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UR
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E PL
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Congressional Record
M
S
United States
of America
PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE
Vol. 146
106 th CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION
WASHINGTON, MONDAY, JULY 17, 2000
No. 92
House of Representatives
The House met at 12:30 p.m. and was
called to order by the Speaker pro tempore (Mrs. BIGGERT).
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DESIGNATION OF SPEAKER PRO
TEMPORE
The SPEAKER pro tempore laid before the House the following communication from the Speaker:
WASHINGTON, DC,
July 17, 2000.
I hereby appoint the Honorable JUDY
BIGGERT to act as Speaker pro tempore on
this day.
J. DENNIS HASTERT,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
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MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE
A message from the Senate by Mr.
Lundregan, one of its clerks, announced that the Senate has passed
without amendment bills of the House
of the following titles:
H.R. 8. An act to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phaseout the estate and
gift taxes over a 10-year period.
H.R. 4391. An act to amend title 4 of the
United States Code to establish sourcing requirements for State and local taxation of
mobile telecommunication services.
The message also announced that the
Senate has passed with an amendment
in which the concurrence of the House
is requested, a bill of the House of the
following title:
H.R. 4205. An act to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2001 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities
of the Department of Energy, to prescribe
personnel strengths for such fiscal year for
the Armed Forces, and for other purposes.
The message also announced that the
Senate insists upon its amendment to
the bill (H.R. 4205) ‘‘An Act to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2001
for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the
Department of Energy, to prescribe
personnel strengths for such fiscal year
for the Armed Forces, and for other
purposes,’’ requests a conference with
the House on the disagreeing votes of
the two Houses thereon, and appoints
Mr. WARNER, Mr. THURMOND, Mr.
MCCAIN, Mr. SMITH of New Hampshire,
Mr. INHOFE, Mr. SANTORUM, Ms. SNOWE,
Mr. ROBERTS, Mr. ALLARD, Mr. HUTCHINSON, Mr. SESSIONS, Mr. LEVIN, Mr.
KENNEDY, Mr. BINGAMAN, Mr. BYRD, Mr.
ROBB, Mr. LIEBERMAN, Mr. CLELAND,
Ms. LANDRIEU, and Mr. REED, to be the
conferees on the part of the Senate.
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MORNING HOUR DEBATES
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of January 19, 1999, the Chair will now recognize Members from lists submitted by
the majority and minority leaders for
morning hour debates. The Chair will
alternate recognition between the parties, with each party limited to not to
exceed 30 minutes, and each Member,
except the majority leader, the minority leader, or the minority whip, limited to not to exceed 5 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentleman
from Florida (Mr. STEARNS) for 5 minutes.
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GAS PRICES
Mr. STEARNS. Madam Speaker, I am
here to speak on a growing controversy, the controversy of who is to
blame for the high gas prices, particularly in the Midwest, the high spikes.
Some say it is big oil and others say it
is the result of the EPA forcing
through Phase II formulated gasoline.
Let us this afternoon analyze the
facts and begin to see where the responsibility lies. Let me cite from an
internal Energy Department memo
that proves that the administration
knew that the new formulated gasoline, RFG, as required by EPA was a
major reason for the spikes in the Midwest.
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The memo was circulated while the
administration was publicly blasting
the big oil companies for gouging
Americans. The Washington Times obtained the June 5 memo that was written for Secretary Richardson of the Department of Energy by the Department’s acting policy director, Ms.
Kenderdine.
This memo mirrors what analysts
and oil companies have been stating;
the mix of high demand and low supply
has led to high prices for all gasoline.
We all realize that; that makes sense.
Of course, that is part of the cycle in a
free market experience. The disturbing
part of that memo goes on to say, and
let me quote, Madam Speaker, ‘‘the
Milwaukee and Chicago areas supply
situation is further affected by, among
other things, an RFG formulation specific to the area that is more difficult
to produce.’’
Despite the clear-cut facts in the
memo, the administration has claimed
that the price hikes and spikes were
unexplainable. In fact, they have openly speculated that it is probably big
business beating up on poor citizens
again. When, in fact, it is big government beating up on the American taxpayers again.
Refineries have been working to capacity to produce a new EPA-mandated
gasoline and have been strained to
meet the summer demands. This has
left reserve supplies in a dangerous position.
According to the DOE memo, Chicago
refineries do not have the capacity to
step up production when there is a
shortage and the specifically formulated gasoline mixed with the ethanol
in the region could not be imported
from other areas because few make the
unique blend of fuel.
The most damaging evidence is the
conclusion in that memo from June 5
that supplies were sufficient to meet
overall demand at the time. The market was ‘‘sufficiently tight,’’ he went
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This symbol represents the time of day during the House proceedings, e.g.,
1407 is 2:07 p.m.
Matter set in this typeface indicates words inserted or appended, rather than spoken, by a Member of the House on the floor.
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July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
on later to say ‘‘that any disruption in
the distribution system could contribute to Phase II RFG shortages’’
throughout the summer. So there we
have it, that is where the spikes came
from.
The White House has attempted to
rely on a strategy to deflect blame
from the real culprit, themselves. Considering the gasoline problems facing
Americans today, I am very surprised
at the timing of the EPA and this administration to move forward with the
implementation of this new blend, this
RFG Phase II.
I do not think the administration intentionally did this, but I am not sure.
Where is their energy plan today?
Where are the steps that could have
prevented this from happening? Why
did the EPA simply not postpone
changing the gas formulas until such a
time as the oil market had leveled off?
Also, why did St. Louis, Missouri receive a waiver while, to my knowledge,
no other city did?
Another shocking piece of this show
is on Friday, June 30, the EPA released
in a proposed rulemaking a comment
period on whether reformulated gasoline is needed to meet the air quality
standards. In other words, they are
saying is this even needed. What? I
mean, here they are mandating they be
put in place, yet now they are issuing
a memo to say is it needed. You mean
to tell me that they insisted on moving
forward with Phase II of RFG without
knowing if they even needed to keep
the program?
When will the EPA do their homework before they force regulations
upon the American people? It appears
to me from the evidence that the
spiked prices in the Midwest were due
to the EPA forcing a new formulation,
a new blend of gasoline, during this
time of high OPEC prices and low supplies.
The EPA should accept responsibility
for putting the public through the expensive process of reformulated gasoline without proof that the gasoline
would help improve our air and should
withhold moving forward with any
other new RFG regulations in any
other cities.
Madam Speaker, the EPA and Department of Energy must formulate a
plan and study to make sure their plan
is effective before they gouge the
American people at the pumps.
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LIVABLE COMMUNITIES
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under a
previous order of the House, the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. BLUMENAUER) is
recognized for 5 minutes.
Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Speaker,
the Federal Government has no greater
priority than to be a good partner to
promote livable communities.
The morning paper carried a story
about another independent study to
chart the ecological vital signs of our
national park systems.
Madam Speaker, I think this is an
important area to pose attention to,
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first, because it shows how the Federal
Government can lead by example, and,
second, it serves as a powerful refutation that somehow the United States,
being a huge and wealthy Nation, does
not have to worry about things like
sprawl and congestion, unplanned
growth and loss of farmland, that we
just pave more, continue to expand,
create more of whatever land we wish
of farm, housing or roads.
Madam Speaker, it is reminiscent of
Alice in Wonderland’s experience with
the Mad Hatter’s tea party. ‘‘Yes,
that’s it’’ said the Hatter with a sigh,
‘‘it’s always tea time and we’ve no
time to wash the things between
whiles.’’
‘‘Then you keep moving round, I suppose?’’ said Alice.
‘‘Exactly so,’’ said the Hatter, ‘‘as
the things get used up.’’
‘‘But what happens when you come to
the beginning again?’’ Alice ventured
to ask.
‘‘Suppose we change the subject,’’ the
March Hare interrupted, yawning. ‘‘I’m
getting tired of this. I vote the young
lady tells us a story.’’
Our tea party with the built and natural environment is not solved with
more stories. We are going to have to
face realities in our mature cities,
small town America, fraying suburbs,
even in our national parks. There are
limits to the strains we can put on the
land in our transportation systems.
The numbers are staggering in our
national parks and other federallymanaged sites. In 1997, over 370 million
visitors
increasingly
jammed
on
clogged parking lots, jammed highways, fragile and irreplaceable resources suffering damage from too
many vehicles and too many people.
Nearby gateways communities are also
negatively impacted by trafficking, decreased air quality, but there is a new
trend in thinking about how we solve
these problems.
Part of the TEA–21 Transportation
Equity Act for the 21st Century called
for a coordination and study between
the Department of Transportation and
the Secretary of the Interior. They
have already produced recommendations for public transportation services
at 128 sites that will enhance the visitor experience and protect the environment.
Madam Speaker, this new broach to
transportation has already produced
tangible results in a number of areas.
The Zion National Park in Utah,
which has suffered from severe congestion, gridlock and destruction of natural resources, has helped to implement a new program, a shuttle bus system initiated in May of this year helps
protect the fragile natural resources
and protect visitors away as they visit
from the canyon and provide services
to the gateway community of Springdale.
The National Park Service has proposed a light rail transit system for the
south rim of the Grand Canyon. It will
allow visitors to leave their cars out-
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side the park and ride the light rail
train to a canyon view information
plaza, there they can view exhibits,
ride alternatively-fueled vehicles and
hike along the canyon’s rim. Construction has already begun on the information plaza in April, and the light rail
system is expected to be in place by the
spring of 2004.
It is also a priority to reduce traffic
congestion in the Yosemite National
Park. It is already implemented a 2year demonstration program for a regional transportation system that
would allow visitors to leave their cars
outside the park and travel by shuttle
bus into and around the Yosemite Valley.
Together activities like this will reduce reliance on private automobiles
for visitors, allow for sustainable use
and enjoyment of our public lands, improve the livability and quality of life
in nearby communities, and allow visitors to better enjoy their experience.
Unlike the Mad Hatter, we cannot
continue to just move to the next place
at the party. Fortunately, this leadership shows how we can achieve this,
not just for national parks, but as a
model for American communities to
make them safer, healthier and more
economically secure.
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RECESS
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 12 of rule I, the Chair declares the House in recess until 2 p.m.
Accordingly (at 12 o’clock and 41
minutes p.m.), the House stood in recess until 2 p.m.
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1400
AFTER RECESS
The recess having expired, the House
was called to order by the Speaker pro
tempore (Mr. MILLER of Florida) at 2
p.m.
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PRAYER
The Chaplain, the Reverend Daniel P.
Coughlin, offered the following prayer:
Lord, our God, our history as a people has been great. We are humbled by
reflecting upon the events of the past.
Fill us with hope and vision.
Preserve us from making the mistakes of the past. Grant us greater
judgment that we may be children born
of freedom and strong in virtue.
May we honor the heroic men and
women of the past who, when insulted,
did not return insult; and, when threatened, handed themselves over to You,
the One who judges justly. In them we
have come to recognize Your grace
shining through human weakness.
May those who suffered for justice’
sake receive the beatitude’s reward;
and may those who cried out in the
void of justice, today be heard that a
new day of peace may be born rooted in
justice, for You live and are attentive
to our cries now and forever. Amen.
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July 17, 2000
THE JOURNAL
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
Chair has examined the Journal of the
last day’s proceedings and announces
to the House his approval thereof.
Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.
lihoods just because the administration
refuses or fails to stand up to foreign
oil pricing nations.
I yield back the administration’s national policy which continues to cost
Americans precious money every time
they go to the gas pump.
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PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Will the
gentleman from Nevada (Mr. GIBBONS)
come forward and lead the House in the
Pledge of Allegiance.
Mr. GIBBONS led the Pledge of Allegiance as follows:
STOP GIVING TECHNOLOGICAL
CHARITY TO CHINA
(Mr. TRAFICANT asked and was
given permission to address the House
for 1 minute and to revise and extend
his remarks.)
Mr. TRAFICANT. Something is
wrong, Mr. Speaker. China has already
stolen our nuclear secrets; and what
they have not stolen, the White House
has given to them, specifically, supercomputer and satellite technology that
enhances China’s missile program, and
they have missiles pointed at us.
Now, if that is not enough to
download your hard drive, news reports
now confirm that the White House will
allow private sector high-tech companies to hire Chinese scientists involved
with their military technologies.
Beam me up. What is next? Will we
give China our Star Wars umbrella?
Mr. Speaker, I yield back both the
danger and the stupidity of this charity to China.
I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the
United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God,
indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
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COMMUNICATION FROM THE
CLERK OF THE HOUSE
The SPEAKER pro tempore laid before the House the following communication from the Clerk of the House of
Representatives:
OFFICE OF THE CLERK,
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
Washington, DC, July 14, 2000.
Hon. J. DENNIS HASTERT,
The Speaker, House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
DEAR MR. SPEAKER: Pursuant to the permission granted to Clause 2(h) of Rule II of
the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Clerk received the following message from the Secretary of the Senate on
July 14, 2000 at 9:05 a.m.
That the Senate Passed without amendment H.R. 3544.
That the Senate Passed without amendment H.R. 3591.
With best wishes, I am
Sincerely,
JEFF TRANDAHL,
Clerk of the House.
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AMERICA’S FOREIGN OIL
DEPENDENCY
(Mr. GIBBONS asked and was given
permission to address the House for 1
minute and to revise and extend his remarks.)
Mr. GIBBONS. Mr. Speaker, Americans are paying more for gas now than
at any other time in our history. Families like David and Jenny Davis of
Reno, Nevada are being forced to eliminate their vacation plans and change
their daily schedules, like eliminating
after-school programs for their children, just to save money on gas; and all
of this when our country’s dependency
on foreign oil is at an all-time high.
Yet, for 8 years, the Clinton-Gore administration has refused to address and
reduce our dependence on foreign oil or
to prevent foreign oil price-fixing
schemes. Instead, the administration
continues to support oil-producing
countries, even though they blatantly
banned together to raise oil prices.
Now American families are paying
for the administration’s actions or inactions. Our hard-working families
should not have to sacrifice their live-
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ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER
PRO TEMPORE
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, the Chair
announces that he will postpone further proceedings today on each motion
to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are
ordered or on which the vote is objected to under clause 6 of rule XX.
Any record votes on postponed questions will be taken after debate has
concluded on all motions to suspend
the rules, but not before 7 p.m. today.
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INTERNET GAMBLING
PROHIBITION ACT OF 2000
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
move to suspend the rules and pass the
bill (H.R. 3125) to prohibit Internet
gambling, and for other purposes, as
amended.
The Clerk read as follows:
H.R. 3125
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in
Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
This Act may be cited as the ‘‘Internet
Gambling Prohibition Act of 2000’’.
SEC. 2. PROHIBITION ON INTERNET GAMBLING.
(a) IN GENERAL.—Chapter 50 of title 18,
United States Code, is amended by adding at
the end the following:
‘‘§ 1085. Internet gambling
‘‘(a) DEFINITIONS.—In this section the following definitions apply:
‘‘(1) BETS OR WAGERS.—The term ‘bets or
wagers’—
‘‘(A) means the staking or risking by any
person of something of value upon the out-
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come of a contest of others, a sporting event,
or a game predominantly subject to chance,
upon an agreement or understanding that
the person or another person will receive
something of greater value than the amount
staked or risked in the event of a certain
outcome;
‘‘(B) includes the purchase of a chance or
opportunity to win a lottery or other prize
(which opportunity to win is predominantly
subject to chance);
‘‘(C) includes any scheme of a type described in section 3702 of title 28; and
‘‘(D) does not include—
‘‘(i) a bona fide business transaction governed by the securities laws (as that term is
defined in section 3(a)(47) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(47)))
for the purchase or sale at a future date of
securities (as that term is defined in section
3(a)(10) of the Securities Exchange Act of
1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(10)));
‘‘(ii) a transaction on or subject to the
rules of a contract market designated pursuant to section 5 of the Commodity Exchange
Act (7 U.S.C. 7);
‘‘(iii) a contract of indemnity or guarantee;
‘‘(iv) a contract for life, health, or accident
insurance; or
‘‘(v) participation in a simulation sports
game or an educational game or contest
that—
‘‘(I) is not dependent solely on the outcome
of any single sporting event or nonparticipant’s singular individual performance in
any single sporting event;
‘‘(II) has an outcome that reflects the relative knowledge and skill of the participants
with such outcome determined predominantly by accumulated statistical results of
sporting events and nonparticipants accumulated individual performances therein; and
‘‘(III) offers a prize or award to a participant that is established in advance of the
game or contest and is not determined by
the number of participants or the amount of
any fees paid by those participants.
‘‘(2) CLOSED-LOOP SUBSCRIBER-BASED SERVICE.—The term ‘closed-loop subscriber-based
service’ means any information service or
system that uses—
‘‘(A) a device or combination of devices—
‘‘(i) expressly authorized and operated in
accordance with the laws of a State, exclusively for placing, receiving, or otherwise
making a bet or wager described in subsection (f)(1)(B); and
‘‘(ii) by which an individual located within
any State must subscribe and be registered
with the provider of the wagering service by
name, address, age, and appropriate billing
information to be authorized to place, receive, or otherwise make a bet or wager, and
must be physically located within that State
in order to be authorized to do so;
‘‘(B) a secure and effective customer
verification and age verification system, updated to remain current with evolving technology, expressly authorized and operated in
accordance with the laws of the State in
which it is located, to ensure that all applicable Federal and State legal and regulatory
requirements for lawful gambling are met;
and
‘‘(C) appropriate data security standards to
prevent unauthorized access by any person
who has not subscribed or who is a minor.
‘‘(3) FOREIGN JURISDICTION.—The term ‘foreign jurisdiction’ means a jurisdiction of a
foreign country or political subdivision
thereof.
‘‘(4) GAMBLING BUSINESS.—The term ‘gambling business’ means—
‘‘(A) a business that is conducted at a gambling establishment, or that—
‘‘(i) involves—
‘‘(I) the placing, receiving, or otherwise
making of bets or wagers; or
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‘‘(II) the offering to engage in the placing,
receiving, or otherwise making of bets or wagers;
‘‘(ii) involves 1 or more persons who conduct, finance, manage, supervise, direct, or
own all or part of such business; and
‘‘(iii) has been or remains in substantially
continuous operation for a period in excess
of 10 days or has a gross revenue of $2,000 or
more from such business during any 24-hour
period; and
‘‘(B) any soliciting agent of a business described in subparagraph (A).
‘‘(5) INFORMATION ASSISTING IN THE PLACING
OF A BET OR WAGER.—The term ‘information
assisting in the placing of a bet or wager’—
‘‘(A) means information that is intended
by the sender or recipient to be used by a
person engaged in the business of betting or
wagering to place, receive, or otherwise
make a bet or wager; and
‘‘(B) does not include—
‘‘(i) information concerning parimutuel
pools that is exchanged exclusively between
or among 1 or more racetracks or other parimutuel wagering facilities licensed by the
State or approved by the foreign jurisdiction
in which the facility is located, and 1 or
more parimutuel wagering facilities licensed
by the State or approved by the foreign jurisdiction in which the facility is located, if
that information is used only to conduct
common pool parimutuel pooling under applicable law;
‘‘(ii) information exchanged exclusively between or among 1 or more racetracks or
other parimutuel wagering facilities licensed
by the State or approved by the foreign jurisdiction in which the facility is located,
and a support service located in another
State or foreign jurisdiction, if the information is used only for processing bets or wagers made with that facility under applicable
law;
‘‘(iii) information exchanged exclusively
between or among 1 or more wagering facilities that are licensed and regulated by the
State in which each facility is located, and
any support service, wherever located, if the
information is used only for the pooling or
processing of bets or wagers made by or with
the facility or facilities under each State’s
applicable law;
‘‘(iv) any news reporting or analysis of wagering activity, including odds, racing or
event results, race and event schedules, or
categories of wagering; or
‘‘(v) any posting or reporting of any educational information on how to make a bet
or wager or the nature of betting or wagering.
‘‘(6) INTERACTIVE COMPUTER SERVICE.—The
term ‘interactive computer service’ means
any information service, system, or access
software provider that operates in, or uses a
channel or instrumentality of, interstate or
foreign commerce to provide or enable access
by multiple users to a computer server,
which includes the transmission, storage, retrieval, hosting, linking, formatting, or
translation of a communication made by another person, and including specifically a
service, system, or access software provider
that—
‘‘(A) provides access to the Internet; or
‘‘(B) is engaged in the business of providing
an information location tool (which means a
service that refers or links users to an online
location, including a directory, index, reference, pointer, or hypertext link).
‘‘(7) INTERACTIVE COMPUTER SERVICE PROVIDER.—The
term ‘interactive computer
service provider’ means any person that provides an interactive computer service, to the
extent that such person offers or provides
such service.
‘‘(8) INTERNET.—The term ‘Internet’ means
the international computer network of both
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Federal and non-Federal interoperable packet switched data networks.
‘‘(9) PERSON.—The term ‘person’ means any
individual, association, partnership, joint
venture, corporation (or any affiliate of a
corporation), State or political subdivision
thereof, department, agency, or instrumentality of a State or political subdivision
thereof, or any other government, organization, or entity (including any governmental
entity (as defined in section 3701(2) of title
28)).
‘‘(10) PRIVATE NETWORK.—The term ‘private
network’ means a communications channel
or channels, including voice or computer
data transmission facilities, that use
either—
‘‘(A) private dedicated lines; or
‘‘(B) the public communications infrastructure, if the infrastructure is secured by
means of the appropriate private communications technology to prevent unauthorized access.
‘‘(11) STATE.—The term ‘State’ means a
State of the United States, the District of
Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto
Rico, or a commonwealth, territory, or possession of the United States.
‘‘(12) SUBSCRIBER.—The term ‘subscriber’—
‘‘(A) means any person with a business relationship with the interactive computer
service provider through which such person
receives access to the system, service, or
network of that provider, even if no formal
subscription agreement exists; and
‘‘(B) includes registrants, students who are
granted access to a university system or network, and employees or contractors who are
granted access to the system or network of
their employer.
‘‘(13) SOLICITING AGENT.—The term ‘soliciting agent’ means any agent who knowingly
solicits for a gambling business described in
paragraph (4)(A) of this subsection.
‘‘(b) INTERNET GAMBLING.—
‘‘(1) PROHIBITION.—Subject to subsection
(f), it shall be unlawful for a person engaged
in a gambling business knowingly to use the
Internet or any other interactive computer
service—
‘‘(A) to place, receive, or otherwise make a
bet or wager; or
‘‘(B) to send, receive, or invite information
assisting in the placing of a bet or wager.
‘‘(2) PENALTIES.—A person engaged in a
gambling business who violates this section
shall be—
‘‘(A) fined in an amount equal to not more
than the greater of—
‘‘(i) the total amount that such person bet
or wagered, or placed, received, or accepted
in bets or wagers, as a result of engaging in
that business in violation of this section; or
‘‘(ii) $20,000;
‘‘(B) imprisoned not more than 4 years; or
‘‘(C) both.
‘‘(3) PERMANENT INJUNCTIONS.—Upon conviction of a person under this section, the
court may enter a permanent injunction enjoining such person from placing, receiving,
or otherwise making bets or wagers or sending, receiving, or inviting information assisting in the placing of bets or wagers.
‘‘(c) CIVIL REMEDIES.—
‘‘(1) JURISDICTION.—The district courts of
the United States shall have original and exclusive jurisdiction to prevent and restrain
violations of this section by issuing appropriate orders in accordance with this section,
regardless of whether a prosecution has been
initiated under this section.
‘‘(2) PROCEEDINGS.—
‘‘(A) INSTITUTION BY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.—
‘‘(i) IN GENERAL.—The United States may
institute proceedings under this subsection
to prevent or restrain a violation of this section.
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‘‘(ii) RELIEF.—Upon application of the
United States under this subparagraph, the
district court may enter a temporary restraining order or an injunction against any
person to prevent or restrain a violation of
this section if the court determines, after notice and an opportunity for a hearing, that
there is a substantial probability that such
violation has occurred or will occur.
‘‘(B) INSTITUTION BY STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL.—
‘‘(i) IN GENERAL.—The attorney general of a
State (or other appropriate State official) in
which a violation of this section allegedly
has occurred or will occur, after providing
written notice to the United States, may institute proceedings under this subsection to
prevent or restrain the violation.
‘‘(ii) RELIEF.—Upon application of the attorney general (or other appropriate State
official) of an affected State under this subparagraph, the district court may enter a
temporary restraining order or an injunction
against any person to prevent or restrain a
violation of this section if the court determines, after notice and an opportunity for a
hearing, that there is a substantial probability that such violation has occurred or
will occur.
‘‘(C) INDIAN LANDS.—Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B), for a violation that
is alleged to have occurred, or may occur, on
Indian lands (as that term is defined in section 4 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act
(25 U.S.C. 2703))—
‘‘(i) the United States shall have the enforcement authority provided under subparagraph (A); and
‘‘(ii) the enforcement authorities specified
in an applicable Tribal-State compact negotiated under section 11 of the Indian Gaming
Regulatory Act (25 U.S.C. 2710) shall be carried out in accordance with that compact.
‘‘(D) EXPIRATION.—Any temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction entered pursuant to subparagraph (A) or (B)
shall expire if, and as soon as, the United
States, or the attorney general (or other appropriate State official) of the State, as applicable, notifies the court that issued the
order or injunction that the United States or
the State, as applicable, will not seek a permanent injunction.
‘‘(3) EXPEDITED PROCEEDINGS.—
‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—In addition to any proceeding under paragraph (2), a district court
may, in exigent circumstances, enter a temporary restraining order against a person alleged to be in violation of this section upon
application of the United States under paragraph (2)(A), or the attorney general (or
other appropriate State official) of an affected State under paragraph (2)(B), without
notice and the opportunity for a hearing as
provided in rule 65(b) of the Federal Rules of
Civil Procedure (except as provided in subsection (d)(3)), if the United States or the
State, as applicable, demonstrates that there
is probable cause to believe that the use of
the Internet or other interactive computer
service at issue violates this section.
‘‘(B) HEARINGS.—A hearing requested concerning an order entered under this paragraph shall be held at the earliest practicable time.
‘‘(d) INTERACTIVE COMPUTER SERVICE PROVIDERS.—
‘‘(1) IMMUNITY FROM LIABILITY FOR USE BY
ANOTHER.—
‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—An interactive computer
service provider described in subparagraph
(B) shall not be liable, under this section or
any other provision of Federal or State law
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prohibiting or regulating gambling or gambling-related activities, for the use of its facilities or services by another person to engage in Internet gambling activity or advertising or promotion of Internet gambling activity that violates such law—
‘‘(i) arising out of any transmitting, routing, or providing of connections for gambling-related material or activity (including
intermediate and temporary storage in the
course of such transmitting, routing, or providing connections) by the provider, if—
‘‘(I) the material or activity was initiated
by or at the direction of a person other than
the provider;
‘‘(II) the transmitting, routing, or providing of connections is carried out through
an automatic process without selection of
the material or activity by the provider;
‘‘(III) the provider does not select the recipients of the material or activity, except
as an automatic response to the request of
another person; and
‘‘(IV) the material or activity is transmitted through the system or network of the
provider without modification of its content;
or
‘‘(ii) arising out of any gambling-related
material or activity at an online site residing on a computer server owned, controlled,
or operated by or for the provider, or arising
out of referring or linking users to an online
location containing such material or activity, if the material or activity was initiated
by or at the direction of a person other than
the provider, unless the provider fails to
take expeditiously, with respect to the particular material or activity at issue, the actions described in paragraph (2)(D) following
the receipt by the provider of an order under
paragraph (2)(B).
‘‘(B) ELIGIBILITY.—An interactive computer service provider is described in this
subparagraph only if the provider—
‘‘(i) maintains and implements a written or
electronic policy that requires the provider
to terminate the account of a subscriber of
its system or network expeditiously following the receipt by the provider of an
order under paragraph (2)(B) alleging that
such subscriber has violated or is violating
this section; and
‘‘(ii) with respect to the particular material or activity at issue, has not knowingly
permitted its computer server to be used to
engage in activity that the provider knows is
prohibited by this section, with the specific
intent that such server be used for such purpose.
‘‘(2) COURT ORDER TO INTERACTIVE COMPUTER SERVICE PROVIDERS.—
‘‘(A) APPLICATION.—A Federal or State law
enforcement agency, acting within its authority and jurisdiction and having reason to
believe that a particular online site residing
on a computer server owned, controlled, or
operated by or for the provider is being used
by another person to violate this section,
may apply ex parte to a United States magistrate judge for an order to such provider
under this paragraph to take the actions described in subparagraph (D).
‘‘(B) ORDER.—The magistrate judge shall
issue the order sought under subparagraph
(A) upon a showing of probable cause to believe the particular on line site is being so
used.
‘‘(C) NOTICE.—Seventy-two hours after the
latter of—
‘‘(i) giving notice to the alleged violator of
the order under subparagraph (B); or
‘‘(ii) making reasonable efforts to notify
the alleged violator of the order;
the law enforcement agency shall give the
provider a copy of the court order. At that
time the order shall take immediate effect.
An alleged violator may, however, contest
the order by requesting an expedited hearing
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from the court during that 72-hour period. If
the alleged violator does so, the court shall
as soon as possible hold the hearing, at
which the law enforcement agency shall have
the burden of establishing by a preponderance of the evidence that the on line site is
being used in violation of this section.
‘‘(D) SCOPE OF ORDER.—An order under this
paragraph shall require that the provider
expeditiously—
‘‘(i) remove or disable access to the material or activity residing at that online site
that allegedly violates this section; or
‘‘(ii) in any case in which the provider does
not control the site at which the subject material or activity resides, the provider,
through any agent of the provider designated
in accordance with section 512(c)(2) of title
17, or other responsible identified employee
or contractor—
‘‘(I) notify the Federal or State law enforcement agency that the provider is not
the proper recipient of such order; and
‘‘(II) upon receipt of a subpoena, cooperate
with the Federal or State law enforcement
agency in identifying the person or persons
who control the site.
‘‘(E) CONTENTS OF ORDER.—An order issued
under this paragraph shall—
‘‘(i) identify the material or activity that
allegedly violates this section;
‘‘(ii) provide information reasonably sufficient to permit the provider to locate (and,
as appropriate, in an order issued under subparagraph (D)(i) to block access to) the material or activity;
‘‘(iii) be supplied to any agent of a provider
designated in accordance with section
512(c)(2) of title 17, if information regarding
such designation is readily available to the
public; and
‘‘(iv) provide information that is reasonably sufficient to permit the provider to contact the law enforcement agency that obtained the order, including the name of the
law enforcement agency, and the name and
telephone number of an individual to contact
at the law enforcement agency (and, if available, the electronic mail address of that individual).
‘‘(F) POSTORDER HEARING.—An alleged violator that has not contested an order under
subparagraph (C) may, not later than 60 days
after the order takes effect, apply to have
the order rescinded. A United States magistrate judge shall hear and determine that
application. At that hearing the law enforcement agency that sought the order shall
have the burden to show, by a preponderance
of the evidence, that the site was being used
by that alleged violator to violate this section.
‘‘(3) INJUNCTIVE RELIEF.—
‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—The United States, or a
State law enforcement agency acting within
its authority and jurisdiction, may, not less
than 24 hours following the issuance to an
interactive computer service provider of an
order described in paragraph (2)(B), in a civil
action, obtain a temporary restraining order,
or an injunction to prevent the use of the
interactive computer service by another person in violation of this section.
‘‘(B) LIMITATIONS.—Notwithstanding any
other provision of this section, in the case of
any application for a temporary restraining
order or an injunction against an interactive
computer service provider described in paragraph (1)(B) to prevent a violation of this
section—
‘‘(i) arising out of activity described in
paragraph (1)(A)(i), the injunctive relief is
limited to—
‘‘(I) an order restraining the provider from
providing access to an identified subscriber
of the system or network of the interactive
computer service provider, if the court determines that there is probable cause to believe
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that such subscriber is using that access to
violate this section, by terminating the specified account of that subscriber; and
‘‘(II) an order restraining the provider from
providing access, by taking reasonable steps
specified in the order to block access, to a
specific, identified, foreign online location;
‘‘(ii) arising out of activity described in
paragraph (1)(A)(ii), the injunctive relief is
limited to—
‘‘(I) the orders described in clause (i)(I);
‘‘(II) an order restraining the provider from
providing access to the material or activity
that violates this section at a particular online site residing on a computer server operated or controlled by the provider; and
‘‘(III) such other injunctive remedies as the
court considers necessary to prevent or restrain access to specified material or activity that is prohibited by this section at a
particular online location residing on a computer server operated or controlled by the
provider, that are the least burdensome to
the provider among the forms of relief that
are comparably effective for that purpose.
‘‘(C) CONSIDERATIONS.—The court, in determining appropriate injunctive relief under
this paragraph, shall consider—
‘‘(i) whether such an injunction, either
alone or in combination with other such injunctions issued, and currently operative,
against the same provider would significantly (and, in the case of relief under subparagraph (B)(ii), taking into account,
among other factors, the conduct of the provider, unreasonably) burden either the provider or the operation of the system or network of the provider;
‘‘(ii) whether implementation of such an
injunction would be technically feasible and
effective, and would not materially interfere
with access to lawful material at other online locations;
‘‘(iii) whether other less burdensome and
comparably effective means of preventing or
restraining access to the illegal material or
activity are available; and
‘‘(iv) the magnitude of the harm likely to
be suffered by the community if the injunction is not granted.
‘‘(D) NOTICE AND EX PARTE ORDERS.—Injunctive relief under this paragraph shall not
be available without notice to the service
provider and an opportunity for such provider to appear before the court, except for
orders ensuring the preservation of evidence
or other orders having no material adverse
effect on the operation of the communications network of the service provider.
‘‘(4) ADVERTISING OR PROMOTION OF NONINTERNET GAMBLING.—
‘‘(A) DEFINITIONS.—In this paragraph:
‘‘(i) CONDUCTED.—With respect to a gambling activity, that activity is ‘conducted’ in
a State if the State is the State in which the
gambling establishment (as defined in section 1081) that offers the gambling activity
being advertised or promoted is physically
located.
‘‘(ii) NON-INTERNET GAMBLING ACTIVITY.—
The term ‘non-Internet gambling activity’
means—
‘‘(I) a gambling activity in which the placing of the bet or wager is not conducted by
the Internet; or
‘‘(II) a gambling activity to which the prohibitions of this section do not apply.
‘‘(B) IMMUNITY FROM LIABILITY FOR USE BY
ANOTHER.—
‘‘(i) IN GENERAL.—An interactive computer
service provider described in clause (ii) shall
not be liable, under any provision of Federal
or State law prohibiting or regulating gambling or gambling-related activities, or
under any State law prohibiting or regulating advertising and promotional activities, for—
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‘‘(I) content, provided by another person,
that advertises or promotes non-Internet
gambling activity that violates such law (unless the provider is engaged in the business
of such gambling), arising out of any of the
activities described in paragraph (1)(A) (i) or
(ii); or
‘‘(II) content, provided by another person,
that advertises or promotes non-Internet
gambling activity that is lawful under Federal law and the law of the State in which
such gambling activity is conducted.
‘‘(ii) ELIGIBILITY.—An interactive computer service is described in this clause only
if the provider—
‘‘(I) maintains and implements a written
or electronic policy that requires the provider to terminate the account of a subscriber of its system or network expeditiously following the receipt by the provider
of a notice described in paragraph (2)(B) alleging that such subscriber maintains a
website on a computer server controlled or
operated by the provider for the purpose of
engaging in advertising or promotion of nonInternet gambling activity prohibited by a
Federal law or a law of the State in which
such activity is conducted;
‘‘(II) with respect to the particular material or activity at issue, has not knowingly
permitted its computer server to be used to
engage in the advertising or promotion of
non-Internet gambling activity that the provider knows is prohibited by a Federal law or
a law of the State in which the activity is
conducted, with the specific intent that such
server be used for such purpose; and
‘‘(III) at reasonable cost, offers residential
customers of the provider’s Internet access
service, if the provider provides Internet access service to such customers, computer
software, or another filtering or blocking
system that includes the capability of filtering or blocking access by minors to online
Internet gambling sites that violate this section.
‘‘(C) NOTICE TO INTERACTIVE COMPUTER
SERVICE PROVIDERS.—
‘‘(i) NOTICE FROM FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.—If an interactive computer
service provider receives from a Federal law
enforcement agency, acting within its authority and jurisdiction, a written or electronic notice described in paragraph (2)(B),
that a particular online site residing on a
computer server owned, controlled, or operated by or for the provider is being used by
another person to advertise or promote nonInternet gambling activity that violates a
Federal law prohibiting or regulating gambling or gambling-related activities, the provider shall expeditiously take the actions described in paragraph (2)(A) (i) or (ii) with respect to the advertising or promotion identified in the notice.
‘‘(ii) NOTICE FROM STATE LAW ENFORCEMENT
AGENCY.—If an interactive computer service
provider receives from a State law enforcement agency, acting within its authority and
jurisdiction, a written or electronic notice
described in paragraph (2)(B), that a particular online site residing on a computer
server owned, controlled, or operated by or
for the provider is being used by another person to advertise or promote non-Internet
gambling activity that is conducted in that
State and that violates a law of that State
prohibiting or regulating gambling or gambling-related activities, the provider shall
expeditiously take the actions described in
paragraph (2)(A) (i) or (ii) with respect to the
advertising or promotion identified in the
notice.
‘‘(D) INJUNCTIVE RELIEF.—The United
States, or a State law enforcement agency,
acting within its authority and jurisdiction,
may, not less than 24 hours following the
issuance to an interactive computer service
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provider of a notice described in paragraph
(2)(B), in a civil action, obtain a temporary
restraining order, or an injunction, to prevent the use of the interactive computer
service by another person to advertise or
promote non-Internet gambling activity that
violates a Federal law, or a law of the State
in which such activity is conducted that prohibits or regulates gambling or gambling-related activities, as applicable. The procedures described in paragraph (3)(D) shall
apply to actions brought under this subparagraph, and the relief in such actions shall be
limited to—
‘‘(i) an order requiring the provider to remove or disable access to the advertising or
promotion of non-Internet gambling activity
that violates Federal law, or the law of the
State in which such activity is conducted, as
applicable, at a particular online site residing on a computer server controlled or operated by the provider;
‘‘(ii) an order restraining the provider from
providing access to an identified subscriber
of the system or network of the provider, if
the court determines that such subscriber
maintains a website on a computer server
controlled or operated by the provider that
the subscriber is knowingly using or knowingly permitting to be used to advertise or
promote non-Internet gambling activity that
violates Federal law or the law of the State
in which such activity is conducted; and
‘‘(iii) an order restraining the provider of
the content of the advertising or promotion
of such illegal gambling activity from disseminating such advertising or promotion on
the computer server controlled or operated
by the provider of such interactive computer
service.
‘‘(E) APPLICABILITY.—The provisions of
subparagraphs (C) and (D) do not apply to
the content described in subparagraph
(B)(i)(II).
‘‘(5) EFFECT ON OTHER LAW.—
‘‘(A) IMMUNITY FROM LIABILITY FOR COMPLIANCE.—An interactive computer service provider shall not be liable for any damages,
penalty, or forfeiture, civil or criminal,
under Federal or State law for taking in
good faith any action described in paragraphs (2)(A), (4)(B)(ii)(I), or (4)(C) to comply
with a notice described in paragraph (2)(B),
or complying with any court order issued
under paragraph (3) or (4)(D).
‘‘(B) DISCLAIMER OF OBLIGATIONS.—Nothing
in this section may be construed to impose
or authorize an obligation on an interactive
computer service provider described in paragraph (1)(B)—
‘‘(i) to monitor material or use of its service; or
‘‘(ii) except as required by a notice or an
order of a court under this subsection, to
gain access to, to remove, or to disable access to material.
‘‘(C) RIGHTS OF SUBSCRIBERS.—Nothing in
this section may be construed to prejudice
the right of a subscriber to secure an appropriate determination, as otherwise provided
by law, in a Federal court or in a State or
local tribunal or agency, that the account of
such subscriber should not be terminated
pursuant to this subsection, or should be restored.
‘‘(e) AVAILABILITY OF RELIEF.—The availability of relief under subsections (c) and (d)
shall not depend on, or be affected by, the
initiation or resolution of any action under
subsection (b), or under any other provision
of Federal or State law.
‘‘(f) APPLICABILITY.—
‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—Subject to paragraph (2),
the prohibition in this section does not apply
to—
‘‘(A) any otherwise lawful bet or wager
that is placed and received, or otherwise
made wholly intrastate for a State lottery,
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or for a multi-State lottery operated jointly
between 2 or more States in conjunction
with State lotteries if—
‘‘(i) each such lottery is expressly authorized, and licensed or regulated, under applicable State law;
‘‘(ii) the bet or wager is placed on an interactive computer service that uses a private
network or a closed-loop subscriber based
service regulated and operated by the State
lottery or its expressly designated agent for
such activity;
‘‘(iii) each person placing or otherwise
making that bet or wager is physically located when such bet or wager is placed at a
facility that is open to the general public;
and
‘‘(iv) each such lottery complies with sections 1301 through 1304, and other applicable
provisions of Federal law;
‘‘(B) any otherwise lawful State-regulated
parimutuel wagering activities on live horse
or dog racing, or live jai alai, conducted on
a closed-loop subscriber-based system, provided that the type of wagering activity has
been authorized by the State.
‘‘(C) any otherwise lawful bet or wager
(other than a bet or wager described in subparagraph (A)) that is placed, received, or
otherwise made wholly intrastate, if such
bet or wager, or the transmission of such information, as applicable is—
‘‘(i) expressly authorized, and licensed or
regulated by the State in which such bet or
wager is initiated and received, under applicable Federal and such State’s laws; and
‘‘(ii) placed on a closed-loop subscriber
based service; or
‘‘(D) any otherwise lawful bet or wager
(other than a bet or wager in any class III
game conducted by a tribe that is not explicitly authorized by an applicable tribal-State
compact between that tribe and the State
where the tribe is located) that is—
‘‘(i) placed on a closed-loop subscriber
based service or a private network; and
‘‘(ii) is lawfully received by a federally recognized Indian tribe, or the sending, receiving, or inviting of information assisting in
the placing of any such bet or wager, if the
game is permitted under and conducted in
accordance with the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, so long as each person placing,
receiving, or otherwise making such a bet or
wager, or transmitting such information, is
physically located on Indian lands (as that
term is defined in section 4 of the Indian
Gaming Regulatory Act) when such person
places, receives, or otherwise makes the bet
or wager.
‘‘(2) BETS OR WAGERS MADE BY AGENTS OR
PROXIES.—
‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—Paragraph (1) does not
apply in any case in which a bet or wager is
placed, received, or otherwise made by the
use of an agent or proxy using the Internet
or an interactive computer service.
‘‘(B) QUALIFICATION.—Nothing in this paragraph may be construed to prohibit the
owner operator of a parimutuel wagering facility that is licensed by a State from employing an agent in the operation of the account wagering system owned or operated by
the parimutuel facility.
‘‘(3) ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION.—The
prohibition of subsection (b)(1)(B) does not
apply to advertising, promotion, or other
communication by, or authorized by, anyone
licensed to operate a gambling business in a
State.
‘‘(g) RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.—Nothing in
this section may be construed to affect any
prohibition or remedy applicable to a person
engaged in a gambling business under any
other provision of Federal or State law.’’.
(b) TECHNICAL AMENDMENT.—The analysis
for chapter 50 of title 18, United States Code,
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is amended by adding at the end the following:
‘‘1085. Internet gambling.’’.
SEC. 3. REPORT ON ENFORCEMENT.
Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Attorney General
shall submit to Congress a report, which
shall include—
(1) an analysis of the problems, if any, associated with enforcing section 1085 of title
18, United States Code, as added by section 2
of this Act;
(2) recommendations for the best use of the
resources of the Department of Justice to enforce that section; and
(3) an estimate of the amount of activity
and money being used to gamble on the
Internet.
SEC. 4. SEVERABILITY.
If any provision of this Act, an amendment
made by this Act, or the application of such
provision or amendment to any person or
circumstance is held to be unconstitutional,
the remainder of this Act, the amendments
made by this Act, and the application of this
Act and the provisions of such amendments
to any other person or circumstance shall
not be affected thereby.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from
Virginia (Mr. GOODLATTE) and the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. CONYERS)
each will control 20 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentleman
from Virginia (Mr. GOODLATTE).
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself 3 minutes.
Mr. Speaker, the Internet Gambling
Prohibition Act is designed to respond
to a major scourge on the Internet.
There are now, more than 700 unregulated out-of-control Internet casinostyle gambling sites on the Internet.
Sports betting may be even larger than
the casino gambling. The proposals
now, not by any of the States, but by
some who would ask that the States
begin to provide the sale of lottery
tickets online in people’s homes, something that a great many people are
very concerned about.
The bill allows the use of the Internet by the States for the sale of lottery
tickets in public places where children
can be screened out. But there are
those who stand to make tens of millions of dollars selling lottery services
to the States to sell those tickets online. No State does that today. This
bill prevents that from occurring.
The bill is supported by a wide array
of organizations, including the National Collegiate Athletic Association,
the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, Major
League Baseball, the National Hockey
League, all concerned about sports betting online, particularly by children.
The bill is supported by a wide array
of religious organizations, the National
Council of Churches, the Presbyterian
Church of the United States, the Family Research Council, Focus on the
Family, the Christian Coalition, Jerry
Falwell Ministries, the American Family Association, the United Methodist
Church, the Southern Baptist Convention, the Home School Legal Defense
Association.
But the bill’s original purpose is
served by the request of the National
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Association of Attorneys General,
NAAG, who came to Senator KYL in
the Senate and to myself in the House
and said that the 1961 Wire Act prohibiting gambling interstate on electronic
means of communications is out of
date and needs to be updated. That is
what this bill responds to. They strongly support the legislation, as does the
National Coalition Against Gambling
Expansion.
I would like to thank a number of
Members for their help with this legislation: the gentleman from Virginia
(Mr. WOLF); the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. TAUZIN), chairman of the
Subcommittee
on
Telecommunications, Trade and Consumer Protection from the Committee on Commerce, which helped to work out additional language to make it absolutely
clear that this legislation does not expand gambling in any way, shape, or
form; the gentleman from New York
(Mr. NADLER) who helped to work out
new language in the legislation related
to due process rights for those who
may have their sites taken down or
blocked.
I would like to thank the gentleman
from Florida (Mr. WEXLER) and the
gentleman from Florida (Mr. HASTINGS)
for their leadership on this issue as
well as the gentleman from Virginia
(Mr. BOUCHER) who has been very supportive.
I would like to thank the gentleman
from Texas (Mr. ARMEY), the majority
leader, and the gentleman from Illinois
(Mr. HYDE), chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary, for their support of this legislation, which I believe
will pass with overwhelmingly strong
bipartisan support.
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself 30 seconds.
Mr. Speaker, let me say from the
outset that I believe that it is highly
inappropriate to consider a controversial deeply flawed bill on the Suspension Calendar. This is the wrong process because I and other Members have
amendments we want to offer that we
are foreclosed from offering in this
process.
So on that basis alone, I believe this
suspension ought to be rejected. The
most controversial aspect of it are the
carve-outs for the powerful special interests.
Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the
distinguished gentleman from Rhode
Island (Mr. KENNEDY).
Mr. KENNEDY of Rhode Island. Mr.
Speaker, the gentleman from Michigan
just pointed out that there are carveouts for horse racing and Jai-Alai and
dog racing. How are we going to have a
realistic bill if Jai-Alai and dog racing
and all these others have exemptions
carved out?
The real rub in this bill is that, while
those have exceptions, State lotteries
do not. I think we would also agree
that our State lotteries are perhaps the
best form of gaming we have out there
and that they are giving legitimate
dollars to our States, for the education
of our kids, for education, for housing.
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Now, no one disputes that we ought
to regulate these offshore gambling casino interests in the Antilles and Antigua. No one disputes that we ought to
have that on the books.
Let me say at the beginning that I
applaud the gentleman from Virginia
(Mr. GOODLATTE) and applaud the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. TAUZIN)
for their efforts to put those provisions
in this bill.
But do my colleagues know what? In
creating those provisions, they have
created numerous other problems by
carving out all these exemptions for
these special interests gaming operations. Really, this language has come
from the Christian Coalition. I thought
that the Congress ought to be the one
that writes legislation, not the Christian Coalition. It is ironic that the
Christian coalition wants to have an
exception for dog racing. The Christian
Coalition does not seem to have a problem with that, but they have a problem
with State lotteries providing necessary educational funds for their kids
in the different States.
In addition to that, this legislation
also does not do enough to protect the
important sovereignty that exists between Native American tribes and our
Federal Government, something that
the majority continues to trample on
at every single turn.
As vice chair of the Native American
Caucus, I just am so upset that this bill
would ignore the important sovereignty provisions that the States
have worked out with these tribes, the
Federal tribe relationship. It is a sovereign relationship.
Finally, the gentleman from Virginia
(Mr. GOODLATTE) understands that
these Internet service providers, the
very people that are charged with policing this bill, are unequipped to deal
with this. The fact is that we have an
Internet that is in its infancy. We all
know the Internet is in its infancy. My
colleagues are going to put the regulatory burden, the enforcement burden
for these regulations on these Internet
service providers, many of whom are
woefully inadequate to do so. So it is
going to create a real hell of a time for
these Internet service providers.
So let me just say that, while my colleagues have the Attorneys General on
their side, we have the governors.
Every governor, the Governors’ Association, has written strongly opposing
this legislation because it would absolutely gut the funding for the necessary programs that many of these
governors rely on in order to provide
our very constituencies with the educational funding that we need.
Finally, let me just say we need more
money in education. The thought that
my colleagues are going to take money
away from education in our States at a
time when we need more of it is just
absolutely incredible to me. The fact
that they carve out exceptions for
these other gambling operations, while
not carving out an exemption, for example, for State lotteries, to me, it
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just does not make any sense. State
lotteries ought to be the ones that we
at least carve out an exemption for,
not these others.
So I just cannot say that this is a
good bill. I agree with the gentleman
from Michigan (Mr. CONYERS), we
ought to consider this bill on regular
calendar and regular order so that we
can have a deeper dialog and discussion
about the very controversial nature of
this legislation.
b
1415
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself 1 minute to say to the
gentleman that not every governor
agrees. In fact, we have a real problem
here with forged letters from governors, as indicated on the front page
of Roll Call and in The New York
Times, with a letter being circulated
by opponents of this legislation claiming that Governor Jeb Bush of Florida
wrote a letter in opposition to the bill
when in point of fact no such thing occurred. The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement is now investigating the
matter.
I would also say to the gentleman
that there are no exemptions in this
legislation for horse racing. That is
why all of these groups are supporting
this legislation. And who would know
better than the reporters for the racing
industry. Here is the headline in the
Daily Racing Form: ‘‘Internet bill said
to lose exemption for racing.’’ Blood
Horse Magazine: ‘‘Racing to lose Internet bill exemptions.’’
The fact of the matter is this bill has
been carefully crafted with the assistance of the gentleman from Louisiana
(Mr. TAUZIN) to make it absolutely
clear that while parimutuel betting is
treated fairly, they are not in any way
exempt or carved out under this legislation.
Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the
gentleman from Florida (Mr. WEXLER).
Mr. WEXLER. Mr. Speaker, I rise
today in support of H.R. 3125.
I strongly support this bill for three
primary reasons: first, it gives law enforcement the ability to block offshore
casino Web sites; second, the bill protects children from gambling; and,
third, it protects the rights of States
to continue governing a legal, regulated, taxpaying industry, the parimutuel industry.
Parimutuel gaming is and always has
been a State issue. States control parimutuel gaming, and they control it effectively. It is an industry that is highly regulated, pays taxes and has a respectable place in the States many of
us represent. States do not, however,
control casinos on Indian reservations.
They certainly do not control offshore
casino Web sites, of which there are at
least 700, many of them in the Caribbean, which are not regulated and not
taxed.
I have heard concerns about cheating
on the Internet. Parimutuel bets, however, are safe bets, equally safe made in
person or at a simulcast.
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04:08 Jul 18, 2000
Finally, we do not have to worry
about children logging on to the parimutuels and placing bets. Individuals
would have to participate in a closedloop subscriber-based service to wager
on horses, greyhounds, or Jai-Alai. It
does not get brought into the home unless a person wants it.
The bill strikes a perfect balance for
what is needed, a prohibition on Internet casino gambling and a preservation
of the rights of States to regulate the
parimutuel industry.
References were made by my respected colleague and friend with respect to the effect of education dollars
of this bill. Speaking as a representative of the State of Florida, let there
be no mistake, the State lottery of
Florida has not added, relatively, a single penny to the schools and to the
education coffers of the State of Florida. Just the opposite.
Mr. Speaker, I urge support of the
bill.
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself 15 seconds.
It may be that my friend from Virginia is not aware of the latest version
of his bill that eliminates the requirements that wagers on horse racing, dog
racing, and Jai-Alai be initiated from a
State in which such betting or wagering is lawful and received in a State in
which such betting is lawful.
Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the
gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr.
FRANK).
Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. Mr.
Speaker, I hope people approaching the
Capitol will be careful because they
might stumble on the increasingly
growing pile of discarded Republican
ideas.
In Sunday’s Washington Post, there
was an excellent article by Stephen
Moore of the Cato Institute documenting the extent to which the Republican Party in the House has abandoned its notion of controlling spending. I recommend people read Mr.
Moore’s article. He used to be a consultant to the Republicans on the Committee on the Budget. He said the Republicans have given up really on controlling spending. They spend it wrong,
in some ways; but they spend a lot of
it.
In this morning’s Washington Post,
we have another Republican idea of
yore biting the dust: term limits. Some
people with very long memories, inconvenient ones, will remember term limits. It used to be part of the Contract
With America. Some people do not remember the Contract With America, or
the contract of Mr. Gingrich; but term
limits has also been discarded. It cited
cases of the Republican leadership urging Members to break their pledge with
regard to term limits.
Well, today two more old Republican
principles bite the dust. One was not
that old, because the Internet is not
that old. But we used to hear about
freedom of the Internet. We used to
hear how important it was that people
be allowed to do what they want on the
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Internet. Now we understand the true
principle. It is important that people
be able to do what the Republican
Party wants them to do on the Internet. If the Republican Party has no objection, then they can do it. But if the
Republican Party thinks there are pictures they should not look at, or perhaps booze they should not buy, or bets
they should not make, then freedom
for the Internet goes away.
This is a very intrusive regulation of
the Internet. This notion that citizens
ought to be able to make their own decisions about what to do over the Web
now stands revealed as a very insufficient idea. In fact, we were told we
must protect children against this because children live in houses with parents with computers, and we must not
allow the parents to be the ones who
decide what their children do. We, the
Federal Government, will step in and
we will protect children from that
Internet, which will reach out and grab
them when their parents are not looking.
Another principle that appears to be
on its last legs that the Republican
Party sometimes professes support for
is that of States’ rights. I understand
the governor of Florida has said that
was not an accurate letter from him. I
also understand that we would need
subpoena power to get the governor of
Florida to tell us what he really thinks
about this. And since I, at least, do not
have that vote, I cannot tell. The governor of Florida has said he will not
tell us his position, but most of the
governors are against it.
And I was particularly struck when
my friend from Florida said, well, parimutuel betting should be an exemption, although it is an exemption that
the author of the bill says does not
exist. But the gentleman from Florida,
defending that nonexistent exemption,
says, well, parimutuel betting is controlled by the States and Jai-Alai is
controlled by the States. Well, are lotteries run by the States not controlled
by the States? This bill makes it illegal for States to decide that they wish
to use the Internet for their lotteries.
Now, remember, the State would
have a decision to stay off the Internet
if it want wanted to. So here we have a
bill that says to the States that we will
tell them, the States, that they may
not use the Internet for their lottery
distribution. What a two-fer: two great
principles with one stone. First of all,
freedom of the Internet; secondly,
States’ rights. Bang, they both go with
this bill.
Here we say to the States we will let
parimutuel gambling go on, because
that is a closed loop, and that is okay
because States have regulated that.
And my friend from Florida said the
State lottery in Florida has not given
Florida enough money for education,
has not given them any money for education. I am sorry about that, but I
will tell my colleague that in the State
of Massachusetts the lottery has, I
think, been very helpful for education.
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I do not understand why this Congress
ought to interfere with the decision by
the people of Massachusetts and the
governor and the legislature of Massachusetts to use the Internet.
Now, understand what we have been
told. If the States want to act to make
sure that retailers in a downtown are
not disadvantaged in the collection of
sales taxes, we will get in their way.
But if the States want to put their lottery on the Internet, we, the Federal
Government, will interfere, if this bill
passes; and we will tell them to forget
all that stuff they read about Internet
freedom because if the Federal Government does not like what the States are
doing on the Internet, to use a technical parliamentary term ‘‘freedom
schmeedom.’’ We will interpose our superior morality and tell the States
that gambling is not right; and, therefore, while the State may choose to
have a lottery, and individuals may
choose to use the Internet for that lottery, we, the Federal Government,
know better than the States and we
know better than the individuals.
I do not think that I have seen in one
piece of legislation a more stunning repudiation of principles.
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield 11⁄2 minutes to the gentleman
from Nevada (Mr. GIBBONS).
Mr. GIBBONS. Mr. Speaker, I thank
the gentleman for yielding me this
time, and I rise in strong support of the
Internet Gambling Prohibition Act. As
an original cosponsor, I urge all my
colleagues to support this very important bill.
After listening to my colleague from
Massachusetts, I hope we can all come
back to reality for just a minute. Everyone, including Republicans and
Democrats, would agree the Internet is
a great educational tool and a valuable
source of information and communication. However, American families must
be protected from the dangers associated with unrestricted and unregulated
gaming.
In States like Nevada, the gaming industry is well regulated and its activities are tightly monitored. However,
allowing gambling to be conducted on
the Internet would open the floodgates
for corruption, abuse, and fraud. Not
only could unscrupulous operators bilk
millions of unsuspecting customers,
but our children could easily obtain
their parents’ credit cards, turn their
bedrooms into casinos, and with these
sites unknowingly squander their families’ hard-earned money.
The Internet Gambling Prohibition
Act provides the necessary tools for
law enforcement officials to crack
down on these fly-by-night Internet
gambling sites. I urge my colleagues to
support this bipartisan bill which will
protect our children, our homes, and
our technology from fraudulent, unscrupulous, and unregulated Internet
gaming and gambling site operators.
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3
minutes to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. SCOTT), the ranking member
of the subcommittee.
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Mr. SCOTT. Mr. Speaker, I thank the
gentleman for yielding me this time,
and I rise in opposition to the bill.
Unfortunately, H.R. 3125 will actually do nothing to stem the tide of
Internet gambling. In fact, the bill constitutes a significant step backwards
for several reasons.
First, it provides for extended Internet gambling in the areas of horse racing, dog racing, and Jai-Alai. And there
seems to be some question about that,
so I will just read from the bill, starting on page 34: ‘‘The prohibition in this
section does not apply to,’’ and when
we turn to page 35 it says, ‘‘any otherwise lawful State regulated parimutuel
waging activities on live horse or dog
racing or live Jai-Alai conducted on a
closed-loop subscriber-based system.’’
That closed-loop subscriber-based system is about as hard to get on as opening up an Internet brokerage account
to trade stocks. About anybody can do
it. As a result of these exemptions, the
bill will proliferate rather than prohibit gambling over the Internet, and
that is because people would rather
gamble at home rather than having to
go all the way to the track.
In addition, the bill will not effectively prohibit those gambling interests it actually seeks to stop because
offshore the Federal Government has
no authority to close those particular
Web sites. We can tell AOL or another
company to shut down a domestic site,
but we have no authority to shut down
something offshore in a rogue nation
for which we have no diplomatic relations. That will give them essentially a
complete exclusive franchise to run
these operations.
Lastly, the bill is not effective because it provides no individual liability. While it makes activities by certain gambling entities running the operation illegal, it does not make it illegal for the individual to gamble.
For that reason, Mr. Speaker, the
title of the bill, the Internet Gambling
Prohibition Act, is one that I am sure
a lot of Americans will support. But
this bill will actually expand gambling
for horse racing, dog racing, and JaiAlai. It will be ineffective in stopping
casino gambling and sports betting run
by offshore businesses and, as a result,
the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act
is more sound bite than reality; and,
therefore, I must oppose the legislation.
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from
Florida (Mr. HASTINGS).
(Mr. HASTINGS of Florida asked and
was given permission to revise and extend his remarks.)
Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr.
Speaker, I thank the gentleman for
yielding me this time, and I thank him
for his leadership on this particular
measure.
Mr. Speaker, today I have come to
the floor to speak on behalf of H.R.
3125, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act. As my colleagues may know,
unregulated Internet gambling through
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virtual casino games has become a very
lucrative business.
b
1430
These Web sites are not regulated,
taxed or licensed by the States and are
available to the public, including those
who are underage and would not be allowed in an actual gambling facility,
on the open Internet.
New sites offering games such as
blackjack and roulette crop up each
day, and the industry has plans for
major expansion next year if the issue
is not addressed legislatively by Congress in this session.
H.R. 3125 effectively addresses the
problems created by these sites, clarifies Federal law, and gives the authorities the tools necessary to regulate
Internet gambling activities. At the
same time, the bill establishes a regulatory framework for Internet gaming
activities that recognizes the leadership role that should be played by the
individual States in regulating legal
gaming activities they have already
authorized.
Mr. Speaker, the Senate companion
bill passed the Senate late last year by
unanimous consent and we are ripe to
enact legislation clarifying the complex issue of Internet gambling. If H.R.
3125 is not passed this year, it will likely be too late to stop the problems
caused by these unregulated gambling
businesses. H.R. 3125 is a good bill that
works, as is evidenced by the broad
level of support that it has garnered
from various groups and on both sides
of the aisle.
I would like to urge my colleagues to
join me in voting for this practical and
necessary legislation and working to
enact the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act into law.
I also would like to clarify the fact
that lotteries are not affected. Lotteries are regressive. And we all know
that.
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, it is
my pleasure to yield 3 minutes to the
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. WOLF) a
real champion in the fight against
gambling.
(Mr. WOLF asked and was given permission to revise and extend his remarks.)
Mr. WOLF. Mr. Speaker, this will not
expand gambling. I rise in strong support. I can stand here all day to categorize the number of hurt and pain
and suffering and agony and even death
of many young people who get involved
in gambling. Gambling hits the poor,
the elderly and, sadly, the young.
I want to share that every Member of
this body who was here when the National Gambling Commission was established, voted for the National Gambling Commission, which issued a report, and it said as follows: Simply put,
‘‘Adolescent gamblers are more likely
to become problem or pathological
gamblers. Several studies have shown
the link between youth gambling and
its association with alcohol and drug
use, truancy, low grades, illegal activities to finance gambling.’’
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The Commission goes on to strongly
support the bill of the gentleman from
Virginia (Mr. GOODLATTE). The Commission reported in 28 percent of the
cases where children carried a gun to
school, gambling was a factor.
This legislation would address an industry that has grown overnight on the
Web virtually without anyone focusing
on it until the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. GOODLATTE) did.
As the gambling commission noted,
youth gambling like youth smoking is
often an issue of accessibility and marketing. Nothing is more accessible to
young people that we now have than
the Internet.
I urge my colleagues, if we miss this
opportunity, more children will be hurt
and go through pain and suffering and
agony and even death. This is an opportunity to do what the National Commission says we should do. This is an
opportunity to do what most people
know is absolutely right.
I urge my Members, particularly
those who say they are for strong family values and they care about the future of young people and they care
about all these issues, to come to the
House tonight when we vote and vote
aye on the Goodlatte bill.
I would like to also put a list of the
stories we have taken off the wire service in the last few months of the hurt
and the pain and the suffering and the
agony of the people who have gotten
involved in gambling.
SAMPLE NEWS CLIPS ON GAMBLING
‘‘As many as 500,000 Michigan adults could
be ‘lifetime compulsive gamblers,’ and the
number could swell with two new Detroit casinos in operation and a third to open soon,
says a new state report. The survey, released
Wednesday, also found that well over half of
those with gambling problems began young.
‘When we asked compulsive gamblers ‘‘When
did you start having a problem?’’ we were
startled to learn that 77% of them said they
were already compulsive by the time they
were 18,’ said Jim McBryde, special assistant
for drug policy in the Michigan Department
of Community Health.’’ (Detroit News, 1/13/
00)
‘‘As allies of the National Collegiate Athletic Association push legislation that would
ban wagering on college sports, a new study
found that one out of every four male student-athletes may be engaging in illegal
sports betting—and that one in 20 places bets
directly through illegal bookies. And though
prevalent among student-athletes, the study
found that sports wagering activity is higher
among ordinary students—39% among male
nonstudent athletes.
‘‘The study surveyed 648 student-athletes
and 1,035 students, both male and female, at
three midwestern universities. The study
also found that 12% of male student-athletes—roughly the same portion as nonathletes—showed signs of problem gambling.
About 5% of the overall athlete sample demonstrated signs of pathological gambling disorders.’’ (Las Vegas Sun, 7/6/00).
‘‘More than 850 Internet gambling sites
worldwide had revenues in 1999 of $1.67 billion, up more than 80% from 1998, according
to Christiansen Capital Advisors, who track
the industry. Revenues are expected to top $3
billion by 2002.’’ (Reuters, 5/31/00).
‘‘Will Torres Jr. spends part of his day listening to sad stories. As the director of the
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04:59 Jul 18, 2000
Terrebonne Parish (La.) District Attorney’s
Office’s Bad Check Enforcement Program,
Torres has heard some doozies. ‘‘I’ve seen
people lose their homes, their retirements
wiped out, their marriage. People losing everything they have,’ Torres said. Gambling,
specifically video poker, is starting to catch
up with drugs and alcohol as a precursor to
local crime . . . ‘‘Torres and the District
Attorney’s Office recently noticed an interesting trend while profiling bad-check writers: a large number of their suspects are
video poker addicts. ‘We’re not talking about
people who mistakenly write a check for groceries at Winn-Dixie for $25.33,’ Torres said.
‘We’re talking about people who are writing
checks for $25 or $30 eight times a day at locations with video machines or places in
close proximity of video poker machines.’
‘‘So far this year, Torres’ office has collected
$320,000 for Terrebonne Parish merchants
who were given 3,600 worthless checks.
Torres said about 30% of those bad checks
are connected to gambling. ‘‘ ‘It’s eating people up,’ he said. ‘It’s real sad when people
don’t have a dollar. No money for food because of gambling addictions. I’ve seen it up
close, and video poker plays a large role in
the problem.’ ’’ (The Courier [Houma, La.], 8/
28/99)
‘‘Rodney Stout, 25, of Pine Bluff (Ark.) was
sentenced Friday to 30 years in prison for abducting Stacey Polston of Jacksonville and
her 18-month-old daughter at gunpoint and
stealing Polston’s van. . . . Stout was under
financial pressure, he said. He had a ‘gambling problem’ that came to a head when he
gambled away $5,000 he had set aside for
moving expenses.’’ (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, 5/9/00).
‘‘Former University of Southern California
baseball player Shon Malani was sentenced
Wednesday to two years in federal prison for
stealing nearly $500,000 from the federal credit union where he worked. U.S. District
Judge Helen Gillmor rejected a request for
leniency made by Malani’s attorney, who
said he stole the money to pay off gambling
debts totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars.’’ (Associated Press, 3/1/00).
‘‘One third of 120 compulsive gamblers participating in a pioneering treatment study
have either filed for bankruptcy or are in the
process of filing, a University of Connecticut
researcher said Tuesday. . . . . (Nancy)
Petry said she recently gave a talk to a
group of bankruptcy lawyers who estimated
that as many as 20% of their clients had
mentioned gambling as a reason for their
problems.’’ (Hartford Courant, 6/14/00).
‘‘Of all the heroes who emerged from the
1984 Los Angeles Olympics, perhaps none was
more inspirational than Henry Tillman. A
big, tough hometown kid, he had plunged
into serious trouble when he was rescued in
a California Youth Authority lockup by a
boxing coach who saw a young man of uncommon heart and untapped talent. In a little more than two years, he would stand
proudly atop the Olympic platform at the
Sports Arena, just blocks from his boyhood
home, the gold medal for heavyweight boxing dangling from his neck.
‘‘But two years after his mediocre pro career ended, he was back behind bars. And
now he stands accused of murder in a case
that could put him away for life.
‘‘[G]ambling got Tillman into trouble. He
was arrested in January 1994 for passing a
bad credit card at the Normandie. He pleaded
no contest and got probation. In 1995, he
pleaded guilty to using a fake credit card in
an attempt to get $800 at the Hollywood
Park Casino in Inglewood.
‘‘I have suffered from a long history of
gambling addiction, which I am very
ashamed had taken over my life,’ Tillman
wrote in a letter to the court.’’ (Los Angeles
Time, 1/26/00)
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‘‘More than half the state’s adult population has visited a casino, either in Michigan or elsewhere, a statewide poll shows. . . .
People at the top and bottom of the income
scale are the biggest spenders at the casinos
Those making less than $15,000 a year spend
$172 per visit, and those earning more than
$100,000 per year spend $161 per visit. People
in the $30,000–$45,000 income bracket spend
the least, reporting an average of $87.40 per
visit. ‘‘Pollster Ed Sarpolus noted that the
age groups most likely to visit casinos are
between 18 and 24, and between 50 and 54.’’
(Detroit Free Press, 11/17/99)
‘‘Tethered to his post by a curly plastic
cord that stretched from his belt loop to a
frequent-player card inserted in a Black,
Widow slot machine, James Lint pondered.
What happens to the little guy when casinos
come to town?
‘‘‘I see a lot of people leave with tears in
their eyes,’ said the Georgia businessman,
taking a short break from the machine in Biloxi’s Beau Rivage casino. ‘They come here
too much, and they spend too much money.’
‘‘Lint, who flies his private plan to Biloxi
three times a year to kick back at the casinos, doesn’t count himself among the ranks
of those who gamble away what they cannot
afford. But some people do lose their grocery
money to slot machines, and no one—not casino operators, not gung-ho promoters of the
industry—denies it.
‘‘It would be hard to: The Mississippi Coast
has been at the center of several high-profile
compulsive gambling incidents, including
one involving two famous writers, brothers
who squandered an inheritance worth more
than $250,000 at blackjack and slots.
‘‘It is a hard-edged reality that happens—
at casinos, at racetracks, at church bingos,
at state lottery outlets. The Mississippi
Coast has seen a 26-fold increase in the number of Gamblers Anonymous meeting—to 13 a
week—since the first casino opened in 1992.’’
(Lexington [Ky.] Herald-Leader, 9/12/99)
‘‘There is an ugly undercurrent that’s
sweeping away thousands of Missourianspeople whose addiction to gambling has led
to debt, divorce and crime. This is a world of
people like Vicky, 36, a St. Charles woman
who regularly left her newborn son with
baby sitters to go to the casinos and who
considered suicide, after losing $100,000. ‘‘And
Kathy, a homemaker and mother of two
from Brentwood, who would drop her kids at
school and spend the entire day at a casino
playing blackjack. She used a secret credit
card that her husband didn’t know about to
rack up more than $30,000 in debt. . . .
‘‘In a three-month look at compulsive
gambling, the Post-Dispatch found that . . .
Fast-cash machines on casino floors can hasten a problem gambler’s descent into debt,
prompting the nation’s largest machine supplier last month to let people deactivate
their cards in casinos. Hard Numbers on
gambling-related crimes are elusive, but
fraud detectives in St. Louis say they’re seeing an increase in workers with access to
money taking it to support gambling habits.’’ (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 2/6/99)
‘‘The battle against domestic violence is
gaining ground, and work by University of
Nebraska Medical Center researcher Dr. Robert Muelleman is helping. . . . Muelleman
worked on a . . . study at the UNMC hospital
this summer. The study has not been published yet, so the results are not entirely
concluded, he said, but some preliminary inferences can be drawn. ‘It looks as if problem
gambling in the partner is going to be as
much a risk factor as problem alcohol and
that’s really new information.’ he said.’’
(Daily Nebraskan, 1/13/00)
‘‘A Charlotte, N.C., postal worker is suing
First Citizens Bank and Visa for his Internet
gambling debts—because he says it’s illegal
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for the bank and Visa to let their credit
cards be used for gambling online. . . .
Lawers for (Mark) Eisele filed the suit,
which seeks class action status, in the U.S.
District Court in San Francisco, where Visa
International is based. . . . The suit claims
Visa and First Citizens, which issued Eisele’s
credit card, violated the federal Wire Act,
which prohibits use of wire communications
services for some gambling.’’ (Las Vegas Review-Journal, 8/18/99)
‘‘A California bank robber returned to his
old habits after being released from a New
Jersey prison to travel to a halfway house in
his home state, according to bank robbery
charges in at least two states. . . .
‘‘[Noel] Miller, who had been staying at a
New Orleans motel, told investigators he was
robbing banks to finance his gambling habit
and to support himself.’’ (Associated Press, 6/
1/00)
‘‘A casino executive who fudged his tax returns should have his license renewed anyway, New Jersey’s top casino regulator said
Monday. James Hurley, chairman of the
state Casino Control Commission, said Mirage Resorts Inc.-Atlantic City president
Mark Juliano demonstrated ‘extremely poor
judgment and an acute lack of sensitivity regarding his financial reporting responsibilities.’ But Hurley said it wasn’t serious
enough to deny Juliano a license to work in
New Jersey casinos. Juliano, 44, of Haddonfield, a former president of Caesars Atlantic
City Hotel Casino, wrote off $8,965 for a
‘phantom’ personal computer, reported gambling losses as a business expense and told
the IRS he drove 180,000 miles on a car found
to have traveled only 69,000 total miles, according to an investigation by the state Division of Gaming Enforcement.’’ (Associated
Press, 6/19/00)
‘‘Brian Dean Gray, a former Richmond
(Va.) stockbroker, pleaded guilty yesterday
in U.S. District Court to all three federal
fraud charges against him for stealing more
than $850,000 from clients and gambling
much of it away. . . . He used more than
$350,000 to gamble on horse racing, at New
Jersey casinos and in card games.’’ (Richmond Times-Dispatch, 6/3/00)
‘‘Before casino gambling, (Atlantic City)
was home to numerous thriving churches of
various denominations. But in recent years,
churches and synagogues have begun to
close. . . . The Rev. Patrick J. Hunt, pastor
at (the Church of the Ascension), said the casino industry is helping society gradually
erode. ‘We want anybody to come to church,’
Hunt said. ‘But gambling is a vice and the
casinos do their darndest to make sure we
don’t exist and that every other church
doesn’t exist.’ ’’ (Atlantic City Press, 10/11/99)
‘‘A Florida man who lost about $50,000
while gambling [in Atlantic City] during the
past two days died Tuesday after he jumped
seven floors from a Trump Plaza Hotel and
Casino roof onto Columbia Place, officials
said.’’ (Atlantic City Press, 8/18/99)
‘‘A German tourist jumped to his death off
a 10-story casino parking garage Wednesday
in the third such suicide in Atlantic City in
eight days.’’ On Aug. 17, a gambler who had
lost $87,000 jumped to his death off a Trump
Plaza roof. On Monday, a dealer at Caesar’s
Atlantic City Hotel Casino committed suicide by leaping off the casino’s parking garage.
‘‘It wasn’t clear if the most recent victim
had been gambling. He left no suicide note.’’
(Associated Press, 8/25/99)
‘‘A Kanawha County (W.V.) woman admitted she skimmed $40,000 from her group’s
bingo and raffle games Thursday, unveiling
an ongoing state and federal investigation of
groups that operate such games. Donna J.
Hopkins, 50, was secretary of the Marmet
Soccer Association when she embezzled the
money.’’ ([Charleston, W.V.] Gazette, 3/3/00)
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Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself 15 seconds, mainly to remind
my friend from Virginia that the gambling commission advocated a ban on
Internet gambling without exception.
And that is not this bill.
Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the
gentleman from Utah (Mr. CANNON).
Mr. CANNON. Mr. Speaker, I would
like to begin by saying that I agree
with the comments of my friend the
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. WOLF).
Gambling is a pernicious vice.
H.R. 3125, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act of 2000, is well-intentioned
but I do not think it succeeds in what
it is attempting to do. Instead, this
legislation creates legislation that is
unenforceable and places great regulatory burdens on Internet service providers and represents the first fullblown regulation of the Internet passed
by this body.
This bill will expand gambling online
and undermine the State’s authority to
regulate gambling. The carve out for
parimutuel betting will allow for parimutuel betting nationwide even in
those States where gambling is currently illegal.
A business licensed and regulated in
one State will be allowed to take bets
from someone located in other States
regardless of whether the State where
the bettor is located has authorized
such activity. All the bettor would
need to do is dial into the licensed
business taking the bets. This would
constitute a closed loop. Anyone who
so desires would be able to load the
software to be able to perform this
function on his computer and the
States would not be able to enforce
their laws.
Internet service providers are burdened by being required by the Government to act as enforcers of this law. By
passing this bill, we will be deputizing
ISPs with the task of denying their
customers access to any site that allows wagering. The courts will need to
issue a court order to each and every
ISP in the country telling them to shut
off access to any offending site, and the
ISP will be required to put in place filters to ensure that none of their subscribers can gain access.
What is the cost? Let me assure my
colleagues that it is not just monetary.
ISPs, in order to be in full compliance
with this law, will need to monitor
what sites its customers are visiting.
Keeping up with the sites that allow
gaming will be impossible for most
ISPs. AOL may have the resources to
monitor the activity on every site
accessed by its servers, but Rocky
Mount Internet based in Utah does not.
ISPs now have or will soon have the
technology to shield the identity of its
customers. People will be able to access gambling sites anonymously, rendering it impossible for this law to be
enforced. With this technology, both
the gambling site as well as the subscriber will be able to mask the address
from Federal agents. Any filters required by the law will, therefore, be
rendered useless.
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This legislation is harmful and ultimately unenforceable. We should reject
this legislation.
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself 30 seconds to say to the
gentleman
from
Michigan
(Mr.
CONYERS) that the National Gambling
Impact Study Commission said the
Federal Government shall prohibit
without new or expanded exemptions
Internet gambling not already authorized.
This legislation, thanks to the good
work of the gentleman from Louisiana
(Mr. TAUZIN), makes it perfectly clear
that there are no exemptions for anyone under this legislation.
I would say to the gentleman from
Utah (Mr. CANNON) that we have
worked very closely with Internet service providers and we will continue to
do that to make sure that the burdens
are manageable, and they have seen
and worked with us on the language
contained in this bill.
Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the
gentleman from Florida (Mr. STEARNS).
(Mr. STEARNS asked and was given
permission to revise and extend his remarks.)
Mr. STEARNS. Mr. Speaker, let me
say in the beginning, let us not let the
perfect become the enemy of the good
here.
I commend the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. GOODLATTE) for his bill and
the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr.
TAUZIN) for crafting a compromise that
we can support. So I hope all the folks
will come on board here. We can mend
this bill later on if they are not happy
with it.
Opponents of this legislation cry out
there is special legislation here creating carve-outs for specific industries.
And I say, Mr. Speaker, the carve-outs
that they cite are not carve-outs.
Rather, they allow for activity that is
already lawful under existing law to
continue.
This legislation permits parimutuel
wagering to operate as it has for many,
many years under Federal and State
laws. This legislation is mindful of
States’ rights and sovereignty and allows States their rights to regulate activity within their border, and that is
currently legal. So there are no carveouts here.
As such, the bill does not expand or
promote gambling on the Internet. Instead it allows for those activities as
currently permitted by States to exist.
This legislation has the support of a lot
of groups. I urge my colleagues to support it.
Mr. Speaker, let me start off by stating let’s
not let the perfect become the enemy of the
good. The Internet Gambling Prohibition Act
before us today is not a perfect bill. But it is
a step in the right direction and I commend my
friend from Virginia, Mr. GOODLATTE, and my
good friend from Louisiana, Mr. TAUZIN, for
crafting a compromise we can support.
Some of the opponents of this legislation
will say that this bill promotes or expands
gambling on the Internet. Nothing can be further from the truth. The legislation before us
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today in no way expands gambling on the
Interent. First and foremost, the legislation offered by my friend from Virginia prohibits gambling businesses from using the Internet to
place, receive, or otherwise make a bet or
wager. It does not create new government
laws, or additional regulations on the Internet,
it merely brings the interstate gambling ban up
to date. H.R. 3125 in no way expands gambling on the Interent and permits only activities
that are otherwise lawful and regulated by the
states.
Opponents of this legislation cry that H.R.
3125 is special favor legislation creating carve
outs for specific industries. Mr. Speaker, the
carve outs they cite are not carve outs, rather,
it allows for activity that is already lawful under
existing law to continue. This legislation permits parimutuel wagering to operate as it has
for many years under federal and state laws.
This legislation is mindful of states’ rights and
sovereignty, and allows states their right to
regulate activity within their borders that is currently legal. As such, the bill does not expand
or promote gambling on the Internet, instead,
it allows for those activities as currently permitted by states.
This legislation has the support of the National Football League, Major League Baseball, National Association of Attorneys General, the Christian Coalition, the Family Research Council, as well as numerous other organizations.
Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote
in favor of this legislation. Though not perfect,
ti certainly is a step in the right direction, and
it is the first step in battling the proliferation of
illegal gambling on the Internet—with future
Congresses free to revisit this matter and
amend this legislation as necessary.
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself 1 minute.
Mr. Speaker, I would hope that this
vote would turn only on the question of
whether or not there are exemptions
created in the bill.
This is the administration’s beginning statement. ‘‘The administration
strongly opposes H.R. 3125, which appears to be designed to protect certain
forms of Internet gambling that are
currently illegal while potentially
opening the floodgates for other forms
of illegal gambling. The administration
is especially troubled by the exemptions included in the bill for parimutuel wagering on activities such as
horse races, dog races and Jai-Alai.
These exemptions could have the effect
of allowing individuals to bet on dog
and horse racing from their homes, giving children and other vulnerable populations unsupervised, unlimited access
to such gambling activities.’’
That is an exemption. There is no
policy justification for such exemptions.
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, I think the best response to the comments of the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. CONYERS)
would come from the gentleman from
Louisiana (Mr. TAUZIN) who has played
a critical role in making it absolutely
clear that the language in this bill does
not provide any exemptions.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
04:59 Jul 18, 2000
Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to
yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from
Louisiana (Mr. TAUZIN) the chairman
of the Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Trade and Consumer Protection, a subcommittee of the Committee
on Commerce.
Mr. TAUZIN. Mr. Speaker, I thank
my friend for yielding me the time.
Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R.
3125, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act. It is a good bill. I urge my
colleagues to vote for it this afternoon.
Back in June the subcommittee I am
honored to chair, the Subcommittee on
Telecommunications, Trade and Consumer Protection, was afforded the opportunity to hold a hearing on this bill.
At the hearing, we learned many
things regarding current State and
Federal law as it applied to both interstate and intrastate gambling activities.
While the existing framework governing such activity is not always a
model of clarity, our hearing revealed
that this bill as it came to us to the
committee explicitly legalized certain
interstate parimutuel gaming activities that the Justice Department believes are prima facie illegal under current Federal law, namely the Wire Act.
As a result, the administration did,
in fact, oppose H.R. 3125 when we held
our hearings and they opposed it on the
grounds that first it did then expand
gambling beyond and above what is allowed by existing law according to Justice’s interpretation of the Wire Act
and, secondly, that it was not technologically neutral and that it made
legal on the Internet activities that
might be illegal when conducted on
phone wire.
In response to these criticisms, my
good friend the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. GOODLATTE) and I, along
with the gentleman from Virginia
(Chairman BLILEY), the gentleman
from Illinois (Mr. HYDE) and the gentleman from Florida (Mr. MCCOLLUM)
and their staffs, recrafted the parimutuel gaming provisions of the bill as
we see them today.
Working with the sports leagues,
many religious interests and the parimutuel gaming interests themselves,
we are happy to report that we were
successful in coming up with the compromise language that makes it clear
that the bill no longer draws any legal
distinction between the Internet and
wire line gaming activities and, as a result, in no way expands gambling beyond the present limits whatever those
limits are according to the Justice Department or the courts of the land.
This language now added to H.R. 3125
in the form of a managers amendment
clarifies the bill prohibits all online
gambling and only permits otherwise
lawful, State regulated, live parimutuel wagering activities that are
conducted on a closed subscriber-based
loop.
By the way, I should also point out it
does allow the Internet intrastate for
the use of the lottery activities pro-
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vided that they are conducted in a public place. With this language, H.R. 3125
now addresses the administration’s
concerns and places an appropriate ban
on gambling activities that is badly
needed for the country and needs to be
adopted.
In the past couple years, online gambling has flourished into a $1 billion industry with more than 700 sites in existence. The sports-related casino style
gambling taking place over the Internet today has, as the gentleman from
Virginia (Mr. WOLF) pointed out, ruined the lives of many Americans
young and old.
If we fail to present the President
with this legislation this year, the proliferation will be enormous. Make no
mistake. This bill needs to be passed. It
is neutral. It does not expand gambling. It needs to be addressed.
b
1445
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself 30 seconds, merely to advise my
friend from Louisiana as well as the
gentleman from Virginia that the
changes that they made made the expansion of gambling worse. That came
from the Department of Justice, whom
you thought you were trying to satisfy.
The Department has received a copy of
the language, they say, which we believe constitutes the amendment intended to resolve concerns over the exemption of horse racing, dog racing,
and Jai-Alai. It is our position that
this amendment may be even more
problematic than the current version
of the bill.
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself 30 seconds to respond to
the gentleman and say that the Justice
Department says that the Wire Act
covers these situations but does not
prosecute anyone. Under this legislation, they would have new tools requested by the National Association of
Attorneys General to combat this very
serious problem on the Internet, and
that is exactly what we intend to give
them with this legislation. There are
no exemptions. We certainly do not expand gambling. We attack the multibillion dollar industry that is growing
on the Internet, the 700 cybercasinos,
the sports betting, the threat of sales
of lottery tickets in people’s homes.
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I am
pleased to yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from California (Mr. Cox).
Mr. COX. Mr. Speaker, I thank the
gentleman from Michigan for yielding
me this time, and I thank my colleagues on both sides of the aisle for
trying to do the right thing here today,
because I share the concerns of my colleagues about the spread of illegal
Internet gambling. But I rise in reluctant opposition to this legislation because while it is well intentioned, it is
bad telecommunications policy.
This legislation would create enormous, if unintentional, regulatory
problems. First, it proposes to treat
online and offline gambling under different rules. That is a violation of the
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fundamental tenet of the Internet Nondiscrimination Act that this House
passed very recently by the overwhelming vote of 352–75. Regulating
commerce on the Internet under different rules from commerce in the offline world is a dangerous precedent
that invites significant new regulation
of the Internet such as we have not yet
seen.
Second, the bill expands gambling
opportunities to make legal certain
types of bets over the Internet that
would be illegal if they were made over
the telephone. Third, the bill would unfairly make Internet service providers
and search engines and other interactive service providers, ISPs, who
have nothing to do with gambling, people who have nothing to do with gambling, it would make them responsible
for policing the behavior of their subscribers. This is the principle that we
rejected when then Representative
WYDEN and I brought the Internet
Freedom and Family Empowerment
Act to the floor so that we could stop
the approach that the Senate had
adopted with the Communications Decency Act, later rejected by the Supreme Court.
In this bill in order to avoid criminal
prosecution, ISPs and other interactive
services would have to make sure that
they are not hosting or linking to Web
sites containing gambling advertising
or information. To avoid criminal prosecution, they would have to block
users from accessing foreign Web sites
over which they have no control, an especially dangerous precedent while the
United States at this very moment is
seeking to oppose efforts by foreign
governments to do that to our Web
sites.
Fourth, this bill would have the Federal
Government
dictate,
indeed
amend, the terms and conditions on
which ISPs today offer service. It
would require that every ISP terminate the account of any subscriber who
is suspected of using the service to
gamble. Fifth, the bill contains price
controls. It requires every ISP to offer
gambling filtering software at, quote,
‘‘reasonable cost,’’ putting the Federal
Government in an unspecified way in
charge of determining what is a reasonable price for filtering software.
For the mom-and-pop Internet service providers who constitute the vast
majority of America’s thousands of
ISPs, the legal and regulatory costs of
complying with this new Federal regulatory scheme are significant. That is
why this imperfect bill remains opposed by so many groups, the Computer and Communications Industry
Association, AT&T, the Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the
Traditional Values Coalition, the Free
Congress Foundation, the Seniors Coalition, and Americans for Tax Reform.
Oppose this legislation.
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself the balance of my time.
First, let me respond to the gentleman from California for whom I
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04:19 Jul 18, 2000
have great respect but with whom I
must disagree on every single point
raised. This legislation does not treat
online gambling unfairly compared to
offline gambling. In fact, the activities
complained of have been going on on
the telephone lines for decades and this
legislation is simply designed to bring
the Wire Act, written in 1961 when the
Wire Act was a good description of
telecommunications in this country,
into the modern age when telecommunications takes on a whole host
of different ramifications, including
the Internet. It does not in any way expand gambling on the Internet. We
have made that perfectly clear time
and time again. Why else would the National Coalition Against Gambling Expansion support this legislation?
The bill retrenches gambling on the
Internet
by
fighting
700
online
cybercasinos, by giving law enforcement new tools to deal with sports betting online, by stopping the efforts of
some who stand to make tens of millions of dollars selling services to State
lotteries to sell tickets online in people’s homes.
I want to make the point perfectly
clear that we do not tell the States
that they cannot use the Internet. We
simply say that when they use the
Internet, they have to use it in public
places, like convenience stores or other
places where children can be screened
out and they cannot buy tickets online
as they could at home. That is why the
Home School Legal Defense Association supports the legislation, the
Southern Baptist Convention supports
it, and many, many other religious and
family organizations.
Furthermore, we do not require
Internet service providers to police the
Internet. We simply require them to
cooperate with law enforcement. And
we do not require them to shut down
suspected sites, because the bill provides due process requirements of notice and hearing before a judge, and a
judge finding that an action should be
taken before an Internet service provider can be required to take down or
block a site.
The legislation has been carefully
crafted to be sensitive to the Internet
industry, which I am very supportive
of. After all, I am the chairman of the
Congressional Internet Caucus and
have worked on many issues with the
gentleman and others to promote the
Internet. But one way to promote the
Internet is to make sure that the
seamy side of life is dealt with on the
Internet. Just like child pornography
has to be dealt with on the Internet, so
does unregulated, out-of-control, illegal gambling. That is why the National
Collegiate Athletic Association, the
National
Football
League,
Major
League Baseball, the National Hockey
League, and the National Basketball
Association support this legislation because of the renewed threat to amateur
and professional sports in America
brought on by an incredible explosion
in gambling and sports betting because
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of the Internet. These new tools are
needed by law enforcement. That is
why the National Association of Attorneys General have asked us for this
legislation. That is why I ask my colleagues to support it.
It is also important to note that this
legislation treats Indian gaming fairly.
Every word in this legislation has been
signed off on by the gentleman from
Alaska (Mr. YOUNG), the chairman of
the Committee on Resources.
I urge my colleagues to support this
effective legislation to fight gambling
on the Internet.
Mr. SHAW. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 3125, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act of 2000. This legislation is necessary to stem the rising tide of Internet gambling, which is largely unregulated and
unreachable by American authorities.
Mr. Speaker, Internet gambling has the potential to make thousands of Americans who
enjoy video games into gambling addicts. All
that an Internet gambler needs to play casinostyle games on the Internet is a computer, a
modem, and a credit card—and therein lies
the dangerous allure of this type of wagering.
Unlike a glitzy casino where playing games of
chance is a social experience, Internet gambling is usually done alone, with the only limit
being the limit on one’s credit card. I believe
that gambling over the Internet has the potential to turn a generation of children who are
addicted to video games into a generation of
adults addicted to playing casino-style games
over the Internet.
Furthermore, most of the cyber-casinos are
located in the Caribbean, so that the few gamblers who do win have no recourse if there is
a dispute. Mr. Speaker, banning Internet gambling now will prevent much more serious social problems later. For that reason, I urge all
of my colleagues to vote for passage of H.R.
3125.
Ms. ESHOO. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to H.R. 3125, The Internet Gambling Prohibition Act, a bill that threatens the continued
growth of e-commerce as well as the privacy
rights of individuals.
The Department of Justice, high-tech companies and socially conservative organizations
agree—H.R. 3125 is fatally flawed. By prohibiting some types of gambling and expanding
others, H.R. 3125 puts an inappropriate burden on high tech companies and interferes
with the civil liberties of Americans.
