Heads Up: Real News About Drugs and Your Body

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Compilation 2010 –11 STUDENT EDITIONS
Heads Up: Real News
About Drugs and Your Body
Photos: top left—© Rachel Lienesch; top right (composite image)—blue sky, © konradlew/iStockphoto; dark sky with lightning, © Chee
Ming Wong/iStockphoto; green grass, © Media Bakery; prescription bottle, © Steven Poe/Workbook Stock/Getty Images; diamondshaped sign, © Alex Slobodkin/iStockphoto; forked road, © Ron Chapple/Taxi Images; bottom right (composite image)—magnifying glass,
© DNY59/iStockphoto; question mark, © Kulev/iStockphoto; prescription bottles, © Steven Poe/Workbook Stock/Getty Images.
Brought to you by Scholastic and the scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse,
Heads Up gives you the facts about the real effects of drugs on the teen brain and body.
Check out the articles and features inside to get the latest news so you can make
informed choices about your health and your future.
Inside:
Prescription Pain Medications ..... page 4
Front Cover
Straight Talk on Prescription Drugs .... page 2
Prescription Stimulants .... page 6
Web Hunt: Myths vs. Facts: Prescription Drugs.... page 8
For more real news about drugs and your body, visit www.scholastic.com/headsup and http://teens.drugabuse.gov.
To order additional copies of this Heads Up Student Edition at no charge, call 1-877-643-2644 and refer to
NIH Pub No.: 11-7649 or visit www.nida.nih.gov/scholastic.html.
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
HEADS UP REAL NEWS
on
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Straigh
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Your likelihood of
becoming addicted is dependent
on a number of factors—the drug
itself, how you take it, your genes,
and your age. If you abuse a pain
medication like OxyContin®,
DR. VOLKOW:
the risk of becoming addicted can
be equivalent to that of heroin—
especially if you snort or inject
the drug. Actually, if a teen starts
tion-drug abuse
ip
cr
with a prescribed painkiller and
es
pr
t
bu
g,
use is declinin
t see the dangers,
no
do
gets hooked, he or she may
s
en
Overall teen drug
te
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is is mainly beca
shift to heroin because it
remains high. Th
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is cheaper.
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says one of the na
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“Teenagers be
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DRUGS
illegal drugs. They
an
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r
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DR. VOLKOW: When you
ie French, Dr. Vo
teen reporter Mar
ith
w
w
ie
rv
te
dangerous
in
as
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st
become
addicted, there are
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us
cription-drug ab
n.
io
many
negative
health and social
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di
ad
d
an
explains why pres
ks
terms of health ris
effects. With smoking, there
as illegal drugs in
is damage to your heart and
that can happen?
What’s the worst
lungs, and it puts you at risk
Volkow.
.
Dr
for a variety of cancers. When
ys
sa
,”
th
ea
“D
you are an alcoholic, you increase
you like, that give you pleasure. So if,
your risk of getting into an accident
What are the effects of
for example, you take a prescription
or damaging your liver and your
prescription-drug abuse—either
painkiller and you like it, you might
brain. Even if you are not addicted,
one-time or long-term use?
take it again in the future. And if
when you are high or drunk, you
you keep taking it, you could become
DR. VOLKOW: There isn’t much
become uninhibited and could
addicted, which is why I say, Why
research on one-time use, so it’s
do things you wouldn’t ordinarily
risk it?—unless it’s something a
hard to say overall what the negative
do—like drive drunk or drugged.
physician prescribes for you to treat
When you become addicted to drugs,
effects may be, except, of course, that
a problem. Do you really want to reach
they rule your behavior. The things that
you may overdose. Another risk is
a point where you are doing something
are normally important to you become
that you may love the way it makes
only because you cannot stop, as if
unimportant. You may get into fights
you feel, and that starts to change
you’ve lost control of your own brain?
with your family, even steal from
your brain. The brain is wired to
It’s just not worth it.
them. If you have ever loved someone
learn very rapidly about things that
Reporter
Marie French
2
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Photo: Janet French.
