE 111
ECE 150 Digital Logic Design
Theoretical and practical issues
concerning design with combinational
and sequential logic circuits, and
programmable logic devices. Number
systems, Boolean algebra,
representation and simplification of
Boolean functions, universal logic
families. Finite-state machines, state
tables and state diagrams, flip-flops,
counters, registers. Adders, decoders,
comparators, multiplexers, memories
and applications. Programmable devices:
PLA, PLD, etc. Principles of analog
circuits are presented in the context of
real world problems, such as “glitches,”
power and ground bounce, contact
bounce, tri-state logic and bus
interfacing, timing circuits, asynchronous
versus synchronous circuit components.
Characterization of electronic and logical
properties of digital circuits. Course work
involves individual and team projects in
which: digital circuits are designed and
prototypes are constructed and tested on
breadboards; designs involving
programmable logic devices are
developed using CAD tools. The projects,
approximately 50 percent of the course
grade, are used to assess technical
103
104
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
writing, oral presentation, teamwork and
project management skills.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none.
Non-refundable materials fee: $40
ECE 151 Computer Architecture
Introduction to the design of computers
and computer systems. Topics include:
integer and floating-point
representations and operations: ALU
design; von Neumann and Harvard
architectures; accumulator, general
purpose register and stack-based
processor design; RISC and CISC
architectures; addressing modes;
vector operations; microprogrammed
and hard-wired controllers; machine
language and assembly language
programming; static and dynamics
memory operation, timing and
interfacing; cache; virtual memory; I/O
systems: bus design and data transfer,
DMA; interrupts and interrupt handling,
polling; disk operation and
organization; pipelined processor
design. The course has a substantial
project component that includes
assembly language programming and
the design and construction of systems
that contain microcontrollers,
programmable logic, and a variety of
I/O devices.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 150.
Non-refundable materials fee: $40
ECE 161 Programming Languages
Examination of the fundamental
concepts of practical programming
languages, focusing on C and C++ but
including additional languages. Topics
include binary representations of
numbers, operators, static and dynamic
memory allocation, arrays, strings,
structures, flow control, file I/O, stacks,
queues, lists, activation records and
recursion. Object oriented
programming concepts covered include
classes, encapsulation, information
hiding, operator and function
overloading, constructors, destructors,
inheritance and polymorphism.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CS 102
ECE 164 Data Structures &
Algorithms I
An introduction to fundamental data
structures and algorithms, with an
emphasis on practical implementation
issues and good programming
methodology. Topics include lists,
stacks, queues, trees, hash tables and
sorting algorithms. Also an introduction
to analysis of algorithms with
big-O notation. Assignments include
programming projects and
problem sets.
2 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 161
ECE 165 Data Structures &
Algorithms II
A continuation of ECE 164, also with an
emphasis on practical implementation
issues and good programming
methodology. Topics include graphs,
graph-related algorithms and dynamic
programming techniques. Also an
introduction to some advanced topics
such as Turing machines, computability
and NP-complete systems.
Assignments include programming
projects and problem sets.
2 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 164
ECE 193 Electrical & Computer
Engineering Projects I
An introduction to laboratory
techniques for electrical and computer
engineering. Topics include the use of
electronic test equipment (e.g., DVM,
oscilloscope, curve tracer, spectrum
analyzer); circuit analysis, design and
simulation; and the use of discrete and
integrated electronic components and
circuits. Several projects/experiments
of limited scope reinforce concepts
learned in previous courses and
provide an understanding of the
fundamental building blocks employed
in the more advanced designs in
successive projects courses. Students
regularly give oral presentations and
demonstrate laboratory proficiency
through in-class demonstrations and
concise, formal technical reports.
1.5 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 111,
ECE 141, ECE 150. Co-requisite:
ECE142. Non-refundable materials fee:
$40
ECE 194 Electrical & Computer
Engineering Projects IV
Principles learned in ECE 193 are
applied to the design, construction and
characterization of electrical and
computer engineering projects of
significant complexity. Assignments
may involve both analog and digital
design, and students are free to pursue
any solution that satisfies the
engineering requirements and meets
with the instructor’s approval. Formal
and informal lectures are given on
safety, circuit operation and design,
and construction techniques; students
participate in design reviews and write
technical reports.
4 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 193.
Non-refundable materials fee: $40
ECE 195 Electrical & Computer
Engineering Projects III
ECE 195 and ECE 196 constitute the
year-long senior design project.
Students work in small groups on
projects chosen with the advice and
consent of the faculty adviser. Projects
may be oriented towards research or
product development, and may be in
any area of electrical and computer
engineering, such as in: computer
engineering, signal processing
(imaging, sensor arrays, multimedia),
telecommunications, computer
networks, microwaves, optics,
advanced electronics, VLSI chip design,
or an interdisciplinary area such as
robotics or bioengineering. Students
perform all aspects of project
management, such as scheduling,
budgeting, system design and
developing milestones, as well as
technical work including hardware
and software implementation, testing
and performance evaluation. Students
also give several spontaneous and
rehearsed oral presentations
and prepare written reports. Students
attend weekly lectures covering: social,
economic, legal and ethical issues;
safety and laboratory practice; design
methodologies; technical writing;
preparation of multimedia
presentations and tailoring
presentations to target audiences.
4 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 194.
Non-refundable materials fee: $40
ECE 196 Electrical & Computer
Engineering Projects IV
This course concludes the senior
project begun in ECE 195. Students
submit two complete theses, one in
short form and the other in long form,
and give at least two presentations,
one short and one long. The initial goal
is to a achieve a functioning system.
Afterwards, students undertake the
completion of the prototyping cycle,
which may involve improving the circuit
implementation (such as by employing
PCBs populated with surface mount
chips), adding a user-friendly interface,
obtaining precise performance
evaluations, or developing
demonstrations and a user’s manual.
Advanced students are strongly
encouraged to complete their project
early and commence a master’s thesis.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 195.
Non-refundable materials fee: $40
ECE 301 Communication Systems
Design
Topics in the design of large scale
communication systems. Quality
of service, system performance
calculations, channel capacity
and traffic models, scalability.
Measurement and simulation
techniques. Noise, interference,
system noise figure, front-end design,
power budgets. Communication
electronics. Baseband DSP, IF and
RF subsystems. Standards, evolution
of technology, product roadmapping.
Case studies.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 101
and ECE 135
ECE 302 Probability Models &
Stochastic Processes
Topics in probability, random variables
and stochastic processes applied to
the fields of electrical and computer
engineering. Probability, events,
random variables, expectation,
moments, characteristic functions,
conditional probability and expectation.
Functions of random variables, random
vectors, Gausian random vectors,
Poisson points. Bounding and limit
theorems. Relations among important
distributions and probability models.
Stochastic processes: stationarity,
ergodicity, Brownian motion, Markov
processes. Deterministic systems with
stochastic inputs, correlation and
power spectral density, ARMA models.
Hilbert space and applications:
orthogonality principle, discrete
Wiener and Kalman filters, linear
prediction, lattice filters.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 224
and ECE 101 or ECE 114 or permission
of instructor
ECE 305 Computer Security
This course covers attack and defense
perspectives of applied information
security. Topics will include networked
and embedded applications, access
controls systems and their failure
modes, privilege escalation, case
studies and some applied cryptography.
Safe practices and OS flaw mitigation
will be reinforced through securitysensitive programming projects. Course
work will include penetration testing,
code auditing and independent
programming projects using
professional auditing frameworks.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CS 102
ECE 311 Modern DSP Hardware
Advanced modern digital signal
processors—algorithm design and
implementation for parallel and
reconfigurable hardware platforms.
Systems to be studied include FPGAs,
multi-core processors, GPUs. HDL,
validation and performance evaluation.
A wide variety of target applications
will be considered, selected according
to student and instructor interest.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
ECE 151
ECE 313 Music & Engineering
Spectral representation and analysis of
music. Analog and digital music
signals, instruments and synthesizers,
analog circuits and digital processing.
Description of musical quality and
perception, introduction to acoustics,
stereo and special effects. Computer
interfacing with MIDI and laboratory
experiments.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 111 and
ECE 150
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
ECE 314 Audio Engineering
Projects
An introduction to design,
implementation, fabrication and
modification of musical and audio
electronics and hardware in a
laboratory environment. Projects will
include analog and digital signal
processing for audio signals, with
focus on implementation of real-time
algorithms in hardware. Additional
projects will include design and
implementation of electro-mechanical
systems and transducers for audio
input / output / display. Formal and
informal lectures will include examples
drawn from standard implementations,
safety concerns, audio specific design
and construction techniques;
participation in oral presentations and
technical reports will be required.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 141 and
ECE 151, or ME 151 and ME 153
ECE 321 Control Systems Design
Control system design using Bode
plots, Nichols chart, root locus. Design
by pole placement, Ackermann’s
formula, state-variable feedback.
Cascade compensation, minor-loop
feedback. Controller and estimator
design, regulator systems, systems
with a reference input. Introduction to
digital control: hybrid analog-digital
control systems, sampled-data
systems, digital extensions of Bode
plots and root locus, Ragazzini’s
method. Extensive use of MATLAB.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 121
ECE 323 Embedded System Design
Hardware and software design for
embedded systems. SBC and
microcontroller architectures, A/D and
D/A conversion, signal conditioning,
interfacing and controlling electronic
and electro-mechanical systems.
Assembly language and high-level
language programming, efficient use of
computational and physical resources,
considerations for speed and
robustness, debugging methods, use of
simulators and in-circuit emulators.
The course is project-based, and
students are required to design and
construct an embedded system.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 121 and
ECE 151
ECE 341 Integrated Circuit
Engineering
Feedback theory, frequency
compensation. Integrated circuit
fabrication and technology. Device
modeling, thermal effects. VLSI CAD
design tools. Circuit layout, extraction
and simulation. Design and analysis of
multistage MOS operational amplifiers,
OTA architectures. Nonlinear circuits,
comparators. Analog switches. Digital
phase-locked loops. Sample and hold
circuits. Data converter architectures.
Switched capacitor circuits. Bandgap
reference circuits. MOST digital circuit
design and layout, hierarchical
approaches. Final design project is a
mixed analog/digital circuit (e.g., Flash
A/D converter, phase-locked loop),
which is sent for fabrication.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 142
ECE 343 Bio-instrumentation
and Sensing
The basic human vital signs and some
related elementary physiology viewed
from an engineering standpoint with
special emphasis placed upon current
electronic measurement methods.
Electrocardiographic and
electromyographic signals. Safety
problems related to electrical isolation.
Guarded, fully isolated, modulated
carrier operational amplifiers and
microvolt-level amplification. Solid-state
“grain of wheat” pressure sensors,
microelectrodes, thermal probes,
ultrasonic transducers and other
biosignal sensors. Course work includes
instrumentation and sensing projects.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
ECE 142
ECE 357 Computer Operating
Systems
Theory and implementation of modern
computer operating systems. Messagebased and multiprocessor kernels.
Networking and interprocess
communication. Security, auditing and
authentication. Device drivers,
interrupt handling, task switching,
virtual memory, memory management,
scheduling, synchronization and
locking. File systems, resource
allocation and management. Real-time,
fault-tolerant and high security
operating systems. User environment
and interface issues. Projects in
operating system design and
programming, case studies.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 151 and
ECE 161
ECE 361 Software Engineering &
Large Systems Design
This course teaches about the
development stages of large, robust,
expandable software systems
developed as part of a team. Topics
include project management, capturing
requirements, system design, UML,
program design, testing, delivery and
maintenance. The class will develop a
large project as a team using Java
throughout the semester. Tools,
libraries and techniques necessary for
the project will be covered in class,
e.g., Eclipse, Javadoc, XML, SOAP,
servlets, threads and processes,
Swing, JUnit, mySQL, JDBC, etc. The
specific resources might change from
semester to semester.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 165
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
ECE 391 Research Problem
An elective course open to qualified
upper division students. Students may
approach an EE faculty member and
apply to carry out research on problems
of mutual interest in theoretical or
applied electrical and computer
engineering. Student performs creative
work with faculty guidance.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor
approval
ECE 392 Research Problem II
(continuation of ECE 391)
3 credits. Prerequisite: instructor
approval
ECE 399 Selected Topics in
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Subjects may include seminars on
topics related to advances in
technology, current research areas.
Also individual research, design and
development or study of subjects in
electrical and computer engineering.
1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
Electrical
and Computer
Engineering (ECE)
Graduate
ECE 401 Selected Topics
in Communication Theory
Advanced topics in communications
engineering, selected according to
student and instructor interest.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 101 and
permission of instructor
ECE 402 Selected Topics
in Probability & Stochastic
Processes
Advanced topics in applied probability
or stochastic processes. Possible areas
of study include: Markov processes,
queuing theory, information theory,
stochastic systems, financial
engineering.
1-3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 302 or
permission of instructor
ECE 403 Advanced Communication
Networks
A continuation of topics from ECE 103.
Technical readings, case studies, and
research in network architectures and
protocols. Related topics such as
distributed computing and ad hoc sensor
networks may be covered as well. Topics
from probability, stochastic processes
and graph theory are presented as
needed for the analysis and simulation
of communication networks.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 103
ECE 405 Advanced Digital
Communications
Advanced digital modulation including
formats with memory, continuousphase and constant-envelope schemes.
Performance analysis for AWGN
and other channels. Multitone and
multicarrier communications. Spread
spectrum with applications to multiple
access schemes and secure
communications. CDMA: PN sequence
generation and properties, multiuser detection. Additional topics as
time permits.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 101 and
ECE 302
105
106
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ECE 406 Applied Monte Carlo
Methods
Application of Monte Carlo methods to
interdisciplinary areas of science and
engineering. Application areas include
(but not limited to) electromagnetics,
device modeling, circuit analysis, heat
transfer, biomedical engineering and
financial engineering. Course work
includes programming projects
(MATLAB, C or another language of
choice).
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 240 and
prior exposure to engineering
applications of ordinary or partial
differential equations
ECE 410 Radar & Sensor Array
Processing
Terminology and system overview for
modern radar and sensor array
systems; antenna parameters; radar
signals and waveforms; Doppler
processing; detection; synthetic
aperture imaging (SAR); beamforming
and space-time array processing
(STAP); adaptive methods; additional
topics may be covered according to
student and instructor interest.
Computer simulations and readings in
the technical literature.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 101 and
ECE 114
ECE 407 Wireless System Design
Hands-on exposure to the design and
implementation of modern digital
communication systems using
software-defined radio (SDR)
technology. The prototyping and realtime experimentation of these systems
via SDR will enable greater flexibility
in the assessment of design trade-offs
as well as the illustration of “real
world” operational behavior.
Laboratory modules for performance
comparisons with quantitative
analytical techniques will be conducted
in order to reinforce digital
communication system design
concepts. A large course project
consisting of original research will be
required. Course topics include SDR
architectures and implementations,
digital signaling and data transmission
analysis in noise, digital receiver
structures (matched filtering,
correlation), multicarrier
communication techniques, radio
frequency spectrum sensing and
identification (energy detection,
matched filtering), and fundamentals of
radio resource management.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
ECE 101
ECE 411 Selected Topics in Signal
Processing
Advanced topics in signal processing
selected according to student and
instructor interest.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
permission of instructor
ECE 408 Wireless Communications
Survey of cellular mobile radio systems
and formats, including market trends
and technological advances. The
emphasis is on CDMA and 3G systems,
and emerging schemes such as WiFi
networks, although TDMA systems will
be discussed as well. Propagation and
multipath fading channel models and
simulation. Cellular system capacity,
traffic models, multiple-access
techniques, handoff and power control
algorithms. Modulation formats,
detection schemes and performance.
Mitigating fading: pulse shaping, DFE,
MLSE (Viterbi). DSP algorithms for
baseband processing.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 101
ECE 414 Machine Learning
Machine learning of structural
relationships among variables from
empirical data. Decision theory,
Bayesian methods. Classification:
naïve Bayes, linear discriminant
analysis, support vector machines
(SVM), boosting. Regression: leastsquares, regularization methods,
logistic regression. Clustering using kmeans and EM algorithms. Model
selection: bias-variance tradeoff, crossvalidation, over-fitting. Feature
selection and dimensionality reduction
methods including PCA, ICA, MDS.
Kernel methods. Other topics may be
covered as time permits.
3 credits. Prerequisities: Ma 224 and
ECE 114
ECE 415 Wavelets and
Multiresolution Imaging
(same as MA 415)
Wavelets and multiresolution signal
processing with an emphasis on 2D
and 3D cases. STFT, wavelet analysis,
wavelet packets, DWT. Multirate filter
banks, PR and paraunitary conditions,
multidimensional filters,
multidimensional sampling lattices.
Bases, frames and sparse
representations. Image and video
applications such as: compression,
noise reduction, tomography and other
inverse problems, hyperspectral
imaging, compressive sensing. Course
work includes MATLAB projects and
readings in the technical literature.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
MA 326 or permission of instructor
ECE 416 Adaptive Filters
Statistical signal processing theory:
discrete-time Wiener and Kalman
filters, linear prediction, steepest
descent and stochastic gradient. LMS,
normalized LMS, LS, RLS, QR-RLS,
order-recursive algorithms.
Applications include equalization,
noise cancellation, system
identification, sensor array processing.
Numerical linear algebra:
eigenanalysis, SVD, matrix
factorizations. Transversal filters,
lattice filters, systolic arrays.
Performance: convergence, learning
curves, misadjustment, tracking in
nonstationary environments. Additional
topics such as adaptive IIR filters,
neural networks and quantization
effects may be covered as time allows.
Extensive use of MATLAB.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 114 or
permission of instructor
ECE 417 Design for Custom DSP
Hardware
Design of programmable and custom
digital signal processors, and
realization of DSP algorithms in
specialized architectures. Features of
programmable DSPs such as datastationary and time-stationary coding,
MAC and ACS ALUs, circular buffers.
Very Long Instruction Word (VLIW)
processors. Applications of graph
theory and passivity theory to map DSP
algorithms to custom structures: SFGs,
DFGs, retiming, folding and unfolding,
lattice and orthogonal filters,
scheduling and allocation, systolic
architectures. Optimization with
respect to number of hardware units,
speed (sample period and latency),
VLSI area, power consumption and
performance (quantization effects).
Special CAD tools and languages for
rapid prototyping. Case studies and
programming exercises.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
ECE 151
ECE 418 Digital Video
Digital video coding, compression,
processing and communications. Target
applications from low bit-rate, low
quality to high bit-rate, high quality.
Two- and three-dimensional sampling,
color spaces, motion representation.
Motion estimation: optical flow, blockmatching; constrained optimization:
Bayesian methods, simulated
annealing, Gibbs random fields.
Mathematical basis for compression
standards such as JPEG and MPEG,
and digital television including HDTV.
Rate-distortion based compression for
optimal bit allocation via dynamic
programming (Viterbi algorithm).
Scalability in multimedia systems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 114
ECE 419 Signals and Security
Applications of digital signal
processing to security, including
biometrics and watermarking. Topics in
statistical signal processing, image
processing, pattern recognition and
computer security are presented as the
basis for algorithmic methods and
secure system design. Overview of
various biometric modalities, including
fingerprint, voice and face; biometric
fusion and system performance.
Watermarking: insertion of information
into digital signals (e.g., documents,
music, video) for identification or
security purposes. Course work
includes readings in technical
literature.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 114
ECE 421 Advanced Control
System Design
Design of control systems using twodegrees of freedom and PID
compensators. Ackermann’s formula,
H-infinity control theory and
applications. Analysis and design for
nonlinear systems using describing
function, state-variables, Lyapunov’s
stability criterion and Popov’s method.
Introduction to optimal control theory
(dynamic programming). Design
problems and extensive use of MATLAB.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
ECE 121
ECE 425 Digital Control Systems
Basic components of digitally
controlled dynamic systems. Sampling
and reconstruction: the ideal sampler,
zero and higher order hold elements.
The pulse transfer function and the ztransfer function description of
dynamic systems. Stability criterion
and analysis by the Nyquist, root locus
and Bode methods. The modified
Routh-Hurwitz and Jury stability
criteria. The state-variable approach:
state equations of dynamic systems
with sample and hold devices, state
equations of systems with all-digital
elements. Digital simulation and
approximation. Controllability,
observability and stability. State and
output feedback, state observers and
the separation principle. Digital control
system design by state feedback.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 121
ECE 431 Microwave Engineering
Passive circuits, open-boundary
waveguides, perturbation theory,
coupled modes, waveguide junctions,
microstrip. Two- and three-terminal
devices; varactor diodes, Gunn diodes;
IMPATT and MESFET technology.
Design of RF amplifiers and phaseshifters. Computer-aided simulation
and design.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 135
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
ECE 433 Optical Communications
Devices & Systems
PIN, avalanche and Schottky
photodiodes; risetime, noise, amplifier
requirements. Semiconductor optical
devices: radiative and non-radiative
recombination, quaternary
semiconductors, heterojunctions,
quantum wells, bandwidth
minimization, lasers, distributed
feedback, vertical cavity structures.
Internal and external modulation,
electro-optic modulators, Stark effect.
Optical fibers: mode structure,
attenuation, dispersion, PM fibers,
WDM. System architecture, analog/
digital communications, terabit data
links. Solitons.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 142 and
ECE 135
ECE 434 Bioelectricity
Electrical behavior of cellular
membranes. Ion transport,
electrochemical equilibrium,
applications of circuit and cable theory,
Hodgkin-Huxley model, resting and
action potentials. Generation and
propagation of signals within the
nervous system and the heart. Case
studies and consideration of topics of
current research interest, such as:
developmental biology, regenerative
medicine, neural prostheses, tissue
engineering.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 141 or
ESC 120, PH 213
ECE 441 Digital Integrated Circuit
Engineering
Design of static and dynamic CMOS
combinational logic gates, layout and
simulation. Standard cell construction.
Sequential logic systems—registers,
latches, clocks. Design of arithmetic
building blocks, ALU, multipliers.
Memory circuits and organization.
FPGAs. System design—hardware
description languages, floorplanning,
system architecture. A major
component of the course is the design
and fabrication of an ASIC using a
variety of VLSI CAD tools.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 341
ECE 442 Communication Electronics
Circuit design for advanced
communications applications. Design of
high-frequency amplifiers, oscillators
and mixers using large signal analysis.
Effects of noise and non-linearities are
examined from the diode and transistor
level to board level. Communication
subsystems of interest include phase
locked loops, modulators and
demodulators (AM, PM FM), and signal
processors for multiple access systems
(TDMA, FDMA, CDMA). Course work
includes computer-aided simulation
and design projects.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 101,
ECE 135 and ECE 142
ECE 443 Thin-Film Electronics
Properties of polycrystalline,
amorphous, liquid and organic
semiconductors. Methods of
deposition: vacuum and nonvacuum
techniques, epitaxial and nonepitaxial
growth. Assessment of thin film
semiconductors: structural, optical,
electrical. Thin film semiconductor
devices: transistors, displays,
photovoltaics, flexible conductors.
Optical coatings and architectural
applications. Thin film superconductors:
metallic, allow and high Tc, fabrication
and assessment. Superconducting
devices: Cooper pairs, Josephson
junctions, SQUIDS, Josephson
computers.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 142
ECE 445 Design with Operational
Amplifiers
Analysis and design of operational
amplifier circuits with various
applications, including amplifiers,
filters, comparators, signal generators,
D/A and A/D converters and phaselocked loops. Introduction to issues
such as static and dynamic limitations,
noise and stability. Use of industry
standard CAD software.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 142
ECE 446 Low-Voltage, Low-Power
Electronic Circuit Design
The physics and modeling of submicron
MOS transistors for analog and digital
circuit design. Circuit techniques for
the design of low-power, low-voltage
digital combinatorial logic, multipliers,
memory and system design. Circuit
techniques for the low-power, lowvoltage analog circuits including the
design of low-voltage constant g_m
differential amplifiers. The use of
switched capacitor circuits for analog
signal processing. The course will
culminate with the design and
simulation of a low-voltage low-power
mixed signal circuit.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 142,
ECE 341 or permission of instructor
ECE 453 Advanced Computer
Architecture
This course studies modern, advanced
techniques used to design and produce
current, state-of-the-art computer
architectures. Technology, performance
and price. The quantitative principle
and Amdahl’s law. Instruction sets;
addressing modes, operands and
opcodes; encoding instruction sets.
RISC versus CISC architectures; MIPS.
Pipelining; the classic five-stage
pipeline, hazards, exceptions, floating
point operations. Advanced pipelining
techniques: dynamic scheduling,
branch prediction. Multiple issue,
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
speculation. Limits of parallelism.
Compiler support for parallelism, VLIW.
Caches. Examination of modern
processors.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 151
ECE 460 Selected Topics in
Computer Engineering
Advanced topics in computer hardware
or software engineering selected
according to student and instructor
interest. Prerequisites will depend on
the topics to be covered.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of
instructor
ECE 461 Advanced Programming
Methods
This course addresses the need for
engineers to craft algorithmic solutions
to problems of ever-increasing
complexity. The curriculum includes
consideration of the man-machine
interface, real-time control, remote
sensing and computing in a distributed
environment. Software fault tolerance
and reliability and unbreakable
database transactions. Computer
network security and network
reliability, safety of data through
authentication and encryption.
Engineering trade-offs between
efficiency and portability and design
for maintenance.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 151 and
ECE 165
ECE 462 Interactive Engineering
Graphics
Graphical primitives, windows, clipping
and viewports. Two- and threedimensional geometric transformations
and translations; rotation, pan and
zoom. Hidden line and surface removal.
Region filling and shading. The
architecture of high performance
graphical engines. Representing
lighting, shading and textures.
Rendering. Rotation. GUIs. Animation.
Course work includes design projects.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 151 and
ECE 165
ECE 464 Databases
Engineering and design of databases.
Topics to be covered may include: data
models, database and scheme design;
schema normalization and integrity
constraints; query processing and
optimization; distributed and parallel
databases; SQL and XML.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 165
ECE 466 Compilers
The theory, design and implementation
of a practical compiler. Finite
automata, LL and LR parsing, attribute
grammars, syntax-directed translation,
symbol tables and scopes, type
systems and representations, abstract
syntax trees, intermediate
representation, basic blocks, data and
control flow optimizations, assembly
language generation including register
and instruction selection. Students
apply tools such as Flex and Bison to
writing a functional compiler for a
subset of a real programming language
such as C.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 151 and
ECE 165
ECE 467 Natural Language
Processing
This course focuses on computational
applications involving the processing
of written or spoken human languages.
Content may vary from year to year.
Theoretical subtopics will likely include
word statistics, formal and natural
language grammars, computational
linguistics, hidden Markov models, and
various machine learning methods.
Applications covered will likely include
information retrieval, information
extraction, text categorization,
question answering, summarization,
machine translation and speech
recognition. Course work includes
programming projects and tests.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 165
ECE 468 Computer Vision
Visual perception and imaging geometry.
Pixels, pixel neighborhoods and pixel
connectivity. Image transforms: Fourier,
Hadamard, Walsh, Discrete Cosine,
Haar, Slant and others. Techniques for
image manipulation and enhancement
in both the frequency and spatial
domains. Histogram equalization, image
subtraction and local averaging.
Filtering, homomorphic methods.
Color models and use of monochrome
techniques on RGB channels. Image
restoration: camera movement
cancellation, scratch removal. Image
compression techniques, lossy and
lossless. Image segmentation, edge
detection, edge linking, boundary
detection; region growing, splitting and
merging. Image representation as a
hierarchical collection of objects, chain
codes, Fourier descriptors. Object
recognition, signatures.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 111,
ECE 151 and ECE 161
107
108
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ECE 469 Artificial Intelligence
This course covers many subtopics
of AI, focusing on a few important
subtopics in detail. The “intelligent
agent” approach is explained and
forms a foundation for the rest of the
course. Intelligent search: uninformed
search, depth-first search, breadth-first
search, iterative deepening; informed
search, best-first search, A*,
heuristics, hill climbing; constraint
satisfaction problems; intelligent game
playing, minimax search, alpha-beta
pruning. Machine learning: probability,
Bayesian learning; decision trees;
statistical machine learning, neural
networks, Naive Bayes, k-nearest
neighbors, support vector machines.
Natural language processing: syntax,
semantics and pragmatics; real-world
knowledge; parsing; statistical NLP.
Philosophy of AI: AI and consciousness,
the Turing test, the Chinese room
experiment. Coursework includes two
large individual programming projects.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 165
ECE 491 Selected Topics in
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Subjects may include study in electrical
and computer engineering, or seminars
on topics related to advances in
technology, This course may not be
used to expand the number of credits
of thesis, or cover material related to
the thesis.
1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ECE 499 Thesis/Project
Master’s candidates are required to
conduct, under the guidance of a faculty
adviser, an original individual
investigation of a problem in electrical
and computer engineering and to
submit a written thesis describing the
results of the work.
6 credits over 1 year
Mechanical
Engineering
Courses
Undergraduate
ME 100 Stress and Applied
Elasticity
Three-dimensional theory of elasticity;
state of stress, state of strain, elastic
stress-strain relations. Applications
include elementary three-dimensional
problems, plane stress and plane
strain, Saint Venant’s long cylinder,
beams and plates. Computer-aided
design projects.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 101
ME 101 Mechanical Vibrations
Mechanical systems with single and
multiple degrees of freedom;
longitudinal, torsional and lateral
vibrations; free and forced oscillations;
vibration testing, dynamic stability,
vibration isolation, design criteria.
Computer-aided design assignments.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 101 and
Ma 240
ME 105 Drawing and Sketching for
Engineers (same as EID 105)
ME 116 Musical Instrument Design
(same as EID 116)
Theory and use of musical scales,
including just intonation and equal
temperament systems. Musical
harmony and basic ear training. Human
hearing and the subjective measures of
sound: pitch, loudness and timbre.
Acoustic analysis of design and
operating principles of traditional
instruments, including members of the
percussion, string and wind families.
Prototyping and testing of original
musical instrument concepts.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ME 120 Design Elements
Application of the principles of
mechanics to the design of basic
machine elements; study of
components subjected to static, impact
and fatigue loading; influence of stress
concentration; deflection of statically
determinate and indeterminate
structures by the energy method.
