Cardiff Cycling Strategy: The Next Steps

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APPENDIX 1
CARDIFF
CYCLING
STRATEGY
2016-2026
DRAFT
How To Use This Strategy
This Cycling Strategy sets out City of Cardiff Council’s vision for cycling and the steps we will take over the next
10 years to realise it. The Strategy shows how cycling will make an important contribution to our vision of
making Cardiff the most liveable capital city in Europe.
Nobody knows the city better than the people who live, work, study, and do business here. This is why we
have engaged extensively with a wide range of groups, organisations and businesses in producing the Strategy.
We will continue to engage with stakeholders to ensure that we achieve the best possible outcomes when
implementing the actions set out in the Strategy.
The Introduction to the Strategy sets out current transport trends and predicted future trends, the reasons
why our vision for cycling makes sense in a city like Cardiff, and the challenges we face in making the changes
that will be needed. The Infrastructure chapter outlines the quality of routes necessary to build a cycle
network for all ages and abilities and the steps we will take to achieve this. The Focus Areas chapter takes
a closer look at how cycling can support three important aspects of city life: schools, workplaces and retail,
in addition to outlining some of the steps City of Cardiff Council is taking to promote cycling among its own
workforce. The Action Plan sets out the actions to be taken to deliver our vision and the timetable for delivery.
Related Documents
LOCAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN
CARDIFF LOCAL TRANSPORT PLAN
CARDIFF TRANSPORT STRATEGY
CARDIFF PUBLIC REALM MANUAL
for references to surfaces and cycle parking
CARDIFF RESIDENTIAL DESIGN GUIDE SPG
for wider guidance of designing residential areas
WELSH GOVERNMENT ACTIVE TRAVEL DESIGN GUIDANCE
MANUAL FOR STREETS EDITIONS 1 AND 2
Contents
1INTRODUCTION
Current Trends
8
Future Developments
9
Challenges
10
Why Cycling Is Essential
11 Our Vision
12
2INFRASTRUCTURE
Our Infrastructure Priorities
16
The Cardiff Cycle Network
17
Infrastructure Standards
18
Next Steps
22
XXXXXXXXXX
23
3
KEY PARTNERSHIPS
Schools
26
Workplaces
28
Retail
30
City of Cardiff Council
32
4
ACTION PLAN
Action Plan
36
Cycling Strategy Next Steps
38
1. Introduction
Current Trends
GROWTH 2005-2015
11%
CITY CENTRE 2004-2014
58%
13%
86%
30%
JOBS
1
POPULATION
CYCLING
%
6.7
9.2%
1%
OTHER
1 6.5 %
PUBLIC TRANSPORT
•
Cardiff is growing. Over the last 10 years the population in Cardiff has increased by 11%. The number of jobs has also increased by 13%
•
Footfall in the city centre has increased by 58%. At the same time journeys to the city centre by car have dropped by 30% and journeys by bike have increased by 86%
CYCLING TO WORK
CAR
WALKING
GENERAL TRENDS
5
6.
•
The proportion of Cardiff residents travelling to work by bike is 9.2%, compared to 56.1% who travel by car (2011-
2015 rolling average).
•
The proportion of residents travelling to work by bike has more than doubled since 2005.
8
CAR TRIPS LESS
THAN 5KM
28%
%
CAR TRIPS MORE
THAN 5KM
52
48 %
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
TARGET MARKET
DO NOT CYCLE BUT
WOULD LIKE TO
•
28% of Cardiff residents say that they do not currently cycle, but would like to.
•
The majority of car trips starting within Cardiff are of a short enough distance to comfortably cycle. 52% of car journeys in 2011 would have taken 20 minutes or less by bike.
Future Development
+40,000
+79,918
PREDICTED GROWTH 2006-2026
JOBS
64 %
SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL MODES
TRIPS
50
0%
%
36%
2011
14%
5
POPULATION
PREDICTED GROWTH
2026
•
The population of Cardiff is expected to grow by a further 79,918 between 2006 and 2026.
• During this period, the number of jobs in Cardiff is expected to increase by 40,000.
• The number of trips to, from and within Cardiff is expected to grow by 14%.
TRANSPORT VISION
•
The Council’s vision is for 50% of all trips to be made by sustainable modes by 2026.
• This vision is set out in the Council’s Local Development Plan and is essential to accommodate the levels of growth predicted for the city within the transport network.