A teen reporter
irector
interviews the d
ading
of the nation’s le
y
research agenc
nd
on drug abuse a
addiction
What’s the likelihood of
someone becoming addicted to
prescription drugs?
WWW.SCHOLASTIC.COM/HEADSUP
who is addicted, then you know it’s
pretty horrible.
I’ve heard of people taking
stimulants, like Adderall® or Ritalin®,
when they have a test—like the
SATs. Why shouldn’t they?
DR. VOLKOW: There are many reasons
why you shouldn’t do it. One is that
there is not really good scientific
evidence that stimulants will even
improve your performance—unless
you are being treated for ADHD.
So some students may take these
drugs to help them stay awake at
night to study, but coffee does the
medication is in your medicine
cabinet, it could become a temptation
for abuse. It is for this very reason
that we are working to raise awareness
of this concern among medical
students, physicians, and dentists—as
well as parents, many of whom don’t
realize they are leaving something
potentially dangerous around for
their kids to abuse.
“ People who are
king
addicted end up ta
high
drugs—not to feel
ead
and good—but inst
to feel less bad.”
a drug—especially when you keep
taking it—and its effects eventually
wear off, you become much less
sensitive to normal pleasures, like
social interactions, going to a movie,
chocolate. Now, that tends to recover,
especially if you are just taking drugs
occasionally. But if you continue,
then the capacity of the brain to
recover becomes diminished. When
you’re addicted, you will feel less
pleasure in general. People who are
addicted end up taking drugs—not
to feel high and good—but instead
to feel less bad. They feel awful when
they are not taking the drug.
—Dr. Nora D. Volkow
Photos: left and right, © Rachel Lienesch; middle photo, © National Institute on Drug Abuse.
same thing. The disadvantage of
stimulants over coffee is that, for
people who are vulnerable, they may
become psychotic and paranoid. That’s
not the best way to go into an exam.
More than 50 percent of teens have
reported getting the prescription
drugs they abuse from their friends
or from their home medicine
cabinets. Does that show a need for
physicians to be more aware when
they’re prescribing drugs?
DR. VOLKOW: Absolutely. You
are touching on the responsibility
of physicians and parents. Anyone
prescribing an addictive medication
should consider the risks and determine
what’s most helpful for each patient.
For example, you might just need
two or three days of a prescription or
maybe just an over-the-counter pain
reliever will do. Once a prescription
What would you say to teenagers
to stop them from abusing
prescription drugs?
DR. VOLKOW: Well, I think kids
start abusing them because they want
to get high or feel good at a party. Or
they want to use them to help them
study, lose weight, or for pain relief.
We’ve already discussed some of the
reasons not to use stimulants to study
or painkillers without a prescription.
But as far as getting high—my advice
is that there are many things that can
make you feel very good that don’t
require drugs. Sports, for example, or
dancing, or going out with friends.
It’s whatever you like. You really don’t
need drugs. You don’t. When you take
drugs, your brain resets itself. So what
that means is that when you take
Resources
http://teens.drugabuse.gov
NIDA’s teen site containing information,
videos, games, and real stories about
drug abuse (including prescription
drugs) and its consequences.
http://teens.drugabuse.gov/blog
NIDA’s teen blog features the latest
news from NIDA, as well as answers
to teen questions about drugs and
drug abuse.
http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov
A searchable directory of drug
treatment centers sponsored by the
Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA)
for those seeking treatment. You
can also reach the referral hotline at
1-800-662-HELP.
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
3
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
HEADS UP REAL NEWS
PRESCRIPTION PAIN
MEDICATIONS
MYTH
FACTS
vs.
PRESCRIPTION
DRUGS
What are Prescription
Painkillers?
related information
and are involved in
emotional responses.
This reduces the
sensation of pain and
any associated feelings
of suffering. Although
our natural opioid
system can relieve
certain types of pain, it’s
not equipped to handle
severe and prolonged
pain. That’s when opioid
medications can be
helpful.
