B.E. Automobile Engineering

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ANNA UNIVERSITY, CHENNAI
UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTS
B.E. AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING
REGULATIONS – 2015
CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM
Programme Educational Objectives (PEO)
PEO1: Students will excel in their professional career in automobile industry and research with
highest professional and ethical standards to their activities by acquiring knowledge in basic
engineering, mathematics, science and automobile engineering.
PEO2: Students will exhibit professionalism, team work in their chosen profession and adapt to
current trends, technologies and industrial scenarios by pursuing lifelong learning
Programme Outcomes (PO)
a. Graduate will demonstrate strong basics in mathematics, science and Engineering
b. Graduate will demonstrate the ability to design and conduct Experiments, as well as to analyze
and interpret data.
c. Graduate will demonstrate the ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired
needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health
and Safety, manufacturability and sustainability.
d. Graduate will become familiar with modern Engineering tools and analyse the problems within
the domains of Automobile Engineering as the members of multidisciplinary teams.
e. Graduate will acquire the capability to identify, formulate and solve complex engineering
problems related to Automobile Engineering
f. Graduate will demonstrate and understanding of professional and ethical responsibility with
reference to their career in the field of Automobile Engineering
g. Graduate will be able to communicate effectively both in verbal non-verbal forms
h. Graduate will be trained towards developing the impact of development of Automobile
engineering on global, economic environment and societal context
i. Graduate will be capable of understanding the value for life-long learning
1
j. Graduate will demonstrate knowledge of contemporary issues focusing on the necessary to
develop new material, design, and engineering practice in the field of Automobile Engineering
k. Graduate will demonstrate the ability to use the techniques , skills and Modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice in the field of Automobile Engineering
l. Graduate will have a firm scientific, technological and communication base that helps them either
to find a desire placement or to become an Entrepreneur and explore their knowledge in their field.
m. Graduate will be capable of doing higher studies and research in inter and multi-disciplinary
areas.
Mapping PEO with POs:
PEO
a
b
c
d
e
f
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ANNA UNIVERSITY, CHENNAI
UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTS
B.E. AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING
REGULATIONS – 2015
CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM
CURRICULA I - VIII SEMESTERS
AND
SYLLABI I & II SEMESTERS
I SEMESTER
S.
COURSE
No CODE
THEORY
1. HS7151
2. MA7151
3. PH7151
4. CY7151
5. GE7152
PRACTICALS
6. BS7161
7. GE7162
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
Foundational English
Mathematics – I
Engineering Physics
Engineering Chemistry
Engineering Graphics
HS
BS
BS
BS
ES
4
4
3
3
5
4
4
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
3
3
4
Basic Sciences
Laboratory
Engineering Practices
Laboratory
BS
4
0
0
4
2
ES
4
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
27
17
2
8
22
CATEGORY
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
Technical English
Mathematics - II
Computing
Techniques
Materials Science
Engineering
Mechanics
Production Processes
HS
BS
ES
4
4
3
4
4
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
3
BS
ES
3
4
3
4
0
0
0
0
3
4
ES
3
3
0
0
3
Computer Practices
Laboratory
Production Processess
Laboratory
ES
4
0
0
4
2
ES
4
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
29
21
0
8
25
II SEMESTER
S.
COURSE
No CODE
THEORY
1. HS7251
2. MA7251
3. GE7151
4. PH7251
5. GE7153
6. PR7251
PRACTICALS
7. GE7161
8. PR7261
COURSE TITLE
3
III SEMESTER
S.
COURSE
No CODE
THEORY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
PRACTICALS
7.
8.
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
Environmental Science
and Engineering
Numerical Methods
Mechanics of Solid
Thermodynamics and
Thermal Engineering
Electrical and
Electronics
Engineering
Automotive Petrol
Engines
HS
3
3
0
0
3
BS
ES
ES
4
3
4
4
3
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
3
4
ES
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
Mechanical Science
Laboratory
Electrical and
Electronic Engineering
Laboratory
BS
4
0
0
4
2
ES
4
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
28
20
0
8
24
CATEGORY
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
ES
3
3
0
0
3
ES
4
4
0
0
4
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
PC
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PC
4
0
0
4
2
PC
4
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
27
19
0
8
23
IV SEMESTER
S.
COURSE
No CODE
THEORY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
PRACTICALS
7.
8.
COURSE TITLE
Engineering Fluid
Mechanics
Kinematics &
Dynamics of Machines
Theory of Fuels and
Lubricants
Automotive Diesel
Engines
Automotive Chassis
Metrology &
Measurement System
Automotive Engine
and Chassis
Components
Laboratory
Fuels and Lubricants
Laboratory
4
V SEMESTER
S.
COURSE
No CODE
THEORY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
PRACTICALS
7.
8.
S.
No
COURS
E
CODE
THEORY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
PRACTICALS
7.
8.
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
Automotive
Components Design
Automotive
Transmission
Electronic Engine
Management System
Automotive Electrical
and Electronics
Systems
Professional Elective I
Professional Elective II
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PE
PE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
Automotive Electrical
and Electronics
Laboratory
Simulation of Engine
and Chassis
Components
Laboratory
PC
4
0
0
4
2
PC
4
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
26
18
0
8
22
COURSE TITLE
VI SEMESTER
CATEGORY
Automotive Pollution and
Control
Vehicle Body
Engineering
Vehicle Control System
Hybrid and Electric
Vehicles
Professional Elective III
Open Elective- I*
Creative and Innovative
Project
Engine Testing and
Emission Measurement
Laboratory
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
PC
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PE
OE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
EEC
6
0
0
6
3
PC
4
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
28
18
0
10
23
5
VII SEMESTER
S.
COURSE
No CODE
THEORY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
PRACTICALS
7.
8.
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
Hydraulic and
Pneumatic Systems
Vehicle Dynamics
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
Engineering Ethics
and Human Values
Professional Elective
IV
Professional Elective V
Open Elective- II*
HS
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
OE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
EEC
4
0
0
4
2
PC
4
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
26
18
0
8
22
CATEGORY
CONTACT
PERIODS
L
T
P
C
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
EEC
20
0
0
20
10
26
6
0
20
16
Industrial Training and
Seminar
Vehicle Testing
Laboratory
VIII SEMESTER
S.
COURSE
No CODE
THEORY
1.
2.
PRACTICALS
3.
COURSE TITLE
Professional Elective
VI
Professional Elective
VII
Project work
TOTAL
TOTAL NO. OF CREDITS:177
*Course from the curriculum of other UG Programmes
6
HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (HS)
S.
COURSE
No CODE
1.
2.
3.
4.
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
Foundational English
Technical English
Environmental Science
and Engineering
Engineering Ethics and
Human Values
L
T
P
C
HS
HS
HS
CONTACT
PERIODS
4
4
3
4
4
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
3
HS
3
3
0
0
3
L
T
P
C
4
3
3
0
4
3
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
4
4
3
3
2
4
3
4
2
BASIC SCIENCES (BS)
S.
No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
Mathematics – I
Engineering Physics
Engineering Chemistry
Basic Science Lab
Mathematics - II
Materials Science
Numerical Methods
Mechanical Science
Laboratory
BS
BS
BS
BS
BS
BS
BS
BS
CONTACT
PERIODS
4
3
3
4
4
3
4
4
ENGINEERING SCIENCES (ES)
S.