The legislation is rife with loopholes. Betting
on horses and dogs is allowed; sports and casino-style games are not. Jai-alai is in, while
state lotteries are out. This arbitrary patchwork
of exemptions and prohibitions seems to be
rooted in the degree of power of a particular
interest group rather than sound public policy.
H.R. 3125 imposes new and unprecedented
regulatory burdens on the Internet that are
shortsighted and threaten our civil liberties.
The notice and take-down provisions are
overbroad, too burdensome for ISPs, and give
the government too much power.
Finally, the blocking provisions in H.R. 3125
threaten to intrude on individual privacy. This
Congress is still in the process of drafting legislation aimed at assuring the privacy of individuals using the Internet. H.R. 3125 would
leap over that thoughtful process and attempt
to regulate what many Members have vowed
to allow—freedom on the Internet. H.R. 3125
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puts artificial boundaries on the Internet when
the Internet is designed specifically to transcend boundaries.
I share my colleagues’s desire to protect society from the dangers of abusive gambling
which can be a corrosive agent, both culturally
and personally. However, H.R. 3125 does not
do what it purports to do. If Congress wants
to ban gambling on the Internet then it should
ban all gambling on the Internet. The piecemeal approach embodied in H.R. 3125 is an
exercise in hypocrisy. I urge my colleagues to
vote against H.R. 3125.
Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Speaker, I rise
today in support of H.R. 3125, the Internet
Gambling Prohibition Act. During Judiciary
Committee mark-up, I brought up my concerns
relating to the tribal gaming exemption. I am
pleased that the Gentleman from Virginia, Mr.
GOODLATTE, and the Gentleman from Alaska,
Mr. YOUNG, were willing to work with me to include language which addresses my concerns
about what I believe was an ambiguous section of the bill.
I would like to take a moment to explain my
concerns and how, through the manager’s
amendment, these concerns were addressed.
The provision exempting gambling on a closed
loop system requires both the sender and the
receiver to be on Indian lands. This is not limited to the Indian lands on which the game is
conducted, therefore, it would allow linking of
all Indian lands nationwide. My concern with
this language was how multi-Tribal linking
could impact individual Tribal/State gaming
Compacts.
Let me provide an example: If State A’s
Compact allows for slots, and State B’s Compact allows for blackjack and slots, absent
clarification, the tribe in State A could argue it
can now participate in blackjack. Included in
the manager’s amendment is additional language on this section to ensure that no Class
III gaming activity can occur without the explicit authorization of a Tribal/State Compact.
This language does not require Tribes to renegotiate their Compacts with states; rather it
reinforces the Tribal/State Compact.
In conclusion, the Indian gaming language
has been clarified so that the carefully negotiated Tribal/State compacts are not at risk. I
urge my colleagues to support the bill.
Mr. BACA. Mr. Speaker, I oppose H.R.
3125, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act.
I am concerned that the bill creates unfair
carve outs. In-home gambling on horse and
dog races is allowed, but tribal Internet gaming is prohibited. I fail to see how dog races
are acceptable but tribal gaming is not. This
bill does not deserve our support.
The bill is so riddled with exemptions it is
opposed by the Traditional Values Coalition,
which says that the bill does little to address
the problems it purports to solve.
Tribal gaming has been essential in furthering economic development on our reservations. It has allowed for medical clinics and
upgrading of substandard housing. It has lifted
Native Americans from poverty. It has given
them self-determination over their destiny. It
has furthered Native American sovereignty.
It is important we recognize all Native Americans have given to this country. For that reason, earlier in the year I introduced H. Res.
487 to honor Native Americans.
Native Americans have shown their willingness to fight and die for this nation in foreign
lands. They honor the American flag at every
powwow.
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04:19 Jul 18, 2000
Native Americans should be treated fairly.
We should not burden them with restrictions
we are unwilling to place on others.
The bill is opposed by the Department of
Justice, AT&T, the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, Computer and Communications
Industry Association, Covad Communications,
Center for Democracy and Technology, National Congress of American Indians, Electronic Privacy Information Center, ACLU, Traditional Values Coalition, Seniors Coalition,
Free Congress Foundation, Americans for Tax
Reform, CATO Institute, American Association
of Concerned Tax Payers, and Coalition for
Constitutional Liberties.
For all of the above reasons, I am opposing
H.R. 3125.
Mr. UDALL of New Mexico. Mr. Speaker,
today I rise in opposition to H.R. 3125, which
could more appropriately be re-titled the Internet Gambling Proliferation Act.
What this proposed legislation does is impose a new set of laws that selectively privilege some forms of gambling by exempting
them from these laws. At the same time, other
forms of gambling are condemned. What Congress should do is work with the states to
enact legislation, which deals rationally with
prohibiting or regulating Internet gambling.
Furthermore, in my home State of New
Mexico—as in many other states—this legislation would unnecessarily complicate the ability
of states and tribal governments to work out a
rational regulatory scheme.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. MILLER of Florida). The question is on the
motion offered by the gentleman from
Virginia (Mr. GOODLATTE) that the
House suspend the rules and pass the
bill, H.R. 3125, as amended.
The question was taken.
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I object
to the vote on the ground that a
quorum is not present and make the
point of order that a quorum is not
present.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8, rule XX and the Chair’s
prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will be postponed.
The point of no quorum is considered
withdrawn.
f
GENERAL LEAVE
Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I ask
unanimous consent that all Members
may have 5 legislative days within
which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material
on H.R. 3125.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentleman from Virginia?
There was no objection.
f
SEMIPOSTAL AUTHORIZATION ACT
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I move to
suspend the rules and pass the bill
(H.R. 4437) to grant to the United
States Postal Service the authority to
issue semipostals, and for other purposes, as amended.
The Clerk read as follows:
H.R. 4437
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in
Congress assembled,
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SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
This Act may be cited as the ‘‘Semipostal
Authorization Act’’.
SEC. 2. AUTHORITY TO ISSUE SEMIPOSTALS.
(a) IN GENERAL.—Chapter 4 of title 39,
United States Code, is amended by adding at
the end the following:
‘‘§ 416. Authority to issue semipostals
‘‘(a) DEFINITIONS.—For purposes of this
section—
‘‘(1) the term ‘semipostal’ means a postage
stamp which is issued and sold by the Postal
Service, at a premium, in order to help provide funding for a cause described in subsection (b); and
‘‘(2) the term ‘agency’ means an Executive
agency within the meaning of section 105 of
title 5.
‘‘(b) DISCRETIONARY AUTHORITY.—The Postal Service is hereby authorized to issue and
sell semipostals under this section in order
to advance such causes as the Postal Service
considers to be in the national public interest and appropriate.
‘‘(c) RATE OF POSTAGE.—The rate of postage on a semipostal issued under this section
shall be established by the Governors, in accordance with such procedures as they shall
by regulation prescribe (in lieu of the procedures under chapter 36), except that—
‘‘(1) the rate established for a semipostal
under this section shall be equal to the rate
of postage that would otherwise regularly
apply, plus a differential of not to exceed 25
percent; and
‘‘(2) no regular rates of postage or fees for
postal services under chapter 36 shall be any
different from what they otherwise would
have been if this section had not been enacted.
The use of any semipostal issued under this
section shall be voluntary on the part of
postal patrons.
‘‘(d) AMOUNTS BECOMING AVAILABLE.—
‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The amounts becoming
available from the sale of a semipostal under
this section shall be transferred to the appropriate agency or agencies under such arrangements as the Postal Service shall by
mutual agreement with each such agency establish.
‘‘(2) IDENTIFICATION OF APPROPRIATE CAUSES
AND AGENCIES.—Decisions concerning the
identification of appropriate causes and
agencies to receive amounts becoming available from the sale of a semipostal under this
section shall be made in accordance with applicable regulations under subsection (e).
‘‘(3) DETERMINATION OF AMOUNTS.—
‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—The amounts becoming
available from the sale of a semipostal under
this section shall be determined in a manner
similar to that provided for under section
414(c)(2) (as in effect on July 1, 2000).
‘‘(B) ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS.—Regulations
under subsection (e) shall specifically address how the costs incurred by the Postal
Service in carrying out this section shall be
computed, recovered, and kept to a minimum.
‘‘(4) OTHER FUNDING NOT TO BE AFFECTED.—
Amounts which have or may become available from the sale of a semipostal under this
section shall not be taken into account in
any decision relating to the level of appropriations or other Federal funding to be furnished to an agency in any year.
‘‘(5) RECOVERY OF COSTS.—Before transferring to an agency in accordance with paragraph (1) any amounts becoming available
from the sale of a semipostal over any period, the Postal Service shall ensure that it
has recovered the full costs incurred by the
Postal Service in connection with such
semipostal through the end of such period.
‘‘(e) REGULATIONS.—
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‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in
subsection (c), the Postal Service shall prescribe any regulations necessary to carry out
this section, including provisions relating
to—
‘‘(A) which office or other authority within
the Postal Service shall be responsible for
making the decisions described in subsection
(d)(2);
‘‘(B) what criteria and procedures shall be
applied in making those decisions; and
‘‘(C) what limitations shall apply, if any,
relating to the issuance of semipostals (such
as whether more than 1 semipostal may be
offered for sale at the same time).
‘‘(2) NOTICE AND COMMENT.—Before any regulation is issued under this section, a copy of
the proposed regulation shall be published in
the Federal Register, and an opportunity
shall be provided for interested parties to
present written and, where practicable, oral
comment. All regulations necessary to carry
out this section shall be issued not later
than 30 days before the date on which
semipostals are first made available to the
public under this section.
‘‘(f) ANNUAL REPORTS.—
‘‘(1) IN GENERAL.—The Postmaster General
shall include in each report rendered under
section 2402, with respect to any period during any portion of which this section is in effect, information concerning the operation
of any program established under this section.
REQUIREMENT.—If
any
‘‘(2)
SPECIFIC
semipostal ceases to be offered during the
period covered by such a report, the information contained in that report shall also
include—
‘‘(A) the commencement and termination
dates for the sale of such semipostal;
‘‘(B) the total amount that became available from the sale of such semipostal; and
‘‘(C) of that total amount, how much was
applied toward administrative costs.
For each year before the year in which a
semipostal ceases to be offered, any report
under this subsection shall include, with respect to that semipostal (for the year covered by such report), the information described in subparagraphs (B) and (C).
‘‘(g) TERMINATION.—This section shall
cease to be effective at the end of the 10-year
period beginning on the date on which
semipostals are first made available to the
public under this section.’’.
(b) REPORTS BY AGENCIES.—Each agency
that receives any funding in a year under
section 416 of title 39, United States Code (as
amended by this section) shall submit a written report under this subsection, with respect to such year, to the congressional committees with jurisdiction over the United
States Postal Service. Each such report shall
include—
(1) the total amount of funding received by
such agency under such section 416 during
the year;
(2) an accounting of how any funds received by such agency under such section 416
were allocated or otherwise used by such
agency in such year; and
(3) a description of any significant advances or accomplishments in such year that
were funded, in whole or in part, out of
amounts received by such agency under such
section 416.
(c) REPORTS BY THE GENERAL ACCOUNTING
OFFICE.—
(1) INTERIM REPORT.—The General Accounting Office shall submit to the President and
each House of Congress an interim report on
the operation of the program established
under section 416 of title 39, United States
Code (as amended by this section) not later
than 4 years after semipostals are first made
available to the public under such section.
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(2) FINAL REPORT.—The General Accounting Office shall transmit to the President
and each House of Congress a final report on
the operation of the program established
under such section 416, not later than 6
months before the date on which it is scheduled to expire. The final report shall contain
a detailed statement of the findings and conclusions of the General Accounting Office,
together with any recommendations it considers appropriate.
(d) CLERICAL AMENDMENT.—The table of
sections for chapter 4 of title 39, United
States Code, is amended by adding at the end
the following:
‘‘416. Authority to issue semipostals.’’.
(e) EFFECTIVE DATE.—The program under
section 416 of title 39, United States Code (as
amended by this section) shall be established
within 6 months after the date of enactment
of this Act.
SEC. 3. EXTENSION OF AUTHORITY TO ISSUE
SEMIPOSTALS FOR BREAST CANCER
RESEARCH.
(a) IN GENERAL.—Section 414(g) of title 39,
United States Code, is amended to read as
follows:
‘‘(g) This section shall cease to be effective
after July 29, 2002, or the end of the 2-year
period beginning on the date of enactment of
the Semipostal Authorization Act, whichever is later.’’.
(b) REPORTING REQUIREMENT.—No later
than 3 months and no earlier than 6 months
before the date as of which section 414 of
title 39, United States Code (as amended by
this section) is scheduled to expire, the
Comptroller General of the United States
shall submit to the Congress a report on the
operation of such section. Such report shall
be in addition to the report required by section 2(b) of Public Law 105–41, and shall address at least the same matters as were required to be included in that earlier report.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from
New York (Mr. MCHUGH) and the gentleman from Florida (Mr. HASTINGS)
each will control 20 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentleman
from New York (Mr. MCHUGH).
GENERAL LEAVE
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I ask
unanimous consent that all Members
may have 5 legislative days within
which to revise and extend their remarks on H.R. 4437.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentleman from New York?
There was no objection.
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, as with any measure of
this magnitude, the point at which a
bill comes to the floor of this House, of
course, is realized only through the
concerted efforts and a great deal of
hard work by a number of good people,
and that is certainly the case here
today.
In that regard, I want to begin by expressing my deepest appreciation particularly to the ranking member on the
subcommittee, the gentleman from
Pennsylvania (Mr. FATTAH), his staff,
the staff of the full subcommittee, for
their efforts, for their support and
most importantly their substantive
and constructive input. I would say not
only is the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. FATTAH) a primary cospon-
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sor of this legislation, he is indeed one
of the primary authors; and frankly his
input, his participation made what I
think is a good piece of legislation
even better.
I also want to thank the chairman of
the full committee, the gentleman
from Indiana (Mr. BURTON), and, of
course, his colleague, the gentleman
from California (Mr. WAXMAN), the
ranking member on the full committee, for their cooperation and for
their efforts in helping to bring this
very worthy piece of legislation before
us today.
The bill before us, Mr. Speaker, seeks
to achieve two very important objectives. The first is to extend the authorization of the highly successful breast
cancer research stamp. It was not that
long ago in the 105th Congress under
the guidance of two of our former colleagues, a fellow State associate of
mine, the gentlewoman Susan Molinari
from New York, and Vic Fazio, the gentleman from California, who worked so
hard in realizing what became the first
ever semipostal issuance in the history
of the United States. Since that time,
since the creation of the breast cancer
research stamp, the proceeds from the
sales of these issues from voluntary
purchases has resulted in some $15 million in additional funds made available
for breast cancer research.
There is truly, Mr. Speaker, not a
person in this country that has not in
some way been touched by the cruel
hand of this disease, a wife, a mother,
a close friend, a loved one or, in my
own case, a grandmother. Those dollars, willingly donated by millions
upon millions of caring individuals,
will hopefully bring us ever closer to
the day when this scourge is but a sad
and very frightening memory. Without
our action here through this bill, Mr.
Speaker, the current authorization will
end at the conclusion of this month, on
July 29, in fact.
So many in this House, so many in
this Nation have called upon us to act
further. In the House, I would say we
owe particular thanks to the gentleman from New Hampshire (Mr.
BASS), who gathered 117 of our colleagues calling for this extension. In
fact, the authorization for such an action contained in this bill is modeled
on the gentleman from New Hampshire’s bill and would extend the current program for an additional 2 years.
As I mentioned, our presence here
today also comes through the urging
and support of many, many others, far
too many to properly credit them all
by name. But we certainly want to
thank and commend each and every
one of those folks. But I do want to pay
particular tribute to just a few, if I
might. Ms. Betsey Mullen, who was
here with us in Washington earlier
today, I believe and I hope she still is,
and her colleague at the Women’s Information Network Against Breast
Cancer, Dr. Bodai, for their untiring efforts. I would also like to thank Ms.
Mullen’s 61⁄2-year-old nephew and her
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
8 ⁄ -year-old niece who took the time
out of what I know are their busy lives
and busy summers to actually address
handwritten letters to all of us here in
Congress urging our continued efforts
on behalf of this semipostal.
Mr. Speaker, I include the letters in
their entirety for the RECORD.
12
DEAR CONGRESS, Girls and boys can get
breast cancer and I don’t want girls and boys
and the President and his wife, cat and dog
to get sick. Keep the stamp going.
From Brendon Fisher.
JULY 16, 2000.
DEAR CONGRESS, I think it’s very important to keep the stamp because if we don’t
every girl is going to worry about it or
maybe get brest cancer. But if we keep it we
will get money to cure to stop it. My Aunt
Betsey risked her life on it and I’m proud of
her. If you think about it no one likes it because you can die from it. I think and a lot
of other people agree with me that it would
be best to keep the stamp and then things
will go perfect.
Hope my letter makes a difference because
not just me is counting on this.
By Paige Fisher, 8 in a half years old, MD.
If I might, I would like to read a part
of both of those.
‘‘Dear Congress:
‘‘Girls and boys can get breast cancer
and I don’t want girls and boys and the
President and his wife, cat and dog to
get sick. Keep the stamp going.’’
That is from Brendon Fisher, who is,
as I said, 61⁄2 years old.
b
1500
And this one: ‘‘Dear Congress, I think
it is very important to keep the stamp,
because if we don’t, every girl is going
to worry about it or maybe get breast
cancer. But if we keep it, we will get
money to cure, to stop it. My Aunt
Betsey risked her life on it and I’m
proud of her. If you think about it, no
one likes it because you can die from
it. I think, and a lot of other people
agree with me, that it would be best to
keep the stamp and then things will go
perfect. I hope my letter makes a difference, because not just me is counting on this. By Paige Fisher, 81⁄2 years
old.’’
Paige, I want to let you know that
yours and Brendon’s efforts have indeed made a difference. As I said, I
have many to thank.
I would like to give a personal
thanks to a special individual, a lady
by the name of Jennifer Katz, who has
a tangential professional interest in
this cause, but who long before this
question evolved, Mr. Speaker, through
her own life experiences taught me and
I suspect many, many others how to
learn from her efforts that through
tragedy one can identify important
goals and challenges and learn in life
some things so personal that can become bigger than self, and to thank her
for helping me better understand that
reality.
Lastly, Mr. Speaker, and certainly
not least, we all owe our thanks to the
dedicated administration and employees of the Postal Service, because it
was through their selfless commit-
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04:19 Jul 18, 2000
ment, through their efforts that this
program in its initial stages has
reached the historic levels that it has.
Yes, Mr. Speaker, many, many thanks
to so many people.
The second equally important part
and important section of this bill
would establish a permanent process
and give defined authority within the
Postal Service to regularly and formally establish future semipostals that
will serve similar purposes in the national American public interest.
The success of the Breast Cancer Research Stamp has understandably led
many of our colleagues to propose
similar initiatives that are designed to
benefit many other worthy causes.
And, indeed, this year alone in this
Congress, we have had some 14 bills introduced into both bodies that attempt
to achieve just such a goal.
Mr. Speaker, I will read from them
briefly: the gentlewoman from California (Ms. MILLENDER-MCDONALD) on
AIDS research; the gentleman from
Pennsylvania (Mr. WELDON) on diabetes; the gentleman from Rhode Island
(Mr. WEYGAND) on Alzheimer’s; the
gentleman
from
California
(Mr.
CUNNINGHAM) on prostate cancer; the
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. JACKSON-LEE) on emergency food relief; the
gentlewoman from Maryland (Mrs.
MORELLA) on organ and tissue donation; the gentlewoman from California
(Ms. LOFGREN) on World War II memorial; the gentleman from Ohio (Mr.
TRAFICANT) on the American Battle
Monuments Commission; the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. HEFLEY) on
domestic violence. And in the other
body, Mr. LOTT on Highway-Rail Grade
crossing safety; Mr. NIGHTHORSE-CAMPBELL on domestic violence; Mr. DEWINE
on organ and tissue donation, and the
list goes on and on.
Clearly, Mr. Speaker, all of these are
very worthy initiatives, and I think it
is just that fact that perhaps most
clearly of all calls for the passage of
this bill. I fear absent our action, Mr.
Speaker, that none of these may be
achieved, that in the perhaps regrettable, but I think undeniable political
reality of this Congress as we push
back and forth toward trying to
achieve our own personal and sometimes equally laudable goals, none of
them may be passed.
Mr. Speaker, through this legislation, we can say to the postal service,
we must establish a system that must
consider these kinds of initiatives and
they must issue them on a regular
basis. In this fashion, Mr. Speaker, I
think we can most assuredly guarantee
that these kinds of initiatives will indeed continue into the future, as I
think they should.
Mr. Speaker, I would say, while the
Breast Cancer Research Stamp Initiative has gone exceedingly well, it has
not been without its flaws. Some observers including the General Accounting Office have found that some of the
procedural and administrative surroundings have been less than perfectly
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implemented. This bill seizes upon a
report done by the GAO that calls for
certain
reforms
within
future
issuances, providing for better accounting methods to make sure that both
the expenditure and the revenue side
are clearly defined and clearly recorded, a provision for full reporting on
the program, including regularly reports to both bodies in this Congress,
methods to ensure full costs coverage,
so that those who choose not to participate in the stamp are not somehow
burdened with added costs, to ensure
that any future, postal increases necessitated are not a result of semipostals
no matter how worthy the cause.
In sum, Mr. Speaker, I do firmly believe that this is a balanced and wellreasoned and in my humble opinion a
very worthy and necessary piece of legislation, and I would urge its passage
here today.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr.
Speaker, I yield myself such time as I
may consume.
(Mr. HASTINGS of Florida asked and
was given permission to revise and extend his remarks.)
Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr.
Speaker, first let me thank the gentleman from New York (Mr. MCHUGH),
the chairman of this committee, for
being forthcoming with reference to
this legislation. Additionally, I would
like to thank the delegate, the gentlewoman from the District of Columbia
(Ms. NORTON), my good friend, for graciously allowing me to manage the
time on this important measure.
I would like to join the gentleman
from New York (Mr. MCHUGH) in the
consideration
of
H.R.
4437,
the
Semipostal Authorization Act, legislation, granting the postal service the
discretionary
authority
to
issue
semipostals. This measure was unanimously reported from the committee
on June 29, 2000.
I am pleased to note that on June 29,
the gentleman from New York (Mr.
MCHUGH) reported out an amendment
in the nature of a substitute to H.R.
4437, which made a number of important changes to the original text. We
owe our interests in semipostals to Dr.
Ernie Bodai, chief of surgery at the
Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in
Sacramento, California, and one of our
former colleagues, former Congressman
Vic Fazio from California.
Mr. Speaker, Dr. Bodai first proposed
the idea of a semipostal with the
money raised going toward breast cancer research. He took his idea to Congressman Vic Fazio; and on May 7, 1996,
Congressman Fazio introduced the first
semipostal bill, H.R. 3401, the Breast
Cancer Research Stamp Act.
He was joined in this effort by Senator DIANNE FEINSTEIN when she sponsored identical legislation in the Senate. Congressman Fazio subsequently
reintroduced his bill in the 105th Congress as H.R. 407. On May 13, 1997, Representative Fazio joined Representative Susan Molinari from New York,
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July 17, 2000
former Congresswoman, in sponsoring
H.R. 1585, Stamp Out Breast Cancer
Act.
The bill, as amended, and passed by
the House on July 22, 1997, by a vote of
423–3 permitted the postal service to establish a special rate of postage for
first class mail, not to exceed 25 percent of the original first class rate of
postage. Stamps issued under this special rate are available for purchase by
the public on a voluntary basis and as
an alternative to regular postage.
After deducting an amount sufficient
to cover reasonable costs attributable
to the printing, sale, and distribution
of the stamps, the postal service would
transfer 70 percent of the amount generated to the National Institutes of
Health and 30 percent to the Department of Defense for breast cancer research.
The National Institutes of Health
designated the money to support innovative pilot studies that will further
breast cancer awareness. The Department of Defense designated the money
for awards intended to encourage innovative approaches to breast cancer research.
H.R. 1585 was subsequently enacted
into law, Public Law 105–41, in addition
to authorizing the breast cancer research stamp for 2 years, required the
General Accounting Office to submit a
report to Congress that evaluated the
effectiveness and the appropriateness
of this method of fund-raising.
In its April 2000 report, entitled
‘‘Breast Cancer Research Stamp, Millions Raised for Research, But Better
Costs Recovery Criteria Needed,’’ the
GAO determined that the semipostal
was successful. It is expected that by
July 28, 2000, well over 215 million
stamps will have been sold and more
than 15 million in revenue raised.
GAO further determined that the
semipostal was an effective and appropriate way to fund-raise.
Mr. Speaker, the incidence of breast
cancer continues to far outstrip available resources and funds. The statistics
are as sobering as they are rising.
Breast cancer is still the number one
cancer killer of women between the
ages of 15 and 24. The disease claims
another woman’s life every 15 minutes
in the United States. More than 2 million women are living with breast cancer in America today, yet 1 million of
them have not been diagnosed.
More and more people are joining the
ranks of breast cancer survivors rather
than breast cancer victims due in large
part to breakthroughs in cancer research. According to the American Association for Cancer Research, 8 million people are alive today as a result
of cancer research. The bottom line is
that every dollar we continue to raise
will save lives.
Clearly, the American public by purchasing more than 215 million breast
cancer semipostal stamps believes this
is a good cause and one worthy of contributions. I would urge on behalf of
the gentlewoman from the District of
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05:56 Jul 18, 2000
Columbia (Ms. NORTON) and the committee that we move quickly and pass
H.R. 4437.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I would
ask the gentleman from Florida (Mr.
HASTINGS) if he has any further requests for time.
Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr.
Speaker, I have no further requests for
time, and I yield back the balance of
my time.
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests, but before yielding back, let me
compliment and express my appreciation to the gentleman from Florida
(Mr. HASTINGS) for his invaluable assistance here and to associate myself
with his remarks about not just the
importance of this bill in its two major
aspects but to the invaluable contributions of both our former colleagues,
Mr. Fazio and Ms. Molinari, as I attempted to state in my remarks, but
also as I said, the gentleman from
Pennsylvania (Mr. FATTAH), the gentlewoman from the District of Columbia
(Ms. NORTON), and others for the great
assistance that they have given and
urge all of our colleagues to join us in
expressing their support of this bill.
Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance
of my time.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. MILLER of Florida). The question is on the
motion offered by the gentleman from
New York (Mr. MCHUGH) that the
House suspend the rules and pass the
bill, H.R. 4437, as amended.
The question was taken; and (twothirds having voted in favor thereof)
the rules were suspended and the bill,
as amended, was passed.
A motion to reconsider was laid on
the table.
f
VICKI COCEANO POST OFFICE
BUILDING
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I move to
suspend the rules and pass the bill
(H.R. 3985) to designate the facility of
the United States Postal Service located at 14900 Southwest 30th Street in
Miramar City, Florida, as the ‘‘Vicki
Coceano Post Office Building’’.
The Clerk read as follows:
H.R. 3985
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in
Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. VICKI COCEANO POST OFFICE BUILDING.
(a) DESIGNATION.—The facility of the
United States Postal Service located at 14900
Southwest 30th Street in Miramar, Florida,
shall be known and designated as the ‘‘Vicki
Coceano Post Office Building’’.
(b) REFERENCES.—Any reference in a law,
map, regulation, document, paper, or other
record of the United States to the facility referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to
be a reference to the ‘‘Vicki Coceano Post
Office Building’’.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from
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New York (Mr. MCHUGH) and the gentleman from Florida (Mr. HASTINGS)
each will control 20 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentleman
from New York (Mr. MCHUGH).
GENERAL LEAVE
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I ask
unanimous consent that all Members
may have 5 legislative days within
which to revise and extend their remarks on H.R. 3985.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentleman from New York?
There was no objection.
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, I had the honor of
standing on this floor just last week as
we proposed four similar naming bills
and made the comment that I felt very
strongly then, and I continue to believe
in that we are indeed fortunate to have
the efforts of so many Members of this
body from across the country who work
so hard and have done such a tremendous job in identifying truly worthy individuals to which and upon whom we
can extend this honor of a post office
naming.
b
1515
I would like to pay my compliments
and thanks to the gentleman from
Florida (Mr. HASTINGS), the primary
sponsor of this legislation, for keeping
us on track in that regard and for helping us to uphold a record in which we
all take a great deal of pride.
As the Clerk has read, Mr. Speaker,
this bill does indeed designate the
United States Postal Service building
located at 14900 Southwest 30th Street
in Miramar, Florida, as the Vicki
Coceano Post Office Building.
H.R. 3985 was amended by the full
committee but only as a result of a
necessary technical correction to the
address that was originally identified
by the Postal Service, and has no other
substantive impact upon the bill itself.
We are indeed fortunate, as we just
heard on the previous piece of legislation, to have the gentleman from Florida (Mr. HASTINGS) with us, and I know
that he is prepared to make a very full
statement about Ms. Coceano. I do not
want to take away from that opportunity, but let me note that as we attempt to do on all of these bills we
have looked over the background and
the contributions of this very special
lady, a special lady, who I understand
is affectionately known in her community as Mayor Vicki, which I think
speaks volumes about the affection and
the respect of those who know her best
and how they view this very, very
unique individual.
As a resident of South Florida for
some 40 years, I understand that is a
fairly remarkable achievement in a
State that benefits from the migration
of many people from my State, for example. So she has been there for 4 decades contributing to her community,
as her nickname suggests, serving in
public office and serving in a distinguished way, but clearly her contributions extend far beyond that of running
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for mayor or some other public position. She has been a contributor, a volunteer and a doer in a wide range of activities that have certainly benefited
her community. But through such efforts as on the White House Conference
on Aging and others, she has not limited her scope and her influence to the
wonderful community of Miramar but
has attempted to serve this entire nation.
So it is with a great deal of pride
that I rise today to put forward this
bill and to commend, as I said, the gentleman from Florida (Mr. HASTINGS)
and the entire Florida delegation who
have joined in the cosponsoring of the
bill, and I urge all of our colleagues to
join us in supporting this initiative.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr.
Speaker, I yield myself such time as I
may consume.
(Mr. HASTINGS of Florida asked and
was given permission to revise and extend his remarks.)
Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr.
Speaker, first let me thank the gentleman from New York (Mr. MCHUGH)
for his warm and generous comment. I
am deeply appreciative. Additionally, I
would like to thank our full committee
chairman, the gentleman from Indiana
(Mr. BURTON), for assisting my office in
expediting this matter before the end
of this portion of our session.
I would also like to thank the gentlewoman from the District of Columbia
(Ms. NORTON) again for giving me the
privilege of going forward today in this
regard, as well as the ranking member,
the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr.
FATTAH), who has been extremely helpful to us.
Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong
support of H.R. 3985. I introduced this
bill earlier in the year to name a post
office in my hometown of Miramar,
Florida, for Vicki Coceano. The city
commission of the City of Miramar
passed a resolution overwhelmingly
supportive of this measure before I undertook any action at all. Additionally,
my colleague, the gentleman from
Florida (Mr. DEUTSCH), in whose district this facility actually exists, was
also extremely supportive.
For me, it becomes a moment of personal privilege. I am now in my fourth
term here in the United States Congress. And I have had the good fortune
of doing a significant number of things
on behalf of the people that I represent
in the district that I am privileged to
serve. And I would hope on behalf of
this Nation and indeed the entire Earth
that some of my actions have been
helpful. But none gives me any greater
pride than to offer this measure today
for indeed as is the case with a lot of
Members who come forward with legislation, today it is a point of real privilege for me because Vicki Coceano is a
person that I have known for 38 years.
And I have known her to be more than
forthright as a citizen. In the days of
segregation, it was Vicki Coceano that
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
05:56 Jul 18, 2000
spoke out frequently with reference to
matters of this kind.
So, Mr. Speaker, and I would also say
to my dear friends in South Florida,
this honor is altogether fitting and appropriate.
In the few minutes that I have, let
me say a little more about a wonderful
woman in South Florida, Vicki
Coceano, that the gentleman from New
York (Mr. MCHUGH) so rightfully
brought up, Mayor Vicki. Mayor Vicki,
as she is affectionately known by some,
Vicki by some of us, and has preferred
it that way, has resided in South Florida for more than 40 years and has generously given both her time and talents
throughout that period to make
Broward County, which its largest city
is Fort Lauderdale but its proudest
city is Miramar, during that period of
time to make it a better place to live
and work.
She was elected to serve as a
Miramar city commissioner in 1977 and
elected mayor in 1989, serving the people of Miramar for more than 20 years,
indeed all of its existence. There is one
who has departed, former Mayor Calhoun, who I know is looking down on
us today as we take this action and is
proud of the fact that Vicki is being a
recipient of this honor.
Vicki has also served on many boards
at the Federal, State and county levels, including the Blue Ribbon Committee for Broward County Schools,
the Area Agency on Aging and the
White House Conference on Aging.
Above all, Vicki has always been interested in our Nation’s youth, recognizing that they are tomorrow’s leaders and that our future rests in their
hands.
She spearheaded a successful fundraising campaign to build a youth center and has since been honored with a
Spirit of Life Humanitarian Award.
Though struggling with illness at
this time, Mayor Vicki is still very
much involved with the planning and
zoning board; serves on the executive
committee of the Area Agency on
Aging and is a volunteer at the
Broward County Humana Hospital.
For Vicki Coceano, civil service is
part of a life blended with optimism,
fervency and genuine care for those she
serves. Her commitment has both
shaped her legacy and the life of
Miramar’s residents.
Coceano was recently awarded the
Spirit of Life Humanitarian Award at a
banquet in which the proceeds will benefit the Mayor Vicki Coceano Cancer
Research Fellowship at the National
Medical Center and Beckman Research
Institute.
In addition, her name brandishes
both the Broward County Hall of Fame
and the Broward County Women’s Hall
of Fame.
The new post office in Miramar will
service the transactions and connections people forge each day. If we can
add Mayor Vicki’s name to this building, it would certainly be fitting for a
leader who understands the power of
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communicating the language of change
and articulating its power through her
actions, commitments and spirit.
Mr. Speaker, I am proud that all 22 of
my Florida colleagues have cosponsored this bill with me, and I am equally proud that Senator BOB GRAHAM has
introduced an identical bill in the Senate.
Clearly, Floridians know and wish to
honor Vicki Coceano. I am delighted to
see this honor bestowed today upon a
delightful woman that has served us so
much.
Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance
of my time.
Mr. MCHUGH. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, in conclusion, let me
again thank the gentleman from Florida (Mr. HASTINGS) for bringing to us
the name of an individual, as we heard
in some detail, who really does bespeak
what is good and right about this country and, more importantly, good and
right about its people. We are indebted
to him and to all of his colleagues who
joined with him in supporting it.
Finally, I would urge of all of our
Members here today to support us in
passing this very worthy bill.
Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance
of my time.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. MILLER of Florida). The question is on the
motion offered by the gentleman from
New York (Mr. MCHUGH) that the
House suspend the rules and pass the
bill, H.R. 3985, as amended.
The question was taken; and (twothirds having voted in favor thereof)
the rules were suspended and the bill,
as amended, was passed.
The title of the bill was amended so
as to read:
‘‘A bill to redesignate the facility of the
United States Postal Service located at 14900
Southwest 30th Street in Miramar, Florida,
as the ‘Vicki Coceano Post Office Building’.’’.
A motion to reconsider was laid on
the table.
f
SENSE OF HOUSE REGARDING NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY AND
PROCEDURES
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, I move to
suspend the rules and agree to the resolution (H. Res. 534) expressing the sense
of the House of Representatives that
the recent nuclear weapons security
failures at Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrate that security policy and security procedures within the
National Nuclear Security Administration remain inadequate, that the individuals responsible for such policy and
procedures must be held accountable
for their performance, and that immediate action must be taken to correct
security deficiencies.
The Clerk read as follows:
H. RES. 534
Whereas two computer hard drives containing a large quantity of sensitive classified nuclear weapons data at the Department
of Energy’s Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, were recently
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missing for an undetermined period of time,
exposing them to possible compromise;
Whereas the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, in its report dated
June 1999 on security problems at the Department of Energy, concluded that ‘‘the Department of Energy and the weapons laboratories have a deeply rooted culture of low regard for and, at times, hostility to security
issues’’;
Whereas in response to longstanding security problems with the nuclear weapons complex and to recommendations made by the
President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory
Board in that report, Congress enacted the
National Nuclear Security Administration
Act (title XXXII of Public Law 106–65) to establish a semi-autonomous National Nuclear
Security Administration with responsibility
for the administration of programs for the
national security applications of nuclear energy;
Whereas the Special Oversight Panel on
Department of Energy Reorganization of the
Committee on Armed Services of the House
of Representatives concluded in February
2000 that the Department’s plan to implement the provisions of that Act ‘‘taken as a
whole appears to allow continued DOE authority, direction, and control over the
NNSA and retain current DOE management,
budget, and planning practices and organizational structures’’;
Whereas the Secretary of Energy has recognized the need to address nuclear weapons
security problems within the Department of
Energy and has sought to make improvements;
Whereas the Secretary of Energy, in fulfilling the duties and functions of the Under
Secretary for Nuclear Security, and the Director of the Office of Security and Emergency Operations of the Department of Energy, in serving as the Chief of Defense Nuclear Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, were responsible for nuclear weapons security policies and implementation of those policies while the computer hard drives were missing;
Whereas the effective protection of nuclear
weapons classified information is a critical
responsibility of those individuals entrusted
with access to that information; and
Whereas the compromise of the nuclear
weapons data stored on the computer hard
drives, if confirmed, would constitute a clear
and present danger to the national security
of the United States and its allies: Now,
therefore, be it
Resolved, That it is the sense of the House
of Representatives that—
(1) the security failures at Los Alamos National Laboratory revealed to Congress on
June 9, 2000, demonstrate the continued inadequacy of nuclear weapons security policy
and procedures within the National Nuclear
Security Administration and at facilities of
the Administration;
(2) individuals responsible for the implementation, oversight, and management of
nuclear weapons security policy and procedures within the Administration and its facilities must be held accountable for their
performance; and
(3) the Administrator for Nuclear Security
must take immediate action to improve procedures for the safeguarding of classified nuclear weapons information and correct all
identified nuclear weapons security deficiencies within the Administration.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from
South Carolina (Mr. SPENCE) and the
gentleman
from
Missouri
(Mr.
SKELTON) each will control 20 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentleman
from South Carolina (Mr. SPENCE).
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H6073
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
04:39 Jul 18, 2000
GENERAL LEAVE
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, I ask
unanimous consent that all Members
may have 5 legislative days within
which to revise and extend their remarks on H. Res. 534, the resolution
under consideration.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentleman from South Carolina?
There was no objection.
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, 5 weeks ago the Department of Energy informed Congress that
two computer hard drives containing a
large quantity of classified nuclear
weapons data were missing from the
Los Alamos National Laboratory and
had been missing for at least 6 weeks.
This breach of security was just the
last in a long and sorry history of lax
security at our nuclear weapons laboratories.
In direct response, Congress last year
created a semi-autonomous agency, the
National Nuclear Security Administration, and charged it with the responsibility to better manage the Nation’s
nuclear weapons complex.
Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson
opposed this new organization from the
beginning and has sought to undermine
the implementation of NNSA at every
step. Contrary to congressional direction, he declared himself as the administrator for nuclear security and he
dual hatted his own chiefs of security
and counterintelligence to serve in
these positions for both the DOE and
NNSA.
While this arrangement is directly
counter to the law, it leaves no doubt
as to who was running the new administration and who was responsible for
security at the labs in June.
In fact, Secretary Richardson and the
senior DOE leadership told Congress repeatedly that the security problems at
the nuclear weapons laboratories were
being fixed. In May of 1999, Secretary
Richardson stated that the safeguards
of national secrets have been dramatically strengthened and improved.
On March 2, 2000, Secretary Richardson testified to the Committee on
Armed Services, quote, ‘‘that we have
reached a point where we have very
strong security procedures,’’ unquote;
and, quote, ‘‘there is no longer a culture of lax security. That has ended,’’
unquote.
Furthermore, the Secretary’s independent oversight office recently reviewed security practices at Los Alamos National Laboratory and stated
that they were, quote, ‘‘first class,’’ unquote.
Of course, Mr. Speaker, this latest
episode at Los Alamos has demonstrated that these assertions were
not true. Through briefings and hearings, the Committee on Armed Services determined that security procedures at the labs continued to be unacceptably lax and ineffective. We
learned that no log was kept of the individuals who entered the vault where
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the hard drives were stolen; that the
Department was not even aware of how
many people have access to the vault;
and that the vault was inadequately secure.
b
1530
I simply cannot understand how any
reasonably comprehensive review of a
laboratory’s security procedures would
conclude that such procedures were
adequate, much less first class.
Mr. Speaker, H. Res. 534 appropriately expresses concern by the
House of Representatives over security
matters within the national nuclear
laboratories and calls for immediate
corrective action. It also expresses the
view that those responsible for these
serious lapses in security must be held
accountable.
The senior leadership of the Department chose to accept responsibility for
the management of NSA and eagerly
and erroneously claimed credit for improving security. They must now accept responsibility for their failures as
well.
Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to
support H. Res. 534.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. SKELTON. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
I rise today in support of this resolution, which is a resolution expressing
the sense of the House concerning recent security lapses at the Energy Department, particularly at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
On June 9 of this year, the Committee on Armed Services was notified
by the Department of Energy that two
computer hard drives containing classified, restricted data were missing from
a document storage vault located in
the weapons design ‘‘X Division’’ at the
Los Alamos National Laboratory. The
information on these hard drives relates to the development, design, and
manufacture and use of nuclear weapons. In a very real sense, the information on these computer disks represents the ‘‘keys to the kingdom.’’
Fortunately, the missing hard drives
have been recovered, but we still do not
know whether they were simply misplaced or whether they were copied or
otherwise used by those with hostile
intentions toward the United States.
The security lapses that led to the
apparently temporary loss of the two
computer disks containing highly sensitive nuclear weapons secrets are inexcusable. I am especially distressed that
a culture continues to exist at the Los
Alamos National Laboratory that relegates security concerns to secondary
importance. Something must be done
to change that culture. I applaud Secretary Richardson’s efforts to improve
security and get the Department of Energy on the right track; but obviously,
the steps he has taken so far are somewhat inadequate to ensure that our nuclear secrets are adequately safeguarded.
The protection of nuclear weapons
information is a critical responsibility
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for all of those with access to that information. The compromise of the data
on the missing hard drives could seriously jeopardize the national security
of our country and of our allies.
Mr. Speaker, the resolution before
the House today, which the gentleman
from South Carolina (Mr. SPENCE) and
I have cosponsored, expresses the sense
of the House that the security failures
at the Los Alamos National Laboratory show that our existing nuclear
weapons security policy is inadequate,
that the individuals responsible for implementing that security policy should
be held accountable, and that the administrator of the Nuclear Security
Administration must take immediate
action to improve our procedures concerning the safeguarding of nuclear
weapons information.
It is my sincere hope that Secretary
Richardson and others with the responsibility for security matters within the
Department will heed the words of this
resolution and take prompt steps to ensure that we do not again suffer security breaches such as that involving
the loss of hard drives at Los Alamos.
Our Nation simply cannot afford lax security when it comes to our nuclear secrets.
Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to
support H. Res. 534.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, I am
pleased to yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. THORNBERRY),
who is chairman of the Special Oversight Panel of the Department of Energy Reorganization.
Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Speaker, I
appreciate my chairman yielding me
this time.
Mr. Speaker, I think it is perfectly
appropriate for the House to express its
concern over the recent incidents at
Los Alamos. A number of people in the
country perhaps have lost sight of the
fact that nuclear weapons continue to
constitute the central element of this
country’s security apparatus around
which the rest of our defense efforts
support, and to have an incident like
this at Los Alamos I think is both
shocking and frustrating for a number
of Members. It is shocking because
once we get into some of the details,
there are several common sense sort of
measures that are simply not employed; and the difficulty for us is how
we legislate common sense into the
day-to-day activities of these facilities.
But it has also been very frustrating,
because this is not an isolated incident;
this is simply the latest in a long series, a long string of incidents. Last
year, as the chairman mentioned, Congress, to try to stop this long string,
enacted reforms in the Department of
Energy which have not been implemented to the letter and spirit of the
law. So there is a great sense of frustration that we continue to have security lapses while we continue to do
business as usual, which has not
worked, for the past 20 years.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
04:39 Jul 18, 2000
Mr. Speaker, we have to break this
stream. Recently, General John Gordon has been installed as the administrator of the Nuclear Security Administration and we need to support him
to make sure that he can take the necessary action to break this string.
Mr. Speaker, this resolution includes
two important points. One is that we
have to hold individuals accountable,
and that is exactly the principle of the
reforms we passed last year, to have a
clear chain of command, more like a
military-style chain of command, but
also a system of accountability, so that
if somebody messes up, we know who
to hold responsible for those lapses.
The second element here urges the
administrator to take appropriate action quickly. It is appropriate for him
to do so, and General Gordon is beginning to go around to all of the sites and
try to get a clear picture of the
strengths and weaknesses in our current nuclear weapons complex.
However, Congress cannot legislate
the details of every silly thing that
may cause a security lapse. It is up to
the administrator, General Gordon,
supported by Congress and others within the administration, to change this
culture which the chairman talked
about, to make the institutional reforms. That is really the answer.
So I support this resolution. I think
it is an appropriate expression of the
deep concern we have, but it also gets
at the heart of what it is going to take
to fix it.
Mr. SKELTON. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3
minutes to the gentleman from Guam
(Mr. UNDERWOOD).
Mr. UNDERWOOD. Mr. Speaker, I
thank the distinguished ranking member for yielding me this time.
I too today rise in support of House
Resolution 534, which focuses attention
on the recent nuclear weapons security
failures at Los Alamos National Lab
and calls for improvements of the current system, especially increased accountability by those in charge.
However, while I am in strong support of the need to improve efforts to
protect and preserve our national security, these efforts should not impinge
on the civil rights for all Americans,
especially those of Asian and Pacific
Islander ancestry. The security procedures at the Los Alamos National Lab
have had a significant impact on the
Asian-American community. The case
of Wen Ho Lee, a Chinese American scientist who was arrested last year for
mishandling classified data at Los Alamos, clearly indicates the nature of
these effects. The effects of Lee’s case
on other Asian-American scientists
was immediate and of sufficient concern for the Department of Energy to
take action to address charges of racial
profiling and treatment of Asian-Pacific Americans in DOE national labs.
In Sunday’s New York Times, James
Glanz reported several APA groups
have called to boycott the labs and are
urging Asian and Asian-American scientists not to seek employment there.
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I do not support this policy; but while
I do not support it, it is important to
note the impact of this case on the recruitment and retention of Asian-Pacific Americans in the labs. The number of Asian applicants decreased from
an average of 28 in 1998 and 1999 to
three in the first half of the year 2000.
And with Sandia and Livermore laboratories included, the percentage of
postdoctoral appointments of Asian
Americans fell from 14 percent in 1998
to half this year. These declines are
disturbing, since Asian-Americans are
a huge source of talent and have contributed more in a disproportionate
way to the security of this country,
and they earn over a quarter of all
Ph.D.s in science and technology at
American universities each year.
The charges of racial profiling and
discriminatory investigation at hand
illustrate just how much security procedures have had an effect on the
Asian-Pacific American community.
All employees should be held accountable, regardless of race or ethnicity,
but no one should be held additionally
responsible either. Let us make sure
that our nuclear weapons security and
any subsequent activities in the labs in
the name of security remain the focus
of this resolution. Let us make sure
that political posturing or advantage
does not intimidate this effort, and let
us make sure that a commitment to
justice and fairness for all citizens is
not sacrificed in the pursuit of national
security.
Mr. Speaker, I include the following
article for the RECORD:
[From the New York Times, July 16, 2000]
AMID RACE PROFILING CLAIMS, ASIANAMERICANS AVOID LABS
(By James Glanz)
Asian and Asian-American scientists are
staying away from jobs at national weapons
laboratories, particularly Los Alamos, saying that researchers of Asian descent are
systematically harassed and denied advancement because of their race.
The issue has long simmered at the laboratories, but it came to a boil last year with
the arrest of Dr. Wen Ho Lee, who is accused
of mishandling nuclear secrets at Los Alamos. Though officials vehemently deny it,
many Asian-Americans said Dr. Lee, a naturalized citizen born in Taiwan, was singled
out because of his ethnicity.
In any event, Asians and Asian-Americans
said, security procedures implemented after
Dr. Lee’s arrest fall hardest on them. Since
the arrest, some scholarly groups have even
called for a boycott of the laboratories, urging Asian and Asian-American scientists not
to apply for jobs with them.
Whether because of the calls for a boycott,
the underlying claims of discrimination, or
both, all three national weapons laboratories—Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore
and Sandia—have seen declines in Asian and
Asian-American applicants for postdoctoral
positions, according to their own statistics.
Other Asian and Asian-American scientists
have left voluntarily.
Los Alamos, for example, has seen the
number of Asian applicants (those granted
formal reviews by committees) dwindle to 3
in the first half of 2000 from an average of 28
in 1998 and 1999. The number accepting jobs
at Los Alamos fell from 18 in 1998 to 9 in 1999
to 3 in the first half of 2000.
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The combined acceptances of Asians and
Asian-Americans at Sandia and Livermore,
which compile statistics by fiscal years ending in late September, are similar to Los Alamos, falling to 3 so far in 2000 from 21 in
1998. At Los Alamos, the number of Asians
applying for jobs declined in percentage as
well, to 4 percent of total applications from
12 percent in 1998. Over all, postdoctoral appointments of Asian and Asian-American fell
to 7 percent from 14 percent when the three
laboratories, with their slightly different
recordkeeping, are combined.
‘‘To me, this is an indicator that some of
the best have decided either not to apply, or
even when they do apply, not to come when
they’re offered a position,’’ said Dr. John C.
Browne, director of Los Alamos.
The decline is troubling for two reasons.
First, Asians and Asian-Americans represent
a huge pool of talent—more than a quarter of
all Ph.D.’s awarded in science and technology at American universities each year.
Second, postdoctoral appointments, which
are generally filled by researchers who have
recently earned Ph.D.’s are an essential
source of candidates for permanent positions. The appointments constitute ‘‘the primary means of recruiting future scientists
and engineers for Los Alamos,’’ said Jim
Danneskliold, a spokesman for the laboratory.
In May, the National Science Foundation,
a major source of research money, reported
that ‘‘heightened security concerns’’ at the
laboratories were hindering efforts to recruit
and retain Asian and Asian-American scientists.
And last week, speaking before a panel of
the House Armed Services Committee on reorganizing the Energy Department, Representative Ellen O. Tauscher, Democrat of
California, referred to suspicions of racial
profiling at Livermore and Sandia.
Mrs. Tauscher said there was ‘‘the sense
that Asian-Americans are targeted or
scapegoated as potentially coming to work
at the labs because they can spy,’’ adding
that the problem ‘‘has a deleterious effect on
our ability to recruit and retain.’’
Observers say they are not surprised by the
comments.
‘‘There’s no question in my mind that the
Asian-Americans are conscientiously avoiding working in Los Alamos and the other
labs like the plague,’’ said Prof. L. Ling-chi
Wang, chairman of the department of ethnic
studies and director of the Asian American
studies program at the University of California at Berkeley.
Two organizations, the Asian Pacific
Americans in Higher Education and the Association for Asian American Studies, have
called for a boycott, urging Asian-Americans
not to work at the laboratories.
Professor Wang, who helped organize the
boycott calls, is not alone in thinking that
they have contributed to the flight from the
laboratories.
Dr. Browne said that an ‘‘overall black
cloud’’ caused by the boycott was driving
Asian and Asian-American scientists away,
but said that the did not believe racial
profiling had occurred at Los Alamos.
Still, it is difficult to say whether anger
over security measures is the sole reason for
the sharp drop in Asian and Asian-American
applicants, particularly with laboratory
budget cuts and a booming economy creating
lucrative jobs in private industry. But the
impact is apparent.
‘‘The labs are falling apart,’’ said Dr. Jonathan Medalia, a specialist in national defense at the Congressional Research Service
and the author of a study on the laboratories, which he presented at a conference
but has not yet delivered to Congress.
The loss of talent is most severe in computer science, Dr. Medalia said, and if it con-
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05:57 Jul 18, 2000
tinues, could threaten the nation’s ability to
ensure the safety and reliability of its nuclear weapons.
He said that tightened security measures
increased the losses among all ethnic groups,
but that the economy and other effects contributed.
Accusations of racism have also led to formal complaints.
In December, nine Asian-American scientists and engineers at Livermore filed a
discrimination complaint with the State of
California that the California Department of
Fair Employment and Housing is investigating.
The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has also begun an investigation, said officials at the laboratory and
a lawyer for the scientists.
Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson,
whose agency oversees the laboratories, conceded that political pressures from Congress
had created ‘‘an atmosphere of fear’’ among
foreign-born scientists.
A year ago, Mr. Richardson named a committee to investigate complaints of racial
profiling, and he appointed Dr. Jeremy Wu, a
former official in the Agriculture Department’s office of civil rights, as the department’s ombudsman to review diversity issues
and hear employee complaints. But the problems are so ingrained, scientists said, that
those measures are not enough.
‘‘For years, a lot of these things have festered, and it was typical of the Asian way to
say nothing,’’ said Kalina Wong, an American-born scientist of Chinese and Hawaiian
descent who tracks inventories of nuclear
materials at Livermore, and one of the employees who filed the complaint. Now, Ms.
Wong said, ‘‘Pandora’s Box is open.’’
Laboratory officials deny any systematic
discrimination. If anything, they said, administrators are eager to promote members
of ethnic groups.
THE COMPLAINTS—A HISTORY OF
DISCRIMINATION
The new security directives do not explicitly mention Asian-Americans or any other
group; moreover, Mr. Richardson accompanied the directives with a warning that
they should not be seen as an excuse to question the ‘‘loyalty and patriotism’’ of AsianAmericans as a group.
But the directives required scientists to report ‘‘close and continuing contact’’ with nationals of sensitive countries—a designation
that overs Russia and most countries in
Asia, but few countries in Europe.
‘‘If you have relatives in sensitive countries, you are under the microscope,’’ said
Dr. Aaron Lai, a climate researcher at Los
Alamos and a naturalized citizen born in
Taiwan. ‘‘Before the Wen Ho Lee case, the
chance of getting promoted was very low,’’
Dr. Lai said. But with the new rules, he said,
‘‘it’s getting worse.’’
Joel Wong, an engineer at Livermore, who
is from Hong Kong and is now an American
citizen, said, ‘‘They associate foreign-born
with being a threat.’’
The 19-member committee appointed by
Mr. Richardson, issued a report earlier this
year, based on interviews with workers. Its
recommendations included appointing an
ombudsman, as Mr. Richardson has done,
and compiling data on minority groups
across the department. Existing data are
sketchy at best. The report also described
pervasive feelings of unease and fear.
In October, the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus heard from several
scientists who said Asian-Americans faced
discrimination at the laboratories.
Ms. Wong, the Livermore scientist, told
the group of a lagging salary, racially insensitive comments from officials, her removal
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from sensitive projects and an unexplained
erosion of authority.
‘‘The whole Chinese spy allegation has set
us back further,’’ said Ms. Wong, whose family has been in the United States for five
generations and who has worked at Livermore for more than two decades. ‘‘It seems
now that there is license to do as was done
to me because we Asians are potential
spies.’’
Livermore officials said racial bias has not
played a role in the treatment of scientists,
either before or after the Lee case.
‘‘There is no underlying discrimination,’’ a
Livermore spokeswoman, Susan Houghton,
said. ‘‘If anything, it’s the opposite. It is still
very much a goal to increase minority representation in management.’’
In an interview, Ms. Houghton and Tommy
Smith, a mechanical engineer who is the laboratory’s director of affirmative action and
diversity, said Livermore had established
goals for increasing the numbers of Asians
and other minorities in management and
held a one-day workshop for employees in
April. ‘‘Obviously, we can always do a better
job,’’ Ms. Houghton said.
She also noted that the investigations into
discrimination claims were not proof of
wrongdoing.
Los Alamos has about 7,000 employees, including
3,500
scientists,
said
Mr.
Danneskiold, the laboratory spokesman.
Over all, Asians or Pacific Islanders make
up 2.4 percent of the staff and about 4 percent of the scientists, he said.
But of 99 senior managers, only 1 is of
Asian descent, Mr. Danneskiold said. And of
322 leaders of technical groups, a lower rung
in management, only 3 are Asian-American.
Similar if somewhat less pronounced disparities exist at Livermore; at Sandia, the
proportion of Asians in management and the
laboratory are nearly the same.
Michael Trujillo, the equal employment
opportunity officer at Los Alamos, also rejected the idea that Asian-Americans’ relatively low representation in management
was a result of bias. But Mr. Trujillo said he
could not offer an explanation. ‘‘I don’t
think that there’s an easy answer on that,’’
he said.
THE RULES—RESPONSE THAT SOME CALLED
RACIAL PROFILING
The Energy Department ombudsman, Dr.
Wu, said in an interview that he believed
new security rules had infringed on ‘‘individual rights and scientific freedom’’ and
added that he hoped he could improve the
situation.
He has been on the job since January, but
he began visiting the laboratories last year
and has already investigated several bias
complaints. In two cases, involving the loss
of a security clearance and the termination
of a grant, rulings against Asian and AsianAmerican scientists have been overturned,
he said.
Edward J. Curran, who directs the Energy
Department’s counterintelligence office, said
a review almost two years ago led to increased reporting requirements for many
employees and to polygraph testing of some
scientists. He said the rules were intended to
make intelligence officials aware of any unusual inquiries from foreign nationals and to
help catch any American scientists who were
spying, whatever their ethnicity.
Among the directives are two that Mr.
Richardson issued last July in which scientists are required to report certain ‘‘close
and continuing contact’’ during unclassified
visits with people from countries deemed
sensitive.
Dr. Al West, a security director at Sandia,
said that at least ´one Asian-American scientist, whose fiancee was from Hong Kong,
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
left for a longstanding job offer in private industry ‘‘because they got tired of dealing
with all the inquiries into their personal affairs’’ as a result of the new rule.
And Dr. Shao-Ping Chen, a physicist at Los
Alamos, criticized a requirement to list all
contacts and relationships with people in
sensitive countries.
‘‘Where it should stop is not easy to tell,’’
said Dr. Chen, originally from Taiwan but
now an American citizen. ‘‘If you have a big
family, those people are large numbers.’’
Henry Tang, chairman of the Committee of
100, a group of Chinese-Americans engaged in
public policy issues, said that in enforcing
the new rules, security officials ‘‘are no different than a highway patrolman suspecting
someone merely by virtue of their physical
characteristics.’’
Dr. Paul D. Moore, who was the F.B.I.’s
chief of Chinese counterintelligence analysis
for more than 20 years and is now at the Center for Counterintelligence and Security
Studies, a nongovernmental training center
in Alexandria, Va., said that belief was mistaken. But Dr. Moore said that it had ultimately taken root because, in his view, the
Chinese government specifically courts ethnic Chinese in the United States when looking for potential spies. As a result, he said,
counterintelligence agents focus on ChineseAmericans. ‘‘It’s unfair,’’ he said, ‘‘but what
are you going to do?’’
THE BOYCOTT—A MIXED REACTION AMONG
SCIENTISTS
As racism accusations simmer, the moves
that have sparked the most discussion—and
dissension—are the calls for a boycott.
Dr. Shujia Zhou, who left Los Alamos last
year, said, ‘‘The Asian people feel hit hard.’’
Dr. Zhou published research in journals
like Science and Physical Review Letters
but said he left the laboratory because officials made continuing his work difficult, revoking his computer access, for example, and
because the atmosphere had soured for
Asians.
He easily found another job, Dr. Browne,
the Los Alamos director, said that revoking
computer privileges for some Asian scientists was an ‘‘unfortunate’’ overreaction
and that fairer procedures had been put in
place.
The calls for a boycott have generated
mixed reactions at the laboratories. Dr.
Manvendra K. Dubey, a Los Alamos scientist
and chairman of its Asian-American Working Group, said he opposed a boycott ‘‘because if we disappear from within, we will
have no voice.’’ Some say the heightened
sensitivity to race may eventually help the
laboratories.
But for now, the security concerns about
Asian countries, the lack of data on where
and how Asian-American scientists work,
and the near-absence of Asians in upper
ranks are hindering progress at the laboratories, many Asian-American scientists say.
Perhaps more pernicious, they add, is the
idea, prevalent among some Americans of
European descent, that rational scientists
must be immune to ordinary racial bias.
That visceral difference in viewpoint may
pose the most elusive but enduring barrier to
improvements, some Asian scientists say.
‘‘I think it’s hard for a white person to appreciate the bias,’’ said Dr. Huan Lee, a Chinese-American scientist at Los Alamos.
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, I have no
further speakers at this time.
Mr. SKELTON. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3
minutes to the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. FRANK).
Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. Mr.
Speaker, I am very pleased to be speaking right after the delegate from
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05:57 Jul 18, 2000
Guam, because I very much agree with
the points he made.
As I read the resolution, I do not disagree with much of what it says, but I
am troubled by the climate that
brought it forward and by the climate
I think it will exacerbate.
First, I believe there has been a substantial exaggeration of the threat to
national security that has so far occurred from mistakes made at Los Alamos. I do not believe that we have any
showing that America’s security has
been, in fact, jeopardized by the errors
that have happened. I also think that
we are likely to see our security jeopardized if we overreact in a way that
drives first-rate scientists away from
participating in the national security
enterprise, and I fear we are coming
close to that point.
There is, after all, a tension between
security and the kind of intellectual
freedom and creativity that is necessary for science to flourish. Of
course, we must not sacrifice security,
but neither can we focus only on security and disregard the negative impact
an excessively harsh and rigid regime
can have on those scientists who especially today have many other choices.
They do not have to come to work for
the Federal Government. They do not
have to come to work in these laboratories. If we make the mistake of treating them as perspective spies and
criminals, we drive them away.
I must say I am especially concerned
about the anti-Asian-American impact
of some of these efforts. I, like the gentleman from Guam, was disturbed to
read in The New York Times, in effect,
admissions by some of those concerned
with security that there was, in fact,
an anti-Asian bias. Indeed, I was interested to see when the Federal Government was forced to produce its potential list of countries with whom Wen
Ho Lee may have dealt that it was
clear that his own ethnicity was irrelevant to this. Even in the allegations, it
was not a case of some idealogical or
homeland betrayal; the allegation is
that Dr. Lee was a man afraid of losing
his job and he may have behaved improperly in pursuit of another job with
a range of countries. I have no knowledge of these accusations, and I obviously should not and would not talk
about them. But it is interesting to say
that even in this most prominent case,
no allegation that his ethnicity and his
being of Chinese ancestry was at all
relevant.
Yes, it is important for us to preserve
security. It is also important for us not
to exaggerate and promote fear because
there has not been any showing that
our security has, in fact, been damaged; and it is especially important to
avoid even the hint of prejudice against
our Asian-American fellow citizens. We
have had too many cases in American
history in which Asian-Americans have
been singled out and in every single
one of them they have been shown to
be unfair.
So if this resolution goes forward, it
in and of itself does no harm. But the
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climate that brought it forward and
the climate it may produce must be resisted.
Mr. SKELTON. Mr. Speaker, I have
no further requests for time, and I
yield back the balance of my time.
b
1545
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3
minutes to the gentleman from Texas
(Mr. THORNBERRY).
Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Speaker, I
just want to briefly comment on some
of the things we have heard here on the
floor.
The first thing is, of course, there is
nothing in this resolution which promotes or in any way encourages the
sorts of concerns that both the gentlemen have talked about. Of course, none
of us want to do that.
In fact, Mr. Speaker, I fully agree
and I think the committee and Congress fully agrees that we want to be
very cautious about saying to any particular group ‘‘We don’t want you,’’ because the fact is, we have to get and
keep top quality people in our National
Laboratories and plants. We can afford
to do nothing to drive them away.
But I think it is important to get
back to the principles that are in this
resolution, which include individual
accountability. That is, if not a group
but an individual makes a mistake or
worse, then that individual will be held
accountable for it.
That is what our national security
requires. It requires that we get and
keep the best quality people, but once
they are there and privy to some of the
most sensitive information in the
country, that we hold them accountable for how they treat that information. That is the principle I think that
General Gordon will move ahead with
as he tries to reach that difficult balance of doing the work in these facilities and also balancing the security,
and bringing it all together to see that
our security is not compromised.
I think that there is a concern that
all of us share. We want to get and
keep the best quality people, but this
resolution does not hinder that. In
fact, I would argue that it helps it by
moving towards and encouraging individual accountability.
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Chairman, will
the gentleman yield?
Mr. THORNBERRY. I yield to the
gentleman from Nebraska.
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I
thank the gentleman for yielding.
I had not intended to participate in
this discussion, but as a member of the
Cox Select Committee, I do have to say
that we developed extraordinary evidence in a unanimous report from that
committee, a bipartisan committee,
that indeed there were grave security
losses from and inappropriate security
procedures at the Los Alamos Lab.
I would also like to mention that
there was no specific reference to Mr.
Lee made in that report. An investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau
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of Investigation was the way that, I believe, there was the first time his identity was ever mentioned in the media
or anyplace else. The Cox Committee
made no recommendations.
I do think the people who suggest in
some fashion that Congress has been
identifying particular ethnic group as
responsible for espionage or as security
risks, is inappropriate and inaccurate.
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, I have no
further requests for time, and I yield
back the balance of my time.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. MILLER of Florida). The question is on the
motion offered by the gentleman from
South Carolina (Mr. SPENCE) that the
House suspend the rules and agree to
the resolution, H. Res. 534.
The question was taken.
Mr. SPENCE. Mr. Speaker, on that I
demand the yeas and nays.
The yeas and nays were ordered.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX and the
Chair’s prior announcement, further
proceedings on this motion will be
postponed.
f
SMALL WATERSHED REHABILITATION AMENDMENTS OF 2000
Mr. LUCAS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and
pass the bill (H.R. 728) to amend the
Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act to authorize the Secretary
of Agriculture to provide cost share assistance for the rehabilitation of structural measures constructed as part of
water resource projects previously
funded by the Secretary under such
Act or related laws, as amended.
The Clerk read as follows:
H.R. 728
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in
Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
This Act may be cited as the ‘‘Small Watershed Rehabilitation Amendments of 2000’’.
TITLE I—DAM REHABILITATION
SEC. 101. REHABILITATION OF WATER RESOURCE
STRUCTURAL
MEASURES
CONSTRUCTED UNDER CERTAIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS.
The Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act (16 U.S.C. 1001 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new
section:
‘‘SEC.
14.
REHABILITATION OF STRUCTURAL
MEASURES NEAR, AT, OR PAST
THEIR EVALUATED LIFE EXPECTANCY.
‘‘(a) DEFINITIONS.—For purposes of this sec-
tion:
‘‘(1) REHABILITATION.—The term ‘rehabilitation’, with respect to a structural measure
constructed as part of a covered water resource project, means the completion of all
work necessary to extend the service life of
the structural measure and meet applicable
safety and performance standards. This may
include (A) protecting the integrity of the
structural measure or prolonging the useful
life of the structural measure beyond the
original evaluated life expectancy, (B) correcting damage to the structural measure
from a catastrophic event, (C) correcting the
deterioration of structural components that
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are deteriorating at an abnormal rate, (D)
upgrading the structural measure to meet
changed land use conditions in the watershed
served by the structural measure or changed
safety criteria applicable to the structural
measure, or (E) decommissioning the structure, if requested by the local organization.
‘‘(2) COVERED WATER RESOURCE PROJECT.—
The term ‘covered water resource project’
means a work of improvement carried out
under any of the following:
‘‘(A) This Act.
‘‘(B) Section 13 of the Act of December 22,
1944 (Public Law 78–534; 58 Stat. 905).
‘‘(C) The pilot watershed program authorized under the heading ‘FLOOD PREVENTION’
of the Department of Agriculture Appropriation Act, 1954 (Public Law 156; 67 Stat. 214).
‘‘(D) Subtitle H of title XV of the Agriculture and Food Act of 1981 (16 U.S.C. 3451 et
seq.; commonly known as the Resource Conservation and Development Program).
‘‘(3) STRUCTURAL MEASURE.—The term
‘structural measure’ means a physical improvement that impounds water, commonly
known as a dam, which was constructed as
part of a covered water resource project, including the impoundment area and flood
pool.
‘‘(b) COST SHARE ASSISTANCE FOR REHABILITATION.—
‘‘(1) ASSISTANCE AUTHORIZED.—The Secretary may provide financial assistance to a
local organization to cover a portion of the
total costs incurred for the rehabilitation of
structural measures originally constructed
as part of a covered water resource project.
The total costs of rehabilitation include the
costs associated with all components of the
rehabilitation project, including acquisition
of land, easements, and rights-of-ways, rehabilitation project administration, the provision of technical assistance, contracting, and
construction costs, except that the local organization shall be responsible for securing
all land, easements, or rights-of-ways necessary for the project.
‘‘(2) AMOUNT OF ASSISTANCE; LIMITATIONS.—
The amount of Federal funds that may be
made available under this subsection to a
local organization for construction of a particular rehabilitation project shall be equal
to 65 percent of the total rehabilitation
costs, but not to exceed 100 percent of actual
construction costs incurred in the rehabilitation. However, the local organization shall
be responsible for the costs of water, mineral, and other resource rights and all Federal, State, and local permits.
‘‘(3) RELATION TO LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS.—As a condition on entering into an agreement to provide financial
assistance under this subsection, the Secretary, working in concert with the affected
unit or units of general purpose local government, may require that proper zoning or
other developmental regulations are in place
in the watershed in which the structural
measures to be rehabilitated under the
agreement are located so that—
‘‘(A) the completed rehabilitation project
is not quickly rendered inadequate by additional development; and
‘‘(B) society can realize the full benefits of
the rehabilitation investment.
‘‘(c) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR WATERSHED PROJECT REHABILITATION.—The Secretary, acting through the Natural Resources Conservation Service, may provide
technical assistance in planning, designing,
and implementing rehabilitation projects
should a local organization request such assistance. Such assistance may consist of specialists in such fields as engineering, geology, soils, agronomy, biology, hydraulics,
hydrology, economics, water quality, and
contract administration.
‘‘(d) PROHIBITED USE.—
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‘‘(1) PERFORMANCE OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.—Rehabilitation
assistance provided under this section may not be used to
perform operation and maintenance activities specified in the agreement for the covered water resource project entered into between the Secretary and the local organization responsible for the works of improvement. Such operation and maintenance activities shall remain the responsibility of the
local organization, as provided in the project
work plan.
‘‘(2)
RENEGOTIATION.—Notwithstanding
paragraph (1), as part of the provision of financial assistance under subsection (b), the
Secretary may renegotiate the original
agreement for the covered water resource
project entered into between the Secretary
and the local organization regarding responsibility for the operation and maintenance of
the project when the rehabilitation is finished.
‘‘(e) APPLICATION FOR REHABILITATION ASSISTANCE.—A local organization may apply
to the Secretary for technical and financial
assistance under this section if the application has also been submitted to and approved
by the State agency having supervisory responsibility over the covered water resource
project at issue or, if there is no State agency having such responsibility, by the Governor of the State. The Secretary shall request the State dam safety officer (or equivalent State official) to be involved in the application process if State permits or approvals are required. The rehabilitation of structural measures shall meet standards established by the Secretary and address other
dam safety issues. At the request of the local
organization, personnel of the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the Department of Agriculture may assist in preparing
applications for assistance.
‘‘(f) RANKING OF REQUESTS FOR REHABILITATION ASSISTANCE.—The Secretary shall establish such system of approving rehabilitation
requests, recognizing that such requests will
be received throughout the fiscal year and
subject to the availability of funds to carry
out this section, as is necessary for proper
administration by the Department of Agriculture and equitable for all local organizations. The approval process shall be in writing, and made known to all local organizations and appropriate State agencies.
‘‘(g) PROHIBITION ON CERTAIN REHABILITATION ASSISTANCE.—The Secretary may not
approve a rehabilitation request if the need
for rehabilitation of the structure is the result of a lack of adequate maintenance by
the party responsible for the maintenance.
‘‘(h) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.—
There is authorized to be appropriated to the
Secretary to provide financial and technical
assistance under this section—
‘‘(1) $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2001;
‘‘(2) $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2002;
‘‘(3) $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2003;
‘‘(4) $25,000,000 for fiscal year 2004; and
‘‘(5) $35,000,000 for fiscal year 2005.
OF
REHABILITATION
‘‘(i)
ASSESSMENT
NEEDS.—The Secretary, in concert with the
responsible State agencies, shall conduct an
assessment of the rehabilitation needs of
covered water resource projects in all States
in which such projects are located.
‘‘(j) RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTS.—
‘‘(1) SECRETARY.—The Secretary shall
maintain a data base to track the benefits
derived from rehabilitation projects supported under this section and the expenditures made under this section. On the basis
of such data and the reports submitted under
paragraph (2), the Secretary shall prepare
and submit to Congress an annual report
providing the status of activities conducted
under this section.
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‘‘(2) GRANT RECIPIENTS.—Not later than 90
days after the completion of a specific rehabilitation project for which assistance is provided under this section, the local organization that received the assistance shall make
a report to the Secretary giving the status of
any rehabilitation effort undertaken using
financial assistance provided under this section.’’.
TITLE II—DAM SAFETY
SEC. 201. DAM SAFETY.
(a) INVENTORY AND ASSESSMENT OF OTHER
DAMS.—
(1) INVENTORY.—The Secretary of the Army
(in this section referred to as the ‘‘Secretary’’) shall establish an inventory of dams
constructed by and using funds made available through the Works Progress Administration, the Works Projects Administration,
and the Civilian Conservation Corps.
OF
REHABILITATION
(2)
ASSESSMENT
NEEDS.—In establishing the inventory required under paragraph (1), the Secretary
shall also assess the condition of the dams
on such inventory and the need for rehabilitation or modification of the dams.
(b) REPORT TO CONGRESS.—Not later than 2
years after the date of enactment of this
Act, the Secretary shall transmit to Congress a report containing the inventory and
assessment required by this section.
(c) INTERIM ACTIONS.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—If the Secretary determines that a dam referred to in subsection
(a) presents an imminent and substantial
risk to public safety, the Secretary is authorized to carry out measures to prevent or
mitigate against such risk.
(2) EXCLUSION.—The assistance authorized
in paragraph (1) shall not be available to
dams under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior.
(3) FEDERAL SHARE.—The Federal share of
the cost of assistance provided under this
subsection shall be 65 percent of such cost.
(4) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.—
There is authorized to be appropriated to
carry out this section a total of $25,000,000
for fiscal years beginning after September 30,
1999, of which not more than $5,000,000 may
be expended on any 1 dam.
(d) COORDINATION.—In carrying out this
section, the Secretary shall coordinate with
the appropriate State dam safety officials
and the Director of the Federal Emergency
Management Agency.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from
Oklahoma (Mr. LUCAS) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. STENHOLM)
each will control 20 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentleman
from Oklahoma (Mr. LUCAS).
Mr. LUCAS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may
consume.
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the efforts
of the gentleman from Texas (Chairman COMBEST) and the ranking member, the gentleman from Texas (Mr.
STENHOLM), in helping me bring forward H.R. 728, the Small Watershed Rehabilitation Amendments.
I also appreciate the support of the
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Chairman SHUSTER) and the gentleman from
New York (Mr. BOEHLERT) for this very
important bill.
Seeing the need for rehabilitation of
aging dams built across the State of
Oklahoma and the country, I introduced H.R. 728. This legislation will
give the Secretary of Agriculture the
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05:57 Jul 18, 2000
authority to provide financial assistance to local organizations for up to 65
percent of the total rehabilitation construction costs for those dams built
under the Small Watershed Program.
H.R. 728 will authorize a total of $90
million over the next 5 years, beginning in 2001, to help us rehabilitate our
Nation’s watershed projects and ensure
that we and our communities continue
to enjoy the benefits that watershed
projects offer.
My predecessors left a legacy with
the Small Watershed Program. They
realized the impact that this program
would have on both the State of Oklahoma and the Nation as whole.
I was raised in and still live in Roger
Mills County, Oklahoma. One of the
things I most clearly recall from growing up there was the sight of these
flood control dams near my home. I did
not know it at the time, but those
dams were built because community
and political leaders knew from firsthand experience the importance of
flood control. They had witnessed the
horrible floods that washed across
Oklahoma’s watersheds in the 1930s and
1940s, terrifying events that inspired
them to take the necessary steps to reduce the threats that flooding poses to
people, land, and water quality.
Since 1944, over 101⁄2 thousand small
watershed dams have been built in the
United States. Over 2,000 of those dams
are located in Oklahoma. Many of
these dams were planned and designed
with a lifespan of 50 years. Fifty years
ago there was little concern about
what to do when these dams reached
their life expectancy.
During the week of July 4, 1998, a
celebration in Cordell, Oklahoma,
marked the 50th anniversary of America’s first United States Department of
Agriculture small watershed dam. This
is just one of a thousand dams that will
reach the end of their 50-year life expectancy within the next 10 years.
Although the Federal government
paid for the construction costs of these
dams, under current law, there is no
Federal authority or funds to rehabilitate them. Repair costs are far beyond
the budgets of the local sponsors.
The Federal government clearly has
a responsibility to ensure dam safety.
We cannot wait until a disaster happens. If rehabilitation is not done, we
may be faced with the awesome and
awful possibilities of flooding, loss of
wildlife habitat, water shortages, and
pollution. Far more regrettable in the
case of failure, we might be confronted
with the loss of life, and yes, property,
crops, and livestock.
The economic impact of dam failures
on communities and local economies
would be devastating. We must act before any of these situations occur.
The small watershed program is one
of our Nation’s most successful public
and private partnerships. In fact, these
completed small watershed projects
have provided over $2.20 in benefits for
every $1 in cost. Very few government
programs can make that claim. We
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must continue to build on this partnership.
Today the Small Watershed Program
represents an $8.5 billion Federal investment and an estimated $6 billion
local investment in the infrastructure
of our Nation. We do not allow our
highways to crumble, nor should we ignore our small watershed dams. It is
time we address the rehabilitation
needs of these structures.
The fact is, these small watersheds
have done such a good job that most
people do not even realize they exist as
they drive by them, as they go up and
down the highways. There are not
many programs that have that kind of
a success factor.
We must continue to build on this
program that our predecessors started
over 50 years ago. It has been a great
privilege to champion this cause here
in our Nation’s capital that will have
such a direct impact on my home county, my home State, and our Nation as
a whole. I look forward to seeing this
legislation passed into law, and continuing to build on one of the most successful programs our government has
known.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. STENHOLM. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support
of H.R. 728, the Small Watershed Rehabilitation Amendments of 2000. This
bill amends the Watershed Protection
and Flood Control Protection Act, also
known as P.L. 566 program, to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to provide financial assistance to eligible
local organizations to cover a portion
of the total cost for the rehabilitation
of structural measures originally constructed as part of the Department of
Agriculture’s USDA water resource
project.
Under current law, the Secretary of
Agriculture, acting through the Natural Resources Conservation Service, is
authorized to provide technical and financial assistance to local organizations in planning and carrying out
small watershed projects for flood protection, agriculture and water management, recreation, municipal and industrial water supply, and wildlife enhancement.
Many of the 10,000-plus dams built
under this program are reaching the
end of their 50-year design life and are
in need of rehabilitation. In fact, some
now pose a threat to public health and
safety.
During the Committee on Agriculture’s markup of this legislation, I
offered an amendment to protect the
privacy of information provided to
USDA by the farmers and ranchers participating in the Department’s voluntary programs or receiving technical
assistance.
My amendment, which was accepted
by the committee, was designed to protect the trust established between the
USDA and America’s farmers and
ranchers resulting in the high level of
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participation we currently enjoy in our
voluntary conservation programs.
When landowners come in on a voluntary basis to work on their local
NRCS, Farm Service Agency, or conservation district office to implement
conservation measures on their farms
and ranches, they need to be assured
that the information they provide remains confidential. Concerns have been
raised that if this information was
transferred to other agencies or entities, it would lose its confidential nature and could be made public.
The provision I offered would not
have prevented other Federal agencies
from collecting data under their own
statutory authority. It would merely
protect from disclosure to other Federal regulatory entities the confidential information provided to USDA,
local conservation districts, or RC&D
councils by a farmer, rancher, or landowner who has participated in the
USDA conservation program.
Without this protection, the billions
of dollars in technical and financial assistance spent every year by the taxpayers to help the Nation’s landowners
protect our soil and water resources
could be jeopardized because of the unwillingness of producers to participate
in our voluntary programs. In short,
my amendment would have ensured
that our voluntary, incentive-based
programs are kept separate from the
regulatory efforts of other agencies.
If Members doubt the callous disregard that some Federal agencies have
for the American farmer, rancher, and
the average citizen in general, look no
further than EPA’s persistence with
the total maximum daily load (TMDL)
regulations.
After a dozen congressional hearings,
35,000 written comments, and clear intent from Congress via the military
construction conference report that
the proposed TMDL regulations needed
to be withdrawn and thoroughly re-examined, the EPA persisted in their policy to put forth these tainted regulations.
We need to send a strong message
that information provided on a voluntary basis for purposes of receiving
assistance from USDA should remain
confidential to all parties working in
cooperation with USDA. While it is unfortunate that this could not be accomplished here today on this worthy bill,
this issue must be addressed by Congress.
I want to applaud and thank my colleague, the gentleman from Oklahoma
(Mr. LUCAS), for his hard work in working to draft and pass this legislation. I
urge my colleagues to support H.R. 728.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 5
minutes to the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. SHERWOOD).
Mr. SHERWOOD. Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, I rise in support of H.R. 728, the Small Watershed
Rehabilitation Amendments of 2000.
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First let me congratulate the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. LUCAS)
and his colleagues, and commend the
leadership of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the
Committee on Agriculture for moving
forward with this important legislation.
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1600
H.R. 728 responds to a growing crisis
in water resources infrastructure
throughout this Nation. There are over
10,000 dams constructed under national
resource conservation service programs; many are in need of critical repair and are presenting flooding and
environmental threats to communities.
This bill responds in two ways. Title
I authorizes NRCS to rehabilitate
aging and deteriorating dams constructed under the agency’s small watershed program. Title II authorizes
the Corps of Engineers to inventory
and assess the condition of dams constructed decades ago under other authorities, such as the Work Projects
Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps, and in the interim, to
provide emergency measures to prevent risks to the public.
A good example of these aging dams
is the Mountain Springs dam right on
the edge of my congressional district.
It is a dam that has provided flood control and watershed qualities throughout 60 years, and now it is about to be
drained because it is deemed dangerous. We need these things attended
to.
Mr. Speaker, I would also like to emphasize that these projects should be
performed in the most cost-effective
manner that accomplishes the rehabilitation objective. However, the Secretary is not required to develop a cost
benefit ratio analysis or a cost benefit
ratio.
Mr. Speaker, this bill is about restoring infrastructure, enhancing public
safety, and protecting the environment. America’s rural communities in
particular will benefit.
For all of these reasons, Mr. Speaker,
I strongly urge my colleagues to support H.R. 728.
Mr. LUCAS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman
from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER).
(Mr. BEREUTER asked and was
given permission to revise and extend
his remarks.)
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I
thank the gentleman from Oklahoma
for yielding me this time.
Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support
of H.R. 728. I want to thank the distinguished gentleman from Oklahoma
(Mr. LUCAS) for his outstanding initiative and effort in introducing this legislation and the leadership of the two
committees for advancing it.
As a cosponsor of this legislation,
this Member certainly supports the
goals of this measure. It is clearly appropriate to provide necessary resources to aid in the rehabilitation of
the small watershed structures which
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have been constructed over the past 50
years. These small dams and other
structures, constructed under the P.L.
566 program, have provided numerous
benefits over the past decades, including flood control, wildlife habitat,
recreation, irrigation and water supplies.
This program has been especially important to Nebraska. Over the years,
the P.L. 566 program has resulted in
the installation of 880 dams and other
structures in Nebraska. In fact, this
Member is proud to point out that his
district, the First Congressional District of Nebraska, has more P.L. 566
dams and structures than any other
district in the Nation. The more than
700 structures in this Member’s district
provides flood protection, reduces erosion and provides many useful benefits.
Throughout Nebraska, it is estimated
that the State realizes a minimum of
$27 million in annual direct benefits as
a result of these structures. Documentation and examples of those benefits are found in the report by the National Resource Conservation Service,
the NRCS, of the USDA, entitled ‘‘Protecting the ‘Good Life’ through P.L.
566; The Watershed Protection and
Flood Prevention Act across Nebraska.’’
As just mentioned, during the previous 50 years, more than 10,000 upstream flood control dams have been
built throughout the United States.
The NRCS has provided cost-sharing
and technical assistance while local
sponsors have assumed responsibility
for the operation and maintenance of
the structures when they were completed. Unfortunately, many of those
structures are now reaching the end of
their 50-year designed life. Without significant rehabilitation, much of this
investment could be lost.
This act authorizes the Secretary of
Agriculture to cover a portion of the
total costs incurred for the rehabilitation of those structures. The bill does
not allow any assistance to be provided
to perform operation and maintenance
activities, a limitation this Member
strongly supports.
During a hearing of the Subcommittee on Water and Environment
of the Committee on Transportation
and Infrastructure, this Member shared
with the subcommittee a letter from
Dayle Williamson who, until very recently, was the outstanding, highly respected director of the State of Nebraska’s Natural Resources Commission, he
just retired, which emphasized that the
sponsors of Nebraska’s projects have
been providing adequate maintenance
over the years for the structures.
Therefore, he suggested, and this Member agrees, that they should not be penalized for their stewardship by allowing other States to tap into scarce resources to perform routine operation
and maintenance which they routinely
should have been providing. The gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. LUCAS)
has taken that fully into consideration. Another outstanding feature of
this legislation.
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This Member additionally asked for
specific safeguards to ensure that funding would not be used for the purposes
of routine operation and maintenance.
I am pleased, therefore, to note that a
provision was added to the legislation
which states that the Secretary of Agriculture may not approve a rehabilitation request if it is determined that the
need for rehabilitation of the structure
is the result of a lack of adequate
maintenance by the party responsible
for the maintenance.
Nevertheless, it is clear that there
are a great many instances where assistance is appropriate and necessary.
This Member believes that H.R. 728 recognizes this growing need and provides
a far-sighted approach in addressing
these problems. By providing additional assistance now, we can ensure
that the original investments will continue to pay dividends well into the future.
Mr. Speaker, this Member urges his
colleagues to support H.R. 728 and
again commends the gentleman from
Oklahoma (Mr. LUCAS) for his outstanding initiative.
Mr. STENHOLM. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, let me just say again in
reiteration of what all of my colleagues who have testified in favor of
this legislation today and the Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, I do also
thank them for their work and input
into this very important legislation.
I know, speaking from back home in
Texas, the importance of these projects
has been demonstrated time and time
again over these 50 years, but now particularly as cities like Dallas and Fort
Worth begin to look at some very serious flood concerns that they have and
how they might address that. Other
cities all over the United States, most
communities will find, when one looks
at how to solve a problem of flood control that one will find the small watershed projects would be right at the top
of the list.
Now, when we have these large number of dams that have been built and
are in need of rehabilitation, this legislation only make makes very, very serious common sense.
So I appreciate, again, the gentleman
from Oklahoma (Mr. LUCAS) for bringing this legislation to all of our attention, and all of the cooperation that
has been made to reach it to the point
to where we are today. I encourage the
House to support the bill.
Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance
of my time.
Mr. LUCAS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may
consume.
Mr. Speaker, in conclusion, I wish
once again to express my appreciation
of the gentleman from Texas (Mr.
STENHOLM), the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER), and the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. SHERWOOD) and all of the members of the
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04:39 Jul 18, 2000
various committees and subcommittees who worked on this.
From a concept that initially came
together in July of 1998 at a gathering
to celebrate 50 years of successful service by one of these structures to the
bill, that was then filed again in February of 1999, that has worked its way
through subcommittee and full Committee on Agriculture, subcommittee
and full Committee on Transportation
and Infrastructure, that has been examined by resources, a bill that is, if
there is such a thing, a textbook way
of reviewing legislation, we have at one
point or other in the last year and a
half examined every facet of this concept, I think, from every perspective.
The legislation that we have today,
thanks to the gentleman from Texas
(Mr. STENHOLM), ranking member, and
the gentleman from Texas (Chairman
COMBEST), and many other Members, is
a good solid piece of legislation that
will do the things that need to be done
in this country and in a fashion we will
all be proud of.
Mr. Speaker, I urge all of my colleagues to support the continued program that has been so successful for
half a century now or more.
Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 728, the small watershed rehabilitation amendments of 2000. The bill takes
steps to improve the nation’s deteriorating
water resources infrastructure and requires the
Secretary of Agriculture to rehabilitate aging
dams built under programs of the Natural Resources Conservation Service.
The bill also requires the Secretary of the
Army to inventory and assess certain dams
from the Great Depression era and authorizes
actions to mitigate against immediate threats
to public safety.
I commend Representative FRANK LUCAS
and his colleagues for championing this legislation and the leadership of the Agriculture
Committee for their cooperation, as well.
Thanks should also go to my colleagues on
the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, in particular Representative JIM OBERSTAR, the ranking Democrat, Representative
SHERRY BOEHLERT, the chairman of the Water
Resources and Environment Subcommittee,
and Representative BOB BORSKI, the subcommittee’s ranking member.
The Transportation and Agriculture Committees share jurisdiction over the NRCS’s small
watershed program and worked together
closely to revise and improve title I of this critically important legislation. I also appreciate
the Agriculture Committee’s cooperation with
respect to title II, relating to the Army Corps of
Engineers’ authorities regarding dam safety
and included by the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.
Mr. Speaker, the needs are great. Rehabilitating the nation’s dams will not be cheap but
the benefits will be enormous. With over
10,000 small watershed dams in need of rehabilitation, H.R. 728 takes an important and
timely first step. We anticipate NRCS and affected local communities will undertake costeffective rehabilitation measures and coordinate closely with State dam safety officials.
We also anticipate that, if funded, this bill will
make communities safer and cleaner as flooding and sedimentation risks are reduced.
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Mr. Speaker, I support passage of H.R. 728,
and urge my colleagues to do the same.
Mr. BOEHLERT. Mr. Speaker, I rise in
strong support of H.R. 728, the Small Watershed Rehabilitation Amendments of 2000.
H.R. 728 authorizes the Department of Agriculture, through the Natural Resources Conservation Service, to rehabilitate dams constructed as part of their small watershed program and other conservation programs.
This bill also authorizes additional dam safety measures for the Corps of Engineers. H.R.
728 requires the Secretary of the Army to inventory and assess the condition of certain
dams and to take interim actions to prevent
threats to public safety.
This bill invests in our nation’s aging dam
infrastructure. It will increase public health and
safety and environmental protection. It will
bring jobs, piece of mind and environmental
benefits to communities with deteriorating
dams.
The final language, essentially what the
Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
reported last November, is the result of extensive input from engineers, construction contractors, environmental advocates, dam safety
officials, local government representatives,
and Federal agencies. It includes, among
other things, important flexibility in defining
‘‘rehabilitation’’ so that environmentally sound
and locally supported options, such as ‘‘decommissioning,’’ may be considered.
I congratulate Representative FRANK LUCAS
and his colleagues for pursuing this legislation
and I thank the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Agriculture Committee
for their cooperation and leadership. In particular, I thank the leadership of the Agriculture
Committee and Chairman BUD SHUSTER,
Ranking Democrat JIM OBERSTAR, Ranking
Democrat of the Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee, Representative BOB
BORSKI, for their interest and support. From
the beginning, our Subcommittee on Water
Resources and Environment, which I chair,
recognized H.R. 728 could help make communities safer and cleaner.
For all these reasons, I urge my colleagues
to pass this important, critically-needed legislation.
Mr. WATKINS. Mr. Speaker, I stand before
you today in full support of H.R. 728, the
Small Watershed Rehabilitation Amendments
of 1999. Most importantly, I want to stress to
my colleagues why this piece of legislation is
vital to so many rural areas of the United
States.