Design projects apply basic criteria to
the design of shafts, springs, screws
and various frictional elements; design
projects make use of computer,
experimental and modeling techniques.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 100
ME 130 Advanced
Thermodynamics
Equations of state; properties of pure
substances; ideal and real gas and gasvapor mixture properties, fundamental
process and cycle analysis of ideal and
real systems; modern gas and vapor
power cycles and refrigeration cycles.
Computer applications to problem
solving.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 130
ME 131 Energetics (same as
EID 131)
Current and near-term energy sources,
including coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear
fission, hydroelectric, oil shale and
refuse. Description of contemporary
methods of energy conversion including
conventional utility power plants and
nuclear power plants. Introduction to
direct energy conversion; magnetohydrodynamics, fuel cells, thermionic
and thermoelectric. Design of the
thermodynamic operation of a steam
power plant.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 130
ME 133 Air-Conditioning, Heating
and Refrigeration (same as
EID 133)
Introduction to air-conditioning, heating
and refrigeration, with emphasis on
application of thermodynamics, fluid
dynamics, mass transfer and heat
transfer; psychometrics, cycles, load
calculation, component and system
performance; absorption, refrigeration,
heat pumps, solar heating and cooling.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 130 and
ESC 140
ME 140 Gas Dynamics
Integral form of the conservation
equations; one-dimensional
compressible flows, including
isentropic flow, isothermal flow, flow
with friction, flow with heat transfer
and normal and oblique shock waves;
generalized one-dimensional flow.
Computer applications and a semesterlong design project.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 130 and
ESC 140
ME 141 Fundamentals of
Aerodynamics
Study of incompressible potential flow
around bodies of aerodynamic interest,
by the use of equations of motion,
method of singularities and conformal
transformation. Investigation of
experimental results and techniques.
Consideration of the effects of viscosity
and transition from laminar to turbulent
flow. A design-oriented project, usually
involving application of computer
methods, will be required.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140
ME 142 Heat Transfer:
Fundamentals and Design
Applications
One-dimensional steady-state
conduction. Two-dimensional steadystate conduction and transient
conduction: finite-difference equations
and computational solution methods.
Convection; introduction to laminar and
turbulent viscous flows; external and
internal forced convection problems,
including exact and numerical solution
techniques; free convection.
Introduction to radiation heat transfer
and multimode problems. Open-ended
design projects will include application
to fins, heat exchangers, tube banks and
radiation enclosures and will make use
of computer-aided design techniques.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140
ME 151 Feedback Control Systems
Modeling and representation of
dynamic physical systems: transfer
functions, block diagrams, state
equations, and transient response.
Principles of feedback control and
linear analysis including root locus and
frequency response methods. Practical
applications and computer simulations
using MATLAB. Discussions of ethics
will be integrated into the curriculum.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 240 and
ESC 161
ME 153 Mechatronics (same as
EID 153)
Topics include computer architecture,
PIC processor overview, dynamic
modeling, sensors, data acquisition,
digital PID control theory, and
utilization of assembly language to
code the controller. Students will
design, build and test a controller
board and present a final prototype of
a control system. Engineering
economics will be introduces and
integrated into the final project.
Prerequisite: ME 151 or ECE 121 or
ChE 152
ME 155 Design and Prototyping
A mechanical engineering hands-on
workshop geared towards the
understanding and practice of basic
engineering design and fabrication
tools. Topics include hand tools, simple
machining, mold making, casting,
materials, fasteners, adhesives, and
finishes. 3-D digitizing, solid modeling,
rapid prototyping and computer
interfacing will also be presented.
Team projects will familiarize the
students with typical tools and
processes employed in realizing a
design concept, from sketch to
functional prototype. Each student will
participate in and contribute to the
team-learning and creation process.
2 credits. Prerequisites: EID 101 and
EID 103
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
ME 160 Engineering
Experimentation
Election, calibration and use of
subsystems for the measurement of
mechanical, thermal/fluid and
electrical phenomena. Laboratory work
includes investigations of heat
exchangers, fluid systems and internal
combustion engines. Emphasis is
placed on data collection and
statistical reduction, computational
methods and written and oral
presentation skills.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
ME 163 Mechanical Engineering
Projects
Original investigations, involving
design and experimental work which
allow the application of engineering
sciences to the analysis and synthesis
of devices or systems and permit the
deepening of experience in engineering
decision making. Projects are carried
out in small groups and are supervised
by the instructor in accordance with
professional practice.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ME 164 Capstone Senior
ME Design
The application of open-ended design
work to the synthesis of engineering
devices and systems for the
satisfaction of a specified need.
Consideration of market requirements,
production costs, safety and esthetics.
Projects are carried out in small groups
and are supervised by the instructor in
accordance with professional practice.
The goal of the course is to create a
working design, clearly defined in
drawings and specifications.
3 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite:
ME 163
ME 165 Sound and Space
(same as EID 165)
Basics of acoustics, including sound
waves, room and hall acoustics and
metrics of sound. Audio engineering,
including microphones, signal
processors, amplifiers and
loudspeakers. Skills and techniques
using Pro Tools brand audio editor
system to create original sonic and
musical compositions. Public exhibition
of an electronic music program.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
ME 300 Space Dynamics
Fundamental principles of advanced
dynamics; kinematics, transformation
or coordinates; particle and rigid body
dynamics. Application to space
problems; satellite orbits; gyro-dynamics,
space vehicle motion; performance and
optimization. Generalized theories of
mechanics; virtual work, D’Alembert’s
principle; Lagrange’s equation;
Hamilton’s principle.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 100
ME 312 Manufacture Engineering
(same as EID 312)
Study of metal processing theory and
application with emphasis on casting,
machining, and metal deformation
processes; plastic forming; special
processing techniques; work-holder
design principles. Specific areas
studied include stages of processing,
mathematical modeling of processes,
equipment determination, relationship
of plant layout, tooling, metrology, and
product design to product cost.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ME 142 and
ME 155
ME 320 Mechanical Design
Mechanical design of basic
transmission elements; design
optimization by blending fundamental
principles and engineering judgment;
design criteria for the various frictional
machine elements. Design projects
provide authentic involvement in
problems from industry; design projects
make use of computer, experimental
and modeling techniques.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 120
ME 330 Internal Combustion
Engine Design
A broad analytical and experimental
review of the governing parameters
involved in piston engine design and
optimization. Thermodynamics, fluid
mechanics, heat transfer, combustion,
emissions, thermochemistry, dynamic
and static loading, and fuel efficiency,
as they apply to different engine cycles
and types, are covered. Varied research
examples from industry, government,
and academia, with particular
emphasis on automotive engine
design, are analyzed from first
principles. Students develop hands-on
learning skills through computational
and experimental assignments.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 130
ME 334 Combustion (same as
EID 334)
Thermodynamics and kinetics of
reacting systems. Conservation laws
for reacting gas mixtures. Gas phase
and heterogeneous phase diffusion
flames, including supersonic diffusion
flames and fuel droplet combustion
in liquid propellant rocket engines and
in residential oil burners. Premixed
flames in gases. Detonation waves in
gases. Examples of current research
in aerospace and environmental
aspects of combustion processes.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 141 or
ME 142
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
ME 363-364 Selected Topics in
Mechanical Engineering
This course will deal with current
technological developments in
various fields of mechanical
engineering. Projects and design
will be emphasized.
3 credits each. Prerequisite:
ME faculty permission
ME 365 Mechanical Engineering
Research Problem
An elective course available to
qualified students. Students may elect
to consult with an ME faculty member
and apply to carry out independent
research on problems of mutual
interest in theoretical or applied
mechanical engineering.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ME faculty
permission and senior standing. May
be repeated
Graduate
ME 401 Advanced Mechanical
Vibrations
Combined analytical and experimental
approach to mechanical vibration
issues; characterization of the dynamic
behavior of a structure in terms of its
modal parameters; digital data
acquisition and signal processing;
experimental modal analysis
procedures and excitation techniques;
extraction of modal parameters from
measured frequency response
functions. Students will acquire handson experience with impact hammer and
shaker data acquisition and analysis.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 101
ME 405 Automotive Engineering
Fundamentals
An introductory course in modern
automotive design, covering aspects of
prime movers, aerodynamics, brakes,
tires, steering, transmission,
suspension and handling, chassis and
advanced hybrid powertrain concepts.
Simulations and physical prototyping
give students a hands-on approach to
the design, optimization, fabrication
and testing of various vehicle
subsystems in a team-based learning
environment.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 130 or
permission of instructor
ME 407 Introduction to
Computational Fluid Dynamics
The need for and applications of
computational fluid dynamics (CFD).
Introduction to CFD analysis and
commercially available codes.
Governing equations and numerical
solution methodologies for basic fluid
flow systems. Geometric modeling and
grid generation. Examination of various
physical models. Use of a commercial
CFD code.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140
ME 408 Introduction to Computer
Aided Engineering (CAE)
Theory and practical applications of
computer aided engineering
methodologies, and use of multiphysics
software, in mechanical engineering
practices. Topics include principal
modeling and solution techniques,
computational geometry applications,
modeling of mechanical engineering
problems, and non-linear and dynamic
problem solving. Students use typical
commercial software packages to work
on practical case studies.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 100
ME 412 Autonomous Mobile Robots
This course introduces basic concepts,
technologies, and limitations of
autonomous mobile robots. Topics
include digital and analog I/O, tactile
sensing, IR sensing and range finding,
light sensing, sonar, magnetic field
sensing, encoders, DC motor actuators,
servo motor actuators, high-level
microprocessor control, low-level
microprocessor control, power
management, and prototyping.
Students will form teams to design
and build autonomous mobile robots
configured to compete with each other
in a singles-match game, or to perform
a team-oriented task.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 153 or
ECE 151
ME 413 Microelectromechanical
Systems (MEMS)
Advances in the design, fabrication,
analysis and control of
mircoelectromechanical systems
(MEMS) have positioned MEMS at the
forefront of high-value, cutting-edge
technologies. The scope of this course
covers both the fundamental and
advanced aspects of MEMS. Topics
include introduction to MEMS,
materials and fabrication processes,
sensors and actuators, microfluidics,
scaling principles, device concepts and
system design. MEMS processing
simulation and modeling, testing and
packaging of MEMS will also be
presented. Furthermore, exposure to
basic MEMS processing and cleanroom
protocol will be included.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 110 or
ESC 110.1
109
110
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
ME 415 Introduction to
Nanotechnology
Understanding and control of matter at
dimensions in the range from one to
100 nanometers for novel applications
are the main objectives of
nanotechnology. The scope of this
course encompasses nanoscale
science and engineering. Typical topics
will include the unique properties of
some nanometer scale materials,
processiong and fabrication
technologies for nanomaterials,
imaging, measuring, modeling and
manipulating matter at this length
scale. In addition, laboratory
demonstrations on nanomaterials
processing, nanoarchitecturing and
self-assembling of nanostructures will
be included.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 110 or ESC
110.1
ME 430 Thermodynamics of
Special Systems (same as EID 430
and ChE 430)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 130
ME 432 Introduction to Nuclear
Power Plant Technology
Nuclear power provides a highpotential form of alternative energy,
with significant safety constraints. The
course centers on the study of a typical
US commercial nuclear power plant—
its design philosophy and analysis of
nuclear steam supply system and
balance of plant systems (including
heat exchangers, pumps, relief valves,
etc.) for normal operation and steady
state and transient accident analysis,
and longer term spent fuel storage. The
course utilizes disciplines/methods of
thermodynamics, heat transfer and
fluid flow, and plant drawings and
data. Analysis includes Three Mile
Island Accident, a small break loss-ofcoolant accident. When feasible, this
course includes a tour of an operating
nuclear power plant.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 130 and
ESC 140
ME 434 Special Topics In
Combustion (same as ChE 434)
Analysis of diffusion and premixed
flame processes, including droplet
and particle flames, combustion in
sprays, chemical reactions in boundary
layers, combustion instability in liquid
and solid rocket engines and gas
burner flames. Consideration of
ignition and quenching processes and
flammability limits.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 334
ME 440 Advanced Fluid Mechanics
(same as EID 440 and ChE 440)
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 140 and
permission of instructor
ME 458 Industrial Robots (same as
EID 458)
Basic concepts, techniques, and
limitations of modern industrial robots;
industrial automation; robot
programming languages; definition and
description of a robot work space;
application of transform and operator
matrices in industrial robotics. Student
projects include computer
programming of forward and inverse
kinematics, and application
programming with an industrial robot.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 151
ME 493-494 Selected Advanced
Topics in Mechanical Engineering
These courses will deal with current
advanced technological developments
in various fields of mechanical
engineering. Projects and design will
be emphasized.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ME faculty
permission and graduate standing
ME 499 Thesis/Project
Master’s candidates are required to
conduct, under the guidance of a faculty
adviser, an original investigation of a
problem in mechanical engineering,
individually or in a group and to submit
a written thesis describing the results
of the work.
6 credits for full year
Engineering
Sciences
Courses
materials for process equipment design,
its effect on economics. Design
concerning effect of corrosion and its
prevention.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 100
Undergraduate
ESC 120 Principles of Electrical
Engineering
Survey of Electrical Engineering for the
non-major. Signal and circuit analysis,
DC and AC circuits, transients,
frequency response and filters, power
systems. Additional topics may be
covered as time permits.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113
ESC 000.1- 000.4 Engineering
Professional Development
Seminars
The Engineering Professional Seminars
and Workshops offer students an
introduction to the profession of
engineering as well as deal with their
development as students. The Cooper
Union’s CONNECT program is an
integral part of these courses and
provides intensive training in effective
communications skills. A wide range of
topics is covered in addition to
communications skills including ethics,
environmental awareness, life-long
learning, career development, conflict
resolution, entrepreneurship,
marketing, work-place issues, team
dynamics, professional licensure and
organizational psychology.
0 credits. Attendance required by all
first and second year students.
Pass/Fail grade based on attendance
and participation
ESC 100 Engineering Mechanics
Equivalent system of forces, distributed
forces; forces in structure; friction
forces. Particle and rigid body
mechanics; kinematics, kinetics.
Newton’s laws of motion; work and
energy; impulse and momentum.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ph 112
ESC 101 Mechanics of Materials
Introduction to solid mechanics;
analysis of stress and deformation.
Extension; flexure; torsion.
Axisymmetric problems, beam theory
elastic stability, yield and failure theory.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 100
ESC 110 Materials Science
The objective of this course is to
promote an understanding of the
relationship between the molecular
structure of a material and its physical
properties. Topics include bonding in
atoms and molecules, crystallinity,
metals and alloys, polymers,
mechanical properties of inorganic
materials and composite materials.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
ESC 110.1 Materials Science for
Chemical Engineers
Understanding relationships among
atomic or molecular structures, physical
properties and performances of
substances. Bonding, crystallinity,
metals, alloys and polymers.
Mechanical properties of inorganic and
composite materials. Selection of
ESC 121 Basic Principles of
Electrical Engineering
Selection of topics from ESC 120. This
class meets with ESC 120 for the first
ten (10) weeks.
2 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113
ESC 130 Engineering
Thermodynamics
Rigorous development of the basic
principles of classical thermodynamics.
Zeroth, first and second laws of
thermo-dynamics and their applications
to open and closed systems. Analysis
of thermodynamic processes,
properties of real substances and
thermodynamic diagrams.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
ESC 130.1 Chemical Engineering
Thermodynamics
First law of thermodynamics for closed
systems; perfect gasses, 2- and 3phase systems of one component;
transient and steady state analyses
using the first law of thermodynamics
for open systems; second law of
thermo-dynamics; introduction to
concepts of entropy. Gibbs free energy
and Helmholtz free energy; derivation
and application of equations describing
the auxiliiary thermodynamic functions
and conditions of equilibrium in
imperfect gasses.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ch 160 or
ESC 170
ESC 140 Fluid Mechanics and
Flow Systems
Introductory concepts of fluid
mechanics and fluid statics.
Development and applications of
differential forms of basic equations.
Dynamics of inviscid and viscous
fluids, flow measurement and
dimensional analysis with applications
in fluid dynamics. Friction loss and
friction factor correlation; design of
piping systems.
3 credits.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
ESC 141 Transport Phenomena
A unified approach to the rate
processes involved in heat, mass and
momentum transfer, including
chemically reactive systems; reviews
of generalized rate equation,
mechanisms of transport processes;
equations of continuity, motion and
energy; applications to conduction,
radiation, convective heat and mass
transfer and diffusion; emphasis on the
derivation of the applicable differential
equations and methods of solving
same for both laminar and turbulent
flows; macroscopic balances for nonisothermal systems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140
ESC 160 Systems Analysis
An introductory course in the basic
concepts and techniques of systems
analysis and optimization and their
applications to the planning, design
and managing of large-scale
engineering systems. Topics include
production functions, marginal
analysis, linear and dynamic
programming, decision analysis,
project evaluation and selection,
systems modeling and economic
methods. Methodology is
demonstrated through design projects.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
ESC 161 Systems Engineering
An introductory course to the
mathematical modeling of systems.
Topics include mechanical elements
and systems, electric circuits and
analogous systems, fluid elements and
systems, analysis of systems using
transfer functions, state space
equations, analog simulation and
digital simulation. Also covered are
block diagrams, Laplace transforms,
and linear system analysis. Computer
projects will be assigned that will use
MATLAB software.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
ESC 170 Material and Energy
Balances Introduction to the analysis
of chemical process systems, using
material and energy conservation
equations. Estimation of
thermodynamics and thermochemical
properties of real fluids for engineering
calculations. Numerical methods and
their implementation on the digital
computer for solution of chemical
engineering problems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 160
Interdisciplinary
Engineering
Courses
Undergraduate
EID 100 Engineering Drafting and
Computer-Aided Design
Students learn skills in visualizing and
documenting engineering designs, and
in use of computer-aided design
software. This course takes students
through a hands-on learning
experience in the practice of traditional
engineering drafting techniques as
well as contemporary computer-aided
design tools, such as AutoCAD and
SolidWorks. Topics include technical
drawing and engineering graphics,
conception and visualization of 3D
engineering models, parts and
assemblies, and detailed generative
2D drawings.
1 credit. Prerequisites: none
EID 101 Engineering Design and
Problem Solving
Students work on cutting-edge,
exploratory design projects in interdisciplinary groups of 20 to 25. Each
project has an industrial
sponsor/partner who is available for
student/faculty consultation and
support. Oral and visual presentations
as well as formal written reports are
required for all projects. Professional
competencies, teamwork, human
values and social concerns are
stressed in the engineering design.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
EID 103 Principles of Design
This course is designed to introduce
students from all disciplines to the
concepts of rational design. It is open
to first-year students and sophomores.
In the first part of the course students
will learn by hands-on experience the
importance of giving attention at the
design stage to consideration of
accessibility, repair, replacement,
choice of materials, recycling, safety,
etc. Students will develop the ability to
make observations and record them in
suitable form for further analysis of the
design process. From this, concepts of
“good” design will be developed, and
students will be introduced to the
formal design axioms and principles.
This will lead to the second part of the
course which will consist of a
comprehensive, realistic design
problem. Creativity, intuition and
cultivation of engineering “common
sense” will be fostered within the
framework of design principles and
axioms. The course will constitute a
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
direct introduction to the disciplines
in their interdisciplinary context.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 101
EID 105 Drawing and Sketching for
Engineers (same as ME 105)
This course introduces engineering
students to the fundamentals of freehand drawing and sketching with an
emphasis on the interpretation and
communication of insights, concepts
and dimensioned solutions. Drawings
and sketches are often the first steps
in innovative engineering solutions and
invention. The primary goal of this
course is to provide a comprehensive
foundation in traditional drawing and
sketching methods for engineers.
2 credits. Prerequisites: none
EID 110 Engineering Design
Graphics
This course is for students who are
well versed in basic AutoCAD and
want to develop their 3D modeling
skills plus learn how to customize the
system. Course work includes writing
custom AutoCAD menus and programs
that are useful for the various
engineering disciplines, using the Lisp
programming language. Students will
be given a number of 3D modeling
assignments throughout the semester,
building up to a final term project that
utilizes their 3D modeling skills as
well as their programming and
customization knowledge.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 120 Foundations of
Bioengineering
An introduction to the engineering
study of biological systems. Basic
physiochemical and organization
principles applicable to biological
systems. Topics include membrane
structure and function, physiology of
the circulatory system, and an
introduction to biorheology and
biological transport phenomena.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 160
EID 121 Biotransport Phenomena
Engineering principles are used to
mathematically model momentum,
heat and mass transfer processes that
occur in biological systems. After a
general introduction to human anatomy
and physiology, topics examined
include blood rheology, circulatory
system fluid dynamics, whole body
heat transfer, vascular heat transfer,
oxygen transport in tissue and blood,
pharmacokinetics and the design of an
artificial kidney (hemodialysis).
3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing
EID 122 Biomaterials
A study of both natural and synthetic
materials, especially those for
orthopaedic applications. Mechanical
properties, design considerations, biocompatibility, potential for allergic
response and carcinogenic
ramifications, mechanical compatibility
and effects of long-term implantation.
Metallics, ceramics and polymers.
Relative advantages and disadvantages
of various materials. Materials for
cardiovascular applications. Corrosion
and chemical degradation.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 123 Biosystems and
Instrumentation
Introduction to mathematical modeling
and the formulation of analogs for
biological systems. Electrical aspects
of nerve signals, coupled with their
analysis and measurement. Design and
construction of electro-cardiographic
systems. Computer analysis of electrocardiograms. Applications of systems
theory to various physiological
subsystems including muscle response
and pupillary-retinal response.
Laboratory work required.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Superior grades
or at least one course in control theory.
Suggested for seniors only
EID 124 Injury Biomechanics and
Safety Design
Frequency and severity of common
injuries. Mechanisms of
musculoskeletal, soft tissue and brain
injuries. Injury criteria, reference
values and their role in safety design.
Experimental and computational
methods for safety design and accident
reconstruction. Automotive safety.
Biomechanical test dummies.
Seatbelts, airbags, and energy
absorbing structures and materials.
Repetitive stress injuries and
occupational health. Government
regulation and legal liability. Expert
witness practice and qualifications.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 100 and
ESC 110
111
112
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
EID 125 Biomechanics
An in-depth treatment of orthopaedic
biomechanics, including freebody
analysis applied to the musculoskeletal
system, applied statics, dynamics and
kinematics. Clinical problems relating
to biomechanics. Lubrication theory
applied to hard and soft tissues.
Mechanical testing of tissue, including
both static tests and dynamics tests.
Tensor treatment of kinematic motions.
Extensive reference to current
literature. Muscle function, evaluation
and testing. Exploration of the
concepts of development of muscular
power, work and fatigue.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 100 and
permission of instructor
EID 131 Energetics (same as
ME 131)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 130
EID 133 Air-Conditioning, Heating
and Refrigeration (same as ME 133)
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 130 and
ESC 140
EID 140 Environmental Systems
Engineering (same as CE 141)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 141 Air Pollution Control
Systems
System design for particulate, gas and
vapor recovery. Study of dynamics of
particulate behavior in fluid stream,
Brownian motion, interception, inertial
impact; target geometry and effects,
nucleation and particle growth; energy
consumption and collection efficiency.
Diffusional operations studies, transfer
unit requirements. Kinetics of diffusion
in gas-gas, gas-liquid, gas-solid and
gas-extended surface systems.
Unsteady-state behavior, surface
renewal; wave-front analysis. Effect of
fluid dynamics. Energy consumption
related to transfer units. Fundamentals
of mechanisms in real systems. Design
problems.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
EID 142 Water Resources
Engineering (same as CE 142)
4.5 credits (3 hours of lecture, 3 hours
of laboratory). Prerequisite: ESC 140
EID 153 Mechatronics (same as
ME 153)
EID 160 Acoustics, Noise and
Vibration Control
Interdisciplinary overview of acoustics
and its applications in industrial and
environmental noise control, acoustics
of buildings, vibration systems and
control. Topics include: sound levels,
decibels and directivity, hearing, hearing
loss and psychological effect of noise,
noise control criteria and regulations,
instrumentation, source of noise, room
acoustics, acoustics of walls, enclosures
and barriers, acoustics materials and
structures, vibration control systems;
design projects.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 165 Sound and Space
(same as ME 165)
Basics of acoustics, including sound
waves, room and hall acoustics and
metrics of sound. Audio engineering,
including microphones, signal
processors, amplifiers and
loudspeakers. Skills and techniques
using Pro Tools brand audio editor
system to create original sonic and
musical compositions. Public exhibition
of an electronic music program.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 170 Engineering Economy
Comparison of alternatives in monetary
terms; meaning and use of interest
rates; results evaluation including
intangibles; risk in alternatives;
principles underlying the determination
of economic life; depreciation and
depreciation accounting; financing
business ventures; financial statement
analysis; replacement of capital assets.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113
EID 176 Legal and Ethical Aspects
of Engineering
A survey of the courts and their
jurisdiction; civil and criminal law;
equity jurisprudence; expert witness,
contracts and the importance of
business law to the engineer. Other
topics include patents, trademarks and
copyrights; product liability; unfair
competition; professional ethics and
professional advancement.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
EID 300 Special Research Project
Students will work on individual
projects in engineering under
supervision of faculty. Problems will
vary according to individual interest.
permission to register is required from
the Office of the Dean of Engineering.
Students on academic probation are
ineligible for registration.
3–6 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of Faculty and Dean’s office
EID 311 Production Automation
Concepts and principles of automated
production lines; analysis of high
volume, discrete parts production
systems in metal working industry;
partial automation; mechanized
assembly systems. Features of
numerically controlled machine tools,
NC part programming, control loops of
NC systems, computerized numerical
control, adaptive control system, group
technology, flexible manufacturing
systems, application of manufacturing
engineering principles to optimize
manufacturing process flow. Student
projects with emphasis upon design
and application.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CS 102
EID 330 Introduction to
Neurophysiology and the
Biophysics of Neural Computation
(Same as Ph 330)
3 credits
EID 312 Manufacturing Engineering
(same as ME 312)
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 101
EID 331 Systems Neuroscience
(Same as Ph 331)
3 credits
EID 313 Science of Material for
Engineering Design (same as
ME 313)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 110 or
ESC 110.1
EID 333 Renewable Energy
Technologies
This course is designed as an
introduction to renewable energy
technologies, with special focus on
wind energy, kinetic hydropower and
solar energy. The course will address
both the current technological status
and the commercialization challenges
facing each sector, including licensing,
deployment, distribution and economic
feasibility issues. Guest lectures by
industry experts and field trips to
various technology sites are planned.
The course is open to all engineering
juniors and seniors.
3 credis. Prerequisite: junior or senior
standing
EID 320 Special Topics in
Bioengineering
Seminars on topics of current interest
in biotechnology.
3 credits. Prerequisites: a basic
understanding of engineering
mechanics and materials and
permission of instructor. May be
repeated
EID 325 Science and Application of
Bioengineering Technology
The overall purpose of the course is
to provide the student with a general
overview of the scope of bioengineering. The major areas in
the course are design in biomedical
engineering, tissue engineering,
medical imaging, cardiovascular,
vision, rehabilitation, masculaskeletal
system, robotic surgery and
medical business.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 326 Ergonomics
Principles of human-machine
interactions with emphasis on the
design of the workplace/machine,
for maximum output or minimum risk
to the operator. Mechanics of injury;
case studies.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 120
EID 327 Tissue Engineering
Tissue Engineering involves the
application of engineering and the life
sciences to gain a fundamental
understanding of structure-function
relationships in normal and pathological
tissues and the development of
biological substitutes to restore,
maintain or improve tissue functions.
This course will provide an introduction
to the science, methods and
applications of tissue engineering.
Topics include quantitative cell biology,
tissue characterization, engineering
design and clinical implementation.
3 credits. Prerequisites: working
knowledge of engineering
fundamentals, senior standing or
instructor approval
EID 356 Digital Control and Nonlinear Control (same as ME 356)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ME 151
EID 357 Sustainable Engineering
and Development
Sustainable engineering is examined,
starting with an analysis of resources,
(materials, energy, water) upon which
manufacturing is based. Each resource
is critically examined in terms of its
availability and form and the ultimate
impact of its usage on the state of the
planet. A comparison of the design and
construction of contemporary and
primitive structure is used to illustrate
the differences between the required
infrastructure and environmental
footprint, leading to a definition of
“green” design. The technologies
required to support contemporary
lifestyles in the developed and the
developing world are discussed within
the context of manufacturing techniques,
usage of natural resources and the
generation of waste. Workshops, guest
lectures and a term project incorporating
the concepts of minimalism, materials
usage, and aesthetic design are used to
present students with a unique
perspective engineering.
3 credits. Prerequisite: material
covered in core engineering science
and mathematics in Freshman and
Sophomore years
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
EID 362 Interdisciplinary Senior
Project I
Individual or group design projects in
interdisciplinary areas of engineering.
These projects are based on the
interest of the students and must have
the approval of their adviser(s) and
course instructor. Periodic and final
engineering reports and formal
presentations are required for all
projects. In addition to technical
aspects projects must also address
some of the following: economic
feasibility environmental impact social
impact, ethics, reliability and safety.
3 or 4 credits. Prerequisite: students
are required to have completed
necessary preparatory engineering
courses related to the project topic
EID 363 Interdisciplinary Senior
Project II Continuation of EID 362
3 or 4 credits. Prerequisite: EID 362
EID 364 Interdisciplinary
Engineering Research Problem
An elective course, available to
qualified upper division students.
Students may approach a faculty
mentor and apply to carry out
independent or group projects in
interdisciplinary fields.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of adviser(s)
EID 365 Engineering and
Entrepreneurship
Students will learn the fundamentals
of being an entrepreneur and operating
a successful business. From its original
idea to the open market, students will
choose an engineering related project
or service and learn the principles of
accounting, marketing, managing,
financing, and continuing research.
Students are required to choose their
own service or product and write a
business plan as their final project.
Lectures include case studies on the
various projects and guest speakers
from the industry. Readings include
articles from journals and textbooks.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 101
EID 370 Engineering Management
An exploration of the theories and
techniques of management beginning
with the classical models of
management and continuing through to
Japanese and American contemporary
models. The course is specifically
directed to those circumstances and
techniques appropriate to the
management of engineering. Lecture,
discussion and case studies will be used.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 371 Operations Management
An in-depth exploration of specific
problems and techniques applicable
to the management of production and
large operating systems (e.g.,
engineering projects). The specific
problems of demand analysis, capacity
planning, production and inventory
planning as well as scheduling and
progress control will be presented. In
addition, the concepts of total quality
management, material requirements
planning and statistical quality control
will be presented. The presentation will
include lectures and case problems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 370
EID 372 Global Perspectives in
Technology Management
Current global political, social and
economic developments and future
trends as they relate to technology
management are discussed. Students
learn to address issues of international
technology transfer, multinational
sourcing, quality control, diverse staff
management, environmental
considerations, etc. Working in teams
on case studies and projects, students
learn to conduct international
negotiations and develop solutions to
complex business problems. Special
emphasis is placed on team
cooperation and personal leadership.