P
rescription painkillers are
strong pain relievers that
include the opioid class of
drugs, including hydrocodone
(e.g., Vicodin®) and oxycodone
(e.g., OxyContin®). Opioids
work by mimicking the
body’s natural pain-relieving
chemicals, but they are more
powerful and longer lasting.
When the body senses
pain following an injury or surgery,
specialized nerve cells relay “pain”
messages to the spinal cord and brain.
In response to these messages, natural
pain-relieving chemicals—endorphins
and enkephalins—are released and
attach themselves to the body’s
opioid receptors, where they have
several functions. In the spinal cord,
they decrease pain-related signals
being transmitted to the brain. In the
brain, they act in a number of areas,
including those that interpret pain4
Why Do Opioids Require
a Prescription?
O
pioids require a prescription
because they are powerful
medications. Although they are
used safely each year by millions of
Americans who are in pain, if not
taken properly, opioids can result
in severe health complications, or
even death.
Before writing a prescription for
opioids, your doctor must evaluate
several factors, including your level
of pain (or expected pain after
surgery), weight, other medical
conditions, any other medications
you are taking, and your current or
past drug-use history. The doctor will
then decide:
• whether an opioid pain reliever is
necessary;
• if a prescription opioid will safely
and effectively treat your pain; and
• the correct dosage and how long
you should take it.
Your doctor will instruct you on
how to safely take the medication,
including which medications or overthe-counter drugs to avoid and the
warning signs to watch for in case
you have a bad reaction.
By following your doctor’s
instructions carefully, you’ll be less
likely to suffer serious side effects as
a result of taking the drug.
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Images: sunny blue sky, © konradlew/iStockphoto; grass with daisies, © Media Bakery; prescription bottle, © Steven Poe/
Workbook Stock/Getty Images; yellow diamond-shaped road sign, © Alex Slobodkin/iStockphoto; teen on crutches; © Media Bakery.
S
WWW.SCHOLASTIC.COM/HEADSUP
Y
ou know that abusing drugs like
cocaine and heroin can lead to
addiction and other serious health
consequences. But did you know that abusing
prescription painkillers—taking someone
else’s prescription, or even taking your own
in ways other than as prescribed—can be
just as dangerous?
Images: dark sky with lightning streaks, © Chee Ming Wong/iStockphoto; fork in road, © Ron Chapple/Taxi Images.
The fact is, it can. But with nearly 1 in 10 high
school seniors reporting nonmedical use of
Why Is abusing
Prescription Opioids
Dangerous?
A
busing prescription opioids
can put your health and life at
serious risk. Opioids can make you
drowsy, nauseous, constipated, and
confused. They can also depress your
breathing and lead to addiction or
overdose.
• Overdose: Abuse of opioids, alone
or in combination with alcohol
or other drugs, can slow or even
stop your breathing and result in
a loss of consciousness, a coma,
or worse. In fact, the number
of accidental fatal poisonings
involving prescription pain
relievers has more than tripled
since 1999.
• Physical Dependence: Long-term
use of opioids can make the body
dependent, and when you stop
taking them, you could experience
withdrawal symptoms, like muscle
Vicodin® in the past year, some teens haven’t
gotten the message.1 Why are these teens
risking their health and maybe even their
lives? They may think prescription drugs are
safer to abuse than illegal “street” drugs—
after all, the thinking goes, doctors prescribe
them, so they must be safe. But that’s not the
whole story. Read on to find out the facts.
1
“Monitoring the Future Survey, Overview of Findings 2009,” National
Institute on Drug Abuse, http://drugabuse.gov/newsroom/09
/MTF09overview.html.
You are abusing
opioids if . . .
Risks
they were prescribed
to you, but you take
more (higher doses
or more often) than
you were directed.
If the pain medication isn’t relieving your pain, why not go
back to the doctor? Your condition may be getting worse
and a different remedy might be needed. By taking more
medication, you could be masking important symptoms.
you got them from a
friend to help relieve
your pain.
Pain medications come in different varieties and doses.
Some are made for people who have chronic pain and need
high doses to relieve their pain. Their bodies have adapted
to the repeated opioid exposure, but yours has not. Taking
one of their pills could have serious repercussions for you.
you take them to
get high.