CAR BASED TRAVEL
CYCLING MODE SHARE
2015
9.2%
2026
18.4%
CYCLING VISION
•
In order to contribute to our overall mode split target, the Council’s vision as set out in this Cycle Strategy is to double the number of cycle trips by 2026, continuing the growth trend from 2005.
•
To achieve this, the cycle network must be able to accommodate an additional 38,000 cycle trips a day.
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
2005
4.3%
9
RIGHT
The Existing Route Map shows routes
which meet the minimum standards
set out in the Welsh Government
Active Travel Design Guidance and
demonstrates the fragmented nature
of the existing network.
BELOW
Current investment in transport in
Cardiff
£39.24
PER RESIDENT
ALL MODES
£3.84
EXISTING ROUTES WHICH
MEET WELSH GOVERNMENT
MINIMUM STANDARDS
PER RESIDENT
CYCLING
The Challenges
FRAGMENTED NETWORK
The existing Cycle Network is fragmented and incomplete, as demonstrated by the 2015 Existing Route
Map which only shows those routes which meet the minimum standards set out in Welsh Government
Design Guidance. Some routes could be improved by addressing relatively short sections of missing links.
However, many parts of the city, in particular the east, have very limited provision for cycling.
RETROFITTING INFRASTRUCTURE IN EXISTING STREETS
Constrained urban corridors need to serve competing demands which makes the retrofitting of cycling
infrastructure challenging. Many recent housing developments in Cardiff have been constructed with
limited public transport access and no purpose-built cycling connections at all.
SAFETY: ACTUAL AND PERCIEVED
Cardiff residents feel that cycling is significantly less safe than other modes of transport. Although the
number of people cycling for everyday journeys is growing in Cardiff, in order to maintain this growth, it is
clear that safety issues, both real and perceptual, need to be addressed.
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
RESOURCES
10
Cardiff Council’s current annual capital expenditure on cycling infrastructure, including both Council capital
funding and external grant funding, equates to just under £4 per resident, part of a total spend of just over
£39 per head by the Council on all modes of transport. This has funded a number of recent improvements
across the network, but is not sufficient to develop a comprehensive network of high quality routes. 78% of
Cardiff residents would like to see more investment in cycling in Cardiff.
DEVELOPMENTS IN OTHER CITIES
21% of Cardiff residents currently cycle at least once a week, which compares well to cities like Edinburgh
(21%) and Bristol (23%). However, a number of UK cities have seen a recent increase in funding for cycling
infrastructure projects which has yet to be matched in Cardiff and may be reflected in future trends. The
level of capital investment in cycling is also low compared to European cities with a strong reputation for
cycling. Amsterdam and Copenhagen invest around £18 per head of population per year. 63% of residents
in Copenhagen cycle to work, compared to 9.2% in Cardiff.
Why Cycling Is Essential
ECONOMIC BENEFIT
For current levels of
cycling in Cardiff:
£14 million a year
saving to individuals and
the local economy for
trips which are cycled
instead of driven 1
£16 million a year
benefit to health for all
cycle trips 2
BUILDING A LIVEABLE CITY
A city that is good for cycling is an attractive city to live in and invest in.
Increasing the amount of cycling is not a goal in itself. Many European cities
with a strong reputation for the quality of life they offer their residents
provide excellent facilities for cycling.
TRAVEL TIME
In a dense urban environment like Cardiff, cycling can offer the quickest
way of travelling from point to point. A 3 mile journey can be cycled at a
comfortable pace within 20 minutes, which is a competitive travel time
compared to the car, particularly during peak periods of congestion.
EFFICIENT USE OF URBAN SPACE
Cycling requires less space to accommodate on the highway network
compared to the private car. 12 cycles can be securely and conveniently
parked in the space required to park one car.
MANAGING GROWTH
The efficiency of cycling as a mode of transport makes it a realistic means
of managing the increase in journeys on Cardiff’s transport network as the
city grows. By providing the right infrastructure in the right places many
journeys starting within Cardiff could be made by bike instead of the car.
The city’s highway network is already under pressure, particularly at peak
times. Expanding road space to accommodate additional traffic is neither
affordable nor sustainable. Therefore, as the city grows, road space must be
reallocated from private cars to more efficient transport modes including
footways, cycle tracks and public transport to enable more people to move
around the city as quickly and efficiently as possible. This will also ensure
that adequate provision remains for those trips where the private car is the
only reasonable option.