No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
COURSE COURSE TITLE
CODE
Engineering Graphics
Engineering Practices
Laboratory
Engineering Mechanics
Production Processes
Production Processes
Laboratory
Mechanics of Solid
Thermodynamics and
Thermal Engineering
Electrical and
Electronics Engineering
Electrical and Electronic
Engineering Laboratory
Engineering Fluid
Mechanics
Kinematics & Dynamics
of Machines
Computer Practice
Laboratory
Computing Techniques
CATEGORY
L
T
P
C
ES
ES
CONTACT
PERIODS
5
4
3
0
2
0
0
4
4
2
ES
ES
ES
4
3
4
4
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
3
2
ES
ES
3
4
3
4
0
0
0
0
3
4
ES
3
3
0
0
3
ES
4
0
0
4
2
ES
3
3
0
0
3
ES
4
4
0
0
4
ES
4
0
0
4
2
ES
3
3
0
0
3
7
PROFESSIONAL CORE (PC)
S.
No
1.
Automotive Petrol
Engines
Theory of Fuels and
Lubricants
Automotive Diesel
Engines
Automotive Chassis
Metrology &
Measurement System
Automotive Engine and
Chassis Components
Laboratory
Fuels and Lubricants
Laboratory
Automotive
Components Design
Automotive
Transmission
Electronic Engine
Management System
Automotive Electrical
and Electronics
Systems
Automotive Electrical
and Electronics
Laboratory
Simulation of Engine
and Chassis
Components
Laboratory
Automotive Pollution
and Control
Vehicle Body
Engineering
Vehicle Control System
Hybrid and Electric
Vehicles
Engine Testing and
Emission Measurement
Laboratory
PC
CONTACT
PERIODS
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
PC
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PC
4
0
0
4
2
PC
4
0
0
4
2
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
4
0
0
4
2
PC
4
0
0
4
2
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
3
3
0
0
3
PC
PC
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PC
4
0
0
4
2
19.
Hydraulic and
Pneumatic Systems
PC
3
3
0
0
3
20.
21.
Vehicle Dynamics
Vehicle Testing
Laboratory
PC
PC
3
4
3
0
0
0
0
4
3
2
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
8
L
T
P
C
3
0
0
3
PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES (PE)
S.
No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE
Advance Theory of IC
Engines
Advance Vehicle
Technology
Alternative Fuels and
Energy System
Automotive
Aerodynamics
Automotive Test
Instrumentation
Combustion
Thermodynamics and
Heat Transfer
Computational Fluid
Mechanics
Principles of Control
System
Simulation of IC
Engines
Noise, Vibration and
Harshness
Polymer Components
in Automotive
Applications
Two and Three
Wheeler Technology
Vehicle Multiplexing
Special Types of
Vehicles
Vehicle AirConditioning
Virtual Instrumentation
in Automobile
Engineering
Finite Element
Techniques
Automotive Materials
Fundamentals of Nano
Science
Vehicle Maintenance
Total Quality
Management
Vehicle Modeling
Quantitative
techniques in
management
Quality control and
reliability
Manufacturing of
Automotive
Components
CATEGORY
L
T
P
C
PE
CONTACT
PERIODS
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
PE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
PE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PE
PE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PE
PE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
3
3
0
0
3
9
26.
27.
28.
Automotive
Automation
Human Rights
Disaster Management
PE
3
3
0
0
3
PE
PE
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
EMPLOYABILITY ENHANCEMENT COURSES (EEC)
S.
COURSE
No CODE
1.
2.
3.
COURSE TITLE
CATEGORY
L
T
P
C
EEC
CONTACT
PERIODS
6
Creative and
Innovative Project
Industrial Training
and Seminar
Project work
0
0
6
3
EEC
4
0
0
4
2
EEC
20
0
0
20
10
10
SUMMARY
S.NO.
SUBJECT
AREA
1.
HS
2.
BS
3.
ES
4.
PC
5.
PE
6.
OE
7.
EEC
Total
8.
CREDITS AS PER SEMESTER
CREDITS
TOTAL
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
04
04
03
00
00
00
00
00
11
12
12
06
00
00
00
00
00
30
06
09
12
07
00
00
00
00
34
00
00
03
16
16
14
11
00
60
00
00
00
00
06
03
06
06
21
00
00
00
00
00
03
03
00
06
00
00
00
00
00
03
02
10
15
22
25
24
23
22
23
22
16
177
Non Credit /
Mandatory
11
HS7151
FOUNDATIONAL ENGLISH
LT PC
4 0 04
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
 This course aims at developing the language skills necessary for the first year students of
Engineering and Technology.
OBJECTIVES:
 To develop the four language skills – Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing.
 To improve the students’ communicative competence in English.
 To teach students the various aspects of English language usage.
CONTENTS
UNIT I
GREETING AND INTRODUCING ONESELF
12
Listening- Types of listening – Listening to short talks, conversations; Speaking – Speaking
about one’s place, important festivals etc. – Introducing oneself, one’s family/ friend; Reading –
Skimming a passage– Scanning for specific information; Writing- Guided writing - Free writing on
any given topic
(My favourite place/ Hobbies/ School life, writing about one’s leisure time
activities, hometown, etc.); Grammar – Tenses (present and present continuous) -Question types
- Regular and irregular verbs; Vocabulary – Synonyms and Antonyms.
UNIT II
GIVING INSTRUCTIONS AND DIRECTIONS
12
Listening – Listening and responding to instructions; Speaking – Telephone etiquette - Giving
oral instructions/ Describing a process – Asking and answering questions; Reading – Reading and
finding key information in a given text - Critical reading - Writing –Process description( nontechnical)- Grammar – Tense (simple past& past continuous) - Use of imperatives – Subject –
verb agreement – Active and passive voice; - Vocabulary – Compound words – Word formation –
Word expansion (root words).
UNIT III
READING AND UNDERSTANDING VISUAL MATERIAL
12
Listening- Listening to lectures/ talks and completing a task; Speaking –Role play/ Simulation –
Group interaction; Reading – Reading and interpreting visual material; Writing- Jumbled
sentences – Discourse markers and Cohesive devices – Essay writing (cause & effect/
narrative);Grammar – Tenses (perfect), Conditional clauses –Modal verbs; Vocabulary –Cause
and effect words; Phrasal verbs in context.
UNIT IV
CRITICAL READING AND WRITING
12
Listening- Watching videos/ documentaries and responding to questions based on them;
Speaking Informal and formal conversation; Reading –Critical reading (prediction &
inference);Writing–Essay writing (compare & contrast/ analytical) – Interpretation of visual
materials; Grammar – Tenses (future time reference);Vocabulary – One word substitutes (with
meanings) – Use of abbreviations & acronyms – Idioms in sentences.
UNIT V
LETTER WRITING AND SENDING E-MAILS
12
Listening- Listening to programmes/broadcast/ telecast/ podcast; Speaking – Giving impromptu
talks, Making presentations on given topics- Discussion on the presentation; Reading –Extensive
reading; Writing- Poster making – Letter writing (Formal and E-mail) ;Grammar – Direct and
Indirect speech – Combining sentences using connectives; Vocabulary –Collocation;
TEACHING METHODS:
Interactive sessions for the speaking module.