Whether or not they were prescribed to you, if you are
taking opioids to get high, you are setting yourself up to
become addicted. The risks increase when you take them in
combination with other drugs (like alcohol or marijuana or
other prescription medications) or by methods other
than those prescribed.
and bone pain, diarrhea, vomiting,
or cold flashes. If you are under a
doctor’s care, he or she can help you
avoid or manage these symptoms.
• Addiction: Opioid receptors are found
in the parts of the brain involved
in emotional responses, including
pleasure. In fact, heroin is an illegal
opioid drug that acts on the same
receptor system as prescription
opioids. However, the dose and the
way a drug is taken can affect how
a person responds to it. People who
abuse opioids often take them in doses
or by methods (crushed, snorted, or
injected) other than prescribed. This
can lead to high doses reaching the
brain rapidly, increasing the risk of
overdose and addiction.
Important Resources
•
For information on drugs:
http://teens.drugabuse.gov or
www.scholastic.com/headsup
•
For help with a crisis:
1–800–273–TALK
•
To find a treatment center:
1-800-662-HELP or http:
//findtreatment.samhsa.gov
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
5
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
HEADS UP REAL NEWS
PRESCRIPTION
STIMULANTS
WHEN USED AS PRESCRIBED, PRESCRIPTION
STIMULANTS ARE SAFE DRUGS THAT HELP
MILLIONS OF TEENS. BUT ABUSING THEM IS
DANGEROUS AND CAN BE ADDICTIVE.
T
he most recent Monitoring
the Future survey
shows a disturbing fact:
Prescription stimulants such as
Adderall® and Ritalin® are two
of the drugs most frequently
abused by high school seniors,
with 6.5 percent reporting
nonmedical use of Adderall® in
the past year.1 Doctors prescribe
stimulants to treat attention
deficit hyperactivity disorder
(ADHD), narcolepsy
(a sleep disorder),
and, occasionally,
MYTHS FACTS
depression.
vs.
When taken
PRESCRIPTION as prescribed,
DRUGS
these medications
help a lot of people.
Unfortunately, they are too
often abused by being taken
in doses and/or in ways other
than intended, or by being
used by someone for whom
they were not prescribed.
Prescription stimulants are
powerful drugs, and when
they are abused there can be
serious health consequences,
including addiction. Read on to
get the facts about prescription
stimulants and why abusing
them is dangerous.
1
“Monitoring the Future survey, Overview of Findings
2010,” National Institute on Drug Abuse, http://
drugabuse.gov/newsroom/10/mtf10overview.html.
6
What are Prescription
Stimulants?
P
rescription stimulants include
medications such as
methylphenidate (Ritalin® and
Concerta®) and amphetamines
(Dexedrine® and Adderall®). These
medications, which are in the
same class of drugs as cocaine
and methamphetamine (“meth”),
increase alertness, energy, and
attention. Like all stimulant drugs,
prescription stimulants increase levels
of dopamine in the brain. Dopamine
is a neurotransmitter associated with
pleasure, movement, and attention.
how Do Prescription
Stimulants Treat aDhD?
P
eople with ADHD have problems
maintaining attention (e.g.,
fidgeting or trouble concentrating),
and may be more hyperactive and
impulsive than others of the same
age. For teens, this can result in
difficulty with completing schoolwork
or other tasks. Doctors prescribe
stimulants such as Concerta® and
Adderall®, sometimes in combination
with counseling, to treat these
symptoms. These stimulants can have
a calming effect on people with ADHD
that helps them focus, dramatically
improving their ability to stay
organized and complete tasks.
When prescribed, stimulant
medications are usually started at
a low dose and gradually increased
until symptoms subside, or until
side effects become problematic.
When taken as directed, prescription
stimulants produce slow, steady
increases of dopamine in the brain.
Scientists think that these gradual
increases may help to correct
abnormal dopamine signaling that
may occur in the brains of people
with ADHD.
Why Do They Require a
Prescription?