HEALTH
ACTIVE TRAVEL DUTY
All local authorities in Wales have a duty to plan for and make continuous
improvement in the provision of facilities for cycling under the Active
Travel (Wales) Act 2013. Cycling also has a significant contribution to make
to all seven of the wellbeing goals as set out in the Wellbeing of Future
Generations (Wales) Act 2015.
1
2
Cardiff Bike Life 2015: Saving to individuals and the local economy for trips which are cycled instead of driven. Value of savings derived from WebTAG
Cardiff Bike Life 2015: Health benefit for all trips made by bike calculated with HEAT
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
The health and wellbeing benefits of regular exercise are well documented
and cycling for everyday journeys is an effortless way of realising these
benefits. People who cycle regularly have the fitness of someone 10 years
younger. Improvements to local air quality through reducing unnecessary
car trips will also have a significant impact on health.
11
Our Vision
Our vision is for Cardiff to be a city where cycling is a normal and practical choice for short trips for people
of all ages and abilities and to double the number of cycle trips in the city by 2026.
The following key actions outline how we will realise our vision:
INFRASTRUCTURE
•
Improve the integration of cycling into transport planning and urban space
•
Provide infrastructure with the right quality in the right place to provide for all ages and abilities
cycling
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
KEY PARTNERSHIPS
12
•
Work with key partners, including workplaces, schools and retailers, to provide end of trip facilities
and promote cycling to residents and visitors
•
Improve the integration of cycling with the way that the Council carries out its core business
13
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
2. Infrastructure
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
Our Infrastructure Priorities
16
KEY CORRIDORS
Plans will be developed to create two primary route
corridors as an exemplar for all ages and abilities
cycling, to connect new development sites to major
destinations across the city, including the City Centre
and the Bay
High quality cycling infrastructure will be fully
integrated into new development from the outset, to
provide an extensive internal network of routes and
connections to the wider cycle network
CITY CENTRE
INTEGRATION WITH HIGHWAY ACTIVITY
Plans will be developed to improve cycling
connections through the City Centre as part of a City
Centre Movement Strategy
Whenever work is being undertaken on the highway,
opportunities will be taken where relevant to make
improvements to cycle facilities at the same time
MISSING LINKS
INVOLVING STAKEHOLDERS
Missing links across the network will be
identified and addressed, including schemes to
address severance across the network, and local
neighbourhood improvements to cycling conditions
on local streets
Engagement with stakeholders, including local
residents and businesses, will be an important part
of designing solutions to get the best possible results
MAINTENANCE
Implementation of new cycling infrastructure will be
complemented by promotional activities to maximise
the impact of infrastructure investment
Maintenance of cycle routes will be prioritised
to ensure that they continue to provide safe and
comfortable conditions for cycling
NEW DEVELOPMENT
PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITY
The Cardiff Cycle Network
PRIMARY ROUTE CORRIDORS TO BE
DELIVERED BY 2020
OTHER ROUTE CORRIDORS
STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT SITES
The Cardiff Cycle Network sets out a comprehensive network of cycle routes linking existing communities and
strategic development sites with key destinations across the city. These routes include:
•
Existing off road routes and signed on road routes
•
Routes defined in the Strategic Cycle Network (Enfys) Plan 2011 which are in development or yet to be completed
•
Additional routes required to address missing links and improve connectivity across the city
A draft Cycle Network Plan has been developed identifying the routes which are to be developed over the
next 10 years and beyond. This includes two primary route corridors running north-south and east-west
which will connect strategic development sites with existing communities and major destinations. These
primary route corridors will be our first priority for delivering continuous route corridors that provide the
right conditions for all ages and abilities cycling.
We will also seek to address missing links across the wider network to improve conditions for cycling and
increase the options for everyday journeys, and address severance in key locations through a prioritised plan
to include:
•
Safety improvements to major junctions
•
Segregated facilities on main roads in key locations
•
Provision of new shortcuts, including bridges, contraflows, and cycle access through road ends
•
Improvements for on road cycling on quiet local streets, including 20mph limits and traffic calming
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
CYCLE NETWORK PLAN
17
Infrastructure Standards
Cycling For All Ages and Abilities
In order to achieve our vision of making cycling a normal and
rational choice for short trips for people of all ages and abilities
and doubling the number of cycle trips in the city, it is essential
to provide infrastructure that gives everyone the confidence
to cycle in Cardiff, including adults who do not cycle often and
school children.
33%
25%
Improvements to the infrastructure for cycling will also improve
the environment for other vulnerable road users, by reducing
conflict between pedestrians and cyclists on segregated cycle
routes and reducing vehicle speeds along on road cycle routes.