Since the 1940’s, over 100,000 small watershed dams have been built under USDA programs. Small watershed dams provide great
benefit to their surrounding areas. These
dams provide downstream flood protection,
water quality improvement, irrigation water,
and rural water supplies. In flood control
alone, the Natural Resources Conservation
Service and the USDA estimate the small watershed dams prevent more than $800 million
in damages each year. People can also enjoy
increased recreation and wildlife habitat.
The bad news is that many have reached or
are rapidly approaching their fifty year life
span. Numerous structures are in need of rehabilitation to ensure the continued environmental and economic benefits that our country
currently enjoys. Action must be taken to prevent the loss of life, water supply, and flood
control that these dams afford to many rural
areas.
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Currently, no funding source exists to restore watershed projects, and local sponsors
do not have the resources to attempt to save
these dams. H.R. 728 establishes financial assistance for the assessment and rehabilitation
of small watershed dams over the next ten
years. With federal cost sharing, local sponsors will now have the opportunity to repair
these crucial watersheds.
The necessity of federal attention to this
problem is critical, and I thank my friend and
Oklahoma colleague Mr. LUCAS for his leadership of this matter and his support and commitment to the restoration of these structures.
I call upon my colleagues to recognize the importance of this legislation with their support of
H.R. 728.
Mr. LUCAS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr.
MILLER of Florida). The question is on
the motion offered by the gentleman
from Oklahoma (Mr. LUCAS) that the
House suspend the rules and pass the
bill, H.R. 728, as amended.
The question was taken; and (twothirds having voted in favor thereof)
the rules were suspended and the bill,
as amended, was passed.
The title of the bill was amended so
as to read:
‘‘A bill to amend the Watershed Protection
and Flood Prevention Act to authorize the
Secretary of Agriculture to provide cost
share assistance for the rehabilitation of
structural measures constructed as part of
water resource projects previously funded by
the Secretary under such Act or related
laws, and for other purposes.’’.
A motion to reconsider was laid on
the table.
f
GENERAL LEAVE
Mr. LUCAS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all
Members may have 5 legislative days
within which to revise and extend their
remarks on H.R. 728, the bill just
adopted.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentleman from Oklahoma?
There was no objection.
f
CONGRATULATING REPUBLIC OF
LATVIA ON 10TH ANNIVERSARY
OF REESTABLISHMENT OF INDEPENDENCE FROM FORMER SOVIET UNION
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I move
to suspend the rules and agree to the
concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 319)
congratulating the Republic of Latvia
on the 10th anniversary of the reestablishment of its independence from the
rule of the former Soviet Union.
The Clerk read as follows:
H. CON. RES. 319
Whereas the United States had never recognized the forcible incorporation of the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
into the former Soviet Union;
Whereas the declaration on May 4, 1990, of
the reestablishment of full sovereignty and
independence of the Republic of Latvia
furthered the disintegration of the former
Soviet Union;
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04:39 Jul 18, 2000
Whereas Latvia since then has successfully
built democracy, passed legislation on
human and minority rights that conform to
European and international norms, ensured
the rule of law, developed a free market
economy, and consistently pursued a course
of integration into the community of free
and democratic nations by seeking membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO); and
Whereas Latvia, as a result of the progress
of its political and economic reforms, has
made, and continues to make, a significant
contribution toward the maintenance of
international peace and stability by, among
other actions, its participation in NATO-led
peacekeeping operations in Bosnia and
Kosovo: Now, therefore, be it
Resolved by the House of Representatives (the
Senate concurring), That the Congress—
(1) congratulates Latvia on the occasion of
the 10th anniversary of the reestablishment
of its independence and the role it played in
the disintegration of the former Soviet
Union; and
(2) commends Latvia for its success in implementing political and economic reforms,
which may further speed the process of that
country’s integration into European and
Western institutions.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from
Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER) and the gentleman from California (Mr. LANTOS)
each will control 20 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentleman
from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER).
GENERAL LEAVE
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I ask
unanimous consent that all Members
may have 5 legislative days within
which to revise and extend their remarks on H. Con. Res. 319.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentleman from Nebraska?
There was no objection.
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
(Mr. BEREUTER asked and was
given permission to revise and extend
his remarks, and include extraneous
material.)
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, this
Member rises in very strong support
for H. Con. Res. 319, a resolution congratulating the Republic of Latvia on
the 10th anniversary of the reestablishment of its independence from the
former Soviet Union. This Member is
pleased to be a cosponsor of this important statement of support.
Mr. Speaker, the Baltic States of
Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia had
been prosperous and progressive independent nations, a set of three nations,
prior to the infamous Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, an agreement that heralded
5 decades of repression.
The United States, of course, never
recognized this unlawful act of international aggression. By 1990, the Soviet
terror machine no longer held sway,
and the long-standing courage and determination of the Latvian people was
finally rewarded with freedom. Again,
it was the United States that was
among the first to recognize their independence when they broke free.
No one could have predicted the rapid
reintegration with the West. Free elec-
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tions have now become the norm, and
the Saeima acts as a fully-functioning
parliament. Inflation has been reduced,
and Latvia has made major strides in
privatization.
While the export market to Russia
has collapsed, important new trading
partnerships have been found in Poland, Germany and the West. Much remains to be done, but Latvians and
Latvian-Americans can take justifiable
pride at what has thus far been accomplished in Latvia.
For our part, the United States continues to work for the Baltic nations to
deepen and broaden our relationship.
As but one example, NATO military officers, including Americans, continue
to work with the Latvian military directly and through NATO’s Partnership
For Peace program.
Latvia-Americans should also be
proud of their contributions, with some
retired military officers actually serving in key positions in the Latvian
Armed Forces and the Ministry of Defense.
As the NATO Summit in Washington,
D.C. last year concluded, Latvia joined
in the Enhanced and More Operational
Partnership, EMOP, a program designed to speed the day when Latvia
can become a full contributing member
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The goal, which this Member
strongly endorses, is to move beyond
the expressions of support and facilitate the concrete steps that will result
in Latvia’s further integration into the
West.
In other areas of cooperation, Peace
Corps volunteers now teach Latvian
schools and help Latvian small businessmen and women with such basic
tasks as accounting and marketing.
This Member is particularly pleased
that the United States has created a
Baltic American Enterprise Fund designed to underwrite fledgling entrepreneurs from Lithuania, Latvia, and
Estonia.
Finally, this Member would point out
that the House of Representatives has
been and is assisting the Latvian
Saeima with such basic necessities as
law books and computers, various
kinds of library assistance.
In 1995, this Member was part of a bipartisan House task force which approved and oversaw this assistance to
this parliamentary body, as we did in
the other two Baltic States, and visited
Latvia for that and other foreign policy security purposes. It should be
noted, additionally, that such assistance most assuredly is not a hand-out.
Rather, we are offering a helping hand
to a nation with historically close ties
to the United States. We are helping
Latvians build a future where their
country can continue to progress in its
rightful place as a full member of the
European family of democratic nations.
Mr. Speaker, this Member congratulates, in particular, the distinguished
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. SHIMKUS)
for crafting a resolution that merits
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the support of all Members of this
body. This Member urges support for H.
Con. Res. 319.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. LANTOS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, let me at the outset
congratulate the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. SHIMKUS) for crafting this
very excellent resolution. I want to
thank the gentleman from Nebraska
(Mr. BEREUTER) for his eloquent and
cogent and strong statement. I want to
associate myself with the comments of
the gentleman from Nebraska, and I
call on all of my colleagues to support
H. Con. Res. 319.
As we congratulate Latvia on the
10th anniversary of its renewed independence, I think it is important to
recognize proudly that the United
States stood on principle at the time of
the beginning of the Second World War
in refusing to accept the incorporation
of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia into
the Soviet Union.
Not many of our fellow citizens know
that the embassies of these three Baltic countries continued to function
during the long decades of both the
Second World War and the Cold War
here in Washington, D.C., underscoring
the principled commitment of the
United States under Republican and
Democratic administrations to the
independence of the Baltic States.
b
1615
Mr. Speaker, Latvia, along with
Lithuania and Estonia, has made enormous progress in developing an economy that was stifled by the nonfunctional Soviet system and building an
increasingly democratic and open and
free society. I have had the privilege
and the pleasure of visiting Latvia,
Lithuania, and Estonia during the crucial days of their attempted breaking
away from Soviet control; and I have
had the privilege of visiting in the Baltics repeatedly since, most recently
just a few months ago.
It is reassuring, Mr. Speaker, that
democracy is taking hold; that the orientation of Latvia and her two Baltic
neighbors to democratic principles is
strong; their desire to become admitted
to the Europe Union is great; to become members of NATO; these are all
manifestations of positive developments.
There is one aspect of development in
these three countries that I would like
to touch upon, which is as yet unfinished business. At the time of the early
days of the Second World War, the Baltic states were whipsawed between Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Soviet
Union. As the German forces occupied
the Baltic states, understandably perhaps, large numbers of citizens in these
countries greeted the Nazis with joy
because they represented liberation
from the Soviet Union. Many joined
Nazi military units.
Now, time has gone on, and most of
the members of these military units
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
04:39 Jul 18, 2000
are no longer alive. But some are, and
it has been critical to remind our
friends in the Baltic states that it is
their moral and legal obligation to
bring the perpetrators of crimes
against humanity to justice, irrespective of their age and medical condition.
I have had the privilege of working
with the presidents of all three Baltic
countries and with members of parliament and, on the whole, I want to
commend them for approaching this
important remaining assignment from
the dark period of the Second World
War with diligence and sincere commitment. There is no doubt in my mind
that under the current leadership of
these three countries, with three
strong democratically oriented presidents and strong democratically controlled parliaments, this job will be
done and the three Baltic states will
occupy their proper role in the family
of democratic nations within the
framework of the European Union and
within the framework of NATO.
It is in that spirit that I want to congratulate the people of Latvia and the
government of Latvia for the remarkable progress they have made during
the course of the last decade, and I
strongly urge all of my colleagues to
approve this resolution.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume to
commend the gentleman from California (Mr. LANTOS), the distinguished
gentleman who gave a very articulate
extemporaneous remark. He has followed the history of these Baltic
states, and he has certainly followed
their evolution since in fact they have
gained their freedom; and I thank him
for his outstanding remarks.
Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he
may consume to the gentleman from
Illinois (Mr. SHIMKUS), the distinguished gentleman who, by his activism, by his leadership, and by his heritage has been recognized already in his
time here in the House as a leader on
matters related to the Baltic states.
(Mr. SHIMKUS asked and was given
permission to revise and extend his remarks.)
Mr. SHIMKUS. Mr. Speaker, it is
with great pleasure that I rise today in
strong support of House Concurrent
Resolution 319, congratulating the Republic of Latvia on the 10th anniversary of the reestablishment, and I underscore reestablishment, of its independence from Russia.
I want to take this opportunity also
to thank my colleagues, the gentleman
from New York (Mr. GILMAN), the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER),
but especially the gentleman from
California (Mr. LANTOS), who is the
conscience of the House and who has
been a good friend as we negotiated
these new areas, which are unchartered
waters for me. And I would be remiss if
I did not mention the gentleman from
Ohio (Mr. KUCINICH), who is the cochair of the Baltic Caucus. I appreciate
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his friendship and support, as well as
all of the original cosponsors of this
legislation.
Mr. Speaker, Latvia lost its freedom
on August 23, 1939, when Nazi Germany
and the U.S.S.R. signed a nonaggression pact and the Baltic states were
placed in the Soviet sphere of influence. By August 1940, the nation had
been placed under Soviet military occupation and was incorporated as a republic of the U.S.S.R. The United
States never recognized the incorporation of these independent countries
into the Soviet Union, and the Russian
Federation currently has no claims on
these independent countries today.
For the subsequent 50 years, the
brave people of Latvia endured the
slaughter of innocent citizens, deportations to Siberia, and heavy political
oppression. Despite these hardships,
the Latvian people kept independence
alive in their minds and spirits, resisting occupation in silent and public
ways, serving as a secret weapon
against the tyranny of the Soviet
Union.
On May 4, 1990, the people of Latvia
solidified their full sovereignty, which
served to further the disintegration of
the Soviet Union. In just one decade,
Latvia has successfully pursued policies to build a strong democracy, protect human rights, expand the rule of
law, develop a free market system, and
pursue a course of integration into the
community of free and democratic nations, including the seeking of membership in the European Union and the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Latvia, together with the Republics
of Estonia and Lithuania, continues to
make a significant contribution toward
maintaining peace and stability in the
surrounding region, notably in peacekeeping operations in Bosnia and
Kosovo. I applaud their participation
and signature on the Vilnius statement
signed on May 19 of this year, especially their commitment to individual
liberty, the free market, and the rule
of law.
Latvia is a nation that has made tremendous progress since its independence and has unlimited potential and
optimism for the future. The story of
Latvian independence deserves to be
widely acknowledged and remembered
as a successful nonviolent model for social and political change.
In the United States, we have imperfect individuals attempting to form a
more perfect union. In Latvia, the attempt by imperfect individuals to form
a more perfect democracy should be
commended. That is why I urge my colleagues to join with me in passing
House Concurrent Resolution 319 and
remembering the good people of Latvia
for all their perseverance and triumph
over the monstrosity of communism.
Mr. LANTOS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume to
thank my very good friend, the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER),
for his most generous comments, as
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well as my very good friend and colleague, the gentleman from Illinois
(Mr. SHIMKUS).
Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time, and I yield back the
balance of my time.
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume to
thank the gentleman for his remarks
earlier, and also the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. SHIMKUS), as I said, for his
leadership and his outstanding statement.
I take particular pleasure in being
able to manage this legislation. Not
only do we have a significant Lithuanian community in both Lincoln and
Omaha, and a small Estonian one in
Lincoln; but we have a relatively larger community of Latvians in Lincoln.
They came to Nebraska in the early
part of the 20th century for freedom, to
escape religious persecution, and for
economic benefits.
As a part of that immigration, shortly following them was a young dissident from Latvia. His name was
Karlis Ulmanis. After receiving his
bachelor’s degree from the University
of Nebraska, he worked for some time
in Nebraska and Texas before returning
to Latvia. There he became the president of Latvia between World War I
and World War II.
He was long-tenured, and an outstanding and benevolent leader of Latvia during that period of time. When
the Soviets came in, they seized him;
and that is the last the world knew of
what happened to Karlis Ulmanis.
Later, it was only justice that his
grandnephew became the recent president of Latvia. For a period of time,
his mother and he had to change their
name in order to escape persecution
from the Soviets. But the second
Ulmanis did became a very distinguished and able president, and the
Lincoln community is very pleased and
proud of both the Ulmanises for their
outstanding leadership of Latvia.
Finally, Mr. Speaker, I thank my
Latvian-American
constituents
for
their outstanding support for the cause
of freedom over the years for the Baltic
states.
Mr. KNOLLENBERG. Mr. Speaker, I rise
today to support this resolution and to commend the success the Republic of Latvia has
achieved since the May 4, 1990 reestablishment of its full sovereignty and independence
from the former Soviet Union.
Since the declaration of its independence,
Latvia has established a democratic government, passed legislation on human and minority rights, ensured the rule of law and sustained the development of its free market
economy.
Latvia has also consistently pursued a
course of integration into the community of
free and democratic nations by seeking membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). I support admitting the Baltic
states into NATO and I hope my colleagues
here in the House will support their entry also
in the next round of NATO expansion.
Latvia has made great strides over the last
ten years and this resolution helps to highlight
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this success. I thank Representative SHIMKUS
for his efforts to bring House Concurrent Resolution 319 to the floor and the opportunity to
congratulate Latvia on the last ten years of
progress.
Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support
of House Concurrent Resolution 319, which
congratulates the Republic of Latvia on the
10th anniversary of its independence from the
rule of the former Soviet regime.
I am certain that all of us in this Congress
appreciate how difficult it has been for countries such as Latvia to move forward with
badly-needed political and economic reforms
over the last decade.
But, many of us can also recall the terrific
challenges the Latvian people and their neighbors in Lithuania and Estonia had to overcome
to regain their independence ten years ago.
This Resolution congratulates the Latvian
people for their success—against all odds—in
regaining their rightful independence, and
commends them for carrying forward since
then with the reforms that should lay the foundation for their full integration into European
and Western institutions.
Mr. Speaker, I support the Resolution and
urge my colleagues to join in its adoption.
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I have
no further requests for time, and I
yield back the balance of my time.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. MILLER of Florida). The question is on the
motion offered by the gentleman from
Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER) that the
House suspend the rules and agree to
the concurrent resolution, H. Con. Res.
319.
The question was taken.
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, on
that I demand the yeas and nays.
The yeas and nays were ordered.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX and the
Chair’s prior announcement, further
proceedings on this motion will be
postponed.
f
CONDEMNING
1994
ATTACK
ON
AMIA JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER IN BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I
move to suspend the rules and agree to
the resolution (H. Res. 531) condemning
the 1994 attack on the AMIA Jewish
Community Center in Buenos Aires,
Argentina, urging the Argentine Government to punish those responsible,
and for other purposes, as amended.
The Clerk read as follows:
H. RES. 531
Whereas on July 18, 1994, 86 innocent
human beings were killed and 300 were
wounded when the AMIA Jewish Community
Center was bombed in Buenos Aires, Argentina;
Whereas the United States welcomes Argentine President Fernando de la Rua’s political will to pursue the investigation of the
bombing of the AMIA Jewish Community
Center to its ultimate conclusion;
Whereas
circumstantial
evidence
attributes the attack to the terrorist group
Hezbollah, based in Lebanon and sponsored
by Iran;
Whereas evidence indicates that this
bombing could not have been carried out
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without local assistance from elements of
the Argentine security forces, some of which
are reported to be sympathetic to anti-Semitic positions and to have participated in
the desecration of Jewish cemeteries in recent years;
Whereas additional evidence indicates that
the tri-border area where Argentina, Paraguay, and Brazil meet, and which is known
to be rife with terrorist activity as well as
drug and arms smuggling, was used to channel resources for the purpose of carrying out
the bombing attack;
Whereas the 6 years since the bombing
have been marked by efforts to minimize the
involvement of these Argentine security elements;
Whereas Argentine officials have acknowledged that there was negligence in the initial phases of the investigation and that the
institutional and political conditions must
be created to advance the investigation of
this terrorist attack;
Whereas failure to duly punish the culprits
of this act serves merely to reward these terrorists and help spread the scourge of terrorism throughout the Western Hemisphere;
Whereas the democratic leaders of the
Western Hemisphere issued mandates at the
1994 and 1998 Summits of the Americas that
they condemn terrorism in all its forms and
that they will, using all legal means, combat
terrorist acts anywhere in the Americas with
unity and vigor;
Whereas the Government of Argentina supports the 1996 Declaration of Lima To Prevent, Combat and Eliminate Terrorism,
which refers to terrorism as a serious form of
organized and systematic violence that is intended to generate chaos and fear among the
population, results in death and destruction,
and is a reprehensible criminal activity, as
well as the 1998 Commitment of Mar del
Plata which calls terrorist acts serious common crimes that erode peaceful and civilized
coexistence, affect the rule of law and the
exercise of democracy, and endanger the stability of democratically elected constitutional governments and the socioeconomic
development of our countries;
Whereas the Government of Argentina was
successful in enacting a law on cooperation
from defendants in terrorist matters, a law
that will be helpful in pursuing full prosecution in this and other terrorist cases; and
Whereas it is the long-standing policy of
the United States to stand firm against terrorist attacks wherever and whenever they
occur and to work with its allies to ensure
that justice is done: Now, therefore, be it
Resolved,
That
the
House
of
Representatives—
(1) reiterates its condemnation of the attack on the AMIA Jewish Community Center
in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in July 1994, and
honors the victims of this heinous act;
(2) strongly urges the Government of Argentina to fulfill its international obligations and its promise to the Argentine people
by pursuing the local and international connections to this act of terrorism, wherever
they may lead, and to duly punish all those
who were involved;
(3) calls on the President to continue to
raise this issue in bilateral discussions with
Argentine officials and to underscore the
United States concern regarding the 6-year
delay in the resolution of this case;
(4) recommends that the United States
Representative to the Organization of American States seek support from the countries
comprising the Inter-American Committee
Against Terrorism to assist, if required by
the Government of Argentina, in the investigation of this terrorist attack;
(5) encourages the President to direct
United States law enforcement agencies to
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
provide support and cooperation to the Government of Argentina, if requested, for purposes of the investigation into this bombing
and terrorist activities in the tri-border
area; and
(6) desires a lasting, warm relationship between the United States and Argentina built
on mutual abhorrence of terrorism and commitments to peace, stability, and democracy
in the Western Hemisphere.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from
Florida (Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN) and the
gentleman from California (Mr. LANTOS) each will control 20 minutes.
The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman
from
Florida
(Ms.
ROSLEHTINEN).
GENERAL LEAVE
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I
ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days within
which to revise and extend their remarks on House Resolution 531.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentlewoman from Florida?
There was no objection.
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself such time as I may consume.
(Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN asked and was
given permission to revise and extend
her remarks.)
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker,
tomorrow marks the sixth anniversary
of the heinous terrorist act against the
AMIA Jewish Community Center in
Buenos Aires, Argentina. Six years
ago, on July 18, 1994, a dark cloud of
fear and anguish enveloped this South
American city when 86 innocent human
beings, including frail little girls and
boys, were killed, and 300 were wounded as a result of the bombing.
However, 6 years later, Mr. Speaker,
sorrow, despair and frustration still
permeate the air. Six years later, justice, peace, and security continue to be
elusive abstract concepts. But as Argentina’s current president, Fernando
de la Rua, has stated, it is imperative
to keep the memory alive, because forgetfulness is a shelter for impunity.
This leads to the primary reason why
I introduced this resolution, to renew
and redirect international attention in
order to ensure that justice will be finally served. Further, this resolution
serves to honor and remember the victims; to outline the evidence supporting the international and local
connections to the bombing; to bring
to the forefront reported attempts by
elements of the Argentine security
forces to derail the main investigation
by hiding evidence and creating false
leads.
The need to effectively address the
alleged Argentine participation for this
terrorist act was underscored by the de
la Rua administration in April of this
year when it established a task force to
look into the corrupt police officers
and their possible role in the financing
of the attack, in providing the vehicle
used in the bombing. This task force
will also pursue undeveloped leads and
information
regarding
the
inter-
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
06:07 Jul 18, 2000
national Iranian terrorist network
which has orchestrated and carried out
horrific acts against defenseless human
beings.
b
1630
It was clear from the onset that this
attack and the earlier one on the
Israeli Embassy were part of a campaign of violence targeted at the Jewish community in Argentina and
throughout the world by radical militant groups in the Middle East. Circumstantial evidence would later support this connection, attributing the
bombing
to
the
terrorist
group
Hezbollah based in Lebanon and sponsored by Iran.
Additional evidence indicates that
the tri-border area, where Argentina,
Paraguay and Brazil meet, were used
to channel resources for the purpose of
carrying out this terrorist attack.
Other circumstantial data indicates
that this bombing could not have been
carried out without local assistance
from elements of the Argentine security forces. This link was supported by
the indictment of 15 military and police officers, with five described as
‘‘necessary parties to the bombing’’
charged with multiple counts of murder, conspiracy and corruption.
The wounds will not begin to heal
until the investigation into the AMIA
bombing is pursued with vigor and determination and until effective action
is taken by all to ensure that justice is
served. The scars will serve as a constant reminder of the need for vigilance in our hemisphere, of the need for
democratic countries to unite in condemning such horrid acts and work together to protect the right of every citizen in every society to live in peace
and liberty free from the threat of terrorism.
This resolution is an important first
step toward achieving that goal. It is a
call to action. It sends an unequivocal
message to all that the United States
considers the resolution of this case to
be a priority, that it is prepared to
take the necessary steps to ensure this
end, working both with regional neighbors as well as with the Argentine government, providing them with assistance when requested.
Six years have passed. We cannot
wait any longer. It is time for the rule
of law to be seen and to be heard in
this important case. We cannot allow
justice to be held captive by inaction.
For the sake of the victims, for the
sake of hemispheric and global security, and for the sake of justice, I ask
our colleagues to support this resolution today.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Mr. LANTOS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, first I want to commend
my very good friend and distinguished
colleague from Florida (Ms. ROSLEHTINEN) for crafting a very important, very powerful, and very eloquent
resolution. And, of course, I rise in
strong support of this resolution.
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Mr. Speaker, a dark cloud hangs over
the honor of Argentina. This neighbor
of ours in this hemisphere has tolerated now two heinous terrorist acts, a
terrorist act against the Embassy of
Israel and the terrorist act against the
Jewish Community Center in Argentina, to go unpunished for years.
The evidence is clear. Although the
direct perpetrators are most likely to
have been members of the terrorist
group Hezbollah, supported by the Government of Iran, the complicity and
participation of Argentinian police and
security forces is beyond any doubt.
This corrupt, far right-wing partnership with Islamic terrorism in our
hemisphere cannot be tolerated.
I welcome the statement of the new
president of Argentina assuring us that
he will do his utmost at this late stage
to bring the perpetrators to justice and
to attempt to clean and clear the honor
and reputation of Argentina. But we
will not rest until these things happen.
Eighty-six innocent men, women and
children lost their lives. Over 300 innocent men, women and children were
wounded for no reason except their religious affiliation. There is no room in
this hemisphere for terrorist acts of
any kind, certainly for terrorist acts as
hate crimes directed against various
religious groups. It is long overdue for
the authorities in Argentina to close
this chapter, which is a chapter that
has brought infamy to that nation.
Following the bombing of the Israeli
Embassy, this bombing of a community
center in the heart of Argentina brings
back memories of the darkest days of
the Second World War when innocent
men, women and children, for no reason whatsoever, were massacred and
murdered.
Argentina must come clean. The new
President of Argentina now has an opportunity to instruct all authorities to
pursue this case with diligence and determination. Until the perpetrators are
brought to justice, a question mark
will hang over the relationship of Argentina to all other civilized nations.
I commend my colleague, the gentlewoman
from
Florida
(Ms.
ROSLEHTINEN), and I call on all of my colleagues to approve this resolution.
Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of
my time.
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I
yield such time as he may consume to
the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER).
(Mr. BEREUTER asked and was
given permission to revise and extend
his remarks.)
Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, I rise
in strong support of H. Res. 531, for it
properly places the U.S. Congress on
record in marking the tragic occasion
of the sixth anniversary of the July 18,
1994, terrorist bombing of the AMIA
Jewish Community Center in Buenos
Aires. Eighty-seven people lost their
lives, and 200 to 300 people were injured
in that attack.
This Member thanks his colleague,
the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms.
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July 17, 2000
ROS-LEHTINEN), from the Committee on
International Relations, the distinguished chairwoman of the Subcommittee on International Policy and
Trade, for introducing this resolution.
Last year, the Argentine Congress
passed important legislation that allows Investigating Judge Juan Jose
Galeano to engage in plea bargaining.
Nonetheless, the trial of the Argentinian citizens charged with complicity
in this terrorist bombing has, regrettably, been much delayed.
During a recent visit to the United
States, Argentina’s president, Fernando de la Rua, made a point of visiting the Holocaust museum and
issuing a public apology for the role
Argentina played in harboring Nazis
during World War II.
President De la Rua said, ‘‘Today, before you and before the world, I want
to express my most sincere pain and to
ask forgiveness that this happened,
that Nazis were hidden among us.’’
Solving this terrible crime and bringing those responsible to justice is the
proper way to bring healing to the still
open wounds in Argentina.
Mr. Speaker, this Member urges his
colleagues to join in unanimously supporting this resolution. Again, I commend my colleague the gentleman
from California (Mr. LANTOS) for his
outstanding statement and especially
the distinguished gentlewoman from
Florida (Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN) for her
eloquant statement and for her introduction and able movement of this legislation to the House floor.
Mr. LANTOS. Mr. Speaker, I yield
myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my
good friend the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER) for his powerful
and eloquent statement. I want to
thank the gentlewoman from Florida
(Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN) for her diligent
and outstanding work on this issue.
I urge all of my colleagues to support
this resolution.
Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time, and I yield back the
balance of my time.
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I
yield myself such time as I may consume.
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague the gentleman from California
(Mr. LANTOS) for his eloquent words,
for his skilled leadership, and for his
deep knowledge of history that has
helped us to pass this resolution today.
I also thank our colleague the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. BEREUTER)
for his constant support of all items
worthy of support, and certainly our
fight against terrorism is on that list.
I thank the gentleman for that.
I also thank the gentleman from
California (Chairman GILMAN) for his
assistance in allowing this resolution
to be brought up to the floor so rapidly.
Mr. Speaker, in conclusion, I would
like to quote from Ambassador Aviran
of Israel, whom I believe encapsulated
the need for this resolution and for jus-
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H6085
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
04:39 Jul 18, 2000
tice. He said, ‘‘Crimes that go
unpunished are crimes that get repeated.’’
The time to act is now. Six years
more should not be allowed to pass before the guilty are brought to justice.
I would like to especially commend
the organization B’nai B’rith for its efforts on behalf of the Argentine Jewish
community and on behalf of justice in
this case. May that day of justice come
quickly.
Therefore, I ask my colleagues to
support House Resolution 531.
Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Speaker, this resolution
properly places the U.S. Congress on record
in marking the tragic occasion of the sixth anniversary of the July 18, 1994 terrorist bombing of the AMIA Jewish Community Center in
Buenos Aires, Argentina. Eight-seven people
lost their lives and two hundred people were
injured in this attack.
I thank my colleague from our International
Relations Committee, the distinguished chairwoman of the Subcommittee on International
Economic Policy and Trade, Ms. ROSLEHTINEN of Florida, for introducing this resolution.
I have long been interested in seeing that
this heinous crime is resolved and those responsible are brought to justice.
Last year, the Argentine Congress passed
important legislation
that allows Investigating
´
Judge Juan Jose Galeano to engage in plea
bargaining. Nonetheless, the trial of the Argentine citizens charged with complicity in this terrorist bombing has, regrettably, been unduly
delayed. Six years is too long a time to let
pass without justice.
When the local trial does finally get underway, I urge Argentina’s authorities to invite
and permit international observers to witness
the trial proceedings.
During a recent visit to the United States,
Argentina’s president, Fernando de la Rua,
made a point of visiting the Holocaust museum and issuing a public apology for the role
Argentina played in harboring Nazis after
World War II.
President De La Rua said, ‘‘Today, before
you and before the world, I want to express
my most sincere pain and to ask forgiveness
that this happened, that Nazis were hidden
among us.’’
I believe in President De La Rua’s sincerity
and thank him for his important statement.
Solving this terrible crime and bringing those
responsible to justice is the proper way to
bring healing to the still open wounds in Argentina.
I urge my colleagues to join me in adopting
this important resolution.
Mr. ACKERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H. Res. 531 and would like to add my
voice to those marking the sixth anniversary of
the cowardly bombing of the AMIA Jewish
Community Center in Buenos Aries, Argentina.
This searing event horrified the world and has,
unfortunately, become a barometer for the political culture of Argentina.
While we commend the statements of interest and commitment made by President Fernando de la Rua, I, along with many in this
House, remain wary, in light of the six years
of stumbling, ineffectual investigation and the
reality of justice denied. The truth in this matter points unmistakably to elements within the
Argentine state and unfortunately, this reality
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has been a source of delay and obfuscation
rather than a catalyst for action by Agentine
investigators.
In addition to this disturbing procrastination
on the part of investigators to dig deep into
the roots of official involvement, the search for
justice in Argentina has also skipped lightly
over the possible involvement of Hizbollah,
Iran and Syria. Notwithstanding the myriad
statements pledging an absolute commitment
to the search for truth and justice, the reality
of the Argentine investigation has been a halfhearted,
poorly
funded,
undermanned,
uninspired, slow-motion search for answers.
Mr. Speaker, six years ago in Buenos Aires,
86 people were killed and hundreds more
were injured by a car bomb created and delivered by an unknown group of conspirators,
who targeted their victims because of their
Jewish faith. Cowardly and offensive, the
bombing of the AMIA Jewish Community Center came little more than two years after the
bombing of the Israeli embassy in the same
city. By all accounts, Argentina’s response to
these two horrific crimes has been lackadaisical and disappointing. The victims of these
crimes, old and young, male and female, deserve better than to have their quest for justice
fade in a bureaucratic haze.
I want to commend my colleagues Congresswoman ROS-LEHTINEN and Congressman
LANTOS for their excellent leadership on this
important resolution, which I strongly urge this
House to adopt. Putting the House on record
on this matter is a vital step toward ensuring
a genuine and effective investigation, and ultimately, a fair trial which provides just punishment for the guilty parties.
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I
yield back the balance of my time.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. MILLER of Florida). The question is on the
motion offered by the gentlewoman
from Florida (Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN) that
the House suspend the rules and agree
to the resolution, H. Res. 531, as
amended.
The question was taken.
Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker,
on that I demand the yeas and nays.
The yeas and nays were ordered.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX and the
Chair’s prior announcement, further
proceedings on this motion will be
postponed.
f
RECESS
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 12 of rule I, the Chair declares the House in recess until approximately 7 p.m.
Accordingly (at 4 o’clock and 41 minutes p.m.), the House stood in recess
until approximately 7 p.m.
f
b
1900
AFTER RECESS
The recess having expired, the House
was called to order by the Speaker pro
tempore (Mr. SHIMKUS) at 7 p.m.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
MAKING IN ORDER AT ANY TIME
ON JULY 18, 2000, OR ANY DAY
THEREAFTER,
CONSIDERATION
OF H.J. RES. 103, AUTHORIZING
EXTENSION
OF
NONDISCRIMINATORY TREATMENT (NORMAL
TRADE RELATIONS TREATMENT)
TO
PEOPLE’S
REPUBLIC
OF
CHINA
Mr. DREIER. Mr. Speaker, I ask
unanimous consent that it be in order
at any time on July 18 of 2000, or any
day thereafter, to consider in the
House the joint resolution (H.J. Res.
103) disapproving the extension of the
waiver authority contained in section
402(c) of the Trade Act of 1974 with respect to the People’s Republic of China;
that the joint resolution be considered
as read for amendment; that all points
of order against the joint resolution
and against its consideration be
waived; that the joint resolution be debatable for 2 hours equally divided and
controlled by the Chairman of the
Committee on Ways and Means, in opposition of the joint resolution, and a
Member in support of the joint resolution; that pursuant to section 152 and
153 of the Trade Act of 1974, the previous question be considered as ordered
on the joint resolution to final passage
without intervening motion; and that
the provision of section 152 and 153 of
the Trade Act of 1974 shall not otherwise apply to any joint resolution disapproving the extension of the waiver
authority contained in section 402(c) of
the Trade Act of 1974 with respect to
the People’s Republic of China for the
remainder of the second session of the
106th Congress.
Mr. Speaker, let me say that it is the
intention of this unanimous consent
request that the 2 hours of debate be
yielded fairly between Members of the
majority and the minority parties on
both sides of this issue.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there
objection to the request of the gentleman from California?
There was no objection.
f
ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER
PRO TEMPORE
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, the Chair
will now put the question on each motion to suspend the rules on which further proceedings were postponed earlier today.
Votes will be taken in the following
order:
H. Res. 534, by the yeas and nays;
H. Con. Res. 319, by the yeas and
nays;
H. Res. 531, by the yeas and nays;
H.R. 3125, de novo.
The Chair will reduce to 5 minutes
the time for any electronic vote after
the first such vote in this series.
f
SENSE OF HOUSE REGARDING NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY AND
PROCEDURES
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
pending business is the question of sus-
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
04:39 Jul 18, 2000
pending the rules and agreeing to resolution, H. Res. 534.
The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
question is on the motion offered by
the gentleman from South Carolina
(Mr. SPENCE) that the House suspend
the rules and agree to the resolution,
H. Res. 534, on which the yeas and nays
are ordered.
The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were—yeas 391, nays 5,
answered ‘‘present’’ 2, not voting 36, as
follows:
[Roll No. 401]
YEAS—391
Aderholt
Allen
Andrews
Archer
Armey
Baca
Bachus
Baird
Baker
Baldacci
Baldwin
Ballenger
Barcia
Barr
Barrett (NE)
Barrett (WI)
Bartlett
Bass
Bateman
Becerra
Bentsen
Bereuter
Berkley
Berman
Berry
Biggert
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Bishop
Bliley
Blumenauer
Blunt
Boehlert
Boehner
Bonilla
Bonior
Bono
Borski
Boswell
Boucher
Boyd
Brady (PA)
Brady (TX)
Brown (FL)
Brown (OH)
Bryant
Burr
Burton
Buyer
Callahan
Camp
Canady
Cannon
Capps
Capuano
Cardin
Castle
Chabot
Chambliss
Chenoweth-Hage
Clay
Clement
Clyburn
Coble
Collins
Combest
Condit
Conyers
Cooksey
Costello
Cox
Coyne
Cramer
Crane
Crowley
Cubin
Cummings
Jkt 079060
PO 00000
Cunningham
Davis (FL)
Davis (IL)
Davis (VA)
Deal
DeFazio
DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
DeLay
DeMint
Deutsch
Diaz-Balart
Dingell
Doggett
Dooley
Doolittle
Doyle
Dreier
Duncan
Dunn
Edwards
Ehlers
Emerson
Engel
English
Eshoo
Etheridge
Evans
Everett
Ewing
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Fletcher
Foley
Forbes
Fossella
Fowler
Franks (NJ)
Frelinghuysen
Frost
Gallegly
Ganske
Gejdenson
Gekas
Gephardt
Gibbons
Gilchrest
Gilman
Gonzalez
Goode
Goodlatte
Goodling
Gordon
Goss
Graham
Green (TX)
Green (WI)
Greenwood
Gutknecht
Hall (OH)
Hall (TX)
Hansen
Hastings (FL)
Hastings (WA)
Hayes
Hayworth
Hefley
Herger
Hill (IN)
Hill (MT)
Hilleary
Hilliard
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hobson
Frm 00032
Fmt 4634
Hoeffel
Hoekstra
Holden
Holt
Hooley
Horn
Hostettler
Houghton
Hoyer
Hulshof
Hunter
Hyde
Inslee
Isakson
Istook
Jackson (IL)
Jackson-Lee
(TX)
Jefferson
Jenkins
John
Johnson (CT)
Johnson, E.B.
Johnson, Sam
Jones (NC)
Jones (OH)
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kasich
Kelly
Kennedy
Kildee
Kind (WI)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kleczka
Knollenberg
Kolbe
Kucinich
Kuykendall
LaFalce
LaHood
Lampson
Lantos
Largent
Larson
Latham
LaTourette
Lazio
Leach
Lee
Levin
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (GA)
Lewis (KY)
Linder
Lipinski
LoBiondo
Lofgren
Lowey
Lucas (KY)
Lucas (OK)
Luther
Maloney (CT)
Maloney (NY)
Manzullo
Mascara
Matsui
McCarthy (MO)
McCarthy (NY)
McCrery
McGovern
McHugh
McInnis
McIntyre
McKeon
McKinney
Sfmt 0634
Meehan
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Menendez
Metcalf
Mica
MillenderMcDonald
Miller (FL)
Miller, Gary
Miller, George
Minge
Mink
Moakley
Mollohan
Moore
Moran (KS)
Moran (VA)
Morella
Myrick
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Nethercutt
Ney
Northup
Norwood
Nussle
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Ose
Owens
Oxley
Packard
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor
Paul
Payne
Pease
Pelosi
Peterson (MN)
Peterson (PA)
Petri
Phelps
Pickering
Pickett
Pitts
Pombo
Pomeroy
Porter
Portman
Price (NC)
Pryce (OH)
Quinn
Radanovich
Rahall
Ramstad
Rangel
Regula
Reyes
Reynolds
Riley
Rivers
Rodriguez
Roemer
Rogan
Rogers
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Rothman
Roukema
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Ryan (WI)
Ryun (KS)
Sabo
Salmon
Sanchez
Sanders
Sandlin
Sanford
Sawyer
Saxton
Scarborough
Schaffer
Schakowsky
Scott
Sensenbrenner
Shadegg
Shaw
Shays
Sherman
Sherwood
Shimkus
Shows
Shuster
Simpson
Sisisky
Skeen
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (MI)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Snyder
Frank (MA)
McDermott
Murtha
Stark
Souder
Spence
Stabenow
Stearns
Stenholm
Strickland
Stump
Stupak
Sununu
Sweeney
Talent
Tancredo
Tanner
Tauscher
Tauzin
Taylor (MS)
Taylor (NC)
Terry
Thomas
Thompson (CA)
Thornberry
Thune
Thurman
Tiahrt
Tierney
Toomey
Towns
Traficant
Turner
Udall (CO)
Udall (NM)
Upton
Velazquez
Vitter
Walden
Walsh
Wamp
Waters
Watkins
Watt (NC)
Watts (OK)
Weiner
Weldon (FL)
Weldon (PA)
Weller
Wexler
Weygand
Whitfield
Wicker
Wolf
Woolsey
Wu
Wynn
Young (AK)
NAYS—5
Visclosky
ANSWERED ‘‘PRESENT’’—2
Dixon
Wilson
NOT VOTING—36
Abercrombie
Ackerman
Barton
Blagojevich
Calvert
Campbell
Carson
Clayton
Coburn
Cook
Danner
Dickey
Dicks
Ehrlich
Ford
Gillmor
Granger
Gutierrez
Hutchinson
Kilpatrick
Klink
Markey
Martinez
McCollum
b
McIntosh
McNulty
Rush
Serrano
Sessions
Smith (WA)
Spratt
Thompson (MS)
Vento
Waxman
Wise
Young (FL)
1926
Mr. STARK changed his vote from
‘‘yea’’ to ‘‘nay.’’
Messrs. GORDON, OWENS and RAHALL changed their vote from ‘‘nay’’
to ‘‘yea.’’
Mr. DIXON changed his vote from
‘‘nay’’ to ‘‘present.’’
So (two-thirds having voted in favor
thereof) the rules were suspended and
the resolution was agreed to.
The result of the vote was announced
as above recorded.
A motion to reconsider was laid on
the table.
E:\CR\FM\K17JY7.070
pfrm02
PsN: H17PT1
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER
PRO TEMPORE
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr.
SHIMKUS). Pursuant to clause 8 of rule
XX, the Chair announces that he will
reduce to a minimum of 5 minutes the
period of time within which a vote by
electronic device may be taken on each
additional motion to suspend the rules
on which the Chair has postponed further proceedings.
f
CONGRATULATING THE REPUBLIC
OF LATVIA ON 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF REESTABLISHMENT OF
INDEPENDENCE
FROM
THE
FORMER SOVIET UNION
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
pending business is the question of suspending the rules and agreeing to the
concurrent resolution, H. Con. Res. 319.
The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
question is on the motion offered by
the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr.
BEREUTER) that the House suspend the
rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. Res. 319, on which the
yeas and nays are ordered.
This will be a 5-minute vote.
The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were—yeas 398, nays 0,
not voting 36, as follows:
[Roll No. 402]
YEAS—398
Aderholt
Allen
Andrews
Archer
Armey
Baca
Bachus
Baird
Baker
Baldacci
Baldwin
Ballenger
Barcia
Barr
Barrett (NE)
Barrett (WI)
Bartlett
Bass
Bateman
Becerra
Bentsen
Bereuter
Berkley
Berman
Berry
Biggert
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Bishop
Bliley
Blumenauer
Blunt
Boehlert
Boehner
Bonilla
Bonior
Bono
Borski
Boswell
Boucher
Boyd
Brady (PA)
Brady (TX)
Brown (FL)
Brown (OH)
Bryant
Burr
Burton
Buyer
Callahan
Camp
Canady
Cannon
Capps
Capuano
Cardin
Castle
Chabot
Chambliss
Chenoweth-Hage
Clay
Clayton
Clement
Clyburn
Coble
Collins
Combest
Condit
Conyers
Cooksey
Costello
Cox
Coyne
Cramer
Crane
Crowley
Cubin
Cummings
Cunningham
Davis (FL)
Davis (IL)
Davis (VA)
Deal
DeFazio
DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
DeLay
DeMint
Deutsch
Diaz-Balart
Dickey
Dingell
Dixon
Doggett
Dooley
Doolittle
Doyle
Dreier
Duncan
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
Dunn
Edwards
Emerson
Engel
English
Eshoo
Etheridge
Evans
Everett
Ewing
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Fletcher
Foley
Forbes
Fossella
Fowler
Frank (MA)
Franks (NJ)
Frelinghuysen
Frost
Gallegly
Ganske
Gejdenson
Gekas
Gephardt
Gibbons
Gilchrest
Gilman
Gonzalez
Goode
Goodlatte
Gordon
Goss
Graham
Green (TX)
Green (WI)
Greenwood
Gutknecht
Hall (OH)
Hall (TX)
Hansen
Hastings (FL)
Hastings (WA)
Hayes
Hayworth
Hefley
Herger
Hill (IN)
04:39 Jul 18, 2000
Hill (MT)
Hilleary
Hilliard
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hobson
Hoeffel
Hoekstra
Holden
Holt
Hooley
Horn
Hostettler
Houghton
Hoyer
Hulshof
Hunter
Hyde
Inslee
Isakson
Istook
Jackson (IL)
Jackson-Lee
(TX)
Jefferson
Jenkins
John
Johnson (CT)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnson, Sam
Jones (NC)
Jones (OH)
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kasich
Kelly
Kennedy
Kildee
Kind (WI)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kleczka
Knollenberg
Kolbe
Kucinich
Kuykendall
LaFalce
LaHood
Lampson
Lantos
Largent
Larson
Latham
LaTourette
Lazio
Leach
Lee
Levin
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (GA)
Lewis (KY)
Linder
Lipinski
LoBiondo
Lofgren
Lowey
Lucas (KY)
Lucas (OK)
Luther
Maloney (CT)
Maloney (NY)
Manzullo
Mascara
Matsui
McCarthy (MO)
McCarthy (NY)
McCrery
McDermott
McGovern
McHugh
McInnis
McIntyre
McKeon
McKinney
Meehan
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Menendez
Metcalf
Mica
MillenderMcDonald
Miller (FL)
Miller, Gary
Miller, George
Minge
Mink
Moakley
Mollohan
Moore
Moran (KS)
Moran (VA)
Morella
Murtha
Myrick
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Nethercutt
Ney
Northup
Norwood
Nussle
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Ose
Owens
Oxley
Packard
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor
Paul
Payne
Pease
Pelosi
Peterson (MN)
Peterson (PA)
Petri
Phelps
Pickering
Pickett
Pitts
Pombo
Pomeroy
Portman
Price (NC)
Pryce (OH)
Quinn
Radanovich
Rahall
Ramstad
Rangel
Regula
Reyes
Reynolds
Riley
Rivers
Rodriguez
Roemer
Rogan
Rogers
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Rothman
Roukema
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Ryan (WI)
Ryun (KS)
Sabo
Salmon
Sanchez
Sanders
Sandlin
Sanford
Sawyer
Saxton
Scarborough
Schaffer
Schakowsky
Scott
Sensenbrenner
Shadegg
Shaw
Shays
Sherman
Sherwood
Shimkus
Shows
Shuster
Simpson
Sisisky
Skeen
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (MI)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Snyder
Souder
Spence
Stabenow
Stark
Stearns
Stenholm
Strickland
Stump
Stupak
Sununu
Sweeney
Talent
Tancredo
Tanner
Tauscher
Tauzin
Taylor (MS)
Taylor (NC)
Terry
Thomas
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Thornberry
Thune
Thurman
Tiahrt
Tierney
Toomey
Towns
Traficant
Turner
Udall (CO)
Udall (NM)
Upton
Velazquez
Visclosky
Vitter
Walden
Walsh
Wamp
Waters
Watkins
Watt (NC)
Watts (OK)
Weiner
Weldon (FL)
Weldon (PA)
Weller
Wexler
Weygand
Whitfield
Wicker
Wilson
Wolf
Woolsey
Wu
Wynn
Young (AK)
NOT VOTING—36
Abercrombie
Ackerman
Barton
Blagojevich
Calvert
Campbell
Carson
Coburn
Cook
Danner
Dicks
Ehlers
Jkt 079060
PO 00000
Ehrlich
Ford
Gillmor
Goodling
Granger
Gutierrez
Hutchinson
Kilpatrick
Klink
Markey
Martinez
McCollum
Frm 00033
Fmt 4634
McIntosh
McNulty
Porter
Rush
Serrano
Sessions
Smith (WA)
Spratt
Vento
Waxman
Wise
Young (FL)
Sfmt 0634
H6087
b
1934
So (two-thirds having voted in favor
thereof) the rules were suspended and
the concurrent resolution was agreed
to.
The result of the vote was announced
as above recorded.
A motion to reconsider was laid on
the table.
Stated for:
Mr. EHLERS. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No.
402, had I been present, I would have voted
‘‘yea.’’
f
CONDEMNING 1994 ATTACK ON THE
AMIA JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER IN BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr.
SHIMKUS). The pending business is the
question of suspending the rules and
agreeing to the resolution, House Resolution 531, as amended.
The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
question is on the motion offered by
the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms.
ROS-LEHTINEN) that the House suspend
the rules and agree to the resolution,
H. Res. 531, as amended, on which the
yeas and nays are ordered.
This will be a 5-minute vote.
The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were—yeas 402, nays 1,
not voting 31, as follows:
[Roll No. 403]
YEAS—402
Aderholt
Allen
Andrews
Archer
Armey
Baca
Bachus
Baird
Baker
Baldacci
Baldwin
Ballenger
Barcia
Barr
Barrett (NE)
Barrett (WI)
Bartlett
Bass
Bateman
Becerra
Bentsen
Bereuter
Berkley
Berman
Berry
Biggert
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Bishop
Bliley
Blumenauer
Blunt
Boehlert
Boehner
Bonilla
Bonior
Bono
Borski
Boswell
Boucher
Boyd
Brady (PA)
Brady (TX)
Brown (FL)
Brown (OH)
Bryant
Burr
Burton
E:\CR\FM\K17JY7.072
Buyer
Callahan
Camp
Canady
Cannon
Capps
Capuano
Cardin
Castle
Chabot
Chambliss
Chenoweth-Hage
Clay
Clayton
Clement
Clyburn
Coble
Collins
Combest
Condit
Conyers
Cooksey
Costello
Cox
Coyne
Cramer
Crane
Crowley
Cubin
Cummings
Cunningham
Danner
Davis (FL)
Davis (IL)
Davis (VA)
Deal
DeFazio
DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
DeLay
DeMint
Deutsch
Diaz-Balart
Dickey
Dingell
Dixon
Doggett
pfrm02
Dooley
Doolittle
Doyle
Dreier
Duncan
Dunn
Edwards
Ehlers
Emerson
Engel
English
Eshoo
Etheridge
Evans
Everett
Ewing
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Fletcher
Foley
Forbes
Fossella
Fowler
Frank (MA)
Franks (NJ)
Frelinghuysen
Frost
Gallegly
Ganske
Gejdenson
Gekas
Gephardt
Gibbons
Gilchrest
Gillmor
Gilman
Gonzalez
Goode
Goodlatte
Goodling
Gordon
Goss
Graham
Green (TX)
Green (WI)
Greenwood
Gutknecht
PsN: H17PT1
H6088
Hall (OH)
Hall (TX)
Hansen
Hastings (FL)
Hastings (WA)
Hayes
Hayworth
Hefley
Herger
Hill (IN)
Hill (MT)
Hilleary
Hilliard
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hobson
Hoeffel
Hoekstra
Holden
Holt
Hooley
Horn
Hostettler
Houghton
Hoyer
Hulshof
Hunter
Hyde
Inslee
Isakson
Istook
Jackson (IL)
Jackson-Lee
(TX)
Jefferson
Jenkins
John
Johnson (CT)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnson, Sam
Jones (NC)
Jones (OH)
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kasich
Kelly
Kennedy
Kildee
Kind (WI)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kleczka
Knollenberg
Kolbe
Kucinich
Kuykendall
LaFalce
LaHood
Lampson
Lantos
Largent
Larson
Latham
LaTourette
Lazio
Leach
Lee
Levin
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (GA)
Lewis (KY)
Linder
Lipinski
LoBiondo
Lofgren
Lowey
Lucas (KY)
Lucas (OK)
Luther
Maloney (CT)
Maloney (NY)
Manzullo
Mascara
Matsui
McCarthy (MO)
McCarthy (NY)
McCrery
Sanchez
Sanders
Sandlin
Sanford
Sawyer
Saxton
Scarborough
Schaffer
Schakowsky
Scott
Sensenbrenner
Shadegg
Shaw
Shays
Sherman
Sherwood
Shimkus
Shows
Shuster
Simpson
Sisisky
Skeen
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (MI)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Snyder
Souder
Spence
Stabenow
Stark
Stearns
Stenholm
Strickland
Stump
Stupak
Sununu
Sweeney
Talent
Tancredo
Tanner
Tauscher
Tauzin
Taylor (MS)
Taylor (NC)
Terry
Thomas
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Thornberry
Thune
Thurman
Tiahrt
Tierney
Toomey
Towns
Traficant
Turner
Udall (CO)
Udall (NM)
Upton
´
Velazquez
Visclosky
Vitter
Walden
Walsh
Wamp
Waters
Watkins
Watt (NC)
Watts (OK)
Weiner
Weldon (FL)
Weldon (PA)
Weller
Wexler
Weygand
Whitfield
Wicker
Wilson
Wolf
Woolsey
Wu
Wynn
Young (AK)
NAYS—1
Paul
NOT VOTING—31
Abercrombie
Ackerman
Barton
Blagojevich
Calvert
Campbell
Carson
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
McDermott
McGovern
McHugh
McInnis
McIntyre
McKeon
McKinney
Meehan
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Menendez
Metcalf
Mica
MillenderMcDonald
Miller (FL)
Miller, Gary
Miller, George
Minge
Mink
Moakley
Mollohan
Moore
Moran (KS)
Moran (VA)
Morella
Murtha
Myrick
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Nethercutt
Ney
Northup
Norwood
Nussle
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Ose
Owens
Oxley
Packard
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor
Payne
Pease
Pelosi
Peterson (MN)
Peterson (PA)
Petri
Phelps
Pickering
Pickett
Pitts
Pombo
Pomeroy
Porter
Portman
Price (NC)
Pryce (OH)
Quinn
Radanovich
Rahall
Ramstad
Rangel
Regula
Reyes
Reynolds
Riley
Rivers
Rodriguez
Roemer
Rogan
Rogers
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Rothman
Roukema
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Ryan (WI)
Ryun (KS)
Sabo
Salmon
Coburn
Cook
Dicks
Ehrlich
Ford
Granger
Gutierrez
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
Hutchinson
Kilpatrick
Klink
Markey
Martinez
McCollum
McIntosh
04:39 Jul 18, 2000
McNulty
Rush
Serrano
Sessions
Smith (WA)
Spratt
Vento
Waxman
Wise
Young (FL)
b
1941
So (two-thirds having voted in favor
thereof) the rules were suspended and
the resolution, as amended, was agreed
to.
The result of the vote was announced
as above recorded.
A motion to reconsider was laid on
the table.
f
INTERNET GAMBLING
PROHIBITION ACT OF 2000
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
pending business is the question of suspending the rules and passing the bill,
H.R. 3125, as amended.
The Clerk read the title of the bill.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The
question is on the motion offered by
the gentleman from Virginia (Mr.
GOODLATTE) that the House suspend
the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 3125, as
amended.
The question was taken.
Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, on that
I demand the yeas and nays.
The yeas and nays were ordered.
The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were—yeas 245, nays
159, not voting 30, as follows:
[Roll No. 404]
YEAS—245
Aderholt
Allen
Armey
Bachus
Baker
Baldacci
Ballenger
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Barrett (NE)
Bartlett
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Bliley
Boehlert
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Boswell
Boucher
Brady (TX)
Brown (FL)
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Burton
Buyer
Callahan
Canady
Castle
Chambliss
Coble
Collins
Combest
Condit
Cooksey
Costello
Cramer
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Danner
Davis (FL)
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Gordon
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Graham
Green (WI)
Gutknecht
Hall (OH)
Hall (TX)
Hansen
Hastings (FL)
Hastings (WA)
Hayes
Hefley
Herger
Hill (IN)
Hill (MT)
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Johnson (CT)
Jones (NC)
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King (NY)
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Leach
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (KY)
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Lucas (KY)
Lucas (OK)
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Maloney (NY)
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McCarthy (MO)
McCarthy (NY)
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McHugh
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Meek (FL)
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Pomeroy
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Price (NC)
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Quinn
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Ryan (WI)
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Shaw
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Davis (VA)
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English
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Green (TX)
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Inslee
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Kildee
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Kolbe
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Lantos
Larson
Lee
Levin
Lewis (GA)
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Lowey
Mascara
Matsui
McDermott
McGovern
McKinney
Meehan
Meeks (NY)
MillenderMcDonald
Mink
Moakley
Moore
Murtha
Napolitano
Neal
Sweeney
Talent
Tancredo
Tanner
Tauzin
Taylor (MS)
Taylor (NC)
Terry
Thomas
Thornberry
Thune
Thurman
Tiahrt
Traficant
Turner
Visclosky
Vitter
Walden
Walsh
Wamp
Waters
Watkins
Watts (OK)
Weldon (FL)
Weller
Wexler
Whitfield
Wicker
Wilson
Wolf
Young (AK)
NAYS—159
Ney
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Owens
Pastor
Paul
Payne
Pelosi
Petri
Pombo
Portman
Rangel
Reyes
Rivers
Rodriguez
Rohrabacher
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Sanchez
Sanders
Sanford
Sawyer
Scarborough
Schaffer
Schakowsky
Scott
Sherman
Simpson
Skeen
Slaughter
Smith (MI)
Snyder
Stark
Stupak
Tauscher
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Tierney
Toomey
Towns
Udall (CO)
Udall (NM)
Upton
Velazquez
Watt (NC)
Weiner
Weldon (PA)
Weygand
Woolsey
Wu
Wynn
NOT VOTING—30
Abercrombie
Ackerman
Barton
Blagojevich
Calvert
Campbell
Carson
Coburn
Cook
Dicks
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Smith (WA)
Vento
Waxman
Wise
Young (FL)
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Mr. KINGSTON changed his vote
from ‘‘aye’’ to ‘‘no.’’
So (two-thirds not having voted in
favor thereof), the motion was rejected.
The result of the vote was announced
as above recorded.
f
PERSONAL EXPLANATION
Ms. KILPATRICK. Mr. Speaker, due to official business in my district, I was unable to
record my vote on the following bills: H. Res.
534 (rollcall No. 401); H. Con. Res. 319 (rollcall No. 402); H. Res. 531 (rollcall No. 403);
and H.R. 3125 (rollcall No. 404). Had I been
present I would have voted ‘‘aye’’ on rollcall
No. 401; ‘‘aye’’ on rollcall No. 402; ‘‘aye’’ on
rollcall No. 403; and ‘‘no’’ on rollcall No. 404.
f
PERMISSION
TO
FILE
CONFERENCE REPORT ON H.R. 4576,
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001
Mr. LEWIS of California. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the
managers on the part of the House may
have until midnight tonight, July 17,
2000, to file a conference report on the
bill (H.R. 4576) making appropriations
for the Department of Defense for the
fiscal year ending September 30, 2001,
and for other purposes.
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr.
SHIMKUS). Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from California?
There was no objection.
f
SPECIAL ORDERS
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under
the Speaker’s announced policy of January 6, 1999, and under a previous order
of the House, the following Members
will be recognized for 5 minutes each.
f
ON THE NEED FOR MORE BORDER
PATROL AGENTS ON AMERICA’S
NORTHERN BORDER
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under a
previous order of the House, the gentleman
from
Washington
(Mr.
METCALF) is recognized for 5 minutes.
Mr. METCALF. Mr. Speaker, I do not
have to remind this House about the
fine work of our border patrol officers.
They put their lives at risk every day
to slow the flow of illegal drugs into
this country and to keep our border
safe from dangerous aliens. Their work
in helping to arrest a suspected terrorist near Port Angeles, Washington,
last December was exemplary.
Due to the current inept management of the INS, however, the jobs of
these officers are made much, much
more difficult. Over the past two fiscal
years, Congress has appropriated funds
for the INS to hire 2,000 new Border Patrol Agents. The agency has failed to
hire anywhere near that number, and
the vast majority of the new agents
they have hired have been assigned to
the southern border.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
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There is no reason why northern border staffing should not be greatly increased. Since 1996, I have sent numerous communications to President Clinton, Attorney General Reno, and INS
Commissioner Doris Meissner demanding a permanent end to the transfers of
Northwestern Border Patrol Agents
and urging higher staffing levels on the
northern border.
Instead, Commissioner Meissner has
recently ordered another reassignment
of agents from the northern to the
southern border. In addition, she has
ordered every Border Patrol plane
moved from the State of Washington.
In a month’s time, every plane along
the entire northern border will be
moved south.
A few days ago, in protest to these
moves, the entire delegation from the
State of Washington wrote to Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Doris Meissner protesting
her recent decision to transfer Washington State Border Patrol Agents and
equipment to the Mexican border.
Ms. Meissner’s latest raid on the
northern border is unconscionable, especially because a July 8 story in the
Seattle Times reports that ‘‘When
Meissner made this decision, she possessed a confidential February report
by the Department of Justice’s Office
of the Inspector General which determined that ‘The 311 Border Patrol
Agents along the northern border cannot adequately patrol the approximately 4,000 mile border with Canada.’ ’’
The February report also notes that
between 1993 and 1998, agents along the
northern border were nine times more
likely to encounter someone smuggling
drugs and 14 times more likely to encounter someone smuggling weapons
than agents along the southwest border.
Despite this overwhelming discrepancy, more than 95 percent of INS’s
Border Patrol Agents are on the southern border. In addition, INS Commissioner Meissner’s decision to move personnel was made knowing that last
year’s arrest of suspected terrorist
Ahmed Ressam highlighted additional
reasons to maintain maximum coverage on the northern border.
I have also previously asked Commissioner Meissner to hire additional
northern border agents, for which Congress has already appropriated the
money. She has not only not hired additional agents, she has again relocated
some of the few agents we have.
b
2000
In addition, she removed all of the
patrol planes from the Washington border. Most outrageous of all, it turns
out she has made these relocations
while refusing to release the contents
of a Department of Justice report that
specifically highlights the severe personnel shortages on the U.S.-Canadian
border.
Relocating agents and equipment
while hiding details of the dangerous
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understaffing problem at the northern
border is a dereliction of duty. It is
risky. It is wrong. It is irresponsible. If
Commissioner Meissner cannot do an
adequate job on our northern border,
then we must get someone in the position who can.
f
UNITED NATIONS SECURITY
COUNCIL ADDRESSES HIV/AIDS
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr.
SHIMKUS). Under a previous order of the
House, the gentlewoman from Texas
(Ms. JACKSON-LEE) is recognized for 5
minutes.
Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr.
Speaker, today I had the honor of joining the Ambassador of the United
States to the United Nations, along
with the gentlewoman from California
(Ms. LEE) and the gentlewoman from
New York (Mrs. MALONEY), in New
York.
We were invited to witness a historic
debate at the U.N. Security Council on
an issue of peacekeeping and security
addressing the question of HIV/AIDS.
For the first time, the world voice, the
United Nations, took a unanimous
stand to fight HIV/AIDS in the peacekeeping forces around the world.
Although we applaud their bravery,
we realize that the military personnel
that travel from one developing nation
to another without the proper education and training are in harm’s way,
not only in terms of war, but in terms
of the devastation of disease. Based
upon our work, we are delighted that
this kind of effort was made on behalf
of the United Nations.
Mr. Speaker, I yield to the distinguished gentlewoman from California
(Ms. LEE) who has been the moving
force on fighting AIDS in this Congress.
Ms. LEE. Mr. Speaker, let me thank
the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms.
JACKSON-LEE) for her leadership and
also for her efforts in helping the orphans and the children of Africa who
are suffering now as a result of their
parents dying of AIDS. I thank the
gentlewoman for her leadership.
We participated in a mission last
year. During that time in Southern Africa, we realized that we had to come
back and do something. We looked in
the eyes of babies, and there was no
way that we could let these children
live like this without us at least trying
to do something for them.
This morning, I had the honor and
the privilege to participate with the
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. JACKSON-LEE) and the gentlewoman from
New York (Mrs. MALONEY) in actually
witnessing the United Nation’s Security Council’s historic discussion and
vote regarding the importance of HIV
and AIDS education and prevention as
it relates to peacekeeping forces.
We all know that an ounce of prevention is really worth a pound of cure. We
should be proud of the fact that our
own
ambassador,
Ambassador
Holbrooke, has and continues to take
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
the lead in raising the moral concerns,
the humanitarian concerns, and, yes,
the security concerns of the AIDS pandemic. He has done remarkable work in
little time to educate the world community; and that is, definitely, he has
put forth and set forth a course to actually break the silence in the world
with regard to this pandemic.
We were waging war on this. I am
proud of the Congress in terms of our
bipartisan efforts to wage war on this
deadly disease. I think today the resolution that was passed by the Security
Council really takes us one step forward in waging the battle that we must
wage on this.
Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr.
Speaker, might I say that the leadership of the gentlewoman from California (Ms. LEE) in the United States
Congress, along with the amendment
on debt relief offered by the gentlewoman from California (Ms. WATERS)
and the gentlewoman from California
(Ms. PELOSI) last week brought us to
where we needed to be by adding $42
million back into the Foreign Operations appropriations.
I think it is important for the American people to understand that as the
world is endangered by the devastation
of the elimination of large populations
by HIV/AIDS, we need to recognize
here in America that we are fully impacted.
I know for many it seems as if we are
looking distant, far away, but AIDS
can be compared to the times historically of the bubonic plague when large
numbers of Europeans were devastated
and eliminated with this disease.
This disease is killing one in five in
South Africa. Forty million children
will be orphaned. I am very proud that
the Ambassador to the United Nations
joined in the causes with, first, the
Vice President speaking before the
United Nations, then our respective
Senators, the gentlewoman from California (Ms. LEE), who has just returned
from Durban, South Africa, to say that
we really are in a war.
As we fight for peace, peace is intertwined in fighting against this devastating disease. I would hope that we
will continue this effort. I thank the
gentlewoman from California (Ms. LEE)
for her leadership, and, of course, I applaud the United Nations for its effort.
f
REPORT ON RESOLUTION PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF
A MOTION TO GO TO CONFERENCE ON H.R. 4810, MARRIAGE TAX PENALTY ELIMINATION RECONCILIATION ACT OF
2000
Ms. PRYCE of Ohio, from the Committee on Rules, submitted a privileged report (Rept. No. 106–752) on the
resolution (H. Res. 553) providing for
consideration of a motion to go to conference on any Senate amendments to
the bill (H.R. 4810) to provide for reconciliation pursuant to section 103(a)(1)
of the concurrent resolution on the
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
06:06 Jul 18, 2000
budget for fiscal year 2001, which was
referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.
f
TAKE BACK CONTROL OF URANIUM ENRICHING FACILITIES BEFORE AMERICA BECOMES DEPENDENT ON FOREIGN SOURCES
FOR ENERGY
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under a
previous order of the House, the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. STRICKLAND) is
recognized for 5 minutes.
Mr. STRICKLAND. Mr. Speaker, I
represent a district in Southern Ohio
that is a part of the Appalachian area.
I am very proud of my constituents.
Many of my constituents throughout
the long years of the Cold War worked
at a facility in southern Ohio which enriches uranium. During the early days
of the Cold War, that facility enriched
uranium which went into our nuclear
weapons. In more recent years, that facility has produced enriched uranium
necessary to create the fuel that produces the nuclear power generated in
this country, the electricity through
nuclear power.
Two years ago, this administration
and this Congress privatized that industry; and just a few weeks ago, this
new privatized corporation announced
that it was closing the facility in my
district, thereby terminating the employment of some nearly 2,000 men and
women. These are individuals who have
served our country well. Many of them
have been exposed to dangerous chemicals and to radiation. They have developed cancers. Many have lost their
lives.
Later on this week, Mr. Speaker, I
am introducing legislation which will
set in motion a process whereby this
government can once again assume
ownership of this industry. Why would
I do this, and why is it important to
the economic and energy security of
our Nation? It is because some 23 percent of the electricity generated in this
country is generated through nuclear
power. Only two facilities in this country enrich the uranium which is necessary to produce the fuel for these nuclear power plants.
The direction of this privatized corporation troubles me. I am very concerned that their ultimate goal is not
to be producers of enriched uranium,
but simply to become brokers of enriched uranium. It is my concern that
their ultimate goal is, not only to close
my facility, but also to close the facility in Paducah, Kentucky.
If that were to happen, Mr. Speaker,
this Nation would become totally dependent on foreign sources for at least
20 percent of all of the electricity that
is generated in this country. We cannot
let that happen. As a body, as a group
of elected Representatives of the people, we must not allow ourselves to become dependent on foreign sources for
a huge portion of all of the electricity
generated within this country.
I am calling tonight upon my colleagues to join me in the introduction
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of this legislation. It is essential and
necessary. We made a mistake when we
privatized this vital industry. We made
a mistake when we turned it over to
the private sector who are not necessarily loyal to this country or to the
objectives of this government. They
are not necessarily loyal to the energy
security need of this Nation. Their primary objective is to their investors and
their stockholders.
I am deeply troubled, Mr. Speaker,
that the individual that oversaw the
privatization process, the individual
who was the CEO of the public corporation before it became private, was dealing with a major, major conflict of interest. As a government employee, he
was making approximately $350,000 a
year. Once this became a privatized
corporation, his salary skyrocketed to
$2.48 million a year. Not only that, but
he convinced the board of directors to
give him a golden parachute of $3.6 million. If he is fired or he loses his job, he
can walk away with $3.6 million.
The workers in my district, many of
them who have served this country as
Cold War warriors who have exposed
themselves to dangerous conditions,
are being terminated of their jobs,
many with only weeks to go before
they qualify for retirement. It is simply wrong. It is wrong for my constituents. It is wrong for this Nation.
I urge my colleagues to join me in
the efforts to once again take over the
ownership of this vital industry and
protect our country from being so totally dependent on foreign sources for
energy.
f
UNITED NATIONS SECURITY COUNCIL SEES HIV/AIDS AS GLOBAL
CRISIS, NOT JUST A HEALTH
PROBLEM
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under a
previous order of the House, the gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. MALONEY)
is recognized for 5 minutes.
Mrs. MALONEY of New York. Mr.
Speaker, I am really here to join two
previous speakers, the gentlewoman
from Texas (Ms. JACKSON-LEE) and the
gentlewoman from California (Ms.
LEE), who were with me today at the
United Nations Security Council in
New York where the United Nation’s
Security Council for the first time in
history voted for a united effort and attack on the AIDS crisis in the world
and saw it as a security problem, not
just a health challenge before us. It
recognized a that HIV/AIDS is more
than a health problem but actually a
global crisis. It set a very important
target to work towards the reduction
of AIDS by 25 percent by the year 2010
in the age group of 15 to 24.
It was a very significant and groundbreaking action, but it is by no means
an end. It is a beginning of many more
steps that we have to take.
Earlier in January, I was there when
Vice President GORE announced his
support for this effort, and I applaud
the leadership, not only of the Vice
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
President,
but
of
Ambassador
Holbrooke who have worked with the
Security Council to bring it to the vote
today on this important resolution.
It will look at AIDS as a long-term
and domestic policy. It will set up a
tracking system around the world. It
will focus on training and education
around the world, but also on the
peacekeepers, testing voluntarily the
peacekeepers, and making them aware
of the crisis and the harm that it can
be to their own health and to many
others.
I might add that this body has also
acted to combat the AIDS crisis. The
Department of Defense legislation contained $10 million to really work, in a
joint effort, with military organizations around the world to educate and
combat AIDS. Just last week, in the
Foreign Operations bill, there was a
vote of $244 million for USAID to combat AIDS.
I also applaud the hard work of the
gentlewoman from California (Ms. LEE)
on her ‘‘Marshal Plan’’ against AIDS,
which was reported out of the Committee on Banking and Financial Services with strong bipartisan support
with $100 million authorization for 1
year and $500 million over 5 years. That
legislation is currently before the Senate. We hope it will likewise receive
strong bipartisan support.
I wanted to join my colleagues in
really applauding the first-ever action
by the Security Council in recognizing
AIDS as a health problem, a security
problem in our new world of interdependence and globalization, in a very
positive step that they took today in
passing out this resolution which I will
place in the RECORD as follows:
DRAFT SECURITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION ON
HIV/AIDS
The Security Council,
Recalling its meeting of 10 January 2000
chaired by the Vice President of the United
States, at which it was briefed the President
of the World Bank, the Administrator of the
United Nations Development Program, and
the Executive Director of the Joint United
Nations Programme on the connection between the spread of HIV/AIDS and peace and
security in Africa,
Deeply concerned by the extent of the HIV/
AIDS pandemic worldwide and by the severity of the crisis in Africa in particular,
Bearing in mind that it has the primary responsibility under the Charter of the United
Nations for international peace and security,
Recalling in this context, the Statement of
its President on the role of the Security
Council in the prevention of armed conflicts
(S/PRST/1999/34),
Reaffirming the importance of a coordinated international response to the economic, health, social, cultural and humanitarian problems which are often the root
causes of armed conflict,
Recognizing that the adverse effects of the
spread of HIV/AIDS on all sectors of society,
including individuals, families, workers, political leadership, and the military, have
weakened the capacity of affected countries
to maintain domestic and regional peace and
security,
Further Recognizing that the spread and
impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic is greatly
exacerbated by poverty and lack of development,
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04:39 Jul 18, 2000
Further Recognizing that the HIV/AIDS
pandemic not only poses a threat to stability
and security, but is also exacerbated by conditions of violence and instability,
Recognizing that HIV/AIDS poses a truly
global risk to all continents and peoples both
civilian and military,
Expressing Concern at the damaging impact of HIV/AIDS on international peacekeeping operations.
Welcoming the March report of the UN
Special Committee on Peacekeeping which
affirmed the need to incorporate HIV/AIDS
prevention training in aspects of the
UNDPKO training for peacekeepers,
Welcoming the Report of the SecretaryGeneral for the Millennium Assembly of the
United Nations, and in particular, those sections where he notes that the spread of HIV/
AIDS is a truly global crisis, that unless action is taken HIV/AIDS will be even more
damaging in the future, and his call for coordinated and intensified international action to reduce the rate of new HIV infections
by 25% by the year 2010,
Commending the efforts by UNAIDS to coordinate and intensify the work of the
world’s states and the UN organizations
against the HIV/AIDS pandemic,
Commending the efforts of the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations to address this issue, including providing HIV/AIDS prevention awareness information to peacekeepers through its trainthe-trainers courses and materials:
1. Requests the Secretary-General ensure
the provision of mission-specific training of
all peacekeepers on issues related to the prevention of the spread of HIV/AIDS, and ensure the further development of pre-deployment and on-going training of all peacekeepers on issues related to the prevention
of the spread of HIV/AIDS,
2. Urges all states to acknowledge the
problem of HIV/AIDS directly, including in
uniformed national military forces, and develop, in consultation with the international
community and UNAIDS, effective civilians
and military personnel on the prevention of
the spread of HIV/AIDS,
3. Urges all member states to institute voluntary and confidential counseling and testing for HIV/AIDS for civilians and members
of uniformed national military forces, especially for troops to be deployed to international peacekeeping missions, because of
the proven effects of testing to reduce highrisk behaviors,
4. Further urges countries to increase
international cooperation among national
military organizations to assist with the creation and execution of HIV/AIDS prevention,
testing and treatment policies within the
militaries,
5. Requests the Secretary General ensure
that UNAIDS cooperate with member states,
including those states that contribute peacekeeping troops, to establish voluntary consultations and a database to track these
countries’ HIV/AIDS prevention education,
testing, deployment, counseling and treatment policies,
6. Calls upon the leadership of all UN organizations to address the HIV/AIDS pandemic
in the context of their organization’s respective mandates and to adjust their organization’s activities accordingly to ensure they
are assisting wherever possible in the global
efforts against the HIV/AIDS pandemic
Decides to remain seized of the matter and
to continue to seek information and guidance on this issue from all appropriate
sources.
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2015
CONGRATULATIONS TO REVEREND
VASHTI M. MCKENZIE OF BALTIMORE
The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr.
PITTS). Under a previous order of the
House, the gentleman from Maryland
(Mr. CUMMINGS) is recognized for 5 minutes.
Mr. CUMMINGS. Mr. Speaker, tonight I rise to salute and pay tribute to
a friend, Bishop Vashti McKenzie, who
was just elevated to be a bishop in the
African Methodist Episcopal Church in
Cincinnati just a few days ago. She is
the first woman to achieve this high
goal, and she is certainly very deserving.
Bishop Vashti McKenzie, whose
church is within one block of my house
in the 7th Congressional District of
Maryland, for many, many years has
labored in the vineyards of lifting up
people, pastoring the Payne Memorial
A.M.E. Church and being a wonderful,
wonderful pastor, a wonderful wife, and
one who has constantly been about the
business of empowering not only her
church members but her community.
Bishop McKenzie is a member of the
Delta Sigma Theta sorority, and she
has been a very active member and she
has constantly done things within the
7th Congressional District to address
the question of how to empower people.
She recently spent a tremendous
amount of time working with the
banks in Baltimore trying to make
sure that they were not redlining. She
spent a tremendous amount of effort
pulling together banks and making
sure that their lending practices were
consistent throughout the entire Baltimore metropolitan area.
But more important than that, even
when she was not even considering running for the position of bishop, she constantly worked in the vineyards. I have
often said that when one is unknown,
unseen,
unappreciated
and
unapplauded, it is what they do in
those moments that really count. So I
take a moment not only to salute
Bishop Vashti McKenzie, but I also
take a moment to salute the African
Methodist Episcopal Church. There are
so many churches that do not even
want women to be pastors, and here is
a church that not only have many pastors throughout these United States
but has decided to elevate one of its
daughters to be a bishop.
It is with great honor that I recognize
and
thank
Bishop
Vashti
McKenzie for all of her work; and, Mr.
Speaker, it is my pleasure to congratulate her for her accomplishments.
f
TAXES AND THEIR IMPACT
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under
the Speaker’s announced policy of January 6, 1999, the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. MCINNIS) is recognized for 60
minutes as the designee of the majority leader.
Mr. McINNIS. Mr. Speaker, I have
just come back from the district, and I
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spent my entire weekend traveling
throughout the district. Interestingly,
the subject that came up time and time
again were the death taxes. So this
evening I am going to talk a little
about taxes. I think it is a good forum
for us to discuss really four basic taxes,
and so I am going to address those with
my colleagues here this evening.
The first, of course, is the death tax.
I will go into some detail about what
that exactly encompasses and why it is
so punitive on the citizens of this country; why it is an unjust tax; why there
is no justification for the death tax in
our tax system; what it does to open
space and to the preservation of open
space in districts such as mine, the
Third Congressional District of the
State of Colorado.
Then I will move on and talk about
the capital gains tax reduction that
the Republicans put into place and
what capital gains means as far as creation of capital and why it is critical
for the economic well-being of our
country.
From there, I will move on to talk a
little about the marriage penalty. To
the best of my knowledge, only in the
United States of America, only in the
United States of America do we tax
couples because they are married. This,
by the way, is the leading country in
the world which advocates family. We
advocate marriage. We want people to
get together and tie that bond, the
very basic entity of the family foundation which has made this country
great. But Uncle Sam comes along, not
to be left out of the game, and puts a
tax on it. We will talk a little about
that.
Finally, I also want to talk about our
homes. Every homeowner, every one of
our constituents, colleagues, who are
homeowners out there in this fine
country of ours, we need to talk about
what happens when they sell that home
for a profit; what used to happen and
what now happens as a result of the Republican leadership. And, frankly, that
was a bipartisan vote, but it is a Republican bill; and we will discuss what
it did to those homeowners and how it
helps homeowners in this country.
It has some bearing for every one of
my colleagues in this Chamber because
the majority of our constituents own
homes. And in these good economic
times, a lot of our constituents have
the opportunity to sell their homes; or
if they sell their home, they will sell it
for a profit.
But first of all let us begin with the
tax that I think is without justification, a tax which was initiated as a
vendetta, as a way to get even with the
wealthy families, the families who met
success in America: the Fords, the Carnegies, the Vanderbilts, the Rockefellers.
Back then the feeling was, how dare
those people make that much money;
we have to figure out a way, without
working for it, to take the wealth from
them and transfer it to us, the Government, in Washington, D.C. What better
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approach than to put a tax on them on
the day they die. The day that person
dies, Uncle Sam will be at the door,
right behind the mortician, except that
Uncle Sam gets to collect before the
mortician, by the way, on the death
tax.
So we will talk a little about what
this death tax means; how it impacts
things in the environment, like open
space in Colorado; how it devastates
families who were brought up and who
lived the American Dream; how everyone’s dream, those my age, is to leave
something for the generation behind
them, and how that dream has been
dashed; what the impact is for the generation ahead of me that wanted to
leave something for this generation to
get kind of a head start, how it has
been demolished in many cases; and
what the impact is of death tax transferring, spinning money right out of
the community to be transferred, without work, without value, simply transferred from our local community to the
bureaucracy in Washington, D.C. under
the death tax.
One of the best articles I have read is
out of a newspaper which I read on a
regular basis, the Wall Street Journal.
Excellent editorials, by the way, colleagues. I would urge all my colleagues
to read those. It was interesting to me
that the TV talk host, Oprah Winfrey,
is quoted as saying, ‘‘I think it is irritating that once I die 55 percent of my
money goes to the government of the
United States.’’
Why is that irritating? Because that
individual may have already paid nearly 50 percent. What Oprah is referring
to is that the money being taxed upon
that person’s death, if that estate
qualifies, is property upon which that
individual may have already paid taxes
on. It is not money that was put away
in some little chuckhole somewhere
and not had taxes paid on it. It is
money, in many cases, that has been
taxed not only once, but twice and
sometimes three times.
Let me go on with her quote: ‘‘When
you leave a house or money to people,
then they’re taxed at 55 percent. So
you’ve got to leave them enough so
once they’re taxed they still have some
money.’’
When we talk about taxes in a country, we have to look around the world.
It is, after all, America that is the
symbol of free enterprise. It is the
dream in America that a person can
start out and if they can figure out a
better mousetrap, a better way of
doing things, a product that will benefit the people, give value to the people, then that person is rewarded the
fruits of their labor. That is the American concept.
Look at other countries. Look at
some of the countries that have the
reputations for high taxes in this
world. Look at Switzerland. Not only
Switzerland, but look at Germany, or
look at Belgium. Even their death
taxes are lower than the United States.
Only one country that I can find in re-
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search, as cited by the Wall Street
Journal article, Japan, has a higher
rate than the United States.
Now, as my colleagues know, the administration, the President and the
Vice President, as a team, are prepared
to veto the elimination of the death
tax. The U.S. House, by a bipartisan
vote, meaning Democrats and Republicans, supported the Republican bill to
eliminate the death tax. The Senators,
both Democrats and Republicans,
adopted the Senate bill, the Republican
Senate bill, to eliminate the death tax.
Yet this bipartisan effort will be vetoed
in the next few days by the President
and Vice President team.
A lot of us hoped, however, that they
would just leave it alone. When we
started this year, we were surprised
when we got the President and Vice
President’s budget, which not only of
course does not call for elimination of
the death tax, it increases the death
tax, and increases it by $9.5 billion.
Today we are sending them a bill that
will finally allow equity in regards to
this, to eliminate it; but the President
and the Vice President see fit to veto
it.
Now, some of my colleagues or their
constituents out there may say, well,
that does not impact me, the death tax
is only for the wealthy. Interesting statistic I saw the other day. The American Association of General Contractors pointed out that a contractor,
somebody who wants to go out and dig
some dirt, who purchases the three
basic tools necessary to move dirt, a
bulldozer, a dump truck and a frontend loader, that contractor in America
that buys a front-end loader, a bulldozer and a dump truck, their estate is
now in the status that it will be faced
with the death tax upon their death.
Look, colleagues, this does not just
apply to the wealthiest of Americans,
this applies to a lot of Americans; and
it applies to Americans who do not necessarily have high cash flow. This contractor who has a bulldozer, a dump
truck, and a backhoe may have no cash
flow, or their business is just breaking
even, and upon the death of this contractor, the Federal Government comes
in and they will crush that business because the only way that estate can pay
that estate tax is to sell the bulldozer
or sell the dump truck or sell the frontend loader. Now, how, as a contractor,
when the business needs those three
basic pieces of equipment, how can the
business be operated with just two of
the three? It cannot.
The same thing applies to ranchers
and farmers, in particular, in rural
America. My State, for example: Colorado, the district I represent, the Third
Congressional District of Colorado,
geographically larger than the State of
Florida, essentially all the mountains
of Colorado. Do my colleagues understand what is happening to our ranching community out there because of
this death tax?
I wish the President’s policy wonks
and the Vice President’s policy wonks
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would come out to Colorado and see
what they are doing to open space.
They are forcing it to go into 35-acre
ranchettes because the family, who is
part of a ranching operation, does not
have heavy cash flow. In some cases,
not even positive cash flow. When the
head of the family passes away and the
estate is activated for the death tax,
what choice do they have? It is like the
contractor who has to sell one of the
three or maybe two of the three pieces
of equipment.
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It demolishes it. The contractor’s
business is gone. And that is what is
happening to ranches in Colorado. Yet
our President and Vice President decided that it was appropriate not only
to have a death tax imposed upon all of
us but to increase the death tax this
year in their budget by $9.5 billion.
Let us go on with this article. I think
it is very interesting. ‘‘Then there are
casualties,’’ speaking about the death
tax, again from the Wall Street Journal, July 29, 1999, ‘‘then there are casualties in small business, particularly
family businesses. Hardest hit are owners of asset-rich enterprises and areas
like farming or timber that, while
growing, may not throw off much cash.
In theory, again, the law provides a
break for these families. However, the
reality is that prohibitive estate taxes
force the heirs to dismantle their legacy to pay the taxes on it.’’
That is what is happening to Colorado ranches. That is what is happening to ranches all around this country. Let me tell you, the very wealthiest people in this country are the ones
that can afford the legions of attorneys
and accountants to figure out how to
preserve that, but the middle class in
America who does not have the money
to acquire the attorneys and the CPAs
for the protection of that estate are
suffering.
Why should they suffer? It is one
thing, we all have a tax burden. The
citizens of this country acknowledge
and know that we have to pay our fair
share in taxes and the people who acquire these estates under the umbrella
of the American dream they know they
have to pay taxes and they pay them as
they acquire their property. But then
at the end, for the United States Government to step in through the door of
death and say now that you have died
it has become a taxable event, we all
know what are taxable events. If you
buy something at the store, you pay, it
is a taxable event. If you buy a car, it
is taxed, it is a taxable event. You get
a license plate, it is a taxable event.
But the U.S. Government and the
President and Vice President think
that the policy should be that when
you die, it is an event so remarkable
that it should be taxed, so remarkable
that it should be taxed, regardless of
the impacts of what that tax does.
I have heard and I have read some
editorials lately, not many, most of the
editorials I read support doing away
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with the death tax, but I read a couple
that say, hey, what are you talking
about? All you are doing is hitting the
rich people. How wrong those people
are.
Interestingly, one of those articles I
saw in the Wall Street Journal, and it
was not an editorial but it was a guest
comment; and I thought to myself, I
wonder if the author of that article had
ever been outside of the boundaries of
the Potomac River to the farmlands
and to the ranchlands and to the small
businesses in America and asked those
people what is it going to be like when
mom or dad dies and you have got to
pay estate taxes? What kind of impact
does it have on your community?
Let us talk about that for a minute.
What happens to the community?
Some people as they write in these editorials think that the only impact is
upon the family with whom the death
occurred. My gosh, they need to open
their eyes, my colleagues, because it
goes much further than just the family
that has the death.
I will give my colleagues an example.
In my district, I had a friend of mine
who lived the American dream, who
went out with soil in his hand and
worked it and worked hard; and he was
rewarded through life. He figured out a
better mousetrap. He figured out how
to build a better road. He knew how to
work harder. He knew how to count his
pennies. And, as a result, he got the
fruits of his labor.
Do you know what he did with the
fruits of his labor, the money that he
made? He made some money. Do you
know what he did with it? He invested
it in the community. He underwrote 75
percent of the local Episcopal church
budget, 75 percent of it, every year.
You could go to my buddy Joe and he
would write the check. The United
Way, the Cancer Society, the Lung Society, M.S., high school yearbook, you
name it, Joe helped provide in that
community. And it was money that
Joe made but he kept in the community and it circulated.
Joe also gave people jobs. He hired
people to work in his construction
company. He hired people to help him
on his land. And those people then took
their money home to their families in
that community. That money was important to that community.
And what happened when Joe died?
Guess who comes in from Washington,
D.C., as if they reserved a private jet
just to fly into this small community
in Colorado to go and smile over the
deceased because it is a taxable event.
They came into that community and
they hit his estate, when you combine
it with capital gains at a rate in excess
of 80 percent, 80 cents on every dollar,
and by the way, every dollar that had
already been taxed at the time it was
accumulated, any interest or investment or return since then was taxed, 80
percent on every dollar.
Do you know what happened to the 57
percent of the local Episcopal church
budget that was underwritten? Gone
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overnight. Do you know what happened
to your major contributions, to your
charities and the community, the
United Way, the Cancer Society, Lung
Society? Gone overnight. Do you know
what happened to jobs in that community that were there as a result of the
investments that he made in that community? Gone overnight.
And yet our President and our Vice
President are willing to stand down
there and veto the elimination of this
unjustified death tax. It is not fair.
I have a wonderful little niece. She is
2 years old. She has a way of crossing
her arms and looking you in the eye
and she says, ‘‘it’s not fair.’’ That is exactly what is happening here.
How can you justify in any regard
other than the fact that you want to be
vindictive against people who have
been successful in our society, how can
you justify a taxable event upon their
death? How can you look at the surviving members of their family or how
can we look at the young people, look
at the 20-some-year-olds in this country who are out there working 60 and 70
hours a week, who have the energy
that we all my age remember well, the
opportunity to be something, the opportunity to make it your own way,
you want it your way, make it your
way, the American free enterprise system, only to know that your goal, and
it was a goal I have had ever since my
wife and I had our first child, it was a
mutual goal, and that is we dedicated
ourselves a certain portion of the hardearned money that we made, and we
are not wealthy, but the hard-earned
money we made we dedicated a portion
of that because we wanted the next
generation to maybe have a home or
maybe our son and daughter who wants
to be a contractor and go out and buy
those three basic pieces of equipment,
a backhoe, a dump truck and a bulldozer.
Whoever dreamed when we were
young and those were the days, whoever dreamed when those were the days
that it would be the United States Government that, upon your death, would
call it a taxable event and come in and
take away the dreams that you and
your spouse have had for a long time,
take away the prosperity that a community enjoys?
Where does that money go? It spends
right out of your community, right out
of your family, right out of your estate. It spends East where and it comes
to Washington, D.C., to be redistributed by the Government.
Is it fair? Of course it is not fair.
Let me go on. I am particularly addressing right now ethnic minority
groups. It is worth noting that a good
share of those people who are vulnerable are owned by two groups whom
high tax leftists claim to protect,
women and minorities.
A survey of black-owned businesses
by Kenneshaw State College in Georgia
found six in ten firms by women and
minorities, six in ten firms reported
that the estate tax makes the survival
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of their business after the current generation significantly more difficult or
impossible. Close to a third of those
people said their heirs would have to
sell their businesses just to pay the
taxes.
Let me read a few letters that I have
gotten in my office that are right on
point when we talk about the impact
that happens by this Government upon
its own people. Colleagues, it is happening to our constituents simply because they die and simply because they
have lived the American dream and
they have had success.
Now, look, if you want to be vindictive, if you are against people being
successful, then I guess you are satisfied with this death tax. And apparently that is perhaps the policy of the
White House, because they are going to
veto a bipartisan bill, Democrat and
Republican. Although it is a Republican bill, the Democrats voted for it,
some of them; and in the Senate Republican bill, some Democrats voted
for it. The President still chooses to
veto it.
This gentleman is named Mr. Roberts. ‘‘My family has ranched in northern Colorado for 125 years. My sons are
the sixth generation to work this land.
We want to continue, but the Internal
Revenue Service is forcing almost all
ranchers and many farmers out of business. The problem is the death tax. The
demand for our land is very high, and
35-acre ranchettes are selling in this
area for as high as $4,500 per acre. We
have many thousands of acres. We
want to keep it as open space, but the
United States Government is making it
impossible because we will have to pay
55 percent of the valuation of that
acreage upon my parents’ death.