P
rescription stimulants are strong
medications, and their proper
use needs a doctor’s supervision. The
first step is an accurate diagnosis of
a physical or mental disorder, such
as ADHD, by a qualified doctor. Then,
if appropriate, stimulants may be
prescribed. A doctor should monitor
both the positive and possibly
negative effects of the medication
to make sure it’s treating symptoms
as intended.
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
WWW.SCHOLASTIC.COM/HEADSUP
Prescription Stimulants and Cocaine Act
on the Same Parts of the Brain
The two brain scans below show how cocaine and methylphenidate
(Ritalin®) both act on the same dopamine sites in the brain. Dopamine
is a brain chemical associated with attention and pleasure.
Cocaine
Brain scan images from: Arch Gen Psychiatry 1995;52(6):456–463. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
You are abusing
prescription
stimulants if . . .
Why are Prescription
Stimulants abused?
M
any teens report abusing
prescription stimulants to get
high because they mistakenly believe
that prescription drugs are a “safer”
alternative to illicit drugs. Teens
also report abusing prescription
stimulants to try to lose weight or
increase wakefulness and attention.
Some even abuse them to get better
grades. Research, however, shows
that stimulant abuse is actually linked
to poorer academic performance.
Why? Because people who abuse
stimulants often take other drugs and
engage in behavior that puts their
academic performance at risk (e.g.,
skipping classes).
Is abusing Prescription
Stimulants Dangerous?
Y
es. In fact, taking prescription
stimulants in high doses, or by
injection, smoking, or snorting, can
affect the brain in ways similar to
cocaine or other drugs of abuse (see
above right). Prescription stimulant
abuse can result in abnormally
Note: In this study, both drugs were
given intravenously to demonstrate
that they affect similar mechanisms
in the brain. However, when taken
orally, methylphenidate causes a
much slower increase in dopamine
levels, and does not create the same
euphoria experienced with cocaine.
Methylphenidate
Risks
. . . you take them
to cram for a test.
Stimulants can help you stay awake, but they can also
make you feel jittery, anxious, irritable, and even paranoid.
Stimulants may improve certain skills (e.g., focused
attention) at the expense of others (e.g., creative thinking).
There is no evidence that stimulants improve academic
performance in someone who does not have ADHD.
. . . you take them
to try to lose
weight.
Abusing stimulants can decrease appetite, which can lead to
weight loss and malnutrition. Plus, when a person stops taking
the stimulants, he or she usually gains the weight back, and
sometimes puts on a few more pounds. Thus, stimulants do
not provide a long-term weight-loss solution, and chronic use
increases the risk of addiction and other health consequences.
. . . you take them
to get high.
To get high on stimulants, people may take them in higher doses
than prescribed or by routes other than oral (e.g., snorted,
smoked, or injected). This practice increases the risk of serious
health consequences. High doses can cause blood vessels to
narrow, forcing the heart to work harder, and possibly lose its
normal rhythm. This could lead to a heart attack or a stroke.
high levels of dopamine, producing
euphoria, an intense feeling of
happiness. This increases the risk
for abusing again, and ultimately
for becoming addicted.
Abusing prescription stimulants
can also result in increased blood
pressure, heart rate, and body
temperature, as well as nausea,
headaches, anxiety, psychosis,
seizures, stroke, and heart failure.
Individuals who chronically abuse
prescription stimulants may
experience withdrawal symptoms
when they stop using them. These
symptoms can include fatigue,
depression, and disturbed sleep
patterns. Although not life
threatening, these symptoms often
prompt a return to drug use.
Important Resources
•
For more information on drugs,
go to http://teens.drugabuse.gov
or www.scholastic.com/headsup.
•
For immediate help with a crisis,
call 1–800–273–TALK.
•
To locate a treatment center,
call 1-800-662-HELP or visit
http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov.