82%
Cycling safety is a major concern to Cardiff residents. It is
essential that cycle routes in Cardiff provide a safe environment,
THINK CYCLING SAFETY
including segregation from motor traffic where it is needed.
NEEDS TO BE IMPROVED
%
50
47
ALL
RE
SI
%
CYC
L
S
NT
DE
18
One of the benefits of cycling in an urban environment is that
it offers point to point travel. For this benefit to be realised,
cycle routes must be well connected, with a dense network of
routes and high quality links between cycle routes and the basic
network of local streets. Cycle routes must be convenient to
use, providing direct routes to destinations and wayfinding that
is intuitive to follow.
S
IST
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
For cycling to be an attractive travel choice, cycling
infrastructure must be comfortable to use. This means that
it addresses the poor perception of safety, by providing
segregation where needed, good quality surfaces and sufficient
space to cater for the number of people using the route.
As with any mode of transport, journey time is important when
cycling. A bicycle journey time saving of 1 minute is worth 12.5p 50% OF CYCLISTS REGARD TRAVEL TIME
per person, per trip. Travel time is the most important factor for AS THE BIGGEST INFLUENCE ON HOW
all Cardiff residents when choosing how to travel to work.
THEY TRAVEL TO WORK.
Measures
PHOTO CREDIT: GEHL
PARKING PROTECTED CYCLE LANES, COPENHAGEN
Cycle lanes protected by car parking bays is a design
feature which can improve the safety of a route.
CYCLE TRACK ACROSS SIDE STREET, COPENHAGEN
Segregation from motor traffic and pedestrians
improves comfort for all users. Priority over side
roads and contraflow arrangements reduce travel
time
SAFETY
CONNECTIVITY
•
Segregation from motor traffic on main roads
•
Good network density
•
20mph speed limits and traffic calming on
streets with lower volumes of traffic
•
•
Early start for cyclists at signal junctions
High quality links between segregated routes
alongside roads, off street paths and traffic
calmed minor roads to create a coherent
network
•
Parking protected cycle lanes
COMFORT
•
Segregation from motor traffic and
pedestrians on main roads
•
Segregation from pedestrians on off road
paths
•
Adequate space to accommodate both the
current and the expected number of route
users
•
Good quality running surface
•
Appropriate lighting
•
Implementation of 20mph speed limits
CONVENIENCE
•
Direct routes to destinations
•
Cycle parking in convenient locations
•
Intuitive wayfinding
TRAVEL TIME
•
Adequate space to accommodate the number of
route users
•
Signal changes to reduce waiting time at
junctions
•
Give priority to segregated cycle routes and
footways over side roads
•
Contraflows for cycling on one way streets
•
Provide cycle access through road ends
•
Provide bridges to reduce severance caused by
natural or man made barriers
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
PHOTO CREDIT: GEHL
City of Cardiff Council will incorporate the following measures into scheme design where needed to ensure
provision for all ages and abilities cycling. Further Guidance will be developed to set out how these measures
should be applied in Cardiff to ensure that we provide infrastructure with the right level of quality to realise
our vision for cycling, taking account of Welsh Government Design Guidance
19
Segregation
In order to provide cycle infrastructure that meets the needs of all ages and abilities, it will often be
necessary to provide some form of segregation from motor vehicles.
The decision on whether or not segregation is required is dependent on both speeds and flows of motor
vehicles. Where speeds and flows are low cyclists will be able to comfortably share space with motor
vehicles. The table below sets out the thresholds at which segregation from motor vehicles should be
considered, based on best practice guidance from Denmark and the Netherlands.1
SPEED LIMIT
VEHICLE FLOWS
(DAILY 2 WAY)
Less than 1000 vehicles per day
20MPH
30MPH
AND ABOVE
•
Segregation will not be required.
•
Additional traffic calming may be
required to ensure that speed limit is
observed if measured speeds indicate
there is a problem.
Between 1000 and 3000 vehicles •
per day
•
Segregation may be required.
Over 3000 vehicles per day
•
Segregation will usually be required.
Any
•
Segregation will be required
•
If flows are light, consideration should
be given to reducing the speed limit,
with additional traffic calming if
needed to ensure that the speed limit
is observed.
If the decision is taken not to
segregate, additional traffic calming
may be required to ensure that speed
limit is observed if measured speeds
indicate there is a problem.