‘‘Ranchers are barrel scrapping by
these days, anyway. But since we want
to save the ranch, we are in trouble.
The family has been able to scrape up
the death taxes as each generation dies
up to now. This time I think we’re done
for. Our only other option is to give the
ranch to a nonprofit organization. And
they all want it.
‘‘My dad is 90. We don’t have much
time left. We are one of only two or
three ranchers left around this area.
Most ranches have been subdivided.
One of the last to go was a family that
had been there as long as ours. When
the old folks died, the kids borrowed
money to pay the taxes. Soon they had
to start selling cattle to pay the interest. When they ran out of cattle, their
ranch was foreclosed on and is now
being developed. The family now lives
in a trailer near town, and the father
works as a highway flagman.
‘‘If you want to stop sprawl, you better ask the U.S. Government to get off
the backs of family farms and
ranches.’’
The next letter, Ron Edwards:
‘‘Dear Representative McInnis,
I’m writing to bring to your attention an issue of utmost importance to
me and my family, employees, and the
businesses: elimination of the death
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tax. I urge you to support and pass the
death tax repeal legislation this year.
Family-owned businesses need relief
from those death taxes now. We are
celebrating 66 years in business.’’
Now, that is the American dream.
That is the American dream, Mr.
Speaker, 66 years in business. Six generations in this letter, six generations
on the same ranch. Do my colleagues
want to be a part of the team that
ruins those six generations? Do they
want to be a part of the team that
comes in here after 66 years of business? Let me continue.
‘‘My grandfather, Vic Edwards, started with a fruit and vegetable farm in
1933 at our location in Colorado. The
business grew into a grocery store and
then a lawn and garden center. My father, Vic Edwards, is 80 years old, and
he is in poor health. No business can
remain competitive in a tax regime
that imposes rates as high as 55 percent upon the death of the owner. Our
tax law should encourage rather than
discourage the perpetuation of these
businesses.’’
Let me repeat that. Our tax laws, Mr.
Speaker, should encourage the continuity of these businesses, not discourage the continuity. This guy works
in his family grocery store and that is
what he is telling us, Mr. Speaker. He
is saying we should encourage the continuity of these businesses, encourage
them to go on, not destroy it.
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If you support that death tax, you
are going to destroy a lot of these family businesses. Leonard Harris, firstgeneration owner of a food center in
Chicago, Illinois. His store is one of
less than 20 African-American-owned
supermarket companies in the United
States. Mr. Harris has said, my focus
has been putting my earnings back
into grow the business. For this reason,
cash resources to pay the Federal
death taxes based on the valuation, the
way valuation is made, would force my
family to sell the store in order to pay
the IRS within 9 months of my death.
Our yearly earnings would not cover
the payment of this tax. I should know.
I started my career as a certified public
accountant. So here is an African
American, first generation in business,
taking the cash flow, the profits out of
that business, putting it back into the
business to create more business, to
create capital, to create jobs, to create
an economic solid block in a community. Now he is saying, ‘‘Look, it isn’t
going to go beyond one generation if
this government continues to put the
death tax on us.’’
Rich Newman, Sr. Our company was
founded in 1917 by Rich Newman’s father and uncle and currently operates
33 grocery stores in Illinois, Missouri,
Kansas and Iowa and provides jobs for
3,000 people. 3,000 people. When Rich’s
father passed away suddenly in 1969,
the family was faced with a death tax
of several hundred thousand dollars
which by law was due within several
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months. The Newman family had to
use all of the resources from the sale of
the company’s wholesale operations to
pay the death tax bill. These proceeds
could have been put to a better use by
being reinvested in retail stores and
new jobs. The sale of the wholesale side
of the business provided the funds to
pay the estate taxes. Now Mr. Newman,
to preserve what is left of the business,
has estimated over the years he has
spent in excess of $600,000 just on accountants and CPAs to help him figure
out how to pass that business on to the
next generation without the death tax.
Brookhart Building Centers in Grand
Junction and Montrose, Colorado.
Those are two thriving communities in
my district out in Colorado. Last September the Brookhart Building Centers
had to be sold in order to avoid paying
the death tax. The owner said that it
was the hardest decision the family
had made in 52 years of business. And
it was a decision that was not brought
on by their failure because maybe they
did not work hard enough. The decision
to sell was not brought on because they
did not have a good product to sell. It
was not brought on because they could
not service the community. It was not
brought on by dissatisfaction of consumers. It was brought on by the Federal bureaucracy in Washington, D.C.
which decided that they are going to
tax this family upon the death and
they are going to break that business
apart. Watt said the current death
taxes forced his father to make the sale
prior to his father’s death in order to
protect our family. Can you believe
that? We have a constituent, colleagues, talking about in order to protect our family from the government,
in order to protect our family from a
death tax, from a taxable event which
was put in in the early 1900s just as a
vindictive tool to get at the Rockefellers and the Carnegies, in order to
protect our family and our employees.
Remember what I said about the community impact? To protect our employees, too, and our community from
a forced liquidation upon the death of
the father and the wife, Betty, the best
thing now would be to sell the company. And it was sold.
Let me conclude with one other article and then we will move on to some
other taxes. But listen to this. I do not
like reading from scripts. But this is an
important one. I hope you have the patience to listen to this. I think it is
very moving. I think it shows you exactly how punishing, how punitive the
death tax is and how unfair and how
unjustified they are and how the President and the Vice President of this
country with their policy can not only
veto the bill, bipartisan bill to get rid
of it, the President and the Vice President have actually proposed raising the
death tax by 9.5 billion in their budget
they proposed. This came out of the
Aspen Times.
There are lots of tales to be told
about the conversion of former ranches
into luxury homes or golf courses
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throughout the valley. Sometimes it
was a simple financial decision, a
choice to take advantage of soaring development values in the face of plummeting cattle prices, but for other families the passing of a parent meant the
passing of a way of life. Listen to that
sentence, colleagues. But for other
families, the simple death of a parent
meant the death of a way of life. The
death of a parent meant the death of a
way of life for the whole family. We
have been around a long time, said
Dwight. The family roots are dug deep
along Capital Creek Road in Old Snow
Mass and for nearly a century, heritage
and hard work were enough to sustain
those who lived on our 13-acre stretch
of land. But it all changed. Until
Dwight’s father’s death, each generation, each generation in that 100 years,
presided over a working cattle ranch
which was both the lifeblood and the
livelihood of the clan, the Monron clan.
His later years were lean times for
Dwight’s father but the fate of this
ranch was not at risk until the government came around to collect its due on
the death of Dwight. The tax bill came
to $750,000. And what it took to pay the
bill was this. We had to sell half the
ranch, the ability of the Monron cattle
to migrate in the winter months in 10
years, until we were able to pay our
final last installment. What those
taxes took was also something very
vital, the ability of the next generation
to support their family by working the
land that had been theirs for such a
long, long time.
So the government came in and not
only took the money but they took
away the future ability of this family
to continue ranching operations. It is
just like the contractor. If you come in
and you have the three pieces of equipment, the bulldozer, the dump truck
and the backhoe and you take one of
those pieces of equipment away, you
can no longer function as a construction operation. What those taxes have
done to our family is exactly that. Now
one of our heirs works full time as a
mechanic, the son, works full time as a
mechanic for the school district and
then works on the ranch when he gets
home at night. He doesn’t mind the
long hours he has to put in. What does
get under his skin is the memory of
how IRS agents overseeing his father’s
taxes either didn’t recognize the devastation that was about to occur or
didn’t care. It was just pay us or we’ll
seize everything. If anything’s left
over, you can keep it, or if you can’t
make ends meet on what’s left, you can
hit the streets. He has no intention of
selling the remaining 640 acres but he
wonders if his daughters will be willing
to go through what he has gone
through just to keep the ranch intact.
With only half of the land to graze and
falling beef prices, the ranch itself is
only making enough to cover its operating costs and annual property taxes.
It is the day job at the school district
that pays the doctor bills, the car insurance, the grocery bills and every-
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thing else. There has always been hope
that things will change before his
daughters have to make decisions. But
he wonders if people really think about
the permanent changes that take place
when the ranch is sold. It’s not just a
loss to the family, it is a loss to the
community. It is a loss to the people
who work on that ranch. There are
some movements in the right direction
but are they moving quickly enough?
Because once our land is sold to developers, it is gone forever. It will never
again have the integrity of a ranch.
That is what your estate, those death
taxes are doing. Some of you out there,
colleagues, who are supporters of the
death tax and claim to be guardians of
the environment, well, you are not
doing it in rural America because in
rural America you are costing us, you
are forcing us to develop those communities. By now you should have drawn
the conclusion, I hope, that the death
tax is fundamentally flawed. There is
no basis for it. There is no justification
for it. The only reason really it came
about were two reasons: One, vindictively to settle a score with the
wealthy people. It was jealousy in my
opinion that drove it. And, two, the
government as usual looks for an easy
way to take money without earning it
and transfer it to somebody else who
did not work for it. Remember that
every time you give a dollar to somebody that is not working, you are taking it from somebody who is. Every
debit has a credit, every credit has a
debit. That is exactly what we are
doing with this death tax. We ought to,
every one of us to the person in these
chambers, ought to stand up to the
President and the Vice President of
this country and say, sign the bill to
eliminate the death tax, Mr. President
and Mr. Vice President. Quit standing
by and letting our small businesses,
our family ranches and our family
farms be destroyed. Quit standing by,
Mr. President and Mr. Vice President,
with this policy and letting our communities, our minority communities
who are now finally getting the opportunity, the fair opportunities that
should have been given to them a long
time ago only to find out now that the
very government which espouses its
push for affirmative action and equality and so on and on forth is the very
one who steps in on the day of death
and says, come here, we want the
money, we want the money to transfer.
Let us move on to another tax I want
to visit with you about. This one you
will feel good about. It is a big break if
you own a home. There are a lot of
young people out here today. Our country now has homeowners that I think
probably are the youngest age in the
history of our country, or certainly in
recent years. I mean people in their
20’s, early 20’s are able to buy a home,
and economically it is probably the
largest investment most of those families will make during their lifetime.
Let me show you what happened in the
past if you sold that home for a profit.
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We will just take a couple of examples
here. Let us say as an individual you
have bought a home for $100,000 and
over time you sold the home, let us say
10 years later you sold the home for
$350,000. So your profit, and this applies
to every homeowner in the country,
your profit if you own a home was
$250,000 and you were taxed on $250,000,
although you could defer the tax by
rolling it over into a home of greater
or higher value or if you were over, I
think, 62, you got a once-in-a-lifetime
exemption I think of $125,000. We felt
that this was punitive. Let me say to
you, I am not up here to get in a partisan battle. But the Democrats, frankly, you could have gotten rid of that
death tax a long time ago, and you
could have done something when you
held control for 40 something years on
these home taxes. But I am proud to
say you joined us, you joined the Republicans in doing away with this tax.
In my opinion, this tax break on the
profit of your home when you sold it is
probably the biggest tax break that
you have seen in our tax structure, I
would guess in the last 15 years.
How so? We changed the law completely. It is the Republicans’ position
that, sure we need to have taxes, we do
not disagree with taxes. But we believe
we are under a fiduciary duty to take
the taxes that are necessary to give
you the functions that you demand.
But beyond that, we think you should
have the tax back. The money in your
pocket works a lot more effectively
than the money back here. Take, for
example, if you won the lottery and
you won $2 million, do you think for
one minute, any one of my colleagues
out here, that you would take that $2
million and send it to the government
in Washington, D.C. to invest? Of
course you would not. Or even to distribute. Of course you would not. If you
wanted to give it to the poor people,
would you send your money to Washington to be distributed to the poor
people? Of course not. Because of the
inefficiencies. This is one of the inefficiencies we saw in the government. So
what we did is we put in a tax bill. Let
us take the same example. The individual, again, buys the house for
$100,000, again sells the home for
$350,000, realizing a profit of $250,000.
Under our bill, which became law, it is
the law today, this is not a hope, it is
not a dream we are hoping for, it is
here. The Republican tax break passed.
Your taxes today, zero. The amount
you were taxed on before, $250,000.
What we have said today, and everyone
out there who owns a home, listen up,
colleagues. Any of you that own a
home now under our tax law as a result
of that Republican bill, and I am proud
of it, I am proud as a Republican to say
we did this, now as a result of that, you
get to take the first $250,000 of net profit, not gross profit, of net profit from
the sale of your home per person. So,
remember, most homes are owned by
individuals.
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In those cases, it is $500,000, the
$250,000 per person doubled, $500,000, we
get to take the first $500,000 of our net
profit. I said net income, I meant net
profit, I stand corrected, of your net
profit; and we get to put it into your
pocket taxfree. That is great.
Mr. Speaker, that is a tremendous
tax benefit that many, many people in
this country do not realize; but, colleagues, every time we go back to our
districts, we should tell homeowners,
which are most of the people that we
represent, we should tell them what an
opportunity now exists out there for
them. They are not going to be penalized when they sell their home at a
profit up to $500,000.
The benefit of what we did in this bill
is it is renewable every 2 years. If we
have a colleague outside of maybe Vail
or Aspen, Colorado, where we have
really escalating profits, or the Hamptons, most people are not going to
make that kind of money every 2
years, there is maybe an exception here
and there; but the reality of it is, this
is a blue collar working family, middle
income, lower income tax break of significant portions. I am very proud of
that.
Mr. Speaker, keep that in mind, any
of my colleagues, any of our constituents that we hear, they are saying we
are selling our home or we are getting
ready to move or we may have some
constituents that say to us, we are getting ready to buy a new house; and in
a lot of those cases, they are also selling their old house.
We ought to take just a moment and
explain to our constituents what a
great tax benefit they have ahead of
them. In fact, they do not have to roll
it over. It goes straight to their pocket. By the way, unless our constituent
takes that money and digs a hole and
puts it in the ground, that is the only
exception, unless that happens, the
money then will regurgitate in the
community; they will take their
money; they will put it in the bank.
The bank will loan it out or they will
take their money and build a bigger
and better house, so we will have contractors and workers going. That
money circulates.
The beauty of this tax break, the big
beauty of this tax break is it keeps the
money in your community; that is one
of my issues with the death taxes. The
death tax, taxing death as an event
takes the money from your local community and moves it east to Washington, D.C. This took money from
your local community and moved it
from your community east to Washington, D.C.
This law that we have passed and if
the President and Vice President will
sign the repeal of the death tax, it will
keep money in your community. It will
be money that will be used for our
local charities, not for the national
ones. It will be money that will keep
local people employed. It is money in
your community. It spends in your
community. It is worth it.
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MARRIAGE PENALTY
Let me talk for a moment about
something else, the marriage penalty.
Can we believe it? I mean, can we really believe it that in the United States
a country that prides itself upon encouragement of family, that talks
about the great foundation, accurately
talks about the great foundation of our
country is family, and yet this government always is looking for a taxable
event, always trying to figure out how
to put another tax on us. They figured
out well, we take them on death. Guess
what else, there is another ceremony.
Mr. Speaker, I think they look at
ceremonies. There is a ceremony called
a wedding. Let us go ahead and put a
tax on a marriage. That certainly is a
good way to espouse family relations;
that certainly is a good way to encourage people to be married and living as
a family unit. Our government actually
penalizes people for being married.
They tax them for being married.
We have had a long time to change
that. It has not changed. Again, I stand
proud as a Republican. One of our priorities was to eliminate not just the
death tax, not just give a break on the
sale of your home, which is now a law,
but also to go out to those people that
are being taxed as a result of being
married and say this is a mistake in
policy.
We are not above ourselves to admit
that Washington sometime back made
a mistake. Washington should have
never taxed the marriages. Washington
should not have a death tax. The House
tax was excessive. Let us get rid of the
marriage tax. I was surprised that we
would have opposition to that.
I was also surprised that we had no
votes on the repeal for the death tax.
Frankly, I was shocked that the President not only did not oppose eliminating the death tax, but also proposed
a $9 billion increase. We actually had
people on this floor back to the marriage tax who opposed it who said we
ought to be penalized.
Mr. Speaker, remember, here we are,
we are penalized at death, and now
when we get married on that great day.
We have a bill working its way
through. We have a bill which will take
the eraser to the death tax, that will be
in front of the President in the next 3
or 4 days. He has promised to veto it,
unfortunately. I hope we all remember
the President’s and the Vice President’s policy is to support the death
tax.
We also have another bill making its
way down to the White House, and that
is to eliminate the marriage penalty.
We want to get rid of the marriage penalty. Now, the President also has promised to veto on that; although, in the
last few weeks the President and Vice
President said let us make a deal, kind
of like the movie show, ‘‘Let Us Make
a Deal,’’ we go ahead and support a
brand new massive spending program
for prescription care in this country. It
is a massive obligation of taxpayer dollars, billions and billions and billions
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of dollars, and we will be fair and
eliminate the marriage tax penalty. No
deal; no bargain.
The marriage penalty is a tax that is
not justified. It should not be there.
The same way with the death tax; no
deal. It is not right. It is not fair. It is
not justified. Stand up, Washington,
D.C., and have enough gumption to say
these things are not good tax policy. It
does not work out in theory, and it
does not work out in reality.
I would urge the President and the
Vice President to change their policy. I
would urge the Vice President and the
President to repeal, to get rid of the
death tax, join Republicans, by the
way, Democrats, join Republicans and
Democrats in the House of Representatives and then in the United States
Senate to get rid of the death tax. Join
Republicans on the Republican bill,
Democrats in both the House and Senate to get rid of the marriage penalty.
I say to the President and the Vice
President that the President down
there has an opportunity to change it;
do not play let us make a deal. On its
face, standing alone the marriage penalty is fundamentally flawed, and obviously the death tax is unfair.
CAPITAL GAINS TAXATION
Let me, with my remaining time,
speak about another issue, and that is
called capital gains taxation. Now, capital gains taxation really used to be a
description that we applied to the
wealthy people who had lots of investments. Those were the ones that made
the so-called capital gains.
Guess what has happened? The small,
little things happened in the last few
years with the economic boom; a lot of
people in America are now facing capital gains. There are mutual funds.
There are retirement funds, the sale of
their land or the sale of investments.
Investments in this country are not restricted to the upper class or to the
wealthy. And more than ever in the
history of our country, the middle
class and even the lower-income class
are now making investments, monetary investments.
Mr. Speaker, we felt that in order to
encourage this, that is what creates
capital, not taxation, taxation does not
create capital. Taxation is simply a
transfer from your pocket to the Government’s pocket. What creates capital
is us out there plowing a field or making a product or delivering a service,
but we felt the encouragement out
there was being disassembled by a punitive tax called the capital gains tax.
That tax was at 28 percent.
Mr. Speaker, 28 cents on every dollar,
28 cents out of every dollar that we
made on the sale of an investment
went east to Washington, D.C.; that is
right where it went. We felt that tax
was too punitive. We felt the tax
should be eliminated.
If we eliminate the tax, what happens
to the 28 cents? The 28 cents, it does
not go to Washington, D.C. No, it stays
in your community. It stays at home
where it is going to be invested, where
it is going to create jobs.
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We had to have negotiations on this.
The President would not agree with us,
the President and the Vice President.
They would not go with our bill of no
capital gains, and we had to have their
signature or enough votes to override
the veto which we did not have. So we
made a compromise. We at least have
gotten this far. We dropped the 28 cents
to 20 cents.
Mr. Speaker, that does not sound like
a lot, but wait until we sell our investment and the tax, the IRS comes
knocking on your door, all of a sudden
8 cents on the dollar savings, it adds
up. It makes a difference.
Now, our goal is not to be satisfied
with the 20-cent capital gains, because
capital gains, the taxation itself simply is not a creation of wealth, it is a
transfer of wealth. Again, it moves the
money from our community to Washington, D.C.
Our idea, and we will not stop until
we get to this point, our idea is eliminate the capital gains taxation, so
when we make money on our investment we send zero dollars to D.C.; we
keep all of the money, all of it, 100 percent of it in our community to invest
in new projects.
I will give my colleagues an idea.
There is a farming family in New Castle, Colorado, a good, good, family. I
was out visiting them not long ago, actually, about 3 or 4 years ago. I remember to this day what the father said. He
said, You see those fields, Scott. He
said they are not being worked, they
are being wasted. He said, by all rights,
there should be a young couple, a couple that has just gotten married, 23, 24
years old, a kid or two, and they want
to work the land. There should be a
young couple working on that land up
there.
He said, But because of the capital
gains taxation and the government, because of the taxing policy of the government, I cannot afford to sell it. So
as a result, that land sits empty, and
that young couple will never have the
opportunity that my wife and I had
many years ago when the ranching
generation or farming generation
ahead of us allowed us to go up and
work the field, allowed us to have our
turn with our hand in the soil. It
makes a difference.
Let me wrap up this evening with the
time that I have remaining telling my
colleagues why I talked about taxes. I
am so focused on what is good at the
local level, at the community level.
Our Federal Government is important,
and we have to finance the Federal
Government to operate. But we have
seen over the years a vast expansion of
what the Federal Government is expected to do in our lives.
We have seen a dramatic dilution of
individual responsibility; and more
than that, we have seen a focus shifting government from the local level to
the Federal level and a lot of that follows tax dollars. I think that the best
government is the government at the
communitywide level, at the State
level.
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Obviously, we need to have that Federal Government; but our real focus of
power in this country should be at the
local level, not the Federal level. In
order to do that, we need to come up
with policy that encourages money to
stay in the community, that encourages money that stays in the community to create capital, not take the
capital from the community in a transfer transaction and send it to Washington, D.C. for redistribution, because
the dollar that goes out of our community, one, is a transfer, it is not a creation. The dollar that goes out of our
community will never come back to
our community as a dollar; some of it
is necessary.
We need a national defense. We need
a national commerce system. We need
a national highway system. We need a
commitment to education. We need a
commitment to certain health care
with closely defined parameters; but
we also need to recognize that taxes, if
they are unfair, are punitive or if they
are in the excess, then we ought to
have enough courage to stand up to the
American people.
By the way, it is not an act of courage. It is a fiduciary responsibility of
all of us in these Chambers to stand up
and say, hey, we collected too many
tax dollars. We are overcharging our
constituents.
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2115
It is a fiduciary duty of us to stand
up and say, is it right, colleagues, for
us to tax people because they are married? It is a fiduciary responsibility on
our part to stand up and say, is it really a taxable event because somebody
dies and they leave property that has
been taxed and taxed already? Is that a
taxable event?
It is a fiduciary responsibility of ours
to stand up and say, gosh, does the 28
percent capital gains rate really make
sense? Does it really encourage American free enterprise? Does it encourage
those young people, those couples just
starting out, individuals starting out
in their early twenties, does it really
encourage them to be prosperous?
Remember, when our people in this
country are prosperous, our country as
a whole is prosperous. If our local communities are prosperous, then our
States are prosperous. When our States
are prosperous, the Federal government is. It makes sense to keep those
dollars in the community.
In conclusion, Mr. Speaker, I urge all
Members tomorrow to pick up a phone
and call the President and the Vice
President and say to them, Mr. President and Mr. Vice President, they need
to listen to the American people. Let
us get rid of this death tax. Death
should not be a taxable event. Hang up
the phone, pick it back up and call
them back, Mr. President and Mr. Vice
President, it is not fair to tax people in
this country for being married. Regardless of the ramifications to the dollars
coming in, it is fundamentally not fair
to tax on death and it is fundamentally
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not fair to tax on marriage. It is a big
difference. We have an obligation to be
fair to the people we represent.
I hope all Members take me up on
that challenge and make every attempt
they can to persuade the President and
the Vice President to change their policies and not veto our bipartisan effort
to eliminate the marriage penalty, and
to not veto our bipartisan effort to get
rid of the death tax.
f
THE NEED OF SENIOR CITIZENS
TO HAVE A MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT
The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under
the Speaker’s announced policy of January 6, 1999, the gentleman from New
Jersey (Mr. PALLONE) is recognized for
60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader.
Mr. PALLONE. Mr. Speaker, I would
like to call the attention of the House
this evening, as I have many times, to
the need for senior citizens to have a
Medicare prescription drug benefit.
I do not really think it is necessary
tonight to go into the reasons why this
is necessary. We all know that the
price of prescription drugs continues to
rise, that seniors as a particular group
have tremendous out-of-pocket expenses, and that many of them do not
have access not only not under Medicare but in general to any kind of prescription drug insurance.
Many times seniors have to make
choices between whether they are
going to pay their bills, the rent, buy
food, as opposed to having access and
being able to buy prescription drugs
that are really important for them to
survive, for them to be able to live a
decent life and to not have to worry
about whether they are going to be
here the next day. The President,
President Clinton, has made it quite
clear that this is a major priority if
not the number one priority for him.
I listened to the previous speaker,
the gentleman from Colorado, talk
about the marriage penalty, the estate
tax repeal. I would remind my colleagues and the American people that
the Republicans are in the majority. It
is very difficult for us as Democrats to
get a proposal up and considered unless
the Republicans who are in the majority allow that, allow us to bring it to
the floor.
The President and myself and most
of the Democrats have not been happy
with the marriage penalty repeal and
the estate tax repeal that the Republican leadership has proposed, not because we do not want to see changes
with regard to tax on married couples,
not because we do not want to see
changes in the estate tax, because we
have proposed changes, but the President has said and the Democratic leadership has said that the bills that the
Republicans have proposed essentially
spend too much and spend too much on
a small percentage of the people impacted by the estate tax who are very
wealthy, whereas the Democratic proposal protects the small business
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owner, the ranchers, the people, the
overwhelming majority that are paying
the estate tax. The same is true for the
marriage penalty.
But the President is making an effort
to try to get something accomplished
around here, because I think most people know that not a great deal is being
accomplished in this Congress. The Republicans, my colleague, the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. MCINNIS)
brings up his proposal for the marriage
penalty, his proposal for the estate tax.
It differs from the Democratic proposal, so we do not come to agreement.
Nothing gets accomplished.
What the President has said is, Look,
I will take some form of estate tax repeal, I will take some sort of adjustment in the marriage penalty that benefits the average person, but along
with that we want the Republican leadership to agree to provide a Medicare
prescription drug plan, the one that
the President and the one that the
Democrats have proposed.
I ask my colleagues, not only my
friend, the gentleman from Colorado
(Mr. MCINNIS), but my colleagues in
general, what better way to try to accomplish something, what better way
than to take some of the Republican
proposals and take some of the Democratic proposals, particularly this one
on prescription drugs, and try to accomplish that goal?
In fact, last week when we voted on
the Republican marriage penalty legislation the Democrats proposed a motion to recommit that would do just
that, that would even take the Republican plan, as long as the Medicare prescription drug proposal was added to it.
And, of course, the Republicans rejected that and nothing was accomplished.
If we are going to accomplish anything, we have to work out things together. The most important thing for
the Democrats, certainly one of the
most important things for the Democrats, is that we get a Medicare prescription drug plan passed so our seniors have access and everyone is covered; just like they are covered now by
Medicare for hospitalization, for their
doctors’ bills, that they get a prescription drug benefit. It is absolutely crucial that that happen, and certainly we
can afford it if we all get together and
figure out how to deal with this budget.
I wanted to point out that, unfortunately, when the Republicans a few
weeks ago proposed a prescription drug
program and had a vote on the House
floor with regard to their prescription
drug program, which is not part of
Medicare, that they would not allow
the Democratic proposal to be considered. Once again, we were shut out.
Once again, the Democrats were told
no, they do not even want to consider
our proposal on the House floor.
What are they afraid of? I think their
problem is that they are afraid that if
we look at the Democratic plan, which
seeks to include prescription drugs
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within Medicare, that ultimately there
would be overwhelming support for it
with the American people and probably
even within the Republican caucus
among the Republicans here as well, if
they only had a chance to vote on it; to
have the opportunity for us to be heard
and to explain it and to finally have a
vote.
What the Republicans have done instead is they decided maybe a month
ago, I actually have an article that was
in the June 15 New York Times, about
2 weeks ago or maybe 3 weeks ago they
asked a pollster to do a poll. Basically
the pollster came back, this was Glenn
Bolger, a pollster with Public Opinion
Strategies, a Virginia firm, and warned
the House Republicans that the prescription drug issue was a political
problem for them.
In other words, they realized that politically if they ran for reelection in
November and they did not have a prescription drug plan of some sort, that
they would probably be defeated and
would no longer be the majority here
in the House of Representatives.
So Mr. Bolger basically told them
that the best thing to do is to at least
start talking about the prescription
drug issue, talk about how seniors are
negative impacted, seniors suffer, and
we have to do something about the
problem.
In fact, Mr. Bolger went so far as to
advise, and I quote from this New York
Times article on June 15, ‘‘It is more
important to communicate that you
have a plan than it is to communicate
what is in the plan.’’ Basically what
Mr. Bolger said is, ‘‘Look, come up
with some rhetoric, if you will, about
prescription drugs, suggest some sort
of program, but do not worry too much
about what is in it, or certainly do not
worry about whether it will ever pass
or be signed by the President. Just
bring something up on the floor of the
House and vote on it, talk about it, and
nothing will ever happen, but at least
you will have something. You can say
you approved something, so when you
go to the voters in November you will
have something to say.’’
This is the impetus, if you will, for
the House Republican prescription drug
plan called the Medicare RX 2000 Act.
It is an illusory plan. It provides no
real prescription drug coverage to anyone, to seniors or anyone. Instead,
what it does is it says, ‘‘We will give
you some money, depending on your income, and you can go out and see if
you can get, with your own money and
the little bit that we subsidize, see if
you can get a drug company to sell you
a prescription drug-only policy.’’
Think about that a minute. We have
this great program called Medicare
that was started in the sixties and that
almost all seniors take advantage of
which provides for their hospitalization, which provides for their doctor
bills, most of their doctor bills to be
cared for.
Instead of doing what the Democrats
say, which is just bring prescription
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drugs under the rubric of Medicare and
administer it essentially under Medicare, which is a proven program, instead, the Republicans say, no, go out
and see if you can get a private insurance company to sell you a drugs-only
policy.
Now, what the Republican leadership
forgot to tell anyone is that the insurance industry itself does not want to
sell those policies. We had representatives from the insurance lobby that
came to the Committee on Commerce,
that has jurisdiction over Medicare
prescription drugs, and they basically
told the committee, we do not want to
sell these drug prescription policies.
We will not sell them.
There is a good reason why they will
not sell them: They cannot make any
money. It is like some of my colleagues
use the analogy of a haircut. Everybody gets a haircut. Everybody who is
a senior, or at least 99, 95 percent,
needs some kind of prescription drugs.
So insurance companies do not want to
underwrite something that is essentially a benefit that everybody is getting because they cannot make any
money. They operate on risk. They assume some people will get coverage
and others will not, and they pool their
resources, and they make money because some people do not take advantage of the benefit.
We cannot do that with prescription
drugs with seniors. Almost everybody
is going to have the benefit and need
the benefit. That is certainly why it
makes sense to include it as a benefit
under Medicare. Just like we include
hospitalization and we include doctor
bills, we include prescription drugs as a
benefit.
Let me just talk a little bit about the
Democratic proposal and explain really
how very simple it is and why it makes
sense.
Right now if one is over 65 and signs
up for Medicare, which almost everyone does, they get their hospitalization
through Part A, and if they pay a
monthly premium of about $45 or so,
they get their doctor bills paid for
mostly under Part B.
What Democrats are saying, ‘‘We will
do the same thing. You pay a certain
amount per month and we will set up a
program called Part C or Part D of
Medicare whereby we will pay a certain
percentage of the prescription drugs,’’
just like they get their doctor bills
paid for.
What the Democrats say is that we
will guarantee the benefit. Not only
will we guarantee the benefit through
Medicare if they want it, if they voluntarily sign up for it like they do for
Part B, but it covers all the medicines
that are medically necessary as determined by their doctor, not the insurance company. So they sign up, they
are guaranteed the prescription drug
benefit, and the nature of what kind of
drugs they get, what kind of medicine
they get, is determined by their physician in consultation with them, not by
the insurance company.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
Now, the Republican bill not only is
not under Medicare, not only will not
work because what insurance company
is going to sell it, but beyond that,
they do not even say to the insurance
company what they have to cover. The
insurance company, if they decide to
sell a policy, they may decide, well, we
will give certain drugs and we will determine what prescription drugs they
need. They do not define what the benefit is, is essentially what I am trying
to get across.
But most important, the Republican
proposal, which just says, go out and
shop around and see if you can find an
insurance company that will sell you a
policy, does not address the issue of
price. We know that one of the major
problems right now with prescription
drugs is that seniors who do not get
prescription drug coverage through
their pension or their employer after
they retire, or because they may sign
up with an HMO, if they have prescription drug coverage, that is the way
they usually get it. But if one has to go
out and buy prescription drugs themselves because one does not have an
HMO or coverage through their employer where they have worked over
the years, they pay a much higher
price for the drugs than the HMO or
those employer pension benefit plans
because they do not have the ability
basically to negotiate a price.
b
2130
Well, what the Democrats are saying
is we are going to address that price
issue, too, because we are going to say
that the agency that is in charge of the
Medicare program can negotiate a
price or at least can set up in different
regions of the country someone who
will negotiate a better price for you because now there are so many people in
the Medicare program, 30 million, 40
million seniors who these drug companies essentially we are at the mercy of,
because if they want to sell them and
sell to the government program, they
have to offer the better price that they
are offering to the HMO or to the employer benefit plan.
So the Democratic plan basically operates under the rubric of Medicare, is
voluntary if one wants to sign up, guarantees one the benefit, guaranteeing
all medical care, medically necessary
drugs as determined by one’s physician
and also seeks to address the problem
of price.
The Republican bill does none of the
above. Frankly, I would say that the
Republican proposal would never work
and is nothing more than an effort to
try to talk about something and try to
give the impression that they care.
But most important, going back to
what I said initially, the Republican
proposal passed the House of Representatives, but it is not moving in
the Senate. The President is not going
to sign it. Why do we not try to get together, Democrat and Republican, and
come up with a proposal like what the
President has suggested where we have
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05:00 Jul 18, 2000
the Medicare prescription drug program, and then we address the issue of
the marriage penalty and the estate
tax in a way that benefits the average
American.
Now, I wanted to, just in case my colleagues doubt that when I talk about
this Republican proposal for prescription drugs to be doomed to failure,
there was a very interesting article
that appeared, I think it was the Saturday before last, July 8, in the New
York Times on the front page which
talked about the Nevada experience.
I think a lot of my colleagues know
that what often happens in Congress is
that one or more of the 50 States tries
something within their own State to
see if it works; and if it does, then
Members usually from that State look
at the idea and say, gee, that is a good
idea, why do we not try it on the Federal level.
Well, interestingly enough, within
the State of Nevada, within the last 6
months, they decided to implement, on
a State level, something that is almost
exactly like what the Republicans propose for a prescription drug program
here; in other words, basically giving
some money, depending on one’s income, that one will put with whatever
other resources one has to go out and
buy a prescription drug only insurance
policy.
It has not worked. Not only when I
say it has not worked, I do not mean
that it even has a chance at working,
because when the State of Nevada put
out this proposal to the insurance company and said, okay, we will entertain
proposals from insurance companies to
sell this kind of insurance, not one single insurance company in the whole
State offered to do it.
I think they had one company that
did not qualify under the law for some
reason that asked to do it, and the
State knew that they were not qualified to do it, so they did not consider
it. But not one insurance company that
was qualified offered to do it.
Now, what better reason could one
have to not adopt that type of a program? But what do the Republicans do
here in Congress? They see the Nevada
example, which was adopted by Republicans, their Republican Governor, and
they seek to enact it into law here.
Usually what we do in Congress is, if
the States are doing something that is
good, we copy it, and we institute it on
a national level. I cannot think of a
single circumstance where we had a
State try something that failed and
then we adopted it anyway. It makes
no sense to me other than going back
to what I said before, which is the Republicans did not really want to pass
something that would actually be enacted into law and become a law and
actually be utilized by anybody. So
they did not. They just wanted something to talk about.
I wanted to, just interesting, if I
could, just quote a little bit from this
New York Times article. But this was
in the New York Times on July 8 of
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this year, about a week or 2 ago, and I
am just going to read from a few
quotes here. I do not usually like to
quote, but this is so appropriate.
It says, ‘‘Nevada has adopted a prescription drug program for the elderly
very similar to one approved last
month by the United States House of
Representatives, but is off to a rocky
road.
‘‘Insurance companies have spurned
Nevada’s invitation to provide coverage. The risks and the costs are too
high, they say, and the subsidies offered by the state are too low.
Nevada’s experience offers ominous
lessons for Congress, especially Republicans, who want to subsidize insurance
companies to entice them into providing drug benefits for elderly and disabled people on Medicare.’’
‘‘In March, the State invited hundreds of insurance companies to bid for
its business providing drug coverage
for 10,000 to 14,000 people age 62 or
older. Only one company responded,
but it was ineligible because it was not
licensed to sell insurance in Nevada.’’
Now, what they did in Nevada is,
within the legislature, they set up a
task force that was going to review
whatever proposals came forward by
insurance companies to see if they
qualified.
Barbara
F.
Buckley,
a
state
assemblywoman who co-chairs this
task force monitoring what was going
on said, ‘‘I have my doubts that an insurance company will be able to offer
meaningful drug benefits under this
program. If an insurance company does
bid on it but the benefits are paltry,
senior citizens will be up in arms.’’
The article goes on and on. But the
point is well made. This does not work.
No insurance company wants to offer
it. This is a ruse. This is a sham. This
is not a serious effort to address the
issue.
The Democrats have a serious plan.
But we do not have an opportunity to
bring it up. We will continue to be here
every night until we have that opportunity.
Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman
from Maine (Mr. ALLEN) who really,
more than anybody else in the Congress, brought this issue to the forefront and particularly pointed out the
problem with price discrimination that
exists for many seniors and the problem of, because he is in the State of
Maine, and he so witnessed it firsthand, about how people will go over
into Canada and be able to buy drugs
for significantly less than in the
United States. That is simply not fair.
Mr. ALLEN. Mr. Speaker, I thank
the gentleman from New Jersey for
yielding to me, and I thank him for all
the good work he has done on this
issue. He has been a real leader and has
been sort of pounding away.
We have learned, have we not, since
our time here in the Congress that the
status quo is the status quo, and it is
very hard to change. It only gets
changed if people speak out again and
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again and again about an injustice
until something is done about it.
While the gentleman from New Jersey was talking about the State of Nevada, and its failed effort to rely on
private insurance companies to provide
prescription drug coverage, I was reminded how proud I am of my home
State of Maine, which has taken a different tact.
Basically what the State of Maine
did in the last legislative session
through the leadership of Chellie Pingree, a State Senator, Mark Lawrence
who is running for the U.S. Senate, and
some others, was to adopt a law which
provides that the State of Maine will
negotiate lower prices for all of those
people, seniors and others, who are not
now covered with prescription drug insurance of one kind or another. So
about 300,000 people in Maine would be
covered under this plan.
The way the law is written, the State
would essentially act as what is calmed
as a pharmacy benefit manager. They
would negotiate prices with the pharmaceutical industry to get a reduced
price based on the fact that they represent 300,000 people, the kinds of discounts that Aetna and Cigna and
United negotiate for their beneficiaries, and the kind of discount that
I have suggested we really should do
for Medicare beneficiaries here.
The bill I have introduced, H.R. 664,
the Prescription Drug Fairness for Seniors Act, is very simple. It involves the
creation of no new bureaucracy. It does
not involve any significant expenditure
of Federal money, but it would allow
pharmacies to buy drugs for Medicare
beneficiaries at the best price given to
the Federal Government. The best
price is usually what the VA pays for
drugs or what Medicaid pays for drugs
for people who qualify for their programs.
It is real simple, a real simple idea. If
one is part of a big pool, one ought to
get a decent discount. That is all we
are suggesting for Medicare beneficiaries. But that is only through that
piece of legislation. But that is only
part of a solution.
The other part of the solution, of
course, is to get a real Medicare reform, a benefit under Medicare so that
those people for whom a discount is not
enough would be able to get assistance
in covering their prescription drugs.
Basically, the Maine legislation is a
path that would get discounted prices
for our seniors without a significant
cost to the government.
I was listening earlier to some of the
commentary from folks on the other
side of the aisle about tax cuts, tax
cuts, tax cuts, how, with this huge new
surplus, we really need to, first thing,
is to have tax cuts, tax cuts larger than
any we have seen certainly in my lifetime here in the Congress. We see them
in a variety of different proposals.
A year ago, the Republican majority
came to us with a suggestion for a tax
cut that was $800 billion. Now they
have carved it up into pieces, but the
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total is still $800 billion. What is really
tragic about this proposal is, not that
there are tax cuts themselves, because
there should be tax cuts. We ought to
eliminate the marriage penalties. We
ought to reduce the estate taxes. We
can provide relief in a number of other
ways. But we should not take the
whole on-budget surplus and spend it
all on tax cuts.
Why? Because we learn something,
we teach our kids something that we
hopefully learned ourselves; and that
is, when we have responsibilities to
others, we need to meet those responsibilities before we give ourselves presence. What I mean by that is this,
Medicare is going to be under increasing pressure. Right now, there are 39
million Medicare beneficiaries. But
when we get out to about 2030, there
will be close to 75 million to 80 million
Medicare beneficiaries. At that point,
it is obvious Medicare needs to be
shored up. It needs more funding. We
cannot get there just going along the
way we are right now.
The real tragedy, the real tragedy, in
New Jersey, we see it all across this
country, and I am glad that people
from Maine pointed it out to me so
long ago now, too many seniors just
cannot do it. They cannot take their
prescription drugs. While folks on the
other side of the aisle are talking
about an estate tax repeal that would
benefit primarily the 1 percent of the
wealthiest taxpayers in the country,
though I believe we should have estate
tax relief, still our priority ought to be
let us take care of those people who
simply cannot afford to take the medical care that their doctors tell them
they have to take.
Every day in this country, people are
trying to decide, can I afford to buy the
food I need today? Can I afford to pay
the electric bill? Can I afford to pay
the rent? Or can I somehow scrape together enough to take the full dosage
of the prescription drugs that I am supposed to?
When I talk to people in Maine, many
of them are taking one pill out of
three. They are cutting pills in half.
They are not filling their prescriptions,
because they cannot do it.
That is not what health care is supposed to be like in this country. It is
not supposed to be like that. In this
country, one would have thought, the
wealthiest country on earth, at the
moment in its history when it is most
prosperous, we could at least provide
prescription drugs for our seniors.
The truth is we can. There is no question, with the surpluses that are projected, that we can provide a Medicare
prescription drug benefit for our seniors. Absolutely no question.
What have we got? We have got the
kind of proposal that went through
here a few weeks ago on a three-vote
margin, not even close to a bipartisan
approach, that basically said, what we
need to do for our seniors for prescription drugs is turn them over to HMOs
and insurance companies; and if we
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give enough money to the HMOs and
insurance companies, maybe, just
maybe, we will not require it, but
maybe, just maybe, they will provide
insurance for our seniors.
Now, this might seem logical except
that the insurance industry says, no,
there is no way we are going to provide
insurance for prescription drugs for
seniors. No way. That is what Chip
Kahn, the head of the Health Insurance
Association of America has said. Leaders of the Blue Cross plans have made
the same point. Why? Because everybody is a claimant. If one is a senior,
the chances are good, 85 percent, that
one is on some form of prescription
medication. So everybody is a claimant.
I say to people in Maine, if Maine
were a low-lying State, and every year
85 percent of the people made a claim
for flood insurance, one would not be
able to buy flood insurance in Maine,
not at all, not at any price. Well, the
same is true for prescription medication for seniors, and the health insurance industry knows that.
Who does not know it in this country? Well, the pharmaceutical industry
does not know it because the pharmaceutical industry is out there basically
promoting this private insurance
scheme. The Republicans from this
House do not get it either, because
they are basically proposing a plan
that the health insurance industry is
saying we will never comply with, we
will never provide this kind of insurance.
I come back to what I said about responsibility. This country at this moment in its history can afford to provide prescription drug coverage for seniors, not to pay for all of the drugs that
every senior needs, but a decent health
care plan. We can afford it.
b
2145
And what holds us back, what holds
us back is the view of the majority
that the one thing we cannot tolerate
in this country is strengthening Medicare; the one thing we cannot tolerate
is strengthening a government health
care plan for our seniors. It has to be
done through the private sector.
Well, look at the private sector. I do
not know in how many States this is
true, but I know it is true in a lot of
places; but as of July 1, 700,000 people
in this country who had some form of
prescription drug coverage through
their HMO simply got dropped by their
HMO. Why? Because it was not profitable to cover them.
In Maine, there were a grand total of
1,700 people under Medicare managed
care, under an Aetna plan. And as of
July 1, Aetna announced they are pulling out of the State of Maine. So there
will be no coverage under managed
care plans in Maine for seniors who
need prescription drug coverage.
What that means for my State is
probably about 50 percent of all the
seniors in Maine have absolutely no
coverage at all for their prescription
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drugs. And many of the people that I
know are supposed to take $200, $300,
$400, $600, $1,000 a month in prescription medications. They cannot begin to
do that.
What we have in this country now is
a rationing system that rations prescription drugs by wealth, by how
wealthy we are. What kind of system is
that? It is not fair, it is not right, it is
completely antithetical to what we
should have in terms of health care for
our seniors in this country.
People can stand up here and talk
about the need to eliminate what they
call the death tax. I am not talking
about relief, because I think we need
relief for our small businesses. I think
we need relief for family farmers. I
think the rate should come down, and
I think the exemption should go up.
Reform is one thing, but repeal is another. What repeal does is put Bill
Gates and Steve Forbes and the megabillionaires in this country ahead of
people who today cannot afford their
prescription drugs, cannot afford the
medication that keeps them out of the
hospital, that extends their lives, that
improves their lives. They cannot do it.
We are stuck in this Congress. We are
stuck because the majority simply cannot abide strengthening Medicare. The
majority simply cannot abide having
Medicare benefits receive the same
kind of discounts and benefits that the
people who are lucky enough to have
private health insurance through
Aetna or Cigna get. And there are lots
of complaints about health care in this
country. Individuals working for a
company that provides a quality health
care plan, they get their prescription
drugs covered. But seniors, 12 percent
of the population, buy a third of all
prescription drugs, and somewhere between 40 and 60 percent have either no
coverage at all or very inadequate coverage.
We need to act. We need to act this
year. There is no reason why we cannot. The Democratic plan was a comprehensive plan that would have provided a benefit, would have provided a
discount, would have worked, did not
rely on insurance companies saying
they would not do anything. That plan
should have come to this floor and been
debated, the way substitutes to Republican legislation normally is, but the
Republican majority would not allow a
full debate and vote on that particular
issue. I think that is the scandal. That
is the real scandal.
We have a responsibility here to take
the most serious problems in this country and deal with them. We ought to be
thinking about the country as a whole,
what will strengthen this country;
what will be the best for our citizens;
and deal with our responsibilities: to
improve Social Security, to strengthen
Medicare, to provide a prescription
drug benefit, to invest in education,
and, sure, to have some targeted tax
cuts and to pay down the debt. Do not
squander this moment of prosperity
simply on tax cuts, which inevitably
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are weighted to wealthier people in
this country.
There is a real choice, a real debate
going on in this House right now, and
it seems to me that what we are trying
to do on the Democratic side is live up
to a wide range of responsibilities. We
are trying to figure out what is best for
all of us, all Americans, all the people
in this country together. We are not
saying, as the other side is, me, me,
me. Give me money. We are saying we.
We are saying we have got to hang together. And when we have our parents
and grandparents unable to buy, unable
to take medication that their doctors
tell them they have to take, we ought
to do something about it. And we ought
to do it this year, now, before we go
home.
I thank the gentleman very much for
all he is doing on this topic. I still
hope, I still hope that as we get closer
to November that we will have some of
our colleagues on the Republican side
come forward with a plan, and not a
plan that is a showpiece, not a plan
that is just there to basically look like
something has been done even if it is
not understood, but a plan that will
mean something to millions of American seniors who today simply cannot
take the medication they should, cannot eat well, cannot pay the rent, cannot do all those things that they expected to do in their retirement years.
So I thank the gentleman very much.
Mr. PALLONE. I want to thank my
colleague from Maine. The gentleman
mentioned a number of things that I
wanted to comment on. The tragedy is,
of course, that what we really want to
do is get something done around here.
That is what the gentleman has said
and that is what the Democrats have
been saying.
I do not know if the gentleman was
here earlier when our colleague from
Colorado delivered his special order before me; but I think, as my colleague
just mentioned, he talked about the
marriage penalty and the estate tax,
and I do not think the President could
be more plain when a couple of weeks
ago he said, look, I will take a version
of the marriage tax penalty repeal, and
I want to eliminate the estate tax for
most of the people that are now paying
it, so give me that with the prescription drug plan under Medicare, that
the gentleman and I have been talking
about; and I will sign it as one big
package, which accomplishes all these
goals in one fell swoop. But the Republicans will not do it.
The only reason I can think that
they will not do it goes back to what
the gentleman said before, which is, for
some reason, ideologically they just do
not like Medicare. When Medicare was
started by Lyndon Johnson in the
1960s, with a Democratic Congress,
most of the Republicans voted against
it because they said it was government-controlled or socialism.
Obviously, this idea of prescription
drug-only insurance policies is not
going to work, because the insurance
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companies would not sell them. But
even if they did, what we would essentially be doing is privatizing Medicare.
We would set the stage to go back to
that old Republican ideology that says
that we should not have any kind of
government health program for the
seniors. So who is to say they would
not next say, okay, let us privatize the
doctor bills. Instead of having a part B,
seniors can go out and buy insurance
coverage for that. Or let us privatize
hospital care, so go out and buy insurance for that.
It is a very dangerous precedent. I
just think that they have a problem
with the Medicare program.
Mr. ALLEN. If the gentleman will
yield once again. I find talking to people in Maine, where we have had a
number of changes, and I hear about
this from other colleagues here in the
House as well, by and large, there are a
lot of mergers going on in the health
care insurance industry. Lots of mergers. We are getting now to about five
major companies plus the Blue Cross
plans, and that is about all there is in
terms of companies that really represent more than 4 or 5 million people
in this country. But what happens
every time there is a change, and this
happened with my parents and other
people I know, it throws the seniors
into a position of trying to figure out
what to do next.
If they have to change their health
care plan, the first question that comes
up is, well, will a new health care plan
allow me to see the doctor I am seeing
now. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. It
is that kind of change, where the benefits change and the premiums change
and the way claims are handled
changes that just really frustrate and
upset so many seniors.
Not to mention, not to mention the
small business people and the self-employed in this country who are now
buying catastrophic coverage only because they cannot afford the cost of
health care, of group health insurance,
or sometimes individual insurance,
which is now vanishing from Maine as
well. But what I am really troubled by
is costs are going up everywhere. And
it is one thing for people who are employed to cope with those changes, but
it is another for seniors to try to cope
with the constant changes with
changes in plans, with being pushed off
one insurance plan into another plan, if
they can find it, for supplemental coverage, I mean, and it is just too much.
It is too much.
Medicare works. Its administrative
costs are 3 percent. Turn to the private
insurance market, and we are talking
administrative costs of roughly 30 percent. Medicare is efficient. Now, one of
the strengths of Medicare is its stability and predictability and equity,
and one of its weaknesses is it has not
changed very often, and there are all
sorts of problems with it. I do not disagree with that. But it is there. It does
not cover only those people in urban
areas. It covers every senior in this
country who signs up.
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Basically, it provides the equity. It
can be strengthened; it can work. We
simply need to make it work before we
go home.
Mr. PALLONE. One of the things I
was looking at in that article that
talks about the Nevada experience that
I quoted before, it is interesting, I just
noticed that Nevada is the only State
that has gone this route of trying to
get to buy private insurance. It mentioned there are 14 States, including
my own State of New Jersey that have
programs to help older people obtain
prescription medicines, but in every
one of those cases the State is the insurer. The State is running the program. Just like Medicare, essentially.
Obviously, Nevada’s proposal does not
work, so why would we want to emulate that when the other 14 States are
doing the opposite?
The other thing the gentleman pointed out, which I think is real important,
is we actually have some statistics
about the HMOs that are quitting
Medicare. And, of course, we make the
same argument as Democrats. Right
now, the HMOs, which is a form of private insurance that a lot of seniors
have relied on to get their prescription
drug coverage, they are pulling out all
over the place. This study that came
out, I guess within the last couple of
weeks, said that in the last 2 years,
HMOs have pulled out of more than 400
counties and at least 33 States, directly
affecting 734,000 Medicare beneficiaries.
And they say that as of July 1, or I
guess it is July 3, which was the deadline when they had to notify if they
wanted to get out by January 1 of 2001,
we have Cigna, which I think the gentleman mentioned, Cigna Corporation
is ending coverage for 104,000 Medicare
beneficiaries, including those in my
State. They are dropping 4,800 in northern New Jersey alone, not just the
whole State. And Aetna, with 676,000
Medicare beneficiaries, said it would
pull out of some markets also. And we
have to, I guess, get more information
about that. So we are getting hundreds
of thousands of seniors that were relying on HMOs to provide their drug coverage that are now canceling.
One of the things I hear from the Republicans is, they say, well, we want to
give seniors choice. That is what we
want to let them go out and buy private insurance because they will have
choice. But even for seniors who are in
HMOs now, or who have employer plans
that they are getting it through after
they retire, we provide under other
Democratic proposal for the majority
of the prescription drug costs for those
plans. It is anything from like 51 percent to 70 percent, depending, that we
are going to be paying for by the Federal Government under our proposal.
So I would argue they will have more
choice. Because the bottom line is they
will have no choice with the Republican plan, because no insurance company will provide it. With us, if they
want to stay in their HMO or if they
want to stay in their employer plan,
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
05:00 Jul 18, 2000
they are more likely to offer it because
we are going to be paying anywhere
from 50 percent to two-thirds of the
cost. So to argue that somehow we are
not providing choice, we are providing
choices, lots of choices, in addition to
the fact that they can just stay in their
regular Medicare and get the prescription drug plan.
So I am more and more convinced
every day that the Republicans are just
talking, going back to that original
pollster memo. They are not really serious; they are just talking about it.
And that is basically it.
I wanted to thank the gentleman for
joining me. This is certainly not the
last our colleagues will hear from us.
We tried last week to put our prescription description drug plan on the marriage penalty, and we are going to try
every maneuver we can to get it up
here and voted on before this session is
completed.
f
CONFERENCE REPORT ON H.R. 4576
Mr. LEWIS of California submitted
the following conference report and
statement on the bill (H.R. 4576) making appropriations for the Department
of Defense for the fiscal year ending
September 30, 2001, and for other purposes:
CONFERENCE REPORT (H. REPT. 106–754)
The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the
amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R.
4576) ‘‘making appropriations for the Department of Defense for the fiscal year ending
September 30, 2001, and for other purposes’’,
having met, after full and free conference,
have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows:
That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate, and
agree to the same with an amendment, as
follows:
In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted
by said amendment, insert:
That the following sums are appropriated, out
of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the fiscal year ending September
30, 2001, for military functions administered by
the Department of Defense, and for other purposes, namely:
TITLE I
MILITARY PERSONNEL
MILITARY PERSONNEL, ARMY
For pay, allowances, individual clothing, subsistence, interest on deposits, gratuities, permanent change of station travel (including all expenses thereof for organizational movements),
and expenses of temporary duty travel between
permanent duty stations, for members of the
Army on active duty (except members of reserve
components provided for elsewhere), cadets, and
aviation cadets; and for payments pursuant to
section 156 of Public Law 97–377, as amended (42
U.S.C. 402 note), to section 229(b) of the Social
Security Act (42 U.S.C. 429(b)), and to the Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund,
$22,175,357,000.
MILITARY PERSONNEL, NAVY
For pay, allowances, individual clothing, subsistence, interest on deposits, gratuities, permanent change of station travel (including all expenses thereof for organizational movements),
and expenses of temporary duty travel between
permanent duty stations, for members of the
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Navy on active duty (except members of the Reserve provided for elsewhere), midshipmen, and
aviation cadets; and for payments pursuant to
section 156 of Public Law 97–377, as amended (42
U.S.C. 402 note), to section 229(b) of the Social
Security Act (42 U.S.C. 429(b)), and to the Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund,
$17,772,297,000.
MILITARY PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS
For pay, allowances, individual clothing, subsistence, interest on deposits, gratuities, permanent change of station travel (including all expenses thereof for organizational movements),
and expenses of temporary duty travel between
permanent duty stations, for members of the
Marine Corps on active duty (except members of
the Reserve provided for elsewhere); and for
payments pursuant to section 156 of Public Law
97–377, as amended (42 U.S.C. 402 note), to section 229(b) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.
429(b)), and to the Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund, $6,833,100,000.
MILITARY PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE
For pay, allowances, individual clothing, subsistence, interest on deposits, gratuities, permanent change of station travel (including all expenses thereof for organizational movements),
and expenses of temporary duty travel between
permanent duty stations, for members of the Air
Force on active duty (except members of reserve
components provided for elsewhere), cadets, and
aviation cadets; and for payments pursuant to
section 156 of Public Law 97–377, as amended (42
U.S.C. 402 note), to section 229(b) of the Social
Security Act (42 U.S.C. 429(b)), and to the Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund,
$18,174,284,000.
RESERVE PERSONNEL, ARMY
For pay, allowances, clothing, subsistence,
gratuities, travel, and related expenses for personnel of the Army Reserve on active duty
under sections 10211, 10302, and 3038 of title 10,
United States Code, or while serving on active
duty under section 12301(d) of title 10, United
States Code, in connection with performing duty
specified in section 12310(a) of title 10, United
States Code, or while undergoing reserve training, or while performing drills or equivalent
duty or other duty, and for members of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, and expenses authorized by section 16131 of title 10, United
States Code; and for payments to the Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund,
$2,473,001,000.
RESERVE PERSONNEL, NAVY
For pay, allowances, clothing, subsistence,
gratuities, travel, and related expenses for personnel of the Navy Reserve on active duty under
section 10211 of title 10, United States Code, or
while serving on active duty under section
12301(d) of title 10, United States Code, in connection with performing duty specified in section 12310(a) of title 10, United States Code, or
while undergoing reserve training, or while performing drills or equivalent duty, and for members of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps,
and expenses authorized by section 16131 of title
10, United States Code; and for payments to the
Department of Defense Military Retirement
Fund, $1,576,174,000.
RESERVE PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS
For pay, allowances, clothing, subsistence,
gratuities, travel, and related expenses for personnel of the Marine Corps Reserve on active
duty under section 10211 of title 10, United
States Code, or while serving on active duty
under section 12301(d) of title 10, United States
Code, in connection with performing duty specified in section 12310(a) of title 10, United States
Code, or while undergoing reserve training, or
while performing drills or equivalent duty, and
for members of the Marine Corps platoon leaders
class, and expenses authorized by section 16131
of title 10, United States Code; and for payments
to the Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund, $448,886,000.
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RESERVE PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE
For pay, allowances, clothing, subsistence,
gratuities, travel, and related expenses for personnel of the Air Force Reserve on active duty
under sections 10211, 10305, and 8038 of title 10,
United States Code, or while serving on active
duty under section 12301(d) of title 10, United
States Code, in connection with performing duty
specified in section 12310(a) of title 10, United
States Code, or while undergoing reserve training, or while performing drills or equivalent
duty or other duty, and for members of the Air
Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, and expenses
authorized by section 16131 of title 10, United
States Code; and for payments to the Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund,
$971,024,000.
NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, ARMY
For pay, allowances, clothing, subsistence,
gratuities, travel, and related expenses for personnel of the Army National Guard while on
duty under section 10211, 10302, or 12402 of title
10 or section 708 of title 32, United States Code,
or while serving on duty under section 12301(d)
of title 10 or section 502(f) of title 32, United
States Code, in connection with performing duty
specified in section 12310(a) of title 10, United
States Code, or while undergoing training, or
while performing drills or equivalent duty or
other duty, and expenses authorized by section
16131 of title 10, United States Code; and for
payments to the Department of Defense Military
Retirement Fund, $3,782,536,000.
NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE
For pay, allowances, clothing, subsistence,
gratuities, travel, and related expenses for personnel of the Air National Guard on duty under
section 10211, 10305, or 12402 of title 10 or section
708 of title 32, United States Code, or while serving on duty under section 12301(d) of title 10 or
section 502(f) of title 32, United States Code, in
connection with performing duty specified in
section 12310(a) of title 10, United States Code,
or while undergoing training, or while performing drills or equivalent duty or other duty,
and expenses authorized by section 16131 of title
10, United States Code; and for payments to the
Department of Defense Military Retirement
Fund, $1,641,081,000.
TITLE II
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance of the
Army, as authorized by law; and not to exceed
$10,616,000 can be used for emergencies and extraordinary expenses, to be expended on the approval or authority of the Secretary of the
Army, and payments may be made on his certificate of necessity for confidential military purposes,
$19,144,431,000
and,
in
addition,
$50,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from the
National Defense Stockpile Transaction Fund:
Provided, That of the funds made available
under this heading, $5,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be transferred to ‘‘National Park Service—Construction’’ within 30
days of enactment of this Act, only for necessary infrastructure repair improvements at
Fort Baker, under the management of the Golden Gate Recreation Area: Provided further,
That of the funds appropriated in this paragraph, not less than $355,000,000 shall be made
available only for conventional ammunition
care and maintenance.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance of the
Navy and the Marine Corps, as authorized by
law; and not to exceed $5,146,000 can be used for
emergencies and extraordinary expenses, to be
expended on the approval or authority of the
Secretary of the Navy, and payments may be
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
05:00 Jul 18, 2000
made on his certificate of necessity for confidential military purposes, $23,419,360,000 and, in
addition, $50,000,000 shall be derived by transfer
from the National Defense Stockpile Transaction Fund.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance of the
Marine
Corps,
as
authorized
by
law,
$2,778,758,000.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance of the
Air Force, as authorized by law; and not to exceed $7,878,000 can be used for emergencies and
extraordinary expenses, to be expended on the
approval or authority of the Secretary of the Air
Force, and payments may be made on his certificate of necessity for confidential military purposes,
$22,383,521,000
and,
in
addition,
$50,000,000, shall be derived by transfer from the
National Defense Stockpile Transaction Fund:
Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, that of the funds available under
this heading, $500,000 shall only be available to
the Secretary of the Air Force for a grant to
Florida Memorial College for the purpose of
funding minority aviation training.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE-WIDE
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance of activities and agencies of the Department of Defense (other than the military departments), as
authorized by law, $11,844,480,000, of which not
to exceed $25,000,000 may be available for the
CINC initiative fund account; and of which not
to exceed $30,000,000 can be used for emergencies
and extraordinary expenses, to be expended on
the approval or authority of the Secretary of
Defense, and payments may be made on his certificate of necessity for confidential military
purposes: Provided, That of the amount provided under this heading, $5,000,000, to remain
available until expended, is available only for
expenses relating to certain classified activities,
and may be transferred as necessary by the Secretary of Defense to operation and maintenance,
procurement, and research, development, test
and evaluation appropriations accounts, to be
merged with and to be available for the same
time period as the appropriations to which
transferred: Provided further, That the transfer
authority provided under this heading is in addition to any other transfer authority provided
in this Act.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY RESERVE
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance, including training, organization, and administration, of the Army Reserve; repair of facilities
and equipment; hire of passenger motor vehicles;
travel and transportation; care of the dead; recruiting; procurement of services, supplies, and
equipment; and communications, $1,562,118,000.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY RESERVE
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance, including training, organization, and administration, of the Navy Reserve; repair of facilities
and equipment; hire of passenger motor vehicles;
travel and transportation; care of the dead; recruiting; procurement of services, supplies, and
equipment; and communications, $978,946,000.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS
RESERVE
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance, including training, organization, and administration, of the Marine Corps Reserve; repair of facilities and equipment; hire of passenger motor
vehicles; travel and transportation; care of the
dead; recruiting; procurement of services, sup-
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plies, and equipment; and communications,
$145,959,000.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE
RESERVE
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the operation and maintenance, including training, organization, and administration, of the Air Force Reserve; repair of facilities
and equipment; hire of passenger motor vehicles;
travel and transportation; care of the dead; recruiting; procurement of services, supplies, and
equipment; and communications, $1,903,659,000.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY NATIONAL
GUARD
For expenses of training, organizing, and administering the Army National Guard, including
medical and hospital treatment and related expenses in non-Federal hospitals; maintenance,
operation, and repairs to structures and facilities; hire of passenger motor vehicles; personnel
services in the National Guard Bureau; travel
expenses (other than mileage), as authorized by
law for Army personnel on active duty, for
Army National Guard division, regimental, and
battalion commanders while inspecting units in
compliance with National Guard Bureau regulations when specifically authorized by the Chief,
National Guard Bureau; supplying and equipping the Army National Guard as authorized by
law; and expenses of repair, modification, maintenance, and issue of supplies and equipment
(including aircraft), $3,333,835,000.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR NATIONAL
GUARD
For operation and maintenance of the Air National Guard, including medical and hospital
treatment and related expenses in non-Federal
hospitals; maintenance, operation, repair, and
other necessary expenses of facilities for the
training and administration of the Air National
Guard, including repair of facilities, maintenance, operation, and modification of aircraft;
transportation of things, hire of passenger
motor vehicles; supplies, materials, and equipment, as authorized by law for the Air National
Guard; and expenses incident to the maintenance and use of supplies, materials, and equipment, including such as may be furnished from
stocks under the control of agencies of the Department of Defense; travel expenses (other than
mileage) on the same basis as authorized by law
for Air National Guard personnel on active Federal duty, for Air National Guard commanders
while inspecting units in compliance with National Guard Bureau regulations when specifically authorized by the Chief, National Guard
Bureau, $3,474,375,000.
OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS TRANSFER
FUND
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For expenses directly relating to Overseas
Contingency Operations by United States military forces, $3,938,777,000, to remain available
until expended: Provided, That the Secretary of
Defense may transfer these funds only to military personnel accounts; operation and maintenance accounts within this title; the Defense
Health Program appropriation; procurement accounts; research, development, test and evaluation accounts; and to working capital funds:
Provided further, That the funds transferred
shall be merged with and shall be available for
the same purposes and for the same time period,
as the appropriation to which transferred: Provided further, That upon a determination that
all or part of the funds transferred from this appropriation are not necessary for the purposes
provided herein, such amounts may be transferred back to this appropriation: Provided further, That the transfer authority provided in
this paragraph is in addition to any other transfer authority contained elsewhere in this Act.
UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE
ARMED FORCES
For salaries and expenses necessary for the
United States Court of Appeals for the Armed
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Forces, $8,574,000, of which not to exceed $2,500
can be used for official representation purposes.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, FORMERLY USED
DEFENSE SITES
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, ARMY
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For the Department of the Army, $389,932,000,
to remain available until transferred: Provided,
That the Secretary of the Army shall, upon determining that such funds are required for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling
of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings
and debris of the Department of the Army, or
for similar purposes, transfer the funds made
available by this appropriation to other appropriations made available to the Department of
the Army, to be merged with and to be available
for the same purposes and for the same time period as the appropriations to which transferred:
Provided further, That upon a determination
that all or part of the funds transferred from
this appropriation are not necessary for the purposes provided herein, such amounts may be
transferred back to this appropriation.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, NAVY
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For the Department of the Navy, $294,038,000,
to remain available until transferred: Provided,
That the Secretary of the Navy shall, upon determining that such funds are required for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling
of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings
and debris of the Department of the Navy, or for
similar purposes, transfer the funds made available by this appropriation to other appropriations made available to the Department of the
Navy, to be merged with and to be available for
the same purposes and for the same time period
as the appropriations to which transferred: Provided further, That upon a determination that
all or part of the funds transferred from this appropriation are not necessary for the purposes
provided herein, such amounts may be transferred back to this appropriation.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, AIR FORCE
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For the Department of the Air Force,
$376,300,000, to remain available until transferred: Provided, That the Secretary of the Air
Force shall, upon determining that such funds
are required for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris of the Department of the Air Force, or for similar purposes, transfer the funds made available by this
appropriation to other appropriations made
available to the Department of the Air Force, to
be merged with and to be available for the same
purposes and for the same time period as the appropriations to which transferred: Provided further, That upon a determination that all or part
of the funds transferred from this appropriation
are not necessary for the purposes provided
herein, such amounts may be transferred back
to this appropriation.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, DEFENSE-WIDE
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For the Department of Defense, $21,412,000, to
remain available until transferred: Provided,
That the Secretary of Defense shall, upon determining that such funds are required for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling
of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings
and debris of the Department of Defense, or for
similar purposes, transfer the funds made available by this appropriation to other appropriations made available to the Department of Defense, to be merged with and to be available for
the same purposes and for the same time period
as the appropriations to which transferred: Provided further, That upon a determination that
all or part of the funds transferred from this appropriation are not necessary for the purposes
provided herein, such amounts may be transferred back to this appropriation.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
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For the Department of the Army, $231,499,000,
to remain available until transferred: Provided,
That the Secretary of the Army shall, upon determining that such funds are required for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling
of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings
and debris at sites formerly used by the Department of Defense, transfer the funds made available by this appropriation to other appropriations made available to the Department of the
Army, to be merged with and to be available for
the same purposes and for the same time period
as the appropriations to which transferred: Provided further, That upon a determination that
all or part of the funds transferred from this appropriation are not necessary for the purposes
provided herein, such amounts may be transferred back to this appropriation.
OVERSEAS HUMANITARIAN, DISASTER, AND CIVIC
AID
For expenses relating to the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid programs of the
Department of Defense (consisting of the programs provided under sections 401, 402, 404,
2547, and 2551 of title 10, United States Code),
$55,900,000, to remain available until September
30, 2002.
FORMER SOVIET UNION THREAT REDUCTION
For assistance to the republics of the former
Soviet Union, including assistance provided by
contract or by grants, for facilitating the elimination and the safe and secure transportation
and storage of nuclear, chemical and other
weapons; for establishing programs to prevent
the proliferation of weapons, weapons components, and weapon-related technology and expertise; for programs relating to the training
and support of defense and military personnel
for demilitarization and protection of weapons,
weapons components and weapons technology
and expertise, $443,400,000, to remain available
until September 30, 2003: Provided, That of the
amounts
provided
under
this
heading,
$25,000,000 shall be available only to support the
dismantling and disposal of nuclear submarines
and submarine reactor components in the Russian Far East.
QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS, DEFENSE
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, resulting from unfunded shortfalls in the repair
and maintenance of real property of the Department of Defense (including military housing and
barracks), $160,500,000, for the maintenance of
real property of the Department of Defense (including minor construction and major maintenance and repair), which shall remain available
for obligation until September 30, 2002, as follows:
Army, $100,000,000;
Navy, $20,000,000;
Marine Corps, $10,000,000;
Air Force, $20,000,000; and
Defense-Wide, $10,500,000:
Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, of the funds appropriated under
this heading for Defense-Wide activities, the entire amount shall only be available for grants by
the Secretary of Defense to local educational
authorities which maintain primary and secondary educational facilities located within Department of Defense installations, and which
are used primarily by Department of Defense
military and civilian dependents, for facility repairs and improvements to such educational facilities: Provided further, That such grants to
local educational authorities may be made for
repairs and improvements to such educational
facilities as required to meet classroom size requirements: Provided further, That the cumulative amount of any grant or grants to any single local education authority provided pursuant
to the provisions under this heading shall not
exceed $1,500,000.
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TITLE III
PROCUREMENT
AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, ARMY
For construction, procurement, production,
modification, and modernization of aircraft,
equipment, including ordnance, ground handling equipment, spare parts, and accessories
therefor; specialized equipment and training devices; expansion of public and private plants,
including the land necessary therefor, for the
foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title;
and procurement and installation of equipment,
appliances, and machine tools in public and private plants; reserve plant and Government and
contractor-owned equipment layaway; and
other expenses necessary for the foregoing purposes, $1,571,812,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2003: Provided, That
of the $189,601,000 appropriated under this
heading for the procurement of UH–60 helicopters, $78,520,000 shall be available only for
the procurement of eight such aircraft to be provided to the Army Reserve.
MISSILE PROCUREMENT, ARMY
For construction, procurement, production,
modification, and modernization of missiles,
equipment, including ordnance, ground handling equipment, spare parts, and accessories
therefor; specialized equipment and training devices; expansion of public and private plants,
including the land necessary therefor, for the
foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title;
and procurement and installation of equipment,
appliances, and machine tools in public and private plants; reserve plant and Government and
contractor-owned equipment layaway; and
other expenses necessary for the foregoing purposes, $1,320,681,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2003.
PROCUREMENT OF WEAPONS AND TRACKED
COMBAT VEHICLES, ARMY
For construction, procurement, production,
and modification of weapons and tracked combat vehicles, equipment, including ordnance,
spare parts, and accessories therefor; specialized
equipment and training devices; expansion of
public and private plants, including the land
necessary therefor, for the foregoing purposes,
and such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction prosecuted thereon
prior to approval of title; and procurement and
installation of equipment, appliances, and machine tools in public and private plants; reserve
plant and Government and contractor-owned
equipment layaway; and other expenses necessary for the foregoing purposes, $2,472,524,000,
to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2003.
PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, ARMY
For construction, procurement, production,
and modification of ammunition, and accessories therefor; specialized equipment and training devices; expansion of public and private
plants, including ammunition facilities authorized by section 2854 of title 10, United States
Code, and the land necessary therefor, for the
foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title;
and procurement and installation of equipment,
appliances, and machine tools in public and private plants; reserve plant and Government and
contractor-owned equipment layaway; and
other expenses necessary for the foregoing purposes, $1,220,516,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2003.
OTHER PROCUREMENT, ARMY
For construction, procurement, production,
and modification of vehicles, including tactical,
support, and non-tracked combat vehicles; the
purchase of not to exceed 35 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only; and the purchase of
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12 vehicles required for physical security of personnel, notwithstanding price limitations applicable to passenger vehicles but not to exceed
$200,000 per vehicle; communications and electronic equipment; other support equipment;
spare parts, ordnance, and accessories therefor;
specialized equipment and training devices; expansion of public and private plants, including
the land necessary therefor, for the foregoing
purposes, and such lands and interests therein,
may be acquired, and construction prosecuted
thereon prior to approval of title; and procurement and installation of equipment, appliances,
and machine tools in public and private plants;
reserve plant and Government and contractorowned equipment layaway; and other expenses
necessary
for
the
foregoing
purposes,
$4,497,009,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2003.
AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, NAVY
For construction, procurement, production,
modification, and modernization of aircraft,
equipment, including ordnance, spare parts,
and accessories therefor; specialized equipment;
expansion of public and private plants, including the land necessary therefor, and such lands
and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction prosecuted thereon prior to approval
of title; and procurement and installation of
equipment, appliances, and machine tools in
public and private plants; reserve plant and
Government and contractor-owned equipment
layaway, $8,477,138,000, to remain available for
obligation until September 30, 2003.
WEAPONS PROCUREMENT, NAVY
For construction, procurement, production,
modification, and modernization of missiles, torpedoes, other weapons, and related support
equipment including spare parts, and accessories therefor; expansion of public and private
plants, including the land necessary therefor,
and such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction prosecuted thereon
prior to approval of title; and procurement and
installation of equipment, appliances, and machine tools in public and private plants; reserve
plant and Government and contractor-owned
equipment layaway, $1,461,600,000, to remain
available for obligation until September 30, 2003.
PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, NAVY AND
MARINE CORPS
For construction, procurement, production,
and modification of ammunition, and accessories therefor; specialized equipment and training devices; expansion of public and private
plants, including ammunition facilities authorized by section 2854 of title 10, United States
Code, and the land necessary therefor, for the
foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title;
and procurement and installation of equipment,
appliances, and machine tools in public and private plants; reserve plant and Government and
contractor-owned equipment layaway; and
other expenses necessary for the foregoing purposes, $498,349,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2003.
SHIPBUILDING AND CONVERSION, NAVY
For expenses necessary for the construction,
acquisition, or conversion of vessels as authorized by law, including armor and armament
thereof, plant equipment, appliances, and machine tools and installation thereof in public
and private plants; reserve plant and Government and contractor-owned equipment layaway;
procurement of critical, long leadtime components and designs for vessels to be constructed
or converted in the future; and expansion of
public and private plants, including land necessary therefor, and such lands and interests
therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title, as
follows:
Carrier Replacement Program, $4,053,653,000;
Carrier
Replacement
Program
(AP),
$21,869,000;
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NSSN, $1,198,012,000;
NSSN (AP), $508,222,000;
CVN Refuelings, $698,441,000;
CVN Refuelings (AP), $25,000,000;
Submarine Refuelings, $210,414,000;
Submarine Refuelings (AP), $72,277,000;
DDG–51 destroyer program, $2,703,559,000;
DDG–51 destroyer program (AP), $456,843,000;
LPD–17 (AP), $560,700,000;
LHD–8, $460,000,000;
ADC(X), $338,951,000;
LCAC landing craft air cushion program,
$15,615,000; and
For craft, outfitting, post delivery, conversions, and first destination transformation
transportation, $291,077,000;
In all: $11,614,633,000, to remain available for
obligation until September 30, 2005: Provided,
That additional obligations may be incurred
after September 30, 2005, for engineering services, tests, evaluations, and other such budgeted
work that must be performed in the final stage
of ship construction: Provided further, That
none of the funds provided under this heading
for the construction or conversion of any naval
vessel to be constructed in shipyards in the
United States shall be expended in foreign facilities for the construction of major components
of such vessel: Provided further, That none of
the funds provided under this heading shall be
used for the construction of any naval vessel in
foreign shipyards: Provided further, That the
Secretary of the Navy is hereby granted the authority to enter into a contract for an LHD–1
Amphibious Assault Ship which shall be funded
on an incremental basis: Provided further, That
the amount made available for the LPD–17 program may be obligated for expenditure for the
procurement of contractor furnished and government furnished material and equipment, and
necessary advance construction activities.
OTHER PROCUREMENT, NAVY
For procurement, production, and modernization of support equipment and materials not
otherwise provided for, Navy ordnance (except
ordnance for new aircraft, new ships, and ships
authorized for conversion); the purchase of not
to exceed 63 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only, and the purchase of one vehicle
required for physical security of personnel, notwithstanding price limitations applicable to passenger vehicles but not to exceed $200,000; expansion of public and private plants, including
the land necessary therefor, and such lands and
interests therein, may be acquired, and construction prosecuted thereon prior to approval
of title; and procurement and installation of
equipment, appliances, and machine tools in
public and private plants; reserve plant and
Government and contractor-owned equipment
layaway, $3,557,380,000, to remain available for
obligation until September 30, 2003.
PROCUREMENT, MARINE CORPS
For expenses necessary for the procurement,
manufacture, and modification of missiles, armament, military equipment, spare parts, and
accessories therefor; plant equipment, appliances, and machine tools, and installation
thereof in public and private plants; reserve
plant and Government and contractor-owned
equipment layaway; vehicles for the Marine
Corps, including the purchase of not to exceed
33 passenger motor vehicles for replacement
only; and expansion of public and private
plants, including land necessary therefor, and
such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction prosecuted thereon
prior to approval of title, $1,233,268,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30,
2003.
AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE
For construction, procurement, lease, and
modification of aircraft and equipment, including armor and armament, specialized ground
handling equipment, and training devices, spare
parts, and accessories therefor; specialized
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equipment; expansion of public and private
plants, Government-owned equipment and installation thereof in such plants, erection of
structures, and acquisition of land, for the foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests
therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title; reserve plant and Government and contractorowned equipment layaway; and other expenses
necessary for the foregoing purposes including
rents
and
transportation
of
things,
$7,583,345,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2003.
MISSILE PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE
For construction, procurement, and modification of missiles, spacecraft, rockets, and related
equipment, including spare parts and accessories therefor, ground handling equipment, and
training devices; expansion of public and private plants, Government-owned equipment and
installation thereof in such plants, erection of
structures, and acquisition of land, for the foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests
therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title; reserve plant and Government and contractorowned equipment layaway; and other expenses
necessary for the foregoing purposes including
rents
and
transportation
of
things,
$2,863,778,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2003.
PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, AIR FORCE
For construction, procurement, production,
and modification of ammunition, and accessories therefor; specialized equipment and training devices; expansion of public and private
plants, including ammunition facilities authorized by section 2854 of title 10, United States
Code, and the land necessary therefor, for the
foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon prior to approval of title;
and procurement and installation of equipment,
appliances, and machine tools in public and private plants; reserve plant and Government and
contractor-owned equipment layaway; and
other expenses necessary for the foregoing purposes, $647,808,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2003.
OTHER PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE
For procurement and modification of equipment (including ground guidance and electronic
control equipment, and ground electronic and
communication equipment), and supplies, materials, and spare parts therefor, not otherwise
provided for; the purchase of not to exceed 173,
passenger motor vehicles for replacement only,
and the purchase of one vehicle required for
physical security of personnel, notwithstanding
price limitations applicable to passenger vehicles
but not to exceed $200,000; lease of passenger
motor vehicles; and expansion of public and private plants, Government-owned equipment and
installation thereof in such plants, erection of
structures, and acquisition of land, for the foregoing purposes, and such lands and interests
therein, may be acquired, and construction
prosecuted thereon, prior to approval of title; reserve plant and Government and contractorowned equipment layaway, $7,763,747,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30,
2003.
PROCUREMENT, DEFENSE-WIDE
For expenses of activities and agencies of the
Department of Defense (other than the military
departments) necessary for procurement, production, and modification of equipment, supplies, materials, and spare parts therefor, not
otherwise provided for; the purchase of not to
exceed 115 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only; the purchase of 10 vehicles required
for physical security of personnel, notwithstanding price limitations applicable to passenger vehicles but not to exceed $250,000 per vehicle; expansion of public and private plants,
equipment, and installation thereof in such
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plants, erection of structures, and acquisition of
land for the foregoing purposes, and such lands
and interests therein, may be acquired, and construction prosecuted thereon prior to approval
of title; reserve plant and Government and contractor-owned
equipment
layaway,
$2,346,258,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2003.
DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT PURCHASES
For activities by the Department of Defense
pursuant to sections 108, 301, 302, and 303 of the
Defense Production Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. App.
2078, 2091, 2092, and 2093), $3,000,000 only for
microwave power tubes and the wireless vibration sensor supplier initiative and to remain
available until expended.
NATIONAL GUARD AND RESERVE EQUIPMENT
For procurement of aircraft, missiles, tracked
combat vehicles, ammunition, other weapons,
and other procurement for the reserve components of the Armed Forces, $100,000,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30,
2003: Provided, That the Chiefs of the Reserve
and National Guard components shall, not later
than 30 days after the enactment of this Act, individually submit to the congressional defense
committees the modernization priority assessment for their respective Reserve or National
Guard component.
TITLE IV
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND
EVALUATION
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND
EVALUATION, ARMY
For expenses necessary for basic and applied
scientific research, development, test and evaluation, including maintenance, rehabilitation,
lease, and operation of facilities and equipment,
$6,342,552,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2002.
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND
EVALUATION, NAVY
For expenses necessary for basic and applied
scientific research, development, test and evaluation, including maintenance, rehabilitation,
lease, and operation of facilities and equipment,
$9,494,374,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2002: Provided, That funds
appropriated in this paragraph which are available for the V–22 may be used to meet unique requirements of the Special Operation Forces.
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND
EVALUATION, AIR FORCE
For expenses necessary for basic and applied
scientific research, development, test and evaluation, including maintenance, rehabilitation,
lease, and operation of facilities and equipment,
$14,138,244,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2002.
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND
EVALUATION, DEFENSE-WIDE
For expenses of activities and agencies of the
Department of Defense (other than the military
departments), necessary for basic and applied
scientific research, development, test and evaluation; advanced research projects as may be
designated and determined by the Secretary of
Defense, pursuant to law; maintenance, rehabilitation, lease, and operation of facilities and
equipment, $11,157,375,000, to remain available
for obligation until September 30, 2002.
OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the independent activities of the Director, Operational Test and Evaluation in the
direction and supervision of operational test
and evaluation, including initial operational
test and evaluation which is conducted prior to,
and in support of, production decisions; joint
operational testing and evaluation; and administrative expenses in connection therewith,
$227,060,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2002.
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TITLE V
REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS
DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS
For the Defense Working Capital Funds,
$916,276,000: Provided, That during fiscal year
2001, funds in the Defense Working Capital
Funds may be used for the purchase of not to
exceed 330 passenger carrying motor vehicles for
replacement only for the Defense Security Service.
NATIONAL DEFENSE SEALIFT FUND
For National Defense Sealift Fund programs,
projects, and activities, and for expenses of the
National Defense Reserve Fleet, as established
by section 11 of the Merchant Ship Sales Act of
1946 (50 U.S.C. App. 1744), $400,658,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That
none of the funds provided in this paragraph
shall be used to award a new contract that provides for the acquisition of any of the following
major components unless such components are
manufactured in the United States: auxiliary
equipment, including pumps, for all shipboard
services; propulsion system components (that is;
engines, reduction gears, and propellers); shipboard cranes; and spreaders for shipboard
cranes: Provided further, That the exercise of
an option in a contract awarded through the
obligation of previously appropriated funds
shall not be considered to be the award of a new
contract: Provided further, That the Secretary
of the military department responsible for such
procurement may waive the restrictions in the
first proviso on a case-by-case basis by certifying in writing to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and
the Senate that adequate domestic supplies are
not available to meet Department of Defense requirements on a timely basis and that such an
acquisition must be made in order to acquire capability for national security purposes.
NATIONAL DEFENSE AIRLIFT FUND
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For National Defense Airlift Fund programs,
projects, and activities, $2,840,923,000, to remain
available until expended: Provided, That these
funds shall only be available for transfer to the
appropriate C–17 program P–1 line items of Title
III of this Act for the purposes specified in this
section: Provided further, That the funds transferred under the authority provided within this
section shall be merged with and shall be available for the same purposes, and for the same
time period, as the appropriation to which
transferred: Provided further, That the transfer
authority provided in this section is in addition
to any other transfer authority contained elsewhere in this Act.
TITLE VI
OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
PROGRAMS
DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, for
medical and health care programs of the Department of Defense, as authorized by law,
$12,117,779,000, of which $11,414,393,000 shall be
for Operation and maintenance, of which not to
exceed 2 percent shall remain available until
September 30, 2002; of which $290,006,000, to remain available for obligation until September 30,
2003, shall be for Procurement; of which
$413,380,000, to remain available for obligation
until September 30, 2002, shall be for Research,
development, test and evaluation, and of which
$10,000,000 shall be available for HIV prevention
educational activities undertaken in connection
with U.S. military training, exercises, and humanitarian assistance activities conducted in
African nations.
CHEMICAL AGENTS AND MUNITIONS
DESTRUCTION, ARMY
For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for the destruction of the United States
stockpile of lethal chemical agents and muni-
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tions in accordance with the provisions of section 1412 of the Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1986 (50 U.S.C. 1521), and for the
destruction of other chemical warfare materials
that are not in the chemical weapon stockpile,
$980,100,000, of which $600,000,000 shall be for
Operation and maintenance to remain available
until September 30, 2002, $105,700,000 shall be for
Procurement to remain available until September 30, 2003, and $274,400,000 shall be for Research, development, test and evaluation to remain available until September 30, 2002: Provided, That of the funds available under this
heading, $1,000,000 shall be available until expended each year only for a Johnston Atoll offisland leave program: Provided further, That
the Secretaries concerned shall, pursuant to
uniform regulations, prescribe travel and transportation allowances for travel by participants
in the off-island leave program: Provided further, That the amount available under Operation and maintenance shall also be available
for the conveyance, without consideration, of
the Emergency One Cyclone II Custom Pumper
truck subject to Army Loan DAAMO1–98–L–0001
to the Umatilla Indian Tribe, the current lessee.
DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG
ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For drug interdiction and counter-drug activities of the Department of Defense, for transfer
to appropriations available to the Department of
Defense for military personnel of the reserve
components serving under the provisions of title
10 and title 32, United States Code; for Operation and maintenance; for Procurement; and
for Research, development, test and evaluation,
$869,000,000: Provided, That the funds appropriated under this heading shall be available for
obligation for the same time period and for the
same purpose as the appropriation to which
transferred: Provided further, That the transfer
authority provided under this heading is in addition to any other transfer authority contained
elsewhere in this Act.
OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL
For expenses and activities of the Office of the
Inspector General in carrying out the provisions
of the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, $147,545,000, of which $144,245,000 shall be
for Operation and maintenance, of which not to
exceed $700,000 is available for emergencies and
extraordinary expenses to be expended on the
approval or authority of the Inspector General,
and payments may be made on the Inspector
General’s certificate of necessity for confidential
military purposes; and of which $3,300,000 to remain available until September 30, 2003, shall be
for Procurement.
TITLE VII
RELATED AGENCIES
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY RETIREMENT
AND DISABILITY SYSTEM FUND
For payment to the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System Fund, to
maintain the proper funding level for continuing the operation of the Central Intelligence
Agency Retirement and Disability System,
$216,000,000.
INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT
ACCOUNT
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For necessary expenses of the Intelligence
Community Management Account, $148,631,000,
of which $22,577,000 for the Advanced Research
and Development Committee shall remain available until September 30, 2002: Provided, That of
the funds appropriated under this heading,
$34,100,000 shall be transferred to the Department of Justice for the National Drug Intelligence Center to support the Department of Defense’s counter-drug intelligence responsibilities,
and of the said amount, $1,500,000 for Procurement shall remain available until September 30,
2003, and $1,000,000 for Research, development,
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test and evaluation shall remain available until
September 30, 2002: Provided further, That the
National Drug Intelligence Center shall maintain the personnel and technical resources to
provide timely support to law enforcement authorities to conduct document exploitation of
materials collected in federal, state, and local
law enforcement activity.
PAYMENT TO KAHO’OLAWE ISLAND CONVEYANCE,
REMEDIATION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION FUND
For payment to Kaho’olawe Island Conveyance, Remediation, and Environmental Restoration Fund, as authorized by law, $60,000,000, to
remain available until expended.
NATIONAL SECURITY EDUCATION TRUST FUND
For the purposes of title VIII of Public Law
102–183, $6,950,000, to be derived from the National Security Education Trust Fund, to remain available until expended.
TITLE VIII
GENERAL PROVISIONS
SEC. 8001. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall be used for publicity or
propaganda purposes not authorized by the
Congress.
SEC. 8002. During the current fiscal year, provisions of law prohibiting the payment of compensation to, or employment of, any person not
a citizen of the United States shall not apply to
personnel of the Department of Defense: Provided, That salary increases granted to direct
and indirect hire foreign national employees of
the Department of Defense funded by this Act
shall not be at a rate in excess of the percentage
increase authorized by law for civilian employees of the Department of Defense whose pay is
computed under the provisions of section 5332 of
title 5, United States Code, or at a rate in excess
of the percentage increase provided by the appropriate host nation to its own employees,
whichever is higher: Provided further, That this
section shall not apply to Department of Defense foreign service national employees serving
at United States diplomatic missions whose pay
is set by the Department of State under the Foreign Service Act of 1980: Provided further, That
the limitations of this provision shall not apply
to foreign national employees of the Department
of Defense in the Republic of Turkey.
SEC. 8003. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year, unless
expressly so provided herein.
SEC. 8004. No more than 20 percent of the appropriations in this Act which are limited for
obligation during the current fiscal year shall be
obligated during the last 2 months of the fiscal
year: Provided, That this section shall not apply
to obligations for support of active duty training
of reserve components or summer camp training
of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps.
(TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8005. Upon determination by the Secretary of Defense that such action is necessary
in the national interest, he may, with the approval of the Office of Management and Budget,
transfer not to exceed $2,000,000,000 of working
capital funds of the Department of Defense or
funds made available in this Act to the Department of Defense for military functions (except
military construction) between such appropriations or funds or any subdivision thereof, to be
merged with and to be available for the same
purposes, and for the same time period, as the
appropriation or fund to which transferred:
Provided, That such authority to transfer may
not be used unless for higher priority items,
based on unforeseen military requirements, than
those for which originally appropriated and in
no case where the item for which funds are requested has been denied by the Congress: Provided further, That the Secretary of Defense
shall notify the Congress promptly of all transfers made pursuant to this authority or any
other authority in this Act: Provided further,
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That no part of the funds in this Act shall be
available to prepare or present a request to the
Committees on Appropriations for reprogramming of funds, unless for higher priority items,
based on unforeseen military requirements, than
those for which originally appropriated and in
no case where the item for which reprogramming
is requested has been denied by the Congress.
(TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8006. During the current fiscal year, cash
balances in working capital funds of the Department of Defense established pursuant to section 2208 of title 10, United States Code, may be
maintained in only such amounts as are necessary at any time for cash disbursements to be
made from such funds: Provided, That transfers
may be made between such funds: Provided further, That transfers may be made between working capital funds and the ‘‘Foreign Currency
Fluctuations, Defense’’ appropriation and the
‘‘Operation and Maintenance’’ appropriation
accounts in such amounts as may be determined
by the Secretary of Defense, with the approval
of the Office of Management and Budget, except
that such transfers may not be made unless the
Secretary of Defense has notified the Congress
of the proposed transfer. Except in amounts
equal to the amounts appropriated to working
capital funds in this Act, no obligations may be
made against a working capital fund to procure
or increase the value of war reserve material inventory, unless the Secretary of Defense has notified the Congress prior to any such obligation.
SEC. 8007. Funds appropriated by this Act
may not be used to initiate a special access program without prior notification 30 calendar
days in session in advance to the congressional
defense committees.
SEC. 8008. None of the funds provided in this
Act shall be available to initiate: (1) a multiyear
contract that employs economic order quantity
procurement in excess of $20,000,000 in any 1
year of the contract or that includes an unfunded contingent liability in excess of
$20,000,000; or (2) a contract for advance procurement leading to a multiyear contract that
employs economic order quantity procurement in
excess of $20,000,000 in any 1 year, unless the
congressional defense committees have been notified at least 30 days in advance of the proposed contract award: Provided, That no part of
any appropriation contained in this Act shall be
available to initiate a multiyear contract for
which the economic order quantity advance procurement is not funded at least to the limits of
the Government’s liability: Provided further,
That no part of any appropriation contained in
this Act shall be available to initiate multiyear
procurement contracts for any systems or component thereof if the value of the multiyear contract would exceed $500,000,000 unless specifically provided in this Act: Provided further,
That no multiyear procurement contract can be
terminated without 10-day prior notification to
the congressional defense committees: Provided
further, That the execution of multiyear authority shall require the use of a present value analysis to determine lowest cost compared to an annual procurement.
Funds appropriated in title III of this Act may
be used for multiyear procurement contracts as
follows:
Javelin missile; M2A3 Bradley fighting vehicle; DDG–51 destroyer; and UH–60/CH–60 aircraft.
SEC. 8009. Within the funds appropriated for
the operation and maintenance of the Armed
Forces, funds are hereby appropriated pursuant
to section 401 of title 10, United States Code, for
humanitarian and civic assistance costs under
chapter 20 of title 10, United States Code. Such
funds may also be obligated for humanitarian
and civic assistance costs incidental to authorized operations and pursuant to authority
granted in section 401 of chapter 20 of title 10,
United States Code, and these obligations shall
be reported to the Congress on September 30 of
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each year: Provided, That funds available for
operation and maintenance shall be available
for providing humanitarian and similar assistance by using Civic Action Teams in the Trust
Territories of the Pacific Islands and freely associated states of Micronesia, pursuant to the
Compact of Free Association as authorized by
Public Law 99–239: Provided further, That upon
a determination by the Secretary of the Army
that such action is beneficial for graduate medical education programs conducted at Army
medical facilities located in Hawaii, the Secretary of the Army may authorize the provision
of medical services at such facilities and transportation to such facilities, on a nonreimbursable basis, for civilian patients from American
Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern
Mariana Islands, the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and Guam.
SEC. 8010. (a) During fiscal year 2001, the civilian personnel of the Department of Defense
may not be managed on the basis of any endstrength, and the management of such personnel during that fiscal year shall not be subject to any constraint or limitation (known as
an end-strength) on the number of such personnel who may be employed on the last day of
such fiscal year.
(b) The fiscal year 2002 budget request for the
Department of Defense as well as all justification material and other documentation supporting the fiscal year 2002 Department of Defense budget request shall be prepared and submitted to the Congress as if subsections (a) and
(b) of this provision were effective with regard
to fiscal year 2002.
(c) Nothing in this section shall be construed
to apply to military (civilian) technicians.
SEC. 8011. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none of the funds made available by
this Act shall be used by the Department of Defense to exceed, outside the 50 United States, its
territories, and the District of Columbia, 125,000
civilian workyears: Provided, That workyears
shall be applied as defined in the Federal Personnel Manual: Provided further, That
workyears expended in dependent student hiring programs for disadvantaged youths shall
not be included in this workyear limitation.
SEC. 8012. None of the funds made available
by this Act shall be used in any way, directly or
indirectly, to influence congressional action on
any legislation or appropriation matters pending before the Congress.
SEC. 8013. (a) None of the funds appropriated
by this Act shall be used to make contributions
to the Department of Defense Education Benefits Fund pursuant to section 2006(g) of title 10,
United States Code, representing the normal
cost for future benefits under section 3015(d) of
title 38, United States Code, for any member of
the armed services who, on or after the date of
the enactment of this Act, enlists in the armed
services for a period of active duty of less than
3 years, nor shall any amounts representing the
normal cost of such future benefits be transferred from the Fund by the Secretary of the
Treasury to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs
pursuant to section 2006(d) of title 10, United
States Code; nor shall the Secretary of Veterans
Affairs pay such benefits to any such member:
Provided, That these limitations shall not apply
to members in combat arms skills or to members
who enlist in the armed services on or after July
1, 1989, under a program continued or established by the Secretary of Defense in fiscal year
1991 to test the cost-effective use of special recruiting incentives involving not more than 19
noncombat arms skills approved in advance by
the Secretary of Defense: Provided further, That
this subsection applies only to active components of the Army.
(b) None of the funds appropriated by this Act
shall be available for the basic pay and allowances of any member of the Army participating
as a full-time student and receiving benefits
paid by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs from
the Department of Defense Education Benefits
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Fund when time spent as a full-time student is
credited toward completion of a service commitment: Provided, That this subsection shall not
apply to those members who have reenlisted
with this option prior to October 1, 1987: Provided further, That this subsection applies only
to active components of the Army.
SEC. 8014. None of the funds appropriated by
this Act shall be available to convert to contractor performance an activity or function of
the Department of Defense that, on or after the
date of the enactment of this Act, is performed
by more than 10 Department of Defense civilian
employees until a most efficient and cost-effective organization analysis is completed on such
activity or function and certification of the
analysis is made to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and
the Senate: Provided, That this section and subsections (a), (b), and (c) of 10 U.S.C. 2461 shall
not apply to a commercial or industrial type
function of the Department of Defense that: (1)
is included on the procurement list established
pursuant to section 2 of the Act of June 25, 1938
(41 U.S.C. 47), popularly referred to as the Javits-Wagner-O’Day Act; (2) is planned to be converted to performance by a qualified nonprofit
agency for the blind or by a qualified nonprofit
agency for other severely handicapped individuals in accordance with that Act; or (3) is
planned to be converted to performance by a
qualified firm under 51 percent ownership by an
Indian tribe, as defined in section 450b(e) of title
25, United States Code, or a Native Hawaiian
organization, as defined in section 637(a)(15) of
title 15, United States Code.
(TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8015. Funds appropriated in title III of
this Act for the Department of Defense Pilot
Mentor-Protege Program may be transferred to
any other appropriation contained in this Act
solely for the purpose of implementing a Mentor-Protege Program developmental assistance
agreement pursuant to section 831 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal
Year 1991 (Public Law 101–510; 10 U.S.C. 2301
note), as amended, under the authority of this
provision or any other transfer authority contained in this Act.
SEC. 8016. None of the funds in this Act may
be available for the purchase by the Department
of Defense (and its departments and agencies) of
welded shipboard anchor and mooring chain 4
inches in diameter and under unless the anchor
and mooring chain are manufactured in the
United States from components which are substantially manufactured in the United States:
Provided, That for the purpose of this section
manufactured will include cutting, heat treating, quality control, testing of chain and welding (including the forging and shot blasting
process): Provided further, That for the purpose
of this section substantially all of the components of anchor and mooring chain shall be considered to be produced or manufactured in the
United States if the aggregate cost of the components produced or manufactured in the United
States exceeds the aggregate cost of the components produced or manufactured outside the
United States: Provided further, That when
adequate domestic supplies are not available to
meet Department of Defense requirements on a
timely basis, the Secretary of the service responsible for the procurement may waive this restriction on a case-by-case basis by certifying in
writing to the Committees on Appropriations
that such an acquisition must be made in order
to acquire capability for national security purposes.
SEC. 8017. None of the funds appropriated by
this Act available for the Civilian Health and
Medical Program of the Uniformed Services
(CHAMPUS) or TRICARE shall be available for
the reimbursement of any health care provider
for inpatient mental health service for care received when a patient is referred to a provider
of inpatient mental health care or residential
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treatment care by a medical or health care professional having an economic interest in the facility to which the patient is referred: Provided,
That this limitation does not apply in the case
of inpatient mental health services provided
under the program for persons with disabilities
under subsection (d) of section 1079 of title 10,
United States Code, provided as partial hospital
care, or provided pursuant to a waiver authorized by the Secretary of Defense because of medical or psychological circumstances of the patient that are confirmed by a health professional
who is not a Federal employee after a review,
pursuant to rules prescribed by the Secretary,
which takes into account the appropriate level
of care for the patient, the intensity of services
required by the patient, and the availability of
that care.
SEC. 8018. Funds available in this Act may be
used to provide transportation for the next-ofkin of individuals who have been prisoners of
war or missing in action from the Vietnam era
to an annual meeting in the United States,
under such regulations as the Secretary of Defense may prescribe.
SEC. 8019. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, during the current fiscal year, the
Secretary of Defense may, by executive agreement, establish with host nation governments in
NATO member states a separate account into
which such residual value amounts negotiated
in the return of United States military installations in NATO member states may be deposited,
in the currency of the host nation, in lieu of direct monetary transfers to the United States
Treasury: Provided, That such credits may be
utilized only for the construction of facilities to
support United States military forces in that
host nation, or such real property maintenance
and base operating costs that are currently executed through monetary transfers to such host
nations: Provided further, That the Department
of Defense’s budget submission for fiscal year
2002 shall identify such sums anticipated in residual value settlements, and identify such construction, real property maintenance or base operating costs that shall be funded by the host
nation through such credits: Provided further,
That all military construction projects to be executed from such accounts must be previously approved in a prior Act of Congress: Provided further, That each such executive agreement with
a NATO member host nation shall be reported to
the congressional defense committees, the Committee on International Relations of the House
of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate 30 days prior to the
conclusion and endorsement of any such agreement established under this provision.
SEC. 8020. None of the funds available to the
Department of Defense may be used to demilitarize or dispose of M–1 Carbines, M–1 Garand
rifles, M–14 rifles, .22 caliber rifles, .30 caliber rifles, or M–1911 pistols.
SEC. 8021. No more than $500,000 of the funds
appropriated or made available in this Act shall
be used during a single fiscal year for any single
relocation of an organization, unit, activity or
function of the Department of Defense into or
within the National Capital Region: Provided,
That the Secretary of Defense may waive this
restriction on a case-by-case basis by certifying
in writing to the congressional defense committees that such a relocation is required in the
best interest of the Government.
SEC. 8022. In addition to the funds provided
elsewhere in this Act, $8,000,000 is appropriated
only for incentive payments authorized by section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 (25
U.S.C. 1544): Provided, That a subcontractor at
any tier shall be considered a contractor for the
purposes of being allowed additional compensation under section 504 of the Indian Financing
Act of 1974 (25 U.S.C. 1544).
SEC. 8023. During the current fiscal year,
funds appropriated or otherwise available for
any Federal agency, the Congress, the judicial
branch, or the District of Columbia may be used
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for the pay, allowances, and benefits of an employee as defined by section 2105 of title 5,
United States Code, or an individual employed
by the government of the District of Columbia,
permanent or temporary indefinite, who—
(1) is a member of a Reserve component of the
Armed Forces, as described in section 10101 of
title 10, United States Code, or the National
Guard, as described in section 101 of title 32,
United States Code;
(2) performs, for the purpose of providing military aid to enforce the law or providing assistance to civil authorities in the protection or saving of life or property or prevention of injury—
(A) Federal service under sections 331, 332,
333, or 12406 of title 10, United States Code, or
other provision of law, as applicable; or
(B) full-time military service for his or her
State, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or a territory of the
United States; and
(3) requests and is granted—
(A) leave under the authority of this section;
or
(B) annual leave, which may be granted without regard to the provisions of sections 5519 and
6323(b) of title 5, United States Code, if such employee is otherwise entitled to such annual
leave:
Provided, That any employee who requests leave
under subsection (3)(A) for service described in
subsection (2) of this section is entitled to such
leave, subject to the provisions of this section
and of the last sentence of section 6323(b) of title
5, United States Code, and such leave shall be
considered leave under section 6323(b) of title 5,
United States Code.
SEC. 8024. None of the funds appropriated by
this Act shall be available to perform any cost
study pursuant to the provisions of OMB Circular A–76 if the study being performed exceeds
a period of 24 months after initiation of such
study with respect to a single function activity
or 48 months after initiation of such study for a
multi-function activity.
SEC. 8025. Funds appropriated by this Act for
the American Forces Information Service shall
not be used for any national or international
political or psychological activities.
SEC. 8026. Notwithstanding any other provision of law or regulation, the Secretary of Defense may adjust wage rates for civilian employees hired for certain health care occupations as
authorized for the Secretary of Veterans Affairs
by section 7455 of title 38, United States Code.
SEC. 8027. None of the funds appropriated or
made available in this Act shall be used to reduce or disestablish the operation of the 53rd
Weather Reconnaissance Squadron of the Air
Force Reserve, if such action would reduce the
WC–130 Weather Reconnaissance mission below
the levels funded in this Act.
SEC. 8028. (a) Of the funds for the procurement of supplies or services appropriated by this
Act, qualified nonprofit agencies for the blind or
other severely handicapped shall be afforded the
maximum practicable opportunity to participate
as subcontractors and suppliers in the performance of contracts let by the Department of Defense.
(b) During the current fiscal year, a business
concern which has negotiated with a military
service or defense agency a subcontracting plan
for the participation by small business concerns
pursuant to section 8(d) of the Small Business
Act (15 U.S.C. 637(d)) shall be given credit toward meeting that subcontracting goal for any
purchases made from qualified nonprofit agencies for the blind or other severely handicapped.
(c) For the purpose of this section, the phrase
‘‘qualified nonprofit agency for the blind or
other severely handicapped’’ means a nonprofit
agency for the blind or other severely handicapped that has been approved by the Committee for the Purchase from the Blind and
Other Severely Handicapped under the JavitsWagner-O’Day Act (41 U.S.C. 46–48).
SEC. 8029. During the current fiscal year, net
receipts pursuant to collections from third party
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payers pursuant to section 1095 of title 10,
United States Code, shall be made available to
the local facility of the uniformed services responsible for the collections and shall be over
and above the facility’s direct budget amount.
SEC. 8030. During the current fiscal year, the
Department of Defense is authorized to incur
obligations of not to exceed $350,000,000 for purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10,
United States Code, in anticipation of receipt of
contributions, only from the Government of Kuwait, under that section: Provided, That upon
receipt, such contributions from the Government
of Kuwait shall be credited to the appropriations or fund which incurred such obligations.
SEC. 8031. Of the funds made available in this
Act, not less than $21,417,000 shall be available
for the Civil Air Patrol Corporation, of which
$19,417,000 shall be available for Civil Air Patrol
Corporation operation and maintenance to support readiness activities which includes
$2,000,000 for the Civil Air Patrol counterdrug
program: Provided, That funds identified for
‘‘Civil Air Patrol’’ under this section are intended for and shall be for the exclusive use of
the Civil Air Patrol Corporation and not for the
Air Force or any unit thereof.
SEC. 8032. (a) None of the funds appropriated
in this Act are available to establish a new Department of Defense (department) federally
funded research and development center
(FFRDC), either as a new entity, or as a separate entity administrated by an organization
managing another FFRDC, or as a nonprofit
membership corporation consisting of a consortium of other FFRDCs and other non-profit entities.
(b) No member of a Board of Directors, Trustees, Overseers, Advisory Group, Special Issues
Panel, Visiting Committee, or any similar entity
of a defense FFRDC, and no paid consultant to
any defense FFRDC, except when acting in a
technical advisory capacity, may be compensated for his or her services as a member of
such entity, or as a paid consultant by more
than one FFRDC in a fiscal year: Provided,
That a member of any such entity referred to
previously in this subsection shall be allowed
travel expenses and per diem as authorized
under the Federal Joint Travel Regulations,
when engaged in the performance of membership duties.
(c) Notwithstanding any other provision of
law, none of the funds available to the department from any source during fiscal year 2001
may be used by a defense FFRDC, through a fee
or other payment mechanism, for construction
of new buildings, for payment of cost sharing
for projects funded by Government grants, for
absorption of contract overruns, or for certain
charitable contributions, not to include employee participation in community service and/
or development.
(d) Notwithstanding any other provision of
law, of the funds available to the department
during fiscal year 2001, not more than 6,227 staff
years of technical effort (staff years) may be
funded for defense FFRDCs: Provided, That of
the specific amount referred to previously in this
subsection, not more than 1,009 staff years may
be funded for the defense studies and analysis
FFRDCs.
(e) The Secretary of Defense shall, with the
submission of the department’s fiscal year 2002
budget request, submit a report presenting the
specific amounts of staff years of technical effort to be allocated for each defense FFRDC
during that fiscal year.
SEC. 8033. None of the funds appropriated or
made available in this Act shall be used to procure carbon, alloy or armor steel plate for use in
any Government-owned facility or property
under the control of the Department of Defense
which were not melted and rolled in the United
States or Canada: Provided, That these procurement restrictions shall apply to any and all Federal Supply Class 9515, American Society of
Testing and Materials (ASTM) or American Iron
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and Steel Institute (AISI) specifications of carbon, alloy or armor steel plate: Provided further,
That the Secretary of the military department
responsible for the procurement may waive this
restriction on a case-by-case basis by certifying
in writing to the Committees on Appropriations
of the House of Representatives and the Senate
that adequate domestic supplies are not available to meet Department of Defense requirements on a timely basis and that such an acquisition must be made in order to acquire capability for national security purposes: Provided
further, That these restrictions shall not apply
to contracts which are in being as of the date of
the enactment of this Act.
SEC. 8034. For the purposes of this Act, the
term ‘‘congressional defense committees’’ means
the Armed Services Committee of the House of
Representatives, the Armed Services Committee
of the Senate, the Subcommittee on Defense of
the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate,
and the Subcommittee on Defense of the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives.
SEC. 8035. During the current fiscal year, the
Department of Defense may acquire the modification, depot maintenance and repair of aircraft, vehicles and vessels as well as the production of components and other Defense-related
articles, through competition between Department of Defense depot maintenance activities
and private firms: Provided, That the Senior Acquisition Executive of the military department
or defense agency concerned, with power of delegation, shall certify that successful bids include comparable estimates of all direct and indirect costs for both public and private bids:
Provided further, That Office of Management
and Budget Circular A–76 shall not apply to
competitions conducted under this section.
SEC. 8036. (a)(1) If the Secretary of Defense,
after consultation with the United States Trade
Representative, determines that a foreign country which is party to an agreement described in
paragraph (2) has violated the terms of the
agreement by discriminating against certain
types of products produced in the United States
that are covered by the agreement, the Secretary
of Defense shall rescind the Secretary’s blanket
waiver of the Buy American Act with respect to
such types of products produced in that foreign
country.
(2) An agreement referred to in paragraph (1)
is any reciprocal defense procurement memorandum of understanding, between the United
States and a foreign country pursuant to which
the Secretary of Defense has prospectively
waived the Buy American Act for certain products in that country.
(b) The Secretary of Defense shall submit to
the Congress a report on the amount of Department of Defense purchases from foreign entities
in fiscal year 2001. Such report shall separately
indicate the dollar value of items for which the
Buy American Act was waived pursuant to any
agreement described in subsection (a)(2), the
Trade Agreement Act of 1979 (19 U.S.C. 2501 et
seq.), or any international agreement to which
the United States is a party.
(c) For purposes of this section, the term ‘‘Buy
American Act’’ means title III of the Act entitled
‘‘An Act making appropriations for the Treasury and Post Office Departments for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1934, and for other purposes’’, approved March 3, 1933 (41 U.S.C. 10a et
seq.).
SEC. 8037. Appropriations contained in this
Act that remain available at the end of the current fiscal year as a result of energy cost savings realized by the Department of Defense shall
remain available for obligation for the next fiscal year to the extent, and for the purposes, provided in section 2865 of title 10, United States
Code.
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8038. Amounts deposited during the current fiscal year to the special account estab-
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lished under 40 U.S.C. 485(h)(2) and to the special account established under 10 U.S.C.
2667(d)(1) are appropriated and shall be available until transferred by the Secretary of Defense to current applicable appropriations or
funds of the Department of Defense under the
terms and conditions specified by 40 U.S.C.
485(h)(2) (A) and (B) and 10 U.S.C.
2667(d)(1)(B), to be merged with and to be available for the same time period and the same purposes as the appropriation to which transferred.
SEC. 8039. The President shall include with
each budget for a fiscal year submitted to the
Congress under section 1105 of title 31, United
States Code, materials that shall identify clearly
and separately the amounts requested in the
budget for appropriation for that fiscal year for
salaries and expenses related to administrative
activities of the Department of Defense, the military departments, and the defense agencies.
SEC. 8040. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds available for ‘‘Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense’’ may
be obligated for the Young Marines program.
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8041. During the current fiscal year,
amounts contained in the Department of Defense Overseas Military Facility Investment Recovery Account established by section 2921(c)(1)
of the National Defense Authorization Act of
1991 (Public Law 101–510; 10 U.S.C. 2687 note)
shall be available until expended for the payments specified by section 2921(c)(2) of that Act:
Provided, That none of the funds made available for expenditure under this section may be
transferred or obligated until 30 days after the
Secretary of Defense submits a report which details the balance available in the Overseas Military Facility Investment Recovery Account, all
projected income into the account during fiscal
years 2001 and 2002, and the specific expenditures to be made using funds transferred from
this account during fiscal year 2001.
SEC. 8042. Of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this Act, not more than
$119,200,000 shall be available for payment of
the operating costs of NATO Headquarters: Provided, That the Secretary of Defense may waive
this section for Department of Defense support
provided to NATO forces in and around the
former Yugoslavia.
SEC. 8043. During the current fiscal year, appropriations which are available to the Department of Defense for operation and maintenance
may be used to purchase items having an investment item unit cost of not more than $100,000.
SEC. 8044. (a) During the current fiscal year,
none of the appropriations or funds available to
the Department of Defense Working Capital
Funds shall be used for the purchase of an investment item for the purpose of acquiring a
new inventory item for sale or anticipated sale
during the current fiscal year or a subsequent
fiscal year to customers of the Department of
Defense Working Capital Funds if such an item
would not have been chargeable to the Department of Defense Business Operations Fund during fiscal year 1994 and if the purchase of such
an investment item would be chargeable during
the current fiscal year to appropriations made
to the Department of Defense for procurement.
(b) The fiscal year 2002 budget request for the
Department of Defense as well as all justification material and other documentation supporting the fiscal year 2002 Department of Defense budget shall be prepared and submitted to
the Congress on the basis that any equipment
which was classified as an end item and funded
in a procurement appropriation contained in
this Act shall be budgeted for in a proposed fiscal year 2002 procurement appropriation and
not in the supply management business area or
any other area or category of the Department of
Defense Working Capital Funds.
SEC. 8045. None of the funds appropriated by
this Act for programs of the Central Intelligence
Agency shall remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year, except for funds
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appropriated for the Reserve for Contingencies,
which shall remain available until September 30,
2002: Provided, That funds appropriated, transferred, or otherwise credited to the Central Intelligence Agency Central Services Working
Capital Fund during this or any prior or subsequent fiscal year shall remain available until expended.
SEC. 8046. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds made available in this Act for
the Defense Intelligence Agency may be used for
the design, development, and deployment of
General Defense Intelligence Program intelligence communications and intelligence information systems for the Services, the Unified and
Specified Commands, and the component commands.
SEC. 8047. Of the funds appropriated by the
Department of Defense under the heading ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’, not
less than $10,000,000 shall be made available
only for the mitigation of environmental impacts, including training and technical assistance to tribes, related administrative support,
the gathering of information, documenting of
environmental damage, and developing a system
for prioritization of mitigation and cost to complete estimates for mitigation, on Indian lands
resulting from Department of Defense activities.
SEC. 8048. Amounts collected for the use of the
facilities of the National Science Center for
Communications and Electronics during the current fiscal year pursuant to section 1459(g) of
the Department of Defense Authorization Act,
1986, and deposited to the special account established under subsection 1459(g)(2) of that Act
are appropriated and shall be available until expended for the operation and maintenance of
the Center as provided for in subsection
1459(g)(2).
SEC. 8049. None of the funds appropriated in
this Act may be used to fill the commander’s position at any military medical facility with a
health care professional unless the prospective
candidate can demonstrate professional administrative skills.
SEC. 8050. (a) None of the funds appropriated
in this Act may be expended by an entity of the
Department of Defense unless the entity, in expending the funds, complies with the Buy American Act. For purposes of this subsection, the
term ‘‘Buy American Act’’ means title III of the
Act entitled ‘‘An Act making appropriations for
the Treasury and Post Office Departments for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1934, and for
other purposes’’, approved March 3, 1933 (41
U.S.C. 10a et seq.).
(b) If the Secretary of Defense determines that
a person has been convicted of intentionally
affixing a label bearing a ‘‘Made in America’’
inscription to any product sold in or shipped to
the United States that is not made in America,
the Secretary shall determine, in accordance
with section 2410f of title 10, United States Code,
whether the person should be debarred from
contracting with the Department of Defense.
(c) In the case of any equipment or products
purchased with appropriations provided under
this Act, it is the sense of the Congress that any
entity of the Department of Defense, in expending the appropriation, purchase only Americanmade equipment and products, provided that
American-made equipment and products are
cost-competitive, quality-competitive, and available in a timely fashion.
SEC. 8051. None of the funds appropriated by
this Act shall be available for a contract for
studies, analysis, or consulting services entered
into without competition on the basis of an unsolicited proposal unless the head of the activity
responsible for the procurement determines—
(1) as a result of thorough technical evaluation, only one source is found fully qualified to
perform the proposed work;
(2) the purpose of the contract is to explore an
unsolicited proposal which offers significant scientific or technological promise, represents the
product of original thinking, and was submitted
in confidence by one source; or
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(3) the purpose of the contract is to take advantage of unique and significant industrial accomplishment by a specific concern, or to insure
that a new product or idea of a specific concern
is given financial support:
Provided, That this limitation shall not apply to
contracts in an amount of less than $25,000, contracts related to improvements of equipment that
is in development or production, or contracts as
to which a civilian official of the Department of
Defense, who has been confirmed by the Senate,
determines that the award of such contract is in
the interest of the national defense.
SEC. 8052. (a) Except as provided in subsections (b) and (c), none of the funds made
available by this Act may be used—
(1) to establish a field operating agency; or
(2) to pay the basic pay of a member of the
Armed Forces or civilian employee of the department who is transferred or reassigned from a
headquarters activity if the member or employee’s place of duty remains at the location of that
headquarters.
(b) The Secretary of Defense or Secretary of a
military department may waive the limitations
in subsection (a), on a case-by-case basis, if the
Secretary determines, and certifies to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate that the granting of the
waiver will reduce the personnel requirements or
the financial requirements of the department.
(c) This section does not apply to field operating agencies funded within the National Foreign Intelligence Program.
SEC. 8053. Funds appropriated by this Act, or
made available by the transfer of funds in this
Act, for intelligence activities are deemed to be
specifically authorized by the Congress for purposes of section 504 of the National Security Act
of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 414) during fiscal year 2001
until the enactment of the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001.
SEC. 8054. Notwithstanding section 303 of Public Law 96–487 or any other provision of law, the
Secretary of the Navy is authorized to lease real
and personal property at Naval Air Facility,
Adak, Alaska, pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 2667(f), for
commercial, industrial or other purposes: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of the Navy may remove hazardous materials from facilities, buildings, and structures at Adak, Alaska, and may
demolish or otherwise dispose of such facilities,
buildings, and structures.
(RESCISSIONS)
SEC. 8055. Of the funds provided in Department of Defense Appropriations Acts, the following funds are hereby rescinded as of the date
of enactment of this Act, or October 1, 2000,
whichever is later, from the following accounts
in the specified amounts:
‘‘Aircraft Procurement, Army, 2000/2002’’,
$7,000,000;
‘‘Missile Procurement, Army, 2000/2002’’,
$6,000,000;
‘‘Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army, 2000/2002’’, $7,000,000;
‘‘Procurement of Ammunition, Army, 2000/
2002’’, $5,000,000;
‘‘Other
Procurement,
Army,
2000/2002’’,
$16,000,000;
‘‘Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2000/2002’’,
$24,125,000;
‘‘Weapons Procurement, Navy, 2000/2002’’,
$3,853,000;
‘‘Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps, 2000/2002’’, $1,463,000;
‘‘Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy, 2000/
2004’’, $19,644,000;
‘‘Other
Procurement,
Navy,
2000/2002’’,
$12,032,000;
‘‘Procurement, Marine Corps, 2000/2002’’,
$3,623,000;
‘‘Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2000/2002’’,
$32,743,000;
‘‘Missile Procurement, Air Force, 2000/2002’’,
$5,500,000;
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‘‘Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force, 2000/
2002’’, $1,232,000;
‘‘Other Procurement, Air Force, 2000/2002’’,
$19,902,000;
‘‘Procurement,
Defense-Wide,
2000/2002’’,
$6,683,000;
‘‘Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army, 2000/2001’’, $20,592,000;
‘‘Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy, 2000/2001’’, $35,621,000;
‘‘Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force, 2000/2001’’, $53,467,000;
‘‘Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide, 2000/2001’’, $36,297,000;
‘‘Defense
Health
Program,
2000/2002’’,
$808,000; and
‘‘Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction,
Army, 2000/2002’’, $1,103,000:
Provided, That these reductions shall be applied
proportionally to each budget activity, activity
group and subactivity group and each program,
project and activity within each appropriation
account: Provided further, That such proportionate reduction shall not be applied to any
funds that will not remain available for obligation beyond fiscal year 2000: Provided further,
That the following additional amounts are hereby rescinded as of the date of enactment of this
Act, or October 1, 2000, whichever is later, from
the following accounts in the specified amounts:
‘‘Other
Procurement,
Army,
1999/2001’’,
$3,000,000;
‘‘Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 1999/2001’’,
$12,300,000;
‘‘Other Procurement, Air Force, 1999/2001’’,
$8,000,000;
‘‘Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army, 2000/2002’’, $23,000,000;
‘‘Other
Procurement,
Army,
2000/2002’’,
$29,300,000;
‘‘Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2000/2002’’,
$6,500,000;
‘‘Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2000/2002’’,
$24,000,000;
‘‘Missile Procurement, Air Force, 2000/2002’’,
$36,192,000;
‘‘Other Procurement, Air Force, 2000/2002’’,
$20,000,000;
‘‘Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army, 2000/2001’’, $22,000,000;
‘‘Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force, 2000/2001’’, $30,000,000; and
‘‘Reserve Mobilization Income Insurance
Fund’’, $13,000,000.
SEC. 8056. None of the funds available in this
Act may be used to reduce the authorized positions for military (civilian) technicians of the
Army National Guard, the Air National Guard,
Army Reserve and Air Force Reserve for the
purpose of applying any administratively imposed civilian personnel ceiling, freeze, or reduction on military (civilian) technicians, unless
such reductions are a direct result of a reduction in military force structure.
SEC. 8057. None of the funds appropriated or
otherwise made available in this Act may be obligated or expended for assistance to the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea unless
specifically appropriated for that purpose.
SEC. 8058. During the current fiscal year,
funds appropriated in this Act are available to
compensate members of the National Guard for
duty performed pursuant to a plan submitted by
a Governor of a State and approved by the Secretary of Defense under section 112 of title 32,
United States Code: Provided, That during the
performance of such duty, the members of the
National Guard shall be under State command
and control: Provided further, That such duty
shall be treated as full-time National Guard
duty for purposes of sections 12602(a)(2) and
(b)(2) of title 10, United States Code.
SEC. 8059. Funds appropriated in this Act for
operation and maintenance of the Military Departments, Combatant Commands and Defense
Agencies shall be available for reimbursement of
pay, allowances and other expenses which
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would otherwise be incurred against appropriations for the National Guard and Reserve when
members of the National Guard and Reserve
provide intelligence or counterintelligence support to Combatant Commands, Defense Agencies
and Joint Intelligence Activities, including the
activities and programs included within the National Foreign Intelligence Program (NFIP), the
Joint Military Intelligence Program (JMIP), and
the Tactical Intelligence and Related Activities
(TIARA) aggregate: Provided, That nothing in
this section authorizes deviation from established Reserve and National Guard personnel
and training procedures.
SEC. 8060. During the current fiscal year, none
of the funds appropriated in this Act may be
used to reduce the civilian medical and medical
support personnel assigned to military treatment
facilities below the September 30, 2000 level: Provided, That the Service Surgeons General may
waive this section by certifying to the congressional defense committees that the beneficiary
population is declining in some catchment areas
and civilian strength reductions may be consistent with responsible resource stewardship
and capitation-based budgeting.
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8061. None of the funds appropriated in
this Act may be transferred to or obligated from
the Pentagon Reservation Maintenance Revolving Fund, unless the Secretary of Defense certifies that the total cost for the planning, design, construction and installation of equipment
for the renovation of the Pentagon Reservation
will not exceed $1,222,000,000.
SEC. 8062. (a) None of the funds available to
the Department of Defense for any fiscal year
for drug interdiction or counter-drug activities
may be transferred to any other department or
agency of the United States except as specifically provided in an appropriations law.
(b) None of the funds available to the Central
Intelligence Agency for any fiscal year for drug
interdiction and counter-drug activities may be
transferred to any other department or agency
of the United States except as specifically provided in an appropriations law.
(TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8063. Appropriations available in this Act
under the heading ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’ for increasing energy and
water efficiency in Federal buildings may, during their period of availability, be transferred to
other appropriations or funds of the Department
of Defense for projects related to increasing energy and water efficiency, to be merged with
and to be available for the same general purposes, and for the same time period, as the appropriation or fund to which transferred.
SEC. 8064. None of the funds appropriated in
fiscal year 2000 and by this Act may be used for
the procurement of vessel propellers and ball
and roller bearings other than those produced
by a domestic source and of domestic origin:
Provided, That the Secretary of the military department responsible for such procurement may
waive this restriction on a case-by-case basis by
certifying in writing to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives
and the Senate, that adequate domestic supplies
are not available to meet Department of Defense
requirements on a timely basis and that such an
acquisition must be made in order to acquire capability for national security purposes: Provided
further, That this restriction shall not apply to
the purchase of ‘‘commercial items’’, as defined
by section 4(12) of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, except that the restriction shall
apply to ball or roller bearings purchased as end
items.
SEC. 8065. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds available to the Department
of Defense shall be made available to provide
transportation of medical supplies and equipment, on a nonreimbursable basis, to American
Samoa, and funds available to the Department
of Defense shall be made available to provide
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transportation of medical supplies and equipment, on a nonreimbursable basis, to the Indian
Health Service when it is in conjunction with a
civil-military project.
SEC. 8066. None of the funds in this Act may
be used to purchase any supercomputer which is
not manufactured in the United States, unless
the Secretary of Defense certifies to the congressional defense committees that such an acquisition must be made in order to acquire capability
for national security purposes that is not available from United States manufacturers.
SEC. 8067. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Naval shipyards of the United
States shall be eligible to participate in any
manufacturing extension program financed by
funds appropriated in this or any other Act.
SEC. 8068. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, each contract awarded by the Department of Defense during the current fiscal
year for construction or service performed in
whole or in part in a State (as defined in section
381(d) of title 10, United States Code) which is
not contiguous with another State and has an
unemployment rate in excess of the national average rate of unemployment as determined by
the Secretary of Labor, shall include a provision
requiring the contractor to employ, for the purpose of performing that portion of the contract
in such State that is not contiguous with another State, individuals who are residents of
such State and who, in the case of any craft or
trade, possess or would be able to acquire
promptly the necessary skills: Provided, That
the Secretary of Defense may waive the requirements of this section, on a case-by-case basis, in
the interest of national security.
SEC. 8069. During the current fiscal year, the
Army shall use the former George Air Force
Base as the airhead for the National Training
Center at Fort Irwin: Provided, That none of
the funds in this Act shall be obligated or expended to transport Army personnel into Edwards Air Force Base for training rotations at
the National Training Center.
SEC. 8070. (a) LIMITATION ON TRANSFER OF
DEFENSE ARTICLES AND SERVICES.—Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none of the
funds available to the Department of Defense
for the current fiscal year may be obligated or
expended to transfer to another nation or an
international organization any defense articles
or services (other than intelligence services) for
use in the activities described in subsection (b)
unless the congressional defense committees, the
Committee on International Relations of the
House of Representatives, and the Committee on
Foreign Relations of the Senate are notified 15
days in advance of such transfer.
(b) COVERED ACTIVITIES.—This section applies
to—
(1) any international peacekeeping or peaceenforcement operation under the authority of
chapter VI or chapter VII of the United Nations
Charter under the authority of a United Nations
Security Council resolution; and
(2) any other international peacekeeping,
peace-enforcement, or humanitarian assistance
operation.
(c) REQUIRED NOTICE.—A notice under subsection (a) shall include the following:
(1) A description of the equipment, supplies,
or services to be transferred.
(2) A statement of the value of the equipment,
supplies, or services to be transferred.
(3) In the case of a proposed transfer of equipment or supplies—
(A) a statement of whether the inventory requirements of all elements of the Armed Forces
(including the reserve components) for the type
of equipment or supplies to be transferred have
been met; and
(B) a statement of whether the items proposed
to be transferred will have to be replaced and,
if so, how the President proposes to provide
funds for such replacement.
SEC. 8071. To the extent authorized by subchapter VI of chapter 148 of title 10, United
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States Code, the Secretary of Defense may issue
loan guarantees in support of United States defense exports not otherwise provided for: Provided, That the total contingent liability of the
United States for guarantees issued under the
authority of this section may not exceed
$15,000,000,000: Provided further, That the exposure fees charged and collected by the Secretary
for each guarantee shall be paid by the country
involved and shall not be financed as part of a
loan guaranteed by the United States: Provided
further, That the Secretary shall provide quarterly reports to the Committees on Appropriations, Armed Services, and Foreign Relations of
the Senate and the Committees on Appropriations, Armed Services, and International Relations in the House of Representatives on the implementation of this program: Provided further,
That amounts charged for administrative fees
and deposited to the special account provided
for under section 2540c(d) of title 10, shall be
available for paying the costs of administrative
expenses of the Department of Defense that are
attributable to the loan guarantee program
under subchapter VI of chapter 148 of title 10,
United States Code.
SEC. 8072. None of the funds available to the
Department of Defense under this Act shall be
obligated or expended to pay a contractor under
a contract with the Department of Defense for
costs of any amount paid by the contractor to
an employee when—
(1) such costs are for a bonus or otherwise in
excess of the normal salary paid by the contractor to the employee; and
(2) such bonus is part of restructuring costs
associated with a business combination.
SEC. 8073. (a) None of the funds appropriated
or otherwise made available in this Act may be
used to transport or provide for the transportation of chemical munitions or agents to the
Johnston Atoll for the purpose of storing or demilitarizing such munitions or agents.
(b) The prohibition in subsection (a) shall not
apply to any obsolete World War II chemical
munition or agent of the United States found in
the World War II Pacific Theater of Operations.
(c) The President may suspend the application
of subsection (a) during a period of war in
which the United States is a party.
SEC. 8074. None of the funds provided in title
II of this Act for ‘‘Former Soviet Union Threat
Reduction’’ may be obligated or expended to finance housing for any individual who was a
member of the military forces of the Soviet
Union or for any individual who is or was a
member of the military forces of the Russian
Federation.
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8075. During the current fiscal year, no
more than $30,000,000 of appropriations made in
this Act under the heading ‘‘Operation and
Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’ may be transferred to appropriations available for the pay of
military personnel, to be merged with, and to be
available for the same time period as the appropriations to which transferred, to be used in
support of such personnel in connection with
support and services for eligible organizations
and activities outside the Department of Defense
pursuant to section 2012 of title 10, United
States Code.
SEC. 8076. For purposes of section 1553(b) of
title 31, United States Code, any subdivision of
appropriations made in this Act under the heading ‘‘Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy’’ shall
be considered to be for the same purpose as any
subdivision under the heading ‘‘Shipbuilding
and Conversion, Navy’’ appropriations in any
prior year, and the 1 percent limitation shall
apply to the total amount of the appropriation.
SEC. 8077. During the current fiscal year, in
the case of an appropriation account of the Department of Defense for which the period of
availability for obligation has expired or which
has closed under the provisions of section 1552
of title 31, United States Code, and which has a
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negative unliquidated or unexpended balance,
an obligation or an adjustment of an obligation
may be charged to any current appropriation
account for the same purpose as the expired or
closed account if—
(1) the obligation would have been properly
chargeable (except as to amount) to the expired
or closed account before the end of the period of
availability or closing of that account;
(2) the obligation is not otherwise properly
chargeable to any current appropriation account of the Department of Defense; and
(3) in the case of an expired account, the obligation is not chargeable to a current appropriation of the Department of Defense under the
provisions of section 1405(b)(8) of the National
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991,
Public Law 101–510, as amended (31 U.S.C. 1551
note): Provided, That in the case of an expired
account, if subsequent review or investigation
discloses that there was not in fact a negative
unliquidated or unexpended balance in the account, any charge to a current account under
the authority of this section shall be reversed
and recorded against the expired account: Provided further, That the total amount charged to
a current appropriation under this section may
not exceed an amount equal to 1 percent of the
total appropriation for that account.
SEC. 8078. The Under Secretary of Defense
(Comptroller) shall submit to the congressional
defense committees by February 1, 2001, a detailed report identifying, by amount and by separate budget activity, activity group, subactivity
group, line item, program element, program,
project, subproject, and activity, any activity
for which the fiscal year 2002 budget request
was reduced because the Congress appropriated
funds above the President’s budget request for
that specific activity for fiscal year 2001.
SEC. 8079. Funds appropriated in title II of
this Act and for the Defense Health Program in
title VI of this Act for supervision and administration costs for facilities maintenance and repair, minor construction, or design projects may
be obligated at the time the reimbursable order
is accepted by the performing activity: Provided,
That for the purpose of this section, supervision
and administration costs includes all in-house
Government cost.
SEC. 8080. During the current fiscal year, the
Secretary of Defense may waive reimbursement
of the cost of conferences, seminars, courses of
instruction, or similar educational activities of
the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies for
military officers and civilian officials of foreign
nations if the Secretary determines that attendance by such personnel, without reimbursement,
is in the national security interest of the United
States: Provided, That costs for which reimbursement is waived pursuant to this section
shall be paid from appropriations available for
the Asia-Pacific Center.
SEC. 8081. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Chief of the National Guard
Bureau may permit the use of equipment of the
National Guard Distance Learning Project by
any person or entity on a space-available, reimbursable basis. The Chief of the National Guard
Bureau shall establish the amount of reimbursement for such use on a case-by-case basis.
(b) Amounts collected under subsection (a)
shall be credited to funds available for the National Guard Distance Learning Project and be
available to defray the costs associated with the
use of equipment of the project under that subsection. Such funds shall be available for such
purposes without fiscal year limitation.
SEC. 8082. Using funds available by this Act or
any other Act, the Secretary of the Air Force,
pursuant to a determination under section 2690
of title 10, United States Code, may implement
cost-effective agreements for required heating
facility modernization in the Kaiserslautern
Military Community in the Federal Republic of
Germany: Provided, That in the City of
Kaiserslautern such agreements will include the
use of United States anthracite as the base load
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energy for municipal district heat to the United
States Defense installations: Provided further,
That at Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center and Ramstein Air Base, furnished heat may
be obtained from private, regional or municipal
services, if provisions are included for the consideration of United States coal as an energy
source.
SEC. 8083. Notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3902,
during the current fiscal year, interest penalties
may be paid by the Department of Defense from
funds financing the operation of the military
department or defense agency with which the
invoice or contract payment is associated.
SEC. 8084. None of the funds appropriated in
title IV of this Act may be used to procure enditems for delivery to military forces for operational training, operational use or inventory
requirements: Provided, That this restriction
does not apply to end-items used in development, prototyping, and test activities preceding
and leading to acceptance for operational use:
Provided further, That this restriction does not
apply to programs funded within the National
Foreign Intelligence Program: Provided further,
That the Secretary of Defense may waive this
restriction on a case-by-case basis by certifying
in writing to the Committees on Appropriations
of the House of Representatives and the Senate
that it is in the national security interest to do
so.
SEC. 8085. Notwithstanding any other provision in this Act, the total amount appropriated
in this Act is hereby reduced by $800,000,000 to
reflect working capital fund cash balance and
rate stabilization adjustments, to be distributed
as follows:
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Army’’,
$40,794,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Navy’’,
$271,856,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Marine
Corps’’, $5,006,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force’’,
$294,209,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, DefenseWide’’, $10,864,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve’’,
$31,669,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps
Reserve’’, $563,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve’’, $43,974,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Army National
Guard’’, $15,572,000; and
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air National
Guard’’, $85,493,000.
SEC. 8086. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, the amounts provided in all appropriation accounts in titles III and IV of this
Act are hereby reduced by 0.7 percent: Provided,
That these reductions shall be applied on a prorata basis to each line item, program element,
program, project, subproject, and activity within
each appropriation account: Provided further,
That not later than 60 days after the enactment
of this Act, the Under Secretary of Defense
(Comptroller) shall submit a report to the congressional defense committees listing the specific
funding reductions allocated to each category
listed in the preceding proviso pursuant to this
section.
SEC. 8087. None of the funds made available in
this Act may be used to approve or license the
sale of the F–22 advanced tactical fighter to any
foreign government.
SEC. 8088. (a) The Secretary of Defense may,
on a case-by-case basis, waive with respect to a
foreign country each limitation on the procurement of defense items from foreign sources provided in law if the Secretary determines that the
application of the limitation with respect to that
country would invalidate cooperative programs
entered into between the Department of Defense
and the foreign country, or would invalidate reciprocal trade agreements for the procurement of
defense items entered into under section 2531 of
title 10, United States Code, and the country
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does not discriminate against the same or similar defense items produced in the United States
for that country.
(b) Subsection (a) applies with respect to—
(1) contracts and subcontracts entered into on
or after the date of the enactment of this Act;
and
(2) options for the procurement of items that
are exercised after such date under contracts
that are entered into before such date if the option prices are adjusted for any reason other
than the application of a waiver granted under
subsection (a).
(c) Subsection (a) does not apply to a limitation regarding construction of public vessels,
ball and roller bearings, food, and clothing or
textile materials as defined by section 11 (chapters 50–65) of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule
and products classified under headings 4010,
4202, 4203, 6401 through 6406, 6505, 7019, 7218
through 7229, 7304.41 through 7304.49, 7306.40,
7502 through 7508, 8105, 8108, 8109, 8211, 8215,
and 9404.
SEC. 8089. Funds made available to the Civil
Air Patrol in this Act under the heading ‘‘Drug
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense’’ may be used for the Civil Air Patrol Corporation’s counterdrug program, including its
demand reduction program involving youth programs, as well as operational and training drug
reconnaissance missions for Federal, State, and
local government agencies; for administrative
costs, including the hiring of Civil Air Patrol
Corporation employees; for travel and per diem
expenses of Civil Air Patrol Corporation personnel in support of those missions; and for
equipment needed for mission support or performance: Provided, That the Department of the
Air Force should waive reimbursement from the
Federal, State, and local government agencies
for the use of these funds.
SEC. 8090. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the TRICARE managed care support contracts in effect, or in final stages of acquisition as of September 30, 2000, may be extended for 2 years: Provided, That any such extension may only take place if the Secretary of
Defense determines that it is in the best interest
of the Government: Provided further, That any
contract extension shall be based on the price in
the final best and final offer for the last year of
the existing contract as adjusted for inflation
and other factors mutually agreed to by the contractor and the Government: Provided further,
That notwithstanding any other provision of
law, all future TRICARE managed care support
contracts replacing contracts in effect, or in the
final stages of acquisition as of September 30,
2000, may include a base contract period for
transition and up to seven 1-year option periods.
SEC. 8091. None of the funds in this Act may
be used to compensate an employee of the Department of Defense who initiates a new start
program without notification to the Office of the
Secretary of Defense, the Office of Management
and Budget, and the congressional defense committees, as required by Department of Defense
financial management regulations.
SEC. 8092. (a) PROHIBITION.—None of the
funds made available by this Act may be used to
support any training program involving a unit
of the security forces of a foreign country if the
Secretary of Defense has received credible information from the Department of State that the
unit has committed a gross violation of human
rights, unless all necessary corrective steps have
been taken.
(b) MONITORING.—The Secretary of Defense,
in consultation with the Secretary of State,
shall ensure that prior to a decision to conduct
any training program referred to in subsection
(a), full consideration is given to all credible information available to the Department of State
relating to human rights violations by foreign
security forces.
(c) WAIVER.—The Secretary of Defense, after
consultation with the Secretary of State, may
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waive the prohibition in subsection (a) if he determines that such waiver is required by extraordinary circumstances.
(d) REPORT.—Not more than 15 days after the
exercise of any waiver under subsection (c), the
Secretary of Defense shall submit a report to the
congressional defense committees describing the
extraordinary circumstances, the purpose and
duration of the training program, the United
States forces and the foreign security forces involved in the training program, and the information relating to human rights violations that
necessitates the waiver.
SEC. 8093. The Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of Health and Human
Services, may carry out a program to distribute
surplus dental equipment of the Department of
Defense, at no cost to the Department of Defense, to Indian health service facilities and to
federally-qualified health centers (within the
meaning of section 1905(l)(2)(B) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396d(l)(2)(B))).
SEC. 8094. Notwithstanding any other provision in this Act, the total amount appropriated
in this Act is hereby reduced by $856,900,000 to
reflect savings from favorable foreign currency
fluctuations, to be distributed as follows:
‘‘Military Personnel, Army’’, $177,200,000;
‘‘Military Personnel, Navy’’, $53,400,000;
‘‘Military
Personnel,
Marine
Corps’’,
$14,200,000;
‘‘Military Personnel, Air Force’’, $147,600,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Army’’,
$272,200,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Navy’’,
$47,000,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Marine
Corps’’, $2,200,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force’’,
$96,000,000;
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, DefenseWide’’, $26,400,000; and
‘‘Defense Health Program’’, $20,700,000.
SEC. 8095. None of the funds appropriated or
made available in this Act to the Department of
the Navy shall be used to develop, lease or procure the ADC(X) class of ships unless the main
propulsion diesel engines and propulsors are
manufactured in the United States by a domestically operated entity: Provided, That the Secretary of Defense may waive this restriction on
a case-by-case basis by certifying in writing to
the Committees on Appropriations of the House
of Representatives and the Senate that adequate
domestic supplies are not available to meet Department of Defense requirements on a timely
basis and that such an acquisition must be made
in order to acquire capability for national security purposes or there exists a significant cost or
quality difference.
SEC. 8096. Of the funds made available in this
Act, not less than $65,200,000 shall be available
to maintain an attrition reserve force of 18 B–52
aircraft, of which $3,200,000 shall be available
from
‘‘Military
Personnel,
Air
Force’’,
$36,900,000 shall be available from ‘‘Operation
and Maintenance, Air Force’’, and $25,100,000
shall be available from ‘‘Aircraft Procurement,
Air Force’’: Provided, That the Secretary of the
Air Force shall maintain a total force of 94 B–
52 aircraft, including 18 attrition reserve aircraft, during fiscal year 2001: Provided further,
That the Secretary of Defense shall include in
the Air Force budget request for fiscal year 2002
amounts sufficient to maintain a B–52 force totaling 94 aircraft.
SEC. 8097. The budget of the President for fiscal year 2002 submitted to the Congress pursuant to section 1105 of title 31, United States
Code, and each annual budget request thereafter, shall include separate budget justification
documents for costs of United States Armed
Forces’ participation in contingency operations
for the Military Personnel accounts, the Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer Fund,
the Operation and Maintenance accounts, and
the Procurement accounts: Provided, That these
budget justification documents shall include a
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description of the funding requested for each
anticipated contingency operation, for each
military service, to include active duty and
Guard and Reserve components, and for each
appropriation account: Provided further, That
these documents shall include estimated costs
for each element of expense or object class, a
reconciliation of increases and decreases for ongoing contingency operations, and programmatic data including, but not limited to
troop strength for each active duty and Guard
and Reserve component, and estimates of the
major weapons systems deployed in support of
each contingency: Provided further, That these
documents shall include budget exhibits OP–5
and OP–32, as defined in the Department of Defense Financial Management Regulation, for
the Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer
Fund for fiscal years 2000 and 2001.
SEC. 8098. None of the funds appropriated or
otherwise made available by this or other Department of Defense Appropriations Acts may be
obligated or expended for the purpose of performing repairs or maintenance to military family housing units of the Department of Defense,
including areas in such military family housing
units that may be used for the purpose of conducting official Department of Defense business.
SEC. 8099. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds appropriated in this Act
under the heading ‘‘Research, Development,
Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide’’ for any
advanced concept technology demonstration
project may only be obligated 30 days after a report, including a description of the project and
its estimated annual and total cost, has been
provided in writing to the congressional defense
committees: Provided, That the Secretary of Defense may waive this restriction on a case-bycase basis by certifying to the congressional defense committees that it is in the national interest to do so.
SEC. 8100. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for the purpose of establishing all
Department of Defense policies governing the
provision of care provided by and financed
under the military health care system’s case
management
program
under
10
U.S.C.
1079(a)(17), the term ‘‘custodial care’’ shall be
defined as care designed essentially to assist an
individual in meeting the activities of daily living and which does not require the supervision
of trained medical, nursing, paramedical or
other specially trained individuals: Provided,
That the case management program shall provide that members and retired members of the
military services, and their dependents and survivors, have access to all medically necessary
health care through the health care delivery
system of the military services regardless of the
health care status of the person seeking the
health care: Provided further, That the case
management program shall be the primary obligor for payment of medically necessary services
and shall not be considered as secondarily liable
to title XIX of the Social Security Act, other
welfare programs or charity based care.
SEC. 8101. During the current fiscal year—
(1) refunds attributable to the use of the Government travel card and refunds attributable to
official Government travel arranged by Government Contracted Travel Management Centers
may be credited to operation and maintenance
accounts of the Department of Defense which
are current when the refunds are received; and
(2) refunds attributable to the use of the Government Purchase Card by military personnel
and civilian employees of the Department of Defense may be credited to accounts of the Department of Defense that are current when the refunds are received and that are available for the
same purposes as the accounts originally
charged.
SEC. 8102. (a) REGISTERING INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS WITH DOD CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER.—None of the funds appropriated in this Act may be used for a mission
critical or mission essential information tech-
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nology system (including a system funded by the
defense working capital fund) that is not registered with the Chief Information Officer of the
Department of Defense. A system shall be considered to be registered with that officer upon
the furnishing to that officer of notice of the
system, together with such information concerning the system as the Secretary of Defense
may prescribe. An information technology system shall be considered a mission critical or mission essential information technology system as
defined by the Secretary of Defense.
(b) CERTIFICATIONS AS TO COMPLIANCE WITH
CLINGER-COHEN ACT.—(1) During the current
fiscal year, a major automated information system may not receive Milestone I approval, Milestone II approval, or Milestone III approval, or
their equivalent, within the Department of Defense until the Chief Information Officer certifies, with respect to that milestone, that the
system is being developed in accordance with
the Clinger-Cohen Act of 1996 (40 U.S.C. 1401 et
seq.). The Chief Information Officer may require
additional certifications, as appropriate, with
respect to any such system.
(2) The Chief Information Officer shall provide the congressional defense committees timely
notification of certifications under paragraph
(1). Each such notification shall include, at a
minimum, the funding baseline and milestone
schedule for each system covered by such a certification and confirmation that the following
steps have been taken with respect to the system:
(A) Business process reengineering.
(B) An analysis of alternatives.
(C) An economic analysis that includes a calculation of the return on investment.
(D) Performance measures.
(E) An information assurance strategy consistent with the Department’s Global Information Grid.
(c) DEFINITIONS.—For purposes of this section:
(1) The term ‘‘Chief Information Officer’’
means the senior official of the Department of
Defense designated by the Secretary of Defense
pursuant to section 3506 of title 44, United
States Code.
(2) The term ‘‘information technology system’’
has the meaning given the term ‘‘information
technology’’ in section 5002 of the ClingerCohen Act of 1996 (40 U.S.C. 1401).
(3) The term ‘‘major automated information
system’’ has the meaning given that term in Department of Defense Directive 5000.1.
SEC. 8103. During the current fiscal year, none
of the funds available to the Department of Defense may be used to provide support to another
department or agency of the United States if
such department or agency is more than 90 days
in arrears in making payment to the Department of Defense for goods or services previously
provided to such department or agency on a reimbursable basis: Provided, That this restriction
shall not apply if the department is authorized
by law to provide support to such department or
agency on a nonreimbursable basis, and is providing the requested support pursuant to such
authority: Provided further, That the Secretary
of Defense may waive this restriction on a caseby-case basis by certifying in writing to the
Committees on Appropriations of the House of
Representatives and the Senate that it is in the
national security interest to do so.
SEC. 8104. None of the funds provided in this
Act may be used to transfer to any nongovernmental entity ammunition held by the Department of Defense that has a center-fire cartridge
and a United States military nomenclature designation of ‘‘armor penetrator’’, ‘‘armor piercing
(AP)’’, ‘‘armor piercing incendiary (API)’’, or
‘‘armor-piercing incendiary-tracer (API–T)’’, except to an entity performing demilitarization
services for the Department of Defense under a
contract that requires the entity to demonstrate
to the satisfaction of the Department of Defense
that armor piercing projectiles are either: (1)
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rendered incapable of reuse by the demilitarization process; or (2) used to manufacture ammunition pursuant to a contract with the Department of Defense or the manufacture of ammunition for export pursuant to a License for Permanent Export of Unclassified Military Articles
issued by the Department of State.
SEC. 8105. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Chief of the National Guard
Bureau, or his designee, may waive payment of
all or part of the consideration that otherwise
would be required under 10 U.S.C. 2667, in the
case of a lease of personal property for a period
not in excess of 1 year to any organization specified in 32 U.S.C. 508(d), or any other youth, social, or fraternal non-profit organization as may
be approved by the Chief of the National Guard
Bureau, or his designee, on a case-by-case basis.
SEC. 8106. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, that not more than 35 percent of
funds provided in this Act, may be obligated for
environmental remediation under indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contracts with a total
contract value of $130,000,000 or higher.
(TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8107. Of the funds made available under
the heading ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air
Force’’, $10,000,000 shall be transferred to the
Department of Transportation to enable the Secretary of Transportation to realign railroad
track on Elmendorf Air Force Base and Fort
Richardson.
SEC. 8108. None of the funds appropriated by
this Act shall be used for the support of any
nonappropriated funds activity of the Department of Defense that procures malt beverages
and wine with nonappropriated funds for resale
(including such alcoholic beverages sold by the
drink) on a military installation located in the
United States unless such malt beverages and
wine are procured within that State, or in the
case of the District of Columbia, within the District of Columbia, in which the military installation is located: Provided, That in a case in
which the military installation is located in
more than one State, purchases may be made in
any State in which the installation is located:
Provided further, That such local procurement
requirements for malt beverages and wine shall
apply to all alcoholic beverages only for military
installations in States which are not contiguous
with another State: Provided further, That alcoholic beverages other than wine and malt beverages, in contiguous States and the District of
Columbia shall be procured from the most competitive source, price and other factors considered.
SEC. 8109. During the current fiscal year,
under regulations prescribed by the Secretary of
Defense, the Center of Excellence for Disaster
Management and Humanitarian Assistance may
also pay, or authorize payment for, the expenses
of providing or facilitating education and training for appropriate military and civilian personnel of foreign countries in disaster management, peace operations, and humanitarian assistance: Provided, That not later than April 1,
2001, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to
the congressional defense committees a report
regarding the training of foreign personnel conducted under this authority during the preceding fiscal year for which expenses were paid
under the section: Provided further, That the
report shall specify the countries in which the
training was conducted, the type of training
conducted, and the foreign personnel trained.
SEC. 8110. (a) The Department of Defense is
authorized to enter into agreements with the
Veterans Administration and federally-funded
health agencies providing services to Native Hawaiians for the purpose of establishing a partnership similar to the Alaska Federal Health
Care Partnership, in order to maximize Federal
resources in the provision of health care services
by federally-funded health agencies, applying
telemedicine technologies. For the purpose of
this partnership, Native Hawaiians shall have
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the same status as other Native Americans who
are eligible for the health care services provided
by the Indian Health Service.
(b) The Department of Defense is authorized
to develop a consultation policy, consistent with
Executive Order No. 13084 (issued May 14, 1998),
with Native Hawaiians for the purpose of assuring maximum Native Hawaiian participation in
the direction and administration of governmental services so as to render those services
more responsive to the needs of the Native Hawaiian community.
(c) For purposes of this section, the term ‘‘Native Hawaiian’’ means any individual who is a
descendant of the aboriginal people who, prior
to 1778, occupied and exercised sovereignty in
the area that now comprises the State of Hawaii.
SEC. 8111. None of the funds appropriated or
otherwise made available by this Act or any
other Act may be made available for reconstruction activities in the Republic of Serbia (excluding the province of Kosovo) as long as Slobodan
Milosevic remains the President of the Federal
Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro).
SEC. 8112. In addition to the amounts provided
elsewhere in this Act, the amount of $7,500,000 is
hereby appropriated for ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’, to be available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, only
for a grant to the United Service Organizations
Incorporated, a federally chartered corporation
under chapter 2201 of title 36, United States
Code. The grant provided for by this section is
in addition to any grant provided for under any
other provision of law.
SEC. 8113. Of the funds made available in this
Act under the heading ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’, up to $5,000,000 shall be
available to provide assistance, by grant or otherwise, to public school systems that have unusually high concentrations of special needs
military dependents enrolled: Provided, That in
selecting school systems to receive such assistance, special consideration shall be given to
school systems in States that are considered
overseas assignments.
SEC. 8114. In addition to the amounts provided
elsewhere in this Act, the amount of $5,000,000 is
hereby appropriated for ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’, to be available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, only
for a grant to the High Desert Partnership in
Academic Excellence Foundation, Inc., for the
purpose of developing, implementing, and evaluating a standards and performance based academic model at schools administered by the Department of Defense Education Activity.
SEC. 8115. (a) IN GENERAL.—Notwithstanding
any other provision of law, the Secretary of the
Air Force may convey at no cost to the Air
Force, without consideration, to Indian tribes
located in the States of North Dakota, South
Dakota, Montana, and Minnesota relocatable
military housing units located at Grand Forks
Air Force Base and Minot Air Force Base that
are excess to the needs of the Air Force.
(b) PROCESSING OF REQUESTS.—The Secretary
of the Air Force shall convey, at no cost to the
Air Force, military housing units under subsection (a) in accordance with the request for
such units that are submitted to the Secretary
by the Operation Walking Shield Program on
behalf of Indian tribes located in the States of
North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and
Minnesota.
(c) RESOLUTION OF HOUSING UNIT CONFLICTS.—The Operation Walking Shield program
shall resolve any conflicts among requests of Indian tribes for housing units under subsection
(a) before submitting requests to the Secretary of
the Air Force under paragraph (b).
(d) INDIAN TRIBE DEFINED.—In this section,
the term ‘‘Indian tribe’’ means any recognized
Indian tribe included on the current list published by the Secretary of Interior under section
104 of the federally Recognized Indian Tribe Act
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of 1994 (Public Law 103–454; 108 Stat. 4792; 25
U.S.C. 479a–1).
SEC. 8116. Of the amounts appropriated in the
Act under the heading ‘‘Research, Development,
Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide’’, $51,000,000
shall be available for the purpose of adjusting
the cost-share of the parties under the Agreement between the Department of Defense and
the Ministry of Defence of Israel for the Arrow
Deployability Program.
SEC. 8117. The Secretary of Defense shall fully
identify and determine the validity of health
care contract liabilities, requests for equitable
adjustment, and claims for unanticipated health
care contract costs: Provided, That the Secretary of Defense shall establish an equitable
and timely process for the adjudication of
claims, and recognize actual liabilities during
the Department’s planning, programming and
budgeting process: Provided further, That not
later than March 1, 2001, the Secretary of Defense shall submit a report to the congressional
defense committees on the scope and extent of
health care contract claims, and on the action
taken to implement the provisions of this section: Provided further, That nothing in this section should be construed as congressional direction to liquidate or pay any claims that otherwise would not have been adjudicated in favor
of the claimant.
SEC. 8118. Funds available to the Department
of Defense for the Global Positioning System
during the current fiscal year may be used to
fund civil requirements associated with the satellite and ground control segments of such system’s modernization program.
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8119. Of the amounts appropriated in this
Act under the heading, ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’, $115,000,000 shall remain
available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, the
Secretary of Defense is authorized to transfer
such funds to other activities of the Federal
Government.
SEC. 8120. (a) REPORT TO THE CONGRESSIONAL
DEFENSE COMMITTEES.—Not later than May 1,
2001, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to
the congressional defense committees a report on
work-related illnesses in the Department of Defense workforce, including the workforce of Department contractors and vendors, resulting
from exposure to beryllium or beryllium alloys.
(b) PROCEDURE, METHODOLOGY, AND TIME PERIODS.—To the maximum extent practicable, the
Secretary shall use the same procedures, methodology, and time periods in carrying out the
work required to prepare the report under subsection (a) as those used by the Department of
Energy to determine work-related illnesses in
the Department of Energy workforce associated
with exposure to beryllium or beryllium alloys.
To the extent that different procedures, methodology, and time periods are used, the Secretary
shall explain in the report why those different
procedures, methodology, or time periods were
used, why they were appropriate, and how they
differ from those used by the Department of Energy.
(c) REPORT ELEMENTS.—The report shall include the following:
(1) A description of the precautions used by
the Department of Defense and its contractors
and vendors to protect their current employees
from beryllium-related disease.
(2) Identification of elements of the Department of Defense and of contractors and vendors
to the Department of Defense that use or have
used beryllium or beryllium alloys in production
of products for the Department of Defense.
(3) The number of employees (or, if an actual
number is not available, an estimate of the number of employees) employed by each of the Department of Defense elements identified under
paragraph (2) that are or were exposed during
the course of their Defense-related employment
to beryllium, beryllium dust, or beryllium fumes.
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(4) A characterization of the amount, frequency, and duration of exposure for employees
identified under paragraph (3).
(5) Identification of the actual number of instances of acute beryllium disease, chronic beryllium disease, or beryllium sensitization that
have been documented to date among employees
of the Department of Defense and its contractors and vendors.
(6) The estimated cost if the Department of
Defense were to provide workers’ compensation
benefits comparable to benefits provided under
the Federal Employees Compensation Act to employees, including former employees, of Government organizations, contractors, and vendors
who have contracted beryllium-related diseases.
(7) The Secretary’s recommendations on
whether compensation for work-related illnesses
in the Department of Defense workforce, including contractors and vendors, is justified or recommended.
(8) Legislative proposals, if any, to implement
the Secretary’s recommendations under paragraph (7).
SEC. 8121. Of the amounts made available in
title II of this Act for ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Army’’, $1,900,000 shall be available only
for the purpose of making a grant to the San
Bernardino County Airports Department for the
installation of a perimeter security fence for
that portion of the Barstow-Daggett Airport,
California, which is used as a heliport for the
National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California, and for installation of other security improvements at that airport.
SEC. 8122. The Secretary of Defense may during the current fiscal year and hereafter carry
out the activities and exercise the authorities
provided under the demonstration program authorized by section 9148 of the Department of
Defense Appropriations Act, 1993 (Public Law
102–396; 106 Stat. 1941).
SEC. 8123. (a) Not later than 90 days after the
date of the source selection for the Interim Armored Vehicle program (also referred to as the
Family of Medium Armored Vehicles program),
the Secretary of the Army shall submit to the
congressional defense committees a detailed report on that program. The report shall include
the following:
(1) The required research and development
cost for each variant of the Interim Armored Vehicle to be procured and the total research and
development cost for the program.
(2) The major milestones for the development
program for the Interim Armored Vehicle program.
(3) The production unit cost of each variant of
the Interim Armored Vehicle to be procured.
(4) The total procurement cost of the Interim
Armored Vehicle program.
(b) The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report (in both classified and unclassified versions) on the joint warfighting requirements to be met by the new medium brigades for
the Army. The report shall describe any adjustments made to operational plans of the commanders of the unified combatant commands for
use of those brigades. The report shall be submitted at the time that the President’s budget
for fiscal year 2002 is transmitted to Congress.
SEC. 8124. None of the funds made available in
this Act or the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2000 (Public Law 106–79) may be
used to award a full funding contract for lowrate initial production for the F–22 aircraft program until—
(1) the first flight of an F–22 aircraft incorporating Block 3.0 software has been conducted;
(2) the Secretary of Defense certifies to the
congressional defense committees that all Defense Acquisition Board exit criteria for the
award of low-rate initial production of the aircraft have been met; and
(3) upon completion of the requirements under
(1) and (2) above, the Director of Operational
Test and Evaluation submits to the congres-
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sional defense committees a report assessing the
adequacy of testing to date to measure and predict performance of F–22 avionics systems,
stealth characteristics, and weapons delivery
systems.
SEC. 8125. (a) The total amount expended by
the Department of Defense for the F–22 aircraft
program (over all fiscal years of the life of the
program) for engineering and manufacturing
development and for production may not exceed
$58,028,200,000. The amount provided in the preceding sentence shall be adjusted by the Secretary of the Air Force in the manner provided
in section 217(c) of Public Law 105–85 (111 Stat.
1660). This section supersedes any limitation
previously provided by law on the amount that
may be obligated or expended for engineering
and manufacturing development under the F–22
aircraft program and any limitation previously
provided by law on the amount that may be obligated or expended for the F–22 production program.
(b) The provisions of subsection (a) apply during the current fiscal year and subsequent fiscal
years.
SEC. 8126. Notwithstanding any other provision in this Act, the total amount appropriated
in this Act under Title IV for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) is hereby reduced by $14,000,000 to reflect a reduction in
system engineering, program management, and
other support costs.
SEC. 8127. The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and its subordinate offices and associated contractors, including the Lead Systems
Integrator, shall notify the congressional defense committees 15 days prior to issuing any
type of information or proposal solicitation
under the NMD Program with a potential annual contract value greater than $5,000,000 or a
total contract value greater than $30,000,000.
SEC. 8128. Up to $3,000,000 of the funds appropriated under the heading, ‘‘Operation and
Maintenance, Navy’’ in this Act for the Pacific
Missile Range Facility may be made available to
contract for the repair, maintenance, and operation of adjacent off-base water, drainage, and
flood control systems critical to base operations.
SEC. 8129. In addition to amounts appropriated elsewhere in this Act, $20,000,000 is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense:
Provided, That the Secretary of Defense shall
make a grant in the amount of $20,000,000 to the
National Center for the Preservation of Democracy for the renovation of buildings and for
other purposes to assist in carrying out the intent of 50 U.S.C. App. 1989.
SEC. 8130. Of the funds made available under
the heading ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air
Force’’, not less than $7,000,000 shall be made
available by grant or otherwise, to the North
Slope Borough, to provide assistance for health
care, monitoring and related issues associated
with research conducted from 1955 to 1957 by the
former Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory.
SEC. 8131. None of the funds appropriated in
this Act under the heading ‘‘Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer Fund’’ may be transferred or obligated for Department of Defense
expenses not directly related to the conduct of
overseas contingencies: Provided, That the Secretary of Defense shall submit a report no later
than thirty days after the end of each fiscal
quarter to the Committees on Appropriations of
the Senate and House of Representatives that
details any transfer of funds from the ‘‘Overseas
Contingency Operations Transfer Fund’’: Provided further, That the report shall explain any
transfer for the maintenance of real property,
pay of civilian personnel, base operations support, and weapon, vehicle or equipment maintenance.
SEC. 8132. In addition to amounts made available elsewhere in this Act, $1,000,000 is hereby
appropriated to the Department of Defense to be
available for payment to members of the uniformed services for reimbursement for mandatory pet quarantines as authorized by law.
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(TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8133. The Secretary of the Navy may
transfer funds from any available Department
of the Navy appropriation to any available
Navy ship construction appropriation for the
purpose of liquidating necessary ship cost
changes for previous ship construction programs
appropriated in law: Provided, That the Secretary may transfer not to exceed $300,000,000
under the authority provided by this section:
Provided further, That the funding transferred
shall be available for the same time period as
the appropriation from which transferred: Provided further, That the Secretary may not
transfer any funds until 30 days after the proposed transfer has been reported to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the
House of Representatives: Provided further,
That the transfer authority provided by this section is in addition to any other transfer authority contained elsewhere in this Act.
SEC. 8134. In addition to amounts appropriated elsewhere in this Act, $2,100,000 is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense:
Provided, That the Secretary of Defense shall
make a grant in the amount of $2,100,000 to the
National D-Day Museum.
SEC. 8135. In addition to amounts appropriated elsewhere in this Act, $5,000,000 is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense:
Provided, That the Secretary of the Army shall
make available a grant of $5,000,000 only to the
Chicago Public Schools for conversion and expansion of the former Eighth Regiment National
Guard Armory (Bronzeville).
SEC. 8136. In addition to the amounts provided
elsewhere in this Act, the amount of $10,000,000
is hereby appropriated for ‘‘Operation and
Maintenance, Navy’’, to accelerate the disposal
and scrapping of ships of the Navy Inactive
Fleet and Maritime Administration National Defense Reserve Fleet: Provided, That the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of Transportation shall develop criteria for selecting
ships for scrapping or disposal based on their
potential for causing pollution, creating an environmental hazard and cost of storage: Provided further, That the Secretary of the Navy
and the Secretary of Transportation shall report
to the congressional defense committees no later
than June 1, 2001 regarding the total number of
vessels currently designated for scrapping, and
the schedule and costs for scrapping these vessels.
SEC. 8137. Section 8106 of the Department of
Defense Appropriations Act, 1997 (titles I
through VIII of the matter under subsection
101(b) of Public Law 104–208; 110 Stat. 3009–111,
10 U.S.C. 113 note) shall continue in effect to
apply to disbursements that are made by the Department of Defense in fiscal year 2001.
SEC. 8138. PRIVACY OF INDIVIDUAL MEDICAL
RECORDS. None of the funds provided in this Act
shall be used to transfer, release, disclose, or
otherwise make available to any individual or
entity outside the Department of Defense for
any non-national security or non-law enforcement purposes an individual’s medical records
without the consent of the individual.
SEC. 8139. Of the amount available under title
II under the heading ‘‘OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE-WIDE’’, $1,000,000 shall be
available only for continuation of the Middle
East Regional Security Issues program.
SEC. 8140. Of the funds available in title II
under the heading ‘‘OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE-WIDE’’, $20,000,000 may be
available for information security initiatives:
Provided, That, of such amount, $5,000,000 is
available for the Institute for Defense Computer
Security and Information Protection of the Department of Defense, and $15,000,000 is available
for the Information Security Scholarship Program of the Department of Defense.
SEC. 8141. In addition to the amounts appropriated or otherwise made available in this Act,
$5,000,000, to remain available until September
30, 2001, is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense: Provided, That the Secretary
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of Defense shall make a grant in the amount of
$5,000,000 to the American Red Cross for Armed
Forces Emergency Services.
SEC. 8142. Of the amounts appropriated under
title II under the heading ‘‘Operation and
Maintenance, Defense-Wide’’, $2,000,000 may be
made available, subject to the enactment of authorizing legislation, for the Bosque Redondo
Memorial in accordance with the provisions of
title II of the bill S. 964 of the 106th Congress,
as passed the Senate on November 19, 1999.
SEC. 8143. Of the funds provided within title I
of this Act, such funds as may be necessary
shall be available for a special subsistence allowance for members eligible to receive food
stamp assistance, as authorized by law.
SEC. 8144. Section 8093 of the Department of
Defense Appropriations Act, 2000 (Public Law
106–79; 113 Stat. 1253) is amended by striking
subsection (d), relating to a prohibition on the
use of Department of Defense funds to procure
a nuclear-capable shipyard crane from a foreign
source.
SEC. 8145. Notwithstanding any other provision of law—
(1) from amounts made available for Research,
Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force in
this Act and the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2000 (Public Law 106–79), an aggregate amount of $99,700,000 (less any proportional general reduction required by law and
any reduction required for the Small Business
Innovative Research program) shall be available
only for the B–2 Link 16/Center Instrument Display/In-Flight Replanner program; and
(2) the Secretary of the Air Force shall not be
required to obligate funds for potential termination liability in connection with the B–2 Link
16/Center Instrument Display/In-Flight Replanner program.
SEC. 8146. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, not less than $233,637,000 of the
funds provided in this Act shall be available
only for the Airborne Laser program.
SEC. 8147. (a) IN GENERAL.—Section 106 of title
38, United States Code, is amended by adding at
the end the following new subsection:
‘‘(f) Service as a member of the Alaska Territorial Guard during World War II of any individual who was honorably discharged therefrom
under section 8147 of the Department of Defense
Appropriations Act, 2001, shall be considered active duty for purposes of all laws administered
by the Secretary.’’.
(b) DISCHARGE.—(1) The Secretary of Defense
shall issue to each individual who served as a
member of the Alaska Territorial Guard during
World War II a discharge from such service
under honorable conditions if the Secretary determines that the nature and duration of the
service of the individual so warrants.
(2) A discharge under paragraph (1) shall designate the date of discharge. The date of discharge shall be the date, as determined by the
Secretary, of the termination of service of the
individual concerned as described in that paragraph.
(c) PROHIBITION ON RETROACTIVE BENEFITS.—
No benefits shall be paid to any individual for
any period before the date of the enactment of
this Act by reason of the enactment of this section.
SEC. 8148. UNITED STATES-CHINA SECURITY
REVIEW COMMISSION. Subject to authorization,
there are hereby appropriated, out of any funds
in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated,
$3,000,000, to remain available until expended,
to the United States-China Security Review
Commission for fiscal year 2001 to carry out its
functions.
SEC. 8149. Section 1621 of Public Law 92–204
(43 U.S.C. 1621), the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended, is further amended by
inserting at the end the following:
‘‘(m) LICENSES HELD BY ALASKA NATIVE REGIONAL CORPORATIONS.—An Alaska Native regional corporation organized pursuant to the
Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, or an af-
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filiate thereof, that holds a Federal Communications Commission license in the personal communications service as of the date of enactment of
this section and has either paid for such license
in full or has complied with the payment schedules for such license shall be permitted to transfer or assign without penalty such license to
any transferee or assignee. No economic penalties shall apply to any transfer or assignment
authorized under this section. Any amounts
owed to the United States for the initial grant of
such licenses shall become immediately due and
payable upon the consummation of any such
transfer or assignment. Any application for
such a transfer or assignment shall be deemed
granted if not denied by the Commission within
90 days of the date on which it was initially
filed. Any provision of law or regulation to the
contrary is hereby amended.’’.
SEC. 8150. For purposes of implementing section 206(b) of H. Con. Res. 290 (106th Congress),
the limits provided in section 302(a)(3)(A) of the
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 shall not
apply with respect to fiscal year 2001.
SEC. 8151. (a) DESIGNATION.—The consolidated
operations center planned for construction at
Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama, to
house the Army’s Space and Missile Defense
Command and for other purposes, shall be
known and designated as the ‘‘Wernher von
Braun Complex’’.
(b) REFERENCES.—Any reference in a law,
map, regulation, document, paper, or other
record of the United States to the complex referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be
a reference to the ‘‘Wernher von Braun Complex’’.
SEC. 8152. Of the funds provided in this Act
under the heading ‘‘Research, Development,
Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide’’ for the Pacific Disaster Center, $300,000 shall be made
available for a grant, to be awarded not later
than 60 days after enactment of this Act, to the
Circum-Pacific Council for the Crowding the
Rim Summit Initiative.
SEC. 8153. Upon enactment of this Act, the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the
Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations
Act, 2000 (as enacted into law by section
1000(a)(1) of Public Law 106–113) is amended
under the heading ‘‘Small Business Administration, Business Loans Program Account’’ in the
first paragraph by striking ‘‘Provided, That of
the total provided, $6,000,000 shall be available
only for the cost of guaranteed loans under the
New Markets Venture Capital program and
shall become available for obligation only upon
authorization of such program by the enactment
of subsequent legislation in fiscal year 2000:’’.
SEC. 8154. In addition to amounts appropriated elsewhere in this Act, $1,650,000 is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense,
only for a competitively awarded grant to a
medical research institution for research among
persons who served on active duty in the Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Persian Gulf War on (1) the possible health effect
of exposure to low levels of hazardous chemicals, including chemical warfare agents and
other substances, and (2) the individual susceptibility of humans to such exposure under environmentally controlled conditions.
SEC. 8155. In addition to the amounts appropriated elsewhere in this Act, $2,000,000, to remain available until expended, is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense: Provided,
That notwithstanding any other provision of
law, the Secretary of Defense shall make available a grant of $2,000,000 to the Oakland Military Institute, Oakland, California.
SEC. 8156. In addition to the amounts provided
elsewhere in this Act, the amount of $10,000,000
is hereby appropriated for ‘‘Operation and
Maintenance, Army’’ and shall be available to
the Secretary of the Army, notwithstanding any
other provision of law, only to be provided as a
grant to the City of San Bernardino, California,
contingent on the resolution of the case City of
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San Bernardino v. United States, pending as of
July 1, 2000, in the United States District Court
for the Central District of California (C.D. Cal.
Case No. CV 96–8867).
SEC. 8157. The Secretary of Defense may
transfer, at no cost, the title/ownership of the
alloying material being stored at the Brownfield
site in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania to the Bethlehem Development Corporation: Provided, That
the net proceeds from the disposition of the materials are only for redevelopment of the
Brownfield site.
SEC. 8158. In addition to amounts provided in
this Act, $2,000,000 is hereby appropriated for
‘‘Defense Health Program’’, to remain available
for obligation until expended: Provided, That
notwithstanding any other provision of law,
these funds shall be available only for a grant
to the Fisher House Foundation, Inc., only for
the construction and furnishing of additional
Fisher Houses to meet the needs of military family members when confronted with the illness or
hospitalization of an eligible military beneficiary.
SEC. 8159. The Office of Economic Adjustment
may amend a grant awarded in 1998 to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for Industrial Modernization of Philadelphia Shipyard for the purpose of undertaking community economic adjustment activities to provide for the acquisition
of equipment that would further the overall purpose of the grant: Provided, That such amendment shall not increase the grant period or the
total amount of the grant award and shall be
deemed, for all purposes, to be within the scope
of the original grant.
SEC. 8160. The appropriation under the heading ‘‘Defense Reinvestment for Economic
Growth’’ in the Supplemental Appropriations
Act of 1993 (Public Law 103–50) is amended by
striking ‘‘that date’’ and inserting ‘‘December 1,
2004’’: Provided, That the amendment, made by
this section shall be effective as of July 2, 1993.
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
SEC. 8161. In addition to the amounts appropriated elsewhere in this Act, $2,000,000, to remain available until expended, is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense: Provided,
That not later than October 15, 2000, the Secretary of Defense shall transfer these funds to
the Department of Energy appropriation account ‘‘Fossil Energy Research and Development’’, only for a proposed conceptual design
study to examine the feasibility of a zero emissions, steam injection process with possible applications for increased power generation efficiency, enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration.
SEC. 8162. Section 104 of the Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2000 (in title I,
chapter 1, of division B of Public Law 106–246)
is amended to read as follows: after ‘‘Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles,
Army’’, insert the following: ‘‘, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2002,’’.
SEC. 8163. Notwithstanding any other provision in this Act, the total amount appropriated
in this Act is hereby reduced by $71,367,000, to
reduce cost growth in consulting and advisory
services and other contract growth, to be distributed as follows:
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Army’’,
$20,000,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Navy’’,
$10,000,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Marine
Corps’’, $367,000; and
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force’’,
$41,000,000.
SEC. 8164. Notwithstanding any other provision in this Act, the total amount appropriated
in this Act is hereby reduced by $92,700,000, to
reduce excess funded carryover, to be distributed
as follows:
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Army’’,
$40,500,000; and
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force’’,
$52,200,000.
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SEC. 8165. Notwithstanding any other provision in this Act, the total amount appropriated
in this Act is hereby reduced by $159,076,000, to
reduce growth in headquarters and administrative activities, to be distributed as follows:
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Army’’,
$56,700,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Navy’’,
$12,376,000; and
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force’’,
$90,000,000.
SEC. 8166. Of the amounts provided in title II
of this Act, the following account is hereby reduced by the specified amount:
‘‘Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer
Fund’’, $1,100,000,000.
TITLE IX
ADDITIONAL FISCAL YEAR 2000 EMERGENCY
SUPPLEMENTAL
APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
The following sums are appropriated, out of
any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to provide additional emergency supplemental appropriations for the Department of
Defense for the fiscal year ending September 30,
2000, and for other purposes, namely:
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS TRANSFER
FUND
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)
For an additional amount for the ‘‘Overseas
Contingency Operations Transfer Fund’’,
$1,100,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That the Secretary of Defense
may transfer the funds provided herein only to
appropriations for military personnel; operation
and maintenance accounts; procurement; research, development, test and evaluation; the
Defense Health Program; and to working capital
funds: Provided further, That the funds transferred shall be merged with and shall be available for the same purposes and for the same time
period, as the appropriation to which transferred: Provided further, That the transfer authority provided in this paragraph is in addition
to any other transfer authority available to the
Department of Defense: Provided further, That
upon a determination that all or part of the
funds transferred from this appropriation are
not necessary for the purposes provided herein,
such amounts may be transferred back to this
appropriation: Provided further, That the entire
amount is designated by the Congress as an
emergency requirement pursuant to section
251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended:
Provided further, That the entire amount shall
be available only to the extent that an official
budget request for a specific dollar amount, that
includes designation of the entire amount of the
request as an emergency requirement as defined
by such Act, is transmitted by the President to
the Congress.
GENERAL PROVISIONS—THIS TITLE
SEC. 9001. (a) In addition to amounts appropriated or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense elsewhere in this Act, the
Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2000
(Public Law 106–79), and the Emergency Supplemental Act, 2000 (division B of Public Law 106–
246), there is hereby appropriated to the Department of Defense $679,000,000, as follows:
(1) For military personnel accounts, to remain
available for obligation until September 30, 2001,
$50,000,000, only for ‘‘Military Personnel,
Navy’’.
(2) For operation and maintenance accounts,
to remain available for obligation until September 30, 2001, $529,000,000, as follows:
(i) For depot-level maintenance and repair,
$234,000,000, as follows:
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‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Army’’,
$50,000,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Navy’’,
$162,000,000 (of which $20,000,000 is for aviation
depot maintenance and $142,000,000 for ship
depot maintenance);
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Marine
Corps’’, $22,000,000.
(ii) For readiness spares kits, $45,000,000, only
for ‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force’’.
(iii)
For
real
property
maintenance,
$250,000,000, as follows:
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Army’’,
$70,000,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Navy’’,
$70,000,000;
‘‘Operation
and
Maintenance,
Marine
Corps’’, $40,000,000; and
‘‘Operation and Maintenance, Air Force’’,
$70,000,000.
(3) For the Defense Health Program, to remain
available for obligation until September 30, 2001,
$100,000,000.
(b) EMERGENCY DESIGNATION.—The entire
amount made available in this section—
(1) is designated by the Congress as an emergency
requirement
pursuant
to
section
251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended;
and
(2) shall be available only if the President
transmits to the Congress an official budget request for $679,000,000, which includes designation of the entire amount of the request as an
emergency requirement as defined in the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control
Act of 1985, as amended.
SEC. 9002. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, funds appropriated by this title,
or made available by the transfer of funds in
this title, for intelligence activities are deemed to
be specifically authorized by the Congress for
purposes of section 504 of the National Security
Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 414).
This Act may be cited as the ‘‘Department of
Defense Appropriations Act, 2001’’.
And the Senate agree to the same.
JERRY LEWIS,
BILL YOUNG,
JOE SKEEN,
DAVE HOBSON,
HENRY BONILLA,
GEORGE R. NETHERCUTT,
Jr.,
ERNEST J. ISTOOK, Jr.,
RANDY ‘‘DUKE’’
CUNNINGHAM,
JAY DICKEY,
RODNEY FRELINGHUYSEN,
JOHN P. MURTHA,
NORMAN D. DICKS,
MARTIN OLAV SABO,
JULIAN C. DIXON,
PETER J. VISCLOSKY,
JAMES P. MORAN,
Managers on the Part of the House.
TED STEVENS,
THAD COCHRAN,
ARLEN SPECTER,
PETE V. DOMENICI,
CHRISTOPHER S. BOND,
MITCH MCCONNELL,
RICHARD C. SHELBY,
JUDD GREGG,
KAY BAILEY HUTCHISON,
DANIEL K. INOUYE,
ERNEST HOLLINGS,
ROBERT C. BYRD,
PATRICK J. LEAHY,
FRANK R. LAUTENBERG,
TOM HARKIN,
BYRON L. DORGAN,
RICHARD J. DURBIN,
Managers on the Part of the Senate.
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JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
The managers on the part of the House and
the Senate at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the
amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R.
4576), making appropriations for the Department of Defense for the fiscal year ending
September 30, 2001, and for other purposes,
submit the following joint statement to the
House and the Senate in explanation of the
effect of the action agreed upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying conference report.
The conference agreement on the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2001, incorporates some of the provisions of both the
House and Senate versions of the bill. The
language and allocations set forth in House
Report 106–644 and Senate Report 106–298
should be complied with unless specifically
addressed in the accompanying bill and
statement of the managers to the contrary.
Senate Amendment: The Senate deleted
the entire House bill after the enacting
clause and inserted the Senate bill. The conference agreement includes a revised bill.
DEFINITION OF PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND
ACTIVITY
The conferees agree that for the purposes
of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99–177) as
amended by the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Reaffirmation Act of
1987 (Public Law 100–119) and by the Budget
Enforcement Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–508),
the term program, project, and activity for
appropriations contained in this Act shall be
defined as the most specific level of budget
items identified in the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2001, the accompanying House and Senate Committee reports, the conference report and accompanying joint explanatory statement of the
managers of the Committee of Conference,
the related classified annexes and reports,
and the P–1 and R–1 budget justification documents as subsequently modified by Congressional action. The following exception to
the above definition shall apply:
For the Military Personnel and the Operation and Maintenance accounts, the term
‘‘program, project, and activity’’ is defined
as the appropriations accounts contained in
the Department of Defense Appropriations
Act. At the time the President submits his
budget for fiscal year 2002, the conferees direct the Department of Defense to transmit
to the congressional defense committees
budget justification documents to be known
as the ‘‘M–1’’ and ‘‘O–1’’ which shall identify,
at the budget activity, activity group, and
subactivity group level, the amounts requested by the President to be appropriated
to the Department of Defense for operation
and maintenance in any budget request, or
amended budget request, for fiscal year 2002.
CONGRESSIONAL SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS
The conferees direct that projects for
which funds are provided as indicated in the
tables or paragraphs of the Conference Report in any appropriation account are special
interest items for the purpose of preparation
of the DD Form 1414. The conferees also direct that the funding adjustments outlined
in the tables shall be provided only for the
specific purposes outlined in the table.
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ITEMS ADDRESSED IN SUPPLEMENTAL ACTS
The recently passed Military Construction Appropriations Act, 2001 (Public Law 106–246), included the Emergency Supplemental Act,
2000 for the Department of Defense. This Supplemental addressed shortfalls in military personnel, recruiting, advertising, and retention
by providing a total of $134,400,000 in the Military Personnel accounts, and $373,000,000 in the Operation and Maintenance accounts. In this
Act, the conferees have agreed to include a total of $50,000,000 for ‘‘Military Personnel, Navy’’, also designated as emergency supplemental
appropriations in Title IX of this Act.