Use of audio – visual aids for the various listening activities.
Contextual Grammar Teaching.
EVALUATION PATTERN:
Internals – 50%
End Semester – 50%
TOTAL:60 PERIODS
12
OUTCOMES:
 Students will improve their reading and writing skills
 Students will become fluent and proficient in communicative English
 Students will be able to improve their interpersonal communication
TEXTBOOK:
1. Richards, Jack.C with Jonathan Hull and Susan Proctor New Interchange : English for
International Communication. (level2, Student’s Book)
Cambridge University
Press,New Delhi: 2010.
REFERENCES:
1. Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A practical guide for students. New York:
Rutledge,2011.
2. Morgan, David and Nicholas Regan. Take-Off: Technical English for Engineering.
London: Garnet Publishing Limited, 2008.
3. Redston, Chris & Gillies Cunningham Face2Face (Pre-intermediate Student’s Book&
Workbook) Cambridge University Press, New Delhi: 2005
4. Comfort, Jeremy, et al. Speaking Effectively : Developing Speaking Skills for Business
English. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: Reprint 2011.
MA7151
MATHEMATICS – I
(Common to all branches of B.E. / B.Tech.
Programmes in I Semester)
L
4
T
0
P
0
C
4
OBJECTIVES:
 The goal of this course is for students to gain proficiency in calculus computations.
In calculus, we use three main tools for analyzing and describing the behavior of functions:
limits, derivatives, and integrals. Students will use these tools to solve application problems
in a variety of settings ranging from physics and biology to business and economics.
 To make the student acquire sound knowledge of techniques in solving ordinary differential
equations that model engineering problems.
 To familiarize the student with functions of several variables. This is needed in many
branches of engineering.
 To acquaint the student with mathematical tools needed in evaluating multiple integrals and
their usage.
UNIT I
DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS
12
Representation of functions - New functions from old functions - Limit of a function - Limits at
infinity - Continuity - Derivatives - Differentiation rules - Polar coordinate system - Differentiation in
polar coordinates - Maxima and Minima of functions of one variable.
UNIT II
FUNCTIONS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES
12
Partial derivatives – Homogeneous functions and Euler’s theorem – Total derivative –
Differentiation of implicit funns – Change of variables – Jacobians – Partial differentiation of implicit
functions – Taylor’s series for functions of two variables – Errors and approximations – Maxima
and minima of functions of two variables – Lagrange’s method of undetermined multipliers.
UNIT III
INTEGRAL CALCULUS
12
Definite and Indefinite integrals - Substitution rule - Techniques of Integration - Integration by
parts, Trigonometric integrals, Trigonometric substitutions, Integration of rational functions by
partial fraction, Integration of irrational functions - Improper integrals.
13
UNIT IV
MULTIPLE INTEGRALS
12
Double integrals – Change of order of integration – Double integrals in polar coordinates – Area
enclosed by plane curves – Triple integrals – Volume of solids – Change of variables in double
and triple integrals.
UNIT V
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
12
Method of variation of parameters – Method of undetermined coefficients – Homogenous equation
of Euler’s and Legendre’s type – System of simultaneous linear differential equations with constant
coefficients.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
OUTCOMES:
 Understanding of the ideas of limits and continuity and an ability to calculate with them and
apply them.
 Improved facility in algebraic manipulation.
 Fluency in differentiation.
 Fluency in integration using standard methods, including the ability to find an appropriate
method for a given integral.
 Understanding the ideas of differential equations and facility in solving simple standard
examples.
TEXTBOOKS:
1.
James Stewart, "Calculus with Early Transcendental Functions", Cengage Learning, New
Delhi, 2008.
2.
Narayanan S. and Manicavachagom Pillai T. K., “Calculus" Volume I and II, S.
Viswanathan Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Chennai, 2007.
3.
Erwin Kreyszig, "Advanced Engineering Mathematics", John Wiley and Sons, 9th Edition,
New Delhi, 2014.
4.
Grewal B.S., “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 43rd
Edition, 2014.
REFERENCES:
1.
Ramana B.V., “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Tata McGraw Hill Co. Ltd., New Delhi,
11th Reprint, 2010.
2.
Jain R.K. and Iyengar S.R.K., “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Narosa Publications,
New Delhi, 3rd Edition, 2007.
3.
Bali N., Goyal M. and Watkins C., “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Firewall Media
(An imprint of Lakshmi Publications Pvt., Ltd.,), New Delhi, 7th Edition, 2009.
4.
Greenberg M.D., “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Pearson Education, New Delhi,
2nd Edition, 5th Reprint, 2009.
5.
Peter V.O’Neil, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Cengage Learning India Pvt., Ltd,
New Delhi, 2007.
14
PH7151
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
(Common to all branches of B.E / B.Tech programmes)
L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To introduce the basic physics concepts relevant to different branches of Engineering and
Technology.
UNIT I
PROPERTIES OF MATTER
9
Elasticity – Poisson’s ratio and relationship between moduli (qualitative) - stress-strain diagram for
ductile and brittle materials, uses - factors affecting elastic modulus and tensile strength - bending
of beams - cantilever - bending moment - Young’s modulus determination - theory and experiment
- uniform and non-uniform bending - I shaped girders - twisting couple - hollow cylinder - shaft torsion pendulum - determination of rigidity modulus- moment of inertia of a body (regular and
irregular).
UNIT II
ACOUSTICS AND ULTRASONICS
9
Classification of sound - loudness and intensity - Weber-Fechner Law - standard intensity and
intensity level - decibel - reverberation - reverberation time - calculation of reverberation time for
different types of buildings – sound absorbing materials - factors affecting acoustics of buildings :
focussing, interference, echo, echelon effect, resonance - noise and their remedies. Ultrasonics:
production - magnetostriction and piezoelectric methods - detection of ultrasound - acoustic
grating – ultrasonic interferometer - industrial applications – Non-destructive testing - ultrasonic
method: scan modes and practice.
UNIT III
THERMAL AND MODERN PHYSICS
9
Thermal expansion - thermal stress - expansion joints - bimetallic strips - thermal conductivityheat conductions in solids – flow of heat through compound media - Forbe’s and Lee’s disc
method: theory and experiment- Black body radiation – Planck’s theory (derivation) – Compton
effect – wave model of radiation and matter – Schrödinger’s wave equation – time dependent and
independent equations – Physical significance of wave function – particle in a one dimensional
box.
UNIT IV
APPLIED OPTICS
9
Interference - Michelson interferometer: construction, working, determination of wave length and
thickness - anti-reflection coating - air wedge and its applications - Lasers – principle and
applications – Einstein’s coefficients – CO2 and Nd:YAG laser - semiconductor lasers: homo
junction and hetro junction - construction and working – applications. Optical fibres - classification
(index & mode based) - principle and propagation of light in optical fibres - acceptance angle and
numerical aperture - fibre optic communication system - active and passive sensors.