Oral presentations and written reports
are required.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 101
EID 373 Patent Law
In this course a student will study patent
law in detail: the requirements for
obtaining a patent (“utility, novelty and
non-obviousness”); “trade secrets” as an
alternative to patent protection;
computer software and “business
methods” as patentable subject matter.
The class will focus on the theoretical
(patent cases from the U.S. Supreme
Court and the Federal Court, the patent
statute, 35 U.S.C.) and the practical
(analysis of issued patents; individual
and group exercises in drafting and
critiquing patent claims, familiarity with
the Manual of Patent Examining
Procedure). The course is open to juniors,
seniors, graduate students and faculty.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 374 Business Economics
In this course, the class will carry out a
real-time forecast of the U.S. economy
and explore its implications for the
bond and stock markets. The course
will build upon principles of both
macro- and micro-economics. It will
provide an introduction to the work
done by business economists and the
techniques they use. Students will
become familiar with the database
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
looking for relationships between key
economic variables, and studying
movements in interest rates over the
period 1960-present. The class will be
divided into teams of two students
with each team choosing a particular
aspect of the economy to forecast. The
class will also work with various
leading indicators of economic activity
and will prepare forecasts of the key
components of gross domestic product
and other important variables. A formal
presentation of the economic with
invited guests from the Wall Street
investment world will take place. To
put forecasting exercise in context,
there will be class discussions of
business cycles, credit cycles, long
waves in inflation and interest rates
and the impact of the Internet on the
economy and the stock market.
3 credits. Prerequisite: either S 334,
S 347, EID 170 or permission
of instructor
EID 376 Economics of Alternative
Energy
The goal of this course is to explore
the economics of alternative energy
technologies. As always, engineering
considerations determine the
feasibility of any technology while
economics determine the practicality
of the technology in the likely
environment of the next five years.
The students participating in this
course will explore a wide range of
alternative energy technologies. It is
expected that their analyses will
combine both economic and
engineering principles in an interesting
and creative way. Each student will
choose a particular technology to
analyze in depth: wind, solarphotovoltaic, passive solar, geothermal,
bio-fuels, etc. There will be periodic
presentations of their work to the class
as a whole. One goal of these class
discussions will be to highlight the
advantages and disadvantages of the
various technologies. At the end of the
semester, there will be a formal
presentation of the students’
conclusions to an audience of Cooper
faculty, industry experts and Wall
Street analysts.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 170, EID
374, or permission of the instructor
Graduate
EID 410 Materials and
Manufacturing Processes (same
as ME 410)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 414 Solid Waste Management
(same as CE 414)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 420 Axiomatic Design
An interdisciplinary design course open
to graduates and senior undergraduates.
Axiomatic design theory and
methodology provide a systematic and
scientific basis for making design
decisions. Axioms, corollaries and
theorems give designers a firm basis
for conceptualizing design issues,
eliminating bad design ideas during the
conceptual stage, choosing the best
design among those proposed and
improving designs. The Independence
Axiom and its implications together
with the Information Axiom and its
implications form the foundation of this
approach. Basic concepts and
methodologies will be illustrated by
case studies taken from many different
fields. Project required.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 421 Rehabilitation Engineering
Rehabilitation engineering is the
application of engineering principles,
technical expertise and design
methodology in the development and
provision of assistive technology, to
help a person with a disability achieve
his or her goals. Topics include the
design of rehabilitation devices, human
factors, client assessment, workplace
assessment, high- and low-tech
assistive devices and alternative and
augmentative communication devices.
Students will conduct research and
design and lubricate custom assistive
devices. Interdisciplinary teams will
be encouraged.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
113
114
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
EID 422 Finite Element Methods
(same as CE 422)
Shape functions and generalized
displacements. Assemblage of
elements, Convergence criteria.
Triangular, rectangular and
quadrilateral elements in plane stress
and strain. Isoparamentric
formulations. General Solids.
Hexahedral and tetrahedral elements.
Flexure in plates. General solids.
Natural Coordinates. Special
applications in blast mitigation design.
Computer codes.
3 credits. Prerequisite: CE 122 or
ME 100
EID 423 Measurement of Human
Performance
Application of advanced engineering
principles to the design of systems to
evaluate muscle groups for strength,
endurance and range of motion. Topics
include isometric, isokinetic and
sensibility testing; biofeedback, and
strategies to minimize “faking.”
Students will conduct intensive
research and design and fabricate a
device to evaluate a single muscle
group. Interdisciplinary teams will be
encouraged.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 424 Bioengineering
Applications in Sports Medicine
Application of engineering principles
to athletic performance and injury.
Topics include athletic training;
mechanical causes of sport injuries;
methods of injury prevention; design
of protective and prophylactic sport
devices; proper application of wound
dressing, taping and bandaging; first
aid for musculoskeletal sports injuries
and healing and rehabilitation.
Students will work in teams on case
studies and projects.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 430 Thermodynamics of
Special Systems (same as ChE 430
and ME 430)
Thermodynamic analyses of solid
systems undergoing elastic strain and
of magnetic, electric and biological
systems. Equations of state for these
and other fluid and non-fluid systems.
Thermodynamics of low temperature
systems. Recent advances in obtaining
real fluid and solid properties.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ChE 131 or
ME 130
EID 435 GeoEnvironmental
Engineering (same as CE 435)
Discussion of pertinent regulations and
regulatory programs relevant to
contaminated soil. Identification and
characterization of contaminated soils,
discussion of current treatment
technologies both ex-situ and in-situ.
Geotechnical design of waste facilities,
the closure and improvement of waste
facilities and construction on waste
Utilization of waste for engineering
purposes, the reuse and recycling of
contaminated soil.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ESC 140,
CE 141, CE 131 and permission
of instructor
EID 437 Sustainability &
Environmental Impact Assessment
(same as CE 437)
EID 438 Industrial Waste Treatment
Design (same as CE 440)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 439 Water and Wastewater
Technology (same as CE 441)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 440 Advanced Fluid Mechanics
(same as ChE 440 and ME 440)
Introduction to the fundamental
constitutive relations and conservation
laws of fluid mechanics. Steady and
transient velocity distributions of
viscous flow. Stream functions,
potential flow, and creeping flow.
Boundary layer theory. Modeling of
turbulent flow. Special topics may
include: hydrodynamic stability,
vorticity dynamics and mixing, waves
in fluids, airfoil theory, lubrication
theory, compressible flow, multiphase
flow, bubbles and droplets, nonNewtonian flow, and computational
fluid dynamics.
3 credits. Prerequisite: ESC 140
EID 441 Advanced Heat and Mass
Transfer (same as ChE 441)
Introduction to the energy equation.
Steady and transient heat transfer by
conduction. Convective heat transfer.
Energy transport in flowing media. Free
convection. Conservation of species
equation. Fick’s law of binary diffusion.
Mass transfer with simultaneous
homogeneous or heterogeneous
reaction. Multicomponent heat and
mass transfer. Stefan-Maxwell
equations for multicomponent
diffusion. Simultaneous heat and mass
transfer. Transport in electrolyte
solutions. Special topics may include:
membrane separation processes, drug
delivery and controlled release,
turbulent heat and mass transfer,
boundary layer heat and mass transfer,
and chemically reacting flows.
3 credits. Prerequisite: EID 440 or ChE
440
EID 446 Pollution Prevention of
Minimization (same as CE 446)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 447 Sustainablitiy and
Pollution (same as ChE 447)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 448 Environmental and
Sanitary Engineering (same as
CE 448)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 449 Hazardous Waste
Management (same as CE 449)
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 452 Principles of Interactive
Computer Graphics
Point plotting, line drawing and raster
graphics techniques. Two-dimensional
transformations, clipping and
windowing, graphical input devices
and techniques. Graphics data
structures and display lists. Principles
of three-dimensional representation
and solid modeling concepts.
Specialized computer architectures for
graphics. User interface design. Each
student will undertake a design project
to realize some aspect of the course
material, related to his or her area of
specialization. (This course will be
limited to 8 students.)
3 credits. Prerequisite: ECE 161
EID 470/CE 470 Urban Security
Design of urban systems to protect
against terrorism. Analysis of blast
loads. Blast mitigation design
considerations. Technology transfer;
military/defense to civilian sector.
Response spectra. Pressure/impulse
diagrams. Stand off distances. Blast
mitigation measures for buildings,
bridges and tunnels. Prevention of
progressive collapse in tall buildings.
Design of glazing. Retrofit upgrade of
existing urban infrastructure. Building
code and insurance issues.
3 credits. Prerequisites: CE 122 or
ME 101 and permission of instructor
EID 480 Challenges Facing
Engineering Start-ups in Innovative
Technologies
This course will address the various
issues facing engineering start-ups in
innovative technologies such as urban
security engineering businesses,
distributed electric generators, bio-
medical engineering businesses. Topics
include definition of mission and core
values, business plans financing
strategies, marketing considerations,
intellectual property issues, employee
relations and regulatory hurdles. The
course will feature guest speakers
with first-hand experience in relevant
start-ups.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Open to seniors
and graduate students
EID 481 Environmental Economics
How environmental regulations affect
economic growth. Analytical
framework and tools: valuing the
environment for decision making;
marginal damage function and
marginal abatement cost: risk
assessment; alternatives assessment;
cost-benefit analysis; costeffectiveness; distributive equity;
precautionary principle. Issues relating
to air, water, energy and materials.
Environmental health issues. Creation
of markets for new technologies.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor
EID 488 Convex Optimization
Techniques (same as ChE 488)
Techniques.
3 credits. Prerequisites: ChE 151 or
ESC 161, Ma 326 (co-enrollment is
fine) and permission of instructor
.
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Biology
Bio 101 Biology for Engineers I
This course will examine in depth the
genetics, molecular and cellular
biology, pathology, toxins, microbiology
and environment as they relate to
humans and disease using organ-based
or systems biology approaches (e.g.,
gastrointestinal pulmonary,
cardiovascular, urinary endocrine, etc.)
Major assignments will be
individualized to student’s interests and
majors when possible. As such, this
course will provide the biological
fundamentals for further study in
biotransport, biochemistry, graduate
school in biomedical engineering, etc.
Combined with Biology 102 and
Biochemistry, it will provide a solid
foundation for medical school.
3 credits (includes lab experience).
Prerequisites: Ch 110 and Ch 160 or
permission of instructor
Bio 102 Biology for Engineers II
This course will provide human biology
fundamentals to springboard into
research projects at the intersection
of biology and engineering Topics will
include anatomy and physiology of
musculoskeletal and other major organ
systems not covered in Bio 101,
imaging modalities, concepts behind
diagnostic and therapeutic surgical
procedures, and their limitations,
human body repair, artificial organs,
tissue engineering, immunology and
cancer. Students will develop an
extensive biological vocabulary and
have requisite knowledge for further
study in biomechanics, rehabilitation
medicine, biomaterials,
bioremediation, etc.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore
standing preferred, but freshman with
AP Biology welcome
Chemistry
Courses
Undergraduate
Ch 110 General Chemistry
An introduction to the general
scientific principles associated with
chemistry. This course will deal with
fundamental ideas such as the concept
of the atom, the molecule, the mole
and their applications to chemical
problems. The classical topics include:
dimensional analysis and significant
figures; atomic weights; periodic
properties; chemical reactions and
stoichiometry; redox reactions; ideal
gas law and real gas equations of
state; the liquid state and
intermolecular forces; solution
concentrations; chemical equilibrium
and equilibrium constants; acids and
bases; solubility equilibria;
nomenclature of inorganic and organic
compounds. The topics for atomic and
molecular properties include: atomic
structure and the quantum theory;
electronic structure of atoms; the
covalent bond and bond properties;
molecular geometries and
hybridization; molecular orbital theory.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
Ch 111 General Chemistry
Laboratory
Methods of quantitative analysis are
used to explore chemical reactions and
analyze unknowns. Modern chemical
instrumentation as well as “classic”
wet chemistry analytical techniques
are covered. Statistical analysis of the
experimental data is used to analyze
results. Chemical laboratory safety and
industrial chemical regulations are
covered, as are the fundamentals of
writing a technical report.
1.5 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 110;
corequisite: Ch 160
Ch 160 Physical Principles
of Chemistry
The study of physicochemical
properties will be extended and
advanced. The laws of thermodynamics,
which involve energy, enthalpy, entropy
and free energy concepts, will be
applied to chemical systems. Other
topics include: vapor pressures and
colligative properties of solutions; the
phase rule; kinetics of homogeneous
reactions; electrolytic conductance
and electrochemistry.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 110, Ma
111; corequisite: Ch 111
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Ch 231 Organic Chemistry I
Bond types and strengths, structural
theory, bond angles and hybrid bonds;
covalent bonds, polarity of bonds and
molecules; dipole moments; molal
refraction; melting points and boiling
points relative to properties and
natures of molecules; solubilities
based on structures; functional groups;
critical temperature, pressure and
volume as a function of structure and
functional groups, prediction of vapor
pressure curves, latent heats.
Nomenclature isomers and properties.
Resonance and delocalization of
charge phenomena; acidity and basicity
(Lewis concept).
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 160
Ch 232 Organic Chemistry II
Extension of Ch 231 to systematic study
of aliphatic and aromatic compounds,
with emphasis on functional behavior
and interpretation of mechanisms
and bond types, polyfunctional
compounds, carbohydrates and
heterocyclic compounds.
2 credits (2 lecture hours).
Prerequisite: Ch 231; corequisite: Ch
233
Ch 233 Organic Chemistry
Laboratory
Laboratory work will cover subject
matter studied in Ch 231 and Ch 232,
including synthesis and type reactions
and identification of organic
compounds.
2 credits (4 laboratory hours)
Prerequisite: Ch 231
Ch 251 Instrumental Analysis
Laboratory
Fundamental principles of instrumental
methods will be covered, including
laboratory applications and limitations
in scientific research. Specific methods
include electrometric, such as
polarography, electro-gravimetry and
potentiometry; optical (such as visible
and ultraviolet absorption),
spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy
and infrared spectroscopy; and other
techniques such as chromatography
and mass spectroscopy shall be
included.
2 credits (4 laboratory hours).
Prerequisite: Ch 160
Ch 261 Physical Chemistry I
With an emphasis on the basic
theoretical justifications underlying
observed physical phenomena,
quantum mechanics will be developed
and applied to the study of chemical
systems with an emphasis on
interpreting spectroscopic data.
Modern methods of computational
molecular modeling are introduced.
Statistical mechanics is introduced as
a link between quantum mechanics
and thermodynamics.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ch 160 and
Ph 214
Ch 262 Physical Chemistry II
Continuation of Ch 261 with emphasis
on electrochemistry, chemical
kinetics and solid state chemistry.
Selected topics.
2 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 261
Ch 333 Advanced Organic
Chemistry
Modern areas of organic chemistry,
including synthesis, structure
determination, stereo-chemistry and
conformational analysis, reaction
mechanisms, photochemistry,
conservation of orbital symmetry,
molecular rearrangements and other
selected topics. Advanced laboratory
studies in research problem form.
Typical problems would involve studies
of the synthesis, structure and
properties of organic compounds,
utilizing modern instrumental
techniques. Independent laboratory
work may be arranged.
3 credits. (2 hours of lecture; 4 hours
of Laboratory). Prerequisite: Ch 232
Ch 334 Physical Organic Chemistry
Molecular orbital theory in organic
chemistry, orbital symmetry and
stereoelectronic selection rules, rate
theory, kinetic isotope effects,
carbonium ions and rearrangements,
acid-base catalysis, quantitative
correlations of reactivity and other
selected topics.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ch 232 and
Ch 261
Ch 340 Biochemistry
This course in the fundamentals of
biochemistry will cover the following:
Chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids,
amino acids, proteins, and nucleotides;
bioenergetics; kinetics and
mechanisms of enzymes; and an
introduction to molecular genetics,
and biochemical dynamics of DNA
and RNA.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Bio 101 and
Ch 231
115
116
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Ch 363 Advanced Physical
Chemistry
Modern applications of physical
chemistry and chemical physics are
developed. Topics covered include:
Quantum and classical statistical
mechanics, phase space, and
fluctuations. Intermolecular forces and
their experimental/theoretical
determination. Computational
molecular modeling, including ab initio,
semiempirical and molecular
mechanics predictions of molecular
properties, as well as Monte Carlo and
molecular dynamics methods. Some
projects will require computer
programming. Applications to liquids,
nanoclusters, polymers, surface
adsorbates and biomolecules are
considered. Guest speakers from
academia and industry are invited to
share their perspectives.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ch 261 and
Ch 262, or permission from instructor
Ch 364 Solid-State Chemistry
Solid-state reactions; nucleation and
diffusion theory; thin films of elements
and compounds; current topics.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 262
Ch 365 Chemical Kinetics
Fundamental study of chemical
reaction systems in gaseous and
condensed phases; absolute rate
theory; collision theory; energetics
from molecular and macroscopic
viewpoints. Experimental rate
techniques, interpretation of
experimental data. Reaction
mechanisms and models for complex
and elementary reactions.
Homogeneous and surface catalysis;
enzyme-controlled reaction rates.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 262
Ch 370 Inorganic Chemistry
The vast and fascinating chemistry of
inorganic compounds and materials
will be covered. Atomic structure and
the periodic table; molecular symmetry
and spectroscopy selection rules;
coordination chemistry; ligand-field
theory and other electrostatic bonding
models; superacids; reaction
mechanisms; organometallic chemistry;
chemistry of the heavy elements;
nuclear chemistry. Chemistry and
physics of ionic and molecular solids;
atomic and molecular clusters;
chemisorption and physisorption of
surface-bound species; cage
compounds and catalysts; bioinorganic
chemistry. A useful course for chemical
engineers to extend their knowledge
of inorganic chemistry beyond the
content of Ch 110. Strongly
recommended for students interested
in graduate work in chemistry.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ch 110,
Ch 160, Ch 231 and Ch 261
Ch 380 Selected Topics in
Chemistry
Study of topics related
to specialized areas as well as
advanced fundamentals.
2-6 credits. Prerequisite: Chemistry
faculty approval required
Ch 391 Research Problem I
An elective course available to any
qualified and interested student
irrespective of year or major. Students
may approach a faculty member and
apply to carry out independent
research on problems of mutual
interest, in pure or applied chemistry.
Topics may range from the completely
practical to the highly theoretical, and
each student is encouraged to do
creative work on his or her own with
faculty guidance.
3 credits. Prerequisite: permission
of research adviser and student’s
adviser(s)
Ch 392 to 398 Research Problem II
to VIII
This is intended to allow students to
continue ongoing research.
3 credits each. Prerequisite:
permission of research adviser and
student’s adviser(s)
Graduate
Ch 440 Biochemistry II
(continuation of Ch 340)
Discussion of metabolism: Glycolysis,
Glycogen Metabolism, Transport
through membranes including
ATP-Driven Active Transport and Ion
Gradient-Driven Active Transport,
Citric Acid Cycle, Electron Transport
and Oxidative Phosphorylation, Lipid
Metabolism including Fatty Acid
Oxidation and Biosynthesis,
Cholesterol Metabolism, Arachidonate
Metabolism: Prostaglandins,
Prostacyclins, Thromboxanes and
Leukotrienes; DNA Repair and
Recombination, Eukaryotic Gene
Expression including Chromosome
Structure, Genomic Organization,
Control of Expression, Cell
Differentiation.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ch 340
Computer
Science
Mathematics
Courses
CS 102 Introduction to Computer
Science
Introduction to Engineering Problem
Solving using algorithms and their
design. Logics and basic analysis
techniques are explored using
programming languages C and Python.
Students will also master one or more
significant engineering design
packages such as MATLAB, AUTOCAD,
Solid Works, etc. Projects will be
assigned.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
Undergraduate
Ma 110 Introduction to Linear
Algebra
Vectors in two- and three-dimensions,
vector algebra, inner product, cross
product and applications. Analytic
geometry in three dimensions: lines,
planes, spheres. Matrix algebra;
solution of system of linear equations,
determinants, inverses, complex
numbers.
2 credits. Prerequisites: none
Ma 111 Calculus I
Functions; limit of functions, continuity.
The derivative and its applications:
curve sketching, maxima and minima,
related rates, velocity and acceleration
in one dimension; trigonometric,
exponential, logarithmic and hyperbolic
functions. Definite and indefinite
integrals; area, the fundamental
theorem, techniques of integration.
4 credits. Prerequisites: none
Ma 113 Calculus II
Applications of definite integrals: area,
volume, improper integrals, work, arc
length, surface area, centroid. Polar
coordinates. Parametric curves in two
and three dimensions: velocity, speed
and accelerations. Partial derivatives
and the chain rule, properties of the
gradient. Maxima and minima.
Sequences and series: convergence
of sequences and series, Taylor and
Maclaurin series, power series.
4 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 111;
prerequisite or corequisite: Ma 110
Ma 151.1 Mathematics in Art
This course deals with the period
beginning with Pythagoras in ancient
Greece and goes up to the present day.
Topics include: Goedel’s incompleteness
theorem. Euclidean and non-Euclidean
geometries, infinity, paradoxes, soap
film experiments. Also discussed are
black holes, the Big-Bang theory,
relativity and quantum theory. The
course is open to all Cooper Union
students but is primarily oriented
toward making the above-mentioned
concepts comprehensive to those with
very little mathematics in their
background. Engineering students
should see the Mathematics faculty
and their adviser(s) for permission to
take this course. The relatedness of
seemingly distant fields (science, art,
mathematics, music) is a central theme
of the course.
3 credits. Prerequisites: none
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Ma 223 Vector Calculus
Double and triple integrals and their
applications. Vector fields. Gradient,
divergence and curl. Line and surface
integrals. Theorems of Green, Gauss
and Stokes. Path independence of
line integrals.
2 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 110 and
Ma 113. Usually given in fall and
spring semesters
Ma 224 Probability
Sample spaces. Random variables.
Probability. Distribution and density
functions. Expectation. Mean and
variance. Moments and generating
function. Central limit theorem.
2 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113;
corequisite: Ma 223. Usually given in
both fall and spring semesters
Ma 224.1 Probability and Statistics
This course deals with sample spaces,
random variables, probability.
Distribution and density functions.
Expectation. Mean and variance.
Moments and generating function.
Central limit theorem. Point estimation.
Confidence intervals. Hypothesis tests.
Chi-square. ANOVA. Estimations,
sampling theory.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113;
corequisite Ma 223
Ma 240 Ordinary and Partial
Differential Equations
Ordinary differential equations of the
first order. Linear equations of higher
order with constant coefficients. Power
series solutions. Laplace
transformation. Fourier series. Partial
differential equations: method of
separations of variables, applications to
vibration and heat flow.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 113
Ma 326 Linear Algebra
Field, vector space, linear
independence, subspace, basis, and
dimension. Finite-dimensional vector
space theory, including linear
transformations, rank, matrix
representation, coordinate
transformation, systems of linear
equations, and matrix algebra.
Determinants, eigenvalues, and
eigenvectors. Inner product space
theory, including orthogonal matrices
and quadratic forms. Canonical form.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 223
Ma 336 Mathematical Statistics
Statistical central limit theorem.
Decision theory. Estimation: properties
of estimators, point estimation,
confidence intervals. Hypothesis
testing: simple and composite
hypothesis, Neyman-Pearson lemma,
sequential methods, relationship to
estimation. Normal distribution tests:
t-test, chi-square, F-test. Introduction
to non-parametric methods, regression
and analysis of variance.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 223
and Ma 224
Ma 337 Operations Research
Linear programming, simplex method,
graphs and network theory, dynamic
programming, game theory, queues,
variational techniques, duality, Markov
chains, Monte Carlo simulation,
decision theory. Special topics
depending on student interest, possibly
including language questions, integer
programming, nonlinear programming
and topics from mathematical biology,
econometrics and other applications
of mathematics to the sciences and
social sciences.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 224
Ma 341 Differential Geometry
Theory of curves and surfaces,
curvature, torsion, mean and Gaussian
curvatures length, area, geodesics,
1st and 2nd quadratic forms, conformal
mapping, minimal surfaces, tensor
formulation and applications.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 223 and
permission of instructor
Ma 344 Tensor Analysis
Tensor algebra, covariant and
contravariant tensors, metric tensors,
Christoffel symbols and applications.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 326
Ma 345 Functions of a Complex
Variable
Topological properties of complex
plane, complex analytic functions,
Cauchy-Riemann equations, line
integrals, Cauchy’s integral theorem
and formula. Taylor series, uniform
convergence, residues, analytic
continuation, conformal mappings and
applications.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 223
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Ma 347 Modern Algebra
Sets and mappings, the integers: well
ordering, induction residue class
arithmetic, Euler-Fermat theorems.
Permutation groups: cyclic
decompositions. transpositions,
conjugate classes of permutations.
Abstract groups: morphisms,
subgroups, cyclic groups, coset
decompositions. Factor and
isomorphism theorems. Direct products
of groups. Sylow’s theorems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 326
Ma 350 Advanced Calculus I
Sets and functions, topological
properties of real line, continuity and
uniform continuity, differentiability,
mean value theorems, the RiemannStieltjes integral and Taylor’s theorem.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 223
Ma 351 Advanced Calculus II
Uniform convergence. Differentitation
of transformations, inverse and implicit
function theorems. Applications to
geometry and analysis.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 350
Ma 352 Discrete Mathematics
Relations. Mathematical structures.
Number theory. Algorithms. Complexity
of algorithms. Cryptology. Recurrence
relations. Graph theory. A shortest-path
algorithm. Planar graphs. Trees. A
maximal flow algorithm. Finite-state
automata. Languages and grammars.
Turing machines. The Church-Turing
thesis. Unsolvable problems.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ma 110
Ma 370 Selected Topics In
Mathematics
This is a seminar course involving
discussion of topics in pure or applied
mathematics that will be chosen by
mutual agreement between the
students and the instructor. Students
will work independently on projects
that may be of special interest to them.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 326 and
permission of the mathematics faculty
Ma 381 Seminar
Individual investigation of selected
topics in pure or applied mathematics,
centered on a subject to be agreed on
between students and the faculty
leader. Emphasis will be on training in
independent reading of mathematical
literature, oral presentations and group
discussions of the theory and problems.
Credits and class hours to be
determined by faculty on individual
basis. Prerequisite: Ma 223
Ma 382 Seminar (continuation
of Ma 381)
Credits to be determined by faculty on
individual basis. Prerequisite: Ma 381
Ma 391 Research Problem 1
An elective course available to
qualified upper division students.
Students may approach a faculty
member and apply to carry out
independent research on problems of
mutual interest in pure or applied
mathematics. Each student is
encouraged to do independent creative
work with faculty guidance.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 240 and
permission of research adviser
Ma 392 Research Problem 2
Continuation of Ma 391
This is intended to allow students to
continue ongoing research.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 391 and
permission of research adviser
Graduate
Ma 401 Boundary Value Problems
Orthogonal polynomials, Fourier series;
properties of Legendre polynomials
and Bessel functions. Applications
to the wave equation and the
differential equations of heat transfer
in several dimensions.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 223 and
Ma 240
Ma 402 Numerical Analysis
Techniques for the solutions of ordinary
and partial differential equations, the
classical problems of linear algebra,
integration and systems of nonlinear
equations. Error analysis, convergence
and stability theory. Course
assignments will include use of
computing facilities.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 223 and
Ma 240
Ma 403 Special Topics in Applied
Mathematics
Introduction to the general theory of
partial differential equations; existence
and uniqueness of solutions; integral
equations; computational techniques
using finite-element and probabilistic
methods. Other current topics in
engineering may be included also.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 223 and
Ma 240
Ma 415 Wavelets and
Multiresolution Imaging (same
as ECE 415)
3 credits. Prerequisites: ECE 114 and
Ma 326 or permission of instructor
117
118
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Ma 417 Mathematics of Medical
Imaging
Mathematical basis for various medical
imaging methods including CT, MRI,
PET. Radon transform, tomography
(recovery from projections), inverse
problems, artifacts and noise.
Mathematical physics of related topics
such as wave propagation, signal
generation and detection, quantum
mechanics.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 240,
Ma 326 or permission of instructor
Ma 470 Selected Advanced Topics
in Mathematics
Selected topics in Mathematics treated
at an advanced level.
Credits to be determined by
Mathematics faculty. Prerequisites:
Ma 326 and permission of
faculty member
Physics
Courses
Undergraduate
Ph 112 Physics I: Mechanics
Static equilibrium, kinematics,
Newton’s Law’s, non-inertial frames of
reference, system of particles, work
and energy, linear and angular
momentum, rigid body motion,
conservation laws, oscillation.
4 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 110, Ma
111; corequisite: Ma 113
Ph 151 Optics: The Physical Basis
of What Is Seen
This course is intended primarily for
students in the Schools of Art and
Architecture. It requires little
mathematical background, but much
interest in such questions as: Why are
sunsets red? Why does colorless rain
splatter dark on the pavement? How
do one-way mirrors work? Topics will
include light and color; mirrors, lenses
and optical devices; reflection,
refraction, absorption, emission,
interference, diffraction and
polarization of light; addition and
subtraction of “color,” the visual
response of the eye. There also will
be special topics based upon student
interest. Emphasis will be on scientific
concepts and their application to
optical and visual phenomena.
3 credits. Cannot be used to satisfy
any degree requirement in the
School of Engineering. Prerequisite:
none
Ph 165 Concepts of Physics I
An introduction to physics with an
emphasis on statics and dynamics.
2 credits. Prerequisites: Ma 160, CS
102; corequisite: Ma 163. Cannot be
used to satisfy any degree
requirement in the School of
Engineering
Ph 166 Concepts of Physics II
(continuation of Ph 165)
Additional topics include optics,
waves and an introduction to structural
analysis.
2 credits. Cannot be used to satisfy
any degree requirement in the School
of Engineering. Prerequisite: Ph 165;
corequisite: Ma 164.