PERSONNEL UNDEREXECUTION SAVINGS
The conferees recommended a total reduction of $243,800,000 to the Active Military Personnel accounts due to lower than budgeted fiscal
year 2000 end strengths, and differences in the actual grade mix of officers and enlisted recommended in the budget request. The General
Accounting Office estimates that the active components will have approximately 3,500 fewer personnel on board to begin fiscal year 2001,
and as a result, the fiscal year 2001 pay and allowances requirements for personnel are incorrect and the budgets overstated.
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ADDITIONAL READINESS FUNDING TO ADDRESS SERVICE SHORTFALLS
The conferees note that, in addition to the funding recommended in title II of this Act, the conference agreement includes additional
fiscal year 2000 emergency supplemental appropriations in title IX, reflecting critical readiness shortfalls identified by the Chiefs of the
Military Departments and addressed by the House during its consideration of H.R. 1398 (Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for fiscal
year 2000). These emergency appropriations include $529,000,000 in the services’ Operation and Maintenance accounts, including $234,000,000
for depot maintenance, $250,000,000 for real property maintenance, and $45,000,000 for readiness spares kits.
OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS TRANSFER FUND
The conferees direct the Secretary of Defense to provide the Appropriations Committees and the General Accounting Office reports identifying contingency related expenses no later than 30 days after the end of each month for which contingency costs are incurred.
BIOMETRICS INFORMATION ASSURANCE
The Conferees include in this Title of the bill $7,000,000 for Army, $3,000,000 for Navy, and $3,000,000 for Air Force, and include $12,000,000
in Title III of the bill for Army, all to support the efforts of Army as Executive Agent to lead, consolidate, and coordinate all biometrics
information assurance programs of the Department of Defense (DoD), pursuant to the June 12, 2000 United States Army Report on the Biometrics Project (Report) prepared at the request of the Committees on Appropriations, and direct that the near-term and long-term implementation plan defined in the Report be implemented.
Recognizing the concerns expressed in the Report and elsewhere regarding social and legal issues associated with the uses of biometrics
in the Government and private sectors, the Conferees support a comprehensive, in-depth legal and social assessment of the issues associated
with the current and near-term uses of biometrics in the United States, to include plans for long-term monitoring of human biometrics
uses, which are expected to increase substantially, and further recommend that this assessment be initiated as soon as practicable, pursuant
to the Report.
To reduce lease costs and to support operating capability of the Biometrics Fusion Center by Fiscal Year (FY) 2004, the Conference
recommended that the funds appropriated for this program in FY 2000 be made available immediately to develop specifications and requirements, not later than June 30, 2001, for the acquisition, via lease, of space suitable for the Biometrics Fusion Center Final Operating Capability in acordance with the Report.
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INTEGRATED TRAINING AREA MANAGEMENT
The conferees understand that commanders are consistently reporting reduced
ITAM funding as a training readiness issue
in the Monthly Readiness Report. Therefore,
the conferees recommend an increase of
$5,100,000 for ITAM and direct the Army to
realign additional resources in order to fully
fund the ITAM program.
sidies. The Army shall provide this report to
the Appropriations Committees no later
than September 15, 2000.
INDUSTRIAL PREPAREDNESS
The conferees do not agree to reductions as
proposed in the House and Senate versions of
the bill to the Industrial Preparedness subactivity group in Operation and Maintenance, Army.
TACTICAL MISSILE MAINTENANCE
AIR BATTLE CAPTAIN
Of the amount provided for Operation and
Maintenance, Army, specifically depot maintenance, the conferees direct that $48,300,000
be applied to Army Tactical Missile Depot
Maintenance
requirements,
to
include
ground support equipment, at its organic
public depots.
The conferees direct to the Secretary of
the Army to submit to the Appropriations
Committees a detailed recruitment plan,
specifically addressing the Air Battle Captain program, within sixty days of enactment of the conference report.
REAL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
The conferees understand that the Army
has decided to terminate the Enhanced
Skills Training Program (ESTP) for students
at Historically Black colleges and Universities (HBCU) and to replace it with a distance learning program. Because of the historic role that HBCU’s have played in integrating the Army, the conferees direct the
Army to maintain through fiscal year 2001
the ESTP as configured during fiscal year
2000. To better understand the benefits of
ESTP, the conferees directs the Army to provide a report to the congressional defense
committees not later than October 1, 2000, on
its long term plans for its partnership with
HBCU’s in preparing students for the Army.
OPEN BURN/OPEN DISPOSAL PRACTICES
The conferees are aware of public concern
regarding possible health risks to civilian
populations associated with the open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) of munitions
and equipment at Army depots at various locations in the U.S. Most of these risks are
believed to be associated with airborne
gases, particles and other contaminants car-
The conferees observe that the Army has
reallocated $1,100,000,000 of its operational
training funds during fiscal years 1997
through 1999, and failed to meet tank mile
training goals by an average of 20 percent.
The Army cites that training resources were
moved to other operation and maintenance
programs such as real property maintenance.
The conferees have provided significant real
property maintenance and Quality of Life
Enhancement resources to the Army for fiscal year 2001, and expects the service to execute the training plan and budget proposed
in the budget request. The conferees direct
the Army to allocate real property maintenance resources, by major command, at levels not less than those provided in Senate
Report 106–298.
UNDERUTILIZED PLANT CAPACITY
The conferees are aware that the Office of
the Secretary of Defense has directed the
Army to study the scale and capacity of the
arsenals and ammunition plants, in an effort
to mitigate the need for further cash sub-
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ENHANCED SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAM
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ried downwind of the burn/detonation sites.
The Army is directed to study potential alternative closed disposal technologies that
do not release into the atmosphere and to report to Congress no later than September 30,
2001 on the possibility of phasing out OB/OD
in favor of closed disposal methods. The report should include a review of technologies
currently in existence and under development and assess the cost and feasibility of
constructing facilities employing those technologies.
MEDIUM GENERAL PURPOSE TENTS
The conferees direct that $14,000,000 of the
funds provided for Operation and Maintenance, Army be made available only for the
purpose of meeting prospective requirements
for modular general purpose tents (MGPT)
associated with wartime and other mobilizations as described in the report accompanying the House-passed Department of Defense Appropriations bill for fiscal year 2001.
The conferees also note that the Department
has refused to fully obligate previously appropriated funds for the program, citing a
lack of firm direction from the Congress.
The conferees therefore believe it necessary
to clarify their strong support for the MGPT
program, and direct the Secretary of the
Army to expend the full amount of Operation
and Maintenance, Army funds designated for
MGPT in the fiscal year 2000 Department of
Defense Conference Report without further
delay.
TACONY WAREHOUSE SITE
The conferees direct that of the funds provided in Operation and Maintenance, Army,
$5,000,000 shall be available only to demolish
the Army’s Tacony Warehouse depot site
owned by Fort Dix in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
ENHANCED SAFETY IN DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES
Public Law 106–79 directed the Department
to initiate programs that improved safety
practices at DOD facilities. The conferees
again urge the Department to undertake
measures to improve the safety of work conditions at DOD industrial facilities. No later
than December 1, 2000, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report regarding the feasibility of establishing pilot programs at
maintenance depots and public shipyards to
improve worker safety. The report shall include proposals, to include any requisite legislative language, for employing gain sharing incentives for the procurement of professional safety services.
FALLON NAS GREENBELT
The conferees understand that the navy
has conducted studies to determine the feasi-
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bility of restoring current and previously irrigated lands around the perimeter (‘‘Greenbelt’’) of Fallon Naval Air Station, Nevada,
to its natural ecological condition. Further,
the conferees understand that the Commander, NAS Fallon, has consulted with the
Army Corps of Engineers concerning their
expertise in similar efforts. The conferees direct, as the Secretary of the Navy strives to
eliminate the need for irrigation to the
‘‘Greenbelt’’, consistent with aircrew safety
and the direction provided in Public Law 101–
618, that the Navy continue to cooperate
with the Army Corps of Engineers to study
the most expedient methods to achieve this
non-agricultural, non-irrigated state in the
‘‘Greenbelt’’ lands. The conferees direct that
of the funds available to the Department of
the Navy under the heading Operation and
Maintenance, Navy, $100,000 shall be available to expedite the study described above.
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CENTER OF EXCELLENCE FOR DISASTER
MANAGEMENT AND HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE
The conferees recommend $5,000,000 for the
Center for Excellence for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance. Within
these funds, $960,000 is to fund the Casualty
Care Research Center. The Committee expects the Centers to work collaboratively to
provide disaster response services in domestic, international, military and civilian settings.
RESTORATION OF USS TURNER JOY
The conferees direct the Navy to cooperate
with the Bremerton Naval Memorial and Historic Ships Association in the repair of the
USS Turner Joy. Of the funds available for
Operation and Maintenance, Navy, $750,000
shall be available for the maintenance and
repair of the USS Turner Joy.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
NEW ENERGY SAVING TECHNOLOGY
The conferees are aware of the unique energy savings and anticorrosion properties of Ambient Temperature Cure (ATC) Glass coatings
for air-conditioning systems. The conference agreement includes $500,000 in Operation and Maintenance, Air Force funding for the 6th Civil
Engineering Squadron located at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, for an energy demonstration of ATC glass coating technology as a followon to its initial testing of this technology on air conditioning systems. Accordingly, the conferees direct the Air Force to conduct a before
and after test and evaluation of energy savings of ATC glass coated air conditioning-systems, at MacDill Air Force Base, over a three-month
period. The evaluation shall measure and document energy consumption and provide comment regarding effectiveness on existing air-conditioning units of varying ages and levels of corrosion. The Secretary of the Air Force shall provide the results of this testing to the House
and Senate Committees on Appropriations not later than April 1, 2001.
CONTAMINANT AIR PROCESSING SYSTEM
The conferees commend the Secretary of the Air Force for standardizing mission-critical equipment that allows Air Force personnel
to be effectively processed after contact with biological, chemical and nuclear agents. The conferees encourage the Secretary to use existing
funds to continue implementation of standardized contaminant air processing systems (CAPS) throughout Air Force installations.
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H6179
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CIVIL/MILITARY PROGRAMS
The conferees recommend a total of $103,000,000 for the Department’s civil/military programs for fiscal year 2001 as shown below. The
conferees direct the Department to report to the Committees on Appropriations on the status of the obligation of these funds not later
than April 15, 2001.
[In thousands of dollars]
National Guard Youth Challenge
Program ....................................
Innovative Readiness Training
Program ....................................
Starbase Program ........................
Youth Development and Leadership Program ............................
Total .........................................
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FAMILY ADVOCACY
$62,500
30,000
10,000
The conferees recommend $2,000,000 for the
Department of Defense Dependents Education account, only for enhancements to
Family Advocacy programs for at-risk
youth.
IMPACT AID PROGRAM
500
103,000
The conferees recommend a total of
$30,000,000 only for the continuation of the
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impact aid program currently being executed
by the Department of Defense for schools
heavily impacted by military dependents.
NORTHERN EDGE
The Conferees direct the Secretary of Defense to transfer funds from the CJCS exercise fund to the service operation and maintenance accounts to cover the incremental
cost of this exercise.
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H6195
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
C–130 OPERATIONS
The conferees recommend a total of $5,000,000 for personnel and operation and maintenance costs to support Air National Guard C–130
operational support aircraft and those stand-alone aircraft currently utilized by selected States.
OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS TRANSFER FUND
The conferees agree to provide $3,938,777,000 for the Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer Fund. This amount provides for continuing operations in and around Bosnia, Kosovo and Southwest Asia adjusted for unanticipated changes in the number of troops supporting
these operations.
The conferees included a general provision which reduces the available funding for overseas contingency operations. The conferees recognize that current levels of deployed forces committed to peacekeeping operations may be reduced during fiscal year 2001. To ensure that
current operations are uninterrupted if force levels and commitments are unchanged, the conference agreement provides sufficient emergency funding for overseas contingencies.
UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ARMED FORCES
The conference agreement provides $8,574,000 for the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, ARMY
The conference agreement provides $389,932,000 for Environmental Restoration, Army.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, NAVY
The conference agreement provides $294,038,000 for Environmental Restoration, Navy.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, AIR FORCE
The conference agreement provides $376,300,000 for Environmental Restoration, Air Force.
FORMER SOVIET UNION THREAT REDUCTION
The conference agreement provides $443,400,000 for the Former Soviet Union Threat Reduction program.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, DEFENSE-WIDE
The conference agreement provides $21,412,000 for Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide.
ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, FORMERLY USED DEFENSE SITES
The conference agreement provides $231,499,000 for Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.
OVERSEAS HUMANITARIAN, DISASTER, AND CIVIC AID
The conference agreement provides $55,900,000 for Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid.
FOREIGN MILITARY SALES
In 1999, the Department of Defense signed a multi-year contract for the E–2C program. The E–2C multi-year contract assumed a total
E–2C purchase which included both Department of the Navy and international aircraft deliveries in future years. The negotiated price for
the Navy aircraft reflected the assumption that the international sales would be successfully completed in the future years. This process
raises serious concerns that the Department of Defense might negotiate future multi-year contracts with sales prices that presume Congressional approval of potential international sales in future years. Such a practice is unacceptable and would violate the intent and spirit
of the Foreign Military Sales notification and approval process.
The conferees direct that any future multi-year contracts shall reflect pricing which assumes only the U.S. military procurement quantities. The Department of Defense is expressly prohibited from negotiating any multi-year contracts which include quantities and pricing
that reflect foreign military sales yet to be approved by the Congress.
INFORMATION ASSURANCE
The House recommended a net increase of $150,000,000 over the President’s budget for selected information assurance and computer network security programs. The conferees endorse the high priority given this effort by the House and recommended a net increase of over
$150,000,000 for specific information assurance initiatives, to include:
$35,000,000 to purchase hardware and software applications to monitor computer networks for suspicious activity;
$19,000,000 for new digital secure phones to replace the outdated STU–III;
$18,600,000 to accelerate the DOD’s Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) program;
$16,400,000 for information security awareness, education and training;
$15,000,000 for the Information Security Scholarship Program;
$10,000,000 to ensure security capabilities are built into new cell phones, rather than retrofitting them later at a significantly higher
cost;
$10,000,000 for information operations vulnerability analysis;
$5,000,000 to examine the use of information operations against certain critical target sets;
$5,000,000 for the Institute for Defense Computer Security and Information Protection;
$3,000,000 for additional basic (6.1) research into information assurance; and
$26,000,000 for USARPAC C4I and Information Assurance.
The conferees expect the Department to execute these funds in a coordinated manner, and where possible, to make use of existing institutions and training programs to ensure the maximum benefit from these resources. The conferees understand that even these investments
will be of limited value if the software used by the Department has been designed with intentional weaknesses to permit future unauthorized access. The conferees expect the Department to carefully consider the origin of all software used in developing or upgrading information technology or national security systems.
TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES
The conferees believe that additional cost savings could be realized if DOD tenant agencies would include their telecommunications
infrastructure upgrades with those of the parent installation and thus achieve the benefits of economies of scale. The conferees therefore
direct DOD agencies that are located on Army, Navy and Air Force installations to coordinate their infrastructure upgrades with those
of the installation where they reside.
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FORWARD LOOKING INFRARED DEVICES
The Horizontal Technology Integration
second generation forward looking infrared
(FLIR) is being fielded on the M1A2 Abrams
tank system enhancement program, M2A3
Bradley Fighting Vehicle, and the long range
advanced scout surveillance system. It met
the original Apache helicopter FLIR requirements for the proposed upgrade to the AH–64
Apache target acquisition designation sight/
pilot night vision system, which the Army
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subsequently changed. The conferees are
concerned that the change in requirements
may not result in a significant increase in
performance that would outweigh the advantages of commonality between air and land
systems in areas such as unit cost, improved
logistics support, and life cycle cost savings.
The conferees direct the Army to perform a
cost-benefit analysis, using the original and
revised aviation FLIR requirements, which
compares the Horizontal Technology Inte-
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gration second generation FLIR and the proposed aviation FLIR upgrade. The conferees
further direct that none of the funds in this
Act may be obligated for an Apache FLIR
upgrade that is not common with the FLIR
for ground systems unless the Secretary of
the Army submits a report to the congressional defense committees which justifies a
requirement for a unique FLIR for airborne
applications and demonstrates that it is affordable compared to a common system.
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COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE AIRCRAFT
The conferees note that the Air Force has decided to consider several different aircraft for its combat search and rescue mission, including such existing products as the EH–101 helicopter. The conferees understand that the Navy may be considering alternative to either extend
the life of or replace the existing MH–53E helicopters used in the Vertical Onboard Delivery and the dedicated Airborne Mine countermeasures missions. The conferees believe that any such analysis should follow a similar competitive process as used by the Air Force, to
ensure that the Navy takes advantage of all existing operational designs to obtain the best rotorcrafts available for those missions.
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H6269
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H6271
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING MODERNIZATION
The conferees have provided $79,978,000 for the High Performance Computing Modernization Program, an increase of $40,000,000 above
the budget request amount. The conferees direct that $30,000,000 of the increased amount shall be available only for the modernization of
the computing equipment at an existing supercomputing center purchased with research, development, test and evaluation funds.
DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT
The conferees agree to provide a total of $3,000,000 for the Defense Production Act account. Of this amount $2,000,000 is only for microwave power tubes and $1,000,000 is only for the Wireless Vibration Sensor Supplier Initiative.
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H6273
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST
The conferees agree that each of the Chiefs of the Reserve and National Guard components should exercise control of modernization
funds provided in this account including aircraft and aircraft modernization. The conferees further agree that separate submissions of a
detailed assessment of its modernization priorities by the component commanders is required to be submitted to the defense committees.
The conferees expect the component commanders to give priority consideration to the following items: multiple launch rocket system
(MLRS), Paladin, onboard oxygen generating system field evaluation for the Air National Guard, LITENING II targeting pod system,
SINCGARS radios, F16 SADL ‘‘D’’, Bradley Fighting Vehicles upgrades, F15 BOL systems, HMMWV Striker Vehicles, support equipment
for Patriot missile air defense battalions, Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck for MLRS units, Army tank recovery vehicle program,
fire fighting trucks for Air Guard, air traffic control landing system (ATCALS), maneuver control system, construction equipment service
life extension program, family of medium tactical vehicles, C130J procurement, A10 upgrades, F15 E-kit upgrades, F16 BLK 42 engine modification kits, Precision Attack Targeting System (PATS), simulators for Norwich Army, master cranes, modular command post system,
laser marksmanship, UH60/UH1 flight simulators, F16 modernization, standard integrated command post system (SICPS), situational awareness data link, KC135 multi-point refueling, Naval Construction Force Communications Equipment, and C212 STOL fixed wing aircraft.
Night Vision PVS–7, CH–47 Internal Crashworthy Fuel Cells, Blackhawk External Fuel Tanks, Multi-Purpose Range Targetry Electronics,
Armored Security Vehicle, Controlled Environmental Storage Shelters, DRFTP, Quadruple Containers, Pallet Containers, C–141 8.33 Khz
Radios, HC130 FLIR (AAQ–22), HH–60 SATCOM (AN/ARC–210 Radios), CH–53 Aircrew Procedures Trainer Flight Simulator, CH–46 Aircrew
Procedures Training Flight Simulator, A–10 Lightweight Airborne Recovery System, C–130 ALR–69 Radar Warning Receiver, HC–130 Armor,
Scope Shield II Tactical Radios, F–16 Helmet Mounted Cueing System, Mobile Chemical Agent Detector, Multi-Mission Patrol Craft, COTS,
DFIRST, A/OA–10, AN/AAQ–29 CH–53E FLIR, P–3C Update III BMUP, RAID Electro-Optical/Infrared Sensor Upgrade Program, CH–47 Fuel
tanks, and AFIST XXI.
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H6319
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July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE (ISR) BATTLE MANAGEMENT
The conferees are aware that the Air Force desires to initiate a program called the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR)
Battle Management. The ISR Battle Management is an effort to extend required ISR command and control functions now resident in the
Distributed Common Ground System to the Air Operations Center. This program was not identified in the fiscal year 2001 budget request.
However, the conferees believe this effort should be initiated and the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations would expeditiously
consider a reprogramming request of up to $7,500,000 for this effort.
DISCOVERER II
After careful consideration, the conferees direct that the Discoverer II program be terminated.
To move forward in a more cost-effective manner, the conferees have provided $30,000,000 to the National Reconnaissance Office to undertake steps to further develop and mature low cost electronically scanned array radar technologies for space applications. The conferees
further directed the continued participation of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in these efforts.
The Director of the National Reconnaissance Office, in consultation with the Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, shall submit a program plan for the development, testing and application of technologies funded under this revised initiative. The conferees direct that none of the funds provided may be used to develop a stand-alone satellite demonstrator.
JOINT EJECTION SEAT PROGRAM
The conferees are concerned about the Defense Department’s management of the Joint Ejection Seat Program, including the failure
to complete a memorandum of agreement between the Navy and the Air Force concerning operation of the joint program. The conferees
have deleted all funds for DoD’s separate program to develop the K–36 seat. The conferees have provided a total of $20,689,000 only for the
Joint Ejection Seat Program. The conferees direct that the Department of Defense conduct a full and open competition among any and
all candidate seats under this program, with no arbitrary restrictions applied by DoD to limit the competition.
The conferees direct that no contract award for the joint ejection seat program using funds provided in fiscal year 2000 be made until
30 days after the Secretary of Defense submits a program plan for the Joint Ejection Seat Program as required by the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2000. This program plan should address all specific applications for the ejection seat or ejection seat technology
developed under the JESP. Further, the report should specifically address the cost and commonality benefits of using any JESP-developed
seat in the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). None of the funds appropriated in fiscal years 2000 or 2001 may be obligated until the Secretaries
of the Navy and Air Force certify to the congressional defense committees that a joint program office is in place to manage the program
in a manner which fairly meets both services’ requirements. The conferees reiterate that the objective of the Joint Ejection Seat Program
is to completely qualify at least two modern and safe ejection seats for potential use in existing and future tactical aircraft.
LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS
The conferees have provided an increase of $4,000,000 only for the ACES II ejection seat. These funds are provided only to complete development and testing on discrete modifications of existing ACES II seats to provide digital sequencing capability and to accommodate higher
weight individuals. It is not the conferees’ intent to fund any activity in this program that would give an unfair advantage to a bidder
for the Joint Ejection Seat program.
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July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
FOCUS PROGRAM
The conferees support the semiconductor Focus Center Program in university research as it moves into full-scale operation. The conferees urge the Department to include funding for this program as it is currently planned in the POM so that the Department may gain
the benefits of this highly leveraged long-term research.
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER
The conferees have provided $20,000,000 only for the Joint Information Technology Center Initiative. These funds shall be available only
to establish two, Pacific-based Information Technology Centers (ITC’s). These centers allow DoD to integrate and implement the many successful logistics and personnel initiatives underway throughout the Department of Defense. The centers will process the wide range and
volume of information essential to the day-to-day operations of our military personnel and defense civilians. The centers will allow DoD
to eliminate legacy systems and to upgrade to more capable and more flexible information technology tools. The conferees direct that the
Secretary of Defense provide a report to the congressional defense committees no later than May 1, 2001, which outlines DoD’s plan for
proceeding with the establishment of these centers.
COMMERCIAL MAPPING AND VISUALIZATION TOOLKIT
The conferees agree to provide a total of $6,000,000 over the request for the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) Commercial
Mapping and Visualization Toolkit. Of these funds $3,000,000 is for upgrades and $3,000,000 is for visualization and bomb blast for force protection. The conferees anticipate that NIMA will pursue all avenues of fair and open competition for the acquisition of the Commercial Mapping and Visualization Toolkit.
NIMA OMNIBUS CONTRACT PROGRAM
The National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) has been required to begin using Architectural and Engineering contracting procedures for all production contracts. This has lead to the development of the ‘‘Omnibus Contract’’ program, allowing NIMA to replace 67 individual production contracts with one contract vehicle for all geospatial information and imagery intelligence requirements. The conferees
agree that the omnibus contract program is a special congressional interest item.
The conferees understand that NIMA plans to continue efforts for the Shuttle Radar Topography data reduction program and the Feature Foundation DATA program. The conferees strongly support NIMA’s efforts to fully fund these important projects in fiscal year 2001
and beyond.
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H6339
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
TITLE V—REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS
The conferees agree to the following amounts for Revolving and Management Funds programs:
[In thousands of dollars]
Budget
House
Defense Working Capital Funds ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
National Defense Sealift Fund ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
National Defense Airlift Fund ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
916,276
388,158
....................
916,276
400,658
....................
Senate
916,276
388,158
2,890,923
Conference
916,276
400,658
2,840,923
Total, Revolving and Management Funds ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1,304,434
1,316,934
4,195,357
4,157,857
DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS
The conferees agree to provide $916,276,000 for the Defense Working Capital Fund.
NATIONAL DEFENSE SEALIFT AND AIRLIFT FUNDS
The appropriation for the ‘National Defense Sealift Fund’ provides funds for the lease, operation, and supply of prepositioning ships;
operation of the Ready Reserve Force; acquisition of large medium speed roll-on/roll-off ships for the Military Sealift Command; and acquisition of ships for the Ready Reserve Force. The budget includes $258,000,000 for Ready Reserve Force and $130,158,000 for acquisition activities in fiscal year 2001.
The conferees have agreed to an expansion of this account to recognize the fact that sea and air mobility are essential ingredients in
the Department of Defense’s force projection capability. Thus, the conferees have recommended renaming this account to create the ‘National Defense Mobility Fund’ account. This new account will incorporate the existing ‘National Defense Sealift Fund’ account and establish the ‘National Defense Airlift Fund’ account.
In addition to providing an increase of $12,500,000 to the budget request amount for the ‘National Defense Sealift Fund’ the conference
recommendation also provides an increase of $2,840,923,000 for the ‘National Defense Airlift Fund.’ This recommendation includes
$2,428,723,000 for the acquisition of 12 C–17 aircraft and advance procurement for the fiscal year 2002 purchase of 15 DC–17 aircraft. Further,
the increase includes $412,200,000 for the interim contractor support of the existing C–17 fleet. The conferees have directed that the C–17
procurement and fleet support programs continue without any interruption during fiscal year 2001. The conferees have included appropriate
legislative authority to permit the transfer of these funds for the continuation of C–17 acquisition and support.
The conferees direct that the Department of Defense budget for all future C–17 procurement and support costs within the National Defense Airlift Fund. The conferees direct that future budget documents for the NDAF should conform to the requirements for other DoD
procurement accounts including the content and format of budget exhibits, reprogramming thresholds among procurement, advanced procurement, and interim contractor support line items, application of the procurement full funding policy, and Congressional notification
for changes in quantity.
TITLE VI—OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS
The conference agreement is as follows:
[In thousands of dollars]
Budget
House
Senate
Conference
Defense Health Program ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Army .................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................
Office of the Inspector General ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
11,600,429
1,003,500
836,300
147,545
12,143,029
927,100
812,200
147,545
12,130,179
979,400
933,700
147,545
12,117,779
980,100
869,000
147,545
Total, Other Department of Defense Programs ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................
13,587,774
14,029,874
14,190,824
14,114,424
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
THE DOD/DVA DISTANCE LEARNING PILOT PROJECT
The conferees are pleased with the progress report on the DoD/DVA Distance Learning pilot project to transition clinical nurse specialists to the role of nurse practitioners. It is noted that 27 students graduated from the first virtual advanced program and 35 new students
have been admitted for the second class of distance learning. The conferees encourage further refinement of this program as requirements
develop.
PEER REVIEWED MEDICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM
The conferees have provided $50,000,000 for a Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program. The conferees direct the Secretary of Defense,
in conjunction with the service Surgeons General, to establish a process to select medical research projects of clear scientific merit and
direct relevance to military health.
Such projects could include: acute lung injury research, arthropod transmitted infectious diseases, biological hazard detection system/
bio-sensor microchip, CAT scan technology for lung cancer, childhood asthma, Dengue fever vaccine, digital mammography imaging, freeze
dried platelets, Fungi Free (a topical anti-fungal agent effective in mitigating onychomycosis), Gulf War illness research, health system
information technology, health care informatics, human imaging institute/magnetoencephalography laboratory, medical surgery technology, medical records management, microsurgery and robotic surgery research, molecular biology for cancer research, neural mechanisms
of chronic fatigue syndrome, obesity related disease prevention especially for minorities, Padget’s disease, quantum optics, remote emergency medicine ultrasound, smoking cessation, social work research, tissue regeneration for combat casualty care, Venus 3–D technology
program, and vitamin D research.
The conferees direct the Department to provide a report to the Congressional Defense Committees by March 1, 2001, on the status of
this Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program, to include the corresponding funds provided in previous fiscal years.
ADDITIONAL DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM FUNDING TO ADDRESS SHORTFALLS
In addition to recommending sizable funding increases for the Defense Health Program for fiscal year 2001 over current year levels, the
conferees note that the recently enacted Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2000 (Public Law 106–246) included over
$1.3 billion to address other critical shortfalls confronting the military health care system. Of this amount, $615,600,000 was provided explicitly to finance existing contract claims for fiscal years 1998–2000 against the Department’s TRICARE managed care system. An additional
$695,900,000 was provided in section 107 of P.L. 106–246 to address other known DHP funding difficulties. The conferees express their intent
that the section 107 funds be used by the Secretary of Defense and the service Surgeons Generals, in conjunction with the funds provided
in this conference agreement, to meet the most critical of the remaining outstanding DHP funding needs. These may include financing
additional TRICARE contract claims (such as those forecast for fiscal year 2001), unfunded requirement associated with the operations of
military treatment facilities, and other needs as identified by the Secretary of Defense and the service Surgeons General.
The conferees further note that in this conference agreement, they have with one exception deferred action on explicitly providing funds
for any proposed expansion or modification of the medical benefit for service members and military retirees which would require changes
in existing law through the congressional authorization process. The conference agreement does provide funding for an improved pharmacy
benefit for military retirees, including those over 65, in recognition of the fact that both the House and Senate-passed versions of the fiscal
year 2001 National Defense Authorization Act each provide for this initiative, albeit in differing fashions. The conferees have been advised
by both the Secretary of Defense and the Office of Management and Budget that the potential fiscal year 2001 costs of this improved benefit,
which was not requested in the President’s budget, could be $200,000,000. The conferees recommend addressing this by providing a fiscal year
2001 appropriation of $100,000 for an improved pharmacy benefit in the Defense Health Program appropriation. Title IX of the conference
agreement provides an additional $100,000,000 in contingent emergency appropriations, subject to release only if the President submits a
budget request pursuant to existing law. The conferees believes this approach strikes the necessary balance needed to ensure that, if authorized, adequate funding has been made available for this important initiative.
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July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
T–AGOS SUPPORT
The conferees agree to provide $15,026,000
for T–AGOS support. The conferees are
aware that changing drug trafficking patterns in the Transit Zone have altered the
original operational concept of using T–
AGOS ships to detect and monitor aircraft
and ships smuggling illegal drugs into the
United States and that other methods exist
to accomplish this mission. The conferees direct the Department to analyze the operational effectiveness of the currently configured T–AGOS ships to determine if their contribution to the counter-drug mission is the
most effective and cost efficient method to
accomplish transit zone surveillance and to
provide a summary of suggested alternative
platforms or assets and their associated
costs. The Department is directed to report
their findings to the defense committees no
later than March 30, 2001.
Nevada to expand operations into southern
Nevada.
NATIONAL GUARD COUNTER-DRUG SUPPORT
CAPER FOCUS
The conferees agree to provide an additional $20,000,000 to the budget request for
National Guard Counter-drug Support and to
concur with language contained in Senate
report 106–298 regarding future budget submissions for this project.
The conferees continue to receive reports
on the positive contribution of Operation
Caper Focus to drug interdiction efforts. Despite this, Caper Focus continues to be virtually ignored in the budget submission. The
conferees direct the Department to provide
sufficient funding for this initiative in the
fiscal year 2002 budget submission.
Out of the funding provided in the ‘‘Drug
Interdiction and Counter-drug Activities,
Defense’’ account, the conferees direct that
$1,000,000 be provided above its state allocation to the Florida National Guard to support a Port Security prototype project and
that $2,000,000 above its state allocation be
provided to the Nevada National Guard to
allow the Counter-Drug Reconnaissance and
Interdiction Detachment unit in northern
OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL
The conferees agree to provide $147,545,000
for the Office of the Inspector General. Of
this amount, $144,245,000 shall be for operation and maintenance and $3,300,000 shall be
for procurement.
TITLE VII—RELATED AGENCIES
The conference agreement is as follows:
[In thousands of dollars]
Budget
Intelligence Community Management Account ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Central Intelligence Agency Retirement & Disability System ..................................................................................................................................................................................................
Payment to Kaho’olawe Island Conveyance, Remediation, and Environmental Restoration Fund ..........................................................................................................................................
National Security Education Trust Fund ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT
ACCOUNT
Details of the adjustments to this account
are addressed in the classified annex accompanying this report.
TITLE VIII—GENERAL PROVISIONS
The conference agreement incorporates
general provisions of the House and Senate
versions of the bill which were not amended.
Those general provisions that were amended
in conference follow:
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8008) which amends language authorizing multi-year procurements.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8022) which amends language that
appropriates funds authorized by the Indian
Financing Act of 1974.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8053) which amends language authorizing intelligence activities.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8055) which amends language recommending rescissions. The rescissions agreed
to are:
Revised Economic Estimates, Fiscal Year 2000
Conference
Aircraft Procurement, Army: Inflation Savings .........................
Missile Procurement, Army: Inflation Savings .........................
Procurement of Weapons and
Tracked
Combat
Vehicles,
Army: Inflation Savings ...........
Procurement of Ammunition,
Army: Inflation Savings ...........
Other Procurement, Army: Inflation Savings ..............................
Aircraft Procurement, Navy: Inflation Savings .........................
Weapons Procurement, Navy: Inflation Savings .........................
Procurement of Ammunition,
Navy and Marine Corps: Inflation Savings ..............................
Shipbuilding
and
Conversion,
Navy: Inflation Savings ............
Other Procurement, Navy: Inflation Savings ..............................
Procurement, Marine Corps: Inflation Savings .........................
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
Inflation Savings ......................
Missile Procurement, Air Force:
Inflation Savings ......................
Procurement of Ammunition, Air
Force: Inflation Savings ...........
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
$7,000,000
6,000,000
7,000,000
5,000,000
16,000,000
24,125,000
3,853,000
1,463,000
19,644,000
12,032,000
3,623,000
32,743,000
5,500,000
1,232,000
10:14 Jul 18, 2000
Conference
Other Procurement, Air Force:
Inflation Savings ......................
Procurement, Defense-Wide: Inflation Savings .........................
Research, Development, Test and
Evaluation, Army: Inflation
Savings .....................................
Research, Development, Test and
Evaluation,
Navy:
Inflation
Savings .....................................
Research, Development, Test and
Evaluation, Air Force: Inflation
Savings .....................................
Research, Development, Test and
Evaluation, Defense-Wide: Inflation Savings .........................
Defense Health Program: Inflation Savings ..............................
Chemical Agents and Munitions
Destruction, Army: Inflation
Savings .....................................
Program Specific Reductions, Fiscal
Other Procurement, Army: R2000
Engine Flush System ................
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
JSTARS (Contract Savings) .....
Other Procurement, Air Force:
RAPCON (Restructuring program) ........................................
Fiscal Year 2000
Procurement of Weapons and
Tracked Combat Vehicles,
Army:
Command and Control Vehicle
Breacher System ......................
Other
Procurement,
Army:
SMART–T (Schedule Slip) ........
Aircraft Procurement, Navy: F/A–
18 E/F cost savings ....................
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
F–16 Advance Procurement ......
Missile Procurement, Air Force:
ARMRAAM (Budget Error) .......
Titan Launch Vehicle ...............
Other Procurement, Air Force:
SMART-T (Schedule Slip) ........
RAPCON (Restructuring program) .....................................
DCGS Communications Segment Upgrade ........................
Research, Development, Test and
Evaluation, Army:
WRAP (Unobligated balance) ...
Stinger Block II ........................
Research, Development, Test and
Evaluation, Air Force: C–130
(Schedule Slip) .........................
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19,902,000
6,683,000
20,592,000
35,621,000
53,467,000
36,297,000
808,000
1,103,000
Year 1999
3,000,000
12,300,000
8,000,000
4,000,000
19,000,000
29,300,000
6,500,000
24,000,000
6,192,000
30,000,000
12,000,000
2,000,000
6,000,000
10,000,000
12,000,000
30,000,000
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137,631
216,000
25,000
6,950
House
224,181
216,000
25,000
6,950
Senate
177,331
216,000
60,000
6,950
Reserve Mobilization Income Insurance Fund: Unused Balance
Conference
148,631
216,000
60,000
6,950
13,000,000
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8064) which amends language governing the procurement of ball and roller
bearings, and vessel propellers from domestic sources.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8075) which amends language allowing the transfer of funds for the purpose of
Reserve peacetime support to community
programs.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8086) which amends Senate language
reducing funds available for titles III and IV
of this Act.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8094) which amends language reducing amounts available for the military personnel and operation and maintenance accounts by $856,900,000 due to favorable foreign currency fluctuation.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8097) which amends Senate language
requiring the Department of Defense to submit certain budget justification materials in
support of the Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer Fund.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8102) which amends House language
requiring registration of mission critical or
mission essential information technology
systems with the Department of Defense
Chief Information Officer, and requiring certification of automated data systems; compliance with the Clinger-Cohen Act.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8112) which amends Senate language
appropriating $7,500,000 for the United Services Organization.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8116) which amends Senate language
earmarking
funds
for
the
Arrow
Deployability Program.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8117) which amends Senate language
requiring the Secretary of Defense to identify, report on, and adjudicate health care
contract claims.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8123) which amends House language
requiring certification that the Department
of Defense program and budget for the Interim Brigade Combat Teams.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8126) which amends Senate language
reducing funds for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization for certain overhead functions.
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The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8127) which amends Senate language
requiring the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization to notify the congress prior to
issuing any type of information or proposal
solicitation.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8129) which amends Senate language
appropriating funds for the Center for the
Preservation of Democracy.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8139) which amends Senate language
earmarking funds for the Middle East Regional Security Issues program.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8140) which amends Senate language
earmarking funds for information security
initiatives.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8141) which amends Senate language
appropriating $5,000,000 for the American Red
Cross.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8142) which amends Senate language
earmarking funds for the Bosque Redondo
Memorial.
The conferees included a general provision
(Section 8145) which earmarks Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force
funds for the B–2 Link 16/Center Instrument
Display/In-Flight Replanner program.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8146) which earmarks funds
for the Airborne Laser program.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8147) which amends section
106 of title 38 U.S.C. concerning the service
of the Alaska Territorial Guard.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8148) which appropriates
$3,000,000 for the United States-China Security Review Commission.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8149) which amends the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8150) which modifies applicability of the Congressional Budget Act of
1974.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8151) which designates the
planned consolidated operations center at
Redstone Arsenal as the Wernher von Braun
Complex.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8152) which earmarks funs in
support of the Pacific Disaster Center.
The conference agreement includes section
8153, which strikes a provision in the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the
Judiciary and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000, earmarking funds under the
Small Business Administration, Business
Loans Program Account, for the New Markets Venture Capital program, subject to authorization. By striking this provision, the
conferees intend that the $6,000,000 originally
earmarked for the New Markets Venture
Capital program, which is not yet authorized, shall instead be used for the 7(a) General Business Loan program in fiscal year
2000.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8154) which authorizes a
grant for the purpose of conducting research
on health effects of low level exposure to
hazardous chemicals.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8155) which appropriates
$2,000,000 for the Oakland Military Institute.
The conferees included a new general provision
(Section
8156)
which
provides
$10,000,000 for Operation and Maintenance,
Army contingent on resolution of the case
City of San Bernardino vs. United States.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8157) which allows the transfer of alloying materials stored at the
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Brownfield site to Bethlehem Development
Corporation.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8158) which appropriates
$2,000,000 for the Defense Health Program for
the purpose of making a grant to the Fisher
House Foundation.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8159) which allows the office
of Economic Adjustment to amend a grant
for Industrial Modernization of the Philadelphia Shipyard.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8160) which extends the availability of funds appropriated under the heading Defense Reinvestment for Economic
Growth in the Supplemental Appropriations
Act of 1993 (Public Law 103–50).
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8161) which provides $2,000,000
for a proposed conceptual design study to examine the feasibility of a zero emissions,
steam injection process that has very promising potential for increasing power generation efficiency, enhanced oil recovery and
carbon sequestration. These funds shall be
transferred not later than October 15, 2000, to
the Fossil Energy Research and Development
program within the Department of Energy,
to pursue this study through its existing
competitive process.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8162) which amends availability of funds provided in the Emergency
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2000, for
Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.
The conferees include a new general provision (Section 8163) which reduces funds available to several Operation and Maintenance
accounts by $71,367,000 due to growth in costs
associated with consulting and advisory
services and other contracts.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8164) which reduces funds
available to several Operation and Maintenance accounts by $92,700,000 due to excess
funded carryover.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8165) which reduces funds
available to several Operation and Maintenance accounts by $159,076,000 due to growth
in the cost of headquarters and administrative activities.
The conferees included a new general provision (Section 8166) which reduces funds
available for the Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer Fund by $1,100,000,000.
The conferees included a new title IX
which provides additional emergency supplemental appropriations for fiscal year 2000,
for unmet military personnel and readiness
requirements and potential military medical
program costs and contingency operations
expenses. Funding in this title has been provided as contingent emergency appropriations, subject to emergency designation by
the President before any obligation of funds.
Title IX includes $1,100,000,000 in contingent emergency appropriations for overseas
contingency operations, as discussed earlier
in the statement of managers under title II,
Operation and Maintenance.
Title IX also includes $50,000,000 in contingent emergency appropriations for ‘‘Military
Personnel, Navy’’, to meet requirements in
the recruiting and retention of personnel.
The conferees direct that these funds shall
be distributed as follows:
Enlistment Bonuses ..........
Selective Reenlistment Bonuses ...............................
Aviation Career Continuation Pay ........................
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[In thousands of dollars]
New budget (obligational)
authority, fiscal year
2000 .................................
Budget estimates of new
(obligational) authority,
fiscal year 2001 ................
House bill, fiscal year 2001
Senate bill, fiscal year 2001
Conference agreement, fiscal year 2001 ....................
Conference
agreement
compared with:
New
budget
(obligational) authority, fiscal
year 2000 ......................
Budget estimates of new
(obligational) authority, fiscal year 2001 ......
House bill, fiscal year
2001 ..............................
Senate bill, fiscal year
2001 ..............................
Title IX—Fiscal Year
2000 Supplementary .....
24,000,000
13,500,000
Sfmt 0634
$273,503,522
284,500,986
288,512,800
287,630,500
287,806,054
+20,253,694
+3,305,069
¥706,746
+175,554
1,779,000
JERRY LEWIS,
BILL YOUNG,
JOE SKEEN,
DAVE HOBSON,
HENRY BONILLA,
GEORGE R. NETHERCUTT,
Jr.,
ERNEST J. ISTOOK, Jr.,
RANDY ‘‘DUKE’’
CUNNINGHAM,
JAY DICKEY,
RODNEY FRELINGHUYSEN,
JOHN P. MURTHA,
NORMAN D. DICKS,
MARTIN OLAV SABO,
JULIAN C. DIXON,
PETER J. VISCLOSKY,
JAMES P. MORAN,
Managers on the Part of the House.
TED STEVENS,
THAD COCHRAN,
ARLEN SPECTER,
PETE V. DOMENICI,
CHRISTOPHER S. BOND,
MITCH MCCONNELL,
RICHARD C. SHELBY,
JUDD GREGG,
KAY BAILEY HUTCHISON,
DANIEL K. INOUYE,
ERNEST HOLLINGS,
ROBERT C. BYRD,
PATRICK J. LEAHY,
FRANK R. LAUTENBERG,
TOM HARKIN,
BYRON L. DORGAN,
RICHARD J. DURBIN,
Managers on the Part of the Senate.
f
$12,500,000
Title IX includes $529,000,000 in contingent
emergency appropriations for unfunded readiness requirements identified by the military
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services, as discussed earlier in this statement under Title II, Operation and Maintenance.
Title IX includes $100,000,000 in contingent
emergency appropriations for the Defense
Health Program, as discussed earlier in this
statement under the Defense Health Program.
CONFERENCE TOTAL—WITH
COMPARISONS
The total new budget (obligational) authority for the fiscal year 2001 recommended
by the Committee of Conference, with comparisons to the fiscal year 2000 amount, the
2001 budget estimates, and the House and
Senate bills for 2001 follow:
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
By unanimous consent, leave of absence was granted to:
Mr. ABERCROMBIE (at the request of
Mr. GEPHARDT) for today on account of
official business.
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July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
Ms. CARSON (at the request of Mr.
GEPHARDT) for today on account of official business.
Mr. MCNULTY (at the request of Mr.
GEPHARDT) for today on account of personal reasons.
Mr. SMITH of Washington (at the request of Mr. GEPHARDT) for today and
the balance of the week on account of
personal matters.
f
SPECIAL ORDERS GRANTED
By unanimous consent, permission to
address the House, following the legislative program and any special orders
heretofore entered, was granted to:
(The following Members (at the request of Mr. STRICKLAND) to revise and
extend their remarks and include extraneous material:)
Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas, for 5 minutes, today.
Mr. STRICKLAND, for 5 minutes,
today.
(The following Member (at the request of Mr. METCALF) to revise and extend his remarks and include extraneous material:)
Mr. METCALF, for 5 minutes, today,
July 18, 19, and 20.
(The following Members (at their own
request) to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material:)
Mrs. MALONEY of New York, for 5
minutes, today.
Mr. CUMMINGS, for 5 minutes, today.
f
ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED
Mr. THOMAS, from the Committee
on House Administration, reported
that that committee had examined and
found truly enrolled bills of the House
of the following titles, which were
thereupon signed by the Speaker:
H.R. 3544. An act to authorize a gold medal
to be presented on behalf of the Congress to
Pope John Paul II in recognition of his many
and enduring contributions to peace and religious understanding, and for other purposes.
H.R. 3591. An act to provide for the award
of a gold medal on behalf of the Congress to
former President Ronald Reagan and his wife
Nancy Reagan in recognition of their service
to the Nation.
H.R. 4391. An act to amend title 4 of the
United States Code to establish sourcing requirements for State and local taxation of
mobile telecommunication services.
f
b
2200
ADJOURNMENT
Mr. PALLONE. Mr. Speaker, I move
that the House do now adjourn.
The motion was agreed to; accordingly (at 10 o’clock p.m.), under its previous order, the House adjourned until
Tuesday, July 18, 2000, at 9 a.m., for
morning hour debates.
f
EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS,
ETC.
Under clause 8 of rule XII, executive
communications were taken from the
Speaker’s table and referred as follows:
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
10:14 Jul 18, 2000
8615. A letter from the Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Noxious Weeds; Update of Weed and
Seed Lists [Docket No. 99–064–2] received
May 26, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8616. A letter from the Associate Administrator, Livestock and Seed Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Changes in Fees for
Federal Meat Grading and Certification
Services [Docket No. LS–98–12] (RIN: 0581–
AB83) received May 30, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8617. A letter from the Associate Administrator, Tobacco Programs, Department of
Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Tobacco Fees and Charges for
Mandatory Inspection; Fee Increase [Docket
No. TB–00–10] (RIN: 0581–AB87) received May
30, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Agriculture.
8618. A letter from the Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture,
transmitting the Department’s final rule—
Veterinary Services User Fees; Pet Food Facility Inspection and Approval Fees [Docket
No. 98–045–2] received June 20, 2000, pursuant
to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Agriculture.
8619. A letter from the Acting Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Department
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final rule—General and Pre-Loan
Policies and Procedures Common to Insured
and Guaranteed Loans (RIN: 0572–AB52) received May 30, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8620. A letter from the Acting Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Department
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Specifications and Drawings for Underground Electric Distribution—
received May 24, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8621. A letter from the Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Hawaii Animal Import Center [Docket
No. 98–013–2] received June 20, 2000, pursuant
to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Agriculture.
8622. A letter from the Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Importation of Gypsy Moth Host Material From Canada [Docket No. 98–110–2] (RIN:
0579–AB11) received June 20, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Agriculture.
8623. A letter from the Administrator, Foreign Agriculture Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Adjustment of Appendices to the
Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing
Regulation for the 2000 Tariff-Rate Quota
Year—received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8624. A letter from the Agricultural Marketing Service, Cotton Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Revision of User Fees
for 2000 Crop Cotton Classification Services
to Growers [Docket No. CN–99–003] (RIN:
0581–AB57) received June 7, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Agriculture.
8625. A letter from the Associate Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service,
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Dairy Programs, Department of Agriculture,
transmitting the Department’s final rule—
Fluid Milk Promotion Order; Amendments
to the Order [DA–00–07] received June 7, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8626. A letter from the Associate Administrator, Cotton Programs, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of Agriculture,
transmitting the Department’s final rule—
Grade Standards and Classification for
American Pima Cotton [Docket No. CN–00–
003] (RIN: 0581–AB82) received June 9, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8627. A letter from the Associate Administrator, Cotton Programs, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of Agriculture,
transmitting the Department’s final rule—
Revision of Cotton Classification Procedures
for Determining Upland Cotton Color Grade
[Docket No. CN–00–001] (RIN: 0581–AB67) received June 9, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8628. A letter from the Administrator, Risk
Management Agency, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s
‘‘Major’’ rule—Catastrophic Risk Protection
Endorsement; Regulations for the 1999 and
Subsequent Reinsurance Years; Group Risk
Plan of Insurance Regulations for the 2000
and Succeeding Crop Years, and the Common
Crop Insurance Regulations; Basic Provisions (RIN: 0563–AB81) received July 12, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8629. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Cyprodinil; Extension of Tolerance for Emergency Exemption [OPP–301006; FRL–6590–4] (RIN: 2070–
AB78) received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8630. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Imidaloprid;
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [OPP–301004; FRL–6558–4] (RIN: 2070–
AB78) received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8631. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Pendimethalin;
Re-establishment of Tolerance for Emergency Exemptions [OPP–301020; FRL–6596–5]
(RIN: 2070–AB78) received July 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8632. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Informtation,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Azoxystrobin
or
Methyl
(E)-2-[2-[6-(-cyanophenoxy)
pyrimidin-4-yloxy]phenyl]-3-; Extension of
Tolerance for Emergency Exemptions [OPP–
301012; FRL–6594–1] (RIN: 2070–AB78) received
July 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8633. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Tebuconazole;
Extension of Tolerance for Emergency Exemptions [OPP–301022; FRL–6596–7] (RIN:
2070–AB) received July 12, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8634. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Humic Acid,
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July 17, 2000
Sodium Salt, Exemption Tolerance [OPP–
301017; FRL–6595–9] (RIN: 2070–AB) received
July 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Agriculture.
8635. A communication from the President
of the United States, transmitting the request and availability of the funds in accordance with provisions of Division B of the
H.R. 4425, the Emergency Supplemental Act,
2000, and Division C of H.R. 4425, the Cerro
Grande Fire Supplemental; (H. Doc. No. 106—
267); to the Committee on Appropriations
and ordered to be printed.
8636. A letter from the Alternate OSD Federal Register Liaison Officer, Office of the
Secretary, Department of Defense, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Transactions Other than Contracts, Grants, or Cooperative Agreements for Prototype Projects
(RIN: 0790–AG79) received May 26, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Armed Services.
8637. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulations, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Housing—Federal Housing
Commissioner, Department of Housing transmitting the Department’s final rule—Tenant
Participation
in
Multifamily
Housing
Projects [Docket No. FR–4403–F–02] (RIN:
2502–AH32) received June 7, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Banking and Financial Services.
8638. A letter from the Director, Office of
Legislative Affairs, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, transmitting the Corporation’s final rule— Minority and Women Outreach Program—Contracting (RIN: 3064–
AB12) received May 22, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Banking and Financial Services.
8639. A letter from the Managing Director,
Office of General Counsel, Federal Housing
Finance Board, transmitting the Board’s
final rule—Office of Finance; Authority of
Federal Home Loan Banks to Issue Consolidated Obligations [No. 2000–24] (RIN: 3069–
AA88) received June 21, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Banking and Financial Services.
8640. A letter from the Secretary, Bureau
of Consumer Protection, Division of Financial Practices, Federal Trade Commission,
transmitting the Commission’s ‘‘Major’’
rule—Privacy of Consumer Financial Information—received June 19, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Banking and Financial Services.
8641. A letter from the General Counsel,
National Credit Union Administration,
transmitting the Administration’s final
rule—Share Insurance and Appendix—received June 13, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Banking
and Financial Services.
8642. A letter from the General Counsel,
National Credit Union Administration,
transmitting the Administration’s final
rule—Privacy of Consumer Financial Information; Requirements for Insurance [12 CFR
Parts 716 and 741] received June 5, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Banking and Financial Services.
8643. A letter from the Deputy Secretary,
Division of Investment Management; Division of Market Regulation, Securities and
Exchange Commission, transmitting the
Commission’s ‘‘Major’’ rule—Privacy of Consumer Finacial Information (Regulation S-P)
[Release Nos. 34–42974, IC–24543, IA–1883; File
No. S7–6–00] (RIN: 3235–AH90) received June
27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Banking and Financial
Services.
8644. A letter from the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department
of Education, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Office of Elementary and Sec-
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
10:14 Jul 18, 2000
ondary
Education-Safe
and
Drug-Free
Schools and Communities National Programs-Federal Activities Grants ProgramThe Challenge Newsletter—received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Education and the Workforce.
8645. A letter from the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department
of Education, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Office of Elementry and Secondary Education—Safe and Drug Free
Schools and Communities National Programs—Federal Activities—Grant Competition to Prevent High-Risk Drinking and Violent Behavior Among College Students—received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Education
and the Workforce.
8646. A letter from the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department
of Education, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Office of Elementary and Secondary Education—Safe and Drug-Free
Schools and Communities National Programs—Federal Activities—Effective Alternative Strategies: Grant Competition to Reduce Student Suspensions and Expulsions
and Ensure Educational Progress of Students
Who Are Suspended or Expelled—received
June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Education
and the Workforce.
8647. A letter from the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department
of Education, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Office of Elementary and Secondary
Education-Safe
and
Drug-Free
Schools and Communities National Programs-Federal Activities-Alcohol and Other
Drug Prevention Models on College Campuses Grant Competition—received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Education and the Workforce.
8648. A letter from the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department
of Education, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Office of Elementary and Secondary Education—Safe and Drug-Free
Schools and Communities National Programs-Federal Activities—Middle School
Drug Prevention and School Safety Program
Coordinators Grant Competition, pursuant
to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Education and the Workforce.
8649. A letter from the General Attorney,
Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Department of Education, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Jacob K.
Javits Gifted and Talented Education Program: National Research and Development
Center—June 16, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Education
and the Workforce.
8650. A letter from the Secretary of Education, transmitting a legislative proposal
entitled, ‘‘College Completion Challenge
Grant Act of 2000’’; to the Committee on
Education and the Workforce.
8651. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulatory Law, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of
Energy, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Criteria and Explosives Safety Criteria Guide
for use with DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety—
received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8652. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulatory Law, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of
Energy, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Department of Energy Badges [DOE N.
473.4] received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8653. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulatory Law, Office of Defense Procurement, Department of Energy,
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transmitting the Department’s final rule—
DOE Specification; Uninterruptible Power
Supply (UPS) Systems [DOE-SPEC–3021–97]
received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8654. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulatory Law, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of
Energy, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—DOE STANDARD; Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for
Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23 Nuclear
Safety Analysis Reports [DOE-STD–1027–92]
received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8655. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulatory Law, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of
Energy, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Guide for the Mitigation of Natural
Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and Nonnuclear Facilities—received
June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A);
to the Committee on Commerce.
8656. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulatory Law, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of
Energy, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—DOE Standard; Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing
Materials (RIN: DOE-STD–3013–99) received
June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A);
to the Committee on Commerce.
8657. A letter from the Assistant General
Counsel for Regulatory Law, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of
Energy, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—DOE Standard; Content of System Design Descriptions (RIN: DOE-STD–3024–98) received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8658. A letter from the Director, Regulations Policy and Management Staff, FDA,
Department of Health and Human Services,
transmitting the Department’s final rule—
Secondary Direct Food Additives Permitted
in Food for Human Consumption [Docket No.
00F–0786] received June 2, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8659. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of Implementation Plans and
Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; Ohio and Kentucky [OH–132–2;
KY–116–2; KY–84–2; FRL–6717–1] received
June 13, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8660. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of State Plans for Designated
Facilities and Pollutants; Arizona; Control
of Emissions from Existing Hospital/Medical/
Infectious Waste Incinerators [AZ025–MWIa;
FRL–6717–7a] received June 13, 2000, pursuant
to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8661. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of State Plans for Designated
Facilities and Pollutants; Colorado, Montana, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/
Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators [FRL–
6717–3] received June 13, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8662. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Clean Air Act
Full Approval of Operating Permit Program;
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Forsyth County (North Carolina) [NC-FORST5–2000–01a; FRL–6712–5] received June 13,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Commerce.
8663. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Reopening of
Comment Period and Delaying of Effective
Date of Revisions to the Interim Enhanced
Surface Water Treatment Rule (IESWTR),
the Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection
Byproducts Rule (Stage 1 DBPR) and Revisions to State Primacy Requirements to Implement the Safe Drinking Water Act
(SDWA) Amendments [FRL–6715–4] received
June 13, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8664. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of Maintenance Plan and Designation of Area for Air Quality Planning
Purposes for Carbon Monoxide; State of Arizona [AZ072–0085; FRL–6601–7] received June
1, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Commerce.
8665. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Nitrogen Oxides
Allowance Requirements [PA 153–4100a;
FRL–6702–3] received May 30, 2000, pursuant
to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8666. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of State Plans for Designated
Facilities and Pollutants: Alabama; Correction [AL52–200014; FRL–6708–6] received May
30, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Commerce.
8667. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regualtory Managment and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of Implementation Plans
[IN112–1a, FRL–6708–5] received May 30, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8668. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Indiana [IN117–1a, FRL–6708–2] received May 30,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Commerce.
8669. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for
Designated Facilities and Pollutants; West
Virginia; Control of Emissions from Existing
Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators [WV–6013a; FRL–6714–2] received June
7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Commerce.
8670. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Clean Air Act
Full Approval of Operating Permit Program;
State of Montana [MT–001a; FRL–6714–4] received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8671. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of State Plans—Alabama: Approval of Revisions to the Alabama State
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
10:14 Jul 18, 2000
Implementation Plan; Transportation Conformity Interagency Memorandum of Agreement; Correction [AL53–200019(a); FRL–6735–
6] received July 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8672. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Rescinding
Findings that the 1–Hour Ozone Standard No
Longer Applies in Certain Areas [FRL–6733–
3] (RIN: 2060–ZA08) received July 6, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8673. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Approval and
Promulgation of State Plans for Designated
Facilities and Pollutants; Control of Emissions From Hospital/Medical/ Infectious
Waste Incinerators (HMIWI); State of Kansas
[KS 105–1105a; FRL–6733–9] received July 6,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Commerce.
8674. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Bureau Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), Table of Allotments, FM Broadcast Stations (Greeley and
Bloomfield, Colorado) [MM Docket No. 99–
279; RM–9716] received June 27, 2000, pursuant
to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8675. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the
Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), FM Table of Allotments, FM
Broadcast Stations. (Saratoga, Green River,
Big Piney and La Barge, Wyoming) [MM
Docket No. 98–130, MM Docket No. 99–56, RM–
9297, RM–9655, RM–9459] received June 27,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Commerce.
8676. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the
Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), FM Table of Allotments, FM
Broadcast Stations (Douglas and Guernsey,
Wyoming) [MM Docket No. 98–15; RM–9320;
RM 9653] received June 27, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8677. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Bureau Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), Table of Allotments, FM Broadcast Stations. (Eldorado,
Beeville, Colorado City, Cotulla , Cuero,
Kerrville, Mason, McQueeney and San Angelo, Texas) [MM Docket No. 99–357 RM–9780]
received June 27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8678. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Bureau Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), Table of Allotments, FM Broadcast Stations. (Whitefield
and Northumberland, New Hampshire) [MM
Docket No. 99–42; RM–9467; RM–9618] received
June 27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8679. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the
Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), FM Table of Allotments, FM
Broadcast Stations (Arnoldsburg, West Virginia) [MM Docket No. 98–216 RM–9381] received June 27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8680. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Bureau Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Fed-
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eral Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), Table of Allotments, FM Broadcast Stations. (CampWood
and Rocksprings, Texas) [MM Docket No. 99–
214; RM–9546; RM–9699] received June 27, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8681. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Bureau Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), Table of Allotments, FM Broadcast Stations. (Carney,
Michigan) [MM Docket No. 99–334 RM–9772]
received June 27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8682. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Bureau Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), Table of Allotments, FM Broadcast Stations (Gwinn,
Michigan) [MM Docket No. 99–341; RM–9776]
received June 27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8683. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the
Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), FM Table of Allotments, FM
Broadcast Stations. (North Tunica and Friars Point, Mississippi, Kennett, Missouri,
Munford, Tennessee, and Marianna, Arkansas) [MM Docket No. 99–140; MM Docket No.
99–146; RM–9490; RM–9724; RM–9725] received
June 27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8684. A letter from the Special Assistant to
the Bureau Chief, Mass Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final rule—Amendment of Section 73.202(b), Table of Allotments, FM Broadcast Stations. (Everglades
City, LaBelle, Estero and Key West, Florida)
[MM Docket No. 97–116; RM–9050; RM–9123]
received June 27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8685. A letter from the Associate Chief,
Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commission’s ‘‘Major’’ rule—
Amendment of the Commission’s Rules to
Establish New Personal Communications
Services, Narrowband PCS [GEN Docket No.
90–314 ET Docket No. 92–100] Implementation
of Section 309(j) of the Communications
Act—Competitive Bidding, Narrowband PCS
[PP Docket No. 93–253] received July 14, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8686. A letter from the Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the
Commission’s
‘‘Major’’
rule—Extending
Wireless Telecommunications Service To
Tribal Lands [WT Docket No. 99–266] received
July 14, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8687. A letter from the Associate Managing
Director,
Performance
Evaluation
and
Records Management, Office of Managing Director, Federal Communications Commission, transmitting the Commision’s final
rule—Assessment and Collection of Regulatory Fees for Fiscal Year 2000, Report and
Order [MD Docket No. 00–58, FCC 00–240] received July 14, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Commerce.
8688. A letter from the Deputy Secretary,
Division of Investment Management, Securities and Exchange Commission, transmitting
the Commission’s final rule—Offer and Sale
of Securities to Canadian Tax-Deferred Retirement Savings Accounts [Release Nos. 33–
7860, 34–42905, IC–24491; File No. S7–10–00
International Series Release No. 1226] (RIN:
3235–AH32) received June 9, 2000, pursuant to
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July 17, 2000
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Commerce.
8689. A letter from the Lieutenant General,
Director, Defense Security Cooperation
Agency, transmitting notification concerning the Department of the Army’s Proposed Letter(s) of Offer and Acceptance
(LOA) to Egypt for defense articles and services (Transmittal No. 00–44), pursuant to 22
U.S.C. 2776(b); to the Committee on International Relations.
8690. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed
manufacturing license agreement with Turkey [Transmittal No. DTC 024–00], pursuant
to 22 U.S.C. 2776(c); to the Committee on
International Relations.
8691. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting notification of a proposed manufacturing license agreement with Norway,
Sweeden, Greece and Turkey (Transmittal
No. DTC–022–00), pursuant to 22 U.S.C.
2776(d); to the Committee on International
Relations.
8692. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed
Manufacturing License Agreement with Sweden [Transmittal No. DTC 021–00], pursuant
to 22 U.S.C. 2776(c); to the Committee on
International Relations.
8693. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting notification of a proposed
Technical Assistance Agreement with Canada [Transmittal No. DTC 058–00], pursuant
to 22 U.S.C. 2776(d); to the Committee on
International Relations.
8694. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed license for the export of defense articles or defense services sold commercially under a
contract to United Kingdom [Transmittal
No. DTC 29–00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2776(c);
to the Committee on International Relations.
8695. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed license for the export of defense articles or defense services sold commercially under a
contract to French Guiana [Transmittal No.
DTC 047–00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2776(c); to
the Committee on International Relations.
8696. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed license for the export of defense articles or defense services sold commercially under a
contract to Germany [Transmittal No. DTC
044–00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2776(c); to the
Committee on International Relations.
8697. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed license for the export of defense articles or defense services sold commercially under a
contract to Australia and Japan [Transmittal No. DTC 053–00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C.
2776(c); to the Committee on International
Relations.
8698. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed license for the export of defense articles or defense services sold commercially under a
contract to Egypt [Transmittal No. DTC 062–
00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2776(c); to the Committee on International Relations.
8699. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed
transfer of major defense equipment from
the Government of the Canada and Sweden
[Transmittal 35–00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C.
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
H6349
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
10:14 Jul 18, 2000
2776(d); to the Committee on International
Relations.
8700. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed license for the export of defense articles or defense services sold commercially under a
contract to France and the United Kingdom
[Transmittal No. DTC 31–00], pursuant to 22
U.S.C. 2776(c); to the Committee on International Relations.
8701. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed license for the export of defense articles or defense services sold commercially under a
contract to Australia [Transmittal No. DTC
34–00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2776(c); to the
Committee on International Relations.
8702. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting certification of a proposed
Manufacturing License Agreement with
France and Germany [Transmittal No. DTC
63–00], pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2776(d); to the
Committee on International Relations.
8703. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Legislative Affairs, Department of State,
transmitting notification that effective June
4, 2000, the danger pay rate for Eritrea was
designated at the 15% level, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 5928; to the Committee on International Relations.
8704. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Export Administration, Department of
Commerce, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Restrictive Trade Practices or
Boycotts [Docket No. 000424111–0111–01] (RIN:
0694–AA11) received May 23, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
International Relations.
8705. A letter from the Assistant Secretary
for Export Administration, Department of
Commerce, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Revisions and Clarifications to
the Export Administration Regulations;
Commerce
Control
List
[Docket
No.
990625176–0029–02] (RIN: 0694–AB86) received
May 23, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on International Relations.
8706. A letter from the Attorney-Advisor,
Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs,
Department of State, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Fees for Exchange
Visitor Program Designation Services [Public Notice 3284] received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee
on International Relations.
8707. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–359, ‘‘Criminal Tax Reorganization Act of 2000’’ received July 14, 2000,
pursuant to D.C. Code section 1—233(c)(1); to
the Committee on Government Reform.
8708. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–360, ‘‘Tax Expenditure
Budget Review Act of 2000’’ received July 14,
2000, pursuant to D.C. Code section 1—
233(c)(1); to the Committee on Government
Reform.
8709. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–363, ‘‘Gray Market Cigarette Prohibition Temporary Act of 2000’’ received July 14, 2000, pursuant to D.C. Code
section 1—233(c)(1); to the Committee on
Government Reform.
8710. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–361, ‘‘Retirement Incentive Temporary Act of 2000’’ received July 14,
2000, pursuant to D.C. Code section 1—
233(c)(1); to the Committee on Government
Reform.
8711. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
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copy of D.C. Act 13–362, ‘‘Campaign Finance
Disclosure and Enforcement Amendment Act
of 2000’’ received July 14, 2000, pursuant to
D.C. Code section 1—233(c)(1); to the Committee on Government Reform.
8712. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. ACT 13–364, ‘‘Underage Drinking
Temporary Amendment Act of 2000’’ received
July 14, 2000, pursuant to D.C. Code section
1—233(c)(1); to the Committee on Government Reform.
8713. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–365, ‘‘Supermarket Tax
Exemption Act of 2000’’ received July 14,
2000, pursuant to D.C. Code section 1—
233(c)(1); to the Committee on Government
Reform.
8714. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–366, ‘‘Public Schools Free
Textbook Temporary Amendment Act of
2000’’ received July 14, 2000, pursuant to D.C.
Code section 1—233(c)(1); to the Committee
on Government Reform.
8715. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–367, ‘‘New Motor Vehicle
Inspection Sticker Renewal Temporary
Amendment Act of 2000’’ received July 14,
2000, pursuant to D.C. Code section 1—
233(c)(1); to the Committee on Government
Reform.
8716. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–373, ‘‘Equal Opportunity
for Local, Small, or Disadvantaged Business
Enterprises Amendment Act of 2000’’ received July 14, 2000, pursuant to D.C. Code
section 1—233(c)(1); to the Committee on
Government Reform.
8717. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–379, ‘‘Closing of a Public
Alley in Square 236, S.O. 00–49, Act of 2000’’
received July 17, 2000, pursuant to D.C. Code
section 1—233(c)(1); to the Committee on
Government Reform.
8718. A letter from the Chairman, Council
of the District of Columbia, transmitting a
copy of D.C. Act 13–378, ‘‘Closing of a Public
Alley in Square 288, S.O. 98–163, Act of 2000’’
received July 17, 2000, pursuant to D.C. Code
section 1—233(c)(1); to the Committee on
Government Reform.
8719. A letter from the Chairman, Amtrak,
transmitting the semiannual report on the
activities of the Office of Inspector General
for the period October 1, 1999 through March
31, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. app. (Insp. Gen.
Act) section 5(b); to the Committee on Government Reform.
8720. A letter from the Executive Director,
Committee For Purchase From People Who
Are Blind or Severely Disabled, transmitting
the Committee’s final rule—Procurement
List: Additions—received May 30, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee
on Government Reform.
8721. A letter from the Chair, Board of Directors, Corporation for Public Broadcasting,
transmitting the report from the Acting Inspector General covering the activities of his
office for the period of October 1, 1999—
March 31, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. app.
(Insp. Gen. Act) section 5(b); to the Committee on Government Reform.
8722. A letter from the Secretary, Department of Education, transmitting the Department’s final rule—The State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program (RIN: 1820–
AB14) received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Government Reform.
8723. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Acquisition
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H6350
Regulation [FRL–6712–2] received June 7,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Government Reform.
8724. A letter from the Chairman, Federal
Election Commission, transmitting a copy of
the annual report in compliance with the
Government in the Sunshine Act during the
calendar year 1999, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
552b(j); to the Committee on Government Reform.
8725. A letter from the Chairman, Federal
Trade Commission, transmitting the semiannual report on the activities of the Office
of Inspector General for the period October 1,
1999 through March 31, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. app. (Insp. Gen. Act) section 5(b); to
the Committee on Government Reform.
8726. A letter from the Chairman, National
Endowment for the Arts, transmitting the
semiannual report on the activities of the
Office of Inspector General for the period October 1, 1999 through March 31, 2000, pursuant
to 5 U.S.C. app. (Insp. Gen. Act) section 5(b);
to the Committee on Government Reform.
8727. A letter from the Secretary of Education, transmitting the the twenty-second
Semiannual Report to Congress on Audit
Follow-Up in compliance with the Inspector
General Act Amendments of 1988, pursuant
to 5 app.; to the Committee on Government
Reform.
8728. A letter from the Chairman, Board of
Governors, United States Postal Service,
transmitting the report from the Acting Inspector General covering the activities of his
office for the period of October 1, 1999—
March 31, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. app.
(Insp. Gen. Act) section 5(b); to the Committee on Government Reform.
8729. A letter from the Acting Director, Office of Surface Mining, Department of the Interior, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Pennsylvania
Regulatory
Program
[PA–129–FOR] received June 21, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee
on Resources.
8730. A letter from the Assistant Secretary,
Land and Minerals Management, Minerals
Management Service, Department of the Interior, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—‘‘Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations
in the Outer Continental Shelf—Production
Measurement Document Incorporated by
Reference’’ (RIN: 1010–AC–73) received June
16, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Resources.
8731. A letter from the General Counsel,
Department of Commerce, transmitting a
draft bill entitled the ‘‘National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration Fees Act of
2000’’; to the Committee on Resources.
8732. A letter from the Acting Director, Office of Surface Mining, Department of Interior, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Alabama Regulatory Program [SPATS
No. AL–069–FOR] received June 20, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Resources.
8733. A letter from the Deputy Assistant
Administrator for Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, transmitting
the Administration’s final rule—Fisheries of
the Northeastern United States; Final 2000
Fishing Quotas for Atlantic Surf Clams,
Ocean Quahogs, and Maine Mahogany Quahogs [Docket No. 99128355–0140–02; I.D.
110999C] (RIN: 0648–AM50) received May 30,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Resources.
8734. A letter from the Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, Domestic Fisheries Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Fisheries of the
Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass
Fishery; Commercial Quota Harvested for
Quarter 2 Period [Docket No. 000119014–0137–
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
10:14 Jul 18, 2000
02; I.D. 060200A] received June 20, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee
on Resources.
8735. A letter from the Secretary of the
Treasury, transmitting a report entitled,
‘‘U.S. Government Debt Collection Activities
of Federal Agencies,’’ pursuant to 31 U.S.C.
3716(c)(3)(B); to the Committee on the Judiciary.
8736. A letter from the General Counsel,
Department of the Treasury, transmitting a
draft bill designed to protect the Department
of the Treasury’s security printing and engraving program by amending the criminal
code to more accurately define the value of
items that are used in the manufacture of
Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) securities; to the Committee on the Judiciary.
8737. A letter from the Deputy Executive
Secretary, Health Resources and Services
Administration, Department of Health and
Human Services, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Ricky Ray Hemophilia
Relief Fund Program (RIN: 0906–AA56) received June 9, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on the Judiciary.
8738. A letter from the Rules Administrator, Bureau of Prisons, Department of
Justice, transmitting the Department’s final
rule—Federal Tort Claims Act [BOP–1098–F]
(RIN: 1120–AA94) received June 5, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee
on the Judiciary.
8739. A letter from the Treasurer, The Congressional Medal of Honor Society of the
United States of America, transmitting the
annual financial report of the Society for
calendar year 1999, pursuant to 36 U.S.C.
1101(19) and 1103; to the Committee on the
Judiciary.
8740. A letter from the Program Analyst,
Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, transmitting the
Department’s final rule—Modification and
Revocation of VOR and Colored Federal Airways and Jet Routes; AK [Airspace Docket
No. 98–AAL–26] (RIN: 2120–AA66) received
June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8741. A letter from the Program Analyst,
Federal Aviation Adminstration, Department of Transportation, transmitting the
Department’s final rule—Realignment of Jet
Route; TX [Airspace Docket No. 99–ASW–33]
received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8742. A letter from the Program Analyst,
Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, transmitting the
Department’s final rule—Correction to Class
E Airspace; Unalaska, AK [Airspace Docket
No. 99–AAL–18] received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee
on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8743. A letter from the Program Analyst,
Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, transmitting the
Department’s final rule—Amendment to
Time of Designation for Restricted Area R–
7104 (R–7104), Vieques Island, PR [Airspace
Docket No. 00–ASO–8] (RIN: 2120–AA66) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8744. A letter from the Program Analyst,
Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, transmitting the
Department’s final rule—Establishment of
Class D Airspace; Jackson, WY [Airspace
Docket No. 99–ANM–11] received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8745. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, trans-
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mitting the Department’s final rule—Modification of Class D Airspace; Rapid City, SD;
modification of Class D Airspace; Rapid City
Ellsworth AFB, SD; and modification of
Class E Airspace; Rapid City, SD [Airspace
Docket No. 00–AGL–03] received May 25, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8746. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Modification of Class E Airspace; Yankton, SD
[Airspace Docket No. 98–AGL–78] received
May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8747. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Modification of Class E Airspace; Ely, MN [Airspace Docket No. 00–AGL–04] received May
25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8748. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Modification of Class D Airspace; establishment
of Class E Airspace; and modification of
Class E Airspace; Belleville, IL [Airspace
Docket No. 00–AGL–01] received May 25, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8749. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Amendment to Class E Airspace; Hampton, IA [Airspace Docket No. 00–ACE–7] received May 25,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8750. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Establishment of Class D Airspace; Jackson, WY
[Airspace Docket No. 99–ANM–11] received
May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8751. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft LTd.
Models PC–12 and PC–12/45 Airplanes [Docket
No. 99–CE–36–AD; Amendment 39–11762; AD
2000–11–14] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8752. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Air Tractor Incorporated Models AT–301, AT–401, and AT–501
Airplanes
[Docket
No.
2000–CE–21–AD;
Amendment 39–11753; AD 2000–11–05] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8753. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. (formerly AlliedSignal Inc.)
ALF502R and LF507 Series Turbofan Engines
[Docket No. 99–NE–36–AD; Amendment 39–
11763; AD 2000–11–15] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8754. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 777–200
Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–NM–307–AD;
Amendment 39–11759; AD 2000–11–11] (RIN:
E:\CR\FM\L17JY7.000
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PsN: H17PT1
July 17, 2000
2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8755. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France
Model SA–365N1, AS–365N2, and SA–366G1
Helicopters
[Docket
No.
99–SW–45–AD;
Amendment 39–11765; AD 2000–11–17] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8756. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Ayres Corporation
S2R Series and Model 600 S2D Airplanes
[Docket No. 98–CE–56–AD; Amendment 39–
11764; AD 2000–11–16] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8757. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Model L–
1011–385 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 98–NM–
311–AD; Amendment 39–11744; Ad 2000–10–20]
(RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8758. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Allison Engine Company AE 3007A and AE 3007C Series Turbofan
Engines [Docket No. 99–NE–07–AD; Amendment 39–1171; AD 2000–11–22] (RIN: 2120–AA64)
received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8759. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319,
A320, and A321 Series Airplanes [Docket No.
99–NM–343–AD; Amendment 39–11757; AD
2000–11–09] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8760. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 747 and
767 Series Airplanes Powered by General
Electric Model CF6–80C2 Series Engines
[Docket No. 99–NM–228–AD; Amendment 39–
11756; AD 2000–11–08] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8761. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 747–200,
-300, and -400 Series Airplanes [Docket No.
99–NM–30–AD; Amendment 39–11755; AD 2000–
11–07] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8762. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 767 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 98–NM–316–AD;
Amendment 39–11754; AD 2000–11–06] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8763. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Model Falcon 2000, Mystere-Falcon 900, Falcon 900EX,
VerDate 11-MAY-2000
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Fan Jet Falcon, Mystere-Falcon 20, and
Mystere-Falcon 200 Series Airplanes [Docket
No. 2000–NM–109–AD; Amendment 39–11751;
AD 2000–11–03] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received
June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8764. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France
Model SA–365C, C1, C2, N, and N1; AS–365N2
and N3; and SA–366G1 Helicopters [Docket
No. 99–SW–62–AD; Amendment 39–11766; AD
2000–11–18] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8765. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Model F.28
Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–NM–358–AD; Amendment 39–11761; AD 2000–11–13] (RIN: 2120–
AA64) received June 12, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8766. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211
Series Turbofan Engines [Docket No. 94–
ANE–16–AD; Amendment 39–11758; AD 2000–
11–10] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 12, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8767. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Saab Model SAAB
SF340A and SAAB 340B Series Airplanes
[Docket No. 99–NM–51–AD; Amendment 39–
11785; AD 2000–12–07] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 23, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8768. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A330
and A340 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 2000–
NM–64–AD; Amendment 39–11784; AD 2000–12–
06] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 23, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8769. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney
PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines [Docket No.
98–ANE–66–AD; Amendment 39–11780; AD
2000–12–02] (RIN:2120–AA64) received June 23,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8770. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319,
A320, and A321 Series Airplanes [Docket No.
99–NM–351–AD; Amendment 39–11791; AD
2000–12–13](RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 23,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8771. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300–600
Series Airplanes [Docket No. 98–NM–164–AD;
Amendment 39–11789; AD 2000–12–11] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 23, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8772. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, trans-
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mitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Saab Model SAAB
SF340A and SAAB 340B Series Airplanes
[Docket No. 2000–NM–25–AD; Amendment 39–
11792; AD 2000–12–14] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 23, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8773. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 747 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 2000–NM–78–AD;
Amendment 39–11794; AD 2000–12–16] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 23, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8774. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 767 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–NM–182–AD;
Amendment 39–11795; AD 2000–12–17] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 23, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8775. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France
Model SA–365N, SA–365N1, AS–365N2 and AS–
365N3 Helicopters [Docket No. 99–SW–86–AD;
Amendment 39–11737; AD 2000–10–13] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8776. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France
Model AS–350B, BA, B1, B2, and D, and Model
AS–355E, F, F1, F2, and N Helicopters [Docket No. 99–SW–39–AD; Amendment 39–11734;
AD 2000–10–10] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May
25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8777. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France
Model AS350B, BA, B1, B2, B3, D, and
AS355E, F, F1, F2, and N Helicopters [Docket
No. 99–SW–36–AD; Amendment 39–11733; AD
2000–10–09] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8778. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada (BHTC) Model 222, 222B, 222U,
and 230 Helicopters [Docket No. 99–SW–43–
AD; Amendment 39–11738; AD 2000–10–14]
(RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8779. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Israel Aircraft Industries, Ltd., Model 1124 and 1124A Westwind
Airplanes
[Docket
No.
2000–NM–42–AD;
Amendment 39–11728; AD 2000–10–04] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8780. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Gulfstream Model G–
159 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–NM–138–
AD; Amendment 39–11735; AD 2000–10–11]
(RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
E:\CR\FM\L17JY7.000
pfrm02
PsN: H17PT1
H6352
8781. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; MD Helicopters Inc.
Model MD900 Helicopters [Docket No. 2000–
SW–04–AD; Amendment 39–11730; AD 2000–10–
06] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8782. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas
Model DC–10 Series Airplanes [Docket No.
99–NM–213–AD; Amendment 39–11727; AD
2000–10–03] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8783. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the
Territory and Airspace of Ethiopia [Docket
No. FAA–2000–7340; SFAR No. 87] (RIN: 2120–
AH01) received May 24, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8784. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France
Model SA–365N1, AS–365N2, and SA–366G1
Helicopters
[Docket
No.
99–SW–34–AD;
Amendment 39–11732; AD 2000–10–08] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8785. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH (Eurocopter) Model EC 135 Helicopters [Docket No. 99–SW–05–AD; Amendment 39–11731; AD 2000–10–07] (RIN: 2120–
AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8786. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Model L–
1011–385 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–NM–
221–AD; Amendment 39–11706; AD 2000–08–20]
(RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8787. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; International Aero
Engines AG V2500–A1/-A5/-D5 Series Turbofan
Engines [Docket No. 98–ANE–45–AD; Amendment 39–11783; AD 2000–12–05] (RIN: 2120–
AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8788. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300–600
Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–NM–362–AD;
Amendment 39–11719; AD 2000–09–10] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8789. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 747–400
and 767–200 and -300 Series Airplanes Powered
by Pratt & Whitney Model PW4000 Series Engines [Docket No. 99–NM–208–AD; Amendment 39–11777; AD 2000–11–28] (RIN: 2120–
AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
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July 17, 2000
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10:14 Jul 18, 2000
8790. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 747–100,
-200, 747SP, and 747SR Series Airplanes
Equipped with Pratt & Whitney JT9D–7, -7A,
-7F, and -7J Series Engines [Docket No. 99–
NM–242–AD; Amendment 39–11717; AD 2000–
09–08] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8791. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; EMBRAER Model
EMB–145 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–
NM–305–AD; Amendment 39–11718; AD 2000–
09–09] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8792. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas
Model DC–10–10, -15, -30, -30F, and -40 Series
Airplanes, and KC–10A (Military) Airplanes
[Docket No. 99–NM–212–AD; Amendment 39–
11716; AD 2000–09–07] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8793. A letter from the Program Analyst,
Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, transmitting the
Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; British Aerospace BAe Model ATP
Airplanes
[Docket
No.
99–NM–230–AD;
Amendment 39–11773; AD 2000–11–24] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8794. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Raytheon (Beech)
Model 400A and 400T Series Airplanes [Docket No. 99–NM–372–AD; Amendment 39–11721;
AD 2000–09–12] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May
25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8795. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300 B2,
A300–B2k, A300 B4–2C, A300 B4–100, and A300
B4–200 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 98–NM–
56–AD; Amendment 39–11725; AD 2000–10–01]
(RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8796. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airworthiness Directives; CFM International (CFMI) CFM56–2,
-2A, -2B, -3, -3B, -3C, -5, -5B, -5C, and -7B Series Turbofan Engines [Docket No. 98–ANE–
38; Amendment 39–11779; AD 2000–12–01] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8797. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 747–400
Series Airplanes [Docket No. 2000–NM–75–AD;
Amendment 39–11736; AD 2000–10–12] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8798. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319,
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A320, A321, A330, and A340 Series Airplanes
[Docket No. 99–NM–103–AD; Amendment 39–
11726; AD 2000–10–02] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8799. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 767–200
and -300 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 98–NM–
313–AD; Amendment 39–11767; AD 2000–11–19]
(RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8800. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Bristish Aerospace
Jetstream Model 3201 Airplanes [Docket No.
99–CE–72–AD; Amendment 39–11722; AD 2000–
09–13] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received May 25, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8801. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6–45/50 Series Turbofan Engines
[Docket No. 98–ANE–32–AD; Amendment 39–
11760; AD 2000–11–12] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8802. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 767 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 2000–NM–138–AD;
Amendment 39–11770; AD 2000–10–51] (RIN:
2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8803. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France
Model AS332L2 Helicopters [Docket No. 99–
SW–82–AD; Amendment 39–11781; AD 2000–12–
03] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8804. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A320–232
and -233 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 2000–
NM–22–AD; Amendment 39–11774; AD 2000–11–
25] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000,
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8805. A letter from the Senior Attorney, Office of the Secretary, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s
final rule—Smoking Aboard Aircraft [Docket
No. OST–2000;OST Docket No. 46783; Notice
90–5; OST Docket No. 44778; Notice 91–1]
(RIN: 2105–AC85; 2105–AB58) received June 5,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8806. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300,
A310, A300–600 Series Airplanes [Docket No.
99–NM–128–AD; Amendment 39–11772; AD
2000–11–23] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8807. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319,
E:\CR\FM\L17JY7.000
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July 17, 2000
A320, and A321 Series Airplanes [Docket No.
2000–NM–139–AD; Amendment 39–11776; AD
2000–11–27] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8808. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A330–
A340 Series Airplanes [Docket No. 2000–NM–
53–AD; Amendment 39–11775; AD 2000–11–26]
(RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8809. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A319,
A320, and A321 Series Airplanes [Docket No.
99–NM–331–AD; Amendment 39–11769; AD
2000–11–21] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8810. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—
Changes to the International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) [14 CFR Part 129] received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.
801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8811. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—National Parks Air Tour Management [14 CFR
Part 91] received June 15, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8812. A letter from the Senior Attorney,
Federal Railroad Administration, Department of Transportation, transmitting the
Department’s ‘‘Major’’ rule—Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing Program; Proposed Revisions [Docket No. FRA
1999–5663] (RIN: 2130–AB26) received June 29,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8813. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Modification of the San Francisco Class B Airspace Area; CA [Airspace Docket No. 97–
AWA–1] (RIN: 2120–AA66) received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8814. A letter from the Program Analyst,
FAA, Department Of Transportation, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier Model
DHC–8–100 and -300 Series Airplanes [Docket
No. 98–NM–380–AD; Amendment 39–11768; AD
2000–11–20] (RIN: 2120–AA64) received June 15,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8815. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Oil Pollution
Prevention and Response; Non-Transportation-Related Facilities [FRL–6707–6] (RIN:
2050–AE64) received June 1, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Transportation and Infrastructure.
8816. A letter from the Director, Office of
Regulatory Management and Information ’,
Environmental Protection Agency, transmitting the Agency’s final rule—Revocation of
the Selenium Criterion Maximum Concentration for the Final Water Quality Guidance for the Great Lakes System [FRL–6707–
7] (RIN: 2040–AC08) received May 30, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Com-
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mittee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8817. A letter from the Chairman, Office of
General Counsel, Federal Maritime Commission, transmitting the Commission’s final
rule—Interpretations and Statements of Policy Regarding Ocean Transportation Intermediaries [Docket No. 00–06] received June
27, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
8818. A letter from the Secretary, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department’s final rule—Rural Empowerment
Zones and Enterprise Communities (RIN:
0503–AA20) received May 24, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Ways and Means.
8819. A letter from the Chief, Regulations
Unit, Internal Revenue Service, transmitting
the Service’s final rule—Determination of
Issue Price in the Case of Certain Debt Instruments Issued for Property [Rev. Rul.
2000–32] received June 20, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Ways and Means.
8820. A letter from the Chief, Regulations
Unit, Internal Revenue Service, transmitting
the Department’s final rule—Additional
Guidance on Cash or Deferred Arrangements—received June 7, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee on
Ways and Means.
8821. A letter from the Chief, Regulations
Unit, Internal Revenue Service, transmitting
the Service’s final rule—Administrative,
Procedural, and Miscellaneous Reporting
IRA Recharacterizations and Reconversions
[Notice 2000–30] received June 5, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the Committee
on Ways and Means.
8822. A letter from the Chief, Regulations
Unit, Internal Revenue Service, transmitting
the Service’s final rule—Deposits of Excise
Tax [TD 8887] (RIN: 1545–AV02) received June
7, 2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to
the Committee on Ways and Means.
8823. A letter from the Regulations Officer,
Social Security Administration, transmitting the Administration’s final rule—Federal
Old-Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance
and Supplemental Security Income for the
Aged, Blind, and Disabled; Medical and Other
Evidance of Your Impairment (s) and Definition of Medical Consultant [Regulations Nos.
4 and 16] (RIN: 0960–AD91) received May 26,
2000, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); to the
Committee on Ways and Means.
8824. A letter from the Assistant Attorney
General, Department of Justice, transmitting the corrected draft bill, ‘‘to establish
police powers for Inspector General agents
engaged in official duties . . . and an oversight mechanism for the exercise of those
powers’’; jointly to the Committees on Government Reform and the Judiciary.
8825. A letter from the Deputy Executive
Secretary, CHPP, Department of Health and
Human Services, transmitting the Department’s ‘‘Major’’ rule—Medicare Program;
Prospective Payment System for Home
Health Agencies [HCFA–1059–F] (RIN: 0938–
AJ24) received July 13, 2000, pursuant to 5
U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); jointly to the Committees
on Ways and Means and Commerce.
8826. A letter from the Deputy Executive
Secretary, Center For Health Plans and Providers, Department of Health and Human
Services, transmitting the Department’s
‘‘Major’’ rule—Medicare Program; Medicare
and Choice Program [HCFA 1030–FC] (RIN:
0938–AI29) received July 12, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); jointly to the Committees on Ways and Means and Commerce.
8827. A letter from the Deputy Executive
Secretary, Office of Inspection General, Department of Health and Human Services,
transmitting the Department’s ‘‘Major’’
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rule—Health Care Programs: Fraud and
Abuse; Revised OIG Civil Money Penalities
Resulting From Public Law 104–191 (RIN:
0991–AA90) received May 3, 2000, pursuant to
5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); jointly to the Committees on Ways and Means and Commerce.
8828. A letter from the Secretary of Education, transmitting a legislative proposal
entitled the, ‘‘Student Loan Improvement
Act of 2000’’; jointly to the Committees on
Education and the Workforce, Ways and
Means, and the Budget.
f
REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON
PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS
Under clause 2 of rule XIII, reports of
committees were delivered to the Clerk
for printing and reference to the proper
calendar, as follows:
Mr. BURTON: Committee on Government
Reform. H.R. 4437. A bill to grant to the
United States Postal Service the authority
to issue semipostals, and for other purposes;
with an amendment (Rept. 106–734 Pt. 1).
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 2671. A bill to provide for the
Yankton Sioux Tribe and the Santee Sioux
Tribe of Nebraska certain benefits of the
Missouri River Basin Pick-Sloan project, and
for other purposes (Rept. 106–735). Referred
to the Committee of the Whole House on the
State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 2435. A bill to expand the
boundaries of the Gettysburg National Military Park to include the Wills House, and for
other purposes; with an amendment (Rept.
106–736). Referred to the Committee of the
Whole House on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3468. A bill to direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey to certain
water rights to Duchesne City, Utah (Rept.