UNIT V
CRYSTAL PHYSICS
9
Single crystalline, polycrystalline and amorphous materials – Single crystals: unit cell, crystal
systems, Bravais lattices, ditections and planes in a crystal, Miller indices - interplanar distance for
a cubic crystal - coordination number and packing factor for SC, BCC, FCC, HCP and diamond
structures - structure and significance of NaCl, CsCl, ZnS and graphite - crystal imperfections:
point defects, line defects – Burger vectors, dislocations and stacking faults – Growth of single
crystals: Bridgman and Czochralski methods.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
OUTCOME:
 The students will acquire knowledge on the basics of physics related to properties of matter,
optics, acoustics etc., and they will apply these fundamental principles to solve practical
problems related to materials used for engineering applications.
TEXTBOOKS:
1. Gaur R.K. and Gupta S.L., “Engineering Physics”, Dhanpat Rai Publications (2013)
2. Palanisamy P.K., “Engineering Physics”, Scitech Publications (P) Ltd. (2006).
15
2. Arumugam M., “Engineering Physics”, Anuradha Publications (2000)
REFERENCES:
1. Serway R.A. and Jewett, J.W. “Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics”.
Brooks/cole Publishing Co. (2010).
2. Tipler P.A. and Mosca, G.P., “Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics”.
W.H.Freeman, (2007).
3. Markert J.T.,Ohanian, H. and Ohanian, M. “Physics for Engineers and Scientists”. W.W.Norton
& Co. (2007).
CY7151
ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY
L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
 To develop an understanding about fundamentals of polymer chemistry.
 Brief elucidation on surface chemistry and catalysis.
 To develop sound knowledge photochemistry and spectroscopy.
 To impart basic knowledge on chemical thermodynamics.
 To understand the basic concepts of nano chemistry.
UNIT I
POLYMER CHEMISTRY
9
Introduction: Functionality-degree of polymerization. Classification of polymers- natural and
synthetic, thermoplastic and thermosetting. Types and mechanism of polymerization: addition
(free radical, cationic, anionic and living); condensation and copolymerization. Properties of
polymers: Tg, tacticity, molecular weight-weight average, number average and polydispersity
index. Techniques of polymerization: Bulk, emulsion, solution and suspension.
UNIT II
SURFACE CHEMISTRYAND CATALYSIS
9
Adsorption-Types of adsorption-adsorption of gases on solids- adsorption from solutionsTypes of isotherms–Frendlich adsorption isotherm, Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Industrial
applications of adsorption. Catalysis: Characteristics and types of catalysts-homogeneous
and heterogeneous, auto catalysis. Enzyme catalysis -factors affecting enzyme catalysis,
Michaelis- Menton equation. Industrial applications of catalysts.
UNIT III
PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND SPECTROSCOPY
9
Photochemistry: Laws of photochemistry-Grotthuss-Draper law, Stark-Einstein law and
Lambert-Beer Law. Photo processes-internal conversion, inter-system crossing,
fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence and photo-sensitization. Spectroscopy:
Electromagnetic spectrum-absorption of radiation-electronic, vibrational and rotational
transitions. Width and intensities of spectral lines. Spectrophotometric estimation of iron. UVVis and IR spectroscopy- principles, instrumentation (Block diagram) and applications.
UNIT IV
CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS
9
Second law: Entropy-entropy change for an ideal gas, reversible and irreversible processes;
entropy of phase transitions; Free energy and work function: Helmholtzand Gibbs free energy
functions; Criteria of spontaneity; Gibbs-Helmholtz equation; Clausius Clapeyron equation;
Maxwell relations-Van’t Hoff isotherm and isochore. Chemical potential; Gibbs-Duhem
equation- variation of chemical potential with temperature and pressure.
UNIT V
NANOCHEMISTRY
9
Basics-distinction between molecules, nanoparticles and bulk materials; size-dependent
properties. Preparation of nanoparticles – sol-gel and solvothermal. Preparation of carbon
16
nanotube by chemical vapour deposition and laser ablation. Preparation of nanowires by VLS
growth, electrochemical deposition and electro spinning. Properties and uses of
nanoparticles, nanoclusters, nanorods, nanotubes and nanowires.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
OUTCOME
 Will be familiar with polymer chemistry, surface chemistry and catalysis.
 Will know the photochemistry, spectroscopy and chemical thermodynamics.
 Will know the fundamentals of nano chemistry.
TEXTBOOKS
1. Jain P. C. & Monica Jain., “Engineering Chemistry”, DhanpatRai Publishing Company
(P) Ltd, New Delhi, 2014.
2. Kannan P., Ravikrishnan A., “Engineering Chemistry”, Sri Krishna Hitech Publishing
Company
Pvt. Ltd. Chennai, 2014
REFERENCES
1. Pahari A., Chauhan B., “Engineering Chemistry”, Firewall Media, New Delhi, 2012.
2. Sivasankar B., “Engineering Chemistry”, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd,
New Delhi, 2012.
3. AshimaSrivastava. Janhavi N N, Concepts of Engineering Chemistry”, ACME Learning
Private Limited., New Delhi., 2010.
4. Vairam S., Kalyani P., Suba Ramesh., “Engineering Chemistry”, Wiley India Pvt Ltd.,
New Delhi., 2011.
GE7152
ENGINEERING GRAPHICS
L T P
3 2 0
C
4
OBJECTIVES
• To develop in students, graphic skills for communication of concepts, ideas and design of
engineering products and expose them to existing national standards related to technical
drawings.
CONCEPTS AND CONVENTIONS (NOT FOR EXAMINATION)
1
Importance of graphics in engineering applications – Use of drafting instruments – BIS
conventions and specifications – Size, layout and folding of drawing sheets – Lettering and
dimensioning.
UNIT I
PLANE CURVES AND FREE HANDSKETCHING
14
Basic Geometrical constructions, Curves used in engineering practices-Conics –
Construction of ellipse, parabola and hyperbola by eccentricity method – Construction of
cycloid – construction of involutes of square and circle – Drawing of tangents and normal to
the above curves. Visualization concepts and Free Hand sketching: Visualization principles –
Representation of Three Dimensional objects – Layout of views- Free hand sketching of
multiple views from pictorial views of objects
UNIT II
PROJECTION OF POINTS, LINES AND PLANE SURFACES
14
Orthographic projection- principles-Principal planes-First angle projection-Projection of points.
Projection of straight lines (only First angle projections) inclined to both the principal planesDetermination of true lengths and true inclinations by rotating line method and trapezoidal
method and traces Projection of planes (polygonal and circular surfaces) inclined to both the
principal planes by rotating object method.
17
UNIT III
PROJECTION OF SOLIDS
14
Projection of simple solids like prisms, pyramids, cylinder, cone and truncated solids when
the axis is inclined to both the principal planes by rotating object method and auxiliary plane
method.
UNIT IV
PROJECTION OF SECTIONED SOLIDS AND DEVELOPMENT OF 14
SURFACES
Sectioning of solids in simple vertical position when the cutting plane is inclined to the one of
the principal planes and perpendicular to the other – obtaining true shape of section.
Development of lateral surfaces of simple and sectioned solids – Prisms, pyramids cylinders
and cones. Development of lateral surfaces of solids with cut-outs and holes.
UNIT V
ISOMETRIC AND PERSPECTIVE PROJECTIONS
15
Principles of isometric projection – isometric scale –Isometric projections of simple solids and
truncated solids - Prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones- combination of two solid objects in
simple vertical positions and miscellaneous problems.
Perspective projection of simple solids-Prisms, pyramids and cylinders by visual ray method
and vanishing point method.
COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING (DEMONSTRATION ONLY)
3
Introduction to drafting packages and demonstration of their use.
L=45+T=30, TOTAL: 75 PERIODS
OUTCOMES:
On Completion of the course the student will be able to
 Perform free hand sketching of basic geometrical shapes and multiple views of
objects.
 Draw orthographic projections of lines, planes and solids
 Obtain development of surfaces.
 Prepare isometric and perspective views of simple solids.
TEXT BOOK:
1.
N.D.Bhatt and V.M.Panchal, “Engineering Drawing”, Charotar Publishing House, 50th
Edition, 2010.
REFERENCES:
1.
K.R.Gopalakrishna., “Engineering Drawing” (Vol I&II combined) SubhasStores,
Bangalore, 2007
2.
Luzzader, Warren.J., and Duff,John M.,,’’ Fundamentals of Engineering Drawingwith an
introduction to Interactive Computer Graphics for Design and Production”,Eastern
Economy Edition, Prentice Hall of India Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, 2005
3. M.B.Shah and B.C.Rana, “Engineering Drawing”, Pearson, 2nd Edition, 2009
4. K.Venugopal and V.Prabhu Raja, “Engineering Graphics”, New Age International
(P)Limited ,2008.
5. K. V.Natarajan, “A text book of Engineering Graphics”, 28th Edition, Dhanalakshmi
Publishers, Chennai, 2015.
6. BasantAgarwal and Agarwal C.M., “Engineering Drawing”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing
Company Limited, New Delhi, 2008.
7. N.S Parthasarathy and Vela Murali, “ Engineering Drawing”, Oxford University Press,
2015
Publication of Bureau of Indian Standards:
1. IS 10711 – 2001: Technical products Documentation – Size and lay out ofdrawing
sheets
2. IS 9609 (Parts 0 & 1) – 2001: Technical products Documentation – Lettering.
3. IS 10714 (Part 20) – 2001 & SP 46 – 2003: Lines for technical drawings.
4. IS 11669 – 1986 & SP 46 – 2003: Dimensioning of Technical Drawings.
5. IS 15021 (Parts 1 to 4) – 2001: Technical drawings – Projection Methods.
18
Special points applicable to University Examinations on Engineering Graphics:
1. There will be five questions, each of either or type covering all units of the syllabus.
2. All questions will carry equal marks of 20 each making a total of 100.
3. The answer paper shall consist of drawing sheets of A3 size only. The students will be
permitted to use appropriate scale to fit solution within A3 size.
4. The examination will be conducted in appropriate sessions on the same day.
BS7161
BASIC SCIENCES LABORATORY
(Common to all branches of B.E. / B.Tech Programmes)
LT PC
0 04 2
PHYSICS LABORATORY: (Any Seven Experiments)
OBJECTIVE:
To introduce different experiments to test basic understanding of physics concepts applied in
optics, thermal physics, properties of matter and liquids.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Torsional pendulum - Determination of rigidity modulus of wire and moment of inertia of disc
Non-uniform bending - Determination of young’s modulus
Uniform bending – Determination of young’s modulus
Lee’s disc Determination of thermal conductivity of a bad conductor
Potentiometer-Determination of thermo e.m.f of a thermocouple
Laser- Determination of the wave length of the laser using grating
Air wedge - Determination of thickness of a thin sheet/wire
a) Optical fibre -Determination of Numerical Aperture and acceptance angle
b) Compact disc- Determination of width of the groove using laser.
9. Acoustic grating- Determination of velocity of ultrasonic waves in liquids.
10. Ultrasonic interferometer – determination of the velocity of sound and compressibility of
liquids
11. Post office box -Determination of Band gap of a semiconductor.
12. Spectrometer- Determination of wavelength using gating.
13. Viscosity of liquids - Determination of co-efficient of viscosity of a liquid by
Poiseuille‟s flow
OUTCOME:
 The hands on exercises undergone by the students will help them to apply physics
principles of optics and thermal physics to evaluate engineering properties of materials.
CHEMISTRY LABORATORY:
(Minimum of 8 experiments to be conducted)
1. Estimation of HCl using Na2CO3 as primary standard and Determination of alkalinity in water
sample.
2. Determination of total, temporary & permanent hardness of water by EDTA method.
3. Determination of DO content of water sample by Winkler’s method.
4. Determination of chloride content of water sample by argentometric method.
5. Estimation of copper content of the given solution by Iodometry.
6. Determination of strength of given hydrochloric acid using pH meter.
7. Determination of strength of acids in a mixture of acids using conductivity meter.
8. Estimation of iron content of the given solution using potentiometer.
9. Estimation of iron content of the water sample using spectrophotometer (1, 10Phenanthroline/thiocyanate method).
10. Estimation of sodium and potassium present in water using flame photometer.
11. Determination of molecular weight of poly vinyl alcohol using Ostwald viscometer.
19
12. Pseudo first order kinetics-ester hydrolysis.
13. Corrosion experiment-weight loss method.
14. Determination of CMC.
15. Phase change in a solid.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
TEXTBOOKS
1. Vogel’s Textbook of Quantitative Chemical Analysis (8TH edition, 2014)
2. Laboratory Manual- Department of Chemistry, CEGC, Anna University (2014).
GE7162
ENGINEERING PRACTICES LABORATORY
(Common to all Branches of B.E. / B.Tech. Programmes)
L
0
T P C
0 4 2
OBJECTIVES
To provide exposure to the students with hands-on experience on various Basic Engineering
Practices in Civil, Mechanical, Electrical and Electronics Engineering.
GROUP – A (CIVIL & ELECTRICAL)
1. CIVIL ENGINEERING PRACTICES
PLUMBING
Basic pipe connections involving the fittings like valves, taps, coupling, unions, reducers,
elbows and other components used in household fittings. Preparation of plumbing line
sketches.
• Laying pipe connection to the suction side of a pump.
• Laying pipe connection to the delivery side of a pump.
• Practice in connecting pipes of different materials: Metal, plastic and flexible pipes used in
household appliances.
15
WOOD WORK
Sawing, planing and making joints like T-Joint, Mortise and Tenon joint and Dovetail
joint.
STUDY
• Study of joints in door panels and wooden furniture
• Study of common industrial trusses using models.
2. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PRACTICES
15
• Basic household wiring using Switches, Fuse, Indicator and Lamp etc.,
• Stair case light wiring
• Tube – light wiring
• Preparation of wiring diagrams for a given situation.
• Study of Iron-Box, Fan Regulator and Emergency Lamp
GROUP – B (MECHANICAL AND ELECTRONICS)
3. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PRACTICES
WELDING
• Arc welding of Butt Joints, Lap Joints, and Tee Joints
• Gas welding Practice.
• Basic Machining - Simple turning, drilling and tapping operations..
• Study and assembling of the following:
Centrifugal pump
a. Mixie
b. Air Conditioner.
c. DEMONSTRATION ON FOUNDRY OPERATIONS.
20
15
4. ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING PRACTICES
• Soldering simple electronic circuits and checking continuity.
• Assembling electronic components on a small PCB and Testing.
• Study of Telephone, FM radio and Low Voltage Power supplies.
15
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
OUTCOMES
 Ability to fabricate carpentry components and to lay pipe connections including plumbing
works.