CYCLE STREET,
COPENHAGEN
In streets with low vehicle
speeds and flows, cyclists
can share space with
motor vehicles. Traffic
calming may be required
to ensure motor vehicles
travel at appropriate
speeds to maintain a
comfortable environment
for cycling, for example
through a ‘Bicycle Street’
treatment
PHOTO CREDIT: GEHL
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
20
TREATMENT
1
Bicycle Planning and Design Guidelines 2012 (draft), Urban Systems for City of Vancouver
Cycling in New Developments
In order to manage the impact of new development on the transport network in Cardiff, new
developments must be designed from the outset to facilitate cycling for everyday journeys for all ages and
abilities. This requires provision of an extensive internal network of routes, connections to routes beyond
the development itself, and cycle facilities including parking at all destinations within the development.
Internal cycling networks should of a scale and quality which is sufficient to make cycling the easiest and
most practical travel option for short local trips including to nearby destinations such as shops and schools.
CYCLE ROUTES
ALONGSIDE MAIN
ROADS
The preferred treatment
option for main roads
through development
sites is a two way cycle
track alongside the
road, segregated from
pedestrians. The cycle
track must provide
sufficient width for the
number of users, which
will require a minimum
clear width of 3 metres.
Cycle tracks and footways
must be given priority
over side roads to reduce
travel time and maintain
the comfort of the route.
CONNECTIVITY
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
Cycle routes to destinations within new developments must be as direct as possible to reduce travel time
and make cycling the most practical travel option for short, local trips. Direct cycle routes may not always
follow the main road network and could include a combination of short cuts through quieter streets, off
road sections and filtered permeability through road ends. However, in order to maintain a comprehensive
network that facilitates all point to point journeys within a development, provision of direct routes away
from the main road does not eliminate the need to provide segregated facilities alongside main roads.
Connections between segregated cycle tracks and the basic network of local streets must be safe, direct,
and intuitive, to create an attractive facility which is easy to use and reduces travel time. The same
principles will apply to connections linking the new development to the wider cycle network for which
contributions will be sought from developers through the planning process.
21
Next Steps
•
•
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
•
22
Develop concept designs for two primary
route corridors:
•
• North – South: Linking strategic sites in
north east Cardiff to Cardiff Bay via the
City Centre
Develop new guidelines for cycle
infrastructure design in Cardiff, taking into
account Welsh Government Active Travel
Design Guidance.
•
• East – West: Linking strategic sites at St
Mellons to strategic sites in north west
Cardiff via the City Centre
Develop and deliver a training programme
on the implementation of good cycle
infrastructure design
•
Develop a City Centre Movement Strategy
for all modes including concept designs for
cycling connections through the City Centre.
Submit Final Network Plan as part of
Integrated Network Map to Welsh
Government for approval (September 2017.)
•
Establish a ring-fenced budget for
maintenance of existing cycle routes
Develop a prioritized plan to address
missing links across the wider cycle network
and start eliminating missing links.
23
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
3. Key Partnerships
Schools
16%
16% OF ALL TRIPS
UNDERTAKEN ON A
WEEKDAY ARE ESCORT
TRIPS (TRIPS TAKEN TO
TRANSPORT SOMEBODY ELSE)
4% of Cardiff children currently travel to school by bike, however 25%
say that they would prefer to travel to school by bike. In contrast, 41%
of Cardiff children travel to school by car. 16% of all trips undertaken on
a weekday are escort trips (trips taken to transport somebody else) and
just over half of these trips are made as car driver. Escort trips represent
a significant cost to the individual, both in terms of time and transport
costs. If children are able to travel to school independently, this saves
their parents time and money.
Government guidelines state that children and young people should
engage in moderate to vigorous physical activity for at least 60 minutes
a day. Cycling to school and for other short trips can contribute to
increasing the amount of physical activity that children undertake. The
benefits of cycling for children and young people include improved
cardiovascular and bone health, maintaining a healthy weight, improved
self-confidence and development of social skills.
26
4% C
YC
L
25%
CHOOL
OS
T
E
SC
H
L
OO
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
T TO CYCLE T
WAN
O
Promoting cycling in schools
CYCLE TRAINING
City of Cardiff Council offers cycle training to all primary schools in Cardiff to give children the skills they
need to cycle on short journeys such as cycling to school or to the local shops. Training is also offered
during the school holidays for children who are unable to attend training through their schools.
ACTIVE JOURNEYS
The Active Journeys in Wales project is delivered by Sustrans to provide information, training and support
to pupils, teachers and parents to enable more children to travel to school by bike, scooter or on foot.