106–737). Referred to the Committee of the
Whole House on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3817. A bill to redesignate the
Big South Trail in the Comanche Peak Wilderness Area of Roosevelt National Forest in
Colorado as the ‘‘Jaryd Atadero Legacy
Trail’’; with amendments (Rept. 106–738). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House
on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 2773. A bill to amend the Wild
and Scenic Rivers Act to designate the
Wekiva River and its tributaries of Rock
Springs Run and Black Water Creek in the
State of Florida as components of the national wild and scenic rivers system; with
amendments (Rept. 106–739). Referred to the
Committee on the Whole House on the State
of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 2833. A bill to establish the
Yuma Crossing National Heritage Area; with
an amendment (Rept. 106–740). Referred to
the Committee on the Whole House on the
State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 2919. A bill to promote preservation and public awareness of the history of
the Underground Railroad by providing financial assistance, to the Freedom Center in
Cincinnati, Ohio; with an amendment (Rept.
106–741). Referred to the Committee on the
Whole House on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3236. A bill to authorize the
Secretary of the Interior to enter into contracts with the Weber Basin Water Conservancy District, Utah, to use Weber Basin
Project facilities for the impounding, storage, and carriage of nonproject water for domestic, municipal, industrial, and other beneficial purposes; with an amendment (Rept.
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106–742). Referred to the Committee on the
Whole House on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3291. A bill to provide for the
settlement of the water rights claims of the
Shivwits Band of the Paiute Indian Tribe of
Utah, and for other purposes; with an amendment (Rept. 106–743). Referred to the Committee on the Whole House on the State of
the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3657. A bill to provide for the
conveyance of a small parcel of public domain land in the San Bernardino National
Forest in the State of California, and for
other purposes; with an amendment (Rept.
106–744). Referred to the Committee of the
Whole House on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3999. A bill to clarify the process for the adoption of local constitutional
self-government for the United States Virgin
Islands and Guam, and for other purposes;
with an amendment (Rept. 106–745). Referred
to the Committee of the Whole House on the
State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. S. 439. An act to amend the National
Forest and Public Lands of Nevada Enhancement Act of 1988 to adjust the boundary of
the Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada (Rept.
106–746). Referred to the Committee of the
Whole House on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. S. 1629. An act to provide for the exchange of certain land in the State of Oregon
(Rept. 106–747). Referred to the Committee of
the Whole House on the State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. S. 1374. An act to authorize the development and maintenance of a multiagency campus project in the town of Jackson, Wyoming (Rept. 106–748). Referred to the
Committee of the Whole House on the State
of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. S. 1705. An act to direct the Secretary of the Interior to enter into land exchanges to acquire from the private owner
and to convey to the State of Idaho approximately 1,240 acres of land near the City of
Rocks National Reserve, Idaho, and for other
purposes (Rept. 106–749). Referred to the
Committee of the Whole House on the State
of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3736. A bill to establish the
Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument in the State of California;
with an amendment (Rept. 106–750). Referred
to the Committee of the Whole House on the
State of the Union.
Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 4115. A bill to authorize appropriations for the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum, and for other purposes;
with an amendment (Rept. 106–751). Referred
to the Committee of the Whole House on the
State of the Union.
Ms. PRYCE of Ohio: Committee on Rules.
House Resolution 553. Resolution providing
for consideration of a motion to go to conference on any Senate amendments to the
bill (H.R. 4810) to provide for reconciliation
pursuant to section 103(a)(1) of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year
2001. (Rept. 106–752). Referred to the House
Calendar.
Mr. ARCHER: Committee on Ways and
Means. H.R. 4843. A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide for retirement security and pension reform; with
an amendment (Rept. 106–753). Referred to
the Committee of the Whole House on the
State of the Union.
Mr. LEWIS of California: Committee of
Conference. Conference report on H.R. 4576.
A bill making appropriations for the Depart-
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July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — HOUSE
10:43 Jul 18, 2000
ment of Defense for the fiscal year ending
September 30, 2001, and for other purposes
(Rept. 106–754). Ordered to be printed.
DISCHARGE OF COMMITTEE
Pursuant to clause 5 of rule X the
Committees on Commerce and Armed
Services discharged. H.R. 4437 referred
to the Committee of the Whole House
on the State of the Union and ordered
to be printed.
f
TIME LIMITATION OF REFERRED
BILL
Pursuant to clause 5 of rule X the following action was taken by the Speaker:
H.R. 4437. Referral to the Committees on
Commerce and Armed Services extended for
a period ending not later than July 17, 2000.
f
PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS
Under clause 2 of rule XII, public
bills and resolutions were introduced
and severally referred, as follows:
By Mr. STUMP (for himself, Mr.
EVANS, Mr. QUINN, Mr. FILNER, Mr.
Mr.
EVERETT,
Mr.
BILIRAKIS,
STEARNS, Mr. HANSEN, Mr. MCKEON,
Mr. GIBBONS, Ms. BROWN of Florida,
Mr. DOYLE, Mr. PETERSON of Minnesota, Mr. REYES, Mr. SHOWS, Mr.
RODRIGUEZ, Ms. BERKLEY, Mr. UDALL
of New Mexico, Mr. SPRATT, Mrs.
JONES of Ohio, Mr. ROHRABACHER, Mr.
DAVIS of Florida, Ms. BALDWIN, Mrs.
JOHNSON of Connecticut, Mr. HOBSON,
Ms. HOOLEY of Oregon, Mr. UNDERWOOD, Ms. KAPTUR, Mr. CRAMER, Mr.
LAZIO, Mr. HOLDEN, Mr. ABERCROMBIE, Mr. MOAKLEY, Ms. ROYBALALLARD, Mr. LUCAS of Oklahoma, Mr.
Mr.
MOLLOHAN,
Mr.
DEFAZIO,
NETHERCUTT, Ms. DUNN, Mr. SANDERS,
and Mr. SMITH of Texas):
H.R. 4864. A bill to amend title 38, United
States Code, to reaffirm and clarify the duty
of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to assist
claimants for benefits under laws administered by the Secretary, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs.
By Mr. ARCHER (for himself and Mr.
SHAW):
H.R. 4865. A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to repeal the 1993 income
tax increase on Social Security benefits; to
the Committee on Ways and Means.
By Mr. FLETCHER (for himself, Mr.
NUSSLE, Mr. ARCHER, Mr. KASICH, Mr.
Mr.
HAYWORTH,
Mr.
TANCREDO,
HERGER, Mr. RAMSTAD, Mr. PORTMAN,
Mr. SAM JOHNSON of Texas, and Mr.
KUYKENDALL):
H.R. 4866. A bill to provide for reconciliation pursuant to section 103(b)(1) of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal
year 2001 to reduce the public debt and to decrease the statutory limit on the public debt;
to the Committee on Ways and Means, and in
addition to the Committee on the Budget,
for a period to be subsequently determined
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
By Mrs. CAPPS (for herself, Mr. RANGEL, Mr. DINGELL, Mr. BROWN of Ohio,
Mr. WAXMAN, Ms. DEGETTE, Mr.
STRICKLAND, Mr. BARRETT of Wisand
Mr.
consin,
Mr.
STUPAK,
DEUTSCH):
H.R. 4867. A bill to revise and extend the
programs of the Substance Abuse and Mental
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Health Services Administration, and for
other purposes; to the Committee on Commerce.
By Mr. CAPUANO (for himself, Mr.
GILCHREST, Mr. UNDERWOOD, Mr.
COBLE, Mr. JONES of North Carolina,
Mr. SANFORD, Mr. DELAHUNT, Mr.
TIERNEY, Mr. GOSS, Mr. WHITFIELD,
Mr. TAYLOR of Mississippi, Mr.
of
California,
Mr.
THOMPSON
SERRANO, Mr. HOEKSTRA, Mr. MCCOLLUM, Mr. KENNEDY of Rhode Island,
Mr. ROMERO-BARCELO, Mrs. MEEK of
Florida, Mr. FORD, Mr. SPENCE, Mr.
STUPAK, Mr. DEFAZIO, Mr. FORBES,
Mr. LOBIONDO, Mr. LANTOS, Mr.
FOSSELLA, Mr. CALLAHAN, Mr. LAFALCE, Mr. LARSON, Mr. SABO, Ms.
KAPTUR, Mr. BATEMAN, Mr. BROWN of
Ohio, Mrs. MINK of Hawaii, Mr. TAYLOR of North Carolina, Mr. WOLF, Mr.
KING, and Mr. CUMMINGS):
H. Con. Res. 372. Concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the Congress regarding
the historic significance of the 210th anniversary of the establishment of the Coast
Guard, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
f
ADDITIONAL SPONSORS
Under clause 7 of rule XII, sponsors
were added to public bills and resolutions as follows:
H.R. 137: Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN.
H.R. 303: Mr. GILLMOR, Mr. SMITH of Texas,
and Mrs. BIGGERT.
H.R. 390: Mr. NEAL of Massachusetts and
Mr. HASTINGS of Florida.
H.R. 460: Mr. PAYNE and Mr. DEFAZIO.
H.R. 483: Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts.
H.R. 632: Mr. OWENS.
H.R. 688: Mr. WELDON of Florida.
H.R. 783: Mr. BILBRAY.
H.R. 860: Mr. TOWNS.
H.R. 1102: Mr, WALDEN of Oregon, Mr.
BAKER, Mr. COX, Mr. WYNN, Mr. RILEY, Mr.
UNDERWOOD, Mr. ROYCE, and Ms. DELAURO.
H.R. 1107: Mr. BRYANT.
H.R. 1116: Mr. MOORE.
H.R. 1227: Mr. WYNN.
H.R. 1495: Ms. MCKINNEY.
H.R. 1525: Ms. MCKINNEY.
H.R. 1824: Mr. BOEHLERT.
H.R. 2121: Mr. ABERCROMBIE, Mr. SANDLIN,
and Mr. TURNER.
H.R. 2308: Mr. SOUDER and Mr. NEAL of
Massachusetts.
H.R. 2331: Mr. MCCOLLUM.
H.R. 2397: Mr. BERRY, Mr. BISHOP, Mr.
CRAMER, Mr. DOOLEY of California, Mr. HALL
of Texas, Mr. MCINTYRE, Mr. MORAN of Virginia, and Mr. SKELTON.
H.R. 2594: Mr. WEXLER.
H.R. 2710: Ms. STABENOW.
H.R. 2892: Mr. ALLEN and Mr. PAUL.
H.R. 2969: Mr. SANFORD.
H.R. 3003: Mrs. EMERSON, Mr. ALLEN, and
Mr. STUPAK.
H.R. 3032: Ms. MCKINNEY.
H.R. 3044: Mr. KUCINICH.
H.R. 3083: Ms. HOOLEY of Oregon, Mr.
OLVER, Mr. BARRETT of Wisconsin, Mr.
LARSON, Mr. DICKS, Mr. GUTIERREZ, and Mr.
KILDEE.
H.R. 3161: Mr. HOYER.
H.R. 3192: Mr. STENHOLM, Mr. SCOTT, Mr.
UDALL of New Mexico, Mr. WEINER, Ms.
PELOSI, Mr. UDALL of Colordo, Mr. SPRATT,
and Mr. BLAGOJEVICH.
H.R. 3193: Mr. KANJORSKI and Ms. ROYBALALLARD.
H.R. 3463: Mr. ABERCROMBIE and Mr. STUPAK.
H.R. 3540: Mr. SAWYER and Mr. CARDIN.
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H.R.
H.R.
H.R.
H.R.
H.R.
H.R.
3595: Mr. SCHAFFER.
3661: Mr. NETHERCUTT.
3875: Mr. FOLEY.
3896: Mr. FRANKS of New Jersey.
3928: Mrs. CLAYTON.
4033: Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi, Mr.
SHOWS, Mr. TERRY, and Mr. PASCRELL.
H.R. 4042: Mrs. MINK of Hawaii.
H.R. 4136: Mr. UDALL of New Mexico.
H.R. 4184: Mr. GOODLATTE and Mr. WELLER.
H.R. 4215: Mr. WHITFIELD.
H.R. 4219: Mr. KILDEE, Mr. HOLT, Mr. PITTS,
Mr. LEVIN, Mrs. MYRICK, Mr. JENKINS, and
Mr. HINCHEY.
H.R. 4237: Mr. GORDON and Mr. CLEMENT.
H.R. 4239: Mr. ROTHMAN.
H.R. 4277: Mr. KLECZKA, Mr. GILLMOR, Mr.
HORN, Mr. ABERCROMBIE, and Mrs. ROUKEMA.
and
Mr.
H.R.
4390:
Mr.
PAYNE
FALEOMAVAEGA.
H.R. 4471: Mr. MCNULTY.
H.R. 4493: Mr. NETHERCUTT and Ms. RIVERS.
H.R. 4511: Mr. NEY, Mr. SHIMKUS, Mr.
WELDON of Pennsylvania, Mr. HOSTETTLER,
Mr. WELLER, and Mr. TOWNS.
H.R. 4543: Mr. BACHUS and Mr. HOUGHTON.
H.R. 4548: Mr. COMBEST, Mr. SAXTON, and
Mr. LAFALCE.
H.R. 4566: Mr. KUCINICH, Mr. MARTINEZ, Mr.
UDALL of New Mexico, and Mr. BISHOP.
H.R. 4598: Mr. PAYNE and Mr. NUSSLE.
H.R. 4613: Mr. KILDEE.
H.R. 4614: Mr. PAYNE, Ms. DELAURO, and
Mr. KUCINICH.
H.R. 4651: Mr. WEXLER and Mr. DOYLE.
H.R. 4659: Mr. COOK, Ms. BALDWIN, and Mr.
SANDERS.
H.R. 4660: Mr. GIBBONS.
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10:43 Jul 18, 2000
H.R. 4669: Mrs. EMERSON and Mr. BURTON of
Indiana.
H.R. 4710: Mr. GARY MILLER of California,
Mr. DEMINT, Mr. PITTS, and Mr. ISTOOK.
H.R. 4736: Mr. GEKAS, Mr. TAYLOR of Mississippi, Mr. BLUNT, and Mrs. EMERSON.
H.R. 4759: Mr. MCHUGH, Mr. BACA, and Mr.
NORWOOD.
H.R. 4770: Mr. PRICE of North Carolina.
H.R. 4793: Mr. BALDACCI.
H.R. 4802: Mr. SWEENEY and Mr. ENGLISH.
H.R. 4807: Mr. MATSUI, Mr. GREEN of Wisconsin, Mr. KUYKENDALL, Mrs. FOWLER, Mr.
KOLBE, Mr. WEXLER, Mr. GREEN of Texas,
Mrs. MALONEY of New York, Mr. INSLEE, Mr.
MALONEY of Connecticut, Mr. GUTIERREZ, Mr.
BECERRA, Mr. FILNER, Mr. DEFAZIO, Ms. ROSLEHTINEN, Mr. LEACH, Mr. DINGELL, Mr.
MCGOVERN, Mr. LARGENT, and Mr. COOKSEY.
H.R. 4820: Mr. OWENS.
H.R. 4841: Mr. THORNBERRY.
H.R. 4848: Mr. DELAHUNT, MR. FILNER, Mr.
HASTINGS of Florida, Mr. POMEROY, Mr.
THOMPSON of California, Mr. BACA, Mrs.
CHRISTENSEN, Mr. CARDIN, Mr. SANDERS, Mr.
MASCARA, Mr. CROWLEY, Mr. BRADY of Pennsylvania, Mr. HOLDEN, Mrs. MINK of Hawaii,
Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California, and Mrs.
CLAYTON.
H.J. Res. 56: Mr. GREENWOOD.
H.J. Res. 102: Mr. DIXON, Mr. CLYBURN,
Mrs. MEEK of Florida, Mr. CRAMER, Mr.
BROWN of Ohio, Mr. JACKSON of Illinois, Ms.
KAPTUR, and Mr. BECERRA.
H. Con. Res. 100: Mrs. ROUKEMA.
H. Con. Res. 115: Mr. REYNOLDS.
H. Con. Res. 159: Mrs. ROUKEMA.
H. Con. Res. 262: Mr. CLEMENT.
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H. Con. Res. 271: Ms. PELOSI, Mr. LEACH,
Mr. LAFALCE, and Ms. WOOLSEY.
H. Con. Res. 283: Mrs. ROUKEMA.
H. Con. Res. 308: Mr. GIBBONS and Mr.
MCNULTY.
H. Con. Res. 313: Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA.
H. Con. Res. 318: Ms. LEE.
H. Con. Res. 340: Mrs. ROUKEMA.
H. Con. Res. 341: Mr. PAYNE, Mrs.
CHRISTENSEN, and Mr. MATSUI.
H. Con. Res. 367: Mr. ANDREWS.
H. Con. Res. 368: Mr. KINGSTON, Mr. HALL of
Ohio, Mr. UDALL of Colorado, Mr. GREEN of
Wisconsin, Mr. SKEEN, Mrs. JACKSON-LEE of
Texas, Mr. FROST, Mr. GUTIERREZ, Ms.
STABENOW, Ms. MILLENDER-MCDONALD, Mr.
EHLERS, Mr. BLUNT, and Mr. JACKSON of Illinois.
H. Con. Res. 370: Mrs. MALONEY of New
York, Mr. BILIRAKIS, and Mrs. ROUKEMA.
H. Res. 462: Mr. DEMINT.
H. Res. 486: Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA.
H. Res. 487: Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA.
H. Res. 531: Mrs. LOWEY, Mr. GILMAN, and
Mr. GEJDENSON.
H. Res. 543: Mr. LANTOS.
H. Res. 549: Mr. WATTS of Oklahoma, Mr.
BRADY of Pennsylvania, Mr. SCARBOROUGH,
Mr. ANDREWS, Mr. GIBBONS, Mrs. TAUSCHER,
Ms. MCKINNEY, Ms. KAPTUR, Mr. BATEMAN,
Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA, Mr. COOKSEY, Mr.
SWEENEY, Mr. TANNER, Mr. CRAMER, Mr.
CLEMENT, and Mr. GILMAN.
H. Res. 551: Mr. TRAFICANT, Mr. GARY MILLER of California, and Mr. SMITH of Texas.
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Congressional Record
M
S
United States
of America
PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE
Vol. 146
106 th CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION
WASHINGTON, MONDAY, JULY 17, 2000
No. 92
Senate
The Senate met at 12 noon and was
called to order by the President pro
tempore [Mr. THURMOND].
PRAYER
The Chaplain, Dr. Lloyd John
Ogilvie, offered the following prayer:
We praise You, dear God. You have
promised never to leave or forsake us.
Our confidence is in You and not ourselves. We come to You in prayer, not
trusting our own goodness but solely in
Your grace. You are our joy when we
get down, our strength when we are
weak, our courage when we vacillate.
You are our security in a world of
change and turmoil. Even when we forget You in the rush of life, You never
forget us. Thank You for Your faithfulness.
At this moment we claim that faithfulness for our friend, Senator PAUL
COVERDELL, as he undergoes surgery.
Bless him, care for him, and heal him.
And now dear God, filled with wonder, love, and gratitude, we commit
this week to live and work for You, inviting the indwelling power of Your
spirit. Bless the Senators. Control
their minds and give them Your discernment. Give them boldness to take
stands for what You have revealed is
the application of Your righteousness
and justice for our Nation.
Thank You for the privilege of living
this week for You. In Your all powerful
name. Amen.
f
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
The Honorable PETER G. FITZGERALD,
a Senator from the State of Illinois, led
the Pledge of Allegiance, as follows:
I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the
United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God,
indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
f
RECOGNITION OF THE MAJORITY
LEADER
The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. FITZGERALD). The majority leader.
Mr. LOTT. I thank the Chair.
f
PRAYERS AND REFLECTIONS
Mr. LOTT. Mr. President, I express
my appreciation also once again to our
Chaplain of the Senate, Lloyd John
Ogilvie, and for his remembering our
friend and my most trusted confidante,
most reliable lieutenant, the Senator
from Georgia, PAUL COVERDELL. I don’t
know of a Senator who works any harder or has a more indomitable spirit. I
noticed particularly Friday afternoon
how happy he was as he took leave of
this Chamber because of the vote that
we had just taken and realizing that he
would have the opportunity to be home
in Georgia on Friday afternoon and on
Saturday. Our thoughts and our prayers are with him as he apparently undergoes a surgical procedure at this
hour. I thank the Chaplain for his
prayer.
Coincidentally, this weekend I also
had a little more time than I anticipated and was able to spend some time
thinking about our country and reading some books. One of those that I
read was ‘‘Going For The Max,’’ by
Senator MAX CLELAND, also of Georgia.
It is a really inspirational book about
his life and his experience as a Vietnam
veteran and the recovery period he had
to go through and the inspiration from
things he had learned in his life—12
principles of life that he had learned
and on which he relies. I talked to him
this morning to tell him how much I
enjoyed his book; that I was inspired
by it. And he said he was at that very
moment standing there looking at
Piedmont Hospital where our friend,
Senator COVERDELL, is, and he was saying a prayer for him. He offered to
cover any meetings or appointments
that needed to be done today or this
week by Senator COVERDELL.
That is the kind of real love and appreciation and bipartisanship we need
more of in this institution and in our
lives. So I encourage my colleagues in
the Senate, if you have not read it, get
a copy of ‘‘Going For The Max,’’ and it
will be an inspiration to you.
f
SCHEDULE
Mr. LOTT. Mr. President, today the
Senate will be in a period of morning
business until 3 p.m. with Senators
BYRD and THOMAS in control of the
time.
Following morning business, the Senate will resume consideration of the Interior appropriations bill, and hopefully we will be able to complete our
deliberations on that bill and get to
final passage on all amendments and
the bill itself tomorrow morning.
Under the previous agreement, there
are up to 10 amendments remaining to
the Interior bill that must be offered
and debated during today’s session.
Hopefully, some of those amendments
will be withdrawn, others will be accepted, and maybe we will not need to
have more than a couple of them actually voted on, and then go to final passage tomorrow morning. I believe those
votes will be stacked in the morning at
9:45 a.m.
At 6:15 this evening, the Senate will
begin the final votes on the reconciliation bill which provides for the elimination of the marriage penalty tax.
Senators should be aware that during
the remainder of the afternoon on Friday, when all amendments were offered
and/or debated, almost 40 potential
votes could occur in regard to this legislation.
Again, I hope and I think that several of those amendments were just
filed as a precaution and that not nearly that many will actually require a
vote; some of them can be accepted.
But I do expect there will be somewhere between 10 and 15, at least, that
will require a recorded vote. We will
try to do a major portion of those tonight, if not all of them. We may try to
get a consent to finish the remainder of
the votes on amendments and final passage tomorrow morning after we take a
∑ This ‘‘bullet’’ symbol identifies statements or insertions which are not spoken by a Member of the Senate on the floor.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
look at exactly how many we are going
to have to do, look at how many we
would have to vote on tonight, how
many we would have to vote on in the
morning, and try to be reasonable in
how we schedule those votes. But we do
need to get both of them completed not
later than tomorrow morning. So votes
are expected into the night. We could
have, I guess, conceivably 10, 15, or
more votes tonight beginning at 6:15.
Of course, we have stacked them and
the votes will be limited to 10 minutes
in length after the first vote. Senators
will be encouraged to remain in the
Chamber again during the votes.
We were able to record 10 votes in
about 11⁄2 hours I think on Friday,
which probably is some kind of new
record. A lot of the credit for that goes
to Senator HARRY REID, the assistant
minority leader, because he stayed in
the Chamber and helped me make sure
that we wrapped those votes up as
quickly as was possible.
This will be an important week.
After we complete those two very important issues, we will need to go to
the Agriculture appropriations bill
which has been awaiting action in the
Senate now for probably a month. Senator COCHRAN has indicated he will be
ready to go tomorrow morning or right
after lunch, whichever is available to
him, to begin debate on this very important legislation.
We also would like to have the opportunity to consider the energy and
water appropriations bill this week
also. It is ready and should not take a
lot of time. But that will depend on
how long it takes on the Agriculture
appropriations bill.
I see smiles throughout the Chamber,
the idea that we would complete these
two bills I have already mentioned and
then take up two appropriations bills,
but with determination we can get it
done.
We achieved more last week than
most people thought we would be able
to do. It took work and it took some
time and it took cooperation between
leaders on both sides of the aisle. We
were able to get that. I hope we can do
it this week. I thank my colleagues for
their participation and their cooperation.
With that, I will yield the floor and I
observe the absence of a quorum.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The
clerk will call the roll.
The assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
Mr. BURNS. Mr. President, I ask
unanimous consent that the order for
the quorum call be rescinded.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
f
CONSERVATION REINVESTMENT
ACT
Mr. BURNS. Mr. President, on the
eve of marking up the Conservation
Reinvestment Act—an act that can
only be described as great politics but
very bad policy—to enact a law that
gives the Federal Government a blank
check to buy land for the purpose of
conservation, preservation, or any
other so called environmental cause is
ill-advised and ill-conceived, it appears, on the surface, the idea of putting land under Federal control for
conservation purposes is a good idea
and good policy for the nation. However, under the surface, hidden in the
dark side of government ownership of
lands, it is very bad policy.
Nobody has hunted or fished and appreciated it more than this Senator.
Nobody enjoys the outdoors as much as
I do—the cold crisp mornings in a
hunting camp or a fishing camp is unequaled and one would not need a fishing rod or a rifle.
I would say that nobody in this body
has fought harder for habitat and policies that promote the enjoyment of the
outdoors, hunting, and fishing. As
former cochairman of the sportman’s
caucus and still active in the foundation, we guard this privilege.
There is no way, Mr. President, this
piece of legislation can be made to reflect or fulfill our role in the protection and improvement of our public
lands. Just adding acres to the Federal
estate does not get it done. Just no
way. The supporters of this legislation
has been blinded by the prospects of
dollars, free dollars coming to their respective States. The money comes
from royalties from off-shore drilling. I
have no problem with that and, in fact,
support such a scheme. It is the purchasing of land for the Federal estate
that I cannot support.
I ask your patience to bear with me
but I feel some facts should be made
part of this record and my colleagues
need reminding of some startling facts.
The Federal Government now controls one-third of the land in the
United States. That is wrong and was
never intended to be as envisioned by
the Founders of our Nation nor the
Framers of our Constitution.
However, the Federal Government
has from its first day, a healthy appetite for land ownership and has never
stopped acquiring more and more land.
Some for good and solid reasons. In the
last 40 years, however, land acquisition
has been under the guise of conservation and preservation.
Do we have enough surplus of money
to squander on the idea that the Federal Government needs more land.
Since 1960, major Federal land agencies have added 33.6 million acres of
land. That is the area the size of Florida.
These agencies control more than 612
million acres or just over one-fourth of
the land area of the United States.
True, the majority of Americans support land conservation and some acquisition, but few know or understand
what it entails.
Most of those demanding public ownership of lands have come from groups
who have little regard for private land
ownership or property rights as provided by our Constitution. Land owner-
July 17, 2000
ship is the cornerstone to individual
freedom which most Americans hold
very dear. Have you not seen the
movie, ‘‘The Patriot’’?
. . . A
for land
There is
chases. .
major increase in Federal funding
acquisition has long been needed.
a tremendous backlog in land pur. .
So says Carl Pope, Ex. Director of
the Sierra Club.
Ron Tipton, a vice president of the
National Park Conservation Association echoes the same line.
I would suggest that both organizations have the money and the political
will to buy land for conservation, preservation, or to heal some real or perceived environmental ill. The problem
arises that they also would be responsible for the operation and management of the lands.
That being the case, why in the world
does the Federal Government need
more land? That is why I started to do
some research some 3 or 4 years ago
and using some information gathered
by very credible organizations, I was
startled what I found.
The Congressional Budget Office has
gone so far as to suggest a freeze on
Federal acquisitions. A 1999 report asserts:
Land management agencies should improve their stewardship of the lands they already own before taking on additional acreage and management responsibilities.
Environmental objectives might be best
met by improving that they already own.
There is one glaring fact that
throughout our history, private individuals and groups have offered the
best and most sound resource conservation. Several organizations such as the
Sierra Club has the funds and expertise
to do and I suggest they proceed.
Here
is
CBO’s
concern.
BLM,
USF&W, and NPS have added 840,000
acres per year since 1960. That is the
area the size of Rhode Island.
In the 1990’s, 3.4 million acres and 25
new units for NPS; 2.7 million acres
and 24 new units for USF&W; plus 18
million acres in military installations,
8.5 million acres in BOR, and 11.7 million acres in the Corps of Engineers.
Even the conservation reserve ‘‘CRP’’
controls 33 million acres.
SPIRALING COSTS AND BALLOONING BUDGETS
Here are the reasons the Congressional Budget Office suggested a freeze
in land acquisition:
Annual costs for land management
have far outpaced the rate at which the
Federal estate was expanding.
For the past 40 years, government’s
appetite for land ownership grew the
total acres just over 6 percent, yet operating budgets have risen 262 percent
above inflation.
From 1962 to 1998, land acquisition
cost $10.5 billion. At that same timeframe, managing Federal lands cost
$176 billion, $6.6 billion in 1999 alone.
It is a little easier to grasp when one
looks at the cost of management in
1962 at $3 per acre. In 1997 the cost has
grown to $10 per acre adjusted for inflation.
July 17, 2000
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
The NPS operating expenses have
risen 2.6 percent per year above inflation since 1980. During the same time,
the system grew only 1 percent per
year in acreage and units. The system
has always gotten more money to operate. Park visits, nationally, only grew
2.3 percent per year.
BLM generated .50 cents for every
$1.00 invested and the NPS .08 cents for
every $1.00. While operating budgets for
day-to-day upkeep and services have
grown faster than acreage, provisions
for infrastructure and major maintenance have not followed a similar pattern.
In some instances, these capital
budgets that provide for long-term facility maintenance have shrunk. Between 1980 and 1995, NPS declined to an
annual rate of 1.5 percent when adjusted for inflation. As a result, the
NPS has a $5.6 billion deficit for construction and maintenance and a $2 billion deficit for resource management.
The USFS has a $5 billion maintenance backlog. Throwing more money
into the Federal trough is not getting
us what we want. Eroding forest roads,
deteriorating
water
quality,
disappearing wildlife habitat, and loss of
priceless artifacts are just the most obvious indicators that current policies
are not providing quality management.
Buying more land only contributes to
a situation that is not achieving the
environmental objectives that we
want.
Billions of dollars are spent each
year to manage our Federal lands, and
the public is not getting the benefits of
multiple-use fiscal responsibility, or
good resource stewardship.
A number of ecologists have also
questioned the ability to fulfill its mission of resource protection. Biologist
Charles Kay of Utah State University
has documented the destruction of the
Crown Jewel of national parks, Yellowstone. Overpopulation of elk and buffalo has taken its toll. The result is
starvation of thousands of elk, and
overgrazed range, the destruction of
plant communities, the elimination of
critical habitat, and a serious decline
in biodiversity. Karl Hess reported the
same in Rocky Mountain National
Park.
Some 39 million acres of Federal forest land are, as we speak, at risk of
catastrophic wildfire and disease according to a GAO report of last year.
BETTER TOOLS—BETTER RESULTS—SATISFIED
CONSERVATIONISTS
It is clear that merely dipping into
the Federal Treasury does not ensure
land conservation for the future. Under
the current system of command and
control, politics plays a major role in
Federal land management. Some pragmatic changes in our Federal land
agencies, however, could help us get
the incentives right.
RECREATIONAL LAND
Lands historically used for recreation, should pay or attempt to pay
their own way and not rely entirely
upon congressional appropriations.
There is no doubt that park managers can better care for the land that
Federal overseers in Congress who fail
to allocate funds for necessary maintenance. The Fee Demonstration Program is a step in the right direction.
As land managers generate revenues
and decide how the money will be
spent, they are allowed to be more responsive to visitors, more expedient
with maintenance, and more protective
of natural resources.
COMMODITY LANDS
Not all Federal lands are equally deserving of preservation. In a world of
limited resources, it makes sense to
sell lands with lesser conservation values to ensure adequate protection for
those worthy of conservation.
HABITAT SET-ASIDES
There are some lands under Federal
management that are not likely to
ever pay their own way, but have ecological or cultural value. The land
might be critical wildlife habitat, watershed for large, diversified users, or
the site of some historical event. These
should be placed under a trust or endowment board. A portion of revenues
derived from user fees at more popular
sites or the sale of other lands could be
used as endowment funds to manage
these valuable areas. I am very supportive of this idea.
NEW ACQUISITIONS
Current Federal land management
permits land acquisitions without regard to operating and maintenance
costs. Before adding more land to the
Federal estate and obligating the
American taxpayer, a detailed accounting of annual operating and maintenance costs should be prepared and,
like private conservators, laws should
require that funding for proper management be part of the appropriation.
No O&M money, no deal. I will insist
on it.
LAND EXCHANGES
There is no doubt in my mind that
land exchanges are necessary. Small
units of range should be either traded
or sold to block up large units for management purposes. The funds derived
from the sales should be placed in the
trust or endowment for management of
other public holdings.
PRIVATE SOLUTIONS
As an alternative to Federal land
conservation, private conservation by
individuals and groups is a viable option with a long history in the United
States. The growing demand to protect
land resources has created a new impetus for private conservation through
ownership and other legal mechanisms.
Whether the land is managed for profit
or to fulfill a mission, these private
conservators have the right incentives.
They face the opportunity costs for alternative uses of the resources. The result is often better land management
than that provided by our Federal land
managers.
FEE SIMPLE
Private landownership is the oldest
and simplest form of land conservation.
It will continue to exist as long as
property rights are well-defined and
owners can profit from their investment in conservation or achieve their
conservation goals.
LAND TRUSTS, CONSERVATION EASEMENTS
Tax benefits.
Perpetual easements.
Restructuring easements.
CONCLUSION
Changes that would improve land
conservation and mitigate environmental damage without adding more
land to the Federal estate include:
Lands for recreational use should pay
their own way or generate some revenue to cover costs;
Land use rights on commodity producing lands should be sold for the
highest value use. The winning bid
could be commercial timber harvest,
selective harvest to enhance wildlife
habitat, wilderness, recreation, or
some combination of uses;
Income from the sale of land and land
use rights should be put into endowment funds to buy or manage lands
with higher conservation values, such
as those with critical wildlife habitat,
scenic value, or historical significance;
and
Barriers should be lowered to encourage private conservation and good
stewardship.
At present our Federal land agencies
are poor land stewards. Many times
through no fault of their own, their
budgets reach into the billions, yet
damage to roads, sewers, buildings, forest, and rangelands remain and continue to worsen.
Only the lands that are under longterm lease arrangements with individuals or groups continue to improve.
Given the right incentives, we can
protect areas like Yellowstone and Yosemite, preserve the Bob Marshall Wilderness of Montana, and the east front.
But forests such as Clinch Valley, VA,
are better left in private hands.
Again, I must iterate that the Conservation Reinvestment Act as written
and presented this day, is ill-conceived
and ill-advised. We can and must invest
those dollars where the environmental
objectives are clearly achievable.
Mr. President, I yield the floor. I suggest the absence of a quorum.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The
clerk will call the roll.
The assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
Mr. BYRD. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order for the
quorum call be rescinded.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
f
MORNING BUSINESS
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under
the previous order, there will now be a
period for morning business not to extend beyond the hour of 3 o’clock with
Senators permitted to speak therein
for up to 10 minutes each, with the following exceptions: The Senator from
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
West Virginia, Mr. BYRD, from 12 p.m.
to 2 p.m.; and the Senator from Wyoming, Mr. THOMAS, or his designee from
2 p.m. until 3 p.m.
The Senator from West Virginia is
recognized.
Mr. BYRD. I thank the Chair.
Mr. President, Alexander Hamilton
spoke 6 hours at the Constitutional
Convention. So I think I am in rather
good company.
f
THE PLIGHT OF OUR NATION
Mr. BYRD. Mr. President, the great
English novelist, Charles Dickens,
began his epic novel, ‘‘A Tale of Two
Cities,’’ with these words, ‘‘It was the
best of times, it was the worst of
times. . . .’’
Well over a century later, and a continent away from the writing of Dickens’ story, those words could well describe the plight of our nation in the
last year of the 20th century.
That is this century—the last year of
the 20th century.
The United States has never been
more affluent, in terms of material
wealth and creature comforts, or more
impoverished in terms of spiritual
well-being. It is the best of times materially. It is the worst of times spiritually. Millions are made daily on
Wall Street, American consumerism
fuels booming international economic
and trade markets, and our Nation’s
living standard is the envy of the
world. We have eliminated our staggering deficits at home, at least on
paper, and jobs are available for our
people in abundance.
Yet, America is, in many ways, a hollow nation. We are a people on the edge
of a precipice. Despite all of our economic prosperity, despite all of our fascination with the glittery toys that
money can buy us, despite all of the
accouterments of success and prosperity, so envied by the rest of the
world, all of the material comforts we
so enthusiastically chase, can never
pacify the hunger beginning to emerge
in our collective souls, nor even start
to solve the endemic problems which
crowd the dark corners of our national
psyche.
Our children randomly slaughter
each other in our schools, clothes are
torn off of innocent women in a public
park, smut crowds the airwaves, the
traditional family structure continues
to deteriorate, advertising reflects little but sexual innuendo and the desire
for a mad rush to some materialistic
nirvana, song lyrics are not fit for polite company, and even the barest mention of the existence of a Creator is
castigated as inappropriate or viewed
as the unbalanced ravings of the lunatic fringe.
We are a people seemingly in deep denial of our own humanity—in deep denial of our own unquenched inner need
for meaning and purpose and direction
in our lives. We have succumbed to the
glossy promise of more, and more, and
more, in a vain and pointless effort to
deny the one essential element which
is so glaringly missing from our aimless, restless pursuit of prosperity.
Religion has all but vanished from
our national life. Worse than that, religion is discouraged; religion is frowned
upon. Religion is suppressed, spurred
by what I believe is a misguided attempt to ensure a completely secular
society and a gross misreading of constitutional intent. Oh, what ills are
born when we forget our history! What
ills are born when we forget our history!
This Nation was founded, in part, so
that religion could freely flourish. The
Constitution was written and ratified
by men who possessed a strong spiritual awareness. These were not Godless men who wrote the Constitution of
the United States. They had a spiritual
awareness. The universal principles espoused in the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and other early American
documents reflect aspirations, which
are, at their core, based on a belief in
a Supreme Being and on the existence
of a human soul. What are these if not
religious principles? Such lofty and
spiritual beliefs as the bedrock equality of all humans,—as the bedrock
equality of all humans—and the endowment by a Creator of basic rights cannot be secularized out of existence in a
nation so rooted in a deep spiritual
consciousness as is ours. Every single
value upon which this country was so
painstakingly built—individual sacrifice for the greater good, fairness,
charity, truthfulness, morality, personal responsibility, honesty—all of
these are, at root, qualities derived
from Judeo-Christian teachings. To try
to separate this nation from the religious grounding which it so obviously
exhibits in every aspect of its history,
is like trying to bifurcate muscle from
bone. Dysfunction is the result—sterile
bone which cannot move, and useless
tissue with no support. That is what
happens when spiritual values become
separated from our national life.
Nowhere are the results of such an
unfortunate rending more obvious,
more destructive or more heartbreaking than in the evident damage
we have done to our most precious
commodity, our children. Millions of
our innocents are lost in a maze of
drugs, cheap sex, violence, and materialism. They are starving—starving—
for lessons by which to live their lives,
and what do we offer them? We offer
them only hedonistic baubles. Love of
pleasure, greed, gratification of sex, deification of the crude and the outrageous, and the selfish culture of Me,
me, me, and More, more, more, are no
guidelines on which to build a life or a
character whether it be a nation or the
individual. These are only empty distractions that lead down roads previously reserved for misfits and criminals. We must look hard at ourselves in
the mirror each morning and ask what
in the name of God we are coming to if
we continue on this course? We are all
at fault, all of us—the clergy for not
July 17, 2000
speaking out, the Church doesn’t speak
out like it used to when I was a boy.
The church took a strong stand on
the great national issues. But the
church, as so many of us, has been
driven into a closet; so the clergy for
not speaking out; the leaders of business in this country for looking only at
profits; the leaders of both political
parties for pandering—pandering. Most
of the issues that plague us nationally—such as violence in our schools,
inadequate health care for the weakest
in our society, crime, greed in politics,
all of these issues, all of them, are at
their root—are issues of right and
wrong, issues of morality.
Yet in order to avoid offending anyone—don’t offend anyone; that is why
so many of the colleges and schools
have taken history out of the required
courses, because history might offend
somebody. It might offend some
group—in order to avoid offending anyone or any group, we try to totally secularize our politics on the left and
overly polarize our politics, with too
much false piety, on the right. So both
are in the wrong. The result is only
endless power struggle and pandering
to the various groups which keep us in
power. As such, political power has become an end, not a means, and the
leadership of this nation too often
winds up pursuing solutions to the effects of our ills and ignoring their
causes.
A prejudice against the influence of
religious commitment and moral values upon political issues now characterizes almost every sector of American society from the media to law to
academia. We have seen the Supreme
Court rule, again and again, against allowing voluntary prayer in public
school in this country. I believe that
this ingrained predisposition against
expressions of religious or spiritual beliefs is wrongheaded, destructive, and
completely contrary to the intent of
the Founders of this great nation. Instead of ensuring freedom of religion in
a nation founded in part to guarantee
that basic liberty, a literal suffocation
of that freedom has been the result.
The rights of those who do not believe
in a Supreme Being have been zealously guarded, to the denigration, I repeat, denigration, of the rights of those
who do so believe.
The American doctrine of separation
of church and state—and you don’t find
that in the Constitution; it says nothing about separation of Church and
State in the Constitution—forbids the
establishment of any one religion by
the state, but not, I repeat, not the influence of religious values in the life of
the nation. Religious faith has always
been an underpinning of American life.
One of the most perceptive of observers of the early American scene was
Alexis de Tocqueville. Writing in the
1830’s on his observations while traveling in America, de Tocqueville
grasped the moral content of America.
Coming from France where abuse of
power by the clergy had made
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
anticlericalism
endemic,
he
was
amazed to find it virtually unknown in
America.
De Tocqueville writes:
What did Thomas Jefferson propose?
This is Thomas Jefferson talking, not
ROBERT C. BYRD. Thomas Jefferson proposed:
In France, I had almost always seen the
spirit of religion and the spirit of freedom
marching in opposite directions, but in
America, I found they were intimately
united, and that they reigned in common
over the same country. . . . Religion . . . must
be regarded as the first of their political institutions . . . .
The children of Israel in the wilderness, led
by a cloud by day, and a pillar of fire by
night.
He is talking about Americans in the
1830s. Let me say that again—
DeTocqueville:
Religion . . . must be regarded as the first
of their political institutions; for if it does
not impart a taste for freedom, it facilitates
the use of it.
He concluded that most Americans
held religion,
to be indispensable to the maintenance of
Republican institutions.
John Adams was the second President of the United States. He served as
Vice President for 8 years under George
Washington. He was a member of the
Continental Congress, and a signer of
the Declaration of Independence. He
greatly influenced the States to ratify
the new Constitution by writing a
three-volume work, entitled, ‘‘A Defense of the Constitutions of the Government of the United States.’’
I like to go back to John Adams’
work from time to time and just read
it again. I recommend it to our people
who are listening in this Chamber. One
might say that, when it came to building the governmental structure of
these United States, John Adams was
in on the ground floor. In his diary
entry dated February 22, 1756, John
Adams wrote—listen to John Adams
now:
Suppose a nation in some distant region
should take the Bible for their only law
book, and every member should regulate his
conduct by the precepts there exhibited!
Every member would be obliged in conscience to temperance, frugality, and industry; to justice, kindness, and charity towards
his fellow men; and to piety, love, and reverence toward Almighty God . . . . What a
Utopia, what a Paradise would this region
be.
That was John Adams. Obviously,
John Adams believed that moral precepts and Biblical teachings would be
an ideal foundation on which to lay the
government of a great nation.
On July 8, 1776, the Declaration of
Independence was read publicly at the
Continental Congress while the famous
‘‘Liberty Bell’’ was rung. Wouldn’t you
have liked to have been there? Congress then established a three-man
Committee consisting of Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Benjamin
Franklin, for the purpose of designing
a great seal for the United States.
What were Franklin’s suggestions?
Franklin’s suggestions for a seal and
motto characterizing the spirit of this
new nation were—this is Franklin talking, not ROBERT C. BYRD:
Moses lifting up his wand, and dividing the
red sea, and pharaoh in his chariot overwhelmed with the waters. This motto: ‘‘Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God.’’
Try as I may, I sense no hypersensitivity about absolute separation
of religion and the government of the
new country in these suggestions for
symbols of our new nation. Would such
men as Jefferson and Franklin have
suggested such symbols if they intended for an absolute wall of separation to be erected between government
and any sort of religious expression? I
think not.
When it comes to current attitudes
about the proper role of religion in
America, the apple has fallen very far
from the tree. In fact, our greatest
leaders have shown no trepidation
about God’s proper place in the American panorama. I am talking about our
greatest leaders. Every session of the
U.S. House of Representatives and the
United States Senate begins with a
prayer. I heard the Chaplin pray today,
and so did you. And each House, from
the Nation’s beginning, has had its
Chaplain paid with Federal tax dollars.
The Supreme Court of the United
States begins each session only after a
solemn pronouncement that concludes
with ‘‘God save the United States and
this Honorable Court.’’
So it is then, with almost total incredulity, that I read the continued pronouncements on the subject of prayer
in school by our Supreme Court, which
since 1962, has steadily chipped away at
any connection between religion and
the governmental sphere. How could
such rulings be handed down time after
time by learned men and women who
are obviously familiar with the history
of this nation, and with the faith-based
grounding of our entire governmental
structure? And recently we have this
latest decision by the Supreme Court,
involving voluntary student-led prayer
at a Texas high school football game.
I don’t attend football games. I have
attended one in the 48 years that I have
been in Washington, and I attended
that only at halftime to crown the
Queen; West Virginia and Maryland
were playing. But even if I don’t attend
football games, there are people who do
attend. And if it is their wish to have
prayers, if the students in the band or
on the football teams want to have
prayer, more power to them.
On June 19, the highest court in our
land ruled in a 6–3 decision that somehow this voluntary student-led prayer
violated the Constitution’s establishment clause.
Justice Stevens, writing for the majority opinion, said that even when attendance was voluntary and the decision to pray was made by students:
the delivery of a pregame prayer has the
improper effect of coercing those present to
participate in an act of religious worship.
What nonsense—nonsense. Such a
pronouncement ignores a separate
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First Amendment problem, in that it
amounts to the censorship of religious
speech in a governmental forum. What
about the rights of those students who
wish to pray, perhaps for the safety of
their classmates? Such a ruling tramples on the Constitutional rights of
those students in favor of some mythical possibility that coercement might
be felt by someone.
In a dissenting opinion, Chief Justice
William H. Rehnquist summed up the
matter pretty nicely, I think, when he
stated that the majority opinion ‘‘bristles’’—bristles—‘‘with hostility to all
things religious in public life.’’
Mr. Chief Justice Rehnquist said it
right: The majority opinion ‘‘bristles
with hostility to all things religious in
public life.’’
For that statement, the Chief Justice
will always have my gratitude. He is
eminently correct, and, of course, it
took courage to say what he did. As everyone knows, I am no fan of amending
the U.S. Constitution, and I believe it
should be done only rarely and with
great care. Certainly this year, an election year, is no year to try to pass a
constitutional amendment on school
prayer.
But I intend to implore the two
major party candidates—and I do implore the two major party candidates—
to seriously consider including a constitutional amendment in the nature of
clarifying the intent of the framers in
the area of prayer in school as part of
both party platforms.
I have yet to read a party platform.
Never read one. I have never read a
Democratic Party platform or any
other party platform, but there are
many who do, and it is only natural the
parties should have platforms. People
expect them to have a platform to indicate where they stand on the great
issues of the day. So I urge Mr. Bush
and Mr. GORE to work to put the words
in the party platforms urging that
there be an amendment to clarify the
intent of the framers in the area of
prayer in school.
The intent of the framers was clearly
only to keep the new government from
endorsing or favoring one religion over
another, but not from favoring a free
exercise of religion over nonreligion.
Certainly, it was never to prohibit voluntary expressions of a religious nature by our citizens.
Just what do we teach our children?
Upon what do we base the most fundamental codes of society if we are not to
base them on moral precepts and spiritual precepts? How can we lead our
own people, how can we grapple with
issues of right and wrong, or how can
we continue to inspire downtrodden
peoples from around the globe if we
continue to deny and to sever our basic
ties to faith-based principles?
Alarmingly, we are crafting a political secularism which does not reflect
the views or practices of most Americans, the overwhelming majority of
Americans. Consider these facts:
Nine Americans in 10 say they have never
doubted the existence of God. Eight Americans in 10 say they believe they will be called
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
before God on Judgment Day to answer for
their actions, their words, their deeds. Eight
Americans in 10 say they believe God still
works miracles, and he does.
One sits right over there in the chair.
Here sits some up here. These are miracles. There are literally millions of
things that could have happened to
each of us, and we would never have
been born or in being born we would
have been confronted with many health
problems. There are miracles every
day.
Seven Americans in 10 believe in life
after death. I do, and I daresay most, if
not all, of the people in this Chamber
do believe there is a life after death.
What would there be to live for otherwise? Oh, you may laugh now, but wait
until you are 82, as I am, and well on
your way to 83. To what do you have to
look forward to each day of your life
which is fast ebbing? Yes, you will
change your mind then.
How can the beliefs of such sizable
sections of the American population
totally escape the attention of politicians and educators? They are all going
to die, too. Every one of them, and
they are going to have to go out and
meet God in eternity, which is a long,
long, long time.
How could these statistics escape the
nine members of the Supreme Court of
the United States? Does the answer lie
in the elitism that so permeates this
arrogant capital city? Does theology
tend to thin out as one gravitates toward the top of the socioeconomic
scale, rather like the thinner air at the
top of some elevated peak? Are we, indeed, witnessing the writing of a new
‘‘Tale of Two Cities’’ as we watch public policy diverge ever more dramatically from the views of the people and
the plain-as-day record of our own documented history?
Power unchecked by moral insight,
teaching untempered by spiritual values, government unenlightened by
faith in a Creator—no city and no nation can sustain such a course. While
we may distract ourselves for a time
with the affluence that a booming
economy provides, eventually there is
a kind of nihilism in a society whose
God is materialism—whose only God is
materialism.
Look carefully around you at the culture of America today. Just stop and
think for a moment. You do not even
have to look around you. Stop and
think for a moment about the culture
of this country today. Note the banality of most public discourse, the lack
of respect for authority, the absence of
common civility, the crudeness of popular entertainment, the glorification of
violence.
There is no map, there is no compass,
there is no vision, and ‘‘Where there is
no vision, the people perish.’’
Mr. President, the very first sentence
of the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States—here is
the Constitution; so small that it fits
into a shirt pocket—the very first sentence of the first amendment to the
Constitution of the United States reads
as follows: ‘‘Congress shall make no
law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise
thereof; . . .’’ It seems to me that the
U.S. Supreme Court, over the years, in
its rulings on school prayer over the
last 40 years has bent over backwards
to enforce the first clause in that
amendment dealing with an establishment of religion, but the Court has
seemingly exhibited a strong bias
against the equally important—the
equally important—second part of the
sentence. That sentence has two parts.
And the second part is, I quote: ‘‘. . . or
prohibiting the free exercise thereof; . . .’’
In ruling after ruling, over the past
40 years the Court seems to be going
farther and farther in the direction of
prohibiting the free exercise of religion. In precedent after precedent, the
Court, often by slim majorities, has
seemed bent upon totally eradicating
any semblance whatsoever of religious
speech in our public schools, even when
such speech is not in any way, shape,
or form connected with an ‘‘establishment’’ of religion.
When I read the first amendment
clause dealing with freedom of religion,
the words of the amendment seem to
strike a balance between an establishment of religion, on the one hand, and
the free exercise of religion, on the
other. But the Court seems determined
to completely ignore, and thus obliterate, any right to a free exercise of religion in the public schools. No wonder
many people take their children out of
the public schools. I believe that the
framers of the United States Constitution—yea, the founders of this Republic
itself—would be appalled. Can you
imagine what the founders—the framers, the people who framed the Constitution, the people who voted on the
ratification of the Constitution—how
they would feel? I believe they would
be appalled at the Court’s apparent
drift over the last 40 years toward total
secularism and away from any modicum of voluntary religious expression
in the public schools of this country.
Now let us briefly reflect upon the
impact of religion on the development
of American constitutionalism. Let’s
go back. Let’s go back over the decades, yea, even over the centuries, and
reflect upon the impact of religion on
the development of American constitutionalism. We will find that the roots
of religion run deep. As one scholar,
Donald S. Lutz, has noted—this is what
he says—‘‘The political covenants written by English colonists in America
lead us to the church covenants written by Protestants in the late 1500’s
and early 1600’s and these, in turn, lead
us back to the Covenant tradition of
the Old Testament.’’ That is what he
said. The American constitutional tradition derives in much of its form and
content from the Judeo-Christian tradition—we can’t avoid it; it is there;
nothing can erase it; you can take all
the history books out of the schools
July 17, 2000
that you want, but the fact remains
that it is still there—the Judeo-Christian tradition as interpreted by the
radical Protestant sects to which belonged so many of the original European settlers in British North America.
Lutz, in his work, entitled, ‘‘The Origins of American Constitutionalism,’’
says this: ‘‘The tribes of Israel shared a
covenant that made them a nation.
American federalism originated at
least in part in the dissenting Protestants’ familiarity with the Bible’’.
The early Calvinist settlers who
came to this country from the Old
World brought with them a familiarity
with the Old Testament Covenants
that made them especially apt in the
formation of colonial documents and
State constitutions.
Now, let me refer to Winton U.
Solberg. He tells us that in 17th century colonial thought, divine law—a fusion of the law of nature in the Old and
New Testaments—usually stood as fundamental law. The Mayflower Compact—how many of us like to claim
that our forebearers were on the
Mayflower? ‘‘Oh, they were there. They
were on the Mayflower.’’ Well, there
was such a thing written as the
Mayflower Compact.
The Mayflower Compact exemplifies
the doctrine of covenant or contract.
Puritanism exalted the biblical component and drew on certain scriptural
passages for a theological outlook.
Called the Covenant or Federal Theology, this was a theory of contract regarding man’s relations with God and
the nature of church and state.
If we examine the public political literature written between 1760 and 1805,
the book most frequently cited in that
literature is the Bible.
Let me say that again. If we examine
the public political literature written
between 1760 and 1805, the book most
frequently cited in that literature is
the Bible.
Saint Paul, the great apostle, is cited
about as frequently as Montesquieu
and Blackstone, the two most cited
secular authors. Deuteronomy is cited
almost twice as often as all of Locke’s
writings put together.
Many of the references to the Bible
came from reprinted sermons, while
other citations came from secular
works. Saint Paul was the favorite in
the New Testament, especially his
Epistle to the Romans, in which he discusses the basis for, and limits on, obedience to political authorities. From
the Old Testament, Deuteronomy was
the most cited book, followed by Isaiah, Genesis, Exodus, and Leviticus.
The authors most frequently referred
to the sections about covenants and
God’s promises to Israel.
The movement towards independence
found the clergy out in front—the
movement toward independence in this
country found the clergy out in front,
not back in the closet; out in front—
and the clergy were also most vigorous
in maintaining morale during the Revolutionary War. When reading comprehensively in the political literature
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
of the war years, one cannot but be
struck by the extent to which biblical
sources used by ministers and traditional Whigs undergirded the justification for the break with Great Britain,
the rationale for continuing the war,
and the basic principles of Americans
writing their own Constitutions at the
State level.
Let us look at the Mayflower Compact, of November 11, 1620. Here is what
they wrote:
In the name of God, Amen. We, whose
names are underwritten, the loyal subjects
of our dread sovereign Lord, King James, by
the grace of God, . . . having undertaken, for
the glory of God, and advancement of the
Christian faith, . . . by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God,
and of one another, covenant and combine
ourselves together into a civil body politick,
for our better ordering and preservation and
furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame
such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts,
Constitutions, and offices, from time to
time, as shall be thought most . . . convenient for the general good of the colony unto
which we promise all due submission and
obedience. . . .
That was the Mayflower Compact.
The authors of the Mayflower Compact
had no hesitation about mentioning
God, no hesitation about placing their
lives in his hands and saying so. Now
let us examine briefly ‘‘The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut.’’ Here
we will find many references to the
Deity, in these orders which were
adopted by a popular Convention of the
three towns of Windsor, Hartford, and
Wethersfield, on January 14, 1639, 361
years ago. The form, according to historians, was ‘‘the first written Constitution, in the modern sense of the
term, as a permanent limitation on
governmental power, known in history,
and certainly the first American Constitution of government to embody the
Democratic idea.’’
I shall quote the following references
to the Deity from The Fundamental
Orders of Connecticut: Forasmuch as it
hath pleased the Almighty God by the
wise disposition of his divine providence . . .’’; ‘‘and well knowing where a
people are gathered together the word
of God requires that to maintain the
peace and union of such a people, there
should be an orderly and decent government established according to God,
. . .’’; ‘‘. . . to maintain and preserve the
liberty and purity of the Gospel of our
Lord Jesus which we now profess, . . .’’;
‘‘. . . do swear by the great and dreadful
name of the everlasting God, . . .’’;
‘‘. . . so help me God, in the name of
the Lord Jesus Christ . . .’’; ‘‘. . . according to the righteous rule of God’s
word; so help me God, and so forth.’’
Now let us look at the opening words
of the treaty with Great Britain in
1783, 217 years ago, providing for the
complete independence of the American states and acknowledgment by
Great Britain: ‘‘In the name of the
Most Holy and Undivided Trinity. It
having pleased the Divine Providence
to dispose the hearts of the most serene and most potent Prince George
III, by the grace of God. . . .’’
The foregoing extracts, and others,
from American historical documents
are sufficient to impress us with the
fact that religious conviction permeated the blood stream of American
Constitutionalism
and
American
statecraft as far back as 200 years prior
to the writing of the Constitution in
1787.
Now let us examine the first inaugural address of George Washington,
1789, who had been chairman of the
convention which framed the Constitution. Here is the greatest President we
have ever had. A few extracts therefrom will leave no doubt as to where
the Nation’s first President stood when
it came to religious expression in matters pertaining to Government: ‘‘. . . it
would be peculiarly improper to omit,
in this first official act, my fervent
supplications to that Almighty Being
who rules over the Universe, who presides in the councils of nations, and
whose providential aids can supply
every human defect, that His benediction may consecrate to the liberties
and happiness of the people of the
United States a government instituted
by themselves for these essential purposes, and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to
execute with success the functions allotted to His charge. In tendering this
homage to the great Author of every
public and private good, I assure myself that it expresses your sentiments
not less than my own; nor those of my
fellow citizens at large less than either.
No people can be bound to acknowledge
and adore the Invisible Hand which
conducts the affairs of men more than
the people of the United States. Every
step by which they have advanced to
the character of an independent nation,
seems to have been distinguished by
some token of providential agency.’’
That is George Washington, the father of our country, the commander in
chief at Valley Forge, the presiding officer of the Constitutional Convention,
first President of the United States and
the best by any measure, by any standard. He had no hesitancy in speaking of
that invisible hand that guides the Nation. If he were alive today and a Member of this Senate or a Member of the
Supreme Court or President of the
United States again. How clear, how
incisive, and how powerful were these
allusions to God by our first and greatest President!
Further expressions by George Washington in that same inaugural address
were indicative of an unabashed religious faith:
Since we ought to be no less persuaded
that the propitious smiles of heaven can
never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right,
which heaven itself has ordained; . . .; I shall
take my present leave, but not without resorting once more to the benign Parent of
the human race, in humble supplication,
that, since He has been pleased to favor the
American people with opportunities for deliberating in perfect tranquility . . . .; . . . so
His divine blessing may be equally conspicuous in the enlarged views, the tempera-
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ment consultations and the wise measures,
on which the success of this government
must depend.
There you have it.
Having quoted from Washington’s
first inaugural address, now let me
quote briefly from Lincoln’s first inaugural address—no hesitation here
about calling upon—no hesitancy here
about calling upon the Creator: ‘‘If the
Almighty Ruler of Nations—he is not
talking about King George III—with
His eternal truth and justice, be on
your side of the North, or on yours of
the South, that truth and that justice
will surely prevail by the judgment of
this great tribunal of the American
people . . . .; Intelligence, patriotism,
Christianity, and a firm reliance on
Him who has never yet forsaken this
favored land are still competent to adjust in the best way all our present difficulty.’’
Issuing the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, Lincoln closed his remarks
with these words: ‘‘And upon this act,
sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution,
upon military necessity, I invoke the
considerate judgment of mankind and
the gracious favor of Almighty God.’’
That is Abraham Lincoln.
Lincoln, in his second inaugural address, rises to a rare pitch of eloquence,
marked by a singular combination of
tenderness and determination:
If we shall suppose that American slavery
is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which,
having continued through His appointed
time, He now wills to remove, and that He
gives to both North and South this terrible
war, as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which
the believers in a living God always ascribe
to Him? Fondly do we hope—fervently do we
pray—that this mighty scourge of war may
speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it
continue until all the wealth piled by the
bondsman’s 250 years of unrequited toil shall
be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn
with the lash shall be paid by another drawn
with a sword, as was said three thousand
years ago, so still it must be said: ‘‘The judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.’’
Now hear that, Supreme Court of the
United States. Hear those words by
Abraham Lincoln.
Lincoln then went on to say those
words with which we all are so familiar: ‘‘With malice towards none; with
charity for all; with firmness in the
right, as God gives us to see the right,
let us strive on to finish the work we
are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds;
to care for him who shall have borne
the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and
cherish just and lasting peace among
ourselves and with all nations.’’
How can one read and reflect upon
these clear and unrestrained references
to Almighty God expressed by our nation’s two greatest Presidents—Washington and Lincoln—and hold any
doubt whatsoever as to the impact of
religion upon the thoughts, the character, and the lives of the two greatest
statesmen America has ever produced?
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
And yet, the Supreme Court in recent
years, in majority opinions, has not
scrupled to bow to materialism in the
Court’s rulings concerning voluntary
prayer in public school settings!
A further examination of the inaugural addresses of the Presidents finds
John Adams, the second President,
closing his inaugural address with the
following invocation:
in Europe during World War II, and had
served as Supreme Commander of
NATO, took the oath of office as President using both George Washington’s
Bible and one given to him by his
mother at his graduation from the
Military Academy at West Point.
Many of us remember his prayer at
the beginning of his first inaugural address:
And may that Being who is supreme over
all, the Patron of Order, the Fountain of Justice, and the Protector in all ages of the
world of virtuous liberty, continue His blessing upon this nation and its government and
give it all possible success and duration consistent with the ends of His providence.
Almighty God, as we stand here at this moment my future associates in the executive
branch of government join me in beseeching
that Thou will make full and complete our
dedication to the service of the people in this
throng, and their fellow citizens everywhere.
Give us, we pray, the power to discern
clearly right from wrong, and allow all our
words and actions to be governed thereby,
and by the laws of this land. Especially we
pray that our concern shall be for all the
people regardless of station, race, or calling.
May cooperation be permitted and be the
mutual aim of those who, under the concepts
of our Constitution, hold to differing political faiths; so that all may work for the good
of our beloved country and Thy glory. Amen.
Thomas Jefferson’s closing words in
his second inaugural address were
these:
I shall need, too, the favor of that Being in
whose hands we are, who led our fathers, as
Israel of old, from their native land and
planted them in a country flowing with all
the necessaries and comforts of life; who has
covered our infancy with His providence and
our riper years with His wisdom and power,
and to whose goodness I ask you to join in
supplications with me that He will so enlighten the minds of your servants, guide
their councils, and prosper their measures
that whatsoever they do shall result in your
good, and shall secure to you the peace,
friendship, and approbation of all nations.
James Madison, the chief author of
our Constitution, showed no hesitancy
in expressing his dependence upon
Providence:
My confidence will under every difficulty
be best placed, next to that which we have
all been encouraged to feel in the guardianship and guidance of that Almighty Being
whose power regulates the destiny of nations, whose blessings have been so conspicuously dispensed to this rising Republic, and
to whom we are bound to address our devout
gratitude for the past, as well as our fervent
supplications and best hopes for the future.
Having quoted from the inaugural addresses of our country’s first four
Presidents, I shall now recall to my fellow Senators references to God in the
inaugural addresses of four Presidents
in the current 20th century. I begin
with William Howard Taft who, subsequent to having served as President,
fulfilled a lifelong dream in 1921 when
he was sworn in as Chief Justice of the
United States. He ended his inaugural
address with these words:
I invoke the considerate sympathy and
support of my fellow citizens and the aid of
the Almighty God in the discharge of my responsible duties.
Franklin D. Roosevelt refers to the
Supreme Being in each of his inaugural
addresses, but I shall quote only from
the fourth and last:
The Almighty God has blessed our land in
many ways. He has given our people stout
hearts and strong arms with which to strike
mighty blows for freedom and truth. He has
given to our country a faith which has become the hope of all peoples in an anguished
world.
So we pray to Him now for the vision to
see our way clearly—to see the way that
leads to a better life for ourselves and for all
our fellow men—to the achievement of His
will, to peace on earth.
Dwight D. Eisenhower, who had been
Supreme Commander of Allied Forces
Dwight D. Eisenhower led the Nation
in prayer himself.
Eisenhower’s was the first prayer to
be uttered by a President in his inaugural address to the nation, but it was
not to be the last. President Reagan, in
his second inaugural address, began his
inaugural address with a silent prayer:
I wonder if we could all join in a moment
of silent prayer. [Moment of silent prayer.]
Amen.
George Bush, after taking the oath
with his hand placed on George Washington’s Bible, began his presidency
with a prayer:
And my first act as President is a prayer.
I ask you to bow your heads:
Heavenly father, we bow our heads and
thank You for Your love. Accept our thanks
for the peace that yields this day and the
shared faith that makes its continuance
likely. Make us strong to do Your work, willing to heed and hear Your will, and write on
our hearts these words: ‘Use power to help
people.’ For we are given power not to advance our own purposes, nor to make a great
show in the world, nor a name. There is but
one just use of power, and it is to serve people. Help us to remember it, Lord. Amen.
That was George Bush.
I have a reason for quoting from
these great American documents and
for these inaugural and other addresses
by some of our Presidents. There have
been other Presidents whom I could
have quoted.
All of these references to religious
faith that I have quoted from early
American documents and from inaugural addresses by Presidents bear witness to the fact that a strong spiritual
consciousness has pervaded the fabric
of American statecraft and American
Constitutionalism for two centuries
prior to the writing of the U.S. Constitution and for these two centuries
following that event.
Mr. President, the Framers of the
Constitution, the voters who ratified
that Constitution, the members of the
First Congress who supported the first
amendment to the Constitution, and
the people in the states who ratified
the First Amendment, would be aghast
July 17, 2000
at the interpretations of the First
Amendment clause by U.S. Supreme
Court rulings concerning prayer in the
public schools of America. I say that
those rulings are having the effect of
‘‘prohibiting the free exercise’’ of religion. The court has drifted too far from
the shore.
I lauded the six members of the Supreme Court whose votes declared the
Line Item Veto Act of 1995 to be unconstitutional. But the Court’s majority
has adopted a dangerous trend in case
after case concerning the free exercise
of religion in the public schools. The
situation has become so bad that most
school boards frown upon the use of
God’s name by teachers or students for
fear of being hit with a costly law suit.
I have had that happen right in West
Virginia, and just within the last year.
Consequently, God is being driven out
of the public schools completely. I
shudder to think that what we put into
the schools will, in a generation, dominate the nation, and what we drop from
the schools will, in a generation, leave
the nation. Can it be said, therefore,
that the U.S. Supreme Court is heading
us down the road to becoming a godless
nation?
The opponents of voluntary prayer in
schools are quick to say that the place
for prayer is in the home—and it is—
and not in the schoolroom. This argument portrays an amazing ignorance of
the religious awareness that has been
the underpinning of our Republic from
its earliest beginnings. Prayer in the
public schools was prevalent in our
country until the courts began to whittle away at this tradition in recent
years. So, we are told that there is no
place for God in the schoolroom.
It must be confusing to the child who
is taught by parents at bedtime to repeat the words: ‘‘Now I lay me down to
sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to keep;
if I should die before I wake, I pray the
Lord my soul to take’’, but if the same
child mentions the Lord’s name in
school, the teacher feels it necessary to
say ‘‘shuh, we must not mention the
Lord’s name in school.’’
At home and at the breakfast table,
America’s children are taught to say:
‘‘God is great, God is good, and we
thank Him for this food; by His goodness all are fed, give us Lord our daily
bread,’’ but in the schoolroom at
lunchtime, the children must not say
grace over the food. That might offend
someone. Hence, the home and the
school are at war with each other
today.
I wonder if the high court is aware of
the chaos that it is creating in the
schools of the country? School administrators are caught in a bind. I wonder
if the court is aware of the harm that
it is doing to the nation when it
strongly enforces the first half of the
religious clause while it shows a dangerous bias against the second half of
the same clause? Isn’t it about time
that the Supreme Court demonstrates
an equal balance in its interpretation
of the first sentence of the First
July 17, 2000
S6999
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
Amendment to the Constitution? It
seems to me that the court is drifting
farther and farther to the left of center
in its drift towards materialism and
radical secularism as its opinions serve
more and more to inhibit any display
of religious belief by the nation’s
school children. In an effort to ensure a
tolerance for all beliefs, the courts are
bending too far, in effect, establishing
an environment of intolerance rather
than tolerance.
Mr. President, we rail, and moan, and
gnash our teeth, and wring our hands
as we see more and more violence in
our schools and a general decline in
morals throughout the nation. Is it any
wonder? Our nation’s leaders are no
longer paragons of rectitude. Don’t
point to them as being the idols of our
youth. The institution of marriage is
crumbling; the church, more and more,
refrains from speaking out boldly on
the great moral issues of the day; and
God is being driven from the classrooms of our nation’s schools by the
U.S. Supreme Court’s decisions that
favor secularism, materialism, and the
stifling of any voluntary and free exercise of religion in the public schools. Is
it any wonder that more and more parents are determined to send their children to private schools and to religious
schools?
Mr. President, George Washington,
the Father of our country, our first
President, bequeathed to us a clear vision of the importance of religion to
morality in our national life, when he
said, in his farewell address to the nation in September, 1796: ‘‘Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain
would that man claim the tribute of
patriotism who should labor to subvert
these great pillars of human happiness,
these firmest props of the duties of
men and citizens. The mere politician,
equally with the pious man, ought to
respect and to cherish them. A volume
could not trace all their connections
with private and public felicity. Let it
simply be asked, George Washington
said, where is the security for property,
for reputation, for life, if the sense of
religious obligation desert the oaths,
which are the instruments of investigations in courts of justice? And let us
with caution indulge the supposition
that morality can be maintained without religion. It can’t be done. Whatever
may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar
structure, reason and experience both
forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.’’ I hope the Supreme
Court will review those words by our
first president, the man who presided
over the Constitutional Convention in
1787.
Mr. President, it is not an idle reflection if, while discussing the issue of
prayer in the public schools, we contemplate the profundity of Benjamin
Franklin’s words to the Constitutional
Convention on June 28, 1787, when he
made a sobering suggestion that
brought the assembly of doubting
minds ‘‘to a realization that destiny
herself sat as guest and witness in this
room.’’ The weather had been hot, and
the delegates to the Convention were
tired and edgy. The debates were seemingly getting nowhere and a melancholy cloud seemed to hover over the
Convention. Little progress was being
made, and the prevailing winds were
those of discouragement, dissension,
and despair, when old Dr. Franklin, sitting with the famous double spectacles
low on his nose, broke silence; he had
said little during these past days. Addressing himself to George Washington
in the chair, Franklin, according to
Catherine Drinker Bowen, in her book,
‘‘Miracle at Philadelphia,’’ reminded
the Convention how, at the beginning
of the war with England, the Continental Congress had had prayers for Divine protection, and in this very room.
‘‘Our prayers, Sir, were heard,’’ said
Franklin, ‘‘and they were graciously
answered. All of us who were engaged
in the struggle must have observed frequent instances of a Superintending
providence in our favor. To that kind
Providence we owe this happy opportunity of consulting in peace on the
means of establishing our future national felicity. And have we now forgotten that powerful friend? I have
lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer
I live, the more convincing proofs I see
of this truth—that God governs in the
affairs of men.’’
Bowen, in her magnificent story of
the Constitutional Convention, goes on
to say that on Dr. Franklin’s manuscript of his little speech, ‘‘the word
God is twice underscored, perhaps as
indication to the printer. But whether
or no Franklin looked upon the Deity
as worthy of three capital letters, his
speech was timely.’’ You will read this
same speech in Madison’s notes.
‘‘If a sparrow cannot fall to the
ground unseen by Him,’’ Franklin continued, ‘‘was it probable that an empire
could arise without his aid? ‘I firmly
believe this, and I also believe that
without his concurring aid we shall
succeed in this political building no
better than the builders of Babel.’’’
Franklin proposed that ‘‘henceforth
prayers imploring the assistance of
heaven and its blessings on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly
every morning before we proceed to
business, and that one or more of the
clergy of this city be requested to officiate in that service.’’
Roger Sherman at once seconded
Franklin’s motion. Incidentally, on
yesterday, July 16, 1787, the convention
adopted the great compromise, without
which none of us would be here today.
That compromise established two bodies in the legislative branch and provided that each State would be equal in
this branch, that we would have votes
in this branch. I won’t go further, but
you might recall it was only yesterday.
But Hamilton and several others,
wrote Madison, feared that calling in a
clergymen at so late a stage might lead
the public to suspect dissensions in the
Convention. Williamson of North Carolina made the frank statement that everyone knew the real reason for not engaging a chaplain: the Convention had
no funds. Franklin’s motion failed,
though Randolph proposed that on the
approaching Fourth of July, a sermon
be preached at the request of the Convention and that thenceforth prayers
be used. In any event, we can all learn
a lesson from this episode: God was
very much a part of national life at a
time when the greatest document of its
kind—the Constitution of the United
States—was ever written, a time when
it was being formed.
Mr. President, I close with words
from the Bible, which Franklin aptly
used in his speech: ‘‘Except the Lord
build the house, they labor in vain that
build it; except the Lord keep the city,
the watchman waketh but in vain.’’
It would be well, Mr. President, if
this Biblical admonition were kept in
mind as future cases concerning school
prayer come before the courts of the
land.
As a matter of fact, this admonition
is one on which all three branches of
government should reflect. We here in
the legislative branch bear some responsibility. Here is where laws are
made, and here is where some positive
steps could originate on a path toward
correcting a court imposed imbalance.
The executive branch, too, could play
some useful role in that regard. This
being an election year, I urge that the
Democratic and Republican political
Conventions adopt planks—why not—
in their respective platforms advocating a Constitutional amendment
concerning prayer in schools. Both the
Democratic and Republican nominees
for President should be urged to support such an amendment.
Both nominees should be urged to
speak out on this subject during the
campaigns. I intend to urge that both
nominees do that.
I thank all Senators and I yield the
floor.
Mr. HOLLINGS. I see the distinguished Senator from Colorado is supposed to take over the time. I ask
unanimous consent to be yielded 5 minutes.
The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr.
KYL). Under the previous order, the
Senator from Wyoming, Mr. THOMAS,
or his designee, has from 2 o’clock
until 3 p.m.
Does the Senator from Colorado wish
to respond to the Senator from South
Carolina?
Mr. ALLARD. I am willing to grant
the Senator from South Carolina 5
minutes.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from South Carolina is recognized.
f
THE DEBT AND TAX CUTS
Mr. HOLLINGS. Mr. President, in response to my amendment relative to
eliminating the tax cut, I ask unanimous consent that my comments of
S7000
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
February 10, this year, in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, be printed in the
RECORD.
There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in the
RECORD, as follows:
FRAUD
Mr. HOLLINGS. Mr. President, if people
back home only knew. This whole town is
engaged in the biggest fraud. Tom Brokaw
has written that the greatest generation suffered the Depression, won the war, and then
came back to lead. They not only won the
war but were conscientious about paying for
that war and Korea and Vietnam. Lyndon
Johnson balanced the budget in 1969.
I ask unanimous consent to print in the
RECORD the record of all the Presidents,
since President Truman down through Presi-
dent Clinton, of the deficit and debt, the national debt, and interest costs.
There being no objection, the material was
ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows:
HOLLING’S BUDGET REALITIES
President and year
Truman:
1946 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1947 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1948 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1949 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1950 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1951 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1952 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1953 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1954 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Eisenhower:
1955 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1956 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1957 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1958 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1959 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1960 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1961 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1962 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Kennedy:
1963 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1964 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Johnson:
1965 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1966 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1967 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1968 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1969 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1970 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Nixon:
1971 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1972 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1973 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1974 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1975 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Ford:
1976 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1977 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Carter:
1978 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1979 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1980 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1981 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Reagan:
1982 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1983 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1984 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1985 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1986 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1987 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1988 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1989 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Bush:
1990 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1991 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1992 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1993 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Clinton:
1994 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1995 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1996 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1997 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1998 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
1999 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
2000 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
2001 ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Annual increases in
spending for
interest
(billions)
U.S. budget
(outlays) (In
billions)
Borrowed
trust funds
(billions)
Unified deficit with
trust funds
(billions)
Actual deficit without
trust funds
(billions)
55.2
34.5
29.8
38.8
42.6
45.5
67.7
76.1
70.9
¥5.0
¥9.9
6.7
1.2
1.2
4.5
2.3
0.4
3.6
¥15.9
4.0
11.8
0.6
¥3.1
6.1
¥1.5
¥6.5
¥1.2
¥10.9
+13.9
+5.1
¥0.6
¥4.3
+1.6
¥3.8
¥6.9
¥4.8
271.0
257.1
252.0
252.6
256.9
255.3
259.1
266.0
270.8
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
68.4
70.6
76.6
82.4
92.1
92.2
97.7
106.8
0.6
2.2
3.0
4.6
¥5.0
3.3
¥1.2
3.2
¥3.0
3.9
3.4
¥2.8
¥12.8
0.3
¥3.3
¥7.1
¥3.6
+1.7
+0.4
¥7.4
¥7.8
¥3.0
¥2.1
¥10.3
274.4
272.7
272.3
279.7
287.5
290.5
292.6
302.9
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
....................
9.1
111.3
118.5
2.6
¥0.1
¥4.8
¥5.9
¥7.4
¥5.8
310.3
316.1
9.9
10.7
118.2
134.5
157.5
178.1
183.6
195.6
4.8
2.5
3.3
3.1
0.3
12.3
¥1.4
¥3.7
¥8.6
¥25.2
3.2
¥2.8
¥6.2
¥6.2
¥11.9
¥28.3
+2.9
¥15.1
322.3
328.5
340.4
368.7
365.8
380.9
11.3
12.0
13.4
14.6
16.6
19.3
210.2
230.7
245.7
269.4
332.3
4.3
4.3
15.5
11.5
4.8
¥23.0
¥23.4
¥14.9
¥6.1
¥53.2
¥27.3
¥27.7
¥30.4
¥17.6
¥58.0
408.2
435.9
466.3
483.9
541.9
21.0
21.8
24.2
29.3
32.7
371.8
409.2
13.4
23.7
¥73.7
¥53.7
¥87.1
¥77.4
629.0
706.4
37.1
41.9
458.7
503.5
590.9
678.2
11.0
12.2
5.8
6.7
¥59.2
¥40.7
¥73.8
¥79.0
¥70.2
¥52.9
¥79.6
¥85.7
776.6
829.5
909.1
994.8
48.7
59.9
74.8
95.5
745.8
808.4
851.8
946.4
990.3
1,003.9
1,064.1
1,143.2
14.5
26.6
7.6
40.5
81.9
75.7
100.0
114.2
¥128.0
¥207.8
¥185.4
¥212.3
¥221.2
¥149.8
¥155.2
¥152.5
¥142.5
¥234.4
¥193.0
¥252.8
¥303.1
¥225.5
¥255.2
¥266.7
1,137.3
1,371.7
1,564.7
1,817.5
2,120.6
2,346.1
2,601.3
2,868.3
117.2
128.7
153.9
178.9
190.3
195.3
214.1
240.9
1,252.7
1,323.8
1,380.9
1,408.2
117.4
122.5
113.2
94.3
¥221.2
¥269.4
¥290.4
¥255.0
¥338.6
¥391.9
¥403.6
¥349.3
3,206.6
3,598.5
4,002.1
4,351.4
264.7
285.5
292.3
292.5
1,460.6
1,514.6
1,453.1
1,601.2
1,651.4
1,704.5
1,769.0
1,839.0
89.2
113.4
153.5
165.9
179.0
250.5
234.5
262.0
¥203.1
¥163.9
¥107.4
¥21.9
70.0
122.7
176.0
177.0
¥292.3
¥277.3
¥260.9
¥187.8
¥109.0
¥127.8
¥58.5
¥85.0
4,643.7
4,921.0
5,181.9
5,369.7
5,478.7
5,606.5
5,665.0
5,750.0
296.3
332.4
344.0
355.8
363.8
353.5
362.0
371.0
National
debt
(billions)
* Historical Tables, Budget of the US Government FY 1998; Beginning in 1962 CBO’S 2001 Economic and Budget Outlook.
Mr. HOLLINGS. Mr. President, Lyndon
Johnson balanced the budget in 1969. At that
time, the national debt was $365 billion with
an interest cost of only $16 billion. Now,
under a new generation without the cost of a
war, the debt has soared to $5.6 trillion with
annual interest costs of $365 billion. That is
right. We spend $1 billion a day for nothing.
It does not buy any defense, any education,
any health care, or highways. Astoundingly,
since President Johnson balanced the budget, we have increased spending $349 billion
for nothing.
Early each morning, the Federal Government goes down to the bank and borrows $1
billion and adds it to the national debt. We
have not had a surplus for 30 years. Senator
TRENT LOTT, commenting on President Clin-
ton’s State of the Union Address, said the
talk cost $1 billion a minute. For an hourand-a-half talk, that would be $90 billion a
year. Governor George W. Bush’s tax cut
costs $90 billion a year. Together, that is $180
billion. Just think, we can pay for both the
Democratic and Republican programs with
the money we are spending on interest and
still have $185 billion to pay down the national debt. Instead, the debt increases, interest costs increase, while all in town, all in
the Congress, shout: Surplus, surplus, surplus.
Understand the game. Ever since President
Johnson’s balanced budget, the Government
has spent more each year than it has taken
in—a deficit. The average deficit for the past
30 years was $175 billion a year. This is with
both Democratic and Republican Presidents
and Democratic and Republican Congresses.
Somebody wants to know why the economy
is good? If you infuse $175 billion a year for
some 30 years and do not pay for it, it ought
to be good.
The trick to calling a deficit a surplus is to
have the Government borrow from itself. The
Federal Government, like an insurance company, has various funds held in reserve to
pay benefits of the program—Social Security, Medicare, military retirement, civilian
retirement, unemployment compensation,
July 17, 2000
S7001
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
highway funds, airport funds, railroad retirement funds.
Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to
print in the RECORD a list of trust funds
looted to balance this budget.
There being no objection, the material was
ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows:
1998
1999
2000
Social Security ......................................
Medicare:
HI .................................................
SMI ..............................................
Military Retirement ...............................
Civilian Retirement ..............................
Unemployment ......................................
Highway ................................................
Airport ...................................................
Railroad Retirement .............................
Other .....................................................
730
855
1,009
118
40
134
461
71
18
9
22
53
154
27
141
492
77
28
12
24
59
176
34
149
522
85
31
13
25
62
Total ........................................
1,656
1,869
2,106
Mr. HOLLINGS. Mr. President, these funds
are held in trust for the specific purpose for
which the taxes are collected.
Under corporate law, it is a felony to pay
off the company debt with the pension fund.
But in Washington we pay down the public
debt with trust funds, call it a surplus, and
they give us the ‘‘Good Government’’ award.
To make it sound correct, we divide the
debt in two: The public debt and the private
debt. Of course, our Government is public,
and the law treats the debt as public without
separation. The separation allows Washington politicians to say: We have paid down
the public debt and have a surplus. There is
no mention, of course, that the Government
debt is increased by the same amount that
the public debt is decreased. It is like paying
off your MasterCard with your Visa card and
saying you do not owe anything. Dr. Dan
Crippen, the Director of the Congressional
Budget Office, describes this as ‘‘taking from
one pocket and putting it in the other.’’
For years we have been using the trust
funds to report a unified budget and a unified
deficit. This has led people to believe the
Government was reporting net figures. It
sounded authentic. But as the unified deficit
appeared less and less, the national debt continued to increase. While the unified deficit
in 1997 was $21.9 billion, the actual deficit
was $187.8 billion. In 1998 the unified budget
reported a surplus of $70 billion, but actually
there was a deficit of $109 billion. In 1999 the
‘‘unified surplus’’ was $124 billion, but the
actual deficit was $127.8 billion.
Now comes the Presidential campaign. Social Security is a hot topic. Both parties are
shouting: Save Social Security. Social Security lockbox. The economy is humming,
booming. With high employment, the Social
Security revenues have increased. It appears
that, separate from Social Security, there
will be enough trust fund money to compute
a surplus. We have reached the millennium—
Utopia—enough money to report a surplus
without spending Social Security.
Washington jargon now changes. Instead of
a ‘‘unified budget,’’ the Government now reports an ‘‘on-budget’’ and an ‘‘off-budget.’’
This is so we can all call it an on-budget surplus, meaning without Social Security. But
to call it an on-budget surplus, the Government spends $96 billion from the other trust
funds.
We ended last year with a deficit of $128
billion—not a surplus. The President’s budget just submitted shows an actual deficit
each year for the next 5 years. Instead of
paying down the debt, the President shows,
on page 420 of his budget, the debt increasing
from the year 2000 to the year 2013—$5.686
trillion to $6.815 trillion, an increase of $1.129
trillion.
They are all talking about paying off the
debt by 2013, and the actual document they
submit shows the debt increasing each year,
and over that period an increase of over $1
trillion.
Each year, Congress spends more than the
President’s budgets. There is no chance of a
surplus with both sides proposing to reduce
revenues with a tax cut. But we have a
sweetheart deal: The Republicans will call a
deficit a surplus, so they can buy the vote
with tax cuts; the Democrats will call the
deficit a surplus, so they can buy the vote
with increased spending. The worst abuse of
campaign finance is using the Federal budget to buy votes.
Alan Greenspan could stop this. He could
call a deficit a deficit. Instead, appearing before Congress in his confirmation hearing,
Greenspan, talking of the Federal budget,
stated: ‘‘I would fear very much that these
huge surpluses . . .’’ and on and on. We are
in real trouble when Greenspan calls huge
deficits ‘‘huge surpluses.’’ Greenspan thinks
his sole role is to protect the financial markets. He does not want the U.S. Government
coming into the market borrowing billions
to pay its deficit, crowding out private capital, and running up interest costs.
But Congress’ job is to not only protect the
financial markets but the overall economy.
Our job, as the board of directors for the
Federal Government, is to make sure the
Government pays its bills. In short, our responsibility is to eliminate waste.
The biggest waste of all is to continue to
run up the debt with devastating interest
costs for nothing. In good times, the least we
can do is put this Government on a pay-asyou-go basis. Greenspan’s limp admonition
to ‘‘pay down the debt’’ is just to cover his
backside. He knows better. He should issue a
clarion call to stop increasing the debt.
While he is raising interest rates to cool the
economy, he should categorically oppose tax
cuts to stimulate it.
Our only hope is the free press. In the earliest days, Thomas Jefferson observed, given
a choice between a free government and a
free press, he would choose the latter. Jefferson believed strongly that with the press reporting the truth to the American people,
the Government would stay free.
Our problem is that the press and media
have joined the conspiracy to defraud. They
complain lamely that the Federal budget
process is too complicated, so they report
‘‘surplus.’’ Complicated it is. But as to being
a deficit or a surplus is clear cut; it is not
complicated at all. All you need to do is go
to the Department of the Treasury’s report
on public debt. They report the growth in
the national debt every day, every minute,
on
the
Internet
at
‘‘www.publicdebt.treas.gov.’’
In fact, there is a big illuminated billboard
on Sixth Avenue in New York that reports
the increase in the debt by the minute. At
present, it shows that we are increasing the
debt every minute by $894,000. Think of
that—$894,000 a minute. Of course, increase
the debt, and interest costs rise. Already, interest costs exceed the defense budget. Interest costs, like taxes, must be paid. Worse,
while regular taxes support defense, and
other programs, interest taxes support
waste. Running a deficit of over $100 billion
today, any tax cut amounts to an interest
tax increase—an increase in waste.
If the American people realized what was
going on, they would run us all out of town.
Mr. HOLLINGS. I ask unanimous
consent the Public Debt to the Penny,
issued by the Secretary of the Treasury, dated as of last Friday, July 14, be
printed in the RECORD.
There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in the
RECORD, as follows:
THE PUBLIC DEBT TO THE PENNY
Current:
07/14/2000 ...............................
Current month:
07/13/2000 ...............................
07/12/2000 ...............................
07/11/2000 ...............................
07/10/2000 ...............................
07/07/2000 ...............................
07/06/2000 ...............................
07/05/2000 ...............................
07/03/2000 ...............................
Prior months:
06/30/2000 ...............................
05/31/2000 ...............................
04/28/2000 ...............................
03/31/2000 ...............................
02/29/2000 ...............................
01/31/2000 ...............................
12/31/1999 ...............................
11/30/1999 ...............................
10/29/1999 ...............................
Prior fiscal years:
09/30/1999 ...............................
09/30/1998 ...............................
09/30/1997 ...............................
09/30/1996 ...............................
09/29/1995 ...............................
09/30/1994 ...............................
09/30/1993 ...............................
09/30/1992 ...............................
09/30/1991 ...............................
09/28/1990 ...............................
09/29/1989 ...............................
09/30/1988 ...............................
09/30/1987 ...............................
$5,666,749,557,909.16
Amount
$5,666,740,403,750.26
5,664,141,886,637.91
5,665,065,032,353.04
5,662,949,608,628.38
5,664,950,120,488.65
5,665,885,115,450.41
5,663,895,163,292.22
5,656,715,920,235.71
5,685,938,087,296.66
5,647,169,888,532.25
5,685,108,228,594.76
5,773,391,634,682.91
5,735,333,348,132.58
5,711,285,168,951.46
5,776,091,314,225.33
5,693,600,157,029.08
5,679,726,662,904.06
5,656,270,901,615.43
5,526,193,008,897.62
5,413,146,011,397.34
5,224,810,939,135.73
4,973,982,900,709.39
4,692,749,910,013.32
4,411,488,883,139.38
4,064,620,655,521.66
3,665,303,351,697.03
3,233,313,451,777.25
2,857,430,960,187.32
2,602,337,712,041.16
2,350,276,890,953.00
Source: Bureau of the Public Debt.
Mr. HOLLINGS. I also ask unanimous consent that the public Interest
Expense on the Public Debt Outstanding, issued by the Secretary of
the Treasury, be printed in the RECORD.
There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in the
RECORD, as follows:
INTEREST EXPENSE ON THE PUBLIC DEBT
OUTSTANDING
The monthly Interest Expense represents
the interest expense on the Public Debt Outstanding as of each month end. The interest
expense on the Public Debt includes interest
for Treasury notes and bonds; foreign and domestic series certificates of indebtedness,
notes and bonds; Savings Bonds; as well as
Government Account Series (GAS), State and
Local Government series (SLGs), and other special purpose securities. Amortized discount
or premium on bills, notes and bonds is also
included in interest expense.
The fiscal year Interest Expense represents
the total interest expense on the Public Debt
Outstanding for a given fiscal year. This includes the months of October through September.
Fiscal year 2000:
Interest expense
June ..........................
$75,884,057,388.85
May ...........................
26,802,350,934.54
April ..........................
19,878,902,328.72
March ........................
20,889,017,596.95
February ...................
20,778,646,308.19
January .....................
19,689,955,250.71
December ..................
73,267,794,917.58
November ..................
25,690,033,589.51
October ......................
19,373,192,333.69
Fiscal year total ....
302,253,950,648.74
Available historical
data—fiscal year end:
1999 ............................
1998 ............................
1997 ............................
1996 ............................
353,511,471,722.87
363,823,722,920.26
355,795,834,214.66
343,955,076,695.15
S7002
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
1990
1989
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
............................
............................
............................
............................
............................
............................
............................
332,413,555,030.62
296,277,764,246.26
292,502,219,484.25
292,361,073,070.74
286,021,921,181.04
264,852,544,615.90
240,863,231,535.71
1988 ............................