 Ability to use welding equipments to join the structures
 Ability to do wiring for electrical connections and to fabricate electronics circuits.
HS7251
TECHNICAL ENGLISH
L T P C
4 0 0 4
OBJECTIVES
 To enable students acquire proficiency in technical communication.
 To enhance their reading and writing skills in a technical context.
 To teach various language learning strategies needed in aprofessional environment.
CONTENTS
UNIT I
ANALYTICAL READING
12
Listening- Listening to informal and formal conversations; Speaking – Conversation Skills
(opening, turn taking, closing)- explaining how something works-describing technical functions and
applications; Reading –Analytical reading, Deductive and inductive reasoning; Writing- vision
statement–structuring paragraphs.
UNIT II
SUMMARISING
12
Listening- Listening to lectures/ talks on Science & Technology; Speaking –Summarizing/ Oral
Reporting, Reading – Reading Scientific and Technical articles; Writing- Extended definition –Lab
Reports – Summary writing.
UNIT III
DESCRIBING VISUAL MATERIAL
12
Listening- Listening to a panel discussion; Speaking – Speaking at formal situations; Reading –
Reading journal articles - Speed reading; Writing-data commentary-describing visual materialwriting problem-process- solution-the structure of problem-solution texts- writing critiques
UNIT IV
WRITING/ E-MAILING THE JOB APPLICATION
12
Listening- Listening to/ Viewing model interviews; Speaking –Speaking at different types of
interviews – Role play practice ( mock interview); Reading – Reading job advertisements and
profile of the company concerned; Writing- job application – cover letter –Résumé preparation.
UNIT V
REPORT WRITING
12
Listening- Viewing a model group discussion; Speaking –Participating in a discussion Presentation; Reading – Case study - analyse -evaluate – arrive at a solution; Writing–
Recommendations- Types of reports (feasibility report)- designing and reporting surveys- – Report
format.- writing discursive essays.
TEACHING METHODS:
Practice writing
Conduct model and mock interview and group discussion.
Use of audio – visual aids to facilitate understanding of various forms of technical communication.
21
Interactive sessions.
EVALUATION PATTERN:
Internals – 50%
End Semester – 50%
TOTAL:60 PERIODS
OUTCOMES
 Students will learn the structure and organization of various forms of technical
communication.
 Students will be able to listen and respond to technical content.
 Students will be able to use different forms of communication in their respective fields.
TEXTBOOK:
1. Craig, Thaine. Cambridge Academic English: An integrated skills course for
EAP(Student’s Book)Level: Intermediate Cambridge University Press, New Delhi: 2012
REFERENCES:
1. Laws, Anne. Presentations. Hyderabad: Orient Blackswan, 2011.
2. Ibbotson, Mark. Cambridge English for Engineering. Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge,New Delhi: 2008
3. Naterop, Jean B. and Rod Revell. Telephoning in English. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press, 2004.
4. Rutherford, Andrea J. Basic Communication Skills for Technology. New Delhi: Pearson
Education, 2001.
5. Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing A practical Guide for Students. Routledge, London:
2004
6. Hewings, Martin. Cambridge Academic English: An integrated skills course for
EAP(Student’s Book)Level: Intermediate Cambridge University Press, New Delhi: 2012.
MA7251
MATHEMATICS - II
(Common to all branches of B.E. / B.Tech. Programmes
in II Semester)
L T P
4 0 0
C
4
OBJECTIVES:
 To develop the use of matrix algebra techniques that is needed by engineers for
practical applications.
 To acquaint the student with the concepts of vector calculus, needed for problems in
all engineering disciplines.
 To develop an understanding of the standard techniques of complex variable theory
so as to enable the student to apply them with confidence, in application areas such
as heat conduction, elasticity, fluid dynamics and flow of the electric current.
 To make the student appreciate the purpose of using transforms to create a new
domain in which it is easier to handle the problem that is being investigated.
UNIT I
MATRICES
12
Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of a real matrix – Characteristic equation – Properties of
eigenvalues and eigenvectors – Cayley-Hamilton theorem – Diagonalization of matrices –
Reduction of a quadratic form to canonical form by orthogonal transformation – Nature of
quadratic forms.
22
UNIT II
VECTOR CALCULUS
12
Gradient and directional derivative – Divergence and Curl – Irrotational and Solenoidal
vector fields – Line integral over a plane curve – Surface integral - Area of a curved surface Volume integral - Green’s, Gauss divergence and Stoke’s theorems – Verification and
application in evaluating line, surface and volume integrals.
UNIT III
ANALYTIC FUNCTION
12
Analytic functions – Necessary and sufficient conditions for analyticity - Properties –
Harmonic conjugates – Construction of analytic function - Conformal mapping – Mapping by
functions w  z  c, az,
1 2
, z - Bilinear transformation.
z
UNIT IV
COMPLEX INTEGRATION
12
Line integral - Cauchy’s integral theorem – Cauchy’s integral formula – Taylor’s and
Laurent’s series – Singularities – Residues – Residue theorem – Application of residue
theorem for evaluation of real integrals – Use of circular contour and semicircular contour
with no pole on real axis.
UNIT V
LAPLACE TRANSFORMS
12
Existence conditions – Transforms of elementary functions – Transform of unit step function
and unit impulse function – Basic properties – Shifting theorems -Transforms of derivatives
and integrals – Initial and final value theorems – Inverse transforms – Convolution theorem –
– Transform of periodic functions – Application to solution of linear ordinary differential
equations with constant coefficients.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
OUTCOMES:
 Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
 Evaluate real and complex integrals using the Cauchy integral formula and the
residue theorem
 Appreciate how complex methods can be used to prove some important theoretical
results.
 Evaluate line, surface and volume integrals in simple coordinate systems
 Calculate grad, div and curl in Cartesian and other simple coordinate systems, and
establish identities connecting these quantities
 Use Gauss, Stokes and Greens theorems to simplify calculations of integrals and
prove simple results.
TEXTBOOKS:
1. Erwin Kreyszig, "Advanced Engineering Mathematics", John Wiley and Sons, 9th
Edition, New Delhi, 2014.
2. Grewal B.S., “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 43rd
Edition, 2014.
REFERENCES:
1. Ramana, B.V. “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2010.
2. Glyn James, “Advanced Modern Engineering Mathematics”, Pearson Education, New
Delhi, 2007.
3. Jain R.K. and Iyengar S.R.K., “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Narosa
Publications, New Delhi, 3rd Edition, 2007.
4. Bali N., Goyal M. and Watkins C., “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Firewall Media
(An imprint of Lakshmi Publications Pvt., Ltd.,), New Delhi, 7th Edition, 2009.
5. Peter V. O’Neil , “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Cengage Learning India Pvt.,
Ltd, New Delhi, 2007.
23
GE7151
COMPUTING TECHNIQUES
(Common to all branches of Engineering and Technology)
L T P
3 0 0
C
3
OBJECTIVE
• To learn programming using a structured programming language.
• To provide C programming exposure.
• To introduce foundational concepts of computer programming to students of different
branches of Engineering and Technology.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
9
Introduction to Computers – Computer Software – Computer Networks and Internet - Need for
logical thinking – Problem formulation and development of simple programs - Pseudo code Flow Chart and Algorithms.