Schools are supported intensively over a three year period to enable them to establish a good foundation to become an independent active journeys school. We currently have 10 supported Active Journeys
schools in Cardiff and 35 schools who have completed the three year programme and have continued
support through the Advice Service.
Whitchurch Primary School
At Whitchurch Primary we have a group of children in year six who are responsible for promoting cycling.
We call them the Bike Crew. Each term we have some events which put the focus on cycling, for example
we have an assembly to introduce the Bike Crew, we hold competitions such as design a poster to show
how to stay safe on your bike, we have a “Bling your Bike” for Christmas event and every term we host a
Bike Breakfast.
In the summer term we run a bike club for year two children. We have involved parents in our events and
we have used the smoothie maker/bike at our school fair.
Our most prominent event is our Big Pedal fortnight when everyone is urged to cycle to school as many
times as possible.
Next Steps
• Develop a detailed programme to
promote cycling to school
• Identify and address missing infrastructure
links to existing schools, through the
development and implementation of
the Cycle Network Plan, including active
to promote cycling to school, including
engagement with schoolchildren in
provision of free cycle stands to schools
collaboration with Sustrans through Welsh
through the Park Your Bike scheme and
Government’s Active Schools project
school holiday cycle training sessions
• Identify opportunities to improve
• Identify funding opportunities to improve
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
• Improve promotion of existing schemes
infrastructure links to new school sites in
provision of covered, secure cycle parking
collaboration with the School Organisation
at schools
project
27
Workplaces
214,600 jobs are based in Cardiff, making a vital contribution to the local economy and the quality of life
offered to our residents. Cardiff residents make up 61% of commuting journeys to jobs based in Cardiff.
Around 9% of journeys to work currently made by Cardiff residents are by bike and almost half of all cycle
trips made by Cardiff residents are for work purposes. However, there is significant scope to increase the
number of people cycling to work in Cardiff, since 56% of Cardiff residents could reach their workplace
within 20 minutes by bike.
The number of jobs in Cardiff is expected to grow with a number of new employment sites to be located
in and around the City Centre, including the redevelopment at Central Square. Increasing the number of
people cycling to work in Cardiff is an important measure to manage the impact of this growth on the
transport network.
0%
56%
0-5km
20 MINUTES BY BIKE
24%
To increase the uptake of cycling to work
and for business travel, the Council must
address the missing links within the cycle
network to facilitate the journeys between
where people live and work in the city.
Accompanying workplace based initiatives
can maximise the impact of infrastructure
improvements. The Council will continue
to engage with local employers to identify
priority areas for improvement and share
knowledge on best practice for workplace
initiatives.
2
Cycling can offer many benefits to employers and employees in Cardiff. It is an easy way to incorporate
physical activity into daily life, which benefits health and wellbeing and leads to a more productive
workforce. Cycling reduces pressure on the demand for car parking spaces, and cycle parking takes
up significantly less space than car parking. Cycling can also offer a cost effective option for business
travel over short distances in an urban area due to the lower running costs and competitive travel times
compared to the car.
5-10km
40 MINUTES BY BIKE
OVER 10km
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
Workplace Initiatives to Increase Cycling:
28
•
Secure cycle parking
•
Cycle mileage for business travel
•
Showers and changing facilities
•
•
Pool bikes for business travel
Tax free bikes through the Cycle to Work scheme
BBC
At our current HQ in Llandaff, we have plenty of on-site parking for staff. However, our move to Central
Square will mean that staff will have to consider new ways of commuting; being in the city centre means
that parking spaces will be reserved for operational requirements and disabled drivers. A staff Travel
Survey showed us that around 20% of respondents are currently thinking of commuting on their bikes,
and we are working hard to make cycling to work as accessible and straight forward as possible. Our plans
include secure indoor bike parking, staff showers and changing rooms, lockers for bike equipment, and a
drying room for wet cycle gear.
Cardiff Metropolitan University
Cardiff Metropolitan University has the largest work based Bike User Group in Wales with in excess of 300
of their circa 1200 staff frequently cycling to work. This number is swelled by over 700 current students
who have requested access to the University’s secure cycle stores in the past two years.
An increasing demand for car parking and inconsiderate parking resulted in the introduction of managed
car parks. This in turn provided the University with the opportunity to ring fence funding and increase its
focus on sustainable travel.
The University has continually focused on cycling over the past 15 years through numerous initiatives and
capital expenditure including:
•
The introduction of nine all weather card access cycle stores.
