Document 20738947

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
To Omaha
EUFAULA
Ch
at
c
oo
tah
27
Refuge Headquarters
1
Observation Platform
39
EUFAULA
131
Little
Barbo
ur
Boat Ramp
431
82
Grass Creek
Closed to All Entry
he
39
National Wildlife Refuge
GA
National Wildlife Refuge
AL GA
PITTSVIEW 165
AL
39C
Wildlife Drive
LUMPKIN
27
Cree
k
Walking Trail
0
Refuge Boundary
27
0 Kilo
Paved Road
1
GEORGETOWN
Miles
Road and Levee
1
N
Unpaved Road
82
1
431
ROOD CREEK LANDING
Recreational Area
(Corps of Engineers)
ek
z,y{|
SEALE
Eufaula
280
R
HEE RI
V ER
431
ALA
GEO BAMA
RGI
A
169
OC
We hope you enjoy your visit to Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge and will visit us again
soon.
26
185 COLUMBUS
CH
HO
AT TA
The “Blue Goose”
symbolizes the national system of refuges established
for the conservation
and management of fish, wildlife, and plants in the
United States for the benefit of present and future generations. Eufaula Refuge is one of
over 500 refuges nationwide. Each one provides a unique piece of puzzle, securing the
necessary habitats needed to protect plants, animals and provide outdoor recreation.
N
CRAWFORD
PHENIX
CITY
To Phenix City
40 miles
The refuge’s primary purpose is to provide habitat for wintering waterfowl, other
migratory birds and resident species; to provide habitat and protection for endangered
or threatened species; and provide wildlife oriented recreational opportunities for the
public.
80
e
Eufaula Refuge was established in 1964 through community support and in cooperation
with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It is located on both banks of the Chattahoochee
River in southeast Alabama and southwest Georgia. Named after the city of Eufaula, the
refuge offers a variety of wetland and upland habitats for a diverse fauna. A prominent
feature of the abundant wetlands is Lake Eufaula (Walter F. George Reservoir) and
several feeder streams.
i ve r
Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge
FLORENCE MARINA
STATE PARK
Rood C
re
To Phenix City
165
,
165
285
Hig
UPLAND
UNIT
Old
LAKEPOINT
STATE
PARK
hw
ay
165
431
ik e e
DAVIS-CLARK
UNIT
Creek
Bus
ta
MOLNAR
UNIT
39
Lake Eufa
To Eu
f
7 mile aula
s
For further information contact the refuge office:
Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge
509 Old Highway 165
Eufaula, Alabama 36027
Voice: 334/687 4065
Fax: 334/687 5906
Email: [email protected]
HOUSTON
UNIT
KENNEDY
IMPOUNDMENT
ul a
AMA
ALAB IA
G
GEOR
To Geo
rgetow
n
8 miles
Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge provides 11,184 acres of land and water for public
enjoyment in a wide range of outdoor activities. Federal and state (Alabama and Georgia)
laws apply to public uses on the refuge. This document is a summary of recreational
opportunities available at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge.
e
Gammag
Road
Co w
Soapstone Creek
BRADLEY
IMPOUNDMENT
hatc
he e
Cree
k
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Refuge Office
Calendar of Wildlife Events
The Refuge Office is open Monday
through Friday, 7:30 am. - 4:00 pm.
It serves as a visitor contact station
providing mounted specimen, maps,
leaflets and other items of
interests. The office is closed
during observed federal holidays.
This calendar serves as a guide to wildlife events.
Weather patterns and fluctuating water levels may
cause variations.
January
Waterfowl numbers peak in early January. There
are a variety of duck species; mallards are usually
the most abundant. Canada geese are common with
a few snow and white-fronted geese seen. Sandhill
crane sightings are possible. Refuge duck hunts
and archery-deer hunts are in progress. Fishing
activity is slow.
Hunting
Hunting is permitted for dove,
deer, waterfowl, squirrel and
rabbit. State and federal laws
apply. Check refuge hunt leaflet/
permit.
February
Waterfowl numbers rapidly decline, resident geese
remain in area. Wood ducks begin nesting. Great blue
heron and great egrets become active in several
rookeries. Rabbit and squirrel hunting available and
warm weather initiates interest in fishing.
Fishing
Fishing is permitted year-round;
some restrictions apply in refuge
impoundments. State and federal
laws apply; Check regulations
before fishing.