Ph 213 Physics II: Electromagnetic
Phenomena
Oscillations; transverse and
longitudinal waves. Electric fields;
Gauss’ Law; electric potential;
capacitance; D.C. circuits; magnetic
fields; Faraday’s law; inductance; A.C.
circuits; electromagnetic waves.
4 credits. Prerequisite: Ph 112;
corequisite: Ma 223
Ph 214 Physics III: Optics and
Modern Physics
Geometric and physical optics. Special
theory of relativity. The quantum theory
of light. The quantum theory of matter.
Atomic structure. Nuclear structure
and radioactivity.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ph 213
Ph 215 Microcontroller Projects
in Physics
This course will introduce students to
the Arduino prototyping platform,
diverse sensors and output devices
that may be interfaced to the Arduino,
and the programming languages
(“Arduino” and “Processing”) required
for stand-alone operation or interaction
with an attached PC. A typical project
will involve developing hardware and
associated software that requires the
study of, and ultimately illustrates,
basic physics principles—for example,
the construction of a self-focusing
telescope. Ideally, student projects will
be integrated into the physics lecture
courses as demonstration apparatus.
The basics of circuit theory that are
required for this course will be taught
to those who have not yet completed
Ph 213. (Students need not be skilled
programmers or have any prior
knowledge of circuits for this course.)
3 credits. Prerequisites: CS102, Ph112,
and permission of instructor
Ph 235 Physics Simulations
Students will be taught how to
numerically solve ordinary differential
equations using 4th order techniques
such as Runge-Kutta and AdamsBashforth-Moulton in the Python
programming language. These
techniques will be used to solve
diverse physics problems not amenable
to simple analytical solution, such as nbody gravitational motion, the motion
of charged particles in a magnetic
bottle, the behavior of a car’s
suspension on a bumpy road. Emphasis
is placed on physically accurate
modeling (e.g. satisfying conservation
laws to high accuracy) and the
effective use of computer
graphics/animation for the
presentation of results. (Students need
not have significant programming
experience for this course.)
3 credits. Prerequisites: CS102, Ph112,
Ma113, and permission of instructor
Ph 291 Introductory Physics
Laboratory
Physical measurements and analysis
of experimental data. The experiments
test and apply some basic principles
selected from the following fields:
mechanics, sound, electromagnetism,
optics and modern physics.
Experiments and topics may vary each
semester. Digital and analog laboratory
instruments; computer acquisition and
analysis of data. Estimate of
systematic and random error,
propagation of error, interpretation of
results. This course complements three
lecture courses, Ph 112, Ph 213, Ph 214.
1.5 credits. Prerequisite: Ph 112;
corequisites: Ph 213, Ma 240
Ph 327 Topics in Modern Physics
Seminar course with student
participation in several topics of
current interest in experimental and
theoretical science.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ph 214
Ph 328 Relativity and
Electrodynamics
Introduction to tensures; formulation
of electromagnetic theory. Special and
general theories of relativity. Topics
include space time transformations,
electromagnetic stress-energy
momentum tensor, four space
curvature and gravitational field
equations, description of basic
experiments, gravitational waves,
cosmological models.
2 credits. Prerequisite: PH 214
Ph 330/EID 330 Introduction to
Neurophysiology and the
Biophysics of Neural Computation
This course will introduce students to
the fundamentals of neurophysiology
through a combination of traditional
classroom instruction and laboratories.
Each topic covered will include a
physiological introduction, laboratory
exploration, physical/mathematical
analysis and computer modeling.
Topics include biophysics of single
neurons (e.g., ion movement through
cell membranes, generation of action
potentials, synapses and
neurotransmitters), Hodgkin-Huxley
and other related models of neural
excitability, signal detection and signal
reconstruction and neural coding in
sensory systems. In the laboratories,
students will learn a variety of
extracellular and intracellular
experimental techniques using
invertebrate preparations. The class will
culminate with an independent project.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ph 213, Ph
214, Ph 291, Ma 240 and permission
of instructor
Ph 331 Systems Neuroscience
This is a lecture, laboratory and
discussion course which will explore
systems-level functions of the nervous
system. Topics include sensory coding
and motor control, neural encoding and
decoding, learning and memory,
dynamics of large networks, computing
with population codes, perception and
interfacing technology with the
nervous system. The laboratories will
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
consist of both computational and
experimental exercises with students
exploring principles of nervous system
design and function. The class will
culminate with an independent group
project. 2 hours of lecture per week
plus give 3 hour lab sessions over the
course of the semester.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Ph/EID 330
Ph 346 Quantum Physics of Solids
Why do silicon, calcite and copper
have very different properties even
though they have similar densities of
electrons? The answer is quantum
mechanics and its application to band
theory. Band theory provides some of
the most direct tests of quantum
mechanics. The course will develop the
theory to explain thermal and electrical
properties of everyday materials. We
shall see how quantum mechanics and
Fermi statistics successfully explained
these properties when classical
physics could not. The course will
provide the concepts and quantum
mechanical training needed to
understand, for example, the workings
of semiconductor devices. It will also
provide theoretical understandings of
material properties like thermal and
electrical conductivity, optical
reflection and transmission coefficients
that you have seen in mechanics, E&M
and modern physics. Topics covered
will include: Drude and Sommerfield
Models; Bloch’s Theorem and periodic
potentials; the nearly free electron
model; tight binding model; band
structures; semiconductors and
insulators; band structure engineering.
The mathematics required to
understand the concepts will be
developed as we go through the topics.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ph 112, Ph
213, and Ph 214
Ph 360 Special Projects in Physics
Special projects in experimental or
theoretical physics.
Credits and prerequisites determined
in each case by the physics faculty
Ph 370 Astrophysics
A quantitative introduction to
astronomy and astrophysics with an
emphasis on understanding the
physical processes underlying
astronomical phenomena. Topics
include: stellar formation, structure and
evolution; interacting binaries; white
dwarfs; neutron stars and black holes;
star clusters; interstellar medium;
galactic structure and evolution;
quasars and active galactic nuclei;
galactic clusters; cosmology. Prior
knowledge of astronomy is not
necessary.
3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Graduate
FACULTY
Ph 429 Deterministic Chaos with
Engineering Applications
A simple mathematical formalism
explains how a nonlinear system with
no random element may be intrinsically
unpredictable even when its governing
equations are known. The mathematics
of chaos (including fractals) will be
presented, with applications drawn
from mechanical, biological, chemical
processes; the weather; electric
circuits; lasers; general relativity;
models of war; the economy; the
spread of epidemics, etc.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ph 214,
Ma 113 (Ma 240 preferred) and CS
102
Administration
Ph 462 Nuclear Physics
Historical introduction, relativity
kinematics, basic nuclear properties,
nuclear chain reactions,
phenomenological nuclear models (shell,
liquid drop and collective), equation
of state (with computer exercises), an
overview of particle physics, quantum
chromodynamics, standard model,
current research topics (neutron stars,
big-bang nucleosynthesis, heavy-ion
collider experiments).
3 credits. Prerequisites: Ph 214, Ma
240 and permission of instructor
Department of
Information Technology
Alan N. Wolf, Acting Dean;
Safety Coordinator
Robert P. Hopkins
Chief Technology Officer and
Director of the Computer Center;
Associate Professor of Mathematics
George J. Delagrammatikas,
Acting Associatate Dean
Gearoid Dolan, Senior Academic
Associate (Art)
Christopher Lent
Director of Academic Computing
Assistant to the Dean for
Student Advisement
Jeff Hakner, Assistant Director
of Telecommunications
Gerardo del Cerro, Director,
Assessment and Evaluation
Daria Sapienza
Administrative Associate to the Dean
Susan M. Dorsey
Administrative Associate
Engineering Student Support,
Dean’s Office
Director, Outreach Programs
Maureen Deol, Secretary,
Electrical Engineering,
Mathematics and Physics Faculties
Ian Hochstead, Information Technology
Support Specialist
John A. Kibbe, Associate Director
of Administrative Systems
Christopher Lent, Assistant Director
of Academic Computing
Paul Tummolo, Manager of Multimedia
Brian Cusack, Senior Systems
Software Engineer
Wayne Adams, Senior Technician
Dennis Delgado, Technical Assistant
John Enxuto, Technical Assistant
Elizabeth Leon, Secretary,
Chemical Engineering and
Chemistry Faculties
Marget Long, Technical Assistant
Maria Jimenez, Secretary,
Civil and Mechanical
Engineering Faculties
Keith Ng, Senior Academic Support
for Architecture and Engineering
Nelson Figallo, Technical Assistant
Lawrence Mesich, Technical Assistant
C.V. Starr Research Foundation
Audio-Visual Resource
Access Center (AVRAC)
Jamshed Bharucha, C.E.O.
Paul Tummolo, Multimedia specialist
Yashodhan C. Risbud, Director
Sara Foley, Senior Audio-Visual
Technician
Simon Ben-Avi, C.V. Starr Professor
of Research
Bernie Brandell, Technician
Robert Dell, Reasearch Fellow
TC Westcott, Treasurer
Sarah Lerner, Secretary Assistant
The Aba and Leja Lefkowitz
Program for
Professional Development
Richard Stock, Director,
CONNECT Program
Coordinator for Professional
Development Seminar
John Osburn, Associate Director
CONNECT Program
119
120
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Professors
Om Agrawal
Professor and Chair of Mathematics
B.A., Kalahandi College, India;
M.A., Sambalpur University, India;
M.A., Ph.D., SUNY at Stony Brook
Jameel Ahmad
George Fox Professor of Urban
Infrastructure Design, and Chair
of Civil Engineering
B.S., Punjab University, Pakistan;
M.S., University of Hawaii;
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Paul M. Bailyn
Professor of Mathematics
B.M.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., Ph.D., New York University,
Courant Institute of Mathematical
Sciences
Irving Brazinsky
Jack and Lewis Rudin Professor of
Chemical Engineering and Chair
B.Ch.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., Lehigh University;
Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
Joseph C. Cataldo
Professor of Civil Engineering
B.C.E., M.S.C.E., Ph.D., City University
of New York; P.E.
Toby J. Cumberbatch
Professor of Electrical Engineering
B.Sc.(Hons.), M.Sc., Ph.D., University of
Manchester Institute of Science and
Technology; C.Eng.
Fred L. Fontaine
Jesse Sherman Professor
of Electrical Engineering and
Chair of Electrical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., New York University, Courant
Institute of Mathematical Sciences;
Ph.D., Stevens Institute of Technology
Vito A. Guido
Professor of Civil Engineering
B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic
University; P.E.
Andrea Newmark
Professor and Chair of Chemistry
B.A., Queens College, CUNY;
M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University
Richard J. Stock
Professor of Chemical Engineering
B.Sc (Hons), University of
Nottingham, England;
M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia University
Carl Sable
Associate Professor of
Computer Engineering
B.S.E.E., Princeton University;
M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University
Robert Q. Topper
Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Florida State University;
M.S., M. Phil., Ph.D. Yale University
Ruben Savizky
Associate Professor of Chemistry
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., Ph.D., Yale University
Cosmas Tzavelis
Professor of Civil Engineering
Diploma, National Technical University
of Athens, Greece;
M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia
University; P.E.
Robert W. Smyth
Associate Professor of Mathematics
B.S., The Cooper Union;
M.S. New York University;
Ph.D., Rutgers University
Leonid Vulakh
Professor of Mathematics
M.A., Ph.D., Moscow State University,
USSR
Chih-Shing Wei
George Clark Professor of Mechanical
Engineering and Chair
B.S., National Chung Hsing
University, Taiwan;
M.S., SUNY at Buffalo; Ph.D., Georgia
Institute of Technology
Alan N. Wolf
Professor and Chair of Physics
B.S., SUNY at Stony Brook;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas;
J.D. Yeshiva University (CSL)
Constantine Yapijakis
Professor of Civil Engineering
Diploma, National Technical University
of Athens, Greece;
M.S., New York University;
Ph.D., Polytechnic University; P.E.
Associate Professors
Melody Baglione
Associate Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S.M.E., Michigan Technological
University;
Ph.D., University of Michigan
George J. Delagrammatikas
Associate Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S.M.E., Massachusetts Institute
of Technology;
M.S.M.E., Ph.D., University
of Michigan
O. Charles Okorafor
Professor of Chemical Engineering
B.Sc., University of Lagos;
M.A.Sc., Ph.D., University
of British Columbia
Robert P. Hopkins
Associate Professor of Mathematics
B.S., St. Joseph’s College, Indiana;
M.B.A., Fordham University
George W. Sidebotham
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
B.S., Trinity College;
M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University
Stuart Kirtman
Associate Professor of
Electrical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union;
Ph.D., Brown University
David M. Wootton
Associate Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S.M.E., Cornell University;
M.S., Massachusetts Institute
of Technology;
Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology
Assistant Professors
Benjamin J. Davis
Assistant Professor of
Chemical Engineering
B.S., Cornell University;
Ph.D., U.C.L.A.
Sam Keene
Assistant Professior of
Electrical Engineering
B.S., Boston University;
M.S., Columbia University;
Ph.D., Boston University
Daniel H. Lepek
Assistant Professor of
Chemical Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
Ph.D., New Jersey Institute of
Tecnology
Eric G. Lima
Assistant Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.A., SUNY Purchase;
B.E., The Cooper Union;
Ph.D., Columbia University
Stanislav Mintchev
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.S., George Washington University;
M.S., Ph.D., New York University,
Courant Institute of Mathematical
Sciences
Adjunct Professors
Zinoviy Akkerman
Adjunct Professor of Physics
M.S., Novosibirsk State University,
Russia;
Ph.D., Institute of Semiconductor
Physics, Russia
Peter Bastor
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Rutgers University;
M.S. Stevens Institute;
Ph.D. University of Nijmegen, Holland
Robert Barrett
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Industrial Engineering
B.E., Pratt Institute;
M.S., New York University
Ines Basalo
Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering
B.Sc., Universidad Bolivar, Venezuala;
M.S., Ph.D. Columbia University
Alan D. Berenbaum
Adjunct Professor of
Computer Engineering
B.A., Yale University;
M.A., Princeton University
Scott N. Bondi
Adjunct Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S., Polytechnic University;
M.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute
of Technology
Dong Chang
Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union;
Ph.D., Columbia University; P.E.
Michael I. Cheikin
Adjunct Professor of
Biomedical Engineering
B.A., SUNY at Stony Brook;
M.D., SUNY Downstate
Bryan Conroy
Adjunct Professor of
Electrical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union;
Ph.D., Princeton University
Sean Cusack
Adjunct Assistant Professor
of Computer Science
B.S., The Cooper Union
Brian Cusack
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Mechanical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Partha P. Debroy
Adjunct Professor of Physics
B.S., M.S., Calcutta;
M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon
University
THE ALBERT NERKEN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Robert Dell
Adjunct Professor of Mechanical
Engineering;
Director, Center for Innovation and
Applied Technology
B.S., SUNY Oneonta;
M.F.A., SUNY New Paltz
Jeff Hakner
Adjunct Professor of Electrical
Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Adam Hapij
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Civil Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union;
P.E.
Lawrence S. Hausman
Adjunct Professor
of Electrical Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., Polytechnic University
Timothy R. Hoerning
Adjunct Professor
of Electrical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Neil Jackman
Adjunct Professor of
Electrical Engineering
B.E., SUNY;
M.S.E.E., Columbia University;
Ph.D., Stevens Institute of Technology
Kevin S. Kolack
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry
B.S., University of Virginia;
Ph.D., Indiana University
Yevgeniy Krasnitsky
Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics
B.A., Boston University;
M.S., New York University
Steven Kreis
Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics
B.S., University of Missouri;
M.S., Hunter College
Ian J. Kremenic
Adjunct Professor
of Biomedical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Lembit Kutt
Adjunct Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia
University
Lawrence Lennon
Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union
M.B.A., New York Universtiy
M.S. Polyytech Institute of NYU, P.E.
Christopher P. Lent
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Computer Science
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Michael Mannino
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Mechanical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Robert Smilowitz
Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
Ph.D., University of Illinois; P.E.
Ericson Mar
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Mechanical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Daniel M. Speyer
Adjunct Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.E., M.E., Ph.D., New York University
Robert Marano
Adjunct Professor
of Electrical Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S.E.E., University of Pennsylvania
Leonid Srubshchik
Adjunct Professor of Mathematics
B.S., M.S., Rostov State University,
USSR;
Ph.D., FSU Institute of Mathematics,
USSR
Lawrence O’Gorman
Adjunct Professor
of Electrical Engineerg
B.A.Sc., University of Ottowa, Canada;
M.S., University of Washington;
Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University
Karl Orishimo
Adjunct Associate Professor of
Biomedical Engineering
B.S.E., University of Pennsylvania;
M.S., Univeristy of Virginia
Katherine M. Panchyk
Adjunct Assistant Professor
of Graphics
B.S., B.Arch., CUNY City College
John M. Razukas
Adjunct Professor of Graphics
B.S., M.S., Polytechnic University; P.E.
Griffin Reilly
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Mechanical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Yashodhan C. Risbud
Adjunct Professor
of Electrical Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union
Gerard Ryan
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Computer Science
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.A., Rutgers University
Eric Schweitzer
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Mathematics
B.S., M.A., SUNY Stony Brook
Omar A. Sharafeddin
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry
B.S., Baylor University;
Ph.D., University of Houston
Stanley M. Shinners
Adjunct Professor of
Electrical Engineering
B.E.E., CUNY City College;
M.S.E.E., Columbia University; P.E.
Marco Shmerykowsky
Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union, P.E.
Thomas Synnott, III
Adjunct Professor of
Industrial Engineering
B.A., Williams College;
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University
Nina Tandon
Adjunct Professor of Electrical
Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union
M.S., MIT
Ph.D. Columbia University
Leonard Tevlin
Adjunct Professor of Physics
B.S., Moscow University;
M.Phil, Ph.D., New York University
Steven Ungar
Adjunct Professor of
Electrical Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University
Joseph Viola
Adjunct Associate Professor
of Civil Engineering
B.E., M.E., The Cooper Union;
P.E.
David Birdsong Weiland
Adjunct Professor of Mathematics
B.S., University of N. Carolina;
Ph.D., Washington University
Carl Weiman
Adjunct Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S., Yale University;
M.A., University of So. Florida;
Ph.D., Ohio State University
Samuel Wiener
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry
B.S., M.A., Brooklyn College;
M.S., Pace University
Hui (Grace) Yu
Adjunct Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S., Wuhan Institute of
Chemical Engineering;
M.S., Huazhong University
of Science and Technology;
Ph.D., Hong Kong University
of Science and Technology;
Ph.D., Boston University
Visiting Professors
Steven Simon
Visiting Assistant Professor of
Mathematics
B.A., Yale University
Ph.D. New York University
David Orbach
Visiting Assistant Professor
of Mechanical Engineering
B.S., Cornell University;
M.S., University of Rochester;
M.D., Ross University School
of Medicine
Emeriti
Eleanor Baum
Dean Emeritus
B.E.E., CUNY City College;
M.E.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of
New York
John L. Bové
Professor of Chemistry Emeritus
and Adjunct Professor
B.A., M.S., Bucknell University;
Ph.D., Case-Western Reserve
University
Shang-I Cheng
Professor of Chemical
Engineering Emeritus
B.S., National Chekiang University;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida
Wallace Chinitz
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Emeritus
B.M.E., CUNY City College;
M.M.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic University
Ralph L. Knapp
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Emeritus
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., Columbia University
Jean Le Mée
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Emeritus
B.S., Ecole Nationale de la Marine
Marchande, Nantes;
M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon
University
Melvin Sandler
Jesse Sherman Professor of
Electrical Engineering
B.E.E., M.E.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic
University
Arsete J. Lucchesi
Professor of Mathematics Emeritus
Associate Dean Emeritus
B.S., Queens College New York;
M.S., New York University
Gerry Weiss
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Emeritus
B.E., The Cooper Union;
S.M., Harvard University;
D.E.E., Polytechnic University; P.E.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Technicians
Engineering Advisory Council
Patrick Chiu, Technician
Chemistry Laboratories
Joel R. Alper (CE’58)
President and CEO, Comtech Mobile
Datacom Corporation (Retired)
John Consiglio, Technician
Mechanical Engineering Laboratories
Glenn Gross, Supervisor
Electrical Engineering Laboratories
Sinisa Janjusevic, Technician
Student Machine Shop
Victoria Joyce, Technician
Chemistry Laboratories
Dion Lutz, Technician
Kanbar Center for Biomedical
Engineering
Aladino Melendez, Technician
Electrical Engineering Laboratories
Jorge Ortega, Senior
Laboratory Technician
Mechanical Engineering Laboratories
Michael Schaff, Technician
Machine Shop
Luis Vega, Technician
Civil Engineering Laboratories
Michael Westbrook, Technician
Chemical Engineering Laboratories
Robert M. Aquilina (CE’78)
Co-chairman and General
Management Adviser
Flag Telecom
Kevin Burke (EE’72)
President and C.E.O
Con-Edison
Tara Chklovski, Ph.D.
Seth Dubin, Esq.
Law Partner
Saterlee, Stephens, Burke and Burke
Jack D. Goodman (ME’51)
President
Sprague-Goodman Electronics, Inc.
Dr. Russell Hulse, Ph.D. (BS’70)
Nobel Laureate
Associate Vice President
for Strategic Initiatives
University of Texas–Dallas
Thomas Iovino, P.E.
C.E.O., Judlau Contracting Inc.
Stanley Lapidus (EE’70)
Chairman and C.E.O.
Helicos Biosciences
Jay LeBoff
President and C.E.O.
C.E.O. Hotseat Chassis Inc.
Jay Moskowitz (Phy’70)
SPD Control Systems Corp.
Frank Napolitano (ME’88)
President, Lakeside Energy, LLC.
Eduardo F. Palacio (EE’75)
Vice President for Programs,
ITT Electronic Systems
Gerry Posner
C.E.O., Bolder Sensors
Chairman, Aegis Software Systems
Steven Silberstang (CE’70)
President, Foolhardy Investors
Joel Spira
Chairman and Director of Research
Lutron Electronics Co., Inc.
Nina Tandon (EE’01)
Adjunct Professor of Electrical
Engineering, The Cooper Union
Donald Toman (EE’55)
Senior Staff Consultant (retired)
Lockheed Martin
Richard Tomasetti,
P.E. Chairman
Thornton-Tomasetti Group, Inc.
Willard Warren (EE’50)
Willard Warren Associates
Philip Weisberg (EE’89)
C.E.O.
FX Alliance
Marie Wieck (BSE’82)
Vice President, WebSphere Platform
IBM
Technology Transfer
Advisory Board
Robert Aquilina (CE’78)
Co-chairman and General
Management Adviser
Flag Telecom
Mike Borkowsky (ME’61)
Vice President
Bristol-Meyers Consultant (retired)
Mark L. Epstein (A’76)
Ossa Properties, Inc.
Stanley Lapidus (EE’70)
Chairman and C.E.O.
Helicos Biosciences
Barry E. Negrin (ME’89)
Partner
Levisohn, Lerner, Berger and Langsam,
LLP
Lawrence Ng (EE’78)
Senior Vice President for Business
Development
Moneyline Network
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
FACULTY OF
HUMANITIES AND
SOCIAL SCIENCES
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
The Cooper Union is committed to the principle that an education
in the liberal arts provides the ethical, social and humanistic
framework crucial to personal development and professional
excellence. Through their work in the humanities and social
sciences, students gain a deeper awareness of the world in which
they must live and act. They learn to think, write and speak clearly
and effectively. Most significantly, an education in the liberal arts
offers students the opportunity to become attentive to the social
and humanistic implications of their professional work and to
acquire the basis for a satisfying cultural and intellectual life.
Curriculum All students take a four-semester core curriculum of
required courses in the humanities and social sciences. In addition, students in the School of Art take a required sequence in art
history. The core curriculum is a prerequisite to all elective offerings in Humanities and Social Sciences. During the third and
fourth years, students have considerable latitude to explore the
humanities and social sciences through elective courses. All
students are expected to take core curriculum courses at The
Cooper Union.
Transfer Credit Transfer credits may be granted for courses with
a grade of B or better upon review by the office of the dean of
Humanities and Social Sciences to determine that the work
accomplished meets the Faculty’s requirements. Students may be
required to provide evidence of work completed in the course:
syllabi, papers, etc. In rare circumstances, the freshman and sophomore requirements may be waived if an equivalent course of study
has been satisfactorily completed elsewhere.Eligible credits should
be transferred during a student’s first semester at The Cooper
Union. Interested students should make an appointment with the
dean or the academic adviser of the Faculty of Humanities and
Social Sciences during the first week of classes in the fall semester.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Advanced Placement Credit The Faculty of Humanities and
Social Sciences rarely grants AP credit. However, a student who
has attained a grade of 5 in an AP course may petition the dean for
permission to waive a core requirement and to substitute an
appropriate elective course.
Independent Study Only juniors and seniors in good academic
standing are eligible for independent study.Independent study may
be taken for a maximum of three credits per semester. The student
must obtain permission of both the instructor and the dean of the
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.The major consideration
in approving proposals for independent study is the educational
value of the study project within the structure of the degree requirements. The Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences insists on
very high standards as a condition for approving any independent
study project.
Minor Students who complete a minimum of 15 upper-division
credits in a specific field of liberal arts may qualify for a minor in
that field of Humanities and Social Sciences. Minors are offered
and may be designated on student transcripts in the following four
fields: American Studies, Art History, Literature, and History and
Society. Additional information is available from the office of the
dean of Humanities and Social Sciences.
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
Credits Unless otherwise noted, HSS courses with the prefixes
HUM and SS carry three credits and courses with the prefix HTA
carry two credits.
Prerequisites The prerequisites for all courses with the prefixes
HUM and SS are HSS1, 2, 3 and 4. HTA 1, 2 and 3 or HTA 101 and
102 are prerequisites for HTA electives. Exceptions may be
granted by special permission of the dean.
Grades At the end of every semester, each student receives a
grade for his or her semester’s work in each subject. Grades, with
their official significance, are as follows:
A
Outstanding performance
B
Very good performance
C
Average performance
D
Passing but unsatisfactory
F
Failure to meet minimum requirements
I
Work of the course not completed and assignment of grade
and credit postponed. This designation will be given only in cases
of illness (confirmed by authorized physician’s letter) or of other
documented extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
control, and only with the approval of the dean of the Faculty of
Humanities and Social Sciences.
The deadline for removal of an I designation will be determined by the instructor, but will not be later than six weeks after
the start of the spring semester for students who receive such a
grade in the fall semester and not later than two weeks after the
start of the fall semester for students who receive such a grade in
the spring semester. If the I is not removed within the set time limit,
either by completing the work in the subject or by passing a reexamination, the I will automatically become an F unless the dean of
the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences extends the time or
the student withdraws from school.
W Withdrawal (see below)
WU Unauthorized withdrawal (see below)
Indicators of plus (+) and minus (-) are used with the grades A, B,
C and D. (The grade of A+ is, however, not given.) These indicators
are included in computing grade point averages.
Dropped Courses and Withdrawals Courses dropped during
the first and second week of the semester will not be entered in
the transcript.
Dropping courses in Weeks 3-8: A student anticipating
inability to continue a course should immediately seek advice. It is
the responsibility of the student to notify the instructor and to file
an official drop form by the end of the eighth week of the semester
in order to receive a W grade. The grade W is not included in the
calculation of the student’s semester rating.
Dropping courses after Week 8: It is the policy of the Faculty
not to approve any withdrawal after the eighth week of classes
except under extreme, extenuating circumstances. If a student
has stopped attending the class without consultation with the
instructor and filing an official drop form, a WU will appear as the
grade for the course. However, if the student is failing the course
at the time of the unauthorized withdrawal, the instructor is free to
record an F grade.
Assignments Students are required to complete all assignments
and examinations on time. In the case of schedule conflict or an
unavoidable delay in completing an assignment, the student should
discuss the problem with his or her instructor. Failure to complete
assignments on time may result in an F grade for the course.
Attendance Students are expected to attend all classes. No more
than the equivalent of one week of unexcused absences will
be permitted. In the event of absence a student should contact
the instructor in advance. Students who miss more than the
equivalent of one week of classes in any one course may receive a
reduction of the final grade or, at the discretion of the instructor,
may be required to withdraw from the course.
Lateness Students are expected to be punctual. Late students
may be refused entry to a class. Chronic, unexcused lateness may
result in a reduction of the final grade or in failure.
Academic Integrity The Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
expects all students to demonstrate the highest levels of academic
integrity. Violations of academic integrity have consequences,
including, but not limited to, failure for the course. Further information concerning the policy on academic integrity is available
from the dean’s office.
Student Behavior Students are expected to conduct themselves
in accordance with the guidelines in “A Code of Fair Practice” (see
page 21).
ACADEMIC ADVISING AND SUPPORT
Academic Advising In addition to the dean, an academic adviser
is available in the office of Humanities and Social Sciences for
consultation by students in all three schools. Students are also
encouraged to seek the advice of individual faculty members
about general curricular and scholarly matters. A course instructor
may not sign add/drop forms, determine transfer or AP credits, or
pre-approve courses to be taken elsewhere. Such questions must
be referred to the dean’s office.
The Center for Writing
The communication of ideas in written and oral form is central to an
education in the liberal arts. All humanities, social sciences and art
history courses include a substantial writing requirement and additional requirements for presentations. The Center for Writing offers
feedback, support, and instruction in all areas of written and spoken
communication. The Center is staffed by experienced teachers,
writers and editors, most with advanced graduate degrees. The
Center offers one-on-one and small group sessions; students may
sign up for single appointments as needed or may enroll for regularly
scheduled ongoing sessions. Center associates provide feedback,
work with students on issues of structure and argument and help all
writers—regardless of level—to engage with their work more effectively. The Center also offers special support for non-native English
speakers, students with learning difficulties, and students without a
strong background in writing, as well as intensive support for
students working on Fulbright and other grants.
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
COURSES
Courses in the Humanities,
Social Sciences, Art History
and Foreign Languages
Prior to registration each semester,
students should consult the latest
announcement of scheduled courses
in the humanities, social sciences,
and art history. (Inquiries concerning
courses in foreign languages should
be directed to Professor Sohnya
Sayres, Academic Adviser for HSS,
during the first week of the fall
semester.) Some courses listed below
may not be offered every year and
new courses may be added each
semester.