•
Cycle lanes, changing, showering and locker facilities at Llandaff Campus
•
28 days a year free breakfasts for staff cycling to work
•
Provision of Grade 10 security D Locks at a quarter of their retail price
•
Social cycling events including the introduction of ‘Cycle with the Dean’.
•
Continuation and extension of Cycle to Work scheme
•
Distribution of 1000 of the Council’s Walking & Cycling Maps annually to students and staff
•
Dr Bike, Police Security Marking and Maintenance Workshops termly for students and staff
•
Annual clearance of Western Avenue bridge of leaf litter providing safer cycling for students and the public.
•
Annual removal of approximately 50 bicycles that have been abandoned and donation to the Cardiff Cycle Workshop for refurbishment and resale
“I have been commuting from Bristol by
train and bicycle on average 3 times per
week since last May. I have significantly
reduced my annual mileage and car
maintenance and bridge toll etc. I have
managed to maintain a better level
of fitness as I have continued cycling
through the winter. Prior to commuting
by bike I would generally only cycle at
the weekend in winter. I also find it very
convenient to combine exercise while
commuting.”
John Cappock, Chief Operating Officer,
Cardiff Metropolitan University
Next Steps
• Improve provision of information and
• Improve promotion of existing workplace
advice to workplaces on best practice for
initiatives offered by the Council, including
promoting cycling to employees
the Park Your Bike scheme offering free
cycle stands to organisations and Free
share knowledge and communicate
Adult Cycle Training for anyone living,
working or studying in the city
business needs to the Council
• Pilot a bicycle station to enable small
• Identify and address missing infrastructure
links to major workplaces, through the
businesses to share facilities for
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
• Establish a Business Cycling Group to
employees travelling by bike
development and implementation of the
Cycle Network Plan.
29
£ Retail
On a typical weekday around 286,000 trips are made to shops in Cardiff, rising to around 388,000 trips
on a typical Saturday. Cardiff city centre is a major shopping destination at a national level with over 40
million visitors a year. Local shops, including those provided at district and local centres, provide important
services to local communities and support the local economy particularly small businesses.
Cardiff residents currently make around 2.2 million cycle trips to the shops every year. The importance
of cycling as a mode of transport for shopping trips is increasing, with an 86% increase in the number of
people visiting the city centre by bike over the last 10 years.
As a mode of transport well suited to short, urban journeys, cycling can offer residents a means to access
shops quickly and conveniently, with the provision of the right infrastructure in the right place, including
speed reduction measures on local streets near local shops and provision of short stay cycle parking in
convenient locations. These facilities will make shops in Cardiff, both within the city centre and at local
shopping areas, more attractive to visit and encourage residents to spend locally.
Measures to increase cycling to shops
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
• Improvements to infrastructure to provide
30
• Provision of short stay cycle parking in
direct and comfortable access to shopping
locations close to shops in sufficient
locations
numbers to meet demand
Key Locations for Retail in Cardiff
CITY CENTRE
Local shopping destinations are
found in various locations across
the city. Good access to local
shops is important to support the
local economy and build liveable
neighbourhoods.
DISTRICT CENTRES
LOCAL CENTRES
Next Steps
• Make a Business Case to the Business
Improvement District (BID) to provide
• Increase provision of cycle parking at local
shops
cycle friendly measures to increase
footfall within the BID through better
access by bicycle
• Implement programme to remove
abandoned bicycles in locations of high
parking demand on a regular basis
local shops, including district and local
• Better promotion of Park Your Bike
centres, through the development and
scheme to provide free Sheffield stands to
implementation of the Cycle Network
local shops
Plan.
• Increase provision of cycle parking at key
locations in the city centre
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
• Identify and address missing links to
31
City Of Cardiff Council
As a major employer within the City, it important that City of Cardiff Council promotes cycling to its own
staff for short journeys to and for work in order to save the Council and its employees time and money and
contribute to the health and wellbeing of our workforce.
Some of the initiatives already in place to promote cycling and manage demand for car parking are set
out below, however we recognise that more can be done and will be developing an internal action plan to
improve the promotion of cycling to our staff.
CYCLE FACILITIES FOR EMPLOYEES
•
•
•
•
•
Cycle parking
Shower and changing facilities at County Hall and Willcox House
Lockers at main council sites
Pool bikes for work travel with an online booking system at County Hall and Willcox House
Free annual bike safety checks with Dr Bike
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
1 IN 5
32
As part of the programme to rationalise the number of buildings operated by the Council, the number
of staff based at County Hall has increased, leading to an increase in demand for car parking spaces. As
a result, the Council has introduced a parking management scheme at County Hall where staff with car
park permits are allocated one day a week where they are not permitted to park their car on site and are
encouraged to travel to work on their car free day using sustainable modes.