UNIT II
C PROGRAMMING BASICS
9
Introduction to C programming – Fundamentals – Structure of a C program – Compilation and
linking processes - Constants, Variables – Data Types – Expressions - Operators –Decision
Making and Branching – Looping statements – Solving Simple Scientific and Statistical
Problems.
UNIT III
ARRAYS AND STRINGS
9
Arrays – Initialization – Declaration – One dimensional and two dimensional arrays - StringsString operations – String Arrays - simple programs- sorting- searching – matrix operations.
UNIT IV
POINTERS
9
Macros - Storage classes –Basic concepts of Pointers– Pointer arithmetic - Example Problems
- Basic file operations
UNIT V
FUNCTIONS AND USER DEFINED DATA TYPES
9
Function – definition of function – Declaration of function – Pass by value – Pass by reference –
Recursion –Enumerators – Structures - Unions
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
OUTCOME
At the end of the course, the student should be able to:
• Write C program for simple applications
• Formulate algorithm for simple problems
• Analyze different data types and arrays
• Perform simple search and sort.
• Use programming language to solve problems.
TEXTBOOKS:
1.
Pradip Dey, Manas Ghosh, “Computer Fundamentals and Programming in C”, Second
Edition, Oxford University Press, 2013
2.
Ashok N. Kamthane, “Computer programming”, Pearson Education, 2007.
3.
Yashavant P. Kanetkar. “Let Us C”, BPB Publications, 2011.
REFERENCES:
1.
Kernighan,B.W and Ritchie,D.M, “The C Programming language”, Second Edition,
Pearson Education, 2006
2.
Byron S Gottfried, “Programming with C”, Schaums Outlines, Second Edition, Tata
McGraw-Hill, 2006.
3.
R.G. Dromey, “How to Solve it by Computer”, Pearson Education, Fourth Reprint, 2007
24
PH7251
MATERIALS SCIENCE
(Common to Manufacturing, Industrial, Mining, Aeronautical,
Automobile and Production Engineering)
L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To introduce the essential principles of materials science for mechanical and related
Engineering applications.
UNIT I
PHASE DIAGRAMS
9
Solid solutions - Hume Rothery's rules - The phase rule - single component system - onecomponent system of iron - binary phase diagrams - isomorphous systems - the tie-line rule - the
lever rule - application to isomorphous system - eutectic phase diagram - peritectic phase diagram
- other invariant reactions – free energy composition curves for binary systems - microstructural
change during cooling.
UNIT II
FERROUS ALLOYS AND HEAT TREATMENT
9
The iron-carbon equilibrium diagram - phases, invariant reactions - microstructue of slowly cooled
steels - eutectoid steel, hypo and hypereutectoid steels - effect of alloying elements on the Fe-C
system - diffusion in solids - Fick's law - phase transformations - T-T-T-diagram for eutectoid steel
– pearlitic, baintic and martensitic transformations - tempering of martensite - heat treatment of
steels - annealing - normalizing - quenching and tempering - case hardening - induction, flame and
laser hardening - carburizing, cyaniding, carbonitriding and nitriding.
UNIT III
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
9
Tensile test - plastic deformation mechanisms - slip and twinning - role of dislocations in slip strengthening methods - strain hardening - refinement of the grain size - solid solution
strengthening - precipitation hardening - creep resistance - creep curves - mechanisms of creep creep-resistant materials - fracture - the Griffith criterion - critical stress intensity factor and its
determination - fatigue failure - fatigue tests - methods of increasing fatigue life - hardness Rockwell and Brinell hardness - Knoop and Vickers microhardness.
UNIT IV
MAGNETIC, DIELECTRIC AND SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIALS
9
Ferromagnetism – Domain theory – types of energy – hysteresis – hard and soft magnetic
materials – ferrites - dielectric materials – types of polarization – Langevin-Debye equation –
frequency effects on polarization - dielectric breakdown – insulating materials – Ferroelectric
materials - superconducting materials, properties, types and applications.
UNIT V
NEW MATERIALS
9
Ceramics – types and applications – Composites: classification, role of matrix and reinforcement –
processing of fiber reinforced plastics – Metallic glasses – types , glass forming ability of alloys –
Inoue criteria – melt spinning process – applications - Shape memory alloys – phases, shape
memory effect, pseudoelastic effect – NiTi alloy – applications- Nanomaterials – preparation: ball
milling and chemical vapour deposition - properties and applications – carbon nanotubes Biomaterials
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
OUTCOME:
 Upon completion of this course, the students can able to apply the different materials, their
processing, and heat treatments in suitable application in mechanical engineering fields.
TEXTBOOKS:
1. Raghavan, V. “Physical Metallurgy: Principles and Practice”, Phi Learning (2009).
2. Balasubramaniam, R. “Callister's Materials Science and Engineering”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.
(2014).
3. Palanisamy P.K., “Materials Science” , Scitech (2013).
REFERENCES:
1. Raghavan, V. “Materials Science and Engineering”, Printice Hall of India (2007).
2. Shackelford, J.F. “Introduction to Materials Science for Engineers”. Pearson India (2006).
25
3.
4.
Donald Askeland. “Materials Science and Engineering”, Brooks/Cole (2010).
Smith, W.F., Hashemi, J. and R.Prakash. “Materials Science and Engineering”,Tata Mcgraw
Hill Education Private Limited (2014).
GE7153
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
L T P
4 0 0
C
4
OBJECTIVE :
 The objective of this course is to inculcate in the student the ability to analyze any
problem in a simple and logical manner and to predict the physical phenomena and
thus lay the foundation for engineering applications.
UNIT I
STATICS OF PARTICLES
12
Fundamental Concepts and Principles, Systems of Units, Method of Problem Solutions,
Statics of Particles -Forces in a Plane, Resultant of Forces, Resolution of a Force into
Components, Rectangular Components of a Force, Unit Vectors.
Equilibrium of a Particle- Newton’s First Law of Motion, Space and Free-Body Diagrams,
Forces in Space, Equilibrium of a Particle in Space.
UNIT II
EQUILIBRIUM OF RIGID BODIES
12
Principle of Transmissibility, Equivalent Forces, Vector Product of Two Vectors, Moment of a
Force about a Point ,Varignon’s Theorem, Rectangular Components of the Moment of a
Force, Scalar Product of Two Vectors, Mixed Triple Product of Three Vectors, Moment of a
Force about an Axis, Couple - Moment of a Couple, Equivalent Couples, Addition of Couples,
Resolution of a Given Force into a Force -Couple system, Further Reduction of a System of
Forces, Equilibrium in Two and Three Dimensions - Reactions at Supports and Connections.
UNIT III
DISTRIBUTED FORCES
16
Centroids of lines and areas – symmetrical and unsymmetrical shapes, Determination of
Centroids by Integration , Theorems of Pappus-Guldinus, Distributed Loads on Beams,
Center of Gravity of a Three-Dimensional Body, Centroid of a Volume, Composite Bodies ,
Determination of Centroids of Volumes by Integration.
Moments of Inertia of Areas and Mass - Determination of the Moment of Inertia of an Area by
Integration , Polar Moment of Inertia , Radius of Gyration of an Area , Parallel-Axis Theorem ,
Moments of Inertia of Composite Areas, Moments of Inertia of a Mass - Moments of Inertia
of Thin Plates , Determination of the Moment of Inertia of a Three-Dimensional Body by
Integration.