214,145,028,847.73
E-mail your questions and comments about this
page.
Mr. HOLLINGS. I ask unanimous
consent that table 23 of the midsession
review by the President of the United
States, dated June 26, be printed in the
RECORD.
There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in the
RECORD, as follows:
TABLE 23.—FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FINANCING AND DEBT
[In billions of dollars]
2000
Financing:
Unified surplus or deficit (¥) ...........................................................................................
Off-budget surplus:
Social Security solvency lock-box:
Social Security solvency transfers ........................................................................
Other Social Security surplus (including Postal) .................................................
Medicare HI solvency lock-box:
Medicare solvency transfers .................................................................................
Other Medicare HI surplus ....................................................................................
On-budget surplus .........................................................................................................
Means of financing other than borrowing from the public:
Premiums paid (¥) on buybacks of Treasury securities .............................................
Changes in:
Treasury operating cash balance .........................................................................
Checks outstanding, deposit funds, etc. ..............................................................
Seigniorage on coins .................................................................................................
Less: Equity purchases by Social Security trust fund ..............................................
Less: Net financing disbursements:
Direct loan financing accounts ............................................................................
Guaranteed loan financing accounts ...................................................................
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
211
228
224
236
255
268
286
304
332
364
416
500
547
..............
148
..............
160
..............
176
..............
191
..............
204
..............
226
..............
239
..............
256
..............
273
..............
288
..............
306
123
316
147
335
..............
24
39
31
29
9
14
33
1
..............
39
6
..............
40
10
..............
41
1
..............
47
1
..............
46
1
9
48
2
21
51
4
40
57
14
2
58
1
4
60
1
¥5
¥2
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
6
¥4
2
..............
10
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
..............
..............
..............
2
¥63
..............
..............
2
¥82
¥27
..............
¥14
1
¥18
1
¥17
1
¥16
2
¥15
2
¥15
2
¥15
2
¥15
2
¥15
2
¥15
2
¥15
3
¥15
3
Total, means of financing other than borrowing from the public ..................
Total, repayment of debt held by the public ..............................................
Change in debt held by the public ....................................................................................
Debt Subject to Statutory Limitation, End of Year:
Debt issued by Treasury .....................................................................................................
Adjustment for Treasury debt not subject to limitation and agency debt subject to
limitation ........................................................................................................................
Adjustment for discount and premium ..............................................................................
¥27
185
¥184
¥3
225
¥225
¥14
210
¥210
¥14
222
¥222
¥12
243
¥243
¥11
257
¥257
¥12
274
¥274
¥11
293
¥293
¥11
321
¥321
¥11
353
¥353
¥11
406
¥406
¥74
426
¥426
¥93
454
¥454
5,529
5,683
5,748
5,809
5,861
5,921
5,982
6,040
6,094
6,146
6,189
6,240
6,525
¥15
5
¥15
5
¥15
5
¥15
5
¥15
4
¥15
4
¥15
4
¥15
4
¥15
3
¥15
3
¥15
2
¥15
2
¥15
2
Total, debt subject to statutory limitation ................................................................
Debt Outstanding, End of Year:
Gross Federal debt:
Debt issued by Treasury ................................................................................................
Debt issued by other agencies ......................................................................................
5,519
5,673
5,737
5,798
5,850
5,910
5,971
6,028
6,082
6,134
6,176
6,227
6,511
5,529
28
5,683
28
5,748
27
5,809
26
5,861
24
5,921
22
5,982
21
6,040
19
6,094
19
6,146
19
6,189
18
6,240
18
6,525
18
Total, gross Federal debt ..........................................................................................
Held by:
Debt securities held as assets by Government accounts .............................................
Social Security ...........................................................................................................
Federal employee retirement .....................................................................................
Other ..........................................................................................................................
Debt securities held as assets by the public ...............................................................
Mr. HOLLINGS. Mr. President, right
to the point. Surplus, surplus, everywhere man cries surplus—paraphrasing
Patrick Henry. But there is no surplus.
I know not, of course, what others
may say, but as for me, I want to pay
down the debt rather than engage in
this shabby charade. As a result, the
only way to do that and pay down the
debt is stop this sweetheart deal of giving a little on spending increases and
giving a little again, of course, on tax
cuts. We do not have a surplus to divide. That is the point of my particular
amendment.
I appreciate the distinguished Senator from Colorado giving me these few
moments, and I yield the floor.
The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr.
BUNNING). The Senator from Colorado.
f
ELIMINATING THE MARRIAGE
PENALTY
Mr. ALLARD. Mr. President, I have
come to the floor to support eliminating the marriage penalty. I think it
is timely that we have some votes
scheduled this evening, I understand
about 6:15 p.m. By eliminating the
marriage penalty, we eliminate one of
the most egregious examples of unfairness and complexity in the Tax Code to
date. Another example of that would be
the death tax or the inheritance tax.
We dealt with that issue last week. I
am extremely excited that it has
5,557
5,711
5,774
5,834
5,885
5,943
6,003
6,060
6,113
6,165
6,208
6,259
6,543
2,108
1,005
681
422
3,449
2,487
1,165
718
604
3,224
2,760
1,341
756
663
3,014
3,042
1,532
792
718
2,792
3,335
1,737
828
770
2,550
3,651
1,963
864
823
2,293
3,985
2,201
899
885
2,018
4,334
2,457
932
944
1,726
4,708
2,729
965
1,014
1,405
5,113
3,014
997
1,102
1,052
5,561
3,318
1,027
1,216
646
6,038
3,692
1,056
1,290
220
6,543
4,090
1,085
1,368
..............
passed the House, passed the Senate,
and is now going on to the President
for his signature.
Both these taxes are prominent concerns of my constituents, at a time
when the tax burden is at record high
levels in this country. When we are
talking about eliminating the death
tax, we are talking about the family
business and what happens to a family
business after an unexpected death
without any estate planning, and how
much the Government takes of that estate, forcing the sale. Many times it is
a farm or a ranch that has been in the
family for many, many generations.
When we talk about the marriage
penalty—we are eliminating that unfair burden—we are talking about the
family. We are talking about reducing
the tax burden. We are talking about
fairness and Tax Code simplification.
Just a brief description needs to be
made of the marriage penalty. The
marriage penalty exists when a married couple, filing a joint tax return,
pays higher taxes than if the same couple were not married and were filing as
individuals. The penalty varies, depending on the tax bracket in which
the couple may find themselves. The
example that has been used before is
based on an assumption that both
spouses are each holding down separate
jobs, each earning about $30,000, in 1999.
It is determined they would pay about
$7,655 in Federal income taxes. If these
two individuals were not married and
both earned the same amount of
money, and had each filed a single tax
return, they would pay only $6,892 in
combined tax liability. There is a $763
difference in tax liability. This is what
we refer to when we talk about the
marriage tax penalty.
According to the Congressional Budget Office, almost half of all married
couples—it figures out to about 22 million—suffered from the marriage tax
penalty last year. The average penalty
paid by these couples was around $1,500.
In the previous example, the marriage
penalty was the result of a higher combined standard deduction for two workers filing as singles than for married
couples, and the income tax bracket
thresholds for married couples are less
than twice the threshold for single taxpayers. We are trying to eliminate this
problem.
The best illustration of the real tax
burden faced by families is to compare
today’s tax burden of an average family with the tax burden of a family
with average income of four decades
ago. The total tax burden for the family today is 39 percent of its income.
That is up from 18 percent in 1955. The
Federal payroll taxes and State and
local taxes have literally doubled the
total tax burden faced by families. As a
result, the middle-income family today
has 25 percent less disposable income
than a similar family in 1955.
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
The bill we have been working on in
the Senate, and which many of us support, addresses the standard deduction
problem I alluded to, and it increases
the standard deduction for married
couples filing jointly to twice the
standard deduction for single taxpayers.
According
to
the
Subcommittee on Taxation, this provision
provides tax relief to approximately 25
million couples filing joint returns.
Hopefully, it can be made effective
after December 31, 2000. That is what
we are talking about in this particular
marriage penalty relief bill.
It also raises the tax brackets. The
bill expands, over a 6-year period—this
is not happening all at once, it is
gradually happening over a 6-year period—the 15-percent and 28-percent income tax brackets for a married couple
filing a joint return to twice the size of
the corresponding brackets for an individual filing a single return. This is a
phase-in provision, ultimately providing relief to 21 million married couples, including 3 million senior citizens.
We also try to address the earned-income credit. This bill increases the beginning and the end of the phase out of
the earned-income credit for couples
filing a joint return. Currently, for a
couple with two or more children, the
earned-income credit begins phasing
out at $12,690 and is eliminated for couples earning more than $31,152. Under
this bill, the new range would be $2,500
higher. The maximum increase in the
earned-income tax credit in this provision for an eligible couple is $526. As
you recall, the earned-income tax credit was put in place to try to help lowincome individuals so they would be
encouraged to go out and get a job and
to stay off welfare. Also, there is a provision preserving the family tax credits.
The bill permanently extends the
current temporary exemption from the
individual alternative minimum tax
for family-related tax credits. This is
so that, once you grant tax deductions
and credits, the alternative minimum
tax doesn’t come in and take that all
away.
One of the complaints I hear from my
constituents is it seems as if Congress
has been working on tax cuts, they
pass tax cuts, they get signed by the
President, but we don’t seem to feel it
when we are paying our taxes on April
15. One of the reasons that you do not
feel it is because, in some cases, the alternative minimum tax kicks in, it
takes effect, and that means the previous tax cuts that were applied to a
particular taxpayer did not take effect
because of the alternative minimum
tax.
Members of the Democratic Party
have thwarted passage of any kind of
relief for marriage, as far as the Tax
Code is concerned, since 1995. In 1995,
we had the marriage tax penalty bill
passed by the Congress, sent to the
President, a Democratic President. He
vetoed it. In 1999, we sent a bill to the
Democratic President and he vetoed it.
Earlier this year, in April, there was a
Democratic filibuster that prevented a
marriage penalty bill from moving forward. We need to pass and the President needs to sign a marriage tax penalty provision to give relief to married
couples.
This year I have held town meetings
in all 63 of Colorado’s counties. At
those meetings I heard from many of
my constituents about how strongly
they feel about tax relief. In Colorado,
over 400,000 couples incur an additional
tax burden simply because they are
married.
I have some numbers here, numbers
from the Congressional Budget Office. I
find them very disturbing. Almost half
of all married couples, the 22 million
couples I mentioned earlier, suffered
from the marriage penalty provisions
last year.
Again, as in the rest of the country,
many of these couples on average have
suffered a $1,500 penalty where, if they
had not been married, they would not
have had to pay this amount.
Cumulatively, the marriage tax penalty increases the taxes on affected
couples throughout the United States
by about $32 billion per year. That is
money that families could use toward
their own needs, rather than Washington trying to set the priorities for
American families.
This penalty is not a tax on the rich.
The marriage tax penalty exists because of multiple tax brackets and the
fact that the standard deductions for
married couples are not twice those
given to single people. This tax can be
incurred by folks in every tax bracket.
In fact, families with two wage earners
are the hardest hit by the marriage
penalty. There are more and more of
these families in today’s workforce.
Many of these folks are in the lower to
middle class—people working hard to
provide for their children. Taxing these
folks for being married is plain wrong.
Another one of the groups implicitly
taxed under the marriage penalty is
the working poor. The earned-income
tax credit is an effective tool in helping these low-income workers, but the
EITC is phased out more quickly for
married couples than for individuals.
So the families incur a greater tax burden simply for being married.
Some colleagues of mine call for
more Government spending for education, health care, and housing. I believe if we simply allow the American
family to keep more of their money, we
permit them to better afford the things
they need.
In this time of a historic budget surplus, we still have nearly record high
taxation. Hard-working American families deserve to keep some of this
money. It is theirs in the first place,
and I see it as the responsibility of
Congress to return some of this money
to the people.
To permit the marriage tax penalty
to continue is wrong. Allowing American families to keep this money is the
S7003
right thing to do, and I believe it is
time to do away with the marriage tax
penalty.
I yield the floor.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Utah.
Mr. HATCH. Mr. President, I rise
today to express my strong support for
the Marriage Tax Penalty Relief Act of
2000. This much-needed bill has had a
long and difficult journey in getting to
this point where we can pass it in the
Senate. Passage will occur today; and,
as we did in 1999, the Congress will send
legislation to help married couples
being hurt by marriage tax penalties to
the President.
I congratulate my colleague, the
chairman of the Finance Committee,
Senator ROTH, for his very effective
leadership on this issue. I realize that
this matter has not been an easy one
for Chairman ROTH this year, because
he has been unfairly criticized by our
colleagues on the other side of the aisle
for taking the approach on marriage
tax penalty relief that is reflected in
this bill. Let me explain.
The Senate last year, led by Chairman ROTH, passed a marriage penalty
relief provision in the Taxpayer Refund
Act, which used a different solution to
the marriage penalty problem than the
one included in the bill before us today.
Last year’s bill would have solved the
marriage penalty problem by allowing
married couples the option of filing as
single taxpayers on a combined joint
return. I supported that bill as did a
majority of our colleagues. It was a
good approach to solving a major tax
problem for American families.
Last year’s bill was effective in relieving the marriage penalty. However,
it left untouched another glaring family tax problem that I will call the single-earner penalty. I would like to illustrate this with a hypothetical example of three Utah families.
Let’s suppose we have three families,
all neighbors living on the same street
in Ogden, UT. These families are nearly
identical, in that they each have three
children and household incomes of
$80,000 per year. The only differences in
these three families are in the marital
status of the parents and in who earns
the income. In the first family, the
Allen family, the parents are married
and both work outside the home and
earn $40,000 each for a total of $80,000.
The second family, the Brown family,
are also married but only the husband
works outside the home, earning $80,000
per year. The third family, the Campbell-Clark family, are unmarried parents and each of them earns $40,000 per
year for a total of $80,000.
As you can see from this chart, under
current law, the Allen and the Brown
families each pay about $9,200 in income tax each year. The CampbellClark family, however, because they
can file as single taxpayers, pay only a
combined $7,900. Because the Allens
each earn one-half the family income,
if they were to divorce and file as singles, they could reduce their combined
S7004
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
tax bill down to $7,900, the same as the
Campbell-Clarks. Therefore, the Allens
suffer a marriage penalty of about
$1,300 each year.
The marriage penalty relief provision
included in last year’s tax bill would
have eliminated this marriage penalty
and reduced the tax bill of the Allen
family down to the same level paid by
the Campbell-Clarks. However, by
doing so it would have left behind the
Brown family, who would still be paying income taxes of $9,200 per year.
This is not fair. We must not, in the
name of fairness, fix the marriage tax
problems of one category of families,
but not another category. It is true
that the Browns do not suffer a marriage penalty, but why should they pay
higher taxes simply because their family income is earned by one spouse and
not two?
There are approximately 210,000 couples in my home state of Utah, who,
like the Allens, suffer a marriage penalty. However, there are also about
108,000 couples in Utah who are like the
Browns, and would be left behind by
marriage tax relief like we passed in
1999.
This is why this year’s marriage penalty bill is superior to last year’s. The
bill before us today lowers the tax burden of both the Allen family and the
Brown family. It alleviates the marriage penalty and the one-earner penalty. It does not leave any family behind.
In essence, the Internal Revenue
Code results in marriage tax penalties
and bonuses because it pursues three
conflicting ideals or principles—marriage neutrality, equal treatment of
married couples with the same household income, and progressive taxation.
The ideal of marriage neutrality
states that a couple’s tax liability
should not be determined based on
their marital status. In other words,
there should not be a tax incentive either to marry, to remain single, or to
divorce. Under our example, current
law does penalize the Allen family, because they would pay about $1,300 per
year less if they were to divorce and
live together. That is ridiculous. We
want to encourage people to live together in marriage.
The equally important principle of
equal treatment holds that married
couples with equal incomes should pay
the same amount in taxes without regard to how much each spouse contributes to the couple’s income. Under this
principle, the Allens and the Browns
should pay the same tax since they are
both married with identical family incomes. Currently, they do pay the
same, but this principle would be violated if we did not also lower the
Browns’ tax while fixing the Allens’
marriage penalty.
Progressive taxation is the principle
that those with higher incomes should
pay a higher percentage of their incomes in taxes than is required of
those with lower incomes.
It is mathematically impossible for
the Tax Code to achieve all three of
these tax policy ideals simultaneously.
One of the three objectives must be
sacrificed. If we continue to insist on a
progressive tax system, we cannot
solve both the marriage penalty and
the one-earner penalty. Simply put,
last year’s marriage penalty relief provision did solve the marriage penalty,
but it violated the one-earner penalty.
The bill before us today does not totally solve the marriage penalty, but it
greatly alleviates it for most families.
And, it does not create a one-earner
penalty. All in all, it represents the
fairest approach for the most families
in our country.
As long as we have a progressive tax
system, we will never achieve total
family tax fairness. Therefore, no marriage tax penalty bill will be perfect.
While making tremendous progress toward marriage penalty relief for most
families, the bill before us leaves some
serious marriage penalties in place.
For example, the current-law student
loan interest deduction provision penalizes married couples struggling to
pay off student loans. In February, the
Senate passed an amendment to the
education tax bill that Senator MACK
and I offered that would have eliminated this problem. I had hoped to add
that provision to this bill, but it would
not be germane under the reconciliation rules. I hope we can take care of
that problem in another tax bill later
this year.
President Clinton has given strong
indications he will veto this bill because it gives tax relief to families who
do not suffer from marriage penalties.
This is a shortsighted point of view
that ignores the structure of our tax
system and the needs of American families.
In fact, it kind of makes me wonder
whether President Clinton’s real concern is the idea of cutting taxes. He has
made no secret of his opposition to tax
cuts. He has fought us every step of the
way in our efforts to return a portion
of the budget surplus to those hardworking Americans who produced it.
But, I will be very sorry if a Presidential veto denies American families
even this tax cut which is not being
made for its own sake, but rather to
correct a longstanding inequity in the
Tax Code.
I implore the President to reconsider
that all American families need fair
and substantial tax relief—those where
both spouses work outside the home as
well as those where one parent stays
home. I hope he will sign this bill into
law.
And, allow me to say just a word
about parents who forego outside income to remain at home. Everyone in
this body knows that I believe we must
have adequate child care for those families who need it. I have worked with
my Republican colleagues and my
Democratic colleagues across the aisle
on child care legislation. But, I cannot
say emphatically enough that the best
July 17, 2000
child care is still provided by a parent.
I have yet to hear a single Senator disagree with that. Yet, our Tax Code penalizes a family in which one parent
makes this choice to stay at home with
their children.
I am glad that my wife stayed home
with our children. She did work in the
early years of our marriage as a grade
school teacher, but she stayed home
virtually all of the time our children
were growing up, and I think it shows.
It is high time we fix this problem. It
is high time we correct the marriage
penalty for both the Allens and the
Browns in Utah, and families like them
all over the country. Today, we have
the means to do it. I say to my colleagues on the other side of the aisle:
There are no more excuses.
Again, I thank Chairman ROTH for
his insight and leadership on this important issue, and I urge my colleagues
to support final passage of this bill. I
urge President Clinton to sign it.
One last thing, and that is, when you
have a $4.3 trillion surplus in the budget, you know darn well somebody is
being taxed too much. Why can’t we at
least solve these inequities that are literally calling out to us for a solution?
Why can’t we make it clear that being
married should not be a disadvantage
to couples? Why don’t we make it clear
that we are going to treat married couples just as well as those who live together and are not married, who don’t
pay as much in taxes today?
These three families illustrate this as
well as I think we can illustrate it.
Why should the Allen family and the
Brown family pay $9,222, while the
Campbell-Clark family, just because
they live together—each of them single, and each of them earning $40,000—
why should they get a tax bill of $1,300
less than the other two families?
I urge the President to sign this bill.
I think it is the right thing to do.
Mr. President, I yield the floor.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Idaho.
f
PRAYERS AND THOUGHTS FOR
SENATOR PAUL COVERDELL
Mr. CRAIG. Mr. President, before I
deliver my remarks on the marriage
tax penalty, for just a moment, let me
say that our colleague, PAUL COVERDELL, is struggling at this moment.
Our prayers and thoughts are with him
and his wife Nancy as he struggles with
his health in an Atlanta hospital. He is
a champion of the issue of the marriage
penalty tax relief.
f
MARRIAGE PENALTY TAX RELIEF
Mr. CRAIG. Mr. President, certainly,
KAY BAILEY HUTCHISON, our colleague
from Texas, has led us on the issue of
the marriage penalty tax. I think probably she has sensitized all of us to it as
only a woman can. I mean that in the
sense of understanding the true balance that ought to be in this Tax Code
that isn’t in the Tax Code. She has
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
been persistent with the Congress and
with this Senate to assure that we develop a sense of equity and balance in
the Tax Code that our marriage penalty tax relief legislation will offer.
Who pays the marriage penalty? In
our country, about 22 million married
couples do. They are not wealthy. They
are modest- and middle-income families. In my State of Idaho, that is
129,710 families.
To really bring this home, if, from
the time a couple marries, they were to
put away, with interest, the difference
in the disparity of taxes between $1,000
and $1,400 per year, on the average, for
their first child, they could afford to
pay 3 years of his or her education at a
State institution in my State of Idaho.
So it is significant. It is important.
There is no question it would help, and
can help, the American family.
The usual suspects out there who are
opposed to this, I think, are using the
most tired and sad arguments against
tax relief. They simply are arguing
from a position of the wrong facts. We
have heard them whining about tax
cuts and saying the tax cuts are for the
rich and somehow you ought not give
the rich any opportunity. Of course, in
this instance they have simply missed
the mark, and they know it. They
know they are on the wrong side of this
issue.
Tax relief, in the area of the marriage penalty tax, helps working families. It ends discrimination against
married couples. It reduces the Tax
Code’s antifamily bias that no tax code
should have in it. We have always said
that the very foundation of our culture
and our country is the family, and yet
we take advantage of that union in the
Tax Code by causing them to pay more
in taxes.
Low- and middle-income married
couples are the ones who truly are hurt
by this penalty. On average, a married
couple hit by the marriage penalty will
pay about $1,400 more a year in taxes
than two single persons at the same
combined income. That is where the
penalty rests.
In total, the marriage penalty overcharges couples in this country $32 billion a year, according to the Congressional Budget Office—that is right, $32
billion a year—that could stay out
there with those young couples.
I use the example in my State of
Idaho that if they simply put it in a
bank, with interest, by the time their
first child is old enough to go to college, they can afford his first or her
first 3 years at a State institution in
my State.
I think those who oppose marriage
tax penalty relief oppose, frankly, all
tax relief. The more they can get to
spend on Government programs and
Government solutions—and go home to
their constituents and talk about what
wonderful things Government is doing
for them—somehow they think that
most of our citizens are either
undertaxed, and not giving enough to
Government for all those wonderful so-
lutions to their problems, or the current Tax Code is fair.
They are not worried about a Tax
Code that charges a family an extra
$1,400 or more, when a family certainly
needs that additional income as they
become a family unit. They are opposed to all tax relief. If you pay taxes,
somehow, in this argument, you are
rich; and the rich do not need the relief.
How many times have we heard that?
At least I have heard it in the good
number of years I have been in the Senate. Every time we talk about tax relief, somebody over there on the other
side of the aisle says: Gee, those darn
Republicans want to give that money
back to the rich, and the rich don’t
need tax relief.
Low- and middle-income families do
need tax relief. So the opposition on
the other side always ponies up some
kind of what I call tax-relief ‘‘lite’’
amendments to offer, so they can show
some degree of compassion. Yet at the
same time they offer nothing except a
new Government program.
Let me break it down into the three
most significant ways that the Tax
Code extracts the marriage penalty for
us to understand.
First of all, it is discrimination in
the standard deduction area. About
two-thirds of the taxpayers take the
standard deduction. For a married couple, the standard deduction this year is
$7,200. For two single taxpayers with
the same combined income, it is $8,600.
This is the first $392 of the marriage
penalty. Lower and middle-income taxpayers are more likely to take the
standard deduction than upper-income
persons. Many middle-income families
who itemize are still hurt by standard
deduction discrimination because the
amount of the standard deduction determines whether they itemize. In
other words, one element triggers the
other element in our Tax Code.
The Senate bill would provide relief
to 25 million couples by making the
standard deduction for married couples
filing jointly equal to the standard deduction for two singles with the same
combined income. That is a little complicated, but it is easy to understand
that for those who take the standard
deduction—and those tend to be the
lower and middle-income families—the
benefit is immediate and, as we have
said, is approximately $1,400 a year.
The second area deals with discrimination in the earned-income tax credit
area, the EITC. We are all familiar
with the EITC. It is supposed to reward
work, ease income tax and other tax
burdens, and supplement incomes for
low-income working families with children. It is astonishing, in a program
designed to help lower income families,
the phaseout schedule for EITC benefits again imposes an antimarriage,
antifamily penalty. This is the very
program Congress designed to help lowincome families. Yet when we look inside the code, the way the IRS has interpreted it and administers it, there is
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an antimarriage, antifamily penalty.
The Senate bill would begin addressing
marriage penalty inequity in the EITC
by first increasing the maximum credit
by $526, starting the phaseout range
$2,500 higher than it was at an income
level just above $15,000.
The third area of discrimination is in
the tax brackets. For the average couple paying a marriage penalty, bracket
discrimination charges them another
$1,000. Bracket discrimination usually
takes the lower income earned by one
spouse, which would be taxed in the 15percent bracket if he or she were single, and taxes it at the other spouse’s
28-percent rate. This devalues the
spouse and the spouse’s work that provides the second income for the family.
Of course, in some instances, both
spouses are professional and choose to
seek their profession in the marketplace. In other marriages, one spouse
simply wants to supplement the overall
family income to broaden the ability of
that family to earn, to save, to invest,
and to provide for its children. In this
instance, this particular structure of
the Tax Code actually devalues the
value of the income of that spouse who
goes into the marketplace to earn additional income for the family.
For folks with modest means, this
adds what we could easily call insult to
the very injury that the Tax Code levees to the taxpayer. Time after time on
this floor, we hear how many families
are forced to earn a second income to
make ends meet. Currently, the heavy
hand of Government has the first claim
on the second income. For anybody
who would choose to vote against this
particular provision, shame on them.
Especially shame on them if they then
turn around and argue that circumstances are so tough out there that
every family needs two incomes. Let us
work today to lessen that burden, to
make it less tough, to give that family
unit greater choices as to whether they
both want to work in the marketplace
or one would choose to stay home.
The Senate bill provides help for 21
million couples, including 3 million
senior citizens, by expanding the 15-to28 percent bracket for one couple to a
range equal to that for two singles. In
addition, this bill preserves the full effect of the family tax credits enacted
in the 1997 Taxpayers Relief Act. We
now find that particular provision taking effect. More and more middle-income families are slipping into the alternative minimum tax or the AMT. In
fact, even some EITC families are now
being affected by this. The AMT is already a dubious tax. It requires thousands of taxpayers to figure their returns according to two different tax
systems. I don’t think anyone really
intended the AMT to apply and wipe
out the family tax credits we enacted
in 1997, including the $500-per-child tax
credit, the HOPE education credit, the
lifetime earnings credit, and the ongoing dependency care credit. It is time
to cut back on the antifamily AMT,
and that is exactly what this provision
will do.
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
In conclusion, we want a Government
that is truly profamily. Certainly all of
us—and in a sincere way—want to
make sure our laws are profamily. Yet
those who will vote against the marriage tax penalty are talking about two
different systems. They are being very
inconsistent with honesty and integrity in debating this kind of an issue.
You cannot talk profamily on one side
of the issue and turn around and vote
against this provision that we will be
voting on on the floor this evening.
Our Tax Code says, unless we change
it tonight, don’t get married. And if
you do, you are going to pay higher
taxes. We say it is time we create equity in this equation. Our Tax Code
says you will pay a penalty if both
spouses work and you will be the most
heavily taxed if your incomes are
about equal. We say the best antipoverty program is a family and a job
in America, or two jobs in America
taxable at a lower rate, leaving more
money inside the family unit to provide for that family and those portions
of the American dream they seek to secure. We encourage our citizens to
dream a better dream, of a fairer and
freer society. Our Tax Code has a great
deal to say about the size and the scope
of their dreams.
I hope we will vote tonight to strike
a blow for a profamily, pro-American,
American-dream approach, not have
the Tax Code constantly confusing the
message and sending a negative signal.
We are going to pass it, I do believe,
and seize the opportunity.
In closing, I say to the President:
Come on. Quit playing the political
games you are playing right now. You
have to have this new spending program and this new spending program
with a multitrillion-dollar surplus.
Give the highest taxed generation in
history just a little break. When this
bill gets to your desk, sign it.
I yield the floor.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Virginia.
Mr. ROBB. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the Democratic
side be permitted to reclaim the 15
minutes accorded to the other side of
the aisle earlier today so that I may
speak at this particular moment.
Mr. CRAIG. Reserving the right to
object, and I will not, I ask unanimous
consent that Senator COLLINS retain 15
minutes in morning business prior to
the Interior bill following the comments of the Senator from Virginia.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
f
PRESCRIPTION DRUG AMENDMENT
ON THE MARRIAGE PENALTY
RECONCILIATION BILL
Mr. ROBB. Mr. President, I rise
today to speak about an amendment
that I submitted on Friday to the marriage penalty bill, which the Senate
will take up and vote on later today.
My amendment, which is cosponsored
by Senators KENNEDY, GRAHAM and
BRYAN, follows up on a similar proposal
I offered in April to the Senate budget
resolution that would have required
Congress to enact a new Medicare prescription drug benefit before considering any massive tax cuts. While a
procedural hurdle prevented that
amendment from passing, fifty-one
senators voted to waive a budget point
of order, indicating they favored it, and
sending the American people a strong
signal that a majority of the U.S. Senate thought we should put the needs of
our nation’s seniors before excessive
tax cuts.
The majority, however, has moved in
the opposite direction since then. This
past Friday, we passed a large tax bill
that would phase out the tax on the estates of those seniors who die, but did
nothing to provide needed prescription
drugs that can preserve the lives of
those seniors who are living. Because I
had cosponsored earlier legislation to
ease the estate tax burden in order to
preserve family farms and small businesses, I voted for this bill. Even
though all of our Democratic amendments were defeated—and look forward
to crafting more equitable legislation
to address these same concerns after
the President vetoes the bill we passed
Friday.
The bill before the Senate now, however, is very different. Under the guise
of eliminating the ‘‘marriage penalty,’’
the majority has brought a bill to the
floor that would devote over half of its
benefits to people who either aren’t
married, or who are actually receiving
right now a tax benefit, or ‘‘bonus,’’ for
being married. As I have stated previously, Mr. President, this takes a lot
of chutzpah.
Mr. President, I believe we ought to
eliminate the marriage penalty for
those who actually suffer the marriage
penalty and need the relief most. With
all the rhetoric from the other side of
the aisle about eliminating the marriage penalty, one might think that
they’d share my view, and want to pass
a bill that would actually focus on the
penalty.
But a closer examination of the Republican bill reveals that it isn’t quite
what it’s described to be. Mr. President, there are in fact 65 provisions in
the current tax code that contain a
marriage penalty, including Social Security. The bill reported from the Finance Committee on a straight partyline vote takes care of one marriage
penalty provision completely and two
others partially, and leaves the other
62 marriage penalties untouched. The
Democratic bill addresses all 65 provisions, and takes care of the entire penalty for almost everyone.
Mr. President, it’s time that we set
our priorities straight. We ought not to
be devoting billions of dollars of the
surplus to individuals who currently
suffer no marriage penalty whatever
when we’ve done nothing to help those
that suffer from the ‘‘senior citizens’
drug penalty’’—the high prices our nation’s seniors are forced to pay for prescription drugs.
July 17, 2000
The amendment that I’ve offered
would force Congress to address these
priorities. It simply says that the tax
bill before the Senate today won’t take
effect until Congress has also fulfilled
its responsibility to enact a meaningful
Medicare prescription drug benefit. My
amendment won’t prevent Congress
from enacting marriage penalty relief
this year, nor will it keep a single married couple from enjoying the tax benefits in this bill. What it will do is ensure that we don’t backtrack from the
Senate’s vote to enact a prescription
drug benefit before we do major tax
cuts.
Let me say, Mr. President, that this
isn’t just rhetoric. The problems faced
by our nation’s seniors in affording
prescription drugs are immediate and
real. I’d like to remind the Senate of a
story I heard from a physician in my
state recently about a patient who was
splitting her doses of Tamoxifin—a
breast cancer drug—with two of her
friends who also had breast cancer, but
couldn’t afford the medication. As a result, all three women had inadequate
doses of the medication.
Or consider the story of a disabled father of three from Pennington Gap,
Virginia, who broke his neck several
years ago, and went from making
$50,000 a year to $800 a month in disability benefits. While he qualifies for
Medicare, he’s forced to choose each
month between spending nearly half of
his disability benefit on prescription
drugs, or helping out his family, because Medicare offers no coverage for
his medications.
These Virginians are not alone in
their troubles. The average Medicare
beneficiary will spend $1100 on prescription drugs this year. Most of them
won’t have adequate prescription drug
coverage to help them cover these
crushing costs. And the numbers of
those that do have coverage are dropping rapidly.
Despite the suggestions of some of
my colleagues, this problem isn’t limited solely to the poor. One in four
Medicare beneficiaries with a high income—defined as $45,000 a year for a
couple—has no coverage for prescription drugs. And while some seniors do
have coverage, nearly half of them lack
coverage for the entire year, making
them extremely vulnerable to catastrophic drug costs.
Complicating this matter for the elderly is the ‘‘senior citizens’ drug penalty’’ that seniors without drug coverage are forced to pay. Most working
Americans who are insured through the
private sector pay less than the full retail price for prescription drugs. This is
because insurers generally contract
with private sector entities that negotiate better prices for drugs, and pass
on the power of group purchasing to
their customers.
Seniors lack this option, however,
and must still pay full price for their
drugs. One recent study showed that
seniors without drug coverage typically pay 15 percent more than people
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
with coverage. And the percentage of
Medicare beneficiaries without drug
coverage who report not being able to
afford a needed drug is about 5 times
higher than those with coverage.
This ‘‘senior citizens’ drug penalty,’’
in my view, is unconscionable. Senior
citizens are more reliant on drugs, and
have higher drug costs, than any other
segment of the population. They deserve to have the same bargaining
power that benefits other Americans.
Mr. President, in April, the other
side spoke against my budget amendment, claiming that there was already
adequate language in the Republican
budget resolution to ensure that we
pass a prescription drug benefit this
year. At the time, they pointed to the
$40 billion reserve fund which was included in the budget resolution that
the Committee had reported, arguing
that this would provide ample money
to enact a prescription drug benefit
and offer tax relief.
Republicans asked, in essence, that
we trust them that the Senate won’t
put tax cuts before our nation’s seniors. Let me say that I do trust my
good friends on the other side of the
aisle. But to borrow a line from Ronald
Reagan, I believe we should trust—but
verify. That requires deeds as well as
words.
Mr. President, our nation’s seniors
deserve better than this. In April, at
least fifty-one senators felt the same
way. I urge every one of them, as well
as senators who opposed my amendment then because they thought the
$40 billion reserve fund would guarantee a prescription drug benefit, to
support my amendment now. With its
passage, we’ll be able to eliminate both
the true ‘‘marriage penalty’’ and the
‘‘senior citizens’ drug penalty.’’
With that, Mr. President, I yield the
floor.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Maine is recognized.
Ms. COLLINS. I believe under the
previous order I will be recognized to
speak.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is recognized for 15 minutes.
f
CONCERN FOR SENATOR PAUL
COVERDELL
Ms. COLLINS. Mr. President, I want
to express the sorrow that is in my
heart, and I know in the hearts of all of
my colleagues and, indeed, everybody
who works in the Senate, about the sad
news of the unexpected ill health of our
friend and colleague, Senator PAUL
COVERDELL of Georgia. My heart and
my prayers go out to him, his family,
his staff, his constituents, and all of
the many people who care so much
about our good friend. He will be in our
hearts and in our prayers. I know I
speak for all of my colleagues when I
wish him a speedy recovery.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Maine is recognized.
(The remarks of Ms. COLLINS and Mr.
CRAIG pertaining to the introduction of
S. 2879 are located in today’s RECORD
under ‘‘Statements on Introduced Bills
and Joint Resolutions.’’)
f
CONCLUSION OF MORNING
BUSINESS
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Morning
business is closed.
f
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Under
the previous order, the hour of 3 p.m.
having arrived, the Senate will now resume consideration of H.R. 4578, which
the clerk will report.
The assistant legislative clerk read
as follows:
A bill (H.R. 4578) making appropriations
for the Department of the Interior and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Washington.
Mr. GORTON. Mr. President, we are
now back for the final 3 and one-quarter hours of debate on amendments to
the Interior appropriations bill. Any
Member who reserved an amendment
to that bill may present it between
now and 6:15 this evening, at which
time, by unanimous consent, we go to
the marriage penalty bill for what may
be an extended series of votes. Any of
the amendments reserved on the Interior bill will be voted on, if, in fact, the
vote is necessary, tomorrow morning.
I list 12 amendments that were reserved for debate during this period of
time. I am informed by staff that we
have settled 4 of them. That leaves
eight amendments: two by the Senator
from New Mexico, Mr. BINGAMAN; one
by the Senator from California, Mrs.
BOXER; one by the Senator from Nevada, Mr. BRYAN; one by the Senator
from Connecticut, Mr. LIEBERMAN; one
by the Senator from Oklahoma, Mr.
NICKLES; one by the Senator from
Rhode Island, Mr. REED; one by the
Senator from Wyoming, Mr. THOMAS.
Curiously enough, most of these Senators who have said they will be here
from between 5 o’clock and 6 o’clock
p.m., which takes a considerable portion of the debate time, are away. I
think some of those eight amendments
I have listed will themselves be settled
without debate or by agreement. If any
of the seven Senators whose names I
have just mentioned are within hearing
and sight of this debate, I urge that
Senator to reach the Senate floor
promptly. At this point they have a
real opportunity to present their
amendments. Later on, they are likely
to be very constricted as to time.
Therefore, I suggest the absence of a
quorum.
The PRESIDING OFFICER (Ms. COLLINS). The clerk will call the roll.
The assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
Mr. THOMPSON. Madam President, I
ask unanimous consent that the order
for the quorum call be rescinded.
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The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
Mr. THOMPSON. Madam President,
as we debate this bill to provide funding for the Department of the Interior
in the next fiscal year, I would like to
discuss an issue that is of increasing
concern to me: our underinvestment in
our national parks.
There are 379 national parks in the
United States and U.S. territories, covering over 80 million acres. These parks
provide Americans with an opportunity
to enjoy activities such as hiking,
camping, white water rafting, or horseback riding in some of the most beautiful sites in the world. The Great
Smoky Mountains National Park in
my home State of Tennessee is often
referred to as the crown jewel of the
national park system, and for good reason.
But one can’t help but be concerned
about what is happening in our parks
today. I have seen first hand the problems associated with air pollution,
traffic congestion, and invasive species
in our parks. Folks come to the Smokies to escape the big city and breathe
the clean mountain air. Unfortunately,
there are too many days now when the
air quality in the Smokies is worse
than in major cities. Already this year,
the park has recorded 13 days with
unhealthy ozone levels. Who would believe that visiting a national park
could be hazardous to your health?
Air pollution is also diminishing the
experience of visitors in the park. People visit the Smokies for the magnificent mountain vistas. Unfortunately,
the pollution reduces their visibility
not only by affecting how far they can
see from a scenic overlook, but also
how well they can see. Ground level
ozone washes out the bright colors of
the leaves in the fall and the flowers in
the spring. These air quality problems
have landed the Great Smoky Mountains National Park on the list of 10
most endangered national parks compiled by the National Parks and Conservation Association.
Another major threat facing many of
our national parks, including the
Smokies, is damage from invasive species. Organisms that are not native to
parks are finding their way in and are
killing wildlife. Virtually all of the
frasier firs on top of Klingman’s Dome
in the Smokies are dead. At first
glance, it would appear that they were
killed by fire, but that is not the case.
These trees were killed by the balsam
woolly adelgid which is not native to
the Smokies and has no natural predator there.
These and similar problems afflict
our entire national park system. That
is why I’m pleased that the appropriations bill before us today recognizes
these serious threats by providing $11
million for the National Park Service’s
Natural Resource Challenge. This
money will help fund air and water
quality studies in our parks. It will
also fund efforts to address the problems caused by non-native invasive
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
species. I thank the Senators from
Washington and West Virginia for their
attention to these needs. I especially
thank Senator GORTON for his leadership as chairman of this very important subcommittee.
I am also growing increasingly concerned that our national parks are
showing the wear and tear of neglect.
Each year our parks are host to more
and more visitors. In 1998, almost 300
million people visited our national
parks. Ten million of those visitors
went to the Smokies, making it the
most visited national park in the country. That is more visitors than the
Grand Canyon and Yosemite combined—which rank second and third in
terms of park visitation.
We in Tennessee and North Carolina
welcome these visitors to our beautiful
mountains. National parks are here to
be used and enjoyed. But our parks are
laboring under their popularity. One
might say our parks are being loved to
death. We must face up to the stresses
to infrastructure that result from increased visitation. More visitors cause
more wear and tear on the trails,
campgrounds, and roads. Growing visitation also requires higher staffing levels in the parks since more visitors
mean more stranded hikers that need
to be rescued, more comfort stations
that need to be cleaned, and more trash
that needs to be picked up.
Unfortuantely, park budgets have
not kept pace with increases in visitation. The National Park Service estimates that there is currently a $4.3
million maintenance backlog. Park
Service staff are struggling to do more
with fewer resources.
Fortunately, they have been able to
rely on a number of organizations for
help such as friends groups, the National Park Foundation and other cooperating associations. These organizations raise money to fund maintenance
and educational projects within the
parks.
I am proud that the Friends of the
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
is held up as the model friends group
for the country. Over the last 7 years,
the Friends of the Smokies has raised
$6 million—$1.5 million last year alone.
This money has come from donation
boxes in the park, license plate sales,
telethons and direct contributions.
And, it is used for a variety of projects.
For example, the Friends just produced
a new orientation film to welcome
park visitors. The Friends funded the
restoration of the historic Mount
Cammerer Fire Tower. And, the
Friends help organize and manage volunteer projects in the park. When a
team of volunteers goes out to work on
a trail, it’s the Friends of the Smokies
that buys the materials needed to do
the job. The hard work and generosity
on the part of the Friends of the Smokies is critical to assisting the Park
Service officials maintain our valuable
natural resource.
Just as important as the financial
contributions to our national parks are
the generous donations of time. This
year alone, volunteers will donate almost 75,000 hours valued at $1.1 million
to run the visitor centers and help
maintain trails and campgrounds in
the Great Smoky Mountains National
Park. Because the Smokies was a gift
from the residents of Tennessee and
North Carolina to the Federal Government, citizens living near the park
have a strong sense of ownership. They
want to volunteer to take care of their
park.
Several years ago, Congress also recognized the need to increase resources
to our national park system, and we
passed legislation to provide the Park
Service with new sources of funding for
maintenance projects. This new law allows national parks to retain most of
the entrance and other fees they may
charge, and use that money for visitor
services. Fee revenue can be used to
fund maintenance projects or to pay
seasonal employees, but it cannot be
used to fund basic operations. This
year, Smokies’ fees will generate $1.9
million over and above the park’s $13.2
million annual appropriated budget.
Fee revenue, volunteer hours, and donations are critical to keeping our
parks running, but they are just not
enough. Without an adequate operations budget and enough permanent
full-time staff, the Park Service lacks
the capability to handle the generosity
of groups like the Friends of the Smokies.
Again, I compliment my colleagues
from Washington and West Virginia for
recognizing the most pressing needs of
our national park system by providing
a substantial increase in the Park
Service’s basic operations budget in
this bill. The bill before us includes
over $1.4 billion for the National Park
Service. That’s an increase of more
than $80 million over FY 2000.
But as impressive a job as the managers have done here today, I’m sure
they would both agree with me when I
say that Congress still must do better
for our national parks. I believe that
the Federal Government has a fundamental responsibility to ensure the
protection of these natural resources
for the enjoyment of both the current
and future generations. But we are not
meeting that responsibility fully. We
must provide our park officials with
adequate resources to maintain the
trails and campgrounds. We must give
them better tools to combat threats
like air pollution.
As Congress debates what to do with
the projected budget surplus, I think
we should start by determining whether government is meeting its fundamental responsibilities now. If we see
that we are neglecting certain responsibilities, then we need to make fulfilling those obligations a priority.
I believe that increasing our investment in our national parks is a priority. I intend to work closely with my
colleagues in the years to come to ensure that Congress provides the funding necessary to protect our precious
July 17, 2000
natural resources for the enjoyment of
my grandchildren and their grandchildren.
I yield the floor.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Nevada is recognized.
Mr. REID. Madam President, before
my friend leaves the floor, I want to
tell him how very much I appreciate
his statement. In years past, I offered
amendments when we did not have a
budget surplus to increase funding for
our park system. I hope next year we
can work together in a bipartisan fashion to increase significantly the funding for our National Park System.
I have not had the good fortune to be
in the park to which the Senator referred, the Great Smoky Mountain National Park, but I have been to a number of national parks. For example, the
living conditions our park rangers have
to put up with in our national parks is
a disgrace. My colleague should see
what park rangers live in at the Grand
Canyon National Park. They are from
World War II. They look like icehouses;
they are square. It is disgraceful.
We only have one national park in
Nevada. It is one of the newer ones, so
I really do not have the right to complain as many do, but we have so many
things that need to be done there. We
do not have a visitors center. Interpretive trails have not been built. There
are parts of our great National Park
System that we have closed as a result
of dangerous conditions. The Park
Service simply does not have the resources to keep up.
I commend and applaud my friend
from Tennessee. He has given a great
statement. I look forward to next year.
Perhaps we can work together to come
up with a funding formula that would
be permanent in nature to take care of
the $5 billion backlog in our National
Park System.
Mr. THOMPSON. Madam President, I
thank my friend from Nevada for those
comments. This is something upon
which I believe we can all agree. Even
those who view the role of Government
to be a limited one must agree that
there are certain basic obligations and
functions the Federal Government has.
Of course, national defense is one of
them; infrastructure is one of them.
Our national parks are a precious resource that we must all protect.
They are, as the Senator indicates,
being attacked from so many different
directions right now. We are taking
them for granted and slowly, but surely, they are falling into disrepair, and
they are being damaged environmentally. We in the Smokies have a
particular problem with the weather
patterns, for example. Not only do we
have some old coal-fired plants in the
area, but we have a weather pattern
that brings the pollution in from other
parts of the country that just seems to
hover over that particular area. We
have days where there is more pollution on top of the Smoky Mountains
than there is in downtown New York
City. It is an increasing problem. Hopefully, as my colleague suggests, we can
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
join together and do even more next
year.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The
Democratic leader.
Mr. DASCHLE. Madam President,
first, I thank our distinguished assistant Democratic leader for his graciousness once again in providing me the opportunity to say a couple of words this
evening.
f
MARRIAGE TAX PENALTY RELIEF
Mr. DASCHLE. Madam President,
the Senate will be voting on two competing marriage penalty relief proposals. The choice really could not be
more clear. I want to talk a little bit
about that choice this afternoon. The
Republican bill has very little to do
with the marriage penalty.
In fact, I was just commenting that if
the Republicans were trying to treat
an illness, they would be sued for malpractice—given the bill they are proposing this afternoon—malpractice because they are not curing the disease.
In fact, in some ways they are causing
the disease, this marriage penalty disease, to be even more problematic,
more difficult. They are actually creating another disease—a singles penalty. We need to be aware of the repercussions of what the Republicans are
attempting to do with their legislation
this afternoon. The singles penalty is
something I will talk a little bit more
about.
To begin, I don’t think there is any
doubt that if you asked all 100 Senators: should we fix the marriage penalty, the answer would be emphatically
yes. The question is, How do we fix it,
and are we really intent on fixing it?
Our Republican colleagues only deal
with three of the marriage penalty provisions incorporated in the law today.
If you were going to completely eliminate the entire marriage penalty, you
would have to deal not with 3 but with
65 of the provisions incorporated in the
tax law that have caused the imbalance
or the inequity to exist today. The Republicans have only dealt with three.
Yet the cost to the Treasury of their
plan—the one we will vote on today—is
$248 billion overall.
I don’t know what it would cost if
you were going to try to fix all 65 under
the
Republican
plan.
Republican
amendments were filed addressing six
additional provisions, totaling $81 billion, in the Finance Committee. The
remaining 56 provisions, untouched in
the Republican bill, not addressed at
all, have yet to be calculated in terms
of what the cost might be with regard
to the approach our Republican colleagues use.
The second chart spells out what
that means. If you only deal with 3 of
the 65 provisions, this is what happens.
Take a married couple with a joint income of $70,000. Under current law, if
the couple were single and they each
paid their share of the tax, their tax
total would be $8,407, depicted on the
chart. Yet because they are kicked into
a higher tax bracket when they reach
that $70,000 joint income level, their
tax is not $8,407; their tax is $9,532. So
the marriage penalty is $1,125 under
current tax law.
Here is what the Republicans do. The
Republicans will provide, under their
bill, 39-percent relief. That is all you
get. Here they are, spending $248 billion, and they can’t even do it right.
They can’t even fix all 65 provisions.
They fix three. So you leave the balance, under the Republican bill, for another day, apparently.
We don’t believe that ought to be the
way to fix the marriage penalty. We
think you ought to fix the marriage
penalty, if you are saying you are
going to fix it. We provide 100-percent
relief, $1,125 in relief for that couple
making $70,000 a year. That is what we
do. That is why we believe it is important for people to know there is a clear
choice tonight when we vote on those
plans: You can vote for the $248 billion
Republican plan that fixes 3 or you can
vote for the Democratic plan that provides for 100-percent relief and fixes all
65.
I think it is very important for us to
understand that not only is there a
choice in trying to address the marriage penalty, but there is also another
problem.
We know how doctors try to fix one
disease and sometimes create another
side effect they had not anticipated because they prescribed the wrong medicine. We have a true illustration of prescription drugs as we know it in this
country today, with a $248 billion fix
when you could do it for a fraction of
the cost. Not only that, their prescription doesn’t cure the disease. Not only
does it not cure the disease, it actually
creates a new one.
I guarantee my colleagues, within
the next few years, you will have somebody come to the floor and say: Now we
have to fix the singles penalty. It is
broken. We may need another $248 billion tax plan to fix the singles penalty.
This is what happens under the Republican plan. You have a joint income
for that couple of $70,000. Current law
requires their tax liability of $10,274.
The Republican plan would provide
$8,743, leaving the $443 relief I mentioned a moment ago.
Let’s take a widow, a widow who is
making that $70,000 income—not a couple but a widow. She has a tax liability
under current law of $14,172. Yet her
penalty, a singles penalty, would go
from $3,898 under current law to $5,429
under the Republican plan.
What happens with this tax plan for a
single person under certain circumstances—take a widow, a widow
who is already probably faced with all
kinds of serious financial pressures.
Her tax burden goes up by $1,531, a new
singles penalty created—I assume inadvertently—because our Republican colleagues are rushing to try to fix a marriage penalty, and they can’t do it
right. That is why this vote this afternoon is so important.
S7009
The Democrats will be offering a plan
that recognizes another inequity in the
Republican plan. I have already talked
about two: First, the importance of
recognizing that out of the 65 provisions, the Republican plan only deals
with 3; and then secondly, how we now
have created—I assume inadvertently—
this singles penalty.
Look at the third problem with the
Republican plan that has caused us to
want to come to the floor to offer the
alternative we will tonight. If you are
making $20,000, the amount of tax relief you get under the Republican plan
is $567. That is all you get. But if you
are making $20,000, under the Democratic plan, your tax reduction, the
amount of relief, is $2,164. If you are
making $30,000 a year, according to the
Joint Committee on Taxation, which
has analyzed this, under the Republican plan you get $800. Under the
Democratic plan, you get $4,191. Why?
Because we fix the marriage penalty.
We provide entire relief, all 65 provisions.
Look at what happens if you are
making $50,000. I don’t know what the
Republicans have as a problem with
those who are making $50,000, but they
are sure penalizing them here. You
only get $240 under the Republican plan
in relief. Why you would want to penalize somebody making $50,000, I don’t
know. Under the Democratic plan, you
get $1,913 in relief.
Let us skip all the way over to the
other end of the spectrum. This probably tells it best.
If you are providing real relief, you
are going to go to those people who
need the relief the most, those people
in the $30,000 to $50,000 category. Under
the Republican plan, if you are making
more than $200,000, that is when you
start kicking in to real money. You get
$1,335 in relief there. But if you make
$50,000 in income, you get $240. That is
the third reason we are so concerned
about this Republican plan.
Under the Republican plan, you get
$1,335 in relief if you are making tons
of money. If you are making $50,000, as
are most people in the country—couples—you are going to get $240.
We are concerned for those three
problems. That is why we are offering
our alternative tonight. The Democratic marriage penalty relief plan allows married couples to file separately
or jointly—another very important aspect: Give them the flexibility. Let
them decide what is most helpful to
them.
That is how we avoid the so-called
singles penalty, not the Republican
plan. It eliminates all marriage tax
penalties for taxpayers earning $100,000
or less, 100 percent. It reduces all marriage tax penalties for those taxpayers
earning up to $150,000 and does not expand the so-called marriage bonus or
the singles penalty that we are actually creating inadvertently today.
I want to show one last chart that
probably makes the case as well as I
can. The marriage penalty bill proposed by the Republican plan deals
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
with three. The Democratic alternative
deals with the standard deduction and
the problem we have with the marriage
penalty and the standard deduction;
earned income tax credits; child tax
credits; Social Security benefits; rate
brackets; IRA deductions, student loan
interest deductions, and the 56 other
marriage penalty provisions that exacerbate the marriage penalty today. We
do them all. The Republican’s do three.
There is one other nonsubstantive
but procedural concern I have, which I
am compelled to bring up. The regular
order in the Senate right now is the
marriage penalty. We ought to be taking this bill up under the regular order,
but we are not doing that. I think everyone here in the Chamber knows
why. We are not doing that because the
Republicans don’t want to vote on tax
amendments. That is why we are not
doing it. They are using the brick wall
they built around their marriage penalty, this impenetrable wall. So this is
an up-or-down vote, a take-it-or-leaveit vote. You either like it or don’t; you
either take it or leave it. That is the
way it is going to be. We are not going
to give the Democrats an amendable
vehicle. We are going to give them a
vehicle they can’t amend, a vehicle
that will allow the one alternative; and
we are not going to debate tax policy,
even though this goes to the heart of
tax policy.
So for the second time in less than a
week we are going to be voting on a
bill that I think deserves to be defeated. We should have defeated the estate tax bill. I will offer to Senator
LOTT that I am willing to sit down
today and negotiate with him and the
Finance Committee Democrats and Republicans to come up with a bill the
President will sign. That isn’t going to
happen with the bill they passed last
week. This bill is going to get vetoed,
too. This bill will be vetoed, and it will
be vetoed for good reason. It doesn’t fix
the marriage penalty. It costs $248 billion. It helps those at the high end and
leaves everyone else in the lurch. It
creates a singles penalty. That isn’t
the way to legislate. That is why we
normally have amendments—to try to
fix problems that were caused on purpose or inadvertently.
I am hopeful the majority will take
great care before they pass the bill
that they are going to be pressing this
evening. I hope they will work with us
to come up with an alternative that
the President will sign. We can do
things the right way and we can enact
them into law and provide meaningful
accomplishment and meaningful relief
and meaningful help to victims of the
marriage penalty. Or we can simply
make more statements about how some
in this Senate prefer simply to help
those at the very top of the income
scale, once again, whether they need it
or not. That is our choice. I hope Senators will take great care in making
their choice, and I look forward to the
debate and vote later this evening.
Again, I thank the Senator from Nevada for yielding the floor.
I yield the floor.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Washington is recognized.
Mr. GORTON. Madam President, I
suggest the absence of a quorum.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The
clerk will call the roll.
The bill clerk proceeded to call the
roll.
Mr. HELMS. Madam President, I ask
unanimous consent that the order for
the quorum call be rescinded.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from North Carolina is recognized.
Mr. HELMS. I thank the Chair.
f
A SMASHING SUCCESS
Mr. HELMS. Madam President, a
noted sports figure in American sports
history once commented that ‘‘Bragging ain’t bragging if you can prove
it.’’
On that basis, I want to brag a little
bit about North Carolina which has had
its share of top sports figures—perhaps
more than our share when you consider
such outstanding sports figures, past
and present, as Arnold Palmer, Catfish
Hunter, Charlie ‘‘Choo-Choo’’ Justice,
Michael Jordan, Richard Petty, David
Thompson, Sonny Jurgensen, Dean
Smith, Everett Case, Joe Gibbs, Enos
Slaughter, and Wallace Wade, who by
the way took two teams from Duke
University to the Rose Bowl. But he
didn’t have to go very far for the second one because it was held in Durham,
NC, right after Pearl Harbor. It was
feared that the Japanese might try to
bomb the stadium out in California, so
they moved the whole thing across the
country to North Carolina—the only
time the Rose Bowl was not played in
Pasadena.
But I don’t recall any previous teenager—from anywhere—who has been
described as a ‘‘tennis phenomenon
who walks in Chris Evert’s footsteps’’.
But that’s the accolade handed 14-yearold Alli Baker of Raleigh my hometown—in
the
May
edition
of
Metromagazine in a sparkling and detailed piece by Patrik Jonsson, writing
from Boca Raton, Florida.
As I read the tribute to Alli Baker, I
was reminded that this young lady is a
great granddaughter of the late Lenox
Dial Baker, one of America’s leading
orthopedic surgeons. Dr. Baker almost
single-handedly founded a children’s
hospital, later named for him, at Duke
University Medical Center in Durham,
where hundreds of crippled children’s
lives have brightened and their lives
improved because of Dr. Baker’s selfless and loving interest in them.
I am going to let the article about
Alli Baker speak for itself. Therefore, I
ask unanimous consent that the tribute to the amazing 14-year-old Alli
Baker by Patrik Jonsson be printed in
the RECORD.
There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in the
RECORD, as follows:
July 17, 2000
TEENAGE TENNIS PHENOMENON WALKS IN
CHRIS EVERT’S FOOTSTEPS
[From Metro Magazine, May 2000]
BOCA RATON, FLA.—Alli Baker is fuming.
Frustrated during a drill at the Evert Tennis
Academy, the 14-year-old tennis phenomenon
from Raleigh huffs and puffs as if she’s about
to blow somebody’s house down. Then a few
easy ground strokes go into the net. That’s
it. Baker’s Volkl racket goes flying into a
patch of grass. Conversations hush. Eyes
glance sideways at the lithe, freckled Southern girl whom everybody knows as the number one ranked 14-year-old in the country,
and the highest-ranked female player yet to
come out of North Carolina. The court mood
tenses the way it used to when John
McEnroe yelled at refs, or when the young
German Boris Becker pumped his fists in defiance. This is just practice. Still, being Alli
Baker’s rival right now seems like a very,
very bad idea.
‘‘It’s true, I get very competitive,’’ says
Baker, who is also the seventh-ranked 16and-under player in the country, an hour before the brief blow-up on the court. ‘‘I love to
win. It’s my greatest strength.’’
Tennis my not be a gritty contact sport,
but it is, above all, a game of mind over
body. Anger and other unchecked emotions
are widely known top scatter the concentrations of even the most experienced players in
clutch situations. But the coaches here already know that North Carolina’s newest
sports star hones her on-court emotions,
polishes them like treasure, and beams them
into that fuzzy yellow ball, straight back at
her opponents on the other side of the net at
center court. Indeed, she’s beaten some of
the world’s best tennis players in her age
group by funneling her competitive angst
into devastating trickery.
‘‘She’s a very mature player,’’ says her
coach, John Evert, the brother of Wimbledon
champ Chris Evert, and a 17-year coach in
his own right. ‘‘Her strength is that she figures out how to play exactly to her opponents’ weaknesses, and she doesn’t let herself get into the dumps.’’
Last year, Baker won five tournament tie
breakers in a row, an almost unheard of feat
that epitomizes her unwillingness to lose.
‘‘I’ve yet to see her play in a tournament,’’
one of the other Evert Academy coaches confides. ‘‘But they say she is very, very hungry.’’
Don’t get the wrong idea, though. Off the
court, Alli Baker is about as sweet as strawberry pie, as humble as corn pone. Freckled,
tan and every bit the exuberant teenager,
she talks about fashion, missing home, seeing the world (Paris is her favorite city),
bonding with tennis stars Monica Seles and
Martina Hingis, how she loves her mentor,
Chris Evert, and the life-affirming step she’s
getting ready to take into professional tennis. She’s making ‘‘a million new friends’’
while coaxing her Raleigh confidantes to
hurry down to where it’s nice and warm and
where the beaches stretch on and on.
So far, it’s been a whirlwind tour from the
halls of Raleigh’s Daniels Middle School to
the star-studded tennis courts of SoFla.
HANGING IN WEST BOCA
It’s here—to the Evert Tennis Academy,
near some of the world’s largest country
clubs, where the average annual income is
$65,000 and where the warm prevailing winds
collect tall afternoon thunder clouds over
the coast—that Alli decided to come this
spring after it became clear that to follow
her dream, she had to follow it right out of
North Carolina.
Although the family will stay in Raleigh,
where dad Bill Baker is a vice president for
a major construction firm, the family just
bought a house across Glades Avenue in west
July 17, 2000
S7011
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
Boca as a permanent base here. Baker and
her family made the decision after acknowledging the lack of a steady stream of crack
practice partners and full-time coaches in
Raleigh. While Bill works and helps shuttle
their second daughter, 11-year-old Lenox, to
her soccer games, mom Leigh Baker has
found a permanent seat on the red-eye to
Boca.
Of course, there were some questions
among family friends: How could the Bakers
send a 13-year-old (her birthday is in April)
off to fend for herself in such a competitive,
cutthroat world? Bill Baker has an easy answer: ‘‘She called yesterday from a hotel
room overlooking Key Biscayne. She said,
‘Dad, I’m here looking our over the bay and
the blue water. It’s so beautiful here.’ I
think she’s going to be all right.’’
If Baker has what it takes to be an international tennis star, Evert Academy is
where the transformation from sharpshooting local kid to Grand Slam winning
hardball player will likely take place. It’s a
place where the phrase, ‘‘Yeah, Agassi decided not to come down today,’’ seems rote.
Don’t be surprised to see top-ranked players
such as France’s Sebastian Grosjean and
Vince Spadea sweating through a four-hour
practice. Tiny, but fiery Amanda Coetzer
shows up here from time to time to practice—and to show the reverent young ones
how it’s done.
On these finely groomed courts nestled
amidst swaying coconut palms is also where
Chris Evert practices with students three
times a week, and where there’s a lyrical
constant of English, French, Spanish and
even Czech spoken over the grunts of determined players returning smashes. Bordered
by dozens of clay and hard courts, flanked by
a beige dormitory hall, this tucked-away facility is what the doorstep to the big time
now looks like for Alli Baker.
‘‘Her dream is to be the top-ranked tennis
player in the world,’’ says Bill Baker at his
Raleigh office overlooking Falls of the Neuse
Road. ‘‘We knew that wouldn’t happen if she
stayed here. She’s doing all this herself. All
that we’re doing is making the sacrifices to
provide her with the opportunities to pursue
this dream. Sometimes it’s hard as a parent
to not get emotionally involved. But in the
end, the fire to do it has to come from within
her.’’
STYLE POINTS
Naturally athletic, Baker picked tennis
over other sports for reasons perhaps girls
can best understand. First, it’s not so—she
searches for the word—‘‘tomboy-ish.’’ The
outfits, in other words, look great. Plus,
there’s no physical contact, only the
physicality of pressurized felt ball against
tight catgut, the action crashing back and
forth across the net in an elaborate joust. It
is a game you can win by using your mind to
imbue the body with the power of wit, intensity and strategy.
‘‘I think it’s the best game out there for
girls,’’ she says. ‘‘You can play hard and be
super-competitive—and you can look good
doing it.’’
Indeed, Baker already has the fresh, jaunty
look that has potential sponsors swooning.
With the exception of Adidas (clothes) and
Volkl (racket), Baker has so far turned down
major sponsorships. In April, she unofficially
entered the pro circuit at a minor qualifying
event. This spring, she will play pro tourneys
in Little Rock and Hilton Head. But she’s
still an amateur, meaning she can’t take any
winnings home yet. Still, it’s at those tournaments, as well as at her new home base
here in Boca, where she’s getting the first
real taste of her new life and where she is, as
Bill Baker says, ‘‘meeting a lot of people who
have been where she wants to go—including
some who made it and some who didn’t.’’
Impressed with Baker’s natural talent, intense competitiveness and impressive number of wins against tough players, the United
States Tennis Association and John Evert,
now Baker’s development coach, ‘‘recruited’’
her into the program.
‘‘She has shown great skill and promise,
but this is the time for her to get on the
court and work hard, because this is where
it’s going to get tougher now,’’ says Ricardo
Acuna, USTA’s Southeast region coach, who
oversees Baker’s overall training program.
For coaches like Evert and Acuna, right
now is when the ball meets the clay for the
great-granddaughter of the late Sports Hall
of Famer Lenox Baker, the famed Duke orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine pioneer, and the granddaughter of single-handicappers Robert F. Baker and Robert M.
Hines of Raleigh, the five-time Carolina
Country Club Senior Championship winner.
Wedged between childhood and the muscular
16- and 17-year-olds playing above her, this is
when this next generation Baker has to concentrate more on fundamentals than winning—a difficult task for someone who has
gotten used to eating victories for lunch. She
says she still lags behind some of her key
competitors as far as skills go. ‘‘Ground
strokes are about the only part of my game
I’m really good at,’’ she admits.
‘‘She’s had a pretty easy time with practices up to this point, where she’s been able
to turn it up and win matches,’’ says Evert.
‘‘But now I’m trying to figure out how she
can match that intensity during practice. At
this point, I’m even ready to cut back on her
practice time to foster that intensity. For
Alli right now, quality is more important
than quantity.’’
THE CHRISSIE FACTOR
Although other tennis academies offer
similarly competitive programs, here Baker
is becoming a member of the Famed Evert
family tennis tradition, which began with
legendary tennis coach Jim Evert’s longtime directorship of Fort Lauderdale’s public
Holiday Park tennis program from which
Chris Evert emanated. Indeed, it may have
been the ‘‘Chrissie presence’’ that finally
convinced the Bakers to make the move.
Having a role model like Chris Evert, who
won 18 grand slams and 159 tournaments before retiring in 1989, rifling balls at you from
the other side of the net is unbelievable,
Baker says. ‘‘I just love her. She comes out
here to practice, and she still plays really
hard. My mom says she would love to have
her body.’’
But Baker and Evert are not two peas in a
pod as far as playing style. Evert was known
for staring her opponents down from the
baseline, playing a cool-headed volley game.
Fans recall her ‘‘icy stare’’ that unnerved
some opponents enough to immobilize them.
On the other hand, Baker loves to explode to
the net with a tenacity that dad Bill Baker
says has also yielded success in her doubles
game.
Indeed, as Baker has served, sliced and
backhanded her way to the top of the
rankings, from playing in tourneys from Rio
de Janeiro to Paris, comparisons run more to
former teenage phenomenon Monica Seles
than to Evert or today’s young superstars
like Serena and Venus Williams. ‘‘She has to
play smarter because she’s not as big as
some of the other players.’’ says her dad.
Still, Baker’s skinny frame is mentioned
as a potential liability, especially when
matched against the new breed of power
players such as the Williams sisters, who
tower above their competitors.
But don’t dismiss a growth spurt yet, says,
Acuno, the USTA coach. ‘‘I’ve seen her increase in size by a lot just this year,’’ he
adds confidently, While Baker sometimes
has trouble getting fired up for practice, she
loves the weight room and working out. As
part of her routine at Evert Tennis Academy, she endures a strenuous regimen along
with nearly four hours of court time a day
against some of the best young players in
the world.
Despite her early success, it’s still not advantage Baker. Most of her competitors were
already enrolled in tennis academies when
then 8-year-old Alli Baker started playing
with her mom at Carolina Country Club,
drawn more to the sport for the ‘‘cute outfits’’ than the competition. Other tennis kids
get started way before that, as evidenced by
a muffin-sized front-court player, perhaps 5
years old, who spent two hours cranking
backhands at her dad-slash-coach on a recent
day at the academy. The girl rode her pink
Barbie bike with training wheels off the
court after the practice. In Baker’s case,
however, her natural talents shone through
right away, and she quickly made up for lost
time. She started beating her mom as a 9year-old—showing right off the bat a natural
inclination toward not just good tennis, but
winning tennis.
‘‘It was a little bit later when I started to
really like the feeling of winning,’’ she says.
‘‘Before that, it was just about the outfits
and having fun with my friends.’’
That love for the game and the big win is
now starting to pay off.
*
*
*
*
*
Interest in Baker began to percolate two
years ago, when USTA began sniffing around
Raleigh, following rumors of a phenom-inthe-making. After attending a few national
camps and doing well in a number of regional
tournaments, Baker bloomed for real last
year.
Locally, North Hills Tennis Club coach
Nancy Arndt, Raleigh Racquet Club’s Mike
Leonard and Rali Bakita, and a handful of
other top-notch coaches worked on Baker’s
fundamentals, knowing they had a potential
star on their hands. But it was at the Ace
Tennis Academy in Atlanta, where Leigh
Baker would shuttle her daughter on weekends, that Baker culled those extra pointers
that propelled last year’s successes.
Before last summer, Baker had already
won both singles and doubles at the coveted
Easter Bowl, a triumph that sent her like a
projectile to the top ranking in the USTA
under-14 category. Against older girls up to
age 16, Baker is still ranked number seven.
Impressed with the wily Raleigh youngster,
CBS included Baker in a segment called
‘‘Top Spin’’ last summer, along with Pete
Sampras and Serena Williams.
The Easter Bowl victory led to Baker’s
USTA National Champion ribbon. She finished third in the World Cup held in the
Czech Republic last year. She was also a runner-up in the Banana Bowl in Brazil, and a
semi-finalist in the Acunsion Bowl in Paraguay, and the Windmill Cup in the Netherlands. This year she is again on the U.S. National Team and this spring worked her way
into the doubles finals tourneys in London
and France. Right now is when competitive
circuits around the world are really starting
to heat up.
On top of the thrill of competition another
boon to her meteoric rise into international
tennis is the gang of cool friends. Baker is
building around her. Currently, she e-mails a
dozen friends in Russia and France, as well
as her clan of pals and fans in Raleigh.
CHALLENGER FROM QUEENS
But Ally’s best friend on the ground in
Boca right now is a gritty, 15-year-old power
player from the blue-collar sky-line of
Queens, Shadisha Robinson. The two squared
off against each other last year where Baker
came back from a deep deficit, unwound
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CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
Robinson in a 7–6 second set and thrashed
her 6–1 in the third. They’ve been best
friends ever since. Evert uses the friendship
to boost both players’ performance on the
court: While Baker leans how to defend
against pure power, Robinson gets a lesson
in wiliness from the freckle-cheeked Southerner.
‘‘John doesn’t really play us together competitively,’’ Baker says. ‘‘He knows we are
good for each other as training partners, but
he doesn’t want us to get too much of a rivalry going.’’
A straight-A student through primary and
middle school, Baker is also managing to
keep up with her academic work through it
all. While vacationing at the beach last year.
Retired Daniels Middle School teacher Lynn
Reynolds heard about Baker’s decision to go
to Florida. She immediately called up the
family and volunteered to come out of retirement and ‘‘sign up for the team’’ as a
home schoolteacher. Reynolds and her young
charge have since become close friends, constantly in touch via e-mail and fax—the
methods they also use to exchange homework assignments and tests. Daily, the
teacher and student log onto the College
Boards web site to work out a daily test
question posted there—just to make sure
Baker is ready for the SAT’s when that time
comes.
‘‘This high-tech teacher and student relationship has really been fun for both of us,’’
Reynolds say. ‘‘She’s a quick study and a
very smart girl. We’ve become great friends.
This is one of the best teaching assignments
of my whole career.’’
In two short years, Baker has traveled
from Prague to Paris, from Palm Springs to
Rio. She says she’s enamored with this lifestyle that a simple game has already given
her. She misses her friends, but they’ll come
visit, they promise. Everyone says they will.
If the ‘‘tennis thing’’ doesn’t work out,
Baker says, ‘‘with all the agents I’ve already
met, I’ve got a chance with my singing’’—
country, that is, her backburner passion. Already the world has opened its doors to a talented Raleigh kid with enough sense to know
that dreams are out there for the getting. ‘‘I
mean, if this were to give me a leg up to go
to a school like Stanford or Duke, then it’s
already worth it,’’ she says. ‘‘Plus, just look
at this place,’’ she adds, holding out her
hands as if to weigh the fresh, precious Florida air. ‘‘This is prefect.’’
Mr. HELMS. I thank the Chair. I
yield the floor.
Mr. GORTON. Madam President, I
suggest the absence of a quorum.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The
clerk will call the roll.
The bill clerk proceeded to call the
roll.
Mr. KENNEDY. Madam President, I
ask unanimous consent that the order
for the quorum call be rescinded.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
f
TAX BREAKS
Mr. KENNEDY. Madam President,
between last Friday and today, in the
span of just 4 days, Republican Senators will pass tax breaks, overwhelmingly targeted for the wealthy, that
will cost the Treasury one and a half
trillion dollars over the next 20 years.
You would think that careful attention
would be paid to the merits of these astronomical tax giveaways before they
are passed. Instead, they are being
rammed through by a right-wing Republican majority in Congress bent on
rewarding the wealthy and ignoring
the country’s true priorities that have
a far greater claim on these enormous
resources.
What about prescription drug coverage for millions of senior citizens
under Medicare? I have just returned
from Massachusetts where I met with
the elderly people. They are asking,
Will the Senate of the United States,
will Congress, take action to provide
some relief to the elderly people in my
State and across the country? Really,
the unfinished business of Medicare is
the prescription drug program. We did
not debate that last Thursday and last
Friday. We are not debating that issue
today. We have basically said, let’s find
out how we can give the one and a half
trillion dollars away over the next 20
years, instead of dealing with the Medicare issue on prescription drugs.
What about greater Federal aid to
education to help schools and colleges
across the country and the students
who attend them? We put into the
RECORD last Friday the most recent
studies of the Congressional Research
Service that showed that by moving to
smaller class sizes, there was an enhancement of academic achievement
and accomplishment by students in
California. That supports the STARS
Program of Tennessee. Senator MURRAY of the State of Washington has
been our leader championing for smaller class sizes, because we believe that
that can be enormously important in
enhancing academic achievement. If we
do that, plus ensure that teachers get
training and professional advancement
in their classrooms, working to enhance their professionalism, we will
see a very important, significant gain
in academic achievement and accomplishment.
We also know the value of afterschool programs, tutorials, and accountability, as Senator BINGAMAN has
talked about; the newer digital divide
that Senator MIKULSKI has talked
about; construction, the need to make
sure our schools will be safe and secure
and not crumbling, as so many of them
are. But, no, we have set that aside. We
are not going to have the resources to
do that. Make no mistake about it, I
say to American families, we have
made enhancing academic achievement
for our teachers, smaller class sizes,
afterschool programs, a lesser priority
than providing $1.5 trillion from the
Federal Treasury to the wealthiest individuals.
What about health insurance for the
millions of hard-working Americans
who have no coverage today? We made
a downpayment in terms of the children in the CHIP program in a bipartisan way. We reach out to try to get
coverage for their hard-working parents, an increasing number of Americans, who do not have health insurance. But we have not put that on the
agenda. We are not debating that here
on the floor of the Senate. There will
July 17, 2000
not be the resources to try to do that.
We are saying we want $1.5 trillion for
the wealthiest individuals. Health insurance for hard-working Americans is
put aside.
What about raising the minimum
wage for millions of low-income Americans, the 13 million Americans, the majority of whom are women who have
children? It is a women’s issue, it is a
children’s issue, and it is a civil rights
issue because so many of these men
and women are men and women of
color. It is a fairness issue. People who
work 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year,
should not have to live in poverty. No,
we cannot debate that up here in the
Senate. We can get tax breaks for the
wealthiest individuals in this country,
but we will not debate an increase in
the minimum wage. We will not do it.
I hope we are not going to hear long
lectures from the other side about how
we ought to be funding, now, the special needs programs. We had great
statements from the other side: We
have failed in meeting our responsibility to special needs children, to help
local communities in the area of education. We have heard that time in and
time out, while we have been trying to
do some of these other actions for children in this country. We had an opportunity to pay for all those special
needs children, but I did not hear from
the other side that this is a priority.
We did not hear it when they had the
$780 billion tax cut 2 years ago, and we
could have taken a fifth of that tax cut
and funded special needs education for
every child in this country for 10 years.
No, no, that is not enough of a priority.
We are not going to do it. Our tax cut
is too important. We are going to give
$1.5 trillion away without spending a
single nickel on special needs children.
The list goes on about protecting Social Security and Medicare. Right now,
I am sure there are scores of Members
of the Congress and the Senate going
on about how we ought to protect
Medicare and Social Security. It is
very clear what the priority has been
in the Senate: $1.5 trillion, not to protect Medicare, not to protect Social
Security, but to provide it to the
wealthiest individuals in this country.
That is what has happened over the
period of these last 4 days, including a
Sunday when we were not even here.
All of these priorities and many more
are being blatantly ignored by this Republican Congress in their unseemly
stampede to enact these tax breaks for
the wealthy. Never, in the entire history of our country, has so much been
given away so quickly to so few with so
little semblance of fairness or even
thoughtful consideration.
I make that statement. I wait to be
challenged on that. Never, never in the
history of this body has so much been
given away to so few, in such a short
period of time, with such little semblance of fairness and even thoughtful
consideration.
I hope we are not going to hear from
the other side: We need to study these
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
issues more carefully in our committee; this hasn’t been carefully considered by the committee—when they
come out with that $1.5 trillion tax
cut, that never even saw the light of
day in committee, on the estate tax.
Think of having a committee report,
think of having a committee discussion, think of having some debate
about what the implications of this
might be in terms of a wide range of
different issues? Absolutely not. We
just took it, faced it, and passed it.
So it goes on. Plums for the rich and
crumbs for everyone else will be the epitaph of this Republican Congress. It’s
a dream Congress for the superwealthy
and their special interest friends, and a
nightmare Congress for hard-working
families across America.
The Republican’s trillion-dollar tax
breaks will eminently deserve the veto
that President Clinton is about to give
them. The Republicans fail to honestly
weigh the nation’s priorities, and I believe that this is an irresponsible and
reckless way to legislate. Some may
view it as good political theater, red
meat for the Republican right wing on
the eve of the Republican convention.
But it is a disservice to all Americans
because it prevents action on the many
true priorities facing this Nation.
I suspect that Americans who see and
understand what is happening here this
week in Washington will ask a single
question: What if George W. Bush were
in the White House? He would sign
these irresponsible tax break monstrosities, and the nation would suffer for
years to come.
I suspect that millions of Americans
who see what is happening here would
say: No thanks, we don’t need a Congress that would pass such irresponsible legislation—and we certainly
don’t need a President who would sign
it.
Last Friday’s estate tax bill gave $250
billion to America’s 400 wealthiest
families, yet this same $250 billion
would buy 10 years of prescription drug
coverage for 11 million senior citizens
who don’t have access to coverage now.
Our senior citizens face a crisis today.
The extraordinary promise of fuller
and healthier lives offered by new discoveries in medicine is often beyond
their reach. They need help to afford
the life-saving, life-changing miracle
drugs that are increasingly available.
Cutting a trillion dollars from the federal budget clearly jeopardizes our
ability to add a prescription drug benefit to Medicare.
Today, in schools across the country,
students face over-crowded classrooms,
teachers go without adequate training,
school buildings are crumbling, and violence is a constant threat. One would
think that at some opportunity over
these past few days we would have debated what most families are concerned about, as well as insuring academic achievement for their children
in a safe and secure area.
No, we are denied that opportunity.
We cannot debate that. We are told
somehow that it is not relevant. It is
relevant to what parents care about,
which is their children in school. I
daresay it is a lot more relevant than
the fact that we will be giving $1.5 trillion, $250 billion of which will go to the
400 wealthiest families. It is a lot more
relevant to their lives than that other
factor, the giveaway.
Yet, Republicans are rushing through
a trillion dollars in tax cuts without
serious consideration of what it means
for the nation’s unmet education
needs. Today, the booming economy is
helping many Americans, but those
who work day after day at the minimum wage are falling farther and farther behind. A recent study by the probusiness Conference Board finds that
the number of working poor is actually
rising, in spite of the record prosperity.
The number of working poor families
who seek emergency help in soup
kitchens and food pantries across the
nation is far ahead of the ability of
agencies to meet their needs.
Read the reports from last week
about what is happening to children in
our society. The total number of poor
children has gone down by about a percentage point, a point and a half,
maybe, in the last 2 years. But the ones
who are living in poverty are living in
deeper poverty than they have ever experienced.
We are finding an increased number
of children who are not being immunized against basic diseases, and here
we are cutting $1.5 trillion, when we
are not immunizing our children and
cannot find ways to make those programs workable and effective. We are
not debating that and trying to find
ways to improve it.
The cost of rental housing is skyrocketing in most cities because of the
economic boom, but the wages of millions of families who need that housing
has failed to keep pace.
My colleague and friend from Massachusetts, JOHN KERRY, made this case
so well last week to, effectively, a deaf
audience in the Senate. Cutting tax
revenues by a trillion and half dollars
jeopardizes our ability to respond to
these needs.
The American people cry out for action on many other basic priorities,
but the tax breaks being passed by the
Republican Congress would make fair
action on all those priorities virtually
impossible. Republicans are well aware
that their tax-cutting extravaganza
would not survive if it were honestly
weighed against the nation’s real priorities. That is why Republicans resort
to gross distortion of the facts.
They apply the phony label ‘‘death
tax’’ of trying to deal with family
farms and small businesses. Republicans told story after story about how
the estate tax hurts owners of small
businesses and family farms. Our
Democratic alternative would grant
them protection, but it wasn’t enough
for Republicans. Their position was to
basically hold small business owners
and small farmers hostage until they
S7013
could get the larger breaks for the
largest estates and the wealthiest individuals in the country.
They know this President is going to
veto this measure, and instead of truly
doing something that would benefit
those small family farms and small
businesses, they say: Oh, we would
rather have it vetoed. We will serve
those small family farms up rather
than deal with them. They know this is
true in the marriage tax penalty as
well.
Listen to this: They apply the phony
label ‘‘marriage tax penalty’’ to the
current bill even though 58 percent of
the tax cuts go to couples who pay no
marriage penalty at all. Do my colleagues hear that? Fifty-eight percent
of the benefits of this measure, according to the Joint Tax Committee, a
measure which we will start voting at
6:30 this evening, will go to couples
who pay no marriage tax penalty at
all.
The Democrats have a simple alternative to address the marriage penalty:
Let them file as a single person if it
will mean it lowers their taxes. What
in the world could be simpler than
that? If one is paying more because of
their marriage situation as a result of
commingling of the funds, Democrats
say: OK, file as single individuals. That
will solve it. There is no red tape and
no administrative bureaucracy. It is
simple. It meets a particular challenge.
The Republicans: Oh, no. We want
our program which will provide this extraordinary windfall to the wealthiest
individuals.
Our Democratic alternative would
cost $11 billion a year less than the Republican bill—but it would provide
greater marriage tax penalty relief to
families with incomes below $150,000 a
year. But, our sensible Democratic approach does not overwhelmingly benefit the wealthy so the Republicans reject it. Republicans intentionally designed their bill to give 78 percent of
the total tax savings to the wealthiest
20 percent of taxpayers.
Ending the marriage tax penalty is a
thinly veiled pretext to their latest installment of massive tax breaks for the
wealthy. We saw the same tactics during the debate on the estate tax. We
heard story after story of how the estate tax will hurt owners of small businesses and family farms.
I found Senator CONRAD’s presentation of our Democratic alternative
compelling and effective, virtually unchallenged on the floor of the Senate.
Oh, yes, there was a challenge saying:
Look, why are we supporting that because all of the various groups evidently support the Republican position?
I thought that was very interesting
coming after our debate on HMO reform where we had 330 organizations
support our HMO reform, and this particular Senate voted against it when
they did not have a single one supporting their proposal and the responses by Senator CONRAD were responsive to this challenge.
S7014
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
They are holding small businesses
and farmers hostage to their flagrant
scheme to help the super-rich even
while they talk piously of helping the
middle class.
This Republican Congress is the trillion-dollar-travesty Congress. Fortunately, President Clinton and AL GORE
are here—in this case, President Clinton—with a veto pen to burst their
bubble. But thank goodness that working families, middle-income families,
have a President who really cares
about the economic and financial situation in this country.
I take pride that I was one of 11
Members of the Senate who voted
against the Reagan tax cut that took
us from $400 billion to $4 trillion in
debt. That is why I am always interested in listening to those on the other
side talk about what wonderful economic programs we have had over the
recent times.
Let me finally use these charts to
demonstrate, once again, what this repeal of the estate tax will cost. It is $55
billion per year that we are effectively
giving the wealthiest individuals by
the year 2010. This could fund every
program in the Department of Education.
We are not saying that just throwing
money at it answers all the problems.
But it is a pretty clear indication
about what a nation’s priorities are,
about how we are going to allocate resources. We could have fully done that,
funded all of education, on this. We
could have funded the total cost of prescription drug medicines for every beneficiary and had $15 billion left over.
We could have had funding for all the
beneficiaries, for all of our senor citizens. We could have provided the funding for the $20 billion which takes care
of all the medical research in the National Institutes of Health, and you
would still have $35 billion left.
This is an indication of priorities.
This is another indication.
This chart depicts that from the Republican estate tax, those who are
going to benefit from it, benefit from it
to the average of $268,000. All we are
trying to get is a Medicare prescription
drug benefit that will be valued for our
senior citizens at $900.
Here it is: $268,000, by 2010, for those
who will benefit under the Republican
tax cut. All we are trying to do is get
$900 for our senior citizens, our 40 million senior citizens we will have at that
time. Or to put it another way, the
beneficiaries will have the estates
worth $2.3 million. The people we are
trying to help average $13,000 a year.
They are the people we are trying to
look out for.
This is the contrast. I believe, as I
have said, never has so much been
given to so few in such a short period
of time—without, I think, the fair, adequate national debate or discussion in
terms of what is really necessary, in
terms of meeting the human needs of
families in this country, the educational needs, the health needs, of
what is needed in terms of housing for
working families and what is necessary
in terms of prescription drugs.
How are we going to have clean air?
How are we going to have clean water?
How are we going to clean up the
brownfields? How are we going to make
sure people are going to continue to
have an opportunity to work in employment and have the training and
the skills in order to be able to compete in the new economy?
All of those priorities have been
washed away. With $1.3 trillion, we
would be able to provide the investments for the American people. We
have given that away. We have given
that away without adequate and fair
consideration of these priorities. I welcome the fact that we have a President
who is going to veto those measures.
I yield the floor.
f
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001—Continued
The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. ROBERTS). The Senator from Rhode Island.
AMENDMENT NO. 3798
Mr. REED. Mr. President, I have
amendment No. 3798 at the desk, and I
ask for its immediate consideration.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The
clerk will report the amendment.
The assistant legislative clerk read
as follows:
The Senator from Rhode Island [Mr. REED]
proposes an amendment numbered 3798.
Mr. REED. I ask unanimous consent
reading of the amendment be dispensed
with.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
The amendment is as follows:
(Purpose: To increase funding for weatherization assistance grants, with an offset)
On page 182, beginning on line 9, strike
‘‘$761,937,000’’ and all that follows through
‘‘$138,000,000’’
on
line
17
and
insert
‘‘$769,937,000, to remain available until expended, of which $2,000,000 shall be derived by
transfer from unobligated balances in the
Biomass Energy Development account and
$8,000,000 shall be derived by transfer of a
proportionate amount from each other account for which this Act makes funds available for travel, supplies, and printing expenses: Provided, That $172,000,000 shall be for
use in energy conservation programs as defined in section 3008(3) of Public Law 99–509
(15 U.S.C. 4507): Provided further, That notwithstanding section 3003(d)(2) of Public Law
99–509, such sums shall be allocated to the eligible programs as follows: $146,000,000’’.
Mr. REED. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that Senator KENNEDY
and Senator SCHUMER be added as cosponsors of this amendment.
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without
objection, it is so ordered.
Mr. REED. Mr. President, this
amendment would provide an additional $8 million for the Department of
Energy’s Weatherization Assistance
Program.
Across the country this summer,
Americans have faced unacceptably
high gasoline prices. Last winter, our
July 17, 2000
constituents,
particularly
in
the
Northeast, saw extraordinary increases
in home heating oil prices.
Members of this body have offered
various proposals to address this issue,
ranging from urging OPEC to increase
production; increasing domestic crude
oil production, by drilling in new areas;
building up our refining capacity; and
expanding our use of ethanol and alternative fuels. Essentially, all of these
proposals are supply side proposals, increasing the supply of energy.
In fact, we are reaching a point now
where the proposal to encourage OPEC
might be running out of time. I note
that the Saudi Arabians are asking for
a meeting of OPEC in the next few
days, because if there is not a meeting
immediately, even if there is an increase in production, it will be insufficient in terms of reaching our markets
for the winter heating season.
All of these supply side proposals are
interesting, but we are neglecting an
important aspect of the overall composition of the heating market—and
that is demand.
The weatherization program goes
right to this critical issue of demand.
By weatherizing homes, by making
them more energy efficient, we are literally cutting down the demand for energy, and typically foreign energy.
As Congress debates these proposals
for supply relief, we should also start
thinking seriously about demand reduction. That is critically involved in
the whole issue of energy efficiency
and weatherization. At the same time,
our weatherization program protects
the most vulnerable people in our society because they are aimed at the elderly, individuals with disabilities,
children, all of them being subject to
huge increases in heating costs, not
only in the wintertime—that is the
case in the Northeast—but in the
Southeast and Southwest and the very
hot parts of this country in the summertime.
In fact, it was not too long ago—several years ago—in Chicago where there
was an extraordinary heat spell. People
literally died because they could not
afford to keep their air-conditioners
running, if they had air-conditioning.
Or they could not afford to keep paying
exorbitant energy costs because their
homes were inefficient in terms of retaining the cool air from air-conditioning. So this is a program that cuts
across the entire country.
The Weatherization Assistance Program supports the weatherization of
over 70,000 low-income homes each
year. To date, over 5 million American
homes have been weatherized with Federal funds, and also local funds, which
must be part of the formula in order to
provide this type of assistance for
American homes.
Last December, I had a chance to
witness this program in action. I was
in Providence, RI, with Secretary of
Energy Bill Richardson. We went to a
low-income home in Providence. In
just a few hours, a contractor was able
July 17, 2000
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD — SENATE
to blow in insulation between the
walls; they were able to caulk windows
and doorways; they were able to conduct tests to ensure that the energy efficiency of the structure had increased
dramatically.
This was a home of a family of firstgeneration Americans. They had come
from Southeast Asia in the turmoil of
the war in Southeast Asia. The father
was in his late 40s, early 50s, and had
several children—all of them American
success stories. The children were in
college. His mother was living with
them. She was disabled, suffering from
Alzheimer’s.
This is typically the type of families—low-income families, struggling,
working hard with jobs, trying to get
kids through college—who are the
beneficiaries of this program. It is an
excellent program. It is a program that
is terribly needed by these low-income
families.
Typically, low-income families will
spend about 15 percent of their income
on heat—or in the summer, air-conditioning—more than four times the average of more affluent families. Over 90
percent of the households that are
served by this weatherization program
have annual incomes of less than
$15,000. This is a program that works.
It works for these individual families.
Not only that, it also works for us. It
creates jobs. About 8,000 jobs throughout the country have been created because of this weatherization program.
It also saves us from consuming and
wasting energy.
I argue, as I have initially, one
should look at the supply side complications of the energy crisis. One
should implore OPEC to increase production. One should have sensible problems to ensure supply. But if we neglect the demand part of the equation,
we are not only missing the boat, but I
think we are deficient in our responsibility to formulate a comprehensive
approach to energy