Next Steps
• Develop an internal action plan to improve promotion of cycling to City of Cardiff Council
staff
33
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
4. Action Plan
21/26
20/21
19/20
18/19
17/18
Action Plan
Develop two primary route corridors to all ages and abilities cycling
standards, including a North – South route linking strategic sites in north
east Cardiff to Cardiff Bay via the City Centre and an East – West route
linking strategic sites at St Mellons to strategic sites in north west Cardif
via the City Centre
Develop concept designs in consultation with residents, businesses, cycling
groups and other stakeholders:
•
•
Start phased construction
Complete construction
•
Develop a city wide network of all ages and abilities primary routes
•
Develop phased implementation plan for city wide network of routes
Develop concept designs for two additional primary route corridors
highlighted in plan in consultation with residents, businesses, cycling groups
and other stakeholders:
•
•
Phase construction of additional primary route corridors highlighted in plan
INFRASTRUCTURE
Develop and implement a City Centre Movement Strategy for all modes
through the City Centre
Develop concept designs including cycling connections through the City
Centre in consultation with residents, businesses, cycling groups and other
stakeholders
•
•
Start phased construction of cycling connections through the city centre
as part of the delivery of provision for all modes through the City Centre
Movement Strategy
•
Complete implementation of cycling connections through the city centre
Develop and implement a prioritized plan to address missing links across
the wider cycle network
Develop a prioritised plan to address missing links across the wider
network, in consultation with residents, businesses, cycling groups and
other stakeholders.
•
Establish a capital budget to address top priority missing links on an annual
basis
•
• • • •
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
Delivery of prioritised schemes to address missing links
36
Develop new guidelines for all ages and abilities cycle infrastructure
design in Cardiff, taking into account Welsh Government Active Travel
Design Guidance.
•
Develop and deliver a staff training programme on the implementation of
good cycle infrastructure design
•
Submit Final Network Plan as part of Integrated Network Map to Welsh
Government for approval
•
Establish an annual ring-fenced budget for maintenance of existing cycle
routes
•
Launch a public on street cycle hire scheme
Implement a Cycle Hub with secure cycle parking provision for 500 cycles
as part of the redevelopment of Central Square
•
•
RETAIL
•
Identify funding to improve provision of covered, secure cycle parking at
schools
•
Improve provision of information and advice to workplaces on best
practice for promoting cycling to employees
•
Improve promotion of existing workplace initiatives offered by the
Council, including the Park Your Bike scheme offering free cycle stands to
organisations and Free Adult Cycle Training for anyone living, working or
studying in the city
•
Develop an annual programme to increase provision of cycle parking at
local shops
Implement programme to remove abandoned bicycles in locations of high
parking demand on a regular basis
Better promotion of Park Your Bike scheme to provide free Sheffield
stands to local shops
Establish a Cycling Steering Group with membership open to business,
public sector organisations and cycling interest groups
Review progress on action plan and identify additional actions to target
additional key partners by 2026
21/26
20/21
•
Pilot a bicycle station to enable small businesses to share facilities for
employees travelling by bike
Develop an annual programme to increase provision of cycle parking at
key locations in the city centre
19/20
•
Develop a detailed programme to promote cycling to school
Make a Business Case to the Business Improvement District (BID) to
provide cycle friendly measures to increase footfall within the BID through
better access by bicycle
£
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
Identify opportunities to improve infrastructure links to new school sites
in collaboration with the School Organisation project
18/19
17/18
SCHOOLS
WORKPLACES
Identify missing infrastructure links to existing schools, including active
engagement with schoolchildren in collaboration with Sustrans through
Welsh Government’s Active Schools project
37
Cardiff Cycling Strategy:
The Next Steps
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y
This document forms the Draft Cycling Strategy for public consultation. The next steps for the publication
of a new Cycle Strategy for Cardiff are as follows:
38
End of Public Consultation
27TH MARCH 2017
Review of Consultation Responses
APRIL TO MAY 2017
Amendments Made to Cycle Strategy Where
Required
MAY 2017
Council Approval of Cycle Strategy
JULY 2017
Publication of Cycle Strategy
JULY 2017
39
C YC L I N G S T R AT E G Y

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