Core Curriculum
HSSI Freshman Seminar
A literature course concentrating on
poetry and drama. Selected texts from
antiquity and the Renaissance are
common to all sections, with works
from other genres, periods and cultures
chosen by individual instructors. The
course develops aesthetic appreciation
of literary texts and encourages a
range of critical responses. Through
close reading and extended discussion
students learn to articulate their
responses in written and spoken form.
3 credits
HSS 2 Texts and Contexts:
Old Worlds and New
A study of texts and topics from 1500
to 1800, with emphasis on literary
expression and cultural context. Topics
include the formation of states,
exploration, the encounter with the New
World, the crises in religious orthodoxy,
the origins of modern science and the
beginnings of political and economic
individualism. This semester develops
both cultural and political understanding
through close reading, class discussion
and careful writing.
3 credits
HSS 3 The Making of
Modern Society
A study of the key political, social
and intellectual developments of
modern Europe in global context. This
course is organized chronologically,
beginning with the Industrial and
French Revolutions. Students develop
an understanding of the political
grammar and material bases of the
present day by exploring the social
origins of conservatism, liberalism,
feminism, imperialism and
totalitarianism. In discussions and in
lectures students learn to study and to
respond critically in written and spoken
form to a variety of historical
documents and secondary texts.
3 credits
HSS 4 The Modern Context:
Figures and Topics
A study of an important figure or topic
from the modern period whose
influence extends into contemporary
culture. The figures and subjects are
chosen from a broad range of
disciplines (including literature, history,
politics, technology and art history,
among others). Through concentration
on a single figure or focused topic
students are encouraged to develop a
deep awareness of works of great
significance and to understand them in
the context of modernity. Guided
independent writing projects and oral
presentations give students
an appreciation for what constitutes
research in the humanities and
social sciences.
3 credits
May be repeated for Free Elective
credit in the Schools of Art and
Engineering. May be repeated for
Elective credit in the School of
Architecture, provided the minimum
requirement of six elective credits
in Humanities and Social Sciences is
fulfilled by elective-level courses.
In both cases, permission of the Dean
of Humanities and Social Sciences
is required.
Note: The Center for Writing provides
targeted support for HSS Core courses.
Associates are available to work on all
aspects of essay writing, including
close reading, analysis, development
of ideas, planning and structure,
writing in stages, arguments and
conclusions, and revision. Associates
are also available to help students
prepare for presentations and public
speaking in the HSS Core. Center
associates can help you to organize
your thinking, to challenge yourself and
to create better, more engaged, more
interesting work through focused
discussion and targeted writing work.
Students from all writing backgrounds
are encouraged to make use of the
Center.Students may make one-time
appointments or may choose to enroll
in ongoing sessions for a particular
semester. Sessions tend to fill up
quickly, and students are encouraged
to make appointments in advance.
Students working on specific written
or spoken communication issues (ESL,
learning differences, writing skills
difficulties) are strongly encouraged
to enroll in ongoing sessions early
in the semester.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Elective Courses
Humanities
The Faculty of Humanities and Social
Sciences offers a varied and flexible
elective program that provides rigorous
study while responding to the changing
needs of students.
HUM105 Fundamentals of Music
A study of the elements and forms of
music and consideration of how they
define the stylistic characteristics of
the literature of music from the late
Renaissance to the present. There will
be extensive use of recordings, as well
as attendance at concerts and recitals.
3 credits
HUM107 Creative Writing
Starting with exercises and word
games, then moving to, e.g., the
objective poem, collage and concrete
poetry, metrics, translations. As well as
writing, students are expected to read
widely in poetry and fiction. Attendance
at a poetry or prose reading is
obligatory. Grade based on class
performance and portfolio of work.
3 credits
HUM129 Environmental Literature
In this class, we will look at ways of
imagining and approaching the natural
environment through writing, ranging
from travelogue to activism. Readings
will include essays, poetry and fiction
by Wordsworth, Thoreau, Carson,
Abbey and others. Topics for reading
and writing will center on such
issues as encounters with nature,
sustainability, species extinction and
global warming.
3 credits
HUM207 Music Cultures of
the World
Examines music from a variety of
musical cultures around the world,
from Native American to Indonesian
Gamelan music, including ethnic
musical events in New York City.
3 credits
HUM208 Aristophanes
Athenian Old Comedy is one of the
timelessly funniest and widest-ranging
forms of comedy every produced. In
this course we will read, perform
(selections), and examine four plays by
Aristophanes, the greatest of ancient
comic playwrights: Frogs, Clouds,
Birds, and Wasps, each named for the
characters assumed by its masked
chorus. Aristophanes’ irreverent
portrait of the philosopher Socrates in
Clouds will be weighed against Plato’s
more flattering, and ultimately more
influential version in the Apology,
which we will also read. Slides will be
shown to recreate the stunning visual
environment of Periclean Athens which
literally and figuratively formed the
backdrop to the original performances
of the plays. This broadly based course
will encompass a little military and
political history, a little art history, a
little social history, a little literary
criticism, and a lot of fun.
3 credits
HUM306 Native America
An examination of Native American
world views against a background of
history. The stress will be on written
literary texts drawn from oral cultures,
including collections of traditional
songs and stories, as well as
contemporary writers. In addition, we
will watch videos and listen to music.
3 credits
HUM307 Playwriting and
Theater Practicum
This course will introduce students to
two disciplines essential to creating
theater: acting and playwriting. To help
guide the beginning of their practice in
these disciplines, students will read
and critique contemporary and master
works, write plays of their own,
perform monologues and scenes
written by master playwrights and
bring the work of their peers alive
through in-class readings and a final
staged reading performance open to
the Cooper Union community.
3 credits
HUM311 New Media
This course considers what makes
media “new” and why those
characteristics are relevant in
contemporary society. We will consider
how older media have been adapted
to incorporate new media technologies
and strategies, how video games and
the Internet have changed our
expectations of media experiences,
the impact of new media on artistic
practice, the important of new media
in contemporary cultural economy, and
related topics.
3 credits
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HUM312 Islamic Aesthetics
This course is an introduction to
Islamic aesthetics with emphasis on
the nature and development of the
arabesque and calligraphy as ornament
in art and architecture. Lectures will
ask and attempt to answer the
question of why a pragmatic and
down-to-earth philosophy chose to
express itself in a most abstract visual
language, how much of the vocabulary
of that language was originally Arabic,
and how much was inspired and/or
acquired from the various lands
conquered by Islam. Digital image
lectures will be accompanied by some
poetry, music, Qur’anic recitations and
film viewings.
3 credits
HUM316 United States
Cultural History
This course traces the development
over time of “America” as place, idea,
nation and culture. It is concerned with
tracing the emergence and contours of
a widely-shared, if indeterminate and
contested, sense of American identity
and culture by studying several
enduring forces and themes in its
formation. These include the
encounters of Europeans and Indians,
the institution of slavery, the West in
myth and reality, modernization and
metropolitan life and the United States
in global culture.
3 credits
HUM319 Russian Art, Architecture
and Literature
Survey of Russian arts from 1703, the
founding of St. Petersburg, to 1924, the
death of Lenin. This course is a study
of the history and ideology underlying
the remarkable literary and artistic
achievement of Russia and, in its early
phase, the Soviet Union.
3 credits
HUM321 The Novel
This course concerns itself with
particular trends, moments, issues or
movements in the history of the novel
as a literary form. Because of the
nature and length of the material, any
version of this course must be focused
on a particular set of issues, literaryhistorical phenomena or cultural
concerns. The course will typically take
as its subject four to six works that
illuminate or ask interesting questions
about the topic at hand. Recent topics:
Joyce’s Ulysses; New York City
literature.
3 credits
HUM323 Presence of Poetry
This will be a class in which the center
of attention is the poem itself. We will
concentrate on modern English and
American poetry. The common text will
be The Norton Anthology of Modern
Poetry, 2nd edition, edited by Richard
Ellman and Robert O’Clair (Norton,
1998), but students are encouraged to
look into other anthologies and into
such studies as those of William
Empson in Seven Types of Ambiguity
and Martin Heidegger in Poetry,
Language, Thought.
3 credits
HUM327 The History of the Cinema
A history of the motion picture from its
origins until now, emphasizing the
evolution of the language of cinematic
representation—in feature,
documentary, animated and
experimental filmmaking. Canonical
works and the major figures of the
silent and sound cinema are treated,
including Griffith, Chaplin, Eisenstein,
Vertov, Renoir, Welles, Deren,
Hitchcock and Godard.
3 credits
HUM328 History of the Cinema:
1895–1945
This course surveys the history of the
motion picture, along with some of the
discourses it inspired, from the
nickelodeon period through World War
II, considering avant-garde,
documentary and commercial films,
with particular emphasis on the movie
as urban entertainment, expression of
modernity and cult enthusiasm.
Important figures include D.W. Griffith,
Fritz Lang, Dziga Vertov, Carl Th.
Dreyer, Leni Riefenstahl, Orson Welles,
and Maya Deren. The transition from
silent to sound cinema and the
surrealist theory of film spectatorship
will be given particular attention.
3 credits
HUM329 The History of the Cinema:
1945 to the Present
A history of the cinema from World
War II through the present day, with
particular attention to the development
of neo-realist, new wave and thirdworld movements. Topics include the
impact of television, the influence of
Pop Art and the development of digital
technology. Alfred Hitchcock, Jean-Luc
Godard, and Andrei Tarkovsky are
among the major figures treated.
3 credits
HUM331 Eros in Antiquity
This course will study the theory and
practice of love in the ancient world
and its legacy in the modern. Working
with primary textual sources, the
course will consider Plato’s erotic
dialogues and writings from the NeoPlatonic tradition extending up to
Shelley’s poetry as well as Ovid’s
Amores and the Art of Love. These
major texts will be supplemented with
examples of erotic poetry from ancient
Egypt, Mesopotamia, Archaic and
Classical Greece, and Rome, as well as
works of visual art.
3 credits
HUM332 Ut Pictura Poesis
A study of ekphrasis and other
interconnections between the visual
and the verbal arts from antiquity to
the present. Primary readings are
drawn from Homer, Hesiod, Plato,
Aristotle, lyric poetry, tragedy, Virgil,
Horace, Lessing, Keats and Ashbery,
among others.
3 credits
HUM343 Decadence and
Modernity
This course is concerned with major
issues in the transition from 19th to
20th century European culture,
focusing on the interaction of politics
and aesthetics.
3 credits
HUM345 Readings in Aesthetics
Key aesthetic concepts in relation to
artistic practice and audience
reception. This course includes a
number of historical debates that
remain ongoing and unresolved, and it
concludes with contemporary attempts
to reestablish beauty and pleasure as
aesthetic categories.
3 credits
HUM346 Western Theories of Art
This course examines the variety and
development of Western theories
of art from antiquity to the present,
with special attention to theoretical
constructs of the past century. Topics
include connoisseurship and formalism;
modernist criticism; iconology,
Marxism and the social history of art;
feminism; psychoanalytic theory;
structuralism and post-structuralism;
postmodern challenges to modernist
theory; and museology and
institutional critique.
3 credits
HUM352 The Personal Essay
In this course we will study and
discuss essays in Philip Lopate, ed.,
The Art of the Personal Essay, and
we will also write our own, on any
topics we choose, on all manner of
subjects—the daily round, pleasures
and pains, taking a walk, solitude,
friendship, in short, our personal
responses to any number of objects
and situations, multiplying ourselves
in the process.
3 credits
HUM353 Public Speaking:
Contemporary Issues
Develops skills in persuasive and
expository speech-making—
extemporaneous, written and
memorized—on contemporary issues
and topics. Students learn how to
research a speech, marshal arguments
and use language effectively by
speaking clearly and eloquently.
3 credits
HUM356 Issues in
Contemporary Fiction
Study of literary topics including
particular genres, themes, sensibilities
and critical approaches. The focus of
this course will change in individual
semesters.
3 credits
HUM357 Philosophy of Science
What, exactly, is science? What is
scientific inquiry and explanation, and
how might it differ from other forms of
inquiry and explanation? In the course,
we will investigate the nature and
status of scientific knowledge. Along
the way, we shall ask such questions
as: What are scientific theories? What
relations obtain between scientific
theories and observed facts? How are
scientific theories confirmed or
disconfirmed? Do scientific theories
represent the true nature of the world,
or are they merely convenient tools for
making predictions and developing
technology? Is scientific inquiry a
purely rational process? Is it influenced
by social and cultural factors? What
makes science successful?
3 credits.
HUM358 Studies in Cinema
A seminar based on a special topic in
the study of cinema. The seminar may
be repeated for credit with the
permission of the dean of the Faculty
of Humanities and Social Sciences.
3 credits
HUM359 Intention, Action and
Self-Knowledge
Studies the problem of defining the
philosophical nature of action by
investigating the nature of intention
and coherent self-knowledge. The
course seeks to distinguish various
forms of action—involuntary,
intentional, teleological (goaldirected)—by examining relationships
among levels of agency, conditions of
freedom and states of awareness.
3 credits
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
HUM360 Mind and Morals
Examines the philosophical dichotomy
of moral realism and moral naturalism,
with emphasis on three types of new
moral naturalism: normative moral
naturalism, meta-ethical moral
naturalism and cognitive moral
naturalism. Authors include Bratman,
Churchland, Descartes, Flanagan,
Goldman, Hume, Johnson, Kant,
Longino, Mill, Millikan, Moore
and Streba.
3 credits
HUM361 Modern Philosophy:
Knowledge and the Mind
Shows how issues related to
knowledge and mind overlap in the
questions that revolve around
knowledge of language, knowledge
of other minds and self-knowledge.
A principal consideration is the extent
to which cognitive science and
contemporary philosophy can continue
to be held apart from one another.
3 credits
HUM362 Black Literature in a
World Perspective
An examination of black literature from
South America to Papua New Guinea,
chiefly in the 20th century. Stress is
placed on the connections between
various literatures and how they form a
world culture. The course considers
oral literature, the Harlem
Renaissance, Negritude poetry, the
African novel and Indian Ocean poets.
3 credits
HUM369 History of the Book
An introduction to the creation, use
and meaning of “the book” over its
long history from the clay tablet to the
digital download. Readings and
discussions will bring together literary
and cultural history, as well as aspects
of politics, art history and the history
of technology. Topics will include the
moves from oral to written
cultures,from the scroll to the codex,
and from public reading to reading as
a private experience; the emergence
of printers and publishers; the
invention of the library; censorship and
the spread of reading publics; the rise
of the novel and “popular reading”; the
comic book; the paperback; and the
movement through digital technologies
to non-print books.
3 credits
HUM373 Seminar in Humanities
Seminar giving close attention to
special topics in the humanities.
The seminar may be repeated for
credit with the permission of the dean
of the Faculty of Humanities and
Social Sciences.
3 credits
HUM374 Contemporary Culture
and Criticism
A survey of the cultural climate since
the 1950s, including the influence of
works by such writers as Benjamin and
Bakhtin and the concern with
contemporary life in terms of
fundamental shifts in community,
representation, identity and power.
3 credits
HUM375 Critical Theory
This course begins with the post World
War II generation of social thinkers and
critics, such as Barthes, de Beauvoir,
Foucault, Adorno, Horkheimer, Lacan, in
the development of what later became
known of as the critical theory of
culture. We then proceed to more
recent critics, each time taking our clues
from real life examples. This course
emphasizing learning how to “see” and
think in “cultural practices.” It offers
a chance to have our understanding
extended into everyday life and its ways
of making us cultural beings.
3 credits
HUM377 General Linguistics
Survey of two major types of linguistic
study: diachronic or historical
linguistics and synchronic or structural
linguistics. The course concludes with
presentation of recent linguistic theory,
with emphasis on cognitive grammar
and biolinguistics.
3 credits
HUM379 Visual Culture
An historical account of the developing
wealth and intensity of visual experience
in the United States in the last century
and study of the circulation of images as
a cultural sign system shaping class,
gender, race and sexual subjectivities.
3 credits
HUM381 Post-Colonial Studies
This course engages with the legacy of
colonialism in literature and theory.
Topics include the relationship between
colonizer and colonized, independence,
apartheid and immigration in novels
from South Asia, the Caribbean and
Africa. Works by Rudyard Kipling, E.M.
Forster, Aime Cesaire, Salman Rushdie,
Nadine Gordimer, Jhumpa Lahiri and
Zadie Smith will be addressed.
3 credits
HUM382 African-American
Literature
Under this rubric, courses may address
a range of issues, periods, themes
or questions in African-American
literature. Specific topics and
descriptions will be detailed in the
relevant course bulletin each time
the course is offered.
3 credits
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
HUM383 Opera
This course will examine the history,
materials and structures of opera, a
rich and complicated art that is both
musical and theatrical. We will
address such topics as the origins of
opera in 17th-century Italy, the Baroque
style, the art of bel canto, opera and
politics, Wagner’s revolutionary ideas,
realism and impressionism in music,
experiments in tonality, and opera in
English. Several works will be
considered in detail. Classes will
combine lecture-discussion and
screenings of performance on DVDs.
An interest in music is essential, but
no ability to read scores or play an
instrument is required.
3 credits
HUM386 The Romantic Movement
Beginning with an examination of
Romantic aesthetic theory and its
application to some of the major
poems of the period, the course will
explore writing by Goethe, Blake,
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley
and Keats. Philosophical and critical
readings will be drawn from Kant,
Lessing, Burke, DeQuincey,
Wollstonecraft and others.
3 credits
HUM387 The Life and Death
of Socrates
Socrates, the son of a humble
stonemason, Sophroniskos, was one of
the most remarkable, controversial and
influential human beings who ever
lived. Though he left behind no written
testimonial of his peculiar, singular
genius, we know quite a bit about him
through the accounts and recollections
of his contemporaries, critics and
followers, primary among them, Plato,
Xenophon and Aristophanes. Based
almost exclusively on readings of the
major ancient texts, the course focuses
less on the philosophy of Socrates, as
filtered through the great and not
unbiased lens of his most famous
student, Plato, than on the man, his
physical demeanor, his way of life, his
loves, his friendships and especially
his trial and death in 399 B.C.E.
3 credits
HUM389 Love in Western Art
and Literature
This course address the representation
of love in Western art, with specific
attention to the body, gender, and
identity. The course will be grounded
across two crucial poles: the so-called
Greek revolution as a founding moment
in the West, with its idea of Eros and
the ideally beautiful body, and the rise
of the individual in the Renaissance/
Baroque period, with its concepts of
subjectivity, self and vision (including
Shakespeare’s provocative formulation
of “a perjured eye.” Readings
will include Plato’s Symposium, poetry
in the troubadour and Petrarchan
traditions, Ficino and the Neoplatonists,
Shakespeare, Keats, Shelley,
Austen, Foucault, Derrida, Anne Carson
and others.
3 credits
HUM392 Ethics
Did human beings invent ideas of right
and wrong? Are there such things as
moral facts, that is, facts that dictate
how we ought to live and what sorts of
actions are worth pursuing? This
course surveys three central traditions
in ethical theory in the West as typified
by the works of Aristotle, Immanuel
Kant, and J. S. Mill, together with a
radical critique by Friedrich Nietzsche
and ending with selections from 20thcentury philosophy.
3 credits
HUM394 World Religions
An introduction to the five major world
religions: Hinduism, Buddhism,
Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The
course considers ancient and
contemporary religious practices as it
examines faith and belief, ritual,
scripture and scriptural interpretation,
religious art, orthodoxy and heresy,
mysticism, and pilgrimage through a
comparative lens. Focus is on origins,
textual traditions and central doctrines
with further attention to religion “on
the ground” as a living and evolving
phenomenon.
3 credits
HUM430 Postmodernism
and Technology
This course will explore postmodern
theory and practice and its relationship
to the problems and solutions posed by
technology in contemporary society.
3 credits
HUM431 Milton
An in-depth study of Milton’s Paradise
Lost, the greatest epic in English, a
poem about devils and angels, small
humans and immense immortals,
appetite, food, lust, confusion, despair
and courage. Our focus will be on close
reading, often explaining the poem line
by line, in order to get at the riches
within Milton’s creation. In addition to
Paradise Lost in its entirety, we will
study some of Milton’s short poems,
selections from Virgil, and, if time
permits, Milton’s dramatic poem
Samson Agonistes.
3 credits
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HUM442 Greek Mythology
The course will concentrate not just on
the endlessly fascinating stories of the
gods drawn from the classic sources,
but on a critical analysis of the
question: How do the gods fare
throughout the course of western
history? Periods to be focused on
include the time of Homer, Hesiod and
the Homeric Hymns; the Archaic period
(the time of the Lyric poets); the high
Classical period (the golden age of
Greek tragedy); the late Classical and
Hellenistic periods (the age of the
great philosophers and their schools);
the Augustan era of the Roman Empire
(the time of Virgil and Ovid); and
the Renaissance.
3 credits
HUM450 Shakespeare
A course devoted to understanding
how the plays work, what characters
say and do, the imagery and thematics
of Shakespeare’s dramas and the
performance practices of the
Elizabethan and Jacobean era. Also to
be addressed is the cultural milieu of
the plays—the historical, political and
religious world they inhabit—in order
to deepen our access to Shakespeare’s
language and to hear it with both his
ears and our own.
3 credits
HUM99 Independent Study
(Humanities)
3 credits
Social Sciences
SS305 Leonardo, Scientist
and Engineer
This course uses the life and work of
Leonardo da Vinci (1453–1519) to
explore science, medicine, and
engineering in Renaissance Europe.
We will look at the social and
economic life of the era and examine
the institutions and influences that
served Leonardo’s imagination, his
inventiveness, and his arts.
3 credits
SS308 Public Policy in
Contemporary America
Issues such as conservation,
environmental law and policy, mass
transportation, transfer of development
rights, incentive zoning and historic
preservation, beginning with an
introduction to and general analysis
of the policy process.
3 credits
SS318 Seminar in Social Science
Seminar giving close attention to special
topics in the social sciences. Recent
topics have included sustainability and
the economy.The seminar may be
repeated for credit with the permission
of the dean of the Faculty of Humanities
and Social Sciences. Recent topics:
sustainability; total war; human rights,
law, and society; Cooper Union world
forum.
3 credits
SS320 Comparative Politics
Comparing political systems is at least
as old as Aristotle, whose library
contained more than 135 studies of
constitutions of the ancient world. This
course will compare contemporary
political systems and consider some of
the main challenges they face: forging
a common identity and sense of
community; meeting social and
economic needs; and securing civil and
political liberties and human rights.
Recognizing that political societies of
today’s worlds can differ dramatically,
the course will begin by introducing
concepts and approaches that make
it possible to compare systems as
different as those of China and Great
Britain. In addition to the broader
paradigms of system, structure and
function, we will also consider forms
of political culture and socialization,
interest articulation and aggregation,
party systems and policymaking. Several
distinct systems will be studied; these
will be chosen not only for their
geographical, but also for their political
diversity, representing first-world
nations such as the United States,
Britain and France, as well as postcommunist and post-colonial states
such as Russia, China and Nigeria.
3 credits
SS321 The American Presidency
The nature and sources of the power
of the American presidency, the
ways in which it is wielded and the
Constitutional restraints upon
its exercise.
3 credits
SS323 Politics and Collective
Memory
The political uses of collective memory
can range from defining national and
social identities to shaping public
opinion. In exploring the interactions
between memory and politics, this
course will focus on the nature and
forms of collective memory, its
development and reconstruction
and its relationship to structures of
authority. Emphasis will be placed on
examples from recent political history.
3 credits
SS333 Politics of Ethnonational
Conflict
An examination of the movements for
national liberation and independence
that have become an increasingly
important phenomenon in the second
half of the 20th century. Among the
movements considered are those of
Algeria, Nigeria, Cyprus, Bangladesh,
Northern Ireland, Quebec, Lebanon and
the PLO.
3 credits
SS334 Microeconomics
The relationship between economic
theory and public policy, focusing
on the central axioms of modern
economics in the light of recent
problems in energy employment
and inflation.
3 credits
SS335 Science and Technology in
the Long 18th Century (1687–1839)
This course will examine the changing
roles of science and technology in the
West during the 18th and early 19th
centuries. We will use a case-study
approach to consider such topics as
color in theories (light and optics) and
color in practice (painting, dyeing and
glassmaking); geology mineralogy and
the development of ceramic industries
in Europe; the invention, use (and
misuse) of the natural classifications;
and automation and automatons:
Vaucanson’s duck, Jacquard’s loom,
Babbage’s Difference Engine.
3 credits
SS337 American Foreign Policy
In the 20th century, challenges to
Western liberalism came from fascism
and communism, while more recent
challenges have come from terrorist
movements on the one hand and the
European Union on the other. This
course examines American foreign
policy since the collapse of
communism in the context of these
changing challenges.
3 credits
SS342 Anthropology of Ritual
The study of ritual takes us to the heart
of anthropological approaches to
experience, performance, symbolism
and association. Once thought to be
“vestigial” organs of archaic societies,
rituals are now seen as arenas through
which social change may emerge and
are recognized to be present in all
societies. Throughout the course we
will explore varying definitions of ritual
and its universal and particular
aspects, while surveying ethnographic
case studies from around the world.
3 credits
SS345 The Raymond G. Brown
Seminar
A seminar in the social sciences on a
topic central to the interests of the late
Professor Raymond G. Brown. Recent
topics: the credit crisis.
3 credits
SS346 Urban Sociology:
Reading the City
Focuses on the relationship between
the built environment and human
behavior, the design of public, urban
spaces as a reflection of and impetus
for certain types of human interactions
and reactions. Another interest of the
course will be to onsider the notion of
community as it plays out in the
disciplines of sociology and
architecture—how they intersect, and
how they are changing in our
postmodern, post-industrial terrain.
Some of the broad areas of interest
of urban sociologists will also
be considered.
3 credits
SS347 Macroeconomics
The development of modern
macroeconomic theory as it evolves
in response to a succession of
economic problems and crises.
Emphasis on the recent Keynesian/
monetarist debates and the role of
the Federal Reserve Bank.
3 credits
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
SS348 Global Cities
Considers specific and general factors
that contribute to the rise of global
cities—New York, London, Tokyo—
and how such cities impact other
city-types, existing and emerging.
This course examines the forces
underpinning globalization, including
the shift from industrial to
informational economies, the
development of new technologies
and the emergence of new patterns
of immigration, in order to understand
the complexities of global processes
in urban terrains.
3 credits
SS349 American Cities
Examination of the crisis of urban
America seen through the lens of New
York City. Individual topics will include
urban poverty, relocation of
manufacturing and foreign competition,
but students will be encouraged to
examine closely a particular aspect of
New York City’s problems.
3 credits
SS351 History of 20th-Century
Europe
A study of the dramatic ruptures of
Europe’s 20th century, haunted by
imperialism, war and genocide. Topics
include the First World War; modernity
and modernism in interwar culture;
fascism, National Socialism and the
Holocaust; postwar displacements and
migrations; decolonization, the cold
war and the postwar economic miracle;
1968 and 1989 in both East and West;
and the ongoing challenges of
integration and multiculturalism.
3 credits
SS353 American Social History
This course offers an introduction to the
major themes in American Social
History from the Late Colonial Period to
World War Two. Over the last few
decades, social historians have
introduced a broader cast of characters
into the making of American society;
workers, immigrants, minorities and
native Americans are now seen more
as active participants in the story of the
United States rather than as passive
victims or marginal figures. This course
examines the changing role of such
significant groups and considers how
they may have changed the shape of
the dominant political culture.
3 credits
SS354 New York, 1820–1920:
An Urban and Cultural History
A presentation of two “maps” to the
city. The first is a history of the built
environment, focusing on the changing
systems of transportation, the
development of building forms and the
way the city’s population and functions
have been distributed in that space.
The second historical map is made
up from people’s imaginative responses
to those changes, especially as seen
in literature and visual iconography.
Among the areas singled out for
special examination are the Bowery
and the Lower East Side, Central Park
and the “downtown” of amusement
and vice, wherever it happened to
be at the time.
3 credits
SS358 Social History of Food
A study of the transformations in food
production and consumption, 1492
to the present. The course examines
the passage of “new world” foods into
Europe and Asia, the rise of commercial
agriculture in the colonies, especially
sugar, the rise of national cuisines, the
advent of restaurant culture and the
perils of fast and industrial food.
3 credits
SS360 American Intellectual
History
A study of major works in intellectual
and literary history written from 1780
to the present, focusing on changing
notions of the self, character and
community and the ways these
concepts have gained intellectual and
literary expression in the United States.
3 credits
SS361 Urban Archaeology
An introduction to the new field of
urban archaeology. Topics include how
archaeologists work in cities; the
special problems and rewards of urban
archaeology; and what can be learned
about the development of particular
cities through this field of study,
including changes in subsistence
patterns, the use of urban space and
the definition of ethnicity and gender.
3 credits
SS362 Popular Culture
This course studies popular culture in
a primarily 20th-century context. Using
both creative and theoretical texts, it
considers developments in contemporary
popular culture including the rise of
mass media and consumerism, the
elaboration of pop-cultural theory and
the trend toward multiculturalism. We
will sharpen our critical perspective on
our cultural surroundings by questioning
boundaries between the popular and
other cultural categories, notions of
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
creativity in the high and popular arts
and the bases of our own preferences.
3 credits
SS367 Acting Globally
This course introduces students to the
developments sometimes called the
post-postmodern era of globalization,
with a particular focus on the study of
cultural impact. Our approach will
entail both the macro level discussion
of conditions and possibilities for
effecting a decent global future and
the micro level of actual sites of
responses to (1) technology transfer;
(2) cultural preservation, resistance,
odernization and integration; and
(3) the new dialogues around
ecological sustainability. We study
analytical texts, autobiographies, films
and proposals on how to humanize the
New World Order.
3 credits
SS368 History of Modern Asia
This course explores the history of Asia
from the later imperial eras of China,
Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia into
the modern era. A wide range of
political, social, economic and cultural
issues are explored. While
emphasizing the distinctive nature of
the region, the course will stress the
wide diversity and inter-connectedness
of ideas, technologies and religions
through the region.
3 credits
SS369 Psychoanalytic Theory
An introduction to forms of
psychoanalytic thinking and theory
making, with special attention paid to
the ways in which different theorists
conceptualize and invoke psychoanalysis
as a theory of mind, research tool,
therapeutic process and utopian vision.