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
7
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
HEADS UP REAL NEWS
WEB HUNT:
There’s a lot of information out there
about prescription drugs, and it can
be tough to distinguish myths from
facts. When it comes to drugs and drug
abuse, it’s important to get the facts
from reliable sources. In the Web Hunt
below, discover facts about prescription
drugs from the scientists at the National
Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the
leading supporter of research on drug
abuse and addiction in the United States.
This handy sheet will help you keep track
of the facts you learn about prescription
drugs and prescription-drug abuse.
1.
Some teens mistakenly believe that abusing prescription drugs is a “safer” alternative to abusing illegal
drugs. Why is this myth untrue?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/qanda-on-prescription-drugs/
2.
Before writing a prescription for medication, what factors does a doctor evaluate?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/qanda-on-prescription-drugs/
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-pain-medications/
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-stimulants/
8
Composite image: magnifying glass, © DNY59/iStockphoto; question mark, © Kulev/iStockphoto; prescription bottles, © Steven Poe/Workbook Stock/Getty Images.
Myths vs. Facts: Prescription Drugs
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
WWW.SCHOLASTIC.COM/HEADSUP
3.
Give three examples of how prescription drugs can be abused.
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/qanda-on-prescription-drugs/
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-pain-medications/
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-stimulants/
4.
Abusing prescription drugs can lead to changes in your brain. In what ways does this happen and how does it put
you at risk for addiction?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/straight-talk-on-prescription-drugs/
5.
What factors play a role in whether someone becomes addicted to prescription drugs?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/straight-talk-on-prescription-drugs/
6.
What type of drugs are opioids and what do they treat?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-pain-medications/
7.
The number of accidental fatal poisonings involving prescription pain relievers has more than tripled since 1999.
In addition to overdose, what are some of the other health risks of abusing prescription painkillers?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-pain-medications/
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
9
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
8.
ABOUT DRUGS AND YOUR BODY
HEADS UP REAL NEWS
esides negative health effects, what other adverse effects can result from prescription drug abuse
B
and addiction?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/straight-talk-on-prescription-drugs/
9.What type of drugs are stimulants and how do they affect the brain and body?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-stimulants/
10.Millions of kids (and adults) safely take prescription stimulants to effectively treat disorders such as ADHD. How
do prescription stimulants treat ADHD?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-stimulants/
11.
What are the dangers of abusing prescription stimulants to help cram for a test or to try to lose weight?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-stimulants/
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/straight-talk-on-prescription-drugs/
12.Why can abusing prescription stimulants have effects on the body that are similar to the effects of
abusing cocaine?
http://headsup.scholastic.com/articles/prescription-stimulants/
10
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
WWW.SCHOLASTIC.COM/HEADSUP
Bonus Questions:
1.
What are some of the treatments for addiction to prescription pain medications and to prescription
stimulants?
http://teens.drugabuse.gov/peerx/the-facts/opioids#opioids6
http://teens.drugabuse.gov/peerx/the-facts/stimulants#stimulants6
2.
How can you protect yourself from addiction or other potential negative health effects of abusing
prescription drugs?
http://teens.drugabuse.gov/facts/facts_rx2.php#protect_myself
Resources
Find more facts about prescription drugs at these NIDA sites:
PEERx: Rx Abuse IS Drug
Abuse
http://teens.drugabuse.gov/
peerx/
Resources and activities to give
teens the facts about prescriptiondrug abuse so they can make smart
decisions
NIDA for Teens
http://teens.drugabuse.gov
Facts about drugs and drug abuse,
along with games and real-life
stories
Heads Up: Real News About
Drugs and Your Body
www.scholastic.com/headsup
Developed with NIDA and
Scholastic, this series provides the
latest scientific news about drugs,
drug addiction, and your health.
FROM SCHOLASTIC AND THE SCIENTISTS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE, NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
11
Compilation 2010 –11
Student Editions
Heads Up compilations are created by Scholastic
and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National
Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services. These compilations are printed by the
National Institute on Drug Abuse. The photographs may
not be removed from the program and reproduced or
resold. The photographs are rights-managed material.
This compilation is in the public domain and may be
reproduced in its entirety without permission. Citation
of the source is appreciated. NIH Pub No.: 11-7649.

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