UNIT IV
FRICTION
8
The Laws of Dry Friction. Coefficients of Friction, Angles of Friction, Wedges, Wheel Friction.
Rolling Resistance , Ladder friction.
UNIT V
DYNAMICS OF PARTICLES
12
Kinematics - Rectilinear Motion and Curvilinear Motion of Particles.
Kinetics- Newton’s Second Law of Motion -Equations of Motions , Dynamic Equilibrium,
Energy and Momentum Methods - Work of a Force , Kinetic Energy of a Particle, Principle of
Work and Energy, Principle of Impulse and Momentum, Impact, Method of Virtual Work Work of a Force, Potential Energy, Potential Energy and Equilibrium.
L – 45 + T – 15 TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
OUTCOMES:
 Upon completion of this course, students will be able to construct meaningful
mathematical models of physical problems and solve them.
26
TEXT BOOK
1. Beer,F.P and Johnson Jr. E.R, “Vector Mechanics for Engineers”, McGraw-Hill Education
(India) Pvt. Ltd. 10th Edition, 2013.
REFERENCES
1.
Hibbeller, R.C., Engineering Mechanics: Statics, and Engineering Mechanics:
Dynamics, 13th edition, Prentice Hall, 2013.
2.
J.L. Meriam & L.G. Karige, Engineering Mechanics: Statics (Volume I) and Engineering
Mechanics: Dynamics, 7th edition, Wiley student edition, 2013.
3.
P. Boresi & J. Schmidt, Engineering Mechanics: Statics and Dynamics, 1/e, Cengage
learning, 2008.
4.
Irving H. Shames, G. Krishna Mohana Rao, Engineering Mechanics - Statics and
Dynamics, Fourth Edition – PHI / Pearson Education Asia Pvt. Ltd., 2006.
5.
Vela Murali, “Engineering Mechanics”, Oxford University Press (2010)
PR7251
PRODUCTION PROCESSES
(Common to Aero/Auto/Rubber and Plastics)
L
3
T
0
P
0
C
3
OBJECTIVES:
 To impart the knowledge about the various production processes available
 To expose the student on the principle and applications of the processes
 To make a decision on a relevant process based on the merits and demerits.
UNIT I
CASTING PROCESSES
10
Methods of production processes – comparison – sand casting – mould, pattern, die – pattern
allowances – materials – types – 2 and 3 box moulding process – steps involved – core
function and core making – runner, riser, gate-purpose – construction, principle, merits,
demerits and applications of die casting, shell moulding, investment casting, centrifugal
casting, continuous casting squeeze casting.
UNIT II
METAL FORMING PROCESSES
8
Definition and companion of hot and cold forming – Principle, construction, types, merits,
demerits and application of forging, rolling, extrusion, spinning processes – sheet metal
operations – Types of dies used – Principle of powder metallurgy – steps involved – merits,
demerits and applications.
UNIT III
MACHINING PROCESSES
9
Machine and machine tool – construction, types operations in the following machines with
block diagrams – Lathe, Milling, Drilling and Grinding – Concept of NC/CNC machines –
Comparison of CNC with conventional machines – sample manual part programming for CNC
Lathe and milling.
UNIT IV
WELDING PROCESSES
9
Types of joining – soldering, brazing, welding, Chemical and mechanical – Fusion welding
process – Gas welding – flame types – applications = Arc welding – types of joint – electrode
– power supply – edge preparation – weld symbol – filler material – flux/ shielding gases – arc
theory – Construction and applications of types of arc welding – Manual, GTAW, GMAW,
SAW, ESW – Thermit welding, Pressure welding – resistance welding – spot, seam, projection
and flash butt welding – stud welding – friction stir welding – diffusion bonding.
27
UNIT V
UNCONVENTIONAL MACHINING PROCESSES
9
Need for unconventional – Construction, working principle merits, demerits and applications
with block diagram only for AJM, AWJM, USM, CHM, ECM, EDM, EBM, LBM, PAM and IBM.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
OUTCOMES:
 Has enough knowledge on the various process available to make a part.
 Confident to select the process to based on cost of time and quantities.
 Can determine processes for new materials.
TEXT BOOKS
1.
Serope Kalpakjian, Steven R. Schmid, Manufacturing Engineering and Technology Anna University, 4/e, Pearson Education, 2014
2.
P.C. Sharma, “A Text Book of Production Technology”, S.Chand and Co. Ltd., New
Delhi, 2010.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
B.H.Amstead, “Manufacturing Processes”, Phillip F.Ostwald, L.Begemon, John Wiley
and Sons, 8th Edition, 1998.
2.
De Garmo, “Materials and Processes in Manufacturing”, Prentice Hall of India, 8th
Edition, 2008.
3.
P.N.Rao, “Manufacturing Technology – I and II”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co., New
Delhi – 2013.
4.
Amitabha Ghosh, Asok Kumar Mallik, Manufacturing Science, EWP Pvt. Ltd, 2007
GE7161
COMPUTER PRACTICES LABORATORY
L
0
T
0
P
4
C
2
OBJECTIVES
 To understand the basic programming constructs and articulate how they are used to
develop a program with a desired runtime execution flow.
 To articulate where computer programs fit in the provision of computer-based solutions to
real world problems.
 To learn to use user defined data structures.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1.
Search, generate, manipulate data using MS office/ Open Office
2.
Presentation and Visualization – graphs, charts, 2D, 3D
3.
Problem formulation, Problem Solving and Flowcharts
4.
C Programming using Simple statements and expressions
5.
Scientific problem solving using decision making and looping.
6.
Simple programming for one dimensional and two dimensional arrays.
7.
Solving problems using String functions
8.
Programs with user defined functions
9.
Program using Recursive Function
10.
Program using structures and unions.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
OUTCOMES
At the end of the course, the student should be able to:
 Write and compile programs using C programs.
 Write program with the concept of Structured Programming
 Identify suitable data structure for solving a problem
 Demonstrate the use of conditional statement.
28
LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS FOR BATCH OF 30 STUDENTS
30 Systems with C compiler
PR7261
PRODUCTION PROCESSESS LABORATORY
(Common to Aero/Auto/Rubber and Plastics)
L T P C
0 0 4 2
OBJECTIVE:


To get hands on experience in the machines for production
To prepare the process planning sheets for all the operations and then follow the
sequence during the machining processes.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS:
1. Study of all the machining tools- identification of parts/mechanisms and position of
tool and work piece.
2. Facing, plain turning/step turning operations in Lathe.
3. Taper Turning/Threading and knurling operations in Lathe.
4. Multi-start Threading/Burnishing operations in Lathe.
5. Machining to make a cube using shaper
6. Machining to make a V-block using shaper.
7. Counter sinking, counter Boring and Tapping operations in a drilling machine.
8. Surfacing/pocket milling in a vertical milling machine.
9. Polygonal shape milling in a horizontal milling machine
10. Flat surface grinding and cylindrical grinding operations
11. Machining an internal spline in slotting machine.
12. To machine the given part drawing using Lathe and milling machines.
TOTAL: 60PERIODS
OUTCOME:
 Enough experience to operate machines and processes commonly used in production
of components.
 Enable interpretation of process plan sheets to be followed for the machining of
products.
29

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