Readings include foundational texts by
Freud, Ferenczi and Klein, as well as
responses to classical theory by
Horney, Winnicott, Lacan and others.
3 credits
SS371 Women and Men:
Power and Politics
An introduction to women’s and gender
studies, and to feminist theory.
Students will examine the ways and
the historical basis for construction of
gender and the interlocking of gender
with other forms of hierarchy, including
race, ethnicity, class and sexuality.
Readings include classic texts and
current scholarship in literature, film,
history and social science.
3 credits
SS372 Global Issues
This course will examine current issues
of global significance and their
implications for policy and decisionmaking. Among the trends we will
consider are the tensions between
resource competition and authority; the
emergence of a global economy; the
environment and sustainable
development; demographic change;
and the emergence of new security
issues, including societal and
environmental stress.
3 credits
SS373 Modernity and Modernism:
Culture and Society in the
Weimar Republic
This course explores the turbulent and
innovative interwar years 1918-1933 in
Weimar Germany, paying particular
attention to cultural and social politics.
We will study the difficult
establishment of the “republic that
nobody wanted” in the wake of a lost
war, a collapsed empire and a failed
revolution; the chaotic period of
rebellion and inflation until 1923; the
brief “Golden Twenties” of relative
stabilization and Neue Sachlichkeit
(New Sobriety) with its burst of social
welfare initiatives, architectural and
engineering innovations and
efflorescence of art, music, theater and
literature; and finally the crises of
economic depression and political
polarization that culminated with Adolf
Hitler’s appointment as chancellor of
Germany in January 1933.
3 credits
SS374 Contemporary Social
Psychology
Utilizing a variety of social
psychological perspectives, general
issues such as human nature,
socialization, attitude formation and
change, verbal and non-verbal language,
interpersonal behavior and the art of
persuasion will be explored with interest
in cross-cultural comparisons. The core
questions we will explore include: What
does it mean to be human? How is the
self defined and determined? What
impact do social groups, culture and the
(built) environment have on the
development of the self and on our
everyday behavior?
3 credits
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SS378 Time, Travel and
Communication in
Early Modern Europe
This course is a history of early modern
European technology with a strong
focus on design technologies and
material culture. It will cover the time
period extending approximately from
the Age of Exploration through the
French Revolution (about 15001800).We will examine early modern
ideas about three critical aspects of
modern life: time, communication and
travel. (Interpretation of these themes
will be broad and may include not only
carriages and bridges but also carriage
upholstery and passports; not only
letters, newspapers and books but also
songs and emblems; not only the shift
from public to personal time but also
calendar reform.) In addition to
readings (both primary and secondary)
and discussions (in-class and online),
students will choose to study three
artifacts that are relevant to the
themes of time, communication and
travel, research them and present their
findings to the class.
3 credits
SS381 Developmental Psychology
The course will follow the unfolding of
human development from conception
through adolescence by means of an
array of analytic perspectives. We will
examine and critique cognitive,
psychoanalytic, information processing,
and psychosocial models of
brain/body/mind growth. Reading
assignments will be from a textbook on
child development as well as primary
sources, which will include academic
writing, memoir, and fiction. We will
also view educational and fictional
films, and may also include family
video chronicles.
3 credits
SS382 Game Theory
Since its introduction in 1943 by John
von Neumann and Oskar Morgenstern,
the general theory of games has been
instrumental to our understanding of
various social behaviors. With key
contributions of such renowned
scholars as John Nash, Robert Arrow,
Thomas Schelling and John Harsanyi,
among other Nobel Laureates, game
theory has quickly gained a large
following among students of
economics, evolutionary biology and
even political science. Though at times
seemingly abstract, game theory has
shown us that it has practical value
with applications in firm-level
management and strategic decisions
making in military campaigns. The
course has two dimensions: the first is
to explore the theoretical basis of
games; the second is to consider the
application of these concepts in
economics and political science.
3 credits
SS384 Anthropology and the Other
This course provides an introduction to
concepts in social-cultural anthropology.
Students will rethink such concepts as
culture, race, ethnicity, nationalism,
transnationalism, gentrification, power
and memory. We will use these
concepts to address the questions
of human universals and the origins
of cultural differences. At the bases
of these inquiries will be the question
of the “Other.” Who are the “Others”
in culture or society?
3 credits
SS385 Science and Technology
in the Modern World (1815 to
the Present)
This course will explore the social
intellectual and economic relationships
of science and technology in the
modern West (i.e., after 1815). Using
modified case studies to provide
“snapshots,” students will learn to
recognize changes to such factors as
who participates, where work is
conducted and the supports (social,
financial, emotional) necessary to
individual and collective pursuits.
3 credits
SS386 The Early Modern
Atlantic World
This course examines the history of the
Atlantic world from the mid-fifteenth
century through the end of the
eighteenth century. Incorporating the
histories of Europe, North America,
South America, and Africa, the course
will explore social, cultural, economic,
and political developments of the early
modern era as men and women came
together to form the societies in the
Americas. Topics will include EuropeanAmerindian relations, European-African
relations, the slave trade, gender
structures, the development of an
Atlantic economy, and the maturation
of colonial societies.
3 credits
SS387 The History of
the Family in America
This course explores the changing
construction and function of the family
across American history. We will
examine how women and men, sons
and daughters, experienced revolution,
war, economic transformation, politics,
sexuality, and religion. We will
consider how the purposes and
experience of family life have changed
over time, as well as how the
ideologies or ideals about family
pressed against the grinding wheel of
history to shape events. Our historical
actors will include Native Americans,
European colonists, rebels and
republicans, masters and slaves,
freedmen and immigrants, free-love
communities, patriarchal polygamists,
Victorian lovers, Cold War housewives,
Baby Boomers, and our own
contemporaries.
3 credits
SS388 Comparative Cities: New
York/Berlin, 1848-1948
A comparative, team-taught urban
history seminar on Berlin and New York
from 1848 to 1948. The course
examines the differing causes of urban
growth and the way it was
accommodated in novel forms of urban
space, highlighting the differences
between a city that became a capital
of empire and one given over to
commercial and residential
development, as well as the very
different ways that both cities
experienced periods of rebellion and
war.
3 credits
SS390 The Rise of the Modern City
in the European Middle Ages
Explores how early medieval
landscapes with castles and small
villages became wider communities—
the first modern cities. Focuses on the
major debates of the Middle Ages: the
tensions between country and city life;
the role of the church; Scholasticism;
the debate between reason and faith;
the role of the French cathedral in
medieval life; the lay reaction to
ecclesiastical control and the rise of
communal Italian cities such as
Florence, Venice and Siena centered
around the civic palace; and the early
requirements for city beautification. We
will “visit” (virtually) the first hospital,
universities and prototypical housing.
Everyday life will be illustrated from the
material remains of art and architecture
through a cross section of different
social environments.
3 credits
SS391 Introduction to Mind
and Brain
The goal of this is to introduce the
student to the basic principles
of psychology, to guide the student
through the brain and to provide a
basic understanding of the relationship
between the brain and mind
addressing issues of consciousness.
The first third of the course will
examine the brain and underlying
theories in psychology. The majority
of the course will be focused on the
relationship between the brain and
consciousness including selfawareness, theory of mind, deception,
abstract reasoning, art, music, spatial
abilities and language. Steeped in
recent findings in both psychology and
neuroscience, the goal of this class will
be to provide a modern foundation in
the mind and the brain.
3 credits
SS393 Darwin and His Times
This course uses the life of Charles
Darwin (1809-1882) to examine the
nature of scientific practices during the
nineteenth century and their changing,
often revolutionary, role in contemporary
life. We will read closely Darwin’s
writings on geology and evolutionary
biology, and we will consider
interpretations and implications of
“Darwinism.” Both readings and films
will be assigned,
3 credits
SS394 American Radicalism
This course will examine cultural
radicalism in American thought from
the Young Americans of the 1910s and
the New York Intellectuals of the 1930s
to the Beat poets of the1950s and the
Neo-Conservatives of the 1970s.
Through figures such as Randolph
Bourne, John Dewey, Meyer Schapiro,
Lewis Mumford, C. Wright Mills and
Dorothy Day, we will trace the rise and
fall of the American avant-garde, the
quest for an indigenous theory of
culture, the social sources of
counterculture, and the shifting
meanings of the concepts “mass
culture,” “consumer culture,” “kitsch,”
and highbrow/middlebrow/lowbrow.
Among the questions we will address
are: Can one be a political radical and
a cultural conservative? A political
conservative and a cultural radical?
3 credits
SS395 Rome
The course focuses on how the city
of Rome changes through time and
the way its idea of eternity reflects
on its culture and urban changes.
Monumental Imperial Rome will be
compared to the recent results from
excavations and research of the poorly
preserved archaic and Medieval Rome.
Fifteenth-century Rome, with its
powerful popes, initiated a radical
urban transformation by attracting the
best architects and artists for the next
300 years. With the monarchy of the
end of the 19th century and then
Mussolini, the city undergoes radical
changes once again.
3 credits
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
SS396 North American
Environmental History
This course examines recent historical
work that makes claims for the
“environment” being the major
determinant in the development of the
North American continent. We will
look at land use in pre-colonial times,
the spread of slave-based extensive
agriculture in the South, wood lot
management in the north, mid-western
farming, western mining, the
parameters of nineteenth century
urban growth as well as the
consequences of the arrival of the
automobile. We will also look at the
growth of the environmental movement
over the last two centuries.
3 credits
SS397 History of Industrial Design
In tracing the history of industrial
design from its emergence at the
beginning of the Industrial Revolution
to the present, this will course will not
only examine aesthetics (of furniture
and the decorative arts, typography,
advertising, machinery, toys, etc.) but
also the social and political forces that
have shaped the many styles.
Throughout, we will also demonstrate
how movements in industrial design
relate to parallel developments in the
history of painting, sculpture and
architecture.
3 credits
SS398 Gender Studies
Study of the “first wave” of feminism,
including Mary Wollstonecraft and
Abigail Adams, through the
achievement of suffrage in 1920 and
then study of the more radical claims
of “second wave” feminists in the
1970s, with Marxist and Freudian
analysis. This course will conclude
with contemporary post-feminisms”
and changing gender relationships.
3 credits
SS420 Environmentalism
in the Urban Context
The recent work of environmental
activists and scholars has produced a
new urbanism in which the city form
and function is intimately connected
with natural processes. This rethinking
of the city has opened several new
possibilities for looking at humanenvironment interactions. In particular,
the everyday environment of the city
may be examined as a site for
identifying the hidden geographies
of raw materials, energy and waste
flows. This course looks at three
central issues: (1) identification of the
material and ecological processes that
make possible city form and function
possible; (2) interpretation of the city
as a constellation of economic
institutions and social practices that
transform nature over different
temporal and spatial scales; and (3) the
examination of the environmental and
health impacts stemming from a city’s
role in production and consumption.
Students will work on projects using
the principles of ecological design in
the redevelopment of urban sites.
3 credits
SS421 History of the Modern
Middle East
This course considers topics in Middle
Eastern history from the First World
War to the present. We examine a
century of political unrest that included
two world wars, colonialism, the ArabIsraeli conflict, the rise of authoritarian
state structures, the Iranian Islamic
revolution, and the American war on
terror.
3 credits
SS99 Independent Study
(Social Sciences)
3 credits
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
History and
Theory of Art
While contributing to the required
curriculum of students enrolled in the
School of Art, courses in the History
of Art are also available to students
in the other schools.
All HTA courses are normally offered
for two credits. In exceptional
circumstances, students may petition
to take an HTA course for an
additional credit. The student must get
permission from both the instructor
and the dean of Humanities and
Social Sciences.
Core Curriculum
HTA 1 Art History I: Origins to
the Middle Ages
Study of artifacts, architecture and
visual culture of ancient civilizations and
their continuing significance. Topics
include prehistory, ancient Near East,
Egypt, Greece, Rome, India, China,
pre-Columbian Americas, Islam, the
Byzantine Empire and medieval Europe,
with special attention given to
crosscultural relationships and affinities.
2 credits
HTA 2 Art History II:
Renaissance to Revolution
Study of painting, sculpture and
architecture produced from the 14th
through the mid-19th centuries. Topics
include Renaissance, Mannerism,
Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism and
Romanticism, with emphasis on the
artist as creative genius and on the
political and ideological climates in
which works were commissioned,
conceived and made.
2 credits
HTA 3 Art History III:
Modern to Contemporary
Study of modern art through a survey
of major movements from the mid-19th
century on. Topics include Realism,
Impressionism, Post-impressionism,
Expressionism, Cubism, Suprematism
and Constructivism, Dada and
Surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop
art, minimalism, conceptualism and
recent trends. With assigned readings
and museum visits, the course leads
students to engage critically with
issues of modernism and modernity.
2 credits
HTA 101, 102 Modern to
Contemporary: An Introduction to
Art History
This two-semester art history core
course, developed as part of the
Foundation year for students in the
School of Art but open to all students,
is organized around a set of themes
running through the history of
modernity from the 18th century to the
present. Within specific themes,
significant works, figures and
movements in art/design will be
presented chronologically. Students
will be able to identify and critically
evaluate significant works, figures and
movements in art/design in the modern
period; be able to describe the main
social and political contexts for the
changes in art/design over the last two
hundred years; and engage, in writing
and class discussion, with theoretical
perspectives on art/design production.
The course will involve museum visits.
Grading will be based on class
participation, papers, and exams.
2 credits each semester
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Electives
HTA 209 Medieval Art
and Architecture
Investigates the art, architecture and
archaeology of medieval Europe from
Constantine (fourth century) to
approximately 1450, a period when
different cultures clashed and mixed
together to shape the eclectic Western
medieval world that rose from Roman
imperial ruins and ideals. This course
will follow a chronological sequence,
but use recent data from medieval
excavations to challenge traditional art
historical statements. Early Christian,
Byzantine, Barbarian, Islamic,
Romanesque and Gothic periods are
examined.
2 credits
HTA 210 The Art and Culture
of Fifteenth-Century Florence
This course examines the unique
historical circumstances and artistic
personalities that brought about a new
kind of art. Special focus will be placed
on the role of the Medici family as
patrons. Painters, sculptors and
architects to be considered include
Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Ghirlandaio,
Botticelli, Ghiberti, Donatello, the
Pollaiuolo brothers, Brunelleschi and
Alberti. Monuments such as
Orsanmichele, the Baptistry, the
Cathedral and the Medici Palace will
be placed in their social context and
discussed in detail.
2 credits.
HTA 220 Japanese Art
A chronological survey of Japanese art
from prehistoric times to the 17th
century, examining the interaction of
the uniquely Japanese aesthetic
sensibility with arts and cultural
traditions transmitted from the Asian
mainland. Although the primary
emphasis is on painting and sculpture,
attention is also paid to architecture,
gardens, pottery, lacquerware and
woodblock prints. Museum visits are
an integral part of the course.
2 credits
HTA 221 Buddhist Art in Asia
An examination of Buddhist art in
India, Afghanistan, Nepal, Tibet,
Central Asia, Sri Lanka, Southeast
Asia, China, Japan and Korea in the
most characteristic styles, in order to
show how each culture received and
interpreted the Buddhist Doctrines and
way of life.
2 credits
HTA 222 Asian Painting
A chronological survey of Chinese and
Japanese painting and an exploration
of the aesthetic and spiritual values
that shaped the arts of the brush in the
Far East.
2 credits
HTA231 History of Industrial Design
In tracing the history of industrial
design from its emergence at the
beginning of the Industrial Revolution
to the present, this course will examine
not only aesthetics (of furniture and the
decorative arts, typography,
advertising, machinery, toys, etc.) but
also the social and political forces that
have shaped the many styles.
Throughout, we will also demonstrate
how movements in industrial design
relate to parallel developments in the
history of painting, sculpture, and
architecture.
2 credits
HTA233 History of Drawing
Examines the changing character and
purpose of drawings, from prehistory
and antiquity through the Italian
Renaissance, Northern Europe,
impressionism, Van Gogh, Cezanne,
Picasso, and others from the modern
and post-modern periods. Even in the
wake of painting, are we beyond
drawing, or does it assume greater
importance as the sine qua non of
visual thought? Topics to be discussed
will include formal accounts,
connoisseurship, technology, figuration
and abstraction, and actual practice at
a place like Cooper Union today.
2 credits
HTA 240 Issues in
Asian Contemporary Art
In this course, students will build a
foundation in critical theory revolving
around issues of race, nationality,
sexuality and gender as they relate to
the formation of an artist’s identity, and
how that identity in turn is reflected in
the artist’s output. Attention will be
paid to Asian contemporary artists
working outside of their own cultures
and to Asian-American artists, in an
attempt to analyze the role of the
Asian diaspora and its connection to
contemporary art production in Asia
proper. Special focus will be paid to
the contemporary art of India,
China, Korea and Japan, although
other nations and regions will also
be discussed.
2 credits
HTA 261 Special Topics in
Nineteenth-Century Art
Recent topics have included Charles
Darwin’s writings, the “Darwin effect,”
and the relationship between
evolutionary theory and modern art,
and the history of the bather in
European art, with particular attention
to the work of Courbet, Manet,
Daumier, Cézanne and Seurat.
2 credits
HTA 277 Contemporary Art
Survey of the development of
contemporary art after Minimalism and
Pop Art of the 1960s. Chronological
treatment includes canonical texts of
critical theory and issues such as
genre, multiculturism and site
specificity crucial to the current
practice of art. Recent topics: German
painting.
2 credits
HTA 263 African Art
An introduction to the stylistic,
conceptual, functional and historical
aspects of sub-Saharan African
sculpture and architecture, the place of
these arts in the traditional context of
black African life and their relationship
to the worldview of the African.
2 credits
HTA 282 Public Sculpture in
New York City
This course will examine trends that
have informed the history of public
sculpture in New York City, including
commemoration of historical events,
artistic and civic education for the
masses, natural history in the service
of the nation, and the cult of great men
and women. We will also examine
individual monuments such as
Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s Farragut
Monument (1880), Frédéric-Auguste
Bartholdi’s Statue of Liberty (1886), the
sculptural programs of Central Park,
Prospect Park, and Green-Wood
Cemetery, the decorations of
Rockefeller Center (including Paul
Manship’s 1934 Prometheus and Lee
Lawrie’s 1937 Atlas), Isamu Noguchi’s
News (1940) and the sculpture garden
he created at his Long Island City
studio, and Richard Serra’s Tilted
Arc (1978). Emphasis will be placed
on reading works or art as primary
texts; viewing sculpture, in local
museums or in situ, will be a key
component of the course.
2 credits
HTA 264 Black Artists
of the Americas
Studies the influence of African art and
culture on black painters and sculptors
in North and South America. Symbols,
myths, religious rituals and deities will
be explicated in terms of the
correspondence they develop between
distant antiquity and the present,
allowing, in some cases, for new
creative possibilities.
2 credits
HTA 273 Topics in the History
of Photography
Writing by the critics, historians and
photographers that have influenced
creation and reception of photography
throughout its history. Issues include
definitions and redefinitions of art,
documentary debates and revisionist
canons and histories.
2 credits
HTA 274 History of Photography
(1839–1965)
A survey of the great artists and their
work throughout the history of
photography with emphasis on the
images that were made. The
importance of key images is discussed.
This historical period was one of
constant technical innovation and the
class studies the effect this had on the
work of the individual photographers.
2 credits
HTA 275, 276 Twentieth-Century
Art History
Considers the flourishing “isms” of the
20th century, as well as historical
events, intellectual currents and
conflicting aesthetic views, explored in
relation to such enduring artists as
Picasso, Matisse, Malevich, Kandinsky,
Miro, Klee, Dubuffet, Giacometti,
Pollock, Smith, Calder and others.
2 credits each semester
HTA 283 The “Genius” of
the Baroque
This course examines the genius of
European Baroque art as distilled in the
work of its greatest exemplars. We will
also address the ideology of the
counter-reformation church, the
emergence of Protestant capitalism
and a pluralist, bourgeois society in the
north, patronage and social identity,
propaganda, religious faith, skepticism,
sexual identity and the family, all
focused through the position of the
artist in society. In no other period
were body and spirit, sensual and
sublime, so closely intermeshed. Art
history resides precisely in the relation
between our present interest in these
artists and the past conditions in which
they worked.
2 credits
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
HTA285: Single-Work Seminar
A seminar devoted entirely to a single
monument or work of art that had a
particularly profound and wide
resonance in the socio-political,
economic, and cultural milieu in which
it was created and whose range of
influence extended well beyond its
historical time frame. The focused
nature of the course material allows
for both a breadth and a depth of
analysis to a greater degree than is
possible in other elective art history
courses. Past topics have included
Duccio’s “Maestà.”
2 credits
HTA 296 Synartesis
A recurring seminar with a changing
focus taught by Professor Dore Ashton.
2 credits
HTA 297 History of Printmaking
Explores the history of printmaking and
its various processes from the 15th
century to the present with an eye to
the unique contribution of this graphic
art to the history of visual language in
both popular and fine art. While major
printmakers (e.g., Durer, Rembrandt,
Daumier, the Nabis, the German
Expressionists, Jasper Johns) will be
addressed, attention will also be given
to the practical and popular use of
prints through the centuries.
2 credits
HTA 298 History of Graphic Design
A study of the history of graphic
design work arising out of the
important cultural, political and social
configurations in Europe, Asia and
the United States from the time of the
industrial revolution to the present
day. Points of reference include
posters, publications and promotional
pieces being drawn from an
unusual collection.
2 credits
HTA 313 Seminar in Art History
A seminar based on a special topic
in the study of art history. The seminar
may be repeated for credit with the
permission of the dean of the Faculty
of Humanities and Social Sciences.
Recent topics: Picasso.
2 credits
HTA 315 Mysteries of Northern
Renaissance Art
This course examines some of the most
hauntingly beautiful and enigmatic
works in the history of art, from a
period of deep religiosity and
aristocratic ideals, emerging contrary
middle-class values and exceptional
artistic ambition and selfconsciousness. We will begin with a
solution for the still unsolved riddle of
the Ghent Altarpiece and the birth of
modern painting in the north, move
through debates about disguised
symbolism and new conceptions of the
artwork in Robert Campin and Rogier
van der Weyden, the crisis of
modernity in Hieronymus Bosch and
the emergence of a new (sublime)
order in the art of Pieter Bruegel,
among others.
2 credits
HTA 317 Art and Architecture
of Ancient Peru
Introduction to the ancient cultures of
Peru from about 3000 B.C.E. to the
Spanish conquest, as seen in
architecture, stone sculpture, ceramics,
metalwork and textiles.
2 credits
HTA 318 Pre-Columbian Art and
Architecture in Mesoamerica
A survey of the arts and architecture of
the pre-Columbian civilizations of
Mexico and Central America from the
earliest times through the Spanish
conquest. Visits to museums and
private collections are an integral part
of the course.
2 credits
HTA 323, 333 Islamic Art
and Architecture
A chronological study of Islamic art and
architecture, including an introduction
to Islamic aesthetics, history and
philosophy. The course will examine
samples from religious and literary
texts, architectural monuments,
painting, ceramics, metal works and
calligraphy from Spain, North Africa,
the Levant, Iraq, Central Asia and India.
2 credits each semester
HTA 324 Arts of the Islamic Book
This course looks at the elements that
contributed to the evolution of Islamic
book illustration from the 10th century
to the 17th century, such as materials,
styles, patronage, administration,
choice of text and the relationship
between text and image, with special
concentration on the Persian book.
2 credits
HTA 327 The New York Art
Collector
This course investigates the history of
art collecting as it unfolded in
Manhattan and the surrounding
boroughs. Beginning in colonial times
with Governor Morris’ acquisition of
18th-century French furniture and
ending in the mid-20th century with the
formation of such public institutions as
the Museum of Modern Art, the
Whitney Museum of American Art and
the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum,
the course will focus on both the men
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
and women instrumental in the
establishment of these collections and
the specific objects they collected.
2 credits
HTA 328 Dada and Surrealism
Since their appearance early in the
20th century, Dada and Surrealism
have had a profound and lasting
influence on the arts. This course
explores the art and ideas of these two
movements within the social, political,
intellectual and art historical context of
the years 1914–1947.
2 credits
HTA 329 Nineteenth-Century
Printmaking
The 19th century witnessed an
explosion of imagery, in part led by the
technical developments in commercial
printmaking and the advent of
photography. This course will survey
the major themes of the period,
including the changing cityscape, the
iconography of peasants and local
landscapes, the influence of caricature
and the popular press and the
development of Japonism. Classes will
be based on the hands-on viewing of
original prints in the New York Public
Library by artists including Eugene
Delacroix, Edouard Manet, Charles
Meryon, Camille Pissarro, Mary
Cassatt and James McNeill Whistler.
2 credits
HTA 331 The Arts of China
This course is a chronological survey
of the arts of China from the potterymaking and jade-carving cultures
of the Neolithic up to contemporary
works of art. A brief discussion of
historical events as well as background
in Chinese philosophy, political
systems and religious practices will
be presented in order to allow students
to recontextualize selected works
within their originating culture. The
course is designed to provide students
with a foundation in visual literacy of
China, facilitate written expression
and familiarize them with New York
City’s cultural institutions exhibiting
Chinese art.
2 credits
HTA 333 Islamic Art
and Architecture
See HTA 323
HTA 334 Art and Architecture
of Islamic India
A chronological study from the 16th
century to the 19th century of the
development of the art and
architecture of the Mughals; and an
examination of the Arab, Persian,
Indian and European influences that
shaped that culture.
2 credits
HTA 335 Art and Architecture
of the Ancient Near East
More than 5,000 years ago, the earliest
components of civilization, writing,
law-giving and the city appeared as
Mesopotamia, the fertile strip of land
between the Tigris and the Euphrates,
today called Iraq. The course will begin
with an introductory history of Iraq;
then it will focus on ancient Iraq and
its interaction with surrounding regions
in today’s Iran, Turkey and Syria. It will
also consider contemporary
civilizations in Egypt and the Indus
Valley. Lectures will look at the
geographical, economical, political and
spiritual factors that led to the birth of
this civilization, with its visual legacy
of temples, tombs and palaces
decorated with artworks of distinctive
forms and styles.
2 credits
HTA336 Site-Specific Art
This course will introduce students to
major issues surrounding site-specific
art, including Earth art, out-door sited
art and installation art within an
architectural space. The range of
artistic interpretation of site-specificity
will be examined, from works that are
conceived for and inseparable from a
particular site, to works created in
response to one site, but subsequently
reconceived in response to another. We
will place special emphasis on the
relationship, both physical and
conceptual, that site-specific artworks
have with their site. While the primary
focus of the course will be on
temporarily sited artworks, some
relevant examples of permanent public
art will also be investigated. Through
readings, discussion and looking at
images, the course will provide an
opportunity to approach and
understand an important development
in post war and contemporary art. Field
trips will be integral to the course.
2 credits
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
HTA337 Russian Art and Culture
The class will survey the history of
Russian art, reaching back to its premodern origins. It will address Russian
arts and culture in their specific
political and ideological context(s).
Special attention will be paid to
examining the interdisciplinary
character (art, architecture, design, film
and theater) of Constructivism and
Suprematism of the early 20th century.
The course will also address the
impact of the historical (or
revolutionary) avant-garde on
contemporary art practices. Students
will be required to prepare short inclass presentation on a specific
modern or contemporary artist,
architect, or designer, who uses or
used the constructivist vocabulary in
his or her work, and, as a final project,
write a ten page research paper.
2 credits
HTA 340 The Artist in
Renaissance Italy
This course will focus on artists
working in the Italian peninsula
between ca 1400 and ca 1600, with
the goal of learning how and why they
created the paintings, tapestries,
sculpture, prints and decorative art
that we now think as “Renaissance.”
In addition to studying materials,
techniques and iconography, we shall
consider the important role of
patronage, both sacred and secular.
2 credits
HTA 400 Single-Artist Seminar
A course devoted entirely to the life
and work of one important artist,
selected anew from across the
spectrum of world art each time it is
offered. The seminar is designed to
allow for an in-depth experience in the
discipline of art history that extends
well beyond what is possible in period
survey courses. Recent topics:
Leonardo; Rembrandt; Degas.
2 credits
HTA 99 Independent Study
(History/Theory of Art)
2 credits
ID441 Interdisciplinary Seminar
Shifting Territories
An interdisciplinary seminar shared by
the Faculty of Humanities and Social
Sciences and the three schools. Each
seminar is taught by a team of faculty
representing at least two of the four
divisions. The theme of the seminar
will be announced in advance.
3 credits
FACULTY
Proportional-Time
Faculty
Susanna Cole
Instructor in Art History
A.B., Brown University
Maren Stange
Professor of Humanities
B.A., Radcliffe College;
M.A., Tufts University;
Ph.D., Boston University
Michelle Hobart
Assistant Professor of Art History
Laurea, University of Siena
M.A., University of London;
Ph.D., New York University
Visiting Distinguished Professors
Visiting distinguished professors
in the Faculty of Humanities and
Social Sciences have included:
Diane Ackerman, André
Aciman,Stanley Aronowitz, David
Garrow, David Harvey, Richard Howard,
Tamar Jacoby, Floyd Lapp, W.S.