Wildlife Observation
The refuge is open during daylight hours, year-round for
wildlife viewing and photography. The refuge provides two
facilities for site-specific viewing. The Houston Observation
Tower overlooks the Chattahoochee River bottom and a
year-round wetland; the Upland Waterfowl Viewing Platform
offers a panoramic view of the Upland Impoundment and
Goose Pen Impoundment. Both are handicap accessible. In
addition to these facilities, all dikes and other habitats are
available. Some areas are seasonally closed.
Auto Tour Route
The refuge provides a seven mile summer route for auto
touring. A variety of habitats and opportunities to observe
wildlife species are offered. During the winter, the tour route
is reduced to five miles to provide waterfowl sanctuary in
several impounded areas.
Walking Trails
A one-third mile long walking trail located near the refuge
office provides self-guided walks through a variety of habitat
types. Several other trails are co-managed with Lakepoint
State Park. Dikes and roads are also available for walking,
biking and jogging.
Boating
Boating is a popular activity in Lake Eufaula and the refuge.
Several public boat ramps are available throughout the
refuge vicinity. Caution should be taken due to shallow
waters with submerged stumps. Use of boats in refuge
impoundments, air boats and jet skis are restricted.
Opportunities for canoeing are also available.
Other Regulated Activities
Camping
Camping is not permitted on the refuge, but is available at
nearby Lakepoint State Park and Florence Marina State
Park.
Vehicles
Only licensed vehicles are permitted. Access is limited to
graveled roads; some roads are closed seasonally. ATVs are
prohibited.
Firearms
March
Other than wood ducks and low numbers of other duck
species, blue-winged teal and shorebirds pass through area.
Rookeries are quite active. Fishing fever is rampant. Refuge
and Lakepoint State Park host a three-day Watchable
Wildlife Weekend. Planting of agricultural fields begin;
water levels in impoundments are lowered.
All weapons are prohibited
except on managed hunts.
April
Non-motorized bikes are
permitted on graveled roads
only. Hunters, fishermen and
wildlife observers are
encouraged to use bicycles to
access remote areas.
Neotropical migrant
songbirds are
migrating through.
Rookeries are very
active as are other
nesting species. Eagles
from local nests are
busy fishing to feed
young. Wild flowers
and butterflies are
abundant as fresh
spring air fills the
countryside. Fishing
remains good.
Fires
May
Horses
Horseback riding is permitted
on graveled roads only. Riders
are cautioned to watch for
vehicles.
Bicycles
Fires are prohibited.
Pets
Pets must be on a leash and
under control of owner.
Littering
Please take your litter home or dispose of it properly.
Archaeological Resources
All archaeological resources are protected. Surface
collecting and digging for objects of antiquity are prohibited.
Alcohol
Possession of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.
Most wildlife species
are busy raising young.
Neotropical migrant
songbirds are
completing migration with some nesting on refuge. Alligators
are really visible and fishing continues good. Mild weather
makes transition into warm early summer.
June
While wading birds are still active in rookeries, the
endangered wood stork makes its summer visit. Deer peak
at dropping fawns. Alligators are nesting while fishing slows
somewhat. Wood duck broods can be seen.
July
This begins the driest months of the year and weather is
making a transition to warm nights and hot days. The easiest
seen wildlife includes wading birds, raptors, deer, alligators
and songbirds; wood storks may be seen.
August
Hot weather dominates. The best time to see wildlife is early
morning and late afternoon. Blue-winged teal are seen as
they begin the long migration to South America. Wood ducks
are forming small flocks after nesting season. Low water
levels in reservoir provide good feeding for wading and
shorebirds.
September
Migrant birds begin southward movement. Crops are
harvested as the refuge prepares for another waterfowl
season. Many animals benefit from agricultural program.
Shorebirds, swallows and many neotropical migrants move
through. A few early waterfowl arrive; wood storks are still
here.
October
Waterfowl numbers increase slowly. Wood storks leave the
area returning to north Florida. Fall fishing for bass can be
good if water levels are stable. A dove hunt, youth deer hunt
and archery deer hunt is provided. The refuge participates in
a National Wildlife Refuge Week celebration.
November
Several thousand waterfowl including resident geese are on
refuge by month's end. Sandhill cranes arrive for several
months' stay. Wading birds are seen in shallows; raptors are
seen perched along roads. Youth deer hunt ends, archery
deer hunt continues and waterfowl hunts start.
December
Weather fluctuates between cold and mild temperatures.
Waterfowl approach peak numbers made up of a wide
variety of species. Wildlife viewing at observation towers and
auto drive are popular during holidays. Waterfowl and
archery hunts continue.

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