Merwin, Derek Mahon, Marie Ponsot,
Hillard Pouncey, Jim Sleeper and
Alan Trachtenberg
James Hoberman
Professor of Cinema
B.A., SUNY at Binghamton;
M.F.A., Columbia University
Administration
William Germano, Dean
Cynthia Hartling,
Administrative Associate
Gwen Hyman, Director,
Center for Writing
Sharla Sava, Associate Director,
Center for Writing
Sohnya Sayres, Academic Adviser
Full-Time Faculty
Professors
Dore Ashton
Art History
B.A., University of Wisconsin;
M.A., Harvard University;
Litt.D., Moore College
William Germano
English Literature
B.A., Columbia University;
Ph.D., Indiana University
Anne Griffin
Political Science
B.A., Wellesley College;
M.A, Ph.D., New York University
Atina Grossmann
History
B.A., CUNY;
Ph.D., Rutgers University
Mary Stieber
Art History
B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon;
M.A., University of Pittsburgh;
M.A, Ph.D., Princeton University
Brian Swann
Humanities
B.A., M.A., Queens College,
Cambridge University;
Ph.D., Princeton University
David Weir
Comparative Literature
B.A., University of North Alabama;
M.A., University of Alabama;
Ph.D., New York University
Associate Professors
Peter Buckley
History
B.A., Sussex University;
M.A., Ph.D., SUNY at Stony Brook
Sohnya Sayres
Humanities
B.A., M.A.H., Ph.D., SUNY at Buffalo
Gwen Hyman
Assistant Professor of Humanities
B.A., University of Toronto;
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia
University
Adjunct Faculty
Julian Paul Keenan
Professor of Social Sciences
B.A., M.A., The College at New Paltz;
Ph.D., The University at Albany
Haitham Abdullah
Instructor in Art History
B.F.A., University of Baghdad;
M.A., M.F.A., City College of New York
Heidi King
Instructor in Art History
B. A., University of Geneva;
M.A., Columbia University
André Aciman
Distinguished Professor
in the Humanities
B.A. Lehman College;
M.A., Ph.D. Harvard
Jonathan Lawhead
Instructor in Humanities
B.A., University of California, Berkeley
Albert Appleton
Associate Professor of Social Sciences
B.A., Gonzaga College;
J.D., Yale Law School
Marek Bartelik
Associate Professor of Art History
M.S., Columbia University;
Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center
Frederick Bengtsson
Instructor in Humanities
A.B., Harvard University;
M. Phil., University of Cambridge;
M. Phil., Columbia University
Benjamin Binstock
Assistant Professor of Art History
B.A., M.A., University of California,
Berkeley;
Ph.D., Columbia University
Sarah Lowengard
Associate Professor of Social Sciences
A.B.,Washington University;
M.A., Ph.D., SUNY at Stony Brook
Jeff Madrick
Professor of Economics
B.S., New York University;
M.B.A., Harvard University
Jared Manasek
Instructor in Social Sciences
B.A., University of Vermont;
M.A., Columbia University
Sean McGlade
Instructor in Humanities
B.A., Vassar College;
M. Phil., Trinity College, Dublin
Jill Muller
Assistant Professor of Humanities
B.A., Mercy College;
Ph.D., Columbia University
Gail Buckland
Distinguished Professor in
the History of Photography
B.A., University of Rochester
Harold Ramdass
Assistant Professor of Humanities
B.A., Baruch College;
Ph.D., Princeton University
Gerardo del Cerro Santamaría
Associate Professor of Social Sciences
M.A., Ph.D., New School for
Social Research;
B.A., Ph.D., Universidad Autónoma
de Madrid;
M.A., Royal Conservatory of Music,
Madrid
John Sarich
Assistant Professor of Economics
B.A., University of Michigan;
M.A., Ph.D., New School for
Social Research
Gail Satler
Professor of Sociology
B.A., Stony Brook University;
M.A., Queens College;
Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Sharla Sava
Assistant Professor of Humanities
B.A., University of Toronto;
M.A., University of British Columbia;
Ph.D., Simon Fraser University
Martha Schulman
Instructor in Humanities
A.B., University of Chicago;
M.F.A., Columbia University
Catherine Siemann
Assistant Professor of
English Literature
B.A., SUNY Binghamton;
J.D., New York University;
M.A., M.Phil., Columbia University;
Ph.D., Columbia University
Nicole Simpson
Instructor in Art History
B.A., University of Chicago;
M. A., Institute of Fine Arts,
New York University
Mary Taylor
Assistant Professor of Social Sciences
B.A., University of Southern Colorado;
M.A., New School for Social Research;
Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center
Deborah Waxenberg
Assistant Professor of Psychology
B.A., Hampshire College;
Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center
Karen Weber
Instructor in Social Sciences
B.A., Columbia University;
M.A., New York University
Andrew Weinstein
Assistant Professor of Art History
B.A., Brown University;
M.A., University of Pennsylvania;
M.A., New York University;
Ph.D., New York University
James Wylie
Associate Professor of Humanities
B.A., Boston University
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Trustees,
Officers, Deans
Administration,
Emeriti
Trustees
Mark Epstein A’76, Chairman
of the Board
Francois de Menil AR’87,
Vice Chairman of the Board
Robert Bernhard, Chairman Emeritus
Lawrence Benenson
Jamshed Bharucha
Don Blauweiss A’61
Michael Borkowsky ME’61
Charles S. Cohen
Joseph B. Dobronyi Jr.
Thomas Driscoll ME’77
Raymond G. Falci
Audrey Flack A’51
Jeffrey Gural
Vikas Kapoor
Stanley N. Lapidus EE’70
Richard S. Lincer
John C. Michaelson
Daniel Okrent
Bruce Pasternack ME’68
Lee H. Skolnick AR’79
Georgiana J. Slade
Martin Trust ME’56
Officers
Jamshed Bharucha, President
B.A., Vassar College;
M.A., Yale University;
Ph.D., Harvard University
T. C. Westcott, Vice President for
Finance, Administration & Treasurer
AAS in Nursing with honors from
Staten Island Community College;
B.S. Lehman College;
M.B.A. Columbia University Graduate
School of Business
Derek A. Wittner, Vice President
for Alumni Affairs and Development
B.A. Columbia College;
J.D. Columbia Law School
Lawrence Cacciatore
Chief of Staff and Secretary to the
Board of Trustees
B.A., M.A., New York University
Deans
Saskia Bos, Dean of the School of Art
B.A., University of Groningen;
M.A., University of Amsterdam
President’s Council
Alan N. Wolf
Acting Dean, Albert Nerken
School of Engineering
Professor of Physics and Chair
B.S., SUNY at Stony Brook
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas
J.D., Yeshiva University (CSL)
Ivan Chermayeff
William Germano, Dean, Faculty of
Humanities and Social Sciences
Professor of English Literature
B.A., Columbia University;
Ph.D., Indiana University
Elizabeth Diller AR‘79
Anthony Vidler, Dean,
The Irwin S. Chanin School
of Architecture
B.A. Hons., Dipl.Arch.,
Cambridge University;
Ph.D., Delft University of Technology
(The Netherlands)
Benedict A. Itri EE’75
Linda M. Lemiesz, Dean of Students
B.A., Smith College;
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.,
Columbia University;
J.D., New York Law School
Mitchell L. Lipton, Dean,
Admissions and Records
B.A., SUNY at Binghamton;
M.P.A., New York University
George J. Delagrammatikas
Acting Associate Dean, Albert Nerken
School of Engineering
Associate Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S.M.E., Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
M.S.M.E., Ph.D., University of Michigan
Steven Lam, Associate Dean,
School of Art
B.A., Trinity University;
M.F.A., University of California, Irvine;
Whitney Museum Independent
Study Program
Elizabeth O’Donnell, Associate Dean,
The Irwin S. Chanin School
of Architecture
University of Minnesota;
B.Arch., The Cooper Union; R.A.
Stephen P. Baker, Associate Dean
of Students
Director of Recreation, Health
and Safety
B.S., New York University
Susan E. Davidson, Assistant Dean,
Admissions
B.S., Cornell University;
Ed.M., Harvard University
John Falls, Assistant Dean,
Admissions
B.A., St. John's University
M.A., Brooklyn College
Joel R. Alper CE’58
Corice Arman
Henry N. Cobb, FAIA
Preston A. Davis
Susan Silver deMenil
Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel
Robert F. Fox Jr.
Alexander Gorlin AR’78
T.J. Gottesdiener AR’79
Elliot S. Jaffe
Maurice Kanbar
Stanley N. Lapidus EE’70
Leon M. Lederman
Carol Sutton Lewis
Richard B. Lowe III
Edgar Mokuvos EE’78
Toshiko Mori, AIA AR’76
Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe A’75
Cynthia Hazen Polsky
Andrew Russell
Morley Safer
Charles A. Shorter
Neal Slavin A’63
Martha Stewart
Willard L. Warren EE’50
Philip Zev Weisberg EE’84
William D. Zabel, Esq.
Administration
Gerardo del Cerro Santamaría, Director
of Assessment and Innovation;
Associate Professor of Social Sciences
M.A., Ph.D., New School for
Social Research;
B.A., Ph.D., Universidad Autónoma
de Madrid;
M.A., Royal Conservatory of Music,
Madrid
Jody Jeffery Grapes, Director
of Facilities Management
David Greenstein, Director
of Continuing Education/
Public Programs
B.A., Dartmouth College;
M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University
Robert P. Hopkins, Chief
Technology Officer
Associate Professor of
Computer Science
B.S., St. Joseph’s College, Indiana;
M.B.A, Fordham University
Mindy Lang, Director,
Center for Design and Typography
B.F.A, The Cooper Union
Donna M. Lippman
Director of Planned Giving
B.A., Cornell University; M.B.A., Emory
Graduate School of Business; J.D.,
Fordham University
Jeanne Lunin, Director of Development
B.A., Bryn Mawr College; M.A.,
Teachers College, Columbia University
Claire McCarthy, Director
of Public Affairs
Sue McCoy
Senior Systems Manager,
Information Services
Joseph McDonald, Director of the
Annual Fund
B.A., Ithaca College
Mary Ruokonen, Director
of Financial Aid
Carol Salomon, Acting Library Director
A.B., Mount Holyoke College
M.L.S., Long Island University
M.S., Long Island University
Robert Thill, Director, Center for
Career Development
B.A., California State University;
M.F.A., Pratt Institute
Caitlin D. Tramel, Director of
Alumni Affairs
B.A. Simmons College; M.Ed. Suffolk
University
President Emeritus
George Campbell Jr.
Natasha Cornell-Poku, Director of
Residence Life
B.A., SUNY at New Platz;
M.S., Hofstra University;
M.A., New York University
Chairman Emeritus
Ronald W. Drucker CE’62
Dirrane Cove, Assistant Director
of Institutional Grants
B.A. Connecticut College
Alex Katz A’49
Ellen Dorsey, Associate Registrar
B.A., Queens College, CUNY;
M.S., City College of New York, CUNY
Carroll L. Wainwright, Jr.
Trustees Emeriti
Milton Glaser A’51
Clarence F. Michalis
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Faculty/Administration Emeriti
Richard L. Bory
Dean Emeritus of Admissions
and Records
B.A., St. Bonaventure University;
M.Div., Christ the King Seminary;
M.S., Queens College, CUNY
Richard S. Bowman *
Professor Emeritus of
Comparative Literature
Arthur Corwin
Professor Emeritus of Art
Ozenfant and Hans Hofmann,
Schools of Fine Art;
The Cooper Union;
B.F.A., B.Arch., Yale University
Shang-I Cheng
Professor Emeritus of
Chemical Engineering
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., P.E.
Wallace Chinitz
Professor Emeritus of
Mechanical Engineering
B.M.E., City College of New York;
M.M.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic University
Richard G. Costello *
Professor Emeritus of
Electrical Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S.E.E., New York University;
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Peter D. Eisenman
The Irwin S. Chanin Distinguished
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
B.Arch., Cornell University;
M.S.Arch., Columbia University;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Cambridge,
England;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B., F.A.I.A.
Walton D. Ellison *
Professor Emeritus of Physics
B.S., University of Colorado;
Ph.D., New York University
Richard C. Extermann *
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Lic. es Sc., Ph.D.
William W. Flexner *
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
B.S., Ph.D.
Stanley M. Forman
Professor Emeritus of Physics
B.A., Ph.D.
Sue Ferguson Gussow
Professor Emerita of Architecture
Pratt Institute;
The Cooper Union;
The Brooklyn Museum;
B.S., Columbia University;
M.F.A., Tulane University
Hans Haacke
Professor Emeritus of Art
M.F.A., Staatsexamen, Staatl
Werkakademie, Kassel, Germany;
Hon. D.F.A., Oberlin College;
Atelier 17, Paris; Tyler School of Art;
Pratt Graphics Center
John Q. Hejduk *
Dean of the Irwin S. Chanin School
of Architecture
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
The Cooper Union
B.S. in Arch., University of Cincinnati
M.Arch., Harvard University;
Università degli Studi, Rome;
Hon. L.H.D., University of Illinois
at Chicago;
R.A.; N.C.A.R.B.;
Fellow of the Royal Society;
F.A.I.A.
Richard Henderson *
Associate Dean of the Irwin S. Chanin
School of Architecture
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
B.Arch., Cornell University;
R.A.
Joel W. Hollenberg *
Professor Emeritus of
Mechanical Engineering
B.E., The Cooper Union;
M.S., Ph.D., Stevens Institute
of Technology;
P.E.
Henry B. Hope
Professor Emeritus of
Chemical Engineering
B.Ch.E., M.A., Ph.D.
Leo S. Kaplan
B.A., City College of New York, CUNY;
M.A., Columbia University
Ralph Knapp
Professor Emeritus
of Electrical Engineering
B.E., M.S.
2011–2012 COURSE CATALOG
2012–2013
George Sadek *
Frank Stanton Professor
of Graphic Design
B.A., M.F.A.
Melvin Sandler
Jesse Sherman Professor of
Electrical Engineering Emeritus
B.E.E., M.E.E., Ph.D. Polytechnic
University
Ricardo Scofidio
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
The Cooper Union
B.Arch., Columbia University;
R.A., N.C.A.R.B.
Michael G. Sundell*
Professor Emeritus of Humanities
B.A., A.M., Ph.D.
David H. H. Tung
Professor Emeritus of
Civil Engineering
B.C.E., M.C.E., Ph.D., P.E.
Ysrael A. Seinuk*
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
Degree in Civil Engineering,
University of Havana;
P.E., F.A.C.I., C.Eng., F.I.C.E.,
F.A.S.C.E.
Fred Siegel
Professor Emeritus of History
B.A., Rutgers University;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Cooper Union Alumni Association
2012–2013 Executive Board
Peter Cafiero CE’83
President
Rocco Cetera CE’99
Vice President/Alumni Activities
Lawrence Hausman EE’94
Vice President/Faculty
and Student Liaison
Robert Tan AR’81
Secretary/Treasurer
Don Blauweiss A’61
Alumni Trustee
Lee Skolnick AR’79
Alumni Trustee
Ray Falci ME’86
Alumni Trustee
Edgar Mokuvos EE’78
Alumni Trustee
MaryAnn Nichols A’68
Past President
Carmi Bee AR’67
Past President
Mary Lynch ChE’82
Nominating Committee Chair
Darrell Low EE’89
Annual Fund Committee Chair
Gerry Weiss
Professor of Electrical
Engineering Emeritus
B.E., The Cooper Union;
S.M., Harvard University;
D.E.E., Polytechnic University;
P.E.
Chester Wisniewski
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
B.Arch., Syracuse University;
Taliesin. R.A., N.C.A.R.B.
Walter S. Kut *
Professor Emeritus
of Mechanical Engineering
B.S. in M.E., M.S., P.E.
Jean Le Mée
Professor Emeritus of
Mechanical Engineering
B.S., Ecole Nationale de la Marine
Marchande, Nantes;
M.S., Ph.D.,
Carnegie Mellon University
Arsete J. Lucchesi
Associate Dean Emeritus, Albert
Nerken School of Engineering
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
B.S., Queens College, CUNY;
M.S., New York University
Philip Nudd *
Professor Emeritus of
Electrical Engineering
B.S.E.E., M.S., P.E.
* deceased
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
THE COOPER UNION
Discrimination Policies
June 2012
NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment
Policies and Complaint Procedures
The Cooper Union’s Vice President for Finance, Administration &
Treasurer/ Equal Opportunity Officer has overall responsibility for
the management of the College’s Equal Opportunity and NonDiscrimination Policies and has been designated to coordinate
compliance activities under these policies and applicable federal,
state and local laws. Students, faculty, and staff may contact the
Vice President for Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal
Opportunity Officer, Human Resources Manager, Dean of Students
or their Academic Dean to inquire about their rights under the
College’s policies, request counseling, or seek information about
filing a complaint.
Complaints by students against students are governed by the
College’s Code of Conduct and Student Equal Educational Opportunity and NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment policies.
Complaints by students against faculty or other college employees
are governed by the Student Equal Educational Opportunity and
NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies.
Complaints by faculty and other employees are governed by the
Equal Employment Opportunity and NonDiscrimination and AntiHarassment Policies, published in the Staff Handbooks. Links to
those policies are available at: http://www.cooper.edu/ hr. Faculty
and bargaining unit staff may also refer to their collective
bargaining agreements.
All students, faculty and other employees are protected from
retaliation for filing a complaint or assisting in an investigation
under the NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies. The
College’s policies apply to all students, faculty, other employees,
and applicants for admission and employment, and all such
persons are protected from coercion, intimidation, interference,
or retaliation for filing an internal or external complaint of discrimination or harassment or assisting in an investigation under any of
the above-named policies and applicable laws.
Student Equal Educational Opportunity
And NonDiscrimination
And Anti-Harassment Policies
The Cooper Union is committed to providing a learning environment free from unlawful discrimination and harassment and to
fostering a nurturing and vibrant community founded upon the
fundamental dignity and worth of all of its members. Consistent
with this commitment and with applicable laws, it is the policy of
The Cooper Union not to tolerate unlawful discrimination or
harassment in any form and to provide students who feel that they
are victims of discrimination or harassment with mechanisms for
seeking redress.
Continuing its long-standing policy to support actively
equality of opportunity for all persons, The Cooper Union does not
discriminate on the basis of age, race, religion, sex, color, sexual
orientation, national and ethnic origin, nor does it discriminate
against qualified persons with disabilities or any other legally
protected characteristic, in the administra- tion of its admission
and educational policies or scholarship, loan, athletic and other
school-administered programs. Rather, The Cooper Union affirms
that it admits students regardless of their age, race, religion, sex,
color, handicap or disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national
origin or any other legally protected characteristic and thereafter
accords them all the rights and privileges generally made available
to students at the school.
Consistent with The Cooper Union’s policy of supporting
cultural diversity, no student shall be refused admission to or be
dismissed from The Cooper Union solely because he/she is unable
to participate in any examination, study, or work requirement due
to his/her religious observances and practices. It is the intent of
The Cooper Union to reasonably accommodate an individual
student’s religious obligations and practices without penalty,
based on good faith, effort and due notice to those relevantly
concerned of the anticipated religious observance date. It is the
student’s obligation to provide prior notice of anticipated
absences. Students absent due to religious observances and practices will be given an opportunity to make up any examination,
study, or work requirement missed, without penalty. The College
also modifies policies, practices, and procedures for, and grants
reasonable accommodations, and provides auxiliary aids and
services to students with disabilities in accordance with the law.
Discriminatory harassment and sexual harassment pose a
direct threat to the right of every member of The Cooper Union
community to be treated respectfully. Students, professors, staff,
and administrators share an obligation to maintain an environment in which members of the community are free to pursue and
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
to promote learning, scholarly inquir y, and artistic achievement
without harassment. The harassment of any student is unacceptable and will not be tolerated at The Cooper Union.
Nothing in this policy shall abridge academic freedom or the
College’s educational mission. Prohibitions against discrimination
and harassment do not extend to statements or written materials
that are germane to the classroom subject matter.
Definitions
For purposes of these policies and procedures, discrimination,
discriminatory harassment, and sexual harassment are defined
as follows:
Discrimination
Discrimination is defined as:
• Treating members of a protected class less favorably because of
their membership in that class
• Having a policy or practice that has a disproportionately
adverse impact on protected class members, without sufficient
justification; or
• Failing to reasonably accommodate, modify policies, practices,
or procedures, or provide appropriate auxiliary aids and services
to students with disabilities.
“Protected class” refers to any personal trait or category that
is protected by law, including an individual’s race, religion, sex,
color, ethnicity, national origin, age, marital status, creed, genetic
predisposition and carrier status, sexual orientation, alienage,
citizenship status, veteran status, disability, or any other characteristic protected by law.
Discriminatory Harassment
Discriminatory harassment is defined as substantially interfering
with an individual’s educational or college living experience by
subjecting him or her to severe or threatening conduct or to
repeated humiliating or abusive conduct, based on his or her
membership in a protected class. This includes sexual harassment, which is described below in further detail.
Under this policy, harassment is verbal or physical conduct
that belittles or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual
because of his or her race, religion, sex, color, ethnicity, national
origin, age, marital status, creed, genetic predisposition and
carrier status, sexual orientation, alienage, citizenship status,
veteran status, disability, or any other characteristic protected by
law, or that of his or her relatives, friends, or associates, and that:
• Has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or
offensive academic environment;
• Has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
individual’s academic performance; or
• Otherwise adversely affects an individual’s academic experience.
Harassing conduct includes, but is not limited to: epithets,
slurs, or negative stereotyping; threatening, intimidating, or hostile
acts; and written or graphic material that belittles or shows hostility
or aversion toward an individual or group and that is placed on
walls or elsewhere on The Cooper Union premises or circulated in
the school (including through e-mail).
Sexual Harassment
Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other
verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual
harassment when:
• Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s education or employment;
or
• Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is
used as the basis for academic or employment decisions affecting
that individual; or
• Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s academic or work performance or
creating an intimidating,hostile,demeaning,or offensive academic,
work or college living environment.
Sexual harassment may include a range of subtle and not so
subtle behaviors and may involve individuals of the same or
different gender. Depending on the circumstances, these behaviors may include, but are not limited to: unwanted sexual advances
or requests for sexual favors; sexual jokes and innuendo; verbal
abuse of a sexual nature; commentary about an individual’s body,
sexual prowess or sexual deficiencies; leering, catcalls or
touching; insulting or obscene comments or gestures; display or
circulation of sexually suggestive objects or pictures (including
through e-mail); and other physical, verbal or visual conduct of a
sexual nature. Sex-based harassment— that is, harassment not
involving sexual activity or language—may also constitute discrimination if it is severe or pervasive and directed at an individual
because of his or her sex.
Truly consensual romantic relationships are not sexual
harassment and are not prohibited by The Cooper Union’s policies. Individuals should be aware, however, that romantic relationships are susceptible to being determined after the fact to
have been nonconsensual, and even coercive, whenever there is
an inherent power differential between the parties. Therefore, any
such relationship between a faculty or staff member and a student
is strongly discouraged.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Requests for Disability Accommodation
Students seeking reasonable accommodations, modifications of
policies, practices or procedures, and/or auxiliary aids and services for a disability should contact the Dean of Students ideally at
least six weeks before the beginning of the semester. Such
requests may also be given to the Vice President for Finance,
Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer.
Inquiries About Policy
Inquiries concerning any policy, program or other activity at The
Cooper Union may be referred to the following individual who has
been designated by The Cooper Union to oversee the continued
application of the School’s NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies:
TC Westcott
Vice President for Finance, Administration
& Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art
Business Office
30 Cooper Square, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10003
212.353.4150
Procedures for Students with Concerns
or Complaints About Discrimination and
Harassment and Non-Retaliation Policy
All members of the College community are expected to adhere to
the College’s policies and to cooperate with the procedures for
responding to complaints of discrimination and harassment. All
are encouraged to report any conduct believed to be in violation of
these policies. It is in the best interest of the entire Cooper Union
community for students to report incidents of discrimination and
harassment. All students and applicants for admission are
protected from coercion, intimidation, interference, or retaliation
for filing a complaint or assisting in an investigation under any of
the applicable policies and laws. Subjecting another to retaliatory,
intimidating or coercive conduct for filing a complaint or participating in an investigation is prohibited and may be addressed as a
separate violation.
Any person who believes that he or she has been the subject
of discrimination or harassment may initially choose to deal with
the alleged offender directly through a face-to-face discussion, a
personal telephone conversation, e-mail correspondence, or
letters. In many cases, this may effectively resolve the situation;
however, individuals are not required to address the alleged
offender directly.Such an approach may be ineffective in correcting
the problem, or an individual may be uncomfortable in handling
the situation alone. All students are strongly urged to promptly
report concerns of discrimination and harassment under the
procedures outlined below.
Formal Complaint Procedures for Students
Students who wish to make a formal complaint may do so in accordance with the procedures set forth below.
Complaints About Other Students
The harassment of any student is unacceptable and will not be
tolerated at The Cooper Union. It is in the best interest of the entire
Cooper Union community for students to report incidents of
discrimination and harassment. Any student who believes he or
she has been subjected to harassment by another student should
submit a complaint, if possible in writing, to the Vice President for
for Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer,
the Dean of Students or his or her Academic Dean. The College will
then designate the appropriate person to address the complaint.
After a complaint is made, it will be investigated and an attempt
will be made to resolve the matter as amicably and privately as
possible.The penalties of expulsion,suspension,dismissal,warning,
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
probation, or loss of privileges can be meted out to the offending
student in the College’s discretion and as the College deems
appropriate. The matter may be referred to the Student Judicial
Committee, in accordance with the procedures set forth in the
Code of Conduct.
Complaints About Faculty And Employees
The Cooper Union has established separate procedures to handle
student complaints about harassment and discrimination
imposed on students by faculty or staff.
Sexual harassment, whether it imposes a requirement of
sexual cooperation as a condition of academic achievement or
not, is inimical to the College’s academic environment. Harassment and discrimina- tion on the basis of race, religion, national
origin, sex, disability, and/or sexual orientation and any other characteristic protected by law are also prohibited. Student complaints
about harassment by staff or faculty should be filed with the Dean
of Students, the Vice President for Finance, Administration &
Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer, or the Academic Dean.
The Vice President for for Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer will investigate, or will appoint an
investigator to investigate the matter and try to resolve the matter
as amicably and privately as possible.
If this effort is not successful and if the Vice President for
Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer or
the President deems it appropriate under the circumstances, a
Hearing Board may be appointed by the President to review the
complaint, conduct any additional investigation deemed appropriate, and make recommendations to the President.
A Hearing Board is typically comprised of an Academic
Dean, a faculty member, and an elected student representative,
all from schools other than that of the complainant, although the
College retains discretion to alter the composition of a Hearing
Board as it deems appropriate.
In resolving any matter, the College retains discretion to take
any remedial action it deems appropriate, including, without limitation, warning, demotion, transfer, suspension, training and
termination.
Complaints against persons represented by a labor organization will be handled in a manner that is consistent with the applicable collective bargaining agreement.
Complaints About Third Parties
Student complaints of discrimination or harassment by third parties
(e.g., visitors to the school or contractors working on school premises) may be filed in the same manner as complaints about faculty
and employees and will be governed by the same procedures.
Independent Investigation and Review by Trustees The
Cooper Union, in its discretion, may conduct an investigation independent of or in addition to the procedures outlined above, at any
time. In addition, although the Board of Trustees will not typically
be involved in the receipt, investigation and remediation of
complaints of discrimination and harassment, the Board of
Trustees or a committee authorized by the Chairman of the Board
of Trustees is authorized to modify the procedures herein as it
deems appropriate under the circumstances, and to take remedial action as it deems appropriate.
At the conclusion of the investigation under any of the procedures set forth above, the complaining party and the accused
party will be notified of the outcome of the investigation. Students
with questions as to the appropriate procedure in a particular situation should contact the Dean of Students, the Vice President for
for Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer,
or their Academic Dean.
Non-Retaliation
Retaliation against students who complain about perceived
discrimination or harassment is strictly prohibited. Complaints of
retaliation will be investigated and treated as violations of the
College’s NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy.
Compliance with Laws Promoting Equal Educational Opportunity and Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment
In accordance with all applicable laws and pursuant to its own policies and operating procedures, The Cooper Union provides for
equal opportunity and prohibits unlawful discrimination and
harassment. The applicable laws include:
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, prohibits
discrimination against any person on the basis of race, color,
or national origin in programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, prohibits
discrimination against any person because of race, color, sex, religion, pregnancy or national origin in connection with employment.
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended,
prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in the conduct or operation of a school’s educational programs or activities, including
admission to these programs and activities.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, prohibits the
exclusion of any person solely on the basis of a disability from
participation in or access to benefits of any federally financed
program or activity; it also prohibits discrimination against any
person solely on the basis of disability in any federally financed
program or activity.
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, amended by
Congress in 2008, prohibits discrimination against persons with
disabilities in public accommodations.
The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, prohibits discrimination on
the basis of age in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. The New York Executive Law, Article 15, Section
296(4), prohibits an educational institution from denying the use
of its facilities to anyone otherwise qualified or permitting harassment of a student or applicant on the basis of color, race, religion,
disability, national origin, sexual orientation, military status, sex,
age, and marital status.
The New York Education Law, Section 313, as amended,
prohibits educational institutions from discriminating against
persons seeking admission as students to any institution, program,
or course because of race, color, sex, religion, creed, marital
status, age, sexual orientation, or national origin.
The New York City Human Rights Law, Section 8-107, prohibits
discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived race, creed, color,
national origin, age, gender (including gender identity and expression), disability, marital status, partnership status, sexual orientation, or alienage or citizenship status in public accommodations.
Any person wanting to file an external complaint under any of
these laws should consult the Web site of the relevant government
agency listed below:
Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education
www.ed.gov
New York State Division of Human Rights
www.dhr.state.ny.us
New York City Commission on Human Rights
www.nyc.gov/html/cchr/home.html
Policy and Procedures for
Faculty and Staff
Faculty and Staff Equal Employment Opportunity and NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies
The Cooper Union is an equal opportunity employer and is
committed to providing a working and learning environment free
from unlawful discrimination and to fostering a nurturing and
vibrant community founded upon the fund- amental dignity and
worth of all of its members. The College does not discriminate
against or permit harassment of employees or applicants for
employment on the basis of race, color, sex, gender (including
gender identity and expression), pregnancy, religion, creed,
national origin, age, alienage and citizenship, status as a perceived
or actual victim of domestic violence, disability, marital status,
sexual orientation, military status, partnership status, genetic
predisposition or carrier status, arrest record, or any other legally
protected status.
Sexual harassment is strictly prohibited. Harassment on the
basis of any other protected characteristic is also strictly prohibited. The Cooper Union reasonably accommo- dates employees
and applicants with disabilities and also provides reasonable
accommodation of religious beliefs and practices in accordance
with law.
Nothing in these policies shall abridge academic freedom or
the College’s educational mission. Prohibitions against discrimination and harassment do not extend to statements or written
materials that are germane to classroom subject matter.
All members of The Cooper Union community are expected
to adhere to these policies and to cooperate with the procedures
for responding to complaints of discrimination and harassment.
They also are encouraged to report any conduct they believe
to be in violation of these policies. Management and supervisory
personnel in particular are responsible for taking reasonable and
necessary action to prevent discrimination and harassment in the
workplace and for responding promptly and thoroughly to any
such claims. Those individuals include any officer or dean having
formal supervisory responsibility over employees. For the purpose
of these policies, faculty are supervisors of other faculty when they
are acting in a supervisory role as department chair, dean,
academic vice president, or similar position.
Employees may file an informal or formal complaint under
this policy as set forth below. Any individual found to have engaged
in discrimination or harassment will be subject to discipline up
to and including termination. Retaliation against anyone who
files a complaint or participates in an investigation of a complaint
is prohibited and will be addressed as a separate violation of
this policy.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
The Cooper Union provides training programs to educate
faculty and adminis- trators about conduct that may constitute a
violation of its policies and to inform them of the procedures that
are available to respond to alleged violations.
Definitions
For purposes of these policies and procedures, discrimination,
discriminator y harassment, and sexual harassment are defined
as follows:
Discrimination
Discrimination is defined as:
• Treating members of a protected class less favorably because of
their membership in that class; or
• Having a policy or practice that has a disproportionately
adverse impact on protected class members, without sufficient
justification.
• Failing to reasonably accommodate qualified individuals with
disabilities where doing so does not constitute an undue hardship.
• “Protected class” refers to any personal trait or category that is
protected by law, including an individual’s race, religion, sex, color,
ethnicity, national origin, age, marital status, creed, genetic predisposi- tion and carrier status, sexual orientation, alienage, citizenship status, veteran status, disability, or any other characteristic
protected by law.
Discriminatory Harassment
Discriminatory Harassment is defined as subjecting an individual
to humiliating, abusive, or threatening conduct that creates an
intimidating, hostile, or abusive work environment; alters the
conditions of employment; or unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work performance on the basis of that individual’s
membership in a protected class. This includes sexual harassment, which is described in further detail below Under this policy,
harassment is verbal or physical conduct that belittles or shows
hostility or aversion toward an individual because of his or her race,
religion, sex, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, marital status,
creed, genetic predisposition and carrier status, sexual orientation, alienage, citizenship status, veteran status, disability, or any
other characteristic protected by law, or that of his or her relatives,
friends, associates, and that:
• Has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or
offensive work environment;
• Has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
individual’s work performance; or
• Otherwise adversely affects an individual’s employment.
Harassing conduct includes, but is not limited to: epithets,
slurs, or negative stereotyping; threatening, intimidating, or hostile
acts; and written or graphic material that belittles or shows hostility
or aversion toward an individual or group and that is placed on
walls or elsewhere on The Cooper Union premises or circulated in
the workplace (including through e-mail).
Sexual Harassment
Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other
verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual
harassment when:
• Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment; or
• Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual
is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting that
individual; or
• Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, demeaning, or offensive working environment.
Sexual harassment may include a range of subtle and not so
subtle behaviors and may involve individuals of the same or
different gender. Depending on the circumstances, these behaviors may include, but are not limited to: unwanted sexual advances
or requests for sexual favors; sexual jokes and innuendo; verbal
abuse of a sexual nature; commentary about an individual’s body,
sexual prowess or sexual deficiencies; leering, catcalls or
touching; insulting or obscene comments or gestures; display or
circulation in the workplace of sexually suggestive objects or
pictures (including through e-mail); and other physical, verbal or
visual conduct of a sexual nature. Sex-based harassment— that
is, harassment not involving sexual activity or language—may also
constitute discrimination if it is severe or pervasive and directed at
employees because of their sex.
Truly consensual romantic relationships are not sexual
harassment and are not prohibited by The Cooper Union policies.
Individuals should be aware, however, that romantic relationships
are susceptible to being determined after the fact to have
been nonconsensual, and even coercive, whenever there is an
inherent power differential between the parties. Therefore, any
such relationship with a subordinate employee or a student is
strongly discouraged.
Disability Accommodation
Employees seeking an accommodation for a disability should
contact the Human Resources Manager, Yvonne Moray, or Vice
President for Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer TC Westcott.
143
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THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Inquiries About Policy
Inquiries concerning any policy, program or other activity at The
Cooper Union may be referred to the following individual who has
been designated by The Cooper Union to oversee the continued
application of the School’s NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies:
TC Westcott
Vice President for Finance, Administration
& Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art
Business Office
30 Cooper Square, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10003
212.353.4150
Individuals and Conduct Covered
These employee policies apply to all applicants and employees,
and prohibit harassment, discrimination and retaliation whether
engaged in by fellow employees, by a supervisor or manager, or by
someone not directly connected to The Cooper Union (e.g., an
outside vendor, consultant or customer). Conduct prohibited by
these policies is unacceptable in the workplace and in any workrelated setting outside the workplace. Any individual found to have
engaged in sexual or any other form of harassment, or other inappropriate conduct, will be disciplined as appropriate, up to and
including discharge.
Non-Retaliation Policy
The Cooper Union will not in any way retaliate against an individual
who, in good faith, makes a complaint or report of harassment, or
participates in the investigation of such complaint or report. Retaliation against any individual for, in good faith, reporting a claim of
discrimination or harassment or cooperating in the investigation
of same will not be tolerated and will itself be subject to appropriate discipline.
Reports of retaliation should be made in the same manner as
complaints reporting discrimination and harassment and such
complaints will be investigated.
Complaint Procedures for Faculty and
Other Employees and Applicants
Any employee who has witnessed, been subject to, or believes
that he or she has been the subject of discrimination, sexual or any
other form of harassment or retali- ation by anyone at The Cooper
Union should, and is encouraged to, bring the matter to the attention of a supervisory staff member or the Vice President for
Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer
referred to above or to other persons designated to receive
complaints as set forth below. Individuals should not feel
obligated to file their complaints with their immediate supervisor
before bringing the matter to the attention of the other designated
representatives.
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL EMPLOYEES: Employees who have
experienced conduct they believe is contrary to this policy have an
obligation to take advantage of this complaint procedure. An
employee’s failure to fulfill this obligation could affect his or her
rights in pursuing legal action. Also, please note, federal, state and
local discrimination laws establish specific time frames for initiating a legal proceeding pursuant to those laws.
The Investigation and Confidentiality
A prompt, thorough and impartial investigation of the alleged incident will be conducted to the extent possible, and appropriate
corrective action will be taken if warranted. To the extent consistent with adequate investigation and appropriate corrective
action, complaints of discrimi- nation and harassment will be
treated as confidential. At the conclusion of the investigation, the
complaining party and the accused party will be notified of the
outcome of the investigation.
Responsive Action
Misconduct constituting harassment, discrimination or retaliation
will be dealt with promptly and adequately. Responsive action may
include, without limitation, training, referral to counseling, monitoring the offender, and/or disciplinary action such as warning,
reprimand, withholding of a promotion or pay increase, reduction
of wages, demotion, reassignment, temporary suspension without
pay, or termination, as The Cooper Union believes appropriate
under the circumstances.
2012–2013 COURSE CATALOG
Grievance Procedure Under The Cooper Union’s NonDiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policies
An employee of The Cooper Union who believes that he or she has
been discriminated against or harassed in violation of any provision of The Cooper Union’s NonDiscrimination or Anti-Harassment Policies may ask the offender to stop his/her behavior. An
employee should not feel obligated to confront the offender,
however, and may also attempt to resolve such grievance in the
following manner.
Step 1. Informal Complaint
Employees with complaints in which the immediate supervisor is
not directly involved generally should start at Step 1. Employees
with complaints which directly involve the immediate supervisor
or in which the employee is not comfortable presenting the
complaint directly to his/her supervisor should proceed directly to
Step 2.
The complainant should present the complaint, if possible in
writing, to his or her immediate superior as soon as possible after
the date on which the alleged act of discrimination or harassment
took place, and should also forward a copy of any written
complaint in a sealed envelope marked “CONFIDENTIAL” to the
Vice President for Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal
Opportunity Officer or to the Human Resources Manager.
The complainant’s immediate superior or another individual
designated by the College shall meet with the complainant for
purposes of initiating an investigation. An investigation may involve
a review of documents and interviews with witnesses and the
alleged offender. Once an investigation is completed, appropriate
remedial action will be taken.
If the complaint is not satisfactorily resolved at Step 1, it may
be presented as a formal grievance/appeal under Step 2. As stated
previously, if the complainant is uncomfortable presenting his/her
complaint to his/her immediate supervisor, the complainant may
immediately proceed to Step 2.
Step 2. Formal Grievance/Step
In the case where the complainant feels uncomfortable presenting
the complaint to his or her immediate supervisor or when the
complainant is dissatisfied by the results of Step 1, the grievance
may be formally presented by the grievant to the Vice President for
Finance, Administration & Treasurer/Equal Opportunity Officer or
to the Human Resources Manager.
The grievance should be written, if possible, and set forth
specifically the facts on which the grievance is based. The Equal
Opportunity Officer, or an authorized designee, will investigate the
grievance and/or review the investigation already conducted
and make a determination on the grievance and appropriate
remedial action.
Separate Rights of Faculty and Bargaining Unit Staff
Nothing herein precludes faculty and bargaining unit staff from
seeking redress under their collective bargaining agreements.
Independent Investigation and Review by Trustees
The Cooper Union, in its discretion, may conduct an investigation
independent of or in addition to the procedures outlined above at
any time. In addition, although the Board of Trustees will not typically be involved in the receipt, investigation and remediation of
complaints of discrimination and harassment, the Board of
Trustees or a committee authorized by the Chairman of the Board
of Trustees is authorized to modify the procedures herein as it
deems appropriate under the circumstances, and to take remedial action as it deems appropriate in certain cases.
Compliance with Federal, State and Local Laws Promoting
Equal Employment Opportunity, Prohibiting Discrimination
and Harassment and Authorizing Affirmative Action
In accordance with all applicable laws and pursuant to its own
policies and operating procedures, The Cooper Union provides for
equal opportunity, prohibits unlawful discrimination and harassment, and takes affirmative action. The applicable laws include:
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, prohibits
discrimination against any person on the basis of race, color, or
national origin in programs or activities receiving federal financial
assistance.
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, prohibits
employment discrimination against any person because of race,
color, religion, sex, pregnancy, or national origin.
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended,
prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in the conduct or operation of a school’s educational programs or activities, including
employment in these programs and activities.
The Equal Pay Act of 1963, prohibits discrimination on the basis
of sex in rates of pay. The Lily Ledbetter Act of 2009 extends this
protection. Executive Order 11246, as amended, prohibits
discrimination in employment because of race, color, religion, sex,
or national origin and requires affirmative action to ensure equality
of opportunity in all aspects of employment.
145
146
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, requires a federal
contractor to take affirmative action to employ and advance in
employment qualified workers with disabilities. Section 504
prohibits the exclusion of any person solely on the basis of a
disability from participation in or access to benefits of any federally financed program or activity; it also prohibits discrimination
against any person solely on the basis of disability in any federally
financed program or activity.
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, amended by
Congress in 2008, prohibits discrimination in public accommodations and in employment against a qualified person with a
disability and requires an employer to provide qualified applicants
and employees with reasonable accommodations.
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as
amended, prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of
age.
The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, prohibits discrimination
on the basis of age in programs and activities receiving federal
financial assistance.
The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment
Rights Act (USERRA), prohibits discrimination in employment
based on past, current, or future military obligations.
The Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of
1974 and the Veterans Employment Opportunities Act of
1998, as amended, prohibit job discrimination and require affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified
special disabled veterans, veterans of the Vietnam Era, recently
separated veterans, and any other veterans who served on active
duty during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a
campaign badge has been authorized.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, prohibits
employers from discriminating on the basis of citizenship status.
The prohibition extends to employers who hire only U.S. citizens
or U.S. citizens and green card holders, as well as to employers
who prefer to employ unauthorized workers or temporary visa
holders rather than U.S. citizens and other workers with employment authorization.
The Small Business Act of 1958, as amended, Section 15(g)(1),
requires federal contractors to afford maximum practicable business opportunities to Small Business Concerns, including businesses owned by disadvantaged individuals, disabled veterans,
and women.
The New York Executive Law, Article 15, Section 296(1),
prohibits discrimination against any person in employment
because of age, race, creed, color, national origin, sexual orientation, military status, sex, disability, genetic predisposition or carrier
status, marital status, or arrest record. Section 296(4) prohibits an
educational institution from denying the use of its facilities to
anyone otherwise qualified or permitting harassment of a student
or applicant on the basis of color, race, religion, disability, national
origin, sexual orientation, military status, sex, age, and marital
status.
The New York Labor Law, Section 194, prohibits discrimination
on the basis of sex in rates of pay.
The New York City Human Rights Law, Chapter 1, Section 8107, makes it an unlawful discriminatory practice for an employer
to discriminate against any person because of his or her actual or
perceived age, race, creed, color, national origin, gender (including
gender identity and expression), disability, marital status, sexual
orientation, alienage or citizenship status, partnership status or
status as a perceived or actual victim of domestic violence.
Any person wanting to file an external complaint under any of
these laws should consult the Web site of the relevant government
agency listed below:
Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
www.dol.gov/esa/contacts/ofccp/ ofnation2.htm#NewYork
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
www.eeoc.gov
Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education
www.ed.gov
Veterans’ Training and Employment Service, U.S. Department
of Labor
www.dol.gov/vets
New York State Division of Human Rights
www.dhr.state.ny.us
New York State Department of Labor
www.labor.state.ny.us
New York City Commission on Human Rights
www.nyc.gov/html/cchr/home.html
Revised June 2012
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
INDEX
41 Cooper Square, 6
Academic standards and regulations
General, 23
Architecture, 38
Art, 55
Engineering 77
Humanities and Social Sciences 123
Accreditation, 5
Administration, The Cooper Union, 136
Admissions, Engineering Master
degree program, 13
Admission after three years of
high school, 15
Admission, early decision
Art, 14
Engineering, 15
Admission information
and application, 9
Admission, rolling (Art), 15
Advanced Placement credit
Engineering, 14
Humanities and Social Sciences,
123
Alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs,
policy on, 29
Alumni Association, Cooper Union, 8
Appeal (of academic standards and
regulations), 34
Application calendar, 9
Architecture,
The Irwin S. Chanin School of
Academic standards and regulations,
38
Application calendar, 9
Attendance, 23
Awards and prizes, 20
Architecture, Irwin S. Chanin School of
Accreditation, 37
Courses, 47
Faculty, 49
Freshman application requirements,
10
Graduate Curriculum, 43
Retention and graduation, 12
Scholarships, 20
Transfer requirements, 13
Undergraduate curriculum, 36
Art, The School of
Academic standards and
regulations, 55
Application calendar, 9
Attendance 23, 55
Awards and prizes, 20
Bachelor of Fine Arts curriculum, 52
Certificate requirements, 52
Courses, 60
Electives, 50
Facilities, 58
Faculty, 68
Freshman application requirements,
11
Nonresident study, 54
Retention and graduation, 12
Scholarships, 20
Transfer requirements, 13
Attendance
General, 23
Art, 23, 55
Engineering, 23
Humanities and Social Sciences,
23, 124
Awards and prizes, 20
Biomedical Engineering, 82
Books, materials and school supplies,
17
Budget guide, 19
Business, Preparatory studies, 72
Calendar
Academic, 2011–12, 2
Application, 9
Changes, 23
Career Development, 8
Center for Design & Typography, 59
Center for Writing, 124
Certificate in Art requirements, 52
Change of program
Architecture, 40
Art, 53 56
Engineering, 75 78
Chemical Engineering
Courses, 94 98
Curriculum, 83
Chemical Technology, Applied, 82
Civil Engineering
Courses, 100
Curriculum, 84
Code of Conduct, 31
College Boards, 14
Computer Center, 72
Computer Studio 59
Architecture, 42 44
Art, 56 58
Computer courses (Art), 61
Continuing Education, 7
Cooper Union, The
Academic Calendar, 2
Accreditation, 5
Administration, 136
Alumni Association, 8
Career Development, 8
Facilities, 5 6
Financial aid, 17
History, 4
Mission, 3
Programs, 5
Scholarships, 20
Trustees, 136
C.V. Starr Foundation, 72
Code of Conduct, 31
Courses
Architecture, 47
Art, 60
Art History and Theory, 131
Biology, 115
Chemistry, 115
Computer Science, 112 116
Design, 59 62
Drawing, 58 61
Engineering, 94 98
Chemical, 98
Civil, 100
Electrical and Computer, 103
Engineering Sciences, 110
Interdisciplinary, 111
Mechanical, 108
2011–2012 COURSE CATALOG
2012–2013
Film and Video, 62
Humanities and Social Sciences,
121
Mathematics, 113
Painting, 64
Performance, 65
Printmaking, 66
Physics, 114
Sculpture, 67
Credits
Architecture, 37
Art, 52
Engineering, 75
Curriculum
Bachelor of Architecture, 36
Bachelor of Engineering, 74
Bachelor of Fine Arts, 52
Humanities and Social Sciences,
119
Master of Architecture, 43
Master of Engineering, 80
Dean’s List (Engineering), 75
Design and Typography, The Center for,
59
Disabled Student Services, 8
Disciplinary sanctions, 33
Dismissal, 30
Dismissal and academic probation
Architecture, 39
Art, 57
Engineering, 79
Drawing
Courses, 61
Facilities, 58
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Courses, 103
Curriculum, 87
Emeriti
Faculty and Administration, 137
Trustee, Chairman, President, 136
Energy Engineering, 82
Engineering, The Albert Nerken School
of
Academic standards, 77
Advisory Council, 76
Application calendar, 9
Attendance, 23
Awards and prizes, 20
Bachelor’s degree programs, 74
Courses, 98
Curricula, 74
Facilities and Research, 72
Faculty, 119
Freshman application requirements,
11
Master of Engineering application
requirements, 13
Minors, 82
Transfer requirements, 13
Engineering Sciences, courses, 110
English proficiency, 14
Environmental Engineering, 82
Examinations, final (Engineering), 79
Exchange programs (Art), 54
Faculty
Architecture, 49
Art, 68
Engineering, 119
Humanities and Social Sciences,
134
Fair Practice Code, 27
Fees and expenses, 16
Film and Video
Courses, 62
Facilities, 58
Financial aid, 17
Foundation Building, 6
Freshman application requirements, 9
Freshman orientation, 9
Freshman profile—Fall 2010, 12
Grades
Architecture, 39
Art, 56
Engineering, 78
Humanities and Social Sciences,
123
Graduation
Architecture, 42
Art, 56
Engineering, 75
Fee, 16
Graphic Design
Courses, 62
Facilities, 58
Great Hall, 7
Health, 16, 24
History of The Cooper Union, 4
Honors, graduation with
(Engineering), 75
Housing, 6
Fee, 16
Humanities and Social Sciences,
Faculty of
Academic standards and
regulations, 123
Aims and objectives, 123
Attendance, 124
Awards and prizes, 20
Center for Writing, 124
Courses, 125-134
Curriculum, 123
Faculty, 134
Minor, 123
Immunization, Vaccination and, 26
Independent study
Art, 55
Humanities and Social Sciences,
123
Insurance, 26
Fee, 16
Interdisciplinary Engineering
Courses, 111
International students, 15
Law, Preparatory studies, 76
Leave of absence
Architecture, 40
Art, 57
Compulsory Medical, 25
Discretionary, 24
Medical, 25
Returning, 25
Library, 7
Lubalin, Herb, Study Center of Design
and Typography staff, 60
147
148
THE COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART
Master of Engineering program
Admission, 76 9
Application requirements, 13
Courses, 96, 99,100,101,102, 105108, 113-114, 116, 119
Curriculum, 80
Degree requirements, 94
Fellowships, 96
Thesis project, 96
Mathematics courses, 116
Mechanical Engineering
Courses, 108
Curriculum, 94
Medical, Preparatory studies, 72
Mobility Program (Art), 54
Nondiscrimination and AntiHarassment policies 138
Officers, Cooper Union, 136
Orientation, new student, 2
Painting
Courses, 64
Facilities, 58
Photography
Courses, 65
Facilities, 58
Physics, 118-119
Pre-medical, Pre-law, Pre-business, 76
Printmaking
Courses, 66
Facilities, 58
Probation, academic
Architecture, 39
Art, 57
Engineering, 79
Program changes, 24
Progress toward the degree
Architecture, 38
Art, 54
Engineering, 74
Property, student, 26
Readmission
Architecture, 42
Art, 57
Engineering, 79
Records, student, 23
Refunds, 16
Registration , 23
Regulations, general, 23
Religious observances, policy on, 27
Residence (degree requirement)
Architecture, 42
Art, 57
Engineering, 75
Retention and graduation rate, 12
Safety, campus security and, 30
Sculpture
Courses, 67
Facilities, 58
Student Accident and Sickness
Enrollment Waiver, 17
Student Council, Joint, 7
Student life, 7
Student records, 23
Student Residence, 6
Student rights, 31
Thesis project (Master of Engineering),
96
30 Cooper Square, 6
Transcripts, 23
Transfer application requirements, 12
Transfer credit
General, 24
Architecture, 38
Art, 55
Engineering, 76
Humanities and Social Sciences,
123
Trustees, The Cooper Union, 136
Tuition, 16
Vaccination and Immunization, 26
Video
Courses, 59
Facilities, 58
Withdrawal
From courses, 40
From school, 39, 57, 79
Writing, Center for, 124
Application For Admission
Office of Admissions and Records
Tel: 212.353.4120
Fax: 212.353.4342
http://cooper.edu
[email protected]
The Cooper Union
for the Advancement of Science and Art
30 Cooper Square
New York, NY 10003
CEEB Code: 2097
September 2013
Please print in ink.
A $70 nonrefundable application fee must be submitted with this application.
Make checks payable to The Cooper Union. Only checks or money orders will be accepted. Your cancelled check is your receipt.
First-Year Applicant
Transfer Applicant
Master’s Degree, Engineering (Deadline: February 1)
Check one category:
Check only one major from the following:
The Irwin S. Chanin
School of Architecture 1
Bachelor of Architecture
The School of Art 1
Bachelor of Fine Arts
(5-year degree)
(4-year degree)
Art Certificate Program
First-Year Deadline: Jan 7
Transfer Deadline: Jan 7
First-Year Deadline: Jan 9
Transfer Deadline: Jan 9
Early Decision
Deadline: Dec 3
The Albert Nerken
School of Engineering
Check one of the following
(Bachelor of Engineering Programs)
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
or
General Engineering (B.S. in Engineering)
First-Year Deadline: Feb 1
Transfer Deadline: Feb 1
Early Decision (First-Year only)
Deadline: Dec 3
Social Security #
Name
Mr.
Ms.
First
Middle
Last
Last name while in high school if now different:
Date of Birth
Birthplace
Are you a U.S. citizen?
Yes No
Are you a Permanent Resident?
Yes No
If not, what type of visa do you have?
A
I
Do you hold an I-20 from any institution?
Yes No
City / State / Country
B
J
F
R
G
L
H
M
Not Applicable
Other
Home Address
No. and Street
Apt#
County
City and State
Zip Code
Mailing Address2
No. and Street
Apt#
County
Telephone (
City and State
)
Cellphone (
)
Zip Code
e-mail address
Please do not include any support material—i.e., slides, sketchbooks, CDs/DVDs—at this time. We will accept portfolio work which accompanies your
hometest. The hometest will be sent to you in December (Early Decision Applicants ) and January (Regular Decision Applicants).
2 All applicants must provide a United States address to use for application processing.
1
Year of H.S. Graduation
Name of Your High School
Address of High School
No. and Street
City and State
Zip Code
CEEB Code
Yes
No
Have you ever attended an Open House or Tour at The Cooper Union?
Yes
No
Have you ever attended a Portfolio Day?
Yes
No
Is this the first time you are seeking either a two or four year college degree?
How did you find out about The Cooper Union?
Have you ever applied to The Cooper Union prior to this year? If so, when?
If yes, please indicate where and when.
Parent/Guardian/Partner/Spouse 1 Name:
Mr.
Ms.
Home Address
No. and Street
Apt#
County
Telephone
E-mail address
Occupation
Employer
Is your Parent/Guardian/Partner/Spouse 1 a college graduate?
Yes
City and State
Zip Code
City and State
Zip Code
No
If so, what college(s)?
Parent/Guardian/Partner/Spouse 2 Name:
Mr.
Ms.
Home Address
No. and Street
Apt#
County
Telephone
E-mail address
Occupation
Employer
Is your Parent/Guardian/Partner/Spouse 2 a college graduate?
Yes
No
If so, what college(s)?
Is English your first language?
Note: All applicants (first-year, transfer and graduate students) MUST answer the following questions:
Have you been convicted of a felony? Yes No Have you been dismissed from a college for disciplinary reasons? Yes No
Ethnic Survey Response is voluntary and the information will be kept confidential. Refusal to provide this information will not
subject the applicant to any adverse treatment. The information is being collected for statistical purposes only and will not be
used in a discriminating manner.
Are you HispanicLatino Yes No
With which ethnic group are you most closely identified?
African American
Puerto Rican–Mainland
Chinese
Japanese
Filipino
South Asian-Indian-Pakistani
Puerto Rican–Commonwealth
Caucasian
Other Latino
(please specify)
Vietnamese-Laotian-Cambodian
Mexican American
Caribbean American
Cuban American
Korean
American Indian or Alaskan Native
Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander
Multi-ethnic
Other
All applicants should sign below to verify that the information on this application is complete
and accurate to the best of your knowledge, and that it is your own work:
Signature
Date
Only transfer and graduate engineering applicants should answer the following:
(If you do not complete this section, you will not be eligible to receive any credit for previous work.)
Colleges attended
Date
Name
Credits Completed
Major
Address
City and State
Zip Code
CEEB Code
Colleges attended
Name
Date
Credits Completed
Major
Address
City and State
Zip Code
CEEB Code
Colleges attended
Name
Date
Credits Completed
Major
Address
City and State
Zip Code
CEEB Code
Colleges attended
Date
Name
Credits Completed
Major
Address
City and State
Zip Code
CEEB Code
Yes
No
Are you in good academic standing?
Yes
No
Are you eligible to return to college last attended?
Yes
No
Do you plan to graduate?
If so, when?
If no, please explain
Reasons for desiring transfer
If you have been out of college more than four months, indicate what you have been doing since leaving school.
over: Master’s Degree Applicants only
For Applicants to the Engineering Master’s Program Only
Full-Time Employment Record:
Indicate the most recent full-time position and list others on a separate page appended to this application.
From
To
Company
Address
Position
Job Description
Extra-Curricular Activities:
Professional Engineering Societies
Honor Societies
Research Projects (include details of papers delivered or published)
Graduate Engineering
Check major option you intend to follow in the Graduate Engineering Program at Cooper Union:
Chemical
Civil
Electrical
Mechanical
Please indicate the minor you intend to follow in the Graduate Engineering Program at Cooper Union (optional):
Are you working in any of the fields checked above?
Have you had your thesis subject approved?
Yes
Yes
No
No
Who will be your thesis adviser? (optional)
I understand that I am expected to complete the prescribed curriculum for the course in which I am enrolled and that I will be retained
only if I comply with the scholastic requirements and the regulations of the School of Engineering Graduate Program.
Signature
Date
Application For Admission | Master of Architecture II
Office of Admissions and Records
Tel: 212.353.4120
Fax: 212.353.4342
http://cooper.edu
The Cooper Union
for the Advancement of Science and Art
30 Cooper Square
New York, NY 10003
Please print in ink
GRE Code: 2097
September 2013
A $70 nonrefundable application fee must be submitted with this application.
Make checks payable to The Cooper Union. Only checks or money orders will be accepted. Your cancelled check is your receipt.
This application and all supporting materials must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records by February 1, 2013.
Please refer to the website for other required documents and materials.
The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture | Master of Architecture II
State your intended area of study (required):
History and Criticism Technologies
Urban Studies
Social Security #
Name
Mr.
Ms.
First
Gender
Male
Middle
Last
City/State
Zip Code
Female
Last name while in high school if now different:
Date of Birth
Birthplace
City / State / Country
Home Address
No. and Street
Apt#
Mailing Address1
No. and Street
Apt#
City and State
Telephone (
Zip Code
)
Are you a U.S. citizen?
e-mail address
Yes
No
Are you a permanent resident? Yes
If not a U.S. citizen, country of citizenship
What type of visa do you have?
A
J
B
R
Do you hold an I-20 from any institution?
Yes
No
F
L
G
M
How did you learn about The Cooper Union?
1. All applicants must provide a United States mailing address to use for application processing
H
I
Other Not applicable
No
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Please list all high schools, colleges and universities attended and degree(s) attained.
Note: You must have completed a first professional accredited degree in architecture at least 2 years prior to applying to the program.
High School
Name
CEEB Code
Year of Graduation
No. and Street
City/State
Zip Code
Address
College attended
Dates
Name
Address
No. and Street
City/State
Zip Code
Degree attained
Date
College attended
Name
Dates
Address
No. and Street
City/State
Zip Code
Degree attained
Date
NATIVE AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE INFORMATION
Native language
Indicate other languages and ability
Language
Written proficiency High Medium Low
Verbal proficiency High Medium Low
Language
Written proficiency High Medium Low
Verbal proficiency High Medium Low
RECOMMENDATIONS
List three people who will write a recommendation letter in support of your application.
Name
College/University/Organization
Name
College/University/Organization
Name
College/University/Organization
RELEVANT WORK EXPERIENCE
Employer
Position held
Start date
End date
Address
No. and Street
City/State
Zip Code
Employer
Position held
Start date
End date
Address
No. and Street
City/State
Zip Code
Employer
Position held
Start date
End date
Address
No. and Street
City/State
Zip Code
All applicants MUST answer the following questions:
Have you been convicted of a felony? Yes No Have you been dismissed from a college for disciplinary reasons? Yes No
Ethnic Survey Response is voluntary and the information will be kept confidential. The information is being collected for statistical
purposes only and will not be used in a discriminating manner. Refusal to provide this information will not subject the applicant to any
adverse treatment.
With which ethnic group are you most closely identified?
African American
Puerto Rican–Mainland
Chinese
Japanese
Filipino
South Asian-Indian-Pakistani
Other
Puerto Rican–Commonwealth
Caucasian
Other Latino
(please specify)
Vietnamese-Laotian-Cambodian
Mexican American
Caribbean American
Cuban American
Korean
Native American Indian
Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander
Multi-ethnic
I certify that the information provided on this application is, to the best of my knowledge, complete and accurate.
I understand that any misrepresentation may be cause for being denied admission.
Your application will not be processed without your signature.
Signature
First Name
Date
Last (family) Name
Date of Birth
Incomplete applications cannot be considered.
Please refer to the website for other documents and materials required for a complete application.
http://apply.cooper.edu

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